Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EXTENDED OFFERS! NOH TAKES ZURICH CLASSIC, SPORTS B1COURT: Ex-cop les a lawsuit against Mascotte for unlawful termination, A3 VATICAN: Pope Francis honors John XXIII and John Paul II, A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 28, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 118 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 SCOREBOARD B2 NATION A2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.91 / 70Some sun and a t-storm 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLeesburg may have earned brag ging rights and set a Guinness Book of World Records for ty ing 2,545 black ban danas together to cre ate thelongest chain of bandanas on Sunday, the last day of Bikefest. The 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandanas in the chain were meticulously videotaped, documented, photographed, counted and measured in the citys attempt to beat the previous record of 2,450 bandanas set in 2011 by the Hiratsuka Coming of Age Day Ceremony Committee in Japan. I think that were going to break the record. It looks like to me that we are going to achieve that goal. Hopefully, nobody broke it somewhere else over the weekend, said Joe Shipes, executive vice president of the Leesburg Partnership. The crowd gathered around Towne Square cheered when it was announced at 12:10 / p.m. that the 2,451st bandana the one to beat Japan had been validated. By 12:23 / p.m., the last bandana in the chain, No. 2,545, was ofcially marked and held up for photographers and videographers to record. This is real fun, absolutely. Its all for a good cause and it has been a great event for the city, and Im excited to be part of it, said Leesburg City Manager Al Minner, who served as an ofcial witness and certier along with Daily Commercial Pub lisher Steve Skaggs. Brandt Booth and Pete Jaequese from Booth, 2,545 bandanas THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Close-up of a 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandana. THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lynn Gerig, right, helps count the chain of bandanas along with Linda Henderson, center, on Sunday. THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Bandana No. 2,545 as Leesburg attempted to set a new world record on Sunday for the longest chain of bandanas.Bikefest may have set new world record; results pending SEE BIKEFEST | A2 PETER LEONARDAssociated PressSLOVYANSK, Ukraine Pro-Russian militants in camouage fa tigues and black bala clavas paraded captive European military ob servers before the media on Sunday, hours after three captured Ukrainian security guards were shown bloodied, blindfolded and stripped of their trousers and shoes, their arms bound with packing tape. The provocative dis plays came as the increasingly ruthless pro-Russian insurgency in the east turns to kidnapping as an ominous new tactic. Dozens of people are being held hostage, including journalists and pro-Ukraine activists, in makeshift jails in Slo vyansk, the heart of the separatists territory, as the pro-Russian insur gents strengthen their control in deance of the interim government in Kiev and its Western supporters. Speaking in deliber ate and clipped phrases, Col. Axel Schneider of Germany, speaking on behalf of the observers, insisted they were not NATO spies, as claimed by the insurgents, but a military observation mission operating under the auspices of the Observers held in Ukraine speak under armed guard Staff ReportPlans for a $1.25 million seaplane ramp to expand business op portunities at Leesburg International Airport will be discussed by city commissioners tonight. The seaplane ramp will serve to increase the airports capacity by allowing seaplanes, which are not equipped to use land-based run ways and taxiways, to access the airports full range of aviation ser vices, Airport Man ager Leo Treggi said in a memo to commis sioners. Also, it will allow the airport to service amphibian air craft whose pilots pre fer water landings over hard-surface landings. The board Monday night will be asked to accept a $420,000 grant from the Florida De partment of Transpor tation to assist with design and construction of the project. The grant requires no local match and is based on the amount of jobs to be created by Wipaire, a seaplane company at the airport. City ofcials have identied other funding sources but will have to come up with $106,000 LEESBURGBoard to accept grant for seaplane ramp BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A seaplane ramp at Leesburg International Airport will allow aircrafts to access the airports full range of aviation services, Airport Manager Leo Treggi said.SEE RAMP | A2SEE UKRAINE | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 Organization of Security and Cooperation in Eu rope. We are not ghters, we are diplomats in uniform, he said, noting that his unarmed team included an ofcer from Sweden, which is not a NATO member. The observers appeared nervous as they were escorted by the masked armed men into the Slovyansk city hall for the news conference. Referring to himself and his team as guests under the protection of the citys self-proclaimed mayor, Schneider said they were being treated as well as possible under the circumstances. The mayor of this city granted us his protection and he regarded us as his guests, Schneider told journalists. I can tell you that the word of the may or is a word of honor. We have not been touched. Schneider said his group, which was detained by pro-Russian militiamen outside Slovyansk on Friday, was initially kept in a basement before being moved Saturday. Since yesterday, we have been in a more comfortable room, which has been equipped with heating. We have daylight and an air conditioning unit, he said, All our ofcers, including the interpret ers, are healthy and well. The spectacle of accred ited diplomats being pre sented to the media as what Slovyansks insur gency-appointed mayor, Vyacheslav Ponomarev, has described as bargain ing chips provoked disgust in European capitals. German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Stein meier condemned it as revolting and a violation of the mens dignity. Four members of the team are German. One of the observ ers, Swedish ofcer Maj. Thomas Johansson, was released later in the day on humanitar ian grounds as he has a mild form of diabetes, said Stella Khorosheva, a spokeswoman for the Slo vyansk mayor. The ofcer got into a car with OSCE representatives outside city hall and drove off with them. Schneider, who was speaking before the Swede was freed, said he had no information about when they would be released and that this was a matter for diplo mats of their countries. The group also includes ofcers from Poland, Denmark and the Czech Republic. The German colonel said he understood that the Slovyansk mayor could use the observers as a bargaining chip. Our presence here in Slovyansk is for sure a po litical instrument for the decision makers here in the region and the possibility to use it for negoti ations, Schneider said. Its logical in the eyes of Mayor Ponomarev that he can use us to present his positions. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 27CASH 3 . ............................................... 5-5-5 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-9-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 2-5-7-8 Afternoon . ....................................... 9-9-3-1FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 26FANTASY 5 . ............................. 3-7-14-21-24 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 8-17-21-29-36-42 POWERBALL ...................... 3-7-22-30-3320 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. UKRAINEFROM PAGE A1 RAMPFROM PAGE A1to $465,000 to complete the project, Treggi said. That amount will be added to next years city budget. In addition to Wipaire, there are companies at the airport that perform air craft maintenance, painting, avionics and detailing that could work on seaplanes if those owners could access the property from Lake Harris. The State of Florida is only second to the State of Alaska in terms of the num ber of seaplanes and seaplane-certied pilots that are registered within the state, Treggi said. The Leesburg International Airports proximity to the Metro Orlando area, together with the availability of U.S. Customs services on the aireld, make it an ideal gateway for seaplane trafc to the Central Florida region. The board meets at 5:30 / p .m. in the Commission Chambers at City Hall, 501 W. Meadow St. BIKEFESTFROM PAGE A1Ern, Straughan and H iott (BESH) of Tavares were the ofcial survey ors documenting and measuring the chain of bandanas. Event ofcials said it may take several weeks before Leesburg learns if it has earned the world record; documents to have to be sent to England to be considered for a Guinness record. Rachel ORyan, marketing coordinator for Bikefest, said proceeds from the sale of bandanas used in the attempt will benet Folds of Honor Foundation, which supports spouses, children and dependents of soldiers who have been killed or disabled. The public can help by continuing to buy bandanas, she said, noting the 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandanas will be available throughout the week at leesburgbikefest.com. I am extremely excited with the support that we have gotten from all of the people who have attended here, ORyan said of Bikefest. A lot of motorcycle riders have a military connection, whether they are military or their family is military. They support our troops and Folds of Honor has been an awesome organization to work with They are doing what they can to support the spouses and children of our fallen and injured heroes. ORyan said all of the bandanas that were strung together for the longest chain of bandanas world record attempt will be untied and each bandana will be sent to a U.S. military member serving overseas. The troops are going to get a little present from Leesburg, ORyan said, noting the bandanas will be sent as part of the care packages prepared by members of Operation Shoebox in The Villages. Leesburg Bikefest concluded Sunday afternoon with a perfor mance by recording artist Uncle Kracker. This has been a good weekend, said Leesburg Partnership board member Steve Knowles. People have really enjoyed the good weather, and the bands have been really good and I think every body has had a fun time. He noted a special highlight of Bikefest was the camaraderie. There has been a lot of community involvement a lot of people out here working hard to help out and that makes a good team, Knowles said. SERGEI GRITS / AP Masked pro Russian armed men stand at the city hall during negotiations about the release of foreign military observers being held by Vyacheslav Ponomarevs group in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, on Sunday. MARK SHERMANAssociated PressWASHINGTON Two Supreme Court cases about police searches of cellphones without war rants present vastly dif ferent views of the ubiq uitous device. Is it a critical tool for a criminal or is it an Americans virtual home? How the justices an swer that question could determine the outcome of the cases being argued Tuesday. A drug dealer and a gang member want the court to rule that the searches of their cellphones after their arrest violated their right to pri vacy in the digital age. The Obama administration and California, defending the searches, say cellphones are no dif ferent from anything else a person may be carry ing when arrested. Police may search those items without a warrant under a line of high court cases reaching back 40 years. Whats more, said Donald Verrilli Jr., the admin istrations top Supreme Court lawyer, Cellphones are now critical tools in the commission of crimes. The cases come to the Supreme Court amid sep arate legal challenges to the massive warrantless collection of telephone records by the National Security Agency and the governments use of technology to track Americans movements. Librarians, the news media, defense lawyers and civil liberties groups on the right and left are try ing to convince the jus tices that they should take a broad view of the privacy issues raised when police have unimpeded access to increasingly powerful devices that may contain a wealth of personal data: emails and phone num bers, photographs, infor mation about purchases and political afliations, books and a gateway to even more material online. Cellphones and oth er portable electronic de vices are, in effect, our new homes, the Ameri can Civil Liberties Union said in a court ling that urged the court to apply the same tough standards to cellphone searches that judges have historically applied to police in trusions into a home. Under the Constitutions Fourth Amendment, police generally need a warrant before they can conduct a search. The war rant itself must be based on probable cause, evidence that a crime has been committed. But in the early 1970s, the Supreme Court carved out exceptions for ofcers dealing with people they have arrested. The court was trying to set clear rules that allowed po lice to look for concealed weapons and prevent the destruction of evidence. Briefcases, wallets, purses and crumpled cigarette packs all are fair game if they are being carried by a suspect or within the per sons immediate control. Car searches pose a somewhat different is sue. In 2009, in the case of a suspect handcuffed and placed in the back seat of a police cruiser, the court said police may search a car only if the arrestee is within reaching distance of the passenger com partment or if police be lieve the car contains ev idence relevant to the crime for which the per son had been arrested. The Supreme Court is expected to resolve growing division in state and federal courts over whether cellphones deserve special protection. More than 90 percent of Americans own at least one cellphone, the Pew Research Center says, and the majority of those are smartphones es sentially increasingly powerful computers that are also telephones. In the two Supreme Court cases being argued Tuesday, one defendant carried a smartphone and the other an older and less advanced ip phone.Supreme Court takes on privacy JACQUELYN MARTIN / AP People walk on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Saturday. SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Online registration for businesses availableThe new competitive bidding process for purchasing goods and ser vices for business owners interested in working with the county is free with online registration. Upon registration, businesses will automatically receive an email when the county issues a formal solicitation for goods or services that match the commodity codes selected. Lake Countys online vendor registration saves business owners time spent checking on the countys purchasing needs and ensures that as many vendors as possible are given the opportunity to bid on projects. For information, and to register, go to www.lakecounty.gov/ procurement.TAVARES Annual Baby Fair to provide information for new parentsThe 25th annual Baby Fair, is an event for rst-time parents providing prenatal and postnatal education. It is open to rst-time or special needs moms and dads, women who are currently pregnant and parents of newborns. Events are scheduled for Tuesday with registration from 5:15 to 6 / p.m., and the program begins at 6:15 / p.m. at the UF/Lake County Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Road, in Tavares. On May 7, registration is from 5:15 to 6 / p.m. with the pro gram starting at 6:15 / p.m. at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave. For information, call Stacy Morgan at 352-314-6933 or email stacy.morgan@kidscentralinc.org.GROVELAND Free classes offered on arthritis pain managementThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting classes in Tavares and Groveland on arthritis pain management. The free program, Put Pain in Its Place: How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control, will provide information about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3:30 / p.m. on Wednesday at the Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave. Register online at www.tavarespain.eventbrite.com. In Groveland, the class will take place from 2 to 3:30 / p.m. on Thursday at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St. Register online at www.grovelandpain.eventbrite.com. For information, or to register, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721.EUSTIS The Highlanders chapter to host a hike and dinnerThe Highlanders chapter of the Florida Trail Association will host a Firey Hike and Pot Luck Dinner in the Woods on May 3 for interested parties. Participants will meet at the Lake Norris Trailhead in Eustis at 6 / p.m. Guests should bring a dish to share, which will be transported to the camp by car while the group hikes the 1.5 mile trail. Enjoy the sunset, watch the birds and have dinner around the re, and at 8:30 / p.m., the group will hike back and see the reies along the trail. Participants should bring a chair, ashlight, bug spray, beverages and a dish to share. Plates and silverware will be provided. Call 352-589-2721 and leave a message; include your telephone number and mention the dish you plan to bring.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comSince March, Mascotte ofcials have received word of two lawsuits against the city in regards to actions taken against former ofcer Sgt. David Grice before, during and after his termination in January. One suit was led a few weeks ago by the Florida Police Benevolent Association, alleging that Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights was violat ed as a result of the way the ring pro cess was carried out. Another suit, recently led by Eustis Attorney Derek Schroth, al leges many shortcomings in the way and reasons for which Grice was red: that false accu sations were made against him as a form of retaliation for com plaints hed made about Po lice Chief Ronaldo Banasco, that he was secretly videotaped without his knowledge, and was harassed, humiliated and mistreated. The suit seeks damages of at least $15,000. I really feel that Sgt. Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights were abused, said Schroth.MASCOTTEEx-cop files lawsuit against city BANASCO LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to The Daily CommercialCome on ladies. Hes worth more than a 100 bucks. He put on a bra for you! With those words, auctioneer Laura Mancinelli urged her audience to up the ante for the cus tom-designed bras (and boxers) up for bid at the Bras for the Cause fundraiser of the Greater Clermont Cancer Foun dation. It is the seventh year the Foundation has held the event, which took place at the Heritage Hills clubhouse in Clermont this year. The new twist was that many of the bras were modeled by reghters both men and women. As event coordinator Kay Simpson said in her opening remarks, I have learned one thing about reghters. They can run into a burning building and rescue people and cats, but they have a hard time wearing a bra. They took a lot of coax ing, but they are here. The rst entry, the Studded bra worn by reghter Robert Sieg worth went for $175. Tamara Richardson, as Cruella DeVille, got the bidding into high gear with an ensemble that fetched $500. Fireghter Dak Rakow didnt hit that mark, but he set the tone for many of the re ghters with his campy approach to the run way, as he tossed stuffing from his bra into the audience of about 250 people. Fireghter Eric Strange closed out the show, modeling his black kit ty bra and doing his best to act cat-like. The two high bidders for the kitty bra, with bids of $500 and $525, decided to both pay up, according to Simpson. It was Ann Dupee who, with a $500 bid, got to take the bra home. I will have to see where it ends up, either at the re department, or city hall or travel ing around the city, she said. Id like to do something fun with it. Noting that last years event netted close to $25,000, Simpson said she was hoping this one would bring in $30,000. In her opening re marks, Simpson dedicated this years event to longtime Cancer Foundation supporter Kathleen Kelley Brown, whom Simpson described as our Seminole-loving Irish valentine. Brown died of cancer on Wednesday. Unlike many cancer foundations, the Cler mont organization does no research. Instead they give grants to local fami lies who have a hard time dealing with the nan cial burden that can come with a diagnosis of cancer. In addition the foun dation gives scholar ships to high school se niors whose lives have been affected by can cer. In 2013 they gave $76,000 in grants and scholarships, according to Simpson. For more information on the Foundation, go to their website at www. gccf.us.CLERMONTFirefighters model bras, boxers for cancer charity LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lt. Eric Strange of the Clermont Fire Department displays a black cat bra designed by Sue Joiner and sponsored by Lyns Ice Cream and Sandwich Shoppe. Staff ReportSumter Adult & Commu nity Education Center has a new program allowing adult students to take non-credit online courses anywhere. Through a partnership with ed2go, the center offers hundreds of online courses on just about every top ic, Allison Nave, the Sumter school districts coordinator of professional accountabil ity, said in a press release. Through well-crafted les sons, expert online instruc tion and interaction with fellow students, youll gain valuable knowledge at your convenience, she said. Youll have the exibility to study at your own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. The courses can be accessed 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection. New sessions of each sixweek online course start monthly, with two lessons released weekly (for a total of 12). Each course includes comprehensive lessons, quizzes, assignments and a discussion area. Instructors facilitate every course by pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback and leading discussions. According to Nave, pop ular course titles include: Creating Web Pages, Accounting Fundamentals, Microsoft Ofce 2010, Speed Spanish, Grant Writing, Medical Terminology and Real Estate Investing. New courses are introduced monthly, so theres surely something to t your needs, she said. Teachers, there are numerous courses designed to help you enhance classroom instruction. To learn more, go to www. aec.sumter.k12..us and click on the link Online Learning. For more information, contact Christine.Burk@ sumter.k12..us, or call 352793-5719, ext. 54210.Education center to offer online classes Staff ReportGopher tortoises have become increasingly ac tive this time of year and are vulnerable to being in jured or killed by vehicles, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) said in a press release. They leave their bur rows in search of green plants to eat and a tortoise to become their mate, the press release stated. From now through May, females will be laying eggs the size of ping-pong balls in the sandy apron outside their burrows. The FWC encourages drivers to slow down on highways to help protect the states gopher tortoises. If a gopher tortoise is crossing the road, wildlife of cials said it is okay to pick it up and move it to safe ty but keep it pointed in the direction it was heading and do not put this terres trial animal into the water. People can also help by downloading a new smartphone app to report to the FWC when and where they spot gopher tortoises. The Tortoises on the move for mating season PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MOYNAHAN Gopher tortoises, like the one shown, are on the move this time of year to mate, leading to potential conicts with motorists.SEE TORTOISE | A4SEE LAWSUIT | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 Scroth said when the city learned of an im pending suit by the FPBA on Grices behalf, city ofcials claimed he was never red, but records show no payment stubs for Grice since January. Ive never seen any thing like this, Schroth said. Documents obtained from the city show that Mascotte police red Grice in January for re fusing to cooperate with an internal investigation for allegedly ha rassing a female ofcer. Grice contends he was the target of discrimination by Banasco because of complaints he made against the chief, including the alleged bug ging of police cars. On Friday, Schroth said that one thing that stands out in his mind is a copy of a video he ob tained from a camera Banasco was wearing when he red the ofcer. They made him take his badge off, take his gun out and they made him get into the back of a po lice car to be transport ed back to the police de partment from city hall to get his car, Schroth said, adding that the tape shows Banasco speaking unprofessionally even af ter Grice gets into his car and drives off. It was obvious that an attempt was being made to humiliate Grice in an unprecedented manner, Schroth said. In addition, Schroth said that when Grice was red in January he was not red in accordance with the Ofcers Bill of Rights. Under that, Grice would have been enti tled to a judicial hearing and certain protection representation by the FPBA and a review of all allegations against him until he could be proven guilty of an offense. In the suit, Schroth seeks to be reinstated to the same position he held prior to being red in January, that his ben ets and seniority rights be restored, his wages, benets and other losses the city caused be paid back, that an injunction be set in place to prevent the city from further re taliating against Grice, that he be paid for dam ages and that all other court and attorney costs Grice incurred be paid. Banasco could not be reached for comment before press time and no comment could be obtained from the city because its ofces were closed as of Thursday around 5 / p.m. In an email Gleason sent to The Daily Commercial last December in response to some of the allegations Grice had made against Banasco he said: Not liking or getting along with your supervisor does not mean there is discrimi nation, hostile work en vironment or retaliation in the work place. It means you have a per sonality conict that ei ther you work out, keep quiet and do your job, or if unhappy, nd another place of employment. In October 2013, two former police ofcers also claimed Banasco discriminated against them. Gregg Woodworth and Scott Thompson hired a Lake Mary law rm to sue the city over the allegations, which Gleason said are untrue. LAWSUITFROM PAGE A3 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.com Celebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOM JUST 10 MILES SOUTH OF THE VILLAGES Your LED Headquarters!$34.95each We honor all competitors sale ads for same brand items! 711 South 14th Street (Hwy 27) Leesburg, FLMon. Fri. 7:30 5:00 After Hours By Appointment IN MEMORY OBITUARIESPaul Ernest PapineauPaul Ernest Papineau, 65, Leesburg, FL. passed away on April 23, 2014. Mr. Papineau was born on June 17, 1948 in Cen tral Falls, Rhode Island to his parents Ernest H. and Marthe Papineau. Mr. Papineau was a Retired Maintenance Su pervisor in the Health Care Industry. He was of the Catholic faith and attended St. Pauls Catholic Church in Leesburg, FL. He and his wife moved to Leesburg in 2001 from Pawtucket, RI and he was a veteran of the Vietnam era serving proudly in the U.S. Coast Guard. He enjoyed the mu sic industry as a Disc Jockey working private events and parties. He is survived by his loving wife of 35 years Diane Papineau of Leesburg, FL; two brothers: Roger Papineau of Rehoboth, MA and Ron Papine au of Leesburg, FL; four sisters: Jeanne Taly of Shorewood, MN, Jackie Brenton of Troy, IL, Sue Parker of Rehoboth, MA and Julie Erkkinen of Clinton, MA., and many loving nieces and nephews. On-line condolences may be shared by visiting www.bankspagetheus.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. PAPINEAU free Florida Gopher Tortoise app recently be came available for the iPhone and Android. When users of the app take a photograph of a tortoise or its burrow, the photo and its GPS coordinates will be sent automatically to the FWC, the press release stated. App-generated data collected by citizens will help guide conservation of this threatened spe cies. Biological information and a quiz testing the users knowledge of the only tortoise east of the Mississippi River also are included in the app. The FWCs Gopher Tortoise Management Plan spells out goals and actions to protect the tor toises, their burrows sheltering hundreds of oth er species and their habitat. Prescribed burning is critical to maintaining the sandy, open elds and forests and the growth of soft-stemmed plants that tortoises need to survive. To access the management plan, go to MyFWC.com/Wild life and select Managed Species. TORTOISEFROM PAGE A3 Associated PressTAMPA The Florida Sheriffs Association is set to make a large push against the legalization of marijuana. Voters will decide on the legalization of medical marijuana in November. The association sent an email to sheriffs across the state during the winter asking for their support. The Tam pa Bay Times reported that 63 of 67 sheriffs were in favor of oppos ing any measures to legalize the drug. The association is also looking for the support of substance-abuse awareness and an ti-drug groups to be part of the Dont Let Florida Go To Pot campaign. It also says there has been a spike in crime and trafc accidents in states that have passed similar leg islation. Of the 20 states with the highest driver acknowledge ment of drugged driv ing, 15 were states that have passed legislation legalizing marijuana, the association said in a statement. The Los Angeles and Denver police departments have reported signicant in creases in crime since marijuana was legalized in their respective states. The association said marijuana has a high potential for abuse and presents signicant dangers to youths in the state.Sheriffs campaigning against medical pot AP FILE PHOTO Different strains of marijuana are displayed for sale at The Clinic, a Denver-based dispensary with several outlets.

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DANIELA PETROFF and NICOLE WINFIELDAssociated PressVATICAN CITY Two 20th-century popes who changed the course of the Catholic Church became saints Sunday as Pope Francis honored John XXIII and John Paul II in a delicate balancing act aimed at bringing together the conservative and pro gressive wings of the church. As if to drive the mes sage of unity home, Francis invited retired Pope Benedict XVI to join him on the altar of St. Peters Square, the rst time a reigning and retired pope have cele brated Mass together in public in the 2,000-year history of the church. An estimated 800,000 people many of them from John Pauls na tive Poland lled St. Peters, the streets around it and bridg es over the Tiber River, a huge turnout but only half the size of the crowd that came out for John Pauls 2011 beatication. John reigned from 1958-1963 and is a hero to liberal Catholics for having convened the Second Vatican Council. The meetings brought the church into the modern era by allowing Mass to be celebrated in local languages rather than Latin and encour aged greater dialogue with people of other faiths, particularly Jews. During his globe-trot ting, quarter-century papacy, John Paul II helped topple communism and invigorated a new generation of Cath olics, while his defense of core church teaching on abortion, marriage and other hot-button issues heartened conservatives after the tur bulent 1960s. Benedict was one of John Pauls closest con dantes and went on to preside over a deeply tradition-minded eightyear papacy. His successor Francis seems a pope much more in spired by the pasto ral, simple style of the good pope John. Yet Francis offered each new saint heart felt praise in his homily, saying John had allowed himself to be led by God to call the council, and hailing John Pauls fo cus on the family. Its an issue that Francis has asked the church as a whole to take up for dis cussion with a two-year debate starting this fall. They were priests, bishops and popes of the 20th century, Francis said. They lived through the tragic events of that century, but they were not over whelmed by them. Benedict put John Paul on the fast-track for possible sainthood just weeks after his 2005 death, responding to the chants of Santo Subito! or Sainthood Now! that erupted during his funeral Mass. John Pauls canonization is now the fastest in modern times. Johns sainthood run, on the other hand, lan guished after his 2000 beatication. Rather than let John Paul have the limelight with a canonization on his own emboldening many in the conservative wing of the church Francis de cided to pair him up with John. To do so, Francis tweaked the Vaticans own saint-making rules, deciding that John could be made a saint along side John Paul without the necessary second miracle usually required. Francis sounded a note of continuity in his homily, praising John for having called the coun cil and John Paul for helping implement it. John XXIII and John Paul II cooperated with the Holy Spirit in renewing and updating the church in keeping with her pristine features, those features which the saints have given her throughout the centuries, Francis said. During the ceremony, Francis took a deep breath and paused for a moment before reciting the saint-making formula in Latin, as if moved by the history he was about to make in canonizing two popes at once. As soon as he did so, applause broke out from a crowd in St. Peters and beyond. This is such a historic moment, marveled the Rev. Victor Perez, who brought a group of stu dents from the John Paul High School in Houston, Texas and waited for nearly 12 hours to get near St. Peters. John Paul was so impactful on the church. He com pleted the work of Vatican II. Today honors the last 50 years of what God has done in the church. In John Pauls native Poland, bells rang out as soon as Francis pronounced the two men saints. He changed Poland and he changed us with his teaching and with his visits here, an emotional Maria Jurek said as she watched the proceedings on giant TV screens at a sanctuary dedicated to John Paul in Krakow. In the Philippines, where John Paul in 1995 drew the largest ever crowd for a papal Mass at 4 million, Filipinos watched the canoniza tion on TV and joined local celebrations, including a suburban Ma nila parade of children dressed like the pope. Yet the atmosphere in St. Peters seemed somber and subdued per haps because of the chilly gray skies and cumulative lack of sleep of many of the pilgrims who camped out on streets near the Vatican. It was a far different scene from the rollicking party at mosphere of John Pauls May 2011 beatication, when bands of young people sang, danced and cheered before, during and after the Mass. Spirits though did pick up after the ser vice when Francis drove through the square and all the way down to the Tiber River in his opentopped car, giving many people their rst and only close-up glimpse of him. The Vatican estimated that 800,000 people watched the Mass in Rome, with about 500,000 in the square and nearby streets and the rest watching on TV screens that had been set up in piazzas around town. Polish pilgrims car rying the red and white ags of John Pauls be loved homeland had been among the rst to push into the square well before sunrise, as the human chains of ne on-vested civil protec tion workers trying to maintain order nally gave up and let them in.Francis presides over historic day of 4 popes ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis dispenses incense as he leads a solemn celebration in St. Peters Square at the Vatican, on Sunday.

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Classic DOONESBURY 1973HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 W ith the snow having re treated and chance en counters with wolves and woolly mammoths apparent ly diminished, it may be time to take out the old sticks canes, walking sticks, crutches and, for those in not enough pain al ready, golf clubs. Yes, the golf clubs have been in their bags all winter, plotting ways to confound and frustrate the nations golng mortals newly released back into the sun. With anticipation building, I too stand ready to drive myself crazy in a new season of trying to hit little balls into little holes. If only the game were easier. If only the clubs were more cooper ative, not to mention those devi ous greens, which are in cahoots with the ball to make it go any where other than into the hole. But just as sand traps and water hazards start their annual siren song Yoo hoo, big fellah in the spiked shoes, we are over here for you, just one swing away I read a story in The New York Times reporting on efforts to make the game easier to keep people interested in playing. Apparently, leaders of the sport are worried about the games declining popularity. That golf has become less popular, especially among the young, comes as a profound cultural shock. Fewer people playing golf? Five million fewer in the past decade, the story said. Surely some mistake. This is America, where the tees are as high as an elephants eye and a shank looks like its climbin clear up to the sky. How do people become properly frustrated without the help of golf clubs? Poor golf-less souls! They must be reduced to jumping up and down on any bar ren spot, without the slightest chance that a ball resting on the lip of a cup will fall due to tiny seismic shocks from the jumping which has never happened in the history of the sport despite numerous fat golfers trying, and I speak here from experience. Now it is suggested that these forlorn, disappointed people might be lured back to the game by gimmicks. The Times story came with a picture of a tour professional putting into a 15-inch-wide hole, which looked like a bucket. What an appalling prospect if this should catch on. You could go play Pebble Beach because its on your bucket list and nd a bucket being used for the hole. This is not right. As one who has found himself turned off by constant rounds of failure, who when confronted with a pond quickly throws the ball into the water on the theory its best to cut out the middle man, who has spent so much time in sand traps that meeting a camel would not be a surprise, let me just say that I dont want golf to be simple. Its only worth playing because its hard. Besides, missing a putt into a hole the size of a bucket would be its own special humiliation. At least a golfer now has a decent excuse, what with the tiny holes. No, if gimmicks are what a golfer wants, theres always the miniature golf course where the ball shoots down little ramps, past windmills and gnomes and into tunnels. The rest of us should continue to revel in the difculty of a large and gnomefree environment. Theres a lot to be said for tradition and mine involves ay ing about for hours in the hot sun, divots ying, balls slicing, then retiring to the bar and announcing proudly: I broke 80! See, its not so hard if you only play nine holes. Mark Twain is supposed to have said, Golf is a good walk spoiled. Certainly it is a witty saying, but if Mark Twain had said all the things attributed to him, he would not have had time to play golf. To me, the time it takes to play a round of golf is probably the only reason to stay home and forgo the aerobic pleasure of swinging and missing a stationary ball. Making the hole as wide as a bucket, or granting a mulligan on every hole, which I do anyway because Mulligan is not around to complain, is not really improving the game. I think people young and old just have to accept that, short of having wolves stay for the summer to move foursomes along, anything worth doing badly is worth wasting a lot of time over. Golf is a good obsession spoiled if it becomes an easy walk.Reg Henry is deputy editorial-page editor for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Readers may email him at rhenry@post-gazette.com.OTHERVOICES Reg HenryMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE An errant drive is on the rise to rid golfers of their pain Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of princi ple, an iconoclast who should be ad mired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact hes a petty scofaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees. After 20 years of dis agreements and court battles, the U.S. govern ment began rounding up his cattle this month. The rancher and a group of armed supporters confronted the federal authorities, leading to a standoff; the authorities withdrew. Bundy justies his stingy and illegal behavior with a variety of claims. One is that this is a states rights issue and that he doesnt recognize the federal government. Another is that his family grazed the land long before it came under the jurisdiction of the BLM. Actually, more than 70 percent of the land in Nevada is federally owned, including the land in question; the state Constitution recognized that ownership years before Bundys ancestors arrived, despite his assertion other wise. (Various reports also have cast serious doubt on whether his family was grazing cattle on the land as long ago as he claims.) For that matter, if prior use of land were all that was needed to avoid paying a landlord, the land would revert back not to Bundy but to the control of Native Americans, who were on the Nevada land long before any white settlement of the area. Despite his professed disbelief in the U.S. government, Bundy brought his case in feder al court, so apparently he does recognize the federal government when he thinks he might gain something from it. But the courts repeatedly ruled against him. Which makes Bundy more of a bad loser than a folk hero. He would surely have insisted that the court rulings be followed if they had gone in his favor. Bundy and his band of armed supporters are declaring victory after the standoff, and now the fringe groups that support him are talking about using these same tactics elsewhere. The feds were wise to back down rather than allow Bundy to provoke a gunght over his 400 head of cattle. Still, the U.S. government cannot let the matter rest there. It must return and enforce the rules. The message to the would-be Bundys of the nation must be that willful violation of laws passed by Congress and the state of Nevada and upheld by the courts will not be tolerated.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEThe U.S. cant let Cliven Bundy win his range war That golf has become less popular, especially among the young, comes as a profound cultural shock. Fewer people playing golf? Five million fewer in the past decade, the story said. Surely some mistake. This is America, where the tees are as high as an elephants eye and a shank looks like its climbin clear up to the sky.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Clippers stage silent protest before game / B4 ANDREW A. NELLES / AP Tampa Bay Rays Ben Zobrist misses the catch as Chicago White Soxs Gordon Beckham (15) slides in safely on Sunday in Chicago. SARAH TROTTOAssociated PressCHICAGO Jose Abreu drove in four runs and set a major league rookie record for RBIs through the end of April and the Chicago White Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays 9-2 on Sunday. Abreu, who had a two-run home run in the sixth and a two-run single in the seventh, has 31 RBIs. Albert Pujols had the previous RBI mark of 27 in 2001. The homer was his major league-leading 10th and ex tended his own record for home runs by a rookie through April. In his major league debut, Scott Carroll (1-0) gave up two runs, one earned, in 7 1-3 in nings after he was called up from Triple-A Charlotte to ll in for injured ace Chris Sale. Rays starter David Price (3-2) allowed eight runs, six earned, in six innings. Trailing 1-0, the White Sox scored ve runs in the sixth and four runs in the seventh. The Rays committed four er rors in the sixth. Gordon Beck ham reached on an error and scored from second when Price threw away the ball after elding Marcus Semiens bunt single. Adam Eaton scored when right elder Wil Myers fumbled the ball after Prices throwing error. Abreu then hit a two-run home run for a 4-1 lead. He set the rookie record for hom ers by the end of April on Fri day with his ninth a walk-off Abreus power display leads White Sox to 9-2 win over Rays ALEX BRANDON / AP Washington Wizards forward Al Harrington (7) drives past Chicago Bulls guard Jimmy Butler (21) on Sunday in Washington, D.C. JOSEPH WHITEAP Sports WriterWASHINGTON In his customary seat next to the bench, Ted Leonsis sported a No. 42 jer sey in support of his suspended forward. By the time the game was over, the Washington Wizards owner stood and cheered as the crowd chanted Free Ne-ne!! Trevor Ariza had a career playoff-high 30 points, and the Wizards scored the rst 14 points of the game and barely looked back Sun day, overcoming the absence of their so-called Wizards zap Bulls 98-89 to take 3-1 series leadSEE NBA | B2 JAY COHENAP Sports WriterCHICAGO Duncan Keith had a goal and three assists, and the Chicago Blackhawks used a four-goal third period to nish off the St. Louis Blues with a 5-1 victory in Game 6 of their rstround playoff series on Sunday. Chicago won four in a row after a slow start in St. Louis. The de fending Stanley Cup champions will play the winner of the Min nesota-Colorado series in the Western Conference seminals. The Avalanche lead the Wild 3-2 heading into Game 6 in Minnesota on Monday night. Jonathan Toews, Patrick Sharp, Andrew Shaw and Keith scored in the third period as the Blackhawks improved to 14-2 in home playoff games over the last two seasons. Co rey Crawford made 35 saves, keeping Chicago in a tie game when St. Louis controlled the second period. T.J. Oshie scored for the Blues, who outshot PHOTOS BY BILL HABER / APNoh Seung-yul, of South Korea, holds up his trophy with tournament ofcials after winning the Zurich Classic golf tournament on Sunday at TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La. SEE RAYS | B2Blues eliminated as Blackhawks win 5-1SEE NHL | B2 BRETT MARTELAP Sports WriterAVONDALE, La. Seung-Yul Noh over came windy conditions and his nerves, shooting a 1-under 71 on Sunday to win the Zurich Classic by two shots for his rst PGA Tour victory. While Noh, the leader through three rounds, never fell out of rst, he did make his rst three bogeys of the tourna ment and briey fell into a tie with Keegan Bradley, the 2011 PGA Championship winner who had the gallery behind him. But Bradley did him self in with a bogey on the fth hole and a triple bogey on the sixth, while Noh remained steady enough to hold off re maining challengers. The 22-year-old South Korean player, the youngest winner this season, wore yel low and black ribbons on his hat to honor the more than 300 dead or missing in a ferry accident in waters off his home country. After taking the thirdround lead and becoming the rst to play 54 holes at TPC Louisiana without a bogey, he said he hoped he could string together one more bogey-free round and come through with a victory to lift the spir its of his nation. He accomplished the second part, and hell take it. His best n ish in 77 previous PGA Tour starts was a tie for fourth at the 2012 AT&T National. The seventh rst-time PGA Tour winner in the last 10 years in the Noh refuses to wilt as he takes first PGA Tour title Bud Cauley hits off the second tee during the nal round of the Zurich Classic golf tournament. SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Toyota Owners 400 ResultsSaturday At Richmond International Raceway Richmond, Va. Lap length: .75 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (17) Joey Logano, Ford, 400 laps, 126.8 rating, 47 points, $274,081. 2. (25) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 134.8, 44, $220,211. 3. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 96.2, 41, $187,666. 4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 128.5, 41, $162,258. 5. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 102.7, 40, $159,261. 6. (14) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 400, 88, 38, $122,448. 7. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 112.1, 38, $104,065. 8. (18) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 99.1, 36, $98,890. 9. (16) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 90.2, 35, $104,165. 10. (22) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 85.6, 34, $116,173. 11. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 108.7, 34, $126,548. 12. (6) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 400, 86.5, 32, $118,740. 13. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 94.4, 31, $118,504. 14. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 101.3, 30, $99,565. 15. (26) Greg Bife, Ford, 400, 81.5, 29, $125,565. 16. (1) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 400, 66.1, 28, $122,085. 17. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 75.2, 27, $119,201. 18. (11) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 71.6, 26, $108,335. 19. (34) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 400, 70.2, 25, $105,823. 20. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 400, 60.7, 24, $104,798. 21. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 400, 68.2, 23, $100,823. 22. (28) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 78.6, 22, $88,890. 23. (21) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 68.4, 21, $77,190. 24. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 63.5, 20, $107,654. 25. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 399, 59.7, 19, $114,948. 26. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 398, 47.9, 0, $76,765. 27. (27) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 398, 54.9, 17, $125,351. 28. (24) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 398, 51.6, 16, $89,237. 29. (30) David Reutimann, Ford, 397, 50.1, 15, $79,465. 30. (37) David Ragan, Ford, 396, 44, 14, $88,690. 31. (8) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 396, 42.9, 13, $79,065. 32. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 396, 84.2, 12, $129,851. 33. (23) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 396, 48.1, 11, $78,290. 34. (35) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 395, 36.5, 10, $83,665. 35. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 395, 37.5, 9, $75,465. 36. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 394, 33.4, 9, $75,285. 37. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 391, 28.2, 0, $83,146. 38. (29) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 390, 40.7, 6, $106,005. 39. (39) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 390, 27.3, 5, $66,180. 40. (42) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 380, 30.3, 0, $62,180. 41. (40) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 367, 28.2, 3, $58,180. 42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, electrical, 225, 35, 2, $54,180. 43. (3) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, suspension, 159, 67, 1, $91,071.NBA Playoff GlanceAll Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 2, Indiana 2 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta at Indiana, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 1: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA Miami 3, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Charlotte at Miami, 7 or 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Miami at Charlotte, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Charlotte at Miami, TBA Brooklyn 2, Toronto 1 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, late Wednesday, April 30: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Toronto at Brooklyn, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn at Toronto, TBA Washington 3, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: Chicago at Washington, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Washington at Chicago, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 2, San Antonio 1 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Dallas at San Antonio, 7 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: San Antonio at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Dallas at San Antonio, TBA Memphis 2, Oklahoma City 2 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 or 9:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA L.A. Clippers 2, Golden State 2 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, May 1: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, TBA Portland 2, Houston 1 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Houston at Portland, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Portland at Houston, TBASundays games Wizards 98, Bulls 89CHICAGO (89) Dunleavy 3-8 0-0 6, Boozer 3-7 2-2 8, Noah 4-9 2-3 10, Hinrich 3-12 0-0 7, Butler 5-14 4-4 16, Augustin 3-10 1-1 8, Gibson 13-16 6-7 32, Snell 1-2 0-0 2. To tals 35-78 15-17 89. WASHINGTON (98) Ariza 10-17 4-5 30, Booker 4-10 0-0 8, Gortat 6-18 5-8 17, Wall 4-15 7-8 15, Beal 7-13 2-2 18, Gooden 1-4 0-0 2, Webster 3-6 2-2 8, Harrington 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 0-2 0-0 0, Seraphin 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-86 20-25 98. Chicago 18 22 22 27 89 Washington 28 27 27 16 98 3-Point GoalsChicago 4-19 (Butler 2-7, Augustin 1-4, Hinrich 1-5, Snell 0-1, Dunleavy 0-2), Washing ton 8-19 (Ariza 6-10, Beal 2-3, Gooden 0-1, Wall 0-1, Harrington 0-1, Webster 0-3). Fouled OutBooker. ReboundsChicago 53 (Noah 15), Washington 48 (Booker 9). AssistsChicago 22 (Hinrich 7), Washing ton 22 (Wall 10). Total FoulsChicago 22, Washing ton 18. TechnicalsGibson, Chicago defensive three second 2, Booker. Flagrant FoulsBoozer. A,356 (20,308).Warriors 118, Clippers 97L.A. CLIPPERS (97) M.Barnes 4-7 1-2 10, Grifn 8-14 5-5 21, Jordan 0-1 0-0 0, Paul 5-9 4-5 16, Redick 3-9 3-3 12, Collison 3-7 0-0 6, Ja.Crawford 8-18 7-8 26, Davis 0-3 0-0 0, Granger 0-4 0-0 0, Turkoglu 1-4 0-0 3, W.Green 0-0 0-0 0, Dudley 0-0 0-0 0, Hollins 1-1 1-1 3. Totals 3377 21-24 97. GOLDEN STATE (118) Iguodala 6-8 8-10 22, D.Green 1-4 2-2 4, Lee 7-11 1-1 15, Curry 10-20 6-7 33, Thompson 5-13 2-4 15, ONeal 2-4 1-1 5, Blake 1-3 0-1 3, H.Barnes 6-7 1-2 15, Armstrong 2-2 0-0 4, Speights 1-2 0-0 2, Kuzmic 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-74 21-28 118. L.A. Clippers 24 24 23 26 97 Golden State 39 27 23 29 118 3-Point GoalsL.A. Clippers 10-31 (Redick 3-6, Ja.Crawford 3-10, Paul 2-4, Turkoglu 1-3, M.Barnes 1-3, Collison 0-2, Granger 0-3), Golden State 15-32 (Curry 7-14, Thompson 3-8, Iguodala 2-2, H.Barnes 2-3, Blake 1-3, D.Green 0-2). Fouled OutThompson. ReboundsL.A. Clippers 42 (Grifn, Jordan 6), Golden State 45 (Curry 7). AssistsL.A. Clippers 20 (Paul 6), Golden State 32 (Iguodala 9). Total FoulsL.A. Clippers 25, Golden State 26. TechnicalsL.A. Clippers Coach Rivers, Golden State defensive three second. Flagrant FoulsTurkoglu. A,596 (19,596). NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Detroit 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston 3, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 24: Boston 3, Detroit 2, OT Saturday, April 26: Boston 4, Detroit 2 Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 2 Tuesday, April 22: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3 Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 2 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday, April 23: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Saturday, April 26: Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1 Monday, April 28: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Columbus at Pittsburgh, TBA N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 2 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, April 25: Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Sunday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Tuesday, April 29: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rang ers, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 3, Minnesota 2 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Minnesota 1, Colorado 0, OT Thursday, April 24: Minnesota 2, Colorado 1 Saturday, April 26: Colorado 4, Minnesota 3, OT Monday, April 28: Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Minnesota at Colorado, TBA Chicago 4, St. Louis 2 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: Chicago 2, St. Louis 0 Wednesday, April 23: Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Sunday, April 27: Chicago 5, St. Louis 1 Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Dallas 3, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 4, Anaheim 2 Friday, April 25: Anaheim 6, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 27: Anaheim at Dallas, late x-Tuesday, April 29: Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m. San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: San Jose 7, Los Angeles 2 Tuesday, April 22: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Thursday, April 24: Los Angeles 6, San Jose 3 Saturday, April 26: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Monday, April 28: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBA Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB Suspended Minnesota INF Jonatan Hinojosa (Cedar Rapids-MWL) 50 games after a positive test for metabolites of Nandrolone under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed 1B Chris Davis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. Recalled INF Jemile Weeks from Norfolk (AHL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX Selected the contract of RHP Scott Carroll from Charlotte (IL). Transferred OF Avisail Garcia to the 60-day DL. DETROIT TIGERS Placed RHP Anibal Sanchez on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Justin Miller from Toledo (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES Recalled RHP Preston Claiborne from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Placed RHP Bruce Billings on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. TEXAS RANGERS Activated LHP Matt Harrison from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Luis Sardinas to Frisco (Texas). National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS Recalled INF Carlos Triunfel from Albuquerque (PCL). Optioned RHP Jose Dominguez to Albuquerque. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Recalled RHP Casey Sadler from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned RHP Jared Hughes to Indianapolis. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Placed OF Bryce Harper on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS Assigned F Tomas Jurco, F Riley Sheahan, D Xavier Ouellet and G Jake Paterson to Grand Rapids (AHL). American Hockey League CHICAGO WOLVES Reassigned F Eric Kattelus to Kalamazoo (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC Recalled MF-F David Estrada from Atlanta (NASL).TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 9 p.m.FS1 Bantamweights, McJoe Arroyo (13-0-0) vs. David Quijano (15-4-1); super lightweights, Michael Perez (19-1-2) vs. Jorge Romero (24-8-0), at Bayamon, Puerto RicoMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m.ESPN Oakland at Texas8:10 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Chicago White SoxNBA 7 p.m.TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Miami at Charlotte9:30 p.m.TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, San Antonio at DallasNHL 7 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, Pittsburgh at Columbus9 p.m.CNBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, Colorado at Minnesota10 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, San Jose at Los AngelesSOCCER 2:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Newcastle at Arsenal PGA-Zurich Classic ScoresSunday At TPC Louisiana Avondale, La. Purse: $6.8 million Yardage: 7,425; Par: 72 Final Seung-Yul Noh (500), $1,224,000 65-68-65-71 Robert Streb (245), $598,400 67-66-68-70 Andrew Svoboda (245), $598,400 64-68-70-69 Jeff Overton (135), $326,400 67-68-67-70 Erik Compton (100), $248,200 66-68-72-68 Robert Garrigus (100), $248,200 73-69-68-64 Charley Hoffman (100), $248,200 68-67-68-71 Keegan Bradley (80), $197,200 69-66-65-75 Tommy Gainey (80), $197,200 71-66-67-71 Justin Rose (80), $197,200 71-67-69-68 Paul Casey (63), $149,600 71-68-64-73 Bud Cauley (63), $149,600 71-68-66-71 Peter Hanson (63), $149,600 65-69-71-71 J.B. Holmes (63), $149,600 71-65-69-71 Ben Martin (56), $119,000 62-67-73-75 David Toms (56), $119,000 73-68-67-69 Mark Anderson (53), $98,600 72-65-70-71 Stuart Appleby (53), $98,600 67-72-70-69 Rory Sabbatini (53), $98,600 69-72-69-68 Cameron Tringale (53), $98,600 73-69-66-70 Retief Goosen (49), $73,440 72-65-68-74 Brooks Koepka, $73,440 71-68-67-73 Bronson LaCassie (49), $73,440 70-69-69-71 Daniel Summerhays (49), $73,440 72-66-68-73 Robert Allenby (45), $54,230 71-68-68-73 David Duval (45), $54,230 68-69-70-73 Danny Lee (45), $54,230 71-69-65-75 Bo Van Pelt (45), $54,230 74-63-73-70 Graham DeLaet (40), $44,200 69-68-71-73 Freddie Jacobson (40), $44,200 72-69-66-74 Alex Prugh (40), $44,200 70-68-70-73 John Senden (40), $44,200 70-70-69-72 Boo Weekley (40), $44,200 71-70-71-69 Sang-Moon Bae (32), $30,785 68-72-71-71 Greg Chalmers (32), $30,785 71-71-71-69 Derek Ernst (32), $30,785 71-71-71-69 David Hearn (32), $30,785 71-71-69-71 Charles Howell III (32), $30,785 68-73-70-71 Mark Calcavecchia (32), $30,785 71-70-69-72 Kevin Chappell (32), $30,785 72-67-69-74 Morgan Hoffmann (32), $30,785 70-68-70-74 Kevin Kisner (32), $30,785 69-68-69-76 Charlie Wi (32), $30,785 70-71-69-72 Will Wilcox (32), $30,785 68-68-71-75 Chad Collins (25), $21,080 66-71-76-70 Tag Ridings (25), $21,080 71-70-72-70 Andres Romero (25), $21,080 70-71-70-72 Max Homa, $17,544 71-71-71-71 Troy Merritt (22), $17,544 71-69-70-74 Kevin Tway (22), $17,544 70-72-69-73 Y.E. Yang (22), $17,544 72-70-69-73 Briny Baird (15), $15,477 71-69-70-75 Ricky Barnes (15), $15,477 70-72-69-74 Martin Flores (15), $15,477 72-68-69-76 Andrew Loupe (15), $15,477 71-70-71-73 Sean OHair (15), $15,477 71-69-71-74 D.A. Points (15), $15,477 73-68-69-75 Kyle Stanley (15), $15,477 71-67-71-76 Brendan Steele (15), $15,477 73-67-70-75 Shawn Stefani (15), $15,477 69-72-72-72 Tim Wilkinson (15), $15,477 70-70-65-80 Lucas Glover (7), $14,416 71-71-69-75 Fabian Gomez (7), $14,416 72-69-66-79 John Merrick (7), $14,416 69-72-72-73 Wes Roach (7), $14,416 74-67-71-74 Vijay Singh (7), $14,416 70-71-68-77 Joe Durant (3), $13,872 69-71-67-80 Padraig Harrington (3), $13,872 70-72-71-74 Michael Thompson (3), $13,872 66-71-75-75 J.J. Henry (1), $13,396 68-69-75-76 Doug LaBelle II (1), $13,396 68-73-72-75 Troy Matteson (1), $13,396 72-68-69-79 Jim Renner (1), $13,396 75-67-71-75 X-factor as they beat the Chicago Bulls 98-89 to take 3-1 lead in their East ern Conference series. Ariza made 6 of 10 3-pointers, John Wall added 15 points and 10 assists for the Wizards, who forced 16 turnovers and committed only six. The other big difference came at the 3-point arc, where Washington went 8 for 19 and Chicago just 4 for 19. The Wizards, seeking to win a playoff series for only the third time since the 1970s, can nish off the Bulls in Game 5 on Tuesday in Chicago. Taj Gibson scored a career-high 32 points on 13 for 16 shooting for Chicago, but his team mates combined to go 22 for 62 from the eld. He made more eld goals in the rst half (8) than the rest the Bulls combined (7). Mike Dunleavy, who scored 35 points in Game 3, could barely get a look, much less a bas ket. He went 0 for 3 from the eld in the rst half and nished 3 for 8 with six points. Chicagos Kirk Hinrich committed four turnovers, and NBA Defensive Player of the Year Joakim Noah had a quiet 10 points and 15 rebounds against the Nene-less Wizards. Nene was suspend ed for the game after grabbing Jimmy Butlers head during a faceto-face confrontation in the fourth quarter of the Wizards Game 3 loss. Wall this week called Nene the X-factor, and for good reason: Since the March 2012 trade that brought the Bra zilian to D.C., Washing ton is 65-63 when he plays and 21-41 when he doesnt, although the club did hold its own by winning 12 of 21 when Nene went down with a knee injury Washington stormed to a 14-0 lead, with Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau calling a timeout after each Wizards touchdown. Chicagos rst seven possessions consisted of six missed shots and two turnovers. Butler nally got the visitors on the board with an 18-footer 4:12 into the game. The next sequence: Hinrich hit the side of the backboard with a baseline jumper, and Ariza hit a 3-pointer that took an odd carom off the rim to make the score 17-2. NBA FROM PAGE B1 grand slam against the Rays. Dayan Viciedo then doubled and scored on shortstop Yunel Escobars throwing error for a 5-1 lead. Semien doubled to extend the White Sox lead to 6-1 in the sev enth and knocked Price out of the game. Abreu hit a two-run single and Ramirez added an RBI single for a 9-1 lead. The Rays went ahead 1-0 in the fth when David DeJesus singled and scored on right elder Viciedos twoout error. The Rays scored their second run in the eighth on Evan Longo rias single. Before his call up, Carroll was 27-38 with a 3.95 ERA in 138 games during eight minor league seasons. He underwent Tommy John surgery in 2012 and bounced back with a 3-1 record and 1.57 ERA in four Triple-A starts this season. It is a feel-good day for him, 29, getting his rst crack at the big leagues, White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper said before the game. Usually you see them come up at 21, 22, 23, something like that. I dont think its much different other than hes had a longer path and probably a lit tle more of a rocky path with the Tommy John. Sale (forearm strain) played catch before Sundays game, but when hell return from the 15-day DL is un certain. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 the Blackhawks 36-27. Ryan Miller nished with 22 saves. St. Louis went 0 for 6 in 10 minutes of pow er-play time over the rst two periods, wast ing a chance to take the lead. The Blues went 2 for 29 with the man ad vantage for the series. The Blackhawks also struggled on the power play, but they scored when it mattered most. With Jay Bouwmeester in the box for tripping, Keith made a nice stop to keep the puck in the St. Louis zone, then red a pass over to Toews. The captain beat Miller over his right shoulder for a 2-1 lead just 44 seconds into the third period. It was Toews third goal of the series. He also scored on a break away in overtime of Fri day nights 3-2 win. Toews 23rd career postseason goal seemed to take the air out of the Blues, and it got even worse for St. Louis. Sharp got loose for a breakaway, shook off a stick to the face by defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk and slid a shot past Miller. Sharps rst point of the playoffs sent a charge through the tow el-waving sellout crowd of 22,144, and there were mocking chants of Mil-ler! Mil-ler! as Shaw added his second goal of the series and helped set up Keith for his second. It was an eerily similar playoff exit for St. Louis to a year ago, when the Blues also were eliminated by the defending Stanley Cup champi ons in six games in the rst round. In that 2013 playoff series, St. Louis won the rst two games at home against Los An geles, then lost four in a row. This year was supposed to be differ ent, especially after the Blues acquired Miller from Buffalo on March 1. But they lost their last six games of the regular season, putting them in a rst-round series against rival Chicago. St. Louis rebounded for two 4-3 overtime victories, but the Black hawks found their stride when the series shift ed to Chicago. Crawford had a shutout in Game 3, Patrick Kane scored in overtime in Game 4, and Toews breakaway score in St. Louis put the Blackhawks in position to advance. Chicago defenseman Brent Seabrook re turned from a threegame suspension. Seabrook was punished by the NHL for his wipeout hit on Blues captain David Backes in Game 2. Backes exacted a measure of revenge when he delivered a hard hit on Seabrook into the end boards in the second period. But Seabrook added two more assists and had six points for the series. NHL FROM PAGE B1 event, Noh nished at 19-under 269 and earned $1,224,000. Andrew Svoboda and Robert Streb tied for second. Svoboda had a 69, and Streb shot 70. Jeff Overton, who briey pulled within a stroke of Noh on the back nine, had a 70 to nish fourth at 16 under. Bradley would up with a 75 to tie for eighth at 13 under. On Saturday, Brad ley worked his way into the nal group, two stroked behind Noh, with a 65. Bradley was within a stroke after the rst hole Sunday, which saw Noh hit his drive into mulch right of the fairway en route to his rst bo gey of the tournament. Bradley then birdied the par-5 second hole to tie Noh, to the delight of the gallery. But just a couple holes later, Bradley missed a par putt from less than 2 feet, and followed that up by hitting his drive into the water on No. 6. Be cause of where his ball crossed the line of the elongated hazard, he had to take his drop 280 yards from the pin. Then, he three-putted to complete a pivotal two-hole stretch in which he dropped four strokes. While Bradley never recovered from his front-nine falter, Noh still had to ward off a challenge from Over ton, who was as close as one stroke when he made a 20-foot birdie putt on 10. Overton, however, bogeyed 11 when he hit his drive into a bunker left of the fairway and his second shot over the fair way and right of the cart path. He nev er got closer than two strokes again. Robert Garrigus, who narrowly made the cut Friday, had the best score Sunday at 64. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 14 10 .583 6-4 W-1 7-4 7-6 Baltimore 12 12 .500 2 5-5 L-1 5-6 7-6 Toronto 12 13 .480 2 1 4-6 W-1 5-7 7-6 Boston 12 14 .462 3 1 5-5 L-1 5-8 7-6 Tampa Bay 11 14 .440 3 2 4-6 L-1 7-7 4-7 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 12 9 .571 6-4 L-1 9-5 3-4 Minnesota 12 11 .522 1 6-4 W-1 6-5 6-6 Chicago 13 13 .500 1 5-5 W-1 8-5 5-8 Kansas City 12 12 .500 1 5-5 W-1 6-3 6-9 Cleveland 11 14 .440 3 2 4-6 L-3 7-6 4-8 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Texas 15 9 .625 8-2 W-1 9-4 6-5 Oakland 15 10 .600 5-5 L-2 6-6 9-4 Los Angeles 11 12 .478 3 1 5-5 L-1 3-6 8-6 Seattle 9 14 .391 5 3 2-8 L-1 4-6 5-8 Houston 9 17 .346 7 4 4-6 W-2 5-9 4-8 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 17 7 .708 7-3 W-4 9-3 8-4 New York 14 11 .560 3 6-4 W-1 8-8 6-3 Washington 14 12 .538 4 5-5 L-1 9-8 5-4 Philadelphia 13 12 .520 4 6-4 W-2 4-5 9-7 Miami 11 14 .440 6 2 5-5 L-1 9-4 2-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 18 7 .720 7-3 L-1 9-6 9-1 St. Louis 14 12 .538 4 4-6 W-1 6-3 8-9 Cincinnati 11 14 .440 7 2 5-5 L-3 4-5 7-9 Pittsburgh 10 16 .385 8 4 2-8 L-1 6-8 4-8 Chicago 8 16 .333 9 5 4-6 W-1 5-8 3-8 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 15 10 .600 5-5 W-4 8-4 7-6 Colorado 14 12 .538 1 7-3 W-1 8-4 6-8 Los Angeles 14 12 .538 1 4-6 L-1 6-9 8-3 San Diego 12 14 .462 3 2 5-5 W-1 7-6 5-8 Arizona 8 20 .286 8 7 4-6 L-2 2-13 6-7 SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 4, L.A. Angels 3 Boston 7, Toronto 6 Minnesota 5, Detroit 3 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Baltimore 3, Kansas City 2, 10 innings Houston 7, Oakland 6 Tampa Bay 4, Chicago White Sox 0 Texas 6, Seattle 3SATURDAYS GAMESWashington 4, San Diego 0 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 1 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 4, Cincinnati 1 Miami 7, N.Y. Mets 6, 10 innings Philadelphia 6, Arizona 5 L.A. Dodgers 6, Colorado 3SUNDAYS GAMESToronto 7, Boston 1 Kansas City 9, Baltimore 3 Houston 5, Oakland 1 Chicago White Sox 9, Tampa Bay 2 Detroit at Minnesota, ppd., inclement weather San Francisco 4, Cleveland 1 Seattle 6, Texas 5 L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, lateSUNDAYS GAMESN.Y. Mets 4, Miami 0 Atlanta 1, Cincinnati 0, 10 innings San Diego 4, Washington 2 Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 0 St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 0 San Francisco 4, Cleveland 1 Colorado 6, L.A. Dodgers 1 Philadelphia 2, Arizona 0DAVID GOLDMAN / APAtlanta Braves Freddie Freeman hits a single to score the winning run in the 10th inning against the Cincinnati Reds on Sunday in Atlanta. The Braves won 1-0. TODAYS GAMESOakland (Gray 3-1) at Texas (Darvish 1-0), 8:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 1-2) at Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 1-0), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 2-0), 10:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESChicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-2) at Cincinnati (Simon 3-1), 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 2-2), 8:15 p.m. Colorado (Morales 2-1) at Arizona (Miley 2-2), 9:40 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 2-3) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 2-2), 10:15 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Viciedo, Chicago, .368; RDavis, Detroit, .353; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .351; AlRamirez, Chicago, .343; MeCabrera, Toronto, .339; Wieters, Baltimore, .338; Rios, Texas, .323. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 24; Bautista, Toronto, 20; Donaldson, Oakland, 19; Mauer, Minnesota, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 18; Plouffe, Minnesota, 18; Pujols, Los Angeles, 18; Trout, Los Angeles, 18. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 27; Colabello, Minnesota, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 23; Pujols, Los Angeles, 21; Donaldson, Oakland, 20; Moss, Oakland, 20; Brantley, Cleve land, 19; KSuzuki, Minnesota, 19. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 37; AlRamirez, Chicago, 34; Rios, Texas, 31; Donaldson, Oakland, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; Altuve, Houston, 29; Ellsbury, New York, 29; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 29; Markakis, Baltimore, 29; Pujols, Los Angeles, 29. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 10; Beltran, New York, 9; Colabello, Minnesota, 9; Donaldson, Oakland, 9; Pe droia, Boston, 9; 7 tied at 8. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Bourn, Cleveland, 2; Ellsbury, New York, 2; Fuld, Minnesota, 2; Infante, Kansas City, 2; AJackson, Detroit, 2; LMartin, Texas, 2; IStewart, Los Angeles, 2. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 9; Pujols, Los Angeles, 9; Bautista, Toronto, 7; Donaldson, Oakland, 7; Dozier, Minnesota, 7; NCruz, Baltimore, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 9; Andrus, Texas, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 8; Ellsbury, New York, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7; Dozier, Minnesota, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6. PITCHING: MPerez, Texas, 4-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 4-1; 19 tied at 3. ERA: MPerez, Texas, 1.42; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.54; Darvish, Texas, 1.61; Kazmir, Oakland, 1.62; Feldman, Houston, 1.69; Ventura, Kansas City, 1.80; Shields, Kansas City, 1.91. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 47; Scherzer, Detroit, 44; Price, Tampa Bay, 40; Lester, Boston, 36; Tanaka, New York, 35; Shields, Kansas City, 35; Sabathia, New York, 35.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .398; Tulowitzki, Colo rado, .360; Utley, Philadelphia, .353; Freeman, Atlanta, .352; DGordon, Los Angeles, .350; Morneau, Colorado, .349; YMolina, St. Louis, .345. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 20; EYoung, New York, 20; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 19; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 18; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 18; 6 tied at 17. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 29; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 22; Morneau, Colorado, 19; Trumbo, Arizona, 19; Braun, Mil waukee, 18; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 18; Blackmon, Colorado, 17; Morse, San Francisco, 17; Rendon, Washington, 17; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 17. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 34; Blackmon, Colorado, 33; Freeman, Atlanta, 31; Uribe, Los Angeles, 31. DOUBLES: HRamirez, Los Angeles, 11; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10; Hill, Arizona, 9; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 9; MaAdams, St. Louis, 8; ECabrera, San Diego, 8; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 8; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 8; Uribe, Los Angeles, 8. TRIPLES: Denora, San Diego, 2; CGomez, Milwaukee, 2; DGordon, Los Angeles, 2; Harper, Washington, 2; Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Hill, Arizona, 2; Puig, Los Ange les, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2; EYoung, New York, 2. HOME RUNS: AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 8; Belt, San Francisco, 7; Stanton, Miami, 7; Trumbo, Arizona, 7; JUp ton, Atlanta, 7; 6 tied at 6. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 12; EYoung, New York, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9; BHamilton, Cincin nati, 9; Revere, Philadelphia, 8; Blackmon, Colorado, 7; Marte, Pittsburgh, 7. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 4-0; Machi, San Francisco, 4-0; Lohse, Milwaukee, 4-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 4-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 4-1; 15 tied at 3. ERA: Harang, Atlanta, 0.85; Simon, Cincinnati, 1.30; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.38; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.42; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.46; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.53. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 53; Fernandez, Miami, 47; Greinke, Los Angeles, 40; ClLee, Philadel phia, 40; Cueto, Cincinnati, 39; Lynn, St. Louis, 36. White Sox 9, Rays 2 T ampa Bay Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist 2b 4 1 2 0 Eaton cf 5 2 3 0 DJnngs cf 2 0 0 0 Semien 3b 5 2 2 1 Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 JAbreu dh 4 2 2 4 Longori 3b 4 0 1 1 V iciedo rf 3 1 1 0 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 JrDnks pr-rf 0 0 0 0 Myers rf 4 0 1 0 K onerk 1b 4 0 0 0 DeJess dh 2 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 1 YEscor ss 3 0 0 1 De Aza lf 4 0 1 0 Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 Flowr s c 4 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 0 1 0 GBckh 2b 3 2 0 0 Totals 30 2 7 2 T otals 36 9 11 6 Tampa Bay 000 010 010 2 Chicago 000 005 40x 9 EZobrist (3), Y.Escobar (3), Price (1), Myers (2), Viciedo (3). DPChicago 4. LOBTampa Bay 6, Chicago 5. 2BSemien (5), Viciedo (9). HRJ.Abreu (10). SBG.Beckham (1). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Price L,3-2 6 9 8 6 1 7 Lueke 1 2 1 1 1 0 H.Bell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Carroll W,1-0 7 1/3 6 2 1 2 3 D.Webb 1 2/3 1 0 0 2 0 Price pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. HBPby Carroll (De.Jennings). WPCarroll. UmpiresHome, Adrian Johnson; First, Tim Welke; Second, Chris Segal; Third, Tim Timmons. T:55. A,313 (40,615). Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 1 Boston T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 Re yes ss 4 1 1 0 GSizmr lf 4 0 0 0 MeCar r lf 4 1 2 1 Napoli 1b 4 0 1 0 Bautist cf-rf 4 1 1 1 Przyns dh 4 0 0 0 Encr nc 1b 4 1 2 2 Mdlrks 3b 3 0 0 0 La wrie 3b 4 2 2 2 JGoms rf 4 1 1 0 F rncsc dh 4 0 0 0 Bogarts ss 4 0 2 0 Sier ra rf 3 0 0 1 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 1 1 Rasms cf 0 0 0 0 D.Ross c 3 0 0 0 Thole c 3 1 1 0 Totals 33 1 6 1 T otals 32 7 9 7 Boston 010 000 000 1 Toronto 011 000 23x 7 ED.Ross (2). LOBBoston 6, Toronto 2. 2BBo gaerts (6), Me.Cabrera (7), Encarnacion 2 (8), Lawrie (1). HRLawrie (6). SDiaz. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lester L,2-4 7 5 4 4 0 7 A.Miller 1/3 3 3 2 0 0 Badenhop 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Toronto Dickey W,2-3 6 1/3 5 1 1 0 6 Delabar H,4 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Dickey (Middlebrooks). UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Alan Porter; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T:28. A,260 (49,282). Royals 9, Orioles 3 Kansas City Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 5 3 2 0 JW eeks dh 4 1 1 0 Infante 2b 3 1 2 6 N.Cr uz rf 4 1 1 2 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 0 Mar kks 1b 3 1 1 0 BButler dh 5 1 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 AGordn lf 4 1 2 2 Cle vngr c 3 0 0 0 S.Perez c 4 0 2 0 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 5 0 1 1 D Yong ph 1 0 1 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 0 Lmrdzz 2b 4 0 0 0 Dyson cf 4 1 1 0 Schoop 3b 3 0 0 0 Lough lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 39 9 13 9 T otals 32 3 5 2 Kansas City 101 020 401 9 Baltimore 000 002 001 3 EShields (2), A.Jones (1). DPKansas City 1, Baltimore 1. LOBKansas City 8, Baltimore 4. 2BInfante (1), A.Gordon (9), Moustakas (4), D.Young (3). HRIn fante (2), N.Cruz (7). SBDyson (4). SFInfante. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,3-2 7 3 2 2 2 6 K.Herrera 1 0 0 0 0 2 G.Holland 1 2 1 1 0 2 Baltimore M.Gonzalez L,1-2 6 6 4 3 1 4 Meek 2/3 5 4 4 0 0 Stinson 1 1/3 0 0 0 3 0 R.Webb 1 2 1 1 0 0 WPG.Holland, Stinson. UmpiresHome, Jim Reynolds; First, Phil Cuzzi; Sec ond, Brian Knight; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T:08. A,368 (45,971). Astros 5, Athletics 1 Oakland Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 2 Lowrie ss 3 0 1 0 F owler cf 4 0 1 1 Dnldsn dh 3 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Moss lf 3 1 0 0 Springr rf 4 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 1 1 Car ter dh 3 0 0 0 Reddck rf 3 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 1 0 0 Gentry ph 1 0 0 0 Hoes lf 4 0 0 0 Jaso c 3 0 0 0 Cor prn c 3 1 1 0 Barton 1b 3 0 0 0 V illar ss 3 2 2 2 Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 2 1 T otals 32 5 7 5 Oakland 000 000 001 1 Houston 001 000 40x 5 ELowrie (4). LOBOakland 5, Houston 5. 2BVillar (7). 3BVillar (1). HRAltuve (1). SBMoss (1). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Milone L,0-2 6 2/3 5 4 4 2 2 Otero 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 2 Houston McHugh W,2-0 8 2/3 2 1 1 3 7 Valdes 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby McHugh (Moss). UmpiresHome, Paul Emmel; First, Toby Basner; Sec ond, Jordan Baker; Third, Jerry Meals. T:32. A,935 (42,060). Mets 4, Marlins 0 Miami Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 3 0 0 0 EY ong lf 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Gr ndrs rf 3 1 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 D Wrght 3b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 DnMr p 2b 3 1 1 0 Sltlmch c 2 0 1 0 CY oung cf 3 1 1 2 GJones 1b 3 0 1 0 Duda 1b 3 0 1 1 Dietrch 2b 3 0 0 0 Reck er c 4 0 1 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 T ejada ss 4 0 1 0 Koehler p 2 0 0 0 Gee p 1 0 0 0 Capps p 0 0 0 0 CT orrs p 0 0 0 0 Totals 28 0 3 0 T otals 29 4 6 4 Miami 000 000 000 0 New York 010 030 00x 4 EG.Jones (3). DPMiami 1, New York 2. LOBMiami 5, New York 7. 2BD.Wright (3), Duda (2). HRC. Young (2). SBDan.Murphy (5). SGee. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Koehler L,2-2 5 5 4 4 4 2 Capps 2 0 0 0 0 3 Hand 1 1 0 0 0 1 New York Gee W,2-1 8 3 0 0 4 6 C.Torres 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Koehler (C.Young). UmpiresHome, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Seth Buckminster. T:42. A,861 (41,922). Braves 1, Reds 0, 10 innings, Cincinnati Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 0 1 0 He ywrd rf 5 1 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 F remn 1b 5 0 1 1 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 2 0 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 2 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 1 0 Leake pr 0 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 Laird c 3 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 T ehern p 2 0 0 0 B.Pena c 4 0 1 0 JW aldn p 0 0 0 0 Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 DCr pnt p 0 0 0 0 Cueto p 2 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 Berndn ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 0 5 0 T otals 35 1 7 1 Cincinnati 000 000 000 0 0 Atlanta 000 000 000 1 1 Two outs when winning run scored. LOBCincinnati 6, Atlanta 9. 2BLudwick (4), B.Pena (4), J.Upton (3), Simmons (3). CSB.Hamilton (4). SCueto, Teheran. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cueto 8 3 0 0 3 11 LeCure 1 1 0 0 0 0 Hoover L,1-3 2/3 2 1 1 0 1 M.Parra 0 1 0 0 0 0 Atlanta Teheran 8 3 0 0 2 5 J.Walden 1 0 0 0 0 2 D.Carpenter 2/3 2 0 0 0 1 Thomas W,1-0 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 M.Parra pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. UmpiresHome, Adam Hamari; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Vic Carapazza. T:02. A,446 (49,586). Padres 4, Nationals 2 San Diego W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi ECarer ss 3 1 1 1 Span cf 4 0 0 0 Denor lf 3 1 2 2 Rendon 3b-2b 4 1 1 0 Grandl c 4 0 1 0 W erth rf 4 0 2 1 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 1 LaRoch 1b 4 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Venale rf 3 1 1 0 Espinos 2b 1 0 0 0 Maybin cf 4 1 2 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 Amarst 3b 2 0 0 0 Bar rett p 0 0 0 0 Hundly ph 1 0 1 0 Ble vins p 0 0 0 0 Petersn pr-3b 1 0 0 0 F rndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Kenndy p 3 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Nady ph 1 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Benoit p 0 0 0 0 TMoore ph 1 0 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 0 Loaton c 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 4 8 4 T otals 32 2 5 2 San Diego 000 112 000 4 Washington 100 000 010 2 DPWashington 1. LOBSan Diego 8, Washington 4. 2BGrandal (3), Maybin (1), Rendon (8), Werth (6). HRMcLouth (1). SBE.Cabrera (3), Denora (5). SFGyorko. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Kennedy W,2-3 7 3 1 1 0 9 Benoit H,4 1 1 1 1 0 1 Street S,9-9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Washington Jordan 4 3 1 1 2 0 Detwiler L,0-1 1 1/3 4 3 3 1 1 Barrett 1/3 1 0 0 2 1 Blevins 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 3 Storen 1 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard 1 0 0 0 1 1 HBPby Kennedy (Espinosa). WPKennedy, Detwiler. UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Ben May; Third, Doug Eddings. T:12. A,873 (41,408). Cardinals 7, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Marte lf 4 0 0 0 MCr pnt 3b 4 1 2 0 Tabata rf 2 0 0 0 Ja y cf 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 1 1 1 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 0 NWalkr 2b 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 3 1 1 1 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Craig rf 4 1 1 1 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 JhP erlt ss 2 2 2 4 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Descals 2b 3 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 3 0 0 0 TSnchz c 3 0 1 0 CMr tnz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 T otals 29 7 9 7 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0 St. Louis 100 014 01x 7 DPPittsburgh 1, St. Louis 1. LOBPittsburgh 5, St. Louis 2. 2BM.Carpenter (2), Y.Molina (7). 3B Ma.Adams (1). HRJh.Peralta 2 (6). SJay. SFHol liday, Y.Molina. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Volquez L,1-2 5 2/3 7 6 6 1 2 J.Gomez 2 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 St. Louis Wainwright W,5-1 8 3 0 0 2 7 C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Wainwright (Tabata). UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Will Little; Third, Paul Schrieber. T:35. A,986 (45,399). Cubs 4, Brewers 0 Chicago Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Kalish lf 4 0 2 0 CGomz cf 4 0 1 0 Lake cf 4 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 3 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 0 0 0 0 Lucro y c 3 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 2 3 2 KDa vis lf 4 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 1 1 0 Overa y 1b 3 0 1 0 Olt 3b 2 0 0 1 Bianchi ss 3 0 0 0 HRndn p 0 0 0 0 EHer rr rf 3 0 0 0 JoBakr c 4 0 2 0 WP erlt p 2 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 1 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Hamml p 3 0 0 0 R Weks ph 1 0 1 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 W ang p 0 0 0 0 Bonifac ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 T otals 30 0 3 0 Chicago 020 001 010 4 Milwaukee 000 000 000 0 EHammel (1), S.Castro (4). DPChicago 1, Milwau kee 1. LOBChicago 5, Milwaukee 5. 2BC.Gomez (7). HRS.Castro 2 (4). SBKalish (2), Schierholtz (2). SFOlt. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Hammel W,4-1 7 3 0 0 2 7 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 0 H.Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 3 Milwaukee W.Peralta L,3-1 7 8 3 3 1 6 Kintzler 1 1 1 1 0 1 Wang 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hammel pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Lance Barksdale; First, Mark Ripperger; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Kerwin Danley. T:47. A,286 (41,900). Giants 4, Indians 1 Cle veland San F rancisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 0 2 0 P agan cf 4 0 1 0 Swisher 1b 4 0 0 0 P ence rf 3 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 2 0 0 0 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 CSantn 3b 4 0 0 0 P osey c 4 0 2 0 Brantly lf 3 0 0 0 Adrianz pr 0 1 0 0 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 Mor se lf 3 0 0 0 YGoms c 3 1 1 1 J.P erez lf 0 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 Blanco ph 0 0 0 0 Salazar p 2 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 1 2 0 Chsnhll ph 1 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 1 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 4 1 1 3 Allen p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 3 1 T otals 32 4 8 4 Cleveland 000 000 010 1 San Francisco 000 100 003 4 Two outs when winning run scored. DPCleveland 1, San Francisco 1. LOBCleveland 3, San Francisco 5. 2BPagan (7), Sandoval (4), B.Craw ford (6). HRY.Gomes (3), B.Hicks (3). SBlanco. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Salazar 7 5 1 1 1 8 Rzepczynski 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Allen L,2-1 1 1/3 2 3 3 1 2 San Francisco Vogelsong 7 2 0 0 2 6 Casilla BS,3-3 1 1 1 1 0 1 Romo W,2-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Scott Barry; First, Jeff Nelson; Sec ond, Marcus Pattillo; Third, Laz Diaz. T:43. A,530 (41,915). Phillies 2, Diamondbacks 0 Philadelphia Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 4 1 2 0 GP arra rf 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 1 2 1 Gldsch 1b 4 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 0 1 0 Monter c 3 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 2 0 Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 C.Ross lf 4 0 0 0 Nieves c 4 0 1 0 P ollock cf 3 0 1 0 Asche 3b 4 0 0 0 Owings ss 3 0 2 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 McCr th p 2 0 0 0 ABrntt p 3 0 0 0 OP erez p 0 0 0 0 Galvis 3b 0 0 0 0 Pnngtn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 8 1 T otals 32 0 6 0 Philadelphia 100 001 000 2 Arizona 000 000 000 0 EOwings (4). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 6, Arizona 6. 2BUtley (11), Howard (3), G.Parra (4). 3BOwings (1). SBRevere (9). CSRollins (2). IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia A.Burnett W,1-1 8 5 0 0 0 8 Papelbon S,8-9 1 1 0 0 0 0 Arizona McCarthy L,0-5 7 7 2 2 1 12 O.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby A.Burnett (Montero). UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, John Tumpane. T:37. A,022 (48,633).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 NASCAR HANK KURZ JR.Associated PressRICHMOND, Va. Joey Logano punched his ticket to NASCARS playoffs. Marcos Am brose punched Casey Mears. Logano used a sav vy move to get around three dueling former champions in the nal laps Saturday night at Richmond International Raceway, and the classic short-track ending caused tempers to are in a big way in the garage afterward. The biggest skirmish had Marcos Ambrose, who nished 18th, confronting Casey Mears, who was 19th. Mears rst pushed Ambrose out of the way, and Ambrose retaliated with a thun dering punch in the face that appeared to draw blood. It was unclear what caused the two to con front each other. The Joe Gibbs Racing driver took advantage of the late-race duel to grab the lead and then outran former champions Matt Kenseth, Jeff Gordon and Brad Kes elowski. Loganos second victory assured him a spot in the 10race Chase for the championship. Loganos rst career victory on the 0.75mile oval came when Gordon, Kenseth and Keselowski raced in a triangle jockeying for position, and Logano went underneath all three and held off Gor don for his fth career Sprint Cup victory.Logan wins at Richmond; Marcos Ambrose draws blood after race STEVE HELBER / AP Joey Logano celebrates his winon Saturday at Richmond International Raceway in Richmond, Va. NBA ANTONIO GONZALEZAP Sports WriterOAKLAND, Calif. The Los Angeles Clippers chose not to speak publicly about own er Donald Sterling. In stead, they made a silent protest. In response to Ster lings purported comments urging a woman to not bring black people to his teams games, the Clippers on Sunday let their uniforms become a show of solidarity. They ran out of the tunnel for Game 4 of their rst-round playoff at Golden State wearing their warmups. Then they huddled at center court and tossed their warmups to the ground, going through their pregame routine with their red Clippers shirts in side out to hide the teams logo. Players also wore black wristbands or armbands. They all wore black socks with their normal jerseys. Its just us, only us. Were all we got, Clip pers star guard Chris Paul could be heard shouting to teammates before they ran out. The Warriors sellout crowd of 19,596, decked out in gold shirts, booed the Clippers as they always do during introductions. Clippers coach Doc Rivers said before the game that he would re main the only one to speak for the team on this, saying players want to remain focused on basketball. Even he, though, acknowledged that has not been easy since TMZ released the alleged recording of Sterling on Saturday. Our message is to play, Rivers said. Our message is that were going to let no one and nothing stop us from what we want to do. And I think thats a good message. I really do. I think thats the message were trying to send. And if we can pull this off all the way, I think that would be a terric message. While the Clippers wanted to let their play do the talking, other NBA players continued to speak out on the subject. Some talked about the hurt Sterlings alleged words caused. Oth ers urged Silver to take an aggressive stance against Sterling, who has a history of alleged discrimination. Most of them hoped Sterling would be removed as the teams owner someday soon.WARRIORS 118, CLIPPERS 97OAKLAND, Calif. Stephen Curry made a career playoff-high seven 3-pointers and scored 33 points, lead ing the Golden State Warriors past the Los Angeles 118-97 on Sun day to even a rst-round series that has been pulled into a race-related scandal involving the Clippers owner. Clippers players made a silent protest against Donald Ster ling by shedding their warm-up jerseys and going through pregame routine with their red shirts on inside out. They also wore black bands on their wrists or arms and black socks in a show of solidarity. With the win, Curry and the Warriors made another kind of statement.NHL IRA PODELLAP Sports WriterNEW YORK Henr ik Lundqvist didnt allow a bad ending to the second period wreck an otherwise good day for the New York Rangers. Lundqvist was the beneciary of a threegoal lead that was trimmed to two when the Philadelphia Flyers got their power play to work in the closing sec onds of the middle period. But the Rangers kept it together in the third, withstood a late surge, and pushed the Flyers to the brink of elimina tion with a 4-2 victory on Sunday. The biggest part to me was to calm down and not be too upset about it, Lundqvist said of Vinny Lecava liers goal with 32.6 sec onds left that made it 3-1. It is really frustrat ing to sit here when you give up a goal like that late in the period. It was just about let ting it go and being fo cused on the right things going into the third. Brad Richards and Dominic Moore scored in the second to make it 3-0. Lundqvist stopped 24 shots and didnt face more than 10 in any pe riod. The only other puck that got past him was Claude Girouxs goal with 1:29 left after the Flyers pulled goalie Steve Mason. Defenseman Marc Staal gave the Rangers the lead in the rst, and Brian Boyle ended the drama with an emp ty-net goal with 15 seconds remaining. Moore helped seal the win when he raced up ice to negate an icing call and fed Boyle. New York leads the series 3-2 and can advance to the second round with a win Tuesday in Philadelphia. Clippers stage silent protest on court before Game 4 MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ / AP The Los Angeles Clippers chose not to speak publicly about owner Donald Sterling. Instead, they made a silent protest. The players wore their Clippers shirts inside out to hide the teams logo. Rangers 4-2 win pushes Flyers to brink of playoff elimination

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014STUDY: Gene therapy may boost cochlear implants / C4 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Amputee support group meeting scheduled for todayThe Waterman Amputee & Limb Loss Konnections group for amputees and those with limb loss will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. today and every fourth Monday at the Mattison Conference Room B, Florida Hospital Waterman, 100 Waterman Way. For information, call Tracey Estok at 352-253-3892. ORLANDO Disability Employment Expo scheduled for FridayThe Agency for Persons with Disabilities is hosting the fourth annual Disability Employment Expo, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at the Fashion Square Mall, State Road 50 in Orlando. Some of the employers scheduled to participate are Lockheed Martin, Hilton Worldwide, Orlando Veterans Administration Medical Center, Krystal Company and Walgreens Distribution Center. This event is open to those with all types of disabilities. For information or to register, call Maryjane Wysocki at 321-474-0015 or email to maryjane.wysocki@apdcares.org, or call 1-866-273-2273 or go to APDcares.org.MOUNT DORA Peripheral Neuropathy Support Group meeting setWaterman Village will host the next Central Florida Peripheral Neuropathy Support Group meeting to take place from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday in the Lodge Card Room, 445 Waterman Ave., in Mount Dora. For information, call Jack Koehler at 352-735-2077. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver Course available in MayA new six-hour curriculum has been developed for the public and, upon completion of the course. Florida drivers ages 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, and includes workbooks and a com pletion certicate. Payment can be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. Classes will take place: %  %  May 5 and 7, from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., Leesburg, to register, call 352-326-3540 %  %  May 5 and 7, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora, to register, call 352-735-7180.TAVARES Sexual abuse support group scheduled to meetAdult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, which offers a 12step program, meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday in Tavares. For information, call 352-406-7485, or go to www.siawso.org. COLLEEN MASTONYChicago TribuneThe nurses on the 20th oor were the rst to see them. Oh my goodness, declared Col leen Forrester, 29, a nurse dressed in green scrubs, who pointed to the win dows. Other nurses came to look and laughed. Were the children strong enough to come see? Soon, parents and nurses were leading kids out of their rooms. The children were small and frail-looking. Most were undergoing treatment for cancer and other serious disorders. But on this cold April morning, they had a precious moment of distraction. The window washers at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital of Chicago were dressed as superheroes. All morning, Captain America, Batman and Spider-Man swung on ropes outside the windows waving to the children, posing for pictures in what is fast becoming a semiannual tradition. Wow. They are so high up, said a wide-eyed Mason Turngren, 8, whose colon is failing and who has been in and out of the hospital the last four years. On Tuesday, he was exhausted from the most recent battery of tests and had to be coaxed to the window. Once there, he was transxed. Mason waved to the heroes and put his hand on the glass to exchange a high-ve with Captain America. That moment meant a lot to Masons mom, Dusty Turngren, 42. Just to see a smile on his face, she said. The hospital had offered other events in recent days, including a visit from a therapy dog, but none had aroused Masons interest. Then he heard that Spider-Man was outside. Superheroes are his favorite, said his mother, especially Spider-Man. Mason spent half an hour at the windows. The superhero window washers made their rst appearance at Lurie last year after Phil Kujawa, 46, the foreman of the crew, saw a news report about a similar event in another city. He mentioned the idea to his bosses at Chicago-based Corporate Cleaning and quickly got the green light. Then Kujawa had the little issue of getting his crew to don the capes and tights. At rst, they were like, I am not wearing that, Kujawa recalled. He emphasized how much it would mean to the kids, and eventually Window washers give young hospital patients a liftSuperhero cleaners MICHAEL TERCHA / MCT Window washers Pedro Castro, 45, as Batman, and Roberto Duran, 32, as Captain America, right, entertain patient Zakk Carrier, 5, as they hang from rope lines from the roof of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital to entertain children in what has become a beloved semi-annual tradition in Chicago. SEE LIFT | C4 GRACE PETERSENNorfolk Daily NewsNORFOLK, Neb. Phyllis Glaser knew something was wrong with her son, Jonathan. Late last year, the usually energetic 7-year-old started to wear out easily. He would have his mo ments where it was hard for him to keep up with do ing the normal kid things, but hes still able to be the kid, still play and do all of those fun things, she told the Norfolk Daily News He just didnt have enough of the energy that he had before to be able to keep up with everybody. Glaser, and her husband, Monte, also noticed the large amount of bruises Jonathan had on his body. At one point, they counted 23. We knew he would wrestle around with his brothers and have fun, but to have 23 bruises, thats not right, Glaser said. After having Dr. Dan Blo menberg examine him, he diagnosed Jonathan with aplastic anemia and was sent to Childrens Hospital in Omaha on Dec. 27. With aplastic anemia, the bone marrow which produces red and white blood cells, as well as blood platelets quits working. He spent three days at the hospital, which is a lot shorter than the six weeks they could have spent there, Glaser said. Since his diagnosis, Jonathan has to get blood work done weekly, as well as blood transfusions. He has been an absolute trooper, Glaser said. His sense of humor has gotten him through all of this. One procedure that could greatly help Jona than was a bone marrow transplant, Glaser said. Everyone in the family got tested for a possible match Phyllis, Monte, sister Al lison, 13; brother, Andrew, 12; and brother, Evan, 10. Evan turned out to be a match. Glaser was hesitant on how to inform Evan, Brother is boys perfect bone marrow match AP PHOTO Jonathan, 7, and and Evan Glaser, 10, pose for a photo at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha on March 19.SEE BROTHERS | C5

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 ABDULLAH AL-SHIHRIAssociated PressRIYADH, Saudi Arabia In the past 24 hours, Saudi Arabia has reported four new deaths from a Middle East virus related to SARS and 36 more cases of infection, in cluding a Turkish pilgrim in Mecca. Ofcials are struggling to alleviate concerns that the vi rus is spreading amid a spike in infections over the past several weeks. Many of the infections reported Wednesday and Thursday are health workers. Prince Miteb, the son of rul er King Abdullah and the head of the Saudi National Guard, was quoted in newspapers Thursday saying that the king arrived in the eastern city of Jiddah sooner than usual in order to be with the people there, amid a rise in infections. The king traditionally spends his summers in Jiddah, where the seaside weather is cooler than in the capital. Every Saudi citizen is more valuable to the king than himself, the prince was quoted as saying in the statebacked al-Watan newspaper. The Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, be longs to a family of viruses known as coronaviruses that include both the common cold and SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which killed some 800 peo ple in a global outbreak in 2003. MERS can cause symptoms such as fever, breathing problems, pneumonia and kidney failure. The most recent deaths re ported by the Saudi Health Ministry bring to 85 the number of people who have died in the kingdom from the virus that appeared in 2012. The kingdom has record ed a total of at least 297 conrmed cases. There is no vaccine or treatment for the virus, and it is still unclear how it is trans mitted. The 65-year-old Turkish pilgrim is among six new cases reported in Mecca, where millions of Muslims from around the world descend year-round. Thats raised concerns that the virus could spread among pilgrims. The ministry said the youngest cases from the newest batch of infections are two 13 year olds, one in the city of Medina and another in Jiddah. In one other case, a 25-year-old Saudi male is being treated in Jor dan, according to the Saudi Health Ministry. The ministry reported the four latest Saudi deaths in separate statements: a 45-year-old male health worker in al-Kharj, a city about 50 miles (80 kilome ters) outside the capital Riyadh; a 29-year-old male who contracted the virus from the public in Jiddah; a 72-year-old woman in Ri yadh; and a 68-year-old man in Mecca. On Monday, the king removed the countrys health minister following the recent spike in MERS cases. The next day, acting Health Minister Adel Faqih toured a hospital in Jiddah and met with MERS patients while wearing gloves, a medical robe and face mask. An out break among health workers prompted authorities to shut down the emergency ward of that hospital for 48 hours earlier this month.Saudi Arabia reports pilgrim infected with MERS AMR NABIL / AP Egyptian Muslim pilgrims, some wearing masks as a precaution against the Middle East respiratory syndrome, pray during a ritual called Jamarat in Mina near the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressNEW YORK Health ofcials are worried about recent U.S. mea sles outbreaks that so far have caused more illnesses than at the same point of any year since 1996. Authorities say 129 cases in 13 states were reported by mid-April, the bulk of them in Cal ifornia and New York City. Most were triggered by travelers who caught the virus abroad and spread it in the United States among unvaccinated people. Many of the travelers had been to the Philippines, where a recent measles epidemic has caused at least 20,000 illnesses. The U.S. numbers re main relatively tiny, but ofcials are worried to see case counts growing. Since 2000, the highly contagious disease has been considered eliminated in the Unit ed States, aside from occasional small outbreaks sparked by over seas travelers. For most of the last decade, the nation was seeing only about 60 cases a year. But since 2010, the average has been near ly 160. This increase in cas es may be a new nor mal, unfortunately, said Dr. William Schaff ner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. Contributing to the problem: Decades of measles vaccination campaigns have been so successful that many doctors have never seen a case, dont realize how contagious it is, and may not take necessary steps to stop it from spreading. Among the 58 cas es reported from Cali fornia, at least 11 were infected in doctors ofces, hospitals or other health-care settings, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New York City health of cials say two of their 26 cases were infected in medical facilities. Also on Thursday, a medical journal the Annals of Internal Med icine released a com mentary warning doc tors to prevent that kind of situation. We must ensure that our facilities do not be come centers for sec ondary measles transmission, wrote Dr. Julia Shaklee Sammons, an infectious disease spe cialist at the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia.Measles off to a fast start as cases trend up

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com won over his crew. Each window washer, Kujawa said, was selected for his experience and skill. (Because of the architectur al details on the building, Lurie Childrens is not an easy building to clean, he said.) Whats more, each man had to look like a hero. Roberto Duran, 32, with a chiseled jaw and clean-cut good looks, would make a perfect Captain America, his bosses thought. Gerardo Vaca, 36, with a short, athletic build, seemed more a Spider-Man type. And Pedro Castro, 45, with a bushy mustache, was chosen to become Batman as a little bit of a joke, Kujawa. We wanted to see what he would look like in a costume. Now, he said, his team revels in the chance to assume the super identities. They smile and wave their hands, Vaca said of the kids. They are so happy. I like (dressing up) because I like to see their happy faces. Evelina London Childrens Hospital in England might have been the rst to ask its window washers to don tights and capes, according to news reports. After photos of the superhero window washers hit the Internet a few years ago, the idea spread to childrens hospitals around the world. Doctors at Lurie believe even if they cant cite scientic studies to prove it the happiness that is generated by Superhero Day can help children heal. There is power in laughter and joy and excitement, said Dr. Stewart Goldman, a neuro-oncologist at Lurie. I cant quote you a trial, but I know in my heart that it helps. The heroes swung back and forth in front of patients windows, lingering outside each oor, before lowering themselves again. Everywhere they went, they created a stir of excitement. Ricky Canas, 27, stood away from the crowd with his 10-yearold sister, Angelina, a tiny girl with a tall IV pole. She got sick in February; doctors found a tumor in her liver. The days since have been long and terrifying. But Angelina has been a trouper, through the biopsy and surgery and now in the run-up to chemother apy. I always liked super heroes, Canas said. He looked down at his sister, and gently touched her delicate chin. It was clear that Canas thought his sister was the real hero of the day. Someone told me once, We dont have to nd heroes. We can be our own. LIFTFROM PAGE C1 LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Australian researchers are trying a novel way to boost the power of co chlear implants: They used the technology to beam gene therapy into the ears of deaf animals and found the combina tion improved hearing. The approach reported Wednesday isnt ready for human test ing, but its part of grow ing research into ways to let users of cochlear implants experience richer, more normal sound. Normally, microscopic hair cells in a part of the inner ear called the cochlea detect vibrations and convert them to electrical impuls es that the brain recog nizes as sound. Hearing loss typically occurs as those hair cells are lost, whether from aging, exposure to loud noises or other factors. Cochlear implants substitute for the miss ing hair cells, sending electrical impulses to directly activate auditory nerves in the brain. Theyve been implanted in more than 300,000 people. While highly successful, they dont restore hearing to normal, missing out on musical tone, for instance. The idea behind the project: Perhaps a closer connection between the implant and the auditory nerves would improve hear ing. Those nerves bush-like endings can regrow if exposed to nerve-nourishing proteins called neurotro phins. Usually, the hair cells would provide those. Researchers at Australias University of New South Wales gured out a new way to deliver one of those growth fac tors. They injected a growth factor-producing gene into the ears of deafened guinea pigs, animals commonly used as a model for hu man hearing. Then they adapted an electrode from a cochlear implant to beam in a few stron ger-than-normal electrical pulses.Study: Gene therapy may boost cochlear implants

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICESSAVE UP TO80%OFFPHARMACY PRICES YOUR COST!Cialis 20mg.24 count.......$89.95Flomax 4mg.90 count.......$68.00Viagra 100mg.20 count.......$65.95NO SHIPPING COST ON THESE PRODUCTS. ALL ADVERTISED MEDICATIONS ARE GENERIC. VALUECALL US FIRST OR CALL US LAST... Our prices on prescription medicines are competitive with other mail order or internet prices. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi north of Kmart)(352) 347-0403 or Fax (352) 347-2034 Fax: (352) 347-2034cdrx441@gmail.com but Jonathan did the work for them. He went over, all ex cited and said, Youre my match, Glaser said, adding that Evan was ready to do it. It was just something he wanted to do. He want ed to help his brother. On March 13, Jona thon was admitted to the Nebraska Medical Center to undergo intense chemotherapy treatments to com pletely wipe out his bone marrow. The bone marrow transplant followed on March 19. Evan, she said, be came slightly nervous the day of the proce dure, but his father re assured him. Glaser said Evan was poked a number of times to get the bone marrow out, which made him real ly sore. Jonathan was joking around, saying, You look like a grandpa now, walking around because he was so stiff, Glaser said. After a two-week w aiting period, the bone marrow transplant has been deemed success ful as Jonathans body is beginning to produce red and white blood cells and platelets. Hes also seems to be feeling better, although he still tires easily. At this point, hes producing bone mar row and the other cells, but theres always that possibility of him rejecting it. Hes taking a lot of medicines to help with the process so he doesnt reject it, Glaser said. Once he gets home, Jonathan will have re strictions, Glaser said. He will have to avoid large crowds and stay out of the sun as much as possible, or wear sunscreen and hats. Because of the med ications hes on, he can burn easily, Gla ser said. And, I guess a lot of sunlight can trig ger graft versus host dis ease, which is where he can reject his brothers bone marrow. He also cant go swimming due to his central line and camping may be limited this year, Glaser said. For the time being, Glaser and Jonathan remain in Omaha, and ex pect to stay for about another two weeks to ensure he doesnt reject the bone marrow, as well as monitoring cell and vitamin/mineral levels. Plus, if Jonathan would get an infection, its better that hes close to the hospital since he doesnt have a high level of white blood cells. Making the stay a lit tle easier is the staff and Child Life specialists at the Med Center. They are awesome, Glaser said. They had a whole bunch of handson activities that kept him entertained and busy. Her family and friends, and the Christ Lutheran School com munity where the Glasers attend school also have been a huge help, Glaser said. I would like to thank all of our family and friends at home that are helping with the kids, Glaser said. BROTHERSFROM PAGE C1 LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO Ten years of U.S. data suggest cho lesterol-lowering statins are giving patients a li cense to pig out. Calorie and fat intake increased among statin users during the decade an indication that many patients might be abandoning hearthealthy lifestyles and assuming that drugs alone will do the trick, the study authors said. They said the goals of statin treatment should be to help patients achieve benets unat tainable by other methods, not to empower them to put butter on their steak. Statins may keep cholesterol low even if peo ple eat less healthy food and slack off on exercise, but those bad habits can contribute to obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and other problems that are bad for the heart. The study was published online Thursday in JAMA Internal Medicine. Dr. Rita Redberg, the journals editor, said the study raises concerns of a potential moral hazard of statin use, in addition to already known potential side effects risks including muscle aches and diabetes. Statins provide a false reassurance, she said. People seem to believe that statins can compensate for poor dietary choices and sedentary life. The researchers examined 1990-2010 government health surveys involving nearly 28,000 adults aged 20 and old er. Different people were surveyed each year, underwent physical exams and blood tests, and reported their food intake. The por tion who used statins steadily increased, from 8 percent in the rst year to 17 percent in the nal year. Statin users in the rst year consumed on aver age 2,000 calories daily; those in the nal year consumed 2,192 daily calories. Average fat intake also increased, from 72 grams daily to 82 grams daily. Experts generally recommend no more than 77 grams daily for adults con suming 2,000 calories daily. The increase was seen in total fat intake and saturated fats, the least healthy kind. Average body-mass index among statin us ers increased from 29 just below the cutoff for obesity to 31, or one point higher than that cutoff. Diabetes also increased 29 percent of statin users had it in 2010 versus 22 percent in the studys rst year. A link between statin use and diabetes has been documented pre viously, but reasons for the trend in the study are uncertain. Calories and fat in take were lower among statin users than non users early on, but by the nal years that dif ference vanished. Calories, fat intake and diabetes remained stable among adults not using statins, and there was a smaller increase in body-mass index among nonusers, although the average BMI remained in the overweight category throughout. The study doesnt prove that statin use prompted patients to slack off, or that there is a true link between the drugs and the changes seen. But the researchers said the results raise troubling questions. If, for example, the average statin user is eating 192 more calories daily than 10 years ago, that could translate into many extra pounds each year unless activity levels also in creased, said Dr. Mar tin Shapiro, the senior author and an internist and researcher at the University of California in Los Angeles. The study certainly doesnt mean that ev eryone responds this way, but the concern is that people who are on statins ought to be par ticularly careful about how many calories they eat and what kinds of foods they eat, he said. They dont appear to be doing that. Shapiro said the re sults mirror his own ex perience taking statins. With a family history of heart disease, Shapiro said he had careful ly controlled his weight and avoided high cho lesterol foods. But Shapiro said he began to be less stringent about his diet after his doctor pre scribed a statin to lower his bad cholesterol. Heart disease prevention guidelines is sued last November by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology stress the need for healthy lifestyles and include recommendations for regular exer cise and heart-healthy eating. But they also would broaden statin use about one-third of U.S. adults would be told to consider taking the drugs under the guidelines.Statins may lead some patients to pig out AP FILE PHOTO This June 14, 2011 photo shows the drug Lipitor at Medco Health Solutions Inc., in Willingboro, N.J.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 28, the 118th day of 2014. There are 247 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On April 28, 1789, there was a mutiny on the HMS Bounty as rebelling crew members of the British ship led by Fletcher Christian set the captain, William Bligh, and 18 sailors adrift in a launch in the South Pacic. (Bligh and most of the men with him managed to reach Timor in 47 days.) On this date: In 1758, the fth president of the United States, James Monroe, was born in Westmoreland County, Va. In 1788, Maryland became the seventh state to ratify the Constitution of the United States. In 1817, the United States and Britain signed the Rush-Bagot Treaty, which limited the number of naval vessels allowed in the Great Lakes. In 1918, Gavrilo Princip, the assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and the archdukes wife, Sophie, died in prison of tuberculosis. In 1937, former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein was born in the village of al-Oja near the desert town of Tikrit (he was executed in December 2006). In 1945, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and his mistress, Clara Petacci, were executed by Italian partisans as they attempted to ee the country. In 1952, war with Japan ofcially ended as a treaty signed in San Francisco the year before took effect. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower resigned as Supreme Allied commander in Europe. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 28, 2014: This year your friends play a bigger role in creating more of what you want. Brainstorming sessions will result in remarkable ideas some of which actually might be applicable! You easily could feel overworked or go to extremes with your health and ideas. If you are single, a friend might become more, or you could meet someone of interest through a friend. You will tend to be far more romantic than you have been in the past. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy hanging out together more. The friendship that exists between you is as strong as your romantic tie. A fellow TAURUS could be more stubborn than you are! ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might not be looking forward to a conversation that has the potential to be awkward. Your intuition could tell you to be more vulnerable. Try to nd some common ground between you and the other party. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might wake up dreading that it is Monday, but you will be pleasantly sur prised as the day goes on. Someone could surprise you by going out of his or her way for you. Youll feel this persons sensitivity, as there is a strong bond between you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You could opt to stay behind the scenes today. Conversations will surround you, and others are likely to express their ideas freely. In order to encourage the ow of this exchange, avoid attacking anyone elses ideas. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Zero in on a key matter that is instrumental to your well-being. Understand what is happening with a loved one. Honor what you need to do, and observe what is occurring with a family member who has been unusually out of sorts. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll give a full Leo performance today, no matter what you do. A disturbing conversation will provide the incentive to work through a problem. Youll resolve an issue and leave everyone smiling. A boss or important loved one appreciates your efforts. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) One-on-one relating will open up doors. You might want to explore your options. Reach out to someone at a distance and listen to his or her news. Curb spending with the knowledge of your ultimate nancial goal. A partner will delight you with suggestions. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Relating on an individual level will help you understand someone who is a dominant presence in your life. You are very different, yet together you conjure up perhaps some of the wildest ideas. Deal with a matter involving your nances. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Be receptive to new ideas. You might be overwhelmed by what is happening around you. Defer to someone who often needs to take the lead. Your imagination is likely to provide a solution to a difcult matter that will please most parties. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your mind might be on everything else but the here and now. Force yourself to focus by midday, or else you might not get done what you might need to. Honor a need for a change in plans. Stay level and direct in handling a problem person. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Tension could get you going this morning. Your creativity will nd the answer to relieve the stress. Honor what is happening, but dont hesitate to lighten up the moment. Allow your sense of humor to emerge, and maintain a grounded perspective. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) You could be overwhelmed by everything you have to do, and you might need to make an adjustment to your plans. You wont know for sure until you catch up with a key person. If you can, work from home, or perhaps make your work setting more comfortable. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Share more of your wilder ideas that take you to some interesting places. A friend absolutely will respond well to this facet of your personality, as this person loves your imagination. A brainstorming session could inspire you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: Child abuse is epidemic in the United States. It occurs at every socioeconomic level, across ethnic and cultural levels, within all religions and at all levels of education. Every year, more than 3 million reports of child abuse are made in the U.S. Without intervention, about 30 percent of those abused and neglected children will later abuse their own children. With the proper skills, all parents can raise happy, healthy children. Treatment is necessary, but our communities also need to do a better job at prevention. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. Please ask your readers to learn about programs and activities in their communities that support parents and promote healthy families. JOHN E. THORESEN, DIRECTOR, BARBARA SINATRA CHILDRENS CENTER, RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. DEAR MR. THORESEN: Thank you for your letter. Readers, the rst step to curbing child abuse is recognizing it. These are the 10 most common indicators: 1. UNEXPLAINED INJURIES: Visible signs may include burns or bruises in the shape of objects. There may be unconvincing explanations for a childs injuries. 2. CHANGES IN BEHAVIOR: Abused children often appear scared, anxious, depressed, withdrawn or more aggressive. 3. RETURNING TO EARLIER BEHAV IOR: Abused children may display behaviors shown when they were younger, such as thumb-sucking, bed-wetting, fear of the dark or strangers. For some, loss of basic language or memory problems may occur. 4. FEAR OF GOING HOME: Abused children may express fear or anxiety about leaving school or going places with the abuser. 5. CHANGES IN EAT ING: The stress, fear and anxiety lead to changes in a childs eating behaviors, which may result in weight gain or weight loss. 6. CHANGES IN SLEEP HABITS: The child may have frequent nightmares or have difculty falling asleep, and appear tired or fatigued. 7. CHANGES IN SCHOOL PERFOR MANCE OR ATTENDANCE: Children may demonstrate difculty concentrating in school or experience excessive absences, sometimes because of adults trying to hide the childrens injuries from authorities. 8. LACK OF PERSONAL CARE OR HYGIENE: The child may appear unkempt, be consistently dirty and have severe body odor, or lack sufcient clothing for the weather. 9. RISK-TAKING BEHAVIORS: The child may engage in highrisk activities such as using drugs or alcohol, or carrying a weapon. 10. INAPPROPRIATE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR: A sexually abused child may exhibit overly sexualized behavior or use explicit sexual language. We can all support children and parents to reduce the stress that often leads to abuse and neglect. Be a friend to a parent or child you know. Volunteer your time or donate to programs that support child abuse treatment and prevention as well as those that build healthy families. Trust your instincts. Suspected abuse is enough of a reason to contact authorities.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Help to curb child abuse by learning its symptoms JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 11.125 Black CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial! SEIZETHE DA Y SSPO RT SNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6.125 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.625 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.625 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr



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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EXTENDED OFFERS! NOH TAKES ZURICH CLASSIC, SPORTS B1 COURT: Ex-cop les a lawsuit against Mascotte for unlawful termination A3 VATICAN: Pope Francis honors John XXIII and John Paul II A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 28, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 118 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 SCOREBOARD B2 NATION A2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 91 / 70 Some sun and a t-storm 50 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com L eesburg may have earned brag ging rights and set a Guinness Book of World Records for ty ing 2,545 black ban danas together to cre ate thelongest chain of bandanas on Sunday, the last day of Bikefest. The 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandanas in the chain were metic ulously videotaped, documented, photo graphed, counted and measured in the citys attempt to beat the pre vious record of 2,450 bandanas set in 2011 by the Hiratsuka Coming of Age Day Ceremony Committee in Japan. I think that were go ing to break the record. It looks like to me that we are going to achieve that goal. Hopeful ly, nobody broke it somewhere else over the weekend, said Joe Shipes, executive vice president of the Lees burg Partnership. The crowd gath ered around Towne Square cheered when it was announced at 12:10 p.m. that the 2,451st bandana the one to beat Japan had been validated. By 12:23 p.m., the last bandana in the chain, No. 2,545, was ofcially marked and held up for photographers and vid eographers to record. This is real fun, ab solutely. Its all for a good cause and it has been a great event for the city, and Im excit ed to be part of it, said Leesburg City Manager Al Minner, who served as an ofcial witness and certier along with Daily Commercial Pub lisher Steve Skaggs. Brandt Booth and Pete Jaequese from Booth, 2,545 bandanas THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Close-up of a 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandana. THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lynn Gerig, right, helps count the chain of bandanas along with Linda Henderson, center, on Sunday. THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Bandana No. 2,545 as Leesburg attempted to set a new world record on Sunday for the longest chain of bandanas. Bikefest may have set new world record; results pending SEE BIKEFEST | A2 PETER LEONARD Associated Press SLOVYANSK, Ukraine Pro-Russian mili tants in camouage fa tigues and black bala clavas paraded captive European military ob servers before the me dia on Sunday, hours after three captured Ukrainian securi ty guards were shown bloodied, blindfold ed and stripped of their trousers and shoes, their arms bound with packing tape. The provocative dis plays came as the in creasingly ruthless pro-Russian insurgency in the east turns to kid napping as an ominous new tactic. Dozens of people are being held hostage, in cluding journalists and pro-Ukraine activists, in makeshift jails in Slo vyansk, the heart of the separatists territory, as the pro-Russian insur gents strengthen their control in deance of the interim government in Kiev and its Western supporters. Speaking in deliber ate and clipped phrases, Col. Axel Schneider of Germany, speaking on behalf of the observers, insisted they were not NATO spies, as claimed by the insurgents, but a military observation mission operating un der the auspices of the Observers held in Ukraine speak under armed guard Staff Report Plans for a $1.25 mil lion seaplane ramp to expand business op portunities at Leesburg International Airport will be discussed by city commissioners tonight. The seaplane ramp will serve to increase the airports capacity by allowing seaplanes, which are not equipped to use land-based run ways and taxiways, to access the airports full range of aviation ser vices, Airport Man ager Leo Treggi said in a memo to commis sioners. Also, it will allow the airport to service amphibian air craft whose pilots pre fer water landings over hard-surface landings. The board Monday night will be asked to accept a $420,000 grant from the Florida De partment of Transpor tation to assist with design and construc tion of the project. The grant requires no local match and is based on the amount of jobs to be created by Wipaire, a seaplane company at the airport. City ofcials have identied other funding sources but will have to come up with $106,000 LEESBURG Board to accept grant for seaplane ramp BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A seaplane ramp at Leesburg International Airport will allow aircrafts to access the airports full range of aviation services, Airport Manager Leo Treggi said. SEE RAMP | A2 SEE UKRAINE | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 Organization of Security and Cooperation in Eu rope. We are not ghters, we are diplomats in uni form, he said, noting that his unarmed team included an ofcer from Sweden, which is not a NATO member. The observers appeared nervous as they were es corted by the masked armed men into the Slo vyansk city hall for the news conference. Referring to himself and his team as guests under the protection of the citys self-proclaimed mayor, Schneider said they were being treated as well as possible under the circumstances. The mayor of this city granted us his protection and he regarded us as his guests, Schneider told journalists. I can tell you that the word of the may or is a word of honor. We have not been touched. Schneider said his group, which was detained by pro-Russian militiamen outside Slovyansk on Fri day, was initially kept in a basement before being moved Saturday. Since yesterday, we have been in a more com fortable room, which has been equipped with heat ing. We have daylight and an air conditioning unit, he said, All our ofcers, including the interpret ers, are healthy and well. The spectacle of accred ited diplomats being pre sented to the media as what Slovyansks insur gency-appointed mayor, Vyacheslav Ponomarev, has described as bargain ing chips provoked dis gust in European capitals. German Foreign Min ister Frank-Walter Stein meier condemned it as revolting and a viola tion of the mens digni ty. Four members of the team are German. One of the observ ers, Swedish ofcer Maj. Thomas Johans son, was released later in the day on humanitar ian grounds as he has a mild form of diabetes, said Stella Khorosheva, a spokeswoman for the Slo vyansk mayor. The ofcer got into a car with OSCE representatives outside city hall and drove off with them. Schneider, who was speaking before the Swede was freed, said he had no information about when they would be released and that this was a matter for diplo mats of their countries. The group also includes ofcers from Poland, Denmark and the Czech Republic. The German colo nel said he understood that the Slovyansk mayor could use the observers as a bargaining chip. Our presence here in Slovyansk is for sure a po litical instrument for the decision makers here in the region and the possi bility to use it for negoti ations, Schneider said. Its logical in the eyes of Mayor Ponomarev that he can use us to present his positions. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 27 CASH 3 ............................................... 5-5-5 Afternoon .......................................... 7-9-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 2-5-7-8 Afternoon ....................................... 9-9-3-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 26 FANTASY 5 ............................. 3-7-14-21-24 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 8-17-21-29-36-42 POWERBALL ...................... 3-7-22-30-3320 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. UKRAINE FROM PAGE A1 RAMP FROM PAGE A1 to $465,000 to complete the project, Treggi said. That amount will be added to next years city budget. In addition to Wipaire, there are com panies at the airport that perform air craft maintenance, painting, avionics and detailing that could work on sea planes if those owners could access the property from Lake Harris. The State of Florida is only second to the State of Alaska in terms of the num ber of seaplanes and seaplane-certied pilots that are registered within the state, Treggi said. The Leesburg International Airports proximity to the Metro Orlando area, together with the availability of U.S. Customs services on the aireld, make it an ideal gateway for seaplane trafc to the Central Florida region. The board meets at 5:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers at City Hall, 501 W. Meadow St. BIKEFEST FROM PAGE A1 Ern, Straughan and H io tt (BESH) of Tavares were the ofcial survey ors documenting and measuring the chain of bandanas. Event ofcials said it may take several weeks before Leesburg learns if it has earned the world record; documents to have to be sent to England to be considered for a Guinness record. Rachel ORyan, marketing co ordinator for Bikefest, said pro ceeds from the sale of bandan as used in the attempt will benet Folds of Honor Foundation, which supports spouses, children and dependents of soldiers who have been killed or disabled. The public can help by con tinuing to buy bandanas, she said, noting the 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandanas will be available throughout the week at leesburg bikefest.com. I am extremely excited with the support that we have gotten from all of the people who have attend ed here, ORyan said of Bikefest. A lot of motorcycle riders have a military connection, whether they are military or their family is mili tary. They support our troops and Folds of Honor has been an awe some organization to work with They are doing what they can to support the spouses and children of our fallen and injured heroes. ORyan said all of the bandan as that were strung together for the longest chain of bandanas world record attempt will be untied and each bandana will be sent to a U.S. military member serving overseas. The troops are going to get a little present from Leesburg, ORyan said, noting the bandan as will be sent as part of the care packages prepared by members of Operation Shoebox in The Villages. Leesburg Bikefest concluded Sunday afternoon with a perfor mance by recording artist Uncle Kracker. This has been a good week end, said Leesburg Partnership board member Steve Knowles. People have really enjoyed the good weather, and the bands have been really good and I think every body has had a fun time. He noted a special highlight of Bikefest was the camaraderie. There has been a lot of commu nity involvement a lot of people out here working hard to help out and that makes a good team, Knowles said. SERGEI GRITS / AP Masked pro Russian armed men stand at the city hall during negotiations about the release of foreign military observers being held by Vyacheslav Ponomarevs group in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, on Sunday. MARK SHERMAN Associated Press WASHINGTON Two Supreme Court cases about police searches of cellphones without war rants present vastly dif ferent views of the ubiq uitous device. Is it a critical tool for a criminal or is it an Ameri cans virtual home? How the justices an swer that question could determine the outcome of the cases being argued Tuesday. A drug dealer and a gang member want the court to rule that the searches of their cell phones after their arrest violated their right to pri vacy in the digital age. The Obama adminis tration and California, defending the searches, say cellphones are no dif ferent from anything else a person may be carry ing when arrested. Police may search those items without a warrant under a line of high court cases reaching back 40 years. Whats more, said Don ald Verrilli Jr., the admin istrations top Supreme Court lawyer, Cellphones are now critical tools in the commission of crimes. The cases come to the Supreme Court amid sep arate legal challenges to the massive warrantless collection of telephone records by the National Security Agency and the governments use of tech nology to track Ameri cans movements. Librarians, the news me dia, defense lawyers and civil liberties groups on the right and left are try ing to convince the jus tices that they should take a broad view of the privacy issues raised when police have unimpeded access to increasingly powerful devices that may contain a wealth of personal data: emails and phone num bers, photographs, infor mation about purchases and political afliations, books and a gateway to even more material online. Cellphones and oth er portable electronic de vices are, in effect, our new homes, the Ameri can Civil Liberties Union said in a court ling that urged the court to apply the same tough standards to cellphone searches that judges have histori cally applied to police in trusions into a home. Under the Constitu tions Fourth Amendment, police generally need a warrant before they can conduct a search. The war rant itself must be based on probable cause, ev idence that a crime has been committed. But in the early 1970s, the Supreme Court carved out exceptions for ofcers dealing with people they have arrested. The court was trying to set clear rules that allowed po lice to look for concealed weapons and prevent the destruction of evidence. Briefcases, wallets, purs es and crumpled cigarette packs all are fair game if they are being carried by a suspect or within the per sons immediate control. Car searches pose a somewhat different is sue. In 2009, in the case of a suspect handcuffed and placed in the back seat of a police cruiser, the court said police may search a car only if the arrestee is within reaching distance of the passenger com partment or if police be lieve the car contains ev idence relevant to the crime for which the per son had been arrested. The Supreme Court is expected to resolve growing division in state and federal courts over whether cellphones de serve special protection. More than 90 percent of Americans own at least one cellphone, the Pew Research Center says, and the majority of those are smartphones es sentially increasingly powerful computers that are also telephones. In the two Supreme Court cases being argued Tuesday, one defendant carried a smartphone and the other an older and less advanced ip phone. Supreme Court takes on privacy JACQUELYN MARTIN / AP People walk on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Saturday. SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Online registration for businesses available The new competitive bidding pro cess for purchasing goods and ser vices for business owners interest ed in working with the county is free with online registration. Upon registration, businesses will automatically receive an email when the county issues a formal so licitation for goods or services that match the commodity codes selected. Lake Countys online vendor reg istration saves business owners time spent checking on the countys purchasing needs and ensures that as many vendors as possible are given the opportunity to bid on projects. For information, and to regis ter, go to www.lakecounty.gov/ procurement. TAVARES Annual Baby Fair to provide information for new parents The 25th annual Baby Fair, is an event for rst-time parents provid ing prenatal and postnatal educa tion. It is open to rst-time or special needs moms and dads, women who are currently pregnant and parents of newborns. Events are scheduled for Tuesday with registration from 5:15 to 6 p.m., and the program begins at 6:15 p.m. at the UF/Lake County Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Road, in Tavares. On May 7, registration is from 5:15 to 6 p.m. with the pro gram starting at 6:15 p.m. at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave. For information, call Stacy Morgan at 352-314-6933 or email stacy.morgan@kidscentralinc.org. GROVELAND Free classes offered on arthritis pain management The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting classes in Tavares and Groveland on arthritis pain management. The free program, Put Pain in Its Place: How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control, will provide information about osteoarthri tis pain and offer strategies to re lieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday at the Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave. Register online at www.tavarespain.eventbrite.com. In Groveland, the class will take place from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St. Register online at www.groveland pain.eventbrite.com. For information, or to register, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721. EUSTIS The Highlanders chapter to host a hike and dinner The Highlanders chapter of the Florida Trail Association will host a Firey Hike and Pot Luck Dinner in the Woods on May 3 for interested parties. Participants will meet at the Lake Norris Trailhead in Eustis at 6 p.m. Guests should bring a dish to share, which will be transport ed to the camp by car while the group hikes the 1.5 mile trail. Enjoy the sunset, watch the birds and have dinner around the re, and at 8:30 p.m., the group will hike back and see the reies along the trail. Participants should bring a chair, ashlight, bug spray, beverages and a dish to share. Plates and silverware will be provided. Call 352-589-2721 and leave a message; include your telephone number and mention the dish you plan to bring. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Since March, Mascotte ofcials have received word of two lawsuits against the city in regards to actions taken against former of cer Sgt. David Grice before, during and after his termi nation in January. One suit was led a few weeks ago by the Florida Police Be nevolent Associa tion, alleging that Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights was violat ed as a result of the way the ring pro cess was carried out. Another suit, recently led by Eustis Attorney Derek Schroth, al leges many short comings in the way and reasons for which Grice was red: that false accu sations were made against him as a form of retaliation for com plaints hed made about Po lice Chief Ronaldo Banasco, that he was secretly video taped without his knowl edge, and was harassed, humiliated and mistreated. The suit seeks damages of at least $15,000. I really feel that Sgt. Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights were abused, said Schroth. MASCOTTE Ex-cop files lawsuit against city BANASCO LINDA CHARLTON Special to The Daily Commercial Come on ladies. Hes worth more than a 100 bucks. He put on a bra for you! With those words, auc tioneer Laura Mancinel li urged her audience to up the ante for the cus tom-designed bras (and boxers) up for bid at the Bras for the Cause fund raiser of the Greater Cl ermont Cancer Foun dation. It is the seventh year the Foundation has held the event, which took place at the Heri tage Hills clubhouse in Clermont this year. The new twist was that many of the bras were modeled by reghters both men and women. As event coordinator Kay Simpson said in her opening remarks, I have learned one thing about reghters. They can run into a burning build ing and rescue people and cats, but they have a hard time wearing a bra. They took a lot of coax ing, but they are here. The rst entry, the Studded bra worn by reghter Robert Sieg worth went for $175. Tamara Richardson, as Cruella DeVille, got the bidding into high gear with an ensemble that fetched $500. Fireght er Dak Rakow didnt hit that mark, but he set the tone for many of the re ghters with his campy approach to the run way, as he tossed stuff ing from his bra into the audience of about 250 people. Fireghter Eric Strange closed out the show, modeling his black kit ty bra and doing his best to act cat-like. The two high bidders for the kit ty bra, with bids of $500 and $525, decided to both pay up, according to Simpson. It was Ann Du pee who, with a $500 bid, got to take the bra home. I will have to see where it ends up, either at the re department, or city hall or travel ing around the city, she said. Id like to do some thing fun with it. Noting that last years event netted close to $25,000, Simpson said she was hoping this one would bring in $30,000. In her opening re marks, Simpson dedi cated this years event to longtime Cancer Foun dation supporter Kath leen Kelley Brown, whom Simpson described as our Seminole-lov ing Irish valentine. Brown died of cancer on Wednesday. Unlike many cancer foundations, the Cler mont organization does no research. Instead they give grants to local fami lies who have a hard time dealing with the nan cial burden that can come with a diagnosis of cancer. In addition the foun dation gives scholar ships to high school se niors whose lives have been affected by can cer. In 2013 they gave $76,000 in grants and scholarships, according to Simpson. For more information on the Foundation, go to their website at www. gccf.us. CLERMONT Firefighters model bras, boxers for cancer charity LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lt. Eric Strange of the Clermont Fire Department displays a black cat bra designed by Sue Joiner and sponsored by Lyns Ice Cream and Sandwich Shoppe. Staff Report Sumter Adult & Commu nity Education Center has a new program allowing adult students to take non-credit online courses anywhere. Through a partnership with ed2go, the center offers hundreds of online cours es on just about every top ic, Allison Nave, the Sumter school districts coordinator of professional accountabil ity, said in a press release. Through well-crafted les sons, expert online instruc tion and interaction with fellow students, youll gain valuable knowledge at your convenience, she said. Youll have the exibility to study at your own pace com bined with enough structure and support to complete the course. The courses can be accessed 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection. New sessions of each sixweek online course start monthly, with two lessons released weekly (for a total of 12). Each course includes comprehensive lessons, quizzes, assignments and a discussion area. Instructors facilitate every course by pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback and leading discussions. According to Nave, pop ular course titles include: Creating Web Pages, Ac counting Fundamentals, Microsoft Ofce 2010, Speed Spanish, Grant Writing, Medical Terminology and Real Estate Investing. New courses are intro duced monthly, so theres surely something to t your needs, she said. Teachers, there are numerous courses designed to help you enhance classroom instruction. To learn more, go to www. aec.sumter.k12..us and click on the link Online Learning. For more information, contact Christine.Burk@ sumter.k12..us, or call 352793-5719, ext. 54210. Education center to offer online classes Staff Report Gopher tortoises have become increasingly ac tive this time of year and are vulnerable to being in jured or killed by vehicles, the Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Com mission (FWC) said in a press release. They leave their bur rows in search of green plants to eat and a tortoise to become their mate, the press release stated. From now through May, females will be laying eggs the size of ping-pong balls in the sandy apron outside their burrows. The FWC encourag es drivers to slow down on highways to help protect the states gopher tortoises. If a gopher tortoise is cross ing the road, wildlife of cials said it is okay to pick it up and move it to safe ty but keep it pointed in the direction it was heading and do not put this terres trial animal into the water. People can also help by downloading a new smart phone app to report to the FWC when and where they spot gopher tortoises. The Tortoises on the move for mating season PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MOYNAHAN Gopher tortoises, like the one shown, are on the move this time of year to mate, leading to potential conicts with motorists. SEE TORTOISE | A4 SEE LAWSUIT | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 Scroth said when the city learned of an im pending suit by the FPBA on Grices behalf, city of cials claimed he was never red, but records show no payment stubs for Grice since January. Ive never seen any thing like this, Schroth said. Documents obtained from the city show that Mascotte police red Grice in January for re fusing to cooperate with an internal investi gation for allegedly ha rassing a female ofcer. Grice contends he was the target of discrimina tion by Banasco because of complaints he made against the chief, in cluding the alleged bug ging of police cars. On Friday, Schroth said that one thing that stands out in his mind is a copy of a video he ob tained from a camera Banasco was wearing when he red the ofcer. They made him take his badge off, take his gun out and they made him get into the back of a po lice car to be transport ed back to the police de partment from city hall to get his car, Schroth said, adding that the tape shows Banasco speaking unprofessionally even af ter Grice gets into his car and drives off. It was obvious that an attempt was being made to humiliate Grice in an unprecedented manner, Schroth said. In addition, Schroth said that when Grice was red in January he was not red in accordance with the Ofcers Bill of Rights. Under that, Grice would have been enti tled to a judicial hearing and certain protection representation by the FPBA and a review of all allegations against him until he could be proven guilty of an offense. In the suit, Schroth seeks to be reinstated to the same position he held prior to being red in January, that his ben ets and seniority rights be restored, his wages, benets and other losses the city caused be paid back, that an injunction be set in place to prevent the city from further re taliating against Grice, that he be paid for dam ages and that all other court and attorney costs Grice incurred be paid. Banasco could not be reached for comment before press time and no comment could be obtained from the city because its ofces were closed as of Thursday around 5 p.m. In an email Gleason sent to The Daily Com mercial last December in response to some of the allegations Grice had made against Ban asco he said: Not lik ing or getting along with your supervisor does not mean there is discrimi nation, hostile work en vironment or retalia tion in the work place. It means you have a per sonality conict that ei ther you work out, keep quiet and do your job, or if unhappy, nd another place of employment. In October 2013, two former police ofcers also claimed Banasco discriminated against them. Gregg Woodworth and Scott Thompson hired a Lake Mary law rm to sue the city over the allegations, which Gleason said are untrue. LAWSUIT FROM PAGE A3 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.com Celebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOM JUST 10 MILES SOUTH OF THE VILLAGES Your LED Headquarters!$34.95each We honor all competitors sale ads for same brand items! 711 South 14th Street (Hwy 27) Leesburg, FLMon. Fri. 7:30 5:00 After Hours By Appointment IN MEMORY OBITUARIES Paul Ernest Papineau Paul Ernest Papineau, 65, Leesburg, FL. passed away on April 23, 2014. Mr. Papineau was born on June 17, 1948 in Cen tral Falls, Rhode Island to his parents Ernest H. and Marthe Papineau. Mr. Papineau was a Re tired Maintenance Su pervisor in the Health Care Industry. He was of the Catholic faith and attended St. Pauls Catholic Church in Leesburg, FL. He and his wife moved to Leesburg in 2001 from Paw tucket, RI and he was a veteran of the Vietnam era serving proudly in the U.S. Coast Guard. He enjoyed the mu sic industry as a Disc Jockey working private events and parties. He is survived by his loving wife of 35 years Diane Papineau of Leesburg, FL; two brothers: Roger Papineau of Rehoboth, MA and Ron Papine au of Leesburg, FL; four sisters: Jeanne Taly of Shorewood, MN, Jackie Brenton of Troy, IL, Sue Parker of Rehoboth, MA and Julie Erkkinen of Clinton, MA., and many loving nieces and neph ews. On-line condo lences may be shared by visiting www.bankspag etheus.com. Arrange ments are entrusted to Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. PAPINEAU free Florida Gopher Tortoise app recently be came available for the iPhone and Android. When users of the app take a photograph of a tortoise or its burrow, the photo and its GPS coordinates will be sent automatically to the FWC, the press release stated. App-generated data collected by citizens will help guide conservation of this threatened spe cies. Biological information and a quiz testing the users knowledge of the only tortoise east of the Mississippi River also are included in the app. The FWCs Gopher Tortoise Management Plan spells out goals and actions to protect the tor toises, their burrows sheltering hundreds of oth er species and their habitat. Prescribed burning is critical to maintaining the sandy, open elds and forests and the growth of soft-stemmed plants that tortoises need to survive. To access the management plan, go to MyFWC.com/Wild life and select Managed Species. TORTOISE FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press TAMPA The Florida Sheriffs Association is set to make a large push against the legalization of marijuana. Voters will decide on the legal ization of medical mari juana in November. The association sent an email to sheriffs across the state during the winter asking for their support. The Tam pa Bay Times report ed that 63 of 67 sheriffs were in favor of oppos ing any measures to le galize the drug. The association is also looking for the support of substance-abuse awareness and an ti-drug groups to be part of the Dont Let Florida Go To Pot campaign. It also says there has been a spike in crime and trafc accidents in states that have passed similar leg islation. Of the 20 states with the highest driver acknowledge ment of drugged driv ing, 15 were states that have passed legislation legalizing marijuana, the association said in a statement. The Los An geles and Denver po lice departments have reported signicant in creases in crime since marijuana was legalized in their respective states. The association said marijuana has a high potential for abuse and presents signicant dan gers to youths in the state. Sheriffs campaigning against medical pot AP FILE PHOTO Different strains of marijuana are displayed for sale at The Clinic, a Denver-based dispensary with several outlets.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DANIELA PETROFF and NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press VATICAN CITY Two 20th-century popes who changed the course of the Catholic Church became saints Sunday as Pope Francis honored John XXIII and John Paul II in a delicate balancing act aimed at bringing together the conservative and pro gressive wings of the church. As if to drive the mes sage of unity home, Francis invited retired Pope Benedict XVI to join him on the altar of St. Peters Square, the rst time a reigning and retired pope have cele brated Mass together in public in the 2,000-year history of the church. An estimated 800,000 people many of them from John Pauls na tive Poland lled St. Peters, the streets around it and bridg es over the Tiber River, a huge turnout but only half the size of the crowd that came out for John Pauls 2011 beatication. John reigned from 1958-1963 and is a hero to liberal Catholics for having convened the Second Vatican Council. The meetings brought the church into the modern era by allowing Mass to be celebrated in local languages rather than Latin and encour aged greater dialogue with people of other faiths, particularly Jews. During his globe-trot ting, quarter-centu ry papacy, John Paul II helped topple commu nism and invigorated a new generation of Cath olics, while his defense of core church teaching on abortion, marriage and other hot-button issues heartened con servatives after the tur bulent 1960s. Benedict was one of John Pauls closest con dantes and went on to preside over a deeply tradition-minded eightyear papacy. His suc cessor Francis seems a pope much more in spired by the pasto ral, simple style of the good pope John. Yet Francis offered each new saint heart felt praise in his homily, saying John had allowed himself to be led by God to call the council, and hailing John Pauls fo cus on the family. Its an issue that Francis has asked the church as a whole to take up for dis cussion with a two-year debate starting this fall. They were priests, bishops and popes of the 20th century, Francis said. They lived through the tragic events of that century, but they were not over whelmed by them. Benedict put John Paul on the fast-track for possible sainthood just weeks after his 2005 death, responding to the chants of Santo Subito! or Sainthood Now! that erupted during his funeral Mass. John Pauls canoniza tion is now the fastest in modern times. Johns sainthood run, on the other hand, lan guished after his 2000 beatication. Rather than let John Paul have the limelight with a can onization on his own emboldening many in the conservative wing of the church Francis de cided to pair him up with John. To do so, Fran cis tweaked the Vaticans own saint-making rules, deciding that John could be made a saint along side John Paul without the necessary second miracle usually required. Francis sounded a note of continuity in his homily, praising John for having called the coun cil and John Paul for helping implement it. John XXIII and John Paul II cooperated with the Holy Spirit in renew ing and updating the church in keeping with her pristine features, those features which the saints have given her throughout the centu ries, Francis said. During the ceremo ny, Francis took a deep breath and paused for a moment before reciting the saint-making formu la in Latin, as if moved by the history he was about to make in canonizing two popes at once. As soon as he did so, applause broke out from a crowd in St. Peters and beyond. This is such a historic moment, marveled the Rev. Victor Perez, who brought a group of stu dents from the John Paul High School in Hous ton, Texas and waited for nearly 12 hours to get near St. Peters. John Paul was so impactful on the church. He com pleted the work of Vati can II. Today honors the last 50 years of what God has done in the church. In John Pauls native Poland, bells rang out as soon as Francis pro nounced the two men saints. He changed Poland and he changed us with his teaching and with his visits here, an emotion al Maria Jurek said as she watched the proceed ings on giant TV screens at a sanctuary dedicated to Jo hn Paul in Krakow. In the Philippines, where John Paul in 1995 drew the largest ever crowd for a papal Mass at 4 million, Filipinos watched the canoniza tion on TV and joined local celebrations, in cluding a suburban Ma nila parade of children dressed like the pope. Yet the atmosphere in St. Peters seemed som ber and subdued per haps because of the chilly gray skies and cu mulative lack of sleep of many of the pilgrims who camped out on streets near the Vatican. It was a far different scene from the rollicking party at mosphere of John Pauls May 2011 beatication, when bands of young people sang, danced and cheered before, during and after the Mass. Spirits though did pick up after the ser vice whe n Francis drove through the square and all the way down to the Tiber River in his opentopped car, giving many people their rst and only close-up glimpse of him. The Vatican estimat ed that 800,000 peo ple watched the Mass in Rome, with about 500,000 in the square and nearby streets and the rest watching on TV screens that had been set up in piazzas around town. Polish pilgrims car rying the red and white ags of John Pauls be loved homeland had been among the rst to push into the square well before sunrise, as the human chains of ne on-vested civil protec tion workers trying to maintain order nally gave up and let them in. Francis presides over historic day of 4 popes ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis dispenses incense as he leads a solemn celebration in St. Peters Square at the Vatican, on Sunday.

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Classic DOONESBURY 1973 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 W ith the snow having re treated and chance en counters with wolves and woolly mammoths apparent ly diminished, it may be time to take out the old sticks canes, walking sticks, crutches and, for those in not enough pain al ready, golf clubs. Yes, the golf clubs have been in their bags all winter, plotting ways to confound and frustrate the nations golng mortals new ly released back into the sun. With anticipation building, I too stand ready to drive myself cra zy in a new season of trying to hit little balls into little holes. If only the game were easier. If only the clubs were more cooper ative, not to mention those devi ous greens, which are in cahoots with the ball to make it go any where other than into the hole. But just as sand traps and wa ter hazards start their annual si ren song Yoo hoo, big fel lah in the spiked shoes, we are over here for you, just one swing away I read a story in The New York Times reporting on ef forts to make the game easi er to keep people interested in playing. Apparently, leaders of the sport are worried about the games declining popularity. That golf has become less pop ular, especially among the young, comes as a profound cultural shock. Fewer people playing golf? Five million fewer in the past de cade, the story said. Surely some mistake. This is America, where the tees are as high as an ele phants eye and a shank looks like its climbin clear up to the sky. How do people become prop erly frustrated without the help of golf clubs? Poor golf-less souls! They must be reduced to jump ing up and down on any bar ren spot, without the slightest chance that a ball resting on the lip of a cup will fall due to tiny seismic shocks from the jumping which has never happened in the history of the sport despite numerous fat golfers trying, and I speak here from experience. Now it is suggested that these forlorn, disappointed peo ple might be lured back to the game by gimmicks. The Times story came with a picture of a tour professional putting into a 15-inch-wide hole, which looked like a bucket. What an appalling prospect if this should catch on. You could go play Pebble Beach because its on your bucket list and nd a bucket being used for the hole. This is not right. As one who has found himself turned off by con stant rounds of failure, who when confronted with a pond quick ly throws the ball into the water on the theory its best to cut out the middle man, who has spent so much time in sand traps that meeting a camel would not be a surprise, let me just say that I dont want golf to be simple. Its only worth playing because its hard. Besides, missing a putt into a hole the size of a bucket would be its own special humiliation. At least a golfer now has a decent excuse, what with the tiny holes. No, if gimmicks are what a golfer wants, theres always the miniature golf course where the ball shoots down little ramps, past windmills and gnomes and into tunnels. The rest of us should continue to revel in the difculty of a large and gnomefree environment. Theres a lot to be said for tra dition and mine involves ay ing about for hours in the hot sun, divots ying, balls slicing, then retiring to the bar and an nouncing proudly: I broke 80! See, its not so hard if you only play nine holes. Mark Twain is supposed to have said, Golf is a good walk spoiled. Certainly it is a wit ty saying, but if Mark Twain had said all the things attributed to him, he would not have had time to play golf. To me, the time it takes to play a round of golf is probably the only reason to stay home and forgo the aerobic pleasure of swinging and missing a stationary ball. Making the hole as wide as a bucket, or granting a mulligan on every hole, which I do anyway because Mulligan is not around to complain, is not really im proving the game. I think people young and old just have to accept that, short of having wolves stay for the sum mer to move foursomes along, anything worth doing badly is worth wasting a lot of time over. Golf is a good obsession spoiled if it becomes an easy walk. Reg Henry is deputy editorial-page editor for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Readers may email him at rhenry@post-gazette.com. OTHER VOICES Reg Henry MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE An errant drive is on the rise to rid golfers of their pain N evada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of princi ple, an iconoclast who should be ad mired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact hes a petty scofaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees. After 20 years of dis agreements and court battles, the U.S. govern ment began rounding up his cattle this month. The rancher and a group of armed supporters confronted the federal authorities, leading to a standoff; the authorities withdrew. Bundy justies his stingy and illegal behav ior with a variety of claims. One is that this is a states rights issue and that he doesnt rec ognize the federal government. Another is that his family grazed the land long before it came under the jurisdiction of the BLM. Actually, more than 70 percent of the land in Nevada is federally owned, including the land in question; the state Constitution rec ognized that ownership years before Bundys ancestors arrived, despite his assertion other wise. (Various reports also have cast serious doubt on whether his family was grazing cat tle on the land as long ago as he claims.) For that matter, if prior use of land were all that was needed to avoid paying a landlord, the land would revert back not to Bundy but to the control of Native Americans, who were on the Nevada land long before any white settle ment of the area. Despite his professed disbelief in the U.S. government, Bundy brought his case in feder al court, so apparently he does recognize the federal government when he thinks he might gain something from it. But the courts repeat edly ruled against him. Which makes Bun dy more of a bad loser than a folk hero. He would surely have insisted that the court rul ings be followed if they had gone in his favor. Bundy and his band of armed supporters are declaring victory after the standoff, and now the fringe groups that support him are talking about using these same tactics elsewhere. The feds were wise to back down rather than allow Bundy to provoke a gunght over his 400 head of cattle. Still, the U.S. govern ment cannot let the matter rest there. It must return and enforce the rules. The message to the would-be Bundys of the nation must be that willful violation of laws passed by Con gress and the state of Nevada and upheld by the courts will not be tolerated. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE The U.S. cant let Cliven Bundy win his range war That golf has become less popular, especially among the young, comes as a profound cultural shock. Fewer people playing golf? Five million fewer in the past decade, the story said. Surely some mistake. This is America, where the tees are as high as an elephants eye and a shank looks like its climbin clear up to the sky.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Clippers stage silent protest before game / B4 ANDREW A. NELLES / AP Tampa Bay Rays Ben Zobrist misses the catch as Chicago White Soxs Gordon Beckham (15) slides in safely on Sunday in Chicago. SARAH TROTTO Associated Press CHICAGO Jose Abreu drove in four runs and set a major league rookie record for RBIs through the end of April and the Chicago White Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays 9-2 on Sunday. Abreu, who had a two-run home run in the sixth and a two-run single in the seventh, has 31 RBIs. Albert Pujols had the previous RBI mark of 27 in 2001. The homer was his major league-leading 10th and ex tended his own record for home runs by a rookie through April. In his major league debut, Scott Carroll (1-0) gave up two runs, one earned, in 7 1-3 in nings after he was called up from Triple-A Charlotte to ll in for injured ace Chris Sale. Rays starter David Price (3-2) allowed eight runs, six earned, in six innings. Trailing 1-0, the White Sox scored ve runs in the sixth and four runs in the seventh. The Rays committed four er rors in the sixth. Gordon Beck ham reached on an error and scored from second when Price threw away the ball after elding Marcus Semiens bunt single. Adam Eaton scored when right elder Wil Myers fumbled the ball after Prices throwing error. Abreu then hit a two-run home run for a 4-1 lead. He set the rookie record for hom ers by the end of April on Fri day with his ninth a walk-off Abreus power display leads White Sox to 9-2 win over Rays ALEX BRANDON / AP Washington Wizards forward Al Harrington (7) drives past Chicago Bulls guard Jimmy Butler (21) on Sunday in Washington, D.C. JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON In his customary seat next to the bench, Ted Leonsis sported a No. 42 jer sey in support of his suspended forward. By the time the game was over, the Washington Wizards owner stood and cheered as the crowd chanted Free Ne-ne!! Trevor Ariza had a career playoff-high 30 points, and the Wizards scored the rst 14 points of the game and barely looked back Sun day, overcoming the absence of their so-called Wizards zap Bulls 98-89 to take 3-1 series lead SEE NBA | B2 JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer CHICAGO Dun can Keith had a goal and three assists, and the Chicago Black hawks used a four-goal third period to nish off the St. Louis Blues with a 5-1 victory in Game 6 of their rstround playoff series on Sunday. Chicago won four in a row after a slow start in St. Louis. The de fending Stanley Cup champions will play the winner of the Min nesota-Colorado se ries in the Western Conference seminals. The Avalanche lead the Wild 3-2 heading into Game 6 in Minnesota on Monday night. Jonathan Toews, Pat rick Sharp, Andrew Shaw and Keith scored in the third period as the Blackhawks im proved to 14-2 in home playoff games over the last two seasons. Co rey Crawford made 35 saves, keeping Chica go in a tie game when St. Louis controlled the second period. T.J. Oshie scored for the Blues, who outshot PHOTOS BY BILL HABER / AP Noh Seung-yul, of South Korea, holds up his trophy with tournament ofcials after winning the Zurich Classic golf tournament on Sunday at TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La. SEE RAYS | B2 Blues eliminated as Blackhawks win 5-1 SEE NHL | B2 BRETT MARTEL AP Sports Writer AVONDALE, La. Seung-Yul Noh over came windy conditions and his nerves, shooting a 1-under 71 on Sunday to win the Zurich Clas sic by two shots for his rst PGA Tour victory. While Noh, the leader through three rounds, never fell out of rst, he did make his rst three bogeys of the tourna ment and briey fell into a tie with Keegan Bradley, the 2011 PGA Championship winner who had the gallery be hind him. But Bradley did him self in with a bogey on the fth hole and a triple bogey on the sixth, while Noh remained steady enough to hold off re maining challengers. The 22-year-old South Korean player, the youngest winner this season, wore yel low and black ribbons on his hat to honor the more than 300 dead or missing in a ferry acci dent in waters off his home country. After taking the thirdround lead and becom ing the rst to play 54 holes at TPC Louisi ana without a bogey, he said he hoped he could string together one more bogey-free round and come through with a victory to lift the spir its of his nation. He accomplished the second part, and hell take it. His best n ish in 77 previous PGA Tour starts was a tie for fourth at the 2012 AT&T National. The seventh rst-time PGA Tour winner in the last 10 years in the Noh refuses to wilt as he takes first PGA Tour title Bud Cauley hits off the second tee during the nal round of the Zurich Classic golf tournament. SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Toyota Owners 400 Results Saturday At Richmond International Raceway Richmond, Va. Lap length: .75 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (17) Joey Logano, Ford, 400 laps, 126.8 rating, 47 points, $274,081. 2. (25) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 134.8, 44, $220,211. 3. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 96.2, 41, $187,666. 4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 128.5, 41, $162,258. 5. (12) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 102.7, 40, $159,261. 6. (14) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 400, 88, 38, $122,448. 7. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 112.1, 38, $104,065. 8. (18) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 99.1, 36, $98,890. 9. (16) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 90.2, 35, $104,165. 10. (22) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 85.6, 34, $116,173. 11. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 108.7, 34, $126,548. 12. (6) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 400, 86.5, 32, $118,740. 13. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 94.4, 31, $118,504. 14. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 101.3, 30, $99,565. 15. (26) Greg Bife, Ford, 400, 81.5, 29, $125,565. 16. (1) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 400, 66.1, 28, $122,085. 17. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 75.2, 27, $119,201. 18. (11) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 400, 71.6, 26, $108,335. 19. (34) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 400, 70.2, 25, $105,823. 20. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 400, 60.7, 24, $104,798. 21. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 400, 68.2, 23, $100,823. 22. (28) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 78.6, 22, $88,890. 23. (21) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 68.4, 21, $77,190. 24. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 63.5, 20, $107,654. 25. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 399, 59.7, 19, $114,948. 26. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 398, 47.9, 0, $76,765. 27. (27) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 398, 54.9, 17, $125,351. 28. (24) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 398, 51.6, 16, $89,237. 29. (30) David Reutimann, Ford, 397, 50.1, 15, $79,465. 30. (37) David Ragan, Ford, 396, 44, 14, $88,690. 31. (8) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 396, 42.9, 13, $79,065. 32. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 396, 84.2, 12, $129,851. 33. (23) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 396, 48.1, 11, $78,290. 34. (35) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 395, 36.5, 10, $83,665. 35. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 395, 37.5, 9, $75,465. 36. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 394, 33.4, 9, $75,285. 37. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 391, 28.2, 0, $83,146. 38. (29) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 390, 40.7, 6, $106,005. 39. (39) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 390, 27.3, 5, $66,180. 40. (42) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 380, 30.3, 0, $62,180. 41. (40) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 367, 28.2, 3, $58,180. 42. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, electrical, 225, 35, 2, $54,180. 43. (3) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, suspension, 159, 67, 1, $91,071. NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 2, Indiana 2 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta at Indiana, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 1: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA Miami 3, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Charlotte at Miami, 7 or 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Miami at Charlotte, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Charlotte at Miami, TBA Brooklyn 2, Toronto 1 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, late Wednesday, April 30: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Toronto at Brooklyn, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn at Toronto, TBA Washington 3, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 Tuesday, April 29: Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: Chicago at Washington, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Washington at Chicago, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 2, San Antonio 1 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Dallas at San Antonio, 7 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: San Antonio at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Dallas at San Antonio, TBA Memphis 2, Oklahoma City 2 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT Tuesday, April 29: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 or 9:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA L.A. Clippers 2, Golden State 2 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clip pers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 Tuesday, April 29: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, May 1: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 3: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, TBA Portland 2, Houston 1 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Houston at Portland, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Portland at Houston, TBA Sundays games Wizards 98, Bulls 89 CHICAGO (89) Dunleavy 3-8 0-0 6, Boozer 3-7 2-2 8, Noah 4-9 2-3 10, Hinrich 3-12 0-0 7, Butler 5-14 4-4 16, Augustin 3-10 1-1 8, Gibson 13-16 6-7 32, Snell 1-2 0-0 2. To tals 35-78 15-17 89. WASHINGTON (98) Ariza 10-17 4-5 30, Booker 4-10 0-0 8, Gortat 6-18 5-8 17, Wall 4-15 7-8 15, Beal 7-13 2-2 18, Gooden 1-4 0-0 2, Webster 3-6 2-2 8, Harrington 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 0-2 0-0 0, Seraphin 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-86 20-25 98. Chicago 18 22 22 27 89 Washington 28 27 27 16 98 3-Point GoalsChicago 4-19 (Butler 2-7, Augustin 1-4, Hinrich 1-5, Snell 0-1, Dunleavy 0-2), Washing ton 8-19 (Ariza 6-10, Beal 2-3, Gooden 0-1, Wall 0-1, Harrington 0-1, Webster 0-3). Fouled OutBooker. ReboundsChicago 53 (Noah 15), Washington 48 (Booker 9). AssistsChicago 22 (Hinrich 7), Washing ton 22 (Wall 10). Total FoulsChicago 22, Washing ton 18. TechnicalsGibson, Chicago defensive three second 2, Booker. Flagrant FoulsBoozer. A,356 (20,308). Warriors 118, Clippers 97 L.A. CLIPPERS (97) M.Barnes 4-7 1-2 10, Grifn 8-14 5-5 21, Jordan 0-1 0-0 0, Paul 5-9 4-5 16, Redick 3-9 3-3 12, Collison 3-7 0-0 6, Ja.Crawford 8-18 7-8 26, Davis 0-3 0-0 0, Granger 0-4 0-0 0, Turkoglu 1-4 0-0 3, W.Green 0-0 0-0 0, Dudley 0-0 0-0 0, Hollins 1-1 1-1 3. Totals 3377 21-24 97. GOLDEN STATE (118) Iguodala 6-8 8-10 22, D.Green 1-4 2-2 4, Lee 7-11 1-1 15, Curry 10-20 6-7 33, Thompson 5-13 2-4 15, ONeal 2-4 1-1 5, Blake 1-3 0-1 3, H.Barnes 6-7 1-2 15, Armstrong 2-2 0-0 4, Speights 1-2 0-0 2, Kuzmic 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-74 21-28 118. L.A. Clippers 24 24 23 26 97 Golden State 39 27 23 29 118 3-Point GoalsL.A. Clippers 10-31 (Redick 3-6, Ja.Crawford 3-10, Paul 2-4, Turkoglu 1-3, M.Barnes 1-3, Collison 0-2, Granger 0-3), Golden State 15-32 (Curry 7-14, Thompson 3-8, Iguodala 2-2, H.Barnes 2-3, Blake 1-3, D.Green 0-2). Fouled OutThompson. ReboundsL.A. Clippers 42 (Grifn, Jordan 6), Golden State 45 (Curry 7). AssistsL.A. Clippers 20 (Paul 6), Golden State 32 (Iguodala 9). Total FoulsL.A. Clip pers 25, Golden State 26. TechnicalsL.A. Clippers Coach Rivers, Golden State defensive three second. Flagrant FoulsTurkoglu. A,596 (19,596). NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Detroit 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston 3, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 24: Boston 3, Detroit 2, OT Saturday, April 26: Boston 4, Detroit 2 Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 2 Tuesday, April 22: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3 Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 2 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday, April 23: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Saturday, April 26: Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 1 Monday, April 28: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Columbus at Pittsburgh, TBA N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 2 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, April 25: Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Sunday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Tuesday, April 29: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rang ers, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 3, Minnesota 2 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Minnesota 1, Colorado 0, OT Thursday, April 24: Minnesota 2, Colorado 1 Saturday, April 26: Colorado 4, Minnesota 3, OT Monday, April 28: Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Minnesota at Colorado, TBA Chicago 4, St. Louis 2 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: Chicago 2, St. Louis 0 Wednesday, April 23: Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Sunday, April 27: Chicago 5, St. Louis 1 Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Dallas 3, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 4, Anaheim 2 Friday, April 25: Anaheim 6, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 27: Anaheim at Dallas, late x-Tuesday, April 29: Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m. San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: San Jose 7, Los Angeles 2 Tuesday, April 22: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Thursday, April 24: Los Angeles 6, San Jose 3 Saturday, April 26: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Monday, April 28: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBA Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB Suspended Minnesota INF Jonatan Hino josa (Cedar Rapids-MWL) 50 games after a positive test for metabolites of Nandrolone under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed 1B Chris Davis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. Recalled INF Jemile Weeks from Norfolk (AHL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX Selected the contract of RHP Scott Carroll from Charlotte (IL). Transferred OF Avisail Garcia to the 60-day DL. DETROIT TIGERS Placed RHP Anibal Sanchez on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Justin Miller from Toledo (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES Recalled RHP Preston Claiborne from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Placed RHP Bruce Billings on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. TEXAS RANGERS Activated LHP Matt Harrison from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Luis Sardinas to Frisco (Texas). National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS Recalled INF Carlos Tri unfel from Albuquerque (PCL). Optioned RHP Jose Dominguez to Albuquerque. PITTSBURGH PIRATES Recalled RHP Casey Sadler from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned RHP Jared Hughes to Indianapolis. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Placed OF Bryce Harper on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS Assigned F Tomas Jurco, F Riley Sheahan, D Xavier Ouellet and G Jake Paterson to Grand Rapids (AHL). American Hockey League CHICAGO WOLVES Reassigned F Eric Kattelus to Kalamazoo (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC Recalled MF-F David Es trada from Atlanta (NASL). TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 9 p.m. FS1 Bantamweights, McJoe Arroyo (13-0-0) vs. David Quijano (15-4-1); super light weights, Michael Perez (19-1-2) vs. Jorge Romero (24-8-0), at Bayamon, Puerto Rico MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. ESPN Oakland at Texas 8:10 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox NBA 7 p.m. TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Miami at Charlotte 9:30 p.m. TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, San Antonio at Dallas NHL 7 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, Pittsburgh at Columbus 9 p.m. CNBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, Colorado at Minnesota 10 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, San Jose at Los Angeles SOCCER 2:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Newcastle at Arsenal PGA-Zurich Classic Scores Sunday At TPC Louisiana Avondale, La. Purse: $6.8 million Yardage: 7,425; Par: 72 Final Seung-Yul Noh (500), $1,224,000 65-68-65-71 Robert Streb (245), $598,400 67-66-68-70 Andrew Svoboda (245), $598,400 64-68-70-69 Jeff Overton (135), $326,400 67-68-67-70 Erik Compton (100), $248,200 66-68-72-68 Robert Garrigus (100), $248,200 73-69-68-64 Charley Hoffman (100), $248,200 68-67-68-71 Keegan Bradley (80), $197,200 69-66-65-75 Tommy Gainey (80), $197,200 71-66-67-71 Justin Rose (80), $197,200 71-67-69-68 Paul Casey (63), $149,600 71-68-64-73 Bud Cauley (63), $149,600 71-68-66-71 Peter Hanson (63), $149,600 65-69-71-71 J.B. Holmes (63), $149,600 71-65-69-71 Ben Martin (56), $119,000 62-67-73-75 David Toms (56), $119,000 73-68-67-69 Mark Anderson (53), $98,600 72-65-70-71 Stuart Appleby (53), $98,600 67-72-70-69 Rory Sabbatini (53), $98,600 69-72-69-68 Cameron Tringale (53), $98,600 73-69-66-70 Retief Goosen (49), $73,440 72-65-68-74 Brooks Koepka, $73,440 71-68-67-73 Bronson LaCassie (49), $73,440 70-69-69-71 Daniel Summerhays (49), $73,440 72-66-68-73 Robert Allenby (45), $54,230 71-68-68-73 David Duval (45), $54,230 68-69-70-73 Danny Lee (45), $54,230 71-69-65-75 Bo Van Pelt (45), $54,230 74-63-73-70 Graham DeLaet (40), $44,200 69-68-71-73 Freddie Jacobson (40), $44,200 72-69-66-74 Alex Prugh (40), $44,200 70-68-70-73 John Senden (40), $44,200 70-70-69-72 Boo Weekley (40), $44,200 71-70-71-69 Sang-Moon Bae (32), $30,785 68-72-71-71 Greg Chalmers (32), $30,785 71-71-71-69 Derek Ernst (32), $30,785 71-71-71-69 David Hearn (32), $30,785 71-71-69-71 Charles Howell III (32), $30,785 68-73-70-71 Mark Calcavecchia (32), $30,785 71-70-69-72 Kevin Chappell (32), $30,785 72-67-69-74 Morgan Hoffmann (32), $30,785 70-68-70-74 Kevin Kisner (32), $30,785 69-68-69-76 Charlie Wi (32), $30,785 70-71-69-72 Will Wilcox (32), $30,785 68-68-71-75 Chad Collins (25), $21,080 66-71-76-70 Tag Ridings (25), $21,080 71-70-72-70 Andres Romero (25), $21,080 70-71-70-72 Max Homa, $17,544 71-71-71-71 Troy Merritt (22), $17,544 71-69-70-74 Kevin Tway (22), $17,544 70-72-69-73 Y.E. Yang (22), $17,544 72-70-69-73 Briny Baird (15), $15,477 71-69-70-75 Ricky Barnes (15), $15,477 70-72-69-74 Martin Flores (15), $15,477 72-68-69-76 Andrew Loupe (15), $15,477 71-70-71-73 Sean OHair (15), $15,477 71-69-71-74 D.A. Points (15), $15,477 73-68-69-75 Kyle Stanley (15), $15,477 71-67-71-76 Brendan Steele (15), $15,477 73-67-70-75 Shawn Stefani (15), $15,477 69-72-72-72 Tim Wilkinson (15), $15,477 70-70-65-80 Lucas Glover (7), $14,416 71-71-69-75 Fabian Gomez (7), $14,416 72-69-66-79 John Merrick (7), $14,416 69-72-72-73 Wes Roach (7), $14,416 74-67-71-74 Vijay Singh (7), $14,416 70-71-68-77 Joe Durant (3), $13,872 69-71-67-80 Padraig Harrington (3), $13,872 70-72-71-74 Michael Thompson (3), $13,872 66-71-75-75 J.J. Henry (1), $13,396 68-69-75-76 Doug LaBelle II (1), $13,396 68-73-72-75 Troy Matteson (1), $13,396 72-68-69-79 Jim Renner (1), $13,396 75-67-71-75 X-factor as they beat the Chicago Bulls 98-89 to take 3-1 lead in their East ern Conference series. Ariza made 6 of 10 3-pointers, John Wall added 15 points and 10 assists for the Wizards, who forced 16 turnovers and committed only six. The other big difference came at the 3-point arc, where Washington went 8 for 19 and Chicago just 4 for 19. The Wizards, seeking to win a playoff series for only the third time since the 1970s, can nish off the Bulls in Game 5 on Tuesday in Chicago. Taj Gibson scored a career-high 32 points on 13 for 16 shooting for Chicago, but his team mates combined to go 22 for 62 from the eld. He made more eld goals in the rst half (8) than the rest the Bulls combined (7). Mike Dunleavy, who scored 35 points in Game 3, could barely get a look, much less a bas ket. He went 0 for 3 from the eld in the rst half and nished 3 for 8 with six points. Chicagos Kirk Hin rich committed four turnovers, and NBA Defensive Player of the Year Joakim Noah had a quiet 10 points and 15 rebounds against the Nene-less Wizards. Nene was suspend ed for the game after grabbing Jimmy But lers head during a faceto-face confrontation in the fourth quarter of the Wizards Game 3 loss. Wall this week called Nene the X-factor, and for good reason: Since the March 2012 trade that brought the Bra zilian to D.C., Washing ton is 65-63 when he plays and 21-41 when he doesnt, although the club did hold its own by winning 12 of 21 when Nene went down with a knee injury Washington stormed to a 14-0 lead, with Bulls coach Tom Thi bodeau calling a time out after each Wizards touchdown. Chica gos rst seven posses sions consisted of six missed shots and two turnovers. Butler nal ly got the visitors on the board with an 18-footer 4:12 into the game. The next sequence: Hinrich hit the side of the backboard with a baseline jumper, and Ariza hit a 3-pointer that took an odd carom off the rim to make the score 17-2. NBA FROM PAGE B1 grand slam against the Rays. Dayan Viciedo then doubled and scored on shortstop Yunel Es cobars throwing error for a 5-1 lead. Semien doubled to extend the White Sox lead to 6-1 in the sev enth and knocked Price out of the game. Abreu hit a two-run single and Ramirez added an RBI single for a 9-1 lead. The Rays went ahead 1-0 in the fth when David DeJesus singled and scored on right elder Viciedos twoout error. The Rays scored their second run in the eighth on Evan Longo rias single. Before his call up, Carroll was 27-38 with a 3.95 ERA in 138 games during eight minor league sea sons. He underwent Tommy John surgery in 2012 and bounced back with a 3-1 record and 1.57 ERA in four Triple-A starts this season. It is a feel-good day for him, 29, getting his rst crack at the big leagues, White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper said before the game. Usually you see them come up at 21, 22, 23, something like that. I dont think its much different other than hes had a longer path and probably a lit tle more of a rocky path with the Tommy John. Sale (forearm strain) played catch before Sundays game, but when hell return from the 15-day DL is un certain. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 the Blackhawks 36-27. Ryan Miller nished with 22 saves. St. Louis went 0 for 6 in 10 minutes of pow er-play time over the rst two periods, wast ing a chance to take the lead. The Blues went 2 for 29 with the man ad vantage for the series. The Blackhawks also struggled on the pow er play, but they scored when it mattered most. With Jay Bouw meester in the box for tripping, Keith made a nice stop to keep the puck in the St. Louis zone, then red a pass over to Toews. The cap tain beat Miller over his right shoulder for a 2-1 lead just 44 seconds into the third period. It was Toews third goal of the series. He also scored on a break away in overtime of Fri day nights 3-2 win. Toews 23rd ca reer postseason goal seemed to take the air out of the Blues, and it got even worse for St. Louis. Sharp got loose for a breakaway, shook off a stick to the face by defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk and slid a shot past Miller. Sharps rst point of the playoffs sent a charge through the tow el-waving sellout crowd of 22,144, and there were mocking chants of Mil-ler! Mil-ler! as Shaw added his second goal of the series and helped set up Keith for his second. It was an eerily similar playoff exit for St. Louis to a year ago, when the Blues also were elimi nated by the defending Stanley Cup champi ons in six games in the rst round. In that 2013 playoff series, St. Louis won the rst two games at home against Los An geles, then lost four in a row. This year was sup posed to be differ ent, especially after the Blues acquired Miller from Buffalo on March 1. But they lost their last six games of the regular season, putting them in a rst-round series against rival Chicago. St. Louis rebound ed for two 4-3 overtime victories, but the Black hawks found their stride when the series shift ed to Chicago. Crawford had a shutout in Game 3, Patrick Kane scored in overtime in Game 4, and Toews breakaway score in St. Louis put the Blackhawks in posi tion to advance. Chicago defensem an Brent Seabrook re turned from a threegame suspension. Seabrook was punished by the NHL for his wipe out hit on Blues captain David Backes in Game 2. Backes exacted a mea sure of revenge when he delivered a hard hit on Seabrook into the end boards in the second period. But Seabrook added two more assists and had six points for the series. NHL FROM PAGE B1 event, Noh nished at 19-under 269 and earned $1,224,000. Andrew Svoboda and Robert Streb tied for second. Svobo da had a 69, and Streb shot 70. Jeff Overton, who briey pulled within a stroke of Noh on the back nine, had a 70 to nish fourth at 16 under. Bradley would up with a 75 to tie for eighth at 13 under. On Saturday, Brad ley worked his way into the nal group, two stroked behind Noh, with a 65. Bradley was within a stroke after the rst hole Sunday, which saw Noh hit his drive into mulch right of the fairway en route to his rst bo gey of the tournament. Bradley then birdied the par-5 second hole to tie Noh, to the delight of the gallery. But just a couple holes later, Bradley missed a par putt from less than 2 feet, and followed that up by hitting his drive into the water on No. 6. Be cause of where his ball crossed the line of the elongated hazard, he had to take his drop 280 yards from the pin. Then, he three-putt ed to complete a piv otal two-hole stretch in which he dropped four strokes. While Bradley nev er recovered from his front-nine falter, Noh still had to ward off a challenge from Over ton, who was as close as one stroke when he made a 20-foot birdie putt on 10. Overton, howev er, bogeyed 11 when he hit his drive into a bunker left of the fairway and his sec ond shot over the fair way and right of the cart path. He nev er got closer than two strokes again. Robert Garrigus, who narrowly made the cut Friday, had the best score Sunday at 64. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 14 10 .583 6-4 W-1 7-4 7-6 Baltimore 12 12 .500 2 5-5 L-1 5-6 7-6 Toronto 12 13 .480 2 1 4-6 W-1 5-7 7-6 Boston 12 14 .462 3 1 5-5 L-1 5-8 7-6 Tampa Bay 11 14 .440 3 2 4-6 L-1 7-7 4-7 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 12 9 .571 6-4 L-1 9-5 3-4 Minnesota 12 11 .522 1 6-4 W-1 6-5 6-6 Chicago 13 13 .500 1 5-5 W-1 8-5 5-8 Kansas City 12 12 .500 1 5-5 W-1 6-3 6-9 Cleveland 11 14 .440 3 2 4-6 L-3 7-6 4-8 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Texas 15 9 .625 8-2 W-1 9-4 6-5 Oakland 15 10 .600 5-5 L-2 6-6 9-4 Los Angeles 11 12 .478 3 1 5-5 L-1 3-6 8-6 Seattle 9 14 .391 5 3 2-8 L-1 4-6 5-8 Houston 9 17 .346 7 4 4-6 W-2 5-9 4-8 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 17 7 .708 7-3 W-4 9-3 8-4 New York 14 11 .560 3 6-4 W-1 8-8 6-3 Washington 14 12 .538 4 5-5 L-1 9-8 5-4 Philadelphia 13 12 .520 4 6-4 W-2 4-5 9-7 Miami 11 14 .440 6 2 5-5 L-1 9-4 2-10 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 18 7 .720 7-3 L-1 9-6 9-1 St. Louis 14 12 .538 4 4-6 W-1 6-3 8-9 Cincinnati 11 14 .440 7 2 5-5 L-3 4-5 7-9 Pittsburgh 10 16 .385 8 4 2-8 L-1 6-8 4-8 Chicago 8 16 .333 9 5 4-6 W-1 5-8 3-8 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 15 10 .600 5-5 W-4 8-4 7-6 Colorado 14 12 .538 1 7-3 W-1 8-4 6-8 Los Angeles 14 12 .538 1 4-6 L-1 6-9 8-3 San Diego 12 14 .462 3 2 5-5 W-1 7-6 5-8 Arizona 8 20 .286 8 7 4-6 L-2 2-13 6-7 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 4, L.A. Angels 3 Boston 7, Toronto 6 Minnesota 5, Detroit 3 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Baltimore 3, Kansas City 2, 10 innings Houston 7, Oakland 6 Tampa Bay 4, Chicago White Sox 0 Texas 6, Seattle 3 SATURDAYS GAMES Washington 4, San Diego 0 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 1 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 4, Cincinnati 1 Miami 7, N.Y. Mets 6, 10 innings Philadelphia 6, Arizona 5 L.A. Dodgers 6, Colorado 3 SUNDAYS GAMES Toronto 7, Boston 1 Kansas City 9, Baltimore 3 Houston 5, Oakland 1 Chicago White Sox 9, Tampa Bay 2 Detroit at Minnesota, ppd., inclement weather San Francisco 4, Cleveland 1 Seattle 6, Texas 5 L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, late SUNDAYS GAMES N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 0 Atlanta 1, Cincinnati 0, 10 innings San Diego 4, Washington 2 Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 0 St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 0 San Francisco 4, Cleveland 1 Colorado 6, L.A. Dodgers 1 Philadelphia 2, Arizona 0 DAVID GOLDMAN / AP Atlanta Braves Freddie Freeman hits a single to score the winning run in the 10th inning against the Cincinnati Reds on Sunday in Atlanta. The Braves won 1-0. TODAYS GAMES Oakland (Gray 3-1) at Texas (Darvish 1-0), 8:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 1-2) at Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 1-0), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 2-0), 10:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-2) at Cincinnati (Simon 3-1), 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 2-2), 8:15 p.m. Colorado (Morales 2-1) at Arizona (Miley 2-2), 9:40 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 2-3) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 2-2), 10:15 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Viciedo, Chicago, .368; RDavis, Detroit, .353; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .351; AlRamirez, Chicago, .343; Me Cabrera, Toronto, .339; Wieters, Baltimore, .338; Rios, Texas, .323. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 24; Bautista, Toronto, 20; Donaldson, Oakland, 19; Mauer, Minnesota, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 18; Plouffe, Minnesota, 18; Pujols, Los Ange les, 18; Trout, Los Angeles, 18. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 27; Colabello, Minnesota, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 23; Pujols, Los Angeles, 21; Donald son, Oakland, 20; Moss, Oakland, 20; Brantley, Cleve land, 19; KSuzuki, Minnesota, 19. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 37; AlRamirez, Chicago, 34; Rios, Texas, 31; Donaldson, Oakland, 30; Trout, Los An geles, 30; Altuve, Houston, 29; Ellsbury, New York, 29; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 29; Markakis, Baltimore, 29; Pujols, Los Angeles, 29. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 10; Beltran, New York, 9; Colabello, Minnesota, 9; Donaldson, Oakland, 9; Pe droia, Boston, 9; 7 tied at 8. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Bourn, Cleveland, 2; Ellsbury, New York, 2; Fuld, Minne sota, 2; Infante, Kansas City, 2; AJackson, Detroit, 2; LMartin, Texas, 2; IStewart, Los Angeles, 2. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 9; Pujols, Los Angeles, 9; Bautista, Toronto, 7; Donaldson, Oakland, 7; Dozier, Min nesota, 7; NCruz, Baltimore, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 9; Andrus, Texas, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 8; Ellsbury, New York, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7; Dozier, Minnesota, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6. PITCHING: MPerez, Texas, 4-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 4-1; 19 tied at 3. ERA: MPerez, Texas, 1.42; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.54; Darvish, Texas, 1.61; Kazmir, Oakland, 1.62; Feldman, Houston, 1.69; Ventura, Kansas City, 1.80; Shields, Kansas City, 1.91. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 47; Scherzer, De troit, 44; Price, Tampa Bay, 40; Lester, Boston, 36; Tanaka, New York, 35; Shields, Kansas City, 35; Sa bathia, New York, 35. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .398; Tulowitzki, Colo rado, .360; Utley, Philadelphia, .353; Freeman, Atlanta, .352; DGordon, Los Angeles, .350; Morneau, Colorado, .349; YMolina, St. Louis, .345. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 20; EYoung, New York, 20; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 19; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 18; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 18; 6 tied at 17. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 29; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 22; Morneau, Colorado, 19; Trumbo, Arizona, 19; Braun, Mil waukee, 18; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 18; Blackmon, Col orado, 17; Morse, San Francisco, 17; Rendon, Washing ton, 17; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 17. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 34; Blackmon, Colorado, 33; Freeman, Atlanta, 31; Uribe, Los Angeles, 31. DOUBLES: HRamirez, Los Angeles, 11; Goldschmidt, Ari zona, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10; Hill, Arizona, 9; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 9; MaAdams, St. Louis, 8; ECabrera, San Di ego, 8; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 8; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 8; Uribe, Los Angeles, 8. TRIPLES: Denora, San Diego, 2; CGomez, Milwaukee, 2; DGordon, Los Angeles, 2; Harper, Washington, 2; Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Hill, Arizona, 2; Puig, Los Ange les, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2; EYoung, New York, 2. HOME RUNS: AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 8; Belt, San Francisco, 7; Stanton, Miami, 7; Trumbo, Arizona, 7; JUp ton, Atlanta, 7; 6 tied at 6. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 12; EYoung, New York, 12; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9; BHamilton, Cincin nati, 9; Revere, Philadelphia, 8; Blackmon, Colorado, 7; Marte, Pittsburgh, 7. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 4-0; Machi, San Fran cisco, 4-0; Lohse, Milwaukee, 4-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 4-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 4-1; 15 tied at 3. ERA: Harang, Atlanta, 0.85; Simon, Cincinnati, 1.30; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.38; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.42; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.46; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.53. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 53; Fernandez, Miami, 47; Greinke, Los Angeles, 40; ClLee, Philadel phia, 40; Cueto, Cincinnati, 39; Lynn, St. Louis, 36. White Sox 9, Rays 2 Tampa Bay Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist 2b 4 1 2 0 Eaton cf 5 2 3 0 DJnngs cf 2 0 0 0 Semien 3b 5 2 2 1 Joyce lf 3 0 1 0 JAbreu dh 4 2 2 4 Longori 3b 4 0 1 1 Viciedo rf 3 1 1 0 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 JrDnks pr-rf 0 0 0 0 Myers rf 4 0 1 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 DeJess dh 2 1 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 1 YEscor ss 3 0 0 1 De Aza lf 4 0 1 0 Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 0 1 0 GBckh 2b 3 2 0 0 Totals 30 2 7 2 Totals 36 9 11 6 Tampa Bay 000 010 010 2 Chicago 000 005 40x 9 EZobrist (3), Y.Escobar (3), Price (1), Myers (2), Viciedo (3). DPChicago 4. LOBTampa Bay 6, Chi cago 5. 2BSemien (5), Viciedo (9). HRJ.Abreu (10). SBG.Beckham (1). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Price L,3-2 6 9 8 6 1 7 Lueke 1 2 1 1 1 0 H.Bell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Carroll W,1-0 7 1 / 3 6 2 1 2 3 D.Webb 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 2 0 Price pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. HBPby Carroll (De.Jennings). WPCarroll. UmpiresHome, Adrian Johnson; First, Tim Welke; Second, Chris Segal; Third, Tim Timmons. T:55. A,313 (40,615). Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 1 Boston Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 Reyes ss 4 1 1 0 GSizmr lf 4 0 0 0 MeCarr lf 4 1 2 1 Napoli 1b 4 0 1 0 Bautist cf-rf 4 1 1 1 Przyns dh 4 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 2 2 Mdlrks 3b 3 0 0 0 Lawrie 3b 4 2 2 2 JGoms rf 4 1 1 0 Frncsc dh 4 0 0 0 Bogarts ss 4 0 2 0 Sierra rf 3 0 0 1 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 1 1 Rasms cf 0 0 0 0 D.Ross c 3 0 0 0 Thole c 3 1 1 0 Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 32 7 9 7 Boston 010 000 000 1 Toronto 011 000 23x 7 ED.Ross (2). LOBBoston 6, Toronto 2. 2BBo gaerts (6), Me.Cabrera (7), Encarnacion 2 (8), Lawrie (1). HRLawrie (6). SDiaz. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lester L,2-4 7 5 4 4 0 7 A.Miller 1 / 3 3 3 2 0 0 Badenhop 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Toronto Dickey W,2-3 6 1 / 3 5 1 1 0 6 Delabar H,4 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Dickey (Middlebrooks). UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Alan Porter; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T:28. A,260 (49,282). Royals 9, Orioles 3 Kansas City Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 5 3 2 0 JWeeks dh 4 1 1 0 Infante 2b 3 1 2 6 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 2 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 0 Markks 1b 3 1 1 0 BButler dh 5 1 1 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 AGordn lf 4 1 2 2 Clevngr c 3 0 0 0 S.Perez c 4 0 2 0 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 5 0 1 1 DYong ph 1 0 1 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 0 Lmrdzz 2b 4 0 0 0 Dyson cf 4 1 1 0 Schoop 3b 3 0 0 0 Lough lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 39 9 13 9 Totals 32 3 5 2 Kansas City 101 020 401 9 Baltimore 000 002 001 3 EShields (2), A.Jones (1). DPKansas City 1, Balti more 1. LOBKansas City 8, Baltimore 4. 2BInfante (1), A.Gordon (9), Moustakas (4), D.Young (3). HRIn fante (2), N.Cruz (7). SBDyson (4). SFInfante. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,3-2 7 3 2 2 2 6 K.Herrera 1 0 0 0 0 2 G.Holland 1 2 1 1 0 2 Baltimore M.Gonzalez L,1-2 6 6 4 3 1 4 Meek 2 / 3 5 4 4 0 0 Stinson 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 3 0 R.Webb 1 2 1 1 0 0 WPG.Holland, Stinson. UmpiresHome, Jim Reynolds; First, Phil Cuzzi; Sec ond, Brian Knight; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T:08. A,368 (45,971). Astros 5, Athletics 1 Oakland Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 2 Lowrie ss 3 0 1 0 Fowler cf 4 0 1 1 Dnldsn dh 3 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Moss lf 3 1 0 0 Springr rf 4 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 1 1 Carter dh 3 0 0 0 Reddck rf 3 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 1 0 0 Gentry ph 1 0 0 0 Hoes lf 4 0 0 0 Jaso c 3 0 0 0 Corprn c 3 1 1 0 Barton 1b 3 0 0 0 Villar ss 3 2 2 2 Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 2 1 Totals 32 5 7 5 Oakland 000 000 001 1 Houston 001 000 40x 5 ELowrie (4). LOBOakland 5, Houston 5. 2BVillar (7). 3BVillar (1). HRAltuve (1). SBMoss (1). IP H R ER BB SO Oakland Milone L,0-2 6 2 / 3 5 4 4 2 2 Otero 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 0 Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 2 Houston McHugh W,2-0 8 2 / 3 2 1 1 3 7 Valdes 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby McHugh (Moss). UmpiresHome, Paul Emmel; First, Toby Basner; Sec ond, Jordan Baker; Third, Jerry Meals. T:32. A,935 (42,060). Mets 4, Marlins 0 Miami New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 3 0 0 0 EYong lf 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Grndrs rf 3 1 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 3 1 1 0 Sltlmch c 2 0 1 0 CYoung cf 3 1 1 2 GJones 1b 3 0 1 0 Duda 1b 3 0 1 1 Dietrch 2b 3 0 0 0 Recker c 4 0 1 0 Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 0 1 0 Koehler p 2 0 0 0 Gee p 1 0 0 0 Capps p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 Totals 28 0 3 0 Totals 29 4 6 4 Miami 000 000 000 0 New York 010 030 00x 4 EG.Jones (3). DPMiami 1, New York 2. LOBMiami 5, New York 7. 2BD.Wright (3), Duda (2). HRC. Young (2). SBDan.Murphy (5). SGee. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Koehler L,2-2 5 5 4 4 4 2 Capps 2 0 0 0 0 3 Hand 1 1 0 0 0 1 New York Gee W,2-1 8 3 0 0 4 6 C.Torres 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Koehler (C.Young). UmpiresHome, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Win ters; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Seth Buckminster. T:42. A,861 (41,922). Braves 1, Reds 0, 10 innings, Cincinnati Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 5 1 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 Fremn 1b 5 0 1 1 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 2 0 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 2 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 1 0 Leake pr 0 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 0 Hoover p 0 0 0 0 Laird c 3 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Tehern p 2 0 0 0 B.Pena c 4 0 1 0 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Cueto p 2 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 Berndn ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 0 5 0 Totals 35 1 7 1 Cincinnati 000 000 000 0 0 Atlanta 000 000 000 1 1 Two outs when winning run scored. LOBCincinnati 6, Atlanta 9. 2BLudwick (4), B.Pena (4), J.Upton (3), Simmons (3). CSB.Hamilton (4). SCueto, Teheran. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cueto 8 3 0 0 3 11 LeCure 1 1 0 0 0 0 Hoover L,1-3 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 M.Parra 0 1 0 0 0 0 Atlanta Teheran 8 3 0 0 2 5 J.Walden 1 0 0 0 0 2 D.Carpenter 2 / 3 2 0 0 0 1 Thomas W,1-0 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 M.Parra pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. UmpiresHome, Adam Hamari; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Vic Carapazza. T:02. A,446 (49,586). Padres 4, Nationals 2 San Diego Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi ECarer ss 3 1 1 1 Span cf 4 0 0 0 Denor lf 3 1 2 2 Rendon 3b-2b 4 1 1 0 Grandl c 4 0 1 0 Werth rf 4 0 2 1 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 1 LaRoch 1b 4 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Venale rf 3 1 1 0 Espinos 2b 1 0 0 0 Maybin cf 4 1 2 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 Amarst 3b 2 0 0 0 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Hundly ph 1 0 1 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Petersn pr-3b 1 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Kenndy p 3 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Nady ph 1 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Benoit p 0 0 0 0 TMoore ph 1 0 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 0 Loaton c 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 4 8 4 Totals 32 2 5 2 San Diego 000 112 000 4 Washington 100 000 010 2 DPWashington 1. LOBSan Diego 8, Washington 4. 2BGrandal (3), Maybin (1), Rendon (8), Werth (6). HRMcLouth (1). SBE.Cabrera (3), Denora (5). SFGyorko. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Kennedy W,2-3 7 3 1 1 0 9 Benoit H,4 1 1 1 1 0 1 Street S,9-9 1 1 0 0 0 1 Washington Jordan 4 3 1 1 2 0 Detwiler L,0-1 1 1 / 3 4 3 3 1 1 Barrett 1 / 3 1 0 0 2 1 Blevins 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 Storen 1 0 0 0 0 1 Clippard 1 0 0 0 1 1 HBPby Kennedy (Espinosa). WPKennedy, Detwiler. UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Cory Blaser; Second, Ben May; Third, Doug Eddings. T:12. A,873 (41,408). Cardinals 7, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Marte lf 4 0 0 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 1 2 0 Tabata rf 2 0 0 0 Jay cf 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 1 1 1 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 1 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 0 NWalkr 2b 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 3 1 1 1 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Craig rf 4 1 1 1 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 2 2 2 4 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 Descals 2b 3 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 3 0 0 0 TSnchz c 3 0 1 0 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 Totals 29 7 9 7 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 0 St. Louis 100 014 01x 7 DPPittsburgh 1, St. Louis 1. LOBPittsburgh 5, St. Louis 2. 2BM.Carpenter (2), Y.Molina (7). 3B Ma.Adams (1). HRJh.Peralta 2 (6). SJay. SFHol liday, Y.Molina. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Volquez L,1-2 5 2 / 3 7 6 6 1 2 J.Gomez 2 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 St. Louis Wainwright W,5-1 8 3 0 0 2 7 C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 3 HBPby Wainwright (Tabata). UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Will Little; Third, Paul Schrieber. T:35. A,986 (45,399). Cubs 4, Brewers 0 Chicago Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Kalish lf 4 0 2 0 CGomz cf 4 0 1 0 Lake cf 4 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 3 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 0 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 2 3 2 KDavis lf 4 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 1 1 0 Overay 1b 3 0 1 0 Olt 3b 2 0 0 1 Bianchi ss 3 0 0 0 HRndn p 0 0 0 0 EHerrr rf 3 0 0 0 JoBakr c 4 0 2 0 WPerlt p 2 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 1 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Hamml p 3 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 0 1 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Wang p 0 0 0 0 Bonifac ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 30 0 3 0 Chicago 020 001 010 4 Milwaukee 000 000 000 0 EHammel (1), S.Castro (4). DPChicago 1, Milwau kee 1. LOBChicago 5, Milwaukee 5. 2BC.Gomez (7). HRS.Castro 2 (4). SBKalish (2), Schierholtz (2). SFOlt. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Hammel W,4-1 7 3 0 0 2 7 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 0 H.Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 3 Milwaukee W.Peralta L,3-1 7 8 3 3 1 6 Kintzler 1 1 1 1 0 1 Wang 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hammel pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Lance Barksdale; First, Mark Rip perger; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Kerwin Danley. T:47. A,286 (41,900). Giants 4, Indians 1 Cleveland San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 4 0 2 0 Pagan cf 4 0 1 0 Swisher 1b 4 0 0 0 Pence rf 3 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 2 0 0 0 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 CSantn 3b 4 0 0 0 Posey c 4 0 2 0 Brantly lf 3 0 0 0 Adrianz pr 0 1 0 0 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 Morse lf 3 0 0 0 YGoms c 3 1 1 1 J.Perez lf 0 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 Blanco ph 0 0 0 0 Salazar p 2 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 1 2 0 Chsnhll ph 1 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 1 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 4 1 1 3 Allen p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 3 1 Totals 32 4 8 4 Cleveland 000 000 010 1 San Francisco 000 100 003 4 Two outs when winning run scored. DPCleveland 1, San Francisco 1. LOBCleveland 3, San Francisco 5. 2BPagan (7), Sandoval (4), B.Craw ford (6). HRY.Gomes (3), B.Hicks (3). SBlanco. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Salazar 7 5 1 1 1 8 Rzepczynski 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Allen L,2-1 1 1 / 3 2 3 3 1 2 San Francisco Vogelsong 7 2 0 0 2 6 Casilla BS,3-3 1 1 1 1 0 1 Romo W,2-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Scott Barry; First, Jeff Nelson; Sec ond, Marcus Pattillo; Third, Laz Diaz. T:43. A,530 (41,915). Phillies 2, Diamondbacks 0 Philadelphia Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Revere cf 4 1 2 0 GParra rf 4 0 1 0 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 1 2 1 Gldsch 1b 4 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 0 1 0 Monter c 3 0 1 0 Byrd rf 4 0 2 0 Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 C.Ross lf 4 0 0 0 Nieves c 4 0 1 0 Pollock cf 3 0 1 0 Asche 3b 4 0 0 0 Owings ss 3 0 2 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 McCrth p 2 0 0 0 ABrntt p 3 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 Galvis 3b 0 0 0 0 Pnngtn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 8 1 Totals 32 0 6 0 Philadelphia 100 001 000 2 Arizona 000 000 000 0 EOwings (4). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBPhiladelphia 6, Arizona 6. 2BUtley (11), Howard (3), G.Parra (4). 3BOwings (1). SBRevere (9). CSRollins (2). IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia A.Burnett W,1-1 8 5 0 0 0 8 Papelbon S,8-9 1 1 0 0 0 0 Arizona McCarthy L,0-5 7 7 2 2 1 12 O.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 1 HBPby A.Burnett (Montero). UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, John Tumpane. T:37. A,022 (48,633).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 NASCAR HANK KURZ JR. Associated Press RICHMOND, Va. Joey Logano punched his ticket to NASCARS playoffs. Marcos Am brose punched Casey Mears. Logano used a sav vy move to get around three dueling former champions in the nal laps Saturday night at Richmond Interna tional Raceway, and the classic short-track ending caused tempers to are in a big way in the garage afterward. The biggest skirmish had Marcos Ambrose, who nished 18th, confronting Casey Mears, who was 19th. Mears rst pushed Ambrose out of the way, and Ambrose re taliated with a thun dering punch in the face that appeared to draw blood. It was unclear what caused the two to con front each other. The Joe Gibbs Racing driver took advantage of the late-race duel to grab the lead and then outran former champi ons Matt Kenseth, Jeff Gordon and Brad Kes elowski. Loganos sec ond victory assured him a spot in the 10race Chase for the championship. Loganos rst career victory on the 0.75mile oval came when Gordon, Kenseth and Keselowski raced in a triangle jockeying for position, and Logano went underneath all three and held off Gor don for his fth career Sprint Cup victory. Logan wins at Richmond; Marcos Ambrose draws blood after race STEVE HELBER / AP Joey Logano celebrates his winon Saturday at Richmond International Raceway in Richmond, Va. NBA ANTONIO GONZALEZ AP Sports Writer OAKLAND, Calif. The Los Angeles Clip pers chose not to speak publicly about own er Donald Sterling. In stead, they made a si lent protest. In response to Ster lings purported com ments urging a woman to not bring black people to his teams games, the Clippers on Sunday let their uniforms become a show of solidarity. They ran out of the tunnel for Game 4 of their rst-round playoff at Golden State wearing their warmups. Then they huddled at center court and tossed their warmups to the ground, going through their pre game routine with their red Clippers shirts in side out to hide the teams logo. Players also wore black wristbands or armbands. They all wore black socks with their normal jerseys. Its just us, only us. Were all we got, Clip pers star guard Chris Paul could be heard shouting to teammates before they ran out. The Warriors sellout crowd of 19,596, decked out in gold shirts, booed the Clippers as they always do during in troductions. Clippers coach Doc Rivers said before the game that he would re main the only one to speak for the team on this, saying players want to remain focused on basketball. Even he, though, acknowledged that has not been easy since TMZ released the alleged recording of Sterling on Saturday. Our message is to play, Rivers said. Our message is that were going to let no one and nothing stop us from what we want to do. And I think thats a good message. I really do. I think thats the message were trying to send. And if we can pull this off all the way, I think that would be a terric message. While the Clippers wanted to let their play do the talking, other NBA players continued to speak out on the subject. Some talked about the hurt Sterlings alleged words caused. Oth ers urged Silver to take an aggressive stance against Sterling, who has a history of alleged discrimination. Most of them hoped Sterling would be removed as the teams owner some day soon. WARRIORS 118, CLIPPERS 97 OAKLAND, Calif. Stephen Curry made a career playoff-high seven 3-pointers and scored 33 points, lead ing the Golden State Warriors past the Los Angeles 118-97 on Sun day to even a rst-round series that has been pulled into a race-re lated scandal involving the Clippers owner. Clippers players made a silent protest against Donald Ster ling by shedding their warm-up jerseys and going through pregame routine with their red shirts on inside out. They also wore black bands on their wrists or arms and black socks in a show of solidarity. With the win, Curry and the Warriors made anoth er kind of statement. NHL IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer NEW YORK Henr ik Lundqvist didnt al low a bad ending to the second period wreck an otherwise good day for the New York Rangers. Lundqvist was the beneciary of a threegoal lead that was trimmed to two when the Philadelphia Flyers got their power play to work in the closing sec onds of the middle peri od. But the Rangers kept it together in the third, withstood a late surge, and pushed the Flyers to the brink of elimina tion with a 4-2 victory on Sunday. The biggest part to me was to calm down and not be too upset about it, Lundqvist said of Vinny Lecava liers goal with 32.6 sec onds left that made it 3-1. It is really frustrat ing to sit here when you give up a goal like that late in the period. It was just about let ting it go and being fo cused on the right things going into the third. Brad Richards and Dominic Moore scored in the second to make it 3-0. Lundqvist stopped 24 shots and didnt face more than 10 in any pe riod. The only other puck that got past him was Claude Girouxs goal with 1:29 left after the Flyers pulled goalie Steve Mason. Defenseman Marc Staal gave the Rang ers the lead in the rst, and Brian Boyle ended the drama with an emp ty-net goal with 15 sec onds remaining. Moore helped seal the win when he raced up ice to negate an icing call and fed Boyle. New York leads the se ries 3-2 and can advance to the second round with a win Tuesday in Philadelphia. Clippers stage silent protest on court before Game 4 MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ / AP The Los Angeles Clippers chose not to speak publicly about owner Donald Sterling. Instead, they made a silent protest. The players wore their Clippers shirts inside out to hide the teams logo. Rangers 4-2 win pushes Flyers to brink of playoff elimination

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 STUDY: Gene therapy may boost cochlear implants / C4 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Amputee support group meeting scheduled for today The Waterman Amputee & Limb Loss Konnections group for am putees and those with limb loss will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. today and every fourth Monday at the Mattison Conference Room B, Florida Hospital Waterman, 100 Waterman Way. For information, call Tracey Estok at 352-253-3892. ORLANDO Disability Employment Expo scheduled for Friday The Agency for Persons with Disabilities is hosting the fourth an nual Disability Employment Expo, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at the Fashion Square Mall, State Road 50 in Orlando. Some of the employers scheduled to participate are Lockheed Martin, Hilton Worldwide, Orlando Veterans Administration Medical Center, Krystal Company and Walgreens Distribution Center. This event is open to those with all types of disabilities. For information or to register, call Maryjane Wysocki at 321-474-0015 or email to maryjane.wysocki@apd cares.org, or call 1-866-273-2273 or go to APDcares.org. MOUNT DORA Peripheral Neuropathy Support Group meeting set Waterman Village will host the next Central Florida Peripheral Neuropathy Support Group meeting to take place from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday in the Lodge Card Room, 445 Waterman Ave., in Mount Dora. For information, call Jack Koehler at 352-735-2077. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver Course available in May A new six-hour curriculum has been developed for the public and, upon completion of the course. Florida drivers ages 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, and includes workbooks and a com pletion certicate. Payment can be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. Classes will take place: May 5 and 7, from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., Leesburg, to register, call 352-326-3540 May 5 and 7, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora, to register, call 352-735-7180. TAVARES Sexual abuse support group scheduled to meet Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, which offers a 12step program, meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday in Tavares. For informa tion, call 352-406-7485, or go to www.siawso.org. COLLEEN MASTONY Chicago Tribune T he nurses on the 20th oor were the rst to see them. Oh my goodness, declared Col leen Forrester, 29, a nurse dressed in green scrubs, who pointed to the win dows. Other nurses came to look and laughed. Were the children strong enough to come see? Soon, parents and nurs es were leading kids out of their rooms. The children were small and frail-look ing. Most were undergoing treatment for cancer and other serious disorders. But on this cold April morning, they had a pre cious moment of distrac tion. The window washers at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital of Chi cago were dressed as su perheroes. All morning, Captain America, Batman and Spider-Man swung on ropes outside the windows waving to the children, posing for pictures in what is fast becoming a semiannual tradition. Wow. They are so high up, said a wide-eyed Ma son Turngren, 8, whose colon is failing and who has been in and out of the hospital the last four years. On Tuesday, he was exhausted from the most recent battery of tests and had to be coaxed to the window. Once there, he was transxed. Mason waved to the heroes and put his hand on the glass to exchange a high-ve with Captain America. That moment meant a lot to Masons mom, Dusty Turngren, 42. Just to see a smile on his face, she said. The hospital had of fered other events in re cent days, including a vis it from a therapy dog, but none had aroused Masons interest. Then he heard that Spider-Man was out side. Superheroes are his fa vorite, said his mother, especially Spider-Man. Mason spent half an hour at t he windows. The superhero window washers made their rst appearance at Lurie last year after Phil Kujawa, 46, the foreman of the crew, saw a news report about a similar event in anoth er city. He mentioned the idea to his bosses at Chi cago-based Corporate Cleaning and quickly got the green light. Then Kujawa had the little issue of getting his crew to don the capes and tights. At rst, they were like, I am not wearing that, Kujawa recalled. He emphasized how much it would mean to the kids, and e ventually Window washers give young hospital patients a lift Superhero cleaners MICHAEL TERCHA / MCT Window washers Pedro Castro, 45, as Batman, and Roberto Duran, 32, as Captain America, right, entertain patient Zakk Carrier, 5, as they hang from rope lines from the roof of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital to entertain children in what has become a beloved semi-annual tradition in Chicago. SEE LIFT | C4 GRACE PETERSEN Norfolk Daily News NORFOLK, Neb. Phyl lis Glaser knew something was wrong with her son, Jonathan. Late last year, the usually energetic 7-year-old start ed to wear out easily. He would have his mo ments where it was hard for him to keep up with do ing the normal kid things, but hes still able to be the kid, still play and do all of those fun things, she told the Norfolk Daily News He just didnt have enough of the energy that he had before to be able to keep up with everybody. Glaser, and her husband, Monte, also noticed the large amount of bruises Jonathan had on his body. At one point, they counted 23. We knew he would wrestle around with his brothers and have fun, but to have 23 bruises, thats not right, Glaser said. After having Dr. Dan Blo menberg examine him, he diagnosed Jonathan with aplastic anemia and was sent to Childrens Hospital in Omaha on Dec. 27. With aplastic anemia, the bone marrow which produces red and white blood cells, as well as blood platelets quits working. He spent three days at the hospital, which is a lot shorter than the six weeks they could have spent there, Glaser said. Since his diagnosis, Jonathan has to get blood work done week ly, as well as blood transfu sions. He has been an absolute trooper, Glaser said. His sense of humor has gotten him through all of this. One procedure that could greatly help Jona than was a bone marrow transplant, Glaser said. Ev eryone in the family got tested for a possible match Phyllis, Monte, sister Al lison, 13; brother, Andrew, 12; and brother, Evan, 10. Evan turned out to be a match. Glaser was hesitant on how to inform Evan, Brother is boys perfect bone marrow match AP PHOTO Jonathan, 7, and and Evan Glaser, 10, pose for a photo at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha on March 19. SEE BROTHERS | C5

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 ABDULLAH AL-SHIHRI Associated Press RI YADH, Saudi Arabia In the past 24 hours, Saudi Ara bia has reported four new deaths from a Middle East virus related to SARS and 36 more cases of infection, in cluding a Turkish pilgrim in Mecca. Ofcials are struggling to alleviate concerns that the vi rus is spreading amid a spike in infections over the past several weeks. Many of the infections reported Wednes day and Thursday are health workers. Prince Miteb, the son of rul er King Abdullah and the head of the Saudi National Guard, was quoted in newspapers Thursday saying that the king arrived in the eastern city of Jiddah sooner than usual in order to be with the people there, amid a rise in infections. The king traditionally spends his summers in Jiddah, where the seaside weather is cooler than in the capital. Every Saudi citizen is more valuable to the king than himself, the prince was quoted as saying in the statebacked al-Watan newspaper. The Middle Ea st respirato ry syndrome, or MERS, be longs to a family of viruses known as coronaviruses that include both the common cold and SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which killed some 800 peo ple in a global outbreak in 2003. MERS can cause symp toms such as fever, breathing problems, pneumonia and kidney failure. The most recent deaths re ported by the Saudi Health Ministry bring to 85 the number of people who have died in the kingdom from the virus that appeared in 2012. The kingdom has record ed a total of at least 297 con rmed cases. There is no vaccine or treatment for the virus, and it is still unclear how it is trans mitted. The 65-year-old Turkish pilgrim is among six new cas es reported in Mecca, where millions of Muslims from around the world descend year-round. Thats raised concerns that the virus could spread among pilgrims. The ministry said the youngest cases from the newest batch of infections are two 13 year olds, one in the city of Medina and an other in Jiddah. In one oth er case, a 25-year-old Saudi male is being treated in Jor dan, according to the Saudi Health Ministry. The ministry reported the four latest Saudi deaths in separate statements: a 45-year-old male health worker in al-Kharj, a city about 50 miles (80 kilome ters) outside the capital Ri yadh; a 29-year-old male who contracted the virus from the public in Jiddah; a 72-year-old woman in Ri yadh; and a 68-year-old man in Mecca. On Monday, the king re moved the countrys health minister following the re cent spike in MERS cases. The next day, acting Health Minister Adel Faqih toured a hospital in Jiddah and met with MERS patients while wearing gloves, a medical robe and face mask. An out break among health workers prompted authorities to shut down the emergency ward of that hospital for 48 hours earlier this month. Saudi Arabia reports pilgrim infected with MERS AMR NABIL / AP Egyptian Muslim pilgrims, some wearing masks as a precaution against the Middle East respiratory syndrome, pray during a ritual called Jamarat in Mina near the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. MIKE STOBBE Associated Press NEW YORK Health ofcials are worried about recent U.S. mea sles outbreaks that so far have caused more illnesses than at the same point of any year since 1996. Authorities say 129 cases in 13 states were reported by mid-April, the bulk of them in Cal ifornia and New York City. Most were triggered by travelers who caught the virus abroad and spread it in the United States among unvacci nated people. Many of the travelers had been to the Philippines, where a recent measles epidem ic has caused at least 20,000 illnesses. The U.S. numbers re main relatively tiny, but ofcials are worried to see case counts grow ing. Since 2000, the high ly contagious disease has been considered eliminated in the Unit ed States, aside from occasional small out breaks sparked by over seas travelers. For most of the last decade, the nation was seeing only about 60 cases a year. But since 2010, the average has been near ly 160. This increase in cas es may be a new nor mal, unfortunately, said Dr. William Schaff ner, an infectious dis ease expert at Van derbilt University in Nashville. Contributing to the problem: Decades of measles vaccina tion campaigns have been so successful that many doctors have never seen a case, dont realize how contagious it is, and may not take necessary steps to stop it from spreading. Among the 58 cas es reported from Cali fornia, at least 11 were infected in doctors of ces, hospitals or oth er health-care settings, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New York City health of cials say two of their 26 cases were infected in medical facilities. Also on Thursday, a medical journal the Annals of Internal Med icine released a com mentary warning doc tors to prevent that kind of situation. We must ensure that our facilities do not be come centers for sec ondary measles trans mission, wrote Dr. Julia Shaklee Sammons, an infectious disease spe cialist at the Childrens Hospital of Philadel phia. Measles off to a fast start as cases trend up

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com won over his crew. Each window wash er, Kujawa said, was se lected for his experi ence and skill. (Because of the architectur al details on the build ing, Lurie Childrens is not an easy building to clean, he said.) Whats more, each man had to look like a hero. Roberto Duran, 32, with a chiseled jaw and clean-cut good looks, would make a perfect Captain America, his bosses thought. Ge rardo Vaca, 36, with a short, athletic build, seemed more a Spi der-Man type. And Pedro Castro, 45, with a bushy mustache, was chosen to become Batman as a little bit of a joke, Kujawa. We wanted to see what he would look like in a costume. Now, he said, his team revels in the chance to assume the super identities. They smile and wave their hands, Vaca said of the kids. They are so happy. I like (dressing up) because I like to see their happy faces. Evelina London Chil drens Hospital in En gland might have been the rst to ask its win dow washers to don tights and capes, ac cording to news re ports. After photos of the superhero win dow washers hit the In ternet a few years ago, the idea spread to chil drens hospitals around the world. Doctors at Lurie be lieve even if they cant cite scientic stud ies to prove it the happiness that is gen erated by Superhero Day can help children heal. There is pow er in laughter and joy and excitement, said Dr. Stewart Goldman, a neuro-oncologist at Lurie. I cant quote you a trial, but I know in my heart that it helps. The heroes swung back and forth in front of patients windows, lingering outside each oor, before lowering themselves again. Ev erywhere they went, they created a stir of ex citement. Ricky Canas, 27, stood away from the crowd with his 10-yearold sister, Angelina, a tiny girl with a tall IV pole. She got sick in February; doctors found a tumor in her liver. The days since have been long and terrifying. But Angeli na has been a trouper, through the biopsy and surgery and now in the run-up to chemother apy. I always liked super heroes, Canas said. He looked down at his sis ter, and gently touched her delicate chin. It was clear that Canas thought his sister was the real hero of the day. Someone told me once, We dont have to nd heroes. We can be our own. LIFT FROM PAGE C1 LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Australian researchers are trying a novel way to boost the power of co chlear implants: They used the technology to beam gene therapy into the ears of deaf animals and found the combina tion improved hearing. The approach re ported Wednesday isnt ready for human test ing, but its part of grow ing research into ways to let users of cochle ar implants experience richer, more normal sound. Normally, microscop ic hair cells in a part of the inner ear called the cochlea detect vibra tions and convert them to electrical impuls es that the brain recog nizes as sound. Hearing loss typically occurs as those hair cells are lost, whether from aging, ex posure to loud noises or other factors. Cochlear implants substitute for the miss ing hair cells, send ing electrical impuls es to directly activate auditory nerves in the brain. Theyve been im planted in more than 300,000 people. While highly successful, they dont restore hearing to normal, missing out on musical tone, for in stance. The idea behind the project: Perhaps a closer connection be tween the implant and the auditory nerves would improve hear ing. Those nerves bush-like endings can regrow if exposed to nerve-nourishing pro teins called neurotro phins. Usually, the hair cells would provide those. Researchers at Austra lias University of New South Wales gured out a new way to deliver one of those growth fac tors. They injected a growth factor-produc ing gene into the ears of deafened guinea pigs, animals commonly used as a model for hu man hearing. Then they adapted an electrode from a cochlear implant to beam in a few stron ger-than-normal elec trical pulses. Study: Gene therapy may boost cochlear implants

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICESSAVE UP TO80%OFFPHARMACY PRICES YOUR COST!Cialis 20mg.24 count.......$89.95Flomax 4mg.90 count.......$68.00Viagra 100mg.20 count.......$65.95NO SHIPPING COST ON THESE PRODUCTS. ALL ADVERTISED MEDICATIONS ARE GENERIC. VALUECALL US FIRST OR CALL US LAST... Our prices on prescription medicines are competitive with other mail order or internet prices. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi north of Kmart)(352) 347-0403 or Fax (352) 347-2034 Fax: (352) 347-2034cdrx441@gmail.com but Jonathan did the work for them. He went over, all ex cited a nd said, Youre my match, Glaser said, adding that Evan was ready to do it. It was just something he wanted to do. He want ed to help his brother. On March 13, Jona thon was admitted to the Nebraska Medi cal Center to undergo intense chemothera py treatments to com pletely wipe out his bone marrow. The bone marrow transplant fol lowed on March 19. Evan, she said, be came slightly nervous the day of the proce dure, but his father re assured him. Glaser said Evan was poked a number of times to get the bone marrow out, which made him real ly sore. Jonathan was jok ing around, saying, You look like a grandpa now, walking around because he was so stiff, Glaser said. After a two-week w ait ing period, the bone marrow transplant has been deemed success ful as Jonathans body is beginning to produce red and white blood cells and platelets. Hes also seems to be feeling better, although he still tires easily. At this point, hes producing bone mar row and the other cells, but theres always that possibility of him re jecting it. Hes taking a lot of medicines to help with the process so he doesnt reject it, Glaser said. Once he gets home, Jonathan will have re strictions, Glaser said. He will have to avoid large crowds and stay out of the sun as much as possible, or wear sunscreen and hats. Because of the med ications hes on, he can burn easily, Gla ser said. And, I guess a lot of sunlight can trig ger graft versus host dis ease, which is where he can reject his brothers bone marrow. He also cant go swim ming due to his central line and camping may be limited this year, Glaser said. For the time being, Glaser and Jonathan re main in Omaha, and ex pect to stay for about another two weeks to ensure he doesnt reject the bone marrow, as well as monitoring cell and vitamin/mineral levels. Plus, if Jonathan would get an infection, its better that hes close to the hospital since he doesnt have a high level of white blood cells. Making the stay a lit tle easier is the staff and Child Life specialists at the Med Center. They are awesome, Glaser said. They had a whole bunch of handson activities that kept him entertained and busy. Her family and friends, and the Christ Lutheran School com munity where the Glasers attend school also have been a huge help, Glaser said. I would like to thank all of our family and friends at home that are helping with the kids, Glaser said. BROTHERS FROM PAGE C1 LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHIC AGO Ten years of U.S. data suggest cho lesterol-lowering statins are giving patients a li cense to pig out. Calorie and fat intake increased among statin users during the decade an indication that many patients might be abandoning hearthealthy lifestyles and assuming that drugs alone will do the trick, the study authors said. They said the goals of statin treatment should be to help patients achieve benets unat tainable by other meth ods, not to empower them to put butter on their steak. Statins may keep cho lesterol low even if peo ple eat less healthy food and slack off on exercise, but those bad habits can contribute to obesity, high blood pressure, di abetes and other prob lems that are bad for the heart. The study was published online Thurs day in JAMA Internal Medicine. Dr. Rita Redberg, the journals editor, said the study raises concerns of a potential moral haz ard of statin use, in ad dition to already known potential side effects risks including muscle aches and diabetes. Statins provide a false reassurance, she said. People seem to believe that statins can compensate for poor dietary choices and sedentary life. The researchers ex amined 1990-2010 gov ernment health surveys involving nearly 28,000 adults aged 20 and old er. Different people were surveyed each year, underwent phys ical exams and blood tests, and reported their food intake. The por tion who used statins steadily increased, from 8 percent in the rst year to 17 percent in the nal year. Statin users in the rst year consumed on aver age 2,000 calories daily; those in the nal year consumed 2,192 dai ly calories. Average fat intake also increased, from 72 grams daily to 82 grams daily. Experts generally recommend no more than 77 grams daily for adults con suming 2,000 calories daily. The increase was seen in total fat intake and saturated fats, the least healthy kind. Average body-mass index among statin us ers increased from 29 just below the cutoff for obesity to 31, or one point higher than that cutoff. Diabetes also in creased 29 percent of statin users had it in 2010 versus 22 percent in the studys rst year. A link between statin use and diabetes has been documented pre viously, but reasons for the trend in the study are uncertain. Calories and fat in take were lower among statin users than non users early on, but by the nal years that dif ference vanished. Calories, fat intake and diabetes remained stable among adults not using statins, and there was a smaller increase in body-mass index among nonusers, although the average BMI remained in the overweight cate gory throughout. The study doesnt prove that statin use prompted patients to slack off, or that there is a true link between the drugs and the changes seen. But the research ers said the results raise troubling questions. If, for example, the average statin user is eating 192 more calo ries daily than 10 years ago, that could translate into many extra pounds each year unless ac tivity levels also in creased, said Dr. Mar tin Shapiro, the senior author and an internist and researcher at the University of California in Los Angeles. The study certain ly doesnt mean that ev eryone responds this way, but the concern is that people who are on statins ought to be par ticularly careful about how many calories they eat and what kinds of foods they eat, he said. They dont appear to be doing that. Shapiro said the re sults mirror his own ex perience taking statins. With a family history of heart disease, Shap iro said he had careful ly controlled his weight and avoided high cho lesterol foods. But Shap iro said he began to be less stringent about his diet after his doctor pre scribed a statin to lower his bad cholesterol. Heart disease pre vention guidelines is sued last November by the American Heart As sociation and Ameri can College of Cardiol ogy stress the need for healthy lifestyles and include recommenda tions for regular exer cise and heart-healthy eating. But they also would broaden statin use about one-third of U.S. adults would be told to consider tak ing the drugs under the guidelines. Statins may lead some patients to pig out AP FILE PHOTO This June 14, 2011 photo shows the drug Lipitor at Medco Health Solutions Inc., in Willingboro, N.J.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 28, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 28 the 118th day of 2014. There are 247 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory: On April 28, 1789, there was a mutiny on the HMS Bounty as rebelling crew mem bers of the British ship led by Fletcher Christian set the cap tain, William Bligh, and 18 sail ors adrift in a launch in the South Pacic. (Bligh and most of the men with him managed to reach Timor in 47 days.) On this date: In 1758 the fth president of the United States, James Monroe, was born in Westmo reland County, Va. In 1788 Maryland became the seventh state to ratify the Constitution of the United States. In 1817 the United States and Britain signed the Rush-Bagot Treaty, which lim ited the number of naval ves sels allowed in the Great Lakes. In 1918 Gavrilo Princip, the assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and the archdukes wife, Sophie, died in prison of tuberculosis. In 1937 former Iraqi pres ident Saddam Hussein was born in the village of al-Oja near the desert town of Tikrit (he was executed in Decem ber 2006). In 1945 Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and his mis tress, Clara Petacci, were ex ecuted by Italian partisans as they attempted to ee the country. In 1952 war with Japan of cially ended as a treaty signed in San Francisco the year be fore took effect. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower resigned as Su preme Allied commander in Europe. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 28, 2014: This year your friends play a bigger role in creating more of what you want. Brain storming sessions will result in remarkable ideas some of which actually might be applicable! You easily could feel overworked or go to ex tremes with your health and ideas. If you are single, a friend might become more, or you could meet someone of interest through a friend. You will tend to be far more romantic than you have been in the past. If you are at tached, the two of you enjoy hanging out together more. The friendship that exists be tween you is as strong as your romantic tie. A fellow TAURUS could be more stub born than you are! ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might not be look ing forward to a conversation that has the potential to be awkward. Your intuition could tell you to be more vulner able. Try to nd some com mon ground between you and the other party. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might wake up dreading that it is Monday, but you will be pleasantly sur prised as the day goes on. Someone could surprise you by going out of his or her way for you. Youll feel this per sons sensitivity, as there is a strong bond between you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You could opt to stay behind the scenes today. Conversa tions will surround you, and others are likely to express their ideas freely. In order to encourage the ow of this ex change, avoid attacking any one elses ideas. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Zero in on a key matter that is instrumental to your well-being. Understand what is happening with a loved one. Honor what you need to do, and observe what is oc curring with a family member who has been unusually out of sorts. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll give a full Leo perfor mance today, no matter what you do. A disturbing conver sation will provide the incen tive to work through a prob lem. Youll resolve an issue and leave everyone smiling. A boss or important loved one appreciates your efforts. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) One-on-one relating will open up doors. You might want to explore your options. Reach out to someone at a dis tance and listen to his or her news. Curb spending with the knowledge of your ulti mate nancial goal. A part ner will delight you with sug gestions. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Relating on an individual lev el will help you understand someone who is a dominant presence in your life. You are very different, yet togeth er you conjure up perhaps some of the wildest ideas. Deal with a matter involving your nances. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Be receptive to new ideas. You might be over whelmed by what is hap pening around you. Defer to someone who often needs to take the lead. Your imag ination is likely to provide a solution to a difcult matter that will please most parties. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your mind might be on everything else but the here and now. Force yourself to focus by midday, or else you might not get done what you might need to. Honor a need for a change in plans. Stay level and direct in han dling a problem person. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Tension could get you going this morning. Your creativity will nd the answer to relieve the stress. Honor what is happening, but dont hesitate to lighten up the moment. Allow your sense of humor to emerge, and main tain a grounded perspective. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) You could be over whelmed by everything you have to do, and you might need to make an adjustment to your plans. You wont know for sure until you catch up with a key person. If you can, work from home, or per haps make your work setting more comfortable. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Share more of your wild er ideas that take you to some interesting places. A friend absolutely will respond well to this facet of your per sonality, as this person loves your imagination. A brain storming session could in spire you. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: Child abuse is epidemic in the United States. It occurs at every socio economic level, across ethnic and cultural lev els, within all religions and at all levels of ed ucation. Every year, more than 3 million re ports of child abuse are made in the U.S. With out intervention, about 30 percent of those abused and neglect ed children will later abuse their own chil dren. With the proper skills, all parents can raise happy, healthy children. Treatment is necessary, but our communities also need to do a better job at prevention. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. Please ask your read ers to learn about pro grams and activities in their communities that support parents and promote healthy fami lies. JOHN E. THORESEN, DIRECTOR, BARBARA SINA TRA CHILDRENS CENTER, RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. DEAR MR. THORESEN: Thank you for your let ter. Readers, the rst step to curbing child abuse is recognizing it. These are the 10 most common indicators: 1. UNEXPLAINED INJURIES: Visible signs may include burns or bruises in the shape of objects. There may be unconvincing explana tions for a childs inju ries. 2. CHANGES IN BE HAVIOR: Abused chil dren often appear scared, anxious, de pressed, withdrawn or more aggressive. 3. RETURNING TO EARLIER BEHAV IOR: Abused children may display behav iors shown when they were younger, such as thumb-sucking, bed-wetting, fear of the dark or strangers. For some, loss of basic language or memory problems may occur. 4. FEAR OF GOING HOME: Abused chil dren may express fear or anxiety about leav ing school or going places with the abuser. 5. CHANGES IN EAT ING: The stress, fear and anxiety lead to changes in a childs eating behaviors, which may result in weight gain or weight loss. 6. CHANGES IN SLEEP HABITS: The child may have fre quent nightmares or have difculty fall ing asleep, and appear tired or fatigued. 7. CHANGES IN SCHOOL PERFOR MANCE OR ATTEN DANCE: Children may demonstrate difcul ty concentrating in school or experience excessive absences, sometimes because of adults trying to hide the childrens injuries from authorities. 8. LACK OF PERSON AL CARE OR HYGIENE: The child may appear unkempt, be consis tently dirty and have severe body odor, or lack sufcient clothing for the weather. 9. RISK-TAKING BE HAVIORS: The child may engage in highrisk activities such as using drugs or alcohol, or carrying a weapon. 10. INAPPROPRIATE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR: A sexually abused child may exhibit overly sex ualized behavior or use explicit sexual lan guage. We can all support children and parents to reduce the stress that often leads to abuse and neglect. Be a friend to a parent or child you know. Volunteer your time or donate to pro grams that support child abuse treatment and prevention as well as those that build healthy families. Trust your instincts. Suspect ed abuse is enough of a reason to contact au thorities. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Help to curb child abuse by learning its symptoms JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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