Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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CALIFORNIA CHROME UPSET AT BELMONT, SPORTS B1CORNFEST: Pet pig participates in corn-eating contest in Leesburg, A3 UKRAINE: Petro Poroshenko sworn in as new president, A7 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, June 8, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 159 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C6 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C5 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C6 NATION A7 OBITUARIES A4 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A9.92 / 74Some sun, a couple t-storms$1 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comLeesburg police were look ing for a lone male Saturday afternoon who is accused of robbing a Wells Fargo bank. The bank is in the 400 block of North Boulevard, also known as U.S. Highway 441. A police sergeant on the scene said they received the call about 12:30 / p .m. and witnesses said the man walked into the bank, de manded money and left on foot with an undetermined amount. According to a press re lease, police Lt. Gary Barrett said the suspect implied a weapon, but witnesses didnt see one. Leesburg police, with the help of Lake County Sheriffs Ofce K-9s, were still search ing the area at 3 / p.m. Saturday afternoon squad cars surrounded the building while detectives interviewed bank employees in the park ing lot. Police said they were still trying to put together witnesses statements and expected to release more details later in the day. Anyone having informa tion on the robbery or the identity of the suspect can contact the Leesburg Po lice Department at 352-7872121.Police looking for suspect in Leesburg bank robbery PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LEESBURG POLICE DEPARTMENT Anyone having information regarding the robbery or the identity of the suspect, shown above, please contact the Leesburg Police Department at 352-787-2121. THERESA CAMPBELL and AUSTIN FULLERnews@dailycommercial.comAmid majestic oaks and tall pine trees, Camp Gene va came to life this week with sounds of kids laughing as they frolicked in the pool and played water sports on the camps picturesque lake. Its summer camp season in Lake County. We are excited about it, said Peter Miraglia, director of Camp Geneva, the 100-acre Fruitland Park camp located off of Spring Lake Road. The camp serves 100 local kids for summer day camp, while hundreds more campers from all over the country will come for week-long overnight stays in the cabins and dormitories and enjoy a rope course, basketball, ping pong, ball elds, amphitheater, dining hall and more. We have 16 groups coming for the summer. Theyre coming from all over the place, he said, including campers from Tennessee, Georgia and as far south as Miami. Were getting a lot of great feedback from the kids, Miraglia said of the camps rst week for the 2014 season. Theyre have a really good time and their parents were just ecstatic about being able to have a summer camp program here locally, because a lot of them have to work and they wanted a safe environment for their kids to be able to come out and have a good time. Camp Geneva has been a popular site for more than 40 years, drawing thousands of campers from all over the Setting up campLake County kicks off kids summer activity season PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Kids jump into the pool at Camp Geneva in Fruitland Park on Thursday. BELOW: JROTC cadets from East River High School in Orlando stand by their canoes before going out on the water at Camp La-No-Che in Paisley. PLACES TO GOOther traditional summer camps in Lake County include: %  enCamp Horizon in Leesburg, featuring one-week overnight camps with swimming, water skiing, tubing, canoeing, wall climbing, archery, soccer, basketball, handicrafts and spiritual activities. Visit CampHorizon.org for details. %  enCamp Montessori Day Camp in Leesburg with sports and games, arts and crafts, archery, water fun and pony rides. Go to www.lakemontessori for details. SEE CAMP | A2 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWith details of the scal year 2014-15 Lake Coun ty budget beginning to take shape, the needs are outweighing the reve nues available, according to county ofcials. Public safety is cer tainly one area where there are requests for more funding for salary increases and to replace aging vehicles. Lake Emergency Medical Services is grappling with more than $1 million shortfall because of a loss in revenue from the Municipal Service Taxing Unit, a county wide property tax to partially fund the ambulance service. The MSTU funds about a third of the ambulance organizations budget with the remaining 65 percent funded from user fees. As a result, Jerry Smith, executive director of the organization, is requesting a $1.6 mil lion increase in MSTU funding for the 201314 budget year, with the majority going toward Lake County EMS faces $1M budget shortfall MICHAEL J. MISHAKAssociated PressMIAMI BEACH On a recent after noon, Scott McKenzie watched torrential rains and a murky tide swal low the street outside his dog-grooming salon. Within minutes, much of this stretch of chic South Beach was ooded ankle-deep in a fetid mix of rain and sea. Welcome to the new Venice, McKenzie joked as salt water surged from the sewers. There are few places in the nation more vul nerable to rising sea levels than low-lying South Florida, a tourist and retirement mecca built on drained swampland. Yet as other coastal states and the Obama administration take aggressive measures to battle the effects of global warming, Floridas top Republican politicians are challenging the science and balking at government xes. Among the chief skeptics are U.S. Sen. Mar co Rubio and former Gov. Jeb Bush, both pos sible presidential can didates in 2016. Gov. Rick Scott, who is run ning for re-election, has worked with the Repub lican-controlled Legisla ture to dismantle Flor idas edgling climate change initiatives. They were put into place by his predecessor and cur rent opponent, Demo crat Charlie Crist. Im not a scientist, Scott said, after a federal report pinpointed Florida and Miami in particu lar as among the coun trys most at-risk areas. He and other Republi cans warn against what they see as alarmist poli cies that could derail the Seas rise, GOP leaders balk at climate changeSEE GOP | A2SEE BUDGET | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 capital expenses for es sential ambulance chassis and equipment, and to provide a 3 percent salary increase for all employees. Recently, Smith submitted his $17.6 million s cal year 2014-15 budget to county commissioners. Funding for $1 million in capital could come from the penny sales tax, but many projects are compet ing for that funding. There is currently only $5.1 mil lion available in the penny sales tax fund, which must go to capital needs. Meanwhile, another option that could be put on the table to fund the remainder of the increase would be a tax increase, according to one county commissioner. Smith said he is dealing with numerous challenges in the organization and has already cut three quarters of a million dol lars from his budget this year. Also this year, Smith put off buying two am bulances for the organization and did not ll six positions. We are estimating call volume to increase and patient transports may also increase marginally, he said. Smith has to replace ve truck chassis for ambulances with more than 240,000 miles on them, eight LIFEPAK 12 cardiac moni tors, six breathing machines and seven stretchers. There are currently 10 ambulances out of warranty, he said, adding the more mileage on a vehicle, the more repairs are needed. If the equipment is not replaced, it could cause a whole host of problems because the manufactur er warranty for the equip ment, such as the cardiac monitors and stretchers, will be expiring, Smith noted. The budget we put to gether is developed to maintain the service level that we have been providing and to address some operational needs, which have reached a critical point of needing to be ad dressed, he said. If not addressed, we could have repair costs go up and the potential for a breakdown occurs. We put off buying new ambulances, said Commissioner Tim Sullivan. We are to the point maintenance of the upkeep of the eet is more expensive than buying new ambulances. The retention of employees is another press ing issue for the organiza tion, Smith said. In the last three years, 59 employees have left the or ganization, of which a third have resigned because of no salary adjustments for the last six years and the work load, Smith said, ac cording to exit interviews he has had with employees. Currently there are 192 employees with Lake EMS. Lack of raises ad versely affects retention, Smith said. Over all, there is a 24 percent turnover rate in the organization com pared with 16 percent in dustrywide, Smith said. Lake EMS employees voted 53 to 19 May 30 to decertify from being represented by the Professional Fireghters of Lake County. The election results are pending certica tion from PERC, the Pub lic Employees Relations Commission. If capital replacements are not made, as well as other shortfalls in person nel, it could cause some issues with our operation and our ability to provide service, Smith said. While difcult to implement in a tough budget year, Smith said the organizations employee deploy ment model needs to be reviewed to address the work load paramedics and EMTs take on when faced with a growing population and overall call volume. The deployment mod el is potentially aged out, he said. There are 19 ambu lance stations, of which 13 provide 24-hour cov erage. Six of those ambulances provide coverage for 13 hours. Peak times are between 11:30 and 8 / p.m., where all ambu lances are on the road. Since 2010, Lake EMS responded to 3,530 more calls annually, according to data from the organization. We may need more units and/or more efcient locations, Smith said. Since April, the county estimated a $8 million shortfall in its 201415 budget because of past declining property values and Sheriff Gary Borders impending budget request made last week for $3.2 million in additional funding. County ofcials said they are still analyzing the budget numbers. There are other challenges, too, according to Stephen Koontz, budget director. Some of the challenges include changes in Flor ida Retirement System rates, increasing demand for services, aging infrastructure and employee compensation, he said. Commissioner Jimmy Conner, who also serves as vice chairman of the Lake EMS board, said public safety remained a top priority for him, emphasizing that it is a lifeor-death issue. We have to make sure when people call an am bulance they are going to have good, modern ambulances and highly trained people, he said. I dont want ambulanc es breaking down when people are being trans ported. I think the capital needs are critical. Conner said he need ed to study the retention issue within the depart ment further. Commissioner Welton Cadwell, who also serves as chairman of the ambu lance board, said the cap ital needs of the organiza tion would be addressed. You cant abandon your rolling stock, he said. We have to look at the big pic ture of all the services we are providing. One of the options we have to look at is a tax increase. HOW TO REACH US JUNE 7CASH 3 . ............................................... 0-6-1 Afternoon . .......................................... 6-6-9 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 6-9-4-3 Afternoon . ....................................... 6-1-8-6FLORIDALOTTERY JUNE 6FANTASY 5 . ............................. 5-7-21-23-25 MEGA MONEY . ...................... 6-18-23-3921 MEGA MILLIONS . .............. 12-29-37-49-729 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.country. We have so many kids who come through the facility and the program, but what I am really most excited about this year is being able to really reach out to the local community and get them involved, he said. The people who live around us our friends and our neighbors can come and enjoy our facility. Camp Geneva is adding a zip line through a wooded landscape and a paintball course, which is expected to be completed in the fall. Were also going to be starting an after-school program this fall with lots of new and exciting things, Miraglia said, including a Little Village for preschoolers ages 2-5, which will feature a childrens theater and themed playground. And while summer camp is in session, Miraglia said Camp Geneva is also providing summer jobs for eight teens from the local high schools. Some 14 college students will be getting paid to work at Easter Seals Camp Challenge in Sorrento when camp begins June 15. The 63-acre campus serves kids with disabilities. Michael Slaymaker, vice president of development and planned giving of Easter Seals Florida Inc., believes Camp Challenge will provide an incredible experience for the college students hired to assist the campers. Many of them have decided that is going to be their vocation, and how wonderful, he said. They might not have had the opportunity to spend four weeks caring or working with children with disabilities, so this really gives them the hands-on job duties and they get to learn what it is all about. Two of the college students hired to work at the camp are from Beacon College in Leesburg, while the camp has also hired students from Lake-Sumter State College in recent years. Its great when you can use home-grown talent to help us out, he said. Camp Challenge will run through July 11. Its great for them to build their independence, he said, saying the camp also provides a much needed break for the caregivers. I dont think people conceptualize how much time that it takes to be a caregiver or a parent of somebody with a disability. Its a 24/7 job and to have a week or two off of that duty and to have your time to regenerate and some respite is so badly needed, and that is what Camp Challenge offers the parents and the caregivers, he said. At Camp La-No-Che, the Boy Scouts of Amer ica campground in Paisley, returning campers on June 8 will nd a second pool, a new bathhouse, beach volleyball area and a new pump and storage building. These improvements cost approximately $1 million and were paid for by Daytona Beachs Brown & Brown Insurance, the companys board chair man, Hyatt Brown and his wife Cici, according to Matt Ragan, the camps director and head of support services for the Central Florida Council for Boy Scouts of America. The pool, which has a new water slide, is 124 feet long and 75 feet wide, said Art Shippee, the camps facility manager. It can hold 200,000 gallons and is handicap accessible. The new bathhouse is 4,300 square feet, and the pump and storage building is 864 square feet, Shippee said. In addition to giving the camp more swimming opportunities, Ragan said the second pool will be used to teach scuba diving, snor keling and lifesaving. And then also it gives them an opportunity to come out and just have fun, especially with the addition of the water slide, Ragan said. The camp also is working on a $25,000 adventure tower which should be done by the third week of camp. The tower will be used for rappelling and a zip line will be added before next years summer camp. The tower was funded by three families and the Knights of Pythias organization, Ragan said. Camp ofcials also have expanded the camps lakefront area and added a pavilion. Ofcials are currently looking for $1 million to enhance the camps Native American area and another $700,000 to renovate a hall to make it more of a training center, with air conditioning and better classrooms, Ragan said. The camp will employ 125 staff this summer, compared with about 100 in the past, and about 30 additional youth volunteers will be used at var ious times during the summer. According to Ragan, about 35 to 40 of those employees come from north Lake County. The camp expects 4,200 youth campers and about 1,000 adult leaders to show up throughout the summer for weeklong stays. CAMPFROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Kevin Murphy, one of the founders of Triple Eagle Experiences, a company that specializes in building challenge courses, works on the rappelling tower being built at Camp La-No-Che in Paisley. GOPFROM PAGE A1 BUDGETFROM PAGE A1countrys tenuous economic recovery. Their positions could affect their polit ical fortunes. Democrats plan to place climate change, and the GOPs skepticism, front and center in a state where the issue is no longer an abstraction. Their hope is to win over independents and siphon some Republicans, who are deeply divided over global warming. Tom Steyer, a billionaire environmental activist, has pledged to spend $100 million this year to inuence seven critical contests nationwide, including the Florida governors race. The battle in the countrys largest swing state offers a preview of what could be a pivotal ght in the next presi dential election. Crist is running for his old job as a Democrat, criticizing Scott and Florida Republicans for reversing his efforts to curb global warming. They dont believe in science. Thats ridiculous, Crist said at a recent cam paign rally in Miami. This is ground zero for climate change in America.The budget we put together is developed to maintain the service level that we have been providing and to address some operational needs, which have reached a critical point of needing to be addressed.Jerry Smith, executive director of Lake EMS

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com OCALA Millers Boating Center to offer boating safety courseHarris Chain Sail and Power Squadron and Millers Boating Center will host a United States Power Squadron boating safety course from 8 / a.m. to 5 / p.m., on June 21 at Millers Boating Center, 1661 NW 57th St. (U.S. Highway 441), in Ocala. Cost for the class is $49 for the rst family member, which includes a copy of the student manual, and an additional $25 for each family member willing to share the manual. Payment can be made by cash or checks only. To pre-register for the course, go to www.harrischain.org. The course has a maximum capacity of 20 students. Call Phil Ponticello, Harris Chain education ofcer, at 352-288-2079 or email Philip@ponticello.me, or contact Millers Boating Center at 352-622-7757.MOUNT DORA B.J. Thomas to perform at community buildingFive-time Grammy and two-time Dove Award winner B.J. Thomas, who has sold more than 70 million records and is ranked in Billboards Top 50 most played artists over the past 50 years, will appear at the Mount Dora Community Building, 520 N. Baker St., next to City Hall, from 4 to 6 / p.m., on June 22 for one show only. For information, call the Parks and Recreation Department at 352-7357183. For tickets, $35 general seating and $45 VIP seating, go to www. whattodoinmtdora.com.LEESBURG Disabilities forum to be held at Sunrise ArcThe Area 13 Family Care Council and the Agency for Persons with Disability (APD) will host a free Family Forum for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m., on Saturday at Sunrise Arc of Lake County, 35201 Radio Road in Leesburg. The meeting will focus on behaviors and developmental disabilities, and will begin with registration at 9:15 / a.m. It will feature behav ioral professionals and a panel of speakers. Guests can also take part in resource exhibits, a scrapbooking event, have lunch and speak with APD staff and Family Care Council members. To RSVP, call Betty Kay Clements at 352-753-1163 or email tocbettykay@aol.com. Child care or adult supervision is not available for this event.THE VILLAGES Paramount Urgent Care to offer free student physicalsTo ensure student success for the new school year, Paramount Urgent Care and the local charity Back to School is COOL-Lake County have teamed up to offer free back-toschool physicals for local kids. Families receiving physicals, or anyone who would like to contribute, are encouraged to donate school supplies at any Paramount location to benet homeless and economically-challenged students. Dates for physicals at participating Paramount locations are as follows and appointments are required: July 16 and 17, 8640 E. County Road 466, in The Villages, 352-674-9218; July 23 and 24, 628 U.S. Highway 27, in Clermont, 352-242-1988.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comDays before his second-degree murder tri al was to begin, an alleged Sorrento gang mem ber was sentenced to 25 years in prison on Fri day in a plea deal in the 2012 shooting death of a DeLand man. Mauricio Garcia-Avila, 20, was also given 10 years of probation for the murder of 22-yearold Robert Headdy by Circuit Judge Mark Nacke on Friday. The shooting oc curred Oct. 19, 2012, near Azalea Avenue in Sorrento. According to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, witnesses said the victim and the suspects family had altercations in the month prior to the shooting and the victim allegedly threatened to shoot the suspects brother, Jose Flores-Avila. Deputies were called to the scene after witnesses reported hear ing three gunshots. They arrived to nd Headdy shot in the head with a shotgun and two spent shotgun shells by his side. Headdy died at the scene. The brothers were al legedly trying to sell the shotgun. Witnesses said they saw Jose Flores-Avila running from the scene and inves tigators found both broth ers at an Orange Avenue SORRENTOMan sentenced 25 years in shooting death GARCIA-AVILA LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAfter ling the paper work 12 days ago, Orange County Sheriff Capt. Sandy Carpenter has withdrawn his bid to run for the Lake County Commission District 2 seat against incumbent Commissioner Sean Parks, according to the Supervisor of Elec tions ofce. In 2012, Carpenter ran for Lake County sheriff against incumbent Sheriff Gary Bor ders. In the August 2012 primary elec tion, Carpenter received 32 percent of the vote, compared with 67 percent for Borders. Messages left for Car penter were not returned. Other races shaping up so far include: %  %  County Commission District 4 Commission er Leslie Campione will face Thomas Henry Poole Jr., a senior pastor of Mount Moriah Church in Wildwood and son of Thomas Henry Poole Sr., a prom inent NAACP civil rights leader and teacher who fought for civil rights after integration in Eustis. Poole is running as a can didate with no party afl iation. %  %  County Judge Judge Terry T. Neal will face Daniel David Archer %  %  Lake County School Board District 1 mem ber Bill Mathias is facing John Ardizone; District 3 School Board Member Tod Howard is facing Jamie Maret Hanja and Marc Anthony Dodd; and Nancy Muenzmay and Stepha nie Ann Luke are vying for the District 5 seat held by Kyleen Fischer, who is not seeking re-election. The qualifying period ends June 20.LAKE COUNTYCarpenter withdraws bid for commission seat CARPENTER MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comA homeless man accused Thursday of burglarizing two Tavares homes wasnt that dif cult to nd considering a description given to police of him wearing a womens bathing suit. According to an arrest afdavit, when police found the suspect, Dustin James Landers, at a nearby BP gas station on U.S. Highway 441, he was wearing a black camouage womens bathing suit and a pair of tight blue jeans rolled up below his knees that allegedly had stolen jewelry in the back pocket. Landers, 31, also allegedly had a pink dufe bag with TAVARESMan charged with burglary found in bikini LANDERS Lake County Animal Ser vices is hosting an auction at 11 / a.m. on S aturday, featuring a variety of animals ranging from a bunny to a horse. The event will be held at the shelter, at 28123 County Road 561, according to a press re lease. The following animals will be up for auction: %  %  10-15-year-old Tennessee Walker Gelding %  %  1 -year-old goat %  %  three roosters %  %  three chickens %  %  New Zealand bunny Auctions not only help offset the cost of caring for our many shelter animals, but are also a great way for public to Animal Shelter to auction off variety of petsLAKE COUNTYSEE AUCTION | A6SEE BURGLARY | A6SEE SHOOTING | A6 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comHe was a pig lit erally at Saturdays corn-eating contest during Leesburgs annual downtown Cornfest. Weighing about 25 pounds with white hair, hooves and a snout, Korky the pig was a last-minute addition to the contest. Organizers were impressed with the 9-month old miniature pig after they saw him in the festivals pet parade, where Korkys owners had to use corn to entice him to march. His owners said Korky loves corn. We thought it would help get more contes tants, said corn-eating contest organizer Rex Masterman, one of sev eral merchants with the Downtown Leesburg Business Association. Participants were given as many ears of corn as they wanted but the ob jective was to eat as many ears as they could within a two-minute period. For a cob to count, it had to be stripped clean of kernels. Saturdays contest was divided into adult and children divisions, the latter which Korky participated in. The 10 or so children in the division ate on a table while Korky devoured his corn in a nearby pen. With a pig compet ing this year, it might be rough, said Mark Romero, as he waited for his relatives to begin competing in childrens LEESBURGSwine tries to hog corn-eating contest PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Stacey McCarthy, front, gnaws through a cob of corn during a corn-eating contest during the Leesburg annual Cornfest on Saturday. Leesburgs Cornfest had a surprise contestant in its corneating competition after Korky the pig decided to join.SEE CONTEST | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 OBITUARIESAlfred Dean AndersonAlfred Dean Ander son, 75, of Leesburg, Florida, died Thursday, June 5, 2014 at Lees burg, FL. He was born October 25, 1938 in Peoria, Illinois. Mr. An derson received his Bachelor of Science Degree at Bradley University Class of in Peoria, IL and then be came a teacher in La con, IL for 3 yrs. In 1964 he became an employee at State Farm Insurance in Bloomington, IL. He was transferred to Winter Haven in 1967 and then moved to Lees burg in 1973 and became a State Farm Insurance Agent. After 36 years of service he retired in 2000. Mr. An derson spent his retire ment years enjoying the outdoors with his family and friends. He also enjoyed golf, hunting, and traveling with his wife Sue. He is survived by his wife of 52 yrs., Carol Sue Anderson of Leesburg; son, Andy (Kim) Anderson of Yalaha; daughter, Kiersten (Derek) Freeman of Sor rento; grandchildren, Patrick, Christopher, Kiersten, and Hunter; and his brother, Fred Ander son of Tampa. He was preceded in death by his sister, Deloris Hoerr. Visitation will be held at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 from 6:00 8:00 pm. Services will be held at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, Leesburg, FL on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 10:00 am, Pastor Barry Hunt eman of Hope Lutheran Church, The Villages, FL will preside. Interment will follow at Tavares Cemetery, Tavares, FL. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Cornerstone Hospice, 2445 Lane Park Rd.,Tavares, FL 32778. Online condolences may be left at www.beyersfuner alhome.com. Arrangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home, Leesburg, FL.Edward Joseph CrowellA 17-year resident of Leesburg, Edward Joseph Crowell, 87, died peacefully June 5 from complications following a fall at home. His life was a joyful jour ney that took him from his birth in Newark, NJ to upstate New York, Miami, the Jackson ville Beaches, Califor nia, Georgia and nal ly Central Florida. As a teenager with U.S. Navy orders in hand, he found himself in Bra zil in case World War II spread there. As an old salt re-enlistee after nearly 20 years of civilian workaday struggle in many different jobs, he sailed repeatedly from Na val Station Mayport (Fl.) to the Mediter ranean on the U.S.S. Saratoga air craft carrier. Aboard the U.S.S. McCaffery de stroyer he was part of the critical blockade Russian ships delivering more missiles to Cuba. In Vietnam, he was on smaller boats supply ing much younger men ghting a controversial war he didnt want his sons to join. Ed was never all about the military. Beginning with his mar riage Sept. 13, 1947 to his beloved Teddy (Mar jorie Jean Palmer), he was intent on raising a family with love as a de pendable provider and caring father. He and Teddy (known mostly as Jean) were together through almost 67 years of laughs, frowns, chal lenges and travels. They brought up four sons and welcomed their wives: Edward Jr. and Lynda of Austin, TX, Richard and Barbara of Duluth, Mn., James and Donna of Hateld, Ma., and Christopher of Punta Gorda, Belize. Six grandchildren and six great grandchildren followed. Wherever they lived, most every year family members visited Florida or Ed and Jean came to see them. No matter where Ed trav eled or how much in a hurry those with him might have been, he never let pass a chance to make a new friend. He always had a nice word or sometimes a maddening lengthy exchange for store cashiers, ticket takers, neighbors or strangers crossing his path .For people in need of a help ing hand, Ed was there to offer what he could regardless of skills or resources. He felt God would want it that way and Ed was secure in his faith. He and Jean attended Mass every Sunday at St. Pauls Catho lic Church in Leesburg. With the Knights of Co lumbus in Jacksonville Beach, he spent many Easters cooking and serving dinner for senior citizens. No one could be richer than Ed in the things that mattered most to him love and family. Ed let his sons and their families know how proud he was of them during ev ery visit and phone call. Most of all, he made it clear that the woman he loved so much was the rock upon which his life was built. He didnt wait until an an niversary or a knock on deaths door to tell the world just that. Ed start ed out without privilege or much of an education. He didnt achieve high rank or a wealth in dollars. But he paid at tention to the world at large, free of prejudice and with respect for others. He could argue differences of opinion with his sons and part with hugs. Toward the end of his long, winding road he acknowledged that luck played a part in his success. But the truth is he simply made the best choices about whats really valuable in life. It was an exam ple that will last for gen erations. A service at the Hawthorne of Leesburg community center will be announced lat er. Online condolenc es may be left at www. beyersfuneralhome. com. Arrangements entrusted to Beyers Funer al Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Charles William KeedyCharles William Bill Keedy, 77, of Lees burg, peacefully passed away on May 22, 2014. Bill was born in Taylor, Michigan on February 7, 1937. Moving to Flor ida at a young age and becoming a resident to Leesburg. Bill enjoyed his past times with his family and friends, trading in real estate and serving the community. He is preceded in death by his wife, Judy Keedy. Survived by his sons, Chuck Keedy of Jack sonville, Mark Keedy of San Diego, Ca., daugh ter Ann Keedy Collier of Orlando; stepdaughter Chris Kao of Weirsdale, stepson, Jay Friend of Lady Lake; eight grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren and sister Margaret Blakemore of Leesburg. A Celebration of Life will be held at 11:00 am on Friday, June 13, 2014 at Bey ers Funer al Home, Leesburg. Inurnment will follow at Lone Oak Cemetery, Leesburg. For those who wish, in lieu of owers, memo rial contributions may be made to: Leesburg Heritage Museum, 111 S. Sixth St., Leesburg, Fl. 34748. Online con dolences may be left at www.beyersfuner alhome.com. Arrangements entrusted to Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Rex A. PentonRex A. Penton, 90 of The Villages, FL and Millbrook, AL passed away June 5, 2014. He is survived by his daugh ters: Debra L. Penton (Clarence Roque) of The Villages, FL; Kellie L. For son (Glen) of Marion, AR; Wendy K. Penton of Wetumpka, AL; longtime and beloved companion Anita J. Billing sley of The Villages, FL; 5 grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren and other loving extended family. A Veteran of the US Army, he served his country in WWII as a sharp shooter instruc tor. He was a sheet met al and air conditioning foreman for Miami Air Conditioning in Miami, FL and an avid professional billiards player as well as jack of all trades. The family will receive friends in the chapel of Beyers Funeral Home in Lady Lake, FL on Mon day June 9, 2014 from 3-5 pm with services and burial to follow in Opp, AL. For those who wish and in memory of Mr. Penton, donations may be made to their favorite charity. Condolences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.com Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Lady Lake/The Villages, FL in charge of arrangements.William O. Bill RastWilliam O. Bill Rast, 96, of Fruitland Park was born May 8, 1918 to Henry Holland and Mamie Cannon Rast. He was a lifelong resident of Leesburg and Fruitland Park and a graduate of Leesburg High School, Class of 1936. A World War II Veteran, he enlisted in the Army in 1944 and served in the infantry in Electric Razor Repair Clinics Wed, June 11th Wed, June 25th WE SHARPEN MOWER BLADES! IN MEMORY CROWELL KEEDY RAST SEE OBITS | A6

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 home a few blocks away from the shooting. A shotgun with similar shells was found by a fence behind the house, along with Maurico Garcia-Avilas wallet, according to sheriffs reports. The trial had been sched uled to start Monday before the plea deal was made Fri day. It is not clear what evi dence the prosecution had planned to present. How ever, according to court records, the defense had motioned for the court to stop the prosecution from enter ing into evidence that Gar cia-Avila is a gang member. Assistant State Attorney Rich Buxman, who prosecuted the case, submitted a motion on June 2, asking the judge to keep witnesses from testifying that Headdy had been smoking marijuana prior to the altercation. While the motion acknowledges medical examiners testing revealed marijuana in Headdys system, Buxman argues the results do not show how much of the drug was present and added theres no evidence the drug affected the victims actions during the altercation. Buxman also motioned the court to prevent the defense from arguing during the trial that a witness who allegedly tied Garcia-Avila to the shooting should be charged with perjury after making inconsistent statements. Buxman said during an in terview Thursday he expected lawyers for Garcia-Avila to argue self-defense. Garcia-Avila was given two years credit for time served. purchase livestock at low prices, Bri an Sheahan, director of Lake Countys Community Safety & Compliance Department, said in the release. Animals will be auctioned off to the highest bidder and must be removed from property before 4 / p .m. Winning bidders must be able to transport their animals off-site. Payments are accepted in cash, mon ey orders, certied check and cred it cards. Animals are sold as is but all horses must have a negative Coggins test. Future Lake County Animal Services events include auctions on June 21 and Aug. 9, and rabies clinic and adoption events on July 19 and Sept. 20. To nd out more about Lake County Animal Services, or to donate funds to help with operations at the shelter, go to www.lakecounty.gov/adopt, visit the shelter or call 352-343-9688. Italy for 2 years. Upon his return, he worked for the Seaboard Coast line Railroad as a clerk for 30 years before re tiring in 1973. He con tinued working for another 12 years at Sumter Motor Co. in Wildwood and was active in his community as a Commissioner for Fruitland Park for 19 years. He was a member of Com munity United Methodist Church in Fruit land Park for 70 years and was active in many facets of the church. Survivors include: wife Winifred Knight Howell Galbreath Rast; daughters: Nancy Rast Lipps and Billie K. Rast Gold en; many grandchil dren and great grand children; and nephew G. M. Ken Rast; Winifreds 3 daughters: Lin da Howell Myer White, Margaret Peggy Howell Farrell and Mary Cla rice Howell. He was pre ceded in death by: his parents; rst wife Thel ma Lee G. Rast; broth er George H. Rast; sister Nellie R. Munden and nephew Charles R. Munden. The family will receive friends on Monday June 9, 2014 in the chapel of Beyers Fu neral Home in Leesburg from 5-7 PM. Graveside services will be at 9:30 AM at Shiloh Cemetery in Fruitland Park on Tuesday June 10 and a Celebration of Life Ser vice will follow at 11 AM at Community United Methodist Church in Fruitland Park with the Rev. Mike Ford ham ofciating. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to: Community United Methodist Church Building Fund, 309 College Ave., Fruit land Park, FL 34731 or Cornerstone Hospice, c/o Lane Purcell Hospice House, 2452 Coun ty Road 526 E, Sumter ville, FL 33585. Online condolences may be left at www.beyersfuner alhome.com. Arrangements entrusted to Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.DEATH NOTICESDaniel Patrick HallDaniel Patrick Hall, 67 of Sorrento, died Thurs day, June 5, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. 1031 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748 www.decoratingden.com OBITSFROM PAGE A4 SHOOTINGFROM PAGE A3 BURGLARYFROM PAGE A3more stolen items inside. Landers was charged with two counts each of burglary and grand theft. Landers remained in the Lake County Jail Saturday on no bail. According to police, two residents one on East Delaware Street and one on North New Hampshire Avenue reported Thursday afternoon that their homes had been burglarized. One woman said she came home and saw the suspect jumping her fence. She said inside her Delaware Street home it appeared the suspect had taken a shower and ate her food. She also said several items were missing, including jewelry. A witness told police the suspect who had climbed the fence was a woman in a bathing suit. Tavares police, joined by Astatula ofcers, searched the area before spotting Landers in the gas station parking lot. Landers then allegedly ran in the store and tried to run out another door before being captured by police. His pink dufe bag and another black bag contained more jewelry, an Xbox, headphones, iPad and other items, according to police. AUCTIONFROM PAGE A3 CONTESTFROM PAGE A3division. Romero won the adult division last year and was also a con testant Saturday. When the contest began, the human partic ipants raised their cobs to their mouths and starting chewing. But most of the eyes appeared to be on Korky as his owners daughter, 12-year-old Karley, held the corn up to his snout for him to chew. When the two minutes was up, however, it was Sydney Levey, Caitlyn Wolff and Kassandra Abarca who won the childrens division after they stripped clean one ear of corn each. Korky ate about one and a half cobs of corn, but appar ently neither was void of kernels. When Korkys owners held him up for pictures after the contest, they had to hurry and place him back down after he let out repeated squeals. He doesnt like losing, said owner Kevin Paulling with a laugh. Paulling also jokingly attributed Korkys loss to allowing children at the event to feed the pet pig shortly before the contest. Paulling and his wife Kim got the pet pig last year and he has been a companion to their oth er pets, including their dog Lillie, an English springer spaniel, who they said helped to potty train Korky. The couple said Korky also likes riding a surf board in their pool, hiding in the home and taking walks on a leash. Hes a lot of fun, Kim said. Romero won the adult division by eating three cobs of corn. In the chil drens corn-shucking division, Jake Olivera, a 12-year-old Leesburg First Academy student, won rst place after stripping nine ears of corn clean; and Bryce Wolff, also 12, an Oak Park Mid dle School student, took second with eight ears. There was also a corn-shucking contest for adults, as well as a Cornhole Tournament, the latter a sanctioned event run by the Sunshine Cornhole group of Orlando. Winners were given monetary prizes. The contests were part of a busy day at the downtown Cornfest, which included more than 10,000 ears of freshly picked, triple-sweet Zellwood corn straight from the Lake County farm of Long & Scott. Patrons could buy bags or crates of corn ears to take home and cook, or sink their teeth into hot, buttery sweet corn on the spot and organiz ers had seasoning and four dipping bowls full of butter setup in front of the vendor stand. The annual Cornfest started at 8 / a.m. G reg Thorpe, a Downtown Leesburg Business Association member who helped sell the corn, said at noon they had already went through ve gallons of butter and sold 3,000 ears.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 READY TO TRY A NEW BINGO PLACE??Open 7 Days a WeekWalk in bingo Noon-7pm daily, tons of pull tabs, food, beer and wine. We will have extended hours once we get enough people playing.A unique place that will be your new hangout! www.facebook.com/bjsbingoeustis Email: bjsbingoeustis@gmail.com BJs Phone: 352-431-4345Located in Eustis at 415 Plaza Drive in the Big Lots shopping center LAURA MILLS and JIM HEINTZAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine Ukraines new president on Saturday called for pro-Russian rebels in the countrys east to lay down their arms and welcomed dia logue with the insurgents, but said he wouldnt negotiate with those he called gangsters and killers and struck a deant tone on the Russian-annexed Crimean Peninsula. Petro Poroshenkos inau gural address after taking the oath of ofce in parliament gave little sign of a quick res olution to the conict in the east, which Ukrainian of cials say has left more than 200 people dead. He also rmly insisted that Crimea, the Black Sea peninsula annexed by Russia in March, was, is and will be Ukrainian. He gave no indi cation of how Ukraine could regain control of Crimea, which Russian President Vlad imir Putin has said was allotted to Ukraine unjustly under Sovi et leader Nikita Khrushchev. Hours after the speech, Putin ordered security tight ened along Russias border with Ukraine to prevent illegal crossings, Russian news agencies said. Ukraine claims that many of the insurgents in the east have come from Russia; Poroshenko on Saturday said he would offer a corridor for safe passage of Russian militants out of the country. Rebel leaders in the east dismissed Poroshenkos speech. At the moment its impos sible for him to come (to Do netsk for talks), said Denis Pushilin, a top gure in the self-declared Donetsk Peo ples Republic. Perhaps with security, a group, so people wont tear him to pieces. Poroshenko offered amnesty to rebels who dont have blood on their hands. But I dont believe it, said Valery Bolotov, the insurgent leader in the Luhansk region. Rebels in both Luhansk and Donetsk have declared their regions independent. The new president promised I will bring you peace, but did not indicate whether Ukrainian forces would scale back their offensives against the insurgency, which Ukraine says is fomented by Russia.Poroshenko sworn in as Ukraines president SERGEI CHUZAVKOV / AP Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko reviews an honor guard after the inauguration ceremony in Sophia Square in Kiev, Ukraine, Saturday. M.L. JOHNSONAssociated PressMILWAUKEE Dozens of gay cou ples married Saturday at courthouses in Milwaukee and Madison, tak ing advantage of what most believed would be a small window in which to get hitched before a judges deci sion overturning the states same-sex marriage ban was put on hold. The decision was announced Friday afternoon just as the party was getting started at PrideFest, an annual gay celebration that draws thousands of people to Milwaukees festival grounds on Lake Michigan. Many couples who married Sat urday said the judges decision had caught them by surprise, and they hadnt wanted to break Friday night plans. Others needed time to assem ble the documents required for a mar riage license. Couples began lining up outside the Milwaukee County court house at 6 / a.m., thr ee hours before it opened. Craig Cook and Marshall Draper ar rived about 8:30 / a.m. and found near ly two dozen couples in line ahead of them. Cook, 43, said he and oth ers had hoped U.S. District Judge Bar bara Crabb would make a decision in time for PrideFest. He and Draper at tended the festival Friday night and planned to return Saturday after be ing married by a Unitarian minister outside the courthouse. Had this been legal, we probably would have done this 20 years ago, Cook said.Hundreds of gay couples rush to marry in Wisconsin SAMEER N. YACOUBAssociated PressBAGHDAD A series of car bombs explod ed across Iraqs capital Saturday night, killing at least 52 people in a day of violence that saw militants storm a university in the countrys restive Anbar province and take dozens hostage, authorities said. The attacks in Baghdad largely focused on Shiite neighborhoods, underscoring the sectar ian violence now striking at Iraq years after a similar wave nearly tore the country apart fol lowing the U.S.-led inva sion that toppled Sadd am Hussein. Now with U.S. troops gone, Iraq founds itself ghting on fronts across the coun try, as separate clashes in a northern city killed 21 police ofcers and 38 militants, ofcials said. The rst Baghdad at tack took place Satur day night in the capitals western Baiyaa district, killing nine people and wounding 22, police said. Later on, seven car bombs in different parts of Baghdad killed at least 41 people and wounded 62, police said. A roadside bomb in western Bagh dad also killed two people and wounded six, po lice said. All the attacks happened in a one-hour period and largely tar geted commercial streets in Shiite neighborhoods, authorities said. Hospital ofcials con rmed the casualty g ures. All ofcials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to release de tails to journalists. The day began with militants killing three po lice ofcers on guard at the gates of Anbar Uni versity, a police and a military ofcial said. Islamic extremists and other anti-government militias have held parts of Anbars nearby provincial capital of Ramadi and the city of Fallujah since Decem ber amid rising tensions between Sunni Muslims and the Shiite-led gov ernment in Baghdad. The gunmen detained dozens of students inside a university dorm during their attack, the ofcials said. Sabah Karhout, the head of Anbars provin cial council, told jour nalists that hundreds of students were inside the university compound when the attack started at the school. Anbar Univer sity says it has more than 10,000 students, making it one of the countrys largest. Ahmed al-Mehamdi, a student who was taken hostage, said he awoke to the crackle of gunre, looked out the window and saw armed men dressed in black running across the campus. Minutes later, the gunmen entered the dor mitory and ordered ev erybody to stay in their rooms while taking others away, he said. The Shiite students at the school were terried, al-Mehamdi said, as the gunmen identied them selves as belonging to an al-Qaida splinter group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Le vant. The Sunni terror group, ghting in Syria with other rebels trying to topple President Bashar Assad, is known for mas sive, bloody attacks in Iraq as well often target ing Shiites that they view as heretics.Bombs kill 52 as gunmen storm university in Iraq AP FILE PHOTO A woman makes a gesture of prayer as she looks at damage from a Saturday car bomb attack near a Kebab restaurant, in the mainly Shiite Habibiya neighborhood of Baghdad.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB Leesburg, FL34748 NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatrist

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HOWARD FENDRICHAssociated PressPARIS Nothing came easily for Maria Sharapova in the French Open nal. Serves hit by her sur gically repaired shoulder often missed the mark, resulting in 12 double-faults. Shots that would be winners against most oppo nents were retrieved by Simona Halep and sent right back. Leads that usually hold up vanished in a blink. On a muggy afternoon, with the temperature in the high 70s (20s Celsius), points were lung-sear ing struggles. Sharapova was up to the task. In an enter taining and undulating championship match the rst womens nal at Roland Garros in 13 years to go three sets Sharapova showed that shes as tough as they come, particularly on the red clay that used to ummox her. She edged Halep 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4 Saturday to win a second French Open title in three years. This is the toughest Grand Slam nal Ive ever played, Sharapova said. It is her fth major trophy in all. Remark ably, Sharapova owns twice as many from Par is as the one each she won at Wimbledon in 2004, the U.S. Open in 2006, and the Australian Open in 2008. If somebody had told me ... at some stage in my career, that Id have more Roland Gar ros titles than any other Grand Slam, Id prob ably go get drunk, Sharapova said with a chuckle. Or tell them to get drunk. One or the SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Can Mickelson win the U.S. Open? / B4 Wait til next year PHOTOS BY MATT SLOCUM / AP Tonalist (11) with Joel Rosario up edges out Commissioner (8) with Javier Castellano up to win the 146th running of the Belmont Stakes on Saturday in Elmont, N.Y. California Chrome, the pre-race favorite to win the Triple Crown, is third from left. California Chrome nished in a dead heat for fourth place. BETH HARRISAssociated PressNEW YORK Califor nia Chrome failed in his bid to win the rst Triple Crown in 36 years on Saturday, losing the Belmont Stakes to 9-1 long shot Tonalist. The Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner nished in a dead-heat for fourth with Wicked Strong. California Chromes loss extended the longest drought without a Triple Crown champion. Three tough races in ve weeks proved too demanding for Califor nia Chrome, who was sent off as the heavy 4-5 favorite by tens of thousands packed into Belmont Park on an 80-de gree day, hoping to see history. Afrmed remains the most recent Triple Crown winner in 1978. The raucous crowd was silenced when it became obvious that California Chrome lacked his usual punch in the stretch. Jockey Victor Espinoza realized long be fore then that his chest nut colt wasnt up to Jockey Joel Rosario is congratulated after winning the Belmont Stakes atop Tonalist. DAVID VINCENT / AP Maria Sharapova returns a shot at Simona Halep during Saturdays womens nal at the French Open at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris. Sharapova edges Halep for second French title BRIAN MAHONEYAssociated PressSAN ANTONIO The San Antonio Spurs are on an unprecedented postseason roll that not even a boatload of turn overs in Game 1 of the NBA Finals could stop. They probably ruined Tim Duncans hopes of a career change, though. Duncan wants to be a point guard, coach Gregg Popovich re vealed Saturday, a wish that wont be granted. But Duncan would gladly settle for another championship, and the Spurs would be halfway there by beating Miami today in Game 2. The Spurs have won eight straight postsea son home games by 15 or more points, an NBA record, but know as well as anyone that a onegame lead means noth ing against the Heat. Thats why I think we cant be satised, said point guard Tony Parker, who isnt worried about losing his job to Duncan. Because we was in the same situa tion and we know they can win here, and so we just have to go out there and play our game and try to win this one. I think its a big game for the series. LeBron James expects to be fully ready for the Heat, who also dropped the opener last year in the nals against the Spurs, and in 2012 to Oklahoma City. Mi ami is 5-0 in series with James when dropping the opener, rebounding to win Game 2 every time. A 2-0 decit would surely bring loads of unwanted attention to whats already one of the most scrutinized players and teams in sports. Im sure the series would be over from the outside, Heat guard Dwyane Wade said, laughing. Our focus is on how we can win ballgames and understand in the series its the rst one to four; not the rst one to one, not the rst one to two, not the rst one to San Antonio tries to drop Heat into unfamiliar 2-0 hole FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comA quintet of players with area connections realized their dreams of being drafted during the annual Major League Baseball June Amateur Draft, which ended Saturday. Former Mount Dora standout Austin Anderson, South Sumter graduate Garrett Cave, Lake-Sumter State College pitcher Shane Crouse, former Eus tis and LSSC pitcher Kuehl McEachern and current Leesburg Lightning inelder Brad Antchak were selected in the ninth, 17th, 24th 34th and 39th rounds, respectively. Anderson was chosen in the ninth round by the Baltimore Orioles, Currently a third baseman for the University of Mississippi, Ander son is batting .332 for the Rebels this season. Ole Miss is playing Lou isiana-Lafayette in Lafayette, La. in the NCAA Super-Regionals. Cave, a right-handed pitcher, was taken with the 512th overall by the New York Yankees. Cave is a Florida International recruit and climbed a draft boards in the weeks leading up to the draft. Scouts say his fast ball regularly hits 93 mph and his secondary pitches have improved, particularly his curveball. At 17-years old, he is one of the youngest players in the class of draftees. Crouse, a right-hand ed pitcher, was taken with the 725th pick by the Cincinnati Reds. He appeared in 14 games for the Lakehawks in 2014 and posted a 3-6 record with a 6.87 ERA. Opposing hitters bat ted .273 against Crouse, who struck out 48 in 38 innings. McEachern, currently a member of the Leesburg Lightning, was se lected with the 1,034th pick by Boston. Heading into todays game against Sanford. A relief pitcher, McEachern has two saves for the Lightning in two appearances. He spent the 2014 col lege season with Flagler College, where he was 2-3 with a 9.39 ERA. With LSSC, he recorded 12 saves as a sopho more with a 1.26 ERA. He was third in the na tion in saves. Antchak spent the 2014 college season at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College. He is currently playing for the Leesburg Lightning. He was chosen with the 1,156th pick by the Houston Astros. Antchak hit .295 with two homers and 29 RBIs with NE Oklaho ma A&M, and was hit ting .143 heading into todays game against Sanford. The annual June draft began Thursday when the Houston As tros selected left-handed pitcher Brady Aiken with the rst pick. Aik en was the rst pitcher to be the top pick since the Yankees selected Brien Taylor in 1991.Locals selected in MLB DraftSEE NBA | B2SEE FRENCH | B2 California Chromes Triple Crown quest collapses with fourth-place finish at Belmont Park in 146th Belmont StakesSEE BELMONT | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 8-14@ College Park Freedom7pmSanford River Rats5pmWinter Garden Squeeze7pm@ Winter Garden Squeeze7pmWinter Garden Squeeze7pmCollege Park Freedom7pm HORSE RACING Belmont Finish Order 1. Tonalist 2. Commissioner 3. Medal Count 4. DH-California Chrome 4. DH-Wicked Strong 6. Samraat 7. General a Rod 8. Matterhorn 9. Commanding Curve 10. Matuszak 11. Ride On Curlin AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Pocono 400 After Friday qualifying; race today At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.415. 2. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 181.408. 3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 181.316. 4. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 180.832. 5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 180.513. 6. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 180.458. 7. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 179.827. 8. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 179.565. 9. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 179.548. 10. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 179.383. 11. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 179.326. 12. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 179.126. 13. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 179.258. 14. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 179.229. 15. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 179.072. 16. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 179.051. 17. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 178.976. 18. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 178.919. 19. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 178.777. 20. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 178.678. 21. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 178.288. 22. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 178.144. 23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 178.031. 24. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 177.288. 25. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 178.045. 26. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 177.968. 27. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 177.908. 28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 177.83. 29. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 177.162. 30. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 176.308. 31. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 176.025. 32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 175.922. 33. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 175.867. 34. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 175.675. 35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 175.613. 36. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 174.958. 37. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 38. (44) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (66) Timmy Hill, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (33) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, Owner Points. BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs Finals (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: San Antonio 110, Miami 95 Sunday, June 8: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. HOCKEY NHL Playoffs Finals (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Wednesday, June 4: Los Angeles 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Saturday, June 7: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, late Monday, June 9: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 11: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Friday, June 13: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 16: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 18: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. BASEBALL NCAA Division I Super Regionals Baseball Best-of-3; x-if necessary Host school is Game 1 home team; visiting school is Game 2 home team; coin ip determines Game 3 home team At Jim Patterson Stadium Louisville, Ky. Friday: Louisville 5, Kennesaw State 3 Saturday: Kennesaw State (40-23) vs. Louisville (49-15), late x-Sunday: Kennesaw State vs. Louisville, 6 p.m. At Hawkins Field Nashville, Tenn. Friday: Vanderbilt 11, Stanford 6 Saturday: Stanford 5, Vanderbilt 4 Sunday: Stanford (35-25) at Vanderbilt (45-19), 3 p.m. At Allie P. Reynolds Stadium Stillwater, Okla. Friday: UC Irvine 8, Oklahoma State 4 Saturday: UC Irvine (39-23) vs. Oklahoma State (48-17), late x-Sunday: UC Irvine vs. Oklahoma State, 9 p.m. At UFCU Disch-Falk Field Austin, Texas Friday: Texas 4, Houston 2 Saturday: Texas 4, Houston 0, Texas advances At Davenport Field Charlottesville, Va. Saturday: Maryland 5, Virginia 4 Sunday: Maryland (40-21) vs. Virginia (47-14), Noon x-Monday: Maryland vs. Virginia, 4 p.m. At M.L. Tigue Moore Field Lafayette, La. Saturday: Mississippi (44-18) at Louisiana-Lafayette (57-8), late Sunday: Mississippi vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 9 p.m. x-Monday: Mississippi vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 7 p.m. At Charlie and Marie Lupton Stadium Fort Worth, Texas Saturday: TCU 3, Pepperdine 2 Sunday: Pepperdine (42-17) vs. TCU (46-15), 6 p.m. x-Monday: Pepperdine vs. TCU, 7 p.m. At Rip Grifn Park Lubbock, Texas Saturday: Texas Tech 1, College of Charleston 0 Sunday: College of Charleston (44-18) vs. Texas Tech (44-19), 3 p.m. x-Monday: College of Charleston vs. Texas Tech, 1 p.m. TENNIS French Open Saturday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Women Championship Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Simona Halep (4), Romania, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4. Doubles Men Championship Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (11), France, def. Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (12), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (1). Legends Doubles Men Under 45 Round Robin Goran Ivanisevic, Croatia, and Todd Woodbridge, Australia, def. Sergi Bruguera, Spain, and Andrei Medve dev, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-4. GOLF PGA Tour FedEx St. Jude Classic Saturday At TPC Southwind Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,239; Par: 70 Completed Second Round Ben Crane 63-65 128 Retief Goosen 66-66 132 Camilo Villegas 68-64 132 Peter Malnati 65-68 133 Troy Merritt 67-66 133 Carl Pettersson 67-67 134 Brian Harman 69-65 134 Davis Love III 65-70 135 Billy Horschel 67-68 135 Jason Bohn 67-68 135 Padraig Harrington 68-67 135 Phil Mickelson 67-68 135 Dustin Johnson 68-67 135 Ted Potter, Jr. 68-67 135 Andrew Svoboda 69-66 135 J.J. Henry 66-70 136 Chesson Hadley 67-69 136 Tim Wilkinson 68-68 136 Ben Martin 69-67 136 Stewart Cink 70-66 136 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 67-70 137 Matt Every 69-68 137 Graeme McDowell 69-68 137 Ian Poulter 69-68 137 Tim Clark 68-69 137 Will Wilcox 70-67 137 John Peterson 69-68 137 Kevin Kisner 65-72 137 Shawn Stefani 70-67 137 Paul Casey 70-67 137 Tommy Gainey 69-68 137 Webb Simpson 71-66 137 Martin Laird 70-67 137 Brooks Koepka 67-70 137 Jerry Kelly 71-67 138 George McNeill 69-69 138 Zach Johnson 64-74 138 John Merrick 70-68 138 Chad Campbell 70-68 138 Cameron Tringale 68-70 138 Freddie Jacobson 67-71 138 Rickie Fowler 70-68 138 Miguel Angel Carballo 68-70 138 Danny Lee 72-67 139 Charlie Wi 68-71 139 Luke Guthrie 67-72 139 John Daly 72-67 139 Stuart Appleby 65-74 139 Boo Weekley 69-70 139 Justin Leonard 68-71 139 Jhonattan Vegas 69-70 139 Jeff Overton 68-71 139 William McGirt 73-66 139 Ryan Palmer 67-72 139 Steve Marino 69-70 139 Heath Slocum 69-70 139 James Hahn 69-70 139 Ben Curtis 70-69 139 Charles Howell III 71-68 139 Woody Austin 68-71 139 Josh Teater 72-67 139 John Rollins 70-69 139 Sean OHair 69-70 139 Ryuji Imada 71-69 140 Martin Flores 70-70 140 Benjamin Alvarado 68-72 140 Austin Cook 67-73 140 David Lingmerth 77-63 140 Scott Stallings 68-72 140 Greg Owen 70-70 140 Robert Streb 70-70 140 Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. Ben Crane -13 6 2. Troy Merritt -9 7 3. Peter Malnati -8 7 4. Billy Horschel -7 8 4. Retief Goosen -7 6 4. Camilo Villegas -7 6 7. Matt Every -6 12 7. Andrew Svoboda -6 9 7. Carl Pettersson -6 7 7. Brian Harman -6 8 LPGA Tour Manulife Financial Classic Saturday At Grey Silo Golf Course Waterloo, Ontario Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,330; Par: 71 Third Round a-denotes amateur Shanshan Feng 66-65-67 198 Inbee Park 69-66-65 200 Michelle Wie 65-67-68 200 Cristie Kerr 67-69-65 201 Lydia Ko 71-67-64 202 Anna Nordqvist 69-64-69 202 Candie Kung 70-68-65 203 Na Yeon Choi 68-67-68 203 Belen Mozo 68-67-68 203 Hee Young Park 65-66-72 203 Suzann Pettersen 70-67-67 204 Angela Stanford 71-67-67 205 Thidapa Suwannapura 72-66-67 205 Meena Lee 70-67-68 205 Jee Young Lee 68-68-69 205 So Yeon Ryu 68-67-70 205 Xi Yu Lin 67-67-71 205 Jennifer Rosales 69-72-65 206 Chella Choi 70-69-67 206 Danielle Kang 71-68-67 206 Stacy Lewis 69-69-68 206 Caroline Masson 69-67-70 206 Mirim Lee 69-73-65 207 Alena Sharp 73-69-65 207 Mi Jung Hur 73-68-66 207 Megan McChrystal 70-71-66 207 Sydnee Michaels 70-71-66 207 Tiffany Joh 72-68-67 207 Paz Echeverria 68-71-68 207 Jennifer Johnson 70-68-69 207 Anya Alvarez 71-66-70 207 Marina Alex 68-68-71 207 Kris Tamulis 69-73-66 208 Julieta Granada 72-69-67 208 Sue Kim 71-70-67 208 Morgan Pressel 71-68-69 208 Line Vedel 69-70-69 208 Austin Ernst 69-69-70 208 Katie Futcher 72-66-70 208 Jaye Marie Green 70-68-70 208 Sarah Kemp 68-70-70 208 Catriona Matthew 71-67-70 208 Christel Boeljon 75-68-66 209 Laura Davies 71-71-67 209 Mi Hyang Lee 70-71-68 209 Alejandra Llaneza 68-71-70 209 Haru Nomura 68-70-71 209 Jane Park 70-68-71 209 Kristy McPherson 68-68-73 209 TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Optioned LHP Tim Berry to Bowie (EL). Recalled RHP Kevin Gausman from Norfolk (IL). Transferred 3B Michael Almanzar to the 60day DL. Sent RHP Tommy Hunter to Delmarva (SAL) for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS Assigned INF Danny Worth outright to Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS Assigned LHP Brooks Raley and RHP Jarrett Grube outright to Salt Lake (PCL) and RHP Michael Brady outright to Arkansas (TL). Recalled RHP Cory Rasmus from Salt Lake. Optioned 2B Grant Green to Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS Sent OF Sam Fuld to New Brit ain (EL) for a rehab assignment. NEW YORK YANKEES Sent RHP Shawn Kelley to Trenton (EL) for a rehab assignment. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Optioned LHP Justin Marks to Sacramento (PCL). Sent LHP Eric OFlaherty to Stockton (Cal) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS Designated RHP Josh Lueke for assignment. Recalled RHP Kirby Yates from Durham (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES Agreed to terms with OF Andy Simunic on a minor league contract. CINCINNATI REDS Sent 1B Joey Votto and RHPs Trevor Bell and Brett Marshall to Louisville (IL) for re hab assignments. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Optioned RHP Luis Garcia to Lehigh Valley (IL). Assigned OF Tyson Gillies outright to Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Sent RHP Stolmy Pimentel to Altoona (EL) for a rehab assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES Reinstated LHP Eric Stults from the bereavement list. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Sent LHP Gio Gonzalez to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. Agreed to terms with SS Leudy Molina on a minor league contract. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed WR Juaquin Iglesia, WR Bert Reed and OL Cordaro Howard.TV2DAY AUTO RACING 1 p.m.TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pocono 400, at Long Pond, Pa.2 p.m.NBC Formula One, Canadian Grand Prix, at MontrealCOLLEGE BASEBALL NoonESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Maryland at Virginia2 p.m.ESPN NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Houston at Texas (if necessary)3 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Stanford at Vanderbilt (if necessary) ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, College of Charleston at Texas Tech6 p.m.ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Pepperdine at TCU ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Kennesaw State at Louisville (if necessary)9 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Mississippi at Louisiana-Lafayette ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, UC Irvine at Oklahoma State (if necessary)GOLF 6:30 a.m.TGC European PGA Tour, Lyoness Open, nal round, at Atzenbrugg, Austria1 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, nal round, at Memphis, Tenn.3 p.m.CBS PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, nal round, at Memphis, Tenn. TGC LPGA, Manulife Financial Classic, nal round, at Waterloo, Ontario5 p.m.TGC USGA, Curtis Cup, nal round matches, at St. Louis7 p.m.TGC Web.com Tour, Cleveland Open, nal round, at Westlake, Ohio9 p.m.TGC Champions Tour, Legends of Golf, nal round, at Ridgedale, Mo.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1:30 p.m.SUN Seattle at Tampa Bay MLB Oakland at Baltimore2 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at Chicago Cubs3:30 p.m.WGN Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels8 p.m.ESPN Boston at DetroitNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 8 p.m.ABC Playoffs, nals, game 2, Miami at San AntonioTENNIS 9 a.m.NBC French Open, mens nal, at ParisSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED three. You win a series by being the rst one to four. We understand the journey, we understand the path and what it takes to get there. The Heat were in position to win Game 1 before James departed with cramps. The Spurs committed 23 turnovers that not only led to 28 Miami points but also prevented them from getting the ball more often to Duncan, who shot 9 of 10 from the eld. Popovich said Duncan never demands more shots, even when he is in a good rhythm like he was Thursday. No, the only thing Timmy has ever de manded is he wants to play the point and he thinks Ive held him back, Popovich said. True story. He thinks hes a point guard. Duncan is one of the best power forwards in NBA history but likes to think like a little guy, though he realizes he hurt his chances of getting to actually play the part of one. After my ve turnovers the other night, I think I took a step back from that, he said. I dont think that Im go ing to be able to step up and ll that role for a little while. But, no, I en joy getting in the middle of the oor and mak ing decisions and get ting the ball to the right place, and thats what a point guards got to do. The Spurs dont need one, not after Parker looked healthy while posting 19 points and eight assists in the opener after missing the second half of the Western Conference nals clincher because of a sore left ankle. He laughed when told that Popovich and Dun can had brought up his teammates aspirations. Are we still talking about that? I cant be lieve they brought it up in the NBA Finals, Parker said. Its been a joke that Timmy thinks hes a great quarterback, that he can be a good passer. I disagree with that. I want to keep my spot. NBA FROM PAGE B1 other. The 3-hour, 2-minute tangle featured too many momentum swings to count, lled with lengthy baseline exchanges, and terric defense and shot making by both women. Not bad for someone who once famously described herself as feel ing like a cow on ice when it came to playing on clay, a slow, demand ing surface that requires excellent footwork. Now Sharapova knows how to move on clay, and can stretch points when needed. Since the start of 2012, Sharapova is 54-4 with seven titles on clay. Shes also won 20 consecutive clay three-set ters, including four in a row this week. It says that shes very t. It says that shes very determined, said Sven Groenefeld, Sharapovas coach. And it says that she never gives up. Sharapova broke into a huge smile while hoist ing the trophy overhead, then shaking it with both hands and scanning a stadium that, improbably, has become hers. This was her third nal in a row in Paris: She won the 2012 title to complete a career Grand Slam, then lost last year to Serena Williams, who bowed out in the second round this time. Sharapova is 20-1 the last three years at Ro land Garros which is nothing compared to Rafael Nadals 65-1 career French Open mark heading into Sundays nal Sunday against Novak Djokovic, but cer tainly quite impressive. Youre not just born being a natural claycourt player. OK, maybe if youre Nadal. But cer tainly not me, Sharapo va said. I didnt grow up on it; didnt play on it. I just took it upon myself to make myself better on it. Plus, Sharapova had an operation on her right shoulder, the one she uses to swing her rack et, in October 2008. That joint troubled the Rus sian again in 2013, when she played one match from July to December. She now travels with a physiotherapist, Jerome Bianchi, and told him during the post-match ceremony, Thank you for keeping me healthy. This was the ninth Grand Slam nal for the No. 7-seeded Sharapova, and the rst for Halep, a 22-year-old Romanian seeded fourth. Supported by a dozen folks in her guest box wearing red T-shirts saying Al lez Simona, and fans that chanted her rst name, Halep acquitted herself well, showing off the scrambling baseline style that carried her to six straight-set wins until Saturday. I will not forget this match, said Halep, who wiped away tears afterward. FRENCH FROM PAGE B1 the grueling 1 -mile trip around the tracks sweeping turns. As soon as he came o ut of the gate, he wasnt the same, Espinoza said. Tonalist was a fresh and rested horse making his debut on the Triple Crown trail. He last ran and won the Peter Pan Stakes on the same Bel mont dirt on May 10. That irked Califor nia Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn, who had said after the Preakness that horses should be re quired to run in all three Triple Crown races. Its all or nothing, he said. This is not fair to these horses and to the people that believe in them. This is the cow ards way out. Tonalist beat Commis sioner, another newcomer to the Triple Crown, by a head. Those two horses nished in the same or der in the Peter Pan. To nalist ran the distance in 2:28.52 and paid $20.40, $9.60 and $7. Commissioner returned $23.20 and $13.20, while Medal Count was another length back in third and paid $13.20 to show. Sam raat was sixth, fol lowed by General a Rod, Matterhorn, Commanding Curve, Matuszak and Ride On Curlin. California Chrome broke quickly but was pressed immediately by Commissioner and General a Rod. Espinoza eased California Chrome back into third along the rail. Approaching the nal turn, California Chrome was maneuvered to the outside. He angled fourwide turning for home, just to the outside of Tonalist, who was close to the pace the entire race. Espinoza started whipping left-handed in the lane but Califor nia Chrome had no re sponse. I thought he was gain ing ground, but he didnt have it in him, apparent ly, Coburn said. Tonalist joined the growing list of Triple Crown spoilers, making California Chrome the 12th horse since Af rmed to lose his Triple try in the Belmont, the longest race in the series. Trained by Frenchman Christophe Clement and ridden by Joel Ro sario, Tonalist was making just his fth career start. BELMONT FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 GOLF

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents SUMMER TUNE UP & PLAY SPECIALCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen Wresh(reg. $180)$150orSeries of (4) 40-Minute Private Lessons (3) 40-Minute Private LessonsPLUS (1) 90-Minute Playing Lesson(reg. $250)$199 Prices good through June 30, 2014. 7th Annual Mike Conley Hospice HouseGolf TournamentSponsored by South Lake County Moose Lodge rfntb June 14th2014Green Valley Country ClubrnrfntbRegistration at 7:30am 8:30am Shotgun Start Entry Fee is $50.00nrnntn REGISTER EARLY Call Robert (352) 516-9232 trrrtf brnrftnrrnrttnnrn rntnnttRobert: (352) 516-9232 or Craig: (734) 552-3382 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available ACTIVE MILITARYAll rates subject to change without notice. $1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC$1700+taxIncludes Green Fee for 18 Holes and Cart. June Golf & Lunch SpecialIncludes Green Fee for 18 Holes, Cart, Hot Dog, and Draft Beer or Soda.Call About Twilight Rates GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAssociated PressPINEHURST, N.C. Even in the best of times, Phil Mickelson has ample reason to expect the worst at the U.S. Open. More than two de cades of play in the major known as the toughest test in golf has produced every thing fr om agony to ag gravation, mostly tor ment, never triumph. And all Mickelson has to show from the U.S. Open are silver medals a record six of them for finishing second. He could have won six, and he hasnt won one, Ernie Els said. I believe hes going to win one. Hes still young enough. His game is still good enough. The U.S. Open took on even greater impor tance to the 43-yearold Mickelson last summer when he won the British Open at Muirfield, leaving him one major away the U.S. Open, of course from joining five oth er greats who have the career Grand Slam. For all his heartache in golfs toughest test, his optimism hasnt wavered. Never mind that he has been linked to an insider trading investi gation involving activist investor Carl Icahn and Las Vegas gambler Billy Walters, in which FBI agents paid him a visit after his first round at the Memori al. Or that Mickelson hasnt won t his year, his worst start to a season since 2003. Mickelson not only believes hes going to win the U.S. Open, he thinks hes going to win more than one. Some people view it as though, Hes come close and hes nev er done it. I see it as though Ive finished second six times in this event, Mickelson said. I played some of my best golf in this event, and I should have an opportunity and more than one oppor tunity to close one out here in the future. The U.S. Open returning to Pinehurst No. 2 only adds to the intrigue. Thats where Mickelson picked up his first silver medal in 1999. He had a one-shot lead with three holes to play and had a 6-foot par putt on the 16th hole, while Payne Stewart was 25 feet away from par. Stewart made his putt, Mickelson missed and they were tied. Stewart took the lead with a short birdie on the 17th, then famously won the U.S. Open with a 15-foot par putt on the final hole. No worries. Mickelson surely would get another chance, and he did. He just doesnt have the trophy. Five years later, he was tied for the lead on the 17th hole at Shin necock Hills when he hit into a bunker, blasted out to 5 feet and three-putted for double bogey. It was like being in a morgue walking up the 18th, said Fred Funk, who was paired with him that day. The most crushing blow was at Winged Foot in 2006. Mickelson had a one-shot lead on the 18th hole. His tee shot clanged off a corporate tent. The bigger mistake was going for the green with a 3-iron and hit ting a tree. His third shot plugged in the bunker. His fourth shot raced across the green. He made double bogey and lost my one. There was Mickelson, crouched on the green, hands cupped over his head. I am such an idiot, he said. Phil handled the whole thing like a true gentleman, said Kenneth Ferrie, who played with him in the final pairing. He had nice words to say to me coming off 18 and was amazingly courteous and polite to the vol unteers and officials considering what had just happened. And yet he keeps coming back for more. Sam Snead, who holds the PGA Tour re cord with 82 career wins, never won a U.S. Open. Lee Trevino nev er won the Masters. Ar nold Palmer and Tom Watson never won the PGA Champion ship. Even so, none of those greats ever had as many chances to win the missing major as Mickelson. Hunter Mahan paid him the ultimate re spect at Bethpage Black in 2009. Mickelson was tied for the lead with four holes to play until missing short par putts on the 15th and 17th holes. Another U.S. Open bid over, Mickelson was walking up to the 18th green when Mahan who had just as good of a chance to win that day began applaud ing, and thousands joined him. Mahan has played with Mickelson twice on Sunday when Lefty was the runner-up. The other occasion was last year at Merion. Mickelson twice made bogey with a wedge in his hand on the back nine. His last hope was to chip in from 40 yards to force a playoff with Justin Rose. He missed. I looked at him and said, Good try, Phil. You can only do what you can do, Mahan said. At some point, youve got to get a bounce or two and make a putt. I think he wants to win that tournament more than anything. The thought of Mickelson at Pinehurst stirs emotions. Stewart died in a freak plane crash four months after he won that U.S. Open. Mickelson carried a pager in his golf bag that week and pledged to withdraw if his wife went into labor. His first child, Amanda, was born the next day. Fifteen years lat er, the pressure is only greater. Maybe it is his strength of mind, or his short game, that has enabled him to put himself in contention as so many times, Fer rie said. As each year has gone on and he has won other majors, the focus has become more and more about the U.S. Open. As a player, when you want something so much, its even mor e difficult to achieve. Yet he keeps giving himself a chance.The missing piece for Mickelson is the US OpenJULIE JACOBSON / APPhil Mickelson stands on the 18th green during a practice round for the 105th US Open Championship in 2005 at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club in Pinehurst, N.C. No one has ever had so many chance in one major without ever winning it. DOUG FERGUSONAssociated PressPINEHURST, N.C. How well do you know the U.S. Open? Try this trivia quiz:FRONT NINE (5 POINTS EACH)1. Where was the rst U.S. Open played? a.) Pinehurst No. 2 b.) Newport c.) Shinnecock Hills 2. Who has the most majors without ever having won the U.S. Open? a.) Phil Mickelson b.) Harry Vardon c.) Sam Snead 3. Which continent where golf is played has never produced a U.S. Open champion? a.) Asia b.) South America c) Africa 4. Who has been runner-up at the U.S. Open the most times? a.) Phil Mickelson b.) Greg Norman c.) Sam Snead 5. Who was the last U.S. Open champion who had to go through sectional qualifying? a.) Michael Campbell b.) Lucas Glover c.) Lee Janzen 6. Who was the last U.S. Open champion to successfully defend his title? a.) Ben Hogan b.) Tiger Woods c.) Curtis Strange 7. Who was the youngest U.S. Open champion? a.) Rory McIlroy b.) Johnny McDermott c.) Gene Sarazen 8. Name the last player to shoot 63 in a U.S. Open. a.) Johnny Miller b.) Thomas Bjorn c.) Vijay Singh 9. Who won the rst major championship held at Pinehurst No. 2? a.) Payne Stewart b.) Jack Nicklaus c.) Denny ShuteBACK NINE (10 POINTS EACH)10. Who is the only player to complete the career Grand Slam at the U.S. Open? a.) Tiger Woods b.) Gary Player c.) Bobby Jones 11. Retief Goosen, Jason Gore and Olin Browne were the top three players after 54 holes at Pinehurst No. 2 in 2005. What did they all have in common on Sunday? a.) They all wore khaki trousers and a white shirt. b.) They were spotted in the merchandise tent before the nal round. c.) None of them broke 80. 12. Who holds the U.S. Open record for most consecutive wins? a.) Ben Hogan b.) Curtis Strange c.) Willie Anderson 13. Name the last U.S. Open champion to win in his rst attempt. a.) Michael Campbell b.) Francis Ouimet c.) Jack Fleck 14. Name the only player to lose a playoff three times in the U.S. Open. a.) Phil Mickelson b.) Sam Snead c.) Arnold Palmer 15. Who was the last U.S. Open champion to never break par in any of the four rounds? a.) Geoff Ogilvy b.) Orville Moody c.) Corey Pavin 16. Who is the oldest player to win the U.S. Open? a.) Julius Boros b.) Raymond Floyd c.) Hale Irwin 17. What is the U.S. Open trophy called? a.) The Havemeyer Trophy b.) The Campbell Cup c.) The U.S. Open Trophy 18. Name the only player to break par in three consecutive U.S. Opens? a.) Curtis Strange b.) Jack Nicklaus c.) Lee Janzen19TH HOLE (25 POINTS)In the last 100 years, only one player has won the U.S. Open at the same course twice. Name him. a.) Bobby Jones b.) Jack Nicklaus c.) Payne StewartANSWERS1. b 2. c 3. a 4. a 5. b 6. c 7. b 8. c 9. c 10. b 11. c 12. c 13. b 14. c 15. a 16. c 17. c 18. a 19. bTest your U.S. Open trivia knowledge

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESBluegill are starting to bed in Haynes Creek, Dead River, Lake Beauclaire and the north end of Lake Harris on crickets and red worms. Bass are biting on the diving baits like June bug, June bug blue and Tennessee shad colored worms. Bream and bluegill are biting in Lake Harris and Lake Eustis. Top water frog bites, poppers, and spinner baits are also working with the cooler temperatures and overcast conditions. Come out and join the Wednesday night bass tournament from 5:30 to 9:00pm with a 3-fish limit. (Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held June 21. The w eigh in will be at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352-742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKCatfish are biting on shrimp. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of artificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESFishing has been very slow, possibly due to the higher temperatures and afternoon rains. A few shellcracker and bluegill are being caught in the river on grass shrimp, red worms and crickets. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEShellcracker are starting to turn on. The bass that are biting are hitting on both artificial baits such as worms and live shiners %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURGPhilip and Jeremy are catching bass on articial baits from a rowboat in Haynes creek near the Haynes Creek Bridge. Red worms and night crawlers are selling well. Boat rentals have been good too. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTOThe area afternoon storms creating runoff is responsible for the schooling bass. Fish early in the morning while the bass are feeding on bait being washed into the lake. Use shiners with a float or noisy top water baits like Rattlin Rogue or Devils Horse or lipless crank baits fished in the run off from the residential canals and mud lakes. Shellcracker and bluegill are starting to spawn with the full moon upcoming in the next week, fishing in the pads and grass in the residential canals should be very good. Angler fishing from the banks at night from the Eustis Lake Walk and Crows Bluff and the bridge at the seawall on the St. Johns River are doing well with small to medium shiners and night crawlers. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rffn tbfffn brbf tnnn nff tfnfnfn trfn n rn tbnnfnfn brbn tnff ffff tff tr rffrff n rnff tbnn brbnn tnnfn nf tn trn WORLD CUP SOCCER KURT VOIGTAssociated PressTab Ramos, then just 15, remembers walking off the field after what he thought would be his last practice with the under-20 United States soccer team. Ramos was only training with the older players because of his state coachs national-team ties, and he thought his weeklong visit was over. But the youngster had opened the eyes of the nation al team coaches. I basically just got lucky, said Ramos, now an assistant coach for the U.S. mens na tional team and the head coach of the un der-20 team. It was a complete surprise for me, because I didnt even think it was a try out. I thought I was just playing. Ramos fortunate discovery out of the New Jersey high school ranks in the early 1980s was a sign of a U.S. development system in desperate need of an overhaul. Ramos played in three World Cups, and the American team has qualified for sev en straight. But those teams were put together without a cen trally organized scout ing system to identify and train the best teen players. In 2006, tired of counting on good fortune to put the players with the most potential in front of national coaches, the U.S. Soccer Federation began to study its de velopment system in earnest. What it found was a little bit of a freefor-all, said Tony Lepore, the U.S. director of scouting. In addition for the need for bet ter scouting, the top players werent getting the best training techniques. Our elite players were playing way too many matches, and all of them were win-atall-costs and not about development first, Lepore said. After studying youth development programs across the world, the U.S. began to implement its revamped system in 2007 modeled heavily af ter soccer powers such as Spain and Germany. The overhaul was based on having a number of soccer academies across the country, all under the umbrella and watch of U.S. Soccer and tasked with developing and eventually feeding elite players to the na tional team. The effort started with 63 clubs, a num ber thats since grown to almost 100. More than 6,000 youth play ers, beginning at the under-13 level, now train with and play against other future national-team hope fuls 10 months out of the year doing so under uniform rules of play and training. And they all do so with a clear path to the national team right in front of them, thanks to a network of scouts focused on the progress of talent in the academy system. A huge part of the academies is thats where all the top play ers migrate to, if they are serious and mo tivated, Lepore said. If they want to reach their potential, they need to be with an academy club. Most of the current U.S. squad thats head ed to Brazil for this years World Cup pre dates the current academy system, but the national team is start ing to reap the r ewards of the revamped model. DeAndre Yedlin, 20, was named to the cur rent 23-man roster by coach Jurgen Klins mann two weeks ago, doing so after spending his amateur years as a member of the Seattle Sounders FC Academy team. The defender earned his fourth cap for the U.S. in a 2-1 win over Turkey last weekend, and hes likely on his way to becoming a national team stalwart af ter being named a Ma jor League All-Star last year. Another future na tional team hopeful and academy product is Columbus Crew midfielder Wil Trapp. The 21-year-old Trapp made the Crews acad emy team as a fresh man in high school, later going on to play collegiately for two seasons at Akron and for the under-20 U.S. national team. Trapp managed to play two years with his high school team in Gahanna, Ohio, unlike some players who live and train on site at different academies. He said the high school and academy environ ments were far differ ent, though he enjoyed both. You were in a com pletely different situation (at the academy), where theres national team scouts at every game, Trapp said. Its just a different level. In addition to his time with the senior national team, Ramos is also the coach of the under-20 U.S. squad. Ramos believes the academy system will be a key for U.S. team in the near future. When we came up at 17, 18, 19 years old 25-30 years ago, we were basically clueless about the game, Ramos said. We were just kids playing soc cer. Now we have at 17, 18, 19, now we have soccer players coming up, not kids playing soccer.New development system starting to pay off for US BOB MACK / AP Clint Dempsey, right, leads the group of midelders and forwards through warm-ups using resistance harnesses as practice began Wednesday in Jacksonville.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 38 25 .603 7-3 L-1 19-14 19-11 New York 31 29 .517 5 4-6 W-2 13-16 18-13 Baltimore 30 29 .508 6 1 4-6 L-2 11-13 19-16 Boston 27 33 .450 9 4 6-4 L-4 15-17 12-16 Tampa Bay 24 39 .381 14 9 1-9 L-1 13-17 11-22 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 32 25 .561 4-6 W-1 15-14 17-11 Chicago 31 31 .500 3 1 6-4 L-1 17-14 14-17 Cleveland 31 31 .500 3 1 7-3 W-1 21-11 10-20 Minnesota 29 31 .483 4 2 5-5 W-1 15-16 14-15 Kansas City 29 32 .475 5 3 5-5 L-1 14-16 15-16 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 38 23 .623 7-3 W-1 17-12 21-11 Los Angeles 32 28 .533 5 4-6 W-1 16-13 16-15 Seattle 32 29 .525 6 7-3 W-1 14-15 18-14 Texas 31 31 .500 7 1 5-5 L-1 15-16 16-15 Houston 27 36 .429 12 6 6-4 L-1 14-18 13-18 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 32 27 .542 4-6 W-1 18-14 14-13 Washington 31 28 .525 1 7-3 W-4 19-15 12-13 Miami 32 30 .516 1 5-5 L-2 22-11 10-19 New York 28 33 .459 5 3 5-5 L-4 13-17 15-16 Philadelphia 25 35 .417 7 6 2-8 L-1 12-19 13-16 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 37 26 .587 6-4 W-1 19-13 18-13 St. Louis 32 31 .508 5 3-7 W-1 16-14 16-17 Pittsburgh 29 32 .475 7 2 6-4 L-1 17-14 12-18 Cincinnati 28 32 .467 7 3 6-4 W-1 14-15 14-17 Chicago 25 34 .424 10 5 6-4 W-5 15-13 10-21 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 40 21 .656 8-2 W-3 20-9 20-12 Los Angeles 32 31 .508 9 3-7 L-1 13-19 19-12 Colorado 29 32 .475 11 2 2-8 W-1 17-11 12-21 San Diego 27 34 .443 13 4 4-6 L-1 15-18 12-16 Arizona 26 37 .413 15 6 5-5 L-1 9-23 17-14 FRIDAYS GAMESOakland 4, Baltimore 3, 11 innings Toronto 3, St. Louis 1 Detroit 6, Boston 2 Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 0 Texas 6, Cleveland 4 Houston 5, Minnesota 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 8, Chicago White Sox 4FRIDAYS GAMESChicago Cubs 5, Miami 3, 13 innings Pittsburgh 15, Milwaukee 5 Toronto 3, St. Louis 1 Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 0 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 2 Atlanta 5, Arizona 2 Washington 6, San Diego 0 San Francisco 4, N.Y. Mets 2SATURDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Minnesota 8, Houston 0 Cleveland 8, Texas 3 Seattle 7, Tampa Bay 4 Boston at Detroit, late N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, late Oakland at Baltimore, late Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, lateSATURDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Miami 2 Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 3 Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 5 N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, late Atlanta at Arizona, late Washington at San Diego, late CHRIS OMEARA / AP Whitney Goldstein, granddaughter of Tampa Bay Rays senior baseball advisor Don Zimmer throws out the ceremonial rst pitch to Dons son Tom Zimmer before Saturdays game between the Rays and the Seattle Mariners at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg. Don Zimmer passed away earlier this week at the age of 83. TODAYS GAMESSt. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at Toronto (Hutchison 4-3), 1:07 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 6-2) at Baltimore (U.Jimenez 2-6), 1:35 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-1) at Tampa Bay (Archer 3-3), 1:40 p.m. Houston (McHugh 4-3) at Minnesota (Deduno 2-3), 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-3) at Kansas City (Shields 6-3), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 3-4) at Texas (J.Saunders 0-1), 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-5) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 6-5), 3:35 p.m. Boston (Lackey 6-4) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 2-2), 8:07 p.m.TODAYS GAMESSt. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at Toronto (Hutchison 4-3), 1:07 p.m. Philadelphia (Buchanan 1-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 6-3), 1:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Morton 2-7), 1:35 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-1), 2:20 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 2-5) at San Francisco (Lincecum 4-4), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Harang 4-4) at Arizona (C.Anderson 4-0), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 4-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-4), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 4-2) at San Diego (Stults 2-6), 4:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Cano, Seattle, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .332; Rios, Texas, .321; AlRamirez, Chicago, .321; Bautista, Toronto, .318; Altuve, Houston, .316; MiCabrera, De troit, .314. RUNS: Donaldson, Oakland, 51; Dozier, Minnesota, 49; Bautista, Toronto, 48; NCruz, Baltimore, 42; Kinsler, De troit, 42; MeCabrera, Toronto, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 41. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 55; MiCabrera, Detroit, 50; Donaldson, Oakland, 50; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Moss, Oakland, 49; JAbreu, Chicago, 47; Bautista, Toronto, 44. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 83; MeCabrera, Toronto, 79; Markakis, Baltimore, 77; AlRamirez, Chicago, 76; Rios, Texas, 76; Cano, Seattle, 74; AJones, Baltimore, 74. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; Hosmer, Kansas City, 20; Kinsler, Detroit, 19; Pedroia, Boston, 19; Altuve, Houston, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; EEscobar, Minne sota, 18. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 21; Encarnacion, Toronto, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 17; Donaldson, Oakland, 17; Bautista, Toronto, 15; Moss, Oakland, 15; Pujols, Los Angeles, 15. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 21; Ellsbury, New York, 18; RDavis, Detroit, 16; AEscobar, Kansas City, 16; Andrus, Texas, 14; Gardner, New York, 14; Dozier, Minnesota, 13; LMartin, Texas, 13. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 10-1; Tanaka, New York, 9-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 8-3; Keuchel, Houston, 7-3; Weaver, Los Angeles, 7-4; 13 tied at 6. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.10; Darvish, Texas, 2.36; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.40; Gray, Oak land, 2.45; Keuchel, Houston, 2.50; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.57. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 101; Kluber, Cleveland, 99; Lester, Boston, 95; Tanaka, New York, 92; FHernandez, Seattle, 91; Darvish, Texas, 91. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 17; Perkins, Minnesota, 16; Rodney, Seattle, 16; DavRobertson, New York, 14; Soria, Texas, 13; Nathan, Detroit, 13; TomHunter, Balti more, 11; Uehara, Boston, 11; Janssen, Toronto, 11.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .359; Puig, Los Angeles, .336; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .324; Utley, Philadelphia, .320; Pagan, San Francisco, .316; CGomez, Milwaukee, .311. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 49; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 46; Pence, San Francisco, 44; Stanton, Miami, 44; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 41; CGomez, Milwaukee, 41; Rendon, Washington, 40. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 53; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 44; Howard, Philadelphia, 41; Morse, San Francisco, 41; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 41; Puig, Los Angeles, 40. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 75; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 74; DanMurphy, New York, 74; Puig, Los Angeles, 72; DWright, New York, 72; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; Utley, Philadelphia, 71. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 23; Utley, Philadelphia, 23; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 21; Byrd, Philadelphia, 18; Are nado, Colorado, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17; Phillips, Cincinnati, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 17. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 17; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16; Morse, San Francisco, 13; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 13; JUpton, Atlanta, 13. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 36; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 22; EYoung, New York, 17; Revere, Philadel phia, 16; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 13; Blackmon, Colorado, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 12; Segura, Milwaukee, 12. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-2; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-3; Ryu, Los Angeles, 7-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 7-2; Simon, Cincinnati, 7-3; 9 tied at 6. ERA: Hudson, San Francisco, 1.75; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.97; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.31; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.50. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 101; Cueto, Cincinnati, 97; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 90; Wainwright, St. Louis, 89; Kennedy, San Diego, 88. SAVES: Romo, San Francisco, 19; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 18; Street, San Diego, 18; Jansen, Los Angeles, 17; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 16; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 16; AReed, Arizona, 15. Cardinals 5, Blue Jays 0 St. Louis T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Re yes ss 4 0 1 0 Grichk lf 4 1 1 2 MeCar r lf 4 0 2 0 Hollidy dh 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 Craig 1b 5 1 1 0 Encrnc dh 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 3 1 1 0 Lind 1b 2 0 0 0 Tavers rf 3 1 1 0 La wrie 2b 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 1 JF rncs 3b 3 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 0 2 0 DNa vrr c 3 0 0 0 T.Cruz c 2 0 1 2 Gose cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 5 T otals 30 0 3 0 St. Louis 000 010 040 5 Toronto 000 000 000 0 EReyes (6). DPToronto 2. LOBSt. Louis 11, Toronto 4. 2BCraig (11), Jh.Peralta (15), Me.Cabrera (15). HRGrichuk (1). ST.Cruz. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis S.Miller W,7-5 9 3 0 0 1 5 Toronto Buehrle L,10-2 7 5 1 1 5 6 Loup 2/3 3 4 4 2 1 Delabar 1/3 0 0 0 2 0 Redmond 1 0 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Seth Buckminster. T:37. A,981 (49,282).Twins 8, Astros 0 Houston Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 2 0 2 0 DSantn dh 5 0 4 5 Grssmn lf 1 0 0 0 Dozier 2b 3 1 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 0 0 Springr rf 4 0 1 0 Nunez rf 1 0 1 0 JCastro c 4 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 4 1 1 1 MDmn 3b 4 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 0 0 Singltn 1b 4 0 1 0 Parmel rf-1b 4 0 0 1 Presley lf-cf 2 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 2 3 1 0 Carter ph 1 0 0 0 EEscor ss 2 1 0 0 Guzmn dh 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 0 0 MGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 T otals 32 8 7 7 Houston 000 000 000 0 Minnesota 030 400 10x 8 EMa.Gonzalez (2), M.Dominguez (6). LOBHouston 8, Minnesota 10. 2BAltuve (19), D.Santana (5). SBD.Santana (4). SA.Hicks. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Feldman L,3-4 1 2/3 1 3 0 2 2 Clemens 2 2 4 4 5 1 Williams 3 3 1 1 1 3 Sipp 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 2 Minnesota Gibson W,5-5 7 3 0 0 3 5 Burton 1 2 0 0 0 1 Thielbar 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Feldman (Willingham). UmpiresHome, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Will Little. T:24. A,732 (39,021).Indians 8, Rangers 3 Cleveland T exas ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 Choice dh 4 0 0 0 ACarer ss 5 0 0 0 Andr us ss 3 1 1 1 Brantly lf 5 1 1 0 Choo lf 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 3 1 1 0 ABeltre 3b 4 1 2 1 Chsnhll 3b 5 1 2 1 Rios rf 4 0 3 0 DvMrp rf 4 1 3 1 Mor lnd 1b 4 0 0 0 Giambi dh 3 0 1 0 Chirins c 4 0 0 0 Raburn ph-dh 1 1 0 1 LMar tn cf 3 1 1 0 CSantn 1b 2 2 2 2 Sardins 2b 3 0 1 0 YGoms c 4 1 1 3 Totals 37 8 12 8 T otals 33 3 8 2 Cleveland 000 103 400 8 Texas 001 002 000 3 EL.Martin (4). DPCleveland 1. LOBCleveland 7, Texas 4. 2BBrantley (14), Dav.Murphy (12), A.Beltre (11). HRC.Santana (7), Y.Gomes (7). SBBourn (6). SFDav.Murphy, Andrus. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin W,4-2 8 7 3 3 0 5 Axford 1 1 0 0 0 0 Texas Tepesch L,2-2 5 1/3 8 4 4 4 1 Ross Jr. 1 3 3 3 0 0 Scheppers 1 2/3 1 1 1 0 1 S.Baker 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tomlin pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. WPTomlin. UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:53. A,633 (48,114).Cubs 5, Marlins 2 Miami Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 1 2 1 Bonifac cf 4 1 1 2 Solano 2b 4 0 0 0 Lak e lf 4 2 2 2 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 2 0 Stanton rf 4 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 McGeh 3b 3 0 1 1 Ruggin rf 4 0 1 0 GJones 1b 3 0 1 0 Olt 3b 3 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Valuen ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Lucas 2b 1 0 0 0 Bar ney 2b 4 0 2 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Whitsd c 3 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 2 1 1 0 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 0 0 0 Wolf p 2 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 JeBakr 1b 1 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 5 2 T otals 33 5 11 4 Miami 001 001 000 2 Chicago 002 011 10x 5 LOBMiami 4, Chicago 5. 2BStanton (15), Rizzo (7), S.Castro 2 (16), Barney (4). HRYelich (6), Bonifacio (1), Lake 2 (8). CSRizzo (3). IP H R ER BB SO Miami Wolf L,1-2 5 2/3 9 4 4 1 2 Hatcher 1 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 Morris 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Samardzija W,2-5 7 5 2 2 1 8 W.Wright H,5 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Grimm H,5 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Strop S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPWolf, Samardzija. UmpiresHome, Tony Randazzo; First, Marcus Pattillo; Second, David Rackley; Third, Brian Gorman. T:49. A,786 (41,072).Reds 6, Phillies 5 Philadelphia Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 5 1 1 2 BHmltn cf 2 1 0 1 Ruiz c 3 1 1 1 Schmkr lf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0 Phillips 2b 2 1 0 0 Howard 1b 4 1 2 0 Br uce rf 2 1 1 3 Byrd rf 4 1 1 2 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 3 0 F razier 1b-3b 4 2 3 1 CHrndz 3b 4 1 2 0 Cozar t ss 4 1 1 1 Revere cf 3 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 3 0 1 0 RHrndz p 1 0 0 0 A Chpm p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0 Simon p 0 0 0 0 EMartn p 0 0 0 0 Ber ndn ph 1 0 0 0 Brignc ph 1 0 0 0 Hoo ver p 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 MP arr p 0 0 0 0 RCeden ph 1 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 B.P ena 1b 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 11 5 T otals 25 6 6 6 Philadelphia 020 001 200 5 Cincinnati 110 220 00x 6 DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 5, Cincinnati 5. 2BUtley (24), D.Brown (8), Cozart (9). HRRollins (8), Ruiz (2), Byrd (9), Bruce (4), Frazier (13). SBB. Hamilton (23), Bruce (7), Frazier (5). SRevere, Si mon 2. SFB.Hamilton, Bruce. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia R.Hernandez L,2-4 4 4 4 4 3 2 E.Martin 2 1 2 2 2 3 De Fratus 2 1 0 0 0 2 Cincinnati Simon W,8-3 6 7 3 3 0 3 Hoover H,1 2/3 2 2 2 1 1 M.Parra H,8 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Broxton H,8 1 1 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman S,8-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby R.Hernandez (Phillips). UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Sean Barber. T:56. A,347 (42,319).Mariners 7, Rays 4 Seattle T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi EnChvz lf 4 0 2 1 DJnngs cf 4 1 1 0 J.Jones cf 5 0 1 0 SRdrgz lf 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 2 Seager 3b 4 1 0 0 Zobrist dh 4 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 1 1 0 Lone y 1b 4 1 1 1 Ackley dh 4 2 2 3 YEscor ss 2 1 1 0 Gillespi rf 4 1 1 1 F orsyth 2b 3 0 1 0 BMiller ss 4 1 1 0 Jo yce ph 1 0 0 0 Blmqst 1b 4 0 2 2 Solis c 2 0 0 1 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 Kier mr rf 3 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11 7 T otals 31 4 5 4 Seattle 010 240 000 7 Tampa Bay 020 000 020 4 LOBSeattle 6, Tampa Bay 3. 2BEn.Chavez (3), Ackley (9), Bloomquist (3), De.Jennings (14), Y.Escobar (9). HRGillespie (1), Longoria (7), Loney (3). SSolis. SFEn.Chavez. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Elias W,5-4 7 2/3 5 4 4 2 5 Farquhar H,4 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Rodney S,17-19 1 0 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay Cobb L,1-4 4 1/3 10 7 7 1 2 C.Ramos 2 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Yates 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 2 Oviedo 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Cobb (Cano). WPElias. UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Clint Fagan; Third, Tim Timmons. T:46. A,996 (31,042).Brewers 9, Pirates 3 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Segura ss 5 2 1 1 JHr rsn rf 5 0 1 0 Braun rf 5 0 1 2 NW alkr 2b 5 1 2 0 Lucroy c 4 1 2 1 AMcCt cf 3 1 1 0 CGomz cf 5 1 1 0 I.Da vis 1b 3 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 1 1 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Falu 3b 0 0 0 1 RMar tn c 2 0 0 0 KDavis lf 4 2 2 1 P Alvrz 3b 3 1 2 2 Gennett 2b 3 1 0 0 T abata lf 3 0 1 0 Overay 1b 2 0 1 2 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 MrRynl ph-1b 1 0 0 0 V olquez p 2 0 0 0 Garza p 2 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 1 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 1 0 1 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 1 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 9 9 9 T otals 32 3 8 2 Milwaukee 100 300 041 9 Pittsburgh 002 001 000 3 EAr.Ramirez (4), J.Gomez (1), P.Alvarez (13), I.Davis 2 (5), Mercer (5). DPMilwaukee 3. LOBMilwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 8. 2BBraun (12), K.Davis (17), J.Har rison (8), P.Alvarez (5). SBR.Weeks (1). SGarza. SFLucroy, Falu. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Garza W,4-4 6 6 3 3 5 1 Wooten H,4 1 1 0 0 0 1 W.Smith 1 0 0 0 1 1 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1 Pittsburgh Volquez L,3-5 6 4 4 3 2 4 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 2 Ju.Wilson 2/3 1 4 4 2 1 J.Gomez 1 1/3 3 1 0 0 1 HBPby Volquez (Ar.Ramirez), by Ju.Wilson (Mar.Reyn olds). WPVolquez. UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt; First, Ed Hickox; Sec ond, Lance Barrett; Third, John Tumpane. T:23. A,525 (38,362).Rockies 5, Dodgers 4 10 innings Los Angeles Colorado ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 2 0 0 0 Blckmn rf-cf 5 0 1 1 Figgins 2b 3 0 1 0 Stubbs cf 4 1 2 0 HRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Otta vin p 0 0 0 0 Puig rf 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 3b 1 0 1 0 VnSlyk rf 1 0 1 0 Dickr sn lf 5 0 1 1 AdGnzl 1b 5 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 5 1 2 0 Kemp lf 4 1 2 0 Mor nea 1b 5 1 2 0 Ethier cf 5 1 2 0 McKnr c 5 1 2 1 JuTrnr 3b 5 1 2 1 R Whelr 3b 2 0 1 0 Fdrwcz c 5 1 1 3 Masset p 0 0 0 0 Greink p 3 0 1 0 Brothr s p 0 0 0 0 League p 0 0 0 0 Bar nes rf 2 0 2 1 Romak ph 1 0 0 0 Rutledg 2b 4 1 2 1 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Chacin p 2 0 0 0 C.Perez p 0 0 0 0 Culer sn 3b 2 0 0 0 Morals p 0 0 0 0 Totals 38 4 10 4 T otals 42 5 16 5 Los Angeles 000 000 400 0 4 Colorado 010 020 100 1 5 Two outs when winning run scored. EJu.Turner (5). DPLos Angeles 2, Colorado 1. LOB Los Angeles 10, Colorado 9. 2BGreinke (4). 3B Kemp (1), Barnes (2). HRFederowicz (1). SBFiggins (3), H.Ramirez (8). CSLeMahieu (4). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Greinke 7 11 4 3 1 6 League 1 2 0 0 0 0 Howell 1 1 0 0 0 0 C.Perez L,0-3 2/3 2 1 1 0 1 Colorado Chacin 6 6 3 3 3 4 Masset BS,2-2 2/3 1 1 1 2 0 Brothers 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Ottavino 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 1 Morales W,4-4 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Chacin pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. WPGreinke. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:35. A,474 (50,480). This Date In Baseball June 8 1914 New Yorks Iron Joe McGinnity posted his 14th straight win beating Pittsburgh 2-0. With the win moved the Giants into rst place over Chicago. 1927 New Yorks Tony Lazzeri hit three homers in the Yankees 12-11 11-inning win over the Chi cago White Sox. Lazzeris rst two homers come off Red Faber and his third was a two-run line drive off George Connally to tie game in the ninth inning. The Yanks were behind 11-6 going into the last inning. New York would win it in the 11th after Cedric Durst tripled Lazzeri was intentionally walked and Ray Morehart singled. 1933 Philadelphias Jimmie Foxx homered in his rst three at bats all off Lefty Gomez as the As beat the New York Yankees 14-10. Foxx had homered his last time up the previous day to tie a major league record of hitting four consecutive home runs. Bobby Lowe did it in 1894. 1940 Harry Craft of Cincinnati connected for a home run, a triple, a double and two singles in seven at-bats to lead a 27-hit attack as the Reds pounded the Dodgers 23-2 at Brooklyn. 1950 The Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Browns 29-4 at Fenway Park and set major league records for runs scored; most long hits, 17 (nine doubles, one triple and seven homers); most total bases, 60; most extra bases on long hits, 32; most runs over two games, 49; most hits in two games, 51, including 28 this game. Bobby Doerr had three homers and 8 RBIs, Walt Dropo hit two homers and drove in seven runs and Ted Williams added two homers and ve RBIs.

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Free speech is not freeThe May 16 column by Cal Thomas, Free speech not so free when discussing gay rights, in the Daily Commercial really hits it. Free speech is up against a strong adversary the folks who will not allow anyone to say something they dont want to hear. To them, good words are bad, and bad, lthy words, and sin-lled living is all OK. So no, only the sinful side of life is OK and Christians and good folks are to be kept quiet. Is that the way it has become? What should one expect these days when anything goes except for free speech thats clean and helpful? May the good Lord help us! ELMER A. WOLFORD | Mount DoraHonoring womens voices in politicsFive years before President Franklin Roosevelts death, on May 24, 1940, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor, welcomed women from the Womens Division of the Democratic National Committee. The women were visiting Washington, D.C. to participate in the Democratic National Convention. Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin planned on touring with 100 guests from this group at the White House. The president also planned on meeting them in the executive ofce to chat. The Roosevelts were delighted when more than 4,000 of these women signed up to chat with the president. The Roosevelts had to arrange to meet with the women in another location in order to accommodate the large numbers. Because of the political engagement the women exhibited, Eleanor Roosevelt successfully advocated for May 24 to be established as Democratic Womens Day. This year, the Florida Democratic Womens Club declared the entire month of May as Democratic Womens Month. We honor President and Eleanor Roosevelt for recognizing the importance of womens voices in politics. NANCY HURLBURT | LeesburgThe false mythology of Ronald ReaganIf Ronald Reagan were alive today, he would be over 100 years old. Conservatives would praise and applaud his every sentence no matter what he said. Today, many Republicans claim that the Gipper was a conservative, but as often happens they fail to list his other deeds. For example, conservatives want to cut taxes because, they say, it will unleash the free enter prise muscle power of American business. Conservatives rarely mention some other facts about Reagan, such as his approval of raising taxes eleven times while he was president. Sen. Alan Simpson said, Reagan was never afraid to raise taxes. Doug Brinkley who edited Reagans memoirs, said those who say Reagan was anti-tax are blinded by his false mythology. They are spinning cloth out of thin air. In reality, Reagan tripled the national debt. After Reagans 1981 tax cuts, unemployment soared. He added the Department of Veterans Affairs, which cost over $90 billion and added 300,000 new government employees. Reagan signed a bill to legalize abortions. His military buildup also built up the debt. Reagan funneled weapons to Iran in exchange for American hostages in a major scandal. Reagan funded the anti-Soviet Islamist Mujahadin with billions of taxpayer dollars. In return, the Taliban and Osama bin Laden attacked American forces and brought about the George W. Bush 10-year war in the Middle East. Bush said, Mission Accomplished! Unfortunately, many conser vatives want to replicate those Reagan days. Maybe those Republicans do not know what Reagan did to this nation. ROBERT WESOLOWSKI | The VillagesThe shame of the VA scandalRonald Reagan was totally cor rect when he said Government is not the solution, it is the problem. The latest example, which is even causing some Democratic politicians to wince although their wincing has more to do with re-election concerns is the absolute shame of the VA debacle. Even all of the left-leaning media, newspapers and TV networks are nding it hard to protect the Obama crowd from this scandal. There are nearly nine million unionized government employ ees on the VA payroll. It appears that only our good Lord can re any of them not even an act of Congress. I personally had a son-in-law die while in VA care and have seen data entry operators destroy their assigned work in trash cans. I know a VA pharmacist who went to work only on overtime days. None of these transgressions come close to what the public is now learning. Being a simple, conservative-thinking person, I ask, why do we need government-owned and government-staffed VA centers? Why do we need nine million more government employ ees? Who in their right minds can conclude that government can function as well as, or better than, proven, privately run medical centers, where incompetence, laziness and fraud are promptly dealt with? Why cant each retired vet receive a Blue Cross/Blue Shield card for admittance to any private medical facility, to replace the taxpayer expense of 9 million government employees, with billions of dollars left over? Why are the welfare recipients in our country eligible but not our deserving veterans? Further, selling the VA centers to private medical centers should be an easy and protable task. Knowing all of the government ineptitude, our politicians still went ahead with Obamacare. Was that all stupidity, or just lust for power? CLINTON GEORGE FISH | Tavares Voiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clar ity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@ dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEKIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANSC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORWhat a difference an election year make s. Last year, Gov. Rick Scott vetoed $368 million from the state budget. His vetoes included a number of projects intended to improve water quality. In explaining the veto, Scott wrote that many water projects didnt provide a signicant return for the investment. Since that time, Scott has either found religion on the water issue or simply decided the vetoes werent worth the blowback in an election year. On Monday, Scott vetoed nearly $69 million from the $77 billion state budget for the upcoming scal year. It was Scotts lowest veto total since taking ofce and spared local water projects, including $300,000 to fund a study of alternative water supplies for south Lake County. Scott didnt hold a public signing of the budget but issued a press release that touted the environmental funding it contained. The budget will ensure we are good environmental stewards so future generations can continue to enjoy our natural resources, he wrote. The reality is that at a time when the state has a $1.2 billion surplus, the budget hardly makes up for years of cuts to environmental programs. While the budget included more than $250 million for Ever glades restoration, the $30 million slated for springs protection will barely make a dent in the damage caused by decades of excessive pollution and pumping. Ofcials from the states ve water management districts had estimated it would take at least $120 million to start reversing that damage. Nearly $380 million would have been dedicated to the effort from an existing real-estate tax if a springs bill had passed. Scott himself had asked for $55 million for springs in his proposed budget. But he failed to do anything to make that happen or get the springs bill passed. The budget also falls short in the area of land conservation. It guarantees $17.5 mil lion in funding toward the Florida Forev er initiative, spending another $40 million only if it can be generated through the sale of non-conservation state property. The budget provides further reason for supporting Amendment 1 in November. The measure would create a dedicated funding source for land conservation, projected to be worth more than $10 billion over two decades. As for the governor, hes at least progressed beyond the rhetoric that water-quality projects dont provide a return on the investment. Yet while his lighter veto touch bodes well for the Florida environment, it would be better if the governor actually showed some leadership in pushing lawmakers to dedicate more than the minimum toward protecting our springs. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST FILE PHOTO Governors budget light on environmental protection

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 OTHERVOICESVoices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. CHEERS OTHERVOICES A guest who checked into an inn one night was warned to be quiet be cause the guest in the room next to him was a very light sleeper. As he undressed for bed he accidentally dropped one shoe, which, sure enough, awakened the other guest. He man aged to get the oth er shoe off in silence, and got into bed. An hour later, he heard a pounding on the wall and a shout, When are you going to drop the other shoe? This humorous description from The Ur ban Dictionary dening waiting for the other shoe to drop seems per fectly applicable as we wait for the second shoe of Obamacare to drop involving the employer mandate coverage. When Obamacare was rolled out last October we saw cancellation letters go out to 6 million policy holders from their insurance companies because their policies did not meet the Obamacare philosophy of one mandated size ts all. We also learned that millions of Americans were not going to keep their doctors, their plans or save $2,400 (for a family of four). The reality crushed the lies that got Obamacare passed and the president reelected. Panic then set in among the Democrats running for reelection, especially in the red states. It was obvious that the rst Obamacare shoe that dropped was a disaster, both in promises and operationally. But, that rst Obamacare shoe that hit the oor also affected many seniors who are covered by Medicare. First, we need to remember that Obamacare cut $700 billion out of Medicare (over 10 years) to help pay for Obamacare. Who do you think is going to make up that $700 billion cut? Based upon my personal experience it is us. It appears that I will likely spend $750 to $1,000 more for my Medicare Part B coverage in 2014 over my 2013 costs. Thank you President Obama. If the additional outof-pocket expenses I am paying would strengthen Medicare and keep it scally viable for future gener ations, I would gladly pay this new expense. But to know that my out of pocket expenditures is going to make up for the $700 Medicare cuts to help fund Obamacare is depressing, as it does nothing to keep Medicare solvent for the future. I, along with millions of other seniors, are part of this rst Obamacare shoe hitting the oor. The second shoe to fall will cause even more canceled policies among many of the employer-provided plans. This segment of Obamacare was deliberately delayed by presidential at in hopes of protecting Democrats in the upcoming November elections. Recent estimates of the number of policies that could be canceled once the employ er component kicks in could be 20 million or more. According to one executive from Blue Cross/Blue Shield, some 3.2 million of their policies could be canceled. When this shoe hits the oor, it will be heard throughout America. If these cancellations were not bad enough, the rise of insurance costs will likely continue, which is opposite of what we were told. Remember, President Obama told us that Obamacare would lower insurance costs. We will also nd that more Americans will wind up on Medicaid, which is a segment of our population that many phy sicians no longer will serve as the reimbursements are insufcient to offset physicians expenses. When the second Obamacare shoe does fall, millions more policies will be canceled, costs will continue to rise, seeing a doctor will likely take longer and your selection of doctors will be more limited. Obamacare passed without a single Republican vote in the House or Senate. So when that second shoe drops, remind the Democrats who rammed this through Congress with the phrase, If the shoe ts, wear it.Waiting for the other Obamacare shoe to drop RUSS SLOANGUEST COLUMNIST On May 18 the Daily Commercial printed a Letter of the Week from Sandra Platt, A case for legalizing pot. Through print and television, it is difcult not to be inundated with pro-legalization statements but it is important to remind people of the other impacts of marijuana with a factual response. alcohol encourages risky driving whereas THC encourages greater caution ... Fatal vehicle crashes nationwide involving mar ijuana have already tripled in the past decade, as reported by Columbia University. Deaths from drugged driving accounted for more than 28 per cent in 2010, with one in nine drivers testing positive for marijuana. With no accepted non-blood test to determine THC intoxication, there is no deterrent to drugged driving, yet the potency of marijuana has increased 151 percent from 1983 to 2007. California (after establishing their medical marijuana program) saw nearly a 100 percent increase in fatal crashes where the at-fault driver tested positive for marijuana. Revenue from taxation of marijuana sales could reach up to $8.7 billion per year ... While federal and state government collected an estimated $14.5 billion in tax revenue, alcohol-related costs totaled over $185 billion. Tobacco use costs over $200 billion but only $25 billion is collected to offset those costs. That means the costs of legal alcohol are more than 12 times the total tax revenue and the costs of legal tobacco are about eight times the revenue collected. This is an economically disastrous tradeoff. The Lancet Neurology has stated that marijuanas active components inhibit pain ... Putting the word medical in front of marijuana does not make it a harmless substance. In fact, most medical associations have rejected smoked marijuana as medicine: American Medical Association, National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and The American Society of Addiction Medicine. Medical marijuana will not be sold in regulated pharmacies like other pharmaceuticals, but instead will be sold from pot shops. The active ingredients that have been found to be medicinally benecial have been and continue to be studied and used, just not recommended in smoking form. Kids would have less access to pot if it was regulated ... Thirty-four percent of marijuana-using 12th graders living in states with medical marijuana laws say they obtain the drug through someone elses medical-marijuana prescription. The impact on our youth cannot be ignored. Marijuana, not alcohol, is the number one reason why adolescents are admitted for substance abuse treatment in the U.S. In Florida, marijuana is the primary substance of abuse for 26.7 percent of adolescents, with 54.5 percent between the ages of 12 and 17. According to the FYSAS 2012 sur vey, 22.1 percent of Lake County high school students had used marijuana within the past 30 days. Through the work of or ganizations like the Safe Climate Coalition of Lake County and other organizations dedicated to the health and well-being of youth, youth marijuana use has fallen by 25 percent; LSD by 60 per cent and methamphetamine by 64 percent. Yet surveyed high school seniors who dont currently use marijuana said they would try it if it became legal. Scary thought, considering one in six adolescents who try marijuana will become addicted. As November approaches keep in mind that the negative impacts of mar ijuana on the community are real and for the sake of our children be the Wall.Debi MacIntyre, M.Ed., Ed.S. is the executive director, of the Safe Climate Coalition of Lake County, Inc., www.safeclimatecoalition.org.Pot is not medicinal, and it is not harmlessMerritt merits another mentionWe know, we know. We bragged about South Sumter High School grad Kirsti Merritt last week after she blasted a walkoff three-run homer to propel the University of Florida softball team into the NCAA Womens College World Series in Oklahoma City. And we gushed when she went two for three with a home run, two runs scored and an RBI in the Gators rstround win in the WCWS. But just when we thought Merritt couldnt top herself, she belted a three-run shot in the deciding game of against Alabama to put the Gators in rm control of the game on their way to a 6-3 win. Then, with Florida up 6-2 in the seventh inning, Merritt made a ridiculous diving catch to help seal the victory. We again salute this rising star and reserve space in this column to brag about her future exploits because, yes, shes only a sophomore.A quick lesson in Theo-logyYou might have missed the story about a young jazz musician who is gaining national and international acclaim for his artistry, but you wont be able to overlook Theo Croker for long. The 29-year-old Leesburg natives newest album, AfroPhysicist, has been applauded by the New York Times and music critics nationwide. His third album displays his breadth, with plush funk and rock idioms, some subtle and complex new-jazz ones, a ballad standard Moodys Mood for Love and high-wire soloing, the New York Times wrote. Croker, by this time, is an international traveler who has performed across the globe and lived ve years in China. But he continues to have a soft spot in his heart for Leesburg. It was quiet and safe, he told Daily Commercial reporter Livi Stanford. Theres a measure of irony in Crokers fondness for the quiet and safety of Leesburg, given that his approach to his music is inuenced by his grandfather, legendary jazz artist Doc Cheatham, who inspired him to take risks. He always emphasized a musician should learn to be themselves and nd their own voice, Croker said. I went my own way. Even if it was not accepted, I would stick with it anyway. It has served him well, and we applaud Croker for following his voice and his dream. THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Cruisin www.dailycommercial.com SUSAN CARPENTERMCTThere was a time when the Cadillac Escalade was syn onymous with hip-hop bling. Unfortunate ly for General Motors, that time was the ear ly 2000s, when the Es calade enjoyed an un usual demographic overlap as the extrav agant SUV of choice for Versace-loving rap stars and Prada-wear ing moms, the two of whom had exactly one thing in common: money. Sixteen years since it rst came on the mar ket, Cadillac hopes to regain some of the Escalades bimodal status in a luxury SUV that is more pampering and fuel efcient while remaining one of the big gest cars on the road. With comfortable seating for seven and room to spare, the 2015 Esca lade is as large and unmistakable as ever. While Cadillac has toned down the blinding chrome shine of its exterior accents in favor of a more understated satin, and has jeweled its lights with full LEDs front and rear, it remains boxy and tall with a blunt-face grille that could do double duty as a battering ram. In fact, the $72,690plus 2015 Escalade is even bigger than it was before. The $76,690 luxury version I tested rolls on gargantuan 22inch wheels that allow its inhabitants to sit in an even more lordly position. And the long wheelbase version has grown an astounding 1 1/2 feet. If its proportions are truck like, driving it is, fortunately, less so. Theres a soothing Calgon quality to the interior of the Escalade that extends beyond the luxury de rigueur leather and wood trim. Its cabin is spa quiet. Available in both twoand four-wheel drive, the handling has also been enhanced with some of the same standard features Cadillac now has on its CTS sedan. That includes selectable sport and touring modes and a magnetic ride control suspension that keeps this otherwise hulking SUV hunkered in highspeed turns without throwing its inhabitants into the door panels. It also incorporates some of the same safety features as Cadillacs smaller offerings, namely an advanced radar and warning system that vibrated my seat whenever the beast ventured outside my lane without signaling, and automatically braked and tensioned my seat belt if I got too close to plowing into a cars rear bumper. As much as the Escalades proportions suggest a throwback mentality to a gluttonous pre-recession era, its powertrain tells a different story. For 2015, the Escalade motors with a new 420-horsepower, direct-injection 6.2-liter engine that performs the Herculean task of propelling its 5,594 pounds from a dead stop to 60 mph in less than six seconds. Just as incredibly, it achieves as much as 21 mpg highway due to a cylinder deactivation system that imperceptibly transforms the V-8 into a V-4 at cruising speeds. During my day with the car, it switched between V-8 and V-4 dozens of times, yet the only indication it had done so was a light that displayed on the dash. The 21-mpg (highway) hybrid option has been discontinued for 2015 due to poor sales in every state except California, of course and the updated models ability to achieve similar fuel economy with a gas engine. The choice of long and short wheelbase versions, however, remains. Both models have enough seats to accommodate an entire AYSO team; the long wheelbase version just offers more space behind the third row for bags of brand-name gear and a lower thirdrow oor that wont force gangly tween knees into armpits. Whats new for 2015 is the seats no longer need to be manhandled into submission. The third row now collapses at at the touch of a button, as do the captains chairs in the second row, which can be moved forward to allow better access for third-seat passengers or can gymnastically tumble forward against the front seats to open a space so cavernous it could almost car ry a couch. In acknowledgment that an SUV at this price point is likely to transport passengers that also come with a passel of gadgets, the Escalades CUE infotainment system can support 10 Bluetooth-enabled devices. It also has ve USB and ve power ports to plug in iPads, laptops and other, as-yet-unknown, Apple products. Its likely the 16-speaker Bose system will be more appreciated by rap stars than soccer moms, but as a whole, the 2015 Escalade has an alluring, self-indulgent appeal, just like the high-ying, good old days of the Cadillac agship.GM looks for the Cadillac Escalade to return to glory days 2015 CADILLAC ESCALADE %  enBase price: $72,690 %  enPrice as tested (Luxury version, 2WD): $76,690 %  enPowertrain: Direct-injected, 6.2-liter V-8 with variable valve timing, cylinder deactivation, six-speed automatic %  enHorsepower: 420 @ 5,600 rpm %  enTorque: 460 lb.-ft. @ 4,100 rpm %  enTowing capacity: 7,900 lbs. %  enWheelbase: 130 inches %  enOverall length: 204.3 inches %  enMaximum cargo room: 94.2 cubic feet %  enCurb weight: 5,594 lbs. %  enFuel tank capacity: 31 gallons %  enEPA-estimated fuel economy: 15 mpg city, 21 mpg highway RICHARD PRINCE / MCT ABOVE, BELOW: The 2015 Cadillac Escalade doesnt shy from its gargantuan reputation, even offering a longwheelbase version that adds 1 1/2 feet to its length. CHARLES FLEMINGMCTEight years ago, Terry Yamaguchi paid $5,000 for a bright or ange 1973 Datsun 240Z. A cou ple of years later, she sold the car for a little more than she paid for it. If only she had kept it. Now, that car is worth $20,000, the vintage car collector said. Its not just the 240Zs. The value of Japanese classic cars has sky rocketed in recent years. A pris tine Toyota Celica from the ear ly 1970s can cost up to $20,000. A well-maintained Datsun 510 might go for as much as $25,000. And a Toyota 2000GT? Dont ask. A pristine 1967 version of the sports car sold at auction for al most $1.2 million in May 2013 a record for a Japanese classic. A 1968 model sold this month at an auction in Monaco for just over $1 million. The shapely coupe was Japans rst supercar, targeting Amer icas Chevrolet Corvette and Britains Jaguar XKE. Only 350 were made in part because, at $7,000, they cost thousands more than the competition. Only 54 of the cars were imported to the United States with lefthand drive, meaning the steer ing wheel is on the left. The $1.2-million sale is hard ly top dollar at a classic car auc tion. Ferrari Testarossas have sold for more than $16 million. Last summer, a 1967 Ferrari 275 GARY FRIEDMAN / MCTTerry and Koji Yamaguchi, right, with two of their classic cars on May 14, in La Mirada, Calif. KATHERINE LONGMCTSEATTLE On the outside, its a basic, affordable, midsize Chevy Malibu. But on the inside its a hybrid like no other, with two separate engines one biodiesel, the oth er electric that together give it the muscle of, well, a muscle car, not the faint and tentative speed of some hybrids. For the last three years, a team of University of Washington students has designed, planned, tested, rebuilt, rewired and re-engineered the innards of the General Motors car. Last week the team showed it off at Den ny International Middle School, where sixth-graders in teach er Ben Evans science class swarmed around the car parked in front of the school, and peppered UW students Ryan Mallory and Jake Garrison with a hun dred questions. How much could you sell it for? How long did it take to make it? Whats that red button? What if it doesnt work? How did you get that big sticker on the car? Why is there a re extinguisher inside? What are those wires for? Could it charge your phone? Its fantastic, said sixth-grader Asli Edey. I think its going to be my dream car. The Malibu hybrid conversion is part of a collegiate competition, EcoCAR 2, sponsored by General Motors and the U.S. Department of ELLEN M. BANNER / MCT A hybrid electric car built by University of Washington students is tested in Seattle on May 20. DAVID UNDERCOFFLERMCTLOS ANGELES For several years, Volkswagen has been watching the race to develop viable electric cars from the sidelines. But this fall, the Ger man automaker will bring its rst all-electric vehicle to the United States, a battery-pow ered version of the ven erable Golf, the hatchback that has sold more than 30 million copies globally over six gener ations. Dubbed the e-Golf, this model uses the same platform and body as gasand diesel-powered Golfs, which have all been re designed for the 2015 model year. The electric effort is overdue. Nearly every other U.S. automaker (Honda, Toyota, GM, Chrysler, Ford, Nissan, BMW, and Mer cedes-Benz) offers a zero-emission vehicle in California. This is to meet a mandate by the California Air Resources Board requiring that each brand either sell such a vehicle or buy credits from automakers that do. Automakers typically lose money on electric cars, despite generous state and federal subsidies to buyers. But its the price of entry to the na tions largest auto market and key to building Car collectors fuel rising value of Japanese classics Washington team builds a hybrid with muscle for collegiate contestVolkswagen to enter US electric market with e-GolfSEE CLASSICS | C4SEE HYBRID | C4SEE ELECTRIC | C4

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 TERRY BOXMCTMaybe the guy in the blue oral dress at the sushi bar last weekend kind of spun you around the one out for dinner with his dazzling wife. He bafed me big-time, too. But, hey, at least his blue-hoop earrings matched his spiky heels, and his spa ghetti-strap dress didnt clash much with his wifes miniskirt. Is this a really interesting time or what? Just call me when the par tys nally, mercifully, over. I wont need a text, tweet or gram not to mention a downtown loft, a sele, a Lana Del Ray download or a Zipcar. In fact, I just might have the perfect time machine for a quick day trip back to when greasy hamburgers and dark tans seemed pretty darn healthy. Probably not. But the 2014 Dodge Charger SRT8 will make you think and act like a hyped-up, tire-smoking, power-shifting teenager, back before they all became couch-bound digital zombies. Once a big, kind of awkward two-door hardtop, the Charger looks more propor tional in the 21st century ver sion and now offers the con venience of four big doors. It rides on a modern inde pendent rear suspension and features in-dash telematics that keep you connected or plugged in to some doohick ey in the sky. Far more important, the SRT8 wears a dark, foreboding snarl up front like the really mean Mopars of the dis tant past. A big blacked-out Dodge crosshair grille pushed up against glaring headlamps on the bright red Charger I had recently. The sinister sedan appeared ready to swallow a Smart car whole. Though a bit square-cut, the sides of the car carried a great s Charger scallop stamped deeply in the doors. Moreover, the Chargers big body got help from a sleekly raked windshield and a top that looked like it had been chopped an inch or two by one of the Barris brothers. The car also had stance, crouching tightly on 245/45 tires wrapped around 20inch alloy wheels. Likewise, tail lamps that ran the width of the rear evoked Chargers of the past but were tted with modern LED lights. If I were going to sweet en this mix of old and new any, I would dump the sil ly boy-racer spoiler on the trunk, which looks more dat ed than some of my hot-rod T-shirts. But I found a quick way to forget it was even back there: Push the start but ton, summoning the SRT8s 470-horsepower Hemi V-8 a gruff, muscled-up motor exclusive to vehicles built by SRT, Chryslers performance division. When the engine was cold, it shuddered with a cammy, old-school idle that quickly settled into something more socially acceptable as it warmed. With 470 pound-feet of torque much of it down low you can almost steer the 4,300-pound Charger with its right pedal. Stand on the SRT8 hard, and the Hemis muted midrange thunder dropped a rough octave or two. Although the re-breathing engine occasionally fell into little holes from gaps in the cars ancient ve-speed automatic, it didnt stay down there long. A at-out, tire-spinning blast to 60 takes only 4.2 sec onds, according to Car and Driver. On a more modern front, the engine is seamlessly reduced to four cylinders at cruising speeds, helping the Charger scratch out 14 miles per gallon in the city and 23 on the highway. The road feel was not great, but it was good enough to know more or less what the front tires were doing. As you might expect, the ride in a muscle-car door-slammer like the SRT8 was as stiff as Mitt Romney at a Rolling Stones concert. But I quickly learned to live with it. The car felt most ly tight and solid over rough roads, rarely delivering any really harsh bounces. Besides, no one will ever mistake the Charger for a luxury car, despite its strato spheric $52,065 price.INTERIORLegand head-room in back were pretty good and the front seats leather with supportive bolsters stitched in white and perforated suede centers felt terric. The door panels also got a little help from suede centers trimmed with lines of vertical white stitching. In addition, large blackfaced gauges with red nee dles proved easy to see at a quick glance, and a large center stack with an 8.4-inch touch screen functioned ne. But overall, the SRT8s easy blend of old and new didnt seem quite as smooth inside as outside. Maybe thats just the price you pay for a big, bawdy American sedan with sizzling straight-line performance and good handling.Dodge Charger SRT8 will blast you into the past 2014 DODGE CHARGER SRT8 %  enType of vehicle: Four-door, rear-wheel-drive, ve-passenger sedan %  enPrice as tested: $52,065 %  enFuel economy: 14 miles per gallon city, 23 highway %  enWeight: 4,371 pounds %  enEngine: 6.4-liter V-8 with 470 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque %  enTransmission: Five-speed automatic %  enPerformance: 0 to 60 mph in 4.2 seconds %  enSOURCES: Dodge division of the Chrysler Group; Car and Driver MCT PHOTO The 2014 Dodge Charger SRT8 carries a 470-horsepower Hemi V-8 engine.N.A.R.T. Spider fetched $27 million. But the market for Jap anese classics has only recently started to catch re, as a new generation of car collectors growing up surrounded by Japanese imports has come of age and started spending. Collecting cars is a relatively modern phenomenon, said Don Rose, who handled the 2000GT Monaco sale for RM Auctions and has a 2000GT in his private collection. For the early collectors, Made in Japan didnt really resonate. Younger collectors are attracted to Japanese cars in part be cause theyre cheaper. Its a way to enter the collector hobby for relatively little money, said Mike Malamut, a retired car dealer whos been collecting for 35 years and has an impres sive private collection of American, European and Japanese classics. But its not as easy, or as cheap, as it used to be. And thats hard on the collector whos just starting out. These vehicles have become very expen sive, which is kind of a bummer, said Pasadena, Calif., chiropractor and car col lector George Shapiro, who owns a rare ear ly 1960s Nissan Pa trol. It blows the av erage grease-monkey hot-rodder out of the market. Yamaguchi and her husband, Koji, have seen the market explode and encouraged it. This September they will host their 10th an nual Japanese Classic Car Show in Long Beach. More than 7,000 enthusiasts attended last years show, which featured 420 cars and a few dozen vintage Japanese motorcycles. While car collectors attending the massive Barrett-Jackson or Bonhams auctions may go ga-ga over As ton Martins or Alfa Ro meos, younger enthu siasts come to Long Beach to drool over preserved or restored Datsun 240Zs or Toyota FJ-40 Land Cruisers. For them, Rose and others said, cars like the 2000GT or Nissan Skyline are as icon ic as a Shelby Mustang or a Porsche Speedster were to an earlier gen eration. Especially the Skyline. A great place for car enthusiasts is Cars & Coffee every Saturday morning at the Ford HQ parking lot. Starts at 6 A.M. The Toyota 2000GT was destined to be a classic after James Bond rode in one in You Only Live Twice. Thats the Japanese hero car, said Eric Bizek, co-founder of the Utah car importing rm JDM Legends. The Skyline was high ly regarded for its suc cess in racing and be ing a car that could be competitive globally. Also, Bizek said, the collectors who are new to the hobby began their driving careers with Japanese cars. For a lot of these younger collectors, a Datsun 210 might have been the rst cars they owned, he said. That creates sentimental value for well-preserved or lovingly restored models. They feel closer to these cars, Terry Yamaguchi said. They are not supercars, but peo ple love them. These are like Mustangs or Camaros to them. CLASSICS FROM PAGE C3 Energy. The University of Washington is one of just 15 universities in the United States and Canada selected to par ticipate. The Malibu has two separate engines: the biodiesel engine in the front of the car, which drives the front wheels; and the 250-horsepower electric motor in the rear of the car, powered by an 800-pound bat tery pack. This week, the Malibu will be shipped on a at bed truck to Michigan for further testing. GM will pick a winner, and the hybrid cars will then be trucked to Washington, D.C., where students will talk to indus try leaders about their experiences. I think our teams on track to do pretty well this year, said UW mechanical-engineering student Trevor Crain, team project leader. In year two of the competi tion, the UW team came in fourth overall and won a top award for best energy consumption and lowest emissions. For all of its success, the Malibu is a learning tool, not a vehicle that could one day go into production. The point of the competition is to train students at univer sities across the coun try how to design the cars of the future. Graduates of the EcoCAR competitions are very experienced, very pro fessional and can tackle really difcult prob lems, Crain said. HYBRID FROM PAGE C3 brand awareness and engineering prowess amid growing consumer de mand for clean, efcient cars. The late arrival doesnt bother VW. Wed rather do it right the rst time, said Lars Menge, general man ager of product strategy for VW of America. Many automakers quickly churned out electric cars with subpar power trains or build quality, he said. We came up with a much better car, so now all others have to stretch to follow us, Menge added. Thats a bold claim, considering the strengths of competitors such as the Nissan Leaf, Fiat 500e and Honda Fit EV. But a day darting around San Francisco shows that VWs rst elec tric vehicle lives up to the big talk. Though its technology and driving range break no new ground, the 2015 e-Golf has the efciency and smooth driving habits that appeal to electric-car fans. And it comes in a clas sic design, packed with useful fea tures needed to lure buyers who have yet to consider a plug-in car. The new Golf platform also under pins a wide range of small cars across Volkswagen Groups global brands, including VW, Audi, Seat and Skoda. Rather than retrot the outgoing platform for an electric vehicle, VW wanted to wait until it could use this setup dubbed MQB since it was designed with an all-electric option in mind. This was another reason for VWs late arrival. The e-Golf gives up no interior space for people or cargo because the 700-pound lithium-ion battery pack is built into the oor and the tunnel between the passengers. Weighing only 60 pounds more than the gas version, the e-Golf has the same nimble handling on the road, just without any engine noise or vibration. VW hasnt yet announced pricing for the e-Golf, but a loaded version with leather seats and navigation probably will sell for around $35,000, before state and federal tax incentives that could knock off as much as $10,000. If that seems close to what a load ed Nissan Leaf sells for, thats no ac cident. ELECTRIC FROM PAGE C3 GARY FRIEDMAN / MCT Koji Yamaguchi looks at the engine in his 1977 Toyota Celica liftback on May 14, in La Mirada, Calif. ELLEN M. BANNER / MCT University of Washington student Jake Garrison speaks with Denny Middle School students Abdinasir Elema, 12, and Liban Anod, 12, right, about the engine of a hybrid electric car in Seattle.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: ALADDINBY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0601RELEASE DATE: 6/8/2014 ACROSS1 To the same extent6 Something Pedro and Pablo might have?9 Coll. program13 Tug-of-war participant19 Watts on a screen20 Like some desk work22 One of a group of Eastern Christians23 Kings move?25 Only what a person can take?26 In fine fettle27 Process of sorting injuries28 Gets browner30 Start of something big?31 Mineralogists study32 Anoint, archaically33 Like some French sauces34 Brooklyn squad35 The two sides of Pac-Mans mouth, say37 Principles espoused during Womens History Month?40 Cry after a roller coaster ride, maybe44 Together45 Coward from England46 Ability to walk a tightrope or swallow a sword?51 Land in the Golden Triangle52 Part of a giggle55 Pass with flying colors56 Like the 10-Down57 Soupon60 Olden62 Finish (up)64 Soprano Sumac65 At the discretion of66 Dream for late sleepers?72 Identity74 Car antitheft aid, for short75 Informal way to say 87-Across76 Sheen79 Chooses beforehand83 Its all tied up with the present86 Start to love?87 Certainly88 Collapse, with out89 Waterway leading to a SW German city?92 Way to lle de la Cit93 Feature of many a Ludacris lyric94 Add up95 Slinky going down the stairs?101 Dough raiser105 Large family106 Postlarval107 Crimean conference locale111 Over112 Captain, e.g.113 Confederate114 Biblical book in two parts115 Star burst116 Neighbor of an 8-Down118 Dissertation on peoples inherent spitefulness?121 Chaperone, often122 Treasure Stater123 Human or alien124 Some cheaters have them125 Frat members126 Drivers brake for it127 Pungent green DOWN1 Hold down2 The ostrich roams the great ___. / Its mouth is wide, its neck is narra: Ogden Nash3 Gave birth on a farm, say4 Unlikely memoirist5 Fix6 Derision7 1966 title role reprised by Jude Law in 20048 Neighbor of a 116-Across9 Inflame, with up10 South American tuber11 Touchy?12 Tidies up13 Not be bold14 Commercial version of crazy eights15 In-between16 Cosmetician Este17 And so on and so forth18 Go over and over21 Lost it24 Letter between two others that rhyme with it29 Like some care33 Lacks36 One who might stick his tongue out at you?38 Long time39 Agosto or settembre41 Ed of Up42 ___ be my pleasure!43 Burnss refusal46 Its widely hailed as a convenient way to get around47 Frozen over48 Entertains49 Bemoan50 Organic compound51 Monastery resident52 One parodied on Portlandia53 Fangorn Forest denizen54 Inflatable thing58 Reason for glasses59 Captain Morgan and others61 Does away with63 Layer67 Action-packed68 It has a light at one end69 Roll of the dice, say70 Up71 Strip for a fashion show72 Secret collector73 Before, poetically77 The ___ City (New Haven)78 Literary inits.80 Nobel Prize subj.81 Trousers82 Racing boat84 Sandwich order, for short85 Scary word90 Young Darth Vaders nickname91 Evergreen shrub92 Thumbs opposites93 Represent, sportswise95 Lines at a theater?96 Like Flatland97 Became less than a trickle98 Composure99 Spiral-horned antelope100 Mischievous girl102 Social breakdown103 Common dice rolls104 Elements of some accents108 American Graffiti director109 Frigid temps110 Like114 Srs. worries117 Colony member119 Telephone trio120 Its logo displays all Roy G. Biv except indigo 12345 678 9101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 3738 39 40414243 44 45 464748 4950 51 525354 55 56 5758 59 60 61 626364 65 66 6768 69 7071 7273 74 75 76 7778 79 8081 82838485 86 87 88 8990 91 92 93 94 959697 98 99100 101102103104 105 106 107108109110111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution to puzzle on page C6

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX ASFARSANROTCPULLER NAOMICLERICALUNIATE CHANGEOFPALACESOMUCH HALETRIAGETANSIDEA ORESANELEWINEYNETS RADII IDEALSOFMARCH AGAINONENOEL CIRCUSTALENTLAOSHEE ACEANDEANSMATTERING BYGONEMOPYMAUPTO AFAREWELLTOALARMS SELFVINYUPLUSTER PRESELECTSRIBBONELL YESCONKCANALOFWORMS PONTPUNTOTAL SPRINGFALLING YEAST CLANPUPALYALTAANEW RANKALLYSAMUELNOVA INDIANOFMALICEANDMEN PARENTMONTANANBEING TRYSTSBROSESSCRESS Sunday crossword puzzle is on page C5.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 1101 E. Hwy. 50 Clermont, FL Highway 50, Just East of 27rrr fntbb 7-YEAR/100,000 MILE LIMITED WARRANTY* 172-POINT INSPECTION ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE NEW WINDSHIELD WIPER BLADES AT DELIVERY FULL FUEL TANK AT DELIVERY OIL/FILTER CHANGE AT DELIVERY QUALITYCHECKED Certified Pre-OwnedAll prices are plus tax tag title and $599 dealer fee. All new car sale prices are after $3000 cash down or trade equity. All pmts are 36 mo leases 10500 per year and include $3000 cash down. Photos are for illustrative purposes only, dealer and newspaper are not responsible for typographical errors. Some prices may require FMCC financing or trade assistance, see dealer for details. Prices are only good for date of publication. Thank you for reading the fine print, smart customers always do. Se Habla Espaol CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES AS LOW AS 1.9% APR FINANCING 100,000 MILE WARRANTY 2006 MERCURY MONTEGOWAS $10,700 NOW$9,820 2010 HYUNDAI SONATA GLSWAS $12,900 NOW$10,180 2007 PONTIAC G6WAS $11,800 NOW$10,700 2008 FORD F-150WAS $13,200 NOW$11,400 2007 MAZDA CX7WAS $13,500 NOW$11,640 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA LEWAS $15,700 NOW$13,920 2009 FORD EXPLORER XLTWAS $16,300 NOW$14,000 2012 FORD ESCAPEWAS $17,200 NOW$14,740 2012 FORD FUSIONWAS $18,600 NOW$15,420 2012 FORD FOCUS WAS $17,500 NOW$15,800 2010 HONDA ACCORD EXWAS $19,400 NOW$16,580 2010 LINCOLN MKZWAS $20,200 NOW$17,720 2009 NISSAN MURANO SWAS $22,700 NOW$18,100 2011 FORD TAURUS LIMITEDWAS $21,500 NOW$19,280 2010 TOYOTA VENZAWAS $20,900 NOW$19,700 2013 FORD C-MAXWAS $26,700 NOW$21,960 2013 TOYOTA RAV4 LEWAS $25,300 NOW$22,860 2011 FORD FLEXWAS $25,600 NOW$23,280 2010 FORD F-150 PLATINUMWAS $26,900 NOW$24,860 2014 FORD ESCAPE TITANIUMWAS $28,400 NOW$25,230 2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER SWAS $28,900 NOW$26,400 2011 LEXUS RX 350WAS $29,600 NOW$26,810 2012 FORD FLEXLIMITED CPO, NAV, LOADEDWAS $33,800 NOW$29,490 2011 ACURA RLWAS $32,200 NOW$30,240 2014 FORD EXPEDITION EL XLTWAS $40,500 NOW$37,210 drive for $169**per month2014 FIESTA starting at $10,500or $500 & 0% up to 60 modrive for $189**per monthor drive for $259**per month2014 FOCUS starting at $12,900or $1000 &0% up to 60 mo2014 F-150 starting at $20,600or $750& 0.0%up to 60 mo or drive for $179**per month2014 FUSION starting at $16,500or $1000 &0% up to 60 mo drive for $249**per month2014 ESCAPE starting at $17,800or $1000 & 0% up to 60 mo drive for $229**per month2014 EDGE starting at $23,300or $1000 & 0.0%up to 60 mo or drive for $219**per month starting at $18,3002014 TAURUS or $1250 & 0% up to 60 modrive for $229**per month starting at $23,9002014 EXPLORER or 0% up to 60 mo drive for $259**per month starting at $23,9002014 FLEX or 0% up to 60 mo or drive for $209**per month starting at $16,9002014 MUSTANG or $2,000 &0% up to 60 mo

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014

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G LD STANDARDTHE IN LAKE COUNTY FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTTHE JOINT COMMISSIONS GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The certication award recognizes Florida Hospital Waterman Joint Replacement Centers dedication to The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. Visit FHWatermanOrtho.com for more information. E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014Businessscott.callahan@dailycommercial.com SUMMER: Vacation prices driven up by surging demand / E4 www.dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comIn a given year, Clermont averages about 40 new businesses, so ofcials are sur prised to count off 50 com mercial enterprises that have either set up shop or have announced plans to do so in the rst ve months of 2014. In that short time, weve ended up going over whats been typical in the last four to ve years, said Jim Hitt, the citys economic development director. Among the higher prole businesses to have opened so far this year are WAWA, Rooms to Go, ABC Fine Wine and Spirits, Advanced Auto Parts, Batteries Plus Bulbs and Wafe House. The opening of Dicks Sporting Goods is just a few weeks away. Hitt said its not just large franchises that are coming to Clermont, but mom-andpop stores that are taking over and rejuvenating empty buildings. Included among the new businesses are Nolands Roong, Garners Emporium, The Urban Spot taco lounge, Christian Brothers Automotive, All About the Nail Bou tique, AGY Pavers, Real Team Realty, Device Doctorz and Marias Mexican Store and Thrift. Many doctors and law of ces and nancial institu tions also are on the list, plus Zab Thai Restaurant and Su shi, which took over the for mer Perkins/NY Pizza Building on State Road 50 and Citrus Tower Blvd. Phase two (192 apartment units) of The Vista at Lost Lake made the list, having started the additions in February.Clermont attracting businesses at record rate ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL A new Wafe house is open at 2480 E. Highway 50 in Clermont. Abdul-Jabbar couldntve made these priceswith a sky hook. From a song by Johnny Guitar WatsonDo things cost more or less than they did a year ago? Lets see. Costs associated with housing went up 2.8 percent. But heating and cooling costs are a whopping 7.7 per cent more. (Honey, cancel the purchase of that new McMansion!) Rental costs escalated 2.9 percent. Homeowners insurance has gone up by 3.5 percent. Water, sewer and trash collection services have increased in cost by 3.4 percent. Heres more. Healthand hospital-related services both cost 4.7 percent more than they did a year ago. It costs 2.3 percent more to dine out than it did last year. But grocery food skyrocketed across the board: Meat prices jumped by 5.2 per cent and fresh fruits by 5 percent. A haircut will cost you 1.4 per cent more. A drink and a smoke is more expensive (we may need both before were done here). Alcohol went up MARGARET MCDOWELLGUEST COLUMNIST MAX FAULKNER / MCT ABOVE: Debera Cobb, a letter carrier who has been bitten by a dog, walks her southeast Fort Worth, Texas, route. BELOW: A dog sits unleashed on the front porch of a house on Cobbs route. DIANE SMITHMCTFORT WORTH, Texas Veteran letter carrier Debera Cobb has a survival code: Never look a dog in the eye. Ive just been bitten once thats all that is going to happen if I can help it, she said. Recently in Fort Worth, a letter carrier was ac cused of killing a dog with a rock, an episode that upset the owners. The worker is on administrative leave while the incident is investigated, according to the U.S. Postal Service. At the same time, sta tistics show that dog bites are a serious hazard for those who deliver the mail. Fort Worth ranked 16th in the number of postal employees 26 at tacked by dogs in 2013, according to the U.S. Postal Service. Postal workers said its hard to nd a letter carri er who doesnt have an experience to share. I dont know what it is about postmen, but the dogs dont like us, said Christi Fite, president of the National Association of Letter Car riers Branch 226, which represents Fort Worth. Nationwide, 5,581 postal employees were attacked last year. The Postal Service hopes to improve matters through an information campaign that includes tips for pet owners. Ad ditionally, it also released the dog attack rankings as part of National Dog Bite Prevention Week, which started May 18 and ended Saturday. Letter carriers are equipped with dog spray, a repellent that consists of less than 1 percent cayenne pepper. They can curtail mail at homes or neighborhoods where large dogs roam loose. They arent timid about call ing animal control when they see loose dogs. It makes a lot of people mad, but it is for the safety of us, said For letter carriers, dog bites are a constant threatPostal hazard Inflation, McMansions and Johnny Guitar Watson TIFFANY HSUMCT7-Eleven relies on thousands of franchi sees to sell millions of Slurpees, Big Bite hot dogs and other snacks. But in the past two years, at least a doz en franchisees have sued the company, al leging it stripped them of their stores for bogus reasons. Some plain tiffs say 7-Eleven target ed successful stores in high-trafc areas, then ipped them to new franchisees willing to pay the company higher fees. 7-Eleven counters in court documents that some of those franchisees were stealing de priving the company of its full share of the store prots, often by falsify ing sales records. Com pany investigations led to hardball negotiations between the store own ers and 7-Eleven, which pressured franchisees to give up their stores or face potential pros ecutions, according to court records. Dilip Patel and his wife, Saroj, said the company used storm trooper interrogation and isolation tactics in such sessions. The couple, who sued in March, ultimately gave up their Riverside, Calif., store, which they had 7-Eleven accused of hardball tactics by franchiseesIve never seen anything like this its like paranoia city. But in all fairness, theyve probably had experiences in the past where their franchise community has been ripping them off.Barry Kurtz, attorneySEE 7-ELEVEN | E2SEE RATE | E2SEE MCDOWELL | E2SEE CARRIERS | E4

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The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hr Dr. Vaziri & StaffShoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLicense# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFinancing Available FREE EXAMMust present ad Exp. date: 06/30/14$85valueNEW PATIENTS run sinc e 1995, with no compensation from 7-Eleven. The company said in a statement that it moved to terminate the couples contract after a thorough and law ful investigation. The company vowed to ght the Patels suit and oth ers, but declined to comment on the couples specic allega tions. Good, hardworking, independent franchisees are the backbone of the 7-Eleven brand, the company said in a statement. As to those few franchisees who violate the law or the franchise agreement, we are determined to protect our guests, employees and other franchisees by ending the relationship. 7-Eleven has invested heavily in efforts to keep a close eye on its stores and the people who run them. In the 2012 scal year, the company spent $40 million on digital vid eo technology, install ing 4,000 camera systems in nine months, many of which 7-Elev en can access remotely. Many stores now have a 360-degree camera and a 180-degree analytics camera at the front door with the ability to measure trafc, the time consumers spend in stores and other analytics. The company has said in court documents that its asset protection agents rigorously investigate suspicious franchisee behavior, view ing hours of in-store footage, taking covert photos and tracing red ags in sales records. In Pennsylvania, an agent sent undercover shoppers into a store where the franchisee was suspected of void ing legitimate sales and pocketing the cash. When the investigator later compared the 18 purchases he had sanctioned against the franchisees sales logs, he found that 13 transactions had been improperly recorded, 7-Eleven said in court documents. Mark Stinde, 7-Elevens vice president of asset protection, told loss prevention publication LP Magazine last year that his department cant just be a cost center in the organization; we really should be an income center. The level of surveillance at 7-Eleven is un common among similar companies, said Enci no, Calif., franchise attorney Barry Kurtz. Ive never seen any thing like this its like paranoia city, he said. But in all fairness, theyve probably had experiences in the past where their franchise community has been ripping them off. Some investigations of franchisees amount to a predatory pro gram, alleges Kurt McCord, who said in court documents that he was briey a corporate in vestigations supervisor for 7-Eleven before stepping down last year. McCord led an af davit in a lawsuit by Karamjeet Sodhi, who alleges that 7-Eleven sent agents into his six New Jersey stores, removed lottery books and money order ma chines and cut him off from his vendors. Sodhi and the company are currently in court ghting over control of the stores. The company em ployed a tactic known in the franchise com munity as churning, McCord alleged in his afdavit. The company generates tens of mil lions of dollars in ad ditional prots by in venting accusations of franchisee fraud, then taking back and reselling the stores, accord ing to McCord. 7-Eleven prioritized stores in areas with high resale values or locations operated by outspoken franchisees, McCord said. The com pany set a yearly target for the number of stores it sought to take back, he said. McCord, who said he previously worked in loss prevention for Burlington Coat Factory and asset protection for Tar get, said he left 7-Eleven after seven months be cause of his objections to the companys strat egy. 7-Eleven has not responded to McCords afdavit in court and declined requests to comment on his allegations. But the company last month won a gag order barring McCord from publicly discuss ing the case. 7-ELEVENFROM PAGE E1 IRFAN KHAN / MCT Saroj Patel, left, and her husband, Dilip, allege 7-Eleven used storm trooper interrogation and isolation tactics to strip them of the Riverside, Calif., store that they had run since 1995. They are building brand new buildings to run their business es out of and also lling up the open storefronts that we had, Hitt said. Even the downtown district is seeing an in crease in new business es with at least six new stores that are opening or that have opened, a trend Hitt said is excel lent because the more people they can attract downtown for shop ping, eating and recre ating, the better. According to infor mation provided by Hitt, some of the busi nesses coming to the downtown area are The Barn Yarn, Ericas Tea Room, Victorias (gifts), Granny Nannies and Tattletales (security). Newly opened are The Lab Hair Studio and Clermont Water front Bikes and Boards. These mom-andpop businesses are the backbone to any city, Hitt said. Were seeing a lot of those and a lot of bigger businesses its a good mix. And from an econom ic standpoint, Hitt said these new businesses are doing just what they should for the commu nity, keeping people lo cal and busy. They are providing jobs, location ser vices and places for people to go, he said. Whether its in larger or smaller plazas, these companies are lling the gaps. Clermont has been able to grown very well over the years, even through the downturn in the economy, and now with the little up turn weve been seeing, its booming now. The whole idea is to capture the jobs here and were doing it. RATE FROM PAGE E1 by 1.1 percent, and tobacco and smoking products by 3.7 per cent. Tuition escalated in price by 3.3 percent. Whew. Now, consider things that have decreased in price. Seems impossible, right? Expenses related to transportation are actually 1.2 percent less expensive than a year ago. New vehicles are down in price by 0.5 percent. Motor fuel has declined in price by 4.6 percent (lets wait until summer is over to declare victory on this one). Wireless and landline telephone services? Now theyre 2.3 percent less expensive. Shoes? A percent less costly. Household furnishings have declined in price by 1.5 percent. Airline fares have decreased by 4.1 percent (hard to believe, right?). Whats it all mean? We do indeed have signicant ination in essential (non-discretionary) service items, like heat and air conditioning, food and health insurance. But many frequently used services actually cost less, like gas and cell phones. So ination is really not rampant. In fact, most economists consider deation a greater cur rent threat to the economy. The reason we think prices are outrageous is that wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. A person earning robust compensation is meeting his grocery bill with ease. But without a quality paycheck, every thing looks expensive. Ination not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with signicant opportunities to prot from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register. Prudent investors and advisors seek out those sectors and companies that have inexible demand, or whose customers have to continue buying their products or services, whether the price of the product goes up 5 percent or not. As always, an investors age, risk tolerance, unique nancial goals and time horizon should be considered.Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www.arborwealth. net), a Fee-Only Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 Inflation not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with significant opportunities to profit from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668 |394-1739Minimum charges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 30 0 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details. BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.com Celebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOM JUST 10 MILES SOUTH OF THE VILLAGES Your LED Headquarters!$34.95each We honor all competitors sale ads for same brand items! 711 South 14th Street (Hwy 27) Leesburg, FLMon. Fri. 7:30 5:00 After Hours By Appointment RICHARD VERRIERMCTLOS ANGELES At a small communi ty park in Santa Mon ica, a group of Los Angeles-area musicians wearing dark blue and orange T-shirts with the slogan Listen Up! gathered around a atbed truck as union leaders, a minister and a local city councilman red up the crowd. Make no mistake, music that we produce is a critical component in the artistic and nancial success of any lm thats produced here, said Neil Samples, a vi olinist. We say to Lionsgate: Abandon the low road, stop offshor ing jobs, do the right thing and bring the music home. After his speech, a zydeco band took the stage, and Samples and his colleagues huddled into a van and drove a few blocks to the head quarters of Lionsgate, the independent studio behind the hit Hunger Games movies. They parked outside the studio and used a dol ly to deliver four box es containing a petition signed by 12,000 supporters urging Lions gate to stop sending musicians jobs over seas. The unrest this month is the latest sign of disharmony between lo cal musicians and their employers. The American Federation of Musicians has previously or ganized rallies against Marvel Studios for hir ing London musicians to work on such movies as The Avengers and Iron Man 3 even though those lms were shot in the United States. Now, with the backing of the AFL-CIO, the union has singled out Lionsgate. It says the studio is hiring foreign musicians to play music on movies that lmed in the U.S. with the sup port of taxpayer subsidies. It has cited such Li onsgate releases as The Hunger Games and The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, which were scored in London, and the recently re leased Draft Day. The Kevin Costner movie about the NFL draft was lmed in Ohio, where the production received tax benets, but was scored in Macedonia. Draft Day what could be more Amer ican than that? said Rafael Rishik, a violin ist with the New Hol lywood String Quartet who recently worked on The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Dis neys Frozen. To say with a straight face that the only way we could do this without going broke is to score this in Macedonia its hard for us to swallow. A spokesman for Santa Monica-based Lions gate declined to com ment. Producers and stu dio executives have long complained that California does not do enough to keep the movie business close to home. The states tax credit, for example, ex cludes large-budget stu dio lms. Musicians and other entertainment unions are backing legislation that would expand the credit. The unrest comes at a time of growing anxiety in the local music industry, where lm and television work have been a key source of income for hundreds of local violinists, cellists, trombonists and other professional musicians. Many use the enter tainment work to supplement what they earn from working in local symphonies, chamber groups and the L.A. Op era. A large movie can employ more than 100 mu sicians. For that reason, Hol lywood has long been a major draw for some of worlds top musicians. But as more work in lm and TV production has moved overseas, lo cal musicians are having a tougher time making a living. On any given day, about 2,000 members of AFM Local 47 will work on a lm or TV show. But their earnings have fallen substantially in recent years. In 2007, union members collectively made $30 mil lion in wages. Now, they earn about $15 million a year, according to Lo cal 47, which represents 7,400 musicians, ar rangers and copyists. If the trend contin ues, L.A.s cultural com munity could suffer as musicians leave to work elsewhere, veteran musicians say. One of the fantas tic things about being a musician in L.A. is that youre surrounded by just an astonishing level of players, said Marc Sazer, a violinist for the Pasadena Symphony who has worked in the recording industry since the 1980s. We have the stars from the whole world gather in the L.A. musical com munity. As more work goes off to London, Bratislava and Prague, thats going to disappear, and the whole re gion will be impover ished. The American Federation of Musicians might be facing an up hill battle. Musicians traditionally could count on lm work being done in L.A. even when a movie was lmed elsewhere, because of the high level of talent here. But more production is leaving the state as studios take advantage of tax benets and re bates that arent available in California. The number of mov ie scoring jobs has declined at least 50 per cent in the last ve years, according the union. Much of the business has gone to Britain, which has long been a big draw for composers given the countrys rich musical heritage. Generous lm incentives also have drawn a grow ing number of big-bud get movies, such as the coming Star Wars and Avengers lms. Orchestras in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Macedonia also are attracting more Hollywood business. The trend has been further accelerated by the advent of low-cost technology that has made it easier to open high-quality recording studios anywhere. Every orchestra in the world would love to be doing Hollywood movies, and theyve been very aggressive in trying to market themselves, said John Acos ta, vice president of AFM Local 47.Musicians implore Hollywood to stop scoring films overseas GENARO MOLINA / MCT Musicians who work in the lm and TV industry wear T-shirts that state Listen Up during a rally to protest the outsourcing of their jobs in Stewart Street Park in Santa Monica, Calif.

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionThe Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology 352.530.2256Call today to schedule your appointment Count on us for a comprehensive range of quality services to meet the unique healthcare needs of you and your family. Abu Azizullah, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Maria A. Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Visit Us at www.impmd.comInternal Medicine Practices MAX FAULKNER / MCT Debera Cobb shows off her dog repellent. She has a survival code when on her route: Never look a dog in the eye.Tina Jarrett, a postal worker bitten by a dog about a year ago. I had my nose almost ripped off, and it was a terrify ing experience. Cobb, a letter carrier for about 15 years, was working a route in southeast Fort Worth on Aug. 3, 2003, when she was attacked. She noticed that a pit bull, normal ly chained, was missing. She looked, took precautions and went on to de liver the mail. Suddenly, the dog ap peared and lunged at her. Cobb said she instinc tively used her mail satchel to protect her self. She was leaving the ground, coming to my face, Cobb said. The dog bounced off, hit the ground and bit her leg once. Unfortunately, she hit a main artery in my leg, Cobb said. It took 10 stitches to suture it up. Cobb called her su pervisors, she said, and her husband came to take her to the doc tor. Cobb said she later learned that the dog had delivered puppies the night before. I was a stranger in her nursery, she said. Jarrett, who has delivered mail for almost a year, was bitten while taking a package to a house in the Polytechnic Heights area. I had done what you are supposed to do, Jarrett said. You walk up to a yard with caution, and you are look ing around making sure there are no dogs. When Jarrett got to the door, a man ap proached her who was walking with two loose dogs a German shepherd mix and a Chihua hua. The Chihuahua was barking at her, and the German shepherd mix lay on the front porch to sleep. The man, who spoke only Spanish, went to nd someone to interpret. When a woman appeared to sign for the package, the German shepherd mix bit Jarrett. As I scan the scanner and step back, the Ger man shepherd mix ew off of the porch and literally lunged for my face, Jarrett said. I was terried. Jarrett said that a piece of her nose had to be reattached and that she became fearful of dogs even though she has ve. Neither letter carrier would comment on the recent investigation involving the postal work er accused of fatally in juring a Yorkshire terrier with a rock. The problems typical ly unfold in older neigh borhoods, where the mail is delivered in slots near the front door. Cobbs mail route near East Allen and Yuma avenues is in an older res idential area in south east Fort Worth. Dogs sometimes sit unat tended on front porch es. Cobb tells custom ers to keep pets leashed, which is the law. Im keeping my dog tied up now. I dont let it bother you, shouted one man on her route recently. Cobb wont deliver mail to a house with a loose dog. Dogs need to be on a leash when being walked or if they are off the owners property, and own ers need to be with their animals at all times, ac cording to city ordinances. Fines can reach $2,000, said Diane Covey, a spokeswoman for the Fort Worth Code Compliance Department. Brandon Bennett, the code compliance direc tor, said the city com bats loose or stray ani mals on various fronts, including fence stan dards, education of the public, and promotion of spay-and-neuter programs. At the post ofce, let ter carriers alert others to possible trouble. People have theories on dogs and letter car riers. Some think its the uniform. Others wonder whether its something with the mail delivery routine. In any case, animal advocates remind pet owners that any dog has the potential to bite, so owners need to keep them securely fenced or indoors. Any dog, no matter how kind or loving, can bite under the right cir cumstances, said Whitney Hanson, director of development and communications for the Humane Society of North Texas. CARRIERSFROM PAGE E1 HUGO MARTINMCTLOS ANGELES Angelica Lopez went to great lengths to save a few bucks on a planned seven-day cruise to the Virgin Islands this month. The West Covina, Calif., resident joined with 32 other people to get a group discount on the cruise. She then booked a cheap ight to the cruise port in Fort Lauderdale four months in advance. In all, she g ures she saved about $1,500. I think the average person al ways has to watch their pennies, but I dont think that should stop you from enjoying life, said Lopez, an escrow account executive who is still bouncing back from the nan cial blow of a divorce in the middle of the Great Recession. With the economy rebounding, Americans are taking vacations in near-record numbers again. But that surge in demand is driving up prices for travel costs such as airfare, hotels and attractions, making it tougher for many to afford that much-need ed respite from the daily grind. Americans will spend an average of $1,246 per person on summer vacations about $100 more than last year, according to an online sur vey of 1,500 adults by American Ex press. Airline tickets are expected to jump an average of 6 percent for the top 10 U.S. destinations, to $415 for a round-trip ticket, according to travel website Orbitz. The hottest summer destinations will have the biggest price increases. The average round-trip ight to New York this summer is $345, up 18 percent from last summer, while the average hotel room in Honolulu is $248 a night, up 15 percent, according to Orbitz. The average hotel rate, mean while, will hit $115 this summer, up 4.9 percent, according to PKF Consulting. Theme park ticket prices are also climbing. The Disneyland Resort in Anaheim recently raised its one-day tickets to $96, up $4 over last year, with a $1 increase in parking to $17. Universal Studios Hollywood hiked daily rates to $92, up $8 over last year. The only break travelers will get this summer will be with the price of gas and rental cars, which should remain stable. The higher prices are driven by surging demand. Three-fourths of Americans say they will take a vacation this summer, compared with 59 percent two years ago, according to the American Express survey. Business travel is also on the upswing. Companies are dispatching workers on more trips and confer ences this summer to take advantage Vacation prices driven higher by surging demandTheme park ticket prices are also climbing. The Disneyland Resort in Anaheim recently raised its oneday tickets to $96, up $4 over last year, with a $1 increase in parking to $17. Universal Studios Hollywood hiked daily rates to $92, up $8 over last year.SEE SUMMER | E6

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, June 8 the 159th day of 2014. There are 206 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On June 8, 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Partys convention in Baltimore. On this date: In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina. In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1915, Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned in a disagreement with President Woodrow Wilson over U.S. handling of the sinking of the Lusitania. In 1948, the Texaco Star Theater made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the rst program. (Berle was later named the shows permanent host.) In 1953, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. Eight tornadoes struck Michigans Lower Peninsula, killing 126 people. In 1967, 34 U.S. servicemen were killed when Israel attacked the USS Liberty, a Navy intelligence-gathering ship in the Mediterranean. (Israel later said the Liberty had been mistaken for an Egyptian vessel.) In 1972, during the Vietnam War, an Associated Press photographer captured the image of 9-yearold Phan Thi Kim Phuc (fahn thee kihm fook) as she ran naked and severely burned from the scene of a South Vietnamese napalm attack. In 1973, Gen. Francisco Franco relinquished his post as Spains prime minister while remaining as chief of state. In 1978, a jury in Clark County, Nevada, ruled the so-called Mormon will, purportedly written by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, was a forgery. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, June 8, 2014: This year you open up to new possibilities. You seem to be more vibrant and more willing to take risks. If you are single, play it slightly more conservatively; youll want to have the other party reveal more of himor herself rst. You are likely to meet someone of interest after midsummer. If you are attached, the two of you seem to t right in together no matter what you do. You cant deny that theres a lot of mutual admiration between you. Be as romantic as you were when you rst met each other. LIBRA might be an intellectual, but he or she is also romantic. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Even if plans fall apart, youll still enjoy yourself. You often prefer hanging out at home anyway. Make time to visit with a neighbor you feel really connected to. A roommate or family member might want to invite a loved one over. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Take time for yourself, even if you dont think you need it. In the near future youll gain new insight into a key person in your life. You need to integrate this information. Calls seem to come in from everywhere; screen them for now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might wonder what would be the best way to approach someone who is often unpredictable. Perhaps the approach is not as important as your ability to adjust to others and their idiosyncrasies. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Youll want to spend time close to home. Be aware that someone might want to tug you out the door. As a result, you might decide to invite this person over. Dont be surprised if more spontaneous invitations come in for the same reason. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make a call in the morning to someone at a distance. You could be surprised by what you hear. You might prefer to keep much of what goes on today hush-hush. Stay centered when dealing with a parent, and the issue will vanish. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have much more to offer than you might realize. These assets go way beyond nances, and they involve your character and your compassion for others. A friend seems to shut down at odd times. Give this person some space. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Use today to enjoy your friendships and your family. Someone will continue to atter you. You might want to change topics, but you could have some difculty. Just say thank you, and move on. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might not want to drop your cool act right now. Whether you are establishing boundaries or trying to let someone know that you have had enough will make little difference. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Go off and join your friends, whether it is for a late brunch or perhaps a trip to the beach. You value camaraderie, and today youll desire that sense of togetherness even more. A loved one might delight you with his or her unpredictability. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Take a stand. You know what you want and what is acceptable. You need to let others know your boundaries. If they do not know, they could infringe on your space. Make a must appearance that could involve an older person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Your mind will be on someone at a distance. Has it occurred to you that it might be best to get together with this person soon? Then maybe you can be more present in the moment. Meanwhile, it could seem to others that you are closed down. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Let someone else make the rst move. Youll enjoy the attention of being sought after. One-onone relating could provide a new openness and a willingness to have a discussion. Choose your words with care. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: Im having problems with my boyfriend, Adam, and I feel stuck. He recently was accepted to graduate school, and were planning to move there. We havent lived together before, and Im not sure Im doing the right thing. I will be working and paying for every thing, and Adam will be just going to school. He thinks this is a fair trade-off because we wont have to wor ry about money at all once he has completed his education. Abby, I dont think he cares that its ME going with him. I feel like a space-ller and a meal ticket. How do I go about nding out his true feelings and intentions? He doesnt make me feel special, wanted or important ever. I worry this will end badly. I do love him, but I dont want this to be a self-fullling prophecy. Please give me some advice. TO MOVE OR NOT TO MOVE IN INDIANA DEAR MOVE OR NOT: You do need advice and here it is: Your womans intuition is telling you this isnt right, and that your boyfriend cant be trusted to fulll his part of the bargain. You should listen to it because thats a poor basis for uprooting your self and becoming his benefactor. The person you have described is someone centered solely upon himself and his own needs. A man who doesnt make you feel special, wanted or important would make a very poor husband. DEAR ABBY: My wife and I have three daughters in their 20s and 30s. One of them, Lauryn, is married with four children. She and her husband are behind in their mortgage, student loans, federal, state and property taxes, utilities, etc. Over the past 15 years, we have given them more than $40,000 to help them stay aoat. Things have not improved. Now that my wife and I are retired, the money we provide is cutting into our retirement savings. For the sake of our grandchildren, we continue to bail Lauryn out hoping their nances will improve. But now we have begun to think our handouts should come at a cost. We want to tell Lauryn and our son-in-law that the money weve given and have continued to give will count against their inheritance. It doesnt seem fair that we have given so much to this one daughter and her family and relatively little to her sisters. Do you agree? Wed appreciate your thoughts on this. LOVING PARENTS AND GRANDPARENTS DEAR LOVING PARENTS: I do agree. And for that reason, you should discuss this issue with an attorney who specializes in estate planning, wills and trusts. Your other daughters should not suffer because Lauryn and her husband have been perpetually needy. An attorney can guide you, and it will be money well spent.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Woman worries she will be a checkbook for her beau JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Se Habla Espaol (352) 735-6941CALL US OR STOP IN OVER 33 YEARS*******SAME LOCATION 17 YEARS US 441Old 44119A K SPECIAL LOAN RATES GOODUSEDSTUFFNeed Cash for Your Gold Jewelry? No Need to Sell It! You Can Borrow on It!PAWNNEED CASH?10%15%Conditions apply offer expires Aug 31, 2014CALL FOR DETAILS Call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Tuesday June 10th, at 11:00 amComfort SuitesD002549 of th e improving economy. That puts high-spending business travelers in competition with vacationing fam ily for hotel rooms and airline seats, putting upward pressure on prices. Airlines, having learned their lessons from the recession, have been cautious about adding more seats and planes in response to the increased demand. That means air carriers dont need to offer as many discounts to keep their planes full. You are not seeing airlines ood the mar ket with an excessive amount of capacity, said Henry Harteveldt, a travel analyst at Atmosphere Research. What we are seeing is custom ers chasing seats. As wanderlust takes hold, the challenge for many Americans will be how to break away with out breaking the bank. They are in bet ter shape nancially than they were in recent years, said Robert Kleinhenz, chief economist at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. They ... are more willing to spend what continues to be a hardearned dollar, but they are doing it cautiously, looking for value. The top money-saving techniques include cashing in loyalty re ward points and shop ping for groceries to prepare meals in hotel rooms. Marilyn Fils, a recently retired school admin istrator from Tarzana, is ying to Paris to attend a wedding with her hus band. She used credit card reward points to pay for the ight, saving thousands of dollars. Otherwise, she said, she could not have afforded the trip. Vacationers can save even more this sum mer by steering clear of expensive tourist hot spots, travel experts say. Consider visiting na tional parks or desti nations like Memphis or Nashville, said Erik Hansen, director of domestic policy for the U.S. Travel Association, the trade group for the nations travel industry. Coby King, president of a Los Angeles public affairs company, is saving by taking his wife and two children to a small lodge on the Ha vasupai Indian Reser vation near the Grand Canyon for several days of hiking. We are not delib erately saving money by going off the beat en path, but its a happy coincidence, he said. SUMMERFROM PAGE E4 HEATHER SOMERVILLEMCTMENLO PARK, Calif. In an unassum ing ofce building here, theres a group of startup founders working fever ishly to fulll their en trepreneurial dreams, and not one of them is a Stanford University dropout in his 20s. You wont nd ba by-faced coders hunched over MacBooks, empty ramen containers or kegs of beer. Instead, you will nd mothers and oth er women, most in their 40s and 50s, with back grounds in fashion, music and law. Many have never worked in the tech industry or at tempted a startup. Despite the odds stacked against them in the youthand male-dominated Silicon Valley startup world, they are forging ahead. I have no fear, said Jodi Murphy, 57, of San Mateo County, who joined the Womens Startup Lab in February to build Geek Club Books, a storytelling app about children with autism. Everything that I have done has led to this. Even though I am older, I literally leap out of bed every day, be cause this is my time for doing this. The lab also has an ambitious mission: To equip women found ers with the skills they need to thrive in the ma cho tech industry, which has made it difcult for women to build and fund startups. Accord ing to research from the Kauffman Foundation, a nonprot focused on education and entre preneurship, between 2004 and 2007 women founded only 3 percent of technology rms. And just 1.3 percent of venture-backed startups have a female founder, while 6.5 percent have a woman as CEO, accord ing to Dow Jones. A woman entrepreneur coming out of a place like the Womens Startup Lab will be better prepared, said An drea Rees Davies, associate director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University. These women will have the strategies to cope. The dearth of women startup founders not only perpetuates the in equality that has long plagued the tech indus try, experts say, but also creates a void of women role models needed to encourage more girls to pursue careers in tech. The shortage of women in computer science is a well-document ed problem a quar ter of Stanford Univer sity computer science degrees are awarded to women, and about 20 percent of the countrys computer program mers and software developers are women and organizations and academic programs are working to push more girls into these elds. But experts say change can only happen when more mid-career women emerge as successful startup founders to inspire younger gener ations. Once you see more Jack Dorseys that are women, youll start to see more girls majoring in computer science, Kleiner Perkins Caueld & Byers venture capital ist Stephanie Tilenius said, referring to the co-founder of Twitter. While none have yet risen to Twitter-like stardom, some startups coming out of the 1-year-old lab have seen success. Monique Giggy, a 35-year-old mother of two from Palo Alto, last month sold her company, Swing by Swing, a smartphone app that maps golf courses and keeps score. Liesl Cap per joined the lab last fall and last month her Australian startup, Cognea, which makes virtual assistant software that responds with different personalities, was acquired by IBM. Neither price was dis closed. And San Fran cisco-based Style Lend, a peer-to-peer market place for renting de signer dresses, grew 26 percent week over week during the rst quarter of 2014. Like other accelera tors, the Womens Start up Lab is a springboard for aspiring entrepre neurs to turn ideas into full-blown businesses, and founders to grow edging companies. But the lab is also atypical: It doesnt offer money or the chance to mingle with celebrities, and its focus is less on hitting revenue growth targets than instilling condence and leader ship skills. The women meet with life coaches and business advisers some of whom are men and gather for week ly problem-solving ses sions. Many juggle their startups with picking up children from school and making sure the grocery shopping is done. Women must apply and pay $4,500, plus the lab takes a 2 percent stake in the company. They dont have the luxury of just up and leaving their lives, said lab founder Ari Horie, who has previously worked at IBM and a handful of mid-size startups. Theyll work around the clock, but still leave to drive their kids to ballet and karate class. Alumni describe the experience as nurtur ing and supportivein contrast to the hyper competitive Y Combinator, where entrepreneurs hole up in Mountain View, leaving behind families to vie for investors attention. Y Combinator is pretty much just num bers, numbers, num bers, said Style Lend founder Lona Alia Dun can, 33, who completed stints at both Womens Startup Lab and Y Combinator. Youre so focused on the metrics, and no one is worried about your needs. With the Womens Startup Lab, its very welcoming, very open. People are willing to collaborate and share.Startup lab offers women path to entrepreneurship MCT PHOTO Jennie Wong, right, makes a point as Cynthia Litchi looks on during a meeting of entrepreneurs at the Womens Startup Lab in Menlo Park, Calif. WOMEN IN STARTUPS %  en1.3 percent of privately held companies have a female founder %  enFor startups with ve or more females, 61 percent were successful and 39 percent failed. %  en83 percent of startups have no female executives %  en3 percent of tech startups are founded by womenSOURCE: Dow Jones, Kauffman Foundation

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CALIFORNIA CHROME UPSET AT BELMONT, SPORTS B1 CORNFEST: Pet pig participates in corn-eating contest in Leesburg A3 UKRAINE: Petro Poroshenko sworn in as new president A7 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, June 8, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 159 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C6 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C5 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C6 NATION A7 OBITUARIES A4 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A9. 92 / 74 Some sun, a couple t-storms $1 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Leesburg police were look ing for a lone male Saturday afternoon who is accused of robbing a Wells Fargo bank. The bank is in the 400 block of North Boulevard, also known as U.S. Highway 441. A police sergeant on the scene said they received the call about 12:30 p.m. and witnesses said the man walked into the bank, de manded money and left on foot with an undetermined amount. According to a press re lease, police Lt. Gary Barrett said the suspect implied a weapon, but witnesses didnt see one. Leesburg police, with the help of Lake County Sheriffs Ofce K-9s, were still search ing the area at 3 p.m. Saturday afternoon squad cars surrounded the building while detectives interviewed bank employees in the park ing lot. Police said they were still trying to put together witnesses statements and expected to release more de tails later in the day. Anyone having informa tion on the robbery or the identity of the suspect can contact the Leesburg Po lice Department at 352-7872121. Police looking for suspect in Leesburg bank robbery PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LEESBURG POLICE DEPARTMENT Anyone having information regarding the robbery or the identity of the suspect, shown above, please contact the Leesburg Police Department at 352-787-2121. THERESA CAMPBELL and AUSTIN FULLER news@dailycommercial.com A mid majestic oaks and tall pine trees, Camp Gene va came to life this week with sounds of kids laughing as they frolicked in the pool and played water sports on the camps picturesque lake. Its summer camp season in Lake County. We are excited about it, said Peter Miraglia, director of Camp Geneva, the 100-acre Fruitland Park camp located off of Spring Lake Road. The camp serves 100 local kids for summer day camp, while hundreds more campers from all over the country will come for week-long overnight stays in the cabins and dormitories and enjoy a rope course, basketball, ping pong, ball elds, amphithe ater, dining hall and more. We have 16 groups coming for the summer. Theyre com ing from all over the place, he said, including campers from Tennessee, Georgia and as far south as Miami. Were getting a lot of great feedback from the kids, Mi raglia said of the camps rst week for the 2014 season. Theyre have a really good time and their parents were just ecstatic about being able to have a summer camp pro gram here locally, because a lot of them have to work and they wanted a safe environment for their kids to be able to come out and have a good time. Camp Geneva has been a popular site for more than 40 years, drawing thousands of campers from all over the Setting up camp Lake County kicks off kids summer activity season PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Kids jump into the pool at Camp Geneva in Fruitland Park on Thursday. BELOW: JROTC cadets from East River High School in Orlando stand by their canoes before going out on the water at Camp La-No-Che in Paisley. PLACES TO GO Other traditional summer camps in Lake County include: Camp Horizon in Leesburg, featuring one-week overnight camps with swimming, water ski ing, tubing, canoeing, wall climb ing, archery, soccer, basketball, handicrafts and spiritual activi ties. Visit CampHorizon.org for details. Camp Montessori Day Camp in Leesburg with sports and games, arts and crafts, archery, water fun and pony rides. Go to www.lakemontessori for details. SEE CAMP | A2 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com With details of the scal year 2014-15 Lake Coun ty budget beginning to take shape, the needs are outweighing the reve nues available, according to county ofcials. Public safety is cer tainly one area where there are requests for more funding for salary increases and to replace aging vehicles. Lake Emergency Med ical Services is grappling with more than $1 mil lion shortfall because of a loss in revenue from the Municipal Service Taxing Unit, a county wide property tax to partially fund the ambu lance service. The MSTU funds about a third of the ambulance organi zations budget with the remaining 65 percent funded from user fees. As a result, Jerry Smith, executive direc tor of the organization, is requesting a $1.6 mil lion increase in MSTU funding for the 201314 budget year, with the majority going toward Lake County EMS faces $1M budget shortfall MICHAEL J. MISHAK Associated Press MIAMI BEACH On a recent after noon, Scott McKenzie watched torrential rains and a murky tide swal low the street outside his dog-grooming salon. Within minutes, much of this stretch of chic South Beach was ood ed ankle-deep in a fetid mix of rain and sea. Welcome to the new Venice, McKen zie joked as salt water surged from the sewers. There are few places in the nation more vul nerable to rising sea lev els than low-lying South Florida, a tourist and re tirement mecca built on drained swampland. Yet as other coastal states and the Obama administration take aggressive measures to battle the effects of global warming, Floridas top Republican politicians are challenging the science and balking at government xes. Among the chief skep tics are U.S. Sen. Mar co Rubio and former Gov. Jeb Bush, both pos sible presidential can didates in 2016. Gov. Rick Scott, who is run ning for re-election, has worked with the Repub lican-controlled Legisla ture to dismantle Flor idas edgling climate change initiatives. They were put into place by his predecessor and cur rent opponent, Demo crat Charlie Crist. Im not a scientist, Scott said, after a federal report pinpointed Florida and Miami in particu lar as among the coun trys most at-risk areas. He and other Republi cans warn against what they see as alarmist poli cies that could derail the Seas rise, GOP leaders balk at climate change SEE GOP | A2 SEE BUDGET | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 capital expenses for es sential ambulance chas sis and equipment, and to provide a 3 percent salary increase for all employees. Recently, Smith submit ted his $17.6 million s cal year 2014-15 budget to county commissioners. Funding for $1 million in capital could come from the penny sales tax, but many projects are compet ing for that funding. There is currently only $5.1 mil lion available in the penny sales tax fund, which must go to capital needs. Meanwhile, another option that could be put on the table to fund the remainder of the increase would be a tax increase, according to one county commissioner. Smith said he is dealing with numerous challeng es in the organization and has already cut three quarters of a million dol lars from his budget this year. Also this year, Smith put off buying two am bulances for the organi zation and did not ll six positions. We are estimating call volume to increase and patient transports may also increase marginally, he said. Smith has to replace ve truck chassis for ambulanc es with more than 240,000 miles on them, eight LIFEPAK 12 cardiac moni tors, six breathing machines and seven stretchers. There are currently 10 ambulances out of warran ty, he said, adding the more mileage on a vehicle, the more repairs are needed. If the equipment is not replaced, it could cause a whole host of problems because the manufactur er warranty for the equip ment, such as the cardiac monitors and stretchers, will be expiring, Smith noted. The budget we put to gether is developed to maintain the service level that we have been provid ing and to address some operational needs, which have reached a critical point of needing to be ad dressed, he said. If not addressed, we could have repair costs go up and the potential for a breakdown occurs. We put off buying new ambulances, said Commissioner Tim Sulli van. We are to the point maintenance of the up keep of the eet is more expensive than buying new ambulances. The retention of em ployees is another press ing issue for the organiza tion, Smith said. In the last three years, 59 employees have left the or ganization, of which a third have resigned because of no salary adjustments for the last six years and the work load, Smith said, ac cording to exit interviews he has had with employees. Currently there are 192 employees with Lake EMS. Lack of raises ad versely affects retention, Smith said. Over all, there is a 24 percent turnover rate in the organization com pared with 16 percent in dustrywide, Smith said. Lake EMS employees voted 53 to 19 May 30 to decertify from being repre sented by the Professional Fireghters of Lake County. The election results are pending certica tion from PERC, the Pub lic Employees Relations Commission. If capital replacements are not made, as well as other shortfalls in person nel, it could cause some issues with our operation and our ability to provide service, Smith said. While difcult to imple ment in a tough budget year, Smith said the organi zations employee deploy ment model needs to be reviewed to address the work load paramedics and EMTs take on when faced with a growing population and overall call volume. The deployment mod el is potentially aged out, he said. There are 19 ambu lance stations, of which 13 provide 24-hour cov erage. Six of those ambu lances provide coverage for 13 hours. Peak times are between 11:30 and 8 p.m., where all ambu lances are on the road. Since 2010, Lake EMS responded to 3,530 more calls annually, according to data from the organization. We may need more units and/or more efcient locations, Smith said. Since April, the county estimated a $8 million shortfall in its 201415 budget because of past declining property values and Sheriff Gary Borders impending budget request made last week for $3.2 million in additional funding. County ofcials said they are still analyzing the budget numbers. There are other challenges, too, according to Stephen Koontz, budget director. Some of the challenges include changes in Flor ida Retirement System rates, increasing demand for services, aging infra structure and employee compensation, he said. Commissioner Jimmy Conner, who also serves as vice chairman of the Lake EMS board, said public safety remained a top priority for him, em phasizing that it is a lifeor-death issue. We have to make sure when people call an am bulance they are going to have good, modern ambulances and highly trained people, he said. I dont want ambulanc es breaking down when people are being trans ported. I think the capital needs are critical. Conner said he need ed to study the retention issue within the depart ment further. Commissioner Welton Cadwell, who also serves as chairman of the ambu lance board, said the cap ital needs of the organiza tion would be addressed. You cant abandon your rolling stock, he said. We have to look at the big pic ture of all the services we are providing. One of the options we have to look at is a tax increase. HOW TO REACH US JUNE 7 CASH 3 ............................................... 0-6-1 Afternoon .......................................... 6-6-9 PLAY 4 ............................................. 6-9-4-3 Afternoon ....................................... 6-1-8-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY JUNE 6 FANTASY 5 ............................. 5-7-21-23-25 MEGA MONEY ...................... 6-18-23-3921 MEGA MILLIONS .............. 12-29-37-49-729 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. country. We have so many kids who come through the facility and the pro gram, but what I am real ly most excited about this year is being able to real ly reach out to the local community and get them involved, he said. The people who live around us our friends and our neighbors can come and enjoy our facility. Camp Geneva is add ing a zip line through a wooded landscape and a paintball course, which is expected to be complet ed in the fall. Were also going to be starting an after-school program this fall with lots of new and exciting things, Miraglia said, in cluding a Little Village for preschoolers ages 2-5, which will feature a childrens theater and themed playground. And while summer camp is in session, Mi raglia said Camp Geneva is also providing summer jobs for eight teens from the local high schools. Some 14 college students will be getting paid to work at Easter Seals Camp Chal lenge in Sorrento when camp begins June 15. The 63-acre campus serves kids with disabilities. Michael Slaymaker, vice president of development and planned giving of Easter Seals Florida Inc., believes Camp Challenge will provide an incredible experience for the college students hired to assist the campers. Many of them have decided that is going to be their vocation, and how wonderful, he said. They might not have had the opportunity to spend four weeks caring or working with children with disabilities, so this really gives them the hands-on job duties and they get to learn what it is all about. Two of the college stu dents hired to work at the camp are from Bea con College in Lees burg, while the camp has also hired students from Lake-Sumter State Col lege in recent years. Its great when you can use home-grown talent to help us out, he said. Camp Challenge will run through July 11. Its great for them to build their indepen dence, he said, saying the camp also provides a much needed break for the caregivers. I dont think people conceptualize how much time that it takes to be a caregiver or a parent of somebody with a disabil ity. Its a 24/7 job and to have a week or two off of that duty and to have your time to regenerate and some respite is so badly needed, and that is what Camp Challenge of fers the parents and the caregivers, he said. At Camp La-No-Che, the Boy Scouts of Amer ica campground in Pais ley, returning campers on June 8 will nd a second pool, a new bathhouse, beach volleyball area and a new pump and storage building. These improvements cost approximately $1 mil lion and were paid for by Daytona Beachs Brown & Brown Insurance, the companys board chair man, Hyatt Brown and his wife Cici, according to Matt Ragan, the camps di rector and head of sup port services for the Cen tral Florida Council for Boy Scouts of America. The pool, which has a new water slide, is 124 feet long and 75 feet wide, said Art Shippee, the camps facility manager. It can hold 200,000 gallons and is handicap accessible. The new bathhouse is 4,300 square feet, and the pump and storage build ing is 864 square feet, Shippee said. In addition to giving the camp more swimming op portunities, Ragan said the second pool will be used to teach scuba diving, snor keling and lifesaving. And then also it gives them an opportunity to come out and just have fun, especially with the addition of the water slide, Ragan said. The camp also is work ing on a $25,000 adven ture tower which should be done by the third week of camp. The tow er will be used for rap pelling and a zip line will be added before next years summer camp. The tower was funded by three families and the Knights of Pythias orga nization, Ragan said. Camp ofcials also have expanded the camps lakefront area and added a pavilion. Ofcials are current ly looking for $1 million to enhance the camps Na tive American area and an other $700,000 to renovate a hall to make it more of a training center, with air conditioning and better classrooms, Ragan said. The camp will employ 125 staff this summer, compared with about 100 in the past, and about 30 additional youth volun teers will be used at var ious times during the summer. According to Ragan, about 35 to 40 of those employees come from north Lake County. The camp expects 4,200 youth campers and about 1,000 adult leaders to show up throughout the summer for weeklong stays. CAMP FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Kevin Murphy, one of the founders of Triple Eagle Experiences, a company that specializes in building challenge courses, works on the rappelling tower being built at Camp La-No-Che in Paisley. GOP FROM PAGE A1 BUDGET FROM PAGE A1 countrys tenuous economic recovery. Their positions could affect their polit ical fortunes. Democrats plan to place climate change, and the GOPs skepticism, front and center in a state where the issue is no longer an abstraction. Their hope is to win over independents and siphon some Republicans, who are deeply divided over global warming. Tom Steyer, a billionaire environmental activist, has pledged to spend $100 mil lion this year to inuence seven critical contests nationwide, including the Flori da governors race. The battle in the countrys largest swing state offers a preview of what could be a pivotal ght in the next presi dential election. Crist is running for his old job as a Democrat, criticizing Scott and Florida Republicans for reversing his efforts to curb global warming. They dont believe in science. Thats ridiculous, Crist said at a recent cam paign rally in Miami. This is ground zero for climate change in America. The budget we put together is developed to maintain the service level that we have been providing and to address some operational needs, which have reached a critical point of needing to be addressed. Jerry Smith, executive director of Lake EMS

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com OCALA Millers Boating Center to offer boating safety course Harris Chain Sail and Power Squadron and Millers Boating Center will host a United States Power Squadron boating safe ty course from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., on June 21 at Millers Boating Center, 1661 NW 57th St. (U.S. Highway 441), in Ocala. Cost for the class is $49 for the rst family member, which includes a copy of the student manual, and an additional $25 for each family member willing to share the manu al. Payment can be made by cash or checks only. To pre-register for the course, go to www.harrischain.org. The course has a maximum capacity of 20 students. Call Phil Ponticello, Harris Chain education ofcer, at 352-288-2079 or email Philip@ponticello.me, or contact Millers Boating Center at 352-622-7757. MOUNT DORA B.J. Thomas to perform at community building Five-time Grammy and two-time Dove Award winner B.J. Thomas, who has sold more than 70 million records and is ranked in Billboards Top 50 most played artists over the past 50 years, will appear at the Mount Dora Community Building, 520 N. Baker St., next to City Hall, from 4 to 6 p.m., on June 22 for one show only. For information, call the Parks and Recreation Department at 352-7357183. For tickets, $35 general seat ing and $45 VIP seating, go to www. whattodoinmtdora.com. LEESBURG Disabilities forum to be held at Sunrise Arc The Area 13 Family Care Council and the Agency for Persons with Disability (APD) will host a free Family Forum for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Saturday at Sunrise Arc of Lake County, 35201 Radio Road in Leesburg. The meeting will focus on behav iors and developmental disabili ties, and will begin with registration at 9:15 a.m. It will feature behav ioral professionals and a panel of speakers. Guests can also take part in re source exhibits, a scrapbooking event, have lunch and speak with APD staff and Family Care Council members. To RSVP, call Betty Kay Clements at 352-753-1163 or email tocbet tykay@aol.com. Child care or adult supervision is not available for this event. THE VILLAGES Paramount Urgent Care to offer free student physicals To ensure student success for the new school year, Paramount Urgent Care and the local charity Back to School is COOL-Lake County have teamed up to offer free back-toschool physicals for local kids. Families receiving physicals, or anyone who would like to con tribute, are encouraged to donate school supplies at any Paramount location to benet homeless and economically-challenged students. Dates for physicals at participat ing Paramount locations are as fol lows and appointments are re quired: July 16 and 17, 8640 E. County Road 466, in The Villages, 352-674-9218; July 23 and 24, 628 U.S. Highway 27, in Clermont, 352-242-1988. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Days before his sec ond-degree murder tri al was to begin, an alleged Sorrento gang mem ber was sentenced to 25 years in prison on Fri day in a plea deal in the 2012 shooting death of a DeLand man. Mauricio Garcia-Avila, 20, was also given 10 years of probation for the murder of 22-yearold Robert Headdy by Circuit Judge Mark Nacke on Friday. The shooting oc curred Oct. 19, 2012, near Azalea Avenue in Sorrento. According to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, witnesses said the victim and the suspects family had altercations in the month prior to the shooting and the victim allegedly threatened to shoot the suspects brother, Jose Flores-Avila. Deputies were called to the scene after witnesses reported hear ing three gunshots. They arrived to nd Head dy shot in the head with a shotgun and two spent shotgun shells by his side. Headdy died at the scene. The brothers were al legedly trying to sell the shotgun. Witnesses said they saw Jose Flores-Avila running from the scene and inves tigators found both broth ers at an Orange Avenue SORRENTO Man sentenced 25 years in shooting death GARCIA-AVILA LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com After ling the paper work 12 days ago, Orange County Sheriff Capt. San dy Carpenter has with drawn his bid to run for the Lake County Commis sion District 2 seat against incumbent Commission er Sean Parks, according to the Supervisor of Elec tions ofce. In 2012, Carpenter ran for Lake County sheriff against incumbent Sheriff Gary Bor ders. In the August 2012 primary elec tion, Carpenter re ceived 32 percent of the vote, compared with 67 percent for Borders. Messages left for Car penter were not returned. Other races shaping up so far include: County Commission District 4 Commission er Leslie Campione will face Thomas Hen ry Poole Jr., a senior pastor of Mount Moriah Church in Wildwood and son of Thomas Henry Poole Sr., a prom inent NAACP civil rights leader and teacher who fought for civil rights after integration in Eustis. Poole is running as a can didate with no party afl iation. County Judge Judge Terry T. Neal will face Daniel David Archer Lake County School Board District 1 mem ber Bill Mathias is facing John Ardizone; District 3 School Board Member Tod Howard is facing Jamie Maret Hanja and Marc An thony Dodd; and Nancy Muenzmay and Stepha nie Ann Luke are vying for the District 5 seat held by Kyleen Fischer, who is not seeking re-election. The qualifying period ends June 20. LAKE COUNTY Carpenter withdraws bid for commission seat CARPENTER MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A homeless man accused Thursday of burglarizing two Tavares homes wasnt that dif cult to nd considering a description giv en to police of him wearing a wom ens bathing suit. According to an arrest afdavit, when police found the suspect, Dustin James Landers, at a nearby BP gas station on U.S. Highway 441, he was wearing a black camouage womens bathing suit and a pair of tight blue jeans rolled up below his knees that allegedly had stolen jewelry in the back pocket. Landers, 31, also allegedly had a pink dufe bag with TAVARES Man charged with burglary found in bikini LANDERS Lake County Animal Ser vices is hosting an auction at 11 a.m. on Saturday, featuring a variety of animals ranging from a bunny to a horse. The event will be held at the shelter, at 28123 County Road 561, according to a press re lease. The following animals will be up for auction: 10-15-year-old Tennessee Walker Gelding 1 -year-old goat three roosters three chickens New Zealand bunny Auctions not only help off set the cost of caring for our many shelter animals, but are also a great way for public to Animal Shelter to auction off variety of pets LAKE COUNTY SEE AUCTION | A6 SEE BURGLARY | A6 SEE SHOOTING | A6 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com He was a pig lit erally at Saturdays corn-eating contest during Leesburgs annu al downtown Cornfest. Weighing about 25 pounds with white hair, hooves and a snout, Korky the pig was a last-minute addition to the contest. Organizers were impressed with the 9-month old miniature pig after they saw him in the festivals pet parade, where Korkys owners had to use corn to entice him to march. His own ers said Korky loves corn. We thought it would help get more contes tants, said corn-eating contest organizer Rex Masterman, one of sev eral merchants with the Downtown Leesburg Business Association. Participants were given as many ears of corn as they wanted but the ob jective was to eat as many ears as they could within a two-minute period. For a cob to count, it had to be stripped clean of kernels. Saturdays contest was divided into adult and children divisions, the latter which Korky participated in. The 10 or so children in the division ate on a table while Korky devoured his corn in a nearby pen. With a pig compet ing this year, it might be rough, said Mark Romero, as he waited for his relatives to begin competing in childrens LEESBURG Swine tries to hog corn-eating contest PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Stacey McCarthy, front, gnaws through a cob of corn during a corn-eating contest during the Leesburg annual Cornfest on Saturday. Leesburgs Cornfest had a surprise contestant in its corneating competition after Korky the pig decided to join. SEE CONTEST | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 OBITUARIES Alfred Dean Anderson Alfred Dean Ander son, 75, of Leesburg, Florida, died Thursday, June 5, 2014 at Lees burg, FL. He was born October 25, 1938 in Peoria, Illinois. Mr. An derson received his Bachelor of Science De gree at Bradley Uni versity Class of in Peoria, IL and then be came a teacher in La con, IL for 3 yrs. In 1964 he became an employee at State Farm Insurance in Bloomington, IL. He was transferred to Win ter Haven in 1967 and then moved to Lees burg in 1973 and be came a State Farm In surance Agent. After 36 years of service he re tired in 2000. Mr. An derson spent his retire ment years enjoying the outdoors with his fam ily and friends. He also enjoyed golf, hunting, and traveling with his wife Sue. He is survived by his wife of 52 yrs., Carol Sue Anderson of Leesburg; son, Andy (Kim) Anderson of Yala ha; daughter, Kiersten (Derek) Freeman of Sor rento; grandchildren, Patrick, Christopher, Ki ersten, and Hunter; and his brother, Fred Ander son of Tampa. He was preceded in death by his sister, Deloris Hoerr. Visitation will be held at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 from 6:00 8:00 pm. Services will be held at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, Lees burg, FL on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 10:00 am, Pastor Barry Hunt eman of Hope Lutheran Church, The Villages, FL will preside. Interment will follow at Tavares Cemetery, Tavares, FL. In lieu of owers, dona tions may be made to Cornerstone Hospice, 2445 Lane Park Rd.,Ta vares, FL 32778. Online condolences may be left at www.beyersfuner alhome.com. Arrange ments entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home, Leesburg, FL. Edward Joseph Crowell A 17-year resident of Leesburg, Edward Jo seph Crowell, 87, died peacefully June 5 from complications follow ing a fall at home. His life was a joyful jour ney that took him from his birth in Newark, NJ to upstate New York, Miami, the Jackson ville Beaches, Califor nia, Georgia and nal ly Central Florida. As a teenager with U.S. Navy orders in hand, he found himself in Bra zil in case World War II spread there. As an old salt re-enlistee after nearly 20 years of civil ian workaday struggle in many different jobs, he sailed repeated ly from Na val Station Mayport (Fl.) to the Mediter ranean on the U.S.S. Sarato ga air craft carrier. Aboard the U.S.S. McCaffery de stroyer he was part of the critical blockade Russian ships delivering more missiles to Cuba. In Vietnam, he was on smaller boats supply ing much younger men ghting a controversial war he didnt want his sons to join. Ed was nev er all about the military. Beginning with his mar riage Sept. 13, 1947 to his beloved Teddy (Mar jorie Jean Palmer), he was intent on raising a family with love as a de pendable provider and caring father. He and Teddy (known mostly as Jean) were together through almost 67 years of laughs, frowns, chal lenges and travels. They brought up four sons and welcomed their wives: Edward Jr. and Lynda of Austin, TX, Richard and Barbara of Duluth, Mn., James and Donna of Hateld, Ma., and Christopher of Punta Gorda, Belize. Six grandchildren and six great grandchildren fol lowed. Wherever they lived, most every year family members visited Florida or Ed and Jean came to see them. No matter where Ed trav eled or how much in a hurry those with him might have been, he never let pass a chance to make a new friend. He always had a nice word or sometimes a maddening lengthy ex change for store ca shiers, ticket takers, neighbors or strangers crossing his path .For people in need of a help ing hand, Ed was there to offer what he could regardless of skills or resources. He felt God would want it that way and Ed was secure in his faith. He and Jean at tended Mass every Sun day at St. Pauls Catho lic Church in Leesburg. With the Knights of Co lumbus in Jacksonville Beach, he spent many Easters cooking and serving dinner for se nior citizens. No one could be richer than Ed in the things that mat tered most to him love and family. Ed let his sons and their fami lies know how proud he was of them during ev ery visit and phone call. Most of all, he made it clear that the woman he loved so much was the rock upon which his life was built. He didnt wait until an an niversary or a knock on deaths door to tell the world just that. Ed start ed out without privilege or much of an educa tion. He didnt achieve high rank or a wealth in dollars. But he paid at tention to the world at large, free of prejudice and with respect for others. He could argue differences of opinion with his sons and part with hugs. Toward the end of his long, winding road he acknowledged that luck played a part in his success. But the truth is he simply made the best choices about whats really valuable in life. It was an exam ple that will last for gen erations. A service at the Hawthorne of Lees burg community center will be announced lat er. Online condolenc es may be left at www. beyersfuneralhome. com. Arrangements en trusted to Beyers Funer al Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg, FL. Charles William Keedy Charles William Bill Keedy, 77, of Lees burg, peacefully passed away on May 22, 2014. Bill was born in Taylor, Michigan on February 7, 1937. Moving to Flor ida at a young age and becoming a resident to Leesburg. Bill enjoyed his past times with his family and friends, trad ing in real estate and serving the community. He is preceded in death by his wife, Judy Keedy. Survived by his sons, Chuck Keedy of Jack sonville, Mark Keedy of San Diego, Ca., daugh ter Ann Keedy Collier of Orlando; stepdaughter Chris Kao of Weirsdale, stepson, Jay Friend of Lady Lake; eight grand children and twelve great-grandchildren and sister Margaret Blakemore of Leesburg. A Celebration of Life will be held at 11:00 am on Friday, June 13, 2014 at Bey ers Funer al Home, Leesburg. Inurn ment will follow at Lone Oak Cemetery, Leesburg. For those who wish, in lieu of owers, memo rial contributions may be made to: Leesburg Heritage Museum, 111 S. Sixth St., Leesburg, Fl. 34748. Online con dolences may be left at www.beyersfuner alhome.com. Arrange ments entrusted to Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. Rex A. Penton Rex A. Penton, 90 of The Villages, FL and Millbrook, AL passed away June 5, 2014. He is survived by his daugh ters: Debra L. Penton (Clarence Roque) of The Vil lages, FL; Kellie L. For son (Glen) of Marion, AR; Wendy K. Penton of Wetumpka, AL; long time and beloved com panion Anita J. Billing sley of The Villages, FL; 5 grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren and oth er loving extended fam ily. A Veteran of the US Army, he served his country in WWII as a sharp shooter instruc tor. He was a sheet met al and air conditioning foreman for Miami Air Conditioning in Miami, FL and an avid profes sional billiards player as well as jack of all trades. The family will receive friends in the chapel of Beyers Funeral Home in Lady Lake, FL on Mon day June 9, 2014 from 3-5 pm with services and burial to follow in Opp, AL. For those who wish and in memory of Mr. Penton, donations may be made to their favorite charity. Con dolences may be left at www.beyersfuneral home.com Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory, Lady Lake/The Villages, FL in charge of arrangements. William O. Bill Rast William O. Bill Rast, 96, of Fruitland Park was born May 8, 1918 to Henry Holland and Mamie Cannon Rast. He was a lifelong resident of Lees burg and Fruitland Park and a gradu ate of Lees burg High School, Class of 1936. A World War II Veteran, he enlisted in the Army in 1944 and served in the infantry in Electric Razor Repair Clinics Wed, June 11th Wed, June 25th WE SHARPEN MOWER BLADES! IN MEMORY CROWELL KEEDY RAST SEE OBITS | A6

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 home a few blocks away from the shooting. A shotgun with similar shells was found by a fence behind the house, along with Maurico Garcia-Avilas wallet, according to sheriffs reports. The trial had been sched uled to start Monday before the plea deal was made Fri day. It is not clear what evi dence the prosecution had planned to present. How ever, according to court re cords, the defense had mo tioned for the court to stop the prosecution from enter ing into evidence that Gar cia-Avila is a gang member. Assistant State Attorney Rich Buxman, who prosecuted the case, submitted a motion on June 2, asking the judge to keep witnesses from testifying that Headdy had been smoking marijuana prior to the altercation. While the motion acknowledges medical examiners testing revealed marijuana in Headdys system, Buxman argues the results do not show how much of the drug was present and added theres no evidence the drug affected the victims actions during the altercation. Buxman also motioned the court to prevent the defense from arguing during the trial that a witness who alleged ly tied Garcia-Avila to the shooting should be charged with perjury after making in consistent statements. Buxman said during an in terview Thursday he expect ed lawyers for Garcia-Avila to argue self-defense. Garcia-Avila was given two years credit for time served. purchase livestock at low prices, Bri an Sheahan, director of Lake Countys Community Safety & Compliance De partment, said in the release. Animals will be auctioned off to the highest bidder and must be removed from property before 4 p.m. Winning bidders must be able to transport their animals off-site. Payments are accepted in cash, mon ey orders, certied check and cred it cards. Animals are sold as is but all horses must have a negative Coggins test. Future Lake County Animal Services events include auctions on June 21 and Aug. 9, and rabies clinic and adoption events on July 19 and Sept. 20. To nd out more about Lake County Animal Services, or to donate funds to help with operations at the shelter, go to www.lakecounty.gov/adopt, visit the shelter or call 352-343-9688. Italy for 2 years. Upon his return, he worked for the Seaboard Coast line Railroad as a clerk for 30 years before re tiring in 1973. He con tinued working for an other 12 years at Sumter Motor Co. in Wildwood and was active in his community as a Com missioner for Fruitland Park for 19 years. He was a member of Com munity United Meth odist Church in Fruit land Park for 70 years and was active in many facets of the church. Survivors include: wife Winifred Knight Howell Galbreath Rast; daugh ters: Nancy Rast Lipps and Billie K. Rast Gold en; many grandchil dren and great grand children; and nephew G. M. Ken Rast; Win ifreds 3 daughters: Lin da Howell Myer White, Margaret Peggy How ell Farrell and Mary Cla rice Howell. He was pre ceded in death by: his parents; rst wife Thel ma Lee G. Rast; broth er George H. Rast; sis ter Nellie R. Munden and nephew Charles R. Munden. The fami ly will receive friends on Monday June 9, 2014 in the chapel of Beyers Fu neral Home in Leesburg from 5-7 PM. Graveside services will be at 9:30 AM at Shiloh Cemetery in Fruitland Park on Tuesday June 10 and a Celebration of Life Ser vice will follow at 11 AM at Community Unit ed Methodist Church in Fruitland Park with the Rev. Mike Ford ham ofciating. For those who wish, me morial donations may be made to: Commu nity United Methodist Church Building Fund, 309 College Ave., Fruit land Park, FL 34731 or Cornerstone Hospice, c/o Lane Purcell Hos pice House, 2452 Coun ty Road 526 E, Sumter ville, FL 33585. Online condolences may be left at www.beyersfuner alhome.com. Arrange ments entrusted to Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. DEATH NOTICES Daniel Patrick Hall Daniel Patrick Hall, 67 of Sorrento, died Thurs day, June 5, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. 1031 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748 www.decoratingden.com OBITS FROM PAGE A4 SHOOTING FROM PAGE A3 BURGLARY FROM PAGE A3 more stolen items inside. Landers was charged with two counts each of burglary and grand theft. Landers remained in the Lake County Jail Saturday on no bail. According to police, two residents one on East Delaware Street and one on North New Hampshire Avenue reported Thursday afternoon that their homes had been burglarized. One woman said she came home and saw the suspect jumping her fence. She said inside her Delaware Street home it appeared the suspect had taken a shower and ate her food. She also said several items were missing, including jewelry. A witness told police the suspect who had climbed the fence was a woman in a bathing suit. Tavares police, joined by Astatula of cers, searched the area before spotting Land ers in the gas station parking lot. Landers then allegedly ran in the store and tried to run out another door before being captured by police. His pink dufe bag and another black bag contained more jew elry, an Xbox, head phones, iPad and oth er items, according to police. AUCTION FROM PAGE A3 CONTEST FROM PAGE A3 division. Romero won the adult division last year and was also a con testant Saturday. When the contest be gan, the human partic ipants raised their cobs to their mouths and starting chewing. But most of the eyes appeared to be on Korky as his owners daughter, 12-year-old Karley, held the corn up to his snout for him to chew. When the two min utes was up, however, it was Sydney Levey, Cait lyn Wolff and Kassan dra Abarca who won the childrens division after they stripped clean one ear of corn each. Korky ate about one and a half cobs of corn, but appar ently neither was void of kernels. When Korkys owners held him up for pictures after the contest, they had to hurry and place him back down after he let out repeated squeals. He doesnt like los ing, said owner Kevin Paulling with a laugh. Paulling also jokingly attributed Korkys loss to allowing children at the event to feed the pet pig shortly before the contest. Paulling and his wife Kim got the pet pig last year and he has been a companion to their oth er pets, including their dog Lillie, an English springer spaniel, who they said helped to pot ty train Korky. The couple said Korky also likes riding a surf board in their pool, hid ing in the home and taking walks on a leash. Hes a lot of fun, Kim said. Romero won the adult division by eating three cobs of corn. In the chil drens corn-shucking di vision, Jake Olivera, a 12-year-old Leesburg First Academy student, won rst place after strip ping nine ears of corn clean; and Bryce Wolff, also 12, an Oak Park Mid dle School student, took second with eight ears. There was also a corn-shucking contest for adults, as well as a Cornhole Tournament, the latter a sanctioned event run by the Sun shine Cornhole group of Orlando. Winners were given monetary prizes. The contests were part of a busy day at the downtown Cornfest, which included more than 10,000 ears of fresh ly picked, triple-sweet Zellwood corn straight from the Lake County farm of Long & Scott. Patrons could buy bags or crates of corn ears to take home and cook, or sink their teeth into hot, buttery sweet corn on the spot and organiz ers had seasoning and four dipping bowls full of butter setup in front of the vendor stand. The annual Cornfest started at 8 a.m. Greg Thorpe, a Downtown Leesburg Business As sociation member who helped sell the corn, said at noon they had already went through ve gallons of butter and sold 3,000 ears.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 READY TO TRY A NEW BINGO PLACE??Open 7 Days a WeekWalk in bingo Noon-7pm daily, tons of pull tabs, food, beer and wine. We will have extended hours once we get enough people playing.A unique place that will be your new hangout! www.facebook.com/bjsbingoeustis Email: bjsbingoeustis@gmail.com BJs Phone: 352-431-4345Located in Eustis at 415 Plaza Drive in the Big Lots shopping center LAURA MILLS and JIM HEINTZ Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine Ukraines new president on Saturday called for pro-Russian rebels in the countrys east to lay down their arms and welcomed dia logue with the insurgents, but said he wouldnt negotiate with those he called gangsters and killers and struck a deant tone on the Russian-annexed Crimean Peninsula. Petro Poroshenkos inau gural address after taking the oath of ofce in parliament gave little sign of a quick res olution to the conict in the east, which Ukrainian of cials say has left more than 200 people dead. He also rmly insisted that Crimea, the Black Sea pen insula annexed by Russia in March, was, is and will be Ukrainian. He gave no indi cation of how Ukraine could regain control of Crimea, which Russian President Vlad imir Putin has said was allotted to Ukraine unjustly under Sovi et leader Nikita Khrushchev. Hours after the speech, Putin ordered security tight ened along Russias border with Ukraine to prevent ille gal crossings, Russian news agencies said. Ukraine claims that many of the insurgents in the east have come from Rus sia; Poroshenko on Saturday said he would offer a corridor for safe passage of Russian militants out of the country. Rebel leaders in the east dismissed Poroshenkos speech. At the moment its impos sible for him to come (to Do netsk for talks), said Denis Pushilin, a top gure in the self-declared Donetsk Peo ples Republic. Perhaps with security, a group, so people wont tear him to pieces. Poroshenko offered am nesty to rebels who dont have blood on their hands. But I dont believe it, said Valery Bolotov, the insurgent leader in the Luhansk region. Rebels in both Luhansk and Donetsk have declared their regions independent. The new president prom ised I will bring you peace, but did not indicate whether Ukrainian forces would scale back their offensives against the insurgency, which Ukraine says is fomented by Russia. Poroshenko sworn in as Ukraines president SERGEI CHUZAVKOV / AP Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko reviews an honor guard after the inauguration ceremony in Sophia Square in Kiev, Ukraine, Saturday. M.L. JOHNSON Associated Press MILWAUKEE Dozens of gay cou ples married Saturday at courthous es in Milwaukee and Madison, tak ing advantage of what most believed would be a small window in which to get hitched before a judges deci sion overturning the states same-sex marriage ban was put on hold. The decision was announced Fri day afternoon just as the party was getting started at PrideFest, an annual gay celebration that draws thousands of people to Milwaukees festival grounds on Lake Michigan. Many couples who married Sat urday said the judges decision had caught them by surprise, and they hadnt wanted to break Friday night plans. Others needed time to assem ble the documents required for a mar riage license. Couples began lining up outside the Milwaukee County court house at 6 a.m., three hours before it opened. Craig Cook and Marshall Draper ar rived about 8:30 a.m. and found near ly two dozen couples in line ahead of them. Cook, 43, said he and oth ers had hoped U.S. District Judge Bar bara Crabb would make a decision in time for PrideFest. He and Draper at tended the festival Friday night and planned to return Saturday after be ing married by a Unitarian minister outside the courthouse. Had this been legal, we probably would have done this 20 years ago, Cook said. Hundreds of gay couples rush to marry in Wisconsin SAMEER N. YACOUB Associated Press BAGHDAD A series of car bombs explod ed across Iraqs capital Saturday night, killing at least 52 people in a day of violence that saw militants storm a uni versity in the countrys restive Anbar province and take dozens hos tage, authorities said. The attacks in Bagh dad largely focused on Shiite neighborhoods, underscoring the sectar ian violence now strik ing at Iraq years after a similar wave nearly tore the country apart fol lowing the U.S.-led inva sion that toppled Sadd am Hussein. Now with U.S. troops gone, Iraq founds itself ghting on fronts across the coun try, as separate clashes in a northern city killed 21 police ofcers and 38 militants, ofcials said. The rst Baghdad at tack took place Satur day night in the capitals western Baiyaa district, killing nine people and wounding 22, police said. Later on, seven car bombs in different parts of Baghdad killed at least 41 people and wounded 62, police said. A roadside bomb in western Bagh dad also killed two peo ple and wounded six, po lice said. All the attacks happened in a one-hour period and largely tar geted commercial streets in Shiite neighborhoods, authorities said. Hospital ofcials con rmed the casualty g ures. All ofcials spoke on condition of anonym ity because they were not authorized to release de tails to journalists. The day began with militants killing three po lice ofcers on guard at the gates of Anbar Uni versity, a police and a mil itary ofcial said. Islamic extremists and other an ti-government militias have held parts of Anbars nearby provincial capi tal of Ramadi and the city of Fallujah since Decem ber amid rising tensions between Sunni Muslims and the Shiite-led gov ernment in Baghdad. The gunmen detained dozens of students inside a university dorm during their attack, the ofcials said. Sabah Karhout, the head of Anbars provin cial council, told jour nalists that hundreds of students were inside the university compound when the attack started at the school. Anbar Univer sity says it has more than 10,000 students, mak ing it one of the countrys largest. Ahmed al-Mehamdi, a student who was taken hostage, said he awoke to the crackle of gunre, looked out the window and saw armed men dressed in black run ning across the campus. Minutes later, the gun men entered the dor mitory and ordered ev erybody to stay in their rooms while taking oth ers away, he said. The Shiite students at the school were terried, al-Mehamdi said, as the gunmen identied them selves as belonging to an al-Qaida splinter group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Le vant. The Sunni terror group, ghting in Syria with other rebels trying to topple President Bashar Assad, is known for mas sive, bloody attacks in Iraq as well often target ing Shiites that they view as heretics. Bombs kill 52 as gunmen storm university in Iraq AP FILE PHOTO A woman makes a gesture of prayer as she looks at damage from a Saturday car bomb attack near a Kebab restaurant, in the mainly Shiite Habibiya neighborhood of Baghdad.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB Leesburg, FL34748 NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatrist

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HOWARD FENDRICH Associated Press PARIS Nothing came easily for Maria Sharapova in the French Open nal. Serves hit by her sur gically repaired shoul der often missed the mark, resulting in 12 double-faults. Shots that would be winners against most oppo nents were retrieved by Simona Halep and sent right back. Leads that usually hold up van ished in a blink. On a muggy afternoon, with the temperature in the high 70s (20s Celsius), points were lung-sear ing struggles. Sharapova was up to the task. In an enter taining and undulating championship match the rst womens nal at Roland Garros in 13 years to go three sets Sharapova showed that shes as tough as they come, particularly on the red clay that used to ummox her. She edged Halep 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4 Saturday to win a second French Open title in three years. This is the toughest Grand Slam nal Ive ever played, Sharapo va said. It is her fth major trophy in all. Remark ably, Sharapova owns twice as many from Par is as the one each she won at Wimbledon in 2004, the U.S. Open in 2006, and the Australian Open in 2008. If somebody had told me ... at some stage in my career, that Id have more Roland Gar ros titles than any oth er Grand Slam, Id prob ably go get drunk, Sharapova said with a chuckle. Or tell them to get drunk. One or the SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Can Mickelson win the U.S. Open? / B4 Wait til next year PHOTOS BY MATT SLOCUM / AP Tonalist (11) with Joel Rosario up edges out Commissioner (8) with Javier Castellano up to win the 146th running of the Belmont Stakes on Saturday in Elmont, N.Y. California Chrome, the pre-race favorite to win the Triple Crown, is third from left. California Chrome nished in a dead heat for fourth place. BETH HARRIS Associated Press NEW YORK Califor nia Chrome failed in his bid to win the rst Tri ple Crown in 36 years on Saturday, losing the Belmont Stakes to 9-1 long shot Tonalist. The Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner nished in a dead-heat for fourth with Wick ed Strong. California Chromes loss extend ed the longest drought without a Triple Crown champion. Three tough races in ve weeks proved too demanding for Califor nia Chrome, who was sent off as the heavy 4-5 favorite by tens of thou sands packed into Bel mont Park on an 80-de gree day, hoping to see history. Afrmed re mains the most recent Triple Crown winner in 1978. The raucous crowd was silenced when it be came obvious that Cali fornia Chrome lacked his usual punch in the stretch. Jockey Victor Espi noza realized long be fore then that his chest nut colt wasnt up to Jockey Joel Rosario is congratulated after winning the Belmont Stakes atop Tonalist. DAVID VINCENT / AP Maria Sharapova returns a shot at Simona Halep during Saturdays womens nal at the French Open at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris. Sharapova edges Halep for second French title BRIAN MAHONEY Associated Press SAN ANTONIO The San Antonio Spurs are on an unprecedented postseason roll that not even a boatload of turn overs in Game 1 of the NBA Finals could stop. They probably ruined Tim Duncans hopes of a career change, though. Duncan wants to be a point guard, coach Gregg Popovich re vealed Saturday, a wish that wont be grant ed. But Duncan would gladly settle for another championship, and the Spurs would be halfway there by beating Miami today in Game 2. The Spurs have won eight straight postsea son home games by 15 or more points, an NBA record, but know as well as anyone that a onegame lead means noth ing against the Heat. Thats why I think we cant be satised, said point guard Tony Park er, who isnt worried about losing his job to Duncan. Because we was in the same situa tion and we know they can win here, and so we just have to go out there and play our game and try to win this one. I think its a big game for the series. LeBron James ex pects to be fully ready for the Heat, who also dropped the opener last year in the nals against the Spurs, and in 2012 to Oklahoma City. Mi ami is 5-0 in series with James when dropping the opener, rebound ing to win Game 2 every time. A 2-0 decit would surely bring loads of unwanted attention to whats already one of the most scrutinized players and teams in sports. Im sure the series would be over from the outside, Heat guard Dwyane Wade said, laughing. Our focus is on how we can win ballgames and understand in the series its the rst one to four; not the rst one to one, not the rst one to two, not the rst one to San Antonio tries to drop Heat into unfamiliar 2-0 hole FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com A quintet of players with area connections realized their dreams of being drafted during the annual Major League Baseball June Amateur Draft, which ended Saturday. Former Mount Dora standout Austin An derson, South Sumter graduate Garrett Cave, Lake-Sumter State Col lege pitcher Shane Crouse, former Eus tis and LSSC pitch er Kuehl McEach ern and cu rrent Leesburg Light ning in elder Brad Antchak were selected in the ninth, 17th, 24th 34th and 39th rounds, re spectively. Anderson was chosen in the ninth round by the Baltimore Orioles, Currently a third base man for the University of Mississippi, Ander son is batting .332 for the Rebels this season. Ole Miss is playing Lou isiana-Lafayette in La fayette, La. in the NCAA Super-Regionals. Cave, a right-handed pitcher, was taken with the 512th overall by the New York Yankees. Cave is a Florida Internation al recruit and climbed a draft boards in the weeks leading up to the draft. Scouts say his fast ball regularly hits 93 mph and his secondary pitches have improved, particularly his curve ball. At 17-years old, he is one of the youngest players in the class of draftees. Crouse, a right-hand ed pitcher, was taken with the 725th pick by the Cincinnati Reds. He appeared in 14 games for the Lakehawks in 2014 and posted a 3-6 record with a 6.87 ERA. Opposing hitters bat ted .273 against Crouse, who struck out 48 in 38 innings. McEachern, currently a member of the Lees burg Lightning, was se lected with the 1,034th pick by Boston. Head ing into todays game against Sanford. A relief pitcher, McEach ern has two saves for the Lightning in two appearances. He spent the 2014 col lege season with Flagler College, where he was 2-3 with a 9.39 ERA. With LSSC, he record ed 12 saves as a sopho more with a 1.26 ERA. He was third in the na tion in saves. Antchak spent the 2014 college season at Northeastern Oklaho ma A&M College. He is currently playing for the Leesburg Lightning. He was chosen with the 1,156th pick by the Houston Astros. Antchak hit .295 with two homers and 29 RBIs with NE Oklaho ma A&M, and was hit ting .143 heading into todays game against Sanford. The annual June draft began Thursday when the Houston As tros selected left-hand ed pitcher Brady Aiken with the rst pick. Aik en was the rst pitcher to be the top pick since the Yankees selected Brien Taylor in 1991. Locals selected in MLB Draft SEE NBA | B2 SEE FRENCH | B2 California Chromes Triple Crown quest collapses with fourth-place finish at Belmont Park in 146th Belmont Stakes SEE BELMONT | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 8 14@ College Park Freedom7p mSanford River Rats5p mWinter Garden Squeeze7p m@ Winter Garden Squeeze7p mWinter Garden Squeeze7p mCollege Park Freedom7p m HORSE RACING Belmont Finish Order 1. Tonalist 2. Commissioner 3. Medal Count 4. DH-California Chrome 4. DH-Wicked Strong 6. Samraat 7. General a Rod 8. Matterhorn 9. Commandi ng Curve 10. Matuszak 11. Ride On Curlin AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Pocono 400 After Friday qualifying; race today At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.415. 2. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 181.408. 3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 181.316. 4. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 180.832. 5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 180.513. 6. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 180.458. 7. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 179.827. 8. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 179.565. 9. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 179.548. 10. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 179.383. 11. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 179.326. 12. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 179.126. 13. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 179.258. 14. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 179.229. 15. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 179.072. 16. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 179.051. 17. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 178.976. 18. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 178.919. 19. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 178.777. 20. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 178.678. 21. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 178.288. 22. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 178.144. 23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 178.031. 24. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 177.288. 25. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 178.045. 26. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 177.968. 27. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 177.908. 28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 177.83. 29. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 177.162. 30. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 176.308. 31. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 176.025. 32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 175.922. 33. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 175.867. 34. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 175.675. 35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 175.613. 36. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 174.958. 37. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 38. (44) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (66) Timmy Hill, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (33) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, Owner Points. BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs Finals (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: San Antonio 110, Miami 95 Sunday, June 8: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. HOCKEY NHL Playoffs Finals (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Wednesday, June 4: Los Angeles 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Saturday, June 7: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, late Monday, June 9: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 11: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Friday, June 13: NY Rangers at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 16: Los Angeles at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 18: NY Rangers at Los Ange les, 8 p.m. BASEBALL NCAA Division I Super Regionals Baseball Best-of-3; x-if necessary Host school is Game 1 home team; visiting school is Game 2 home team; coin ip determines Game 3 home team At Jim Patterson Stadium Louisville, Ky. Friday: Louisville 5, Kennesaw State 3 Saturday: Kennesaw State (40-23) vs. Louisville (49-15), late x-Sunday: Kennesaw State vs. Louisville, 6 p.m. At Hawkins Field Nashville, Tenn. Friday: Vanderbilt 11, Stanford 6 Saturday: Stanford 5, Vanderbilt 4 Sunday: Stanford (35-25) at Vanderbilt (45-19), 3 p.m. At Allie P. Reynolds Stadium Stillwater, Okla. Friday: UC Irvine 8, Oklahoma State 4 Saturday: UC Irvine (39-23) vs. Oklahoma State (48-17), late x-Sunday: UC Irvine vs. Oklahoma State, 9 p.m. At UFCU Disch-Falk Field Austin, Texas Friday: Texas 4, Houston 2 Saturday: Texas 4, Houston 0, Texas advances At Davenport Field Charlottesville, Va. Saturday: Maryland 5, Virginia 4 Sunday: Maryland (40-21) vs. Virginia (47-14), Noon x-Monday: Maryland vs. Virginia, 4 p.m. At M.L. Tigue Moore Field Lafayette, La. Saturday: Mississippi (44-18) at Louisiana-Lafayette (57-8), late Sunday: Mississippi vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 9 p.m. x-Monday: Mississippi vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 7 p.m. At Charlie and Marie Lupton Stadium Fort Worth, Texas Saturday: TCU 3, Pepperdine 2 Sunday: Pepperdine (42-17) vs. TCU (46-15), 6 p.m. x-Monday: Pepperdine vs. TCU, 7 p.m. At Rip Grifn Park Lubbock, Texas Saturday: Texas Tech 1, College of Charleston 0 Sunday: College of Charleston (44-18) vs. Texas Tech (44-19), 3 p.m. x-Monday: College of Charleston vs. Texas Tech, 1 p.m. TENNIS French Open Saturday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Women Championship Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Simona Halep (4), Romania, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4. Doubles Men Championship Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (11), France, def. Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (12), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (1). Legends Doubles Men Under 45 Round Robin Goran Ivanisevic, Croatia, and Todd Woodbridge, Aus tralia, def. Sergi Bruguera, Spain, and Andrei Medve dev, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-4. GOLF PGA Tour FedEx St. Jude Classic Saturday At TPC Southwind Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,239; Par: 70 Completed Second Round Ben Crane 63-65 128 Retief Goosen 66-66 132 Camilo Villegas 68-64 132 Peter Malnati 65-68 133 Troy Merritt 67-66 133 Carl Pettersson 67-67 134 Brian Harman 69-65 134 Davis Love III 65-70 135 Billy Horschel 67-68 135 Jason Bohn 67-68 135 Padraig Harrington 68-67 135 Phil Mickelson 67-68 135 Dustin Johnson 68-67 135 Ted Potter, Jr. 68-67 135 Andrew Svoboda 69-66 135 J.J. Henry 66-70 136 Chesson Hadley 67-69 136 Tim Wilkinson 68-68 136 Ben Martin 69-67 136 Stewart Cink 70-66 136 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 67-70 137 Matt Every 69-68 137 Graeme McDowell 69-68 137 Ian Poulter 69-68 137 Tim Clark 68-69 137 Will Wilcox 70-67 137 John Peterson 69-68 137 Kevin Kisner 65-72 137 Shawn Stefani 70-67 137 Paul Casey 70-67 137 Tommy Gainey 69-68 137 Webb Simpson 71-66 137 Martin Laird 70-67 137 Brooks Koepka 67-70 137 Jerry Kelly 71-67 138 George McNeill 69-69 138 Zach Johnson 64-74 138 John Merrick 70-68 138 Chad Campbell 70-68 138 Cameron Tringale 68-70 138 Freddie Jacobson 67-71 138 Rickie Fowler 70-68 138 Miguel Angel Carballo 68-70 138 Danny Lee 72-67 139 Charlie Wi 68-71 139 Luke Guthrie 67-72 139 John Daly 72-67 139 Stuart Appleby 65-74 139 Boo Weekley 69-70 139 Justin Leonard 68-71 139 Jhonattan Vegas 69-70 139 Jeff Overton 68-71 139 William McGirt 73-66 139 Ryan Palmer 67-72 139 Steve Marino 69-70 139 Heath Slocum 69-70 139 James Hahn 69-70 139 Ben Curtis 70-69 139 Charles Howell III 71-68 139 Woody Austin 68-71 139 Josh Teater 72-67 139 John Rollins 70-69 139 Sean OHair 69-70 139 Ryuji Imada 71-69 140 Martin Flores 70-70 140 Benjamin Alvarado 68-72 140 Austin Cook 67-73 140 David Lingmerth 77-63 140 Scott Stallings 68-72 140 Greg Owen 70-70 140 Robert Streb 70-70 140 Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. Ben Crane -13 6 2. Troy Merritt -9 7 3. Peter Malnati -8 7 4. Billy Horschel -7 8 4. Retief Goosen -7 6 4. Camilo Villegas -7 6 7. Matt Every -6 12 7. Andrew Svoboda -6 9 7. Carl Pettersson -6 7 7. Brian Harman -6 8 LPGA Tour Manulife Financial Classic Saturday At Grey Silo Golf Course Waterloo, Ontario Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,330; Par: 71 Third Round a-denotes amateur Shanshan Feng 66-65-67 198 Inbee Park 69-66-65 200 Michelle Wie 65-67-68 200 Cristie Kerr 67-69-65 201 Lydia Ko 71-67-64 202 Anna Nordqvist 69-64-69 202 Candie Kung 70-68-65 203 Na Yeon Choi 68-67-68 203 Belen Mozo 68-67-68 203 Hee Young Park 65-66-72 203 Suzann Pettersen 70-67-67 204 Angela Stanford 71-67-67 205 Thidapa Suwannapura 72-66-67 205 Meena Lee 70-67-68 205 Jee Young Lee 68-68-69 205 So Yeon Ryu 68-67-70 205 Xi Yu Lin 67-67-71 205 Jennifer Rosales 69-72-65 206 Chella Choi 70-69-67 206 Danielle Kang 71-68-67 206 Stacy Lewis 69-69-68 206 Caroline Masson 69-67-70 206 Mirim Lee 69-73-65 207 Alena Sharp 73-69-65 207 Mi Jung Hur 73-68-66 207 Megan McChrystal 70-71-66 207 Sydnee Michaels 70-71-66 207 Tiffany Joh 72-68-67 207 Paz Echeverria 68-71-68 207 Jennifer Johnson 70-68-69 207 Anya Alvarez 71-66-70 207 Marina Alex 68-68-71 207 Kris Tamulis 69-73-66 208 Julieta Granada 72-69-67 208 Sue Kim 71-70-67 208 Morgan Pressel 71-68-69 208 Line Vedel 69-70-69 208 Austin Ernst 69-69-70 208 Katie Futcher 72-66-70 208 Jaye Marie Green 70-68-70 208 Sarah Kemp 68-70-70 208 Catriona Matthew 71-67-70 208 Christel Boeljon 75-68-66 209 Laura Davies 71-71-67 209 Mi Hyang Lee 70-71-68 209 Alejandra Llaneza 68-71-70 209 Haru Nomura 68-70-71 209 Jane Park 70-68-71 209 Kristy McPherson 68-68-73 209 TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Optioned LHP Tim Berry to Bowie (EL). Recalled RHP Kevin Gausman from Nor folk (IL). Transferred 3B Michael Almanzar to the 60day DL. Sent RHP Tommy Hunter to Delmarva (SAL) for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS Assigned INF Danny Worth out right to Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS Assigned LHP Brooks Ra ley and RHP Jarrett Grube outright to Salt Lake (PCL) and RHP Michael Brady outright to Arkansas (TL). Recalled RHP Cory Rasmus from Salt Lake. Optioned 2B Grant Green to Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS Sent OF Sam Fuld to New Brit ain (EL) for a rehab assignment. NEW YORK YANKEES Sent RHP Shawn Kelley to Trenton (EL) for a rehab assignment. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Optioned LHP Justin Marks to Sacramento (PCL). Sent LHP Eric OFlaherty to Stockton (Cal) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS Designated RHP Josh Lueke for assignment. Recalled RHP Kirby Yates from Durham (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES Agreed to terms with OF Andy Simunic on a minor league contract. CINCINNATI REDS Sent 1B Joey Votto and RHPs Trevor Bell and Brett Marshall to Louisville (IL) for re hab assignments. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Optioned RHP Luis Gar cia to Lehigh Valley (IL). Assigned OF Tyson Gillies outright to Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Sent RHP Stolmy Pimentel to Altoona (EL) for a rehab assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES Reinstated LHP Eric Stults from the bereavement list. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Sent LHP Gio Gonza lez to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. Agreed to terms with SS Leudy Molina on a minor league contract. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed WR Juaquin Ig lesia, WR Bert Reed and OL Cordaro Howard. TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 1 p.m. TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pocono 400, at Long Pond, Pa. 2 p.m. NBC Formula One, Canadian Grand Prix, at Montreal COLLEGE BASEBALL Noon ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Maryland at Virginia 2 p.m. ESPN NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Houston at Texas (if necessary) 3 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Stanford at Vanderbilt (if necessary) ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, College of Charleston at Texas Tech 6 p.m. ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Pepperdine at TCU ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Kennesaw State at Louisville (if necessary) 9 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, Mississippi at Louisiana-Lafayette ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, super regionals, UC Irvine at Oklahoma State (if necessary) GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC European PGA Tour, Lyoness Open, nal round, at Atzenbrugg, Austria 1 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, nal round, at Memphis, Tenn. 3 p.m. CBS PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, nal round, at Memphis, Tenn. TGC LPGA, Manulife Financial Classic, nal round, at Waterloo, Ontario 5 p.m. TGC USGA, Curtis Cup, nal round matches, at St. Louis 7 p.m. TGC Web.com Tour, Cleveland Open, nal round, at Westlake, Ohio 9 p.m. TGC Champions Tour, Legends of Golf, nal round, at Ridgedale, Mo. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1:30 p.m. SUN Seattle at Tampa Bay MLB Oakland at Baltimore 2 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Chicago Cubs 3:30 p.m. WGN Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels 8 p.m. ESPN Boston at Detroit NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 8 p.m. ABC Playoffs, nals, game 2, Miami at San Antonio TENNIS 9 a.m. NBC French Open, mens nal, at Paris SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED three. You win a series by bein g the rst one to four. We understand the journey, we understand the path and what it takes to get there. The Heat were in po sition to win Game 1 before James departed with cramps. The Spurs committed 23 turnovers that not only led to 28 Miami points but also prevented them from getting the ball more often to Duncan, who shot 9 of 10 from the eld. Popovich said Dun can never demands more shots, even when he is in a good rhythm like he was Thursday. No, the only thing Timmy has ever de manded is he wants to play the point and he thinks Ive held him back, Popovich said. True story. He thinks hes a point guard. Duncan is one of the best power forwards in NBA history but likes to think like a little guy, though he realizes he hurt his chances of get ting to actually play the part of one. After my ve turn overs the other night, I think I took a step back from that, he said. I dont think that Im go ing to be able to step up and ll that role for a lit tle while. But, no, I en joy getting in the middle of the oor and mak ing decisions and get ting the ball to the right place, and thats what a point guards got to do. The Spurs dont need one, not after Parker looked healthy while posting 19 points and eight assists in the opener after missing the second half of the Western Conference nals clincher because of a sore left ankle. He laughed when told that Popovich and Dun can had brought up his teammates aspirations. Are we still talking about that? I cant be lieve they brought it up in the NBA Finals, Parker said. Its been a joke that Timmy thinks hes a great quarterback, that he can be a good passer. I disagree with that. I want to keep my spot. NBA FROM PAGE B1 other. The 3-hour, 2-minute tangle featured too many momentum swings to count, lled with lengthy baseline exchanges, and terric defense and shot making by both women. Not bad for someone who once famously de scribed herself as feel ing like a cow on ice when it came to playing on clay, a slow, demand ing surface that requires excellent footwork. Now Sharapova knows how to move on clay, and can stretch points when needed. Since the start of 2012, Sharapova is 54-4 with seven titles on clay. Shes also won 20 con secutive clay three-set ters, including four in a row this week. It says that shes very t. It says that shes very determined, said Sven Groenefeld, Sharapovas coach. And it says that she never gives up. Sharapova broke into a huge smile while hoist ing the trophy overhead, then shaking it with both hands and scan ning a stadium that, im probably, has become hers. This was her third nal in a row in Paris: She won the 2012 title to complete a career Grand Slam, then lost last year to Serena Williams, who bowed out in the second round this time. Sharapova is 20-1 the last three years at Ro land Garros which is nothing compared to Rafael Nadals 65-1 ca reer French Open mark heading into Sundays nal Sunday against No vak Djokovic, but cer tainly quite impressive. Youre not just born being a natural claycourt player. OK, maybe if youre Nadal. But cer tainly not me, Sharapo va said. I didnt grow up on it; didnt play on it. I just took it upon myself to make myself better on it. Plus, Sharapova had an operation on her right shoulder, the one she uses to swing her rack et, in October 2008. That joint troubled the Rus sian again in 2013, when she played one match from July to December. She now travels with a physiotherapist, Jerome Bianchi, and told him during the post-match ceremony, Thank you for keeping me healthy. This was the ninth Grand Slam nal for the No. 7-seeded Sharapova, and the rst for Halep, a 22-year-old Romanian seeded fourth. Support ed by a dozen folks in her guest box wearing red T-shirts saying Al lez Simona, and fans that chanted her rst name, Halep acquitted herself well, showing off the scrambling baseline style that carried her to six straight-set wins un til Saturday. I will not forget this match, said Halep, who wiped away tears afterward. FRENCH FROM PAGE B1 the grueling 1 -mile trip around the tracks sweeping turns. As soon as he came o ut of the gate, he wasnt the same, Espinoza said. Tonalist was a fresh and rested horse making his debut on the Triple Crown trail. He last ran and won the Peter Pan Stakes on the same Bel mont dirt on May 10. That irked Califor nia Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn, who had said after the Preakness that horses should be re quired to run in all three Triple Crown races. Its all or nothing, he said. This is not fair to these horses and to the people that believe in them. This is the cow ards way out. Tonalist beat Commis sioner, another newcom er to the Triple Crown, by a head. Those two horses nished in the same or der in the Peter Pan. To nalist ran the distance in 2:28.52 and paid $20.40, $9.60 and $7. Commissioner re turned $23.20 and $13.20, while Med al Count was another length back in third and paid $13.20 to show. Sam raat was sixth, fol lowed by General a Rod, Matterhorn, Command ing Curve, Matuszak and Ride On Curlin. California Chrome broke quickly but was pressed immediately by Commissioner and General a Rod. Espinoza eased California Chrome back into third along the rail. Approaching the nal turn, California Chrome was maneuvered to the outside. He angled fourwide turning for home, just to the outside of To nalist, who was close to the pace the entire race. Espinoza started whipping left-handed in the lane but Califor nia Chrome had no re sponse. I thought he was gain ing ground, but he didnt have it in him, apparent ly, Coburn said. Tonalist joined the growing list of Triple Crown spoilers, mak ing California Chrome the 12th horse since Af rmed to lose his Triple try in the Belmont, the longest race in the series. Trained by Frenchman Christophe Clement and ridden by Joel Ro sario, Tonalist w as mak ing just his fth career start. BELMONT FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 GOLF

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents SUMMER TUNE UP & PLAY SPECIALCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen Wresh(reg. $180)$150orSeries of (4) 40-Minute Private Lessons (3) 40-Minute Private LessonsPLUS (1) 90-Minute Playing Lesson(reg. $250)$199 Prices good through June 30, 2014. 7th Annual Mike Conley Hospice HouseGolf TournamentSponsored by South Lake County Moose Lodge rfntb June 14th2014Green Valley Country ClubrnrfntbRegistration at 7:30am 8:30am Shotgun Start Entry Fee is $50.00nrnntn REGISTER EARLY Call Robert (352) 516-9232 trrrtf brnrftnrrnrttnnrn rntnnttRobert: (352) 516-9232 or Craig: (734) 552-3382 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available ACTIVE MILITARYAll rates subject to change without notice. $1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC$1700+taxIncludes Green Fee for 18 Holes and Cart. June Golf & Lunch SpecialIncludes Green Fee for 18 Holes, Cart, Hot Dog, and Draft Beer or Soda.Call About Twilight Rates GOLF DOUG FERGUSON Associated Press PINEHURST, N.C. Even in the best of times, Phil Mickelson has ample reason to expect the worst at the U.S. Open. More than two de cades of play in the major known as the toughest test in golf has produced every thing fr om agony to ag gravation, mostly tor ment, never triumph. And all Mickelson has to show from the U.S. Open are silver medals a record six of them for finishing second. He could have won six, and he hasnt won one, Ernie Els said. I believe hes go ing to win one. Hes still young enough. His game is still good enough. The U.S. Open took on even greater impor tance to the 43-yearold Mickelson last summer when he won the British Open at Muirfield, leaving him one major away the U.S. Open, of course from joining five oth er greats who have the career Grand Slam. For all his heartache in golfs toughest test, his optimism hasnt wavered. Never mind that he has been linked to an insider trading investi gation involving activ ist investor Carl Icahn and Las Vegas gambler Billy Walters, in which FBI agents paid him a visit after his first round at the Memori al. Or that Mickelson hasnt won t his year, his worst start to a sea son since 2003. Mickelson not only believes hes going to win the U.S. Open, he thinks hes going to win more than one. Some people view it as though, Hes come close and hes nev er done it. I see it as though Ive finished second six times in this event, Mickelson said. I played some of my best golf in this event, and I should have an opportunity and more than one oppor tunity to close one out here in the future. The U.S. Open re turning to Pinehurst No. 2 only adds to the intrigue. Thats where Mickel son picked up his first silver medal in 1999. He had a one-shot lead with three holes to play and had a 6-foot par putt on the 16th hole, while Payne Stewart was 25 feet away from par. Stewart made his putt, Mickelson missed and they were tied. Stewart took the lead with a short birdie on the 17th, then famous ly won the U.S. Open with a 15-foot par putt on the final hole. No worries. Mickel son surely would get another chance, and he did. He just doesnt have the trophy. Five years later, he was tied for the lead on the 17th hole at Shin necock Hills when he hit into a bunker, blasted out to 5 feet and three-putted for double bogey. It was like being in a morgue walking up the 18th, said Fred Funk, who was paired with him that day. The most crushing blow was at Winged Foot in 2006. Mick elson had a one-shot lead on the 18th hole. His tee shot clanged off a corporate tent. The bigger mistake was going for the green with a 3-iron and hit ting a tree. His third shot plugged in the bunker. His f ourth shot raced across the green. He made double bogey and lost my one. There was Mickel son, crouched on the green, hands cupped over his head. I am such an idiot, he said. Phil handled the whole thing like a true gentleman, said Kenneth Ferrie, who played with him in the final pairing. He had nice words to say to me coming off 18 and was amazingly courteous and p ol ite to the vol unteers and officials considering what had just happened. And yet he keeps coming back for more. Sam Snead, who holds the PGA Tour re cord with 82 career wins, never won a U.S. Open. Lee Trevino nev er won the Masters. Ar nold Palmer and Tom Watson never won the PGA Champion ship. Even so, none of those greats ever had as many chances to win the missing major as Mickelson. Hunter Mahan paid him the ultimate re spect at Bethpage Black in 2009. Mick elson was tied for the lead with four holes to play until missing short par putts on the 15th and 17th holes. Another U.S. Open bid over, Mickelson was walking up to the 18th green when Mahan who had just as good of a chance to win that day began applaud ing, and thousands joined him. Mahan has played with Mickelson twice on Sunday when Lefty was the runner-up. The other occasion was last year at Merion. Mick elson twice made bo gey with a wedge in his hand on the back nine. His last hope was to chip in from 40 yards to force a playoff with Justin Rose. He missed. I looked at him and said, Good try, Phil. You can only do what you can do, Mahan said. At some point, youve got to get a bounce or two and make a putt. I think he wants to win that tournament more than anything. The thought of Mick elson at Pinehurst stirs emotions. Stewart died in a freak plane crash four months after he won that U.S. Open. Mickelson carried a pager in his golf bag that week and pledged to withdraw if his wife went into labor. His first child, Amanda, was born the next day. Fifteen years lat er, the pressure is only greater. Maybe it is his strength of mind, or his short game, that has enabled him to put himself in contention as so many times, Fer rie said. As each year has gone on and he has won other majors, the focus has become more and more about the U.S. Open. As a player, when you want something so much, its even mor e diffi cult to achieve. Yet he keeps giving himself a chance. The missing piece for Mickelson is the US Open JULIE JACOBSON / AP Phil Mickelson stands on the 18th green during a practice round for the 105th US Open Championship in 2005 at the Pinehurst Resort and Country Club in Pinehurst, N.C. No one has ever had so many chance in one major without ever winning it. DOUG FERGUSON Associated Press PINEHURST, N.C. How well do you know the U.S. Open? Try this trivia quiz: FRONT NINE (5 POINTS EACH) 1. Where was the rst U.S. Open played? a.) Pinehurst No. 2 b.) Newport c.) Shinnecock Hills 2. Who has the most majors without ever having won the U.S. Open? a.) Phil Mickelson b.) Harry Vardon c.) Sam Snead 3. Which continent where golf is played has never produced a U.S. Open cham pion? a.) Asia b.) South America c) Africa 4. Who has been runner-up at the U.S. Open the most times? a.) Phil Mickelson b.) Greg Norman c.) Sam Snead 5. Who was the last U.S. Open champion who had to go through sec tional qualifying? a.) Michael Campbell b.) Lucas Glover c.) Lee Janzen 6. Who was the last U.S. Open cham pion to successfully defend his title? a.) Ben Hogan b.) Tiger Woods c.) Curtis Strange 7. Who was the youngest U.S. Open champion? a.) Rory McIlroy b.) Johnny McDermott c.) Gene Sarazen 8. Name the last player to shoot 63 in a U.S. Open. a.) Johnny Miller b.) Thomas Bjorn c.) Vijay Singh 9. Who won the rst major champion ship held at Pinehurst No. 2? a.) Payne Stewart b.) Jack Nicklaus c.) Denny Shute BACK NINE (10 POINTS EACH) 10. Who is the only player to complete the career Grand Slam at the U.S. Open? a.) Tiger Woods b.) Gary Player c.) Bobby Jones 11. Retief Goosen, Jason Gore and Olin Browne were the top three players after 54 holes at Pinehurst No. 2 in 2005. What did they all have in common on Sunday? a.) They all wore khaki trousers and a white shirt. b.) They were spotted in the merchandise tent before the nal round. c.) None of them broke 80. 12. Who holds the U.S. Open record for most consecutive wins? a.) Ben Hogan b.) Curtis Strange c.) Willie Anderson 13. Name the last U.S. Open champion to win in his rst attempt. a.) Michael Campbell b.) Francis Ouimet c.) Jack Fleck 14. Name the only player to lose a play off three times in the U.S. Open. a.) Phil Mickelson b.) Sam Snead c.) Arnold Palmer 15. Who was the last U.S. Open cham pion to never break par in any of the four rounds? a.) Geoff Ogilvy b.) Orville Moody c.) Corey Pavin 16. Who is the oldest player to win the U.S. Open? a.) Julius Boros b.) Raymond Floyd c.) Hale Irwin 17. What is the U.S. Open trophy called? a.) The Havemeyer Trophy b.) The Campbell Cup c.) The U.S. Open Trophy 18. Name the only player to break par in three consecutive U.S. Opens? a.) C urtis Strange b.) Jack Nicklaus c.) Lee Janzen 19TH HOLE (25 POINTS) In the last 100 years, only one player has won the U.S. Open at the same course twice. Name him. a.) Bobby Jones b.) Jack Nicklaus c.) Payne Stewart ANSWERS 1. b 2. c 3. a 4. a 5. b 6. c 7. b 8. c 9. c 10. b 11. c 12. c 13. b 14. c 15. a 16. c 17. c 18. a 19. b Test your U.S. Open trivia knowledge

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Bluegill are starting to bed in Haynes Creek, Dead River, Lake Beauclaire and the north end of Lake Harris on crickets and red worms. Bass are biting on the div ing baits like June bug, June bug blue and Tennessee shad colored worms. Bream and bluegill are bit ing in Lake Harris and Lake Eus tis. Top water frog bites, poppers, and spinner baits are also work ing with the cooler temperatures and overcast conditions. Come out and join the Wednesday night bass tournament from 5:30 to 9:00pm with a 3-fish limit. (Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held June 21. The w eigh in will be at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352-742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Catfish are biting on shrimp. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of artificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Fishing has been very slow, pos sibly due to the higher tempera tures and afternoon rains. A few shellcracker and bluegill are be ing caught in the river on grass shrimp, red worms and crickets. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Shellcracker are starting to turn on. The bass that are biting are hitting on both artificial baits such as worms and live shiners BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURG Philip and Jeremy are catching bass on articial baits from a row boat in Hayne s creek near the Haynes Creek Bridge. Red worms and night crawlers are selling well. Boat rentals have been good too. SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTO The area afternoon storms cre ating runoff is responsible for the schooling bass. Fish early in the morning while the bass are feed ing on bait being washed into the lake. Use shiners with a float or noisy top water baits like Rat tlin Rogue or Devils Horse or lip less crank baits fished in the run off from the residential canals and mud lakes. Shellcracker and blue gill are starting to spawn with the full moon upcoming in the next week, fishing in the pads and grass in the residential canals should be very good. Angler fishing from the banks at night from the Eu stis Lake Walk and Crows Bluff and the bridge at the seawall on the St. Johns River are doing well with small to medium shiners and night crawlers. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rffn tbfffn brbf t nnn nff tfnfnfn trfn n r n tbnnfnfn brbn t n f f ffff tff tr rf f rf f n rnff tbnn brb n n t n n f n nf tn tr n WORLD CUP SOCCER KURT VOIGT Associated Press Tab Ramos, then just 15, remembers walking off the field after what he thought would be his last practice with the under-20 United States soccer team. Ramos was only training with the older players because of his state coachs nation al-team ties, and he thought his weeklong visit was over. But the youngster had opened the eyes of the nation al team coaches. I basically just got lucky, said Ramos, now an assistant coach for the U.S. mens na tional team and the head coach of the un der-20 team. It was a complete surprise for me, because I didnt even think it was a try out. I thought I was just playing. Ramos fortunate discovery out of the New Jersey high school ranks in the early 1980s was a sign of a U.S. de velopment system in desperate need of an overhaul. Ramos played in three World Cups, and the American team has qualified for sev en straight. But those teams were put to gether without a cen trally organized scout ing system to identify and train the best teen players. In 2006, tired of counting on good fortune to put the players with the most potential in front of national coaches, the U.S. Soccer Federation began to study its de velopment system in earnest. What it found was a little bit of a freefor-all, said Tony Lep ore, the U.S. director of scouting. In addition for the need for bet ter scouting, the top players werent getting the best training tech niques. Our elite players were playing way too many matches, and all of them were win-atall-costs and not about development first, Lepore said. After studying youth development pro grams across the world, the U.S. began to implement its re vamped system in 2007 modeled heavily af ter soccer powers such as Spain and Germany. The overhaul was based on having a number of soccer academies across the country, all under the umbrella and watch of U.S. Soccer and tasked with developing and eventually feeding elite players to the na tional team. The effort started with 63 clubs, a num ber thats since grown to almost 100. More than 6,000 youth play ers, beginning at the under-13 level, now train with and play against other future national-team hope fuls 10 months out of the year doing so under uniform rules of play and training. And they all do so with a clear path to the national team right in front of them, thanks to a network of scouts focused on the prog ress of talent in the academy system. A huge part of the academies is thats where all the top play ers migrate to, if they are serious and mo tivated, Lepore said. If they want to reach their potential, they need to be with an academy club. Most of the current U.S. squad thats head ed to Brazil for this years World Cup pre dates the current acad emy system, but the national team is start ing to reap the r ewards of the revamped mod el. DeAndre Yedlin, 20, was named to the cur rent 23-man roster by coach Jurgen Klins mann two weeks ago, doing so after spend ing his amateur years as a member of the Seattle Sounders FC Academy team. The defender earned his fourth cap for the U.S. in a 2-1 win over Turkey last weekend, and hes likely on his way to becoming a na tional team stalwart af ter being named a Ma jor League All-Star last year. Another future na tional team hopeful and academy product is Columbus Crew midfielder Wil Trapp. The 21-year-old Trapp made the Crews acad emy team as a fresh man in high school, later going on to play collegiately for two seasons at Akron and for the under-20 U.S. national team. Trapp managed to play two years with his high school team in Gahanna, Ohio, un like some players who live and train on site at different academies. He said the high school and academy environ ments were far differ ent, though he enjoyed both. You were in a com pletely different situa tion (at the academy), where theres nation al team scouts at every game, Trapp said. Its just a different level. In addition to his time with the senior national team, Ramos is also the coach of the under-20 U.S. squad. Ramos believes the academy system will be a key for U.S. team in the near future. When we came up at 17, 18, 19 years old 25-30 years ago, we were basically clue less about the game, Ramos said. We were just kids playing soc cer. Now we have at 17, 18, 19, now we have soccer players coming up, not kids playing soccer. New development system starting to pay off for US BOB MACK / AP Clint Dempsey, right, leads the group of midelders and forwards through warm-ups using resistance harnesses as practice began Wednesday in Jacksonville.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 38 25 .603 7-3 L-1 19-14 19-11 New York 31 29 .517 5 4-6 W-2 13-16 18-13 Baltimore 30 29 .508 6 1 4-6 L-2 11-13 19-16 Boston 27 33 .450 9 4 6-4 L-4 15-17 12-16 Tampa Bay 24 39 .381 14 9 1-9 L-1 13-17 11-22 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 32 25 .561 4-6 W-1 15-14 17-11 Chicago 31 31 .500 3 1 6-4 L-1 17-14 14-17 Cleveland 31 31 .500 3 1 7-3 W-1 21-11 10-20 Minnesota 29 31 .483 4 2 5-5 W-1 15-16 14-15 Kansas City 29 32 .475 5 3 5-5 L-1 14-16 15-16 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 38 23 .623 7-3 W-1 17-12 21-11 Los Angeles 32 28 .533 5 4-6 W-1 16-13 16-15 Seattle 32 29 .525 6 7-3 W-1 14-15 18-14 Texas 31 31 .500 7 1 5-5 L-1 15-16 16-15 Houston 27 36 .429 12 6 6-4 L-1 14-18 13-18 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 32 27 .542 4-6 W-1 18-14 14-13 Washington 31 28 .525 1 7-3 W-4 19-15 12-13 Miami 32 30 .516 1 5-5 L-2 22-11 10-19 New York 28 33 .459 5 3 5-5 L-4 13-17 15-16 Philadelphia 25 35 .417 7 6 2-8 L-1 12-19 13-16 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 37 26 .587 6-4 W-1 19-13 18-13 St. Louis 32 31 .508 5 3-7 W-1 16-14 16-17 Pittsburgh 29 32 .475 7 2 6-4 L-1 17-14 12-18 Cincinnati 28 32 .467 7 3 6-4 W-1 14-15 14-17 Chicago 25 34 .424 10 5 6-4 W-5 15-13 10-21 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 40 21 .656 8-2 W-3 20-9 20-12 Los Angeles 32 31 .508 9 3-7 L-1 13-19 19-12 Colorado 29 32 .475 11 2 2-8 W-1 17-11 12-21 San Diego 27 34 .443 13 4 4-6 L-1 15-18 12-16 Arizona 26 37 .413 15 6 5-5 L-1 9-23 17-14 FRIDAYS GAMES Oakland 4, Baltimore 3, 11 innings Toronto 3, St. Louis 1 Detroit 6, Boston 2 Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 0 Texas 6, Cleveland 4 Houston 5, Minnesota 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 8, Chicago White Sox 4 FRIDAYS GAMES Chicago Cubs 5, Miami 3, 13 innings Pittsburgh 15, Milwaukee 5 Toronto 3, St. Louis 1 Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 0 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 2 Atlanta 5, Arizona 2 Washington 6, San Diego 0 San Francisco 4, N.Y. Mets 2 SATURDAYS GAMES St. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Minnesota 8, Houston 0 Cleveland 8, Texas 3 Seattle 7, Tampa Bay 4 Boston at Detroit, late N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, late Oakland at Baltimore, late Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, late SATURDAYS GAMES St. Louis 5, Toronto 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Miami 2 Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 3 Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 5 N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, late Atlanta at Arizona, late Washington at San Diego, late CHRIS OMEARA / AP Whitney Goldstein, granddaughter of Tampa Bay Rays senior baseball advisor Don Zimmer throws out the ceremonial rst pitch to Dons son Tom Zimmer before Saturdays game between the Rays and the Seattle Mariners at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg. Don Zimmer passed away earlier this week at the age of 83. TODAYS GAMES St. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at Toronto (Hutchison 4-3), 1:07 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 6-2) at Baltimore (U.Jimenez 2-6), 1:35 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-1) at Tampa Bay (Archer 3-3), 1:40 p.m. Houston (McHugh 4-3) at Minnesota (Deduno 2-3), 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-3) at Kansas City (Shields 6-3), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 3-4) at Texas (J.Saunders 0-1), 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-5) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 6-5), 3:35 p.m. Boston (Lackey 6-4) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 2-2), 8:07 p.m. TODAYS GAMES St. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at Toronto (Hutchison 4-3), 1:07 p.m. Philadelphia (Buchanan 1-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 6-3), 1:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Morton 2-7), 1:35 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-1), 2:20 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 2-5) at San Francisco (Lincecum 4-4), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Harang 4-4) at Arizona (C.Anderson 4-0), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 4-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-4), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 4-2) at San Diego (Stults 2-6), 4:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Cano, Seattle, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .332; Rios, Texas, .321; AlRamirez, Chicago, .321; Bautista, Toronto, .318; Altuve, Houston, .316; MiCabrera, De troit, .314. RUNS: Donaldson, Oakland, 51; Dozier, Minnesota, 49; Bautista, Toronto, 48; NCruz, Baltimore, 42; Kinsler, De troit, 42; MeCabrera, Toronto, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 41. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 55; MiCabrera, Detroit, 50; Don aldson, Oakland, 50; Encarnacion, Toronto, 50; Moss, Oakland, 49; JAbreu, Chicago, 47; Bautista, Toronto, 44. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 83; MeCabrera, Toronto, 79; Markakis, Baltimore, 77; AlRamirez, Chicago, 76; Rios, Texas, 76; Cano, Seattle, 74; AJones, Baltimore, 74. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 22; Hosmer, Kansas City, 20; Kinsler, Detroit, 19; Pedroia, Boston, 19; Altuve, Houston, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; EEscobar, Minne sota, 18. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 21; Encarnacion, To ronto, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 17; Donaldson, Oakland, 17; Bautista, Toronto, 15; Moss, Oakland, 15; Pujols, Los Angeles, 15. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 21; Ellsbury, New York, 18; RDavis, Detroit, 16; AEscobar, Kansas City, 16; Andrus, Texas, 14; Gardner, New York, 14; Dozier, Min nesota, 13; LMartin, Texas, 13. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 10-1; Tanaka, New York, 9-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 8-3; Keuchel, Houston, 7-3; Weaver, Los Angeles, 7-4; 13 tied at 6. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.02; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.10; Darvish, Texas, 2.36; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.40; Gray, Oak land, 2.45; Keuchel, Houston, 2.50; FHernandez, Seat tle, 2.57. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 101; Kluber, Cleveland, 99; Lester, Boston, 95; Tanaka, New York, 92; FHernan dez, Seattle, 91; Darvish, Texas, 91. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 17; Perkins, Minnesota, 16; Rodney, Seattle, 16; DavRobertson, New York, 14; Soria, Texas, 13; Nathan, Detroit, 13; TomHunter, Balti more, 11; Uehara, Boston, 11; Janssen, Toronto, 11. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .359; Puig, Los Angeles, .336; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .324; Utley, Philadelphia, .320; Pagan, San Francisco, .316; CGomez, Milwaukee, .311. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 49; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 46; Pence, San Francisco, 44; Stanton, Miami, 44; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 41; CGomez, Milwaukee, 41; Rendon, Washington, 40. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 53; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 44; Howard, Philadelphia, 41; Morse, San Francisco, 41; Tu lowitzki, Colorado, 41; Puig, Los Angeles, 40. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 75; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 74; DanMurphy, New York, 74; Puig, Los Angeles, 72; DWright, New York, 72; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; Utley, Philadelphia, 71. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 23; Utley, Philadelphia, 23; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 21; Byrd, Philadelphia, 18; Are nado, Colorado, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17; Phillips, Cincinnati, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 17. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 17; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16; Morse, San Francisco, 13; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 13; JUpton, Atlanta, 13. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 36; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 22; EYoung, New York, 17; Revere, Philadel phia, 16; Bonifacio, Chicago, 13; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 13; Blackmon, Colorado, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 12; Segura, Milwaukee, 12. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-2; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 8-3; Ryu, Los An geles, 7-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 7-2; Simon, Cincinnati, 7-3; 9 tied at 6. ERA: Hudson, San Francisco, 1.75; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.89; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.97; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.31; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.50. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 101; Cueto, Cin cinnati, 97; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 90; Wainwright, St. Louis, 89; Kennedy, San Diego, 88. SAVES: Romo, San Francisco, 19; FrRodriguez, Mil waukee, 18; Street, San Diego, 18; Jansen, Los Ange les, 17; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 16; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 16; AReed, Arizona, 15. Cardinals 5, Blue Jays 0 St. Louis Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 Grichk lf 4 1 1 2 MeCarr lf 4 0 2 0 Hollidy dh 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 Craig 1b 5 1 1 0 Encrnc dh 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 3 1 1 0 Lind 1b 2 0 0 0 Tavers rf 3 1 1 0 Lawrie 2b 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 1 JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 0 2 0 DNavrr c 3 0 0 0 T.Cruz c 2 0 1 2 Gose cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 5 Totals 30 0 3 0 St. Louis 000 010 040 5 Toronto 000 000 000 0 EReyes (6). DPToronto 2. LOBSt. Louis 11, To ronto 4. 2BCraig (11), Jh.Peralta (15), Me.Cabrera (15). HRGrichuk (1). ST.Cruz. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis S.Miller W,7-5 9 3 0 0 1 5 Toronto Buehrle L,10-2 7 5 1 1 5 6 Loup 2 / 3 3 4 4 2 1 Delabar 1 / 3 0 0 0 2 0 Redmond 1 0 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny Gonza lez; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Seth Buckminster. T:37. A,981 (49,282). Twins 8, Astros 0 Houston Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 2 0 2 0 DSantn dh 5 0 4 5 Grssmn lf 1 0 0 0 Dozier 2b 3 1 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 0 0 Springr rf 4 0 1 0 Nunez rf 1 0 1 0 JCastro c 4 0 0 0 Wlngh lf 4 1 1 1 MDmn 3b 4 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 0 0 Singltn 1b 4 0 1 0 Parmel rf-1b 4 0 0 1 Presley lf-cf 2 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 2 3 1 0 Carter ph 1 0 0 0 EEscor ss 2 1 0 0 Guzmn dh 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 0 0 MGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 Totals 32 8 7 7 Houston 000 000 000 0 Minnesota 030 400 10x 8 EMa.Gonzalez (2), M.Dominguez (6). LOBHouston 8, Minnesota 10. 2BAltuve (19), D.Santana (5). SBD.Santana (4). SA.Hicks. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Feldman L,3-4 1 2 / 3 1 3 0 2 2 Clemens 2 2 4 4 5 1 Williams 3 3 1 1 1 3 Sipp 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 2 Minnesota Gibson W,5-5 7 3 0 0 3 5 Burton 1 2 0 0 0 1 Thielbar 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Feldman (Willingham). UmpiresHome, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Will Little. T:24. A,732 (39,021). Indians 8, Rangers 3 Cleveland Texas ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 Choice dh 4 0 0 0 ACarer ss 5 0 0 0 Andrus ss 3 1 1 1 Brantly lf 5 1 1 0 Choo lf 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 3 1 1 0 ABeltre 3b 4 1 2 1 Chsnhll 3b 5 1 2 1 Rios rf 4 0 3 0 DvMrp rf 4 1 3 1 Morlnd 1b 4 0 0 0 Giambi dh 3 0 1 0 Chirins c 4 0 0 0 Raburn ph-dh 1 1 0 1 LMartn cf 3 1 1 0 CSantn 1b 2 2 2 2 Sardins 2b 3 0 1 0 YGoms c 4 1 1 3 Totals 37 8 12 8 Totals 33 3 8 2 Cleveland 000 103 400 8 Texas 001 002 000 3 EL.Martin (4). DPCleveland 1. LOBCleveland 7, Texas 4. 2BBrantley (14), Dav.Murphy (12), A.Beltre (11). HRC.Santana (7), Y.Gomes (7). SBBourn (6). SFDav.Murphy, Andrus. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin W,4-2 8 7 3 3 0 5 Axford 1 1 0 0 0 0 Texas Tepesch L,2-2 5 1 / 3 8 4 4 4 1 Ross Jr. 1 3 3 3 0 0 Scheppers 1 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 1 S.Baker 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tomlin pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. WPTomlin. UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Gary Ceder strom; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:53. A,633 (48,114). Cubs 5, Marlins 2 Miami Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 1 2 1 Bonifac cf 4 1 1 2 Solano 2b 4 0 0 0 Lake lf 4 2 2 2 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 2 0 Stanton rf 4 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 McGeh 3b 3 0 1 1 Ruggin rf 4 0 1 0 GJones 1b 3 0 1 0 Olt 3b 3 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 Valuen ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Lucas 2b 1 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Whitsd c 3 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 2 1 1 0 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 0 0 0 Wolf p 2 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 JeBakr 1b 1 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 5 2 Totals 33 5 11 4 Miami 001 001 000 2 Chicago 002 011 10x 5 LOBMiami 4, Chicago 5. 2BStanton (15), Rizzo (7), S.Castro 2 (16), Barney (4). HRYelich (6), Bonifacio (1), Lake 2 (8). CSRizzo (3). IP H R ER BB SO Miami Wolf L,1-2 5 2 / 3 9 4 4 1 2 Hatcher 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Morris 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Samardzija W,2-5 7 5 2 2 1 8 W.Wright H,5 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Grimm H,5 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Strop S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPWolf, Samardzija. UmpiresHome, Tony Randazzo; First, Marcus Pat tillo; Second, David Rackley; Third, Brian Gorman. T:49. A,786 (41,072). Reds 6, Phillies 5 Philadelphia Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 5 1 1 2 BHmltn cf 2 1 0 1 Ruiz c 3 1 1 1 Schmkr lf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0 Phillips 2b 2 1 0 0 Howard 1b 4 1 2 0 Bruce rf 2 1 1 3 Byrd rf 4 1 1 2 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 3 0 Frazier 1b-3b 4 2 3 1 CHrndz 3b 4 1 2 0 Cozart ss 4 1 1 1 Revere cf 3 0 0 0 RSantg 3b 3 0 1 0 RHrndz p 1 0 0 0 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry ph 1 0 0 0 Simon p 0 0 0 0 EMartn p 0 0 0 0 Berndn ph 1 0 0 0 Brignc ph 1 0 0 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 RCeden ph 1 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 B.Pena 1b 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 11 5 Totals 25 6 6 6 Philadelphia 020 001 200 5 Cincinnati 110 220 00x 6 DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 5, Cincinnati 5. 2BUtley (24), D.Brown (8), Cozart (9). HRRollins (8), Ruiz (2), Byrd (9), Bruce (4), Frazier (13). SBB. Hamilton (23), Bruce (7), Frazier (5). SRevere, Si mon 2. SFB.Hamilton, Bruce. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia R.Hernandez L,2-4 4 4 4 4 3 2 E.Martin 2 1 2 2 2 3 De Fratus 2 1 0 0 0 2 Cincinnati Simon W,8-3 6 7 3 3 0 3 Hoover H,1 2 / 3 2 2 2 1 1 M.Parra H,8 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Broxton H,8 1 1 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman S,8-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby R.Hernandez (Phillips). UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Sean Barber. T:56. A,347 (42,319). Mariners 7, Rays 4 Seattle Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi EnChvz lf 4 0 2 1 DJnngs cf 4 1 1 0 J.Jones cf 5 0 1 0 SRdrgz lf 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 2 Seager 3b 4 1 0 0 Zobrist dh 4 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 1 1 0 Loney 1b 4 1 1 1 Ackley dh 4 2 2 3 YEscor ss 2 1 1 0 Gillespi rf 4 1 1 1 Forsyth 2b 3 0 1 0 BMiller ss 4 1 1 0 Joyce ph 1 0 0 0 Blmqst 1b 4 0 2 2 Solis c 2 0 0 1 Smoak 1b 0 0 0 0 Kiermr rf 3 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11 7 Totals 31 4 5 4 Seattle 010 240 000 7 Tampa Bay 020 000 020 4 LOBSeattle 6, Tampa Bay 3. 2BEn.Chavez (3), Ack ley (9), Bloomquist (3), De.Jennings (14), Y.Escobar (9). HRGillespie (1), Longoria (7), Loney (3). SSo lis. SFEn.Chavez. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Elias W,5-4 7 2 / 3 5 4 4 2 5 Farquhar H,4 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Rodney S,17-19 1 0 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay Cobb L,1-4 4 1 / 3 10 7 7 1 2 C.Ramos 2 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Yates 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Oviedo 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Cobb (Cano). WPElias. UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Todd Tichenor; Sec ond, Clint Fagan; Third, Tim Timmons. T:46. A,996 (31,042). Brewers 9, Pirates 3 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Segura ss 5 2 1 1 JHrrsn rf 5 0 1 0 Braun rf 5 0 1 2 NWalkr 2b 5 1 2 0 Lucroy c 4 1 2 1 AMcCt cf 3 1 1 0 CGomz cf 5 1 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 1 1 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Falu 3b 0 0 0 1 RMartn c 2 0 0 0 KDavis lf 4 2 2 1 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 2 2 Gennett 2b 3 1 0 0 Tabata lf 3 0 1 0 Overay 1b 2 0 1 2 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 MrRynl ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Volquez p 2 0 0 0 Garza p 2 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 1 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 1 0 1 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 1 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 9 9 9 Totals 32 3 8 2 Milwaukee 100 300 041 9 Pittsburgh 002 001 000 3 EAr.Ramirez (4), J.Gomez (1), P.Alvarez (13), I.Davis 2 (5), Mercer (5). DPMilwaukee 3. LOBMilwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 8. 2BBraun (12), K.Davis (17), J.Har rison (8), P.Alvarez (5). SBR.Weeks (1). SGarza. SFLucroy, Falu. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Garza W,4-4 6 6 3 3 5 1 Wooten H,4 1 1 0 0 0 1 W.Smith 1 0 0 0 1 1 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1 Pittsburgh Volquez L,3-5 6 4 4 3 2 4 J.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 2 Ju.Wilson 2 / 3 1 4 4 2 1 J.Gomez 1 1 / 3 3 1 0 0 1 HBPby Volquez (Ar.Ramirez), by Ju.Wilson (Mar.Reyn olds). WPVolquez. UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt; First, Ed Hickox; Sec ond, Lance Barrett; Third, John Tumpane. T:23. A,525 (38,362). Rockies 5, Dodgers 4 10 innings Los Angeles Colorado ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 2 0 0 0 Blckmn rf-cf 5 0 1 1 Figgins 2b 3 0 1 0 Stubbs cf 4 1 2 0 HRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Puig rf 1 0 0 0 LeMahi 3b 1 0 1 0 VnSlyk rf 1 0 1 0 Dickrsn lf 5 0 1 1 AdGnzl 1b 5 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 5 1 2 0 Kemp lf 4 1 2 0 Mornea 1b 5 1 2 0 Ethier cf 5 1 2 0 McKnr c 5 1 2 1 JuTrnr 3b 5 1 2 1 RWhelr 3b 2 0 1 0 Fdrwcz c 5 1 1 3 Masset p 0 0 0 0 Greink p 3 0 1 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 League p 0 0 0 0 Barnes rf 2 0 2 1 Romak ph 1 0 0 0 Rutledg 2b 4 1 2 1 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Chacin p 2 0 0 0 C.Perez p 0 0 0 0 Culersn 3b 2 0 0 0 Morals p 0 0 0 0 Totals 38 4 10 4 Totals 42 5 16 5 Los Angeles 000 000 400 0 4 Colorado 010 020 100 1 5 Two outs when winning run scored. EJu.Turner (5). DPLos Angeles 2, Colorado 1. LOB Los Angeles 10, Colorado 9. 2BGreinke (4). 3B Kemp (1), Barnes (2). HRFederowicz (1). SBFiggins (3), H.Ramirez (8). CSLeMahieu (4). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Greinke 7 11 4 3 1 6 League 1 2 0 0 0 0 Howell 1 1 0 0 0 0 C.Perez L,0-3 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Colorado Chacin 6 6 3 3 3 4 Masset BS,2-2 2 / 3 1 1 1 2 0 Brothers 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Ottavino 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 1 1 Morales W,4-4 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Chacin pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. WPGreinke. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:35. A,474 (50,480). This Date In Baseball June 8 1914 New Yorks Iron Joe McGinnity posted his 14th straight win beating Pittsburgh 2-0. With the win moved the Giants into rst place over Chicago. 1927 New Yorks Tony Lazzeri hit three homers in the Yankees 12-11 11-inning win over the Chi cago White Sox. Lazzeris rst two homers come off Red Faber and his third was a two-run line drive off George Connally to tie game in the ninth inning. The Yanks were behind 11-6 going into the last inning. New York would win it in the 11th after Cedric Durst tripled Lazzeri was intentionally walked and Ray Morehart singled. 1933 Philadelphias Jimmie Foxx homered in his rst three at bats all off Lefty Gomez as the As beat the New York Yankees 14-10. Foxx had homered his last time up the previous day to tie a major league record of hitting four consecutive home runs. Bobby Lowe did it in 1894. 1940 Harry Craft of Cincinnati connected for a home run, a triple, a double and two singles in seven at-bats to lead a 27-hit attack as the Reds pounded the Dodgers 23-2 at Brooklyn. 1950 The Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Browns 29-4 at Fenway Park and set major league records for runs scored; most long hits, 17 (nine doubles, one triple and seven homers); most total bases, 60; most extra bases on long hits, 32; most runs over two games, 49; most hits in two games, 51, including 28 this game. Bobby Doerr had three homers and 8 RBIs, Walt Dropo hit two homers and drove in seven runs and Ted Williams added two homers and ve RBIs.

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Free speech is not free The May 16 column by Cal Thomas, Free speech not so free when discussing gay rights, in the Daily Commercial really hits it. Free speech is up against a strong adversary the folks who will not allow anyone to say some thing they dont want to hear. To them, good words are bad, and bad, lthy words, and sin-lled living is all OK. So no, only the sinful side of life is OK and Christians and good folks are to be kept quiet. Is that the way it has become? What should one expect these days when anything goes except for free speech thats clean and helpful? May the good Lord help us! ELMER A. WOLFORD | Mount Dora Honoring womens voices in politics Five years before President Franklin Roosevelts death, on May 24, 1940, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor, welcomed women from the Womens Division of the Democratic National Committee. The women were vis iting Washington, D.C. to partic ipate in the Democratic National Convention. Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin planned on touring with 100 guests from this group at the White House. The president also planned on meeting them in the executive ofce to chat. The Roosevelts were delight ed when more than 4,000 of these women signed up to chat with the president. The Roosevelts had to arrange to meet with the women in another location in order to accommodate the large numbers. Because of the political engagement the women exhibit ed, Eleanor Roosevelt successful ly advocated for May 24 to be es tablished as Democratic Womens Day. This year, the Florida Democratic Womens Club de clared the entire month of May as Democratic Womens Month. We honor President and Eleanor Roosevelt for recognizing the im portance of womens voices in politics. NANCY HURLBURT | Leesburg The false mythology of Ronald Reagan If Ronald Reagan were alive today, he would be over 100 years old. Conservatives would praise and applaud his every sentence no matter what he said. Today, many Republicans claim that the Gipper was a conserva tive, but as often happens they fail to list his other deeds. For example, conservatives want to cut taxes because, they say, it will unleash the free enter prise muscle power of American business. Conservatives rarely mention some other facts about Reagan, such as his approval of raising taxes eleven times while he was president. Sen. Alan Simpson said, Reagan was never afraid to raise taxes. Doug Brinkley who edited Reagans memoirs, said those who say Reagan was anti-tax are blind ed by his false mythology. They are spinning cloth out of thin air. In reality, Reagan tripled the na tional debt. After Reagans 1981 tax cuts, unemployment soared. He added the Department of Veterans Affairs, which cost over $90 billion and added 300,000 new government employees. Reagan signed a bill to legal ize abortions. His military buildup also built up the debt. Reagan funneled weapons to Iran in ex change for American hostages in a major scandal. Reagan funded the anti-Soviet Islamist Mujahadin with billions of taxpayer dollars. In return, the Taliban and Osama bin Laden attacked American forces and brought about the George W. Bush 10-year war in the Middle East. Bush said, Mission Accomplished! Unfortunately, many conser vatives want to replicate those Reagan days. Maybe those Republicans do not know what Reagan did to this nation. ROBERT WESOLOWSKI | The Villages The shame of the VA scandal Ronald Reaga n was totally cor rect when he said Government is not the solution, it is the problem. The latest example, which is even causing some Democratic politicians to wince although their wincing has more to do with re-election concerns is the absolute shame of the VA debacle. Even all of the left-leaning media, newspapers and TV net works are nding it hard to pro tect the Obama crowd from this scandal. There are nearly nine million unionized government employ ees on the VA payroll. It appears that only our good Lord can re any of them not even an act of Congress. I personally had a son-in-law die while in VA care and have seen data entry operators de stroy their assigned work in trash cans. I know a VA pharma cist who went to work only on overtime days. None of these transgressions come close to what the public i s now learning. Being a simple, conserva tive-thinking person, I ask, why do we need government-owned and government-staffed VA cen ters? Why do we need nine mil lion more government employ ees? Who in their right minds can conclude that government can function as well as, or bet ter than, proven, privately run medical centers, where incom petence, laziness and fraud are promptly dealt with? Why cant each retired vet re ceive a Blue Cross/Blue Shield card for admittance to any pri vate medical facility, to replace the taxpayer expense of 9 million government employees, with bil lions of dollars left over? Why are the welfare recipients in our country eligible but not our de serving veterans? Further, selling the VA cen ters to private medical centers should be an easy and prot able task. Knowing all of the gov ernment ineptitude, our pol iticians still went ahead with Obamacare. Was that all stupidity, or just lust for power? CLINTON GEORGE FISH | Tavares Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clar ity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@ dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR W hat a difference an election year make s. Last year, Gov. Rick Scott vetoed $368 million from the state budget. His vetoes included a number of projects in tended to improve water quality. In ex plaining the veto, Scott wrote that many water projects didnt provide a signicant return for the investment. Since that time, Scott has either found religion on the water issue or simply de cided the vetoes werent worth the blow back in an election year. On Monday, Scott vetoed nearly $69 million from the $77 billion state bud get for the upcoming scal year. It was Scotts lowest veto total since taking ofce and spared local water projects, includ ing $300,000 to fund a study of alternative water supplies for south Lake County. Scott didnt hold a public signing of the budget but issued a press release that touted the environmental funding it con tained. The budget will ensure we are good environmental stewards so future generations can continue to enjoy our natural resources, he wrote. The reality is that at a time when the state has a $1.2 billion surplus, the budget hardly makes up for years of cuts to en vironmental programs. While the budget included more than $250 million for Ever glades restoration, the $30 million slated for springs protection will barely make a dent in the damage caused by decades of excessive pollution and pumping. Ofcials from the states ve water man agement districts had estimated it would take at least $120 million to start reversing that damage. Nearly $380 million would have been dedicated to the effort from an existing real-estate tax if a springs bill had passed. Scott himself had asked for $55 million for springs in his proposed budget. But he failed to do anything to make that happen or get the springs bill passed. The budget also falls short in the area of land conservation. It guarantees $17.5 mil lion in funding toward the Florida Forev er initiative, spending another $40 million only if it can be generated through the sale of non-conservation state property. The budget provides further reason for supporting Amendment 1 in Novem ber. The measure would create a dedicat ed funding source for land conservation, projected to be worth more than $10 bil lion over two decades. As for the governor, hes at least pro gressed beyond the rhetoric that wa ter-quality projects dont provide a return on the investment. Yet while his lighter veto touch bodes well for the Florida en vironment, it would be better if the gov ernor actually showed some leadership in pushing lawmakers to dedicate more than the minimum toward protecting our springs. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST FILE PHOTO Governors budget light on environmental protection

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 OTHER VOICES Voices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. CHEERS OTHER VOICES A guest who checked into an inn one night was warned to be quiet be cause the guest in the room next to him was a very light sleeper. As he undressed for bed he accidentally dropped one shoe, which, sure enough, awakened the other guest. He man aged to get the oth er shoe off in silence, and got into bed. An hour later, he heard a pounding on the wall and a shout, When are you going to drop the other shoe? This humorous de scription from The Ur ban Dictionary den ing waiting for the other shoe to drop seems per fectly applicable as we wait for the second shoe of Obamacare to drop involving the employer mandate coverage. When Obamacare was rolled out last Oc tober we saw cancel lation letters go out to 6 million policy holders from their in surance companies because their poli cies did not meet the Obamacare philosophy of one mandated size ts all. We also learned that millions of Ameri cans were not going to keep their doctors, their plans or save $2,400 (for a family of four). The reality crushed the lies that got Obamacare passed and the presi dent reelected. Panic then set in among the Democrats running for reelection, especially in the red states. It was obvious that the rst Obamacare shoe that dropped was a disaster, both in promises and opera tionally. But, that rst Obamacare shoe that hit the oor also affect ed many seniors who are covered by Medi care. First, we need to remember that Obamacare cut $700 billion out of Medicare (over 10 years) to help pay for Obamacare. Who do you think is going to make up that $700 billion cut? Based upon my personal ex perience it is us. It ap pears that I will likely spend $750 to $1,000 more for my Medicare Part B cov erage in 2014 over my 2013 costs. Thank you President Obama. If the additional outof-pocket expens es I am paying would strengthen Medicare and keep it scally vi able for future gener ations, I would gladly pay this new expense. But to know that my out of pocket expendi tures is going to make up for the $700 Medi care cuts to help fund Obamacare is depress ing, as it does nothing to keep Medicare sol vent for the future. I, along with millions of other seniors, are part of this rst Obamacare shoe hitting the oor. The second shoe to fall will cause even more canceled poli cies among many of the employer-provid ed plans. This segment of Obamacare was de liberately delayed by presidential at in hopes of protecting Democrats in the up coming November elec tions. Recent estimates of the number of poli cies that could be can celed once the employ er component kicks in could be 20 million or more. According to one executive from Blue Cross/Blue Shield, some 3.2 million of their policies could be canceled. When this shoe hits the oor, it will be heard through out America. If these cancellations were not bad enough, the rise of insurance costs will likely continue, which is opposite of what we were told. Remember, President Obama told us that Obamacare would low er insurance costs. We will also nd that more Americans will wind up on Medicaid, which is a segment of our pop ulation that many phy sicians no longer will serve as the reimburse ments are insufcient to offset physicians ex penses. When the second Obamacare shoe does fall, millions more pol icies will be canceled, costs will continue to rise, seeing a doctor will likely take longer and your selection of doc tors will be more lim ited. Obamacare passed without a single Repub lican vote in the House or Senate. So when that second shoe drops, remind the Demo crats who rammed this through Congress with the phrase, If the shoe ts, wear it. Waiting for the other Obamacare shoe to drop RUSS SLOAN GUEST COLUMNIST O n May 18 the Daily Commercial printed a Letter of the Week from Sandra Platt, A case for legalizing pot. Through print and tele vision, it is difcult not to be inundated with pro-le galization statements but it is important to remind people of the other im pacts of marijuana with a factual response. alcohol encourages risky driving whereas THC encourages greater cau tion ... Fatal vehicle crashes na tionwide involving mar ijuana have already tri pled in the past decade, as reported by Columbia University. Deaths from drugged driving account ed for more than 28 per cent in 2010, with one in nine drivers testing pos itive for marijuana. With no accepted non-blood test to determine THC in toxication, there is no de terrent to drugged driving, yet the potency of mari juana has increased 151 percent from 1983 to 2007. California (after es tablishing their medi cal marijuana program) saw nearly a 100 percent increase in fatal crashes where the at-fault driver tested positive for mari juana. Revenue from taxation of marijuana sales could reach up to $8.7 billion per year ... While federal and state government collected an estimated $14.5 billion in tax revenue, alcohol-relat ed costs totaled over $185 billion. Tobacco use costs over $200 billion but only $25 billion is collected to offset those costs. That means the costs of legal alcohol are more than 12 times the total tax reve nue and the costs of legal tobacco are about eight times the revenue collect ed. This is an economical ly disastrous tradeoff. The Lancet Neurology has stated that marijua nas active components inhibit pain ... Putting the word med ical in front of marijua na does not make it a harmless substance. In fact, most medical as sociations have reject ed smoked marijuana as medicine: American Med ical Association, National Cancer Institute, Ameri can Cancer Society, Na tional Multiple Sclero sis Society, The American Academy of Child and Ad olescent Psychiatry and The American Society of Addiction Medicine. Medical marijuana will not be sold in regulat ed pharmacies like oth er pharmaceuticals, but instead will be sold from pot shops. The active ingredients that have been found to be medicinally benecial have been and continue to be studied and used, just not recommended in smoking form. Kids would have less access to pot if it was reg ulated ... Thirty-four percent of marijuana-using 12th graders living in states with medical marijuana laws say they obtain the drug through someone elses medical-marijuana prescription. The impact on our youth cannot be ignored. Marijuana, not alcohol, is the number one rea son why adolescents are admitted for substance abuse treatment in the U.S. In Florida, marijuana is the primary substance of abuse for 26.7 percent of adolescents, with 54.5 percent between the ages of 12 and 17. According to the FYSAS 2012 sur vey, 22.1 percent of Lake County high school stu dents had used marijuana within the past 30 days. Through the work of or ganizations like the Safe Climate Coalition of Lake County and other orga nizations dedicated to the health and well-be ing of youth, youth mari juana use has fallen by 25 percent; LSD by 60 per cent and methamphet amine by 64 percent. Yet surveyed high school se niors who dont current ly use marijuana said they would try it if it became legal. Scary thought, con sidering one in six adoles cents who try marijuana will become addicted. As November approach es keep in mind that the negative impacts of mar ijuana on the community are real and for the sake of our children be the Wall. Debi MacIntyre, M.Ed., Ed.S. is the executive director, of the Safe Cli mate Coalition of Lake County, Inc., www.safeclimatecoalition.org. Pot is not medicinal, and it is not harmless Merritt merits another mention We know, we know. We bragged about South Sumter High School grad Kirsti Merritt last week after she blasted a walkoff three-run homer to propel the University of Florida softball team into the NCAA Womens College World Series in Oklahoma City. And we gushed when she went two for three with a home run, two runs scored and an RBI in the Gators rstround win in the WCWS. But just when we thought Merritt couldnt top herself, she belted a three-run shot in the deciding game of against Alabama to put the Gators in rm control of the game on their way to a 6-3 win. Then, with Florida up 6-2 in the seventh inning, Merritt made a ridiculous diving catch to help seal the victory. We again salute this rising star and reserve space in this column to brag about her future exploits because, yes, shes only a sophomore. A quick lesson in Theo-logy You might have missed the story about a young jazz musician who is gaining national and international acclaim for his artistry, but you wont be able to overlook Theo Croker for long. The 29-year-old Leesburg natives newest album, AfroPhysicist, has been applauded by the New York Times and music critics nationwide. His third album displays his breadth, with plush funk and rock idioms, some subtle and complex new-jazz ones, a ballad standard Moodys Mood for Love and high-wire soloing, the New York Times wrote. Croker, by this time, is an international traveler who has performed across the globe and lived ve years in China. But he continues to have a soft spot in his heart for Leesburg. It was quiet and safe, he told Daily Commercial reporter Livi Stanford. Theres a measure of irony in Crokers fondness for the quiet and safety of Leesburg, given that his approach to his music is inuenced by his grandfather, legendary jazz artist Doc Cheatham, who inspired him to take risks. He always emphasized a musician should learn to be themselves and nd their own voice, Croker said. I went my own way. Even if it was not accepted, I would stick with it anyway. It has served him well, and we applaud Croker for following his voice and his dream. THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Cruisin www.dailycommercial.com SUSAN CARPENTER MCT T here was a time when the Cadillac Escalade was syn onymous with hip-hop bling. Unfortunate ly for General Motors, that time was the ear ly 2000s, when the Es calade enjoyed an un usual demographic overlap as the extrav agant SUV of choice for Versace-loving rap stars and Prada-wear ing moms, the two of whom had exactly one thing in common: money. Sixteen years since it rst came on the mar ket, Cadillac hopes to regain some of the Es calades bimodal status in a luxury SUV that is more pampering and fuel efcient while re maining one of the big gest cars on the road. With comfortable seat ing for seven and room to spare, the 2015 Esca lade is as large and un mistakable as ever. While Cadillac has toned down the blinding chrome shine of its exterior accents in favor of a more un derstated satin, and has jeweled its lights with full LEDs front and rear, it remains boxy and tall with a blunt-face grille that could do double duty as a battering ram. In fact, the $72,690plus 2015 Escalade is even bigger than it was before. The $76,690 luxury version I tested rolls on gargantuan 22inch wheels that allow its inhabitants to sit in an even more lordly position. And the long wheelbase version has grown an astounding 1 1/2 feet. If its proportions are truck like, driving it is, fortunately, less so. Theres a soothing Cal gon quality to the inte rior of the Escalade that extends beyond the luxury de rigueur leather and wood trim. Its cabin is spa quiet. Available in both twoand four-wheel drive, the handling has also been enhanced with some of the same stan dard features Cadil lac now has on its CTS sedan. That includes selectable sport and touring modes and a magnetic ride control suspension that keeps this otherwise hulking SUV hunkered in highspeed turns without throwing its inhabitants into the door panels. It also incorporates some of the same safe ty features as Cadil lacs smaller offerings, namely an advanced ra dar and warning sys tem that vibrated my seat whenever the beast ventured outside my lane without signal ing, and automatical ly braked and tensioned my seat belt if I got too close to plowing into a cars rear bumper. As much as the Esca lades proportions sug gest a throwback men tality to a gluttonous pre-recession era, its powertrain tells a dif ferent story. For 2015, the Esca lade motors with a new 420-horsepower, di rect-injection 6.2-liter engine that performs the Herculean task of propelling its 5,594 pounds from a dead stop to 60 mph in less than six seconds. Just as incredibly, it achieves as much as 21 mpg highway due to a cyl inder deactivation sys tem that imperceptibly transforms the V-8 into a V-4 at cruising speeds. During my day with the car, it switched between V-8 and V-4 dozens of times, yet the only in dication it had done so was a light that dis played on the dash. The 21-mpg (high way) hybrid option has been discontinued for 2015 due to poor sales in every state except California, of course and the updated mod els ability to achieve similar fuel economy with a gas engine. The choice of long and short wheelbase versions, however, re mains. Both models have enough seats to accommodate an en tire AYSO team; the long wheelbase version just offers more space behind the third row for bags of brand-name gear and a lower thirdrow oor that wont force gangly tween knees into armpits. Whats new for 2015 is the seats no longer need to be manhandled into submission. The third row now collapses at at the touch of a button, as do the captains chairs in the second row, which can be moved forward to allow better access for third-seat passen gers or can gymnasti cally tumble forward against the front seats to open a space so cavern ous it could almost car ry a couch. In acknowledgment that an SUV at this price point is likely to transport passengers that also come with a passel of gadgets, the Escalades CUE in fotainment system can support 10 Blue tooth-enabled devices. It also has ve USB and ve power ports to plug in iPads, laptops and other, as-yet-unknown, Apple products. Its likely the 16-speaker Bose sys tem will be more ap preciated by rap stars than soccer moms, but as a whole, the 2015 Es calade has an alluring, self-indulgent appeal, just like the high-ying, good old days of the Cadillac agship. GM looks for the Cadillac Escalade to return to glory days 2015 CADILLAC ESCALADE Base price: $72,690 Price as tested (Luxury version, 2WD): $76,690 Powertrain: Direct-injected, 6.2-liter V-8 with vari able valve timing, cylinder deactivation, six-speed au tomatic Horsepower: 420 @ 5,600 rpm Torque: 460 lb.-ft. @ 4,100 rpm Towing capacity: 7,900 lbs. Wheelbase: 130 inches Overall length: 204.3 inches Maximum cargo room: 94.2 cubic feet Curb weight: 5,594 lbs. Fuel tank capacity: 31 gallons EPA-estimated fuel economy: 15 mpg city, 21 mpg highway RICHARD PRINCE / MCT ABOVE, BELOW: The 2015 Cadillac Escalade doesnt shy from its gargantuan reputation, even offering a longwheelbase version that adds 1 1/2 feet to its length. CHARLES FLEMING MCT Eight years ago, Terry Yamagu chi paid $5,000 for a bright or ange 1973 Datsun 240Z. A cou ple of years later, she sold the car for a little more than she paid for it. If only she had kept it. Now, that car is worth $20,000, the vintage car collec tor said. Its not just the 240Zs. The value of Japanese classic cars has sky rocketed in recent years. A pris tine Toyota Celica from the ear ly 1970s can cost up to $20,000. A well-maintained Datsun 510 might go for as much as $25,000. And a Toyota 2000GT? Dont ask. A pristine 1967 version of the sports car sold at auction for al most $1.2 million in May 2013 a record for a Japanese classic. A 1968 model sold this month at an auction in Monaco for just over $1 million. The shapely coupe was Japans rst supercar, targeting Amer icas Chevrolet Corvette and Britains Jaguar XKE. Only 350 were made in part because, at $7,000, they cost thousands more than the competition. Only 54 of the cars were import ed to the United States with lefthand drive, meaning the steer ing wheel is on the left. The $1.2-million sale is hard ly top dollar at a classic car auc tion. Ferrari Testarossas have sold for more than $16 million. Last summer, a 1967 Ferrari 275 GARY FRIEDMAN / MCT Terry and Koji Yamaguchi, right, with two of their classic cars on May 14, in La Mirada, Calif. KATHERINE LONG MCT SEATTLE On the outside, its a basic, af fordable, midsize Chevy Malibu. But on the inside its a hybrid like no other, with two separate engines one biodiesel, the oth er electric that togeth er give it the muscle of, well, a muscle car, not the faint and tentative speed of some hybrids. For the last three years, a team of Uni versity of Washington students has designed, planned, tested, rebuilt, rewired and re-engi neered the innards of the General Motors car. Last week the team showed it off at Den ny International Mid dle School, where sixth-graders in teach er Ben Evans science class swarmed around the car parked in front of the school, and pep pered UW students Ryan Mallory and Jake Garrison with a hun dred questions. How much could you sell it for? How long did it take to make it? Whats that red button? What if it doesnt work? How did you get that big sticker on the car? Why is there a re extin guisher inside? What are those wires for? Could it charge your phone? Its fantastic, said sixth-grader Asli Edey. I think its going to be my dream car. The Malibu hybrid conversion is part of a collegiate competition, EcoCAR 2, sponsored by General Motors and the U.S. Department of ELLEN M. BANNER / MCT A hybrid electric car built by University of Washington students is tested in Seattle on May 20. DAVID UNDERCOFFLER MCT LOS ANGELES For several years, Volkswa gen has been watching the race to develop vi able electric cars from the sidelines. But this fall, the Ger man automaker will bring its rst all-electric vehicle to the United States, a battery-pow ered version of the ven erable Golf, the hatch back that has sold more than 30 million copies globally over six gener ations. Dubbed the e-Golf, this model uses the same platform and body as gasand die sel-powered Golfs, which have all been re designed for the 2015 model year. The electric effort is overdue. Nearly every other U.S. automak er (Honda, Toyota, GM, Chrysler, Ford, Nis san, BMW, and Mer cedes-Benz) offers a zero-emission vehicle in California. This is to meet a mandate by the California Air Resourc es Board requiring that each brand either sell such a vehicle or buy credits from automak ers that do. Automakers typical ly lose money on electric cars, despite generous state and federal subsi dies to buyers. But its the price of entry to the na tions largest auto market and key to building Car collectors fuel rising value of Japanese classics Washington team builds a hybrid with muscle for collegiate contest Volkswagen to enter US electric market with e-Golf SEE CLASSICS | C4 SEE HYBRID | C4 SEE ELECTRIC | C4

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 TERRY BOX MCT Maybe the guy in the blue oral dress at the sushi bar last weekend kind of spun you around the one out for dinner with his dazzling wife. He bafed me big-time, too. But, hey, at least his blue-hoop earrings matched his spiky heels, and his spa ghetti-strap dress didnt clash much with his wifes mini skirt. Is this a really interesting time or what? Just call me when the par tys nally, mercifully, over. I wont need a text, tweet or gram not to mention a downtown loft, a sele, a Lana Del Ray download or a Zipcar. In fact, I just might have the perfect time machine for a quick day trip back to when greasy hamburgers and dark tans seemed pretty darn healthy. Probably not. But the 2014 Dodge Charger SRT8 will make you think and act like a hyped-up, tire-smok ing, power-shifting teenager, back before they all became couch-bound digital zom bies. Once a big, kind of awk ward two-door hardtop, the Charger looks more propor tional in the 21st century ver sion and now offers the con venience of four big doors. It rides on a modern inde pendent rear suspension and features in-dash telematics that keep you connected or plugged in to some doohick ey in the sky. Far more important, the SRT8 wears a dark, forebod ing snarl up front like the re ally mean Mopars of the dis tant past. A big blacked-out Dodge crosshair grille pushed up against glaring headlamps on the bright red Charger I had recently. The sinister sedan ap peared ready to swallow a Smart car whole. Though a bit square-cut, the sides of the car carried a great s Charger scallop stamped deeply in the doors. Moreover, the Chargers big body got help from a sleekly raked windshield and a top that looked like it had been chopped an inch or two by one of the Barris brothers. The car also had stance, crouching tightly on 245/45 tires wrapped around 20inch alloy wheels. Likewise, tail lamps that ran the width of the rear evoked Chargers of the past but were tted with modern LED lights. If I were going to sweet en this mix of old and new any, I would dump the sil ly boy-racer spoiler on the trunk, which looks more dat ed than some of my hot-rod T-shirts. But I found a quick way to forget it was even back there: Push the start but ton, summoning the SRT8s 470-horsepower Hemi V-8 a gruff, muscled-up motor exclusive to vehicles built by SRT, Chryslers performance division. When the engine was cold, it shuddered with a cammy, old-school idle that quick ly settled into something more socially acceptable as it warmed. With 470 pound-feet of torque much of it down low you can almost steer the 4,300-pound Charger with its right pedal. Stand on the SRT8 hard, and the Hemis muted midrange thunder dropped a rough octave or two. Although the re-breathing engine occasionally fell into little holes from gaps in the cars ancient ve-speed au tomatic, it didnt stay down there long. A at-out, tire-spinning blast to 60 takes only 4.2 sec onds, according to Car and Driver. On a more modern front, the engine is seamlessly re duced to four cylinders at cruising speeds, helping the Charger scratch out 14 miles per gallon in the city and 23 on the highway. The road feel was not great, but it was good enough to know more or less what the front tires were doing. As you might expect, the ride in a muscle-car door-slammer like the SRT8 was as stiff as Mitt Romney at a Rolling Stones concert. But I quickly learned to live with it. The car felt most ly tight and solid over rough roads, rarely delivering any really harsh bounces. Besides, no one will ever mistake the Charger for a luxury car, despite its strato spheric $52,065 price. INTERIOR Legand head-room in back were pretty good and the front seats leather with supportive bolsters stitched in white and perforated suede centers felt terric. The door panels also got a little help from suede centers trimmed with lines of vertical white stitching. In addition, large blackfaced gauges with red nee dles proved easy to see at a quick glance, and a large center stack with an 8.4-inch touch screen functioned ne. But overall, the SRT8s easy blend of old and new didnt seem quite as smooth inside as outside. Maybe thats just the price you pay for a big, bawdy American sedan with sizzling straight-line performance and good handling. Dodge Charger SRT8 will blast you into the past 2014 DODGE CHARGER SRT8 Type of vehicle: Four-door, rear-wheel-drive, ve-passenger sedan Price as tested: $52,065 Fuel economy: 14 miles per gallon city, 23 highway Weight: 4,371 pounds Engine: 6.4-liter V-8 with 470 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque Transmission: Five-speed automatic Performance: 0 to 60 mph in 4.2 seconds SOURCES: Dodge division of the Chrysler Group; Car and Driver MCT PHOTO The 2014 Dodge Charger SRT8 carries a 470-horsepower Hemi V-8 engine. N.A.R.T. Spider fetched $27 million. But the market for Jap anese classics has only recently started to catch re, as a new genera tion of car collectors growing up surround ed by Japanese imports has come of age and started spending. Collecting cars is a relatively modern phe nomenon, said Don Rose, who handled the 2000GT Monaco sale for RM Auctions and has a 2000GT in his pri vate collection. For the early collectors, Made in Japan didnt really resonate. Younger collectors are attracted to Japa nese cars in part be cause theyre cheaper. Its a way to enter the collector hobby for rela tively little money, said Mike Malamut, a retired car dealer whos been collecting for 35 years and has an impres sive private collection of American, European and Japanese classics. But its not as easy, or as cheap, as it used to be. And thats hard on the collector whos just starting out. These vehicles have become very expen sive, which is kind of a bummer, said Pas adena, Calif., chiro practor and car col lector George Shapiro, who owns a rare ear ly 1960s Nissan Pa trol. It blows the av erage grease-monkey hot-rodder out of the market. Yamaguchi and her husband, Koji, have seen the market ex plode and encouraged it. This September they will host their 10th an nual Japanese Clas sic Car Show in Long Beach. More than 7,000 enthusiasts attended last years show, which featured 420 cars and a few dozen vintage Jap anese motorcycles. While car collectors attending the mas sive Barrett-Jackson or Bonhams auctions may go ga-ga over As ton Martins or Alfa Ro meos, younger enthu siasts come to Long Beach to drool over preserved or restored Datsun 240Zs or Toyo ta FJ-40 Land Cruisers. For them, Rose and others said, cars like the 2000GT or Nissan Skyline are as icon ic as a Shelby Mustang or a Porsche Speedster were to an earlier gen eration. Especially the Skyline. A great place for car enthusiasts is Cars & Coffee every Saturday morning at the Ford HQ parking lot. Starts at 6 A.M. The Toyota 2000GT was destined to be a classic after James Bond rode in one in You Only Live Twice. Thats the Japanese hero car, said Eric Bizek, co-founder of the Utah car import ing rm JDM Legends. The Skyline was high ly regarded for its suc cess in racing and be ing a car that could be competitive globally. Also, Bizek said, the collectors who are new to the hobby began their driving careers with Japanese cars. For a lot of these younger collectors, a Datsun 210 might have been the rst cars they owned, he said. That creates sen timental value for well-preserved or lov ingly restored models. They feel closer to these cars, Terry Yama guchi said. They are not supercars, but peo ple love them. These are like Mustangs or Cama ros to them. CLASSICS FROM PAGE C3 Energy. The Universi ty of Washington is one of just 15 universities in the United States and Canada selected to par ticipate. The Malibu has two separate engines: the biodiesel engine in the front of the car, which drives the front wheels; and the 250-horsepow er electric motor in the rear of the car, powered by an 800-pound bat tery pack. This week, the Malibu will be shipped on a at bed truck to Michigan for further testing. GM will pick a winner, and the hybrid cars will then be trucked to Washing ton, D.C., where stu dents will talk to indus try leaders about their experiences. I think our teams on track to do pretty well this year, said UW me chanical-engineering student Trevor Crain, team project leader. In year two of the competi tion, the UW team came in fourth overall and won a top award for best energy consumption and lowest emissions. For all of its success, the Malibu is a learning tool, not a vehicle that could one day go into production. The point of the competition is to train students at univer sities across the coun try how to design the cars of the future. Grad uates of the EcoCAR competitions are very experienced, very pro fessional and can tack le really difcult prob lems, Crain said. HYBRID FROM PAGE C3 brand awareness and engineering prowess amid growing consumer de mand for clean, efcient cars. The late arrival doesnt bother VW. Wed rather do it right the rst time, said Lars Menge, general man ager of product strategy for VW of America. Many automakers quickly churned out electric cars with subpar power trains or build quality, he said. We came up with a much better car, so now all others have to stretch to follow us, Menge added. Thats a bold claim, considering the strengths of competitors such as the Nissan Leaf, Fiat 500e and Honda Fit EV. But a day darting around San Francisco shows that VWs rst elec tric vehicle lives up to the big talk. Though its technology and driving range break no new ground, the 2015 e-Golf has the efciency and smooth driving habits that appeal to elec tric-car fans. And it comes in a clas sic design, packed with useful fea tures needed to lure buyers who have yet to consider a plug-in car. The new Golf platform also under pins a wide range of small cars across Volkswagen Groups global brands, including VW, Audi, Seat and Skoda. Rather than retrot the outgoing platform for an electric vehicle, VW wanted to wait until it could use this setup dubbed MQB since it was designed with an all-electric option in mind. This was another reason for VWs late arrival. The e-Golf gives up no interior space for people or cargo because the 700-pound lithium-ion battery pack is built into the oor and the tunnel between the passengers. Weighing only 60 pounds more than the gas version, the e-Golf has the same nimble handling on the road, just without any engine noise or vibration. VW hasnt yet announced pricing for the e-Golf, but a loaded version with leather seats and navigation proba bly will sell for around $35,000, before state and federal tax incentives that could knock off as much as $10,000. If that seems close to what a load ed Nissan Leaf sells for, thats no ac cident. ELECTRIC FROM PAGE C3 GARY FRIEDMAN / MCT Koji Yamaguchi looks at the engine in his 1977 Toyota Celica liftback on May 14, in La Mirada, Calif. ELLEN M. BANNER / MCT University of Washington student Jake Garrison speaks with Denny Middle School students Abdinasir Elema, 12, and Liban Anod, 12, right, about the engine of a hybrid electric car in Seattle.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: ALADDINBY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0601RELEASE DATE: 6/8/2014 ACROSS1 To the same extent6 Something Pedro and Pablo might have?9 Coll. program13 Tug-of-war participant19 Watts on a screen20 Like some desk work22 One of a group of Eastern Christians23 Kings move?25 Only what a person can take?26 In fine fettle27 Process of sorting injuries28 Gets browner30 Start of something big?31 Mineralogists study32 Anoint, archaically33 Like some French sauces34 Brooklyn squad35 The two sides of Pac-Mans mouth, say37 Principles espoused during Womens History Month?40 Cry after a roller coaster ride, maybe44 Together45 Coward from England46 Ability to walk a tightrope or swallow a sword?51 Land in the Golden Triangle52 Part of a giggle55 Pass with flying colors56 Like the 10-Down57 Soupon60 Olden62 Finish (up)64 Soprano Sumac65 At the discretion of66 Dream for late sleepers?72 Identity74 Car antitheft aid, for short75 Informal way to say 87-Across76 Sheen79 Chooses beforehand83 Its all tied up with the present86 Start to love?87 Certainly88 Collapse, with out89 Waterway leading to a SW German city?92 Way to lle de la Cit93 Feature of many a Ludacris lyric94 Add up95 Slinky going down the stairs?101 Dough raiser105 Large family106 Postlarval107 Crimean conference locale111 Over112 Captain, e.g.113 Confederate114 Biblical book in two parts115 Star burst116 Neighbor of an 8-Down118 Dissertation on peoples inherent spitefulness?121 Chaperone, often122 Treasure Stater123 Human or alien124 Some cheaters have them125 Frat members126 Drivers brake for it127 Pungent green DOWN1 Hold down2 The ostrich roams the great ___. / Its mouth is wide, its neck is narra: Ogden Nash3 Gave birth on a farm, say4 Unlikely memoirist5 Fix6 Derision7 1966 title role reprised by Jude Law in 20048 Neighbor of a 116-Across9 Inflame, with up10 South American tuber11 Touchy?12 Tidies up13 Not be bold14 Commercial version of crazy eights15 In-between16 Cosmetician Este17 And so on and so forth18 Go over and over21 Lost it24 Letter between two others that rhyme with it29 Like some care33 Lacks36 One who might stick his tongue out at you?38 Long time39 Agosto or settembre41 Ed of Up42 ___ be my pleasure!43 Burnss refusal46 Its widely hailed as a convenient way to get around47 Frozen over48 Entertains49 Bemoan50 Organic compound51 Monastery resident52 One parodied on Portlandia53 Fangorn Forest denizen54 Inflatable thing58 Reason for glasses59 Captain Morgan and others61 Does away with63 Layer67 Action-packed68 It has a light at one end69 Roll of the dice, say70 Up71 Strip for a fashion show72 Secret collector73 Before, poetically77 The ___ City (New Haven)78 Literary inits.80 Nobel Prize subj.81 Trousers82 Racing boat84 Sandwich order, for short85 Scary word90 Young Darth Vaders nickname91 Evergreen shrub92 Thumbs opposites93 Represent, sportswise95 Lines at a theater?96 Like Flatland97 Became less than a trickle98 Composure99 Spiral-horned antelope100 Mischievous girl102 Social breakdown103 Common dice rolls104 Elements of some accents108 American Graffiti director109 Frigid temps110 Like114 Srs. worries117 Colony member119 Telephone trio120 Its logo displays all Roy G. Biv except indigo 12345 678 9101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 3738 39 40414243 44 45 464748 4950 51 525354 55 56 5758 59 60 61 626364 65 66 6768 69 7071 7273 74 75 76 7778 79 8081 82838485 86 87 88 8990 91 92 93 94 959697 98 99100 101102103104 105 106 107108109110111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution to puzzle on page C6

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX A S F A R S A N R O T C P U L L E R N A O M I C L E R I C A L U N I A T E C H A N G E O F P A L A C E S O M U C H H A L E T R I A G E T A N S I D E A O R E S A N E L E W I N E Y N E T S R A D I I I D E A L S O F M A R C H A G A I N O N E N O E L C I R C U S T A L E N T L A O S H E E A C E A N D E A N S M A T T E R I N G B Y G O N E M O P Y M A U P T O A F A R E W E L L T O A L A R M S S E L F V I N Y U P L U S T E R P R E S E L E C T S R I B B O N E L L Y E S C O N K C A N A L O F W O R M S P O N T P U N T O T A L S P R I N G F A L L I N G Y E A S T C L A N P U P A L Y A L T A A N E W R A N K A L L Y S A M U E L N O V A I N D I A N O F M A L I C E A N D M E N P A R E N T M O N T A N A N B E I N G T R Y S T S B R O S E S S C R E S S Sunday crossword puzzle is on page C5.

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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G LD STANDARDTHE IN LAKE COUNTY FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTTHE JOINT COMMISSIONS GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The certication award recognizes Florida Hospital Waterman Joint Replacement Centers dedication to The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. Visit FHWatermanOrtho.com for more information. E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Business scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com SUMMER: Vacation prices driven up by surging demand / E4 www.dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com In a given year, Clermont averages about 40 new busi nesses, so ofcials are sur prised to count off 50 com mercial enterprises that have either set up shop or have announced plans to do so in the rst ve months of 2014. In that short time, weve ended up going over whats been typical in the last four to ve years, said Jim Hitt, the citys economic develop ment director. Among the higher prole businesses to have opened so far this year are WAWA, Rooms to Go, ABC Fine Wine and Spirits, Advanced Auto Parts, Batteries Plus Bulbs and Wafe House. The open ing of Dicks Sporting Goods is just a few weeks away. Hitt said its not just large franchises that are coming to Clermont, but mom-andpop stores that are taking over and rejuvenating empty buildings. Included among the new businesses are Nolands Roong, Garners Emporium, The Urban Spot taco lounge, Christian Brothers Automo tive, All About the Nail Bou tique, AGY Pavers, Real Team Realty, Device Doctorz and Marias Mexican Store and Thrift. Many doctors and law of ces and nancial institu tions also are on the list, plus Zab Thai Restaurant and Su shi, which took over the for mer Perkins/NY Pizza Build ing on State Road 50 and Citrus Tower Blvd. Phase two (192 apartment units) of The Vista at Lost Lake made the list, having started the additions in Feb ruary. Clermont attracting businesses at record rate ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL A new Wafe house is open at 2480 E. Highway 50 in Clermont. Abdul-Jabbar couldntve made these priceswith a sky hook. From a song by John ny Guitar Watson D o things cost more or less than they did a year ago? Lets see. Costs associated with housing went up 2.8 percent. But heating and cooling costs are a whopping 7.7 per cent more. (Honey, cancel the purchase of that new McMansion!) Rental costs escalated 2.9 percent. Homeown ers insurance has gone up by 3.5 percent. Wa ter, sewer and trash col lection services have increased in cost by 3.4 percent. Heres more. Healthand hospital-relat ed services both cost 4.7 percent more than they did a year ago. It costs 2.3 percent more to dine out than it did last year. But grocery food skyrocketed across the board: Meat pric es jumped by 5.2 per cent and fresh fruits by 5 percent. A haircut will cost you 1.4 per cent more. A drink and a smoke is more ex pensive (we may need both before were done here). Alcohol went up MARGARET MCDOWELL GUEST COLUMNIST MAX FAULKNER / MCT ABOVE: Debera Cobb, a letter carrier who has been bitten by a dog, walks her southeast Fort Worth, Texas, route. BELOW: A dog sits unleashed on the front porch of a house on Cobbs route. DIANE SMITH MCT FORT WORTH, Texas Veteran letter carrier De bera Cobb has a survival code: Never look a dog in the eye. Ive just been bitten once thats all that is going to happen if I can help it, she said. Recently in Fort Worth, a letter carrier was ac cused of killing a dog with a rock, an episode that up set the owners. The work er is on administrative leave while the incident is investigated, according to the U.S. Postal Service. At the same time, sta tistics show that dog bites are a serious hazard for those who deliver the mail. Fort Worth ranked 16th in the number of post al employees 26 at tacked by dogs in 2013, according to the U.S. Postal Service. Postal workers said its hard to nd a letter carri er who doesnt have an ex perience to share. I dont know what it is about postmen, but the dogs dont like us, said Christi Fite, president of the National Associ ation of Letter Car riers Branch 226, which represents Fort Worth. Na tionwide, 5,581 postal employees were attacked last year. The Postal Service hopes to improve matters through an information campaign that includes tips for pet owners. Ad ditionally, it also released the dog attack rankings as part of National Dog Bite Prevention Week, which started May 18 and ended Saturday. Letter carriers are equipped with dog spray, a repellent that consists of less than 1 percent cayenne pep per. They can curtail mail at homes or neigh borhoods where large dogs roam loose. They arent timid about call ing animal control when they see loose dogs. It makes a lot of people mad, but it is for the safety of us, said For letter carriers, dog bites are a constant threat Postal hazard Inflation, McMansions and Johnny Guitar Watson TIFFANY HSU MCT 7-Eleven relies on thousands of franchi sees to sell millions of Slurpees, Big Bite hot dogs and other snacks. But in the past two years, at least a doz en franchisees have sued the company, al leging it stripped them of their stores for bogus reasons. Some plain tiffs say 7-Eleven target ed successful stores in high-trafc areas, then ipped them to new franchisees willing to pay the company high er fees. 7-Eleven counters in court documents that some of those franchi sees were stealing de priving the company of its full share of the store prots, often by falsify ing sales records. Com pany investigations led to hardball negotiations between the store own ers and 7-Eleven, which pressured franchisees to give up their stores or face potential pros ecutions, according to court records. Dilip Patel and his wife, Saroj, said the company used storm trooper interrogation and isolation tactics in such sessions. The cou ple, who sued in March, ultimately gave up their Riverside, Calif., store, which they had 7-Eleven accused of hardball tactics by franchisees Ive never seen anything like this its like paranoia city. But in all fairness, theyve probably had experiences in the past where their franchise community has been ripping them off. Barry Kurtz, attorney SEE 7-ELEVEN | E2 SEE RATE | E2 SEE MCDOWELL | E2 SEE CARRIERS | E4

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The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for paym ent for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the a dvertisement for treatment. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hr Dr. Vaziri & StaffShoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLicense# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFinancing Available FREE EXAMMust present ad Exp. date: 06/30/14$85valueNEW PATIENTS run sinc e 1995, with no compensation from 7-Eleven. The company said in a statement that it moved to terminate the couples contract after a thorough and law ful investigation. The company vowed to ght the Patels suit and oth ers, but declined to comment on the cou ples specic allega tions. Good, hardworking, independent franchi sees are the backbone of the 7-Eleven brand, the company said in a statement. As to those few franchisees who vi olate the law or the fran chise agreement, we are determined to protect our guests, employees and other franchisees by ending t he relation ship. 7-Eleven has invest ed heavily in efforts to keep a close eye on its stores and the people who run them. In the 2012 scal year, the company spent $40 million on digital vid eo technology, install ing 4,000 camera sys tems in nine months, many of which 7-Elev en can access remotely. Many stores now have a 360-degree camera and a 180-degree analyt ics camera at the front door with the ability to measure trafc, the time consumers spend in stores and other an alytics. The company has said in court documents that its asset protection agents rigorously inves tigate suspicious fran chisee behavior, view ing hours of in-store footage, taking covert photos and tracing red ags in sales records. In Pennsylvania, an agent sent undercov er shoppers into a store where the franchisee was suspected of void ing legitimate sales and pocketing the cash. When the investigator later compared the 18 purchases he had sanc tioned against the fran chisees sales logs, he found that 13 trans actions had been im properly recorded, 7-Eleven said in court documents. Mark Stinde, 7-Elev ens vice president of as set protection, told loss prevention publication LP Magazine last year that his department cant just be a cost cen ter in the organization; we really should be an income center. The level of surveil lance at 7-Eleven is un common among similar companies, said Enci no, Calif., franchise at torney Barry Kurtz. Ive never seen any thing like this its like paranoia city, he said. But in all fairness, theyve probably had experiences in the past where their franchise community has been ripping them off. Some investigations of franchisees amount to a predatory pro gram, alleges Kurt Mc Cord, who said in court documents that he was briey a corporate in vestigations supervi sor for 7-Eleven before stepping down last year. McCord led an af davit in a lawsuit by Karamjeet Sodhi, who alleges that 7-Eleven sent agents into his six New Jersey stores, re moved lottery books and money order ma chines and cut him off from his vendors. Sodhi and the company are currently in court ght ing over control of the stores. The company em ployed a tactic known in the franchise com munity as churning, McCord alleged in his afdavit. The company generates tens of mil lions of dollars in ad ditional prots by in venting accusations of franchisee fraud, then taking back and resell ing the stores, accord ing to McCord. 7-Eleven prioritized stores in areas with high resale values or loca tions operated by out spoken franchisees, McCord said. The com pany set a yearly target for the number of stores it sought to take back, he said. McCord, who said he previously worked in loss prevention for Burl ington Coat Factory and asset protection for Tar get, said he left 7-Eleven after seven months be cause of his objections to the companys strat egy. 7-Eleven has not re sponded to McCords afdavit in court and declined requests to comment on his allega tions. But the compa ny last month won a gag order barring McCord from publicly discuss ing the case. 7-ELEVEN FROM PAGE E1 IRFAN KHAN / MCT Saroj Patel, left, and her husband, Dilip, allege 7-Eleven used storm trooper interrogation and isolation tactics to strip them of the Riverside, Calif., store that they had run since 1995. They are building brand new buildings to run their business es out of and also lling up the open storefronts that we had, Hitt said. Even the downtown district is seeing an in crease in new business es with at least six new stores that are opening or that have opened, a trend Hitt said is excel lent because the more people they can attract downtown for shop ping, eating and recre ating, the better. According to infor mation provided by Hitt, some of the busi nesses coming to the downtown area are The Barn Yarn, Ericas Tea Room, Victorias (gifts), Granny Nannies and Tattletales (securi ty). Newly opened are The Lab Hair Studio and Clermont Water front Bikes and Boards. These mom-andpop businesses are the backbone to any city, Hitt said. Were seeing a lot of those and a lot of bigger businesses its a good mix. And from an econom ic standpoint, Hitt said these new businesses are doing just what they should for the commu nity, keeping people lo cal and busy. They are provid ing jobs, location ser vices and places for people to go, he said. Whether its in larg er or smaller plazas, these companies are lling the gaps. Clermont has been able to grown very well over the years, even through the downturn in the economy, and now with the little up turn weve been see ing, its booming now. The whole idea is to capture the jobs here and were doing it. RATE FROM PAGE E1 by 1.1 percent, and tobacco and smoking products by 3.7 per cent. Tuition escalated in price by 3.3 percent. Whew. Now, consider things that have decreased in price. Seems impossible, right? Expenses re lated to transportation are ac tually 1.2 percent less expensive than a year ago. New vehicles are down in price by 0.5 percent. Motor fuel has declined in price by 4.6 percent (lets wait until summer is over to declare vic tory on this one). Wireless and landline telephone services? Now theyre 2.3 percent less ex pensive. Shoes? A percent less costly. Household furnishings have declined in price by 1.5 percent. Airline fares have de creased by 4.1 percent (hard to believe, right?). Whats it all mean? We do in deed have signicant ination in essential (non-discretionary) service items, like heat and air conditioning, food and health insurance. But many frequently used services actually cost less, like gas and cell phones. So in ation is really not rampant. In fact, most economists con sider deation a greater cur rent threat to the economy. The reason we think prices are out rageous is that wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. A person earning robust compensation is meeting his grocery bill with ease. But with out a quality paycheck, every thing looks expensive. Ination not only impacts the cost of living, it also pro vides savvy investors with sig nicant opportunities to prot from rising prices. If a compa ny can charge more for its prod ucts each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register. Prudent investors and advi sors seek out those sectors and companies that have inexible demand, or whose customers have to continue buying their products or services, wheth er the price of the product goes up 5 percent or not. As always, an investors age, risk tolerance, unique nancial goals and time horizon should be considered. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www.arborwealth. net), a Fee-Only Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 Inflation not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with significant opportunities to profit from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register.

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Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.com Celebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOM JUST 10 MILES SOUTH OF THE VILLAGES Your LED Headquarters!$34.95each We honor all competitors sale ads for same brand items! 711 South 14th Street (Hwy 27) Leesburg, FLMon. Fri. 7:30 5:00 After Hours By Appointment RICHARD VERRIER MCT LOS ANGELES At a small communi ty park in Santa Mon ica, a group of Los Angeles-area musicians wearing dark blue and orange T-shirts with the slogan Listen Up! gathered around a at bed truck as union leaders, a minister and a local city councilman red up the crowd. Make no mistake, music that we produce is a critical component in the artistic and nan cial success of any lm thats produced here, said Neil Samples, a vi olinist. We say to Li onsgate: Abandon the low road, stop offshor ing jobs, do the right thing and bring the mu sic home. After his speech, a zydeco band took the stage, and Samples and his colleagues huddled into a van and drove a few blocks to the head quarters of Lionsgate, the independent studio behind the hit Hunger Games movies. They parked outside the stu dio and used a dol ly to deliver four box es containing a petition signed by 12,000 sup porters urging Lions gate to stop sending musicians jobs over seas. The unrest this month is the latest sign of dis harmony between lo cal musicians and their employers. The Ameri can Federation of Musi cians has previously or ganized rallies against Marvel Studios for hir ing London musicians to work on such mov ies as The Avengers and Iron Man 3 even though those lms were shot in the United States. Now, with the back ing of the AFL-CIO, the union has singled out Lionsgate. It says the studio is hiring foreign musicians to play music on movies that lmed in the U.S. with the sup port of taxpayer subsi dies. It has cited such Li onsgate releases as The Hunger Games and The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, which were scored in London, and the recently re leased Draft Day. The Kevin Costner movie about the NFL draft was lmed in Ohio, where the production received tax benets, but was scored in Macedonia. Draft Day what could be more Amer ican than that? said Rafael Rishik, a violin ist with the New Hol lywood String Quartet who recently worked on The Amazing Spi der-Man 2 and Dis neys Frozen. To say with a straight face that the only way we could do this without going broke is to score this in Macedonia its hard for us to swallow. A spokesman for San ta Monica-based Lions gate declined to com ment. Producers and stu dio executives have long complained that California does not do enough to keep the movie business close to home. The states tax credit, for example, ex cludes large-budget stu dio lms. Musicians and other entertainment unions are backing leg islation that would ex pand the credit. The unrest comes at a time of growing anxiety in the local music in dustry, where lm and television work have been a key source of in come for hundreds of local violinists, cellists, trombonists and other professional musicians. Many use the enter tainment work to sup plement what they earn from working in local symphonies, chamber groups and the L.A. Op era. A large movie can em ploy more than 100 mu sicians. For that reason, Hol lywood has long been a major draw for some of worlds top musicians. But as more work in lm and TV production has moved overseas, lo cal musicians are hav ing a tougher time mak ing a living. On any given day, about 2,000 members of AFM Local 47 will work on a lm or TV show. But their earnings have fallen substantially in recent years. In 2007, union members col lectively made $30 mil lion in wages. Now, they earn about $15 million a year, according to Lo cal 47, which represents 7,400 musicians, ar rangers and copyists. If the trend contin ues, L.A.s cultural com munity could suffer as musicians leave to work elsewhere, veteran mu sicians say. One of the fantas tic things about being a musician in L.A. is that youre surrounded by just an astonishing level of players, said Marc Sazer, a violinist for the Pasadena Sym phony who has worked in the recording indus try since the 1980s. We have the stars from the whole world gather in the L.A. musical com munity. As more work goes off to London, Bratislava and Prague, thats going to disap pear, and the whole re gion will be impover ished. The American Fed eration of Musicians might be facing an up hill battle. Musicians tradition ally could count on lm work being done in L.A. even when a movie was lmed elsewhere, be cause of the high level of talent here. But more production is leaving the state as studios take advantage of tax benets and re bates that arent avail able in California. The number of mov ie scoring jobs has de clined at least 50 per cent in the last ve years, according the union. Much of the business has gone to Britain, which has long been a big draw for composers given the countrys rich musical heritage. Gen erous lm incentives also have drawn a grow ing number of big-bud get movies, such as the coming Star Wars and Avengers lms. Orchestras in the Czech Republic, Slova kia and Macedonia also are attracting more Hol lywood business. The trend has been further accelerated by the advent of low-cost technology that has made it easier to open high-quality recording studios anywhere. Every orchestra in the world would love to be doing Hollywood movies, and theyve been very aggressive in trying to market them selves, said John Acos ta, vice presid ent of AFM Local 47. Musicians implore Hollywood to stop scoring films overseas GENARO MOLINA / MCT Musicians who work in the lm and TV industry wear T-shirts that state Listen Up during a rally to protest the outsourcing of their jobs in Stewart Street Park in Santa Monica, Calif.

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I had my nose almost ripped off, and it was a terrify ing experience. Cobb, a letter carrier for about 15 years, was working a route in south east Fort Worth on Aug. 3, 2003, when she was attacked. She noticed that a pit bull, normal ly chained, was missing. She looked, took precau tions and went on to de liver the mail. Suddenly, the dog ap peared and lunged at her. Cobb said she instinc tively used her mail satchel to protect her self. She was leaving the ground, coming to my face, Cobb said. The dog bounced off, hit the ground and bit her leg once. Unfortunately, she hit a main artery in my leg, Cobb said. It took 10 stitches to suture it up. Cobb called her su pervisors, she said, and her husband came to take her to the doc tor. Cobb said she lat er learned that the dog had delivered puppies the night before. I was a stranger in her nursery, she said. Jarrett, who has de livered mail for almost a year, was bitten while taking a package to a house in the Polytech nic Heights area. I had done what you are supposed to do, Jarrett said. You walk up to a yard with cau tion, and you are look ing around making sure there are no dogs. When Jarrett got to the door, a man ap proached her who was walking with two loose dogs a German shep herd mix and a Chihua hua. The Chihuahua was barking at her, and the German shepherd mix lay on the front porch to sleep. The man, who spoke only Spanish, went to nd someone to interpret. When a woman ap peared to sign for the package, the German shepherd mix bit Jarrett. As I scan the scanner and step back, the Ger man shepherd mix ew off of the porch and lit erally lunged for my face, Jarrett said. I was terried. Jarrett said that a piece of her nose had to be reattached and that she became fearful of dogs even though she has ve. Neither letter carrier would comment on the recent investigation in volving the postal work er accused of fatally in juring a Yorkshire terrier with a rock. The problems typical ly unfold in older neigh borhoods, where the mail is delivered in slots near the front door. Cobbs mail route near East Allen and Yuma av enues is in an older res idential area in south east Fort Worth. Dogs sometimes sit unat tended on front porch es. Cobb tells custom ers to keep pets leashed, which is the law. Im keeping my dog tied up now. I dont let it bother you, shouted one man on her route recently. Cobb wont deliver mail to a house with a loose dog. Dogs need to be on a leash when being walked or if they are off the own ers property, and own ers need to be with their animals at all times, ac cording to city ordi nances. Fines can reach $2,000, said Diane Covey, a spokeswoman for the Fort Worth Code Com pliance Department. Brandon Bennett, the code compliance direc tor, said the city com bats loose or stray ani mals on various fronts, including fence stan dards, education of the public, and promotion of spay-and-neuter pro grams. At the post ofce, let ter carriers alert others to possible trouble. People have theories on dogs and letter car riers. Some think its the uniform. Others won der whether its some thing with the mail de livery routine. In any case, animal advocates remind pet owners that any dog has the potential to bite, so owners need to keep them securely fenced or indoors. Any dog, no matter how kind or loving, can bite under the right cir cumstances, said Whit ney Hanson, director of development and com munications for the Hu mane Society of North Texas. CARRIERS FROM PAGE E1 HUGO MARTIN MCT LOS ANGELES Angelica Lopez went to great lengths to save a few bucks on a planned seven-day cruise to the Virgin Islands this month. The West Covina, Calif., resident joined with 32 other people to get a group discount on the cruise. She then booked a cheap ight to the cruise port in Fort Lauderdale four months in advance. In all, she g ures she saved about $1,500. I think the average person al ways has to watch their pennies, but I dont think that should stop you from enjoying life, said Lopez, an escrow account executive who is still bouncing back from the nan cial blow of a divorce in the middle of the Great Recession. With the economy rebounding, Americans are taking vacations in near-record numbers again. But that surge in demand is driving up prices for travel costs such as airfare, hotels and attractions, making it tougher for many to afford that much-need ed respite from the daily grind. Americans will spend an average of $1,246 per person on summer vacations about $100 more than last year, according to an online sur vey of 1,500 adults by American Ex press. Airline tickets are expected to jump an average of 6 percent for the top 10 U.S. destinations, to $415 for a round-trip ticket, according to travel website Orbitz. The hottest summer destinati ons will have the biggest price increases. The average round-trip ight to New York this summer is $345, up 18 percent from last summer, while the average hotel room in Honolulu is $248 a night, up 15 percent, accord ing to Orbitz. The average hotel rate, mean while, will hit $115 this summer, up 4.9 percent, according to PKF Con sulting. Theme park ticket prices are also climbing. The Disneyland Resort in Anaheim recently raised its one-day tickets to $96, up $4 over last year, with a $1 increase in parking to $17. Universal Studios Hollywood hiked daily rates to $92, up $8 over last year. The only break travelers will get this summer will be with the price of gas and rental cars, which should remain stable. The higher prices are driven by surging demand. Three-fourths of Americans say they will take a vaca tion this summer, compared with 59 percent two years ago, according to the American Express survey. Business travel is also on the up swing. Companies are dispatching workers on more trips and confer ences this summer to take advantage Vacation prices driven higher by surging demand Theme park ticket prices are also climbing. The Disneyland Resort in Anaheim recently raised its oneday tickets to $96, up $4 over last year, with a $1 increase in parking to $17. Universal Studios Hollywood hiked daily rates to $92, up $8 over last year. SEE SUMMER | E6

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Sunday, June 8, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, June 8 the 159th day of 2014. There are 206 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On June 8, 1864, Abra ham Lincoln was nominat ed for another term as pres ident during the National Union (Republican) Partys convention in Baltimore. On this date : In A.D. 632 the prophet Muhammad died in Medina. In 1845 Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nash ville, Tennessee. In 1915 Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned in a dis agreement with President Woodrow Wilson over U.S. handling of the sinking of the Lusitania. In 1948 the Texaco Star Theater made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Ber le guest-hosting the rst program. (Berle was later named the shows perma nent host.) In 1953 the U.S. Su preme Court ruled unan imously that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. Eight tornadoes struck Michigans Lower Peninsula, killing 126 peo ple. In 1967 34 U.S. service men were killed when Israel attacked the USS Liberty, a Navy intelligence-gathering ship in the Mediterranean. (Israel later said the Liber ty had been mistaken for an Egyptian vessel.) In 1972 during the Viet nam War, an Associated Press photographer cap tured the image of 9-yearold Phan Thi Kim Phuc (fahn thee kihm fook) as she ran naked and severely burned from the scene of a South Vietnamese napalm attack. In 1973 Gen. Francis co Franco relinquished his post as Spains prime minis ter while remaining as chief of state. In 1978 a jury in Clark County, Nevada, ruled the so-called Mormon will, purportedly written by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, was a forgery. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, June 8, 2014: This year you open up to new possibilities. You seem to be more vibrant and more willing to take risks. If you are single, play it slight ly more conservatively; youll want to have the other party reveal more of himor herself rst. You are likely to meet someone of inter est after midsummer. If you are attached, the two of you seem to t right in togeth er no matter what you do. You cant deny that theres a lot of mutual admiration between you. Be as roman tic as you were when you rst met each other. LIBRA might be an intellectual, but he or she is also romantic. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Even if plans fall apart, youll still enjoy yourself. You often prefer hanging out at home anyway. Make time to visit with a neighbor you feel really connected to. A roommate or family member might want to invite a loved one over. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Take time for yourself, even if you dont think you need it. In the near future youll gain new insight into a key person in your life. You need to integrate this infor mation. Calls seem to come in from everywhere; screen them for now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might wonder what would be the best way to approach someone who is often unpredictable. Per haps the approach is not as important as your ability to adjust to others and their idiosyncrasies. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Youll want to spend time close to home. Be aware that someone might want to tug you out the door. As a result, you might decide to invite this person over. Dont be surprised if more spontaneous invita tions come in for the same reason. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make a call in the morning to someone at a distance. You could be surprised by what you hear. You might prefer to keep much of what goes on today hush-hush. Stay centered when dealing with a parent, and the issue will vanish. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have much more to offer than you might re alize. These assets go way beyond nances, and they involve your character and your compassion for oth ers. A friend seems to shut down at odd times. Give this person some space. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Use today to enjoy your friendships and your fami ly. Someone will continue to atter you. You might want to change topics, but you could have some difculty. Just say thank you, and move on. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might not want to drop your cool act right now. Whether you are establish ing boundaries or trying to let someone know that you have had enough will make little difference. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Go off and join your friends, whether it is for a late brunch or perhaps a trip to the beach. You val ue camaraderie, and today youll desire that sense of togetherness even more. A loved one might delight you with his or her unpredict ability. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Take a stand. You know what you want and what is acceptable. You need to let others know your boundaries. If they do not know, they could infringe on your space. Make a must appearance that could involve an older person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Your mind will be on someone at a distance. Has it occurred to you that it might be best to get to gether with this person soon? Then maybe you can be more present in the mo ment. Meanwhile, it could seem to others that you are closed down. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Let someone else make the rst move. Youll enjoy the attention of be ing sought after. One-onone relating could provide a new openness and a will ingness to have a discus sion. Choose your words with care. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: Im hav ing problems with my boyfriend, Adam, and I feel stuck. He re cently was accepted to graduate school, and were planning to move there. We havent lived together before, and Im not sure Im doing the right thing. I will be working and paying for every thing, and Adam will be just going to school. He thinks this is a fair trade-off because we wont have to wor ry about money at all once he has completed his education. Abby, I dont think he cares that its ME going with him. I feel like a space-ller and a meal ticket. How do I go about nding out his true feelings and intentions? He doesnt make me feel special, wanted or important ever. I worry this will end badly. I do love him, but I dont want this to be a self-fulll ing prophecy. Please give me some advice. TO MOVE OR NOT TO MOVE IN INDIANA DEAR MOVE OR NOT: You do need ad vice and here it is: Your womans intu ition is telling you this isnt right, and that your boyfriend cant be trusted to fulll his part of the bargain. You should listen to it be cause thats a poor ba sis for uprooting your self and becoming his benefactor. The person you have described is some one centered solely upon himself and his own needs. A man who doesnt make you feel special, wanted or im portant would make a very poor husband. DEAR ABBY: My wife and I have three daughters in their 20s and 30s. One of them, Lauryn, is married with four children. She and her husband are behind in their mort gage, student loans, federal, state and prop erty taxes, utilities, etc. Over the past 15 years, we have given them more than $40,000 to help them stay aoat. Things have not im proved. Now that my wife and I are retired, the money we provide is cutting into our retire ment savings. For the sake of our grandchil dren, we continue to bail Lauryn out hop ing their nances will improve. But now we have begun to think our handouts should come at a cost. We want to tell Lau ryn and our son-in-law that the money weve given and have con tinued to give will count against their in heritance. It doesnt seem fair that we have given so much to this one daughter and her family and relatively little to her sisters. Do you agree? Wed appre ciate your thoughts on this. LOVING PARENTS AND GRANDPARENTS DEAR LOVING PARENTS: I do agree. And for that reason, you should dis cuss this issue with an attorney who special izes in estate planning, wills and trusts. Your other daughters should not suffer because Lau ryn and her husband have been perpetually needy. An attorney can guide you, and it will be money well spent. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Woman worries she will be a checkbook for her beau JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, June 8, 2014 Se Habla Espaol (352) 735-6941CALL US OR STOP IN OVER 33 YEARS*******SAME LOCATION 17 YEARS US 441Old 44119A K SPECIAL LOAN RATES GOODUSEDSTUFFNeed Cash for Your Gold Jewelry? No Need to Sell It! You Can Borrow on It!PAWNNEED CASH?10%15%Conditions apply offer expires Aug 31, 2014CALL FOR DETAILS Call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Tuesday June 10th, at 11:00 amComfort SuitesD002549 of th e improving economy. That puts high-spending business travelers in competition with vacationing fam ily for hotel rooms and airline seats, putting up ward pressure on prices. Airlines, having learned their lessons from the recession, have been cautious about adding more seats and planes in response to the increased demand. That means air carriers dont need to offer as many discounts to keep their planes full. You are not seeing airlines ood the mar ket with an excessive amount of capacity, said Henry Harteveldt, a travel analyst at Atmo sphere Research. What we are seeing is custom ers chasing seats. As wanderlust takes hold, the challenge for many Americans will be how to break away with out breaking the bank. They are in bet ter shape nancially than they were in recent years, said Robert Klein henz, chief economist at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. They ... are more willing to spend what continues to be a hardearned dollar, but they are doing it cautiously, looking for value. The top money-sav ing techniques include cashing in loyalty re ward points and shop ping for groceries to prepare meals in hotel rooms. Marilyn Fils, a recent ly retired school admin istrator from Tarzana, is ying to Paris to attend a wedding with her hus band. She used cred it card reward points to pay for the ight, saving thousands of dollars. Otherwise, she said, she could not have afforded the trip. Vacationers can save even more this sum mer by steering clear of expensive tourist hot spots, travel experts say. Consider visiting na tional parks or desti nations like Memphis or Nashville, said Erik Hansen, director of do mestic policy for the U.S. Travel Association, the trade group for the nations travel industry. Coby King, president of a Los Angeles public affairs company, is sav ing by taking his wife and two children to a small lodge on the Ha vasupai Indian Reser vation near the Grand Canyon for several days of hiking. We are not delib erately saving money by going off the beat en path, but its a happy coincidence, he said. SUMMER FROM PAGE E4 HEATHER SOMERVILLE MCT MENLO PARK, Ca lif. In an unassum ing ofce building here, theres a group of startup founders working fever ishly to fulll their en trepreneurial dreams, and not one of them is a Stanford University dropout in his 20s. You wont nd ba by-faced coders hunched over Mac Books, empty ramen containers or kegs of beer. Instead, you will nd mothers and oth er women, most in their 40s and 50s, with back grounds in fashion, music and law. Many have never worked in the tech industry or at tempted a startup. De spite the odds stacked against them in the youthand male-dom inated Silicon Valley startup world, they are forging ahead. I have no fear, said Jodi Murphy, 57, of San Mateo County, who joined the Womens Startup Lab in Febru ary to build Geek Club Books, a storytelling app about children with autism. Everything that I have done has led to this. Even though I am older, I literally leap out of bed every day, be cause this is my time for doing this. The lab also has an ambitious mission: To equip women found ers with the skills they need to thrive in the ma cho tech industry, which has made it difcult for women to build and fund startups. Accord ing to research from the Kauffman Foundation, a nonprot focused on education and entre preneurship, between 2004 and 2007 women founded only 3 percent of technology rms. And just 1.3 percent of ven ture-backed startups have a female founder, while 6.5 percent have a woman as CEO, accord ing to Dow Jones. A woman entrepre neur coming out of a place like the Womens Startup Lab will be bet ter prepared, said An drea Rees Davies, as sociate director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford Universi ty. These women will have the strategies to cope. The dearth of wom en startup founders not only perpetuates the in equality that has long plagued the tech indus try, experts say, but also creates a void of women role models needed to encourage more girls to pursue careers in tech. The shortage of wom en in computer science is a well-document ed problem a quar ter of Stanford Univer sity computer science degrees are awarded to women, and about 20 percent of the countrys computer program mers and software de velopers are women and organizations and academic programs are working to push more girls into these elds. But experts say change can only happen when more mid-career wom en emerge as success ful startup founders to inspire younger gener ations. Once you see more Jack Dorseys that are women, youll start to see more girls majoring in computer science, Kleiner Perkins Caueld & Byers venture capital ist Stephanie Tilenius said, referring to the co-founder of Twitter. While none have yet risen to Twitter-like stardom, some start ups coming out of the 1-year-old lab have seen success. Monique Giggy, a 35-year-old mother of two from Palo Alto, last month sold her com pany, Swing by Swing, a smartphone app that maps golf courses and keeps score. Liesl Cap per joined the lab last fall and last month her Australian startup, Cognea, which makes virtual assistant soft ware that responds with different personalities, was acquired by IBM. Neither price was dis closed. And San Fran cisco-based Style Lend, a peer-to-peer market place for renting de signer dresses, grew 26 percent week over week during the rst quarter of 2014. Like other accelera tors, the Womens Start up Lab is a springboard for aspiring entrepre neurs to turn ideas into full-blown business es, and founders to grow edging compa nies. But the lab is also atypical: It doesnt offer money or the chance to mingle with celebrities, and its focus is less on hitting revenue growth targets than instilling condence and leader ship skills. The women meet with life coaches and business advisers some of whom are men and gather for week ly problem-solving ses sions. Many juggle their startups with pick ing up children from school and making sure the grocery shopping is done. Women must ap ply and pay $4,500, plus the lab takes a 2 percent stake in the company. They dont have the luxury of just up and leaving their lives, said lab founder Ari Horie, who has previous ly worked at IBM and a handful of mid-size startups. Theyll work around the clock, but still leave to drive their kids to ballet and kara te class. Alumni describe the experience as nurtur ing and supportivein contrast to the hyper competitive Y Combi nator, where entre preneurs hole up in Mountain View, leaving behind families to vie for investors attention. Y Combinator is pretty much just num bers, numbers, num bers, said Style Lend founder Lona Alia Dun can, 33, who complet ed stints at both Wom ens Startup Lab and Y Combinator. Youre so focused on the metrics, and no one is worried about your needs. With the Womens Startup Lab, its very welcom ing, very open. People are willing to collabo rate and share. Startup lab offers women path to entrepreneurship MCT PHOTO Jennie Wong, right, makes a point as Cynthia Litchi looks on during a meeting of entrepreneurs at the Womens Startup Lab in Menlo Park, Calif. WOMEN IN STARTUPS 1.3 percent of pri vately held companies have a female founder For startups with ve or more females, 61 percent were suc cessful and 39 percent failed. 83 percent of start ups have no female ex ecutives 3 percent of tech startups are founded by women SOURCE: Dow Jones, Kauffman Foundation

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