Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Care and Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comPreparing for the possibility that Florida vot ers pass a constitutional amendment this No vember legalizing the dispensing of medical marijuana, the city of Mount Dora is working on an ordinance regulating it in the city, accord ing to the citys planning and development di rector. The current draft of the ordinance would prohibit the production of medical marijuana in the city as an agricultural product and limit the dispensing of medical marijuana to the citys most intense industrial zoning district, the WP-2 Workplace zoning district, according to a Mount Dora city council agenda. We take a pretty hard line on agricultur al production in the city anyway. So, were just adding this to the list, Mount Dora planning and development director Mark Reggentin said. Reggentin said the heaviest uses in the zoning district where medical marijuana would be al lowed would be manufacturing type uses. The council will have a rst reading of the or dinance on May 6, Reggentin said. Reggentin said the state legislature is working MOUNT DORACity prepares for possibility of medical marijuana SEE PLAN | A2 More online For more on this story, see www.dailycommercial.com. SERGEI GRITS / AP A Ukrainian government soldier sits atop an armored personal carrier on Saturday at a checkpoint near the village of Dolina, eastern Ukraine. PETER LEONARDAssociated PressSLOVYANSK, Ukraine As Western governments vowed to impose more sanctions against Rus sia and its supporters in eastern Ukraine, a group of foreign mil itary observers remained in captivity Saturday accused of being NATO spies by a pro-Russian insur gency. The German-led, eight-member team was traveling under the auspices of the Or ganization of Securi ty and Cooperation in Europe when they were detained Friday. Vyacheslav Ponomarev, the self-proclaimed peoples mayor of Slovyansk, described the detained observers as captives and said that they were ofcers from NATO member states. As we found maps on them containing information about the location of our check points, we get the im pression that they are ofcers carrying out a certain spying mis sion, Ponomarev Sanctions loom as observers held in eastern UkraineSEE SANCTIONS | A2 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sporting a bandana, a motorcycle rider rolls into Leesburg during Bikefest weekend on Saturday. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comBandanas are the fashion accesso ries that help bik ers achieve that rugged edge. But this morning, bik ers and anyone else so inclined will be wearing at least 2,500 bandanas to show off their gentler side as Leesburg Bikefest ofcials try to set a world record for the longest chain of bandanas. The linked bandanas will be made possible by a $10 donation, which will allow buyers to purchase two ofcially designated black bandanas one of which can be used to try for the record, and one to help them remember the event. The black bandanas will be sold until 9:30 / a.m. to day, when the attempt to break the record will begin at Towne Square nestled in the heart of Bikefest in front of City Hall. Proceeds will benet the Folds of Honor Foundation, which supports the spouses, children and dependents of soldiers who have been killed or disabled. So many bikers wear bandanas, so we thought it would be the perfect record to try for, said Rachel ORy an, who works in event marketing. ORyan said they hope to have at least 2,500 bandanas to break the current record, which was set in 2011 by the Hiratsuka Coming of Age Day Cer emony Committee in Japan, using 2,450 bandanas that stretched about 4,500 feet. And in order to count for the Guinness Book of World Records, the bandanas must be tied to each other, with no strings or any other devices helping to hold them together. Joe Shipes, executive vice president of the Leesburg Partnership, which sponsors Bikefest, said he is optimistic the record will be broken. An online effort to sell the black bandanas, embroidered with Leesburg Bikefest, began well before bikers began rolling into Leesburg. We basically are already there, Shipes said. Kim Waters, one of many people who snatched up bandanas, was wearing one Satur day as a top. We all love our freedom and want to support the U.S. military, said Waters, shortly after showing off her tattoos in a Bikefest contest on Saturday. Representatives from the Guinness Book of World Records will not be on hand today for The Full Throttle Saloon is open for business during Bikefest weekend. LEESBURGBiking for Guinness World Record in bandana tyingSEE BANDANA | A2 IRON JUNGLE QUALIFIES 2 MORE FOR NATIONALS, SPORTS B1EDUCATION: Lakefront TV to feature local students, schools in new production, A3 CONGRESS: Members back from vacation but will they work? A8 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, April 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 117 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C6 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C6 MONEY E1 NATION A8 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A9 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.88 / 68Possible thunderstorms$1

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 the event. Representatives of the organization come at a price of $7,500, ORyan said. To help make the record ofcial, ofcials will use video, photos and media stories to help support the validity of any claim and community leaders will serve as ofcial witnesses including Leesburg City Manager Al Minner and Daily Commercial publisher Steve Skaggs, as well as an independent surveyor. Dave Dierinzo, vice president of the Folds of Honor Foundation, applauded the effort. Its for a good cause, said Dierinzo, standing at his organizations booth on Saturday. Of course, bandanas arent the only biker attire being sold at this years 18th annual Bikefest, which ofcially kicked off Friday. A cluster of thousands of bikes roared throughout downtown Leesburg as onlookers were treated to motorcycle stunting, live music, Texas cheeseburgers, lamb and chicken gyros, egg rolls, rib-eye steak sandwiches and a smorgasbord of other food and drinks. More than 250 vendors are on hand this year for Bikefest, with many selling the fashions and motorcycle accessories that have become a hallmark of the event. One booth is selling motorcycle masks designed as animals, skulls, outlaws and other facial takes. Its hot, but it looks so cool, said Terri Ann Stanback, a Jacksonville resident, looking at a mask with a smile covered in pink lipstick. Shipes said the nice weather this year helped to attract a record number of patrons in an event that was expected earlier to welcome more than 300,000 bikers and music fans to the free three-day weekend festival. Bikefest also gives a number of bikers the chance to show off their motorcycles. Andre Mar tinez and his wife Maribel, of Davenport, showed off their white Suzuki Hayabusa with its $250 chrome handlebars and other matching accessories that had onlookers snapping a bar rage of photos. It turns heads, Andre Martinez said. A 3rd Street mobile set-up of Full Throttle Saloon, the subject of a popular truTV reality show, sold its famous Sloonshine and Jesse James Americas Outlaw Bourbon. Michael Ballard, who owns the Full Throttle Saloon in Stur gis, S.D., said they have set up at a number of bike festivals across the country. He said their show is a hit with the blue collar workers. This allows people to experience our saloon without having to go all the way to Sturgis, he said. Other activities include the World Famous Frisbee Dogs, a bikini contest featuring women from Hooters, a Hot Body contest for the men, a poker run and more than 80 concert performances. Leesburg Bikefest will conclude today at 3:30 / p.m. with a perfor mance by platinum recording artist Uncle Kracker. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 26CASH 3 . ............................................... 5-8-0 Afternoon . .......................................... 0-8-4 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 1-9-2-1 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-7-1-7FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 25FANTASY 5 . ............................. 2-4-11-18-32 MEGA MONEY . .................... 18-21-31-4218 MEGA MILLIONS . ................ 3-11-18-20-669 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.said, adding they could be released in exchange for jailed pro-Russian activists. Outside Slovyansk, a city about 90 miles west of Russia, Ukraine government forces continued operations to form a secu rity cordon as it attempts to quell unrest threatening to derail the planned May 25 presidential election. The U.S. and other nations in the Group of Seven said in a joint statement released Friday night by the White House that they plan to impose additional eco nomic sanctions on Russia in response to its actions in Ukraine. The West has accused Russia of using covert forces to encourage unrest in Ukraine and says Moscow has done nothing to pressure pro-Russian militias to free police sta tions and government buildings in at least 10 cities across the region. Condemning Russias earlier annexation of Ukraines Crimea Peninsula, the G-7 said: We will now follow through on the full legal and practical consequences of this illegal annexation, including but not limited to the economic, trade and nancial areas. SANCTIONS FROM PAGE A1W on creating legislature to regulate medical mari juana and the city wants to have laws in place ahead of time. The problem is we dont know what the states (going to) do, Reg gentin said. So what wed like to do is sort of control our own destiny, because a lot of times when the state legislature writes laws, they put provisions in it that prohibit cities and counties from doing any regulation dif ferent than the statute and many times, if we have regulations on the books they will essential ly grandfather those in. Reggentin added the ordinance will change assuming the constitutional amendment pass es and depending on how the state legislature acts. Philosophically, what were trying to do is get out in front of it what were doing is just pro tecting our right to regulate it, Reggentin said. The city council hasnt actually said its a good thing or its a bad thing. Ultimately, communities may want to embrace the production and distribu tion of medical marijuana as an industry. He added that since the city is taking a conserva tive approach, it allows us to back off that if we want to a little bit and react. Morgan Fox, the communications manager with Marijuana Policy Project, said its good that the initiative is be ing taken to develop regulations, but also that it might be early to do so as the law has not yet passed and state regulations are not yet in place. Its good that theyre taking the lead on this, Fox said. Weve seen in places like California where local and state ofcials were slow to try to regulate the industry. They ended up not real ly liking what came out of that and when youre able to set up clear and con cise regulations youre much better able to en force best practices in the industry. Fox added the regulations should not go so far as to prevent dispensing medical marijuana in the city. As long as people are able to have access to it and the dispensaries arent zoned into places where its unsafe for pa tients to travel to, I really think that thats a matter for local discretion, Fox said. Fox said the Marijua na Policy Project is the nations largest marijuana policy reform organization and concentrates on state and federal lob bying. He said, however, they are not directly in volved in the Florida ini tiative. The organizations vi sion statement says that, MPP and MPP Foun dation envision a nation where marijuana is legally regulated similarly to alcohol, marijuana education is honest and re alistic, and treatment for problem marijuana us ers is non-coercive and geared toward reducing harm. PLAN FROM PAGE A1 BANDANA FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake County Sheriffs Sergeant Michael Marden asks for the registration of a motorcycle with no rear-view mirrors on Saturday during Bikefest weekend on U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. JULIE PACEAP White House CorrespondentKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia President Barack Obama is hopscotching through Chinas neighborhood with a carefully calibrated message for Beijing, trying both to counter and court. During visits to U.S. al lies, Obama has signaled that American military power can blunt Chinese aggression in the Asia-Pa cic region, even as he urges Beijing to use its growing clout to help resolve international disputes with Russia and North Korea. The dual tracks underscore Beijings out sized importance to Obamas four-country swing through Asia, even though China is absent from his itinerary. The president opened a long-awaited visit to Ma laysia on Saturday, fol lowing stops in Japan and South Korea, and ahead of a visit to the Philippines. Obamas trip comes at a tense time for the region, where Chinas aggressive stance in territorial disputes has its smaller neighbors on edge. There also are continued questions about the White Houses commit ment to a greater U.S. focus on Asia. In an af rmation, Obama is ex pected to sign a security agreement with the Philippines clearing the way for an increased American troop presence there. In Tokyo, Obama asserted that a treaty obli gating the U.S. to defend Japan would apply if Bei jing makes a move on a string of islands in the East China Sea that Ja pan administers but China also claims. Yet at times, the pres ident has tempered his tough talk in an attempt to avoid antagonizing Beijing. To the chagrin of the Japanese, Obama said the U.S. would not pick sides in the sovereignty claims at the heart of the re gions territorial disputes. He repeatedly declared that the U.S. is not asking Asian allies to choose between a relationship with Washington and Beijing. I think theres enor mous opportunities for trade, development, working on common is sues like climate change with China, Obama said.In Asia, Obama carefully calibrates his China message CAROLYN KASTER / AP President Barack Obama arrives with Malaysian King Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah, left, and Queen Haminah, right, followed by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razakon on Saturday in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Halifax Media GroupA Florida Islamic group is accusing some Repub lican Party lawmakers and local party organizations of fostering anti-Muslim sentiment. The Council on Amer ican-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, sent letters to almost every Republican Club or par ty extension in the state, asking the groups to stop bringing speakers who espouse anti-Islamic views. The letter said it repre sented the interests of more than 150,000 registered Florida Muslim voters. Hassan Shibly, executive director for CAIR, based in Tampa, said such speak ers not only iname an ti-Islam tensions but have also led to discriminatory legislation: namely Senate Bill 864, sponsored by Sen. Alan Hayes, R-Umatilla, which allows school districts to select textbooks instead of adhering to the statewide curriculum. Shibly said the textbook debate came about after a parent in Volusia Coun ty became uncomfortable with the number of pages in a history textbook that described Islam and or ganized a protest to per suade the school district to stop using the book. The Volusia School Dis trict noted that there are many more references to Christianity in the textbook than there are to Is lam. Shibly said the letters were only sent to Republican lawmakers and groups because Republi cans drafted and support these two bills and be cause no other party has invited anti-Islam speak ers to give presentations. Our ofce has documented a pattern of local GOP organizations invit ing extremist anti-Muslim speakers who promote fear and hatred of the en tire Muslim faith and community, often under the pretense of targeting radicals, Shibly wrote in the letter. CAIR also is concerned Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT SORRENTO Deadline extended for poetry contestIn honor of Aprils National Poetry Month, the East Lake County Library is sponsoring the 12th annual Poetry Contest, open to all ages and divided into three groups: children up to age 12, teens aged 13-18 and adults over the age of 19. The May 3 deadline for entries has been extended to May 10 for those interested in taking part. Entry forms are available online at www.mylakelibrary.org. The completed form may be delivered with the original poetry or mailed to the East Lake County Library, 31340 County Road 437 South, Sorrento, FL 32776. For information, call Scott Amey at 352 -383-9980.SUMTERVILLE Online courses set for adult students in Sumter CountyThe Sumter Adult and Community Education Center has a program offering high-quality, noncredit online courses for the community through a partnership with ed2go featur ing hundreds of courses on numer ous topics. Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and inter action with fellow students, participants gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. New six-week online courses start monthly, with two lessons released weekly. For information, go to Sumter Adult and Community Education Center website at www.aec.sumter. k12..us, or call 352-793-5719.TAVARES Online registration for businesses availableThe new competitive bidding process for purchasing goods and ser vices is convenient and free, with online registration for business owners interested in working with the county. Upon registration, businesses will automatically receive an email notice when the county issues a formal solicitation for goods or services that match the commodity codes selected. For information and to register, go to www.lakecounty.gov/ procurement.GROVELAND Arthritis pain management classes scheduledThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting classes in Tavares and Groveland on arthritis pain management. The free program will provide information about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3:30 / p.m. on Wednesday at the Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave. Register online at www.tavarespain. eventbrite.com. In Groveland, the class is from 2 to 3:30 / p.m. on Thursday at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St. Register online at www. grovelandpain.eventbrite.com. For information or to register, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff reportThe Florida Region of USA Volleyball in Eustis will hold a groundbreaking ceremony at 11 / a.m. Wednesday at the Hickory Point Beach sand volley ball complex in Tavares. Organizations taking part will include the Lake County Board of Commis sioners, Lake County Wa ter Authority, Central Flor ida Sports Commission, Lake County Economic Development & Tourism, Mission Inn, Lake-Sumter State College, Mount Dora Community Trust and the Florida Region of USA Vol leyball. This unique partner ship between Lake Coun ty, Lake County Water Authority and our non-prot corporation demonstrates how great things can happen when organizations come together with a common goal, Steve Bishop, executive director for the Florida Region of USA Volleyball, said in a press release. The new sand volleyball complex will bring many volleyball enthusiasts to Lake County in the coming years as we focus on hosting events for amateurs and professionals of all ages. This is truly a win-win for Lake County and for the sport of volleyball. Hickory Point Beach will be a 20-court sand volley ball complex located on Lake Harris at the Hickory Point Recreational Complex in Tavares. It is set to open over the July 4th weekend. Lake County is proud to be at the forefront of one of the fastest growing sports in the world, said Robert Chandler, Lake County Economic Development & Tourism director. We are grateful for the partnerships that have contributed to the devel opment of The Hickory Point Beach sand volley ball complex. This venue TAVARESCeremony set for volleyball complexSEE SAND | A5UMATILLADoes GOP foster anti-Muslim sentiment?Florida Islamic group says some lawmakers do HAYES Staff reportThe Florida Department of Health (DOH) in Lake County, in partner ship with the Lake County Board of County Commissioners (BCC), was part of a group of state wide employees credited with saving government a total of $558 million. Florida Lieutenant Gov ernor Carlos Lopez-Cantera joined Florida TaxWatch in announcing the 2014 Prudential Pro ductivity Award winners Workers save govt money SEE SAVING | A4 Staff reportRobotics students at Carver Middle and Bever ly Shores Elementary are in Anaheim, Calif., this weekend for the 2014 VEX Robotics World Championship. Competing against 800 schools from 28 different countries are four teams from Carver Middle and one team from Bever ly Shores, Chris Patton, spokesman for the school district, said in a press re lease. The VEX Robotics World Championships will include the top teams from more than 400 tour naments held between Lake students vying for robotics titleSEE LAKE | A5 Staff reportLake County Schools and Lakefront TV unveiled a new program this weekend featuring news about local students, activities and school pro grams. Inside Lake Schools will feature school students and faculty report ing information from around the countys pub lic schools. The show appeared on Lakefront TV at 9 / a.m. Saturday, and will air again at 4:30 / p .m. today and 4 / p.m. Wednesday. Each new episode will feature a different student as guest host, Robert Sargent, spokesman for the city of Lees burg, said in a press re lease. Lake Minneola High School student Kristyn Evens hosts the rst show with several reports, including results from the countys STEM Bowl competition and nalists for the districts rookie teacher of the year recognition. Chief Academic Ofcer David Christiansen, who joined Lake Schools in January, provides an extensive interview into improvements for Lakes high schools, Sargent noted. One proposal for a seven-period class schedule will provide more instructional time for students while saving the district $4.6 million in operation costs. Lakefront TV, the government-access cable channel operated by the city of Leesburg, ap pears daily on Comcast channel 22, Brighthouse channel 199 and Florida Cable Channel 4. The channel also streams live on the Internet at www. lakefronttv.com. For more informa tion about Inside Lake Schools, contact Lake County Schools Communications Ofcer Chris topher Patton at 352253-6522. COURTESY LAKEFRONT TV Lake Minneola High School student Kristyn Evens will host the rst episode of Inside Lake Schools on Lakefront TV. The new program began airing this weekend.LEESBURGNew local production to focus on schoolsSEE GOP | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 IN MEMORY OBITUARIESLucille C. MartinLucille C. Martin, 94, went home to be with the Lord on April 24, 2014. She was born July 3, 1919 to Charles B and Leila Milton, Sr., in Sumter County, FL. She was a lifelong member of Pleasant Grove Bap tist Church, Oxford, FL. Lucille worked in the Wildwood High School Cafeteria and drove the school bus for Sumter County Schools. She enjoyed retirement by traveling to all 50 states and many foreign countries. Lucille loved to run the produce stand many years for Mar tin & Martin. Her recent years have been lled with numerous fun hours playing the the marble game with her friends and proudly carrying the title of The Marble Queen. Lu cille is survived by her daughter, Lynelle (Jer ry) Purcell of Oxford, FL; four grandchildren, Wanda (Bill) Crittenden of Panama City FL, Craig (Angel) Martin of Oxford, FL, Shawn Pur cell of Oxford, FL and Brad Deon Martin of Oxford, FL, six great grandchildren; Heath (Amber) Crittenden of St. Petersburg, FL, Jessica Martin of Anchorage, AK, Bret (Katie) Crittenden of Manhattan, KS, Broughton Mar tin of Oxford, FL, Avery Martin of Bellevue, FL, and Branson Mar tin of Oxford, FL and one great great grand child, Tristan Crittenden of St. Petersburg, FL, one sister, Clara Roll of Oviedo, FL, and many much-loved niec es and nephews. Lucille is preceded in death by her husband, Ernest B. Martin, daughter, Thelma Jeanette Martin and son Darroll Martin. A visitation for Mrs. Mar tin will be held on Mon day, April 28, 2014 from 6:00PM ~ 8:00PM in the Banks/Page-Theus Chapel with funeral services being held on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 10:00 AM at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, Oxford. Interment will be at Nichols Cemetery. On-line condolences may be shared by visit ing www.bankspagetheus.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.DEATH NOTICESSarah Ruth BrannockSarah Ruth Brannock, 81, of Longwood, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Umatilla.Paul Ernest PapineauPaul Ernest Papine au, 65, of Leesburg, died on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Mike Leo SkibaMike Leo Skiba, 93, of Tavares passed away on Friday, April 25, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL at the Florida Cap itol, which included employees of the DOH in Lake County and the BCC, Elisha Pappacoda, a coun ty public information ofcer, said in a press release. One program that received recognition is Lakes on line septic system permitting initiative, the only one of its kind in the state. The countys Growth Management Department web page at www.lakecounty .gov/departments/ growth_management/building_ser vices was created to help streamline the permitting process by assigning a Lake County planner to help residents le their permits with the state. Allowing the per mitting process to transition online in its entirety for our residents and businesses was a crucial step in our economic development efforts, said Commissioner Sean Parks. The staff from the BCC and the Health Department worked hand-in-hand to make the online per mitting process work smoothly, and we have received several calls from oth er counties around the state inquiring as to how we made it work between the two agencies. The Lake County honorees were Amye King, Elias Christ, Diane Fox, Mike Cates, Anita Greiner, Erikk Ross, Carmen Carroll and Skip Nemecek for their work on the septic system and online permitting initiative. The 26th annual awards honored 432 people and teams of state employees for creating and imple menting innovative solutions and productivity improvements in cost savings, cost avoidances, and increased revenue for state gov ernment. Of the 432 award winners, 195 will receive cash or plaques during the regional awards cer emonies this sum mer. SAVING FROM PAGE A3

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days June 2013 and March 2014. The competition is based on an engineer ing challenge presented to the teams in the form of a game, Pat ton said. This years event is Toss Up, which requires robots to perform stunts that include picking up various sized balls and tossing them into goals, climbing over bumps and hanging from walls. Carver Middle and Beverly Shores Elementary students have been working yearround using the VEX Robotics Design System to build robots designed to score the most points possible in qualication matches, elimination compe titions and skills challenges. According to Bart Nash, robotics teacher at Carver Mid dle, students have been working diligently to come up with solutions to play the predeter mined robotics game. For the past four or ve years I have been in vited over to Carver Mid dle School for the state tournament that Mr. Nash has held, School Board Member Rosanne Brandeburg said. In its rst year of competition, one of the teams from Bever ly Shores Elementary won the state title. I am very proud of my students, said Jo seph Newton, fthgrade teacher at Beverly Shores Elementary. We just started this year and we ha vent even had these robots for more than six months and our kids went all the way. To learn more, visit www.vexrobotics.com. LAKE FROM PAGE A3 about Senate Bill 386, referred to as the An ti-Foreign Law Bill and the Anti-Sharia Law Bill, legislation that would keep Florida judges from applying foreign laws. The only exception would be if the foreign law guar antees the same constitutional protections found in the Florida and U.S. constitutions. The bill also is spon sored by Hays in the Senate and Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk City, in the House. Gov. Rick Scott has voiced his approval for the measure, but critics say the law is unneces sary and there are vir tually no examples of foreign law previously intervening with state laws. Shibly said the bill is thinly veiled anti-Is lam legislation, citing a booklet Hays handed out to other Senators. According to the Mi ami Herald, the book let was called: Shariah Law: Radical Islams threat to the U.S. Constitution. Its unconstitution al, and well seriously consider litigation if it passes, Shibly said of the bill. Florida has real problems and we dont have time to x imaginary ones driven by a discriminatory agenda. GOP FROM PAGE A3 will greatly improve the countys sports infrastructure and positively impact our economy for years to come. On April 8, The Lake County Board of County Commissioners ap proved spending $398,000 fully fund ed by the tourist devel opment tax to help pay for construction of the complex. On April 23, the Lake County Wa ter Authority approved a lease agreement with the county. The Hickory Point Beach sand volleyball complex will reside at the 68-acre Hicko ry Point Recreational Complex that currently has ve soccer elds operated by Lake County Soccer. The sand volleyball complex will have professional level net systems, lights, per manent restrooms, an intercom system, web cams and 24 inches of top-grade sand. Bishop said events at Hickory Point Beach will include tournaments, leagues, camps and clinics. A local beach volleyball league will be scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday nights beginning in July. Ad ditional information will be available on the Florida region website in the coming weeks. SAND FROM PAGE A3 Associated PressBROWNSVILLE, Texas SpaceX found er and chief executive Elon Musk has signaled his companys intent to put its much-sought launch pad project on a beach near Brownsville. The signs came Fri day in nal comments Musk gave at an un related news confer ence in Washington, D.C. SpaceX is developing a launch pad on the south coast of Texas, near Brownsville. Were waiting on the nal en vironmental approvals for that. We expect those soon, and well prob ably have that site ac tive in a couple of years, said Musk, who also co-founded PayPal and Tesla Motors in addition to the California-based private rocket maker. A nal environmental impact assessment is pending from the Federal Aviation Administration. Lower Rio Grande Valley promoters are as suming nothing regard ing the regions pros pects for becoming a space base. There is no spaceport project in Brownsville yet, Gilberto Sali nas, executive vice president of the Brownsville Economic Development Council, told the Houston Chronicle. However, I think it is all looking very, very positive, Camer on County Judge Car los Cascos told The Brownsville Herald. If he (Musk) is saying that, all that is left now is the results of the EIS (environmental impact statement). And I think what he is trying to say is if this comes out in a positive light, then they are going to come to South Texas. PHILIP ELLIOTTAssociated PressWASHINGTON The once and perhaps future presidential candidate Rick Santo rum has lots of policy ideas for fellow Repub licans seeking public ofce. Hes just not sure hell be one of those hope fuls ever again. Yeah, I dont know if I can do this. Its just tough, Santorum said about another White House run. The former Pennsyl vania senator tells The Associated Press in an interview that he isnt ruling out a 2016 can didacy. But, he says, there are plenty of reasons why he wouldnt do it. He is enjoying a sec ond career as a movie studio executive. His daughters health remains a concern. And, Santorum writes in a new book, he can help shape his partys future from off stage. In the interview, San torum said the GOP will struggle to win rac es unless candidates came up with policies that help working Americans. Victories will be tough, he said, unless elected ofcials stop being obstructionists. Santorum said the libertarian streak run ning through his party distorts the denition of freedom, and that politicians wrongly look to President Ron ald Reagans policies to address todays challenges. Then theres Santo rums slap at Republi cans who demonize so cial welfare programs. Do Republicans re ally care less about the person at the bottom of the ladder than Demo crats do? To be painfully honest, I would have to say in some ways yes, Santorum writes in his book, Blue Collar Conservatives: Recommitting to an America That Works. The tough talk raises questions about Santo rums viability in what could be a crowded 2016 primary eld. Also, hes not rush ing to camp out in ear ly nominating Iowa or New Hampshire again. A while. A year at least, probably, he said of his timeline to decide on a 2016 bid. Santorum ran an up start campaign in 2012, surviving long enough to be Mitt Romneys last remaining rival. He struggled to raise money or support among establishment-minded Republicans, but his socially conservative prole drew enough backing for Santorum to pick up victories in 11 states. Even in victory, his disorganized campaign cost him, includ ing failing to qualify for the ballot in Virginia. We cannot run the campaign we ran last time if we run this time, Santorum said. How Republicans win is the focus of San torums latest book, to be released Monday. Santorum offers ideas on energy, educa tion, the economy and health care. It comes across as part think tank policy paper, part campaign playbook and part communica tions advice on how to connect with work ing-class voters. For instance, Repub licans should not focus exclusively on business leaders and job creators and should speak to employees, Santorum said.Santorum undecided in 2016 bid AJ MAST / AP Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks during the leadership forum on Friday at the National Rie Associations annual convention in Indianapolis. SpaceX CEO signals his favor for Texas launch pad site

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The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hr Dr. Vaziri & StaffShoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLicense# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFinancing Available FREEExam & X-RaysMust present ad Exp. date: 04/30/14$170valueNEW PATIENTS D001795-April 27, 2014THE CITY OF LEESBURG COMMISSION is seeking citizens who are willing to serve on the following boards and commissions. For additional information and/or application, please call 728-9732. FIRE PENSION PLAN BOARD One member of a five-member board to complete the term from January 1, 2013 thru December 31. 2014. Responsibilities: Perform all duties as are required to prudently administer the plan. POLICE PENSION PLAN BOARD One members of a five-member board for a one year term. Responsibilities: Perform all duties as are required to prudently administer the plan. PLANNING COMMISSION One Alternate Member of a seven member Commission for three year terms. Responsibilities: Long range planning activities such as the Comprehensive Plan, current planning reviews of applications for rezoning, conditional uses, comprehensive plan amendments etc. The Planning Commission also functions as the Board of Appeals and hears variance requests and appeals of administrative decisions HISTORIC PRESERVATION BOARD Two Alternate members to serve as part of a seven member board to serve a three year term and two alternates to serve three year terms Responsibilities: To work with the Planning Division in applying design standards to properties requesting alterations, construction, demolition, relocation or removal in the historic district: To recognize historic properties in the District where significant physical improvements have been made. To develop programs to promote historic preservation in the City of Leesburg. Meets Fourth Wednesday of the month in the Commission Chambers at 4:00 p.m. GREATER LEESBURG COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY One member of a seven member Commission for a four year term Responsibilities: Plan revitalization projects for the GLCRA area and approve the budget for the agency. Meetings as called. Meet in Commission Chambers Betty M. Richardson, City Clerk ANDREW TAYLORAssociated PressWASHINGTON Congress gets back to work Monday after a two-week vacation, and its looking like lawmak ers will do what they do best: the bare mini mum. Forget immigration, a tax overhaul, stiffer gun checks. Theyre all DOA. Raising the minimum wage or restoring lost unemployment benets? Not going to hap pen. Forcing government approval of the Keystone XL pipeline? Veto bait. The only things likely to become law in a Con gress bitterly divided between House Republicans and the Demo cratic-led Senate are those that simply have to pass, such as a mea sure to avoid a govern ment shutdown. Thats a short, short list. It gets even shorter if you leave off things that can wait until a postelection lame-duck ses sion. Atop the list is a shortterm spending bill to keep the government running past the Oct. 1 start of the new budget year. Votes on the bill arent needed until September. After stumbling into a politically costly par tial government shutdown last fall, Republi cans wont let it happen again, especially with an election just around the corner. This years measure should be no problem. Much more difcult, however, is the second main item of must-do business: nding more money for the Highway Trust Fund to keep road and bridge construction projects aoat. The fund is running critically low on cash. The ad ministration says that could mean a slowdown in construction projects this summer and fall when lawmakers are back home asking voters to return them to Washington for another term. The current highway bill expires at the end of September. The number of (must-do) items is small, said GOP lobbyist Hazen Marshall of the Nickles Group. But the degree of dif culty, particularly for the highway bill, is very high. Top lawmakers and the administration all say they want to pass a multiyear highway and transit funding bill. Most Capitol Hill watch ers think a temporary extension of funding is far more likely. Thats still complicated. Lawmakers will have to agree on perhaps $10 billion to $15 billion in funding to cover ex pected trust fund shortfalls. Optimally, Congress would act before its August vacation. Passing those two bills is probably all that has to happen before Elec tion Day. Congress has taken care of must-do legislation to increase the debt limit and x Medicares awed pay ment formula. So what will Congress do for the next few months? Not much. There will be efforts to get the troubled appro priations process back on track in the after math of last years shut down and modest follow-up budget bargain. Senate Majority Lead er Harry Reid, D-Nev., has promised the head of the Senate Appro priations Committee, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., a few weeks of oor time after last years failure to pass a single appropriations bill through the Senate. The House will try to pass as many bills of the 12 spending bills as it can, but measures funding implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Protection Agency are can didates to bog down.Congress returns to work but will anything be accomplished? MICHAEL MELIAAssociated PressHARTFORD, Conn. A teen ager charged with stabbing a fellow high school student to death on the day of their junior prom is being held in a hospital under psychiatric evaluation where he will likely remain for two weeks, one of his attorneys said Satur day. The name of the 16-year-old suspect was not ofcially re leased but people who saw him taken into custody identied him as Chris Plaskon, a friend of the victims and an athlete described as genial and respectful. Plaskon is accused of stab bing to death Maren Sanchez, 16, in the hallway of Jonathan Law High School in Milford. The attack occurred Friday morning, hours before the schools ju nior prom, and authorities were investigating whether Sanchez was stabbed after turning down his invitation to the dance. The suspect, who is charged as a juvenile offender, will not ap pear at an arraignment sched uled for Monday in New Haven, attorney Richard Meehan said. The hospital commitment can last for up to 15 days, accord ing to Meehan. He said doctors typically order such involuntary commitments in cases where someone in custody is consid ered a danger to himself. Meehan said the suspects family is also reeling from the at tack. His family is devastated not only for him, but the youngster who was killed. Its a terrible sit uation all the way around, Mee han said. His client is expected to be charged as an adult, but he would need to appear in court for that to happen, Meehan said. States Attorney Kevin Lawlor said several factors go into that decision, including the serious ness of the charges.J. DAVID AKE / APTulips bloom in front of the Capitol recently in Washington. Congress gets back to work on Monday after a two-week vacation, and its looking like lawmakers will do what they do best: the bare minimum. School stabbing suspect under mental evaluation PETER CASOLIN0 / APFriends and family attend a memorial service for Maren Sanchez who was killed at the school on Friday. MICHAEL HILLAssociated PressWEST POINT, N.Y. West Point wants more women. With female cadets representing less than one in ve cadets in the Long Gray Line, the U.S. Military Academy is taking steps to boost the number of women arriving here this sum mer and beyond. West Points new superintendent said the moves will help keep the storied academy ahead of the curve now that the Pentagon is lifting restrictions for women in combat jobs. We obviously have to increase the female population for a number of reasons. One is because there are more opportunities in the branches for the females, Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen Jr. said. Women have been a presence at the nations military academies since 1976. Female cadets here can grow their hair longer than the standard military buzz-cut and can wear stud ear rings. But they carry the same heavy packs, march the same miles and graduate with the same second lieutenant bars the men here do.West Point seeking more female cadets

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 ABSOLUTE MACHINE SHOP AUCTIONWEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 at 10:00 AM(AB2985) 13% BP Both Fine Machines Are In Excellent Condition and Ready To Go To Work For You! BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! ASSOCIATED PRESS Polish pilgrims hold a ag portraying Pope John Paul II during a vigil in the SantAgnese in Agone church on Saturday in piazza Navona, Rome. FRANCES DEMILIOAssociated PressVATICAN CITY Re tired pontiff Benedict XVI will help Pope Francis celebrate the saint hood ceremony to day for John Paul II and John XXIII, setting the stage for an unprecedented occurrence of two living popes canon izing two of their prede cessors. About 1 million pilgrims are expected at the event and many were ooding into Rome on Saturday. Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombar di told reporters on Saturday that Benedict will be in St. Peters Square for the canonization of John and John Paul. He said Benedict and many car dinals will concelebrate the Mass with Francis. Benedict resigned from the papacy a year ago, and since has large ly dedicated himself to prayer in a monastery on the Vatican grounds. Todays appearance will be his highest-prole one since he retired. Francis, who lives else where in Vatican City, in a guesthouse, has been quite welcoming to his predecessor, occasionally paying a call on Benedict. It was Francis who sought to include Benedict in todays cer emony, expected to draw hundreds of thou sands of tourists and pilgrims. Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI has accepted the invitation, and has let Pope Francis know that he will be present tomorrow morning at the canonization cere mony and will concelebrate along with other prelates, Lombardi said. That doesnt mean that he will go up on the altar on the steps of St. Peters Basilica, Lom bardi said of the out door Mass. He noted that during the ceremo ny, cardinals and bishops will be seated on one side of the espla nade, with, presumably, Benedict, among them. We will all be happy to have his presence at the ceremony, the Vatican spokesman said. Benedict also showed up Francis ceremony to elevate churchmen to cardinals rank in Feb ruary. But that ceremo ny wasnt a Mass, mean ing todays appearance by two popes would be the rst Mass concelebrated by two pontiffs. As German Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, Benedict presided over John Paul IIs funeral in the square in 2005. He was soon elected pontiff himself, going on to lead the ceremony to beatify his Polish-born predecessor in 2011, also in the square. Beatication is the last for mal step before sainthood. It was John Paul who, early in his papa cy, appointed the Ger man prelate to a key Vatican post in charge of safeguarding church teaching, and eventu ally, also dealing with the mounting cases of sexual abuse of minors by priests in the United States and elsewhere. Benedict has a con nection to John XXIIIs papacy as well. As a young theologian, he attended the Second Vatican Council, the gath ering of prelates from around the globe that the Italian pope set up as a way to bring mod ernizing reforms to the Catholic church. On Saturday, pilgrims were pouring into Rome in big groups or as individual families or travelers, eager to be among those taking their place in the square before dawn on the day of the ceremony. The sound of hymns, in Pol ish, English and Italian, echoed suddenly in some of Romes streets Saturday, then just as abruptly faded, as faith ful joyfully sang as they made their way through the Italian capital. Interior Minister Angelino Alfano said an estimated 1 million people were expected to ood into Rome for the event.Benedict to join in double sainthood ceremonySAO PAULO A former army colonel who acknowledged he tortured and killed political prisoners during Brazils 19641985 military regime was murdered in his home outside Rio de Janeiro, police told local news media on Saturday. Citing the victims widow, police inspector Fabio Salva dorete told the UOL news portal that Pau lo Malhaes was suffocated to death on Thursday by three men who broke into his house and stole two computers and some of the antique guns he collected. Last month, Mal haes gave Brazils Na tional Truth Commission a detailed account of how he participated in the abduction, torture and killing of politi cal prisoners. He also said he helped in the disappearance of the bodies. He said that at the time he did not regret his ac tions which he justied saying they were guerrillas and ene mies of the state. Malhaes was the rst member of the Armed Forces to openly acknowledge that he tor tured, killed and hid the bodies of political prisoners. Created in 2012, the Truth Commission is investigating human rights abuses com mitted under Brazils military regimes. It does not have pow ers to prosecute any one because of a 1979 amnesty law that re leased civilians and the military from li ability for politically motivated crimes committed during the dictatorship. It can, however, reveal the abuses and the names of those who committed them.Ex-colonel who admitted torture killed in Brazil

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB Leesburg, FL34748 NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatrist

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014www.dailycommercial.comMLB: Standings, league leaders, box scores / B5 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comIron Jungle Weightlifting continues to move along. Lake Countys only weightlifting club competed recently at the Florida Youth Trials, a tune-up meet at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School and Iron Jungle Weighlifting had two more lifters earn spots in USA Weightliftings Youth National Championship in June. I only had four lift ers compete, so half of our competitors qualied for nationals, said Iron Jungle Weightlifting coach Josh Boyer. That gives us four team members who have qualied (for nationals). We have a tough sixweek prep period com ing up, and our success at Youth Nationals will be a direct correlation to the approach to our training. We are past the level of being content with qualifying and now it is time to bring home medals each time we attend a national champi onship. I have condence that we will have our best training days over this next month-and-ahalf. Alexis Smith and Car los Molano had solid performances at Port Orange Spruce Creek to join teammates Mor gan Rhone and Brett Ollila at nationals. Smith competed at 75 kilograms (about 165 pounds) and Molano lifted at 69 kilograms (about 152 pounds). Smith entered the competition needing 97 kilograms (213 pounds) to qualify for nation als and Boyer said she turned up at the meet ready to succeed. She hit personal records of 41 kilograms (90 pounds) in the Snatch and another personal record weight of 56 kilo grams (123 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a total of 97 kilograms, a third personal mark. Smith hit on four of her six total lifts and qualied for nation als with her second at tempt in the Clean-andJerk. Her performance earned Iron Jungle its only medal of the competition. I couldnt be more proud of Alexis because she has come so far in reaching this point, PHOTO COURTESY OF TARA WILLIS-SMITH Iron Jungle Weightlifting club member Alexis Smith (right) poses with coach Josh Boyer after a recent meet at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School. Smiths performance in the competition earned her a spot in the USA Weightling Youth Nationals in June.Iron Jungle has 2 more qualifiers for nationals JOHN BAZEMORE / APAtlanta center Pero Antic (6) pulls down a rebound against Indiana forward Evan Turner (12) in Game 4 of the teams rst-round playoff series on Saturday in Atlanta. DANNY MOLOSHOK / APLos Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling looks on during preseason game in 2010 between the Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers in Los Angeles. ANTONIO GONZALEZAssociated PressSAN FRANCISCO The NBA is investigating a report of an au dio recording in which a man identied as Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling tells his girlfriend not to bring black people to games. NBA spokesman Mike Bass said in a statement Saturday that the league is in the process of au thenticating the validi ty of the recording posted on TMZs website. Bass called the comments disturbing and offensive and said the league would have no further comment. In the recording post ed on TMZ, the man questions his girl friends association with minorities. TMZ reported the woman, V. Stiviano, who is of black and Mexican descent, posted a picture of her self with Lakers Hall NBA probing alleged recording of owner PAUL NEWBERRYAssociated PressATLANTA Paul George and David West hit key 3-point ers down the stretch, and the top-seeded In diana Pacers held off the Atlanta Hawks 9188 Saturday to even the opening-round series at two wins apiece. In a game they had to have, the Pacers nally showed some grit and regained the homecourt edge. George put the Pacers ahead 86-85 with a jumper beyond the arc, and West hit another trey with 1:33 remaining. Atlanta had a chance after Kyle Korver was fouled in the corner and knocked down three free throws, taking advantage of a doover after the Pacers were called for a lane violation on the third attempt. But George pulled down an offen sive rebound to set up George Hills driving shot with 56 seconds left. Pero Antic missed a 3-pointer at the buzz er that wouldve forced overtime. Game 5 is Monday in Indianapolis. George scored 24 points and West added 18. Paul Millsap led the Hawks with 29, but the All-Star forward struggled in the nal minute. First, he turned the Pacers win, even series with Hawks SEE NBA | B2SEE OWNER | B2SEE IRON | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 2, Indiana 2 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta at Indiana, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 1: Indiana at Atlanta, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA Miami 2, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami at Charlotte, late Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Charlotte at Miami, 7 or 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Miami at Charlotte, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Charlotte at Miami, TBA Brooklyn 2, Toronto 1 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Toronto at Brooklyn, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn at Toronto, TBA Washington 2, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 29: Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: Chicago at Washington, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Washington at Chicago, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 2, San Antonio 1 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Dallas at San Antonio, 7 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: San Antonio at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Dallas at San Antonio, TBA Memphis 2, Oklahoma City 1 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City at Memphis, late Tuesday, April 29: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA L.A. Clippers 2, Golden State 1 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 29: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, TBA Portland 2, Houston 1 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Houston at Portland, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Portland at Houston, TBASaturdays games Pacers 91, Hawks 88INDIANA (91) George 10-18 0-2 24, West 7-13 3-6 18, Hibbert 3-5 0-0 6, G.Hill 5-8 3-4 15, Stephenson 2-9 0-0 5, Turner 4-8 2-2 11, Mahinmi 1-1 0-0 2, Scola 2-7 0-0 4, Watson 3-8 0-0 6. Totals 37-77 8-14 91. ATLANTA (88) Carroll 1-6 0-0 3, Millsap 10-18 6-6 29, Antic 1-6 0-0 2, Teague 5-15 2-2 14, Korver 4-9 4-4 15, Brand 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 2-7 2-2 6, Mack 3-6 0-0 7, Martin 0-1 0-0 0, Scott 4-15 3-3 12. Totals 30-84 17-17 88. Indiana 29 13 24 25 91 Atlanta 22 26 17 23 88 3-Point GoalsIndiana 9-23 (George 4-7, G.Hill 2-4, West 1-1, Turner 1-2, Stephenson 1-7, Watson 0-2), Atlanta 11-31 (Millsap 3-6, Korver 3-8, Teague 2-5, Carroll 1-2, Mack 1-2, Scott 1-4, Williams 0-1, Antic 0-3). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsIndiana 49 (George 10), Atlanta 51 (Korver 9). AssistsIndiana 22 (G.Hill, George 5), Atlanta 22 (Teague 7). Total FoulsIndiana 19, Atlanta 18. TechnicalsG.Hill, Ste phenson, Scott. A,043 (18,729). Mavericks 109, Spurs 108 SAN ANTONIO (108) Leonard 7-8 1-3 17, Duncan 8-14 6-6 22, Splitter 6-8 2-2 14, Parker 9-18 0-0 19, Green 1-5 0-0 3, Ginobili 4-14 4-4 12, Diaw 3-5 0-0 7, Belinelli 3-3 0-0 7, Mills 2-5 1-2 5, Bonner 1-1 0-0 2, Joseph 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-81 14-17 108. DALLAS (109) Marion 3-11 1-2 9, Nowitzki 7-13 4-6 18, Dalembert 4-8 5-5 13, Calderon 7-10 0-0 16, Ellis 12-22 2-2 29, Carter 3-8 4-4 11, Blair 1-1 0-0 2, Harris 1-5 0-0 3, Wright 2-2 0-0 4, Crowder 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 4282 16-19 109. San Antonio 34 20 20 34 108 Dallas 27 32 18 32 109 3-Point GoalsSan Antonio 6-18 (Leonard 2-2, Belinelli 1-1, Parker 1-2, Diaw 1-2, Green 1-4, Mills 0-3, Ginobili 0-4), Dallas 9-23 (Ellis 3-7, Calderon 2-3, Marion 2-6, Carter 1-3, Harris 1-4). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsSan Antonio 39 (Splitter 13), Dallas 44 (Dalembert 10). AssistsSan Antonio 26 (Parker 6), Dallas 25 (Calderon 9). Total FoulsSan Antonio 20, Dallas 19. A,636 (19,200). HOCKEY NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Detroit 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston 3, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 24: Boston 3, Detroit 2, OT Saturday, April 26: Boston 4, Detroit 2 Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 2 Tuesday, April 22: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3 Pittsburgh 2, Columbus 2 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday, April 23: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Saturday, April 26: Columbus at Pittsburgh, late Monday, April 28: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Columbus at Pittsburgh, TBA N.Y. Rangers 2, Philadelphia 2 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, April 25: Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Sunday, April 27: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, Noon Tuesday, April 29: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, TBA x-Wednesday, April 30: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rang ers, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 2, Minnesota 2 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Minnesota 1, Colorado 0, OT Thursday, April 24: Minnesota 2, Colorado 1 Saturday, April 26: Minnesota at Colorado, late Monday, April 28: Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Minnesota at Colorado, TBA Chicago 3, St. Louis 2 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: Chicago 2, St. Louis 0 Wednesday, April 23: Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Sunday, April 27: St. Louis at Chicago, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 29: Chicago at St. Louis, TBA Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Dallas 3, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 4, Anaheim 2 Friday, April 25: Anaheim 6, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 27: Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 29: Dallas at Anaheim, TBA San Jose 3, Los Angeles 1 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: San Jose 7, Los Angeles 2 Tuesday, April 22: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Thursday, April 24: Los Angeles 6, San Jose 3 Saturday, April 26: Los Angeles at San Jose, late x-Monday, April 28: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBA GOLF PGA Tour Zurich Classic Saturday At TPC Louisiana Avondale, La. Purse: $6.8 million Yardage: 7,425; Par: 72 Third Round Seung-Yul Noh 65-68-65 198 Keegan Bradley 69-66-65 200 Robert Streb 67-66-68 201 Jeff Overton 67-68-67 202 Ben Martin 62-67-73 202 A ndrew Svoboda 64-68-70 202 Paul Casey 71-68-64 203 Charley Hoffman 68-67-68 203 Tommy Gainey 71-66-67 204 Tim Wilkinson 70-70-65 205 Danny Lee 71-69-65 205 Bud Cauley 71-68-66 205 Retief Goosen 72-65-68 205 J.B. Holmes 71-65-69 205 Peter Hanson 65-69-71 205 Brooks Koepka 71-68-67 206 Daniel Summerhays 72-66-68 206 Kevin Kisner 69-68-69 206 Erik Compton 66-68-72 206 Joe Durant 69-71-67 207 Freddie Jacobson 72-69-66 207 Robert Allenby 71-68-68 207 Justin Rose 71-67-69 207 Mark Anderson 72-65-70 207 Fabian Gomez 72-69-66 207 David Duval 68-69-70 207 Will Wilcox 68-68-71 207 Kevin Chappell 72-67-69 208 Bronson LaCassie 70-69-69 208 David Toms 73-68-67 208 Alex Prugh 70-68-70 208 Morgan Hoffmann 70-68-70 208 Graham DeLaet 69-68-71 208 Cameron Tringale 73-69-66 208 Martin Flores 72-68-69 209 John Senden 70-70-69 209 Troy Matteson 72-68-69 209 Stuart Appleby 67-72-70 209 Vijay Singh 70-71-68 209 Kyle Stanley 71-67-71 209 Brendan Steele 73-67-70 210 Briny Baird 71-69-70 210 Troy Merritt 71-69-70 210 Mark Calcavecchia 71-70-69 210 D.A. Points 73-68-69 210 Rory Sabbatini 69-72-69 210 Charlie Wi 70-71-69 210 Bo Van Pelt 74-63-73 210 Robert Garrigus 73-69-68 210 Sean OHair 71-69-71 211 Sang-Moon Bae 68-72-71 211 Andres Romero 70-71-70 211 Charles Howell III 68-73-70 211 David Hearn 71-71-69 211 Lucas Glover 71-71-69 211 Y.E. Yang 72-70-69 211 Ricky Barnes 70-72-69 211 Kevin Tway 70-72-69 211 Boo Weekley 71-70-71 212 Wes Roach 74-67-71 212 Andrew Loupe 71-70-71 212 J.J. Henry 68-69-75 212 Michael Thompson 66-71-75 212 Tag Ridings 71-70-72 213 John Rollins 74-66-73 213 John Merrick 69-72-72 213 Shawn Stefani 69-72-72 213 Doug LaBelle II 68-73-72 213 Chad Collins 66-71-76 213 Derek Ernst 71-71-71 213 Jim Renner 75-67-71 213 Padraig Harrington 70-72-71 213 Greg Chalmers 71-71-71 213 Max Homa 71-71-71 213 TV2DAY ARENA FOOTBALL 4 p.m.ESPN2 Iowa at PhiladelphiaAUTO RACING 2:30 p.m.NBCSN IndyCar, Grand Prix of Alabama, at Birmingham, Ala.5:30 p.m.NBCSN Indy Lights, Indy Lights 100, at Birmingham, Ala.7 p.m.ESPN2 NHRA, Springnationals, at Baytown, TexasCOLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN Alabama at South Carolina4 p.m.ESPNU Oregon at Oregon St.7:30 p.m.ESPNU Arizona St. at Arizona10:30 p.m.ESPNU Hawaii at Cal St.-FullertonGOLF 6:30 a.m.TGC European PGA Tour, China Open, nal round, at Shenzhen, China1 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, nal round, at New Orleans3 p.m.CBS PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, nal round, at New Orleans7 p.m.TGC LPGA, Swinging Skirts Classic, nal round, at Daly City, Calif.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at N.Y. Mets1:30 p.m.MLB Cincinnati at Atlanta2 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee8 p.m.ESPN L.A. Angels at N.Y. YankeesMOTORSPORTS NoonFS1 MotoGP World Championship, Grand Prix of Argentina, at Santiago del Estero, ArgentinaNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 1 p.m.ABC Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Chicago at Washington3:30 p.m.ABC Playoffs, rst round, game 4, L.A. Clippers at Golden State7 p.m.TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Toronto at Brooklyn9:30 p.m.TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Houston at PortlandNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE NoonNBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 5, Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers3 p.m.NBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, St. Louis at Chicago8 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, Anaheim at DallasSOCCER 6:55 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Cardiff at Sunderland9 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Liverpool11:05 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Manchester City at Crystal PalaceSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED ball over with a bad pass. Then, he missed a spinning shot in the lane after Atlanta passed on a chance at a tying 3-pointer. Indiana left the door open by missing its nal four free throws, including a pair by George with 7.5 seconds left when only one would have been enough to seal the victory. But the Pacers buckled down at the defensive end, forcing Antic to throw up a desperation 3 that clanked off the rim. The Pacers decided against benching Roy Hib bert to go with a smaller lineup against the Hawks, who have taken the 7-foot-2 center out of his com fort zone by spreading the court with their big men and taking advantage of every chance to run. Hibbert continued to struggle, with just six points and three rebounds in a little less than 25 minutes. But he did have his rst two blocks of the series, and his teammates took care of the rest. Cheered on by a raucous crowd at Philips Arena, where they even took down a curtain that normal ly covers part of the upper deck, the Hawks looked as though they were headed for a commanding lead in the series as they pushed out to their big gest lead, 54-44, early in the third quarter. But Millsap picked up two fouls just 7 seconds apart, giving him four in the game and forcing him to the bench for much of the period. The Pacers took advantage of the Atlanta stars absence, whit tling the decit down to 59-56 by the time he re turned. It was tight all the way in the fourth, and things got heated down the stretch. NBA FROM PAGE B1 of Famer Magic John son on Instagram which has since been removed. The man asked Stiviano not to broadcast her association with black people or bring black people to games. The man specically mentioned Magic John son on the recording, saying dont bring him to my games, OK? I will never go to a Clippers game again as long as Donald Sterling is the owner, Johnson responded on Twitter. He also said the alleged comments are a black eye for the NBA and said he felt bad that friends such as Clippers coach Doc Rivers and Clippers point guard Chris Paul had to work for Sterling. At a practice before the Clippers play Gold en State on Sunday, Riv ers said: As far as the comments, were not happy with them. Paul released a state ment through the play ers union that said: On behalf of the Na tional Basketball Play ers Association, this is a very serious issue which we will address aggressively. New NBA commis sioner Adam Silver was scheduled to address media Saturday night in Memphis, Tenn. be fore the Grizzlies play off game. On TNTs halftime studio show Satur day, host Charles Bar kley said: This is the rst test of Adam Sil ver. Hes got to suspend him right now. First of all, theyve got to prove thats his voice on that tape. But this is the rst big test for Adam Silver. You cant have this guy making statements like that. You have to suspend him and ne him immediately. NBA TV analyst and former player Chris Webber said that the NBA owners need to handle their own. A spokeswoman for the Rev. Al Sharptons National Action Network, Jacky Johnson, said the organization planned a protest outside Tuesday nights NBA playoff game in Los Angeles. In Dallas, where the Spurs were getting ready to play the Maver icks, San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich said: The comments are obviously disgusting. Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said I have plenty of opin ions, just not going to share them, fending off several inquiries before saying: Obviously if any business or entrepreneur says or does things that arent con gruent with what the organization is trying to convey, thats a problem. But its not my problem. Messages seeking comment from the Clippers were not re turned. Sterling, a real estate owner, bought the Clippers in 1981. He is the longest-tenured owner in the NBA since Lakers owner Jerry Buss died last year. He has been frequent ly criticized for his fru gal operation of the Clippers, although in recent years he has spent heavily to add stars such as Paul and Rivers, who led the team back to the playoffs in his rst year as coach. Former Clippers guard Baron Davis wrote on Twitter that Sterlings discrimination has been going on for a long time. Sterling has been involved in sever al lawsuits over the years, including ones with discrimination accusations. In November 2009, Sterling agreed to pay $2.73 million to settle allegations by the government that he refused to rent apart ments to Hispanics and blacks and to families with children. The Jus tice Department sued Sterling in August 2006 for allegations of hous ing discrimination in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles. In March 2011, Ster ling won a lawsuit against former Clippers general manager Elgin Baylor when a jury rejected the Hall of Famers claim of age discrimination and harassment. Baylor, who was 76 at the time, had sought about $2 mil lion after claiming he was forced out of the job he had held for 22 years. The team said Baylor left on his own and a jury awarded him nothing. Sterling is a courtside xture at Clippers home games. But he rarely visits the teams locker room at Staples Center, although he made an appearance in Decem ber 2012 after they had won their 11th straight game, when he led an awkward locker room cheer. OWNER FROM PAGE B1 Boyer said. Alexis hurt her wrist during the high-school season and has battled the mental block many athletes go through on their road to recovery. I shared with her that I dont ask of my student-athletes to do anything I have done myself. In college, I broke my femur in a football game. I explained to her that I completely understand the physical and mental challenges she was going through. Being able to relate to her situation, I think, helped her in overcom ing the mental obstacle of being healed. Molano competed in the second session of the meet. He need ed 132 kilograms (291 pounds) to qualify for nationals and hit of four-of-six lifts. He set a personal mark of 59 kilograms (130 pounds) in Snatch and another personal best of 78 kilograms (172 pound) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a re cord total of 137 kilo grams (302 pounds). Carlos is starting to truly understand the nuances that separates the strict judging of USA Weightlifting ver sus what a lot lifters get away with during high school season, Boyer said. Ultimately, competing in USA Weightlifting competitions will make anyone who also competes during high school season a better lifting and competitor. Rhone also lifted at 53 kilograms (116 pounds). She hit on ve-of-six lifts and nished with a personal record to tal of 94 kilograms (207 pounds). Warren Brown also represented the Iron Jungle, competing in the 77 kilogram (169 pounds) Junior catego ry. He is not eligible for nationals because of his age, Boyer said. Warren didnt have a lot of success during the Snatch portion of the competition and missed on all three of his attempts, Boyer said. Ive seen lifters do this before, but I have never had a club lifter of mine experience this. I felt bad for him, but it happens. There are days when your body just doesnt nish lifts. Boyer said Brown asked if he should even compete in the Cleanand-Jerk after missing all of his Snatch attempts. The coach encouraged the pupil to continue competing, explaining the impor tance of salvaging the day. Brown responded with a a personal record of 93 kilograms (205 pounds). Warren composed himself after the Snatch competition, Boy er said. He showed his true character. Boyer said Iron Jungle Weightlifting will likely have at least one more competition prior to the Youth Nationals, which will be held June 12 to June 15 at Port Orange Spruce Creek. IRON FROM PAGE B1

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Take 10% off of your first order! 352-326-5530www.THERMOCOOLair.com ** ALL OFFERS NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNT PROMOTION CODE: DC7772014All system installation offers assumes reconnection to existing refrigerant lines and ductwork. Horizontal installations will incur an additional fee. $3,277 offer assumes air conditioning installation using existing gas furnace. Certain restrictions apply. See www.THERMOCOOLair.com for more information. AUTO RACING JOHN ZENORAssociated PressBIRMINGHAM, Ala. Juan Pablo Montoya is still in the transition phase, where a fourthplace nish is good enough. The grace period wont necessarily last long for Montoya, who returned to IndyCar after ve seasons in For mula One and seven in NASCAR. He heads into race No. 3 today at Bar ber Motorsports Park with expectations still of contending quickly after the Top-5 nish at Long Beach, Calif. Montoya saw no need to get overly aggressive gunning for an even higher spot, a play-itsafe approach that is unlikely to continue much deeper into the season. I think it was the right thing under the circumstances, Tim Cindric, president of Penske Performance, said Friday. Later in the season, hell be disappointed with fourth and wed certainly be disap pointed if later in the season we were happy with fourth. Hes smart. He hasnt had all the success that hes had without understanding when to go and when not to. Certainly, I think lat er in the season that mind-set might be a bit different. In the meantime, Montoya is still effec tively a rookie at new tracks like Barber, a 2.38-mile road course. He practiced at the track in much cooler condi tions back in February. The goal for Montoya was to crack the top 10 at Long Beach on April 13, and he easily topped that standard. Now, Cindric said the team is hoping Montoya makes it into the second qualifying session and secures a Top12 start. Barbers going to be a bit of a challenge for him, because its a re ally close race, Cindric said. The amount of grip that there is, its very hard to pass. I think hes some body thats on cold tires here because itll be a three-stop race. I think youll see him gain more spots in the pits but qualifying will be tough for him again. Montoya had the eighth-fastest lap in practice Friday, at 1:09.1484. The fourthplace nish at Long Beach was better than hed had in practice or testing, but there are further indications hes getting closer to his form of 14 years ago. Beating Penske teammates Helio Castro neves and Will Power in a testing session is a step forward, too. We tested last week in Texas and I was quicker than my team mates, Montoya said. I think thats a good sign. He won his rst pole position in NASCAR some 40 miles down In terstate 20 at Talladega Superspeedway. That move came after Montoya spent ve seasons in Formula One following his Indianapolis 500 win in 2000. Now, hes back dealing with both technical and not so technical changes involved in getting comfortable in the driv ers seat in open-wheel racing, from adjusting to the braking zones to just getting comfortable. With NASCAR you drive with the elbows out, because the seat is really big so you have to drive with the elbows out, Montoya said. Here you have no el bow room, so you do a little wrist movement. In the beginning it was like, Oh my God. Now its good. I got in the car (Friday) morning and its becoming more nat ural. The next stop will be the Grand Prix of India napolis, followed by the Indy 500. Barber, which he calls a really technical track, is another opportunity to get better before IndyCars sig nature race. This is the last chance, the way I look at it, to get really good before we get to Indy, Montoya said. Indys the key. We want to real ly peak at Indy, so well see. In Alabama, he has the benet of team mates Power a twotime winner at Barber and Castroneves, who won the tracks inaugural IndyCar race in 2010. Castroneves isnt sure the veteran Montoya needs many pointers. He certainly came up very quick, Castro neves said. His background is with openwheel, so its like riding a bicycle. Everything is coming back. There was not much advice from us.Montoyas transition continues in Alabama ALEX GALLARDO / AP Juan Pablo Montoya drives through a turn in the IndyCar Grand Prix of Long Beach on April 13 in Long Beach, Calif. He continues his transition from NASCAR to IndyCar today in Birmingham, Ala.

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Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held May 17 this tournament will usher in a new season. For infor mation, call the shop at 352-7420036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKShellcracker are being caught on worms. Catfish are biting on shrimp. Pine Island has a full sup ply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of ar tificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESA few stripers are being caught on saltwater shrimp and lures with silver spoons. A few specks are still being picked up on minnows. The shell cracker action has slowed with the passage of the most recent cold front. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEShellcracker activity has been strong. Shell cracker are biting on grass shrimp. Bass action has been very good. They are biting on spinner baits and soft plastic worms. Bluegill and speck have been biting on grass shrimp and worms. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURGAction has been a little slower with the passage of the last cold front. A few fish are being caught from the dock. In addition to canoes and rowboats Black Bass now rents kayaks. Minnows, red worms and night crawlers sales contin ue to be strong, suggesting specks, bream and catfish are biting. Want to try something new, try fishing from a kayak. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTOSome specks are still spawning in the canals in Lake Carlton and Lake Beauclaire among the cat tails, brush and fallen trees where eel grass and lily pads flour ish. Specks are being caught in ap proximately 10 feet of water in the Apopka-Beauclaire canal and out from Deer Island. They are being caught on Rons Zip jigs and small ice jigs fished around 5 to 6 feet covering a lot of water. On Lake Carlton, drift the jig tipped minnow across the lake. Post spawn bass are biting early in the morning in the mouths of residential canals on noisy top water baits like Rat-L-Traps. Lots of hybrid bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feeder creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. A mixed bag of fish are being caught in Lake Monroe fishing the channel and deep water. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfnf tb brbff t fff tnf trnfn f rf tbfn brbnnn t t trnf rffrff f rnf tbfffn brbfn tff fn tf trff STAFF REPORTLake Pierce bass an glers will be happy to know the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) has stocked 160,000 largemouth bass fingerlings into the 3,728-acre Polk County lake. The FWC stocked 2.5inch fish, from its Flor ida Bass Conservation Center at Richloam, in Sumter County, to supplement low natural reproduction attributed to a relatively small adult bass population, documented in FWC samples. The larger-than-normal fingerlings we stocked have growth advantages over smaller finger lings because they can readily consume abundant larval shad found in the lake, said FWC fishery biologist Chris Wiley. Stockings on April 16 and 17 should help en sure the viability of the bass shery, while lake managers wrestle with the problem of an aging lake, characterized by al gal blooms and signi cant muck deposits over portions of the lakes bottom. It typically takes one to two years before stocked bass become available for anglers to catch but in the long-run, hopes are that many of these bass will become the parents of future generations of Lake Pierce bass. For more information on freshwater shing, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and select Freshwater or call the FWC Lakeland regional of fice at 863-648-3200.Bass fingerlings stocked in Polk lake by FWC

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 14 10 .583 6-4 W-1 7-4 7-6 Baltimore 11 11 .500 2 6-4 L-1 4-5 7-6 Boston 12 13 .480 2 1 6-4 W-2 5-8 7-5 Toronto 11 13 .458 3 1 3-7 L-4 4-7 7-6 Tampa Bay 10 13 .435 3 2 3-7 L-3 7-7 3-6 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 12 9 .571 6-4 L-1 9-5 3-4 Minnesota 12 11 .522 1 6-4 W-1 6-5 6-6 Chicago 12 12 .500 1 4-6 W-1 7-4 5-8 Kansas City 11 11 .500 1 6-4 W-1 6-3 5-8 Cleveland 11 13 .458 2 1 4-6 L-2 7-6 4-7 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 15 8 .652 6-4 W-2 6-6 9-2 Texas 14 9 .609 1 8-2 L-1 9-4 5-5 Los Angeles 11 12 .478 4 1 5-5 L-1 3-6 8-6 Seattle 9 13 .409 5 2 2-8 W-2 4-5 5-8 Houston 7 17 .292 8 5 2-8 L-3 3-9 4-8 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 15 7 .682 7-3 W-2 7-3 8-4 New York 13 10 .565 2 7-3 W-3 7-7 6-3 Washington 14 11 .560 2 5-5 W-2 9-7 5-4 Philadelphia 11 12 .478 4 2 5-5 L-1 4-5 7-7 Miami 10 13 .435 5 3 5-5 L-2 9-4 1-9 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 17 6 .739 7-3 W-2 8-5 9-1 St. Louis 13 12 .520 5 1 4-6 L-1 5-3 8-9 Cincinnati 11 12 .478 6 2 7-3 L-1 4-5 7-7 Pittsburgh 10 15 .400 8 4 3-7 W-1 6-8 4-7 Chicago 7 15 .318 9 5 3-7 L-3 5-8 2-7 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 14 10 .583 5-5 W-3 7-4 7-6 Colorado 13 11 .542 1 7-3 W-1 8-4 5-7 Los Angeles 13 11 .542 1 4-6 L-2 5-8 8-3 San Diego 11 14 .440 3 3 4-6 L-2 7-6 4-8 Arizona 8 18 .308 7 6 4-6 W-3 2-11 6-7 FRIDAYS GAMESKansas City 5, Baltimore 0 L.A. Angels 13, N.Y. Yankees 1 Boston 8, Toronto 1 Detroit 10, Minnesota 6 Oakland 12, Houston 5 Chicago White Sox 9, Tampa Bay 6 Seattle 6, Texas 5 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 1FRIDAYS GAMESWashington 11, San Diego 1 N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 3 Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 4 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 0 Arizona 5, Philadelphia 4 Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 11 innings San Francisco 5, Cleveland 1SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 4, L.A. Angels 3 Boston 7, Toronto 6 Minnesota 5, Detroit 3 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Kansas City at Baltimore, late Oakland at Houston, late Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, late Texas at Seattle, lateSATURDAYS GAMESWashington 4, San Diego 0 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 1 Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, late Cincinnati at Atlanta, late Miami at N.Y. Mets, late Philadelphia at Arizona, late Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late JOHN MINCHILLO / AP New York Yankees relief pitcher David Robertson throws the nal pitch to strike out Los Angeles Angels batter Howie Kendrick (47) to close out Saturdays game at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Yankees won, 4-3. TODAYS GAMESBoston (Lester 2-3) at Toronto (Dickey 1-3), 1:07 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 2-2) at Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 1-1), 1:35 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 3-1) at Minnesota (Gibson 3-1), 2:10 p.m. Oakland (Milone 0-1) at Houston (McHugh 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 3-1) at Chicago White Sox (Undecided), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 0-3) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Harrison 0-0) at Seattle (Maurer 0-0), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 3-0), 8:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESMiami (Koehler 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 1-1), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 2-2) at Atlanta (Teheran 2-1), 1:35 p.m. San Diego (Kennedy 1-3) at Washington (Jordan 0-3), 1:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Hammel 3-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 3-0), 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 1-1) at St. Louis (Wainwright 4-1), 2:15 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 0-3) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 1-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Burnett 0-1) at Arizona (McCarthy 0-4), 4:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Viciedo, Chicago, .370; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .364; AlRamirez, Chicago, .358; Wieters, Baltimore, .357; RDavis, Detroit, .354; MeCabrera, Toronto, .346. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 23; Donaldson, Oakland, 19; Mauer, Minnesota, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 18; Bautista, Toronto, 18; Plouffe, Minnesota, 18. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 27; Colabello, Minnesota, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 23; Pujols, Los Angeles, 21; Donaldson, Oakland, 20; Brantley, Cleveland, 19; KSuzuki, Min nesota, 19. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 36; AlRamirez, Chicago, 34; Rios, Texas, 30; Donaldson, Oakland, 29; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 29; 6 tied at 28. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 10; Beltran, New York, 9; Colabello, Minnesota, 9; Donaldson, Oakland, 9; Pe droia, Boston, 9; 6 tied at 8. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Bourn, Cleveland, 2; Ellsbury, New York, 2; Fuld, Minnesota, 2; Infante, Kansas City, 2; AJackson, Detroit, 2; LMartin, Texas, 2; IStewart, Los Angeles, 2. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 9; Pujols, Los Angeles, 9; Donaldson, Oakland, 7; Dozier, Minnesota, 7; Bau tista, Toronto, 6; NCruz, Baltimore, 6; 7 tied at 5. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 9; Andrus, Texas, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 8; Ellsbury, New York, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 6; Dozier, Minnesota, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6. PITCHING: MPerez, Texas, 4-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 4-1; 18 tied at 3. ERA: MPerez, Texas, 1.42; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.54; Darvish, Texas, 1.61; Kazmir, Oakland, 1.62; Feldman, Houston, 1.69; Ventura, Kansas City, 1.80; Shields, Kansas City, 1.91. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Detroit, 44; FHernandez, Seattle, 43; Price, Tampa Bay, 40; Lester, Boston, 36; Tanaka, New York, 35; Shields, Kansas City, 35; Sabathia, New York, 35. SAVES: Axford, Cleveland, 8; Holland, Kansas City, 6; TomHunter, Baltimore, 6; Santos, Toronto, 5; Soria, Texas, 5; Perkins, Minnesota, 5; 5 tied at 4.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .398; Tulowitzki, Colo rado, .380; YMolina, St. Louis, .361; Utley, Philadelphia, .358; Freeman, Atlanta, .357; Bonifacio, Chicago, .353. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 20; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 20; EYoung, New York, 19; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; Braun, Milwaukee, 17; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 17. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 27; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 20; Trumbo, Arizona, 19; Braun, Milwaukee, 18; Morneau, Colorado, 18. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 34; Blackmon, Colorado, 33; Uribe, Los Angeles, 31; Bonifacio, Chicago, 30; ECabrera, San Diego, 30; Freeman, Atlanta, 30; YMo lina, St. Louis, 30. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 10; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 9. TRIPLES: Denora, San Diego, 2; CGomez, Milwaukee, 2; Harper, Washington, 2; Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Hill, Ar izona, 2; Puig, Los Angeles, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2; EYoung, New York, 2. HOME RUNS: Belt, San Francisco, 7; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 7; Trumbo, Arizona, 7; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 6; Morse, San Francisco, 6; Stanton, Miami, 6; JUpton, Atlanta, 6; Walker, Pittsburgh, 6. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 12; EYoung, New York, 11; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9 PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 4-0; Machi, San Francisco, 4-0; Wainwright, St. Louis, 4-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 4-1; Lohse, Milwaukee, 4-1; 15 tied at 3. ERA: Harang, Atlanta, 0.85; Simon, Cincinnati, 1.30; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.38; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.42; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.46; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.53; AWood, Atlanta, 1.54. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 53; Fernandez, Miami, 47; Greinke, Los Angeles, 40; Cueto, Cincinnati, 39; ClLee, Philadelphia, 38; Lynn, St. Louis, 36; Wacha, St. Louis, 35; AWood, Atlanta, 35; Wainwright, St. Louis, 35. SAVES: FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 10; Street, San Diego, 8; Jansen, Los Angeles, 8; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 7; Hawkins, Colorado, 7; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 7; Papelbon, Philadel phia, 6; AReed, Arizona, 6. Nationals 4, Padres 0 San Diego W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi ECarer ss 4 0 0 0 Span cf 5 0 1 1 Denor lf 4 0 1 0 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 Venale rf 4 0 0 0 W erth rf 4 1 2 0 Gyorko 2b 4 0 1 0 LaRoch 1b 3 1 1 1 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 3 1 Amarst cf 3 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 1 Petersn 3b 3 0 0 0 F rndsn lf 3 1 1 0 Rivera c 2 0 1 0 Leon c 4 0 0 0 Grandl ph-c 0 0 0 0 Roar k p 3 0 1 0 Cashnr p 1 0 0 0 Roach p 0 0 0 0 Nady ph 1 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 T otals 33 4 10 4 San Diego 000 000 000 0 Washington 300 001 00x 4 EE.Cabrera (3), Alonso (1), Gyorko (3), LaRoche (2). DPWashington 1. LOBSan Diego 4, Washington 9. 2BDesmond (4). SBDesmond (1). SCashner, Roark. SFEspinosa. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Cashner L,2-3 6 9 4 4 1 5 Roach 1 1 0 0 0 1 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Washington Roark W,2-0 9 3 0 0 1 8 HBPby Thayer (Frandsen). UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jim Joyce. T:19. A,590 (41,408).Yankees 4, Angels 3 Los Angeles Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Cowgill rf 5 0 1 0 Ellsur y cf 4 0 1 0 Trout cf 3 1 2 1 Jeter ss 4 0 1 0 Pujols dh 5 1 2 0 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 ASorin rf 4 0 1 0 Aybar ss 4 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 Iannett c 4 0 2 1 T eixeir 1b 3 1 0 0 Boesch pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 3 1 2 0 IStewrt 1b 3 0 1 0 BRor ts 2b 3 1 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 KJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Shuck lf 3 0 0 0 JMr phy c 3 1 2 3 Ibanez ph 1 0 0 0 Conger c 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 3 9 2 T otals 31 4 7 3 Los Angeles 100 200 000 3 New York 030 010 00x 4 EB.Roberts (3). LOBLos Angeles 10, New York 6. 2BIannetta (5). HRTrout (6), J.Murphy (1). SBTrout (3), Gardner (6). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles H.Santiago L,0-4 4 1/3 6 4 4 1 3 Jepsen 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Maronde 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Kohn 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Nuno 4 1/3 5 3 3 2 4 Betances W,1-0 2 1 0 0 1 3 Kelley H,3 1 1/3 2 0 0 1 1 Thornton H,7 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Dav.Robertson S,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBPby Frieri (Gardner), by H.Santiago (Teixeira). BalkH.Santiago, Betances. UmpiresHome, Tripp Gibson; First, Bill Welke; Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, CB Bucknor. T:05. A,908 (49,642).Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 6 Boston T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 Re yes ss 3 1 0 0 Victorn rf 4 1 0 0 MeCar r lf 5 1 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 1 1 0 0 Bautist dh 5 2 3 2 Carp 1b 3 2 1 0 F rncsc 1b-3b 4 1 1 1 GSizmr lf 2 1 1 2 Na varr c 4 1 3 1 Przyns c 3 1 1 4 Rasms cf 5 0 1 0 Mdlrks 3b 4 1 1 1 La wrie 3b-2b 5 0 2 0 JHerrr ss 4 0 0 0 Sier ra rf 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 0 0 0 Encrnc ph-1b 2 0 1 1 Goins 2b 3 0 1 0 Diaz ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 7 5 7 T otals 40 6 13 5 Boston 006 010 000 7 Toronto 300 000 021 6 DPToronto 2. LOBBoston 4, Toronto 11. 2BCarp (3), G.Sizemore (3), Bautista (4). HRPierzynski (2), Middlebrooks (2), Bautista (7), Francisco (2). CS Pedroia (2). IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz W,1-2 7 6 3 3 3 3 Tazawa 1/3 4 2 2 0 0 Capuano H,3 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 Uehara S,5-5 1 1/3 3 1 1 0 2 Toronto Morrow L,1-2 2 2/3 0 4 4 8 1 Jenkins 1 2/3 5 3 3 0 2 Loup 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Cecil 1 0 0 0 1 2 Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 0 Santos 1 0 0 0 0 2 WPBuchholz. PBNavarro. UmpiresHome, Jeff Kellogg; First, Marty Foster; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Rob Drake. T:23. A,322 (49,282).Twins 5, Tigers 3 Detroit Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 Dozier 2b 2 1 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 1 3 0 Mauer dh 2 0 0 1 MiCarr 1b 4 1 1 1 Plouffe 3b 2 0 1 2 VMrtnz dh 3 1 1 2 Flor mn ss 1 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 4 0 2 0 Colaell 1b 3 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 0 0 K ubel lf 4 0 0 0 AnRmn ss 3 0 0 0 Pinto c 3 1 1 1 JMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0 Fuld rf 3 1 1 0 Holady c 2 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 1 1 0 Avila ph-c 1 0 0 0 EEscor ss-3b 3 1 0 0 RDavis lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 33 3 8 3 T otals 26 5 4 4 Detroit 200 000 001 3 Minnesota 000 040 01x 5 EHoladay (2), Fuld (1). DPDetroit 1, Minnesota 1. LOBDetroit 5, Minnesota 7. 2BTor.Hunter (6), Mi.Cabrera (7), A.Jackson (6), Fuld (4), A.Hicks (3). HRV.Martinez (4), Pinto (5). SBA.Jackson (2), Fuld (2). CSDozier (1). SE.Escobar. SFV.Martinez. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit A.Sanchez 2 2/3 0 0 0 2 2 Ortega L,0-1 1 1/3 0 4 4 4 1 Coke 2 2/3 2 0 0 2 2 Alburquerque 1 1/3 2 1 1 0 4 Minnesota P.Hughes W,2-1 7 4 2 1 0 6 Burton H,4 1 2 0 0 1 0 Perkins S,6-7 1 2 1 1 0 2 Ortega pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBPby Ortega (Plouffe). WPCoke. UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Brian ONora; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T:13. A,122 (39,021).Pirates 6, Cardinals 1 Pittsburgh St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Marte lf 3 1 0 0 MCr pnt 3b 3 1 0 0 JHrrsn 3b 4 1 1 0 JhP erlt ss 3 0 1 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 1 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 1 GSnchz 1b 3 1 1 2 MAdms 1b 4 0 2 0 I.Davis ph-1b 0 1 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 0 0 NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 Craig rf 4 0 1 0 Tabata rf 4 1 3 1 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 TSnchz c 4 0 1 2 L yons p 1 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Ja y ph 1 0 0 0 Pimntl p 1 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 F ornatr p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 PAlvrz ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 6 7 6 T otals 32 1 5 1 Pittsburgh 000 400 002 6 St. Louis 000 010 000 1 LOBPittsburgh 3, St. Louis 9. 2BG.Sanchez (3), Jh.Peralta (5), Holliday (7). SBBourjos (2). SMercer. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Liriano 2 2 0 0 2 2 Pimentel W,2-0 2 2/3 2 1 1 2 3 J.Hughes 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 1 Ju.Wilson H,1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Watson H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 1 St. Louis Lyons L,0-2 6 4 4 4 1 4 Maness 2 1 0 0 0 1 Fornataro 2/3 2 2 2 1 0 Choate 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Liriano pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. PBT.Sanchez. UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Will Little. T:02. A,254 (45,399).Giants 5, Indians 3 Cleveland San F rancisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 2 2 0 P agan cf 3 0 1 1 Swisher 1b 5 1 2 1 P ence rf 4 0 1 2 Kipnis 2b 5 0 1 2 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 CSantn 3b 3 0 0 0 P osey c 3 1 1 1 Brantly lf 3 0 0 0 Mor se lf 3 1 1 0 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 J.P erez lf 1 0 0 0 YGoms c 4 0 1 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 4 0 2 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 McAlst p 2 0 1 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Chsnhll ph 1 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 0 C.Lee p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 2 1 0 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0 Linccm p 1 0 0 0 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 JGutr rz p 0 0 0 0 Giambi ph 0 0 0 0 Blanco ph 1 1 1 1 Kluber pr 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Arias 3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 3 9 3 T otals 29 5 6 5 Cleveland 101 010 000 3 San Francisco 000 041 00x 5 EMcAllister (2). DPSan Francisco 1. LOBCleveland 9, San Francisco 3. 2BBourn (1), Swisher 2 (6), Pa gan (6). HRPosey (5). SBBlanco (1). SFPagan. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland McAllister L,3-1 5 5 4 4 1 6 C.Lee 1/3 1 1 1 0 1 Outman 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Shaw 2 0 0 0 0 1 San Francisco Lincecum 4 2/3 9 3 2 2 3 J.Gutierrez W,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Machi H,2 1 2/3 0 0 0 1 1 Affeldt H,2 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Romo S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Shaw (Posey), by Romo (Giambi). PBPosey. UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:47. A,088 (41,915). This Date in Baseball April 27 1909 The Chicago White Sox win their third straight 1-0 game over St. Louis in three days. 1918 The Brooklyn Dodgers got into the win column after a major league record 0-9 start, with a 5-3 victory over the New York Giants in the opening game of a doubleheader. 1929 Brooklyn relief pitcher Clise Dudley homered on the rst major league pitch he saw at Philadelphias Baker Bowl. 1930 Chicago White Sox rst baseman Bud Clancy had no chances in a nine-inning game against St. Louis. 1944 Jim Tobin of the Braves pitched a no-hitter against the Dodgers in Boston, winning 2-0. He also hit a homer. 1947 Babe Ruth Day at Yankee Stadium drew a crowd of more than 58,000 to honor the ailing star. In the game, Sid Hudson of the Washington Senators beat Spud Chandler 1-0. 1963 Two two-sport players pitched in the fourth inning in a game at Fenway park. NBA players Gene Conley of the Celtics and Dave DeBusschere of the Knicks pitched for their respective Major League Baseball teams, Conley for the Red Sox and DeBusschere for the White Sox. The Red Sox won 9-5. 1968 Tom Phoebus of the Orioles no-hit the Boston Red Sox 6-0 at Baltimore. 1973 Kansas Citys Steve Busby pitched his rst of two career no-hitters with a 3-0 victory over the Tigers at Detroit. 1983 Walter Johnsons record of 3,508 career strikeouts was eclipsed by Houstons Nolan Ryan a record which stood for 56 years. Ryan fanned Montreal pinch-hitter Brad Mills in the eighth inning of the Astros 4-2 win over the Expos. 1994 Scott Erickson, who allowed the most hits in the majors the previous season, pitched Minnesotas rst no-hitter in 27 years as the Twins beat Milwaukee 6-0. 1996 Barry Bonds became the fourth major leaguer to amass 300 homers and 300 steals when he homered in the third inning of the San Francisco Giants 6-3 victory over the Florida Marlins. His father, Bobby Bonds, godfather Willie Mays and Andre Dawson are the only other players to reach 300-300. 2000 Chicago White Sox shortstop Jose Valentin hit for the cycle and drove in ve runs in a 13-4 victory over the Baltimore Orioles. Valentin hit for the cycle in single, double, triple and home run order. 2002 Derek Lowe, who struggled to keep his job as a closer last season, pitched a no-hitter against Tampa Bay. Brent Abernathy was the only baserunner Lowe allowed in Bostons 10-0 victory. 2003 Kevin Millwood pitched a no-hitter to lead the Philadelphia Phillies over the San Francisco Giants 1-0. Millwood struck out 10 and walked three. 2005 Mark Grudzielanek hit for the cycle in his rst four at-bats in St. Louis 6-3 victory over Milwaukee. 2005 Jose Mesa earned his 300th career save in Pittsburghs 2-0 victory over Houston. Mesa became the 19th pitcher in major league history with 300. 2007 Kirk Radomski, a former New York Mets clubhouse employee, pleaded guilty to distributing steroids to major league players for a decade and agreed to help baseballs steroids investigators. 2009 West Virginia States Bo Darby hit home runs in ve consecutive at-bats over two games, including four in one contest. The sophomore outelder homered in his rst four trips to the plate against Salem International. He also connected in his nal at-bat two days earlier against the University of Charleston. Darby homered twice more in the second game of the doubleheader, giving him six for the day with 14 RBIs.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014

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Oppose corporate greedIn the April 6 edition of the Daily Commercial there was a great article by Kevin G. Hall, of the McClatchy Washington Bureau, U.S. companies chipping away at retiree benets. Employees need to get organized and unionize against these companies who only show their support through their stockholders and their CEOs large salaries. The poor and middle class Americans need to boycott these companies. And everyone in America needs to vote Democrat in upcoming elections for a better Congress who will increase the minimum wage and protect Social Security, allow immigrants who were born here to become U.S. citizens and also keep womens rights intact. LINDA GREEN | LeesburgThe founding fathers would have been pleasedRuss Sloan in his diatribe on Easter Sunday on the welfare system wrote, The Preamble to the Constitution reads, provide for the common defense and promote the general welfare, not vice versa. That is absolutely correct, but he fails to mention the Preamble has no legal standing when we interpret the Constitution. The Founding Fathers in their great wisdom wrote in Article 1 Section 8, Congress shall have the power to, Provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States ... Sloan has a propensity for not telling the whole story, just what ts his ideological beliefs. The founding fathers also added in Article 1 section 8, to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the fore going powers ... In essence, they gave the Congress the power to make any law necessary and proper to provide for the general welfare. Sloan also wrote, We have so distorted the intent of our founding fathers that they would be in shock to see what a welfare mentality we have accepted. I do not have the clairvoyance Russ seems to claim, but most probably would be pleased to see Congress has used the power they gave them to provide for the general welfare. There are some things they probably would be shocked about, like non-property owners, women and blacks voting, that corporations are people, money is speech and a black man is president. MARVIN JACOBSON | ClermontNot the place of the Supreme CourtI am referencing an article on the front page of the Daily Commercial on April 17 by Jim Turner of the News Service of Florida, Amazon to start collecting sales taxes. The article goes on to say if the entity has a presence in the state that a person is ordering from, then they will be charged sales tax. The Supreme Court ruled some years ago that if the business had a presence in a state that a person or ders from then a tax can be collected. This is a classic example of the court legislating from the bench. Article 1 section 9-10, states that no tax can be collected from items crossing any state line or from port to port. The proper way to handle it would have been to amend the Constitution but they knew that the amendment would never y. I imagine that political inuence was exercised in this process. I do not pay sales tax on items ordered across state lines. If the shipper hints at charging a tax, I cancel the order. I refuse to be a part of this tax, tax, tax! It is just another way of draining the citi zen of a few more drops of blood in the form of taxes. I would rather do without the product than pay the tax. The state of Florida had to return $700 million to people who were charged a tax for bringing their cars into the state. The per son taxed had to make application for it. The state should have been required to purge the archives and see who paid the tax and notify them at their last known address. But then again, they never do the right thing. This ruling by the Supreme Court should have been revisited by a more competent Court than made the ruling. I do remember that one of the judges on the ruling court had a stroke at the time the 5 to 4 decision was made. I have no problem with a 6 to 3, or 7 to 2, but a 5 to 4 is no good. D.J. LYNCH | WildwoodThe generosity of bikersI have lived in Leesburg for 24 years and I have been a biker for more than 50 years. Having said that, here are the good, bad and the ugly sides of Bikefest. I have gone to every Bikefest since the rst one. I even have the original T-shirt. The good is that the Leesburg Partnership puts on a great rally. The bad is that non-bikers hate it. Now the ugly. The Sound of Money. That was the front-page headline on Easter Sunday in the Daily Commercial. Bikers are the most generous group of people on the earth. They will assemble in masses to donate to charities. So why does the Partnership and every vendor screw them? Basically, Leesburg is a charity, a depressed community. Hundreds of thousands of bikers come to Leesburg each year and bail them out by pouring millions into the economy. What do they get for this? Michael Vassell, general m anager of Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites in Tavares, says this, A standard room normally goes for $101 to $125, but during Bikefest that goes up to $150 because rates are based on demand. Dont you really mean greed? I remember when beer cost $2 at Bikefest. It is now $5 to $6, not counting the cost of a commemorative cup. Parking used to be free. Food prices have soared because the vendors have to pay so much for their spaces. The list goes on, and on and on. Leesburg, think about this: The bikers come here to help, and what do they get? What would happen if Bikefest came and no one showed up? Where are your millions then? Get back to reality before you become Daytona. A lot of bikers dont go there any more for the same reasons I mentioned above. Be thankful for the bikers. Dont screw them. THOMAS J. ZAKLUKIEWICZ Leesburg Voiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clar ity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@ dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEKIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANSC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORWhen the Florida Legislatures an nual session ends next month and campaigning for state ofces be gins, incumbents seeking re-election to state ofces will brag how they have kept taxes low. Their claims will be correct. Florida ranked 47th in total per capi ta taxation heading into this years ses sion. Whats more, legislators are likely to reduce some revenues this year by, for ex ample, lowering vehicle-registration fees. In this context, Florida TaxWatch, an in dependent organization that studies state taxation and spending policies, cites these state revenue sources: lottery proceeds, documentary stamps on real estate trans actions, a sales tax (6 percent) and taxes on utilities, cellphones, motor fuels, insur ance, alcoholic beverages and tobacco. Indeed, Floridas statewide taxes are low compared with those in other states. But, theres more. Floridas place on the bottom rungs of state-level taxation and total revenue are due in part to an extraordinary reliance on local governments not only to provide services, but to generate dollars. Thanks to the folks at TaxWatch, who recently issued their 2014 How Florida Compares report, we know that: %  en The state has the fth-highest per centage (50 percent) of state and local taxes generated by local governments. %  en Florida has the second-highest per centage (55 percent) of state and local revenue generated by local governments. %  en Local revenues include not only property taxes but local-option sales taxes, impact fees, franchise fees for utilities and special assessments. In general, cities, counties and other local entities in Florida are assigned and assume disproportionately greater responsibility for courts, social services, infrastructure, health care for indigent patients and education. Nowhere is the state governments reliance on locals more evident than in public education. The Florida Constitution requires the state to adequately fund high-quality education and also prohibits the state from levying a property tax. Yet, each year, the Legislature requires school boards to levy property taxes at specic rates. Even though local, per capita revenues in Florida rank seventh nationwide and local, per capita taxes rank 22nd, the combined state and local tax burden is below average. Ranked 33rd, Floridas state and local governments collect $5,599 per person in total revenues; the average in the United States is $6,303. In terms of state and local taxes, Florida ranks 37th $3,420 per capita; the national average is $4,287. It would be polite for incumbents in state ofces to thank local governments and their taxpayers for making them look good. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST FILE PHOTO The states pass-the-buck Legislature

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 OTHERVOICESVoices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHERVOICESOTHERVOICES I am constant ly amazed by the frequent exam ples, across Ameri ca, of those who pro fess tolerance yet are extremely intolerant if you disagree with their viewpoints. The most recent and notable example of intolerance was the forced resignation of Mozilla co-founder Brendan Eich. His dastardly action which forced his resignation was the revelation that he legally gave $1,000 to Califor nias Prop 8 Measure in 2008 which banned gay marriage in that state. His position on gay marriage in 2008 was the same as that of President Obama and Hillary Clinton. No matter. The spokeswoman hypocrite for Mozilla, Executive Chairwoman Mitchell Baker, issued the following statement after the forced resignation: Mozilla believes in both equality and freedom of speech. And you need free speech to ght for equality. Figur ing out how to stand for both at the same time can be hard. Really! I would wager a friendly cup of coffee that Chairwoman Baker voted for president in 2008 knowing that Obamas stated view on marriage was that it is between one man and one woman. In 2008 that was the same position as Brendan Eich. Another recent example of intolerance from those professing toler ance comes to us cour tesy of the students and faculty of Rutgers University. The administration at Rutgers had invited one of the most accomplished women in America, Condoleeza Rice, to be their commencement speaker. What apparently drew the ire of the faculty and students was her support of President Bush in ending the tyrannical regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. We had gone to war with Hussein to end his aggression in Kuwait, and we knew he had used chemical weapons against his own people (the Kurds). His continuous refusal to let U.N. inspectors explore his possible weapons of mass destruction sites led to Bushs decision. Condoleeza Rice concurred with that decision. At this point I expect some readers to utter the phrase Bush lied and people died. I would like to remind those that feel that way the following assessments made by Democrats regarding Hussein: We know he has stored secret supplies of biological and chemical weapons throughout his country, said Al Gore on Sept. 23, 2002. Then Senator John Kerry said: I will be voting to give the president of the United States the authority to use force, if necessary, to disarm Saddam Hussein because I believe that a deadly arsenal of weapons of mass destruction in his hands is a real and grave threat to our security. Finally there was Senator Ted Kennedy who said, We have known for many years that Saddam Hussein is seeking and developing weapons of mass destruction. (Sept. 27, 2002) I can cite similar quotes from Hillary Clinton, Rep. Nancy Peolsi, Senators Carl Levin and Jay Rockfeller and more. Getting back to the credentials of Condoleeza Rice. Born in Alabama, before desegregation, she received her masters at Notre Dame and her PhD from the University of Denvers Graduate School of International Studies in 1981. In 1993, Rice became the rst African American to serve as provost of Stanford and she also served as the universitys chief budget and academic ofcer. She went on to become the rst black woman to serve as our nations national security advisor, as well as secretary of state. But all of these accomplishments did not satisfy the academic hypocrites at Rutgers. Apparently they ignored the Democrat leaders taking the same position as she did regarding Iraq. Our colleges and universities are supposedly bastions of free speech and where ideas and concepts are exchanged. I wish. Check commencement speakers at both public and private colleges. In 2012 only one Republican elected ofcial was invited to speak at a top 50 liber al arts college and that was at the University of Richmond in his home state. The top 100 universities invited three Republican ofce holders, but all three spoke within their state. Conservative commencement speakers are on the endangered species list. This comes as no surprise as the majority of the faculties at universities who champion tolerance exclude conservative thought on campus. Dont take my word for it, go Google the conservative or Republican speakers at colleges and see how many times rude and disruptive behavior, including pie throwing, is conducted among our campuses of tolerance. Academically, we too often tolerate most anything on campus except conservative political thought and speech. RUSS SLOANGUEST COLUMNIST The intolerance of those espousing tolerance The last month has been a very busy and successful time for the Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County. We owe it to the great showing of community support from local clubs, businesses and volunteers who supported four of our largest fundraising events in March and April. Our annual Paper Shredding event (sponsored by the Rainbow Family and Friends Club, Buffalo Ridge Animal Hospital and Hills Shred Express), Fun Time Follies (sponsored by show producers Kim and Jim Krum and their talented performers) and the Above Par For Animals Golf Ball Drop (sponsored by Remax Premier Realty of The Villages/Ocala, George Nahas Chevrolet, Nathan Thomas State Farm Insurance, Columbia ParCar) and the Villages Charter Middle School Builders Club (sponsored by the Kiwanis and HighFive Frozen Yogurt) pet supply drive have raised numerous donations to help our non-prot continue with much needed community programs as the challenges of summertime in Florida fast approach. Spay/neuter funding and pet food assistance are only made possible through donations from the community. As April is also Volunteer Appreciation Month, we would like to acknowledge the tremendous kindness shown by the HS/SPCA volunteers for their compassion, teamwork and gifts of kindness to allow the many helpless animals we in turn help nd happier lives. Without our volunteers and contributions from the community, we couldnt do the necessary work we do to better the lives of both animals and their people in Sumter County. Stay tuned for upcoming events we have planned and please dont forget that the need continues during the difcult summer months. Donations will be accepted at local dropoff sites including the shelter at 994 County Road 529A in Lake Panasoffkee, or mail to the Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County, Inc., P.O. Box 67, Lake Panasoffkee, Fla., 33538, or online at www.hsspca.org. CLAUDIA LABBE | Public Relations Chairperson SPCA of Sumter CountyThanks for your kindness to our animalsRepublican leaders are getting ready for elections in Novem ber, 2016. Ron Paul wants the GOP to appeal to those voters who are usually ignored by Republicans. He refers to minorities. Ted Cruz wants a traditional view of the GOP, which he says is growth and opportunity for the Hispanic community. He said, Washington D.C. aint listening. Mike Huckabee enjoyed applause from the audience when he mentioned Benghazi, the IRS, and photos at voting polls. All three GOP politicians agreed that the GOP is at a crossroads because many Republicans are saddened by the lack of progress promised by conservatives. Then Donald Trump took the microphone and told the GOP audience that he is passionate about his new real estate development in Florida. Trump said, Im a builder. He promised the audience that he wants to build a big fence along the southern border of the U.S. It will be a fence like youve never seen, he promised. The audience roared. The three GOP leaders probably think the great wall of Texas will provide some growth opportunity for common labor ers. It appears that the GOP leaders probably have not read about other great walls around the world that were built to keep low class people out of the promised land, and each wall is a failure. Here is a list of walls that tried to keep people from migrating: Hadrians Wall in England. The Great Wall of China. The Walls of Jericho. Trajans Wall in Romania. The Ber lin Wall came tumbling down. Belfast Wall in Ireland. The Wailing Wall, Jerusalem. Walls of Ston, Croatia. Walls of Babylon. Walls of Troy, Turkey. Walls of Constantinople, Turkey. Aurelian Walls in Rome. Ron Paul, Ted Cruz, and Donald Trump appear to be the best GOP candidates today. However, anybody can see that their ideas for the GOP are like a mental wall which looks to be as ineffective as the stone walls listed above. Please review the list of walls. ROBERT WESOLOWSKI The VillagesA party with too many wallsRon Paul, Ted Cruz, and Donald Trump appear to be the best GOP candidates today. However, anybody can see that their ideas for the GOP are like a mental wall which looks to be as ineffective as the stone walls listed above.

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Cruisin352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com ERIK LACITISThe Seattle TimesThey crank up their Ford Mustangs, among them, a 1965 Fastback and a 2012 Boss. You can hear that growl. This is a real American car. No whiny sounds like in the Euro pean makes. A lot of Mustangs have that nice rumble. I roll down my windows so I can hear the en gine, says Linda Hallberg. Shes 64, a retired postmaster. Her husband, Gary Hallberg, 67, worked in planning for a manufacturer. They own four Mustangs. They loved the cars when they were young and in their 20s; they love them now. Among their collection was a 1998 GT that theyve now sold. Gary made sure that when Linda rst drove it, the CD player blasted Wilson Picketts Mustang Sally when she turned the key. They so love Mustangs that they had the trunk of a red Mustang convert ible made into a couch for their Renton, Wash., home. April 17, 1964 is a day etched for the keepers of the Mustang ame. Thats when their be loved brand debuted at the New York Worlds Fair. Over 50 years, more than 9 million of the vehicles have sold, says Ford. The Mustang has been in at least 3,000 movies and TV shows, including the classic 1968 Steve McQueen lm, Bullitt, with its nine-minute-long chase scene. Icon drives icon. The car was a marvel of Mad Men market ing when it rst came out, with its long hood like European sports Mustang owners devotion hasnt waned MARK PHELANDetroit Free PressSaints preserve us from the day when some wan nabe-hip automaker de cides to names its cars and trucks with emoticons. Kia brings us one step closer to that vomitous Look at me! Arent I clever? level of cuteness with the 2014 Soul !. Thats right. The top trim level of the new Soul hatchback is called the exclamation point. Kia has freed us from those tiresome words, letters and numbers other companies use. Colon: Give me a break. Dash bring me the head of Kias chief marketing ofcer. Frowny face. Aside from the cloying self-consciousness of its name, the Soul has much to recommend it, including a quirky design and loads of interior room. The Soul comes in three avors: base, (plus) and !. The period at the end of that sentence is a punctuation mark, not a name. Sorry to disappoint you. Kia thoughtfully suggests you call the upper two trims plus and exclaim, two perfectly ne words for which coincidentally enough words actually exist. The base model starts at $14,900. It comes with a 130-horsepower, 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and sixspeed manual transmission. Automatic transmission models start at $16,900 for a base model with the same engine and a six-speed. The Plus and Exclaim mate a 164-horsepower, 2.0-liter engine to the automatic transmission. They start at $18,400 and $20,500, respectively. All models have frontwheel drive. I tested a well-equipped Soul Exclaim with features including a touch screen, Bluetooth phone and music compatibility, USB input, heated and ventilated front seats, a large power sun roof and heated rear seats. It stickered at $24,500. The Souls most direct competitors are small cars and crossover utilities that combine striking looks with roomy interiors. The Buick Encore, Nissan Cube, Scion xB and Volkswagen Jetta wagon come to mind. Soul prices compare favorably to them. The Honda Element originated this class of roomy, offbeat little cars. Itd compete with the 2014 Soul, but to the dismay of surfers, mountain bikers and dog owners everywhere Honda sent the Element to live on a beautiful farm upstate a few years ago. The 2014 Soul is bigger and more sophisticated than its rst generation. It has plenty of interior and cargo room. The high seating position, big windows and upright design provide excellent visibility. The glove box is huge. A dish in the center console for phones and iPods looks sloppy when loaded with devices and wires. The touch screen is large and easy to use. Conventional buttons and dials control audio and climate. The Souls voice recognition and Bluetooth work well, but the interior gets noisy at highway speed. The 2.0-liter engine provides adequate power, but acceleration and handling are not the Souls strengths. The steering lacks feel, particularly at highway speed. Body roll is noticeable on fast curves. The Souls fuel economy is poor. The EPA rates the car I tested at 23 mpg in the city, 31 on the highway and 26 combined. The combined gure trails comparable models of the Encore, Sonic, Fiesta and Cube. It beats the Scion xB by 2 mpg and matches the larger 2.5-liter Jetta wagon. The combined rating is also several mpg worse than such bigger compact sedans as the Chevrolet Cruze, Ford Fusion, Honda Civic, Hyundai Elantra, Nissan Sentra and Toyota Corolla. The Souls mechanical systems are nothing to exclaim about, but its room and quirky looks largely offset that. Period.Kia tucks plenty of features into its quirky Soul hatchback 2014 KIA SOUL EXCLAIMTYPE OF VEHICLE: Front-wheel-drive ve-passenger hatchback RATING: Three out of four stars REASONS TO BUY: Looks; passenger and cargo space; features SHORTCOMINGS: Fuel economy; handling; interior noise ENGINE: 2.0-liter 16-valve DOHC four-cylinder POWER: 164 horsepower at 6,200 rpm; 151 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm TRANSMISSION: Six-speed automatic EPA FUEL ECONOMY RATING: 23 mpg city/31 highway/26 combined. Regular gasoline WHEELBASE: 101.2 inches LENGTH: 163.0 inches WIDTH: 70.9 inches HEIGHT: 63.0 inches CURB WEIGHT: 2,837 lbs. BASE PRICE: $14,900 PRICE AS TESTED: $25,400Prices exclude destination charge. KIA / MCT The 2014 Kia Soul has a slighly larger, reshaped body and upgraded interior from its predecessor. G. CHAMBERS WILLIAMS IIIFort Worth Star-TelegramGMCs Sierra 1500 pickup has been com pletely redesigned for 2014, offering an ar ray of model and engine choices, just like its Chevrolet Silverado sibling. The regular cab mod el, with two doors and only a front seat, be gins at $26,075, while crew cab prices begin at $34,200 for the rearwheel-drive base ver sion. Double cab mod els, which have slightly smaller cabins but still carry up to six, start at $30,100. But the fanciest ver sion is the Denali crew cab, our test vehicle for a week, whose prices begin at $48,315 for the two-wheel-drive, shortbox version and range as high as $51,765 for the four-wheel-drive GMC gives Sierra truck a carlike feel GMC / MCT The 2014 GMC Sierra Denali is the most luxurious, lavishly equipped version of the Sierra pickup. LAYLAN COPELINAustin American-StatesmanAUSTIN, Texas Susan Abplanalp of West Lake Hills, Texas, ew to San Francisco last year to test drive a car be fore buying it over the Inter net. Not just any car: the Tes la Model S, a $70,000 to $130,000 electric car that got Consumer Reports highest marks ever. The manufacturer, Tesla Motors Inc., is battling pow erful auto dealers around the country, including in Texas, trying to block how it sells cars even as Texas and three other states compete for the companys $5 billion battery plant and its 6,500 jobs. Selling directly to consum ers in Tesla-owned dealer ships, as Tesla wants, would cut out franchised dealers who are the middlemen between car manufacturers and consumers. The Texas Automobile Dealers Association last year easily defeated California billionaire Elon Musks effort to exempt his Tesla Motors from selling through dealerships, but auto dealers are sudden ly playing defense because of the possibility of Texas land ing the plant and its jobs. I think all this talk about 6,500 direct jobs has gotten the Legislatures attention, said state Rep. Eddie Rodri guez, D-Austin, who carried Teslas exemption bid last year. Thats what my colleagues are talking about. The association responded last month with a letter to all Texas lawmakers saying the law shouldnt be changed for any special interest or potential project. It is an issue that pits tech nological innovation against Main Street, if lobbying While wooing electric automakers factory, Texas wont let Tesla sell cars in-state RICARDO BRAZZIELL / MCT The front trunk on the Tesla Model S 6.0 is shown at the Domain in Austin, Texas. SEE SIERRA | C5SEE TESLA | C5SEE MUSTANG | C5

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 standard-box model. And for 2014, the Double Cab comes with four regular doors, replacing the previous-generations Extended Cab model. Three engines are offered: a 4.3-liter V-6, 5.3-liter V-8, and 6.2-liter V-8. EPA rat ings for the 5.3-liter engine are the best in the segment at 16 mpg city/23 highway with rear-wheel drive, and 16/22 with four-wheel drive. Standard in the fourwheel-drive short-box Denali, such as the one I tested for this report, is the 5.3-li ter engine. But the test vehi cle came with the upgraded 6.2-liter engine. In keeping with its carlike, fancy qualities, it came with the optional power sunroof, and also had the Driver Alert package and trailer brake controller. Just like the Chevy Silverado LTZ Crew Cab I tested recently, the Sierra Denali had a full four-wheel-drive system that includes low-range gearing through a two-speed transfer case, and an automatic-locking rear differential. That made the truck suitable for almost any terrain. But as fancy as the Denali is, its not likely that many buy ers would relegate it to serious trail-driving much of the time if any. So instead of exploring the wild, the Sierra Denali is in tended more as a truck ver sion of the traditional lux ury sedan, giving its owner premium carlike amenities in a vehicle thats a whole lot more versatile than the typical car. With the front bucket seats and rear bench, the Denali can carry ve passengers in leather-upholstered comfort, but it also can haul whatever you can load in the cargo bed, and can pull a trailer weigh ing up to 9,800 pounds (9,600 pounds for four-wheel-drive versions). That makes it practical for a variety of person al and business applications, whether it be to take the family on a trip or haul a crew to a work site. As with the Silver ado High Country model, the Chevy equivalent of the Sier ra Denali 1500, this vehicle is a bit fancy to dedicate to crew hauling, but a rancher or business owner could easily use it as a combined per sonal and work vehicle. Of course, crew cab models can be bought for a lot less if you can do without all the premium amenities found on the Denali. Sierra twowheel-drive crew cab base models at about $35,000 can do most of what the Denali can do, just without the premium touches like the heat ed and cooled front seats, 20-inch chrome wheels, chrome body side moldings and grille, dual-zone auto matic climate control, leath er-wrapped/heated steer ing wheel (quite unusual for a truck), standard navigation system with premium Bose audio, universal garage/gate opener, power-adjustable pedals, and a power-sliding rear window with defroster. Riding in the Denali isnt very trucklike, either, even on a rough road. The suspen sion is smoother than you might expect, and the cabin is nearly as quiet as that of a nice sedan. I found the 6.2-liter engine, with 420 horsepower and 460 foot-pounds of torque, to have plenty of power, cou pled with the six-speed automatic transmission and the 3.42 rear axle. The four-wheel drive is activated by a rota ry switch on the dash to the left of the steering wheel. EPA ratings are 15 mpg city/21 highway with two-wheel drive, and 14/20 with fourwheel drive. There are full-size rear doors that open to the rear, allowing for easy passen ger or cargo access to the rear seating area. The rear seat has a 60/40 split-fold ing arrangement so it can be moved out of the way to accommodate cargo that you might want to carry inside, out of the weather (such as your groceries, or the box carrying your new big-screen TV). The Driver Alert package added high-tech safety features such as lane-departure warning, forward collision alert, and a safety-alert seat that vibrates to warn of a po tential forward collision. Standard on the Denali are the 6-inch oval chrome assist steps, moveable cargo tiedowns, and LED lights for the cargo box. We also had front fog lights, a chrome exhaust tip, an un derbody shield to help pro tect components from rocks and other off-road obstacles, front tow hooks, power/heat ed outside mirrors with in tegrated turn signals, hillstart assist, front and rear body-color bumpers, and the new EZ-Lift locking tailgate. GMs new CornerStep bumper and built-in hand grips have been added to make it easier to step up into the bed. The tailgate is better balanced to make it easier to raise or lower. The standard Denali 5.3-liter Ecotec Flex-Fuel V-8 comes with an aluminum block, cylinder deactivation, and ratings of 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque. Cylinder deactivation cuts out four of the cylinders during level highway cruising to improve gas mileage. EPA ratings for the 5.3-liter engine are the best in the segment even better than the F-150s EcoBoost V-6 engine at 16 mpg city/23 highway with rear-wheel drive, and 16/22 with four-wheel drive. SIERRA FROM PAGE C3 GMC / MCT The Denali has a full four-wheel-drive system that includes low-range gearing through a two-speed transfer case, and an automatic-locking rear differential. RATING: 9.3 (of a possible 10). TYPE OF VEHICLE: Premium, fullsize, veor six-passenger, fourdoor, rearor four-wheel-drive, shortor long-box, V-8 powered, light-duty pickup truck. HIGHLIGHTS: This is the newest generation of GMCs Sierra 1500 Denali high-end model. The truck is all-new for 2014, and is wider and more muscular than before, with a wide range of new features and options, including new safety and connectivity technologies. NEGATIVES: Can get quite pricey with all the options. ENGINE: 5.3-liter V-8 (standard); 6.2-liter V-8 TRANSMISSION: Six-speed automatic POWER/TORQUE: 355 horsepower/383 pound-feet (5.3-liter); 420 horsepower/460 poundfeet (6.2-liter) BRAKES, FRONT/REAR: Disc/disc, antilock LENGTH: 229 inches (with short box); 239 inches (long box) CURB WEIGHT: 5,042-5,370 pounds CARGO CAPACITY (PAYLOAD): 1,883-1,957 pounds. ELECTRONIC STABILITY CONTROL: Standard. SIDE AIR BAGS: Front seat-mounted; side-curtain both rows TOWING CAPACITY: 9,800 pounds (2WD); 9,600 pounds (4WD) EPA FUEL ECONOMY: 16 mpg city/23 highway (5.3, 2WD); 16/22 (5.3, 4WD); 15/21 (6.2, 2WD); 14/20 (6.2, 4WD) FUEL CAPACITY/TYPE: 26 gallons/ regular unleaded. BASE PRICE, BASE MODEL: $26,075 BASE PRICE, MODEL TESTED: $51,465 PRICE AS TESTED, INCLUDING DESTINATION CHARGE: $56,2302014 GMC SIERRA 1500 DENALI CREW CABhyperbole is to be be lieved, and underscores how government can affect the marketplace. For us, its a matter of life and death, Musk told Texas lawmakers during his failed at tempt last year to be ex empted from the state law. Bill Wolters, president of the Texas Automobile Dealers Association, raises the specter of dealerships, particularly in rural Texas, going out of business without legal protection against factory-owned dealerships: All the Main Street mer chants are gone except the car dealers. Consumers are caught in the middle. How hard is Texas going to make it to buy a Tesla? Abplanalp said earlier this month. They made it really hard for me. Teslas Austin location is what the company calls a gallery. Customers can look at a car but, under state law, cant test-drive it. The Tesla employee can explain the technology but cannot discuss price, take orders or di rect the customer to the companys website. Instead, the customer goes home to order the car online. Periodically, Tesla is permitted to host lim ited test-driving oppor tunities in Texas. Ab planalp said she was unaware of that option when she combined her test-driving trip to San Francisco with a busi ness trip. The average person isnt going to spend that kind of money without test-driving the car, she said. Texas is one of four states Maryland, Vir ginia and Arizona are the others that pro hibit Teslas direct-sales model. But this year, New Jersey, New York and Ohio, at the behest of auto dealers, also are trying to limit Teslas sales approach. The battle over how Tesla wants to sell cars became muddled with the companys February announcement that it wants to build a $5 bil lion battery factory ei ther in Texas, New Mexico, Nevada or Arizona. Arizona lawmakers are considering changing their law as part of their incentive package to land the battery factory. Such a law isnt an issue in Nevada, and Tesla has no stores in New Mexico. Texas Gov. Rick Per ry last month called the states law antiquated and suggested it should be changed, but his staff said he has no plans to call a special session on the topic. So the Leg islature wont convene until January, probably after Tesla has named a winner in the battery plant sweepstakes. But the competition raises the issue anew as Texas cities vie for the jobs. For example, San An tonio Mayor Julian Cas tro tweeted that the law should be changed when Tesla ofcials recently met with San An tonio leaders. They are the worlds greatest at publicity and promotion, Wolters said of Tesla. GM sells more in a day than Tes la does worldwide in a year. Indeed, Tesla is a niche player in auto sales. In his testimony last year, Musk estimated that Tesla would only sell 1,000 to 1,500 cars out of the 1.3 million new vehicles sold last year in Texas. Tesla expects to increase its worldwide sales to 35,000 from 22,000 this year, but, by building its own lithium-ion batteries, the company hopes to cut the price of its next generation of cars in half and eventually sell as many as 500,000 ve hicles worldwide. By comparison, global vehicle sales topped 83 million last year. TESLA FROM PAGE C3 RICARDO BRAZZIELL / MCT Betty Lange holds her son Jackson, 2 months, as Tesla product specialist Kevin Stanley tells her how the electric car works at The Domain in Austin, Texas.cars, and that gallop ing horse insignia at the front that creat ed the pony class of cars. It had world-record sales of 418,812 in its rst year, four times the expected number, says Ford. Longtime Chicago auto writer Dan Jedlicka said, There was nothing mechanically advanced about the 2,572-pound Mustang. It was based on Fords bland, reliable Falcon economy car. The Mustang was marketed both to men wanting engine power and women seeking economy and style. A 1966 TV commer cial showed a young woman, her hair in a bun, dressed in a busi ness suit, wearing glasses, peering into a Mustang. The male voice-over says, Everything you could ask for on a secretarys sal ary. The commercial asks, Should a single girl buy a Mustang? It answers the question with wedding bells. Another ad, play ing on the best-selling Helen Gurley Brown book, Sex and the Sin gle Girl, said about the Mustangs six cyl inders, Six and the single girl. The ad tells of the cars husky, brute of an engine to squire her around. For men, a print ad showed a photo of a guy yawning over a desk full of paperwork. The headline asked, Should a harried Pub lic Accountant drive a relaxed private fun car like a Mustang? The answer is the happy, smiling accountant sitting in a red Mustang convertible. Another ad shows a guy in a white shirt and tie and glasses who spends his Sundays collecting seashells. Then he starts driv ing a Mustang and suddenly becomes a life guard, with the glasses gone, surrounded by three adoring bathing beauties he has saved. For thrifty types, the basic model began at $2,368 about $18,100 in todays dollars. The money was made with all the addons. Famed car design er Carroll Shelby was even commissioned to build limited-edition versions that could beat Chevrolet Cor vettes on the racetrack, Jedlicka said. The sixth generation of the Mustang begins with the 2015 model, with news reports say ing that Ford hopes for sales to increase from the 77,000 sold in 2013. It hopes to build from the momentum of celebrations this week, in which 100,000 Mustang fans, and 10,000 of their cars, are congregating in Las Vegas and Charlotte Mo tor Speedway in North Carolina. MUSTANG FROM PAGE C3

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 15.125 Black Thank you for reading the local newspaper! Classied line ads are continued on page C9.

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 ON WHEELSBY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0420RELEASE DATE: 4/27/2014 ACROSS1 Healing cover 5 Instants 9 Ancient symbols of royalty 13 Checks 18 ___ and Louis, 1956 jazz album 19 The Sun, The Moon or The Star 21 Best-selling novelist whom Time called Bard of the Litigious Age 23 Attribute of Elks or Lions Club members 25 Recital piece for a wind player 26 Toast words after Heres 27 Relative of turquoise 29 Proceeds 30 Within earshot 32 Anthem preposition 33 Mobile home seeker? 34 1966 Wilson Pickett R&B hit 40 Abbr. on sale garment tags 41 Short open jackets 42 Commandment word 43 Pipe valves 49 Ive got half ___ to 50 s political inits. 51 Year, to Casals 52 Greeting that includes a Spanish greeting in reverse? 53 Andean tuber 54 Opera based on a play by Pierre Beaumarchais, with The 58 Complete shutout? 61 Post letters 62 Hammer 63 Stockholm-bound carrier 65 Yale Bowl fan 66 Roisterous 68 Bond yield: Abbr. 69 These, to Thierry 70 Ruler known as Big Daddy 72 TVs Cousin ___ 73 Urban renewal target 76 Qualcomm Stadium athlete 79 Pariss ___ du Carrousel 81 Writer Chekhov 82 Pet Shop Boys, e.g. 83 Stella D___ (cookie brand) 84 Jermaine of the N.B.A. 86 Theyre steeped in strainers 89 Mrs. abroad 90 Vocabulary 92 Reversal, of sorts 93 Walkers strip 95 Govt. promissory notes 99 Former Chevrolet division 100 Suffix with narc101 Dirty rats 102 Like equinoxes 105 Fine hosiery material 110 Visa alternative 112 The African Queen novelist 114 Makeup removal item 115 Classic theater name 116 Stain 117 Designer Anne 118 Leonard ___ a.k.a. Roy Rogers 119 Covenant keepers 120 All alternative DOWN1 Breakaway group 2 Renault model with a mythological name3 Woodys Annie Hall role 4 Joanie Loves Chachi co-star 5 ___ 500, annual race in Ridgeway, Va. 6 Wildlife IDs 7 Ones who are the talk of the town? 8 Baking ___ 9 Actress Judd 10 Use elbow grease on 11 Opening for a dermatologist 12 Common newsstand locale: Abbr. 13 Seat at the counter 14 Ready to be played, say 15 De-file? 16 ___ Trend 17 Graceful trumpeter20 ___ Aviv 22 John Irving character 24 QE2s operator 28 Leave in a hurry 31 Music producer Brian 33 ___-Magnon man 34 New corp. hire, often 35 Man, in Milano 36 Cuts, as a cake 37 Coffee-break time, perhaps 38 Shakespeares Titus ___ 39 Financial writer Marshall 40 What business is ___ yours? 43 Bird whose feathers were once prized by milliners 44 Neil of Fox News 45 Ken of Brothers & Sisters 46 Quaker production47 One of the Kardashians 48 Composer Camille Saint-___ 50 The U.N.s ___ Hammarskjld 51 Pounds sounds 54 Give rise to 55 You Must Love Me musical 56 Nosy one 57 Millennia on end 59 Candy-heart message 60 Thats ___! (Not true!) 63 Rug fiber 64 Herseys Italian town 67 Roman emperor 71 Flaps 74 Naval petty officer: Abbr. 75 Amazing debunker 77 Anita of jazz 78 La Dolce Vita setting 80 Sluggers practice area 84 Futurist 85 ESPN broadcaster Bob 87 Certain Sooner 88 Some M.I.T. grads: Abbr. 89 Are you putting ___? 90 Slick hairstyle 91 Fancy tie 93 English church official 94 Kick-around shoe 95 Chaim ___, 1971 Best Actor nominee 96 City that sounds like a humdinger? 97 Query from Judas 98 Life Saver flavor 99 Like bachelorette parties, typically 101 Product of Yale 102 Jezebels idol 103 Many a PX patron 104 Prime letters? 106 Amazon fig. 107 D-Day invasion town 108 Former C.I.A. chief Panetta 109 Artists alias with an accent 111 The Price Is Right broadcaster 113 I.C.U. pros 1234 5678 91011121314151617 18 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33 34353637 3839 40 41 42 43 4445464748 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 5657 585960 61 62 6364 65 6667 68 69 70 71 72 7374 75 76 77 78 7980 81 82 83 84 85 86 8788 89 9091 92 93 94 95969798 99 100 101 102 103104 105106107108109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Sunday Crossword PuzzleCrossword puzzle answers are on page D3. TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. 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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 5.125 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4.125 Black Untitled art#: order#: 4 X 12.625 Black SCABSECSASPSSTEMS ELLATAROTSCOTTTUROW CIVICPRIDEHORNSONATA TOYOUTEALBLUEGOESON NEAROERCALDER MUSTANGSALLYIRR BOLEROSNOTSTOPCOCKS AMINDDDEANOALOHA OCABARBEROFSEVILLE EMBARGOVFWPOUNDON SASELINOISYINTCES IDIAMINITTEYESORE SANDIEGOCHARGERARC ANTONDUOOROONEAL LOOSETEASMMEWORDAGE UEYBEETLEBAILEY TBILLSGEOOTIC LOUSESBIANNUALLISLE OPTIMACARDCSFORESTER COTTONBALLODEONBLOT KLEINSLYEARKSNONE Sunday crossword puzzle is on page C6. SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 5 X 11.325 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6.125 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2.125 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332 SEIZETHE DA Y SSPORTSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comJoshua Jungferman, the op erating partner and gener al manager of Mount Doras Pisces Rising, prefers smaller farms over big, industrialized farms. What seems more natural to me is a working farm. You know, where you can talk to the farmer, Jungferman said. As a restaurant, it would be nice to be able to meet the farmer and maybe talk to him before hes seeding his next crop and let him know what youre looking at, what you want to do. Jungferman said his restaurant is in the process of explor ing its options to buy more of its ingredients locally, like it did in January when it began buying microgreens from ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. Pisces Rising, however, is just one of approximately 15 area restaurants that buys from ARC Greenhouses, according to manager Rachel Vanlandingham. Those restaurants also include Cask & Larder and The Ravenous Pig in Winter Park, and Dally in the Alley in DeLand. ARC Greenhouses is the company and the brand is Mr. McGregors Greens. Vanlandingham said it is nice to be able to see where ingredients come from. Just like in Dally in the Alley in DeLand, they have a huge blackboard in there and it shows all of their local suppliers, Vanlandingham said. Just to go in there and see, you know, oh, hey, these tomatoes are coming from so-andsos farm, and hey, these microgreens are coming from Mr. McGregors over in Mount Dora. She added chefs can tour the farms facilities and are able to talk to her about growing ingredients smaller or larger for their dishes, or suggest something that they might want grown. They can specify to me, as the grower and the supplier, exactly what theyre looking for, Vanlandingham said. G LD STANDARDTHE IN LAKE COUNTY FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTTHE JOINT COMMISSIONS GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The certication award recognizes Florida Hospital Waterman Joint Replacement Centers dedication to The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. Visit FHWatermanOrtho.com for more information. E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014Businessscott.callahan@dailycommercial.com PIZZA: Expo is a slice of heaven for vendors / E4 www.dailycommercial.com FOOD PURCHASESTotal value of all food purchased annually through local market channels in 2011-2012 in Florida: $8.314 billion %  enThrough grocery stores: $6.079 billion %  enThrough farmers markets, roadside stands and u-pick farms: $1.813 billion %  enThrough restaurants: $320 million %  enThrough special arrangements with producers: $91.2 million %  enThrough community-supported agriculture organizations: $11.4 millionSource: Local Food Systems in Florida: Consumer Characteristics and Economic Impacts by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida. From farm to tableMount Dora restaurant, farm doing business locally PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Pisces Rising general manager Joshua Jungferman, right, and chef Alexander Gandia, left, pose for a photo at Pisces Rising with all locally sourced or small batch food and liquors in Mount Dora. Workers space out basil plants at ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. The company participates in both the Jersey Fresh and Fresh From Florida programs.SEE LOCAL | E2The tax mans taken all my dough And left me in my stately home. Sunny Afternoon by Ray Davies and The KinksGrowing up on Chicagos north west side, April always brought two things: another year of frustration at Wrig ley Field, and the spec ter of tax day. Neither was a pleasant pros pect. From the looks of this years team, Con gress stands a better chance of successfully overhauling the federal tax code than the Cubs do of making the World Series. Want to really get depressed about taxes? Make a lot of money. The perception that highly compensated wage earners utilize multiple loopholes to avoid paying their fair share is largely inaccurate, especially this year. Now, sometimes large, protable U.S. corporations manage MARGARET MCDOWELLGUEST COLUMNIST Caymans, Kinks and the Cubs on a sunny afternoonSEE MCDOWELL | E4 ROBERT CHANNICKChicago TribuneThe Onion is turning funny into money as a digital media company. Two years after con solidating editorial operations in Chicago, the satirical weekly newspa per has ceased publica tion, its website is lled with commercial comedy videos and the com pany has launched its own advertising agency. While real newspa pers struggle to adapt to the changing media landscape, a fake one thinks it has gured out how to thrive in the dig ital age, with audience and revenue growing at a double-digit pace. For Steve Hannah, chief executive ofcer and minority owner of The Onion, reinventing Americas Finest News Source as a diverse digital media company has worked out better and faster than he imagined. We made some calculations and we got some of them right, said Hannah, 65. So far, we havent screwed it up. Founded in 1988 by students at the Univer sity of Wisconsin-Madison, The Onion grew to national prominence by parodying the gravi tas of newspapers with satirical headlines and stories, such as Drugs Win Drug War. It staked out online turf in 1996 with the launch of TheOnion.com, sharing content between print and digital. Current owners bought The Onion in 2001, led by money manager David Schafer. The editorial staff relo cated to New York that year, leaving the corporate headquarters behind in Wisconsin. A former executive editor at the Milwaukee Jour nal, Hannah took the helm three years later. Hannah moved the Onion branches into digital media after exiting printSEE ONION | E2 MICHAEL TERCHA / MCT Style Guide Marlin Ross II, center right, walks customer Jason Chan, of Chicago, through suiting fabric choices and upgrades at the Indochino Traveling Tailor popup store in Chicago. ALEXIA ELEJALDE-RUIZChicago TribuneCHICAGO As a rstyear law student with job interviews on the horizon, Huy Nguyen was in the market for a well-tting suit that wouldnt blow his budget. Online custom suit re tailer Indochino enticed Nguyen with the right price and quality, but what ultimately sold him was a Face book ad offer ing old-fashioned ser vice: in-person measuring and styling at its Traveling Tailor pop-up shop in downtown Chicago. I like the in-person con tact, having a profession als advice, said Nguyen, 22, who brought three fel low Chicago-Kent College of Law students with him to buy suits at the pop-up shop. If I measure myself at home, I dont know if Im doing it correctly. As many traditional re tailers scramble to boost their online presence in an age of rapid growth in e-commerce, a growing number of online retailers are investing in bricksand-mortar shops to put in valuable face time with their customers. Online menswear brand Bonobos was among the pioneers when it launched its physical Guideshops, Online retailers seek to reach, reassure buyers face-to-faceSEE ONLINE | E4

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 headquarters to Chicago in 2007, hoping to consolidate editorial and business oper ations here. That became an imperative during the reces sion in 2008 and 2009, when red ink forced The Onion to chart a new course phas ing out print operations and focusing on its websites. In 2010, The Onion struck a deal with the Chicago Tribune and other partners across the country to publish, print and sell advertising for the publication. The strat egy helped return The Onion to protability, with digital driving revenue growth every year since, according to exec utives. The tough part about dig ital is getting enough scale to support an entire infrastructure of a company, said Mike McAvoy, 34, president of On ion Inc. Its paying for every thing now. Last year, The O nion newspaper ended its run with the Dec. 12 edition, a tongue-incheek paean to its bright future in print. Copies of the nal issue are piled on a table near a couch in the waiting area of its River North ofc es, an open, 12,000-squarefoot space housing giant vid eo props, workstations, play areas and 80-plus employ ees navigating a dizzying cre ative maze. In January 2013, The Onion relocated one block west of its old digs, where its banner still ies from the building. The move to larger quarters came less than a year after recalling its reluctant writers from New York to join The Onions business staff and sister entertainment publi cation A.V. Club under one roof. Bringing everyone together fomented a cultural change, getting editorial and busi ness on the same page. It also laid the groundwork for On ion Labs, an in-house adver tising agency that now ac counts for more than half of The Onions revenue, according to executives. Last month, Rick Hamann, 41, a former creative director at Energy BBDO, was named to head Onion Labs, reecting its growth and aspirations as a full-service creative agency. Begun in 2012, Onion Labs was built to create branded video content for advertisers on The Onion website ba sically custom commercials reecting The Onions comedic sensibility. Its premise is that advertisers pay much more for video than display ads across the Internet. The lure for marketers is reaching the elusive millennial audi ence that The Onion serves, with the hope that a commercial video might go viral, offering a jackpot return to the brand. The Onion has honed its ex pertise in video through ev erything from the Onion News Network, an award-winning CNN parody, to Onion Sports Dome, an ESPN parody. Both shows migrated to cable TV for short runs. Video spoofs abound on The Onions website and its premium YouTube channel, drawing millions of viewers. The Onion had 3.7 million unique visitors and The A.V. Club had 2.2 million unique visitors in March, according to comScore, gures that do not include mobile viewers. The Onion touts 15 million unique monthly visitors to its websites using data supplied by Google Analytics, up from 10 million two years ago. Google Analytics uses a different methodology that includes mobile viewers. More than 47 percent of The Onions audience is between 18 and 34, accord ing to comScore. Broadly, that demo covers about 26 percent of the tot al Internet population. 1 Palm Reading 1721 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 917 S. US HWY 27 Minneola, FL352.787.7075NOW$1050%2 LocationsREG$20 The local restaurant purchases are mixed with distributor pur chases, Vanlandingham said, and the farm is located at 3050 Britt Rd. in Mount Dora. The farm expanded to Mount Dora from its other location in New Jersey, according to the companys website. Vanlandingham advised restaurants looking to participate in the farm-to-table movement not to be afraid to reach out to local farms to see if they sell to the public or restaurants and to establish those relationships. There should be more restaurants that are seeking to do farm to table, because its becoming a trend that everybody wants to know where their food is coming from, Vanlandingham said. She said Pisces Rising purchases micro rainbow mix and micro wasabi from the farm. Meanwhile, Jungfer man said Pisces Rising is exploring its options to source more locally, which includes looking for small-scale, local distributors, and they are currently talking with the company Local Roots. Local Roots website states that it only sources food from Florida farms of the highest standards. He said it is the restaurants responsibility to push clientele to locally sourced food. People look to us to know the right wine to pair with something. They look to us to know which spirits to mix together for a cocktail. They look to us for our recipes. So, I think thats an important platform we should use it fully to really explore the benets of local local and small, as opposed to the big, industrialized farms, Jungferman said. Jungferman said buy ing locally has long been important to him and the chef, but they now are able to pur sue sourcing locally as Jungferman became an operating partner of the restaurant in January. It is a nancial undertaking. Usually, the food is a little costlier and then youre also spending time, Jungferman said. And its a newer concept. He said while the restaurant is transitioning to using more local products, it has always sourced most of its seafood locally. A study, titled Local Food Systems in Florida: Consumer Characteristics and Economic Impacts, by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Univer sity of Floridas Food and Resource Economics Department, estimated the total value of all food purchased annually through local market channels in 2011-2012 in Florida at $8.314 billion. Of that, the study states, $6.079 billion was through grocery stores; $1.813 billion through farmers mar kets, u-pick operations and roadside stands; $320 million came through restaurants and food service; $91.2 million came through special arrangements with producers and $11.4 million through Community Supported Agriculture organizations. The study claimed an average of $1,114 spent annually per household on local food pur chases. The study values vegetables as the largest local food category at $1.699 billion. Fruits were valued at $1.574 billion; sh at $686 million; beef at $641 million; poultry at $569 million; beverages at $541 million; prepared foods, jams or jellies at $530 million; dairy at $489 million; honey at $439 million; pork, lamb and other meats at $393 million; eggs at $372 million and nuts at $315 million. Local food purchases in 2011-2012 in Flor ida were estimated by the study to lead to an economic impact of 183,625 fulland parttime jobs. The research was based on a mail survey in the summer of 2012 to 7,500 households and had 1,599 usable responses, according to the study. The study also notes that there was no standard accepted geographic denition of local foods among survey respondents. Some of the denitions included in the survey results were within Florida, in the respondents county or specic city, the Southeast or within a 100-mile radius from the respondents home. I think its consumer demand, said Danielle Treadwell, an associate professor of horticultural sciences at the University of Florida, of restaurants buying locally. I think ultimately consumers pretty much drive demand and there has been a lot of education, a lot of media attention and a lot of word of mouth. Citing the USDA Census of Agriculture, Treadwell said there are 44,519 farms in Florida, with 93 percent being small farms. She added numer ous reports and data show most small farms sell direct to consumer, which includes selling to a restaurant. To me, its a no-brainer. I really would encourage restaurateurs to work with their local farmers and ranchers, Treadwell said. Food, we know, is a lot more nutritious when its consumed as quickly after harvest as possible. Purchasing things from other states that require days, if not weeks, to arrive, just arent going to taste as good. She added there are a lot of farmers and ranch ers that work closely with chefs to provide specic products. Together, they are able to offer a real value to consumers that sort of sets them apart from the competition, Treadwell said. LOCAL FROM PAGE E1 FOOD PRODUCTS SOLD BY TOTAL VALUE VEGETABLES: $1.699 billion. FRUIT: $1.574 billion FISH: $686 million BEEF: $641 million POULTRY: $569 million BEVERAGES: $541 million PREPARED FOODS, JAMS OR JELLIES: $530 million DAIRY AT $489 MILLION HONEY: $439 million PORK, LAMB AND OTHER MEATS: $393 million EGGS: $372 million NUTS: $315 millionSource: Local Food Systems in Florida: Consumer Characteristics and Economic Impacts by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida. ABEL URIBE / MCT Mike McAvoy is president of The Onion which, started as a satirical newspaper but has expanded into a digital media company featauring its comedic sensibility. ONIONFROM PAGE E1

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 SEAN SPOSITOThe Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionHeres the thing about Taka Torimoto: Hes more likely to remem ber his smartphone than his billfold. And that spells opportunity for a whole raft of new players in the lucrative payments industry. A 41-year-old technical consultant with an engineering degree from Georgia Institute of Technology, Torim oto has paid for fast food with the tap of his phone and sent money just as you would at tachments in emails. His father digitally sends the grandkids cash for Christmas. No more checks. Torimotos voice rises with excitement as he talks about the new possibilities. Payments is one area that is going in so many different di rections. For the rst time since the advent of credit cards, there are new ways to pay that dont involve cash, check or plastic. Most are built on top of the existing payments system, but courtesy of that hand-held computer in our pockets and purs es offer new vistas for both consumers and tech entrepreneurs. Its clear that the mobile phone is the device that people are going to be using in the future to pay, said David S. Evans, chairman of the Global Economics Group. Its not going to be a plastic card. By 2017, Forrester Research estimates, Americans will spend roughly $90 billion using a smartphone or other handheld de vice, a more than sev en-fold increase from the amount spent in 2012. The rms gures include mobile remote commerce; mobile peer to peer payments and remittances; and mobile proximity pay ments. Even if its estimate is too optimistic as pro jections in this arena have tended to be the pace at which startups are emerging is already head-spinning: Stripe, PayNearMe and WePay, among more than a thousand others, fueled by billions of dollars in venture capital. For consumers, mobile payments mean greater convenience and better security. For merchants and banks, they present new op portunities to track you and target sales pitches and rewards to you. And they give tech entrepreneurs a low-cost entry point into the multi-billion dollar payments pipeline. So why arent already living in a post-plastic world? In part, because ev eryone involved in the chain merchants, card issuers, traditional processors, tech innovators and consumers is looking to maxi mize how much money they keep at the end of the day. Sometimes, the interests of two or more players align, but often they dont. Sorting it out via market forces and regulation is likely to make for a period thats exciting, bewildering, messy and frustrating. And right now, were at an inection point, where what emerged as a handful of novelties is becoming a new way of doing business. Thats evident in the changes the in cumbents are mak ing. Banks, payment networks such as Visa, MasterCard, Discover and Amex, and the tech companies that serve them, such as FIS and Fiserv, are scrambling to keep up. In 2014, youll see larger payments enti ties scramble to acceler ate the pace of their innovation to catch up to these smaller and more nimble competitors, PayPal President David Marcus predicted in a blog post. Meanwhile, smaller players will scram ble to achieve the scale and experience needed to compete in a global business, he wrote. As a result, billions of dol lars will be at play in the payment industry, and 2014 will be a year of game-changing disruption. Last year, PayPal launched 58 new products, partly because of new threats, according to a recent New York Times report. And earlier this year the e-commerce arm of eBay announced PayPal Beacon, a Bluetooth de vice that reads payment information from a smartphone. With that device, someone like a restaurant server would no longer have to take your card away from the table to complete a transaction. Thats in addition to a partnership with Dis cover, which lets folks use PayPal in the check out line at some of the nation s largest mer chants. PayPal has also recently acquired pro gressive payment pro cessor Braintree, which has regulatory approval to move money nationwide. Its marketing its ser vices to mobile-based innovators such as Uber, Airbnb and TaskRabbit, which facilitate transactions between individual sellers and buyers of, respectively, rides, lodging and doers of household errands and other tasks. And we havent even talked yet about bitcoin and other cryptocur rencies, which operate in a parallel payments universe, completely outside the existing sys tem. To be sure, some of the innovations wont stick. Innovation and dis ruption is an inherent ly inefcient and lofty process, said Matt Har ris, managing direc tor at Bain Capital Ven tures. He harkens back to the rst wave of dotcoms, with its rash of failures. We are at that now, at least in consumer nancial services, he said. But some of the ex periments will succeed, and at least a few will change the landscape for all of us. BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrr$50 OFF 3ROOMS& A HALL$99fnrtrbt EXTENDED OFFERS! When its Heart Disease It Makes A Difference Where You Start. ~ Barry Weinstock, MD, FACC MD: Yale Medical School Fellowship Trained: Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles Board Certified www.FLHeartCenter.com 511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg | 352-728-6808 1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages | 352-750-5000 Most Insurances Accepted Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP Dr. Weinstock has more than 25 years of experience in interventions for cardiac and peripheral disease, pacemaker implantation and treatment of heart attacks. He has joined our expert team to strengthen our fight against heart disease, and is accepting new patients. Start where renowned cardiac and peripheral vascular disease specialists work together with one focus the best possible outcomes for their patients.Start here. Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP I teach drawing. We will study color & design in our classes. You will learn how to draw and see how an artist sees. For more information Call 352.602.7748 or Email rdog229@msn.com RETURN OF 18 LAKE COUNTY WWII HONOR FLIGHT VETERANSPlease Welcome Veterans returning from Washington DC with a Patriotic Heroes HomecomingCome greet the Veterans. Please bring chairs and a friend.Sunday, April 27th, 2014 9:30pmAmerican Legion Post 347, Rolling Acres Rd. & CR466, Lady LakeFor more information call: 352-432-1382 www.villageshonorflight.org Goodbye, billfold. Hello, smartphone RYON HORNE / MCT Taka Torimoto of Atlanta uses his phone to make purchases at fast food restaurants and other places that accept alternate methods of payments from cash and credit cards.

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor Se Habla Espaol (352) 735-6941CALL US OR STOP IN OVER 33 YEARS*******SAME LOCATION 17 YEARS US 441Old 44119A K SPECIAL LOAN RATES GOODUSEDSTUFFNeed Cash for Your Gold Jewelry? No Need to Sell It! You Can Borrow on It!PAWNNEED CASH?10%15%Conditions apply offer expires Aug 31, 2014CALL FOR DETAILS to whittle their effec tive tax liability by moving prots overseas and escaping high U.S. cor porate tax rates. And hedge fund managers can sometimes pay lower tax rates on incentive prots to lower their liabilities. And its also true that some super wealthy folks, whose main source of income is from investments, sometimes pay closer to the 15 percent capital gains tax rate than the rate associated with their income level. But for highly compensated wage earners? Their tax rate just went up, from 35 per cent to 39.6 percent. There were also new restrictions on itemized deductions. And even investment income was taxed at a higher rate. If your AGI is above $300,000, you cant deduct any charitable contributions on Form 1040, Schedule A. If a man making $75,000 a year wants to tithe (give 10 percent, or $7,500) to his church, he can deduct the donation and lower his taxes. But if someone who earned $400,000 last year wants to tithe (give $40,000) and has an AGI above $300,000, he can still give the money, but he cant deduct the contribution. A proposal is also being considered limiting what high-income earners can contribute to qualied retirement accounts. One problem with this is that not all high earners have been salting away money in a retirement plan for years. Some are 30-year overnight successes, who have traditionally plowed any prots back into their businesses and need to make up for lost time in building up retirement accounts. Folks with signicant incomes are obvious targets in the goal to increase tax revenues. But we may be rapidly approaching a point of diminishing returns by increasing taxes on the highly compensated. More taxes may mean that these same folks have less money to expand their businesses and hire new employ ees. And this hinders economic growth. Continuing to increase taxes on top earners may also actually create a wave of outsourcing, as business owners faced with a growing tax liability consider relocating in more tax-friendly climates like the Caymans.Margaret R. McDowell, a syndicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 offering t and style advice, in 2011, and later made its appar el available at Nordstrom. Eyeglass retailer Warby Parker, as well as Gap Inc.-owned Athle ta and Piperlime, are other digital success stories that have set up ofine locations. Online crafts mar ket Etsy isnt opening its own stores but is devel oping a wholesale ser vice to help its sellers get their wares into independent boutiques and large retail shops across the world. Etsy Wholesale, which launched in beta a year ago and will launch publicly in Au gust, screens and as sists sellers to ensure they are able to produce at the scale necessary to satisfy orders from buyers such as Nordstrom, West Elm and New York boutique Mi chele Varian. The trend, which has accelerated during the past year, doesnt suggest a reverse commute from digital to physical as much as the mount ing importance of hitting customers from all angles, said Joe Scartz, chief marketing ofcer for Digital BrandWorks, a Chicago-based con sultant helping retailers thrive in a digital world. Smartphone-wielding customers have come to expect an always-on shopping ex perience, including the option to walk into a store, Scartz said. And as many tradi tional stores face down showrooming thats the practice of check ing out the merchan dise in-store and then nding the cheapest price online by of fering price-matching alongside the added value of their associ ates expertise, online retailers are having to compete on more than price, he said. If these online retail ers dont compete in an omnichannel way, they will lose ground to the bricks who are able to do this kind of thing, Scartz said, employing the retail worlds favor ite buzzword. Though e-commerce is growing fast, up 17 percent last year compared with 3.5 percent growth for bricks-andmortar stores, it repre sented just 5.8 percent of the $4.53 trillion in overall retail sales in the U.S. in 2013, according to eMarketer. For some online retailers, pop-up shops are low-risk opportunities to dip into the ofine waters without making major lease or inventory commitments, Scartz said. Often, the real mon eymaking remains on line while the physical locations serve public relations or marketing purposes. Physical real estate is very expensive in de sirable locations, and brands that choose to do this often have secondary goals oth er than sales, such as awareness, Web acquisition or branding, said Sucharita Mulpuru, an analyst with For rester Research. Gilt City, the local life style arm of designer ash sale site Gilt, has been hosting occasion al warehouse sales since its founding in 2011 to connect with its mem bers and drive them to their brand partners physical locations, said Steven Schneider, president and general man ager of Gilt City. ONLINEFROM PAGE E1 JOHN M. GLIONNA / MCT A booth at the International Pizza Expo was devoted to costumes that could be worn on the street to advertise a business. JOHN M. GLIONNALos Angeles TimesLAS VEGAS My old pal Vinnie the pizza guy called the other night. Hes coming to town, but not to gamble: Pizza people shop owners, sauce makers, cheese peddlers are gathering for their annual trade show and he plans to be there. In exchange for use of my spare bedroom, he offers his services as my tour guide to a lit tle-known event that is nevertheless one of the biggest happenings annually in the pizza world: the three-day International Pizza Expo, which this year would draw 8,000 avid attendees. Vinnie Mineo is a sec ond-generation pizza man who in 1965 opened his rst shop, Vinces Pizzeria, in Buffalo, N.Y., where back then they called it piz za pie. Over the next half-century, he ran six pizza shops in western New York and later in Phoenix, before nally throwing in his apron a few years ago. Now, he wants back into the game, and in a big way. He subscribes to Pizza Today magazine and every morn ing at his home in Mesa, Ariz., scours the Internet for his next pizza opportunity, looking for the lost soul whos so tired of the business hell be willing to sell cheaply. I tried my rst slice of Vinnies pizza 35 years ago and Ill nev er forget the thin crust, loaded cheese and, oh man, that greasy pep peroni! Just maybe, Vinnie gures, the pizza show will offer a few business For pizza vendors, Vegas expo is a slice of heavenSEE EXPO | E6

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, April 27, the 117th day of 2014. There are 248 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On April 27, 1521, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan was killed by natives in the Philippines. On this date: In 1509, Pope Julius II placed the Republic of Venice under an interdict following its refusal to give up lands claimed by the Papal States. (The pope lifted the sanction in February 1510.) In 1777, the only land battle in Connecticut during the Revolutionary War, the Battle of Ridgeeld, took place, resulting in a limited British victory. In 1805, during the First Barbary War, an American-led force of Marines and mercenaries captured the city of Derna, on the shores of Tripoli. In 1813, the Battle of York took place in Upper Canada during the War of 1812 as a U.S. force defeated the British garrison in present-day Toronto before withdrawing. In 1822, the 18th president of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant, was born in Point Pleasant, Ohio. In 1865, the steamer Sultana exploded on the Mississippi River near Memphis, Tenn., killing more than 1,400 people, mostly freed Union prisoners of war. In 1938, King Zog I of the Albanians married Countess Geraldine Apponyi de Nagy-Apponyi. In 1941, German forces occupied Athens during World War II. In 1967, Expo was ofcially opened in Montreal by Canadian Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson. In 1973, Acting FBI Director L. Patrick Gray resigned after it was revealed that hed destroyed les removed from the safe of Watergate conspirator E. Howard Hunt. In 1982, the trial of John W. Hinckley Jr., who had shot four people, including President Ronald Reagan, began in Washington. (The trial ended with Hinckleys acquittal by reason of insanity.) In 1994, former President Richard M. Nixon was remem bered at an outdoor funeral service attended by all ve of his successors at the Nixon presidential library in Yorba Linda, Calif. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, April 27, 2014: This year you head down a new path, as you are determined to full a goal that could affect your life. You transform, and your desires transform as well. You will discover the importance of staying true to yourself. If you are single, you could meet people who are not authentic and who cant offer you what you desire. Dont worry; someone who is true to himor herself is likely to appear. If you are attached, your sweetie will need to catch up to you. Know that that might not happen until the new year. ARIES is a natural healer for you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll smile a lot, as if you have a secret you have not yet shared. Others will try to nd out what is going on as they discover that your lips are sealed on this topic. Be spontaneous when making a purchase. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Try as you may, no one seems to be letting the cat out of the bag. The smart move would be to ignore the situation, as someone is likely to spill the beans. Make plans for yourself right now. You need some much-needed downtime. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You seem to have a secret or something you would prefer not to share. You seem to beam with this information, which could trigger a friends curiosity. G o off and watch a game, but do not push too hard. Fatigue could be high. CANCER (June 21-July 22) If you are not going on a mini day excursion, plan on going on one very soon. A change of pace always grounds you and helps you gain a new perspective. Whatever you do, youll do it intensely. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Deal with one person at a time. You might be easily distracted, as a phone call or news from a distance could put you on high alert. A change seems to be ying your way. Are you ready for some diversity in the near future? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might want to seriously consider a partners request. This person needs a change of pace. Friends are likely to call you to head out and join them. Making a point to get some exercise, whether it is mental or physical, could reduce stress. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Just let others do their thing. Decide when you would like to join in and when you would prefer to do something else. You often give in for the sake of keeping the peace, which is one of the reasons why your anger is so close to the surface, SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might be hardpressed to follow through on a project and also get to a game on time. Know that you will manage to do both, if you want to. However, dont hesitate to adjust your plans. You need to let go of stress. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Let your imagina tion color your plans. You will have a great time, as will others. Curb any frustration you have toward a loved one who seem to playing out a mock war. Do not feed this persons hostilities. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Stay close to home and handle a personal matter. An older parent or relative could seem out of sorts. Asking this person what is wrong might be a mistake. Invite him or her along if you have plans, but do not create more pressure. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Make some phone calls that you have been putting off. Your ability to read between the lines is an important skill, especially as someone is vested in not sharing. Do not push. Run some errands or meet up with friends. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Be aware of the cost of proceeding as you have been. You could pretend that your actions have no effect on others, and you actually might believe that. Revise your thinking. Make calls to a neighbor or dear friend to get together. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I have worked in a pharmacy for 30 years, and every summer its the same story. People forget their medication and leave it at home. Why do people not realize that their meds should be one of the FIRST things they pack? Yes, we can call their pharmacist back home to get a transfer, but if the prescription was just lled, their insurance will not go through, or theyll have to wait while we call for a vacation override. Please, people remember your medications, and if you dont plan on spending a while sitting around our phar macy waiting for us to call your hometown pharmacy, and possibly your insurance company, then dont get angry at us when it takes longer than the 15 minutes you expected. I love my job. But Im beginning to dread irresponsible, crabby tour ists who know they need their blood pressure meds every day and expect us to drop whatever were doing to take care of them. PHRUSTRATED PHARMACIST IN MONTANA DEAR PHARMACIST: I sympathize with your phrustration, so Im printing your heartfelt letter, hoping it will help you to lower YOUR blood pressure. I dont think the people you describe are irresponsible as much as they may be disorganized. The way I have solved this problem is to keep multiple copies of a printed list of items I must have when I travel. As I pack, I check them off my list and before I close my travel bag, I double-check to make sure nothing has been forgotten. Perhaps others will nd this helpful. DEAR ABBY: Whats up with penmanship these days? A few years ago, my mother gave me some old letters written by my grandfather to my grandmother. Some of them are treasures because the written words are not only loving and endearing, but the penmanship is beautiful. The script writings are actually examples of art in this modern age. I work at a bank, Abby, and many of the signatures I see every day are illegible. Is written communication becoming obsolete? With the electronic age and schools going paperless, will penmanship become unnecessary? MARY IN HUNTSVILLE, ALA. DEAR MARY: Years ago, penmanship was routinely taught in the public schools, and students spent nearly an hour a day practicing how to write legibly. Today, I am told that 10 minutes is devoted to teaching students to PRINT. If the emails I receive are any indication, capitalization and punctuation are also being jettisoned. And if the electric grid ever goes down and battery power runs out, well have to start over with stone tablets and chisels. DEAR ABBY: I know its rude to ask workers how much money they make, but does that also apply to asking a student what his or her grades are? Aside from parents and teachers, I dont think its anybodys business how Im doing academically. In my opinion, asking, How are your grades? is as rude as asking, How much money do you make? What do you think? MATT IN EUGENE, ORE. DEAR MATT: Im with you. How about coming back with, Ill forgive you for asking if youll forgive me for not answering.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Medications left at home cause vacation headaches JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 352.530.2256803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionCall today to schedule your appointmentThe Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology leads. But what he real ly longs for are the expos sights and smells the spicy scent of sa lami and roasted pep pers, the white wheels of Parmesan cheese and all the free samples. Hes always been his own boss, making piz zas long before the likes of Papa John and Chuck E. Cheese, and rolled his rst ball of dough in a region where pizza is like air: It sustains life. Now 70, he arrives at the airport in a shirt printed with an island motif, sunglasses and long white hair the col or of bakers our. As we walk toward the Las Vegas Convention Center, he can barely contain his enthusiasm. You wont believe it, he gushes. Everywhere you look, people trying to sell you slicers, sauc es, ovens, every type of cheese and topping. Its an entire universe of pizza. Closed to the pub lic, the expo is the reserved domain of those who bring you the worlds most popular food: from manufactur ers and suppliers down to the proprietors of mom-and-pop pizzerias across America. Inside, the showroom explodes like a Big Bang for the senses. Even the carpet is a feast for the eyes a rich red, the color of a nice Bolognese sauce. Each year, U.S. consumers spend $1 bil lion on pizza a lot of dough, if you will. One in 8 people eat pizza on a given day; for males between 6 and 19, the rate rises to 1 in 4. For pizza makers like Vinnie, the expo is like Christmas morning, full of surprises only its scented with anchovies, and the goodies in clude ventless fryers, auto-saucing machines and sturdy brick ovens. Brick ovens are the best, Vinnie says. Fast and greaseless. We examine vented pizza boxes with plas tic liners to ensure the pie doesnt get soggy; displays for oil, yeast, spices and olives; racks of meats, sauces and cheeses; an app that al lows customers to track their pizza delivery on line. There are people selling vegan, organic and gluten-free pizzas as well as sauces with non-genetically-modied tomato seeds. Vinnie eyes a display of pizza paddles; he prefers the metal kind: Its easier to slide un der the pizza. He scouts for sauce that isnt too sweet; something with a little kick. He loves to try other peoples pies either deep-dish or thin crust, it doesnt matter. He samples a fro zen pizza. My uncle had the idea for frozen pizza in the 1950s, he says, chewing. He was ahead of his time. If he hadnt died, he would have been the king. We pass workshops for aspiring entrepreneurs with titles like So, You Want to Open a Piz zeria and Common Pizza Startup Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. There are panel discus sions on Health Care and the Pizzeria, and talks on how to make the best classic Neapolitan pie (with just toma toes and mozzarella). Most popular, howev er, are the World Pizza Games, where people compete at activities like rolling a wheel of uncooked dough along their shoulder blades. Theres the fastest dough-rolling con test, the quickest piz za-box folding and the triathlon, which combines box-folding, dough-tossing and dough-stretching skills. Nearby, Garrett Marlin waits for the dough-stretching contest. He won last years event stretching an 8-ounce mound of dough the widest, just over 38 inches in ve minutes. He explains the rules. Any holes bigger than a dime and youre out. Judges frown on the lick and stick trick, in which contestants use saliva to stretch the dough. Three judges decide who wins the $1,000 rst prize and, as important, Marlin says, the bragging rights. I never toss my dough to use gravity in the stretch, said Mar lin, who runs a pizzeria in Fort Collins, Colo. I keep my hands moving that dough as much as I can. Everywhere we look, its all one big pizza fraternity. Everybody seems to know each oth er. Passing men speak Italian. Many greetings involve pecks on both cheeks. We wander past signs with compa ny names like Fontani ni, Stella and Mangia Inc. Everybodys into the old-country atmo sphere. Quipped salesman John Correll: I say my real name is Cor relli but that my family dropped the I. Vinnie takes my arm: He wants me to meet his Buffalo pizza cro nies. Ive met many in the past, ever since my brother-in-law, Neil Downey, took me to Vinnies shop in 1980. The two had been best friends since grade school and Vinnie always let Neil and his family eat for free. Buffalo is full of such characters. For Vinnie, theyre pizza royalty, guys like Joey the Wing King, who, Vinnie says, runs the expos biggest spread serving up samples to advertise his two Buffalo pizzerias and a frozen chicken wing business. At 47, Joe Todaro is a Buffalo native who each year hires young wom en in short skirts to dole out his slices and wings. Dressed in a white chefs jacket, he says his family started in the pizza business in 1957. Nowadays, his company La Nova sells 500,000 pounds of chicken wings a week. Im a pizza guy; its in my blood, he says. I love the energy here. Every year, I just wan der around here to take it all in. Then we spot the Pepperoni Queen, Valarie Rossman, a sup plier who once enjoyed making stops at Vinnies Phoenix shop. You were always so good to your mother, she says, squeezing his arm. Pepperoni, along with cheese, remains the nations most popu lar pizza topping, studies show. Rossman gestures to a display that includes Italian dry sa lami, genoa and lingui ca. Asked why pepper oni pizza is so avorful, she explains the phenomenon sometimes known as the grease bomb. Slide a pizza into the oven and after a while the pepperoni curls up at the edges, creating a little bowl of oil that provides the avor. We leave the casing on the pepperoni, she says, so it curls up. Our mouths water. Vinnie never nds his pizza opportunity, but it doesnt matter. On the loudspeaker blares the Pharrell Williams hit Happy. Vinnie is smiling. Still, our stomachs are full and our feet weary. A day of sampling the pizza universe leads to a quick culinary choice: Cuban food for dinner. EXPOFROM PAGE E4 JOHN M. GLIONNA / MCT Andrew Scudera, a cook from Goodfellas Pizza School of New York, takes a fresh pie from the oven for the throngs to sample at the International Pizza Expo in Las Vegas.

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FROM FREE FALLS TO BLACKOUTSA GUIDE TO FLORIDAS BEST RIDES, see page 2 CAMP DIRECTORYA LIST OF WHATS GOING ON THIS SUMMER IN LAKE COUNTY see page 3 SUMMER PLANNER A publication of the Daily CommercialAPRIL 27, 2014

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2 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday April 27, 2014 SARAH WHITMANVisitorida.comAn increased heart rate. Bel ly ips. The illusion of free-fall ing off a skyscraper. These days, theme park thrill rides generate gallons of adrenaline and trick visitors into believing the im possible. Thanks to advancing technologies, you can play Quidditch with Harry Potter or meet an gry dinosaurs. You can test the limits of physical experience without putting yourself in real danger. A battle against Decepticons? Why not? A rock-n-roll blast-off with Aerosmith? Done. High-speed attractions engage everything from the senses to our internal organs, said Rob ert Criss, professor of physics at the University of South Florida. The more that goes on dur ing a ride, the more we feel and the more willing we are to wait in line. Our experiences are partly the result of acceleration, or the rate at which an object changes its velocity, Criss said. Riders sense acceleration as ride ve hicles push against the body to change direction. If the body is forced forward, the heart and lungs will lunge forward too, creating a noticeable sensation. Many thrill rides also ght gravity, creating feelings of weight lessness and at times. Here are some examples of the thrills you can nd at Flor idas theme parks this summer.FREE-FALLINGNothing makes bellies ip like a good drop tower. These tall wonders, designed to simulate the sensation of, say, falling down an elevator shaft, trigger fear-for-fun responses. So what makes it feel like your stomach has risen to your throat? The stomach is accustomed to hanging from the rest of the organs, being supported by a frame that is in rm contact with the ground, which is push ing back. This is not so during a free fall, Criss said. For this thrill, check out the 150-foot Dr. Dooms Fearfall at Universals Islands of Adventure or The Twilight Zone Tow er of Terror at Disneys Holly wood Studios. The Tower, which opened in 1994, drops riders 13 stories, brings them back up and drops them straight down again, all in the dark. Opening May 1 is Falcons Fury at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay. This unique tower will take guests up 300 feet, pivot so they are looking face-down at the ground and then drop at 60 miles per hour.LIGHTS OUTWhen a drop or twist comes without warning, the result ing rush is even sweeter. From Space Mountain at Disneys Magic Kingdom to Harry Pot ter and the Forbidden Journey at Universals Islands of Adven ture, dark rides rely on the el ement of surprise to intensi fy thrills. Many also feature lit scenes and visual effects. A favorite: Revenge of the Mummy at Universal Studios. As if re-breathing mummies werent enough to get the blood pumping, the attraction com bines special effects with coast er speeds. Harry Potter and the Forbid den Journey uses robotic arm technology to make it feel as though you are ying in and out of harrowing scenes from the movies.SHOT OUT OF A CANNONNo matter how you prepare myself for the sudden jolt associ ated with launch coasters, when it hits, it hits hard. One moment you are sitting still then, bam, electromagnets propel the ride car from zero to rocket speed. Cheetah Hunt, Floridas newest launch coaster, is open at Busch Gardens. Others include Rock N Roller Coaster at Disneys Hollywood Studios and The In credible Hulk at Universals Is lands of Adventure.A LITTLE LOOPYMany of Floridas premiere coasters feature signature loops. Loops are exhilarating because the human body experiences multiple sensations in a short pe riod of time, said Tom Henderson of the Physics Classroom. Though coasters move through a loop in mere seconds, the forces at work change dras tically from one point to the next. This explains why riders feel pressed to the seat going into the loop and nearly weight less at the top. Roller coasters thrill us be cause of their ability to acceler ate us downward one moment and upward the next, Hender son said. Get loopy on Kumba at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay or Kraken at SeaWorld Orlando.SUPER SOAKERSWater rides are usually a lot of small drops throughout but no real belly ips until the big dive at the end. Among the super soakers are Splash Mountain at Disney Worlds Magic Kingdom, the Jurassic Park River Adven ture and Dudley Do Rights Rip saw Falls at Universals Islands of Adventure and Journey to At lantis at Sea World. These rides end with a massive plunge, dropping guests as far as 84 feet. For an old-school feel, check out Tanganyika Tidal Wave and Stanley Falls at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, featuring smaller drops but a classic splash.NO SANDALS, PLEASEOn an inverted coaster, the feet dangle free. It feels like oating through open air and when the rides go upside down, all you see is sky. Without a place to rmly plant my feet, its dizzying. But, these rides are su per smooth. For this twist on the tradition al coaster experience, visit Mon tu at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay or Dragon Challenge at Univer sals Islands of Adventure.FLYING HIGHManta at SeaWorld Or lando is Floridas only ying coaster. Riders glide in the prone position through in versions at 56 miles per hour. The ride is designed to mim ic the movements of a manta ray gliding through the sea. Because youre tilted down, its a completely differ ent experience compared to other thrill rides, said Ash ley Reams, theme park en thusiast. You almost feel like you are really ying, which is incredibly exhilarating.From free falls to blackouts: A guide to Floridas best rides PHOTO COURTESY OF WALT DISNEY WORLD Walt Disney World guests will soon take ight over the wondrous Golden State in Soarin, an attraction that landed at Epcot in 2005. The Florida attraction was inspired by the hugely popular Soarin Over California at Disneys California Adventure.

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For More Information or to Register Call:352-787-4657ext. 321or email: mpinder@saintpaulschool.comr rfntnb Choose from either the Half Day or Full Day 7 Week ProgramsEach week is a different theme Everyone is welcome at...St. Pauls Life Enrichment Summer Series Sunday, April 27, 2014 SUMMER PLANNER 3FRUITLAND PARKCAMP GENEVACamp Geneva in Fruitland Park has added programs that include a unique preschool called Little Village, which features a childrens theater and themed playground. The camp also features a zip line through a wooded landscape, paintball course to be completed in the fall and upgrades to the lakefront. For decades, Camp Geneva has hosted church groups, cheerlead ers and martial arts groups from throughout the state. Enrollment for preschool, day camp and afterschool care in the fall are ongoing. To learn more, contact Peter Mi raglia, camp director, at 352-7877016 or Peter@aca-camp.com, or go to www.aca-camp.com.LEESBURGSTORY TIME AT LEESBURG PUBLIC LIBRARYCome and enjoy story time and a craft with Ms. Hannah at 10:30 / a.m. every Thursday from May 1 to July 31. Admission is free. This event is for ages 0 to 5. Call Hannah Williams at 352728-9790, email hannah.williams@leesburgorida.gov or go to www.mylakelibrary.org.CLERMONTSPIRITED KIDS ART CLASSES AT CAGAN STUDIOClass meets May 2, 9, 23, 30 and June 6, 13, 20 and 27 at the South Lake Art League, 16640 Ca gan Crossings Blvd., Clermont. The cost is $20. Spirited Kids Art Classes are for ages 7 through 12. Come to the Cagan Studio and paint a design in acrylic that can be framed to hang on your wall. Different artists will be featured each week. Students will paint a smaller, easier version of the evenings Spirited Easel adult class lesson. Go to www.spiritedeasel.com for a schedule. The $20 fee covers instruction and all painting supplies. Discount rates are avail able for groups and private parties. Call Kathie Camara at 352241-6407 or email southlakeart@ yahoo.com.SUMMER CAMP DIRECTORYSEE EVENTS | PAGE 4 HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Camp Montessori Day Camp June 2nd thruAugust 1st, 2014 rf352-787-5333 nnntb ntbtbtb bttntbb b bt bt b btb b Open House May 19, 2014 6:00pm For Campers 2-12Awaken Your Childs Spirit and ImaginationWith hundreds of camps to choose from, children of all ages can actively take part. While some of these camps are day events others run weekly or overnight. Depending on your interest summer camps offer a wide spectrum of programs and cater to thousands of children every summer. Summer camps offer one of the best ways to experience new and exciting activities. At the same time, they also help to expand on the activities one already enjoys. Thats where Camp Montessori comes in. Camp Montessori is focused on increasing a child's appreciation for their natural environment, giving campers opportunities to work with Montessori materials at the same time having fun while learning. Campers get to make new friends, share their stories and interact in their own way. Excitement and adventure rule at Camp Montessori as the children explore newer horizons. If you thought summer camp did not have much to offer, think again! Camp Montessori is virtually a click away, check us out at lakemontessori.com. Camp Montessoris day camp is filled with exploration of every sort! From art to sports and games to academic work in our Montessori classroom, there is always something fun going on at camp! Families may choose to register for weekly, daily or half day programs. Campers range in age from 2 to 12. Dail y activities are age appropriate with special attention given to each campers individual needs. Camp Montessori offers programs June 2nd through August 1st, Monday through Friday. Visit us during our open house May 19 at 6:00 p.m. at Lake Montessori & Learning Institute located at 415 N. Lee Street in Leesburg. Come meet the director, visit the school and ask an y questions you have. You cannot realize the importance o f camp in shaping your childs life unless you send them. CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS128 E Magnolia Ave. Eustis, FL 32726352.589.8622www.studio19performarts.comSUMMER ARTS ON MAGNOLIA DAY CAMPSFor Students Ages 5-12 Years Old Cost: $185/wk (Includes Materials Fees) Time: 8:45 AM 4:45 PM Registration: $15Tutus, Tiaras and All that JazzJune 9th June 13th June 16th June 20th June 23rd June 27th Where the Wild Things Are Beyond the Emerald City All 3 Camps include daily art classes at One Dane Place (below Studio 19), and Student Performances Fridays after camp at Olivias Coffee House (corner of Magnolia & Bay)Students will take dance, acting and singing classes and will participate in other arts-related camp activities along with arts and crafts classes built on the theme of each camp. Ballet, Jazz, Modern/Contemporary, Tap and Hip-Hop Evening Classes for Students 5-18. Call Studio 19 for more information. 4 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday April 27, 2014 CUBSTRUCTION CUB SCOUT SUMMER DAY CAMPLake County Cubstruction Cub Scout camps will be from 8 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. at three different locations: June 16-20 at Montverde Academy (for Webelos only, fourth and fth graders), 17235 7th St., in Mont verde; June 23-27 at the Latter Day Saints Church, 14600 Green Valley Blvd., in Clermont and July 7-11 at the First Baptist Church of Eustis, 3551 E. Orange Ave., in Eustis. The cost is $95, and registra tion is available online at www. cscouting.org. Call 352-4551271 for information.PAT BURKES 2014 HOOPS BASKETBALL SUMMER CAMPSThe Pat Burke basketball camps instruct players in goal setting, ed ucation in strength and agility training, on-court player develop ment, nutritional education and life skills. All camps will be held Monday to Friday from 8:30 / a.m. to 3:30 / p.m. and are geared for boys and girls ages 7 to 13. The cost is $395 per session per child. Local camps will be June 23-27 and July 14-18. Both camps will be at Windy Hill Middle School, 3575 Hancock Rd. in Clermont. For information and to register, go to www.orlandobasketballtraining.com, call 352-385-0131 or email Hoops31@me.com.MONTVERDEWOMENS HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER TRAINING CAMPPro Soccer Kicks and Mont verde Academy have teamed up to give local and international girls a great opportunity to improve their game at this camp, June 26-29 for girls entering grades 9-12. The camp is designed for the athlete that wants to achieve a higher level of competition with the opportunity to be evaluated and coached by current college coach es in the Central Florida area. For camp cost and information go to www.prosoccerkicks.com. EVENTS FROM PAGE 3 SEE EVENTS | PAGE 5 HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Our shop is located in the Clermont Waterfront Park at the end of Second Street nestled amongst the oak hammocks. Bring your chairs and coolers for a relaxing day. We offer bicycle, kayak, and paddleboard rentals and sales. Starting in June we will be open 7 days a week 9a.m. to 6p.m. for the summer! Look for us on Facebook to keep up with our unique activities on and off the water as well as our offered specials. Ex. scavenger hunts water & land, happy hour paddles, sunset paddles, yoga paddles, group paddles, the Klondike challenge and more. Farm Animals to Pet & Feed, Pony Rides, Hayrides, Picnic Area, Gift Shop, Birthday Parties & Group Rates $1 OFF ADMISSIONMust present coupon. Not valid on group rates or special events. Exp. 8/31/14.352-753-2882 www.uncledonaldsfarm.com 6 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday April 27, 2014 CITY OF EUSTIS PARKS & RECREATIONSummer camp sign-ups have started with camps running from 7:30 a.m to 6 / p.m. June 9 to August 13 at 2214 Bates Ave., in Eustis. Camps are for ages 5 to 12. The registration fee is $25 per family, and is non-refundable. The cost is $500 for the rst 25 kids to sign up. All others are $550 for the summer. The weekly fee is $85 and includes all eld trips and dai ly snacks. Call 352-357-8510 for information or go to www.eustisrec.org.MOUNT DORATENNIS CAMPKids will use smaller rackets, easy-to-hit balls and nets to t their size. Participants will learn tennis with fun, engaging practices by trained coaches. For informa tion, go to www.dtennis.net. Ses sion 3 runs from May 5 to 30 and costs $48 per session at the Don nelly Park Courts.SUMMER TENNIS CAMPCamp Director Diana Belton is a USPTR certied professional tennis instructor with more than 26 years of playing and 18 years of teaching experience. She was the director of Fort Gatlin tennis programs and summer tennis camps in Orlando for more than 10 years. For information, email dtennisptr@ gmail.com. Session 1 is June 11 to 25, and Session 2 is July 23 to August 6. The cost is $36 per session at the Lincoln Park Unser Courts, 1101 N. Unser St.MIDDLE SCHOOL MAYHEMAre your teens tired of staying at home during the summer with nothing to do and nowhere to go? Call 352-735-7183 to register or go to the City of Mount Dora Parks and Recreation Department, at 900 N. Donnelly St. The camp is designed for kids from ages 12 to 14 and costs $85 per participant. The cost includes a eld trip. It runs from 7:30 / a.m. to 5:30 / p.m. Monday through Fri day, beginning June 9.KIDZQUEST SUMMER SURVIVOR CAMPThis camp runs for eight weeks, from June 9 to August 1. Each week is designed with a different theme and activities. There is also a eld trip seven of the eight weeks and swimming two to three times per week. The camp is offered in EVENTS FROM PAGE 5 SEE EVENTS | PAGE 7

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Cruise the scenic Withlacoochee River on a boat tour with Capt. Mike. Enjoy dining with a Southern touch at Stumpknockers Restaurant on the river. + 352-637-2726 rf r GUNS & GOLDFind great prices on quality sporting arms, ammo, and accessories for the summer seasonNordic Gun & Pawn 748-2210 HOURS: 42 YEARS IN THE SAME LOCATIONGOLD & DIAMOND JEWELRY We Buy Gold and Gun CollectionsOver 700 Guns in Stock! Gun Cleaning & Repair Sunday, April 27, 2014 SUMMER PLANNER 7partnership with W.T. Bland Library. The cost is $85 per week.TAVARESTHE CHILDRENS SPLASH PARK, A SEAPLANETHEMED VENUE Open 10 / a.m. to 6 / p.m., week ends only, through Memorial Day and 10 / a.m. to 6 / p.m. daily from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The venue is closed October through March for the winter. General admission is $2, with a seasonal $15 pass for city resi dents. First come, rst served. For information on the Splash Park, call 352-742-6267 or email seaplanebase@tavares.org.SUMTER COUNTYWELCOME TO OUR JUNGLE!The Sumter County Extension in Bushnell will offer a Welcome to Our Jungle! summer camp for kids from July 21-25 at 4-H Camp Oc ala, 18533 NFS 535, in Altoona. The deadline for camp registration is June 27. The $25 non-refundable deposit is required by June 27. The total camp cost is $195, with scholarship amounts determined after all registrations are in. The balance of the camp fee is due by July 9. Make check or money order payable to Sumter County 4-H, 7620 State Road 471, Suite 2 in Bushnell, FL 33513. Call 352793-2728 for information. EVENTS FROM PAGE 6

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8 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday April 27, 2014



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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Care and Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Preparing for the possibility that Florida vot ers pass a constitutional amendment this No vember legalizing the dispensing of medical marijuana, the city of Mount Dora is working on an ordinance regulating it in the city, accord ing to the citys planning and development di rector. The current draft of the ordinance would prohibit the production of medical marijuana in the city as an agricultural product and lim it the dispensing of medical marijuana to the citys most intense industrial zoning district, the WP-2 Workplace zoning district, according to a Mount Dora city council agenda. We take a pretty hard line on agricultur al production in the city anyway. So, were just adding this to the list, Mount Dora planning and development director Mark Reggentin said. Reggentin said the heaviest uses in the zoning district where medical marijuana would be al lowed would be manufacturing type uses. The council will have a rst reading of the or dinance on May 6, Reggentin said. Reggentin said the state legislature is working MOUNT DORA City prepares for possibility of medical marijuana SEE PLAN | A2 More online For more on this story, see www.dailycommercial.com. SERGEI GRITS / AP A Ukrainian government soldier sits atop an armored personal carrier on Saturday at a checkpoint near the village of Dolina, eastern Ukraine. PETER LEONARD Associated Press SLOVYANSK, Ukraine As Western governments vowed to impose more sanc tions against Rus sia and its supporters in eastern Ukraine, a group of foreign mil itary observers re mained in captivity Saturday accused of being NATO spies by a pro-Russian insur gency. The German-led, eight-member team was traveling under the auspices of the Or ganization of Securi ty and Cooperation in Europe when they were detained Friday. Vyacheslav Ponomarev, the self-proclaimed peo ples mayor of Slo vyansk, described the detained observers as captives and said that they were ofcers from NATO member states. As we found maps on them containing information about the location of our check points, we get the im pression that they are ofcers carrying out a certain spying mis sion, Ponomarev Sanctions loom as observers held in eastern Ukraine SEE SANCTIONS | A2 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sporting a bandana, a motorcycle rider rolls into Leesburg during Bikefest weekend on Saturday. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com B andanas are the fashion accesso ries that help bik ers achieve that rugged edge. But this morning, bik ers and anyone else so inclined will be wearing at least 2,500 bandanas to show off their gentler side as Leesburg Bike fest ofcials try to set a world record for the longest chain of ban danas. The linked bandan as will be made possi ble by a $10 donation, which will allow buyers to purchase two of cially designated black bandanas one of which can be used to try for the record, and one to help them re member the event. The black bandanas will be sold until 9:30 a.m. to day, when the attempt to break the record will begin at Towne Square nestled in the heart of Bikefest in front of City Hall. Proceeds will ben et the Folds of Hon or Foundation, which supports the spouses, children and depen dents of soldiers who have been killed or dis abled. So many bikers wear bandanas, so we thought it would be the perfect record to try for, said Rachel ORy an, who works in event marketing. ORyan said they hope to have at least 2,500 bandanas to break the current re cord, which was set in 2011 by the Hiratsuka Coming of Age Day Cer emony Committee in Japan, using 2,450 ban danas that stretched about 4,500 feet. And in order to count for the Guinness Book of World Records, the bandanas must be tied to each other, with no strings or any other de vices helping to hold them together. Joe Shipes, executive vice president of the Leesburg Partnership, which sponsors Bikef est, said he is optimistic the record will be bro ken. An online effort to sell the black bandan as, embroidered with Leesburg Bikefest, be gan well before bikers began rolling into Lees burg. We basically are al ready there, Shipes said. Kim Waters, one of many people who snatched up bandanas, was wearing one Satur day as a top. We all love our free dom and want to sup port the U.S. military, said Waters, shortly af ter showing off her tat toos in a Bikefest con test on Saturday. Representatives from the Guinness Book of World Records will not be on hand today for The Full Throttle Saloon is open for business during Bikefest weekend. LEESBURG Biking for Guinness World Record in bandana tying SEE BANDANA | A2 IRON JUNGLE QUALIFIES 2 MORE FOR NATIONALS, SPORTS B1 EDUCATION: Lakefront TV to feature local students, schools in new production A3 CONGRESS: Members back from vacation but will they work ? A8 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, April 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 117 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C6 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C8 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C6 MONEY E1 NATION A8 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A9 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 88 / 68 Possible thunderstorms $1

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 the event. Representa tives of the organization come at a price of $7,500, ORyan said. To help make the re cord ofcial, ofcials will use video, photos and media stories to help support the validity of any claim and commu nity leaders will serve as ofcial witnesses in cluding Leesburg City Manager Al Minner and Daily Commercial pub lisher Steve Skaggs, as well as an independent surveyor. Dave Dierinzo, vice president of the Folds of Honor Foundation, ap plauded the effort. Its for a good cause, said Dierinzo, standing at his organizations booth on Saturday. Of course, bandan as arent the only bik er attire being sold at this years 18th annual Bikefest, which ofcially kicked off Friday. A cluster of thousands of bikes roared through out downtown Leesburg as onlookers were treat ed to motorcycle stunt ing, live music, Texas cheeseburgers, lamb and chicken gyros, egg rolls, rib-eye steak sandwich es and a smorgasbord of other food and drinks. More than 250 vendors are on hand this year for Bikefest, with many sell ing the fashions and mo torcycle accessories that have become a hallmark of the event. One booth is selling motorcycle masks de signed as animals, skulls, outlaws and other facial takes. Its hot, but it looks so cool, said Terri Ann Stanback, a Jackson ville resident, looking at a mask with a smile cov ered in pink lipstick. Shipes said the nice weather this year helped to attract a record num ber of patrons in an event that was expected earlier to welcome more than 300,000 bikers and music fans to the free three-day weekend fes tival. Bikefest also gives a number of bikers the chance to show off their motorcycles. Andre Mar tinez and his wife Ma ribel, of Davenport, showed off their white Suzuki Hayabusa with its $250 chrome handle bars and other matching accessories that had on lookers snapping a bar rage of photos. It turns heads, Andre Martinez said. A 3rd Street mobile set-up of Full Throt tle Saloon, the subject of a popular truTV reali ty show, sold its famous Sloonshine and Jesse James Americas Outlaw Bourbon. Michael Bal lard, who owns the Full Throttle Saloon in Stur gis, S.D., said they have set up at a number of bike festivals across the country. He said their show is a hit with the blue collar workers. This allows people to experience our saloon without having to go all the way to Sturgis, he said. Other activities include the World Famous Fris bee Dogs, a bikini contest featuring women from Hooters, a Hot Body con test for the men, a pok er run and more than 80 concert performances. Leesburg Bikefest will conclude today at 3:30 p.m. with a perfor mance by platinum re cording artist Uncle Kracker. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 26 CASH 3 ............................................... 5-8-0 Afternoon .......................................... 0-8-4 PLAY 4 ............................................. 1-9-2-1 Afternoon ....................................... 2-7-1-7 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 25 FANTASY 5 ............................. 2-4-11-18-32 MEGA MONEY .................... 18-21-31-4218 MEGA MILLIONS ................ 3-11-18-20-669 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. said, adding they could be released in exchange for jailed pro-Russian activists. Outside Slovyansk, a city about 90 miles west of Russia, Ukraine government forc es continued operations to form a secu rity cordon as it attempts to quell unrest threatening to derail the planned May 25 presidential election. The U.S. and other nations in the Group of Seven said in a joint statement released Friday night by the White House that they plan to impose additional eco nomic sanctions on Russia in response to its actions in Ukraine. The West has accused Russia of using covert forces to encourage unrest in Ukraine and says Moscow has done nothing to pressure pro-Russian militias to free police sta tions and government buildings in at least 10 cities across the region. Condemning Russias earlier annex ation of Ukraines Crimea Peninsula, the G-7 said: We will now follow through on the full legal and practical consequences of this illegal annexation, including but not limited to the economic, trade and nancial areas. SANCTIONS FROM PAGE A1W on creating legislature to regulate medical mari juana and the city wants to have laws in place ahead of time. The problem is we dont know what the states (going to) do, Reg gentin said. So what wed like to do is sort of control our own desti ny, because a lot of times when the state legislature writes laws, they put pro visions in it that prohibit cities and counties from doing any regulation dif ferent than the statute and many times, if we have regulations on the books they will essential ly grandfather those in. Reggentin added the ordinance will change assuming the constitu tional amendment pass es and depending on how the state legislature acts. Philosophically, what were trying to do is get out in front of it what were doing is just pro tecting our right to reg ulate it, Reggentin said. The city council hasnt actually said its a good thing or its a bad thing. Ultimately, communities may want to embrace the production and distribu tion of medical marijua na as an industry. He added that since the city is taking a conserva tive approach, it allows us to back off that if we want to a little bit and react. Morgan Fox, the com munications manag er with Marijuana Poli cy Project, said its good that the initiative is be ing taken to develop reg ulations, but also that it might be early to do so as the law has not yet passed and state regula tions are not yet in place. Its good that theyre taking the lead on this, Fox said. Weve seen in places like California where local and state of cials were slow to try to regulate the industry. They ended up not real ly liking what came out of that and when youre able to set up clear and con cise regulations youre much better able to en force best practices in the industry. Fox added the regula tions should not go so far as to prevent dispensing medical marijuana in the city. As long as people are able to have access to it and the dispensaries arent zoned into places where its unsafe for pa tients to travel to, I really think that thats a matter for local discretion, Fox said. Fox said the Marijua na Policy Project is the nations largest marijua na policy reform organi zation and concentrates on state and federal lob bying. He said, however, they are not directly in volved in the Florida ini tiative. The organizations vi sion statement says that, MPP and MPP Foun dation envision a nation where marijuana is legal ly regulated similarly to alcohol, marijuana edu cation is honest and re alistic, and treatment for problem marijuana us ers is non-coercive and geared toward reducing harm. PLAN FROM PAGE A1 BANDANA FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake County Sheriffs Sergeant Michael Marden asks for the registration of a motorcycle with no rear-view mirrors on Saturday during Bikefest weekend on U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent KUALA LUMPUR, Ma laysia President Barack Obama is hopscotching through Chinas neigh borhood with a careful ly calibrated message for Beijing, trying both to counter and court. During visits to U.S. al lies, Obama has signaled that American military power can blunt Chinese aggression in the Asia-Pa cic region, even as he urges Beijing to use its growing clout to help re solve international dis putes with Russia and North Korea. The dual tracks un derscore Beijings out sized importance to Obamas four-country swing through Asia, even though China is absent from his itinerary. The president opened a long-awaited visit to Ma laysia on Saturday, fol lowing stops in Japan and South Korea, and ahead of a visit to the Philippines. Obamas trip comes at a tense time for the region, where Chinas aggres sive stance in territorial disputes has its smaller neighbors on edge. There also are contin ued questions about the White Houses commit ment to a greater U.S. focus on Asia. In an af rmation, Obama is ex pected to sign a security agreement with the Phil ippines clearing the way for an increased Ameri can troop presence there. In Tokyo, Obama as serted that a treaty obli gating the U.S. to defend Japan would apply if Bei jing makes a move on a string of islands in the East China Sea that Ja pan administers but Chi na also claims. Yet at times, the pres ident has tempered his tough talk in an attempt to avoid antagonizing Beijing. To the chagrin of the Japanese, Obama said the U.S. would not pick sides in the sovereignty claims at the heart of the re gions territorial disputes. He repeatedly declared that the U.S. is not asking Asian allies to choose be tween a relationship with Washington and Beijing. I think theres enor mous opportunities for trade, development, working on common is sues like climate change with China, Obama said. In Asia, Obama carefully calibrates his China message CAROLYN KASTER / AP President Barack Obama arrives with Malaysian King Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah, left, and Queen Haminah, right, followed by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razakon on Saturday in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Halifax Media Group A Florida Islamic group is accusing some Repub lican Party lawmakers and local party organizations of fostering anti-Muslim sentiment. The Coun cil on Amer ican-Islam ic Relations, or CAIR, sent letters to al most every Republican Club or par ty extension in the state, asking the groups to stop bringing speakers who es pouse anti-Islamic views. The letter said it repre sented the interests of more than 150,000 regis tered Florida Muslim vot ers. Hassan Shibly, executive director for CAIR, based in Tampa, said such speak ers not only iname an ti-Islam tensions but have also led to discriminatory legislation: namely Senate Bill 864, sponsored by Sen. Alan Hayes, R-Umatilla, which allows school dis tricts to select textbooks instead of adhering to the statewide curriculum. Shibly said the textbook debate came about after a parent in Volusia Coun ty became uncomfortable with the number of pages in a history textbook that described Islam and or ganized a protest to per suade the school district to stop using the book. The Volusia School Dis trict noted that there are many more references to Christianity in the text book than there are to Is lam. Shibly said the let ters were only sent to Re publican lawmakers and groups because Republi cans drafted and support these two bills and be cause no other party has invited anti-Islam speak ers to give presentations. Our ofce has docu mented a pattern of local GOP organizations invit ing extremist anti-Muslim speakers who promote fear and hatred of the en tire Muslim faith and community, often under the pretense of targeting radicals, Shibly wrote in the letter. CAIR also is concerned Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT SORRENTO Deadline extended for poetry contest In honor of Aprils National Poetry Month, the East Lake County Library is sponsoring the 12th an nual Poetry Contest, open to all ages and divided into three groups: chil dren up to age 12, teens aged 13-18 and adults over the age of 19. The May 3 deadline for entries has been extended to May 10 for those interested in taking part. Entry forms are available online at www.mylakelibrary.org. The com pleted form may be delivered with the original poetry or mailed to the East Lake County Library, 31340 County Road 437 South, Sorrento, FL 32776. For information, call Scott Amey at 352 -383-9980. SUMTERVILLE Online courses set for adult students in Sumter County The Sumter Adult and Community Education Center has a program of fering high-quality, noncredit online courses for the community through a partnership with ed2go featur ing hundreds of courses on numer ous topics. Through well-crafted lessons, ex pert online instruction and inter action with fellow students, partic ipants gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. New six-week online courses start monthly, with two lessons released weekly. For information, go to Sumter Adult and Community Education Center website at www.aec.sumter. k12..us, or call 352-793-5719. TAVARES Online registration for businesses available The new competitive bidding pro cess for purchasing goods and ser vices is convenient and free, with on line registration for business owners interested in working with the county. Upon registration, businesses will automatically receive an email no tice when the county issues a formal solicitation for goods or services that match the commodity codes selected. For information and to regis ter, go to www.lakecounty.gov/ procurement. GROVELAND Arthritis pain management classes scheduled The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting classes in Tavares and Groveland on arthritis pain management. The free program will provide in formation about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday at the Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave. Register online at www.tavarespain. eventbrite.com. In Groveland, the class is from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St. Register online at www. grovelandpain.eventbrite.com. For information or to register, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff report The Florida Region of USA Volleyball in Eustis will hold a groundbreak ing ceremony at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Hickory Point Beach sand volley ball complex in Tavares. Organizations taking part will include the Lake County Board of Commis sioners, Lake County Wa ter Authority, Central Flor ida Sports Commission, Lake County Economic Development & Tourism, Mission Inn, Lake-Sumter State College, Mount Dora Community Trust and the Florida Region of USA Vol leyball. This unique partner ship between Lake Coun ty, Lake County Water Au thority and our non-prot corporation demonstrates how great things can happen when organiza tions come together with a common goal, Steve Bishop, executive direc tor for the Florida Region of USA Volleyball, said in a press release. The new sand volleyball complex will bring many volleyball enthusiasts to Lake Coun ty in the coming years as we focus on hosting events for amateurs and professionals of all ages. This is truly a win-win for Lake County and for the sport of volleyball. Hickory Point Beach will be a 20-court sand volley ball complex located on Lake Harris at the Hickory Point Recreational Com plex in Tavares. It is set to open over the July 4th weekend. Lake County is proud to be at the forefront of one of the fastest growing sports in the world, said Robert Chandler, Lake County Economic Devel opment & Tourism direc tor. We are grateful for the partnerships that have contributed to the devel opment of The Hickory Point Beach sand volley ball complex. This venue TAVARES Ceremony set for volleyball complex SEE SAND | A5 UMATILLA Does GOP foster anti-Muslim sentiment? Florida Islamic group says some lawmakers do HAYES Staff report The Florida Depart ment of Health (DOH) in Lake County, in partner ship with the Lake Coun ty Board of County Com missioners (BCC), was part of a group of state wide employees credited with saving government a total of $558 million. Florida Lieutenant Gov ernor Carlos Lopez-Can tera joined Florida Tax Watch in announcing the 2014 Prudential Pro ductivity Award winners Workers save govt money SEE SAVING | A4 Staff report Robotics students at Carver Middle and Bever ly Shores Elementary are in Anaheim, Calif., this weekend for the 2014 VEX Robotics World Champi onship. Competing against 800 schools from 28 different countries are four teams from Carver Middle and one team from Bever ly Shores, Chris Patton, spokesman for the school district, said in a press re lease. The VEX Robotics World Championships will include the top teams from more than 400 tour naments held between Lake students vying for robotics title SEE LAKE | A5 Staff report Lake County Schools and Lakefront TV un veiled a new program this weekend featuring news about local students, ac tivities and school pro grams. Inside Lake Schools will feature school stu dents and faculty report ing information from around the countys pub lic schools. The show ap peared on Lakefront TV at 9 a.m. Saturday, and will air again at 4:30 p.m. today and 4 p.m. Wednesday. Each new episode will feature a different student as guest host, Robert Sargent, spokes man for the city of Lees burg, said in a press re lease. Lake Minneola High School student Kristyn Evens hosts the rst show with several re ports, including results from the countys STEM Bowl competition and nalists for the districts rookie teacher of the year recognition. Chief Academic Of cer David Christiansen, who joined Lake Schools in January, provides an extensive interview into improvements for Lakes high schools, Sargent noted. One proposal for a seven-period class schedule will provide more instructional time for students while saving the district $4.6 million in operation costs. Lakefront TV, the gov ernment-access ca ble channel operated by the city of Leesburg, ap pears daily on Comcast channel 22, Brighthouse channel 199 and Flori da Cable Channel 4. The channel also streams live on the Internet at www. lakefronttv.com. For more informa tion about Inside Lake Schools, contact Lake County Schools Commu nications Ofcer Chris topher Patton at 352253-6522. COURTESY LAKEFRONT TV Lake Minneola High School student Kristyn Evens will host the rst episode of Inside Lake Schools on Lakefront TV. The new program began airing this weekend. LEESBURG New local production to focus on schools SEE GOP | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 IN MEMORY OBITUARIES Lucille C. Martin Lucille C. Martin, 94, went home to be with the Lord on April 24, 2014. She was born July 3, 1919 to Charles B and Leila Milton, Sr., in Sumter County, FL. She was a lifelong member of Pleasant Grove Bap tist Church, Oxford, FL. Lucille worked in the Wildwood High School Cafeteria and drove the school bus for Sum ter County Schools. She enjoyed retirement by traveling to all 50 states and many foreign coun tries. Lucille loved to run the produce stand many years for Mar tin & Martin. Her re cent years have been lled with numerous fun hours playing the the marble game with her friends and proudly carrying the title of The Marble Queen. Lu cille is survived by her daughter, Lynelle (Jer ry) Purcell of Oxford, FL; four grandchildren, Wanda (Bill) Critten den of Panama City FL, Craig (Angel) Martin of Oxford, FL, Shawn Pur cell of Oxford, FL and Brad Deon Martin of Oxford, FL, six great grandchildren; Heath (Amber) Crittenden of St. Petersburg, FL, Jessi ca Martin of Anchorage, AK, Bret (Katie) Crit tenden of Manhattan, KS, Broughton Mar tin of Oxford, FL, Av ery Martin of Bellevue, FL, and Branson Mar tin of Oxford, FL and one great great grand child, Tristan Critten den of St. Petersburg, FL, one sister, Clara Roll of Oviedo, FL, and many much-loved niec es and nephews. Lucille is preceded in death by her husband, Ernest B. Martin, daughter, Thel ma Jeanette Martin and son Darroll Martin. A visitation for Mrs. Mar tin will be held on Mon day, April 28, 2014 from 6:00PM ~ 8:00PM in the Banks/Page-Theus Chapel with funeral services being held on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 10:00 AM at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, Oxford. Interment will be at Nichols Cemetery. On-line condolences may be shared by visit ing www.bankspageth eus.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. DEATH NOTICES Sarah Ruth Brannock Sarah Ruth Bran nock, 81, of Longwood, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Umatilla. Paul Ernest Papineau Paul Ernest Papine au, 65, of Leesburg, died on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Mike Leo Skiba Mike Leo Skiba, 93, of Tavares passed away on Friday, April 25, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL at the Florida Cap itol, which includ ed employees of the DOH in Lake County and the BCC, Elisha Pappacoda, a coun ty public information ofcer, said in a press release. One program that received recogni tion is Lakes on line septic system permitting initia tive, the only one of its kind in the state. The countys Growth Management De partment web page at www.lakecounty .gov/departments/ growth_manage ment/building_ser vices was created to help streamline the permitting process by assigning a Lake County planner to help residents le their permits with the state. Allowing the per mitting process to transition online in its entirety for our residents and busi nesses was a crucial step in our econom ic development ef forts, said Commis sioner Sean Parks. The staff from the BCC and the Health Department worked hand-in-hand to make the online per mitting process work smoothly, and we have received sev eral calls from oth er counties around the state inquiring as to how we made it work between the two agencies. The Lake Coun ty honorees were Amye King, Elias Christ, Diane Fox, Mike Cates, Anita Greiner, Erikk Ross, Carmen Carroll and Skip Nemecek for their work on the septic system and online permitting initiative. The 26th annual awards honored 432 people and teams of state employees for creating and imple menting innovative solutions and pro ductivity improve ments in cost sav ings, cost avoidances, and increased rev enue for state gov ernment. Of the 432 award winners, 195 will receive cash or plaques during the regional awards cer emonies this sum mer. SAVING FROM PAGE A3

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) HARMONY UNITED PSYCHIATRIC CARE We are a full service psychiatry practice dedicated and experienced in working with psychiatric patients to maintain & improve their mental health Psychiatric Evaluation, Diagnosis & Management of: Adil A. Mohammed, M.D. Brenda S. Faiber, M.S., LMFT OUR SERVICES www.harmonyunitedhc.com We accept most insurances with special pricing for cash paying patients.Appointments available within 7 days June 2013 and March 2014. The competition is based on an engineer ing challenge present ed to the teams in the form of a game, Pat ton said. This years event is Toss Up, which requires ro bots to perform stunts that include picking up various sized balls and tossing them into goals, climbing over bumps and hanging from walls. Carver Middle and Beverly Shores Ele mentary students have been working yearround using the VEX Robotics Design Sys tem to build robots designed to score the most points possible in qualication match es, elimination compe titions and skills chal lenges. According to Bart Nash, robotics teacher at Carver Mid dle, students have been working diligently to come up with solutions to play the predeter mined robotics game. For the past four or ve years I have been in vited over to Carver Mid dle School for the state tournament that Mr. Nash has held, School Board Member Rosanne Brandeburg said. In its rst year of competition, one of the teams from Bever ly Shores Elementary won the state title. I am very proud of my students, said Jo seph Newton, fthgrade teacher at Beverly Shores Ele mentary. We just start ed this year and we ha vent even had these robots for more than six months and our kids went all the way. To learn more, visit www.vexrobotics.com. LAKE FROM PAGE A3 about Senate Bill 386, referred to as the An ti-Foreign Law Bill and the Anti-Sharia Law Bill, legislation that would keep Florida judges from applying foreign laws. The only exception would be if the foreign law guar antees the same con stitutional protections found in the Florida and U.S. constitutions. The bill also is spon sored by Hays in the Senate and Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk City, in the House. Gov. Rick Scott has voiced his approval for the measure, but critics say the law is unneces sary and there are vir tually no examples of foreign law previously intervening with state laws. Shibly said the bill is thinly veiled anti-Is lam legislation, citing a booklet Hays handed out to other Senators. According to the Mi ami Herald the book let was called: Shariah Law: Radical Islams threat to the U.S. Con stitution. Its unconstitution al, and well serious ly consider litigation if it passes, Shibly said of the bill. Florida has real problems and we dont have time to x imaginary ones driv en by a discriminatory agenda. GOP FROM PAGE A3 will greatly improve the countys sports infra structure and positive ly impact our economy for years to come. On April 8, The Lake County Board of Coun ty Commissioners ap proved spending $398,000 fully fund ed by the tourist devel opment tax to help pay for construction of the complex. On April 23, the Lake County Wa ter Authority approved a lease agreement with the county. The Hickory Point Beach sand volleyball complex will reside at the 68-acre Hicko ry Point Recreational Complex that current ly has ve soccer elds operated by Lake Coun ty Soccer. The sand vol leyball complex will have professional level net systems, lights, per manent restrooms, an intercom system, web cams and 24 inches of top-grade sand. Bishop said events at Hickory Point Beach will include tourna ments, leagues, camps and clinics. A local beach vol leyball league will be scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday nights beginning in July. Ad ditional information will be available on the Florida region website in the coming weeks. SAND FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press BROWNSVILLE, Tex as SpaceX found er and chief executive Elon Musk has signaled his companys intent to put its much-sought launch pad project on a beach near Brownsville. The signs came Fri day in nal comments Musk gave at an un related news confer ence in Washington, D.C. SpaceX is devel oping a launch pad on the south coast of Texas, near Brownsville. Were waiting on the nal en vironmental approvals for that. We expect those soon, and well prob ably have that site ac tive in a couple of years, said Musk, who also co-founded PayPal and Tesla Motors in addition to the California-based private rocket maker. A nal environmental impact assessment is pending from the Fed eral Aviation Adminis tration. Lower Rio Grande Valley promoters are as suming nothing regard ing the regions pros pects for becoming a space base. There is no spaceport project in Brownsville yet, Gilberto Sali nas, executive vice pres ident of the Brownsville Economic Development Council, told the Hous ton Chronicle However, I think it is all looking very, very positive, Camer on County Judge Car los Cascos told The Brownsville Herald If he (Musk) is saying that, all that is left now is the results of the EIS (environmental impact statement). And I think what he is trying to say is if this comes out in a positive light then they are going to come to South Texas. PHILIP ELLIOTT Associated Press WASHINGTON The once and perhaps future presidential candidate Rick Santo rum has lots of policy ideas for fellow Repub licans seeking public ofce. Hes just not sure hell be one of those hope fuls ever again. Yeah, I dont know if I can do this. Its just tough, Santorum said about another White House run. The former Pennsyl vania senator tells The Associated Press in an interview that he isnt ruling out a 2016 can didacy. But, he says, there are plenty of reasons why he wouldnt do it. He is enjoying a sec ond career as a mov ie studio executive. His daughters health re mains a concern. And, Santorum writes in a new book, he can help shape his partys future from off stage. In the interview, San torum said the GOP will struggle to win rac es unless candidates came up with poli cies that help working Americans. Victories will be tough, he said, unless elected ofcials stop being obstructionists. Santorum said the libertarian streak run ning through his party distorts the denition of freedom, and that politicians wrongly look to President Ron ald Reagans policies to address todays chal lenges. Then theres Santo rums slap at Republi cans who demonize so cial welfare programs. Do Republicans re ally care less about the person at the bottom of the ladder than Demo crats do? To be painful ly honest, I would have to say in some ways yes, Santorum writes in his book, Blue Col lar Conservatives: Re committing to an America That Works. The tough talk raises questions about Santo rums viability in what could be a crowded 2016 primary eld. Also, hes not rush ing to camp out in ear ly nominating Iowa or New Hampshire again. A while. A year at least, probably, he said of his timeline to decide on a 2016 bid. Santorum ran an up start campaign in 2012, surviving long enough to be Mitt Romneys last remaining rival. He struggled to raise mon ey or support among establishment-mind ed Republicans, but his socially conservative prole drew enough backing for Santorum to pick up victories in 11 states. Even in victory, his disorganized cam paign cost him, includ ing failing to qualify for the ballot in Virginia. We cannot run the campaign we ran last time if we run this time, Santorum said. How Republicans win is the focus of San torums latest book, to be released Monday. Santorum offers ideas on energy, educa tion, the economy and health care. It comes across as part think tank policy paper, part campaign playbook and part communica tions advice on how to connect with work ing-class voters. For instance, Repub licans should not focus exclusively on busi ness leaders and job creators and should speak to employees, Santorum said. Santorum undecided in 2016 bid AJ MAST / AP Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks during the leadership forum on Friday at the National Rie Associations annual convention in Indianapolis. SpaceX CEO signals his favor for Texas launch pad site

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7

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Responsibilities: Perform all duties as are required to prudently administer the plan. POLICE PENSION PLAN BOARD One members of a five-member board for a one year term. Responsibilities: Perform all duties as are required to prudently administer the plan. PLANNING COMMISSION One Alternate Member of a seven member Commission for three year terms. Responsibilities: Long range planning activities such as the Comprehensive Plan, current planning reviews of applications for rezoning, conditional uses, comprehensive plan amendments etc. The Planning Commission also functions as the Board of Appeals and hears variance requests and appeals of administrative decisions HISTORIC PRESERVATION BOARD Two Alternate members to serve as part of a seven member board to serve a three year term and two alternates to serve three year terms Responsibilities: To work with the Planning Division in applying design standards to properties requesting alterations, construction, demolition, relocation or removal in the historic district: To recognize historic properties in the District where significant physical improvements have been made. To develop programs to promote historic preservation in the City of Leesburg. Meets Fourth Wednesday of the month in the Commission Chambers at 4:00 p.m. GREATER LEESBURG COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY One member of a seven member Commission for a four year term Responsibilities: Plan revitalization projects for the GLCRA area and approve the budget for the agency. Meetings as called. Meet in Commission Chambers Betty M. Richardson, City Clerk ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press WASHINGTON Congress gets back to work Monday after a two-week vacation, and its looking like lawmak ers will do what they do best: the bare mini mum. Forget immigration, a tax overhaul, stiffer gun checks. Theyre all DOA. Raising the minimum wage or restoring lost unemployment bene ts? Not going to hap pen. Forcing govern ment approval of the Keystone XL pipeline? Veto bait. The only things likely to become law in a Con gress bitterly divided between House Repub licans and the Demo cratic-led Senate are those that simply have to pass, such as a mea sure to avoid a govern ment shutdown. Thats a short, short list. It gets even shorter if you leave off things that can wait until a post election lame-duck ses sion. Atop the list is a shortterm spending bill to keep the government running past the Oct. 1 start of the new budget year. Votes on the bill arent needed until Sep tember. After stumbling into a politically costly par tial government shut down last fall, Republi cans wont let it happen again, especially with an election just around the corner. This years measure should be no problem. Much more difcult, however, is the second main item of must-do business: nding more money for the Highway Trust Fund to keep road and bridge construc tion projects aoat. The fund is running critical ly low on cash. The ad ministration says that could mean a slowdown in construction proj ects this summer and fall when lawmakers are back home asking vot ers to return them to Washington for another term. The current high way bill expires at the end of September. The number of (must-do) items is small, said GOP lob byist Hazen Marshall of the Nickles Group. But the degree of dif culty, particularly for the highway bill, is very high. Top lawmakers and the administration all say they want to pass a multiyear highway and transit funding bill. Most Capitol Hill watch ers think a temporary extension of funding is far more likely. Thats still complicated. Lawmakers will have to agree on perhaps $10 billion to $15 billion in funding to cover ex pected trust fund short falls. Optimally, Con gress would act before its August vacation. Passing those two bills is probably all that has to happen before Elec tion Day. Congress has taken care of must-do legislation to increase the debt limit and x Medicares awed pay ment formula. So what will Con gress do for the next few months? Not much. There will be efforts to get the troubled appro priations process back on track in the after math of last years shut down and modest fol low-up budget bargain. Senate Majority Lead er Harry Reid, D-Nev., has promised the head of the Senate Appro priations Committee, Sen. Barbara Mikuls ki, D-Md., a few weeks of oor time after last years failure to pass a single appropriations bill through the Senate. The House will try to pass as many bills of the 12 spending bills as it can, but measures funding implementa tion of the Affordable Care Act, the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Pro tection Agency are can didates to bog down. Congress returns to work but will anything be accomplished? MICHAEL MELIA Associated Press HARTFORD, Conn. A teen ager charged with stabbing a fel low high school student to death on the day of their junior prom is being held in a hospital under psychiatric evaluation where he will likely remain for two weeks, one of his attorneys said Satur day. The name of the 16-year-old suspect was not ofcially re leased but people who saw him taken into custody identied him as Chris Plaskon, a friend of the victims and an athlete de scribed as genial and respectful. Plaskon is accused of stab bing to death Maren Sanchez, 16, in the hallway of Jonathan Law High School in Milford. The attack occurred Friday morn ing, hours before the schools ju nior prom, and authorities were investigating whether Sanchez was stabbed after turning down his invitation to the dance. The suspect, who is charged as a juvenile offender, will not ap pear at an arraignment sched uled for Monday in New Haven, attorney Richard Meehan said. The hospital commitment can last for up to 15 days, accord ing to Meehan. He said doctors typically order such involuntary commitments in cases where someone in custody is consid ered a danger to himself. Meehan said the suspects family is also reeling from the at tack. His family is devastated not only for him, but the youngster who was killed. Its a terrible sit uation all the way around, Mee han said. His client is expected to be charged as an adult, but he would need to appear in court for that to happen, Meehan said. States Attorney Kevin Lawlor said several factors go into that decision, including the serious ness of the charges. J. DAVID AKE / AP Tulips bloom in front of the Capitol recently in Washington. Congress gets back to work on Monday after a two-week vacation, and its looking like lawmakers will do what they do best: the bare minimum. School stabbing suspect under mental evaluation PETER CASOLIN0 / AP Friends and family attend a memorial service for Maren Sanchez who was killed at the school on Friday. MICHAEL HILL Associated Press WEST POINT, N.Y. West Point wants more women. With female cadets representing less than one in ve cadets in the Long Gray Line, the U.S. Military Academy is taking steps to boost the number of women arriving here this sum mer and beyond. West Points new superintendent said the moves will help keep the storied academy ahead of the curve now that the Pentagon is lifting restrictions for women in combat jobs. We obviously have to increase the female population for a number of reasons. One is because there are more opportunities in the branches for the females, Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen Jr. said. Women have been a presence at the nations military academies since 1976. Female cadets here can grow their hair longer than the stan dard military buzz-cut and can wear stud ear rings. But they carry the same heavy packs, march the same miles and graduate with the same second lieutenant bars the men here do. West Point seeking more female cadets

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Federico Lombar di told reporters on Sat urday that Benedict will be in St. Peters Square for the canonization of John and John Paul. He said Benedict and many car dinals will concelebrate the Mass with Francis. Benedict resigned from the papacy a year ago, and since has large ly dedicated himself to prayer in a monastery on the Vatican grounds. Todays appearance will be his highest-pro le one since he retired. Francis, who lives else where in Vatican City, in a guesthouse, has been quite welcoming to his predecessor, occasion ally paying a call on Benedict. It was Francis who sought to include Benedict in todays cer emony, expected to draw hundreds of thou sands of tourists and pilgrims. Emeritus Pope Ben edict XVI has accepted the invitation, and has let Pope Francis know that he will be present tomorrow morning at the canonization cere mony and will concele brate along with other prelates, Lombardi said. That doesnt mean that he will go up on the altar on the steps of St. Peters Basilica, Lom bardi said of the out door Mass. He noted that during the ceremo ny, cardinals and bish ops will be seated on one side of the espla nade, with, presumably, Benedict, among them. We will all be happy to have his presence at the ceremony, the Vati can spokesman said. Benedict also showed up Francis ceremony to elevate churchmen to cardinals rank in Feb ruary. But that ceremo ny wasnt a Mass, mean ing todays appearance by two popes would be the rst Mass concele brated by two pontiffs. As German Cardi nal Joseph Ratzinger, Benedict presided over John Paul IIs funeral in the square in 2005. He was soon elected pon tiff himself, going on to lead the ceremony to beatify his Polish-born predecessor in 2011, also in the square. Beat ication is the last for mal step before saint hood. It was John Paul who, early in his papa cy, appointed the Ger man prelate to a key Vatican post in charge of safeguarding church teaching, and eventu ally, also dealing with the mounting cases of sexual abuse of minors by priests in the United States and elsewhere. Benedict has a con nection to John XXIIIs papacy as well. As a young theologian, he at tended the Second Vati can Council, the gath ering of prelates from around the globe that the Italian pope set up as a way to bring mod ernizing reforms to the Catholic church. On Saturday, pil grims were pouring into Rome in big groups or as individual families or travelers, eager to be among those taking their place in the square before dawn on the day of the ceremony. The sound of hymns, in Pol ish, English and Ital ian, echoed suddenly in some of Romes streets Saturday, then just as abruptly faded, as faith ful joyfully sang as they made their way through the Italian capital. Interior Minister An gelino Alfano said an estimated 1 million people were expected to ood into Rome for the event. Benedict to join in double sainthood ceremony SAO PAULO A former army colonel who acknowledged he tortured and killed political prisoners during Brazils 19641985 military regime was murdered in his home outside Rio de Janeiro, police told local news media on Saturday. Citing the victims widow, police in spector Fabio Salva dorete told the UOL news portal that Pau lo Malhaes was suf focated to death on Thursday by three men who broke into his house and stole two computers and some of the antique guns he collected. Last month, Mal haes gave Brazils Na tional Truth Com mission a detailed account of how he participated in the abduction, torture and killing of politi cal prisoners. He also said he helped in the disappearance of the bodies. He said that at the time he did not regret his ac tions which he justi ed saying they were guerrillas and ene mies of the state. Malhaes was the rst member of the Armed Forces to openly acknowl edge that he tor tured, killed and hid the bodies of political prisoners. Created in 2012, the Truth Commission is investigating human rights abuses com mitted under Brazils military regimes. It does not have pow ers to prosecute any one because of a 1979 amnesty law that re leased civilians and the military from li ability for political ly motivated crimes committed during the dictatorship. It can, however, reveal the abuses and the names of those who committed them. Ex-colonel who admitted torture killed in Brazil

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com MLB: Standings, league leaders, box scores / B5 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Iron Jungle Weightlift ing continues to move along. Lake Countys only weightlifting club com peted recently at the Florida Youth Trials, a tune-up meet at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School and Iron Jungle Weighlifting had two more lifters earn spots in USA Weight liftings Youth National Championship in June. I only had four lift ers compete, so half of our competitors quali ed for nationals, said Iron Jungle Weightlift ing coach Josh Boyer. That gives us four team members who have qualied (for nationals). We have a tough sixweek prep period com ing up, and our success at Youth Nationals will be a direct correlation to the approach to our training. We are past the level of being content with qualifying and now it is time to bring home medals each time we at tend a national champi onship. I have condence that we will have our best training days over this next month-and-ahalf. Alexis Smith and Car los Molano had solid performances at Port Orange Spruce Creek to join teammates Mor gan Rhone and Brett Ol lila at nationals. Smith competed at 75 ki lograms (about 165 pounds) and Molano lifted at 69 kilograms (about 152 pounds). Smith entered the competition needing 97 kilograms (213 pounds) to qualify for nation als and Boyer said she turned up at the meet ready to succeed. She hit personal records of 41 kilograms (90 pounds) in the Snatch and another personal record weight of 56 kilo grams (123 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a total of 97 kilograms, a third personal mark. Smith hit on four of her six total lifts and qualied for nation als with her second at tempt in the Clean-andJerk. Her performance earned Iron Jungle its only medal of the com petition. I couldnt be more proud of Alexis because she has come so far in reaching this point, PHOTO COURTESY OF TARA WILLIS-SMITH Iron Jungle Weightlifting club member Alexis Smith (right) poses with coach Josh Boyer after a recent meet at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School. Smiths performance in the competition earned her a spot in the USA Weightling Youth Nationals in June. Iron Jungle has 2 more qualifiers for nationals JOHN BAZEMORE / AP Atlanta center Pero Antic (6) pulls down a rebound against Indiana forward Evan Turner (12) in Game 4 of the teams rst-round playoff series on Saturday in Atlanta. DANNY MOLOSHOK / AP Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling looks on during preseason game in 2010 between the Clippers and the Los Angeles Lakers in Los Angeles. ANTONIO GONZALEZ Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO The NBA is investigat ing a report of an au dio recording in which a man identied as Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling tells his girlfriend not to bring black people to games. NBA spokesman Mike Bass said in a statement Saturday that the league is in the process of au thenticating the validi ty of the recording post ed on TMZs website. Bass called the com ments disturbing and offensive and said the league would have no further comment. In the recording post ed on TMZ, the man questions his girl friends association with minorities. TMZ reported the woman, V. Stiviano, who is of black and Mexican descent, posted a picture of her self with Lakers Hall NBA probing alleged recording of owner PAUL NEWBERRY Associated Press ATLANTA Paul George and David West hit key 3-point ers down the stretch, and the top-seeded In diana Pacers held off the Atlanta Hawks 9188 Saturday to even the opening-round series at two wins apiece. In a game they had to have, the Pacers nally showed some grit and regained the homecourt edge. George put the Pacers ahead 86-85 with a jumper beyond the arc, and West hit another trey with 1:33 remaining. Atlanta had a chance after Kyle Korver was fouled in the corner and knocked down three free throws, tak ing advantage of a doover after the Pacers were called for a lane violation on the third attempt. But George pulled down an offen sive rebound to set up George Hills driving shot with 56 seconds left. Pero Antic missed a 3-pointer at the buzz er t hat wouldve forced overtime. Game 5 is Monday in Indianapolis. George scored 24 points and West added 18. Paul Millsap led the Hawks with 29, but the All-Star forward strug gled in the nal min ute. First, he turned the Pacers win, even series with Hawks SEE NBA | B2 SEE OWNER | B2 SEE IRON | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 2, Indiana 2 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 Thursday, April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 Saturday, April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 Monday, April 28: Atlanta at Indiana, 8 p.m. Thursday, May 1: Indiana at Atlanta, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Atlanta at Indiana, TBA Miami 2, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 Saturday, April 26: Miami at Charlotte, late Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Charlotte at Miami, 7 or 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Miami at Charlotte, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Charlotte at Miami, TBA Brooklyn 2, Toronto 1 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 Friday, April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 or 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Toronto at Brooklyn, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Brooklyn at Toronto, TBA Washington 2, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 Tuesday, April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 Sunday, April 27: Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 29: Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: Chicago at Washington, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Washington at Chicago, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 2, San Antonio 1 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 Saturday, April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30: Dallas at San Antonio, 7 or 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: San Antonio at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Dallas at San Antonio, TBA Memphis 2, Oklahoma City 1 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT Thursday, April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City at Memphis, late Tuesday, April 29: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA L.A. Clippers 2, Golden State 1 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clip pers 105 Monday, April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 Sunday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 29: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 1: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, TBA x-Saturday, May 3: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, TBA Portland 2, Houston 1 Sunday, April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT Wednesday, April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 Friday, April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Wednesd ay, April 30: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 2: Houston at Portland, TBA x-Sunday, May 4: Portland at Houston, TBA Saturdays games Pacers 91, Hawks 88 INDIANA (91) George 10-18 0-2 24, West 7-13 3-6 18, Hibbert 3-5 0-0 6, G.Hill 5-8 3-4 15, Stephenson 2-9 0-0 5, Turner 4-8 2-2 11, Mahinmi 1-1 0-0 2, Scola 2-7 0-0 4, Watson 3-8 0-0 6. Totals 37-77 8-14 91. ATLANTA (88) Carroll 1-6 0-0 3, Millsap 10-18 6-6 29, Antic 1-6 0-0 2, Teague 5-15 2-2 14, Korver 4-9 4-4 15, Brand 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 2-7 2-2 6, Mack 3-6 0-0 7, Martin 0-1 0-0 0, Scott 4-15 3-3 12. Totals 30-84 17-17 88. Indiana 29 13 24 25 91 Atlanta 22 26 17 23 88 3-Point GoalsIndiana 9-23 (George 4-7, G.Hill 2-4, West 1-1, Turner 1-2, Stephenson 1-7, Watson 0-2), Atlanta 11-31 (Millsap 3-6, Korver 3-8, Teague 2-5, Carroll 1-2, Mack 1-2, Scott 1-4, Williams 0-1, An tic 0-3). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsIndiana 49 (George 10), Atlanta 51 (Korver 9). AssistsIndiana 22 (G.Hill, George 5), Atlanta 22 (Teague 7). Total FoulsIndiana 19, Atlanta 18. TechnicalsG.Hill, Ste phenson, Scott. A,043 (18,729). Mavericks 109, Spurs 108 SAN ANTONIO (108) Leonard 7-8 1-3 17, Duncan 8-14 6-6 22, Splitter 6-8 2-2 14, Parker 9-18 0-0 19, Green 1-5 0-0 3, Ginobili 4-14 4-4 12, Diaw 3-5 0-0 7, Belinelli 3-3 0-0 7, Mills 2-5 1-2 5, Bonner 1-1 0-0 2, Joseph 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-81 14-17 108. DALLAS (109) Marion 3-11 1-2 9, Nowitzki 7-13 4-6 18, Dalembert 4-8 5-5 13, Calderon 7-10 0-0 16, Ellis 12-22 2-2 29, Carter 3-8 4-4 11, Blair 1-1 0-0 2, Harris 1-5 0-0 3, Wright 2-2 0-0 4, Crowder 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 4282 16-19 109. San Antonio 34 20 20 34 108 Dallas 27 32 18 32 109 3-Point GoalsSan Antonio 6-18 (Leonard 2-2, Beli nelli 1-1, Parker 1-2, Diaw 1-2, Green 1-4, Mills 0-3, Ginobili 0-4), Dallas 9-23 (Ellis 3-7, Calderon 2-3, Marion 2-6, Carter 1-3, Harris 1-4). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsSan Antonio 39 (Splitter 13), Dallas 44 (Dalembert 10). AssistsSan Antonio 26 (Parker 6), Dallas 25 (Calderon 9). Total FoulsSan Antonio 20, Dallas 19. A,636 (19,200). HOCKEY NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Detroit 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston 3, Detroit 0 Thursday, April 24: Boston 3, Detroit 2, OT Saturday, April 26: Boston 4, Detroit 2 Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Montreal 3, Tampa Bay 2 Tuesday, April 22: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3 Pittsburgh 2, Columbus 2 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Wednesday, April 23: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Saturday, April 26: Columbus at Pittsburgh, late Monday, April 28: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Columbus at Pittsburgh, TBA N.Y. Rangers 2, Philadelphia 2 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, April 25: Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Sunday, April 27: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, Noon Tuesday, April 29: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, TBA x-Wednesday, April 30: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rang ers, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 2, Minnesota 2 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Minnesota 1, Colorado 0, OT Thursday, April 24: Minnesota 2, Colorado 1 Saturday, April 26: Minnesota at Colorado, late Monday, April 28: Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Minnesota at Colorado, TBA Chicago 3, St. Louis 2 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: Chicago 2, St. Louis 0 Wednesday, April 23: Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Friday, April 25: Chicago 3, St. Louis 2, OT Sunday, April 27: St. Louis at Chicago, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 29: Chicago at St. Louis, TBA Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Dallas 3, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas 4, Anaheim 2 Friday, April 25: Anaheim 6, Dallas 2 Sunday, April 27: Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 29: Dallas at Anaheim, TBA San Jose 3, Los Angeles 1 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: San Jose 7, Los Angeles 2 Tuesday, April 22: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Thursday, April 24: Los Angeles 6, San Jose 3 Saturday, April 26: Los Angeles at San Jose, late x-Monday, April 28: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 30: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBA GOLF PGA Tour Zurich Classic Saturday At TPC Louisiana Avondale, La. Purse: $6.8 million Yardage: 7,425; Par: 72 Third Round Seung-Yul Noh 65-68-65 198 Keegan Bradley 69-66-65 200 Robert Streb 67-66-68 201 Jeff Overton 67-68-67 202 Ben Martin 62-67-73 202 A ndrew Svoboda 64-68-70 202 Paul Casey 71-68-64 203 Charley Hoffman 68-67-68 203 Tommy Gainey 71-66-67 204 Tim Wilkinson 70-70-65 205 Danny Lee 71-69-65 205 Bud Cauley 71-68-66 205 Retief Goosen 72-65-68 205 J.B. Holmes 71-65-69 205 Peter Hanson 65-69-71 205 Brooks Koepka 71-68-67 206 Daniel Summerhays 72-66-68 206 Kevin Kisner 69-68-69 206 Erik Compton 66-68-72 206 Joe Durant 69-71-67 207 Freddie Jacobson 72-69-66 207 Robert Allenby 71-68-68 207 Justin Rose 71-67-69 207 Mark Anderson 72-65-70 207 Fabian Gomez 72-69-66 207 David Duval 68-69-70 207 Will Wilcox 68-68-71 207 Kevin Chappell 72-67-69 208 Bronson LaCassie 70-69-69 208 David Toms 73-68-67 208 Alex Prugh 70-68-70 208 Morgan Hoffmann 70-68-70 208 Graham DeLaet 69-68-71 208 Cameron Tringale 73-69-66 208 Martin Flores 72-68-69 209 John Senden 70-70-69 209 Troy Matteson 72-68-69 209 Stuart Appleby 67-72-70 209 Vijay Singh 70-71-68 209 Kyle Stanley 71-67-71 209 Brendan Steele 73-67-70 210 Briny Baird 71-69-70 210 Troy Merritt 71-69-70 210 Mark Calcavecchia 71-70-69 210 D.A. Points 73-68-69 210 Rory Sabbatini 69-72-69 210 Charlie Wi 70-71-69 210 Bo Van Pelt 74-63-73 210 Robert Garrigus 73-69-68 210 Sean OHair 71-69-71 211 Sang-Moon Bae 68-72-71 211 Andres Romero 70-71-70 211 Charles Howell III 68-73-70 211 David Hearn 71-71-69 211 Lucas Glover 71-71-69 211 Y.E. Yang 72-70-69 211 Ricky Barnes 70-72-69 211 Kevin Tway 70-72-69 211 Boo Weekley 71-70-71 212 Wes Roach 74-67-71 212 Andrew Loupe 71-70-71 212 J.J. Henry 68-69-75 212 Michael Thompson 66-71-75 212 Tag Ridings 71-70-72 213 John Rollins 74-66-73 213 John Merrick 69-72-72 213 Shawn Stefani 69-72-72 213 Doug LaBelle II 68-73-72 213 Chad Collins 66-71-76 213 Derek Ernst 71-71-71 213 Jim Renner 75-67-71 213 Padraig Harrington 70-72-71 213 Greg Chalmers 71-71-71 213 Max Homa 71-71-71 213 TV 2 DAY ARENA FOOTBALL 4 p.m. ESPN2 Iowa at Philadelphia AUTO RACING 2:30 p.m. NBCSN IndyCar, Grand Prix of Alabama, at Birmingham, Ala. 5:30 p.m. NBCSN Indy Lights, Indy Lights 100, at Birmingham, Ala. 7 p.m. ESPN2 NHRA, Springnationals, at Baytown, Texas COLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN Alabama at South Carolina 4 p.m. ESPNU Oregon at Oregon St. 7:30 p.m. ESPNU Arizona St. at Arizona 10:30 p.m. ESPNU Hawaii at Cal St.-Fullerton GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC European PGA Tour, China Open, nal round, at Shenzhen, China 1 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, nal round, at New Orleans 3 p.m. CBS PGA Tour, Zurich Classic, nal round, at New Orleans 7 p.m. TGC LPGA, Swinging Skirts Classic, nal round, at Daly City, Calif. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at N.Y. Mets 1:30 p.m. MLB Cincinnati at Atlanta 2 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee 8 p.m. ESPN L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees MOTORSPORTS Noon FS1 MotoGP World Championship, Grand Prix of Argentina, at Santiago del Estero, Argentina NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 1 p.m. ABC Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Chicago at Washington 3:30 p.m. ABC Playoffs, rst round, game 4, L.A. Clippers at Golden State 7 p.m. TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Toronto at Brooklyn 9:30 p.m. TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 4, Houston at Portland NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Noon NBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 5, Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers 3 p.m. NBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, St. Louis at Chicago 8 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 6, Anaheim at Dallas SOCCER 6:55 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Cardiff at Sunderland 9 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Liverpool 11:05 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Manchester City at Crystal Palace SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED ball over with a bad pass. Then, he missed a spin ning shot in the lane after Atlanta passed on a chance at a tying 3-pointer. Indiana left the door open by missing its nal four free throws, including a pair by George with 7.5 seconds left when only one would have been enough to seal the victory. But the Pacers buckled down at the defensive end, forcing Antic to throw up a desperation 3 that clanked off the rim. The Pacers decided against benching Roy Hib bert to go with a smaller lineup against the Hawks, who have taken the 7-foot-2 center out of his com fort zone by spreading the court with their big men and taking advantage of every chance to run. Hibbert continued to struggle, with just six points and three rebounds in a little less than 25 minutes. But he did have his rst two blocks of the series, and his teammates took care of the rest. Cheered on by a raucous crowd at Philips Arena, where they even took down a curtain that normal ly covers part of the upper deck, the Hawks looked as though they were headed for a commanding lead in the series as they pushed out to their big gest lead, 54-44, early in the third quarter. But Millsap picked up two fouls just 7 seconds apart, giving him four in the game and forcing him to the bench for much of the period. The Pacers took advantage of the Atlanta stars absence, whit tling the decit down to 59-56 by the time he re turned. It was tight all the way in the fourth, and things got heated down the stretch. NBA FROM PAGE B1 of Famer Magic John son on Instagram which has since been removed. The man asked Stivia no not to broadcast her association with black people or bring black people to games. The man specically mentioned Magic John son on the recording, saying dont bring him to my games, OK? I will never go to a Clippers game again as long as Donald Sterling is the owner, Johnson responded on Twitter. He also said the alleged comments are a black eye for the NBA and said he felt bad that friends such as Clippers coach Doc Rivers and Clippers point guard Chris Paul had to work for Sterling. At a practice before the Clippers play Gold en State on Sunday, Riv ers said: As far as the comments, were not happy with them. Paul released a state ment through the play ers union that said: On behalf of the Na tional Basketball Play ers Association, this is a very serious issue which we will address aggressively. New NBA commis sioner Adam Silver was scheduled to address media Saturday night in Memphis, Tenn. be fore the Grizzlies play off game. On TNTs halftime studio show Satur day, host Charles Bar kley said: This is the rst test of Adam Sil ver. Hes got to suspend him right now. First of all, theyve got to prove thats his voice on that tape. But this is the rst big test for Adam Silver. You cant have this guy making statements like that. You have to suspend him and ne him immediately. NBA TV analyst and former player Chris Webber said that the NBA owners need to handle their own. A spokeswoman for the Rev. Al Sharptons National Action Net work, Jacky Johnson, said the organization planned a protest out side Tuesday nights NBA playoff game in Los Angeles. In Dallas, where the Spurs were getting ready to play the Maver icks, San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich said: The comments are ob viously disgusting. Mavericks own er Mark Cuban said I have plenty of opin ions, just not going to share them, fending off several inquiries be fore saying: Obvious ly if any business or en trepreneur says or does things that arent con gruent with what the organization is trying to convey, thats a prob lem. But its not my problem. Messages seeking comment from the Clippers were not re turned. Sterling, a real estate owner, bought the Clip pers in 1981. He is the longest-tenured owner in the NBA since Lakers owner Jerry Buss died last year. He has been frequent ly criticized for his fru gal operation of the Clippers, although in re cent years he has spent heavily to add stars such as Paul and Rivers, who led the team back to the playoffs in his rst year as coach. Former Clippers guard Baron Davis wrote on Twitter that Sterlings discrimina tion has been going on for a long time. Sterling has been involved in sever al lawsuits over the years, including ones with discrimination accusations. In November 2009, Sterling agreed to pay $2.73 million to settle allegations by the gov ernment that he re fused to rent apart ments to Hispanics and blacks and to families with children. The Jus tice Department sued Sterling in August 2006 for allegations of hous ing discrimination in the Koreatown area of Los Angeles. In March 2011, Ster ling won a lawsuit against former Clip pers general manag er Elgin Baylor when a jury rejected the Hall of Famers claim of age discrimination and ha rassment. Baylor, who was 76 at the time, had sought about $2 mil lion after claiming he was forced out of the job he had held for 22 years. The team said Baylor left on his own and a jury awarded him nothing. Sterling is a courtside xture at Clippers home games. But he rarely visits the teams locker room at Staples Center, although he made an appearance in Decem ber 2012 after they had won their 11th straight game, when he led an awkward locker room cheer. OWNER FROM PAGE B1 Boyer said. Alexis hurt her wrist during the high-school season and has battled the mental block many athletes go through on their road to recovery. I shared with her that I dont ask of my student-athletes to do anything I have done myself. In college, I broke my femur in a football game. I explained to her that I completely un derstand the physical and mental challenges she was going through. Being able to relate to her situation, I think, helped her in overcom ing the mental obstacle of being healed. Molano competed in the second session of the meet. He need ed 132 kilograms (291 pounds) to qualify for nationals and hit of four-of-six lifts. He set a personal mark of 59 kilograms (130 pounds) in Snatch and another person al best of 78 kilograms (172 pound) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a re cord total of 137 kilo grams (302 pounds). Carlos is starting to truly understand the nuances that separates the strict judging of USA Weightlifting ver sus what a lot lifters get away with during high school season, Boyer said. Ultimately, com peting in USA Weight lifting competitions will make anyone who also competes during high school season a better lifting and competitor. Rhone also lifted at 53 kilograms (116 pounds). She hit on ve-of-six lifts and nished with a personal record to tal of 94 kilograms (207 pounds). Warren Brown also represented the Iron Jungle, competing in the 77 kilogram (169 pounds) Junior catego ry. He is not eligible for nationals because of his age, Boyer said. Warren didnt have a lot of success during the Snatch portion of the competition and missed on all three of his attempts, Boyer said. Ive seen lifters do this before, but I have never had a club lifter of mine experience this. I felt bad for him, but it happens. There are days when your body just doesnt nish lifts. Boyer said Brown asked if he should even compete in the Cleanand-Jerk after miss ing all of his Snatch at tempts. The coach encouraged the pupil to continue competing, explaining the impor tance of salvaging the day. Brown responded with a a personal record of 93 kilograms (205 pounds). Warren composed himself after the Snatch competition, Boy er said. He showed his true character. Boyer said Iron Jungle Weightlifting will likely have at least one more competition prior to the Youth Nationals, which will be held June 12 to June 15 at Port Orange Spruce Creek. IRON FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 My Summer Forecast...HOT! HOT! HOT!HALLMARK OF MY CUSTOMER COMMITMENTMy Promise: 100% Satisfaction, Unconditional Money Back Guarantee! I Call it My One Year Test Drive.If you are not completely satisfied for any reason, simply contact me within one year of your purchase date and I will remove the system you purchased at my expense. You will then receive a prompt refund of the products purchase price. This promise is in writing and is good toward any service I offer, including repairs and system replacements. You are either absolutely delighted with the entire experience or you get a full refund. Its that simple and as promised, no fine print and no conditions.My name is Michael Raffensberger and I look forward to offering you exceptional service for years to come. 7AM TO 7PM 7 DAYS A WEEK!AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING 3 Ton AC Heat Pump installed 10 Year Warranty!Offer expires June 30, 2014Regular $4,977 You Save $1,208Just $3,977 10 Year Warranty!Offer expires June 30, 2014New Bryant 3 Ton Air Conditioning systemJust $3,27710 Year Warranty!Offer expires June 30, 2014New Bryant 3 Ton Mobile Home Heat Pump Package UnitJust $3,777*Limit 1 coupon per customer.Offer expires June 30, 201427-Step Precision a/c System Tune-Up & Professional Cleaning$47.77(Reg. $79.95) $50 discount/credit toward any of our services.Offer expires June 30, 2014 *Limit 1 coupon per customer.Offer expires June 30, 2014Join Now!Let us remember for you! Take 10% off of your first order! 352-326-5530www.THERMOCOOLair.com ** ALL OFFERS NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNT PROMOTION CODE: DC7772014All system installation offers assumes reconnection to existing refrigerant lines and ductwork. Horizontal installations will incur an additional fee. $3,277 offer assumes air conditioning installation using existing gas furnace. Certain restrictions apply. See www.THERMOCOOLair.com for more information. AUTO RACING JOHN ZENOR Associated Press BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Juan Pablo Montoya is still in the transition phase, where a fourthplace nish is good enough. The grace period wont necessarily last long for Montoya, who returned to IndyCar af ter ve seasons in For mula One and seven in NASCAR. He heads into race No. 3 today at Bar ber Motorsports Park with expectations still of contending quickly after the Top-5 nish at Long Beach, Calif. Montoya saw no need to get overly aggressive gunning for an even higher spot, a play-itsafe approach that is unlikely to continue much deeper into the season. I think it was the right thing under the circumstances, Tim Cindric, president of Penske Performance, said Friday. Later in the season, hell be disap pointed with fourth and wed certainly be disap pointed if later in the season we were happy with fourth. Hes smart. He hasnt had all the success that hes had without understanding when to go and when not to. Certainly, I think lat er in the season that mind-set might be a bit different. In the meantime, Montoya is still effec tively a rookie at new tracks like Barber, a 2.38-mile road course. He practiced at the track in much cooler condi tions back in February. The goal for Montoya was to crack the top 10 at Long Beach on April 13, and he easily topped that standard. Now, Cindric said the team is hoping Mon toya makes it into the second qualifying ses sion and secures a Top12 start. Barbers going to be a bit of a challenge for him, because its a re ally close race, Cin dric said. The amount of grip that there is, its very hard to pass. I think hes some body thats on cold tires here because itll be a three-stop race. I think youll see him gain more spots in the pits but qualifying will be tough for him again. Montoya had the eighth-fastest lap in practice Friday, at 1:09.1484. The fourthplace nish at Long Beach was better than hed had in practice or testing, but there are further indications hes getting closer to his form of 14 years ago. Beating Penske team mates Helio Castro neves and Will Power in a testing session is a step forward, too. We tested last week in Texas and I was quicker than my team mates, Montoya said. I think thats a good sign. He won his rst pole position in NASCAR some 40 miles down In terstate 20 at Talladega Superspeedway. That move came af ter Montoya spent ve seasons in Formula One following his Indianap olis 500 win in 2000. Now, hes back dealing with both technical and not so technical chang es involved in getting comfortable in the driv ers seat in open-wheel racing, from adjusting to the braking zones to just getting comfort able. With NASCAR you drive with the elbows out, because the seat is really big so you have to drive with the elbows out, Montoya said. Here you have no el bow room, so you do a little wrist movement. In the beginning it was like, Oh my God. Now its good. I got in the car (Friday) morning and its becoming more nat ural. The next stop will be the Grand Prix of India napolis, followed by the Indy 500. Barber, which he calls a really tech nical track, is another opportunity to get bet ter before IndyCars sig nature race. This is the last chance, the way I look at it, to get really good before we get to Indy, Montoya said. Indys the key. We want to real ly peak at Indy, so well see. In Alabama, he has the benet of team mates Power a twotime winner at Barber and Castroneves, who won the tracks in augural IndyCar race in 2010. Castroneves isnt sure the veteran Montoya needs many pointers. He certainly came up very quick, Castro neves said. His back ground is with openwheel, so its like riding a bicycle. Everything is coming back. There was not much advice from us. Montoyas transition continues in Alabama ALEX GALLARDO / AP Juan Pablo Montoya drives through a turn in the IndyCar Grand Prix of Long Beach on April 13 in Long Beach, Calif. He continues his transition from NASCAR to IndyCar today in Birmingham, Ala.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available ACTIVE MILITARYAll rates subject to change without notice. $1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC$1700+taxIncludes Green Fee for 18 Holes and Cart. May Golf & Lunch SpecialIncludes Green Fee for 18 Holes, Cart, Hot Dog, and Draft Beer or Soda.Call About Twilight Rates Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents TOUR TECHNIQUESCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen WreshShort Game Series(Chipping, Pitching, Putting & Bunkers)orFull Swing Series(reg. $200)$180Four 40-Minute Sessions THANKS FOR READING THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Largemouth bass are being caught on soft plastic baits such as June bug or June bug blue trick worms and watermelon red and June bug red swimming worms. Shell cracker are being caught on grass shrimp and yellow tailed worms. Some crappie are still be ing caught on chartreuse or pink jig heads tipped with minnows. Sandys next regular bass tourna ment will be an open tournament held May 17 this tournament will usher in a new season. For infor mation, call the shop at 352-7420036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Shellcracker are being caught on worms. Catfish are biting on shrimp. Pine Island has a full sup ply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of ar tificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES A few stripers are being caught on saltwater shrimp and lures with silver spoons. A few specks are still being picked up on minnows. The shell cracker action has slowed with the passage of the most re cent cold front. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Shellcracker activity has been strong. Shell cracker are biting on grass shrimp. Bass action has been very good. They are biting on spin ner baits and soft plastic worms. Bluegill and speck have been bit ing on grass shrimp and worms. BL ACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURG Action has been a little slow er with the passage of the last cold front. A few fish are being caught from the dock. In addition to ca noes and rowboats Black Bass now rents kayaks. Minnows, red worms and night crawlers sales contin ue to be strong, suggesting specks, bream and catfish are biting. Want to try something new, try fishing from a kayak. SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTO Some specks are still spawn ing in the canals in Lake Carlton and Lake Beauclaire among the cat tails, brush and fallen trees where eel grass and lily pads flour ish. Specks are being caught in ap proximately 10 feet of water in the Apopka-Beauclaire canal and out from Deer Island. They are being caught on Rons Zip jigs and small ice jigs fished around 5 to 6 feet covering a lot of water. On Lake Carlton, drift the jig tipped min now across the lake. Post spawn bass are biting early in the morn ing in the mouths of residential canals on noisy top water baits like Rat-L-Traps. Lots of hybrid bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feed er creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. A mixed bag of fish are being caught in Lake Monroe fishing the channel and deep water. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfnf tb brbff t fff tnf trnfn f r f tbfn brbnnn t t trnf rf f rf f f rnf tbfffn brbfn t ff f n t f trff STAFF REPORT Lake Pierce bass an glers will be happy to know t he Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) has stocked 160,000 largemouth bass fingerlings into the 3,728-acre Polk County lake. The FWC stocked 2.5inch fish, from its Flor ida Bass Conservation Center at Richloam, in Sumter County, to sup plement low natural reproduction attribut ed to a relatively small adult bass population, documented in FWC samples. The larg er-than-normal fin gerlings we stocked have growth advantag es over smaller finger lings because they can readily con sume abun dant larval shad found in the lake, said FWC fishery biologist Chris Wiley. Stockings on April 16 and 17 should help en sure the viability of the bass shery, while lake managers wrestle with the problem of an aging lake, characterized by al gal blooms and signi cant muck deposits over portions of the lakes bot tom. It typically takes one to two years before stocked bass become available for anglers to catch but in the long-run, hopes are that many of these bass will become the parents of future genera tions of Lake Pierce bass. For more information on freshwater shing, visit MyFWC.com/Fish ing and select Fresh water or call the FWC Lakeland regional of fice at 863-648-3200. Bass fingerlings stocked in Polk lake by FWC

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 14 10 .583 6-4 W-1 7-4 7-6 Baltimore 11 11 .500 2 6-4 L-1 4-5 7-6 Boston 12 13 .480 2 1 6-4 W-2 5-8 7-5 Toronto 11 13 .458 3 1 3-7 L-4 4-7 7-6 Tampa Bay 10 13 .435 3 2 3-7 L-3 7-7 3-6 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 12 9 .571 6-4 L-1 9-5 3-4 Minnesota 12 11 .522 1 6-4 W-1 6-5 6-6 Chicago 12 12 .500 1 4-6 W-1 7-4 5-8 Kansas City 11 11 .500 1 6-4 W-1 6-3 5-8 Cleveland 11 13 .458 2 1 4-6 L-2 7-6 4-7 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 15 8 .652 6-4 W-2 6-6 9-2 Texas 14 9 .609 1 8-2 L-1 9-4 5-5 Los Angeles 11 12 .478 4 1 5-5 L-1 3-6 8-6 Seattle 9 13 .409 5 2 2-8 W-2 4-5 5-8 Houston 7 17 .292 8 5 2-8 L-3 3-9 4-8 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 15 7 .682 7-3 W-2 7-3 8-4 New York 13 10 .565 2 7-3 W-3 7-7 6-3 Washington 14 11 .560 2 5-5 W-2 9-7 5-4 Philadelphia 11 12 .478 4 2 5-5 L-1 4-5 7-7 Miami 10 13 .435 5 3 5-5 L-2 9-4 1-9 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 17 6 .739 7-3 W-2 8-5 9-1 St. Louis 13 12 .520 5 1 4-6 L-1 5-3 8-9 Cincinnati 11 12 .478 6 2 7-3 L-1 4-5 7-7 Pittsburgh 10 15 .400 8 4 3-7 W-1 6-8 4-7 Chicago 7 15 .318 9 5 3-7 L-3 5-8 2-7 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY San Francisco 14 10 .583 5-5 W-3 7-4 7-6 Colorado 13 11 .542 1 7-3 W-1 8-4 5-7 Los Angeles 13 11 .542 1 4-6 L-2 5-8 8-3 San Diego 11 14 .440 3 3 4-6 L-2 7-6 4-8 Arizona 8 18 .308 7 6 4-6 W-3 2-11 6-7 FRIDAYS GAMES Kansas City 5, Baltimore 0 L.A. Angels 13, N.Y. Yankees 1 Boston 8, Toronto 1 Detroit 10, Minnesota 6 Oakland 12, Houston 5 Chicago White Sox 9, Tampa Bay 6 Seattle 6, Texas 5 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 1 FRIDAYS GAMES Washington 11, San Diego 1 N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 3 Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 4 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 0 Arizona 5, Philadelphia 4 Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 4, 11 innings San Francisco 5, Cleveland 1 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 4, L.A. Angels 3 Boston 7, Toronto 6 Minnesota 5, Detroit 3 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Kansas City at Baltimore, late Oakland at Houston, late Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, late Texas at Seattle, late SATURDAYS GAMES Washington 4, San Diego 0 San Francisco 5, Cleveland 3 Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 1 Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, late Cincinnati at Atlanta, late Miami at N.Y. Mets, late Philadelphia at Arizona, late Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late JOHN MINCHILLO / AP New York Yankees relief pitcher David Robertson throws the nal pitch to strike out Los Angeles Angels batter Howie Kendrick (47) to close out Saturdays game at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Yankees won, 4-3. TODAYS GAMES Boston (Lester 2-3) at Toronto (Dickey 1-3), 1:07 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 2-2) at Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 1-1), 1:35 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 3-1) at Minnesota (Gibson 3-1), 2:10 p.m. Oakland (Milone 0-1) at Houston (McHugh 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 3-1) at Chicago White Sox (Undecided), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 0-3) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Harrison 0-0) at Seattle (Maurer 0-0), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 3-0), 8:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Miami (Koehler 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 1-1), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 2-2) at Atlanta (Teheran 2-1), 1:35 p.m. San Diego (Kennedy 1-3) at Washington (Jordan 0-3), 1:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Hammel 3-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 3-0), 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 1-1) at St. Louis (Wainwright 4-1), 2:15 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 0-3) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 1-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Burnett 0-1) at Arizona (McCarthy 0-4), 4:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Viciedo, Chicago, .370; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .364; AlRamirez, Chicago, .358; Wieters, Baltimore, .357; RDavis, Detroit, .354; MeCabrera, Toronto, .346. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 23; Donaldson, Oakland, 19; Mauer, Minnesota, 19; JAbreu, Chicago, 18; Bautista, Toronto, 18; Plouffe, Minnesota, 18. RBI: JAbreu, Chicago, 27; Colabello, Minnesota, 27; NCruz, Baltimore, 23; Pujols, Los Angeles, 21; Donald son, Oakland, 20; Brantley, Cleveland, 19; KSuzuki, Min nesota, 19. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 36; AlRamirez, Chicago, 34; Rios, Texas, 30; Donaldson, Oakland, 29; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 29; 6 tied at 28. DOUBLES: Plouffe, Minnesota, 10; Beltran, New York, 9; Colabello, Minnesota, 9; Donaldson, Oakland, 9; Pe droia, Boston, 9; 6 tied at 8. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Bourn, Cleveland, 2; Ellsbury, New York, 2; Fuld, Minne sota, 2; Infante, Kansas City, 2; AJackson, Detroit, 2; LMartin, Texas, 2; IStewart, Los Angeles, 2. HOME RUNS: JAbreu, Chicago, 9; Pujols, Los Angeles, 9; Donaldson, Oakland, 7; Dozier, Minnesota, 7; Bau tista, Toronto, 6; NCruz, Baltimore, 6; 7 tied at 5. STOLEN BASES: Altuve, Houston, 9; Andrus, Texas, 9; RDavis, Detroit, 8; Ellsbury, New York, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 6; Dozier, Minnesota, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6. PITCHING: MPerez, Texas, 4-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 4-1; 18 tied at 3. ERA: MPerez, Texas, 1.42; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.54; Darvish, Texas, 1.61; Kazmir, Oakland, 1.62; Feldman, Houston, 1.69; Ventura, Kansas City, 1.80; Shields, Kansas City, 1.91. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Detroit, 44; FHernandez, Se attle, 43; Price, Tampa Bay, 40; Lester, Boston, 36; Tanaka, New York, 35; Shields, Kansas City, 35; Sa bathia, New York, 35. SAVES: Axford, Cleveland, 8; Holland, Kansas City, 6; TomHunter, Baltimore, 6; Santos, Toronto, 5; Soria, Texas, 5; Perkins, Minnesota, 5; 5 tied at 4. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .398; Tulowitzki, Colo rado, .380; YMolina, St. Louis, .361; Utley, Philadelphia, .358; Freeman, Atlanta, .357; Bonifacio, Chicago, .353. RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 20; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 20; EYoung, New York, 19; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; Braun, Milwaukee, 17; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 17. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 27; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 20; Trumbo, Arizona, 19; Braun, Milwaukee, 18; Morneau, Colorado, 18. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 34; Blackmon, Colorado, 33; Uribe, Los Angeles, 31; Bonifacio, Chicago, 30; ECabrera, San Diego, 30; Freeman, Atlanta, 30; YMo lina, St. Louis, 30. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 10; HRamirez, Los An geles, 10; Utley, Philadelphia, 10; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 9. TRIPLES: Denora, San Diego, 2; CGomez, Milwaukee, 2; Harper, Washington, 2; Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Hill, Ar izona, 2; Puig, Los Angeles, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2; EYoung, New York, 2. HOME RUNS: Belt, San Francisco, 7; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 7; Trumbo, Arizona, 7; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 6; Morse, San Francisco, 6; Stanton, Miami, 6; JUpton, Atlanta, 6; Walker, Pittsburgh, 6. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 12; EYoung, New York, 11; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9 PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 4-0; Machi, San Fran cisco, 4-0; Wainwright, St. Louis, 4-1; Lynn, St. Louis, 4-1; Lohse, Milwaukee, 4-1; 15 tied at 3. ERA: Harang, Atlanta, 0.85; Simon, Cincinnati, 1.30; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.38; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.42; Wainwright, St. Louis, 1.46; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.53; AWood, Atlanta, 1.54. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 53; Fernandez, Miami, 47; Greinke, Los Angeles, 40; Cueto, Cincinnati, 39; ClLee, Philadelphia, 38; Lynn, St. Louis, 36; Wa cha, St. Louis, 35; AWood, Atlanta, 35; Wainwright, St. Louis, 35. SAVES: FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 10; Street, San Diego, 8; Jansen, Los Angeles, 8; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 7; Hawkins, Colorado, 7; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 7; Papelbon, Philadel phia, 6; AReed, Arizona, 6. Nationals 4, Padres 0 San Diego Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi ECarer ss 4 0 0 0 Span cf 5 0 1 1 Denor lf 4 0 1 0 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 Venale rf 4 0 0 0 Werth rf 4 1 2 0 Gyorko 2b 4 0 1 0 LaRoch 1b 3 1 1 1 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 3 1 Amarst cf 3 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 1 Petersn 3b 3 0 0 0 Frndsn lf 3 1 1 0 Rivera c 2 0 1 0 Leon c 4 0 0 0 Grandl ph-c 0 0 0 0 Roark p 3 0 1 0 Cashnr p 1 0 0 0 Roach p 0 0 0 0 Nady ph 1 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 Totals 33 4 10 4 San Diego 000 000 000 0 Washington 300 001 00x 4 EE.Cabrera (3), Alonso (1), Gyorko (3), LaRoche (2). DPWashington 1. LOBSan Diego 4, Washington 9. 2BDesmond (4). SBDesmond (1). SCashner, Roark. SFEspinosa. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Cashner L,2-3 6 9 4 4 1 5 Roach 1 1 0 0 0 1 Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Washington Roark W,2-0 9 3 0 0 1 8 HBPby Thayer (Frandsen). UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jim Joyce. T:19. A,590 (41,408). Yankees 4, Angels 3 Los Angeles New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Cowgill rf 5 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 0 Trout cf 3 1 2 1 Jeter ss 4 0 1 0 Pujols dh 5 1 2 0 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 ASorin rf 4 0 1 0 Aybar ss 4 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 Iannett c 4 0 2 1 Teixeir 1b 3 1 0 0 Boesch pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 3 1 2 0 IStewrt 1b 3 0 1 0 BRorts 2b 3 1 0 0 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 KJhnsn 3b 3 0 0 0 Shuck lf 3 0 0 0 JMrphy c 3 1 2 3 Ibanez ph 1 0 0 0 Conger c 0 0 0 0 Totals 36 3 9 2 Totals 31 4 7 3 Los Angeles 100 200 000 3 New York 030 010 00x 4 EB.Roberts (3). LOBLos Angeles 10, New York 6. 2BIannetta (5). HRTrout (6), J.Murphy (1). SBTrout (3), Gardner (6). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles H.Santiago L,0-4 4 1 / 3 6 4 4 1 3 Jepsen 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Maronde 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Kohn 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Nuno 4 1 / 3 5 3 3 2 4 Betances W,1-0 2 1 0 0 1 3 Kelley H,3 1 1 / 3 2 0 0 1 1 Thornton H,7 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Dav.Robertson S,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBPby Frieri (Gardner), by H.Santiago (Teixeira). BalkH.Santiago, Betances. UmpiresHome, Tripp Gibson; First, Bill Welke; Sec ond, Dan Iassogna; Third, CB Bucknor. T:05. A,908 (49,642). Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 6 Boston Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 Reyes ss 3 1 0 0 Victorn rf 4 1 0 0 MeCarr lf 5 1 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 1 1 0 0 Bautist dh 5 2 3 2 Carp 1b 3 2 1 0 Frncsc 1b-3b 4 1 1 1 GSizmr lf 2 1 1 2 Navarr c 4 1 3 1 Przyns c 3 1 1 4 Rasms cf 5 0 1 0 Mdlrks 3b 4 1 1 1 Lawrie 3b-2b 5 0 2 0 JHerrr ss 4 0 0 0 Sierra rf 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 4 0 0 0 Encrnc ph-1b 2 0 1 1 Goins 2b 3 0 1 0 Diaz ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 7 5 7 Totals 40 6 13 5 Boston 006 010 000 7 Toronto 300 000 021 6 DPToronto 2. LOBBoston 4, Toronto 11. 2BCarp (3), G.Sizemore (3), Bautista (4). HRPierzynski (2), Middlebrooks (2), Bautista (7), Francisco (2). CS Pedroia (2). IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz W,1-2 7 6 3 3 3 3 Tazawa 1 / 3 4 2 2 0 0 Capuano H,3 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Uehara S,5-5 1 1 / 3 3 1 1 0 2 Toronto Morrow L,1-2 2 2 / 3 0 4 4 8 1 Jenkins 1 2 / 3 5 3 3 0 2 Loup 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Cecil 1 0 0 0 1 2 Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 0 Santos 1 0 0 0 0 2 WPBuchholz. PBNavarro. UmpiresHome, Jeff Kellogg; First, Marty Foster; Sec ond, Alan Porter; Third, Rob Drake. T:23. A,322 (49,282). Twins 5, Tigers 3 Detroit Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 Dozier 2b 2 1 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 1 3 0 Mauer dh 2 0 0 1 MiCarr 1b 4 1 1 1 Plouffe 3b 2 0 1 2 VMrtnz dh 3 1 1 2 Flormn ss 1 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 4 0 2 0 Colaell 1b 3 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 0 0 Kubel lf 4 0 0 0 AnRmn ss 3 0 0 0 Pinto c 3 1 1 1 JMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0 Fuld rf 3 1 1 0 Holady c 2 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 1 1 0 Avila ph-c 1 0 0 0 EEscor ss-3b 3 1 0 0 RDavis lf 3 0 1 0 Totals 33 3 8 3 Totals 26 5 4 4 Detroit 200 000 001 3 Minnesota 000 040 01x 5 EHoladay (2), Fuld (1). DPDetroit 1, Minnesota 1. LOBDetroit 5, Minnesota 7. 2BTor.Hunter (6), Mi.Cabrera (7), A.Jackson (6), Fuld (4), A.Hicks (3). HRV.Martinez (4), Pinto (5). SBA.Jackson (2), Fuld (2). CSDozier (1). SE.Escobar. SFV.Martinez. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit A.Sanchez 2 2 / 3 0 0 0 2 2 Ortega L,0-1 1 1 / 3 0 4 4 4 1 Coke 2 2 / 3 2 0 0 2 2 Alburquerque 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 4 Minnesota P.Hughes W,2-1 7 4 2 1 0 6 Burton H,4 1 2 0 0 1 0 Perkins S,6-7 1 2 1 1 0 2 Ortega pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBPby Ortega (Plouffe). WPCoke. UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Brian ONora; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T:13. A,122 (39,021). Pirates 6, Cardinals 1 Pittsburgh St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Marte lf 3 1 0 0 MCrpnt 3b 3 1 0 0 JHrrsn 3b 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 3 0 1 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 1 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 1 GSnchz 1b 3 1 1 2 MAdms 1b 4 0 2 0 I.Davis ph-1b 0 1 0 0 YMolin c 4 0 0 0 NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 Craig rf 4 0 1 0 Tabata rf 4 1 3 1 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 TSnchz c 4 0 1 2 Lyons p 1 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 0 0 Jay ph 1 0 0 0 Pimntl p 1 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0 Fornatr p 0 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Descals ph 1 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 PAlvrz ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 6 7 6 Totals 32 1 5 1 Pittsburgh 000 400 002 6 St. Louis 000 010 000 1 LOBPittsburgh 3, St. Louis 9. 2BG.Sanchez (3), Jh.Peralta (5), Holliday (7). SBBourjos (2). SMercer. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Liriano 2 2 0 0 2 2 Pimentel W,2-0 2 2 / 3 2 1 1 2 3 J.Hughes 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Ju.Wilson H,1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Watson H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 1 St. Louis Lyons L,0-2 6 4 4 4 1 4 Maness 2 1 0 0 0 1 Fornataro 2 / 3 2 2 2 1 0 Choate 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Liriano pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. PBT.Sanchez. UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Will Little. T:02. A,254 (45,399). Giants 5, Indians 3 Cleveland San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 5 2 2 0 Pagan cf 3 0 1 1 Swisher 1b 5 1 2 1 Pence rf 4 0 1 2 Kipnis 2b 5 0 1 2 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 CSantn 3b 3 0 0 0 Posey c 3 1 1 1 Brantly lf 3 0 0 0 Morse lf 3 1 1 0 ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 J.Perez lf 1 0 0 0 YGoms c 4 0 1 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 4 0 2 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 McAlst p 2 0 1 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Chsnhll ph 1 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 0 C.Lee p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 2 1 0 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0 Linccm p 1 0 0 0 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 Giambi ph 0 0 0 0 Blanco ph 1 1 1 1 Kluber pr 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Arias 3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 3 9 3 Totals 29 5 6 5 Cleveland 101 010 000 3 San Francisco 000 041 00x 5 EMcAllister (2). DPSan Francisco 1. LOBCleveland 9, San Francisco 3. 2BBourn (1), Swisher 2 (6), Pa gan (6). HRPosey (5). SBBlanco (1). SFPagan. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland McAllister L,3-1 5 5 4 4 1 6 C.Lee 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 1 Outman 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Shaw 2 0 0 0 0 1 San Francisco Lincecum 4 2 / 3 9 3 2 2 3 J.Gutierrez W,1-1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Machi H,2 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Affeldt H,2 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Romo S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Shaw (Posey), by Romo (Giambi). PBPosey. UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:47. A,088 (41,915). This Date in Baseball April 27 1909 The Chicago White Sox win their third straight 1-0 game over St. Louis in three days. 1918 The Brooklyn Dodgers got into the win column after a major league record 0-9 start, with a 5-3 victory over the New York Gi ants in the opening game of a doubleheader. 1929 Brooklyn relief pitcher Clise Dudley homered on the rst major league pitch he saw at Philadelphias Baker Bowl. 1930 Chicago White Sox rst baseman Bud Clancy had no chances in a nine-inning game against St. Louis. 1944 Jim Tobin of the Braves pitched a no-hitter against the Dodgers in Boston, win ning 2-0. He also hit a homer. 1947 Babe Ruth Day at Yankee Stadium drew a crowd of more than 58,000 to honor the ailing star. In the game, Sid Hudson of the Washington Senators beat Spud Chandler 1-0. 1963 Two two-sport players pitched in the fourth inning in a game at Fenway park. NBA players Gene Conley of the Celtics and Dave DeBusschere of the Knicks pitched for their respective Major League Baseball teams, Con ley for the Red Sox and DeBusschere for the White Sox. The Red Sox won 9-5. 1968 Tom Phoebus of the Orioles no-hit the Boston Red Sox 6-0 at Baltimore. 1973 Kansas Citys Steve Busby pitched his rst of two career no-hitters with a 3-0 vic tory over the Tigers at Detroit. 1983 Walter Johnsons record of 3,508 ca reer strikeouts was eclipsed by Houstons No lan Ryan a record which stood for 56 years. Ryan fanned Montreal pinch-hitter Brad Mills in the eighth inning of the Astros 4-2 win over the Expos. 1994 Scott Erickson, who allowed the most hits in the majors the previous season, pitched Minnesotas rst no-hitter in 27 years as the Twins beat Milwaukee 6-0. 1996 Barry Bonds became the fourth ma jor leaguer to amass 300 homers and 300 steals when he homered in the third inning of the San Francisco Giants 6-3 victory over the Florida Marlins. His father, Bobby Bonds, god father Willie Mays and Andre Dawson are the only other players to reach 300-300. 200 0 Chicago White Sox shortstop Jose Valentin hit for the cycle and drove in ve runs in a 13-4 victory over the Baltimore Orioles. Valentin hit for the cycle in single, double, tri ple and home run order. 2002 Derek Lowe, who struggled to keep his job as a closer last season, pitched a no-hitter against Tampa Bay. Brent Abernathy was the only baserunner Lowe allowed in Bos tons 10-0 victory. 2003 Kevin Millwood pitched a no-hitter to lead the Philadelphia Phillies over the San Francisco Giants 1-0. Millwood struck out 10 and walked three. 2005 Mark Grudzielanek hit for the cycle in his rst four at-bats in St. Louis 6-3 victory over Milwaukee. 2005 Jose Mesa earned his 300th career save in Pittsburghs 2-0 victory over Hous ton. Mesa became the 19th pitcher in major league history with 300. 2007 Kirk Radomski, a former New York Mets clubhouse employee, pleaded guilty to distributing steroids to major league players for a decade and agreed to help baseballs steroids investigators. 2009 West Virginia States Bo Darby hit home runs in ve consecutive at-bats over two games, including four in one contest. The sophomore outelder homered in his rst four trips to the plate against Salem International. He also connected in his nal at-bat two days earlier against the University of Charleston. Darby homered twice more in the second game of the doubleheader, giving him six for the day with 14 RBIs.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014

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Oppose corporate greed In the April 6 edition of the Daily Commercial there was a great article by Kevin G. Hall, of the McClatchy Washington Bureau, U.S. companies chipping away at retiree benets. Employees need to get orga nized and unionize against these companies who only show their support through their stockhold ers and their CEOs large salaries. The poor and middle class Americans need to boycott these companies. And everyone in America needs to vote Democrat in upcoming elections for a bet ter Congress who will increase the minimum wage and protect Social Security, allow immigrants who were born here to become U.S. citizens and also keep womens rights intact. LINDA GREEN | Leesburg The founding fathers would have been pleased Russ Sloan in his diatribe on Easter Sunday on the welfare sys tem wrote, The Preamble to the Constitution reads, provide for the common defense and pro mote the general welfare, not vice versa. That is absolute ly correct, but he fails to men tion the Preamble has no legal standing when we interpret the Constitution. The Founding Fathers in their great wisdom wrote in Article 1 Section 8, Congress shall have the power to, Provide for the com mon defense and general wel fare of the United States ... Sloan has a propensity for not telling the whole story, just what ts his ideo logical beliefs. The founding fathers also added in Article 1 section 8, to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the fore going powers ... In es sence, they gave the Congress the power to make any law necessary and proper to provide for the gen eral welfare. Sloan also wrote, We have so distorted the intent of our found ing fathers that they would be in shock to see what a welfare men tality we have accepted. I do not have the clairvoyance Russ seems to claim, but most probably would be pleased to see Congress has used the power they gave them to provide for the gen eral welfare. There are some things they probably would be shocked about, like non-property owners, women and blacks voting, that corpora tions are people, money is speech and a black man is president. MARVIN JACOBSON | Clermont Not the place of the Supreme Court I am referencing an article on the front page of the Daily Commercial on April 17 by Jim Turner of the News Service of Florida, Amazon to start collect ing sales taxes. The article goes on to say if the entity has a presence in the state that a person is ordering from, then they will be charged sales tax. The Supreme Court ruled some years ago that if the business had a pres ence in a state that a person or ders from then a tax can be collect ed. This is a classic example of the court legislating from the bench. Article 1 section 9-10, states that no tax can be collected from items crossing any state line or from port to port. The proper way to handle it would have been to amend the Constitution but they knew that the amendment would never y. I imagine that politi cal inuence was exercised in this process. I do not pay sales tax on items ordered across state lines. If the shipper hints at charging a tax, I cancel the order. I refuse to be a part of this tax, tax, tax! It is just another way of draining the citi zen of a few more drops of blood in the form of taxes. I would rath er do without the product than pay the tax. The state of Florida had to re turn $700 million to people who were charged a tax for bringing their cars into the state. The per son taxed had to make application for it. The state should have been required to purge the archives and see who paid the tax and notify them at their last known address. But then again, they never do the right thing. This ruling by the Supreme Court should have been revisited by a more competent Court than made the ruling. I do remember that one of the judges on the rul ing court had a stroke at the time the 5 to 4 decision was made. I have no problem with a 6 to 3, or 7 to 2, but a 5 to 4 is no good. D.J. LYNCH | Wildwood The generosity of bikers I have lived in Leesburg for 24 years and I have been a biker for more than 50 years. Having said that, here are the good, bad and the ugly sides of Bikefest. I have gone to every Bikefest since the rst one. I even have the original T-shirt. The good is that the Leesburg Partnership puts on a great rally. The bad is that non-bikers hate it. Now the ugly. The Sound of Money. That was the front-page headline on Easter Sunday in the Daily Commercial Bikers are the most generous group of people on the earth. They will assemble in masses to donate to charities. So why does the Partnership and every vendor screw them? Basically, Leesburg is a charity, a depressed community. Hundreds of thousands of bikers come to Leesburg each year and bail them out by pouring millions into the economy. What do they get for this? Michael Vassell, general m anager of Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites in Tavares, says this, A standard room normal ly goes for $101 to $125, but during Bikefest that goes up to $150 be cause rates are based on demand. Dont you really mean greed? I remember when beer cost $2 at Bikefest. It is now $5 to $6, not counting the cost of a commem orative cup. Parking used to be free. Food prices have soared be cause the vendors have to pay so much for their spaces. The list goes on, and on and on. Leesburg, think about this: The bikers come here to help, and what do they get? What would happen if Bikefest came and no one showed up? Where are your millions then? Get back to reality before you become Daytona. A lot of bik ers dont go there any more for the same reasons I mentioned above. Be thankful for the bikers. Dont screw them. THOMAS J. ZAKLUKIEWICZ Leesburg Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clar ity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@ dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR W hen the Florida Legislatures an nual session ends next month and campaigning for state ofces be gins, incumbents seeking re-election to state ofces will brag how they have kept taxes low. Their claims will be correct. Florida ranked 47th in total per capi ta taxation heading into this years ses sion. Whats more, legislators are likely to reduce some revenues this year by, for ex ample, lowering vehicle-registration fees. In this context, Florida TaxWatch, an in dependent organization that studies state taxation and spending policies, cites these state revenue sources: lottery proceeds, documentary stamps on real estate trans actions, a sales tax (6 percent) and taxes on utilities, cellphones, motor fuels, insur ance, alcoholic beverages and tobacco. Indeed, Floridas statewide taxes are low compared with those in other states. But, theres more. Floridas place on the bottom rungs of state-level taxation and total revenue are due in part to an extraordinary reliance on local governments not only to pro vide services, but to generate dollars. Thanks to the folks at TaxWatch, who recently issued their 2014 How Florida Compares report, we know that: The state has the fth-highest per centage (50 percent) of state and local taxes generated by local governments. Florida has the second-highest per centage (55 percent) of state and local revenue generated by local governments. Local revenues include not only property taxes but local-option sales tax es, impact fees, franchise fees for utilities and special assessments. In general, cities, counties and other lo cal entities in Florida are assigned and assume disproportionately greater re sponsibility for courts, social services, in frastructure, health care for indigent pa tients and education. Nowhere is the state governments reli ance on locals more evident than in pub lic education. The Florida Constitution requires the state to adequately fund high-quality ed ucation and also prohibits the state from levying a property tax. Yet, each year, the Legislature requires school boards to levy property taxes at specic rates. Even though local, per capita reve nues in Florida rank seventh nationwide and local, per capita taxes rank 22nd, the combined state and local tax burden is below average. Ranked 33rd, Floridas state and local governments collect $5,599 per person in total revenues; the average in the United States is $6,303. In terms of state and lo cal taxes, Florida ranks 37th $3,420 per capita; the national average is $4,287. It would be polite for incumbents in state ofces to thank local governments and their taxpayers for making them look good. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST FILE PHOTO The states pass-the-buck Legislature

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 OTHER VOICES Voices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHER VOICES OTHER VOICES I am constant ly amazed by the frequent exam ples, across Ameri ca, of those who pro fess tolerance yet are extremely intolerant if you disagree with their viewpoints. The most recent and notable example of in tolerance was the forced resignation of Mozil la co-founder Brendan Eich. His dastardly ac tion which forced his resignation was the rev elation that he legally gave $1,000 to Califor nias Prop 8 Measure in 2008 which banned gay marriage in that state. His position on gay marriage in 2008 was the same as that of President Obama and Hillary Clinton. No matter. The spokes woman hypocrite for Mozilla, Executive Chairwoman Mitch ell Baker, issued the fol lowing statement after the forced resignation: Mozilla believes in both equality and free dom of speech. And you need free speech to ght for equality. Figur ing out how to stand for both at the same time can be hard. Really! I would wager a friendly cup of coffee that Chairwoman Bak er voted for president in 2008 knowing that Obamas stated view on marriage was that it is between one man and one woman. In 2008 that was the same posi tion as Brendan Eich. Another recent exam ple of intolerance from those professing toler ance comes to us cour tesy of the students and faculty of Rutgers Uni versity. The administration at Rutgers had invit ed one of the most ac complished women in America, Condoleeza Rice, to be their com mencement speak er. What apparently drew the ire of the fac ulty and students was her support of Presi dent Bush in ending the tyrannical regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. We had gone to war with Hussein to end his aggression in Kuwait, and we knew he had used chemi cal weapons against his own people (the Kurds). His continuous refus al to let U.N. inspec tors explore his possi ble weapons of mass destruction sites led to Bushs decision. Con doleeza Rice concurred with that decision. At this point I expect some readers to ut ter the phrase Bush lied and people died. I would like to remind those that feel that way the following assess ments made by Demo crats regarding Hussein: We know he has stored secret supplies of biological and chemical weapons throughout his country, said Al Gore on Sept. 23, 2002. Then Sen ator John Kerry said: I will be voting to give the president of the United States the authority to use force, if necessary, to disarm Saddam Hussein because I believe that a deadly arsenal of weap ons of mass destruction in his hands is a real and grave threat to our secu rity. Finally there was Senator Ted Kenne dy who said, We have known for many years that Saddam Hussein is seeking and develop ing weapons of mass destruction. (Sept. 27, 2002) I can cite simi lar quotes from Hil lary Clinton, Rep. Nan cy Peolsi, Senators Carl Levin and Jay Rockfeller and more. Getting back to the credentials of Condo leeza Rice. Born in Ala bama, before desegre gation, she received her masters at Notre Dame and her PhD from the University of Denvers Graduate School of In ternational Studies in 1981. In 1993, Rice be came the rst African American to serve as provost of Stanford and she also served as the universitys chief bud get and academic of cer. She went on to be come the rst black woman to serve as our nations national secu rity advisor, as well as secretary of state. But all of these ac complishments did not satisfy the academic hypocrites at Rutgers. Apparently they ignored the Democrat leaders taking the same posi tion as she did regard ing Iraq. Our colleges and universities are supposedly bastions of free speech and where ideas and concepts are exchanged. I wish. Check commence ment speakers at both public and private col leges. In 2012 only one Republican elected of cial was invited to speak at a top 50 liber al arts college and that was at the University of Richmond in his home state. The top 100 uni versities invited three Republican ofce hold ers, but all three spoke within their state. Conservative com mencement speak ers are on the endan gered species list. This comes as no surprise as the majority of the faculties at universi ties who champion tol erance exclude con servative thought on campus. Dont take my word for it, go Google the conservative or Re publican speakers at colleges and see how many times rude and disruptive behavior, in cluding pie throwing, is conducted among our campuses of tolerance. Academically, we too often tolerate most anything on campus except conservative political thought and speech. RUSS SLOAN GUEST COLUMNIST The intolerance of those espousing tolerance T he last month has been a very busy and successful time for the Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County. We owe it to the great showing of community support from local clubs, businesses and volunteers who supported four of our largest fundraising events in March and April. Our annual Paper Shredding event (sponsored by the Rainbow Family and Friends Club, Buffalo Ridge Animal Hospital and Hills Shred Express), Fun Time Follies (sponsored by show producers Kim and Jim Krum and their talented performers) and the Above Par For Animals Golf Ball Drop (sponsored by Remax Premier Realty of The Villages/Ocala, George Nahas Chevrolet, Nathan Thomas State Farm Insurance, Columbia ParCar) and the Villages Charter Middle School Builders Club (sponsored by the Kiwanis and HighFive Frozen Yogurt) pet supply drive have raised numerous donations to help our non-prot continue with much needed community programs as the challenges of summertime in Florida fast approach. Spay/neuter funding and pet food assistance are only made possible through donations from the community. As April is also Volunteer Appreciation Month, we would like to acknowledge the tremendous kindness shown by the HS/SPCA volunteers for their compassion, teamwork and gifts of kindness to allow the many helpless animals we in turn help nd happier lives. Without our volunteers and contributions from the community, we couldnt do the necessary work we do to better the lives of both animals and their people in Sumter County. Stay tuned for upcoming events we have planned and please dont forget that the need continues during the difcult summer months. Donations will be accepted at local dropoff sites including the shelter at 994 County Road 529A in Lake Panasoffkee, or mail to the Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County, Inc., P.O. Box 67, Lake Panasoffkee, Fla., 33538, or online at www.hsspca.org. CLAUDIA LABBE | Public Relations Chairperson SPCA of Sumter County Thanks for your kindness to our animals R epublican leaders are getting ready for elections in Novem ber, 2016. Ron Paul wants the GOP to appeal to those voters who are usually ignored by Republicans. He refers to minorities. Ted Cruz wants a tra ditional view of the GOP, which he says is growth and opportunity for the Hispanic community. He said, Washington D.C. aint listening. Mike Huckabee en joyed applause from the audience when he men tioned Benghazi, the IRS, and photos at voting polls. All three GOP pol iticians agreed that the GOP is at a crossroads be cause many Republicans are saddened by the lack of progress promised by conservatives. Then Donald Trump took the microphone and told the GOP audi ence that he is passionate about his new real estate development in Florida. Trump said, Im a build er. He promised the au dience that he wants to build a big fence along the southern border of the U.S. It will be a fence like youve never seen, he promised. The audi ence roared. The three GOP leaders probably think the great wall of Texas will provide some growth opportu nity for common labor ers. It appears that the GOP leaders probably have not read about oth er great walls around the world that were built to keep low class people out of the promised land, and each wall is a failure. Here is a list of walls that tried to keep people from migrating: Hadri ans Wall in England. The Great Wall of China. The Walls of Jericho. Trajans Wall in Romania. The Ber lin Wall came tumbling down. Belfast Wall in Ire land. The Wailing Wall, Je rusalem. Walls of Ston, Croatia. Walls of Babylon. Walls of Troy, Turkey. Walls of Constantinople, Turkey. Aurelian Walls in Rome. Ron Paul, Ted Cruz, and Donald Trump appear to be the best GOP can didates today. Howev er, anybody can see that their ideas for the GOP are like a mental wall which looks to be as inef fective as the stone walls listed above. Please review the list of walls. ROBERT WESOLOWSKI The Villages A party with too many walls Ron Paul, Ted Cruz, and Donald Trump appear to be the best GOP candidates today. However, anybody can see that their ideas for the GOP are like a mental wall which looks to be as ineffective as the stone walls listed above.

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Cruisin 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com ERIK LACITIS The Seattle Times They crank up their Ford Mustangs, among them, a 1965 Fastback and a 2012 Boss. You can hear that growl. This is a real American car. No whiny sounds like in the Euro pean makes. A lot of Mustangs have that nice rumble. I roll down my windows so I can hear the en gine, says Linda Hall berg. Shes 64, a retired postmaster. Her hus band, Gary Hallberg, 67, worked in planning for a manufacturer. They own four Mustangs. They loved the cars when they were young and in their 20s; they love them now. Among their collec tion was a 1998 GT that theyve now sold. Gary made sure that when Linda rst drove it, the CD player blasted Wilson Picketts Mus tang Sally when she turned the key. They so love Mustangs that they had the trunk of a red Mustang convert ible made into a couch for their Renton, Wash., home. April 17, 1964 is a day etched for the keepers of the Mustang ame. Thats when their be loved brand debuted at the New York Worlds Fair. Over 50 years, more than 9 million of the ve hicles have sold, says Ford. The Mustang has been in at least 3,000 movies and TV shows, including the classic 1968 Steve McQueen lm, Bullitt, with its nine-minute-long chase scene. Icon drives icon. The car was a marvel of Mad Men market ing when it rst came out, with its long hood like European sports Mustang owners devotion hasnt waned MARK PHELAN Detroit Free Press S aints preserve us from the day when some wan nabe-hip automaker de cides to names its cars and trucks with emoticons. Kia brings us one step closer to that vomitous Look at me! Arent I clever? level of cuteness with the 2014 Soul !. Thats right. The top trim lev el of the new Soul hatchback is called the exclamation point. Kia has freed us from those tire some words, letters and num bers other companies use. Colon: Give me a break. Dash bring me the head of Kias chief marketing ofcer. Frowny face. Aside from the cloying self-consciousness of its name, the Soul has much to recom mend it, including a quirky de sign and loads of interior room. The Soul comes in three a vors: base, (plus) and !. The pe riod at the end of that sentence is a punctuation mark, not a name. Sorry to disappoint you. Kia thoughtfully suggests you call the upper two trims plus and exclaim, two perfectly ne words for which coinci dentally enough words actu ally exist. The base model starts at $14,900. It comes with a 130-horsepower, 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and sixspeed manual transmission. Automatic transmission mod els start at $16,900 for a base model with the same engine and a six-speed. The Plus and Exclaim mate a 164-horsepow er, 2.0-liter engine to the auto matic transmission. They start at $18,400 and $20,500, respec tively. All models have frontwheel drive. I tested a well-equipped Soul Exclaim with features includ ing a touch screen, Bluetooth phone and music compatibili ty, USB input, heated and ven tilated front seats, a large power sun roof and heated rear seats. It stickered at $24,500. The Souls most direct com petitors are small cars and crossover utilities that combine striking looks with roomy inte riors. The Buick Encore, Nissan Cube, Scion xB and Volkswa gen Jetta wagon come to mind. Soul prices compare favorably to them. The Honda Element originat ed this class of roomy, offbeat little cars. Itd compete with the 2014 Soul, but to the dis may of surfers, mountain bikers and dog owners everywhere Honda sent the Element to live on a beautiful farm upstate a few years ago. The 2014 Soul is bigger and more sophisticated than its rst generation. It has plenty of in terior and cargo room. The high seating position, big windows and upright design provide ex cellent visibility. The glove box is huge. A dish in the center console for phones and iPods looks sloppy when loaded with devices and wires. The touch screen is large and easy to use. Conventional but tons and dials control audio and climate. The Souls voice recognition and Bluetooth work well, but the interior gets noisy at highway speed. The 2.0-liter engine provides adequate power, but accelera tion and handling are not the Souls strengths. The steering lacks feel, particularly at high way speed. Body roll is notice able on fast curves. The Souls fuel economy is poor. The EPA rates the car I tested at 23 mpg in the city, 31 on the highway and 26 com bined. The combined gure trails comparable models of the En core, Sonic, Fiesta and Cube. It beats the Scion xB by 2 mpg and matches the larger 2.5-liter Jetta wagon. The combined rating is also several mpg worse than such bigger compact sedans as the Chevrolet Cruze, Ford Fusion, Honda Civic, Hyundai Elantra, Nissan Sentra and Toyota Co rolla. The Souls mechanical sys tems are nothing to exclaim about, but its room and quirky looks largely offset that. Period. Kia tucks plenty of features into its quirky Soul hatchback 2014 KIA SOUL EXCLAIM TYPE OF VEHICLE: Front-wheel-drive ve-passenger hatchback RATING: Three out of four stars REASONS TO BUY: Looks; passen ger and cargo space; features SHORTCOMINGS: Fuel economy; handling; interior noise ENGINE: 2.0-liter 16-valve DOHC four-cylinder POWER: 164 horsepower at 6,200 rpm; 151 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm TRANSMISSION: Six-speed auto matic EPA FUEL ECONOMY RATING: 23 mpg city/31 highway/26 com bined. Regular gasoline WHEELBASE: 101.2 inches LENGTH: 163.0 inches WIDTH: 70.9 inches HEIGHT: 63.0 inches CURB WEIGHT: 2,837 lbs. BASE PRICE: $14,900 PRICE AS TESTED: $25,400 Prices exclude destination charge. KIA / MCT The 2014 Kia Soul has a slighly larger, reshaped body and upgraded interior from its predecessor. G. CHAMBERS WILLIAMS III Fort Worth Star-Telegram GMCs Sierra 1500 pickup has been com pletely redesigned for 2014, offering an ar ray of model and en gine choices, just like its Chevrolet Silverado sib ling. The regular cab mod el, with two doors and only a front seat, be gins at $26,075, while crew cab prices begin at $34,200 for the rearwheel-drive base ver sion. Double cab mod els, which have slightly smaller cabins but still carry up to six, start at $30,100. But the fanciest ver sion is the Denali crew cab, our test vehicle for a week, whose prices begin at $48,315 for the two-wheel-drive, shortbox version and range as high as $51,765 for the four-wheel-drive GMC gives Sierra truck a carlike feel GMC / MCT The 2014 GMC Sierra Denali is the most luxurious, lavishly equipped version of the Sierra pickup. LAYLAN COPELIN Austin American-Statesman AUSTIN, Texas Susan Abplanalp of West Lake Hills, Texas, ew to San Francisco last year to test drive a car be fore buying it over the Inter net. Not just any car: the Tes la Model S, a $70,000 to $130,000 electric car that got Consumer Reports highest marks ever. The manufacturer, Tesla Motors Inc., is battling pow erful auto dealers around the country, including in Texas, trying to block how it sells cars even as Texas and three other states compete for the companys $5 billion battery plant and its 6,500 jobs. Selling directly to consum ers in Tesla-owned dealer ships, as Tesla wants, would cut out franchised dealers who are the middlemen be tween car manufacturers and consumers. The Texas Automobile Dealers Association last year easily defeated California bil lionaire Elon Musks effort to exempt his Tesla Motors from selling through dealerships, but auto dealers are sudden ly playing defense because of the possibility of Texas land ing the plant and its jobs. I think all this talk about 6,500 direct jobs has gotten the Legislatures attention, said state Rep. Eddie Rodri guez, D-Austin, who carried Teslas exemption bid last year. Thats what my col leagues are talking about. The association responded last month with a letter to all Texas lawmakers saying the law shouldnt be changed for any special interest or po tential project. It is an issue that pits tech nological innovation against Main Street, if lobbying While wooing electric automakers factory, Texas wont let Tesla sell cars in-state RICARDO BRAZZIELL / MCT The front trunk on the Tesla Model S 6.0 is shown at the Domain in Austin, Texas. SEE SIERRA | C5 SEE TESLA | C5 SEE MUSTANG | C5

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 standard-box model. And for 2014, the Double Cab comes with four regu lar doors, replacing the pre vious-generations Extended Cab model. Three engines are offered: a 4.3-liter V-6, 5.3-liter V-8, and 6.2-liter V-8. EPA rat ings for the 5.3-liter engine are the best in the segment at 16 mpg city/23 highway with rear-wheel drive, and 16/22 with four-wheel drive. Standard in the fourwheel-drive short-box De nali, such as the one I tested for this report, is the 5.3-li ter engine. But the test vehi cle came with the upgraded 6.2-liter engine. In keeping with its carlike, fancy qualities, it came with the optional power sunroof, and also had the Driver Alert package and trailer brake controller. Just like the Chevy Silverado LTZ Crew Cab I tested recent ly, the Sierra Denali had a full four-wheel-drive system that includes low-range gearing through a two-speed transfer case, and an automatic-lock ing rear differential. That made the truck suit able for almost any terrain. But as fancy as the Denali is, its not likely that many buy ers would relegate it to seri ous trail-driving much of the time if any. So instead of exploring the wild, the Sierra Denali is in tended more as a truck ver sion of the traditional lux ury sedan, giving its owner premium carlike amenities in a vehicle thats a whole lot more versatile than the typi cal car. With the front bucket seats and rear bench, the Denali can carry ve passengers in leather-upholstered comfort, but it also can haul whatever you can load in the cargo bed, and can pull a trailer weigh ing up to 9,800 pounds (9,600 pounds for four-wheel-drive versions). That makes it practi cal for a variety of person al and business applications, whether it be to take the fam ily on a trip or haul a crew to a work site. As with the Silver ado High Country model, the Chevy equivalent of the Sier ra Denali 1500, this vehicle is a bit fancy to dedicate to crew hauling, but a rancher or business owner could eas ily use it as a combined per sonal and work vehicle. Of course, crew cab models can be bought for a lot less if you can do without all the premium amenities found on the Denali. Sierra twowheel-drive crew cab base models at about $35,000 can do most of what the Denali can do, just without the pre mium touches like the heat ed and cooled front seats, 20-inch chrome wheels, chrome body side moldings and grille, dual-zone auto matic climate control, leath er-wrapped/heated steer ing wheel (quite unusual for a truck), standard navigation system with premium Bose audio, universal garage/gate opener, power-adjustable pedals, and a power-sliding rear window with defroster. Riding in the Denali isnt very trucklike, either, even on a rough road. The suspen sion is smoother than you might expect, and the cabin is nearly as quiet as that of a nice sedan. I found the 6.2-liter engine, with 420 horsepower and 460 foot-pounds of torque, to have plenty of power, cou pled with the six-speed auto matic transmission and the 3.42 rear axle. The four-wheel drive is activated by a rota ry switch on the dash to the left of the steering wheel. EPA ratings are 15 mpg city/21 highway with two-wheel drive, and 14/20 with fourwheel drive. There are full-size rear doors that open to the rear, allowing for easy passen ger or cargo access to the rear seating area. The rear seat has a 60/40 split-fold ing arrangement so it can be moved out of the way to ac commodate cargo that you might want to carry inside, out of the weather (such as your groceries, or the box carrying your new big-screen TV). The Driver Alert package added high-tech safety fea tures such as lane-departure warning, forward collision alert, and a safety-alert seat that vibrates to warn of a po tential forward collision. Standard on the Denali are the 6-inch oval chrome assist steps, moveable cargo tiedowns, and LED lights for the cargo box. We also had front fog lights, a chrome exhaust tip, an un derbody shield to help pro tect components from rocks and other off-road obstacles, front tow hooks, power/heat ed outside mirrors with in tegrated turn signals, hillstart assist, front and rear body-color bumpers, and the new EZ-Lift locking tailgate. GMs new CornerStep bumper and built-in hand grips have been added to make it easier to step up into the bed. The tailgate is better balanced to make it easier to raise or lower. The standard Denali 5.3-li ter Ecotec Flex-Fuel V-8 comes with an aluminum block, cylinder deactivation, and ratings of 355 horse power and 383 pound-feet of torque. Cylinder deactivation cuts out four of the cylinders during level highway cruis ing to improve gas mileage. EPA ratings for the 5.3-liter engine are the best in the seg ment even better than the F-150s EcoBoost V-6 engine at 16 mpg city/23 highway with rear-wheel drive, and 16/22 with four-wheel drive. SIERRA FROM PAGE C3 GMC / MCT The Denali has a full four-wheel-drive system that includes low-range gearing through a two-speed transfer case, and an automatic-locking rear differential. RATING: 9.3 (of a possible 10). TYPE OF VEHICLE: Premium, fullsize, veor six-passenger, fourdoor, rearor four-wheel-drive, shortor long-box, V-8 powered, light-duty pickup truck. HIGHLIGHTS: This is the new est generation of GMCs Sier ra 1500 Denali high-end model. The truck is all-new for 2014, and is wider and more muscular than before, with a wide range of new features and options, in cluding new safety and connec tivity technologies. NEGATIVES: Can get quite pricey with all the options. ENGINE: 5.3-liter V-8 (standard); 6.2-liter V-8 TRANSMISSION: Six-speed auto matic POWER/TORQUE: 355 horsepow er/383 pound-feet (5.3-liter); 420 horsepower/460 poundfeet (6.2-liter) BRAKES, FRONT/REAR: Disc/disc, antilock LENGTH: 229 inches (with short box); 239 inches (long box) CURB WEIGHT: 5,042-5,370 pounds CARGO CAPACITY (PAYLOAD): 1,883-1,957 pounds. ELECTRONIC STABILITY CONTROL: Standard. SIDE AIR BAGS: Front seat-mount ed; side-curtain both rows TOWING CAPACITY: 9,800 pounds (2WD); 9,600 pounds (4WD) EPA FUEL ECONOMY: 16 mpg city/23 highway (5.3, 2WD); 16/22 (5.3, 4WD); 15/21 (6.2, 2WD); 14/20 (6.2, 4WD) FUEL CAPACITY/TYPE: 26 gallons/ regular unleaded. BASE PRICE, BASE MODEL: $26,075 BASE PRICE, MODEL TESTED: $51,465 PRICE AS TESTED, INCLUDING DES TINATION CHARGE: $56,230 2014 GMC SIERRA 1500 DENALI CREW CAB hyperbole is to be be lieved, and underscores how government can affect the marketplace. For us, its a matter of life and death, Musk told Texas lawmak ers during his failed at tempt last year to be ex empted from the state law. Bill Wolters, president of the Texas Automo bile Dealers Association, raises the specter of dealerships, particularly in rural Texas, going out of business without legal protection against fac tory-owned dealerships: All the Main Street mer chants are gone except the car dealers. Consumers are caught in the middle. How hard is Tex as going to make it to buy a Tesla? Abplanalp said earlier this month. They made it really hard for me. Teslas Austin location is what the company calls a gallery. Customers can look at a car but, under state law, cant test-drive it. The Tesla employee can explain the technolo gy but cannot discuss price, take orders or di rect the customer to the companys website. Instead, the customer goes home to order the car online. Periodically, Tesla is permitted to host lim ited test-driving oppor tunities in Texas. Ab planalp said she was unaware of that option when she combined her test-driving trip to San Francisco with a busi ness trip. The average person isnt going to spend that kind of money without test-driving the car, she said. Texas is one of four states Maryland, Vir ginia and Arizona are the others that pro hibit Teslas direct-sales model. But this year, New Jersey, New York and Ohio, at the behest of auto dealers, also are trying to limit Teslas sales approach. The battle over how Tesla wants to sell cars became muddled with the companys February announcement that it wants to build a $5 bil lion battery factory ei ther in Texas, New Mex ico, Nevada or Arizona. Arizona lawmakers are considering chang ing their law as part of their incentive package to land the battery fac tory. Such a law isnt an issue in Nevada, and Tesla has no stores in New Mexico. Texas Gov. Rick Per ry last month called the states law antiquated and suggested it should be changed, but his staff said he has no plans to call a special session on the topic. So the Leg islature wont convene until January, probably after Tesla has named a winner in the battery plant sweepstakes. But the competition raises the issue anew as Texas cities vie for the jobs. For example, San An tonio Mayor Julian Cas tro tweeted that the law should be changed when Tesla ofcials re cently met with San An tonio leaders. They are the worlds greatest at publicity and promotion, Wolters said of Tesla. GM sells more in a day than Tes la does worldwide in a year. Indeed, Tesla is a niche player in auto sales. In his testimony last year, Musk estimated that Tesla would only sell 1,000 to 1,500 cars out of the 1.3 million new vehicles sold last year in Texas. Tesla expects to in crease its worldwide sales to 35,000 from 22,000 this year, but, by building its own lithi um-ion batteries, the company hopes to cut the price of its next gen eration of cars in half and eventually sell as many as 500,000 ve hicles worldwide. By comparison, global ve hicle sales topped 83 million last year. TESLA FROM PAGE C3 RICARDO BRAZZIELL / MCT Betty Lange holds her son Jackson, 2 months, as Tesla product specialist Kevin Stanley tells her how the electric car works at The Domain in Austin, Texas. cars, and that gallop ing horse insignia at the front that creat ed the pony class of cars. It had world-record sales of 418,812 in its rst year, four times the expected number, says Ford. Longtime Chicago auto writer Dan Jedlic ka said, There was nothing mechanical ly advanced about the 2,572-pound Mustang. It was based on Fords bland, reliable Falcon economy car. The Mustang was marketed both to men wanting engine pow er and women seeking economy and style. A 1966 TV commer cial showed a young woman, her hair in a bun, dressed in a busi ness suit, wearing glasses, peering into a Mustang. The male voice-over says, Ev erything you could ask for on a secretarys sal ary. The commercial asks, Should a single girl buy a Mustang? It answers the question with wedding bells. Another ad, play ing on the best-selling Helen Gurley Brown book, Sex and the Sin gle Girl, said about the Mustangs six cyl inders, Six and the single girl. The ad tells of the cars husky, brute of an engine to squire her around. For men, a print ad showed a photo of a guy yawning over a desk full of paperwork. The headline asked, Should a harried Pub lic Accountant drive a relaxed private fun car like a Mustang? The answer is the happy, smiling accoun tant sitting in a red Mustang convertible. Another ad shows a guy in a white shirt and tie and glasses who spends his Sundays collecting seashells. Then he starts driv ing a Mustang and sud denly becomes a life guard, with the glasses gone, surrounded by three adoring bathing beauties he has saved. For thrifty types, the basic model began at $2,368 about $18,100 in todays dollars. The money was made with all the addons. Famed car design er Carroll Shelby was even commissioned to build limited-edition versions that could beat Chevrolet Cor vettes on the racetrack, Jedlicka said. The sixth generation of the Mustang begins with the 2015 model, with news reports say ing that Ford hopes for sales to increase from the 77,000 sold in 2013. It hopes to build from the momentum of celebrations this week, in which 100,000 Mustang fans, and 10,000 of their cars, are congregating in Las Ve gas and Charlotte Mo tor Speedway in North Carolina. MUSTANG FROM PAGE C3

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 15.125 Black Thank you for reading the local newspaper! Classied line ads are continued on page C9.

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 ON WHEELSBY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0420RELEASE DATE: 4/27/2014 ACROSS1 Healing cover 5 Instants 9 Ancient symbols of royalty 13 Checks 18 ___ and Louis, 1956 jazz album 19 The Sun, The Moon or The Star 21 Best-selling novelist whom Time called Bard of the Litigious Age 23 Attribute of Elks or Lions Club members 25 Recital piece for a wind player 26 Toast words after Heres 27 Relative of turquoise 29 Proceeds 30 Within earshot 32 Anthem preposition 33 Mobile home seeker? 34 1966 Wilson Pickett R&B hit 40 Abbr. on sale garment tags 41 Short open jackets 42 Commandment word 43 Pipe valves 49 Ive got half ___ to 50 s political inits. 51 Year, to Casals 52 Greeting that includes a Spanish greeting in reverse? 53 Andean tuber 54 Opera based on a play by Pierre Beaumarchais, with The 58 Complete shutout? 61 Post letters 62 Hammer 63 Stockholm-bound carrier 65 Yale Bowl fan 66 Roisterous 68 Bond yield: Abbr. 69 These, to Thierry 70 Ruler known as Big Daddy 72 TVs Cousin ___ 73 Urban renewal target 76 Qualcomm Stadium athlete 79 Pariss ___ du Carrousel 81 Writer Chekhov 82 Pet Shop Boys, e.g. 83 Stella D___ (cookie brand) 84 Jermaine of the N.B.A. 86 Theyre steeped in strainers 89 Mrs. abroad 90 Vocabulary 92 Reversal, of sorts 93 Walkers strip 95 Govt. promissory notes 99 Former Chevrolet division 100 Suffix with narc101 Dirty rats 102 Like equinoxes 105 Fine hosiery material 110 Visa alternative 112 The African Queen novelist 114 Makeup removal item 115 Classic theater name 116 Stain 117 Designer Anne 118 Leonard ___ a.k.a. Roy Rogers 119 Covenant keepers 120 All alternative DOWN1 Breakaway group 2 Renault model with a mythological name3 Woodys Annie Hall role 4 Joanie Loves Chachi co-star 5 ___ 500, annual race in Ridgeway, Va. 6 Wildlife IDs 7 Ones who are the talk of the town? 8 Baking ___ 9 Actress Judd 10 Use elbow grease on 11 Opening for a dermatologist 12 Common newsstand locale: Abbr. 13 Seat at the counter 14 Ready to be played, say 15 De-file? 16 ___ Trend 17 Graceful trumpeter20 ___ Aviv 22 John Irving character 24 QE2s operator 28 Leave in a hurry 31 Music producer Brian 33 ___-Magnon man 34 New corp. hire, often 35 Man, in Milano 36 Cuts, as a cake 37 Coffee-break time, perhaps 38 Shakespeares Titus ___ 39 Financial writer Marshall 40 What business is ___ yours? 43 Bird whose feathers were once prized by milliners 44 Neil of Fox News 45 Ken of Brothers & Sisters 46 Quaker production47 One of the Kardashians 48 Composer Camille Saint-___ 50 The U.N.s ___ Hammarskjld 51 Pounds sounds 54 Give rise to 55 You Must Love Me musical 56 Nosy one 57 Millennia on end 59 Candy-heart message 60 Thats ___! (Not true!) 63 Rug fiber 64 Herseys Italian town 67 Roman emperor 71 Flaps 74 Naval petty officer: Abbr. 75 Amazing debunker 77 Anita of jazz 78 La Dolce Vita setting 80 Sluggers practice area 84 Futurist 85 ESPN broadcaster Bob 87 Certain Sooner 88 Some M.I.T. grads: Abbr. 89 Are you putting ___? 90 Slick hairstyle 91 Fancy tie 93 English church official 94 Kick-around shoe 95 Chaim ___, 1971 Best Actor nominee 96 City that sounds like a humdinger? 97 Query from Judas 98 Life Saver flavor 99 Like bachelorette parties, typically 101 Product of Yale 102 Jezebels idol 103 Many a PX patron 104 Prime letters? 106 Amazon fig. 107 D-Day invasion town 108 Former C.I.A. chief Panetta 109 Artists alias with an accent 111 The Price Is Right broadcaster 113 I.C.U. pros 1234 5678 91011121314151617 18 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33 34353637 3839 40 41 42 43 4445464748 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 5657 585960 61 62 6364 65 6667 68 69 70 71 72 7374 75 76 77 78 7980 81 82 83 84 85 86 8788 89 9091 92 93 94 95969798 99 100 101 102 103104 105106107108109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Sunday Crossword Puzzle Crossword puzzle answers are on page D3. TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. 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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 5.125 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4.125 Black Untitled art#: order#: 4 X 12.625 Black S C A B S E C S A S P S S T E M S E L L A T A R O T S C O T T T U R O W C I V I C P R I D E H O R N S O N A T A T O Y O U T E A L B L U E G O E S O N N E A R O E R C A L D E R M U S T A N G S A L L Y I R R B O L E R O S N O T S T O P C O C K S A M I N D D D E A N O A L O H A O C A B A R B E R O F S E V I L L E E M B A R G O V F W P O U N D O N S A S E L I N O I S Y I N T C E S I D I A M I N I T T E Y E S O R E S A N D I E G O C H A R G E R A R C A N T O N D U O O R O O N E A L L O O S E T E A S M M E W O R D A G E U E Y B E E T L E B A I L E Y T B I L L S G E O O T I C L O U S E S B I A N N U A L L I S L E O P T I M A C A R D C S F O R E S T E R C O T T O N B A L L O D E O N B L O T K L E I N S L Y E A R K S N O N E Sunday crossword puzzle is on page C6. SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com J oshua Jungferman, the op erating partner and gener al manager of Mount Doras Pisces Rising, prefers smaller farms over big, industrialized farms. What seems more natural to me is a working farm. You know, where you can talk to the farmer, Jungferman said. As a restaurant, it would be nice to be able to meet the farmer and maybe talk to him before hes seeding his next crop and let him know what youre look ing at, what you want to do. Jungferman said his restau rant is in the process of explor ing its options to buy more of its ingredients locally, like it did in January when it began buying microgreens from ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. Pisces Rising, however, is just one of approximately 15 area restaurants that buys from ARC Greenhouses, accord ing to manager Rachel Van landingham. Those restaurants also include Cask & Larder and The Ravenous Pig in Winter Park, and Dally in the Alley in DeLand. ARC Greenhouses is the company and the brand is Mr. McGregors Greens. Vanlandingham said it is nice to be able to see where ingredi ents come from. Just like in Dally in the Al ley in DeLand, they have a huge blackboard in there and it shows all of their local sup pliers, Vanlandingham said. Just to go in there and see, you know, oh, hey, these toma toes are coming from so-andsos farm, and hey, these mi crogreens are coming from Mr. McGregors over in Mount Dora. She added chefs can tour the farms facilities and are able to talk to her about growing ingre dients smaller or larger for their dishes, or suggest something that they might want grown. They can specify to me, as the grower and the supplier, ex actly what theyre looking for, Vanlandingham said. G LD STANDARDTHE IN LAKE COUNTY FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTTHE JOINT COMMISSIONS GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The certication award recognizes Florida Hospital Waterman Joint Replacement Centers dedication to The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. Visit FHWatermanOrtho.com for more information. E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 Business scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com PIZZA: Expo is a slice of heaven for vendors / E4 www.dailycommercial.com FOOD PURCHASES Total value of all food purchased annually through local market channels in 2011-2012 in Flori da: $8.314 billion Through grocery stores: $6.079 billion Through farmers markets, roadside stands and u-pick farms: $1.813 billion Through restaurants: $320 million Through special arrangements with producers: $91.2 million Through community-supported agriculture organizations: $11.4 million Source: Local Food Systems in Florida: Con sumer Characteristics and Economic Impacts by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida. From farm to table Mount Dora restaurant, farm doing business locally PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Pisces Rising general manager Joshua Jungferman, right, and chef Alexander Gandia, left, pose for a photo at Pisces Rising with all locally sourced or small batch food and liquors in Mount Dora. Workers space out basil plants at ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. The company participates in both the Jersey Fresh and Fresh From Florida programs. SEE LOCAL | E2 The tax mans taken all my dough And left me in my stately home. Sunny Afternoon by Ray Davies and The Kinks G rowing up on Chicagos north west side, April always brought two things: another year of frustration at Wrig ley Field, and the spec ter of tax day. Neither was a pleasant pros pect. From the looks of this years team, Con gress stands a better chance of successfully overhauling the federal tax code than the Cubs do of making the World Series. Want to really get de pressed about taxes? Make a lot of money. The perception that highly compensat ed wage earners utilize multiple loopholes to avoid paying their fair share is largely inac curate, especially this year. Now, sometimes large, protable U.S. corporations manage MARGARET MCDOWELL GUEST COLUMNIST Caymans, Kinks and the Cubs on a sunny afternoon SEE MCDOWELL | E4 ROBERT CHANNICK Chicago Tribune The Onion is turning funny into money as a digital media company. Two years after con solidating editorial op erations in Chicago, the satirical weekly newspa per has ceased publica tion, its website is lled with commercial come dy videos and the com pany has launched its own advertising agency. While real newspa pers struggle to adapt to the changing media landscape, a fake one thinks it has gured out how to thrive in the dig ital age, with audience and revenue growing at a double-digit pace. For Steve Hannah, chief executive ofcer and minority owner of The Onion, reinventing Americas Finest News Source as a diverse digital media company has worked out better and faster than he imagined. We made some cal culations and we got some of them right, said Hannah, 65. So far, we havent screwed it up. Founded in 1988 by students at the Univer sity of Wisconsin-Mad ison, The Onion grew to national prominence by parodying the gravi tas of newspapers with satirical headlines and stories, such as Drugs Win Drug War. It staked out online turf in 1996 with the launch of TheOnion.com, sharing content between print and digital. Current owners bought The Onion in 2001, led by money manager David Schafer. The editorial staff relo cated to New York that year, leaving the corpo rate headquarters be hind in Wisconsin. A former executive editor at the Milwaukee Jour nal Hannah took the helm three years later. Hannah moved the Onion branches into digital media after exiting print SEE ONION | E2 MICHAEL TERCHA / MCT Style Guide Marlin Ross II, center right, walks customer Jason Chan, of Chicago, through suiting fabric choices and upgrades at the Indochino Traveling Tailor popup store in Chicago. ALEXIA ELEJALDE-RUIZ Chicago Tribune CHICAGO As a rstyear law student with job interviews on the horizon, Huy Nguyen was in the market for a well-tting suit that wouldnt blow his budget. Online custom suit re tailer Indochino enticed Nguyen with the right price and quality, but what ultimately sold him was a Face book ad offer ing old-fashioned ser vice: in-person measuring and styling at its Travel ing Tailor pop-up shop in downtown Chicago. I like the in-person con tact, having a profession als advice, said Nguyen, 22, who brought three fel low Chicago-Kent College of Law students with him to buy suits at the pop-up shop. If I measure myself at home, I dont know if Im doing it correctly. As many traditional re tailers scramble to boost their online presence in an age of rapid growth in e-commerce, a growing number of online retail ers are investing in bricksand-mortar shops to put in valuable face time with their customers. Online menswear brand Bonobos was among the pioneers when it launched its physical Guideshops, Online retailers seek to reach, reassure buyers face-to-face SEE ONLINE | E4

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 headquarters to Chicago in 2007, hoping to consolidate editorial an d business oper ations here. That became an imperative during the reces sion in 2008 and 2009, when red ink forced The Onion to chart a new course phas ing out print operations and focusing on its websites. In 2010, The Onion struck a deal with the Chicago Tri bune and other partners across the country to pub lish, print and sell advertising for the publication. The strat egy helped return The Onion to protability, with digital driving revenue growth every year since, according to exec utives. The tough part about dig ital is getting enough scale to support an entire infrastruc ture of a company, said Mike McAvoy, 34, president of On ion Inc. Its paying for every thing now. Last year, The O nion news paper ended its run with the Dec. 12 edition, a tongue-incheek paean to its bright future in print. Copies of the nal issue are piled on a table near a couch in the waiting area of its River North ofc es, an open, 12,000-squarefoot space housing giant vid eo props, workstations, play areas and 80-plus employ ees navigating a dizzying cre ative maze. In January 2013, The Onion relocated one block west of its old digs, where its banner still ies from the building. The move to larger quarters came less than a year after recalling its reluctant writ ers from New York to join The Onions business staff and sister entertainment publi cation A.V. Club under one roof. Bringing everyone together fomented a cultural change, getting editorial and busi ness on the same page. It also laid the groundwork for On ion Labs, an in-house adver tising agency that now ac counts for more than half of The Onions revenue, accord ing to executives. Last month, Rick Hamann, 41, a former creative director at Energy BBDO, was named to head Onion Labs, reect ing its growth and aspira tions as a full-service creative agency. Begun in 2012, Onion Labs was built to create branded video content for advertisers on The Onion website ba sically custom commercials reecting The Onions come dic sensibility. Its premise is that advertisers pay much more for video than display ads across the Internet. The lure for marketers is reaching the elusive millennial audi ence that The Onion serves, with the hope that a com mercial video might go viral, offering a jackpot return to the brand. The Onion has honed its ex pertise in video through ev erything from the Onion News Network, a n award-winning CNN parody, to Onion Sports Dome, an ESPN parody. Both shows migrated to cable TV for short runs. Video spoofs abound on The Onions web site and its premium YouTube channel, drawing millions of viewers. The Onion had 3.7 million unique visitors and The A.V. Club had 2.2 million unique visitors in March, according to comScore, gures that do not include mobile viewers. The Onion touts 15 million unique monthly visitors to its websites using data supplied by Google Analytics, up from 10 million two years ago. Google Analytics uses a dif ferent methodology that in cludes mobile viewers. More than 47 percent of The Onions audience is be tween 18 and 34, accord ing to comScore. Broadly, that demo covers about 26 percent of the tot al Internet population. 1 Palm Reading 1721 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 917 S. US HWY 27 Minneola, FL352.787.7075NOW$1050%2 LocationsREG$20 The local restaurant purchases are mixed with distributor pur chases, Vanlanding ham said, and the farm is located at 3050 Britt Rd. in Mount Dora. The farm expanded to Mount Dora from its other location in New Jersey, according to the companys website. Vanlandingham ad vised restaurants look ing to participate in the farm-to-table move ment not to be afraid to reach out to local farms to see if they sell to the public or restaurants and to establish those relationships. There should be more restaurants that are seeking to do farm to table, because its becoming a trend that everybody wants to know where their food is coming from, Van landingham said. She said Pisces Ris ing purchases micro rainbow mix and micro wasabi from the farm. Meanwhile, Jungfer man said Pisces Rising is exploring its options to source more locally, which includes looking for small-scale, local distributors, and they are currently talking with the company Lo cal Roots. Local Roots website states that it only sources food from Florida farms of the highest standards. He said it is the restaurants responsi bility to push clientele to locally sourced food. People look to us to know the right wine to pair with something. They look to us to know which spirits to mix together for a cock tail. They look to us for our recipes. So, I think thats an important platform we should use it fully to really ex plore the benets of lo cal local and small, as opposed to the big, industrialized farms, Jungferman said. Jungferman said buy ing locally has long been important to him and the chef, but they now are able to pur sue s ourcing locally as Jungferman became an operating partner of the restaurant in January. It is a nancial un dertaking. Usually, the food is a little costli er and then youre also spending time, Jung ferman said. And its a newer concept. He said while the restaurant is transition ing to using more local products, it has always sourced most of its sea food locally. A study, titled Local Food Systems in Flori da: Consumer Charac teristics and Econom ic Impacts, by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Univer sity of Floridas Food and Resource Econom ics Department, esti mated the total value of all food purchased annually through lo cal market channels in 2011-2012 in Florida at $8.314 billion. Of that, the study states, $6.079 billion was through grocery stores; $1.813 billion through farmers mar kets, u-pick operations and roadside stands; $320 million came through restaurants and food service; $91.2 mil lion came through spe cial arrangements with producers and $11.4 million through Com munity Supported Agri culture organizations. The study claimed an average of $1,114 spent annually per house hold on local food pur chases. The study values veg etables as the largest local food category at $1.699 billion. Fruits were valued at $1.574 billion; sh at $686 mil lion; beef at $641 mil lion; poultry at $569 million; beverages at $541 million; prepared foods, jams or jellies at $530 million; dairy at $489 million; hon ey at $439 million; pork, lamb and other meats at $393 million; eggs at $372 million and nuts at $315 million. Local food purchas es in 2011-2012 in Flor ida were estimated by the study to lead to an economic impact of 183,625 fulland parttime jobs. The research was based on a mail survey in the summer of 2012 to 7,500 households and had 1,599 usable responses, according to the study. The study also notes that there was no stan dard accepted geo graphic denition of lo cal foods among survey respondents. Some of the denitions includ ed in the survey results were within Florida, in the respondents coun ty or specic city, the Southeast or within a 100-mile radius from the respondents home. I think its consumer demand, said Danielle Treadwell, an associ ate professor of horti cultural sciences at the University of Florida, of restaurants buying lo cally. I think ultimately consumers pretty much drive demand and there has been a lot of education, a lot of me dia attention and a lot of word of mouth. Citing the USDA Census of Agriculture, Treadwell said there are 44,519 farms in Florida, with 93 percent being small farms. She added numer ous reports and data show most small farms sell direct to consumer, which includes selling to a restaurant. To me, its a no-brainer. I real ly would encourage restaurateurs to work with their local farmers and ranchers, Tread well said. Food, we know, is a lot more nu tritious when its con sumed as quickly af ter harvest as possible. Purchasing things from other states that require days, if not weeks, to arrive, just arent going to taste as good. She added there are a lot of farmers and ranch ers that work close ly with chefs to provide specic products. Together, they are able to offer a real val ue to consumers that sort of sets them apart from the competition, Treadwell said. LOCAL FROM PAGE E1 FOOD PRODUCTS SOLD BY TOTAL VALUE VEGETABLES: $1.699 billion. FRUIT: $1.574 billion FISH: $686 million BEEF: $641 million POULTRY: $569 million BEVERAGES: $541 million PREPARED FOODS, JAMS OR JELLIES: $530 million DAIRY AT $489 MILLION HONEY: $439 million PORK, LAMB AND OTHER MEATS: $393 million EGGS: $372 million NUTS: $315 million Source: Local Food Systems in Florida: Consumer Characteristics and Eco nomic Impacts by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Food and Re source Economics Department at the University of Florida. ABEL URIBE / MCT Mike McAvoy is president of The Onion which, started as a satirical newspaper but has expanded into a digital media company featauring its comedic sensibility. ONION FROM PAGE E1

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 SEAN SPOSITO The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Heres the thing about Taka Torimoto: Hes more likely to remem ber his smartphone than his billfold. And that spells opportunity for a whole raft of new players in the lucrative payments industry. A 41-year-old tech nical consultant with an engineering degree from Georgia Institute of Technology, Torim oto has paid for fast food with the tap of his phone and sent mon ey just as you would at tachments in emails. His father digital ly sends the grandkids cash for Christmas. No more checks. Torimotos voice ris es with excitement as he talks about the new possibilities. Payments is one area that is going in so many different di rections. For the rst time since the advent of cred it cards, there are new ways to pay that dont involve cash, check or plastic. Most are built on top of the exist ing payments system, but courtesy of that hand-held computer in our pockets and purs es offer new vistas for both consumers and tech entrepreneurs. Its clear that the mo bile phone is the device that people are going to be using in the fu ture to pay, said David S. Evans, chairman of the Global Economics Group. Its not going to be a plastic card. By 2017, Forrest er Research estimates, Americans will spend roughly $90 billion us ing a smartphone or other handheld de vice, a more than sev en-fold increase from the amount spent in 2012. The rms gures include mobile remote commerce; mobile peer to peer payments and remittances; and mo bile proximity pay ments. Even if its estimate is too optimistic as pro jections in this arena have tended to be the pace at which startups are emerging is already head-spinning: Stripe, PayNearMe and We Pay, among more than a thousand others, fueled by billions of dollars in venture capital. For consumers, mo bile payments mean greater convenience and better security. For merchants and banks, they present new op portunities to track you and target sales pitches and rewards to you. And they give tech entrepre neurs a low-cost entry point into the multi-bil lion dollar payments pipeline. So why arent already living in a post-plastic world? In part, because ev eryone involved in the chain merchants, card issuers, traditional processors, tech inno vators and consumers is looking to maxi mize how much money they keep at the end of the day. Sometimes, the interests of two or more players align, but often they dont. Sorting it out via market forces and reg ulation is likely to make for a period thats exciting, bewildering, messy and frustrating. And right now, were at an inection point, where what emerged as a handful of novelties is becoming a new way of doing business. Thats evident in the changes the in cumbents are mak ing. Banks, payment networks such as Visa, MasterCard, Discover and Amex, and the tech companies that serve them, such as FIS and Fiserv, are scrambling to keep up. In 2014, youll see larger payments enti ties scramble to acceler ate the pace of their in novation to catch up to these smaller and more nimble competitors, PayPal President David Marcus predicted in a blog post. Meanwhile, small er players will scram ble to achieve the scale and experience needed to compete in a global business, he wrote. As a result, billions of dol lars will be at play in the payment industry, and 2014 will be a year of game-changing disrup tion. Last year, PayPal launched 58 new prod ucts, partly because of new threats, accord ing to a recent New York Times report. And earlier this year the e-commerce arm of eBay announced PayPal Beacon, a Bluetooth de vice that reads payment information from a smartphone. With that device, someone like a restaurant server would no longer have to take your card away from the table to complete a transaction. Thats in addition to a partnership with Dis cover, which lets folks use PayPal in the check out line at some of the nation s largest mer chants. PayPal has also recently acquired pro gressive payment pro cessor Braintree, which has regulatory approval to move money nation wide. Its marketing its ser vices to mobile-based innovators such as Uber, Airbnb and Task Rabbit, which facilitate transactions between individual sellers and buyers of, respectively, rides, lodging and doers of household errands and other tasks. And we havent even talked yet about bitcoin and other cryptocur rencies, which operate in a parallel payments universe, completely outside the existing sys tem. To be sure, some of the innovations wont stick. Innovation and dis ruption is an inherent ly inefcient and lofty process, said Matt Har ris, managing direc tor at Bain Capital Ven tures. He harkens back to the rst wave of dotcoms, with its rash of failures. We are at that now, at least in consumer nancial services, he said. But some of the ex periments will succeed, and at least a few will change the landscape for all of us. BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrr$50 OFF 3ROOMS& A HALL$99fnrtrbt EXTENDED OFFERS! When its Heart Disease It Makes A Difference Where You Start. ~ Barry Weinstock, MD, FACC MD: Yale Medical School Fellowship Trained: Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles Board Certified www.FLHeartCenter.com 511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg | 352-728-6808 1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages | 352-750-5000 Most Insurances Accepted Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP Dr. Weinstock has more than 25 years of experience in interventions for cardiac and peripheral disease, pacemaker implantation and treatment of heart attacks. He has joined our expert team to strengthen our fight against heart disease, and is accepting new patients. Start where renowned cardiac and peripheral vascular disease specialists work together with one focus the best possible outcomes for their patients.Start here. Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP I teach drawing. We will study color & design in our classes. You will learn how to draw and see how an artist sees. For more information Call 352.602.7748 or Email rdog229@msn.com RETURN OF 18 LAKE COUNTY WWII HONOR FLIGHT VETERANSPlease Welcome Veterans returning from Washington DC with a Patriotic Heroes HomecomingCome greet the Veterans. Please bring chairs and a friend.Sunday, April 27th, 2014 9:30pmAmerican Legion Post 347, Rolling Acres Rd. & CR466, Lady LakeFor more information call: 352-432-1382 www.villageshonorflight.org Goodbye, billfold. Hello, smartphone RYON HORNE / MCT Taka Torimoto of Atlanta uses his phone to make purchases at fast food restaurants and other places that accept alternate methods of payments from cash and credit cards.

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor Se Habla Espaol (352) 735-6941CALL US OR STOP IN OVER 33 YEARS*******SAME LOCATION 17 YEARS US 441Old 44119A K SPECIAL LOAN RATES GOODUSEDSTUFFNeed Cash for Your Gold Jewelry? No Need to Sell It! You Can Borrow on It!PAWNNEED CASH?10%15%Conditions apply offer expires Aug 31, 2014CALL FOR DETAILS to whittle their effec tive tax liability by mov ing prots overseas and escaping high U.S. cor porate tax rates. And hedge fund manag ers can sometimes pay lower tax rates on in centive prots to low er their liabilities. And its also true that some super wealthy folks, whose main source of income is from invest ments, sometimes pay closer to the 15 percent capital gains tax rate than the rate associated with their income level. But for highly com pensated wage earn ers? Their tax rate just went up, from 35 per cent to 39.6 percent. There were also new re strictions on itemized deductions. And even investment income was taxed at a higher rate. If your AGI is above $300,000, you cant de duct any charitable contributions on Form 1040, Schedule A. If a man making $75,000 a year wants to tithe (give 10 percent, or $7,500) to his church, he can deduct the donation and lower his taxes. But if someone who earned $400,000 last year wants to tithe (give $40,000) and has an AGI above $300,000, he can still give the money, but he cant deduct the contribution. A proposal is also be ing considered limit ing what high-income earners can contribute to qualied retirement accounts. One problem with this is that not all high earners have been salting away money in a retirement plan for years. Some are 30-year overnight successes, who have traditionally plowed any prots back into their businesses and need to make up for lost time in building up retirement accounts. Folks with signicant incomes are obvious targets in the goal to in crease tax revenues. But we may be rapidly ap proaching a point of di minishing returns by increasing taxes on the highly compensated. More taxes may mean that these same folks have less money to ex pand their businesses and hire new employ ees. And this hinders economic growth. Continuing to in crease taxes on top earners may also ac tually create a wave of outsourcing, as busi ness owners faced with a growing tax liability consider relocating in more tax-friendly cli mates like the Caymans. Margaret R. McDowell, a syn dicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Ar bor Wealth Management LLC, a fee-only registered invest ment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 offering t and style ad vice, in 2011, and later made its appar el available at Nord strom. Eyeglass retailer Warby Parker, as well as Gap Inc.-owned Athle ta and Piperlime, are other digital success stories that have set up ofine locations. Online crafts mar ket Etsy isnt opening its own stores but is devel oping a wholesale ser vice to help its sellers get their wares into inde pendent boutiques and large retail shops across the world. Etsy Whole sale, which launched in beta a year ago and will launch publicly in Au gust, screens and as sists sellers to ensure they are able to produce at the scale necessary to satisfy orders from buyers such as Nord strom, West Elm and New York boutique Mi chele Varian. The trend, which has accelerated during the past year, doesnt sug gest a reverse commute from digital to physical as much as the mount ing importance of hit ting customers from all angles, said Joe Scartz, chief marketing ofcer for Digital BrandWorks, a Chicago-based con sultant helping retail ers thrive in a digital world. Smartphone-wield ing customers have come to expect an al ways-on shopping ex perience, including the option to walk into a store, Scartz said. And as many tradi tional stores face down showrooming thats the practice of check ing out the merchan dise in-store and then nding the cheapest price online by of fering price-matching alongside the added value of their associ ates expertise, online retailers are having to compete on more than price, he said. If these online retail ers dont compete in an omnichannel way, they will lose ground to the bricks who are able to do this kind of thing, Scartz said, employing the retail worlds favor ite buzzword. Though e-commerce is growing fast, up 17 percent last year com pared with 3.5 percent growth for bricks-andmortar stores, it repre sented just 5.8 percent of the $4.53 trillion in overall retail sales in the U.S. in 2013, ac cording to eMarketer. For some online re tailers, pop-up shops are low-risk opportu nities to dip into the ofine waters without making major lease or inventory commit ments, Scartz said. Often, the real mon eymaking remains on line while the physical locations serve public relations or marketing purposes. Physical real estate is very expensive in de sirable locations, and brands that choose to do this often have secondary goals oth er than sales, such as awareness, Web ac quisition or branding, said Sucharita Mulpu ru, an analyst with For rester Research. Gilt City, the local life style arm of designer ash sale site Gilt, has been hosting occasion al warehouse sales since its founding in 2011 to connect with its mem bers and drive them to their brand partners physical locations, said Steven Schneider, pres ident and general man ager of Gilt City. ONLINE FROM PAGE E1 JOHN M. GLIONNA / MCT A booth at the International Pizza Expo was devoted to costumes that could be worn on the street to advertise a business. JOHN M. GLIONNA Los Angeles Times LAS VEGAS My old pal Vinnie the pizza guy called the other night. Hes coming to town, but not to gamble: Pizza people shop owners, sauce makers, cheese peddlers are gath ering for their annual trade show and he plans to be there. In exchange for use of my spare bedroom, he offers his services as my tour guide to a lit tle-known event that is nevertheless one of the biggest happenings annually in the pizza world: the three-day In ternational Pizza Expo, which this year would draw 8,000 avid attend ees. Vinnie Mineo is a sec ond-generation piz za man who in 1965 opened his rst shop, Vinces Pizzeria, in Buf falo, N.Y., where back then they called it piz za pie. Over the next half-century, he ran six pizza shops in western New York and later in Phoenix, before nally throwing in his apron a few years ago. Now, he wants back into the game, and in a big way. He subscribes to Pizza Today mag azine and every morn ing at his home in Mesa, Ariz., scours the In ternet for his next piz za opportunity, looking for the lost soul whos so tired of the business hell be willing to sell cheaply. I tried my rst slice of Vinnies pizza 35 years ago and Ill nev er forget the thin crust, loaded cheese and, oh man, that greasy pep peroni! Just maybe, Vinnie gures, the pizza show will offer a few business For pizza vendors, Vegas expo is a slice of heaven SEE EXPO | E6

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Sunday, April 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, April 27 the 117th day of 2014. There are 248 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory: On April 27, 1521, Portu guese explorer Ferdinand Ma gellan was killed by natives in the Philippines. On this date: In 1509 Pope Julius II placed the Republic of Ven ice under an interdict follow ing its refusal to give up lands claimed by the Papal States. (The pope lifted the sanction in February 1510.) In 1777 the only land battle in Connecticut during the Rev olutionary War, the Battle of Ridgeeld, took place, result ing in a limited British victory. In 1805 during the First Barbary War, an American-led force of Marines and merce naries captured the city of Der na, on the shores of Tripoli. In 1813 the Battle of York took place in Upper Canada during the War of 1812 as a U.S. force defeated the British garrison in present-day Toronto before withdrawing. In 1822 the 18th president of the United States, Ulyss es S. Grant, was born in Point Pleasant, Ohio. In 1865 the steamer Sulta na exploded on the Mississip pi River near Memphis, Tenn., killing more than 1,400 peo ple, mostly freed Union prison ers of war. In 1938 King Zog I of the Albanians married Countess Geraldine Apponyi de Nagy-Ap ponyi. In 1941 German forces oc cupied Athens during World War II. In 1967 Expo was of cially opened in Montreal by Canadian Prime Minister Les ter B. Pearson. In 1973 Acting FBI Director L. Patrick Gray resigned after it was revealed that hed de stroyed les removed from the safe of Watergate conspirator E. Howard Hunt. In 1982 the trial of John W. Hinckley Jr., who had shot four people, including Presi dent Ronald Reagan, began in Washington. (The trial end ed with Hinckleys acquittal by reason of insanity.) In 1994 former President Richard M. Nixon was remem bered at an outdoor funer al service attended by all ve of his successors at the Nix on presidential library in Yorba Linda, Calif. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, April 27, 2014: This year you head down a new path, as you are de termined to full a goal that could affect your life. You transform, and your desires transform as well. You will discover the importance of staying true to yourself. If you are single, you could meet people who are not authentic and who cant of fer you what you desire. Dont worry; someone who is true to himor herself is likely to appear. If you are attached, your sweetie will need to catch up to you. Know that that might not happen until the new year. ARIES is a natural healer for you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll smile a lot, as if you have a secret you have not yet shared. Others will try to nd out what is go ing on as they discover that your lips are sealed on this topic. Be spontaneous when making a purchase. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Try as you may, no one seems to be letting the cat out of the bag. The smart move would be to ignore the situation, as someone is likely to spill the beans. Make plans for yourself right now. You need some much-needed downtime. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You seem to have a secret or something you would prefer not to share. You seem to beam with this information, which could trigger a friends curiosity. G o off and watch a game, but do not push too hard. Fatigue could be high. CANCER (June 21-July 22) If you are not going on a mini day excursion, plan on going on one very soon. A change of pace always grounds you and helps you gain a new perspective. Whatever you do, youll do it intensely. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Deal with one person at a time. You might be easily distracted, as a phone call or news from a distance could put you on high alert. A change seems to be y ing your way. Are you ready for some diversity in the near future? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might want to se riously consider a part ners request. This person needs a change of pace. Friends are likely to call you to head out and join them. Making a point to get some exercise, whether it is men tal or physical, could re duce stress. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Just let others do their thing. Decide when you would like to join in and when you would prefer to do something else. You of ten give in for the sake of keeping the peace, which is one of the reasons why your anger is so close to the surface, SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might be hardpressed to follow through on a project and also get to a game on time. Know that you will manage to do both, if you want to. Howev er, dont hesitate to adjust your plans. You need to let go of stress. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Let your imagina tion color your plans. You will have a great time, as will others. Curb any frus tration you have toward a loved one who seem to playing out a mock war. Do not feed this persons hos tilities. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Stay close to home and handle a person al matter. An older parent or relative could seem out of sorts. Asking this per son what is wrong might be a mistake. Invite him or her along if you have plans, but do not create more pres sure. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Make some phone calls that you have been putting off. Your ability to read between the lines is an important skill, especial ly as someone is vested in not sharing. Do not push. Run some errands or meet up with friends. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Be aware of the cost of proceeding as you have been. You could pretend that your actions have no effect on others, and you actually might believe that. Revise your thinking. Make calls to a neighbor or dear friend to get together. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I have worked in a pharma cy for 30 years, and ev ery summer its the same story. People forget their medication and leave it at home. Why do people not realize that their meds should be one of the FIRST things they pack? Yes, we can call their pharmacist back home to get a transfer, but if the prescription was just lled, their insurance will not go through, or theyll have to wait while we call for a vacation override. Please, people re member your medica tions, and if you dont plan on spending a while sitting around our phar macy waiting for us to call your hometown pharmacy, and possibly your insurance compa ny, then dont get angry at us when it takes lon ger than the 15 minutes you expected. I love my job. But Im beginning to dread irre sponsible, crabby tour ists who know they need their blood pressure meds every day and ex pect us to drop whatever were doing to take care of them. PHRUSTRATED PHARMACIST IN MONTANA DEAR PHARMACIST: I sympathize with your phrustration, so Im printing your heart felt letter, hoping it will help you to lower YOUR blood pressure. I dont think the people you de scribe are irresponsible as much as they may be disorganized. The way I have solved this problem is to keep multiple copies of a printed list of items I must have when I travel. As I pack, I check them off my list and before I close my travel bag, I double-check to make sure nothing has been forgotten. Perhaps oth ers will nd this helpful. DEAR ABBY: Whats up with penmanship these days? A few years ago, my mother gave me some old letters written by my grandfather to my grandmother. Some of them are treasures be cause the written words are not only loving and endearing, but the pen manship is beautiful. The script writings are actually examples of art in this modern age. I work at a bank, Abby, and many of the signa tures I see every day are illegible. Is written com munication becoming obsolete? With the elec tronic age and schools going paperless, will penmanship become unnecessary? MARY IN HUNTSVILLE, ALA. DEAR MARY: Years ago, penmanship was rou tinely taught in the pub lic schools, and students spent nearly an hour a day practicing how to write legibly. Today, I am told that 10 minutes is devoted to teaching stu dents to PRINT. If the emails I receive are any indication, capitaliza tion and punctuation are also being jettisoned. And if the electric grid ever goes down and bat tery power runs out, well have to start over with stone tablets and chisels. DEAR ABBY: I know its rude to ask workers how much money they make, but does that also apply to asking a student what his or her grades are? Aside from parents and teachers, I dont think its anybodys business how Im doing academically. In my opinion, asking, How are your grades? is as rude as asking, How much money do you make? What do you think? MATT IN EUGENE, ORE. DEAR MATT: Im with you. How about com ing back with, Ill forgive you for asking if youll forgive me for not an swering. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Medications left at home cause vacation headaches JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 27, 2014 352.530.2256803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionCall today to schedule your appointmentThe Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology leads. But what he real ly longs for are the ex pos sights and smells the spicy scent of sa lami and roasted pep pers, the white wheels of Parmesan cheese and all the free samples. Hes always been his own boss, making piz zas long before the likes of Papa John and Chuck E. Cheese, and rolled his rst ball of dough in a region where piz za is like air: It sustains life. Now 70, he arrives at the airport in a shirt printed with an island motif, sunglasses and long white hair the col or of bakers our. As we walk toward the Las Vegas Convention Center, he can barely contain his enthusiasm. You wont believe it, he gushes. Everywhere you look, people trying to sell you slicers, sauc es, ovens, every type of cheese and topping. Its an entire universe of pizza. Closed to the pub lic, the expo is the re served domain of those who bring you the worlds most popular food: from manufactur ers and suppliers down to the proprietors of mom-and-pop pizzeri as across America. Inside, the showroom explodes like a Big Bang for the senses. Even the carpet is a feast for the eyes a rich red, the color of a nice Bolog nese sauce. Each year, U.S. con sumers spend $1 bil lion on pizza a lot of dough, if you will. One in 8 people eat pizza on a given day; for males between 6 and 19, the rate rises to 1 in 4. For pizza makers like Vinnie, the expo is like Christmas morning, full of surprises only its scented with ancho vies, and the goodies in clude ventless fryers, auto-saucing machines and sturdy brick ovens. Brick ovens are the best, Vinnie says. Fast and greaseless. We examine vented pizza boxes with plas tic liners to ensure the pie doesnt get soggy; displays for oil, yeast, spices and olives; racks of meats, sauces and cheeses; an app that al lows customers to track their pizza delivery on line. There are people selling vegan, organic and gluten-free pizzas as well as sauces with non-genetically-modi ed tomato seeds. Vinnie eyes a display of pizza paddles; he prefers the metal kind: Its easier to slide un der the pizza. He scouts for sauce that isnt too sweet; something with a little kick. He loves to try oth er peoples pies either deep-dish or thin crust, it doesnt matter. He samples a fro zen pizza. My uncle had the idea for frozen pizza in the 1950s, he says, chewing. He was ahead of his time. If he hadnt died, he would have been the king. We pass workshops for aspiring entrepre neurs with titles like So, You Want to Open a Piz zeria and Common Piz za Startup Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. There are panel discus sions on Health Care and the Pizzeria, and talks on how to make the best classic Neapol itan pie (with just toma toes and mozzarella). Most popular, howev er, are the World Pizza Games, where people compete at activities like rolling a wheel of uncooked dough along their shoulder blades. Theres the fast est dough-rolling con test, the quickest piz za-box folding and the triathlon, which combines box-fold ing, dough-tossing and dough-stretching skills. Nearby, Garrett Marlin waits for the dough-stretching con test. He won last years event stretching an 8-ounce mound of dough the widest, just over 38 inches in ve minutes. He explains the rules. Any holes bigger than a dime and youre out. Judges frown on the lick and stick trick, in which contestants use saliva to stretch the dough. Three judg es decide who wins the $1,000 rst prize and, as important, Marlin says, the bragging rights. I never toss my dough to use gravity in the stretch, said Mar lin, who runs a pizzeria in Fort Collins, Colo. I keep my hands moving that dough as much as I can. Everywhere we look, its all one big pizza fraternity. Everybody seems to know each oth er. Passing men speak Italian. Many greet ings involve pecks on both cheeks. We wander past signs with compa ny names like Fontani ni, Stella and Mangia Inc. Everybodys into the old-country atmo sphere. Quipped sales man John Correll: I say my real name is Cor relli but that my family dropped the I. Vinnie takes my arm: He wants me to meet his Buffalo pizza cro nies. Ive met many in the past, ever since my brother-in-law, Neil Downey, took me to Vinnies shop in 1980. The two had been best friends since grade school and Vinnie al ways let Neil and his family eat for free. Buffalo is full of such characters. For Vinnie, theyre pizza royalty, guys like Joey the Wing King, who, Vinnie says, runs the expos biggest spread serving up samples to advertise his two Buffalo pizzeri as and a frozen chicken wing business. At 47, Joe Todaro is a Buffalo native who each year hires young wom en in short skirts to dole out his slices and wings. Dressed in a white chefs jacket, he says his family started in the pizza business in 1957. Nowadays, his compa ny La Nova sells 500,000 pounds of chicken wings a week. Im a pizza guy; its in my blood, he says. I love the energy here. Every year, I just wan der around here to take it all in. Then we spot the Pepperoni Queen, Va larie Rossman, a sup plier who once enjoyed making stops at Vin nies Phoenix shop. You were always so good to your mother, she says, squeezing his arm. Pepperoni, along with cheese, remains the nations most popu lar pizza topping, stud ies show. Rossman ges tures to a display that includes Italian dry sa lami, genoa and lingui ca. Asked why pepper oni pizza is so avorful, she explains the phe nomenon sometimes known as the grease bomb. Slide a pizza into the oven and after a while the pepperoni curls up at the edges, creating a little bowl of oil that provides the avor. We leave the casing on the pepperoni, she says, so it curls up. Our mouths water. Vinnie never nds his pizza opportunity, but it doesnt matter. On the loudspeaker blares the Pharrell Williams hit Happy. Vinnie is smil ing. Still, our stomachs are full and our feet weary. A day of sampling the pizza universe leads to a quick culinary choice: Cuban food for dinner. EXPO FROM PAGE E4 JOHN M. GLIONNA / MCT Andrew Scudera, a cook from Goodfellas Pizza School of New York, takes a fresh pie from the oven for the throngs to sample at the International Pizza Expo in Las Vegas.

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FROM FREE FALLS TO BLACKOUTS A GUIDE TO FLORIDAS BEST RIDES, see page 2 CAMP DIRECTORY A LIST OF WHATS GOING ON THIS SUMMER IN LAKE COUNTY see page 3 SUMMER PLANNER A publication of the Daily Commercial APRIL 27, 2014

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2 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday, April 27, 2014 SARAH WHITMAN Visitorida.com An increased heart rate. Bel ly ips. The illusion of free-fall ing off a skyscraper. These days, theme park thrill rides generate gallons of adrenaline and trick visitors into believing the im possible. Thanks to advancing technol ogies, you can play Quidditch with Harry Potter or meet an gry dinosaurs. You can test the limits of physical experience without putting yourself in real danger. A battle against Decep ticons? Why not? A rock-n-roll blast-off with Aerosmith? Done. High-speed attractions en gage everything from the senses to our internal organs, said Rob ert Criss, professor of physics at the University of South Florida. The more that goes on dur ing a ride, the more we feel and the more willing we are to wait in line. Our experiences are partly the result of acceleration, or the rate at which an object chang es its velocity, Criss said. Riders sense acceleration as ride ve hicles push against the body to change direction. If the body is forced forward, the heart and lungs will lunge forward too, creating a noticeable sensation. Many thrill rides also ght grav ity, creating feelings of weight lessness and at times. Here are some examples of the thrills you can nd at Flor idas theme parks this summer. FREE-FALLING Nothing makes bellies ip like a good drop tower. These tall wonders, designed to simu late the sensation of, say, falling down an elevator shaft, trigger fear-for-fun responses. So what makes it feel like your stomach has risen to your throat? The stomach is accustomed to hanging from the rest of the organs, being supported by a frame that is in rm contact with the ground, which is push ing back. This is not so during a free fall, Criss said. For this thrill, check out the 150-foot Dr. Dooms Fearfall at Universals Islands of Adven ture or The Twilight Zone Tow er of Terror at Disneys Holly wood Studios. The Tower, which opened in 1994, drops riders 13 stories, brings them back up and drops them straight down again, all in the dark. Opening May 1 is Falcons Fury at Busch Gardens Tam pa Bay. This unique tower will take guests up 300 feet, pivot so they are looking face-down at the ground and then drop at 60 miles per hour. LIGHTS OUT When a drop or twist comes without warning, the result ing rush is even sweeter. From Space Mountain at Disneys Magic Kingdom to Harry Pot ter and the Forbidden Journey at Universals Islands of Adven ture, dark rides rely on the el ement of surprise to intensi fy thrills. Many also feature lit scenes and visual effects. A favorite: Revenge of the Mummy at Universal Studios. As if re-breathing mummies werent enough to get the blood pumping, the attraction com bines special effects with coast er speeds. Harry Potter and the Forbid den Journey uses robotic arm technology to make it feel as though you are ying in and out of harrowing scenes from the movies. SHOT OUT OF A CANNON No matter how you prepare myself for the sudden jolt associ ated with launch coasters, when it hits, it hits hard. One moment you are sitting still then, bam, electromagnets propel the ride car from zero to rocket speed. Cheetah Hunt, Floridas newest launch coaster, is open at Busch Gardens. Others include Rock N Roller Coaster at Disneys Hollywood Studios and The In credible Hulk at Universals Is lands of Adventure. A LITTLE LOOPY Many of Floridas premiere coasters feature signature loops. Loops are exhilarating because the human body experiences multiple sensations in a short pe riod of time, said Tom Henderson of the Physics Classroom. Though coasters move through a loop in mere seconds, the forces at work change dras tically from one point to the next. This explains why riders feel pressed to the seat going into the loop and nearly weight less at the top. Roller coasters thrill us be cause of their ability to acceler ate us downward one moment and upward the next, Hender son said. Get loopy on Kumba at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay or Kraken at SeaWorld Orlando. SUPER SOAKERS Water rides are usually a lot of small drops throughout but no real belly ips until the big dive at the end. Among the super soakers are Splash Mountain at Disney Worlds Magic Kingdom, the Jurassic Park River Adven ture and Dudley Do Rights Rip saw Falls at Universals Islands of Adventure and Journey to At lantis at Sea World. These rides end with a massive plunge, dropping guests as far as 84 feet. For an old-school feel, check out Tanganyika Tidal Wave and Stanley Falls at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, featuring smaller drops but a classic splash. NO SANDALS, PLEASE On an inverted coaster, the feet dangle free. It feels like oating through open air and when the rides go upside down, all you see is sky. Without a place to rmly plant my feet, its dizzying. But, these rides are su per smooth. For this twist on the tradition al coaster experience, visit Mon tu at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay or Dragon Challenge at Univer sals Islands of Adventure. FLYING HIGH Manta at SeaWorld Or lando is Floridas only ying coaster. Riders glide in the prone position through in versions at 56 miles per hour. The ride is designed to mim ic the movements of a manta ray gliding through the sea. Because youre tilted down, its a completely differ ent experience compared to other thrill rides, said Ash ley Reams, theme park en thusiast. You almost feel like you are really ying, which is in credibly exhilarating. From free falls to blackouts: A guide to Floridas best rides PHOTO COURTESY OF WALT DISNEY WORLD Walt Disney World guests will soon take ight over the wondrous Golden State in Soarin, an attraction that landed at Epcot in 2005. The Florida attraction was inspired by the hugely popular Soarin Over California at Disneys California Adventure.

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For More Information or to Register Call:352-787-4657ext. 321or email: mpinder@saintpaulschool.comr rfntnb Choose from either the Half Day or Full Day 7 Week ProgramsEach week is a different theme Everyone is welcome at...St. Pauls Life Enrichment Summer Series Sunday, April 27, 2014 SUMMER PLANNER 3 FRUITLAND PARK CAMP GENEVA Camp Geneva in Fruitland Park has added programs that include a unique preschool called Little Village, which features a childrens theater and themed playground. The camp also features a zip line through a wooded landscape, paint ball course to be completed in the fall and upgrades to the lakefront. For decades, Camp Geneva has hosted church groups, cheerlead ers and martial arts groups from throughout the state. Enrollment for preschool, day camp and afterschool care in the fall are ongoing. To learn more, contact Peter Mi raglia, camp director, at 352-7877016 or Peter@aca-camp.com, or go to www.aca-camp.com. LEESBURG STORY TIME AT LEESBURG PUBLIC LIBRARY Come and enjoy story time and a craft with Ms. Hannah at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday from May 1 to July 31. Admission is free. This event is for ages 0 to 5. Call Hannah Williams at 352728-9790, email hannah.wil liams@leesburgorida.gov or go to www.mylakelibrary.org. CLERMONT SPIRITED KIDS ART CLASSES AT CAGAN STUDIO Class meets May 2, 9, 23, 30 and June 6, 13, 20 and 27 at the South Lake Art League, 16640 Ca gan Crossings Blvd., Clermont. The cost is $20. Spirited Kids Art Classes are for ages 7 through 12. Come to the Cagan Studio and paint a design in acrylic that can be framed to hang on your wall. Different artists will be featured each week. Students will paint a smaller, easier version of the evenings Spirited Easel adult class lesson. Go to www.spiritedea sel.com for a schedule. The $20 fee covers instruction and all painting supplies. Discount rates are avail able for groups and private parties. Call Kathie Camara at 352241-6407 or email southlakeart@ yahoo.com. SUMMER CAMP DIRECTORY SEE EVENTS | PAGE 4 HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Camp Montessori Day Camp June 2nd thruAugust 1st, 2014 rf352-787-5333 nnntb ntbtbtb bttntbb b bt bt b btb b Open House May 19, 2014 6:00pm For Campers 2-12Awaken Your Childs Spirit and ImaginationWith hundreds of camps to choose from, children of all ages can actively take part. While some of these camps are day events others run weekly or overnight. Depending on your interest summer camps offer a wide spectrum of programs and cater to thousands of children every summer. Summer camps offer one of the best ways to experience new and exciting activities. At the same time, they also help to expand on the activities one already enjoys. Thats where Camp Montessori comes in. Camp Montessori is focused on increasing a child's appreciation for their natural environment, giving campers opportunities to work with Montessori materials at the same time having fun while learning. Campers get to make new friends, share their stories and interact in their own way. Excitement and adventure rule at Camp Montessori as the children explore newer horizons. If you thought summer camp did not have much to offer, think again! Camp Montessori is virtually a click away, check us out at lakemontessori.com. Camp Montessoris day camp is filled with exploration of every sort! From art to sports and games to academic work in our Montessori classroom, there is always something fun going on at camp! Families may choose to register for weekly, daily or half day programs. Campers range in age from 2 to 12. Dail y activities are age appropriate with special attention given to each campers individual needs. Camp Montessori offers programs June 2nd through August 1st, Monday through Friday. Visit us during our open house May 19 at 6:00 p.m. at Lake Montessori & Learning Institute located at 415 N. Lee Street in Leesburg. Come meet the director, visit the school and ask an y questions you have. You cannot realize the importance o f camp in shaping your childs life unless you send them. CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS128 E Magnolia Ave. Eustis, FL 32726352.589.8622www.studio19performarts.comSUMMER ARTS ON MAGNOLIA DAY CAMPSFor Students Ages 5-12 Years Old Cost: $185/wk (Includes Materials Fees) Time: 8:45 AM 4:45 PM Registration: $15Tutus, Tiaras and All that JazzJune 9th June 13th June 16th June 20th June 23rd June 27th Where the Wild Things Are Beyond the Emerald City All 3 Camps include daily art classes at One Dane Place (below Studio 19), and Student Performances Fridays after camp at Olivias Coffee House (corner of Magnolia & Bay)Students will take dance, acting and singing classes and will participate in other arts-related camp activities along with arts and crafts classes built on the theme of each camp. Ballet, Jazz, Modern/Contemporary, Tap and Hip-Hop Evening Classes for Students 5-18. Call Studio 19 for more information. 4 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday, April 27, 2014 CUBSTRUCTION CUB SCOUT SUMMER DAY CAMP Lake County Cubstruction Cub Scout camps will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at three different locations: June 16-20 at Montverde Academy (for Webelos only, fourth and fth graders), 17235 7th St., in Mont verde; June 23-27 at the Latter Day Saints Church, 14600 Green Valley Blvd., in Clermont and July 7-11 at the First Baptist Church of Eustis, 3551 E. Orange Ave., in Eustis. The cost is $95, and registra tion is available online at www. cscouting.org. Call 352-4551271 for information. PAT BURKES 2014 HOOPS BASKETBALL SUMMER CAMPS The Pat Burke basketball camps instruct players in goal setting, ed ucation in strength and agility training, on-court player develop ment, nutritional education and life skills. All camps will be held Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and are geared for boys and girls ages 7 to 13. The cost is $395 per session per child. Local camps will be June 23-27 and July 14-18. Both camps will be at Windy Hill Middle School, 3575 Hancock Rd. in Clermont. For information and to register, go to www.orlandobasketballtrain ing.com, call 352-385-0131 or email Hoops31@me.com. MONTVERDE WOMENS HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER TRAINING CAMP Pro Soccer Kicks and Mont verde Academy have teamed up to give local and international girls a great opportunity to improve their game at this camp, June 26-29 for girls entering grades 9-12. The camp is designed for the athlete that wants to achieve a higher level of competition with the opportunity to be evaluated and coached by current college coach es in the Central Florida area. For camp cost and information go to www.prosoccerkicks.com. EVENTS FROM PAGE 3 SEE EVENTS | PAGE 5 HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Our shop is located in the Clermont Waterfront Park at the end of Second Street nestled amongst the oak hammocks. Bring your chairs and coolers for a relaxing day. We offer bicycle, kayak, and paddleboard rentals and sales. Starting in June we will be open 7 days a week 9a.m. to 6p.m. for the summer! Look for us on Facebook to keep up with our unique activities on and off the water as well as our offered specials. Ex. scavenger hunts water & land, happy hour paddles, sunset paddles, yoga paddles, group paddles, the Klondike challenge and more. Farm Animals to Pet & Feed, Pony Rides, Hayrides, Picnic Area, Gift Shop, Birthday Parties & Group Rates $1 OFF ADMISSIONMust present coupon. Not valid on group rates or special events. Exp. 8/31/14.352-753-2882 www.uncledonaldsfarm.com 6 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday, April 27, 2014 CITY OF EUSTIS PARKS & RECREATION Summer camp sign-ups have started with camps running from 7:30 a.m to 6 p.m. June 9 to August 13 at 2214 Bates Ave., in Eustis. Camps are for ages 5 to 12. The registration fee is $25 per family, and is non-refundable. The cost is $500 for the rst 25 kids to sign up. All others are $550 for the summer. The weekly fee is $85 and includes all eld trips and dai ly snacks. Call 352-357-8510 for infor mation or go to www.eustisrec.org. MOUNT DORA TENNIS CAMP Kids will use smaller rackets, easy-to-hit balls and nets to t their size. Participants will learn tennis with fun, engaging practices by trained coaches. For informa tion, go to www.dtennis.net. Ses sion 3 runs from May 5 to 30 and costs $48 per session at the Don nelly Park Courts. SUMMER TENNIS CAMP Camp Director Diana Belton is a USPTR certied professional ten nis instructor with more than 26 years of playing and 18 years of teaching experience. She was the director of Fort Gatlin tennis pro grams and summer tennis camps in Orlando for more than 10 years. For information, email dtennisptr@ gmail.com. Session 1 is June 11 to 25, and Session 2 is July 23 to August 6. The cost is $36 per session at the Lincoln Park Unser Courts, 1101 N. Unser St. MIDDLE SCHOOL MAYHEM Are your teens tired of staying at home during the summer with nothing to do and nowhere to go? Call 352-735-7183 to register or go to the City of Mount Dora Parks and Recreation Department, at 900 N. Donnelly St. The camp is designed for kids from ages 12 to 14 and costs $85 per participant. The cost includes a eld trip. It runs from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Fri day, beginning June 9. KIDZQUEST SUMMER SURVIVOR CAMP This camp runs for eight weeks, from June 9 to August 1. Each week is designed with a different theme and activities. There is also a eld trip seven of the eight weeks and swimming two to three times per week. The camp is offered in EVENTS FROM PAGE 5 SEE EVENTS | PAGE 7

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Cruise the scenic Withlacoochee River on a boat tour with Capt. Mike. Enjoy dining with a Southern touch at Stumpknockers Restaurant on the river. + 352-637-2726 rf r GUNS & GOLDFind great prices on quality sporting arms, ammo, and accessories for the summer seasonNordic Gun & Pawn 748-2210 HOURS: 42 YEARS IN THE SAME LOCATIONGOLD & DIAMOND JEWELRY We Buy Gold and Gun CollectionsOver 700 Guns in Stock! Gun Cleaning & Repair Sunday, April 27, 2014 SUMMER PLANNER 7 partnership with W.T. Bland Library. The cost is $85 per week. TAVARES THE CHILDRENS SPLASH PARK, A SEAPLANETHEMED VENUE Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., week ends only, through Memorial Day and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The venue is closed October through March for the winter. General admission is $2, with a seasonal $15 pass for city resi dents. First come, rst served. For information on the Splash Park, call 352-742-6267 or email seaplanebase@tavares.org. SUMTER COUNTY WELCOME TO OUR JUNGLE! The Sumter County Extension in Bushnell will offer a Welcome to Our Jungle! summer camp for kids from July 21-25 at 4-H Camp Oc ala, 18533 NFS 535, in Altoona. The deadline for camp registration is June 27. The $25 non-refundable deposit is required by June 27. The total camp cost is $195, with schol arship amounts determined after all registrations are in. The balance of the camp fee is due by July 9. Make check or money order payable to Sumter County 4-H, 7620 State Road 471, Suite 2 in Bushnell, FL 33513. Call 352793-2728 for information. EVENTS FROM PAGE 6

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8 SUMMER PLANNER Sunday, April 27, 2014