Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE KAYMER WINS PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP, SPORTS B1 LEESBURG: City commission will debate businessmans hangar request A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Bodybuilder has big goal for 80th birthday C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 132 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 90 / 73 Partly sunny. 50 STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily Commercial Three ordinances are now in the books that constitute nal approv al of The Villages of Fruitland Park and the 2,050 homes there. Construction is ex pected to get under way in two weeks, accord ing to Gary Moyer, vice president of develop ment for The Villages. This completes the entitlement process, and I want you all to know how much we ap preciate your efforts, Moyer told commis sioners last week. Moyer said former Interim City Manager Rick Scott, City Manag er Gary La Venia, Com munity Development Director Charlie Rector Work set to begin on The Villages of Fruitland Park LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com F our school board members said this week they will not ask for a larger share of the penny sales tax that is currently split even ly between the schools, county government and the areas collective municipalities. While acknowledg ing the $10 million it re ceives yearly from the penny sales tax will not be enough to meet at least $1 billion worth of needs for buildings, equipment and other capital, board members said it was important to work together with the municipalities and the county on the issue. Some school board members previous ly suggested that half a cent be allocated for the schools, as the stu dent population is ex pected to increase. The real difference of a half cent versus a third is about $3 million a year, said Bill Mathi as, board member. While I dont disagree about the needs, I also believe the municipal ities and the counties have the same needs. Kyleen Fischer, school board member, echoed similar senti ments. I would like to work with the cities and the county, she said. Asked how to meet the growing needs of the school district, which is still $200 mil lion in debt, she said the district would have to be creative. We discussed gen eral obligation bonds and other ways of funding, she said. We have to look to ser vice schools that would come up and put their own private schools. General obligation bonds are backed by the issuers full faith credit and taxing au thority. The one-cent sales tax for infrastructure generated $34.8 mil lion in total revenue LAKE COUNTY Board members express support for penny sales tax allocation PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE, BELOW: Construction workers perform road work on County Road 44 in Eustis on Friday. CONNIE CASS Associated Press WASHINGTON To con gressional Republicans, Beng hazi is shorthand for incompe tence and cover-up. Democrats hear it is as the hollow sound of pointless investigations. It is, in fact, a Mediterranean port city in Libya that was the site of a deadly attack on an American diplomatic com pound on the 11th anniversary of 9/11 that killed U.S. Ambas sador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Thats near ly all that U.S. politicians can agree on about Benghazi. Its been a political rallying cry since just weeks before Presi dent Barack Obamas re-elec tion in November 2012. With the launch of a new House in vestigation, Benghazi is shap ing up as a byword of this falls midterm election and the pres idential race in 2016, especially if former Secretary of State Hil lary Rodham Clinton is on the ballot. A guide to the controversy: SETTING THE SCENE The 2011 revolt that de posed and killed Libyan dic tator Moammar Gadha, with the help of NATO warships and planes, began in Benghazi. A year later, the city of 1 million remained chaotic, in the grip of heavily armed militias and Isla mist militants, some with links to al-Qaida. The temporary U.S. diplomat ic mission, created in hopes of building ties and encouraging stability and democracy, was struck by homemade bombs twice in the spring of 2012. Brit ish diplomats, the Red Cross and other Westerners were For Democrats and Republicans, a look at all that Benghazi stands for AP FILE PHOTO This Sept. 13, 2012 photo shows a man walking in the rubble of the damaged U.S. consulate, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens on the night of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012, in Benghazi, Libya. SEE VILLAGES | A2 SEE TAX | A2 CAROLYN THOMPSON Associated Press Police negotiator Andres Wells was doing all he could to keep a suspect from committing suicide after a gas station robbery and 100 mph chase. But the man kept cutting phone calls short and point ing his handgun to his head. About 10 minutes after the last hang up, Wells cellphone chimed. It was a text from the suspect. Police add texting to crisis negotiation arsenal SEE TEXTING | A2 SEE BENGHAZI | A8 MARK BUGNASKI / AP Sgt. Andres Wells of the Kalamazoo Deptartment of Public Safety, who successfully used text messaging to negotiate with a suicidal robbery suspect during a 2011 standoff, shows his phone.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MAY 11 CASH 3 ............................................... 0-8-7 Afternoon .......................................... 7-4-3 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-2-3-5 Afternoon ....................................... 7-6-9-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY MAY 10 FANTASY 5 ............................. 2-7-18-30-31 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 1-2-10-35-42-44 POWERBALL ...................... 4-31-41-47-551 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. and City Attorney Scott Gerken all played promi nent roles in the effort. They were able to ac commodate our schedule and we deeply appreciate their efforts, Moyer said. Moments later outside commission chambers, Moyer said he never ex pected any opposition to the project. I said from the beginning we didnt plan to show a lot of pictures and charts, Moyer explained. Any resident who had any questions about what we plan to do could look at what we have done, and thats the best evi dence of what we have in mind, he said of the mas sive retirement commu nity that currently spans three counties. Rector was noticeably upbeat about the nal hurdle being cleared for the project. Its been a wild and crazy year, he said. Im glad most developers dont move at their pace. Their pace is worth noting. Thirteen months ago Charles Roesel, for mer pastor of First Bap tist Church in Leesburg, called Moyer and asked for a meeting. The 950-acre Pine Ridge Dairy tract, which forms the citys western border, had been bequeathed to First Baptist when the former owner died. Roe sel had the tract annexed into the city in 2009. City ofcials expected development of a hodge podge of small PUD-style neighborhoods by vari ous home builders over 15 or 20 years, a timeline that would constitute av erage growth. After six years of eco nomic recession and no potential developers on the horizon, Roesel hoped to sell the entire tract to The Villages. Moyer saw an opportuni ty, but large-scale develop ment is decidedly difcult within municipal bound aries. Floridas planning and development statutes encourage participation of the local residents, and ap proval of such a large tract with so many homes usually takes years. It was just one year ago this month when The Vil lages ofcials asked for pri vate meetings with each commissioner to gauge their feelings. Last July, The Villages announced its de velopment plans. The effort has meant complex changes to the citys Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Ordi nances, as well as a mas sive effort to rewrite city codes, the citys govern ing charter and the citys budget in order to accom modate development. In less than two weeks, development of 2,050 homes, three communi ty centers and 18 miles of streets will get under way, Moyer said. An estimated $1 billion in housing sales will start next April, if all goes ac cording to plan. And be fore the end of the year, The Villages ofcials pre dict, more than 4,000 new residents will have moved into the city. As veteran Commission er John Gunter said last August, This will change Fruitland Park forever. But before that happens, city ofcials hope to con vince voters to amend the citys governing charter to allow single-member commission districts. The change is seen as the only way to help preserve some thing of the citys smalltown character when new voters a considerable majority suddenly call Fruitland Park home. To make sure, char ter proponents are push ing an amendment to re quire a supermajority of voters to make any future changes. The last development of this magnitude occurred around 1882, when Orlan do P. Rooks convinced the Florida Southern Railway Corporation to plot its new narrow-gauge freight line through the village of Gardenia. Five years later, a fast-growing Gardenia changed its name to Fruit land Park. VILLAGES FROM PAGE A1 last year. That money was divided equally between the cities, coun ty and school district, with each receiving a third of the allocation. The 14 cities then must divide their allocation proportionately. Revenue from the tax goes to ward infrastructure capital needs such as road work, construction of buildings and the purchase of public safety vehicles. The revenue, however, cannot be used for operational costs. The tax is set to expire in 2017, but the Lake County Commission said at a board workshop in Febru ary that they would like residents to vote on whether to renew the tax in 2015. In the last ve years, the school district has lost more than $67 mil lion in property tax revenue be cause the stagnant economy has kept property values low and the Florida Legislature cut the maxi mum tax rate by 25 percent. While in support of the cur rent sales tax distribution formu la, Board Member Rosanne Bran deburg said more funding needs to go into education. I can support the third of the penny sales tax, but I want to make sure the county is going to support the growth that we are beginning to see, she said. A consultant for the school dis trict in November projected that by 2020 there will be an increase of about 2,297 students, particularly in the southern part of the county. Brandeburg said school impact fees, which can only be designated for new growth, should be raised to 100 percent from 25 percent. My fear is that we are going to have great needs, no funds and it is going to put this board and fu ture boards in the same situation that prior boards were in when all the growth hit in 2000. We have got to have a unied front and we need to be able to fund education in Lake County. With the current revenue from impact fees at $2,500 a home, Brandeburg said it would take 8,000 homes to build a new ele mentary school. There are at least six schools in the district that need to be rebuilt or replaced, board member Tod Howard said. They are Clermont Elementary, Cypress Ridge, Cler mont Middle, Treadway Elementa ry, Beverly Shores Elementary and Fruitland Park Elementary. We are going to have to prioritize our needs and do the most we can with the dollars we have, he said. Commissioner Tim Sullivan, who serves as a liaison to the Lake County League of Cities, said the cities and the county have come together to support the same allo cation of the penny sales tax. Based on conversations with them, they think it is something vi tal to their economic well-being and would like to continue it as is, he said. We are kind of waiting on the school board. The school board has not for mally come to a decision or in formed the County Commission yet. But if they do come together with the county and municipal ities, Sullivan said it would be a positive thing. If the municipalities, county and school board go forward with a uni ed front to show why we need to continue this tax since it is not a new tax, I think that it would go a long way in showing the people that we are being conscientious on how we spend our dollars, he said. TAX FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Revenue from tax goes toward infrastructure capital needs, such as road work. Please call Amie, the message said, followed by the number of the mans girlfriend. Wells was taken aback. In three years as a nego tiator with the Kalama zoo, Mich., police, hed always relied on spo ken give-and-take, tak ing cues from a persons tone of voice, the inec tions, emotions. Hed never thought about negotiating via text. It had never even been brought up at one of our training, Wells recalled of the 2011 case. What do you want me to tell her? he text ed back. The truth, suspect Jesse Cook wrote. While Wells ordinari ly would rely on a skill called active listening, he couldnt hear Cooks voice. Cook couldnt hear his. Was he yelling? Crying? Its not the preferred method of communi cation in a crisis, but if its the only way that we have, then well en gage, said New York State Police spokes woman Darcy Wells. In Kalamazoo, Wells used Cooks text about telling his girlfriend the truth as a way to show empathy and build trust. He texted that he understood the unem ployed veteran was try ing to provide for his girlfriend and daughter when he robbed the gas station. There was no re sponse. A minute later, Wells typed again, deter mined to keep the com munication going. This doesnt have to go down like this. Again, nothing. Do you need any thing? Water? Food? Wells tried after anoth er minute. Finally, a reply. Water, Cook wrote. As soon as he wrote water, I thought, OK, I can work with this, Wells recalled later. Well get something gured out. Wells asked Cook to roll down his window so an ofcer could toss a bottle of water into his SUV, which was dis abled by tire-popping spikes laid by police. This guy throws like a girl, Wells texted, shing for Cooks state of mind. Thanks. He does throw like a girl, Cook wrote afterward. Then a smiley face. It was the cue Wells had been waiting for, proof Cook had relaxed enough to perhaps re sume talking by phone, which had been the goal all along. Looking back, Wells said having someones responses in text form could be benecial during negotiations, providing a chance to show them to a relative or another negotiator for guidance. But the negatives, in cluding the potential to be misunderstood and absence of emotion and real-time give-andtake, outweigh the ben ets, he said. Can I call u? Wells then asked Cook. OK, Cook replied. He surrendered 15 min utes later. TEXTING FROM PAGE A1 MARK BUGNASKI / AP Sgt. Andres Wells is seen in his armored vehicle holding his cell phone and vehicle speaker. An estimated $1 billion in housing sales will start next April, if all goes according to plan. And before the end of the year, The Villages officials predict, more than 4,000 new residents will have moved into the city.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT OXFORD Guardian ad Litem program in need of volunteers The Guardian ad Litem program is seeking volunteer advocates to be a voice for abused, neglected or aban doned children whose cases are in the court system. Volunteers must be 21 or older, have successfully completed 30 hours of pre-service training and be cleared of any serious criminal histo ry via a Level II criminal background check. Individuals ages 19 and 20 are eligible to work alongside a certied volunteer. The next training session begins June 9 at the Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301. For information about the pro gram, call 352-274-5231 or email Sarah.Jay@gal..gov. To download an application, go to www.guardi anadlitem.org. LAKE COUNTY Immunization program ongoing in middle schools The Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools this month for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 201415 school year. Upcoming dates are: Thursday at Clermont Middle School; May 20 at Cecil E. Gray Middle School; May 22 at Life Stream Academy Leesburg; May 23 at Spring Creek Charter School; May 23 at Lake Hills School; May 23 at Life Stream Academy Eustis and May 23 at Imagine Schools of South Lake. For information, call 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com. THE VILLAGES Fundraiser will support efforts against type 1 diabetes Fresh Market will celebrate the 20th anniversary of its annual Hope Floats Sidewalk Sale, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, Friday to Sunday, to benet Junior Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), the leading global organiza tion funding type 1 diabetes research. Fresh Markets stores will offer hot dogs, root beer oats and ice cream sundaes (regular and sugar-free) for $2, and will donate 100 percent of the money raised in the three-day sale directly to JDRF. Fresh Market is at 3740 Wedgewood Lane, The Villages, 352-391-9620, and there are stores in other Central Florida locations. For information, go to www.the freshmarket.com. CLERMONT Community Foundation to host estate planning seminar Speakers for the Charitable Estate Planning Seminar are Hilgardt Lamprecht, president and se nior LifeWealth Advisor for The LifeWealth Group, and Wade Boyette of BNC Law Firm, at noon on May 21, offering information about how the Community Foundation of South Lake can help you meet char itable goals while maximizing asset transfers to your loved ones. The meeting will be at the Community Foundation of South Lake,12150 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Lunch will be provided and space is limited. RSVP by May 20 at 352-394-3818 or kathy@cfslc.org. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A $1.5 million interior facelift is currently taking place at Lakeside West, an independent living build ing on the campus of Lake Port Square in Leesburg, and the project is expect ed to be completed by fall. There is a lot of excite ment among residents, Bill Powell, director of concierge and security, said on Sunday, showing the lobby and reception areas that will be renovat ed, along with upgrades to the corridors, dining ar eas and hospitality suites. A new concierge area will be created, too. Lake Port Square has 277 residents, while 176 live in the Lakeside West building that is under ren ovation. Powell said residents are updated and involved in part of the decision-mak ing process about the ren ovation. We had several choic es for them to pick from for the interior, he said, showing a display board of the colors and fabric sam ples that residents chose LEESBURG Lake Port Square begins facelift THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL The Lakeside West facility, on the 78-acre campus of Lake Port Square in Leesburg, is currently undergoing a $1.5 million interior facelift. LINDA CHARLTON Special to the Daily Commercial S enior archers gathered in south Lake County on Saturday to play their part in the rst ever Lake Se nior Games. A total of 20 archers from around Central Florida competed in the 900 tournament at Off Road Revolution, a few miles north of the Lake-Polk county line. As Kevin Murphy, winner in the com pound-release ages 65-69 category said, It is a beautiful set up here. Denitely be here next year. Speaking at con tests end, Mary Ann Hartman (one of three women com peting) said, It was a good day. I didnt break any arrows and I didnt lose any. In the 900 format, archers shoot ve ends of six arrows each with a maximum CLERMONT Archers compete at Lake Senior Games PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Stan Oles, left, and Don Driscoll retrieve arrows and record scores after one end of the competition. Archers shot 15 ends of six arrows each. BELOW: Seventyeight-year-old Frank Skvarek of the Villages Archery Club takes a shot during the Lake Senior Games competition held Saturday at Off Road Revolution, south of Clermont. Staff Report Angelo Perciballi, re tired U.S. Air Force major general, will be the 20142015 president of the Ro tary Club of Lake County Golden Triangle, outgoing president Chuck Hiott has announced. Perciballi, who lives in Mount Dora, retired from 37 years of commissioned service in the USAF and will be joined by a slate of ofcers and a nine-mem ber board of directors, Hiott said in a press re lease. Perciballi has both a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineer ing and a master of sci ence degree in aeronau tics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Insti tute of Technology. He attended the Indus trial College of the Armed Forces and Harvard Ken nedy School of Govern ment, in the Program for Executives in National and International Security. Perciballis career expe rience includes more than 35 years in aerospace en gineering at Lockheed Aircraft, Raytheon Missiles and Mar tin Marietta. He also has more than 6,500 ying hours in worldwide airlift operations and gen eral aviation. Other ofcers include: President-elect Shane Sherman of Data Graphics Inc. in Mount Dora. Secretary Patricia Thompson, a fourth-gen eration citrus grower and part-time bookkeeper. Treasurer David Donofrio of Greenlee, Kur ras, Rice & Brown in Mount Dora. Sergeant at arms Rick Gonzalez of Crosby & Associates of Ta vares. Past Pres ident Hiott, a princi pal and engineer at Booth, Ern, Straughan, Hiott Inc. (BESH) in Tavares. The 2014-2015 Board of Directors is compiled of: Carl Stigdon, who re tired as a regional supervi sor in 1998 from a nancial services company. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A businessman wants a longterm lease on a hangar at Leesburg International Airport so badly that he is willing to undertake $150,000 worth of repairs on the building, yet city commissioners want to re negotiate the proposal for more fa vorable nancial terms before giv ing their approval. The city plans to discuss this fur ther at todays 5:30 p.m. commis sion meeting. Those negotiations were un fruitful, Leo Treggi, airport manag er, wrote in an agenda memo to city commissioners. Treggi said in the memo that Paul Harris has request ed the commission reconsider the initial lease of $0.15 per square feet per year for the land, and a prepaid hangar lease of $225,000 annual ized at 3.25 percent over 20 years. Treggi also said in the memo that the lease will gross $309,504.98, and that Harris has agreed to a schedule of improvements to be completed within two years if the lease is ap proved. As the owner of Stempro, Har ris reportedly wants to use the 6,400-square-foot hangar at 32746 Echo Dr. to store three aircraft. At the commissions last meet ing on April 28, Commissioner Bill Polk questioned why Stempro was being offered a lease for $225,000 on a hangar that was appraised for $250,000. Polk also said 3.25 per cent was lower than most business es are able to obtain through com mercial lending from a bank. If we are going to get into the nance business, then we need to act like nancial people. Were not acting like nancial people, Polk said. Leesburg City Manager Al Minner Leesburg city commission to debate request for hangar Retired major general Perciballi to head Rotary Club PERCIBALLI SEE ROTARY | A4 SEE HANGAR | A4 SEE ARCHERS | A4 SEE FACELIFT | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 DEATH NOTICES Brian Christopher Gibson Brian Christopher Gibson, 30, of Ocala, died on Saturday, May 10, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. IN MEMORY Vickie Stockglaus ner, who is retired from Harry S. Truman Me morial Veterans Hospi tal in Columbia, Mo. Kathy Yarbrough, bank manager of the BMO Harris Bank in Ta vares. Jodie McEwen, vice president of Hillcrest Insurance in Mount Dora and Ocoee. Dee Johns, who owns Directories Ink, a publishing company in Tavares. Janet Westlake, minister of discipleship at First United Meth odist Church of Mount Dora. Colleen McGinley, executive director of the Tavares Chamber of Commerce. Julie Riley, a regis tered sales assistant at Belton Financial Group Raymond James & As sociates Inc. in Tavares. Phyllis M Olm stead, who owns Olm stead Publishing LLC in Apopka and is re tired from international higher education. The Rotary Club of Lake County Golden Tri angle meets on Tuesdays at 11:45 a.m. at Lake Re ceptions in Mount Dora. ROTARY FROM PAGE A3 said at the last meeting that the hangar was in poor condition and that Harris offer to improve the facility would be benet the city by sav ing it from making the repairs. Were trying to give a little to get a little, Min ner said at the meet ing, adding he felt that it was a fair trade-off for the city. Treggi said in the memo that the han gar is 30 years old and is in a state of disre pair. He noted current issues with the hangar include a leaking roof, poor landscaping, un desirable ramp con ditions and structural beams that needed at tention, all estimated to cost $150,000. Treggi said in the memo that there was some confusion at the last meeting with re gard to whether this lease provided the high est and best use for the airport. Essentially, Mr. Harris proposes to use the ex isting 6,400-square-foot facility to hangar three aircraft, Treggi wrote in the memo. A facility of this size is reasonable to store such number of air craft. Pursuant to Lees burg International Air ports Assurances and FAA Airport Compliance Manual regulations, this use is arguably an avia tion use and worthy of prime airport frontage. Further, because the po tential lessee has a small manufacturing business and available space in the facility in question, it is not unreasonable to permit that usage, nor would it be in any viola tion of any FAA or City regulation. The memo notes the total term of the lease is for 30 years and the property, including all improvements, would revert back to the city upon termination of the lease agreement. HANGAR FROM PAGE A3 score of 10 points per arrow. Archers on Saturday ranged in age from 52 to 79. They came from as far away as Homosas sa and Fort Meade, but almost half came from The Villages Ar chery Club. Frank Skvarek, 78, is perhaps typical of the Villagers, though bet ter at shooting than most. Hes been us ing bows and arrows for about 12 years, and holds or has held mul tiple state and nation al records. I used to be a gun shooter, Skvarek says. I did it for a lot of years. I didnt want to shoot guns any more, so I thought another challenge would be archery. Skvarek started with a compound bow, but then saw a man shooting a tradi tional recurve. (Com pound bows incorpo rate pulleys that will mechanically assist the archer.) That just looked like archery to me, Svarek says. I shot Olympic style for a while, but then I took ARCHERS FROM PAGE A3 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Mary Ann Hartman and Gary Perigo score each others arrows, while archery coordinator Joe Steed looks on. for paint, trim and the textile fabrics for the furnishings. Residents are talking about the colors and all of the new additions to the dining room and to our lobby, Powell said. Basically, its going well; resi dents are really excited about whats happening. Executive Director Jamie Began said in a press release that she believes the improve ments will make Lake Port Square even more appeal ing for those looking for a se nior living facility. The investment will en hance the beauty that sur rounds us daily on campus, both inside and out, Began said in the press release. Im excited to unveil the beautiful results later this year. Lake Port Square has been operating in Leesburg for 23 years. It is part of the fami ly of Brookdale senior living, the leading owner and opera tor of senior living communi ties through the United States, according to the press release, and Lake Port Square is a con tinuing care retirement com munity that offers indepen dent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehabili tation. The campus is nestled on 78 acres on the shores of Lake Harris off State Road 44 (Dix ie Avenue) in Leesburg. For more information about Lake Port Square and Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com. FACELIFT FROM PAGE A3 the sight off. When I look at the compound bows, that doesnt even look like archery to me. Hartman, 79, in structs at The Villages Archery Club ve days a week. She also came to the sport relatively late in life. I always wanted to do it, Hartman says. My boys shot at home but I never had time to do it. I moved out here and I saw the archery range and I said, This is the time. Archery is a great sport for wom en because it is a mind sport. The playing eld is level. Theres no age limit for archery. High scorers on Sat urday were Rick Hard man on compound bow and Larry Michael on re curve. All of the compet itors are eligible to com pete in the state senior games, set for this De cember in Lee Coun ty. The next sched uled event in the Lake County games is bowl ing, set for May 14-15 at Bowling Triangle in Mount Dora. The state games are scheduled for Dec. 6-24 in Lee County. Senior games co ordinator Gary Peri go said the archers are happy the senior games have come to Lake County. Were promoting the active, healthy lifestyle for seniors, he said. Archery instruc tor Joseph Steed, who ran the archery com petition, made simi lar comments. We are trying to drive the brand that South Lake County is the center for health, wellness and tness, he said. Thats the brand we are pushing in South Lake County. There has not been a venue specically for seniors until now. BETH REESE CRAVEY The Florida Times-Union JACKSONVILLE Robbie and Doug Smith were preparing for a round-the-world sailboat cruise in 1982 when they and their Jacksonville-based boat temporarily took in a few troubled boys to work on the water. They never went on that cruise. What was supposed to be a yearlong detour turned into a 32-year career. Since the couple founded the Safe Harbor Maritime Academy, a Christian therapeutic boarding school for boys, they have helped about 1,100 at-risk boys turn their lives around. But last year, Doug Smith, 61, had a stroke, which led him and his wife, 57, to ponder the fu ture. They said in a recent interview that they love their boys, but the slower pace and freedom of retirement beckoned. Im too old for this, Doug Smith said. So on June 30, they will turn over day-to-day op erations to former staffer Dustin Johnson, whom they brought back to lead the privately funded academys second act. Were tired, Robbie Smith said. Its time. Robbie Smith is a licensed mental health coun selor. Her husband is a licensed clinical pastoral counselor and an ordained minister. After June 30, the Smiths plan to travel for a few months, so Johnson can get his bearings without them around. They then will return to live on the Safe Harbor property but separated from the daily operations. They will assume ambassador roles, traveling near and far to raise funds and awareness. After 1,100 boys, Safe Harbor founders to retire

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 PETER LEONARD Associated Press DONETSK, Ukraine Ninety percent of voters in a key industrial region in east ern Ukraine came out in fa vor of sovereignty Sunday, pro-Russian insurgents said in announcing preliminary results of a twin referendum that is certain to deepen the turmoil in the country. Roman Lyagin, election chief of the self-styled Do netsk Peoples Republic, said around 75 percent of the Do netsk regions 3 million or so eligible voters cast ballots, and the vast majority backed self-rule. With no international elec tion monitors in place, it was all but impossible to verify the insurgents claims. The pre liminary vote count was an nounced just two hours after the polls closed in an election conducted via paper ballots. A second referendum or ganized by pro-Russian sep aratists was held Sunday in eastern Ukraines industrial Luhansk region, but no im mediate results were released. Ukraines central govern ment and the West had con demned the balloting as a sham and a violation of inter national law, and they have accused Moscow of orches trating the unrest in a possi ble attempt to grab another piece of the country weeks af ter the annexation of Crimea. The results of the two ref erendums could hasten the breakup of the country and worsen what is already the gravest crisis between the West and Russia since the end of the Cold War. Although the voting in the two regions with a com bined population of 6.5 mil lion appeared mostly peace ful, armed men identied as members of the Ukrainian national guard opened re on a crowd outside the town hall in Krasnoarmeisk, and an of cial with the regions insur gents said people were killed. It was not clear how many. The bloodshed took place hours after dozens of armed men shut down the voting in the town. The shooting starkly demonstrated the hair-trig ger tensions in the east, where pro-Russian separat ists have seized government buildings and clashed with Ukrainian forces over the past month. Even before the results were announced, Ukraines Foreign Ministry called the twin referendums a crimi nal farce. The U.S. and oth er Western governments said they wouldnt recognize the outcome. Earlier in the day, the head of the referendum organizers in Donetsk said the ultimate status of the region would be discussed later and would in clude the possibility of seces sion or annexation by Russia. We are just saying to the world that we want changes, we want to be heard, elec tion commission head Ro man Lyagin said. The violence in Krasnoar meisk, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) from the regional capi tal, Donetsk, came hours after armed men, one of whom said they were from the national guard, put a stop to the voting and took control of town hall. In the evening, more armed men arrived in a van, and a scufe broke out with people gathered around the building. Then the men red shots. An Associated Press pho tographer who witnessed the shooting said two peo ple lay motionless on the ground. Insurgent leader De nis Pushilin was quoted by the ITAR-Tass news agency as saying there were an un specied number of deaths. Over the past few weeks, the Ukrainian government and the West have accused Russia of trying to destabi lize the country or create a pretext for another invasion. Russia which annexed Ukraines Crimean Peninsu la just days after voters there approved secession in a March referendum has re jected the accusations. Russian President Vladimir Putin had asked the organiz ers of the latest referendums to delay the vote in an appar ent attempt to ease the crisis. The insurgents refused. At one polling station at a school in Donetsk, turnout was brisk in the rst hour of voting. All voting slips that could be seen in the clear ballot boxes showed that selfrule had been selected. Most opponents of sover eignty appeared likely to stay away from the polls rather than risk drawing attention to themselves. Darya, a 25-year-old medi cal worker who would not give her last name, said she saw no point in casting a ballot, since the vote had no legal force. There were no notices about this referendum any where, about where and when it was happening, she said. In any case, it is not valid, so there was no reason to take part. There were no immediate signs of any outright intimi dation by pro-Russian forces Sunday, and insurgents near the polls were not wearing their usual balaclavas. The haphazard nature of the referendums was in full display at Spartak, a leafy vil lage on the fringes of Donetsk. Villagers were unable to vote for about three hours after the polls opened be cause election ofcials failed to bring a ballot box. Finally, an election organizer arrived with a voting urn crude ly fashioned from cardboard boxes and sealed with tape. Most present said they were voting in favor of au tonomy and against the in terim government headed by acting President Oleksan dr Turchynov. One said she would not take part in a na tionwide presidential elec tion set for May 25. I dont agree with what is happening in the country. And I want some changes for the better. What is happening on May 25 is not honest, truth ful or in our best interests. And that is why I am voting today, said Irina Zelyonova, 30, cra dling her baby in her arms. Insurgents say Ukraine region opts for sovereignty ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO / AP A gunman stands guard as local residents walk from a polling station in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, on Sunday. HARUNA UMAR and MICHELLE FAUL Associated Press BAUCHI, Nigeria One of the teenagers who escaped from Is lamic extremists who abducted more than 300 schoolgirls says the kidnapping was too terrifying for words, and she is now scared to go back to school. Sarah Lawan, a 19-year-old science stu dent, spoke Sunday as Nigerians prayed for the safety of the 276 students still held cap tive. Their prayers were joined by Pope Francis. Let us all join in prayer for the imme diate release of the schoolgirls kidnapped in Nigeria, the Roman Catholic leader tweet ed, using the trending #BringBackOurGirls. Lawan told The Asso ciated Press that more of the girls could have escaped but that they were frightened by their captors threats to shoot them. She spoke in the local Hausa language in a phone interview from Chibok, her home and the site of the mass ab duction in northeast Ni geria. The failure to rescue those who remain cap tive four weeks later has attracted mounting na tional and international outrage. Last week, Ni geria was forced to ac cept international help in the search, after ig noring offers for weeks. More experts are ex pected in Nigeria to help rescue the girls, including U.S. hostage negotiators and others from Britain, France, China and Spain. I am pained that my other colleagues could not summon the cour age to run away with me, Lawan said. Now I cry each time I come across their parents and see how they weep when they see me. Police say 53 students have escaped. Nigerias homegrown Boko Ha ram terrorist network is threatening to sell those who remain in captivity into slavery. In churches across the nation, Nigerians prayed for the girls, whose plight has brought to gether ordinary people in a year that had seen growing dissension be tween Muslims and Christians, disagree ments exacerbated by the increasingly deadly attacks of the Boko Ha ram terrorist network. Abducted Nigerian girl scared to go back to school SUNDAY ALAMBA / AP Hosea Abana, center, the chairman of the Chibok community in Abuja, Nigeria, pauses during a rally calling on the government to rescue the schoolgirls kidnapped from the Chibok Government secondary school, on Saturday.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 R epellent is a fair ly strong word that, if used too often, loses its power. It has such potency that I reserve it just for things that make my stomach turn and my head spin, things that make me question humanity, things that have a rancid smell and an ugly outer shell. Emily Letts is one of those rare creatures who ts my idea of re pellent. In fact, Emily and the whole Planned Parenthood crew that support her are prima facie evidence that the world is lled with what Hannah Arendt fa mously referred to as the banal ity of evil. At the risk of giving her more notoriety than she has already garnered, Emily Letts is the woman who found out she was pregnant, didnt want the baby, didnt have any intention of pay ing for her roll in the hay with nine months of drudgery and chose to have an abortion. That is already something I re ject on principle, the idea that a human life, even one so inni tesimally small that it can t on the head of a pin with the danc ing angels, is disposable because someone had a little too much fun in the sheets. But this isnt just the case of a woman who chose to have an abortion, something that Planned Parenthood advocates with a zeal that surprises even some of its (former) employ ees. Here we have an extremely short-term mother who decided that not only would she dispose of her baby but that she would lm herself in agrante, preserv ing for posterity her narcissism. In one of her numerous inter views to the media which sur prise! was fascinated by her stunt, Letts said, I feel super great about having an abortion. Being the language snob that I am, the rst thing that jumps off the page with this comment is the sophomoric phraseology, the use of one adjective to modify another. Clearly, this young lady did not go to Catholic school or the nuns would have taught her to pay better attention to the grammar. The second thing that occurs to me is that someone who can feel super great about end ing a pregnancy because it was the right decision for my life is a big embarrassment for the prochoice movement, even though theyd never admit it (theyre still recovering over pink-sneak er Wendy Davis and her creative version of the truth). Then again, maybe she isnt. Emily Letts is the bitter harvest that Planned Parenthood has forced society to reap by its nihil istic insistence on reproductive rights to the exclusion of the rights of the unborn. This organization, founded by a eugenicist who actively sup ported the sterilization of the mentally inrm and the racially undesirable, has been unrelent ing in its crusade to normalize abortion. Everything it has done, every move made, has been designed to remove the stig ma from an act that ends in the death of at least one party, and sometimes two. Which brings me to anoth er reason I nd Planned Parent hood even more repellent than randy Emily, who, after all, is just a victim of several decades worth of brainwashing from the femi nists. She has been taught to feel good about her choices, and the lesson took so well that not only is she unashamed, she is abso lutely delighted with her ability to destroy human life and make a great conversation piece on YouTube in the process. Planned Parenthood is the reason that Emily Letts ex ists, and the propaganda about how much it supports women through mammograms (an in signicant part of its mission) and other reproductive health services is just a smokescreen for its biggest moneymaker: abor tion. And that, my friends, is why the organization has gone on the warpath against one of its own. Margo Davidson represents Delaware County, my home dis trict, in Harrisburg. She was sup ported by NOW and Planned Parenthood in her rst cam paign. But a funny thing happened on the way back to the state house. Davidson was one of the few Democrats to vote in favor of additional restrictions on abor tion clinics in the wake of the Gosnell tragedy. Her cousin, Se mika Shaw, died as a result of a botched abortion performed at Gosnells clinic in West Philadel phia. This is how she explained her vote: I honor (my cousins) memory by voting yes on this legislation that seeks to safe guard the health of women that is long overdue, so that never again will a woman walk into a licensed health-care facility in the state of Pennsylvania and be butchered as she was. Because of that courageous stand, Planned Parenthood has targeted her for defeat in the up coming Democratic primary by supporting her male challeng er. I am beginning to realize that if you cross the grand priestesses of reproductive freedom by ght ing to protect women, you will be struck down. If, on the oth er hand, you glorify that deadly choice with a close up, youre a heroine. And thats a tragedy for society. Id call it mourning sickness. Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Dai ly News. Readers may send her email at cowers1961@gmail.com. OTHER VOICES Christine M. Flowers MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Planned Parenthoods repellent spawn C apital punishment is unjust, immor al and prone to error, as most of the worlds developed nations have gured out. But the United States, unwilling to put aside a desire for revenge, continues to kill its own citizens; 32 states and the federal gov ernment still impose the death penalty. At the very least, they ought to perform that barbaric task as fairly and humanely as pos sible. A report released Wednesday by the Consti tution Project, a bipartisan think tank that in cludes both death penalty abolitionists and death penalty supporters, calls for a complete overhaul of the process, from arrest to execu tion. Given the human factor in capital punish ment prosecutors, witnesses, judges, ju rors this page does not believe the system can ever be xed. It should be abolished. But there are changes that can reduce errors, misapplication and misconduct. Many of the recommendations of the Constitution Project would move the system in a positive direc tion, so policymakers would be wise to read the report closely. The 208-page report offers 39 proposals most of them reasonable, some crucial in cluding dropping the widely used three-drug execution cocktail (California has already scrapped it under the weight of a legal chal lenge) in favor of the single-shot method. Ad ministering a single overdose of a barbitu rate, according to the report, would decrease problems associated with the administration of drugs as well as the risks associated with the use of paralyzing and painful chemical agents. Presumably, that would lead to fewer tor turous executions such as the one that oc curred earlier this year in Oklahoma, in which the condemned man said after the rst injec tion that I feel my whole body burning, and in Ohio, where it took a convicted murderer 25 minutes to die. Those who are interested in justice, wheth er they are supporters of the death penalty or opponents, owe it to their fellow citizens to embrace the kinds of systemic chang es the Constitution Project advocates. A re cent study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that at least 4 percent of death row inmates are likely to have been wrongfully convicted. While that represents a relatively small num ber of people, it amounts to a lot of innocent blood if they are executed. Any steps to lessen that miscarriage of justice would be welcome, particularly by the innocent facing death at the command of their own government. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE How to make the death penalty less unfair and less inhumane Classic DOONESBURY 1974

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 targeted that spring and summer. Stevens, based in the capital city of Tripo li, chose to visit Beng hazi on the anniversa ry of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when U.S. em bassies around the world were on alert for terrorism. In Egypt that day, a different sort of trou ble struck, and would spread to other Mid east cities over several days: Protesters angry about an anti-Muslim video made in America stormed the U.S. Em bassy in Cairo, clamber ing over the walls and setting ags on re. Hours later, the as sault in Benghazi began. A FIERY ASSAULT AND FOUR DEATHS The Benghazi attack came in three waves, spread over eight hours at two locations. Only in hindsight is the dura tion of the attack clear because of a lengthy pause before the sec ond assault. According to ac counts from congres sional investigators and the State Departments Accountability Review Board: Around 9:40 p.m. on Sept. 11, a few attack ers scaled the wall of the diplomatic post and opened the front gate, allowing dozens of armed men in. Local Libyan security guards ed. A U.S. security of cer shepherded Stevens and Sean Smith, a State Department communi cations specialist, into a fortied safe room in the main building. Attackers set the building and its fur niture are with die sel fuel. Stevens and Smith were overcome by blinding, choking smoke that prevented security ofcers from reaching them. Libyan civilians found Stevens in the wreckage hours later and took him to a hospital, where he, like Smith, died of smoke inhalation. He was the rst U.S. ambassador to be killed in the line of duty in more than 30 years. A security team from the CIA annex about a mile away arrived to help about 25 minutes into the attack, armed only with ries and handguns. The U.S. per sonnel ed with Smiths body back to the annex in armored vehicles. Hours after the rst attack ended, the annex was twice targeted by early-morning mortar re. The second round killed Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty, two CIA security contractors who were defending the annex from the rooftop. A team of six securi ty ofcials summoned from Tripoli and a Lib yan military unit helped evacuate the remaining U.S. personnel on the site to the airport and out of Benghazi. THE FALLOUT BACK HOME Word hit Washington in the nal weeks of the presidential race. Over the next several days, the Benghazi news blend ed with images of angry anti-American demon strations and ag-burn ings spreading across the Middle East over the offensive video. Political reaction to the Benghazi attack quickly formed along partisan lines that hold fast to this day. Republican presiden tial nominee Mitt Rom ney and others said Obama had embold ened Islamic extremists by being weak against terrorism. But the pub lic still credited Obama with the successful strike against al-Qaida leader Osama bin Lad en a few months earlier in Pakistan. The accusation that took hold was a Re publican charge that the White House inten tionally misled voters by portraying the Beng hazi assault as one of the many protests over the video, instead of a calculated terrorist at tack under his watch. Obama accused the Republicans of politi cizing a national trag edy. He insists that the narrative about the vid eo protests was the best information available at the time. After 13 public hear ings, the release of 25,000 pages of docu ments and 50 separate briengs over the past year and a half, the ar guments are the same. WHO WAS TO BLAME FOR LEAVING THE DIPLOMATIC POST SO VULNERABLE? Republican and Dem ocratic lawmakers agreed: The State De partment under Clinton kept open the Benghazi mission, which em ployed a few State De partment workers and more than two dozen CIA workers, with little protection in the midst of well-known dangers. The attack probably could have been pre vented if the depart ment had heeded intel ligence warnings about the deteriorating situ ation in eastern Libya, a bipartisan report by the Senate Intelligence Committee said. Stevens requests for more security, made clear in cables to State Department headquar ters in July and August 2012, went unheeded, according to the Sen ate report, as did those made by his predeces sor earlier that year. But Stevens also twice declined the U.S. mili tarys offer of a special operations team to bol ster security and other wise help his staff. The month after the attack, Clinton said she was responsible for the safety of those who had served in Benghazi, without acknowledging any specic mistakes on her part. Obama said the blame ultimately rested on his shoulders as president. Yet the administration says neither Obama nor Clinton was aware of the requests for better protection in Benghazi because they were han dled at lower levels. Four senior State De partment ofcials were put on paid leave after an independent board investigating the at tack said security at the Benghazi mission was grossly inadequate. Af ter a review, the depart ment says it reassigned three ofcials to posi tions of lesser responsi bility; one resigned. Some Republicans complained that no one was red. Democrats tried to shift some blame to GOP lawmakers, com plaining that they had cut the administra tions budget request for diplomatic security in 2012. AN UNFINISHED STORY No one has been ar rested for the Benghazi attack. The administration has named two militant groups that ofcials be lieve were among the attackers. One is led by a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, Suan bin Qumu, who was released from the U.S. military prison in Cuba in 2007. He was described by of cials there as a probable member of al-Qaida. The suspected groups are considered ideolog ical cousins of the ter rorists behind the 2001 attacks on New York and Washington. But State Department of cials say they dont think core al-Qaida leaders orchestrated the Beng hazi attack. The administration says it wont give up on bringing the assailants to justice. Since the Benghazi mission was burned, the rebel brigades that once fought Gadhas forces have hardened into in creasingly powerful mi litias, many made up of Islamic extremists. Lib yas central government is weak, security forc es cant maintain con trol, and bombings and shootings continue. The State Department maintains the U.S Em bassy in Tripoli but hasnt returned to Benghazi. BENGHAZI FROM PAGE A1 JACQUELYN MARTIN / AP House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, center, arrives for a House Democratic caucus where the agenda includes discussing whether they should participate in the Benghazi committee, Friday, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

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DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PONTE VEDRA BEACH Martin Kay mer produced one of the most unlikely pars on the 17th green at the TPC Sawgrass without ever going in the water. It carried him to a oneshot victory Sunday in The Players Champion ship that was emotional in so many ways. Kaymer nearly blew a three-shot lead after a 90-minute rain delay until he holed a 30-foot par putt on the famous island green. He got upand-down with his put ter from short of the 18th green for one last par and a 1-under 71. Jim Furyk closed with a 66 he had to wait af ter the rain delay to rap in a 3-foot par putt and it looked as though it might be enough to force a playoff, or even win outright when the 29-year-old German began to crumble. Fu ryk had to settle for a runner-up nish for the second straight week. Jordan Spieth, tied with Kaymer going into the nal round, made his rst bogey of the tournament on the fth hole, and plenty more followed. He closed with a 74. The typical stress that Sawgrass brings on Sunday was contained to the nal hour, and it was almost more than Kaymer could take. The German made double bogey from an aggres sive play behind a pine tree on the 15th. He nervously chose putter from a collection area on the par-5 16th that cost him a chance at birdie. Nothing could top the 17th hole, the most ex citing on the Stadium Course. Kaymer had a oneshot lead. His tee shot cleared the water and landed on a mound just over the bunker, but it mysteriously spun hard back toward the front of the green and looked as if it might go into the SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Nets try to back up belief / B6 PHOTOS BY LYNNE SLADKY / AP Martin Kaymer of Germany, holds The Players championship trophy on Sunday at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach. MARK J. TERRILL / AP Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan smacks Oklahoma Citys Kevin Durant in the rst half of Game 4 on Sunday in Los Angeles. BETH HARRIS AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES After be ing thoroughly outplayed for over 40 minutes, the Los An geles Clippers fought back. Leading the way was a player not known for coming up big in the clutch. Darren Collison scored eight of his 18 points in the nal 2:58, rallying the Clip pers past the Oklahoma City Thunder 101-99 on Sunday to tie the Western Confer ence seminal series 2-2. Even though we didnt play well throughout the game, we were able to get a win, Collison said. That feels more impressive than anything we did. Russell Westbrook, who scored 27 points, missed a 3-pointer and Serge Ibakas tip attempt was too late at the buzzer, allowing the Clip pers to salvage a game they trailed until the nal 1:23. It was a good look, West brook said. Just didnt go in. Blake Grifn led Los An geles with 25 points, mak ing 9 of 11 free throws. Jamal Crawford added 18 points. DeAndre Jordan had 14 re bounds, helping the Clippers win the boards, 45-43 the rst time in 11 playoff games the Thunder were outre bounded. We just willed this one. We found a way, said Chris Paul, who had 23 points and 10 assists. Kevin Durant scored 40 points, hitting 15 of 18 free Clippers stun Thunder 101-99 to deadlock semifinal series MARK DIDTLER Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG Josh Tomlin won his second straight start, Nyjer Morgan and Michael Bourn both drove in two runs and the Cleveland Indians beat the Tampa Bay Rays 6-5 on Sunday. Tomlin (2-0), who pitched just once in the big leagues last season after right el bow surgery in 2012, allowed two runs and six hits over six innings in his second outing this year. Tomlin, Morgan key Tribes win over Rays SEE RAYS | B2 Staff Report Former South Lake High School and Uni versity of Florida standout Jonotthan Harrison signed with the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday as an undrafted free agent. Harrison played for Walter Banks at South Lake and was a team cap tain for the Gators in 2013. A 6-foot-4, 299-pound center, Harrison started in all 12 games for Florida last season. He was the only offensive lineman to start in same position for each game in 2013. For his career, he played in 51 games and made 39 starts. Harrison was a high-school and college team mate of Jeff Demps, who currently is a running back with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Jonotthan Harrison signs with Colts HARRISON STEVE NESIUS / AP Cleveland Indians Asdrubal Cabrera scores on Nyjer Morgans RBI-single during the second inning against the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday in St. Petersburg. SEE HOOPS | B2 Kaymer and his caddie, Craig Connelly, look from the third tee during the nal round. Kaymer holds on to win Players Championship SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 Morgan had an RBI ineld single that rolled to a stop near the line between home and third before Bourn hit a two-run double as the Indians took a 3-1 lead in the second. Morgan also hit his rst major league homer since July 30, 2012, an eighth-in ning solo shot that made it 6-2. Matt Joyce homered and had two RBIs for the Rays, who went 1-5 on their homestand. Chris Archer (2-2) gave up four runs and eight hits in ve-plus innings. A three-run eighth pulled the Rays to 6-5. Ben Zobrist scored the rst run in the in ning when reliever Marc Rzepczynski made an errant throw to sec ond on what could have been an inning-end ing double play. Cody Allen entered and, af ter allowing Wil Myers RBI single, hit Desmond Jennings with a pitch to load the bases. Yunel Es cobar hit a sacrice y. Bryan Shaw pitched a perfect ninth in place of demoted closer John Ax ford for his second save. Yan Gomes hit a lead off homer that chased Archer during a tworun sixth that gave Cleveland a 5-2 advan tage. Morgan reached on a bunt single off Brad Boxberger that involved a call overturned on re play, advanced on a balk and wild pitch, and scored the innings sec ond run on Mike Aviles sacrice y. Joyce hit a rst-inning solo homer off Tomlin. Joyce, who is 6 for 12 with two homers against the right-hander, had an RBI single in the fourth. NASCAR Sprint Cup-5-hour ENERGY 400 Results Saturday At Kansas Speedway Kansas City, Kan. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (13) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267 laps, 119.4 rat ing, 47 points. 2. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267, 137.7, 44. 3. (17) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 115.5, 42. 4. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 128.7, 41. 5. (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 109, 40. 6. (4) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 103, 39. 7. (9) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 267, 101.4, 37. 8. (12) Aric Almirola, Ford, 267, 90.4, 36. 9. (14) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 100.2, 36. 10. (28) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 81.3, 35. 11. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 92.7, 33. 12. (5) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 267, 89.4, 32. 13. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267, 89.9, 32. 14. (15) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 267, 82.9, 30. 15. (24) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 75.3, 30. 16. (10) Greg Bife, Ford, 267, 79, 28. 17. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 266, 70.4, 27. 18. (30) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 266, 70.6, 26. 19. (19) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 266, 68.5, 25. 20. (8) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 266, 94.9, 24. 21. (26) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 266, 59, 23. 22. (20) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 265, 62.1, 22. 23. (23) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 264, 59.9, 21. 24. (25) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 264, 58.2, 20. 25. (34) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 264, 49.1, 19. 26. (27) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 264, 52, 18. 27. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 263, 60.8, 0. 28. (36) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 263, 42.2, 16. 29. (6) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 263, 66.9, 15. 30. (29) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 262, 50, 14. 31. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 262, 32.6, 0. 32. (37) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 261, 32.1, 12. 33. (32) Josh Wise, Ford, 261, 29, 11. 34. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 258, 41.7, 10. 35. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 257, 35.8, 9. 36. (18) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 186, 64.5, 8. 37. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 184, 40.9, 7. 38. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 171, 31.5, 6. 39. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 149, 86.2, 5. 40. (42) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, engine, 137, 32.9, 4. 41. (35) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 136, 42.2, 0. 42. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 63, 28.4, 0. 43. (31) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 57, 38.8, 1. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 4, Atlanta 3 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Thursday, May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 Saturday, May 3: Indiana 92, Atlanta 80 Miami 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Brooklyn 4, Toronto 3 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 Wednesday, April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 Friday, May 2: Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83 Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103 Washington 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Dallas 3 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 Wednesday, April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 Friday, May 2: Dallas 113, San Antonio 111 Sunday, May 4: San Antonio 119, Dallas 96 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 Saturday, May 3: Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 4, Golden State 3 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clip pers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 Thursday, May 1: Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99 Saturday, May 3: L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121 Portland 4, Houston 2 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 Friday, May 2: Portland 99, Houston 98 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Brooklyn 1 Tuesday, May 6: Miami 107, Brooklyn 86 Thursday, May 8: Miami 94, Brooklyn 82 Saturday, May 10: Brooklyn 104, Miami 90 Monday, May 12: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 14: Brooklyn at Miami, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 16: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, May 18: Brooklyn at Miami, TBA Indiana 2, Washington 1 Monday, May 5: Washington 102, Indiana 96 Wednesday, May 7: Indiana 86, Washington 82 Friday, May 9: Indiana 85, Washington 63 Sunday, May 11: Indiana at Washington, late Tuesday, May 13: Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. x-Thursday, May 15: Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, May 18: Washington at Indiana, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 3, Portland 0 Tuesday, May 6: San Antonio 116, Portland 92 Thursday, May 8: San Antonio 114, Portland 97 Saturday, May 10: San Antonio 118, Portland 103 Monday, May 12: at San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Portland at San Antonio, 8:30 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 16: San Antonio at Portland, 9:30 or 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 19: Portland at San Antonio, TBA Oklahoma City 2, L.A. Clippers 2 Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 7: Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clip pers 101 Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112 Sunday, May 11: L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99 Tuesday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 or 10:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 18: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, TBA Clippers 101, Thunder 99 OKLAHOMA CITY (99) Durant 12-24 15-18 40, Ibaka 2-5 2-2 8, Perkins 0-2 1-2 1, Westbrook 10-22 6-6 27, Sefolosha 2-4 0-0 4, Jackson 4-8 0-0 10, Butler 2-7 1-2 6, Adams 0-0 1-4 1, N.Collison 1-3 0-0 2, Fisher 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-75 26-34 99. L.A. CLIPPERS (101) Barnes 0-6 0-0 0, Grifn 8-19 9-11 25, Jordan 3-5 1-7 7, Paul 10-23 3-4 23, Redick 2-8 1-1 6, Crawford 7-16 2-2 18, Davis 2-3 0-0 4, D.Collison 7-12 4-4 18, Granger 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-93 20-29 101. Oklahoma City 32 25 18 24 99 L.A. Clippers 15 31 17 38 101 3-Point GoalsOklahoma City 7-24 (Ibaka 2-2, Jack son 2-3, Westbrook 1-4, Butler 1-5, Durant 1-7, N.Collison 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2), L.A. Clippers 3-21 (Crawford 2-8, Redick 1-3, Granger 0-1, D.Collison 0-1, Paul 0-4, Barnes 0-4). Fouled OutNone. Re boundsOklahoma City 58 (Durant 7), L.A. Clippers 55 (Jordan 14). AssistsOklahoma City 17 (West brook 8), L.A. Clippers 23 (Paul 10). Total Fouls Oklahoma City 27, L.A. Clippers 24. Technicals Perkins, Westbrook, Oklahoma City defensive three second, Jordan. A,365 (19,060). NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT SECOND ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 3, Montreal 2 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Montreal 4, Boston 2 Thursday, May 8: Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT Saturday, May 10: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Monday, May 12: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Montreal at Boston, TBA Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Sunday, May 11: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, Minnesota 2 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Minnesota 4, Chicago 0 Friday, May 9: Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Sunday, May 11: Minnesota at Chicago, 9 p.m. Tuesday, May 13: Chicago at Minnesota, TBA x-Thursday, May 15: Minnesota at Chicago, TBA Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 2 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1 Thursday, May 8: Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, May 10: Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0 Monday, May 12: Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Wednesday, May 14: Anaheim at Los Angeles, TBA x-Friday, May 16: Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBA Mutua Madrid Open Results Sunday At Caja Magica Madrid, Spain Purse: Men, $5.1 million (Masters 1000); Women, $5.1 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Kei Nishikori (10), Ja pan, 2-6, 6-4, 3-0, retired. Women Championship Maria Sharapova (8), Russia, def. Simona Halep (4), Romania, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3. Doubles Men Championship Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (6), Serbia, def. Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, 6-4, 6-2. Internazionali BNL dItalia Results Sunday At Foro Italico Rome Purse: Men, $4.77 million (Masters 1000); Women, $3.63 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Robin Haase, Nether lands, 6-4, 6-4. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-3, 6-7 (1), 6-3. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. John Isner (9), United States, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Tommy Robredo (16), Spain, def. Juan Monaco, Ar gentina, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed C Matt Wieters on the 15-day DL. Reinstated 1B Chris Davis from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES Placed LHP CC Sabathia on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Matt Daley from Scran ton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TAMPA BAY RAYS Released RHP Heath Bell. TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated 2B Chris Getz for assignment. Reinstated RHP Casey Janssen from the 15-day DL. National League MIAMI MARLINS Designated RHP Carlos Marmol for assignment. Recalleed RHP Henry Rodriguez from New Orleans (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned INF Brent Morel to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled OF Jaff Decker from Indianapolis. SAN DIEGO PADRES Optioned RHP Kevin Quack enbush to El Paso (PCL). Assigned RHP Hector Ambriz outright to El Paso. Reinstated 3B Chase Headley from the 15-day DL. Announced OF Xavier Nady declined outright assignment and elected free agency. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Placed 1B Adam LaRo che on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Re called OF Tyler Moore from Syracuse (IL). American Association AMARILLO SOX Released OF Justin Pearson. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Released OF TreVon Johnson. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES Released RHP Jeff Duda and LHP Ryan Rogers. ROCKLAND BOULDERS Released RHP Amalio Diaz. Signed OF Jerod Edmondson. TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES Released C Kyle Nisson. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS Agreed to terms with RB Jor dan Lynch, T Cody Booth, Gs Ryan Groy and James Dunbar, DTs Brandon Dunn and Lee Pegues and LBs Tana Patrick, Christian Jones and Devekeyan Lattimore. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Agreed to terms with TEs Blake Annen and Trey Burton, WRs Kadron Boone and Quron Pratt, RBs David Fluellen and Henry Josey, CB John Fulton, T Kevin Graf, DT Wade Keliikipi, S Daytawion Lowe, DE Frank Mays, K Carey Spear and Gs Josh Andrews, Karim Barton and Donald Hawkins. PITTSBURGH STEELERS Agreed to terms with DEs Ethan Hemer and Josh Mauro, QB Brendon Kay, DB Devon Carrington, OL Chris Elkins, G Will Simmons, OT Kaycee Ike, LB Howard Jones, DT Roy Philon and TE Eric Waters. MINNESOTA VIKINGS Agreed to terms with TE A.C. Leonard, QB Kain Coulter, C Zac Kerin, Gs Austin Wentworth and Conor Boffeli, NT Isame Faciane, HB Dominique Williams, DEs Jake Snyder, Tyler Scott and Rakim Cox, WRs Erik Lora and Donte Foster and OTs Antonio Richardson, Pierce Burton and Matt Hall. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Agreed to terms with CBs Chris Davis and Greg Ducre, DL Tenny Palepoi and Ricky Tjong-A-Tjoe, LBs Colton Underwood and Alvin Scioneaux, RB D.J. Adams, S Alden Darby, TE Michael Flacco, G D.J. Johnson, OT Jeremiah Sirles, P Chase Tenpenny, OT Ian White and WRs Torrence Allen, Bre lan Chancellor, Micah Hateld and Javontee Herndon. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL Fined Boston F Shawn Thornton $2,820.52 for unsportsmanlike conduct during Saturdays game. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 6 p.m. ESPNU Wake Forest at NC State CYCLING 5 p.m. NBCSN Tour of California, Stage 2, at Folsom, Calif. HOCKEY 1:30 p.m. NBCSN IIHF, World Championship, Russia vs. United States, at Minsk, Belarus MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. ESPN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis 10:10 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Seattle FS-Florida Miami at L.A. Dodgers NBA 8 p.m. TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 4, Miami at Brooklyn 10:30 p.m. TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 4, San Antonio at Portland NHL 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Boston at Montreal 10 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Los Angeles at Anaheim RAYS FROM PAGE B1 throws, for the Thunder. We let this one slip away, he said. We could have took control of the series. Game 5 is Tuesday night in Oklahoma City. We were almost on the mat and we got off of it. We didnt get pinned, Clippers coach Doc Riv ers said. Theyre seeth ing right now. They had an opportunity to go up 3-1 and now its an even series. It was the 14th come back and largest yet by the Clippers this season after trailing by double digits. They rallied from 12 points down in the second quarter of Game 7 to oust Golden State in the rst round. This is one of the best ones yet, Paul said. Darren Collison was amazing. You just got to love a guy like that who plays with so much heart and never gives up. The Clippers had no answer for Durant and Westbrook until mid way through the fourth quarter. That dynamic duo drove the lane with abandon, drew fouls and made free throws in leading the Thunder to an early 22-point lead. Durants three-point play early in the fourth extended the Thunders lead to 15 points, and they were still up by 10 with 7:44 to go. But the comeback Clippers were not to be denied. Everybody kept tell ing each other, Chip away, chip away, Grif n said. That was kind of our mentality for the rest of the game. We just kept ghting. The Clippers stole a page out of the Thun ders playbook, switch ing to a smaller lineup that included Collison and Danny Granger, who helped disrupt the Thunders rebounding late. Paul willed his team back into it, scoring six straight points to get the Clippers with in six. Grifn, who was saddled with ve fouls, made three of four free throws before Collison got hot. The whole time Im thinking, We cant be down 3-1, we just cant be down 3-1 going to Okla homa, Collison said. With the game tied at 97, Collison scored the Clippers nal four points on layups. Craw ford passed to a streak ing Collison for a fastbreak conversion on the second one for a 101-97 lead with 32 seconds left. Westbrook scored for the Thunder, but after Grif n missed, Westbrook did too to end the game. Did that really just happen? a still stunned Crawford said. Paul missed all ve of his shots in the third, when Grifn picked up three fouls to give him ve, and Crawford and Jordan each got their third. Ibaka, who shot 9 of 10 in the Thunders Game 3 win, got his fourth foul, along with Westbrook in the third. The Clippers came as close as eight points be fore Reggie Jacksons 3-pointer beat the shot clock to keep the Thun der ahead 75-63 going into the fourth. The Thunder had the Clippers on their heels from the opening tip, with Oklahoma City shooting 65 percent in building a 22-point lead. Oklahoma City out scored the Clippers 3215 in the rst; the fewest points theyve allowed in a quarter of a playoff game. NBA Commission er Adam Silver, who banned Clippers own er Donald Sterling for life and ned him $2.5 million, attended the game. HOOPS FROM PAGE B1 The Players Championship Leading Scores Sunday At TPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium Course Ponte Vedra Beach Purse: $10 million Yardage: 7,215; Par 72 Final Martin Kaymer (600), $1,800,000 63-69-72-71 275 -13 Jim Furyk (330), $1,080,000 70-68-72-66 276 -12 Sergio Garcia (210), $680,000 67-71-69-70 277 -11 Justin Rose (135), $440,000 67-71-71-69 278 -10 Jordan Spieth (135), $440,000 67-66-71-74 278 -10 David Hearn (95), $313,000 70-71-68-70 279 -9 Rory McIlroy (95), $313,000 70-74-69-66 279 -9 Francesco Molinari, $313,000 72-70-67-70 279 -9 Jimmy Walker (95), $313,000 75-68-71-65 279 -9 Lee Westwood (95), $313,000 67-71-71-70 279 -9 Brian Davis (75), $240,000 72-67-73-68 280 -8 Gary Woodland (75), $240,000 67-71-70-72 280 -8 K.J. Choi (63), $187,500 74-70-72-65 281 -7 Chris Kirk (63), $187,500 71-73-70-67 281 -7 George McNeill (63), $187,500 71-68-69-73 281 -7 Steve Stricker (63), $187,500 71-70-71-69 281 -7 Russell Henley (53), $135,333 65-71-80-66 282 -6 Justin Hicks (53), $135,333 73-70-71-68 282 -6 Morgan Hoffmann (53), $135,333 71-70-70-71 282 -6 Matt Jones (53), $135,333 70-69-69-74 282 -6 Matt Kuchar (53), $135,333 71-71-69-71 282 -6 Brian Stuard (53), $135,333 67-76-69-70 282 -6 Marc Leishman (47), $96,000 70-72-74-67 283 -5 Hideki Matsuyama (47), $96,000 70-71-72-70 283 -5 Daniel Summerhays (47), $96,000 74-68-69-72 283 -5 Kevin Chappell (42), $69,500 72-68-75-69 284 -4 Bill Haas (42), $69,500 68-71-72-73 284 -4 Billy Horschel (42), $69,500 72-70-75-67 284 -4 Zach Johnson (42), $69,500 69-71-72-72 284 -4 Ryan Moore (42), $69,500 70-74-67-73 284 -4 John Senden (42), $69,500 70-69-68-77 284 -4 Brendan Steele (42), $69,500 69-73-75-67 284 -4 Bo Van Pelt (42), $69,500 71-70-70-73 284 -4 Erik Compton (36), $52,750 72-70-74-69 285 -3 Russell Knox (36), $52,750 72-72-73-68 285 -3 Scott Langley (36), $52,750 71-72-72-70 285 -3 Henrik Stenson (36), $52,750 71-70-70-74 285 -3 Angel Cabrera (29), $38,000 70-74-71-71 286 -2 Stewart Cink (29), $38,000 70-70-70-76 286 -2 Jamie Donaldson, $38,000 74-67-74-71 286 -2 Luke Donald (29), $38,000 73-69-75-69 286 -2 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (29), $38,000 67-77-72-70 286 -2 Charley Hoffman (29), $38,000 77-67-71-71 286 -2 Justin Leonard (29), $38,000 68-73-70-75 286 -2 Kevin Na (29), $38,000 70-69-76-71 286 -2 Rory Sabbatini (29), $38,000 71-73-69-73 286 -2 Adam Scott (29), $38,000 77-67-69-73 286 -2 Charlie Beljan (18), $24,073 73-69-73-72 287 -1 Jason Dufner (18), $24,073 69-74-72-72 287 -1 Martin Flores (18), $24,073 70-71-74-72 287 -1 Retief Goosen (18), $24,073 72-70-75-70 287 -1 J.J. Henry (18), $24,073 74-70-72-71 287 -1 water until it settled into the clumpy collar a foot from the bulkhead. His chip was weak, and he still had 30 feet down a ridge with a sharp swing to the right. He made the putt, pumping his st in a rare show of emotion. His putt from the fairway on 18 settled 3 feet behind the hole, and Kaymer was as much re lieved as excited when he knocked it in. A former world No. 1 and major champion, Kaymer nearly choked up when asked about winning on Mothers Day. His mother, Rina, died of cancer in 2008 shortly after Kaymer won the BMW International Open in Germany. He has a sunower her favorite ower on his golf bag. My mother was always there to be affection ate and show us love, Kaymer said in a taped interview with NBC Sports. When my mom passed away, that stopped. We had enough when we were younger. Mothers Day is always a nice day. I hope a lot of kids show their moth ers we love them. Interviewed on the 18th green, so dark that the clubhouse was glowing from the outdoor lights, Kaymer said brother Phillip sent him a text that morning which he described as very emotional. Its a good day for all of us, he said. Kaymer nished at 13-under 275 and joined an elite group by winning the biggest event on golfs strongest tour. Tiger Woods, Phil Mick elson and Adam Scott are the only other play ers to win a major, a World Golf Championship and The Players Championship. Sergio Garcia made a strong run until he hit into the water on the par-5 11th and lost mo mentum by missing too many putts. He closed with a 70 to nish alone in third at 11 under. For the 20-year-old Spieth, it was another lost opportunity. He went 58 consecutive holes without a bogey at Sawgrass until dropping a shot at No. 5. Spieth still was tied for the lead approaching the turn when Kaymer pulled away. Spieth made bogey on No. 8. Kaymer got upand-down from a bunker for birdie on No. 9. Spieth made another bogey on No. 10 when his wedge bounced over the green, and Kaymer made another superb bunker shot on the par5 11th for birdie. He was humming along until the horn sounded to stop play. When he returned, it all started to go wrong. But he held his nerve he spoke earlier in the week about trying not to be a wimp and produced an important win. It was the 14th victory worldwide for Kaymer, ended an 0-for-29 drought. His last win was at the Nedbank Challenge in South Africa at the end of 2012, right after he delivered the crucial point for Europe in its Ryder Cup comeback. Kaymer was No. 1 in the world in February 2011 until he wanted to retool his swing to be able to hit a greater variety of shots. He needed all of them Sunday. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 20 15 .571 7-3 L-1 9-7 11-8 New York 19 17 .528 1 4-6 L-2 9-8 10-9 Boston 19 18 .514 2 6-4 W-2 10-11 9-7 Toronto 18 20 .474 3 2 5-5 L-3 7-10 11-10 Tampa Bay 16 22 .421 5 4 4-6 L-1 8-12 8-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 21 12 .636 7-3 L-1 13-8 8-4 Chicago 19 20 .487 5 1 5-5 L-2 11-10 8-10 Kansas City 18 19 .486 5 1 4-6 W-1 8-7 10-12 Cleveland 18 20 .474 5 2 7-3 W-1 12-8 6-12 Minnesota 17 19 .472 5 2 5-5 W-1 8-9 9-10 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 23 15 .605 5-5 W-4 10-9 13-6 Los Angeles 19 17 .528 3 6-4 W-3 8-10 11-7 Seattle 19 18 .514 3 7-3 L-1 7-8 12-10 Texas 19 19 .500 4 1 4-6 L-2 11-10 8-9 Houston 12 26 .316 11 8 3-7 W-1 6-13 6-13 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 21 15 .583 4-6 W-3 13-8 8-7 Miami 20 18 .526 2 6-4 L-3 17-5 3-13 Washington 19 18 .514 2 4-6 L-3 11-9 8-9 New York 17 19 .472 4 2 2-8 W-1 9-10 8-9 Philadelphia 17 19 .472 4 2 4-6 L-1 6-9 11-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 24 14 .632 4-6 W-2 12-9 12-5 St. Louis 18 19 .486 5 1 4-6 L-2 7-5 11-14 Cincinnati 17 19 .472 6 2 5-5 W-1 10-8 7-11 Pittsburgh 16 20 .444 7 3 6-4 W-4 12-10 4-10 Chicago 12 24 .333 11 7 3-7 L-3 7-11 5-13 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 24 14 .632 7-3 W-1 10-5 14-9 Colorado 23 17 .575 2 6-4 L-1 13-5 10-12 Los Angeles 20 19 .513 4 3-7 L-1 7-12 13-7 San Diego 18 21 .462 6 2 5-5 W-3 12-11 6-10 Arizona 15 25 .375 10 6 7-3 W-2 3-15 12-10 SATURDAYS GAMES L.A. Angels 5, Toronto 3 Detroit 9, Minnesota 3 Baltimore 5, Houston 4, 10 innings Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 1 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Boston 8, Texas 3 Oakland 4, Washington 3, 10 innings Seattle 3, Kansas City 1 SATURDAYS GAMES L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 2 Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3 Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Atlanta 2, Chicago Cubs 0 Colorado 11, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 4 San Diego 9, Miami 3 Oakland 4, Washington 3, 10 innings SUNDAYS GAMES L.A. Angels 9, Toronto 3 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 Houston 5, Baltimore 2 Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 5 Arizona 5, Chicago White Sox 1 Milwaukee 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Boston 5, Texas 2 Oakland 9, Washington 1 Kansas City 9, Seattle 7 SUNDAYS GAMES Cincinnati 4, Colorado 1 N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 4, 11 innings Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 2 Arizona 5, Chicago White Sox 1 Milwaukee 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Oakland 9, Washington 1 San Diego 5, Miami 4 San Francisco 7, L.A. Dodgers 4, 10 innings St. Louis at Pittsburgh, late AL BEHRMAN / AP Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman, left, is congratulated by manager Bryan Price after Chapman earned his rst save of the year on Sunday in Cincinnati. TODAYS GAMES Detroit (Porcello 5-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 2-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 2-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 4-2) at Toronto (Buehrle 6-1), 7:07 p.m. Texas (Lewis 2-2) at Houston (Peacock 0-3), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 3-2) at Oakland (J.Chavez 2-1), 10:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (C.Ramos 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-1), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES N.Y. Mets (Colon 2-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 2-4) at St. Louis (Lyons 0-2), 8:15 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 2-1) at Arizona (Collmenter 1-2), 9:40 p.m. Miami (Koehler 3-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 4-1), 10:10 p.m. Atlanta (Floyd 0-0) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-2), 10:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: AlRamirez, Chicago, .340; Choo, Texas, .336; MeCabrera, Toronto, .333; Loney, Tampa Bay, .326; VMartinez, Detroit, .325; Markakis, Baltimore, .317; Hosmer, Kansas City, .317. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 34; Bautista, Toronto, 31; Donaldson, Oakland, 28; JAbreu, Chicago, 26; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 25; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 25; Trout, Los Angeles, 25. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 37; Brantley, Cleveland, 30; Cola bello, Minnesota, 30; NCruz, Baltimore, 30; MiCabrera, Detroit, 29; Moss, Oakland, 28; Encarnacion, Toronto, 27. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 54; AlRamirez, Chicago, 51; Hosmer, Kansas City, 46; Markakis, Baltimore, 46; Al tuve, Houston, 45; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 45; Rios, Texas, 44. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 14; AGordon, Kansas City, 13; Hosmer, Kansas City, 13; Pedroia, Boston, 13; Encarnacion, Toronto, 12; SPerez, Kansas City, 12; 7 tied at 11. TRIPLES: Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Bourn, Cleveland, 3; In fante, Kansas City, 3; Rios, Texas, 3. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 13; NCruz, Baltimore, 10; Pujols, Los Angeles, 10; Bautista, Toronto, 9; Doz ier, Minnesota, 9; ColRasmus, Toronto, 9; VMartinez, Detroit, 8. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 13; RDavis, Detroit, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Andrus, Texas, 11; AEscobar, Kansas City, 11; Ellsbury, New York, 10; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 9; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 9; LMartin, Texas, 9; Villar, Houston, 9. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 6-1; Tanaka, New York, 5-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 5-1; Porcello, Detroit, 5-1; 11 tied at 4. ERA: Buehrle, Toronto, 1.91; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.04; Gray, Oakland, 2.17; Darvish, Texas, 2.33; Ventura, Kan sas City, 2.34; JChavez, Oakland, 2.47; Tanaka, New York, 2.57. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Detroit, 66; Lester, Boston, 66; Price, Tampa Bay, 58; Tanaka, New York, 58; Kluber, Cleveland, 57; Darvish, Texas, 54. SAVES:TomHunter, Baltimore, 11; Rodney, Seattle, 11; Perkins, Minnesota, 10; Axford, Cleveland, 9. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .395; Blackmon, Colo rado, .352; Utley, Philadelphia, .344; DGordon, Los An geles, .336; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .329; Morneau, Colo rado, .329; SSmith, San Diego, .327. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 34; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 27; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Pence, San Francisco, 26; Stanton, Miami, 26; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 25. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 40; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 33; Black mon, Colorado, 29; Morneau, Colorado, 29; Arenado, Colorado, 26; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 26; CGonzalez, Colorado, 25; McGehee, Miami, 25. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 52; Blackmon, Colorado, 51; Arenado, Colorado, 49; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 49; DGordon, Los Angeles, 47; Morneau, Colorado, 46; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 44; Utley, Philadelphia, 44. DOUBLES: Utley, Philadelphia, 15; Arenado, Colorado, 14; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 13; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 13; MaAdams, St. Louis, 12; Byrd, Philadelphia, 12; Lu croy, Milwaukee, 12. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 3; Hechavarria, Miami, 3; Rendon, Washington, 3; Simmons, Atlanta, 3. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 11; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 11; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Blackmon, Colorado, 9; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 9; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 24; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; EYoung, New York, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 11; Blackmon, Colorado, 8. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 6-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 6-2; Machi, San Francisco, 5-0; Lyles, Colorado, 5-0; 15 tied at 4. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.43; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.45; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.71; Niese, New York, 1.82; ESantana, Atlanta, 1.99; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.99; Koehler, Miami, 1.99. STRIKEOUTS: Fernandez, Miami, 70; Cueto, Cincinnati, 68; Strasburg, Washington, 64; Wacha, St. Louis, 57; Kennedy, San Diego, 56; Greinke, Los Angeles, 55. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 15; Romo, San Fran cisco, 12; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 11. Indians 6, Rays 5 Cleveland Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 0 1 2 DeJess dh 3 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 5 0 1 0 Forsyth ph-dh 2 0 0 0 Brantly dh 4 0 1 0 Zobrist 2b 4 2 1 0 CSantn 1b 3 0 2 0 Joyce lf 5 1 2 2 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 1 2 0 ACarer ss 4 1 1 0 Loney 1b 4 1 0 1 YGoms c 5 2 2 1 Myers rf 4 0 1 1 Morgan lf 4 3 3 2 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 Aviles 2b 3 0 1 1 YEscor ss 3 0 1 1 JMolin c 3 0 1 0 Hanign ph-c 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 12 6 Totals 36 5 9 5 Cleveland 030 002 010 6 Tampa Bay 100 100 030 5 ETomlin (1), Rzepczynski (1). DPCleveland 1, Tampa Bay 1. LOBCleveland 10, Tampa Bay 7. 2B Bourn (2), Chisenhall (8), C.Santana (5), Zobrist (7). HRY.Gomes (5), Morgan (1), Joyce (3). SFAviles, Y.Escobar. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin W,2-0 6 6 2 2 0 2 Atchison H,3 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Rzepczynski H,3 2 / 3 1 3 1 1 2 Allen H,8 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay Archer L,2-2 5 8 4 4 4 2 Boxberger 1 1 / 3 1 1 1 2 3 B.Gomes 1 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 0 Archer pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby Allen (De.Jennings). WPBoxberger. Balk Boxberger. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, James Hoye; Sec ond, Mark Wegner; Third, John Tumpane. T:48. A,679 (31,042). Brewers 6, Yankees 5 New York Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 5 1 1 0 CGomz cf 3 1 1 0 Jeter ss 5 0 1 0 LSchfr rf 4 0 1 1 Ellsbury cf 4 1 1 0 RWeks 2b 5 1 3 2 Teixeira 1b 4 3 2 1 Overay 1b 5 0 1 1 KJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 2 MrRynl 3b 5 0 2 1 Beltran ph-rf 2 0 0 0 KDavis lf 3 0 0 0 Solarte 2b-3b 2 0 2 2 Segura ss 3 1 1 0 ISuzuki rf 2 0 0 0 Maldnd c 4 1 1 0 ASorin ph 1 0 0 0 Garza p 2 1 1 0 Ryan 2b 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Warren p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 0 0 0 0 JMrphy c 4 0 3 0 Lucroy ph 1 1 1 1 Phelps p 2 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 Thrntn p 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Betncs p 0 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 BRorts ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Gindl ph 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 11 5 Totals 35 6 12 6 New York 300 000 101 5 Milwaukee 002 003 001 6 Two outs when winning run scored. DPNew York 1, Milwaukee 1. LOBNew York 9, Mil waukee 9. 2BGardner (4), Ke.Johnson (6), L.Schafer (6), R.Weeks (2), Garza (1). HRTeixeira (7). SBC. Gomez (6), Segura (7). CSR.Weeks (1). SPhelps, L.Schafer. SFSolarte. IP H R ER BB SO New York Phelps 5 8 4 4 3 1 Thornton BS,1-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 Betances 2 1 0 0 0 1 Warren L,1-2 1 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 3 Milwaukee Garza 5 6 3 3 4 4 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 0 Duke H,4 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Wooten H,1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 W.Smith H,10 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez W,1-0 BS,1-16 1 1 1 1 0 0 Phelps pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Thornton pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby Phelps (C.Gomez). WPWarren. BalkPhelps. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel. T:40. A,544 (41,900). Twins 4, Tigers 3 Minnesota Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0 Kinsler 2b 4 2 2 1 Mauer dh 3 1 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 0 0 0 MiCarr 1b 3 1 2 1 Colaell 1b 4 0 0 0 VMrtnz dh 4 0 1 0 Pinto c 4 2 2 1 D.Kelly 3b 3 0 0 0 Nunez lf 4 0 2 1 Cstllns ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Parmel rf 4 0 1 0 AJcksn cf 4 0 1 1 A.Hicks cf 1 0 0 0 Avila c 2 0 0 0 DSantn ph-cf 2 0 1 1 AnRmn ss 3 0 1 0 EEscor ss 4 0 2 0 JMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0 RDavis lf 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 10 3 Totals 32 3 7 3 Minnesota 000 000 130 4 Detroit 100 110 000 3 EParmelee (1), R.Davis (2). DPDetroit 1. LOBMin nesota 5, Detroit 5. 2BE.Escobar (9), Kinsler (9). HRKinsler (3). SBDozier (12), Nunez (1). CSA. Hicks (1), E.Escobar (1). SFMi.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Deduno 6 6 3 3 1 5 Burton W,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fien H,5 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Perkins S,10-11 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit Ray 6 4 0 0 1 2 Alburquerque H,5 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Krol H,5 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 1 Chamberlain L,1-2 BS,1-2 1 2 3 2 1 2 E.Reed 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBPby Deduno (Avila), by Chamberlain (Dozier). PBPinto. UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Marty Foster; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T:08. A,468 (41,681). Angels 9, Blue Jays 3 Los Angeles Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Aybar ss 6 0 1 0 Reyes ss 3 2 1 0 Trout dh 5 0 1 1 MeCarr lf 4 1 1 0 Pujols 1b 5 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 1 Ibanez lf 3 1 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 0 1 2 HKndrc 2b 4 3 3 0 Lind dh 3 0 2 0 ENavrr rf 4 2 2 1 DNavrr c 4 0 1 0 Conger c 4 1 3 5 JFrncs 3b 3 0 0 0 IStewrt 3b 3 1 1 0 ClRsms cf 4 0 0 0 JMcDnl ph-3b 2 0 0 1 StTllsn 2b 4 0 0 0 Cowgill cf 2 1 1 1 Totals 38 9 12 9 Totals 33 3 6 3 Los Angeles 000 214 002 9 Toronto 100 000 020 3 EEncarnacion (4), D.Navarro (2). LOBLos Ange les 10, Toronto 6. 2BTrout (9), H.Kendrick 2 (10), E.Navarro (3), Conger (4), Encarnacion (12), Lind (4). 3BI.Stewart (3). HRConger (3). SBH.Kendrick 2 (9), Reyes (5). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Weaver W,4-2 6 1 / 3 4 1 1 2 5 Kohn 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Salas 1 / 3 2 2 2 1 1 H.Santiago 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Morin 1 0 0 0 0 2 Toronto Hutchison L,1-3 4 1 / 3 3 3 3 4 5 Stroman 1 2 / 3 6 4 4 0 2 Loup 1 1 0 0 1 0 Delabar 1 0 0 0 1 2 Cecil 1 2 2 2 2 1 WPHutchison. UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Adrian Johnson. T:24. A,871 (49,282). Braves 5, Cubs 2 Chicago Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Kalish cf 4 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 3 1 1 2 Coghln lf 3 0 0 0 Pstrnck 2b 4 0 0 0 Lake ph-lf 1 0 0 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 Fremn 1b 4 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 1 2 Gattis c 3 2 1 1 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 1 2 0 Olt 3b 4 0 0 0 Doumit lf 4 0 2 1 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 BUpton cf 0 0 0 0 EJcksn p 2 0 1 0 Smmns ss 3 0 1 1 Valuen ph 1 0 0 0 Harang p 2 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Bonifac ph 1 0 0 0 Uggla ph-2b 0 1 0 0 JSchafr cf-lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 9 2 Totals 29 5 7 5 Chicago 000 200 000 2 Atlanta 020 100 20x 5 DPChicago 1, Atlanta 1. LOBChicago 8, Atlanta 4. 2BS.Castro (8), Schierholtz (5), Simmons (4). HRHeyward (3), Gattis (8). CSSchierholtz (2). SJ. Schafer. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago E.Jackson L,2-3 6 6 3 3 2 3 Russell 1 1 2 2 0 0 N.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 1 Atlanta Harang W,4-3 6 6 2 2 2 9 Varvaro H,2 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Thomas H,3 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 2 A.Wood H,1 1 2 0 0 0 2 D.Carpenter S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Russell (Uggla). UmpiresHome, Seth Buckminster; First, Mike Much linski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:54. A,151 (49,586). Reds 4, Rockies 1 Colorado Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn rf 4 1 1 1 BHmltn cf 3 1 2 0 Dickrsn cf 4 0 1 0 Schmkr rf 4 0 1 2 Tlwtzk ss 3 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 CGnzlz lf 3 0 0 0 Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 1 Mornea 1b 3 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 0 1 0 Brnhrt c 3 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 1 0 RSantg ss 3 2 2 0 Nicasio p 2 0 0 0 Bailey p 1 0 0 0 CMartn p 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 29 4 6 3 Colorado 000 100 000 1 Cincinnati 101 110 00x 4 EMorneau (3), Arenado (7). LOBColorado 5, Cincin nati 4. 2BMcKenry (2), R.Santiago (1). 3BB.Hamil ton (2). HRBlackmon (9), Frazier (7). SBB.Hamilton (12). CSDickerson (1). SBailey 2. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Nicasio L,4-2 6 5 4 2 1 3 C.Martin 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cincinnati Bailey W,3-2 7 1 / 3 4 1 1 2 6 M.Parra H,4 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman S,1-1 1 0 0 0 1 3 BalkNicasio. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Chris Segal; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Brian ONora. T:49. A,143 (42,319). Mets 5, Phillies 4, 11 innings Philadelphia New York ab r h bi ab r h bi GwynJ cf 6 0 0 0 EYong lf 6 2 3 0 Rollins ss 3 1 1 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 3 2 Utley 2b 5 0 1 1 DWrght 3b 6 0 1 1 Howard 1b 4 1 1 0 CYoung rf 6 2 2 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Campll 1b 3 0 1 0 RHrndz p 0 0 0 0 BAreu ph 1 0 1 0 Brignc 3b 1 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 1 2 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 5 0 0 1 ZWhelr ph 0 0 0 0 Nieves c 4 1 2 1 Lagars cf 5 0 1 1 Asche 3b 4 0 2 1 Recker c 6 0 2 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 0 2 1 Hamels p 2 0 0 0 Niese p 2 0 0 0 Hollnds p 0 0 0 0 Grndrs ph 1 0 0 0 Revere ph 1 0 0 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry 1b 1 0 0 0 dArnad ph 1 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 40 4 9 4 Totals 46 5 16 5 Philadelphia 010 200 001 00 4 New York 100 000 003 01 5 One out when winning run scored. ENieves (1). DPNew York 2. LOBPhiladelphia 12, New York 17. 2BRollins (5), Byrd (13), Nieves (3), Asche (6), E.Young (2), Dan.Murphy 2 (12), C.Young (5), Tejada (3). 3BUtley (2). HRDan.Murphy (2). SBNieves (1), E.Young 2 (14). SHamels, Z.Wheeler. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Hamels 7 7 1 1 3 10 Hollands H,2 1 1 0 0 1 1 Bastardo H,5 1 / 3 3 3 3 0 1 R.Hernandez BS,1-1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Manship L,1-1 1 1 / 3 4 1 1 2 0 New York Niese 6 8 3 3 1 6 Matsuzaka 2 0 0 0 2 2 Valverde 1 1 1 1 2 1 Familia 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Rice W,1-1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Rice (Utley), by Matsuzaka (Nieves). UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Todd Tichenor; Sec ond, Gabe Morales; Third, Tim Timmons. T:22. A,926 (41,922). Diamondbacks 5, White Sox 1 Arizona Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi GParra rf 5 2 2 2 De Aza cf 3 0 0 0 Prado 3b 5 0 2 1 LeGarc ph 1 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 0 2 0 Monter c 2 1 2 2 Gillaspi 3b 3 0 0 0 Hill 2b 5 0 0 0 Konerk ph 1 0 0 0 EChavz dh 5 0 1 0 JAreu dh 3 0 1 0 C.Ross lf 3 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 Inciart lf 0 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 Pollock cf 3 1 2 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0 Sierra rf 3 1 1 1 Flowrs c 2 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 5 Totals 29 1 4 1 Arizona 100 020 002 5 Chicago 000 001 000 1 EA.Dunn (1). DPArizona 1, Chicago 2. LOBArizona 10, Chicago 2. 2BPennington (2). 3BG.Parra (2). HRG.Parra (4), Montero (5), Sierra (1). SBInciarte (1), Pollock 2 (5). IP H R ER BB SO Arizona C.Anderson W,1-0 5 1 / 3 2 1 1 1 6 Thatcher H,1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 E.Marshall H,1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Ziegler H,8 1 0 0 0 0 0 O.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago Noesi L,0-3 6 8 3 3 3 4 Petricka 1 0 0 0 1 1 F.Francisco 1 2 / 3 2 2 1 1 3 S.Downs 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Petricka (Montero). WPThatcher. UmpiresHome, Quinn Wolcott; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T:10. A,612 (40,615). Astros 5, Orioles 2 Houston Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 4 1 3 0 Markks rf 3 1 1 0 Fowler cf 3 1 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 0 JCastro dh 5 1 1 3 C.Davis 1b 4 0 2 0 MDmn 3b 5 1 2 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 2 Krauss 1b 4 1 2 2 N.Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 Springr rf 5 0 0 0 Clevngr c 3 0 1 0 Presley lf 4 0 2 0 DYong ph 1 0 0 0 Corprn c 4 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 Villar ss 4 0 1 0 Flahrty 2b 3 0 0 0 Lough lf 2 0 0 0 Pearce ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 11 5 Totals 33 2 8 2 Houston 300 000 200 5 Baltimore 002 000 000 2 DPHouston 2. LOBHouston 11, Baltimore 7. 2B Altuve (11), Presley (2), C.Davis (5). HRJ.Castro (5), Krauss (3). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Cosart W,2-3 6 8 2 2 2 3 Sipp H,1 2 0 0 0 0 5 Qualls S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore Tillman L,3-2 5 4 3 3 5 3 McFarland 3 7 2 2 0 4 Patton 1 0 0 0 0 2 McFarland pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBPby Qualls (Flaherty). WPTillman. UmpiresHome, Tripp Gibson; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Jeff Kellogg.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 PAUL LOGOTHETIS AP Sports Writer MADRID Rafael Nadal won his fourth Madrid Open title on Sunday after Kei Nishi kori was forced to with draw with a back injury when trailing 2-6, 6-4, 3-0 in the nal. Earlier, Maria Shara pova bounced back from a poor start to defeat Si mona Halep 1-6, 6-2, 6-3 to win the womens title. Nadal became the rst repeat winner in Madrid, and recovered from two recent quar ternal losses on clay to win his second title on the surface and third overall this year. Nadal showed signs of improvement this week compared to his early exits in Monte Carlo and Barcelona, but still didnt look quite like the play er who has won eight French Open titles. We dont deserve the victory, (Nishikori) de serves it, he played bet ter than us the whole time, Nadals uncle and coach Toni Nadal told Antenna 3 TV. We had a lot of luck today. We didnt really come back, he was hurt. After both players held serve to start, Ni shikori jumped out to a 5-1 lead with powerful groundstrokes that over whelmed Nadal, who couldnt nd a way to counter his opponent. After the early breaks (Nadal) got tense and his opponent played at a great level, Toni Nadal said. After being broken in his rst service game in the second set, Nadal slowly clawed back into the match at the Magic Box although Nishiko ri was already in some discomfort when Nadal broke back for 4-4. Nishikori needed a medical timeout to treat his sore lower back, and his energy looked sapped as he hit a shot long to concede the set. Nishikori visibly strug gled in the third before eventually retiring. Im very sorry for what happened today for everybody, said Ni shikori, who will become the rst Japanese play er in the top-10 when the new rankings are re leased. Unfortunately I was hurting today and I was too hurt to ght. Nadals victory guar antees he will stay No. 1 heading into Roland Garros. Sharapova, who lost to Serena Williams in last years nal, crum bled in the opening set when she held her serve just once. But Haleps serve dipped in the second set, and Sharapova started hitting pinpoint ground strokes that kept the fth-ranked Romanian running. The ninth-ranked Rus sian converted both her break points in the set to even the match. Sharapova then pulled away in the de ciding set with an ear ly break to follow up her triumph in Stuttgart. Since the 2011 French Open, Sharapova has a 47-3 record on clay with all three defeats coming to Williams. The top-ranked American was the two-time defend ing champion in Madrid but withdrew with a leg injury on Friday. I dont know how I pulled it off, Shara pova said after win ning her 32nd career ti tle. I came close last year, and I didnt have a great rst set today, but I knew it wasnt over until the last point was played. RALPH D. RUSSO AP College Football Writer NEW YORK Michael Sam waited and waited. Hours passed, rounds came and went, and eventually, there were only eight more picks left on the third and nal day of the NFL draft. For just a moment, it looked as if his chance of being picked by a pro team and becoming the leagues rst openly gay player might take a detour. Or at least be delayed. The call nally came in Saturday from the St. Louis Rams, the team right down the road from where Sam played his college ball at the University of Missouri. Sam was selected in the seventh and nal round and admitted it was a frustrat ing wait. He said teams that passed on him chickened out and he should have been drafted sooner. From last season alone, I shouldve been in the rst three rounds. SEC Defensive Player of the Year, All-Amer ican, Sam said. He stopped short of directly saying his stock dropped in the draft because he came out. You know what, who knows? Who knows? Only the people who sit in the war room know, he said. They saw Michael Sam, day after day they scratched it off the board. That was their loss. But St. Louis kept me on that board. And you know what I feel like Im a (Jadeveon) Clowney, a rst draft pick. Im proud of where I am now. Sam came out as gay in media interviews earlier this year. His team and coach es knew his secret and kept it for his nal college season. He went on to have the best year of his career: He was the co-defensive player of the year in the nations best col lege football conference and had 11.5 sacks. The pick came after several rounds of suspense. The rst round of the day, No. 4 over all, came and went, no Sam. Then the fth and sixth, and nally, the day was down to just a handful of picks. When Mike Kensil, the NFLs vice president of game operations, walked to the podium at Radio City Music Hall in the drafts nal min utes to announce the Rams second-to-last pick, the crowd got a sense something was up. Very few of the last day picks were announced at the podium. Twitter lit up with suggestions the Rams were about to make news. When Kensil said: The St. Louis Rams select ... Michael Sam... the fans gave a hearty cheer, chanting Yes! Yes! Yes! and Michael Sam! Sam was in San Diego watching with friends and family at the home of his agent, Joe Barkett of Empire Athletes. ESPN and the NFL Network had cameras there and showed Sams reaction. Sam was on the phone bending over, with his boy friend hugging him and rub bing his left bicep. When Sam got off the phone, the tears started. He gave his boy friend a big kiss and a long hug as he cried and his eyes reddened. After, they shared cake and another kiss. Thank you to the St. Lou is Rams and the whole city of St. Louis. Im using every once of this to achieve great ness!! Sam tweeted with a frenzied typo moments after he was picked, with a picture of himself wearing a Rams cap and a pink polo shirt. The 6-foot-2, 255-pound Sam was considered a midto-late round pick, far from a sure thing to be drafted. He played defensive end in col lege, but hes short for that position in the NFL and slow er than most outside line backers, the position hell need to transition to at the professional level. He was taken with the 249th overall pick out of 256. Play ers from Marist, Maine and McGill University in Canada were selected before Sam. In the world of diversity we live in now, Im honored to be a part of this, Rams coach Jeff Fisher said during an interview on ESPN. The NFL had no comment on Sam being drafted. The impact of Sams selec tion goes far beyond football. At a time when gay marriage is gaining acceptance among Americans, Sams entry into the NFL is a huge step toward the integration of gay men into professional team sports. Pro sports have in many ways lagged behind the rest of so ciety in acceptance. Michael Sam wouldnt have been drafted ve years ago, said former Viking punter Chris Kluwe, who has accused Minnesota of cutting him in part because of his vo cal support for gay rights. In the last year, NBA vet eran Jason Collins has come out publicly as gay, and is now playing for the Brooklyn Nets. Collins said before the Nets playoff game against the Heat that he was watch ing the draft and texted Sam after he was picked. Its a great day for Michael and his family and for the NFL, Collins said. NFL Rams welcome first openly gay player to NFL AP FILE PHOTO Missouris All-American defensive end Michael Sam claps during the Cotton Bowl trophy presentation at halftime of the basketball game between Missouri and Tennessee in Columbia, Mo. Sam was selected in the seventh round, 249th overall, by the St. Louis Rams in the NFL draft. TENNIS Nadal wins Madrid Open after Nishikori retires down two sets ANDRES KUDACKI / AP Rafael Nadal displays his trophy as he poses with the ball girls after the Madrid Open in Madrid.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 NBA AUTO RACING JOSEPH WILSON Associated Press MONTMELO, Spain Mercedes team mates Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg sped away to their fourth straight one-two n ish at the Spanish Grand Prix on Sunday in a dominant perfor mance that does not bode well for the rest of the Formula One eld. Hamilton took off from pole position and stayed ahead of Ros berg despite the German closing to less than a second in a tense nal lap to re cord a fourth consecu tive victory and move ahead of his teammate in the overall stand ings. Hamiltons 100 points after ve races put him three points ahead of Rosberg, who failed to nd a way in front of his main ri val for a fourth straight time after winning the season opener. His 26th career win gave Hamilton one more than former world champions Niki Lauda, who now works for Mercedes, and Jim Clark. Hamilton set himself on course to add to his own title from 2008. He hadnt led the champi onship since June 2012 after winning the Cana dian GP with McLaren. This is our fourth one-two, its just unre al, Hamilton said after Rosberg helped douse him in champagne to celebrate his rst vic tory at the Barcelo na-Catalunya circuit. Getting my rst win here after trying for eight years, it is dif cult to put into words my feeling. I have nev er had a car like this. I have never had a gap like this. I am grateful I was able to keep (Ros berg) behind me. Hamilton, Rosberg register fourth straight one-two finish at GP GREG HUEY / AP James Hinchcliffe, of Canada, holds his head after pulling off the course during the inaugural Grand Prix of Indianapolis on Saturday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer INDIANAPOLIS Indianapolis Motor Speedway ofcially opened for the month of May with a chaotic road course race that started with a wreck, saw James Hinchliffe and the mayor of the city injured by ying debris, and, nally, Si mon Pagenaud cele brate a fuel-mileage victory. Pagenaud won the inaugural Grand Prix of Indianapolis on Saturday, the rst In dyCar Series race on IMS road course, by stretching his fuel the nal 29 laps. The Frenchman was one of several driv ers to gamble on gas, and he took the lead when Oriol Servia had to stop with four laps remaining. Pagenaud managed to make it to the nish for his third series victory despite having to keep an eye on his mirrors. Ryan Hunter-Reay was second and Helio Castroneves third on his 39th birthday. Man I didnt know what we were asking for, but we made fuel, Pagenaud said in Vic tory Lane. The fuel saving was amazing. It was nerve-wracking. I was worried about RHR coming back, and I didnt know what He lio was doing here. I dont like racing off throttle. Sebastien Bourda is and Charlie Kimball rounded out the top ve. Hinchcliffe was tak en from the track on a stretcher and trans ported to a hospital, where he was diag nosed with a concus sion after he was hit in the head with de bris. A replay appeared to show debris from a car in front of him ew into his cockpit follow ing a restart. Pagenaud wins, Hinchcliffe injured in chaotic road race Nets try to back up belief by beating Heat once again BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW YORK Paul Pierce called the Miami Heat a juggernaut. He insisted they are still the team to beat. So yes, the Brooklyn Nets have plenty of re spect for the two-time defending NBA cham pions and no fear. Pierce made that clear again Sunday, a day af ter the Nets Game 3 rout that cut Miamis lead to 2-1 in the East ern Conference semi nals. Brooklyn will try to even the series at home Monday night. Youve got to have that type of mental ego against a jugger naut. You go against the best, a lot of series are won on fear factor, like, or non-belief. When you have that non-be lief, then you have no chance, Pierce said af ter practice. What I try to do in this locker room, or with my teammates, is just try to give them belief that we can beat this team. Theyre not unbeatable. The Heat had been in these playoffs until the Nets 104-90 victory on Saturday night. Mi ami hadnt even faced a fourth-quarter de cit, but was out of the game long before then after Brooklyn domi nated the third quarter to build a huge lead. The defeat was com plete, Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. It was both sides of the bas ketball. It was like trying to plug in holes in a leak ing dam. There was so many things that were not in our favor really on both ends of the court. The Nets made 15 of 25 3-point attempts, outrebounded Miami 43-27, and limited LeB ron James to two bas kets over the nal three quarters after he had 16 points on 6-of-7 shoot ing in the rst. Brooklyn swept the regular-season series, though none of the games was anywhere near as easy as Game 3. Yet the four victories gave the Nets a con dence against the Heat that some other oppo nents may not have. We just had a lit tle success against them during the regu lar season. We played them well and we feel like we match up well with them, Nets guard Deron Williams said. And if were on top of our game, were playing defense the way were capable of playing, like we did the last game, we put ourselves in a good position to win. Pierce did his part af ter the Nets were routed in Game 1, asking coach Jason Kidd to switch up the defense so he could guard James. And af ter he and the Nets did such a good job of it over the nal three quar ters of Game 3, Pierce said the Nets wanted to show the Heat that they werent scared of them. Why should it be a fear factor? James said. Its just basket ball. Were not trying to win a war here, its just basketball. Thats all it is. Were all grown men, who cares about whos fearing who? Weve never been a team that talks. We dont get into that, and weve never been a bul letin board team. We just want to play the game the right way and we give ourselves a good chance to win if we play our type of bas ketball and last night we didnt do that. Miami had won its previous eight postsea son games and followed every loss with a victo ry last year. To do that in this series, Spoelstra said the Heat would not only need better effort and urgency, but also more attention to the little details. Pierce is expecting that, as well as in Game 5 back in Miami on Wednesday night. Even though the Heat didnt look it Saturday, he be lieves they are just as good as the recent ver sions that ended his seasons in Boston. Denitely. Theyre well-seasoned now. They know how to win, Pierce said. Theyve won two champion ships, theres noth ing they havent been through. So the one thing you always hear, its kind of a cliche, is never underestimate the heart of a champi on, and you know thats what they have un der their belts. So you know, theyre the team to beat. JULIE JACOBSON / AP Brooklyn Nets forward Paul Pierce (34) fouls Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) as he drives through the lane to score in the rst period during Game 3 of an Eastern Conference seminal game on Saturday in New York. Pierce was called for a agrant foul and James scored on the play. DAN GELSTON Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Kan. Danica Patrick added another May moment to cherish. Chicks rule, huh? crew chief Tony Gib son playfully told her at Kansas. She may not have to tally ruled, but she put on a performance that recalled her better ones at the Indianapolis 500. Patrick showed that she can be a serious driv er who can craft a com plete weekend and con tend for a top-ve nish. Patrick was the surprise of Saturday night with her seventh-place nish at Kansas Speedway, the best of her Cup career. Stewart-Haas Racing boss and teammate Tony Stewart, Gibson, and her parents were among the throng of well-wishers in the garage that made it a celebratory scene straight out of her daz zling Daytona 500 to kick off 2013. Ive always believed in myself and with the right situation, a good car, that I can do it, she said. She easily had her best weekend of the season, spending most of the race inside the top 10, and brought a needed jolt of electricity in a race during which the lights went out on the backstretch, pass ing teammate Stewart and Dale Earnhardt Jr. to move into third with 95 laps left. She also passed sixtime champion Jimmie Johnson on a late restart, adding him to the collec tion of heavy hitters left in the rearview mirror. The most reward ing part of my night was probably when I drove around the outside of the No. 48 on a restart, he said. That was prob ably my most rewarding thing of the night. I say that with all the respect in the world. Its a big deal because he is Jim mie Johnson. Patrick hadnt nished better this season than 14th at Fontana and her lone top-10 in the Cup series was eighth in the 2013 Daytona 500. She won a pole at Kansas in IndyCar in 2005. Patrick qualied ninth for her second straight top-10 start, and SHR teammate Kevin Har vick said a little 15-min ute pep talk may have spurred her to another solid qualifying run. She just basically needed to quit think ing about it and smash the gas, he said. Thats what she said. Shes done a great job in try ing to take in all the in formation. She has the support system and even the car necessary to nish bet ter than in the back of the pack. Patrick wants to re ward their faith in her. Its really cool when you have teammates that are uncondition al like that, that want to help you, she said. And when everyone is better and we all get better, it pumps the team up and everybody wants it even more. I guarantee you were going work even hard er now. Its not just sit ting back. Were going to work harder because we love where were at and this is what we work for. When you taste it you dont want to let it go. Patricks nish came out of nowhere because there was little to in dicate she was build ing toward any kind of breakthrough. She hadnt nished better than 22nd in any of her last ve races and a brief irtation with the lead at Talladega ended after she bumped Brad Keselowski. Patrick and Gibson kept pushing, her Stew art-Haas teammates kept the encourage ment coming, and now she has a result worth savoring. Patrick surprises Kansas with career-best run RAINIER ERHARDT / AP Danica Patrick holds Kevin Harvicks son Keelan before the NASCAR Aarons 499 Sprint Cup series auto race recently at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Ala. NASCAR

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 COUPLES: Relationships benet from volunteering together / C5 Health check www.dailycommercial.com PHOTOS BY JOYCE MARSHALL / MCT ABOVE, BELOW: Gerald Campbell may be turning 80 in October, but he still is a tness instructor and is training in Hurst, Texas, for an upcoming lifting competition. TERRY EVANS MCT H URST, Texas Ger ald Campbell is giv ing up his career as a tness instructor and go ing full-time into body building before his next birthday. He turns 80 in October. Im retiring from that because my wife and I want to travel more while we still have good health, Campbell said. Another reason is that I cant work out myself as much as I need to for heavyweight bodybuilding. Campbells goal before his birthday is to bench press 280 pounds. Thats 115 pounds more than his weight of 165. On Satur day, he bench pressed 245 pounds, breaking his own record, at the Texas Push/ Pull Showdown in Mes quite. I tried to do 260, but I couldnt get it past halfway up, Campbell said. Hell try again for that 260-pound mark in the July 26, world-qualifying Dallas Southwest Regional Bench Press and Dead Lift Championships competi tion in Irving. Then comes 280. Anytime Campbell lifts more than his person al best he breaks a re cord, said Bryan Dobson, Campbells trainer and owner of MetroFlex Gym in Fort Worth, Texas. There are only a hand ful of people in the world at Campbells age and weight who are capable of a bench press anywhere near what he can do, Dob son said. Hell be in the top of the 165-pound weight class in Masters 70 plus, Dobson said. For his body weight, the weight hes lifting is competitive with 20-yearolds. Dobson describes Campbell as phenome nal, and he isnt alone in that opinion. The 140 or so people Campbell trains at Hurst Senior Center and Euless Family Life Cen ter compare him with Jack LaLanne, a pioneer in per sonal training whose in novative techniques and equipment, and a 34-year run on TV, helped earn him the title Godfather of Fitness. The woman destined to take Campbells place in front of those seniors, Hurst resident Tricia Whit lock, 41, thinks hes the new Godfather. When he started train ing me, I was struggling to keep up with him during abdominal exercises, even some of the exibili ty exercises that he does, Whitlock said. Geralds just amazing. His eyes are bright and his mind is quick. Hes a very good role model for me. Michelle Varley, 45, Hurst Senior Centers ac tivities coordinator, said Campbell is a huge asset that she and the seniors will miss. He helped develop our tness programs, Varley said. Hes just very pas sionate about everything. Just like LaLanne, Campbell has been on a personal tness crusade since he was 15. My buddy, Bobby Risinger, and I bought some weights at a garage sale, Campbell said. We set em up in my garage. We didnt know anything about it, but we started lifting weights and learn ing the proper way to do it. The friends worked out together for three years, until Bobby went in the Air Force, and I didnt, Campbell said. So I kept working out. Campbell who made his living selling insur ance, before he retired at 65 also became a per sonal trainer in his late teens. Soon afterward, he gave up weightlifting and took up running. Heavy lifting Texas bodybuilder has big goal for 80th birthday I dont think working out adds years to your life, but it adds quality. As long as God keeps me healthy I want to have good quality of life. I dont want to walk with a cane, or a walker or be in a wheelchair. Gerald Campbell SEE LIFTER | C5 LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program needs volunteers Lake and Sumter County resi dents age 55 and older who have a lifetime of experience to share and the desire to make a real differ ence in the community can be RSVP volunteers. Volunteers assist in tutoring elementary grade students, mentor low-income high school students who are college bound, participate in after-school educational/ enrichment programs, deliver meals, make telephone reassurance calls to home-bound seniors and provide transportation for cancer patients. For information, call 352-365-1995. WILDWOOD Area 13 Family Care Council meeting set for today Those interested in the issues in volving developmental disabilities are welcome to attend the Area 13 Family Care Council meeting from 10 a.m. to noon today at 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood. Area 13 covers Lake, Sumter, Marion, Citrus and Hernando coun ties with 15 family care councils across the state. For information, call Betty Kay Clements at 352-753-1163, email cbettykay@aol.com or go to www. FCCorida.org. LEESBURG Lakes Parkinsons Support Group meeting scheduled Jenenne Valentino-Bottaro is the guest for this meeting from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Lake Square Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morningside Dr., in Leesburg. Valentino-Bottaro will offer in struction in dance for the guests aiding patients and caregivers. Call Dave Tribbey at 352-343-0376 for details. MOUNT DORA Brain Gym Academy for seniors meets Thursday Stephen Jepson will speak and demonstrate his methods to en hance balance, stability and coor dination from his program Never Leaving the Playground at 1 p.m. Thursday at Waterman Village, 445 Waterman Ave., in the Garden of Life Hall. For information, call Debbie Garay at 352-383-0051, ext. 313. MOUNT DORA Avante at Mount Dora to host Community Health Fair Honoring National Nursing Home Week, Avante at Mount Dora, a skilled nursing and rehabili tation center, will host its 11th annual Community Health Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday at Avante, 3050 Brown Ave. in Mount Dora. For information, go to www.avan tecenters.com or call 352-383-4161.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted LANDON HALL MCT SANTA ANA, Calif. Dan Dunbar lets you look closely at his left eye. And then deep ly into it. Its impolite to stare, of course, but it has a hypnotic effect: It resembles a cats eye with its silky glow. Gen Xers will immediately recall their Steve Austin Six Million Dol lar Man doll with the bion ic left eye. However, whats inside Dunbar isnt theoretical 1970s NASA gadgetry, but 21st-century practical tech nology: a tiny telescope, with a lens thats 3.2 millimeters in diameter, surgically implant ed into his eyeball. He had the procedure done in 2011 to improve his vision, which had been failing for years be cause of age-related macu lar degeneration, or AMD, a condition characterized by a blurry gray or dark spot in the central vision. The telescope, called Cen traSight and made by Vision Care Ophthalmic Technol ogies Inc., is one of several implantable devices to be de veloped in recent years to treat a variety of vision problems, from the mild to the devas tating: There have been ad vances in removing cataracts, as well as sophisticated hard ware to reduce the impact of glaucoma and even certain kinds of blindness that had few treatments before. The effect on Dunbar, 82, has been profound. For years he relied on his peripher al vision, peering around the fuzzy center. With the tele scope magnifying his eld of vision, he can see details that had eluded him for so long: walk/dont walk signals at in tersections near his home in Costa Mesa, Calif.; the con tours of the face of his wife, Jean. After much practice, he can use the telescope to read, something hed largely given up; hes resumed his passion ate hobbies, model trains and woodworking. And when he goes skiing, an avocation he picked up only after he retired, he can actually see where hes going now. I dont run into closed fences like I used to, he says, recalling his latest outing to Mammoth Lakes, just two weeks ago. I can see my kids on the ski slopes. I want people to know its not utopia, but it sure is a big boost over what you normal ly have with AMD. It cer tainly has improved my life. The vast majority of Amer icans has some kind of vision problem, but most are re fractive errors in which the eye doesnt bend, or refract, properly when light comes in. Disorders such as myopia (nearsightedness) and hyper opia (farsightedness) are easi ly correctable with eyeglasses. About two-thirds of U.S. adults wear some type of cor rective lenses, either eye glasses, contacts or reading glasses, according to the Na tional Eye Institute. Other problems are more serious, however, and can lead to severe vision loss, or partial or total blindness. Glaucoma, caused by steadily increasing pressure inside the eye, affects more than 2 million Americans age 40 and older, and 3 million older people have age-relat ed macular degeneration, a condition in which the mac ula, a spot on the retina be hind the eye, deteriorates. More than half of people who live to 80 get cataracts, when the lens becomes cloudy and limits vision. The new generation of tiny, sophisticated optical hard ware is being developed just in time: In 1980, there were 26 million people age 65 and older in the United States; by 2020 that number will be 55 million. In California, men who make it to age 65 have a life expectancy of 83.9 years; for women, its 86.5. There are a lot of pa tients entering those elder ly years, where these condi tions do become an issue, and wouldnt be an issue if we didnt live so long, said Dr. Roger F. Steinert, an oph thalmologist whos direc tor of the University of Cali fornia-Irvines Gavin Herbert Eye Institute. And were not only living longer, were liv ing longer, healthier. Dunbar sat in his bright, cozy living room discussing when his vision rst began to slip. It was around 2000, he said. The dead spots devel oped so slowly in both eyes that he trained himself to view the world without look ing at it head-on. Its gray, theres just no sight at all in there, its just like you kind of erase out all the vision. I learned not to look at things, he said. The mind plays tricks on you to compensate. For Dun bar, he literally hallucinated a few times, seeing objects that werent there. At a play, he watched seven cast members onstage when he knew there were only four not double vision; they all did their own thing, independently of one another. Another time, when he was driving with Jean on the northbound I-5, he thought he saw another car start to levitate oat up, go along with us, go through a bridge. Didnt hurt anybody, didnt do anything. Come out the other side, then disappear. You begin to think, Hey, Im losing it. Surgically implanted telescope restores vision for man ANNA REED / MCT Dan Dunbar, 82, poses for a portrait at his home in Costa Mesa, Calif. Dunbar has age-related macular degeneration. In November 2011, he had a telescope implanted in his left eye to improve his vision. MARY MACVEAN MCT Not even the pain of a mi graine headache keeps peo ple from Twitter. (Just 67 characters.) Over the course of a week, students studying how peo ple share their migraine pain on Twitter collected every tweet that mentioned the word migraine. Once they cleared out the ads, the retweets and the metaphori cal uses of the word, they had 14,028 tweets from people who described their head aches in real time with words such as killer, the worst (almost 15 percent of the tweets) and the F-word. The Twitter users also re ported the repercussions from their migraines: missed school or work, lost sleep, mood changes. The researchers found the information to be a powerful source of knowledge about the headaches because usu ally sufferers are providing information after the fact in clinical situations. The technology evolves, and our language evolves, Dr. Alexandre DaSilva, an as sistant professor at the Uni versity of Michigan School of Dentistry and lead author of the study, said by phone. Clinical researchers lan guage such as throbbing or pulsating might not be as apt today, to the gen eration that grew up with video games. Their vocab ulary, he said, often reects those games, with words such as killer, splitting or pounding. In his study, published re cently in the Journal of Med ical Internet Research, DaSil va and his colleagues and students collected 21,741 tweets with the word mi graine, keeping 14,028 of them and sorting them into categories based on the sort of information that was re vealed. Nearly three-quarters of the tweeters were female; two identied themselves as transgender. They used 242 descriptive words, but some were common horrible, killing, pounding and splitting among them. The researchers also found pat terns in the timing of tweets, with the peaks coming Mon day morning and evening. On a recent day, migraine tweets included splitting migraine :) and Took 6 ibu profen in 45 minutes and I still have this damn mi graine. DaSilva said he was aston ished by the trove of informa tion. I was surprised, and I be lieve that social media is also a relief for them. To kind of share, Im suffering here. I am leaving work early, this migraine is killing me, he said. I believe it gives some kind of relief to share the pain, and that provides so much information we dont usually get. The more you connect with your patient, the better you can treat them, he said. Migraines affect about 12 percent of adults in the West ern world; about 90 percent of sufferers say their pain is moderate to severe, and 75 percent say their ability to function is reduced. Nearly a third require bed rest. Tweets on migraine headaches share the pain HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Kristi Allegra receives Botox injections from dermatologist Megan Bogart on Monday. Allegra says the injections have reduced the frequency of her migraine headaches.

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com MIMI WHITEFIELD MCT MIAMI Astrid Fla herty nimbly hops off a low platform and then swoops from side to side touching orange plastic cones. Though she is 70 years old and a breast cancer survivor, she seems barely winded. Her secret: lifelong ex ercise and healthy eat ing. Exercise is the best anti-aging pill you can take, says Dawn Da vis, a tness instructor at Sh ulas Athletic Club in Miami Lakes. And Flaherty has dis covered on her own what doctors and t ness experts are say ing: people can age more successfully if they develop a healthy lifestyle when theyre young that includes exercise, a healthy diet, sufcient sleep and watching their weight. The Miami Lakes res ident still hits the gym three times a week and plays tennis on Satur days. And her diet em phasizes fresh, natural foods. Being in good shape also helped when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. My doctors were amazed that I was able to come back from my chemo sessions so quickly, she says. People need to think about t he ag ing process through out their lives. I know its hard when youre 20 years old, says Dr. Sara Czaja, professor of psychiatry and be havioral sciences and the scientic director of the Center on Aging at the University of Mi amis Miller School of Medicine. Its really important to take advantage of what we know, Czaja says, and we do know a lot about how to age healthily. That includes stay ing socially engaged throughout life and be ing mindful at a young age of the dangers of smoking, the links be tween skin cancer and overexposure to the sun, and having rec ommended preventive screenings, Czaja says. A lot of chronic dis ease diabetes, highblood pressure, car diovascular disease, obesity may be pre vented by maintain ing a healthy lifestyle throughout life too, she says. What were also learning more and more is the impor tance of engaging in physical exercise. That leads to not only better cardiovascular health but also better cog nitive health, Czaja says. There is suggest ed evidence that being obese can cause cogni tive problems. But the reality is what initially motivates many people to exer cise is concern about their appearance not their health, says Rickie Ali, a tness/ wellness specialist and personal trainer at Shulas Athletic Club. The tness busi ness knows this with the ads about sixpack abs and all that, he says. You can get lean following some of the programs now in Aging well starts young PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN / MCT KeYanna Roddy plays with her son, Byron, in St. Louis. Because of many medications from his open-heart surgery, Byron can go through 10-15 diapers a day, putting a strain on Roddys limited budget. NANCY CAMBRIA MCT ST. LOUIS They are such a hot commodity, pharmacies and stores sometimes keep them behind glass. They are the rst line of defense against in fection and disease and are even linked to preventing depression and violence. Desperate people will sometimes steal to get them. No, this is not a story about illicit pills or drug abuse. Its about dispos able diapers, an item the poor need desper ately. Researchers are start ing to realize diaper need not only caus es obvious health prob lems for children, but leads to depression in moms and poor so cial and developmental outcomes for the child even child abuse. It is estimated that disposable diapers can cost up to $100 a month for one baby. On aver age, a newborn goes through eight to 10 di apers a day, said Melin da Ohlemiller, CEO of Nurses for Newborns. Nurses with the or ganization see the dia per need rsthand with their clients but can of fer minimal help. To provide diapers for their mostly poor cli ents, Ohlemiller said, the organization would need 8,000 to 10,000 diapers a day. But the agency can supply only about 12 diapers to es tablished clients on an emergency basis. One of its clients, Catalina Martinez of Overland, Mo., said she was unable to work af ter having her second child. Its been difcult to afford diapers for a newborn and a toddler on her boyfriends sal ary. Shes had to keep a diaper on her child lon ger than she should. I even have tried to get my oldest one to potty train. But she wouldnt train yet. Last summer a study in the medical journal Pediatrics identied diaper need among the poor as a growing health and psycholog ical risk for babies and their mothers. The study determined that as many as 30 per cent of poor parents in New Haven, Conn., struggled to afford di apers for their infants. It further linked diaper need as a factor causing maternal depression, which can also lead to poor outcomes for chil dren. Theres just a great need and no one is calling attention to this, said DiAnne Mueller, CEO of Crisis Nursery, a St. Louis-ar ea child abuse preven tion agency. Crisis Nursery work ers sometimes go doorto-door in poor neigh borhoods asking people what they need. The an swer is almost always the same: diapers and formula. Although formula purchases can be fed erally subsidized, dia pers are not covered by food stamps through the federal Supplemen tal Nutrition Assistance Program or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC. As a result, some food pantries are inundat ed with requests for dis posable diapers. But the pantries dont get steady donations of them and dont always have them on the shelves. When they do, they y out of the door, said Marcia Mermelstein, coordina tor of the Harvey Korn blum Jewish Food Pan try in St. Louis. Were giving people four to six diapers when in reality when most people buy a box of di apers, theyre getting 24 or 48. Its like giving one tiny bar of soap a month. Its not enough, its a token gesture, Mermelstein said. Families will take what they can get, she said. Theyre taking di apers that are clear ly too small and taping them together and us ing whatever they can. Although charitable agencies see the diaper need, they cant make collecting and distrib uting diapers their rst priority because it takes away energy and dona tions from their main services. Yes, we need dia pers, Mermelstein said. But in the great scheme of things, we are a food pantry and the highest priority is to give food for survival. Some cities and re gions have developed thriving diaper banks that collect and promote donated diapers and act as a clearinghouse to agencies like food pan tries and community outreach centers. According to the Na tional Diaper Bank Net work in Connecticut, about 100 established diaper banks operate nationwide. Happy Bot toms in Kansas City, Mo., for example, has distributed more than 1.5 million diapers to agencies that work with the poor. But St. Louis is only in the beginning stages of developing such a re source. Jessica Adams, a so cial worker, said she has When parents cant afford diapers, babies wear dirty diapers longer Diapers are shown at Roddys home. C.W. GRIFFIN / MCT Jenny Rodriguez works out at a gym in Miami Lakes. SEE DIAPERS | C8 SEE AGING | C8

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press ALEXANDRIA, Va. Becky Domokos-Bays of Alexandria City Pub lic Schools has served her students wholegrain pasta 20 times. Each time, she said, they rejected it. Starting next school year, pasta and other grain products in schools will have to be wholegrain rich, or more than half whole grain. That includes rolls, biscuits, pizza crust, tortillas and even grits. The requirement is part of a government effort to make school lunches and breakfasts healthier. Championed by rst lady Michelle Obama, the new stan dards have been phased in over the last two school years, with more changes coming in 2014. Some schools say the changes have been ex pensive and difcult to put in place, and school ofcials are asking Con gress and the Agricul ture Department to roll back some of the requirements. Their main concerns: nding enough whole grainrich foods that kids like, lowering sodium levels and keeping fruits and vegetables from ending up in the trash. In interviews, school nutrition direc tors across the coun try mostly agreed that healthy changes were needed in school lunch es long famous for daily servings of greasy fries and pizza. Kids have adapted easily to many of the changes, are getting more variety in the lunch line and are eating healthier. But Domokos-Bays and other school nu trition directors say the standards were put in place too quickly as kids get used to new tastes and school lunch ven dors rush to reformu late their foods. When kids dont buy lunch, or throw it away, it costs the schools precious dollars. The regulations are so prescriptive, so its difcult to man age not only the nutri tion side of your busi nesses but the business side of your business, Domokos-Bays said. Some of the main challenges reported by school nutrition direc tors: Whole grains. While many kids have adapted to whole grain rolls, breads and even pizza crusts, some schools are having prob lems with whole grainrich pastas, which can cook differently. USDAs Janey Thornton, a for mer school nutrition di rector, says the govern ment is working with the food industry to de velop better pastas. Whole grains have also proved a hard sell for some popular re gional items, like bis cuits and grits in the South. Lyman Graham of the Roswell, New Mexico, school district says tortillas are one of the most popular foods in his area, but the whole wheat our ver sions are going in the trash. Sodium. Schools will have to lower the total sodium levels in school meals next school year and then will have to lower them even further by 2017. School lunch direc tors say the 2017 target 640 milligrams total in an elementary school lunch and 740 milli grams in a high school lunch isnt feasi ble and say kids will re ject the foods. USDAs Thornton acknowl edges the food indus try isnt there yet but encourages frustrated school lunch directors to worry about today rst before we imag ine the worst down the road. Fruits and vege tables. The standards require every student to take a fruit or veg etable to create a bal anced plate. The reac tion among students has been mixed. If the kids dont eat the food, then all I have is healthy trash cans, said Peg gy Lawrence, direc tor of nutrition at the Rockdale County Public Schools in Georgia. Healthier snacks. Schools will for the rst time this year have to make sure that all foods, including vending ma chines and a la carte lines, meet healthier standards. While many schools have already moved to make snacks healthier, others depend on snack money to help operate their lunch rooms and are worried about a sales dip. The School Nutrition Association has asked Congress and USDA to only require that 50 per cent of foods be whole grain-rich, to suspend the 2017 sodium re quirements and to stop requiring students to take a fruit or vegetable. USDA has shown some exibility already: In 2012, the department scrapped maximums on proteins and grains af ter students complained they were hungry. USDAs Thornton says problems will lessen as the food industry cre ates healthier products. Ill bet that ve or sev en years down the road, well see kids eating healthy food and well see acceptance, she said. At Alexandrias Patrick Henry Elementary last Tuesday, students said they loved their lunches and gobbled up plump strawberries. Kinder gartner Jade Kennedy said she recently tried kiwi at school for the rst time. But Domokos-Bays said she will serve white pasta to the students until she has to make the change this sum mer. Tuesday was pas ta day, and several chil dren said it was their favorite lunch better than my mom made, rst-grader Ruth Geb regiorgis said. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Schools seek changes to healthier lunch rules SUSAN WALSH / AP Brianna Delcid-Gomez, 7, right, Ruth Gebregiorgis, 8, far left, and Amina Sharif, 7, center, eat lunch at the Patrick Henry Elementary School in Alexandria, Va.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 www.LakeENT.net Call 352-728-2404 today to reserve your seat for the seminar most convenient for you.(Limited Seating. Reservations strongly recommended. Light snacks and beverages provided)Pain and pressure from chronic sinusitis can make everyday life unbearable, but for many patients, relief may be as easy as the innovative Balloon Sinuplasty procedure. Want Sinus Relief? Join Lake Ear, Nose & Throats Dr. Michael Freedman at our : Lake ENT Leesburg Office 601 E. Dixie Ave. Medical Plaza 901 I like running be cause it builds up the heart, Campbell said. If the heart dont work right there isnt any thing going to work right. Campbell said his wife of 45 years, Do lores, also is a runner. We used to run 10 miles a day togeth er back in our 40s and 50s, Campbell said. I would run 10 miles in the morning and an other 10 with her after work. One year I logged 3,600 miles. Campbell said he kept running well into his 70s, because old age was chasing me and I wanted to stay ahead of it. After 14 marathons his best time was three hours and 10 min utes when he was 44 and seven 50-mile rac es, Campbell decided to give his feet a break. But old age hasnt gained that much on him, because he start ed power lifting again about 30 years ago. I dont think working out adds years to your life, but it adds quali ty, Campbell said. As long as God keeps me healthy I want to have good quality of life. I dont want to walk with a cane, or a walker or be in a wheelchair. Power-lifting compe titions are about push ing himself, Campbell said. In competition youll always do more than you will by yourself, Campbell said. And while he does want to set records, he isnt looking for immor tality through record books. Its not records for publicity as much as it is for other older peo ple to say, That guy did it. By cracky I think I might try to do it, he said. LIFTER FROM PAGE C1 JOYCE MARSHALL / MCT I like running because it builds up the heart. If the heart dont work right there isnt anything going to work right, Campbell said. PAMELA KNUDSON MCT GRAND FORKS, N.D. This past winter, as they headed into the East Grand Forks Li brary, Mike and Jean Moe would sometimes nd people whod wait ed 30 minutes outside to receive tax preparation help from volunteers. And you know how cold it was this winter, he said. Mike and his wife, Jean, have served four years as volunteers and are local site coordina tors for the AARP-spon sored tax service, aimed at low-income elderly but open to all. Theres a real need for this, Mike said. Some of these people have no money. Volunteering not only makes him and Jean feel good, its also good for their relation ship, he said. It makes us much more close. We have to actually sit down and talk and plan our day. Doing volunteer work together enhances their communication as a married couple, he said. It gives us something structured to talk about, and that works into oth er aspects of life. AARP tax preparation volunteers are required to have another person check their work. Mike and Jean did that qual ity review for each oth er. That kind of reliance and communication extends to the home, Mike said. Jean prepares a news letter for the North Da kota Hearing Society which Mike reviews for errors and other input, she said. During his nearly 31-year career as a pi lot, Mike would often be away from home two or three weeks at a time, he said. As he ap proached retirement in 2009, he was kind of worried that if we spent this much time togeth er, we wouldnt like it. Turns out, we really do enjoy being togeth er, he said. We found that we not only sur vive, we ourish. Jean said the volun teer work she and Mike do has impacted their children, both of whom live in Grand Forks. I believe its inu enced them to also give of their time and tal ents, she said. One of their sons, James Moe, helped im measurably by setting up nine computers for the AARP tax prepara tion site, she said. Also a pilot, James doesnt have a lot of time off, Mike said, but he spent almost three days before tax season solving computer prob lems and properly con necting equipment. Their daughter, Susan Moe, has also become a volunteer. An avid dancer, she participat ed in the recent Danc ing for Special Stars event to raise funds for North Dakota Special Olympics. In similar ways, Jodie and Bruce Storhaug, of Grand Forks, say vol unteering together has positively affected their relationship. They have been helping other peo ple, together and with their children, for about nine years, Jodie said. Its nice to have something you share in together, Bruce said. Volunteering is a rela tionship-builder over all. For the past four years, the Storhaugs have led the Feed My Starving Children annual effort, based at Calvary Lu theran Church in Grand Forks, to provide meals for children worldwide. In the acts of volun teering, I just think, in our relationship, our love for each other grows, Jodie said. You see that giving heart of the person youre mar ried to. You see more deeply into that heart. And not negatively you are proud to see them serving and giv ing and not being self ish with their time, giv ing to other people. Mutual support is even more important when the project is more long-term demanding, Jodie said. Its easier to do together. One person is not pulled in another direction. When you go through the valleys of service, its not always easy. Some days, its harder to press yourself and get it done. In the Storhaug fam ily, the seeds of volun teerism were sewn after the Flood of 1997 when people from around the country came in droves to help residents here, she said. We saw a lot of peo ple come to our homes and serve us. The gift that service can be was kind of driven home to us. A mother and her two daughters from Con necticut came to the Storhaug home to help out, Bruce said. Thats how they were spend ing their family vaca tion. That really amazed me. That puts more of a desire to do those kinds of things in our hearts, too. Couples: Relationships benefit from volunteering together

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 12 the 132nd day of 2014. There are 233 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On May 12, 1949, the So viet Union lifted the Berlin Blockade, which the Western powers had succeeded in cir cumventing with their Berlin Airlift. On this date : In 1780 during the Revolu tionary War, the besieged city of Charleston, South Carolina, surrendered to British forces. In 1870 an act creat ing the Canadian province of Manitoba was given royal as sent, to take effect in July. In 1914 author and broad cast journalist Howard K. Smith was born in Ferriday, Louisiana. In 1922 a 20-ton meteor crashed near Blackstone, Vir ginia. In 1932 the body of Charles Lindbergh Jr., the kidnapped son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, was found in a wooded area near Hopewell, New Jersey. In 1937 Britains King George VI was crowned at Westminster Abbey; his wife, Elizabeth, was crowned as queen consort. In 1943 during World War II, Axis forces in North Africa surrendered. The two-week Trident Conference, headed by President Franklin D. Roos evelt and British Prime Minis ter Winston Churchill, opened in Washington. In 1958 the United States and Canada signed an agree ment to create the North American Air Defense Com mand (later the North Ameri can Aerospace Defense Com mand, or NORAD). In 1963 Betty Miller be came the rst woman to y solo across the Pacic Ocean as she landed her Piper Apache in Brisbane, Australia, having left Oakland, Califor nia, on April 30, making three stopovers along the way. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 12, 2014: This year you often feel un comfortable in what normal ly are easy situations; you could feel awkward at work or at the dentists ofce. This same feeling might perme ate important conversations. Take good care of yourself, and make sure you see the dentist and doctor on a reg ular schedule. If you are sin gle, you easily could meet someone through your daily travels or through a co-work er; this person could knock your socks off. If you are at tached, the two of you will get into many intellectual conver sations and come to agree ments more often than you have in the past. You also will delight in time spent togeth er, sometimes even doing nothing. LIBRA is as gentle as you are. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might be uncom fortable with what an asso ciate and/or friend verbaliz es. You understand that this person is not seeing the big picture, even though he or she seems to grasp certain issues very well. Attempt to help this individual detach. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might be deferring to someone else more than you need to be. You could feel as if this person has a better grasp on a situation. Focus on one item at a time. You will tend to go deeper into one issue, rather than see the big picture. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Curbing your playfulness could be difcult, or even im possible. Youll want to see the big picture. You could be heading into a more demand ing period at work. Prepare accordingly. Follow your in stincts, and you will land well. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Be more playful and forthright about a situation. Know what you want, and investigate a problem more fully. You might not feel ready to act, and for good reason. A discussion with a friend will help you un derstand your behavior. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might want to encourage a discussion. You have many ideas, as do those around you. Some of them will be better than others. Be wise, air out your differences and go for the best solution. Trust your sense of humor and your ability to see the big pic ture. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Listen to news with an eye to change. The impact could be nancial. You might want to step back and observe more. Be aware of the costs involved at this point. Togeth erness continues to be a theme. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might be less grounded than someone youre working with, but your creativity and intellectual resourcefulness are likely to point to the cor rect path. Use your charisma when dealing with a friend. Reach out to a loved one at a distance. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Assume a low prole in how you deal with a person al matter. You also might not want to lie low in other areas. When evaluating a situation, it suits you best to be an ob server. You will gain informa tion that you otherwise would not hear. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Youll want to zero in on the real issue behind a problem that keeps being debated in a meeting; other wise, you and the others in the group will not come to a consensus. Address the real matter, and you will come to a conclusion quickly. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Take charge of a problem in order to prevent a signi cant fallout from happening. Allow your creativity to ow as you gure out what might be appropriate and most ef fective under the present cir cumstances. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might be more stuck on a professional matter than you realize. Remain sensitive to a friend or loved one at a distance. This person might be uncomfortable sharing a problem. Use your imagina tion. Stay centered, and ev erything will work out well. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might want to revise your thinking about an in vestment. A discussion with a partner could be difcult. Speak your mind, but also lis ten to this person carefully, as he or she reveals his or her thoughts in response. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I have been married for 18 years to a won derful woman who was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer a few years ago. We dont know how much time she has left, but she feels the cancer has robbed her of her re tirement. She is try ing to persuade our family to move to Florida so she can enjoy some warm weather. Abby, for many rea sons I do not want to move. We have lived in the Midwest all our lives. My elder ly parent would be all alone if we move, and I have a sibling who is also terminally ill. I have had the same job for 25 years, and I dont want to give it up because I have the freedom to do much of my work from home, which al lows me to help my wife and have in come as well. If we move, there would be no guarantee that I could find a similar work situation that is so beneficial. My wife says Im be ing selfish because Im unwilling to leave my job, family and friends to do as she wants. I understand her desire to live in a warmer climate, but I think shes the one who is being selfish. What do you think? WANTS TO STAY PUT DEAR WANTS TO STAY PUT: I think the win ter in the Midwest was brutal this year, and now the spring rains have arrived, which are also de pressing. But in a short time the flowers will bloom and the warmth of summer and autumn will last for the next half-year. Why not take a va cation (or leave) from your job for the next three or four weeks? If you telecommute, you could still get some work done and let your wife have her dose of sunshine. Surely someone can check on your par ent and keep you in formed about your sibling for that short time. I do not recom mend moving any where permanent ly because theres no guarantee youd find a job that compen sates you as well as the one you have, and you may need the in come. DEAR ABBY: A tall, at tractive man came into the insurance of fice where I work to buy an auto insur ance policy. I havent talked with men out side of my church in a long time, so I was nervous. I thought my heart would explode from beating so fast. He will be coming back in a couple of weeks, and Im afraid if I dont ask him out, I will regret it. I dont know how to ap proach him or ask a guy out at all. Help! NERVOUS OUT WEST DEAR NERVOUS: The man may be mar ried, so take it slow. If he comes in before noon, casually men tion theres a restau rant not far away that serves good food and offer to show him. If he comes in lat er, use the old want to grab a cup of cof fee? gambit. Either of these will give you a chance to talk with him and find out more about him with out being overly ob vious. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Forecast is cloudy for man whose wife seeks the sun JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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So spreading the word to involve every agency will help every one. Adams said she realized the need after she went through a divorce with a toddler and three older children. Money was scarce, and she relied on food pantries to get by. I had to call family members for money for diapers, she said. Its hu miliating, absolutely humiliating. Nurses for Newborns and Cri sis Nursery workers hear of mothers rinsing out disposable diapers and reusing them. More commonly they see horrid cases of diaper rash. Mueller said when a baby presents with bad rashes and even staph in fections people unfairly conclude mothers are neglectful. But further questioning almost always reveals families are keeping the diapers on longer than they should because they dont have enough. Diapers are mandatory. Theyre not optional, said Ohlemiller. And yet families are making really hard decisions: Are we going to buy di apers or formula or are we going to buy food? That stress is putting a lot of hardships on families. Obtaining diapers can be more expensive for the poor because most dont have enough cash on hand to buy diapers in bulk at a cheaper cost per diaper. So they resort to buy ing smaller packages at higher prices. If a family lacks a working car, they often buy diapers at the local con venience store, where the price sky rockets. Ohlemiller said cheaper cloth di apers are typically not an option for the poor who often lack working washers and dryers. Coin laundries often ban diapers in their machines for sanitary reasons. DIAPERS FROM PAGE C3 vogue, he says, but they are not complete and some also put people at risk of injury by trying to do too much too fast. My main goal for people is for them to have the t ness they need to get through their everyday activities, he says. By default, the body gets leaner. But that is not my motivation. Anyone who wants health for life needs to address life style habits, nutrition, well ness and tness at every phase of their lives, Ali says. A basic mantra for any one who wants to age well is move, move, move. In the 20s and early 30s that means building strong mus cles, bone density and as healthy a cardiovascular sys tem as possible, Ali says. Its like when you build a house. You need to build a solid foundation. And anyone who embarks on a tness program needs to improve their nutrition as well. Think of food as a fuel like gas for a car, Ali says. You might want to drive that car ve days a week, but if the gas isnt there, you cant do it. As people head toward middle age, their metabolism may slow and a more seden tary lifestyle and chronic ail ments may begin to take a toll. Ali says the exercise move ments for those at mid-life are basically the same as for a younger person but the number of repetitions and intensity may vary. For older people, its im portant to work on move ments that encourage better balance, exibility and sta bility, Ali says. He might have people in this age group do balancing exercises on one leg, work on posture and alignment, and do stretches. If you have strong mus cles and core, its easier to stop yourself from falling and risking injury, Davis says. Charles Eaves, 75, a retired salesman who trains with Da vis, was almost an everyday runner before a recurrent foot injury sidetracked him. After he stopped running, my resilience just wasnt there. I felt like if I fell, I would just lie there like a limp rag and wouldnt be able to get up, Eaves says. Now after a year of thrice weekly training sessions with Davis, he says the strength and exibility he had as a runner have come back. As people age they need to adapt to changing realities, Czaja says. Your life may be different but that doesnt mean youre not aging suc cessfully. The good news is that even if youve never exercised or havent worked out regularly, its still possible to ease back into a tness routine and nd success at any age. But its important before beginning an exercise re gime, says Ali, to get medical clearance from a doctor and let your trainer know if there are any limitations. He also recommends a physical and lifestyle assessment to estab lish a baseline for building a tness program. Dr. Anaisys Ballesteros, a family practice physician with Baptist Health Medical Group, said her key advice to younger patients is: Dont forget your annual preven tive physical. AGING FROM PAGE C3 C.W. GRIFFIN / MCT Personal trainer Rickie Ali works with Laura Fuentes in Miami Lakes.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE KAYMER WINS PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP, SPORTS B1LEESBURG: City commission will debate businessmans hangar request, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Bodybuilder has big goal for 80th birthday, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 132 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.90 / 73Partly sunny. 50 STEVE FUSSELLSpecial to the Daily CommercialThree ordinances are now in the books that constitute nal approval of The Villages of Fruitland Park and the 2,050 homes there. Construction is expected to get under way in two weeks, accord ing to Gary Moyer, vice president of develop ment for The Villages. This completes the entitlement process, and I want you all to know how much we ap preciate your efforts, Moyer told commissioners last week. Moyer said former Interim City Manager Rick Scott, City Manag er Gary La Venia, Com munity Development Director Charlie Rector Work set to begin on The Villages of Fruitland Park LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comFour school board members said this week they will not ask for a larger share of the penny sales tax that is currently split even ly between the schools, county government and the areas collective municipalities. While acknowledging the $10 million it receives yearly from the penny sales tax will not be enough to meet at least $1 billion worth of needs for buildings, equipment and other capital, board members said it was important to work together with the municipalities and the county on the issue. Some school board members previously suggested that half a cent be allocated for the schools, as the student population is expected to increase. The real difference of a half cent versus a third is about $3 million a year, said Bill Mathias, board member. While I dont disagree about the needs, I also believe the municipalities and the counties have the same needs. Kyleen Fischer, school board member, echoed similar sentiments. I would like to work with the cities and the county, she said. Asked how to meet the growing needs of the school district, which is still $200 million in debt, she said the district would have to be creative. We discussed general obligation bonds and other ways of funding, she said. We have to look to ser vice schools that would come up and put their own private schools. General obligation bonds are backed by the issuers full faith credit and taxing authority. The one-cent sales tax for infrastructure generated $34.8 million in total revenue LAKE COUNTYBoard members express support for penny sales tax allocation PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE, BELOW: Construction workers perform road work on County Road 44 in Eustis on Friday. CONNIE CASSAssociated PressWASHINGTON To con gressional Republicans, Benghazi is shorthand for incompe tence and cover-up. Democrats hear it is as the hollow sound of pointless investigations. It is, in fact, a Mediterranean port city in Libya that was the site of a deadly attack on an American diplomatic com pound on the 11th anniversary of 9/11 that killed U.S. Ambas sador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Thats near ly all that U.S. politicians can agree on about Benghazi. Its been a political rallying cry since just weeks before Presi dent Barack Obamas re-election in November 2012. With the launch of a new House in vestigation, Benghazi is shap ing up as a byword of this falls midterm election and the pres idential race in 2016, especially if former Secretary of State Hil lary Rodham Clinton is on the ballot. A guide to the controversy:SETTING THE SCENEThe 2011 revolt that de posed and killed Libyan dictator Moammar Gadha, with the help of NATO warships and planes, began in Benghazi. A year later, the city of 1 million remained chaotic, in the grip of heavily armed militias and Isla mist militants, some with links to al-Qaida. The temporary U.S. diplomatic mission, created in hopes of building ties and encouraging stability and democracy, was struck by homemade bombs twice in the spring of 2012. Brit ish diplomats, the Red Cross and other Westerners were For Democrats and Republicans, a look at all that Benghazi stands for AP FILE PHOTO This Sept. 13, 2012 photo shows a man walking in the rubble of the damaged U.S. consulate, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens on the night of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012, in Benghazi, Libya. SEE VILLAGES | A2SEE TAX | A2 CAROLYN THOMPSONAssociated PressPolice negotiator Andres Wells was doing all he could to keep a suspect from committing suicide after a gas station robbery and 100 mph chase. But the man kept cutting phone calls short and point ing his handgun to his head. About 10 minutes after the last hang up, Wells cellphone chimed. It was a text from the suspect.Police add texting to crisis negotiation arsenalSEE TEXTING | A2SEE BENGHAZI | A8 MARK BUGNASKI / AP Sgt. Andres Wells of the Kalamazoo Deptartment of Public Safety, who successfully used text messaging to negotiate with a suicidal robbery suspect during a 2011 standoff, shows his phone.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MAY 11CASH 3 . ............................................... 0-8-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-4-3 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-2-3-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 7-6-9-6FLORIDALOTTERY MAY 10FANTASY 5 . ............................. 2-7-18-30-31 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 1-2-10-35-42-44 POWERBALL ...................... 4-31-41-47-551 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. and City Attorney Scott Gerken all played promi nent roles in the effort. They were able to ac commodate our schedule and we deeply appreciate their efforts, Moyer said. Moments later outside commission chambers, Moyer said he never ex pected any opposition to the project. I said from the beginning we didnt plan to show a lot of pictures and charts, Moyer explained. Any resident who had any questions about what we plan to do could look at what we have done, and thats the best evi dence of what we have in mind, he said of the mas sive retirement commu nity that currently spans three counties. Rector was noticeably upbeat about the nal hurdle being cleared for the project. Its been a wild and crazy year, he said. Im glad most developers dont move at their pace. Their pace is worth noting. Thirteen months ago Charles Roesel, for mer pastor of First Bap tist Church in Leesburg, called Moyer and asked for a meeting. The 950-acre Pine Ridge Dairy tract, which forms the citys western border, had been bequeathed to First Baptist when the former owner died. Roe sel had the tract annexed into the city in 2009. City ofcials expected development of a hodge podge of small PUD-style neighborhoods by various home builders over 15 or 20 years, a timeline that would constitute average growth. After six years of economic recession and no potential developers on the horizon, Roesel hoped to sell the entire tract to The Villages. Moyer saw an opportunity, but large-scale development is decidedly difcult within municipal bound aries. Floridas planning and development statutes encourage participation of the local residents, and approval of such a large tract with so many homes usually takes years. It was just one year ago this month when The Vil lages ofcials asked for private meetings with each commissioner to gauge their feelings. Last July, The Villages announced its de velopment plans. The effort has meant complex changes to the citys Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Ordi nances, as well as a massive effort to rewrite city codes, the citys govern ing charter and the citys budget in order to accom modate development. In less than two weeks, development of 2,050 homes, three communi ty centers and 18 miles of streets will get under way, Moyer said. An estimated $1 billion in housing sales will start next April, if all goes according to plan. And before the end of the year, The Villages ofcials predict, more than 4,000 new residents will have moved into the city. As veteran Commissioner John Gunter said last August, This will change Fruitland Park forever. But before that happens, city ofcials hope to convince voters to amend the citys governing charter to allow single-member commission districts. The change is seen as the only way to help preserve some thing of the citys smalltown character when new voters a considerable majority suddenly call Fruitland Park home. To make sure, char ter proponents are pushing an amendment to re quire a supermajority of voters to make any future changes. The last development of this magnitude occurred around 1882, when Orlando P. Rooks convinced the Florida Southern Railway Corporation to plot its new narrow-gauge freight line through the village of Gardenia. Five years later, a fast-growing Gardenia changed its name to Fruit land Park. VILLAGES FROM PAGE A1 last year. That money was divided equally between the cities, county and school district, with each receiving a third of the allocation. The 14 cities then must divide their allocation proportionately. Revenue from the tax goes toward infrastructure capital needs such as road work, construction of buildings and the purchase of public safety vehicles. The revenue, however, cannot be used for operational costs. The tax is set to expire in 2017, but the Lake County Commission said at a board workshop in February that they would like residents to vote on whether to renew the tax in 2015. In the last ve years, the school district has lost more than $67 million in property tax revenue because the stagnant economy has kept property values low and the Florida Legislature cut the maximum tax rate by 25 percent. While in support of the cur rent sales tax distribution formula, Board Member Rosanne Brandeburg said more funding needs to go into education. I can support the third of the penny sales tax, but I want to make sure the county is going to support the growth that we are beginning to see, she said. A consultant for the school district in November projected that by 2020 there will be an increase of about 2,297 students, particularly in the southern part of the county. Brandeburg said school impact fees, which can only be designated for new growth, should be raised to 100 percent from 25 percent. My fear is that we are going to have great needs, no funds and it is going to put this board and future boards in the same situation that prior boards were in when all the growth hit in 2000. We have got to have a unied front and we need to be able to fund education in Lake County. With the current revenue from impact fees at $2,500 a home, Brandeburg said it would take 8,000 homes to build a new elementary school. There are at least six schools in the district that need to be rebuilt or replaced, board member Tod Howard said. They are Clermont Elementary, Cypress Ridge, Cler mont Middle, Treadway Elementary, Beverly Shores Elementary and Fruitland Park Elementary. We are going to have to prioritize our needs and do the most we can with the dollars we have, he said. Commissioner Tim Sullivan, who serves as a liaison to the Lake County League of Cities, said the cities and the county have come together to support the same allocation of the penny sales tax. Based on conversations with them, they think it is something vital to their economic well-being and would like to continue it as is, he said. We are kind of waiting on the school board. The school board has not for mally come to a decision or informed the County Commission yet. But if they do come together with the county and municipalities, Sullivan said it would be a positive thing. If the municipalities, county and school board go forward with a unied front to show why we need to continue this tax since it is not a new tax, I think that it would go a long way in showing the people that we are being conscientious on how we spend our dollars, he said. TAX FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Revenue from tax goes toward infrastructure capital needs, such as road work.Please call Amie, the message said, followed by the number of the mans girlfriend. Wells was taken aback. In three years as a negotiator with the Kalama zoo, Mich., police, hed always relied on spo ken give-and-take, tak ing cues from a persons tone of voice, the inec tions, emotions. Hed never thought about negotiating via text. It had never even been brought up at one of our training, Wells recalled of the 2011 case. What do you want me to tell her? he text ed back. The truth, suspect Jesse Cook wrote. While Wells ordinarily would rely on a skill called active listening, he couldnt hear Cooks voice. Cook couldnt hear his. Was he yelling? Crying? Its not the preferred method of communi cation in a crisis, but if its the only way that we have, then well engage, said New York State Police spokeswoman Darcy Wells. In Kalamazoo, Wells used Cooks text about telling his girlfriend the truth as a way to show empathy and build trust. He texted that he understood the unemployed veteran was try ing to provide for his girlfriend and daughter when he robbed the gas station. There was no response. A minute later, Wells typed again, deter mined to keep the communication going. This doesnt have to go down like this. Again, nothing. Do you need any thing? Water? Food? Wells tried after anoth er minute. Finally, a reply. Water, Cook wrote. As soon as he wrote water, I thought, OK, I can work with this, Wells recalled later. Well get something gured out. Wells asked Cook to roll down his window so an ofcer could toss a bottle of water into his SUV, which was dis abled by tire-popping spikes laid by police. This guy throws like a girl, Wells texted, shing for Cooks state of mind. Thanks. He does throw like a girl, Cook wrote afterward. Then a smiley face. It was the cue Wells had been waiting for, proof Cook had relaxed enough to perhaps re sume talking by phone, which had been the goal all along. Looking back, Wells said having someones responses in text form could be benecial during negotiations, providing a chance to show them to a relative or another negotiator for guidance. But the negatives, including the potential to be misunderstood and absence of emotion and real-time give-andtake, outweigh the benets, he said. Can I call u? Wells then asked Cook. OK, Cook replied. He surrendered 15 minutes later. TEXTING FROM PAGE A1 MARK BUGNASKI / AP Sgt. Andres Wells is seen in his armored vehicle holding his cell phone and vehicle speaker.An estimated $1 billion in housing sales will start next April, if all goes according to plan. And before the end of the year, The Villages officials predict, more than 4,000 new residents will have moved into the city.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT OXFORD Guardian ad Litem program in need of volunteersThe Guardian ad Litem program is seeking volunteer advocates to be a voice for abused, neglected or abandoned children whose cases are in the court system. Volunteers must be 21 or older, have successfully completed 30 hours of pre-service training and be cleared of any serious criminal histo ry via a Level II criminal background check. Individuals ages 19 and 20 are eligible to work alongside a certied volunteer. The next training session begins June 9 at the Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301. For information about the program, call 352-274-5231 or email Sarah.Jay@gal..gov. To download an application, go to www.guardianadlitem.org.LAKE COUNTY Immunization program ongoing in middle schoolsThe Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools this month for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 201415 school year. Upcoming dates are: Thursday at Clermont Middle School; May 20 at Cecil E. Gray Middle School; May 22 at Life Stream Academy Leesburg; May 23 at Spring Creek Charter School; May 23 at Lake Hills School; May 23 at Life Stream Academy Eustis and May 23 at Imagine Schools of South Lake. For information, call 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com.THE VILLAGES Fundraiser will support efforts against type 1 diabetesFresh Market will celebrate the 20th anniversary of its annual Hope Floats Sidewalk Sale, from 11 / a.m. to 6 / p.m. daily, Friday to Sunday, to benet Junior Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes research. Fresh Markets stores will offer hot dogs, root beer oats and ice cream sundaes (regular and sugar-free) for $2, and will donate 100 percent of the money raised in the three-day sale directly to JDRF. Fresh Market is at 3740 Wedgewood Lane, The Villages, 352-391-9620, and there are stores in other Central Florida locations. For information, go to www.thefreshmarket.com.CLERMONT Community Foundation to host estate planning seminarSpeakers for the Charitable Estate Planning Seminar are Hilgardt Lamprecht, president and senior LifeWealth Advisor for The LifeWealth Group, and Wade Boyette of BNC Law Firm, at noon on May 21, offering information about how the Community Foundation of South Lake can help you meet char itable goals while maximizing asset transfers to your loved ones. The meeting will be at the Community Foundation of South Lake,12150 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Lunch will be provided and space is limited. RSVP by May 20 at 352-394-3818 or kathy@cfslc.org.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA $1.5 million interior facelift is currently taking place at Lakeside West, an independent living build ing on the campus of Lake Port Square in Leesburg, and the project is expect ed to be completed by fall. There is a lot of excite ment among residents, Bill Powell, director of concierge and security, said on Sunday, showing the lobby and reception areas that will be renovat ed, along with upgrades to the corridors, dining ar eas and hospitality suites. A new concierge area will be created, too. Lake Port Square has 277 residents, while 176 live in the Lakeside West building that is under renovation. Powell said residents are updated and involved in part of the decision-mak ing process about the ren ovation. We had several choic es for them to pick from for the interior, he said, showing a display board of the colors and fabric sam ples that residents chose LEESBURGLake Port Square begins facelift THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIALThe Lakeside West facility, on the 78-acre campus of Lake Port Square in Leesburg, is currently undergoing a $1.5 million interior facelift. LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to the Daily CommercialSenior archers gathered in south Lake County on Saturday to play their part in the rst ever Lake Se nior Games. A total of 20 archers from around Central Florida competed in the 900 tournament at Off Road Revolution, a few miles north of the Lake-Polk county line. As Kevin Murphy, winner in the compound-release ages 65-69 category said, It is a beautiful setup here. Denitely be here next year. Speaking at contests end, Mary Ann Hartman (one of three women competing) said, It was a good day. I didnt break any arrows and I didnt lose any. In the 900 format, archers shoot ve ends of six arrows each with a maximum CLERMONTArchers compete at Lake Senior Games PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALABOVE: Stan Oles, left, and Don Driscoll retrieve arrows and record scores after one end of the competition. Archers shot 15 ends of six arrows each. BELOW: Seventyeight-year-old Frank Skvarek of the Villages Archery Club takes a shot during the Lake Senior Games competition held Saturday at Off Road Revolution, south of Clermont. Staff ReportAngelo Perciballi, re tired U.S. Air Force major general, will be the 20142015 president of the Ro tary Club of Lake County Golden Triangle, outgoing president Chuck Hiott has announced. Perciballi, who lives in Mount Dora, retired from 37 years of commissioned service in the USAF and will be joined by a slate of ofcers and a nine-member board of directors, Hiott said in a press re lease. Perciballi has both a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineer ing and a master of sci ence degree in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Insti tute of Technology. He attended the Industrial College of the Armed Forces and Harvard Ken nedy School of Government, in the Program for Executives in National and International Security. Perciballis career experience includes more than 35 years in aerospace en gineering at Lockheed Aircraft, Raytheon Missiles and Mar tin Marietta. He also has more than 6,500 ying hours in worldwide airlift operations and gen eral aviation. Other ofcers include: %  %  President-elect Shane Sherman of Data Graphics Inc. in Mount Dora. %  %  Secretary Patricia Thompson, a fourth-gen eration citrus grower and part-time bookkeeper. %  %  Treasurer David Donofrio of Greenlee, Kur ras, Rice & Brown in Mount Dora. %  %  Sergeant at arms Rick Gonzalez of Crosby & Associates of Ta vares. %  %  Past President Hiott, a principal and engineer at Booth, Ern, Straughan, Hiott Inc. (BESH) in Tavares. The 2014-2015 Board of Directors is compiled of: %  %  Carl Stigdon, who re tired as a regional supervi sor in 1998 from a nancial services company. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA businessman wants a longterm lease on a hangar at Leesburg International Airport so badly that he is willing to undertake $150,000 worth of repairs on the building, yet city commissioners want to re negotiate the proposal for more fa vorable nancial terms before giving their approval. The city plans to discuss this fur ther at todays 5:30 / p .m. commis sion meeting. Those negotiations were un fruitful, Leo Treggi, airport manager, wrote in an agenda memo to city commissioners. Treggi said in the memo that Paul Harris has requested the commission reconsider the initial lease of $0.15 per square feet per year for the land, and a prepaid hangar lease of $225,000 annualized at 3.25 percent over 20 years. Treggi also said in the memo that the lease will gross $309,504.98, and that Harris has agreed to a schedule of improvements to be completed within two years if the lease is ap proved. As the owner of Stempro, Har ris reportedly wants to use the 6,400-square-foot hangar at 32746 Echo Dr. to store three aircraft. At the commissions last meet ing on April 28, Commissioner Bill Polk questioned why Stempro was being offered a lease for $225,000 on a hangar that was appraised for $250,000. Polk also said 3.25 per cent was lower than most business es are able to obtain through com mercial lending from a bank. If we are going to get into the nance business, then we need to act like nancial people. Were not acting like nancial people, Polk said. Leesburg City Manager Al Minner Leesburg city commission to debate request for hangar Retired major general Perciballi to head Rotary Club PERCIBALLI SEE ROTARY | A4SEE HANGAR | A4SEE ARCHERS | A4SEE FACELIFT | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 DEATH NOTICESBrian Christopher GibsonBrian Christopher Gibson, 30, of Ocala, died on Saturday, May 10, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.IN MEMORY %  en Vickie Stockglausner, who is retired from Harry S. Truman Me morial Veterans Hospital in Columbia, Mo. %  en Kathy Yarbrough, bank manager of the BMO Harris Bank in Tavares. %  en Jodie McEwen, vice president of Hillcrest Insurance in Mount Dora and Ocoee. %  en Dee Johns, who owns Directories Ink, a publishing company in Tavares. %  en Janet Westlake, minister of discipleship at First United Methodist Church of Mount Dora. %  en Colleen McGinley, executive director of the Tavares Chamber of Commerce. %  en Julie Riley, a registered sales assistant at Belton Financial Group Raymond James & Associates Inc. in Tavares. %  en Phyllis M Olmstead, who owns Olm stead Publishing LLC in Apopka and is re tired from international higher education. The Rotary Club of Lake County Golden Triangle meets on Tuesdays at 11:45 / a.m. at Lake R e ceptions in Mount Dora. ROTARY FROM PAGE A3 said at the last meeting that the hangar was in poor condition and that Harris offer to improve the facility would be benet the city by sav ing it from making the repairs. Were trying to give a little to get a little, Minner said at the meet ing, adding he felt that it was a fair trade-off for the city. Treggi said in the memo that the han gar is 30 years old and is in a state of disre pair. He noted current issues with the hangar include a leaking roof, poor landscaping, un desirable ramp conditions and structural beams that needed at tention, all estimated to cost $150,000. Treggi said in the memo that there was some confusion at the last meeting with regard to whether this lease provided the highest and best use for the airport. Essentially, Mr. Harris proposes to use the ex isting 6,400-square-foot facility to hangar three aircraft, Treggi wrote in the memo. A facility of this size is reasonable to store such number of air craft. Pursuant to Leesburg International Air ports Assurances and FAA Airport Compliance Manual regulations, this use is arguably an avia tion use and worthy of prime airport frontage. Further, because the potential lessee has a small manufacturing business and available space in the facility in question, it is not unreasonable to permit that usage, nor would it be in any viola tion of any FAA or City regulation. The memo notes the total term of the lease is for 30 years and the property, including all improvements, would revert back to the city upon termination of the lease agreement. HANGAR FROM PAGE A3 score of 10 points per arrow. Archers on Saturday ranged in age from 52 to 79. They came from as far away as Homosassa and Fort Meade, but almost half came from The Villages Ar chery Club. Frank Skvarek, 78, is perhaps typical of the Villagers, though better at shooting than most. Hes been using bows and arrows for about 12 years, and holds or has held multiple state and national records. I used to be a gun shooter, Skvarek says. I did it for a lot of years. I didnt want to shoot guns any more, so I thought another challenge would be archery. Skvarek started with a compound bow, but then saw a man shooting a traditional recurve. (Compound bows incorporate pulleys that will mechanically assist the archer.) That just looked like archery to me, Svarek says. I shot Olympic style for a while, but then I took ARCHERS FROM PAGE A3 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Mary Ann Hartman and Gary Perigo score each others arrows, while archery coordinator Joe Steed looks on. for paint, trim and the textile fabrics for the furnishings. Residents are talking about the colors and all of the new additions to the dining room and to our lobby, Powell said. Basically, its going well; resi dents are really excited about whats happening. Executive Director Jamie Began said in a press release that she believes the improve ments will make Lake Port Square even more appealing for those looking for a se nior living facility. The investment will enhance the beauty that sur rounds us daily on campus, both inside and out, Began said in the press release. Im excited to unveil the beautiful results later this year. Lake Port Square has been operating in Leesburg for 23 years. It is part of the fami ly of Brookdale senior living, the leading owner and operator of senior living communi ties through the United States, according to the press release, and Lake Port Square is a con tinuing care retirement com munity that offers indepen dent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehabilitation. The campus is nestled on 78 acres on the shores of Lake Harris off State Road 44 (Dix ie Avenue) in Leesburg. For more information about Lake Port Square and Brookdale, visit www.brookdale.com. FACELIFT FROM PAGE A3 the sight off. When I look at the compound bows, that doesnt even look like archery to me. Hartman, 79, instructs at The Villages Archery Club ve days a week. She also came to the sport relatively late in life. I always wanted to do it, Hartman says. My boys shot at home but I never had time to do it. I moved out here and I saw the archery range and I said, This is the time. Archery is a great sport for women because it is a mind sport. The playing eld is level. Theres no age limit for archery. High scorers on Saturday were Rick Hardman on compound bow and Larry Michael on recurve. All of the competitors are eligible to compete in the state senior games, set for this December in Lee County. The next scheduled event in the Lake County games is bowling, set for May 14-15 at Bowling Triangle in Mount Dora. The state games are scheduled for Dec. 6-24 in Lee County. Senior games coordinator Gary Perigo said the archers are happy the senior games have come to Lake County. Were promoting the active, healthy lifestyle for seniors, he said. Archery instructor Joseph Steed, who ran the archery competition, made similar comments. We are trying to drive the brand that South Lake County is the center for health, wellness and tness, he said. Thats the brand we are pushing in South Lake County. There has not been a venue specically for seniors until now. BETH REESE CRAVEYThe Florida Times-UnionJACKSONVILLE Robbie and Doug Smith were preparing for a round-the-world sailboat cruise in 1982 when they and their Jacksonville-based boat temporarily took in a few troubled boys to work on the water. They never went on that cruise. What was supposed to be a yearlong detour turned into a 32-year career. Since the couple founded the Safe Harbor Maritime Academy, a Christian therapeutic boarding school for boys, they have helped about 1,100 at-risk boys turn their lives around. But last year, Doug Smith, 61, had a stroke, which led him and his wife, 57, to ponder the fu ture. They said in a recent interview that they love their boys, but the slower pace and freedom of retirement beckoned. Im too old for this, Doug Smith said. So on June 30, they will turn over day-to-day op erations to former staffer Dustin Johnson, whom they brought back to lead the privately funded academys second act. Were tired, Robbie Smith said. Its time. Robbie Smith is a licensed mental health coun selor. Her husband is a licensed clinical pastoral counselor and an ordained minister. After June 30, the Smiths plan to travel for a few months, so Johnson can get his bearings without them around. They then will return to live on the Safe Harbor property but separated from the daily operations. They will assume ambassador roles, traveling near and far to raise funds and awareness.After 1,100 boys, Safe Harbor founders to retire

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 PETER LEONARDAssociated PressDONETSK, Ukraine Ninety percent of voters in a key industrial region in east ern Ukraine came out in fa vor of sovereignty Sunday, pro-Russian insurgents said in announcing preliminary results of a twin referendum that is certain to deepen the turmoil in the country. Roman Lyagin, election chief of the self-styled Do netsk Peoples Republic, said around 75 percent of the Do netsk regions 3 million or so eligible voters cast ballots, and the vast majority backed self-rule. With no international elec tion monitors in place, it was all but impossible to verify the insurgents claims. The preliminary vote count was an nounced just two hours after the polls closed in an election conducted via paper ballots. A second referendum or ganized by pro-Russian separatists was held Sunday in eastern Ukraines industrial Luhansk region, but no immediate results were released. Ukraines central govern ment and the West had con demned the balloting as a sham and a violation of inter national law, and they have accused Moscow of orches trating the unrest in a possi ble attempt to grab another piece of the country weeks af ter the annexation of Crimea. The results of the two referendums could hasten the breakup of the country and worsen what is already the gravest crisis between the West and Russia since the end of the Cold War. Although the voting in the two regions with a com bined population of 6.5 mil lion appeared mostly peaceful, armed men identied as members of the Ukrainian national guard opened re on a crowd outside the town hall in Krasnoarmeisk, and an of cial with the regions insur gents said people were killed. It was not clear how many. The bloodshed took place hours after dozens of armed men shut down the voting in the town. The shooting starkly demonstrated the hair-trigger tensions in the east, where pro-Russian separat ists have seized government buildings and clashed with Ukrainian forces over the past month. Even before the results were announced, Ukraines Foreign Ministry called the twin referendums a crimi nal farce. The U.S. and other Western governments said they wouldnt recognize the outcome. Earlier in the day, the head of the referendum organizers in Donetsk said the ultimate status of the region would be discussed later and would in clude the possibility of secession or annexation by Russia. We are just saying to the world that we want changes, we want to be heard, elec tion commission head Roman Lyagin said. The violence in Krasnoar meisk, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) from the regional capital, Donetsk, came hours after armed men, one of whom said they were from the national guard, put a stop to the voting and took control of town hall. In the evening, more armed men arrived in a van, and a scufe broke out with people gathered around the building. Then the men red shots. An Associated Press pho tographer who witnessed the shooting said two people lay motionless on the ground. Insurgent leader Denis Pushilin was quoted by the ITAR-Tass news agency as saying there were an un specied number of deaths. Over the past few weeks, the Ukrainian government and the West have accused Russia of trying to destabilize the country or create a pretext for another invasion. Russia which annexed Ukraines Crimean Peninsula just days after voters there approved secession in a March referendum has rejected the accusations. Russian President Vladimir Putin had asked the organizers of the latest referendums to delay the vote in an appar ent attempt to ease the crisis. The insurgents refused. At one polling station at a school in Donetsk, turnout was brisk in the rst hour of voting. All voting slips that could be seen in the clear ballot boxes showed that selfrule had been selected. Most opponents of sover eignty appeared likely to stay away from the polls rather than risk drawing attention to themselves. Darya, a 25-year-old medical worker who would not give her last name, said she saw no point in casting a ballot, since the vote had no legal force. There were no notices about this referendum any where, about where and when it was happening, she said. In any case, it is not valid, so there was no reason to take part. There were no immediate signs of any outright intimidation by pro-Russian forces Sunday, and insurgents near the polls were not wearing their usual balaclavas. The haphazard nature of the referendums was in full display at Spartak, a leafy vil lage on the fringes of Donetsk. Villagers were unable to vote for about three hours after the polls opened be cause election ofcials failed to bring a ballot box. Finally, an election organizer arrived with a voting urn crudely fashioned from cardboard boxes and sealed with tape. Most present said they were voting in favor of au tonomy and against the in terim government headed by acting President Oleksan dr Turchynov. One said she would not take part in a na tionwide presidential elec tion set for May 25. I dont agree with what is happening in the country. And I want some changes for the better. What is happening on May 25 is not honest, truth ful or in our best interests. And that is why I am voting today, said Irina Zelyonova, 30, cradling her baby in her arms.Insurgents say Ukraine region opts for sovereignty ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO / AP A gunman stands guard as local residents walk from a polling station in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, on Sunday. HARUNA UMAR and MICHELLE FAULAssociated PressBAUCHI, Nigeria One of the teenagers who escaped from Islamic extremists who abducted more than 300 schoolgirls says the kidnapping was too terrifying for words, and she is now scared to go back to school. Sarah Lawan, a 19-year-old science student, spoke Sunday as Nigerians prayed for the safety of the 276 students still held cap tive. Their prayers were joined by Pope Francis. Let us all join in prayer for the imme diate release of the schoolgirls kidnapped in Nigeria, the Roman Catholic leader tweet ed, using the trending #BringBackOurGirls. Lawan told The Associated Press that more of the girls could have escaped but that they were frightened by their captors threats to shoot them. She spoke in the local Hausa language in a phone interview from Chibok, her home and the site of the mass ab duction in northeast Ni geria. The failure to rescue those who remain cap tive four weeks later has attracted mounting national and international outrage. Last week, Ni geria was forced to ac cept international help in the search, after ig noring offers for weeks. More experts are expected in Nigeria to help rescue the girls, including U.S. hostage negotiators and others from Britain, France, China and Spain. I am pained that my other colleagues could not summon the cour age to run away with me, Lawan said. Now I cry each time I come across their parents and see how they weep when they see me. Police say 53 students have escaped. Nigerias homegrown Boko Ha ram terrorist network is threatening to sell those who remain in captivity into slavery. In churches across the nation, Nigerians prayed for the girls, whose plight has brought together ordinary people in a year that had seen growing dissension between Muslims and Christians, disagreements exacerbated by the increasingly deadly attacks of the Boko Ha ram terrorist network. Abducted Nigerian girl scared to go back to school SUNDAY ALAMBA / AP Hosea Abana, center, the chairman of the Chibok community in Abuja, Nigeria, pauses during a rally calling on the government to rescue the schoolgirls kidnapped from the Chibok Government secondary school, on Saturday.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 R epellent is a fair ly strong word that, if used too often, loses its power. It has such potency that I reserve it just for things that make my stomach turn and my head spin, things that make me question humanity, things that have a rancid smell and an ugly outer shell. Emily Letts is one of those rare creatures who ts my idea of repellent. In fact, Emily and the whole Planned Parenthood crew that support her are prima facie evidence that the world is lled with what Hannah Arendt famously referred to as the banality of evil. At the risk of giving her more notoriety than she has already garnered, Emily Letts is the woman who found out she was pregnant, didnt want the baby, didnt have any intention of pay ing for her roll in the hay with nine months of drudgery and chose to have an abortion. That is already something I reject on principle, the idea that a human life, even one so innitesimally small that it can t on the head of a pin with the dancing angels, is disposable because someone had a little too much fun in the sheets. But this isnt just the case of a woman who chose to have an abortion, something that Planned Parenthood advocates with a zeal that surprises even some of its (former) employ ees. Here we have an extremely short-term mother who decided that not only would she dispose of her baby but that she would lm herself in agrante, preserving for posterity her narcissism. In one of her numerous inter views to the media which sur prise! was fascinated by her stunt, Letts said, I feel super great about having an abortion. Being the language snob that I am, the rst thing that jumps off the page with this comment is the sophomoric phraseology, the use of one adjective to modify another. Clearly, this young lady did not go to Catholic school or the nuns would have taught her to pay better attention to the grammar. The second thing that occurs to me is that someone who can feel super great about ending a pregnancy because it was the right decision for my life is a big embarrassment for the prochoice movement, even though theyd never admit it (theyre still recovering over pink-sneaker Wendy Davis and her creative version of the truth). Then again, maybe she isnt. Emily Letts is the bitter harvest that Planned Parenthood has forced society to reap by its nihilistic insistence on reproductive rights to the exclusion of the rights of the unborn. This organization, founded by a eugenicist who actively supported the sterilization of the mentally inrm and the racially undesirable, has been unrelenting in its crusade to normalize abortion. Everything it has done, every move made, has been designed to remove the stigma from an act that ends in the death of at least one party, and sometimes two. Which brings me to another reason I nd Planned Parenthood even more repellent than randy Emily, who, after all, is just a victim of several decades worth of brainwashing from the feminists. She has been taught to feel good about her choices, and the lesson took so well that not only is she unashamed, she is absolutely delighted with her ability to destroy human life and make a great conversation piece on YouTube in the process. Planned Parenthood is the reason that Emily Letts exists, and the propaganda about how much it supports women through mammograms (an insignicant part of its mission) and other reproductive health services is just a smokescreen for its biggest moneymaker: abor tion. And that, my friends, is why the organization has gone on the warpath against one of its own. Margo Davidson represents Delaware County, my home district, in Harrisburg. She was supported by NOW and Planned Parenthood in her rst campaign. But a funny thing happened on the way back to the statehouse. Davidson was one of the few Democrats to vote in favor of additional restrictions on abor tion clinics in the wake of the Gosnell tragedy. Her cousin, Semika Shaw, died as a result of a botched abortion performed at Gosnells clinic in West Philadelphia. This is how she explained her vote: I honor (my cousins) memory by voting yes on this legislation that seeks to safeguard the health of women that is long overdue, so that never again will a woman walk into a licensed health-care facility in the state of Pennsylvania and be butchered as she was. Because of that courageous stand, Planned Parenthood has targeted her for defeat in the upcoming Democratic primary by supporting her male challenger. I am beginning to realize that if you cross the grand priestesses of reproductive freedom by ghting to protect women, you will be struck down. If, on the other hand, you glorify that deadly choice with a close up, youre a heroine. And thats a tragedy for society. Id call it mourning sickness.Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Readers may send her email at cowers1961@gmail.com.OTHERVOICES Christine M. FlowersMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Planned Parenthoods repellent spawn Capital punishment is unjust, immor al and prone to error, as most of the worlds developed nations have gured out. But the United States, unwilling to put aside a desire for revenge, continues to kill its own citizens; 32 states and the federal gov ernment still impose the death penalty. At the very least, they ought to perform that barbaric task as fairly and humanely as pos sible. A report released Wednesday by the Constitution Project, a bipartisan think tank that includes both death penalty abolitionists and death penalty supporters, calls for a complete overhaul of the process, from arrest to execution. Given the human factor in capital punishment prosecutors, witnesses, judges, jurors this page does not believe the system can ever be xed. It should be abolished. But there are changes that can reduce errors, misapplication and misconduct. Many of the recommendations of the Constitution Project would move the system in a positive direction, so policymakers would be wise to read the report closely. The 208-page report offers 39 proposals most of them reasonable, some crucial including dropping the widely used three-drug execution cocktail (California has already scrapped it under the weight of a legal challenge) in favor of the single-shot method. Administering a single overdose of a barbiturate, according to the report, would decrease problems associated with the administration of drugs as well as the risks associated with the use of paralyzing and painful chemical agents. Presumably, that would lead to fewer tor turous executions such as the one that occurred earlier this year in Oklahoma, in which the condemned man said after the rst injection that I feel my whole body burning, and in Ohio, where it took a convicted murderer 25 minutes to die. Those who are interested in justice, whether they are supporters of the death penalty or opponents, owe it to their fellow citizens to embrace the kinds of systemic changes the Constitution Project advocates. A recent study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that at least 4 percent of death row inmates are likely to have been wrongfully convicted. While that represents a relatively small number of people, it amounts to a lot of innocent blood if they are executed. Any steps to lessen that miscarriage of justice would be welcome, particularly by the innocent facing death at the command of their own government.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEHow to make the death penalty less unfair and less inhumane Classic DOONESBURY 1974

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 targeted that spring and summer. Stevens, based in the capital city of Tripoli, chose to visit Benghazi on the anniversa ry of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when U.S. em bassies around the world were on alert for terrorism. In Egypt that day, a different sort of trouble struck, and would spread to other Mid east cities over several days: Protesters angry about an anti-Muslim video made in America stormed the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, clamber ing over the walls and setting ags on re. Hours later, the as sault in Benghazi began.A FIERY ASSAULT AND FOUR DEATHSThe Benghazi attack came in three waves, spread over eight hours at two locations. Only in hindsight is the duration of the attack clear because of a lengthy pause before the sec ond assault. According to accounts from congres sional investigators and the State Departments Accountability Review Board: Around 9:40 / p .m. on Sept. 11, a few attack ers scaled the wall of the diplomatic post and opened the front gate, allowing dozens of armed men in. Local Libyan security guards ed. A U.S. security ofcer shepherded Stevens and Sean Smith, a State Department communications specialist, into a fortied safe room in the main building. Attackers set the building and its fur niture are with die sel fuel. Stevens and Smith were overcome by blinding, choking smoke that prevented security ofcers from reaching them. Libyan civilians found Stevens in the wreckage hours later and took him to a hospital, where he, like Smith, died of smoke inhalation. He was the rst U.S. ambassador to be killed in the line of duty in more than 30 years. A security team from the CIA annex about a mile away arrived to help about 25 minutes into the attack, armed only with ries and handguns. The U.S. per sonnel ed with Smiths body back to the annex in armored vehicles. Hours after the rst attack ended, the annex was twice targeted by early-morning mortar re. The second round killed Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty, two CIA security contractors who were defending the annex from the rooftop. A team of six securi ty ofcials summoned from Tripoli and a Libyan military unit helped evacuate the remaining U.S. personnel on the site to the airport and out of Benghazi.THE FALLOUT BACK HOMEWord hit Washington in the nal weeks of the presidential race. Over the next several days, the Benghazi news blended with images of angry anti-American demonstrations and ag-burn ings spreading across the Middle East over the offensive video. Political reaction to the Benghazi attack quickly formed along partisan lines that hold fast to this day. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and others said Obama had emboldened Islamic extremists by being weak against terrorism. But the pub lic still credited Obama with the successful strike against al-Qaida leader Osama bin Lad en a few months earlier in Pakistan. The accusation that took hold was a Republican charge that the White House intentionally misled voters by portraying the Beng hazi assault as one of the many protests over the video, instead of a calculated terrorist at tack under his watch. Obama accused the Republicans of politicizing a national trag edy. He insists that the narrative about the vid eo protests was the best information available at the time. After 13 public hear ings, the release of 25,000 pages of docu ments and 50 separate briengs over the past year and a half, the ar guments are the same.WHO WAS TO BLAME FOR LEAVING THE DIPLOMATIC POST SO VULNERABLE?Republican and Democratic lawmakers agreed: The State De partment under Clinton kept open the Benghazi mission, which em ployed a few State De partment workers and more than two dozen CIA workers, with little protection in the midst of well-known dangers. The attack probably could have been prevented if the department had heeded intel ligence warnings about the deteriorating situ ation in eastern Libya, a bipartisan report by the Senate Intelligence Committee said. Stevens requests for more security, made clear in cables to State Department headquar ters in July and August 2012, went unheeded, according to the Sen ate report, as did those made by his predeces sor earlier that year. But Stevens also twice declined the U.S. mili tarys offer of a special operations team to bol ster security and other wise help his staff. The month after the attack, Clinton said she was responsible for the safety of those who had served in Benghazi, without acknowledging any specic mistakes on her part. Obama said the blame ultimately rested on his shoulders as president. Yet the administration says neither Obama nor Clinton was aware of the requests for better protection in Benghazi because they were handled at lower levels. Four senior State De partment ofcials were put on paid leave after an independent board investigating the attack said security at the Benghazi mission was grossly inadequate. After a review, the department says it reassigned three ofcials to positions of lesser responsibility; one resigned. Some Republicans complained that no one was red. Democrats tried to shift some blame to GOP lawmakers, com plaining that they had cut the administra tions budget request for diplomatic security in 2012.AN UNFINISHED STORYNo one has been ar rested for the Benghazi attack. The administration has named two militant groups that ofcials be lieve were among the attackers. One is led by a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, Suan bin Qumu, who was released from the U.S. military prison in Cuba in 2007. He was described by of cials there as a probable member of al-Qaida. The suspected groups are considered ideolog ical cousins of the ter rorists behind the 2001 attacks on New York and Washington. But State Department of cials say they dont think core al-Qaida leaders orchestrated the Beng hazi attack. The administration says it wont give up on bringing the assailants to justice. Since the Benghazi mission was burned, the rebel brigades that once fought Gadhas forces have hardened into increasingly powerful militias, many made up of Islamic extremists. Libyas central government is weak, security forces cant maintain con trol, and bombings and shootings continue. The State Department maintains the U.S Em bassy in Tripoli but hasnt returned to Benghazi. BENGHAZI FROM PAGE A1 JACQUELYN MARTIN / AP House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, center, arrives for a House Democratic caucus where the agenda includes discussing whether they should participate in the Benghazi committee, Friday, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

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DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterPONTE VEDRA BEACH Martin Kay mer produced one of the most unlikely pars on the 17th green at the TPC Sawgrass without ever going in the water. It carried him to a oneshot victory Sunday in The Players Championship that was emotional in so many ways. Kaymer nearly blew a three-shot lead after a 90-minute rain delay until he holed a 30-foot par putt on the famous island green. He got upand-down with his put ter from short of the 18th green for one last par and a 1-under 71. Jim Furyk closed with a 66 he had to wait af ter the rain delay to rap in a 3-foot par putt and it looked as though it might be enough to force a playoff, or even win outright when the 29-year-old German began to crumble. Furyk had to settle for a runner-up nish for the second straight week. Jordan Spieth, tied with Kaymer going into the nal round, made his rst bogey of the tournament on the fth hole, and plenty more followed. He closed with a 74. The typical stress that Sawgrass brings on Sunday was contained to the nal hour, and it was almost more than Kaymer could take. The German made double bogey from an aggres sive play behind a pine tree on the 15th. He nervously chose putter from a collection area on the par-5 16th that cost him a chance at birdie. Nothing could top the 17th hole, the most ex citing on the Stadium Course. Kaymer had a oneshot lead. His tee shot cleared the water and landed on a mound just over the bunker, but it mysteriously spun hard back toward the front of the green and looked as if it might go into the SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Nets try to back up belief / B6 PHOTOS BY LYNNE SLADKY / AP Martin Kaymer of Germany, holds The Players championship trophy on Sunday at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach. MARK J. TERRILL / AP Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan smacks Oklahoma Citys Kevin Durant in the rst half of Game 4 on Sunday in Los Angeles. BETH HARRISAP Sports WriterLOS ANGELES After be ing thoroughly outplayed for over 40 minutes, the Los Angeles Clippers fought back. Leading the way was a player not known for coming up big in the clutch. Darren Collison scored eight of his 18 points in the nal 2:58, rallying the Clippers past the Oklahoma City Thunder 101-99 on Sunday to tie the Western Confer ence seminal series 2-2. Even though we didnt play well throughout the game, we were able to get a win, Collison said. That feels more impressive than anything we did. Russell Westbrook, who scored 27 points, missed a 3-pointer and Serge Ibakas tip attempt was too late at the buzzer, allowing the Clip pers to salvage a game they trailed until the nal 1:23. It was a good look, West brook said. Just didnt go in. Blake Grifn led Los An geles with 25 points, making 9 of 11 free throws. Jamal Crawford added 18 points. DeAndre Jordan had 14 re bounds, helping the Clippers win the boards, 45-43 the rst time in 11 playoff games the Thunder were outrebounded. We just willed this one. We found a way, said Chris Paul, who had 23 points and 10 assists. Kevin Durant scored 40 points, hitting 15 of 18 free Clippers stun Thunder 101-99 to deadlock semifinal series MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG Josh Tomlin won his second straight start, Nyjer Morgan and Michael Bourn both drove in two runs and the Cleveland Indians beat the Tampa Bay Rays 6-5 on Sunday. Tomlin (2-0), who pitched just once in the big leagues last season after right elbow surgery in 2012, allowed two runs and six hits over six innings in his second outing this year.Tomlin, Morgan key Tribes win over RaysSEE RAYS | B2 Staff ReportFormer South Lake High School and Uni versity of Florida standout Jonotthan Harrison signed with the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday as an undrafted free agent. Harrison played for Walter Banks at South Lake and was a team cap tain for the Gators in 2013. A 6-foot-4, 299-pound center, Harrison started in all 12 games for Florida last season. He was the only offensive lineman to start in same position for each game in 2013. For his career, he played in 51 games and made 39 starts. Harrison was a high-school and college team mate of Jeff Demps, who currently is a running back with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.Jonotthan Harrison signs with Colts HARRISON STEVE NESIUS / AP Cleveland Indians Asdrubal Cabrera scores on Nyjer Morgans RBI-single during the second inning against the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday in St. Petersburg.SEE HOOPS | B2 Kaymer and his caddie, Craig Connelly, look from the third tee during the nal round. Kaymer holds on to win Players ChampionshipSEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 Morgan had an RBI ineld single that rolled to a stop near the line between home and third before Bourn hit a two-run double as the Indians took a 3-1 lead in the second. Morgan also hit his rst major league homer since July 30, 2012, an eighth-inning solo shot that made it 6-2. Matt Joyce homered and had two RBIs for the Rays, who went 1-5 on their homestand. Chris Archer (2-2) gave up four runs and eight hits in ve-plus innings. A three-run eighth pulled the Rays to 6-5. Ben Zobrist scored the rst run in the in ning when reliever Marc Rzepczynski made an errant throw to second on what could have been an inning-ending double play. Cody Allen entered and, after allowing Wil Myers RBI single, hit Desmond Jennings with a pitch to load the bases. Yunel Es cobar hit a sacrice y. Bryan Shaw pitched a perfect ninth in place of demoted closer John Axford for his second save. Yan Gomes hit a lead off homer that chased Archer during a tworun sixth that gave Cleveland a 5-2 advantage. Morgan reached on a bunt single off Brad Boxberger that involved a call overturned on re play, advanced on a balk and wild pitch, and scored the innings sec ond run on Mike Aviles sacrice y. Joyce hit a rst-inning solo homer off Tomlin. Joyce, who is 6 for 12 with two homers against the right-hander, had an RBI single in the fourth. NASCAR Sprint Cup-5-hour ENERGY 400 ResultsSaturday At Kansas Speedway Kansas City, Kan. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (13) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267 laps, 119.4 rating, 47 points. 2. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 267, 137.7, 44. 3. (17) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 115.5, 42. 4. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 128.7, 41. 5. (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 109, 40. 6. (4) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 103, 39. 7. (9) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 267, 101.4, 37. 8. (12) Aric Almirola, Ford, 267, 90.4, 36. 9. (14) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 100.2, 36. 10. (28) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 81.3, 35. 11. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 92.7, 33. 12. (5) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 267, 89.4, 32. 13. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267, 89.9, 32. 14. (15) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 267, 82.9, 30. 15. (24) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 75.3, 30. 16. (10) Greg Bife, Ford, 267, 79, 28. 17. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 266, 70.4, 27. 18. (30) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 266, 70.6, 26. 19. (19) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 266, 68.5, 25. 20. (8) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 266, 94.9, 24. 21. (26) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 266, 59, 23. 22. (20) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 265, 62.1, 22. 23. (23) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 264, 59.9, 21. 24. (25) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 264, 58.2, 20. 25. (34) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 264, 49.1, 19. 26. (27) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 264, 52, 18. 27. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 263, 60.8, 0. 28. (36) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 263, 42.2, 16. 29. (6) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 263, 66.9, 15. 30. (29) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 262, 50, 14. 31. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 262, 32.6, 0. 32. (37) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 261, 32.1, 12. 33. (32) Josh Wise, Ford, 261, 29, 11. 34. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 258, 41.7, 10. 35. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 257, 35.8, 9. 36. (18) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 186, 64.5, 8. 37. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 184, 40.9, 7. 38. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 171, 31.5, 6. 39. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 149, 86.2, 5. 40. (42) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, engine, 137, 32.9, 4. 41. (35) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 136, 42.2, 0. 42. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 63, 28.4, 0. 43. (31) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 57, 38.8, 1. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 4, Atlanta 3 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Thursday, May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 Saturday, May 3: Indiana 92, Atlanta 80 Miami 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Brooklyn 4, Toronto 3 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 Wednesday, April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 Friday, May 2: Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83 Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103 Washington 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Dallas 3 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 Wednesday, April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 Friday, May 2: Dallas 113, San Antonio 111 Sunday, May 4: San Antonio 119, Dallas 96 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 Saturday, May 3: Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 4, Golden State 3 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 Thursday, May 1: Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99 Saturday, May 3: L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121 Portland 4, Houston 2 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 Friday, May 2: Portland 99, Houston 98 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 2, Brooklyn 1 Tuesday, May 6: Miami 107, Brooklyn 86 Thursday, May 8: Miami 94, Brooklyn 82 Saturday, May 10: Brooklyn 104, Miami 90 Monday, May 12: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 14: Brooklyn at Miami, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 16: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, May 18: Brooklyn at Miami, TBA Indiana 2, Washington 1 Monday, May 5: Washington 102, Indiana 96 Wednesday, May 7: Indiana 86, Washington 82 Friday, May 9: Indiana 85, Washington 63 Sunday, May 11: Indiana at Washington, late Tuesday, May 13: Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. x-Thursday, May 15: Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, May 18: Washington at Indiana, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 3, Portland 0 Tuesday, May 6: San Antonio 116, Portland 92 Thursday, May 8: San Antonio 114, Portland 97 Saturday, May 10: San Antonio 118, Portland 103 Monday, May 12: at San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Portland at San Antonio, 8:30 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 16: San Antonio at Portland, 9:30 or 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 19: Portland at San Antonio, TBA Oklahoma City 2, L.A. Clippers 2 Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105 Wednesday, May 7: Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clippers 101 Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112 Sunday, May 11: L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99 Tuesday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 or 10:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 18: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, TBA Clippers 101, Thunder 99 OKLAHOMA CITY (99) Durant 12-24 15-18 40, Ibaka 2-5 2-2 8, Perkins 0-2 1-2 1, Westbrook 10-22 6-6 27, Sefolosha 2-4 0-0 4, Jackson 4-8 0-0 10, Butler 2-7 1-2 6, Adams 0-0 1-4 1, N.Collison 1-3 0-0 2, Fisher 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-75 26-34 99. L.A. CLIPPERS (101) Barnes 0-6 0-0 0, Grifn 8-19 9-11 25, Jordan 3-5 1-7 7, Paul 10-23 3-4 23, Redick 2-8 1-1 6, Crawford 7-16 2-2 18, Davis 2-3 0-0 4, D.Collison 7-12 4-4 18, Granger 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-93 20-29 101. Oklahoma City 32 25 18 24 99 L.A. Clippers 15 31 17 38 101 3-Point GoalsOklahoma City 7-24 (Ibaka 2-2, Jackson 2-3, Westbrook 1-4, Butler 1-5, Durant 1-7, N.Collison 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2), L.A. Clippers 3-21 (Crawford 2-8, Redick 1-3, Granger 0-1, D.Collison 0-1, Paul 0-4, Barnes 0-4). Fouled OutNone. Re boundsOklahoma City 58 (Durant 7), L.A. Clippers 55 (Jordan 14). AssistsOklahoma City 17 (West brook 8), L.A. Clippers 23 (Paul 10). Total Fouls Oklahoma City 27, L.A. Clippers 24. Technicals Perkins, Westbrook, Oklahoma City defensive three second, Jordan. A,365 (19,060).NHL Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT SECOND ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 3, Montreal 2 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Montreal 4, Boston 2 Thursday, May 8: Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT Saturday, May 10: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Monday, May 12: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Montreal at Boston, TBA Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Sunday, May 11: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, Minnesota 2 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Minnesota 4, Chicago 0 Friday, May 9: Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Sunday, May 11: Minnesota at Chicago, 9 p.m. Tuesday, May 13: Chicago at Minnesota, TBA x-Thursday, May 15: Minnesota at Chicago, TBA Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 2 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1 Thursday, May 8: Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, May 10: Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 0 Monday, May 12: Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Wednesday, May 14: Anaheim at Los Angeles, TBA x-Friday, May 16: Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBA Mutua Madrid Open Results Sunday At Caja Magica Madrid, Spain Purse: Men, $5.1 million (Masters 1000); Women, $5.1 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Kei Nishikori (10), Ja pan, 2-6, 6-4, 3-0, retired. Women Championship Maria Sharapova (8), Russia, def. Simona Halep (4), Romania, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3. Doubles Men Championship Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (6), Serbia, def. Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, 6-4, 6-2. Internazionali BNL dItalia Results Sunday At Foro Italico Rome Purse: Men, $4.77 million (Masters 1000); Women, $3.63 million (Premier) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-4. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-3, 6-7 (1), 6-3. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. John Isner (9), United States, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Tommy Robredo (16), Spain, def. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed C Matt Wieters on the 15-day DL. Reinstated 1B Chris Davis from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES Placed LHP CC Sabathia on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Matt Daley from Scran ton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TAMPA BAY RAYS Released RHP Heath Bell. TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated 2B Chris Getz for assignment. Reinstated RHP Casey Janssen from the 15-day DL. National League MIAMI MARLINS Designated RHP Carlos Marmol for assignment. Recalleed RHP Henry Rodriguez from New Orleans (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned INF Brent Morel to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled OF Jaff Decker from Indianapolis. SAN DIEGO PADRES Optioned RHP Kevin Quackenbush to El Paso (PCL). Assigned RHP Hector Ambriz outright to El Paso. Reinstated 3B Chase Headley from the 15-day DL. Announced OF Xavier Nady declined outright assignment and elected free agency. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Placed 1B Adam LaRoche on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Re called OF Tyler Moore from Syracuse (IL). American Association AMARILLO SOX Released OF Justin Pearson. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Released OF TreVon Johnson. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES Released RHP Jeff Duda and LHP Ryan Rogers. ROCKLAND BOULDERS Released RHP Amalio Diaz. Signed OF Jerod Edmondson. TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES Released C Kyle Nisson. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS Agreed to terms with RB Jordan Lynch, T Cody Booth, Gs Ryan Groy and James Dunbar, DTs Brandon Dunn and Lee Pegues and LBs Tana Patrick, Christian Jones and Devekeyan Lattimore. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Agreed to terms with TEs Blake Annen and Trey Burton, WRs Kadron Boone and Quron Pratt, RBs David Fluellen and Henry Josey, CB John Fulton, T Kevin Graf, DT Wade Keliikipi, S Daytawion Lowe, DE Frank Mays, K Carey Spear and Gs Josh Andrews, Karim Barton and Donald Hawkins. PITTSBURGH STEELERS Agreed to terms with DEs Ethan Hemer and Josh Mauro, QB Brendon Kay, DB Devon Carrington, OL Chris Elkins, G Will Simmons, OT Kaycee Ike, LB Howard Jones, DT Roy Philon and TE Eric Waters. MINNESOTA VIKINGS Agreed to terms with TE A.C. Leonard, QB Kain Coulter, C Zac Kerin, Gs Austin Wentworth and Conor Boffeli, NT Isame Faciane, HB Dominique Williams, DEs Jake Snyder, Tyler Scott and Rakim Cox, WRs Erik Lora and Donte Foster and OTs Antonio Richardson, Pierce Burton and Matt Hall. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Agreed to terms with CBs Chris Davis and Greg Ducre, DL Tenny Palepoi and Ricky Tjong-A-Tjoe, LBs Colton Underwood and Alvin Scioneaux, RB D.J. Adams, S Alden Darby, TE Michael Flacco, G D.J. Johnson, OT Jeremiah Sirles, P Chase Tenpenny, OT Ian White and WRs Torrence Allen, Bre lan Chancellor, Micah Hateld and Javontee Herndon. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL Fined Boston F Shawn Thornton $2,820.52 for unsportsmanlike conduct during Saturdays game.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 6 p.m.ESPNU Wake Forest at NC StateCYCLING 5 p.m.NBCSN Tour of California, Stage 2, at Folsom, Calif.HOCKEY 1:30 p.m.NBCSN IIHF, World Championship, Russia vs. United States, at Minsk, BelarusMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m.ESPN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis10:10 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Seattle FS-Florida Miami at L.A. DodgersNBA 8 p.m.TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 4, Miami at Brooklyn10:30 p.m.TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 4, San Antonio at PortlandNHL 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Boston at Montreal10 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Los Angeles at Anaheim RAYS FROM PAGE B1 throws, for the Thunder. We let this one slip away, he said. We could have took control of the series. Game 5 is Tuesday night in Oklahoma City. We were almost on the mat and we got off of it. We didnt get pinned, Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. Theyre seeth ing right now. They had an opportunity to go up 3-1 and now its an even series. It was the 14th come back and largest yet by the Clippers this season after trailing by double digits. They rallied from 12 points down in the second quarter of Game 7 to oust Golden State in the rst round. This is one of the best ones yet, Paul said. Darren Collison was amazing. You just got to love a guy like that who plays with so much heart and never gives up. The Clippers had no answer for Durant and Westbrook until mid way through the fourth quarter. That dynamic duo drove the lane with abandon, drew fouls and made free throws in leading the Thunder to an early 22-point lead. Durants three-point play early in the fourth extended the Thunders lead to 15 points, and they were still up by 10 with 7:44 to go. But the comeback Clippers were not to be denied. Everybody kept telling each other, Chip away, chip away, Grifn said. That was kind of our mentality for the rest of the game. We just kept ghting. The Clippers stole a page out of the Thunders playbook, switch ing to a smaller lineup that included Collison and Danny Granger, who helped disrupt the Thunders rebounding late. Paul willed his team back into it, scoring six straight points to get the Clippers within six. Grifn, who was saddled with ve fouls, made three of four free throws before Collison got hot. The whole time Im thinking, We cant be down 3-1, we just cant be down 3-1 going to Okla homa, Collison said. With the game tied at 97, Collison scored the Clippers nal four points on layups. Craw ford passed to a streak ing Collison for a fastbreak conversion on the second one for a 101-97 lead with 32 seconds left. Westbrook scored for the Thunder, but after Grifn missed, Westbrook did too to end the game. Did that really just happen? a still stunned Crawford said. Paul missed all ve of his shots in the third, when Grifn picked up three fouls to give him ve, and Crawford and Jordan each got their third. Ibaka, who shot 9 of 10 in the Thunders Game 3 win, got his fourth foul, along with Westbrook in the third. The Clippers came as close as eight points be fore Reggie Jacksons 3-pointer beat the shot clock to keep the Thunder ahead 75-63 going into the fourth. The Thunder had the Clippers on their heels from the opening tip, with Oklahoma City shooting 65 percent in building a 22-point lead. Oklahoma City out scored the Clippers 3215 in the rst; the fewest points theyve allowed in a quarter of a playoff game. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, who banned Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life and ned him $2.5 million, attended the game. HOOPS FROM PAGE B1 The Players Championship Leading Scores Sunday At TPC Sawgrass, Players Stadium Course Ponte Vedra Beach Purse: $10 million Yardage: 7,215; Par 72 Final Martin Kaymer (600), $1,800,000 63-69-72-71 275 -13 Jim Furyk (330), $1,080,000 70-68-72-66 276 -12 Sergio Garcia (210), $680,000 67-71-69-70 277 -11 Justin Rose (135), $440,000 67-71-71-69 278 -10 Jordan Spieth (135), $440,000 67-66-71-74 278 -10 David Hearn (95), $313,000 70-71-68-70 279 -9 Rory McIlroy (95), $313,000 70-74-69-66 279 -9 Francesco Molinari, $313,000 72-70-67-70 279 -9 Jimmy Walker (95), $313,000 75-68-71-65 279 -9 Lee Westwood (95), $313,000 67-71-71-70 279 -9 Brian Davis (75), $240,000 72-67-73-68 280 -8 Gary Woodland (75), $240,000 67-71-70-72 280 -8 K.J. Choi (63), $187,500 74-70-72-65 281 -7 Chris Kirk (63), $187,500 71-73-70-67 281 -7 George McNeill (63), $187,500 71-68-69-73 281 -7 Steve Stricker (63), $187,500 71-70-71-69 281 -7 Russell Henley (53), $135,333 65-71-80-66 282 -6 Justin Hicks (53), $135,333 73-70-71-68 282 -6 Morgan Hoffmann (53), $135,333 71-70-70-71 282 -6 Matt Jones (53), $135,333 70-69-69-74 282 -6 Matt Kuchar (53), $135,333 71-71-69-71 282 -6 Brian Stuard (53), $135,333 67-76-69-70 282 -6 Marc Leishman (47), $96,000 70-72-74-67 283 -5 Hideki Matsuyama (47), $96,000 70-71-72-70 283 -5 Daniel Summerhays (47), $96,000 74-68-69-72 283 -5 Kevin Chappell (42), $69,500 72-68-75-69 284 -4 Bill Haas (42), $69,500 68-71-72-73 284 -4 Billy Horschel (42), $69,500 72-70-75-67 284 -4 Zach Johnson (42), $69,500 69-71-72-72 284 -4 Ryan Moore (42), $69,500 70-74-67-73 284 -4 John Senden (42), $69,500 70-69-68-77 284 -4 Brendan Steele (42), $69,500 69-73-75-67 284 -4 Bo Van Pelt (42), $69,500 71-70-70-73 284 -4 Erik Compton (36), $52,750 72-70-74-69 285 -3 Russell Knox (36), $52,750 72-72-73-68 285 -3 Scott Langley (36), $52,750 71-72-72-70 285 -3 Henrik Stenson (36), $52,750 71-70-70-74 285 -3 Angel Cabrera (29), $38,000 70-74-71-71 286 -2 Stewart Cink (29), $38,000 70-70-70-76 286 -2 Jamie Donaldson, $38,000 74-67-74-71 286 -2 Luke Donald (29), $38,000 73-69-75-69 286 -2 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (29), $38,000 67-77-72-70 286 -2 Charley Hoffman (29), $38,000 77-67-71-71 286 -2 Justin Leonard (29), $38,000 68-73-70-75 286 -2 Kevin Na (29), $38,000 70-69-76-71 286 -2 Rory Sabbatini (29), $38,000 71-73-69-73 286 -2 Adam Scott (29), $38,000 77-67-69-73 286 -2 Charlie Beljan (18), $24,073 73-69-73-72 287 -1 Jason Dufner (18), $24,073 69-74-72-72 287 -1 Martin Flores (18), $24,073 70-71-74-72 287 -1 Retief Goosen (18), $24,073 72-70-75-70 287 -1 J.J. Henry (18), $24,073 74-70-72-71 287 -1 water until it settled into the clumpy collar a foot from the bulkhead. His chip was weak, and he still had 30 feet down a ridge with a sharp swing to the right. He made the putt, pumping his st in a rare show of emotion. His putt from the fairway on 18 settled 3 feet behind the hole, and Kaymer was as much re lieved as excited when he knocked it in. A former world No. 1 and major champion, Kaymer nearly choked up when asked about winning on Mothers Day. His mother, Rina, died of cancer in 2008 shortly after Kaymer won the BMW International Open in Germany. He has a sunower her favorite ower on his golf bag. My mother was always there to be affection ate and show us love, Kaymer said in a taped interview with NBC Sports. When my mom passed away, that stopped. We had enough when we were younger. Mothers Day is always a nice day. I hope a lot of kids show their mothers we love them. Interviewed on the 18th green, so dark that the clubhouse was glowing from the outdoor lights, Kaymer said brother Phillip sent him a text that morning which he described as very emotional. Its a good day for all of us, he said. Kaymer nished at 13-under 275 and joined an elite group by winning the biggest event on golfs strongest tour. Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Adam Scott are the only other play ers to win a major, a World Golf Championship and The Players Championship. Sergio Garcia made a strong run until he hit into the water on the par-5 11th and lost momentum by missing too many putts. He closed with a 70 to nish alone in third at 11 under. For the 20-year-old Spieth, it was another lost opportunity. He went 58 consecutive holes without a bogey at Sawgrass until dropping a shot at No. 5. Spieth still was tied for the lead approaching the turn when Kaymer pulled away. Spieth made bogey on No. 8. Kaymer got upand-down from a bunker for birdie on No. 9. Spieth made another bogey on No. 10 when his wedge bounced over the green, and Kaymer made another superb bunker shot on the par5 11th for birdie. He was humming along until the horn sounded to stop play. When he returned, it all started to go wrong. But he held his nerve he spoke earlier in the week about trying not to be a wimp and produced an important win. It was the 14th victory worldwide for Kaymer, ended an 0-for-29 drought. His last win was at the Nedbank Challenge in South Africa at the end of 2012, right after he delivered the crucial point for Europe in its Ryder Cup comeback. Kaymer was No. 1 in the world in February 2011 until he wanted to retool his swing to be able to hit a greater variety of shots. He needed all of them Sunday. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Baltimore 20 15 .571 7-3 L-1 9-7 11-8 New York 19 17 .528 1 4-6 L-2 9-8 10-9 Boston 19 18 .514 2 6-4 W-2 10-11 9-7 Toronto 18 20 .474 3 2 5-5 L-3 7-10 11-10 Tampa Bay 16 22 .421 5 4 4-6 L-1 8-12 8-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 21 12 .636 7-3 L-1 13-8 8-4 Chicago 19 20 .487 5 1 5-5 L-2 11-10 8-10 Kansas City 18 19 .486 5 1 4-6 W-1 8-7 10-12 Cleveland 18 20 .474 5 2 7-3 W-1 12-8 6-12 Minnesota 17 19 .472 5 2 5-5 W-1 8-9 9-10 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 23 15 .605 5-5 W-4 10-9 13-6 Los Angeles 19 17 .528 3 6-4 W-3 8-10 11-7 Seattle 19 18 .514 3 7-3 L-1 7-8 12-10 Texas 19 19 .500 4 1 4-6 L-2 11-10 8-9 Houston 12 26 .316 11 8 3-7 W-1 6-13 6-13 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 21 15 .583 4-6 W-3 13-8 8-7 Miami 20 18 .526 2 6-4 L-3 17-5 3-13 Washington 19 18 .514 2 4-6 L-3 11-9 8-9 New York 17 19 .472 4 2 2-8 W-1 9-10 8-9 Philadelphia 17 19 .472 4 2 4-6 L-1 6-9 11-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 24 14 .632 4-6 W-2 12-9 12-5 St. Louis 18 19 .486 5 1 4-6 L-2 7-5 11-14 Cincinnati 17 19 .472 6 2 5-5 W-1 10-8 7-11 Pittsburgh 16 20 .444 7 3 6-4 W-4 12-10 4-10 Chicago 12 24 .333 11 7 3-7 L-3 7-11 5-13 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 24 14 .632 7-3 W-1 10-5 14-9 Colorado 23 17 .575 2 6-4 L-1 13-5 10-12 Los Angeles 20 19 .513 4 3-7 L-1 7-12 13-7 San Diego 18 21 .462 6 2 5-5 W-3 12-11 6-10 Arizona 15 25 .375 10 6 7-3 W-2 3-15 12-10 SATURDAYS GAMESL.A. Angels 5, Toronto 3 Detroit 9, Minnesota 3 Baltimore 5, Houston 4, 10 innings Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 1 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Boston 8, Texas 3 Oakland 4, Washington 3, 10 innings Seattle 3, Kansas City 1SATURDAYS GAMESL.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 2 Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3 Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Atlanta 2, Chicago Cubs 0 Colorado 11, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 4 San Diego 9, Miami 3 Oakland 4, Washington 3, 10 inningsSUNDAYS GAMESL.A. Angels 9, Toronto 3 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 Houston 5, Baltimore 2 Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 5 Arizona 5, Chicago White Sox 1 Milwaukee 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Boston 5, Texas 2 Oakland 9, Washington 1 Kansas City 9, Seattle 7SUNDAYS GAMESCincinnati 4, Colorado 1 N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 4, 11 innings Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 2 Arizona 5, Chicago White Sox 1 Milwaukee 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Oakland 9, Washington 1 San Diego 5, Miami 4 San Francisco 7, L.A. Dodgers 4, 10 innings St. Louis at Pittsburgh, late AL BEHRMAN / AP Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman, left, is congratulated by manager Bryan Price after Chapman earned his rst save of the year on Sunday in Cincinnati.TODAYS GAMESDetroit (Porcello 5-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 2-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 2-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 4-2) at Toronto (Buehrle 6-1), 7:07 p.m. Texas (Lewis 2-2) at Houston (Peacock 0-3), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 3-2) at Oakland (J.Chavez 2-1), 10:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (C.Ramos 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-1), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESN.Y. Mets (Colon 2-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 2-4) at St. Louis (Lyons 0-2), 8:15 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 2-1) at Arizona (Collmenter 1-2), 9:40 p.m. Miami (Koehler 3-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 4-1), 10:10 p.m. Atlanta (Floyd 0-0) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-2), 10:15 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: AlRamirez, Chicago, .340; Choo, Texas, .336; MeCabrera, Toronto, .333; Loney, Tampa Bay, .326; VMartinez, Detroit, .325; Markakis, Baltimore, .317; Hosmer, Kansas City, .317. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 34; Bautista, Toronto, 31; Donaldson, Oakland, 28; JAbreu, Chicago, 26; Me Cabrera, Toronto, 25; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 25; Trout, Los Angeles, 25. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 37; Brantley, Cleveland, 30; Colabello, Minnesota, 30; NCruz, Baltimore, 30; MiCabrera, Detroit, 29; Moss, Oakland, 28; Encarnacion, Toronto, 27. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 54; AlRamirez, Chicago, 51; Hosmer, Kansas City, 46; Markakis, Baltimore, 46; Al tuve, Houston, 45; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 45; Rios, Texas, 44. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 14; AGordon, Kansas City, 13; Hosmer, Kansas City, 13; Pedroia, Boston, 13; Encarnacion, Toronto, 12; SPerez, Kansas City, 12; 7 tied at 11. TRIPLES: Aybar, Los Angeles, 3; Bourn, Cleveland, 3; In fante, Kansas City, 3; Rios, Texas, 3. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 13; NCruz, Baltimore, 10; Pujols, Los Angeles, 10; Bautista, Toronto, 9; Dozier, Minnesota, 9; ColRasmus, Toronto, 9; VMartinez, Detroit, 8. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 13; RDavis, Detroit, 12; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Andrus, Texas, 11; AEscobar, Kansas City, 11; Ellsbury, New York, 10; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 9; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 9; LMartin, Texas, 9; Villar, Houston, 9. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 6-1; Tanaka, New York, 5-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 5-1; Porcello, Detroit, 5-1; 11 tied at 4. ERA: Buehrle, Toronto, 1.91; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.04; Gray, Oakland, 2.17; Darvish, Texas, 2.33; Ventura, Kan sas City, 2.34; JChavez, Oakland, 2.47; Tanaka, New York, 2.57. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Detroit, 66; Lester, Boston, 66; Price, Tampa Bay, 58; Tanaka, New York, 58; Kluber, Cleveland, 57; Darvish, Texas, 54. SAVES:TomHunter, Baltimore, 11; Rodney, Seattle, 11; Perkins, Minnesota, 10; Axford, Cleveland, 9.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .395; Blackmon, Colorado, .352; Utley, Philadelphia, .344; DGordon, Los Angeles, .336; Goldschmidt, Arizona, .329; Morneau, Colorado, .329; SSmith, San Diego, .327. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 36; Blackmon, Colorado, 34; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 27; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 27; Pence, San Francisco, 26; Stanton, Miami, 26; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 25. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 40; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 33; Blackmon, Colorado, 29; Morneau, Colorado, 29; Arenado, Colorado, 26; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 26; CGonzalez, Colorado, 25; McGehee, Miami, 25. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 52; Blackmon, Colorado, 51; Arenado, Colorado, 49; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 49; DGordon, Los Angeles, 47; Morneau, Colorado, 46; CGomez, Milwaukee, 44; Utley, Philadelphia, 44. DOUBLES: Utley, Philadelphia, 15; Arenado, Colorado, 14; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 13; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 13; MaAdams, St. Louis, 12; Byrd, Philadelphia, 12; Lu croy, Milwaukee, 12. TRIPLES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 3; Hechavarria, Miami, 3; Rendon, Washington, 3; Simmons, Atlanta, 3. HOME RUNS: Stanton, Miami, 11; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 11; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Blackmon, Colorado, 9; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 24; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 12; Revere, Philadelphia, 12; EYoung, New York, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 11; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 11; Blackmon, Colorado, 8. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 6-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 6-2; Machi, San Francisco, 5-0; Lyles, Colorado, 5-0; 15 tied at 4. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.43; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.45; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.71; Niese, New York, 1.82; ESantana, Atlanta, 1.99; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.99; Koehler, Miami, 1.99. STRIKEOUTS: Fernandez, Miami, 70; Cueto, Cincinnati, 68; Strasburg, Washington, 64; Wacha, St. Louis, 57; Kennedy, San Diego, 56; Greinke, Los Angeles, 55. SAVES: FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 15; Romo, San Fran cisco, 12; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 11. Indians 6, Rays 5 Cle veland T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 0 1 2 DeJess dh 3 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 5 0 1 0 Forsyth ph-dh 2 0 0 0 Brantly dh 4 0 1 0 Zobrist 2b 4 2 1 0 CSantn 1b 3 0 2 0 Jo yce lf 5 1 2 2 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 1 2 0 ACarer ss 4 1 1 0 Lone y 1b 4 1 0 1 YGoms c 5 2 2 1 Myer s rf 4 0 1 1 Morgan lf 4 3 3 2 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 Aviles 2b 3 0 1 1 YEscor ss 3 0 1 1 JMolin c 3 0 1 0 Hanign ph-c 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 12 6 T otals 36 5 9 5 Cleveland 030 002 010 6 Tampa Bay 100 100 030 5 ETomlin (1), Rzepczynski (1). DPCleveland 1, Tampa Bay 1. LOBCleveland 10, Tampa Bay 7. 2B Bourn (2), Chisenhall (8), C.Santana (5), Zobrist (7). HRY.Gomes (5), Morgan (1), Joyce (3). SFAviles, Y.Escobar. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Tomlin W,2-0 6 6 2 2 0 2 Atchison H,3 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Rzepczynski H,3 2/3 1 3 1 1 2 Allen H,8 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay Archer L,2-2 5 8 4 4 4 2 Boxberger 1 1/3 1 1 1 2 3 B.Gomes 1 2/3 2 1 1 0 0 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 0 Archer pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby Allen (De.Jennings). WPBoxberger. Balk Boxberger. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, James Hoye; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, John Tumpane. T:48. A,679 (31,042). Brewers 6, Yankees 5 Ne w York Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Gardnr lf 5 1 1 0 CGomz cf 3 1 1 0 Jeter ss 5 0 1 0 LSchfr rf 4 0 1 1 Ellsbury cf 4 1 1 0 R Weks 2b 5 1 3 2 Teixeira 1b 4 3 2 1 Overa y 1b 5 0 1 1 KJhnsn 3b 3 0 1 2 MrRynl 3b 5 0 2 1 Beltran ph-rf 2 0 0 0 KDa vis lf 3 0 0 0 Solarte 2b-3b 2 0 2 2 Segura ss 3 1 1 0 ISuzuki rf 2 0 0 0 Maldnd c 4 1 1 0 ASorin ph 1 0 0 0 Garza p 2 1 1 0 Ryan 2b 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Warren p 0 0 0 0 Gennett ph 0 0 0 0 JMrphy c 4 0 3 0 Lucro y ph 1 1 1 1 Phelps p 2 0 0 0 Duk e p 0 0 0 0 Thrntn p 0 0 0 0 W ooten p 0 0 0 0 Betncs p 0 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 BRorts ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Gindl ph 0 0 0 0 F rRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 11 5 T otals 35 6 12 6 New York 300 000 101 5 Milwaukee 002 003 001 6 Two outs when winning run scored. DPNew York 1, Milwaukee 1. LOBNew York 9, Milwaukee 9. 2BGardner (4), Ke.Johnson (6), L.Schafer (6), R.Weeks (2), Garza (1). HRTeixeira (7). SBC. Gomez (6), Segura (7). CSR.Weeks (1). SPhelps, L.Schafer. SFSolarte. IP H R ER BB SO New York Phelps 5 8 4 4 3 1 Thornton BS,1-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 Betances 2 1 0 0 0 1 Warren L,1-2 1 2/3 2 1 1 1 3 Milwaukee Garza 5 6 3 3 4 4 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 0 Duke H,4 2/3 2 1 1 0 0 Wooten H,1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 W.Smith H,10 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez W,1-0 BS,1-16 1 1 1 1 0 0 Phelps pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Thornton pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby Phelps (C.Gomez). WPWarren. BalkPhelps. UmpiresHome, Tom Woodring; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel. T:40. A,544 (41,900). Twins 4, Tigers 3 Minnesota Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0 Kinsler 2b 4 2 2 1 Mauer dh 3 1 1 0 T rHntr rf 4 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 0 0 0 MiCar r 1b 3 1 2 1 Colaell 1b 4 0 0 0 VMr tnz dh 4 0 1 0 Pinto c 4 2 2 1 D .Kelly 3b 3 0 0 0 Nunez lf 4 0 2 1 Cstllns ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Parmel rf 4 0 1 0 AJcksn cf 4 0 1 1 A.Hicks cf 1 0 0 0 A vila c 2 0 0 0 DSantn ph-cf 2 0 1 1 AnRmn ss 3 0 1 0 EEscor ss 4 0 2 0 JMr tnz ph 1 0 0 0 RDa vis lf 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 10 3 T otals 32 3 7 3 Minnesota 000 000 130 4 Detroit 100 110 000 3 EParmelee (1), R.Davis (2). DPDetroit 1. LOBMinnesota 5, Detroit 5. 2BE.Escobar (9), Kinsler (9). HRKinsler (3). SBDozier (12), Nunez (1). CSA. Hicks (1), E.Escobar (1). SFMi.Cabrera. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Deduno 6 6 3 3 1 5 Burton W,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fien H,5 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Perkins S,10-11 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit Ray 6 4 0 0 1 2 Alburquerque H,5 2/3 1 1 1 0 0 Krol H,5 1/3 2 0 0 0 1 Chamberlain L,1-2 BS,1-2 1 2 3 2 1 2 E.Reed 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBPby Deduno (Avila), by Chamberlain (Dozier). PBPinto. UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Marty Foster; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T:08. A,468 (41,681). Angels 9, Blue Jays 3 Los Angeles T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Aybar ss 6 0 1 0 Re yes ss 3 2 1 0 Trout dh 5 0 1 1 MeCar r lf 4 1 1 0 Pujols 1b 5 0 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 1 Ibanez lf 3 1 0 0 Encr nc 1b 4 0 1 2 HKndrc 2b 4 3 3 0 Lind dh 3 0 2 0 ENavrr rf 4 2 2 1 DNa vrr c 4 0 1 0 Conger c 4 1 3 5 JF rncs 3b 3 0 0 0 IStewrt 3b 3 1 1 0 ClRsms cf 4 0 0 0 JMcDnl ph-3b 2 0 0 1 StTllsn 2b 4 0 0 0 Cowgill cf 2 1 1 1 Totals 38 9 12 9 T otals 33 3 6 3 Los Angeles 000 214 002 9 Toronto 100 000 020 3 EEncarnacion (4), D.Navarro (2). LOBLos Ange les 10, Toronto 6. 2BTrout (9), H.Kendrick 2 (10), E.Navarro (3), Conger (4), Encarnacion (12), Lind (4). 3BI.Stewart (3). HRConger (3). SBH.Kendrick 2 (9), Reyes (5). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Weaver W,4-2 6 1/3 4 1 1 2 5 Kohn 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Salas 1/3 2 2 2 1 1 H.Santiago 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Morin 1 0 0 0 0 2 Toronto Hutchison L,1-3 4 1/3 3 3 3 4 5 Stroman 1 2/3 6 4 4 0 2 Loup 1 1 0 0 1 0 Delabar 1 0 0 0 1 2 Cecil 1 2 2 2 2 1 WPHutchison. UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Adrian Johnson. T:24. A,871 (49,282). Braves 5, Cubs 2 Chicago Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Kalish cf 4 0 1 0 He ywrd rf 3 1 1 2 Coghln lf 3 0 0 0 Pstr nck 2b 4 0 0 0 Lake ph-lf 1 0 0 0 A.W ood p 0 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 0 DCr pnt p 0 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 1 2 0 F remn 1b 4 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 1 2 Gattis c 3 2 1 1 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 1 2 0 Olt 3b 4 0 0 0 Doumit lf 4 0 2 1 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 BUpton cf 0 0 0 0 EJcksn p 2 0 1 0 Smmns ss 3 0 1 1 Valuen ph 1 0 0 0 Harang p 2 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 V arvar p 0 0 0 0 NRmrz p 0 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Bonifac ph 1 0 0 0 Uggla ph-2b 0 1 0 0 JSchafr cf-lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 9 2 T otals 29 5 7 5 Chicago 000 200 000 2 Atlanta 020 100 20x 5 DPChicago 1, Atlanta 1. LOBChicago 8, Atlanta 4. 2BS.Castro (8), Schierholtz (5), Simmons (4). HRHeyward (3), Gattis (8). CSSchierholtz (2). SJ. Schafer. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago E.Jackson L,2-3 6 6 3 3 2 3 Russell 1 1 2 2 0 0 N.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 1 Atlanta Harang W,4-3 6 6 2 2 2 9 Varvaro H,2 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Thomas H,3 2/3 0 0 0 1 2 A.Wood H,1 1 2 0 0 0 2 D.Carpenter S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Russell (Uggla). UmpiresHome, Seth Buckminster; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Andy Fletcher. T:54. A,151 (49,586). Reds 4, Rockies 1 Colorado Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn rf 4 1 1 1 BHmltn cf 3 1 2 0 Dickrsn cf 4 0 1 0 Schmkr rf 4 0 1 2 Tlwtzk ss 3 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 CGnzlz lf 3 0 0 0 V otto 1b 4 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 0 0 F razier 3b 4 1 1 1 Mornea 1b 3 0 0 0 Lud wck lf 3 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 0 1 0 Br nhrt c 3 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 1 0 RSantg ss 3 2 2 0 Nicasio p 2 0 0 0 Baile y p 1 0 0 0 CMartn p 0 0 0 0 MP arr p 0 0 0 0 Barnes ph 1 0 0 0 A Chpm p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 T otals 29 4 6 3 Colorado 000 100 000 1 Cincinnati 101 110 00x 4 EMorneau (3), Arenado (7). LOBColorado 5, Cincinnati 4. 2BMcKenry (2), R.Santiago (1). 3BB.Hamil ton (2). HRBlackmon (9), Frazier (7). SBB.Hamilton (12). CSDickerson (1). SBailey 2. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Nicasio L,4-2 6 5 4 2 1 3 C.Martin 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cincinnati Bailey W,3-2 7 1/3 4 1 1 2 6 M.Parra H,4 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 A.Chapman S,1-1 1 0 0 0 1 3 BalkNicasio. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Chris Segal; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Brian ONora. T:49. A,143 (42,319). Mets 5, Phillies 4, 11 innings Philadelphia Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi GwynJ cf 6 0 0 0 EY ong lf 6 2 3 0 Rollins ss 3 1 1 0 DnMr p 2b 4 1 3 2 Utley 2b 5 0 1 1 DWrght 3b 6 0 1 1 Howard 1b 4 1 1 0 CY oung rf 6 2 2 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Campll 1b 3 0 1 0 RHrndz p 0 0 0 0 BAreu ph 1 0 1 0 Brignc 3b 1 0 0 0 F amili p 0 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 1 2 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 5 0 0 1 ZWhelr ph 0 0 0 0 Nieves c 4 1 2 1 Lagar s cf 5 0 1 1 Asche 3b 4 0 2 1 Reck er c 6 0 2 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 T ejada ss 4 0 2 1 Hamels p 2 0 0 0 Niese p 2 0 0 0 Hollnds p 0 0 0 0 Gr ndrs ph 1 0 0 0 Revere ph 1 0 0 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry 1b 1 0 0 0 dAr nad ph 1 0 0 0 V alvrd p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 40 4 9 4 T otals 46 5 16 5 Philadelphia 010 200 001 00 4 New York 100 000 003 01 5 One out when winning run scored. ENieves (1). DPNew York 2. LOBPhiladelphia 12, New York 17. 2BRollins (5), Byrd (13), Nieves (3), Asche (6), E.Young (2), Dan.Murphy 2 (12), C.Young (5), Tejada (3). 3BUtley (2). HRDan.Murphy (2). SBNieves (1), E.Young 2 (14). SHamels, Z.Wheeler. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Hamels 7 7 1 1 3 10 Hollands H,2 1 1 0 0 1 1 Bastardo H,5 1/3 3 3 3 0 1 R.Hernandez BS,1-1 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Manship L,1-1 1 1/3 4 1 1 2 0 New York Niese 6 8 3 3 1 6 Matsuzaka 2 0 0 0 2 2 Valverde 1 1 1 1 2 1 Familia 1 2/3 0 0 0 1 1 Rice W,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Rice (Utley), by Matsuzaka (Nieves). UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Tim Timmons. T:22. A,926 (41,922). Diamondbacks 5, White Sox 1 Arizona Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi GParra rf 5 2 2 2 De Aza cf 3 0 0 0 Prado 3b 5 0 2 1 LeGarc ph 1 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 0 0 GBckh 2b 4 0 2 0 Monter c 2 1 2 2 Gillaspi 3b 3 0 0 0 Hill 2b 5 0 0 0 K onerk ph 1 0 0 0 EChavz dh 5 0 1 0 JAreu dh 3 0 1 0 C.Ross lf 3 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0 Inciart lf 0 0 0 0 V iciedo lf 3 0 0 0 Pollock cf 3 1 2 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 4 0 1 0 Sier ra rf 3 1 1 1 Flowr s c 2 0 0 0 Totals 36 5 10 5 T otals 29 1 4 1 Arizona 100 020 002 5 Chicago 000 001 000 1 EA.Dunn (1). DPArizona 1, Chicago 2. LOBArizona 10, Chicago 2. 2BPennington (2). 3BG.Parra (2). HRG.Parra (4), Montero (5), Sierra (1). SBInciarte (1), Pollock 2 (5). IP H R ER BB SO Arizona C.Anderson W,1-0 5 1/3 2 1 1 1 6 Thatcher H,1 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 E.Marshall H,1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Ziegler H,8 1 0 0 0 0 0 O.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago Noesi L,0-3 6 8 3 3 3 4 Petricka 1 0 0 0 1 1 F.Francisco 1 2/3 2 2 1 1 3 S.Downs 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Petricka (Montero). WPThatcher. UmpiresHome, Quinn Wolcott; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T:10. A,612 (40,615). Astros 5, Orioles 2 Houston Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 4 1 3 0 Mar kks rf 3 1 1 0 Fowler cf 3 1 0 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 0 JCastro dh 5 1 1 3 C.Da vis 1b 4 0 2 0 MDmn 3b 5 1 2 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 2 Krauss 1b 4 1 2 2 N.Cr uz dh 3 0 0 0 Springr rf 5 0 0 0 Cle vngr c 3 0 1 0 Presley lf 4 0 2 0 D Yong ph 1 0 0 0 Corprn c 4 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 Villar ss 4 0 1 0 Flahr ty 2b 3 0 0 0 Lough lf 2 0 0 0 Pearce ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 11 5 T otals 33 2 8 2 Houston 300 000 200 5 Baltimore 002 000 000 2 DPHouston 2. LOBHouston 11, Baltimore 7. 2B Altuve (11), Presley (2), C.Davis (5). HRJ.Castro (5), Krauss (3). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Cosart W,2-3 6 8 2 2 2 3 Sipp H,1 2 0 0 0 0 5 Qualls S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Baltimore Tillman L,3-2 5 4 3 3 5 3 McFarland 3 7 2 2 0 4 Patton 1 0 0 0 0 2 McFarland pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. HBPby Qualls (Flaherty). WPTillman. UmpiresHome, Tripp Gibson; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Jeff Kellogg.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 PAUL LOGOTHETISAP Sports WriterMADRID Rafael Nadal won his fourth Madrid Open title on Sunday after Kei Nishi kori was forced to with draw with a back injury when trailing 2-6, 6-4, 3-0 in the nal. Earlier, Maria Shara pova bounced back from a poor start to defeat Simona Halep 1-6, 6-2, 6-3 to win the womens title. Nadal became the rst repeat winner in Madrid, and recovered from two recent quar ternal losses on clay to win his second title on the surface and third overall this year. Nadal showed signs of improvement this week compared to his early exits in Monte Carlo and Barcelona, but still didnt look quite like the play er who has won eight French Open titles. We dont deserve the victory, (Nishikori) deserves it, he played bet ter than us the whole time, Nadals uncle and coach Toni Nadal told Antenna 3 TV. We had a lot of luck today. We didnt really come back, he was hurt. After both players held serve to start, Nishikori jumped out to a 5-1 lead with powerful groundstrokes that over whelmed Nadal, who couldnt nd a way to counter his opponent. After the early breaks (Nadal) got tense and his opponent played at a great level, Toni Nadal said. After being broken in his rst service game in the second set, Nadal slowly clawed back into the match at the Magic Box although Nishiko ri was already in some discomfort when Nadal broke back for 4-4. Nishikori needed a medical timeout to treat his sore lower back, and his energy looked sapped as he hit a shot long to concede the set. Nishikori visibly strug gled in the third before eventually retiring. Im very sorry for what happened today for everybody, said Ni shikori, who will become the rst Japanese play er in the top-10 when the new rankings are re leased. Unfortunately I was hurting today and I was too hurt to ght. Nadals victory guar antees he will stay No. 1 heading into Roland Garros. Sharapova, who lost to Serena Williams in last years nal, crumbled in the opening set when she held her serve just once. But Haleps serve dipped in the second set, and Sharapova started hitting pinpoint ground strokes that kept the fth-ranked Romanian running. The ninth-ranked Russian converted both her break points in the set to even the match. Sharapova then pulled away in the deciding set with an ear ly break to follow up her triumph in Stuttgart. Since the 2011 French Open, Sharapova has a 47-3 record on clay with all three defeats coming to Williams. The top-ranked American was the two-time defend ing champion in Madrid but withdrew with a leg injury on Friday. I dont know how I pulled it off, Shara pova said after win ning her 32nd career ti tle. I came close last year, and I didnt have a great rst set today, but I knew it wasnt over until the last point was played. RALPH D. RUSSOAP College Football WriterNEW YORK Michael Sam waited and waited. Hours passed, rounds came and went, and eventually, there were only eight more picks left on the third and nal day of the NFL draft. For just a moment, it looked as if his chance of being picked by a pro team and becoming the leagues rst openly gay player might take a detour. Or at least be delayed. The call nally came in Saturday from the St. Louis Rams, the team right down the road from where Sam played his college ball at the University of Missouri. Sam was selected in the seventh and nal round and admitted it was a frustrat ing wait. He said teams that passed on him chickened out and he should have been drafted sooner. From last season alone, I shouldve been in the rst three rounds. SEC Defensive Player of the Year, All-Amer ican, Sam said. He stopped short of directly saying his stock dropped in the draft because he came out. You know what, who knows? Who knows? Only the people who sit in the war room know, he said. They saw Michael Sam, day after day they scratched it off the board. That was their loss. But St. Louis kept me on that board. And you know what I feel like Im a (Jadeveon) Clowney, a rst draft pick. Im proud of where I am now. Sam came out as gay in media interviews earlier this year. His team and coach es knew his secret and kept it for his nal college season. He went on to have the best year of his career: He was the co-defensive player of the year in the nations best col lege football conference and had 11.5 sacks. The pick came after several rounds of suspense. The rst round of the day, No. 4 over all, came and went, no Sam. Then the fth and sixth, and nally, the day was down to just a handful of picks. When Mike Kensil, the NFLs vice president of game operations, walked to the podium at Radio City Music Hall in the drafts nal min utes to announce the Rams second-to-last pick, the crowd got a sense something was up. Very few of the last day picks were announced at the podium. Twitter lit up with suggestions the Rams were about to make news. When Kensil said: The St. Louis Rams select ... Michael Sam... the fans gave a hearty cheer, chanting Yes! Yes! Yes! and Michael Sam! Sam was in San Diego watching with friends and family at the home of his agent, Joe Barkett of Empire Athletes. ESPN and the NFL Network had cameras there and showed Sams reaction. Sam was on the phone bending over, with his boy friend hugging him and rub bing his left bicep. When Sam got off the phone, the tears started. He gave his boy friend a big kiss and a long hug as he cried and his eyes reddened. After, they shared cake and another kiss. Thank you to the St. Louis Rams and the whole city of St. Louis. Im using every once of this to achieve great ness!! Sam tweeted with a frenzied typo moments after he was picked, with a picture of himself wearing a Rams cap and a pink polo shirt. The 6-foot-2, 255-pound Sam was considered a midto-late round pick, far from a sure thing to be drafted. He played defensive end in col lege, but hes short for that position in the NFL and slow er than most outside line backers, the position hell need to transition to at the professional level. He was taken with the 249th overall pick out of 256. Play ers from Marist, Maine and McGill University in Canada were selected before Sam. In the world of diversity we live in now, Im honored to be a part of this, Rams coach Jeff Fisher said during an interview on ESPN. The NFL had no comment on Sam being drafted. The impact of Sams selection goes far beyond football. At a time when gay marriage is gaining acceptance among Americans, Sams entry into the NFL is a huge step toward the integration of gay men into professional team sports. Pro sports have in many ways lagged behind the rest of so ciety in acceptance. Michael Sam wouldnt have been drafted ve years ago, said former Viking punter Chris Kluwe, who has accused Minnesota of cutting him in part because of his vo cal support for gay rights. In the last year, NBA vet eran Jason Collins has come out publicly as gay, and is now playing for the Brooklyn Nets. Collins said before the Nets playoff game against the Heat that he was watch ing the draft and texted Sam after he was picked. Its a great day for Michael and his family and for the NFL, Collins said. NFL Rams welcome first openly gay player to NFL AP FILE PHOTO Missouris All-American defensive end Michael Sam claps during the Cotton Bowl trophy presentation at halftime of the basketball game between Missouri and Tennessee in Columbia, Mo. Sam was selected in the seventh round, 249th overall, by the St. Louis Rams in the NFL draft. TENNISNadal wins Madrid Open after Nishikori retires down two sets ANDRES KUDACKI / AP Rafael Nadal displays his trophy as he poses with the ball girls after the Madrid Open in Madrid.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 NBA AUTO RACING JOSEPH WILSONAssociated PressMONTMELO, Spain Mercedes team mates Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg sped away to their fourth straight one-two n ish at the Spanish Grand Prix on Sunday in a dominant perfor mance that does not bode well for the rest of the Formula One eld. Hamilton took off from pole position and stayed ahead of Rosberg despite the German closing to less than a second in a tense nal lap to re cord a fourth consecu tive victory and move ahead of his teammate in the overall stand ings. Hamiltons 100 points after ve races put him three points ahead of Rosberg, who failed to nd a way in front of his main rival for a fourth straight time after winning the season opener. His 26th career win gave Hamilton one more than former world champions Niki Lauda, who now works for Mercedes, and Jim Clark. Hamilton set himself on course to add to his own title from 2008. He hadnt led the championship since June 2012 after winning the Cana dian GP with McLaren. This is our fourth one-two, its just unre al, Hamilton said after Rosberg helped douse him in champagne to celebrate his rst victory at the Barcelo na-Catalunya circuit. Getting my rst win here after trying for eight years, it is dif cult to put into words my feeling. I have nev er had a car like this. I have never had a gap like this. I am grateful I was able to keep (Rosberg) behind me.Hamilton, Rosberg register fourth straight one-two finish at GP GREG HUEY / AP James Hinchcliffe, of Canada, holds his head after pulling off the course during the inaugural Grand Prix of Indianapolis on Saturday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterINDIANAPOLIS Indianapolis Motor Speedway ofcially opened for the month of May with a chaotic road course race that started with a wreck, saw James Hinchliffe and the mayor of the city injured by ying debris, and, nally, Simon Pagenaud celebrate a fuel-mileage victory. Pagenaud won the inaugural Grand Prix of Indianapolis on Saturday, the rst In dyCar Series race on IMS road course, by stretching his fuel the nal 29 laps. The Frenchman was one of several drivers to gamble on gas, and he took the lead when Oriol Servia had to stop with four laps remaining. Pagenaud managed to make it to the nish for his third series victory despite having to keep an eye on his mirrors. Ryan Hunter-Reay was second and Helio Castroneves third on his 39th birthday. Man I didnt know what we were asking for, but we made fuel, Pagenaud said in Victory Lane. The fuel saving was amazing. It was nerve-wracking. I was worried about RHR coming back, and I didnt know what Helio was doing here. I dont like racing off throttle. Sebastien Bourdais and Charlie Kimball rounded out the top ve. Hinchcliffe was taken from the track on a stretcher and transported to a hospital, where he was diagnosed with a concus sion after he was hit in the head with debris. A replay appeared to show debris from a car in front of him ew into his cockpit follow ing a restart.Pagenaud wins, Hinchcliffe injured in chaotic road raceNets try to back up belief by beating Heat once again BRIAN MAHONEYAP Basketball WriterNEW YORK Paul Pierce called the Miami Heat a juggernaut. He insisted they are still the team to beat. So yes, the Brooklyn Nets have plenty of re spect for the two-time defending NBA champions and no fear. Pierce made that clear again Sunday, a day af ter the Nets Game 3 rout that cut Miamis lead to 2-1 in the East ern Conference semi nals. Brooklyn will try to even the series at home Monday night. Youve got to have that type of mental ego against a jugger naut. You go against the best, a lot of series are won on fear factor, like, or non-belief. When you have that non-be lief, then you have no chance, Pierce said after practice. What I try to do in this locker room, or with my teammates, is just try to give them belief that we can beat this team. Theyre not unbeatable. The Heat had been in these playoffs until the Nets 104-90 victory on Saturday night. Mi ami hadnt even faced a fourth-quarter decit, but was out of the game long before then after Brooklyn dominated the third quarter to build a huge lead. The defeat was com plete, Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. It was both sides of the basketball. It was like trying to plug in holes in a leak ing dam. There was so many things that were not in our favor really on both ends of the court. The Nets made 15 of 25 3-point attempts, outrebounded Miami 43-27, and limited LeB ron James to two bas kets over the nal three quarters after he had 16 points on 6-of-7 shooting in the rst. Brooklyn swept the regular-season series, though none of the games was anywhere near as easy as Game 3. Yet the four victories gave the Nets a con dence against the Heat that some other oppo nents may not have. We just had a lit tle success against them during the regu lar season. We played them well and we feel like we match up well with them, Nets guard Deron Williams said. And if were on top of our game, were playing defense the way were capable of playing, like we did the last game, we put ourselves in a good position to win. Pierce did his part af ter the Nets were routed in Game 1, asking coach Jason Kidd to switch up the defense so he could guard James. And after he and the Nets did such a good job of it over the nal three quar ters of Game 3, Pierce said the Nets wanted to show the Heat that they werent scared of them. Why should it be a fear factor? James said. Its just basket ball. Were not trying to win a war here, its just basketball. Thats all it is. Were all grown men, who cares about whos fearing who? Weve never been a team that talks. We dont get into that, and weve never been a bulletin board team. We just want to play the game the right way and we give ourselves a good chance to win if we play our type of bas ketball and last night we didnt do that. Miami had won its previous eight postseason games and followed every loss with a victory last year. To do that in this series, Spoelstra said the Heat would not only need better effort and urgency, but also more attention to the little details. Pierce is expecting that, as well as in Game 5 back in Miami on Wednesday night. Even though the Heat didnt look it Saturday, he be lieves they are just as good as the recent ver sions that ended his seasons in Boston. Denitely. Theyre well-seasoned now. They know how to win, Pierce said. Theyve won two champion ships, theres nothing they havent been through. So the one thing you always hear, its kind of a cliche, is never underestimate the heart of a champion, and you know thats what they have under their belts. So you know, theyre the team to beat. JULIE JACOBSON / APBrooklyn Nets forward Paul Pierce (34) fouls Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) as he drives through the lane to score in the rst period during Game 3 of an Eastern Conference seminal game on Saturday in New York. Pierce was called for a agrant foul and James scored on the play. DAN GELSTONAssociated PressKANSAS CITY, Kan. Danica Patrick added another May moment to cherish. Chicks rule, huh? crew chief Tony Gibson playfully told her at Kansas. She may not have to tally ruled, but she put on a performance that recalled her better ones at the Indianapolis 500. Patrick showed that she can be a serious driv er who can craft a com plete weekend and con tend for a top-ve nish. Patrick was the surprise of Saturday night with her seventh-place nish at Kansas Speedway, the best of her Cup career. Stewart-Haas Racing boss and teammate Tony Stewart, Gibson, and her parents were among the throng of well-wishers in the garage that made it a celebratory scene straight out of her dazzling Daytona 500 to kick off 2013. Ive always believed in myself and with the right situation, a good car, that I can do it, she said. She easily had her best weekend of the season, spending most of the race inside the top 10, and brought a needed jolt of electricity in a race during which the lights went out on the backstretch, pass ing teammate Stewart and Dale Earnhardt Jr. to move into third with 95 laps left. She also passed sixtime champion Jimmie Johnson on a late restart, adding him to the collec tion of heavy hitters left in the rearview mirror. The most reward ing part of my night was probably when I drove around the outside of the No. 48 on a restart, he said. That was prob ably my most rewarding thing of the night. I say that with all the respect in the world. Its a big deal because he is Jim mie Johnson. Patrick hadnt nished better this season than 14th at Fontana and her lone top-10 in the Cup series was eighth in the 2013 Daytona 500. She won a pole at Kansas in IndyCar in 2005. Patrick qualied ninth for her second straight top-10 start, and SHR teammate Kevin Har vick said a little 15-min ute pep talk may have spurred her to another solid qualifying run. She just basically needed to quit thinking about it and smash the gas, he said. Thats what she said. Shes done a great job in try ing to take in all the in formation. She has the support system and even the car necessary to nish bet ter than in the back of the pack. Patrick wants to re ward their faith in her. Its really cool when you have teammates that are uncondition al like that, that want to help you, she said. And when everyone is better and we all get better, it pumps the team up and everybody wants it even more. I guarantee you were going work even harder now. Its not just sit ting back. Were going to work harder because we love where were at and this is what we work for. When you taste it you dont want to let it go. Patricks nish came out of nowhere because there was little to in dicate she was build ing toward any kind of breakthrough. She hadnt nished better than 22nd in any of her last ve races and a brief irtation with the lead at Talladega ended after she bumped Brad Keselowski. Patrick and Gibson kept pushing, her Stewart-Haas teammates kept the encourage ment coming, and now she has a result worth savoring.Patrick surprises Kansas with career-best run RAINIER ERHARDT / AP Danica Patrick holds Kevin Harvicks son Keelan before the NASCAR Aarons 499 Sprint Cup series auto race recently at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Ala. NASCAR

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014COUPLES: Relationships benet from volunteering together / C5 Health check www.dailycommercial.com PHOTOS BY JOYCE MARSHALL / MCT ABOVE, BELOW: Gerald Campbell may be turning 80 in October, but he still is a tness instructor and is training in Hurst, Texas, for an upcoming lifting competition. TERRY EVANSMCTHURST, Texas Ger ald Campbell is giv ing up his career as a tness instructor and go ing full-time into body building before his next birthday. He turns 80 in October. Im retiring from that because my wife and I want to travel more while we still have good health, Campbell said. Another reason is that I cant work out myself as much as I need to for heavyweight bodybuilding. Campbells goal before his birthday is to bench press 280 pounds. Thats 115 pounds more than his weight of 165. On Satur day, he bench pressed 245 pounds, breaking his own record, at the Texas Push/ Pull Showdown in Mesquite. I tried to do 260, but I couldnt get it past halfway up, Campbell said. Hell try again for that 260-pound mark in the July 26, world-qualifying Dallas Southwest Regional Bench Press and Dead Lift Championships competition in Irving. Then comes 280. Anytime Campbell lifts more than his personal best he breaks a record, said Bryan Dobson, Campbells trainer and owner of MetroFlex Gym in Fort Worth, Texas. There are only a handful of people in the world at Campbells age and weight who are capable of a bench press anywhere near what he can do, Dobson said. Hell be in the top of the 165-pound weight class in Masters 70 plus, Dobson said. For his body weight, the weight hes lifting is competitive with 20-yearolds. Dobson describes Campbell as phenomenal, and he isnt alone in that opinion. The 140 or so people Campbell trains at Hurst Senior Center and Euless Family Life Center compare him with Jack LaLanne, a pioneer in per sonal training whose innovative techniques and equipment, and a 34-year run on TV, helped earn him the title Godfather of Fitness. The woman destined to take Campbells place in front of those seniors, Hurst resident Tricia Whitlock, 41, thinks hes the new Godfather. When he started training me, I was struggling to keep up with him during abdominal exercises, even some of the exibility exercises that he does, Whitlock said. Geralds just amazing. His eyes are bright and his mind is quick. Hes a very good role model for me. Michelle Varley, 45, Hurst Senior Centers activities coordinator, said Campbell is a huge asset that she and the seniors will miss. He helped develop our tness programs, Varley said. Hes just very passionate about everything. Just like LaLanne, Campbell has been on a personal tness crusade since he was 15. My buddy, Bobby Risinger, and I bought some weights at a garage sale, Campbell said. We set em up in my garage. We didnt know anything about it, but we started lifting weights and learning the proper way to do it. The friends worked out together for three years, until Bobby went in the Air Force, and I didnt, Campbell said. So I kept working out. Campbell who made his living selling insur ance, before he retired at 65 also became a per sonal trainer in his late teens. Soon afterward, he gave up weightlifting and took up running.Heavy liftingTexas bodybuilder has big goal for 80th birthday I dont think working out adds years to your life, but it adds quality. As long as God keeps me healthy I want to have good quality of life. I dont want to walk with a cane, or a walker or be in a wheelchair.Gerald CampbellSEE LIFTER | C5 LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program needs volunteersLake and Sumter County residents age 55 and older who have a lifetime of experience to share and the desire to make a real differ ence in the community can be RSVP volunteers. Volunteers assist in tutoring elementary grade students, mentor low-income high school students who are college bound, participate in after-school educational/ enrichment programs, deliver meals, make telephone reassurance calls to home-bound seniors and provide transportation for cancer patients. For information, call 352-365-1995.WILDWOOD Area 13 Family Care Council meeting set for today Those interested in the issues involving developmental disabilities are welcome to attend the Area 13 Family Care Council meeting from 10 a.m. to noon today at 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood. Area 13 covers Lake, Sumter, Marion, Citrus and Hernando counties with 15 family care councils across the state. For information, call Betty Kay Clements at 352-753-1163, email cbettykay@aol.com or go to www. FCCorida.org. LEESBURG Lakes Parkinsons Support Group meeting scheduledJenenne Valentino-Bottaro is the guest for this meeting from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Lake Square Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morningside Dr., in Leesburg. Valentino-Bottaro will offer instruction in dance for the guests aiding patients and caregivers. Call Dave Tribbey at 352-343-0376 for details. MOUNT DORA Brain Gym Academy for seniors meets Thursday Stephen Jepson will speak and demonstrate his methods to enhance balance, stability and coor dination from his program Never Leaving the Playground at 1 p.m. Thursday at Waterman Village, 445 Waterman Ave., in the Garden of Life Hall. For information, call Debbie Garay at 352-383-0051, ext. 313. MOUNT DORA Avante at Mount Dora to host Community Health Fair Honoring National Nursing Home Week, Avante at Mount Dora, a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center, will host its 11th annual Community Health Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday at Avante, 3050 Brown Ave. in Mount Dora. For information, go to www.avantecenters.com or call 352-383-4161.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark D002088 HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted LANDON HALLMCTSANTA ANA, Calif. Dan Dunbar lets you look closely at his left eye. And then deep ly into it. Its impolite to stare, of course, but it has a hypnotic effect: It resembles a cats eye with its silky glow. Gen Xers will immediately recall their Steve Austin Six Million Dol lar Man doll with the bionic left eye. However, whats inside Dunbar isnt theoretical 1970s NASA gadgetry, but 21st-century practical technology: a tiny telescope, with a lens thats 3.2 millimeters in diameter, surgically implanted into his eyeball. He had the procedure done in 2011 to improve his vision, which had been failing for years be cause of age-related macu lar degeneration, or AMD, a condition characterized by a blurry gray or dark spot in the central vision. The telescope, called Cen traSight and made by VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies Inc., is one of several implantable devices to be developed in recent years to treat a variety of vision problems, from the mild to the devas tating: There have been ad vances in removing cataracts, as well as sophisticated hard ware to reduce the impact of glaucoma and even certain kinds of blindness that had few treatments before. The effect on Dunbar, 82, has been profound. For years he relied on his peripher al vision, peering around the fuzzy center. With the tele scope magnifying his eld of vision, he can see details that had eluded him for so long: walk/dont walk signals at intersections near his home in Costa Mesa, Calif.; the con tours of the face of his wife, Jean. After much practice, he can use the telescope to read, something hed largely given up; hes resumed his passion ate hobbies, model trains and woodworking. And when he goes skiing, an avocation he picked up only after he retired, he can actually see where hes going now. I dont run into closed fences like I used to, he says, recalling his latest outing to Mammoth Lakes, just two weeks ago. I can see my kids on the ski slopes. I want people to know its not utopia, but it sure is a big boost over what you normal ly have with AMD. It cer tainly has improved my life. The vast majority of Amer icans has some kind of vision problem, but most are refractive errors in which the eye doesnt bend, or refract, properly when light comes in. Disorders such as myopia (nearsightedness) and hyper opia (farsightedness) are easi ly correctable with eyeglasses. About two-thirds of U.S. adults wear some type of cor rective lenses, either eyeglasses, contacts or reading glasses, according to the Na tional Eye Institute. Other problems are more serious, however, and can lead to severe vision loss, or partial or total blindness. Glaucoma, caused by steadily increasing pressure inside the eye, affects more than 2 million Americans age 40 and older, and 3 million older people have age-relat ed macular degeneration, a condition in which the mac ula, a spot on the retina behind the eye, deteriorates. More than half of people who live to 80 get cataracts, when the lens becomes cloudy and limits vision. The new generation of tiny, sophisticated optical hardware is being developed just in time: In 1980, there were 26 million people age 65 and older in the United States; by 2020 that number will be 55 million. In California, men who make it to age 65 have a life expectancy of 83.9 years; for women, its 86.5. There are a lot of pa tients entering those elder ly years, where these condi tions do become an issue, and wouldnt be an issue if we didnt live so long, said Dr. Roger F. Steinert, an oph thalmologist whos direc tor of the University of Cali fornia-Irvines Gavin Herbert Eye Institute. And were not only living longer, were liv ing longer, healthier. Dunbar sat in his bright, cozy living room discussing when his vision rst began to slip. It was around 2000, he said. The dead spots devel oped so slowly in both eyes that he trained himself to view the world without look ing at it head-on. Its gray, theres just no sight at all in there, its just like you kind of erase out all the vision. I learned not to look at things, he said. The mind plays tricks on you to compensate. For Dunbar, he literally hallucinated a few times, seeing objects that werent there. At a play, he watched seven cast members onstage when he knew there were only four not double vision; they all did their own thing, independently of one another. Another time, when he was driving with Jean on the northbound I-5, he thought he saw another car start to levitate oat up, go along with us, go through a bridge. Didnt hurt anybody, didnt do anything. Come out the other side, then disappear. You begin to think, Hey, Im losing it.Surgically implanted telescope restores vision for man ANNA REED / MCT Dan Dunbar, 82, poses for a portrait at his home in Costa Mesa, Calif. Dunbar has age-related macular degeneration. In November 2011, he had a telescope implanted in his left eye to improve his vision. MARY MACVEANMCTNot even the pain of a mi graine headache keeps peo ple from Twitter. (Just 67 characters.) Over the course of a week, students studying how peo ple share their migraine pain on Twitter collected every tweet that mentioned the word migraine. Once they cleared out the ads, the retweets and the metaphori cal uses of the word, they had 14,028 tweets from people who described their head aches in real time with words such as killer, the worst (almost 15 percent of the tweets) and the F-word. The Twitter users also re ported the repercussions from their migraines: missed school or work, lost sleep, mood changes. The researchers found the information to be a powerful source of knowledge about the headaches because usu ally sufferers are providing information after the fact in clinical situations. The technology evolves, and our language evolves, Dr. Alexandre DaSilva, an as sistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and lead author of the study, said by phone. Clinical researchers lan guage such as throbbing or pulsating might not be as apt today, to the gen eration that grew up with video games. Their vocabulary, he said, often reects those games, with words such as killer, splitting or pounding. In his study, published re cently in the Journal of Med ical Internet Research, DaSilva and his colleagues and students collected 21,741 tweets with the word mi graine, keeping 14,028 of them and sorting them into categories based on the sort of information that was re vealed. Nearly three-quarters of the tweeters were female; two identied themselves as transgender. They used 242 descriptive words, but some were common horrible, killing, pounding and splitting among them. The researchers also found pat terns in the timing of tweets, with the peaks coming Monday morning and evening. On a recent day, migraine tweets included splitting migraine :) and Took 6 ibu profen in 45 minutes and I still have this damn mi graine. DaSilva said he was aston ished by the trove of informa tion. I was surprised, and I be lieve that social media is also a relief for them. To kind of share, Im suffering here. I am leaving work early, this migraine is killing me, he said. I believe it gives some kind of relief to share the pain, and that provides so much information we dont usually get. The more you connect with your patient, the better you can treat them, he said. Migraines affect about 12 percent of adults in the Western world; about 90 percent of sufferers say their pain is moderate to severe, and 75 percent say their ability to function is reduced. Nearly a third require bed rest.Tweets on migraine headaches share the pain HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Kristi Allegra receives Botox injections from dermatologist Megan Bogart on Monday. Allegra says the injections have reduced the frequency of her migraine headaches.

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) D002409 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis20mg.24 count.....$89.95 Viagra100mg.20 count.....$65.95 Actonel35mg.12 count.....$69 RX REQUIRED CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com MIMI WHITEFIELDMCTMIAMI Astrid Fla herty nimbly hops off a low platform and then swoops from side to side touching orange plastic cones. Though she is 70 years old and a breast cancer survivor, she seems barely winded. Her secret: lifelong ex ercise and healthy eat ing. Exercise is the best anti-aging pill you can take, says Dawn Da vis, a tness instructor at Shulas Athletic Club in Miami Lakes. And Flaherty has discovered on her own what doctors and t ness experts are say ing: people can age more successfully if they develop a healthy lifestyle when theyre young that includes exercise, a healthy diet, sufcient sleep and watching their weight. The Miami Lakes res ident still hits the gym three times a week and plays tennis on Satur days. And her diet emphasizes fresh, natural foods. Being in good shape also helped when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. My doctors were amazed that I was able to come back from my chemo sessions so quickly, she says. People need to think about t he aging process throughout their lives. I know its hard when youre 20 years old, says Dr. Sara Czaja, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the scientic director of the Center on Aging at the University of Mi amis Miller School of Medicine. Its really important to take advantage of what we know, Czaja says, and we do know a lot about how to age healthily. That includes stay ing socially engaged throughout life and be ing mindful at a young age of the dangers of smoking, the links between skin cancer and overexposure to the sun, and having rec ommended preventive screenings, Czaja says. A lot of chronic dis ease diabetes, highblood pressure, car diovascular disease, obesity may be prevented by maintaining a healthy lifestyle throughout life too, she says. What were also learning more and more is the impor tance of engaging in physical exercise. That leads to not only better cardiovascular health but also better cog nitive health, Czaja says. There is suggested evidence that being obese can cause cognitive problems. But the reality is what initially motivates many people to exer cise is concern about their appearance not their health, says Rickie Ali, a tness/ wellness specialist and personal trainer at Shulas Athletic Club. The tness business knows this with the ads about sixpack abs and all that, he says. You can get lean following some of the programs now in Aging well starts young PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN / MCT KeYanna Roddy plays with her son, Byron, in St. Louis. Because of many medications from his open-heart surgery, Byron can go through 10-15 diapers a day, putting a strain on Roddys limited budget. NANCY CAMBRIAMCTST. LOUIS They are such a hot commodity, pharmacies and stores sometimes keep them behind glass. They are the rst line of defense against in fection and disease and are even linked to preventing depression and violence. Desperate people will sometimes steal to get them. No, this is not a story about illicit pills or drug abuse. Its about dispos able diapers, an item the poor need desper ately. Researchers are start ing to realize diaper need not only causes obvious health prob lems for children, but leads to depression in moms and poor so cial and developmental outcomes for the child even child abuse. It is estimated that disposable diapers can cost up to $100 a month for one baby. On aver age, a newborn goes through eight to 10 di apers a day, said Melin da Ohlemiller, CEO of Nurses for Newborns. Nurses with the or ganization see the dia per need rsthand with their clients but can offer minimal help. To provide diapers for their mostly poor clients, Ohlemiller said, the organization would need 8,000 to 10,000 diapers a day. But the agency can supply only about 12 diapers to es tablished clients on an emergency basis. One of its clients, Catalina Martinez of Overland, Mo., said she was unable to work af ter having her second child. Its been difcult to afford diapers for a newborn and a toddler on her boyfriends salary. Shes had to keep a diaper on her child lon ger than she should. I even have tried to get my oldest one to potty train. But she wouldnt train yet. Last summer a study in the medical journal Pediatrics identied diaper need among the poor as a growing health and psychological risk for babies and their mothers. The study determined that as many as 30 per cent of poor parents in New Haven, Conn., struggled to afford di apers for their infants. It further linked diaper need as a factor causing maternal depression, which can also lead to poor outcomes for chil dren. Theres just a great need and no one is calling attention to this, said DiAnne Mueller, CEO of Crisis Nursery, a St. Louis-ar ea child abuse preven tion agency. Crisis Nursery workers sometimes go doorto-door in poor neighborhoods asking people what they need. The answer is almost always the same: diapers and formula. Although formula purchases can be federally subsidized, diapers are not covered by food stamps through the federal Supplemen tal Nutrition Assistance Program or the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC. As a result, some food pantries are inundated with requests for dis posable diapers. But the pantries dont get steady donations of them and dont always have them on the shelves. When they do, they y out of the door, said Marcia Mermelstein, coordinator of the Harvey Korn blum Jewish Food Pan try in St. Louis. Were giving people four to six diapers when in reality when most people buy a box of di apers, theyre getting 24 or 48. Its like giving one tiny bar of soap a month. Its not enough, its a token gesture, Mermelstein said. Families will take what they can get, she said. Theyre taking di apers that are clear ly too small and taping them together and us ing whatever they can. Although charitable agencies see the diaper need, they cant make collecting and distributing diapers their rst priority because it takes away energy and dona tions from their main services. Yes, we need dia pers, Mermelstein said. But in the great scheme of things, we are a food pantry and the highest priority is to give food for survival. Some cities and regions have developed thriving diaper banks that collect and promote donated diapers and act as a clearinghouse to agencies like food pan tries and community outreach centers. According to the Na tional Diaper Bank Network in Connecticut, about 100 established diaper banks operate nationwide. Happy Bottoms in Kansas City, Mo., for example, has distributed more than 1.5 million diapers to agencies that work with the poor. But St. Louis is only in the beginning stages of developing such a re source. Jessica Adams, a so cial worker, said she has When parents cant afford diapers, babies wear dirty diapers longer Diapers are shown at Roddys home. C.W. GRIFFIN / MCT Jenny Rodriguez works out at a gym in Miami Lakes.SEE DIAPERS | C8SEE AGING | C8

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressALEXANDRIA, Va. Becky Domokos-Bays of Alexandria City Pub lic Schools has served her students wholegrain pasta 20 times. Each time, she said, they rejected it. Starting next school year, pasta and other grain products in schools will have to be wholegrain rich, or more than half whole grain. That includes rolls, biscuits, pizza crust, tortillas and even grits. The requirement is part of a government effort to make school lunches and breakfasts healthier. Championed by rst lady Michelle Obama, the new stan dards have been phased in over the last two school years, with more changes coming in 2014. Some schools say the changes have been ex pensive and difcult to put in place, and school ofcials are asking Congress and the Agricul ture Department to roll back some of the requirements. Their main concerns: nding enough whole grainrich foods that kids like, lowering sodium levels and keeping fruits and vegetables from ending up in the trash. In interviews, school nutrition directors across the country mostly agreed that healthy changes were needed in school lunch es long famous for daily servings of greasy fries and pizza. Kids have adapted easily to many of the changes, are getting more variety in the lunch line and are eating healthier. But Domokos-Bays and other school nu trition directors say the standards were put in place too quickly as kids get used to new tastes and school lunch ven dors rush to reformu late their foods. When kids dont buy lunch, or throw it away, it costs the schools precious dollars. The regulations are so prescriptive, so its difcult to manage not only the nutrition side of your busi nesses but the business side of your business, Domokos-Bays said. Some of the main challenges reported by school nutrition directors: %  en Whole grains. While many kids have adapted to whole grain rolls, breads and even pizza crusts, some schools are having problems with whole grainrich pastas, which can cook differently. USDAs Janey Thornton, a for mer school nutrition di rector, says the govern ment is working with the food industry to develop better pastas. Whole grains have also proved a hard sell for some popular regional items, like biscuits and grits in the South. Lyman Graham of the Roswell, New Mexico, school district says tortillas are one of the most popular foods in his area, but the whole wheat our ver sions are going in the trash. %  en Sodium. Schools will have to lower the total sodium levels in school meals next school year and then will have to lower them even further by 2017. School lunch directors say the 2017 target 640 milligrams total in an elementary school lunch and 740 milligrams in a high school lunch isnt feasible and say kids will reject the foods. USDAs Thornton acknowledges the food indus try isnt there yet but encourages frustrated school lunch directors to worry about today rst before we imag ine the worst down the road. %  en Fruits and vegetables. The standards require every student to take a fruit or veg etable to create a bal anced plate. The reac tion among students has been mixed. If the kids dont eat the food, then all I have is healthy trash cans, said Peg gy Lawrence, director of nutrition at the Rockdale County Public Schools in Georgia. %  en Healthier snacks. Schools will for the rst time this year have to make sure that all foods, including vending machines and a la carte lines, meet healthier standards. While many schools have already moved to make snacks healthier, others depend on snack money to help operate their lunchrooms and are worried about a sales dip. The School Nutrition Association has asked Congress and USDA to only require that 50 per cent of foods be whole grain-rich, to suspend the 2017 sodium re quirements and to stop requiring students to take a fruit or vegetable. USDA has shown some exibility already: In 2012, the department scrapped maximums on proteins and grains af ter students complained they were hungry. USDAs Thornton says problems will lessen as the food industry cre ates healthier products. Ill bet that ve or sev en years down the road, well see kids eating healthy food and well see acceptance, she said. At Alexandrias Patrick Henry Elementary last Tuesday, students said they loved their lunches and gobbled up plump strawberries. Kinder gartner Jade Kennedy said she recently tried kiwi at school for the rst time. But Domokos-Bays said she will serve white pasta to the students until she has to make the change this sum mer. Tuesday was pas ta day, and several chil dren said it was their favorite lunch better than my mom made, rst-grader Ruth Gebregiorgis said. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Schools seek changes to healthier lunch rules SUSAN WALSH / AP Brianna Delcid-Gomez, 7, right, Ruth Gebregiorgis, 8, far left, and Amina Sharif, 7, center, eat lunch at the Patrick Henry Elementary School in Alexandria, Va.

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 www.LakeENT.net Call 352-728-2404 today to reserve your seat for the seminar most convenient for you.(Limited Seating. Reservations strongly recommended. Light snacks and beverages provided)Pain and pressure from chronic sinusitis can make everyday life unbearable, but for many patients, relief may be as easy as the innovative Balloon Sinuplasty procedure. Want Sinus Relief? Join Lake Ear, Nose & Throats Dr. Michael Freedman at our : Lake ENT Leesburg Office 601 E. Dixie Ave. Medical Plaza 901 I like running because it builds up the heart, Campbell said. If the heart dont work right there isnt any thing going to work right. Campbell said his wife of 45 years, Dolores, also is a runner. We used to run 10 miles a day together back in our 40s and 50s, Campbell said. I would run 10 miles in the morning and another 10 with her after work. One year I logged 3,600 miles. Campbell said he kept running well into his 70s, because old age was chasing me and I wanted to stay ahead of it. After 14 marathons his best time was three hours and 10 minutes when he was 44 and seven 50-mile races, Campbell decided to give his feet a break. But old age hasnt gained that much on him, because he started power lifting again about 30 years ago. I dont think working out adds years to your life, but it adds quality, Campbell said. As long as God keeps me healthy I want to have good quality of life. I dont want to walk with a cane, or a walker or be in a wheelchair. Power-lifting competitions are about pushing himself, Campbell said. In competition youll always do more than you will by yourself, Campbell said. And while he does want to set records, he isnt looking for immor tality through record books. Its not records for publicity as much as it is for other older people to say, That guy did it. By cracky I think I might try to do it, he said. LIFTERFROM PAGE C1 JOYCE MARSHALL / MCT I like running because it builds up the heart. If the heart dont work right there isnt anything going to work right, Campbell said. PAMELA KNUDSONMCTGRAND FORKS, N.D. This past winter, as they headed into the East Grand Forks Li brary, Mike and Jean Moe would sometimes nd people whod waited 30 minutes outside to receive tax preparation help from volunteers. And you know how cold it was this winter, he said. Mike and his wife, Jean, have served four years as volunteers and are local site coordina tors for the AARP-sponsored tax service, aimed at low-income elderly but open to all. Theres a real need for this, Mike said. Some of these people have no money. Volunteering not only makes him and Jean feel good, its also good for their relation ship, he said. It makes us much more close. We have to actually sit down and talk and plan our day. Doing volunteer work together enhances their communication as a married couple, he said. It gives us something structured to talk about, and that works into other aspects of life. AARP tax preparation volunteers are required to have another person check their work. Mike and Jean did that quality review for each oth er. That kind of reliance and communication extends to the home, Mike said. Jean prepares a news letter for the North Da kota Hearing Society which Mike reviews for errors and other input, she said. During his nearly 31-year career as a pi lot, Mike would often be away from home two or three weeks at a time, he said. As he approached retirement in 2009, he was kind of worried that if we spent this much time together, we wouldnt like it. Turns out, we really do enjoy being together, he said. We found that we not only sur vive, we ourish. Jean said the volunteer work she and Mike do has impacted their children, both of whom live in Grand Forks. I believe its inu enced them to also give of their time and talents, she said. One of their sons, James Moe, helped im measurably by setting up nine computers for the AARP tax prepara tion site, she said. Also a pilot, James doesnt have a lot of time off, Mike said, but he spent almost three days before tax season solving computer problems and properly con necting equipment. Their daughter, Susan Moe, has also become a volunteer. An avid dancer, she participated in the recent Danc ing for Special Stars event to raise funds for North Dakota Special Olympics. In similar ways, Jodie and Bruce Storhaug, of Grand Forks, say vol unteering together has positively affected their relationship. They have been helping other peo ple, together and with their children, for about nine years, Jodie said. Its nice to have something you share in together, Bruce said. Volunteering is a rela tionship-builder over all. For the past four years, the Storhaugs have led the Feed My Starving Children annual effort, based at Calvary Lu theran Church in Grand Forks, to provide meals for children worldwide. In the acts of volun teering, I just think, in our relationship, our love for each other grows, Jodie said. You see that giving heart of the person youre mar ried to. You see more deeply into that heart. And not negatively you are proud to see them serving and giv ing and not being selfish with their time, giving to other people. Mutual support is even more important when the project is more long-term demanding, Jodie said. Its easier to do together. One person is not pulled in another direction. When you go through the valleys of service, its not always easy. Some days, its harder to press yourself and get it done. In the Storhaug fam ily, the seeds of volun teerism were sewn after the Flood of 1997 when people from around the country came in droves to help residents here, she said. We saw a lot of people come to our homes and serve us. The gift that service can be was kind of driven home to us. A mother and her two daughters from Connecticut came to the Storhaug home to help out, Bruce said. Thats how they were spend ing their family vacation. That really amazed me. That puts more of a desire to do those kinds of things in our hearts, too.Couples: Relationships benefit from volunteering together

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 12, the 132nd day of 2014. There are 233 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 12, 1949, the Soviet Union lifted the Berlin Blockade, which the Western powers had succeeded in circumventing with their Berlin Airlift. On this date: In 1780, during the Revolutionary War, the besieged city of Charleston, South Carolina, surrendered to British forces. In 1870, an act creating the Canadian province of Manitoba was given royal assent, to take effect in July. In 1914, author and broadcast journalist Howard K. Smith was born in Ferriday, Louisiana. In 1922, a 20-ton meteor crashed near Blackstone, Virginia. In 1932, the body of Charles Lindbergh Jr., the kidnapped son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh, was found in a wooded area near Hopewell, New Jersey. In 1937, Britains King George VI was crowned at Westminster Abbey; his wife, Elizabeth, was crowned as queen consort. In 1943, during World War II, Axis forces in North Africa surrendered. The two-week Trident Conference, headed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, opened in Washington. In 1958, the United States and Canada signed an agreement to create the North American Air Defense Command (later the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD). In 1963, Betty Miller became the rst woman to y solo across the Pacic Ocean as she landed her Piper Apache in Brisbane, Australia, having left Oakland, California, on April 30, making three stopovers along the way. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 12, 2014: This year you often feel uncomfortable in what normally are easy situations; you could feel awkward at work or at the dentists ofce. This same feeling might permeate important conversations. Take good care of yourself, and make sure you see the dentist and doctor on a reg ular schedule. If you are single, you easily could meet someone through your daily travels or through a co-worker; this person could knock your socks off. If you are attached, the two of you will get into many intellectual conversations and come to agreements more often than you have in the past. You also will delight in time spent together, sometimes even doing nothing. LIBRA is as gentle as you are. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might be uncomfortable with what an associate and/or friend verbalizes. You understand that this person is not seeing the big picture, even though he or she seems to grasp certain issues very well. Attempt to help this individual detach. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might be deferring to someone else more than you need to be. You could feel as if this person has a better grasp on a situation. Focus on one item at a time. You will tend to go deeper into one issue, rather than see the big picture. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Curbing your playfulness could be difcult, or even impossible. Youll want to see the big picture. You could be heading into a more demanding period at work. Prepare accordingly. Follow your instincts, and you will land well. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Be more playful and forthright about a situation. Know what you want, and investigate a problem more fully. You might not feel ready to act, and for good reason. A discussion with a friend will help you understand your behavior. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might want to encourage a discussion. You have many ideas, as do those around you. Some of them will be better than others. Be wise, air out your differences and go for the best solution. Trust your sense of humor and your ability to see the big picture. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Listen to news with an eye to change. The impact could be nancial. You might want to step back and observe more. Be aware of the costs involved at this point. Togetherness continues to be a theme. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might be less grounded than someone youre working with, but your creativity and intellectual resourcefulness are likely to point to the correct path. Use your charisma when dealing with a friend. Reach out to a loved one at a distance. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Assume a low prole in how you deal with a personal matter. You also might not want to lie low in other areas. When evaluating a situation, it suits you best to be an observer. You will gain information that you otherwise would not hear. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Youll want to zero in on the real issue behind a problem that keeps being debated in a meeting; otherwise, you and the others in the group will not come to a consensus. Address the real matter, and you will come to a conclusion quickly. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Take charge of a problem in order to prevent a signicant fallout from happening. Allow your creativity to ow as you gure out what might be appropriate and most effective under the present circumstances. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might be more stuck on a professional matter than you realize. Remain sensitive to a friend or loved one at a distance. This person might be uncomfortable sharing a problem. Use your imagination. Stay centered, and everything will work out well. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might want to revise your thinking about an investment. A discussion with a partner could be difcult. Speak your mind, but also listen to this person carefully, as he or she reveals his or her thoughts in response. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I have been married for 18 years to a wonderful woman who was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer a few years ago. We dont know how much time she has left, but she feels the cancer has robbed her of her retirement. She is try ing to persuade our family to move to Florida so she can enjoy some warm weather. Abby, for many reasons I do not want to move. We have lived in the Midwest all our lives. My elder ly parent would be all alone if we move, and I have a sibling who is also terminally ill. I have had the same job for 25 years, and I dont want to give it up because I have the freedom to do much of my work from home, which allows me to help my wife and have income as well. If we move, there would be no guarantee that I could find a similar work situation that is so beneficial. My wife says Im being selfish because Im unwilling to leave my job, family and friends to do as she wants. I understand her desire to live in a warmer climate, but I think shes the one who is being selfish. What do you think? WANTS TO STAY PUT DEAR WANTS TO STAY PUT: I think the winter in the Midwest was brutal this year, and now the spring rains have arrived, which are also depressing. But in a short time the flowers will bloom and the warmth of summer and autumn will last for the next half-year. Why not take a vacation (or leave) from your job for the next three or four weeks? If you telecommute, you could still get some work done and let your wife have her dose of sunshine. Surely someone can check on your par ent and keep you informed about your sibling for that short time. I do not recommend moving any where permanently because theres no guarantee youd find a job that compensates you as well as the one you have, and you may need the income. DEAR ABBY: A tall, attractive man came into the insurance office where I work to buy an auto insur ance policy. I havent talked with men outside of my church in a long time, so I was nervous. I thought my heart would explode from beating so fast. He will be coming back in a couple of weeks, and Im afraid if I dont ask him out, I will regret it. I dont know how to approach him or ask a guy out at all. Help! NERVOUS OUT WEST DEAR NERVOUS: The man may be mar ried, so take it slow. If he comes in before noon, casually mention theres a restaurant not far away that serves good food and offer to show him. If he comes in later, use the old want to grab a cup of coffee? gambit. Either of these will give you a chance to talk with him and find out more about him without being overly obvious.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Forecast is cloudy for man whose wife seeks the sun JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 12, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59*D002755 led the 501c paperwork for the St. Louis Area Diaper Bank and hopes to begin taking donations and making partnerships with agencies soon. I think the biggest issue in St. Lou is is theres not a roundtable conver sation going on about diaper need, she said. So spreading the word to involve every agency will help every one. Adams said she realized the need after she went through a divorce with a toddler and three older children. Money was scarce, and she relied on food pantries to get by. I had to call family members for money for diapers, she said. Its humiliating, absolutely humiliating. Nurses for Newborns and Crisis Nursery workers hear of mothers rinsing out disposable diapers and reusing them. More commonly they see horrid cases of diaper rash. Mueller said when a baby presents with bad rashes and even staph in fections people unfairly conclude mothers are neglectful. But further questioning almost always reveals families are keeping the diapers on longer than they should because they dont have enough. Diapers are mandatory. Theyre not optional, said Ohlemiller. And yet families are making really hard decisions: Are we going to buy diapers or formula or are we going to buy food? That stress is putting a lot of hardships on families. Obtaining diapers can be more expensive for the poor because most dont have enough cash on hand to buy diapers in bulk at a cheaper cost per diaper. So they resort to buy ing smaller packages at higher prices. If a family lacks a working car, they often buy diapers at the local con venience store, where the price sky rockets. Ohlemiller said cheaper cloth di apers are typically not an option for the poor who often lack working washers and dryers. Coin laundries often ban diapers in their machines for sanitary reasons. DIAPERSFROM PAGE C3 vogue, he says, but they are not complete and some also put people at risk of injury by trying to do too much too fast. My main goal for people is for them to have the t ness they need to get through their everyday activities, he says. By default, the body gets leaner. But that is not my motivation. Anyone who wants health for life needs to address life style habits, nutrition, well ness and tness at every phase of their lives, Ali says. A basic mantra for any one who wants to age well is move, move, move. In the 20s and early 30s that means building strong mus cles, bone density and as healthy a cardiovascular system as possible, Ali says. Its like when you build a house. You need to build a solid foundation. And anyone who embarks on a tness program needs to improve their nutrition as well. Think of food as a fuel like gas for a car, Ali says. You might want to drive that car ve days a week, but if the gas isnt there, you cant do it. As people head toward middle age, their metabolism may slow and a more sedentary lifestyle and chronic ail ments may begin to take a toll. Ali says the exercise move ments for those at mid-life are basically the same as for a younger person but the number of repetitions and intensity may vary. For older people, its im portant to work on movements that encourage better balance, exibility and sta bility, Ali says. He might have people in this age group do balancing exercises on one leg, work on posture and alignment, and do stretches. If you have strong muscles and core, its easier to stop yourself from falling and risking injury, Davis says. Charles Eaves, 75, a retired salesman who trains with Davis, was almost an everyday runner before a recurrent foot injury sidetracked him. After he stopped running, my resilience just wasnt there. I felt like if I fell, I would just lie there like a limp rag and wouldnt be able to get up, Eaves says. Now after a year of thrice weekly training sessions with Davis, he says the strength and exibility he had as a runner have come back. As people age they need to adapt to changing realities, Czaja says. Your life may be different but that doesnt mean youre not aging suc cessfully. The good news is that even if youve never exercised or havent worked out regularly, its still possible to ease back into a tness routine and nd success at any age. But its important before beginning an exercise regime, says Ali, to get medical clearance from a doctor and let your trainer know if there are any limitations. He also recommends a physical and lifestyle assessment to establish a baseline for building a tness program. Dr. Anaisys Ballesteros, a family practice physician with Baptist Health Medical Group, said her key advice to younger patients is: Dont forget your annual preven tive physical. AGINGFROM PAGE C3 C.W. GRIFFIN / MCT Personal trainer Rickie Ali works with Laura Fuentes in Miami Lakes.

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