Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE GATORS STOMP BAYLOR, HEAD FOR FINALS, SPORTS B1 BURGLARIES: Suspect may have hit Lake, Sumter counties A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Study nds more than 2 billion people now heavy C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 2, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 153 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D2 COMICS C10 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C11 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A10 WORLD A9 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12. 88 / 70 Party sunny, evening T-storms. 50 LOLITA C. BALDOR and CALVIN WOODWARD Associated Press F ive years a captive from the Afghani stan war, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in American hands, freed for ve Guantanamo terrorism detainees in a swap stirring sharp debate in Washington over whether the U.S. should have negoti ated with the Taliban over prisoners. U.S. ofcials said Sunday that Bergdahls health and safety ap peared in jeopardy, prompting rapid ac tion to secure his re lease. Republicans said the deal could place U.S. troops in danger, especially if the freed detainees return to the ght one called it shocking. Another, Arizona Sen. John Mc Cain, said of the ve detainees: These are the hardest of the hard core. Visiting troops in Afghanistan, De fense Secretary Ha gel stepped forward at Bagram Air Field to thank the special op erations forces that re trieved Bergdahl, who ofcials said was the only American prison er of war still held by insurgents in that con ict. Gen. Joseph Dun ford spoke of the ex citement that spread through U.S. ranks when the sergeants re lease was conrmed. You almost got choked up, he said. It was pretty extraordi nary. Tireless campaigners for their sons freedom, Bob and Jani Bergdahl planned a news con ference Sunday in their hometown of Hai ley, Idaho. The Taliban handed Bergdahl over to special operations US defends captive swap with Taliban, critics stir CAROLYN KASTER / AP Accompanied by President Barack Obama, Jani Bergdahl and Bob Bergdahl speak during a news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on Saturday about the release of their son, U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS / AP U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, right, walks on the tarmac with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan James Cunningham, left, during his arrival at Bagram Aireld in Afghanistan, on Sunday. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Family members, lo cal residents and Lees burg police are relieved that a 75-year-old wom an who had been reported miss ing for nearly a month was found alive and safe Sat urday afternoon, yet questions re main about her whereabouts and why she disap peared. Traute Rankin was reported missing on May 2 from her Lees burg home, and she was found lying in the bush es near the Leesburg Walmart, where police noted she was slightly dirty and confused, yet appeared to be in good health. She was tak en to Leesburg Region al Medical Center for medical evaluation. Rankins daughter, Renee Shelley, and Dan, Renees husband of 31 years, ex pressed gratitude to police and lo cal residents who had been involved in search efforts. The Shel leys are in the process of moving from South Car olina to Sumter County. We are relieved, Dan Shelley said of Questions linger about missing Leesburg woman RANKIN ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Aurelia Cole, chief of administration for Lake County Schools, is counting down the days to her re tirement next month after 43 years as an educator. On June 11, the Educational Foundation of Lake County will host a benet dinner in her honor, but the city of Clermont last week hosted a reception recognizing her efforts. Nearly 100 people were in attendance, including friends, family, city ofcials, fellow teachers and former students. Many shared stories about how Cole touched their lives, but the one thing everyone acknowl edged was Coles love for children and her efforts to ensure they were educated and cared for. DINA CAPPIELLO Associated Press WASHINGTON Details of a refashioned bill to address the problems plaguing the federally run veterans health care system were released Sunday by its sponsor, the chairman of the Senate Veter ans Affairs Committee. Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Ver mont Independent, posted a summary of his bill Sunday and said it would be intro duced this week. The bill includes several new provisions aimed at x ing the long delays for vet erans care. The long-sim mering issue erupted into a scandal in April and led to last weeks resignation of VA Sec retary Eric Shinseki after a federal investigation into the troubled Phoenix VA Health Care System found that about 1,700 veterans in need of care were at risk of being lost or forgotten after being kept off an ofcial waiting list. The investigation also found broad and deep-seat ed problems throughout the sprawling health care system, which provides medical care to about 6.5 million veterans annually. Sanders said in a statement issued Sunday that while the people who have lied or ma nipulated data must be pun ished, we also need to get to the root causes of the prob lems that have been exposed. The bill would allow Senate to take up new bill to address veterans health system AP FILE PHOTO House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., left, and Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., right, arrive for a May 30 vote on Capitol Hill in Washington. CLERMONT Lake County educator retiring after 43 years The bill would allow veterans facing long delays to seek care outside the VA, at private doctors offices, military bases or community health centers. SEE MISSING | A2 SEE CAPTIVE | A2 SEE EDUCATOR | A2 SEE VETERANS | A10

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 1 CASH 3 ............................................... 8-8-8 Afternoon .......................................... 8-2-1 PLAY 4 ............................................. 0-2-8-0 Afternoon ....................................... 5-7-8-8 FLORIDA LOTTERY MAY 31 FANTASY 5 ............................. 3-9-11-23-28 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 2-11-31-38-49-52 POWERBALL .................... 15-27-31-34-481 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. seeing his mother-in-law on Saturday night in the emergency room. She seems to be in decent health, and they were go ing to keep her overnight because her blood pres sure was kind of low. And obviously, the next cou ple of days we have to get doctors evaluating her. Although she is back and were happy that she is back, there is still busi ness to take care of and to understand why (she dis appeared) and her mental frame of mind. The family wants to make sure that Rankin has the right medications and doctors. We are very concerned about her emotional and mental state, Shelley said, noting Rankin had been living in her own home in Leesburg before she disappeared. We are going to have doctors evaluate her, be cause her mental stabil ity right now is in ques tion, he said. We need to understand where she is at emotionally, mental ly and physically. We dont plan to take her anywhere right now. We are going to let the doctors do what the doctors need to do. Shelley said his wifes sister, Tina Tabor, will be making a trip from En gland next week to see her mother. We think the Leesburg police did a tremendous job, Shelley said, noting detectives were in con stant communication with the family. We are very appreciative of all the work that they did. Local residents, who kept the case alive on Facebook, also were in volved in searches for Rankin. The people in the com munity have been great. They have bonded to gether and they have giv en my wife and I a lot of emotional support, which has been very helpful, Shelley said. We are hop ing within the next couple of weeks we can get down to Leesburg and meet all of the people who helped in the search a few weeks ago, and to talk to them, and thank them from the bottom of our hearts for all that they have done. Leesburg police re ceived the call around 2:07 p.m. Saturday about an elderly woman lying in the bushes at the edge of the Walmart parking lot whom LPD were able to identify as Rankin. She was found dirty and she had some scratch es that look like some one who had been walk ing through the woods, said Sgt. Scott Mack of LPD, the second ofcer to question Rankin. She had told (the rst ofcer) that she had run away, said Mack, who noticed Rankin was up and walking in the park ing lot when he arrived. My primary concern when I got there was to evaluate her physical and mental well-being, and I talked to her briey about how she felt, and if she knew where she was. She seemed to be fairly with it. She knew who she was, where she was and she knew it was the month of May, but she did not know the day or the date, Mack said. There may have been a little bit of confu sion, and it could be that she at out didnt know because she had not been keeping track. Mack said Rankin was aware that she had been missing for a month. We knew that she had a heart condition and that was a major concern to us, the sergeant said. We wanted to make sure that she was physically okay, so I turned her over to the paramedics there on the scene. They told me that all of her vitals were good. We were hap py to nd her in the con dition that she was in. The LPD sergeant praised the community involvement in searching for Rankin. Obviously, were ap preciative of any time that the community assists us with any of our investiga tions, Mack said. When we have community in volvement and coopera tion, it makes our job so much easier, and we are denitely appreciative of the woman who called us (Saturday) and said that she saw Mrs. Rankin and to make sure that she was taken care of. He said LPD detectives will continue to investi gate this case and to form a timeline. On the police end, we want to determine where she has been all this time, and how she has been taking care of herself or if anybody has been with her, Mack said. We ob viously have a lot of ques tions to answer there. The next concern for us is what we need to do to make sure that this doesnt happen again. Realtor Pamela Dona hey helped coordinate some searches for Rankin over the past month. Im glad that she is al right, said Donahey, who was among a group of about 20 people who searched woods and homeless campsites look ing for Rankin. Obviously it is the best outcome that she was found alive and is now re united with her family, added Jamie Asmus, one of the searchers, who was instrumental in keeping Rankins disappearance as a topic on Facebook after she had seen a poster of the missing woman by the door of Harbor Freight, not far from where the woman was found. Asmus was pleased that Renee Shelley notied her right away on Face book that her mother had been found after she was contacted by LPD. I feel somewhat of a sentimental attachment, Asmus said of Rankin. I wanted obviously for her to be found and to be found healthy and reunit ed with her family. MISSING FROM PAGE A1 forces in an area of eastern Af ghanistan, near the Pakistani bor der, U.S. ofcials said. In a state ment on its website, the Taliban put the location on the outskirts of Khost province. Bergdahl, 28, was taken to Bagram Air Field for medical evaluations, then transferred to Landstuhl Re gional Medical Center before he is reunited with his family in the U.S., probably at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, ofcials said. Ofcials did not offer details about Bergdahls health. National security adviser Susan Rice said he had lost considerable weight and faced an acute situation. Yet she said he appeared to be in good physical condition and is said to be walking. Questions persisted, too, about the circumstances of Bergdahls capture; Hagel declined to com ment on earlier reports that the sergeant had walked away from his unit, disillusioned with the war. Such matters will be dealt with later, Hagel said. Hagel was met with silence when he told troops in a Bagram hangar: This is a happy day. We got one of our own back. It was unclear whether the absence of cheers and applause came from a reluctance to display emotion in front of the Pentagon chief or from any doubts among the troops about Bergdahl. In weighing the swap, U.S. of cials decided that it could help the effort to reach reconciliation with the Taliban, which the U.S. sees as key to more security in Afghani stan. But they acknowledged the risk that the deal would embolden insurgents, perhaps encouraging them to grab U.S. troops or citi zens as bargaining chips for the re lease of others in U.S. custody. President Barack Obama, joined in the Rose Garden on Saturday by the sergeants parents, said the deal was struck because the U.S. does not ever leave our men and women in uniform behind. CAPTIVE FROM PAGE A1 ASHLEY SMITH / AP Sondra Van Ert, co-owner of Baldy Sports, hangs a sign celebrating news of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahls release on Saturday. Paula Johnson Hoisington, one of Coles former students, now the vice president of Net Communica tions in Orlando, said she credits much of her condence and success to Cole. I am one of the seeds she planted, Hoising ton said to the crowd before addressing Cole personally. I can remember the days in your class, and I thank you for the seeds you planted in me ... You used to tell us, You can do whatever youd like to do. You can be whatever you want to be. I believed it and I achieved it, Hoisington said to Cole. Clermont City Man ager Darren Gray shared Coles history as an educator, and ac knowledged the con tributions she and her family have made to the south Lake community and beyond. Cole is the only daughter of the late Rev. William N. and Marie Rose McKinney, who were both longtime ed ucators in the commu nity. She completed her elementary and sec ondary education in Cl ermont, where she was the salutatorian of her class. She went on to receive her bachelors degree in English from Tuskegee Institute (University). Years later she received a master of science de gree in educational leadership from Nova University. Immediately after graduation, Cole began teaching in the Lake County School District, where she was a teach er for 18 years, admin istrative dean for six years, assistant princi pal for four years, mid dle school principal for ve years, high school principal for ve years and chief of adminis tration (assistant super intendent), her present position, for ve years. Cole has been married to her husband, Devon, for 44 years, and is the mother of two children, Devon Michael, an as sistant principal, and Danielle Marie, a read ing teacher. The cou ple has four grandsons: Devon Jr., Ethon Wil liam, Willie III and Wes ley Daniel. Cole is a member of New Jacobs Chapel Mis sionary Baptist Church, where she serves in the Family Matters (food distribution) and Vision Committee ministries. She is also the Home coming chairperson, pastor of the support team and on the Black History Committee. In addition, she is a long time member of Del ta Sigma Theta Sorority, the South Lake Histor ical Society and presi dent of the W.N. McK inney Gospel Choir. She also serves on the South Lake Chambers Educa tion and Teacher Appre ciation Breakfast com mittees. Chris Patton, Lake County Schools spokes person, said the fact that so many gathered to honor her Cole shows how well respected she is in the community. Her service and con tributions to the chil dren, to the education system and to the com munity are enormous, and I think it it shows when a local municipal ity goes out of their way to honor someone like that, Patton said. Devon Cole, Aurel ias husband, who re tired 11 years ago after 35 years with UPS, said he is glad to see his wife nally willing to slow down a bit. Were just gonna take it one day at a time, en joy life, he said. Its good to have her retir ing because shes been at the craft for many years, but she doesnt sit (still). She will nd something to do, Im absolutely sure of that. EDUCATOR FROM PAGE A1 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE COMMERCIAL Aurelia Cole, retiring after 43 years as an educator, is surprised by a remark made during a benet dinner in her honor.

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT ORLANDO Celebration Golf to host Kids Play Free event Celebration Golf Management will host its fourth annual Kids Play Free program, Wednesday through Oct. 4. Kids ages 5-16 play free when ac companied by an adult golfer. Local participating cours es are: Celebration Golf Club at Celebration, The Golden Bear Club in Windermere, Kings Ridge Golf Club and Legends Golf Club in Clermont, Stoneybrook West Golf Club in Winter Garden, Eagle Creek Golf Club in southeast Orlando, Stonegate Golf Club at Solivita in Kissimmee, RedTail Golf Club in Sorrento and Orange County National Golf Center in Winter Garden. Call 407-566-1045, ext. 4604, or email knairn@cgmgolfproperties. com for details. OXFORD Guardian ad Litem program in need of volunteers The Guardian ad Litem program is seeking volunteer advocates to be a voice for abused, neglected or aban doned children whose cases are in the court system. To be eligible, volunteers must be 21 years of age or older, have suc cessfully completed 30 hours of pre-service training and be cleared of any serious criminal history via a Level II criminal background check. Individuals ages 19-20 are eligible to work alongside a certied volunteer. The next training session begins on June 9 at Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301. For information, call 352-2745231 or email Sarah.Jay@gal..gov. To download an application, go to www.guardianadlitem.org. LEESBURG Cornhole Tournament team sought for Cornfest The Downtown Leesburg Business Association is seeking teams to par ticipate in the annual Cornfest Festival from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., on Saturday at the Towne Square in downtown Leesburg, featuring an abundance of cooked and uncooked Zellwood sweet corn for purchase. The Cornhole Tournament will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with prizes awarded. Other events include the pet parade and costume contest, in which guests can dress up their pet in a corny costume to win prizes. For information and to register, call 941-223-4177 or go to www.it syourdowntown.com. OCALA Summer jobs available at Ocala outdoor camp The FWC is looking for sum mer camp counselors for its Ocala Outdoor Adventure Camp at the 57acre facility on Lake Eaton in the Ocala National Forest. Applicants must be age 18 or older, pass a mandatory background check and have a desire to mentor boys and girls, ages 9-15. The camp offers six one-week ses sions beginning June 16. Employees must be available for all sessions. For information, call 352-625-2804. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN L. MILLER Halifax Media Group A team of Marion Coun ty sheriffs detectives ar rested a 50-year-old Sum mereld man who is accused of committing a string of residential bur glaries. The burglaries occurred in Summereld, Weirs dale, Belleview and Ocala, authorities said, and Rob ert Sternaman may be a person of interest in home burglaries in Lake and Sumter counties. Sternaman was taken into custody by authori ties who were responding to a burglary on Southeast 44th Avenue Road in Oc ala. Detectives got a de scription of a vehicle they say Sternaman may have left in, and that vehicle was located at a Summer eld residence. Inside the car, de tectives found a lawnmower that was later discovered to have been sto len from the Ocala home on 44th Ave nue Road. Sternaman was detained and transported to a dis trict ofce for question ing. There, he admitted to ofcials that he broke into six homes one of which was oc cupied because he needed cash to support his meth amphetamine ad diction, detectives said. He also said he need ed money to pay his bills, authorities said. Ofcials believe Ster naman, who in March SUMMERFIELD Burglary suspect may have hit Lake, Sumter STERNAMAN THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com The Leesburg Boating Club Inc. has received the OK from the city to remove a large water oak tree in poor condition from its waterfront prop erty and to replace it with temporary shading. Steve Knowles, commodore of the boat club, recently told city commis sioners the club would pay for the cost of the tree removal and suggest ed the installation of a three-sided pole barn to provide the shading. He said the barn would match the adja cent buildings on the property. Normally, we would protect a tree, but from the information that we have gathered, it sounds like the tree is in somewhat of a decline, he said, adding there is concern about the trees dead limbs and the possi bility of property damage as hurri cane season begins. The tree would be taken down, the stump would be removed and it would be nice and cleaned up, and it will be at the boat clubs expense, Knowles said. There would be no expense to the city whatsoever. He showed renderings of a pro posed pole barn structure that he said would be aesthetically appeal ing and provide shading on the boat LEESBURG Aging water oak tree to get the ax THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Commissioners voted Tuesday to cut down a water oak tree in poor health on the grounds of the Leesburg Boating Club. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com L eesburg ofcials have been told that problems with the citys 10-year-old park ing garage appear to be relatively minor and xable, based on nd ings from engineers. The overall structure does not appear to be compromised, Leesburg Public Works Director D.C. Maudlin said while looking over a report from AECOM engineers. We wanted it to be a small problem. It was a much smaller problem than it could have been. The third and fourth decks of the four-deck garage next to the city library had been cor doned off, including the Leesburg Bikef est crowd in late April, as the city was await ing results from the en gineering rm on what had caused 19 holes to appear in the concrete oor panels. City ofcials became concerned after see ing some of the weld ed metal connectors used to hold the con crete sections of the ga rage decks together LEESBURG City parking garage problems appear minor DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTOS The third level of the parking garage is off limits until repairs are made. Daylight shines through cracks in the ceiling of one of the concrete section panels from the third deck of the citys parking garage. BILL THOMPSON Halifax Media Group As part of the $1.3 billion deal to bring commuter rail to Orlando, CSX Transportation has had to improve the com panys S line a long ribbon of track that runs through the heart of the state in connect ing Jacksonville and Lakeland. Between those points, the S line passes through com munities such as Belleview, Summereld and Wildwood. CSX had to upgrade capacity along the route to handle an increase in freight trains that were rerouted from the haul ers A line in order to accom modate SunRail. About seven or eight additional trains or a total of 20 to 28 trains a day are headed to the S line. Company spokeswoman Kristin Seay said the S line ex pansion projects are expect ed to be completed some time this month. Some of the S-line improve ments include laying miles of double-tracking, or build ing a parallel track alongside the main line so slower trains can yield to speedier ones. The work list also included erect ing new, or improving exist ing, overpasses in Wildwood and Alachua County. The state funded those from a $198-million pot that was part of the overall payment to CSX. And while the SunRail-relat ed work might be done soon, Seay suggested other improve ments could be forthcoming. CSX continually looks for ways to improve infrastruc ture and therefore may have additional projects in the fu ture, she wrote in an email. WILDWOOD SunRail leads to track upgrades SEE GARAGE | A9 SEE BURGLARY | A9 SEE TREE | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 SCOTT CALLAHAN | Staff Writer scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com Umatilla needs $100,000 to ad dress water damage along with mold and mildew problems caused by leaks occurring during roof replacement work at City Hall. At this point, it is unknown whether the roong contractor is going to make repairs, how much he is willing to take responsibili ty for, and what damages his insur ance carrier will cover, according to a city staff report to be discussed by the city council Tuesday night. Because staff members dont know if or when the damage claim will be settled, they will ask council members for permission to take out a $100,000 bank loan. The leaks caused by rainwa ter have damaged ceilings, ceiling framing, lighting, ductwork, insula tion, drywall, doors and trim, elec trical conduits and wiring and ex haust fans in restrooms, the staff report states. Asbestos also has been found in the ceiling, and that will have to be removed as well. Few companies perform both mold and mildew re moval and asbestos removal, so an other company will have to be hired to remove the asbestos, the staff re port states. While the interior x-up takes place, the staff also would like to modern ize the council chambers. Because of the roof issues, council members over the past few months have had to meet in places like the local elemen tary school and the library. An amount of $100,000 is be lieved to be plenty to accomplish (the) repairs and also enough to mit igate the mold, mildew, remove the asbestos and provide much need ed modernization to the room, the staff report states. Workers at City Hall, meanwhile, will need to complete a move to a renovated southern portion of the building unaffected by the leaks. The Umatilla Police Department, which operates out of a separate building, has been dealing with its own mold and mildew problems caused by roof leaks. Last April, council members were asked to lease a nearby ofce on Central Ave nue for the police department until the leaks caused by rainwater com ing off an adjacent building can be addressed. In other action Tuesday night, a man who purchased a house and parcel valued at $63,701, saddled with a $51,500 lien, will ask council members for debt relief. A Code Enforcement Lien was or dered on the property at 61 Win throp Ave. because of tall grass, ac cording to staff report. A ne of $250 a day effective Oct. 13, 2013, through May 13, when Bri an Lunsford bought the property has amounted to $51,500. In a letter to council mem bers, Lunsford said he and his wife bought the house as an investment and hope the board will consider re ducing the ne to $25 a day, which they intend to pay. Our intent is to use the house for many years as a rental home, the Windermere couple wrote. We will not be homesteading this house, nor do we intend to ip this home. We just like the town and think that it will be a good place to own prop erty for the long term. Upon purchasing the property, Lunsford said, he cleaned up the yard and repaired a damaged ga rage door. He said he takes care of his property and assured the coun cil members they will never again have issues with the property. Reducing the ne to $25 a day would reduce the lien from $51,500 to $5,450, according to city ofcials. The council meets at 7 p.m. at the Umatilla Public Library, 412 Hateld Drive. Umatilla needs $100K to address City Hall damage Staff Report Construction will be gin today on Donnelly Street from Fourth Av enue to Fifth Avenue in Mount Dora, a $3 mil lion project expected to be nished by Oct. 1. City ofcials will hold a ground-breaking cer emony for this next por tion of Phase 2 improve ments at 11 a.m. at the intersection of Fourth Avenue and Donnelly Street, Kelda Senior, the citys public communi cation ofcer, said in a press release. The intersection of Fifth Avenue and Don nelly Street will remain open throughout the construction period, ex cept for any night time work that may be need ed, according to the re lease. This is an extreme ly important project be cause we are upgrad ing and expanding our citys aging infrastruc ture, Senior said pre viously. Its just (going to) make our downtown more accessible, more walkable and safer for our many visitors. Underground utili ty work continues on Third Avenue from Dora Drawdy Way to Baker Street. This area will be closed to vehicular traf c until the end of Sep tember. Sidewalks and businesses will remain accessible through the construction period. Senior said park ing is available at the lot located on Tremain Street. Additional free parking can be found at the First United Meth odist Church, located at 439 E. Fifth Ave. in downtown Mount Dora. Businesses located in both construction zones will remain open and accessible through this improvement peri od. This is just anoth er phase of downtown street work. Last sum mer, improvements were made on a section of Third Avenue, a por tion of Fifth Avenue, Al exander Street from Fourth to Third Ave nue, and also included the revamping of Sun set Park on the corner of Alexander Street and Fourth Avenue and the conversion of Fourth Avenue from Alexander Street to Lake Dora to a pedestrian mall. For information about this second phase of downtown im provements, including parking maps and ren derings, visit www.city ofmountdora.com. MOUNT DORA Construction on Donnelly Street will begin today SUBMITTED PHOTO This a rendering of how Third Avenue and Donnelly Street will look after the Mount Dora construction project has been completed. JUST THE FACTS Phase 2 work will in clude: Replacement of wa ter lines and sewer lines. Replacement of stormwater lines and storm inlets, improve system capacity. Widened roadways to accommodate more/ safer parking. Reconstructed side walks and ramps to be American Disability Act compliant. Installation of paver crosswalks. Installation of new landscape and irriga tion. Installation of new street lights. Installation of new street signs. Installation of new street furniture. Addition of parallel parking on both sides of Baker Street from Fourth to Third Ave nues. club grounds. Commissioner Elise Dennison suggested the club take down the tree and wait until the com mission receives results from a Venetian Gar dens master-plan study before constructing the barn. How about remov ing the tree and, be fore building the pole barn, wait until the study on Venetian Gar dens comes back, and it should be within the next couple of months, Dennison said. That way if there is storm there wont be any dam age the tree will be gone. Then if we de cide that we dont want a pole barn, we can al ways put another tree in there. Commissioner Da vid Knowles (brother of Steve Knowles) said he has looked at the oak tree extensively. It would be very wise to have that tree down before the hurricane season comes, David said. Water oaks are inclined to go in case we have strong winds. It does supply some shade, and it would be nice to have some shade there, and we may want to build some type of temporary structure to allow some kind of shade. Leesburg City Man ager Al Minner said he felt Commissioner Den nisons request was rea sonable, considering there has been a lot of effort and time put into the Venetian Gardens study. One of the things that the commission has talked about a lot is making sure we have the best and improved Venetian Gardens, Minner said. Commissioner Bill Polk made the motion for the tree to be taken down immediately and to allow for temporary shade until the Venetian Gardens report is re leased. Fellow commis sioners voted in agree ment. Polk said on Wednes day that the tempo rary shade would be similar to what is used for downtown farmers market events and not the pole barn structure Steve Knowles had pro posed. TREE FROM PAGE A3

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 were missing. They were initially alerted to the problem by a resi dent who noticed some of the support pieces of the parking garages concrete panels didnt look right or appeared to be broken. The entire garage was closed off as a result, and the lower portions were reopened after the engineering rm gave its initial assessment and noted the lower 1 deck areas were OK and could still be used. Leesburg City Man ager Al Minner has in formed commissioners that the builder of the garage would be pre sented with the engi neers report. Were hopeful that Dura-Stress will x these issues at no cost to us, Minner said. To protect us in the future, what we would like to do as well is spend another $5,900 with Southeastern Sur vey. One of the things that we were a little bit concerned with was set tling. Minner said the city could then use the sur vey as a benchmark in the future to keep track of the structure. The sur vey would provide an ex amination of the eleva tion of each of the sides of the parking garage just in case we do have a settlement issue and to keep an eye on poten tial problem areas. He said the surveying rm would use a laser scanner to record struc tural components and the base condition. So in the future, if we ever have a problem again, well be able to go back and say, In 2014 we took this very detailed survey and this is what it was, Minner said. Well be able to do it again and tell how it has changed, if it has shifted, and that will be import ant information for us. GARAGE FROM PAGE A3 DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO One of several broken metal connectors spotted at Leesburgs parking garage. Welded metal connectors were used to hold the concrete sections of the deck panels together when the garage was built 10 years ago. failed to register as a career offender and was arrested for the charge, may have taken part in home burglaries in Lake and Sumter counties as well. The detectives had been investi gating the Marion County burglar ies since they were rst reported on May 2. The latest burglary occurred on Friday. Ofcials said the burglar would ei ther smash a window usually lo cated in the back of the home or pry open a door to gain entry. Then the burglar would take a wide assort ment of items, including appliances, jewelry and cash. Detectives said the burglaries mostly occurred in the day when the victims were away. Of the six burglar ies, four occurred within days of each other. The routine in which a majority of the burglaries occurred while home owners were away changed on May 7. In that case, a woman said she was at her Southeast 43rd Terrace Bel leview home with her 2-year-old son when she saw a man in her fathers bedroom. Seeing the woman, the burglar ran and escaped in a car that was parked on the property. Apparently the sus pect escaped empty-handed as a 46inch TV was recovered from the back porch. It appears it wasnt the only time the burglar left without taking any thing. On May 8, a deputy went to an address on Sunset Harbor Road where a kitchen window had been broken and the alarm went off. Dep uties got permission from the home owner to search the home and noth ing was out of place, they said. State records indicate that Ster naman has a criminal history dating back to March 1993. His crimes in clude burglary, grand theft and traf cking in stolen property. He has been out of prison since November 2013. BURGLARY FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press WASHINGTON Al-Qa ida has decentralized, yet its unclear whether the ter rorist network is weaker and less likely to launch a Sept. 11-style attack against the United States, as President Barack Obama says, or re mains potent despite the deaths of several leaders. Obama said in his foreign policy speech last week that the prime threat comes not from al-Qaidas core leader ship, but from afliates and extremists with their sights trained on targets in the Mid dle East and Africa, where they are based. This lessens the possibility of large-scale 9/11-type attacks against America, the president said. But it heightens the dan ger of U.S. personnel over seas being attacked, as we saw in Benghazi, he said, referring to the September 2012 attack on a U.S. diplo matic outpost in Libya that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. Experts argue that this re structured al-Qaida is per haps even stronger than it has been in recent years, and that the potential for attacks on U.S. soil endures. We have never been on a path to strategically defeat al-Qaida. All weve been able to do is suppress some of its tactical abilities. But strate gically, we have never had an effective way of taking it on. Thats why it continues to mutate, adapt and evolve to get stronger, said David Sed ney, former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Af ghanistan, Pakistan and Cen tral Asia. Decentralization does not mean weakness, he said. I think Americans think al-Qaida is no longer a threat that Osama bin Ladens death means al-Qaida is not a big thing anymore, Sedney said. He believes al-Qaida is gaining strength in Pakistan, is stronger in Iraq than it was three or four years ago and is stronger in Syria than it was a year or two ago. This is a ght about ideol ogy. Al-Qaida is not this lead er or that leader or this group or that group, he said. The experts say al-Qaida today looks less like a wheel with spokes and more like a spider web stringing togeth er like-minded groups. Tom Joscelyn, a senior fel low at the Foundation for De fense of Democracies and se nior editor of The Long War Journal, a website that tracks how al-Qaida and its afliates operate around the globe, said he thinks the Bush and Obama administrations mis takenly dened al-Qaida as a top-down pyramid with a hi erarchal structure that if you sort of lop off the top of the pyramid, the whole thing crumbles. Al-Qaida leaders have scat tered to other parts of the world, he said, noting that Al-Qaida in the Arabian Pen insula is headed by a for mer aide to bin Laden, who is now general manager of al-Qaida globally. More recently, the Treasury Department penalized a se nior al-Qaida operative on al-Qaidas military commit tee who relocated from Paki stan to Syria and is involved with a group plotting against Western targets, he said. U.S. ofcials have tracked com munication trafc going back and forth between Syr ia and Pakistan and Afghani stan, he said. This shows, to my mind, that were not dealing with this sort of discrete core en tity in Pakistan and Afghan istan that can be droned to death, but in fact an interna tional network that poses a lot graver challenges, Josce lyn said. Al-Qaida decentralized, but not necessarily weaker AP FILE PHOTO This Feb. 2, 2014 photo shows Iraqi Security forces preparing to attack al-Qaida positions in Ramadi, 70 miles west of Baghdad, Iraq. JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELAINE GANLEY Associated Press PARIS A suspect ed French jihadist who spent time in Syria is in custody over the shoot ing deaths of three peo ple at a Belgian Jewish museum, prosecutors said Sunday, crystaliz ing fears that European radicals will parlay their experiences in Syria into terrorism back home. When Mehdi Nem mouche was arrested in southern France on Fri day, he was in posses sion of rearms, a large quantity of ammuni tion and a video claim ing responsibility for the May 24 attack, a Belgian prosecutor said. In a one-minute ram page that deeply shook Europes Jewish com munity, a gunman opened re at the Brus sels museum. In ad dition to the fatalities, another person was gravely wounded. Authorities raised an ti-terror alert levels as they searched for the attacker. But it was ul timately a customs in spection in the French port city of Marseille that turned up Nem mouche, as he dis embarked from a bus coming from Amster dam, Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said. The suspect had a re volver and a retractable automatic weapon like those used in the Brus sels attack, and ballis tics analyses were un derway to determine if they were used in the attack, Molins said. At least one of the weapons was wrapped up in a white sheet scrawled with the name of the Islam ic State of Iraq and the Levant, an extremist group ghting in Syria, Molins said. Nemmouche, a 29-year-old from northern France, had a criminal record, with seven convictions for crimes like attempted robbery but nothing related to terrorism, Molins said. He said the suspect became radicalized in prison, and left for Syr ia just three weeks after his last prison stay in late 2012, going to Syr ia via Brussels, London and Istanbul. He said the suspect had spent about a year in Syr ia, though it is unclear why he went and what he did while there. Belgian federal pros ecutor Frederic Van Leeuw, in a separate news conference in Brussels on Sunday, said the suspect had tried to lm the kill ings on May 24, but his camera failed. A video found in his possession shows his weapons and clothes, and includes a voice claiming responsibility for the attack in Brus sels against Jews, Van Leeuw said. He said it wasnt certain wheth er the voice was that of the suspect. Belgian police carried out raids in the Court rai region of Belgium on Sunday morning, where the suspect is believed to have spent time, and were questioning two people there, Van Leeuw said. The suspect has been handed to anti-terrorist investigators and could be held at least through Tuesday under French counterterrorism law. The new elements in this investigation draw attention once more to the problem of the returnees in other words the people going to Syria to partic ipate in combat and re turn afterward to our country, Van Leeuw said. All European countries are confront ed at this moment with this problem. Interior ministers from around the Eu ropean Union are ex pected to focus on strengthening ways to stem Syria-related vio lence when they meet in Brussels on Thurs day. Belgiums interior minister, Joelle Milquet, called the returnees a generalized problem for all of Europe. The Brussels killings, which came on the eve of European par liament elections in which far right parties had a strong showing, led Belgian ofcials to boost their anti-terror measures, and raised fears of rising an ti-Semitism. Two Israeli citizens and a French citizen were killed in the shoot ing, and a fourth victim remains hospitalized between life and death, the Belgian prosecutor said Sunday. The European Jew ish Congress welcomed the arrest in France and urged European au thorities to act faster and more aggressively to prevent such crimes. The suspect has said nothing to investigators so far during his inter rogations, Molins said. Prosecutors: Suspect in Jewish museum killings was in Syria YVES LOGGHE / AP Belgian federal prosecutor Frederic Van Leeuw addresses the media at the Federal Prosecutors ofce in Brussels, on Sunday.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON President Barack Obama will press Euro pean leaders this week to keep up pressure on Russia over its threatening moves in Ukraine, while seeking to assuage fears from Poland and other NATO allies that the West could slip back into a business-as-usual relationship with Moscow. Obamas four day trip to Poland, Belgium and France comes against the backdrop of successful national elec tions in Ukraine and signs that Russia is moving most of its troops off its shared bor der with the former Soviet re public. Yet violence continues to rage in eastern Ukrainian cities and there remains deep uncertainty about whether Ukraines new president-elect can stabilize his country. U.S. ofcials contend that, even with some signs of prog ress, Russia has not taken the necessary steps to ease ten sions and could still face ad ditional economic sanctions. Obama will look for Western allies to show a united front during a meeting of the Group of Seven major industrial na tions that was quickly ar ranged after leaders decided to boycott a meeting Russia had been scheduled to host this week. But at least some parts of Obamas visit will challenge the notion that the West has isolated Moscow. Russian President Vladmir Putin is scheduled to join U.S. and Eu ropean leaders in France Fri day for a day of events mark ing the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion at Normandy. Putin will also hold one-onone talks with French Presi dent Francois Hollande, his rst meeting with a Western leader since the Ukraine cri sis began. Putin may not get to host the G-8 but if he gets to go to Normandy with everybody, it begins to diminish the ap pearance of isolation, said Steven Pifer, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who now serves as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. The White House says Obama will not hold a formal bilateral meeting with Putin, though the two leaders are ex pected to have some contact. Ofcials also disputed the no tion that Putins presence con stituted a return to normal re lations, noting that Obama and other leaders have talk ed with the Russian president throughout the crisis with Ukraine. Yet those reassurances may be of little solace to NATO al lies who sit near the Russian border, particularly Poland, where Obama will open his trip Tuesday. In April, the U.S. moved about 150 troops into Poland to try to ease its secu rity concerns, but Obama is likely to get requests from Pol ish leaders for additional sup port. Hes going to hear a very strong message from Pol ish ofcials that the mission has not been accomplished, said Heather Conley, a Europe scholar at the Center for Stra tegic and International Stud ies. In fact, the work has only begun. While in Warsaw, Obama will also meet with region al leaders who are in town to mark the 25th anniversary of Polands rst post-communist free elections. Among those leaders will be Ukrainian Pres ident-elect Petro Poroshenko, who won Ukraines May 25 election and will hold his rst bilateral meeting with Obama. We very much admired that the people of Ukraine have turned out in huge numbers to elect President-elect Po roshenko, said Ben Rhodes, Obamas deputy national se curity adviser. Weve admired his commitment to pursue di alogue and to aim to reduce tensions and put Ukraine on a positive path. From Warsaw, Obama will head to Brussels to meet with leaders from the other G-7 na tions: U.S., Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Canada and Ja pan. The wealthy nations will discuss ways to wean Europe off of Russian energy sup plies, as well as gauge interest in levying more sanctions on Russia. The U.S. and European Union have each sanctioned Russian businesses and indi viduals, including some peo ple in Putins inner circle, and threatened the prospect of broader penalties on Russias key economic sectors. But with European nations that have close economic ties with Russia already wary of those sector sanctions, Obama is likely to face an uphill climb in cementing those commit ments amid the recent signs of progress with Ukraine. I think there is no politi cal appetite for further sanc tions, Conley said of the Eu ropean nations. Many of the G-7 leaders will also travel to Norman dy for the 70th anniversa ry of the Normandy invasion. But all eyes will be on Obama and Putin, who have a histo ry of tense public encounters even before the Ukraine crisis worsened their relationship. Obama and Putin will both attend a leaders lunch and a ceremony at Sword Beach, one of the ve main landing ar eas during the Normandy in vasion. The U.S. president will also attend a separate ceremo ny at Omaha Beach, the largest of the assault areas during the June 6, 1944, invasion. Obama to urge European leaders to keep up pressure on Russia AP FILE PHOTO This May 28, 2011 photo shows U.S. President Barack Obama during an arrival ceremony at the presidential palace in Warsaw, Poland. ADAM BEAM Associated Press LA GRANGE, Ky. Patrick OHara, a pris oner convicted of mur der, is 69 years old and mostly conned to his bed. He is incarcerat ed in a sparkling-clean facility where nurses work behind steel cag es and he gets oxygen from tubes in his nose while a television mum bles nearby. Hes one of 67 inmates in the Kentucky State Reformatorys nursing care facility, which costs state taxpayers more than $4.4 million a year. In a state grappling with $1.6 billion in budget cuts since 2008, some Kentucky lawmakers ask why its worth keep ing OHara and others like him behind bars. The state legislature has approved a pilot program that requires Kentucky to parole some inrm inmates excluding sex offenders and death row inmates to private nursing homes where the feder al government, through Medicaid, would pay most of the medical bills. For the plan to work, inmates cannot be in prison. The federal gov ernment will not pay for inmates medical ex penses. But if the in mates are paroled to a private facility, they be come eligible for Med icaid. Inmates who leave the nursing home would be returned to prison for violating pa role. The expanded pro gram comes as many states are grappling with the cost of aging prisoners. Connecticut began paroling inmates to a private nursing home last year under a program ofcials say will save that state up to $5 million annually. From 1995 to 2010, when the nations pris on population grew 42 percent, the number of inmates over age 55 quadrupled, accord ing to a 2012 study by Human Rights Watch. From 2001 to 2008, state spending on inmate health care increased in 42 of 44 states surveyed by the Pew Charitable Trust and the MacAr thur Foundation. The geriatric prison population is swelling for multiple reasons, including longer pris on sentences with no chance of parole and the fact that the huge population of aging baby boomers accounts for more arrests. Its not a crime wave, its just there are more older people in that age category, said Ron Aday, a professor at Middle Tennessee State University and author of the book Aging Pris oners: Crisis in Ameri can Corrections. It costs $182 per day to care for inmates like OHara, while Ken tuckys daily cost for an average healthy inmate is $50. That really isnt the mission of the depart ment to provide nursing care for elderly folks, Kentucky Corrections Commissioner LaDon na Thompson said. Kentucky considering private nursing homes for elderly inmates TIMOTHY D. EASLEY / AP Patrick OHara, a patient in the medical unit, speaks with staff members of the Kentucky State Reformatory, April 17, in LaGrange, Ky. veterans facing long delays to seek care out side the VA, at private doctors ofces, mili tary bases or commu nity health centers. It also authorizes emer gency funding to hire new doctors and nurs es and would provide scholarships or forgive college loans for doc tors and nurses who go to work at the VA. In ad dition, it would give the department authority to re poor-performing executives, but not as broadly as a bill passed in the House and de feated in the Senate last month. An earlier version of Sanders bill did not have enough support to pass in February. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said Sunday that the key to xing the problem was giving veterans the exibili ty to get the care they need at the closest, most available place. And thats the solu tion to this problem is exibility to the vet eran to choose their health care, just like other people under other health care plans have the are able to do, McCain, a Vietnam veteran, said on CBS Face the Nation. Why doesnt that veteran have a card and go to the caregiver that he or she needs and wants? The VA spent about $4.8 billion last year on medical care at non-VA hospitals and clinics. That amounts to about 10 percent of health care costs for the Vet erans Health Adminis tration. VETERANS FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 Y es, all women, all girls, grow up learning ways to avoid attracting the attention of unnerving guys; its no doubt built into our DNA, along with an affection for miniatures and the early songs of Patsy Cline. Simply in order to leave the house in the morning, a girl has to assemble an arsenal of be haviors to just shut that thing down. You remember that phrase, right? Thats from Todd Akin, R-Mo, who argued not very long ago that women dont get pregnant from criminal acts be cause If its a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. Every girl remembers the rst time she was degraded sexually in public. It is not, as the movies would have us believe, a wonder fully cheerful moment of sen sual awakening and blossoming womanhood. Its the moment when you start carrying your keys in your hand so youve got quick access to the door plus some metal be tween your ngers, and when you should have your phone pre-di aled to 91 so that theres one more digit to hit. Its the sense of shame sweeping over you because you looked pretty only to be slimed in a drive-by insult, told you look like a hooker. Its knowing where the well-lighted streets are be cause you are afraid of the dark, and its being wary of the spot light because if youre the center of attention, youre an easy target. Its developing a ninja-like awareness of your surroundings even when youre supposed to be relaxed and enjoying yourself. Its recognizing that nowhere is safe. If girls standing on the lawn of the California house where they lived in college werent safe from a 22-year-old who wanted to prove he was the alpha man by slaughtering them, then no where is safe. So we develop strategies to make ourselves feel, if not safe, then safer. They are talismanic rather than scientic, but some do work. I discovered around age 12, for example, that one way to dis suade men from leering at me or making sucking-teeth-clicking noises as I passed them on the street was to stick a nger in my ear and start digging. You have to look really determined; you have to appear on a mission. It cant look like youre twirling a strand of your hair or some thing like that, because that might be seen as cute and then you couldnt expect anybodys sympathy even if you were ab ducted and forced to live on a farm with Todd Akin. If that didnt work, and an in timidating presence remained nearby lets say on a subway or bus where you couldnt just sneak away casually but had to stay in your seat for fear of nev er nding one again stick ing another nger unapologet ically and directly into a nostril and keeping it there would, nine times out of 10, work instantly. That youd never be able to get a date in that borough with a normal guy would be the down side. Yes, all women and girls have ways of making ourselves in conspicuous. It isnt modes ty that drives us to do it: Its fear. Its self-protection. And dont tell yourself were being forced into the virtue of modesty because were not, no more than a man with his hand cut off is being forced into the virtue of patience. Its also hard to get ahead in the world if you spend a lot of time looking over your shoul der to make sure youre not be ing stalked. Yet, yes, all women want love. But what disguises itself under that name, smuggled in under a fake passport? You know that somewhere theres a teenage girl feeling really bad for the San ta Barbara murderer because all he needed was somebody to love him. Shes writing poems to him right now, romanticizing the vio lence and turning pathology into romance. And yes, while all people wish we could shut it all out and pre tend it will all go away, we cant. Hatred, disguised as lust, haunts, corrodes and seeps from one generation to the next. The system that supports it cant be ignored; it must be dis mantled. Its work that needs to be done by us by all of us. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist schol ar who has written eight books, and a col umnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Women grow up being afraid of, fending off creeps A ccused National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden was handed a golden opportunity to justify himself Wednes day when he was asked by NBCs Brian Wil liams whether the American public should view his unauthorized release of thousands of classied U.S. government documents to the media as a principled act of civil disobe dience or as a betrayal of his country and he blew it. The interview, taped last week, took place at a hotel in Moscow, where Snowden ed last year in order to avoid prosecution on espi onage charges. Snowden spent much of the hourlong broadcast trying to convince Wil liams and the TV audience that he was actual ly a patriot, not a traitor. His actions, he said, were those of a whistleblower prompted by the noblest of motives: to alert his fellow citi zens of the massive government wrongdoing involved in the NSAs secret surveillance pro grams targeting millions of Americans pri vate phone calls and emails. Much of what Snowden had to say about the governments technical capacity to invade the privacy of ordinary citizens without their knowledge or consent surely resonated with a public that has become far more concerned about the scope and purposes of the NSAs ac tivities than it was year ago, when the secret surveillance programs were rst reported. But the crucial question came when Wil liams asked Snowden why he ed to Russia if he considered his disclosure of classied ma terial an act of civil disobedience. Why didnt he return to the United States, as Secretary of State John Kerry has urged him to do, in order to face the charges against him at a public tri al where he could argue the legitimacy of his motives and the gravity of the danger repre sented by the NSAs unchecked power to peer into the private lives of citizens? Moreover, Williams reminded him, isnt the whole point of civil disobedience that it is driven by conscience, and that those who to practice it must also be willing to suffer the consequences for their actions? Snowdens reply, in a nutshell, was that (1) he couldnt get a fair trial in the U.S. under the terms of the Espionage Act, and (2) that he was unwilling to risk spending years or pos sibly decades in prison because the criminal system was rigged against defendants in es pionage cases. That, he said, would only dis courage future whistleblowers from coming forward when they saw the government en gaged in illegal activity carried out in secret. Does that sound like someone who broke the law out of conscience in full recognition that he should be prepared to endure the consequences of his actions? Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE NSA leaker still doesnt look like a hero Classic DOONESBURY 1974 Yes, all women want love. But what disguises itself under that name, smuggled in under a fake passport? You know that somewhere theres a teenage girl feeling really bad for the Santa Barbara murderer because all he needed was somebody to love him. Shes writing poems to him right now, romanticizing the violence and turning pathology into romance.

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A12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NASCAR: Jimmie Johnson wins at Dover / B3 Switzerlands Roger Federer waves after losing his fourth-round match against Latvias Ernests Gulbis on Sunday at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris, France DARKO VOJINOVIC / AP HOWARD FENDRICH AP Tennis Writer PARIS So unbeatable for so long until the clos ing days of Grand Slam tournaments, Roger Fed erer is suddenly accumu lating early exits. Federers streak of nine consecutive quarter nals at the French Open ended Sunday with a 6-7 (5), 7-6 (3), 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 fourth-round loss to 18th-seeded Ernests Gul bis of Latvia. A lot of regrets, Fed erer said. I just couldnt kind of gure it out. The 17-time Grand Slam champion had not left Roland Garros so soon since 2004, when he was beaten in the third round by Gustavo Federers Open streak ends SEE TENNIS | B2 Im sorry I had to win. I know all of you like Roger. Ernests Gulbis, after ending Federers streak of nine straight quarternals James, Duncan set to break their Finals deadlock JAMES DUNCAN TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI Over the last 10 sea sons, only one NBA player has been part of more wins than LeBron James. His name is Tim Duncan. Their numbers over that de cade are incredibly similar. Duncan has appeared in 622 regular-season and playoff vic tories, James has played in 621. Duncan is shooting 50.2 per cent from the eld, James is shooting 50 percent. Duncan has won two championships with San Antonio during this 10-season stretch, James has two with Miami. Plus, when facing each oth er in the NBA Finals, both have won one, lost one. Here comes the tiebreaker a Finals rematch that will have high expectations. Miami and San Antonio are the leagues last two teams standing for the second consecutive year, their next chapter starting on the Spurs home oor Thursday night. The Heat won a wild se ries last season for their second straight championship, needing a frantic rally to avoid elimina tion in Game 6 and then riding the strength of a 37-point, 12-re bound effort from James to top the Spurs in Game 7. I think our guys, they actual ly grew from the loss last year, Spurs coach Gregg Popovich SEE FINALS | B2 PHOTOS BY ALONZO ADAMS / AP Florida celebrates after defeating Baylor during an NCAA womens softball College World Series tournament game on Sunday in Oklahoma City. Florida won 6-3. CLIFF BRUNT AP Sports Writer OKLAHOMA CITY Florida didnt dom inate Baylor in the re match, but the Gators performance was good enough. Hannah Rogers pitched a complete game and helped Flori da defeat Baylor 6-3 on Sunday to advance to the Womens College World Series national champi onship best-of-three se ries. Florida will play Al abama for the title. The Gators, who beat Baylor 11-0 on Thurs day on the opening day of competition, won Sunday with solid fun damentals. Florida had eight hits and three walks, but no home runs. The little things win games here in the Col lege World Series, Flor ida coach Tim Walton said. Just proud of our kids for believing in us and believing in them selves and in their abili ties and not trying to do too much. Here we are getting a chance and an opportunity to play for a national champion ship. Rogers allowed three runs on ve hits and threw 96 pitches. She improved to 29-8 this season. I just want to contin ue to do everything and not over think anything, and use my defense like I have all season, she said. I mean, theyve been doing a great job here and all year and I will continue to use them. Florida (53-12), took a 5-0 lead Sunday in the top of the fth inning before the Bears scored three runs in the bottom of the fth to make it a game. The Bears, who came from 7-0 down to beat Kentucky on Sat urday night, couldnt quite do it again. Im extremely proud of my team, Baylor coach Glenn Moore said. We came here Gators stomp Baylor to set up all-SEC final with Tide Oregon catcher Janelle Lindvall, center, runs down Alabamas Haylie McCleney (8) at third base for an out during the rst inning. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer DUBLIN, Ohio Hideki Matsuyama earned his rst victo ry in America and val idation as one of golfs young stars Sunday with birdie on the 18th hole to force a playoff and a 10-foot par putt on the rst extra to win the Memorial. In a tournament that Masters cham pions Bubba Wat son and Adam Scott threw away on a wild back nine, Matsuyama looked certain to join them. He lost the lead by dropping three shots on two holes, and he didnt look like a win ner when he pushed his drive toward the bunkers on the nal hole. Lightly slam ming his driver to the turf in disgust, the head broke off. Mat suyama followed with an approach to just outside 5 feet for bird ie and a 3-under 69. That forced a play off with Kevin Na, who nished his round of 64 about two hours earlier. Matsuyama chose not to replace his bro ken driver in the play off, and his 3-wood went into the bun ker. Na drove left into the creek and still had about 10 feet for bo gey on the 18th hole in the playoff when Mat suyama made his par putt. The 22-year-old from Japan pumped his st as the ball was a few inches from drop ping. Im really, really happy, Matsuyama said through his in terpreter. Its a dream come true to win at Mr. Nicklaus course. Matsuyama won for the sixth time in his career, all of them on the Japan Golf Tour. He had a pair of top JAY LAPRETE / AP Hideki Matsuyama holds the trophy after winning the Memorial golf tournament on the rst playoff hole on Sunday in Dublin, Ohio. SEE GATORS | B2 Matsuyama wins Memorial in playoff SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 17Deland Suns7p mSanford River Rats7p m@ Sanford River Rats7p m@ Deland Suns7p m NASCAR Sprint Cup-FedEx 400 beneting Autism Speaks Results Sunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 148.3 rating, 48 points. 2. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 111.8, 43. 3. (21) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 114.5, 42. 4. (10) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 100.7, 41. 5. (7) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 103, 39. 6. (16) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 87.6, 38. 7. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 93.5, 37. 8. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 400, 100, 36. 9. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 104.3, 35. 10. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 92.7, 34. 11. (5) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 400, 85.5, 33. 12. (25) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 87.8, 32. 13. (19) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 76.7, 31. 14. (29) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 75.7, 30. 15. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 109.5, 29. 16. (27) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 68.6, 28. 17. (8) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 399, 105.5, 28. 18. (24) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 399, 75.4, 26. 19. (17) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 399, 83.9, 25. 20. (23) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 398, 74, 24. 21. (11) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 397, 65.5, 23. 22. (18) Brett Moftt, Toyota, 396, 53.2, 22. 23. (28) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 396, 56.7, 21. 24. (38) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 396, 49.9, 20. 25. (22) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 395, 60.1, 19. 26. (30) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 395, 46, 18. 27. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 394, 49.1, 17. 28. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 390, 45.7, 16. 29. (32) David Gilliland, Ford, 388, 45.7, 15. 30. (43) Blake Koch, Ford, 388, 30.8, 0. 31. (14) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 387, 64.4, 13. 32. (41) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 387, 34.4, 12. 33. (42) Dave Blaney, Ford, 383, 30.4, 11. 34. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 382, 32, 0. 35. (39) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 378, 52.1, 9. 36. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 350, 37.1, 8. 37. (40) David Stremme, Chevrolet, overheating, 297, 37.7, 7. 38. (12) Greg Bife, Ford, 292, 62.5, 6. 39. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 232, 30, 0. 40. (35) Alex Bowman, Toyota, accident, 208, 30.6, 4. 41. (26) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, accident, 131, 47.1, 3. 42. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 125, 93, 3. 43. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, engine, 73, 50.1, 1. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 117.724 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 23 minutes, 52 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.885 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 41 laps. Lead Changes: 18 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-81; J.Johnson 82-126; C.Bowyer 127; J.Johnson 128-139; K.Harvick 140-158; M.Kenseth 159; K.Harvick 160-164; M.Kenseth 165-177; J.Johnson 178-222; M.Kenseth 223; J.Johnson 224-240; M.Kenseth 241; J.John son 242-322; M.Kenseth 323; J.Johnson 324-361; B.Keselowski 362; C.Bowyer 363-366; J.Johnson 367-400. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J. Johnson, 7 times for 272 laps; Ky.Busch, 1 time for 81 laps; K.Harvick, 2 times for 24 laps; M.Kenseth, 5 times for 17 laps; C.Bowyer, 2 times for 5 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 1 lap. Wins: K.Harvick, 2; J.Johnson, 2; J.Logano, 2; Ku.Busch, 1; Ky.Busch, 1; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1; C.Ed wards, 1; J.Gordon, 1; D.Hamlin, 1; Bra.Kesel owski, 1. Top 12 in Points: 1. M.Kenseth, 463; 2. J.Gordon, 461; 3. C.Edwards, 438; 4. J.Johnson, 436; 5. D.Earnhardt Jr., 429; 6. J.Logano, 414; 7. Ky.Busch, 411; 8. Bra.Keselowski, 404; 9. D.Hamlin, 379; 10. K.Larson, 377; 11. R.Newman, 374; 12. K.Harvick, 373. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Indiana 2 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 Saturday, May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 Monday, May 26: Miami 102, Indiana 90 Wednesday, May 28: Indiana 93, Miami 90 Friday, May 30: Miami 117, Indiana 92 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Oklahoma City 2 Monday, May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 Sunday, May 25: Oklahoma City 106, San Antonio 97 Tuesday, May 27: Oklahoma City 105, San Anto nio 92 Thursday, May 29: San Antonio 117, Oklahoma City 89 Saturday, May 31: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 107, OT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 8: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 2 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Thursday, May 22: Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 25: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 2, OT Tuesday, May 27: Montreal 7, NY Rangers 4 Thursday, May 29: NY Rangers 1, Montreal 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 3, Chicago 3 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 Saturday, May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 Monday, May 26: Los Angeles 5, Chicago 2 Wednesday, May 28: Chicago 5, Los Angeles 4, 2OT Friday, May 30: Chicago 4, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Wednesday, June 4: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA Saturday, June 7: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA Monday, June 9: Chicago or Los Angeles at NY Rangers, TBA Wednesday, June 11: Chicago or Los Angeles at NY Rangers, TBA x-Friday, June 13: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA x-Monday, June 16: Chicago or Los Angeles at NY Rangers, TBA x-Wednesday, June 18: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA French Open Results Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Third Round Fernando Verdasco (24), Spain, def. Richard Gasquet (12), France, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3. Andy Murray (7), Britain, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (28), Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 12-10. Fourth Round Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. John Isner (10), United States, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Women Fourth Round Eugenie Bouchard (18), Canada, def. Angelique Ker ber (8), Germany, 6-1, 6-2. Carla Suarez Navarro (14), Spain, def. Ajla Toml janovic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-3. Doubles Men Third Round Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, and Samuel Groth, Australia, def. Jack Sock, United States, and Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-4, 6-3. Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (11), France, def. Michael Llodra and Nicolas Mahut (5), France, 2-1, retired. Women Third Round Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (1), China, def. Liezel Huber and Lisa Raymond (15), United States, 6-0, 6-2. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Michaella Kra jicek, Netherlands, def .Madison Keys and Alison Riske, United States, 7-6 (6), 3-6, 6-1. Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza (5), India, def. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, and Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, 6-3, 6-3. Junior Singles Boys First Round Johan Sebastien Tatlot (9), France, def. Marc Pol mans, Australia, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-4. Taylor Harry Fritz, United States, def. Kang Ku Keon, South Korea, 6-4, 6-2. Orlando Luz (2), Brazil, def. Alex Molcan, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-1. Daniil Medvedev (16), Russia, def. Pedro Martinez Portero, Spain, 7-5, 7-6 (7). Naoki Nakagawa (8), Japan, def. Boris Pokotilov, Russia, 6-2, 6-2. Jan Zielinski, Poland, def. Alexandre Muller, France, 1-6, 7-5, 6-4. Stefan Kozlov (6), United States, def. Ryotero Matsu mura, Japan, 6-4, 6-2. Akira Santillan, Australia, def. Maxime Janvier, France, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Chung Yunseong, South Korea, def. Qi Xi, China, 6-2, 6-4. Francisco Bahamonde, Argentina, def. Matteo Berret tini, Italy, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Mandresy Rakotomalala, France, def. Matias Zukas, Argentina, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3. Jumpei Yamasaki (13), Japan, def. Bogdan Bobrov, Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Noah Rubin, United States, def. Bastian Malla, Chile, 7-5, 6-3. Karen Khachanov (3), Russia, def. Peter Bertran, Do minican Republic, 6-2, 6-2. Alex Rybakov, United States, def. Oh Chan-yeong, South Korea, 6-4, 6-4. Girls First Round Margot Yerolymos, France, def. Anhelina Kalinina (9), Ukraine, 6-3, 7-5. Emmanuelle Salas, France, def. Evgeniya Levashova, Russia, 6-1, 6-7 (4), 6-2. Katarina Jokic, Serbia, def. You Xiao-Di, China, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 6-3. Jana Fett, Croatia, def. Ioana Ducu, Romania, 2-6, 6-3, 6-1. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic, def. Anna Bondar (14), Hungary, 6-2, 6-0. Catherine Cartan Bellis (2), United States, def. Kim berly Birrell, Australia, 6-3, 6-3. Fiona Ferro, France, def. Olga Fridman (13), Ukraine, 6-2, 6-3. Tereza Mihalikova, Slovakia, def. Soa Kenin, United States, 6-3, 6-3. Akvile Parazinskaite, Lithuania, def. Anna Kalinskaya, Russia, 6-2, 6-0. Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Tessah Andrian jatrimo, France, 6-4, 6-1. Isabelle Wallace, Britain, def. Varvara Flink (6), Rus sia, 7-5, 6-2. Darya Kasatkina (8), Russia, def. Kamonwan Buayam, Thailand, 6-2, 6-0. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX Optioned RHP Alex Wilson to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled 3B Garin Cecchini from Pawtucket. CHICAGO WHITE SOX Optioned INF Marcus Semien to Charlotte (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS Optioned RHP Alex White and LHP Brett Oberholtzer to Oklahoma City (PCL). Re called RHP Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Placed 3B Danny Valencia on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Aaron Brooks to Omaha (PCL). Recalled LHP Francisley Bueno and 3B Mike Moustakas from Omaha. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Optioned RHP Fernando Rodriguez to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled C Stephen Vogt from Sacramento. Sent RHP Ryan Cook to Stockton (Cal) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS Placed OF Wil Myers on the 15day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Selected the contract of OF Jerry Sands from Durham (IL). Transferred 2B Tim Beckham to the 60-day DL. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Designated RHP Wirn Obispo for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Shae Simmons from Mississippi (SL). MIAMI MARLINS Placed C Jarrod Saltalamacchia on the 7-day DL. Recalled C J.T. Realmuto from Jack sonville (SL). Transferred RHP Jose Fernandez to the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Sent 3B Aramis Ramirez to Wisconsin (MWL) for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Placed RHP Jeff Man ship on the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Darin Ruf to Le high Valley (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Cesar Jimenez from Lehigh Valley. Recalled RHP Phillippe Aumont from Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Traded RHP Bryan Morris to Miami for the 2014 39th overall draft pick. Recalled RP Casey Sadler from Indianapolis (IL). American Association AMARILLO SOX Signed RHP John Holdzkom and INF Mike Broad. Released OF Tommy Barksdale and LHP Logan Williamson. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Signed RHP Jhonny Montoya. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Released LHP Joe Testa. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS Released RHP Brett Hunter. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES Signed RHP Tim Brechbuehler. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS Signed DBs Robert Sands and Anthony Watkins and OL Trevis Turner. Named Phillip Lolley linebackers coach. HOCKEY ECHL ALASKA ACES Signed G Rob Gunderson to an am ateur tryout agreement. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, regionals, teams TBD 11 p.m. ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, regionals, teams TBD COLLEGE SOFTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 World Series, nals, game 1, teams TBD, at Oklahoma City MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:10 p.m. SUN, FS-Florida Tampa Bay at Miami 8 p.m. ESPN Kansas City at St. Louis Kuerten. After that decade-old setback, though, Fed erer made at least the quarternals at a record 36 consecutive major tournaments, a streak that ended with a sec ond-round loss at Wim bledon last year. Fed erer also put together record Slam runs of 10 nals and 23 seminals in a row when he was at his dominant best. Now the 32-year-old Federer has bowed out before the quarternals at three of the last four majors. I think it was the big gest, probably, win of my career, said Gul bis, who most certain ly could have dispensed with the word proba bly. Addressing spectators who sang Federers rst name between points, Gulbis said: Im sorry I had to win. I know all of you like Roger. The result t with the topsy-turvy nature of this tournament: Both reigning Australian Open champions, No. 3 Stan Wawrinka and No. 2 Li Na, lost in the rst round; No. 1 Serena Wil liams left in the second round. Gulbis now plays No. 6 Tomas Berdych, who eliminated the last American man, No. 10 John Isner. In another quarternal, No. 2 No vak Djokovic will face No. 8 Milos Raonic. Wimbledon champion Andy Murray and No. 24 Fernando Verdasco set up a fourth-round meeting by nishing off victories in match es suspended Saturday night because of fading light. In womens action, 2012 champion Ma ria Sharapova ran off the last nine games to come back and beat No. 19 Samantha Sto sur 3-6, 6-4, 6-0 for a quarternal berth against 35th-ranked Garbine Muguruza of Spain, the 20-year-old who stunned Williams last week. No. 18 Euge nie Bouchard of Cana da will face No. 14 Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain in another quarternal. The fourth-seeded Federers resume in cludes the 2009 French Open title, and he was a four-time runner-up in Paris to Rafael Nadal. But Federer was hard ly in top form Sunday, making 59 unforced er rors and getting broken twice while serving for a set. That included at 5-3, 40-15 in the second, when Federer sent an overhead right to Gul bis, who whipped a backhand passing winner. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1 said. I call it fortitude. I think they showed an unbelievable amount of fortitude. If I can compliment my own team humbly, to have that tough loss, espe cially the Game 6 and not have a pity par ty and come back this year and get back to the same position, I think thats fortitude. Its the leagues rst Finals rematch since Chicago and Utah played in 1997 and 1998. The teams have actu ally played three times since last seasons clas sic series ended, twice in the regular season, another being a pre season meeting in Mi ami where the Spurs acknowledged that the pain of losing Game 7 on that oor was still real. Then again, its al most like they want ed to feel that hurt at times. Popovich showed the Spurs clips of Games 6 and 7 early in training camp this season, not so much to open old wounds but rather speed up the healing process. We were just try ing to put it away, just get over that part of it, learn from it, and move forward from there, said Duncan, a champion in 1999, 2003, 2005 and 2007. San Antonio won 62 games in the reg ular season, the best record in the league. One of those wins was a 24-point romp over Miami, on the same oor where this series will start on Thursday. The Heat know what wanting revenge feels like. They lost the 2011 NBA Finals to Dallas, then opened the follow ing season on the Mav ericks oor and simply blew them away. Heat forward Chris Bosh called it extra motivation for the Spurs. Its just something that we have to deal with, and we know that theyre going to be very passionate, and theyre going to play some good bas ketball, Bosh said. So whoever we play, we just have to con tinue to keep our ap proach the same and play good basketball. While the Spurs were punching their ticket by ousting Okla homa City from the West nals on Satur day night, the Heat were getting a day off. James was taking his kids to see X-Men. FINALS FROM PAGE B1 to win this thing, and were dealt a big set back on the rst day and had to recover from that. I thought we showed incredi ble ght, pride as we worked our way back to today and won an incredible come back last night, of course. We didnt take the easy road to get here. Stephanie Tofft walked with the bases loaded in the top of the sixth to score an insur ance run. She had two hits and knocked in two runs and Schwarz knocked in three runs for the Gators. Kaitlyn Thumann knocked in two runs and Jordan Strickland knocked in the other one for the Bears (4916). Whitney Canion fell to 31-12. She allowed six runs on eight hits and threw 151 pitches. Walton said that ral ly against Kentucky might have sapped Baylors energy. I can tell you that be ing on the other side of that coin, winning an emotional game yester day, in the fashion that they did, I know how draining it can be, he said. GATORS FROM PAGE B1 Memorial Scores Sunday At Muireld Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,392; Par: 72 (x-won on rst playoff hole) Final x-Hideki Matsuyama (500), $1,116,000 70-67-69-69 275 Kevin Na (300), $669,600 72-69-70-64 275 Bubba Watson (190), $421,600 66-69-69-72 276 Chris Kirk (123), $272,800 66-70-74-68 278 Adam Scott (123), $272,800 69-70-68-71 278 Ben Curtis (95), $215,450 69-71-69-70 279 Steve Stricker (95), $215,450 71-70-70-68 279 Luke Guthrie (75), $167,400 75-69-66-70 280 Bill Haas (75), $167,400 73-67-72-68 280 Thorbjorn Olesen (75), $167,400 71-67-74-68 280 Charl Schwartzel (75), $167,400 72-69-67-72 280 Brendon Todd (75), $167,400 71-68-69-72 280 Scott Brown (59), $124,000 70-69-71-71 281 Paul Casey (59), $124,000 66-66-76-73 281 Jason Allred, $102,300 74-68-74-66 282 Billy Horschel (55), $102,300 71-69-68-74 282 Matt Kuchar (55), $102,300 74-69-69-70 282 Rory McIlroy (55), $102,300 63-78-69-72 282 Jason Dufner (48), $65,238 71-69-71-72 283 Ernie Els (48), $65,238 70-72-69-72 283 Martin Flores (48), $65,238 69-68-75-71 283 Jim Furyk (48), $65,238 73-68-72-70 283 Charley Hoffman (48), $65,238 69-72-73-69 283 Ryan Moore (48), $65,238 68-70-72-73 283 Bo Van Pelt (48), $65,238 72-72-66-73 283 Jordan Spieth (48), $65,238 69-72-67-75 283 Andrew Svoboda (48), $65,238 72-69-68-74 283 K.J. Choi (39), $38,647 73-71-72-68 284 Brendon de Jonge (39), $38,647 73-69-69-73 284 Robert Garrigus (39), $38,647 72-70-70-72 284 David Hearn (39), $38,647 71-73-69-71 284 Hunter Mahan (39), $38,647 68-70-73-73 284 Daniel Summerhays (39), $38,647 74-70-68-72 284 Scott Langley (39), $38,647 72-66-67-79 284 Kevin Stadler (39), $38,647 72-71-68-73 284 Robert Streb (39), $38,647 72-67-69-76 284 Aaron Baddeley (30), $25,420 69-74-70-72 285 Keegan Bradley (30), $25,420 67-75-70-73 285 Jason Day (30), $25,420 72-69-70-74 285 Billy Hurley III (30), $25,420 73-70-74-68 285 Marc Leishman (30), $25,420 71-68-73-73 285 Justin Thomas, $25,420 73-68-72-72 285 Michael Thompson (30), $25,420 67-76-72-70 285 Cameron Tringale (30), $25,420 73-70-70-72 285 Camilo Villegas (30), $25,420 71-68-72-74 285 Dustin Johnson (24), $18,063 73-68-72-73 286 Kevin Kisner (24), $18,063 69-72-76-69 286 Justin Hicks (24), $18,063 73-67-71-75 286 Stewart Cink (20), $15,149 71-73-72-71 287 Luke Donald (20), $15,149 71-69-73-74 287 David Lingmerth (20), $15,149 72-72-70-73 287 Phil Mickelson (20), $15,149 72-70-72-73 287 Freddie Jacobson (20), $15,149 71-71-71-74 287 Ben Martin (20), $15,149 72-72-65-78 287 Michael Putnam (16), $14,198 71-73-73-71 288 Nick Watney (16), $14,198 69-71-74-74 288 Charles Howell III (12), $13,764 69-75-71-74 289 Ryo Ishikawa (12), $13,764 72-71-71-75 289 Richard H. Lee (12), $13,764 76-68-76-69 289 10s in the majors last year. Tournament host Jack Nicklaus greeted him behind the 18th green. Nicklaus spent much of the back nine in the broadcast booth, and it was a brand of golf that was unfamiliar to golfs greatest champion. The Memorial became only the latest event where proven players faltered badly. Watson, who started the nal round with a one-shot lead, was still in control until a cou ple of wild tee shots one into deep rough on the 14th that led to bo gey, and one so far right on the par-5 15th that it went over the trees and into a neighborhood, far out-of-bounds. That led to double bogey and he never recovered. Watson closed with a 72 and nished one shot out of the playoff. Its tough, Watson said, who was going for his third win of the year. I made one bad deci sion. If I hit 4-wood off the tee instead of driver on the par 5, we make 5 and we win by one. But I made double, so we lost by one. Scott had a share of the lead after 11 holes and was poised for his second straight PGA Tour win. But he put his tee shot into the wa ter on the par-3 12th for double bogey, took two shots to get out of a bunker on the 14th for bogey, and then dropped another shot at the 15th when his wedge hit the pin and caromed back into the fairway. He closed with a 71 and tied for fourth with Chris Kirk (68). Its the way it goes, Scott said. You get lucky breaks and you get bad ones. Na was in the club house at Muireld Vil lage, leaning against two pillows watching this collection of er rors, even joking that he might win by sitting on a couch. He nally headed out to the range, but one swing into the water was too much to overcome. The only consolation for Na was that his run ner-up nish moved him high enough in the world ranking that he will be exempt for the U.S. Open. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer DOVER, Del. Jim mie Johnson dominat ed again at Dover In ternational Speedway, extending his track vic tory record to nine. He followed last weeks victory in the Co ca-Cola 600 with anoth er sensational run in a race red-agged for 22 minutes because of a pothole in the concrete track. Johnson led 272 of 400 laps, and won con secutive races for the 13th time. The six-time Cup champion swept Dover in 2002 and 2009 and won races in 2005, 2010, 2012 and 2013. Brad Keselowski was second, followed by Matt Kenseth, Clint Bowyer and Denny Hamlin. For sure, when you come to Dover, its al ways the 48, Kenseth said. Weve got to gure out how to get ahead of him. Johnson also became Dovers career leader in laps led when he hit the 2,802 mark. Its incredible, John son said. So much to be thankful for. Johnson never left any doubt his No. 48 Chevrolet was the car to beat, the only drama coming when the race was stopped 160 laps into the race after Ryan Newmans car pulled up chunks of the track that kicked back and dam aged Jamie McMur rays car. The race was soon stopped and crews werent allowed to work on the cars. McMurrays plea for an exception was de nied. More pieces of the track ew up and cracked a window on the pedestrian cross over bridge. NASCAR ofcials and safety crews went to work on the pot holes and applied a quick-drying concrete mix. Cup races were in famously delayed by potholes at Martinsville in 2004 and the 2010 Daytona 500. McMur ray won at Daytona in 2010. You knew it was go ing to get worse if some one didnt repair it, Ke selowski said. I thought the repair was pretty good. You could feel it a little bit. Kevin Harvick might have wished for a lon ger delay. Harvicks lead at the red ag evaporat ed because of a at tire not long after racing re sumed and he fell two laps behind Johnson. Harvick worked his way back into a 17th-place nish. Kyle Busch led the rst 81 laps before John son passed him. Buschs bid for a tripleheader sweep at Dover would soon end when the No. 18 Toyota slammed into the outside wall. Bow yer moved into Buschs line, which caused him to wreck 124 laps into the race. Busch won the Truck Series race Friday and the Nationwide race Saturday. He has the only three-race sweep since NASCAR expand ed to three national se ries in 1995, accom plishing the feat in 2010 at Bristol. Busch, who did not talk to the media, is 1 for 9 in Cup races after winning the rst two in the same weekend. Busch had some com pany in the garage. AJ Allmendinger turned into Greg Bife and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. on Lap 135, which knocked out the Roush Fenway Racing teammates. Bif e, though, later re turned to nish. They were racing hard back there and he stuck it into a hole that maybe there wasnt room for, Bife said. NASCAR Johnson extends track record to 9 at Dover MOLLY RILEY / AP Jimmie Johnson celebrates winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race on Sunday at Dover International Speedway in Dover, Del. MLB GOLF DAVE ZEITLIN Associated Press GALLOWAY TOWN SHIP, N.J. Stacy Lew is won the ShopRite LPGA Classic on Sun day to take the top spot in the world rank ing from Inbee Park, nishing with a 4-un der 67 for a six-stroke victory. No. 1 for four weeks early last year, Lewis ended Parks 59-week run in the top spot. Lewis nished at 16-under 197 on Seaviews Bay Course and earned $225,000 for her second victo ry of the year and 10th overall. Also the 2012 winner at Seaview, she won the North Tex as LPGA Shootout last month after nish ing second six times in her previous 16 events since winning the Womens British Open in August. Christina Kim was second after a 72. Park closed with a 70 to tie for eighth at 7 un der. Shes winless in 10 tour starts this season after sweeping the rst three majors last year and nishing the sea son with six victories. Lewis nished a stroke off the tournament scor ing record set by Annika Sorenstam in 1998 and 2005. The 29-year-old Texan opened with a 67 and had a 63 on Satur day to take a one-stroke lead over Kim into the nal round. She joined Sorens tam (1998, 2002, 2005), Juli Inkster (1986, 1988) and Betsy King (1987, 1995, 2001) as the only multiple winners in the tournament. STEVEN SENNE / AP Boston Red Soxs Jon Lester delivers a pitch against the Tampa Bay Rays in the rst inning on Sunday in Boston. KEN POWTAK Associated Press BOSTON Jon Lester pitched seven shutout innings and Brock Holt drove in two runs with one of his four dou bles to lift the Boston Red Sox to their seventh straight win, complet ing a three-game sweep over the reeling Tampa Bay Rays with a 4-0 vic tory on Sunday. Bostons streak fol lows a 10-game skid, its longest in 20 years. The Red Sox said that matches a major league record for consecutive wins after a double-dig it losing stretch, accord ing to research by the Elias Sports Bureau. The 1989 Detroit Ti gers did it after losing 12 in a row, and the 1942 Pittsburgh Pirates also did it after dropping 10 straight. Holt had his big day after hitting his rst ma jor league homer in Sat urday nights win. Garin Cecchini added an RBI double for his rst ma jor league hit. Evan Longoria had a pair of singles for the Rays, who dropped their season-high sixth straight. Tampa Bay owns the ALs worst re cord at 23-34. Lester (6-6) allowed four hits, while striking out 12 and walking one. It was the left-handers 19th career double-dig it strikeout game, com ing after he struck out a career-best 15 against the Oakland Athletics on May 3. For the second straight day, the clubs were cor dial to each other on the eld after three Boston managers and a pitcher were ejected in Fridays game. Rays starter David Price hit David Ortiz in the rst inning and Mike Carp later in the fourth. The Carp one trig gered the benches to clear, the second time in less than a week the two teams had a scrum. Red Sox win seventh straight, beat Rays 4-0 Stacy Lewis World No. 1 after win at ShopRite LPGA Classic MEL EVANS / AP Stacy Lewis kisses the trophy after winning the ShopRite LPGA Classic golf tournament on Sunday in Galloway Township, N.J. Lewis shot 16-under-par, 197 to win the tournament. LUKE MEREDITH AP Sports Writer DES MOINES, Iowa For the second time in less than a year, Tom Pernice Jr. hit a crucial shot on the 17th hole on his way to a victory. This time, Pernice needed one more big shot to secure the win. Pernice birdied the second hole of a sud den-death playoff with Doug Garwood on Sun day to win the Cham pions Tours Principal Charity Classic. I was calm all day. I played it with the right edge and I stroked it and it went right in the hole, Pernice said. Pernice won for the third time on the 50-andover tour, closing with a 3-under 69 to match Garwood at 12-under 204 at Wakonda Club. Garwood, making only his fourth start of the season, birdied the nal two holes of regu lation for a 71. They played the par4 18th hole twice in the playoff. Pernice won with a putt from roughly 8 feet after they opened the play off with matching pars. Pernices perfor mance was reminis cent of the 3M Cham pionship last August in Minnesota, when he made a 45-foot putt on No. 17 to win. He chipped in from roughly 30 feet out to take the lead on Sun day, though Garwood matched that birdie and later forced a playoff. I really hit the ball good all week and real ly kept the ball in play in the fairway when I needed to and holed some key shots at key times, Pernice said. Bill Glasson, Jay Haas, Mark Calcavec chia and Michael Allen nished a shot back. Glasson shot 64, Haas 67, Calcavecchia 70, and Allen 71. LPGA-Shoprite Classic Leading Scores Sunday At Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club, Bay Course Galloway Township, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,177; Par: 71 Final Stacy Lewis, $225,000 67-63-67 197 Christina Kim, $138,527 64-67-72 203 Haeji Kang, $72,998 68-67-69 204 Anna Nordqvist, $72,998 69-65-70 204 Gerina Piller, $72,998 67-67-70 204 Jennifer Johnson, $72,998 62-70-72 204 Julieta Granada, $42,851 71-66-68 205 Meena Lee, $31,399 70-70-66 206 Azahara Munoz, $31,399 69-71-66 206 Shanshan Feng, $31,399 74-65-67 206 Karrie Webb, $31,399 69-70-67 206 Inbee Park, $31,399 66-70-70 206 Joanna Klatten, $21,590 70-71-66 207 Mo Martin, $21,590 70-71-66 207 Mina Harigae, $21,590 68-72-67 207 Suzann Pettersen, $21,590 70-70-67 207 Na Yeon Choi, $21,590 66-71-70 207 Haru Nomura, $21,590 63-73-71 207 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $17,140 68-73-67 208 Sarah Kemp, $17,140 67-72-69 208 Chella Choi, $17,140 67-71-70 208 Brittany Lincicome, $17,140 67-70-71 208 Paula Creamer, $13,212 73-70-66 209 Line Vedel, $13,212 74-69-66 209 Karine Icher, $13,212 72-69-68 209 Hee Young Park, $13,212 70-70-69 209 Christel Boeljon, $13,212 71-68-70 209 Laura Diaz, $13,212 67-72-70 209 Becky Morgan, $13,212 69-70-70 209 Michelle Wie, $13,212 67-72-70 209 Dori Carter, $13,212 69-68-72 209 Kim Kaufman, $13,212 69-68-72 209 Jenny Shin, $9,723 71-72-67 210 Brittany Lang, $9,723 69-70-71 210 Sydnee Michaels, $9,723 68-71-71 210 Amy Anderson, $9,723 70-68-72 210 Lindsey Wright, $9,723 68-70-72 210 Catriona Matthew, $7,182 70-73-68 211 Mika Miyazato, $7,182 73-70-68 211 Yani Tseng, $7,182 72-71-68 211 Chie Arimura, $7,182 70-72-69 211 Ai Miyazato, $7,182 73-69-69 211 Ashleigh Simon, $7,182 69-73-69 211 Brooke Pancake, $7,182 70-71-70 211 Giulia Sergas, $7,182 74-67-70 211 Mariajo Uribe, $7,182 70-69-72 211 Sandra Gal, $7,182 67-71-73 211 Lydia Ko, $5,442 68-75-69 212 Jennifer Kirby, $5,442 67-75-70 212 Mirim Lee, $5,442 70-71-71 212 Mi Hyang Lee, $5,442 68-70-74 212 Ji Young Oh, $4,475 71-72-70 213 Jee Young Lee, $4,475 72-70-71 213 Belen Mozo, $4,475 70-72-71 213 Reilley Rankin, $4,475 69-73-71 213 Cristie Kerr, $4,475 70-71-72 213 Ilhee Lee, $4,475 69-72-72 213 Jane Park, $4,475 68-73-72 213 Giulia Molinaro, $3,678 69-74-71 214 Lee-Anne Pace, $3,678 72-70-72 214 Katherine Kirk, $3,678 73-68-73 214 Tampa Bay Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist ss-rf 4 0 1 0 Holt 1b 4 1 4 2 DJnngs cf 2 0 0 0 Bogarts ss 5 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 0 2 0 Pedroia 2b 2 0 0 0 Sands dh 4 0 0 0 Cecchin 3b 2 0 1 1 SRdrgz lf 4 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 2 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 4 0 0 0 JGoms lf 2 1 1 0 Loney 1b 3 0 1 0 Hassan rf 3 1 1 0 JMolin c 2 0 0 0 D.Ross c 4 0 0 0 YEscor ph-ss 2 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 1 0 0 Kiermr rf 3 0 0 0 JHerrr 3b-2b 3 0 0 1 Solis c 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 Totals 30 4 7 4 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 0 Boston 000 300 10x 4 EHolt (5). DPBoston 1. LOBTampa Bay 8, Boston 10. 2BLoney (13), Holt 4 (9), Cecchini (1). SBHolt (3). SFJ.Herrera. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Bedard L,2-4 4 2 / 3 5 3 3 4 4 Boxberger 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Oviedo 1 1 1 1 3 2 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 2 Boston Lester W,6-6 7 4 0 0 1 12 Mujica 1 1 0 0 1 1 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Lester (Loney). WPLester. PBSolis. UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Ted Barrett. T:12. A,688 (37,071). CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Tom Pernice Jr. holds the trophy after winning the Champions Tours Principal Charity Classic golf tournament on Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa. Pernice wins Principal Charity Classic in playoff

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away Toronto 34 24 .586 8-2 W-2 18-13 16-11 New York 29 26 .527 3 5-5 L-1 12-13 17-13 Baltimore 28 27 .509 4 1 5-5 W-2 11-12 17-15 Boston 27 29 .482 6 2 7-3 W-7 15-17 12-12 Tampa Bay 23 34 .404 10 7 4-6 L-6 12-14 11-20 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 31 22 .585 4-6 L-2 14-11 17-11 Chicago 29 29 .500 4 1 6-4 W-1 17-14 12-15 Minnesota 26 28 .481 5 2 3-7 W-1 13-14 13-14 Cleveland 27 30 .474 6 3 5-5 W-3 18-11 9-19 Kansas City 26 30 .464 6 3 3-7 L-2 13-14 13-16 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 35 22 .614 5-5 W-3 17-12 18-10 Los Angeles 30 26 .536 4 4-6 L-3 15-13 15-13 Texas 29 28 .509 6 1 6-4 W-1 13-13 16-15 Seattle 28 28 .500 6 1 5-5 W-2 14-15 14-13 Houston 24 34 .414 11 6 7-3 L-2 12-17 12-17 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 31 25 .554 5-5 W-3 18-12 13-13 Miami 28 28 .500 3 1 5-5 L-3 20-11 8-17 Washington 27 28 .491 3 2 3-7 L-1 16-15 11-13 New York 27 29 .482 4 2 6-4 W-2 13-17 14-12 Philadelphia 24 30 .444 6 4 4-6 L-2 12-18 12-12 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 34 23 .596 6-4 W-1 18-12 16-11 St. Louis 30 27 .526 4 4-6 L-1 16-12 14-15 Cincinnati 26 29 .473 7 3 5-5 W-3 12-12 14-17 Pittsburgh 25 30 .455 8 4 6-4 L-1 16-13 9-17 Chicago 20 34 .370 12 8 4-6 L-1 10-13 10-21 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 37 20 .649 8-2 W-1 19-9 18-11 Los Angeles 30 27 .526 7 5-5 W-1 12-16 18-11 Colorado 28 28 .500 8 1 2-7 L-4 16-7 12-21 San Diego 26 31 .456 11 4 5-5 L-1 14-15 12-16 Arizona 23 36 .390 15 8 5-5 L-3 9-22 14-14 SATURDAYS GAMES Washington 10, Texas 2 N.Y. Yankees 3, Minnesota 1 Toronto 12, Kansas City 2 San Diego 4, Chicago White Sox 2 Cleveland 7, Colorado 6 Baltimore 4, Houston 1 Boston 7, Tampa Bay 1 Oakland 11, L.A. Angels 3 Seattle 3, Detroit 2 SATURDAYS GAMES Washington 10, Texas 2 San Diego 4, Chicago White Sox 2 St. Louis 2, San Francisco 0 Cleveland 7, Colorado 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 4, 14 innings Atlanta 9, Miami 5 Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 0 L.A. Dodgers 12, Pittsburgh 2 Cincinnati 5, Arizona 0 SUNDAYS GAMES Cleveland 6, Colorado 4 Minnesota 7, N.Y. Yankees 2 Toronto 4, Kansas City 0 Boston 4, Tampa Bay 0 Texas 2, Washington 0 Baltimore 9, Houston 4 Chicago White Sox 4, San Diego 1 Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 3 Seattle 4, Detroit 0 SUNDAYS GAMES Cleveland 6, Colorado 4 Atlanta 4, Miami 2 N.Y. Mets 4, Philadelphia 3, 11 innings Texas 2, Washington 0 Milwaukee 9, Chicago Cubs 0 Chicago White Sox 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco 8, St. Louis 0 Cincinnati 4, Arizona 3 Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, late H. RUMPH JR. / AP New York Mets starting pitcher Jonathon Niese throws against the Philadelphia Phillies on Sunday in Philadelphia. TODAYS GAMES Boston (Lackey 6-3) at Cleveland (Masterson 2-4), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 7-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-2) at Miami (Wolf 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 4-4) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 7:20 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-5) at St. Louis (S.Miller 6-4), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 3-2), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES N.Y. Mets (Colon 4-5) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-2) at Miami (Wolf 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 4-4) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 7:20 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-5) at St. Louis (S.Miller 6-4), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 3-2), 10:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 1-7) at San Diego (Stauffer 2-1), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: VMartinez, Detroit, .340; MiCabrera, Detroit, .332; AlRamirez, Chicago, .329; Cano, Seattle, .327; Altuve, Houston, .318; Rios, Texas, .317; NCruz, Balti more, .315. RUNS: Donaldson, Oakland, 48; Dozier, Minnesota, 44; Bautista, Toronto, 43; NCruz, Baltimore, 39; Encarna cion, Toronto, 39; Kinsler, Detroit, 38; MeCabrera, To ronto, 37. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 49; En carnacion, Toronto, 48; Donaldson, Oakland, 46; Moss, Oakland, 46; JAbreu, Chicago, 42; Bautista, Toronto, 40. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 77; MeCabrera, Toronto, 73; Al Ramirez, Chicago, 72; Rios, Texas, 69; Kinsler, Detroit, 68; Markakis, Baltimore, 68; MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; Cano, Seattle, 67; VMartinez, Detroit, 67. DOUBLES: Hosmer, Kansas City, 19; Kinsler, Detroit, 19; Plouffe, Minnesota, 19; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; Pedroia, Boston, 18; Altuve, Houston, 17; Viciedo, Chicago, 16. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 6; Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; 8 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 20; Encarnacion, To ronto, 18; JAbreu, Chicago, 15; Donaldson, Oakland, 15; Bautista, Toronto, 14; Pujols, Los Angeles, 14; VMarti nez, Detroit, 13; Moss, Oakland, 13. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 20; RDavis, Detroit, 16; Ellsbury, New York, 15; AEscobar, Kansas City, 15; Andrus, Texas, 13; Gardner, New York, 13; Dozier, Min nesota, 12. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 9-1; Tanaka, New York, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 8-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 7-1; 9 tied at 6. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.06; Gray, Oakland, 2.31; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.33; Darvish, Texas, 2.35; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.36; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.57; Keuchel, Houston, 2.70. STRIKEOUTS: Kluber, Cleveland, 95; Price, Tampa Bay, 90; Tanaka, New York, 88; Lester, Boston, 83; FHernan dez, Seattle, 83; Scherzer, Detroit, 82; Darvish, Texas, 71. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 15; Rodney, Seattle, 14; Perkins, Minnesota, 14; Nathan, Detroit 13. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .352; Puig, Los Angeles, .344; Pagan, San Francisco, .325; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .321; Utley, Philadelphia, .320; CGomez, Milwaukee, .318. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; Pence, San Francisco, 42; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 41; Stanton, Miami, 40; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 37; Yelich, Miami, 37; Blackmon, Colorado, 36; CGomez, Milwaukee, 36. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 51; Puig, Los Angeles, 40; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 38; Morse, San Francisco, 38; Black mon, Colorado, 37; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 37; How ard, Philadelphia, 37; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 37. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 70; DWright, New York, 69; DanMurphy, New York, 67; Puig, Los Angeles, 67; Stan ton, Miami, 65; Utley, Philadelphia, 65; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 64. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 22; Utley, Philadelphia, 22; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 21; Arenado, Colorado, 17; Byrd, Philadelphia, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 17. TRIPLES: Yelich, Miami, 5; DGordon, Los Angeles, 4; Pollock, Arizona, 4; Rendon, Washington, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 16; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 13; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 12; CGomez, Milwaukee, 11; Morse, San Francisco, 11; Puig, Los Angeles, 11. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 34; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 20; EYoung, New York, 17; Revere, Philadel phia, 15; Bonifacio, Chicago, 12; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 11; CGomez, Milwaukee, 1. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 7-3; 8 tied at 6. ERA: Samardzija, Chicago, 1.68; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.68; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.83; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.92; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.18; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.32; Cashner, San Diego, 2.35. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 92; Strasburg, Wash ington, 90; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 85; Wainwright, St. Louis, 81; Kennedy, San Diego, 81; Greinke, Los An geles, 76; Wacha, St. Louis, 75. SAVES: Street, San Diego, 17; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Francisco, 17; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 16. Twins 7, Yankees 2 Minnesota New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 5 1 1 1 Gardnr lf 4 1 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 1 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 0 2 1 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 0 Nunez pr-3b 1 1 1 2 McCnn c 2 0 0 0 Arcia rf 5 0 2 2 Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 Wlngh dh 4 1 1 1 ISuzuki rf 2 0 0 1 Kubel lf 4 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 1 1 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 EEscor ss 4 0 0 0 ZAlmnt dh 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 2 1 0 Totals 37 7 10 7 Totals 28 2 3 2 Minnesota 001 000 006 7 New York 000 200 000 2 DPMinnesota 1. LOBMinnesota 7, New York 2. 2BDozier (8), Plouffe (20), Nunez (2). 3BGardner (3). HRWillingham (3). SFI.Suzuki. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota P.Hughes W,6-1 8 3 2 2 2 6 Thielbar 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Whitley 5 5 1 1 0 6 Betances H,6 2 0 0 0 0 5 Warren H,9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Dav.Robertson L,0-2 BS,2-14 2 / 3 2 5 5 3 2 Daley 0 1 1 1 0 0 Thornton 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Daley pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBPby Whitley (Willingham). UmpiresHome, Brian Gorman; First, David Rackley; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Jim Wolf. T:58. A,449 (49,642). Orioles 9, Astros 4 Baltimore Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks dh 4 1 1 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 0 Machd 3b 4 2 2 4 MGnzlz 2b 0 0 0 0 N.Cruz rf 1 0 0 0 Springr rf 5 1 2 0 DYong lf 3 0 0 0 Fowler cf 3 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 1 Presley cf 1 1 1 0 C.Davis 1b 5 1 1 0 MDmn 3b 4 1 1 2 Hardy ss 4 1 2 0 Carter dh 4 0 1 1 Schoop 2b 4 2 3 0 Guzmn 1b 3 1 1 0 Lough lf-rf 3 2 2 3 Grssmn lf 4 0 1 0 Hundly c 3 0 0 1 Corprn c 3 0 0 1 Villar ss 4 0 0 0 Totals 35 9 12 9 Totals 34 4 8 4 Baltimore 021 006 000 9 Houston 000 100 120 4 DPHouston 1. LOBBaltimore 5, Houston 7. 2B Machado (2), Springer (7), Grossman (3). HRMach ado (3), Lough (1), M.Dominguez (8). SBMachado (1), N.Cruz (1). SLough. SFA.Jones, Hundley, Corporan. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore W.Chen W,6-2 5 1 / 3 4 1 1 1 6 Brach 1 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 3 Guilmet 1 2 2 2 0 2 Matusz 1 0 0 0 0 1 Houston Feldman L,3-3 5 1 / 3 11 9 9 1 3 Fields 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Clemens 2 0 0 0 0 3 D.Downs 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby Matusz (Ma.Gonzalez), by Feldman (Mach ado, N.Cruz). BalkFeldman. UmpiresHome, Chris Segal; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:14. A,022 (42,060). Blue Jays 4, Royals 0 Kansas City Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 4 0 1 0 Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 4 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 Pillar lf 0 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 1 0 AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Lind dh 4 1 2 0 S.Perez c 3 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 3 1 2 2 L.Cain cf 4 0 0 0 JFrncs 3b 3 1 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0 StTllsn 2b 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 0 2 0 Lawrie 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 DNavrr c 3 1 1 1 Gose cf 3 0 0 1 Totals 33 0 6 0 Totals 32 4 10 4 Kansas City 000 000 000 0 Toronto 010 100 02x 4 EGuthrie (5). DPKansas City 1. LOBKansas City 7, Toronto 6. 2BInfante (5), Hosmer (20), A.Escobar (14), Encarnacion (15), J.Francisco (7). HREncarna cion (19), D.Navarro (3). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Guthrie L,2-5 7 8 2 2 2 5 Crow 1 2 2 2 0 1 Toronto Buehrle W,10-1 8 6 0 0 1 3 Loup 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Larry Vanover; First, Angel Hernan dez; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Gabe Morales. T:14. A,008 (49,282). Braves 4, Marlins 2 Atlanta Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Heyward rf 4 0 2 1 Yelich lf 4 0 1 0 B.Upton cf 4 0 1 1 Dietrich 2b 3 0 0 0 F.Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 Lucas ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Gattis c 4 1 1 2 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Doumit lf 4 0 0 0 McGehee 3b 4 0 0 0 S.Simmons p 0 0 0 0 G.Jones 1b 4 1 2 0 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 3 1 2 2 La Stella 2b 3 1 2 0 Hechavarria ss 4 0 1 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 J.Schafer ph-lf 1 0 1 0 Eovaldi p 2 0 0 0 A.Simmons ss 3 1 1 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Harang p 1 0 0 0 R.Johnson ph 1 0 1 0 R.Pena 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 31 2 7 2 Atlanta 002 000 002 4 Miami 020 000 000 2 DPAtlanta 2, Miami 1. LOBAtlanta 5, Miami 8. 2B Yelich (9), G.Jones (14). HRGattis (11), Ozuna (10). SBJ.Schafer (4), Yelich (8). SHarang, Eovaldi. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Harang 6 2 / 3 5 2 2 4 2 A.Wood W,5-5 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 S.Simmons S,1-1 1 2 0 0 1 0 Miami Eovaldi 8 6 2 2 0 4 Cishek L,4-2 1 3 2 2 1 2 WPHarang. UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Phil Cuzzi; Sec ond, Gerry Davis; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T:39. A,997 (37,442). Mets 4, Phillies 3, 11 innings New York Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Lagars cf 5 0 1 0 Revere cf 4 0 1 0 Edgin p 1 0 0 0 Aumont p 0 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 5 0 0 0 Byrd rf 5 1 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 1 1 0 Ruiz c 5 1 2 0 Campll 1b-lf 5 1 2 0 Howard 1b 5 1 1 2 CYoung lf-cf 4 0 1 1 Mayrry lf 4 0 0 0 Grndrs rf 3 0 1 1 CHrndz 2b 4 0 1 0 Tejada ss 5 0 1 0 Brignc 3b 3 0 0 0 dArnad c 2 1 0 0 Hamels p 2 0 1 0 Niese p 3 0 0 0 DBrwn ph 1 0 1 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 CJimnz p 0 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Black p 0 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 1 1 1 2 GwynJ ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 4 8 4 Totals 39 3 9 3 New York 000 101 000 02 4 Philadelphia 000 200 000 01 3 ERollins (4), Brignac (1). DPNew York 1, Philadel phia 1. LOBNew York 9, Philadelphia 5. 2BD.Wright (13), Campbell (3), Ruiz (13). HRDuda (8), Byrd (8), Howard (11). SBLagares (1). CSTejada (1). SBri gnac. SFC.Young, Granderson. IP H R ER BB SO New York Niese 8 8 2 2 1 6 Rice 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Black 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Edgin W,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 3 Mejia S,6-6 1 1 1 1 0 0 Philadelphia Hamels 7 6 2 1 4 8 C.Jimenez 1 1 0 0 0 1 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 1 De Fratus 1 0 0 0 0 1 Aumont L,0-1 1 1 2 2 1 2 UmpiresHome, Brian ONora; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Marvin Hudson. T:29. A,039 (43,651). Brewers 9, Cubs 0 Chicago Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Bonifac cf-3b 4 0 0 0 Segura ss 4 1 1 0 Lake lf-cf 4 0 1 0 Falu ss 0 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 1 0 0 0 Braun rf 3 2 2 2 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 Schlittr p 1 0 1 0 CGomz cf 3 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 KDavis lf 4 1 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 4 3 3 1 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 MrRynl 3b 2 1 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 1 0 EHerrr 3b 1 0 0 0 Castillo c 1 0 0 0 Overay 1b 4 1 1 3 JoBakr c 2 0 0 0 Lohse p 3 0 2 2 Totals 30 0 3 0 Totals 31 9 9 8 Chicago 000 000 000 0 Milwaukee 215 010 00x 9 DPChicago 2. LOBChicago 4, Milwaukee 2. 2B Gennett 2 (11), Overbay (5). HRBraun (9), Gen nett (3). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Samardzija L,1-5 3 8 8 8 2 3 Grimm 2 1 1 1 1 0 Schlitter 2 0 0 0 0 0 Russell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Milwaukee Lohse W,7-1 9 3 0 0 0 6 HBPby Samardzija (C.Gomez), by Lohse (Rizzo). UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Paul Emmel; Sec ond, Jordan Baker; Third, Angel Campos. T:18. A,277 (41,900). Giants 8, Cardinals 0 San Francisco St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 1 2 1 MCrpnt 3b 3 0 2 0 J.Perez rf 1 0 0 0 Bourjos ph 1 0 0 0 Pence rf 5 1 1 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Colvin lf 1 0 0 0 Wong 2b 4 0 1 0 Posey c 5 2 3 1 Hollidy lf 2 0 0 0 HSnchz c 0 0 0 0 Grichk lf 1 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 1 1 0 Craig 1b 2 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Huff p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Blanco lf-cf 4 0 2 1 Tavers rf 4 0 1 0 BCrwfr ss 4 2 1 2 JhPerlt ss 4 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 1 0 0 Jay cf 3 0 0 0 Arias 1b 4 0 3 3 T.Cruz c 3 0 0 0 THudsn p 4 0 0 0 Lynn p 1 0 0 0 Adrianz 3b 1 0 1 0 CMrtnz p 1 0 0 0 M.Ellis 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 41 8 14 8 Totals 31 0 4 0 San Francisco 402 101 000 8 St. Louis 000 000 000 0 EWong (4). DPSt. Louis 1. LOBSan Francisco 12, St. Louis 7. 2BSandoval (11), B.Crawford (10), M. Carpenter (14). 3BBlanco (3). IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco T.Hudson W,6-2 7 3 0 0 2 6 J.Lopez 1 1 0 0 0 0 Huff 1 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Lynn L,6-3 3 1 / 3 8 7 4 4 2 C.Martinez 2 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 4 Maness 2 3 0 0 0 0 Motte 1 1 0 0 1 0 HBPby T.Hudson (Craig). WPT.Hudson. UmpiresHome, Lance Barrett; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:04. A,734 (45,399). White Sox 4, Padres 1 San Diego Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi ECarer ss 4 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 Denor rf 3 0 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 0 1 0 Quentin dh 3 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 4 1 0 0 Headly 3b 3 1 1 1 De Aza lf 0 0 0 0 Medica lf 3 0 1 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 1 0 Amarst lf 0 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 1 1 0 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 0 Konerk dh 3 1 2 3 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 Semien 3b 3 0 0 0 Rivera c 3 0 0 0 Flowrs c 3 1 1 1 Venale cf 2 0 0 0 Sierra rf 3 0 0 0 Grandl ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 1 2 1 Totals 29 4 6 4 San Diego 000 010 000 1 Chicago 010 012 00x 4 DPChicago 1. LOBSan Diego 0, Chicago 3. 2BA. Dunn (9), Konerko (5). HRHeadley (5), Konerko (3), Flowers (4). CSEaton (5). IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Stults L,2-6 6 5 4 4 1 6 Quackenbush 1 1 0 0 0 1 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Sale W,5-0 9 2 1 1 0 9 HBPby Stults (Al.Ramirez). UmpiresHome, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Tripp Gibson. T:08. A,185 (40,615). Rangers 2, Nationals 0 Texas Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi DRrtsn lf 5 1 1 0 Span cf 4 0 2 0 Andrus ss 4 0 2 0 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 2 0 Werth rf 4 0 1 0 ABeltre 3b 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 DMrph 1b 4 0 3 1 WRams c 4 0 1 0 LMartn cf 4 1 1 1 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0 Gimenz c 4 0 1 0 McLoth lf 4 0 0 0 Sardins 2b 2 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 Darvsh p 3 0 0 0 Roark p 2 0 0 0 Choo ph 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 NMrtnz pr 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Soria p 0 0 0 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 10 2 Totals 32 0 5 0 Texas 000 000 110 2 Washington 000 000 000 0 ESpan (1). DPWashington 1. LOBTexas 9, Wash ington 7. 2BGimenez (4), Span (13). HRL.Martin (3). SBRios (11), Span (8). CSRios (7), Do.Murphy (1). SAndrus. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Darvish W,5-2 8 5 0 0 2 12 Soria S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 2 Washington Roark L,3-4 7 7 1 1 2 4 Storen 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 1 Blevins 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano 1 1 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Jeff Nelson; Sec ond, Scott Barry; Third, Laz Diaz. T:06. A,813 (41,408). Indians 6, Rockies 4 Colorado Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 4 0 0 1 Bourn cf 4 2 1 2 Cuddyr 3b 4 1 2 0 ACarer ss 3 1 0 0 CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0 Brantly lf 4 2 2 1 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 1 0 1 Chsnhll 1b 3 0 0 1 Dickrsn dh 4 1 1 2 Giambi dh 2 0 0 1 Barnes rf 4 1 1 0 Raburn ph-dh 1 0 1 0 Pachec c 2 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 1 1 LeMahi 2b 2 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 4 1 2 0 Kottars c 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 4 7 4 Totals 29 6 7 6 Colorado 021 000 100 4 Cleveland 301 000 002 6 One out when winning run scored. EChacin (1), Kahnle (1), Aviles (3). DPColorado 1. LOBColorado 6, Cleveland 6. 2BBarnes (8), LeMahieu (7), Brantley (13). HRDickerson (7), Bourn (2). SBAviles (5). SLeMahieu 2, Kottaras. SF Blackmon, Chisenhall, Dav.Murphy. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chacin 5 3 4 4 5 4 Kahnle 1 1 0 0 0 0 Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 2 Logan 1 1 0 0 0 0 Ottavino L,0-2 1 / 3 2 2 2 0 0 Cleveland Tomlin 5 2 / 3 4 3 2 1 8 Outman H,1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Shaw BS,2-4 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 1 0 Rzepczynski 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Atchison W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 3 UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, Bill Welke; Sec ond, John Tumpane; Third, Bob Davidson. T:11. A,682 (42,487).

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 TANNING BEDS: FDA announces new age restriction / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARIA CHENG Associated Press L ONDON Almost a third of the world is now fat, and no coun try has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis. Researchers found more than 2 billion people worldwide are now over weight or obese. The high est rates were in the Mid dle East and North Africa, where nearly 60 percent of men and 65 percent of women are heavy. The U.S. has about 13 percent of the worlds fat population, a greater percentage than any other country. China and India combined have about 15 percent. Its pretty grim, said Christopher Murray of the Institute for Health Met rics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, who led the study. He and colleagues reviewed more than 1,700 studies cov ering 188 countries from 1980 to 2013. When we realized that not a single country has had a signif icant decline in obesity, that tells you how hard a challenge this is. Murray said there was a strong link between in come and obesity; as peo ple get richer, their waist lines also tend to start bulging. He said scientists have noticed accompany ing spikes in diabetes and that rates of cancers linked to weight, like pancreatic cancer, are also rising. The new report was paid for by the Bill & Melin da Gates Foundation and published online Thurs day in the journal, Lancet. Last week, the World Health Organization es tablished a high-level commission tasked with ending childhood obesity. Our children are getting fatter, Dr. Margaret Chan, WHOs director-gener al, said bluntly during a speech at the agencys an nual meeting in Gene va. Parts of the world are quite literally eating them selves to death. Earlier this year, WHO said that no more than 5 percent of your daily calories should come from sugar. Modernization has not been good for health, said Syed Shah, an obesity ex pert at United Arab Emir ates University, who found obesity rates have jumped ve times in the last 20 years even in a handful of remote Himalayan villages in Pakistan. His research was presented this week at a conference in Bulgar ia. Years ago, people had to walk for hours if they wanted to make a phone call, he said. Now every one has a cellphone. Shah also said the vil lagers no longer have to rely on their own farms for food. There are roads for (companies) to bring in their processed foods and the people dont have to slaughter their own ani mals for meat and oil, he said. No one knew about Coke and Pepsi 20 years ago. Now its everywhere. In Britain, the indepen dent health watchdog is sued new advice Wednes day recommending that heavy people be sent to free weight-loss classes to drop about 3 percent of their weight. It reasoned that losing just a few pounds improves health and is more realistic. About two in three adults in the U.K. are overweight, making it the fattest coun try in Western Europe. This is not something where you can just wake up one morning and say, I am going to lose 10 pounds, said Mike Kelly, the agencys public health director, in a statement. It takes resolve and it takes encouragement. A fat world? Study finds more than 2 billion people now heavy MARK LENNIHAN / AP Two overweight women hold a conversation in New York. Almost a third of the worlds population is now fat, and no country has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis released Thursday. FATTEST COUNTRIES Below are the top 10 countries with the highest rates of obesity and overweight in adults older than age 20. 1) Tonga 2) Samoa 3) Kiribati 4) Kuwait 5) Qatar 6) Marshall Islands 7) Egypt 8) Micronesia 9) Libya 10) Jordan DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press WASHINGTON Presi dent Barack Obama called Thursday for more robust research into youth concus sions, saying there remains deep uncertainty over both the scope of the troubling issue and the long-term impacts on young people. We want our kids partic ipating in sports, Obama said as he opened a day long summit on concus sions at the White House. As parents though, we want to keep them safe and that means we have to have better information. The summit signaled an effort by Obama to use the power of the presidency to elevate a national con versation over youth con cussions. The White House brought together repre sentatives of profession al sports leagues, coach es, parents, young athletes, medical professionals and others for the event. Obama, an avid sports fan and father of two daugh ters involved in athletics, highlighted millions of dol lars in pledges and other support from the Nation al Football League, the Na tional Institutes of Health and others to conduct re search that could begin to provide answers and im prove safety. Among the nancial commitments is a $30 mil lion joint research effort by the NCAA and Defense De partment and an NFL com mitment of $25 million over the next three years to pro mote youth sports safety. The president said ad ditional research needs to also be combined with a broader recognition of the need to take the matter se riously. We have to change a cul ture that says, suck it up, he said. Obama had wad ed into the debate over Obama: Too little info known about youth concussions CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP President Barack Obama applauds Victoria Bellucci, a 2014 graduate of Huntingtown High Shool in Huntingtown, Md., who suffered ve concussions playing soccer, Thursday, during the White House Healthy Kids and Safe Sports Concussion Summit. We want our kids participating in sports. As parents though, we want to keep them safe and that means we have to have better information. President Barack Obama SEE OBAMA | C6 LEESBURG Senior Advocacy Symposium scheduled for Wednesday Tips on wellness education, pre ventative care and lifestyle re sources will be offered at a Senior Advocacy Symposium hosted by Care Patrol from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday at Gator-Harley Davidson, 1745 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. For registration, call David Wilkins at 352-356-8127 or email davidw@ carepatrol.com. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driving Course to be offered The AARP Smart Driving Course helps participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driv ing habits. Cost for the course is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-mem bers. Payment must be made by check to AARP. From 1 to 4 p.m. today and Wednesday at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., in Leesburg. To register, call 352-326-3540. From 9 a.m. to noon today and Wednesday at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. To register, call 352-735-7180. WILDWOOD Meetings set for World Elder Abuse Awareness Day For World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, representatives from DCF Adult Protective Services, the Agency for Health Care Administration, Long Term Care Ombudsman program and the Attorney Generals Ofce will con duct meetings focusing on the pre vention of abuse, neglect and ex ploitation of senior adults. Meetings at this free event will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on June 16, in rooms 2002 and 2003 on the sec ond oor of the DCF facility, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood. For information, call DCF in Wildwood at 352-330-5605. MOUNT DORA Brain Fitness Classes for Seniors to start July 14 Learn the steps to a healthy brain in an eight-week class on Mondays and Wednesdays beginning July 14 and running through Sept. 3. The classes will be from 10 a.m. to noon or 2 to 4 p.m., at the Brain Gym, 500 Waterman Ave., in Mount Dora.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com MATTHEW PERRONE Associated Press Tanning beds and sun lamps will carry new warnings that they should not be used by anyone under age 18, part of a government ac tion announced Thurs day aimed at reducing rising rates of skin can cer linked to the radia tion-emitting devices. The Food and Drug Administration has reg ulated tanning machines for over 30 years, but for the rst time the agency is requiring manufactur ers to warn consumers about the cancer risks of indoor tanning. Makers of sunlamps and related devices must include a prom inent label, known as a black box warning, on their devices, stating they should not be used by people under 18. Ad ditionally, manufactur ers must provide more warnings about can cer risks in pamphlets, catalogues and web sites that promote their products. Those ma terials must warn that the devices shouldnt be used by people who have had skin cancer or have a family history of the disease. The government ac tion is aimed at curb ing cases of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, which have been on the rise for about 30 years. An esti mated 2.3 million U.S. teenagers tan indoors each year, and mel anoma is the second most common form of cancer among young adults, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. For years, physician groups have urged the U.S. government to take action on tanning beds. The groups cite increas es in the number of skin cancer cases among people in their teens and 20s, especially fe males ages 15 to 29. A spokeswoman for the American Academy of Dermatology said she hoped the federal move would spur more states to take action. Twenty four states already have laws banning minors of various ages from using indoor tanning equip ment. The FDA has tak en a very strong stand about indoor tanning and this will, I think, re ally encourage addition al states to strengthen their indoor tanning re strictions, said Dr. Mary Maloney of the Univer sity of Massachusetts Medical School. Calls placed to the In door Tanning Associa tion were not immedi ately returned Thursday. The group represents makers of tanning prod ucts and operators of in door tanning facilities. The FDA is also re quiring manufactur ers to meet certain safety and design re quirements, including timers and limits on the radiation levels the products produce. FDA warns against tanning beds AP PHOTO Teresa Lynch, owner of Dynamic Tanning in DeKalb, Ill., wipes down a tanning bed last April. Tanning beds and sun lamps will carry new warnings that they should not be used by anyone under age 18, under a government action aimed at reducing rising rates of skin cancer linked to the radiation-emitting devices. Previously the FDA classied tanning ma chines as low-risk de vices, in the same group as bandages and tongue depressors. As part of Thursdays action the FDA reclas sied all tanning beds and sun lamps as mod erate-risk, or class II, devices. That allows the FDA to review their safety and design be fore manufacturers be gin selling them. Safety standards are important because re cent studies show that many devices can cause sunburn even when used as directed. Companies will have roughly 15 months to place the warning labels on devices already used in tanning facilities but no longer market ed. Companies looking to sell new devices will have to comply with the new labeling and pre market review require ments in 90 days. The FDA require ments only apply to makers of indoor tan ning devices, not salon operators. The FDA is not try ing to burden salons but rather to educate consumers who choose to voluntarily use sun lamp products about the potential risks, said FDA deputy director for policy, Nancy Stade, on a call with reporters. Nearly 140,000 new cases of melanoma are expected to be diag nosed this year and the disease is expected to cause 9,710 deaths, ac cording to the Ameri can Cancer Society. Recent studies have shown that the risk of melanoma is 75 per cent higher in people who have been exposed to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning. While most cases are diagnosed in people in their 40s and 50s, the disease is linked to sun exposure at a young age.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press WASHINGTON A House committee has endorsed a Republi can plan to allow some schools to opt out of healthier meal stan dards. The vote comes as rst lady Michelle Obama campaigns in support of the stan dards. On Tuesday, she met with school nutri tion ofcials who said the guidelines are work ing in their schools. The rules set by Con gress and the Obama administration over the past several years re quire more fruits, vege tables and whole grains in the lunch line. Also, there are limits on sodi um, sugar and fat. Some school nutri tion directors have lob bied for a break, saying the rules have proved to be costly and restrictive. The Republican pro vision in an agriculture spending bill would al low schools to opt out of the standards for the next school year if the schools are losing mon ey on meal programs for a six-month period. The House Appropri ations Committee re jected, by a 29-22 vote, a Democratic amend ment that would have removed the GOP lan guage. A subcommittee approved the spending bill last week. Republicans have said the standards are overreach. Bottom line is schools are nding the regula tions to be too much too quick, said Rep. Robert Aderholt, R-Ala., who wrote the language. They need more time. Democrats said they were concerned the provision was an at tempt to permanently roll back the standards. We dont tell kids, you dont have to take math if its hard, science if its hard, said Califor nia Rep. Sam Farr, who offered the amendment to strike the provision. White House Spokes man Jay Carney said the House language replac es the judgment of doc tors and nutritionists with the opinions of pol iticians regarding what is healthy for our kids. The schools pushing for changes say limits on sodium and require ments for more whole grains are particularly challenging, while some school ofcials say kids are throwing away fruits and vegetables that are required. The Senate did not in clude the opt-out lan guage in its version of the spending bill. House committee endorses plan to allow schools to opt out of meal standards AP FILE PHOTO A healthy chicken salad school lunch, prepared under federal guidelines, sits on display in the cafeteria at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y. MIKE STOBBE Associated Press NEW YORK Mea sles cases are accelerat ing, and in the last ve months have caused more U.S. illnesses than in any entire year since 1996. Health ofcials say 307 cases have been re ported since New Years Day. About half have been in the past month most from a huge outbre ak in unvaccinat ed Amish communities in Ohio. Thats a blistering start, even before the customary spurt of cas es seen in the late spring and summer, health of cials noted. Measles has reached a 20-year high. This is not the kind of record we want to break, said Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention. The CDC released the latest numbers Thurs day during a news con ference. Nearly all the cas es have been linked to travelers who caught the virus abroad and spread it in the United States among unvacci nated people. Many of the travelers had been to the Philippines, where a recent measles epidem ic has caused more than 30,000 illnesses. Most of the unvacci nated skipped shots for personal or philosoph ical reasons, Schuchat said. About half of those who got sick have been adults 20 or older. At least 43 people were hospitalized with mea sles complications mainly pneumonia. There have been no deaths. No measles deaths have been reported in the U.S. since 2003. The measles vi rus is highly conta gious, spreadi ng easily through the air and in closed rooms. Officials: Measles at worst since 1996 as cases have doubled in past month

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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BLOOD and TAMI ABDOLLAH Associated Press LOS ANGELES El liot Rodgers murder ous rampage near San ta Barbara has tragically exposed the limitations of involuntary-commit ment laws that allow au thorities to temporari ly conne people who are deemed a danger to themselves or others. Three weeks before he stabbed and shot six people to death and then apparently took his own life, the 22-year-old sometime college stu dent was questioned by sheriffs deputies out side his apartment and was able to convince them he was calm, cour teous and no threat to anyone. The ofcers had been sent by local health ofcials after Rodgers family expressed con cern about him. He just didnt meet the criteria for any fur ther intervention, San ta Barbara County Sher iff Bill Brown said on CBS Face the Nation on Sunday. He was able to make a very con vincing story that there was no problem, that he wasnt going to hurt himself or anyone else. Like many other states, California has a law intended to identify and conne dangerous ly unstable people be fore they can do harm. It allows authorities to hold people in a men tal hospital for up to 72 hours for observation. To trigger it, there must be evidence a per son is suicidal, intent on hurting others or so gravely disabled as to be unable to care for himself. Police and medical personnel make tens of thousands of such wel fare checks in Califor nia annually. In the year that ended June 2012, nearly 126,000 people were placed on tem porary mental health holds in California. In Rodgers case, its not clear whether the law was too porous, if deputies were inad equately trained or if they simply werent pro vided enough informa tion to ferret out how deeply troubled Rodger had become. For example, Rodgers mother knew at the time of the April 30 vis it that her son had been posting bizarre videos on YouTube, yet police have said they were un aware of any such foot age until after the ram page last Friday. Rodger had also been in therapy for years, and its not known what, if anything, authorities knew about his psychi atric care. Ideally, ofcers mak ing welfare checks should gather as much evidence as possible beforehand, includ ing family statements and videos, said Ris don Slate, a professor of criminology at Flor ida Southern College who has trained law en forcement personnel to recognize the signs of mental illness. But even if the depu ties are well-trained, a person with mental ill ness may be able to hold it together long enough to avoid appearing sus picious, Slate said. Rick Wall, a retired Los Angeles police cap tain who created the agencys procedures for responding to people with mental problems, said many tend to have some leakage in their behavior that can be a tipoff to what they are planning to do. In this case the leak age was like a sieve, there was so much stuff out there, Wall said. People were hearing this, but no one was connecting the dots. No one was for warding the information to where it could have been put together. Law enforcement au thorities dealing with such cases must also strike a balance be tween public safety and individual liberty and privacy. In his written mate rials that surfaced after the shootings, Rodger said his weapons were stashed steps away in side his apartment, along with his blueprint to exact revenge on my enemies. But his room was nev er searched on the day deputies visited. His par ents have said they were unaware he owned guns, and police would have been unable to search his apartment unless they obtained a warrant or believed there was an imminent threat. California Senate President Pro Tem Dar rell Steinberg suggest ed Tuesday that author ities should be required to determine if a per son being assessed has bought guns, and ad ditional steps could in clude talking to room mates, neighbors and relatives. Still, its not clear whether involuntari ly committing Rodger would have averted the bloodshed. In many cases, people must be set free after the 72 hours are up. Thats the debate. Thats the issue: liber ty versus forced treat ment, said Tony Beliz, a retired deputy direc tor of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health. After Columbine, af ter Sandy Hook, after things like this, the usu al arguments come up. On the gun side, its take all the guns away the extremists say or give everybody a gun, Beliz said. California rampage shows gaps in mental health law ELLIOT RODGER

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 MELISSA HEALY MCT Parenting a small child requires the forethought of a crisis planner, the re exes of a professional goalkeeper, the energy of a cheerleader and the empathy of a therapist. After eons of practice at such caregiving, its clear that mothers have evolved some brawn in those parts of the brain that weave together these many skills, and that practice strength ens them. But fathers can clearly develop the same cognitive and emotional muscle, and a new study nds that the more he cares for his offspring, the more a fa thers brain looks and behaves like that of a mother engaged in the everyday care of a child. In fact, say the Israeli authors of the study, the very practice of caregiv ing, whether by a mom who is her childs pri mary caregiver, a dad who steps in to help or a gay father raising a child with no woman in the picture, activates a recognizable parental caregiving neural net work. Their research was published Tuesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Acade my of Sciences. The re searchers said they may be the rst to take ad vantage of an unprec edented cultural shift. Changing cultural mo res have given modern men a larger role in the care of their offspring, and in instances of gay male couples who have chosen to raise children together, at least one of the men takes on the role of primary caregiver and no mother gure is present at all. In a series of experi ments, the researchers, led by Eyal Abraham of Bar-Ilan University, vis ited and videotaped 89 rst-time parents as they interacted with their babies. They took measurements of the parents levels of oxy tocin, a hormone that mediates behavior re lated to nurturing, trust and affection. And later they scanned the brains of the parents as they watched video of them selves with their babies, and of other parents in teracting with their own children. The aim of the functional magnet ic resonance imaging (fMRI) was to discern patterns of brain activa tion associated with pa rental caregiving. Whether their direct caregiving role is full or part time, men have a pattern of activation that is just a little differ ent from womens. But caring for ones baby prompts activity in and communication among the same brain circuits, whether a man or a woman is doing it. Key components in the parental caregiv ing neural network are circuits that are central in attaching emotion al importance to experi ence (the amygdala, the ventral anterior cingu late cortex, the inferior frontal gyrus and insular cortex, and the ventral tegmentum), as well as others that help us im pute needs, intentions or mental state to other people (the ventromedi al prefrontal cortex, the superior temporal sul cus). The circuits that came alive with caregiv ing involve emotional processing, reward and motivation, and in de veloping a smooth ex change of give-and-take known as parent-child synchrony. In mothers, the brains emotional processing circuit was most acti vated by watching vid eos of their interaction with baby. In fathers who were not full-time caregivers, the largest activations were seen in regions involved in in terpreting and respond ing to anothers social cues. Among gay fa thers who were full-time caregivers, both regions were greatly activated, with much cross talk be tween them. In women, as luck would have it, the brain structures from which these motivations and behaviors spring are rich in receptors for the hormone oxytocin, a chemical copiously re leased by women in the wake of giving birth. Although a man make oxytocin and are sen sitive to its effects, this hormone has not always been seen as a central driver of nurturing be havior. In this study, research er found that a wom ans oxytocin levels were a good predictor of ac tivation of her brains emotional processing centers and of affec tionate behavior. Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted Study: Caring for a baby changes a mans brain HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Whether their direct caregiving role is full or part time, men have a pattern of activation that is just a little different from womens. But caring for ones baby prompts activity in and communication among the same brain circuits, whether a man or a woman is doing it.

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 LESLIE BARKER MCT DALLAS When it comes to success in sports, the rst need that probably comes to mind is the obvious: tal ent. But with softball and baseball seasons in full swing, its good to be reminded that suc cess requires one oth er must-have element: teamwork. It all comes out in performance, says Yolanda Bruce Brooks. The Dallas psycholo gist, whose background includes serving as se nior director of play er development for the National Basketball As sociation, has worked extensively with coach es and athletes at all lev els. The coach can have all the talent in the world, she says. But theres no guarantee of success if team mem bers arent working to gether to pool their tal ents. Creating cohesion is a bit of an art, a delicate combination of hap penstance and chemis try, serendipity and nesse. Think of a basket of market-fresh foods, or a jumble of musi cal notes. Delicious and pure on their own, they dont always meld into a meal or a composition. Talent isnt enough, Brooks says. There are so many elements that go into it. Is that per son a good team play er? Will that person help players on the team be come better than who they are? Its about play ers, mind-set, working with others as a team. You dont have to be friends or best buddies, but you have to gure out a way to get togeth er. Successful teams usu ally share three traits, she says: Common cause. Ev eryone is working to ward the same goal, she says. Mind-set. Youre fo cused on achieving that goal. They call it fa miliarity for the great est good, Brooks says. You know you wont stand alone and achieve goals. Everyone is there to support you. Creating the ow or synchronicity. Success ful teams learn to work together as one. Those are things you need to create a solid, cohesive team, she says, whether in sports, business or the military. Peyton Harris adds others: communication and longevity. Communication is a big key, says Harris, who has played on the Jack Wagons since the Dallas softball teams inception ve years ago. Its not like we sit around and strategize, though. A big part of it is just playing together for so long. For almost 10 years, Richard Danielson has worked with softball teams in Plano, Texas. Some are competitive; some play just for fun. The teams that work, that develop a bond, those whose camara derie is palpable even to the casual observ er tend to be both orga nized and altruistic. Why are you out there? If youre out there to show youre the best individual softball play er in the world, maybe thats detrimental to the team as a whole, says Danielson, adult sports supervisor for the city of Plano. If you nd a good mix of people who enjoy playing together and are willing to sac rice individual acco lades for working with the team, youre able to have a better group. That works for the Jack Wagons. Everybody holds himself accountable and knows the others will hold themselves ac countable, too, says Harris, whose team has already won one tour nament this year. One of the biggest points weve driven home is that its important to hit your cutoff man in stead of having some guy trying to show off his arm and throw the ball home. Coaches play a signif icant role in how well this works, Danielson says. If you can have a coach who treats each player as a special indi vidual and nds a place for him to be on that team and contribute in a meaningful way, youll have a bet ter team over all as opposed to one who says, I have my team here. One pitch es, one catches, one plays shortstop and the rest we dont talk to, he says. A good coach unites the team by treat ing players differently but equally, says Scott Martin, professor of sport and exercise psy chology at the Universi ty of North Texas. Are you as a coach preparing each player to be the best they can be and not coaching to the person you used to be as a young pl ay er? he says. Some of the coaches I know are some of the best psy chologists I know. Good coaches make sure peo ple understand how im portant their contribu tion is. That contribution doesnt necessari ly mean being the star, Brooks says. Not by any means. With talented play ers, you see this disrup tion most, she says. The coach puts every thing into that player. The rules are different; theres a higher toler ance for things not tol erated with other play ers. When that happens, she says, youre under mining team cohesive ness. In strong teams, each player has a role, wheth er being captain or giv ing the pregame prayer or motivational speech. Who are the peo ple who will be the goto in the crunch? she says. Who are the en ergizers? If theyre not pumped up, you can see the energy of the team plummet. 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Now I can eat what I want, worry free!rf nftbfr tfrr rt ffn r tt f nrnfr tf tn t rr r t rn t f rttb MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg.Exp. 06/30/2014 How to create a winning team on the field or anywhere else ANDY JACOBSOHN / MCT Everybody holds himself accountable and knows the others will hold themselves accountable, too, says the Jack Wagons Peyton Harris, right.

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C11 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg Golf CarAccessible www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 2 the 153rd day of 2014. There are 212 days left in the year. On this date: In 1897 Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that the report of my death was an exaggeration. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 2, 2014: This year you say what you feel in a direct yet charming way. You often discover that life has a surprise for you waiting just around the cor ner. When youre upset, you tend to withdraw. Communica tion is one of your strengths. Remember to be sensitive with your tone of voice, as your words could carry a lot of anger in the way they are expressed. If you are sin gle, someone you meet from mid-July on could be signi cant in your daily life. You will meet this person in your dai ly travels. If you are attached, you are more direct about your feelings. You might opt to take a couples class with your signicant other. By next year at this time, you will be much closer to your sweetie. LEO can be proud, and he or she always demands to be on center stage. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your creativity surges and adds an interesting touch to whatever you do. A partner has been on the warpath the past few months, so choose your words with care. Buy a token of affection for this per son. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Do not push someone too far, as you could get an unusual ly strong reaction. Maintaining an even pace will be difcult. Investing in your home will be an even better idea than you originally might have thought. Refuse to get cornered in an argument. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Count on your intuition to take the lead should you become insecure when dealing with one of the many people you count on. Just listen to your inner voice, and you will be ne. A child or loved one will express caring toward you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Stay on top of your nanc es. A mistake made right now could be rather costly. You also might need to get sev eral estimates before doing some work on your home. Dont just assume that the cheapest way is to do it your self. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll feel empowered and ready to tackle any task that might appear. A situation with a boss could demand extra time and attention. This per son likes to demonstrate how much power he or she has. Dont take this personally. Handle what you must. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might want to see a situa tion in a new light. First, deter mine how much your innate prejudices could be affecting your perspective. Use care with spending, as you might be inclined to go to extremes nancially as you process an emotional matter. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Youll want to get through a problem quickly. Be careful as to how assertive you are. Your actions could make someone more defensive than need be. Be gentle with handling an im portant emotional tie. The un expected could occur with a partner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Approach forthcoming news with an eye toward mak ing the right decision, and others will follow your lead. A partner might share some deep insight into what is go ing on. Have a long-overdue discussion. Someone might be quite controlling. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to look at a situation that sur rounds a potential trip. You have a unique way of han dling pressure, and you will use this skill in a meeting. Be more forthright in how you deal with a problem. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You could be worn out by a sequence of events that emerge from out of the blue. Know when to push back and say enough. A partner will ll in for you, should you re quest it. A child or new friend could become quite con trolling. Detach some. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could be taking on too much, even for you. Allow greater give-and-take within a relationship. News from a dis tance will be exhilarating, but think before rushing into ac tion. You might be looking at some long-term ramications. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Dive into work, and get as much done as possible. Everyone has his or her lim its, and you are no different. Someone might want to be a more active leader and have more control. How do you feel about the situation? What works best for you? HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I am a young, recently married woman. My husband and I are about at the point where were think ing of having kids. My brother married a close friend of mine soon af ter my wedding, and my sister-in-law has a med ical condition that may prevent her from having children. I am very close to my brother and his wife, and I can see the writ ing on the wall. She has mentioned surroga cy once in passing, as a possible alternative if she cant have kids. If I am asked to be the sur rogate, what advice do you have? Id be more than willing to consid er it, but only after my husband and I have had our own children. If I do it, would it be selsh of me to expect some compensation for my time and the toll it will take on my body? I want to be ready if and when Im asked. What would be the best way to explain my reasoning to her? BACKUP MOM IN THE NORTHWEST DEAR BACKUP: You may be jumping the gun, be cause you do not yet know how your body will tolerate a pregnan cy. Not all women have easy pregnancies, and if youre one of them, you may be less willing to be a surrogate. As to mon etary compensation for wear and tear, thats a question you should ask a lawyer because com pensation may not be allowed in the state in which you reside. You, together with your brother and sis ter-in-law, should also discuss with a mental health professional the emotional issues that may arise such as ev eryones expectations about what will hap pen when the baby ar rives, what might hap pen if there is a death, a divorce, a move, and what your role would be whether you will be the birth mother or a legal aunt, etc. All of this should be claried if your sister-in-law asks you to be her surrogate. DEAR ABBY: I recent ly retired for the second time. At 70, I applied for a job online, was in terviewed by a compa ny and hired. I could hardly believe it. Three years later, I was having a medical problem, so I thought it best to retire again if I couldnt do the work I was hired to do. After a month of rest I feel ne now. My hus band thinks I was over worked. I want to get another job. Abby, why do I feel the need to still work? Most of my friends tell me to enjoy life, sit back and relax, but my work dened me and I loved it. Shouldnt I try working again if my health continues to improve? NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE IN GEORGIA DEAR NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE: Not every one is happy in retire ment. Some people need the routine of work and the stimulation of being around other peo ple. Also, not everyone ages at the same rate. However, its import ant to listen to your body and pace yourself. Theres a saying, You can fool Mother Nature, but you cant fool Father Time. If your last job drained you to the point of illness, choose some thing that is less taxing (either full-time or parttime). Youll enjoy your life and last longer if you do. DEAR ABBY: I am a Brit, now living in the U.S. When, upon departing, someone says, Have a good one! what is the correct response? PUZ ZLED IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR PUZZLED: Some people respond, Thanks, the same to you. Others have been known to say, Thanks, Im already having one! The important thing is to always say thank you. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Wife has much to consider before agreeing to surrogacy JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX WITH US. EVERYTHING www .dailycomme rc ial.com 352-365-8200 SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE GATORS STOMP BAYLOR, HEAD FOR FINALS, SPORTS B1BURGLARIES: Suspect may have hit Lake, Sumter counties, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Study nds more than 2 billion people now heavy, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, June 2, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 153 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D2 COMICS C10 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C11 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A10 WORLD A9 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12.88 / 70Party sunny, evening T-storms. 50 LOLITA C. BALDOR and CALVIN WOODWARDAssociated PressFive years a captive from the Afghani stan war, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in American hands, freed for ve Guantanamo terrorism detainees in a swap stirring sharp debate in Washington over whether the U.S. should have negoti ated with the Taliban over prisoners. U.S. ofcials said Sunday that Bergdahls health and safety appeared in jeopardy, prompting rapid action to secure his release. Republicans said the deal could place U.S. troops in danger, especially if the freed detainees return to the ght one called it shocking. Another, Arizona Sen. John McCain, said of the ve detainees: These are the hardest of the hard core. Visiting troops in Afghanistan, Defense Secretary Hagel stepped forward at Bagram Air Field to thank the special operations forces that retrieved Bergdahl, who ofcials said was the only American prisoner of war still held by insurgents in that conict. Gen. Joseph Dunford spoke of the excitement that spread through U.S. ranks when the sergeants release was conrmed. You almost got choked up, he said. It was pretty extraordinary. Tireless campaigners for their sons freedom, Bob and Jani Bergdahl planned a news conference Sunday in their hometown of Hailey, Idaho. The Taliban handed Bergdahl over to special operations US defends captive swap with Taliban, critics stir CAROLYN KASTER / AP Accompanied by President Barack Obama, Jani Bergdahl and Bob Bergdahl speak during a news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington on Saturday about the release of their son, U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS / AP U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, right, walks on the tarmac with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan James Cunningham, left, during his arrival at Bagram Aireld in Afghanistan, on Sunday. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comFamily members, local residents and Leesburg police are relieved that a 75-year-old woman who had been reported missing for nearly a month was found alive and safe Sat urday afternoon, yet questions remain about her whereabouts and why she disappeared. Traute Rankin was reported missing on May 2 from her Leesburg home, and she was found lying in the bush es near the Leesburg Walmart, where police noted she was slightly dirty and confused, yet appeared to be in good health. She was taken to Leesburg Region al Medical Center for medical evaluation. Rankins daughter, Renee Shelley, and Dan, Renees husband of 31 years, expressed gratitude to police and lo cal residents who had been involved in search efforts. The Shelleys are in the process of moving from South Car olina to Sumter County. We are relieved, Dan Shelley said of Questions linger about missing Leesburg woman RANKIN ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAurelia Cole, chief of administration for Lake County Schools, is counting down the days to her re tirement next month after 43 years as an educator. On June 11, the Educational Foundation of Lake County will host a benet dinner in her honor, but the city of Clermont last week hosted a reception recognizing her efforts. Nearly 100 people were in attendance, including friends, family, city ofcials, fellow teachers and former students. Many shared stories about how Cole touched their lives, but the one thing everyone acknowl edged was Coles love for children and her efforts to ensure they were educated and cared for. DINA CAPPIELLOAssociated PressWASHINGTON Details of a refashioned bill to address the problems plaguing the federally run veterans health care system were released Sunday by its sponsor, the chairman of the Senate Veter ans Affairs Committee. Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Ver mont Independent, posted a summary of his bill Sunday and said it would be intro duced this week. The bill includes several new provisions aimed at x ing the long delays for vet erans care. The long-simmering issue erupted into a scandal in April and led to last weeks resignation of VA Sec retary Eric Shinseki after a federal investigation into the troubled Phoenix VA Health Care System found that about 1,700 veterans in need of care were at risk of being lost or forgotten after being kept off an ofcial waiting list. The investigation also found broad and deep-seat ed problems throughout the sprawling health care system, which provides medical care to about 6.5 million veterans annually. Sanders said in a statement issued Sunday that while the people who have lied or manipulated data must be pun ished, we also need to get to the root causes of the prob lems that have been exposed. The bill would allow Senate to take up new bill to address veterans health system AP FILE PHOTO House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., left, and Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., right, arrive for a May 30 vote on Capitol Hill in Washington.CLERMONTLake County educator retiring after 43 yearsThe bill would allow veterans facing long delays to seek care outside the VA, at private doctors offices, military bases or community health centers. SEE MISSING | A2SEE CAPTIVE | A2SEE EDUCATOR | A2SEE VETERANS | A10

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 HOW TO REACH US JUNE 1CASH 3 . ............................................... 8-8-8 Afternoon . .......................................... 8-2-1 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 0-2-8-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 5-7-8-8FLORIDALOTTERY MAY 31FANTASY 5 . ............................. 3-9-11-23-28 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 2-11-31-38-49-52 POWERBALL .................... 15-27-31-34-481 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. seeing his mother-in-law on Saturday night in the emergency room. She seems to be in decent health, and they were go ing to keep her overnight because her blood pressure was kind of low. And obviously, the next couple of days we have to get doctors evaluating her. Although she is back and were happy that she is back, there is still business to take care of and to understand why (she dis appeared) and her mental frame of mind. The family wants to make sure that Rankin has the right medications and doctors. We are very concerned about her emotional and mental state, Shelley said, noting Rankin had been living in her own home in Leesburg before she disappeared. We are going to have doctors evaluate her, because her mental stability right now is in ques tion, he said. We need to understand where she is at emotionally, mentally and physically. We dont plan to take her anywhere right now. We are going to let the doctors do what the doctors need to do. Shelley said his wifes sister, Tina Tabor, will be making a trip from England next week to see her mother. We think the Leesburg police did a tremendous job, Shelley said, noting detectives were in con stant communication with the family. We are very appreciative of all the work that they did. Local residents, who kept the case alive on Facebook, also were in volved in searches for Rankin. The people in the com munity have been great. They have bonded together and they have given my wife and I a lot of emotional support, which has been very helpful, Shelley said. We are hop ing within the next couple of weeks we can get down to Leesburg and meet all of the people who helped in the search a few weeks ago, and to talk to them, and thank them from the bottom of our hearts for all that they have done. Leesburg police received the call around 2:07 / p.m. Saturday about an elderly woman lying in the bushes at the edge of the Walmart parking lot whom LPD were able to identify as Rankin. She was found dirty and she had some scratches that look like someone who had been walk ing through the woods, said Sgt. Scott Mack of LPD, the second ofcer to question Rankin. She had told (the rst ofcer) that she had run away, said Mack, who noticed Rankin was up and walking in the park ing lot when he arrived. My primary concern when I got there was to evaluate her physical and mental well-being, and I talked to her briey about how she felt, and if she knew where she was. She seemed to be fairly with it. She knew who she was, where she was and she knew it was the month of May, but she did not know the day or the date, Mack said. There may have been a little bit of confu sion, and it could be that she at out didnt know because she had not been keeping track. Mack said Rankin was aware that she had been missing for a month. We knew that she had a heart condition and that was a major concern to us, the sergeant said. We wanted to make sure that she was physically okay, so I turned her over to the paramedics there on the scene. They told me that all of her vitals were good. We were happy to nd her in the condition that she was in. The LPD sergeant praised the community involvement in searching for Rankin. Obviously, were appreciative of any time that the community assists us with any of our investiga tions, Mack said. When we have community in volvement and coopera tion, it makes our job so much easier, and we are denitely appreciative of the woman who called us (Saturday) and said that she saw Mrs. Rankin and to make sure that she was taken care of. He said LPD detectives will continue to investi gate this case and to form a timeline. On the police end, we want to determine where she has been all this time, and how she has been taking care of herself or if anybody has been with her, Mack said. We obviously have a lot of ques tions to answer there. The next concern for us is what we need to do to make sure that this doesnt happen again. Realtor Pamela Donahey helped coordinate some searches for Rankin over the past month. Im glad that she is al right, said Donahey, who was among a group of about 20 people who searched woods and homeless campsites looking for Rankin. Obviously it is the best outcome that she was found alive and is now re united with her family, added Jamie Asmus, one of the searchers, who was instrumental in keeping Rankins disappearance as a topic on Facebook after she had seen a poster of the missing woman by the door of Harbor Freight, not far from where the woman was found. Asmus was pleased that Renee Shelley notied her right away on Face book that her mother had been found after she was contacted by LPD. I feel somewhat of a sentimental attachment, Asmus said of Rankin. I wanted obviously for her to be found and to be found healthy and reunited with her family. MISSING FROM PAGE A1 forces in an area of eastern Afghanistan, near the Pakistani bor der, U.S. ofcials said. In a statement on its website, the Taliban put the location on the outskirts of Khost province. Bergdahl, 28, was taken to Bagram Air Field for medical evaluations, then transferred to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center before he is reunited with his family in the U.S., probably at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, ofcials said. Ofcials did not offer details about Bergdahls health. National security adviser Susan Rice said he had lost considerable weight and faced an acute situation. Yet she said he appeared to be in good physical condition and is said to be walking. Questions persisted, too, about the circumstances of Bergdahls capture; Hagel declined to comment on earlier reports that the sergeant had walked away from his unit, disillusioned with the war. Such matters will be dealt with later, Hagel said. Hagel was met with silence when he told troops in a Bagram hangar: This is a happy day. We got one of our own back. It was unclear whether the absence of cheers and applause came from a reluctance to display emotion in front of the Pentagon chief or from any doubts among the troops about Bergdahl. In weighing the swap, U.S. ofcials decided that it could help the effort to reach reconciliation with the Taliban, which the U.S. sees as key to more security in Afghanistan. But they acknowledged the risk that the deal would embolden insurgents, perhaps encouraging them to grab U.S. troops or citizens as bargaining chips for the release of others in U.S. custody. President Barack Obama, joined in the Rose Garden on Saturday by the sergeants parents, said the deal was struck because the U.S. does not ever leave our men and women in uniform behind. CAPTIVE FROM PAGE A1 ASHLEY SMITH / AP Sondra Van Ert, co-owner of Baldy Sports, hangs a sign celebrating news of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahls release on Saturday.Paula Johnson Hoisington, one of Coles former students, now the vice president of Net Communica tions in Orlando, said she credits much of her condence and success to Cole. I am one of the seeds she planted, Hoising ton said to the crowd before addressing Cole personally. I can remember the days in your class, and I thank you for the seeds you planted in me ... You used to tell us, You can do whatever youd like to do. You can be whatever you want to be. I believed it and I achieved it, Hoisington said to Cole. Clermont City Man ager Darren Gray shared Coles history as an educator, and ac knowledged the con tributions she and her family have made to the south Lake community and beyond. Cole is the only daughter of the late Rev. William N. and Marie Rose McKinney, who were both longtime educators in the commu nity. She completed her elementary and sec ondary education in Cl ermont, where she was the salutatorian of her class. She went on to receive her bachelors degree in English from Tuskegee Institute (University). Years later she received a master of science de gree in educational leadership from Nova University. Immediately after graduation, Cole began teaching in the Lake County School District, where she was a teach er for 18 years, administrative dean for six years, assistant princi pal for four years, mid dle school principal for ve years, high school principal for ve years and chief of adminis tration (assistant super intendent), her present position, for ve years. Cole has been married to her husband, Devon, for 44 years, and is the mother of two children, Devon Michael, an as sistant principal, and Danielle Marie, a read ing teacher. The couple has four grandsons: Devon Jr., Ethon William, Willie III and Wesley Daniel. Cole is a member of New Jacobs Chapel Missionary Baptist Church, where she serves in the Family Matters (food distribution) and Vision Committee ministries. She is also the Home coming chairperson, pastor of the support team and on the Black History Committee. In addition, she is a long time member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, the South Lake Histor ical Society and president of the W.N. McK inney Gospel Choir. She also serves on the South Lake Chambers Educa tion and Teacher Appre ciation Breakfast com mittees. Chris Patton, Lake County Schools spokes person, said the fact that so many gathered to honor her Cole shows how well respected she is in the community. Her service and con tributions to the chil dren, to the education system and to the com munity are enormous, and I think it it shows when a local municipal ity goes out of their way to honor someone like that, Patton said. Devon Cole, Aurel ias husband, who re tired 11 years ago after 35 years with UPS, said he is glad to see his wife nally willing to slow down a bit. Were just gonna take it one day at a time, en joy life, he said. Its good to have her retir ing because shes been at the craft for many years, but she doesnt sit (still). She will nd something to do, Im absolutely sure of that. EDUCATOR FROM PAGE A1 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE COMMERCIAL Aurelia Cole, retiring after 43 years as an educator, is surprised by a remark made during a benet dinner in her honor.

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT ORLANDO Celebration Golf to host Kids Play Free eventCelebration Golf Management will host its fourth annual Kids Play Free program, Wednesday through Oct. 4. Kids ages 5-16 play free when accompanied by an adult golfer. Local participating courses are: Celebration Golf Club at Celebration, The Golden Bear Club in Windermere, Kings Ridge Golf Club and Legends Golf Club in Clermont, Stoneybrook West Golf Club in Winter Garden, Eagle Creek Golf Club in southeast Orlando, Stonegate Golf Club at Solivita in Kissimmee, RedTail Golf Club in Sorrento and Orange County National Golf Center in Winter Garden. Call 407-566-1045, ext. 4604, or email knairn@cgmgolfproperties. com for details.OXFORD Guardian ad Litem program in need of volunteersThe Guardian ad Litem program is seeking volunteer advocates to be a voice for abused, neglected or abandoned children whose cases are in the court system. To be eligible, volunteers must be 21 years of age or older, have successfully completed 30 hours of pre-service training and be cleared of any serious criminal history via a Level II criminal background check. Individuals ages 19-20 are eligible to work alongside a certied volunteer. The next training session begins on June 9 at Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301. For information, call 352-2745231 or email Sarah.Jay@gal..gov. To download an application, go to www.guardianadlitem.org.LEESBURG Cornhole Tournament team sought for CornfestThe Downtown Leesburg Business Association is seeking teams to par ticipate in the annual Cornfest Festival from 8 / a.m. to 6 / p.m., on Saturday at the Towne Square in downtown Leesburg, featuring an abundance of cooked and uncooked Zellwood sweet corn for purchase. The Cornhole Tournament will be from 11 / a.m. to 2 / p.m., with prizes awarded. Other events include the pet parade and costume contest, in which guests can dress up their pet in a corny costume to win prizes. For information and to register, call 941-223-4177 or go to www.itsyourdowntown.com.OCALA Summer jobs available at Ocala outdoor campThe FWC is looking for summer camp counselors for its Ocala Outdoor Adventure Camp at the 57acre facility on Lake Eaton in the Ocala National Forest. Applicants must be age 18 or older, pass a mandatory background check and have a desire to mentor boys and girls, ages 9-15. The camp offers six one-week sessions beginning June 16. Employees must be available for all sessions. For information, call 352-625-2804.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN L. MILLERHalifax Media GroupA team of Marion County sheriffs detectives ar rested a 50-year-old Summereld man who is accused of committing a string of residential bur glaries. The burglaries occurred in Summereld, Weirsdale, Belleview and Ocala, authorities said, and Robert Sternaman may be a person of interest in home burglaries in Lake and Sumter counties. Sternaman was taken into custody by authori ties who were responding to a burglary on Southeast 44th Avenue Road in Ocala. Detectives got a de scription of a vehicle they say Sternaman may have left in, and that vehicle was located at a Summer eld residence. Inside the car, de tectives found a lawnmower that was later discovered to have been stolen from the Ocala home on 44th Avenue Road. Sternaman was detained and transported to a district ofce for question ing. There, he admitted to ofcials that he broke into six homes one of which was occupied because he needed cash to support his meth amphetamine addiction, detectives said. He also said he need ed money to pay his bills, authorities said. Ofcials believe Ster naman, who in March SUMMERFIELDBurglary suspect may have hit Lake, Sumter STERNAMAN THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comThe Leesburg Boating Club Inc. has received the OK from the city to remove a large water oak tree in poor condition from its waterfront prop erty and to replace it with temporary shading. Steve Knowles, commodore of the boat club, recently told city commis sioners the club would pay for the cost of the tree removal and suggested the installation of a three-sided pole barn to provide the shading. He said the barn would match the adja cent buildings on the property. Normally, we would protect a tree, but from the information that we have gathered, it sounds like the tree is in somewhat of a decline, he said, adding there is concern about the trees dead limbs and the possibility of property damage as hurri cane season begins. The tree would be taken down, the stump would be removed and it would be nice and cleaned up, and it will be at the boat clubs expense, Knowles said. There would be no expense to the city whatsoever. He showed renderings of a pro posed pole barn structure that he said would be aesthetically appealing and provide shading on the boat LEESBURGAging water oak tree to get the ax THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Commissioners voted Tuesday to cut down a water oak tree in poor health on the grounds of the Leesburg Boating Club. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLeesburg ofcials have been told that problems with the citys 10-year-old park ing garage appear to be relatively minor and xable, based on nd ings from engineers. The overall structure does not appear to be compromised, Leesburg Public Works Director D.C. Maudlin said while looking over a report from AECOM engineers. We wanted it to be a small problem. It was a much smaller problem than it could have been. The third and fourth decks of the four-deck garage next to the city library had been cor doned off, including the Leesburg Bikefest crowd in late April, as the city was awaiting results from the engineering rm on what had caused 19 holes to appear in the concrete oor panels. City ofcials became concerned after seeing some of the welded metal connectors used to hold the concrete sections of the garage decks together LEESBURGCity parking garage problems appear minor DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTOS The third level of the parking garage is off limits until repairs are made. Daylight shines through cracks in the ceiling of one of the concrete section panels from the third deck of the citys parking garage. BILL THOMPSONHalifax Media GroupAs part of the $1.3 billion deal to bring commuter rail to Orlando, CSX Transportation has had to improve the com panys S line a long ribbon of track that runs through the heart of the state in connect ing Jacksonville and Lakeland. Between those points, the S line passes through com munities such as Belleview, Summereld and Wildwood. CSX had to upgrade capacity along the route to handle an increase in freight trains that were rerouted from the haulers A line in order to accommodate SunRail. About seven or eight additional trains or a total of 20 to 28 trains a day are headed to the S line. Company spokeswoman Kristin Seay said the S line ex pansion projects are expect ed to be completed some time this month. Some of the S-line improve ments include laying miles of double-tracking, or building a parallel track alongside the main line so slower trains can yield to speedier ones. The work list also included erect ing new, or improving exist ing, overpasses in Wildwood and Alachua County. The state funded those from a $198-million pot that was part of the overall payment to CSX. And while the SunRail-relat ed work might be done soon, Seay suggested other improve ments could be forthcoming. CSX continually looks for ways to improve infrastruc ture and therefore may have additional projects in the fu ture, she wrote in an email.WILDWOODSunRail leads to track upgradesSEE GARAGE | A9SEE BURGLARY | A9SEE TREE | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 SCOTT CALLAHAN | Staff Writerscott.callahan@dailycommercial.comUmatilla needs $100,000 to ad dress water damage along with mold and mildew problems caused by leaks occurring during roof replacement work at City Hall. At this point, it is unknown whether the roong contractor is going to make repairs, how much he is willing to take responsibili ty for, and what damages his insur ance carrier will cover, according to a city staff report to be discussed by the city council Tuesday night. Because staff members dont know if or when the damage claim will be settled, they will ask council members for permission to take out a $100,000 bank loan. The leaks caused by rainwater have damaged ceilings, ceiling framing, lighting, ductwork, insula tion, drywall, doors and trim, elec trical conduits and wiring and exhaust fans in restrooms, the staff report states. Asbestos also has been found in the ceiling, and that will have to be removed as well. Few companies perform both mold and mildew re moval and asbestos removal, so an other company will have to be hired to remove the asbestos, the staff re port states. While the interior x-up takes place, the staff also would like to modern ize the council chambers. Because of the roof issues, council members over the past few months have had to meet in places like the local elemen tary school and the library. An amount of $100,000 is be lieved to be plenty to accomplish (the) repairs and also enough to mit igate the mold, mildew, remove the asbestos and provide much needed modernization to the room, the staff report states. Workers at City Hall, meanwhile, will need to complete a move to a renovated southern portion of the building unaffected by the leaks. The Umatilla Police Department, which operates out of a separate building, has been dealing with its own mold and mildew problems caused by roof leaks. Last April, council members were asked to lease a nearby ofce on Central Ave nue for the police department until the leaks caused by rainwater com ing off an adjacent building can be addressed. In other action Tuesday night, a man who purchased a house and parcel valued at $63,701, saddled with a $51,500 lien, will ask council members for debt relief. A Code Enforcement Lien was or dered on the property at 61 Win throp Ave. because of tall grass, ac cording to staff report. A ne of $250 a day effective Oct. 13, 2013, through May 13, when Bri an Lunsford bought the property has amounted to $51,500. In a letter to council mem bers, Lunsford said he and his wife bought the house as an investment and hope the board will consider re ducing the ne to $25 a day, which they intend to pay. Our intent is to use the house for many years as a rental home, the Windermere couple wrote. We will not be homesteading this house, nor do we intend to ip this home. We just like the town and think that it will be a good place to own prop erty for the long term. Upon purchasing the property, Lunsford said, he cleaned up the yard and repaired a damaged ga rage door. He said he takes care of his property and assured the coun cil members they will never again have issues with the property. Reducing the ne to $25 a day would reduce the lien from $51,500 to $5,450, according to city ofcials. The council meets at 7 / p .m. at the Umatilla Public Library, 412 Hateld Drive.Umatilla needs $100K to address City Hall damage Staff ReportConstruction will begin today on Donnelly Street from Fourth Av enue to Fifth Avenue in Mount Dora, a $3 mil lion project expected to be nished by Oct. 1. City ofcials will hold a ground-breaking cer emony for this next por tion of Phase 2 improvements at 11 / a.m. at the intersection of Fourth Avenue and Donnelly Street, Kelda Senior, the citys public communi cation ofcer, said in a press release. The intersection of Fifth Avenue and Don nelly Street will remain open throughout the construction period, ex cept for any night time work that may be needed, according to the re lease. This is an extremely important project because we are upgrad ing and expanding our citys aging infrastruc ture, Senior said pre viously. Its just (going to) make our downtown more accessible, more walkable and safer for our many visitors. Underground utility work continues on Third Avenue from Dora Drawdy Way to Baker Street. This area will be closed to vehicular trafc until the end of Sep tember. Sidewalks and businesses will remain accessible through the construction period. Senior said park ing is available at the lot located on Tremain Street. Additional free parking can be found at the First United Meth odist Church, located at 439 E. Fifth Ave. in downtown Mount Dora. Businesses located in both construction zones will remain open and accessible through this improvement peri od. This is just another phase of downtown street work. Last sum mer, improvements were made on a section of Third Avenue, a por tion of Fifth Avenue, Al exander Street from Fourth to Third Avenue, and also included the revamping of Sunset Park on the corner of Alexander Street and Fourth Avenue and the conversion of Fourth Avenue from Alexander Street to Lake Dora to a pedestrian mall. For information about this second phase of downtown im provements, including parking maps and ren derings, visit www.city ofmountdora.com.MOUNT DORAConstruction on Donnelly Street will begin today SUBMITTED PHOTO This a rendering of how Third Avenue and Donnelly Street will look after the Mount Dora construction project has been completed. JUST THE FACTSPhase 2 work will include: %  en Replacement of water lines and sewer lines. %  en Replacement of stormwater lines and storm inlets, improve system capacity. %  en Widened roadways to accommodate more/ safer parking. %  en Reconstructed sidewalks and ramps to be American Disability Act compliant. %  en Installation of paver crosswalks. %  en Installation of new landscape and irrigation. %  en Installation of new street lights. %  en Installation of new street signs. %  en Installation of new street furniture. %  en Addition of parallel parking on both sides of Baker Street from Fourth to Third Avenues.club grounds. Commissioner Elise Dennison suggested the club take down the tree and wait until the com mission receives results from a Venetian Gar dens master-plan study before constructing the barn. How about remov ing the tree and, before building the pole barn, wait until the study on Venetian Gar dens comes back, and it should be within the next couple of months, Dennison said. That way if there is storm there wont be any damage the tree will be gone. Then if we de cide that we dont want a pole barn, we can al ways put another tree in there. Commissioner David Knowles (brother of Steve Knowles) said he has looked at the oak tree extensively. It would be very wise to have that tree down before the hurricane season comes, David said. Water oaks are inclined to go in case we have strong winds. It does supply some shade, and it would be nice to have some shade there, and we may want to build some type of temporary structure to allow some kind of shade. Leesburg City Man ager Al Minner said he felt Commissioner Den nisons request was rea sonable, considering there has been a lot of effort and time put into the Venetian Gardens study. One of the things that the commission has talked about a lot is making sure we have the best and improved Venetian Gardens, Minner said. Commissioner Bill Polk made the motion for the tree to be taken down immediately and to allow for temporary shade until the Venetian Gardens report is released. Fellow commissioners voted in agreement. Polk said on Wednesday that the tempo rary shade would be similar to what is used for downtown farmers market events and not the pole barn structure Steve Knowles had pro posed. TREE FROM PAGE A3

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 were missing. They were initially alerted to the problem by a resident who noticed some of the support pieces of the parking garages concrete panels didnt look right or appeared to be broken. The entire garage was closed off as a result, and the lower portions were reopened after the engineering rm gave its initial assessment and noted the lower 1 deck areas were OK and could still be used. Leesburg City Manager Al Minner has informed commissioners that the builder of the garage would be presented with the engineers report. Were hopeful that Dura-Stress will x these issues at no cost to us, Minner said. To protect us in the future, what we would like to do as well is spend another $5,900 with Southeastern Sur vey. One of the things that we were a little bit concerned with was settling. Minner said the city could then use the sur vey as a benchmark in the future to keep track of the structure. The sur vey would provide an ex amination of the elevation of each of the sides of the parking garage just in case we do have a settlement issue and to keep an eye on potential problem areas. He said the surveying rm would use a laser scanner to record structural components and the base condition. So in the future, if we ever have a problem again, well be able to go back and say, In 2014 we took this very detailed survey and this is what it was, Minner said. Well be able to do it again and tell how it has changed, if it has shifted, and that will be important information for us. GARAGE FROM PAGE A3 DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO One of several broken metal connectors spotted at Leesburgs parking garage. Welded metal connectors were used to hold the concrete sections of the deck panels together when the garage was built 10 years ago.failed to register as a career offender and was arrested for the charge, may have taken part in home burglaries in Lake and Sumter counties as well. The detectives had been investigating the Marion County burglar ies since they were rst reported on May 2. The latest burglary occurred on Friday. Ofcials said the burglar would ei ther smash a window usually lo cated in the back of the home or pry open a door to gain entry. Then the burglar would take a wide assortment of items, including appliances, jewelry and cash. Detectives said the burglaries mostly occurred in the day when the victims were away. Of the six burglar ies, four occurred within days of each other. The routine in which a majority of the burglaries occurred while home owners were away changed on May 7. In that case, a woman said she was at her Southeast 43rd Terrace Bel leview home with her 2-year-old son when she saw a man in her fathers bedroom. Seeing the woman, the burglar ran and escaped in a car that was parked on the property. Apparently the sus pect escaped empty-handed as a 46inch TV was recovered from the back porch. It appears it wasnt the only time the burglar left without taking any thing. On May 8, a deputy went to an address on Sunset Harbor Road where a kitchen window had been broken and the alarm went off. Deputies got permission from the home owner to search the home and noth ing was out of place, they said. State records indicate that Ster naman has a criminal history dating back to March 1993. His crimes in clude burglary, grand theft and traf cking in stolen property. He has been out of prison since November 2013. BURGLARY FROM PAGE A3 Associated PressWASHINGTON Al-Qaida has decentralized, yet its unclear whether the ter rorist network is weaker and less likely to launch a Sept. 11-style attack against the United States, as President Barack Obama says, or re mains potent despite the deaths of several leaders. Obama said in his foreign policy speech last week that the prime threat comes not from al-Qaidas core leader ship, but from afliates and extremists with their sights trained on targets in the Mid dle East and Africa, where they are based. This lessens the possibility of large-scale 9/11-type attacks against America, the president said. But it heightens the danger of U.S. personnel over seas being attacked, as we saw in Benghazi, he said, referring to the September 2012 attack on a U.S. diplo matic outpost in Libya that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. Experts argue that this re structured al-Qaida is per haps even stronger than it has been in recent years, and that the potential for attacks on U.S. soil endures. We have never been on a path to strategically defeat al-Qaida. All weve been able to do is suppress some of its tactical abilities. But strategically, we have never had an effective way of taking it on. Thats why it continues to mutate, adapt and evolve to get stronger, said David Sedney, former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Afghanistan, Pakistan and Cen tral Asia. Decentralization does not mean weakness, he said. I think Americans think al-Qaida is no longer a threat that Osama bin Ladens death means al-Qaida is not a big thing anymore, Sedney said. He believes al-Qaida is gaining strength in Pakistan, is stronger in Iraq than it was three or four years ago and is stronger in Syria than it was a year or two ago. This is a ght about ideol ogy. Al-Qaida is not this lead er or that leader or this group or that group, he said. The experts say al-Qaida today looks less like a wheel with spokes and more like a spider web stringing togeth er like-minded groups. Tom Joscelyn, a senior fel low at the Foundation for De fense of Democracies and senior editor of The Long War Journal, a website that tracks how al-Qaida and its afliates operate around the globe, said he thinks the Bush and Obama administrations mistakenly dened al-Qaida as a top-down pyramid with a hi erarchal structure that if you sort of lop off the top of the pyramid, the whole thing crumbles. Al-Qaida leaders have scat tered to other parts of the world, he said, noting that Al-Qaida in the Arabian Pen insula is headed by a for mer aide to bin Laden, who is now general manager of al-Qaida globally. More recently, the Treasury Department penalized a senior al-Qaida operative on al-Qaidas military committee who relocated from Pakistan to Syria and is involved with a group plotting against Western targets, he said. U.S. ofcials have tracked com munication trafc going back and forth between Syr ia and Pakistan and Afghani stan, he said. This shows, to my mind, that were not dealing with this sort of discrete core en tity in Pakistan and Afghanistan that can be droned to death, but in fact an interna tional network that poses a lot graver challenges, Josce lyn said.Al-Qaida decentralized, but not necessarily weaker AP FILE PHOTO This Feb. 2, 2014 photo shows Iraqi Security forces preparing to attack al-Qaida positions in Ramadi, 70 miles west of Baghdad, Iraq. JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELAINE GANLEYAssociated PressPARIS A suspect ed French jihadist who spent time in Syria is in custody over the shoot ing deaths of three peo ple at a Belgian Jewish museum, prosecutors said Sunday, crystaliz ing fears that European radicals will parlay their experiences in Syria into terrorism back home. When Mehdi Nem mouche was arrested in southern France on Fri day, he was in possession of rearms, a large quantity of ammuni tion and a video claiming responsibility for the May 24 attack, a Belgian prosecutor said. In a one-minute rampage that deeply shook Europes Jewish community, a gunman opened re at the Brussels museum. In ad dition to the fatalities, another person was gravely wounded. Authorities raised anti-terror alert levels as they searched for the attacker. But it was ultimately a customs in spection in the French port city of Marseille that turned up Nem mouche, as he dis embarked from a bus coming from Amster dam, Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said. The suspect had a re volver and a retractable automatic weapon like those used in the Brussels attack, and ballis tics analyses were un derway to determine if they were used in the attack, Molins said. At least one of the weapons was wrapped up in a white sheet scrawled with the name of the Islam ic State of Iraq and the Levant, an extremist group ghting in Syria, Molins said. Nemmouche, a 29-year-old from northern France, had a criminal record, with seven convictions for crimes like attempted robbery but nothing related to terrorism, Molins said. He said the suspect became radicalized in prison, and left for Syr ia just three weeks after his last prison stay in late 2012, going to Syr ia via Brussels, London and Istanbul. He said the suspect had spent about a year in Syr ia, though it is unclear why he went and what he did while there. Belgian federal prosecutor Frederic Van Leeuw, in a separate news conference in Brussels on Sunday, said the suspect had tried to lm the killings on May 24, but his camera failed. A video found in his possession shows his weapons and clothes, and includes a voice claiming responsibility for the attack in Brussels against Jews, Van Leeuw said. He said it wasnt certain whether the voice was that of the suspect. Belgian police carried out raids in the Court rai region of Belgium on Sunday morning, where the suspect is believed to have spent time, and were questioning two people there, Van Leeuw said. The suspect has been handed to anti-terrorist investigators and could be held at least through Tuesday under French counterterrorism law. The new elements in this investigation draw attention once more to the problem of the returnees in other words the people going to Syria to partic ipate in combat and return afterward to our country, Van Leeuw said. All European countries are confronted at this moment with this problem. Interior ministers from around the European Union are expected to focus on strengthening ways to stem Syria-related violence when they meet in Brussels on Thurs day. Belgiums interior minister, Joelle Milquet, called the returnees a generalized problem for all of Europe. The Brussels killings, which came on the eve of European par liament elections in which far right parties had a strong showing, led Belgian ofcials to boost their anti-terror measures, and raised fears of rising an ti-Semitism. Two Israeli citizens and a French citizen were killed in the shoot ing, and a fourth victim remains hospitalized between life and death, the Belgian prosecutor said Sunday. The European Jewish Congress welcomed the arrest in France and urged European au thorities to act faster and more aggressively to prevent such crimes. The suspect has said nothing to investigators so far during his inter rogations, Molins said.Prosecutors: Suspect in Jewish museum killings was in Syria YVES LOGGHE / AP Belgian federal prosecutor Frederic Van Leeuw addresses the media at the Federal Prosecutors ofce in Brussels, on Sunday.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 JULIE PACEAP White House CorrespondentWASHINGTON President Barack Obama will press European leaders this week to keep up pressure on Russia over its threatening moves in Ukraine, while seeking to assuage fears from Poland and other NATO allies that the West could slip back into a business-as-usual relationship with Moscow. Obamas four day trip to Poland, Belgium and France comes against the backdrop of successful national elec tions in Ukraine and signs that Russia is moving most of its troops off its shared bor der with the former Soviet re public. Yet violence continues to rage in eastern Ukrainian cities and there remains deep uncertainty about whether Ukraines new president-elect can stabilize his country. U.S. ofcials contend that, even with some signs of prog ress, Russia has not taken the necessary steps to ease ten sions and could still face ad ditional economic sanctions. Obama will look for Western allies to show a united front during a meeting of the Group of Seven major industrial nations that was quickly ar ranged after leaders decided to boycott a meeting Russia had been scheduled to host this week. But at least some parts of Obamas visit will challenge the notion that the West has isolated Moscow. Russian President Vladmir Putin is scheduled to join U.S. and Eu ropean leaders in France Fri day for a day of events mark ing the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion at Normandy. Putin will also hold one-onone talks with French Presi dent Francois Hollande, his rst meeting with a Western leader since the Ukraine crisis began. Putin may not get to host the G-8 but if he gets to go to Normandy with everybody, it begins to diminish the ap pearance of isolation, said Steven Pifer, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who now serves as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. The White House says Obama will not hold a formal bilateral meeting with Putin, though the two leaders are expected to have some contact. Ofcials also disputed the no tion that Putins presence constituted a return to normal re lations, noting that Obama and other leaders have talk ed with the Russian president throughout the crisis with Ukraine. Yet those reassurances may be of little solace to NATO al lies who sit near the Russian border, particularly Poland, where Obama will open his trip Tuesday. In April, the U.S. moved about 150 troops into Poland to try to ease its security concerns, but Obama is likely to get requests from Polish leaders for additional support. Hes going to hear a very strong message from Pol ish ofcials that the mission has not been accomplished, said Heather Conley, a Europe scholar at the Center for Stra tegic and International Stud ies. In fact, the work has only begun. While in Warsaw, Obama will also meet with regional leaders who are in town to mark the 25th anniversary of Polands rst post-communist free elections. Among those leaders will be Ukrainian Pres ident-elect Petro Poroshenko, who won Ukraines May 25 election and will hold his rst bilateral meeting with Obama. We very much admired that the people of Ukraine have turned out in huge numbers to elect President-elect Po roshenko, said Ben Rhodes, Obamas deputy national security adviser. Weve admired his commitment to pursue di alogue and to aim to reduce tensions and put Ukraine on a positive path. From Warsaw, Obama will head to Brussels to meet with leaders from the other G-7 nations: U.S., Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Canada and Japan. The wealthy nations will discuss ways to wean Europe off of Russian energy supplies, as well as gauge interest in levying more sanctions on Russia. The U.S. and European Union have each sanctioned Russian businesses and indi viduals, including some people in Putins inner circle, and threatened the prospect of broader penalties on Russias key economic sectors. But with European nations that have close economic ties with Russia already wary of those sector sanctions, Obama is likely to face an uphill climb in cementing those commit ments amid the recent signs of progress with Ukraine. I think there is no political appetite for further sanc tions, Conley said of the Eu ropean nations. Many of the G-7 leaders will also travel to Norman dy for the 70th anniversary of the Normandy invasion. But all eyes will be on Obama and Putin, who have a histo ry of tense public encounters even before the Ukraine crisis worsened their relationship. Obama and Putin will both attend a leaders lunch and a ceremony at Sword Beach, one of the ve main landing ar eas during the Normandy in vasion. The U.S. president will also attend a separate ceremony at Omaha Beach, the largest of the assault areas during the June 6, 1944, invasion.Obama to urge European leaders to keep up pressure on Russia AP FILE PHOTO This May 28, 2011 photo shows U.S. President Barack Obama during an arrival ceremony at the presidential palace in Warsaw, Poland. ADAM BEAMAssociated PressLA GRANGE, Ky. Patrick OHara, a pris oner convicted of mur der, is 69 years old and mostly conned to his bed. He is incarcerat ed in a sparkling-clean facility where nurses work behind steel cages and he gets oxygen from tubes in his nose while a television mum bles nearby. Hes one of 67 inmates in the Kentucky State Reformatorys nursing care facility, which costs state taxpayers more than $4.4 million a year. In a state grappling with $1.6 billion in budget cuts since 2008, some Kentucky lawmakers ask why its worth keep ing OHara and others like him behind bars. The state legislature has approved a pilot program that requires Kentucky to parole some inrm inmates excluding sex offenders and death row inmates to private nursing homes where the feder al government, through Medicaid, would pay most of the medical bills. For the plan to work, inmates cannot be in prison. The federal government will not pay for inmates medical expenses. But if the in mates are paroled to a private facility, they become eligible for Medicaid. Inmates who leave the nursing home would be returned to prison for violating pa role. The expanded program comes as many states are grappling with the cost of aging prisoners. Connecticut began paroling inmates to a private nursing home last year under a program ofcials say will save that state up to $5 million annually. From 1995 to 2010, when the nations prison population grew 42 percent, the number of inmates over age 55 quadrupled, according to a 2012 study by Human Rights Watch. From 2001 to 2008, state spending on inmate health care increased in 42 of 44 states surveyed by the Pew Charitable Trust and the MacAr thur Foundation. The geriatric prison population is swelling for multiple reasons, including longer prison sentences with no chance of parole and the fact that the huge population of aging baby boomers accounts for more arrests. Its not a crime wave, its just there are more older people in that age category, said Ron Aday, a professor at Middle Tennessee State University and author of the book Aging Pris oners: Crisis in Ameri can Corrections. It costs $182 per day to care for inmates like OHara, while Kentuckys daily cost for an average healthy inmate is $50. That really isnt the mission of the depart ment to provide nursing care for elderly folks, Kentucky Corrections Commissioner LaDonna Thompson said.Kentucky considering private nursing homes for elderly inmates TIMOTHY D. EASLEY / AP Patrick OHara, a patient in the medical unit, speaks with staff members of the Kentucky State Reformatory, April 17, in LaGrange, Ky.veterans facing long delays to seek care out side the VA, at private doctors ofces, military bases or community health centers. It also authorizes emer gency funding to hire new doctors and nurs es and would provide scholarships or forgive college loans for doc tors and nurses who go to work at the VA. In ad dition, it would give the department authority to re poor-performing executives, but not as broadly as a bill passed in the House and defeated in the Senate last month. An earlier version of Sanders bill did not have enough support to pass in February. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said Sunday that the key to xing the problem was giving veterans the exibili ty to get the care they need at the closest, most available place. And thats the solution to this problem is exibility to the vet eran to choose their health care, just like other people under other health care plans have the are able to do, McCain, a Vietnam veteran, said on CBS Face the Nation. Why doesnt that veteran have a card and go to the caregiver that he or she needs and wants? The VA spent about $4.8 billion last year on medical care at non-VA hospitals and clinics. That amounts to about 10 percent of health care costs for the Veterans Health Administration. VETERANS FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 Y es, all women, all girls, grow up learning ways to avoid attracting the attention of unnerving guys; its no doubt built into our DNA, along with an affection for miniatures and the early songs of Patsy Cline. Simply in order to leave the house in the morning, a girl has to assemble an arsenal of behaviors to just shut that thing down. You remember that phrase, right? Thats from Todd Akin, R-Mo, who argued not very long ago that women dont get pregnant from criminal acts because If its a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. Every girl remembers the rst time she was degraded sexually in public. It is not, as the movies would have us believe, a wonder fully cheerful moment of sensual awakening and blossoming womanhood. Its the moment when you start carrying your keys in your hand so youve got quick access to the door plus some metal between your ngers, and when you should have your phone pre-dialed to 91 so that theres one more digit to hit. Its the sense of shame sweeping over you because you looked pretty only to be slimed in a drive-by insult, told you look like a hooker. Its knowing where the well-lighted streets are be cause you are afraid of the dark, and its being wary of the spotlight because if youre the center of attention, youre an easy target. Its developing a ninja-like awareness of your surroundings even when youre supposed to be relaxed and enjoying yourself. Its recognizing that nowhere is safe. If girls standing on the lawn of the California house where they lived in college werent safe from a 22-year-old who wanted to prove he was the alpha man by slaughtering them, then nowhere is safe. So we develop strategies to make ourselves feel, if not safe, then safer. They are talismanic rather than scientic, but some do work. I discovered around age 12, for example, that one way to dissuade men from leering at me or making sucking-teeth-clicking noises as I passed them on the street was to stick a nger in my ear and start digging. You have to look really determined; you have to appear on a mission. It cant look like youre twirling a strand of your hair or something like that, because that might be seen as cute and then you couldnt expect anybodys sympathy even if you were abducted and forced to live on a farm with Todd Akin. If that didnt work, and an intimidating presence remained nearby lets say on a subway or bus where you couldnt just sneak away casually but had to stay in your seat for fear of never nding one again sticking another nger unapologetically and directly into a nostril and keeping it there would, nine times out of 10, work instantly. That youd never be able to get a date in that borough with a normal guy would be the downside. Yes, all women and girls have ways of making ourselves inconspicuous. It isnt modesty that drives us to do it: Its fear. Its self-protection. And dont tell yourself were being forced into the virtue of modesty because were not, no more than a man with his hand cut off is being forced into the virtue of patience. Its also hard to get ahead in the world if you spend a lot of time looking over your shoulder to make sure youre not being stalked. Yet, yes, all women want love. But what disguises itself under that name, smuggled in under a fake passport? You know that somewhere theres a teenage girl feeling really bad for the Santa Barbara murderer because all he needed was somebody to love him. Shes writing poems to him right now, romanticizing the violence and turning pathology into romance. And yes, while all people wish we could shut it all out and pretend it will all go away, we cant. Hatred, disguised as lust, haunts, corrodes and seeps from one generation to the next. The system that supports it cant be ignored; it must be dismantled. Its work that needs to be done by us by all of us.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Women grow up being afraid of, fending off creeps Accused National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden was handed a golden opportunity to justify himself Wednes day when he was asked by NBCs Brian Wil liams whether the American public should view his unauthorized release of thousands of classied U.S. government documents to the media as a principled act of civil disobe dience or as a betrayal of his country and he blew it. The interview, taped last week, took place at a hotel in Moscow, where Snowden ed last year in order to avoid prosecution on espionage charges. Snowden spent much of the hourlong broadcast trying to convince Williams and the TV audience that he was actual ly a patriot, not a traitor. His actions, he said, were those of a whistleblower prompted by the noblest of motives: to alert his fellow citizens of the massive government wrongdoing involved in the NSAs secret surveillance programs targeting millions of Americans private phone calls and emails. Much of what Snowden had to say about the governments technical capacity to invade the privacy of ordinary citizens without their knowledge or consent surely resonated with a public that has become far more concerned about the scope and purposes of the NSAs ac tivities than it was year ago, when the secret surveillance programs were rst reported. But the crucial question came when Williams asked Snowden why he ed to Russia if he considered his disclosure of classied material an act of civil disobedience. Why didnt he return to the United States, as Secretary of State John Kerry has urged him to do, in order to face the charges against him at a public trial where he could argue the legitimacy of his motives and the gravity of the danger represented by the NSAs unchecked power to peer into the private lives of citizens? Moreover, Williams reminded him, isnt the whole point of civil disobedience that it is driven by conscience, and that those who to practice it must also be willing to suffer the consequences for their actions? Snowdens reply, in a nutshell, was that (1) he couldnt get a fair trial in the U.S. under the terms of the Espionage Act, and (2) that he was unwilling to risk spending years or possibly decades in prison because the criminal system was rigged against defendants in espionage cases. That, he said, would only discourage future whistleblowers from coming forward when they saw the government engaged in illegal activity carried out in secret. Does that sound like someone who broke the law out of conscience in full recognition that he should be prepared to endure the consequences of his actions?Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICENSA leaker still doesnt look like a hero Classic DOONESBURY 1974Yes, all women want love. But what disguises itself under that name, smuggled in under a fake passport? You know that somewhere theres a teenage girl feeling really bad for the Santa Barbara murderer because all he needed was somebody to love him. Shes writing poems to him right now, romanticizing the violence and turning pathology into romance.

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A12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNASCAR: Jimmie Johnson wins at Dover / B3 Switzerlands Roger Federer waves after losing his fourth-round match against Latvias Ernests Gulbis on Sunday at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris, FranceDARKO VOJINOVIC / AP HOWARD FENDRICHAP Tennis WriterPARIS So unbeatable for so long until the clos ing days of Grand Slam tournaments, Roger Fed erer is suddenly accumulating early exits. Federers streak of nine consecutive quarternals at the French Open ended Sunday with a 6-7 (5), 7-6 (3), 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 fourth-round loss to 18th-seeded Ernests Gulbis of Latvia. A lot of regrets, Fed erer said. I just couldnt kind of gure it out. The 17-time Grand Slam champion had not left Roland Garros so soon since 2004, when he was beaten in the third round by Gustavo Federers Open streak ends SEE TENNIS | B2 Im sorry I had to win. I know all of you like Roger.Ernests Gulbis,after ending Federers streak of nine straight quarternals James, Duncan set to break their Finals deadlock JAMES DUNCAN TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterMIAMI Over the last 10 sea sons, only one NBA player has been part of more wins than LeBron James. His name is Tim Duncan. Their numbers over that de cade are incredibly similar. Duncan has appeared in 622 regular-season and playoff vic tories, James has played in 621. Duncan is shooting 50.2 per cent from the eld, James is shooting 50 percent. Duncan has won two championships with San Antonio during this 10-season stretch, James has two with Miami. Plus, when facing each other in the NBA Finals, both have won one, lost one. Here comes the tiebreaker a Finals rematch that will have high expectations. Miami and San Antonio are the leagues last two teams standing for the second consecutive year, their next chapter starting on the Spurs home oor Thursday night. The Heat won a wild se ries last season for their second straight championship, needing a frantic rally to avoid elimina tion in Game 6 and then riding the strength of a 37-point, 12-re bound effort from James to top the Spurs in Game 7. I think our guys, they actual ly grew from the loss last year, Spurs coach Gregg Popovich SEE FINALS | B2 PHOTOS BY ALONZO ADAMS / AP Florida celebrates after defeating Baylor during an NCAA womens softball College World Series tournament game on Sunday in Oklahoma City. Florida won 6-3. CLIFF BRUNTAP Sports WriterOKLAHOMA CITY Florida didnt dom inate Baylor in the re match, but the Gators performance was good enough. Hannah Rogers pitched a complete game and helped Flori da defeat Baylor 6-3 on Sunday to advance to the Womens College World Series national championship best-of-three se ries. Florida will play Alabama for the title. The Gators, who beat Baylor 11-0 on Thursday on the opening day of competition, won Sunday with solid fun damentals. Florida had eight hits and three walks, but no home runs. The little things win games here in the Col lege World Series, Flor ida coach Tim Walton said. Just proud of our kids for believing in us and believing in themselves and in their abili ties and not trying to do too much. Here we are getting a chance and an opportunity to play for a national championship. Rogers allowed three runs on ve hits and threw 96 pitches. She improved to 29-8 this season. I just want to contin ue to do everything and not over think anything, and use my defense like I have all season, she said. I mean, theyve been doing a great job here and all year and I will continue to use them. Florida (53-12), took a 5-0 lead Sunday in the top of the fth inning before the Bears scored three runs in the bottom of the fth to make it a game. The Bears, who came from 7-0 down to beat Kentucky on Saturday night, couldnt quite do it again. Im extremely proud of my team, Baylor coach Glenn Moore said. We came here Gators stomp Baylor to set up all-SEC final with Tide Oregon catcher Janelle Lindvall, center, runs down Alabamas Haylie McCleney (8) at third base for an out during the rst inning. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterDUBLIN, Ohio Hideki Matsuyama earned his rst victory in America and val idation as one of golfs young stars Sunday with birdie on the 18th hole to force a playoff and a 10-foot par putt on the rst extra to win the Memorial. In a tournament that Masters cham pions Bubba Watson and Adam Scott threw away on a wild back nine, Matsuyama looked certain to join them. He lost the lead by dropping three shots on two holes, and he didnt look like a winner when he pushed his drive toward the bunkers on the nal hole. Lightly slam ming his driver to the turf in disgust, the head broke off. Mat suyama followed with an approach to just outside 5 feet for birdie and a 3-under 69. That forced a play off with Kevin Na, who nished his round of 64 about two hours earlier. Matsuyama chose not to replace his bro ken driver in the play off, and his 3-wood went into the bun ker. Na drove left into the creek and still had about 10 feet for bo gey on the 18th hole in the playoff when Mat suyama made his par putt. The 22-year-old from Japan pumped his st as the ball was a few inches from dropping. Im really, really happy, Matsuyama said through his in terpreter. Its a dream come true to win at Mr. Nicklaus course. Matsuyama won for the sixth time in his career, all of them on the Japan Golf Tour. He had a pair of top JAY LAPRETE / AP Hideki Matsuyama holds the trophy after winning the Memorial golf tournament on the rst playoff hole on Sunday in Dublin, Ohio. SEE GATORS | B2Matsuyama wins Memorial in playoffSEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 SUN mon tues wed thurs fri SatLeesburg LightningJune 1-7Deland Suns7pmSanford River Rats7pm@ Sanford River Rats7pm@ Deland Suns7pm NASCAR Sprint Cup-FedEx 400 beneting Autism Speaks ResultsSunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 148.3 rating, 48 points. 2. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 111.8, 43. 3. (21) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 114.5, 42. 4. (10) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 400, 100.7, 41. 5. (7) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 103, 39. 6. (16) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 87.6, 38. 7. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 93.5, 37. 8. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 400, 100, 36. 9. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 104.3, 35. 10. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 92.7, 34. 11. (5) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 400, 85.5, 33. 12. (25) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 87.8, 32. 13. (19) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 76.7, 31. 14. (29) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 75.7, 30. 15. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 109.5, 29. 16. (27) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 68.6, 28. 17. (8) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 399, 105.5, 28. 18. (24) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 399, 75.4, 26. 19. (17) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 399, 83.9, 25. 20. (23) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 398, 74, 24. 21. (11) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 397, 65.5, 23. 22. (18) Brett Moftt, Toyota, 396, 53.2, 22. 23. (28) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 396, 56.7, 21. 24. (38) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 396, 49.9, 20. 25. (22) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 395, 60.1, 19. 26. (30) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 395, 46, 18. 27. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 394, 49.1, 17. 28. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 390, 45.7, 16. 29. (32) David Gilliland, Ford, 388, 45.7, 15. 30. (43) Blake Koch, Ford, 388, 30.8, 0. 31. (14) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 387, 64.4, 13. 32. (41) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 387, 34.4, 12. 33. (42) Dave Blaney, Ford, 383, 30.4, 11. 34. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 382, 32, 0. 35. (39) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 378, 52.1, 9. 36. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 350, 37.1, 8. 37. (40) David Stremme, Chevrolet, overheating, 297, 37.7, 7. 38. (12) Greg Bife, Ford, 292, 62.5, 6. 39. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 232, 30, 0. 40. (35) Alex Bowman, Toyota, accident, 208, 30.6, 4. 41. (26) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, accident, 131, 47.1, 3. 42. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 125, 93, 3. 43. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, engine, 73, 50.1, 1. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 117.724 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 23 minutes, 52 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.885 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 41 laps. Lead Changes: 18 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-81; J.Johnson 82-126; C.Bowyer 127; J.Johnson 128-139; K.Harvick 140-158; M.Kenseth 159; K.Harvick 160-164; M.Kenseth 165-177; J.Johnson 178-222; M.Kenseth 223; J.Johnson 224-240; M.Kenseth 241; J.John son 242-322; M.Kenseth 323; J.Johnson 324-361; B.Keselowski 362; C.Bowyer 363-366; J.Johnson 367-400. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J. Johnson, 7 times for 272 laps; Ky.Busch, 1 time for 81 laps; K.Harvick, 2 times for 24 laps; M.Kenseth, 5 times for 17 laps; C.Bowyer, 2 times for 5 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 1 lap. Wins: K.Harvick, 2; J.Johnson, 2; J.Logano, 2; Ku.Busch, 1; Ky.Busch, 1; D.Earnhardt Jr., 1; C.Ed wards, 1; J.Gordon, 1; D.Hamlin, 1; Bra.Keselowski, 1. Top 12 in Points: 1. M.Kenseth, 463; 2. J.Gordon, 461; 3. C.Edwards, 438; 4. J.Johnson, 436; 5. D.Earnhardt Jr., 429; 6. J.Logano, 414; 7. Ky.Busch, 411; 8. Bra.Keselowski, 404; 9. D.Hamlin, 379; 10. K.Larson, 377; 11. R.Newman, 374; 12. K.Harvick, 373. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.NBA Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Indiana 2 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 Saturday, May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 Monday, May 26: Miami 102, Indiana 90 Wednesday, May 28: Indiana 93, Miami 90 Friday, May 30: Miami 117, Indiana 92 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Oklahoma City 2 Monday, May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 Sunday, May 25: Oklahoma City 106, San Antonio 97 Tuesday, May 27: Oklahoma City 105, San Antonio 92 Thursday, May 29: San Antonio 117, Oklahoma City 89 Saturday, May 31: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 107, OT FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 8: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: San Antonio at Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Miami at San Antonio, 9 p.m.NHL Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 4, Montreal 2 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Thursday, May 22: Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 25: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 2, OT Tuesday, May 27: Montreal 7, NY Rangers 4 Thursday, May 29: NY Rangers 1, Montreal 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 3, Chicago 3 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 Saturday, May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 Monday, May 26: Los Angeles 5, Chicago 2 Wednesday, May 28: Chicago 5, Los Angeles 4, 2OT Friday, May 30: Chicago 4, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Wednesday, June 4: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA Saturday, June 7: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA Monday, June 9: Chicago or Los Angeles at NY Rangers, TBA Wednesday, June 11: Chicago or Los Angeles at NY Rangers, TBA x-Friday, June 13: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA x-Monday, June 16: Chicago or Los Angeles at NY Rangers, TBA x-Wednesday, June 18: NY Rangers at Chicago or Los Angeles, TBA French Open Results Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Third Round Fernando Verdasco (24), Spain, def. Richard Gasquet (12), France, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3. Andy Murray (7), Britain, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (28), Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 12-10. Fourth Round Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. John Isner (10), United States, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Women Fourth Round Eugenie Bouchard (18), Canada, def. Angelique Ker ber (8), Germany, 6-1, 6-2. Carla Suarez Navarro (14), Spain, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-3. Doubles Men Third Round Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, and Samuel Groth, Australia, def. Jack Sock, United States, and Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-4, 6-3. Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (11), France, def. Michael Llodra and Nicolas Mahut (5), France, 2-1, retired. Women Third Round Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (1), China, def. Liezel Huber and Lisa Raymond (15), United States, 6-0, 6-2. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Michaella Kra jicek, Netherlands, def .Madison Keys and Alison Riske, United States, 7-6 (6), 3-6, 6-1. Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza (5), India, def. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, and Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, 6-3, 6-3. Junior Singles Boys First Round Johan Sebastien Tatlot (9), France, def. Marc Pol mans, Australia, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-4. Taylor Harry Fritz, United States, def. Kang Ku Keon, South Korea, 6-4, 6-2. Orlando Luz (2), Brazil, def. Alex Molcan, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-1. Daniil Medvedev (16), Russia, def. Pedro Martinez Portero, Spain, 7-5, 7-6 (7). Naoki Nakagawa (8), Japan, def. Boris Pokotilov, Russia, 6-2, 6-2. Jan Zielinski, Poland, def. Alexandre Muller, France, 1-6, 7-5, 6-4. Stefan Kozlov (6), United States, def. Ryotero Matsumura, Japan, 6-4, 6-2. Akira Santillan, Australia, def. Maxime Janvier, France, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Chung Yunseong, South Korea, def. Qi Xi, China, 6-2, 6-4. Francisco Bahamonde, Argentina, def. Matteo Berret tini, Italy, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Mandresy Rakotomalala, France, def. Matias Zukas, Argentina, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3. Jumpei Yamasaki (13), Japan, def. Bogdan Bobrov, Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Noah Rubin, United States, def. Bastian Malla, Chile, 7-5, 6-3. Karen Khachanov (3), Russia, def. Peter Bertran, Do minican Republic, 6-2, 6-2. Alex Rybakov, United States, def. Oh Chan-yeong, South Korea, 6-4, 6-4. Girls First Round Margot Yerolymos, France, def. Anhelina Kalinina (9), Ukraine, 6-3, 7-5. Emmanuelle Salas, France, def. Evgeniya Levashova, Russia, 6-1, 6-7 (4), 6-2. Katarina Jokic, Serbia, def. You Xiao-Di, China, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 6-3. Jana Fett, Croatia, def. Ioana Ducu, Romania, 2-6, 6-3, 6-1. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic, def. Anna Bondar (14), Hungary, 6-2, 6-0. Catherine Cartan Bellis (2), United States, def. Kim berly Birrell, Australia, 6-3, 6-3. Fiona Ferro, France, def. Olga Fridman (13), Ukraine, 6-2, 6-3. Tereza Mihalikova, Slovakia, def. Soa Kenin, United States, 6-3, 6-3. Akvile Parazinskaite, Lithuania, def. Anna Kalinskaya, Russia, 6-2, 6-0. Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Tessah Andrianjatrimo, France, 6-4, 6-1. Isabelle Wallace, Britain, def. Varvara Flink (6), Rus sia, 7-5, 6-2. Darya Kasatkina (8), Russia, def. Kamonwan Buayam, Thailand, 6-2, 6-0. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX Optioned RHP Alex Wilson to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled 3B Garin Cecchini from Pawtucket. CHICAGO WHITE SOX Optioned INF Marcus Semien to Charlotte (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS Optioned RHP Alex White and LHP Brett Oberholtzer to Oklahoma City (PCL). Re called RHP Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Placed 3B Danny Valencia on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Aaron Brooks to Omaha (PCL). Recalled LHP Francisley Bueno and 3B Mike Moustakas from Omaha. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Optioned RHP Fernando Rodriguez to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled C Stephen Vogt from Sacramento. Sent RHP Ryan Cook to Stockton (Cal) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS Placed OF Wil Myers on the 15day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Selected the contract of OF Jerry Sands from Durham (IL). Transferred 2B Tim Beckham to the 60-day DL. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Designated RHP Wirn Obispo for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Shae Simmons from Mississippi (SL). MIAMI MARLINS Placed C Jarrod Saltalamacchia on the 7-day DL. Recalled C J.T. Realmuto from Jack sonville (SL). Transferred RHP Jose Fernandez to the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Sent 3B Aramis Ramirez to Wisconsin (MWL) for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Placed RHP Jeff Manship on the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Darin Ruf to Le high Valley (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Cesar Jimenez from Lehigh Valley. Recalled RHP Phillippe Aumont from Lehigh Valley. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Traded RHP Bryan Morris to Miami for the 2014 39th overall draft pick. Recalled RP Casey Sadler from Indianapolis (IL). American Association AMARILLO SOX Signed RHP John Holdzkom and INF Mike Broad. Released OF Tommy Barksdale and LHP Logan Williamson. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Signed RHP Jhonny Montoya. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Released LHP Joe Testa. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS Released RHP Brett Hunter. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES Signed RHP Tim Brechbuehler. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS Signed DBs Robert Sands and Anthony Watkins and OL Trevis Turner. Named Phillip Lolley linebackers coach. HOCKEY ECHL ALASKA ACES Signed G Rob Gunderson to an amateur tryout agreement.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, regionals, teams TBD11 p.m.ESPNU NCAA, Division I playoffs, regionals, teams TBDCOLLEGE SOFTBALL 8 p.m.ESPN2 World Series, nals, game 1, teams TBD, at Oklahoma CityMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:10 p.m.SUN, FS-Florida Tampa Bay at Miami8 p.m.ESPN Kansas City at St. LouisKuerten. After that decade-old setback, though, Federer made at least the quarternals at a record 36 consecutive major tournaments, a streak that ended with a sec ond-round loss at Wim bledon last year. Fed erer also put together record Slam runs of 10 nals and 23 seminals in a row when he was at his dominant best. Now the 32-year-old Federer has bowed out before the quarternals at three of the last four majors. I think it was the biggest, probably, win of my career, said Gulbis, who most certain ly could have dispensed with the word proba bly. Addressing spectators who sang Federers rst name between points, Gulbis said: Im sorry I had to win. I know all of you like Roger. The result t with the topsy-turvy nature of this tournament: Both reigning Australian Open champions, No. 3 Stan Wawrinka and No. 2 Li Na, lost in the rst round; No. 1 Serena Wil liams left in the second round. Gulbis now plays No. 6 Tomas Berdych, who eliminated the last American man, No. 10 John Isner. In another quarternal, No. 2 No vak Djokovic will face No. 8 Milos Raonic. Wimbledon champion Andy Murray and No. 24 Fernando Verdasco set up a fourth-round meeting by nishing off victories in match es suspended Saturday night because of fading light. In womens action, 2012 champion Ma ria Sharapova ran off the last nine games to come back and beat No. 19 Samantha Sto sur 3-6, 6-4, 6-0 for a quarternal berth against 35th-ranked Garbine Muguruza of Spain, the 20-year-old who stunned Williams last week. No. 18 Eugenie Bouchard of Canada will face No. 14 Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain in another quarternal. The fourth-seeded Federers resume includes the 2009 French Open title, and he was a four-time runner-up in Paris to Rafael Nadal. But Federer was hard ly in top form Sunday, making 59 unforced er rors and getting broken twice while serving for a set. That included at 5-3, 40-15 in the second, when Federer sent an overhead right to Gul bis, who whipped a backhand passing winner. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1 said. I call it fortitude. I think they showed an unbelievable amount of fortitude. If I can compliment my own team humbly, to have that tough loss, espe cially the Game 6 and not have a pity par ty and come back this year and get back to the same position, I think thats fortitude. Its the leagues rst Finals rematch since Chicago and Utah played in 1997 and 1998. The teams have actu ally played three times since last seasons clas sic series ended, twice in the regular season, another being a pre season meeting in Miami where the Spurs acknowledged that the pain of losing Game 7 on that oor was still real. Then again, its al most like they wanted to feel that hurt at times. Popovich showed the Spurs clips of Games 6 and 7 early in training camp this season, not so much to open old wounds but rather speed up the healing process. We were just try ing to put it away, just get over that part of it, learn from it, and move forward from there, said Duncan, a champion in 1999, 2003, 2005 and 2007. San Antonio won 62 games in the reg ular season, the best record in the league. One of those wins was a 24-point romp over Miami, on the same oor where this series will start on Thursday. The Heat know what wanting revenge feels like. They lost the 2011 NBA Finals to Dallas, then opened the follow ing season on the Mavericks oor and simply blew them away. Heat forward Chris Bosh called it extra motivation for the Spurs. Its just something that we have to deal with, and we know that theyre going to be very passionate, and theyre going to play some good basketball, Bosh said. So whoever we play, we just have to con tinue to keep our approach the same and play good basketball. While the Spurs were punching their ticket by ousting Oklahoma City from the West nals on Satur day night, the Heat were getting a day off. James was taking his kids to see X-Men. FINALS FROM PAGE B1 to win this thing, and were dealt a big set back on the rst day and had to recover from that. I thought we showed incredi ble ght, pride as we worked our way back to today and won an incredible come back last night, of course. We didnt take the easy road to get here. Stephanie Tofft walked with the bases loaded in the top of the sixth to score an insur ance run. She had two hits and knocked in two runs and Schwarz knocked in three runs for the Gators. Kaitlyn Thumann knocked in two runs and Jordan Strickland knocked in the other one for the Bears (4916). Whitney Canion fell to 31-12. She allowed six runs on eight hits and threw 151 pitches. Walton said that rally against Kentucky might have sapped Baylors energy. I can tell you that be ing on the other side of that coin, winning an emotional game yester day, in the fashion that they did, I know how draining it can be, he said. GATORS FROM PAGE B1 Memorial Scores Sunday At Muireld Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,392; Par: 72 (x-won on rst playoff hole) Final x-Hideki Matsuyama (500), $1,116,000 70-67-69-69 275 Kevin Na (300), $669,600 72-69-70-64 275 Bubba Watson (190), $421,600 66-69-69-72 276 Chris Kirk (123), $272,800 66-70-74-68 278 Adam Scott (123), $272,800 69-70-68-71 278 Ben Curtis (95), $215,450 69-71-69-70 279 Steve Stricker (95), $215,450 71-70-70-68 279 Luke Guthrie (75), $167,400 75-69-66-70 280 Bill Haas (75), $167,400 73-67-72-68 280 Thorbjorn Olesen (75), $167,400 71-67-74-68 280 Charl Schwartzel (75), $167,400 72-69-67-72 280 Brendon Todd (75), $167,400 71-68-69-72 280 Scott Brown (59), $124,000 70-69-71-71 281 Paul Casey (59), $124,000 66-66-76-73 281 Jason Allred, $102,300 74-68-74-66 282 Billy Horschel (55), $102,300 71-69-68-74 282 Matt Kuchar (55), $102,300 74-69-69-70 282 Rory McIlroy (55), $102,300 63-78-69-72 282 Jason Dufner (48), $65,238 71-69-71-72 283 Ernie Els (48), $65,238 70-72-69-72 283 Martin Flores (48), $65,238 69-68-75-71 283 Jim Furyk (48), $65,238 73-68-72-70 283 Charley Hoffman (48), $65,238 69-72-73-69 283 Ryan Moore (48), $65,238 68-70-72-73 283 Bo Van Pelt (48), $65,238 72-72-66-73 283 Jordan Spieth (48), $65,238 69-72-67-75 283 Andrew Svoboda (48), $65,238 72-69-68-74 283 K.J. Choi (39), $38,647 73-71-72-68 284 Brendon de Jonge (39), $38,647 73-69-69-73 284 Robert Garrigus (39), $38,647 72-70-70-72 284 David Hearn (39), $38,647 71-73-69-71 284 Hunter Mahan (39), $38,647 68-70-73-73 284 Daniel Summerhays (39), $38,647 74-70-68-72 284 Scott Langley (39), $38,647 72-66-67-79 284 Kevin Stadler (39), $38,647 72-71-68-73 284 Robert Streb (39), $38,647 72-67-69-76 284 Aaron Baddeley (30), $25,420 69-74-70-72 285 Keegan Bradley (30), $25,420 67-75-70-73 285 Jason Day (30), $25,420 72-69-70-74 285 Billy Hurley III (30), $25,420 73-70-74-68 285 Marc Leishman (30), $25,420 71-68-73-73 285 Justin Thomas, $25,420 73-68-72-72 285 Michael Thompson (30), $25,420 67-76-72-70 285 Cameron Tringale (30), $25,420 73-70-70-72 285 Camilo Villegas (30), $25,420 71-68-72-74 285 Dustin Johnson (24), $18,063 73-68-72-73 286 Kevin Kisner (24), $18,063 69-72-76-69 286 Justin Hicks (24), $18,063 73-67-71-75 286 Stewart Cink (20), $15,149 71-73-72-71 287 Luke Donald (20), $15,149 71-69-73-74 287 David Lingmerth (20), $15,149 72-72-70-73 287 Phil Mickelson (20), $15,149 72-70-72-73 287 Freddie Jacobson (20), $15,149 71-71-71-74 287 Ben Martin (20), $15,149 72-72-65-78 287 Michael Putnam (16), $14,198 71-73-73-71 288 Nick Watney (16), $14,198 69-71-74-74 288 Charles Howell III (12), $13,764 69-75-71-74 289 Ryo Ishikawa (12), $13,764 72-71-71-75 289 Richard H. Lee (12), $13,764 76-68-76-69 289 10s in the majors last year. Tournament host Jack Nicklaus greeted him behind the 18th green. Nicklaus spent much of the back nine in the broadcast booth, and it was a brand of golf that was unfamiliar to golfs greatest champion. The Memorial became only the latest event where proven players faltered badly. Watson, who started the nal round with a one-shot lead, was still in control until a couple of wild tee shots one into deep rough on the 14th that led to bo gey, and one so far right on the par-5 15th that it went over the trees and into a neighborhood, far out-of-bounds. That led to double bogey and he never recovered. Watson closed with a 72 and nished one shot out of the playoff. Its tough, Watson said, who was going for his third win of the year. I made one bad deci sion. If I hit 4-wood off the tee instead of driver on the par 5, we make 5 and we win by one. But I made double, so we lost by one. Scott had a share of the lead after 11 holes and was poised for his second straight PGA Tour win. But he put his tee shot into the wa ter on the par-3 12th for double bogey, took two shots to get out of a bunker on the 14th for bogey, and then dropped another shot at the 15th when his wedge hit the pin and caromed back into the fairway. He closed with a 71 and tied for fourth with Chris Kirk (68). Its the way it goes, Scott said. You get lucky breaks and you get bad ones. Na was in the club house at Muireld Village, leaning against two pillows watching this collection of er rors, even joking that he might win by sitting on a couch. He nally headed out to the range, but one swing into the water was too much to overcome. The only consolation for Na was that his run ner-up nish moved him high enough in the world ranking that he will be exempt for the U.S. Open. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 DAN GELSTONAP Sports WriterDOVER, Del. Jim mie Johnson dominated again at Dover International Speedway, extending his track vic tory record to nine. He followed last weeks victory in the Co ca-Cola 600 with another sensational run in a race red-agged for 22 minutes because of a pothole in the concrete track. Johnson led 272 of 400 laps, and won con secutive races for the 13th time. The six-time Cup champion swept Dover in 2002 and 2009 and won races in 2005, 2010, 2012 and 2013. Brad Keselowski was second, followed by Matt Kenseth, Clint Bowyer and Denny Hamlin. For sure, when you come to Dover, its always the 48, Kenseth said. Weve got to gure out how to get ahead of him. Johnson also became Dovers career leader in laps led when he hit the 2,802 mark. Its incredible, Johnson said. So much to be thankful for. Johnson never left any doubt his No. 48 Chevrolet was the car to beat, the only drama coming when the race was stopped 160 laps into the race after Ryan Newmans car pulled up chunks of the track that kicked back and dam aged Jamie McMur rays car. The race was soon stopped and crews werent allowed to work on the cars. McMurrays plea for an exception was de nied. More pieces of the track ew up and cracked a window on the pedestrian cross over bridge. NASCAR ofcials and safety crews went to work on the potholes and applied a quick-drying concrete mix. Cup races were in famously delayed by potholes at Martinsville in 2004 and the 2010 Daytona 500. McMur ray won at Daytona in 2010. You knew it was going to get worse if someone didnt repair it, Ke selowski said. I thought the repair was pretty good. You could feel it a little bit. Kevin Harvick might have wished for a lon ger delay. Harvicks lead at the red ag evaporated because of a at tire not long after racing re sumed and he fell two laps behind Johnson. Harvick worked his way back into a 17th-place nish. Kyle Busch led the rst 81 laps before Johnson passed him. Buschs bid for a tripleheader sweep at Dover would soon end when the No. 18 Toyota slammed into the outside wall. Bow yer moved into Buschs line, which caused him to wreck 124 laps into the race. Busch won the Truck Series race Friday and the Nationwide race Saturday. He has the only three-race sweep since NASCAR expanded to three national se ries in 1995, accom plishing the feat in 2010 at Bristol. Busch, who did not talk to the media, is 1 for 9 in Cup races after winning the rst two in the same weekend. Busch had some com pany in the garage. AJ Allmendinger turned into Greg Bife and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. on Lap 135, which knocked out the Roush Fenway Racing teammates. Bife, though, later re turned to nish. They were racing hard back there and he stuck it into a hole that maybe there wasnt room for, Bife said. NASCARJohnson extends track record to 9 at Dover MOLLY RILEY / APJimmie Johnson celebrates winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race on Sunday at Dover International Speedway in Dover, Del. MLB GOLF DAVE ZEITLINAssociated PressGALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. Stacy Lew is won the ShopRite LPGA Classic on Sun day to take the top spot in the world rank ing from Inbee Park, nishing with a 4-under 67 for a six-stroke victory. No. 1 for four weeks early last year, Lewis ended Parks 59-week run in the top spot. Lewis nished at 16-under 197 on Seaviews Bay Course and earned $225,000 for her second victo ry of the year and 10th overall. Also the 2012 winner at Seaview, she won the North Texas LPGA Shootout last month after nish ing second six times in her previous 16 events since winning the Womens British Open in August. Christina Kim was second after a 72. Park closed with a 70 to tie for eighth at 7 un der. Shes winless in 10 tour starts this season after sweeping the rst three majors last year and nishing the season with six victories. Lewis nished a stroke off the tournament scor ing record set by Annika Sorenstam in 1998 and 2005. The 29-year-old Texan opened with a 67 and had a 63 on Satur day to take a one-stroke lead over Kim into the nal round. She joined Sorens tam (1998, 2002, 2005), Juli Inkster (1986, 1988) and Betsy King (1987, 1995, 2001) as the only multiple winners in the tournament. STEVEN SENNE / AP Boston Red Soxs Jon Lester delivers a pitch against the Tampa Bay Rays in the rst inning on Sunday in Boston. KEN POWTAKAssociated PressBOSTON Jon Lester pitched seven shutout innings and Brock Holt drove in two runs with one of his four dou bles to lift the Boston Red Sox to their seventh straight win, completing a three-game sweep over the reeling Tampa Bay Rays with a 4-0 vic tory on Sunday. Bostons streak fol lows a 10-game skid, its longest in 20 years. The Red Sox said that matches a major league record for consecutive wins after a double-dig it losing stretch, according to research by the Elias Sports Bureau. The 1989 Detroit Ti gers did it after losing 12 in a row, and the 1942 Pittsburgh Pirates also did it after dropping 10 straight. Holt had his big day after hitting his rst ma jor league homer in Saturday nights win. Garin Cecchini added an RBI double for his rst major league hit. Evan Longoria had a pair of singles for the Rays, who dropped their season-high sixth straight. Tampa Bay owns the ALs worst record at 23-34. Lester (6-6) allowed four hits, while striking out 12 and walking one. It was the left-handers 19th career double-digit strikeout game, coming after he struck out a career-best 15 against the Oakland Athletics on May 3. For the second straight day, the clubs were cor dial to each other on the eld after three Boston managers and a pitcher were ejected in Fridays game. Rays starter David Price hit David Ortiz in the rst inning and Mike Carp later in the fourth. The Carp one triggered the benches to clear, the second time in less than a week the two teams had a scrum.Red Sox win seventh straight, beat Rays 4-0Stacy Lewis World No. 1 after win at ShopRite LPGA Classic MEL EVANS / AP Stacy Lewis kisses the trophy after winning the ShopRite LPGA Classic golf tournament on Sunday in Galloway Township, N.J. Lewis shot 16-under-par, 197 to win the tournament. LUKE MEREDITHAP Sports WriterDES MOINES, Iowa For the second time in less than a year, Tom Pernice Jr. hit a crucial shot on the 17th hole on his way to a victory. This time, Pernice needed one more big shot to secure the win. Pernice birdied the second hole of a sudden-death playoff with Doug Garwood on Sunday to win the Cham pions Tours Principal Charity Classic. I was calm all day. I played it with the right edge and I stroked it and it went right in the hole, Pernice said. Pernice won for the third time on the 50-andover tour, closing with a 3-under 69 to match Garwood at 12-under 204 at Wakonda Club. Garwood, making only his fourth start of the season, birdied the nal two holes of regulation for a 71. They played the par4 18th hole twice in the playoff. Pernice won with a putt from roughly 8 feet after they opened the play off with matching pars. Pernices perfor mance was reminiscent of the 3M Cham pionship last August in Minnesota, when he made a 45-foot putt on No. 17 to win. He chipped in from roughly 30 feet out to take the lead on Sun day, though Garwood matched that birdie and later forced a playoff. I really hit the ball good all week and really kept the ball in play in the fairway when I needed to and holed some key shots at key times, Pernice said. Bill Glasson, Jay Haas, Mark Calcavecchia and Michael Allen nished a shot back. Glasson shot 64, Haas 67, Calcavecchia 70, and Allen 71. LPGA-Shoprite Classic Leading Scores Sunday At Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club, Bay Course Galloway Township, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,177; Par: 71 Final Stacy Lewis, $225,000 67-63-67 197 Christina Kim, $138,527 64-67-72 203 Haeji Kang, $72,998 68-67-69 204 Anna Nordqvist, $72,998 69-65-70 204 Gerina Piller, $72,998 67-67-70 204 Jennifer Johnson, $72,998 62-70-72 204 Julieta Granada, $42,851 71-66-68 205 Meena Lee, $31,399 70-70-66 206 Azahara Munoz, $31,399 69-71-66 206 Shanshan Feng, $31,399 74-65-67 206 Karrie Webb, $31,399 69-70-67 206 Inbee Park, $31,399 66-70-70 206 Joanna Klatten, $21,590 70-71-66 207 Mo Martin, $21,590 70-71-66 207 Mina Harigae, $21,590 68-72-67 207 Suzann Pettersen, $21,590 70-70-67 207 Na Yeon Choi, $21,590 66-71-70 207 Haru Nomura, $21,590 63-73-71 207 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $17,140 68-73-67 208 Sarah Kemp, $17,140 67-72-69 208 Chella Choi, $17,140 67-71-70 208 Brittany Lincicome, $17,140 67-70-71 208 Paula Creamer, $13,212 73-70-66 209 Line Vedel, $13,212 74-69-66 209 Karine Icher, $13,212 72-69-68 209 Hee Young Park, $13,212 70-70-69 209 Christel Boeljon, $13,212 71-68-70 209 Laura Diaz, $13,212 67-72-70 209 Becky Morgan, $13,212 69-70-70 209 Michelle Wie, $13,212 67-72-70 209 Dori Carter, $13,212 69-68-72 209 Kim Kaufman, $13,212 69-68-72 209 Jenny Shin, $9,723 71-72-67 210 Brittany Lang, $9,723 69-70-71 210 Sydnee Michaels, $9,723 68-71-71 210 Amy Anderson, $9,723 70-68-72 210 Lindsey Wright, $9,723 68-70-72 210 Catriona Matthew, $7,182 70-73-68 211 Mika Miyazato, $7,182 73-70-68 211 Yani Tseng, $7,182 72-71-68 211 Chie Arimura, $7,182 70-72-69 211 Ai Miyazato, $7,182 73-69-69 211 Ashleigh Simon, $7,182 69-73-69 211 Brooke Pancake, $7,182 70-71-70 211 Giulia Sergas, $7,182 74-67-70 211 Mariajo Uribe, $7,182 70-69-72 211 Sandra Gal, $7,182 67-71-73 211 Lydia Ko, $5,442 68-75-69 212 Jennifer Kirby, $5,442 67-75-70 212 Mirim Lee, $5,442 70-71-71 212 Mi Hyang Lee, $5,442 68-70-74 212 Ji Young Oh, $4,475 71-72-70 213 Jee Young Lee, $4,475 72-70-71 213 Belen Mozo, $4,475 70-72-71 213 Reilley Rankin, $4,475 69-73-71 213 Cristie Kerr, $4,475 70-71-72 213 Ilhee Lee, $4,475 69-72-72 213 Jane Park, $4,475 68-73-72 213 Giulia Molinaro, $3,678 69-74-71 214 Lee-Anne Pace, $3,678 72-70-72 214 Katherine Kirk, $3,678 73-68-73 214 T ampa Bay Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist ss-rf 4 0 1 0 Holt 1b 4 1 4 2 DJnngs cf 2 0 0 0 Bogar ts ss 5 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 0 2 0 P edroia 2b 2 0 0 0 Sands dh 4 0 0 0 Cecchin 3b 2 0 1 1 SRdrgz lf 4 0 1 0 D .Ortiz dh 2 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 4 0 0 0 JGoms lf 2 1 1 0 Loney 1b 3 0 1 0 Hassan rf 3 1 1 0 JMolin c 2 0 0 0 D .Ross c 4 0 0 0 YEscor ph-ss 2 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 1 0 0 Kiermr rf 3 0 0 0 JHerrr 3b-2b 3 0 0 1 Solis c 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 5 0 T otals 30 4 7 4 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 0 Boston 000 300 10x 4 EHolt (5). DPBoston 1. LOBTampa Bay 8, Boston 10. 2BLoney (13), Holt 4 (9), Cecchini (1). SBHolt (3). SFJ.Herrera. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Bedard L,2-4 4 2/3 5 3 3 4 4 Boxberger 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 2 Oviedo 1 1 1 1 3 2 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 2 Boston Lester W,6-6 7 4 0 0 1 12 Mujica 1 1 0 0 1 1 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Lester (Loney). WPLester. PBSolis. UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Ted Barrett. T:12. A,688 (37,071). CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Tom Pernice Jr. holds the trophy after winning the Champions Tours Principal Charity Classic golf tournament on Sunday in Des Moines, Iowa. Pernice wins Principal Charity Classic in playoff

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home A way Toronto 34 24 .586 8-2 W-2 18-13 16-11 New York 29 26 .527 3 5-5 L-1 12-13 17-13 Baltimore 28 27 .509 4 1 5-5 W-2 11-12 17-15 Boston 27 29 .482 6 2 7-3 W-7 15-17 12-12 Tampa Bay 23 34 .404 10 7 4-6 L-6 12-14 11-20 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 31 22 .585 4-6 L-2 14-11 17-11 Chicago 29 29 .500 4 1 6-4 W-1 17-14 12-15 Minnesota 26 28 .481 5 2 3-7 W-1 13-14 13-14 Cleveland 27 30 .474 6 3 5-5 W-3 18-11 9-19 Kansas City 26 30 .464 6 3 3-7 L-2 13-14 13-16 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 35 22 .614 5-5 W-3 17-12 18-10 Los Angeles 30 26 .536 4 4-6 L-3 15-13 15-13 Texas 29 28 .509 6 1 6-4 W-1 13-13 16-15 Seattle 28 28 .500 6 1 5-5 W-2 14-15 14-13 Houston 24 34 .414 11 6 7-3 L-2 12-17 12-17 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 31 25 .554 5-5 W-3 18-12 13-13 Miami 28 28 .500 3 1 5-5 L-3 20-11 8-17 Washington 27 28 .491 3 2 3-7 L-1 16-15 11-13 New York 27 29 .482 4 2 6-4 W-2 13-17 14-12 Philadelphia 24 30 .444 6 4 4-6 L-2 12-18 12-12 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 34 23 .596 6-4 W-1 18-12 16-11 St. Louis 30 27 .526 4 4-6 L-1 16-12 14-15 Cincinnati 26 29 .473 7 3 5-5 W-3 12-12 14-17 Pittsburgh 25 30 .455 8 4 6-4 L-1 16-13 9-17 Chicago 20 34 .370 12 8 4-6 L-1 10-13 10-21 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 37 20 .649 8-2 W-1 19-9 18-11 Los Angeles 30 27 .526 7 5-5 W-1 12-16 18-11 Colorado 28 28 .500 8 1 2-7 L-4 16-7 12-21 San Diego 26 31 .456 11 4 5-5 L-1 14-15 12-16 Arizona 23 36 .390 15 8 5-5 L-3 9-22 14-14 SATURDAYS GAMESWashington 10, Texas 2 N.Y. Yankees 3, Minnesota 1 Toronto 12, Kansas City 2 San Diego 4, Chicago White Sox 2 Cleveland 7, Colorado 6 Baltimore 4, Houston 1 Boston 7, Tampa Bay 1 Oakland 11, L.A. Angels 3 Seattle 3, Detroit 2SATURDAYS GAMESWashington 10, Texas 2 San Diego 4, Chicago White Sox 2 St. Louis 2, San Francisco 0 Cleveland 7, Colorado 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 4, 14 innings Atlanta 9, Miami 5 Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 0 L.A. Dodgers 12, Pittsburgh 2 Cincinnati 5, Arizona 0SUNDAYS GAMESCleveland 6, Colorado 4 Minnesota 7, N.Y. Yankees 2 Toronto 4, Kansas City 0 Boston 4, Tampa Bay 0 Texas 2, Washington 0 Baltimore 9, Houston 4 Chicago White Sox 4, San Diego 1 Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 3 Seattle 4, Detroit 0SUNDAYS GAMESCleveland 6, Colorado 4 Atlanta 4, Miami 2 N.Y. Mets 4, Philadelphia 3, 11 innings Texas 2, Washington 0 Milwaukee 9, Chicago Cubs 0 Chicago White Sox 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco 8, St. Louis 0 Cincinnati 4, Arizona 3 Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, late H. RUMPH JR. / AP New York Mets starting pitcher Jonathon Niese throws against the Philadelphia Phillies on Sunday in Philadelphia. TODAYS GAMESBoston (Lackey 6-3) at Cleveland (Masterson 2-4), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 7-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-2) at Miami (Wolf 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 4-4) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 7:20 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-5) at St. Louis (S.Miller 6-4), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 3-2), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESN.Y. Mets (Colon 4-5) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-2) at Miami (Wolf 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 4-4) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 7:20 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-5) at St. Louis (S.Miller 6-4), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 3-2), 10:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 1-7) at San Diego (Stauffer 2-1), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: VMartinez, Detroit, .340; MiCabrera, Detroit, .332; AlRamirez, Chicago, .329; Cano, Seattle, .327; Altuve, Houston, .318; Rios, Texas, .317; NCruz, Balti more, .315. RUNS: Donaldson, Oakland, 48; Dozier, Minnesota, 44; Bautista, Toronto, 43; NCruz, Baltimore, 39; Encarna cion, Toronto, 39; Kinsler, Detroit, 38; MeCabrera, To ronto, 37. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 49; Encarnacion, Toronto, 48; Donaldson, Oakland, 46; Moss, Oakland, 46; JAbreu, Chicago, 42; Bautista, Toronto, 40. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 77; MeCabrera, Toronto, 73; AlRamirez, Chicago, 72; Rios, Texas, 69; Kinsler, Detroit, 68; Markakis, Baltimore, 68; MiCabrera, Detroit, 67; Cano, Seattle, 67; VMartinez, Detroit, 67. DOUBLES: Hosmer, Kansas City, 19; Kinsler, Detroit, 19; Plouffe, Minnesota, 19; MiCabrera, Detroit, 18; Pedroia, Boston, 18; Altuve, Houston, 17; Viciedo, Chicago, 16. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 6; Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; 8 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 20; Encarnacion, Toronto, 18; JAbreu, Chicago, 15; Donaldson, Oakland, 15; Bautista, Toronto, 14; Pujols, Los Angeles, 14; VMartinez, Detroit, 13; Moss, Oakland, 13. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 20; RDavis, Detroit, 16; Ellsbury, New York, 15; AEscobar, Kansas City, 15; Andrus, Texas, 13; Gardner, New York, 13; Dozier, Minnesota, 12. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 9-1; Tanaka, New York, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 8-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 7-1; 9 tied at 6. ERA: Tanaka, New York, 2.06; Gray, Oakland, 2.31; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.33; Darvish, Texas, 2.35; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.36; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.57; Keuchel, Houston, 2.70. STRIKEOUTS: Kluber, Cleveland, 95; Price, Tampa Bay, 90; Tanaka, New York, 88; Lester, Boston, 83; FHernan dez, Seattle, 83; Scherzer, Detroit, 82; Darvish, Texas, 71. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 15; Rodney, Seattle, 14; Perkins, Minnesota, 14; Nathan, Detroit 13.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .352; Puig, Los Angeles, .344; Pagan, San Francisco, .325; MaAdams, St. Louis, .325; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .321; Utley, Philadelphia, .320; CGomez, Milwaukee, .318. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; Pence, San Francisco, 42; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 41; Stanton, Miami, 40; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 37; Yelich, Miami, 37; Blackmon, Colorado, 36; CGomez, Milwaukee, 36. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 51; Puig, Los Angeles, 40; Gold schmidt, Arizona, 38; Morse, San Francisco, 38; Blackmon, Colorado, 37; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 37; Howard, Philadelphia, 37; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 37. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 70; DWright, New York, 69; DanMurphy, New York, 67; Puig, Los Angeles, 67; Stanton, Miami, 65; Utley, Philadelphia, 65; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 64. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 22; Utley, Philadelphia, 22; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 21; Arenado, Colorado, 17; Byrd, Philadelphia, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 17. TRIPLES: Yelich, Miami, 5; DGordon, Los Angeles, 4; Pollock, Arizona, 4; Rendon, Washington, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 16; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 13; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 12; CGomez, Milwaukee, 11; Morse, San Francisco, 11; Puig, Los Angeles, 11. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 34; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 20; EYoung, New York, 17; Revere, Philadel phia, 15; Bonifacio, Chicago, 12; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 12; ECabrera, San Diego, 11; CGomez, Milwaukee, 1. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 8-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 7-3; 8 tied at 6. ERA: Samardzija, Chicago, 1.68; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.68; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.83; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.92; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.18; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.32; Cashner, San Diego, 2.35. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 92; Strasburg, Washington, 90; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 85; Wainwright, St. Louis, 81; Kennedy, San Diego, 81; Greinke, Los An geles, 76; Wacha, St. Louis, 75. SAVES: Street, San Diego, 17; FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Francisco, 17; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 16. Twins 7, Yankees 2 Minnesota Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 5 1 1 1 Gardnr lf 4 1 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 1 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 0 2 1 Ellsur y cf 4 0 1 0 Nunez pr-3b 1 1 1 2 McCnn c 2 0 0 0 Arcia rf 5 0 2 2 Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 Wlngh dh 4 1 1 1 ISuzuki rf 2 0 0 1 Kubel lf 4 0 0 0 BRor ts 2b 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 1 1 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 EEscor ss 4 0 0 0 ZAlmnt dh 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 2 1 0 Totals 37 7 10 7 T otals 28 2 3 2 Minnesota 001 000 006 7 New York 000 200 000 2 DPMinnesota 1. LOBMinnesota 7, New York 2. 2BDozier (8), Plouffe (20), Nunez (2). 3BGardner (3). HRWillingham (3). SFI.Suzuki. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota P.Hughes W,6-1 8 3 2 2 2 6 Thielbar 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Whitley 5 5 1 1 0 6 Betances H,6 2 0 0 0 0 5 Warren H,9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Dav.Robertson L,0-2 BS,2-14 2/3 2 5 5 3 2 Daley 0 1 1 1 0 0 Thornton 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Daley pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBPby Whitley (Willingham). UmpiresHome, Brian Gorman; First, David Rackley; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Jim Wolf. T:58. A,449 (49,642). Orioles 9, Astros 4 Baltimore Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks dh 4 1 1 0 Altuve 2b 3 0 1 0 Machd 3b 4 2 2 4 MGnzlz 2b 0 0 0 0 N.Cruz rf 1 0 0 0 Springr rf 5 1 2 0 DYong lf 3 0 0 0 F owler cf 3 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 1 Presle y cf 1 1 1 0 C.Davis 1b 5 1 1 0 MDmn 3b 4 1 1 2 Hardy ss 4 1 2 0 Car ter dh 4 0 1 1 Schoop 2b 4 2 3 0 Guzmn 1b 3 1 1 0 Lough lf-rf 3 2 2 3 Gr ssmn lf 4 0 1 0 Hundly c 3 0 0 1 Cor prn c 3 0 0 1 V illar ss 4 0 0 0 Totals 35 9 12 9 T otals 34 4 8 4 Baltimore 021 006 000 9 Houston 000 100 120 4 DPHouston 1. LOBBaltimore 5, Houston 7. 2B Machado (2), Springer (7), Grossman (3). HRMach ado (3), Lough (1), M.Dominguez (8). SBMachado (1), N.Cruz (1). SLough. SFA.Jones, Hundley, Corporan. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore W.Chen W,6-2 5 1/3 4 1 1 1 6 Brach 1 2/3 2 1 1 1 3 Guilmet 1 2 2 2 0 2 Matusz 1 0 0 0 0 1 Houston Feldman L,3-3 5 1/3 11 9 9 1 3 Fields 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Clemens 2 0 0 0 0 3 D.Downs 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby Matusz (Ma.Gonzalez), by Feldman (Machado, N.Cruz). BalkFeldman. UmpiresHome, Chris Segal; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:14. A,022 (42,060). Blue Jays 4, Royals 0 Kansas City T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 4 0 1 0 Re yes ss 4 0 1 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0 MeCar r lf 4 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 Pillar lf 0 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 1 0 AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Lind dh 4 1 2 0 S.Perez c 3 0 1 0 Encr nc 1b 3 1 2 2 L.Cain cf 4 0 0 0 JF rncs 3b 3 1 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0 StTllsn 2b 1 0 0 0 AEscor ss 3 0 2 0 Lawrie 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 DNa vrr c 3 1 1 1 Gose cf 3 0 0 1 Totals 33 0 6 0 T otals 32 4 10 4 Kansas City 000 000 000 0 Toronto 010 100 02x 4 EGuthrie (5). DPKansas City 1. LOBKansas City 7, Toronto 6. 2BInfante (5), Hosmer (20), A.Escobar (14), Encarnacion (15), J.Francisco (7). HREncarnacion (19), D.Navarro (3). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Guthrie L,2-5 7 8 2 2 2 5 Crow 1 2 2 2 0 1 Toronto Buehrle W,10-1 8 6 0 0 1 3 Loup 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Larry Vanover; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Gabe Morales. T:14. A,008 (49,282). Braves 4, Marlins 2 Atlanta Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Heyward rf 4 0 2 1 Y elich lf 4 0 1 0 B.Upton cf 4 0 1 1 Dietrich 2b 3 0 0 0 F.Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 Lucas ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Gattis c 4 1 1 2 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Doumit lf 4 0 0 0 McGehee 3b 4 0 0 0 S.Simmons p 0 0 0 0 G.Jones 1b 4 1 2 0 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 3 1 2 2 La Stella 2b 3 1 2 0 Hechavarria ss 4 0 1 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 J.Schafer ph-lf 1 0 1 0 Eo valdi p 2 0 0 0 A.Simmons ss 3 1 1 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Harang p 1 0 0 0 R.Johnson ph 1 0 1 0 R.Pena 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 T otals 31 2 7 2 Atlanta 002 000 002 4 Miami 020 000 000 2 DPAtlanta 2, Miami 1. LOBAtlanta 5, Miami 8. 2B Yelich (9), G.Jones (14). HRGattis (11), Ozuna (10). SBJ.Schafer (4), Yelich (8). SHarang, Eovaldi. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Harang 6 2/3 5 2 2 4 2 A.Wood W,5-5 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 S.Simmons S,1-1 1 2 0 0 1 0 Miami Eovaldi 8 6 2 2 0 4 Cishek L,4-2 1 3 2 2 1 2 WPHarang. UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T:39. A,997 (37,442). Mets 4, Phillies 3, 11 innings Ne w York Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Lagars cf 5 0 1 0 Re vere cf 4 0 1 0 Edgin p 1 0 0 0 Aumont p 0 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 5 0 0 0 Byrd rf 5 1 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 1 1 0 Ruiz c 5 1 2 0 Campll 1b-lf 5 1 2 0 How ard 1b 5 1 1 2 CYoung lf-cf 4 0 1 1 Ma yrry lf 4 0 0 0 Grndrs rf 3 0 1 1 CHr ndz 2b 4 0 1 0 Tejada ss 5 0 1 0 Brignc 3b 3 0 0 0 dArnad c 2 1 0 0 Hamels p 2 0 1 0 Niese p 3 0 0 0 DBrwn ph 1 0 1 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 CJimnz p 0 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 P apeln p 0 0 0 0 Black p 0 0 0 0 DeF rts p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 1 1 1 2 GwynJ ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 4 8 4 T otals 39 3 9 3 New York 000 101 000 02 4 Philadelphia 000 200 000 01 3 ERollins (4), Brignac (1). DPNew York 1, Philadelphia 1. LOBNew York 9, Philadelphia 5. 2BD.Wright (13), Campbell (3), Ruiz (13). HRDuda (8), Byrd (8), Howard (11). SBLagares (1). CSTejada (1). SBrignac. SFC.Young, Granderson. IP H R ER BB SO New York Niese 8 8 2 2 1 6 Rice 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Black 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Edgin W,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 3 Mejia S,6-6 1 1 1 1 0 0 Philadelphia Hamels 7 6 2 1 4 8 C.Jimenez 1 1 0 0 0 1 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 1 De Fratus 1 0 0 0 0 1 Aumont L,0-1 1 1 2 2 1 2 UmpiresHome, Brian ONora; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Marvin Hudson. T:29. A,039 (43,651). Brewers 9, Cubs 0 Chicago Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Bonifac cf-3b 4 0 0 0 Segura ss 4 1 1 0 Lake lf-cf 4 0 1 0 F alu ss 0 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 1 0 0 0 Braun rf 3 2 2 2 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Lucro y c 3 0 0 0 Schlittr p 1 0 1 0 CGomz cf 3 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 KDa vis lf 4 1 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 4 3 3 1 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 MrRynl 3b 2 1 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 1 0 EHer rr 3b 1 0 0 0 Castillo c 1 0 0 0 Overa y 1b 4 1 1 3 JoBakr c 2 0 0 0 Lohse p 3 0 2 2 Totals 30 0 3 0 T otals 31 9 9 8 Chicago 000 000 000 0 Milwaukee 215 010 00x 9 DPChicago 2. LOBChicago 4, Milwaukee 2. 2B Gennett 2 (11), Overbay (5). HRBraun (9), Gen nett (3). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Samardzija L,1-5 3 8 8 8 2 3 Grimm 2 1 1 1 1 0 Schlitter 2 0 0 0 0 0 Russell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Milwaukee Lohse W,7-1 9 3 0 0 0 6 HBPby Samardzija (C.Gomez), by Lohse (Rizzo). UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Paul Emmel; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Angel Campos. T:18. A,277 (41,900). Giants 8, Cardinals 0 San F rancisco St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 1 2 1 MCr pnt 3b 3 0 2 0 J.Perez rf 1 0 0 0 Bourjos ph 1 0 0 0 Pence rf 5 1 1 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 Colvin lf 1 0 0 0 W ong 2b 4 0 1 0 Posey c 5 2 3 1 Hollidy lf 2 0 0 0 HSnchz c 0 0 0 0 Grichk lf 1 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 1 1 0 Craig 1b 2 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Huff p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Blanco lf-cf 4 0 2 1 T avers rf 4 0 1 0 BCrwfr ss 4 2 1 2 JhP erlt ss 4 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 1 0 0 Ja y cf 3 0 0 0 Arias 1b 4 0 3 3 T .Cruz c 3 0 0 0 THudsn p 4 0 0 0 L ynn p 1 0 0 0 Adrianz 3b 1 0 1 0 CMr tnz p 1 0 0 0 M.Ellis 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 41 8 14 8 T otals 31 0 4 0 San Francisco 402 101 000 8 St. Louis 000 000 000 0 EWong (4). DPSt. Louis 1. LOBSan Francisco 12, St. Louis 7. 2BSandoval (11), B.Crawford (10), M. Carpenter (14). 3BBlanco (3). IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco T.Hudson W,6-2 7 3 0 0 2 6 J.Lopez 1 1 0 0 0 0 Huff 1 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Lynn L,6-3 3 1/3 8 7 4 4 2 C.Martinez 2 2/3 2 1 1 1 4 Maness 2 3 0 0 0 0 Motte 1 1 0 0 1 0 HBPby T.Hudson (Craig). WPT.Hudson. UmpiresHome, Lance Barrett; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:04. A,734 (45,399). White Sox 4, Padres 1 San Diego Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi ECarer ss 4 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 Denor rf 3 0 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 0 1 0 Quentin dh 3 0 0 0 V iciedo lf 4 1 0 0 Headly 3b 3 1 1 1 De Aza lf 0 0 0 0 Medica lf 3 0 1 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 1 0 Amarst lf 0 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 1 1 0 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 0 K onerk dh 3 1 2 3 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 Semien 3b 3 0 0 0 Rivera c 3 0 0 0 Flowr s c 3 1 1 1 Venale cf 2 0 0 0 Sier ra rf 3 0 0 0 Grandl ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 1 2 1 T otals 29 4 6 4 San Diego 000 010 000 1 Chicago 010 012 00x 4 DPChicago 1. LOBSan Diego 0, Chicago 3. 2BA. Dunn (9), Konerko (5). HRHeadley (5), Konerko (3), Flowers (4). CSEaton (5). IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Stults L,2-6 6 5 4 4 1 6 Quackenbush 1 1 0 0 0 1 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Sale W,5-0 9 2 1 1 0 9 HBPby Stults (Al.Ramirez). UmpiresHome, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Tripp Gibson. T:08. A,185 (40,615). Rangers 2, Nationals 0 T exas W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi DRrtsn lf 5 1 1 0 Span cf 4 0 2 0 Andrus ss 4 0 2 0 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 2 0 W erth rf 4 0 1 0 ABeltre 3b 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 DMrph 1b 4 0 3 1 WRams c 4 0 1 0 LMartn cf 4 1 1 1 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0 Gimenz c 4 0 1 0 McLoth lf 4 0 0 0 Sardins 2b 2 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 Darvsh p 3 0 0 0 Roar k p 2 0 0 0 Choo ph 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 NMrtnz pr 0 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Soria p 0 0 0 0 Ble vins p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 10 2 T otals 32 0 5 0 Texas 000 000 110 2 Washington 000 000 000 0 ESpan (1). DPWashington 1. LOBTexas 9, Washington 7. 2BGimenez (4), Span (13). HRL.Martin (3). SBRios (11), Span (8). CSRios (7), Do.Murphy (1). SAndrus. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Darvish W,5-2 8 5 0 0 2 12 Soria S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 2 Washington Roark L,3-4 7 7 1 1 2 4 Storen 2/3 2 1 1 1 1 Blevins 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano 1 1 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Jeff Nelson; Sec ond, Scott Barry; Third, Laz Diaz. T:06. A,813 (41,408). Indians 6, Rockies 4 Colorado Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 4 0 0 1 Bour n cf 4 2 1 2 Cuddyr 3b 4 1 2 0 A Carer ss 3 1 0 0 CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0 Brantly lf 4 2 2 1 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 1 0 1 Chsnhll 1b 3 0 0 1 Dickrsn dh 4 1 1 2 Giambi dh 2 0 0 1 Barnes rf 4 1 1 0 Raburn ph-dh 1 0 1 0 Pachec c 2 0 0 0 DvMr p rf 3 0 1 1 LeMahi 2b 2 0 1 0 A viles 3b 4 1 2 0 K ottars c 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 4 7 4 T otals 29 6 7 6 Colorado 021 000 100 4 Cleveland 301 000 002 6 One out when winning run scored. EChacin (1), Kahnle (1), Aviles (3). DPColorado 1. LOBColorado 6, Cleveland 6. 2BBarnes (8), LeMahieu (7), Brantley (13). HRDickerson (7), Bourn (2). SBAviles (5). SLeMahieu 2, Kottaras. SF Blackmon, Chisenhall, Dav.Murphy. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chacin 5 3 4 4 5 4 Kahnle 1 1 0 0 0 0 Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 2 Logan 1 1 0 0 0 0 Ottavino L,0-2 1/3 2 2 2 0 0 Cleveland Tomlin 5 2/3 4 3 2 1 8 Outman H,1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Shaw BS,2-4 1 1/3 2 1 1 1 0 Rzepczynski 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Atchison W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 3 UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, Bill Welke; Sec ond, John Tumpane; Third, Bob Davidson. T:11. A,682 (42,487).

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014TANNING BEDS: FDA announces new age restriction / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARIA CHENGAssociated PressLONDON Almost a third of the world is now fat, and no coun try has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis. Researchers found more than 2 billion people worldwide are now over weight or obese. The highest rates were in the Middle East and North Africa, where nearly 60 percent of men and 65 percent of women are heavy. The U.S. has about 13 percent of the worlds fat population, a greater percentage than any other country. China and India combined have about 15 percent. Its pretty grim, said Christopher Murray of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, who led the study. He and colleagues reviewed more than 1,700 studies covering 188 countries from 1980 to 2013. When we realized that not a single country has had a significant decline in obesity, that tells you how hard a challenge this is. Murray said there was a strong link between income and obesity; as people get richer, their waistlines also tend to start bulging. He said scientists have noticed accompany ing spikes in diabetes and that rates of cancers linked to weight, like pancreatic cancer, are also rising. The new report was paid for by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and published online Thursday in the journal, Lancet. Last week, the World Health Organization established a high-level commission tasked with ending childhood obesity. Our children are getting fatter, Dr. Margaret Chan, WHOs director-gener al, said bluntly during a speech at the agencys annual meeting in Geneva. Parts of the world are quite literally eating themselves to death. Earlier this year, WHO said that no more than 5 percent of your daily calories should come from sugar. Modernization has not been good for health, said Syed Shah, an obesity expert at United Arab Emir ates University, who found obesity rates have jumped ve times in the last 20 years even in a handful of remote Himalayan villages in Pakistan. His research was presented this week at a conference in Bulgar ia. Years ago, people had to walk for hours if they wanted to make a phone call, he said. Now every one has a cellphone. Shah also said the villagers no longer have to rely on their own farms for food. There are roads for (companies) to bring in their processed foods and the people dont have to slaughter their own animals for meat and oil, he said. No one knew about Coke and Pepsi 20 years ago. Now its everywhere. In Britain, the independent health watchdog issued new advice Wednesday recommending that heavy people be sent to free weight-loss classes to drop about 3 percent of their weight. It reasoned that losing just a few pounds improves health and is more realistic. About two in three adults in the U.K. are overweight, making it the fattest country in Western Europe. This is not something where you can just wake up one morning and say, I am going to lose 10 pounds, said Mike Kelly, the agencys public health director, in a statement. It takes resolve and it takes encouragement.A fat world?Study finds more than 2 billion people now heavy MARK LENNIHAN / AP Two overweight women hold a conversation in New York. Almost a third of the worlds population is now fat, and no country has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis released Thursday. FATTEST COUNTRIESBelow are the top 10 countries with the highest rates of obesity and overweight in adults older than age 20. 1) Tonga 2) Samoa 3) Kiribati 4) Kuwait 5) Qatar 6) Marshall Islands 7) Egypt 8) Micronesia 9) Libya 10) Jordan DARLENE SUPERVILLEAssociated PressWASHINGTON Presi dent Barack Obama called Thursday for more robust research into youth concus sions, saying there remains deep uncertainty over both the scope of the troubling issue and the long-term impacts on young people. We want our kids partic ipating in sports, Obama said as he opened a day long summit on concussions at the White House. As parents though, we want to keep them safe and that means we have to have better information. The summit signaled an effort by Obama to use the power of the presidency to elevate a national con versation over youth concussions. The White House brought together representatives of professional sports leagues, coaches, parents, young athletes, medical professionals and others for the event. Obama, an avid sports fan and father of two daugh ters involved in athletics, highlighted millions of dol lars in pledges and other support from the National Football League, the Na tional Institutes of Health and others to conduct re search that could begin to provide answers and im prove safety. Among the nancial commitments is a $30 mil lion joint research effort by the NCAA and Defense De partment and an NFL commitment of $25 million over the next three years to pro mote youth sports safety. The president said ad ditional research needs to also be combined with a broader recognition of the need to take the matter seriously. We have to change a culture that says, suck it up, he said. Obama had waded into the debate over Obama: Too little info known about youth concussions CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP President Barack Obama applauds Victoria Bellucci, a 2014 graduate of Huntingtown High Shool in Huntingtown, Md., who suffered ve concussions playing soccer, Thursday, during the White House Healthy Kids and Safe Sports Concussion Summit.We want our kids participating in sports. As parents though, we want to keep them safe and that means we have to have better information.President Barack ObamaSEE OBAMA | C6 LEESBURG Senior Advocacy Symposium scheduled for WednesdayTips on wellness education, preventative care and lifestyle resources will be offered at a Senior Advocacy Symposium hosted by Care Patrol from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday at Gator-Harley Davidson, 1745 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. For registration, call David Wilkins at 352-356-8127 or email davidw@ carepatrol.com. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driving Course to be offered The AARP Smart Driving Course helps participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits. Cost for the course is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. %  %  From 1 to 4 p.m. today and Wednesday at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., in Leesburg. To register, call 352-326-3540. %  %  From 9 a.m. to noon today and Wednesday at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. To register, call 352-735-7180.WILDWOOD Meetings set for World Elder Abuse Awareness Day For World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, representatives from DCF Adult Protective Services, the Agency for Health Care Administration, Long Term Care Ombudsman program and the Attorney Generals Ofce will conduct meetings focusing on the prevention of abuse, neglect and exploitation of senior adults. Meetings at this free event will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on June 16, in rooms 2002 and 2003 on the second oor of the DCF facility, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood. For information, call DCF in Wildwood at 352-330-5605. MOUNT DORA Brain Fitness Classes for Seniors to start July 14 Learn the steps to a healthy brain in an eight-week class on Mondays and Wednesdays beginning July 14 and running through Sept. 3. The classes will be from 10 a.m. to noon or 2 to 4 p.m., at the Brain Gym, 500 Waterman Ave., in Mount Dora.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com MATTHEW PERRONEAssociated PressTanning beds and sun lamps will carry new warnings that they should not be used by anyone under age 18, part of a government action announced Thursday aimed at reducing rising rates of skin can cer linked to the radia tion-emitting devices. The Food and Drug Administration has regulated tanning machines for over 30 years, but for the rst time the agency is requiring manufactur ers to warn consumers about the cancer risks of indoor tanning. Makers of sunlamps and related devices must include a prominent label, known as a black box warning, on their devices, stating they should not be used by people under 18. Ad ditionally, manufactur ers must provide more warnings about cancer risks in pamphlets, catalogues and web sites that promote their products. Those materials must warn that the devices shouldnt be used by people who have had skin cancer or have a family history of the disease. The government ac tion is aimed at curb ing cases of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, which have been on the rise for about 30 years. An esti mated 2.3 million U.S. teenagers tan indoors each year, and melanoma is the second most common form of cancer among young adults, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. For years, physician groups have urged the U.S. government to take action on tanning beds. The groups cite increas es in the number of skin cancer cases among people in their teens and 20s, especially females ages 15 to 29. A spokeswoman for the American Academy of Dermatology said she hoped the federal move would spur more states to take action. Twenty four states already have laws banning minors of various ages from using indoor tanning equip ment. The FDA has taken a very strong stand about indoor tanning and this will, I think, re ally encourage addition al states to strengthen their indoor tanning re strictions, said Dr. Mary Maloney of the Univer sity of Massachusetts Medical School. Calls placed to the In door Tanning Association were not immediately returned Thursday. The group represents makers of tanning products and operators of in door tanning facilities. The FDA is also re quiring manufactur ers to meet certain safety and design re quirements, including timers and limits on the radiation levels the products produce.FDA warns against tanning beds AP PHOTO Teresa Lynch, owner of Dynamic Tanning in DeKalb, Ill., wipes down a tanning bed last April. Tanning beds and sun lamps will carry new warnings that they should not be used by anyone under age 18, under a government action aimed at reducing rising rates of skin cancer linked to the radiation-emitting devices. Previously the FDA classied tanning ma chines as low-risk de vices, in the same group as bandages and tongue depressors. As part of Thursdays action the FDA reclassied all tanning beds and sun lamps as mod erate-risk, or class II, devices. That allows the FDA to review their safety and design before manufacturers be gin selling them. Safety standards are important because re cent studies show that many devices can cause sunburn even when used as directed. Companies will have roughly 15 months to place the warning labels on devices already used in tanning facilities but no longer market ed. Companies looking to sell new devices will have to comply with the new labeling and premarket review requirements in 90 days. The FDA requirements only apply to makers of indoor tan ning devices, not salon operators. The FDA is not try ing to burden salons but rather to educate consumers who choose to voluntarily use sun lamp products about the potential risks, said FDA deputy director for policy, Nancy Stade, on a call with reporters. Nearly 140,000 new cases of melanoma are expected to be diag nosed this year and the disease is expected to cause 9,710 deaths, according to the American Cancer Society. Recent studies have shown that the risk of melanoma is 75 per cent higher in people who have been exposed to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning. While most cases are diagnosed in people in their 40s and 50s, the disease is linked to sun exposure at a young age.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON A House committee has endorsed a Republi can plan to allow some schools to opt out of healthier meal standards. The vote comes as rst lady Michelle Obama campaigns in support of the stan dards. On Tuesday, she met with school nutri tion ofcials who said the guidelines are work ing in their schools. The rules set by Con gress and the Obama administration over the past several years require more fruits, vege tables and whole grains in the lunch line. Also, there are limits on sodi um, sugar and fat. Some school nutrition directors have lobbied for a break, saying the rules have proved to be costly and restrictive. The Republican provision in an agriculture spending bill would al low schools to opt out of the standards for the next school year if the schools are losing mon ey on meal programs for a six-month period. The House Appropri ations Committee re jected, by a 29-22 vote, a Democratic amend ment that would have removed the GOP language. A subcommittee approved the spending bill last week. Republicans have said the standards are overreach. Bottom line is schools are nding the regulations to be too much too quick, said Rep. Robert Aderholt, R-Ala., who wrote the language. They need more time. Democrats said they were concerned the provision was an attempt to permanently roll back the standards. We dont tell kids, you dont have to take math if its hard, science if its hard, said Califor nia Rep. Sam Farr, who offered the amendment to strike the provision. White House Spokes man Jay Carney said the House language replac es the judgment of doc tors and nutritionists with the opinions of politicians regarding what is healthy for our kids. The schools pushing for changes say limits on sodium and require ments for more whole grains are particularly challenging, while some school ofcials say kids are throwing away fruits and vegetables that are required. The Senate did not in clude the opt-out lan guage in its version of the spending bill.House committee endorses plan to allow schools to opt out of meal standards AP FILE PHOTO A healthy chicken salad school lunch, prepared under federal guidelines, sits on display in the cafeteria at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y. MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressNEW YORK Mea sles cases are accelerat ing, and in the last ve months have caused more U.S. illnesses than in any entire year since 1996. Health ofcials say 307 cases have been re ported since New Years Day. About half have been in the past month most from a huge outbreak in unvaccinat ed Amish communities in Ohio. Thats a blistering start, even before the customary spurt of cases seen in the late spring and summer, health ofcials noted. Measles has reached a 20-year high. This is not the kind of record we want to break, said Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention. The CDC released the latest numbers Thursday during a news con ference. Nearly all the cas es have been linked to travelers who caught the virus abroad and spread it in the United States among unvaccinated people. Many of the travelers had been to the Philippines, where a recent measles epidemic has caused more than 30,000 illnesses. Most of the unvacci nated skipped shots for personal or philosophical reasons, Schuchat said. About half of those who got sick have been adults 20 or older. At least 43 people were hospitalized with mea sles complications mainly pneumonia. There have been no deaths. No measles deaths have been reported in the U.S. since 2003. The measles virus is highly conta gious, spreading easily through the air and in closed rooms. Officials: Measles at worst since 1996 as cases have doubled in past month

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 rrfntbftbn fbbtrrfntbftb tnbftftbttn401 North Blvd. West, Leesburg352.728.424217809 S.E. 109th Ave., Summerfield352.307.4200 rfntcentersleepmed@yahoo.comAlways tired & fatigued? Do you have strange dreams or morning headaches? Type 2 Diabetes? CHF/Heart Failure? TIA (Mini Stroke)? Arrhythmias? Body Mass Index >30, (Neck Circumference Male >17, Female >16)?Management of . .Call Today 352.460.0922 Procedures: Neurological rf GI ntb fnbn Female Wellness bfbn nnn Male Wellness tbntr Weight Loss Clinic FLU SHOTS AVAILABLEwww.mid-floridaprimarycare.comSleep is the Golden Chain that ties...Health & Our Bodies Together!Ravi P. Gupta, M.D.Cardiovascular r nn bf Endocrine Disorder n Breathing Problems fn b Musculoskeletal n Non-Invasive Cardiology t n ffft Dermatology r r rntt rftnn ntnn nn Pulmonary b b Musculoskeletal t b t MICHAEL R. BLOOD and TAMI ABDOLLAHAssociated PressLOS ANGELES Elliot Rodgers murder ous rampage near San ta Barbara has tragically exposed the limitations of involuntary-commit ment laws that allow au thorities to temporarily conne people who are deemed a danger to themselves or others. Three weeks before he stabbed and shot six people to death and then apparently took his own life, the 22-year-old sometime college student was questioned by sheriffs deputies out side his apartment and was able to convince them he was calm, cour teous and no threat to anyone. The ofcers had been sent by local health ofcials after Rodgers family expressed con cern about him. He just didnt meet the criteria for any fur ther intervention, Santa Barbara County Sher iff Bill Brown said on CBS Face the Nation on Sunday. He was able to make a very convincing story that there was no problem, that he wasnt going to hurt himself or anyone else. Like many other states, California has a law intended to identify and conne dangerous ly unstable people before they can do harm. It allows authorities to hold people in a mental hospital for up to 72 hours for observation. To trigger it, there must be evidence a per son is suicidal, intent on hurting others or so gravely disabled as to be unable to care for himself. Police and medical personnel make tens of thousands of such wel fare checks in Califor nia annually. In the year that ended June 2012, nearly 126,000 people were placed on temporary mental health holds in California. In Rodgers case, its not clear whether the law was too porous, if deputies were inadequately trained or if they simply werent pro vided enough information to ferret out how deeply troubled Rodger had become. For example, Rodgers mother knew at the time of the April 30 vis it that her son had been posting bizarre videos on YouTube, yet police have said they were un aware of any such footage until after the ram page last Friday. Rodger had also been in therapy for years, and its not known what, if anything, authorities knew about his psychiatric care. Ideally, ofcers mak ing welfare checks should gather as much evidence as possible beforehand, includ ing family statements and videos, said Ris don Slate, a professor of criminology at Flor ida Southern College who has trained law en forcement personnel to recognize the signs of mental illness. But even if the depu ties are well-trained, a person with mental ill ness may be able to hold it together long enough to avoid appearing sus picious, Slate said. Rick Wall, a retired Los Angeles police cap tain who created the agencys procedures for responding to people with mental problems, said many tend to have some leakage in their behavior that can be a tipoff to what they are planning to do. In this case the leakage was like a sieve, there was so much stuff out there, Wall said. People were hearing this, but no one was connecting the dots. No one was for warding the information to where it could have been put together. Law enforcement authorities dealing with such cases must also strike a balance be tween public safety and individual liberty and privacy. In his written mate rials that surfaced after the shootings, Rodger said his weapons were stashed steps away in side his apartment, along with his blueprint to exact revenge on my enemies. But his room was nev er searched on the day deputies visited. His par ents have said they were unaware he owned guns, and police would have been unable to search his apartment unless they obtained a warrant or believed there was an imminent threat. California Senate President Pro Tem Dar rell Steinberg suggested Tuesday that author ities should be required to determine if a per son being assessed has bought guns, and additional steps could in clude talking to room mates, neighbors and relatives. Still, its not clear whether involuntarily committing Rodger would have averted the bloodshed. In many cases, people must be set free after the 72 hours are up. Thats the debate. Thats the issue: liber ty versus forced treat ment, said Tony Beliz, a retired deputy director of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health. After Columbine, af ter Sandy Hook, after things like this, the usu al arguments come up. On the gun side, its take all the guns away the extremists say or give everybody a gun, Beliz said.California rampage shows gaps in mental health law ELLIOT RODGER

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 MELISSA HEALYMCTParenting a small child requires the forethought of a crisis planner, the re exes of a professional goalkeeper, the energy of a cheerleader and the empathy of a therapist. After eons of practice at such caregiving, its clear that mothers have evolved some brawn in those parts of the brain that weave together these many skills, and that practice strength ens them. But fathers can clearly develop the same cognitive and emotional muscle, and a new study nds that the more he cares for his offspring, the more a fa thers brain looks and behaves like that of a mother engaged in the everyday care of a child. In fact, say the Israeli authors of the study, the very practice of caregiving, whether by a mom who is her childs pri mary caregiver, a dad who steps in to help or a gay father raising a child with no woman in the picture, activates a recognizable parental caregiving neural net work. Their research was published Tuesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The re searchers said they may be the rst to take ad vantage of an unprec edented cultural shift. Changing cultural mores have given modern men a larger role in the care of their offspring, and in instances of gay male couples who have chosen to raise children together, at least one of the men takes on the role of primary caregiver and no mother gure is present at all. In a series of experi ments, the researchers, led by Eyal Abraham of Bar-Ilan University, visited and videotaped 89 rst-time parents as they interacted with their babies. They took measurements of the parents levels of oxy tocin, a hormone that mediates behavior related to nurturing, trust and affection. And later they scanned the brains of the parents as they watched video of them selves with their babies, and of other parents in teracting with their own children. The aim of the functional magnet ic resonance imaging (fMRI) was to discern patterns of brain activation associated with parental caregiving. Whether their direct caregiving role is full or part time, men have a pattern of activation that is just a little differ ent from womens. But caring for ones baby prompts activity in and communication among the same brain circuits, whether a man or a woman is doing it. Key components in the parental caregiving neural network are circuits that are central in attaching emotion al importance to experi ence (the amygdala, the ventral anterior cingulate cortex, the inferior frontal gyrus and insular cortex, and the ventral tegmentum), as well as others that help us impute needs, intentions or mental state to other people (the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the superior temporal sul cus). The circuits that came alive with caregiving involve emotional processing, reward and motivation, and in de veloping a smooth exchange of give-and-take known as parent-child synchrony. In mothers, the brains emotional processing circuit was most activated by watching videos of their interaction with baby. In fathers who were not full-time caregivers, the largest activations were seen in regions involved in in terpreting and responding to anothers social cues. Among gay fathers who were full-time caregivers, both regions were greatly activated, with much cross talk be tween them. In women, as luck would have it, the brain structures from which these motivations and behaviors spring are rich in receptors for the hormone oxytocin, a chemical copiously re leased by women in the wake of giving birth. Although a man make oxytocin and are sen sitive to its effects, this hormone has not always been seen as a central driver of nurturing be havior. In this study, researcher found that a womans oxytocin levels were a good predictor of ac tivation of her brains emotional processing centers and of affec tionate behavior. Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted Study: Caring for a baby changes a mans brain HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Whether their direct caregiving role is full or part time, men have a pattern of activation that is just a little different from womens. But caring for ones baby prompts activity in and communication among the same brain circuits, whether a man or a woman is doing it.

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 LESLIE BARKERMCTDALLAS When it comes to success in sports, the rst need that probably comes to mind is the obvious: tal ent. But with softball and baseball seasons in full swing, its good to be reminded that suc cess requires one other must-have element: teamwork. It all comes out in performance, says Yolanda Bruce Brooks. The Dallas psycholo gist, whose background includes serving as se nior director of play er development for the National Basketball Association, has worked extensively with coach es and athletes at all lev els. The coach can have all the talent in the world, she says. But theres no guarantee of success if team mem bers arent working to gether to pool their tal ents. Creating cohesion is a bit of an art, a delicate combination of happenstance and chemistry, serendipity and nesse. Think of a basket of market-fresh foods, or a jumble of musical notes. Delicious and pure on their own, they dont always meld into a meal or a composition. Talent isnt enough, Brooks says. There are so many elements that go into it. Is that per son a good team play er? Will that person help players on the team be come better than who they are? Its about play ers, mind-set, working with others as a team. You dont have to be friends or best buddies, but you have to gure out a way to get together. Successful teams usu ally share three traits, she says: Common cause. Ev eryone is working to ward the same goal, she says. Mind-set. Youre focused on achieving that goal. They call it fa miliarity for the great est good, Brooks says. You know you wont stand alone and achieve goals. Everyone is there to support you. Creating the ow or synchronicity. Successful teams learn to work together as one. Those are things you need to create a solid, cohesive team, she says, whether in sports, business or the military. Peyton Harris adds others: communication and longevity. Communication is a big key, says Harris, who has played on the Jack Wagons since the Dallas softball teams inception ve years ago. Its not like we sit around and strategize, though. A big part of it is just playing together for so long. For almost 10 years, Richard Danielson has worked with softball teams in Plano, Texas. Some are competitive; some play just for fun. The teams that work, that develop a bond, those whose camaraderie is palpable even to the casual observer tend to be both orga nized and altruistic. Why are you out there? If youre out there to show youre the best individual softball play er in the world, maybe thats detrimental to the team as a whole, says Danielson, adult sports supervisor for the city of Plano. If you nd a good mix of people who enjoy playing together and are willing to sac rice individual accolades for working with the team, youre able to have a better group. That works for the Jack Wagons. Everybody holds himself accountable and knows the others will hold themselves ac countable, too, says Harris, whose team has already won one tour nament this year. One of the biggest points weve driven home is that its important to hit your cutoff man instead of having some guy trying to show off his arm and throw the ball home. Coaches play a significant role in how well this works, Danielson says. If you can have a coach who treats each player as a special indi vidual and nds a place for him to be on that team and contribute in a meaningful way, youll have a better team over all as opposed to one who says, I have my team here. One pitch es, one catches, one plays shortstop and the rest we dont talk to, he says. A good coach unites the team by treating players differently but equally, says Scott Martin, professor of sport and exercise psy chology at the University of North Texas. Are you as a coach preparing each player to be the best they can be and not coaching to the person you used to be as a young pl ay er? he says. Some of the coaches I know are some of the best psy chologists I know. Good coaches make sure people understand how im portant their contribution is. That contribution doesnt necessarily mean being the star, Brooks says. Not by any means. With talented play ers, you see this disrup tion most, she says. The coach puts every thing into that player. The rules are different; theres a higher toler ance for things not tol erated with other play ers. When that happens, she says, youre under mining team cohesive ness. In strong teams, each player has a role, wheth er being captain or giv ing the pregame prayer or motivational speech. Who are the people who will be the goto in the crunch? she says. Who are the energizers? If theyre not pumped up, you can see the energy of the team plummet. 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Now I can eat what I want, worry free!rf nftbfr tfrr rt ffn r tt f nrnfr tf tn t rr r t rn t f rttb MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg.Exp. 06/30/2014 How to create a winning team on the field or anywhere else ANDY JACOBSOHN / MCT Everybody holds himself accountable and knows the others will hold themselves accountable, too, says the Jack Wagons Peyton Harris, right.

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, June 2, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, June 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C11 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg Golf CarAccessible www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, June 2, the 153rd day of 2014. There are 212 days left in the year. On this date: In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that the report of my death was an exaggeration. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 2, 2014: This year you say what you feel in a direct yet charming way. You often discover that life has a surprise for you waiting just around the corner. When youre upset, you tend to withdraw. Communication is one of your strengths. Remember to be sensitive with your tone of voice, as your words could carry a lot of anger in the way they are expressed. If you are single, someone you meet from mid-July on could be signicant in your daily life. You will meet this person in your daily travels. If you are attached, you are more direct about your feelings. You might opt to take a couples class with your signicant other. By next year at this time, you will be much closer to your sweetie. LEO can be proud, and he or she always demands to be on center stage. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your creativity surges and adds an interesting touch to whatever you do. A partner has been on the warpath the past few months, so choose your words with care. Buy a token of affection for this person. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Do not push someone too far, as you could get an unusually strong reaction. Maintaining an even pace will be difcult. Investing in your home will be an even better idea than you originally might have thought. Refuse to get cornered in an argument. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Count on your intuition to take the lead should you become insecure when dealing with one of the many people you count on. Just listen to your inner voice, and you will be ne. A child or loved one will express caring toward you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Stay on top of your nances. A mistake made right now could be rather costly. You also might need to get several estimates before doing some work on your home. Dont just assume that the cheapest way is to do it yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll feel empowered and ready to tackle any task that might appear. A situation with a boss could demand extra time and attention. This person likes to demonstrate how much power he or she has. Dont take this personally. Handle what you must. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might want to see a situation in a new light. First, determine how much your innate prejudices could be affecting your perspective. Use care with spending, as you might be inclined to go to extremes nancially as you process an emotional matter. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Youll want to get through a problem quickly. Be careful as to how assertive you are. Your actions could make someone more defensive than need be. Be gentle with handling an important emotional tie. The unexpected could occur with a partner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Approach forthcoming news with an eye toward making the right decision, and others will follow your lead. A partner might share some deep insight into what is going on. Have a long-overdue discussion. Someone might be quite controlling. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to look at a situation that surrounds a potential trip. You have a unique way of handling pressure, and you will use this skill in a meeting. Be more forthright in how you deal with a problem. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You could be worn out by a sequence of events that emerge from out of the blue. Know when to push back and say enough. A partner will ll in for you, should you request it. A child or new friend could become quite controlling. Detach some. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could be taking on too much, even for you. Allow greater give-and-take within a relationship. News from a distance will be exhilarating, but think before rushing into action. You might be looking at some long-term ramications. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Dive into work, and get as much done as possible. Everyone has his or her limits, and you are no different. Someone might want to be a more active leader and have more control. How do you feel about the situation? What works best for you? HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I am a young, recently married woman. My husband and I are about at the point where were thinking of having kids. My brother married a close friend of mine soon after my wedding, and my sister-in-law has a medical condition that may prevent her from having children. I am very close to my brother and his wife, and I can see the writing on the wall. She has mentioned surrogacy once in passing, as a possible alternative if she cant have kids. If I am asked to be the sur rogate, what advice do you have? Id be more than willing to consider it, but only after my husband and I have had our own children. If I do it, would it be selsh of me to expect some compensation for my time and the toll it will take on my body? I want to be ready if and when Im asked. What would be the best way to explain my reasoning to her? BACKUP MOM IN THE NORTHWEST DEAR BACKUP: You may be jumping the gun, because you do not yet know how your body will tolerate a pregnancy. Not all women have easy pregnancies, and if youre one of them, you may be less willing to be a surrogate. As to monetary compensation for wear and tear, thats a question you should ask a lawyer because compensation may not be allowed in the state in which you reside. You, together with your brother and sister-in-law, should also discuss with a mental health professional the emotional issues that may arise such as everyones expectations about what will happen when the baby ar rives, what might happen if there is a death, a divorce, a move, and what your role would be whether you will be the birth mother or a legal aunt, etc. All of this should be claried if your sister-in-law asks you to be her surrogate. DEAR ABBY: I recently retired for the second time. At 70, I applied for a job online, was interviewed by a company and hired. I could hardly believe it. Three years later, I was having a medical problem, so I thought it best to retire again if I couldnt do the work I was hired to do. After a month of rest I feel ne now. My husband thinks I was over worked. I want to get another job. Abby, why do I feel the need to still work? Most of my friends tell me to enjoy life, sit back and relax, but my work dened me and I loved it. Shouldnt I try working again if my health continues to improve? NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE IN GEORGIA DEAR NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE: Not every one is happy in retirement. Some people need the routine of work and the stimulation of being around other people. Also, not everyone ages at the same rate. However, its important to listen to your body and pace yourself. Theres a saying, You can fool Mother Nature, but you cant fool Father Time. If your last job drained you to the point of illness, choose something that is less taxing (either full-time or parttime). Youll enjoy your life and last longer if you do. DEAR ABBY: I am a Brit, now living in the U.S. When, upon departing, someone says, Have a good one! what is the correct response? PUZZLED IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR PUZZLED: Some people respond, Thanks, the same to you. Others have been known to say, Thanks, Im already having one! The important thing is to always say thank you.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Wife has much to consider before agreeing to surrogacy JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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