Daily Commercial

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00019282:00229


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

FSU IS No. 4 SEED AT NCCA TOURNAMENT, SPORTS B1 UKRAINE: Kiev orders airstrike against pro-Russian rebels in Donetsk A10 BUDGET: Leesburg may offer early retirement to lower costs A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Tuesday, May 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 147 2 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED B7 COMICS B6 CROSSWORDS B7 DIVERSIONS B5 LEGALS B7 NATION A9 OBITUARIES A4 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 WORLD A10 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12. 91 / 71 Partly sunny and stormy 50 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Thomas Giallella, di agnosed at 3 years old with acute lympho blastic leukemia, spent most of his childhood in and out of hospi tals undergoing test af ter test, procedure after procedure. Giallellas prognosis was glum. He was told repeatedly that if he survived, his academ ic future would most likely be unexception al because he would lose about 16 IQ points from the intense che motherapy sessions. Giallella said a study he participated in with the University of Mi ami, which measured his post-cancer treat ment IQ, put him at a level indicating mental retardation in process ing skills. He was told if he sur vived, hed probably be shorter than aver age and would lack the coordination needed to play sports or par ticipate in physically strenuous activities. I remember going to the hospital but I dont remember much about it hurting or anything like that, Thomas said. I also remember peo ple being worried and not understanding why. Now I do, but back then I didnt. Thomas said he sometimes reects on an F he received for an in elementa ry school. The assign ment was to write a non-ctional essay, so he wrote about his own experiences and all he went through as a child. I got my essay back and there was a big red F on the top of it with a note from the teacher that said, Non-ction al means real, Thom as said with a smile. I wrote a note back to the teacher and said, It MINNEOLA Cancer survivor hopes to serve as a beacon for others ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cancer survivor Thomas Giallella wants to become a pediatric oncologist so he can help other kids struggling with the disease. MICHELLE FAUL Associated Press ABUJA, Nigeria Nigerias military has located nearly 300 school girls abducted by Islamic extremists but fears using force to try to free them could get them killed, the countrys chief of defense said Monday. Air Marshal Alex Badeh told dem onstrators supporting the much crit icized military that Nigerian troops can save the girls. But he added, we cant go and kill our girls in the name of trying to get them back. He spoke to thousands of demon strators who marched to Defense Ministry headquarters in Abuja, the capital. Many were brought in on buses, indicating it was an organized event. Asked by reporters where they had found the girls, Badeh refused to elaborate. We want our girls back. I can tell you we can do it. Our military can do it. But where they are held, can we go with force? he asked the crowd. People roared back, No! If we go with force what will hap pen? he asked. They will die, the demonstrators said. Badeh said no one should criticize the military. Nobody should come and say the Nigerian military does not know what it is doing. We know what we are doing, he insisted. Nigerias military and government have faced national and internation al outrage over their failure to rescue the girls seized by Boko Haram mil itants from a remote northeastern school six weeks ago. President Goodluck Jonathan was forced this month to accept inter national help. American planes have been searching for the girls and Brit ain, France, Israel and other coun tries have sent experts in surveillance and hostage negotiation. The U.S. State Department had no immediate comment on the reports about the missing Nigerian girls. Jonathans reluctance to accept of fered help for weeks is seen as unwill ingness to have outsiders looking in on what is considered a very corrupt AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T ampa resident Patrick Waruinge Gachau said Memorial Day and the ceremony at the Florida National Cemetery help him heal after losing his son in Iraq in 2005. This is part of the heal ing, for me, Gachau said. And I come here and meet with the rest of the parents and see Im not alone. Its a healing for me and I feel very proud that the community and every body supports this occa sion. That means a lot for me. Gachau was by his sons grave Monday during the Florida National Cemetery Memorial Day Ceremony near Bushnell. He said his son, Kevin Gachau Waruinge, joined in 2001 and served two tours in Iraq. He said his son moved to the United States from Kenya when he was nine years old and was motivated to join the military by his patriotism. Im proud because he died doing what he loved to do, Gachau said. Gachau said his son felt that the United States was his home. He came to love it. Out of that love thats how he decided to serve in the military, Gachau said. Gachau said his other son is now at West Point, motivated by his brother. He wanted to go and nish what he did, Gachau said. Dean Coleman, from Hernando Beach, said his son, Justin Dean Coleman, died in Afghanistan on July 24, 2009. Todays for people like my son, Coleman said. Dean said Justin was his only child and that he tries to come every year to set up his sons grave so SEE GRAD | A2 BUSHNELL AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Patrick Waruinge Gachau poses at his sons grave in the Florida National Cemetery on Memorial Day. BRUCE ACKERMAN / OCALA STAR-BANNER American ags for Memorial Day are shown at grave sites of veterans in Section 323 in the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Members of the American Legion Riders Chapter 219 surround the Shiloh Cemetery Memorial Day ceremony in Fruitland Park on Monday. Part of the healing Families gather to honor their loved ones service and sacrifice Thats why we have our freedom, because of them. Dean Coleman, whose son died in Afghanistan President Obama leads ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery. See Page A9 Nigeria: Abducted girls found SEE CEREMONIES | A10 SEE NIGERIA | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 is real. She changed it to an A++. Now 18, Thomas be lieves that difcult child hood shaped him to face lifes obstacles head on with gritty determina tion. The nearly 6 foottall former baseball player, president of the National Honor Society and vice president of the Key Club, will graduate 10th in his class of 365 students at Lake Minne ola High School with a 4.6 weighted grade point average. He has received an ac ademic scholarship to attend the UCF to study bio medical science and is looking forward to be coming a pediatric on cologist so he can help other kids struggling with cancer. Thom as is considered cured from cancer but annual checkups still have doc tors amazed at how far hes come, he said. Im still here, thats the main thing, but I was supposed to be short and I grew, he said. I wasnt supposed to be able to do well in school and I did. I wasnt sup posed to be able to be coordinated enough to play sports but I picked up on baseball really quickly. My parents never told me to stop when I tried anything or told me I couldnt do something. They always support ed anything I did and were very good at treat ing me like a normal kid. Thats why I never listen to people when they tell me I cant do anything. Jill Fornoles, Thom as guidance counsel or at LMHS, said Thom as is an inspiration to her and others because of his positive attitude and conviction. She said if Thomas runs into a roadblock, he nds a way around it. Hes also wants to help others, as evident by the 324 hours of volunteer time he completed this year. I think its amazing that anyone can over come cancer to begin with, but to see some one like Thomas and see the person he is today, is motivational, Fornoles said. Thomas mom Mindy Giallella, an elementary school teacher at Minne ola Charter School, said she, her husband and two daughters are are proud of Thomas and cant wait to see how far hell go in life. Sometimes, Min dy said, she nds her self looking at Thomas in admiration. He nev er losing hope and re mains strong through the toughest of days. She recalled his intensity on the baseball diamond. I would be watch ing him as he picked up the baseball bat then stand there waiting for the ball to be pitched to him, she said. He al ways looked so deter mined and as he swung the bat, I couldnt help think sometimes that, My Gosh, hes alive and hes doing this, and it was just overwhelming. Thomas will not waste time after graduation to get started on the next chapter of his life, either. Although his college ori entation is not until June 5, hes moving to Orlan do immediately to begin looking for a job. Thomas said he is ea ger to start college and cant wait to reach the point where he will be able to encourage chil dren going through what he did and let ting them know that the odds can be beat, some thing he got a taste of last summer as a coun selor at Camp Bog gy Creek a summer camp for children with disabilities or serious ill nesses. I met this little boy with Spina Bida and I got to talking to him about his sickness, Thomas said. He didnt think Id understand but I told him I would since Id been through it, too. It ended up that for the whole week, we did things hed never done before because peo ple always told him he couldnt because he might get hurt. We went swimming and sh ing, and even though they were in modied ways, he was so happy and proud of himself. He took on a whole new personality. It was a lot of fun to see him do that and thats what I want to do as an oncologist; give children and par ents going through can cer some hope, and liv ing proof, that maybe it has to be a certain way for them or maybe it doesnt. IF YOU GO LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION WHEN: 8 p.m. Friday. WHERE: The LMHS football stadium, 101 north Hancock Road, Minneola. GRADUATES: 365 VALEDICTORIAN: Kaelyn Peacock SALUTATORIAN: Marcela Sierra-Arce HOW TO REACH US MAY 26 CASH 3 ............................................... 0-6-0 Afternoon .......................................... 4-3-3 PLAY 4 ............................................. 9-4-3-9 Afternoon ....................................... 9-6-7-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY MAY 25 FANTASY 5 ........................... 4-12-19-21-31 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. GRAD FROM PAGE A1 force. Soldiers have told The Associated Press that they are not properly paid, are dumped in dangerous bush with no supplies and that the Boko Haram extremists holding the girls are better equipped than they are. Some soldiers have said ofcers enriching themselves off the de fense budget have no in terest in halting the veyear-old uprising that has killed thousands. Soldiers near mutiny earlier this month red on the car of a command ing ofcer come to pay his respects to the bodies of 12 soldiers who their colleagues said were un necessarily killed by the insurgents in a nighttime ambush. The military also is ac cused of killing thousands of detainees held illegal ly in their barracks, some by shooting, some by tor ture and many starved to death or asphyxiated in overcrowded cells. More than 300 teenag ers were abducted from their school in the town Chibok on April 15. Police say 53 escaped on their own and 276 remain cap tive. A Boko Haram video has shown some of the girls reciting Quranic verses in Arabic and two of them explaining why they had converted from Christi anity to Islam in captivity. Unveried reports have indicated two may have died of snake bites, that some have been forced to marry their abductors and that some may have been carried across bor ders into Chad and Cam eroon. Boko Haram the nickname means West ern education is sinful believes Western in uences have corrupt ed Nigerian society and want to install an Islam ic state under strict Shari ah law, though the popu lation 170 million people is divided almost equally between Christians and Muslims. NIGERIA FROM PAGE A1 GBENGA OLAMIKAN / AP Nigerias chief of defense staff Air Marshal Alex S. Badeh, center, speaks during a demonstration calling on the government to rescue the kidnapped girls in Abuja, Nigeria. TOM MURPHY Associated Press The wild hikes in health insurance rates that blindsided many Amer icans in recent years may become less frequent because of the health care overhaul. Final rates for 2015 wont be out for months, but early lings from insur ers suggest price increases of 10 per cent or more. That may sound like a lot, but rates have risen as much as 20 or 30 percent in recent years. The rates that emerge over the next few months for 2015 will carry con siderable political weight, since they will come out before Republicans and Democrats settle their ght for Congressional control in next falls midterm elections. Republicans are vowing to make failures of the law a main theme of their election push, and abnormally high premiums might bolster their argument. In addition to insuring millions of uninsured people, the other great promise of the massive health care overhaul was to tame the rate hikes that had become commonplace in the market for individual insurance coverage. No one expects price increases to go away, but some nonpartisan in dustry watchers say they do expect the big hikes to hit less frequently in the years to come, even though its still early in the laws implementa tion. They point to competition and greater scrutiny fostered by the law as key factors. Public insurance exchanges that debuted last fall and were created by the law make it easier for customers to compare prices. The overhaul also prevents insurers from rejecting cus tomers because of their health. That means someone who de velops a health condition like high blood pressure isnt stuck in the same plan year after year because other insurers wont take her. She can now shop around. The Urban Institute, a nonparti san policy research organization, said in a recent report that competi tion will help restrain individual in surance prices next year. And it could have a lasting impact once the new markets for coverage stabilize in a few years, said Larry Levitt, an insurance expert with the Kaiser Family Foundation, which analyzes health policy issues. Now if a plan tries to raise premi ums a lot, people can vote with their feet and move to another plan, Lev itt said. Greater scrutiny by regulators could also keep rates from skyrock eting. The overhaul requires a man datory review of rate increases larg er than 10 percent, which can lead to public attention that insurers dont want. Nobodys going to get a rate in crease unless they truly deserve it, said Dave Axene, a fellow of the So ciety of Actuaries, who is working with insurers in several states to g ure out pricing. The rigor that we had to go through to prove that the rates were reasonable, its worse than an IRS audit at times. To be sure, insurers and others in the eld say its too early to ful ly understand what pricing trends will emerge for individual insur ance plans, which make up a small slice of the insured population. And some experts arent convinced of any one outcome of the law. Industry consultant Bob Laszews ki called the idea that the exchang es will reign in prices by promoting competition an unproven theory. No one has any idea what this risk really looks like yet and proba bly wont for two to three years, he said. Karen Ignagni agrees. The CEO of the trade association Americas Health Insurance Plans, which rep resents insurers, said competition between insurers will mean little if too many sick people sign up for coverage on the exchanges. Insur ers need a balance between sick and healthy people to avoid big claim hits that lead to future rate hikes. Laszewski expects some plans to seek either big premium increases or decreases in 2015, but he says that says nothing about the long-term im plications of the overhaul. He noted that insurers entered 2014 without a good feel for what their competitors would charge, so price swings are in evitable as companies adjust. Insurance rate hikes may be tamed AP FILE PHOTO Navigator John Jones explains the many options to a client seeking help buying health insurance at the Family Guidance Center in Springeld, Ill.

PAGE 3

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Nature lovers invited to bird and butterfly surveys Outdoor enthusiasts are invited to take part in two opportunities in June to survey birds and butteries, led by park rangers for a Bird and Buttery Survey and hike through two of Lake Countys parks and preserves on June 7 at Ellis Acres Reserve, 25302 County Road 42, in Paisley, and June 14 at the Pasture Reserve, 5144 Lake Erie Road, Groveland, both are from 7:30 to 11 a.m. Knowledge of common species is a plus but not required, and the event includes hiking about two miles on unpaved trails. Online registration is recom mended and is available at www. lakecountygov/parks or by call ing the Parks and Trials Division at 352-253-4950. BUSHNELL Third annual Pioneer Day kids Camp coming Kids ages, 8-12 years can take part in the third annual Pioneer Day Camp at historic Dade Battleeld in Bushnell beginning June 9. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., through June 13 with Seminole Pioneer crafts, games, food, hands-on demonstrations, re enactors and more at the park, 7200 County Road 603 in Bushnell. Cost is $75 per child and registra tion and payment is available on line at www.dadebattleeld.com, or Call Kristin Wood at 352-793-4781 or email to Kristin.n.wood@dep.state. .us for information. SUMTERVILLE GED summer boot camp available in Sumter Sumter County Adult and Community Education Centers will host a GED summer boot camp on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings from 5 to 9 p.m. beginning on June 3, 200 Cleveland Ave. in Wildwood. Sumterville classes will run on the same days from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The four-week camps will end June 26 with participants taking the GED test in Wildwood on June 27 and June 30. Classes are $45 with proof of Florida residency required. Call 352-793-5719, ext. 54200 or go to aec.sumter.k12..us. MOUNT DORA Pat Burkes Hoops Summer Camps begin in June Boys and girls ages 7-13 can take part in a basketball camp hosted by six-time European champion and NBA player Pat Burke at respec tive camps beginning June 9-13 at Mount Dora High School. Other dates for the camps are: July 7-11, also at Mount Dora High School; June 23-27 at Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont; and July 14-18 also at Windy Hill Middle School. For details and registration, go to www.orlandobasketballtrain ing.com or call Pat Burkes Hoops Training Facility, 1178 Camp Ave., in Mount Dora at 352-385-0131. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Leesburg ofcials are looking for ways to save money as they prepare the 2015 budget, and one option the commission will consider tonight is offering a one-time voluntary early retirement incentive plan for up to 54 eligible city employees, who are at least 50 years of age and have served at least 20 years with the city. The board will hear public com ments on the plan at todays 5:30 p.m. meeting on the third oor of Leesburg City Hall. William Spinelli, the citys nance director, claims personnel costs make up 67 percent of the citys gen eral fund expenses. A Voluntary Early Retirement In centive Plan (VERIP) is an effective way to realize signicant personnel savings, while providing a reason able and humane inducement to re duce the size and cost of the existing workforce, Spinelli said in the agen da memo, noting it could result in total personnel savings of $206,849 in the rst year, which the savings would compound in future years. However, Spinelli said the city does THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com The Memorial Day week end soapbox race was can celed because CM Box Car Racing was unable to af ford permits or meet oth er requirements imposed on them by Minneola and Lake County Sheriffs Of ce. The club president now hopes 35 young driv ers will race in the fall. John Bomm, president of CM Box Car Racing, has been involved in soapbox races throughout Florida and the East Coast for eight years. He said the cars for the holiday race had been prepared, inspected, and safety precautions were also in place at the down hill track of private prop erty along Mountain Hill Drive. Bomm had permis sion from the homeown ers for the event, so he was surprised to be told by of cials that a special events permit was needed for the Mountain Hill Drive site. I did not think that I needed permits on pri vate property, Bomm said in an e-mail, recall ing his mid-May meeting with ofcials. Just so you understand, Lake Coun ty Sheriff (Gary Borders) was the one that stopped the race and told us that race will not happen at all on Mountain Club Drive. Not at all. Then the may or said he will honor what the sheriff said. The sheriffs ofce did not respond to an e-mail from the Daily Commercial seek ing comment, yet Bomm said hes now looking into other cities in Lake County to host the race, including Clermont and Eustis. With some 40-plus cars in the garage, I need to nd someone that really wants this, and I feel Minneo la does not, Bomm said. How can a city shut down an event for kids? It shows me they do not care about the kids feelings. Bomm is now moving forward with plans for a race in September or Oc tober, which he believes will be cooler weather and better for the young racers and their cars. We love children and we will work to accomplish this, he said in the e-mail, noting kids and their par ents were upset that the Memorial Day weekend race had come to a halt. BILL THOMPSON Halifax Media Griup A committee from the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs is ex pected to visit Ocala on June 20 as part of the site-selection process for a new veterans home that would serve former service people within a 75-mile radius. The stop in Oca la is one of a hand ful the panel will make next month in whittling down the list of poten tial homes for the $17 million facility. Besides Marion Coun ty, the group will trav el in June to Lake Al fred and Bartow in Polk County, Port St. Lucie in St. Lucie County and Palatka in neighboring Putnam County. It was unclear when the com mittee would visit lo cations in Collier and Manatee counties, the remaining nalists for the facility. While in Ocala next month, the FDVA com mittee will tour a 20acre parcel at the inter section of Southwest 80th Avenue and 80th Street. The site is within the On Top of the World community, whose de veloper, Kenneth Colen, has offered to donate the land to help Marion County win the project. County staff recent ly issued invitations to the event to federal, state and local elected ofcials who represent Marion County. Yet county Veterans Services Department Director Jeffrey Askew wants a major show of support from all people. If everybody could come out, it would be great, Askew said in an LEESBURG Retirement plan could aid city budget New vets home may be coming to Ocala MINNEOLA Local soapbox racers looking for new track PHOTOS COURTESY OF CM BOX CAR RACING After a Memorial Day race was cancelled, CM Box Car Racing President John Bomm hopes 35 racers will take part in an event this fall. COURTESY CM BOX RACING The cost to sponsor a car is $800 for the rst year and $300 for each year after. BILL DIPAOLO The Palm Beach Post JUPITER Standing on the wood deck of their mobile home, Sam and Marcia Arsenault can toss a shing line into the tur quoise water of the Jupiter Inlet and watch sailboats drift past the Jupiter Light house. When we rst walked back here, my mouth fell open. I couldnt believe how beautiful it is. We looked at each other and said, This is the place we want to live, said Mar cia, 73, a former resident of Danvers, Mass. But the days of water Funky waterfront mobile park faces redevelopment THOMAS CORDY / AP Nenita Tobias, known as Grandma to residents of Suni Sands mobile home park in Jupiter, stops for a photo on her mail pickup route near the entrance to the park on Wednesday. SEE PLAN | A4 SEE DERBY | A4 SEE HOME | A4 SEE SUNI SANDS | A4

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 OBITUARIES Sadie M. Lee Sadie M. Lee, 80, of Leesburg, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, May 25, 2014. She enjoyed her career as a registered nurse for 34 years, during that time she was a Direc tor of Nursing at many different facilities. She attended First Bap tist Church of Fruit land Park and was a loy al member for 28 years; she served as the Di rector of Food Service Ministries and on many other committees, she also enjoyed singing in the choir. Sadie also en joyed photography and was very supportive of her ve sons in athlet ics. Sadie is survived by her husband, John H. Lee of 53 years of Fruit land Park, ve sons, Samuel (Susan) Rixie of Fruitland Park; Lavelle (Ellen) Rixie of Mt Dora; Dennis E. Rixie of Lees burg; Don (Kathy) Rix ie of Leesburg; David (Tina) Lee of Tavares; 14 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren; sisters Leona Davis, of Gray, GA; Peggy Sykes, of Mobile, AL; Judy Ne smith, of High Spring, FL; brother, Lawrence Johnson of Mascott with many nieces and nephews. Visitation will be Thursday, May 29, from 6:00 to 8:00pm at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg. Ser vices will be held at Heritage Community Church, Fruitland Park on Friday, May 30, 2014 at 1:30 PM with Pas tor Sidney Brock ofci ating. Burial will follow at Lone Oak Cemetery, Leesburg. Online con dolences may be left at www.beyersfuneral home.com. Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory, in charge of arrangements. Lutie Deane Self Walker Lutie Deane Self Walker, 85, of Fruit land Park, FL passed from this life into eter nity Wednesday, May 21, 2014 in Leesburg. Born in Lynchburg, VA, Deane was a beloved wife, mother, grand mother and homemak er. She volunteered for 23 years as a member of the Leesburg Region al Medical Center Auxil iary. She was married to the late Harry M. Walk er of Fruitland Park. Deane is survived by her daughter, Janet Walker, of Fruitland Park; sons and daughters-in-law, Andrew Walker (Lin da) of Bonita Springs, FL; Richard Walker of Adamsville, FL; Thom as Walker (Dana) of Spring Hill, FL and she was the proud and lov ing grandmother of ve grandchildren. A me morial service will be held Friday, May 30th at 11:00 am at Beyers Funeral Home, 1123 W. Main St., Leesburg, fol lowed by graveside ser vices at 1:30 pm at Flor ida National Cemetery in Bushnell. In lieu of owers, the family re quests that donations in Deanes name be made to Not Ashamed Minis try, P.O. Box 208, Fruit land Park, FL 34731. On line condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.comAr rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg, FL. Willie Vern Wright Willie Vern Wright, 71, of Leesburg, passed away May 23, 2014. He was born to the late Willie and Marga ret Wright, November 13, 1942 in Fayetteville, NC. He was a devot ed husband, loving fa ther, grandfather and brother. Vern graduat ed from Livorno Ameri can High School, Livor no Italy. He was married to Linda Ray in 1967 and they lived togeth er in North Carolina be fore settling in Leesburg Florida. Vern started out with North Caroli na telephone company. He remained in that in dustry for 38 years, re ceiving numerous certications and ac creditations and nal ly retiring from Sprint in 2003. Vern is survived by his loving wife Linda, brothers; Ronald Park er of Fayetteville, NC, Doug Wright, Sebring, FL and Danny Wright of Hope Mills, NC, his two children: Jeff Wright of Umatilla, FL and Heath er Stewart of Tampa, FL. He is also survived by his four grandchildren Jordan, Chelsie, Ella and Madison. Visita tion will be held Sunday June 1, 2014 from 2-3:30 with service immedi ately following in the Chapel of Beyers Funer al Home in Leesburg, FL. Online condolenc es may be left at www. beyersfuneralhome. com. Arrangements en trusted to Beyers Funer al Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg, FL. DEATH NOTICES Stephen J. Bleier Stephen J. Bleier, 81, of Sebring, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Angela M. Russell Angela M. Russell, 37, Floral City died Friday, May 23, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Iva J. Wiegand Iva J. Wiegand, 90, of Leesburg, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. IN MEMORY not believe all 54 eli gible workers will take the early retirement, but around 15 to 25 employees may opt to do so. It is assumed that more senior employees with higher paying jobs will take the offer which immediately increas es the savings ratios for the city, the nance di rector said in the memo, noting the city would replace the retired em ployees with employees at the lower end of the pay scale. Spinelli not ed the city also plans to eliminate some jobs by not lling the current vacant positions. Currently, Leesburgs general employees may retire at age 65 with out penalty, yet there is a 3.33 percent annual penalty if they do so be fore age 65. To encour age early voluntary re tirement, Leesburg is waiving the penalty for those with 35 or more years of service. A pen alty of 1.5 percent would faced those with 25 to 30 years of service, with 2 percent facing those with 20 to 25 years. Spinelli noted that by offering the penalty re ductions, expenses ini tially will increase due to more money needed in the retirement plan to cover the early de partures. There are other ini tial expenses in the retirement plan, as well, because Spinel li doesnt see some em ployees with at least 15 years of service ea ger to pay for their own health insurance un til the city picks this up at age 58, according to current policy. Reducing the re tirement penalty is not enough incentive, he said. ... If an employee takes the early retire ment incentive, then the city will have to pick up $400 a month for healthcare costs prior to the age of 58. A single years cost will be $139,000 if all em ployees take advantage of the early retirement incentive. Although Spinelli said the city would also have to pay for any un used paid time off due to employees retiring early, he believes the city would still bene t with overall savings while also allowing for organizational restruc turing. If the board approves the plan, Spinelli said his staff would return to the commission with a nal report on the exact organization al savings. Eligible employ ees who decide to re tire early would have to provide notice to the citys human resourc es department no lat er than July 1, with re tirement effective on or before Sept. 1. PLAN FROM PAGE A3 We have received great support from approximately 30 dif ferent area merchants donating products we needed to put this race in operations, Bomm said, noting CMC Box DERBY FROM PAGE A3 interview. The countys plan, he added, is to greet the 11-member FDVA committee with a band, offer refreshments and decorate the grounds in military colors. We want over whelming support to try to sell the place be cause we denite ly need it here, Askew said. Local advocates also will get an opportunity to be heard, since FDVA ofcials have said the selection committee will take public com ment during its visit. The FDVA selected Marion as one of 10 nalists for the 120-bed facility back in Febru ary. That list was nar rowed to six once the application process closed on May 14. The FDVA already op erates nursing homes in Daytona Beach, Land O Lakes, Panama City, Pembroke Pines, Port Charlotte and St. Augustine, as well as an assisted-living facility in Lake City. State ofcials say a new nursing home is needed because exist ing ones are full. In addition to serving up to 120 aging military veterans, the project is expected to create 190 new jobs. The federal govern ment will fund 65 per cent of the cost of the nursing home. The state will cover the rest, although local govern ments have been en couraged to contribute beyond just offering shovel-ready land. The FDVA has suggested lo cal governments put $500,000 toward the project, although that was not required to be selected. FDVA ofcials have said the facility is in tended to serve veter ans within a 75-mile ra dius. HOME FROM PAGE A3 Car Racing will also need more funds for the fall event, including spon sors to pay forcible, such as police at $35 an hour. He noted the public can help by getting in volved to help sponsor a car or race. A one-day race with police (on scene) is about $1,900 and two days is $3,500, he said, noting the cost for a car sponsor is $800 for the rst year and $300 for each year after, which covers parts for main tainable and child regis tration fees. To learn more, Bomm can be reached at 352708-4207 or by email at cmboxcarracing@ gmail.com. front living are num bered for Arsenault and the other 200 res idents of Suni Sands Mobile Home Park off State Road A1A, locat ed on 10 of the most prime waterfront acres in northern Palm Beach County. Charles Modica bought the proper ty last summer for $17 million. The Jupiter Is land resident, who has not led any propos als with the town, en visions a historic inn with restaurants and shops. He wants to re furbish the 100-yearold boathouse. There could be docks and a stop for a water taxi. And maybe a swim ming pool that would be open to the public, he said. Im doing my best to work with the Suni Sands residents. I want to let them stay as long as possible, Modica said. Town regulations on the 10-acre property al low up to six residenc es per acre. Buildings could be up to three stories high. Modica could apply for high er density and building heights. Town council approval is required. I want to keep with the funky shing vil lage theme, said Mod ica, referring to the towns plan to build shops, restaurants and residences along A1A between U.S. 1 and Ju piter Beach Road. That funky village theme is evident as soon as a visitor en ters the narrow road into the park. Colorful handmade salaman ders and pelicans dec orate the outside walls of the mobile homes. Unlocked bicycles clutter driveways. Res idents walk past with shing poles on their shoulders. Everybody knows everybody. We look out for each other, Sam Arsenault said. Residents at Suni Sands, who must be at least 55 years old, own their own trailers. They each pay about $600 a month to rent their lots, which in cludes water, sew er, lawn maintenance, trash collection and ca ble. Residents pay their own electric bills. Many, like 85-yearold Doris Smith, say cant afford to leave. She and others say they are unwilling to make any improvements to their mobile homes be cause they are uncer tain about when they must move out. Smith moved to Suni Sands 30 years ago with her husband George from Point Pleasant, N.J. George known as Capt. George to his neighbors died a decade ago. Doris, a friendly woman with a rm handshake, works three days a week do ing food demonstra tions at a local grocery store. Ive got applications in at subsidized hous ing. There is a veyear wait. I dont want to go back up north. I want to stay here year-round. This is my home, Smith said. But Bill Leo, a re tired paving contractor whose parents bought a mobile home in the park in the late 1970s, said residents must be realistic. Its not like Briny Breezes. We dont own the land. This is prime waterfront property. If I can spend another year or two here, I will be happy, said Leo, 67, a full-time resident for 10 years. Modica, who last week visited the park and knocked on res idents doors to talk about his plans, said he wants to work with residents. He wrote a letter dated March 21, 2014, to all residents, inviting them to sign a years lease. Residents now pay on a monthto-month basis. About 30 residents signed, said Steven Burns, Suni Sands operating man ager. Florida law requires mobile-home park res idents get at least six months notice before they are required to leave. Many residents did not sign the lease because they did not believe they would be guaranteed a full year to stay, said Marcia Ar senault. I dont believe that a lease can guarantee us any more time than state law allows, she said. While there is no denite timeline to build, Modica expects development to start in the next several years. When developers stand here and look at Suni Sands, they see Old Port Cove, said resident Tom Ryan, re ferring to the condo minium-marina de velopment in North Palm Beach on U.S. 1. When Suni Sands resi dents look out our win dows, we see old Flor ida. We want to keep it that way. SUNI SANDS FROM PAGE A3

PAGE 5

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PAGE 7

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

PAGE 9

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrfrrf$50 OFFntrbrfbORDERS OF $150 OR MORE$25 OFF CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 PETE YOST Associated Press WASHINGTON Presi dent Barack Obama led the nation in commemorating Memorial Day, declaring the United States has reached a pivotal moment in Afghan istan with the end of war ap proaching. Obama, who returned just hours earlier from a surprise visit with U.S. troops at Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan, paid tribute to those lost in battle there and elsewhere over his tory. He called them patriots who made the ultimate sacri ce for their country. Early this morning, I re turned from Afghanistan, Obama told the audience of several thousand peo ple. Yesterday, I visited with some of our men and women serving there 7,000 miles from home. For more than 12 years, men and women like those I met with have borne the burden of our nations se curity. Now, because of their profound sacrice, because of the progress they have made, were at a pivotal moment. Our troops are coming home. By the end of this year, our war in Afghanistan will nally come to end, the pres ident said to applause. And yesterday at Bagram, and here today at Arlington, we pay tribute to the nearly 2,200 American patriots whove made the ultimate sacrice in Afghanistan. We will hon or them, always. Obama has said it was likely that a small contingent of U.S. forces would stay behind for coun terterrorism missions, as well as to train Afghan security forces. The president made a eet ing reference to the widening scandal involving reports of poor performance by the De partment of Veterans Affairs, which is facing allegations of delayed treatments, and even deaths in Arizona. As weve been reminded in recent days we must do more to keep faith with our veterans and their families, and ensure they get the care and benets and opportuni ties that theyve earned and that they deserve, said the president. These Americans have done their duty, Obama said. They ask nothing more than that our country does ours now and for decades to come, he added, drawing more applause. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, a retired Army general, was among those attending the ceremony. Lawmakers from both par ties have pressed for policy changes and better manage ment at the department. The Arlington remem brance was duplicated in vil lages, towns, cities and coun ties across the country. There was a holiday weekend re union of some of the last sur viving members of the Tuske gee Airmen in upstate New York. More than 3,000 volun teers placed ags at the graves of 120,000 veterans at the Florida National Cemetery. And in Mississippi, the annu al Vicksburg Memorial Day parade was being accompa nied by a wreath-laying cer emony at Vicksburg National Cemetery. In Suffolk, Va., Navy Pet ty Ofcer 1st Class Brian Mc Neal joined those attending Fleet Week. They made the sacrice so everyday citizens dont have to worry about the evils of the world, he said. At Arlington, Obama was joined by rst lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill, at the solemn ceremony across the Potomac River from White House on the hallowed grounds of Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. The re membrance was for the war heroes of yesteryear as well as servicemen and women stationed around the world. It was carried out in idyllic weather under cloudless skies and a brilliant sunshine. The national observance was to be matched by parades, pic nics and speeches across the country. Obama appeared at the cemeterys amphitheater to speak after carrying out the traditional presiden tial wreath-laying, surround ed there by troops in formal dress and hearing the playing of Taps. Obama leads country in celebrating Memorial Day SUSAN WALSH / AP President Barack Obama lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., on Monday. PAUL WISEMAN AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON China may be trying to steal trade secrets from U.S. business es, as federal prose cutors allege. Yet for many U.S. companies, Chinas vast market re mains an irresistible source of business. The Justice Depart ments indictment last week of ve Chi nese military ofcials accused them of try ing to pilfer conden tial information from American companies. But even some of the alleged U.S. corporate victims of the hackers have little incentive to cheer any trade rup ture with China. One, Westinghouse, is building four nucle ar reactors in China. Another, special ty steelmaker Alleghe ny Technologies, oper ates a joint venture in Shanghai. A third, Alcoa, is the biggest foreign inves tor in Chinas alumi num market. Indeed, Alcoa went so far as to downplay Justices charges: No mate rial information was compromised during this incident which CHRISTOPHER WEBER and ALICIA CHANG Associated Press GOLETA, Calif. Colorado movie theater shooter James Holmes. Sandy Hook school at tacker Adam Lanza. And now Elliot Rodger. All were young loners with no criminal histo ry who went on shooting sprees, leaving devastat ed families in their wake. Mass murderers tend to have a history of pent-up frustration and failures, are social ly isolated and venge ful, blaming others for their unhappiness, ex perts say. They all display de luded thinking and a lot of rage about feeling so marginalized, said James Garbarino, a pro fessor of psychology at Loyola University. Since mass killings are extremely rare, schol ars say theres no way to predict who has dead ly intentions, let alone who will reach a break ing point and take ac tion. Past violence is a clue, but in Rodgers case, po lice did not see him as a threat to himself or others during a wel fare check weeks be fore Friday nights ram page near the University of California, Santa Bar bara that left six victims dead and 13 injured. Rodger died of an ap parent self-inicted gunshot wound to the head after a shootout with deputies, ending a night of terror in this tight-knit seaside cam pus community as the semester drew to a close. Pinpointing a mass killer is not an exact science. We dont have a foolproof way of pre dicting who will turn violent, said Risdon Slate, a professor at Florida Southern Col lege. Before Rodger stabbed three male UCSB stu dents in his apartment and cruised around in his black BMW ring at sorority girls and strang ers, he left a trail of You Tube videos and a 140page manifesto ranting against women and couples and lamenting his lack of a sex life. occurred several years ago, the company said. American compa nies are in a delicate position. They want to maintain good rela tions with China, the worlds second-biggest economy and a mar ket where U.S. rms earnings grew near ly 50 percent last year. But theyre also increas ingly fearful of Chinese hackers stealing their trade secrets. Looked that way, the hacking case is going to be positive in opening up the conversation, said Jamian Ronca Spa davecchia, founder of the Oxbow Advisory, which advises compa nies about risks in Chi na and other emerging markets. Its bringing into the open some of the issues U.S. compa nies are facing. Experts say mass murderers are hard to predict Hacking case belies US links with China

PAGE 10

A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 352-253-0059Visitpetlodgeandspa.comIn Leesburg, next to Home DepotDiscover why pet owners trust us for their boarding, day care and grooming needs. Your Miracle Donation will change someones lifeMIRACULOUSTHRIFTSTORE2891 US Hwy. 441/27352-315-0002 Donations are being acceptedVOLUNTEERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY people can see who he was. Coleman said the event is im portant because people need to be remembered, especially the fallen heroes. Thats why we have our freedom, because of them, Coleman said. Herbert Patchett, a World War II and Korean War veteran, was in at tendance Monday at the ceremony. He said he served from 1942 through 1957 and lives in nearby Nobleton. Im thanking all those who gave their lives so that I could be free, Patchett said. He added his wife, who did not serve, is buried at the cemetery. Major General Michael Plehn was the keynote speaker at the ceremo ny. According to the U.S. Air Forces website, Plehn is the Principal Di rector for Middle East Policy in the Ofce of the Under Secretary of De fense for Policy. April Warren of the Ocala Star-Banner reported that more than 3,000 volunteers placed small American ags near the 120,000 graves of veterans and their spous es in the cemetery on Sunday. The story states that the ags are be cause of the Flags for Fallen Vets nonprot and that this is the rst time this has happened at the cem etery on Memorial Day. The ags will stay at the cemetery until Thursday, according to the Star-Banner Other Memorial Day events in cluded an event organized by Amer ican Legion Post 219 that took place at Shiloh Cemetery in Fruitland Park, an event at the Waterfront Pa vilion in Clermont, a picnic in Cl ermont put on by American Legion Post 55, and the Water Oaks Memo rial Day ceremony in Lady Lake. CEREMONIES FROM PAGE A1 CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lloyd Thorne and Gerry Dufresne lay a wreath during the Water Oaks Memorial Day ceremony in Lady Lake. LINDA CHARLTON / DAILY COMMERCIAL Allen Venezio plays taps at the Memorial Day ceremonies at Waterfront Park in Clermont. PETER LEONARD Associated Press DONETSK, Ukraine Ukraines presi dent-elect said Mon day he wants to begin talks with Moscow and end a pro-Russia insur gency in the east, but the rebels escalated the conict by occupying a major airport, and the government in Kiev re sponded with an air strike. As darkness fell in Do netsk, a city of about 1 million, it was unclear who was in control of the airport. Hundreds of ghters of the sep aratist Donetsk Peo ples Republic had been brought by trucks to a wooded area on the fringes of the airport, many of them armed with rocket-propelled grenade launchers and automatic ries. At least one warplane streaked over the city, ring ares, and explosions were heard from the di rection of the airport. The rebels, who de clared independence for Donetsk and the neighboring Luhansk region after a hasti ly called and dubious referendum two weeks ago, regarded Sundays election of candy ty coon Petro Poroshen ko as president to be il legitimate. In a victory speech, the billionaire promised to open a dialogue with res idents of eastern Ukraine and to guarantee their rights. The rebels and many others in the region say they fear the Febru ary ouster of pro-Mos cow President Viktor Ya nukovych will lead to the repression of its predom inantly Russian-speaking population by Ukrainian nationalists. Poroshenko also said he would not negotiate with armed insurgents that he calls terrorists. Peace can only be achieved through a di alogue with people, he said Monday. This pro cess cannot be stopped with the use of arms only; arms can be used exclusively against kill ers and terrorists. Russia has heavi ly criticized an offen sive by Ukraines mili tary against the rebels, and Poroshenko indi cated he wants it to end quickly. The anti-terrorist operation cannot and should not last two or three months, he said. It should and will last hours. But aggression by reb els, as at the Donetsk air port, could make it im possible for Ukrainian forces to back off. News reports said scores of armed insur gents descended on the airport about 3 a.m., and all ights were can celed. Heavy gunre broke out, Ukrainian ghter jets and helicop ters ew overhead, and dense black smoke rose in the air. VADIM GHIRDA / AP Pro-Russian insurgents aim their ries during ghting around the airport on Monday outside Donetsk, Ukraine. Ukraine launches airstrike on pro-Moscow rebels NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press ABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE Pope Francis announced Monday he would meet soon with a group of sex abuse vic tims at the Vatican and declared zero toler ance for any member of the clergy who would violate a child. Francis also revealed that three bishops are currently under investi gation by the Vatican for abuse-related reasons, though it wasnt clear if they were accused of committing abuse itself or of having covered it up. There are no privi leges, he told reporters en route back to Rome from Jerusalem. The meeting with a half-dozen victims will mark the rst such en counter for the pope, who has been criticized by victims for not ex pressing personal soli darity with them when he has reached out to other people who suf fer. Francis said the meeting and a Mass at the Vatican hotel where he lives would take place early next month, but ofcials suggest ed the date hadnt been pinned down. On this issue we must go forward, for ward. Zero tolerance, Francis said, calling abuse of children an ugly crime that be trays God. Francis spoke to re porters for nearly an hour after his grueling, three-day trip to Jordan, the West Bank and Is rael, taking all 11 ques tions posed and re sponding with candor and occasional humor. He said he would travel to Sri Lanka and the Philippines in Jan uary 2015. And he sug gested that he might follow in emeritus Pope Benedict XVIs footsteps and retire if he no lon ger had the strength to do the job. We need to look at him as an institution: he opened a door, the door of emeritus popes, Francis said. Only God knows if there will be others, but the door is open. If and when the time comes, he said, I will do what the Lord tells me to do, pray and try to nd Gods will. But I think that Benedict XVI wasnt a unique case. ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis places an envelope in on of the cracks between the stones of the Western Wall, the holiest place where Jews can pray, on Monday in the old city of Jerusalem. Pope Francis to meet with sex abuse victims, cites zero tolerance

PAGE 11

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I f your phone is smarter than you, it is not time to get a new phone: Its time to get a new life. Many of us have more inti mate relationship with our de vices than we have with mem bers of our immediate family. Were more attached to our de vices, more fond of them, re sponsive to them and attuned to every nuance of their tiny, soul less selves than we are to, say, our rst cousins. We remember the day we got our rst computer or iPad but forget the exact year our neph ew got married. We know how to upload apps but dont have a current mailing address for our best friend from high school. Weve bookmarked cute pup py-meets-dolphin videos from HappyPlace but erased the performance by our neighbor when she sang in the community theater production of The Fan tasticks. We know how to play Candy Crush but we dont know how to make folks feel comfortable by talking to them when they enter a room; we know how to Insta gram our meal but have lost the art of making conversation over dinner. Ill admit that I have a severe allergic reaction to seeing peo ple using electronic devices at meals. Its like being allergic to nuts. Actually, as far as Im con cerned, it is being allergic to nuts. Ive seen whole groups sitting around a lovely table at a nice restaurant where every fami ly member, ages 7 to 70, is hold ing a square piece of plastic, eyes down, thumbs going like mad (OK, Grandpa might be using a stylus) and saying, in terms of spoken language, exactly noth ing. Zip. Zero. Nada. Its un nerving, right? If youre at a ta ble nearby, you nd yourself speaking in low voices because the groups almost looks lost in prayer, heads bowed as if their devices were hymnals. The only person using her nor mal voice near that table is the server, whos been instructed by management to memorize the menu because to read the dai ly specials from a sheet of paper might be considered unsophisti cated by the patrons. Since none of the patrons bothers to look up at the server, of course, she could be crossing her eyes and sticking both index ngers in her ears while wiggling them around as she explains how the scrod is prepared. So much for ambi ence. Whod know? And dont tell me that little Ri ley is having more interaction with Grandpa via Pet Rescue Saga than she would be if they were talking to each other. You know thats ridiculous. Thats like saying, Im not fat, Im big-boned or Im on a glu ten-free diet not to be thin but for health reasons. Sure, in some cases it is true but you know what Im saying, right? How many people would be on a gluten-free diet if it immediately made you gain, say, 100 pounds? Some would, but not as many. And sometimes Grandpa and Ri ley are better off not talking, but not usually. But right now in our culture we justify an odd collection of be haviors effectively and efcient ly enough to make them appear ordinary and convincingly nor mal. We look up information we should know and we rely on a kind of technological exoskel eton to keep us upright rather than strengthening the core of our knowledge. As we over-med icate ourselves and become less physically resilient, so we be come less intellectually resilient when we over-tech ourselves. When we rely on a computer to remember the name of that ac tress from that movie, we miss out on the glorious feeling when we retrieve it on our own. Heres how George Eliot described it: That action of memory ... had suddenly completed itself with out conscious effort a common experience, agreeable as a com pleted sneeze, even if the name remembered is of no value. If its too easy, theres no fun. And its our fault. Technology, like nature, is neither friend nor foe. It is profoundly and aston ishingly indifferent; human be ings are no smarter, and no less smart, than we once were or will ever be. Technology is simply there to be made our servant or our master, as we see t and we are responsible choosing how we use it. Now that youve nished read ing, please look up. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist schol ar who has written eight books, and a col umnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES GINA BARRECA MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Cmon people, dont get hung up on your phone look up I ts hard to blame consumers if their ini tial reaction to the proposed $48.5-billion merger of AT&T and DirecTV is to reach for their wallets and hold on tight. Mergers usual ly leave the public with fewer choices and lead to higher prices. What makes this merger of vital importance to consumers is the near universal demand for the companies services. Turned off by airline mergers and rising fares? In a pinch, there are still road and rail alternatives. But these days almost everyone buys service from a telecom company, unless theyre completely off the grid, which is both unlikely and impractical or go back to rabbit ears. The Comcast-Time Warner deal, worth $45 billion, was announced three months ago. In that agreement, which is awaiting govern ment approval, both partners made much of the fact that although they are both cable sys tems, each serves different geographical areas, with little overlap. Thus, they argued, a merger would not amount to decreased competition. The proposed consolidation between AT&T, the No. 2 seller of high-speed Internet service, and DirecTV, the largest satellite video provid er, is a different deal. They compete head-tohead for TV viewers in 10 of the 20 largest met ropolitan markets. To the claim that this would reduce choices, executives at both rms argue that there are benets for both sides. AT&Ts wireless cus tomers, for example, would be able to tap into DirecTV video on their smartphones. And Di recTV customers would get better broadband, wireless and national bundle services. To sweeten the offer, AT&T promised to ex pand its broadband service to 15 million new customer locations in rural parts of its service areas, as well as offering stand-alone broad band for three years to those who choose to go without bundled services. These are undeniable benets for some con sumers, for a limited time in some instances. But there are signicant concerns, as well, in the rapidly changing telecom world from all of these proposed combinations. If the Comcast-Time Warner merger is ap proved and AT&T/DirecTVs is not, that would leave one behemoth in the telecom world standing alone, with an ability to overwhelm its competitors while hapless consumers watch impotently from the sidelines. If that merger is approved, then nding an equally robust competitor would only make sense. Green-lighting both, however, would provide an incentive for all the other players to get into the act. Its hard to see how consumers benet as individual companies morph into telecom giants. For regulators, that should be the bottom line. The promised benets have to be weighed against the obvious risk to consumers. A VOICE Take skeptical view of telecom merger mania Classic DOONESBURY 1972

PAGE 12

A12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 2249 N. Citrus Blvd (441) LeesburgBeside Wal-Mart next to the new Dollar TreeCALL352.787.1617Appointments Preferred Walk-ins Welcome COLOR& HIGHLIGHTSpecial with PattyIncludes Cut & StylePICK & GO PERMSpecial with Kami$35.00(Must Present Ad) $25.00Manicure & Pedicure Combo Special Mens Pedicure(Reg $95)$85.00

PAGE 13

www.Leesburgdermatologyandmohssurgery.comEast Main StreetPine StreetEast Dixie AvenueLeesburg DERMATOLOGY & MOHS Surgery Leesburg Regional Medical Center S. Lake StreetJohnny Gurgen, DO FAOCDBoard Certified Dermatologist & Mohs SurgeonAward Winning Author & Lecturer of multiple World Renowned Dermatologic Publications. SPECIALIZING IN: rfnt bt t tt t NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSMost Insurance Plans Accepted Medicare Accepted ttt t tt ttt tttt ttt tttt SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Thunder look to even series with Spurs / B3 Jackie Slater is introduced before the inaugural Pro Football Hall of Fame Fan Fest on May 2 at the International Exposition Center in Cleveland. Years before Slater was a gigantic teenager in Jackson, Mississippi, playing football for Wingeld High School and hoping to attract the attention of college scouts. AP FILE PHOTO DAVID BRANDT Associated Press JACKSON, Miss. Years before Jackie Slater was a Hall of Fame offensive lineman, he was playing for Wingeld High School in Jackson, Mis sissippi, and hoping to at tract the attention of college scouts. This was in the early 1970s about the time South eastern Conference foot ball teams were just begin ning to recruit black players so this massive teenag er was mostly ignored by the big schools. But Jackson State welcomed him. It was where I was want ed, Slater recalled. And its where I could excel. Slater was one of many players who thrived at the na tions historically black col leges and universities, partic ularly from the s through the s. NFL superstars Jerry Rice and Walter Payton were part of that wave. But HBCUs have slowly turned into an afterthought on the college football land scape. For the rst time in the NFLs common draft era, which started in 1967, not one play er from the Southwestern Money woes, declining talent plague historically black colleges, universities It was where I was wanted, and its where I could excel. Hall-of-Famer Jackie Slater on why he played at Jackson State SEE HBCU | B2 MARK YIEN / AP Oregon State players rush to greet Logan Ice, who hit a game-winning single to beat the Washington Huskies 1-0 in an NCAA college baseball game on May 1 in Corvallis, Ore. OSU is the No. 1 seed for the NCAA tournament which begins on Friday. ERIC OLSON Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. Or egon State has proved itself as the best in the West. The NCAA Divi sion I Baseball Com mittee also thinks the Beavers are best in the nation. The committee on Monday made the Pac12 champions the top seed for the NCAA tour nament over SEC regu lar-season winner Flor ida and a Virginia team thats been one of the most consistent in the nation but failed to win an ACC title. I thought if you took Florida and Ore gon State and Virgin ia, you could nd a rea son for any of them to be the (No. 1) seed, Beavers coach Pat Ca sey said. When it came down to the fact nei ther Florida or Virginia were automatic quali ers, I thought that might swing it our way. The other ve nation al seeds, in order, are: Indiana, Florida State, Louisiana-Lafayette, TCU and LSU. Oregon State (42-12) is the No. 1 seed for the rst time after being No. 3 a year ago. The Bea vers have one of the na tions best starting ro tations in Ben Wetzler, Jace Fry and Andrew Moore and one of the top offensive players in the country in left eld er Michael Conforto. Florida (40-21) won the SEC regular-season Oregon St. top seed, FSU No. 4 in NCAA tournament BOB LEVERONE / AP Florida State catcher Danny De La Calle (13) exchanges highves with pitcher Jameis Winston (44) after defeating Virginia 6-4 in the ACC tournament on Saturday in Greensboro, N.C. SEE NCAA | B2 MICHEL EULER / AP Russias Maria Sharapova serves to Ksenia Pervak on Monday at the French Open in Paris. CHRIS LEHOURITES Associated Press PARIS Novak Djokovic and Maria Sharapova successful ly dealt with the wet weather and their op ponents Monday at the French Open. Both former No. 1 players advanced to the second round at Roland Garros, playing through rain and rain delays, while current No. 1 Rafael Nadal n ished off his match in the sunshine. Djokovic beat Joao Sousa of Portugal 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 despite being broken three times, in cluding while serving for the match for the rst time. The second-seed ed Serb was leading 4-1 when rain halted play on Court Philippe Chatrier, but it restart ed about an hour later. Very heavy condi tions. The court is not that great, in a great condition, at this mo ment, Djokovic said. But of course, con sidering the amount of the rain that we had in last four or ve days, it is not easy for people to maintain the court in the right state. They are doing their best. In the second set, a short shower stopped play for only a few min utes. Djokovic, wear ing a white rain jacket, Djokovic, Sharapova reach second round at French Open SEE TENNIS | B2

PAGE 14

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Coca-Cola 600 Results Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 140.8 rating, 48 points. 2. (11) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 128.2, 43. 3. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 117.7, 42. 4. (22) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 90, 41. 5. (26) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 100.4, 40. 6. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 400, 101.9, 38. 7. (27) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 106.7, 38. 8. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 83.5, 36. 9. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 84.7, 35. 10. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 107.1, 35. 11. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 86.2, 34. 12. (8) Joey Logano, Ford, 400, 95.2, 32. 13. (18) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 79.7, 31. 14. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 399, 85.2, 30. 15. (42) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 399, 73.2, 29. 16. (32) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 399, 70.3, 28. 17. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 399, 105.4, 27. 18. (25) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 398, 71.8, 26. 19. (10) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 398, 100.6, 26. 20. (14) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 398, 58.8, 0. 21. (24) Greg Bife, Ford, 398, 63.6, 23. 22. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 398, 78.9, 22. 23. (20) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 398, 59.9, 21. 24. (34) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 398, 55.6, 20. 25. (15) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 398, 83.3, 19. 26. (23) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 397, 57.9, 18. 27. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 397, 47.4, 17. 28. (39) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 396, 40.8, 16. 29. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 396, 51.8, 15. 30. (30) Michael McDowell, Ford, 396, 44.1, 14. 31. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 395, 43.2, 13. 32. (19) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 395, 48.7, 0. 33. (29) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 392, 34.1, 11. 34. (38) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 390, 29.1, 0. 35. (43) Blake Koch, Ford, 390, 28.5, 0. 36. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 382, 35.6, 0. 37. (17) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 378, 60.5, 7. 38. (36) Ryan Truex, Toyota, engine, 303, 29.9, 6. 39. (4) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, engine, 281, 63.5, 5. 40. (28) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, engine, 271, 51.6, 4. 41. (37) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, accident, 229, 30.4, 3. 42. (41) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, engine, 162, 32.9, 2. 43. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 160, 39.7, 1. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 4, Atlanta 3 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Thursday, May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 Saturday, May 3: Indiana 92, Atlanta 80 Miami 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Brooklyn 4, Toronto 3 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 Wednesday, April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 Friday, May 2: Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83 Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103 Washington 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Dallas 3 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 Wednesday, April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 Friday, May 2: Dallas 113, San Antonio 111 Sunday, May 4: San Antonio 119, Dallas 96 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 Saturday, May 3: Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 4, Golden State 3 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clip pers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 Thursday, May 1: Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99 Saturday, May 3: L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121 Portland 4, Houston 2 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 Friday, May 2: Portland 99, Houston 98 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Brooklyn 1 Tuesday, May 6: Miami 107, Brooklyn 86 Thursday, May 8: Miami 94, Brooklyn 82 Saturday, May 10: Brooklyn 104, Miami 90 Monday, May 12: Miami 102, Brooklyn 96 Wednesday, May 14: Miami 96, Brooklyn 94 Indiana 4, Washington 2 Monday, May 5: Washington 102, Indiana 96 Wednesday, May 7: Indiana 86, Washington 82 Friday, May 9: Indiana 85, Washington 63 Sunday, May 11: Indiana 95, Washington 92 Tuesday, May 13: Washington 102, Indiana 79 Thursday, May 15: Indiana 93, Washington 80 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Portland 1 Tuesday, May 6: San Antonio 116, Portland 92 Thursday, May 8: San Antonio 114, Portland 97 Saturday, May 10: San Antonio 118, Portland 103 Monday, May 12: Portland 103, San Antonio 92 Wednesday, May 14: San Antonio 104, Portland 82 Oklahoma City 4, L.A. Clippers 2 Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 7: Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clip pers 101 Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112 Sunday, May 11: L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99 Tuesday, May 13: Oklahoma City 105, L.A. Clip pers 104 Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City 104, L.A. Clip pers 98 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Indiana 1 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 Saturday, May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 Monday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, late Wednesday, May 28: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 1 Monday, May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 Sunday, May 25: Oklahoma City 106, San Antonio 97 Tuesday, May 27: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 2: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 8: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Detroit 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston 3, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 24: Boston 3, Detroit 2, OT Saturday, April 26: Boston 4, Detroit 2 Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 2 Tuesday, April 22: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3 Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday, April 23: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Saturday, April 26: Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1 Monday, April 28: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 3 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, April 25: Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Sunday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Tuesday, April 29: Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Wednesday, April 30: N.Y. Rangers 2, Philadelphia 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Minnesota 4, Colorado 3 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Minnesota 1, Colorado 0, OT Thursday, April 24: Minnesota 2, Colorado 1 Saturday, April 26: Colorado 4, Minnesota 3, OT Monday, April 28: Minnesota 5, Colorado 2 Wednesday, April 30: Minnesota 5, Colorado 4, OT Chicago 4, St. Louis 2 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: Chicago 2, St. Louis 0 Wednesday, April 23: Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Sunday, April 27: Chicago 5, St. Louis 1 Anaheim 4, Dallas 2 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Dallas 3, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 4, Anaheim 2 Friday, April 25: Anaheim 6, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 27: Anaheim 5, Dallas 4, OT Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: San Jose 7, Los Angeles 2 Tuesday, April 22: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Thursday, April 24: Los Angeles 6, San Jose 3 Saturday, April 26: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Monday, April 28: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 1 Wednesday, April 30: Los Angeles 5, San Jose 1 SECOND ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 4, Boston 3 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Montreal 4, Boston 2 Thursday, May 8: Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT Saturday, May 10: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Monday, May 12: Montreal 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 14: Montreal 3, Boston 1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 3 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Sunday, May 11: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 1 Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers 2, Pittsburgh 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Minnesota 2 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Minnesota 4, Chicago 0 Friday, May 9: Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Sunday, May 11: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 13: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 3 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1 Thursday, May 8: Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, May 10: Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0 Monday, May 12: Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 3 Wednesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 1 Friday, May 16: Los Angeles 6, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Thursday, May 22: Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 25: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 2, OT Tuesday, May 27: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 2, Chicago 1 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 Saturday, May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 Monday, May 26: Chicago at Los Angeles, late Wednesday, May 28: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. French Open Results Monday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Kei Nishikori (9), Japan, 7-6 (4), 6-1, 6-2. Kenny de Schepper, France, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 3-1, retired. Benoit Paire, France, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 7-5. Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 7-5, 6-4, 6-2. Marin Cilic (25), Croatia, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-0, 6-3, 7-6 (6). Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 2-2, retired. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Joao Sousa, Portu gal, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4. Gilles Simon (29), France, def. Ante Pavic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-1, 6-3. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. David Gofn, Belgium, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4. Tommy Robredo (17), Spain, def. James Ward, Brit ain, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4. Alejandro Gonzalez, Colombia, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 6-1. Roberto Bautista Agut (27), Spain, def. Paolo Lo renzi, Italy, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2. Feliciano Lopez (26), Spain, def. Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Robby Ginepri, United States, 6-0, 6-3, 6-0. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Vasek Pospisil (30), Canada, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Benjamin Becker, Ger many, 6-2, 6-4, 3-6, 4-6, 6-2. Fabio Fognini (14), Italy, def. Andreas Beck, Germany, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1. Women First Round Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Ksenia Pervak, Russia, 6-1, 6-2. Dominika Cibulkova (9), Slovakia, def. Virginie Raz zano, France, 7-5, 6-0. Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Karin Knapp, Italy, 6-4, 6-0. Sabine Lisicki (16), Germany, def. Fiona Ferro, France, 6-1, 7-5. Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Alison Van Uytvanck, Bel gium, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, def. Maryna Zanevska, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-4. Flavia Pennetta (12), Italy, def. Patricia Mayr-Achleit ner, Austria, 6-2, 6-2. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Lauren Davis, United States, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. Eugenie Bouchard (18), Canada, def. Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-0, 6-2. Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Roberta Vinci (17), Italy, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Sam Stosur (19), Australia, def. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, 6-1, 6-1. Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def. Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-2. Elena Vesnina (32), Russia, def. Christina McHale, United States, 7-6 (0), 4-6, 6-3. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, def. Anna-Lena Fried sam, Germany, 6-7 (3), Alize Cornet (20), France, def. Ashleigh Barty, Aus tralia, 6-2, 6-1. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Mathilde Jo hansson, France, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Michelle Larcher de Brito, Portugal, 6-2, 6-3. Mondays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX Recalled C Ryan Lavarnway from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Alex Wilson to Pawtucket. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Called up INF Irving Falu from Nashville (PCL). Optioned RHP Jimmy Nelson to Nashville. National League CHICAGO CUBS Activated OF Justin Ruggiano from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Ryan Kalish to Iowa (PCL). NEW YORK METS Placed OF Eric Young Jr. on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 25. Recalled OF Matt den Dekker from Las Vegas (PCL). Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS Announced the contract of RHP Leo Rosales was purchased by Leones de Yu catan (Mexican League). TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED GOLF 5 p.m. TGC NCAA, Division I playoffs, match play seminals, at Hutchinson, Kan. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Boston at Atlanta 7:05 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Washington 7:07 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Toronto 10 p.m. ESPN Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers NBA BASKETBALL 9 p.m. TNT Playoffs, conference nals, game 4, San Antonio at Oklahoma City NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference nals, N.Y. Rangers at Montreal SOCCER 7:45 p.m. ESPN2 MLS, N.Y. at Kansas City 9:55 p.m. ESPN2 Mens national teams, exhibition, United States vs. Azerbaijan, at S.F TENNIS 5 a.m. ESPN2 French Open, second round, at Paris Athletic Conference or Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference was select ed this month. The two conferences combined to produce at least 20 NFL draft picks ev ery year from 1967 to 1976, according to re search by STATS. That output has slowly de clined since. Now storied pro grams like Grambling, Southern, Florida A&M and Mississippi Valley State are known more for crumbling fa cilities, player boycotts and struggles to meet NCAA academic stan dards than for what happens on the eld. College sports rev enue and spending have become increas ingly unequal over the past three decades, and HBCUs have hard time keeping up. The lack of money is especially pronounced for schools in the SWAC, which have yearly ath letic budgets as low as Mississippi Valley States $3.6 million. Thats about half the salary coach Nick Sa ban earns at Alabama, where the schools to tal athletic budget is well over $100 million. Even other Football Championship Sub division schools have athletic budgets twice as large as many as those at HBCUs. Like his late brother Walter, Eddie Payton played football at Jack son State, where he is now the golf coach. Payton says bringing HBCUs back to some level of prominence is possible, but it will be difcult. As TV con tracts for college foot ball have grown, the bigger schools have been able to pour money into facilities and programs that make it nearly impos sible for HBCUs to compete for elite ath letes. And, as recruit ing has grown more sophisticated, schools from around the coun try have been taking star football players out of the South, the main talent base for the HBCUs. Its not that were get ting less money its that everybody else is growing while weve basically stayed the same, Payton said. We havent cultivated our fan bases and now the quality has gone down. Its going to be hard to get those people back. Payton traced the SWACs downfall back to the 1980s and 1990s, when programs started playing Clas sic games on the road in places like Chicago and Indianapolis. Pay ton said in an effort to spread the HBCU brand and earn a little extra money, leaders focused too much on the schools popular marching bands and the parties surround ing the games instead of the football. When you go to a steakhouse, the thing that makes or breaks your meal is the steak, Payton said. Its not the salad or the baked potato. We havent been focusing on the most important issue and thats the qual ity of the football. SWAC Commission er Duer Sharp said he hopes its the beginning of leaguewide improve ment that can start in the classroom and car ry over to the eld. Our goal is to be a progressive Division I conference, Sharp said. Jackson State is a perfect example of how these prob lems can be turned around. They worked along with the NCAA, got some grant mon ey and now have im proved tremendously. HBCU FROM PAGE B1 title for the third time in ve years and reached the conference tour nament nal. The Ga tors schedule ranks as toughest in the country, and theyre 16-5 in onerun games. The tournament opens Friday with 16 four-team, dou ble-elimination region als. Best-of-three super regionals will be held next week, with those winners moving to the College World Series in Omaha. National seeds that win their regionals play at home in super re gionals. The Southeastern Conference has 10 teams in the tourna ment, the most ever by a conference. The At lantic Coast Confer ence is represented by seven schools, the Big 12 and Pac-12 by ve apiece and the Big West by four. Miami is in the eld for the 42nd straight year, extending its own record. Florida State is in for the 37th season in a row, second all-time. Three teams with losing records are in after win ning conference tourna ment titles: Youngstown State (16-36), Siena (2531) and Bethune-Cook man (26-31). Oregon State starts the tournament against Summit League cham pion North Dakota State. UC Irvine and UNLV also are in the Corvallis, Ore gon, regional. Casey said his teams No. 1 seeding didnt come with an easy path to Omaha. Bar ring an upset, the Bea vers would be matched against Big 12 regu lar-season champion Oklahoma State in a su per regional. I have no com plaints, Casey said. Its a tough job, trying to balance it out. You could take every regional, and everybody would have something to say. Miami coach Jim Mor ris isnt pleased with the prospect of his ACC reg ular-season champi on team having to play at Florida in a super re gional. Though Farrell listed Rice and Vander bilt as teams that were edged out for national seeds, Miami was in the running for one before it lost two of three in the ACC tournament. You never know the rhyme or reason for where youre going to go, Morris said on the ESPNU selection show. It makes no sense to me, if were on the bor derline, to be going to possibly the No. 2 seed. Florida will be chal lenged this weekend. It will be hosting the Big Wests second-place team in Long Beach State, a North Caroli na squad with lots of postseason experience, and a 41-win College of Charleston thats the bottom seed in the re gional. This is probably a re gional we need, Gators coach Kevin OSullivan said. We tend to play up to our competition or sometimes down to our competition. NCAA FROM PAGE B1 used the time to enter tain the crowd by chat ting with a ball boy and letting the youngster sit alongside him on the bench. At one point, Djokov ic grabbed the umbrel la out of the ball boys hand and in return gave him a racket. Then Djokovic handed him a bottle of Perrier, and the two clinked bottles be fore taking a sip. We had a nice chat. Hes a tennis player, so I asked him how long hes playing, and how hes enjoying his time as a ball kid, Djokovic said. It was a nice, fun time, something unusual for the Grand Slams. Djokovic can com plete a career Grand Slam by winning the French Open. Nadal has already won a record eight French Open titles, but he is looking to become the rst man to win ve times in a row in Paris. On Monday, he im proved his record at Ro land Garros to 60-1 by beating Robby Ginepri of the United States 6-0, 6-3, 6-0. Always the same: To win against anyone I need to play at a good level and I need to be ready for ght and for everything that I will need to do to win, said Nadal, looking ahead to his next match. And with that I can see I need to be aggres sive and need to nd a rhythm on the legs and play solid points, nd real ways to win the points. Thats it. Sharapova, the 2012 champion, was rst on court in the main sta dium and needed little more than an hour to beat Ksenia Pervak 6-1, 6-2. She broke Pervak ve times and nished with 17 winners, while Pervak had only four. Sharapova, seeded seventh at the French Open, completed a ca reer Grand Slam at Ro land Garros two years ago. She then lost to Serena Williams in the 2013 nal. Up next in Paris will be Tsvetana Pironko va of Bulgaria in the second round. But she could face Williams in the quarternals. Its tough to think about that match down the line where you have to compete in three matches before that, Sharapova said. Obvi ously its a match that many people always look forward to when we play against each other. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 15

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 NASCAR PETE IACOBELLI AP Sports Writer CONCORD, N.C. Jimmie Johnsons run at another Sprint Cup title is on and could bring him a piece of NASCAR history. Johnsons victory in the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday night all but locked him into the new, expanded cham pionship Chase for mat. If the 38-year-old Johnson pulls it off, itll be his seventh series crown to tie the NA SCAR mark shared by Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt. NASCAR leaders changed the empha sis in qualifying, put ting more of a premi um on wins over the steadiness of points racing. Thats led to a urry of drivers tak ing the checkered ag 10 of them through 12 races all glee fully celebrating their near-assured spot in the 10-race champion ship run at the end. Johnson had been on the outside of that un til his record-break ing seventh career win at Charlotte Motor Speedway. He outlast ed second-place Kev in Harvick and Matt Kenseth in third to pick up his fourth victory all-time in NASCARs longest race. The rst goal is to make the Chase, John son said. You want to win races at the end of the season. Few had done that better when it counts than Johnson. Hes col lected 14 Chase victo ries in his six title runs, including a pair last season that led him to title No. 6. Its a reci pe, combined with the No. 48s typically sol id performance, John son was certain would prevail no matter how many outside the race shop raised questions. Of course, we want to win early and often, Johnson said. But we were holding steady in championship points. In my opinion, I dont believe there will be 16 different winners. I felt like a strong championship points position would get us into the rst phase of the Chase, he added. Granted, tonight sim plies things. And gives crew chief Chad Knaus the ability to take a few chances to prepare for the play offs the rest of the sea son. Not that he has to as the team approach es a stretch of tracks where they know suc cess. Next week comes Dover where Johnson owns a record eight victories, then Pocono where Johnsons won three times. When Johnson broke through for his rst crown in 2006, he and Knaus used the formu la to add four more in one of the series most dominant stretches. After Johnson nished sixth in 2011 and third in 2012, he was back on top last season and moved one step closer to the record with two drivers who were part of NASCARs rst Hall of Fame class ve years ago. Johnson earned the 11th career Coca-Co la 600 victory for car owner Rick Hendrick. What theyve been able to accomplish to gether, its been amaz ing, he said. I always say Im just glad I dont race against them. Jimmie Johnsons title defense is on after victory at Coca-Cola 600 TERRY RENNA / AP Jimmie Johnson, center, poses in Victory Lane with his crew after winning the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. NBA CLIFF BRUNT AP Sports Writer OKLAHOMA CITY Serge Ibaka knew play ing on his injured leg would be painful. He didnt care. Oklahoma Citys de fensive star made a dra matic return Sunday night from what was thought to be a sea son-ending left calf strain. He started and scored 15 points to help the Thunder defeat the San Antonio Spurs 10697 and cut the Spurs lead in the Western Conference nals series to 2-1. Ibaka had mental ly prepared for the dis comfort in the days leading up to the game. He said the pain was relative, given his early life struggles in the Re public of Congo. Well, pain is pain, and I dont want to be here to talk about the pain, he said after the game. Most impor tantly, we got that win tonight, and the focus is about next game. Ibaka missed the rst two games of the series. The Thunder original ly said he would miss the rest of the playoffs, but changed course Fri day. He participated in the teams shootaround Sunday morning, then got positive feedback from the teams medi cal staff as the game ap proached. The crowd roared when Ibakas name was announced during pre game introductions, and it got even loud er when Ibaka started playing. He scored the rst points of the game on a 19-foot jumper. Words cant describe it, Thunder forward Caron Butler said. It was a great moment. We just kind of rode that energy from the crowd, from the beginning, right out till the fourth quarter. Ibaka had eight points, three rebounds and two blocks in just over six minutes of play in the rst quarter. He went to an elliptical ma chine when he was not playing to stay loose. At one point, he took a fall and came up limping slightly before walking it off. It was all worth it. Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks took him out with 3:17 remaining and the Thunder ahead by 20. I was just trying to do my job, stay focused, do the best I can do to help my team, Ibaka said. He made six of seven shots and his presence eased the pressure on Kevin Durant and Rus sell Westbrook. West brook had 26 points, eight rebounds and sev en assists, and Durant added 25 points and 10 rebounds. On defense, Iba ka blocked and altered shots and used his still formidable mobility to close out on shooters. He had seven rebounds, four blocks and a seem ingly endless amount of energy. Serge has put so much work in through out the season that missing a couple of days didnt hurt him, West brook said. Tonight, he jumped right back into where he was. Manu Ginobili scored 23 points and Tim Dun can added 16 points and eight rebounds for the Spurs. Game 4 is tonight at Oklahoma City. Ibaka, Thunder look to even series against Spurs SUE OGROCKI / AP Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka (9) and forward Kevin Durant (35) exchange high-ves in the fourth quarter of Game 3 on Sunday in Oklahoma City. The Thunder won 106-97. Serge has put so much work in throughout the season that missing a couple of days didnt hurt him. Tonight, he jumped right back into where he was. Russell Westbrook Oklahoma City Thunder guard Associated Press MONTREAL When other parts of their game are sputtering, the New York Rangers have two solid-gold as sets to fall back on penalty killing and goal tending. Its a combo that has put them within one victory of their rst Stanley Cup nal in 20 years. And it has frus trated the Montreal Ca nadiens, who must win Game 5 Tuesday at the Bell Centre to stave off elimination. With a 17 percent strike rate good for 19th during the regular season the Montre al power play was hard ly a humming machine. But against the Rang ers, the Canadiens are 1-for-17 with the man advantage. Montreals lone pow er-play breakthrough came Sunday night in a 3-2 overtime loss at Madison Square Gar den. That P.K. Subban blast from the point, however, was tempered by a short-handed goal by Carl Hagelin that opened the scoring. The Canadiens pow er play went 1-for-8 on a night where the Rang ers spent 14 minutes or almost 22 percent of the game a man short. Give credit to our kill ers and our goaltender, Rangers coach Alain Vi gneault said. They did a real good job. Rangers need one more win over Canadiens to make finals NHL KATHY WILLENS / AP New York Rangers mob Martin St. Louis after he scored the winning goal in overtime against Montreal on Sunday in New York.

PAGE 16

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 29 22 .569 9-1 W-6 13-11 16-11 Baltimore 26 23 .531 2 5-5 W-2 11-12 15-11 New York 26 23 .531 2 6-4 W-2 11-11 15-12 Tampa Bay 23 28 .451 6 4 5-5 W-4 12-14 11-14 Boston 21 29 .420 7 5 1-9 W-1 10-17 11-12 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 28 19 .596 3-7 L-3 14-11 14-8 Chicago 26 27 .491 5 2 5-5 W-1 14-12 12-15 Kansas City 24 25 .490 5 2 4-6 L-1 13-11 11-14 Minnesota 23 25 .479 5 2 5-5 L-4 12-12 11-13 Cleveland 24 28 .462 6 3 5-5 L-2 15-11 9-17 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 31 20 .608 6-4 W-1 13-10 18-10 Los Angeles 28 22 .560 2 6-4 L-1 15-13 13-9 Texas 26 25 .510 5 1 6-4 W-3 13-13 13-12 Seattle 25 25 .500 5 1 5-5 W-1 11-12 14-13 Houston 19 32 .373 12 8 5-5 W-2 10-15 9-17 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 28 22 .560 6-4 L-1 18-11 10-11 Miami 27 25 .519 2 1 6-4 W-1 20-8 7-17 Washington 25 26 .490 3 2 3-7 L-1 14-13 11-13 Philadelphia 21 26 .447 5 4 4-6 L-1 9-14 12-12 New York 22 28 .440 6 5 3-7 L-1 11-17 11-11 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 30 22 .577 3-7 L-1 14-11 16-11 St. Louis 28 22 .560 1 8-2 W-2 14-7 14-15 Pittsburgh 23 27 .460 6 4 6-4 W-1 16-13 7-14 Cincinnati 22 26 .458 6 4 4-6 L-2 12-12 10-14 Chicago 19 30 .388 9 7 6-4 W-1 10-13 9-17 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away San Francisco 32 19 .627 5-4 L-1 17-9 15-10 Colorado 27 23 .540 4 4-6 L-1 16-7 11-16 Los Angeles 27 24 .529 5 5-5 W-1 9-13 18-11 San Diego 23 28 .451 9 4 4-6 W-1 14-15 9-13 Arizona 20 32 .385 12 8 4-6 L-1 6-18 14-14 SUNDAYS GAMES Toronto 3, Oakland 1 Texas 12, Detroit 4 Baltimore 4, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 5 N.Y. Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 4, Kansas City 3 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 Houston 4, Seattle 1 SUNDAYS GAMES Arizona 2, N.Y. Mets 1, 1st game Milwaukee 7, Miami 1 N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 2, 2nd game L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 0 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 7, Colorado 0 St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 0 MONDAYS GAMES Boston 8, Atlanta 6 Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2 Texas 7, Minnesota 2 Oakland 10, Detroit 0 Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 1 N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, late Tampa Bay at Toronto, late Houston at Kansas City, late MONDAYS GAMES Boston 8, Atlanta 6 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Miami 3, Washington 2 Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 8, San Francisco 4 Philadelphia 9, Colorado 0 N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, late Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, late San Diego at Arizona, late AP PHOTO Miami Marlins Giancarlo Stanton rounds the bases after his two-run homer in the third inning against the Washington Nationals on Monday at Nationals Park in Washington. TODAYS GAMES Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-1) at Toronto (Buehrle 8-1), 7:07 p.m. Boston (Lester 4-6) at Atlanta (Harang 4-4), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 2-3) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 4-0), 8:10 p.m. Houston (McHugh 2-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3), 8:10 p.m. Texas (Darvish 4-2) at Minnesota (P.Hughes 5-1), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2), 8:15 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 6-1) at Oakland (Gray 5-1), 10:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-3) at Seattle (Elias 3-3), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Colorado (J.De La Rosa 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 2-3) at Washington (Treinen 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Boston (Lester 4-6) at Atlanta (Harang 4-4), 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 2-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-3), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2), 8:15 p.m. San Diego (Stults 2-5) at Arizona (Miley 3-5), 9:40 p.m. Cincinnati (Simon 6-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 7-1), 10:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-0) at San Francisco (Hudson 4-2), 10:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: VMartinez, Detroit, .337; Kinsler, Detroit, .330; Altuve, Houston, .326; Cano, Seattle, .323; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .322; AlRamirez, Chicago, .322. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 42; Donaldson, Oakland, 41; Bautista, Toronto, 37; Kinsler, Detroit, 35; NCruz, Baltimore, 34; MeCabrera, Toronto, 33; Pujols, Los Angeles, 32. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 44; JAbreu, Chicago, 42; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, 42; Moss, Oakland, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 40; Brantley, Cleveland, 38; Donaldson, Oak land, 36. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 70; MeCabrera, Toronto, 66; Kinsler, Detroit, 65; AlRamirez, Chicago, 64; Cano, Seat tle, 62; Rios, Texas, 62; AJones, Baltimore, 59; HKend rick, Los Angeles, 59; Markakis, Baltimore, 59; VMarti nez, Detroit, 59. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 17; Hosmer, Kansas City, 17; Kinsler, Detroit, 17; Pe droia, Boston, 17; Altuve, Houston, 16; Viciedo, Chi cago, 15. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 5; Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Infante, Kansas City, 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 16; JAbreu, Chicago, 15; Encarnacion, Toronto, 14; Pujols, Los Angeles, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 12; VMartinez, Detroit, 12; Donald son, Oakland, 11; Dozier, Minnesota, 11; Moss, Oak land, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 11. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 17; RDavis, Detroit, 15; AEscobar, Kansas City, 14; Andrus, Texas, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Ellsbury, New York, 11. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 8-1; Tanaka, New York, 7-1; Porcello, Detroit, 7-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 6-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 6-1; Keuchel, Houston, 6-2; Shields, Kansas City, 6-3; CWilson, Los Angeles, 6-3. ERA: Gray, Oakland, 1.99; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.16; Tanaka, New York, 2.29; Darvish, Texas, 2.35; Keuchel, Houston, 2.55; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.56. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 84; Kluber, Cleveland, 83; Tanaka, New York, 79; Scherzer, Detroit, 78; Lester, Boston, 76; FHernandez, Seattle, 74; Darvish, Texas, 71. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 14; Perkins, Minnesota, 14; Rodney, Seattle, 12; Nathan, Detroit, 11. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .375; Puig, Los Angeles, .349; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .331; YMolina, St. Louis, .330; Utley, Philadelphia, .328; CGomez, Milwaukee, .320; MaAdams, St. Louis, .319; Blackmon, Colorado, .319. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; Pence, San Francisco, 38; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 35; Stanton, Miami, 35; Yelich, Miami, 34. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 47; Puig, Los Angeles, 38; AdGon zalez, Los Angeles, 36; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 36; Black mon, Colorado, 33; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 33; Morse, San Francisco, 33. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 64; DWright, New York, 64; DanMurphy, New York, 62; Puig, Los Angeles, 61; Tulow itzki, Colorado, 60; MaAdams, St. Louis, 59. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Lucroy, Milwau kee, 20; Utley, Philadelphia, 20; Arenado, Colorado, 17; MaAdams, St. Louis, 16; Byrd, Philadelphia, 16; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 16. TRIPLES: Rendon, Washington, 4; Simmons, Atlanta, 4; Yelich, Miami, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 14; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 13; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 11; Gattis, Atlanta, 10; CGomez, Milwaukee, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10; Puig, Los An geles, 10; Walker, Pittsburgh, 10. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 30; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 18; EYoung, New York, 17; SMarte, Pitts burgh, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; ECabrera, San Diego, 10; Segura, Milwaukee, 10. PITCHING: Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-2; Greinke, Los An geles, 7-1; Lohse, Milwaukee, 6-1; Simon, Cincinnati, 6-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 6-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 6-3; 9 tied at 5. ERA: Samardzija, Chicago, 1.46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.67; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.77; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.86; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.01; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.12; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.13. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 82; Strasburg, Wash ington, 81; Wainwright, St. Louis, 77. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Fran cisco, 16; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 15. Red Sox 8, Braves 6 Boston Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Holt 3b 5 2 2 0 Heywrd rf 2 2 1 0 Bogarts ss 3 2 0 0 BUpton cf 5 1 1 1 Pedroia 2b 3 1 1 2 FFrmn 1b 2 2 0 0 D.Ortiz 1b 3 1 1 4 J.Upton lf 4 1 2 3 Przyns c 5 0 1 1 CJhnsn 3b 5 0 2 0 JGoms rf 2 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 1 GSizmr lf 4 1 1 0 R.Pena 2b 4 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 0 1 Laird c 3 0 1 1 Bchhlz p 1 0 1 0 ESantn p 2 0 0 0 Badnhp p 0 0 0 0 Pstrnck ph 1 0 0 0 Nava ph 0 1 0 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Capuan p 0 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Lvrnwy ph 1 0 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Tazawa p 0 0 0 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Carp ph 1 0 0 0 Hale p 0 0 0 0 AMiller p 0 0 0 0 Uehara p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 8 7 8 Totals 33 6 8 6 Boston 001 050 200 8 Atlanta 003 300 000 6 DPBoston 2, Atlanta 1. LOBBoston 6, Atlanta 9. 2BHolt (4), B.Upton (9), J.Upton 2 (11). 3BG.Size more (2). HRD.Ortiz (12). SFD.Ortiz, Bradley Jr.. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz 3 4 6 6 8 4 Badenhop 1 2 0 0 0 0 Capuano 1 0 0 0 0 1 Mujica W,2-1 1 0 0 0 1 0 Tazawa H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 A.Miller H,2 1 1 0 0 0 2 Uehara S,10-10 1 1 0 0 0 0 Atlanta E.Santana 5 5 6 6 3 6 A.Wood 1 0 0 0 1 1 Thomas L,1-2 2 / 3 2 2 2 2 0 Avilan 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 2 Hale 1 0 0 0 1 0 Buchholz pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. WPCapuano, Thomas. UmpiresHome, John Tumpane; First, Bob Davidson; Second, James Hoye; Third, Bill Welke. T:40 (Rain delay: 1:26). A,501 (49,586). Rangers 7, Twins 2 Texas Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo dh 5 1 1 0 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 Andrus ss 5 1 3 2 Mauer 1b 4 0 1 0 Morlnd 1b 5 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 1 ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Arcia rf 4 0 1 0 Rios rf 3 2 2 0 Wlngh lf 3 1 0 0 Gimenz c 4 2 2 2 Kubel dh 3 0 0 0 LMartn cf 4 0 1 1 Nunez ph 1 0 0 0 Choice lf 4 0 1 1 KSuzuk c 4 0 2 0 Odor 2b 4 1 1 0 A.Hicks cf 4 0 2 0 EEscor ss 3 0 2 1 Totals 38 7 11 6 Totals 34 2 9 2 Texas 020 020 030 7 Minnesota 110 000 000 2 ECorreia (3). LOBTexas 5, Minnesota 6. 2BAn drus (13), Rios (12), Gimenez (2), Choice (3), Arcia (1), E.Escobar (15). HRPlouffe (4). SBAndrus (13), Rios (9). IP H R ER BB SO Texas Tepesch W,2-0 6 2 / 3 7 2 2 0 4 Frasor H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cotts 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Minnesota Correia L,2-6 7 7 4 4 0 5 Burton 1 3 3 3 1 0 Duensing 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Tepesch (Willingham). UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Jerry Layne. T:52. A,571 (39,021). Mariners 5, Angels 1 Los Angeles Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 J.Jones cf 4 2 1 0 Trout cf 4 0 1 0 MSndrs rf 3 2 2 1 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 1 Cano 2b 4 0 3 2 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 2 0 0 1 Ibanez lf 2 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 Cron dh 3 0 0 0 Romer dh 4 0 0 0 Conger c 2 0 0 0 Ackley lf 3 1 1 0 Iannett ph-c 1 0 0 0 Frnkln ss 3 0 0 0 Calhon rf 2 0 1 0 Totals 28 1 3 1 Totals 30 5 7 4 Los Angeles 000 000 100 1 Seattle 230 000 00x 5 EAybar (4). DPLos Angeles 1, Seattle 2. LOBLos Angeles 3, Seattle 5. 3BM.Saunders (3). HRPujols (14). SBJ.Jones (4), Cano (4), Ackley (2). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Skaggs L,4-2 7 7 5 2 2 8 Kohn 1 0 0 0 2 1 Seattle C.Young W,4-2 6 1 / 3 2 1 1 3 5 Furbush 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Farquhar 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 0 WPKohn. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:40. A,710 (47,476). Athletics 10, Tigers 0 Detroit Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi RDavis lf 4 0 1 0 Crisp cf 4 1 1 1 AJcksn cf 4 0 0 0 DNorrs c 5 1 1 4 MiCarr 1b 4 0 1 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 1 3 2 VMrtnz dh 4 0 2 0 Cespds lf 5 1 1 1 TrHntr rf 4 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 2 0 0 0 Moss dh 4 1 1 1 Holady c 4 0 0 0 Callasp 2b 4 1 1 0 Worth 2b 4 0 0 0 Blanks 1b 3 3 2 1 AnRmn ss 3 0 1 0 Gentry rf 2 1 0 0 Totals 33 0 5 0 Totals 36 10 11 10 Detroit 000 000 000 0 Oakland 022 200 04x 10 EAn.Romine (6), Holaday (3), Castellanos (3), Lowrie (6). LOBDetroit 8, Oakland 7. 2BMi.Cabrera (18), An.Romine (2). HRD.Norris (5), Donaldson (12), Cespedes (9), Moss (12), Blanks (1). SFCrisp. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Smyly L,2-3 5 8 6 6 2 3 Knebel 2 2 0 0 0 2 Coke 1 1 4 2 1 1 Oakland Milone W,3-3 6 2 / 3 4 0 0 2 6 Otero 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Jordan Baker; First, Angel Campos; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel. T:53. A,067 (35,067). White Sox 6, Indians 2 Cleveland Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 Aviles 2b 4 0 2 0 Semien 2b 4 2 1 0 Brantly lf 3 1 2 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 2 4 1 ACarer dh 4 0 0 0 Viciedo dh 4 2 2 3 Raburn rf-1b 4 0 2 1 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 Swisher 1b 3 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 1 DvMrp ph-rf 1 0 0 0 De Aza lf 4 0 1 1 YGoms c 4 0 0 0 Flowrs c 2 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 1 0 0 Nieto c 2 0 0 0 Sellers ss 3 0 1 0 Sierra rf 3 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 8 2 Totals 34 6 9 6 Cleveland 001 001 000 2 Chicago 003 002 10x 6 EChisenhall (8), Semien (8). DPChicago 1. LOB Cleveland 8, Chicago 5. 2BGillaspie 3 (12). HR Viciedo (5). SBBrantley (8), De Aza (6). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin L,3-2 5 5 5 2 1 8 Outman 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Shaw 2 / 3 2 0 0 0 2 Rzepczynski 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Carrasco 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Quintana W,3-4 6 5 2 2 2 5 Petricka H,4 1 0 0 0 0 0 Putnam 2 / 3 3 0 0 0 2 S.Downs S,1-1 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Mike Everitt. Orioles 7, Brewers 6, 10 innings Baltimore Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 5 1 2 1 Segura ss 5 1 2 2 Machd 3b 4 1 1 0 Braun rf 5 0 1 1 A.Jones cf 5 1 2 2 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 N.Cruz lf 4 0 1 1 EHerrr pr 0 0 0 0 Pearce 1b 5 0 0 0 Maldnd c 0 0 0 0 Hardy ss 5 1 3 0 CGomz cf 3 0 1 0 Hundly c 5 0 1 1 MrRynl 3b 4 0 0 1 Schoop 2b 5 2 3 2 Gennett 2b 5 0 1 0 Tillman p 2 0 0 0 KDavis lf 4 2 4 1 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 Overay 1b 2 2 1 1 Clevngr ph 1 0 0 0 Lohse p 3 0 0 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 DYong ph 1 0 1 0 RWeks ph 1 0 0 0 Lough pr 0 1 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 ODay p 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 ZBrittn p 0 0 0 0 Falu ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 7 14 7 Totals 37 6 11 6 Baltimore 003 000 102 1 7 Milwaukee 101 202 000 0 6 EHundley (1). DPBaltimore 2, Milwaukee 2. LOB Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 9. 2BMarkakis (8), N.Cruz (11), Hardy 2 (11), Segura (7), Braun (8), Gennett (9), K.Davis (14). 3BA.Jones (2), Segura (2). HR Schoop 2 (5), K.Davis (7), Overbay (2). CSC.Gomez (2). SC.Gomez. SFMar.Reynolds. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Tillman 5 2 / 3 7 6 6 4 7 R.Webb 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Brach 2 2 0 0 1 2 ODay W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Z.Britton S,3-3 1 1 0 0 1 0 Milwaukee Lohse 6 2 / 3 9 4 4 0 5 Kintzler H,3 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Fr.Rodriguez BS,2-19 1 3 2 2 1 0 Wooten L,1-2 1 2 1 1 0 1 UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Dan Bellino. T:42. A,889 (41,900). Marlins 3, Nationals 2 Miami Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 0 0 0 Span cf 4 0 0 0 Dietrch 2b 3 1 1 0 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 2 3 2 Werth rf 4 1 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 2 1 LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 2 GJones 1b 4 0 0 0 WRams c 4 0 1 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Eovaldi p 2 0 0 0 McLoth lf 2 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Roark p 1 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 TMoore ph 1 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 7 3 Totals 30 2 3 2 Miami 102 000 000 3 Washington 000 002 000 2 EDietrich (8). DPWashington 1. LOBMiami 4, Washington 5. 2BStanton (13), McGehee (12), W.Ramos (3). HRStanton (15), LaRoche (6). SB McLouth (3). CSSaltalamacchia (1). SRoark. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Eovaldi W,4-2 6 1 / 3 3 2 2 1 5 M.Dunn H,7 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 A.Ramos H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cishek S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 Washington Roark L,3-3 7 5 3 3 1 4 Clippard 1 2 0 0 0 1 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Eovaldi (Espinosa, McLouth), by Roark (Di etrich). UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Seth Buck minster; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Brian Knight. T:46. A,677 (41,408). Pirates 5, Mets 3 Pittsburgh New York ab r h bi ab r h bi JHrrsn rf 5 0 0 0 Lagars cf 3 1 1 0 NWalkr 2b 4 1 2 0 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 1 AMcCt cf 3 1 2 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 2 0 0 0 Grndrs lf 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 2 2 2 2 BAreu rf 4 0 2 0 RMartn c 5 0 1 1 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 2 0 Duda 1b 4 1 2 1 SMarte lf 4 1 1 0 Flores ss 4 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Centen c 4 0 0 0 Tabata ph 1 0 1 1 deGrm p 2 1 2 0 Watson p 1 0 1 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 Cumptn p 2 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 0 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 dnDkkr rf 1 0 0 0 Barmes ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 12 4 Totals 34 3 8 2 Pittsburgh 000 000 023 5 New York 000 020 001 3 IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Cumpton 6 7 2 1 1 1 J.Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 0 Watson W,5-0 1 0 0 0 1 0 Melancon S,10-12 1 1 1 1 0 2 New York deGrom 6 2 / 3 5 0 0 5 4 Familia H,2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Rice H,5 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Valverde L,1-1 BS,2-4 2 / 3 4 4 4 1 0 C.Torres 2 / 3 2 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Scott Barry. T:30. A,309 (41,922). Phillies 9, Rockies 0 Colorado Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 4 0 2 0 Revere cf 5 0 3 1 Cuddyr rf 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 4 1 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 2 0 Brignc ss 0 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 0 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 3 3 1 CGnzlz lf 2 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 2 3 5 Pachec 1b 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 3 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 2 1 1 0 Rutledg 2b-ss 4 0 0 0 MAdms p 0 0 0 0 Culersn 3b 4 0 1 0 Mayrry ph-1b 1 1 1 2 Chacin p 0 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz 3b 4 0 0 0 Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ lf 1 1 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 0 7 0 Totals 35 9 12 9 Colorado 000 000 000 0 Philadelphia 000 112 50x 9 ETulowitzki (1). DPColorado 1, Philadelphia 2. LOBColorado 9, Philadelphia 4. 2BUtley (21). HR Howard (8), Mayberry (2). SChacin. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chacin L,0-4 5 7 4 4 1 5 Kahnle 1 1 0 0 0 1 Masset 1 / 3 1 2 2 1 0 Brothers 2 / 3 3 3 3 0 1 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia K.Kendrick W,1-5 6 2 / 3 6 0 0 4 2 Mi.Adams 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 1 De Fratus 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Jim Wolf; First, Brian Gorman; Sec ond, Jeff Gosney; Third, David Rackley.

PAGE 17

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Golf CarAccessible Simon Sez: Time to Plant Purina Dealerrf787-4415 n www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is T uesday, May 27 the 147th day of 2014. There are 218 days left in the year. On this date : In 1896 255 people were killed when a tornado struck St. Louis, Missouri, and East St. Louis, Illinois. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, May 27, 2014: This year you open up to a lot of new possibilities. You are unusually creative, dy namic and charismatic. As a result, doors open for you. Your sense of humor car ries you far. If you are sin gle, youll meet a lot of spe cial people. Youll want to choose the right person for you. Date until you nd Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are at tached, the two of you will want to spend more time to gether. Your popularity will soar, so you will need to make special time for your sweetie and/or involve him or her more in the different elements of your life. A fel low GEMINI encourages re bellion. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might feel strong ly about a nancial matter, and youll want to let every one else know. No one will question your direction. You will be greeted with a sigh of relief once you explain your logic. A family member is likely to go overboard. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Youll be ying high and enjoying it. Look around to see if a grouchy friend or loved one is tagging along behind you. Your positive, optimistic smile allows oth ers to relax and become more authentic. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your instincts will guide you with spending, price com parison and negotiation. Be sure to keep your budget in mind, even though you wont want to. If you have been feeling unusually tired and withdrawn, you might want to consider scheduling a checkup. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Zero in on what you want and what you feel is most important for the ma jority. You could over think an emotional issue or a problem with a child or loved one. Your positive attitude will help you to get past a bump or hassle. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You will have an opportunity to take the lead on an import ant project that you care a lot about. Your sense of hu mor allows greater exibility in what quickly could evolve into a difcult and touchy situation. Your instincts will carry you far. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep reaching out to some one at a distance. You could feel intimidated if you dont get a hold of this person within a certain number of phone calls. You might want to try a different approach. A friend will lend a hand and come through for you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Relate to a partner or as sociate directly about an is sue surrounding funds. This person needs to know how you feel; saying nothing or copping an attitude will not be as powerful. He or she needs to know where you are coming from. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might want to have a long-overdue conversation with several colleagues. Un less you convene a meeting with the people involved, you will not see this talk happen. Take responsibility for what you desire, and make it so. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You have a lot of ground to cover. You can succeed if you focus on each task at hand. A part ner will pitch in and help if you delegate some of your responsibilities. Curb a ten dency to be so critical of yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll put in a major effort at a meeting to pres ent others with the options as you see them. You will anticipate a certain amount of feedback, but what you end up hearing might be to tally unexpected. Go with the moment, and know your limits. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might want to recon sider an offer involving prop erty. You could feel overbur dened by your options and not know which way to go. Lighten up the moment with your sense of humor. A child like energy will emerge later today, when you nally feel free. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might want to ask more questions about a mat ter that surrounds your per sonal life. Let your ingenui ty lead the way to the right path for you, and hopefully for others as well. A friend is likely to wonder what is go ing on with you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: Im a 32-year-old woman who is HIV-positive. My col league who is un aware of my status re cently introduced me to a relative of hers who is also lonely and look ing for someone to settle down with. We clicked and seem to comple ment each other in ev ery way, although we havent had any sexual encounter. My fear is, how do I disclose my status with out being rejected? He seems to have big plans for us, which include settling down and hav ing kids in the future. I am also worried that he might be angry with my colleague and not be lieve that she is unaware of my status. Please help me get out of this dilem ma. IN A SPOT IN SOUTH AFRICA DEAR IN A SPOT: Ill try, but there are no guar antees. Much depends upon the strength of this mans feelings for you. It is very important that you have a frank discus sion with him before the relationship goes any further. The fact that you are HIV-positive may be problematic, but it does not mean you cannot have a family togeth er if you wish in the fu ture. Medications and other medical interven tions can help keep the virus from being trans mitted to your children, and condoms can pro tect your partner. If you are upfront about your status, the chances are better that he will believe you when you tell him his rela tive was not aware that you have HIV when you were introduced. In a case like this, honesty is the best policy. DEAR ABBY: I have three grown sons, all educat ed, married and suc cessful. Their wives are the daughters I never had, and I treasure them and their children. Im blessed with three per fect grandchildren un der the age of 5. The problem is my sons. Although I raised them carefully with love, they are like teenagers. They constantly den igrate and ght with each other, and mea sure my time with them on a competitive scale. I no longer want to be in volved with their bick ering. Their dad, from whom I am separated, is not involved. This has created a sad cloud in my otherwise sunny life. I need some advice. TIED IN KNOTS IN INDIANAPOLIS DEAR TIED IN KNOTS: Have you told your sons how uncomfortable their sibling quibbling makes you? If you ha vent, you should. And if that doesnt improve the situation, I suggest you see them separately. And if that causes prob lems, please dont make it YOUR problem. DEAR ABBY: Over the past 10 years or so, I have noticed a vast in crease in people who talk while they are yawn ing. These yawn-talk ers are not only rude, but also almost impos sible to understand. I wouldnt normally care, except that a lot of peo ple do it where I work. Is it OK to tell them to stop yawn-talking? Or would I be the rude one in the scenario? WIDE AWAKE IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR WIDE AWAKE: It wouldnt be rude to ask someone to repeat the statement because you were unable to under stand what the per son was trying to say. And, by the way, po lite folks cover their mouths when they yawn to avoid spraying saliva on the person in front of them. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Womans hiv status casts shadow on budding romance JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

PAGE 18

B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

PAGE 19

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: CROSSWORD PUZZLE

PAGE 20

B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PAGE 21

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B9 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

PAGE 22

B10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PAGE 23

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B11 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial

PAGE 24

B12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Thank you for reading the local paper!



PAGE 1

FSU IS No. 4 SEED AT NCCA TOURNAMENT, SPORTS B1UKRAINE: Kiev orders airstrike against pro-Russian rebels in Donetsk, A10 BUDGET: Leesburg may offer early retirement to lower costs, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Tuesday, May 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 147 2 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED B7 COMICS B6 CROSSWORDS B7 DIVERSIONS B5 LEGALS B7 NATION A9 OBITUARIES A4 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 WORLD A10 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12.91 / 71Partly sunny and stormy50 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThomas Giallella, diagnosed at 3 years old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, spent most of his childhood in and out of hospitals undergoing test after test, procedure after procedure. Giallellas prognosis was glum. He was told repeatedly that if he survived, his academic future would most likely be unexception al because he would lose about 16 IQ points from the intense che motherapy sessions. Giallella said a study he participated in with the University of Mi ami, which measured his post-cancer treatment IQ, put him at a level indicating mental retardation in processing skills. He was told if he sur vived, hed probably be shorter than aver age and would lack the coordination needed to play sports or par ticipate in physically strenuous activities. I remember going to the hospital but I dont remember much about it hurting or anything like that, Thomas said. I also remember people being worried and not understanding why. Now I do, but back then I didnt. Thomas said he sometimes reects on an F he received for an in elementary school. The assignment was to write a non-ctional essay, so he wrote about his own experiences and all he went through as a child. I got my essay back and there was a big red F on the top of it with a note from the teacher that said, Non-ctional means real, Thomas said with a smile. I wrote a note back to the teacher and said, It MINNEOLACancer survivor hopes to serve as a beacon for others ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cancer survivor Thomas Giallella wants to become a pediatric oncologist so he can help other kids struggling with the disease. MICHELLE FAULAssociated PressABUJA, Nigeria Nigerias military has located nearly 300 school girls abducted by Islamic extremists but fears using force to try to free them could get them killed, the countrys chief of defense said Monday. Air Marshal Alex Badeh told demonstrators supporting the much crit icized military that Nigerian troops can save the girls. But he added, we cant go and kill our girls in the name of trying to get them back. He spoke to thousands of demonstrators who marched to Defense Ministry headquarters in Abuja, the capital. Many were brought in on buses, indicating it was an organized event. Asked by reporters where they had found the girls, Badeh refused to elaborate. We want our girls back. I can tell you we can do it. Our military can do it. But where they are held, can we go with force? he asked the crowd. People roared back, No! If we go with force what will hap pen? he asked. They will die, the demonstrators said. Badeh said no one should criticize the military. Nobody should come and say the Nigerian military does not know what it is doing. We know what we are doing, he insisted. Nigerias military and government have faced national and internation al outrage over their failure to rescue the girls seized by Boko Haram mil itants from a remote northeastern school six weeks ago. President Goodluck Jonathan was forced this month to accept inter national help. American planes have been searching for the girls and Brit ain, France, Israel and other countries have sent experts in surveillance and hostage negotiation. The U.S. State Department had no immediate comment on the reports about the missing Nigerian girls. Jonathans reluctance to accept offered help for weeks is seen as unwill ingness to have outsiders looking in on what is considered a very corrupt AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comTampa resident Patrick Waruinge Gachau said Memorial Day and the ceremony at the Florida National Cemetery help him heal after losing his son in Iraq in 2005. This is part of the healing, for me, Gachau said. And I come here and meet with the rest of the parents and see Im not alone. Its a healing for me and I feel very proud that the community and every body supports this occasion. That means a lot for me. Gachau was by his sons grave Monday during the Florida National Cemetery Memorial Day Ceremony near Bushnell. He said his son, Kevin Gachau Waruinge, joined in 2001 and served two tours in Iraq. He said his son moved to the United States from Kenya when he was nine years old and was motivated to join the military by his patriotism. Im proud because he died doing what he loved to do, Gachau said. Gachau said his son felt that the United States was his home. He came to love it. Out of that love thats how he decided to serve in the military, Gachau said. Gachau said his other son is now at West Point, motivated by his brother. He wanted to go and nish what he did, Gachau said. Dean Coleman, from Hernando Beach, said his son, Justin Dean Coleman, died in Afghanistan on July 24, 2009. Todays for people like my son, Coleman said. Dean said Justin was his only child and that he tries to come every year to set up his sons grave so SEE GRAD | A2BUSHNELL AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Patrick Waruinge Gachau poses at his sons grave in the Florida National Cemetery on Memorial Day. BRUCE ACKERMAN / OCALA STAR-BANNER American ags for Memorial Day are shown at grave sites of veterans in Section 323 in the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Members of the American Legion Riders Chapter 219 surround the Shiloh Cemetery Memorial Day ceremony in Fruitland Park on Monday. Part of the healingFamilies gather to honor their loved ones service and sacrifice Thats why we have our freedom, because of them.Dean Coleman, whose son died in Afghanistan President Obama leads ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery. See Page A9Nigeria: Abducted girls foundSEE CEREMONIES |A10SEE NIGERIA | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 is real. She changed it to an A++. Now 18, Thomas be lieves that difcult child hood shaped him to face lifes obstacles head on with gritty determination. The nearly 6 foottall former baseball player, president of the National Honor Society and vice president of the Key Club, will graduate 10th in his class of 365 students at Lake Minne ola High School with a 4.6 weighted grade point average. He has received an ac ademic scholarship to attend the UCF to study bio medical science and is looking forward to be coming a pediatric oncologist so he can help other kids struggling with cancer. Thomas is considered cured from cancer but annual checkups still have doc tors amazed at how far hes come, he said. Im still here, thats the main thing, but I was supposed to be short and I grew, he said. I wasnt supposed to be able to do well in school and I did. I wasnt sup posed to be able to be coordinated enough to play sports but I picked up on baseball really quickly. My parents never told me to stop when I tried anything or told me I couldnt do something. They always supported anything I did and were very good at treating me like a normal kid. Thats why I never listen to people when they tell me I cant do anything. Jill Fornoles, Thomas guidance counselor at LMHS, said Thomas is an inspiration to her and others because of his positive attitude and conviction. She said if Thomas runs into a roadblock, he nds a way around it. Hes also wants to help others, as evident by the 324 hours of volunteer time he completed this year. I think its amazing that anyone can over come cancer to begin with, but to see some one like Thomas and see the person he is today, is motivational, Fornoles said. Thomas mom Mindy Giallella, an elementary school teacher at Minneola Charter School, said she, her husband and two daughters are are proud of Thomas and cant wait to see how far hell go in life. Sometimes, Mindy said, she nds her self looking at Thomas in admiration. He nev er losing hope and re mains strong through the toughest of days. She recalled his intensity on the baseball diamond. I would be watch ing him as he picked up the baseball bat then stand there waiting for the ball to be pitched to him, she said. He al ways looked so deter mined and as he swung the bat, I couldnt help think sometimes that, My Gosh, hes alive and hes doing this, and it was just overwhelming. Thomas will not waste time after graduation to get started on the next chapter of his life, either. Although his college ori entation is not until June 5, hes moving to Orlan do immediately to begin looking for a job. Thomas said he is eager to start college and cant wait to reach the point where he will be able to encourage children going through what he did and letting them know that the odds can be beat, something he got a taste of last summer as a coun selor at Camp Boggy Creek a summer camp for children with disabilities or serious ill nesses. I met this little boy with Spina Bida and I got to talking to him about his sickness, Thomas said. He didnt think Id understand but I told him I would since Id been through it, too. It ended up that for the whole week, we did things hed never done before because people always told him he couldnt because he might get hurt. We went swimming and sh ing, and even though they were in modied ways, he was so happy and proud of himself. He took on a whole new personality. It was a lot of fun to see him do that and thats what I want to do as an oncologist; give children and par ents going through can cer some hope, and liv ing proof, that maybe it has to be a certain way for them or maybe it doesnt. IF YOU GOLAKE MINNEOLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION WHEN: 8 / p.m. Friday. WHERE: The LMHS football stadium, 101 north Hancock Road, Minneola. GRADUATES: 365 VALEDICTORIAN: Kaelyn Peacock SALUTATORIAN: Marcela Sierra-Arce HOW TO REACH US MAY 26CASH 3 . ............................................... 0-6-0 Afternoon . .......................................... 4-3-3 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 9-4-3-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 9-6-7-6FLORIDALOTTERY MAY 25FANTASY 5 . ........................... 4-12-19-21-31 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. GRAD FROM PAGE A1 force. Soldiers have told The Associated Press that they are not properly paid, are dumped in dangerous bush with no supplies and that the Boko Haram extremists holding the girls are better equipped than they are. Some soldiers have said ofcers enriching themselves off the defense budget have no in terest in halting the veyear-old uprising that has killed thousands. Soldiers near mutiny earlier this month red on the car of a command ing ofcer come to pay his respects to the bodies of 12 soldiers who their colleagues said were unnecessarily killed by the insurgents in a nighttime ambush. The military also is accused of killing thousands of detainees held illegal ly in their barracks, some by shooting, some by tor ture and many starved to death or asphyxiated in overcrowded cells. More than 300 teenag ers were abducted from their school in the town Chibok on April 15. Police say 53 escaped on their own and 276 remain cap tive. A Boko Haram video has shown some of the girls reciting Quranic verses in Arabic and two of them explaining why they had converted from Christi anity to Islam in captivity. Unveried reports have indicated two may have died of snake bites, that some have been forced to marry their abductors and that some may have been carried across bor ders into Chad and Cam eroon. Boko Haram the nickname means Western education is sinful believes Western inuences have corrupted Nigerian society and want to install an Islam ic state under strict Shari ah law, though the popu lation 170 million people is divided almost equally between Christians and Muslims. NIGERIA FROM PAGE A1 GBENGA OLAMIKAN / APNigerias chief of defense staff Air Marshal Alex S. Badeh, center, speaks during a demonstration calling on the government to rescue the kidnapped girls in Abuja, Nigeria. TOM MURPHYAssociated PressThe wild hikes in health insurance rates that blindsided many Amer icans in recent years may become less frequent because of the health care overhaul. Final rates for 2015 wont be out for months, but early lings from insur ers suggest price increases of 10 per cent or more. That may sound like a lot, but rates have risen as much as 20 or 30 percent in recent years. The rates that emerge over the next few months for 2015 will carry con siderable political weight, since they will come out before Republicans and Democrats settle their ght for Congressional control in next falls midterm elections. Republicans are vowing to make failures of the law a main theme of their election push, and abnormally high premiums might bolster their argument. In addition to insuring millions of uninsured people, the other great promise of the massive health care overhaul was to tame the rate hikes that had become commonplace in the market for individual insurance coverage. No one expects price increases to go away, but some nonpartisan in dustry watchers say they do expect the big hikes to hit less frequently in the years to come, even though its still early in the laws implementa tion. They point to competition and greater scrutiny fostered by the law as key factors. Public insurance exchanges that debuted last fall and were created by the law make it easier for customers to compare prices. The overhaul also prevents insurers from rejecting cus tomers because of their health. That means someone who de velops a health condition like high blood pressure isnt stuck in the same plan year after year because other insurers wont take her. She can now shop around. The Urban Institute, a nonparti san policy research organization, said in a recent report that competi tion will help restrain individual in surance prices next year. And it could have a lasting impact once the new markets for coverage stabilize in a few years, said Larry Levitt, an insurance expert with the Kaiser Family Foundation, which analyzes health policy issues. Now if a plan tries to raise premi ums a lot, people can vote with their feet and move to another plan, Lev itt said. Greater scrutiny by regulators could also keep rates from skyrock eting. The overhaul requires a mandatory review of rate increases larger than 10 percent, which can lead to public attention that insurers dont want. Nobodys going to get a rate in crease unless they truly deserve it, said Dave Axene, a fellow of the So ciety of Actuaries, who is working with insurers in several states to g ure out pricing. The rigor that we had to go through to prove that the rates were reasonable, its worse than an IRS audit at times. To be sure, insurers and others in the eld say its too early to fully understand what pricing trends will emerge for individual insur ance plans, which make up a small slice of the insured population. And some experts arent convinced of any one outcome of the law. Industry consultant Bob Laszews ki called the idea that the exchang es will reign in prices by promoting competition an unproven theory. No one has any idea what this risk really looks like yet and proba bly wont for two to three years, he said. Karen Ignagni agrees. The CEO of the trade association Americas Health Insurance Plans, which rep resents insurers, said competition between insurers will mean little if too many sick people sign up for coverage on the exchanges. Insur ers need a balance between sick and healthy people to avoid big claim hits that lead to future rate hikes. Laszewski expects some plans to seek either big premium increases or decreases in 2015, but he says that says nothing about the long-term im plications of the overhaul. He noted that insurers entered 2014 without a good feel for what their competitors would charge, so price swings are in evitable as companies adjust.Insurance rate hikes may be tamed AP FILE PHOTO Navigator John Jones explains the many options to a client seeking help buying health insurance at the Family Guidance Center in Springeld, Ill.

PAGE 3

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Nature lovers invited to bird and butterfly surveysOutdoor enthusiasts are invited to take part in two opportunities in June to survey birds and butteries, led by park rangers for a Bird and Buttery Survey and hike through two of Lake Countys parks and preserves on June 7 at Ellis Acres Reserve, 25302 County Road 42, in Paisley, and June 14 at the Pasture Reserve, 5144 Lake Erie Road, Groveland, both are from 7:30 to 11 / a.m. Knowledge of common species is a plus but not required, and the event includes hiking about two miles on unpaved trails. Online registration is recommended and is available at www. lakecountygov/parks or by calling the Parks and Trials Division at 352-253-4950.BUSHNELL Third annual Pioneer Day kids Camp comingKids ages, 8-12 years can take part in the third annual Pioneer Day Camp at historic Dade Battleeld in Bushnell beginning June 9. The camp will run from 9 / a.m. to 3 / p.m., through June 13 with Seminole Pioneer crafts, games, food, hands-on demonstrations, reenactors and more at the park, 7200 County Road 603 in Bushnell. Cost is $75 per child and registration and payment is available online at www.dadebattleeld.com, or Call Kristin Wood at 352-793-4781 or email to Kristin.n.wood@dep.state. .us for information.SUMTERVILLE GED summer boot camp available in SumterSumter County Adult and Community Education Centers will host a GED summer boot camp on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings from 5 to 9 / p.m. beginning on June 3, 200 Cleveland Ave. in Wildwood. Sumterville classes will run on the same days from 9 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. The four-week camps will end June 26 with participants taking the GED test in Wildwood on June 27 and June 30. Classes are $45 with proof of Florida residency required. Call 352-793-5719, ext. 54200 or go to aec.sumter.k12..us.MOUNT DORA Pat Burkes Hoops Summer Camps begin in JuneBoys and girls ages 7-13 can take part in a basketball camp hosted by six-time European champion and NBA player Pat Burke at respective camps beginning June 9-13 at Mount Dora High School. Other dates for the camps are: July 7-11, also at Mount Dora High School; June 23-27 at Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont; and July 14-18 also at Windy Hill Middle School. For details and registration, go to www.orlandobasketballtraining.com or call Pat Burkes Hoops Training Facility, 1178 Camp Ave., in Mount Dora at 352-385-0131.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLeesburg ofcials are looking for ways to save money as they prepare the 2015 budget, and one option the commission will consider tonight is offering a one-time voluntary early retirement incentive plan for up to 54 eligible city employees, who are at least 50 years of age and have served at least 20 years with the city. The board will hear public comments on the plan at todays 5:30 / p.m. meeting on the third oor of Leesburg City Hall. William Spinelli, the citys nance director, claims personnel costs make up 67 percent of the citys general fund expenses. A Voluntary Early Retirement In centive Plan (VERIP) is an effective way to realize signicant personnel savings, while providing a reasonable and humane inducement to re duce the size and cost of the existing workforce, Spinelli said in the agen da memo, noting it could result in total personnel savings of $206,849 in the rst year, which the savings would compound in future years. However, Spinelli said the city does THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comThe Memorial Day week end soapbox race was can celed because CM Box Car Racing was unable to af ford permits or meet other requirements imposed on them by Minneola and Lake County Sheriffs Ofce. The club president now hopes 35 young driv ers will race in the fall. John Bomm, president of CM Box Car Racing, has been involved in soapbox races throughout Florida and the East Coast for eight years. He said the cars for the holiday race had been prepared, inspected, and safety precautions were also in place at the down hill track of private prop erty along Mountain Hill Drive. Bomm had permis sion from the homeowners for the event, so he was surprised to be told by ofcials that a special events permit was needed for the Mountain Hill Drive site. I did not think that I needed permits on pri vate property, Bomm said in an e-mail, recall ing his mid-May meeting with ofcials. Just so you understand, Lake County Sheriff (Gary Borders) was the one that stopped the race and told us that race will not happen at all on Mountain Club Drive. Not at all. Then the may or said he will honor what the sheriff said. The sheriffs ofce did not respond to an e-mail from the Daily Commercial seeking comment, yet Bomm said hes now looking into other cities in Lake County to host the race, including Clermont and Eustis. With some 40-plus cars in the garage, I need to nd someone that really wants this, and I feel Minneo la does not, Bomm said. How can a city shut down an event for kids? It shows me they do not care about the kids feelings. Bomm is now moving forward with plans for a race in September or Oc tober, which he believes will be cooler weather and better for the young racers and their cars. We love children and we will work to accomplish this, he said in the e-mail, noting kids and their par ents were upset that the Memorial Day weekend race had come to a halt. BILL THOMPSONHalifax Media GriupA committee from the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs is expected to visit Ocala on June 20 as part of the site-selection process for a new veterans home that would serve former service people within a 75-mile radius. The stop in Ocala is one of a handful the panel will make next month in whittling down the list of poten tial homes for the $17 million facility. Besides Marion Coun ty, the group will trav el in June to Lake Al fred and Bartow in Polk County, Port St. Lucie in St. Lucie County and Palatka in neighboring Putnam County. It was unclear when the com mittee would visit lo cations in Collier and Manatee counties, the remaining nalists for the facility. While in Ocala next month, the FDVA com mittee will tour a 20acre parcel at the inter section of Southwest 80th Avenue and 80th Street. The site is within the On Top of the World community, whose developer, Kenneth Colen, has offered to donate the land to help Marion County win the project. County staff recently issued invitations to the event to federal, state and local elected ofcials who represent Marion County. Yet county Veterans Services Department Director Jeffrey Askew wants a major show of support from all people. If everybody could come out, it would be great, Askew said in an LEESBURGRetirement plan could aid city budget New vets home may be coming to Ocala MINNEOLALocal soapbox racers looking for new track PHOTOS COURTESY OF CM BOX CAR RACING After a Memorial Day race was cancelled, CM Box Car Racing President John Bomm hopes 35 racers will take part in an event this fall. COURTESY CM BOX RACINGThe cost to sponsor a car is $800 for the rst year and $300 for each year after. BILL DIPAOLOThe Palm Beach PostJUPITER Standing on the wood deck of their mobile home, Sam and Marcia Arsenault can toss a shing line into the tur quoise water of the Jupiter Inlet and watch sailboats drift past the Jupiter Light house. When we rst walked back here, my mouth fell open. I couldnt believe how beautiful it is. We looked at each other and said, This is the place we want to live, said Mar cia, 73, a former resident of Danvers, Mass. But the days of water Funky waterfront mobile park faces redevelopment THOMAS CORDY / AP Nenita Tobias, known as Grandma to residents of Suni Sands mobile home park in Jupiter, stops for a photo on her mail pickup route near the entrance to the park on Wednesday.SEE PLAN | A4SEE DERBY | A4SEE HOME | A4SEE SUNI SANDS | A4

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 OBITUARIESSadie M. LeeSadie M. Lee, 80, of Leesburg, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, May 25, 2014. She enjoyed her career as a registered nurse for 34 years, during that time she was a Direc tor of Nursing at many different facilities. She attended First Baptist Church of Fruitland Park and was a loy al member for 28 years; she served as the Di rector of Food Service Ministries and on many other committees, she also enjoyed singing in the choir. Sadie also en joyed photography and was very supportive of her ve sons in athlet ics. Sadie is survived by her husband, John H. Lee of 53 years of Fruitland Park, ve sons, Samuel (Susan) Rixie of Fruitland Park; Lavelle (Ellen) Rixie of Mt Dora; Dennis E. Rixie of Leesburg; Don (Kathy) Rixie of Leesburg; David (Tina) Lee of Tavares; 14 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren; sisters Leona Davis, of Gray, GA; Peggy Sykes, of Mobile, AL; Judy Ne smith, of High Spring, FL; brother, Lawrence Johnson of Mascott with many nieces and nephews. Visitation will be Thursday, May 29, from 6:00 to 8:00pm at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg. Ser vices will be held at Heritage Community Church, Fruitland Park on Friday, May 30, 2014 at 1:30 PM with Pas tor Sidney Brock ofciating. Burial will follow at Lone Oak Cemetery, Leesburg. Online condolences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.com. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, in charge of arrangements.Lutie Deane Self WalkerLutie Deane Self Walker, 85, of Fruit land Park, FL passed from this life into eter nity Wednesday, May 21, 2014 in Leesburg. Born in Lynchburg, VA, Deane was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother and homemak er. She volunteered for 23 years as a member of the Leesburg Regional Medical Center Auxiliary. She was married to the late Harry M. Walker of Fruitland Park. Deane is survived by her daughter, Janet Walker, of Fruitland Park; sons and daughters-in-law, Andrew Walker (Linda) of Bonita Springs, FL; Richard Walker of Adamsville, FL; Thomas Walker (Dana) of Spring Hill, FL and she was the proud and loving grandmother of ve grandchildren. A me morial service will be held Friday, May 30th at 11:00 am at Beyers Funeral Home, 1123 W. Main St., Leesburg, followed by graveside ser vices at 1:30 pm at Flor ida National Cemetery in Bushnell. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations in Deanes name be made to Not Ashamed Ministry, P.O. Box 208, Fruit land Park, FL 34731. On line condolences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.comAr rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg, FL.Willie Vern WrightWillie Vern Wright, 71, of Leesburg, passed away May 23, 2014. He was born to the late Willie and Marga ret Wright, November 13, 1942 in Fayetteville, NC. He was a devot ed husband, loving father, grandfather and brother. Vern graduated from Livorno Ameri can High School, Livor no Italy. He was married to Linda Ray in 1967 and they lived togeth er in North Carolina be fore settling in Leesburg Florida. Vern started out with North Caroli na telephone company. He remained in that industry for 38 years, re ceiving numerous certications and accreditations and nal ly retiring from Sprint in 2003. Vern is survived by his loving wife Linda, brothers; Ronald Park er of Fayetteville, NC, Doug Wright, Sebring, FL and Danny Wright of Hope Mills, NC, his two children: Jeff Wright of Umatilla, FL and Heather Stewart of Tampa, FL. He is also survived by his four grandchildren Jordan, Chelsie, Ella and Madison. Visita tion will be held Sunday June 1, 2014 from 2-3:30 with service immediately following in the Chapel of Beyers Funer al Home in Leesburg, FL. Online condolenc es may be left at www. beyersfuneralhome. com. Arrangements entrusted to Beyers Funer al Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.DEATH NOTICESStephen J. BleierStephen J. Bleier, 81, of Sebring, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Angela M. RussellAngela M. Russell, 37, Floral City died Friday, May 23, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Iva J. WiegandIva J. Wiegand, 90, of Leesburg, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.IN MEMORY not believe all 54 eli gible workers will take the early retirement, but around 15 to 25 employees may opt to do so. It is assumed that more senior employees with higher paying jobs will take the offer which immediately increases the savings ratios for the city, the nance di rector said in the memo, noting the city would replace the retired em ployees with employees at the lower end of the pay scale. Spinelli not ed the city also plans to eliminate some jobs by not lling the current vacant positions. Currently, Leesburgs general employees may retire at age 65 without penalty, yet there is a 3.33 percent annual penalty if they do so be fore age 65. To encour age early voluntary re tirement, Leesburg is waiving the penalty for those with 35 or more years of service. A penalty of 1.5 percent would faced those with 25 to 30 years of service, with 2 percent facing those with 20 to 25 years. Spinelli noted that by offering the penalty reductions, expenses initially will increase due to more money needed in the retirement plan to cover the early de partures. There are other ini tial expenses in the retirement plan, as well, because Spinelli doesnt see some em ployees with at least 15 years of service eager to pay for their own health insurance un til the city picks this up at age 58, according to current policy. Reducing the re tirement penalty is not enough incentive, he said. ... If an employee takes the early retire ment incentive, then the city will have to pick up $400 a month for healthcare costs prior to the age of 58. A single years cost will be $139,000 if all em ployees take advantage of the early retirement incentive. Although Spinelli said the city would also have to pay for any unused paid time off due to employees retiring early, he believes the city would still benet with overall savings while also allowing for organizational restructuring. If the board approves the plan, Spinelli said his staff would return to the commission with a nal report on the exact organization al savings. Eligible employ ees who decide to retire early would have to provide notice to the citys human resources department no lat er than July 1, with re tirement effective on or before Sept. 1. PLAN FROM PAGE A3 We have received great support from approximately 30 dif ferent area merchants donating products we needed to put this race in operations, Bomm said, noting CMC Box DERBY FROM PAGE A3 interview. The countys plan, he added, is to greet the 11-member FDVA committee with a band, offer refreshments and decorate the grounds in military colors. We want over whelming support to try to sell the place be cause we denite ly need it here, Askew said. Local advocates also will get an opportunity to be heard, since FDVA ofcials have said the selection committee will take public comment during its visit. The FDVA selected Marion as one of 10 nalists for the 120-bed facility back in Febru ary. That list was nar rowed to six once the application process closed on May 14. The FDVA already operates nursing homes in Daytona Beach, Land O Lakes, Panama City, Pembroke Pines, Port Charlotte and St. Augustine, as well as an assisted-living facility in Lake City. State ofcials say a new nursing home is needed because exist ing ones are full. In addition to serving up to 120 aging military veterans, the project is expected to create 190 new jobs. The federal government will fund 65 per cent of the cost of the nursing home. The state will cover the rest, although local governments have been en couraged to contribute beyond just offering shovel-ready land. The FDVA has suggested lo cal governments put $500,000 toward the project, although that was not required to be selected. FDVA ofcials have said the facility is intended to serve veter ans within a 75-mile ra dius. HOME FROM PAGE A3 Car Racing will also need more funds for the fall event, including sponsors to pay forcible, such as police at $35 an hour. He noted the public can help by getting in volved to help sponsor a car or race. A one-day race with police (on scene) is about $1,900 and two days is $3,500, he said, noting the cost for a car sponsor is $800 for the rst year and $300 for each year after, which covers parts for maintainable and child regis tration fees. To learn more, Bomm can be reached at 352708-4207 or by email at cmboxcarracing@ gmail.com. front living are num bered for Arsenault and the other 200 res idents of Suni Sands Mobile Home Park off State Road A1A, located on 10 of the most prime waterfront acres in northern Palm Beach County. Charles Modica bought the proper ty last summer for $17 million. The Jupiter Is land resident, who has not led any propos als with the town, en visions a historic inn with restaurants and shops. He wants to re furbish the 100-yearold boathouse. There could be docks and a stop for a water taxi. And maybe a swim ming pool that would be open to the public, he said. Im doing my best to work with the Suni Sands residents. I want to let them stay as long as possible, Modica said. Town regulations on the 10-acre property allow up to six residenc es per acre. Buildings could be up to three stories high. Modica could apply for high er density and building heights. Town council approval is required. I want to keep with the funky shing vil lage theme, said Modica, referring to the towns plan to build shops, restaurants and residences along A1A between U.S. 1 and Ju piter Beach Road. That funky village theme is evident as soon as a visitor en ters the narrow road into the park. Colorful handmade salaman ders and pelicans dec orate the outside walls of the mobile homes. Unlocked bicycles clutter driveways. Res idents walk past with shing poles on their shoulders. Everybody knows everybody. We look out for each other, Sam Arsenault said. Residents at Suni Sands, who must be at least 55 years old, own their own trailers. They each pay about $600 a month to rent their lots, which in cludes water, sewer, lawn maintenance, trash collection and cable. Residents pay their own electric bills. Many, like 85-yearold Doris Smith, say cant afford to leave. She and others say they are unwilling to make any improvements to their mobile homes because they are uncer tain about when they must move out. Smith moved to Suni Sands 30 years ago with her husband George from Point Pleasant, N.J. George known as Capt. George to his neighbors died a decade ago. Doris, a friendly woman with a rm handshake, works three days a week do ing food demonstrations at a local grocery store. Ive got applications in at subsidized housing. There is a veyear wait. I dont want to go back up north. I want to stay here year-round. This is my home, Smith said. But Bill Leo, a retired paving contractor whose parents bought a mobile home in the park in the late 1970s, said residents must be realistic. Its not like Briny Breezes. We dont own the land. This is prime waterfront property. If I can spend another year or two here, I will be happy, said Leo, 67, a full-time resident for 10 years. Modica, who last week visited the park and knocked on residents doors to talk about his plans, said he wants to work with residents. He wrote a letter dated March 21, 2014, to all residents, inviting them to sign a years lease. Residents now pay on a monthto-month basis. About 30 residents signed, said Steven Burns, Suni Sands operating manager. Florida law requires mobile-home park residents get at least six months notice before they are required to leave. Many residents did not sign the lease because they did not believe they would be guaranteed a full year to stay, said Marcia Ar senault. I dont believe that a lease can guarantee us any more time than state law allows, she said. While there is no denite timeline to build, Modica expects development to start in the next several years. When developers stand here and look at Suni Sands, they see Old Port Cove, said resident Tom Ryan, referring to the condo minium-marina development in North Palm Beach on U.S. 1. When Suni Sands residents look out our win dows, we see old Flor ida. We want to keep it that way. SUNI SANDS FROM PAGE A3

PAGE 5

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PAGE 7

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

PAGE 9

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrfrrf$50 OFFntrbrfbORDERS OF $150 OR MORE$25 OFF CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 PETE YOSTAssociated PressWASHINGTON Presi dent Barack Obama led the nation in commemorating Memorial Day, declaring the United States has reached a pivotal moment in Afghanistan with the end of war ap proaching. Obama, who returned just hours earlier from a surprise visit with U.S. troops at Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan, paid tribute to those lost in battle there and elsewhere over history. He called them patriots who made the ultimate sacri ce for their country. Early this morning, I re turned from Afghanistan, Obama told the audience of several thousand peo ple. Yesterday, I visited with some of our men and women serving there 7,000 miles from home. For more than 12 years, men and women like those I met with have borne the burden of our nations se curity. Now, because of their profound sacrice, because of the progress they have made, were at a pivotal moment. Our troops are coming home. By the end of this year, our war in Afghanistan will nally come to end, the pres ident said to applause. And yesterday at Bagram, and here today at Arlington, we pay tribute to the nearly 2,200 American patriots whove made the ultimate sacrice in Afghanistan. We will honor them, always. Obama has said it was likely that a small contingent of U.S. forces would stay behind for coun terterrorism missions, as well as to train Afghan security forces. The president made a eet ing reference to the widening scandal involving reports of poor performance by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which is facing allegations of delayed treatments, and even deaths in Arizona. As weve been reminded in recent days we must do more to keep faith with our veterans and their families, and ensure they get the care and benets and opportuni ties that theyve earned and that they deserve, said the president. These Americans have done their duty, Obama said. They ask nothing more than that our country does ours now and for decades to come, he added, drawing more applause. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, a retired Army general, was among those attending the ceremony. Lawmakers from both par ties have pressed for policy changes and better management at the department. The Arlington remembrance was duplicated in villages, towns, cities and coun ties across the country. There was a holiday weekend reunion of some of the last sur viving members of the Tuskegee Airmen in upstate New York. More than 3,000 volunteers placed ags at the graves of 120,000 veterans at the Florida National Cemetery. And in Mississippi, the annual Vicksburg Memorial Day parade was being accompa nied by a wreath-laying cer emony at Vicksburg National Cemetery. In Suffolk, Va., Navy Petty Ofcer 1st Class Brian McNeal joined those attending Fleet Week. They made the sacrice so everyday citizens dont have to worry about the evils of the world, he said. At Arlington, Obama was joined by rst lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill, at the solemn ceremony across the Potomac River from White House on the hallowed grounds of Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. The re membrance was for the war heroes of yesteryear as well as servicemen and women stationed around the world. It was carried out in idyllic weather under cloudless skies and a brilliant sunshine. The national observance was to be matched by parades, pic nics and speeches across the country. Obama appeared at the cemeterys amphitheater to speak after carrying out the traditional presidential wreath-laying, surrounded there by troops in formal dress and hearing the playing of Taps.Obama leads country in celebrating Memorial Day SUSAN WALSH / APPresident Barack Obama lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., on Monday. PAUL WISEMANAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON China may be trying to steal trade secrets from U.S. businesses, as federal prose cutors allege. Yet for many U.S. companies, Chinas vast market remains an irresistible source of business. The Justice Departments indictment last week of ve Chi nese military ofcials accused them of try ing to pilfer conden tial information from American companies. But even some of the alleged U.S. corporate victims of the hackers have little incentive to cheer any trade rup ture with China. One, Westinghouse, is building four nucle ar reactors in China. Another, specialty steelmaker Alleghe ny Technologies, oper ates a joint venture in Shanghai. A third, Alcoa, is the biggest foreign investor in Chinas aluminum market. Indeed, Alcoa went so far as to downplay Justices charges: No material information was compromised during this incident which CHRISTOPHER WEBER and ALICIA CHANGAssociated PressGOLETA, Calif. Colorado movie theater shooter James Holmes. Sandy Hook school attacker Adam Lanza. And now Elliot Rodger. All were young loners with no criminal history who went on shooting sprees, leaving devastat ed families in their wake. Mass murderers tend to have a history of pent-up frustration and failures, are social ly isolated and vengeful, blaming others for their unhappiness, experts say. They all display deluded thinking and a lot of rage about feeling so marginalized, said James Garbarino, a professor of psychology at Loyola University. Since mass killings are extremely rare, scholars say theres no way to predict who has dead ly intentions, let alone who will reach a break ing point and take action. Past violence is a clue, but in Rodgers case, police did not see him as a threat to himself or others during a wel fare check weeks be fore Friday nights ram page near the University of California, Santa Bar bara that left six victims dead and 13 injured. Rodger died of an apparent self-inicted gunshot wound to the head after a shootout with deputies, ending a night of terror in this tight-knit seaside campus community as the semester drew to a close. Pinpointing a mass killer is not an exact science. We dont have a foolproof way of pre dicting who will turn violent, said Risdon Slate, a professor at Florida Southern College. Before Rodger stabbed three male UCSB students in his apartment and cruised around in his black BMW ring at sorority girls and strang ers, he left a trail of You Tube videos and a 140page manifesto ranting against women and couples and lamenting his lack of a sex life. occurred several years ago, the company said. American compa nies are in a delicate position. They want to maintain good rela tions with China, the worlds second-biggest economy and a mar ket where U.S. rms earnings grew near ly 50 percent last year. But theyre also increas ingly fearful of Chinese hackers stealing their trade secrets. Looked that way, the hacking case is going to be positive in opening up the conversation, said Jamian Ronca Spa davecchia, founder of the Oxbow Advisory, which advises compa nies about risks in Chi na and other emerging markets. Its bringing into the open some of the issues U.S. compa nies are facing. Experts say mass murderers are hard to predict Hacking case belies US links with China

PAGE 10

A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 352-253-0059Visitpetlodgeandspa.comIn Leesburg, next to Home DepotDiscover why pet owners trust us for their boarding, day care and grooming needs. Your Miracle Donation will change someones lifeMIRACULOUSTHRIFTSTORE2891 US Hwy. 441/27352-315-0002 Donations are being acceptedVOLUNTEERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY people can see who he was. Coleman said the event is important because people need to be remembered, especially the fallen heroes. Thats why we have our freedom, because of them, Coleman said. Herbert Patchett, a World War II and Korean War veteran, was in at tendance Monday at the ceremony. He said he served from 1942 through 1957 and lives in nearby Nobleton. Im thanking all those who gave their lives so that I could be free, Patchett said. He added his wife, who did not serve, is buried at the cemetery. Major General Michael Plehn was the keynote speaker at the ceremony. According to the U.S. Air Forces website, Plehn is the Principal Director for Middle East Policy in the Ofce of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. April Warren of the Ocala Star-Banner reported that more than 3,000 volunteers placed small American ags near the 120,000 graves of veterans and their spouses in the cemetery on Sunday. The story states that the ags are because of the Flags for Fallen Vets nonprot and that this is the rst time this has happened at the cemetery on Memorial Day. The ags will stay at the cemetery until Thursday, according to the Star-Banner. Other Memorial Day events included an event organized by Amer ican Legion Post 219 that took place at Shiloh Cemetery in Fruitland Park, an event at the Waterfront Pavilion in Clermont, a picnic in Clermont put on by American Legion Post 55, and the Water Oaks Memorial Day ceremony in Lady Lake. CEREMONIES FROM PAGE A1 CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lloyd Thorne and Gerry Dufresne lay a wreath during the Water Oaks Memorial Day ceremony in Lady Lake. LINDA CHARLTON / DAILY COMMERCIAL Allen Venezio plays taps at the Memorial Day ceremonies at Waterfront Park in Clermont. PETER LEONARD Associated PressDONETSK, Ukraine Ukraines presi dent-elect said Mon day he wants to begin talks with Moscow and end a pro-Russia insur gency in the east, but the rebels escalated the conict by occupying a major airport, and the government in Kiev responded with an air strike. As darkness fell in Do netsk, a city of about 1 million, it was unclear who was in control of the airport. Hundreds of ghters of the separatist Donetsk Peoples Republic had been brought by trucks to a wooded area on the fringes of the airport, many of them armed with rocket-propelled grenade launchers and automatic ries. At least one warplane streaked over the city, ring ares, and explosions were heard from the di rection of the airport. The rebels, who de clared independence for Donetsk and the neighboring Luhansk region after a hastily called and dubious referendum two weeks ago, regarded Sundays election of candy ty coon Petro Poroshenko as president to be il legitimate. In a victory speech, the billionaire promised to open a dialogue with res idents of eastern Ukraine and to guarantee their rights. The rebels and many others in the region say they fear the Febru ary ouster of pro-Mos cow President Viktor Yanukovych will lead to the repression of its predominantly Russian-speaking population by Ukrainian nationalists. Poroshenko also said he would not negotiate with armed insurgents that he calls terrorists. Peace can only be achieved through a di alogue with people, he said Monday. This process cannot be stopped with the use of arms only; arms can be used exclusively against kill ers and terrorists. Russia has heavily criticized an offensive by Ukraines mili tary against the rebels, and Poroshenko indicated he wants it to end quickly. The anti-terrorist operation cannot and should not last two or three months, he said. It should and will last hours. But aggression by reb els, as at the Donetsk air port, could make it impossible for Ukrainian forces to back off. News reports said scores of armed insur gents descended on the airport about 3 / a.m., and all ights were can celed. Heavy gunre broke out, Ukrainian ghter jets and helicop ters ew overhead, and dense black smoke rose in the air. VADIM GHIRDA / AP Pro-Russian insurgents aim their ries during ghting around the airport on Monday outside Donetsk, Ukraine. Ukraine launches airstrike on pro-Moscow rebels NICOLE WINFIELDAssociated PressABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE Pope Francis announced Monday he would meet soon with a group of sex abuse vic tims at the Vatican and declared zero toler ance for any member of the clergy who would violate a child. Francis also revealed that three bishops are currently under investigation by the Vatican for abuse-related reasons, though it wasnt clear if they were accused of committing abuse itself or of having covered it up. There are no privi leges, he told reporters en route back to Rome from Jerusalem. The meeting with a half-dozen victims will mark the rst such encounter for the pope, who has been criticized by victims for not ex pressing personal solidarity with them when he has reached out to other people who suf fer. Francis said the meeting and a Mass at the Vatican hotel where he lives would take place early next month, but ofcials suggest ed the date hadnt been pinned down. On this issue we must go forward, for ward. Zero tolerance, Francis said, calling abuse of children an ugly crime that be trays God. Francis spoke to reporters for nearly an hour after his grueling, three-day trip to Jordan, the West Bank and Israel, taking all 11 questions posed and re sponding with candor and occasional humor. He said he would travel to Sri Lanka and the Philippines in January 2015. And he sug gested that he might follow in emeritus Pope Benedict XVIs footsteps and retire if he no lon ger had the strength to do the job. We need to look at him as an institution: he opened a door, the door of emeritus popes, Francis said. Only God knows if there will be others, but the door is open. If and when the time comes, he said, I will do what the Lord tells me to do, pray and try to nd Gods will. But I think that Benedict XVI wasnt a unique case. ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis places an envelope in on of the cracks between the stones of the Western Wall, the holiest place where Jews can pray, on Monday in the old city of Jerusalem.Pope Francis to meet with sex abuse victims, cites zero tolerance

PAGE 11

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I f your phone is smarter than you, it is not time to get a new phone: Its time to get a new life. Many of us have more intimate relationship with our devices than we have with members of our immediate family. Were more attached to our devices, more fond of them, responsive to them and attuned to every nuance of their tiny, soulless selves than we are to, say, our rst cousins. We remember the day we got our rst computer or iPad but forget the exact year our nephew got married. We know how to upload apps but dont have a current mailing address for our best friend from high school. Weve bookmarked cute puppy-meets-dolphin videos from HappyPlace but erased the performance by our neighbor when she sang in the community theater production of The Fantasticks. We know how to play Candy Crush but we dont know how to make folks feel comfortable by talking to them when they enter a room; we know how to Instagram our meal but have lost the art of making conversation over dinner. Ill admit that I have a severe allergic reaction to seeing people using electronic devices at meals. Its like being allergic to nuts. Actually, as far as Im concerned, it is being allergic to nuts. Ive seen whole groups sitting around a lovely table at a nice restaurant where every family member, ages 7 to 70, is holding a square piece of plastic, eyes down, thumbs going like mad (OK, Grandpa might be using a stylus) and saying, in terms of spoken language, exactly nothing. Zip. Zero. Nada. Its unnerving, right? If youre at a table nearby, you nd yourself speaking in low voices because the groups almost looks lost in prayer, heads bowed as if their devices were hymnals. The only person using her nor mal voice near that table is the server, whos been instructed by management to memorize the menu because to read the daily specials from a sheet of paper might be considered unsophisticated by the patrons. Since none of the patrons bothers to look up at the server, of course, she could be crossing her eyes and sticking both index ngers in her ears while wiggling them around as she explains how the scrod is prepared. So much for ambience. Whod know? And dont tell me that little Riley is having more interaction with Grandpa via Pet Rescue Saga than she would be if they were talking to each other. You know thats ridiculous. Thats like saying, Im not fat, Im big-boned or Im on a gluten-free diet not to be thin but for health reasons. Sure, in some cases it is true but you know what Im saying, right? How many people would be on a gluten-free diet if it immediately made you gain, say, 100 pounds? Some would, but not as many. And sometimes Grandpa and Riley are better off not talking, but not usually. But right now in our culture we justify an odd collection of behaviors effectively and efciently enough to make them appear ordinary and convincingly nor mal. We look up information we should know and we rely on a kind of technological exoskeleton to keep us upright rather than strengthening the core of our knowledge. As we over-medicate ourselves and become less physically resilient, so we become less intellectually resilient when we over-tech ourselves. When we rely on a computer to remember the name of that actress from that movie, we miss out on the glorious feeling when we retrieve it on our own. Heres how George Eliot described it: That action of memory ... had suddenly completed itself without conscious effort a common experience, agreeable as a completed sneeze, even if the name remembered is of no value. If its too easy, theres no fun. And its our fault. Technology, like nature, is neither friend nor foe. It is profoundly and astonishingly indifferent; human beings are no smarter, and no less smart, than we once were or will ever be. Technology is simply there to be made our servant or our master, as we see t and we are responsible choosing how we use it. Now that youve nished reading, please look up.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES GINA BARRECAMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Cmon people, dont get hung up on your phone look up I ts hard to blame consumers if their ini tial reaction to the proposed $48.5-billion merger of AT&T and DirecTV is to reach for their wallets and hold on tight. Mergers usual ly leave the public with fewer choices and lead to higher prices. What makes this merger of vital importance to consumers is the near universal demand for the companies services. Turned off by airline mergers and rising fares? In a pinch, there are still road and rail alternatives. But these days almost everyone buys service from a telecom company, unless theyre completely off the grid, which is both unlikely and impractical or go back to rabbit ears. The Comcast-Time Warner deal, worth $45 billion, was announced three months ago. In that agreement, which is awaiting government approval, both partners made much of the fact that although they are both cable systems, each serves different geographical areas, with little overlap. Thus, they argued, a merger would not amount to decreased competition. The proposed consolidation between AT&T, the No. 2 seller of high-speed Internet service, and DirecTV, the largest satellite video provider, is a different deal. They compete head-tohead for TV viewers in 10 of the 20 largest metropolitan markets. To the claim that this would reduce choices, executives at both rms argue that there are benets for both sides. AT&Ts wireless customers, for example, would be able to tap into DirecTV video on their smartphones. And DirecTV customers would get better broadband, wireless and national bundle services. To sweeten the offer, AT&T promised to expand its broadband service to 15 million new customer locations in rural parts of its service areas, as well as offering stand-alone broadband for three years to those who choose to go without bundled services. These are undeniable benets for some consumers, for a limited time in some instances. But there are signicant concerns, as well, in the rapidly changing telecom world from all of these proposed combinations. If the Comcast-Time Warner merger is approved and AT&T/DirecTVs is not, that would leave one behemoth in the telecom world standing alone, with an ability to overwhelm its competitors while hapless consumers watch impotently from the sidelines. If that merger is approved, then nding an equally robust competitor would only make sense. Green-lighting both, however, would provide an incentive for all the other players to get into the act. Its hard to see how consumers benet as individual companies morph into telecom giants. For regulators, that should be the bottom line. The promised benets have to be weighed against the obvious risk to consumers.AVOICETake skeptical view of telecom merger mania Classic DOONESBURY 1972

PAGE 12

A12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 2249 N. Citrus Blvd (441) LeesburgBeside Wal-Mart next to the new Dollar TreeCALL352.787.1617Appointments Preferred Walk-ins Welcome COLOR& HIGHLIGHTSpecial with PattyIncludes Cut & StylePICK & GO PERMSpecial with Kami$35.00(Must Present Ad) $25.00Manicure & Pedicure Combo Special Mens Pedicure(Reg $95)$85.00

PAGE 13

www.Leesburgdermatologyandmohssurgery.comEast Main StreetPine StreetEast Dixie AvenueLeesburg DERMATOLOGY & MOHS Surgery Leesburg Regional Medical Center S. Lake StreetJohnny Gurgen, DO FAOCDBoard Certified Dermatologist & Mohs SurgeonAward Winning Author & Lecturer of multiple World Renowned Dermatologic Publications. SPECIALIZING IN: rfnt bt t tt t NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSMost Insurance Plans Accepted Medicare Accepted ttt t tt ttt tttt ttt tttt SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Thunder look to even series with Spurs / B3 Jackie Slater is introduced before the inaugural Pro Football Hall of Fame Fan Fest on May 2 at the International Exposition Center in Cleveland. Years before Slater was a gigantic teenager in Jackson, Mississippi, playing football for Wingeld High School and hoping to attract the attention of college scouts. AP FILE PHOTO DAVID BRANDTAssociated PressJACKSON, Miss. Years before Jackie Slater was a Hall of Fame offensive lineman, he was playing for Wingeld High School in Jackson, Mis sissippi, and hoping to attract the attention of college scouts. This was in the early 1970s about the time Southeastern Conference football teams were just beginning to recruit black players so this massive teenag er was mostly ignored by the big schools. But Jackson State welcomed him. It was where I was want ed, Slater recalled. And its where I could excel. Slater was one of many players who thrived at the na tions historically black colleges and universities, particularly from the s through the s. NFL superstars Jerry Rice and Walter Payton were part of that wave. But HBCUs have slowly turned into an afterthought on the college football land scape. For the rst time in the NFLs common draft era, which started in 1967, not one play er from the Southwestern Money woes, declining talent plague historically black colleges, universitiesIt was where I was wanted, and its where I could excel.Hall-of-Famer Jackie Slateron why he played at Jackson StateSEE HBCU | B2 MARK YIEN / AP Oregon State players rush to greet Logan Ice, who hit a game-winning single to beat the Washington Huskies 1-0 in an NCAA college baseball game on May 1 in Corvallis, Ore. OSU is the No. 1 seed for the NCAA tournament which begins on Friday. ERIC OLSONAssociated PressOMAHA, Neb. Or egon State has proved itself as the best in the West. The NCAA Divi sion I Baseball Com mittee also thinks the Beavers are best in the nation. The committee on Monday made the Pac12 champions the top seed for the NCAA tour nament over SEC regu lar-season winner Flor ida and a Virginia team thats been one of the most consistent in the nation but failed to win an ACC title. I thought if you took Florida and Oregon State and Virginia, you could nd a rea son for any of them to be the (No. 1) seed, Beavers coach Pat Ca sey said. When it came down to the fact neither Florida or Virginia were automatic quali ers, I thought that might swing it our way. The other ve national seeds, in order, are: Indiana, Florida State, Louisiana-Lafayette, TCU and LSU. Oregon State (42-12) is the No. 1 seed for the rst time after being No. 3 a year ago. The Beavers have one of the na tions best starting ro tations in Ben Wetzler, Jace Fry and Andrew Moore and one of the top offensive players in the country in left eld er Michael Conforto. Florida (40-21) won the SEC regular-season Oregon St. top seed, FSU No. 4 in NCAA tournament BOB LEVERONE / AP Florida State catcher Danny De La Calle (13) exchanges highves with pitcher Jameis Winston (44) after defeating Virginia 6-4 in the ACC tournament on Saturday in Greensboro, N.C.SEE NCAA | B2 MICHEL EULER / AP Russias Maria Sharapova serves to Ksenia Pervak on Monday at the French Open in Paris. CHRIS LEHOURITESAssociated PressPARIS Novak Djokovic and Maria Sharapova successfully dealt with the wet weather and their op ponents Monday at the French Open. Both former No. 1 players advanced to the second round at Roland Garros, playing through rain and rain delays, while current No. 1 Rafael Nadal nished off his match in the sunshine. Djokovic beat Joao Sousa of Portugal 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 despite being broken three times, including while serving for the match for the rst time. The second-seeded Serb was leading 4-1 when rain halted play on Court Philippe Chatrier, but it restart ed about an hour later. Very heavy conditions. The court is not that great, in a great condition, at this mo ment, Djokovic said. But of course, con sidering the amount of the rain that we had in last four or ve days, it is not easy for people to maintain the court in the right state. They are doing their best. In the second set, a short shower stopped play for only a few min utes. Djokovic, wear ing a white rain jacket, Djokovic, Sharapova reach second round at French Open SEE TENNIS | B2

PAGE 14

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Coca-Cola 600 ResultsSunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400 laps, 140.8 rating, 48 points. 2. (11) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 128.2, 43. 3. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 117.7, 42. 4. (22) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 90, 41. 5. (26) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 100.4, 40. 6. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 400, 101.9, 38. 7. (27) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 106.7, 38. 8. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 83.5, 36. 9. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 84.7, 35. 10. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 107.1, 35. 11. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 86.2, 34. 12. (8) Joey Logano, Ford, 400, 95.2, 32. 13. (18) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 79.7, 31. 14. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 399, 85.2, 30. 15. (42) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 399, 73.2, 29. 16. (32) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 399, 70.3, 28. 17. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 399, 105.4, 27. 18. (25) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 398, 71.8, 26. 19. (10) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 398, 100.6, 26. 20. (14) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 398, 58.8, 0. 21. (24) Greg Bife, Ford, 398, 63.6, 23. 22. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 398, 78.9, 22. 23. (20) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 398, 59.9, 21. 24. (34) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 398, 55.6, 20. 25. (15) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 398, 83.3, 19. 26. (23) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 397, 57.9, 18. 27. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 397, 47.4, 17. 28. (39) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 396, 40.8, 16. 29. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 396, 51.8, 15. 30. (30) Michael McDowell, Ford, 396, 44.1, 14. 31. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 395, 43.2, 13. 32. (19) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 395, 48.7, 0. 33. (29) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 392, 34.1, 11. 34. (38) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 390, 29.1, 0. 35. (43) Blake Koch, Ford, 390, 28.5, 0. 36. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 382, 35.6, 0. 37. (17) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 378, 60.5, 7. 38. (36) Ryan Truex, Toyota, engine, 303, 29.9, 6. 39. (4) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, engine, 281, 63.5, 5. 40. (28) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, engine, 271, 51.6, 4. 41. (37) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, accident, 229, 30.4, 3. 42. (41) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, engine, 162, 32.9, 2. 43. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 160, 39.7, 1. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 4, Atlanta 3 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Thursday, May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 Saturday, May 3: Indiana 92, Atlanta 80 Miami 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Brooklyn 4, Toronto 3 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 Wednesday, April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 Friday, May 2: Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83 Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103 Washington 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Dallas 3 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 Wednesday, April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 Friday, May 2: Dallas 113, San Antonio 111 Sunday, May 4: San Antonio 119, Dallas 96 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 Saturday, May 3: Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 4, Golden State 3 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 Thursday, May 1: Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99 Saturday, May 3: L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121 Portland 4, Houston 2 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 Friday, May 2: Portland 99, Houston 98 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Brooklyn 1 Tuesday, May 6: Miami 107, Brooklyn 86 Thursday, May 8: Miami 94, Brooklyn 82 Saturday, May 10: Brooklyn 104, Miami 90 Monday, May 12: Miami 102, Brooklyn 96 Wednesday, May 14: Miami 96, Brooklyn 94 Indiana 4, Washington 2 Monday, May 5: Washington 102, Indiana 96 Wednesday, May 7: Indiana 86, Washington 82 Friday, May 9: Indiana 85, Washington 63 Sunday, May 11: Indiana 95, Washington 92 Tuesday, May 13: Washington 102, Indiana 79 Thursday, May 15: Indiana 93, Washington 80 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Portland 1 Tuesday, May 6: San Antonio 116, Portland 92 Thursday, May 8: San Antonio 114, Portland 97 Saturday, May 10: San Antonio 118, Portland 103 Monday, May 12: Portland 103, San Antonio 92 Wednesday, May 14: San Antonio 104, Portland 82 Oklahoma City 4, L.A. Clippers 2 Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 7: Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clip pers 101 Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112 Sunday, May 11: L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99 Tuesday, May 13: Oklahoma City 105, L.A. Clippers 104 Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City 104, L.A. Clip pers 98 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Indiana 1 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 Saturday, May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 Monday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, late Wednesday, May 28: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 1 Monday, May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 Sunday, May 25: Oklahoma City 106, San Antonio 97 Tuesday, May 27: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 2: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 8: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Detroit 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston 3, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 24: Boston 3, Detroit 2, OT Saturday, April 26: Boston 4, Detroit 2 Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 2 Tuesday, April 22: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3 Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday, April 23: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Saturday, April 26: Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1 Monday, April 28: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 3 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, April 25: Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Sunday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Tuesday, April 29: Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Wednesday, April 30: N.Y. Rangers 2, Philadelphia 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Minnesota 4, Colorado 3 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Minnesota 1, Colorado 0, OT Thursday, April 24: Minnesota 2, Colorado 1 Saturday, April 26: Colorado 4, Minnesota 3, OT Monday, April 28: Minnesota 5, Colorado 2 Wednesday, April 30: Minnesota 5, Colorado 4, OT Chicago 4, St. Louis 2 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: Chicago 2, St. Louis 0 Wednesday, April 23: Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Sunday, April 27: Chicago 5, St. Louis 1 Anaheim 4, Dallas 2 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Dallas 3, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 4, Anaheim 2 Friday, April 25: Anaheim 6, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 27: Anaheim 5, Dallas 4, OT Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: San Jose 7, Los Angeles 2 Tuesday, April 22: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Thursday, April 24: Los Angeles 6, San Jose 3 Saturday, April 26: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Monday, April 28: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 1 Wednesday, April 30: Los Angeles 5, San Jose 1 SECOND ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 4, Boston 3 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Montreal 4, Boston 2 Thursday, May 8: Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT Saturday, May 10: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Monday, May 12: Montreal 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 14: Montreal 3, Boston 1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 3 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Sunday, May 11: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 1 Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers 2, Pittsburgh 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Minnesota 2 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Minnesota 4, Chicago 0 Friday, May 9: Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Sunday, May 11: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 13: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 3 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1 Thursday, May 8: Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, May 10: Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0 Monday, May 12: Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 3 Wednesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 1 Friday, May 16: Los Angeles 6, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Thursday, May 22: Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 25: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 2, OT Tuesday, May 27: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 2, Chicago 1 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 Saturday, May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 Monday, May 26: Chicago at Los Angeles, late Wednesday, May 28: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.French Open ResultsMonday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Kei Nishikori (9), Japan, 7-6 (4), 6-1, 6-2. Kenny de Schepper, France, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 3-1, retired. Benoit Paire, France, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 7-5. Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 7-5, 6-4, 6-2. Marin Cilic (25), Croatia, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-0, 6-3, 7-6 (6). Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 2-2, retired. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4. Gilles Simon (29), France, def. Ante Pavic, Croatia, 6-1, 6-1, 6-3. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. David Gofn, Belgium, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4. Tommy Robredo (17), Spain, def. James Ward, Britain, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4. Alejandro Gonzalez, Colombia, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 6-1. Roberto Bautista Agut (27), Spain, def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2. Feliciano Lopez (26), Spain, def. Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Robby Ginepri, United States, 6-0, 6-3, 6-0. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Vasek Pospisil (30), Canada, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-2, 6-4, 3-6, 4-6, 6-2. Fabio Fognini (14), Italy, def. Andreas Beck, Germany, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1. Women First Round Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Ksenia Pervak, Russia, 6-1, 6-2. Dominika Cibulkova (9), Slovakia, def. Virginie Razzano, France, 7-5, 6-0. Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Karin Knapp, Italy, 6-4, 6-0. Sabine Lisicki (16), Germany, def. Fiona Ferro, France, 6-1, 7-5. Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Alison Van Uytvanck, Bel gium, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, def. Maryna Zanevska, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-4. Flavia Pennetta (12), Italy, def. Patricia Mayr-Achleit ner, Austria, 6-2, 6-2. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Lauren Davis, United States, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. Eugenie Bouchard (18), Canada, def. Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-0, 6-2. Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Roberta Vinci (17), Italy, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Sam Stosur (19), Australia, def. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, 6-1, 6-1. Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def. Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-2. Elena Vesnina (32), Russia, def. Christina McHale, United States, 7-6 (0), 4-6, 6-3. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, def. Anna-Lena Fried sam, Germany, 6-7 (3), Alize Cornet (20), France, def. Ashleigh Barty, Aus tralia, 6-2, 6-1. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Michelle Larcher de Brito, Portugal, 6-2, 6-3. Mondays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX Recalled C Ryan Lavarnway from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Alex Wilson to Pawtucket. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Called up INF Irving Falu from Nashville (PCL). Optioned RHP Jimmy Nelson to Nashville. National League CHICAGO CUBS Activated OF Justin Ruggiano from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Ryan Kalish to Iowa (PCL). NEW YORK METS Placed OF Eric Young Jr. on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 25. Recalled OF Matt den Dekker from Las Vegas (PCL). Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS Announced the contract of RHP Leo Rosales was purchased by Leones de Yucatan (Mexican League).TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED GOLF 5 p.m.TGC NCAA, Division I playoffs, match play seminals, at Hutchinson, Kan.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Boston at Atlanta7:05 p.m.FS-FloridaMiami at Washington7:07 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Toronto10 p.m.ESPN Cincinnati at L.A. DodgersNBA BASKETBALL 9 p.m.TNT Playoffs, conference nals, game 4, San Antonio at Oklahoma CityNHL HOCKEY 8 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference nals, N.Y. Rangers at MontrealSOCCER 7:45 p.m.ESPN2 MLS, N.Y. at Kansas City9:55 p.m.ESPN2 Mens national teams, exhibition, United States vs. Azerbaijan, at S.FTENNIS 5 a.m.ESPN2 French Open, second round, at ParisAthletic Conference or Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference was select ed this month. The two conferences combined to produce at least 20 NFL draft picks ev ery year from 1967 to 1976, according to research by STATS. That output has slowly de clined since. Now storied programs like Grambling, Southern, Florida A&M and Mississippi Valley State are known more for crumbling facilities, player boycotts and struggles to meet NCAA academic standards than for what happens on the eld. College sports revenue and spending have become increasingly unequal over the past three decades, and HBCUs have hard time keeping up. The lack of money is especially pronounced for schools in the SWAC, which have yearly ath letic budgets as low as Mississippi Valley States $3.6 million. Thats about half the salary coach Nick Sa ban earns at Alabama, where the schools to tal athletic budget is well over $100 million. Even other Football Championship Subdivision schools have athletic budgets twice as large as many as those at HBCUs. Like his late brother Walter, Eddie Payton played football at Jack son State, where he is now the golf coach. Payton says bringing HBCUs back to some level of prominence is possible, but it will be difcult. As TV contracts for college football have grown, the bigger schools have been able to pour money into facilities and programs that make it nearly impossible for HBCUs to compete for elite ath letes. And, as recruit ing has grown more sophisticated, schools from around the country have been taking star football players out of the South, the main talent base for the HBCUs. Its not that were get ting less money its that everybody else is growing while weve basically stayed the same, Payton said. We havent cultivated our fan bases and now the quality has gone down. Its going to be hard to get those people back. Payton traced the SWACs downfall back to the 1980s and 1990s, when programs started playing Classic games on the road in places like Chicago and Indianapolis. Pay ton said in an effort to spread the HBCU brand and earn a little extra money, leaders focused too much on the schools popular marching bands and the parties surrounding the games instead of the football. When you go to a steakhouse, the thing that makes or breaks your meal is the steak, Payton said. Its not the salad or the baked potato. We havent been focusing on the most important issue and thats the qual ity of the football. SWAC Commissioner Duer Sharp said he hopes its the beginning of leaguewide improve ment that can start in the classroom and car ry over to the eld. Our goal is to be a progressive Division I conference, Sharp said. Jackson State is a perfect example of how these problems can be turned around. They worked along with the NCAA, got some grant mon ey and now have im proved tremendously. HBCU FROM PAGE B1 title for the third time in ve years and reached the conference tour nament nal. The Gators schedule ranks as toughest in the country, and theyre 16-5 in onerun games. The tournament opens Friday with 16 four-team, dou ble-elimination regionals. Best-of-three super regionals will be held next week, with those winners moving to the College World Series in Omaha. National seeds that win their regionals play at home in super re gionals. The Southeastern Conference has 10 teams in the tourna ment, the most ever by a conference. The At lantic Coast Confer ence is represented by seven schools, the Big 12 and Pac-12 by ve apiece and the Big West by four. Miami is in the eld for the 42nd straight year, extending its own record. Florida State is in for the 37th season in a row, second all-time. Three teams with losing records are in after win ning conference tournament titles: Youngstown State (16-36), Siena (2531) and Bethune-Cook man (26-31). Oregon State starts the tournament against Summit League cham pion North Dakota State. UC Irvine and UNLV also are in the Corvallis, Ore gon, regional. Casey said his teams No. 1 seeding didnt come with an easy path to Omaha. Bar ring an upset, the Beavers would be matched against Big 12 regular-season champion Oklahoma State in a su per regional. I have no complaints, Casey said. Its a tough job, trying to balance it out. You could take every regional, and everybody would have something to say. Miami coach Jim Mor ris isnt pleased with the prospect of his ACC regular-season champion team having to play at Florida in a super re gional. Though Farrell listed Rice and Vander bilt as teams that were edged out for national seeds, Miami was in the running for one before it lost two of three in the ACC tournament. You never know the rhyme or reason for where youre going to go, Morris said on the ESPNU selection show. It makes no sense to me, if were on the bor derline, to be going to possibly the No. 2 seed. Florida will be chal lenged this weekend. It will be hosting the Big Wests second-place team in Long Beach State, a North Caroli na squad with lots of postseason experience, and a 41-win College of Charleston thats the bottom seed in the re gional. This is probably a re gional we need, Gators coach Kevin OSullivan said. We tend to play up to our competition or sometimes down to our competition. NCAA FROM PAGE B1 used the time to enter tain the crowd by chat ting with a ball boy and letting the youngster sit alongside him on the bench. At one point, Djokovic grabbed the umbrella out of the ball boys hand and in return gave him a racket. Then Djokovic handed him a bottle of Perrier, and the two clinked bottles be fore taking a sip. We had a nice chat. Hes a tennis player, so I asked him how long hes playing, and how hes enjoying his time as a ball kid, Djokovic said. It was a nice, fun time, something unusual for the Grand Slams. Djokovic can com plete a career Grand Slam by winning the French Open. Nadal has already won a record eight French Open titles, but he is looking to become the rst man to win ve times in a row in Paris. On Monday, he improved his record at Ro land Garros to 60-1 by beating Robby Ginepri of the United States 6-0, 6-3, 6-0. Always the same: To win against anyone I need to play at a good level and I need to be ready for ght and for everything that I will need to do to win, said Nadal, looking ahead to his next match. And with that I can see I need to be aggressive and need to nd a rhythm on the legs and play solid points, nd real ways to win the points. Thats it. Sharapova, the 2012 champion, was rst on court in the main stadium and needed little more than an hour to beat Ksenia Pervak 6-1, 6-2. She broke Pervak ve times and nished with 17 winners, while Pervak had only four. Sharapova, seeded seventh at the French Open, completed a career Grand Slam at Ro land Garros two years ago. She then lost to Serena Williams in the 2013 nal. Up next in Paris will be Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria in the second round. But she could face Williams in the quarternals. Its tough to think about that match down the line where you have to compete in three matches before that, Sharapova said. Obviously its a match that many people always look forward to when we play against each other. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 15

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 NASCAR PETE IACOBELLIAP Sports WriterCONCORD, N.C. Jimmie Johnsons run at another Sprint Cup title is on and could bring him a piece of NASCAR history. Johnsons victory in the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday night all but locked him into the new, expanded championship Chase for mat. If the 38-year-old Johnson pulls it off, itll be his seventh series crown to tie the NASCAR mark shared by Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt. NASCAR leaders changed the emphasis in qualifying, putting more of a premi um on wins over the steadiness of points racing. Thats led to a urry of drivers tak ing the checkered ag 10 of them through 12 races all glee fully celebrating their near-assured spot in the 10-race champion ship run at the end. Johnson had been on the outside of that until his record-break ing seventh career win at Charlotte Motor Speedway. He outlast ed second-place Kev in Harvick and Matt Kenseth in third to pick up his fourth victory all-time in NASCARs longest race. The rst goal is to make the Chase, John son said. You want to win races at the end of the season. Few had done that better when it counts than Johnson. Hes col lected 14 Chase victories in his six title runs, including a pair last season that led him to title No. 6. Its a reci pe, combined with the No. 48s typically sol id performance, Johnson was certain would prevail no matter how many outside the race shop raised questions. Of course, we want to win early and often, Johnson said. But we were holding steady in championship points. In my opinion, I dont believe there will be 16 different winners. I felt like a strong championship points position would get us into the rst phase of the Chase, he added. Granted, tonight simplies things. And gives crew chief Chad Knaus the ability to take a few chances to prepare for the play offs the rest of the sea son. Not that he has to as the team approaches a stretch of tracks where they know suc cess. Next week comes Dover where Johnson owns a record eight victories, then Pocono where Johnsons won three times. When Johnson broke through for his rst crown in 2006, he and Knaus used the formula to add four more in one of the series most dominant stretches. After Johnson nished sixth in 2011 and third in 2012, he was back on top last season and moved one step closer to the record with two drivers who were part of NASCARs rst Hall of Fame class ve years ago. Johnson earned the 11th career Coca-Cola 600 victory for car owner Rick Hendrick. What theyve been able to accomplish together, its been amazing, he said. I always say Im just glad I dont race against them.Jimmie Johnsons title defense is on after victory at Coca-Cola 600 TERRY RENNA / AP Jimmie Johnson, center, poses in Victory Lane with his crew after winning the Coca-Cola 600 on Sunday at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. NBA CLIFF BRUNTAP Sports WriterOKLAHOMA CITY Serge Ibaka knew play ing on his injured leg would be painful. He didnt care. Oklahoma Citys de fensive star made a dra matic return Sunday night from what was thought to be a sea son-ending left calf strain. He started and scored 15 points to help the Thunder defeat the San Antonio Spurs 10697 and cut the Spurs lead in the Western Conference nals series to 2-1. Ibaka had mental ly prepared for the dis comfort in the days leading up to the game. He said the pain was relative, given his early life struggles in the Re public of Congo. Well, pain is pain, and I dont want to be here to talk about the pain, he said after the game. Most impor tantly, we got that win tonight, and the focus is about next game. Ibaka missed the rst two games of the series. The Thunder originally said he would miss the rest of the playoffs, but changed course Friday. He participated in the teams shootaround Sunday morning, then got positive feedback from the teams medical staff as the game ap proached. The crowd roared when Ibakas name was announced during pre game introductions, and it got even louder when Ibaka started playing. He scored the rst points of the game on a 19-foot jumper. Words cant describe it, Thunder forward Caron Butler said. It was a great moment. We just kind of rode that energy from the crowd, from the beginning, right out till the fourth quarter. Ibaka had eight points, three rebounds and two blocks in just over six minutes of play in the rst quarter. He went to an elliptical ma chine when he was not playing to stay loose. At one point, he took a fall and came up limping slightly before walking it off. It was all worth it. Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks took him out with 3:17 remaining and the Thunder ahead by 20. I was just trying to do my job, stay focused, do the best I can do to help my team, Ibaka said. He made six of seven shots and his presence eased the pressure on Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. West brook had 26 points, eight rebounds and sev en assists, and Durant added 25 points and 10 rebounds. On defense, Ibaka blocked and altered shots and used his still formidable mobility to close out on shooters. He had seven rebounds, four blocks and a seem ingly endless amount of energy. Serge has put so much work in throughout the season that missing a couple of days didnt hurt him, West brook said. Tonight, he jumped right back into where he was. Manu Ginobili scored 23 points and Tim Dun can added 16 points and eight rebounds for the Spurs. Game 4 is tonight at Oklahoma City.Ibaka, Thunder look to even series against Spurs SUE OGROCKI / AP Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka (9) and forward Kevin Durant (35) exchange high-ves in the fourth quarter of Game 3 on Sunday in Oklahoma City. The Thunder won 106-97.Serge has put so much work in throughout the season that missing a couple of days didnt hurt him. Tonight, he jumped right back into where he was.Russell WestbrookOklahoma City Thunder guard Associated PressMONTREAL When other parts of their game are sputtering, the New York Rangers have two solid-gold as sets to fall back on penalty killing and goal tending. Its a combo that has put them within one victory of their rst Stanley Cup nal in 20 years. And it has frus trated the Montreal Canadiens, who must win Game 5 Tuesday at the Bell Centre to stave off elimination. With a 17 percent strike rate good for 19th during the regular season the Montre al power play was hard ly a humming machine. But against the Rang ers, the Canadiens are 1-for-17 with the man advantage. Montreals lone pow er-play breakthrough came Sunday night in a 3-2 overtime loss at Madison Square Gar den. That P.K. Subban blast from the point, however, was tempered by a short-handed goal by Carl Hagelin that opened the scoring. The Canadiens power play went 1-for-8 on a night where the Rangers spent 14 minutes or almost 22 percent of the game a man short. Give credit to our killers and our goaltender, Rangers coach Alain Vigneault said. They did a real good job.Rangers need one more win over Canadiens to make finalsNHL KATHY WILLENS / AP New York Rangers mob Martin St. Louis after he scored the winning goal in overtime against Montreal on Sunday in New York.

PAGE 16

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 29 22 .569 9-1 W-6 13-11 16-11 Baltimore 26 23 .531 2 5-5 W-2 11-12 15-11 New York 26 23 .531 2 6-4 W-2 11-11 15-12 Tampa Bay 23 28 .451 6 4 5-5 W-4 12-14 11-14 Boston 21 29 .420 7 5 1-9 W-1 10-17 11-12 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 28 19 .596 3-7 L-3 14-11 14-8 Chicago 26 27 .491 5 2 5-5 W-1 14-12 12-15 Kansas City 24 25 .490 5 2 4-6 L-1 13-11 11-14 Minnesota 23 25 .479 5 2 5-5 L-4 12-12 11-13 Cleveland 24 28 .462 6 3 5-5 L-2 15-11 9-17 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 31 20 .608 6-4 W-1 13-10 18-10 Los Angeles 28 22 .560 2 6-4 L-1 15-13 13-9 Texas 26 25 .510 5 1 6-4 W-3 13-13 13-12 Seattle 25 25 .500 5 1 5-5 W-1 11-12 14-13 Houston 19 32 .373 12 8 5-5 W-2 10-15 9-17 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 28 22 .560 6-4 L-1 18-11 10-11 Miami 27 25 .519 2 1 6-4 W-1 20-8 7-17 Washington 25 26 .490 3 2 3-7 L-1 14-13 11-13 Philadelphia 21 26 .447 5 4 4-6 L-1 9-14 12-12 New York 22 28 .440 6 5 3-7 L-1 11-17 11-11 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 30 22 .577 3-7 L-1 14-11 16-11 St. Louis 28 22 .560 1 8-2 W-2 14-7 14-15 Pittsburgh 23 27 .460 6 4 6-4 W-1 16-13 7-14 Cincinnati 22 26 .458 6 4 4-6 L-2 12-12 10-14 Chicago 19 30 .388 9 7 6-4 W-1 10-13 9-17 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home A way San Francisco 32 19 .627 5-4 L-1 17-9 15-10 Colorado 27 23 .540 4 4-6 L-1 16-7 11-16 Los Angeles 27 24 .529 5 5-5 W-1 9-13 18-11 San Diego 23 28 .451 9 4 4-6 W-1 14-15 9-13 Arizona 20 32 .385 12 8 4-6 L-1 6-18 14-14 SUNDAYS GAMESToronto 3, Oakland 1 Texas 12, Detroit 4 Baltimore 4, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 5 N.Y. Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 4, Kansas City 3 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 Houston 4, Seattle 1SUNDAYS GAMESArizona 2, N.Y. Mets 1, 1st game Milwaukee 7, Miami 1 N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 2, 2nd game L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 0 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 7, Colorado 0 St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 0MONDAYS GAMESBoston 8, Atlanta 6 Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2 Texas 7, Minnesota 2 Oakland 10, Detroit 0 Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 1 N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, late Tampa Bay at Toronto, late Houston at Kansas City, lateMONDAYS GAMESBoston 8, Atlanta 6 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Miami 3, Washington 2 Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 8, San Francisco 4 Philadelphia 9, Colorado 0 N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, late Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, late San Diego at Arizona, late AP PHOTO Miami Marlins Giancarlo Stanton rounds the bases after his two-run homer in the third inning against the Washington Nationals on Monday at Nationals Park in Washington. TODAYS GAMESTampa Bay (Cobb 1-1) at Toronto (Buehrle 8-1), 7:07 p.m. Boston (Lester 4-6) at Atlanta (Harang 4-4), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 2-3) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 4-0), 8:10 p.m. Houston (McHugh 2-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3), 8:10 p.m. Texas (Darvish 4-2) at Minnesota (P.Hughes 5-1), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2), 8:15 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 6-1) at Oakland (Gray 5-1), 10:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-3) at Seattle (Elias 3-3), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESColorado (J.De La Rosa 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 2-3) at Washington (Treinen 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Boston (Lester 4-6) at Atlanta (Harang 4-4), 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 2-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-3), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2), 8:15 p.m. San Diego (Stults 2-5) at Arizona (Miley 3-5), 9:40 p.m. Cincinnati (Simon 6-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 7-1), 10:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-0) at San Francisco (Hudson 4-2), 10:15 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: VMartinez, Detroit, .337; Kinsler, Detroit, .330; Altuve, Houston, .326; Cano, Seattle, .323; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, .322; AlRamirez, Chicago, .322. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 42; Donaldson, Oakland, 41; Bautista, Toronto, 37; Kinsler, Detroit, 35; NCruz, Baltimore, 34; MeCabrera, Toronto, 33; Pujols, Los Angeles, 32. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 44; JAbreu, Chicago, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 42; Moss, Oakland, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 40; Brantley, Cleveland, 38; Donaldson, Oakland, 36. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 70; MeCabrera, Toronto, 66; Kinsler, Detroit, 65; AlRamirez, Chicago, 64; Cano, Seat tle, 62; Rios, Texas, 62; AJones, Baltimore, 59; HKend rick, Los Angeles, 59; Markakis, Baltimore, 59; VMartinez, Detroit, 59. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 17; Hosmer, Kansas City, 17; Kinsler, Detroit, 17; Pedroia, Boston, 17; Altuve, Houston, 16; Viciedo, Chicago, 15. TRIPLES: Rios, Texas, 5; Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Infante, Kansas City, 3. HOME RUNS: NCruz, Baltimore, 16; JAbreu, Chicago, 15; Encarnacion, Toronto, 14; Pujols, Los Angeles, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 12; VMartinez, Detroit, 12; Donald son, Oakland, 11; Dozier, Minnesota, 11; Moss, Oak land, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 11. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 17; RDavis, Detroit, 15; AEscobar, Kansas City, 14; Andrus, Texas, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Ellsbury, New York, 11. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 8-1; Tanaka, New York, 7-1; Porcello, Detroit, 7-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 6-1; FHernandez, Seattle, 6-1; Keuchel, Houston, 6-2; Shields, Kansas City, 6-3; CWilson, Los Angeles, 6-3. ERA: Gray, Oakland, 1.99; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.16; Tanaka, New York, 2.29; Darvish, Texas, 2.35; Keuchel, Houston, 2.55; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.56. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 84; Kluber, Cleveland, 83; Tanaka, New York, 79; Scherzer, Detroit, 78; Lester, Boston, 76; FHernandez, Seattle, 74; Darvish, Texas, 71. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 14; Perkins, Minnesota, 14; Rodney, Seattle, 12; Nathan, Detroit, 11.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .375; Puig, Los Angeles, .349; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .331; YMolina, St. Louis, .330; Utley, Philadelphia, .328; CGomez, Milwaukee, .320; MaAdams, St. Louis, .319; Blackmon, Colorado, .319. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; Pence, San Francisco, 38; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 35; Stanton, Miami, 35; Yelich, Miami, 34. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 47; Puig, Los Angeles, 38; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 36; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 33; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 33; Morse, San Francisco, 33. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 64; DWright, New York, 64; DanMurphy, New York, 62; Puig, Los Angeles, 61; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 60; MaAdams, St. Louis, 59. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 21; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 20; Utley, Philadelphia, 20; Arenado, Colorado, 17; MaAdams, St. Louis, 16; Byrd, Philadelphia, 16; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 16. TRIPLES: Rendon, Washington, 4; Simmons, Atlanta, 4; Yelich, Miami, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 14; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 13; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 11; Gattis, Atlanta, 10; CGomez, Milwaukee, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10; Puig, Los Angeles, 10; Walker, Pittsburgh, 10. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 30; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 18; EYoung, New York, 17; SMarte, Pitts burgh, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; ECabrera, San Diego, 10; Segura, Milwaukee, 10. PITCHING: Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-2; Greinke, Los An geles, 7-1; Lohse, Milwaukee, 6-1; Simon, Cincinnati, 6-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 6-3; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 6-3; 9 tied at 5. ERA: Samardzija, Chicago, 1.46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.67; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.77; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.86; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.01; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.12; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.13. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 82; Strasburg, Washington, 81; Wainwright, St. Louis, 77. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Francisco, 16; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 15. Red Sox 8, Braves 6 Boston Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Holt 3b 5 2 2 0 He ywrd rf 2 2 1 0 Bogarts ss 3 2 0 0 BUpton cf 5 1 1 1 Pedroia 2b 3 1 1 2 FF rmn 1b 2 2 0 0 D.Ortiz 1b 3 1 1 4 J.Upton lf 4 1 2 3 Przyns c 5 0 1 1 CJhnsn 3b 5 0 2 0 JGoms rf 2 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 1 GSizmr lf 4 1 1 0 R.P ena 2b 4 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 0 1 Laird c 3 0 1 1 Bchhlz p 1 0 1 0 ESantn p 2 0 0 0 Badnhp p 0 0 0 0 Pstr nck ph 1 0 0 0 Nava ph 0 1 0 0 A.W ood p 0 0 0 0 Capuan p 0 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 A vilan p 0 0 0 0 Lvrnwy ph 1 0 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Tazawa p 0 0 0 0 DCr pnt p 0 0 0 0 Carp ph 1 0 0 0 Hale p 0 0 0 0 AMiller p 0 0 0 0 Uehara p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 8 7 8 T otals 33 6 8 6 Boston 001 050 200 8 Atlanta 003 300 000 6 DPBoston 2, Atlanta 1. LOBBoston 6, Atlanta 9. 2BHolt (4), B.Upton (9), J.Upton 2 (11). 3BG.Size more (2). HRD.Ortiz (12). SFD.Ortiz, Bradley Jr.. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz 3 4 6 6 8 4 Badenhop 1 2 0 0 0 0 Capuano 1 0 0 0 0 1 Mujica W,2-1 1 0 0 0 1 0 Tazawa H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 A.Miller H,2 1 1 0 0 0 2 Uehara S,10-10 1 1 0 0 0 0 Atlanta E.Santana 5 5 6 6 3 6 A.Wood 1 0 0 0 1 1 Thomas L,1-2 2/3 2 2 2 2 0 Avilan 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 2 Hale 1 0 0 0 1 0 Buchholz pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. WPCapuano, Thomas. UmpiresHome, John Tumpane; First, Bob Davidson; Second, James Hoye; Third, Bill Welke. T:40 (Rain delay: 1:26). A,501 (49,586). Rangers 7, Twins 2 T exas Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo dh 5 1 1 0 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 Andrus ss 5 1 3 2 Mauer 1b 4 0 1 0 Morlnd 1b 5 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 1 ABeltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Arcia rf 4 0 1 0 Rios rf 3 2 2 0 Wlngh lf 3 1 0 0 Gimenz c 4 2 2 2 K ubel dh 3 0 0 0 LMartn cf 4 0 1 1 Nunez ph 1 0 0 0 Choice lf 4 0 1 1 KSuzuk c 4 0 2 0 Odor 2b 4 1 1 0 A.Hicks cf 4 0 2 0 EEscor ss 3 0 2 1 Totals 38 7 11 6 T otals 34 2 9 2 Texas 020 020 030 7 Minnesota 110 000 000 2 ECorreia (3). LOBTexas 5, Minnesota 6. 2BAn drus (13), Rios (12), Gimenez (2), Choice (3), Arcia (1), E.Escobar (15). HRPlouffe (4). SBAndrus (13), Rios (9). IP H R ER BB SO Texas Tepesch W,2-0 6 2/3 7 2 2 0 4 Frasor H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cotts 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Minnesota Correia L,2-6 7 7 4 4 0 5 Burton 1 3 3 3 1 0 Duensing 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Tepesch (Willingham). UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Jerry Layne. T:52. A,571 (39,021). Mariners 5, Angels 1 Los Angeles Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 J.Jones cf 4 2 1 0 Trout cf 4 0 1 0 MSndr s rf 3 2 2 1 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 1 Cano 2b 4 0 3 2 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 2 0 0 1 Ibanez lf 2 0 0 0 Zunino c 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 Cron dh 3 0 0 0 Romer dh 4 0 0 0 Conger c 2 0 0 0 Ackle y lf 3 1 1 0 Iannett ph-c 1 0 0 0 F rnkln ss 3 0 0 0 Calhon rf 2 0 1 0 Totals 28 1 3 1 T otals 30 5 7 4 Los Angeles 000 000 100 1 Seattle 230 000 00x 5 EAybar (4). DPLos Angeles 1, Seattle 2. LOBLos Angeles 3, Seattle 5. 3BM.Saunders (3). HRPujols (14). SBJ.Jones (4), Cano (4), Ackley (2). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Skaggs L,4-2 7 7 5 2 2 8 Kohn 1 0 0 0 2 1 Seattle C.Young W,4-2 6 1/3 2 1 1 3 5 Furbush 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Farquhar 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 0 WPKohn. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:40. A,710 (47,476). Athletics 10, Tigers 0 Detroit Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi RDavis lf 4 0 1 0 Crisp cf 4 1 1 1 AJcksn cf 4 0 0 0 DNor rs c 5 1 1 4 MiCarr 1b 4 0 1 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 1 3 2 VMrtnz dh 4 0 2 0 Cespds lf 5 1 1 1 TrHntr rf 4 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 2 0 0 0 Moss dh 4 1 1 1 Holady c 4 0 0 0 Callasp 2b 4 1 1 0 Worth 2b 4 0 0 0 Blanks 1b 3 3 2 1 AnRmn ss 3 0 1 0 Gentr y rf 2 1 0 0 Totals 33 0 5 0 T otals 36 10 11 10 Detroit 000 000 000 0 Oakland 022 200 04x 10 EAn.Romine (6), Holaday (3), Castellanos (3), Lowrie (6). LOBDetroit 8, Oakland 7. 2BMi.Cabrera (18), An.Romine (2). HRD.Norris (5), Donaldson (12), Cespedes (9), Moss (12), Blanks (1). SFCrisp. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Smyly L,2-3 5 8 6 6 2 3 Knebel 2 2 0 0 0 2 Coke 1 1 4 2 1 1 Oakland Milone W,3-3 6 2/3 4 0 0 2 6 Otero 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Jordan Baker; First, Angel Campos; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel. T:53. A,067 (35,067). White Sox 6, Indians 2 Cle veland Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 Aviles 2b 4 0 2 0 Semien 2b 4 2 1 0 Brantly lf 3 1 2 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 2 4 1 ACarer dh 4 0 0 0 V iciedo dh 4 2 2 3 Raburn rf-1b 4 0 2 1 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 Swisher 1b 3 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 1 DvMrp ph-rf 1 0 0 0 De Aza lf 4 0 1 1 YGoms c 4 0 0 0 Flowr s c 2 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 1 0 0 Nieto c 2 0 0 0 Sellers ss 3 0 1 0 Sier ra rf 3 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 8 2 T otals 34 6 9 6 Cleveland 001 001 000 2 Chicago 003 002 10x 6 EChisenhall (8), Semien (8). DPChicago 1. LOB Cleveland 8, Chicago 5. 2BGillaspie 3 (12). HR Viciedo (5). SBBrantley (8), De Aza (6). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin L,3-2 5 5 5 2 1 8 Outman 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Shaw 2/3 2 0 0 0 2 Rzepczynski 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 Carrasco 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Quintana W,3-4 6 5 2 2 2 5 Petricka H,4 1 0 0 0 0 0 Putnam 2/3 3 0 0 0 2 S.Downs S,1-1 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Mike Everitt. Orioles 7, Brewers 6, 10 innings Baltimore Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 5 1 2 1 Segura ss 5 1 2 2 Machd 3b 4 1 1 0 Braun rf 5 0 1 1 A.Jones cf 5 1 2 2 Lucro y c 4 1 1 0 N.Cruz lf 4 0 1 1 EHer rr pr 0 0 0 0 Pearce 1b 5 0 0 0 Maldnd c 0 0 0 0 Hardy ss 5 1 3 0 CGomz cf 3 0 1 0 Hundly c 5 0 1 1 MrRynl 3b 4 0 0 1 Schoop 2b 5 2 3 2 Gennett 2b 5 0 1 0 Tillman p 2 0 0 0 KDa vis lf 4 2 4 1 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 Overa y 1b 2 2 1 1 Clevngr ph 1 0 0 0 Lohse p 3 0 0 0 Brach p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 DYong ph 1 0 1 0 R Weks ph 1 0 0 0 Lough pr 0 1 0 0 F rRdrg p 0 0 0 0 ODay p 0 0 0 0 W ooten p 0 0 0 0 ZBrittn p 0 0 0 0 F alu ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 7 14 7 T otals 37 6 11 6 Baltimore 003 000 102 1 7 Milwaukee 101 202 000 0 6 EHundley (1). DPBaltimore 2, Milwaukee 2. LOB Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 9. 2BMarkakis (8), N.Cruz (11), Hardy 2 (11), Segura (7), Braun (8), Gennett (9), K.Davis (14). 3BA.Jones (2), Segura (2). HR Schoop 2 (5), K.Davis (7), Overbay (2). CSC.Gomez (2). SC.Gomez. SFMar.Reynolds. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore Tillman 5 2/3 7 6 6 4 7 R.Webb 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Brach 2 2 0 0 1 2 ODay W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Z.Britton S,3-3 1 1 0 0 1 0 Milwaukee Lohse 6 2/3 9 4 4 0 5 Kintzler H,3 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 Fr.Rodriguez BS,2-19 1 3 2 2 1 0 Wooten L,1-2 1 2 1 1 0 1 UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Dan Bellino. T:42. A,889 (41,900). Marlins 3, Nationals 2 Miami W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 0 0 0 Span cf 4 0 0 0 Dietrch 2b 3 1 1 0 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 2 3 2 W erth rf 4 1 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 2 1 LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 2 GJones 1b 4 0 0 0 WRams c 4 0 1 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 2 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 F rndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Eovaldi p 2 0 0 0 McLoth lf 2 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Roar k p 1 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 TMoore ph 1 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 7 3 T otals 30 2 3 2 Miami 102 000 000 3 Washington 000 002 000 2 EDietrich (8). DPWashington 1. LOBMiami 4, Washington 5. 2BStanton (13), McGehee (12), W.Ramos (3). HRStanton (15), LaRoche (6). SB McLouth (3). CSSaltalamacchia (1). SRoark. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Eovaldi W,4-2 6 1/3 3 2 2 1 5 M.Dunn H,7 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 A.Ramos H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cishek S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 Washington Roark L,3-3 7 5 3 3 1 4 Clippard 1 2 0 0 0 1 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Eovaldi (Espinosa, McLouth), by Roark (Di etrich). UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Seth Buckminster; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Brian Knight. T:46. A,677 (41,408). Pirates 5, Mets 3 Pittsburgh Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi JHrrsn rf 5 0 0 0 Lagar s cf 3 1 1 0 NWalkr 2b 4 1 2 0 DnMr p 2b 4 0 1 1 AMcCt cf 3 1 2 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 2 0 0 0 Gr ndrs lf 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph-1b 2 2 2 2 BAreu rf 4 0 2 0 RMartn c 5 0 1 1 CT orrs p 0 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 2 0 Duda 1b 4 1 2 1 SMarte lf 4 1 1 0 Flores ss 4 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Centen c 4 0 0 0 Tabata ph 1 0 1 1 deGr m p 2 1 2 0 Watson p 1 0 1 0 F amili p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 Cumptn p 2 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 0 0 0 0 V alvrd p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 dnDkkr rf 1 0 0 0 Barmes ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 12 4 T otals 34 3 8 2 Pittsburgh 000 000 023 5 New York 000 020 001 3 IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Cumpton 6 7 2 1 1 1 J.Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 0 Watson W,5-0 1 0 0 0 1 0 Melancon S,10-12 1 1 1 1 0 2 New York deGrom 6 2/3 5 0 0 5 4 Familia H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Rice H,5 2/3 1 1 1 0 0 Valverde L,1-1 BS,2-4 2/3 4 4 4 1 0 C.Torres 2/3 2 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Clint Fagan; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Scott Barry. T:30. A,309 (41,922). Phillies 9, Rockies 0 Colorado Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 4 0 2 0 Re vere cf 5 0 3 1 Cuddyr rf 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 4 1 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 2 0 Brignc ss 0 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 0 0 0 0 Utle y 2b 4 3 3 1 CGnzlz lf 2 0 0 0 How ard 1b 4 2 3 5 Pachec 1b 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 0 DeF rts p 0 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 3 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 2 1 1 0 Rutledg 2b-ss 4 0 0 0 MAdms p 0 0 0 0 Culersn 3b 4 0 1 0 Mayrry ph-1b 1 1 1 2 Chacin p 0 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 CHr ndz 3b 4 0 0 0 Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ lf 1 1 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 0 7 0 T otals 35 9 12 9 Colorado 000 000 000 0 Philadelphia 000 112 50x 9 ETulowitzki (1). DPColorado 1, Philadelphia 2. LOBColorado 9, Philadelphia 4. 2BUtley (21). HR Howard (8), Mayberry (2). SChacin. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chacin L,0-4 5 7 4 4 1 5 Kahnle 1 1 0 0 0 1 Masset 1/3 1 2 2 1 0 Brothers 2/3 3 3 3 0 1 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia K.Kendrick W,1-5 6 2/3 6 0 0 4 2 Mi.Adams 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 1 De Fratus 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Jim Wolf; First, Brian Gorman; Second, Jeff Gosney; Third, David Rackley.

PAGE 17

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Golf CarAccessible Simon Sez: Time to Plant Purina Dealerrf787-4415 n www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Tuesday, May 27, the 147th day of 2014. There are 218 days left in the year. On this date: In 1896, 255 people were killed when a tornado struck St. Louis, Missouri, and East St. Louis, Illinois. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, May 27, 2014: This year you open up to a lot of new possibilities. You are unusually creative, dynamic and charismatic. As a result, doors open for you. Your sense of humor carries you far. If you are single, youll meet a lot of special people. Youll want to choose the right person for you. Date until you nd Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, the two of you will want to spend more time together. Your popularity will soar, so you will need to make special time for your sweetie and/or involve him or her more in the different elements of your life. A fellow GEMINI encourages rebellion. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might feel strongly about a nancial matter, and youll want to let everyone else know. No one will question your direction. You will be greeted with a sigh of relief once you explain your logic. A family member is likely to go overboard. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Youll be ying high and enjoying it. Look around to see if a grouchy friend or loved one is tagging along behind you. Your positive, optimistic smile allows others to relax and become more authentic. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your instincts will guide you with spending, price comparison and negotiation. Be sure to keep your budget in mind, even though you wont want to. If you have been feeling unusually tired and withdrawn, you might want to consider scheduling a checkup. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Zero in on what you want and what you feel is most important for the majority. You could over think an emotional issue or a problem with a child or loved one. Your positive attitude will help you to get past a bump or hassle. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You will have an opportunity to take the lead on an important project that you care a lot about. Your sense of humor allows greater exibility in what quickly could evolve into a difcult and touchy situation. Your instincts will carry you far. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You could feel intimidated if you dont get a hold of this person within a certain number of phone calls. You might want to try a different approach. A friend will lend a hand and come through for you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Relate to a partner or associate directly about an issue surrounding funds. This person needs to know how you feel; saying nothing or copping an attitude will not be as powerful. He or she needs to know where you are coming from. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might want to have a long-overdue conversation with several colleagues. Unless you convene a meeting with the people involved, you will not see this talk happen. Take responsibility for what you desire, and make it so. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You have a lot of ground to cover. You can succeed if you focus on each task at hand. A partner will pitch in and help if you delegate some of your responsibilities. Curb a tendency to be so critical of yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll put in a major effort at a meeting to present others with the options as you see them. You will anticipate a certain amount of feedback, but what you end up hearing might be totally unexpected. Go with the moment, and know your limits. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might want to reconsider an offer involving property. You could feel overburdened by your options and not know which way to go. Lighten up the moment with your sense of humor. A childlike energy will emerge later today, when you nally feel free. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might want to ask more questions about a mat ter that surrounds your personal life. Let your ingenuity lead the way to the right path for you, and hopefully for others as well. A friend is likely to wonder what is going on with you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: Im a 32-year-old woman who is HIV-positive. My colleague who is unaware of my status recently introduced me to a relative of hers who is also lonely and looking for someone to settle down with. We clicked and seem to complement each other in every way, although we havent had any sexual encounter. My fear is, how do I disclose my status without being rejected? He seems to have big plans for us, which include settling down and having kids in the future. I am also worried that he might be angry with my colleague and not believe that she is unaware of my status. Please help me get out of this dilemma. IN A SPOT IN SOUTH AFRICA DEAR IN A SPOT: Ill try, but there are no guar antees. Much depends upon the strength of this mans feelings for you. It is very important that you have a frank discussion with him before the relationship goes any further. The fact that you are HIV-positive may be problematic, but it does not mean you cannot have a family together if you wish in the future. Medications and other medical interventions can help keep the virus from being transmitted to your children, and condoms can protect your partner. If you are upfront about your status, the chances are better that he will believe you when you tell him his relative was not aware that you have HIV when you were introduced. In a case like this, honesty is the best policy. DEAR ABBY: I have three grown sons, all educated, married and successful. Their wives are the daughters I never had, and I treasure them and their children. Im blessed with three per fect grandchildren under the age of 5. The problem is my sons. Although I raised them carefully with love, they are like teenagers. They constantly denigrate and ght with each other, and measure my time with them on a competitive scale. I no longer want to be involved with their bickering. Their dad, from whom I am separated, is not involved. This has created a sad cloud in my otherwise sunny life. I need some advice. TIED IN KNOTS IN INDIANAPOLIS DEAR TIED IN KNOTS: Have you told your sons how uncomfortable their sibling quibbling makes you? If you havent, you should. And if that doesnt improve the situation, I suggest you see them separately. And if that causes problems, please dont make it YOUR problem. DEAR ABBY: Over the past 10 years or so, I have noticed a vast increase in people who talk while they are yawning. These yawn-talkers are not only rude, but also almost impossible to understand. I wouldnt normally care, except that a lot of people do it where I work. Is it OK to tell them to stop yawn-talking? Or would I be the rude one in the scenario? WIDE AWAKE IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR WIDE AWAKE: It wouldnt be rude to ask someone to repeat the statement because you were unable to under stand what the per son was trying to say. And, by the way, polite folks cover their mouths when they yawn to avoid spraying saliva on the person in front of them.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Womans hiv status casts shadow on budding romance JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

PAGE 18

B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

PAGE 19

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: CROSSWORD PUZZLE

PAGE 20

B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PAGE 21

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B9 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

PAGE 22

B10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014

PAGE 23

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B11 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial!

PAGE 24

B12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, May 27, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Thank you for reading the local paper!