Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE TODD WINS BYRON NELSON FOR FIRST PGA TITLE, SPORTS B1PROJECT SOS: Donates wheelchairs to three Lake Hills School students, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Shops say pet owners choose food with care, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 139 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.87 / 66Sun mixed with some clouds. 50 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comHaving been in Future Farm ers of America all four years of high school, Tavares High School senior Krista Wilson made it this year to the state level in the tractor operations competition. This has pretty much been my high school life, Wilson said of FFA. In order to reach the state competition, Wilson won both the sub-district and district-level competitions. It was pretty much a relief when I won it, because I was so excited because Ive worked four years to try to get the state level, Wilson said. Wilson, who nished seventh out of 12 in the state competi tion, said she had competed in other competitions in the past, but this year focused only on tractor operations in order to study more for it. Jessica Holland, the agricul ture instructor and FFA advi sor at Tavares High School, also saw the level of work Wilson put into preparing for the competition. I think her going to the state level for tractor is amazing be cause shes put so much hard work into it over the last four years, Holland said. She was a little disappointed to get sev enth, but she took it very well and knew what she could im prove upon and that shows a great person, in my opinion. Also, I did some checking and found out that she was the rst female to compete at the state level (in Florida) for that con test, and that was very hum bling for her and me. Wilson said she had been in volved in music since the rst grade and was in band her FFA helps shape Tavares High School senior Krista Wilsons life AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Senior Krista Wilson poses with agriculture instructor and FFA advisor Jessica Holland. CHARLES BABINGTONAssociated PressTuesdays high-pro le primary elec tions may extend a streak of sorts for tea party Republicans: losing individual races but winning the larg er ideological war by tugging the GOP right ward. Tea party-endorsed candidates are struggling in Tuesdays Republican congressional primaries in Georgia, Kentucky and Idaho. In each state, however, the establishment Republican candidates have emphasized their conservative credentials, which narrows the partys philosophical differences. Citing similar dy namics in other states, Democrats say the GOP candidates who are trying to give Republicans control of the Senate will prove too far right for centrist voters in November. Republicans need to gain six Senate seats to control the chamber. Holding Kentucky and Georgia against well-funded Democrats, both women, is crucial to their hopes. Six states hold primaries Tuesday. Geor gia, Kentucky and Or egon have closely watched Republican contests for Senate. Pennsylvania and Ar kansas have feisty gubernatorial primaries. In Idaho, tea par ty-backed lawyer Bry an Smith is trying to oust Republican Rep. Mike Simpson, whos seeking a ninth House term. In Kentucky, tea par tyers would love to LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comSeveral Lake County commissioners say they had concerns about the effects of a controver sial sand mine in south Lake on adjacent landowners, agricultural resources and trafc is sues on U.S. Highway 27. CEMEX proposed the 1,196-acre sand mine in the center of the plan ning area of the Well ness Way Sector Plan. The sector plan would transform 16,000 acres in the southeast corner of the county into a hub for high-tech health care jobs and other LISA LEFFAssociated PressSAN FRANCISCO Isaac Barnett took a bold step last year: He told teachers and class mates at his Kansas high school that the student they had known as a girl now wanted to be ac cepted as a boy. His close childhood friend, who also identi ed as transgender, was ready to reveal his secret, too. With the administrations blessing, a segment featuring the two friends talking about their transitions aired in CLERMONTCemex faced uphill battle with sand mine DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO This is a Cemex sand mining facility in Polk County. The company would like to open another one in south Lake.Tea party is losing races but tugging GOP rightward TIMOTHY D. EASLEY / AP ABOVE: Darrell Uhls, left, shakes hans with Kentucky Republican senatorial candidate Mitch McConnell during a campaign stop Saturday, at the Tanglewood Farms Restaurant in Franklin, Ky. BELOW: Kentucky Democratic senatorial candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes speaks to a gathering of supporters at the Simpson County Courthouse on Saturday, in Franklin, Ky. Schools work to help transgender students fit inSEE STUDENTS | A2SEE CEMEX | A2SEE GOP | A2SEE WILSON |A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MAY 18CASH 3 . ............................................... 7-2-1 Afternoon . .......................................... 5-6-0 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 8-5-4-3 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-4-7-2FLORIDALOTTERY MAY 17FANTASY 5 . ........................... 7-17-21-27-32 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 3-11-13-15-33-50 POWERBALL .................. 23-32-39-47-4922 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. the schools classrooms, alongside a basketball team promotion and a feature on the impor tance of the arts. I didnt get any ques tions or hate or putdowns or anything like that, said Barnett, now 18, adding that they called him Isaac immediately a drama-free coming-out that would have been extraordinary in schools a decade ago. With children rejecting the birth gender at younger ages and the transgender rights movement gaining momentum, schools in dis tricts large and small, conservative and liber al, are working to help transitioning youth t in without a fuss. California this year became the rst state with a law spelling out the transgender student rights in public schools, including the ability to use restrooms and to play on sports teams that match their ex pressed genders. Another 13 states pro hibit discrimination on the basis of gender identity in schools. Dozens of districts, from Salt Lake City and Kansas City to Knoxville, Tennessee, and Decatur, Georgia, have adopted similar protections. Parents are increas ingly seeking a com fortable learning environment for their transgender children, according to Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund Executive Director Michael Silverman. His group represented the parents of a transgender Colorado grade school girl who was prevented from us ing the girls restroom until state civil rights of cials ruled in her favor last year. Theres a new generation of parents who grew up in the age of the gay rights move ment and are saying, We want to do what is best for our children, he said. The trend is likely to accelerate with help from the federal gov ernment. Last month, the U.S. Education Department alerted districts in a memo on sexual violence that it would welcome civil rights complaints from trans gender students under Title IX, the 1972 law that bans gender dis crimination at schools. Kim Pearson, training director of Trans Youth Family Allies, estimates that for every case that makes headlines there are dozens that are resolved quietly and easily. Since she co-founded the support and advoca cy group in 2007, Pear son has worked with parents and educators in half of the states. If a school wants to get it, they will, Pearson said. STUDENTS FROM PAGE A1 CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Transgender high school students Isaac Barnett, left, and his prom date, identied only by his rst name Jasen, pose for photos after picking up their tuxedos for prom in Kansas City, Mo. The seniors, both born as females, are open about their transgender status in their schools.industries, which would attract people who like to bike, walk and enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle. Wellness Way has been called the largest piece of undeveloped proper ty left in Lake County. The tract runs east of US 27 along the Orange Coun ty border, running south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. Commissioner Sean Parks said he was pleased CEMEX withdrew its application. I have had serious concerns all along about the compatibility with the Wellness Way Sec tor Plan, he said. There were some trafc and health issues that needed to be addressed. I am concerned about the ef fects on water resources and some agricultural re sources. Additionally, a health expert previously said there are questions about mining and its effects on public health because of the particulates it gener ates. Crispin Pierce, an associate professor and program director for the Envi ronmental Public Health Program at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, recently concluded an air quality study at mining sites, which showed high er levels of PM2.5 the particulates mining generates, including silica than what was report ed by the Department of Natural Resources. Even in digging it out and loading it in a truck you are generating those small particulates (of sil ica), he previously said. Without monitoring by an independent agency, we dont have the kind of assurance we need to protect public health. In a letter dated May 13 to County Attorney San dy Minkoff, CEMEXs at torney, Roger Sims, wrote the company wished to withdraw its application for conditional use ap proval after reviewing a large number of objection letters received which raise concerns about al leged trafc impacts from the project. CEMEX prefers to understand such concerns, determine their validity and determine whether they should be addressed with proactive measures requiring amendments to the application Sims wrote. More than 100 people recently attended a meeting in Clermont to oppose the plans for the sand mine. Many area residents mainly in the Kings Ridge development were concerned about trafc, noise and dust from the mine. Some residents talked about char tering buses to the county commission meeting on Tuesday, where the CE MEX request was slated to be heard before it was withdrawn. Commissioner Jimmy Conner also expressed concerns. There were legitimate concerns raised by adja cent landowners and by people who live in Kings Ridge, he said. But Sara Engdahl, direc tor of communications for CEMEX USA, said in a press release, There are rumors and statistics re garding our project that are false. Asked what specically Engdahl was referring to, she cited the trafc con cerns. Per an independent trafc study of the po tential impacts of the mine, the trafc impacts to Highway 27 would be insignicant, less than 1 percent of the highways capacity, she wrote in an email message, stating there would be 300 round trips by sand trucks made per day. There are 21,500 vehicles that travel in that area daily, according to the countys Department of Public Works, which conrmed the sand mine trucks would make up roughly 1.4 percent of the highways trafc. Even so, county ofcials have said they have concerns about dust being kicked up by the trucks on Schoeld Road, a clay road in the vicinity of the proposed sand mine. A clay road is a dirt road, and if you put 300 trucks on it, it is going to create dust, said Com missioner Tim Sullivan. I think one of the ways to mitigate that is to pave that road. Like Parks, Sullivan said he had concerns about the sand mines impact on agricultural resources. Agriculture is a huge part of the Lake County economy, he said. The sand mine needs to t the character of the com munity. Commissioner Leslie Campione credited CE MEX for recognizing that issues being raised were genuine and they were of concern to the county commission. Asked if she believed the county had valid con cerns regarding the issues raised, Engdahl wrote: The project has received all other permits required to construct and operate other than commission approval, as well as from the Planning and Zoning Board. But at the same time, Engdahl also wrote, CEMEX believes, however, that taking time to work through these concerns regarding our application is in the best interest of both Lake County and CEMEX. CEMEX FROM PAGE A1 knock off Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a 30-year senator they see as too accommodating to Democrats. But challenger Matt Bevin has struggled under a barrage of attacks from McConnell and his allies. McConnell, caught off guard by the tea party movement in 2010, has scrambled to win support from conservatives who dislike compromise. He quickly allied himself with Sen. Rand Paul, who defeated McConnells hand-picked candidate in the 2010 primary. And in February, McConnell voted against raising the debt ceiling, a never-pleasant vote that past party leaders often swallowed to avert a government default. Rep. Jack Kingston and businessman David Per due have walked a careful line: showing more openness to establishment support while still cater ing to hard-core conser vatives who dominate Republican primaries. When the U.S. Chamber of Commerce endorsed Kingston, Broun called him the king of pork. That tag might have t a few years ago. Kingston, a longtime Appropriations Committee member, has proudly steered millions of federal dollars to his district. But tea party-driven attacks on federal spending have sent Republicans scurrying to tighter-sted ground. Kingston raised eyebrows in January when he voted against an appropriations bill after working hard to insert funding for Savannahs port. In a sign of the narrowing differences between tea party activists and traditional Republican groups, Kingston was endorsed by Brent Bozell, an outspoken critic of Republican moderation. Bozell, who founded the conservative Media Research Center, said of the Republican primaries: With virtually no exception, everyone is running as a conser vative. No one is running as a moderate, no one is running as an anti-tea-partyer. GOP FROM PAGE A1 JIM HADLEY / AP Idaho Gov. Butch Otter, second right, appears on stage with Republican gubernatorial hopefuls, from left, Harley Brown, Walt Bayes and state Sen. Russ Fulcher, at a debate Thursday in Boise, Idaho.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Lake-Sumter State will host Tourism Expo in JuneThe Lake County Economic Development & Tourism Department will host a Tourism Expo from 2-7 / p.m. on June 11 at LakeSumter State College in Leesburg. Robert Chandler, director of Lake Countys Economic Development & Tourism Department, along with Brandy Hastings of VISIT FLORIDA, will be the keynote speakers, from 2-3 / p.m. in the Magnolia Room. The Expo and Exhibit Hall inside the gym will be open from 3-7 / p.m. and feature informational booths of tourism-related businesses and organizations. The event is free and open to the public, and citizens will have a chance to mingle with business owners, including event planners, hoteliers and restaurateurs, said Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public information ofcer. For information, call 352-7423918, email ddyer@lakecounty. gov or go to www.lakecounty.gov/ tourismexpo.EUSTIS Count plant, animal species at Lake May ReserveResidents are invited to join park rangers to count Lake Countys many varieties of plants and animal spe cies in celebration of International Day of Biodiversity, from 8:30 to 10:30 / a.m. on Thursday at Lake May Reserve, 36300 County Road 44A. Park rangers will hope to see the ve-lined skinks, raccoons, Eastern gray squirrels, Summer Tanagers and others at the event. For information, call 352-253-4950.MINNEOLA Harlem Wizards roll into Minneola for benefitAudience participation is part of the fun at this Harlem Wizards basketball game to take place at 7 / p.m. Thursday at Lake Minneola High School, 101 N. Hancock Rd. The Harlem Wizards will take on a team of Lake County educators for the benet event that will include food trucks on site at 5 / p.m. The event also features a silent auction with numerous big ticket items for purchase. Tickets are $10 and can be pur chased online at www.harlemwizards. com. Cost does not include a $5 parking fee at the school. Funds raised benet the schools athletic teams. For information, call 352-394-9600.BUSHNELL Florida National Cemetery to hold Memorial Day eventMajor General Michael T. Plehn, principal director for Middle East policy, is the keynote speaker at the annual Memorial Day Ceremony at the Florida National Cemetery on May 26. Organizations, veterans and the general public are welcome to take part in the event beginning at 11 / a.m., at 6502 S.W. 102nd Ave., that will host Steve Jerve of WFLATV as master of ceremonies. Those participating in the massing of colors should arrive at 9:30 / a.m. For information, call 352-793-7740.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comBoleros Cigar and Wine Bar kicked off its inaugural Suds, Stogies and Song writers event Sunday after noon outside the Tavares business where talented local musicians took to the stage to perform original songs for the crowd. Boleros owner Heather Graham relished seeing the audience grow as attendees were eagerly awaiting the arrival of the events special guest and Lake County native, Michael Ray, to perform for the hometown crowd. Originally from Eustis, Ray has been touring and working on his debut album after having recently signed with Warner Music Group in Nashville. Everybody seems to be having a really good time. Its a beautiful day, a great venue and everybody is happy, said Graham, pleased that 27 artists signed up to participate, including Mark Z, Jeff Whiteld, Alan Darcy, Rita Brooke, Mike Campbell, Bobby Croft, Rick Merrill, John French, Joe Ramirez, Paul Smithson, Dave Mer rill, Michael Hartman, Andy Dubois, Sol Varon, T. Scott Walker, Chris Ash, Rick Redeye, Kelly Jarrard, TAVARESBoleros hosts event for songwriters The Friends of Lake Louisa State Park held its an nual Nature Fest on the main beach of Lake Louisa near Cl ermont. The fami ly-friendly event is held to create aware ness about Floridas environment and ecosystems. There were discussions about birds, snakes and butteries, as well as walks, tram tours and an eques trian obstacle trail challenge.CLERMONTState park hosts annual Nature Fest PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Carol McCorkle shows off Spartacus, a male Peregrine Falcon. Both are from the Avian Reconditioning Center in Apopka. BELOW: Calla Tittering shows off her rainbow boa Coco. Staff ReportProject SOS recently made another round of motorized wheelchair do nations to three students at Lake Hills School. Lake Hills is very fortunate that they have graciously reached out beyond their traditional scope of services to assist our children, school Principal Robin Meyers said of Project SOS in a press release. Their generous dona tions have given our students a new found freedom of mobility and inde pendence. Located in Howey-in-the-Hills, Lake Hills School serves students with moderate to profound disabilities. Three students received wheelchairs last year. This years recipients were LaFabian Irvine, Jaymie Gleash and Sophie Joseph. The primary goal of Project SOS is to provide services to veterans and their families in times of need, the press release said. The charity foundation was established in 2009 by Gary Kadow and supports U.S. military serv ing overseas, disabled veterans and homeless veterans. Initially, Project SOS provid ed medical and surgical supplies to U.S. military personnel carrying out humanitarian missions in Iraq and Af ghanistan. This resulted in the opening of 22 medical clinics and one pediatric hospital to treat the children caught in wartime conditions, the press release said. All these facilities were operat ed by U.S. military medical battalions, and thousands of childrens lives were saved as a result of the troops efforts. During the past year, Project SOS shifted its effort from overseas be cause of troop withdrawals and now concentrates on the local area by pro viding motorized wheelchairs to dis abled veterans, and also providing clean water, food, clothing, shelter and medical care to our homeless vet erans in the Central Florida area. Project SOS has distributed 42 motor ized wheelchairs and numerous mobility devices to local veterans who have served in World War II, up to and in cluding those returning from Afghanistan. This is in addition to caring for our homeless veterans and families living in the Ocala National Forest.HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLSProject SOS donates wheelchairs to childrenSEE STOGIES | A4 Associated PressA Central Florida woman was joyously reunited with her daughter after near ly ve years after authori ties tracked the girl down in Mexico. The Volusia County Sheriffs Ofce said Jodie Borchert of Deltona was reunited with her 12-yearold daughter Saturday in Miami, where the girl was transported after being found in the mountainous region of Hidalgo, Mexico, about two hours outside Mexico City. The childs fa ther, Aaron Cox, ed with the girl in August 2009, po lice said. Cox, 55, was arrested and charged with inter ference with child custody. He is being held in Mi ami, awaiting extradition to Volusia County. Its not known whether he has obtained an attorney. It is such a huge re lief to bring this case to a successful conclusion, said Brandon Haught, a spokesman for the Volusia County Sheriffs Ofce. Reports are the girl is extremely happy to be reunited with her family. Authorities have pur sued the case since the girls disappearance, but said no viable leads had emerged until Monday, when a tip was received at the National Center For Missing and Exploit ed Children. Over the fol lowing ve days, the Volu sia County Sheriffs Ofce worked with U.S. Mar shals, the State Attorneys Ofce and the Florida/Ca ribbean Regional Fugitive Task Force. Cox was arrested without incident, authorities said. The man and his daughter had been living in Mexico under assumed names.Deltona woman reunited with daughter after nearly five years MARCIA DUNNAP Aerospace WriterCAPE CANAVERAL The com mercial cargo ship Dragon returned to Earth from the International Space Station on Sunday, bringing back nearly 2 tons of science experiments and old equipment for NASA. SpaceXs Dragon splashed into the Pacic, just ve hours after leaving the orbiting lab. After a one-month visit, the SpaceX cargo ship was set loose Sunday morning. Astronaut Steven Swanson, the station commander, released it using the big robot arm as the craft zoomed more than 260 miles above the South Pacic. Very nice to have a vehicle that can take your science, equipment and maybe someday even humans back to Earth, Swanson told Mission Control. The SpaceX Dragon is the only supply ship capable of returning items to Earth. The others burn up on re-entry. This was the fourth Dragon to bring back space station goods, with 3,500 pounds aboard; it came down off Mexicos Baja California coast. NASA is paying SpaceX and Vir ginia-based Orbital Sciences Corp. to make station deliveries. Orbit al is next up, next month. Russia, Europe and Japan also make occa sional shipments.Dragon returns from space station

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 OBITUARIESDonald Paul Jones, Sr.Donald Paul Jones, Sr, 86, of Oxford went to be with the Lord Saturday, May 17, 2014. Mr. Jones was born September 6, 1927 in Wildwood to the late William B. and Alma Gladys (Rogers) Jones. He has lived here all of his life farming, hunting and shing. As a member of Pleasant Grove Missionary Baptist Church, he was a Deacon and taught Sunday school for over 45 years. He loved spending time with his family, espe cially his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Survivors include his loving wife of almost 65 years, Wil ma Dean; 3 daughters, Debra Wade of Wildwood, Tina (Tim) Shel ton of Bay City, TX and Donna Kinney of Oxford; son, Don P. (Con nie) Jones, Jr. of Oxford; sister, Clara Nell Shirey of CA.; 9 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchil dren. Visitation for Mr. Jones will be held 5:00 8:00pm, Wednesday, May 21, 2014 in the Banks/Page-Theus Funeral Home, Wildwood. The funeral service will be 2:00pm, Thursday, May 22, 2014 at Pleasant Grove Missionary Baptist Church, Oxford with interment follow ing the service in Nichols Cemetery. On-line condolences may be shared by visiting www. bankspagetheus.com. If so desired, contributions may be made to Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, Oxford or Cor nerstone Hospice, Villages. Arrangements are entrusted to Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.DEATH NOTICESDonald Paul Jones Sr.Donald Paul Jones, Sr., 86, of Oxford, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Edward TemplinEdward Templin, 73, of Webster, died on Sat urday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.IN MEMORY JONES Mark Cleveland, Travis Gilrane and Aman da Cooksey. Graham said Boleros wants to make Suds, Stogies and Songwrit ers an annual event. There has been good feedback about seeing all the artists do only original works. A lot of these artists per form here on a regular basis throughout Lake County, but they all do covers, because that is what the audience usually wants to hear, she said of the singers performing popular songs recorded by oth er artists. It was really a cool idea to put them together to just do orig inal works, said Graham, noting Suds, Stogies and Songwrit ers was the brainchild of her boyfriend, Mark Zinkiewicz, a local muisican, who books musicians for bars and restaurants at Als Cor ner in Tavares. He knows a lot of musicians, and he knows that a lot of them have great original stuff, she said. Graham has owned Boleros Cigar and Wine Bar since June 2013, and the event allowed her to showcase a variety of craft beers and wine for at tendees to sample in a taste-testing hosted by national craft beer company, Sierra Nevada. Ceijas Ernesto, a pro fessional cigar roller, and Dayana Alleg ues, both from Tampa, also were at the event demonstrating the cigar-making craft for at tendees inside Boleros. It takes about three minutes, Ernesto said of the amount of time he spends rolling one cigar before it is placed in a press for one hour. The cigars are very popular, Graham said, marveling over Ernestos talent in cre ating each one. Hes doing a handrolled demonstration and its an awesome part of [the event]. STOGIES FROM PAGE A3 CHRIS ANDERSONSarasota Herald-TribuneCORTEZ A few times a week 88-yearold Mary Green hops in her 2005 Honda and drives three blocks to the post ofce. She has to. There is no mail de livery to her home. In fact, no one in the historic shing village of Cortez population of roughly 4,000 re ceives home mail deliv ery or has a mail box. We like it that way, Green said. United States Post Of ce, Cortez, Florida, 34215, is usually a busy place most mornings. Residents walk or take their cars or ride their golf carts to pick up their mail. The mail is kept locked up in one of 1,318 small post ofce boxes residents can ac cess with a key. Until the mid-1990s, the mailboxes had combination locks on them. It is not unusual for small towns in Flori da not to receive home mail delivery, but it is not commonplace either. Residents say they like it this way for sev eral reasons: it is a way to meet socially, get ex ercise, check the neighborhood message board on the side the building and retain part of the villages rich history. They also dont want home mailboxes for safety reasons. Ive heard lots of stories and seen people lose checks in mailboxes, resident Richard Culbreath said. When you raise that red ag, thats a telltale sign and people will come in. Weve never had any mailboxes. Whenever there is any talk about bringing them in we al ways say we dont want them. Culbreath is 80 and walks about a mile most days to the post ofce on Cortez Road. The post ofce is in a small strip mall next to a barbershop, restaurant and laundry. Some resi dents, like former Post master Wyman Coarsey, walk up for coffee at the restaurant and then check their mail. Sometimes I see peo ple here I wouldnt see otherwise, so its kind of a social thing, resident Atlas Kight said. She moved to Cortez in 1961 and believes the current post ofce has been at its present site since 1960. She worked at the Cortez post ofce for many years, retiring in 1989. Green who, at 88, is the oldest woman living in Cortez who was born there is well-known for her historical knowl edge of the village. The original post ofce was built in 1895 and was part of what was called Bratton Store. That building has been preserved in the village. Green said a man named Henry Foreman used to carry mail back and forth between Cor tez and Bradenton on a one-seat horse buggy. Green said the post ofce moved to a sh ing dock, but was de stroyed by a erce hur ricane in 1921. It then was moved to a grocery store owned by her uncle, Thomas Fulford, until it was given to an 18-year-old wom an named Elizabeth Guthrie, who became the postmaster. I think it was re markable, Green said. She was probably the youngest postmaster in Florida, and she was a woman. Her parents, Bessie and Joe, ran the post of ce. They also owned the Albion Inn, which is In tiny Cortez, no mail delivery is no problemwhere the post ofce was. It also moved to a house across the street from the hotel for a time before it landed at its current location. Green remembers attending Flor ida State College for Women in the 1940s and sometimes re ceiving several letters a day from back home. Her friends thought she had a lot of boys trying to date her. Everyone thought I was some hot chick, she said. The letters were re ally from a boy in Cor tez who had a crush on her but she never dated. He kept writ ing her anyway. On Friday she was planning on driving her Honda to the post ofce to drop off a birthday card for her 10-year-old great-grandson. The Cortez post of ce has long been part of her history as well as the shing villages history. And we like to keep our histo ry alive, she said.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza) 352-308-8318 THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 freshman year, but had to make a difcult choice to quit band in order to do FFA. So, it was kind of a tough decision, but I think it was one of the best decisions, she said. Wilson said she wants to become an agricul ture teacher, because she loves helping students and other FFA members. She is cur rently thinking about joining the Navy before going to college. Shes also stepped up in a big way this year and last year, as a ju nior, with helping teach the younger students, This is how you groom your steer. This is how you should be feeding and nishing out your hog. This is the stuff you need to gather for fair, Holland said. Wilson said she was soft-spoken and shy as a freshman, and FFA helped her become better at public speaking. This year Im loud and proud. Ill get up in front of a hundred people and talk to them. I love talking in front of people now, its one of my favorite things to do, Wilson said. Wilson was the FFA parliamentarian her sophomore year, start ed as vice president her junior year before becoming president during that year and was the president for her senior year. Holland said this is her rst graduating class as she has been teaching for four years, and it has been rewarding to see Wilson blos som over the four years they have known each other. Ive seen Krista grow tremendously, in not only being more com fortable speaking with people, from her fresh man year to her now se nior year, but also being more willing to take on those initiatives, Holland said. In addition to the tractor competition this year, Wilson also had numerous ani mals in the Lake County Fair and won multiple awards. She has shown animals and won awards each year. Raising livestock, thats like one of my fa vorite things to do, and I love showing. Its one of my big drives that I love, Wilson said. I always look forward to April when the county fair is in town. She added it was somewhat hard balancing taking care of her animals with the prepa ration for the tractor competition. Holland said Wilson has been a big exhibitor at the fair all four years. Shes always come to me and said, I want to show this, I want to show this. I didnt have to go and push her to do anything, it was her drive, her initiative, Holland said. WILSON FROM PAGE A1 IF YOU GOTAVARES HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION WHEN: 8 / p.m., May 30. WHERE: Tavares High School Football Field NUMBER OF GRADUATES: 258 SPEAKER: Senior Class President Alexis Clark NOTE: Tickets are required for entry. MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON The U.S. government is stepping up efforts to help Central American farmers ght a devastating coffee disease and hold down the price of your morning cup. At issue is a fungus called coffee rust that has caused more than $1 billion in damage across Latin American region. The fungus is es pecially deadly to Arabi ca coffee, the bean that makes up most highend, specialty coffees. Already, it is affecting the price of some of those coffees in the United States. We are concerned because we know coffee rust is already causing massive amounts of devastation, said Raj Shah, head of the U.S. Agency for Internation al Development. On Monday, he was expected to announce a $5 million partnership with Texas A&M Univer sitys World Coffee Research center to try to eliminate the fungus. But the government isnt doing this just to protect our $4 specialty coffees, as much as Americans love them. The chief concern is about the economic se curity of these small farms abroad. If farm ers lose their jobs, it increases hunger and poverty in the region and contributes to violence and drug trafcking. Washington estimates that production could be down anywhere from 15 percent to 40 percent in coming years, and that those losses could mean as many as 500,000 people could lose their jobs. Though some countries have brought the fungus under control, many of the poorer coffee-pro ducing countries in Latin America dont see the rust problem getting better anytime soon. Guatemala, El Salva dor, Honduras, Panama and Costa Rica have all been hard hit. Much of the blander, mass-produced cof fee in this country comes from Asia and other regions. Most of the rich er, more expensive coffees are from small, high altitude farms in Central America. Because the farms are smaller, farm ers there often dont have enough money to buy the fungicides needed or lack the training to plant in ways that could avoid contamination. The rust, called roya in Spanish, is a fungus that is highly con tagious due to airborne fungal spores. It affects different varieties, but the Arabica beans are especially susceptible. Rainy weather worsens the problem. We dont see an end in sight anytime soon, said Leonardo Lom bardini of Texas A&Ms World Coffee Research. So far, major U.S. coffee companies have been able to nd enough supply to avoid price in creases. But some small er outts already have seen higher prices, said Ric Rhinehart of the Specialty Coffee Associ ation of America. Rhinehart said the worst-case scenario is that consumers even tually will pay extraor dinarily high prices for those coffees, if you can nd them at all. He said some very specialized varieties from a single origin Guatemalan antigua coffees, for example have been much harder to source. If the problem continues, he says, some small cof fee companies either will raise prices or use blends that are easier to nd, decreasing the quality of the coffee. Larger companies such as Starbucks and Keurig Green Mountain Inc. have multiple sup pliers across the region and say they have so far been able to source enough coffee. Its a little bit too soon to tell what the impact will be on supply and long term quality over time, said Lindsey Bolger, who heads up cof fee sourcing for Keurig Green Mountain.Coffee fungus raising prices for high-end blends AP FILE PHOTO In this Feb. 9, 2013 photo, small coffee producer Hector Perez show coffee beans damaged by the roya fungus in San Gaspar Vivar, Guatemala.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 SABINA NIKSIC and JOVANA GECAssociated PressBRCKO, Bosnia-Her zegovina Floodwa ters triggered more than 2,000 landslides across much of the Balkans on Sunday, laying waste to entire towns and villag es and disturbing land mines left over from the regions 1990s war, along with warning signs that marked the unexploded devices. The Balkans worst ooding since record keeping began forced tens of thou sands of people from their homes and threat ened to inundate Ser bias main power plant, which supplies elec tricity to a third of the country and most of the capital, Belgrade. Authorities organized a frenzied helicopter airlift to get terried families to safety before the water swallowed up their homes. Many were plucked from rooftops. Floodwaters receded Sunday in some locations, laying bare the full scale of the damage. Elsewhere, authorities warned that the water would keep rising into Sunday night. The situation is catastrophic, said Bosnias refugee minister, Adil Osmanovic. Three months worth of rain fell on the region in three days, producing the worst oods since rainfall measurements began 120 years ago. At least two dozen people have died, with more ca sualties expected. The rain caused an estimated 2,100 land slides that covered roads, homes and whole villages throughout hilly Bosnia. The cities of Orasje and Brcko in northeast Bosnia, where the Sava River forms the natural border with Croatia, were in danger of being overwhelmed. Ofcials in Brcko ordered six vil lages to be evacuated. Rescuers urged people to go to the balconies or rooftops of their houses with bright fab ric to make themselves visible. Brcko Mayor Anto Domic said that unless the Bosnian Army is able to reinforce from the air, the city will be ooded completely. He called for the Defense Ministry to use helicop ters to lower steel barri ers that could be backed by sandbags to contain the water. It is a very demanding task, he said, acknowledging that of cials would have no other way to protect the port city of more than 70,000. Civil protection commander Fahrudin So lak said the Sava Riv er was spilling over another portion of the ood barrier in Orasje while emergency work ers tried desperately to reinforce it with sandbags. In Serbia, where oods have inundated towns and villages, au thorities braced for high water that could last for several more days. Serbian Prime Min ister Aleksandar Vucic said Sunday that 12 bodies have been found so far in Obrenovac, site of the coal-red Nikola Tesla power plant, Ser bias biggest. Parts of the plant and a nearby mine that pro vides its fuel were un derwater. Serbias state power company, EPS, said crews were doing all they could to prevent any further damage to the plant. Damage to the mine alone is estimated at more than 100 million euros ($137 million). Serbias energy minister, Aleksandar Antic, appealed to people to conserve power, calling the threat to the plant very serious. The oods and landslides raised fears about the estimated 1 million land mines planted during Bosnias 1992-95 war. Nearly 120,000 of the unexploded devic es remain in more than 9,400 carefully marked mineelds. But the weather toppled warning signs and, in many cases, dislodged the mines themselves. Beyond the danger to Bosnians, any loose mines could also create an international prob lem if oodwaters car ry the explosives down stream. Experts warned that mines could trav el through half of south east Europe or get stuck in the turbines of a hy droelectric dam. From the air, the northeastern third of Bosnia resembled a huge muddy lake, with houses, roads and rail lines submerged. Ofcials say about a million people more than a quarter of the countrys population live in the worst-affected areas. The hillside village of Horozovina, close to the northeastern town of Tuzla, was practical ly split in two by a land slide that swallowed eight houses. More than 100 other houses were under threat from the restless earth. Residents told stories of narrow escapes from injury or death. I am homeless. I have nothing left, not even a toothpick, Me san Ikanovic said. I ran out of the house bare foot, carrying children in my arms. Ikanovic said 10 min utes separated him and his family from like ly death. He carried his 7-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son to safety. He said he had secured a mortgage and moved in only last year. Now I have nothing, he said. Where will I go now? Where will we live? Semid Ivilics house in the lower part of the village was still standing. But looking up at the mass of earth and rubble that engulfed his neighbors homes, he said he was worried. Nobody is coming to help us, he said. The nal person to evacuate a village near Brcko said he had lost everything he valued. I was the last one to leave, said 72-year-old Anto Zuparic. I left ev erything behind, my cat tle and everything else. I do not know what to do. I am glad I wont live much longer anyway.Bosnia flooding triggers landslides, unearths mines DARKO VOJINOVIC / AP A man walks in front of a his ooded home in the village of Veliki Crljeni, some 18 miles south of Belgrade, Serbia, on Sunday.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I s Jill Abramson, the rst fe male executive editor of the New York Times who was un ceremoniously dumped from her job Wednesday, the profes sional-class equivalent of equal pay heroine Lilly Ledbetter? Much is still unknown about the circumstances leading up to Abramsons termination by New York Times Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. But at least two well-sourced media reporters, Ken Auletta of the New Yorker, and David Folkenik of NPR, conrmed that Abramson, 60, who was less than three years into the top Times job, was red after she discovered she earned less in pay and benets than her predecessor, Bill Keller, and asked the newspaper to make it right. There is obviously more to the story, but if that part is true, the comparison to Ledbetter is apt. Ledbetter, a retired Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. supervisor, discovered that for years she was paid substantially less than her 15 male counterparts. She sued, and lost because she did not bring the lawsuit in a timely manner. (How could she? She didnt know she was being underpaid.) Thanks to her, Congress passed the Lilly Ledbetter Act, which restarts the 180-day statute of limitations clock each time a discriminatory paycheck is issued. It was the rst bill President Barack Obama signed in ofce. Many reports say Abramson had other problems, including a conicted relationship with the publisher and Times CEO Mark Thompson. On her watch, the Times aggressively reported on Thompsons role at the BBC when it was involved in a controversy over a sex scandal investigation. She has also been described as brusque and even, yes, pushy. The Guardian reported that Abramson tried to hire its U.S. editor-in-chief, Janine Gibson, to be co-managing editor with Dean Baquet, 57, the former Los Angeles Times editor who succeeds Abramson now in the top Times job. Though Gibson turned down the offer, the Times own story said Baquet was unhappy about Abramsons effort to hire her. Abramsons dismissal was so abrupt, and Sulzberger was so terse about why he red her (citing only an issue with management in the newsroom), that its only natural for people to wonder what really happened. The headline over Rebecca Traisters New Republic column reected the feelings of many women: I sort of hope we nd out that Jill Abramson was Robbing the Cash Register. Abramsons ring, wrote Traister, was among the most harsh and humiliating Ive ever seen play out in the medias recent history. Within minutes of the editorial meeting at which the turnover was announced, Abramsons name had been scrubbed from the masthead of the paper shes run for the past two and a half years. When disgraced New York Times Executive Editor Howell Raines left the paper in 2003 after presiding over the Jayson Blair scandal, Traister noted, he went out with a big newsroom sendoff: In the papers report about the departures of Raines and his dep uty Gerald Boyd, she wrote, Sulzberger was quoted as wanting to applaud Howell and Gerald for putting the interests of this news paper above their own. When Baquet was canned in 2006 by Los Angeles Times Pub lisher David Hiller after public ly pushing back against proposed newsroom cuts, he stood on a desk in the newsroom for his farewell speech and was treated like a hero. Like many with a deep interest in the newspaper business and its female leaders, I eagerly anticipate an investigation into Abramsons ring by Margaret Sullivan, the Times independent and consistently excellent public editor. Ironically, Sullivans most recent column is about a new study that nds a continuing gender imbalance in the newspaper industry, and among New York Times reporters in particular. (Of the 10 largest American newspapers, the study found, the New York Times has the biggest newsroom gender gap; 69 percent of its bylines are male. Here at the Los Angeles Times, the study says, men account for 64 percent of the bylines.) The public editor must explain why, exactly, Abramson was red, and why she was treated so disrespectfully. Sullivan noted in her column that shed recently taken part in a panel discussion at an inter national journalism symposium called Where are the Women? Sitting there, she wrote, discussing the paucity of women in journalism leadership globally I had the surreal feeling: Are we really still talking about this?Robin Abcarian is a columnist for the Los Angeles Times.OTHERVOICES Robin AbcarianMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Is fired N.Y. Times editor Jill Abramson the new Lilly Ledbetter? Judges on Europes highest court may have thought they were striking a blow for in dividual privacy when they ruled Tuesday that search engines could be ordered to stop linking to sensitive or older information about people online, even if it had been lawfully published. Instead, they were creating an en titlement to censor history, or at least to make parts of the public record harder to nd. The case began when a Spanish lawyer, Mario Costeja Gonzalez, did a Google search on his own name and found links to embarrassing legal notices that a Barcelona newspaper had published in 1998 announcing a real estate auction to pay his social security debts. After Spains data protection agency ruled that the newspaper could leave the pages online but Google couldnt link to them, Google appealed to the European Court of Justice. Its ruling, which is not subject to appeal, held that individual privacy rights override, as a general rule, the publics interest in data, particularly if the presentation is inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive. It doesnt matter where the search engine does its data-crunching so long as it has an establishment within the European Union. As a result, the ruling sets the stage for people to conceal legally published information from the entire world. One of the many aws in the ruling is that it unfairly focuses on Google and other search engines, which arent the real problem here. Theyre not repositories for the data that people might want to remove; they are just remarkably efcient tools for nding things online. And whether a piece of information is relevant or valuable is in the eyes of the beholder. One of the beauties of the Internet, after all, is the extent to which it gives anyone with a browser access to troves of knowledge that had previously been locked in government ofces, publishers morgues and other storage vaults of the analog era. Costeja Gonzalez may not want the 1998 dispute included in his online biography, but it may very well be signicant to people researching debtors auctions during that period. And if Google stops indexing those legal notices, the links would be lost to every researcher. Its one thing to make sure people can protect their privacy by forcing sites to remove sensitive per sonal information, or to provide Internet users a way to erase material they themselves have posted. And policymakers can debate whether information collected by the government should have an online expiration date. But the Court of Justices ruling would create an over ly broad right for individuals to airbrush the historical record, and that just invites abuse by people who have something to hide.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEEuropes highest court strikes a blow for censoring history Classic DOONESBURY 1974Ledbetter, a retired Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. supervisor, discovered that for years she was paid substantially less than her 15 male counterparts.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014www.dailycommercial.comMLB: Angels pound Rays 6-2 / B4 BETH HARRISAP Racing WriterBALTIMORE Califor nia Chrome might abandon his Triple Crown bid if New York ofcials do not allow the colt to wear a na sal strip in the Belmont Stakes. Trainer Art Sherman made no threats about the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner passing on a chance to become horse racings 12th Triple Crown winner, but he suggested it was a possibility. Id have to leave it up to the owners, he said Sun day. I know theyll be up set. Neither the New York State Gaming Commission nor the New York Racing Association stewards has received a request to use nasal strips in the Belmont on June 7. If a request to use nasal strips is made, the decision on whether to permit them or not will be fully evaluat ed and determined by the stewards, Gaming Commission spokesman Lee Park said Sunday. Among the Gaming Commissions rules gov erning Belmont Park is one that states: Only equip ment specically approved by the stewards shall be worn or carried by a jockey or a horse in a race. In a post on its Twitter feed, NYRA said: We op erate under the rules set forth by @NYSGamingCommission. Will California Chrome abandon Triple Crown bid? AP PHOTOCo-owner Steven Coburn kisses California Chrome after winning the Preakness Stakes.Its a possibility if N.Y. ofcials dont allow colt to wear nasal stripSEE CHROME | B2 MICHAEL MAROTAssociated PressINDIANAPOLIS When Ed Carpenter, Carlos Munoz and He lio Castroneves were pushed to the edge Sat urday, each remained calm and came up with their best-qualify ing runs of the day. Now they have to do it again one more time Sunday. The American, Colombian and Brazilian who have celebrated some of their biggest career moments at Indianapolis each made daring runs over the nal 80 minutes Sat urday to take the top three seeds heading into Sundays India napolis 500 shootout. Carpenter nished rst Carpenter grabs Indy 500 pole for second straight year MICHAEL CONROY / AP Ed Carpenter displays the P1 award ag after winning the pole for the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday in Indianapolis. JAY COHENAssociated PressCHICAGO Corey Crawford made 25 saves, Jonathan Toews had a big goal in the third pe riod and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the Los Angeles Kings 3-1 in Game 1 of the Western Conference nal Sunday. Brandon Saad added a goal and an assist for defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago, which remained perfect in seven home playoff games this year. Duncan Keith had a tiebreak ing score in the third period. Playing just two days after a Game 7 victory PHOTOS BY TONY GUTIERREZ / APBrendon Todd poses with the trophy and Peggy Nelson, right, widow of tournament namesake Byron Nelson after Todd won the Byron Nelson Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Irving, Texas. Todd outlasts Weir to win Byron Nelson Championship STEPHEN HAWKINSAP Sports WriterIRVING, Texas Brendon Todd won the Byron Nelson Championship on Sunday for his rst PGA Tour title, closing with a bogey-free 4-under 66 for a two-stroke victory over Mike Weir. It was the 77th career PGA Tour event for Todd. He earned $1,242,000, a two-year PGA Tour exemption and a spot next year in the Masters. Todd nished at 14-under 266. He took the lead for good with birdies at Nos. 9 and 10, and went on to become the eighth rst-time winner this season. Weir, the 2003 Masters champion who won the last of his eight PGA Tour titles in 2007, nished with a 67. Charles Howell III and Marc Leishman tied for third at 10 under. After Todd hit his tee shot at the 195-yard second into a green side bunker, his shot from the sand landed on the green and rolled in for a birdie. When he knocked in a 14-foot birdie putt at the 181yard fth, he tied Weir who made a bogey on No. 6 for the lead at 12 under. Todd took the lead for good with consecutive birdies midway through his round, a 6-footer at No. 9 and a 24-footer at No. 10. Weir had his best tournament since n ishing second behind Dustin Johnson at Pebble Beach in 2009. The Canadian left-hander hadnt had a top-25 nish since 2010, the same year he suffered a partial ligament tear in his right elbow be fore a stretch when he missed 17 cuts in a row including all 14 tour naments he started in 2012. Howell shot a 67 with a three-putt bogey on the nal hole, while Leishman had three bogeys in a ve-hole stretch on the back nine Mike Weir hits off the rst tee during the nal round of the tournament. Weir nished second by a single stroke. DARRON CUMMINGS / APIndiana Pacers Roy Hibbert (55) and Paul George celebrate during the second half of Game 1 on Sunday in Indianapolis. MICHAEL MAROTAssociated PressINDIANAPOLIS Paul George scored 24 points, David West had 19, and the Indiana Pacers protect ed their home court with a 107-96 victory over the Miami Heat on Sunday to take a 1-0 lead in the East ern Conference nals. Indiana led wire-to-wire and never even gave the Heat a chance to tie the score after starting the game with a 5-0 lead. Game 2 is Tuesday in In diana. The home team has won all ve meetings this season. Dwyane Wade scored 27 points and LeBron James had 25 for the two-time defending NBA champions, who lost for only the second time in 10 playoff games. Indiana had a 30-point rst quarter for the rst time since Feb. 27, extend ed the lead to 19 in the third and Miami couldnt get closer than nine the rest of the way. For months, people wondered what happened to the Indiana team that dominated the rst half of the NBA season. On Sunday, those Pacers SEE GOLF | B2SEE INDY | B2Corey Crawford leads Blackhawks past Kings 3-1 for Game 1 victorySEE HOCKEY | B2George, West help Pacers outgun Heat for 1-0 series leadSEE HEAT | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Indianapolis 500 LineupAfter Sunday qualifying; race Sunday, May 25 At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis Lap length: 2.5 miles All cars Dallara chassis 1. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevy, 2:35.7992, 231.067 mph. 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 2:35.9528, 230.839. 3. (12) Will Power, Chevy, 2:36.0488, 230.697. 4. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevy, 2:36.0812, 230.649. 5. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 2:36.1049, 230.614. 6. (25) Marco Andretti, Honda, 2:36.1526, 230.544. 7. (34) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 2:36.4224, 230.146. 8. (67) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 2:36.5946, 229.893. 9. (21) JR Hildebrand, Chevy, 2:37.3938, 228.726. 10. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 2:35.8396, 231.007. 11. (9) Scott Dixon, Chevy, 2:35.8930, 230.928. 12. (26) Kurt Busch, Honda, 2:35.9913, 230.782. 13. (98) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 2:36.1779, 230.506. 14. (19) Justin Wilson, Honda, 2:36.3480, 230.256. 15. (7) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 2:36.4881, 230.049. 16. (10) Tony Kanaan, Chevy, 2:36.5750, 229.922. 17. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevy, 2:36.6259, 229.847. 18. (16) Oriol Servia, Honda, 2:36.6905, 229.752. 19. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 2:36.7132, 229.719. 20. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 2:36.7756, 229.628. 21. (18) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 2:37.0328, 229.251. 22. (63) Pippa Mann, Honda, 2:37.0521, 229.223. 23. (14) Takuma Sato, Honda, 2:37.0671, 229.201. 24. (68) Alex Tagliani, Honda, 2:37.1038, 229.148. 25. (6) Townsend Bell, Chevy, 2:37.1990, 229.009. 26. (83) Charlie Kimball, Chevy, 2:37.2376, 228.953. 27. (5) Jacques Villeneuve, Honda, 2:37.2400, 228.949. 28. (33) James Davison, Chevy, 2:37.2977, 228.865. 29. (41) Martin Plowman, Honda, 2:37.3333, 228.814. 30. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Chevy, 2:37.4028, 228.713. 31. (22) Sage Karam, Chevy, 2:37.5931, 228.436. 32. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevy, 2:37.8335, 228.088. 33. (91) Buddy Lazier, Chevy, 2:37.9501, 227.920.NASCAR Sprint Cup-NASCAR Sprint AllStar Race ResultsSaturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 90 laps, 120.3 rating, 0 points. 2. (3) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 90, 123.9, 0. 3. (8) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 90, 88.3, 0. 4. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 90, 92.4, 0. 5. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 90, 99.1, 0. 6. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 90, 85.1, 0. 7. (9) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 90, 67.8, 0. 8. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 90, 71.6, 0. 9. (22) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 90, 54.1, 0. 10. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 90, 73.3, 0. 11. (18) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 90, 57.8, 0. 12. (15) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 90, 41, 0. 13. (20) David Ragan, Ford, 90, 36.4, 0. 14. (7) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 90, 95.3, 0. 15. (19) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 90, 32.4, 0. 16. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, accident, 77, 44, 0. 17. (4) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 60, 87.1, 0. 18. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 60, 37.6, 0. 19. (14) Greg Bife, Ford, accident, 60, 36.4, 0. 20. (17) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, accident, 30, 41.5, 0. 21. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 25, 90.6, 0. 22. (10) Joey Logano, Ford, accident, 25, 50.7, 0.NBA Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Brooklyn 1 Tuesday, May 6: Miami 107, Brooklyn 86 Thursday, May 8: Miami 94, Brooklyn 82 Saturday, May 10: Brooklyn 104, Miami 90 Monday, May 12: Miami 102, Brooklyn 96 Wednesday, May 14: Miami 96, Brooklyn 94 Indiana 4, Washington 2 Monday, May 5: Washington 102, Indiana 96 Wednesday, May 7: Indiana 86, Washington 82 Friday, May 9: Indiana 85, Washington 63 Sunday, May 11: Indiana 95, Washington 92 Tuesday, May 13: Washington 102, Indiana 79 Thursday, May 15: Indiana 93, Washington 80 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Portland 1 Tuesday, May 6: San Antonio 116, Portland 92 Thursday, May 8: San Antonio 114, Portland 97 Saturday, May 10: San Antonio 118, Portland 103 Monday, May 12: Portland 103, San Antonio 92 Wednesday, May 14: San Antonio 104, Portland 82 Oklahoma City 4, L.A. Clippers 2 Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 7: Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clip pers 101 Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112 Sunday, May 11: L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99 Tuesday, May 13: Oklahoma City 105, L.A. Clippers 104 Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City 104, L.A. Clip pers 98 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 1, Miami 0 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 24: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 28: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City vs. San Antonio Monday, May 19: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 21: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Sunday, May 25: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 27: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Anto nio, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 2: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Open de Espana Leading Scores Sunday At PGA Catalunya Resort (Stadium Course) Girona, Spain Purse: $2.06 million Yardage: 7,333; Par: 72 Final Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 69-73-69-73 284 Richard Green, Australia 74-69-69-72 284 Thomas Pieters, Belgium 69-69-71-75 284 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-69-74-72 285 Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 75-69-69-73 286 Richie Ramsay, Scotland 69-72-71-74 286 Felipe Aguilar, Chile 74-70-69-74 287 Alejandro Canizares, Spain 72-76-69-70 287 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 77-66-73-71 287 Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland 73-70-73-71 287 Chris Wood, England 73-70-69-75 287 Richard Bland, England 73-68-72-75 288 Daan Huizing, Netherlands 71-76-71-70 288 Alvaro Velasco, Spain 75-73-68-72 288 Also Paul Lawrie 70-72-74-73 Francesco Molinari 73-67-75-75 Matteo Manassero, Italy 74-71-74-72 Brinson Paolini, United States 73-75-73-70 Sergio Garcia, Spain 69-74-73-76 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castan 73-75-71-74 NHL Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT SECOND ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 4, Boston 3 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Montreal 4, Boston 2 Thursday, May 8: Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT Saturday, May 10: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Monday, May 12: Montreal 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 14: Montreal 3, Boston 1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 3 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Sunday, May 11: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 1 Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers 2, Pittsburgh 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Minnesota 2 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Minnesota 4, Chicago 0 Friday, May 9: Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Sunday, May 11: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 13: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 3 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1 Thursday, May 8: Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, May 10: Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0 Monday, May 12: Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 3 Wednesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 1 Friday, May 16: Los Angeles 6, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 1, Montreal 0 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 22: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 25: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 27: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 1, Los Angeles 0 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Saturday, May 24: Chicago at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Monday, May 26: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 28: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Internazionali BNL dItalia Results Sunday At Foro Italico Rome Purse: Men, $4.77 million (Masters 1000); Women, $3.63 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Women Championship Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Sara Errani (10), Italy, 6-3, 6-0. Doubles Men Championship Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (6), Ser bia, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, and Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Women Championship Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (4), Slovenia, def. Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (2), Italy, 4-0, retired. ATP World Tour Open de Nice Cote dAzur ResultsSunday At The Nice Lawn Tennis Club Nice, France Purse: $665,000 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles First Round Federico Delbonis (7), Argentina, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-3. Edouard Roger-Vasselin (8), France, def. Alejandro Gonzalez, Colombia, 6-3, 6-1. Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-2. Martin Emmrich and Christopher Kas, Germany, vs. Nicholas Monroe, United States, and Simon Stadler, Germany, 2-6, 6-4, 10-7. States, 6-0, 6-1.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Detroit at ClevelandNBA 9 p.m.TNT Playoffs, conference nals, Game 1, Oklahoma City at San AntonioNHL 8 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference nals, Game 2, NY Rangers at MontrealCalifornia Chrome has worn a nasal strip during his current sixrace winning streak af ter co-owner Perry Mar tin wanted to try it. Sherman is based in California and said he wasnt aware that using one in New York might be a problem. He said he would talk to New York racing ofcials and the horses owners. Some horses, like humans, wear nasal strips to assist breathing. The colt wears the strip only during races, not train ing. At 1 miles, the Belmont is the longest and most grueling of the three Triple Crown races. I think it opens up his air passage and gives him that little extra oomph that he needs, especially going a mile and a half, Sherman said. Anytime you can have a good air passage, that means a lot for these thoroughbreds. Sherman said Mar tin likes to try differ ent products and the co-owner thought a nasal strip might benet California Chrome. This guy, Perry Mar tin, he might not run if they say you cant run with a nasal strip. Hes very funny about things like that, the trainer said. I dont know why they would ban you from wearing one. Well have to cross that bridge when we get there. Other states allow na sal strips while racing, and even some jockeys wear them. Its something nonmedical that can be benecial to a workout or a race, Califor nia-based trainer Doug ONeill said by phone. If you think your horse could use some help with their nostrils, you do it. CHROME FROM PAGE B1 for a closing 68. Todd is the fth for mer University of Geor gia player to win on the PGA Tour this sea son. He joined Mas ters champion Bubba Watson, Harris English, Russell Henley and Chris Kirk. An errant tee shot at the 185-yard 13th that settled at the base of a tree, forcing the slender 6-foot-3 Todd to set up left-handed which would have been natural for the 44-yearold Weir and strike the ball with the back of his bladed club. The ball popped up slightly and rolled to 7 feet of the cup, and Todd saved par. Todd played his last 31 holes at TPC Four Seasons without a bogey. Weir had birdies on four of the rst ve holes. He was 13 un der and ahead of Todd by two strokes when his tee shot at No. 5 settled 1 feet from the cup. That came after Weir blindly hit out of a fair way bunker to 3 feet at No. 4. But Weir missed the fairway and green for a bogey at the 431-yard sixth hole at the same time Todd was tapping in at the fth. Boo Weekley (68) was 9 under to tie for fth with James Hahn (70). Weekley is the defend ing champion at Colonial, about 30 miles away and the next tour nament. Louis Oosthuizen, the 2010 British Open in the nal group with Todd, had already slipped four strokes back at the turn before bogeys at Nos. 10-11. The 2010 British Open champion shot 74, 10 strokes worse than Saturday, to tie for 11th at 6 under. Martin Kaymer won The Players Champion ship last weekend and opened at the Nelson with consecutive 67s. But he shot 71 Saturday before a bogey-bird ie-bogey start Sunday on way to a 72 and tied for 29th at 3 under. That was a stroke bet ter than Jimmy Walker, who will remain No. 1 in the FedEx Cup stand ings. Jordan Spieth, the 20-year-old Dallas na tive ranked eighth in the world, had a closing 68 to nish 2-under and tied for 37th at the tour nament where he made the cut as an amateur at ages 16 and 17. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 with a four-lap qualify ing average of 230.661 mph. Munoz was sec ond at 230.460. I wasnt sure we were going to go 230 in our rst run, so I was relieved when we did, Carpenter said. But to be honest, I didnt think going into qualifying I was going to ex ceed 230. Others drivers thought Carpenter would, and it only took one practice lap and one qualifying lap to assuage any doubts. Carpenter, the fth car on the track, aver aged 230.114 then sat around all day as other drivers tried to knock him off the top rung. Nobody caught him until a rain delay ended at 4:18 / p .m. Then in a urry of speed, An dretti Autosport driv er James Hinchcliffe knocked Carpenter off the pole, Munoz knocked Hinchcliffe, his teammate, off the pole, and Carpenter retook the pole. He n ished the day waiting 65 minutes to see if it would stand. Normally, the reward for surviving such ten sion would be cele brating a pole win. Instead, under the new qualifying format, all Saturday did was assure Carpenter and the other eight top cars of a top-nine starting spot on Indys traditional 33-car starting grid. Each of the top nine will have one qualifying run Sunday with the fastest claim ing the coveted No. 1 starting spot for the May 25 race. INDY FROM PAGE B1 over Anaheim, the Kings got a second-pe riod score from Ty ler Toffoli and outshot the Blackhawks 26-20 in the opener of a re match from last years Western Conference nal. But Crawford made a couple of solid stops in another terrific performance. Game 2 of the bestof-seven series is Wednesday night. With the Blackhawks clinging to a 2-1 lead in the third, Toews got loose on a 3-on-1 break and onetimed Johnny Oduyas pass right by Jonathan Quick for his sixth playoff goal at 16:10. Quick made 17 saves after he played a key role in Los Angeles rally from a 3-2 decit in the series against the Ducks. The Kings also battled back from a 3-0 decit against San Jose in the rst round. Toews 26th career playoff goal came after he had one waved off in a confusing stretch in the second period. It looked as if Chi cago had a 2-0 lead when Toews rush to the net resulted in the puck going off the skate of Kings defen seman Slava Voynov and into the goal. But it was waved off after a conference by the ofcials, prompting a round of boos from the crowd of 21,832 and a waving, yelling display from Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville. According to the NHL, the original call of good goal was changed because the ofcials decid ed Toews made inci dental contact with Quick before the puck crossed the goal line. The league said the ruling was not reviewable, so the call on the ice remained in place. The sequence seemed to wake up the Kings while deating the Blackhawks. Los Angeles got its rst goal about a min ute later, with Tanner Pearson making a ter ric pass to the middle to Toffoli for his fourth of the playoffs at 4:35. The Kings then had a couple of chances to take the lead, but Crawford stepped up each time. He denied Kyle Clifford on a 2-on1 break with 13:42 re maining, and stopped Marian Gaborik and Dustin Brown in rapid succession midway through the period. Crawfords solid play bought Chicago some time to shake off the disallowed goal, and it paid off when Keiths slap shot went off the stick of Trevor Lew is and bounced past Quick for a 2-1 lead. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B1 PGA-Byron Nelson Leading ScoresSunday At TPC Four Seasons Resort Irving, Texas Purse: $6.9 million Yardage: 7,166; Par: 70 (a-amateur) Final Brendon Todd (500), $1,242,000 68-64-68-66 Mike Weir (300), $745,200 68-66-67-67 Charles Howell III (163), $400,200 68-66-69-67 Marc Leishman (163), $400,200 66-68-68-68 James Hahn (105), $262,200 71-65-65-70 Boo Weekley (105), $262,200 67-68-68-68 Graham DeLaet (83), $207,863 68-66-68-70 Dustin Johnson (83), $207,863 69-69-68-66 Matt Kuchar (83), $207,863 69-67-68-68 Gary Woodland (83), $207,863 68-67-66-71 Charlie Beljan (62), $146,280 72-65-70-67 Louis Oosthuizen (62), $146,280 68-68-64-74 Charl Schwartzel (62), $146,280 73-67-67-67 John Senden (62), $146,280 70-70-68-66 Shawn Stefani (62), $146,280 74-66-67-67 Paul Casey (53), $100,050 71-63-73-68 Morgan Hoffmann (53), $100,050 68-66-68-73 John Huh (53), $100,050 67-71-66-71 Billy Hurley III (53), $100,050 70-69-68-68 Kevin Kisner (53), $100,050 69-70-70-66 Tyrone Van Aswegen (53), $100,050 67-68-72-68 Greg Chalmers (46), $64,055 71-67-65-73 Padraig Harrington (46), $64,055 68-68-66-74 Tim Herron (46), $64,055 68-66-74-68 Ryan Palmer (46), $64,055 67-68-71-70 Andres Romero (46), $64,055 71-66-69-70 Tim Wilkinson (46), $64,055 66-71-71-68 a-Scottie Schefer, $0 71-68-69-68 Brendon de Jonge (39), $43,944 73-68-67-69 Brice Garnett (39), $43,944 69-70-68-70 Brian Harman (39), $43,944 72-69-71-65 Charlie Wi (39), $43,944 73-67-66-71 Aaron Baddeley (39), $43,944 68-70-67-72 Keegan Bradley (39), $43,944 70-68-68-71 Robert Garrigus (39), $43,944 74-64-68-71 Martin Kaymer (39), $43,944 67-67-71-72 Robert Allenby (31), $30,403 72-69-70-67 Ben Crane (31), $30,403 68-70-73-67 Peter Hanson (31), $30,403 65-73-69-71 Jordan Spieth (31), $30,403 70-67-73-68 Scott Gardiner (31), $30,403 70-69-67-72 Retief Goosen (31), $30,403 70-65-71-72 Vijay Singh (31), $30,403 69-68-68-73 Jimmy Walker (31), $30,403 71-68-68-71 Carl Pettersson (25), $22,770 69-71-67-72 Michael Putnam (25), $22,770 70-70-71-68 Rory Sabbatini (25), $22,770 70-68-71-70 Kris Blanks (19), $17,327 70-69-70-71 Chad Campbell (19), $17,327 69-72-70-69 Jason Dufner (19), $17,327 70-70-69-71 Bryce Molder (19), $17,327 71-70-71-68 suddenly reappeared. Indiana swarmed the glass, exploited its size advantage, knocked down early 3-pointers with regularity and defended well enough to force the Heat to play catch-up the entire game. The fans that oc casionally serenaded them with boos during the rst two rounds of the playoffs spent most of the rst half on their feet and nished the game with repeated chants of Beat the Heat! Beat the Heat! All ve of Indianas starters and backup C.J. Watson reached dou ble gures as the Pacers produced their highest point total of the post season. Indiana has lost Game 1 at home in its rst two playoff series, but it was obvious right from the start that this game would be different. George Hill scored the rst ve points to give the Pacers the lead, which they extended to 20-10. They spent the rest of the game either pulling away or fending off Miami challenges. When the Heat trimmed the de cit to 30-24 after one and eventually to 4137 midway through the second quarter, Lance Stephenson scored four points in a 5-0 run to make it 46-37. When James again cut the decit to 50-45 with back-to-back baskets late in the second, the Pacers closed the half with ve straight points to make it 55-45. Then the Pacers poured it on. Roy Hibbert and West scored eight of Indianas rst 14 points to open the second half, making it 69-52. HEAT FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 23 20 .535 5-5 L-1 11-11 12-9 Baltimore 22 20 .524 4-6 L-2 9-10 13-10 Toronto 23 22 .511 1 5-5 L-1 10-11 13-11 Boston 20 22 .476 2 2 5-5 L-3 10-13 10-9 Tampa Bay 19 26 .422 5 4 4-6 L-2 8-12 11-14 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 26 12 .684 7-3 W-5 13-8 13-4 Kansas City 22 21 .512 6 6-4 W-2 12-9 10-12 Minnesota 21 21 .500 7 1 6-4 L-1 12-11 9-10 Chicago 21 24 .467 8 2 3-7 L-2 11-10 10-14 Cleveland 19 25 .432 10 4 4-6 L-4 12-11 7-14 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 28 16 .636 9-1 W-3 12-10 16-6 Los Angeles 24 19 .558 3 8-2 W-2 11-11 13-8 Seattle 21 22 .488 6 1 4-6 W-1 8-10 13-12 Texas 21 23 .477 7 2 4-6 W-1 12-12 9-11 Houston 16 28 .364 12 7 6-4 W-2 10-15 6-13 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 23 19 .548 5-5 W-1 13-8 10-11 Washington 23 20 .535 5-5 W-1 13-10 10-10 Miami 23 22 .511 1 1 3-7 L-1 17-5 6-17 New York 20 23 .465 3 3 4-6 L-1 9-12 11-11 Philadelphia 19 22 .463 3 3 4-6 W-2 8-12 11-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 27 17 .614 5-5 L-2 14-10 13-7 St. Louis 23 21 .523 4 6-4 L-1 11-7 12-14 Cincinnati 19 23 .452 7 3 4-6 L-2 11-10 8-13 Pittsburgh 18 25 .419 8 5 5-5 W-1 12-11 6-14 Chicago 15 27 .357 11 7 4-6 W-2 9-12 6-15 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home A way San Francisco 28 17 .622 6-4 W-1 14-8 14-9 Colorado 25 20 .556 3 4-6 W-1 15-6 10-14 Los Angeles 23 22 .511 5 1 4-6 L-2 9-13 14-9 San Diego 21 24 .467 7 3 6-4 L-1 12-11 9-13 Arizona 18 28 .391 10 6 6-4 W-2 6-18 12-10 SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 7, Pittsburgh 1 Houston 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Oakland 6, Cleveland 2 Kansas City 1, Baltimore 0 Detroit 6, Boston 1 Minnesota 4, Seattle 3 Toronto 4, Texas 2 L.A. Angels 6, Tampa Bay 0SATURDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 4, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 3, Milwaukee 0 N.Y. Mets 5, Washington 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 12, Cincinnati 1 Arizona 18, L.A. Dodgers 7 San Diego 8, Colorado 5 Miami 5, San Francisco 0SUNDAYS GAMESOakland 13, Cleveland 3 N.Y. Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 3, 1st game Kansas City 8, Baltimore 6 Houston 8, Chicago White Sox 2 Seattle 6, Minnesota 2 Texas 6, Toronto 2 L.A. Angels 6, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Yankees 3, 2nd game Detroit at Boston, late.SUNDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 3, 1st game Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 3 Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 3 Atlanta 6, St. Louis 5 Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 2 San Francisco 4, Miami 1 Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Colorado 8, San Diego 6, 10 innings Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Yankees 3, 2nd game SETH WENIG / AP New York Yankees Mark Teixeira reacts after being hit by a ball during the sixth inning of the rst game of a double-header against the New York Yankees on Sunday in New York. TODAYS GAMESDetroit (Smyly 2-2) at Cleveland (Kluber 4-3), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Carroll 1-3) at Kansas City (Vargas 4-1), 8:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 4-2) at L.A. Angels (Richards 4-0), 10:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESCincinnati (Leake 2-3) at Washington (Strasburg 3-3), 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee (W.Peralta 4-2) at Atlanta (Minor 1-2), 7:10 p.mAMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING_ VMartinez, Detroit, .336; KSuzuki, Minnesota, .322; AlRamirez, Chicago, .322; Solarte, New York, .315; MeCabrera, Toronto, .311; MiCabrera, Detroit, .305; Loney, Tampa Bay, .305. RUNS_ Dozier, Minnesota, 40; Bautista, Toronto, 35; Donaldson, Oakland, 34; JAbreu, Chicago, 29; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 28; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 27; Kins ler, Detroit, 27; Trout, Los Angeles, 27. RBI_ JAbreu, Chicago, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 37; NCruz, Baltimore, 37; Moss, Oakland, 36; Donaldson, Oakland, 34; Bautista, Toronto, 30; Brantley, Cleveland, 30; Colabello, Minnesota, 30; Encarnacion, Toronto, 30. HITS_ MeCabrera, Toronto, 57; Altuve, Houston, 55; AlRamirez, Chicago, 55; Cano, Seattle, 50; Hosmer, Kansas City, 50; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 49; Markakis, Bal timore, 49; Rios, Texas, 49. DOUBLES_ Plouffe, Minnesota, 17; Hosmer, Kansas City, 15; Pedroia, Boston, 15; Lowrie, Oakland, 14; Viciedo, Chicago, 14; Altuve, Houston, 13; Encarnacion, Toronto, 13; AGordon, Kansas City, 13. TRIPLES_ Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Infante, Kansas City, 3. HOME RUNS_ JAbreu, Chicago, 15; NCruz, Baltimore, 12; Bautista, Toronto, 11; Dozier, Minnesota, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 11; Donaldson, Oakland, 10; Pujols, Los Ange les, 10. STOLEN BASES_ Altuve, Houston, 14; RDavis, Detroit, 14; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Andrus, Texas, 11; Ellsbury, New York, 11; AEscobar, Kansas City, 11; Gardner, New York, 10; Villar, Houston, 10. PITCHING_ Porcello, Detroit, 7-1; Buehrle, Toronto, 7-1; Tanaka, New York, 6-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 6-1. ERA_ Scherzer, Detroit, 1.83; Gray, Oakland, 2.10; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.11; Tanaka, New York, 2.17; Darvish, Texas, 2.32; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.39; Ventura, Kan sas City, 2.40. STRIKEOUTS_ Scherzer, Detroit, 73; Lester, Boston, 73; Price, Tampa Bay, 70; Kluber, Cleveland, 66; Tanaka, New York, 66; Darvish, Texas, 65. SAVES_ Perkins, Minnesota, 12; Rodney, Seattle, 11; Holland, Kansas City, 11; TomHunter, Baltimore, 11.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING_ Tulowitzki, Colorado, .400; Utley, Philadelphia, .347; Blackmon, Colorado, .333; SSmith, San Di ego, .333; Puig, Los Angeles, .329; Morneau, Colorado, .325; YMolina, St. Louis, .325. RUNS_ Tulowitzki, Colorado, 40; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 35; Blackmon, Colorado, 34; Yelich, Miami, 33; Pence, San Francisco, 31; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 29; Stanton, Miami, 29. RBI_ Stanton, Miami, 43; Puig, Los Angeles, 35; Tulow itzki, Colorado, 34; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 32; Blackmon, Colorado, 30; Morneau, Colorado, 30; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 28; CGonzalez, Colorado, 28; McGehee, Miami, 28; Morse, San Francisco, 28. HITS_ Goldschmidt, Arizona, 59; Blackmon, Colorado, 54; DanMurphy, New York, 54; Stanton, Miami, 54; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 54; Arenado, Colorado, 52. DOUBLES_ Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; Utley, Philadelphia, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 16; Arenado, Colorado, 15; MaAdams, St. Louis, 14; Byrd, Philadelphia, 14. TRIPLES_ Simmons, Atlanta, 4; 11 tied at 3. HOME RUNS_ Stanton, Miami, 12; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 12; Morse, San Francisco, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Blackmon, Colorado, 9; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 9; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9; Puig, Los Angeles, 9; JUpton, Atlanta, 9. STOLEN BASES_ DGordon, Los Angeles, 25; EYoung, New York, 15; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 14; SMarte, Pitts burgh, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; Blackmon, Colorado, 9; DanMurphy, New York, 9; Pagan, San Francisco, 9. PITCHING_ Greinke, Los Angeles, 7-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 6-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 6-2; 9 tied at 5. ERA_Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.25; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.62; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.03; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.05; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.09; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.11; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.20. STRIKEOUTS_ Cueto, Cincinnati, 76; Strasburg, Washington, 70; Fernandez, Miami, 70; Wacha, St. Louis, 62; Greinke, Los Angeles, 61; Kennedy, San Diego, 60. SAVES_ FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Angels 6, Rays 2 T ampa Bay Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi DeJess dh 4 0 2 0 Cowgill rf 4 0 0 1 Myers rf 3 0 0 0 T rout cf 4 1 1 0 Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 Pujols dh 4 2 3 2 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 1 Loney 1b 3 1 1 0 Cron 1b 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 ENa vrr 1b 1 0 1 0 Kiermr cf 4 1 1 2 A ybar ss 4 1 1 0 CFigur 2b 3 0 0 0 Iannett c 4 1 2 0 Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 Green lf 4 1 3 1 JMolin c 3 0 0 0 LJimnz 3b 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 5 2 T otals 35 6 12 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 200 2 Los Angeles 101 300 10x 6 ELongoria (3). LOBTampa Bay 6, Los Angeles 6. 2BDeJesus (9), E.Navarro (4). HRKiermaier (1), Pujols 2 (12). CSGreen (2). SL.Jimenez. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Price L,4-4 6 2/3 11 6 5 0 7 Boxberger 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles Shoemaker W,2-1 6 2 1 1 3 6 Morin 1 1 1 1 0 0 J.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 2 Frieri 1 1 0 0 0 2 Shoemaker pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Bill Miller; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:59. A,655 (45,483). Athletics 13, Indians 3 Oakland Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 2 1 0 0 Bour n cf 3 1 1 1 Gentry ph-cf 1 0 0 0 A viles ss 4 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 1 0 0 0 Brantly lf 3 1 2 2 Punto ss 5 2 2 0 Rabur n dh 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 2 4 1 1 DvMr p rf 5 0 3 0 Moss lf 3 4 3 3 Swisher 1b 5 0 0 0 Cespds dh 5 0 2 5 CSantn c 4 0 0 0 Jaso c 5 1 1 2 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 2 0 Reddck rf 4 0 2 2 JRmrz 2b 4 1 0 0 Callasp 1b-2b 5 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 4 1 1 0 Blanks 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 13 12 13 T otals 34 3 8 3 Oakland 010 242 130 13 Cleveland 100 011 000 3 ESwisher (6), Chisenhall (4). DPOakland 1, Cleveland 3. LOBOakland 7, Cleveland 12. 2BPunto (4), Moss 2 (10), Cespedes 2 (13), Jaso (5), Reddick (2), Chisenhall (10). 3BMoss (2). HRBourn (1), Brant ley (8). SBDav.Murphy (2). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland J.Chavez W,4-1 5 6 2 2 3 6 Ji.Johnson 2/3 0 1 1 3 0 Abad 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Savery 2 2 0 0 1 0 Cleveland Masterson L,2-3 4 1/3 7 7 7 5 1 Outman 1 1/3 2 2 1 2 2 Atchison 1 1/3 1 1 0 0 0 Allen 0 2 3 3 2 0 Crockett 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Axford 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Allen pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. HBPby Ji.Johnson (Chisenhall). PBC.Santana. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T:21. A,872 (42,487). Giants 4, Marlins 1 Miami San F rancisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Hchvrr ss 5 1 2 0 Blanco cf 2 1 0 0 Dietrch 2b 3 0 1 0 P ence rf 4 0 1 0 Yelich lf 4 0 0 1 P osey c 3 0 0 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 2 0 Sando vl 3b 4 2 2 1 GJones 1b 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 0 0 0 0 Lucas rf 3 0 1 0 Mor se 1b 4 1 1 0 Stanton ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Colvin lf 3 0 1 1 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 B.Hicks 2b 4 0 1 1 Mathis c 4 0 2 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 JaTrnr p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 1 0 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 Adrianz ph 1 0 0 0 Capps p 0 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Hand p 0 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 9 1 T otals 30 4 7 4 Miami 000 000 010 1 San Francisco 300 010 00x 4 EB.Crawford (4). DPSan Francisco 1. LOBMiami 9, San Francisco 6. 2BDietrich (4). HRSandoval (3). SBBlanco (5). CSHechavarria (4). SJa.Turner 2. SFPosey. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Ja.Turner L,0-2 6 6 4 4 1 7 Capps 1 1 0 0 0 2 Hand 1 0 0 0 1 1 San Francisco Vogelsong W,2-2 7 5 0 0 1 6 Affeldt 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 Casilla H,7 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Romo S,15-16 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby Ja.Turner (Blanco), by Vogelsong (Dietrich). UmpiresHome, Kerwin Danley; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Gary Ced erstrom. T:04. A,551 (41,915). Phillies 8, Reds 3 Cincinnati Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 5 1 2 0 Rollins ss 3 2 1 1 Heisey rf 3 1 0 0 Nie ves c 3 1 2 1 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Utle y 2b 4 0 0 1 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Howard 1b 2 1 0 0 B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 2 2 2 Phillips 2b 4 0 1 1 Asche 3b 4 1 2 3 Frazier 3b 5 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 Mesorc c 4 0 4 1 Ma yrry cf 3 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 4 1 1 0 Cl.Lee p 3 1 1 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 MAdms p 0 0 0 0 N.Soto 1b 4 0 0 0 CHr ndz ph 1 0 0 0 Cingrn p 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Berndn ph-rf 2 0 1 0 Totals 37 3 10 2 T otals 31 8 9 8 Cincinnati 200 000 010 3 Philadelphia 200 011 40x 8 EUtley (3). DPCincinnati 1. LOBCincinnati 10, Philadelphia 5. 2BMesoraco 2 (8), Mayberry (3). HRRollins (5), Nieves (1), Byrd (5), Asche (4). SBB. Hamilton (15), Heisey (5). CSAsche (1). SCingrani, Nieves. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cingrani L,2-3 6 7 4 4 3 7 M.Parra 1 2 4 4 2 2 Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia Cl.Lee W,4-4 6 2/3 9 2 2 1 3 Mi.Adams H,4 1 1/3 1 1 0 0 1 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 1 2 BalkCingrani. UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Paul Emmel; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Jordan Baker. T:03. A,096 (43,651). Braves 6, Cardinals 5 Atlanta St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 5 1 1 0 MCr pnt 3b 2 1 2 0 J.Upton lf 4 2 2 1 W ong 2b 3 0 1 3 FFrmn 1b 3 2 3 3 CMr tnz p 0 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 0 Smmns ss 4 0 0 0 Craig rf 5 1 0 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 5 1 2 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 2 1 Doumit ph 1 1 1 0 JhP erlt ss 5 0 1 1 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 1 1 0 Laird c 3 0 0 0 JGarci p 2 1 1 0 Gattis ph-c 0 0 0 0 JButler ph 0 0 0 0 JSchafr cf 2 0 0 1 Ja y ph 1 0 0 0 Floyd p 2 0 0 0 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 R.Pena 2b 0 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 6 7 5 T otals 35 5 11 5 Atlanta 100 102 002 6 St. Louis 030 010 100 5 DPAtlanta 3, St. Louis 2. LOBAtlanta 4, St. Louis 12. 2BJ.Upton (7), Doumit (2), Wong (2), Jh.Per alta (9). HRJ.Upton (10), F.Freeman (8). SR.Pena. SFMa.Adams. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Floyd 5 1/3 7 4 1 3 4 A.Wood 1 1/3 2 1 1 2 1 D.Carpenter W,3-0 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Kimbrel S,11-13 1 1 0 0 0 1 St. Louis J.Garcia 7 5 4 4 0 5 Siegrist H,12 2/3 0 0 0 1 1 Neshek H,5 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Rosenthal L,0-2 BS,2-15 2/3 2 2 2 2 1 C.Martinez 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 HBPby Floyd (Holliday, J.Garcia), by D.Carpenter (Wong), by J.Garcia (F.Freeman). WPKimbrel, C.Mar tinez. PBLaird. UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Ron Kulpa. T:20. A,278 (45,399). Cubs 4, Brewers 2 Milw aukee Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi RWeks 2b 4 1 1 2 Bonifac cf 4 0 1 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 Lak e lf 4 0 2 0 Braun rf 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 MrRynl 1b 3 0 0 0 Valuen 2b-3b 3 1 1 1 KDavis lf 4 0 0 0 Castillo c 4 1 1 2 Bianchi 3b 3 0 0 0 Olt 3b 4 1 1 1 LSchfr cf 3 1 1 0 HRndn p 0 0 0 0 Estrad p 2 0 0 0 Kalish rf 2 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 T .Wood p 3 0 0 0 Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 1 0 0 0 Bar ney 2b 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 2 3 2 T otals 31 4 8 4 Milwaukee 000 020 000 2 Chicago 021 100 00x 4 LOBMilwaukee 4, Chicago 6. 2BBraun (5), L.Schafer (7), Bonifacio (10), Lake (7), S.Castro 2 (12), Valbuena (8). HRR.Weeks (2), Castillo (5), Olt (9). SBKalish (3). CSLake (1). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Estrada L,3-2 5 7 4 4 2 4 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 0 Thornburg 1 1 0 0 1 1 Wooten 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago T.Wood W,4-4 7 2 2 2 3 7 Schlitter H,5 1 0 0 0 0 2 H.Rondon S,5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 WPThornburg. UmpiresHome, David Rackley; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Brian Gorman. T:47. A,631 (41,072). Nationals 6, Mets 3 Ne w York W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 4 0 0 0 Span cf 4 1 1 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 1 1 1 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 W erth rf 4 1 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 0 WRams c 3 1 2 4 DWrght 3b 3 1 2 0 Dsmnd ss 4 1 2 1 Grndrs rf 3 1 1 0 TMoore 1b 4 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 1 1 0 F rndsn 2b 4 0 0 1 Lagars cf 4 0 1 1 McLoth lf 4 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 0 0 0 Zmr mn p 2 1 1 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Centen c 4 0 2 2 W alters ph 1 0 0 0 ZWhelr p 2 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 CYoung ph-lf 1 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 8 3 T otals 31 6 7 6 New York 010 002 000 3 Washington 012 020 01x 6 ECenteno (1), Tejada (3). DPNew York 1, Wash ington 1. LOBNew York 5, Washington 5. 2BDuda (5), Span (8), W.Ramos (2). HRDesmond (7). SB Rendon (2). IP H R ER BB SO New York Z.Wheeler L,1-4 6 6 5 3 2 5 Familia 1 0 0 0 1 0 Matsuzaka 1 1 1 0 1 1 Washington Zimmermann W,3-1 6 8 3 3 2 1 Storen H,7 1 0 0 0 0 0 Clippard H,11 1 0 0 0 0 1 R.Soriano S,10-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 PBCenteno. UmpiresHome, Jon Byrne; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Ed Hickox. T:45. A,965 (41,408). Yankees 4, Pirates 3 First Game Pittsburgh Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Snider rf 3 0 0 0 Gardnr dh-lf 3 1 1 1 Tabata ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 0 NWalkr 2b 4 1 2 2 Ellsur y cf 3 1 0 0 AMcCt cf 3 0 1 0 T eixeir 1b 3 0 1 2 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 McCnn c 3 0 1 1 SMarte lf 4 0 0 0 ASorin rf 3 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Solar te 2b 3 0 0 0 GSnchz dh 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 3b 3 1 1 0 TSnchz c 4 1 1 1 ZAlmnt lf 3 0 1 0 Barmes ss 3 1 1 0 DvRr ts p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 6 3 T otals 28 4 6 4 Pittsburgh 100 020 000 3 New York 310 000 00x 4 ET.Sanchez (5). DPPittsburgh 1. LOBPittsburgh 5, New York 2. 2BBarmes (2), Gardner (5). HRN. Walker (9), T.Sanchez (2). SBKe.Johnson (2). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Morton L,0-6 7 6 4 4 1 6 Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 1 New York Kuroda W,3-3 6 5 3 3 2 7 Daley H,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Thornton H,8 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Warren H,7 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Dav.Robertson S,8-8 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Morton (Ellsbury). WPMorton. PBMcCann. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Marcus Pattillo; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Bob Davidson. T:52. A (49,642). Pirates 5, Yankees 3 Second Game Pittsburgh Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi JHrrsn 3b-lf 5 1 2 1 Gardnr cf 4 0 2 0 NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 BRor ts 2b 4 0 2 0 AMcCt cf 3 1 1 0 T eixeir dh 3 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 SMarte lf 3 2 1 2 Jeter ph-ss 1 0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 1 0 0 0 Solar te 3b 4 2 2 1 Mercer ss 4 1 2 0 ZAlmnt lf 3 0 0 0 Tabata rf 1 0 0 0 ASorin ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Snider rf 2 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf-lf 4 0 1 0 TSnchz dh 3 0 0 0 JMr phy c 3 1 1 0 I.Davis ph-dh 0 0 0 0 Ellsur y ph 1 0 0 0 CStwrt c 3 0 1 2 Ry an ss-1b 3 0 1 1 McCnn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 5 T otals 35 3 10 2 Pittsburgh 010 002 101 5 New York 020 001 000 3 ESnider (1), Cole (2), B.Roberts (4), Solarte (4). DP Pittsburgh 1. LOBPittsburgh 5, New York 7. 2BJ. Harrison (4), Mercer (7), B.Roberts (5). 3BGardner (2). HRJ.Harrison (2), S.Marte (4), Solarte (5). S Snider. SFC.Stewart. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Cole W,4-3 6 7 3 3 2 8 Morris H,3 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Watson H,9 1 1/3 3 0 0 0 2 Melancon S,6-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Nuno 6 6 3 2 1 5 Aceves L,0-2 1 2/3 1 1 1 0 1 Thornton 2/3 1 1 1 0 0 Claiborne 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 BalkCole. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, John Tumpane; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:04. A,858 (49,642). Astros 8, White Sox 2 Chicago Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 5 0 1 0 GBckh 2b 3 0 0 0 Springr rf 3 0 1 0 Semien 2b 1 0 0 0 F owler cf 3 2 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 0 MDmn 3b 4 2 2 4 Viciedo rf 4 0 0 0 Car ter dh 4 1 1 1 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 2 1 1 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Hoes lf 4 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 1 2 0 0 Cor prn c 3 0 0 0 LeGarc ss 1 0 1 0 V illar ss 2 1 2 2 De Aza lf 2 0 0 0 MGnzlz ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Nieto c 3 0 3 2 Totals 31 2 6 2 T otals 32 8 10 7 Chicago 001 000 100 2 Houston 042 020 00x 8 EDe Aza (2), Nieto (1). DPChicago 2, Houston 2. LOBChicago 6, Houston 5. 2BNieto (3), Fowler (6), Hoes (3). HRM.Dominguez 2 (7), Carter (6). SBAltuve (15), Villar (11). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Joh.Danks L,3-4 4 2/3 10 8 7 3 7 D.Webb 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 0 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 1 Houston Peacock W,1-4 6 2/3 5 2 2 4 5 Fields 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 3 Williams 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBPby Joh.Danks (Corporan). WPD.Webb, Lindstrom. UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Will Little; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Ted Barrett.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 ANDREW DAMPFAP Sports WriterROME Novak Djokovic is going to the French Open with a big clay-court victory in his pocket. And a heavy heart. Djokovic extended his recent dominance over Rafael Nadal by rallying for a 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 victory Sunday to win the Ital ian Open for the third time then dedicated the title to his ood-hit native Serbia by carving a heart on the clay with his racket. This heart on the court is for you, he told the fans in Italian during the victory cele bration. Its also a special dedication to my country, which is suf fering a lot right now. My heart is with them. In the womens nal, Serena Williams kept the crowd from being a factor in a 6-3, 6-0 vic tory over 10th-seeded home favorite Sara Errani to win her third Rome title. Errani was bidding to become the rst Italian to win the tournament in nearly 30 years but the top-ranked Wil liams quickly took con trol in both sets and Er rani was slowed by a left thigh problem. Williams had a left thigh problem herself last week that prompt ed her to withdraw be fore her quarternal match at the Madrid Open but now she ap pears back on track for the French, which starts next Sunday. Im not 100 percent but Im just kind of going on adrenaline, the topranked American said. Djokovic found his motivation from a dif ferent source. Authorities say 25 peo ple have died in the Bal kans because of the worst ooding in a cen tury after three months worth of rain fell on the region in three days this week. Tens of thousands of homes were left with out electricity or drinking water. Im trying to contribute in my own way, Djokovic said. These are very critical times for our country and our people. But were being united and this win and this trophy is dedicated to them. Having also been beaten in Monte Carlo and Barcelona recent ly, it marked the rst time in a decade that the top-ranked Nadal has lost more than two matches on clay in the same year. Nadal was pushed to three sets in four out of his ve matches here. When he hit the rst ball good a lot of times it was very difcult to arrive to the ball and change the dynamic of the point, Nadal said. I didnt have enough energy to hit the rst shot with the right intensity. The second-ranked Djokovic has now won four straight matches against Nadal the previous three in straight sets and takes the psychological edge to Paris. It gives me a lot of condence winning against Rafa in the nals of a big tourna ment on clay, he said. Its denitely a con dence booster. Its an ultimate challenge and Im very happy with my game so far and hopefully I can carry that into Roland Garros. The French Open is the only Grand Slam that Djokovic has yet to win, with his best re sult a runner-up nish in 2012. Nadal has won the tournament eight times. Djokovic was able to dictate play by stepping inside the baseline. I tried to be aggres sive from the start to the end, said Djokovic, whose other Rome titles came in 2008 and 2011. I know that the only way to win against him is to be aggressive. Earlier, Errani left the court for an inju ry timeout while trailing 5-3 in the opening set and came back with her thigh bandaged. On the nal point before she left the court, Erra ni pulled up and let a shot from Williams pass by her without even attempting to get to it. Im sorry. You were unbelievable all week, Errani told fans during the victory ceremony, as she brushed back tears. I tried to do my best and stayed on the court only for you. Williams other Rome titles came in 2002 and last year and she went on to win the French Open on both occasions. Im also sorry for Sara today, Williams told the crowd in Ital ian. She really played great all week. Organizers attempted to whip up patriotic fer vor by having the Italian anthem sung before the players walked out onto the court, and fans continuously chanted Sara, Sara to try and encourage Errani in an atmosphere that more resembled a Davis Cup or Fed Cup setting. But Williams jumped out to a 3-0 lead and while Errani had a few chances to get back into the rst set, Williams overpowered the Italian with her serve she had seven aces to Erra nis none and overall attacking game. Still, Errani could console herself by becoming the rst Ital ian nalist in the tour nament since Raffaella Reggi took the 1985 title in Taranto.GOLF MLB ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy after defeating Rafael Nadal at the Italian Open tennis tournament on Sunday in Rome. Djokovic dedicates Rome title to victims of floodingTENNIS KELVIN KUO / AP Los Angeles Angels Albert Pujols follows through on a hit off Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price, not pictured, during the third inning on Sunday in Anaheim, Calif. JOHN ZENORAP Sports WriterBIRMINGHAM, Ala. Kenny Perry won his third Champions Tour major in the past year with a one-stroke victo ry over Mark Calcavec chia on Sunday in the Regions Tradition. Perry closed with an even-par 72 at Shoal Creek to nish at 7-un der 281, while oth er contenders had upand-down days and John Cook lost the lead with a double hit. Perry bogeyed No. 15 but retook the lead with a birdie on the next hole and lined up an easy par putt on the closing hole. Calcavecchia nished with a 70. Twotime winner Tom Lehman closed with a 67 to tie Jay Haas at 5 under. Haas closed with a 71. Cooks closing 72 put him three strokes back. Perry got his sixth victory and became the second player to win in three consecutive Champions Tour major starts, joining Gary Player, who did it in 1987-88. Perry won the Senior Players Championship and U.S. Senior Open in consecutive tour starts last year, then skipped the Senior British Open. It was the highest score for a Tradition winner. Fred Couples was dis qualied Sunday after missing his tee time. He was 9 over after a 73 Saturday, his best round. Couples also withdrew from the Senior PGA next week at Harbor Shores in Benton Har bor, Michigan. Cooks double bogey on No. 14 cost him the lead. Cooks ball was buried deep in the right bunker just under the lip, and appeared to ricochet backward before wind ing up a couple of feet out of the sand. Tour ofcials reviewed the bunker shot using phone video shot by an event staffer and deter mined that Cook hit it again on his back swing. Golf Channel didnt have a great view of it but there was some one with the event who was shooting social media video of it that had a face-on angle, and it was clear that he dou ble hit it, said Brian Claar, the Champions Tours vice president for competition.EUROPEAN TOURGIRONA, Spain Mi guel Angel Jimenez won the Spanish Open on Sunday after a threeway playoff to become the European Tours rst winner over the age of 50. Jimenez extended his own record as the old est European Tour winner at 50 years and 133 days old. There is no secret, Jimenez said. Good food, good wine, good cigars and some exer cise. Jimenez beat Thomas Pieters of Belgium and Australias Richard Green in a playoff after he was the only one to make par on the rst ex tra hole. All three play ers nished on 4-under 284. It was the Spaniards 21st European Tour win and his second of the season after he won at Hong Kong in December, also following a playoff, at the age of 49 years, 337 days. Pieters led by two shots going into the nal round at the PGA Catalunya Resort but only managed a 3-over 75 despite an eagle on No. 15. Jimenez shot a 73, while Green carded 72. It was the rst win for Jimenez at the tourna ment in 27 appearances. Theres no words to describe what it means to me, you need to be into my skin but Im not going to let you, joked Jimenez. Its amazing. I have been close a couple of times. Today it was very tough out there but I got it in the end. BUTCH DILL / AP Kenny Perry holds up the trophy after winning the Champions Tour Regions Tradition golf tournament on Sunday in Birmingham, Ala. Kenny Perry edges Calcavecchia to win Regions Tradition tourney Regions Tradition Leading Scores Sunday At Shoal Creek Shoal Creek, Ala. Purse: $2.2 million Yardage: 7,231; Par: 72 Final Kenny Perry (660), $330,000 72-68-69-72 281 Mark Calcavecchia (388), $193,600 69-69-74-70 282 Jay Haas (262), $131,267 69-70-73-71 283 Tom Lehman (262), $131,267 73-71-72-67 283 Olin Browne (262), $131,267 69-71-72-71 283 John Cook (158), $79,200 71-70-71-72 284 Rocco Mediate (158), $79,200 73-72-69-70 284 Tom Watson (158), $79,200 72-72-73-67 284 Michael Allen (98), $49,343 73-74-69-69 285 Marco Dawson (98), $49,343 71-73-71-70 285 Joe Durant (98), $49,343 74-73-69-69 285 Bernhard Langer (98), $49,343 74-70-70-71 285 Jeff Sluman (98), $49,343 72-71-71-71 285 Steve Elkington (98), $49,343 70-71-71-73 285 John Inman (98), $49,343 72-72-66-75 285 Fred Funk (0), $33,044 71-72-73-70 286 Jeff Hart (0), $33,044 73-70-73-70 286 Colin Montgomerie (0), $33,044 72-72-69-73 286 Corey Pavin (0), $33,044 70-74-71-71 286 Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $33,044 72-70-70-74 286 Jeff Maggert (0), $27,060 73-70-69-75 287 Chien Soon Lu (0), $25,520 69-77-70-72 288 Roger Chapman (0), $23,650 72-77-72-68 289 Steve Pate (0), $23,650 73-74-71-71 289 David Frost (0), $20,064 72-71-71-76 290 Mike Goodes (0), $20,064 74-71-70-75 290 Gene Sauers (0), $20,064 75-74-71-70 290 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $20,064 74-69-73-74 290 Willie Wood (0), $20,064 70-75-73-72 290 Peter Senior (0), $17,380 74-75-75-67 291 Mike Reid (0), $15,510 74-74-73-71 292 Loren Roberts (0), $15,510 74-78-69-71 292 Rod Spittle (0), $15,510 72-75-72-73 292 Esteban Toledo (0), $15,510 74-72-74-72 292 Doug Garwood (0), $13,200 74-76-75-68 293 Sandy Lyle (0), $13,200 75-71-78-69 293 Mark OMeara (0), $13,200 74-70-74-75 293 Tommy Armour III (0), $11,880 77-72-74-71 294 Bobby Clampett (0), $11,880 77-76-69-72 294 Mark Brooks (0), $10,780 73-74-77-71 295 Bill Glasson (0), $10,780 71-74-74-76 295 John Riegger (0), $10,780 71-75-75-74 295 Tom Byrum (0), $9,460 74-71-77-74 296 Gil Morgan (0), $9,460 74-75-72-75 296 Ian Woosnam (0), $9,460 73-72-77-74 296 Peter Jacobsen (0), $7,260 74-81-73-69 297 Mark McNulty (0), $7,260 74-74-70-79 297 Larry Mize (0), $7,260 76-75-74-72 297 Jerry Pate (0), $7,260 79-71-77-70 297 Nick Price (0), $7,260 74-69-75-79 297 Scott Simpson (0), $7,260 75-74-72-76 297 Duffy Waldorf (0), $7,260 73-77-73-74 297 Brian Henninger (0), $5,060 76-75-76-71 298 Tom Purtzer (0), $5,060 74-72-78-74 298 Jim Rutledge (0), $5,060 76-74-75-73 298 Joey Sindelar (0), $5,060 73-76-78-71 298 Hal Sutton (0), $5,060 77-71-74-76 298 Mark Wiebe (0), $4,400 72-73-77-77 299 JOE RESNICKAssociated PressANAHEIM, Calif. Albert Pujols hit a pair of solo homers against David Price, and Matt Shoemaker took a shutout into the sev enth inning to lead the Los Angeles Angels over the Tampa Bay Rays 6-2 Sunday. Pujols drove an 0-2 pitch over the cen ter-eld fence in the rst inning. The threetime NL MVP increased the Angels ad vantage to 6-2 in the seventh with his 12th homer this season and the 504th of his career, tying Eddie Murray for 25th place. Price became the 319th pitcher Pujols has homered off during the regular season. Shoemaker (2-1) was charged with a run and two hits in sixplus innings. He struck out six, ve days after earning his rst major league win with a 4-3 victory at Philadelphia. The 27-year-old right-hander was lifted after issuing his third walk, to James Loney leading off the sev enth. Michael Morin relieved Shoemaker with a 5-0 lead and retired his rst batter before Kevin Kiermaier hit his rst big league homer a drive to left that kept carrying un til it disappeared in the lower seats in the lefteld corner. That end ed a career-opening streak of nine scoreless innings by Morin. Price (4-4) gave up six runs ve earned and 11 hits in 6 2-3 innings with seven strikeouts and no walks. He beat the Mariners 2-1 last Tues day at Seattle with a complete game. The 2012 AL Cy Young Award winner, who has allowed no more than one walk in a franchise-record 13 consecutive starts dating to last season, went to a three-ball count on ve Angels batters. But hes paid the price for his major league-best strikeout-to-walk ratio. Hes given up 78 hits, tying Philadelphias Cliff Lee for most in the majors. Howie Kendrick gave the Angels a 2-0 lead with a two-out RBI sin gle in the third, and they increased the mar gin to 5-0 with three runs in the fourth after Price gave up three straight singles with none out. The third one was a drive by Grant Green over the head of left elder Matt Joyce scoring Erick Aybar.Pujols hits two homers as Angels top Rays

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 CITY OF MINNEOLA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGORDINANCE 2014-07 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MINNEOLA, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE BOUNDARIES OF THE CITY OF MINNEOLA IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCEDURE SET FORTH IN SECTION 171.044, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO INCLUDE WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS APPROXIMATELY 10.1 ACRES OF PROPERTY GENERALLY LOCATED AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF BABAIR LANE, SOUTH OF LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH SCHOOL, NORTH OF JIM HUNT ROAD, IN LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR CONDITIONS AND CONTINGENCIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The City of Minneola City Council will hold public hearings on Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 6:30 p.m., at City Hall, located at 800 North U.S. 27, Minneola, FL to consider a request for the annexation of 10.1 +/acres of property located at the northeast corner of Babair Lane, south of Lake Minneola High School, north of Jim Hunt Road. The staff report on the case shall be sent to the City Council and will be available to the general public at least ve (5) days prior to the hearing on the case. A person who decides to appeal any decision made by any board, agency, or council with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, will need a record of the proceedings. For such purposes, any such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based (Florida Statutes, 286.0105). The City of Minneola Land Development Code is available for inspection at the City Hall, located at 800 North U.S. 27, Minneola, FL, during normal working hours 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT JANET McDANIEL, CITY CLERK AT (352) 394-3598 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEARING. D001800-May 19 & 26, 2014 AUTO RACING PHOTOS BY GERRY BROOME / AP Jamie McMurray celebrates after winning the NASCAR Sprint All-Star auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday in Concord, N.C. LUKE MEREDITHAssociated PressNEWTON, Iowa Sam Hornish Jr. beat Ryan Blaney off a re start with 21 laps to go and hung on to win the NASCAR Nationwide Series race Sunday at Iowa Speedway. Pole-sitter Ryan Blaney was second, followed by Regan Smith, Chase Elliott and El liott Sadler in the rst stand-alone event of the season. Hornish, in the No. 54 car usually driven by Kyle Busch, led 167 of 250 laps to win in second Nationwide start of the season for Joe Gibbs Racing. Elliott has a twopoint lead over Sadler and Smith in the series points standings. From the startl, Hor nish and Blaney were the only drivers in seri ous contention. Blaney began the race on the outside of the front row after winning his rst series pole Saturday. But Hornish, who qualied second, pulled in front on the opening lap. Blaney and Hornish were the only leaders for the rst 214 laps, and lapped trafc was often more of a con cern that the cars di rectly behind them. Blaney eventually caught Hornish at the tail end of a green ag run that lasted roughly 65 laps. But the nal re start belonged to Hor nish, who failed to secure a full-time ride for 2014 despite nishing second in the points standings last season. It was Hornishs third win in 101 Nationwide starts. Michael McDowell then briey took the lead with 30 laps to go by taking just two tires while the rest of the leaders took four. But McDowells gamble failed to pay off, and he settled for seventh. Elliotts fourth-place nish concluded a hectic weekend for the 18-year-old. He graduated from high school in Georgia on Satur day morning and ew back to Iowa in time to qualify sixth later in the day. Elliotts crew hung his graduation cap and tassel on the No. 9 pit box for good luck on Sunday. McMurray and Ganassi share another huge victory McMurray does a burnout following his victory. JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterCONCORD, N.C. In a hurry to y back to Indianapolis Chip Ga nassi, abruptly left the news conference after Jamie McMurrays upset victory in the Sprint All-Star race. Before he stepped down from the podium, Ganassi leaned in and planted a kiss on McMurrays cheek. Ganassi, often gruff and sometimes just plain grumpy, also has a softer side that he cant hide. It comes out in bursts of emo tion, or sentimental moments like Saturday night, when McMurray pulled off a bold upset to win the $1 million prize at Charlotte Motor Speedway. He said to me in Victory Lane, Weve won a lot of great races to gether, havent we? Ganassi recalled. I said, Yes, we have. It was kind of special for him to think of that. He understands what it takes to be in this sport and be a driver. Theres no doubt McMurray went out in the nal 10-lap segment and took the win. He was second on the restart, lined up on the outside of leader Carl Edwards, and he refused to back down as the two went door-todoor for an entire lap. McMurray surged ahead after the white-knuckle battle to win in the event hed never before nished higher than eighth. It added yet anoth er NASCAR major to a resume that exclusively includes big wins. McMurray had seven previous victories in the Sprint Cup Series, all at Daytona, Talladega, Charlotte and Indi anapolis. Among those wins? The Daytona 500 and the Brickyard 400, two of the biggest races on the calendar. Now he has an All-Star victory, making him one of only seven drivers to win the Daytona 500, the Brickyard and the All-Star exhibition. Mc Murrays won all three with Ganassi and team co-owner Felix Sabates. After the race, one of the rst things I thought was Im so glad that Chip and Felix are here and I get to share this with them, McMurray said. They were in Day tona, they were in Indy, and when I look back at those races, the memo ries of Chip being there are really special to me.CREW CHIEF CONNECTIONMcMurray heaped praise on rst-year crew chief Keith Rodden, a longtime engineer for Kasey Kahne before he was practically handpicked by McMurray to take control of the No. 1 team. Hed heard of Rod den time and again over the years, and was sold on his capabilities after one 20-minute conver sation in the basement of Roddens house. McMurray left the meeting and imme diately called Ganassi general manager Max Jones, imploring him to lure Rodden away from his supporting role with Kahne at Hendrick Mo torsports. Im like, Thats the guy. Youve got to g ure out how to make it work. No matter what you have to pay him, what you have to do, get that guy because I like everything about him, McMurray said.BLAME GAMEAs McMurray celebrated the win, Kevin Har vick was left contemplat ing how a victory slipped away for the second con secutive week. Harvick was the lead er headed to pit road for a mandatory fourtire stop following the fourth segment. Hed earned that spot out front by accumulating the highest average nish from the previ ous four segments, and a strong stop from his Stewart-Haas Racing crew would allow him to stay out front and presumably wrap up the win over the 10-lap sprint to the nish. Instead, he was beat off pit road by Edwards and McMurray and re started in third. He wound up second, but wasnt pleased with the result. Cost us the race, Harvick said. All in all, they put a car on the race track that was ca pable of winning. We just didnt get it done.SLICK TRACKKahne believed he was the guy to beat after winning the second and third segments of the race. But he smacked the wall hard in the fourth segment, and grumbled after the race his car slid in oil on the Charlotte Motor Speedway surface. Kahne wound up 14th after leading 20 laps. You could see the oil through the speedy dry, Kahne said. The spotters are even saying something and the guy who drives the pace car said it was clean, it was just stained. No, it was still oil out there. NA SCAR just didnt clean the track.BIG MONEYPhil Parsons Racing wound up winning more than $100,000 this weekend because the online Reddit community has vigorously got ten behind driver Josh Wise. Wise was the upset winner of the fan vote, beating out favorite Danica Patrick to earn a berth in the All-Star race. Reddit users have backed Wise and the underfunded team with the virtual cur rency Dogecoin. Supporters raised more than $55,000 to spon sor Wises car earlier this month at Talladega, then set their sights on winning the fan vote for him.Sam Hornish Jr. bests Blaney in restart to take win CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Sam Hornish Jr. holds the trophy after winning the NASCAR Nationwide auto race on Sunday at Iowa Speedway in Newton, Iowa.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Associated PressLAVAL, Quebec New York Rangers coaches and players joined star forward Martin St. Lou is at his mothers funer al outside Montreal on Sunday. St. Louis former Tampa Bay Lightning teammate Steven Stamkos and Hall of Famer Guy Laeur also attended. It was a very personal matter for Marty, said Rangers defense man Ryan McDonagh. We just wanted to be there to support him and his family. Hes been tremendous through this whole process. Its great to have someone like that on our squad. His mother, France St. Louis, died suddenly three days before Moth ers Day in the middle of the Rangers series against the Pittsburgh Penguins. She was 63. St. Louis didnt miss a game and provided a lift to his teammates as they battled back from a 3-1 decit to win the series. Then the Rangers beat the Montreal Can adiens 7-2 on Saturday in Game 1 of the East ern Conference nal, with St. Louis scoring the opening goal early in the rst period. The series resumes tonight in Montreal. New York coach Alain Vigneaults voice cracked as he described the service. The New York Rangers family has been touched by a little Quebec family in a deep, profound way, he said. It was a very emotional, very moving time for our team to have the opportunity to be there and share that with Marty and his family. Marty took the podium and shared some incredible moments. It was a deep message. It was a challenging day for us. Center Brad Richards, who won a Stanley Cup with St. Louis when they played together with the Lightning, said the 38-year-old scoring star has bonded with his new teammates during this difcult time. St. Louis joined the Rang ers at the March 5 NHL trade deadline. I think its going to help just to get his mind off two things: trying to play and then trying to make sure hes doing all the right things for his family and his dad, and do what his mom would want, Richards said. But hes done an unbelievable job keeping everything together and helping his sister and his dad get through this. You wouldnt expect anything else. Habs fan Jeff Quinn, who drove from Saint John, New Brunswick, with his girlfriend to see Saturdays game, said hes always admired St. Louis and came to pay his respects. CLIFF BRUNTAP Sports WriterOKLAHOMA CITY Thunder players fondly described Serge Ibakas contributions to the team this season and explained how much hed be missed. Then, they moved on. Ibaka, one of the NBAs top shot blockers, hurt his left calf in Game 6 of the Western Conference seminal against the Los Angeles Clippers. A day after the team learned it would likely be without its best defender for the rest of the playoffs, Oklahoma City began practicing for the Western Conference nals against the San Antonio Spurs. Game 1 is Monday night, and the Thunder will take a laid back approach. Its unfortunate for us and for Serge, league MVP Kevin Durant said after practice Saturday. Hes a guy that loves the game so much and has to sit out at the peak of the sea son, being in the play offs. But it happens in this league. Nobodys ever going to feel sorry for us. Were not going to panic. Were going to continue to stick to what we do. During the regular season, Ibaka had career highs with averag es of 15.1 points and 8.8 rebounds while lead ing the league in total blocks for the fourth consecutive season with 219. The Thunder dont expect to dupli cate Ibakas explosiveness or his ability to protect the rim. Were going to play team defense, guard Russell Westbrook said. Were not going to take the onus on ourselves to block shots and do what Serge does, be cause nobody can do that. Brooks wouldnt say how he would ll the minutes or who would start in Ibakas place. He jokingly named almost every reserve as a possible replacement. Based on past patterns, rookie center Steven Adams and veteran for ward Nick Collison will likely step in for Ibaka. Adams has been exceptional recently. The 7-footer from New Zealand was especial ly effective in Game 6 against the Clippers, when he had 10 points and 11 rebounds in 40 minutes. He had never played more than 31 minutes in an NBA game. It was hard, Adams said. My body after wards I felt like an old man. Going for ward, I got familiar with playing while I was fatigued. Im familiar with it. I need to get comfortable with it. Adams had gained his teammates condence throughout the playoffs. They say hes ready for more re sponsibility. The last two series, he played extreme ly well for us, Durant said. Doing any thing we need him to do, playing hard, physical. Were going to need him this series to do the same thing. The coaches have been preparing him. Hes learning, and hes get ting better every day.NBA NHLWithout Serge Ibaka Thunder still confident AP PHOTO Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka (9) defends as Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Grifn shoots in the second half of Game 5 on May 13 in Oklahoma City.Rangers players join St. Louis for his mothers funeral near Montreal RYAN REMIORZ / THE CANADIAN PRESS New York Rangers NHL hockey players leave the funeral home following funeral services for France St. Louis, mother of New York Rangers hockey player Martin St. Louis on Sunday in Laval, Quebec. The New York Rangers family has been touched by a little Quebec family in a deep, profound way.Alain VigneaultNew York Rangers coach

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014WORK OUT: Comfort key in running shoes / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com DON SMITH / MCT Owner Susan Weinrich of Westwood Pets Unlimited with her dog, Ayla. She sells about 10 holistic brands at her Westwood, N.J., store. ANDREW WYRICHMCTHACKENSACK, N.J. Some pet supply store owners say the trend of customers seeking pet food containing all-natural ingre dients might cost customers more, but it has brought a growing num ber of better-informed pet owners into their shops. In 2007, a massive recall of pet food that contained the chemical melamine, which is used in fertilizer and plastic utensils, shook customers preferences from generic food that contains corn, wheat or soy toward hormoneand steroid-free, grass-fed, all-meat ingredients, owners said. In fact, through May 2013, the percentage of dog food brands claiming to be gluten-free was 28.6 percent, up from 12.6 percent in the full year of 2012, according to a report on United States pet food trends last year by Supply Side Animal Nutrition Insights. In the same report it said natural pet food accounted for $1.5 billion in sales in 2009, and was projected to outpace the sales of traditional pet food over the next ve years. This shift in what customers wanted to feed their pets forced some store owners to expand their offerings of pet food, which added costs to their bottom line. But it also helped build trust with their customers. While large retailers like Petco offer organic and all-natural food, the owners said being a smaller store offers them the opportunity to talk one-on-one with customers and offer specic food recommendations for certain breeds of dogs. There is absolutely a push for better ingredients, said Susan Weinrich, the owner of Westwood Pets Unlimited in Westwood, N.J. Customers now want grain-free, high-quality food for their pets. Weinrich said over the past ve years the number of brands offer ing higher quality ingredients in their pet food has skyrocketed. She estimated that as many as 25 to 30 brands are offering holistic ingredients, and her store offers about 10 of those brands, she said. Over the past few years, Weinrich said she has attended trade shows, seminars Shops say pet owners choosing food with careFeeding Fido LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver Course available in MayAARP classes for drivers ages 50 and older on the dates are available for $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment can be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. Classes will take place: %  %  From 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday and Thursday at the Live Well campus at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. Register by calling 352-394-0250. %  %  From 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at the Harden-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St. in Eustis. Register at 352-394-0250.THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer support group meeting scheduledThis men-only meeting will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr., in The Villages. The meeting gives men an oppor tunity to exchange experiences and learn from one another about the challenges related to prostate cancer. For information, call Tom Vejda at 352-446-4192.LADY LAKE Essential tremor support group meeting scheduledLearn about coping methods, medications, helpful hints and gain understanding at this meeting for those aficted and for caregivers at 2 p.m. Wednesday at St. Timothy Church, 1351 Paige Place, in Lady Lake. For information, call Ken Taylor at 352-787-3866 or email kstaylor62@ usa2net.net. LEESBURG Quit Smoking Program to begin on May 27The Lake County Health Department will host free, veweek quit smoking classes on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., beginning on May 27, at the Community Health Center, 225 N. First St., in Leesburg. The program will also be on Mondays from 6:30 to 8 p.m., beginning on June 1, at the National Training Center at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. To enroll, call 1-877-252-6094.LAKE COUNTY Neurologist to speak about stroke awarenessThe Central Florida Health Alliance and local hospitals are focusing on stroke prevention by promoting awareness and the importance of fast diagnosis and treatment during National Stroke Awareness month in May. Dr. Firas Siou, neurologist at Leesburg Regional Medical Center, will present a free talk at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., downtown Leesburg on May 28 at 6 p.m. Call 352-751-8585 to RSVP.There is absolutely a push for better ingredients. Customers now want grain-free, highquality food for their pets.Susan Weinrich, Owner of Westwood Pets Unlimited LARRY LARUEMCTTACOMA, Wash. Jake Stanton had more than 2,000 friends on Facebook and, since early May, hundreds of people have put photographs and memo ries on a new Facebook page, RIP Jake Stanton. He was a popular 19-year-old who attended Western Washington University, a Stadium High School graduate who competed on the swim team and played in the school band, a young man whose kindness and smile are being called unforgettable. Over the last six months, that smile hid his pain and confusion. Jake was tortured by voices telling him to hurt himself. He didnt want to die, said his mother, Jacquie Stanton. He fought so hard to be normal, to just be a kid in school. Three days after their son suffocated himself in his bedroom, Jacquie and Bill Stan ton came to call at The News Tribune in Tacoma, Wash., last week. They wanted to talk about Jake and his de cision to be an organ donor. But mostly they wanted to talk about a dysfunctional mental health system. When they noticed a change in their son about a year ago, the Stantons tried to get him help. They started with their family doctor, who told them everybody has moods and recommended Jake see a counselor. I started calling counselors and was told I couldnt get an appointment for two months, Jacquie said. And we couldnt see a psychiatrist who can prescribe meds until wed seen a therapist. We started looking for help in October and didnt get an appoint ment until December.Parents say son couldnt get help he neededSEE PETS | C2 LUI KIT WONG / MCT Bill and Jacquie Stanton reect their sadness while talking about the suicide of their son, Jacob, 19, at their family home.SEE HELP | C4

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 and devoted hours to self-educating herself about the ingredients used in pet food. But the demand from customers for higher-quality pet food has driven up the cost on both ends of the pur chase. Weinrich said a ve-pound bag of lower-quality food once cost her about $8 to or der, where the higher quality food popular today will cost between $16 and $18 for a 5-pound bag. The idea for customers behind good quality food is that youre spending money now, but will save it in the long run when you dont have to go to the vet down the line, Weinrich said. Shawn Kim, the owner of Mamas and Papas Petshop in Englewood, N.J., said he has seen an inux of customers coming to his store looking for better quality food, rather than shopping at supermar kets or chain stores. While the high-quality food costs him up to 15 percent more for each bag, Kim said his customers are willing to pay higher prices on the retail side of the purchase. At least in our community, we are seeing that customers are willing to pay a little extra because in the long run, they are actually saving money with the healthier food, Kim said. Karl McQuilken, the owner of New Jer seys Wholistic Paws in Ridgewood and Bark Ridge in Park Ridge, said his stores sell only all-natural pet food. People love their pets and are passionate about their pets, and were seeing that at our store, said McQuilken. But Weinrich said that while all-natural pet food is driving trafc to her store, the food has the lowest markup of the items she sells, so the key to remaining protable is getting customers who come in for the healthier dog food to buy some of the other items she sells in the store such as accessories or toys for their pets. The dog food isnt a money maker, thats for sure, Weinrich said. When people realize that our store is knowledgeable and can direct each individual customer to a specific brand of food that is the right t for their dog, they will oftentimes nd something else in the store to buy. Thats where we make the money. McQuilken said most of his customers ask questions about differ ent ailments their pets might have, and he then directs them to the best pet food that would t that individual pet. While the all-natural food is a little more expensive, most people are willing to pay it because of the con nection they have with their pets, McQuilken said. How can you put a dollar sign on that? HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 PETSFROM PAGE C1 DAVID TEMPLETONMCTPITTSBURGH Her foot pain began 15 years ago, leading to a 2002 diagnosis of osteoarthritis, which left her limping and unable to walk for extended periods of time. And it progressively worsened. In time, Deborah Cole Thomas, 60, of Plum, Pa., would undergo sur geries to fuse joints in both feet along with a left-ankle replacement, all from the wear-andtear form of arthritis. She endured shoulder pain and more recent problems with rightknee pain, which she likens to a knife stab. Round-the-clock pain medications are a must. I try not to let it affect me, Thomas said, not ing that her husband, Llewellyn, 82, has had both arthritic knees re placed. It drives me to keep moving. I watched my mom give up, and her hands became so crippled she had to be fed. Thomas, now retired, worked as a Westinghouse computer engineer, spending hours at a desk that made her feel like the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz. Shed stand and struggle to ex stiffened joints. In coming years, she faces further surger ies, including knee-replacement surgery. But shes still walking, with the goal of 10,000 steps a day and an average of about 7,000. She also cant run and isnt allowed to jump. Doctors orders. But she works around those limitations. Theres always something I can do just to keep moving. While people with osteoarthritis struggle to move, theres plenty of movement in research as scientists work through the biological puzzle of osteoarthritis to come up with poten tial treatments. A University of Pittsburgh research team, led by Rocky S. Tuan professor and executive vice chairman of the department of orthopedic surgery and di rector of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering is making headway in under standing the complex stew of enzymes (his tones), proteins and genes that cause osteo arthritis while identifying a potential treatment to slow the rate of cartilage destruction. Theres further breaking news from the Tuan camp that sounds like science ction: His team is using a 3-D printer, which makes structures one layer at a time, to make new joints. Using a solution containing the patients stem cells, along with growth factors and scaf folding material, the 3-D printer constructs actual cartilage in the right shape to replace damaged cartilage. The stem-cell solu tion extruded through a catheter also could be used to create new cartilage, as guided by a 3-D printer, directly onto the joint bone. The teams tissue-engineered joints already have shown success in large animals, raising the promise of creating replacement joints for people now dependent on plastic and metal ones. The process could be particularly useful in repairing battleeld injuries. Tuan announced the success April 27 at the Experimental Biology 2014 scientic sessions and meeting in San Di ego. We essentially speed up the development process by giving the cells everything they need, while creating a scaffold to give the tissue the ex act shape and structure that we want, Tuan said, adding that his team continues working to develop cartilage more closely resembling human cartilage. Total joint replacements involving plastic and metal joints work well, but they dont last long enough, Tuan said. For someone who is 60, thats OK. But if you are in your 30s, thats not good because you may need revision after revision. Osteoarthritis represents 80 percent of all cases of arthritis, whose various forms plague 27 million Americans, making arthritis the na tions major form of physical disability. The disease burden is partic ularly acute in the aged population, with one out of two individuals older than 65 having at least one joint affected.Delving into the pain of osteoarthritis BOB DONALDSON / MCT Deborah Cole Thomas arthritis has led to an ankle replacement and two mid-foot fusions.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 MELISSA DRIBBENMCTPHILADELPHIA Wondering about the best shoes to wear for spring running? Neutral? Minimalist? Stability? Motion control? Cushioned heel? Confused? Of course you are. Well, sports medicine specialists have good news. Stop worrying about fallen arches, overpronation, and putting your feet on a paleolithic regimen. The latest thinking about how to choose the best running shoe is to let comfort be your guide. Since the 1970s, run ning shoes have evolved from puny slabs of rubber sewn to canvas shells into engineering feats rivaling 3-D-printed surveillance drones. Far beyond the latest Nike Flyknit Lunar 2 are plans for running shoes made of computer-gen erated molecules that will link to living organ isms and conform to your foots ever-changing needs. In the somewhat-less-distant future are Google Bluetooth-enabled shoes that talk to you and tell you how your run is going. For now, runners have a hard enough time picking from hundreds of mute, inorganic options. Historically, the push has always been to look at foot pronation, said Bryan Heiderscheit, a professor in the de partment of biomedical engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Runners were told to wear shoes that would correct for the foots tendency to roll inward or outward, on the theory that this would correct biomechanical aws and pre vent injuries to the knees and lower back. But the best studies that have been done in the last 10 years, said Heiderscheit, have not substantiated that claim. In 2010, the American Journal of Sports Medicine published a study of 1,400 Marine Corps recruits. Half the group was given shoes based on a careful evaluation of the shape of their feet. The control groups shoes were chosen ran domly. Assigning shoes based on the shape of the plantar foot sur face, the authors concluded, had little inuence on injuries. When Heiderscheit tries to explain this to members of the running-shoe industry, he gets pushback. Not surprising, he said, considering that the $20 billion athlet ic-shoe market sustains itself on innovation. Most companies re lease new models twice a year, offering features designed to improve performance and pre vent injury. The idea that almost any shoe is ne if its comfortable is also apt to meet resistance from runners for whom theo ry has become dogma. Believers in barefoot running or minimalist shoes, for instance, are unlikely to be con vinced. Both are ne, said Heiderscheit, as long as recent converts do not make the switch too abruptly. Speaking from per sonal experience, Heiderscheit said, it is easy to get injured if you decide to toss your cushiony sneakers and immediately start racking up miles in a pair of barely-theres. It can take months to adapt, he said. He recommends exercises to strengthen muscles in the calf and foot and using the minimal ist shoes for short, easy runs at rst. You should feel so comfortable in a shoe that you could sleep in them, said Jon Woo, a sports medicine specialist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Experts say that just as everyones feet are unique, so are their run ning styles. There is no absolute biomechanical ideal, said Heider scheit. One of the worlds fastest marathoners, Pescah Jeptoo, has a knock-kneed gait that has carried her through 26.2 miles in a blazing two hours, 20 minutes, and 14 seconds. Still, Heiderscheit said, there are aws to avoid. You dont want to bounce too much. You dont want to overstride. And the one thing we absolutely dont want people to do is a hard heel strike truly com ing down on your heel with your foot pointed high in air. Jeptoo, for the re cord, runs in Nike Zoom Streak 3s, a lightweight, breathable shoe with some support and cush ioning. Online reviews of the shoe range from I got huge blisters to Perfect! If this proves any thing, experts said, it is that the one true au thority on which shoes are best is the runner who wears them. Most important quality in a running shoe? Comfort MELISSA DRIBBEN / MCT Danielle Tolbert tries on a pair of running shoes in Philadelphia on April 25.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 After that, he started seeing a psychiatrist and was prescribed medications that didnt seem to help. Jake began losing faith in a mental health sys tem his family couldnt seem to make work. One January evening, he jumped off a bridge in Dash Point, Wash. That landed him in the hospital for 10 days, fol lowed by another week in the mental health unit. Though his par ents wanted him to stay there, he was released. His mother, a registered nurse, couldnt see reports on her son, because Jake was legally an adult. Trying to get him help, she found ob stacles everywhere. Ive been a nurse for 25 years, so I know the medical system, Jacquie said. I had no idea until I was in crit ical need of the mental health system that its broken. The only way to get immediate care was the emergency room, where we could keep him safe for three or four days as a danger to himself. We went through the ER ve times in six months, and even then it wasnt working. He wasnt getting help, and they wouldnt keep him and give him help. Bill Stanton watched Jacob, the oldest of his three children, isolate himself from friends, though never from his family, with whom he lived in Tacoma. One night last week, he came into our bedroom where I was watch ing TV and laid down on the bed with me, Bill said. His mom came in and asked what he was doing, and he said, Watching TV with dad. The voices, howev er, had been growing worse. Jake would con sole a neighbor one afternoon, consider killing himself that evening. A few weeks ago, he put all his medications in a blender and made a lethal chocolate shake then poured it down the sink. Jake told me, Im having such a hard time, and I told him, Were going to win, Jake, Jacquie recalled. Last Thursday night, he came home from a night class and talked to his father, then went downstairs to his room. Ten minutes later, Jac quie came home from work, asked where Jake was and called to him. There was no answer. I knew right then, she said. Jacquie Stanton en tered her sons room. He was lying on the bed with a trash bag over his head, she said. I had to tear the bag off his head and begin try ing to resuscitate him. Bill called 911, then began helping his wife perform CPR. Jakes 15-year-old brother, Kyle, and 13-year-old sister, Avery, watched in horror. Paramedics arrived, found a slight heartbeat and raced him to the hospital. He was alive but not alive, Jacquie said. They kept him alive with machines until the next morning. Jake was an organ donor, so we had to talk to doctors there about the process. It wasnt easy for the family. Once he was breath ing on his own, he died in seven minutes, Jac quie said. Then the team had to take him within two minutes to do what they had to do. Jakes liver, kidneys and corneas were giv en to recipients within hours. His friends have been stopping by the Stanton home since Friday, stay ing for hours, talking and crying. Jake had an appointment with his psychiatrist set up for the day he died, and the psy chiatrist was notied of Jakes death, but the family has not heard from him. HELPFROM PAGE C1 Associated PressCHICAGO A small study of col lege football players found that the areas of their brains that control memory were smaller than average, especially if they had suffered concussions. But more research is needed to determine if the differences mean theyre headed for problems down the road. The study of NCAA players is only preliminary, but the differences were seen in a part of the brain affected by a destructive disease linked with head blows and found in autopsies of some former NFL play ers. The college players studied did just as well on tests of mental func tion, including memory, as a healthy control group of college athlete s in non-contact sports, although those in the football group whod played the longest had slower reaction times. Its unknown when the brain dif ferences occurred and its possible the football players were born with them, said study co-author Pat rick Bellgowan, a neuroscientist at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Okla. The differences were found in the hippocampus, a small sea horseshaped region behind the front part of the brain. In football play ers whod had concussions, the right part of the hippocampus was 26 percent smaller on average than in the control group. In football play ers without concussions, it was 17 percent smaller. Similar differences were seen in the left part of the hip pocampus.Brain differences found in NCAA football players

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 JAN HEFLERMCTEGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, N.J. Before buy ing cannabis at south ern New Jerseys only medical-marijuana dispensary, patients must circle one of six animat ed faces that stare out from a clipboard. The row of smiling, wincing, frowning, and sobbing cartoon faces is being used to rank the degree of pain that patients experience due to cancer, multiple sclero sis, epilepsy and sever al other conditions the state deems treatable by cannabis. When the patients return to the Compassionate Care Founda tion dispensary in Egg Harbor Township, N.J., for a rell, they again are handed the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale so that the effect of the marijuana can be assessed. The results so far are absolutely dramatic, said Suzanne Miller, a researcher with a Ph.D. who sits on the dispen sarys board of trustees. Miller is also a profes sor and the director of behavioral medicine at Fox Chase Cancer Cen ter/Temple Health in Philadelphia. About 80 percent of the 145 CCF patients who completed the rankings at least twice over the last two months have chart ed signicant improvement, she said. Still being collected and analyzed, the data show that on average, most patients are reporting their pain levels decreased by 30 to 50 percent, Miller said. You usually see small er results, about 10 per cent, or 20 percent, she said. An author of four books and a contributor to more than 100 academic articles, Miller will be the lead researcher on a re port she plans to submit to medical journals for publication possibly this fall. The dispensary has 600 registered patients and expects to have more data by that time. On a gloomy, wet morning last week, sev eral patients walked into the dispensary to purchase cannabis, which is packaged in plastic bottles and sold at $428 an ounce. Two patients who agreed to be interviewed af terward said the marijuana they bought had changed their lives. Three other patients who were reached by phone said it markedly eased their pain. I was addicted to Vi codin, said Gary Car nevale Sr., a multiple sclerosis patient from Bayville, N.J., shortly after he picked up an ounce of Red Cherry Berry marijuana from an employee behind a glass window at the dispensary. Carnevale, 57, a former licensed practical nurse, said increasing amounts of prescribed Vicodin, OxyContin, Percocet, and other narcotics did not relieve the throb bing pain shooting up his back and legs, and he then had to be hos pitalized for two weeks early last year. Carnevale was among the rst patients to come to CCF, which opened six months ago inside a cavernous warehouse just outside Atlantic City. Marijuana plants are also grown at that location under spe cial purple, red, blue, and yellow lights. I took three or four hits. I laid in bed, and I could not believe the pain slipping away, Carnevale said, recalling the rst day he smoked it using a vaporizer. My pain was like 10. But when I smoke marijuana, I swear its zero, he said. While he previous ly spent most of his days in bed, he said he now is able to function and even took a recent vaca tion with his family, including his two grandchildren. Jacqueline Angotti, a nurse-practitioner from Robbinsville, N.J., began sobbing when asked the effect the marijuana had on her 9-year-old son, Miles, who had suffered multiple, daily seizures since he was 2. Hes been sei zure-free; hes had none for the past 31 days and has had no side effects, she said. And hes bet ter cognitively. In the past, Miles was forced to wear a mask to protect his face and teeth from frequent falls caused by the violent seizures, she said. And, for the same reason, he had to eat meals from a tray while sitting on the oor. Angotti turned the marijuana buds into a tincture, which she gives to Miles in tiny doses three times a day, and he no longer needs his mask, she said. He eats dinner at the table now, she added. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Medical marijuana has effect on symptom relief DAVID M. WARREN / MCT Marijuana plants grow in the owering room at Compassionate Care Foundation, the only medical marijuana dispensary in New Jersey.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 19, the 139th day of 2014. There are 226 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 19, 1864, American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, 59, died in Plymouth, New Hampshire. On this date: In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Englands King Henry VIII, was beheaded after being convicted of adultery. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 19, 2014: This year you will be more in touch with your feelings. You will be an effective communicator, and youll also be more expressive when you feel upset or angry. If you are single, potential suitors might notice how you switch back and forth between being conservative and being quirky. You need to relate to someone who is not judgmental. Come summertime, you could meet Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, the two of you are more likely to take up a new hobby together. Your mutual interest will help you both open up more. AQUARIUS can be as stubborn as you are, but your views are very different. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your calmness will transform quickly into strong action. A partner seems to be a bit difcult at the moment. You might be unusually irritable in the evening as well. Know that this, too, will pass. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Take a leap of faith, and be willing to take risks in order to get past a situation. You could be sorry that you decided to act a certain way with an associate or a loved one. Put in the extra effort that could help this person to relax and ease up. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might be more interested in what someone else has to say about what seems like a never-ending, difcult work or personal situation. Your creativity is likely to emerge when dealing with someone at a distance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Zero in on what is important. Your creativity could be stunted by someone elses gesture and/or idea. Help this person add the ourishing touches on his or her concept. You might be driven by your need to get things accomplished. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) What you are thinking is more logical than you might realize. Be willing to take a stand. You might want to start interacting with a friend who demonstrates a similar interest. A discussion will become very lively, except around a family member. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Expenses could go overboard at the drop of a hat. You might regret letting your impulsiveness take the lead. A partner or friend understands much more than you think he or she does. You might not be communicating as well as you think you are. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You are full of energy and dynamic ideas. Deal with one person at a time. A partner nally might be a lot more easygoing than he or she has been in a while. Be careful a disagreement still could arise. Resist being combative; instead, go for a brief walk. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Know when to back down in order to get the best possible results from a situation. The less said, the better off youll be. You could feel awkward with others, and perhaps also with an associate. Try not to let your frustration get the best of you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Dont stand on ceremony, just pick up the phone and start a conversation. You might be delighted by how happy the other party is to hear from you. Several people might challenge you in a meeting, but make it your pleasure to be responsive. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might want to indulge a boss. Your high energy and distinctive ideas will come out, no matter who runs into you. Youll want to be aware of the costs of your actions. Someone could become angrier than he or she has been in a while. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You tend to ourish, no matter what youre doing. Do research, or call someone you consider an expert. Get as much feedback as possible. Push to get a better grasp of a situation, and know that you will make the right decision. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might need to be more detached and not personalize a situation so much. Read between the lines when you speak with a friend. You could be wafing about what you are seeing. Dont allow others to add fuel to any res that might be smoldering. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I have been working hard to advance in my health care career so I can give my family a decent life. I have worked my way up from poverty, paying my own way, earning my degree through the military and sheer determination. I have reached a point where I would like to enjoy life a little more, but my husband thinks I am being materialistic. We ght often over my wardrobe spending. I believe the clothes I wear, mostly nice skirt suits and heels, are part of my job and image. I believe it has helped me to get ahead. I dont buy overly expensive items, but they arent cheap. I wear the things I buy for years and have a $200-a-month budget for what I may need, even though I dont always spend it. I think I have earned the right to shop a little, which will ultimately lead to bigger and better things for my family, so why does my husband make me feel so guilty? CLOTHES MAKE THE WOMAN DEAR C.M.T.W.: Not knowing your husband, its difcult to say, but Ill throw out a few ideas. Could he be insecure or intimidated by your professional image? Could he be jealous on some level? In what kind of environment was he raised? Was his mothers uniform a housedress? If you are earning good money and your family is being provided for, then you are cer tainly entitled to spend some of it on yourself. And you shouldnt have to apologize for it. DEAR ABBY: I am getting married in October, and my ance, Brad, and I are having trouble seeing eye-to-eye on the name change issue. Brads family is originally from the North, and my family is from the South. He and his family are convinced that I should drop my maiden name, keep my middle name, and take his name as my new last name. However, the women in MY family have always kept our maiden names, added their new husbands last name to theirs and dropped their middle names. This is about the only thing Brad and I cant seem to agree on. What can I do when my mother says one thing and my sweetie says another? With your years of experience, I hope you can steer me in the right direction. BRADS BRIDE IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR BRIDE: Its YOUR name. So do what you are most comfortable doing, because its the name you will have to carry til the day you die (or divorce). DEAR ABBY: I am under a lot of stress, but the woman I am with doesnt know it. I am 17, and I have been sleeping with my 38-year-old aunty. Shes married and has three children. Shes my mums sister. Weve slept together seven times and we cant stop doing it. I think Im in love with her. I know this is wrong. I need advice. Please help. LOVESICK TEEN IN THE U.K. DEAR LOVESICK: Being in love shouldnt cause stress; it should relieve it. You know what you are doing is wrong, and YOU must be the adult and end this relationship. If you dont, it will bring heartache and tur moil to you and the rest of the family. By having an adulterous and incestuous affair with you her nephew and a minor your aunt is behaving like a sexual predator.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Husband thinks less is more when wife budgets for clothes JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 LEESBURG352-326-4079Mon. Fri. 9:00am 4:30pmSaturday by Appointment Only.In Home Test Available. INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE Audibel

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Thank you for reading the local paper!

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Thank you for reading the local paper!

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Thank you for reading the local newspaper!



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Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE TODD WINS BYRON NELSON FOR FIRST PGA TITLE, SPORTS B1 PROJECT SOS: Donates wheelchairs to three Lake Hills School students A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Shops say pet owners choose food with care C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 139 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 87 / 66 Sun mixed with some clouds. 50 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Having been in Future Farm ers of America all four years of high school, Tavares High School senior Krista Wilson made it this year to the state level in the tractor operations competition. This has pretty much been my high school life, Wilson said of FFA. In order to reach the state competition, Wilson won both the sub-district and dis trict-level competitions. It was pretty much a relief when I won it, because I was so excited because Ive worked four years to try to get the state level, Wilson said. Wilson, who nished seventh out of 12 in the state competi tion, said she had competed in other competitions in the past, but this year focused only on tractor operations in order to study more for it. Jessica Holland, the agricul ture instructor and FFA advi sor at Tavares High School, also saw the level of work Wilson put into preparing for the com petition. I think her going to the state level for tractor is amazing be cause shes put so much hard work into it over the last four years, Holland said. She was a little disappointed to get sev enth, but she took it very well and knew what she could im prove upon and that shows a great person, in my opinion. Also, I did some checking and found out that she was the rst female to compete at the state level (in Florida) for that con test, and that was very hum bling for her and me. Wilson said she had been in volved in music since the rst grade and was in band her FFA helps shape Tavares High School senior Krista Wilsons life AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Senior Krista Wilson poses with agriculture instructor and FFA advisor Jessica Holland. CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press T uesdays high-pro le primary elec tions may extend a streak of sorts for tea party Republicans: losing individual races but winning the larg er ideological war by tugging the GOP right ward. Tea party-endorsed candidates are strug gling in Tuesdays Re publican congressional primaries in Georgia, Kentucky and Idaho. In each state, howev er, the establishment Republican candidates have emphasized their conservative creden tials, which narrows the partys philosophi cal differences. Citing similar dy namics in other states, Democrats say the GOP candidates who are trying to give Re publicans control of the Senate will prove too far right for centrist voters in November. Republicans need to gain six Senate seats to control the cham ber. Holding Kentucky and Georgia against well-funded Demo crats, both women, is crucial to their hopes. Six states hold pri maries Tuesday. Geor gia, Kentucky and Or egon have closely watched Republican contests for Senate. Pennsylvania and Ar kansas have feisty gu bernatorial primaries. In Idaho, tea par ty-backed lawyer Bry an Smith is trying to oust Republican Rep. Mike Simpson, whos seeking a ninth House term. In Kentucky, tea par tyers would love to LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Several Lake County commissioners say they had concerns about the effects of a controver sial sand mine in south Lake on adjacent land owners, agricultural re sources and trafc is sues on U.S. Highway 27. CEMEX proposed the 1,196-acre sand mine in the center of the plan ning area of the Well ness Way Sector Plan. The sector plan would transform 16,000 acres in the southeast corner of the county into a hub for high-tech health care jobs and other LISA LEFF Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO Isaac Barnett took a bold step last year: He told teachers and class mates at his Kansas high school that the student they had known as a girl now wanted to be ac cepted as a boy. His close childhood friend, who also identi ed as transgender, was ready to reveal his se cret, too. With the administra tions blessing, a seg ment featuring the two friends talking about their transitions aired in CLERMONT Cemex faced uphill battle with sand mine DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO This is a Cemex sand mining facility in Polk County. The company would like to open another one in south Lake. Tea party is losing races but tugging GOP rightward TIMOTHY D. EASLEY / AP ABOVE: Darrell Uhls, left, shakes hans with Kentucky Republican senatorial candidate Mitch McConnell during a campaign stop Saturday, at the Tanglewood Farms Restaurant in Franklin, Ky. BELOW: Kentucky Democratic senatorial candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes speaks to a gathering of supporters at the Simpson County Courthouse on Saturday, in Franklin, Ky. Schools work to help transgender students fit in SEE STUDENTS | A2 SEE CEMEX | A2 SEE GOP | A2 SEE WILSON | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MAY 18 CASH 3 ............................................... 7-2-1 Afternoon .......................................... 5-6-0 PLAY 4 ............................................. 8-5-4-3 Afternoon ....................................... 2-4-7-2 FLORIDA LOTTERY MAY 17 FANTASY 5 ........................... 7-17-21-27-32 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 3-11-13-15-33-50 POWERBALL .................. 23-32-39-47-4922 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. the schools classrooms, alongside a basketball team promotion and a feature on the impor tance of the arts. I didnt get any ques tions or hate or putdowns or anything like that, said Barnett, now 18, adding that they called him Isaac imme diately a drama-free coming-out that would have been extraordi nary in schools a de cade ago. With children reject ing the birth gender at younger ages and the transgender rights movement gaining mo mentum, schools in dis tricts large and small, conservative and liber al, are working to help transitioning youth t in without a fuss. California this year became the rst state with a law spelling out the transgender student rights in public schools, including the ability to use restrooms and to play on sports teams that match their ex pressed genders. Another 13 states pro hibit discrimination on the basis of gender iden tity in schools. Dozens of districts, from Salt Lake City and Kansas City to Knoxville, Ten nessee, and Decatur, Georgia, have adopted similar protections. Parents are increas ingly seeking a com fortable learning en vironment for their transgender children, according to Transgen der Legal Defense and Education Fund Exec utive Director Michael Silverman. His group represent ed the parents of a transgender Colorado grade school girl who was prevented from us ing the girls restroom until state civil rights of cials ruled in her favor last year. Theres a new gen eration of parents who grew up in the age of the gay rights move ment and are saying, We want to do what is best for our children, he said. The trend is likely to accelerate with help from the federal gov ernment. Last month, the U.S. Education Depart ment alerted districts in a memo on sexual violence that it would welcome civil rights complaints from trans gender students under Title IX, the 1972 law that bans gender dis crimination at schools. Kim Pearson, training director of Trans Youth Family Allies, estimates that for every case that makes headlines there are dozens that are re solved quietly and easily. Since she co-founded the support and advoca cy group in 2007, Pear son has worked with parents and educators in half of the states. If a school wants to get it, they will, Pearson said. STUDENTS FROM PAGE A1 CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Transgender high school students Isaac Barnett, left, and his prom date, identied only by his rst name Jasen, pose for photos after picking up their tuxedos for prom in Kansas City, Mo. The seniors, both born as females, are open about their transgender status in their schools. industries, which would attract people who like to bike, walk and enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle. Wellness Way has been called the largest piece of undeveloped proper ty left in Lake County. The tract runs east of US 27 along the Orange Coun ty border, running south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. Commissioner Sean Parks said he was pleased CEMEX withdrew its ap plication. I have had serious concerns all along about the compatibility with the Wellness Way Sec tor Plan, he said. There were some trafc and health issues that need ed to be addressed. I am concerned about the ef fects on water resources and some agricultural re sources. Additionally, a health expert previously said there are questions about mining and its effects on public health because of the particulates it gener ates. Crispin Pierce, an asso ciate professor and pro gram director for the Envi ronmental Public Health Program at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, recently concluded an air quality study at mining sites, which showed high er levels of PM2.5 the particulates mining gen erates, including silica than what was report ed by the Department of Natural Resources. Even in digging it out and loading it in a truck you are generating those small particulates (of sil ica), he previously said. Without monitoring by an independent agen cy, we dont have the kind of assurance we need to protect public health. In a letter dated May 13 to County Attorney San dy Minkoff, CEMEXs at torney, Roger Sims, wrote the company wished to withdraw its application for conditional use ap proval after reviewing a large number of objection letters received which raise concerns about al leged trafc impacts from the project. CEMEX prefers to un derstand such concerns, determine their validity and determine whether they should be addressed with proactive measures requiring amendments to the application Sims wrote. More than 100 peo ple recently attended a meeting in Clermont to oppose the plans for the sand mine. Many area residents mainly in the Kings Ridge development were concerned about trafc, noise and dust from the mine. Some res idents talked about char tering buses to the county commission meeting on Tuesday, where the CE MEX request was slated to be heard before it was withdrawn. Commissioner Jimmy Conner also expressed concerns. There were legitimate concerns raised by adja cent landowners and by people who live in Kings Ridge, he said. But Sara Engdahl, direc tor of communications for CEMEX USA, said in a press release, There are rumors and statistics re garding our project that are false. Asked what specically Engdahl was referring to, she cited the trafc con cerns. Per an independent trafc study of the po tential impacts of the mine, the trafc impacts to Highway 27 would be insignicant, less than 1 percent of the highways capacity, she wrote in an email message, stating there would be 300 round trips by sand trucks made per day. There are 21,500 ve hicles that travel in that area daily, according to the countys Department of Public Works, which conrmed the sand mine trucks would make up roughly 1.4 percent of the highways trafc. Even so, county ofcials have said they have con cerns about dust being kicked up by the trucks on Schoeld Road, a clay road in the vicinity of the proposed sand mine. A clay road is a dirt road, and if you put 300 trucks on it, it is going to create dust, said Com missioner Tim Sullivan. I think one of the ways to mitigate that is to pave that road. Like Parks, Sullivan said he had concerns about the sand mines impact on agricultural resources. Agriculture is a huge part of the Lake Coun ty economy, he said. The sand mine needs to t the character of the com munity. Commissioner Leslie Campione credited CE MEX for recognizing that issues being raised were genuine and they were of concern to the county commission. Asked if she believed the county had valid con cerns regarding the issues raised, Engdahl wrote: The project has received all other permits required to construct and operate other than commission approval, as well as from the Planning and Zoning Board. But at the same time, Engdahl also wrote, CE MEX believes, however, that taking time to work through these concerns regarding our applica tion is in the best interest of both Lake County and CEMEX. CEMEX FROM PAGE A1 knock off Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a 30-year senator they see as too accommodating to Democrats. But challeng er Matt Bevin has strug gled under a barrage of attacks from McConnell and his allies. McConnell, caught off guard by the tea party movement in 2010, has scrambled to win sup port from conservatives who dislike compromise. He quickly allied himself with Sen. Rand Paul, who defeated McConnells hand-picked candidate in the 2010 primary. And in February, Mc Connell voted against raising the debt ceiling, a never-pleasant vote that past party leaders often swallowed to avert a gov ernment default. Rep. Jack Kingston and businessman David Per due have walked a careful line: showing more open ness to establishment support while still cater ing to hard-core conser vatives who dominate Republican primaries. When the U.S. Chamber of Commerce endorsed Kingston, Broun called him the king of pork. That tag might have t a few years ago. Kings ton, a longtime Appropri ations Committee mem ber, has proudly steered millions of federal dollars to his district. But tea party-driven at tacks on federal spending have sent Republicans scurrying to tighter-sted ground. Kingston raised eyebrows in January when he voted against an appropriations bill af ter working hard to insert funding for Savannahs port. In a sign of the narrow ing differences between tea party activists and traditional Republican groups, Kingston was en dorsed by Brent Bozell, an outspoken critic of Re publican moderation. Bozell, who found ed the conservative Me dia Research Center, said of the Republican pri maries: With virtually no exception, everyone is running as a conser vative. No one is run ning as a moderate, no one is running as an an ti-tea-partyer. GOP FROM PAGE A1 JIM HADLEY / AP Idaho Gov. Butch Otter, second right, appears on stage with Republican gubernatorial hopefuls, from left, Harley Brown, Walt Bayes and state Sen. Russ Fulcher, at a debate Thursday in Boise, Idaho.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Lake-Sumter State will host Tourism Expo in June The Lake County Economic Development & Tourism Department will host a Tourism Expo from 2-7 p.m. on June 11 at LakeSumter State College in Leesburg. Robert Chandler, director of Lake Countys Economic Development & Tourism Department, along with Brandy Hastings of VISIT FLORIDA, will be the keynote speakers, from 2-3 p.m. in the Magnolia Room. The Expo and Exhibit Hall inside the gym will be open from 3-7 p.m. and feature informational booths of tourism-related businesses and organizations. The event is free and open to the public, and citizens will have a chance to mingle with business owners, including event planners, hoteliers and restaurateurs, said Elisha Pappacoda, the countys pub lic information ofcer. For information, call 352-7423918, email ddyer@lakecounty. gov or go to www.lakecounty.gov/ tourismexpo. EUSTIS Count plant, animal species at Lake May Reserve Residents are invited to join park rangers to count Lake Countys many varieties of plants and animal spe cies in celebration of International Day of Biodiversity, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Thursday at Lake May Reserve, 36300 County Road 44A. Park rangers will hope to see the ve-lined skinks, raccoons, Eastern gray squirrels, Summer Tanagers and others at the event. For information, call 352-253-4950. MINNEOLA Harlem Wizards roll into Minneola for benefit Audience participation is part of the fun at this Harlem Wizards bas ketball game to take place at 7 p.m. Thursday at Lake Minneola High School, 101 N. Hancock Rd. The Harlem Wizards will take on a team of Lake County educators for the benet event that will include food trucks on site at 5 p.m. The event also features a silent auction with numerous big ticket items for purchase. Tickets are $10 and can be pur chased online at www.harlemwizards. com. Cost does not include a $5 park ing fee at the school. Funds raised benet the schools athletic teams. For information, call 352-394-9600. BUSHNELL Florida National Cemetery to hold Memorial Day event Major General Michael T. Plehn, principal director for Middle East pol icy, is the keynote speaker at the an nual Memorial Day Ceremony at the Florida National Cemetery on May 26. Organizations, veterans and the general public are welcome to take part in the event beginning at 11 a.m., at 6502 S.W. 102nd Ave., that will host Steve Jerve of WFLATV as master of ceremonies. Those participating in the massing of colors should arrive at 9:30 a.m. For information, call 352-793-7740. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Boleros Cigar and Wine Bar kicked off its inaugu ral Suds, Stogies and Song writers event Sunday after noon outside the Tavares business where talented local musicians took to the stage to perform original songs for the crowd. Boleros owner Heath er Graham relished see ing the audience grow as attendees were eagerly awaiting the arrival of the events special guest and Lake County native, Mi chael Ray, to perform for the hometown crowd. Originally from Eustis, Ray has been touring and working on his debut al bum after having recently signed with Warner Music Group in Nashville. Everybody seems to be having a really good time. Its a beautiful day, a great venue and everybody is happy, said Graham, pleased that 27 artists signed up to participate, including Mark Z, Jeff Whiteld, Alan Darcy, Rita Brooke, Mike Campbell, Bobby Croft, Rick Merrill, John French, Joe Ramirez, Paul Smithson, Dave Mer rill, Michael Hartman, Andy Dubois, Sol Varon, T. Scott Walker, Chris Ash, Rick Redeye, Kelly Jarrard, TAVARES Boleros hosts event for songwriters T he Friends of Lake Louisa State Park held its an nual Nature Fest on the main beach of Lake Louisa near Cl ermont. The fami ly-friendly event is held to create aware ness about Floridas environment and ecosystems. There were discussions about birds, snakes and butteries, as well as walks, tram tours and an eques trian obstacle trail challenge. CLERMONT State park hosts annual Nature Fest PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Carol McCorkle shows off Spartacus, a male Peregrine Falcon. Both are from the Avian Reconditioning Center in Apopka. BELOW: Calla Tittering shows off her rainbow boa Coco. Staff Report Project SOS recently made anoth er round of motorized wheelchair do nations to three students at Lake Hills School. Lake Hills is very fortunate that they have graciously reached out beyond their traditional scope of services to assist our children, school Principal Robin Meyers said of Project SOS in a press release. Their generous dona tions have given our students a new found freedom of mobility and inde pendence. Located in Howey-in-the-Hills, Lake Hills School serves students with moderate to profound disabilities. Three students received wheelchairs last year. This years recipients were LaFabian Irvine, Jaymie Gleash and Sophie Joseph. The primary goal of Project SOS is to provide services to veterans and their families in times of need, the press release said. The charity foundation was established in 2009 by Gary Kad ow and supports U.S. military serv ing overseas, disabled veterans and homeless veterans. Initially, Project SOS provid ed medical and surgical supplies to U.S. military personnel carrying out humanitarian missions in Iraq and Af ghanistan. This resulted in the opening of 22 medical clinics and one pediatric hospital to treat the children caught in wartime conditions, the press release said. All these facilities were operat ed by U.S. military medical battalions, and thousands of childrens lives were saved as a result of the troops efforts. During the past year, Project SOS shifted its effort from overseas be cause of troop withdrawals and now concentrates on the local area by pro viding motorized wheelchairs to dis abled veterans, and also providing clean water, food, clothing, shelter and medical care to our homeless vet erans in the Central Florida area. Project SOS has distributed 42 motor ized wheelchairs and numerous mobil ity devices to local veterans who have served in World War II, up to and in cluding those returning from Afghani stan. This is in addition to caring for our homeless veterans and families living in the Ocala National Forest. HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS Project SOS donates wheelchairs to children SEE STOGIES | A4 Associated Press A Central Florida woman was joyously reunited with her daughter after near ly ve years after authori ties tracked the girl down in Mexico. The Volusia County Sheriffs Ofce said Jodie Borchert of Deltona was reunited with her 12-yearold daughter Saturday in Miami, where the girl was transported after being found in the mountainous region of Hidalgo, Mexico, about two hours outside Mexico City. The childs fa ther, Aaron Cox, ed with the girl in August 2009, po lice said. Cox, 55, was arrested and charged with inter ference with child custo dy. He is being held in Mi ami, awaiting extradition to Volusia County. Its not known whether he has ob tained an attorney. It is such a huge re lief to bring this case to a successful conclusion, said Brandon Haught, a spokesman for the Volu sia County Sheriffs Ofce. Reports are the girl is ex tremely happy to be re united with her family. Authorities have pur sued the case since the girls disappearance, but said no viable leads had emerged until Monday, when a tip was received at the National Center For Missing and Exploit ed Children. Over the fol lowing ve days, the Volu sia County Sheriffs Ofce worked with U.S. Mar shals, the State Attorneys Ofce and the Florida/Ca ribbean Regional Fugitive Task Force. Cox was arrested without incident, authorities said. The man and his daughter had been living in Mexico under assumed names. Deltona woman reunited with daughter after nearly five years MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL The com mercial cargo ship Dragon returned to Earth from the International Space Station on Sunday, bringing back nearly 2 tons of science experi ments and old equipment for NASA. SpaceXs Dragon splashed into the Pacic, just ve hours after leaving the orbiting lab. After a one-month visit, the SpaceX cargo ship was set loose Sunday morning. Astronaut Steven Swanson, the station commander, released it using the big robot arm as the craft zoomed more than 260 miles above the South Pacic. Very nice to have a vehicle that can take your science, equipment and maybe someday even humans back to Earth, Swanson told Mis sion Control. The SpaceX Dragon is the only supply ship capable of returning items to Earth. The others burn up on re-entry. This was the fourth Dragon to bring back space station goods, with 3,500 pounds aboard; it came down off Mexicos Baja Cal ifornia coast. NASA is paying SpaceX and Vir ginia-based Orbital Sciences Corp. to make station deliveries. Orbit al is next up, next month. Russia, Europe and Japan also make occa sional shipments. Dragon returns from space station

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 OBITUARIES Donald Paul Jones, Sr. Donald Paul Jones, Sr, 86, of Oxford went to be with the Lord Saturday, May 17, 2014. Mr. Jones was born September 6, 1927 in Wildwood to the late William B. and Alma Gladys (Rogers) Jones. He has lived here all of his life farming, hunt ing and shing. As a member of Pleas ant Grove Mission ary Baptist Church, he was a Dea con and taught Sunday school for over 45 years. He loved spending time with his family, espe cially his grandchil dren and great-grand children. Survivors include his loving wife of almost 65 years, Wil ma Dean; 3 daughters, Debra Wade of Wild wood, Tina (Tim) Shel ton of Bay City, TX and Donna Kinney of Ox ford; son, Don P. (Con nie) Jones, Jr. of Oxford; sister, Clara Nell Shirey of CA.; 9 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchil dren. Visitation for Mr. Jones will be held 5:00 8:00pm, Wednesday, May 21, 2014 in the Banks/Page-Theus Fu neral Home, Wildwood. The funeral service will be 2:00pm, Thursday, May 22, 2014 at Pleas ant Grove Missionary Baptist Church, Oxford with interment follow ing the service in Nich ols Cemetery. On-line condolences may be shared by visiting www. bankspagetheus.com. If so desired, contribu tions may be made to Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, Oxford or Cor nerstone Hospice, Vil lages. Arrangements are entrusted to Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. DEATH NOTICES Donald Paul Jones Sr. Donald Paul Jones, Sr., 86, of Oxford, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Edward Templin Edward Templin, 73, of Webster, died on Sat urday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. IN MEMORY JONES Mark Cleveland, Tra vis Gilrane and Aman da Cooksey. Graham said Boleros wants to make Suds, Stogies and Songwrit ers an annual event. There has been good feedback about seeing all the artists do only original works. A lot of these artists per form here on a regular basis throughout Lake County, but they all do covers, because that is what the audience usually wants to hear, she said of the singers performing popular songs recorded by oth er artists. It was really a cool idea to put them to gether to just do orig inal works, said Gra ham, noting Suds, Stogies and Songwrit ers was the brainchild of her boyfriend, Mark Zinkiewicz, a local muisican, who books musicians for bars and restaurants at Als Cor ner in Tavares. He knows a lot of musicians, and he knows that a lot of them have great origi nal stuff, she said. Graham has owned Boleros Cigar and Wine Bar since June 2013, and the event allowed her to show case a variety of craft beers and wine for at tendees to sample in a taste-testing hosted by national craft beer company, Sierra Ne vada. Ceijas Ernesto, a pro fessional cigar roll er, and Dayana Alleg ues, both from Tampa, also were at the event demonstrating the ci gar-making craft for at tendees inside Boleros. It takes about three minutes, Ernesto said of the amount of time he spends rolling one cigar before it is placed in a press for one hour. The cigars are very popular, Graham said, marveling over Ernestos talent in cre ating each one. Hes doing a handrolled demonstration and its an awesome part of [the event]. STOGIES FROM PAGE A3 CHRIS ANDERSON Sarasota Herald-Tribune CORTEZ A few times a week 88-yearold Mary Green hops in her 2005 Honda and drives three blocks to the post ofce. She has to. There is no mail de livery to her home. In fact, no one in the historic shing village of Cortez population of roughly 4,000 re ceives home mail deliv ery or has a mail box. We like it that way, Green said. United States Post Of ce, Cortez, Florida, 34215, is usually a busy place most mornings. Residents walk or take their cars or ride their golf carts to pick up their mail. The mail is kept locked up in one of 1,318 small post ofce boxes residents can ac cess with a key. Until the mid-1990s, the mail boxes had combination locks on them. It is not unusual for small towns in Flori da not to receive home mail delivery, but it is not commonplace either. Residents say they like it this way for sev eral reasons: it is a way to meet socially, get ex ercise, check the neigh borhood message board on the side the building and retain part of the villages rich history. They also dont want home mailboxes for safety reasons. Ive heard lots of stories and seen people lose checks in mailboxes, resident Richard Culbreath said. When you raise that red ag, thats a telltale sign and people will come in. Weve never had any mailboxes. Whenever there is any talk about bringing them in we al ways say we dont want them. Culbreath is 80 and walks about a mile most days to the post ofce on Cortez Road. The post ofce is in a small strip mall next to a barbershop, restaurant and laundry. Some resi dents, like former Post master Wyman Coarsey, walk up for coffee at the restaurant and then check their mail. Sometimes I see peo ple here I wouldnt see otherwise, so its kind of a social thing, resident Atlas Kight said. She moved to Cortez in 1961 and believes the current post ofce has been at its present site since 1960. She worked at the Cortez post ofce for many years, retiring in 1989. Green who, at 88, is the oldest woman living in Cortez who was born there is well-known for her historical knowl edge of the village. The original post of ce was built in 1895 and was part of what was called Bratton Store. That building has been preserved in the village. Green said a man named Henry Foreman used to carry mail back and forth between Cor tez and Bradenton on a one-seat horse buggy. Green said the post ofce moved to a sh ing dock, but was de stroyed by a erce hur ricane in 1921. It then was moved to a grocery store owned by her uncle, Thomas Ful ford, until it was given to an 18-year-old wom an named Elizabeth Guthrie, who became the postmaster. I think it was re markable, Green said. She was probably the youngest postmaster in Florida, and she was a woman. Her parents, Bessie and Joe, ran the post of ce. They also owned the Albion Inn, which is In tiny Cortez, no mail delivery is no problem where the post ofce was. It also moved to a house across the street from the hotel for a time before it landed at its current location. Green remem bers attending Flor ida State College for Women in the 1940s and sometimes re ceiving several letters a day from back home. Her friends thought she had a lot of boys trying to date her. Everyone thought I was some hot chick, she said. The letters were re ally from a boy in Cor tez who had a crush on her but she never dated. He kept writ ing her anyway. On Friday she was planning on driv ing her Honda to the post ofce to drop off a birthday card for her 10-year-old great-grandson. The Cortez post of ce has long been part of her history as well as the shing vil lages history. And we like to keep our histo ry alive, she said.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza) 352-308-8318 THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 freshman year, but had to make a difcult choice to quit band in order to do FFA. So, it was kind of a tough decision, but I think it was one of the best decisions, she said. Wilson said she wants to become an agricul ture teacher, because she loves helping stu dents and other FFA members. She is cur rently thinking about joining the Navy before going to college. Shes also stepped up in a big way this year and last year, as a ju nior, with helping teach the younger students, This is how you groom your steer. This is how you should be feeding and nishing out your hog. This is the stuff you need to gather for fair, Holland said. Wilson said she was soft-spoken and shy as a freshman, and FFA helped her become bet ter at public speaking. This year Im loud and proud. Ill get up in front of a hundred peo ple and talk to them. I love talking in front of people now, its one of my favorite things to do, Wilson said. Wilson was the FFA parliamentarian her sophomore year, start ed as vice president her junior year before becoming president during that year and was the president for her senior year. Holland said this is her rst graduating class as she has been teaching for four years, and it has been reward ing to see Wilson blos som over the four years they have known each other. Ive seen Krista grow tremendously, in not only being more com fortable speaking with people, from her fresh man year to her now se nior year, but also being more willing to take on those initiatives, Hol land said. In addition to the tractor competition this year, Wilson also had numerous ani mals in the Lake Coun ty Fair and won mul tiple awards. She has shown animals and won awards each year. Raising livestock, thats like one of my fa vorite things to do, and I love showing. Its one of my big drives that I love, Wilson said. I always look forward to April when the coun ty fair is in town. She added it was somewhat hard balanc ing taking care of her animals with the prepa ration for the tractor competition. Holland said Wilson has been a big exhibitor at the fair all four years. Shes always come to me and said, I want to show this, I want to show this. I didnt have to go and push her to do anything, it was her drive, her initiative, Holland said. WILSON FROM PAGE A1 IF YOU GO TAVARES HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION WHEN: 8 p.m., May 30. WHERE: Tavares High School Football Field NUMBER OF GRADUATES: 258 SPEAKER: Senior Class President Alexis Clark NOTE: Tickets are re quired for entry. MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press WASHINGTON The U.S. government is step ping up efforts to help Central American farm ers ght a devastating coffee disease and hold down the price of your morning cup. At issue is a fungus called coffee rust that has caused more than $1 billion in damage across Latin American region. The fungus is es pecially deadly to Arabi ca coffee, the bean that makes up most highend, specialty coffees. Already, it is affect ing the price of some of those coffees in the United States. We are concerned because we know cof fee rust is already caus ing massive amounts of devastation, said Raj Shah, head of the U.S. Agency for Internation al Development. On Monday, he was expected to announce a $5 million partnership with Texas A&M Univer sitys World Coffee Re search center to try to eliminate the fungus. But the government isnt doing this just to protect our $4 special ty coffees, as much as Americans love them. The chief concern is about the economic se curity of these small farms abroad. If farm ers lose their jobs, it in creases hunger and pov erty in the region and contributes to violence and drug trafcking. Washington estimates that production could be down anywhere from 15 percent to 40 percent in coming years, and that those losses could mean as many as 500,000 peo ple could lose their jobs. Though some countries have brought the fungus under control, many of the poorer coffee-pro ducing countries in Lat in America dont see the rust problem getting better anytime soon. Guatemala, El Salva dor, Honduras, Panama and Costa Rica have all been hard hit. Much of the bland er, mass-produced cof fee in this country comes from Asia and other re gions. Most of the rich er, more expensive cof fees are from small, high altitude farms in Central America. Because the farms are smaller, farm ers there often dont have enough money to buy the fungicides needed or lack the training to plant in ways that could avoid contamination. The rust, called roya in Spanish, is a fun gus that is highly con tagious due to airborne fungal spores. It affects different varieties, but the Arabica beans are especially susceptible. Rainy weather worsens the problem. We dont see an end in sight anytime soon, said Leonardo Lom bardini of Texas A&Ms World Coffee Research. So far, major U.S. cof fee companies have been able to nd enough supply to avoid price in creases. But some small er outts already have seen higher prices, said Ric Rhinehart of the Specialty Coffee Associ ation of America. Rhinehart said the worst-case scenario is that consumers even tually will pay extraor dinarily high prices for those coffees, if you can nd them at all. He said some very spe cialized varieties from a single origin Guate malan antigua coffees, for example have been much harder to source. If the problem continues, he says, some small cof fee companies either will raise prices or use blends that are easier to nd, decreasing the quality of the coffee. Larger companies such as Starbucks and Keurig Green Mountain Inc. have multiple sup pliers across the region and say they have so far been able to source enough coffee. Its a little bit too soon to tell what the impact will be on supply and long term quality over time, said Lindsey Bol ger, who heads up cof fee sourcing for Keurig Green Mountain. Coffee fungus raising prices for high-end blends AP FILE PHOTO In this Feb. 9, 2013 photo, small coffee producer Hector Perez show coffee beans damaged by the roya fungus in San Gaspar Vivar, Guatemala.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 SABINA NIKSIC and JOVANA GEC Associated Press BRCKO, Bosnia-Her zegovina Floodwa ters triggered more than 2,000 landslides across much of the Balkans on Sunday, laying waste to entire towns and villag es and disturbing land mines left over from the regions 1990s war, along with warning signs that marked the unexploded devices. The Balkans worst ooding since re cord keeping began forced tens of thou sands of people from their homes and threat ened to inundate Ser bias main power plant, which supplies elec tricity to a third of the country and most of the capital, Belgrade. Authorities organized a frenzied helicopter airlift to get terried families to safety before the water swallowed up their homes. Many were plucked from rooftops. Floodwaters reced ed Sunday in some lo cations, laying bare the full scale of the damage. Elsewhere, authorities warned that the water would keep rising into Sunday night. The situation is cata strophic, said Bosnias refugee minister, Adil Osmanovic. Three months worth of rain fell on the region in three days, producing the worst oods since rainfall measurements began 120 years ago. At least two dozen people have died, with more ca sualties expected. The rain caused an estimated 2,100 land slides that covered roads, homes and whole villages through out hilly Bosnia. The cities of Orasje and Brcko in northeast Bosnia, where the Sava River forms the natu ral border with Croatia, were in danger of being overwhelmed. Ofcials in Brcko ordered six vil lages to be evacuated. Rescuers urged peo ple to go to the balco nies or rooftops of their houses with bright fab ric to make themselves visible. Brcko Mayor Anto Domic said that un less the Bosnian Army is able to reinforce from the air, the city will be ooded completely. He called for the Defense Ministry to use helicop ters to lower steel barri ers that could be backed by sandbags to contain the water. It is a very demand ing task, he said, ac knowledging that of cials would have no other way to protect the port city of more than 70,000. Civil protection com mander Fahrudin So lak said the Sava Riv er was spilling over another portion of the ood barrier in Orasje while emergency work ers tried desperately to reinforce it with sand bags. In Serbia, where oods have inundated towns and villages, au thorities braced for high water that could last for several more days. Serbian Prime Min ister Aleksandar Vucic said Sunday that 12 bodies have been found so far in Obrenovac, site of the coal-red Nikola Tesla power plant, Ser bias biggest. Parts of the plant and a nearby mine that pro vides its fuel were un derwater. Serbias state pow er company, EPS, said crews were doing all they could to prevent any further damage to the plant. Damage to the mine alone is esti mated at more than 100 million euros ($137 mil lion). Serbias energy min ister, Aleksandar Antic, appealed to people to conserve power, calling the threat to the plant very serious. The oods and land slides raised fears about the estimated 1 mil lion land mines planted during Bosnias 1992-95 war. Nearly 120,000 of the unexploded devic es remain in more than 9,400 carefully marked mineelds. But the weather toppled warn ing signs and, in many cases, dislodged the mines themselves. Beyond the danger to Bosnians, any loose mines could also create an international prob lem if oodwaters car ry the explosives down stream. Experts warned that mines could trav el through half of south east Europe or get stuck in the turbines of a hy droelectric dam. From the air, the northeastern third of Bosnia resembled a huge muddy lake, with houses, roads and rail lines submerged. Of cials say about a million people more than a quarter of the countrys population live in the worst-affected areas. The hillside village of Horozovina, close to the northeastern town of Tuzla, was practical ly split in two by a land slide that swallowed eight houses. More than 100 other houses were under threat from the restless earth. Residents told stories of narrow escapes from injury or death. I am homeless. I have nothing left, not even a toothpick, Me san Ikanovic said. I ran out of the house bare foot, carrying children in my arms. Ikanovic said 10 min utes separated him and his family from like ly death. He carried his 7-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son to safety. He said he had se cured a mortgage and moved in only last year. Now I have nothing, he said. Where will I go now? Where will we live? Semid Ivilics house in the lower part of the village was still stand ing. But looking up at the mass of earth and rubble that engulfed his neighbors homes, he said he was worried. Nobody is coming to help us, he said. The nal person to evacuate a village near Brcko said he had lost everything he valued. I was the last one to leave, said 72-year-old Anto Zuparic. I left ev erything behind, my cat tle and everything else. I do not know what to do. I am glad I wont live much longer anyway. Bosnia flooding triggers landslides, unearths mines DARKO VOJINOVIC / AP A man walks in front of a his ooded home in the village of Veliki Crljeni, some 18 miles south of Belgrade, Serbia, on Sunday.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I s Jill Abramson, the rst fe male executive editor of the New York Times who was un ceremoniously dumped from her job Wednesday, the profes sional-class equivalent of equal pay heroine Lilly Ledbetter? Much is still unknown about the circumstances leading up to Abramsons termination by New York Times Publisher Arthur Sul zberger Jr. But at least two well-sourced media reporters, Ken Aulet ta of the New Yorker and Da vid Folkenik of NPR, conrmed that Abramson, 60, who was less than three years into the top Times job, was red after she dis covered she earned less in pay and benets than her prede cessor, Bill Keller, and asked the newspaper to make it right. There is obviously more to the story, but if that part is true, the comparison to Ledbetter is apt. Ledbetter, a retired Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. supervisor, discovered that for years she was paid substantially less than her 15 male counterparts. She sued, and lost because she did not bring the lawsuit in a timely manner. (How could she? She didnt know she was being underpaid.) Thanks to her, Congress passed the Lil ly Ledbetter Act, which restarts the 180-day statute of limitations clock each time a discriminato ry paycheck is issued. It was the rst bill President Barack Obama signed in ofce. Many reports say Abramson had other problems, including a conicted relationship with the publisher and Times CEO Mark Thompson. On her watch, the Times aggressively reported on Thompsons role at the BBC when it was involved in a controversy over a sex scandal investigation. She has also been described as brusque and even, yes, pushy. The Guardian reported that Abramson tried to hire its U.S. editor-in-chief, Janine Gibson, to be co-managing editor with Dean Baquet, 57, the former Los An geles Times editor who succeeds Abramson now in the top Times job. Though Gibson turned down the offer, the Times own story said Baquet was unhappy about Abramsons effort to hire her. Abramsons dismissal was so abrupt, and Sulzberger was so terse about why he red her (cit ing only an issue with manage ment in the newsroom), that its only natural for people to won der what really happened. The headline over Rebecca Traisters New Republic column reected the feelings of many women: I sort of hope we nd out that Jill Abramson was Rob bing the Cash Register. Abramsons ring, wrote Traister, was among the most harsh and humiliating Ive ever seen play out in the medias re cent history. Within minutes of the editorial meeting at which the turnover was announced, Abramsons name had been scrubbed from the masthead of the paper shes run for the past two and a half years. When disgraced New York Times Executive Editor Howell Raines left the paper in 2003 af ter presiding over the Jayson Blair scandal, Traister noted, he went out with a big newsroom sendoff: In the papers report about the departures of Raines and his dep uty Gerald Boyd, she wrote, Sul zberger was quoted as wanting to applaud Howell and Gerald for putting the interests of this news paper above their own. When Baquet was canned in 2006 by Los Angeles Times Pub lisher David Hiller after public ly pushing back against proposed newsroom cuts, he stood on a desk in the newsroom for his farewell speech and was treated like a hero. Like many with a deep interest in the newspaper business and its female leaders, I eagerly anticipate an investigation into Abramsons ring by Margaret Sullivan, the Times independent and consis tently excellent public editor. Ironically, Sullivans most re cent column is about a new study that nds a continuing gender imbalance in the news paper industry, and among New York Times reporters in particu lar. (Of the 10 largest American newspapers, the study found, the New York Times has the big gest newsroom gender gap; 69 percent of its bylines are male. Here at the Los Angeles Times the study says, men account for 64 percent of the bylines.) The public editor must explain why, exactly, Abramson was red, and why she was treated so disrespectfully. Sullivan noted in her column that shed recently taken part in a panel discussion at an inter national journalism symposium called Where are the Women? Sitting there, she wrote, dis cussing the paucity of women in journalism leadership globally I had the surreal feeling: Are we really still talking about this? Robin Abcarian is a columnist for the Los Angeles Times. OTHER VOICES Robin Abcarian MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Is fired N.Y. Times editor Jill Abramson the new Lilly Ledbetter? J udges on Europes highest court may have thought they were striking a blow for in dividual privacy when they ruled Tuesday that search engines could be ordered to stop linking to sensitive or older information about people online, even if it had been lawfully published. Instead, they were creating an en titlement to censor history, or at least to make parts of the public record harder to nd. The case began when a Spanish lawyer, Ma rio Costeja Gonzalez, did a Google search on his own name and found links to embarrass ing legal notices that a Barcelona newspaper had published in 1998 announcing a real es tate auction to pay his social security debts. Af ter Spains data protection agency ruled that the newspaper could leave the pages online but Google couldnt link to them, Google ap pealed to the European Court of Justice. Its rul ing, which is not subject to appeal, held that in dividual privacy rights override, as a general rule, the publics interest in data, particularly if the presentation is inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive. It doesnt matter where the search engine does its data-crunch ing so long as it has an establishment with in the European Union. As a result, the ruling sets the stage for people to conceal legally pub lished information from the entire world. One of the many aws in the ruling is that it unfairly focuses on Google and other search engines, which arent the real problem here. Theyre not repositories for the data that peo ple might want to remove; they are just re markably efcient tools for nding things on line. And whether a piece of information is relevant or valuable is in the eyes of the be holder. One of the beauties of the Internet, af ter all, is the extent to which it gives anyone with a browser access to troves of knowledge that had previously been locked in govern ment ofces, publishers morgues and other storage vaults of the analog era. Costeja Gonzalez may not want the 1998 dis pute included in his online biography, but it may very well be signicant to people research ing debtors auctions during that period. And if Google stops indexing those legal notices, the links would be lost to every researcher. Its one thing to make sure people can protect their pri vacy by forcing sites to remove sensitive per sonal information, or to provide Internet users a way to erase material they themselves have posted. And policymakers can debate wheth er information collected by the government should have an online expiration date. But the Court of Justices ruling would create an over ly broad right for individuals to airbrush the historical record, and that just invites abuse by people who have something to hide. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE Europes highest court strikes a blow for censoring history Classic DOONESBURY 1974 Ledbetter, a retired Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. supervisor, discovered that for years she was paid substantially less than her 15 male counterparts.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com MLB: Angels pound Rays 6-2 / B4 BETH HARRIS AP Racing Writer BALTIMORE Califor nia Chrome might aban don his Triple Crown bid if New York ofcials do not allow the colt to wear a na sal strip in the Belmont Stakes. Trainer Art Sherman made no threats about the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner pass ing on a chance to become horse racings 12th Triple Crown winner, but he sug gested it was a possibility. Id have to leave it up to the owners, he said Sun day. I know theyll be up set. Neither the New York State Gaming Commission nor the New York Racing Association stewards has received a request to use nasal strips in the Belmont on June 7. If a request to use nasal strips is made, the decision on whether to permit them or not will be fully evaluat ed and determined by the stewards, Gaming Com mission spokesman Lee Park said Sunday. Among the Gaming Commissions rules gov erning Belmont Park is one that states: Only equip ment specically approved by the stewards shall be worn or carried by a jockey or a horse in a race. In a post on its Twitter feed, NYRA said: We op erate under the rules set forth by @NYSGaming Commission. Will California Chrome abandon Triple Crown bid? AP PHOTO Co-owner Steven Coburn kisses California Chrome after winning the Preakness Stakes. Its a possibility if N.Y. ofcials dont allow colt to wear nasal strip SEE CHROME | B2 MICHAEL MAROT Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS When Ed Carpenter, Carlos Munoz and He lio Castroneves were pushed to the edge Sat urday, each remained calm and came up with their best-qualify ing runs of the day. Now they have to do it again one more time Sunday. The American, Co lombian and Brazilian who have celebrated some of their biggest career moments at In dianapolis each made daring runs over the nal 80 minutes Sat urday to take the top three seeds heading into Sundays India napolis 500 shootout. Carpenter nished rst Carpenter grabs Indy 500 pole for second straight year MICHAEL CONROY / AP Ed Carpenter displays the P1 award ag after winning the pole for the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday in Indianapolis. JAY COHEN Associated Press CHICAGO Corey Crawford made 25 saves, Jonathan Toews had a big goal in the third pe riod and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the Los Angeles Kings 3-1 in Game 1 of the Western Conference nal Sunday. Brandon Saad added a goal and an assist for defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago, which remained perfect in seven home playoff games this year. Duncan Keith had a tiebreak ing score in the third period. Playing just two days after a Game 7 victory PHOTOS BY TONY GUTIERREZ / AP Brendon Todd poses with the trophy and Peggy Nelson, right, widow of tournament namesake Byron Nelson after Todd won the Byron Nelson Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Irving, Texas. Todd outlasts Weir to win Byron Nelson Championship STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writer IRVING, Texas Brendon Todd won the Byron Nelson Champi onship on Sunday for his rst PGA Tour ti tle, closing with a bo gey-free 4-under 66 for a two-stroke victory over Mike Weir. It was the 77th ca reer PGA Tour event for Todd. He earned $1,242,000, a two-year PGA Tour exemption and a spot next year in the Masters. Todd nished at 14-under 266. He took the lead for good with birdies at Nos. 9 and 10, and went on to become the eighth rst-time winner this season. Weir, the 2003 Mas ters champion who won the last of his eight PGA Tour titles in 2007, n ished with a 67. Charles Howell III and Marc Leishman tied for third at 10 under. After Todd hit his tee shot at the 195-yard second into a green side bunker, his shot from the sand landed on the green and rolled in for a birdie. When he knocked in a 14-foot birdie putt at the 181yard fth, he tied Weir who made a bogey on No. 6 for the lead at 12 under. Todd took the lead for good with consecutive birdies midway through his round, a 6-footer at No. 9 and a 24-footer at No. 10. Weir had his best tournament since n ishing second behind Dustin Johnson at Peb ble Beach in 2009. The Canadian left-hander hadnt had a top-25 nish since 2010, the same year he suffered a partial ligament tear in his right elbow be fore a stretch when he missed 17 cuts in a row including all 14 tour naments he started in 2012. Howell shot a 67 with a three-putt bogey on the nal hole, while Leishman had three bogeys in a ve-hole stretch on the back nine Mike Weir hits off the rst tee during the nal round of the tournament. Weir nished second by a single stroke. DARRON CUMMINGS / AP Indiana Pacers Roy Hibbert (55) and Paul George celebrate during the second half of Game 1 on Sunday in Indianapolis. MICHAEL MAROT Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS Paul George scored 24 points, David West had 19, and the Indiana Pacers protect ed their home court with a 107-96 victory over the Miami Heat on Sunday to take a 1-0 lead in the East ern Conference nals. Indiana led wire-to-wire and never even gave the Heat a chance to tie the score after starting the game with a 5-0 lead. Game 2 is Tuesday in In diana. The home team has won all ve meetings this season. Dwyane Wade scored 27 points and LeBron James had 25 for the two-time defending NBA champi ons, who lost for only the second time in 10 playoff games. Indiana had a 30-point rst quarter for the rst time since Feb. 27, extend ed the lead to 19 in the third and Miami couldnt get closer than nine the rest of the way. For months, people wondered what happened to the Indiana team that dominated the rst half of the NBA season. On Sunday, those Pacers SEE GOLF | B2 SEE INDY | B2 Corey Crawford leads Blackhawks past Kings 3-1 for Game 1 victory SEE HOCKEY | B2 George, West help Pacers outgun Heat for 1-0 series lead SEE HEAT | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Indianapolis 500 Lineup After Sunday qualifying; race Sunday, May 25 At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis Lap length: 2.5 miles All cars Dallara chassis 1. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevy, 2:35.7992, 231.067 mph. 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 2:35.9528, 230.839. 3. (12) Will Power, Chevy, 2:36.0488, 230.697. 4. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevy, 2:36.0812, 230.649. 5. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 2:36.1049, 230.614. 6. (25) Marco Andretti, Honda, 2:36.1526, 230.544. 7. (34) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 2:36.4224, 230.146. 8. (67) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 2:36.5946, 229.893. 9. (21) JR Hildebrand, Chevy, 2:37.3938, 228.726. 10. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 2:35.8396, 231.007. 11. (9) Scott Dixon, Chevy, 2:35.8930, 230.928. 12. (26) Kurt Busch, Honda, 2:35.9913, 230.782. 13. (98) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 2:36.1779, 230.506. 14. (19) Justin Wilson, Honda, 2:36.3480, 230.256. 15. (7) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 2:36.4881, 230.049. 16. (10) Tony Kanaan, Chevy, 2:36.5750, 229.922. 17. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevy, 2:36.6259, 229.847. 18. (16) Oriol Servia, Honda, 2:36.6905, 229.752. 19. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 2:36.7132, 229.719. 20. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 2:36.7756, 229.628. 21. (18) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 2:37.0328, 229.251. 22. (63) Pippa Mann, Honda, 2:37.0521, 229.223. 23. (14) Takuma Sato, Honda, 2:37.0671, 229.201. 24. (68) Alex Tagliani, Honda, 2:37.1038, 229.148. 25. (6) Townsend Bell, Chevy, 2:37.1990, 229.009. 26. (83) Charlie Kimball, Chevy, 2:37.2376, 228.953. 27. (5) Jacques Villeneuve, Honda, 2:37.2400, 228.949. 28. (33) James Davison, Chevy, 2:37.2977, 228.865. 29. (41) Martin Plowman, Honda, 2:37.3333, 228.814. 30. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Chevy, 2:37.4028, 228.713. 31. (22) Sage Karam, Chevy, 2:37.5931, 228.436. 32. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevy, 2:37.8335, 228.088. 33. (91) Buddy Lazier, Chevy, 2:37.9501, 227.920. NASCAR Sprint Cup-NASCAR Sprint AllStar Race Results Saturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 90 laps, 120.3 rating, 0 points. 2. (3) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 90, 123.9, 0. 3. (8) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 90, 88.3, 0. 4. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 90, 92.4, 0. 5. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 90, 99.1, 0. 6. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 90, 85.1, 0. 7. (9) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 90, 67.8, 0. 8. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 90, 71.6, 0. 9. (22) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 90, 54.1, 0. 10. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 90, 73.3, 0. 11. (18) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 90, 57.8, 0. 12. (15) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 90, 41, 0. 13. (20) David Ragan, Ford, 90, 36.4, 0. 14. (7) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 90, 95.3, 0. 15. (19) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 90, 32.4, 0. 16. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, accident, 77, 44, 0. 17. (4) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 60, 87.1, 0. 18. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 60, 37.6, 0. 19. (14) Greg Bife, Ford, accident, 60, 36.4, 0. 20. (17) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, accident, 30, 41.5, 0. 21. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 25, 90.6, 0. 22. (10) Joey Logano, Ford, accident, 25, 50.7, 0. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 4, Brooklyn 1 Tuesday, May 6: Miami 107, Brooklyn 86 Thursday, May 8: Miami 94, Brooklyn 82 Saturday, May 10: Brooklyn 104, Miami 90 Monday, May 12: Miami 102, Brooklyn 96 Wednesday, May 14: Miami 96, Brooklyn 94 Indiana 4, Washington 2 Monday, May 5: Washington 102, Indiana 96 Wednesday, May 7: Indiana 86, Washington 82 Friday, May 9: Indiana 85, Washington 63 Sunday, May 11: Indiana 95, Washington 92 Tuesday, May 13: Washington 102, Indiana 79 Thursday, May 15: Indiana 93, Washington 80 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Portland 1 Tuesday, May 6: San Antonio 116, Portland 92 Thursday, May 8: San Antonio 114, Portland 97 Saturday, May 10: San Antonio 118, Portland 103 Monday, May 12: Portland 103, San Antonio 92 Wednesday, May 14: San Antonio 104, Portland 82 Oklahoma City 4, L.A. Clippers 2 Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 7: Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clip pers 101 Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112 Sunday, May 11: L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99 Tuesday, May 13: Oklahoma City 105, L.A. Clip pers 104 Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City 104, L.A. Clip pers 98 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 1, Miami 0 Sunday, May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 Tuesday, May 20: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 24: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Monday, May 26: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 28: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City vs. San Antonio Monday, May 19: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 21: Oklahoma City at San Anto nio, 9 p.m. Sunday, May 25: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 27: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Anto nio, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 2: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Open de Espana Leading Scores Sunday At PGA Catalunya Resort (Stadium Course) Girona, Spain Purse: $2.06 million Yardage: 7,333; Par: 72 Final Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 69-73-69-73 284 Richard Green, Australia 74-69-69-72 284 Thomas Pieters, Belgium 69-69-71-75 284 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-69-74-72 285 Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 75-69-69-73 286 Richie Ramsay, Scotland 69-72-71-74 286 Felipe Aguilar, Chile 74-70-69-74 287 Alejandro Canizares, Spain 72-76-69-70 287 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 77-66-73-71 287 Gareth Maybin, Northern Ireland 73-70-73-71 287 Chris Wood, England 73-70-69-75 287 Richard Bland, England 73-68-72-75 288 Daan Huizing, Netherlands 71-76-71-70 288 Alvaro Velasco, Spain 75-73-68-72 288 Also Paul Lawrie 70-72-74-73 Francesco Molinari 73-67-75-75 Matteo Manassero, Italy 74-71-74-72 Brinson Paolini, United States 73-75-73-70 Sergio Garcia, Spain 69-74-73-76 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castan 73-75-71-74 NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT SECOND ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 4, Boston 3 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Montreal 4, Boston 2 Thursday, May 8: Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT Saturday, May 10: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Monday, May 12: Montreal 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 14: Montreal 3, Boston 1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 3 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Sunday, May 11: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 1 Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers 2, Pittsburgh 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Minnesota 2 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Minnesota 4, Chicago 0 Friday, May 9: Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Sunday, May 11: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 13: Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 3 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1 Thursday, May 8: Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, May 10: Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0 Monday, May 12: Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 3 Wednesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 1 Friday, May 16: Los Angeles 6, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 1, Montreal 0 Saturday, May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Monday, May 19: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 22: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 25: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 27: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 29: Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 31: NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 1, Los Angeles 0 Sunday, May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Wednesday, May 21: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Saturday, May 24: Chicago at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Monday, May 26: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 28: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 30: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Internazionali BNL dItalia Results Sunday At Foro Italico Rome Purse: Men, $4.77 million (Masters 1000); Women, $3.63 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Women Championship Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Sara Errani (10), Italy, 6-3, 6-0. Doubles Men Championship Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (6), Ser bia, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, and Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Women Championship Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebot nik (4), Slovenia, def. Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (2), Italy, 4-0, retired. ATP World Tour Open de Nice Cote dAzur Results Sunday At The Nice Lawn Tennis Club Nice, France Purse: $665,000 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles First Round Federico Delbonis (7), Argentina, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-3. Edouard Roger-Vasselin (8), France, def. Alejandro Gonzalez, Colombia, 6-3, 6-1. Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-2. Martin Emmrich and Christopher Kas, Germany, vs. Nicholas Monroe, United States, and Simon Stadler, Germany, 2-6, 6-4, 10-7. States, 6-0, 6-1. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Detroit at Cleveland NBA 9 p.m. TNT Playoffs, conference nals, Game 1, Oklahoma City at San Antonio NHL 8 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference nals, Game 2, NY Rangers at Montreal California Chrome has worn a nasal strip during his current sixrace winning streak af ter co-owner Perry Mar tin wanted to try it. Sherman is based in California and said he wasnt aware that using one in New York might be a problem. He said he would talk to New York racing ofcials and the horses owners. Some horses, like hu mans, wear nasal strips to assist breathing. The colt wears the strip only during races, not train ing. At 1 miles, the Bel mont is the longest and most grueling of the three Triple Crown rac es. I think it opens up his air passage and gives him that little ex tra oomph that he needs, especially go ing a mile and a half, Sherman said. Anytime you can have a good air passage, that means a lot for these thorough breds. Sherman said Mar tin likes to try differ ent products and the co-owner thought a na sal strip might benet California Chrome. This guy, Perry Mar tin, he might not run if they say you cant run with a nasal strip. Hes very funny about things like that, the trainer said. I dont know why they would ban you from wearing one. Well have to cross that bridge when we get there. Other states allow na sal strips while racing, and even some jockeys wear them. Its something non medical that can be benecial to a work out or a race, Califor nia-based trainer Doug ONeill said by phone. If you think your horse could use some help with their nostrils, you do it. CHROME FROM PAGE B1 for a closing 68. Todd is the fth for mer University of Geor gia player to win on the PGA Tour this sea son. He joined Mas ters champion Bubba Watson, Harris English, Russell Henley and Chris Kirk. An errant tee shot at the 185-yard 13th that settled at the base of a tree, forcing the slen der 6-foot-3 Todd to set up left-handed which would have been natural for the 44-yearold Weir and strike the ball with the back of his bladed club. The ball popped up slight ly and rolled to 7 feet of the cup, and Todd saved par. Todd played his last 31 holes at TPC Four Sea sons without a bogey. Weir had birdies on four of the rst ve holes. He was 13 un der and ahead of Todd by two strokes when his tee shot at No. 5 settled 1 feet from the cup. That came after Weir blindly hit out of a fair way bunker to 3 feet at No. 4. But Weir missed the fairway and green for a bogey at the 431-yard sixth hole at the same time Todd was tapping in at the fth. Boo Weekley (68) was 9 under to tie for fth with James Hahn (70). Weekley is the defend ing champion at Co lonial, about 30 miles away and the next tour nament. Louis Oosthuizen, the 2010 British Open in the nal group with Todd, had already slipped four strokes back at the turn before bogeys at Nos. 10-11. The 2010 British Open champi on shot 74, 10 strokes worse than Saturday, to tie for 11th at 6 under. Martin Kaymer won The Players Champion ship last weekend and opened at the Nelson with consecutive 67s. But he shot 71 Saturday before a bogey-bird ie-bogey start Sunday on way to a 72 and tied for 29th at 3 under. That was a stroke bet ter than Jimmy Walker, who will remain No. 1 in the FedEx Cup stand ings. Jordan Spieth, the 20-year-old Dallas na tive ranked eighth in the world, had a closing 68 to nish 2-under and tied for 37th at the tour nament where he made the cut as an amateur at ages 16 and 17. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 with a four-lap qualify ing average of 230.661 mph. Munoz was sec ond at 230.460. I wasnt sure we were going to go 230 in our rst run, so I was relieved when we did, Carpenter said. But to be honest, I didnt think going into quali fying I was going to ex ceed 230. Others drivers thought Carpenter would, and it only took one practice lap and one qualifying lap to assuage any doubts. Carpenter, the fth car on the track, aver aged 230.114 then sat around all day as other drivers tried to knock him off the top rung. Nobody caught him until a rain delay end ed at 4:18 p.m. Then in a urry of speed, An dretti Autosport driv er James Hinchcliffe knocked Carpenter off the pole, Munoz knocked Hinchcliffe, his teammate, off the pole, and Carpenter retook the pole. He n ished the day waiting 65 minutes to see if it would stand. Normally, the reward for surviving such ten sion would be cele brating a pole win. Instead, under the new qualifying format, all Saturday did was assure Carpenter and the other eight top cars of a top-nine start ing spot on Indys tra ditional 33-car start ing grid. Each of the top nine will have one qualifying run Sunday with the fastest claim ing the coveted No. 1 starting spot for the May 25 race. INDY FROM PAGE B1 over Anaheim, the Kings got a second-pe riod score from Ty ler Toffoli and outshot the Blackhawks 26-20 in the opener of a re match from last years Western Conference nal. But Crawford made a couple of solid stops in another terrif ic performance. Game 2 of the bestof-seven series is Wednesday night. With the Black hawks clinging to a 2-1 lead in the third, Toews got loose on a 3-on-1 break and onetimed Johnny Oduyas pass right by Jonathan Quick for his sixth playoff goal at 16:10. Quick made 17 saves after he played a key role in Los Angeles ral ly from a 3-2 decit in the series against the Ducks. The Kings also battled back from a 3-0 decit against San Jose in the rst round. Toews 26th career playoff goal came after he had one waved off in a confusing stretch in the second period. It looked as if Chi cago had a 2-0 lead when Toews rush to the net resulted in the puck going off the skate of Kings defen seman Slava Voyn ov and into the goal. But it was waved off after a conference by the ofcials, prompt ing a round of boos from the crowd of 21,832 and a waving, yelling display from Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville. According to the NHL, the original call of good goal was changed because the ofcials decid ed Toews made inci dental contact with Quick before the puck crossed the goal line. The league said the ruling was not review able, so the call on the ice remained in place. The sequence seemed to wake up the Kings while deat ing the Blackhawks. Los Angeles got its rst goal about a min ute later, with Tanner Pearson making a ter ric pass to the middle to Toffoli for his fourth of the playoffs at 4:35. The Kings then had a couple of chances to take the lead, but Crawford stepped up each time. He denied Kyle Clifford on a 2-on1 break with 13:42 re maining, and stopped Marian Gaborik and Dustin Brown in rap id succession midway through the period. Crawfords solid play bought Chicago some time to shake off the disallowed goal, and it paid off when Keiths slap shot went off the stick of Trevor Lew is and bounced past Quick for a 2-1 lead. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B1 PGA-Byron Nelson Leading Scores Sunday At TPC Four Seasons Resort Irving, Texas Purse: $6.9 million Yardage: 7,166; Par: 70 (a-amateur) Final Brendon Todd (500), $1,242,000 68-64-68-66 Mike Weir (300), $745,200 68-66-67-67 Charles Howell III (163), $400,200 68-66-69-67 Marc Leishman (163), $400,200 66-68-68-68 James Hahn (105), $262,200 71-65-65-70 Boo Weekley (105), $262,200 67-68-68-68 Graham DeLaet (83), $207,863 68-66-68-70 Dustin Johnson (83), $207,863 69-69-68-66 Matt Kuchar (83), $207,863 69-67-68-68 Gary Woodland (83), $207,863 68-67-66-71 Charlie Beljan (62), $146,280 72-65-70-67 Louis Oosthuizen (62), $146,280 68-68-64-74 Charl Schwartzel (62), $146,280 73-67-67-67 John Senden (62), $146,280 70-70-68-66 Shawn Stefani (62), $146,280 74-66-67-67 Paul Casey (53), $100,050 71-63-73-68 Morgan Hoffmann (53), $100,050 68-66-68-73 John Huh (53), $100,050 67-71-66-71 Billy Hurley III (53), $100,050 70-69-68-68 Kevin Kisner (53), $100,050 69-70-70-66 Tyrone Van Aswegen (53), $100,050 67-68-72-68 Greg Chalmers (46), $64,055 71-67-65-73 Padraig Harrington (46), $64,055 68-68-66-74 Tim Herron (46), $64,055 68-66-74-68 Ryan Palmer (46), $64,055 67-68-71-70 Andres Romero (46), $64,055 71-66-69-70 Tim Wilkinson (46), $64,055 66-71-71-68 a-Scottie Schefer, $0 71-68-69-68 Brendon de Jonge (39), $43,944 73-68-67-69 Brice Garnett (39), $43,944 69-70-68-70 Brian Harman (39), $43,944 72-69-71-65 Charlie Wi (39), $43,944 73-67-66-71 Aaron Baddeley (39), $43,944 68-70-67-72 Keegan Bradley (39), $43,944 70-68-68-71 Robert Garrigus (39), $43,944 74-64-68-71 Martin Kaymer (39), $43,944 67-67-71-72 Robert Allenby (31), $30,403 72-69-70-67 Ben Crane (31), $30,403 68-70-73-67 Peter Hanson (31), $30,403 65-73-69-71 Jordan Spieth (31), $30,403 70-67-73-68 Scott Gardiner (31), $30,403 70-69-67-72 Retief Goosen (31), $30,403 70-65-71-72 Vijay Singh (31), $30,403 69-68-68-73 Jimmy Walker (31), $30,403 71-68-68-71 Carl Pettersson (25), $22,770 69-71-67-72 Michael Putnam (25), $22,770 70-70-71-68 Rory Sabbatini (25), $22,770 70-68-71-70 Kris Blanks (19), $17,327 70-69-70-71 Chad Campbell (19), $17,327 69-72-70-69 Jason Dufner (19), $17,327 70-70-69-71 Bryce Molder (19), $17,327 71-70-71-68 suddenly reappeared. Indiana swarmed the glass, exploited its size advantage, knocked down early 3-pointers with regularity and de fended well enough to force the Heat to play catch-up the entire game. The fans that oc casionally serenaded them with boos during the rst two rounds of the playoffs spent most of the rst half on their feet and nished the game with repeat ed chants of Beat the Heat! Beat the Heat! All ve of Indianas starters and backup C.J. Watson reached dou ble gures as the Pacers produced their highest point total of the post season. Indiana has lost Game 1 at home in its rst two playoff series, but it was obvious right from the start that this game would be different. George Hill scored the rst ve points to give the Pacers the lead, which they extended to 20-10. They spent the rest of the game either pulling away or fending off Miami challenges. When the Heat trimmed the de cit to 30-24 after one and eventually to 4137 midway through the second quarter, Lance Stephenson scored four points in a 5-0 run to make it 46-37. When James again cut the decit to 50-45 with back-to-back baskets late in the second, the Pacers closed the half with ve straight points to make it 55-45. Then the Pacers poured it on. Roy Hibbert and West scored eight of Indianas rst 14 points to open the second half, making it 69-52. HEAT FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 23 20 .535 5-5 L-1 11-11 12-9 Baltimore 22 20 .524 4-6 L-2 9-10 13-10 Toronto 23 22 .511 1 5-5 L-1 10-11 13-11 Boston 20 22 .476 2 2 5-5 L-3 10-13 10-9 Tampa Bay 19 26 .422 5 4 4-6 L-2 8-12 11-14 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 26 12 .684 7-3 W-5 13-8 13-4 Kansas City 22 21 .512 6 6-4 W-2 12-9 10-12 Minnesota 21 21 .500 7 1 6-4 L-1 12-11 9-10 Chicago 21 24 .467 8 2 3-7 L-2 11-10 10-14 Cleveland 19 25 .432 10 4 4-6 L-4 12-11 7-14 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 28 16 .636 9-1 W-3 12-10 16-6 Los Angeles 24 19 .558 3 8-2 W-2 11-11 13-8 Seattle 21 22 .488 6 1 4-6 W-1 8-10 13-12 Texas 21 23 .477 7 2 4-6 W-1 12-12 9-11 Houston 16 28 .364 12 7 6-4 W-2 10-15 6-13 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 23 19 .548 5-5 W-1 13-8 10-11 Washington 23 20 .535 5-5 W-1 13-10 10-10 Miami 23 22 .511 1 1 3-7 L-1 17-5 6-17 New York 20 23 .465 3 3 4-6 L-1 9-12 11-11 Philadelphia 19 22 .463 3 3 4-6 W-2 8-12 11-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 27 17 .614 5-5 L-2 14-10 13-7 St. Louis 23 21 .523 4 6-4 L-1 11-7 12-14 Cincinnati 19 23 .452 7 3 4-6 L-2 11-10 8-13 Pittsburgh 18 25 .419 8 5 5-5 W-1 12-11 6-14 Chicago 15 27 .357 11 7 4-6 W-2 9-12 6-15 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away San Francisco 28 17 .622 6-4 W-1 14-8 14-9 Colorado 25 20 .556 3 4-6 W-1 15-6 10-14 Los Angeles 23 22 .511 5 1 4-6 L-2 9-13 14-9 San Diego 21 24 .467 7 3 6-4 L-1 12-11 9-13 Arizona 18 28 .391 10 6 6-4 W-2 6-18 12-10 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 7, Pittsburgh 1 Houston 6, Chicago White Sox 5 Oakland 6, Cleveland 2 Kansas City 1, Baltimore 0 Detroit 6, Boston 1 Minnesota 4, Seattle 3 Toronto 4, Texas 2 L.A. Angels 6, Tampa Bay 0 SATURDAYS GAMES St. Louis 4, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 3, Milwaukee 0 N.Y. Mets 5, Washington 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 12, Cincinnati 1 Arizona 18, L.A. Dodgers 7 San Diego 8, Colorado 5 Miami 5, San Francisco 0 SUNDAYS GAMES Oakland 13, Cleveland 3 N.Y. Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 3, 1st game Kansas City 8, Baltimore 6 Houston 8, Chicago White Sox 2 Seattle 6, Minnesota 2 Texas 6, Toronto 2 L.A. Angels 6, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Yankees 3, 2nd game Detroit at Boston, late. SUNDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 4, Pittsburgh 3, 1st game Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 3 Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 3 Atlanta 6, St. Louis 5 Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 2 San Francisco 4, Miami 1 Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Colorado 8, San Diego 6, 10 innings Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Yankees 3, 2nd game SETH WENIG / AP New York Yankees Mark Teixeira reacts after being hit by a ball during the sixth inning of the rst game of a double-header against the New York Yankees on Sunday in New York. TODAYS GAMES Detroit (Smyly 2-2) at Cleveland (Kluber 4-3), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Carroll 1-3) at Kansas City (Vargas 4-1), 8:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 4-2) at L.A. Angels (Richards 4-0), 10:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Cincinnati (Leake 2-3) at Washington (Strasburg 3-3), 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee (W.Peralta 4-2) at Atlanta (Minor 1-2), 7:10 p.m AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING_ VMartinez, Detroit, .336; KSuzuki, Minne sota, .322; AlRamirez, Chicago, .322; Solarte, New York, .315; MeCabrera, Toronto, .311; MiCabrera, Detroit, .305; Loney, Tampa Bay, .305. RUNS_ Dozier, Minnesota, 40; Bautista, Toronto, 35; Donaldson, Oakland, 34; JAbreu, Chicago, 29; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 28; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 27; Kins ler, Detroit, 27; Trout, Los Angeles, 27. RBI_ JAbreu, Chicago, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 37; NCruz, Baltimore, 37; Moss, Oakland, 36; Donaldson, Oakland, 34; Bautista, Toronto, 30; Brantley, Cleveland, 30; Colabello, Minnesota, 30; Encarnacion, Toronto, 30. HITS_ MeCabrera, Toronto, 57; Altuve, Houston, 55; Al Ramirez, Chicago, 55; Cano, Seattle, 50; Hosmer, Kan sas City, 50; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 49; Markakis, Bal timore, 49; Rios, Texas, 49. DOUBLES_ Plouffe, Minnesota, 17; Hosmer, Kansas City, 15; Pedroia, Boston, 15; Lowrie, Oakland, 14; Viciedo, Chicago, 14; Altuve, Houston, 13; Encarnacion, Toronto, 13; AGordon, Kansas City, 13. TRIPLES_ Bourn, Cleveland, 4; Trout, Los Angeles, 4; Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Infante, Kansas City, 3. HOME RUNS_ JAbreu, Chicago, 15; NCruz, Baltimore, 12; Bautista, Toronto, 11; Dozier, Minnesota, 11; Ortiz, Boston, 11; Donaldson, Oakland, 10; Pujols, Los Ange les, 10. STOLEN BASES_ Altuve, Houston, 14; RDavis, Detroit, 14; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Andrus, Texas, 11; Ellsbury, New York, 11; AEscobar, Kansas City, 11; Gardner, New York, 10; Villar, Houston, 10. PITCHING_ Porcello, Detroit, 7-1; Buehrle, Toronto, 7-1; Tanaka, New York, 6-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 6-1. ERA_ Scherzer, Detroit, 1.83; Gray, Oakland, 2.10; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.11; Tanaka, New York, 2.17; Dar vish, Texas, 2.32; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.39; Ventura, Kan sas City, 2.40. STRIKEOUTS_ Scherzer, Detroit, 73; Lester, Boston, 73; Price, Tampa Bay, 70; Kluber, Cleveland, 66; Tanaka, New York, 66; Darvish, Texas, 65. SAVES_ Perkins, Minnesota, 12; Rodney, Seattle, 11; Holland, Kansas City, 11; TomHunter, Baltimore, 11. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING_ Tulowitzki, Colorado, .400; Utley, Philadel phia, .347; Blackmon, Colorado, .333; SSmith, San Di ego, .333; Puig, Los Angeles, .329; Morneau, Colorado, .325; YMolina, St. Louis, .325. RUNS Tulowitzki, Colorado, 40; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 35; Blackmon, Colorado, 34; Yelich, Miami, 33; Pence, San Francisco, 31; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 29; Stanton, Miami, 29. RBI Stanton, Miami, 43; Puig, Los Angeles, 35; Tulow itzki, Colorado, 34; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 32; Blackmon, Colorado, 30; Morneau, Colorado, 30; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 28; CGonzalez, Colorado, 28; McGehee, Miami, 28; Morse, San Francisco, 28. HITS Goldschmidt, Arizona, 59; Blackmon, Colorado, 54; DanMurphy, New York, 54; Stanton, Miami, 54; Tu lowitzki, Colorado, 54; Arenado, Colorado, 52. DOUBLES Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; Utley, Philadel phia, 17; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 16; Arenado, Colo rado, 15; MaAdams, St. Louis, 14; Byrd, Philadelphia, 14. TRIPLES Simmons, Atlanta, 4; 11 tied at 3. HOME RUNS_ Stanton, Miami, 12; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 12; Morse, San Francisco, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Blackmon, Colorado, 9; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 9; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 9; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9; Puig, Los Angeles, 9; JUpton, Atlanta, 9. STOLEN BASES_ DGordon, Los Angeles, 25; EYoung, New York, 15; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 14; SMarte, Pitts burgh, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; Blackmon, Colorado, 9; DanMurphy, New York, 9; Pa gan, San Francisco, 9. PITCHING_ Greinke, Los Angeles, 7-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 6-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 6-2; 9 tied at 5. ERA_Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.25; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.62; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.03; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.05; Hudson, San Francisco, 2.09; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.11; Teheran, Atlanta, 2.20. STRIKEOUTS_ Cueto, Cincinnati, 76; Strasburg, Wash ington, 70; Fernandez, Miami, 70; Wacha, St. Louis, 62; Greinke, Los Angeles, 61; Kennedy, San Diego, 60. SAVES_ FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 17; Romo, San Angels 6, Rays 2 Tampa Bay Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi DeJess dh 4 0 2 0 Cowgill rf 4 0 0 1 Myers rf 3 0 0 0 Trout cf 4 1 1 0 Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 Pujols dh 4 2 3 2 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 1 Loney 1b 3 1 1 0 Cron 1b 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 4 0 0 0 ENavrr 1b 1 0 1 0 Kiermr cf 4 1 1 2 Aybar ss 4 1 1 0 CFigur 2b 3 0 0 0 Iannett c 4 1 2 0 Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 Green lf 4 1 3 1 JMolin c 3 0 0 0 LJimnz 3b 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 5 2 Totals 35 6 12 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 200 2 Los Angeles 101 300 10x 6 ELongoria (3). LOBTampa Bay 6, Los Angeles 6. 2BDeJesus (9), E.Navarro (4). HRKiermaier (1), Pu jols 2 (12). CSGreen (2). SL.Jimenez. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Price L,4-4 6 2 / 3 11 6 5 0 7 Boxberger 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles Shoemaker W,2-1 6 2 1 1 3 6 Morin 1 1 1 1 0 0 J.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 2 Frieri 1 1 0 0 0 2 Shoemaker pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Bill Miller; First, Vic Carapazza; Sec ond, Adam Hamari; Third, Jim Reynolds. T:59. A,655 (45,483). Athletics 13, Indians 3 Oakland Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 2 1 0 0 Bourn cf 3 1 1 1 Gentry ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Aviles ss 4 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 1 0 0 0 Brantly lf 3 1 2 2 Punto ss 5 2 2 0 Raburn dh 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 2 4 1 1 DvMrp rf 5 0 3 0 Moss lf 3 4 3 3 Swisher 1b 5 0 0 0 Cespds dh 5 0 2 5 CSantn c 4 0 0 0 Jaso c 5 1 1 2 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 2 0 Reddck rf 4 0 2 2 JRmrz 2b 4 1 0 0 Callasp 1b-2b 5 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 4 1 1 0 Blanks 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 13 12 13 Totals 34 3 8 3 Oakland 010 242 130 13 Cleveland 100 011 000 3 ESwisher (6), Chisenhall (4). DPOakland 1, Cleve land 3. LOBOakland 7, Cleveland 12. 2BPunto (4), Moss 2 (10), Cespedes 2 (13), Jaso (5), Reddick (2), Chisenhall (10). 3BMoss (2). HRBourn (1), Brant ley (8). SBDav.Murphy (2). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland J.Chavez W,4-1 5 6 2 2 3 6 Ji.Johnson 2 / 3 0 1 1 3 0 Abad 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Savery 2 2 0 0 1 0 Cleveland Masterson L,2-3 4 1 / 3 7 7 7 5 1 Outman 1 1 / 3 2 2 1 2 2 Atchison 1 1 / 3 1 1 0 0 0 Allen 0 2 3 3 2 0 Crockett 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Axford 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Allen pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. HBPby Ji.Johnson (Chisenhall). PBC.Santana. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T:21. A,872 (42,487). Giants 4, Marlins 1 Miami San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Hchvrr ss 5 1 2 0 Blanco cf 2 1 0 0 Dietrch 2b 3 0 1 0 Pence rf 4 0 1 0 Yelich lf 4 0 0 1 Posey c 3 0 0 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 2 0 Sandovl 3b 4 2 2 1 GJones 1b 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 0 0 0 0 Lucas rf 3 0 1 0 Morse 1b 4 1 1 0 Stanton ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Colvin lf 3 0 1 1 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 B.Hicks 2b 4 0 1 1 Mathis c 4 0 2 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 JaTrnr p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 1 0 Solano ph 1 0 0 0 Adrianz ph 1 0 0 0 Capps p 0 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Hand p 0 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 9 1 Totals 30 4 7 4 Miami 000 000 010 1 San Francisco 300 010 00x 4 EB.Crawford (4). DPSan Francisco 1. LOBMiami 9, San Francisco 6. 2BDietrich (4). HRSandoval (3). SBBlanco (5). CSHechavarria (4). SJa.Turner 2. SFPosey. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Ja.Turner L,0-2 6 6 4 4 1 7 Capps 1 1 0 0 0 2 Hand 1 0 0 0 1 1 San Francisco Vogelsong W,2-2 7 5 0 0 1 6 Affeldt 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Casilla H,7 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Romo S,15-16 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby Ja.Turner (Blanco), by Vogelsong (Dietrich). UmpiresHome, Kerwin Danley; First, Lance Barks dale; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Gary Ced erstrom. T:04. A,551 (41,915). Phillies 8, Reds 3 Cincinnati Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 5 1 2 0 Rollins ss 3 2 1 1 Heisey rf 3 1 0 0 Nieves c 3 1 2 1 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 1 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Howard 1b 2 1 0 0 B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 2 2 2 Phillips 2b 4 0 1 1 Asche 3b 4 1 2 3 Frazier 3b 5 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 Mesorc c 4 0 4 1 Mayrry cf 3 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 4 1 1 0 Cl.Lee p 3 1 1 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 MAdms p 0 0 0 0 N.Soto 1b 4 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 0 0 0 Cingrn p 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Berndn ph-rf 2 0 1 0 Totals 37 3 10 2 Totals 31 8 9 8 Cincinnati 200 000 010 3 Philadelphia 200 011 40x 8 EUtley (3). DPCincinnati 1. LOBCincinnati 10, Philadelphia 5. 2BMesoraco 2 (8), Mayberry (3). HRRollins (5), Nieves (1), Byrd (5), Asche (4). SBB. Hamilton (15), Heisey (5). CSAsche (1). SCin grani, Nieves. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cingrani L,2-3 6 7 4 4 3 7 M.Parra 1 2 4 4 2 2 Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia Cl.Lee W,4-4 6 2 / 3 9 2 2 1 3 Mi.Adams H,4 1 1 / 3 1 1 0 0 1 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 1 2 BalkCingrani. UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Paul Emmel; Sec ond, Chris Conroy; Third, Jordan Baker. T:03. A,096 (43,651). Braves 6, Cardinals 5 Atlanta St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 5 1 1 0 MCrpnt 3b 2 1 2 0 J.Upton lf 4 2 2 1 Wong 2b 3 0 1 3 FFrmn 1b 3 2 3 3 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 0 Smmns ss 4 0 0 0 Craig rf 5 1 0 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 5 1 2 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 2 1 Doumit ph 1 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 5 0 1 1 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 1 1 0 Laird c 3 0 0 0 JGarci p 2 1 1 0 Gattis ph-c 0 0 0 0 JButler ph 0 0 0 0 JSchafr cf 2 0 0 1 Jay ph 1 0 0 0 Floyd p 2 0 0 0 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 R.Pena 2b 0 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 6 7 5 Totals 35 5 11 5 Atlanta 100 102 002 6 St. Louis 030 010 100 5 DPAtlanta 3, St. Louis 2. LOBAtlanta 4, St. Louis 12. 2BJ.Upton (7), Doumit (2), Wong (2), Jh.Per alta (9). HRJ.Upton (10), F.Freeman (8). SR.Pena. SFMa.Adams. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Floyd 5 1 / 3 7 4 1 3 4 A.Wood 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 2 1 D.Carpenter W,3-0 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Kimbrel S,11-13 1 1 0 0 0 1 St. Louis J.Garcia 7 5 4 4 0 5 Siegrist H,12 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Neshek H,5 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Rosenthal L,0-2 BS,2-15 2 / 3 2 2 2 2 1 C.Martinez 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 HBPby Floyd (Holliday, J.Garcia), by D.Carpenter (Wong), by J.Garcia (F.Freeman). WPKimbrel, C.Mar tinez. PBLaird. UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Chris Guccione; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Ron Kulpa. T:20. A,278 (45,399). Cubs 4, Brewers 2 Milwaukee Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi RWeks 2b 4 1 1 2 Bonifac cf 4 0 1 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 Lake lf 4 0 2 0 Braun rf 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 MrRynl 1b 3 0 0 0 Valuen 2b-3b 3 1 1 1 KDavis lf 4 0 0 0 Castillo c 4 1 1 2 Bianchi 3b 3 0 0 0 Olt 3b 4 1 1 1 LSchfr cf 3 1 1 0 HRndn p 0 0 0 0 Estrad p 2 0 0 0 Kalish rf 2 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 T.Wood p 3 0 0 0 Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 1 0 0 0 Barney 2b 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 2 3 2 Totals 31 4 8 4 Milwaukee 000 020 000 2 Chicago 021 100 00x 4 LOBMilwaukee 4, Chicago 6. 2BBraun (5), L.Scha fer (7), Bonifacio (10), Lake (7), S.Castro 2 (12), Valbuena (8). HRR.Weeks (2), Castillo (5), Olt (9). SBKalish (3). CSLake (1). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Estrada L,3-2 5 7 4 4 2 4 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 0 Thornburg 1 1 0 0 1 1 Wooten 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago T.Wood W,4-4 7 2 2 2 3 7 Schlitter H,5 1 0 0 0 0 2 H.Rondon S,5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 WPThornburg. UmpiresHome, David Rackley; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Brian Gorman. T:47. A,631 (41,072). Nationals 6, Mets 3 New York Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 4 0 0 0 Span cf 4 1 1 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 1 1 1 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 Werth rf 4 1 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 0 WRams c 3 1 2 4 DWrght 3b 3 1 2 0 Dsmnd ss 4 1 2 1 Grndrs rf 3 1 1 0 TMoore 1b 4 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 1 1 0 Frndsn 2b 4 0 0 1 Lagars cf 4 0 1 1 McLoth lf 4 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 0 0 0 Zmrmn p 2 1 1 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Centen c 4 0 2 2 Walters ph 1 0 0 0 ZWhelr p 2 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 CYoung ph-lf 1 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 8 3 Totals 31 6 7 6 New York 010 002 000 3 Washington 012 020 01x 6 ECenteno (1), Tejada (3). DPNew York 1, Wash ington 1. LOBNew York 5, Washington 5. 2BDuda (5), Span (8), W.Ramos (2). HRDesmond (7). SB Rendon (2). IP H R ER BB SO New York Z.Wheeler L,1-4 6 6 5 3 2 5 Familia 1 0 0 0 1 0 Matsuzaka 1 1 1 0 1 1 Washington Zimmermann W,3-1 6 8 3 3 2 1 Storen H,7 1 0 0 0 0 0 Clippard H,11 1 0 0 0 0 1 R.Soriano S,10-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 PBCenteno. UmpiresHome, Jon Byrne; First, Lance Barrett; Sec ond, Dana DeMuth; Third, Ed Hickox. T:45. A,965 (41,408). Yankees 4, Pirates 3 First Game Pittsburgh New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Snider rf 3 0 0 0 Gardnr dh-lf 3 1 1 1 Tabata ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 0 NWalkr 2b 4 1 2 2 Ellsury cf 3 1 0 0 AMcCt cf 3 0 1 0 Teixeir 1b 3 0 1 2 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 McCnn c 3 0 1 1 SMarte lf 4 0 0 0 ASorin rf 3 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Solarte 2b 3 0 0 0 GSnchz dh 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 3b 3 1 1 0 TSnchz c 4 1 1 1 ZAlmnt lf 3 0 1 0 Barmes ss 3 1 1 0 DvRrts p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 6 3 Totals 28 4 6 4 Pittsburgh 100 020 000 3 New York 310 000 00x 4 ET.Sanchez (5). DPPittsburgh 1. LOBPittsburgh 5, New York 2. 2BBarmes (2), Gardner (5). HRN. Walker (9), T.Sanchez (2). SBKe.Johnson (2). IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Morton L,0-6 7 6 4 4 1 6 Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 1 New York Kuroda W,3-3 6 5 3 3 2 7 Daley H,1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Thornton H,8 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Warren H,7 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Dav.Robertson S,8-8 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Morton (Ellsbury). WPMorton. PBMcCann. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Marcus Pattillo; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Bob Davidson. T:52. A (49,642). Pirates 5, Yankees 3 Second Game Pittsburgh New York ab r h bi ab r h bi JHrrsn 3b-lf 5 1 2 1 Gardnr cf 4 0 2 0 NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 4 0 2 0 AMcCt cf 3 1 1 0 Teixeir dh 3 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 SMarte lf 3 2 1 2 Jeter ph-ss 1 0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 1 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 2 2 1 Mercer ss 4 1 2 0 ZAlmnt lf 3 0 0 0 Tabata rf 1 0 0 0 ASorin ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Snider rf 2 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf-lf 4 0 1 0 TSnchz dh 3 0 0 0 JMrphy c 3 1 1 0 I.Davis ph-dh 0 0 0 0 Ellsury ph 1 0 0 0 CStwrt c 3 0 1 2 Ryan ss-1b 3 0 1 1 McCnn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 5 Totals 35 3 10 2 Pittsburgh 010 002 101 5 New York 020 001 000 3 ESnider (1), Cole (2), B.Roberts (4), Solarte (4). DP Pittsburgh 1. LOBPittsburgh 5, New York 7. 2BJ. Harrison (4), Mercer (7), B.Roberts (5). 3BGardner (2). HRJ.Harrison (2), S.Marte (4), Solarte (5). S Snider. SFC.Stewart. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Cole W,4-3 6 7 3 3 2 8 Morris H,3 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Watson H,9 1 1 / 3 3 0 0 0 2 Melancon S,6-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Nuno 6 6 3 2 1 5 Aceves L,0-2 1 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 1 Thornton 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Claiborne 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 BalkCole. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, John Tumpane; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:04. A,858 (49,642). Astros 8, White Sox 2 Chicago Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 5 0 1 0 GBckh 2b 3 0 0 0 Springr rf 3 0 1 0 Semien 2b 1 0 0 0 Fowler cf 3 2 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 0 MDmn 3b 4 2 2 4 Viciedo rf 4 0 0 0 Carter dh 4 1 1 1 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 2 1 1 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Hoes lf 4 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 1 2 0 0 Corprn c 3 0 0 0 LeGarc ss 1 0 1 0 Villar ss 2 1 2 2 De Aza lf 2 0 0 0 MGnzlz ph-ss 2 0 0 0 Nieto c 3 0 3 2 Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 32 8 10 7 Chicago 001 000 100 2 Houston 042 020 00x 8 EDe Aza (2), Nieto (1). DPChicago 2, Houston 2. LOBChicago 6, Houston 5. 2BNieto (3), Fowler (6), Hoes (3). HRM.Dominguez 2 (7), Carter (6). SBAl tuve (15), Villar (11). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Joh.Danks L,3-4 4 2 / 3 10 8 7 3 7 D.Webb 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 0 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 1 Houston Peacock W,1-4 6 2 / 3 5 2 2 4 5 Fields 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 Williams 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBPby Joh.Danks (Corporan). WPD.Webb, Lind strom. UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Will Little; Sec ond, Mark Carlson; Third, Ted Barrett.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer ROME Novak Djokovic is going to the French Open with a big clay-court victory in his pocket. And a heavy heart. Djokovic extended his recent dominance over Rafael Nadal by rallying for a 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 victory Sunday to win the Ital ian Open for the third time then dedicated the title to his ood-hit native Serbia by carving a heart on the clay with his racket. This heart on the court is for you, he told the fans in Italian during the victory cele bration. Its also a spe cial dedication to my country, which is suf fering a lot right now. My heart is with them. In the womens nal, Serena Williams kept the crowd from being a factor in a 6-3, 6-0 vic tory over 10th-seed ed home favorite Sara Errani to win her third Rome title. Errani was bidding to become the rst Ital ian to win the tourna ment in nearly 30 years but the top-ranked Wil liams quickly took con trol in both sets and Er rani was slowed by a left thigh problem. Williams had a left thigh problem herself last week that prompt ed her to withdraw be fore her quarternal match at the Madrid Open but now she ap pears back on track for the French, which starts next Sunday. Im not 100 percent but Im just kind of going on adrenaline, the topranked American said. Djokovic found his motivation from a dif ferent source. Authorities say 25 peo ple have died in the Bal kans because of the worst ooding in a cen tury after three months worth of rain fell on the region in three days this week. Tens of thousands of homes were left with out electricity or drink ing water. Im trying to con tribute in my own way, Djokovic said. These are very critical times for our country and our people. But were being united and this win and this trophy is dedicated to them. Having also been beaten in Monte Carlo and Barcelona recent ly, it marked the rst time in a decade that the top-ranked Nadal has lost more than two matches on clay in the same year. Nadal was pushed to three sets in four out of his ve matches here. When he hit the rst ball good a lot of times it was very difcult to arrive to the ball and change the dynamic of the point, Nadal said. I didnt have enough energy to hit the rst shot with the right in tensity. The second-ranked Djokovic has now won four straight match es against Nadal the previous three in straight sets and takes the psychological edge to Paris. It gives me a lot of condence winning against Rafa in the nals of a big tourna ment on clay, he said. Its denitely a con dence booster. Its an ultimate challenge and Im very happy with my game so far and hope fully I can carry that into Roland Garros. The French Open is the only Grand Slam that Djokovic has yet to win, with his best re sult a runner-up nish in 2012. Nadal has won the tournament eight times. Djokovic was able to dictate play by stepping inside the baseline. I tried to be aggres sive from the start to the end, said Djokovic, whose other Rome titles came in 2008 and 2011. I know that the only way to win against him is to be aggressive. Earlier, Errani left the court for an inju ry timeout while trail ing 5-3 in the opening set and came back with her thigh bandaged. On the nal point before she left the court, Erra ni pulled up and let a shot from Williams pass by her without even at tempting to get to it. Im sorry. You were unbelievable all week, Errani told fans during the victory ceremony, as she brushed back tears. I tried to do my best and stayed on the court only for you. Williams other Rome titles came in 2002 and last year and she went on to win the French Open on both occasions. Im also sorry for Sara today, Williams told the crowd in Ital ian. She really played great all week. Organizers attempted to whip up patriotic fer vor by having the Ital ian anthem sung before the players walked out onto the court, and fans continuously chanted Sara, Sara to try and encourage Errani in an atmosphere that more resembled a Davis Cup or Fed Cup setting. But Williams jumped out to a 3-0 lead and while Errani had a few chances to get back into the rst set, Williams overpowered the Italian with her serve she had seven aces to Erra nis none and overall attacking game. Still, Errani could console herself by be coming the rst Ital ian nalist in the tour nament since Raffaella Reggi took the 1985 title in Taranto. GOLF MLB ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy after defeating Rafael Nadal at the Italian Open tennis tournament on Sunday in Rome. Djokovic dedicates Rome title to victims of flooding TENNIS KELVIN KUO / AP Los Angeles Angels Albert Pujols follows through on a hit off Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price, not pictured, during the third inning on Sunday in Anaheim, Calif. JOHN ZENOR AP Sports Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Kenny Perry won his third Champions Tour major in the past year with a one-stroke victo ry over Mark Calcavec chia on Sunday in the Regions Tradition. Perry closed with an even-par 72 at Shoal Creek to nish at 7-un der 281, while oth er contenders had upand-down days and John Cook lost the lead with a double hit. Perry bogeyed No. 15 but retook the lead with a birdie on the next hole and lined up an easy par putt on the closing hole. Calcavecchia n ished with a 70. Twotime winner Tom Leh man closed with a 67 to tie Jay Haas at 5 under. Haas closed with a 71. Cooks closing 72 put him three strokes back. Perry got his sixth vic tory and became the second player to win in three consecutive Champions Tour ma jor starts, joining Gary Player, who did it in 1987-88. Perry won the Senior Players Championship and U.S. Senior Open in consecutive tour starts last year, then skipped the Senior British Open. It was the highest score for a Tradition winner. Fred Couples was dis qualied Sunday after missing his tee time. He was 9 over after a 73 Sat urday, his best round. Couples also withdrew from the Senior PGA next week at Harbor Shores in Benton Har bor, Michigan. Cooks double bogey on No. 14 cost him the lead. Cooks ball was buried deep in the right bunker just under the lip, and appeared to ricochet backward before wind ing up a couple of feet out of the sand. Tour ofcials reviewed the bunker shot using phone video shot by an event staffer and deter mined that Cook hit it again on his back swing. Golf Channel didnt have a great view of it but there was some one with the event who was shooting social me dia video of it that had a face-on angle, and it was clear that he dou ble hit it, said Brian Claar, the Champions Tours vice president for competition. EUROPEAN TOUR GIRONA, Spain Mi guel Angel Jimenez won the Spanish Open on Sunday after a threeway playoff to become the European Tours rst winner over the age of 50. Jimenez extended his own record as the old est European Tour win ner at 50 years and 133 days old. There is no secret, Jimenez said. Good food, good wine, good cigars and some exer cise. Jimenez beat Thom as Pieters of Belgium and Australias Richard Green in a playoff after he was the only one to make par on the rst ex tra hole. All three play ers nished on 4-under 284. It was the Spaniards 21st European Tour win and his second of the season after he won at Hong Kong in Decem ber, also following a playoff, at the age of 49 years, 337 days. Pieters led by two shots going into the nal round at the PGA Catalunya Resort but only managed a 3-over 75 despite an eagle on No. 15. Jimenez shot a 73, while Green carded 72. It was the rst win for Jimenez at the tourna ment in 27 appearances. Theres no words to describe what it means to me, you need to be into my skin but Im not going to let you, joked Jimenez. Its amaz ing. I have been close a couple of times. Today it was very tough out there but I got it in the end. BUTCH DILL / AP Kenny Perry holds up the trophy after winning the Champions Tour Regions Tradition golf tournament on Sunday in Birmingham, Ala. Kenny Perry edges Calcavecchia to win Regions Tradition tourney Regions Tradition Leading Scores Sunday At Shoal Creek Shoal Creek, Ala. Purse: $2.2 million Yardage: 7,231; Par: 72 Final Kenny Perry (660), $330,000 72-68-69-72 281 Mark Calcavecchia (388), $193,600 69-69-74-70 282 Jay Haas (262), $131,267 69-70-73-71 283 Tom Lehman (262), $131,267 73-71-72-67 283 Olin Browne (262), $131,267 69-71-72-71 283 John Cook (158), $79,200 71-70-71-72 284 Rocco Mediate (158), $79,200 73-72-69-70 284 Tom Watson (158), $79,200 72-72-73-67 284 Michael Allen (98), $49,343 73-74-69-69 285 Marco Dawson (98), $49,343 71-73-71-70 285 Joe Durant (98), $49,343 74-73-69-69 285 Bernhard Langer (98), $49,343 74-70-70-71 285 Jeff Sluman (98), $49,343 72-71-71-71 285 Steve Elkington (98), $49,343 70-71-71-73 285 John Inman (98), $49,343 72-72-66-75 285 Fred Funk (0), $33,044 71-72-73-70 286 Jeff Hart (0), $33,044 73-70-73-70 286 Colin Montgomerie (0), $33,044 72-72-69-73 286 Corey Pavin (0), $33,044 70-74-71-71 286 Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $33,044 72-70-70-74 286 Jeff Maggert (0), $27,060 73-70-69-75 287 Chien Soon Lu (0), $25,520 69-77-70-72 288 Roger Chapman (0), $23,650 72-77-72-68 289 Steve Pate (0), $23,650 73-74-71-71 289 David Frost (0), $20,064 72-71-71-76 290 Mike Goodes (0), $20,064 74-71-70-75 290 Gene Sauers (0), $20,064 75-74-71-70 290 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $20,064 74-69-73-74 290 Willie Wood (0), $20,064 70-75-73-72 290 Peter Senior (0), $17,380 74-75-75-67 291 Mike Reid (0), $15,510 74-74-73-71 292 Loren Roberts (0), $15,510 74-78-69-71 292 Rod Spittle (0), $15,510 72-75-72-73 292 Esteban Toledo (0), $15,510 74-72-74-72 292 Doug Garwood (0), $13,200 74-76-75-68 293 Sandy Lyle (0), $13,200 75-71-78-69 293 Mark OMeara (0), $13,200 74-70-74-75 293 Tommy Armour III (0), $11,880 77-72-74-71 294 Bobby Clampett (0), $11,880 77-76-69-72 294 Mark Brooks (0), $10,780 73-74-77-71 295 Bill Glasson (0), $10,780 71-74-74-76 295 John Riegger (0), $10,780 71-75-75-74 295 Tom Byrum (0), $9,460 74-71-77-74 296 Gil Morgan (0), $9,460 74-75-72-75 296 Ian Woosnam (0), $9,460 73-72-77-74 296 Peter Jacobsen (0), $7,260 74-81-73-69 297 Mark McNulty (0), $7,260 74-74-70-79 297 Larry Mize (0), $7,260 76-75-74-72 297 Jerry Pate (0), $7,260 79-71-77-70 297 Nick Price (0), $7,260 74-69-75-79 297 Scott Simpson (0), $7,260 75-74-72-76 297 Duffy Waldorf (0), $7,260 73-77-73-74 297 Brian Henninger (0), $5,060 76-75-76-71 298 Tom Purtzer (0), $5,060 74-72-78-74 298 Jim Rutledge (0), $5,060 76-74-75-73 298 Joey Sindelar (0), $5,060 73-76-78-71 298 Hal Sutton (0), $5,060 77-71-74-76 298 Mark Wiebe (0), $4,400 72-73-77-77 299 JOE RESNICK Associated Press ANAHEIM, Calif. Albert Pujols hit a pair of solo homers against David Price, and Matt Shoemaker took a shutout into the sev enth inning to lead the Los Angeles Angels over the Tampa Bay Rays 6-2 Sunday. Pujols drove an 0-2 pitch over the cen ter-eld fence in the rst inning. The threetime NL MVP in creased the Angels ad vantage to 6-2 in the seventh with his 12th homer this season and the 504th of his career, tying Eddie Murray for 25th place. Price became the 319th pitcher Pujols has homered off during the regular season. Shoemaker (2-1) was charged with a run and two hits in sixplus innings. He struck out six, ve days after earning his rst ma jor league win with a 4-3 victory at Philadel phia. The 27-year-old right-hander was lifted after issuing his third walk, to James Loney leading off the sev enth. Michael Morin re lieved Shoemaker with a 5-0 lead and retired his rst batter before Kevin Kiermaier hit his rst big league ho mer a drive to left that kept carrying un til it disappeared in the lower seats in the lefteld corner. That end ed a career-opening streak of nine scoreless innings by Morin. Price (4-4) gave up six runs ve earned and 11 hits in 6 2-3 innings with sev en strikeouts and no walks. He beat the Mariners 2-1 last Tues day at Seattle with a complete game. The 2012 AL Cy Young Award winner, who has allowed no more than one walk in a franchise-record 13 consecutive starts dating to last season, went to a three-ball count on ve Angels batters. But hes paid the price for his ma jor league-best strike out-to-walk ratio. Hes given up 78 hits, tying Philadelphias Cliff Lee for most in the majors. Howie Kendrick gave the Angels a 2-0 lead with a two-out RBI sin gle in the third, and they increased the mar gin to 5-0 with three runs in the fourth af ter Price gave up three straight singles with none out. The third one was a drive by Grant Green over the head of left elder Matt Joyce scoring Erick Aybar. Pujols hits two homers as Angels top Rays

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 CITY OF MINNEOLA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGORDINANCE 2014-07 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MINNEOLA, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE BOUNDARIES OF THE CITY OF MINNEOLA IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCEDURE SET FORTH IN SECTION 171.044, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO INCLUDE WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS APPROXIMATELY 10.1 ACRES OF PROPERTY GENERALLY LOCATED AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF BABAIR LANE, SOUTH OF LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH SCHOOL, NORTH OF JIM HUNT ROAD, IN LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR CONDITIONS AND CONTINGENCIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The City of Minneola City Council will hold public hearings on Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 6:30 p.m., at City Hall, located at 800 North U.S. 27, Minneola, FL to consider a request for the annexation of 10.1 +/acres of property located at the northeast corner of Babair Lane, south of Lake Minneola High School, north of Jim Hunt Road. The staff report on the case shall be sent to the City Council and will be available to the general public at least ve (5) days prior to the hearing on the case. A person who decides to appeal any decision made by any board, agency, or council with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, will need a record of the proceedings. For such purposes, any such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based (Florida Statutes, 286.0105). The City of Minneola Land Development Code is available for inspection at the City Hall, located at 800 North U.S. 27, Minneola, FL, during normal working hours 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT JANET McDANIEL, CITY CLERK AT (352) 394-3598 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEARING. D001800-May 19 & 26, 2014 AUTO RACING PHOTOS BY GERRY BROOME / AP Jamie McMurray celebrates after winning the NASCAR Sprint All-Star auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday in Concord, N.C. LUKE MEREDITH Associated Press NEWTON, Iowa Sam Hornish Jr. beat Ryan Blaney off a re start with 21 laps to go and hung on to win the NASCAR Nationwide Series race Sunday at Iowa Speedway. Pole-sitter Ryan Blaney was second, fol lowed by Regan Smith, Chase Elliott and El liott Sadler in the rst stand-alone event of the season. Hornish, in the No. 54 car usually driv en by Kyle Busch, led 167 of 250 laps to win in second Nationwide start of the season for Joe Gibbs Racing. Elliott has a twopoint lead over Sadler and Smith in the series points standings. From the startl, Hor nish and Blaney were the only drivers in seri ous contention. Blaney began the race on the outside of the front row after winning his rst se ries pole Saturday. But Hornish, who qualied second, pulled in front on the opening lap. Blaney and Hornish were the only leaders for the rst 214 laps, and lapped trafc was often more of a con cern that the cars di rectly behind them. Blaney eventually caught Hornish at the tail end of a green ag run that lasted roughly 65 laps. But the nal re start belonged to Hor nish, who failed to se cure a full-time ride for 2014 despite nishing second in the points standings last season. It was Hornishs third win in 101 Nationwide starts. Michael McDowell then briey took the lead with 30 laps to go by taking just two tires while the rest of the leaders took four. But McDowells gamble failed to pay off, and he settled for seventh. Elliotts fourth-place nish concluded a hectic weekend for the 18-year-old. He gradu ated from high school in Georgia on Satur day morning and ew back to Iowa in time to qualify sixth later in the day. Elliotts crew hung his graduation cap and tassel on the No. 9 pit box for good luck on Sunday. McMurray and Ganassi share another huge victory McMurray does a burnout following his victory. JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer CONCORD, N.C. In a hurry to y back to Indianapolis Chip Ga nassi, abruptly left the news conference after Jamie McMurrays up set victory in the Sprint All-Star race. Before he stepped down from the podium, Ganassi leaned in and planted a kiss on McMurrays cheek. Ganassi, often gruff and sometimes just plain grumpy, also has a softer side that he cant hide. It comes out in bursts of emo tion, or sentimental moments like Saturday night, when McMurray pulled off a bold upset to win the $1 million prize at Charlotte Mo tor Speedway. He said to me in Vic tory Lane, Weve won a lot of great races to gether, havent we? Ganassi recalled. I said, Yes, we have. It was kind of special for him to think of that. He understands what it takes to be in this sport and be a driver. Theres no doubt Mc Murray went out in the nal 10-lap segment and took the win. He was second on the re start, lined up on the outside of leader Carl Edwards, and he re fused to back down as the two went door-todoor for an entire lap. McMurray surged ahead after the white-knuckle battle to win in the event hed never before nished higher than eighth. It added yet anoth er NASCAR major to a resume that exclusively includes big wins. Mc Murray had seven pre vious victories in the Sprint Cup Series, all at Daytona, Tallade ga, Charlotte and Indi anapolis. Among those wins? The Daytona 500 and the Brickyard 400, two of the biggest races on the calendar. Now he has an All-Star victory, making him one of only seven drivers to win the Daytona 500, the Brickyard and the All-Star exhibition. Mc Murrays won all three with Ganassi and team co-owner Felix Sabates. After the race, one of the rst things I thought was Im so glad that Chip and Felix are here and I get to share this with them, McMurray said. They were in Day tona, they were in Indy, and when I look back at those races, the memo ries of Chip being there are really special to me. CREW CHIEF CONNECTION McMurray heaped praise on rst-year crew chief Keith Rodden, a longtime engineer for Kasey Kahne before he was practically handpicked by McMurray to take control of the No. 1 team. Hed heard of Rod den time and again over the years, and was sold on his capabilities after one 20-minute conver sation in the basement of Roddens house. McMurray left the meeting and imme diately called Ganas si general manager Max Jones, imploring him to lure Rodden away from his supporting role with Kahne at Hendrick Mo torsports. Im like, Thats the guy. Youve got to g ure out how to make it work. No matter what you have to pay him, what you have to do, get that guy because I like everything about him, McMurray said. BLAME GAME As McMurray celebrat ed the win, Kevin Har vick was left contemplat ing how a victory slipped away for the second con secutive week. Harvick was the lead er headed to pit road for a mandatory fourtire stop following the fourth segment. Hed earned that spot out front by accumulat ing the highest average nish from the previ ous four segments, and a strong stop from his Stewart-Haas Racing crew would allow him to stay out front and presumably wrap up the win over the 10-lap sprint to the nish. Instead, he was beat off pit road by Edwards and McMurray and re started in third. He wound up second, but wasnt pleased with the result. Cost us the race, Harvick said. All in all, they put a car on the race track that was ca pable of winning. We just didnt get it done. SLICK TRACK Kahne believed he was the guy to beat after winning the second and third segments of the race. But he smacked the wall hard in the fourth segment, and grumbled after the race his car slid in oil on the Charlotte Motor Speed way surface. Kahne wound up 14th after leading 20 laps. You could see the oil through the speedy dry, Kahne said. The spotters are even saying something and the guy who drives the pace car said it was clean, it was just stained. No, it was still oil out there. NA SCAR just didnt clean the track. BIG MONEY Phil Parsons Rac ing wound up winning more than $100,000 this weekend because the online Reddit commu nity has vigorously got ten behind driver Josh Wise. Wise was the upset winner of the fan vote, beating out favorite Danica Patrick to earn a berth in the All-Star race. Reddit users have backed Wise and the underfunded team with the virtual cur rency Dogecoin. Sup porters raised more than $55,000 to spon sor Wises car earlier this month at Tallade ga, then set their sights on winning the fan vote for him. Sam Hornish Jr. bests Blaney in restart to take win CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Sam Hornish Jr. holds the trophy after winning the NASCAR Nationwide auto race on Sunday at Iowa Speedway in Newton, Iowa.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Associated Press LAVAL, Quebec New York Rangers coaches and players joined star forward Martin St. Lou is at his mothers funer al outside Montreal on Sunday. St. Louis former Tam pa Bay Lightning team mate Steven Stamkos and Hall of Famer Guy Laeur also attended. It was a very person al matter for Marty, said Rangers defense man Ryan McDonagh. We just wanted to be there to support him and his family. Hes been tremen dous through this whole process. Its great to have someone like that on our squad. His mother, France St. Louis, died suddenly three days before Moth ers Day in the middle of the Rangers series against the Pittsburgh Penguins. She was 63. St. Louis didnt miss a game and provided a lift to his teammates as they battled back from a 3-1 decit to win the series. Then the Rangers beat the Montreal Can adiens 7-2 on Saturday in Game 1 of the East ern Conference nal, with St. Louis scoring the opening goal early in the rst period. The series resumes tonight in Montreal. New York coach Alain Vigneaults voice cracked as he described the service. The New York Rang ers family has been touched by a little Que bec family in a deep, profound way, he said. It was a very emotion al, very moving time for our team to have the opportunity to be there and share that with Marty and his family. Marty took the podi um and shared some in credible moments. It was a deep message. It was a challenging day for us. Center Brad Richards, who won a Stanley Cup with St. Louis when they played together with the Lightning, said the 38-year-old scoring star has bonded with his new teammates during this difcult time. St. Louis joined the Rang ers at the March 5 NHL trade deadline. I think its going to help just to get his mind off two things: trying to play and then trying to make sure hes doing all the right things for his family and his dad, and do what his mom would want, Richards said. But hes done an unbelievable job keep ing everything togeth er and helping his sister and his dad get through this. You wouldnt ex pect anything else. Habs fan Jeff Quinn, who drove from Saint John, New Brunswick, with his girlfriend to see Saturdays game, said hes always admired St. Louis and came to pay his respects. CLIFF BRUNT AP Sports Writer OKLAHOMA CITY Thunder players fondly described Serge Ibakas contributions to the team this season and explained how much hed be missed. Then, they moved on. Ibaka, one of the NBAs top shot blockers, hurt his left calf in Game 6 of the Western Conference seminal against the Los Angeles Clippers. A day after the team learned it would likely be without its best de fender for the rest of the playoffs, Oklahoma City began practicing for the Western Conference nals against the San An tonio Spurs. Game 1 is Monday night, and the Thunder will take a laid back approach. Its unfortunate for us and for Serge, league MVP Kevin Du rant said after practice Saturday. Hes a guy that loves the game so much and has to sit out at the peak of the sea son, being in the play offs. But it happens in this league. Nobodys ever going to feel sorry for us. Were not going to panic. Were going to continue to stick to what we do. During the regular season, Ibaka had ca reer highs with averag es of 15.1 points and 8.8 rebounds while lead ing the league in total blocks for the fourth consecutive season with 219. The Thunder dont expect to dupli cate Ibakas explosive ness or his ability to protect the rim. Were going to play team defense, guard Russell Westbrook said. Were not going to take the onus on ourselves to block shots and do what Serge does, be cause nobody can do that. Brooks wouldnt say how he would ll the minutes or who would start in Ibakas place. He jokingly named al most every reserve as a possible replacement. Based on past patterns, rookie center Steven Adams and veteran for ward Nick Collison will likely step in for Ibaka. Adams has been ex ceptional recently. The 7-footer from New Zealand was especial ly effective in Game 6 against the Clippers, when he had 10 points and 11 rebounds in 40 minutes. He had nev er played more than 31 minutes in an NBA game. It was hard, Adams said. My body after wards I felt like an old man. Going for ward, I got familiar with playing while I was fatigued. Im famil iar with it. I need to get comfortable with it. Adams had gained his teammates con dence throughout the playoffs. They say hes ready for more re sponsibility. The last two series, he played extreme ly well for us, Du rant said. Doing any thing we need him to do, playing hard, phys ical. Were going to need him this series to do the same thing. The coaches have been preparing him. Hes learning, and hes get ting bet ter every day. NBA NHL Without Serge Ibaka Thunder still confident AP PHOTO Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka (9) defends as Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Grifn shoots in the second half of Game 5 on May 13 in Oklahoma City. Rangers players join St. Louis for his mothers funeral near Montreal RYAN REMIORZ / THE CANADIAN PRESS New York Rangers NHL hockey players leave the funeral home following funeral services for France St. Louis, mother of New York Rangers hockey player Martin St. Louis on Sunday in Laval, Quebec. The New York Rangers family has been touched by a little Quebec family in a deep, profound way. Alain Vigneault New York Rangers coach

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 WORK OUT: Comfort key in running shoes / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com DON SMITH / MCT Owner Susan Weinrich of Westwood Pets Unlimited with her dog, Ayla. She sells about 10 holistic brands at her Westwood, N.J., store. ANDREW WYRICH MCT H ACKENSACK, N.J. Some pet supply store owners say the trend of customers seeking pet food containing all-natural ingre dients might cost customers more, but it has brought a growing num ber of better-informed pet owners into their shops. In 2007, a massive recall of pet food that contained the chemical melamine, which is used in fertilizer and plastic utensils, shook custom ers preferences from generic food that contains corn, wheat or soy to ward hormoneand steroid-free, grass-fed, all-meat ingredients, owners said. In fact, through May 2013, the percentage of dog food brands claiming to be gluten-free was 28.6 percent, up from 12.6 percent in the full year of 2012, according to a report on United States pet food trends last year by Supply Side Ani mal Nutrition Insights. In the same report it said natural pet food ac counted for $1.5 billion in sales in 2009, and was projected to outpace the sales of traditional pet food over the next ve years. This shift in what customers wanted to feed their pets forced some store owners to expand their offerings of pet food, which add ed costs to their bottom line. But it also helped build trust with their customers. While large retailers like Petco offer organic and all-natural food, the owners said being a small er store offers them the opportunity to talk one-on-one with customers and offer specic food recommen dations for certain breeds of dogs. There is absolutely a push for better ingredients, said Susan Weinrich, the owner of Westwood Pets Unlimited in Westwood, N.J. Customers now want grain-free, high-quality food for their pets. Weinrich said over the past ve years the number of brands offer ing higher quality ingredients in their pet food has skyrocketed. She estimated that as many as 25 to 30 brands are offering holistic ingredi ents, and her store offers about 10 of those brands, she said. Over the past few years, Weinrich said she has attended trade shows, seminars Shops say pet owners choosing food with care Feeding Fido LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver Course available in May AARP classes for drivers ages 50 and older on the dates are available for $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment can be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. Classes will take place: From 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday and Thursday at the Live Well cam pus at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. Register by calling 352-394-0250. From 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at the Harden-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St. in Eustis. Register at 352-394-0250. THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer support group meeting scheduled This men-only meeting will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr., in The Villages. The meeting gives men an oppor tunity to exchange experiences and learn from one another about the challenges related to prostate cancer. For information, call Tom Vejda at 352-446-4192. LADY LAKE Essential tremor support group meeting scheduled Learn about coping methods, medications, helpful hints and gain understanding at this meeting for those aficted and for caregivers at 2 p.m. Wednesday at St. Timothy Church, 1351 Paige Place, in Lady Lake. For information, call Ken Taylor at 352-787-3866 or email kstaylor62@ usa2net.net. LEESBURG Quit Smoking Program to begin on May 27 The Lake County Health Department will host free, veweek quit smoking classes on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., beginning on May 27, at the Community Health Center, 225 N. First St., in Leesburg. The program will also be on Mondays from 6:30 to 8 p.m., be ginning on June 1, at the National Training Center at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. To enroll, call 1-877-252-6094. LAKE COUNTY Neurologist to speak about stroke awareness The Central Florida Health Alliance and local hospitals are focusing on stroke prevention by promoting awareness and the importance of fast diagnosis and treatment during National Stroke Awareness month in May. Dr. Firas Siou, neurologist at Leesburg Regional Medical Center, will present a free talk at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., downtown Leesburg on May 28 at 6 p.m. Call 352-751-8585 to RSVP. There is absolutely a push for better ingredients. Customers now want grain-free, highquality food for their pets. Susan Weinrich, Owner of Westwood Pets Unlimited LARRY LARUE MCT TACOMA, Wash. Jake Stanton had more than 2,000 friends on Facebook and, since early May, hundreds of people have put pho tographs and memo ries on a new Facebook page, RIP Jake Stanton. He was a popular 19-year-old who at tended Western Wash ington University, a Stadium High School graduate who com peted on the swim team and played in the school band, a young man whose kindness and smile are being called unforgettable. Over the last six months, that smile hid his pain and confusion. Jake was tortured by voices telling him to hurt himself. He didnt want to die, said his mother, Jacquie Stan ton. He fought so hard to be normal, to just be a kid in school. Three days after their son suffocated him self in his bedroom, Jacquie and Bill Stan ton came to call at The News Tribune in Taco ma, Wash., last week. They wanted to talk about Jake and his de cision to be an organ donor. But mostly they wanted to talk about a dysfunctional mental health system. When they noticed a change in their son about a year ago, the Stantons tried to get him help. They started with their family doc tor, who told them ev erybody has moods and recommended Jake see a counselor. I started calling counselors and was told I couldnt get an appointment for two months, Jacquie said. And we couldnt see a psychiatrist who can prescribe meds until wed seen a therapist. We started looking for help in October and didnt get an appoint ment until December. Parents say son couldnt get help he needed SEE PETS | C2 LUI KIT WONG / MCT Bill and Jacquie Stanton reect their sadness while talking about the suicide of their son, Jacob, 19, at their family home. SEE HELP | C4

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 and devoted hours to self-educating herself about the ingredients used in pet food. But the demand from customers for high er-quality pet food has driven up the cost on both ends of the pur chase. Weinrich said a ve-pound bag of low er-quality food once cost her about $8 to or der, where the higher quality food popular to day will cost between $16 and $18 for a 5-pound bag. The idea for cus tomers behind good quality food is that youre spending mon ey now, but will save it in the long run when you dont have to go to the vet down the line, Weinrich said. Shawn Kim, the own er of Mamas and Papas Petshop in Englewood, N.J., said he has seen an inux of custom ers coming to his store looking for better qual ity food, rather than shopping at supermar kets or chain stores. While the high-qual ity food costs him up to 15 percent more for each bag, Kim said his customers are willing to pay higher prices on the retail side of the purchase. At least in our com munity, we are seeing that customers are will ing to pay a little extra because in the long run, they are actually saving money with the healthi er food, Kim said. Karl McQuilken, the owner of New Jer seys Wholistic Paws in Ridgewood and Bark Ridge in Park Ridge, said his stores sell only all-natural pet food. People love their pets and are passionate about their pets, and were seeing that at our store, said McQuilken. But Weinrich said that while all-natural pet food is driving traf c to her store, the food has the lowest markup of the items she sells, so the key to remain ing protable is getting customers who come in for the healthier dog food to buy some of the other items she sells in the store such as ac cessories or toys for their pets. The dog food isnt a money maker, thats for sure, Weinrich said. When people realize that our store is knowl edgeable and can di rect each individual customer to a specif ic brand of food that is the right t for their dog, they will often times nd something else in the store to buy. Thats where we make the money. McQuilken said most of his customers ask questions about differ ent ailments their pets might have, and he then directs them to the best pet food that would t that individual pet. While the all-natu ral food is a little more expensive, most peo ple are willing to pay it because of the con nection they have with their pets, McQuilken said. How can you put a dollar sign on that? HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 PETS FROM PAGE C1 DAVID TEMPLETON MCT PITTSBURGH Her foot pain began 15 years ago, leading to a 2002 diagnosis of osteo arthritis, which left her limping and unable to walk for extended peri ods of time. And it progressively worsened. In time, Deborah Cole Thomas, 60, of Plum, Pa., would undergo sur geries to fuse joints in both feet along with a left-ankle replacement, all from the wear-andtear form of arthritis. She endured shoulder pain and more recent problems with rightknee pain, which she likens to a knife stab. Round-the-clock pain medications are a must. I try not to let it affect me, Thomas said, not ing that her husband, Llewellyn, 82, has had both arthritic knees re placed. It drives me to keep moving. I watched my mom give up, and her hands became so crip pled she had to be fed. Thomas, now retired, worked as a Westing house computer engi neer, spending hours at a desk that made her feel like the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz. Shed stand and struggle to ex stiffened joints. In coming years, she faces further surger ies, including knee-re placement surgery. But shes still walking, with the goal of 10,000 steps a day and an average of about 7,000. She also cant run and isnt allowed to jump. Doctors orders. But she works around those limitations. Theres always some thing I can do just to keep moving. While people with os teoarthritis struggle to move, theres plenty of movement in research as scientists work through the biological puzzle of osteoarthritis to come up with poten tial treatments. A University of Pitts burgh research team, led by Rocky S. Tuan professor and executive vice chairman of the department of ortho pedic surgery and di rector of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering is mak ing headway in under standing the complex stew of enzymes (his tones), proteins and genes that cause osteo arthritis while identi fying a potential treat ment to slow the rate of cartilage destruction. Theres further break ing news from the Tuan camp that sounds like science ction: His team is using a 3-D printer, which makes structures one layer at a time, to make new joints. Using a solution containing the patients stem cells, along with growth factors and scaf folding material, the 3-D printer constructs actu al cartilage in the right shape to replace dam aged cartilage. The stem-cell solu tion extruded through a catheter also could be used to create new cartilage, as guided by a 3-D printer, directly onto the joint bone. The teams tissue-en gineered joints already have shown success in large animals, raising the promise of creating replacement joints for people now dependent on plastic and metal ones. The process could be particularly useful in repairing battleeld in juries. Tuan announced the success April 27 at the Experimental Biology 2014 scientic sessions and meeting in San Di ego. We essentially speed up the development pro cess by giving the cells everything they need, while creating a scaffold to give the tissue the ex act shape and structure that we want, Tuan said, adding that his team continues working to develop cartilage more closely resembling hu man cartilage. Total joint replace ments involving plastic and metal joints work well, but they dont last long enough, Tuan said. For someone who is 60, thats OK. But if you are in your 30s, thats not good because you may need revision after revision. Osteoarthritis rep resents 80 percent of all cases of arthritis, whose various forms plague 27 million Americans, making arthritis the na tions major form of physical disability. The disease burden is partic ularly acute in the aged population, with one out of two individuals older than 65 having at least one joint affected. Delving into the pain of osteoarthritis BOB DONALDSON / MCT Deborah Cole Thomas arthritis has led to an ankle replacement and two mid-foot fusions.

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 MELISSA DRIBBEN MCT PHILADELPHIA Wondering about the best shoes to wear for spring running? Neutral? Minimalist? Stability? Motion con trol? Cushioned heel? Confused? Of course you are. Well, sports medicine specialists have good news. Stop worrying about fallen arches, overpronation, and putting your feet on a paleolithic regimen. The latest thinking about how to choose the best running shoe is to let comfort be your guide. Since the 1970s, run ning shoes have evolved from puny slabs of rub ber sewn to canvas shells into engineering feats rivaling 3-D-print ed surveillance drones. Far beyond the latest Nike Flyknit Lunar 2 are plans for running shoes made of computer-gen erated molecules that will link to living organ isms and conform to your foots ever-chang ing needs. In the some what-less-distant fu ture are Google Blue tooth-enabled shoes that talk to you and tell you how your run is go ing. For now, runners have a hard enough time picking from hundreds of mute, inorganic op tions. Historically, the push has always been to look at foot pronation, said Bryan Heiderscheit, a professor in the de partment of biomedi cal engineering at the University of Wiscon sin-Madison. Runners were told to wear shoes that would correct for the foots tendency to roll inward or outward, on the theory that this would correct biome chanical aws and pre vent injuries to the knees and lower back. But the best studies that have been done in the last 10 years, said Heiderscheit, have not substantiated that claim. In 2010, the American Journal of Sports Medi cine published a study of 1,400 Marine Corps recruits. Half the group was given shoes based on a careful evaluation of the shape of their feet. The control groups shoes were chosen ran domly. Assigning shoes based on the shape of the plantar foot sur face, the authors con cluded, had little inu ence on injuries. When Heiderscheit tries to explain this to members of the run ning-shoe industry, he gets pushback. Not surprising, he said, considering that the $20 billion athlet ic-shoe market sustains itself on innovation. Most companies re lease new models twice a year, offering features designed to improve performance and pre vent injury. The idea that almost any shoe is ne if its comfortable is also apt to meet resistance from runners for whom theo ry has become dogma. Believers in barefoot running or minimal ist shoes, for instance, are unlikely to be con vinced. Both are ne, said Heiderscheit, as long as recent converts do not make the switch too abruptly. Speaking from per sonal experience, Heiderscheit said, it is easy to get injured if you decide to toss your cushiony sneakers and immediately start rack ing up miles in a pair of barely-theres. It can take months to adapt, he said. He recommends exercis es to strengthen mus cles in the calf and foot and using the minimal ist shoes for short, easy runs at rst. You should feel so comfortable in a shoe that you could sleep in them, said Jon Woo, a sports medicine spe cialist at the Universi ty of Washington in Se attle. Experts say that just as everyones feet are unique, so are their run ning styles. There is no absolute biomechani cal ideal, said Heider scheit. One of the worlds fastest marathoners, Pescah Jeptoo, has a knock-kneed gait that has carried her through 26.2 miles in a blazing two hours, 20 minutes, and 14 seconds. Still, Heiderscheit said, there are aws to avoid. You dont want to bounce too much. You dont want to overstride. And the one thing we absolutely dont want people to do is a hard heel strike truly com ing down on your heel with your foot pointed high in air. Jeptoo, for the re cord, runs in Nike Zoom Streak 3s, a lightweight, breathable shoe with some support and cush ioning. Online reviews of the shoe range from I got huge blisters to Perfect! If this proves any thing, experts said, it is that the one true au thority on which shoes are best is the runner who wears them. Most important quality in a running shoe? Comfort MELISSA DRIBBEN / MCT Danielle Tolbert tries on a pair of running shoes in Philadelphia on April 25.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 After that, he start ed seeing a psychia trist and was prescribed medications that didnt seem to help. Jake began losing faith in a mental health sys tem his family couldnt seem to make work. One January evening, he jumped off a bridge in Dash Point, Wash. That landed him in the hospital for 10 days, fol lowed by another week in the mental health unit. Though his par ents wanted him to stay there, he was released. His mother, a regis tered nurse, couldnt see reports on her son, because Jake was legal ly an adult. Trying to get him help, she found ob stacles everywhere. Ive been a nurse for 25 years, so I know the medical system, Jac quie said. I had no idea until I was in crit ical need of the mental health system that its broken. The only way to get immediate care was the emergency room, where we could keep him safe for three or four days as a danger to himself. We went through the ER ve times in six months, and even then it wasnt working. He wasnt get ting help, and they wouldnt keep him and give him help. Bill Stanton watched Jacob, the oldest of his three children, isolate himself from friends, though never from his family, with whom he lived in Tacoma. One night last week, he came into our bed room where I was watch ing TV and laid down on the bed with me, Bill said. His mom came in and asked what he was doing, and he said, Watching TV with dad. The voices, howev er, had been growing worse. Jake would con sole a neighbor one afternoon, consider killing himself that eve ning. A few weeks ago, he put all his medica tions in a blender and made a lethal chocolate shake then poured it down the sink. Jake told me, Im having such a hard time, and I told him, Were going to win, Jake, Jacquie recalled. Last Thursday night, he came home from a night class and talked to his father, then went downstairs to his room. Ten minutes later, Jac quie came home from work, asked where Jake was and called to him. There was no answer. I knew right then, she said. Jacquie Stanton en tered her sons room. He was lying on the bed with a trash bag over his head, she said. I had to tear the bag off his head and begin try ing to resuscitate him. Bill called 911, then began helping his wife perform CPR. Jakes 15-year-old brother, Kyle, and 13-year-old sister, Avery, watched in horror. Paramedics arrived, found a slight heartbeat and raced him to the hospital. He was alive but not alive, Jacquie said. They kept him alive with machines until the next morning. Jake was an organ donor, so we had to talk to doctors there about the process. It wasnt easy for the family. Once he was breath ing on his own, he died in seven minutes, Jac quie said. Then the team had to take him within two minutes to do what they had to do. Jakes liver, kidneys and corneas were giv en to recipients within hours. His friends have been stopping by the Stanton home since Friday, stay ing for hours, talking and crying. Jake had an appoint ment with his psychia trist set up for the day he died, and the psy chiatrist was notied of Jakes death, but the family has not heard from him. HELP FROM PAGE C1 Associated Press CHICAGO A small study of col lege football players found that the areas of their brains that control memory were smaller than average, especially if they had suffered con cussions. But more research is need ed to determine if the differences mean theyre headed for problems down the road. The study of NCAA players is only preliminary, but the differenc es were seen in a part of the brain affected by a destructive disease linked with head blows and found in autopsies of some former NFL play ers. The college players studied did just as well on tests of mental func tion, including memory, as a healthy control group of college athlete s in non-contact sports, although those in the football group whod played the longest had slower reaction times. Its unknown when the brain dif ferences occurred and its possible the football players were born with them, said study co-author Pat rick Bellgowan, a neuroscientist at the Laureate Institute for Brain Re search in Tulsa, Okla. The differences were found in the hippocampus, a small sea horseshaped region behind the front part of the brain. In football play ers whod had concussions, the right part of the hippocampus was 26 percent smaller on average than in the control group. In football play ers without concussions, it was 17 percent smaller. Similar differences were seen in the left part of the hip pocampus. Brain differences found in NCAA football players

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 JAN HEFLER MCT EGG HARBOR TOWN SHIP, N.J. Before buy ing cannabis at south ern New Jerseys only medical-marijuana dis pensary, patients must circle one of six animat ed faces that stare out from a clipboard. The row of smiling, wincing, frowning, and sobbing cartoon faces is being used to rank the degree of pain that pa tients experience due to cancer, multiple sclero sis, epilepsy and sever al other conditions the state deems treatable by cannabis. When the patients re turn to the Compas sionate Care Founda tion dispensary in Egg Harbor Township, N.J., for a rell, they again are handed the Wong-Bak er FACES Pain Rating Scale so that the effect of the marijuana can be assessed. The results so far are absolutely dramatic, said Suzanne Miller, a researcher with a Ph.D. who sits on the dispen sarys board of trustees. Miller is also a profes sor and the director of behavioral medicine at Fox Chase Cancer Cen ter/Temple Health in Philadelphia. About 80 percent of the 145 CCF patients who complet ed the rankings at least twice over the last two months have chart ed signicant improve ment, she said. Still being collected and analyzed, the data show that on average, most patients are re porting their pain lev els decreased by 30 to 50 percent, Miller said. You usually see small er results, about 10 per cent, or 20 percent, she said. An author of four books and a contribu tor to more than 100 ac ademic articles, Mill er will be the lead researcher on a re port she plans to sub mit to medical journals for publication possi bly this fall. The dispen sary has 600 registered patients and expects to have more data by that time. On a gloomy, wet morning last week, sev eral patients walked into the dispensary to purchase cannabis, which is packaged in plastic bottles and sold at $428 an ounce. Two patients who agreed to be interviewed af terward said the mari juana they bought had changed their lives. Three other patients who were reached by phone said it markedly eased their pain. I was addicted to Vi codin, said Gary Car nevale Sr., a multiple sclerosis patient from Bayville, N.J., short ly after he picked up an ounce of Red Cherry Berry marijuana from an employee behind a glass window at the dispensary. Carneva le, 57, a former licensed practical nurse, said in creasing amounts of prescribed Vicodin, OxyContin, Percocet, and other narcotics did not relieve the throb bing pain shooting up his back and legs, and he then had to be hos pitalized for two weeks early last year. Carnevale was among the rst patients to come to CCF, which opened six months ago inside a cavernous warehouse just outside Atlantic City. Marijuana plants are also grown at that location under spe cial purple, red, blue, and yellow lights. I took three or four hits. I laid in bed, and I could not believe the pain slipping away, Carnevale said, recalling the rst day he smoked it using a vaporizer. My pain was like 10. But when I smoke marijua na, I swear its zero, he said. While he previous ly spent most of his days in bed, he said he now is able to function and even took a recent vaca tion with his family, in cluding his two grand children. Jacqueline Angot ti, a nurse-practitioner from Robbinsville, N.J., began sobbing when asked the effect the marijuana had on her 9-year-old son, Miles, who had suffered multi ple, daily seizures since he was 2. Hes been sei zure-free; hes had none for the past 31 days and has had no side effects, she said. And hes bet ter cognitively. In the past, Miles was forced to wear a mask to protect his face and teeth from frequent falls caused by the violent seizures, she said. And, for the same reason, he had to eat meals from a tray while sitting on the oor. Angotti turned the marijuana buds into a tincture, which she gives to Miles in tiny doses three times a day, and he no longer needs his mask, she said. He eats dinner at the table now, she added. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Medical marijuana has effect on symptom relief DAVID M. WARREN / MCT Marijuana plants grow in the owering room at Compassionate Care Foundation, the only medical marijuana dispensary in New Jersey.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 19 the 139th day of 2014. There are 226 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On May 19, 1864, American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, 59, died in Plymouth, New Hampshire. On this date : In 1536 Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Englands King Henry VIII, was beheaded after being convicted of adultery. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 19, 2014: This year you will be more in touch with your feelings. You will be an effective com municator, and youll also be more expressive when you feel upset or angry. If you are single, potential suitors might notice how you switch back and forth between be ing conservative and being quirky. You need to relate to someone who is not judg mental. Come summertime, you could meet Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, the two of you are more like ly to take up a new hobby to gether. Your mutual interest will help you both open up more. AQUARIUS can be as stubborn as you are, but your views are very different. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your calmness will trans form quickly into strong ac tion. A partner seems to be a bit difcult at the moment. You might be unusually irri table in the evening as well. Know that this, too, will pass. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Take a leap of faith, and be willing to take risks in or der to get past a situation. You could be sorry that you decided to act a certain way with an associate or a loved one. Put in the extra effort that could help this person to relax and ease up. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might be more interest ed in what someone else has to say about what seems like a never-ending, difcult work or personal situation. Your creativity is likely to emerge when dealing with someone at a distance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Zero in on what is important. Your creativity could be stunt ed by someone elses ges ture and/or idea. Help this person add the ourishing touches on his or her con cept. You might be driven by your need to get things ac complished. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) What you are thinking is more logical than you might realize. Be willing to take a stand. You might want to start interacting with a friend who demonstrates a simi lar interest. A discussion will become very lively, except around a family member. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Expenses could go overboard at the drop of a hat. You might regret letting your im pulsiveness take the lead. A partner or friend understands much more than you think he or she does. You might not be communicating as well as you think you are. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You are full of energy and dy namic ideas. Deal with one person at a time. A partner nally might be a lot more easygoing than he or she has been in a while. Be careful a disagreement still could arise. Resist being combat ive; instead, go for a brief walk. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Know when to back down in order to get the best pos sible results from a situation. The less said, the better off youll be. You could feel awk ward with others, and per haps also with an associate. Try not to let your frustration get the best of you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Dont stand on ceremony, just pick up the phone and start a conversa tion. You might be delighted by how happy the other par ty is to hear from you. Sev eral people might challenge you in a meeting, but make it your pleasure to be respon sive. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might want to indulge a boss. Your high en ergy and distinctive ideas will come out, no matter who runs into you. Youll want to be aware of the costs of your actions. Someone could be come angrier than he or she has been in a while. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You tend to ourish, no matter what youre doing. Do research, or call some one you consider an expert. Get as much feedback as possible. Push to get a bet ter grasp of a situation, and know that you will make the right decision. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might need to be more detached and not per sonalize a situation so much. Read between the lines when you speak with a friend. You could be wafing about what you are seeing. Dont allow others to add fuel to any res that might be smoldering. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I have been working hard to advance in my health care career so I can give my fami ly a decent life. I have worked my way up from poverty, paying my own way, earning my degree through the military and sheer determination. I have reached a point where I would like to en joy life a little more, but my husband thinks I am being materialistic. We ght often over my wardrobe spending. I believe the clothes I wear, mostly nice skirt suits and heels, are part of my job and image. I believe it has helped me to get ahead. I dont buy overly expensive items, but they arent cheap. I wear the things I buy for years and have a $200-a-month bud get for what I may need, even though I dont al ways spend it. I think I have earned the right to shop a lit tle, which will ultimately lead to bigger and better things for my family, so why does my husband make me feel so guilty? CLOTHES MAKE THE WOMAN DEAR C.M.T.W.: Not knowing your husband, its difcult to say, but Ill throw out a few ideas. Could he be insecure or intimidated by your pro fessional image? Could he be jealous on some level? In what kind of environment was he raised? Was his mothers uniform a housedress? If you are earning good money and your family is being provid ed for, then you are cer tainly entitled to spend some of it on yourself. And you shouldnt have to apologize for it. DEAR ABBY: I am get ting married in October, and my ance, Brad, and I are having trouble seeing eye-to-eye on the name change issue. Brads family is orig inally from the North, and my family is from the South. He and his family are convinced that I should drop my maiden name, keep my middle name, and take his name as my new last name. However, the wom en in MY family have al ways kept our maiden names, added their new husbands last name to theirs and dropped their middle names. This is about the only thing Brad and I cant seem to agree on. What can I do when my moth er says one thing and my sweetie says anoth er? With your years of ex perience, I hope you can steer me in the right di rection. BRADS BRIDE IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR BRIDE: Its YOUR name. So do what you are most comfortable doing, because its the name you will have to carry til the day you die (or divorce). DEAR ABBY: I am un der a lot of stress, but the woman I am with doesnt know it. I am 17, and I have been sleep ing with my 38-year-old aunty. Shes married and has three children. Shes my mums sister. Weve slept together seven times and we cant stop doing it. I think Im in love with her. I know this is wrong. I need advice. Please help. LOVESICK TEEN IN THE U.K. DEAR LOVESICK: Being in love shouldnt cause stress; it should relieve it. You know what you are doing is wrong, and YOU must be the adult and end this relation ship. If you dont, it will bring heartache and tur moil to you and the rest of the family. By having an adulterous and inces tuous affair with you her nephew and a minor your aunt is behaving like a sexual predator. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Husband thinks less is more when wife budgets for clothes JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 LEESBURG352-326-4079Mon. Fri. 9:00am 4:30pmSaturday by Appointment Only.In Home Test Available. INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE Audibel

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Thank you for reading the local paper!

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Monday, May 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 19, 2014 Thank you for reading the local newspaper!