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Daily Commercial
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE MYERS INSIDE-THE-PARK HOMER HELPS RAYS WIN, SPORTS B1VETERANS AFFAIRS: Ofcials want federal funding for nursing home in Marion, A3 CIRCUS: Several acrobats fall during an aerial stunt, A2 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 5, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 125 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D5 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 SCOREBOARD B2 LIVING HEALTHY C1 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 NATION A2 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.89 / 65Mostly sunny 50 GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Confronting a tough re-election ght Gov. Rick Scott came into his fourth legislative session as governor with a fo cused, but yet limited agenda that dealt primarily on tax cuts and spending priorities. By the time the Florida Legislature ended its 60-day session, Scott also had wad ed into a Republican ght over immigration and even tried to gauge support from legislators over a possible gambling deal with The Seminole Tribe of Florida. During his rst three years in ofce Scotts relationship with GOP legislative leaders was often tentative and even a bit combative. But Republi can legislative leaders intent on helping the rst-term gov ernor gave Scott much of what he wanted as he prepares for an expensive and lengthy re-election ght against likely Democratic nominee and for mer Gov. Charlie Crist. We are cognizant its an election year, said House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel. We are the same party. We want him to win. We wanted to help jump start him coming in to the campaign season and I think we have done that. Polls have consistently shown Scotts job approv al rating under 50 percent and some have even shown that a majority of Florida voters dont want him to be re-elected. When Scott opened up this years session in March, he bypassed contentious issues such as expanding Medicaid or opening the door to Las Vegas casinos. Instead he asked he them AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe Leapfrog Group, a national leader and advo cate in hospital trans parency, has released its spring 2014 Hospi tal Safety Score Report with Florida Hospi tal Waterman receiv ing an A, The Villages Regional Hospital re ceiving an A, Leesburg Regional Medical Cen ter receiving a B and South Lake Hospital receiving a C. The report shows Leesburg Regional Medical Center improved its rating from a C in both the fall and spring of 2013. The Villages Regional Hospital also saw an improvement from a B in the fall and spring of 2013. Two of your hospitals have an A, thats good. You have a very nice record in your community, said Leah Binder, the president and CEO of Leapfrog Group. You denitely see a pattern of improvement in the other two and thats also good news. Binder said the C grade does raise concerns about South Lake Hospital. A C grade is very disturbing, she said. The people in the community have a right to some answers to why this hospital isnt Leesburg Regional Medial Center is shown on a rainy Friday. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The entrance to the Leesburg Regional Medial Center is shown on Friday.Leapfrog Group rates local hospitals on patient safety NICOLAE DUMITRACHE and PETER LEONARDAssociated PressODESSA, Ukraine Outrage over the deaths of pro-Russian activists in riots in Odessa triggered new violence Sunday in the Black Sea port, where a mob of protesters stormed police headquarters and freed dozens of their jailed allies. The activists had been jailed for their involvement in clashes Friday that killed more than 40 people some died from gunshot wounds, but most from a re that broke out in a trade union building. It was the worst violence in the Ukrainian cri sis since more than 100 people died in Kiev in February, most of them shot by snipers. Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk visited Odessa on Sunday to try to defuse the mount ing tensions and hinted strongly that he saw Moscows hand in the unrest spreading through south eastern Ukraine. Odessa is the major city between the Crimean Peninsula, which Russia annexed in March, and the Moldovan separatist region of Trans-Dniester, where Russia has a military peacekeeping contingent. Concerns are mount ing that Moscow Pro-Russian crowd storms police HQ VADIM GHIRDA / AP A man is greeted by supporters after being released from a local police station which was stormed by pro-Russian protesters in Odessa, Ukraine, on Sunday.Gov. in tough re-election fight gets help from GOPSEE SCOTT | A2 MASSOUD HOSSAINI and RAHIM FAIEZAssociated PressABI BARIK, Afghanistan As Afghans observed a day of mourning Sunday for the hundreds of people killed in a horric landslide, authori ties tried to help the 700 fam ilies displaced by the torrent of mud that swept through their village. The families left their homes due to the threat of more landslides in the village of Abi Barik in Badakhshan province, Minister for Rural Rehabilitation Wais Ahmad Barmak said. Another reason for the evacuation was the threat of ooding caused in part by the landslide itself, said Mohammad Daim Kakar, from the Afghanistan Natural Disaster Management Authority. He said the shifting earth had made it difcult for wa ter to drain through the val ley a serious concern as rain continued to fall Sunday. Engineers are working on a plan to divert the water, he said. Aid groups and the govern ment have rushed to the re mote area in northeastern Af ghanistan bordering Tajikistan and China with food, shelter and water. But for those affect ed, help was slow to arrive. My family, my wife and eight children are alive, but have nothing to use as shel ter. We have nothing to eat, said Barat Bay, a 50-year-old farmer and father of eight. We have passed the last two nights with our children at the top of this hill with no tent, no blanket.Focus shifts to helping Afghan families displaced by slideSEE ODESSA| A2SEE HOSPITALS | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 doing more to protect its patients. At South Lake Hospital, Binder noted infection rates in central lines, UTI infection rates, their rate of falls, tears from medical treatment, blood clots, breathing failures, collapsed lungs and colon surgical site infections. She said the collapsed lung measure was only slightly below the national average. In a number of the sort of terrible events that can happen in a hospital, we look at 13 of those terrible events, and a good number of those this hospital is either below the national average or much worse than the national average, Binder said. So, theres some concerns here. Dr. Julie Holland, the chief quality ofcer for South Lake Hospital, said Leapfrog Group looks at processes and outcomes, and South Lake Hospital is working and committed to improving the processes. She said the outcomes are soon to follow. Obviously, were well aware of what a C means, but at this point, given where we started and where we are now, weve improved processes immensely so I think were well on our way to achieving much higher than a C and I think well see that in the future, Holland said. Were cer tainly condent that what weve been doing will improve our score. Currently, we are in the process of implementing TeamSTEPPS, which is basically a program for nurses and phy sicians to improve processes, and quality, and communication and working together, Holland said. Holland said teamwork training and skill building are areas the Leapfrog Group looks at and that teamwork is important for patient safety. At this point, every bodys kind of learned that, you know, we need to work together, so that each of us are helping each other, catching each others mistakes and basically just build a good team, Holland said. Holland said South Lake Hospital participated in the Leapfrog survey portion of the evaluation for the rst time last year and Binder said there has been progress there. Theres a variety of measures here that show a consistent investment by this hospital in improving their safety... so I am cautiously optimistic that they will continue to see an improvement in their scores, she said. Binder said Florida Hospital Waterman getting As in spring 2013, fall 2013 and spring 2014 shows it is safer than most of its peers and prioritizes safety. However, she noted that no hospital is perfect and, in all cases, patients need to take precautions when going to a hospital. Dianna Liebnitzky, the director of quality and the patient safety ofcer with Florida Hospital Waterman, said the hospital understands the rankings are very important and patient safety is essential for its success. It really proves to us that the concept of safety culture is really hardwired in the foundation of what we do, Liebnitzky said. It also shows to the community that they can trust the care that we deliver is going to be optimal and always in their best interest. It also, to me, shows that they know that were continually monitoring this on an ongoing, day-to-day basis, its not a one-time effort, its just what we do, always. She advised hospitals seeking to improve patient safety to be forward looking. Day-to-day, be very proactive, monitor it, understand where these types of scores come from, and not just be working toward the numbers, but actually putting the patient safety rst. Let that be your leading driver in everything that you do, Liebnitzky said. She added it is not always the least expensive or easiest route, and sometimes there is a lot of due diligence to ensure safety. Randy Harmatz, the chief quality ofcer with the University of Florida Health, said patients should look at the ratings when making decisions. She noted many of the measures for the Leapfrog grade are already reported in the public domain, and patients should be aware of health risks such as possible infections. I think its one more piece of information thats valuable to consumers. Its probably not the one tool they should use, but it certainly is another piece of information that they can access when making a decision about who to choose for their healthcare, Harmatz said. Harmatz said other important information can be found with Hospital Compare and Florida Health Finder. She also said patients could talk to their physician as well. She added a potential hole in the Leapfrog score is the fact that they assign a score whether or not a group completes the Leapfrog survey. However, Binder said they use other data if hospitals do not report to Leapfrog. Binder said the group has been around for 14 years and reviews many hospitals. The group started doing the Hospital Safety Score Report in 2012. The scores are based off 28 measures, which are weighted and combined for the grade, according to the reports. Binder said the majority of data used for the scores comes from required information the hospitals report to the federal government, as a condition of getting Medicare. Data also comes from the Leapfrog Hospital Survey and the American Hospital Association. Binder said experts in patient safety advised the group on coming up with a methodology to grade hospitals.{div}To view the breakdown of each hospitals scores, go to www.hospitalsafetyscore.org. The hospitals category scores on the website are compared to the best, average and worst performing hospitals. The scores also include the data source and time period of the grading. SCOTTFROM PAGE A1to cut taxes and rollback auto registration fees and to increase spending in key areas such as hiring more child protection workers. But midway through the session Scott decided to back away from his previous strong stance on immigration. He threw his weight behind a con tentious bill to let stu dents living in the coun try illegally to qualify for in-state tuition. Many Re publicans were opposed to the legislation but Scotts push helped get the measure passed. Shortly before midnight on Friday, a beam ing Scott proclaimed that weve had a great session. But he stepped aside any talk that his de cision to pursue a smaller agenda this year was key to his success. All four years Ive tried to focus on whats most important for Flor ida families, how do we change the direction of this state, Scott said. Sen. Chris Smith, D-Fort Lauderdale, said the ma jor issue of the 2014 session was propping up a governor seeking re-election whose poll numbers are agging. Smith said that the decision of Scott and other Republicans to support the in-state tu ition measure as well as Scotts announcement he will sign a bill authorizing a specic strain of marijuana for medical purposes showed that it took dimming re-elec tion prospects to bring him around. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, denied that election year politics were at work. None of this was done in just the Republican cloakroom or the majority ofce, Gaetz said. Ev erything initiative that we passed through the leg islative process was bipartisan in nature. These policies are not just for Republicans. If they are good for Republicans and good for Democrats then they are good for Florida. Were more wor ried about the next gen eration. We think if we do that the next election will take care of itself. Florida legislators did not give everything Scott wanted. They politely ig nored some of his budget requests, including a push to boost the amount of state tax dollars to Visit Florida up to $100 million. Legislators also rejected Scotts request to keep alive his push to eliminate the corporate income tax. Scott at one time vowed to get rid of the tax in seven years, but has been forced to scale it back due to leg islative resistance. Rep. Ritch Workman, R-Melbourne and the House member in charge of pushing tax cut bills, said the governor was pushing hard but he said there was no way to go along with that request after going along with the size of the auto registration fee rollback sought by the governor. It kind of got squeezed out, Workman said. The Scott administra tion also appeared to miscalculate how legislators would respond to a potential deal with the Seminole Tribe of Florida to extend the states cur rent gambling compact. With days winding down in the session, Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera approached legislative leaders to tell them a deal was close. There were even discussions about a possible special session in May to consid er the revised deal. Key parts of the tribes current deal expire next year. But legislative leaders said they couldnt make any promises without knowing more details while Demo crats said they would not go along unless they were involved in negotiations. We have not heard any follow up in terms of a special session or a compact so my guess is that its probably zzled out, Weatherford said. HOW TO REACH US MAY 4CASH 3 . ............................................... 2-6-2 Afternoon . .......................................... 2-4-7 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 1-0-1-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 4-8-0-1FLORIDALOTTERY MAY 3FANTASY 5 . ......................... 14-19-20-22-35 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 9-17-19-27-31-43 POWERBALL .................... 5-15-16-46-4926 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. HOSPITALSFROM PAGE A1 ODESSAFROM PAGE A1ultimately aims to take control of a huge swath of southeastern Ukraine from Trans-Dniester to Russian-dominated industrial areas in the east. Russian Pres ident Vladimir Putin, who calls the area historically Russian lands, has said he doesnt want to send in troops but will if necessary to protect his countrys inter ests. Alexei Pushkov, a prominent mem ber of Russias parliament who often ex presses Kremlin views on foreign poli cy, suggested Ukraine was destined to be split apart. Through the justication of arson, military operations and the killing of Russians in Ukraine, the Kiev govern ment is destroying the basis for the exis tence of a united country, Pushkov said on Twitter. Yatsenyuk said Odessa police were be ing investigated for their failure to keep the peace during the riots and said he had ordered prosecutors to nd all in stigators, all organizers and all those that under Russian leadership began a deadly attack on Ukraine and Odessa. MICHELLE R. SMITHAssociated PressPROVIDENCE, R.I. A support frame collapsed during an aerial hair-hanging stunt at a circus perfor mance Sunday, sending eight acrobats plummet ing to the ground. Nine performers were seriously injured in the fall, includ ing a dancer below, while an unknown number of others suffered less seri ous injuries. The accident was re ported about 45 minutes into the Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Circus 11 / a.m. Legends show at the Dunkin Donuts Cen ter in Providence. Stephen Payne, a spokesman for Feld Entertainment, the par ent company of Ringling Bros., said the accident happened during an act in which eight perform ers hang like a human chandelier using their hair. He said the metal-frame apparatus from which the performers were hanging came free from the met al truss it was connected to. The eight women fell 25 to 40 feet, landing on a dancer below. All the performers have been doing some variation of this act for some time, Payne said, though he didnt know how long. The current incarnation of the act began in Janu ary with the launch of the show, he said. Acrobats fall during circus stunt BOB BREIDENBACH / AP An injured female performer is lifted onto a stretcher after a platform collapsed during an aerial hair-hanging stunt on Sunday in Providence, R.I.

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT FRUITLAND PARK American Legion to host 5K run/walk eventHonoring Armed Forces Day, American Legion Post 219, 194 W. Fountain St., will host a 5K Fun Run/ Walk event, observing the day that pays tribute to the men and women of the United States armed forces. Pre-registration deadline for the event and the non-refundable entry fee of $25 per runner and $20 per walker, is due by May 10. Race day check-in begins at 7 / a.m. on May 17 at the Post. For information and to register, call the Post at 352-787-2338 or Jim Maynard at 352-978-9197.LEESBURG Oak Park Middle School to celebrate historical figuresSixth, seventh and eighth graders have chosen important gures from history to study and bring to life at Oak Park Middle School as the school hosts its fourth annual Knight at the Museum from 6 to 8 / p.m., on Friday, at 2101 South St. Students have built background scenery, studied and made costumes for the event, which includes tours led by guides, the curator and history and language arts teacher Ellyn Ball. The event is free and donations will be accepted. Snacks and drinks will be available. For information, email Lilly Jenkins at jenkinsl@lake.k12..us.LEESBURG The Little Foxes opens at Melon Patch TheatreThe lust for money, dysfunctional families, womens rights and racism are all subjects explored in the classic drama The Little Foxes, written by playwright Lillian Hellman. Taking place in an afuent southern home in the 1900s, the play shows members of the tyrannical Hubbard family trying to outwit each other in their attempts to become millionaires. It opens on Friday and runs on weekends through May 25 at the Melon Patch Theatre, 311 N. 13th St. For information and reservations, call 352-787-3013.MOUNT DORA Avante health fair to offer free medical screeningsIn honor of National Nursing Home Week Avante at Mount Dora, a nursing and rehabilitation center, will host its 11th annual Community Health Fair from 8:30 / a.m. to 1 / p.m., on May 14 at Avante, 3050 Brown Ave. More than 40 vendors will be on hand offering free health screenings including blood pressure checks, hearing tests, cholesterol checks, memory screenings and balance testing. There will also be an antique car show, pet therapy dogs, blood mobile, local re, police and EMS, facility tours, refreshments and a free barbecue lunch. For information, call 352-383-4161 or go to www.avantecenters.com.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to The Daily CommercialSaturday was race day at Lake Louisa State Park, only this time the racers werent on foot they were on longboards. The Clermont Challenge Races, sponsored by the Ian Tilmann Foundation and Sector 9 Skateboard Company, hosted approximate ly 25 racers in the events. Competitors ranged in age from 10 to 50-plus and used boards longer than typical skateboards. The slalom race was curtailed due to rain, but the 5K and 10K distance races and the free style dance competition went on as planned. Marcus Acevedo, of Gainesville, came out on top in the mens division, placing second in the 5K, rst in the 10K and rst (by 3 seconds) overall. This one was actually very challenging, he said. I actually ran this race last year and came in second in both. This year they changed the course. It was awful. Awful in a good way. Richard Prine of Mi ami Beach came out on top in the junior division and was also one of the skaters who signed the foundations promise to wear a helmet. I came up for this, Prine said. I love com ing up for the races. CLERMONTNew way to race PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, William Frank and Marcus Acevedo race in the 10K during the Clermont Challenge. Marcus Acevedo performs in the freestyle dance contest. Skaters of all ages compete in various longboarding eventsSEE RACE | A6 Halifax Media GroupLocating a new nurs ing home for aging veterans in Marion County has become a top priori ty for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and is being pushed by state Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatil la, and state Rep. Marlene OToole, R-The Villages. The VA has ranked Marion County 17th nationally among the top 100 construction projects the agency has identied in the current budget, according to VA documents and U.S. Rep. Rich Nugents ofce. Records indicate the VA has set aside $928 million for those projects, with the federal government ready to commit up to $23.5 million toward the proposed 120-bed home in Florida. Nugent has urged the agency to recognize the care needed by aging veterans in this part of the state. Now, the VA has made the nursing home the agencys top-ranked new construction project in this years budget. Nugents ofce said the ranking means Marion County is a lock to ob tain the federal funding, if selected as the home for the project. And thats where the Officials want nursing home in Marion HAYS OTOOLE SEE MARION | A6 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLynn Bannister, of Na ples, said even with Satur days weather, she enjoyed participating in the inaugu ral Mount Dora Paddle Fest. Its kind of fun when you have elements to work against. It makes the whole thing more mentally challenging, Bannister said. After participating in three races on Satur day, Bannister was back Sunday morning to compete in a three-mile kayak race. She said she had never raced before, but is an avid kayaker. Paddle Fest races took place Saturday and Sunday at Mount Doras Lakeside Inn. Event Director Rod Price said Sunday morning he was pleased with the turnout. Its not bad for a MOUNT DORADespite rain, Paddle Fest considered a success AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Paddlers in the inaugural Mount Dora Paddle Fest compete in various races on Lake Dora.SEE PADDLE | A6 Associated PressOCALA Florida Highway Patrol trooper and two others were killed over the weekend after being struck by a vehicle while standing alongside Interstate 75 near a trafc acci dent, authorities said. FHP officials said veter an trooper Chelsea Rich ard died Saturday afternoon after she, tow truck driver John Duggan and pedestri an George Phillip were hit by a pickup truck as they stood on the shoulder beside the interstate in Marion County. Richard, 30 and Duggan, 57, were pronounced dead at the scene. FHP said that 52-year-old Phillip later died at a hospital. Richard initially arrived on the scene of a two-car crash on I-75 southbound. FHP trooper, 2 others struck by truck, killed Associated PressCAPE CANAVERAL A pair of space shuttle era astronauts who combined for nearly 7,000 hours in space have become the latest inductees into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. Florida Today reports astro nauts Shannon Lucid and Jer ry Ross were inducted Satur day during a ceremony at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Lucid is the only American woman to serve aboard the Russian space station Mir. She logged 5,354 ight hours in space, a record for a female as tronaut until 2007. She also ew aboard space shuttle Atlantis three times, including a trip for her 188-day stay on Mir. That stay earned her the Congressional Space Medal of Honor. Ross was the rst person to complete seven shuttle mis sions, including ve on Atlan tis. He logged more than 1,393 hours in space.Two astronauts inducted into Hall of FameSEE TROOPER | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 IN MEMORY OBITUARIESJohn H. HarrisJohn H. Harris, age 59, passed away on April 30, 2014. He was born on February 7, 1955 in Monroe, NC. More recently, he lived in Mt. Dora, FL with The Love Of His Life, Martha Maddux. He was pre ceded in death by his mother, Nadine Smith Keeter and is survived by his stepfather, Frank Keeter. He is also sur vived by his brothers, Gene Harris, Junior Harris, and Doug Har ris; and his sisters, Patsy Hinson, Vicki Harris, Debra Harris, Ann Web ber and Regina Lee. He leaves behind many nieces, nephews, and loved ones. The visitation will be Monday, May 5, 2014, from 6pm-8pm at Baldwin-Fairchild Funeral Home in Apopka, Flor ida. The Celebration Of Life will be held at 2pm on Tuesday May 6,2014 also at Baldwin-Fair child Funeral Home, with Pastor John Hampton ofciating. Inter ment will immediate ly follow at Highland Memory Gardens in Apopka, Florida. The family requests that any donations be sent to the American Heart Association in his memory. Ar rangements are under the direction and care of Baldwin-Fairchild Funeral Home, 601 N. Park Avenue, Apopka, Florida 32712. (407) 886-1461.DEATH NOTICESBettye J. Jackson-LarryBettye J. Jackson-Lar ry, 78, of Minneola, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc. HARRIS TROOPERFROM PAGE A3Both cars involved in the crash were on the shoulder. Shortly afterward, authorities said, a pickup truck traveled onto the shoulder and struck the troopers vehicle, the trooper, Duggan and Phillip. FHP said investigators are going through physical evidence and witness state ments. Authorities said charges are pending upon completion of the investigation, which could take sev eral months. Richard was a nineyear veteran of FHP, and the 45th FHP trooper killed in the line of duty. Funeral arrangements for Richard were still being worked out by her family.

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 I had a helmet but I needed a better one. Ten-year-old Anton Mc Campbell would have won the 12-and-under division, except he was the only one in it. So he raced in the 17-and-under junior divi sion and nished third. Its fun. I like to be outdoors and I never use up my energy, McCampbell said of his longboarding passion. The foundation donated 29 helmets to recipients who merely had to sign a pledge stating they will wear them. For every $20 the foun dation receives, it is able to buy a helmet, said Marcy Tilmann, director of the organization. Tilmanns son, Ian, died in 2005 from a skateboard fall while not wearing a helmet. Our son was a Marine, she said. He was a good marine. And he died from a skateboard. Over 100 skate boarders a year die because they dont wear helmets. RACEFROM PAGE A3 MARIONFROM PAGE A3congressman sees a dilemma. Nugent, who is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, thinks the opportunity might slip away if local ofcials dont get more vocal about locating the facil ity in Marion County. The VA will spend the money someplace in Florida, Nugents aides said. Although Marion is formally named, the ultimate location will be determined by the Flor ida Department of Veterans Affairs (FDVA). The Brooksville Republican, whose district encompasses the city of Ocala and most of Marion County, is con cerned Lee County or Collier County has the inside track for the project. Three months ago the FDVA announced that those Southwest Flor ida communities had topped the list for a new regional nursing home. That emerged from an FDVA study that analyzed factors such as the local population of elderly veterans, number of available beds and poverty rates. Of the eight other counties to make the short list, the FDVA identied the Polk-Manatee-Hillsborough region as second choice, followed by a district comprised of Marion, Putnam and Sumter counties. For his part, in addition to pushing the VA in Washington to designate Marion County, Nugent has written letters to Gov. Rick Scott and retired Army Col. Mike Prender gast, executive director of the FDVA, to locate the facility in the Ocala area. In the letters, Nugent notes that a facility in Marion could serve not only about 45,000 military veterans within the community but rough ly another 600,000 who live in two dozen sur rounding counties. Against that back drop, hes calling on the communitys locally elected ofcials to ramp up their efforts to con vince the FDVA to pick Marion County. I think weve done all we can on this end, Nugent said in an inter view. Its time for all the state and local ofcials to step up. Some of them already have. County Commission Chairman Carl Zalak, on behalf of the board, has already expressed the commissions enthusi asm for landing the estimated $17 million proj ect in letters to the FDVA announcing the countys interest in applying. The board, mean while, has discussed with local developer Kenneth Colen a donation of 20 acres at his On Top of the World community for the site, and approved spending up to $100,000 for a consultant to sur vey the grounds to see what work must be done to make it suitable. Pursuant to a public records request, the FDVA supplied the Star-Banner with three letters of support that the agency had received from other elected ofcials. State Sen. Char lie Dean, R-Inverness, wrote in an April 9 letter that Marion County had his highest recommendation for the project, both as a state senator and as a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. Our veterans deserve the utmost care as they approach their golden years and we, as a na tion and a state, must be attentive to the needs of this great group of patri ots, wrote Dean, who also serves on the Senate Military and Veterans Affairs, Space and Domes tic Security Committee. Marion County has a growing industry of medical personnel and a professional workforce that would provide the best, aroundthe-clock care possible for our veterans. Hays, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, also writing to the FDVA on April 9, added, Given the countys long history of caring for our veter ans who have sacriced in service for our coun try, Marion County is the ideal choice for your new nursing home. On April 10, OToole agreed that Marion County would be an ideal location, and she strongly recommended the department put the facility here. Noting the more than 600,000 veterans in the region, OToole added, This strong presence of veterans and associations will most certain ly be supportive and ap preciative of a veterans nursing home facility in Marion County. The county must submit its application to the FDVA by May 14. The department will announce the winning site in August. PADDLEFROM PAGE A3rst-year event, Price said. There are so many paddling events going on in the state of Florida now that it takes a while to build up a following. Price said he saw a lot of cross over between the pad dling disciplines. A lot of the dragon boat people enjoyed getting in other boats yesterday and trying those out and racing in the sprint races, Price said. And a lot of the canoe and kayakers enjoyed getting in the dragon boats. Lesz Banham, of Winder mere, said on Sunday he was doing the three-mile race on a paddle board. He said he has been paddleboarding for about a year, and this was probably his fourth race. However, he said he has been canoeing for about 20 years. He thought it was cool to have a celebration of paddling, but said it would have been nice for more paddle board participants to be there. Banham spotted an alli gator while out on the water Sunday morning before the races. The fact that theres wildlife here is kind of interesting, Banham said. He joked that his strategy for Sunday would be to give the gators space. Price said gators are most active at night and are most aggressive when they guard ing an egg mound. You just need to be aware if a gator is blocking your way, you nd another way around, Price said. Price previously told the Daily Commercial they would like to make Paddle Fest an annual event. LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, Richard Prine and Evan Beshures compete in the 10K race.

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I n February 2010, Israeli De fense Minister Ehud Barak warned that failure to make peace with the Palestinians would cause Israel either to lose its Jewish majority or to become an apartheid state. He meant that without a twostate solution, Israel would face two impossible choices: Either give citizenship to millions of Palestin ians, who would soon become a majority in Israel, or continue to control the lives of millions of Ar abs who lack basic rights. Baraks remarks caused no political hysteria in Israel because they reected painful reality; other Israeli politicians and pundits have said the same before and after. Yet, when Secretary of State John Kerry dared to utter the A-word (apartheid) last week, Israeli and American Jewish leaders slammed him. Like Barak, he warned of the threat Israel faces once the two-state option vanishes: A unitary state winds up either being an apartheid state with second-class citizens, he said, or destroys the capacity of Israel to be a Jewish state. The criticism Kerry faced was so harsh he felt compelled to issue a humiliating apology, even as his nine-month effort to broker a peace deal came to a failed close. Instead of maligning Kerry, the critics should have taken his (and Baraks) warning to heart. Within its 1967 boundaries, Israel is a vibrant democracy, and Arab citizens of Israel have the vote. But on the West Bank, around 2.5 million Palestinians live under a total ly different system. They cant vote for a national government (their Palestinian Authority has mini mal powers), while their physical movements are controlled by Israeli military checkpoints. Most West Bank land, along with water usage, imports, and exports, is controlled by Israel. (In Gaza, with 1.5 million people, Israel still controls the air, sea, and almost all land exits including the movement of goods and people.) The ceaseless expansion of Israeli settlements all over the West Bank, along with exclusive settler roads and fences, divides Palestinian areas into disconnected cantons that supercially resemble the former black Bantustans in South Africa. So even if Israels situation differs from South Africas and lacks the racial laws that dened that countrys apartheid system, some parallels cant be avoided. One group dominates and controls another, which lacks political rights. As then-Prime Minister Ehud Olmert warned in 2007, the collapse of the two-state solution means Israel likely will face a South African-style struggle for equal voting rights. Indeed, many younger Palestinians want to turn away from failed talks about two states to a campaign for full citizenship inside one state. A one-state solution is a nonstarter: The Middle East is a com munal region, in which Israel Jews and Palestinians both want their own country, and would resist sharing control. But a oneman, one-vote campaign could resonate with Europeans and in developing countries, and accelerate the global boycott, di vestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement that calls for Israel to withdraw from the West Bank. Kerrys critics clearly were wor ried that the use of the A-word would advance the BDS campaign. But dumping on Kerry wont resolve the problem, nor will playing the blame game of whose fault it is that peace talks ended. Rather, those who care about Israels future should take a hard look at the facts on the ground. Nothing has furthered comparisons of the Palestinian situation to South Africa more than the Israeli governments promotion of Jewish settlement on the West Bank. The current settlement grid was originally advocated by the late Israeli leader Ariel Sharon as a means to ensure long-term control of the territory. Settlers live by differ ent laws, have full Israeli national rights, and move freely around the West Bank, while Palestinians are heavily restricted. Kerry blames Israels construction of thousands of new settlement houses for souring the atmosphere of talks, with some building plans announced by hawkish Israeli leaders at critical points in negotiations. Whatever Israeli leaders say or truly intend, the expansion of settlements sends a physical message that Israel will never countenance a viable Palestinian state. Expansion also obscures important arguments that Israel could make about the time not being ripe for a two-state solution, with the Mideast in disarray and Irans nuclear intentions still not clear. Had the settlements been frozen long ago, or even at the beginning of Kerrys efforts, that case might have been persuasive. But the continued settlement building overshadows those legitimate concerns. If Kerrys critics are really wor ried about the A-word, or the BDS campaign, they should be pressing Israels government to freeze settlement expansion. Dumping on Kerry, a friend of Israel who pressed mightily for a two-state solution, is outrageous and wont help Israel face the challenges ahead.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial-board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE John Kerry is not the problem Finally, the U.S. government is waking up to the realization that it cannot jail its way out of a drug problem. President Obamas Department of Justice last year stopped making the problem worse, easing mandatory minimum sentencing in some cases. Last week, it offered a relatively narrow window for retroactive review. The DOJ laid out criteria for a new and welcomed opportunity for inmates who have served at least a decade for low-level, nonviolent offenses to apply for clemency. Decades of adherence to failed War on Drugs policies has helped make the U.S. the worlds largest jailer, with only 5 percent of the planets population but 25 percent of its inmates. Of the nearly 217,000 federal inmates, half are incar cerated for drug crimes, according to the Bureau of Prisons. Yet drug usage has risen 2,800 percent since the War on Drugs began in 1971. That absurd juxtaposition has forced cities, including Seattle, and states, led by Washington and Colorado, to form a controlled revolt against marijuana laws, the low-hanging fruit of drug-policy reform. But the federal government, until recently, has mostly ignored the clamor. Congress in 2010 nally ended a disparity in cocaine-sentencing laws that sent mostly African-American users of crack to prison for two years longer, on average, than mostly white users of powder cocaine. Congress, locked in dysfunction, hasnt made that law retroactive, or done anything else toward meaningful drug reform. Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder are making an end run around the legislative branch by turning to clemency, the tool of the executive. How far they are willing to go is an open question. Criteria for this clemency initiative are vague, requiring no signicant criminal history and demonstrated good conduct in prison. Used broadly, about 7,000 or more inmates could be freed. Expect fewer. In the meantime, Congress remains wedded to failed drug policies. Members of Congress should wake up and re alize drug-sentencing reform is a populist issue: More than half of Americans favor legalizing marijuana. And the issue is increasingly a bipartisan affair. Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a likely GOP presidential candidate, advocated to shut prisons down at the recent Conservative Political Action Conference. Sens. Dick Durban, D-Ill., and Mike Lee, R-Utah, are co-sponsors of the Smarter Sentencing Act, which would make retroactive the 2010 crack cocaine sentencing x. Obama and Holder, the rst African-Amer icans to hold either job, speak eloquently about communities of color hollowed out by the racially disproportionate effect of the War on Drugs. Good for them for leading. They shouldnt be alone.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEClemency is a good first step to ending failed War on Drugs policies Classic DOONESBURY 1973The criticism Kerry faced was so harsh he felt compelled to issue a humiliating apology, even as his nine-month effort to broker a peace deal came to a failed close.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Heat preparing for second round / B5 DAN WAGNER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Big Daddy Don Garlits gears up in the cockpit of the SR-37 Quest for 200 MPH on Batteries dragster recently before a test run at Bradenton Motorsports Park in Bradenton. SUSAN SMILEY-HEIGHTHalifax Media GroupBig Daddy Don Gar lits has always been an innovator, and he has always liked going fast. At age 82, he is still in volved in creating the next generation of high-powered race cars and is still gutsy enough to strap into a dragster and blast down a race track in pursuit of speed and time records. On Wednesday, Gar lits was at the Bradenton Motorsports Park testing his new SR-37 Quest for 200 MPH on Batteries dragster. SR stands for Swamp Rat, the moniker given for years to each incar nation of Garlits racers. According to Ran dy Cannon, the Las Vegas-based media manager for the project, the Quest Dragster was designed to be the rst battery-electric dragster to exceed 200 mph on a 1/4 mile drag strip. On Thursday, Don Garlits said the team broke the ofcial bat tery-powered car record in the 1/4 mile. It (the old record) was 156 mph in 7.95 seconds. I set the new record at 184.01 mph in 7.258 seconds, with a backup run of 178.42 mph in 7.526 seconds. This was a very good test, as the car was brand new, he said in an email message. Garlits said he made six passes with the drag ster, but there were sev eral issues, technically speaking. We learned a lot. Donna Garlits, the youngest of Dons two daughters and the general manager and CFO of the Don Gar lits Museum of Drag Racing south of Ocala, said everyone consid ered the day of testing a success. She said that on two of the runs, the batteries shut off, which blew a fuse and activat ed a governor that powers it off. She said that on the nal run the parachute did not deploy and Don ran off the end of the dragstrip. We were screaming, It didnt come out, it didnt come out, she said. I saw it run off the track and there was a puff of smoke. It went through a fence and wound up in a recently plowed eld. I was cry ing. My son, who is part of the crew, was distraught because hes a father gure to him. She said when the MIKE LANG / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Garlits does a burnout as he prepares for a pass while testing the dragster. Chasing 200 againBig Daddy in search of new records with battery-electric dragster IAN HARRISONAssociated PressTORONTO Paul Pierce blocked Kyle Lowrys shot from the lane on the nal play of the game, and the Brooklyn Nets held off the Toronto Raptors 104-103 in Game 7 on Sunday to advance to the second round of the playoffs. The Nets will begin the confer ence seminals at Miami on Tues day night to play the two-time defending NBA champion Heat. Leading by one point, Brooklyn used its nal timeout after failing to inbound the ball. On the sec ond opportunity, Shaun Living ston tried a lob pass to Pierce but Terrence Ross got a hand on the ball, then knocked it off Pierce and out of bounds for a turnover. Toronto used a timeout and gave the ball to Lowry, whose driv ing shot was blocked by Pierce as time expired. Lowry lay prone in the key as the Nets surged onto the court in celebration. Joe Johnson scored 13 of his 26 points in the fourth quarter to lead the Nets. Marcus Thornton scored 17, Kevin Garnett had 12 points and 11 rebounds for his rst double-double of the series and Deron Williams scored 13 points. Lowry nished with 28 points and DeMar DeRozan 18 for the Raptors, who fell to 0-2 in franchise history when playing in a Game 7. Toronto lost Game 7 of the conference seminals to Phil adelphia in 2001. FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry (7) gets fouled by Brooklyn Nets forward Kevin Garnett, right, during the rst half of Game 7 on Sunday in Toronto. Pierces block leads Nets past Raptors 104-103Brooklyn to face Miami on Tuesday in second round of playoffsSEE GARLITS | B2 KATHY WILLENS / AP Tampa Bay Rays catcher Ryan Hanigan, left, and reliever Grant Balfour (50) shake after Rays beat Yankees 5-1 on Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York. Myers inside-the-park home run leads Rays past Yankees 5-1 MIKE FITZPATRICKAP Sports WriterNEW YORK Wil Myers hit an inside-the-park homer, his latest big hit against the New York Yankees, and drove in four runs as the Tampa Bay Rays battered an ineffective CC Sabathia in a 5-1 victory Sunday. Erik Bedard earned his rst win as a starter since last June, and Evan Longoria had an early RBI double to help the Rays nish 5-5 on a try ing trip that included a doubleheader sweep Thursday in Boston and a 14-inning win Friday night at Yankee Stadium. Myers knocked in three runs with his homer off the top of the center-eld fence and then chased Sabathia with a ringing RBI double in the fourth. The struggling Sabathia (3-4) gave up 10 hits and ve runs in 3 2-3 innings, his shortest start since lasting 2 2-3 innings on Oct. 2, 2009, at Tampa Bay. He was late covering rst on a potential double play in the fourth and heard some boos from the crowd of 41,122 during an outing that raised his ERA to 5.75. Peyton Manning and his brother, Eli, showed up to watch buddy Derek Jeter play one last time during his nal season. The star quarter backs sat in Jeters suite along SEE RAYS | B2 JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterTALLADEGA, Ala. Denny Hamlin, win ner of three races at Daytona that didnt count, nally has a points-paying victory at a restrictor-plate track. Hamlin, who opened the season with a pair of wins in Daytona ex hibition races only to nish second in the Daytona 500, was again sitting second in the closing laps Sunday at Talladega Superspeedway. But he won a drag race with leader Kevin Harvick on a restart with two laps remaining, and was out front when NASCAR froze the eld because of debris from an accident. Hamlin let out a deep sigh when the yellow ag waved. Superspeedway win, he said on his radio. With points! With points! Hamlin became the eighth winner in 10 races this season as drivers jockey to grab Denny Hamlin outduels Harvick in drag race to win at Talladega BOB LEVERONE / AP J.B. Holmes poses with the trophy after winning the Wells Fargo championship on Sunday in Charlotte, N.C. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterCHARLOTTE, N.C. More than two years af ter going through brain surgery, J.B. Holmes is a winner again on the PGA Tour. Holmes made it harder than he needed to on the nal hole at Quail Hollow until rapping in a 3-foot bogey putt for a 1-under 71 and a oneshot victory over Jim Furyk in the Wells Fargo Championship. Furyk nished his Sunday-best 65 some two hours earlier. Jason Bohn had the best chance to catch Holmes. He was one shot behind when he SEE NASCAR | B2Holmes completes his comeback with victorySEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Aarons 499 ResultsSunday At Talladega Superspeedway Talladega, Ala. Lap length: 2.66 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (34) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 188 laps, 123.2 rating, 47 points. 2. (35) Greg Bife, Ford, 188, 115.1, 44. 3. (27) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 188, 67.2, 41. 4. (18) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 188, 81.8, 41. 5. (3) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 188, 88.2, 39. 6. (2) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 188, 83.8, 39. 7. (8) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 188, 107.6, 38. 8. (42) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 188, 87.7, 36. 9. (29) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 188, 94.8, 35. 10. (25) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 188, 65.5, 34. 11. (41) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 188, 64.6, 0. 12. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 188, 103.4, 33. 13. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 188, 66.3, 31. 14. (4) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 188, 74.7, 31. 15. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 188, 79.4, 29. 16. (17) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 188, 55.2, 28. 17. (43) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 188, 85.2, 27. 18. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 188, 45.8, 27. 19. (26) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188, 61, 26. 20. (36) Josh Wise, Ford, 188, 48.8, 24. 21. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 188, 58.2, 23. 22. (7) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 188, 74.9, 23. 23. (20) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 188, 99.8, 22. 24. (37) Terry Labonte, Ford, 188, 38.7, 20. 25. (28) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 188, 43.9, 19. 26. (30) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 188, 69, 19. 27. (38) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 188, 53.4, 17. 28. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota, accident, 187, 62.4, 16. 29. (32) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 187, 32.4, 15. 30. (10) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 182, 52, 15. 31. (24) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 182, 62.5, 13. 32. (16) Joey Logano, Ford, accident, 174, 91.3, 13. 33. (9) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 174, 82.4, 11. 34. (22) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident, 174, 50.1, 11. 35. (39) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 174, 52.9, 10. 36. (14) Michael McDowell, Ford, accident, 174, 56.2, 9. 37. (21) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 171, 77.6, 8. 38. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 160, 32.6, 7. 39. (11) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 156, 69.1, 6. 40. (40) David Gilliland, Ford, engine, 150, 60.6, 5. 41. (23) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 136, 77.6, 0. 42. (1) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, accident, 136, 60.3, 0. 43. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, accident, 136, 44.2, 1. European Tour/Asian Tour-The Championship Laguna National ScoresSunday At Laguna National Golf and Country Club, Masters Course Singapore Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 7,109; Par: 72 Final Felipe Aguilar, Chile 65-67-72-62 266 David Lipsky, United States 64-68-70-65 267 Anders Hansen, Denmark 67-66-67-67 267 Rahil Gangjee, India 66-67-71-65 269 Chris Wood, England 68-67-68-67 270 Anirban Lahiri, India 67-70-68-66 271 Gregory Bourdy, France 66-70-67-68 271 David Drysdale, Scotland 68-70-70-65 273 Raphael Jacquelin, France 69-70-68-66 273 Tommy Fleetwood, England 68-67-69-69 273 Rikard Karlberg, Sweden 70-68-70-66 274 S.S.P. Chowrasia, India 68-68-71-67 274 Antonio Lascuna, Philippines 68-69-69-68 274 Baek Seuk-hyun, South Korea 66-67-72-69 274 Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 68-70-66-70 274 Panuphol Pittayarat, Thailand 63-68-69-74 274 Prom Meesawat, Thailand 66-70-72-67 275 Nacho Elvira, Spain 68-69-71-67 275 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 65-68-73-68 275 NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 4, Atlanta 3 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Thursday, May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 Saturday, May 3: Indiana 92, Atlanta 80 Miami 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Brooklyn 4, Toronto 3 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 Wednesday, April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 Friday, May 2: Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83 Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103 Washington 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Dallas 3 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 Wednesday, April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 Friday, May 2: Dallas 113, San Antonio 111 Sunday, May 4: San Antonio 119, Dallas 96 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 Saturday, May 3: Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 4, Golden State 3 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 Thursday, May 1: Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99 Saturday, May 3: L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121 Portland 4, Houston 2 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 Friday, May 2: Portland 99, Houston 98 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami vs. Brooklyn Tuesday, May 6: Brooklyn at Miami, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Brooklyn at Miami, 7 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Monday, May 12: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Brooklyn at Miami, TBD x-Friday, May 16: Miami at Brooklyn, TBD x-Sunday, May 18: Brooklyn at Miami, TBD Indiana vs. Washington Monday, May 5: Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. Friday, May 9: Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 11: Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 13: Washington at Indiana, TBD x-Thursday, May 15: Indiana at Washington, TBD x-Sunday, May 18: Washington at Indiana, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Portland Tuesday, May 6: Portland at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Portland at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10: San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Monday, May 12: at San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Portland at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, May 16: San Antonio at Portland, TBD x-Monday, May 19: Portland at San Antonio, TBD Oklahoma City vs. L.A. Clippers Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, May 11: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clip pers, TBD x-Sunday, May 18: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, TBD Nets 104, Raptors 103 BROOKLYN (104) J.Johnson 11-25 3-5 26, Pierce 4-10 0-0 10, Garnett 5-8 2-3 12, Williams 3-8 7-10 13, Anderson 2-6 0-0 5, Blatche 4-7 1-2 9, Thornton 4-8 5-6 17, Kirilenko 0-0 0-0 0, Plumlee 0-1 2-2 2, Livingston 4-5 2-2 10, Teletovic 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 37-81 22-30 104. TORONTO (103) Ross 5-12 1-3 11, A.Johnson 9-12 2-2 20, Valanci unas 1-5 1-1 3, Lowry 7-19 12-14 28, DeRozan 5-12 7-7 18, Patterson 5-5 6-6 16, Vasquez 1-3 0-0 2, Salmons 1-3 0-0 3, Fields 0-0 0-0 0, Hayes 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-73 29-33 103. Brooklyn 26 35 20 23 104 Toronto 28 25 20 30 103 3-Point GoalsBrooklyn 8-23 (Thornton 4-6, Pierce 2-4, Anderson 1-4, J.Johnson 1-5, Williams 0-1, Tele tovic 0-3), Toronto 4-13 (Lowry 2-4, DeRozan 1-2, Salmons 1-3, Vasquez 0-1, Ross 0-3). Fouled OutA. Johnson. ReboundsBrooklyn 51 (Garnett 11), Toronto 43 (A.Johnson 10). AssistsBrooklyn 16 (Wil liams, J.Johnson 4), Toronto 13 (DeRozan 6). Total FoulsBrooklyn 26, Toronto 27. TechnicalsGarnett, DeRozan. A,457 (19,800). Spurs 119, Mavericks 96 DALLAS (96) Marion 2-5 1-2 5, Nowitzki 8-21 6-7 22, Dalembert 1-3 0-0 2, Calderon 2-8 0-0 4, Ellis 3-11 4-4 12, Carter 4-12 0-0 10, Blair 4-5 0-0 8, Harris 6-10 2-2 17, Wright 3-4 0-0 6, Crowder 1-4 0-0 2, Larkin 0-1 0-0 0, Ellington 2-4 2-2 8, B.James 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-88 15-17 96. SAN ANTONIO (119) Leonard 7-14 0-1 15, Duncan 7-8 1-2 15, Splitter 0-0 1-2 1, Parker 11-19 10-13 32, Green 5-7 2-2 16, Diaw 3-5 2-2 8, Ginobili 5-7 8-9 20, Belinelli 2-4 0-0 5, Mills 2-8 1-2 7, Baynes 0-0 0-0 0, Bonner 0-0 0-0 0, Joseph 0-0 0-0 0, Ayres 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 4274 25-33 119. Dallas 23 23 22 28 96 San Antonio 35 33 26 25 119 3-Point GoalsDallas 9-25 (Harris 3-3, Ellington 2-4, Ellis 2-6, Carter 2-6, Marion 0-1, Crowder 0-1, Nowitzki 0-2, Calderon 0-2), San Antonio 10-24 (Green 4-6, Ginobili 2-3, Mills 2-6, Belinelli 1-2, Leon ard 1-5, Parker 0-1, Diaw 0-1). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsDallas 46 (Nowitzki 9), San Antonio 48 (Duncan 8). AssistsDallas 21 (Carter, Calderon 4), San Antonio 21 (Diaw, Ginobili 5). Total FoulsDallas 21, San Antonio 21. TechnicalsDallas Coach Carlisle, Parker. Flagrant FoulsBlair, Crowder. A,581 (18,797). NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT SECOND ROUND EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 1, Boston 1 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Montreal at Boston, TBD x-Monday, May 12: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, May 14: Montreal at Boston, TBD N.Y. Rangers 1, Pittsburgh 0 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Sunday, May 11: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, Minnesota 0 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Chicago at Minnesota, 9 p.m. Friday, May 9: Chicago at Minnesota, TBD x-Sunday, May 11: Minnesota at Chicago, TBD x-Tuesday, May 13: Chicago at Minnesota, TBD x-Thursday, May 15: Minnesota at Chicago, TBD Los Angeles 1, Anaheim 0 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Anaheim at Los Angeles, TBD x-Monday, May 12: Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBD x-Wednesday, May 14: Anaheim at Los Angeles, TBD x-Friday, May 16: Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBD Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled OF Nyjer Morgan from Columbus (IL). Optioned LHP Nick Hagadone to Columbus. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Activated LHP Tim Collins from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Aaron Brooks to Omaha (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled RHP Nathan Karns from Durham (IL). Designated RHP Heath Bell for assignment.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPN St. Louis at Atlanta7:10 p.m.FS-Florida N.Y. Mets at MiamiNBA 7 p.m.TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 1, Washington at Indiana9:30 p.m.TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 1, L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma CityNHL 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 3, N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh10 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 2, Los Angeles at AnaheimSOCCER 2:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Crystal Palace vs. Liverpool, at London PGA-Wells Fargo Leading Scores Sunday At Quail Hollow Club Course Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.9 million Yardage: 7,562; Par: 72 Final J.B. Holmes (500), $1,242,000 70-67-66-71 274 Jim Furyk (300), $745,200 72-69-69-65 275 Martin Flores (190), $469,200 67-68-69-72 276 Jason Bohn (135), $331,200 73-67-67-70 277 Justin Rose (110), $276,000 69-67-71-71 278 Brendon de Jonge (95), $239,775 80-62-68-69 279 Kevin Kisner (95), $239,775 72-66-68-73 279 Roberto Castro (80), $200,100 71-70-69-70 280 Rory McIlroy (80), $200,100 69-76-65-70 280 Rory Sabbatini (80), $200,100 74-68-71-67 280 Kevin Chappell (65), $158,700 73-70-70-68 281 Phil Mickelson (65), $158,700 67-75-63-76 281 Michael Thompson (65), $158,700 71-69-69-72 281 Jonathan Byrd (56), $120,750 68-71-70-73 282 Zach Johnson (56), $120,750 71-70-69-72 282 Geoff Ogilvy (56), $120,750 72-67-70-73 282 Kevin Streelman (56), $120,750 72-69-71-70 282 Charles Howell III (51), $89,976 69-71-70-73 283 Martin Kaymer (51), $89,976 69-69-70-75 283 Ryan Moore (51), $89,976 70-71-76-66 283 Kevin Na (51), $89,976 69-72-69-73 283 Gary Woodland (51), $89,976 71-72-68-72 283 Jason Kokrak (45), $58,157 75-68-73-68 284 Y.E. Yang (45), $58,157 73-72-71-68 284 Stewart Cink (45), $58,157 68-70-74-72 284 John Merrick (45), $58,157 71-70-70-73 284 Wes Roach (45), $58,157 71-71-69-73 284 Robert Streb (45), $58,157 71-69-71-73 284 Mark Wilson (45), $58,157 72-72-66-74 284 Ricky Barnes (38), $40,106 72-72-68-73 285 Scott Brown (38), $40,106 71-73-70-71 285 Angel Cabrera (38), $40,106 66-69-75-75 285 Derek Ernst (38), $40,106 73-68-70-74 285 Chris Kirk (38), $40,106 71-70-71-73 285 Martin Laird (38), $40,106 69-70-73-73 285 Vijay Singh (38), $40,106 69-72-71-73 285 Brendan Steele (38), $40,106 72-72-69-72 285 crew got to the car, Dons rst words were: I guess I need a tow rope. He was cool as a cu cumber, she said. Hes ne; the car is pretty much ne, she added. Well gure out whats ahead and get better and try again for 200 (mph). That car can denitely do it. According to Cannon, the cars team hopes to set the 200 mph speed mark this year to coin cide with the 50th anniversary of Don Gar lits historic rst ofcial 200 mph pass in 1964 in a top-fuel dragster. Many things have changed in those 50 years. Garlits went on to set a long list of re cords and amass a number of championship titles. The innovations he implement ed after an explosion in a front-engine dragster nearly killed him and claimed part of his right foot in the ear ly 1970s led to a radi cal change in the way top fuel cars were congured and in much-improved driver safety. Garlits again is on the forefront of change. Cannon said in a state ment that the Quest car is powered by a 1,500 kilowatt array of lithium polymer (LiPo) batter ies by HighTech Systems that produce an equiva lent horsepower rating of more than 2,000 hp, with GE motors by Lawless Industries. The car uses Manzanita Micro Zilla Controllers. The co-own ers are Garlits, Brad Had man and Mike Gerry. Cannon said by phone Wednesday that everyone was pretty happy with the rst full test runs of the electric dragster. He said they began testing in late 2012 when the car was bare bones: no skin, no wing. Tuesdays tests, he said, were right out of the crate and proved the technology is work able. He said the car sur vived some pounding. The rst run was at 30 percent power and it went 129 (mph), which is pretty strong. Most electric vehicles dont go much faster than that. At 50 percent, it went 151 mph. At 100 percent there was a power de cline, maybe a controller issue. It didnt seem to get up to full power. Don Garlits stated that the team is trying to get the Tesla Car Co. involved, as they have access to lots of techni cal information. They had a Tesla car there that was very im pressive, a stock vehi cle that ran the 1/4 mile in 13.13 seconds with a 105 mph, stock off the showroom oor. I enjoyed driving the Tesla car, Garlits wrote in his email. Cannon said the Quest Dragster will be thoroughly gone over to determine if there is any damage from landing in the plowed eld. He said the batteries would be ne as they are encased in Plexiglas, but the motors and chassis and other components would be torn down for inspection. Cannon said the team will still try for the 200 mph record as soon as possible. That will depend on Dons schedule. Hes busier than everyone at his age, Cannon said. Garlits is aiming for a retry in a few weeks. We did not reach the desired goal of 200 mph, but we will re turn to the strip in June when the modications have been made to the car that will improve the performance, he noted. GARLITS FROM PAGE B1 the rst base line but didnt see much of a show a slumping Jeter went 0 for 4 and stranded four runners, extending his hitless streak to 13 at-bats. Bedard (1-1) pitched six-plus effective innings for his rst win as a starter since June 26 for Houston against St. Louis. He was 0-9 in his previous 15 starts, though he did win in relief on Sept. 4 against Minnesota. Logan Forsythe, the rst batter Sabathia faced, doubled off the wall in left and scored on Longorias ground-rule double to right. With runners at rst and second in the third, Myers sent a long drive to right-center beyond the reach of Jacoby Ellsbury. The ball hit the top of the wall near the 385-foot sign, caromed off a leaping Ellsbury and rolled away along the warning track. Last seasons AL Rookie of the Year jogged out of the batters box, then turned it on while rounding rst base. He scored standing up without a play after second baseman Yangervis Solarte couldnt handle a one-hop throw from right elder Carlos Beltran. It was Tampa Bays 11th inside-the-park ho mer and rst since Ben Zobrists against Toron to at Tropicana Field on Sept. 25, 2011. The pre vious player to hit an inside-the-park home run at Yankee Stadium was Jeter against Kansas City on July 22, 2010, according to STATS. Myers also homered Saturday and had a tie breaking single in the 14th inning of the series opener Friday night. He has hit safely in all 13 of his games at Yankee Stadium, the longest streak to start a career at the new or old versions of the ballpark. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 the 16 spots available in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. A victory conceivably gives a driver an auto matic berth, and Joe Gibbs Racing now has both Hamlin and Kyle Busch eligible for the Chase. It didnt appear that Hamlin had enough to beat Harvick, already a two-time winner this season, until the nal restart. Harvick didnt get the help he needed from behind, was hung out without any drafting partners, and Hamlin pulled out to a comfort able lead. Then an acci dent deep in the pack scattered debris, and NASCAR was forced to throw the caution when a bumper was seen lay ing on the surface. The yellow prevented Greg Bife from pulling out of line in an attempt to grab the victory away from Hamlin. Clint Bowyer nished third and was followed by Michael Waltrip Racing teammate Brian Vickers as Toyota took the victory and three of the top four spots. AJ Allmendinger nished fth in a Chev rolet, followed by Paul Menard and then Har vick, who faded to sev enth. Kasey Kahne, Kyle Larson and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. rounded out the top 10. Danica Patrick led two times for six laps, and the crowd roared its approval when she drove to the front early in the race. It was a rough day for Brad Keselowski, a twotime Talladega winner, who darted to the lead on Lap 14 but appeared to not have cleared Patrick before squeezing in front of her car. She tapped the back of Ke selowskis car, sending him for a spin through the grass that caused enough damage to drop him six laps off the pace. We werent clear enough to make that, crew chief Paul Wolfe told his driver. Ill just call it at that: We werent clear enough to make that move. Keselowski raced in the heart of the pack af ter the rst incident in an attempt to get his laps back under caution periods. But he was heavily criticized for triggering a 14-car accident with 51 laps re maining. The accident began when Keselowski spun in front of Trevor Bayne, and among those collected were Jeff Gordon, Matt Kenseth, Tony Stewart and Jimmie Johnson. Brad made a pret ty bold move early, a mind-boggling move, in going in front of Dani ca and spun out in front of the eld and got away with it, Kenseth said. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 pulled a 4-iron into the water on the par-3 17th, making double bogey. Phil Mickelson nev er had a chance, missing four putts from the 4-foot range and closing with a 76 to nish out of the top 10. The victory capped a remarkable turnaround for Holmes, who won for the third time in his career. He was diagnosed in 2011 with structural de fects in the cerebellum known as Chiara mal formations, and he had surgery twice once to remove a piece of his skull that he still keeps at home, another because of an allergic reac tion to the adhesive on the titanium plate at the base of his skull. Then, he injured his elbow by hitting too many balls in an attempt to return from the brain surgery. He didnt bother having sur gery on his elbow until last year, when he was sidelined by a broken ankle and couldnt play, anyway. Only last week, Holmes earned enough money to keep his card for the rest of the year from a medical extension. Now, hes headed to The Players Championship next week for the rich est prize in golf, and more importantly, secured a spot in the PGA Championship this summer in his native Kentucky. Its been a long journey for me, Holmes said. Ive had some ups and downs. Its a great feeling to be out there and to get one done. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 16 14 .533 4-6 L-1 9-8 7-6 Baltimore 15 14 .517 6-4 L-2 7-6 8-8 Boston 15 17 .469 2 1 5-5 L-1 8-11 7-6 Tampa Bay 15 17 .469 2 1 5-5 W-1 7-7 8-10 Toronto 14 17 .452 2 2 3-7 W-1 5-7 9-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 17 9 .654 8-2 W-5 9-5 8-4 Minnesota 14 15 .483 4 1 5-5 W-2 8-9 6-6 Chicago 15 17 .469 5 1 4-6 W-1 9-7 6-10 Kansas City 14 16 .467 5 1 4-6 L-4 8-7 6-9 Cleveland 13 18 .419 6 3 3-7 L-1 9-7 4-11 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 19 12 .613 6-4 W-1 6-6 13-6 Texas 17 14 .548 2 4-6 W-1 9-7 8-7 Los Angeles 15 15 .500 3 5-5 L-1 7-8 8-7 Seattle 14 15 .483 4 1 7-3 W-2 5-6 9-9 Houston 10 21 .323 9 6 3-7 L-2 6-13 4-8 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 17 13 .567 4-6 L-6 9-6 8-7 Washington 17 14 .548 6-4 L-2 9-8 8-6 New York 16 14 .533 1 1 6-4 W-1 8-8 8-6 Philadelphia 15 14 .517 1 1 6-4 W-2 6-7 9-7 Miami 16 15 .516 1 1 6-4 W-1 14-5 2-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 21 11 .656 5-5 L-2 9-6 12-5 Cincinnati 15 16 .484 5 2 5-5 W-2 8-7 7-9 St. Louis 15 16 .484 5 2 3-7 L-2 7-5 8-11 Chicago 11 17 .393 8 5 5-5 W-3 7-8 4-9 Pittsburgh 12 19 .387 8 5 3-7 L-1 8-9 4-10 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 20 11 .645 9-1 W-5 10-5 10-6 Colorado 19 14 .576 2 7-3 L-1 11-5 8-9 Los Angeles 18 14 .563 2 5-5 L-1 6-9 12-5 San Diego 14 18 .438 6 4 4-6 W-1 8-8 6-10 Arizona 11 23 .324 10 8 5-5 L-1 3-15 8-8 SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 9, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 6, Oakland 3 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 1 Seattle 9, Houston 8 Cleveland 2, Chicago White Sox 0 Pittsburgh 8, Toronto 6 Detroit 9, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 5, Texas 3SATURDAYS GAMESChicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 0 Pittsburgh 8, Toronto 6 Philadelphia 7, Washington 2 L.A. Dodgers 9, Miami 7, 11 innings Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2 San Francisco 3, Atlanta 1 Colorado 11, N.Y. Mets 10 Arizona 4, San Diego 3SUNDAYS GAMESChicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 3 Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Yankees 1 Oakland 3, Boston 2, 10 innings Toronto 7, Pittsburgh 2 Minnesota 5, Baltimore 2 Detroit 9, Kansas City 4 Seattle 8, Houston 7 Texas 14, L.A. Angels 3SUNDAYS GAMESMiami 5, L.A. Dodgers 4 San Francisco 4, Atlanta 1 Toronto 7, Pittsburgh 2 Philadelphia 1, Washington 0 San Diego 4, Arizona 3 Cincinnati 4, Milwaukee 3, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 5, Colorado 1 St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, late KATHY WILLENS / AP From left to right, Tampa Bay Rays Sean Rodriguez, Desmond Jennings and Evan Longoria greet Wil Myers after Myers third-inning homer on Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York.TODAYS GAMESMinnesota (Gibson 3-2) at Cleveland (McAllister 3-2), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Happ 0-0) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Houston (Cosart 1-2) at Detroit (Scherzer 3-1), 7:08 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-2) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-3), 8:05 p.m. Texas (M.Perez 4-1) at Colorado (Lyles 3-0), 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 2-2), 10:05 p.m. Seattle (C.Young 1-0) at Oakland (Kazmir 4-0), 10:05 p.m. Kansas City (Ventura 2-1) at San Diego (Stults 1-3), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESL.A. Dodgers (Greinke 5-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 2-1), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 0-3) at Pittsburgh (Locke 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Happ 0-0) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-2) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 3-2) at Atlanta (Harang 3-2), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-2) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-3), 8:05 p.m. Arizona (Bolsinger 1-1) at Milwaukee (Garza 1-3), 8:10 p.m. Texas (M.Perez 4-1) at Colorado (Lyles 3-0), 8:40 p.m. Kansas City (Ventura 2-1) at San Diego (Stults 1-3), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Wieters, Baltimore, .354; Ellsbury, New York, .346; AlRamirez, Chicago, .344; Loney, Tampa Bay, .343; Choo, Texas, .337; Rios, Texas, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .326; MeCabrera, Toronto, .326. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 29; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Donaldson, Oakland, 23; Mauer, Minnesota, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; JAbreu, Chicago, 21; Pujols, Los Angeles, 21. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 33; Colabello, Minnesota, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 27; Pujols, Los Angeles, 24; Brantley, Cleveland, 23; Donaldson, Oakland, 23; Lawrie, Toronto, 21; Moss, Oakland, 21. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 42; AlRamirez, Chicago, 42; Rios, Texas, 39; Ellsbury, New York, 37; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 37; Loney, Tampa Bay, 37; Altuve, Houston, 36. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 13; AGordon, Kansas City, 12; Hosmer, Kansas City, 12; Loney, Tampa Bay, 11; Pedroia, Boston, 11; Viciedo, Chicago, 11; Donald son, Oakland, 10; Ellsbury, New York, 10. TRIPLES: Infante, Kansas City, 3; 12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 11; Bautista, Toronto, 9; Pujols, Los Angeles, 9; NCruz, Baltimore, 8; Dozier, Min nesota, 8; Donaldson, Oakland, 7; Lawrie, Toronto, 6; Ortiz, Boston, 6; Rasmus, Toronto, 6. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 11; Ellsbury, New York, 10; Andrus, Texas, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 9; Dozier, Minnesota, 9; LMartin, Texas, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 5-1; Kazmir, Oakland, 4-0; Tanaka, New York, 4-0; Porcello, Detroit, 4-1; MPerez, Texas, 4-1; Gray, Oakland, 4-1; CWilson, Los Angeles, 4-2; Lackey, Boston, 4-2. ERA: Ventura, Kansas City, 1.50; Gray, Oakland, 1.76; JChavez, Oakland, 1.89; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.08; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.11; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.25; Vargas, Kansas City, 2.40. STRIKEOUTS: Lester, Boston, 58; Price, Tampa Bay, 55; FHernandez, Seattle, 53; Scherzer, Detroit, 51; Tanaka, New York, 51; Shields, Kansas City, 44; Sabathia, New York, 41; Masterson, Cleveland, 41. SAVES: Axford, Cleveland, 9; TomHunter, Baltimore, 8; Soria, Texas, 7; Rodney, Seattle, 7; Uehara, Boston. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .400; Blackmon, Colorado, .372; DGordon, Los Angeles, .357; Utley, Philadelphia, .350; YMolina, St. Louis, .343; Morneau, Colorado, .339; Uribe, Los Angeles, .333; MaAdams, St. Louis, .333. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 29; Blackmon, Colorado, 27; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 23; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 22; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 21; EYoung, New York, 21; Bruce, Cincinnati, 20; Rendon, Washington, 20. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 33; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 25; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 25; Morneau, Colorado, 24; Blackmon, Colorado, 22; Byrd, Philadelphia, 22. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 43; Blackmon, Colorado, 42; Arenado, Colorado, 40; DGordon, Los Angeles, 40; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 40; Uribe, Los Angeles, 39; MaAdams, St. Louis, 38; Morneau, Colorado, 38. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 12; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 12; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 11; Utley, Philadelphia, 11; Hill, Arizona, 10; Rendon, Washington, 10; Tulow itzki, Colorado, 10. TRIPLES: Hechavarria, Miami, 3; Simmons, Atlanta, 3; Yelich, Miami, 3; 12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9; Belt, San Francisco, 8; Morse, San Francisco, 8; Stanton, Miami, 8; JUpton, Atlanta, 8; 8 tied at 7. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 19; EYoung, New York, 12; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 11; Bonifacio, Chi cago, 10; Revere, Philadelphia, 10; Marte, Pittsburgh, 9; Blackmon, Colorado, 7. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 5-0; Wainwright, St. Louis, 5-2; 9 tied at 4. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.31; Fernandez, Miami, 1.59; Simon, Cincinnati, 1.60; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.80; Sa mardzija, Chicago, 1.98; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.04; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.04. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 60; Strasburg, Washington, 58; Fernandez, Miami, 55; Wacha, St. Louis, 50; Greinke, Los Angeles, 46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 46; ClLee, Philadelphia, 45. SAVES: FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 14; Jansen, Los Angeles, 11; Street, San Diego, 10; Romo, San Francisco, 9. Rays 5, Yankees 1 T ampa Bay Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Forsyth 3b 5 2 2 0 Ellsur y cf 4 0 0 0 DJnngs cf 4 1 3 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 Longori dh 4 1 1 1 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 Myers rf 5 1 2 4 T eixeir 1b 4 1 1 0 SRdrgz 2b 5 0 1 0 ASorin dh 3 0 1 0 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 2 0 Solarte 2b 2 0 1 1 Guyer lf 4 0 2 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 2 0 Hanign c 4 0 0 0 JMr phy c 3 0 1 0 McCnn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 5 13 5 T otals 33 1 7 1 Tampa Bay 103 100 000 5 New York 010 000 000 1 LOBTampa Bay 9, New York 8. 2BForsythe (4), De.Jennings (9), Longoria (6), Myers (6), A.Soriano (7), Ke.Johnson (5). HRMyers (4). SDe.Jennings. SFSolarte. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Bedard W,1-1 6 6 1 1 1 3 McGee 1 1 0 0 0 0 Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 0 0 0 1 0 New York Sabathia L,3-4 3 2/3 10 5 5 1 3 Aceves 5 1/3 3 0 0 0 5 Bedard pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPBedard. UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Brian ONora; Third, Doug Eddings. T:14. A,122 (49,642). White Sox 4, Indians 3 Chicago Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi De Aza lf 3 0 0 0 Morgan cf 5 0 2 0 GBckh 2b 3 1 0 0 Swisher 1b 4 0 0 0 JAreu 1b 4 1 1 1 Brantly lf 5 1 1 0 A.Dunn dh 2 0 0 0 CSantn 3b 4 0 0 0 Sierra pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Chsnhll dh 4 0 3 1 Viciedo rf 4 1 2 3 A Carer ss 4 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 DvMr p rf 3 0 1 0 JrDnks cf 4 0 0 0 JRmrz 2b 4 0 0 0 Flowrs c 3 0 0 0 K ottars c 3 2 2 2 LeGarc 3b 2 0 1 0 Totals 29 4 4 4 T otals 36 3 9 3 Chicago 100 000 003 4 Cleveland 002 100 000 3 DPCleveland 1. LOBChicago 3, Cleveland 12. 2B Morgan (1). HRJ.Abreu (12), Viciedo (2), Kottaras 2 (2). SBLe.Garcia (4), Chisenhall (2). SDe Aza. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Rienzo 4 2/3 7 3 3 4 2 Putnam 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 1 D.Webb W,2-0 1 1 0 0 1 0 Lindstrom S,4-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cleveland Kluber 8 3 1 1 2 13 Axford L,0-2 BS,2-11 2/3 1 3 3 2 2 Rzepczynski 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Belisario (Chisenhall). PBFlowers. UmpiresHome, Pat Hoberg; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Eric Cooper; Third, Chris Guccione. T:55. A,455 (42,487). Twins 5, Orioles 2 Baltimore Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 5 0 1 0 Dozier 2b 3 2 1 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 0 Mauer 1b 1 0 0 0 N.Cruz lf 4 1 1 2 Hr mnn rf 4 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 Plouffe dh 4 0 2 2 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 Colaell rf-1b 5 1 1 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 K ubel lf 2 1 1 0 DYong dh 4 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 3 3 Pearce 1b 4 0 0 0 Fuld cf 4 0 0 0 Schoop 2b 3 0 1 0 EEscor 3b 4 0 1 0 Flor mn ss 4 1 0 0 Totals 36 2 8 2 T otals 34 5 10 5 Baltimore 000 002 000 2 Minnesota 002 010 20x 5 EHerrmann (1). LOBBaltimore 8, Minnesota 11. 2BPlouffe (14), Colabello (10), K.Suzuki 2 (7). HRN.Cruz (9). SBDozier 2 (11). IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore M.Gonzalez L,1-3 4 2/3 6 3 3 4 7 Patton 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Matusz 1 0 0 0 1 0 R.Webb 1/3 2 2 2 1 0 Z.Britton 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Brach 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Minnesota P.Hughes W,3-1 6 1/3 6 2 2 0 3 Swarzak H,1 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 Thielbar H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Fien H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Perkins S,7-8 1 1 0 0 0 1 BalkR.Webb. UmpiresHome, Marcus Pattillo; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:02. A,559 (39,021). Tigers 9, Royals 4 Detroit Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi RDavis lf 6 3 3 0 Aoki rf 1 0 1 2 Kinsler 2b 5 1 2 1 Infante 2b 5 0 1 0 MiCarr 1b 4 0 1 2 Hosmer 1b 5 0 0 0 VMrtnz dh 3 0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 2 0 TrHntr rf 5 0 3 3 A Gordn lf 3 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 5 1 1 0 S.P erez c 3 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 5 1 1 1 Ha yes pr-c 1 1 0 0 Avila c 5 1 1 2 Mostks 3b 3 1 0 0 AnRmn ss 5 2 3 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 0 Dyson cf 4 1 1 2 Totals 43 9 16 9 T otals 33 4 7 4 Detroit 011 320 020 9 Kansas City 000 000 301 4 LOBDetroit 10, Kansas City 8. 2BR.Davis (3), Kins ler (8), Mi.Cabrera (10), B.Butler (5), S.Perez (10). 3BDyson (1). HRCastellanos (4), Avila (2). SBR. Davis 2 (11), A.Jackson (3). SFAoki. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Verlander W,4-1 7 4 3 3 4 7 Krol 1 1 0 0 0 0 Alburquerque 1 2 1 1 1 1 Kansas City Vargas L,2-1 5 11 7 7 2 3 Ti.Collins 2 1 0 0 0 1 Mariot 1 3 2 2 1 1 G.Holland 1 1 0 0 0 2 WPVerlander, Mariot. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Todd Tichenor. T:11. A,504 (37,903). Athletics 3, Red Sox 2, 10 innings Oakland Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 5 0 0 0 P edroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 5 1 1 0 V ictorn rf 4 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 2 2 1 0 D .Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 Moss 1b-rf 4 0 2 1 Car p 1b 4 1 2 0 Callasp ph 0 0 0 0 JHer rr pr 0 0 0 0 Gentry rf 0 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 0 0 0 0 Cespds lf 5 0 2 2 Przyns c 4 1 2 1 Jaso dh 5 0 1 0 Bogar ts ss 3 0 1 0 DNorrs c 2 0 1 0 GSizmr lf 2 0 2 1 Reddck rf 4 0 0 0 JGoms ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Barton 1b 0 0 0 0 Mdlr ks 3b 3 0 1 0 Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 0 0 0 Punto ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 3 8 3 T otals 35 2 9 2 Oakland 100 001 000 1 3 Boston 000 010 100 0 2 ECrisp (2), Reddick (2). DPOakland 4, Boston 1. LOBOakland 9, Boston 5. 2BLowrie (10), Moss (4), Cespedes (9), G.Sizemore (5). HRPierzynski (3). SBDonaldson (1). CSJ.Herrera (2). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Gray 6 6 2 2 2 3 Abad 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Ji.Johnson W,3-2 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Boston Lackey 6 5 2 2 3 4 A.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 2 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 2 Uehara 1 1 0 0 1 1 Capuano L,1-1 2/3 1 1 1 2 0 Badenhop 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Dan Bellino; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T:45. A,649 (37,071). Marlins 5, Dodgers 4 Los Angeles Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 1 1 0 Y elich lf 4 1 1 1 Puig rf 4 1 1 0 Dietrch 2b 3 1 1 0 HRmrz ss 5 0 1 1 JeBakr ph-2b 2 0 1 1 AdGnzl 1b 4 1 0 0 Stanton rf 3 2 2 3 Kemp cf 3 0 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 3 0 1 1 Sltlmch c 4 0 1 0 VnSlyk ph 0 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 0 1 0 JWrght p 0 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 3 0 0 0 Hchvr r ss 3 1 2 0 Butera c 3 0 0 0 F rnndz p 2 0 0 0 Figgins ph 0 1 0 0 RJhnsn ph 0 0 0 0 Olivo c 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Fife p 3 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Solano ph 0 0 0 0 Ethier lf 1 0 1 1 Totals 33 4 6 3 T otals 33 5 9 5 Los Angeles 002 001 001 4 Miami 200 011 001 5 Two outs when winning run scored. EDietrich (6). LOBLos Angeles 9, Miami 7. 2B Ethier (3), Je.Baker (2), G.Jones (6). HRYelich (2), Stanton 2 (10). CSD.Gordon (3). SYelich, Solano. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Fife 6 7 4 4 1 5 Howell 1 0 0 0 1 1 J.Wright L,2-2 1 2/3 2 1 1 0 1 Miami Fernandez 7 5 3 2 4 10 M.Dunn H,4 1 0 0 0 1 0 A.Ramos W,2-0 BS,2-2 1 1 1 1 2 1 Fife pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBPby Fife (R.Johnson). PBSaltalamacchia. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:06. A,145 (37,442). Blue Jays 7, Pirates 2 T oronto Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 1 0 JHrrsn rf-ss 4 2 2 0 MeCarr lf 5 1 3 2 NW alkr 2b 3 0 0 1 Bautist rf 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 2 0 0 1 Encrnc 1b 4 1 0 0 P Alvrz 3b 3 0 1 0 Frncsc 3b 4 1 1 0 SMar te lf 4 0 0 0 Lawrie 2b 4 1 1 0 I.Da vis 1b 3 0 0 0 Rasms cf 4 2 3 4 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Kratz c 4 0 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 McGwn p 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Navarr ph 1 0 1 1 CStwr t c 3 0 1 0 Dickey pr 0 0 0 0 V olquez p 1 0 0 0 Stromn p 0 0 0 0 T abata ph 1 0 0 0 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 Sadler p 0 0 0 0 Snider rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11 7 T otals 29 2 4 2 Toronto 040 020 010 7 Pittsburgh 100 000 010 2 DPToronto 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOBToronto 7, Pittsburgh 5. 2BReyes (5), Rasmus (7). 3BJ.Harrison 2 (2). HRMe.Cabrera (6), Rasmus (7). SFA. McCutchen. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto McGowan W,2-1 7 3 1 1 3 5 Stroman 2/3 1 1 1 0 0 Cecil 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 2 Pittsburgh Volquez L,1-3 5 7 6 6 3 3 Sadler 2 1 0 0 1 1 J.Hughes 2 3 1 1 0 0 HBPby Stroman (N.Walker). PBC.Stewart. UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Bill Miller; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Adam Hamari. T:49. A,496 (38,362). Giants 4, Braves 1 San F rancisco Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 0 2 0 He ywrd rf 3 0 0 1 Pence rf 5 1 2 0 BUpton cf 2 0 0 0 Posey c 3 0 2 1 F remn 1b 4 0 0 0 Morse lf 3 0 0 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 Gattis c 4 0 0 0 Arias 3b 1 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 2 0 Belt 1b 5 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 R.P ena ss 3 1 1 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 A.W ood p 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Pstr nck ph 1 0 1 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Hale p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 1 1 0 A vilan p 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 4 2 2 3 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Bmgrn p 3 0 1 0 JW aldn p 0 0 0 0 J.Perez lf 1 0 0 0 V arvar p 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 4 10 4 T otals 30 1 4 1 San Francisco 100 100 020 4 Atlanta 001 000 000 1 EBumgarner (1). DPAtlanta 1. LOBSan Francisco 10, Atlanta 6. 2BPence (7). HRB.Crawford 2 (3). SBPagan (5), B.Upton (7). SA.Wood. SFHeyward. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Bumgarner W,3-3 6 3 1 0 1 9 J.Gutierrez H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Lopez H,5 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 Machi H,4 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Casilla S,1-4 1 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta A.Wood L,2-5 5 7 2 2 1 7 Hale 1 1/3 1 0 0 2 1 Avilan 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Walden 1 1 2 2 1 1 Varvaro 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby A.Wood (Sandoval). WPA.Wood, Varvaro. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Rob Drake; Second, Joe West; Third, Clint Fagan. T:15. A,067 (49,586). Mets 5, Rockies 1 Ne w York Colorado ab r h bi ab r h bi Lagars cf 5 2 3 0 Blckmn rf 4 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 2 1 Culer sn ss 4 0 1 0 DWrght 3b 5 1 1 1 CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0 Grndrs rf 4 0 1 1 Arenad 3b 4 0 1 0 CYoung lf 4 1 2 1 Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Duda 1b 1 0 1 1 McKnr c 4 0 1 0 dArnad c 4 0 0 0 Dickr sn cf 4 0 2 0 Quntnll ss 4 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 0 0 Gee p 3 0 0 0 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 Bar nes ph 1 0 1 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 Stubbs ph 1 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 10 5 T otals 34 1 8 1 New York 102 100 100 5 Colorado 000 000 001 1 DPNew York 1, Colorado 2. LOBNew York 9, Colorado 7. 2BLagares (7), Dan.Murphy (8), D.Wright (5), C.Young (4), Duda (3), Culberson (2), Arenado (9). HRMorneau (7). SBC.Young (3). IP H R ER BB SO New York Gee W,3-1 6 6 0 0 1 5 C.Torres 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Rice 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Familia 2 2 1 1 0 2 Colorado Chacin L,0-1 5 8 4 4 5 4 Kahnle 2 2 1 1 1 0 Belisle 2 0 0 0 0 1 Gee pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Will Little; Sec ond, Mark Carlson; Third, Ted Barrett.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 JAY COHENAP Sports WriterCHICAGO Bry an Bickell had a goal and two assists, and the Chicago Black hawks beat the Minnesota Wild 4 -1 on Sunday to take a 2-0 lead in the Western Confer ence seminals. Brandon Saad scored his rst two goals of the postseason, and Chi cago earned its sixth consecutive win de spite stretches of lackluster play in the second and third periods. Corey Crawford made 18 saves in another sol id performance. Cody McCormick scored his second ca reer playoff goal, but Minnesota missed an other chance to steal home-ice advantage from the Stanley Cup champions. The series open er was tied at 2 in the third period before Patrick Kane scored two of Chicagos nal three goals in a 5-2 vic tory on Friday night. Game 3 is Tuesday night in Minnesota. Clayton Stoner and Erik Haula made nice passed to set up McCormicks rst play off goal in three years 2 minutes into the third, trimming Chicagos lead to 2-1. Crawford then batted a potential tying shot from Charlie Coyle over the crossbar. The Blackhawks eventually regained their composure and turned up the pressure again. Bickell shot the puck off the crossbar on a break with 4:39 to go. Given a second chance, the physi cal forward delivered. Marian Hossa and Bic kell got loose on another break, and Bickell buried his shot into the upper right corner to extend Chicagos lead to 3-1 at 17:15. Saad added an empty-net goal as the Blackhawks improved to 16-2 in home playoff games over the last two years. Chicago played without forward Andrew Shaw, who was out with a lower-body in jury. Shaw left the se ries opener after he was hit hard by Stoner in the rst period. He appeared to favor his right side as he made his way off the ice. Shaw, who had 19 goals and 20 assists in the regular season, is expected to travel with the team to Minnesota. NBA NHL CHUCK BURTON / APCharlotte Bobcats Kemba Walker, center, is trapped by Miami Heat players, from left, Mario Chalmers, Chris Bosh, and LeBron James during the second half in Game 4 of an openinground playoff series on April 28 in Charlotte, N.C. TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterMIAMI For the last week, the Miami Heat were waiting and watching, resting and recovering. The mode changes now. A new opponent, nally, awaits and its a team that befuddled the Heat like no other this season. The Heat will face Brooklyn in the Eastern Conference semi nals, which start Tuesday night in Miami. Brooklyn punched its ticket by winning 104103 at Toronto in Game 7 of their rst-round se ries Sunday, setting up a matchup that wont be hurting for intrigue es pecially after the Nets swept four meetings be tween the clubs during the regular season. Were about tired of practice, tired of whatever coach can think of to make us do, Heat guard Dwyane Wade said Sun day. We want to get back on the court, about ready to get our rhythm back, get back out there in the playoffs. Miami worked out ear ly Sunday, wrapping up even before the 1 / p .m. tip of the Nets-Raptors game in Toronto. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra made the call to prac tice early in large part so his team could fo cus again on itself, then spend Monday working on things specic to the opponent. Besides, much of Mi amis prep work will be centered on its own game, Spoelstra said. Our habits, thatll be the most important thing, Spoelstra said. The rest-versusrhythm argument is one thats been waged plenty around the Heat in recent postseasons, since by now its hardly uncommon for Mi ami to have long breaks between postseason rounds. By the time Game 1 against Brooklyn starts, eight days will have passed since Miami nished off its rst-round sweep of the Charlotte Bobcats. Its hardly been a va cation for the Heat, however. Weve had two days off in eight days, Heat forward LeBron James said. Weve had six work days and we denitely went after it. James spent much of the week dealing with a sore thigh, courte sy of a collision he got the worst of in Game 4 against the Bobcats. After days of treatment, he pronounced himself ready to go and said he expects to be some where near 100 percent for Game 1. The last time James felt that good? On my honeymoon, he quipped. If the Heat had a pref erence on their next op ponent, it wasnt voiced openly. Several players said as the regular sea son wound down that they expected to see Brooklyn at some point in the playoffs. Brooklyn took two preseason games from the Heat, then went 4-0 in the regular season with three of those games decided by a sin gle point, the other in double overtime. Theyre a different team in the playoffs, Brooklyns Paul Pierce said. Meanwhile, the Heat hasnt lost to the Rap tors in the last four years, coinciding from when Chris Bosh left Toronto in the sum mer of 2010 to be team mates with James and Wade in Miami. Still, Bosh said he wasnt rooting. Even if you do have a preference, be careful what you ask for, Bosh said. Thats what Ive learned throughout my career. Theres no such thing as a good match up. Whoever you play is going to be very dif cult and youre going to have to play good bas ketball. Spoelstra said Miami wont be fretting over the rust factor this time. You dont want to necessarily obsess about that, Spoelstra said. We went back and looked at it. Some times you can talk your self into that. And now they know: Its the Heat vs. Nets in second roundWere about tired of practice, tired of whatever coach can think of to make us do. We want to get back on the court, about ready to get our rhythm back, get back out there in the playoffs.Dwyane WadeMiami Heat shooting guardBryan Bickell powers Blackhawks past Wild 4-1 for Game 2 leadNAM Y. HUH / APChicago Blackhawks Bryan Bickell (29), center, celebrates with Marian Hossa (81), right, after scoring against Minnesota on Sunday in Chicago.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 GOLF Champions-Insperity Invitational Leading ScoresSunday At The Woodlands CC The Woodlands, Texas Purse: $2 million Yardage: 7,002; Par: 72 Final Bernhard Langer (300), $300,000 66-68-71 Fred Couples (176), $176,000 69-70-67 Colin Montgomerie (144), $144,000 71-66-70 Esteban Toledo (119), $119,000 67-71-71 Jay Haas (88), $87,500 70-70-70 Tom Pernice Jr. (88), $87,500 72-67-71 Bart Bryant (68), $68,000 66-72-73 Russ Cochran (68), $68,000 71-70-70 Tom Byrum (50), $50,000 74-70-68 Fred Funk (50), $50,000 68-71-73 Jeff Maggert (50), $50,000 68-73-71 Rod Spittle (50), $50,000 71-70-71 Michael Allen, $39,000 71-72-70 Steve Pate, $39,000 69-70-74 Billy Andrade, $34,000 72-70-72 Joe Daley, $34,000 68-75-71 Mark OMeara, $34,000 69-70-75 Peter Senior, $28,067 71-72-72 Duffy Waldorf, $28,067 74-70-71 Dan Forsman, $28,067 70-71-74 Mark McNulty, $23,900 71-71-74 Bob Tway, $23,900 69-72-75 Larry Mize, $20,500 73-74-70 Kenny Perry, $20,500 75-70-72 Gene Sauers, $20,500 70-72-75 Scott Simpson, $20,500 LPGA-North Texas Shootout Scores Sunday At Las Colinas Country Club Course Irving, Texas Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,410; Par: 71 Final Stacy Lewis, $195,000 71-64-69-64 268 Meena Lee, $119,765 70-64-70-70 274 Michelle Wie, $86,881 67-73-68-67 275 Na Yeon Choi, $60,653 72-69-66-69 276 Kim Kaufman, $60,653 72-66-68-70 276 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $32,348 71-66-72-68 277 Lexi Thompson, $32,348 70-71-67-69 277 Cristie Kerr, $32,348 67-70-69-71 277 Christina Kim, $32,348 67-69-70-71 277 Dori Carter, $32,348 67-70-68-72 277 Suzann Pettersen, $32,348 66-71-68-72 277 Jennifer Johnson, $22,228 71-70-65-72 278 Jenny Shin, $22,228 69-69-68-72 278 Amy Anderson, $18,097 71-72-67-69 279 Chella Choi, $18,097 69-74-67-69 279 Alena Sharp, $18,097 73-70-66-70 279 Pat Hurst, $18,097 72-70-67-70 279 Inbee Park, $18,097 71-68-68-72 279 Megan Grehan, $14,295 76-67-69-68 280 Stacey Keating, $14,295 71-71-69-69 280 Pornanong Phatlum, $14,295 70-68-71-71 280 Thidapa Suwannapura, $14,295 70-68-68-74 280 Natalie Gulbis, $14,295 70-65-71-74 280 Julieta Granada, $14,295 71-66-68-75 280 Sarah Jane Smith, $11,606 72-70-70-69 281 Ji Young Oh, $11,606 73-67-71-70 281 Mina Harigae, $11,606 74-68-68-71 281 Karine Icher, $11,606 73-69-68-71 281 Tiffany Joh, $11,606 74-66-70-71 281 Alison Walshe, $9,704 72-72-67-71 282 Brittany Lang, $9,704 70-71-70-71 282 Jennifer Song, $9,704 73-69-68-72 282 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $9,704 69-72-68-73 282 Mi Hyang Lee, $8,229 69-74-69-71 283 Juli Inkster, $8,229 69-72-71-71 283 Azahara Munoz, $8,229 70-68-74-71 283 Caroline Masson, $8,229 67-67-75-74 283 Pernilla Lindberg, $6,967 73-71-68-72 284 Ryann OToole, $6,967 70-73-68-73 284 Haru Nomura, $6,967 70-70-69-75 284 Sarah Kemp, $6,967 71-68-69-76 284 Paz Echeverria, $6,033 70-73-70-72 285 Katherine Kirk, $6,033 69-69-75-72 285 Sydnee Michaels, $6,033 71-71-70-73 285 Gerina Piller, $5,377 72-71-70-73 286 Megan McChrystal, $5,377 70-68-74-74 286 Lorie Kane, $5,377 69-73-67-77 286 Felicity Johnson, $4,705 70-68-75-74 287 Cydney Clanton, $4,705 67-76-69-75 287 STEPHEN HAWKINSAP Sports WritersIRVING, Texas There was no nearmiss for Stacy Lewis this time. This was a runaway for the highest-ranked American after six runner-up nishes in her previous 16 tourna ments. Lewis shot a 7-un der 64 on Sunday in the North Texas LPGA Shootout, nishing at 16-under 268 and six strokes ahead of Meena Lee. It was the LPGA Tours largest margin of victory since Jiyai Shin won the 2012 Womens British Open by nine. Ive been wanting to do this for a long time. I kind of have these mini goals in the back of my mind, Lewis said. One of them was kind of tak ing a tournament and running away with it. ... So to be so close the last few weeks and then to come out and shoot 64, I mean I dont even know what to say. It was the ninth ca reer LPGA Tour victory for Lewis, her rst since August in the Womens British Open, and will boost the Texan from third to second in the world ranking. Lewis made a putt from about 25 feet off the fringe at the 540yard seventh for an ea gle. She followed with consecutive birdies to make the turn at 14 un der and up by three strokes. The eagle just really kind of got things going in the right direction, and then just I never let up, said Lewis, who punctuated her round with birdies on Nos. 17 and 18. I never let the hammer down. Lee, the South Korean who won the last of her two LPGA Tour titles in 2006, shot 70 after go ing into the nal round at Las Colinas Coun try Club tied with Lew is for the lead. Lee bogeyed the opening hole and needed a birdie at No. 18 to nish alone in second place. Michelle Wie, who closed within two before faltering late, had a 67 to nish third at 9 under. Na Yeon Choi (69) and Kim Kauffman (70) tied for fourth at 8 under. Kraft Nabisco winner Lexi Thompson (69), Cristie Kerr (71) and Suzann Pettersen (72) were among six players at 7 under. Lewis, from The Woodlands near Houston, has nished outside the top six only once in nine tourna ments this year. She was third at the Kraft Na bisco and had another runner-up nish just last week in San Francisco. She had three runner-up nishes in her last eight tourna ments in 2013 after her victory at St. Andrews. Lewis got a share of the lead in Texas af ter a frustrating 69 in the third round Satur day when she hit all 18 greens in regulation but missed several makeable birdie putts. Honestly, I didnt change anything. I didnt do anything dif ferent, she said. They just didnt go in (Satur day). ... But once you see putts in, its kind of contagious. Defending champion Inbee Park closed with a 72 to tie for 14th at n ish at 5 under. That will be good enough when the new world ranking comes out to stay No. 1 for the 56th consecutive week since the South Korean replaced Lewis at the top.Stacy Lewis wins North Texas LPGA Shootout by 6 over Lee LM OTERO / AP Stacy Lewis posses for a photo with the trophy after winning the North Texas LPGA Shootout on Sunday in Irving, Texas. ADAM COLEMANAssociated PressTHE WOODLANDS, Texas Bernhard Langer won the Cham pions Tours Insperity Invitational for the third time, closing with a 1-under 71 on Sunday for a one-stroke victory over Fred Couples. Langer nished at 11-under 205 at The Woodlands to become the 10th 20-time winner on the 50-and-over tour The 56-year-old Ger man player also won the 2007 event at Augusta Pines and suc cessfully defended his title in 2008 at The Woodlands. He opened this season with a vic tory in Hawaii. Im hoping to add to that number, Langer said. I hope Im not done yet. Im very blessed to have won 20 times in 6 years. Its been a great run and a wonder ful achievement. I just feel like Im playing some of my best golf in my career. Couples, the former University of Houston player who won the 2010 event, nished with a 67. He won in March in Newport Beach, California. On a golf course as hard as this, you cant really play relaxed golf, Couples said. You have to pay attention to what youre do ing. I didnt hit enough good shots to shoot a lot lower to catch Ber nhard, although I got close to him. Colin Montgomerie was third at 9 under after a 70. His best nish on the tour is second in March in Newport Beach. The Scot had no complaints about his nish. If youre second, third to Couples and Langer, youre doing OK, Montgomerie said.Bernhard Langer wins Insperity Invitational

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014BLINDNESS: Young performer stands out on stage / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressNEW YORK Falls are just as much of a problem for middle-aged adults with arthritis as they are for older people, a new government study shows. In a telephone survey, about a third of adults 65 and older with ar thritis said they had taken a tumble in the last year. But slightly more of those aged 45 to 64 reported falling. More of the middle-aged group reported being injured from falls; 17 percent compared to 12 percent in the older group. Thursdays report was issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About half of Americans 65 and older complain of arthritis symp toms like joint pain and stiffness. Nearly a third of middle-aged peo ple have arthritis. The number of has been growing, mostly because of overweight baby boomers. Arthritis can make it harder to balance and it can sap lower-body strength, contributing to falls. Walk ing and moderate physical exercise is recommended for those with ar thritis to keep symptoms from get ting worse, said the CDCs Kamil Barbour, the studys lead author. The report is based on a 2012 survey of 339,000 people ages 45 and older.Falls also problem for middle-aged with arthritis PHOTOS BY RON TARVER / MCT Eight-year-old Steele Songle, left, smiles at his mother Ellen after trying on an articial hand designed by engineering students at Westtown High School in West Chester, Pa. KATHY BOCCELLAThe Philadelphia InquirerSteele Songle was born without a left hand but has never let that hold him back from the thing he loves most playing sports. And now, the 8-year-old from Wilmington, Delaware, who plays lacrosse and golf, swims, skis, and bounces on his friends trampoline until the two of them collapse, is getting a bit of bionic help from engineering students at the Westtown School in Chester County, Pennsylvania. As part of their design and engineering class, using a 3-D device, the students are making a robotic hand with ngers that can open and close around a lacrosse stick or ski pole. Among other things, Steele says he is condent the hand will improve his trampoline-basketball game. I can grip better on the trampoline and slamdunk better, said Steele, a sandy-haired charmer who maneuvered and played with the device as if it were the coolest toy on the planet, during a visit to the 600-acre campus. That would be fabulous, said his mother, Ellen, associate director of parent and alumni engagement at the 215-yearold Quaker boarding school, although she also hopes the hand will help Steele with more mundane activities, such as buttoning his shirt and ty ing his shoes. The two, along with Steeles father, David, saw the plastic hand-in-progress Friday in the schools recently renovated Science Center. The six engineer ing students were eager to show Steele what they had so far, although there were some tense moments before the family arrived when a needle used to thread shing line through the ngers, which allows the ngers to move, broke. The idea for a simple robotic hand was created, like many good inventions, out of need and ingenuity. Richard van As, a carpenter from South Africa who lost four ngers while sawing wood, teamed with Ivan Owen, a mechanical special-effects artist from Washington state, to develop a mechanical nger in 2011. Soon they had developed the Robohand and put the design online so anyone with access to a 3-D printer could make ngers, hands, or arms. While 3-D printing lets students explore ideas and solve problems as never before, said teacher Steve Compton, making a hand is a real challenge. Many parts must inter act smoothly and reliably, and the design has to be form-tted to an individual body. This is a real and transformative thing for a real kid, so doing it right no matter how many prototypes it takes to get to nished product its got to be focused and tailored and great, Compton said. His other students are making a submarine to test water quality in the schools lake, an improved geriatric walker, and an emergency stove that also creates electricity for use in disasters. Layer by layer, 3-D print ers build objects out of strands of lament that are heated and become Students create robotic hand for boy An engineering student shows eight-year-old Steele Songle how to wear the articial hand designed for him.SEE HAND | C3 TAVARES Joint Replacement Center awarded certificationAfter an onsite review in February, the Joint Replacement Center at Florida Hospital Waterman is the rst hospital in Lake County to earn the Joint Commissions Gold Seal of Approval for knee and hip replacement. By demonstrating compliance with The Joint Commissions national standards for health care quality and safety in disease-specific care, the certication recognizes the ongoing efforts of the Joint Replacement Centers dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. For information about the hospital, go to www.oridahospital.com or call 352-253-3635.MOUNT DORA Brain Gym Academy scheduled to meet May 15 Stephen Jepson will speak and demonstrate his methods to enhance balance, stability and coor dination from his program Never Leaving the Playground at 1 p.m., May 15 at Waterman Village, 445 Waterman Ave., in the Garden of Life Hall. Jepsons program helps people of all ages live healthy, happy and productive lives through his brain and body training. For information, call Debbie Garay at 352-383-0051, ext. 313. MOUNT DORA Annual Community Health Fair scheduled for May 14Honoring National Nursing Home Week, Avante at Mount Dora, a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center will host its 11th annual Community Health Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., May 14, at Avante, 3050 Brown Ave., in Mount Dora. More than 40 vendors will be offering free health screenings. There will also be an antique car show, pet therapy dogs, blood mobile, local re, police and EMS and facility tours. Refreshments and a free barbecue lunch will be provided. For details, call 352-383-4161 or go to www.avantecenters.com.LEESBURG Lake Medical Imaging receives excellence award Lake Medical Imaging has received the ACR Diagnostic Imaging Center of Excellence designation from the American College of Radiology (ACR), an achievement that recognizes best-quality imaging practices and patient safeguards. To be a recipient of the distinction, facilities must be accredited by the ACR in all facilities they provide. They are also required to participate in the Dose Index Registry and General Radiology Improvement Database as well as the Image Wisely and Image Gently patient radiation protection campaigns. For information, go to www.lakemedicalimaging.com.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 MARIA CHENGAP Medical WriterLONDON (AP) Bac teria resistant to antibiotics have now spread to every part of the world and might lead to a future where minor infections could kill, ac cording to a report pub lished Wednesday by the World Health Orga nization. In its rst global sur vey of the resistance problem, WHO said it found very high rates of drug-resistant E. coli bacteria, which causes problems including meningitis and infec tions of the skin, blood and the kidneys. The agency noted there are many countries where treatment for the bug is useless in more than half of patients. WHOs report also found worrying rates of resistance in other bac teria, including common causes of pneumonia and gonorrhea. Unless there is ur gent action, the world is headed for a post-an tibiotic era in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill, Dr. Keiji Fukuda, one of the agencys as sistant director-gener als, warned in a release. WHO acknowledged it couldnt assess the va lidity of the data provid ed by countries and that many had no informa tion on antibiotic resis tance available. Health experts have long warned about the dangers of drug resis tance, particularly in diseases such as tuber culosis, malaria and u. In a report by Britains Chief Medical Ofcer last year, Dr. Sally Davies described resistance as a ticking time bomb and said it was as big a threat as terrorism. In 1928, Alexander Flemings discovery of penicillin revolutionized medicine by giving doctors the rst ef fective treatment for a wide variety of infections. Despite the in troduction of numer ous other antibiotics since then, there have been no new classes of the drugs discovered for more than 30 years. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Scientists implanted thin sheets of scaffolding-like material from pigs into a few young men with disabling leg injuries and say the experimental treatment coaxed the mens own stem cells to regrow new muscle. The research, fund ed by the Defense De partment, included just ve patients, a small rst step in the complex quest for regenerative medicine. But the researchers described some of the men improving enough to no longer need canes, or to ride a bi cycle again, after years of living with injuries that today have no good treatment. The real rush for someone like myself is to see this patient be ing able to do these things and not strug gle and have a smile on his face, said Dr. Ste phen Badylak of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He led the study, which was reported Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Muscles have some natural ability to re generate after small injuries. But if too much is lost from a car ac cident, a sports injury or, for soldiers, a bomb blast the body cant heal properly. Hard scar tissue lls the gap in stead. Called volumetric muscle loss, a severe enough injury can leave an arm or leg essential ly useless. The new experiment combines bioengineer ing with a heavy dose of physical therapy to spur stem cells that are roaming the body to settle on the injury and turn into the right kind of tissue to repair it. First, surgeons re move the scar tissue. Then they implant something called an extracellular matrix derived from pigs. Its the connective scaffolding that remains after cells are removed from a tissue. (Without cells, the immune system doesnt reject it.) Such material has been used for many years as a kind of mesh in treatments for skin ulcers and in hernia repair. Whats new here: The matrix temporarily lls in the injury, between edges of remaining muscle. As the scaffold ing slowly degrades, it releases chemical sig nals that attract stem cells to the site, Badylak said. Then physical thera py puts tension on the spot, in turn signaling the stem cells that they need to form strong, stretchy muscle tis sue, he said. Without the exercise, Badylak cautioned, those cells wont get the message to boost muscle mass, and scar tissue could return. To start proving thats what happens, Badylaks team rst removed chunks of leg muscle from mice and administered the treatment. In-depth tests showed which cells moved in, and showed that they created working muscle. Then it was time for human testing, with three military veter ans and two civilians. Each had lost between 60 percent and 90 per cent of an affected leg muscle two from the thigh, the rest from the lower leg anywhere from about a year to seven years earlier. The men, in their 20s and 30s, underwent a few months of custom ized physical therapy to get their muscle function to its maximum ca pacity. Then they received the implants, followed by more physical thera py that began within 48 hours after surgery. Six months later, biopsies and medical scans showed some new muscle grew in all the men. Three patients were of cially deemed a suc cess because their legs were stronger by 20 per cent or more after the surgery. They had dramatic improvements in tests showing they could hop or squat on the injured leg. Badylak said the two other men had some improvement in balance and quality of life, but not enough to meet the studys denition of success. Researchers around the country are explor ing different ways to spur the regeneration of various body parts, and many focus on in jecting stem cells or tis sues grown from them. Wednesdays approach is more novel. This strategy obvi ously has some merit, said professor George Christ of the Wake For est Institute for Regenerative Medicine, who wasnt involved with the new study. While larger studies must verify the ndings, the concept of physical therapy coupled with these regener ative strategies is going to be really important. The Pittsburgh study is continuing, and Badylak would like to test as many as 50 more patients. He said that the technique probably would work better after a recent injury but that researchers needed to begin with old injuries to prove that physical therapy alone couldnt explain the muscle re growth. HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Experiment grows new muscle in mens injured legs AP FILE PHOTODr. Stephen Badylak, a surgery professor at the university, and deputy director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, holds a sheet of extracellular matrix, scaffolding-like material derived from pig bladder. THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Drug resistance found worldwide

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 gooey plastic. For the Robohand, shing line and pins are inserted into internal holes in the ngers to make them move. During Steeles visit, the students were printing another set of ngers. With a picture on a computer, the printer moved back and forth, building layer upon lay er of lament into the shape of ngers. The device is strapped on with Velcro and driven by the motion of the wrist. Move the wrist up, and the hand opens; down, and the ngers close. Clay McKee, 18, a senior, said Steele ultimately will be able to adjust the tension of the ngers for different activities. Total cost $3 and some screws. A commercially made hand can cost $10,000 or more. Were thinking of making one specially for swimming, McKee said. Although the prototype was white, the hand can be made in any color. Steele, the Man of Steel to his parents, asked for Supermans colors. Were going to put the Superman logo on top, said Alex Nunes, 17, a junior. We gure after that, were going to have to make them for all his friends. The project started in January after the school received new 3-D printers and Ellen Songle approached Compton with the idea of making a prosthetic for her son after reading about it online. Why her son was born without a hand remains a mystery, she said. Songle said the family had not thought about prosthetics before, taking the attitude that Steele would decide what he wanted. And since the super-condent boy could do with one hand just about anything anyone else can with two including making par on a hole at a regulation golf course with his grandfather recently there seemed to be no need. He doesnt let it affect him in any way, Songle said. At times I forget about it. Hes adapted. But now that he is in rst grade at Brandy wine Springs Elementary School, she said, she wanted him to be fully independent. Steeles initial reaction was low-key. The fact that all these cool kids are making it for him won him over, his mother said. And that puts extra pressure on the students to get it right. They talked about making a 3-D model of Steeles right hand so they could match the prosthetic better, and making different hands for Steeles different activities. If the students were designing and building a bicycle, say, and it didnt work out, no harm done, Compton said. But with a prosthetic and an 8-year-old client who clearly is thrilled by all the possibilities this opens for him, he said, failure is not an option. Count on us for a comprehensive range of quality services to meet the unique healthcare needs of you and your family. Abu Azizullah, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Maria A. Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Visit Us at www.impmd.comInternal Medicine Practices NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59* GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark HANDFROM PAGE C1 ANDRA BRYAN STEFANONIThe Joplin GlobeNEVADA, Mo. Nevada junior Landon Delgado stands out on stage, but it isnt be cause of his physical impairment. Its because he is a born performer a ne tenor able to memorize and execute complicated dance steps, one who enjoys dressing in a modern, trendy cloth ing style that might in clude a bow tie and fuchsia skinny jeans. He also happens to be legally blind. Most who see him perform dont even know. Most of our judges when we go to competitions and often many of our audiences have no idea, said Wes Mor ton, the director of Ne vada High School Show Choir. Then, it might be mentioned in conversa tion afterward, and they cant believe it. Delgado, legally blind since birth, has received numerous awards for his vocal and perfor mance abilities, having been selected for Mis souri All-District and racking up ratings on solos at various con tests. Tomorrow, he will be anxiously awaiting an announcement on whether hes been cho sen for Missouri AllState Show Choir. If its a yes, hell be among just 30 young men in the state to perform in Jefferson City in July. His performance re sume also includes the lead in the all-school musical, Pippin, a role in Hairspray, a role in Rock to Disco and a role in the schools rock opera Tommy, featur ing the song Pinball Wizard. Yes, I sang the lyrics that mention the deaf, dumb and blind kid, he said, grinning. It ac tually was awesome. Delgado has risen to the top in performance through hard work, a positive attitude and the support of the rest of the show choir and other high school friends, Morton said. Hes an amazing young man. Hes nev er let his disability in terfere with his perfor mance or with him as a student, said Morton, who has had Delgado in class since the perform er was a seventh grader. He has grown so much in our music program. He works so hard and spends so many extra hours learning the cho reography to make sure hes right on with the rest of kids. His voice is a very, very ne voice; hes certainly a leader in his vocal techniques and his vocal abilities. Delgado was inspired toward pursuing music in junior high, when the death of his best friends sister pointed him in the direction of the ministry, and he re alized he could com bine the two interests. The guy who led the service, he played the guitar, Delgado said. I do, too. It made me want to get involved in that. And now, thats my dream. I really aspire after Phil Wickham, a noted worship leader. A youth minister be gan a youth praise team at Delgados church, the First Baptist Church of Nevada, and Delga do soon joined. Mor ton approached Delga do about performing in show choir. Delgado, who can see shapes as well as hints of colors and light, has learned Braille. I did that in eighth grade, he said. A teacher, Karen Smotherman, volunteered to help me learn, and I just thought it would be good to have something to fall back on in case my other options were limited at some point. He gets enlarged text books for school, for example, but its occa sionally easier to get them printed in Braille, he said. When Morton hands out sheet music, however, Delgado scans it electronically so he can access it and enlarge it on an iPad. He doesnt complain or ask for help; he just does it, Morton said. Hes independent and doesnt want to be known as different from the rest of the kids. And he isnt, really. Although the directors worried a bit at rst about the com plex dance elements in volved in show choir. They thought I might step off the edge of the stage, Delgado said, laughing. That soon changed. Weve had him up on tables dancing, and he knows exactly where his boundaries are, Mor ton said. Every once in awhile its not really noticeable to the audi ence unless youre real ly, really looking another student might lightly touch his arm to help guide him up a step. Its just a slight touch. They have it all worked out.Blindness cant keep young performer off the stage ROGER NOMER / AP Landon Delgado, a junior at Nevada High School, practices a number with the Nevada High show choir in Nevada, Mo.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 JULIE DEARDORFFChicago TribuneCHICAGO Ellen Hanrahan, a 36-yearold mother of two, was done having children. To make sure, she had tiny metal coils implanted inside her fallo pian tubes, a relatively new form of permanent birth control marketed under the brand name Essure. A year later, Hanrahan began feeling a familiar form of fatigue one shed experienced with her previous pregnancies. Incredulous, she took a home pregnancy test. And then another. I panicked, called my husband and said, We have a problem, said Hanrahan, who was, in deed, 10 weeks pregnant. A team of research ers estimated Monday that as many as 9.6 per cent of women could become pregnant with in 10 years of undergo ing hysteroscopic sterilization, or Essure. That is nearly four times the estimated risk after a laparoscopic tubal ligation, the more tradi tional method. The study, published in the journal Contraception, is the rst to compare the effective ness of the two main choices offered to women who seek a permanent form of birth con trol. About 345,000 American women undergo sterilization pro cedures each year, with Essure an increasingly popular choice because it does not require a sur gical incision. Overall, sterilization is very effective; the ab solute risk of pregnan cy is low, said lead author Aileen Gariepy, an assistant professor in the department of ob stetrics, gynecology and reproductive sci ences at the Yale School of Medicine. But if one method is not as effective, that denite ly needs to be part of the decision-making process and not over looked. During a laparoscopic tubal ligation, a phy sician makes a small cut in the abdomen, then blocks, ties or seals the fallopian tubes to keep eggs and sperm apart. Essure also involves blocking the tubes, but instead of us ing an incision the phy sician weaves a catheter through the cervix to insert the coils. Scar tissue then gradually forms a barrier. Essures manufacturer says clinical trials show the procedure is 99.83 percent effective at preventing pregnancy over a ve-year period when used according to approved instructions. But that rate is for so-called perfect use. Gariepys team want ed to estimate the ef fectiveness under real-world conditions, or typical use. For example, doc tors dont always insert the implants correctly, and the fallopian tubes may not become fully blocked. Women are di rected to use an alterna tive form of birth con trol before returning to the doctors ofce after three months to con rm proper placement a critical follow-up step that some fail to carry out. For the new study, the researchers used available published data including reported cases of post-Essure pregnancies to esti mate what would happen to hypothetical groups of 100,000 women using a particular sterilization procedure, including cases where problems occurred. According to their calculations, 96 of ev ery 1,000 women who undergo hysteroscopic sterilization, or Es sure, would get preg nant within 10 years. For laparoscopic tubal ligations, the pregnancy risks were signicantly lower: 24 to 30 pregnan cies per 1,000 women. Patients deserve to have this information, which differs from the data provided by the manufacturer, said Dr. Cassing Hammond, an CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Essure less effective at preventing pregnancy SEE STUDY | C5

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern Universitys Feinberg School of Medicine who was not involved in the study. But Essure offers ad vantages that may make it the right choice for some women, he add ed. If patients and pro viders are assiduous during the rst year of use, the hysteroscopic Essure implant remains a very effective form of sterilization, he said. Bayer Healthcare, which purchased Es sure manufacturer Conceptus in June, said hundreds of thousands of women have beneted from the procedure since it was approved for sale in 2002. But the company also stresses that no method of con traception is 100 per cent effective and pregnancies have occurred in the commercial set ting. The type of mathematical model used by Gariepys team is useful in identifying fu ture areas for clinical research, the company said in a statement. Bayer welcomes ongoing evaluation and research of new innovations in contraception. Described on the Es sure site as a quick 10-minute procedure that can be performed right in your doctors ofce, the technique allows women to return to normal activities within a day or two. But hysteroscopic sterilization is effec tive only if both coils are properly placed; es timates of the success rate on the rst attempt vary from 76 to 96 per cent, according to the Contraception study. Also, unlike a laparo scopic tubal ligation, which is effective immediately, hysteroscopic sterilization requires several steps, including the three-month waiting period and followup procedure, which is re quired by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Previously pub lished studies on Essure primarily reported the outcomes in women who successfully com pleted all of the steps, said Gariepy. The bottom line is we do see a higher preg nancy risk (with Essure), she said. Any time there are multiple steps, there are multiple opportunities for things to go wrong. Elizabeth Cox, 42, became pregnant despite Essure and worried about the coils moving or even puncturing her uterus. She recently was able to conrm they are in the right place but still plans to have a hysterectomy after the baby is born in order to remove the coils. Cox said she originally wanted a tubal li gation but her doctor steered her toward Essure. She had the pro cedure in September 2012, and the threemonth follow-up test conrmed her tubes were fully blocked, according to records Cox provided. Her fourth child is due in July. Im pregnant with these coils in my body and theres no study to tell me its going to be ne, said Cox, who lives near Sacramento, Calif. Coxs doctor, Timothy Phelan, said he has been implanting Essure in patients for seven years and Cox is the rst to become pregnant. To me the biggest issue is whether the fol low-up test is reliable enough to conrm the tubes are blocked, he said. If the tubes are truly blocked, how do they get pregnant? Hanrahan said her pregnancy was stress ful and involved many scares. Due to my age, preterm labor and Essure, there were many po tential risks and most of them were unknown, she said. I do consid er myself lucky to have survived the pregnancy and have a healthy baby. Like other women, she wishes more infor mation was available to families affected by unplanned pregnancy. Pregnancy is a huge side effect, especially when women are led to believe its not possible, she said. Were left to wait and wonder and pray everything will turn out OK. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. STUDYFROM PAGE C4 STACEY WESCOTT / MCT Ellen Hanrahan plays with her 2-year-old daughter, Leena Hanrahan, in their home in Prophetstown, Ill. In 2012 Hanrahan gave birth to Leena, despite undergoing a permanent sterilization procedure called Essure. WITH US. EVERYTHING www.dailycommercial.com 352-365-8200

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 5 the 125th day of 2014. There are 240 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 5, 1862, Mexican troops defeated French occupying forces in the Battle of Puebla. (The Cinco de Mayo holiday commemorates Mexicos victory.) HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 5, 2014: This year you demonstrate an evolving ability to network and broaden your circle of friends and associates. Others see you as somewhat moody yet reliable. Your domestic life increases in signicance. A new home is a possibility. If you are single, resist taking a relationship to a live-in status too quickly. A very romantic bond arises as a possibility. If you are attached, the two of you create a landmark year with a transformation or adjustment to your home life. The tie that exists between the two of you ourishes with more time together. LEO provides an anchor when you are moody. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could be more in the mood for Cinco de Mayo than some of your friends who might hail from that culture. By midafternoon, you will help a friend relax and enjoy the mood of the celebration. Let go of a serious conversation for now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Use the morning for any matter that is very serious and that could demand an important conversation or two. Just because you do not see eye to eye with someone does not mean you need to quarrel. Honor and respect your differences. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might want to honor a change that is likely to make you feel a bit off-kilter. You could feel tense about a personal matter. Understand the liabilities of giving in to your feelings this afternoon you might not get anything done! CANCER (June 21-July 22) Initiate an important conversation, but avoid any bilateral comments that would add to the present discomfort level. You have an opportunity to clear the air, and you absolutely need to take it. Understand the dynamics of what is going on here. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could be excited by news that heads your way. Ponder this information with a greater eye to success and change. You wont want to deny your innate creativity; however, you will need to think before you leap. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Friends play a signicant role in your plans, whether you are at work or just off doing your own thing. Youll have a lot to deal with when speaking to a key loved one or associate. In the afternoon, you might not want to share your ideas so openly. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Defer to someone else, and remain open to the possibilities. You will discover the limitations of staying locked in a certain situation. Communication is likely to evolve with someone you trust, who has sound nancial knowledge. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Return calls in the morning. You could hear some interesting information or gossip, and you will need time to digest this news. Honor a change in plans without making it a big deal. You could get into a project but have difculty switching gears. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You have a way of bringing out the best in people, no matter what goes down. You could see a situation in a totally new light after a conversation, and possibly from a different perspective after a talk with someone else. Absorb as much as possible. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll want to relate more directly to a loved one than you have been able to in the past. Seize an opportunity to open up a conversation, and listen to the feedback you get. A situation around your domestic life could put a smile on your face. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Listen to news that comes from a parent or loved one. You might want to visit with someone at a distance and just enjoy life. Be content hanging out with your immediate circle. Laughter seems to surround a child or loved one. Enjoy it! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Examine what is going on in your immediate circle. You will want to have a conversation with a child or loved one as a result. Realize that a lot is happening around you that might not be easy to integrate into your plans. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: For the last few years my family has rented the same beach condo. My friend John and his family have joined us there on many occasions. When I asked him his vaca tion plans for this year, he informed me last night that he has rent ed the beach condo for the same weeks we have historically occupied it. I was oored. I think a more appropriate ap proach would have been for him to have called me rst and expressed his interest in renting it, but he should not have rented the unit if it con icted with our vaca tion plans. I understand the free marketplace rst-come, rst-served but I cant help feel ing he undercut me. CONFUSED IN A TENT AT THE BEACH DEAR CONFUSED: Your feeling is 100 percent ac curate. That weasel DID undercut you, and real friends dont act that way. Now that you know what hes capable of, contact the landlord and make a long-term deal in advance if you want that unit in the future. DEAR ABBY: I am a lonely 83-year-old woman. All I want is someone to love me, preferably a handsome, wealthy man who will spoil me. I have spent my entire life making other people happy, and now all I want is some happiness back. I mean, cant an older woman get some loving, too? I have been told Im charming. I have the laugh of an angel, a full head of blond/gray hair and a slim gure. I would like a man (preferably in his elderly years) who is lonely and needs some company. And also someone who wants to spend his savings on me. Abby, help me nd my soul mate. WAITING FOR GOT-DOUGH DEAR WAITING FOR GOTDOUGH: Why do I sus pect this letter may have been written by a group of sorority sisters after a few drinks? How ever, just in case its ac tually on the level, your want ad has now been viewed by millions of Dear Abby readers worldwide, and Im sure we will hear from many applicants who are ea ger to be The One. Lets hope none of them write from Scam-dinavia. DEAR ABBY: My daughter-in-law is having a baby. My mother and I told her we would have a shower for her. She registered at a local store for baby gifts, let us start planning the shower, and then informed us that she would not be opening gifts at the par ty. My son has sided with her. He said he didnt know her reason, but felt like it was no big deal. Why would she act that way? We think its peculiar. The shower has now been canceled at her request. MYSTIFIED IN CALIFORNIA DEAR MYSTIFIED: Your daughter-in-law may have been trying to be considerate of any guests possibly members of her family whose gifts might not have been as expensive as those purchased or crafted by other guests. Or she may have felt self-conscious about being the center of attention. While I agree that one of the pleasures of at tending a shower is seeing the expression of joy on the mother-tobes face as the presents are unwrapped, look at it this way: Because the shower is canceled, your problem is solved. Now forget about it.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Beach bully kicks sand in friends vacation plans JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 Hearing tests through May 9THLEESBURG(Across from Sears Auto Center)352-326-4079Mon. Fri. 9:00am 4:30pmSaturday by Appointment Only. In Home Test Available.INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE AudibelHearing Tests to determine candidacy will be held through May 9th. Please call immediately. Appointments are limited! Those interested must call today!Bring in the talk. . Screen down the noise!www.audibelnorthflorida.comBoard Certified Hearing Instrument SpecialistD002685

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 11 Black TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX SEIZETHE DA Y SSPORTSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6.3 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr CROSSWORD PUZZLE www.dailycommercial.com WITH US. EVERYTHING

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 GRADUATION Format: Expanded Broadsheet Advertising Deadline: May 9th, 2014 Publication: DC May 25th, 2014 SLP May 28th, 2014 A look at this years graduating seniors for the countys public and private high schools. Graduation is a special time in the life of a student, family, and the community in which they live. Be a part as a local business or family member to recognize Lake and Sumter Countys public and private high schools outgoing 2014 classes. As an added bonus, Graduation 2014 will be online for a full year at www.dailycommercial.com For more information or to reserve your advertising space, call 352-365-8287



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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739ANY SERVICE SPECIALAIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrrf rrf$50 OFFfla#CAC1816408$25 OFFORDERS OF $150 OR MORE MYERS INSIDE-THE-PARK HOMER HELPS RAYS WIN, SPORTS B1 VETERANS AFFAIRS: Ofcials want federal funding for nursing home in Marion A3 CIRCUS: Several acrobats fall during an aerial stunt A2 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, May 5, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 125 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D5 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 SCOREBOARD B2 LIVING HEALTHY C1 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 NATION A2 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 89 / 65 Mostly sunny 50 GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Con fronting a tough re-election ght Gov. Rick Scott came into his fourth legislative ses sion as governor with a fo cused, but yet limited agen da that dealt primarily on tax cuts and spending priorities. By the time the Florida Legislature ended its 60-day session, Scott also had wad ed into a Republican ght over immigration and even tried to gauge support from legislators over a possible gambling deal with The Sem inole Tribe of Florida. During his rst three years in ofce Scotts relationship with GOP legislative leaders was often tentative and even a bit combative. But Republi can legislative leaders intent on helping the rst-term gov ernor gave Scott much of what he wanted as he prepares for an expensive and lengthy re-election ght against likely Democratic nominee and for mer Gov. Charlie Crist. We are cognizant its an election year, said House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel. We are the same party. We want him to win. We wanted to help jump start him coming in to the campaign season and I think we have done that. Polls have consistent ly shown Scotts job approv al rating under 50 percent and some have even shown that a majority of Florida voters dont want him to be re-elected. When Scott opened up this years session in March, he bypassed contentious issues such as expanding Medicaid or opening the door to Las Vegas casinos. Instead he asked he them AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T he Leapfrog Group, a national leader and advo cate in hospital trans parency, has released its spring 2014 Hospi tal Safety Score Report with Florida Hospi tal Waterman receiv ing an A, The Villages Regional Hospital re ceiving an A, Leesburg Regional Medical Cen ter receiving a B and South Lake Hospital receiving a C. The report shows Leesburg Regional Medical Center im proved its rating from a C in both the fall and spring of 2013. The Villages Regional Hospital also saw an improvement from a B in the fall and spring of 2013. Two of your hospi tals have an A, thats good. You have a very nice record in your community, said Leah Binder, the president and CEO of Leapfrog Group. You denite ly see a pattern of im provement in the oth er two and thats also good news. Binder said the C grade does raise con cerns about South Lake Hospital. A C grade is very dis turbing, she said. The people in the com munity have a right to some answers to why this hospital isnt Leesburg Regional Medial Center is shown on a rainy Friday. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The entrance to the Leesburg Regional Medial Center is shown on Friday. Leapfrog Group rates local hospitals on patient safety NICOLAE DUMITRACHE and PETER LEONARD Associated Press ODESSA, Ukraine Outrage over the deaths of pro-Russian activ ists in riots in Odessa triggered new violence Sunday in the Black Sea port, where a mob of protesters stormed po lice headquarters and freed dozens of their jailed allies. The activists had been jailed for their in volvement in clashes Friday that killed more than 40 people some died from gunshot wounds, but most from a re that broke out in a trade union building. It was the worst violence in the Ukrainian cri sis since more than 100 people died in Kiev in February, most of them shot by snipers. Ukrainian Prime Minis ter Arseniy Yatsenyuk vis ited Odessa on Sunday to try to defuse the mount ing tensions and hinted strongly that he saw Mos cows hand in the unrest spreading through south eastern Ukraine. Odessa is the major city between the Crimean Peninsula, which Russia annexed in March, and the Moldovan separat ist region of Trans-Dni ester, where Russia has a military peacekeeping contingent. Concerns are mount ing that Moscow Pro-Russian crowd storms police HQ VADIM GHIRDA / AP A man is greeted by supporters after being released from a local police station which was stormed by pro-Russian protesters in Odessa, Ukraine, on Sunday. Gov. in tough re-election fight gets help from GOP SEE SCOTT | A2 MASSOUD HOSSAINI and RAHIM FAIEZ Associated Press ABI BARIK, Afghanistan As Afghans observed a day of mourning Sunday for the hundreds of people killed in a horric landslide, authori ties tried to help the 700 fam ilies displaced by the torrent of mud that swept through their village. The families left their homes due to the threat of more land slides in the village of Abi Barik in Badakhshan province, Min ister for Rural Rehabilitation Wais Ahmad Barmak said. Another reason for the evacuation was the threat of ooding caused in part by the landslide itself, said Mo hammad Daim Kakar, from the Afghanistan Natural Di saster Management Authori ty. He said the shifting earth had made it difcult for wa ter to drain through the val ley a serious concern as rain continued to fall Sunday. Engineers are working on a plan to divert the water, he said. Aid groups and the govern ment have rushed to the re mote area in northeastern Af ghanistan bordering Tajikistan and China with food, shelter and water. But for those affect ed, help was slow to arrive. My family, my wife and eight children are alive, but have nothing to use as shel ter. We have nothing to eat, said Barat Bay, a 50-year-old farmer and father of eight. We have passed the last two nights with our children at the top of this hill with no tent, no blanket. Focus shifts to helping Afghan families displaced by slide SEE ODESSA| A2 SEE HOSPITALS | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 doing more to protect its patients. At South Lake Hospi tal, Binder noted infec tion rates in central lines, UTI infection rates, their rate of falls, tears from medical treatment, blood clots, breathing failures, collapsed lungs and co lon surgical site infec tions. She said the col lapsed lung measure was only slightly below the national average. In a number of the sort of terrible events that can happen in a hos pital, we look at 13 of those terrible events, and a good number of those this hospital is either be low the national average or much worse than the national average, Bind er said. So, theres some concerns here. Dr. Julie Holland, the chief quality ofcer for South Lake Hospital, said Leapfrog Group looks at processes and outcomes, and South Lake Hospital is working and commit ted to improving the pro cesses. She said the out comes are soon to follow. Obviously, were well aware of what a C means, but at this point, giv en where we started and where we are now, weve improved process es immensely so I think were well on our way to achieving much higher than a C and I think well see that in the future, Holland said. Were cer tainly condent that what weve been doing will improve our score. Currently, we are in the process of imple menting TeamSTEPPS, which is basically a pro gram for nurses and phy sicians to improve pro cesses, and quality, and communication and working together, Hol land said. Holland said teamwork training and skill build ing are areas the Leap frog Group looks at and that teamwork is import ant for patient safety. At this point, every bodys kind of learned that, you know, we need to work together, so that each of us are helping each other, catching each others mistakes and ba sically just build a good team, Holland said. Holland said South Lake Hospital participat ed in the Leapfrog survey portion of the evaluation for the rst time last year and Binder said there has been progress there. Theres a variety of measures here that show a consistent investment by this hospital in im proving their safety... so I am cautiously optimis tic that they will continue to see an improvement in their scores, she said. Binder said Florida Hospital Waterman get ting As in spring 2013, fall 2013 and spring 2014 shows it is safer than most of its peers and pri oritizes safety. However, she noted that no hospi tal is perfect and, in all cases, patients need to take precautions when going to a hospital. Dianna Liebnitzky, the director of quality and the patient safety ofcer with Florida Hospital Wa terman, said the hospital understands the rankings are very important and patient safety is essential for its success. It really proves to us that the concept of safe ty culture is really hardwired in the foundation of what we do, Liebnitz ky said. It also shows to the community that they can trust the care that we deliver is going to be op timal and always in their best interest. It also, to me, shows that they know that were continually moni toring this on an ongoing, day-to-day basis, its not a one-time effort, its just what we do, always. She advised hospitals seeking to improve pa tient safety to be forward looking. Day-to-day, be very proactive, monitor it, un derstand where these types of scores come from, and not just be working toward the num bers, but actually putting the patient safety rst. Let that be your leading driver in everything that you do, Liebnitzky said. She added it is not al ways the least expensive or easiest route, and some times there is a lot of due diligence to ensure safety. Randy Harmatz, the chief quality ofcer with the University of Flori da Health, said patients should look at the rat ings when making deci sions. She noted many of the measures for the Leapfrog grade are al ready reported in the public domain, and pa tients should be aware of health risks such as pos sible infections. I think its one more piece of information thats valuable to consumers. Its probably not the one tool they should use, but it certainly is another piece of information that they can access when making a decision about who to choose for their health care, Harmatz said. Harmatz said other im portant information can be found with Hospi tal Compare and Florida Health Finder. She also said patients could talk to their physician as well. She added a poten tial hole in the Leapfrog score is the fact that they assign a score whether or not a group completes the Leapfrog survey. However, Binder said they use other data if hospitals do not report to Leapfrog. Binder said the group has been around for 14 years and reviews many hospitals. The group start ed doing the Hospital Safe ty Score Report in 2012. The scores are based off 28 measures, which are weighted and com bined for the grade, ac cording to the reports. Binder said the majority of data used for the scores comes from required in formation the hospi tals report to the federal government, as a condi tion of getting Medicare. Data also comes from the Leapfrog Hospital Survey and the American Hospi tal Association. Binder said experts in patient safety advised the group on coming up with a methodology to grade hospitals. {div} To view the breakdown of each hospi tals scores, go to www.hos pitalsafetyscore.org. The hospitals category scores on the website are com pared to the best, average and worst performing hos pitals. The scores also in clude the data source and time period of the grading. SCOTT FROM PAGE A1 to cut taxes and rollback auto registration fees and to increase spending in key areas such as hiring more child protection workers. But midway through the session Scott decid ed to back away from his previous strong stance on immigration. He threw his weight behind a con tentious bill to let stu dents living in the coun try illegally to qualify for in-state tuition. Many Re publicans were opposed to the legislation but Scotts push helped get the measure passed. Shortly before mid night on Friday, a beam ing Scott proclaimed that weve had a great ses sion. But he stepped aside any talk that his de cision to pursue a smaller agenda this year was key to his success. All four years Ive tried to focus on whats most important for Flor ida families, how do we change the direction of this state, Scott said. Sen. Chris Smith, D-Fort Lauderdale, said the ma jor issue of the 2014 ses sion was propping up a governor seeking re-elec tion whose poll numbers are agging. Smith said that the decision of Scott and other Republicans to support the in-state tu ition measure as well as Scotts announcement he will sign a bill autho rizing a specic strain of marijuana for medical purposes showed that it took dimming re-elec tion prospects to bring him around. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, denied that election year politics were at work. None of this was done in just the Republican cloakroom or the majori ty ofce, Gaetz said. Ev erything initiative that we passed through the leg islative process was bi partisan in nature. These policies are not just for Republicans. If they are good for Republicans and good for Democrats then they are good for Florida. Were more wor ried about the next gen eration. We think if we do that the next election will take care of itself. Florida legislators did not give everything Scott wanted. They politely ig nored some of his bud get requests, including a push to boost the amount of state tax dollars to Visit Florida up to $100 million. Legislators also reject ed Scotts request to keep alive his push to eliminate the corporate income tax. Scott at one time vowed to get rid of the tax in seven years, but has been forced to scale it back due to leg islative resistance. Rep. Ritch Workman, R-Melbourne and the House member in charge of pushing tax cut bills, said the governor was pushing hard but he said there was no way to go along with that request after going along with the size of the auto registra tion fee rollback sought by the governor. It kind of got squeezed out, Workman said. The Scott administra tion also appeared to miscalculate how legis lators would respond to a potential deal with the Seminole Tribe of Florida to extend the states cur rent gambling compact. With days winding down in the session, Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Can tera approached legisla tive leaders to tell them a deal was close. There were even discussions about a possible special session in May to consid er the revised deal. Key parts of the tribes current deal expire next year. But legislative leaders said they couldnt make any promises without knowing more details while Demo crats said they would not go along unless they were involved in negotiations. We have not heard any follow up in terms of a special session or a com pact so my guess is that its probably zzled out, Weatherford said. HOW TO REACH US MAY 4 CASH 3 ............................................... 2-6-2 Afternoon .......................................... 2-4-7 PLAY 4 ............................................. 1-0-1-0 Afternoon ....................................... 4-8-0-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY MAY 3 FANTASY 5 ......................... 14-19-20-22-35 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 9-17-19-27-31-43 POWERBALL .................... 5-15-16-46-4926 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. HOSPITALS FROM PAGE A1 ODESSA FROM PAGE A1 ultimately aims to take control of a huge swath of southeastern Ukraine from Trans-Dniester to Russian-dominated industrial areas in the east. Russian Pres ident Vladimir Putin, who calls the area historically Russian lands, has said he doesnt want to send in troops but will if necessary to protect his countrys inter ests. Alexei Pushkov, a prominent mem ber of Russias parliament who often ex presses Kremlin views on foreign poli cy, suggested Ukraine was destined to be split apart. Through the justication of arson, military operations and the killing of Russians in Ukraine, the Kiev govern ment is destroying the basis for the exis tence of a united country, Pushkov said on Twitter. Yatsenyuk said Odessa police were be ing investigated for their failure to keep the peace during the riots and said he had ordered prosecutors to nd all in stigators, all organizers and all those that under Russian leadership began a dead ly attack on Ukraine and Odessa. MICHELLE R. SMITH Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. A support frame collapsed during an aerial hair-hang ing stunt at a circus perfor mance Sunday, sending eight acrobats plummet ing to the ground. Nine performers were seriously injured in the fall, includ ing a dancer below, while an unknown number of others suffered less seri ous injuries. The accident was re ported about 45 minutes into the Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Circus 11 a.m. Legends show at the Dunkin Donuts Cen ter in Providence. Stephen Payne, a spokesman for Feld Entertainment, the par ent company of Ringling Bros., said the accident happened during an act in which eight perform ers hang like a human chandelier using their hair. He said the metal-frame apparatus from which the performers were hanging came free from the met al truss it was connected to. The eight women fell 25 to 40 feet, landing on a dancer below. All the performers have been doing some varia tion of this act for some time, Payne said, though he didnt know how long. The current incarnation of the act began in Janu ary with the launch of the show, he said. Acrobats fall during circus stunt BOB BREIDENBACH / AP An injured female performer is lifted onto a stretcher after a platform collapsed during an aerial hair-hanging stunt on Sunday in Providence, R.I.

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT FRUITLAND PARK American Legion to host 5K run/walk event Honoring Armed Forces Day, American Legion Post 219, 194 W. Fountain St., will host a 5K Fun Run/ Walk event, observing the day that pays tribute to the men and women of the United States armed forces. Pre-registration deadline for the event and the non-refundable entry fee of $25 per runner and $20 per walker, is due by May 10. Race day check-in begins at 7 a.m. on May 17 at the Post. For information and to register, call the Post at 352-787-2338 or Jim Maynard at 352-978-9197. LEESBURG Oak Park Middle School to celebrate historical figures Sixth, seventh and eighth grad ers have chosen important gures from history to study and bring to life at Oak Park Middle School as the school hosts its fourth annu al Knight at the Museum from 6 to 8 p.m., on Friday, at 2101 South St. Students have built background scenery, studied and made cos tumes for the event, which includes tours led by guides, the curator and history and language arts teacher Ellyn Ball. The event is free and donations will be accepted. Snacks and drinks will be available. For information, email Lilly Jenkins at jenkinsl@lake.k12..us. LEESBURG The Little Foxes opens at Melon Patch Theatre The lust for money, dysfunctional families, womens rights and racism are all subjects explored in the clas sic drama The Little Foxes, written by playwright Lillian Hellman. Taking place in an afuent south ern home in the 1900s, the play shows members of the tyranni cal Hubbard family trying to out wit each other in their attempts to become millionaires. It opens on Friday and runs on weekends through May 25 at the Melon Patch Theatre, 311 N. 13th St. For information and reservations, call 352-787-3013. MOUNT DORA Avante health fair to offer free medical screenings In honor of National Nursing Home Week Avante at Mount Dora, a nurs ing and rehabilitation center, will host its 11th annual Community Health Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., on May 14 at Avante, 3050 Brown Ave. More than 40 vendors will be on hand offering free health screenings including blood pressure checks, hearing tests, cholesterol checks, memory screenings and balance testing. There will also be an antique car show, pet therapy dogs, blood mo bile, local re, police and EMS, fa cility tours, refreshments and a free barbecue lunch. For information, call 352-383-4161 or go to www.avantecenters.com. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 LINDA CHARLTON Special to The Daily Commercial Saturday was race day at Lake Louisa State Park, only this time the racers werent on foot they were on longboards. The Clermont Chal lenge Races, sponsored by the Ian Tilmann Foundation and Sector 9 Skateboard Compa ny, hosted approximate ly 25 racers in the events. Competitors ranged in age from 10 to 50-plus and used boards longer than typical skateboards. The slalom race was curtailed due to rain, but the 5K and 10K dis tance races and the free style dance competition went on as planned. Marcus Acevedo, of Gainesville, came out on top in the mens division, placing second in the 5K, rst in the 10K and rst (by 3 seconds) overall. This one was actual ly very challenging, he said. I actually ran this race last year and came in second in both. This year they changed the course. It was awful. Awful in a good way. Richard Prine of Mi ami Beach came out on top in the junior division and was also one of the skaters who signed the foundations promise to wear a helmet. I came up for this, Prine said. I love com ing up for the races. CLERMONT New way to race PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, William Frank and Marcus Acevedo race in the 10K during the Clermont Challenge. Marcus Acevedo performs in the freestyle dance contest. Skaters of all ages compete in various longboarding events SEE RACE | A6 Halifax Media Group Locating a new nurs ing home for aging vet erans in Marion County has become a top priori ty for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and is being pushed by state Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatil la, and state Rep. Marlene OToole, R-The Villages. The VA has ranked Marion County 17th nationally among the top 100 construc tion projects the agency has identied in the current budget, according to VA documents and U.S. Rep. Rich Nugents ofce. Records indicate the VA has set aside $928 million for those proj ects, with the federal gov ernment ready to commit up to $23.5 mil lion toward the proposed 120-bed home in Florida. Nugent has urged the agency to recognize the care needed by aging vet erans in this part of the state. Now, the VA has made the nursing home the agencys top-ranked new construction project in this years budget. Nugents ofce said the ranking means Marion County is a lock to ob tain the federal funding, if selected as the home for the project. And thats where the Officials want nursing home in Marion HAYS OTOOLE SEE MARION | A6 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Lynn Bannister, of Na ples, said even with Satur days weather, she enjoyed participating in the inaugu ral Mount Dora Paddle Fest. Its kind of fun when you have elements to work against. It makes the whole thing more mentally chal lenging, Bannister said. After participating in three races on Satur day, Bannister was back Sunday morning to compete in a three-mile kayak race. She said she had never raced before, but is an avid kayaker. Paddle Fest races took place Saturday and Sunday at Mount Doras Lakeside Inn. Event Director Rod Price said Sunday morning he was pleased with the turnout. Its not bad for a MOUNT DORA Despite rain, Paddle Fest considered a success AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL Paddlers in the inaugural Mount Dora Paddle Fest compete in various races on Lake Dora. SEE PADDLE | A6 Associated Press OCALA Florida Highway Patrol trooper and two others were killed over the weekend after being struck by a vehicle while standing alongside In terstate 75 near a trafc acci dent, authorities said. FHP officials said veter an trooper Chelsea Rich ard died Saturday afternoon after she, tow truck driver John Duggan and pedestri an George Phillip were hit by a pickup truck as they stood on the shoulder beside the interstate in Marion County. Richard, 30 and Duggan, 57, were pronounced dead at the scene. FHP said that 52-year-old Phillip later died at a hospital. Richard initially arrived on the scene of a two-car crash on I-75 southbound. FHP trooper, 2 others struck by truck, killed Associated Press CAPE CANAVERAL A pair of space shuttle era astronauts who combined for nearly 7,000 hours in space have become the latest inductees into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. Florida Today reports astro nauts Shannon Lucid and Jer ry Ross were inducted Satur day during a ceremony at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Lucid is the only American woman to serve aboard the Russian space station Mir. She logged 5,354 ight hours in space, a record for a female as tronaut until 2007. She also ew aboard space shuttle Atlantis three times, including a trip for her 188-day stay on Mir. That stay earned her the Congressio nal Space Medal of Honor. Ross was the rst person to complete seven shuttle mis sions, including ve on Atlan tis. He logged more than 1,393 hours in space. Two astronauts inducted into Hall of Fame SEE TROOPER | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 IN MEMORY OBITUARIES John H. Harris John H. Harris, age 59, passed away on April 30, 2014. He was born on February 7, 1955 in Monroe, NC. More re cently, he lived in Mt. Dora, FL with The Love Of His Life, Martha Maddux. He was pre ceded in death by his mother, Nadine Smith Keeter and is survived by his stepfather, Frank Keeter. He is also sur vived by his brothers, Gene Harris, Junior Harris, and Doug Har ris; and his sisters, Pat sy Hinson, Vicki Harris, Debra Harris, Ann Web ber and Regina Lee. He leaves behind many niec es, neph ews, and loved ones. The visitation will be Monday, May 5, 2014, from 6pm-8pm at Bald win-Fairchild Funeral Home in Apopka, Flor ida. The Celebration Of Life will be held at 2pm on Tuesday May 6,2014 also at Baldwin-Fair child Funeral Home, with Pastor John Hamp ton ofciating. Inter ment will immediate ly follow at Highland Memory Gardens in Apopka, Florida. The family requests that any donations be sent to the American Heart Associ ation in his memory. Ar rangements are under the direction and care of Baldwin-Fairchild Funeral Home, 601 N. Park Avenue, Apop ka, Florida 32712. (407) 886-1461. DEATH NOTICES Bettye J. Jackson-Larry Bettye J. Jackson-Lar ry, 78, of Minneola, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc. HARRIS TROOPER FROM PAGE A3 Both cars involved in the crash were on the shoulder. Shortly af terward, authorities said, a pickup truck traveled onto the shoulder and struck the troopers vehicle, the trooper, Duggan and Phillip. FHP said investiga tors are going through physical evidence and witness state ments. Authorities said charges are pend ing upon completion of the investigation, which could take sev eral months. Richard was a nineyear veteran of FHP, and the 45th FHP trooper killed in the line of duty. Funeral arrange ments for Richard were still being worked out by her family.

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 I had a helmet but I needed a better one. Ten-year-old Anton Mc Campbell would have won the 12-and-under divi sion, except he was the only one in it. So he raced in the 17-and-under junior divi sion and nished third. Its fun. I like to be out doors and I never use up my energy, McCampbell said of his longboarding passion. The foundation donated 29 helmets to recipients who merely had to sign a pledge stating they will wear them. For every $20 the foun dation receives, it is able to buy a helmet, said Marcy Tilmann, direc tor of the organization. Tilmanns son, Ian, died in 2005 from a skateboard fall while not wearing a helmet. Our son was a Marine, she said. He was a good marine. And he died from a skateboard. Over 100 skate boarders a year die because they dont wear helmets. RACE FROM PAGE A3 MARION FROM PAGE A3 congressman sees a dilemma. Nugent, who is a member of the House Armed Services Com mittee, thinks the op portunity might slip away if local ofcials dont get more vocal about locating the facil ity in Marion County. The VA will spend the money someplace in Florida, Nugents aides said. Although Marion is formally named, the ul timate location will be determined by the Flor ida Department of Vet erans Affairs (FDVA). The Brooksville Re publican, whose dis trict encompasses the city of Ocala and most of Marion County, is con cerned Lee County or Collier County has the in side track for the project. Three months ago the FDVA announced that those Southwest Flor ida communities had topped the list for a new regional nursing home. That emerged from an FDVA study that ana lyzed factors such as the local population of el derly veterans, number of available beds and poverty rates. Of the eight oth er counties to make the short list, the FDVA identied the Polk-Manatee-Hills borough region as sec ond choice, followed by a district comprised of Marion, Putnam and Sumter counties. For his part, in addi tion to pushing the VA in Washington to designate Marion County, Nugent has written letters to Gov. Rick Scott and retired Army Col. Mike Prender gast, executive director of the FDVA, to locate the facility in the Ocala area. In the letters, Nugent notes that a facility in Marion could serve not only about 45,000 mili tary veterans within the community but rough ly another 600,000 who live in two dozen sur rounding counties. Against that back drop, hes calling on the communitys locally elected ofcials to ramp up their efforts to con vince the FDVA to pick Marion County. I think weve done all we can on this end, Nugent said in an inter view. Its time for all the state and local ofcials to step up. Some of them already have. County Commission Chairman Carl Zalak, on behalf of the board, has already expressed the commissions enthusi asm for landing the esti mated $17 million proj ect in letters to the FDVA announcing the coun tys interest in applying. The board, mean while, has discussed with local developer Kenneth Colen a donation of 20 acres at his On Top of the World community for the site, and approved spending up to $100,000 for a consultant to sur vey the grounds to see what work must be done to make it suitable. Pursuant to a public re cords request, the FDVA supplied the Star-Ban ner with three letters of support that the agency had received from other elected ofcials. State Sen. Char lie Dean, R-Inverness, wrote in an April 9 letter that Marion County had his highest recommen dation for the project, both as a state senator and as a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. Our veterans deserve the utmost care as they approach their golden years and we, as a na tion and a state, must be attentive to the needs of this great group of patri ots, wrote Dean, who also serves on the Senate Military and Veterans Af fairs, Space and Domes tic Security Committee. Marion County has a growing industry of medical personnel and a professional work force that would pro vide the best, aroundthe-clock care possible for our veterans. Hays, a member of the Senate Appropria tions Committee, also writing to the FDVA on April 9, added, Given the countys long history of caring for our veter ans who have sacriced in service for our coun try, Marion County is the ideal choice for your new nursing home. On April 10, OToole agreed that Marion County would be an ideal location, and she strongly recommended the department put the facility here. Noting the more than 600,000 veterans in the region, OToole added, This strong presence of veterans and associa tions will most certain ly be supportive and ap preciative of a veterans nursing home facility in Marion County. The county must sub mit its application to the FDVA by May 14. The department will announce the winning site in August. PADDLE FROM PAGE A3 rst-year event, Price said. There are so many paddling events going on in the state of Florida now that it takes a while to build up a following. Price said he saw a lot of cross over between the pad dling disciplines. A lot of the dragon boat people enjoyed getting in other boats yesterday and trying those out and racing in the sprint races, Price said. And a lot of the canoe and kayakers enjoyed getting in the dragon boats. Lesz Banham, of Winder mere, said on Sunday he was doing the three-mile race on a paddle board. He said he has been paddleboard ing for about a year, and this was probably his fourth race. However, he said he has been canoeing for about 20 years. He thought it was cool to have a celebration of paddling, but said it would have been nice for more paddle board participants to be there. Banham spotted an alli gator while out on the water Sunday morning be fo re the races. The fact that theres wild life here is kind of interest ing, Banham said. He joked that his strategy for Sunday would be to give the gators space. Price said gators are most active at night and are most aggressive when they guard ing an egg mound. You just need to be aware if a gator is blocking your way, you nd another way around, Price said. Price previously told the Daily Commercial they would like to make Paddle Fest an annual event. LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, Richard Prine and Evan Beshures compete in the 10K race.

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I n February 2010, Israeli De fense Minister Ehud Barak warned that failure to make peace with the Palestinians would cause Israel either to lose its Jewish majority or to become an apartheid state. He meant that without a twostate solution, Israel would face two impossible choices: Either give citizenship to millions of Palestin ians, who would soon become a majority in Israel, or continue to control the lives of millions of Ar abs who lack basic rights. Baraks remarks caused no polit ical hysteria in Israel because they reected painful reality; other Is raeli politicians and pundits have said the same before and after. Yet, when Secretary of State John Kerry dared to utter the A-word (apartheid) last week, Is raeli and American Jewish lead ers slammed him. Like Barak, he warned of the threat Israel faces once the two-state option van ishes: A unitary state winds up either being an apartheid state with second-class citizens, he said, or destroys the capacity of Israel to be a Jewish state. The criticism Kerry faced was so harsh he felt compelled to is sue a humiliating apology, even as his nine-month effort to broker a peace deal came to a failed close. Instead of maligning Kerry, the critics should have taken his (and Baraks) warning to heart. Within its 1967 boundaries, Isra el is a vibrant democracy, and Arab citizens of Israel have the vote. But on the West Bank, around 2.5 mil lion Palestinians live under a total ly different system. They cant vote for a national government (their Palestinian Authority has mini mal powers), while their physical movements are controlled by Is raeli military checkpoints. Most West Bank land, along with water usage, imports, and exports, is controlled by Israel. (In Gaza, with 1.5 million people, Israel still controls the air, sea, and almost all land exits including the move ment of goods and people.) The ceaseless expansion of Is raeli settlements all over the West Bank, along with exclusive settler roads and fences, divides Pales tinian areas into disconnected cantons that supercially resem ble the former black Bantustans in South Africa. So even if Israels situation differs from South Afri cas and lacks the racial laws that dened that countrys apartheid system, some parallels cant be avoided. One group dominates and controls another, which lacks political rights. As then-Prime Minister Ehud Olmert warned in 2007, the col lapse of the two-state solution means Israel likely will face a South African-style struggle for equal voting rights. Indeed, many younger Palestinians want to turn away from failed talks about two states to a campaign for full citi zenship inside one state. A one-state solution is a non starter: The Middle East is a com munal region, in which Israel Jews and Palestinians both want their own country, and would re sist sharing control. But a oneman, one-vote campaign could resonate with Europeans and in developing countries, and ac celerate the global boycott, di vestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement that calls for Israel to withdraw from the West Bank. Kerrys critics clearly were wor ried that the use of the A-word would advance the BDS cam paign But dumping on Kerry wont resolve the problem, nor will playing the blame game of whose fault it is that peace talks ended. Rather, those who care about Isra els future should take a hard look at the facts on the ground. Nothing has furthered compari sons of the Palestinian situation to South Africa more than the Israeli governments promotion of Jewish settlement on the West Bank. The current settlement grid was origi nally advocated by the late Israe li leader Ariel Sharon as a means to ensure long-term control of the territory. Settlers live by differ ent laws, have full Israeli national rights, and move freely around the West Bank, while Palestinians are heavily restricted. Kerry blames Israels construc tion of thousands of new settle ment houses for souring the at mosphere of talks, with some building plans announced by hawkish Israeli leaders at critical points in negotiations. Whatever Israeli leaders say or truly intend, the expansion of settlements sends a physical message that Is rael will never countenance a vi able Palestinian state. Expansion also obscures import ant arguments that Israel could make about the time not being ripe for a two-state solution, with the Mideast in disarray and Irans nu clear intentions still not clear. Had the settlements been frozen long ago, or even at the beginning of Kerrys efforts, that case might have been persuasive. But the continued settlement building overshadows those legitimate concerns. If Kerrys critics are really wor ried about the A-word, or the BDS campaign, they should be pressing Israels government to freeze set tlement expansion. Dumping on Kerry, a friend of Israel who pressed mightily for a two-state solution, is outrageous and wont help Israel face the challenges ahead. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and ed itorial-board member for the Phila delphia Inquirer. Readers may write her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE John Kerry is not the problem F inally, the U.S. government is waking up to the realization that it cannot jail its way out of a drug problem. President Obamas Department of Justice last year stopped making the problem worse, easing mandatory minimum sentencing in some cases. Last week, it offered a relative ly narrow window for retroactive review. The DOJ laid out criteria for a new and welcomed opportunity for inmates who have served at least a decade for low-level, nonviolent of fenses to apply for clemency. Decades of adherence to failed War on Drugs policies has helped make the U.S. the worlds largest jailer, with only 5 percent of the planets population but 25 percent of its inmates. Of the nearly 217,000 federal inmates, half are incar cerated for drug crimes, according to the Bu reau of Prisons. Yet drug usage has risen 2,800 percent since the War on Drugs began in 1971. That absurd juxtaposition has forced cities, including Seattle, and states, led by Washing ton and Colorado, to form a controlled revolt against marijuana laws, the low-hanging fruit of drug-policy reform. But the federal government, until recent ly, has mostly ignored the clamor. Congress in 2010 nally ended a disparity in cocaine-sen tencing laws that sent mostly African-American users of crack to prison for two years longer, on average, than mostly white users of powder co caine. Congress, locked in dysfunction, hasnt made that law retroactive, or done anything else toward meaningful drug reform. Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder are making an end run around the legislative branch by turning to clemency, the tool of the executive. How far they are willing to go is an open question. Criteria for this clemency initiative are vague, requiring no signicant criminal history and demonstrated good conduct in prison. Used broadly, about 7,000 or more in mates could be freed. Expect fewer. In the meantime, Congress remains wed ded to failed drug policies. Members of Congress should wake up and re alize drug-sentencing reform is a populist is sue: More than half of Americans favor legaliz ing marijuana. And the issue is increasingly a bipartisan affair. Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a likely GOP presidential candidate, advocated to shut prisons down at the recent Conservative Politi cal Action Conference. Sens. Dick Durban, D-Ill., and Mike Lee, R-Utah, are co-sponsors of the Smarter Sentencing Act, which would make ret roactive the 2010 crack cocaine sentencing x. Obama and Holder, the rst African-Amer icans to hold either job, speak eloquently about communities of color hollowed out by the racially disproportionate effect of the War on Drugs. Good for them for leading. They shouldnt be alone. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Clemency is a good first step to ending failed War on Drugs policies Classic DOONESBURY 1973 The criticism Kerry faced was so harsh he felt compelled to issue a humiliating apology, even as his nine-month effort to broker a peace deal came to a failed close.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Heat preparing for second round / B5 DAN WAGNER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Big Daddy Don Garlits gears up in the cockpit of the SR-37 Quest for 200 MPH on Batteries dragster recently before a test run at Bradenton Motorsports Park in Bradenton. SUSAN SMILEY-HEIGHT Halifax Media Group Big Daddy Don Gar lits has always been an innovator, and he has always liked going fast. At age 82, he is still in volved in creating the next generation of high-powered race cars and is still gutsy enough to strap into a dragster and blast down a race track in pursuit of speed and time records. On Wednesday, Gar lits was at the Braden ton Motorsports Park testing his new SR-37 Quest for 200 MPH on Batteries dragster. SR stands for Swamp Rat, the moniker given for years to each incar nation of Garlits rac ers. According to Ran dy Cannon, the Las Vegas-based media manager for the project, the Quest Dragster was designed to be the rst battery-electric drag ster to exceed 200 mph on a 1/4 mile drag strip. On Thursday, Don Garlits said the team broke the ofcial bat tery-powered car record in the 1/4 mile. It (the old record) was 156 mph in 7.95 seconds. I set the new record at 184.01 mph in 7.258 seconds, with a backup run of 178.42 mph in 7.526 seconds. This was a very good test, as the car was brand new, he said in an email message. Garlits said he made six passes with the drag ster, but there were sev eral issues, technically speaking. We learned a lot. Donna Garlits, the youngest of Dons two daughters and the general manager and CFO of the Don Gar lits Museum of Drag Racing south of Ocala, said everyone consid ered the day of testing a success. She said that on two of the runs, the batteries shut off, which blew a fuse and activat ed a governor that pow ers it off. She said that on the nal run the parachute did not deploy and Don ran off the end of the dragstrip. We were screaming, It didnt come out, it didnt come out, she said. I saw it run off the track and there was a puff of smoke. It went through a fence and wound up in a recently plowed eld. I was cry ing. My son, who is part of the crew, was dis traught because hes a father gure to him. She said when the MIKE LANG / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Garlits does a burnout as he prepares for a pass while testing the dragster. Chasing 200 again Big Daddy in search of new records with battery-electric dragster IAN HARRISON Associated Press TORONTO Paul Pierce blocked Kyle Lowrys shot from the lane on the nal play of the game, and the Brooklyn Nets held off the Toronto Raptors 104-103 in Game 7 on Sunday to advance to the second round of the playoffs. The Nets will begin the confer ence seminals at Miami on Tues day night to play the two-time de fending NBA champion Heat. Leading by one point, Brooklyn used its nal timeout after failing to inbound the ball. On the sec ond opportunity, Shaun Living ston tried a lob pass to Pierce but Terrence Ross got a hand on the ball, then knocked it off Pierce and out of bounds for a turnover. Toronto used a timeout and gave the ball to Lowry, whose driv ing shot was blocked by Pierce as time expired. Lowry lay prone in the key as the Nets surged onto the court in celebration. Joe Johnson scored 13 of his 26 points in the fourth quarter to lead the Nets. Marcus Thorn ton scored 17, Kevin Garnett had 12 points and 11 rebounds for his rst double-double of the series and Deron Williams scored 13 points. Lowry nished with 28 points and DeMar DeRozan 18 for the Raptors, who fell to 0-2 in fran chise history when playing in a Game 7. Toronto lost Game 7 of the conference seminals to Phil adelphia in 2001. FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry (7) gets fouled by Brooklyn Nets forward Kevin Garnett, right, during the rst half of Game 7 on Sunday in Toronto. Pierces block leads Nets past Raptors 104-103 Brooklyn to face Miami on Tuesday in second round of playoffs SEE GARLITS | B2 KATHY WILLENS / AP Tampa Bay Rays catcher Ryan Hanigan, left, and reliever Grant Balfour (50) shake after Rays beat Yankees 5-1 on Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York. Myers inside-the-park home run leads Rays past Yankees 5-1 MIKE FITZPATRICK AP Sports Writer NEW YORK Wil Myers hit an inside-the-park homer, his latest big hit against the New York Yankees, and drove in four runs as the Tampa Bay Rays battered an ineffective CC Sabathia in a 5-1 victory Sunday. Erik Bedard earned his rst win as a starter since last June, and Evan Longoria had an early RBI double to help the Rays nish 5-5 on a try ing trip that included a dou bleheader sweep Thursday in Boston and a 14-inning win Friday night at Yankee Stadium. Myers knocked in three runs with his homer off the top of the center-eld fence and then chased Sabathia with a ringing RBI double in the fourth. The struggling Sabath ia (3-4) gave up 10 hits and ve runs in 3 2-3 innings, his shortest start since lasting 2 2-3 innings on Oct. 2, 2009, at Tampa Bay. He was late covering rst on a poten tial double play in the fourth and heard some boos from the crowd of 41,122 during an outing that raised his ERA to 5.75. Peyton Manning and his brother, Eli, showed up to watch buddy Derek Jeter play one last time during his nal season. The star quarter backs sat in Jeters suite along SEE RAYS | B2 JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer TALLADEGA, Ala. Denny Hamlin, win ner of three races at Daytona that didnt count, nally has a points-paying victo ry at a restrictor-plate track. Hamlin, who opened the season with a pair of wins in Daytona ex hibition races only to nish second in the Daytona 500, was again sitting second in the closing laps Sun day at Talladega Su perspeedway. But he won a drag race with leader Kevin Harvick on a restart with two laps remaining, and was out front when NASCAR froze the eld because of debris from an accident. Hamlin let out a deep sigh when the yellow ag waved. Superspeedway win, he said on his ra dio. With points! With points! Hamlin became the eighth winner in 10 races this season as drivers jockey to grab Denny Hamlin outduels Harvick in drag race to win at Talladega BOB LEVERONE / AP J.B. Holmes poses with the trophy after winning the Wells Fargo championship on Sunday in Charlotte, N.C. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer CHARLOTTE, N.C. More than two years af ter going through brain surgery, J.B. Holmes is a winner again on the PGA Tour. Holmes made it harder than he needed to on the nal hole at Quail Hollow until rapping in a 3-foot bogey putt for a 1-under 71 and a oneshot victory over Jim Furyk in the Wells Fargo Championship. Furyk nished his Sunday-best 65 some two hours earlier. Jason Bohn had the best chance to catch Holmes. He was one shot behind when he SEE NASCAR | B2 Holmes completes his comeback with victory SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Aarons 499 Results Sunday At Talladega Superspeedway Talladega, Ala. Lap length: 2.66 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (34) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 188 laps, 123.2 rat ing, 47 points. 2. (35) Greg Bife, Ford, 188, 115.1, 44. 3. (27) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 188, 67.2, 41. 4. (18) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 188, 81.8, 41. 5. (3) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 188, 88.2, 39. 6. (2) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 188, 83.8, 39. 7. (8) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 188, 107.6, 38. 8. (42) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 188, 87.7, 36. 9. (29) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 188, 94.8, 35. 10. (25) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 188, 65.5, 34. 11. (41) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 188, 64.6, 0. 12. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 188, 103.4, 33. 13. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 188, 66.3, 31. 14. (4) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 188, 74.7, 31. 15. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 188, 79.4, 29. 16. (17) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 188, 55.2, 28. 17. (43) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 188, 85.2, 27. 18. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 188, 45.8, 27. 19. (26) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188, 61, 26. 20. (36) Josh Wise, Ford, 188, 48.8, 24. 21. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 188, 58.2, 23. 22. (7) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 188, 74.9, 23. 23. (20) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 188, 99.8, 22. 24. (37) Terry Labonte, Ford, 188, 38.7, 20. 25. (28) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 188, 43.9, 19. 26. (30) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 188, 69, 19. 27. (38) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 188, 53.4, 17. 28. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota, accident, 187, 62.4, 16. 29. (32) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 187, 32.4, 15. 30. (10) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 182, 52, 15. 31. (24) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 182, 62.5, 13. 32. (16) Joey Logano, Ford, accident, 174, 91.3, 13. 33. (9) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 174, 82.4, 11. 34. (22) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident, 174, 50.1, 11. 35. (39) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 174, 52.9, 10. 36. (14) Michael McDowell, Ford, accident, 174, 56.2, 9. 37. (21) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 171, 77.6, 8. 38. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 160, 32.6, 7. 39. (11) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 156, 69.1, 6. 40. (40) David Gilliland, Ford, engine, 150, 60.6, 5. 41. (23) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 136, 77.6, 0. 42. (1) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, accident, 136, 60.3, 0. 43. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, accident, 136, 44.2, 1. European Tour/Asian Tour-The Championship Laguna National Scores Sunday At Laguna National Golf and Country Club, Masters Course Singapore Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 7,109; Par: 72 Final Felipe Aguilar, Chile 65-67-72-62 266 David Lipsky, United States 64-68-70-65 267 Anders Hansen, Denmark 67-66-67-67 267 Rahil Gangjee, India 66-67-71-65 269 Chris Wood, England 68-67-68-67 270 Anirban Lahiri, India 67-70-68-66 271 Gregory Bourdy, France 66-70-67-68 271 David Drysdale, Scotland 68-70-70-65 273 Raphael Jacquelin, France 69-70-68-66 273 Tommy Fleetwood, England 68-67-69-69 273 Rikard Karlberg, Sweden 70-68-70-66 274 S.S.P. Chowrasia, India 68-68-71-67 274 Antonio Lascuna, Philippines 68-69-69-68 274 Baek Seuk-hyun, South Korea 66-67-72-69 274 Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 68-70-66-70 274 Panuphol Pittayarat, Thailand 63-68-69-74 274 Prom Meesawat, Thailand 66-70-72-67 275 Nacho Elvira, Spain 68-69-71-67 275 Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 65-68-73-68 275 NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana 4, Atlanta 3 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Thursday, May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 Saturday, May 3: Indiana 92, Atlanta 80 Miami 4, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Brooklyn 4, Toronto 3 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 Wednesday, April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 Friday, May 2: Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83 Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103 Washington 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69 WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Dallas 3 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 Wednesday, April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 Friday, May 2: Dallas 113, San Antonio 111 Sunday, May 4: San Antonio 119, Dallas 96 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 Saturday, May 3: Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109 L.A. Clippers 4, Golden State 3 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clip pers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 Thursday, May 1: Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99 Saturday, May 3: L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121 Portland 4, Houston 2 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 Friday, May 2: Portland 99, Houston 98 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami vs. Brooklyn Tuesday, May 6: Brooklyn at Miami, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Brooklyn at Miami, 7 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Monday, May 12: Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Brooklyn at Miami, TBD x-Friday, May 16: Miami at Brooklyn, TBD x-Sunday, May 18: Brooklyn at Miami, TBD Indiana vs. Washington Monday, May 5: Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. Friday, May 9: Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 11: Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 13: Washington at Indiana, TBD x-Thursday, May 15: Indiana at Washington, TBD x-Sunday, May 18: Washington at Indiana, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Portland Tuesday, May 6: Portland at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Portland at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10: San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Monday, May 12: at San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 14: Portland at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, May 16: San Antonio at Portland, TBD x-Monday, May 19: Portland at San Antonio, TBD Oklahoma City vs. L.A. Clippers Monday, May 5: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Friday, May 9: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, May 11: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 13: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Thursday, May 15: Oklahoma City at L.A. Clip pers, TBD x-Sunday, May 18: L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, TBD Nets 104, Raptors 103 BROOKLYN (104) J.Johnson 11-25 3-5 26, Pierce 4-10 0-0 10, Garnett 5-8 2-3 12, Williams 3-8 7-10 13, Anderson 2-6 0-0 5, Blatche 4-7 1-2 9, Thornton 4-8 5-6 17, Kirilenko 0-0 0-0 0, Plumlee 0-1 2-2 2, Livingston 4-5 2-2 10, Teletovic 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 37-81 22-30 104. TORONTO (103) Ross 5-12 1-3 11, A.Johnson 9-12 2-2 20, Valanci unas 1-5 1-1 3, Lowry 7-19 12-14 28, DeRozan 5-12 7-7 18, Patterson 5-5 6-6 16, Vasquez 1-3 0-0 2, Sal mons 1-3 0-0 3, Fields 0-0 0-0 0, Hayes 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-73 29-33 103. Brooklyn 26 35 20 23 104 Toronto 28 25 20 30 103 3-Point GoalsBrooklyn 8-23 (Thornton 4-6, Pierce 2-4, Anderson 1-4, J.Johnson 1-5, Williams 0-1, Tele tovic 0-3), Toronto 4-13 (Lowry 2-4, DeRozan 1-2, Salmons 1-3, Vasquez 0-1, Ross 0-3). Fouled OutA. Johnson. ReboundsBrooklyn 51 (Garnett 11), To ronto 43 (A.Johnson 10). AssistsBrooklyn 16 (Wil liams, J.Johnson 4), Toronto 13 (DeRozan 6). Total FoulsBrooklyn 26, Toronto 27. TechnicalsGarnett, DeRozan. A,457 (19,800). Spurs 119, Mavericks 96 DALLAS (96) Marion 2-5 1-2 5, Nowitzki 8-21 6-7 22, Dalembert 1-3 0-0 2, Calderon 2-8 0-0 4, Ellis 3-11 4-4 12, Carter 4-12 0-0 10, Blair 4-5 0-0 8, Harris 6-10 2-2 17, Wright 3-4 0-0 6, Crowder 1-4 0-0 2, Larkin 0-1 0-0 0, Ellington 2-4 2-2 8, B.James 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-88 15-17 96. SAN ANTONIO (119) Leonard 7-14 0-1 15, Duncan 7-8 1-2 15, Splitter 0-0 1-2 1, Parker 11-19 10-13 32, Green 5-7 2-2 16, Diaw 3-5 2-2 8, Ginobili 5-7 8-9 20, Belinelli 2-4 0-0 5, Mills 2-8 1-2 7, Baynes 0-0 0-0 0, Bonner 0-0 0-0 0, Joseph 0-0 0-0 0, Ayres 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 4274 25-33 119. Dallas 23 23 22 28 96 San Antonio 35 33 26 25 119 3-Point GoalsDallas 9-25 (Harris 3-3, Ellington 2-4, Ellis 2-6, Carter 2-6, Marion 0-1, Crowder 0-1, Nowitzki 0-2, Calderon 0-2), San Antonio 10-24 (Green 4-6, Ginobili 2-3, Mills 2-6, Belinelli 1-2, Leon ard 1-5, Parker 0-1, Diaw 0-1). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsDallas 46 (Nowitzki 9), San Antonio 48 (Duncan 8). AssistsDallas 21 (Carter, Calderon 4), San Antonio 21 (Diaw, Ginobili 5). Total FoulsDallas 21, San Antonio 21. TechnicalsDallas Coach Carl isle, Parker. Flagrant FoulsBlair, Crowder. A,581 (18,797). NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT SECOND ROUND EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 1, Boston 1 Thursday, May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT Saturday, May 3: Boston 5, Montreal 3 Tuesday, May 6: Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Montreal at Boston, TBD x-Monday, May 12: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, May 14: Montreal at Boston, TBD N.Y. Rangers 1, Pittsburgh 0 Friday, May 2: N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Sunday, May 4: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 5: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 9: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Sunday, May 11: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Tuesday, May 13: N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, Minnesota 0 Friday, May 2: Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Sunday, May 4: Chicago 4, Minnesota 1 Tuesday, May 6: Chicago at Minnesota, 9 p.m. Friday, May 9: Chicago at Minnesota, TBD x-Sunday, May 11: Minnesota at Chicago, TBD x-Tuesday, May 13: Chicago at Minnesota, TBD x-Thursday, May 15: Minnesota at Chicago, TBD Los Angeles 1, Anaheim 0 Saturday, May 3: Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT Monday, May 5: Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday, May 8: Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Anaheim at Los Angeles, TBD x-Monday, May 12: Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBD x-Wednesday, May 14: Anaheim at Los Angeles, TBD x-Friday, May 16: Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBD Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled OF Nyjer Morgan from Columbus (IL). Optioned LHP Nick Hagadone to Columbus. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Activated LHP Tim Collins from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Aaron Brooks to Omaha (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled RHP Nathan Karns from Durham (IL). Designated RHP Heath Bell for assignment. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN St. Louis at Atlanta 7:10 p.m. FS-Florida N.Y. Mets at Miami NBA 7 p.m. TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 1, Washington at Indiana 9:30 p.m. TNT Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 1, L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City NHL 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 3, N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh 10 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference seminals, Game 2, Los Angeles at Anaheim SOCCER 2:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Crystal Palace vs. Liverpool, at London PGA-Wells Fargo Leading Scores Sunday At Quail Hollow Club Course Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.9 million Yardage: 7,562; Par: 72 Final J.B. Holmes (500), $1,242,000 70-67-66-71 274 Jim Furyk (300), $745,200 72-69-69-65 275 Martin Flores (190), $469,200 67-68-69-72 276 Jason Bohn (135), $331,200 73-67-67-70 277 Justin Rose (110), $276,000 69-67-71-71 278 Brendon de Jonge (95), $239,775 80-62-68-69 279 Kevin Kisner (95), $239,775 72-66-68-73 279 Roberto Castro (80), $200,100 71-70-69-70 280 Rory McIlroy (80), $200,100 69-76-65-70 280 Rory Sabbatini (80), $200,100 74-68-71-67 280 Kevin Chappell (65), $158,700 73-70-70-68 281 Phil Mickelson (65), $158,700 67-75-63-76 281 Michael Thompson (65), $158,700 71-69-69-72 281 Jonathan Byrd (56), $120,750 68-71-70-73 282 Zach Johnson (56), $120,750 71-70-69-72 282 Geoff Ogilvy (56), $120,750 72-67-70-73 282 Kevin Streelman (56), $120,750 72-69-71-70 282 Charles Howell III (51), $89,976 69-71-70-73 283 Martin Kaymer (51), $89,976 69-69-70-75 283 Ryan Moore (51), $89,976 70-71-76-66 283 Kevin Na (51), $89,976 69-72-69-73 283 Gary Woodland (51), $89,976 71-72-68-72 283 Jason Kokrak (45), $58,157 75-68-73-68 284 Y.E. Yang (45), $58,157 73-72-71-68 284 Stewart Cink (45), $58,157 68-70-74-72 284 John Merrick (45), $58,157 71-70-70-73 284 Wes Roach (45), $58,157 71-71-69-73 284 Robert Streb (45), $58,157 71-69-71-73 284 Mark Wilson (45), $58,157 72-72-66-74 284 Ricky Barnes (38), $40,106 72-72-68-73 285 Scott Brown (38), $40,106 71-73-70-71 285 Angel Cabrera (38), $40,106 66-69-75-75 285 Derek Ernst (38), $40,106 73-68-70-74 285 Chris Kirk (38), $40,106 71-70-71-73 285 Martin Laird (38), $40,106 69-70-73-73 285 Vijay Singh (38), $40,106 69-72-71-73 285 Brendan Steele (38), $40,106 72-72-69-72 285 crew got to the car, Dons rst words were: I guess I need a tow rope. He was cool as a cu cumber, she said. Hes ne; the car is pretty much ne, she added. Well gure out whats ahead and get better and try again for 200 (mph). That car can denitely do it. According to Cannon, the cars team hopes to set the 200 mph speed mark this year to coin cide with the 50th an niversary of Don Gar lits historic rst ofcial 200 mph pass in 1964 in a top-fuel dragster. Many things have changed in those 50 years. Garlits went on to set a long list of re cords and amass a number of champion ship titles. The inno vations he implement ed after an explosion in a front-engine drag ster nearly killed him and claimed part of his right foot in the ear ly 1970s led to a radi cal change in the way top fuel cars were congured and in much-improved driver safety. Garlits again is on the forefront of change. Cannon said in a state ment that the Quest car is powered by a 1,500 kilowatt array of lithium polymer (LiPo) batter ies by HighTech Systems that produce an equiva lent horsepower rating of more than 2,000 hp, with GE motors by Lawless Industries. The car uses Manzanita Micro Zilla Controllers. The co-own ers are Garlits, Brad Had man and Mike Gerry. Cannon said by phone Wednesday that everyone was pretty happy with the rst full test runs of the electric dragster. He said they began testing in late 2012 when the car was bare bones: no skin, no wing. Tuesdays tests, he said, were right out of the crate and proved the technology is work able. He said the car sur vived some pounding. The rst run was at 30 percent power and it went 129 (mph), which is pretty strong. Most electric vehicles dont go much faster than that. At 50 percent, it went 151 mph. At 100 percent there was a power de cline, maybe a control ler issue. It didnt seem to get up to full power. Don Garlits stated that the team is trying to get the Tesla Car Co. involved, as they have access to lots of techni cal information. They had a Tesla car there that was very im pressive, a stock vehi cle that ran the 1/4 mile in 13.13 seconds with a 105 mph, stock off the showroom oor. I en joyed driving the Tesla car, Garlits wrote in his email. Cannon said the Quest Dragster will be thoroughly gone over to determine if there is any damage from landing in the plowed eld. He said the batteries would be ne as they are en cased in Plexiglas, but the motors and chassis and other components would be torn down for inspection. Cannon said the team will still try for the 200 mph record as soon as possible. That will depend on Dons schedule. Hes busier than everyone at his age, Cannon said. Garlits is aiming for a retry in a few weeks. We did not reach the desired goal of 200 mph, but we will re turn to the strip in June when the modications have been made to the car that will improve the performance, he noted. GARLITS FROM PAGE B1 the rst base line but didnt see much of a show a slumping Jeter went 0 for 4 and stranded four runners, extending his hitless streak to 13 at-bats. Bedard (1-1) pitched six-plus effective in nings for his rst win as a starter since June 26 for Houston against St. Louis. He was 0-9 in his previous 15 starts, though he did win in relief on Sept. 4 against Minnesota. Logan Forsythe, the rst batter Sabathia faced, doubled off the wall in left and scored on Longorias ground-rule double to right. With runners at rst and second in the third, Myers sent a long drive to right-center beyond the reach of Jacoby Ellsbury. The ball hit the top of the wall near the 385-foot sign, caromed off a leaping Ellsbury and rolled away along the warning track. Last seasons AL Rookie of the Year jogged out of the batters box, then turned it on while rounding rst base. He scored standing up without a play after second baseman Yangervis Solarte couldnt handle a one-hop throw from right elder Carlos Beltran. It was Tampa Bays 11th inside-the-park ho mer and rst since Ben Zobrists against Toron to at Tropicana Field on Sept. 25, 2011. The pre vious player to hit an inside-the-park home run at Yankee Stadium was Jeter against Kansas City on July 22, 2010, according to STATS. Myers also homered Saturday and had a tie breaking single in the 14th inning of the series opener Friday night. He has hit safely in all 13 of his games at Yankee Stadium, the longest streak to start a career at the new or old versions of the ballpark. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 the 16 spots available in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. A victory conceivably gives a driver an auto matic berth, and Joe Gibbs Racing now has both Hamlin and Kyle Busch eligible for the Chase. It didnt appear that Hamlin had enough to beat Harvick, already a two-time winner this season, until the nal restart. Harvick didnt get the help he needed from behind, was hung out without any drafting partners, and Hamlin pulled out to a comfort able lead. Then an acci dent deep in the pack scattered debris, and NASCAR was forced to throw the caution when a bumper was seen lay ing on the surface. The yellow prevented Greg Bife from pulling out of line in an attempt to grab the victory away from Hamlin. Clint Bowyer nished third and was followed by Michael Waltrip Rac ing teammate Brian Vickers as Toyota took the victory and three of the top four spots. AJ Allmendinger n ished fth in a Chev rolet, followed by Paul Menard and then Har vick, who faded to sev enth. Kasey Kahne, Kyle Larson and Ricky Sten house Jr. rounded out the top 10. Danica Patrick led two times for six laps, and the crowd roared its approval when she drove to the front early in the race. It was a rough day for Brad Keselowski, a twotime Talladega winner, who darted to the lead on Lap 14 but appeared to not have cleared Pat rick before squeezing in front of her car. She tapped the back of Ke selowskis car, sending him for a spin through the grass that caused enough damage to drop him six laps off the pace. We werent clear enough to make that, crew chief Paul Wolfe told his driver. Ill just call it at that: We werent clear enough to make that move. Keselowski raced in the heart of the pack af ter the rst incident in an attempt to get his laps back under cau tion periods. But he was heavily criticized for triggering a 14-car ac cident with 51 laps re maining. The accident began when Keselows ki spun in front of Trev or Bayne, and among those collected were Jeff Gordon, Matt Kenseth, Tony Stewart and Jim mie Johnson. Brad made a pret ty bold move early, a mind-boggling move, in going in front of Dani ca and spun out in front of the eld and got away with it, Kenseth said. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 pulled a 4-iron into the water on the par-3 17th, making double bogey. Phil Mickelson nev er had a chance, missing four putts from the 4-foot range and closing with a 76 to nish out of the top 10. The victory capped a remarkable turnaround for Holmes, who won for the third time in his career. He was diagnosed in 2011 with structural de fects in the cerebellum known as Chiara mal formations, and he had surgery twice once to remove a piece of his skull that he still keeps at home, another because of an allergic reac tion to the adhesive on the titanium plate at the base of his skull. Then, he injured his elbow by hitting too many balls in an attempt to return from the brain surgery. He didnt bother having sur gery on his elbow until last year, when he was sidelined by a broken ankle and couldnt play, anyway. Only last week, Holmes earned enough mon ey to keep his card for the rest of the year from a medical extension. Now, hes headed to The Players Championship next week for the rich est prize in golf, and more importantly, secured a spot in the PGA Championship this summer in his native Kentucky. Its been a long journey for me, Holmes said. Ive had some ups and downs. Its a great feeling to be out there and to get one done. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 16 14 .533 4-6 L-1 9-8 7-6 Baltimore 15 14 .517 6-4 L-2 7-6 8-8 Boston 15 17 .469 2 1 5-5 L-1 8-11 7-6 Tampa Bay 15 17 .469 2 1 5-5 W-1 7-7 8-10 Toronto 14 17 .452 2 2 3-7 W-1 5-7 9-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 17 9 .654 8-2 W-5 9-5 8-4 Minnesota 14 15 .483 4 1 5-5 W-2 8-9 6-6 Chicago 15 17 .469 5 1 4-6 W-1 9-7 6-10 Kansas City 14 16 .467 5 1 4-6 L-4 8-7 6-9 Cleveland 13 18 .419 6 3 3-7 L-1 9-7 4-11 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 19 12 .613 6-4 W-1 6-6 13-6 Texas 17 14 .548 2 4-6 W-1 9-7 8-7 Los Angeles 15 15 .500 3 5-5 L-1 7-8 8-7 Seattle 14 15 .483 4 1 7-3 W-2 5-6 9-9 Houston 10 21 .323 9 6 3-7 L-2 6-13 4-8 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 17 13 .567 4-6 L-6 9-6 8-7 Washington 17 14 .548 6-4 L-2 9-8 8-6 New York 16 14 .533 1 1 6-4 W-1 8-8 8-6 Philadelphia 15 14 .517 1 1 6-4 W-2 6-7 9-7 Miami 16 15 .516 1 1 6-4 W-1 14-5 2-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 21 11 .656 5-5 L-2 9-6 12-5 Cincinnati 15 16 .484 5 2 5-5 W-2 8-7 7-9 St. Louis 15 16 .484 5 2 3-7 L-2 7-5 8-11 Chicago 11 17 .393 8 5 5-5 W-3 7-8 4-9 Pittsburgh 12 19 .387 8 5 3-7 L-1 8-9 4-10 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 20 11 .645 9-1 W-5 10-5 10-6 Colorado 19 14 .576 2 7-3 L-1 11-5 8-9 Los Angeles 18 14 .563 2 5-5 L-1 6-9 12-5 San Diego 14 18 .438 6 4 4-6 W-1 8-8 6-10 Arizona 11 23 .324 10 8 5-5 L-1 3-15 8-8 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 9, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 6, Oakland 3 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 1 Seattle 9, Houston 8 Cleveland 2, Chicago White Sox 0 Pittsburgh 8, Toronto 6 Detroit 9, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 5, Texas 3 SATURDAYS GAMES Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 0 Pittsburgh 8, Toronto 6 Philadelphia 7, Washington 2 L.A. Dodgers 9, Miami 7, 11 innings Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2 San Francisco 3, Atlanta 1 Colorado 11, N.Y. Mets 10 Arizona 4, San Diego 3 SUNDAYS GAMES Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 3 Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Yankees 1 Oakland 3, Boston 2, 10 innings Toronto 7, Pittsburgh 2 Minnesota 5, Baltimore 2 Detroit 9, Kansas City 4 Seattle 8, Houston 7 Texas 14, L.A. Angels 3 SUNDAYS GAMES Miami 5, L.A. Dodgers 4 San Francisco 4, Atlanta 1 Toronto 7, Pittsburgh 2 Philadelphia 1, Washington 0 San Diego 4, Arizona 3 Cincinnati 4, Milwaukee 3, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 5, Colorado 1 St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, late KATHY WILLENS / AP From left to right, Tampa Bay Rays Sean Rodriguez, Desmond Jennings and Evan Longoria greet Wil Myers after Myers third-inning homer on Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York. TODAYS GAMES Minnesota (Gibson 3-2) at Cleveland (McAllister 3-2), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Happ 0-0) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Houston (Cosart 1-2) at Detroit (Scherzer 3-1), 7:08 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-2) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-3), 8:05 p.m. Texas (M.Perez 4-1) at Colorado (Lyles 3-0), 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 2-2), 10:05 p.m. Seattle (C.Young 1-0) at Oakland (Kazmir 4-0), 10:05 p.m. Kansas City (Ventura 2-1) at San Diego (Stults 1-3), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 5-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 2-1), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 0-3) at Pittsburgh (Locke 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Happ 0-0) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-2), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-2) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 3-2) at Atlanta (Harang 3-2), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-2) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-3), 8:05 p.m. Arizona (Bolsinger 1-1) at Milwaukee (Garza 1-3), 8:10 p.m. Texas (M.Perez 4-1) at Colorado (Lyles 3-0), 8:40 p.m. Kansas City (Ventura 2-1) at San Diego (Stults 1-3), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Wieters, Baltimore, .354; Ellsbury, New York, .346; AlRamirez, Chicago, .344; Loney, Tampa Bay, .343; Choo, Texas, .337; Rios, Texas, .333; VMartinez, Detroit, .326; MeCabrera, Toronto, .326. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 29; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Donaldson, Oakland, 23; Mauer, Minnesota, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 22; JAbreu, Chicago, 21; Pujols, Los An geles, 21. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 33; Colabello, Minnesota, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 27; Pujols, Los Angeles, 24; Brantley, Cleveland, 23; Donaldson, Oakland, 23; Lawrie, Toronto, 21; Moss, Oakland, 21. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 42; AlRamirez, Chicago, 42; Rios, Texas, 39; Ellsbury, New York, 37; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 37; Loney, Tampa Bay, 37; Altuve, Houston, 36. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 13; AGordon, Kansas City, 12; Hosmer, Kansas City, 12; Loney, Tampa Bay, 11; Pedroia, Boston, 11; Viciedo, Chicago, 11; Donald son, Oakland, 10; Ellsbury, New York, 10. TRIPLES: Infante, Kansas City, 3; 12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 11; Bautista, Toronto, 9; Pujols, Los Angeles, 9; NCruz, Baltimore, 8; Dozier, Min nesota, 8; Donaldson, Oakland, 7; Lawrie, Toronto, 6; Ortiz, Boston, 6; Rasmus, Toronto, 6. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 11; Ellsbury, New York, 10; Andrus, Texas, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 9; Dozier, Minnesota, 9; LMartin, Texas, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 5-1; Kazmir, Oakland, 4-0; Tanaka, New York, 4-0; Porcello, Detroit, 4-1; MPerez, Texas, 4-1; Gray, Oakland, 4-1; CWilson, Los Angeles, 4-2; Lackey, Boston, 4-2. ERA: Ventura, Kansas City, 1.50; Gray, Oakland, 1.76; JChavez, Oakland, 1.89; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.08; Kazmir, Oakland, 2.11; Buehrle, Toronto, 2.25; Vargas, Kansas City, 2.40. STRIKEOUTS: Lester, Boston, 58; Price, Tampa Bay, 55; FHernandez, Seattle, 53; Scherzer, Detroit, 51; Tanaka, New York, 51; Shields, Kansas City, 44; Sabathia, New York, 41; Masterson, Cleveland, 41. SAVES: Axford, Cleveland, 9; TomHunter, Baltimore, 8; Soria, Texas, 7; Rodney, Seattle, 7; Uehara, Boston. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Tulowitzki, Colorado, .400; Blackmon, Colo rado, .372; DGordon, Los Angeles, .357; Utley, Phila delphia, .350; YMolina, St. Louis, .343; Morneau, Col orado, .339; Uribe, Los Angeles, .333; MaAdams, St. Louis, .333. RUNS: Tulowitzki, Colorado, 29; Blackmon, Colorado, 27; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 23; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 22; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 21; EYoung, New York, 21; Bruce, Cincinnati, 20; Rendon, Washington, 20. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 33; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 25; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 25; Morneau, Colorado, 24; Black mon, Colorado, 22; Byrd, Philadelphia, 22. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 43; Blackmon, Colorado, 42; Arenado, Colorado, 40; DGordon, Los Angeles, 40; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 40; Uribe, Los Angeles, 39; MaAd ams, St. Louis, 38; Morneau, Colorado, 38. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 12; HRamirez, Los An geles, 12; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 11; Utley, Philadelphia, 11; Hill, Arizona, 10; Rendon, Washington, 10; Tulow itzki, Colorado, 10. TRIPLES: Hechavarria, Miami, 3; Simmons, Atlanta, 3; Yelich, Miami, 3; 12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 9; Belt, San Francisco, 8; Morse, San Francisco, 8; Stanton, Miami, 8; JUpton, Atlanta, 8; 8 tied at 7. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 19; EYoung, New York, 12; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 11; Bonifacio, Chi cago, 10; Revere, Philadelphia, 10; Marte, Pittsburgh, 9; Blackmon, Colorado, 7. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 5-0; Wainwright, St. Louis, 5-2; 9 tied at 4. ERA: Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.31; Fernandez, Miami, 1.59; Simon, Cincinnati, 1.60; Teheran, Atlanta, 1.80; Sa mardzija, Chicago, 1.98; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 2.04; Greinke, Los Angeles, 2.04. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 60; Strasburg, Wash ington, 58; Fernandez, Miami, 55; Wacha, St. Louis, 50; Greinke, Los Angeles, 46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 46; ClLee, Philadelphia, 45. SAVES: FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 14; Jansen, Los Ange les, 11; Street, San Diego, 10; Romo, San Francisco, 9. Rays 5, Yankees 1 Tampa Bay New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Forsyth 3b 5 2 2 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 0 0 DJnngs cf 4 1 3 0 Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 Longori dh 4 1 1 1 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 Myers rf 5 1 2 4 Teixeir 1b 4 1 1 0 SRdrgz 2b 5 0 1 0 ASorin dh 3 0 1 0 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 2 0 Solarte 2b 2 0 1 1 Guyer lf 4 0 2 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 2 0 Hanign c 4 0 0 0 JMrphy c 3 0 1 0 McCnn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 39 5 13 5 Totals 33 1 7 1 Tampa Bay 103 100 000 5 New York 010 000 000 1 LOBTampa Bay 9, New York 8. 2BForsythe (4), De.Jennings (9), Longoria (6), Myers (6), A.Soriano (7), Ke.Johnson (5). HRMyers (4). SDe.Jennings. SFSolarte. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Bedard W,1-1 6 6 1 1 1 3 McGee 1 1 0 0 0 0 Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 0 0 0 1 0 New York Sabathia L,3-4 3 2 / 3 10 5 5 1 3 Aceves 5 1 / 3 3 0 0 0 5 Bedard pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPBedard. UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Brian ONora; Third, Doug Eddings. T:14. A,122 (49,642). White Sox 4, Indians 3 Chicago Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi De Aza lf 3 0 0 0 Morgan cf 5 0 2 0 GBckh 2b 3 1 0 0 Swisher 1b 4 0 0 0 JAreu 1b 4 1 1 1 Brantly lf 5 1 1 0 A.Dunn dh 2 0 0 0 CSantn 3b 4 0 0 0 Sierra pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Chsnhll dh 4 0 3 1 Viciedo rf 4 1 2 3 ACarer ss 4 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 1 0 JrDnks cf 4 0 0 0 JRmrz 2b 4 0 0 0 Flowrs c 3 0 0 0 Kottars c 3 2 2 2 LeGarc 3b 2 0 1 0 Totals 29 4 4 4 Totals 36 3 9 3 Chicago 100 000 003 4 Cleveland 002 100 000 3 DPCleveland 1. LOBChicago 3, Cleveland 12. 2B Morgan (1). HRJ.Abreu (12), Viciedo (2), Kottaras 2 (2). SBLe.Garcia (4), Chisenhall (2). SDe Aza. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Rienzo 4 2 / 3 7 3 3 4 2 Putnam 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 1 D.Webb W,2-0 1 1 0 0 1 0 Lindstrom S,4-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 Cleveland Kluber 8 3 1 1 2 13 Axford L,0-2 BS,2-11 2 / 3 1 3 3 2 2 Rzepczynski 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Belisario (Chisenhall). PBFlowers. UmpiresHome, Pat Hoberg; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Eric Cooper; Third, Chris Guccione. T:55. A,455 (42,487). Twins 5, Orioles 2 Baltimore Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 5 0 1 0 Dozier 2b 3 2 1 0 Machd 3b 4 1 2 0 Mauer 1b 1 0 0 0 N.Cruz lf 4 1 1 2 Hrmnn rf 4 0 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 Plouffe dh 4 0 2 2 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 Colaell rf-1b 5 1 1 0 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 Kubel lf 2 1 1 0 DYong dh 4 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 3 3 Pearce 1b 4 0 0 0 Fuld cf 4 0 0 0 Schoop 2b 3 0 1 0 EEscor 3b 4 0 1 0 Flormn ss 4 1 0 0 Totals 36 2 8 2 Totals 34 5 10 5 Baltimore 000 002 000 2 Minnesota 002 010 20x 5 EHerrmann (1). LOBBaltimore 8, Minnesota 11. 2BPlouffe (14), Colabello (10), K.Suzuki 2 (7). HRN.Cruz (9). SBDozier 2 (11). IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore M.Gonzalez L,1-3 4 2 / 3 6 3 3 4 7 Patton 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Matusz 1 0 0 0 1 0 R.Webb 1 / 3 2 2 2 1 0 Z.Britton 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Brach 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Minnesota P.Hughes W,3-1 6 1 / 3 6 2 2 0 3 Swarzak H,1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Thielbar H,2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Fien H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Perkins S,7-8 1 1 0 0 0 1 BalkR.Webb. UmpiresHome, Marcus Pattillo; First, Laz Diaz; Sec ond, Scott Barry; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:02. A,559 (39,021). Tigers 9, Royals 4 Detroit Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi RDavis lf 6 3 3 0 Aoki rf 1 0 1 2 Kinsler 2b 5 1 2 1 Infante 2b 5 0 1 0 MiCarr 1b 4 0 1 2 Hosmer 1b 5 0 0 0 VMrtnz dh 3 0 1 0 BButler dh 4 0 2 0 TrHntr rf 5 0 3 3 AGordn lf 3 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 5 1 1 0 S.Perez c 3 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 5 1 1 1 Hayes pr-c 1 1 0 0 Avila c 5 1 1 2 Mostks 3b 3 1 0 0 AnRmn ss 5 2 3 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 0 Dyson cf 4 1 1 2 Totals 43 9 16 9 Totals 33 4 7 4 Detroit 011 320 020 9 Kansas City 000 000 301 4 LOBDetroit 10, Kansas City 8. 2BR.Davis (3), Kins ler (8), Mi.Cabrera (10), B.Butler (5), S.Perez (10). 3BDyson (1). HRCastellanos (4), Avila (2). SBR. Davis 2 (11), A.Jackson (3). SFAoki. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Verlander W,4-1 7 4 3 3 4 7 Krol 1 1 0 0 0 0 Alburquerque 1 2 1 1 1 1 Kansas City Vargas L,2-1 5 11 7 7 2 3 Ti.Collins 2 1 0 0 0 1 Mariot 1 3 2 2 1 1 G.Holland 1 1 0 0 0 2 WPVerlander, Mariot. UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Todd Tichenor. T:11. A,504 (37,903). Athletics 3, Red Sox 2, 10 innings Oakland Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 5 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 5 1 1 0 Victorn rf 4 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 2 2 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 Moss 1b-rf 4 0 2 1 Carp 1b 4 1 2 0 Callasp ph 0 0 0 0 JHerrr pr 0 0 0 0 Gentry rf 0 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 0 0 0 0 Cespds lf 5 0 2 2 Przyns c 4 1 2 1 Jaso dh 5 0 1 0 Bogarts ss 3 0 1 0 DNorrs c 2 0 1 0 GSizmr lf 2 0 2 1 Reddck rf 4 0 0 0 JGoms ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Barton 1b 0 0 0 0 Mdlrks 3b 3 0 1 0 Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 0 0 0 Punto ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 3 8 3 Totals 35 2 9 2 Oakland 100 001 000 1 3 Boston 000 010 100 0 2 ECrisp (2), Reddick (2). DPOakland 4, Boston 1. LOBOakland 9, Boston 5. 2BLowrie (10), Moss (4), Cespedes (9), G.Sizemore (5). HRPierzynski (3). SBDonaldson (1). CSJ.Herrera (2). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Gray 6 6 2 2 2 3 Abad 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0 Doolittle 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Ji.Johnson W,3-2 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Boston Lackey 6 5 2 2 3 4 A.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 2 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 2 Uehara 1 1 0 0 1 1 Capuano L,1-1 2 / 3 1 1 1 2 0 Badenhop 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Dan Bellino; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T:45. A,649 (37,071). Marlins 5, Dodgers 4 Los Angeles Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 1 1 0 Yelich lf 4 1 1 1 Puig rf 4 1 1 0 Dietrch 2b 3 1 1 0 HRmrz ss 5 0 1 1 JeBakr ph-2b 2 0 1 1 AdGnzl 1b 4 1 0 0 Stanton rf 3 2 2 3 Kemp cf 3 0 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 3 0 1 1 Sltlmch c 4 0 1 0 VnSlyk ph 0 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 0 1 0 JWrght p 0 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 3 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 3 1 2 0 Butera c 3 0 0 0 Frnndz p 2 0 0 0 Figgins ph 0 1 0 0 RJhnsn ph 0 0 0 0 Olivo c 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Fife p 3 0 0 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Solano ph 0 0 0 0 Ethier lf 1 0 1 1 Totals 33 4 6 3 Totals 33 5 9 5 Los Angeles 002 001 001 4 Miami 200 011 001 5 Two outs when winning run scored. EDietrich (6). LOBLos Angeles 9, Miami 7. 2B Ethier (3), Je.Baker (2), G.Jones (6). HRYelich (2), Stanton 2 (10). CSD.Gordon (3). SYelich, Solano. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Fife 6 7 4 4 1 5 Howell 1 0 0 0 1 1 J.Wright L,2-2 1 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Miami Fernandez 7 5 3 2 4 10 M.Dunn H,4 1 0 0 0 1 0 A.Ramos W,2-0 BS,2-2 1 1 1 1 2 1 Fife pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBPby Fife (R.Johnson). PBSaltalamacchia. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:06. A,145 (37,442). Blue Jays 7, Pirates 2 Toronto Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 1 0 JHrrsn rf-ss 4 2 2 0 MeCarr lf 5 1 3 2 NWalkr 2b 3 0 0 1 Bautist rf 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 2 0 0 1 Encrnc 1b 4 1 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 1 0 Frncsc 3b 4 1 1 0 SMarte lf 4 0 0 0 Lawrie 2b 4 1 1 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Rasms cf 4 2 3 4 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Kratz c 4 0 1 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 McGwn p 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Navarr ph 1 0 1 1 CStwrt c 3 0 1 0 Dickey pr 0 0 0 0 Volquez p 1 0 0 0 Stromn p 0 0 0 0 Tabata ph 1 0 0 0 Cecil p 0 0 0 0 Sadler p 0 0 0 0 Snider rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11 7 Totals 29 2 4 2 Toronto 040 020 010 7 Pittsburgh 100 000 010 2 DPToronto 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOBToronto 7, Pitts burgh 5. 2BReyes (5), Rasmus (7). 3BJ.Harri son 2 (2). HRMe.Cabrera (6), Rasmus (7). SFA. McCutchen. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto McGowan W,2-1 7 3 1 1 3 5 Stroman 2 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Cecil 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Pittsburgh Volquez L,1-3 5 7 6 6 3 3 Sadler 2 1 0 0 1 1 J.Hughes 2 3 1 1 0 0 HBPby Stroman (N.Walker). PBC.Stewart. UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Bill Miller; Sec ond, Vic Carapazza; Third, Adam Hamari. T:49. A,496 (38,362). Giants 4, Braves 1 San Francisco Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 0 2 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 1 Pence rf 5 1 2 0 BUpton cf 2 0 0 0 Posey c 3 0 2 1 Fremn 1b 4 0 0 0 Morse lf 3 0 0 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 Gattis c 4 0 0 0 Arias 3b 1 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 2 0 Belt 1b 5 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 R.Pena ss 3 1 1 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 A.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Pstrnck ph 1 0 1 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Hale p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 1 1 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 4 2 2 3 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Bmgrn p 3 0 1 0 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 J.Perez lf 1 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 4 10 4 Totals 30 1 4 1 San Francisco 100 100 020 4 Atlanta 001 000 000 1 EBumgarner (1). DPAtlanta 1. LOBSan Francisco 10, Atlanta 6. 2BPence (7). HRB.Crawford 2 (3). SBPagan (5), B.Upton (7). SA.Wood. SFHeyward. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Bumgarner W,3-3 6 3 1 0 1 9 J.Gutierrez H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Lopez H,5 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Machi H,4 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Casilla S,1-4 1 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta A.Wood L,2-5 5 7 2 2 1 7 Hale 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 2 1 Avilan 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 J.Walden 1 1 2 2 1 1 Varvaro 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby A.Wood (Sandoval). WPA.Wood, Varvaro. UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Joe West; Third, Clint Fagan. T:15. A,067 (49,586). Mets 5, Rockies 1 New York Colorado ab r h bi ab r h bi Lagars cf 5 2 3 0 Blckmn rf 4 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 1 2 1 Culersn ss 4 0 1 0 DWrght 3b 5 1 1 1 CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0 Grndrs rf 4 0 1 1 Arenad 3b 4 0 1 0 CYoung lf 4 1 2 1 Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Duda 1b 1 0 1 1 McKnr c 4 0 1 0 dArnad c 4 0 0 0 Dickrsn cf 4 0 2 0 Quntnll ss 4 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 0 0 Gee p 3 0 0 0 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 Barnes ph 1 0 1 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 BAreu ph 1 0 0 0 Stubbs ph 1 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 10 5 Totals 34 1 8 1 New York 102 100 100 5 Colorado 000 000 001 1 DPNew York 1, Colorado 2. LOBNew York 9, Col orado 7. 2BLagares (7), Dan.Murphy (8), D.Wright (5), C.Young (4), Duda (3), Culberson (2), Arenado (9). HRMorneau (7). SBC.Young (3). IP H R ER BB SO New York Gee W,3-1 6 6 0 0 1 5 C.Torres 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Rice 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Familia 2 2 1 1 0 2 Colorado Chacin L,0-1 5 8 4 4 5 4 Kahnle 2 2 1 1 1 0 Belisle 2 0 0 0 0 1 Gee pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Will Little; Sec ond, Mark Carlson; Third, Ted Barrett.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer CHICAGO Bry an Bickell had a goal and two assists, and the Chicago Black hawks beat the Minne sota Wild 4 -1 on Sun day to take a 2-0 lead in the Western Confer ence seminals. Brandon Saad scored his rst two goals of the postseason, and Chi cago earned its sixth consecutive win de spite stretches of lack luster play in the sec ond and third periods. Corey Crawford made 18 saves in another sol id performance. Cody McCormick scored his second ca reer playoff goal, but Minnesota missed an other chance to steal home-ice advantage from the Stanley Cup champions. The series open er was tied at 2 in the third period before Patrick Kane scored two of Chicagos nal three goals in a 5-2 vic tory on Friday night. Game 3 is Tuesday night in Minnesota. Clayton Stoner and Erik Haula made nice passed to set up Mc Cormicks rst play off goal in three years 2 minutes into the third, trimming Chicagos lead to 2-1. Crawford then batted a potential tying shot from Charlie Coyle over the crossbar. The Blackhawks even tually regained their composure and turned up the pressure again. Bickell shot the puck off the crossbar on a break with 4:39 to go. Given a second chance, the physi cal forward delivered. Marian Hossa and Bic kell got loose on anoth er break, and Bickell buried his shot into the upper right corner to extend Chicagos lead to 3-1 at 17:15. Saad added an emp ty-net goal as the Blackhawks improved to 16-2 in home playoff games over the last two years. Chicago played with out forward Andrew Shaw, who was out with a lower-body in jury. Shaw left the se ries opener after he was hit hard by Stoner in the rst period. He appeared to favor his right side as he made his way off the ice. Shaw, who had 19 goals and 20 assists in the regular season, is expected to travel with the team to Minnesota. NBA NHL CHUCK BURTON / AP Charlotte Bobcats Kemba Walker, center, is trapped by Miami Heat players, from left, Mario Chalmers, Chris Bosh, and LeBron James during the second half in Game 4 of an openinground playoff series on April 28 in Charlotte, N.C. TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI For the last week, the Miami Heat were waiting and watching, resting and recovering. The mode changes now. A new opponent, nally, awaits and its a team that befuddled the Heat like no other this season. The Heat will face Brooklyn in the East ern Conference semi nals, which start Tues day night in Miami. Brooklyn punched its ticket by winning 104103 at Toronto in Game 7 of their rst-round se ries Sunday, setting up a matchup that wont be hurting for intrigue es pecially after the Nets swept four meetings be tween the clubs during the regular season. Were about tired of practice, tired of whatev er coach can think of to make us do, Heat guard Dwyane Wade said Sun day. We want to get back on the court, about ready to get our rhythm back, get back out there in the playoffs. Miami worked out ear ly Sunday, wrapping up even before the 1 p.m. tip of the Nets-Raptors game in Toronto. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra made the call to prac tice early in large part so his team could fo cus again on itself, then spend Monday working on things specic to the opponent. Besides, much of Mi amis prep work will be centered on its own game, Spoelstra said. Our habits, thatll be the most important thing, Spoelstra said. The rest-versusrhythm argument is one thats been waged plenty around the Heat in recent postseasons, since by now its hard ly uncommon for Mi ami to have long breaks between postseason rounds. By the time Game 1 against Brook lyn starts, eight days will have passed since Miami nished off its rst-round sweep of the Charlotte Bobcats. Its hardly been a va cation for the Heat, however. Weve had two days off in eight days, Heat forward LeBron James said. Weve had six work days and we de nitely went after it. James spent much of the week dealing with a sore thigh, courte sy of a collision he got the worst of in Game 4 against the Bobcats. Af ter days of treatment, he pronounced him self ready to go and said he expects to be some where near 100 percent for Game 1. The last time James felt that good? On my honeymoon, he quipped. If the Heat had a pref erence on their next op ponent, it wasnt voiced openly. Several players said as the regular sea son wound down that they expected to see Brooklyn at some point in the playoffs. Brooklyn took two preseason games from the Heat, then went 4-0 in the regular season with three of those games decided by a sin gle point, the other in double overtime. Theyre a different team in the playoffs, Brooklyns Paul Pierce said. Meanwhile, the Heat hasnt lost to the Rap tors in the last four years, coinciding from when Chris Bosh left Toronto in the sum mer of 2010 to be team mates with James and Wade in Miami. Still, Bosh said he wasnt rooting. Even if you do have a preference, be careful what you ask for, Bosh said. Thats what Ive learned throughout my career. Theres no such thing as a good match up. Whoever you play is going to be very dif cult and youre going to have to play good bas ketball. Spoelstra said Miami wont be fretting over the rust factor this time. You dont want to necessarily obsess about that, Spoels tra said. We went back and looked at it. Some times you can talk your self into that. And now they know: Its the Heat vs. Nets in second round Were about tired of practice, tired of whatever coach can think of to make us do. We want to get back on the court, about ready to get our rhythm back, get back out there in the playoffs. Dwyane Wade Miami Heat shooting guard Bryan Bickell powers Blackhawks past Wild 4-1 for Game 2 lead NAM Y. HUH / AP Chicago Blackhawks Bryan Bickell (29), center, celebrates with Marian Hossa (81), right, after scoring against Minnesota on Sunday in Chicago.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 GOLF Champions-Insperity Invitational Leading Scores Sunday At The Woodlands CC The Woodlands, Texas Purse: $2 million Yardage: 7,002; Par: 72 Final Bernhard Langer (300), $300,000 66-68-71 Fred Couples (176), $176,000 69-70-67 Colin Montgomerie (144), $144,000 71-66-70 Esteban Toledo (119), $119,000 67-71-71 Jay Haas (88), $87,500 70-70-70 Tom Pernice Jr. (88), $87,500 72-67-71 Bart Bryant (68), $68,000 66-72-73 Russ Cochran (68), $68,000 71-70-70 Tom Byrum (50), $50,000 74-70-68 Fred Funk (50), $50,000 68-71-73 Jeff Maggert (50), $50,000 68-73-71 Rod Spittle (50), $50,000 71-70-71 Michael Allen, $39,000 71-72-70 Steve Pate, $39,000 69-70-74 Billy Andrade, $34,000 72-70-72 Joe Daley, $34,000 68-75-71 Mark OMeara, $34,000 69-70-75 Peter Senior, $28,067 71-72-72 Duffy Waldorf, $28,067 74-70-71 Dan Forsman, $28,067 70-71-74 Mark McNulty, $23,900 71-71-74 Bob Tway, $23,900 69-72-75 Larry Mize, $20,500 73-74-70 Kenny Perry, $20,500 75-70-72 Gene Sauers, $20,500 70-72-75 Scott Simpson, $20,500 LPGA-North Texas Shootout Scores Sunday At Las Colinas Country Club Course Irving, Texas Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,410; Par: 71 Final Stacy Lewis, $195,000 71-64-69-64 268 Meena Lee, $119,765 70-64-70-70 274 Michelle Wie, $86,881 67-73-68-67 275 Na Yeon Choi, $60,653 72-69-66-69 276 Kim Kaufman, $60,653 72-66-68-70 276 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $32,348 71-66-72-68 277 Lexi Thompson, $32,348 70-71-67-69 277 Cristie Kerr, $32,348 67-70-69-71 277 Christina Kim, $32,348 67-69-70-71 277 Dori Carter, $32,348 67-70-68-72 277 Suzann Pettersen, $32,348 66-71-68-72 277 Jennifer Johnson, $22,228 71-70-65-72 278 Jenny Shin, $22,228 69-69-68-72 278 Amy Anderson, $18,097 71-72-67-69 279 Chella Choi, $18,097 69-74-67-69 279 Alena Sharp, $18,097 73-70-66-70 279 Pat Hurst, $18,097 72-70-67-70 279 Inbee Park, $18,097 71-68-68-72 279 Megan Grehan, $14,295 76-67-69-68 280 Stacey Keating, $14,295 71-71-69-69 280 Pornanong Phatlum, $14,295 70-68-71-71 280 Thidapa Suwannapura, $14,295 70-68-68-74 280 Natalie Gulbis, $14,295 70-65-71-74 280 Julieta Granada, $14,295 71-66-68-75 280 Sarah Jane Smith, $11,606 72-70-70-69 281 Ji Young Oh, $11,606 73-67-71-70 281 Mina Harigae, $11,606 74-68-68-71 281 Karine Icher, $11,606 73-69-68-71 281 Tiffany Joh, $11,606 74-66-70-71 281 Alison Walshe, $9,704 72-72-67-71 282 Brittany Lang, $9,704 70-71-70-71 282 Jennifer Song, $9,704 73-69-68-72 282 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $9,704 69-72-68-73 282 Mi Hyang Lee, $8,229 69-74-69-71 283 Juli Inkster, $8,229 69-72-71-71 283 Azahara Munoz, $8,229 70-68-74-71 283 Caroline Masson, $8,229 67-67-75-74 283 Pernilla Lindberg, $6,967 73-71-68-72 284 Ryann OToole, $6,967 70-73-68-73 284 Haru Nomura, $6,967 70-70-69-75 284 Sarah Kemp, $6,967 71-68-69-76 284 Paz Echeverria, $6,033 70-73-70-72 285 Katherine Kirk, $6,033 69-69-75-72 285 Sydnee Michaels, $6,033 71-71-70-73 285 Gerina Piller, $5,377 72-71-70-73 286 Megan McChrystal, $5,377 70-68-74-74 286 Lorie Kane, $5,377 69-73-67-77 286 Felicity Johnson, $4,705 70-68-75-74 287 Cydney Clanton, $4,705 67-76-69-75 287 STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Sports Writers IRVING, Texas There was no nearmiss for Stacy Lewis this time. This was a runaway for the highest-ranked American after six run ner-up nishes in her previous 16 tourna ments. Lewis shot a 7-un der 64 on Sunday in the North Texas LPGA Shootout, nishing at 16-under 268 and six strokes ahead of Mee na Lee. It was the LPGA Tours largest margin of victory since Jiyai Shin won the 2012 Womens British Open by nine. Ive been wanting to do this for a long time. I kind of have these mini goals in the back of my mind, Lewis said. One of them was kind of tak ing a tournament and running away with it. ... So to be so close the last few weeks and then to come out and shoot 64, I mean I dont even know what to say. It was the ninth ca reer LPGA Tour victory for Lewis, her rst since August in the Womens British Open, and will boost the Texan from third to second in the world ranking. Lewis made a putt from about 25 feet off the fringe at the 540yard seventh for an ea gle. She followed with consecutive birdies to make the turn at 14 un der and up by three strokes. The eagle just really kind of got things going in the right direction, and then just I never let up, said Lewis, who punctuated her round with birdies on Nos. 17 and 18. I never let the hammer down. Lee, the South Korean who won the last of her two LPGA Tour titles in 2006, shot 70 after go ing into the nal round at Las Colinas Coun try Club tied with Lew is for the lead. Lee bo geyed the opening hole and needed a birdie at No. 18 to nish alone in second place. Michelle Wie, who closed within two before faltering late, had a 67 to nish third at 9 under. Na Yeon Choi (69) and Kim Kauffman (70) tied for fourth at 8 under. Kraft Nabisco winner Lexi Thompson (69), Cristie Kerr (71) and Suzann Pettersen (72) were among six players at 7 under. Lewis, from The Woodlands near Hous ton, has nished out side the top six only once in nine tourna ments this year. She was third at the Kraft Na bisco and had anoth er runner-up nish just last week in San Fran cisco. She had three runner-up nishes in her last eight tourna ments in 2013 after her victory at St. Andrews. Lewis got a share of the lead in Texas af ter a frustrating 69 in the third round Satur day when she hit all 18 greens in regulation but missed several make able birdie putts. Honestly, I didnt change anything. I didnt do anything dif ferent, she said. They just didnt go in (Satur day). ... But once you see putts in, its kind of contagious. Defending champion Inbee Park closed with a 72 to tie for 14th at n ish at 5 under. That will be good enough when the new world ranking comes out to stay No. 1 for the 56th consecutive week since the South Korean replaced Lewis at the top. Stacy Lewis wins North Texas LPGA Shootout by 6 over Lee LM OTERO / AP Stacy Lewis posses for a photo with the trophy after winning the North Texas LPGA Shootout on Sunday in Irving, Texas. ADAM COLEMAN Associated Press THE WOODLANDS, Texas Bernhard Langer won the Cham pions Tours Insperi ty Invitational for the third time, closing with a 1-under 71 on Sun day for a one-stroke victory over Fred Cou ples. Langer nished at 11-under 205 at The Woodlands to become the 10th 20-time win ner on the 50-and-over tour The 56-year-old Ger man player also won the 2007 event at Au gusta Pines and suc cessfully defended his title in 2008 at The Woodlands. He opened this season with a vic tory in Hawaii. Im hoping to add to that number, Langer said. I hope Im not done yet. Im very blessed to have won 20 times in 6 years. Its been a great run and a wonder ful achievement. I just feel like Im playing some of my best golf in my career. Couples, the former University of Houston player who won the 2010 event, nished with a 67. He won in March in Newport Beach, California. On a golf course as hard as this, you cant really play relaxed golf, Couples said. You have to pay atten tion to what youre do ing. I didnt hit enough good shots to shoot a lot lower to catch Ber nhard, although I got close to him. Colin Montgomerie was third at 9 under af ter a 70. His best nish on the tour is second in March in Newport Beach. The Scot had no complaints about his nish. If youre second, third to Couples and Langer, youre doing OK, Montgomerie said. Bernhard Langer wins Insperity Invitational

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 BLINDNESS: Young performer stands out on stage / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MIKE STOBBE Associated Press NEW YORK Falls are just as much of a problem for middle-aged adults with arthritis as they are for older people, a new government study shows. In a telephone survey, about a third of adults 65 and older with ar thritis said they had taken a tumble in the last year. But slightly more of those aged 45 to 64 reported falling. More of the middle-aged group re ported being injured from falls; 17 percent compared to 12 percent in the older group. Thursdays report was issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About half of Americans 65 and older complain of arthritis symp toms like joint pain and stiffness. Nearly a third of middle-aged peo ple have arthritis. The number of has been growing, mostly because of overweight baby boomers. Arthritis can make it harder to balance and it can sap lower-body strength, contributing to falls. Walk ing and moderate physical exercise is recommended for those with ar thritis to keep symptoms from get ting worse, said the CDCs Kamil Barbour, the studys lead author. The report is based on a 2012 survey of 339,000 people ages 45 and older. Falls also problem for middle-aged with arthritis PHOTOS BY RON TARVER / MCT Eight-year-old Steele Songle, left, smiles at his mother Ellen after trying on an articial hand designed by engineering students at Westtown High School in West Chester, Pa. KATHY BOCCELLA The Philadelphia Inquirer S teele Songle was born without a left hand but has never let that hold him back from the thing he loves most playing sports. And now, the 8-year-old from Wilmington, Dela ware, who plays lacrosse and golf, swims, skis, and bounces on his friends trampoline until the two of them collapse, is getting a bit of bionic help from en gineering students at the Westtown School in Ches ter County, Pennsylvania. As part of their design and engineering class, us ing a 3-D device, the stu dents are making a robotic hand with ngers that can open and close around a lacrosse stick or ski pole. Among other things, Steele says he is condent the hand will improve his trampoline-basketball game. I can grip better on the trampoline and slamdunk better, said Steele, a sandy-haired charm er who maneuvered and played with the device as if it were the coolest toy on the planet, during a visit to the 600-acre campus. That would be fabu lous, said his mother, El len, associate director of parent and alumni en gagement at the 215-yearold Quaker boarding school, although she also hopes the hand will help Steele with more mun dane activities, such as buttoning his shirt and ty ing his shoes. The two, along with Steeles father, David, saw the plastic hand-in-prog ress Friday in the schools recently renovated Science Center. The six engineer ing students were eager to show Steele what they had so far, although there were some tense moments before the family arrived when a needle used to thread shing line through the ngers, which allows the ngers to move, broke. The idea for a simple robotic hand was creat ed, like many good inven tions, out of need and in genuity. Richard van As, a carpenter from South Africa who lost four n gers while sawing wood, teamed with Ivan Owen, a mechanical special-ef fects artist from Washing ton state, to develop a me chanical nger in 2011. Soon they had developed the Robohand and put the design online so anyone with access to a 3-D print er could make ngers, hands, or arms. While 3-D printing lets students explore ideas and solve problems as nev er before, said teacher Steve Compton, making a hand is a real challenge. Many parts must inter act smoothly and reliably, and the design has to be form-tted to an individu al body. This is a real and trans formative thing for a real kid, so doing it right no matter how many proto types it takes to get to n ished product its got to be focused and tai lored and great, Compton said. His other students are making a submarine to test water quality in the schools lake, an improved geriatric walker, and an emergency stove that also creates electricity for use in disasters. Layer by layer, 3-D print ers build objects out of strands of lament that are heated and become Students create robotic hand for boy An engineering student shows eight-year-old Steele Songle how to wear the articial hand designed for him. SEE HAND | C3 TAVARES Joint Replacement Center awarded certification After an onsite review in February, the Joint Replacement Center at Florida Hospital Waterman is the rst hospital in Lake County to earn the Joint Commissions Gold Seal of Approval for knee and hip replacement. By demonstrating compliance with The Joint Commissions na tional standards for health care quality and safety in disease-specif ic care, the certication recogniz es the ongoing efforts of the Joint Replacement Centers dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. For information about the hospi tal, go to www.oridahospital.com or call 352-253-3635. MOUNT DORA Brain Gym Academy scheduled to meet May 15 Stephen Jepson will speak and demonstrate his methods to en hance balance, stability and coor dination from his program Never Leaving the Playground at 1 p.m., May 15 at Waterman Village, 445 Waterman Ave., in the Garden of Life Hall. Jepsons program helps people of all ages live healthy, happy and pro ductive lives through his brain and body training. For information, call Debbie Garay at 352-383-0051, ext. 313. MOUNT DORA Annual Community Health Fair scheduled for May 14 Honoring National Nursing Home Week, Avante at Mount Dora, a skilled nursing and rehabilita tion center will host its 11th annu al Community Health Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., May 14, at Avante, 3050 Brown Ave., in Mount Dora. More than 40 vendors will be of fering free health screenings. There will also be an antique car show, pet therapy dogs, blood mo bile, local re, police and EMS and facility tours. Refreshments and a free barbecue lunch will be provided. For details, call 352-383-4161 or go to www.avantecenters.com. LEESBURG Lake Medical Imaging receives excellence award Lake Medical Imaging has re ceived the ACR Diagnostic Imaging Center of Excellence designa tion from the American College of Radiology (ACR), an achieve ment that recognizes best-quali ty imaging practices and patient safeguards. To be a recipient of the distinc tion, facilities must be accredited by the ACR in all facilities they provide. They are also required to partici pate in the Dose Index Registry and General Radiology Improvement Database as well as the Image Wisely and Image Gently patient ra diation protection campaigns. For information, go to www.lake medicalimaging.com.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 MARIA CHENG AP Medical Writer LONDON (AP) Bac teria resistant to antibi otics have now spread to every part of the world and might lead to a future where minor infections could kill, ac cording to a report pub lished Wednesday by the World Health Orga nization. In its rst global sur vey of the resistance problem, WHO said it found very high rates of drug-resistant E. coli bacteria, which caus es problems including meningitis and infec tions of the skin, blood and the kidneys. The agency noted there are many countries where treatment for the bug is useless in more than half of patients. WHOs report also found worrying rates of resistance in other bac teria, including com mon causes of pneu monia and gonorrhea. Unless there is ur gent action, the world is headed for a post-an tibiotic era in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill, Dr. Keiji Fukuda, one of the agencys as sistant director-gener als, warned in a release. WHO acknowledged it couldnt assess the va lidity of the data provid ed by countries and that many had no informa tion on antibiotic resis tance available. Health experts have long warned about the dangers of drug resis tance, particularly in diseases such as tuber culosis, malaria and u. In a report by Britains Chief Medical Ofcer last year, Dr. Sally Davies described resistance as a ticking time bomb and said it was as big a threat as terrorism. In 1928, Alexander Flemings discovery of penicillin revolution ized medicine by giv ing doctors the rst ef fective treatment for a wide variety of infec tions. Despite the in troduction of numer ous other antibiotics since then, there have been no new classes of the drugs discovered for more than 30 years. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Scientists implanted thin sheets of scaffold ing-like material from pigs into a few young men with disabling leg injuries and say the experimental treatment coaxed the mens own stem cells to regrow new muscle. The research, fund ed by the Defense De partment, included just ve patients, a small rst step in the complex quest for regenerative medicine. But the researchers described some of the men improving enough to no longer need canes, or to ride a bi cycle again, after years of living with injuries that today have no good treatment. The real rush for someone like myself is to see this patient be ing able to do these things and not strug gle and have a smile on his face, said Dr. Ste phen Badylak of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He led the study, which was reported Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Muscles have some natural ability to re generate after small in juries. But if too much is lost from a car ac cident, a sports injury or, for soldiers, a bomb blast the body cant heal properly. Hard scar tissue lls the gap in stead. Called volumet ric muscle loss, a severe enough injury can leave an arm or leg essential ly useless. The new experiment combines bioengineer ing with a heavy dose of physical therapy to spur stem cells that are roaming the body to settle on the injury and turn into the right kind of tissue to repair it. First, surgeons re move the scar tissue. Then they implant something called an extracellular matrix derived from pigs. Its the connective scaffold ing that remains after cells are removed from a tissue. (Without cells, the immune system doesnt reject it.) Such material has been used for many years as a kind of mesh in treatments for skin ulcers and in hernia repair. Whats new here: The matrix temporarily lls in the injury, between edges of remaining muscle. As the scaffold ing slowly degrades, it releases chemical sig nals that attract stem cells to the site, Badylak said. Then physical thera py puts tension on the spot, in turn signaling the stem cells that they need to form strong, stretchy muscle tis sue, he said. Without the exercise, Badylak cautioned, those cells wont get the message to boost muscle mass, and scar tissue could return. To start proving thats what happens, Badylaks team rst re moved chunks of leg muscle from mice and administered the treat ment. In-depth tests showed which cells moved in, and showed that they created work ing muscle. Then it was time for human testing, with three military veter ans and two civilians. Each had lost between 60 percent and 90 per cent of an affected leg muscle two from the thigh, the rest from the lower leg anywhere from about a year to seven years earlier. The men, in their 20s and 30s, underwent a few months of custom ized physical therapy to get their muscle func tion to its maximum ca pacity. Then they received the implants, followed by more physical thera py that began within 48 hours after surgery. Six months later, biop sies and medical scans showed some new mus cle grew in all the men. Three patients were of cially deemed a suc cess because their legs were stronger by 20 per cent or more after the surgery. They had dra matic improvements in tests showing they could hop or squat on the injured leg. Badylak said the two other men had some improvement in balance and quality of life, but not enough to meet the studys de nition of success. Researchers around the country are explor ing different ways to spur the regeneration of various body parts, and many focus on in jecting stem cells or tis sues grown from them. Wednesdays approach is more novel. This strategy obvi ously has some merit, said professor George Christ of the Wake For est Institute for Regen erative Medicine, who wasnt involved with the new study. While larger studies must verify the ndings, the concept of physical therapy cou pled with these regener ative strategies is going to be really important. The Pittsburgh study is continuing, and Badylak would like to test as many as 50 more patients. He said that the technique probably would work better after a recent injury but that researchers needed to begin with old injuries to prove that physical therapy alone couldnt explain the muscle re growth. 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MostMajor Insurances Accepted CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Experiment grows new muscle in mens injured legs AP FILE PHOTO Dr. Stephen Badylak, a surgery professor at the university, and deputy director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, holds a sheet of extracellular matrix, scaffolding-like material derived from pig bladder. THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Drug resistance found worldwide

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 gooey plastic. For the Robohand, shing line and pins are insert ed into internal holes in the ngers to make them move. During Steeles visit, the students were print ing another set of n gers. With a picture on a computer, the printer moved back and forth, building layer upon lay er of lament into the shape of ngers. The device is strapped on with Velcro and driv en by the motion of the wrist. Move the wrist up, and the hand opens; down, and the ngers close. Clay McKee, 18, a senior, said Steele ul timately will be able to adjust the tension of the ngers for different ac tivities. Total cost $3 and some screws. A com mercially made hand can cost $10,000 or more. Were thinking of making one specially for swimming, McK ee said. Although the pro totype was white, the hand can be made in any color. Steele, the Man of Steel to his parents, asked for Su permans colors. Were going to put the Superman logo on top, said Alex Nunes, 17, a junior. We gure after that, were going to have to make them for all his friends. The project started in January after the school received new 3-D print ers and Ellen Songle approached Compton with the idea of mak ing a prosthetic for her son after reading about it online. Why her son was born without a hand remains a mys tery, she said. Songle said the family had not thought about prosthetics before, tak ing the attitude that Steele would decide what he wanted. And since the super-con dent boy could do with one hand just about anything anyone else can with two includ ing making par on a hole at a regulation golf course with his grand father recently there seemed to be no need. He doesnt let it af fect him in any way, Songle said. At times I forget about it. Hes adapted. But now that he is in rst grade at Brandy wine Springs Elementa ry School, she said, she wanted him to be fully independent. Steeles initial reac tion was low-key. The fact that all these cool kids are making it for him won him over, his mother said. And that puts extra pressure on the stu dents to get it right. They talked about mak ing a 3-D model of Steeles right hand so they could match the prosthetic better, and making different hands for Steeles different ac tivities. If the students were designing and build ing a bicycle, say, and it didnt work out, no harm done, Compton said. But with a prosthet ic and an 8-year-old client who clearly is thrilled by all the pos sibilities this opens for him, he said, failure is not an option. Count on us for a comprehensive range of quality services to meet the unique healthcare needs of you and your family. Abu Azizullah, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Maria A. Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Visit Us at www.impmd.comInternal Medicine Practices NEW PATIENT SPECIALComplete Exam (D0150)Digital Xrays (D0210)Cleaning (D1110)Oral Cancer Screening (D0431)with Identafi 3000*Non-Insured Patients Only. All major insurances accepted including PPO & HMO plans.$59* GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark HAND FROM PAGE C1 ANDRA BRYAN STEFANONI The Joplin Globe NEVADA, Mo. Ne vada junior Landon Delgado stands out on stage, but it isnt be cause of his physical impairment. Its because he is a born performer a ne tenor able to memorize and execute compli cated dance steps, one who enjoys dressing in a modern, trendy cloth ing style that might in clude a bow tie and fuchsia skinny jeans. He also happens to be legally blind. Most who see him perform dont even know. Most of our judges when we go to competi tions and often many of our audiences have no idea, said Wes Mor ton, the director of Ne vada High School Show Choir. Then, it might be mentioned in conversa tion afterward, and they cant believe it. Delgado, legally blind since birth, has received numerous awards for his vocal and perfor mance abilities, having been selected for Mis souri All-District and racking up ratings on solos at various con tests. Tomorrow, he will be anxiously awaiting an announcement on whether hes been cho sen for Missouri AllState Show Choir. If its a yes, hell be among just 30 young men in the state to perform in Jefferson City in July. His performance re sume also includes the lead in the all-school musical, Pippin, a role in Hairspray, a role in Rock to Disco and a role in the schools rock opera Tommy, featur ing the song Pinball Wizard. Yes, I sang the lyrics that mention the deaf, dumb and blind kid, he said, grinning. It ac tually was awesome. Delgado has risen to the top in performance through hard work, a positive attitude and the support of the rest of the show choir and oth er high school friends, Morton said. Hes an amazing young man. Hes nev er let his disability in terfere with his perfor mance or with him as a student, said Morton, who has had Delgado in class since the perform er was a seventh grader. He has grown so much in our music program. He works so hard and spends so many extra hours learning the cho reography to make sure hes right on with the rest of kids. His voice is a very, very ne voice; hes certainly a leader in his vocal techniques and his vocal abilities. Delgado was inspired toward pursuing mu sic in junior high, when the death of his best friends sister pointed him in the direction of the ministry, and he re alized he could com bine the two interests. The guy who led the service, he played the guitar, Delgado said. I do, too. It made me want to get involved in that. And now, thats my dream. I really aspire af ter Phil Wickham, a not ed worship leader. A youth minister be gan a youth praise team at Delgados church, the First Baptist Church of Nevada, and Delga do soon joined. Mor ton approached Delga do about performing in show choir. Delgado, who can see shapes as well as hints of colors and light, has learned Braille. I did that in eighth grade, he said. A teacher, Karen Smo therman, volunteered to help me learn, and I just thought it would be good to have something to fall back on in case my other options were limited at some point. He gets enlarged text books for school, for example, but its occa sionally easier to get them printed in Braille, he said. When Morton hands out sheet music, how ever, Delgado scans it electronically so he can access it and enlarge it on an iPad. He doesnt com plain or ask for help; he ju st does it, Morton said. Hes independent and doesnt want to be known as different from the rest of the kids. And he isnt, really. Although the direc tors worried a bit at rst about the com plex dance elements in volved in show choir. They thought I might step off the edge of the stage, Delgado said, laughing. That soon changed. Weve had him up on tables dancing, and he knows exactly where his boundaries are, Mor ton said. Every once in awhile its not really noticeable to the audi ence unless youre real ly, really looking an other student might lightly touch his arm to help guide him up a step. Its just a slight touch. They have it all worked out. Blindness cant keep young performer off the stage ROGER NOMER / AP Landon Delgado, a junior at Nevada High School, practices a number with the Nevada High show choir in Nevada, Mo.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 JULIE DEARDORFF Chicago Tribune CHICAGO Ellen Hanrahan, a 36-yearold mother of two, was done having children. To make sure, she had tiny metal coils im planted inside her fallo pian tubes, a relatively new form of permanent birth control marketed under the brand name Essure. A year later, Hanrahan began feeling a familiar form of fatigue one shed experienced with her previous pregnan cies. Incredulous, she took a home pregnancy test. And then another. I panicked, called my husband and said, We have a problem, said Hanrahan, who was, in deed, 10 weeks preg nant. A team of research ers estimated Monday that as many as 9.6 per cent of women could become pregnant with in 10 years of undergo ing hysteroscopic steril ization, or Essure. That is nearly four times the estimated risk after a laparoscopic tubal li gation, the more tradi tional method. The study, published in the journal Contra ception, is the rst to compare the effective ness of the two main choices offered to wom en who seek a perma nent form of birth con trol. About 345,000 American women un dergo sterilization pro cedures each year, with Essure an increasingly popular choice because it does not require a sur gical incision. Overall, sterilization is very effective; the ab solute risk of pregnan cy is low, said lead au thor Aileen Gariepy, an assistant professor in the department of ob stetrics, gynecology and reproductive sci ences at the Yale School of Medicine. But if one method is not as effective, that denite ly needs to be part of the decision-making process and not over looked. During a laparoscop ic tubal ligation, a phy sician makes a small cut in the abdomen, then blocks, ties or seals the fallopian tubes to keep eggs and sperm apart. Essure also in volves blocking the tubes, but instead of us ing an incision the phy sician weaves a catheter through the cervix to in sert the coils. Scar tissue then gradually forms a barrier. Essures manufacturer says clinical trials show the procedure is 99.83 percent effective at pre venting pregnancy over a ve-year period when used according to ap proved instructions. But that rate is for so-called perfect use. Gariepys team want ed to estimate the ef fectiveness under re al-world conditions, or typical use. For example, doc tors dont always insert the implants correctly, and the fallopian tubes may not become fully blocked. Women are di rected to use an alterna tive form of birth con trol before returning to the doctors ofce after three months to con rm proper placement a critical follow-up step that some fail to carry out. For the new study, the researchers used avail able published data including report ed cases of post-Essure pregnancies to esti mate what would hap pen to hypothetical groups of 100,000 wom en using a particular sterilization procedure, including cases where problems occurred. According to their calculations, 96 of ev ery 1,000 women who undergo hysteroscop ic sterilization, or Es sure, would get preg nant within 10 years. For laparoscopic tubal ligations, the pregnancy risks were signicantly lower: 24 to 30 pregnan cies per 1,000 women. Patients deserve to have this information, which differs from the data provided by the manufacturer, said Dr. Cassing Hammond, an CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Essure less effective at preventing pregnancy SEE STUDY | C5

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 associate professor of obstetrics and gyne cology at Northwestern Universitys Feinberg School of Medicine who was not involved in the study. But Essure offers ad vantages that may make it the right choice for some women, he add ed. If patients and pro viders are assiduous during the rst year of use, the hysteroscopic Essure implant remains a very effective form of sterilization, he said. Bayer Healthcare, which purchased Es sure manufacturer Conceptus in June, said hundreds of thousands of women have benet ed from the procedure since it was approved for sale in 2002. But the company also stresses that no method of con traception is 100 per cent effective and preg nancies have occurred in the commercial set ting. The type of mathe matical model used by Gariepys team is use ful in identifying fu ture areas for clinical research, the compa ny said in a statement. Bayer welcomes ongo ing evaluation and re search of new innova tions in contraception. Described on the Es sure site as a quick 10-minute procedure that can be performed right in your doctors of ce, the technique al lows women to return to normal activities within a day or two. But hysteroscop ic sterilization is effec tive only if both coils are properly placed; es timates of the success rate on the rst attempt vary from 76 to 96 per cent, according to the Contraception study. Also, unlike a laparo scopic tubal ligation, which is effective im mediately, hysteroscop ic sterilization requires several steps, including the three-month wait ing period and followup procedure, which is re quired by the U.S. Food and Drug Administra tion. Previously pub lished studies on Essure primarily reported the outcomes in women who successfully com pleted all of the steps, said Gariepy. The bottom line is we do see a higher preg nancy risk (with Es sure), she said. Any time there are multiple steps, there are multiple opportunities for things to go wrong. Elizabeth Cox, 42, be came pregnant despite Essure and worried about the coils moving or even puncturing her uterus. She recently was able to conrm they are in the right place but still plans to have a hysterectomy after the baby is born in order to remove the coils. Cox said she origi nally wanted a tubal li gation but her doctor steered her toward Es sure. She had the pro cedure in September 2012, and the threemonth follow-up test conrmed her tubes were fully blocked, ac cording to records Cox provided. Her fourth child is due in July. Im pregnant with these coils in my body and theres no study to tell me its going to be ne, said Cox, who lives near Sacramento, Calif. Coxs doctor, Timo thy Phelan, said he has been implanting Es sure in patients for sev en years and Cox is the rst to become preg nant. To me the biggest issue is whether the fol low-up test is reliable enough to conrm the tubes are blocked, he said. If the tubes are truly blocked, how do they get pregnant? Hanrahan said her pregnancy was stress ful and involved many scares. Due to my age, preterm labor and Essure, there were many po tential risks and most of them were unknown, she said. I do consid er myself lucky to have survived the pregnan cy and have a healthy baby. Like other women, she wishes more infor mation was available to families affected by un planned pregnancy. Pregnancy is a huge side effect, especial ly when women are led to believe its not pos sible, she said. Were left to wait and wonder and pray everything will turn out OK. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. STUDY FROM PAGE C4 STACEY WESCOTT / MCT Ellen Hanrahan plays with her 2-year-old daughter, Leena Hanrahan, in their home in Prophetstown, Ill. In 2012 Hanrahan gave birth to Leena, despite undergoing a permanent sterilization procedure called Essure. WITH US. EVERYTHING www .dailycommer cial.com 352-365-8200

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, May 5 the 125th day of 2014. There are 240 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On May 5, 1862, Mexi can troops defeated French occupying forces in the Bat tle of Puebla. (The Cinco de Mayo holiday commemo rates Mexicos victory.) HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 5, 2014: This year you demonstrate an evolving ability to network and broaden your circle of friends and associates. Oth ers see you as somewhat moody yet reliable. Your do mestic life increases in sig nicance. A new home is a possibility. If you are single, resist taking a relationship to a live-in status too quick ly. A very romantic bond aris es as a possibility. If you are attached, the two of you cre ate a landmark year with a transformation or adjust ment to your home life. The tie that exists between the two of you ourishes with more time together. LEO pro vides an anchor when you are moody. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could be more in the mood for Cinco de Mayo than some of your friends who might hail from that cul ture. By midafternoon, you will help a friend relax and enjoy the mood of the cele bration. Let go of a serious conversation for now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Use the morning for any matter that is very serious and that could demand an important conversation or two. Just because you do not see eye to eye with someone does not mean you need to quarrel. Honor and respect your differences. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might want to hon or a change that is likely to make you feel a bit off-kilter. You could feel tense about a personal matter. Understand the liabilities of giving in to your feelings this afternoon you might not get anything done! CANCER (June 21-July 22) Initiate an important con versation, but avoid any bi lateral comments that would add to the present discom fort level. You have an op portunity to clear the air, and you absolutely need to take it. Understand the dynamics of what is going on here. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could be excited by news that heads your way. Pon der this information with a greater eye to success and change. You wont want to deny your innate creativi ty; however, you will need to think before you leap. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Friends play a signicant role in your plans, whether you are at work or just off doing your own thing. Youll have a lot to deal with when speak ing to a key loved one or as sociate. In the afternoon, you might not want to share your ideas so openly. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Defer to someone else, and remain open to the possibili ties. You will discover the lim itations of staying locked in a certain situation. Communi cation is likely to evolve with someone you trust, who has sound nancial knowledge. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Return calls in the morn ing. You could hear some in teresting information or gos sip, and you will need time to digest this news. Honor a change in plans without mak ing it a big deal. You could get into a project but have difculty switching gears. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You have a way of bringing out the best in peo ple, no matter what goes down. You could see a sit uation in a totally new light after a conversation, and possibly from a different per spective after a talk with someone else. Absorb as much as possible. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll want to re late more directly to a loved one than you have been able to in the past. Seize an op portunity to open up a con versation, and listen to the feedback you get. A situa tion around your domestic life could put a smile on your face. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Listen to news that comes from a parent or loved one. You might want to visit with someone at a distance and just enjoy life. Be content hanging out with your immediate circle. Laugh ter seems to surround a child or loved one. Enjoy it! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Examine what is go ing on in your immediate cir cle. You will want to have a conversation with a child or loved one as a result. Real ize that a lot is happening around you that might not be easy to integrate into your plans. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: For the last few years my fami ly has rented the same beach condo. My friend John and his family have joined us there on many occasions. When I asked him his vaca tion plans for this year, he informed me last night that he has rent ed the beach condo for the same weeks we have historically occupied it. I was oored. I think a more appropriate ap proach would have been for him to have called me rst and expressed his interest in renting it, but he should not have rented the unit if it con icted with our vaca tion plans. I understand the free marketplace rst-come, rst-served but I cant help feel ing he undercut me. CONFUSED IN A TENT AT THE BEACH DEAR CONFUSED: Your feeling is 100 percent ac curate. That weasel DID undercut you, and real friends dont act that way. Now that you know what hes capable of, contact the landlord and make a long-term deal in advance if you want that unit in the future. DEAR ABBY: I am a lonely 83-year-old wom an. All I want is someone to love me, preferably a handsome, wealthy man who will spoil me. I have spent my entire life making other peo ple happy, and now all I want is some happiness back. I mean, cant an older woman get some loving, too? I have been told Im charming. I have the laugh of an angel, a full head of blond/gray hair and a slim gure. I would like a man (preferably in his elderly years) who is lonely and needs some company. And also someone who wants to spend his savings on me. Abby, help me nd my soul mate. WAITING FOR GOT-DOUGH DEAR WAITING FOR GOTDOUGH: Why do I sus pect this letter may have been written by a group of sorority sisters af ter a few drinks? How ever, just in case its ac tually on the level, your want ad has now been viewed by millions of Dear Abby readers worldwide, and Im sure we will hear from many applicants who are ea ger to be The One. Lets hope none of them write from Scam-dina via. DEAR ABBY: My daughter-in-law is hav ing a baby. My mother and I told her we would have a shower for her. She registered at a local store for baby gifts, let us start planning the show er, and then informed us that she would not be opening gifts at the par ty. My son has sided with her. He said he didnt know her reason, but felt like it was no big deal. Why would she act that way? We think its peculiar. The shower has now been canceled at her request. MYSTI FIED IN CALIFORNIA DEAR MYSTIFIED : Your daughter-in-law may have been trying to be considerate of any guests possibly mem bers of her family whose gifts might not have been as expensive as those purchased or crafted by other guests. Or she may have felt self-conscious about being the center of at tention. While I agree that one of the pleasures of at tending a shower is see ing the expression of joy on the mother-tobes face as the presents are unwrapped, look at it this way: Because the shower is canceled, your problem is solved. Now forget about it. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Beach bully kicks sand in friends vacation plans JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 Hearing tests through May 9THLEESBURG(Across from Sears Auto Center)352-326-4079Mon. Fri. 9:00am 4:30pmSaturday by Appointment Only. In Home Test Available.INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE AudibelHearing Tests to determine candidacy will be held through May 9th. Please call immediately. Appointments are limited! Those interested must call today!Bring in the talk. . Screen down the noise!www.audibelnorthflorida.comBoard Certified Hearing Instrument SpecialistD002685

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Monday, May 5, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 11 Black TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, May 5, 2014 GRADUATION Format: Expanded Broadsheet Advertising Deadline: May 9th, 2014 Publication: DC May 25th, 2014 SLP May 28th, 2014 A look at this years graduating seniors for the countys public and private high schools. Graduation is a special time in the life of a student, family, and the community in which they live. Be a part as a local business or family member to recognize Lake and Sumter Countys public and private high schools outgoing 2014 classes. As an added bonus, Graduation 2014 will be online for a full year at www.dailycommercial.com For more information or to reserve your advertising space, call 352-365-8287