Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE RYAN HUNTER-REAY WINS INDY 500, SPORTS B1 LEESBURG: Watts receives national civilian honor A3 LIVING HEALTHY: iPads give autistic children a voice C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 26, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 146 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D2 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D3 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A5 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 91 / 70 Partly sunny, T-storm late. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A dispute between the con tractor for Niagara Bot tling, Lake County and the town of Montverde seems to have been resolved. There were concerns in re cent weeks about Indian Riv er water tanker trucks speed ing along County Road 455 in Montverde and County Road 561A day and night. The issue has become more than a nuisance for residents. County, town and Montverde Academy ofcials have ex pressed concerns about safety as well. Steve Ferguson, director of human resources for Indian River Transport, said on Friday the company was looking into the issue and seeking a resolu tion as we speak. Roy Patterson, a resident who lives on CR 455, said he is of ten awakened by the trucks at night. When they hit those reec tors on the road down the cen ter, it bounces through the house, the Montverde resi dent said of the 20 to 30 tanker trucks that pass his house. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks is planning to write a letter to Niagara, requesting the tankers take another route to U.S. Highway 27 other than CR 455 or County Road 561A. If there is not a solution to mitigate the issue, Parks said, We will look at measures to re strict truck trafc on that road. Montverde Mayor Troy Ben nett is equally concerned, par ticularly because CR 455 runs through the Montverde Acade my campus. Kids are always crossing the road, he said. Kasey Kesselring, headmas ter at Montverde Academy, said while he understood the need for a business like Niaga ra to continue its work, he also worries about the safety of stu dents. JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON Confronting critics of his foreign policy, Presi dent Barack Obama will soon outline a strategy for his nal years in of ce that aims to avoid overreach as the sec ond of the two wars he inherited comes to a close. The president will make the case for that seemingly more lim ited approach during a commencement ad dress Wednesday at the U.S. Military Acade my at West Point. The speech will come amid growing frustration in the White House with Republicans and oth er critics who contend that Obama has weak ened Americas stand ing around the world and faltered on prob lems across the Middle East and in Russia, Chi na and elsewhere. BILL BARROW and JOSH LEDERMAN Associated Press ATLANTA Democratic candidates are trying to gure out whether to embrace or avoid Presi dent Barack Obamas health care overhaul or land somewhere in between. The president says his party shouldnt apologize or go on the defensive about the Affordable Care Act. Candidates arent so sure. Two top recruits for Senate races Michelle AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com It took a couple of trips to Guatemala, one of the poorest countries in Latin America, for Umatilla High School senior Jessica Mow ery to decide she wanted to work as a nurse in re duced-price clinics both here and abroad. During her rst trip to Guatemala, a mission trip with Florida Hospital Wa terman, Mowery was not able to help at a clinic be cause of her age. During the second one, also a mission trip, she was able to assist and saw herself working in such a clinic in the future. She took a third trip with an aunt, who also is a nurse. To get a jump start on her career, Mowery became a dual-enrollment student at Lake-Sumter State College during her senior year of high school. She also began working at Florida Hospital Waterman in February as a patient care tech after train ing last summer at a techni cal school to become a certi ed nursing assistant. After graduating, Mowrey plans to attend LSSC before eventually going on to get her bachelors and masters degrees in nursing. Ive gotten a lot of bed side manner experience and a lot of experience, not only technically like with how to take care of a pa tient, its how to treat a per son, she said. Umatilla senior hopes to help people in reduced-price clinics AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Umatilla High School senior Jessica Mowery poses at the school on Thursday. Niagara: Residents traffic concerns will be resolved BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Roy Patterson poses for a photo in his yard as a semi truck passes by in Montverde on Thursday. Obama to outline case for a limited foreign policy AP FILE PHOTO President Barack Obama, shown addressing U.S. Military Academy graduates on May 22, 2010, in West Point, N.Y., will soon outline a foreign policy strategy for his nal years in ofce. MONTVERDE I am all for business and economic development, and people being able to continue their work, but trucks that size, they are hard to stop, and with children coming back and forth across the road, my concern is for their safety. Kasey Kesselring, Montverde Academy headmaster Health law: Embrace, avoid or in between for Democrats SEE TRAFFIC | A2 SEE HEALTH | A2 SEE SENIOR | A2 IF YOU GO UMATILLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION: WHEN: Friday, 8 p.m. WHERE: UHS Football Field NUMBER OF GRADUATES: Ap proximately 145 ADMISSION: Open to the public SEE POLICY | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MAY 25 CASH 3 ............................................... 1-9-4 Afternoon .......................................... 7-4-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 4-8-6-3 Afternoon ....................................... 6-7-0-7 FLORIDA LOTTERY MAY 24 FANTASY 5 ........................... 7-19-29-30-34 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 3-6-17-19-45-48 POWERBALL .................. 15-16-28-49-5518 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. I am all for business and economic develop ment, and people be ing able to continue their work, but trucks that size, they are hard to stop, and with children coming back and forth across the road, my concern is for their safety, he said. The mayor said he has received a lot of citizen complaints concerning the issue. They are not keep ing to the speed lim it and a lot are jake brak ing, he said, referring to the noisy engine brake on diesel engines. Bennett said the issue will be discussed further at the towns June meet ing. We are evaluating re stricting and putting weight limits on trucks coming into town, low ering the speed limit and not allowing jake braking to happen, he said. While safety remains Bennetts top concern, he said the trucks are also a total nuisance and in convenience at all hours to our residents that live along that road that are sleeping. They did not want to build their home next to a turnpike, he said. Now we have a turn pike. We want to return to a nice, quiet and rural road. On Thursday night, Sheriff Gary Borders ad dressed citizen concerns at a meeting in Mont verde. As we do anytime we receive a complaint re garding speeding in a certain area, we have no tied our Trafc Enforce ment Unit, Borders said in an email statement Friday morning. The unit is in the process of assessing the situation so that they can determine the best enforcement ac tion to take. Kesselring said he has reached out to Niagaras plant manager and that she has been cooperative. I am optimistic we will nd an amicable solu tion, he said. TRAFFIC FROM PAGE A1 Nunn in Georgia and Al ison Lundergan Grimes in Kentucky wont say how they would have voted when the Senate passed the bill in 2010. Their refusals are over shadowing their endorse ments of individual parts of the law that are more popular than the law it self. In Montana, Sen. John Walsh, appointed to of ce in February and now running for a full term, re minds voters that he was nowhere near Congress in 2010. In Alaska, an advertise ment by an outside group defends part of the law without mentioning it by name. Also, several in cumbents who voted for the overhaul four years ago highlight some of its benets and promise to tweak other parts. Obama knows the law and this years elections will have much to say about his legacy, and he says, There is a strong, good, right story to tell about the law. But so far in the 2014 midterm elections, that bold approach hasnt tak en hold. Instead, its a more nuanced one. I believe we need to move forward and build on whats working ... and x the things that are not, said Nunn. That was one of her many at tempts to clarify previous remarks that it was im possible for her to say how she would have vot ed on legislation she had no role in negotiating. Nunn will face Rep. Jack Kingston or businessman David Perdue, who meet in a July 22 Republican runoff. Grimes twice refused to answer the yes-or-no question last week, offer ing a similar argument as she began her gener al election campaign to unseat Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader in the Senate. I, when we are in the United States Senate, will work to x the Affordable Care Act, she said. Walsh, at a recent fo rum, had this to say: I was preparing soldiers and airmen to deploy to Iraq and Afghanistan. So I did not vote on the Af fordable Care Act just want to make that clear. Walsh spent 33 years in the Montana National Guard, and became the states adjutant general in 2008, resigning from that post in 2012 to run for lieutenant governor. Those answers reect challenging political real ities for Democrats in an election year that favors Republicans. The GOP must gain six Senate seats to re claim the majority. Dem ocrats must defend seven seats ve incumbents, counting Montana in states Obama lost in 2012 and where he remains broadly unpopular. Nunn and Grimes must woo voters in states that give Obama approval rat ings even lower than his national rating. The GOP is heavily fa vored to maintain its House majority. Republicans have gone after Sens. Mark Begich of Alaska, Kay Hagan of North Carolina, Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Mark Pryor of Arkan sas for being the decid ing vote for Obamacare. Ads hit those states after the disastrous early roll out of online insurance exchanges that allow peo ple to shop for private policies. Democrats say that message is oversimpli ed. White House polit ical advisers insist there are openings to go on offense, with the web site xed and enrollment numbers exceeding 8 mil lion to counter the GOPs argument that the law is a failure. HEALTH FROM PAGE A1 Mowery said she has been inter ested in health care for most of her life. Her mother is a patient care tech and her grandmother was an administrator at a nursing home. Mowery, who does not know her father, currently lives with her aunt and uncle and also has lived with grandparents. She said although she does not live with her mom, she still sees her regularly. It was not just my mom on her own raising me, my grandparents had a huge inuence, my aunt and uncle, and I think thats probably the better thing my mom could have done instead of struggling to raise me by herself, Mowery said. Mowerys mom has her GED, but Mowery said she has al ways planned to graduate from high school and wanted to be a good inspiration for her younger half-brother. Mowery, who is the Student Gov ernment Association president this year at the high school, said she has participated in SGA since her soph omore year, as well as other clubs, including the Key Club and Hi-Q trivia club. She also does commu nity outreach with her church, New Leaf Christian Ministries. She said helping people is one of the most important things in her life because of all the people who have helped her, including teach ers and family. SENIOR FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Michelle Nunn talks with reporters in Decatur, Ga., on May 13. Ben Rhodes, Obamas deputy national securi ty adviser, said the pres ident had not yet nal ized his decision and no announcement was expected while he is in Afghanistan. Rhodes spoke with reporters ac companying Obama on a surprise visit to U.S. troops serving in the closing months of the Afghanistan war. Even so, Rhodes said, You can expect to hear additional clarity from the president on his thinking on Afghanistan in the coming days. Criticism over Obama has only mounted over the past year following Obamas decision to pull back a military strike in Syria and his inability to stop Russia from an nexing territory from Ukraine. A White House ofcial said Obama would specically ad dress both situations, as well as the status of on going nuclear negotia tions with Iran. The president is also expected to discuss how he views shifts in the counterterrorism threat from al-Qaida and oth er groups, according to the ofcial, who in sisted on anonymity to preview the presidents speech. Obama came into of ce vowing to end the lengthy American-led wars in Iraq and Af ghanistan and seeking to keep a war-weary na tion out of unnecessary conicts. The war in Iraq ended in the clos ing days of 2011 and the Afghan conict will for mally conclude later this year, though the White House is seeking to keep a smaller contingent of U.S. troops behind to train Afghan forces and conduct counterterror ism missions. While Obama has fol lowed through on his pledge to end Americas wars, some foreign poli cy analysts argue that he has overcorrected, and his aversion to military action makes it harder for the U.S. to levy cred ible threats that force international foes to change their behavior. In a world where no one will lead except America, he has abdi cated and surrendered much of the leader ship, said Aaron David Miller, a Middle East ad viser to Republican and Democratic adminis trations. The White House of cial said Obama will argue that the U.S. re mains the only nation capable of galvanizing action and will make the case that American power needs to be part of a sustainable inter national system. He will argue that his foreign policy philosophy is not isolationist, but rather interventionist and in ternationalist, accord ing to the ofcial. The president is ex pected to expand on remarks he made last month at a news con ference in the Philip pines, when the extent of his frustration with his critics boiled over. He specically targeted those who are quick to call for U.S. military ac tion, arguing that they had failed to learn the lessons of the Iraq war. Why is it that ev erybody is so eager to use military force after weve just gone through a decade of war at enormous costs to our troops and to our bud get? he said. And what is it exactly that these critics think would have been accomplished? Yet Obama also cast his approach as one that avoids errors by being more limited in scope. You hit singles, you hit doubles, he said. Every once in a while we may be able to hit a home run. Ahead of the presi dents speech, Obamas top advisers have been holding private meet ings with congressional lawmakers to address their specic foreign policy concerns. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., was among those who participat ed in the White House meetings. In an inter view, he questioned how much Obamas speech can accom plish in shifting the way the White Houses for eign policy approach is viewed. One of the problems with the White House is that they view speeches as foreign policy, Cork er said. They dont re ally follow through with much in the way of sub stance. Its always mini mal. POLICY FROM PAGE A1 While Obama has followed through on his pledge to end Americas wars, some foreign policy analysts argue that he has overcorrected, and his aversion to military action makes it harder for the U.S. to levy credible threats that force international foes to change their behavior.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LAKE COUNTY Government offices, libraries closed for Memorial Day All ofces of the Lake County Board of County Commissioners, Clerk of Courts, Property Appraiser, Supervisor of Elections and Tax Collector and Lake County librar ies are closed today in observance of Memorial Day. Operations for the Lake County Solid Waste Division and LakeXpress, and Lake Countys xed-route bus service will be closed for the holi day, with normal hours resuming on Tuesday. All Florida Department of Health ofces in Lake County also will be closed on Monday and will re open on Tuesday. The Helen Lehmann Memorial Library in Montverde will op erate on limited hours, and the Eustis Memorial Library will be closed Saturday through Monday. Go to www.mylakelibrary.com for information. THE VILLAGES Sumter County to host annual Business Expo Show Me the Money, Sumter County Chambers annual Business Expo, takes place from 6 to 8 p.m., on June 5 at the Savannah Center, 1575 Buena Vista Blvd., in The Villages. Guests will be able to enjoy a cash bar, win prizes and browse exhibits from businesses such as Cals Barber and Beauty, Solid Image, Tom and Jerrys Airboat Adventures and Blue Monster Promotions. For information about the free event, or to be a vendor, call the Sumter County Chamber of Commerce at 352-793-3099 or go to www.sumterchamber.org. LAKE COUNTY Library Summer Reading Program begins in June Lake County libraries will begin its annual Summer Reading Program, Fizz, Boom, Read! in June for pre schoolthrough elementary-aged children. The themed event will explore a wide variety of topics with a focus on science, offering reading incen tive games, special presenters, story time and interactive events. For information, registration and a schedule of events, go to www.my lakelibrary.org. All programs are free. OXFORD GAL program in need of child advocate volunteers The Guardian ad Litem (GAL) pro gram is seeking volunteer advocates to be a voice for abused, neglected or abandoned children whose cases are in the court system. Volunteers must be 21 years of age or older, successfully complete 30 hours of pre-service training and be cleared of any serious criminal history via a Level II criminal back ground check. Individuals ages 19 and 20 are eligible to work alongside a certied volunteer. The next training session begins on June 9 at the Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301. Call 352-274-5231 or email Sarah. Jay@gal..gov. To download an ap plication, go to www.guardianadli tem.org. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A retired teacher and community volunteer, Linda Watts, 67, of Lees burg, was surprised to be named one of the nations top 20 nalists from more than 200 nominees for 2014 Citizen Service Be fore Self Honors, a top ci vilians award, from the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation in Ar lington, Va. I didnt even know of it, Watts said, unaware of the award or who nominat ed her for the honor. I re ceived this big, certied packet in the mail and it came with this big sterling silver pendant. It was a nice surprised. I am honored to be recognized nationwide. Watts said the award is as meaningful as when she was named a Points of Light recipient. Harold A. Fritz, Congressional Soci ety president, stated on the award cita tion that Watts has distin guished herself through extraordinary heroism in dedicating her life to spending every day help ing others. Her lifes passion is taking care of people and instilling in youth the importance of volunteer work and giving to others. Watts was praised as the founder of the Flor ida Hometown USA Pro gram, established as an educational initiative to LEESBURG Watts receives national civilian honor WATTS ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com T he city of Cler mont and the Lake Coun ty Rowing Associa tion announced Fri day that the rst-ever rowing regatta the Leader of the Lake Regatta will be hosted on Nov. 8-9 at Lake Minneola. The regatta is one result of a grant the city of Clermont won to build the Clermont Boathouse at Water front Park, city of cials said. Lake Coun ty is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse, which will be headquarters for the Lake County Row ing Association. Lake County Com missioner Sean Parks helped Clermont se cure a matching tour ism grant for the boathouse, which is expected to cost $750,000. The Lake Coun ty Rowing Associa tion is a nonprot or ganization created to promote rowing as a sport at all lev els of interest. It has incorporated a crew of masters and high school students. Many of the student athletes involved with the association repre sent South Lake High School, East Ridge High School, Minne ola High School and Montverde Academy, according to the asso ciation. Using the boat house as a hub, train ing will take place year round in prepa ration for competi tions at local, region al and national levels through the associa tion, city ofcials said in a press release. The boathouse, which will hold about 30 boats, is expect ed to be completed in late September. Ofcials, associa tion members and supporters gathered at the site a few weeks ago as a sign was put up, indicating the boathouses arrival in the fall. The boathouse will present numer ous opportunities for recreation, tness Clermont breaks ground on boathouse SUBMITTED PHOTO This is an architects rendering of the Clermont Boathouse at Waterfront Park. Lake County is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse. SUBMITTED PHOTO Lake County Rowing Association ofcials, members and supporters gathered at the boathouse site a few weeks ago as a sign was raised, indicating the boathouses arrival in the fall. SHELDON GARDNER Associated Press ST. AUGUSTINE When Martin Luther King Jr., came to St. Augustine in the 1960s, he was look ing to keep the momen tum alive for passage of the Civil Rights Act. He and other Southern Christian Leadership Con ference members were looking for a community with an active civil rights movement, said David Colburn, a University of Florida history professor. They were also looking for a community that was symbolic in some way, and St. Augustine t the bill, he said. It was 1964, and in the wake of demonstrations and brutality in Birming ham, Ala., there was some talk that King would go to Washington, D.C. His con cern was about violence erupting there and the possibility of disrupting legislators. That would be counterproductive to the goal. So when Robert Hayling, a leader of the civil rights movement in St. Augus tine, reached out to the SCLC for help in response BRENDAN FARRINGTON AP Political Writer TAMPA At a recent meeting, the Tampa Bay Young Republicans recit ed the Pledge of Allegiance, prayed and then tackled the nights topic: marijuana. Their guest? Personal injury law yer John Morgan, a huge Demo cratic Party donor campaigning to legalize medical marijuana in Flor ida. Months earlier, the same group supported a Supreme Court opinion that was a victory for gay marriage advocates even as Republican lead ers insisted marriage should be be tween only a man and a woman. The group illustrates a growing generational divide in the GOP as younger Republicans increasingly break rank from the establishment on social issues. In Alabama, a col lege Republican group leader was nearly kicked out of the party for supporting gay marriage. The suc cessful push to legalize gay marriage in Minnesota was backed by sever al prominent younger Republicans. And in Colorado, the spokesman for a group that pushed to legalize mari juana was a Republican activist. Per haps only in opposing abortion are most young Republicans national ly as conservative socially as older members. Weve grown up in a time where everythings much more open. We want to talk about more things, Tampa Bay Young Republicans pres ident Anibal Cabrera said. Were willing to listen to the other point of view. Were willing to have an oppo site opinion. Whether the split on social issues forces the GOP to change its plat form or risk alienating younger vot ers probably wont be answered until after the 2016 presidential election, said Matthew Corrigan, a Univer sity of North Florida political sci ence professor. He said one thing to watch is support for Kentucky Sen. GOP, young members split on social issues St. Augustine played key role in civil rights movement AP FILE PHOTO In this June 10, 1964 photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gives a young picket a pat on the back as a group of youngsters started to picket St. Augustine. SEE GOP | A4 SEE WATTS | A4 SEE CLERMONT | A5 SEE RIGHTS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted Rand Paul, the son of former Texas Rep. Ron Paul, who is mixing a libertarian message with a more moderate out reach to Republicans. Its unsettled, Corrigan said. If the nominee of the Republican Party signals less of an emphasis on social is sues than in years past, that leaves an opening for these young Republicans who may have more libertarian lean ings, but theres a lot of se niors within the party that I dont think are ready to give up on those positions. While Republicans na tionally have struggled to re cruit younger voters, wom en and minorities, the Tampa group says welcoming social ly liberal as well as conser vative members has helped swell its ranks from seven to 200 members in less than a year. Executive director Lac ey Wickline said the party es tablishment could learn from the approach, but instead has largely ignored the group. Were doing something right. Weve got the energy, were trying to do whats right by our party, and wheres the support? Wickline said. If youre really trying to target the under 40 demographic, theres only one place to turn thats us. Part of the shift among younger Republicans is growing up in an era where gay rights, pot smoking and other issues are more accept able, even among conserva tives. We grew up on Will and Grace and our parents grew up on All in the Family, said Stephanie Petelos, the chair man of the College Republi can Federation of Alabama who was almost banished from her party for support ing gay marriage. Alabama Republican Party Chairman Bill Armistead said there may be some differing opinions among younger Re publicans, but he still feels most support the party plat form. Those interviewed not ed even young Republicans tend to be anti-abortion. And Armistead pointed out that the man elected to replace Petelos after she graduated rmly supports traditional marriage. It was very disruptive for the previous college chair man to advocate a position thats contradictory to our state position and our na tional platform, Armistead said. It did not represent the majority of college Republi cans, yet she used her posi tion to advocate her personal opinions, which is unfortu nate. Beyond being a generation al issue, young Republicans say their positions stem from the partys belief that gov ernment shouldnt intrude on peoples lives. Ron Pauls 2012 presidential campaign got most of its following from younger Republicans attract ed by his libertarian message that allowed for gay marriage and the legalization of mari juana. When it comes to issues like gay marriage or mari juana legalization, young er Republicans often nd themselves asking, Why is government involved in this at all? said Alex Holzbach, a Tallahassee-based Repub lican political consultant who served as president of the Florida State Universi ty College Republicans be fore graduating this year. Its really just a realization that the partys current status quo against some of these issues is in direct conict with our belief in smaller, less intru sive government. He and Petelos said they are Republicans because they believe the party is stronger on economic issues, and both said the GOPs posi tion on social issues made it harder to recruit college stu dents. Its just a little bit harder to get into what the Fed did last week than it is for equality for one of your best friends from high school, Petelos said. The economy is especial ly relevant when recruiting students staring down col lege loan debt and a tough job market, said Young Re publican National Federa tion Chairman Jason Weing artner. Its often the Democrats that are trying to shake the narrative so that we go back to discussing predominantly social issues so it will distract from the current economic climate, he said. GOP FROM PAGE A3 LAUREN MATTHEWS / AP Tampa Bay Young Republicans executive director Lacey Wickline interviews personal injury lawyer John Morgan about his campaign to legalize medical marijuana during the groups monthly meeting in Tampa. teach Floridas youth about the importance of volunteer service. The Miss Leesburg Scholarship Program is part of the program, in which Watts leads young ambassadors, ranging from young children to teenagers, as they visit nursing homes, veterans hospi tals, childrens homes and orphanages. Youth collect and dis tribute food and person al care items, clean up the environment, visit the sick and elderly and put on entertainment programs to bring joy to those who are lonely. Through her out reach, she positive ly impacts the lives of over 5,000 people each and every year, carrying donations and spend ing time with those in need, the award reads. Her heroic actions re ect great credit upon herself, her family, her community and the state of Florida. Watts has no plans to retire from volunteer work. It is so special for me to be involved and to be giving back, she said. WATTS FROM PAGE A3 to violence, ofcials responded. What met them was brutal vio lence, and what they found was a town ripe for change. Theyd throw rocks at us and bricks at us and everything down town, said J.T. John son of Atlanta, an SCLC member who in 1964 jumped into the whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge. People were very cruel in St. Augus tine, he said. After King arrived in St. Augustine, demon strations followed that are credited with helping the passage of the Civil Rights Act. St. Augustine was thrust into the na tional spotlight. Why St. Augustine was the focal point of leaders in a crucial time was partly strat egy. Leaders found an active movement here and knew what took place would grab the attention of the na tional media. The citys 400th an niversary played a role, if nothing else RIGHTS FROM PAGE A3 for symbolism: It was the oldest city in the na tion, and also the oldest segregated city. Demonstrations had already been taking place since the s by the time King arrived, Colburn said. We didnt start the movement, Johnson said. A couple of men were major gures in St. Au gustines movement. The Rev. Thomas Wright, who graduated from Florida Memorial College, was part of re organizing the Nation al Association for the Advancement of Col ored People and was its president, accord ing to information from the exhibit, Journey: 450 Years of the Afri can-American Experi ence Exhibition at the St. Augustine Visitor In formation Center. In the s and s, Wright was part of non-violent train ing for students, some of whom took part in lunch-counter protests at Woolworth. Wright and his fam ily moved after being threatened. Hayling, a dentist, led a protest in March 1963 for the NAACP against the segregated 400th anniversary celebration of St. Augustine. People in the move ment wanted to be part of the anniversary, but the power structure said no, said resident Barba ra Vickers, who was part of demonstrations. Some people in town knew the timing was right because of the an niversary, said Thom as James T.J. Jackson, who was 12 when he participated in a march. There was enthusiasm about the anniversary, and that increased the attention on St. Augus tine. Hayling established a youth council for the NAACP that held non-violent demon strations and the Wool worth sit-in protest that ended with four teenag ers getting arrested. The Ku Klux Klan ter rorized African-Amer ican neighborhoods in St. Augustine, but they were driven off with gunre, accord ing to the exhibit. That happened after the KKK beat Hayling and other activists in September 1963. The NAACP and Hay ling eventually split, and Hayling contacted the SCLC for the help. SCLC ofcials came at Haylings request. The symbolism of the ap proaching 400th anni versary may have been icing on the cake. A quote from a speech King gave in St. Augus tine, shown in the Jour ney exhibit, reads: St. Augustine is merely a symbol of an expression of the trag edies that invoke our whole nation in the area of racial issues. Now the fact is that we are pick ing on St. Augustine, we are seeking to make this the oldest city in the United States, one of the most democrat ic cities of the United States. The SCLC sent in rep resentatives to see how things were going. They found that there was a pretty strong movement, Col burn said. When King arrived, so did more white mil itants from outside St. Augustine. King and leaders held meetings at churches and organized march es and demonstrations, which were met with vi olence. Some of St. Augus tines law enforcement ofcers were opposed to demonstrations and did not nd more subtle approaches to prevent ing them. St. Augustine react ed much more militant ly, Colburn said. They turned dogs and police batons on the demon strators. They actual ly cooperated with the militants. The marches and demonstrations that followed were peaceful. Jackson, of St. Johns County, remembers that people were told that if they couldnt keep themselves from ghting, they should not march. He was 12 years old when he went to meet ings at churches around the community. He was in a march when Andrew Young was attacked. He re membered that a white man from Boston was walking with them. They knocked all of us out the way and jumped on him, Jack son said of the attackers. The marchers went around the plaza and near the former slave market, which was full of people with bats and chains and hoses. We Shall Over come, he said. We Shall Not Be Moved. Those were two of the main songs we sang. AP FILE PHOTO In this June 18, 1964 le photo, Integration demonstrators are shown after a long march through the white business and residential section, holding prayer sessions at the Monson Motor Lodge Restaurant in St. Augustine.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days and economic devel opment, City Manager Darren Gray said. It has already generated a lot of enthusiasm and inter est, and we look forward to this and future regat tas on Lake Minneola. It will also give our youth another recre ational activity that could lead to scholar ships (because of the formation of local high school teams). It will enhance the vision we have for our downtown waterfront area that is going to be a major fo cus in our future plans for Clermont. Debbie Kiely, past president of the Lake County Rowing Associ ation, said her club will host the November re gatta. Races are typi cally hosted during the fall rowing season and are about 5,000 meters long, she said. Beyond the rst re gatta, the association, which has about 40 members, anticipates hosting several regattas per year, Kiely said. Gray said that besides offering a new sport at the citys popular Wa terfront Park, he fore sees many economic development opportu nities. Kiely said her club plans to attract north ern teams during the winter when they are seeking a warm climate in which to train. Parks, a rower him self, had similar thoughts. What I hope the boathouse brings is winter training in Cler mont for high schools and colleges from up north, he said. The people from those groups would then stay in Clermont or somewhere in Lake County and spend money here at our busi nesses, Parks said. Additionally, in 2017, Sarasota will host the World Rowing Champi onships, which is like ly to draw more than 100,000 rowing enthu siasts to Florida. Some might return to Lake County, since they would already know the area, ofcials said. Parks said there are also many possibilities for participants in oth er water sports, such as sailing and canoeing, to use the boathouse and/ or hold events at Lake Minneola. Its gonna be a multiuse facility, he said. Parks also said the re gattas, and any other events that result from the boathouses buildout, will involve coop eration between Cler mont, Lake County, the sports commission, the National Training Cen ter/Live Well and the South Lake Chamber of Commerce. Thats a good thing, Parks said. And the most important thing we all have to do right now is to work togeth er and focus on making sure this rst regatta goes off extraordinari ly well to make the best rst impression we can to pave the way for many future regattas still to come. CLERMONT FROM PAGE A3 NATALIYA VASILYEVA and PETER LEONARD Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine Exit polls suggested candy tycoon Pet ro Poroshenko was elected president Sunday in the rst round of balloting in the bit terly divided country, and he vowed to bring peace to the Ukrainian land. The billionaire who sup ports strong ties with Europe but also wants to mend rela tions with Russia claimed vic tory after a vote that took place amid weeks of ghting in east ern Ukraine where pro-Mos cow separatists have seized government buildings and battled government troops. The rebels had vowed to block the ballot in the east, and less than 20 percent of the polling stations were open there after gunmen in timidated locals by smashing ballot boxes, shutting down polling centers and issuing threats. But nationwide, about 60 percent of 35.5 million eli gible voters turned out, the central elections commis sion said, and long lines snaked around polling sta tions in the capital of Kiev. The exit polls, conducted by three respected Ukrainian survey agencies, found the 48-year-old Poroshenko get ting 55.9 percent of the vote in the eld of 21 candidates. A distant second was for mer Prime Minister Yulia Ty moshenko with 12.9 percent, the poll showed. Full results are expected Monday, but if that margin holds, Poroshen ko would avoid a runoff elec tion next month with the sec ond-place nisher. Viewing the exit polls as denitive evidence of victo ry, Poroshenko said his rst steps as president would be to visit the Donbass eastern industrial region, home to Ukraines coal mines and put an end to war, chaos, crime, and bring peace to the Ukrainian land. He also promised a dia logue with residents of east ern Ukraine and said he was ready to extend amnesty to those who did not commit any crimes. For those people who dont take (up) weapons, we are always ready for nego tiations to guarantee them security, to guarantee them defending of their rights, in cluding speaking the lan guage they want, he said in English. The election, which came three months after pro-Mos cow President Viktor Yanu kovych was chased from of ce by crowds following months of street protests and allegations of corruption, was seen as a critical step to ward resolving Ukraines pro tracted crisis. Since his ouster, Russia has annexed the Crimea in southern Ukraine, the east ern regions of Luhansk and Donetsk have declared their independence from Kiev, and the interim Ukrainian government has launched an offensive in the east to quash an uprising that has left doz ens dead. Exit poll: Candy tycoon elected Ukraine president VADIM GHIRDA / AP Pro-Russian militants smash ballot boxes in front of the seized regional administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com MARTHA MENDOZA and TOBY STERLING Associated Press MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. Europes moves to rein in Google in cluding a court ruling this month ordering the search giant to give people a say in what pops up when someone searches their name may be seen in Brussels as striking a blow for the little guy. But across the Atlan tic, the idea that users should be able to edit Google search results in the name of privacy is being slammed as weird and difcult to enforce at best and a crackdown on free speech at worst. Americans will nd their searches bowdler ized by prissy European sensibilities, said Stew art Baker, former assis tant secretary for policy at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Well be the big losers. The big winners will be French ministers who want the right to have their last mistress for gotten. Mountain View, Cal ifornia -based Goo gle says its still guring out how to comply with the European Court of Justices May 13 ruling, which says the com pany must respond to complaints about pri vate information that turns up in searches. Google must then de cide whether the pub lics right to be able to nd the information outweighs an individu als right to control it with preference given to the individual. The judgment applies to all search engines op erating within the Euro pean Union. But in prac tice that means Google, given that 90 percent of all online searches there use Googles search en gine. The ruling has sig nicant implications for how we handle take down requests, Google spokesman Al Verney said. This is logistically complicated, not least because of the many languages involved and the need for careful re view. As soon as we have thought through exact ly how this will work, which may take sever al weeks, we will let our users know. There will be serious technological challeng es, said U.S. privacy at torney David Keating in Atlanta. It seems aspiration al, not a reality, to com ply with such a stan dard, he said. The reengineering neces sary to implement the right to be forgotten is signicant. Google may partial ly automate the pro cess, as it does with copyright-infringement complaints, but ulti mately a human will have to decide when results should be sani tized. Johannes Caspar, who as Hamburgs Commis sioner for Data Protec tion acts as Germanys lead regulator of Goo gle on privacy issues, conrmed the compa ny is already working on an online tool to help people le complaints. Because the courts ruling applies only with in Europe, it will mean some fragmentation of search results. That is, Europeans and Ameri cans will see slightly dif ferent versions of the Internet. A worst-case scenario would be if Google decides it must err on the side of cau tion and removes links Americans seen as big losers as Europe moves to rein in Google THE ASSOCIATED PRESS In this April 17, 2007 photo, exhibitors of the Google company work on laptop computers in front of an illuminated sign of the Google logo at the industrial fair Hannover Messe in Hanover, Germany. liberally in order to avoid lawsuits, critics of the ruling said. Wikipedia found er Jimmy Wales, who has been an outspo ken critic of the rul ing, summarized it for The Associated Press as a technological ly incompetent viola tion of human rights. He said it amounts to censorship, and he predicted it will ulti mately be scrapped. The danger is that search engines now are faced with an un certain legal future which may require them to censor all kinds of things when someone thinks it is irrelevant, Wales said. In the wake of the decision, some Eu ropeans are already asking to clean up their online histo ry, though there may not yet have been a ood of hundreds of requests, includ ing some from pedo philes and politicians, as was reported in the British press short ly after the ruling was handed down. In Britain, David Murphy of the In formation Commis sioners Ofce said while weve had some people get in touch around this is sue, were simply tell ing them to speak to Google. Ofcials in the Netherlands said they havent had any new requests since the ruling. Caspar, the Ger man ofcial, said his ofce has received 20 new requests, includ ing some from people who won legal ghts with websites to have material taken down but the sites didnt comply because they were based abroad. JAKE PEARSON Associated Press NEW YORK The U.S. Marine Corps chaplain, speaking Sun day to a congregation that has tied gold rib bons on the churchs fence in honor of fall en soldiers since the Iraq War began, laud ed the sacrice of vet erans around the world as President Barack Obama made a surprise visit to Afghanistan for Memorial Day. What they have done has allowed us to be here, Rear Admiral Margaret Kibben told the roughly 200 wor shippers at the Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan, including active duty servicemen and women in town for the annual Fleet Week celebration. Memorial Day, she said, was a time to re mind ourselves of the meaning of sacrice and to put personal struggles and difcul ties in perspective. Across the nation, cit izens were marking Me morial Day with som ber ceremonies, ag planting at cemeteries, parades and even bar becues an American pastime that Petty Of cer 1st Class Brian Mc Neal said should be en joyed this weekend. Im in the service so that they can en joy that, said McNeal, 39, who is stationed in Suffolk, Virginia, and is in town for Fleet Week. They made the sac rice so everyday citi zens dont have to wor ry about the evils of the world. Thousands of me morial ribbons are tied on the storied churchs fence. There are gold ribbons for service members killed in Af ghanistan, green rib bons representing prayers for peace and blue ribbons for the people of Afghanistan. Obama arrived at Ba gram Air Field in Af ghanistan to speak with troops and visit sol diers being treated at a base hospital. At least 2,181 members of the U.S. military have died during the nearly 13year Afghan war and thousands more have been wounded. On Saturday, Dem ocratic congresswom an Tammy Duckworth served as grand marshal of Chicagos Memorial Day Parade and strug gled to hold back tears during a wreath-lay ing ceremony to honor fallen soldiers. She lost her legs and partial use of an arm when a rock et-propelled grenade hit the Black Hawk heli copter she was piloting in Iraq in 2004. More than 300 Ju nior ROTC students from Chicago Military Academy at Bronzeville marched in the citys parade. Afterward, still dressed in their uni forms, they chatted, bantered and ordered ice cream from a ven dors truck while wait ing for a bus that would take them back home. US marks Memorial Day weekend with somber ceremonies JOHN GREEN / AP Cub Scout Mateo Armijo, 7, with Pack 28 in Burlingame, runs with ags at the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif., on Saturday.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 T he crowds are gone from In dependence Square, known as the Maidan, where mas sive demonstrations unseated a Ukrainian president. Yet the signs of struggle remain, sprawl ing across the Maidan and the surrounding streets: the tents and soup kitchens, the piles of black tires and debris, and the posters of the youthful dead on walls and makeshift shrines that are adorned daily with fresh owers. Pay attention to this revolution. The Kremlin has tried to crush it by dismembering Ukraine and mounting a erce propaganda campaign that falsely labels the uprising fascist. Moscow wants to discredit Ukraines presiden tial elections on Sunday by stir ring up violence that makes vot ing impossible in eastern sections of the country. But the Maidan revolution of February is still alive. And the on going battle between Moscow and Kiev reects a larger struggle for the soul and direction of Europe. The struggle pits an educated gen eration of young Ukrainians seek ing democracy against Vladimir Putin, who wants to build a Eur asian empire based on anti-West ern values and autocratic rule. Ukraine is the test case in which Putin seeks to demonstrate the decadence of democracy. He has destroyed the post-Cold War European order by invading an other country and faced little op position. His aggressive Russian nationalism is admired by farright European parties that are expected to do well in European Parliament elections that will also be held Sunday. With his bare-chested machis mo, his homophobia, his odes to tradition and religious or thodoxy, and his disdain for the West, Putin has become a hero to conservative Europeans who have been hurt by globalization and the economic strictures of the European Union. The real plan of Putin is to break the European Union, the French intellectual Ber nard-Henri Levy said during a fascinating gathering of U.S., Eu ropean, and Ukrainian scholars in Kiev, called Ukraine: Think ing Together. Putin, says Levy, has bought into the Eurasian ism dogma of an adviser named Alexander Dugin, who has writ ten of scenarios in which a strong Russia splits Europe and NATO and becomes the leader of a grand (and anti-American) fed eration of Eurasia and Europe. Sound fanciful? In reality, yes, given Russias economic and de mographic weakness. But not in the Russian leaders mind. His aggression was provoked by Ukrainians desire to move to ward the European Union rather than join the Eurasian confeder ation he was promoting. Putin is trying to divide Eu rope and to stimulate anti-Amer ican sentiment in Europe, said Constantin Sigov, a professor at the National University of Ky iv-Mohyla Academy. That is self-evident in Ukraine. So the geopolitical impact is clear. If Putin can thwart the pro-Europe Maidan revolution, he may decide to snatch chunks of Romania, Kazakhstan, or Lat via on the pretext that they are inhabited by ethnic Russians. But at the Kiev conference, it became clear that the fate of Ukraine will have an emotional impact as well. It is more than 20 years since Eastern and Central European nations joined Europe after the Berlin Wall fell, breathing new passion into Western civics les sons on democracy. Since then, U.S. democracy has become par alyzed by partisanship, and the European Union has become bu reaucratized and passionless. The conference participants spoke emotionally of the yearn ing for democracy that they wit nessed on the Maidan, where EU ags were raised next to the Ukrainian banner. (The violence of the revolutions last days, sparked by a pro-Russian gov ernments murder of demonstra tors, was only a coda to months of peaceful protest.) Putin has demonized the Eu ro-Maidan revolution because its example threatens his authoritar ian system. How ironic that he de mands a destructive form of fed eralism for Ukraine when he has totally centralized power in Rus sia. Ukraines new government is ready to decentralize power and protect language rights, but that isnt what Putin wants. Rather, he aims to promote a new philosophy for Europe based on naked power grabs and antidemocratic norms. The Maidans civic activists are seek ing the opposite: a chance to prove that democracy is still the best system. They are different from their parents, who grew up under the Soviet Union, and they have nothing to do with the an ti-Semitism of Ukraines past. This is terribly threatening to Putin, who has his own mid dle-class youth to contend with. Putin wants to break the Maidan because the Maidan can break Putin, said Volodymyr Via trovych, director of the Ukrainian Institute for National Memory. If the Maidan revolt succeeds which would require sustained U.S. and European help it will have a profound effect on Russia. If it fails, said Sigov, it will be very dangerous for the future of Eu rope. Indeed it will. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and edi torial-board member for the Philadel phia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Ukraines revolution is pivotal C ornell Brooks is inheriting the leader ship of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People at a time when the nations oldest civil rights or ganization is experiencing a resurgence of inuence and membership in its long strug gle for equal rights. Brooks, whose appoint ment as NAACP chief was announced Satur day, is a lawyer, minister and long-time civil rights activist who is well equipped to carry forward the new initiatives begun in 2008 by his predecessor, Benjamin Jealous. Jealous realized that in order to remain rel evant to todays challenges the NAACP must broaden its efforts to include all those unfair ly victimized because of their race, ethnicity, gender, national origin or sexual orientation. Despite the progress made in recent decades toward ending the disparate treatment of mi norities and the climate of bigotry and intol erance that enabled it, the NAACPs efforts are needed today as much as ever to combat the systemic injustices that continue to taint American democracy in less obvious forms. U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder pro vided a good summary of those challeng es in his commencement address at Morgan State University over the weekend. Hold er condemned the continuing racial dispar ities that restrict African-Americans access to health care, employment, housing, educa tion and the ballot box as well as in the dis proportionately harsh sentences meted out to African-Americans by the criminal justice system. These legacies of slavery and the era of de jure segregation that followed continue to limit the opportunities of millions of black Americans long after the Supreme Courts landmark 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education decision outlawing segregation in the nations public schools. The Obama administration has pledged to address these continuing forms of injus tice through executive orders if Congress fails to act, and Holder already has issued new guidelines for granting early release to some low-level, nonviolent drug offenders who were condemned to long prison terms under the harsh mandatory sentencing policies passed by lawmakers as part of the war on drugs. Clearly, the NAACP has a role to play in all these battles, where the stakes are much high er than those involved in refuting the offensive comments of a sports team owner or a bigot ed public ofcial. If Brooks can keep the NAACP focused on the much more insidious, systemic injustices that deny minorities a chance to par ticipate in the American dream, he will prove a worthy successor to the leader he is replacing. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Brooks announced as new leader of NAACP Classic DOONESBURY 1974

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com MLB: Scores, schedules / B3 PHOTOS BY MICHAEL CONROY / AP ABOVE: Ryan Hunter-Reay celebrates after winning the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. BELOW: Hunter-Reay celebrates after nishing the nal lap. Hunter-Reay holds off Helio Castroneves to win Indy 500 JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer INDIANAPOLIS The nish at the India napolis 500 was worth the wait for Ryan Hunt er-Reay. He used a series of daredevil moves to deny Helio Castroneves a chance at history on Sunday and became the rst American since 2006 to win The Great est Spectacle in Racing. He passed Castroneves at the Yard of Bricks as the two bright yellow cars raced wheel-towheel under the white ag in a thrilling nal lap. As Hunter-Reay surged ahead down the backstretch, Cas troneves took one nal look coming out of Turn 4, but couldnt pull off the pass and lost by 0.060 seconds. Only the 1992 race had a closer nish when Al Unser Jr. beat Scott Goodyear by 0.043 seconds. Im a proud Ameri can boy, thats for sure, Hunter-Reay said in Victory Lane before he was joined by his wife and son. Ive watched this race since I was sit ting in diapers on the oor in front of the TV. My son did it today. He watched me here. Im thrilled. This is Amer ican history, this race, this is American tradi tion. Ryden, born short ly after Hunter-Reays 2012 IndyCar champi onship, celebrated the traditional kissing of the bricks with his fam ily while wearing a min iature version of his fa thers re suit. Castroneves, trying to become the fourth driv er to win a record fourth Indianapolis 500, set tled for second. He was devastated by the defeat and needed several mo ments to compose him self, slumped in his car, Indiana Pacers guard Lance Stephenson, right, defends Miami Heat forward LeBron James during Game 3 on Saturday in Miami. LYNNE SLADKY / AP TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI In the 2011 NBA Finals, LeBron James spent too much time for his liking talking about his purported ri valry with an easily excitable guard named Stevenson. Theres a new rival now. His name sounds the same. Different spelling, though. Back then, it was Dallas De Shawn Stevenson. In these Eastern Conference nals, its Indianas Lance Stephenson in the foil role. James sees the ob vious parallels but isnt inter ested in stoking the res es pecially with the Heat leading the Pacers 2-1 heading into Monday nights Game 4, one that could allow Miami to put a stranglehold on the series. Winning the game is more important, James said. I un derstand what the main goal is. Still, it seems fair to say that Stephenson and James got each other going often in Game 3. When the Pacers n ished practice Sunday, Ste phenson talked about how Pacers seeking breakthrough, Heat aim to improve SEE HEAT | B2 Yeah, we havent played our best game. They probably feel the same way. We havent started how we want to, how we need to. So we think our best basketball is yet to come. LeBron James Miami Heat small forward SEE INDY | B2 MATT SLOCUM / AP Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Josh Beckett, center, is doused by second baseman Justin Turner, right, after Beckett pitched a no-hitter on Sunday in Philadelphia. ROB MAADDI Associated Press PHILADELPHIA Josh Beckett pitched the rst no-hitter of his stellar ca reer and the rst in the majors this season, lead ing the Los Angeles Dodg ers over the Philadelphia Phillies 6-0 on Sunday. Beckett struck out six, walked three and didnt come close to allowing a hit against a lineup that included two former NL MVPs and four former All-Stars. I dont think I had nohit stuff, he said. I just re ally kept them guessing. The 34-year-old righthander, whose career was almost derailed last year by a nerve condition that left him unable to feel his ngertips, threw 128 pitch es and fanned Chase Utley on a called strike three to end the game. Beckett mixed a sharp fastball with a slow, decep tive curve that kept hitters off-balance. He pitched the Dodgers rst no-hit ter since Hideo Nomo beat Colorado at Coors Field in 1996, and the 21st in fran chise history. Sandy Kou fax threw four. Beckett pitched the rst no-hitter in the majors since Miamis Henderson Alvarez did it against De troit on the nal day of the 2013 season. Beckett also became the rst visiting pitcher Beckett tosses first career no-hitter in win over Phils SEE NO-NO | B2 STEPHEN HAWKINS Associated Press FORT WORTH, Tex as Adam Scott made a 7-foot birdie putt on the third hole of a play off Sunday to end his rst week as the worlds No. 1 player with a vic tory at Colonial. Jason Dufner, who made a 25-foot birdie putt on No. 18 in reg ulation, slid a 40-foot er past when he and Scott played the 18th hole for the second time during the play off. Scott then made the 7-footer for his 11th PGA Tour victory. The major cham pions parred No. 18 to start the playoff, then matched bird ies at the 17th hole. Dufner, who won the Scott beats Dufner on 3rd playoff hole LM OTERO / AP Adam Scott celebrates after sinking the winning putt. CHRIS LEHOURITES AP Sports Writer PARIS The young Federer sisters were in the stands watching daddy win his opening match at the French Open, and the Williams sisters were on separate courts Sunday ensuring their own progress. Roger Federer had little trou ble beating Lukas Lacko of Slova kia 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. As soon as he n ished, Serena Williams took over on Court Philippe Chatrier, the main stadium at Roland Garros, and beat Alize Lim 6-2, 6-1. Over on Court Suzanne Lenglen, Venus Williams was also playing, and winning. The older Williams sibling defeated Belinda Bencic 6-4, 6-1. Federer moves into 2nd round at French Open SEE GOLF | B2 SEE OPEN | B2 FEDERER

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 Indianapolis 500 Results Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (19) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 200 laps. 2. (4) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (6) Marco Andretti, Honda, 200. 4. (7) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 200. 5. (10) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200. 6. (12) Kurt Busch, Honda, 200. 7. (17) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 200. 8. (3) Will Power, Chevrolet, 200. 9. (31) Sage Karam, Chevrolet, 200. 10. (9) J.R. Hildebrand, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (18) Oriol Servia, Honda, 200. 12. (5) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 200. 13. (24) Alex Tagliani, Honda, 200. 14. (27) Jacques Villeneuve, Honda, 200. 15. (32) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 200. 16. (28) James Davison, Chevrolet, 200. 17. (21) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 200. 18. (30) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 200. 19. (23) Takuma Sato, Honda, 200. 20. (13) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 200. 21. (15) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 198. 22. (14) Justin Wilson, Honda, 198. 23. (29) Martin Plowman, Honda, 196. 24. (22) Pippa Mann, Honda, 193. 25. (25) Townsend Bell, Chevrolet, 190, contact. 26. (16) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 177. 27. (1) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 175, contact. 28. (2) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 175, contact. 29. (11) Scott Dixon, Chevrolet, 167, contact. 30. (8) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 156, contact. 31. (26) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 149, contact. 32. (33) Buddy Lazier, Chevrolet, 87, mechanical. 33. (20) Graham Rahal, Honda, 44, electrical. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Indiana 1 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 Saturday, May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 Monday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 28: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 0 Monday, May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 Sunday, May 25: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, late Tuesday, May 27: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Anto nio, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 2: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 8: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 2, Montreal 1 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Thursday, May 22: Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 25: Montreal at NY Rangers, late Tuesday, May 27: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 2, Chicago 1 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 Saturday, May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 Monday, May 26: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 28: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. BMW PGA Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Wentworth Club (West Course) Virginia Water, England Purse: $6.1 million Yardage: 7,302; Par: 72 Final Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 68-71-69-66 274 Shane Lowry, Ireland 64-70-73-68 275 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 62-72-67-75 276 Luke Donald, England 71-67-68-70 276 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 70-75-68-66 279 Simon Dyson, England 69-74-69-67 279 Marcel Siem, Germany 69-71-72-68 280 Henrik Stenson, Sweden 68-71-71-70 280 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 68-72-70-70 280 Francesco Molinari, Italy 71-74-65-70 280 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-71-69-71 280 Alexander Levy, France 71-73-70-67 281 Martin Kaymer, Germany 68-75-69-69 281 Chris Doak, Scotland 69-72-69-71 281 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-71-67-73 281 Marc Warren, Scotland 73-69-71-69 282 Richard Green, Australia 70-73-70-69 282 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 67-72-73-70 282 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 65-73-73-71 282 Jonas Blixt, Sweden 68-71-72-71 282 Also Paul Lawrie, Scotland 72-71-73-67 283 Justin Rose, England 70-73-70-71 284 Ian Poulter, England 70-72-74-69 285 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-69-68-76 286 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 72-72-72-71 287 Lee Westwood, England 71-71-72-73 287 Padraig Harrington, Ireland 69-76-74-73 292 French Open Results Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Milos Raonic (8), Canada, def. Nick Kyrgios, Austra lia, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3. Mikhail Youzhny (15), Russia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 3-6, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-0. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Michal Przysiezny, Po land, 6-7 (7), 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Facundo Ar guello, Argentina, 6-7 (8), 3-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. Aleksandr Nedovyesov, Kazakhstan, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 5-7, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Roger Federer (4), Switzerland, def. Lukas Lacko, Slo vakia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Peter Polan sky, Canada, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Women First Round Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 6-3, 6-0. Daniela Hantuchova (31), Slovakia, def. Jovana Jaksic, Serbia, 2-6, 6-2, 6-4. Anna Schmiedlova, Slovakia, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-4. Venus Williams (29), United States, def. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-1. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Alize Lim, France, 6-2, 6-1. Carla Suarez Navarro (14), Spain, def. Yuliya Bey gelzimer, Ukraine, 7-5, 7-5. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed 1B Chris Davis on paternity leave. Optioned INF Steve Lombardozzi to Norfolk (IL). Recalled RHP Preston Guilmet from Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX Placed 1B Mike Napoli on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Brandon Workman from Pawtucket (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX Assigned RHP Frank Fran cisco outright to Charlotte (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS Sent 3B Ian Stewart to Salt Lake (PCL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS Assigned RHP Esmil Rogers outright to Buffalo (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBS Agreed to terms with OF/DH Manny Ramirez on a minor league contract and named him player-coach for Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS Sent RHP Mat Latos to Louis ville (IL) for a rehab assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Assigned INF Jeff Bianchi outright to Nashville (PCL). Recalled RHP Jimmy Nel son from Huntsville (SL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Placed 3B Cody Asche on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Justin De Fratus from Lehigh Valley (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES Designated RHPs Billy Buck ner and Blaine Boyer for assignment. Recalled INF/ OF Tommy Medica from El Paso (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS Optioned INF Zach Wal ters to Syracuse (IL). Reinstated 1B Adam LaRoche from the 15-day DL. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 9 p.m. FS1 Champion Rene Alvarado (20-2-0) vs. Rocky Juarez (29-10-1), for WBC Silver featherweight title, at El Paso, Texas COLLEGE BASEBALL Noon ESPNU NCAA, Division I, Championship Selection Show, at Charlotte, N.C. GOLF 5 p.m. TGC NCAA, Division I playoffs, nal round individual stroke play, at Hutchinson, Kan. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN Boston at Atlanta 1:35 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Washington 4 p.m. ESPN N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis WGN Chicago Cubs at S.F 7:07 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Toronto 8 p.m. MLB Regional coverage, Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers or Houston at Kansas City MENS COLLEGE LACROSSE 1 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, championship, Duke vs. Notre Dame, at Baltimore NBA BASKETBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN Playoffs, conference nals, game 4, Indiana at Miami NHL HOCKEY 9 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference nals, game 4, Chicago at Los Angeles TENNIS Noon NBC French Open, rst round, at Paris 5 a.m. ESPN2 French Open, rst round, at Paris WNBA BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 Minnesota at Chicago he enjoys rufing the four-time MVPs feath ers. To me, I think its a sign of weakness, Ste phenson said. He nev er used to say anything to me. I always used to be the one who said, Im going to do some thing to get you mad. Now hes trying to do it to me. So I feel like its a weakness. I feel like Im doing something right because Im get ting under his skin, but Ive denitely got to keep stepping up to the plate and be more aggressive when he does that. The way Stephen son sees it, its a lit tle-brother vs. big-brother sort of sce nario. Thats precisely the analogy Pacers coach Frank Vogel broke out on Sunday when talking to his team. Indiana was ousted by Miami in the 2012 playoffs, again in the 2013 playoffs, and now needs to beat the Heat in three of the next four games to avoid that same fate this year. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 head down and helmet on, before he was ready to speak. The Brazilian said a caution with 10 laps to go that caused a red ag so track work ers could clean up de bris and make repairs to the track wall broke his rhythm. It was a great ght, he smiled. I tell you what, I was having a great time. Unfortu nately second. Its good, but second sucks, you know what I mean? Marco Andretti n ished third and Car los Munoz was fourth as Andretti Autosport had three cars in the top four, as well as the win ner. Kurt Busch, also in a Honda for Andretti, was sixth in his rst race of the day. He left imme diately after the race to y to North Carolina for Sunday nights NASCAR Sprint Cup race, where he was expected to run 600 miles in his bid to become just the sec ond driver to complete the 1,100-mile Double in one day. Three oth er drivers have made the attempt, but only Tony Stewart in 2001 have pulled it off. Stew art was sixth at Indy and third at Charlotte Motor Speedway. All in all, Im very pleased. I cannot be lieve the execution of this team, Busch said before hustling away for a helicopter ride to his waiting plane. I tried to enjoy it. My throats real dry because I was smil ing the whole time and the fresh air was coming in my mouth. Marco Andretti ap peared to have a shot at the win, but after the nal restart he nev er could mix it up with Hunter-Reay and Cas troneves as the two leaders swapped posi tion four times in the nal ve laps. So cer tain his son would be a contender for the victo ry Sunday, Michael An dretti was just as thrilled with Hunter-Reays win. Ryans just been a huge part of our team, a great guy, a friend, said Michael Andretti, who won for the third time as a team owner. To have him get a win here is awesome, he de serves it, he deserves to have his face on that trophy. If it couldnt be Marco, hes the next guy I wanted. A year ago, Hunt er-Reay was passed for the lead with three laps remaining and went on to nish third as the race nished under caution. He was leading Sun day and had control of the race until Townsend Bells crash brought out the red ag. Hunter-Reay gured his chances were over. I cant get a break, he lamented on his team radio. But after swapping the lead with Castro neves three times, in cluding a dramatic in side move in Turn 3, Hunter-Reay made the nal and decisive pass as the two cars took the white ag. At the end of the day theres stupid and brav ery, and I think we were right there on the edge, both of us, Castroneves said. Im glad we both come out in a good way. Im sad it did not come out the way I wanted. INDY FROM PAGE B1 to throw a no-hit ter in Philadelphia since Montreals Bill Stoneman stopped the Phillies on April 17, 1969, at Connie Mack Stadium. All of the defensive plays behind Beckett were routine. Domonic Brown had the hardest out, a liner that left eld er Carl Crawford ran down near the warning track in the fth. Beckett sat at the end of the bench, next to a security guard, as the Dodgers batted in the ninth inning, before taking the mound in his bid for history. It was awesome. You think about it pretty much from the fourth on. Im not one of those guys that carried a lot of no-hitters deep into games, he said. Beckett retired pinch-hitter Tony Gwynn Jr. on a pop up to shortstop to start the ninth. Speedy Ben Revere followed with a grounder that rst baseman Adrian Gon zalez elded, and he ipped to Beckett cov ering the bag for the second out. Jimmy Rollins was up next, and Beck ett walked him on a full-count pitch. That brought up Utley, and when the count when to 3-2, Dodgers catch er Drew Butera went to the mound to talk to Beckett. Beckett then threw a 94 mph fastball that Utley looked at, and plate umpire Brian Knight called strike three to end it. Beckett walked off the mound, pumped his st and was mobbed by team mates. He got a stand ing ovation from the crowd of 36,141 at Cit izens Bank Park on his way to the dugout. NO-NO FROM PAGE B1 Senior PGA Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Harbor Shores Golf Course Benton Harbor, Mich. Purse: TBA ($2 million in 2013) Yardage: 6,852; Par: 71 Final Colin Montgomerie, $378,000 69-69-68-65 271 Tom Watson, $227,000 70-68-72-65 275 Jay Haas, $121,500 69-71-70-67 277 Bernhard Langer, $121,500 70-68-69-70 277 Joe Durant, $68,000 65-75-74-64 278 Mark Brooks, $68,000 68-71-74-65 278 David Frost, $68,000 72-69-69-68 278 Bart Bryant, $68,000 71-67-70-70 278 Jeff Maggert, $51,000 69-72-72-66 279 Kiyoshi Murota, $51,000 73-65-70-71 279 Marco Dawson, $51,000 72-72-64-71 279 Russ Cochran, $43,000 70-69-72-69 280 Steve Pate, $38,500 72-67-72-70 281 Kenny Perry, $38,500 70-75-66-70 281 Mike Goodes, $28,166 70-74-73-65 282 Peter Senior, $28,166 70-73-71-68 282 Bill Glasson, $28,166 69-76-68-69 282 Mark Calcavecchia, $28,166 71-72-69-70 282 Jeff Sluman, $28,166 73-72-67-70 282 Stephen Ames, $28,166 71-68-72-71 282 Joey Sindelar, $19,500 69-72-72-70 283 Scott Simpson, $19,500 71-69-72-71 283 Gary Hallberg, $19,500 70-70-70-73 283 John Cook, $19,500 70-72-68-73 283 Dan Forsman, $15,300 66-73-75-70 284 Gene Sauers, $15,300 73-73-68-70 284 Carl Mason, $15,300 73-71-70-70 284 Greg Bruckner, $15,300 69-71-73-71 284 Duffy Waldorf, $15,300 70-70-72-72 284 John Riegger, $12,833 78-67-70-70 285 Steve Lowery, $12,833 69-73-71-72 285 Jim Carter, $12,833 72-71-68-74 285 Kohki Idoki, $10,600 76-70-70-71 287 Bobby Clampett, $10,600 74-72-70-71 287 Craig Thomas, $10,600 71-74-70-72 287 Bob Friend, $10,600 72-72-69-74 287 Nick Job, $10,600 69-76-68-74 287 PGA-Colonial Leading Scores Sunday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,204; Par: 70 Final (x-won on third playoff hole) x-Adam Scott (500), $1,152,000 71-68-66-66 271 Jason Dufner (300), $691,200 67-69-69-66 271 Freddie Jacobson (163), $371,200 67-71-67-67 272 Nicholas Thompson (163), $371,200 69-68-69-66 272 David Lingmerth (93), $216,960 72-69-66-66 273 Ryan Palmer (93), $216,960 69-69-68-67 273 John Senden (93), $216,960 71-68-66-68 273 Brendon Todd (93), $216,960 69-69-67-68 273 David Toms (93), $216,960 72-66-65-70 273 Kevin Chappell (68), $153,600 68-73-63-70 274 Hideki Matsuyama (68), $153,600 69-70-64-71 274 Michael Thompson (68), $153,600 73-66-69-66 274 Jimmy Walker (68), $153,600 67-68-69-70 274 Brian Davis (54), $102,400 68-67-70-70 275 Graham DeLaet (54), $102,400 69-70-68-68 275 Dustin Johnson (54), $102,400 65-70-74-66 275 Chris Kirk (54), $102,400 73-64-67-71 275 Jordan Spieth (54), $102,400 67-69-70-69 275 Chris Stroud (54), $102,400 70-64-69-72 275 Bo Van Pelt (54), $102,400 67-68-70-70 275 Bud Cauley (46), $58,453 70-69-69-68 276 David Hearn (46), $58,453 67-69-74-66 276 George McNeill (46), $58,453 68-72-68-68 276 Tim Clark (46), $58,453 67-68-69-72 276 Bill Haas (46), $58,453 70-68-69-69 276 Russell Knox (46), $58,453 71-70-66-69 276 Marc Leishman (46), $58,453 69-68-67-72 276 Ben Martin (46), $58,453 70-68-69-69 276 William McGirt (46), $58,453 72-67-67-70 276 Chad Campbell (38), $37,200 69-66-68-74 277 PGA Championship last year, hit his approach pin high on 17 to 4 feet, but 2013 Masters champ Scott drained a 14-foot birdie before Dufner putted. Dufner and Scott both shot 4-under 66 to n ish at 9 under, the high est winning score at Co lonial since 1999. Scott replaced the in jured Tiger Woods at the top of the ranking last Monday and will stay No. 1. Scott had to be in the top 13 at Colonial after Henrik Stenson nished in a ve-way tie for seventh place in the BMW PGA Champi onship at Wentworth. The win at Hogans Al ley, which comes with $1,152,000 and a plaid jacket, made Scott the rst player to win all four PGA Tour events in Texas. He is the 15th to win both the Byron Nelson Championship (2008) and the Colonial in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The 11th playoff in Colonial history was the rst since 2009, and the longest since Jim Col bert beat Fuzzy Zoeller on the sixth extra hole in 1983. Nicholas Thompson and Freddie Jacobson tied for third at 8 un der. Thompson shot 66, a stroke better than Jacobson. David Toms, in the nal group, led at 9 under when he made his turn. But he had three bogeys over the next ve holes and nished with a 70. Toms ended up at 7 under with Brendon Todd (68), who last week got his rst PGA Tour victory at the Nelson. Jimmy Walker, No. 1 in the FedEx Cup stand ings, shot a 70 and was among four players tied for 10th at 6 under. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Serena, the defending cham pion, could meet Venus in the third round if both get through their next matches. The French Open is only Fed erers third clay-court tourna ment this season. He reached the nal in Monte Carlo but missed the Madrid tournament when his second set of twins, boys Leo and Lenny, was born. His rst match after their birth was a loss in Rome. On Sunday, with the clay court hard and damp due to days of rain and overcast skies, the fourth-seeded Federer was back to himself, winning ve of his 11 break points. I was happy seeing, getting early signs out of the match that I was actually playing well and I was going to get my chances I was looking for, Federer said. The French Open is the only Grand Slam tournament to start on Sunday, and Federer played the second match on center court. I wasnt nervous, actually, go ing into the match. Its more just like those hints of fear, may be yesterday, maybe this morn ing at one point, just for like ve seconds, Oh, I really hope I dont have to pack my bags to day, that kind of feeling, Feder er said. Eighth-seeded Milos Raonic of Canada also advanced, beating Nick Kyrgios of Australia 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3. OPEN FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 29 22 .569 9-1 W-6 13-11 16-11 New York 26 23 .531 2 6-4 W-2 11-11 15-12 Baltimore 25 23 .521 2 5-5 W-1 11-12 14-11 Tampa Bay 23 28 .451 6 4 5-5 W-4 12-14 11-14 Boston 20 29 .408 8 6 0-10 L-10 10-17 10-12 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 28 18 .609 4-6 L-2 14-11 14-7 Kansas City 24 25 .490 5 2 4-6 L-1 13-11 11-14 Minnesota 23 24 .489 5 2 5-5 L-3 12-11 11-13 Chicago 25 27 .481 6 2 5-5 L-2 13-12 12-15 Cleveland 24 27 .471 6 3 5-5 L-1 15-11 9-16 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 30 20 .600 5-5 L-4 12-10 18-10 Los Angeles 28 21 .571 1 7-3 W-1 15-13 13-8 Texas 25 25 .500 5 1 5-5 W-2 13-13 12-12 Seattle 24 25 .490 5 2 4-6 L-2 10-12 14-13 Houston 19 32 .373 11 8 5-5 W-2 10-15 9-17 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 27 21 .563 5-5 L-1 17-10 10-11 Miami 26 25 .510 2 2 5-5 L-1 20-8 6-17 Washington 25 25 .500 3 2 4-6 W-1 14-12 11-13 Philadelphia 21 26 .447 5 5 4-6 L-1 9-14 12-12 New York 21 27 .438 6 5 2-8 L-2 10-16 11-11 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 30 21 .588 4-6 W-1 14-10 16-11 St. Louis 27 22 .551 2 8-2 W-1 14-7 13-15 Cincinnati 22 25 .468 6 4 5-5 L-1 12-11 10-14 Pittsburgh 22 27 .449 7 5 5-5 L-1 16-13 6-14 Chicago 18 30 .375 10 8 5-5 L-1 10-13 8-17 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 32 18 .640 6-3 W-3 17-8 15-10 Colorado 27 22 .551 4 4-6 W-1 16-7 11-15 Los Angeles 27 24 .529 5 1 5-5 W-1 9-13 18-11 San Diego 23 28 .451 9 5 4-6 W-1 14-15 9-13 Arizona 20 31 .392 12 8 5-5 W-2 6-18 14-13 SATURDAYS GAMES Cleveland 9, Baltimore 0 Toronto 5, Oakland 2 N.Y. Yankees 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings Texas 12, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5, 15 innings Kansas City 7, L.A. Angels 4, 13 innings San Francisco 2, Minnesota 1 Houston 9, Seattle 4 SATURDAYS GAMES Philadelphia 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Arizona 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Colorado 3, Atlanta 1 Miami 2, Milwaukee 1 St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 3 Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2 San Francisco 2, Minnesota 1 Chicago Cubs 3, San Diego 2 SUNDAYS GAMES Toronto 3, Oakland 1 Texas 12, Detroit 4 Baltimore 4, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 5 N.Y. Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 4, Kansas City 3 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 Houston 4, Seattle 1 SUNDAYS GAMES Arizona 2, N.Y. Mets 1, 1st game N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 2, 2nd game Milwaukee 7, Miami 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 0 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 7, Colorado 0 St. Louis at Cincinnati, late KATHY KMONICEK / AP Los Angeles Dodgers Josh Beckett, center, celebrates with catcher Drew Butera, left, and rst baseman Adrian Gonzalez after pitching a no-hitter on Sunday in Philadelphia. TODAYS GAMES Boston (Buchholz 2-4) at Atlanta (E.Santana 4-2), 1:10 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 4-2) at Milwaukee (Lohse 6-1), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Tomlin 3-1) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 2-4), 2:10 p.m. Texas (Tepesch 1-0) at Minnesota (Correia 2-5), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Smyly 2-2) at Oakland (Milone 2-3), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Skaggs 4-1) at Seattle (C.Young 3-2), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-3), 4:15 p.m. Tampa Bay (Bedard 2-2) at Toronto (Hutchison 3-3), 7:07 p.m. Houston (Feldman 2-2) at Kansas City (Ventura 2-4), 8:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Boston (Buchholz 2-4) at Atlanta (E.Santana 4-2), 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Cumpton 0-1) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 0-2), 1:10 p.m. Miami (Eovaldi 3-2) at Washington (Roark 3-2), 1:35 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 4-2) at Milwaukee (Lohse 6-1), 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-4) at San Francisco (Petit 3-1), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-3), 4:15 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 0-3) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-5), 5:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 4-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 4-2), 8:10 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 5-4) at Arizona (McCarthy 1-6), 8:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Kinsler, Detroit, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .331; Cano, Seattle, .326; MiCabrera, Detroit, .322; Altuve, Houston, .319; AlRamirez, Chicago, .318; Me Cabrera, Toronto, .317. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 42; Donaldson, Oakland, 40; Bautista, Toronto, 37; Kinsler, Detroit, 34; MeCabrera, To ronto, 33; NCruz, Baltimore, 32; Pujols, Los Angeles, 32. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 43; JAbreu, Chicago, 42; Mi Cabrera, Detroit, 42; Moss, Oakland, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 39; Brantley, Cleveland, 38; Donaldson, Oak land, 35; AlRamirez, Chicago, 35. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 66; MeCabrera, Toronto, 66; Kinsler, Detroit, 64; AlRamirez, Chicago, 62; Cano, Seat tle, 60; Rios, Texas, 60; Markakis, Baltimore, 59. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 17; Hosmer, Kansas City, 17; Kinsler, Detroit, 17; Pe droia, Boston, 17; Altuve, Houston, 16; Viciedo, Chi cago, 15. TRIPLES: Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Rios, Texas, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Infante, Kansas City, 3; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 3; Reddick, Oakland, 3; BRoberts, New York, 3; IStewart, Los Angeles, 3. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 15; NCruz, Baltimore, 15; Encarnacion, Toronto, 13; Pujols, Los Angeles, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 12; VMartinez, Detroit, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 11; Moss, Oakland, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 11. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 17; RDavis, Detroit, 14; AEscobar, Kansas City, 14; Andrus, Texas, 12; Doz ier, Minnesota, 12; Ellsbury, New York, 11. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 7-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 6-1; Scherzer, Detroit, 6-1; Tanaka, New York, 6-1; Shields, Kansas City, 6-3; CWilson, Los Angeles, 6-3. ERA: Gray, Oakland, 1.99; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.16; Dar vish, Texas, 2.35; Tanaka, New York, 2.39. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 84; Kluber, Cleveland, 83; Scherzer, Detroit, 78; Lester, Boston, 76. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 14; Perkins, Minnesota, 14; Rodney, Seattle, 12; Nathan, Detroit, 11; Tom Hunter, Baltimore, 11; DavRobertson, New York, 10; Axford, Cleveland, 9; Uehara, Boston, 9. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .382; Puig, Los Ange les, .347; Utley, Philadelphia, .333; SSmith, San Diego, .333; YMolina, St. Louis, .330; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .324; Blackmon, Colorado, .320. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 35; Pence, San Francisco, 35; Stanton, Miami, 35; Yelich, Miami, 34; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 32. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 47; Puig, Los Angeles, 38; Tulow itzki, Colorado, 36; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 34; Black mon, Colorado, 33; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 33; Morneau, Colorado, 32. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 62; DWright, New York, 61; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 60; Puig, Los Angeles, 59; Are nado, Colorado, 58; YMolina, St. Louis, 58; Stanton, Miami, 58. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 20; Utley, Philadel phia, 20; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 18; Arenado, Colorado, 17; MaAdams, St. Louis, 16; Byrd, Philadelphia, 16; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 16. TRIPLES: Simmons, Atlanta, 4; Yelich, Miami, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 14; Tulowitzki, Colo rado, 14; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12; JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 11; CGomez, Milwaukee, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10; Puig, Los Angeles, 10; Walker, Pittsburgh, 10. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 28; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 18; EYoung, New York, 17; SMarte, Pitts burgh, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; ECabrera, San Diego, 10; Segura, Milwaukee, 10. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 7-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 7-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 6-1; Simon, Cincinnati, 6-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 6-3; 9 tied at 5. ERA: Samardzija, Chicago, 1.46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.85; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.86; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.92; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.01; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.12; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.13. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 82; Strasburg, Wash ington, 81; Fernandez, Miami, 70; Wacha, St. Louis, 66. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Fran cisco, 15; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 15. Dodgers 6, Phillies 0 Los Angeles Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 2 1 0 Revere cf 4 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 5 1 0 0 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 Puig rf 5 1 2 0 Utley 2b 3 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 3 2 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 Ethier cf 4 0 0 0 Byrd rf 2 0 0 0 JuTrnr 3b 4 2 2 1 DBrwn lf 3 0 0 0 Butera c 4 0 1 0 Nieves c 3 0 0 0 Arrrrn ss 4 0 2 1 CHrndz 3b 3 0 0 0 Beckett p 3 0 0 0 ABrntt p 2 0 0 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 6 11 4 Totals 27 0 0 0 Los Angeles 110 001 300 6 Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 EHoward (3). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBLos Ange les 6, Philadelphia 3. 2BPuig (12), Ad.Gonzalez (12). HRJu.Turner (2). SBD.Gordon 2 (30), Puig (5). SBeckett. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Beckett W,3-1 9 0 0 0 3 6 Philadelphia A.Burnett L,3-4 7 11 6 4 1 3 Manship 2 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Seth Buckminster. T:37. A,141 (43,651). Rays 8, Red Sox 5 Boston Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Holt 3b 4 1 1 1 DeJess lf 3 1 1 0 Bogarts ss 4 0 2 2 DJnngs ph-cf 1 1 0 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Longori 3b 5 2 3 1 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 Joyce dh 2 0 0 0 Carp 1b-lf 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-dh 1 1 1 3 Nava rf 4 0 0 0 Hanign ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Przyns c 4 3 3 0 Myers rf 3 1 0 1 GSizmr lf-cf 4 0 2 0 Loney 1b 4 1 1 0 BrdlyJr cf 2 0 0 0 Guyer cf-lf 3 1 2 0 JGoms ph-lf 1 1 1 2 Forsyth 2b-ss 4 0 1 1 JHerrr 1b 1 0 0 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 2 CFigur pr-2b 0 0 0 0 JMolin c 4 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 5 Totals 34 8 10 8 Boston 001 000 202 5 Tampa Bay 000 210 50x 8 LOBBoston 7, Tampa Bay 7. 2BBogaerts (11), Pier zynski 2 (6), G.Sizemore 2 (8), DeJesus (10), Y.Esco bar (7). HRJ.Gomes (5), Longoria (5), S.Rodriguez (6). SBGuyer (1). SFHolt. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Workman 5 5 3 3 3 3 A.Wilson 1 0 0 0 1 0 Breslow L,2-1 2 / 3 5 5 5 1 0 Mujica 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay Odorizzi 6 4 1 1 1 5 Jo.Peralta W,2-3 BS,3-3 1 3 2 2 0 1 Oviedo 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lueke 2 / 3 3 2 2 0 1 Balfour S,9-11 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Odorizzi (Bogaerts). WPJo.Peralta. UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Adrian John son; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third, Larry Vanover. T:27. A,199 (31,042). Brewers 7, Marlins 1 Milwaukee Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Segura ss 5 1 0 0 Yelich lf 3 0 0 0 Braun rf 5 2 4 1 Dietrch 2b 3 0 0 0 Lucroy 1b 5 1 3 2 Stanton rf 4 0 1 0 CGomz cf 4 1 2 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 LSchfr cf 1 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 0 0 0 RWeks 2b 5 0 1 0 Ozuna cf 3 1 2 1 MrRynl 3b 3 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 4 0 2 0 KDavis lf 5 2 2 0 Mathis c 4 0 2 0 Maldnd c 3 0 1 1 Wolf p 1 0 0 0 Nelson p 3 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Slowey p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 1 0 1 1 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Capps p 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Lucas ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 40 7 14 6 Totals 33 1 7 1 Milwaukee 321 000 010 7 Miami 000 000 001 1 EHechavarria (5), Yelich (2). DPMilwaukee 1, Miami 2. LOBMilwaukee 9, Miami 8. 2BBraun (7), Lucroy 2 (20), K.Davis 2 (13). 3BBraun (2), Lucroy (1). HR Ozuna (9). SBC.Gomez (9). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Nelson W,1-0 5 2 / 3 5 0 0 3 6 Wooten 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez 1 1 1 1 0 0 Miami Wolf L,0-1 5 9 6 4 1 3 Slowey 2 2 0 0 0 2 Capps 1 2 1 1 1 1 Da.Jennings 1 1 0 0 1 2 WPNelson. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Brian ONora. T:16. A,897 (37,442). Nationals 5, Pirates 2 Washington Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Span cf 5 2 2 0 JHrrsn rf 4 2 2 1 Rendon 3b 3 2 1 1 NWalkr 2b 4 0 3 0 Werth rf 5 1 2 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 4 0 1 0 I.Davis 1b 4 0 2 1 Dsmnd ss 5 0 2 2 SMarte lf 4 0 0 0 TMoore lf 3 0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 McLoth lf 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Frndsn 2b 3 0 1 0 CStwrt c 4 0 1 0 Loaton c 4 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Fister p 3 0 0 0 Tabata ph 1 0 0 0 Stmmn p 1 0 0 0 Mazzar p 0 0 0 0 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 3 Totals 35 2 9 2 Washington 200 020 100 5 Pittsburgh 000 001 010 2 EDesmond (13), I.Davis (3). DPWashington 2, Pitts burgh 1. LOBWashington 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2BSpan (12). 3BRendon (4). HRJ.Harrison (3). SBSpan (7), Desmond (4). CSRendon (1). IP H R ER BB SO Washington Fister W,2-1 5 1 / 3 6 1 1 0 4 Stammen H,1 2 2 1 1 0 1 Barrett H,2 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 2 R.Soriano S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh Liriano L,0-5 5 6 4 4 4 5 Mazzaro 3 3 1 1 0 3 Morris 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Mazzaro (Frandsen). WPLiriano 2. UmpiresHome, Tim Timmons; First, Tim Welke; Sec ond, Todd Tichenor; Third, Gabe Morales. T:08. A,047 (38,362). Diamondbacks 2, Mets 1 First Game Arizona New York ab r h bi ab r h bi GParra rf 3 0 0 0 Lagars cf 5 1 1 0 Owings ss 4 1 1 1 DnMrp 2b 5 0 2 0 Gldsch 1b 5 0 2 0 DWrght 3b 3 0 2 1 MMntr c 3 0 0 0 Grndrs rf-lf 2 0 0 0 Hill 2b 2 0 0 0 CYoung lf 3 0 0 0 EChavz 3b 4 0 1 0 BAreu ph-rf 0 0 0 0 Pollock cf 4 1 1 0 Duda 1b 4 0 0 0 AMarte lf 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 0 1 0 Inciart ph-lf 0 0 0 0 Centen c 4 0 2 0 Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 Recker pr 0 0 0 0 C.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 RMontr p 2 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 EMrshl p 0 0 0 0 Campll ph 0 0 0 0 Prado ph 1 0 0 0 Edgin p 0 0 0 0 A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Flores ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 32 2 5 1 Totals 32 1 9 1 Arizona 100 000 001 2 New York 100 000 000 1 EOwings (9), Dan.Murphy (6). DPArizona 5. LOB Arizona 10, New York 10. 2BGoldschmidt (21), E.Chavez (3), Pollock (10). HROwings (3). SIn ciarte. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Arroyo 6 6 1 1 1 1 O.Perez 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 1 2 E.Marshall W,2-0 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 A.Reed S,14-16 1 2 0 0 0 2 New York R.Montero 6 2 1 1 3 10 Familia 1 1 0 0 0 2 Edgin 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Valverde 2 / 3 1 0 0 2 0 Mejia L,4-1 1 1 1 0 1 1 HBPby Arroyo (Tejada, Granderson), by O.Perez (Campbell). UmpiresHome, Bill Welke; First, Ben May; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:09. A (41,922). Blue Jays 3, Athletics 1 Oakland Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp dh 3 0 0 0 Reyes ss 3 1 2 0 Dnldsn 3b 3 1 1 1 MeCarr lf 3 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 1 2 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 3 1 1 1 DNorrs c 4 0 1 0 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0 Moss rf 3 0 0 0 DNavrr dh 4 0 2 0 Callasp 2b 4 0 1 0 StTllsn 2b 3 0 2 0 Blanks 1b 3 0 1 0 Kratz c 4 0 0 0 Jaso ph 1 0 0 0 Pillar cf 2 1 1 0 Gentry cf 3 0 1 0 Lind ph 1 0 0 0 Gose cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 31 3 10 3 Oakland 000 000 010 1 Toronto 000 110 10x 3 DPOakland 1. LOBOakland 7, Toronto 9. 2BD.Nor ris (8). HRDonaldson (11), Encarnacion (14). SB Crisp (9), Gentry (8), Reyes 3 (10). SFBautista. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Pomeranz L,4-2 4 5 2 2 4 3 Ji.Johnson 2 2 0 0 0 0 Gregerson 1 1 1 1 0 1 Abad 1 2 0 0 0 1 Toronto Happ W,4-1 7 4 0 0 3 7 McGowan H,2 1 1 1 1 0 0 Janssen S,7-7 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pomeranz pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Will Little. T:08. A,277 (49,282). Orioles 4, Indians 2 Cleveland Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 1 2 0 Markks rf 5 0 0 0 CSantn c 1 1 0 0 Machd 3b 2 1 1 1 Brantly lf 4 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 1 1 N.Cruz dh 4 2 2 1 Swisher 1b 2 0 0 1 Pearce 1b 4 1 3 1 Giambi dh 3 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 ACarer ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 1 Aviles 2b 4 0 0 0 Lough lf 3 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 1 0 CJosph c 3 0 0 0 Raburn ph 1 0 0 0 Sellers ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 28 2 5 2 Totals 33 4 9 4 Cleveland 200 000 000 2 Baltimore 011 020 00x 4 EChisenhall (7). DPCleveland 1, Baltimore 1. LOBCleveland 7, Baltimore 9. 2BN.Cruz (10), Pearce (4). HRMachado (2), N.Cruz (16). SBPearce (1), Lough (5). CSDav.Murphy (2). SFChisenhall, Swisher. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Bauer L,1-2 4 1 / 3 6 4 4 3 8 Lowe 1 1 / 3 2 0 0 1 3 Atchison 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Outman 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore M.Gonzalez W,3-3 6 4 2 2 4 4 Guilmet H,1 1 0 0 0 1 2 Matusz H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1 Z.Britton S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby M.Gonzalez (C.Santana). UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:12. A,649 (45,971). Yankees 7, White Sox 1 New York Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 5 1 1 2 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 Jeter ss 5 1 4 2 GBckh 2b 4 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 3 0 0 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 1 Teixeir 1b 4 0 0 0 Viciedo rf 4 0 0 0 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 1 0 Solarte 3b 5 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 0 ASorin rf 4 1 2 0 Konerk dh 3 0 0 0 ISuzuki dh 4 1 1 0 De Aza lf 3 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 2 2 1 1 Flowrs c 3 1 1 0 Totals 36 7 10 6 Totals 32 1 7 1 New York 040 101 010 7 Chicago 000 001 000 1 ERienzo (3). DPNew York 2. LOBNew York 8, Chi cago 7. 2BA.Soriano 2 (13), A.Dunn (8), Flowers (5). 3BJeter (1). HRB.Roberts (2). SFEllsbury. IP H R ER BB SO New York Tanaka W,7-1 6 2 / 3 5 1 1 2 6 Warren 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Daley 1 1 0 0 0 0 Chicago Rienzo L,4-1 5 7 5 4 2 7 Guerra 2 2 1 1 0 3 Carroll 2 1 1 1 1 2 HBPby Tanaka (Konerko), by Guerra (B.Roberts, Mc Cann). WPTanaka, Rienzo. UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Tom Woodring; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:17. A,142 (40,615). Rangers 12, Tigers 4 Texas Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo dh 3 3 1 0 RDavis lf 5 1 2 0 Andrus ss 5 3 2 1 Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 0 Sardins ph-ss 1 0 0 0 Worth 2b 0 0 0 0 Morlnd 1b 5 1 3 3 MiCarr dh 3 0 1 0 ABeltre 3b 4 1 3 2 Holady pr-dh 1 1 0 0 DMrph 3b 1 0 0 0 VMrtnz 1b 3 0 2 1 Rios rf 6 1 2 3 D.Kelly ph-1b 1 0 0 0 LMartn cf 5 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 1 Choice lf 5 1 1 1 JMrtnz rf 1 0 0 0 Chirins c 5 1 3 1 AJcksn cf 5 1 1 1 Odor 2b 4 1 2 0 Avila c 2 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 2 0 1 0 AnRmn ss 4 0 2 1 Totals 44 12 17 11 Totals 36 4 11 4 Texas 120 051 300 12 Detroit 110 000 200 4 EL.Martin (3), Verlander (2), An.Romine (5). DP Texas 1. LOBTexas 11, Detroit 11. 2BAndrus (12), Moreland (10), Chirinos 2 (5), V.Martinez (12). 3B Rios (5). HRChoice (3). SBR.Davis (15). CSOdor (3), Avila (3). SOdor. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Lewis W,4-3 5 2 / 3 5 2 2 5 2 Ross Jr. 2 2 / 3 6 2 2 1 1 Soria 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit Verlander L,5-4 5 1 / 3 11 9 6 3 1 E.Reed 1 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 1 Krol 1 / 3 3 2 2 1 0 Chamberlain 2 / 3 2 0 0 1 0 Alburquerque 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 2 BalkLewis. UmpiresHome, Jeff Gosney; First, Ron Kulpa; Sec ond, Ed Hickox; Third, Lance Barrett.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 STUDY: Bacteria live even in healthy placentas / C3 www.dailycommercial.com LUCIA BENAVIDES MCT J aime Morin, 9, was di agnosed with autism at age 2 and has been nonverbal his whole life. When the therapy he was receiving at school be came insufcient, his mother, Lupe Santand er, sent him to Big Sky Pe diatric Therapy, where he went for speech and oc cupational therapy once a week. It was there that they heard of Zachs Voice, a nonprot group that provides iPads to autistic children with communi cation deciencies. He can say exactly what he wants with the iPad, says Santander. When he rst gured it out, the look on his face was priceless. We could nally under stand him, we didnt have to say Yes or No when he pointed to things. Because children with autism who are nonverbal cannot talk, the thoughts occupying their heads are unable to come out thats where the iPad comes in. Through the ap plication of their choice, the children can form sen tences by putting togeth er words, which come in the form of buttons and a picture to match the word. Then, they play it back for others to hear. The iPad becomes their voice. It facilitates their un derstanding of the world around them, says Dan ielle Skala, function al communication class room teacher at Forest North Elementary in the Round Rock Independent School District. She has a few students who use iP ads in her classroom. Zachs Voice became an ofcial organization last May, giving out their rst iPad the month before. Their mission is to provide iPads to children ages 3 to 21 with autism spectrum disorder who have com munication disabilities. They take iPad donations from the community, as well as money donations to use toward buying re furbished iPads. Their pilot program took place in the 2013 spring semester in Texas with the Round Rock school dis trict, and they have since expanded to include schools in the Georgetown district. Zachs Voice was founded by Abby Whit worth, who named the More than fun and games: iPads give autistic children a voice JAY JANNER / MCT ABOVE: Educational assistant Stacey Beswick high-ves Zach Whitworth, 7, at Forest North Elementary School on May 8, in Austin, Texas. BELOW: Zach Whitworth works with an iPad in the functional communication class. Associated Press HARLEYSVILLE, Pa. If mans best friend is a dog, then who is a dogs best friend? That would be Rover. Or Glow. Or Ivan or Raina. The four canines recently donated precious pints of blood to their fel low pooches. And they did it without having to travel far from home: They visited an animal bloodmobile. Similar to the Red Cross vehi cles for humans, the University of Pennsylvanias traveling veterinary lab goes to where the donors are to make it easier to give. You dont really think about it un til you actually need it, said Kym Marryott, manager of Penns Animal Blood Bank. Just like in people, dogs need blood too. Ofcials at Penns School of Veter inary Medicine said they dont know of any other animal bloodmobiles operating in the U.S. Theirs makes weekly rounds through suburban Philadelphia and New Jersey. Dogs must have the correct blood type, weigh at least 55 pounds and be younger than 8 years old. Owners volunteer their pet for the short pro cedure, which requires no sedation. However, Marryott said its the dog that ultimately chooses to lie still and give. Dogs best friend? Other dogs that give blood MATT SLOCUM / AP Raina, a 6-year-old German Shepherd, waits in the back of a car after having blood drawn at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary schools animal bloodmobile in Harleysville, Pa. SEE DOGS | C2 SEE IPAD | C3 LAKE COUNTY Department of Health hosts Quit Smoking Program The Lake County Health Depart ment will host free, ve-week Quit Smoking classes on Tuesdays, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., beginning on Tues day at the Community Health Cen ter, 225 N. First St., in Leesburg, and on Mondays, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., be ginning on June 1 at the National Training Center at South Lake Hos pital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Cl ermont. To enroll in a program or for infor mation, call 1-877-252-6094. LAKE COUNTY Health Alliance, hospitals focus on stroke awareness The Central Florida Health Alli ance and local hospitals are promot ing awareness of stroke prevention and the importance of fast diagno sis and treatment during National Stroke Awareness month in May. Dr. Firas Siou, neurologist at Leesburg Regional Medical Center, will present a free talk at the Lees burg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., downtown Leesburg on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Call 352-751-8585 to RSVP. Leesburg Regional Medical Cen ter will host a Stroke Support Group meeting, Maximizing Your Capabili ties after Stroke with Physical Thera py, from 10:30 a.m. to noon on June 5 at the North Campus Conference Room To RSVP, call 352-323-5658. THE VILLAGES New dentist joins team at Village Dental Pablo J. Sierra, DMD., FAGD., FI COI., is the newest dentist at Village Dental. Sierra has worked in private practice as well as with the mobile dental unit of Wake Forest Univer sity Baptist Hospital serving special needs patients, and as part of the hospital staffs of Moses Cone Me morial Hospital in Greensboro and Randolph Hospital in Asheboro, N.C. He also takes regular trips to Gua temala with the University of Flori das Christian Dental Society provid ing treatment to rural populations, and has volunteered with the Flori da Baptist Conventions dental mo bile bus. For information, call 352-430-2037. TAVARES Group diabetes education classes now available Florida Hospital Waterman has partnered with the Florida Hospi tal Diabetes Institute to provide pa tients with the educational tools and information they need to manage their diabetes daily and make posi tive lifestyle changes. The class is designed for patients newly diagnosed with diabetes as well as those who need help managing their diabetes care plan, and includes planning meals, starting an exercise plan, monitoring blood glucose, man aging diabetes and preventing com plications and making lifestyle chang es to improve overall health. For information, go to www.FH Waterman.com for information. Health check

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com ERIK LACITIS MCT SEATTLE Lets assume you are, oh, 25 years old. Wrin kle-free, bag-free, sag-free. Would you want to see a pret ty realistic image of what youll look like at age 70? A little hesitation? In a couple of months youll be able to do just do that. Just upload a photo of you, at any age 2, 10, 25 into a free program created at the Univer sity of Washingtons Computer Science & Engineering depart ment. In about a minute, youll see the old you. If you dare. Or put in a photo of anyone. Certainly, it worked quite well when we tested it with photos of former President Clinton as a kid, and compared what the program said hed look like now with a real photo of the older Clinton. We also asked the program to age a number of others from Miley Cyrus to Russell Wilson to Macklemore to show them in their 60s. It showed us what Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain would have looked like had they lived, to 71 and 47 this year, respec tively. No wonder so many plastic surgeons get rich. But, it turns out that the main researcher who put together this age-progression software has not run her own photo. I didnt do that, no, says Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, an assistant professor who helped create the program. Shes 33. It just wasnt some thing that interested her, she says. Not an unexpected reaction, according to pioneering re search by Tony Greenwald, a psychology professor at the Uni versity of Washington. Hes part of a team that has done unrelat ed research about how we react to a photo of an old face, versus a photo of a young face. You can take the test yourself online. We react more negatively to elderly faces. It makes it clear that being old is not a pleasant thing. Why should we want to know what unpleasantness fac es us? he says. Kemelmacher-Shlizerman says there will be real uses for the software, such as in help ing nd long-missing children whove now become adults. Right now, the National Cen ter for Missing & Exploited Chil dren has four full-time foren sic-imaging artists who do their best at depicting what a child missing at age 5 might look like at age 25. The center says it has more than 2,000 open, longterm missing cases. Their artists use Photoshop, pictures of the childs parents and relatives, and part science and part art to create their im ages of the child at an older age, says a spokesman. The center says its eager to give the universitys program, which is based on the science of imaging, a try. Kemelmacher-Shlizerman says it turns a face into 4,000 pixels. A corner of an eye becomes rows of numbers: 141 140 139 138 137 136 134 132 In putting together the pro gram, the researchers used pho tos they found online in which they could determine the age of the person, images from soc cer-team photos and beauty competitions, for example. Over two years, they came up with 40,000 photos. Then they divided the subjects by gen der and 14 age groups, and put math to how our faces change over time. They found that, over time, our faces simply get bigger. Our eyes get narrower. Lips get narrower. Noses get larger. And, of course, our skin sags, we get wrinkles, and we get bags under our eyes. The research paper goes into all the math involved, with ref erences to illumination sub space, lighting-aware ow and aspect ratio progress. Bottom line, the program works very well. The researchers had peo ple look at computer-generat ed images of somebody at an older age, versus real images of the person at that age. The par ticipants basically couldnt tell them apart. The program even works when the starting image is that of a baby, a much harder task because the face changes so much into adulthood. In a couple of months, when the program is publicly avail able, probably on the schools site, itll be a matter of do you or dont you want to know? Maybe run that photo of a girlfriend or boyfriend? Says psychologist Green wald, When I got married, and you had asked me if I wanted to know what my wife would look like in 50 years, I probably would have said, no. As for you 25-year-olds think ing of giving the program a try, just search for images for So phia Loren and Cary Grant. These two movie stars, as they aged, looked fantastic no matter how old they were. Thats probably not you. What will you look like when you grow old? Software can show you ELLEN M. BANNER / MCT Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, 33, is an assistant University of Washington professor who helped create the sophisticated software that depicts the aging process. If (the dog) wanted to get up and leave, he could, said Marryott. But theyre really good about it, they trust their owner. About 150 dogs par ticipate in the program. Each donates three or four pints a year, which can help animals suffer ing from illnesses like cancer or an accidental trauma like being hit by a car. One pint can save up to three dogs. Sandy Lucas brought her 7-year-old black German shepherd to the bloodmobile last week, when it was parked at a strip mall in Harleysville about 14 miles from her home. The Pottstown, Penn sylvania, resident said she wouldnt have braved highway trafc and city parking prob lems to take the dog to Penn Vets animal hos pital in downtown Phil adelphia, which is twice as far. But the blood mobile made it conve nient to nd out if Raina could donate, she said. I was very, very thrilled that she had the right blood that was needed to help anoth er dog out, said Lucas. Well denitely do it again. Just like people, the furry donors get a snack and a heart-shaped U of P Blood Donor sticker immediately af ter giving. In addition, they receive free blood screenings and dog food to take home. While the bloodmo bile helps solve Penns urban logistical chal lenges, not all donation centers have such is sues. Trafc and parking arent big problems at North Carolina State Universitys pet blood bank in Raleigh, where owners can easily drop off their dogs for dona tions and pick them up later, spokesman Dave Green said. And what about a cat mobile? Perhaps not surprisingly, felines are bit less cooperative. They need to be sedated in order to give blood, so Penn does that only at its animal hospital. DOGS FROM PAGE C1 MATT SLOCUM / AP Ace, a 15-month-old golden retriever, is tempted into the University of Pennsylvania veterinary schools animal bloodmobile with his owners, Vicki Camuso, left, of Red Hill, Pa., and her daughter Mary Camuso, 13, in Harleysville, Pa. STEPHANIE EARLS MCT COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. Youve likely heard of the placebo effect, an outcome that cannot be at tributed to a specic treatment or therapy but rath er is caused by a patients mindset alone. As it turns out, the force behind the placebo effect namely our beliefs and perceptions might be one of the more powerful health tools in our arsenal. A study by a Colorado College senior found that students who were told theyd gotten a good nights sleep, even if they hadnt, performed better on tests that assessed attention and memory skills than students who were told theyd slept poorly, even if they were well rested. Christina Dragan ich based her results on two experiments with 164 students, and a paper about the study, Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning, was pub lished this year in the Journal of Experimental Psy chology: Learning, Memory and Cognition. Because the study hinged on students believing researchers could assess the quality of their pre vious nights sleep, Draganich had to devise a le gitimate-seeming fabrication. As setup, she rst asked participants to ll out a questionnaire about how well they believed theyd slept the previous night; then, they were brought into the lab for a ve-minute lesson about sleep. Participants then were given real tests to mea sure cognitive functioning. Generally, those who were told they didnt get enough sleep scored low er, while people who were told theyd slept well achieved higher-than-average marks. Sleep study taps students mindset

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 organization after her 7-year-old son. Whit worth was inspired by Zachs initial interac tion with the iPad. Pri or to the Apple prod uct, he used DynaVox, a heavy device that was hard to program, Whit worth said. Besides be ing clunky, it also drew attention to him. With an iPad, however, he blends in. Theyre the cool est kids in school, says Skala. The iPad gives them a social status. A particular inci dent at the grocery store prompted Whit worth to spread the positive effects of the iPad to other families with nonverbal kids in the community. While shopping, she saw an autistic child walking around with note cards, which he used to com municate. The num ber of words available through this approach, however, is limited. The iPad lets kids use all the words they want, says Whit worth. Its an unlimit ed amount of options, as opposed to what you get with handwritten note cards. With picture books and note cards, I got to decide what the kids said, says Skala. Now, the child decides. The application rec ommended by Zachs Voice is ProLoQuo2Go, which costs $219.99 at the iTunes store. The organization provides its recipients with a gift card that covers the cost of whatever app they decide to down load. Jaime chose Lamp Words for Life, the pro gram he had been us ing with his therapist. ProLoQuo2Go lets its users add words to the program, such as fam ily members names and their favorite car toon characters. Add ing a button is instan taneous, and kids can customize them by taking a picture of the word they add. The kids start off us ing the app to commu nicate about the things they love, says Whit worth. Its rewarding and motivates them to use the program. Zachs Voice works with speech-language therapists at different schools to nd fami lies who would benet from the program. When the therapist nds a student that would be a good candi date for a communica tion device, they con tact Hannah Markowitz, who works at the Round Rock districts Assis tive Technology Team. After trying out the app with the child, the speech-language thera pist will decide whether to recommend that the parents ll out an appli cation with the organi zation. Zachs Voice only takes applications iden tied as eligible by the school district and re quires the signatures of the parent, classroom teacher and speech-lan guage pathologist. Its great that kids have access to the iPad at home and out in their community, says Markowitz. It gives them ownership. Parents must promise to use the iPad strict ly for the benet of the autistic child, and no other apps are allowed to be downloaded. The idea is that the iPad is to be used as a means to help the kid commu nicate and for no oth er purpose. It becomes part of the childs ev eryday activity, just as essential as wearing shoes when they leave the house. The iPad can do more than just help children with autism communi cate; sometimes it can facilitate them to talk. Zach talks now, Whitworth says. It started six months ago, about a year and a half after he rst got his iPad. According to a study done by Ann Kaiser, re searcher at Vanderbilt Peabody College of Ed ucation and Human Development in Ten nessee, children with autism who are mini mally verbal can learn to speak later than pre viously thought, and iPads are playing an increasing role in mak ing that happen. The speech-generating de vices can encourage children ages 5 to 8 to develop speaking skills, Kaiser wrote. Jaimes speech also expanded since his rst interaction with the iPad. He has start ed to repeat sentences and words after hearing them through the app. When he hears a cer tain pronunciation, he tries to imitate it. It opens up their world, their voice can be heard, Santander says. Hes not stuck in his lit tle body anymore. It has given him condence. The iPad as a com munication device also can relieve anxi ety, which is common in nonverbal kids with autism. Being heard and un derstood can be a great source of relief for our kids, Whitworth says. NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 IPAD FROM PAGE C1 JAY JANNER / MCT Leo Eichenwald, right, 9, works on his iPad while Functional Communication teacher Danielle Skala helps Eshan Aren, 8, work with his iPad at Forest North Elementary School on May 8, in Austin, Texas. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Surpris ing new research shows a small but diverse communi ty of bacteria lives in the pla centas of healthy pregnant women, overturning the be lief that fetuses grow in a pretty sterile environment. These are mostly variet ies of good germs that live in everybody. But Wednes days study also hints that the make-up of this microbial colony plays a role in prema ture birth. It allows us to think about the biology of pregnancy in different ways than we have before, that pregnancy and early life arent supposed to be these totally sterile events, said lead researcher Dr. Kjers ti Aagaard of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. We share our bodies with trillions of microbes on the skin, in the gut, in the mouth. These communi ties are called our micro biome, and many bacteria play critical roles in keeping us healthy, especially those in the intestinal tract. A few years ago, the governments Human Microbiome Proj ect mapped what makes up these colonies and calculat ed that healthy adults cohab itate with more than 10,000 species. Healthy newborns pick up some from their mother during birth, different bugs depending on whether they were delivered vaginally or by C-section. What about before birth? There have been some signs that the process could begin in-utero. But, we have traditionally believed in medicine that the uterus is a sterile part of the human body, said Dr. Lita Proctor of the National Insti tutes of Health, who oversaw the microbiome project. With the new research, we realize that microbes may play a role even in fetus de velopment, added Proc tor, who wasnt involved in the work. The results of this study now open up a whole new line of research on ma ternal and pediatric health. Aagards team earlier had studied the microbiome of the vagina, and learned that its composition changes when a woman becomes pregnant. The puzzle: The most com mon vaginal microbes werent the same as the earliest gut bacteria that scientists were nding in newborns. What else, Aagaard won dered, could be seeding the infants intestinal tract? With colleagues from Bay lor and Texas Childrens Hos pital, Aagaard analyzed 320 donated placentas, using technology that teases out bacterial DNA to evaluate the type and abundance of dif ferent microbes. The placenta isnt teeming with microbes it harbors a low level, Aagaard stressed. Among them are kinds of E. coli that live in the intestines of most healthy people. But to Aagaards surprise, the placental microbiome most resembled bacteria fre quently found in the mouth, she reported in the journal Science Translational Med icine. The theory: Oral mi crobes slip into the mothers bloodstream and make their way to the placenta. Why does the body allow them to stay? Aagaard said there appears to be a role for different microbes. Some metabolize nutrients. Some are toxic to yeast and para sites. Some act a bit like nat ural versions of medications used to stop preterm con tractions, she said. In fact, among the 89 pla centas that were collected af ter preterm births, levels of some of the apparently help ful bacteria were markedly lower, she said. Aagaard is beginning a larg er study to explore the link, planning to analyze the oral and placental microbiomes of more than 500 pregnant wom en at risk of preterm birth. Study: Bacteria live even in healthy placentas AGAPITO SANCHEZ / AP Dr. Kjersti Aagaard sits in her laboratory at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Aagaards new research shows a small but diverse community of bacteria lives in the placentas of healthy pregnant women, and hints that the microbes may play a role in premature birth. We share our bodies with trillions of microbes on the skin, in the gut, in the mouth. These communities are called our microbiome, and many bacteria play critical roles in keeping us healthy, especially those in the intestinal tract.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 EZEQUIEL ABIU LOPEZ Associated Press SAN CRISTOBAL, Dominican Republic They suffer searing headaches, a burning fever and so much pain in their joints they can barely walk or use their hands. Its like having a terrible u combined with an abrupt case of arthritis. Hospitals and clinics throughout the Caribbe an are seeing thousands of people with the same symptoms, victims of a virus with a long and unfamiliar name that has been spread rapid ly by mosquitoes across the islands after the rst locally transmitted case was conrmed in De cember. You feel it in your bones, your ngers and your hands. Its like ev erything is coming apart, said 34-year-old Sahira Francisco as she and her daughter waited for treatment at a hos pital in San Cristobal, a town in the southern Dominican Republic that has seen a surge of the cases in recent days. The virus is chikun gunya, derived from an African word that loose ly translates as contort ed with pain. People encountering it in the Caribbean for the rst time say the description is tting. While the vi rus is rarely fatal it is ex tremely debilitating. It is terrible, I have never in my life gotten such an illness, said Maria Norde, a 66-yearold woman conned to bed at her home on the lush eastern Caribbean island of Dominica. All my joints are in pain. Outbreaks of the virus have long made people miserable in Africa and Asia. But it is new to the Caribbean, with the rst locally transmitted case documented in Decem ber in French St. Mar tin, likely brought in by an infected air travel er. Health ofcials are now working feverish ly to educate the pub lic about the illness, knock down the mos quito population, and deal with an onslaught of cases. Authorities are at tempting to control mosquitoes through out the Caribbean, from dense urban neighbor hoods to beach resorts. There have been no conrmed cases of lo cal transmission of chi kungunya on the U.S. mainland, but experts say the high number of travelers to the re gion means that could change as early as this summer. So far, there are no signs the virus is keep ing visitors away though some Caribbean of cials warn it might if it is not controlled. We need to come togeth er and deal with this disease, said Domini ca Tourism Minister Ian Douglas. One thing is certain: The virus has found fer tile ground in the Carib bean. The Pan American Health Organization re ports more than 55,000 suspected and con rmed cases since De cember throughout the islands. It has also reached French Guiana, the rst conrmed trans mission on the South American mainland. The Pan American Health Organization says seven people in the Caribbean with chikun gunya have died during the outbreak but they had underlying health issues that likely con tributed to their death. Its building up like a snowball because of the constant movement of people, said Jacque line Medina, a specialist at the Instituto Techno logico university in the Dominican Republic, where some hospitals report more than 100 new cases per day. Chikungunya was identied in Africa in 1953 and is found throughout the trop ics of the Eastern Hemi sphere. It can spread to a new area if someone has it circulating in their sys tem during a relative ly short period of time, roughly two to three days before the onset of symptoms to ve days after, and then arrives to an area with the right kind of mosquitoes. For years, there have been sporadic cases of travelers diagnosed with chikungunya but without local transmis sion. In 2007, there was an outbreak in northern Italy, so health author ities gured it was just a matter of time before it spread to the West ern Hemisphere, said Dr. Roger Nasci, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With the increase in travelers the likelihood that something like this would happen goes up and eventually it did, said Nasci, chief of a CDC branch that tracks insect-borne diseas es. We ended up with somebody at the right time and the right place infecting mosquitoes. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classified Department at (352) 314-3278. Window Services Window Services Window Services Painful and rapid spread of new virus in Caribbean EZEQUIEL ABIU LOPEZ / AP Five-year-old Karla Sepulveda, who suffers chikungunya fever symptoms, waits with her grandmother for treatment in the pediatric area of a public hospital in the coastal town of Boca Chica, Dominican Republic.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 (352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgEverything50% OFFUnless Otherwise Marked Golf CarAccessible www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 26 the 146th day of 2014. There are 219 days left in the year. This is the Memorial Day observance. On this date : In 1521 Martin Luther was banned by the Edict of Worms (vohrms) because of his religious beliefs and writ ings. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 26, 2014 This year youll want more time for yourself. You tend to have one or more con dants whom you share and brainstorm with. As a result, by the time you are ready to act, your ideas will have been well-thought-out. If you are single, be careful, as you could run into someone who is emotionally unavailable. You wont have that knowl edge until you date this person, so guard against making commitments too quickly. If you are attached, the two of you will want to schedule several weekends away together. Your relation ship blossoms without all the daily interference. TAU RUS makes a great healer for you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Use your intuition with money, especially if facing a risk. Take an overview when deciding what would make someone older feel more comfortable. You are like ly to have a discussion with this person sometime in the next 24 hours. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Youll hear good news from a friend. You might have been tough on this per son in your past few interac tions. Make a sensitive ges ture to let him or her know that you are sorry for the way you acted. Make plans for a getaway. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your sixth sense needs to be honored more often. You might want to impress someone important to you, so use today to do some thinking. A partner will come through for you in a big way. Understand how much you depend on this person. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Stay on top of an im portant offer. You might not want to push too hard, but you must remain respon sive. Defer to a dear friend or loved one you trust, even if you have different opin ions on the matter at hand. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A take-charge attitude works better than you might think. Be aware of a partners needs. A discussion could prove to be enlightening, and it might encourage a slightly different solution or path. You are better off working as a team. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You might have nearly become partners or loved ones at some point. Your creativi ty seems to expand when around this person. You might want to give him or her a call and get some feedback. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Listen to a partner whose feedback you value. This person might be very slow to change his or her mind, but is open to different ideas. You have a way of fo cusing yourself and then moving forward; this person has a different process. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Others seem to want to take the lead, whether plan ning a lunch or bringing oth ers together for a sports game. Take a break from your hectic pace, and en joy catching up on a friends news. You rarely have time to kick back with those in your daily life. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Get into a nice, re laxed pace, and try working with an inspirational idea. You might want to share it with someone who has a great sense of what will work. Make a decision to start incorporating more ex ercise into your daily life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Ideas seem to ow naturally from you to oth ers. You are more centered than you realize. Encourage someone to play devils ad vocate. As a result, you will see where there are prob lems with your ideas. Allow more impulsiveness to ow. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) You will be happi est at home, perhaps host ing an impromptu gathering. You might overspend in try ing to get everything togeth er at the last minute. Your intuition will direct you as to what to do or what to choose. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You have a way of inspir ing others, and it continues to be one of the hallmarks of your personality. Return calls. Discuss plans for the coming weekend. A friend or loved one is likely to play an important role later today. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I mar ried a great guy a short while ago. Its the sec ond marriage for both of us. Hes good to my kids, my parents, and even gets along with my ex-husband. Stan moved into my home after we married. Theres only one ma jor problem Im having trouble dealing with: He goes through all my things, from my mail to my closet. I have caught him going through my glove compartment, the trunk of my car and anything else he can get his hands on. He says he has a right to do it be cause we are married, but I dont look at it that way. His rst marriage did not go well. His ex didnt cheat on him, so I dont know where this is coming from. Abby, I am squeaky clean. I have never giv en him any reason not to trust me. I believe hes just nosy. Mean while, I feel violated. I have tried talking to him about it, but he just doesnt get it. Please help before I end my new marriage. THE NEW MRS. IN DELAWARE DEAR NEW MRS.: Great guys do not ri e through their wives mail and personal be longings after having been asked not to. You say your husbands rst marriage didnt go well, and she didnt cheat on him. Do you know what did cause their divorce? Your husbands ob session with searching through your belong ings is not normal be havior. There may be a chapter in his life you know nothing about. Because you have asked him to stop, and he is either unwilling or unable to, it may take help from a licensed psychotherapist to get to the bottom of it. Of course, in order for that to happen, your hus band would have to be willing. If he isnt, you may indeed have to de cide whether you can live with this quirk of his or would be better off without him. DEAR ABBY: I am a teacher who loves my job. Now that the school year is winding down, may I ask you to pass on this suggestion to all the wonderful par ents who send in gifts to their childrens teach ers? My family has food allergies. For this rea son, unless the lovingly baked goodies have ALL the ingredients listed on the wrapping paper, my family cannot enjoy them. I usually pass on these goodies to other teachers and neighbors. (Please dont think Im not appreciative; this is purely a medical pre caution.) If I may suggest a gift idea: gift certicates for all kinds of owers. How often do we re ceive the joy of owers? Thank you for passing this along. EDUCATOR IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR EDUCATOR: Youre welcome. While gift cer ticates for owers are a wonderful idea, Im sure a gift certicate for school supplies would also be welcomed, be cause many teachers purchase supplies for their classrooms out of their own funds. DEAR READERS: Along with the mil lions of Americans who are observing this Me morial Day, I would like to add my prayer of thanks to those men and women of our armed services who laid down their lives in ser vice to our country. May they rest in peace. {&at trib} Love, ABBY Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Nosy new husband claims he has the right to snoop JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 1101 E. Hwy. 50 Clermont, FL Highway 50, Just East of 27rrr fntbb 7-YEAR/100,000 MILE LIMITED WARRANTY* 172-POINT INSPECTION ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE NEW WINDSHIELD WIPER BLADES AT DELIVERY FULL FUEL TANK AT DELIVERY OIL/FILTER CHANGE AT DELIVERY QUALITYCHECKED Certified Pre-OwnedAll prices are plus tax tag title and $599 dealer fee. All new car sale prices are after $3000 cash down or trade equity. All p mts are 36 mo leases 10500 per year and include $3000 cash down. Photos are for illustrative purposes only, dealer and newspaper are not responsible for typographical errors. Some prices may require FMCC financing or trade assistance, see dealer for details. Prices are only good for date of publication. Thank you for reading the fine print, s mart customers always do. Se Habla Espaol CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES AS LOW AS 1.9% APR FINANCING 100,000 MILE WARRANTY 2003 LINCOLN TOWN CARWAS $7,700 NOW$6,800 2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOXWAS $10,300 NOW$9,240 2006 MERCURY MONTEGOWAS $10,700 NOW$9,820 2007 PONTIAC G6WAS $11,800 NOW$10,700 2008 FORD F-150WAS $13,200 NOW$11,400 2006 MAZDA CX7WAS $13,500 NOW$12,000 2006 FORD RANGER EXTRA CABWAS $14,500 NOW$12,860 2008 JEEP LIBERTY SOFT TOPWAS $15,300 NOW$13,300 2009 FORD EXPLORER XLTWAS $16,300 NOW$14,000 2010 FORD MUSTANG COUPEWAS $16,700 NOW$14,500 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA SWAS $16,900 NOW$14,910 2012 FORD FOCUS WAS $17,500 NOW$15,800 2010 TOYOTA PRIUSWAS $19,900 NOW$16,480 2013 DODGE DART LIMITEDWAS $22,400 NOW$17,860 2010 TOYOTA VENZAWAS $20,900 NOW$19,700 2012 HONDA ACCORD ONLY 7,000 MILESWAS $24,500 NOW$20,410 2012 TOYOTA CAMRYWAS $23,900 NOW$21,780 2012 LINCOLN MKZWAS $25,200 NOW$22,360 2012 NISSAN MAXIMAWAS $24,500 NOW$22,380 2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRYLOADED WAS $25,800 NOW$22,830 2013 FORD C-MAXWAS $26,700 NOW$24,500 2014 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLEWAS $29,500 NOW$25,410 2012 FORD FLEXLIMITED CPO, NAV, LOADEDWAS $33,800 NOW$30,980 2011 ACURA RLWAS $32,200 NOW$31,000 2014 FORD EXPEDITION ELWAS $40,500 NOW$37,640 drive for $199**per month2014 FIESTA starting at $10,500or $1000 & 0% up to 60 modrive for $199**per monthor drive for $259**per month2014 FOCUS starting at $12,900or $1000 &0% up to 60 mo2014 F-150 starting at $20,600or $750& 0.0%up to 60 mo or drive for $179**per month2014 FUSION starting at $16,500or $1500 &0% up to 60 mo drive for $269**per month2014 ESCAPE starting at $17,800or $1510 & 0% up to 60 mo drive for $319**per month2014 EDGE starting at $23,300or $1000 & 0.0%up to 60 mo or drive for $219**per month starting at $18,3002014 TAURUS or $1250 & 0% up to 60 modrive for $329**per month starting at $23,9002014 EXPLORER or 0% up to 60 mo drive for $329**per month starting at $23,9002014 FLEX or 0% up to 60 mo or drive for $209**per month starting at $16,9002014 MUSTANG or $2,000 &0% up to 60 mo

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital SOMETHING SPECIAL IS COMING... At Orchard Heights Clermonts newest retirement community, we believe PATIENCE, LOYALTY, UNDERSTANDING and HARD WORK are the core components of rewarding lives and careers. If this interests you, come join our team! Orchard Heights, a gracious retirement community for seniors in Clermont, is seeking the following positions:Orchard Heights is an Equal Opportunity EmployerAttn:Paul and Martha Johnson Holiday Inn Express near PNC Bank 1810 South Hwy. 27 Clermont, FL 34711 Fax:352-241-9685 Or email:orchardheights.hiring@hawthornret.com passenger endorsements) Shop Operator Part-Time and Full-Time positions are available, depending on position. If you are interested, r f n trfn b r fr nrtbt f

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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE RYAN HUNTER-REAY WINS INDY 500, SPORTS B1LEESBURG: Watts receives national civilian honor, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: iPads give autistic children a voice, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 26, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 146 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D2 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D3 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A5 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.91 / 70Partly sunny, T-storm late. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comA dispute between the con tractor for Niagara Bot tling, Lake County and the town of Montverde seems to have been resolved. There were concerns in recent weeks about Indian River water tanker trucks speeding along County Road 455 in Montverde and County Road 561A day and night. The issue has become more than a nuisance for residents. County, town and Montverde Academy ofcials have expressed concerns about safety as well. Steve Ferguson, director of human resources for Indian River Transport, said on Friday the company was looking into the issue and seeking a resolution as we speak. Roy Patterson, a resident who lives on CR 455, said he is often awakened by the trucks at night. When they hit those reectors on the road down the center, it bounces through the house, the Montverde resident said of the 20 to 30 tanker trucks that pass his house. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks is planning to write a letter to Niagara, requesting the tankers take another route to U.S. Highway 27 other than CR 455 or County Road 561A. If there is not a solution to mitigate the issue, Parks said, We will look at measures to restrict truck trafc on that road. Montverde Mayor Troy Bennett is equally concerned, par ticularly because CR 455 runs through the Montverde Academy campus. Kids are always crossing the road, he said. Kasey Kesselring, headmaster at Montverde Academy, said while he understood the need for a business like Niagara to continue its work, he also worries about the safety of students. JULIE PACEAP White House CorrespondentWASHINGTON Confronting critics of his foreign policy, President Barack Obama will soon outline a strategy for his nal years in of ce that aims to avoid overreach as the sec ond of the two wars he inherited comes to a close. The president will make the case for that seemingly more lim ited approach during a commencement ad dress Wednesday at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. The speech will come amid growing frustration in the White House with Republicans and other critics who contend that Obama has weakened Americas standing around the world and faltered on problems across the Middle East and in Russia, Chi na and elsewhere. BILL BARROW and JOSH LEDERMANAssociated PressATLANTA Democratic candidates are trying to gure out whether to embrace or avoid Presi dent Barack Obamas health care overhaul or land somewhere in between. The president says his party shouldnt apologize or go on the defensive about the Affordable Care Act. Candidates arent so sure. Two top recruits for Senate races Michelle AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comIt took a couple of trips to Guatemala, one of the poorest countries in Latin America, for Umatilla High School senior Jessica Mowery to decide she wanted to work as a nurse in re duced-price clinics both here and abroad. During her rst trip to Guatemala, a mission trip with Florida Hospital Waterman, Mowery was not able to help at a clinic be cause of her age. During the second one, also a mission trip, she was able to assist and saw herself working in such a clinic in the future. She took a third trip with an aunt, who also is a nurse. To get a jump start on her career, Mowery became a dual-enrollment student at Lake-Sumter State College during her senior year of high school. She also began working at Florida Hospital Waterman in February as a patient care tech after train ing last summer at a techni cal school to become a certied nursing assistant. After graduating, Mowrey plans to attend LSSC before eventually going on to get her bachelors and masters degrees in nursing. Ive gotten a lot of bed side manner experience and a lot of experience, not only technically like with how to take care of a pa tient, its how to treat a per son, she said.Umatilla senior hopes to help people in reduced-price clinics AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Umatilla High School senior Jessica Mowery poses at the school on Thursday. Niagara: Residents traffic concerns will be resolved BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Roy Patterson poses for a photo in his yard as a semi truck passes by in Montverde on Thursday.Obama to outline case for a limited foreign policy AP FILE PHOTO President Barack Obama, shown addressing U.S. Military Academy graduates on May 22, 2010, in West Point, N.Y., will soon outline a foreign policy strategy for his nal years in ofce.MONTVERDEI am all for business and economic development, and people being able to continue their work, but trucks that size, they are hard to stop, and with children coming back and forth across the road, my concern is for their safety.Kasey Kesselring, Montverde Academy headmasterHealth law: Embrace, avoid or in between for DemocratsSEE TRAFFIC | A2SEE HEALTH | A2SEE SENIOR | A2 IF YOU GOUMATILLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION: WHEN: Friday, 8 / p.m. WHERE: UHS Football Field NUMBER OF GRADUATES: Approximately 145 ADMISSION: Open to the publicSEE POLICY | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MAY 25CASH 3 . ............................................... 1-9-4 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-4-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 4-8-6-3 Afternoon . ....................................... 6-7-0-7FLORIDALOTTERY MAY 24FANTASY 5 . ........................... 7-19-29-30-34 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 3-6-17-19-45-48 POWERBALL .................. 15-16-28-49-5518 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. I am all for business and economic development, and people being able to continue their work, but trucks that size, they are hard to stop, and with children coming back and forth across the road, my concern is for their safety, he said. The mayor said he has received a lot of citizen complaints concerning the issue. They are not keeping to the speed limit and a lot are jake braking, he said, referring to the noisy engine brake on diesel engines. Bennett said the issue will be discussed further at the towns June meeting. We are evaluating restricting and putting weight limits on trucks coming into town, lowering the speed limit and not allowing jake braking to happen, he said. While safety remains Bennetts top concern, he said the trucks are also a total nuisance and inconvenience at all hours to our residents that live along that road that are sleeping. They did not want to build their home next to a turnpike, he said. Now we have a turnpike. We want to return to a nice, quiet and rural road. On Thursday night, Sheriff Gary Borders addressed citizen concerns at a meeting in Montverde. As we do anytime we receive a complaint regarding speeding in a certain area, we have notied our Trafc Enforcement Unit, Borders said in an email statement Friday morning. The unit is in the process of assessing the situation so that they can determine the best enforcement action to take. Kesselring said he has reached out to Niagaras plant manager and that she has been cooperative. I am optimistic we will nd an amicable solution, he said. TRAFFIC FROM PAGE A1 Nunn in Georgia and Alison Lundergan Grimes in Kentucky wont say how they would have voted when the Senate passed the bill in 2010. Their refusals are over shadowing their endorse ments of individual parts of the law that are more popular than the law it self. In Montana, Sen. John Walsh, appointed to of ce in February and now running for a full term, re minds voters that he was nowhere near Congress in 2010. In Alaska, an advertisement by an outside group defends part of the law without mentioning it by name. Also, several incumbents who voted for the overhaul four years ago highlight some of its benets and promise to tweak other parts. Obama knows the law and this years elections will have much to say about his legacy, and he says, There is a strong, good, right story to tell about the law. But so far in the 2014 midterm elections, that bold approach hasnt taken hold. Instead, its a more nuanced one. I believe we need to move forward and build on whats working ... and x the things that are not, said Nunn. That was one of her many at tempts to clarify previous remarks that it was im possible for her to say how she would have vot ed on legislation she had no role in negotiating. Nunn will face Rep. Jack Kingston or businessman David Perdue, who meet in a July 22 Republican runoff. Grimes twice refused to answer the yes-or-no question last week, offer ing a similar argument as she began her gener al election campaign to unseat Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader in the Senate. I, when we are in the United States Senate, will work to x the Affordable Care Act, she said. Walsh, at a recent fo rum, had this to say: I was preparing soldiers and airmen to deploy to Iraq and Afghanistan. So I did not vote on the Affordable Care Act just want to make that clear. Walsh spent 33 years in the Montana National Guard, and became the states adjutant general in 2008, resigning from that post in 2012 to run for lieutenant governor. Those answers reect challenging political real ities for Democrats in an election year that favors Republicans. The GOP must gain six Senate seats to reclaim the majority. Dem ocrats must defend seven seats ve incumbents, counting Montana in states Obama lost in 2012 and where he remains broadly unpopular. Nunn and Grimes must woo voters in states that give Obama approval rat ings even lower than his national rating. The GOP is heavily favored to maintain its House majority. Republicans have gone after Sens. Mark Begich of Alaska, Kay Hagan of North Carolina, Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Mark Pryor of Arkan sas for being the deciding vote for Obamacare. Ads hit those states after the disastrous early rollout of online insurance exchanges that allow peo ple to shop for private policies. Democrats say that message is oversimplied. White House political advisers insist there are openings to go on offense, with the web site xed and enrollment numbers exceeding 8 mil lion to counter the GOPs argument that the law is a failure. HEALTH FROM PAGE A1 Mowery said she has been inter ested in health care for most of her life. Her mother is a patient care tech and her grandmother was an administrator at a nursing home. Mowery, who does not know her father, currently lives with her aunt and uncle and also has lived with grandparents. She said although she does not live with her mom, she still sees her regularly. It was not just my mom on her own raising me, my grandparents had a huge inuence, my aunt and uncle, and I think thats probably the better thing my mom could have done instead of struggling to raise me by herself, Mowery said. Mowerys mom has her GED, but Mowery said she has al ways planned to graduate from high school and wanted to be a good inspiration for her younger half-brother. Mowery, who is the Student Gov ernment Association president this year at the high school, said she has participated in SGA since her soph omore year, as well as other clubs, including the Key Club and Hi-Q trivia club. She also does commu nity outreach with her church, New Leaf Christian Ministries. She said helping people is one of the most important things in her life because of all the people who have helped her, including teachers and family. SENIOR FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Michelle Nunn talks with reporters in Decatur, Ga., on May 13.Ben Rhodes, Obamas deputy national securi ty adviser, said the president had not yet nalized his decision and no announcement was expected while he is in Afghanistan. Rhodes spoke with reporters accompanying Obama on a surprise visit to U.S. troops serving in the closing months of the Afghanistan war. Even so, Rhodes said, You can expect to hear additional clarity from the president on his thinking on Afghanistan in the coming days. Criticism over Obama has only mounted over the past year following Obamas decision to pull back a military strike in Syria and his inability to stop Russia from an nexing territory from Ukraine. A White House ofcial said Obama would specically address both situations, as well as the status of on going nuclear negotiations with Iran. The president is also expected to discuss how he views shifts in the counterterrorism threat from al-Qaida and other groups, according to the ofcial, who insisted on anonymity to preview the presidents speech. Obama came into ofce vowing to end the lengthy American-led wars in Iraq and Af ghanistan and seeking to keep a war-weary na tion out of unnecessary conicts. The war in Iraq ended in the clos ing days of 2011 and the Afghan conict will for mally conclude later this year, though the White House is seeking to keep a smaller contingent of U.S. troops behind to train Afghan forces and conduct counterterror ism missions. While Obama has fol lowed through on his pledge to end Americas wars, some foreign poli cy analysts argue that he has overcorrected, and his aversion to military action makes it harder for the U.S. to levy credible threats that force international foes to change their behavior. In a world where no one will lead except America, he has abdicated and surrendered much of the leader ship, said Aaron David Miller, a Middle East ad viser to Republican and Democratic administrations. The White House of cial said Obama will argue that the U.S. re mains the only nation capable of galvanizing action and will make the case that American power needs to be part of a sustainable inter national system. He will argue that his foreign policy philosophy is not isolationist, but rather interventionist and internationalist, according to the ofcial. The president is ex pected to expand on remarks he made last month at a news conference in the Philippines, when the extent of his frustration with his critics boiled over. He specically targeted those who are quick to call for U.S. military action, arguing that they had failed to learn the lessons of the Iraq war. Why is it that everybody is so eager to use military force after weve just gone through a decade of war at enormous costs to our troops and to our bud get? he said. And what is it exactly that these critics think would have been accomplished? Yet Obama also cast his approach as one that avoids errors by being more limited in scope. You hit singles, you hit doubles, he said. Every once in a while we may be able to hit a home run. Ahead of the presi dents speech, Obamas top advisers have been holding private meet ings with congressional lawmakers to address their specic foreign policy concerns. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., was among those who participated in the White House meetings. In an inter view, he questioned how much Obamas speech can accomplish in shifting the way the White Houses for eign policy approach is viewed. One of the problems with the White House is that they view speeches as foreign policy, Cork er said. They dont really follow through with much in the way of sub stance. Its always mini mal. POLICY FROM PAGE A1 While Obama has followed through on his pledge to end Americas wars, some foreign policy analysts argue that he has overcorrected, and his aversion to military action makes it harder for the U.S. to levy credible threats that force international foes to change their behavior.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LAKE COUNTY Government offices, libraries closed for Memorial DayAll ofces of the Lake County Board of County Commissioners, Clerk of Courts, Property Appraiser, Supervisor of Elections and Tax Collector and Lake County librar ies are closed today in observance of Memorial Day. Operations for the Lake County Solid Waste Division and LakeXpress, and Lake Countys xed-route bus service will be closed for the holi day, with normal hours resuming on Tuesday. All Florida Department of Health ofces in Lake County also will be closed on Monday and will re open on Tuesday. The Helen Lehmann Memorial Library in Montverde will operate on limited hours, and the Eustis Memorial Library will be closed Saturday through Monday. Go to www.mylakelibrary.com for information.THE VILLAGES Sumter County to host annual Business ExpoShow Me the Money, Sumter County Chambers annual Business Expo, takes place from 6 to 8 / p.m., on June 5 at the Savannah Center, 1575 Buena Vista Blvd., in The Villages. Guests will be able to enjoy a cash bar, win prizes and browse exhibits from businesses such as Cals Barber and Beauty, Solid Image, Tom and Jerrys Airboat Adventures and Blue Monster Promotions. For information about the free event, or to be a vendor, call the Sumter County Chamber of Commerce at 352-793-3099 or go to www.sumterchamber.org.LAKE COUNTY Library Summer Reading Program begins in JuneLake County libraries will begin its annual Summer Reading Program, Fizz, Boom, Read! in June for preschoolthrough elementary-aged children. The themed event will explore a wide variety of topics with a focus on science, offering reading incentive games, special presenters, story time and interactive events. For information, registration and a schedule of events, go to www.my lakelibrary.org. All programs are free.OXFORD GAL program in need of child advocate volunteersThe Guardian ad Litem (GAL) program is seeking volunteer advocates to be a voice for abused, neglected or abandoned children whose cases are in the court system. Volunteers must be 21 years of age or older, successfully complete 30 hours of pre-service training and be cleared of any serious criminal history via a Level II criminal background check. Individuals ages 19 and 20 are eligible to work alongside a certied volunteer. The next training session begins on June 9 at the Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301. Call 352-274-5231 or email Sarah. Jay@gal..gov. To download an application, go to www.guardianadlitem.org.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA retired teacher and community volunteer, Linda Watts, 67, of Leesburg, was surprised to be named one of the nations top 20 nalists from more than 200 nominees for 2014 Citizen Service Before Self Honors, a top ci vilians award, from the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation in Ar lington, Va. I didnt even know of it, Watts said, unaware of the award or who nominated her for the honor. I re ceived this big, certied packet in the mail and it came with this big sterling silver pendant. It was a nice surprised. I am honored to be recognized nationwide. Watts said the award is as meaningful as when she was named a Points of Light recipient. Harold A. Fritz, Congressional Society president, stated on the award citation that Watts has distinguished herself through extraordinary heroism in dedicating her life to spending every day helping others. Her lifes passion is taking care of people and instilling in youth the importance of volunteer work and giving to others. Watts was praised as the founder of the Flor ida Hometown USA Pro gram, established as an educational initiative to LEESBURGWatts receives national civilian honor WATTS ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe city of Cler mont and the Lake Coun ty Rowing Associa tion announced Fri day that the rst-ever rowing regatta the Leader of the Lake Regatta will be hosted on Nov. 8-9 at Lake Minneola. The regatta is one result of a grant the city of Clermont won to build the Clermont Boathouse at Water front Park, city ofcials said. Lake County is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse, which will be headquarters for the Lake County Rowing Association. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks helped Clermont secure a matching tour ism grant for the boathouse, which is expected to cost $750,000. The Lake County Rowing Association is a nonprot or ganization created to promote rowing as a sport at all levels of interest. It has incorporated a crew of masters and high school students. Many of the student athletes involved with the association represent South Lake High School, East Ridge High School, Minneola High School and Montverde Academy, according to the association. Using the boathouse as a hub, training will take place year round in preparation for competitions at local, regional and national levels through the association, city ofcials said in a press release. The boathouse, which will hold about 30 boats, is expected to be completed in late September. Ofcials, association members and supporters gathered at the site a few weeks ago as a sign was put up, indicating the boathouses arrival in the fall. The boathouse will present numer ous opportunities for recreation, tness Clermont breaks ground on boathouse SUBMITTED PHOTO This is an architects rendering of the Clermont Boathouse at Waterfront Park. Lake County is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse. SUBMITTED PHOTO Lake County Rowing Association ofcials, members and supporters gathered at the boathouse site a few weeks ago as a sign was raised, indicating the boathouses arrival in the fall. SHELDON GARDNERAssociated PressST. AUGUSTINE When Martin Luther King Jr., came to St. Augustine in the 1960s, he was looking to keep the momen tum alive for passage of the Civil Rights Act. He and other Southern Christian Leadership Conference members were looking for a community with an active civil rights movement, said David Colburn, a University of Florida history professor. They were also looking for a community that was symbolic in some way, and St. Augustine t the bill, he said. It was 1964, and in the wake of demonstrations and brutality in Birmingham, Ala., there was some talk that King would go to Washington, D.C. His con cern was about violence erupting there and the possibility of disrupting legislators. That would be counterproductive to the goal. So when Robert Hayling, a leader of the civil rights movement in St. Augus tine, reached out to the SCLC for help in response BRENDAN FARRINGTONAP Political WriterTAMPA At a recent meeting, the Tampa Bay Young Republicans recited the Pledge of Allegiance, prayed and then tackled the nights topic: marijuana. Their guest? Personal injury lawyer John Morgan, a huge Demo cratic Party donor campaigning to legalize medical marijuana in Flor ida. Months earlier, the same group supported a Supreme Court opinion that was a victory for gay marriage advocates even as Republican leaders insisted marriage should be be tween only a man and a woman. The group illustrates a growing generational divide in the GOP as younger Republicans increasingly break rank from the establishment on social issues. In Alabama, a col lege Republican group leader was nearly kicked out of the party for supporting gay marriage. The suc cessful push to legalize gay marriage in Minnesota was backed by sever al prominent younger Republicans. And in Colorado, the spokesman for a group that pushed to legalize mari juana was a Republican activist. Per haps only in opposing abortion are most young Republicans national ly as conservative socially as older members. Weve grown up in a time where everythings much more open. We want to talk about more things, Tampa Bay Young Republicans president Anibal Cabrera said. Were willing to listen to the other point of view. Were willing to have an oppo site opinion. Whether the split on social issues forces the GOP to change its plat form or risk alienating younger vot ers probably wont be answered until after the 2016 presidential election, said Matthew Corrigan, a Univer sity of North Florida political sci ence professor. He said one thing to watch is support for Kentucky Sen. GOP, young members split on social issuesSt. Augustine played key role in civil rights movement AP FILE PHOTO In this June 10, 1964 photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gives a young picket a pat on the back as a group of youngsters started to picket St. Augustine.SEE GOP | A4SEE WATTS | A4SEE CLERMONT | A5SEE RIGHTS | A4

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We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted Rand Paul, the son of former Texas Rep. Ron Paul, who is mixing a libertarian message with a more moderate outreach to Republicans. Its unsettled, Corrigan said. If the nominee of the Republican Party signals less of an emphasis on social issues than in years past, that leaves an opening for these young Republicans who may have more libertarian leanings, but theres a lot of se niors within the party that I dont think are ready to give up on those positions. While Republicans nationally have struggled to recruit younger voters, wom en and minorities, the Tampa group says welcoming social ly liberal as well as conser vative members has helped swell its ranks from seven to 200 members in less than a year. Executive director Lacey Wickline said the party es tablishment could learn from the approach, but instead has largely ignored the group. Were doing something right. Weve got the energy, were trying to do whats right by our party, and wheres the support? Wickline said. If youre really trying to target the under 40 demographic, theres only one place to turn thats us. Part of the shift among younger Republicans is growing up in an era where gay rights, pot smoking and other issues are more accept able, even among conserva tives. We grew up on Will and Grace and our parents grew up on All in the Family, said Stephanie Petelos, the chair man of the College Republican Federation of Alabama who was almost banished from her party for support ing gay marriage. Alabama Republican Party Chairman Bill Armistead said there may be some differing opinions among younger Republicans, but he still feels most support the party plat form. Those interviewed not ed even young Republicans tend to be anti-abortion. And Armistead pointed out that the man elected to replace Petelos after she graduated rmly supports traditional marriage. It was very disruptive for the previous college chair man to advocate a position thats contradictory to our state position and our na tional platform, Armistead said. It did not represent the majority of college Republicans, yet she used her posi tion to advocate her personal opinions, which is unfortunate. Beyond being a generation al issue, young Republicans say their positions stem from the partys belief that gov ernment shouldnt intrude on peoples lives. Ron Pauls 2012 presidential campaign got most of its following from younger Republicans attracted by his libertarian message that allowed for gay marriage and the legalization of marijuana. When it comes to issues like gay marriage or marijuana legalization, younger Republicans often nd themselves asking, Why is government involved in this at all? said Alex Holzbach, a Tallahassee-based Republican political consultant who served as president of the Florida State University College Republicans be fore graduating this year. Its really just a realization that the partys current status quo against some of these issues is in direct conict with our belief in smaller, less intru sive government. He and Petelos said they are Republicans because they believe the party is stronger on economic issues, and both said the GOPs posi tion on social issues made it harder to recruit college stu dents. Its just a little bit harder to get into what the Fed did last week than it is for equality for one of your best friends from high school, Petelos said. The economy is especial ly relevant when recruiting students staring down col lege loan debt and a tough job market, said Young Re publican National Federa tion Chairman Jason Weingartner. Its often the Democrats that are trying to shake the narrative so that we go back to discussing predominantly social issues so it will distract from the current economic climate, he said. GOP FROM PAGE A3 LAUREN MATTHEWS / APTampa Bay Young Republicans executive director Lacey Wickline interviews personal injury lawyer John Morgan about his campaign to legalize medical marijuana during the groups monthly meeting in Tampa.teach Floridas youth about the importance of volunteer service. The Miss Leesburg Scholarship Program is part of the program, in which Watts leads young ambassadors, ranging from young children to teenagers, as they visit nursing homes, veterans hospi tals, childrens homes and orphanages. Youth collect and distribute food and person al care items, clean up the environment, visit the sick and elderly and put on entertainment programs to bring joy to those who are lonely. Through her out reach, she positively impacts the lives of over 5,000 people each and every year, carrying donations and spending time with those in need, the award reads. Her heroic actions re ect great credit upon herself, her family, her community and the state of Florida. Watts has no plans to retire from volunteer work. It is so special for me to be involved and to be giving back, she said. WATTS FROM PAGE A3 to violence, ofcials responded. What met them was brutal violence, and what they found was a town ripe for change. Theyd throw rocks at us and bricks at us and everything down town, said J.T. Johnson of Atlanta, an SCLC member who in 1964 jumped into the whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge. People were very cruel in St. Augus tine, he said. After King arrived in St. Augustine, demonstrations followed that are credited with helping the passage of the Civil Rights Act. St. Augustine was thrust into the na tional spotlight. Why St. Augustine was the focal point of leaders in a crucial time was partly strategy. Leaders found an active movement here and knew what took place would grab the attention of the na tional media. The citys 400th anniversary played a role, if nothing else RIGHTS FROM PAGE A3 for symbolism: It was the oldest city in the na tion, and also the oldest segregated city. Demonstrations had already been taking place since the s by the time King arrived, Colburn said. We didnt start the movement, Johnson said. A couple of men were major gures in St. Augustines movement. The Rev. Thomas Wright, who graduated from Florida Memorial College, was part of re organizing the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and was its president, according to information from the exhibit, Journey: 450 Years of the Afri can-American Experience Exhibition at the St. Augustine Visitor Information Center. In the s and s, Wright was part of non-violent training for students, some of whom took part in lunch-counter protests at Woolworth. Wright and his fam ily moved after being threatened. Hayling, a dentist, led a protest in March 1963 for the NAACP against the segregated 400th anniversary celebration of St. Augustine. People in the move ment wanted to be part of the anniversary, but the power structure said no, said resident Barba ra Vickers, who was part of demonstrations. Some people in town knew the timing was right because of the anniversary, said Thomas James T.J. Jackson, who was 12 when he participated in a march. There was enthusiasm about the anniversary, and that increased the attention on St. Augustine. Hayling established a youth council for the NAACP that held non-violent demonstrations and the Woolworth sit-in protest that ended with four teenagers getting arrested. The Ku Klux Klan ter rorized African-Amer ican neighborhoods in St. Augustine, but they were driven off with gunre, accord ing to the exhibit. That happened after the KKK beat Hayling and other activists in September 1963. The NAACP and Hay ling eventually split, and Hayling contacted the SCLC for the help. SCLC ofcials came at Haylings request. The symbolism of the approaching 400th anni versary may have been icing on the cake. A quote from a speech King gave in St. Augustine, shown in the Jour ney exhibit, reads: St. Augustine is merely a symbol of an expression of the trag edies that invoke our whole nation in the area of racial issues. Now the fact is that we are pick ing on St. Augustine, we are seeking to make this the oldest city in the United States, one of the most democratic cities of the United States. The SCLC sent in rep resentatives to see how things were going. They found that there was a pretty strong movement, Col burn said. When King arrived, so did more white mil itants from outside St. Augustine. King and leaders held meetings at churches and organized march es and demonstrations, which were met with vi olence. Some of St. Augus tines law enforcement ofcers were opposed to demonstrations and did not nd more subtle approaches to prevent ing them. St. Augustine reacted much more militant ly, Colburn said. They turned dogs and police batons on the demonstrators. They actual ly cooperated with the militants. The marches and demonstrations that followed were peaceful. Jackson, of St. Johns County, remembers that people were told that if they couldnt keep themselves from ghting, they should not march. He was 12 years old when he went to meet ings at churches around the community. He was in a march when Andrew Young was attacked. He re membered that a white man from Boston was walking with them. They knocked all of us out the way and jumped on him, Jackson said of the attackers. The marchers went around the plaza and near the former slave market, which was full of people with bats and chains and hoses. We Shall Over come, he said. We Shall Not Be Moved. Those were two of the main songs we sang. AP FILE PHOTO In this June 18, 1964 le photo, Integration demonstrators are shown after a long march through the white business and residential section, holding prayer sessions at the Monson Motor Lodge Restaurant in St. Augustine.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days and economic development, City Manager Darren Gray said. It has already generated a lot of enthusiasm and inter est, and we look forward to this and future regattas on Lake Minneola. It will also give our youth another recreational activity that could lead to scholar ships (because of the formation of local high school teams). It will enhance the vision we have for our downtown waterfront area that is going to be a major focus in our future plans for Clermont. Debbie Kiely, past president of the Lake County Rowing Association, said her club will host the November regatta. Races are typically hosted during the fall rowing season and are about 5,000 meters long, she said. Beyond the rst regatta, the association, which has about 40 members, anticipates hosting several regattas per year, Kiely said. Gray said that besides offering a new sport at the citys popular Waterfront Park, he foresees many economic development opportunities. Kiely said her club plans to attract northern teams during the winter when they are seeking a warm climate in which to train. Parks, a rower himself, had similar thoughts. What I hope the boathouse brings is winter training in Cler mont for high schools and colleges from up north, he said. The people from those groups would then stay in Clermont or somewhere in Lake County and spend money here at our busi nesses, Parks said. Additionally, in 2017, Sarasota will host the World Rowing Championships, which is likely to draw more than 100,000 rowing enthusiasts to Florida. Some might return to Lake County, since they would already know the area, ofcials said. Parks said there are also many possibilities for participants in other water sports, such as sailing and canoeing, to use the boathouse and/ or hold events at Lake Minneola. Its gonna be a multiuse facility, he said. Parks also said the regattas, and any other events that result from the boathouses buildout, will involve cooperation between Cler mont, Lake County, the sports commission, the National Training Center/Live Well and the South Lake Chamber of Commerce. Thats a good thing, Parks said. And the most important thing we all have to do right now is to work together and focus on making sure this rst regatta goes off extraordinarily well to make the best rst impression we can to pave the way for many future regattas still to come. CLERMONT FROM PAGE A3 NATALIYA VASILYEVA and PETER LEONARDAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine Exit polls suggested candy tycoon Petro Poroshenko was elected president Sunday in the rst round of balloting in the bit terly divided country, and he vowed to bring peace to the Ukrainian land. The billionaire who sup ports strong ties with Europe but also wants to mend rela tions with Russia claimed vic tory after a vote that took place amid weeks of ghting in eastern Ukraine where pro-Moscow separatists have seized government buildings and battled government troops. The rebels had vowed to block the ballot in the east, and less than 20 percent of the polling stations were open there after gunmen in timidated locals by smashing ballot boxes, shutting down polling centers and issuing threats. But nationwide, about 60 percent of 35.5 million eligible voters turned out, the central elections commission said, and long lines snaked around polling stations in the capital of Kiev. The exit polls, conducted by three respected Ukrainian survey agencies, found the 48-year-old Poroshenko getting 55.9 percent of the vote in the eld of 21 candidates. A distant second was for mer Prime Minister Yulia Ty moshenko with 12.9 percent, the poll showed. Full results are expected Monday, but if that margin holds, Poroshenko would avoid a runoff election next month with the sec ond-place nisher. Viewing the exit polls as denitive evidence of victo ry, Poroshenko said his rst steps as president would be to visit the Donbass eastern industrial region, home to Ukraines coal mines and put an end to war, chaos, crime, and bring peace to the Ukrainian land. He also promised a dia logue with residents of east ern Ukraine and said he was ready to extend amnesty to those who did not commit any crimes. For those people who dont take (up) weapons, we are always ready for nego tiations to guarantee them security, to guarantee them defending of their rights, in cluding speaking the lan guage they want, he said in English. The election, which came three months after pro-Mos cow President Viktor Yanu kovych was chased from of ce by crowds following months of street protests and allegations of corruption, was seen as a critical step to ward resolving Ukraines protracted crisis. Since his ouster, Russia has annexed the Crimea in southern Ukraine, the east ern regions of Luhansk and Donetsk have declared their independence from Kiev, and the interim Ukrainian government has launched an offensive in the east to quash an uprising that has left dozens dead.Exit poll: Candy tycoon elected Ukraine president VADIM GHIRDA / AP Pro-Russian militants smash ballot boxes in front of the seized regional administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com MARTHA MENDOZA and TOBY STERLINGAssociated PressMOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. Europes moves to rein in Google including a court ruling this month ordering the search giant to give people a say in what pops up when someone searches their name may be seen in Brussels as striking a blow for the little guy. But across the Atlan tic, the idea that users should be able to edit Google search results in the name of privacy is being slammed as weird and difcult to enforce at best and a crackdown on free speech at worst. Americans will nd their searches bowdler ized by prissy European sensibilities, said Stewart Baker, former assis tant secretary for policy at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Well be the big losers. The big winners will be French ministers who want the right to have their last mistress for gotten. Mountain View, California -based Goo gle says its still guring out how to comply with the European Court of Justices May 13 ruling, which says the company must respond to complaints about private information that turns up in searches. Google must then decide whether the pub lics right to be able to nd the information outweighs an individu als right to control it with preference given to the individual. The judgment applies to all search engines operating within the Euro pean Union. But in prac tice that means Google, given that 90 percent of all online searches there use Googles search engine. The ruling has signicant implications for how we handle take down requests, Google spokesman Al Verney said. This is logistically complicated, not least because of the many languages involved and the need for careful review. As soon as we have thought through exactly how this will work, which may take sever al weeks, we will let our users know. There will be serious technological challeng es, said U.S. privacy attorney David Keating in Atlanta. It seems aspiration al, not a reality, to comply with such a standard, he said. The reengineering neces sary to implement the right to be forgotten is signicant. Google may partially automate the process, as it does with copyright-infringement complaints, but ultimately a human will have to decide when results should be sanitized. Johannes Caspar, who as Hamburgs Commissioner for Data Protec tion acts as Germanys lead regulator of Google on privacy issues, conrmed the company is already working on an online tool to help people le complaints. Because the courts ruling applies only with in Europe, it will mean some fragmentation of search results. That is, Europeans and Americans will see slightly dif ferent versions of the Internet. A worst-case scenario would be if Google decides it must err on the side of cau tion and removes links Americans seen as big losers as Europe moves to rein in Google THE ASSOCIATED PRESS In this April 17, 2007 photo, exhibitors of the Google company work on laptop computers in front of an illuminated sign of the Google logo at the industrial fair Hannover Messe in Hanover, Germany.liberally in order to avoid lawsuits, critics of the ruling said. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, who has been an outspo ken critic of the ruling, summarized it for The Associated Press as a technologically incompetent violation of human rights. He said it amounts to censorship, and he predicted it will ulti mately be scrapped. The danger is that search engines now are faced with an uncertain legal future which may require them to censor all kinds of things when someone thinks it is irrelevant, Wales said. In the wake of the decision, some Europeans are already asking to clean up their online history, though there may not yet have been a ood of hundreds of requests, includ ing some from pedophiles and politicians, as was reported in the British press shortly after the ruling was handed down. In Britain, David Murphy of the Information Commissioners Ofce said while weve had some people get in touch around this is sue, were simply tell ing them to speak to Google. Ofcials in the Netherlands said they havent had any new requests since the ruling. Caspar, the Ger man ofcial, said his ofce has received 20 new requests, includ ing some from people who won legal ghts with websites to have material taken down but the sites didnt comply because they were based abroad. JAKE PEARSONAssociated PressNEW YORK The U.S. Marine Corps chaplain, speaking Sunday to a congregation that has tied gold rib bons on the churchs fence in honor of fall en soldiers since the Iraq War began, laud ed the sacrice of vet erans around the world as President Barack Obama made a surprise visit to Afghanistan for Memorial Day. What they have done has allowed us to be here, Rear Admiral Margaret Kibben told the roughly 200 wor shippers at the Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan, including active duty servicemen and women in town for the annual Fleet Week celebration. Memorial Day, she said, was a time to re mind ourselves of the meaning of sacrice and to put personal struggles and difculties in perspective. Across the nation, cit izens were marking Memorial Day with som ber ceremonies, ag planting at cemeteries, parades and even bar becues an American pastime that Petty Ofcer 1st Class Brian Mc Neal said should be en joyed this weekend. Im in the service so that they can enjoy that, said McNeal, 39, who is stationed in Suffolk, Virginia, and is in town for Fleet Week. They made the sac rice so everyday citi zens dont have to wor ry about the evils of the world. Thousands of me morial ribbons are tied on the storied churchs fence. There are gold ribbons for service members killed in Af ghanistan, green rib bons representing prayers for peace and blue ribbons for the people of Afghanistan. Obama arrived at Bagram Air Field in Af ghanistan to speak with troops and visit soldiers being treated at a base hospital. At least 2,181 members of the U.S. military have died during the nearly 13year Afghan war and thousands more have been wounded. On Saturday, Democratic congresswoman Tammy Duckworth served as grand marshal of Chicagos Memorial Day Parade and struggled to hold back tears during a wreath-lay ing ceremony to honor fallen soldiers. She lost her legs and partial use of an arm when a rock et-propelled grenade hit the Black Hawk heli copter she was piloting in Iraq in 2004. More than 300 Ju nior ROTC students from Chicago Military Academy at Bronzeville marched in the citys parade. Afterward, still dressed in their uni forms, they chatted, bantered and ordered ice cream from a ven dors truck while waiting for a bus that would take them back home.US marks Memorial Day weekend with somber ceremonies JOHN GREEN / AP Cub Scout Mateo Armijo, 7, with Pack 28 in Burlingame, runs with ags at the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif., on Saturday.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 T he crowds are gone from In dependence Square, known as the Maidan, where mas sive demonstrations unseated a Ukrainian president. Yet the signs of struggle remain, sprawl ing across the Maidan and the surrounding streets: the tents and soup kitchens, the piles of black tires and debris, and the posters of the youthful dead on walls and makeshift shrines that are adorned daily with fresh owers. Pay attention to this revolution. The Kremlin has tried to crush it by dismembering Ukraine and mounting a erce propaganda campaign that falsely labels the uprising fascist. Moscow wants to discredit Ukraines presidential elections on Sunday by stir ring up violence that makes voting impossible in eastern sections of the country. But the Maidan revolution of February is still alive. And the ongoing battle between Moscow and Kiev reects a larger struggle for the soul and direction of Europe. The struggle pits an educated generation of young Ukrainians seeking democracy against Vladimir Putin, who wants to build a Eur asian empire based on anti-Western values and autocratic rule. Ukraine is the test case in which Putin seeks to demonstrate the decadence of democracy. He has destroyed the post-Cold War European order by invading another country and faced little op position. His aggressive Russian nationalism is admired by farright European parties that are expected to do well in European Parliament elections that will also be held Sunday. With his bare-chested machismo, his homophobia, his odes to tradition and religious or thodoxy, and his disdain for the West, Putin has become a hero to conservative Europeans who have been hurt by globalization and the economic strictures of the European Union. The real plan of Putin is to break the European Union, the French intellectual Ber nard-Henri Levy said during a fascinating gathering of U.S., European, and Ukrainian scholars in Kiev, called Ukraine: Thinking Together. Putin, says Levy, has bought into the Eurasianism dogma of an adviser named Alexander Dugin, who has written of scenarios in which a strong Russia splits Europe and NATO and becomes the leader of a grand (and anti-American) federation of Eurasia and Europe. Sound fanciful? In reality, yes, given Russias economic and demographic weakness. But not in the Russian leaders mind. His aggression was provoked by Ukrainians desire to move toward the European Union rather than join the Eurasian confeder ation he was promoting. Putin is trying to divide Europe and to stimulate anti-Amer ican sentiment in Europe, said Constantin Sigov, a professor at the National University of Ky iv-Mohyla Academy. That is self-evident in Ukraine. So the geopolitical impact is clear. If Putin can thwart the pro-Europe Maidan revolution, he may decide to snatch chunks of Romania, Kazakhstan, or Latvia on the pretext that they are inhabited by ethnic Russians. But at the Kiev conference, it became clear that the fate of Ukraine will have an emotional impact as well. It is more than 20 years since Eastern and Central European nations joined Europe after the Berlin Wall fell, breathing new passion into Western civics lessons on democracy. Since then, U.S. democracy has become par alyzed by partisanship, and the European Union has become bu reaucratized and passionless. The conference participants spoke emotionally of the yearning for democracy that they witnessed on the Maidan, where EU ags were raised next to the Ukrainian banner. (The violence of the revolutions last days, sparked by a pro-Russian governments murder of demonstrators, was only a coda to months of peaceful protest.) Putin has demonized the Euro-Maidan revolution because its example threatens his authoritar ian system. How ironic that he demands a destructive form of federalism for Ukraine when he has totally centralized power in Russia. Ukraines new government is ready to decentralize power and protect language rights, but that isnt what Putin wants. Rather, he aims to promote a new philosophy for Europe based on naked power grabs and antidemocratic norms. The Maidans civic activists are seeking the opposite: a chance to prove that democracy is still the best system. They are different from their parents, who grew up under the Soviet Union, and they have nothing to do with the anti-Semitism of Ukraines past. This is terribly threatening to Putin, who has his own middle-class youth to contend with. Putin wants to break the Maidan because the Maidan can break Putin, said Volodymyr Viatrovych, director of the Ukrainian Institute for National Memory. If the Maidan revolt succeeds which would require sustained U.S. and European help it will have a profound effect on Russia. If it fails, said Sigov, it will be very dangerous for the future of Eu rope. Indeed it will.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial-board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Ukraines revolution is pivotal Cornell Brooks is inheriting the leader ship of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People at a time when the nations oldest civil rights or ganization is experiencing a resurgence of inuence and membership in its long strug gle for equal rights. Brooks, whose appoint ment as NAACP chief was announced Satur day, is a lawyer, minister and long-time civil rights activist who is well equipped to carry forward the new initiatives begun in 2008 by his predecessor, Benjamin Jealous. Jealous realized that in order to remain relevant to todays challenges the NAACP must broaden its efforts to include all those unfair ly victimized because of their race, ethnicity, gender, national origin or sexual orientation. Despite the progress made in recent decades toward ending the disparate treatment of minorities and the climate of bigotry and intolerance that enabled it, the NAACPs efforts are needed today as much as ever to combat the systemic injustices that continue to taint American democracy in less obvious forms. U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder provided a good summary of those challenges in his commencement address at Morgan State University over the weekend. Holder condemned the continuing racial dispar ities that restrict African-Americans access to health care, employment, housing, education and the ballot box as well as in the disproportionately harsh sentences meted out to African-Americans by the criminal justice system. These legacies of slavery and the era of de jure segregation that followed continue to limit the opportunities of millions of black Americans long after the Supreme Courts landmark 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education decision outlawing segregation in the nations public schools. The Obama administration has pledged to address these continuing forms of injus tice through executive orders if Congress fails to act, and Holder already has issued new guidelines for granting early release to some low-level, nonviolent drug offenders who were condemned to long prison terms under the harsh mandatory sentencing policies passed by lawmakers as part of the war on drugs. Clearly, the NAACP has a role to play in all these battles, where the stakes are much higher than those involved in refuting the offensive comments of a sports team owner or a bigoted public ofcial. If Brooks can keep the NAACP focused on the much more insidious, systemic injustices that deny minorities a chance to par ticipate in the American dream, he will prove a worthy successor to the leader he is replacing.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEBrooks announced as new leader of NAACP Classic DOONESBURY 1974

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014www.dailycommercial.comMLB: Scores, schedules / B3 PHOTOS BY MICHAEL CONROY / AP ABOVE: Ryan Hunter-Reay celebrates after winning the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. BELOW: Hunter-Reay celebrates after nishing the nal lap.Hunter-Reay holds off Helio Castroneves to win Indy 500 JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterINDIANAPOLIS The nish at the India napolis 500 was worth the wait for Ryan Hunt er-Reay. He used a series of daredevil moves to deny Helio Castroneves a chance at history on Sunday and became the rst American since 2006 to win The Greatest Spectacle in Racing. He passed Castroneves at the Yard of Bricks as the two bright yellow cars raced wheel-towheel under the white ag in a thrilling nal lap. As Hunter-Reay surged ahead down the backstretch, Castroneves took one nal look coming out of Turn 4, but couldnt pull off the pass and lost by 0.060 seconds. Only the 1992 race had a closer nish when Al Unser Jr. beat Scott Goodyear by 0.043 seconds. Im a proud American boy, thats for sure, Hunter-Reay said in Victory Lane before he was joined by his wife and son. Ive watched this race since I was sit ting in diapers on the oor in front of the TV. My son did it today. He watched me here. Im thrilled. This is Amer ican history, this race, this is American tradi tion. Ryden, born shortly after Hunter-Reays 2012 IndyCar champi onship, celebrated the traditional kissing of the bricks with his fam ily while wearing a miniature version of his fa thers re suit. Castroneves, trying to become the fourth driver to win a record fourth Indianapolis 500, settled for second. He was devastated by the defeat and needed several mo ments to compose himself, slumped in his car, Indiana Pacers guard Lance Stephenson, right, defends Miami Heat forward LeBron James during Game 3 on Saturday in Miami.LYNNE SLADKY / AP TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterMIAMI In the 2011 NBA Finals, LeBron James spent too much time for his liking talking about his purported ri valry with an easily excitable guard named Stevenson. Theres a new rival now. His name sounds the same. Different spelling, though. Back then, it was Dallas DeShawn Stevenson. In these Eastern Conference nals, its Indianas Lance Stephenson in the foil role. James sees the ob vious parallels but isnt inter ested in stoking the res especially with the Heat leading the Pacers 2-1 heading into Monday nights Game 4, one that could allow Miami to put a stranglehold on the series. Winning the game is more important, James said. I understand what the main goal is. Still, it seems fair to say that Stephenson and James got each other going often in Game 3. When the Pacers n ished practice Sunday, Stephenson talked about how Pacers seeking breakthrough, Heat aim to improve SEE HEAT | B2Yeah, we havent played our best game. They probably feel the same way. We havent started how we want to, how we need to. So we think our best basketball is yet to come.LeBron JamesMiami Heat small forwardSEE INDY | B2 MATT SLOCUM / AP Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Josh Beckett, center, is doused by second baseman Justin Turner, right, after Beckett pitched a no-hitter on Sunday in Philadelphia. ROB MAADDIAssociated PressPHILADELPHIA Josh Beckett pitched the rst no-hitter of his stellar ca reer and the rst in the majors this season, lead ing the Los Angeles Dodg ers over the Philadelphia Phillies 6-0 on Sunday. Beckett struck out six, walked three and didnt come close to allowing a hit against a lineup that included two former NL MVPs and four former All-Stars. I dont think I had nohit stuff, he said. I just really kept them guessing. The 34-year-old righthander, whose career was almost derailed last year by a nerve condition that left him unable to feel his ngertips, threw 128 pitches and fanned Chase Utley on a called strike three to end the game. Beckett mixed a sharp fastball with a slow, deceptive curve that kept hitters off-balance. He pitched the Dodgers rst no-hitter since Hideo Nomo beat Colorado at Coors Field in 1996, and the 21st in fran chise history. Sandy Kou fax threw four. Beckett pitched the rst no-hitter in the majors since Miamis Henderson Alvarez did it against De troit on the nal day of the 2013 season. Beckett also became the rst visiting pitcher Beckett tosses first career no-hitter in win over PhilsSEE NO-NO | B2 STEPHEN HAWKINSAssociated PressFORT WORTH, Texas Adam Scott made a 7-foot birdie putt on the third hole of a play off Sunday to end his rst week as the worlds No. 1 player with a vic tory at Colonial. Jason Dufner, who made a 25-foot birdie putt on No. 18 in regulation, slid a 40-foot er past when he and Scott played the 18th hole for the second time during the play off. Scott then made the 7-footer for his 11th PGA Tour victory. The major cham pions parred No. 18 to start the playoff, then matched bird ies at the 17th hole. Dufner, who won the Scott beats Dufner on 3rd playoff hole LM OTERO / AP Adam Scott celebrates after sinking the winning putt. CHRIS LEHOURITESAP Sports WriterPARIS The young Federer sisters were in the stands watching daddy win his opening match at the French Open, and the Williams sisters were on separate courts Sunday ensuring their own progress. Roger Federer had little trou ble beating Lukas Lacko of Slovakia 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. As soon as he n ished, Serena Williams took over on Court Philippe Chatrier, the main stadium at Roland Garros, and beat Alize Lim 6-2, 6-1. Over on Court Suzanne Lenglen, Venus Williams was also playing, and winning. The older Williams sibling defeated Belinda Bencic 6-4, 6-1.Federer moves into 2nd round at French OpenSEE GOLF | B2SEE OPEN | B2 FEDERER

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 Indianapolis 500 Results Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (19) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 200 laps. 2. (4) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (6) Marco Andretti, Honda, 200. 4. (7) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 200. 5. (10) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 200. 6. (12) Kurt Busch, Honda, 200. 7. (17) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 200. 8. (3) Will Power, Chevrolet, 200. 9. (31) Sage Karam, Chevrolet, 200. 10. (9) J.R. Hildebrand, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (18) Oriol Servia, Honda, 200. 12. (5) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 200. 13. (24) Alex Tagliani, Honda, 200. 14. (27) Jacques Villeneuve, Honda, 200. 15. (32) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 200. 16. (28) James Davison, Chevrolet, 200. 17. (21) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 200. 18. (30) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 200. 19. (23) Takuma Sato, Honda, 200. 20. (13) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 200. 21. (15) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 198. 22. (14) Justin Wilson, Honda, 198. 23. (29) Martin Plowman, Honda, 196. 24. (22) Pippa Mann, Honda, 193. 25. (25) Townsend Bell, Chevrolet, 190, contact. 26. (16) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 177. 27. (1) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 175, contact. 28. (2) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 175, contact. 29. (11) Scott Dixon, Chevrolet, 167, contact. 30. (8) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 156, contact. 31. (26) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 149, contact. 32. (33) Buddy Lazier, Chevrolet, 87, mechanical. 33. (20) Graham Rahal, Honda, 44, electrical.NBA Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Indiana 1 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 Saturday, May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 Monday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 28: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 0 Monday, May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 Sunday, May 25: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, late Tuesday, May 27: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 2: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, June 5: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 8: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 10: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 12: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 15: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 17: Western champion at Indiana or Miami, 9 p.m. x-Friday, June 20: Eastern champion at San Antonio or Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.NHL Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 2, Montreal 1 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Thursday, May 22: Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 25: Montreal at NY Rangers, late Tuesday, May 27: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 2, Chicago 1 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 Saturday, May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 Monday, May 26: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 28: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. BMW PGA Championship Leading ScoresSunday At Wentworth Club (West Course) Virginia Water, England Purse: $6.1 million Yardage: 7,302; Par: 72 Final Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 68-71-69-66 274 Shane Lowry, Ireland 64-70-73-68 275 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 62-72-67-75 276 Luke Donald, England 71-67-68-70 276 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 70-75-68-66 279 Simon Dyson, England 69-74-69-67 279 Marcel Siem, Germany 69-71-72-68 280 Henrik Stenson, Sweden 68-71-71-70 280 Thomas Aiken, South Africa 68-72-70-70 280 Francesco Molinari, Italy 71-74-65-70 280 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-71-69-71 280 Alexander Levy, France 71-73-70-67 281 Martin Kaymer, Germany 68-75-69-69 281 Chris Doak, Scotland 69-72-69-71 281 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-71-67-73 281 Marc Warren, Scotland 73-69-71-69 282 Richard Green, Australia 70-73-70-69 282 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 67-72-73-70 282 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 65-73-73-71 282 Jonas Blixt, Sweden 68-71-72-71 282 Also Paul Lawrie, Scotland 72-71-73-67 283 Justin Rose, England 70-73-70-71 284 Ian Poulter, England 70-72-74-69 285 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-69-68-76 286 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 72-72-72-71 287 Lee Westwood, England 71-71-72-73 287 Padraig Harrington, Ireland 69-76-74-73 292 French Open Results Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Milos Raonic (8), Canada, def. Nick Kyrgios, Austra lia, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3. Mikhail Youzhny (15), Russia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 3-6, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-0. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Michal Przysiezny, Poland, 6-7 (7), 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Facundo Ar guello, Argentina, 6-7 (8), 3-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. Aleksandr Nedovyesov, Kazakhstan, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 5-7, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Roger Federer (4), Switzerland, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Peter Polan sky, Canada, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Women First Round Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 6-3, 6-0. Daniela Hantuchova (31), Slovakia, def. Jovana Jaksic, Serbia, 2-6, 6-2, 6-4. Anna Schmiedlova, Slovakia, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-4. Venus Williams (29), United States, def. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-1. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Alize Lim, France, 6-2, 6-1. Carla Suarez Navarro (14), Spain, def. Yuliya Beygelzimer, Ukraine, 7-5, 7-5. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed 1B Chris Davis on paternity leave. Optioned INF Steve Lombardozzi to Norfolk (IL). Recalled RHP Preston Guilmet from Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX Placed 1B Mike Napoli on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Brandon Workman from Pawtucket (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX Assigned RHP Frank Francisco outright to Charlotte (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS Sent 3B Ian Stewart to Salt Lake (PCL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS Assigned RHP Esmil Rogers outright to Buffalo (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBS Agreed to terms with OF/DH Manny Ramirez on a minor league contract and named him player-coach for Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS Sent RHP Mat Latos to Louis ville (IL) for a rehab assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Assigned INF Jeff Bianchi outright to Nashville (PCL). Recalled RHP Jimmy Nelson from Huntsville (SL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Placed 3B Cody Asche on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Justin De Fratus from Lehigh Valley (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES Designated RHPs Billy Buckner and Blaine Boyer for assignment. Recalled INF/ OF Tommy Medica from El Paso (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS Optioned INF Zach Wal ters to Syracuse (IL). Reinstated 1B Adam LaRoche from the 15-day DL.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 9 p.m.FS1 Champion Rene Alvarado (20-2-0) vs. Rocky Juarez (29-10-1), for WBC Silver featherweight title, at El Paso, TexasCOLLEGE BASEBALL NoonESPNU NCAA, Division I, Championship Selection Show, at Charlotte, N.C.GOLF 5 p.m.TGC NCAA, Division I playoffs, nal round individual stroke play, at Hutchinson, Kan.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN Boston at Atlanta1:35 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at Washington4 p.m.ESPN N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis WGN Chicago Cubs at S.F7:07 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Toronto8 p.m.MLB Regional coverage, Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers or Houston at Kansas CityMENS COLLEGE LACROSSE 1 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA, Division I playoffs, championship, Duke vs. Notre Dame, at BaltimoreNBA BASKETBALL 8:30 p.m.ESPN Playoffs, conference nals, game 4, Indiana at MiamiNHL HOCKEY 9 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference nals, game 4, Chicago at Los AngelesTENNIS NoonNBC French Open, rst round, at Paris5 a.m.ESPN2 French Open, rst round, at ParisWNBA BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m.ESPN2 Minnesota at Chicagohe enjoys rufing the four-time MVPs feath ers. To me, I think its a sign of weakness, Stephenson said. He nev er used to say anything to me. I always used to be the one who said, Im going to do some thing to get you mad. Now hes trying to do it to me. So I feel like its a weakness. I feel like Im doing something right because Im get ting under his skin, but Ive denitely got to keep stepping up to the plate and be more aggressive when he does that. The way Stephen son sees it, its a little-brother vs. big-brother sort of sce nario. Thats precisely the analogy Pacers coach Frank Vogel broke out on Sunday when talking to his team. Indiana was ousted by Miami in the 2012 playoffs, again in the 2013 playoffs, and now needs to beat the Heat in three of the next four games to avoid that same fate this year. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 head down and helmet on, before he was ready to speak. The Brazilian said a caution with 10 laps to go that caused a red ag so track work ers could clean up de bris and make repairs to the track wall broke his rhythm. It was a great ght, he smiled. I tell you what, I was having a great time. Unfortunately second. Its good, but second sucks, you know what I mean? Marco Andretti nished third and Car los Munoz was fourth as Andretti Autosport had three cars in the top four, as well as the win ner. Kurt Busch, also in a Honda for Andretti, was sixth in his rst race of the day. He left imme diately after the race to y to North Carolina for Sunday nights NASCAR Sprint Cup race, where he was expected to run 600 miles in his bid to become just the second driver to complete the 1,100-mile Double in one day. Three other drivers have made the attempt, but only Tony Stewart in 2001 have pulled it off. Stewart was sixth at Indy and third at Charlotte Motor Speedway. All in all, Im very pleased. I cannot be lieve the execution of this team, Busch said before hustling away for a helicopter ride to his waiting plane. I tried to enjoy it. My throats real dry because I was smiling the whole time and the fresh air was coming in my mouth. Marco Andretti ap peared to have a shot at the win, but after the nal restart he nev er could mix it up with Hunter-Reay and Castroneves as the two leaders swapped posi tion four times in the nal ve laps. So cer tain his son would be a contender for the victo ry Sunday, Michael An dretti was just as thrilled with Hunter-Reays win. Ryans just been a huge part of our team, a great guy, a friend, said Michael Andretti, who won for the third time as a team owner. To have him get a win here is awesome, he de serves it, he deserves to have his face on that trophy. If it couldnt be Marco, hes the next guy I wanted. A year ago, Hunt er-Reay was passed for the lead with three laps remaining and went on to nish third as the race nished under caution. He was leading Sun day and had control of the race until Townsend Bells crash brought out the red ag. Hunter-Reay gured his chances were over. I cant get a break, he lamented on his team radio. But after swapping the lead with Castro neves three times, including a dramatic in side move in Turn 3, Hunter-Reay made the nal and decisive pass as the two cars took the white ag. At the end of the day theres stupid and bravery, and I think we were right there on the edge, both of us, Castroneves said. Im glad we both come out in a good way. Im sad it did not come out the way I wanted. INDY FROM PAGE B1 to throw a no-hitter in Philadelphia since Montreals Bill Stoneman stopped the Phillies on April 17, 1969, at Connie Mack Stadium. All of the defensive plays behind Beckett were routine. Domonic Brown had the hardest out, a liner that left eld er Carl Crawford ran down near the warning track in the fth. Beckett sat at the end of the bench, next to a security guard, as the Dodgers batted in the ninth inning, before taking the mound in his bid for history. It was awesome. You think about it pretty much from the fourth on. Im not one of those guys that carried a lot of no-hitters deep into games, he said. Beckett retired pinch-hitter Tony Gwynn Jr. on a pop up to shortstop to start the ninth. Speedy Ben Revere followed with a grounder that rst baseman Adrian Gonzalez elded, and he ipped to Beckett covering the bag for the second out. Jimmy Rollins was up next, and Beck ett walked him on a full-count pitch. That brought up Utley, and when the count when to 3-2, Dodgers catch er Drew Butera went to the mound to talk to Beckett. Beckett then threw a 94 mph fastball that Utley looked at, and plate umpire Brian Knight called strike three to end it. Beckett walked off the mound, pumped his st and was mobbed by team mates. He got a stand ing ovation from the crowd of 36,141 at Citizens Bank Park on his way to the dugout. NO-NO FROM PAGE B1 Senior PGA Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Harbor Shores Golf Course Benton Harbor, Mich. Purse: TBA ($2 million in 2013) Yardage: 6,852; Par: 71 Final Colin Montgomerie, $378,000 69-69-68-65 271 Tom Watson, $227,000 70-68-72-65 275 Jay Haas, $121,500 69-71-70-67 277 Bernhard Langer, $121,500 70-68-69-70 277 Joe Durant, $68,000 65-75-74-64 278 Mark Brooks, $68,000 68-71-74-65 278 David Frost, $68,000 72-69-69-68 278 Bart Bryant, $68,000 71-67-70-70 278 Jeff Maggert, $51,000 69-72-72-66 279 Kiyoshi Murota, $51,000 73-65-70-71 279 Marco Dawson, $51,000 72-72-64-71 279 Russ Cochran, $43,000 70-69-72-69 280 Steve Pate, $38,500 72-67-72-70 281 Kenny Perry, $38,500 70-75-66-70 281 Mike Goodes, $28,166 70-74-73-65 282 Peter Senior, $28,166 70-73-71-68 282 Bill Glasson, $28,166 69-76-68-69 282 Mark Calcavecchia, $28,166 71-72-69-70 282 Jeff Sluman, $28,166 73-72-67-70 282 Stephen Ames, $28,166 71-68-72-71 282 Joey Sindelar, $19,500 69-72-72-70 283 Scott Simpson, $19,500 71-69-72-71 283 Gary Hallberg, $19,500 70-70-70-73 283 John Cook, $19,500 70-72-68-73 283 Dan Forsman, $15,300 66-73-75-70 284 Gene Sauers, $15,300 73-73-68-70 284 Carl Mason, $15,300 73-71-70-70 284 Greg Bruckner, $15,300 69-71-73-71 284 Duffy Waldorf, $15,300 70-70-72-72 284 John Riegger, $12,833 78-67-70-70 285 Steve Lowery, $12,833 69-73-71-72 285 Jim Carter, $12,833 72-71-68-74 285 Kohki Idoki, $10,600 76-70-70-71 287 Bobby Clampett, $10,600 74-72-70-71 287 Craig Thomas, $10,600 71-74-70-72 287 Bob Friend, $10,600 72-72-69-74 287 Nick Job, $10,600 69-76-68-74 287 PGA-Colonial Leading Scores Sunday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,204; Par: 70 Final (x-won on third playoff hole) x-Adam Scott (500), $1,152,000 71-68-66-66 271 Jason Dufner (300), $691,200 67-69-69-66 271 Freddie Jacobson (163), $371,200 67-71-67-67 272 Nicholas Thompson (163), $371,200 69-68-69-66 272 David Lingmerth (93), $216,960 72-69-66-66 273 Ryan Palmer (93), $216,960 69-69-68-67 273 John Senden (93), $216,960 71-68-66-68 273 Brendon Todd (93), $216,960 69-69-67-68 273 David Toms (93), $216,960 72-66-65-70 273 Kevin Chappell (68), $153,600 68-73-63-70 274 Hideki Matsuyama (68), $153,600 69-70-64-71 274 Michael Thompson (68), $153,600 73-66-69-66 274 Jimmy Walker (68), $153,600 67-68-69-70 274 Brian Davis (54), $102,400 68-67-70-70 275 Graham DeLaet (54), $102,400 69-70-68-68 275 Dustin Johnson (54), $102,400 65-70-74-66 275 Chris Kirk (54), $102,400 73-64-67-71 275 Jordan Spieth (54), $102,400 67-69-70-69 275 Chris Stroud (54), $102,400 70-64-69-72 275 Bo Van Pelt (54), $102,400 67-68-70-70 275 Bud Cauley (46), $58,453 70-69-69-68 276 David Hearn (46), $58,453 67-69-74-66 276 George McNeill (46), $58,453 68-72-68-68 276 Tim Clark (46), $58,453 67-68-69-72 276 Bill Haas (46), $58,453 70-68-69-69 276 Russell Knox (46), $58,453 71-70-66-69 276 Marc Leishman (46), $58,453 69-68-67-72 276 Ben Martin (46), $58,453 70-68-69-69 276 William McGirt (46), $58,453 72-67-67-70 276 Chad Campbell (38), $37,200 69-66-68-74 277 PGA Championship last year, hit his approach pin high on 17 to 4 feet, but 2013 Masters champ Scott drained a 14-foot birdie before Dufner putted. Dufner and Scott both shot 4-under 66 to n ish at 9 under, the highest winning score at Co lonial since 1999. Scott replaced the in jured Tiger Woods at the top of the ranking last Monday and will stay No. 1. Scott had to be in the top 13 at Colonial after Henrik Stenson nished in a ve-way tie for seventh place in the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth. The win at Hogans Al ley, which comes with $1,152,000 and a plaid jacket, made Scott the rst player to win all four PGA Tour events in Texas. He is the 15th to win both the Byron Nelson Championship (2008) and the Colonial in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The 11th playoff in Colonial history was the rst since 2009, and the longest since Jim Colbert beat Fuzzy Zoeller on the sixth extra hole in 1983. Nicholas Thompson and Freddie Jacobson tied for third at 8 under. Thompson shot 66, a stroke better than Jacobson. David Toms, in the nal group, led at 9 under when he made his turn. But he had three bogeys over the next ve holes and nished with a 70. Toms ended up at 7 under with Brendon Todd (68), who last week got his rst PGA Tour victory at the Nelson. Jimmy Walker, No. 1 in the FedEx Cup stand ings, shot a 70 and was among four players tied for 10th at 6 under. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Serena, the defending cham pion, could meet Venus in the third round if both get through their next matches. The French Open is only Fed erers third clay-court tourna ment this season. He reached the nal in Monte Carlo but missed the Madrid tournament when his second set of twins, boys Leo and Lenny, was born. His rst match after their birth was a loss in Rome. On Sunday, with the clay court hard and damp due to days of rain and overcast skies, the fourth-seeded Federer was back to himself, winning ve of his 11 break points. I was happy seeing, getting early signs out of the match that I was actually playing well and I was going to get my chances I was looking for, Federer said. The French Open is the only Grand Slam tournament to start on Sunday, and Federer played the second match on center court. I wasnt nervous, actually, go ing into the match. Its more just like those hints of fear, may be yesterday, maybe this morning at one point, just for like ve seconds, Oh, I really hope I dont have to pack my bags to day, that kind of feeling, Feder er said. Eighth-seeded Milos Raonic of Canada also advanced, beating Nick Kyrgios of Australia 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3. OPEN FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Toronto 29 22 .569 9-1 W-6 13-11 16-11 New York 26 23 .531 2 6-4 W-2 11-11 15-12 Baltimore 25 23 .521 2 5-5 W-1 11-12 14-11 Tampa Bay 23 28 .451 6 4 5-5 W-4 12-14 11-14 Boston 20 29 .408 8 6 0-10 L-10 10-17 10-12 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 28 18 .609 4-6 L-2 14-11 14-7 Kansas City 24 25 .490 5 2 4-6 L-1 13-11 11-14 Minnesota 23 24 .489 5 2 5-5 L-3 12-11 11-13 Chicago 25 27 .481 6 2 5-5 L-2 13-12 12-15 Cleveland 24 27 .471 6 3 5-5 L-1 15-11 9-16 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 30 20 .600 5-5 L-4 12-10 18-10 Los Angeles 28 21 .571 1 7-3 W-1 15-13 13-8 Texas 25 25 .500 5 1 5-5 W-2 13-13 12-12 Seattle 24 25 .490 5 2 4-6 L-2 10-12 14-13 Houston 19 32 .373 11 8 5-5 W-2 10-15 9-17 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 27 21 .563 5-5 L-1 17-10 10-11 Miami 26 25 .510 2 2 5-5 L-1 20-8 6-17 Washington 25 25 .500 3 2 4-6 W-1 14-12 11-13 Philadelphia 21 26 .447 5 5 4-6 L-1 9-14 12-12 New York 21 27 .438 6 5 2-8 L-2 10-16 11-11 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 30 21 .588 4-6 W-1 14-10 16-11 St. Louis 27 22 .551 2 8-2 W-1 14-7 13-15 Cincinnati 22 25 .468 6 4 5-5 L-1 12-11 10-14 Pittsburgh 22 27 .449 7 5 5-5 L-1 16-13 6-14 Chicago 18 30 .375 10 8 5-5 L-1 10-13 8-17 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 32 18 .640 6-3 W-3 17-8 15-10 Colorado 27 22 .551 4 4-6 W-1 16-7 11-15 Los Angeles 27 24 .529 5 1 5-5 W-1 9-13 18-11 San Diego 23 28 .451 9 5 4-6 W-1 14-15 9-13 Arizona 20 31 .392 12 8 5-5 W-2 6-18 14-13 SATURDAYS GAMESCleveland 9, Baltimore 0 Toronto 5, Oakland 2 N.Y. Yankees 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings Texas 12, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5, 15 innings Kansas City 7, L.A. Angels 4, 13 innings San Francisco 2, Minnesota 1 Houston 9, Seattle 4SATURDAYS GAMESPhiladelphia 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Arizona 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Colorado 3, Atlanta 1 Miami 2, Milwaukee 1 St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 3 Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2 San Francisco 2, Minnesota 1 Chicago Cubs 3, San Diego 2SUNDAYS GAMESToronto 3, Oakland 1 Texas 12, Detroit 4 Baltimore 4, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 5 N.Y. Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 4, Kansas City 3 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 Houston 4, Seattle 1SUNDAYS GAMESArizona 2, N.Y. Mets 1, 1st game N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 2, 2nd game Milwaukee 7, Miami 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 0 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 7, Colorado 0 St. Louis at Cincinnati, late KATHY KMONICEK / AP Los Angeles Dodgers Josh Beckett, center, celebrates with catcher Drew Butera, left, and rst baseman Adrian Gonzalez after pitching a no-hitter on Sunday in Philadelphia. TODAYS GAMESBoston (Buchholz 2-4) at Atlanta (E.Santana 4-2), 1:10 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 4-2) at Milwaukee (Lohse 6-1), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Tomlin 3-1) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 2-4), 2:10 p.m. Texas (Tepesch 1-0) at Minnesota (Correia 2-5), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Smyly 2-2) at Oakland (Milone 2-3), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Skaggs 4-1) at Seattle (C.Young 3-2), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-3), 4:15 p.m. Tampa Bay (Bedard 2-2) at Toronto (Hutchison 3-3), 7:07 p.m. Houston (Feldman 2-2) at Kansas City (Ventura 2-4), 8:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESBoston (Buchholz 2-4) at Atlanta (E.Santana 4-2), 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Cumpton 0-1) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 0-2), 1:10 p.m. Miami (Eovaldi 3-2) at Washington (Roark 3-2), 1:35 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 4-2) at Milwaukee (Lohse 6-1), 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-4) at San Francisco (Petit 3-1), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-3), 4:15 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 0-3) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-5), 5:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 4-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 4-2), 8:10 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 5-4) at Arizona (McCarthy 1-6), 8:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Kinsler, Detroit, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .331; Cano, Seattle, .326; MiCabrera, Detroit, .322; Altuve, Houston, .319; AlRamirez, Chicago, .318; MeCabrera, Toronto, .317. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 42; Donaldson, Oakland, 40; Bautista, Toronto, 37; Kinsler, Detroit, 34; MeCabrera, Toronto, 33; NCruz, Baltimore, 32; Pujols, Los Angeles, 32. RBI: NCruz, Baltimore, 43; JAbreu, Chicago, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 42; Moss, Oakland, 41; Encarnacion, Toronto, 39; Brantley, Cleveland, 38; Donaldson, Oakland, 35; AlRamirez, Chicago, 35. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 66; MeCabrera, Toronto, 66; Kinsler, Detroit, 64; AlRamirez, Chicago, 62; Cano, Seat tle, 60; Rios, Texas, 60; Markakis, Baltimore, 59. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 17; Hosmer, Kansas City, 17; Kinsler, Detroit, 17; Pedroia, Boston, 17; Altuve, Houston, 16; Viciedo, Chicago, 15. TRIPLES: Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Rios, Texas, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Infante, Kansas City, 3; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 3; Reddick, Oakland, 3; BRoberts, New York, 3; IStewart, Los Angeles, 3. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 15; NCruz, Baltimore, 15; Encarnacion, Toronto, 13; Pujols, Los Angeles, 13; Bautista, Toronto, 12; VMartinez, Detroit, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 11; Moss, Oakland, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 11. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 17; RDavis, Detroit, 14; AEscobar, Kansas City, 14; Andrus, Texas, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Ellsbury, New York, 11. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 8-1; Porcello, Detroit, 7-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 6-1; Scherzer, Detroit, 6-1; Tanaka, New York, 6-1; Shields, Kansas City, 6-3; CWilson, Los Angeles, 6-3. ERA: Gray, Oakland, 1.99; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.16; Darvish, Texas, 2.35; Tanaka, New York, 2.39. STRIKEOUTS: Price, Tampa Bay, 84; Kluber, Cleveland, 83; Scherzer, Detroit, 78; Lester, Boston, 76. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 14; Perkins, Minnesota, 14; Rodney, Seattle, 12; Nathan, Detroit, 11; TomHunter, Baltimore, 11; DavRobertson, New York, 10; Axford, Cleveland, 9; Uehara, Boston, 9.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .382; Puig, Los Angeles, .347; Utley, Philadelphia, .333; SSmith, San Diego, .333; YMolina, St. Louis, .330; Lucroy, Milwaukee, .324; Blackmon, Colorado, .320. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 45; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 35; Pence, San Francisco, 35; Stanton, Miami, 35; Yelich, Miami, 34; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 32. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 47; Puig, Los Angeles, 38; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 36; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 34; Blackmon, Colorado, 33; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 33; Morneau, Colorado, 32. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 62; DWright, New York, 61; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 60; Puig, Los Angeles, 59; Arenado, Colorado, 58; YMolina, St. Louis, 58; Stanton, Miami, 58. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 20; Utley, Philadelphia, 20; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 18; Arenado, Colorado, 17; MaAdams, St. Louis, 16; Byrd, Philadelphia, 16; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 16. TRIPLES: Simmons, Atlanta, 4; Yelich, Miami, 4. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 14; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 14; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 12; JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Reynolds, Milwaukee, 11; CGomez, Milwaukee, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10; Puig, Los Angeles, 10; Walker, Pittsburgh, 10. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 28; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 18; EYoung, New York, 17; SMarte, Pitts burgh, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; ECabrera, San Diego, 10; Segura, Milwaukee, 10. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 7-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 7-2; Lohse, Milwaukee, 6-1; Simon, Cincinnati, 6-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 6-3; 9 tied at 5. ERA: Samardzija, Chicago, 1.46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.85; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.86; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.92; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.01; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.12; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.13. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 82; Strasburg, Washington, 81; Fernandez, Miami, 70; Wacha, St. Louis, 66. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Francisco, 15; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 15. Dodgers 6, Phillies 0 Los Angeles Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 2 1 0 Re vere cf 4 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 5 1 0 0 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 Puig rf 5 1 2 0 Utle y 2b 3 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 3 2 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 Ethier cf 4 0 0 0 Byrd rf 2 0 0 0 JuTrnr 3b 4 2 2 1 DBrwn lf 3 0 0 0 Butera c 4 0 1 0 Nie ves c 3 0 0 0 Arrrrn ss 4 0 2 1 CHr ndz 3b 3 0 0 0 Beckett p 3 0 0 0 ABr ntt p 2 0 0 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 6 11 4 T otals 27 0 0 0 Los Angeles 110 001 300 6 Philadelphia 000 000 000 0 EHoward (3). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBLos Angeles 6, Philadelphia 3. 2BPuig (12), Ad.Gonzalez (12). HRJu.Turner (2). SBD.Gordon 2 (30), Puig (5). SBeckett. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Beckett W,3-1 9 0 0 0 3 6 Philadelphia A.Burnett L,3-4 7 11 6 4 1 3 Manship 2 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Seth Buckminster. T:37. A,141 (43,651). Rays 8, Red Sox 5 Boston T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Holt 3b 4 1 1 1 DeJess lf 3 1 1 0 Bogarts ss 4 0 2 2 DJnngs ph-cf 1 1 0 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Longori 3b 5 2 3 1 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 Jo yce dh 2 0 0 0 Carp 1b-lf 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz ph-dh 1 1 1 3 Nava rf 4 0 0 0 Hanign ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Przyns c 4 3 3 0 Myer s rf 3 1 0 1 GSizmr lf-cf 4 0 2 0 Lone y 1b 4 1 1 0 BrdlyJr cf 2 0 0 0 Guyer cf-lf 3 1 2 0 JGoms ph-lf 1 1 1 2 F orsyth 2b-ss 4 0 1 1 JHerrr 1b 1 0 0 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 2 CF igur pr-2b 0 0 0 0 JMolin c 4 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 5 T otals 34 8 10 8 Boston 001 000 202 5 Tampa Bay 000 210 50x 8 LOBBoston 7, Tampa Bay 7. 2BBogaerts (11), Pierzynski 2 (6), G.Sizemore 2 (8), DeJesus (10), Y.Escobar (7). HRJ.Gomes (5), Longoria (5), S.Rodriguez (6). SBGuyer (1). SFHolt. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Workman 5 5 3 3 3 3 A.Wilson 1 0 0 0 1 0 Breslow L,2-1 2/3 5 5 5 1 0 Mujica 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay Odorizzi 6 4 1 1 1 5 Jo.Peralta W,2-3 BS,3-3 1 3 2 2 0 1 Oviedo 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lueke 2/3 3 2 2 0 1 Balfour S,9-11 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Odorizzi (Bogaerts). WPJo.Peralta. UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third, Larry Vanover. T:27. A,199 (31,042). Brewers 7, Marlins 1 Milw aukee Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Segura ss 5 1 0 0 Y elich lf 3 0 0 0 Braun rf 5 2 4 1 Dietrch 2b 3 0 0 0 Lucroy 1b 5 1 3 2 Stanton rf 4 0 1 0 CGomz cf 4 1 2 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 LSchfr cf 1 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 0 0 0 RWeks 2b 5 0 1 0 Ozuna cf 3 1 2 1 MrRynl 3b 3 0 0 0 Hchvr r ss 4 0 2 0 KDavis lf 5 2 2 0 Mathis c 4 0 2 0 Maldnd c 3 0 1 1 W olf p 1 0 0 0 Nelson p 3 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Slow ey p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 1 0 1 1 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Capps p 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Lucas ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 40 7 14 6 T otals 33 1 7 1 Milwaukee 321 000 010 7 Miami 000 000 001 1 EHechavarria (5), Yelich (2). DPMilwaukee 1, Miami 2. LOBMilwaukee 9, Miami 8. 2BBraun (7), Lucroy 2 (20), K.Davis 2 (13). 3BBraun (2), Lucroy (1). HR Ozuna (9). SBC.Gomez (9). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Nelson W,1-0 5 2/3 5 0 0 3 6 Wooten 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez 1 1 1 1 0 0 Miami Wolf L,0-1 5 9 6 4 1 3 Slowey 2 2 0 0 0 2 Capps 1 2 1 1 1 1 Da.Jennings 1 1 0 0 1 2 WPNelson. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Brian ONora. T:16. A,897 (37,442). Nationals 5, Pirates 2 W ashington Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Span cf 5 2 2 0 JHr rsn rf 4 2 2 1 Rendon 3b 3 2 1 1 NWalkr 2b 4 0 3 0 Werth rf 5 1 2 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 4 0 1 0 I.Da vis 1b 4 0 2 1 Dsmnd ss 5 0 2 2 SMar te lf 4 0 0 0 TMoore lf 3 0 1 0 P Alvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 McLoth lf 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss 4 0 0 0 Frndsn 2b 3 0 1 0 CStwr t c 4 0 1 0 Loaton c 4 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Fister p 3 0 0 0 T abata ph 1 0 0 0 Stmmn p 1 0 0 0 Mazzar p 0 0 0 0 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Mor ris p 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 3 T otals 35 2 9 2 Washington 200 020 100 5 Pittsburgh 000 001 010 2 EDesmond (13), I.Davis (3). DPWashington 2, Pitts burgh 1. LOBWashington 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2BSpan (12). 3BRendon (4). HRJ.Harrison (3). SBSpan (7), Desmond (4). CSRendon (1). IP H R ER BB SO Washington Fister W,2-1 5 1/3 6 1 1 0 4 Stammen H,1 2 2 1 1 0 1 Barrett H,2 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 R.Soriano S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh Liriano L,0-5 5 6 4 4 4 5 Mazzaro 3 3 1 1 0 3 Morris 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Mazzaro (Frandsen). WPLiriano 2. UmpiresHome, Tim Timmons; First, Tim Welke; Sec ond, Todd Tichenor; Third, Gabe Morales. T:08. A,047 (38,362). Diamondbacks 2, Mets 1 First Game Arizona Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi GParra rf 3 0 0 0 Lagar s cf 5 1 1 0 Owings ss 4 1 1 1 DnMr p 2b 5 0 2 0 Gldsch 1b 5 0 2 0 D Wrght 3b 3 0 2 1 MMntr c 3 0 0 0 Gr ndrs rf-lf 2 0 0 0 Hill 2b 2 0 0 0 CY oung lf 3 0 0 0 EChavz 3b 4 0 1 0 BAreu ph-rf 0 0 0 0 Pollock cf 4 1 1 0 Duda 1b 4 0 0 0 AMarte lf 3 0 0 0 T ejada ss 3 0 1 0 Inciart ph-lf 0 0 0 0 Centen c 4 0 2 0 Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 Reck er pr 0 0 0 0 C.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 RMontr p 2 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 F amili p 0 0 0 0 EMrshl p 0 0 0 0 Campll ph 0 0 0 0 Prado ph 1 0 0 0 Edgin p 0 0 0 0 A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 V alvrd p 0 0 0 0 Mejia p 0 0 0 0 Flores ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 32 2 5 1 T otals 32 1 9 1 Arizona 100 000 001 2 New York 100 000 000 1 EOwings (9), Dan.Murphy (6). DPArizona 5. LOB Arizona 10, New York 10. 2BGoldschmidt (21), E.Chavez (3), Pollock (10). HROwings (3). SInciarte. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Arroyo 6 6 1 1 1 1 O.Perez 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 E.Marshall W,2-0 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 A.Reed S,14-16 1 2 0 0 0 2 New York R.Montero 6 2 1 1 3 10 Familia 1 1 0 0 0 2 Edgin 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Valverde 2/3 1 0 0 2 0 Mejia L,4-1 1 1 1 0 1 1 HBPby Arroyo (Tejada, Granderson), by O.Perez (Campbell). UmpiresHome, Bill Welke; First, Ben May; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:09. A (41,922). Blue Jays 3, Athletics 1 Oakland T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp dh 3 0 0 0 Re yes ss 3 1 2 0 Dnldsn 3b 3 1 1 1 MeCar r lf 3 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 1 2 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0 Encr nc 1b 3 1 1 1 DNorrs c 4 0 1 0 La wrie 3b 4 0 1 0 Moss rf 3 0 0 0 DNa vrr dh 4 0 2 0 Callasp 2b 4 0 1 0 StTllsn 2b 3 0 2 0 Blanks 1b 3 0 1 0 Kratz c 4 0 0 0 Jaso ph 1 0 0 0 Pillar cf 2 1 1 0 Gentry cf 3 0 1 0 Lind ph 1 0 0 0 Gose cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 T otals 31 3 10 3 Oakland 000 000 010 1 Toronto 000 110 10x 3 DPOakland 1. LOBOakland 7, Toronto 9. 2BD.Norris (8). HRDonaldson (11), Encarnacion (14). SB Crisp (9), Gentry (8), Reyes 3 (10). SFBautista. IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Pomeranz L,4-2 4 5 2 2 4 3 Ji.Johnson 2 2 0 0 0 0 Gregerson 1 1 1 1 0 1 Abad 1 2 0 0 0 1 Toronto Happ W,4-1 7 4 0 0 3 7 McGowan H,2 1 1 1 1 0 0 Janssen S,7-7 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pomeranz pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Will Little. T:08. A,277 (49,282). Orioles 4, Indians 2 Cle veland Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 1 2 0 Mar kks rf 5 0 0 0 CSantn c 1 1 0 0 Machd 3b 2 1 1 1 Brantly lf 4 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 1 1 N.Cr uz dh 4 2 2 1 Swisher 1b 2 0 0 1 P earce 1b 4 1 3 1 Giambi dh 3 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 ACarer ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 1 Aviles 2b 4 0 0 0 Lough lf 3 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 1 0 CJosph c 3 0 0 0 Raburn ph 1 0 0 0 Sellers ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 28 2 5 2 T otals 33 4 9 4 Cleveland 200 000 000 2 Baltimore 011 020 00x 4 EChisenhall (7). DPCleveland 1, Baltimore 1. LOBCleveland 7, Baltimore 9. 2BN.Cruz (10), Pearce (4). HRMachado (2), N.Cruz (16). SBPearce (1), Lough (5). CSDav.Murphy (2). SFChisenhall, Swisher. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Bauer L,1-2 4 1/3 6 4 4 3 8 Lowe 1 1/3 2 0 0 1 3 Atchison 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Outman 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore M.Gonzalez W,3-3 6 4 2 2 4 4 Guilmet H,1 1 0 0 0 1 2 Matusz H,6 1 1 0 0 0 1 Z.Britton S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby M.Gonzalez (C.Santana). UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:12. A,649 (45,971). Yankees 7, White Sox 1 Ne w York Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 5 1 1 2 Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 Jeter ss 5 1 4 2 GBckh 2b 4 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 3 0 0 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 1 Teixeir 1b 4 0 0 0 V iciedo rf 4 0 0 0 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 1 0 Solarte 3b 5 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 0 ASorin rf 4 1 2 0 K onerk dh 3 0 0 0 ISuzuki dh 4 1 1 0 De Aza lf 3 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 2 2 1 1 Flowr s c 3 1 1 0 Totals 36 7 10 6 T otals 32 1 7 1 New York 040 101 010 7 Chicago 000 001 000 1 ERienzo (3). DPNew York 2. LOBNew York 8, Chi cago 7. 2BA.Soriano 2 (13), A.Dunn (8), Flowers (5). 3BJeter (1). HRB.Roberts (2). SFEllsbury. IP H R ER BB SO New York Tanaka W,7-1 6 2/3 5 1 1 2 6 Warren 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Daley 1 1 0 0 0 0 Chicago Rienzo L,4-1 5 7 5 4 2 7 Guerra 2 2 1 1 0 3 Carroll 2 1 1 1 1 2 HBPby Tanaka (Konerko), by Guerra (B.Roberts, McCann). WPTanaka, Rienzo. UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Tom Woodring; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:17. A,142 (40,615). Rangers 12, Tigers 4 T exas Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Choo dh 3 3 1 0 RDa vis lf 5 1 2 0 Andrus ss 5 3 2 1 Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 0 Sardins ph-ss 1 0 0 0 W orth 2b 0 0 0 0 Morlnd 1b 5 1 3 3 MiCar r dh 3 0 1 0 ABeltre 3b 4 1 3 2 Holady pr-dh 1 1 0 0 DMrph 3b 1 0 0 0 VMr tnz 1b 3 0 2 1 Rios rf 6 1 2 3 D .Kelly ph-1b 1 0 0 0 LMartn cf 5 0 0 0 T rHntr rf 4 0 1 1 Choice lf 5 1 1 1 JMr tnz rf 1 0 0 0 Chirins c 5 1 3 1 AJcksn cf 5 1 1 1 Odor 2b 4 1 2 0 A vila c 2 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 2 0 1 0 AnRmn ss 4 0 2 1 Totals 44 12 17 11 T otals 36 4 11 4 Texas 120 051 300 12 Detroit 110 000 200 4 EL.Martin (3), Verlander (2), An.Romine (5). DP Texas 1. LOBTexas 11, Detroit 11. 2BAndrus (12), Moreland (10), Chirinos 2 (5), V.Martinez (12). 3B Rios (5). HRChoice (3). SBR.Davis (15). CSOdor (3), Avila (3). SOdor. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Lewis W,4-3 5 2/3 5 2 2 5 2 Ross Jr. 2 2/3 6 2 2 1 1 Soria 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit Verlander L,5-4 5 1/3 11 9 6 3 1 E.Reed 1 1/3 1 1 1 0 1 Krol 1/3 3 2 2 1 0 Chamberlain 2/3 2 0 0 1 0 Alburquerque 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 2 BalkLewis. UmpiresHome, Jeff Gosney; First, Ron Kulpa; Sec ond, Ed Hickox; Third, Lance Barrett.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014STUDY: Bacteria live even in healthy placentas / C3 www.dailycommercial.com LUCIA BENAVIDESMCTJaime Morin, 9, was di agnosed with autism at age 2 and has been nonverbal his whole life. When the therapy he was receiving at school be came insufcient, his mother, Lupe Santand er, sent him to Big Sky Pe diatric Therapy, where he went for speech and oc cupational therapy once a week. It was there that they heard of Zachs Voice, a nonprot group that provides iPads to autistic children with communi cation deciencies. He can say exactly what he wants with the iPad, says Santander. When he rst gured it out, the look on his face was priceless. We could nally under stand him, we didnt have to say Yes or No when he pointed to things. Because children with autism who are nonverbal cannot talk, the thoughts occupying their heads are unable to come out thats where the iPad comes in. Through the application of their choice, the children can form sentences by putting together words, which come in the form of buttons and a picture to match the word. Then, they play it back for others to hear. The iPad becomes their voice. It facilitates their understanding of the world around them, says Danielle Skala, functional communication classroom teacher at Forest North Elementary in the Round Rock Independent School District. She has a few students who use iP ads in her classroom. Zachs Voice became an ofcial organization last May, giving out their rst iPad the month before. Their mission is to provide iPads to children ages 3 to 21 with autism spectrum disorder who have communication disabilities. They take iPad donations from the community, as well as money donations to use toward buying refurbished iPads. Their pilot program took place in the 2013 spring semester in Texas with the Round Rock school district, and they have since expanded to include schools in the Georgetown district. Zachs Voice was founded by Abby Whitworth, who named the More than fun and games: iPads give autistic children a voice JAY JANNER / MCT ABOVE: Educational assistant Stacey Beswick high-ves Zach Whitworth, 7, at Forest North Elementary School on May 8, in Austin, Texas. BELOW: Zach Whitworth works with an iPad in the functional communication class. Associated PressHARLEYSVILLE, Pa. If mans best friend is a dog, then who is a dogs best friend? That would be Rover. Or Glow. Or Ivan or Raina. The four canines recently donated precious pints of blood to their fellow pooches. And they did it without having to travel far from home: They visited an animal bloodmobile. Similar to the Red Cross vehi cles for humans, the University of Pennsylvanias traveling veterinary lab goes to where the donors are to make it easier to give. You dont really think about it un til you actually need it, said Kym Marryott, manager of Penns Animal Blood Bank. Just like in people, dogs need blood too. Ofcials at Penns School of Veter inary Medicine said they dont know of any other animal bloodmobiles operating in the U.S. Theirs makes weekly rounds through suburban Philadelphia and New Jersey. Dogs must have the correct blood type, weigh at least 55 pounds and be younger than 8 years old. Owners volunteer their pet for the short procedure, which requires no sedation. However, Marryott said its the dog that ultimately chooses to lie still and give.Dogs best friend? Other dogs that give blood MATT SLOCUM / AP Raina, a 6-year-old German Shepherd, waits in the back of a car after having blood drawn at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary schools animal bloodmobile in Harleysville, Pa. SEE DOGS | C2SEE IPAD | C3 LAKE COUNTY Department of Health hosts Quit Smoking ProgramThe Lake County Health Depart ment will host free, ve-week Quit Smoking classes on Tuesdays, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., beginning on Tues day at the Community Health Center, 225 N. First St., in Leesburg, and on Mondays, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., beginning on June 1 at the National Training Center at South Lake Hos pital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. To enroll in a program or for infor mation, call 1-877-252-6094.LAKE COUNTY Health Alliance, hospitals focus on stroke awarenessThe Central Florida Health Alli ance and local hospitals are promot ing awareness of stroke prevention and the importance of fast diagno sis and treatment during National Stroke Awareness month in May. Dr. Firas Siou, neurologist at Leesburg Regional Medical Center, will present a free talk at the Lees burg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., downtown Leesburg on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Call 352-751-8585 to RSVP. Leesburg Regional Medical Center will host a Stroke Support Group meeting, Maximizing Your Capabilities after Stroke with Physical Therapy, from 10:30 a.m. to noon on June 5 at the North Campus Conference Room To RSVP, call 352-323-5658.THE VILLAGES New dentist joins team at Village DentalPablo J. Sierra, DMD., FAGD., FI COI., is the newest dentist at Village Dental. Sierra has worked in private practice as well as with the mobile dental unit of Wake Forest Univer sity Baptist Hospital serving special needs patients, and as part of the hospital staffs of Moses Cone Me morial Hospital in Greensboro and Randolph Hospital in Asheboro, N.C. He also takes regular trips to Gua temala with the University of Flori das Christian Dental Society provid ing treatment to rural populations, and has volunteered with the Flori da Baptist Conventions dental mobile bus. For information, call 352-430-2037.TAVARES Group diabetes education classes now availableFlorida Hospital Waterman has partnered with the Florida Hospi tal Diabetes Institute to provide pa tients with the educational tools and information they need to manage their diabetes daily and make positive lifestyle changes. The class is designed for patients newly diagnosed with diabetes as well as those who need help managing their diabetes care plan, and includes planning meals, starting an exercise plan, monitoring blood glucose, managing diabetes and preventing complications and making lifestyle changes to improve overall health. For information, go to www.FHWaterman.com for information. Health check

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com ERIK LACITISMCTSEATTLE Lets assume you are, oh, 25 years old. Wrinkle-free, bag-free, sag-free. Would you want to see a pret ty realistic image of what youll look like at age 70? A little hesitation? In a couple of months youll be able to do just do that. Just upload a photo of you, at any age 2, 10, 25 into a free program created at the Univer sity of Washingtons Computer Science & Engineering department. In about a minute, youll see the old you. If you dare. Or put in a photo of anyone. Certainly, it worked quite well when we tested it with photos of former President Clinton as a kid, and compared what the program said hed look like now with a real photo of the older Clinton. We also asked the program to age a number of others from Miley Cyrus to Russell Wilson to Macklemore to show them in their 60s. It showed us what Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain would have looked like had they lived, to 71 and 47 this year, respec tively. No wonder so many plastic surgeons get rich. But, it turns out that the main researcher who put together this age-progression software has not run her own photo. I didnt do that, no, says Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, an assistant professor who helped create the program. Shes 33. It just wasnt something that interested her, she says. Not an unexpected reaction, according to pioneering research by Tony Greenwald, a psychology professor at the Uni versity of Washington. Hes part of a team that has done unrelat ed research about how we react to a photo of an old face, versus a photo of a young face. You can take the test yourself online. We react more negatively to elderly faces. It makes it clear that being old is not a pleasant thing. Why should we want to know what unpleasantness faces us? he says. Kemelmacher-Shlizerman says there will be real uses for the software, such as in help ing nd long-missing children whove now become adults. Right now, the National Cen ter for Missing & Exploited Chil dren has four full-time foren sic-imaging artists who do their best at depicting what a child missing at age 5 might look like at age 25. The center says it has more than 2,000 open, longterm missing cases. Their artists use Photoshop, pictures of the childs parents and relatives, and part science and part art to create their images of the child at an older age, says a spokesman. The center says its eager to give the universitys program, which is based on the science of imaging, a try. Kemelmacher-Shlizerman says it turns a face into 4,000 pixels. A corner of an eye becomes rows of numbers: 141 140 139 138 137 136 134 132 In putting together the pro gram, the researchers used pho tos they found online in which they could determine the age of the person, images from soccer-team photos and beauty competitions, for example. Over two years, they came up with 40,000 photos. Then they divided the subjects by gender and 14 age groups, and put math to how our faces change over time. They found that, over time, our faces simply get bigger. Our eyes get narrower. Lips get narrower. Noses get larger. And, of course, our skin sags, we get wrinkles, and we get bags under our eyes. The research paper goes into all the math involved, with ref erences to illumination subspace, lighting-aware ow and aspect ratio progress. Bottom line, the program works very well. The researchers had people look at computer-generat ed images of somebody at an older age, versus real images of the person at that age. The par ticipants basically couldnt tell them apart. The program even works when the starting image is that of a baby, a much harder task because the face changes so much into adulthood. In a couple of months, when the program is publicly avail able, probably on the schools site, itll be a matter of do you or dont you want to know? Maybe run that photo of a girlfriend or boyfriend? Says psychologist Green wald, When I got married, and you had asked me if I wanted to know what my wife would look like in 50 years, I probably would have said, no. As for you 25-year-olds think ing of giving the program a try, just search for images for So phia Loren and Cary Grant. These two movie stars, as they aged, looked fantastic no matter how old they were. Thats probably not you.What will you look like when you grow old? Software can show you ELLEN M. BANNER / MCT Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, 33, is an assistant University of Washington professor who helped create the sophisticated software that depicts the aging process.If (the dog) wanted to get up and leave, he could, said Marryott. But theyre really good about it, they trust their owner. About 150 dogs par ticipate in the program. Each donates three or four pints a year, which can help animals suffer ing from illnesses like cancer or an accidental trauma like being hit by a car. One pint can save up to three dogs. Sandy Lucas brought her 7-year-old black German shepherd to the bloodmobile last week, when it was parked at a strip mall in Harleysville about 14 miles from her home. The Pottstown, Penn sylvania, resident said she wouldnt have braved highway trafc and city parking problems to take the dog to Penn Vets animal hos pital in downtown Phil adelphia, which is twice as far. But the bloodmobile made it conve nient to nd out if Raina could donate, she said. I was very, very thrilled that she had the right blood that was needed to help another dog out, said Lucas. Well denitely do it again. Just like people, the furry donors get a snack and a heart-shaped U of P Blood Donor sticker immediately after giving. In addition, they receive free blood screenings and dog food to take home. While the bloodmo bile helps solve Penns urban logistical chal lenges, not all donation centers have such is sues. Trafc and parking arent big problems at North Carolina State Universitys pet blood bank in Raleigh, where owners can easily drop off their dogs for donations and pick them up later, spokesman Dave Green said. And what about a cat mobile? Perhaps not surprisingly, felines are bit less cooperative. They need to be sedated in order to give blood, so Penn does that only at its animal hospital. DOGS FROM PAGE C1 MATT SLOCUM / AP Ace, a 15-month-old golden retriever, is tempted into the University of Pennsylvania veterinary schools animal bloodmobile with his owners, Vicki Camuso, left, of Red Hill, Pa., and her daughter Mary Camuso, 13, in Harleysville, Pa. STEPHANIE EARLSMCTCOLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. Youve likely heard of the placebo effect, an outcome that cannot be at tributed to a specic treatment or therapy but rath er is caused by a patients mindset alone. As it turns out, the force behind the placebo effect namely our beliefs and perceptions might be one of the more powerful health tools in our arsenal. A study by a Colorado College senior found that students who were told theyd gotten a good nights sleep, even if they hadnt, performed better on tests that assessed attention and memory skills than students who were told theyd slept poorly, even if they were well rested. Christina Dragan ich based her results on two experiments with 164 students, and a paper about the study, Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning, was published this year in the Journal of Experimental Psy chology: Learning, Memory and Cognition. Because the study hinged on students believing researchers could assess the quality of their pre vious nights sleep, Draganich had to devise a le gitimate-seeming fabrication. As setup, she rst asked participants to ll out a questionnaire about how well they believed theyd slept the previous night; then, they were brought into the lab for a ve-minute lesson about sleep. Participants then were given real tests to measure cognitive functioning. Generally, those who were told they didnt get enough sleep scored lower, while people who were told theyd slept well achieved higher-than-average marks.Sleep study taps students mindset

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 organization after her 7-year-old son. Whitworth was inspired by Zachs initial interaction with the iPad. Prior to the Apple product, he used DynaVox, a heavy device that was hard to program, Whitworth said. Besides being clunky, it also drew attention to him. With an iPad, however, he blends in. Theyre the coolest kids in school, says Skala. The iPad gives them a social status. A particular incident at the grocery store prompted Whitworth to spread the positive effects of the iPad to other families with nonverbal kids in the community. While shopping, she saw an autistic child walking around with note cards, which he used to communicate. The number of words available through this approach, however, is limited. The iPad lets kids use all the words they want, says Whitworth. Its an unlimited amount of options, as opposed to what you get with handwritten note cards. With picture books and note cards, I got to decide what the kids said, says Skala. Now, the child decides. The application recommended by Zachs Voice is ProLoQuo2Go, which costs $219.99 at the iTunes store. The organization provides its recipients with a gift card that covers the cost of whatever app they decide to download. Jaime chose Lamp Words for Life, the program he had been using with his therapist. ProLoQuo2Go lets its users add words to the program, such as family members names and their favorite car toon characters. Adding a button is instantaneous, and kids can customize them by taking a picture of the word they add. The kids start off using the app to communicate about the things they love, says Whitworth. Its rewarding and motivates them to use the program. Zachs Voice works with speech-language therapists at different schools to nd families who would benet from the program. When the therapist nds a student that would be a good candidate for a communication device, they contact Hannah Markowitz, who works at the Round Rock districts Assistive Technology Team. After trying out the app with the child, the speech-language therapist will decide whether to recommend that the parents ll out an application with the organization. Zachs Voice only takes applications identied as eligible by the school district and requires the signatures of the parent, classroom teacher and speech-language pathologist. Its great that kids have access to the iPad at home and out in their community, says Markowitz. It gives them ownership. Parents must promise to use the iPad strictly for the benet of the autistic child, and no other apps are allowed to be downloaded. The idea is that the iPad is to be used as a means to help the kid communicate and for no other purpose. It becomes part of the childs everyday activity, just as essential as wearing shoes when they leave the house. The iPad can do more than just help children with autism communicate; sometimes it can facilitate them to talk. Zach talks now, Whitworth says. It started six months ago, about a year and a half after he rst got his iPad. According to a study done by Ann Kaiser, researcher at Vanderbilt Peabody College of Education and Human Development in Tennessee, children with autism who are minimally verbal can learn to speak later than previously thought, and iPads are playing an increasing role in making that happen. The speech-generating devices can encourage children ages 5 to 8 to develop speaking skills, Kaiser wrote. Jaimes speech also expanded since his rst interaction with the iPad. He has started to repeat sentences and words after hearing them through the app. When he hears a cer tain pronunciation, he tries to imitate it. It opens up their world, their voice can be heard, Santander says. Hes not stuck in his little body anymore. It has given him condence. The iPad as a communication device also can relieve anxiety, which is common in nonverbal kids with autism. Being heard and understood can be a great source of relief for our kids, Whitworth says. NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002756 IPAD FROM PAGE C1 JAY JANNER / MCT Leo Eichenwald, right, 9, works on his iPad while Functional Communication teacher Danielle Skala helps Eshan Aren, 8, work with his iPad at Forest North Elementary School on May 8, in Austin, Texas. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Surprising new research shows a small but diverse communi ty of bacteria lives in the placentas of healthy pregnant women, overturning the belief that fetuses grow in a pretty sterile environment. These are mostly variet ies of good germs that live in everybody. But Wednes days study also hints that the make-up of this microbial colony plays a role in prema ture birth. It allows us to think about the biology of pregnancy in different ways than we have before, that pregnancy and early life arent supposed to be these totally sterile events, said lead researcher Dr. Kjers ti Aagaard of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. We share our bodies with trillions of microbes on the skin, in the gut, in the mouth. These communities are called our micro biome, and many bacteria play critical roles in keeping us healthy, especially those in the intestinal tract. A few years ago, the governments Human Microbiome Project mapped what makes up these colonies and calculated that healthy adults cohab itate with more than 10,000 species. Healthy newborns pick up some from their mother during birth, different bugs depending on whether they were delivered vaginally or by C-section. What about before birth? There have been some signs that the process could begin in-utero. But, we have traditionally believed in medicine that the uterus is a sterile part of the human body, said Dr. Lita Proctor of the National Insti tutes of Health, who oversaw the microbiome project. With the new research, we realize that microbes may play a role even in fetus development, added Proctor, who wasnt involved in the work. The results of this study now open up a whole new line of research on maternal and pediatric health. Aagards team earlier had studied the microbiome of the vagina, and learned that its composition changes when a woman becomes pregnant. The puzzle: The most com mon vaginal microbes werent the same as the earliest gut bacteria that scientists were nding in newborns. What else, Aagaard won dered, could be seeding the infants intestinal tract? With colleagues from Bay lor and Texas Childrens Hos pital, Aagaard analyzed 320 donated placentas, using technology that teases out bacterial DNA to evaluate the type and abundance of different microbes. The placenta isnt teeming with microbes it harbors a low level, Aagaard stressed. Among them are kinds of E. coli that live in the intestines of most healthy people. But to Aagaards surprise, the placental microbiome most resembled bacteria frequently found in the mouth, she reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The theory: Oral microbes slip into the mothers bloodstream and make their way to the placenta. Why does the body allow them to stay? Aagaard said there appears to be a role for different microbes. Some metabolize nutrients. Some are toxic to yeast and parasites. Some act a bit like natural versions of medications used to stop preterm contractions, she said. In fact, among the 89 pla centas that were collected after preterm births, levels of some of the apparently helpful bacteria were markedly lower, she said. Aagaard is beginning a larger study to explore the link, planning to analyze the oral and placental microbiomes of more than 500 pregnant wom en at risk of preterm birth.Study: Bacteria live even in healthy placentas AGAPITO SANCHEZ / AP Dr. Kjersti Aagaard sits in her laboratory at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Aagaards new research shows a small but diverse community of bacteria lives in the placentas of healthy pregnant women, and hints that the microbes may play a role in premature birth.We share our bodies with trillions of microbes on the skin, in the gut, in the mouth. These communities are called our microbiome, and many bacteria play critical roles in keeping us healthy, especially those in the intestinal tract.

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 EZEQUIEL ABIU LOPEZAssociated PressSAN CRISTOBAL, Dominican Republic They suffer searing headaches, a burning fever and so much pain in their joints they can barely walk or use their hands. Its like having a terrible u combined with an abrupt case of arthritis. Hospitals and clinics throughout the Caribbean are seeing thousands of people with the same symptoms, victims of a virus with a long and unfamiliar name that has been spread rapid ly by mosquitoes across the islands after the rst locally transmitted case was conrmed in December. You feel it in your bones, your ngers and your hands. Its like everything is coming apart, said 34-year-old Sahira Francisco as she and her daughter waited for treatment at a hospital in San Cristobal, a town in the southern Dominican Republic that has seen a surge of the cases in recent days. The virus is chikungunya, derived from an African word that loose ly translates as contort ed with pain. People encountering it in the Caribbean for the rst time say the description is tting. While the vi rus is rarely fatal it is ex tremely debilitating. It is terrible, I have never in my life gotten such an illness, said Maria Norde, a 66-yearold woman conned to bed at her home on the lush eastern Caribbean island of Dominica. All my joints are in pain. Outbreaks of the virus have long made people miserable in Africa and Asia. But it is new to the Caribbean, with the rst locally transmitted case documented in December in French St. Mar tin, likely brought in by an infected air traveler. Health ofcials are now working feverishly to educate the pub lic about the illness, knock down the mos quito population, and deal with an onslaught of cases. Authorities are attempting to control mosquitoes through out the Caribbean, from dense urban neighbor hoods to beach resorts. There have been no conrmed cases of lo cal transmission of chi kungunya on the U.S. mainland, but experts say the high number of travelers to the re gion means that could change as early as this summer. So far, there are no signs the virus is keeping visitors away though some Caribbean of cials warn it might if it is not controlled. We need to come togeth er and deal with this disease, said Dominica Tourism Minister Ian Douglas. One thing is certain: The virus has found fer tile ground in the Carib bean. The Pan American Health Organization reports more than 55,000 suspected and conrmed cases since De cember throughout the islands. It has also reached French Guiana, the rst conrmed transmission on the South American mainland. The Pan American Health Organization says seven people in the Caribbean with chikungunya have died during the outbreak but they had underlying health issues that likely con tributed to their death. Its building up like a snowball because of the constant movement of people, said Jacqueline Medina, a specialist at the Instituto Techno logico university in the Dominican Republic, where some hospitals report more than 100 new cases per day. Chikungunya was identied in Africa in 1953 and is found throughout the tropics of the Eastern Hemi sphere. It can spread to a new area if someone has it circulating in their sys tem during a relative ly short period of time, roughly two to three days before the onset of symptoms to ve days after, and then arrives to an area with the right kind of mosquitoes. For years, there have been sporadic cases of travelers diagnosed with chikungunya but without local transmis sion. In 2007, there was an outbreak in northern Italy, so health author ities gured it was just a matter of time before it spread to the Western Hemisphere, said Dr. Roger Nasci, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With the increase in travelers the likelihood that something like this would happen goes up and eventually it did, said Nasci, chief of a CDC branch that tracks insect-borne diseases. We ended up with somebody at the right time and the right place infecting mosquitoes. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classified Department at (352) 314-3278. Window Services Window Services Window Services Painful and rapid spread of new virus in Caribbean EZEQUIEL ABIU LOPEZ / AP Five-year-old Karla Sepulveda, who suffers chikungunya fever symptoms, waits with her grandmother for treatment in the pediatric area of a public hospital in the coastal town of Boca Chica, Dominican Republic.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 (352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgEverything50% OFFUnless Otherwise Marked Golf CarAccessible www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 26, the 146th day of 2014. There are 219 days left in the year. This is the Memorial Day observance. On this date: In 1521, Martin Luther was banned by the Edict of Worms (vohrms) because of his religious beliefs and writings. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 26, 2014 This year youll want more time for yourself. You tend to have one or more condants whom you share and brainstorm with. As a result, by the time you are ready to act, your ideas will have been well-thought-out. If you are single, be careful, as you could run into someone who is emotionally unavailable. You wont have that knowledge until you date this person, so guard against making commitments too quickly. If you are attached, the two of you will want to schedule several weekends away together. Your relationship blossoms without all the daily interference. TAURUS makes a great healer for you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Use your intuition with money, especially if facing a risk. Take an overview when deciding what would make someone older feel more comfortable. You are likely to have a discussion with this person sometime in the next 24 hours. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Youll hear good news from a friend. You might have been tough on this person in your past few interactions. Make a sensitive gesture to let him or her know that you are sorry for the way you acted. Make plans for a getaway. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)Your sixth sense needs to be honored more often. You might want to impress someone important to you, so use today to do some thinking. A partner will come through for you in a big way. Understand how much you depend on this person. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Stay on top of an important offer. You might not want to push too hard, but you must remain responsive. Defer to a dear friend or loved one you trust, even if you have different opinions on the matter at hand. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A take-charge attitude works better than you might think. Be aware of a partners needs. A discussion could prove to be enlightening, and it might encourage a slightly different solution or path. You are better off working as a team. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You might have nearly become partners or loved ones at some point. Your creativity seems to expand when around this person. You might want to give him or her a call and get some feedback. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Listen to a partner whose feedback you value. This person might be very slow to change his or her mind, but is open to different ideas. You have a way of focusing yourself and then moving forward; this person has a different process. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Others seem to want to take the lead, whether planning a lunch or bringing others together for a sports game. Take a break from your hectic pace, and enjoy catching up on a friends news. You rarely have time to kick back with those in your daily life. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Get into a nice, relaxed pace, and try working with an inspirational idea. You might want to share it with someone who has a great sense of what will work. Make a decision to start incorporating more exercise into your daily life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19)Ideas seem to ow naturally from you to others. You are more centered than you realize. Encourage someone to play devils advocate. As a result, you will see where there are problems with your ideas. Allow more impulsiveness to ow. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) You will be happiest at home, perhaps hosting an impromptu gathering. You might overspend in trying to get everything together at the last minute. Your intuition will direct you as to what to do or what to choose. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You have a way of inspiring others, and it continues to be one of the hallmarks of your personality. Return calls. Discuss plans for the coming weekend. A friend or loved one is likely to play an important role later today. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I mar ried a great guy a short while ago. Its the second marriage for both of us. Hes good to my kids, my parents, and even gets along with my ex-husband. Stan moved into my home after we married. Theres only one major problem Im having trouble dealing with: He goes through all my things, from my mail to my closet. I have caught him going through my glove compartment, the trunk of my car and anything else he can get his hands on. He says he has a right to do it because we are married, but I dont look at it that way. His rst marriage did not go well. His ex didnt cheat on him, so I dont know where this is coming from. Abby, I am squeaky clean. I have never given him any reason not to trust me. I believe hes just nosy. Meanwhile, I feel violated. I have tried talking to him about it, but he just doesnt get it. Please help before I end my new marriage. THE NEW MRS. IN DELAWARE DEAR NEW MRS.: Great guys do not rie through their wives mail and personal belongings after having been asked not to. You say your husbands rst marriage didnt go well, and she didnt cheat on him. Do you know what did cause their divorce? Your husbands obsession with searching through your belongings is not normal behavior. There may be a chapter in his life you know nothing about. Because you have asked him to stop, and he is either unwilling or unable to, it may take help from a licensed psychotherapist to get to the bottom of it. Of course, in order for that to happen, your husband would have to be willing. If he isnt, you may indeed have to decide whether you can live with this quirk of his or would be better off without him. DEAR ABBY: I am a teacher who loves my job. Now that the school year is winding down, may I ask you to pass on this suggestion to all the wonderful par ents who send in gifts to their childrens teachers? My family has food allergies. For this reason, unless the lovingly baked goodies have ALL the ingredients listed on the wrapping paper, my family cannot enjoy them. I usually pass on these goodies to other teachers and neighbors. (Please dont think Im not appreciative; this is purely a medical precaution.) If I may suggest a gift idea: gift certicates for all kinds of owers. How often do we receive the joy of owers? Thank you for passing this along. EDUCATOR IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR EDUCATOR: Youre welcome. While gift cer ticates for owers are a wonderful idea, Im sure a gift certicate for school supplies would also be welcomed, because many teachers purchase supplies for their classrooms out of their own funds. DEAR READERS: Along with the millions of Americans who are observing this Memorial Day, I would like to add my prayer of thanks to those men and women of our armed services who laid down their lives in ser vice to our country. May they rest in peace. {&attrib} Love, ABBYDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Nosy new husband claims he has the right to snoop JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 1101 E. Hwy. 50 Clermont, FL Highway 50, Just East of 27rrr fntbb 7-YEAR/100,000 MILE LIMITED WARRANTY* 172-POINT INSPECTION ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE NEW WINDSHIELD WIPER BLADES AT DELIVERY FULL FUEL TANK AT DELIVERY OIL/FILTER CHANGE AT DELIVERY QUALITYCHECKED Certified Pre-OwnedAll prices are plus tax tag title and $599 dealer fee. All new car sale prices are after $3000 cash down or trade equity. All pmts are 36 mo leases 10500 per year and include $3000 cash down. Photos are for illustrative purposes only, dealer and newspaper are not responsible for typographical errors. Some prices may require FMCC financing or trade assistance, see dealer for details. Prices are only good for date of publication. Thank you for reading the fine print, smart customers always do. Se Habla Espaol CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES AS LOW AS 1.9% APR FINANCING 100,000 MILE WARRANTY 2003 LINCOLN TOWN CARWAS $7,700 NOW$6,800 2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOXWAS $10,300 NOW$9,240 2006 MERCURY MONTEGOWAS $10,700 NOW$9,820 2007 PONTIAC G6WAS $11,800 NOW$10,700 2008 FORD F-150WAS $13,200 NOW$11,400 2006 MAZDA CX7WAS $13,500 NOW$12,000 2006 FORD RANGER EXTRA CABWAS $14,500 NOW$12,860 2008 JEEP LIBERTY SOFT TOPWAS $15,300 NOW$13,300 2009 FORD EXPLORER XLTWAS $16,300 NOW$14,000 2010 FORD MUSTANG COUPEWAS $16,700 NOW$14,500 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA SWAS $16,900 NOW$14,910 2012 FORD FOCUS WAS $17,500 NOW$15,800 2010 TOYOTA PRIUSWAS $19,900 NOW$16,480 2013 DODGE DART LIMITEDWAS $22,400 NOW$17,860 2010 TOYOTA VENZAWAS $20,900 NOW$19,700 2012 HONDA ACCORD ONLY 7,000 MILESWAS $24,500 NOW$20,410 2012 TOYOTA CAMRYWAS $23,900 NOW$21,780 2012 LINCOLN MKZWAS $25,200 NOW$22,360 2012 NISSAN MAXIMAWAS $24,500 NOW$22,380 2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRYLOADED WAS $25,800 NOW$22,830 2013 FORD C-MAXWAS $26,700 NOW$24,500 2014 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLEWAS $29,500 NOW$25,410 2012 FORD FLEXLIMITED CPO, NAV, LOADEDWAS $33,800 NOW$30,980 2011 ACURA RLWAS $32,200 NOW$31,000 2014 FORD EXPEDITION ELWAS $40,500 NOW$37,640 drive for $199**per month2014 FIESTA starting at $10,500or $1000 & 0% up to 60 modrive for $199**per monthor drive for $259**per month2014 FOCUS starting at $12,900or $1000 &0% up to 60 mo2014 F-150 starting at $20,600or $750& 0.0%up to 60 mo or drive for $179**per month2014 FUSION starting at $16,500or $1500 &0% up to 60 mo drive for $269**per month2014 ESCAPE starting at $17,800or $1510 & 0% up to 60 mo drive for $319**per month2014 EDGE starting at $23,300or $1000 & 0.0%up to 60 mo or drive for $219**per month starting at $18,3002014 TAURUS or $1250 & 0% up to 60 modrive for $329**per month starting at $23,9002014 EXPLORER or 0% up to 60 mo drive for $329**per month starting at $23,9002014 FLEX or 0% up to 60 mo or drive for $209**per month starting at $16,9002014 MUSTANG or $2,000 &0% up to 60 mo

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital SOMETHING SPECIAL IS COMING... At Orchard Heights Clermonts newest retirement community, we believe PATIENCE, LOYALTY, UNDERSTANDING and HARD WORK are the core components of rewarding lives and careers. If this interests you, come join our team! Orchard Heights, a gracious retirement community for seniors in Clermont, is seeking the following positions:Orchard Heights is an Equal Opportunity EmployerAttn:Paul and Martha Johnson Holiday Inn Express near PNC Bank 1810 South Hwy. 27 Clermont, FL 34711 Fax:352-241-9685 Or email:orchardheights.hiring@hawthornret.com passenger endorsements) Shop Operator Part-Time and Full-Time positions are available, depending on position. If you are interested, r f n trfn b rfr nrtbtf

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Monday, May 26, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 26, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr www.dailycommercial.com WITH US. EVERYTHING Cash in on Clutter Supplement your budget with a Classified Ad!IN LAKE COUNTY CALL 314-FASTIN SUMTER COUNTY CALL 748-1955 POWER BUY$!!!