Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrf rf$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EXTENDED OFFERS! HEAT BEAT CHARLOTTE IN SERIES OPENER, SPORTS B1EASTER: Groveland couple provides meals for the needy, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Yoga and prayer a full-body worship experience, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 111 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D2 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 NATION A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.79 / 59Partly sunny. 50 MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comLaw enforcement will beef up its ranks for the thousands of motorcycles expected to zoom into Leesburg for the three-day Bikefest event this weekend. For the event, which is ex pected to bring more than a quarter of a million peo ple into the city, Capt. Rob ert Hicks, Leesburg police spokesman, said all available ofcers from his department would work in several capac ities, including vehicle and foot patrols. We want a robust pres ence out there, Hicks said. As usual, car trafc as well as golf carts that just be came legal to drive in parts of downtown Leesburg will be prohibited from traveling on much of downtown Main Street, the main thoroughfare for the event. That area will be reserved for motorcy cles. In addition to Leesburg police, deputies from the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce will patrol the area in side and outside the city lim its. Sandi Chessher, with the sheriffs motorcycle patrol, said they will have addition al DUI units from surrounding county agencies and the Florida Highway Patrol. There will denitely be a very visible police presence, said Chessher, who in recent LEESBURGLaw enforcement ranks will swell for BikefestSEE BIKEFEST | A2 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comCrews worked through Easter morning to ll a massive 60-foot deep sinkhole with a mix ture of sand and ce ment in efforts to save two homes in The Vil lages that were on the edge of destruction. This is the biggest sinkhole that Ive seen, Casey Rankin, grout foreman from Helicon Property Restoration of Tampa, said on Sunday about the 25-foot-wide crater that forced the residents to evacuate. We put in 400 yards (of grout) and did everything that we could (to save the properties); that is why we stayed all night, Rankin said of working through the night on Saturday and into Sunday in the 2000 block of Chalmer Terrace. He said it could take up to 45 days for the concrete to harden. Helicon rst began working in the neighborhood around two weeks ago after a homeowner was concerned about a depression in his yard. We were already xing and remediating the swell under neath the house, said Rankin. They noticed a few telltale signs of YURAS KARMANAUAssociated PressBYLBASIVKA, Ukraine Within hours of an Eas ter morning shootout at a checkpoint manned by pro-Russia insurgents in eastern Ukraine, Russias Foreign Ministry issued a statement blaming militant Ukrainian nationalists and Russian state tele vision stations aired pictures of supposed proof of their involvement in the attack that left at least three people dead. The Ukrainian Security Service, however, said the attack was staged by provocateurs from 25-foot-wide sinkhole opens between two homes in The Villages THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Casey Rankin of Helicon Property Restoration of Tampa works Sunday morning to ll a large sinkhole in The Villages with a mixture of sand and cement. PHOTO COURTESY OF HELICON A sinkhole that opened Saturday in The Villages threatened two homes on Chalmer Terrace. DID YOU KNOW?Lake County has had three other sinkholes in the past three years that have generated media attention: %  en In February, a 15-foot-wide sinkhole opened up near a bus stop at the intersection of Powderhorn Place and Peaceful Valley Drive in Clermonts Hartwood Reserve subdivision. %  en In August 2013, a 100 foot-wide sinkhole swallowed a section of the Summer Bay Resort near Clermont. Thirty ve of the guests were in the building when it started breaking apart. %  en In July 2011, a 60 foot-wide sinkhole destroyed Main Street Hair & Beauty Salon in Leesburg, which Rafeek Mohamid had owned for 17 years. Part of the building collapsed.Dangerous ground Ukraine, Russia trade blame for shootout in east MAX VETROV / APMasked pro-Russia insurgents show a detained man to people gathered at barricades in front of a regional administration building that was seized by pro-Russian activists earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday. FRANCES DEMILIOAssociated PressVATICAN CITY Marking Christianitys most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and neediest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists Romans and pilgrims, young and old turned out for the Mass that Francis celebrated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peters Basil ica. So great were their numbers that they over owed from sprawling St. Peters Square, which was bedecked with row after row of potted daffodils, sprays of blue hyacinths and bunches of white roses. Wav ing ags from the popes native Argentina as well as from Brazil, Mexi co, Britain, Poland and Pope Francis, huge crowd celebrate EasterSEE SINKHOLE | A2SEE UKRAINE | A2SEE EASTER | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 HOW TO REACH US APRIL 20CASH 3 . ............................................... 7-2-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 7-6-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 1-9-0-3 Afternoon . ....................................... 6-8-9-6FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 19FANTASY 5 . ............................. 2-3-12-35-36 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 9-11-12-14-21-39 POWERBALL ...................... 5-6-29-35-5121 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. years successfully applied for a $100,000 Florida Department of Transportation grant to pay depu ties overtime so they could conduct extra DUI patrols. Chessher, who will be leading the DUI patrol, added they are aiming to be highly visible and stop suspected intoxicat ed motorists for any vio lations they observe, not just weaving and such. She said they will not tol erate drunk driving. My goal is to have zero trafc fatalities or injuries, she said. We will have zero tolerance for DUI, and if they are impaired and decide to drive in on a motor cycle, they will go to jail. Some activities of Bikefest will be held Thursday night, but the event ofcially kicks off Friday. City ofcials are encour aging residents to take ad vantage of the Lake Ex press shuttle service, which will be traveling throughout the county. Hicks added the police department has developed successful partnerships for the event with outside public safety agencies, including Lake EMS, Lake County Emergency Man agement and Leesburg Regional Medical Center in case of unexpected medical needs. We have to make sure we are prepared in every way, Hicks said. Hicks added that in Leesburgs biggest annual event, he wants all Bikef est patrons to have a good time, but act responsibly. We want everyone to act like an adult and we will treat them like an adult, Hicks said. BIKEFEST FROM PAGE A1 activity underneath the house as far as cracks. The company was near nished lling a smaller sinkhole on the property before Fridays heavy rains loosened the soil and caused the sinkhole to expand. Neighbors walking in the area Saturday morning noticed the sinkhole and reported it to author ities. Helicon arrived by noon. Villagers Mike and Margaret Remsha were among curious residents who drove by in their golf cart to check out the situation. Thank goodness for sinkhole insurance, said Mike, adding that after he and his wife moved to The Villages two years ago from Wisconsin, they were encouraged to buy sinkhole insurance. We did it right away, he said. Rankin said several Villagers have asked for an inspection of their homes, regarding the possible risk of sinkholes on their land. Im sure well be doing more inspections, he said, while noting some residents asked if they could go ahead and have cement poured under their homes. Rankin credits the residents at Chalmer Terrace for being proactive in noticing questionable areas of concern. Cracks are your number one sign, he said, adding they may appear on the exterior of a stucco home or pop up in the driveway. SINKHOLE FROM PAGE A1 outside the country. And the presented evidence particularly a pristine business card said to have been left behind by the attackers was met with widespread rid icule in Ukraine, where it soon had its own Twitter hashtag. The armed clash ear ly Sunday near the city of Slovyansk appeared to be the rst since an inter national agreement was reached last week in Ge neva to ease tensions in eastern Ukraine, where armed pro-Russia activists have seized government buildings in at least 10 cities. Ukraines new leaders and many in the West fear that such clashes could provide a pretext for Russia to seize more Ukrainian territory. Russia, which annexed the Crimean Peninsula last month, has tens of thousands of troops along its border with Ukraine. Russian ofcials, including President Vladimir Putin, originally said the troops were there for military exercises, but Putins spokesman on Saturday acknowledged that some were there because of instability in eastern Ukraine. The self-proclaimed mayor of Slovyansk ap pealed to Putin on Sun day to send in peace keeping troops to protect Russian speakers from Ukrainian nationalists. They want to make us slaves. They dont talk to us, but simply kill us, Vyacheslav Ponomary ov said during a news conference in Slovyansk shown on Rossiya state television. Yuri Zhadobin, who co ordinates the pro-Russia unit manning the check point in the village of Bylbasivka, told The Associ ated Press he was with about 20 men celebrating Eas ter when unknown men drove up in four vehicles and opened re about 3 / a.m. We began to shoot back from behind the bar ricades and we threw Mo lotov cocktails at them, Zhadobin said. Two of the vehicles caught re and the attackers ed in the other two, he said. The Ukrainian Interi or Ministrys ofce in the eastern Donetsk region said three people died in the attack and three others were wounded. The statement said some of the attackers were also killed or wounded, but the number wasnt known. Russian state television reported that two of the attackers were killed. In Moscow, the Russian Foreign Ministry quickly blamed the clash on the Right Sector, a nationalist Ukrainian group that has supported the pro-West ern interim government in Kiev, the capital. But a spokesman for Right Sector, Artyom Skoropatskiy, denied any involvement in Sundays shootout, which he called a provocation staged by Russian special services. Ukraines Security Ser vice also called the attack a cynical provocation staged from the outside. Russian state and other Kremlin-friendly tele vision channels showed pictures of items said to have been seized from the attackers and the two captured vehicles, which were pockmarked by bul lets and gutted by re. The items included weapons, ammunition, maps and the business card of Right Sector leader Dmy tro Yarosh. This gave rise to a ood of humorous posts on Ukrainian Twitter with the hashtag VizitkaYarosha, or Yaroshs business card. A man said to be a member of Right Sector and one of the attackers was later paraded before the television cameras in the custody of an in surgent wearing camou age fatigues and a black balaclava. The man said he would advise oth er Right Sector activists against coming to eastern Ukraine. There is a war here, he said in footage broadcast by Russias Channel One. People here are defending their land, defend ing their home and their rights. Putin has rejected claims that Russian spe cial forces are direct ing or encouraging the insurgents. Putin also has said he hopes not to send troops into eastern Ukraine, but he retains the right to intervene if necessary to protect eth nic Russians living there. UKRAINE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Helicon Property Restoration crew members work Sunday to nish stabilizing a sinkhole between two properties in The Villages. many other countries, they also lled the broad boule vard leading from the square to the Tiber River. Easter is the culmination of Holy Week and marks Chris tian belief that Jesus rose from the dead after his cru cixion. Francis noted that this year the Catholic churchs celebration of Easter coincided with that of Orthodox churches, which have many followers in Ukraine. Francis prayed that God would enlighten and inspire the initiatives that promote peace in Ukraine, so that all those involved, with the support of the international community, will make every effort to prevent violence. In eastern Ukraine, the hol iday was marred by a deadly shooting Sunday fueled by tensions between pro-Rus sian supporters in the east and those loyal to an inter im government in Kiev. The clash appeared to defy an international agreement reached last week in hopes of ending months of unrest. Francis also prayed that all sides in Syria will be moved to boldly negotiate the peace long awaited and long overdue. Syria has been wracked by a three-year civil war that has cost 150,000 lives and forced millions to ee the country. Christians make up about 5 percent of Syrias population. In comments to mark Easter there, the Greek Orthodox patriarch vowed that Christians there will not submit to extremists who attack our people and holy places. Francis makes a pilgrimage to Jordan, the Palestinian ter ritories and Israel next month, so on Easter he prayed that hopes sparked by the resump tion of Mideast peace negotia tions will be sustained. Thousands of pilgrims from around the world ocked to the celebrate Eas ter in the Holy Land, where Christian communities, as well as elsewhere in the Middle East, have been declin ing as the faithful ee region al turmoil. Francis also spoke of those suffering in Africa from an epidemic of deadly Ebola and urged a halt to brutal terrorist attacks in parts of Nigeria. Nigerians marked Easter with heightened securi ty against a spreading Islam ic uprising, mourning the deaths of 75 bomb blast vic tims and fearful of the fate of 85 abducted schoolgirls. The homegrown terror network Boko Haram has claimed responsibility for last weeks rush-hour explosion in the capital, Abuja, and threatened more attacks. In Venezuela, there have been hopes Vatican media tion can help end the coun trys violent political unrest, and Francis urged that hearts be turned to reconciliation and fraternal con cord there. But Francis Easter message also urged people to pay attention to the needy close to home. He said the good news of Easters joy means leaving ourselves behind and encountering others, be ing close to those crushed by lifes troubles, sharing with the needy, standing at the side of the sick, elderly and the outcast. Cheering and applauding, the crowd tried to catch a glimpse of the pontiff as he circled around in his white popemobile before going to the basilicas balcony to de liver his commentary. EASTER FROM PAGE A1 ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis, center, arrives to celebrate an Easter Sunday Mass in St. Peters Square at the Vatican Sunday.

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Tickets available for Dining in the DarkThis unique dinner is an expedition into the world of smell, taste, sound and texture as guests experience dinner served in darkness at the fourth annual Dining in the Dark event on May 2 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora. The dinner is designed to raise awareness and funds for New Vision for Independence, a local nonprofit that provides rehabilitation, community education and support services for people dealing with blindness or low vision. For information or to purchase tickets, which are $60 for gener al seating and $440 for a private table of eight, go to www.newvision.org or call Chantel Buck at 352-435-5040.SORRENTO East Lake library will sponsor poetry contestIn honor of Aprils National Poetry Month, the East Lake County Library is sponsoring the 12th Annual Poetry Contest that is open to all ages, di vided into three groups: children up to age 12, teens age 13-18 and adults age 19 and older. There is no limit to how many en tries one person can submit, and qualifying entries can be on any topic or any style of writing but must be typed on one page of 8 x 11-inch paper. Deadline for entries is May 3. Download the entry form at www. mylakelibrary.org, and deliver the completed entry form with your original poetry or mail it to the East Lake County Library, 31340 County Road 437 South, Sorrento, FL 32776. Call 352 -383-9980 for information.EUSTIS Eagle Rider group to sell breakfast for charityMembers of the Golden Triangle Eagle Rider group will be selling a biscuits and gravy breakfast, along with a fresh cinnamon biscuit to go, beginning at 9 / a.m. Saturday at the Eagle Aerie, at 999 N. Bay St. The homemade breakfasts are $5. Proceeds benet Eagle Rider charities. For information, call 352-348-1909.TAVARES Tavares to host annual spring Seaplane Fly-InThe city of Tavares is hosting its annual spring Seaplane Fly-In from 9 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. on Saturday at the Tavares Seaplane Base on Lake Dora in Wooton Park, 100 E. Ruby St. Admission is free and the public is encouraged to come view and photograph the wide variety of seaplanes that will start arriving at 9 / a.m. along the shoreline and on the tarmac. In conjunction with the y-in, Tavares is celebrating 100 Years of Seaplanes, and will showcase historical exhibits and memorabilia, historical re-enactors and ying demonstrations by a typical seaplane of the early 1900s. The Wooton Park boat launch in downtown Tavares will be closed to the public for this event. For information, go to www. Tavares.org or call 352-742-6267.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportThe upcoming Central Florida Landscape & Garden Fair is a fami ly-friendly weekend event, featuring not only ex pert gardening classes for adults, but a range of edu cational activities for chil dren. Free childrens activi ties include the Childrens Passport, a seed necklace craft and entrance into the buttery garden, maze and ve senses area, Eli sha Pappacoda, a county public information ofcer, said in a press release. Kids under 16 may com plete the Childrens Passport by stopping at the six designated locations on the events program map. After visiting each gar den, they can exchange the completed passport for a free meal voucher from Chick-l-A in Mount Dora. The Central Florida Landscape & Garden Fair is designed to be a fun, educational event for the en tire family, said Brooke Mofs, Residential Horticulture Agent. The fair will be held May 3-4 at Discovery Gardens, located at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. in Tavares, from 9 / a.m. to 4 / p .m. on Saturday and from 10 / a.m. R etired cater ers Pete and Sue Joiner have been providing food for the needy in south Lake for the past 30 years, mainly for Thanks giving and Christ mas. For the rst time in years, their ministry on Saturday did an Easter meal consisting of ham, beans, macaroni and cheese, rolls and homemade desserts. Most of the food is donated. The Joiners credited the Clermont Methodist Church for a donation of 22 hams, the Lake County Sher iffs Ofce for produce from the jails garden and South Lake Presbyterian Church for the rolls.Couple provides Easter meals for the needyPHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALBonnie Ray carries Easter dinners, ve to a bag, as Dolly Ott supervises. Peggy Weaver lls a plate on the Easter dinner assembly line. Rod Jemison is delivering 150 Easter dinners to folks in Groveland. Ive been doing this for years, he says. I know people who need them.GROVELAND Halifax Media GroupThe company that owns San Sebastian Winery in St. Augustine and Lakeridge Winery in Clermont Floridas largest premium winery has been working closely with University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences as its racks up award after award. IFAS biologist Dennis Gray com mends Jeanne Burgess and Gary Cox, the founder of Seavin Inc., for developing a good market for wine production in Florida. Jeanne and Gary Cox were the pioneers, showing that you can re ally make a good business in grow ing grapes and wine, Gray said. San Sebastian recently won 10 awards at the 26th annual Florida State Fair International Wine and ST. AUGUSTINEAlliance with UF a good choice for winemaker GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Hidden be hind live oaks and magnolias near the Florida Governors Mansion, an historic house that symbolizes much of the states terrible past and transformation will soon have its doors opened to the public. Crews and contractors are putting the nal touches on a substan tial renovation of the antebellum mansion known as the Grove just a few blocks north of the state Cap itol. Built by one of Floridas early ter ritorial governors using slave la bor, the Grove would later serve as home to the governor who shep herded the state through the civil rights era. The state at a cost of nearly $6 million is turning the Greek Re vival style mansion and its 10-acre grounds into a museum designed to document the lives of the states governors as well as an architectur al classroom for visitors. The house, which had settled over the years, needed brickwork repairs and updating to meet mod ern building codes. It is scheduled to open this fall. The fact that the Grove has re mained standing for so long is also a reminder that Florida did not en dure the same type of destruction associated with the Civil War. Governors mansion back in spotlightTAVARESKids not overlooked at Landscape & Garden Fair SUBMITTED PHOTO A variety of free childrens activities will be available at the 3rd Annual Central Florida Landscape & Garden Fair.SEE FAIR | A4SEE WINE | A4SEE MANSION | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. to 3 / p.m. on Sunday. Discovery Gardens is nestled on over 4 acres behind the Lake Coun ty Agricultural Center and features 20 themed gardens, including a string of lush courtyards and six spe cially designed childrens gardens. For adults, expert guest speakers will present on a variety of garden and landscape topics including native plants, edible plants, no-turf landscaping and geocaching. The fair will also pro vide visitors an oppor tunity to browse and purchase goods from exhibitors specializing in landscaping, gar dening, irrigation, fer tilizer, composting and hardscapes. For information or to register as a vendor or sponsor, contact Tina Chavez at 352-3439647 or tchavez@lake county.gov or visit www.lakecounty. gov/gardenfair. FAIR FROM PAGE A3 Grape Juice Competi tion in Tampa, while Lakeridge won eight. Tim Fannin and his wife, Andrea Lavorie, have toured San Sebastian ve times before, but their recent sixth visit was the rst time they saw the wine they love being bottled. Fannin, a 60-yearold from South Deer eld, Mass., said they visit the nations oldest city a couple of times a year to see family and briey escape the cold, eventually making their way to San Sebastian to sample the winerys dif ferent products before buying a case. What is usually a quiet, guided tour quickly turned into an assembly line of hissing ma chinery. After Fannin walked up 20 stairs to the cat walk above the facto ry, he looked down and watched the wine being bottled. The bot tling aerated the room in a deep, fruity cloud as employees lled, corked and sealed San Sebastians Port Ruby, which is barrel-aged for one year. Four employees pushed about 28 to 32 bottles through the production line, which is the size of a large dining room table, every minute and boxed up about 115 cases in an hour, at 12 bottles per case. After seeing and smelling the bottling, Fanning said he wished he had the same setup at home. Of the dozen or so dif ferent wines San Sebastian makes, only a handful are bottled at the St. Augustine location: the Port Ruby, Cream Sherry and 2-year Port. Most of the other bottling takes place at the companys Clermont vineyard. One wine in particular thats bottled there is made from hybrid grapes bred out of the IFAS program in Apopka. One of the programs hybrid grapes, called Blanc Du Bois, was crossbred to thrive in Floridas humid climate and to resist Pierces dis ease, which kills grape vines and is caused by a bug called a glassywinged sharpshooter. They go and they ac tually feed on the vine. When they do that, they basically leave behind a disease, Cox said. Some grapevines are resistant to the disease and some are not, he said. But what IFAS researchers also were looking for was a grape that would make a drier wine because the Southeast is more suited to growing sweet er muscadine grapes. Researchers blended those characteristics together and made a grape that was more acidic and could thrive in Florida. St. Sebastian Director of Winemaking Jeanne Burgess said the Blanc Du Bois wine named after Emile Du Bois, a winemaker in Tallahassee in the late 1800s has an aroma of apricots and offers a spiciness that people recognize as a grape fruit. It pairs well with seafood and is light on the palate, she said. Burgess, who has been with the company for 31 years, has had a long standing relationship with UFs IFAS program. We evaluated 11 different varieties (of grapes), and Blanc Du Bois was the one that captured our interest, she said. IFAS researchers have been proud to watch Blanc Du Bois win in competitions across the U.S., and Burgess hopes the program will be suc cessful with grapes for red wines in the future. WINE FROM PAGE A3 HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP PHOTOKenny Savage, 33, manages the bottling production equipment at San Sebastian Winery in St. Augustine.

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Hearing tests through April 25thLEESBURG(Across from Sears Auto Center)352-326-4079Mon. Fri. 9:00am 4:30pmSaturday by Appointment Only. In Home Test Available.INTEREST FREE FINANCING AVAILABLE AudibelHearing Tests to determine candidacy will be held through April 25th. Please call immediately. Appointments are limited! Those interested must call today!Bring in the talk. . Screen down the noise!www.audibelnorthflorida.comBoard Certified Hearing Instrument Specialist

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.com Celebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOM JUST 10 MILES SOUTH OF THE VILLAGES Your LED Headquarters!$34.95each We honor all competitors sale ads for same brand items! 711 South 14th Street (Hwy 27) Leesburg, FLMon. Fri. 7:30 5:00 After Hours By Appointment Tallahassee was the only state capital east of the Mississippi that was not captured during the war. Even today the front windows have some of the same glass used when the home was built. This is one of the most remarkable places in the state, said Rob Bendus, the director of the states Division of Historical Resources. We are in the middle of an urban area and its still intact the way it was 200 years ago. Situated atop one of Tallahassees hills, the Grove was once part of a 640-acre tract including the land that now contains the Governors Mansion. Richard Keith Call, an ofcer on Gen. Andrew Jacksons personal staff, modeled his home after Jacksons Hermitage in Tennessee and is believed to have nished building it by 1831. The mansion features a wide main hallway found in many Southern homes, pinewood oors and a winding cy press staircase. It was at the Grove in 1861 that Call chas tised a group when they came to tell him Flori da had voted to secede from the United States. Well, gentlemen, you have unlocked the gates to hell, from which shall ow the curses of the damned, Call reportedly told them. Almost a century lat er, another owner of the Grove would have to confront the turbulence of the civil rights era. Gov. LeRoy Collins, who married Calls great-granddaughter Mary, entered ofce in 1955. He would earn a reputation for try ing to chart a moderate course on race relations instead of adopting the confrontational stance of other Southern gov ernors. Collins blasted state legislators when they passed an interposition resolution in 1957 contending the U.S. Su preme Court decision ordering the desegre gation of schools to be null and void in Florida. I decry it as an evil thing, whipped up by the demagogues and carried on the hot and erratic winds of passion, prejudice, and hysteria, Collins wrote. Collins and his wife, Mary Call Darby Collins, bought the Grove in the early s. By that time, the home was far removed from its glorious past. Over the years, the land surrounding the mansion and the fur niture inside had been sold off. At one point, it was turned into a room ing house. Collins and his fam ily wound up living at the Grove while he was governor after the state tore down the original Governors Mansion and replaced it with the one now standing. Signs of the family life there include Collins son writing on the wall how much he hated damned homework. The state paid more than $2 million in the s to acquire the 10 acres and the mansion, but it included a provision that the state would not physically begin work on the prop erty until Mary Collins died. Former Gov. Col lins died in the home in 1991; his wife passed away in 2009. Both are buried on the estate. It was a place we all loved, not only because of its history, said Collins daughter Mary Call Collins, who recalled sliding down the bannister of the stairs as a child. Even though the Collins family helped repair the home during the decades they lived there, transforming the mansion to a pub lic museum has been a time-consuming undertaking. There also have been legal battles after Gov. Rick Scott and state ofcials supported a move to acquire prop erty next to the site for parking. The case is still in court. The rear of the home, which is an addition built in the s, was modied to make it ac cessible to the disabled. An elevator was placed where a bathroom once stood and crews have made the old home en ergy efcient. Its been like birthing a child, Bendus said. MANSION FROM PAGE A3 STEVE CANNON / AP The Grove is a historical mansion that once belonged to former Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins in Tallahassee. KAREN MATTHEWSAssociated PressNEW YORK Just Do It has been a familiar Nike slogan for years, but some parents are wondering what it was doing on some of New Yorks Common Core standardized English tests. Brands including Bar bie, iPod, Mug Root Beer and Life Savers showed up on the tests more than a million students in grades 3 through 8 took this month, lead ing to speculation it was some form of product placement advertising. New York state education ofcials and the test publisher say the brand references were not paid product placement but just happened to be contained in previously published passages selected for the tests. Some critics arent so sure and questioned why specic brand names would be mentioned at all. It just seems so unnecessary, said Josh Golin, associate director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, which mon itors marketing directed at children. It would be horrible if they were getting paid for it, he said. But even if theyre not, its taking something that should not be a com mercial experience and commercializing it. The test questions have not been made public, and teachers and principals are barred from discussing them. But teachers posting anonymously on education blogs have complained that students were confused by the brand names, which were accompa nied by trademark symbols. The Nike question was about being a risk taker and included the line, Just Do It is a registered trademark of Nike, according to stu dents who took the test. Sam Pirozzolo, of Staten Island, whose fth-grader encountered the Nike question, said there was appar ently no reason for such a specic brand. Im sure they could have used a historical gure who took risks and invented things, Pirozzolo said. Im sure they could have found something other than Nike to express their point.Brand names in New York standardized tests vex parents

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 D espite Russias Crimean landgrab and its massing of troops on the Ukrainian border, Western leaders still re fuse to recognize the mind-set of Vladimir Putin. U.S. ofcials still hope he will negotiate a compromise with the Kiev government rather than engineer the dismemberment of Ukraine. Anyone who still believes this pap should be sentenced to a week of watching the gross anti-Western propaganda on Russian state TV (nearly all national media are now state-controlled), which distorts the facts on Ukraine while whipping up nationalist fervor. This kind of agitprop, which hasnt been seen since the worst days of Joseph Stalin, proves that dealing with Putin requires a tougher approach. Under President Boris Yeltsin in the 1990s, Russian media were privatized and were pretty freewheeling. Putin took back control of national television networks still the most important news vehicle for the Russian heartland along with nearly all of the independent newspapers. On a visit to Moscow in 2012 in the run-up to the last Russian elections, I was astonished at the level of anti-Western vitriol on TV political talk shows: The most astonishing tales of Western conspiracies to wreck Russia were discussed as if they were fact. But that was nothing compared with what is going on now. Never, even in Soviet times, did we have such propaganda, a Russian colleague told me by phone from Moscow. If I listen I have a heart attack. (I havent named her because, for the rst time in 25 years, there is a vicious Russian campaign against fth columnists and traitors who voice any criticism of their government.) Indeed, the Kremlin campaign on Crimea and eastern Ukraine has taken propaganda to a new level. The Kremlin shut off or took control of most of the few remaining independent media voices, including the last independent TV channel, Dozhd, and online sites. The state-owned but respected RIA Novosti news agency was suddenly shut and reinvented as Russia Today, under the direction of the notorious Dmitry Kiselyov. He made headlines recently by suggesting that Russia could turn the United States into radioactive ash. With near-total media control, the Kremlin set about selling its narrative of Ukraine to its own people and the world. Russian news outlets relentlessly painted the demonstrations and government turnover in Kiev as a coup engineered by the West with the aid of anti-Semitic Nazis and fascists. In reality, while right-wing groups did demonstrate, they were only a small part of the protests, which were ignited by the pro-Russian governments cor ruption and decision, under Kremlin pressure, to turn away from Europe. The government fell not because of a plot, but because special Ukrainian forces, with advisers from Moscow, killed dozens of demonstrators. The new Ukrainian government has cracked down on the far right (which is less virulent than neo-Nazi groups in Russia) and has offered ethnic Russians language and autonomy rights. Youd never hear this on Russian media. Nor would you hear that Ukraines Jewish leaders have publicly asked Putin to stop distorting the facts about the treatment of Jews. Instead, Russian media broadcast nonstop, frenzied reports, with doctored lm and fake claims of casualties, that whip up fear of fascists among Russians at home and in eastern Ukraine (who watch Moscow TV stations). The media hysteria gal vanizes domestic support for Putin and convinced Russians their government had to intervene in Crimea and may need to do so again in eastern Ukraine. Putin brazenly denies he sent troops to Crimea and has 40,000 troops ready to invade on Ukraines border (they are fully on display in satellite photos). But President Obama, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and company dont seem to grasp the importance of Putins big lies. The Russian leader couldnt care less about world opinion. His Ukrainian adventure has sent his popularity soaring at home and sends a clear message to Kiev: Either you come back under Russias wing, or I will ruin you whether by destabilizing the country or by invasion. Putin is not interested in compromise, says the Brookings Institutions Fiona Hill, co-author of Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin. Hes playing the long game. Hes willing to push things to the end. This is not World War III. Putin cant afford to attack NATO countries. He is leading Russia toward bankruptcy, and his power will wane when Russias gas income drops as more U.S. gas comes on line. But Western leaders should not underestimate his intent to re-exert control over Ukraine; he wont think twice unless they give Ukraine more aid and take a much tougher stance on sanctions. Watch a little Russian TV and that becomes very clear.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial-board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Putin is playing a long game The rst open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended with rough ly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchang es, including more than 1.3 million at Cov ered California. Thats an amazing and wel come result, considering how badly many of the exchanges stumbled when sign-ups began in October. Nevertheless, its far too early to judge the success or failure of the health care law, given that key tests of the programs sus tainability have yet to be passed. Almost all of the exchanges got off to a wretched start, particularly the federally managed ones that shared a mind-bogglingly dysfunctional website. And yet, as Covered California Executive Director Peter V. Lee predicted last year, sign-ups increased dramatically as the deadline for enrolling approached. The results are signicantly better than had been projected in California, and modestly better for the country as a whole. Its hard to say how much headway the law is making toward insuring the uninsured, however. The exchanges didnt measure how many of their new enrollees had previously lacked coverage, as opposed to the number who signed up because their old policies had been canceled or because they were no longer covered at work. Although two recent surveys show a sharp drop in the overall percentage of uninsured Americans, analysts at Rand Corp. say most of the increase came from people gaining coverage through an employer, not the exchanges. And the refusal of about half the states to expand their Medicaid programs has left millions of poor American adults unable to afford coverage. Nor do we know yet whether the exchanges customers will nd their new plans adequate. Many of those who signed up have yet to seek treatment from their new plans more restricted (or narrow) networks of providers, one of the key cost-saving steps insurers took in Year One. Another outstanding question is what will happen to premiums at the exchanges, which will depend to a great degree on the demand for healthcare from the new enrollees. Covered Californias early results bode well for future premiums because they suggest that insurers signed up more consumers who are comparatively young and healthy than expected. But the rst real indication wont come until June, when insurers actually le their rates for 2015. With any complex law, some pitfalls dont become clear until after implementation be gins in earnest. That process is well under way now for the Affordable Care Act, and its en couraging to see the exchanges exceed their enrollment targets despite the manifold prob lems theyve experienced. And we clearly are making progress toward the goal of increased insurance coverage. Its just too early to tell whether that progress is truly sustainable.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICENo need for a rush to judgment on Obamacare Classic DOONESBURY 1973

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Late push lifts Spurs past Mavs / B4 MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG Dean Anna drew a bas es-loaded walk on a full-count pitch with two outs in the 12th in ning and Carlos Beltran followed with a two-run single as the New York Yankees beat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-1 on Sunday. Yangervis Solarte was walked by Heath Bell (01) to open the 12th. Af ter failing twice to bunt against C.J. Riefenhauser, Brett Gardner reached on a eld ers choice and went to third on Brian McCanns two-out single. Jacoby Ellsbury was intentionally walked before Anna checked his swing to complete an eight-pitch at-bat and score the goahead run. Beltran had his hit off Josh Leuke before Al fonso Soriano added an RBI single that made it 5-1. Preston Claiborne (10) went two scoreless innings for the Yankees. The teams split a wild four-game series. After the Yankees beat David Price and the Rays 10-2 in Thursdays opener, Tampa Bay rebounded for 11-5 and 16-1 victories Friday and Satur day. Derek Jeter opened the 11th with a sin gle off Bell. Ichiro Su zuki pinch-ran for Jeter stole second with one out, but Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon MIKE CARLSON / AP New York Yankees Brett Gardner, right, follows through on a y ball to Tampa Bay right elder Wil Myers during the fourth inning of Sundays game in St. Petersburg. Originally called a catch, the play was overturned on appeal and Garner was awarded a double with Alfonso Soriano scoring on the play. LYNNE SLADKY / AP Miamis LeBron James, center, is fouled by Charlottes Bismack Biyombo (0) as teammate Chris Douglas-Roberts (55) looks on during the rst half in Game 1 of the teams opening-round playoff series on Sunday in Miami. TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI LeBron James scored 27 points, Dwyane Wade added 23 and the Miami Heat used a late charge to beat the Charlotte Bob cats 99-88 on Sunday in Game 1 of their Eastern Conference rst-round series. Chris Bosh scored 13 points and James Jones had 12 for the Heat. Game 2 of the best-ofseven series is Wednesday. Kemba Walker scored 20 points for the Bob cats, who led by nine early and led again in the third. Al Jefferson missed eight of his nal 13 shots after get ting hurt in the rst quarter. He nished with 18 points and 10 rebounds for the Bobcats, who got 17 from Gary Neal and 15 from Josh McRoberts. Miami sealed it with an 18-4 run in the fourth, all but three of those points coming with James getting a rest. Luke Ridnour made a high-arcing baseline jumper with 10:29 left to get Charlotte within 74-69 before Jones an swered with a 3-pointer to put Miami up by PETE IACOBELLIAssociated PressHILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. Matt Kuchar overcame a four-stroke decit to nally nish on top, when his stunning chip-in on the 18th hole gave him a 64 and a vic tory at the RBC Heritage on Sunday. Kuchar was four shots behind Luke Donald at the start but made that up with seven birdies on his rst 10 holes. He had a birdie putt of less than eight feet at the par-3 17th, but three-putted for bogey to fall into a tie for rst. Kuchar was in more trouble in a bunker at Harbour Town Golf Links closing lighthouse hole. Thats when he blasted out and watched the ball rat tle in for birdie. Kuchar punched the air and raised his arms in cele bration of what would be his seventh career PGA Tour win. Donald had two holes STEPHEN B. MORTON / AP Matt Kuchar watches his drive off the third tee during Sundays nal round of the RBC Heritage in Hilton Head Island, S.C. GREG BEACHAMAssociated PressTORONTO Rubin Hurricane Carter, the boxer whose wrongful murder conviction be came an international symbol of racial injustice, has died at 76. John Artis, a longtime friend and caregiver, said Car ter died in his sleep Sun day. Carter had been stricken with prostate cancer in Toronto, the New Jersey natives ad opted home. Carter spent 19 years in prison for three mur ders at a tavern in Paterson, N.J., in 1966. He was convicted alongside Artis in 1967 and again in a new trial in 1976. Carter was freed in Novem ber 1985 when his con victions were set aside after years of appeals and public advocacy. His ordeal and the al leged racial motivations behind it were publicized in Bob Dylans 1975 song Hurricane, several books and a 1999 lm starring Den zel Washington, who received an Academy Award nomination for playing the boxer turned prisoner. Carters murder convictions abruptly ended the boxing career of a former petty criminal who became an un dersized middleweight contender largely on ferocity and punching power. Although never a world champion, Car ter went 27-12-1 with 19 knockouts, memora bly stopping two-divi sion champ Emile Grifth in the rst round in 1963. He also fought for a middleweight title in December 1964, losing a unanimous decision to Joey Giardello. In June 1966, three white people were shot by two black men at the Lafayette Bar and Grill in Paterson. Carter and Artis were convicted by an all-white jury largely on the testimony of two thieves who later re canted their stories. Carter was granted a new trial and brief ly freed in 1976, but sent back for nine more years after being convicted in a second trial. I wouldnt give up, Carter said in an inter view on PBS in 2011. No matter that they sentenced me to three life terms in prison. I wouldnt give up. Just because a jury of 12 misinformed people ... found me guilty did not make me guilty. And be cause I was not guilty, I refused to act like a guilty person. Dylan became aware of Carters plight after reading the boxers autobiography. He met Carter and co-wrote Hurricane, which he performed on his Boxer Rubin Hurricane Carter, subject of Bob Dylan song, dies at 76 CARTER SEE CARTER | B2Heat start sluggish, finish in stride to beat Bobcats SEE HEAT | B2Anna, Beltran key Yankees 12-inning winSEE RAYS | B2Kuchar chips in to win HeritageSEE PGA | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 1, Indiana 0 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Indiana at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Miami 1, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Brooklyn 1, Toronto 0 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Chicago vs. Washington Sunday, April 20: Washington at Chicago, late Tuesday, April 22: Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Chicago at Washington, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 1, Dallas 0 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: San Antonio at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City 1, Memphis 0 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. Golden State 1, L.A. Clippers 0 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 Monday, April 21: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Houston vs. Portland Sunday, April 20: Portland at Houston, late Wednesday, April 23: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Detroit 1, Boston 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Boston at Detroit, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Detroit at Boston, 3 p.m. Montreal 2, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Tampa Bay at Montreal, late Tuesday, April 22: Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh 1, Columbus 1 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Columbus at Pittsburgh, TBD N.Y. Rangers 1, Philadelphia 1 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Friday, April 25: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, Noon WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 2, Minnesota 0 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Colorado at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. St. Louis 2, Chicago 0 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: St. Louis at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Anaheim 2, Dallas 0 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Anaheim at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: Los Angeles at San Jose, late Tuesday, April 22: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Thursday, April 24: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour RBC Heritage Sunday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,101; Par: 71 Final Matt Kuchar 66-73-70-64 273 Luke Donald 70-69-66-69 274 John Huh 71-68-68-68 275 Ben Martin 69-68-71-67 275 Scott Brown 70-69-71-67 277 Brian Stuard 69-72-68-68 277 Jim Furyk 71-66-71-70 278 Brian Harman 69-71-69-69 278 Russell Knox 69-72-68-70 279 William McGirt 66-76-71-66 279 Rory Sabbatini 69-72-70-68 279 Stuart Appleby 73-73-67-67 280 Matt Every 69-70-70-71 280 Jason Kokrak 71-73-66-70 280 Charl Schwartzel 70-70-68-72 280 Jordan Spieth 69-74-70-67 280 Nicholas Thompson70-70-68-72 280 Paul Casey 74-67-72-68 281 J.B. Holmes 72-71-69-69 281 Ryo Ishikawa 77-68-67-69 281 Pat Perez 74-69-74-64 281 Ted Potter, Jr. 70-69-71-71 281 Robert Allenby 69-72-70-71 282 Martin Kaymer 73-67-72-70 282 Graeme McDowell71-69-72-70 282 Matthew Fitzpatrick71-71-69-71 282 Tim Herron 69-72-72-70 283 Chris Kirk 71-72-71-69 283 Geoff Ogilvy 72-68-71-72 283 Camilo Villegas 72-71-73-67 283 Jonathan Byrd 71-73-73-67 284 K.J. Choi 70-67-74-73 284 Harris English 68-73-75-68 284 Billy Hurley III 70-69-73-72 284 Jerry Kelly 76-70-67-71 284 Richard H. Lee 70-69-71-74 284 Steve Marino 72-72-72-68 284 Ricky Barnes 72-73-72-68 285 Tim Clark 72-71-71-71 285 Chesson Hadley 72-67-73-73 285 Justin Hicks 75-70-68-72 285 Charley Hoffman 73-71-68-73 285 Kevin Kisner 73-72-68-72 285 Scott Langley 66-73-75-71 285 Spencer Levin 72-74-70-69 285 Kevin Stadler 71-69-72-73 285 Brendon Todd 75-71-71-68 285 Ken Duke 72-71-69-74 286 Andrew Loupe 70-73-72-71 286 Patrick Reed 71-72-70-73 286 Chris Stroud 71-71-74-70 286 Bo Van Pelt 69-70-73-74 286 Woody Austin 74-71-67-75 287 Champions Tour Greater Gwinnett Championship Sunday At TPC Sugarloaf Duluth, Ga. Purse: $1.8 million Yardage: 7,131; Par: 72 Final Miguel A. Jimenez (270), $270,000 65-70-67 202 Bernhard Langer (158), $158,400 68-68-68 204 Jay Haas (130), $129,600 71-68-67 206 Fred Couples (107), $107,100 69-68-70 207 David Frost (74), $74,100 72-68-69 209 Steve Pate (74), $74,100 68-71-70 209 Duffy Waldorf (74), $74,100 71-68-70 209 Chien Soon Lu (50), $49,500 71-68-71 210 Colin Montgomerie (50), $49,500 70-72-68 210 Kenny Perry (50), $49,500 68-71-71 210 Willie Wood (50), $49,500 74-70-66 210 Billy Andrade (0), $36,600 72-72-67 211 Scott Dunlap (0), $36,600 73-68-70 211 Fred Funk (0), $36,600 72-69-70 211 Larry Mize (0), $32,400 73-71-68 212 Bart Bryant (0), $27,036 73-71-69 213 Mark Calcavecchia (0), $27,036 73-71-69 213 Roger Chapman (0), $27,036 71-74-68 213 Peter Senior (0), $27,036 72-73-68 213 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $27,036 73-69-71 213 Russ Cochran (0), $18,608 73-71-70 214 Marco Dawson (0), $18,608 71-69-74 214 Joe Durant (0), $18,608 74-73-67 214 Bill Glasson (0), $18,608 72-70-72 214 Mike Goodes (0), $18,608 72-73-69 214 Joey Sindelar (0), $18,608 72-69-73 214 Jeff Sluman (0), $18,608 69-75-70 214 Esteban Toledo (0), $18,608 72-73-69 214 Michael Allen (0), $13,320 72-70-73 215 Anders Forsbrand (0), $13,320 73-70-72 215 Dan Forsman (0), $13,320 76-70-69 215 Jim Rutledge (0), $13,320 75-73-67 215 Rod Spittle (0), $13,320 70-71-74 215 Bob Tway (0), $13,320 73-73-69 215 LPGA Tour LPGA-Lotte Championship Saturday At Ko Olina Golf Club Course Kapolei, Hawaii Purse: $1.7 million Yardage: 6,383; Par: 72 Final a-denotes amateur Michelle Wie, $255,000 70-67-70-67 274 Angela Stanford, $155,874 72-64-67-73 276 Inbee Park, $113,075 70-68-72-67 277 Hyo Joo Kim, $87,473 68-70-69-71 278 Chella Choi, $64,005 74-68-70-67 279 So Yeon Ryu, $64,005 68-70-72-69 279 Haru Nomura, $45,231 73-67-73-68 281 Amy Anderson, $45,231 70-72-68-71 281 Katherine Kirk, $33,602 73-70-71-68 282 Se Ri Pak, $33,602 68-71-74-69 282 Katie M. Burnett, $33,602 71-69-72-70 282 Cristie Kerr, $33,602 72-66-70-74 282 Christel Boeljon, $26,341 71-70-74-69 284 Shanshan Feng, $26,341 73-71-70-70 284 Julieta Granada, $26,341 74-72-67-71 284 Ariya Jutanugarn, $23,383 73-70-71-71 285 Eun-Hee Ji, $20,448 77-71-72-66 286 Tiffany Joh, $20,448 73-68-77-68 286 Brooke Pancake, $20,448 75-69-73-69 286 Na Yeon Choi, $20,448 75-70-69-72 286 Amelia Lewis, $20,448 77-66-70-73 286 Amy Yang, $17,260 74-73-73-67 287 Lizette Salas, $17,260 73-71-74-69 287 a-So Young Lee 70-70-75-72 287 Azahara Munoz, $17,260 73-70-71-73 287 Paula Reto, $17,260 72-69-73-73 287 Line Vedel, $14,525 76-71-72-69 288 Jenny Shin, $14525 73-72-73-70 288 TV2DAY COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPNU Notre Dame at MiamiMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 11 a.m.MLB Baltimore at Boston7 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at Atlanta ESPN Cincinnati at PittsburghNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 8 p.m.TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 2, Memphis at Oklahoma City10:30 p.m.TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 2, Golden State at L.A. ClippersNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 3, Pittsburgh at Columbus9:30 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 3, Anaheim at DallasSOCCER 2:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, West Bromwich at Manchester CitySCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975. Muhammad Ali also spoke out on Carters behalf, while advertising art director George Lois and other celebri ties also worked toward Carters release. With a network of friends and volunteers also advocating for him, Carter eventually won his release from U.S. District Judge H. Lee Sa rokin, who wrote that Carters prosecution had been predicated upon an appeal to racism rather than reason, and concealment rather than disclosure. Born on May 6, 1937, into a family of seven children, Carter struggled with a hereditary speech impediment and was sent to a juvenile reform center at 12 after an assault. He es caped and joined the Army in 1954, experi encing racial segregation and learning to box while in West Germany. Carter then committed a series of muggings after returning home, spending four years in various state prisons. He began his pro boxing career in 1961 af ter his release, winning 20 of his rst 24 ghts mostly by stoppage. Carter was fairly short for a middleweight at 5-foot-8, but his aggres sion and high punch volume made him effective. His shaved head and menacing glower gave him an imposing ring presence, but also con tributed to a menacing aura outside the ring. He was also quoted as joking about killing po lice ofcers in a 1964 story in the Saturday Evening Post which was later cited by Carter as a cause of his troubles with police. Carter boxed regular ly on television at Mad ison Square Garden and overseas in Lon don, Paris and Johan nesburg. Although his career appeared to be on a downswing be fore he was implicated in the murders, Carter was hoping for a second middleweight title shot. Carter and Artis were questioned after being spotted in the area of the murders in Carters white car, which vaguely matched witnesses descriptions. Both cit ed alibis and were re leased, but were arrest ed months later. A case relying largely on the testimony of thieves Al fred Bello and Arthur Bradley resulted in a conviction in June 1967. Carter deed his prison guards from the rst day of his incarceration, spending time in soli tary connement be cause of it. When I walked into prison, I refused to wear their stripes, Carter said. I refused to eat their food. I refused to work their jobs, and I would have refused to breathe the prisons air if I could have done so. Carter eventually wrote and spoke elo quently about his plight, publishing his autobi ography, The Sixteenth Round, in 1974. Ben et concerts were held for his legal defense. After his release, Car ter moved to Toronto, where he served as the executive director of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted from 1993 to 2005. He received two hon orary doctorates for his work. Director Norman Jew ison made Carters story into a well-reviewed biographical lm, with Washington working closely alongside Carter to capture the boxers transformation and redemption. Washington won a Golden Globe for the role. This man right here is love, Washington said while onstage with Carter at the Gold en Globes ceremony in early 2000. Hes all love. He lost about 7,300 days of his life, and hes love. Hes all love. But the makers of The Hurricane were widely criticized for factual inaccuracies and glossing over oth er parts of Carters story, including his criminal past and a reputation for a violent temper. Giardello sued the lms producers for its depiction of a racist x in his victory over Carter, who acknowledged Giardello deserved the win. Carters weight and activity dwindled during his nal months, but he still advocat ed for prisoners he be lieved to be wrongfully convicted. Carter wrote an opinion essay for the New York Daily News in Feb ruary, arguing vehemently for the release of David McCallum, convicted of a kidnapping and murder in 1985. Carter also briey men tioned his health, say ing he was quite literal ly on my deathbed. Now Im looking death straight in the eye, Carter wrote. Hes got me on the ropes, but I wont back down. CARTER FROM PAGE B1 eight. Thats when James got a breather. He returned to tons of breathing room. Chris Andersen had a tip-in for a 12-point lead, Wade made a 3-pointer as the shot clock was winding down with 6:50 left to make it 85-70, and another score by Anders en pushed the margin to 17. With that, Game 1 was secure. And just for good measure, James drilled a 3 on his rst possession after check ing back in, putting Mi ami up 20. It was a solid rst step for the two-time defending champions, who lost 14 of their nal 25 games and earned only the No. 2 seed in the East. But James said before the game that the Heat felt like the season was starting anew, and that the playoffs were what matter most. So far, so good. Charlottes opening lineup had four play ers making their rst playoff starts three of them seeing their rst playoff action. It was also the rst national-television appear ance this season for the Bobcats, who seemed anything but over whelmed by the mo ment. Before long, they had a nine-point lead be hind Jefferson, who made his rst four shots. But he limped to the bench late in the rst quarter, tugged his left shoe off and began rubbing his heel before wobbling toward the Charlotte locker room. The team said he was bothered by a left plantar fascia strain the pain of which sometimes forced him to resort to one-legged jumpers and generally limping wherever he went. Still, Charlotte led by six midway through the second when the Heat embarked on what be came a 19-2 run. Miami scored the rst 12 in that stretch, and the Heat got a sur prise boost as well. Lit tle-used James Jones came off the bench to score four more late, and the Heat suddenly were up 47-36. Walker made a 3-pointer to beat the rst-half buzzer, drawing Charlotte within 4942. That started an 11-0 answer by the Bobcats, who scored the rst eight of the third quar ter to reclaim a onepoint lead. And the third stayed close, neither team leading by more than three for the majority of the third. But a quick 7-2 Heat spurt in cluding a nifty drive by Jones, who had exactly three two-pointers in the entire regular sea son gave Miami a 6661 cushion late in the period. James made a 3-point er with 0.6 seconds left, and it was 72-65 enter ing the fourth. Heat 99, Bobcats 88 CHARLOTTE (88) Kidd-Gilchrist 2-4 1-1 5, McRoberts 6-9 0-0 15, Jef ferson 9-17 0-0 18, Walker 6-15 5-6 20, Henderson 3-9 0-1 6, Zeller 2-3 0-0 4, Neal 7-16 1-2 17, Ridnour 1-5 0-0 2, Douglas-Roberts 0-1 1-2 1, Biyombo 0-0 0-0 0, Tolliver 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 8-12 88. MIAMI (99) James 8-16 7-10 27, Haslem 0-2 2-2 2, Bosh 4-13 3-4 13, Chalmers 3-7 0-0 7, Wade 10-16 2-3 23, Cole 3-5 0-0 7, Lewis 0-2 0-0 0, Allen 0-4 0-0 0, Andersen 3-5 2-4 8, Jones 4-6 2-3 12. Totals 3576 18-26 99. Charlotte 23 19 23 23 88 Miami 19 30 23 27 99 3-Point GoalsCharlotte 8-21 (McRoberts 3-5, Walker 3-6, Neal 2-5, Ridnour 0-1, Douglas-Roberts 0-1, Henderson 0-3), Miami 11-23 (James 4-8, Jones 2-3, Bosh 2-4, Cole 1-1, Wade 1-2, Chalmers 1-2, Allen 0-1, Lewis 0-2). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsCharlotte 50 (Jefferson 10), Miami 46 (Andersen 10). AssistsCharlotte 18 (Walker 6), Miami 14 (Wade 5). Total FoulsCharlotte 17, Miami 12. A,640 (19,600). HEAT FROM PAGE B1 challenged the call and after a 2 minute, 4 sec ond delay the umpires changed the close call to out. New York took a 1-0 lead in the fourth when Gardner was given an RBI double after a chal lenge by Yankees manager Joe Girardi. The umpires rst ruled that Rays right elder Wil My ers had caught Gardners drive at the wall for the third out. The call was overturned following a 2:17 delay after replays clearly showed Myers caught the ball after it hit off the top of the wall. Soriano, who opened the fourth with a dou ble, was on the third and was awarded home on the overturned decision. Tampa Bay tied it at 1 on pinch-hitter Matt Joyces two-out sacrice y in the seventh. The Rays capitalized after second baseman Brian Roberts dropped a throw on a force play earli er in the inning. New York starter Vidal Nuno, in the mix to take the spot of injured starter Ivan Nova, allowed three hits over ve shutout innings. The Yankees put Nova, who was hurt in Saturdays game, on the 15-day disabled list with a partial ulnar collateral ligament tear in his right elbow that could require surgery. Cesar Ramos, who replaced the injured Matt Moore in the Rays rotation, gave up one run and four hits in ve innings. Moore is sched uled to have elbow ligament replacement sur gery Tuesday. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 to catch Kuchar after the chip but couldnt do it. He missed a 28-foot birdie putt at the 17th hole, then saw his own try at a chip-in birdie slide past the cup. Kuchar nished at 11-under 273 to win $1.044 million and his rst trophy since the Memorial last June. Kuchar has spent a month of Sundays in the thick of things, only to come up short. He was two strokes behind winner Steven Bowditch at the Texas Open on March 30, lost a playoff to Matt Jones 42-yard chip-in on the rst extra hole in Houston the next week, then was tied for the lead at Augusta National last Sunday before four-putting the fourth hole and nishing tied for fth. Donald shot 69 to nish at 10 under and earn his fth top-three nish in his past six appear ances at the RBC Heritage. Ben Martin, who turned pro in 2010, shot 67 to nish tied for third at 9 under with John Huh, who shot 68. At sixth in the world, Kuchar was the high est-ranked player competing the week after the seasons rst major, when most of golfs biggest names were taking a needed break. But Kuchar, smiling all the way, hoped to ride the momentum of his near misses. Sunday nally brought the sunshine the tour nament had lacked all week. Players got the bo nus of easy, softened greens from three days of moisture. PGA FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 11 8 .579 7-3 W-1 6-3 5-5 Toronto 10 9 .526 1 5-5 L-1 3-3 7-6 Baltimore 8 8 .500 1 6-4 L-1 4-4 4-4 Tampa Bay 9 10 .474 2 1 4-6 L-1 6-5 3-5 Boston 8 10 .444 2 1 5-5 W-1 3-5 5-5 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 9 6 .600 5-5 W-2 7-3 2-3 Kansas City 9 8 .529 1 6-4 L-1 6-3 3-5 Minnesota 9 9 .500 1 6-4 W-1 5-4 4-5 Chicago 9 10 .474 2 1 5-5 W-1 6-4 3-6 Cleveland 8 10 .444 2 1 3-7 W-1 4-5 4-5 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 13 5 .722 8-2 W-3 6-3 7-2 Texas 11 8 .579 2 7-3 L-1 9-4 2-4 Los Angeles 8 10 .444 5 1 5-5 L-2 3-6 5-4 Seattle 7 11 .389 6 2 2-8 L-6 2-3 5-8 Houston 5 14 .263 8 5 2-8 L-7 3-7 2-7 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 12 6 .667 7-3 L-1 4-2 8-4 Washington 11 8 .579 1 4-6 W-1 6-4 5-4 New York 9 9 .500 3 1 6-4 W-1 3-6 6-3 Miami 9 10 .474 3 2 4-6 W-3 9-4 0-6 Philadelphia 8 10 .444 4 2 5-5 W-1 4-5 4-5 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 14 5 .737 7-3 W-3 5-4 9-1 St. Louis 11 8 .579 3 6-4 L-1 4-2 7-6 Cincinnati 8 10 .444 5 2 6-4 W-1 4-5 4-5 Pittsburgh 8 11 .421 6 3 2-8 L-3 5-5 3-6 Chicago 5 12 .294 8 5 3-7 L-1 3-6 2-6 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 12 7 .632 6-4 W-2 4-4 8-3 San Francisco 11 8 .579 1 5-5 W-1 5-4 6-4 Colorado 10 10 .500 2 1 5-5 L-1 6-3 4-7 San Diego 9 10 .474 3 2 6-4 L-1 7-6 2-4 Arizona 5 16 .238 8 7 2-8 L-2 1-11 4-5 SATURDAYS GAMESToronto 5, Cleveland 0 Detroit 5, L.A. Angels 2 Boston 4, Baltimore 2 Kansas City 5, Minnesota 4 Oakland 4, Houston 3 Tampa Bay 16, N.Y. Yankees 1 Miami 7, Seattle 0 Texas 6, Chicago White Sox 3SATURDAYS GAMESSt. Louis 4, Washington 3 Chicago Cubs 8, Cincinnati 4 Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 7 Atlanta 7, N.Y. Mets 5 Miami 7, Seattle 0 L.A. Dodgers 8, Arizona 6 Colorado 3, Philadelphia 1 San Diego 3, San Francisco 1SUNDAYS GAMESCleveland 6, Toronto 4 Detroit 2, L.A. Angels 1 Miami 3, Seattle 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 1, 12 innings Minnesota 8, Kansas City 3 Chicago White Sox 16, Texas 2 Oakland 4, Houston 1 Baltimore at Boston, lateSUNDAYS GAMESN.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 3, 14 innings Miami 3, Seattle 2 Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 2, 14 innings Washington 3, St. Louis 2 Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 2 L.A. Dodgers 4, Arizona 1 Philadelphia 10, Colorado 9 San Francisco 4, San Diego 3 GENE J. PUSKAR / AP Milwaukees Carlos Gomez (27) tries to get past umpire Fieldin Culbreth, center, and Pittsburgh third baseman Josh Harrison (5) to get to Pittsburgh starting pitcher Gerrit Cole in the third inning of Sundays game in Pittsburgh. A dugouts-clearing brawl ensued, with Gomez at the center of the fracas. He was later ejected from the game. TODAYS GAMESBaltimore (W.Chen 2-1) at Boston (Buchholz 0-1), 11:05 a.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-0), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at Washington (Roark 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 1-0) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 0-1), 7:08 p.m. Texas (Darvish 1-0) at Oakland (Straily 1-1), 10:05 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-0), 10:10 p.m.TODAYS GAMESCincinnati (Leake 2-1) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at Washington (Roark 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Miami (Koehler 2-1) at Atlanta (Teheran 2-1), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lyons 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Mejia 2-0), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (Arroyo 1-1) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-2), 8:05 p.m. San Diego (Cashner 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-0), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 0-3), 8:40 p.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Maholm 0-1), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Ellsbury, New York, .365; Colabello, Minnesota, .359; AlRamirez, Chicago, .357; Solarte, New York, .351; Longoria, Tampa Bay, .348. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 18; Bautista, Toronto, 16; Eaton, Chicago, 15; Trout, Los Angeles, 14; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 14; Donaldson, Oakland, 13; Mauer, Minnesota, 13; AlRamirez, Chicago, 13. RBI: Colabello, Minnesota, 19; Moss, Oakland, 15; Abreu, Chicago, 14; Brantley, Cleveland, 14; Pujols, Los Angeles, 14; AlRamirez, Chicago, 14. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 28; AlRamirez, Chicago, 25; Rios, Texas, 24; Colabello, Minnesota, 23; Ellsbury, New York, 23; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23. DOUBLES: Colabello, Minnesota, 9; SPerez, Kansas City, 7; Solarte, New York, 7; Beltran, New York, 6; AGordon, Kansas City, 6; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Loney, Tampa Bay, 6; Rios, Texas, 6; Schoop, Baltimore, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; LMartin, Texas, 2; Stewart, Los Angeles, 2; 39 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Bautista, Toronto, 6; Pujols, Los Angeles, 6; Dozier, Minnesota, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5. STOLEN BASES: Andrus, Texas, 8; Ellsbury, New York, 8; Altuve, Houston, 7; RDavis, Detroit, 6; Dozier, Minne sota, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 4; Florimon, Minnesota, 4; Rios, Texas, 4; Villar, Houston, 4. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 4-0; Gray, Oakland, 3-0; Gibson, Minnesota, 3-0; Sale, Chicago, 3-0; MPerez, Texas, 3-0; Otero, Oakland, 3-0; FHernandez, Seattle, 3-0. ERA: Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Darvish, Texas, 0.82; Gibson, Minnesota, 0.93; Pineda, New York, 1.00; Ross Jr, Texas, 1.00; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.24. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 39; Scherzer, Detroit, 34; Lester, Boston, 29; Sale, Chicago, 29. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 6; Axford, Cleveland, 5; Santos, Toronto, 5; TomHunter, Baltimore, 4; Uehara, Boston, 4; Kelley, New York, 4; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 4.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Utley, Philadelphia, .417; Blackmon, Colorado, .415; Freeman, Atlanta, .413; DGordon, Los Angeles, .375; Pagan, San Francisco, .362. RUNS: Braun, Milwaukee, 15; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 14; Freeman, Atlanta, 14; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 14; Stanton, Miami, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Yelich, Miami, 14; EYoung, New York, 14. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 26; Trumbo, Arizona, 18; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 17; McGehee, Miami, 15; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 15; Rendon, Washington, 14; 5 tied at 13. HITS: Blackmon, Colorado, 27; Freeman, Atlanta, 26; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 25; Pagan, San Francisco, 25; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 25; Uribe, Los Angeles, 25; Utley, Philadelphia, 25. DOUBLES: Lucroy, Milwaukee, 9; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 8; Uribe, Los Angeles, 8; ECabrera, San Diego, 7; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 7; Utley, Philadelphia, 7. TRIPLES: Denora, San Diego, 2; Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 6; Belt, San Francisco, 6; Stanton, Miami, 6; Trumbo, Arizona, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 5; Freeman, Atlanta, 5; CGomez, Milwaukee, 5; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 5; JUpton, Atlanta, 5; Walker, Pittsburgh, 5. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 10; EYoung, New York, 10; Bonifacio, Chicago, 8; Marte, Pittsburgh, 7; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 6; Blackmon, Colorado, 5; Re vere, Philadelphia, 5. PITCHING: Lynn, St. Louis, 4-0; 10 tied at 3. ERA: Harang, Atlanta, 0.70; ESantana, Atlanta, 0.86; Simon, Cincinnati, 0.86; Cashner, San Diego, 1.27; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.29; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.46. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 35; Strasburg, Washington, 33; Fernandez, Miami, 33; Wainwright, St. Louis, 32; Greinke, Los Angeles, 29; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 28; ClLee, Philadelphia, 28. SAVES: Jansen, Los Angeles, 6; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 6; Street, San Diego, 6; Hawkins, Colorado, 5; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 5; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 5; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 4; RSoriano, Washington, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 4; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 4. Yankees 5, Rays 1 12 innings New York T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 5 1 0 0 SRdrgz lf 3 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 1 0 DeJess ph 1 0 0 0 ISuzuki pr 0 0 0 0 JMolin c 1 0 0 0 Anna ss 0 1 0 1 Zobrist dh 5 0 1 0 Beltran rf 6 0 2 2 F orsyth 2b 6 0 1 0 ASorin dh 5 1 2 1 Longori 3b 5 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 6 0 2 0 Myer s rf 5 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 0 0 0 Lone y 1b 4 1 2 0 Gardnr lf 5 1 2 1 Guyer cf 3 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 5 0 0 0 YEscor ss 5 0 2 0 JMrphy c 3 0 0 0 Hanign c 2 0 0 0 McCnn ph-c 2 1 1 0 Jo yce ph-lf 1 0 0 1 Totals 45 5 10 5 T otals 41 1 6 1 New York 000 100 000 004 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 100 000 1 EB.Roberts (2), Teixeira (3), Anna (1). DPNew York 1. LOBNew York 9, Tampa Bay 11. 2BA.Soriano (3), Gardner (3), Forsythe (3), Y.Escobar (4). CSI.Suzuki (1), Myers (1). SGuyer. SFJoyce. IP H R ER BB SO New York Nuno 5 3 0 0 2 6 Phelps H,5 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Thornton 0 1 1 0 0 0 Warren BS,2-3 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 Kelley 2 0 0 0 2 4 Claiborne W,1-0 2 1 0 0 1 2 Tampa Bay C.Ramos 5 4 1 1 1 3 B.Gomes 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 McGee 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 3 Jo.Peralta 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour 2 0 0 0 0 1 H.Bell L,0-1 1 1 1 1 2 2 Riefenhauser 2/3 1 3 3 2 0 Lueke 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 H.Bell pitched to 1 batter in the 12th. Thornton pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Joe West; Third, Marty Foster. T:23. A,462 (31,042).Reds 8, Cubs 2 Cincinnati Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 5 0 1 0 Bonifac cf 4 1 2 0 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 Sw eeny lf 4 1 2 1 Phillips 2b 5 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 2 0 Bruce rf 5 2 2 1 Schrhlt rf 5 0 2 1 Frazier 3b 5 2 2 1 SCastro ss 5 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 2 1 Olt 3b 4 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Castillo c 5 0 1 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Bar ney 2b 2 0 0 0 N.Soto ph 1 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 SMrshll p 0 0 0 0 Kalish ph 1 0 1 0 Mesorc c 4 2 3 1 V eras p 0 0 0 0 Cozart ss 5 2 3 3 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Bailey p 3 0 1 1 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 Heisey ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 V illanv p 1 0 0 0 V aluen 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 8 15 8 T otals 36 2 11 2 Cincinnati 000 320 300 8 Chicago 000 000 200 2 DPCincinnati 1. LOBCincinnati 10, Chicago 14. 2BBruce (3), Frazier (2), Ludwick (1), Mesoraco (6), Cozart (3), Bonifacio (4), Kalish (2). HRBruce (3), Cozart (1). SBB.Hamilton (7), Bonifacio (9). CS Bonifacio (2). IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Bailey W,1-1 6 6 0 0 3 8 M.Parra 1/3 3 2 2 2 1 LeCure 1 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 S.Marshall 1 2 0 0 0 1 Chicago Villanueva L,1-4 4 2/3 9 5 5 1 7 W.Wright 1 1/3 2 0 0 0 1 Veras 1 2 3 3 2 2 Russell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Grimm 1 2 0 0 0 1 HBPby Bailey (Sweeney). WPVillanueva. UmpiresHome, Cory Blaser; First, Jim Joyce; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Marvin Hudson. T:50. A,927 (41,072).White Sox 16, Rangers 2 Chicago T exas ab r h bi ab r h bi Semien 2b 6 2 4 4 Choo lf 1 0 0 1 Gillaspi 3b 5 1 1 3 Andr us ss 2 1 0 0 Abreu 1b 6 2 3 3 Sardins ss 1 0 1 0 A.Dunn dh 6 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo rf 5 3 3 2 F ielder 1b 2 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 5 2 2 0 Kzmnff 3b 3 0 0 0 De Aza lf 5 1 1 2 DMr ph ph 1 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 3 3 0 Mor lnd dh 4 0 0 0 JrDnks cf 4 2 1 2 JoWilsn 2b 1 1 0 0 LMar tn cf 2 0 1 0 Choice cf 1 0 0 0 Arencii c 2 0 0 0 Totals 46 16 18 16 T otals 24 2 2 1 Chicago 002 033 107 16 Texas 001 100 000 2 EFlowers (1), Kouzmanoff (2). DPChicago 2. LOB Chicago 6, Texas 4. 2BGillaspie (6), Abreu 2 (5), Viciedo (5), Al.Ramirez (5). 3BSemien (1). HR Abreu (5), Viciedo (1), Jor.Danks (1). SBAl.Ramirez (4), Andrus (9), L.Martin (3). CSChoo (2). SFGil laspie, Choo. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Er.Johnson W,1-1 5 1 2 1 5 2 Belisario 2 0 0 0 0 1 Rienzo 1 1 0 0 1 1 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 1 Texas Ross Jr. L,1-1 5 1/3 7 7 4 0 8 Tolleson 1 2/3 2 2 2 1 2 Figueroa 1 2 0 0 0 1 Noesi 1 7 7 7 1 1 HBPby Belisario (Choo), by Rienzo (Arencibia). WP Er.Johnson, Ross Jr.. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, John Tumpane; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Bob Davidson. T:16. A,402 (48,114).Giants 4, Padres 3 San Francisco San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 4 0 1 2 ECarer ss 4 0 2 0 Pence rf 3 1 0 0 V enale cf 4 1 1 0 Posey c 4 1 1 2 S.Smith lf 2 1 1 0 Morse lf 3 0 0 0 Nady rf 3 0 0 0 Blanco lf 1 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 1 2 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Medica 1b 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 4 0 0 0 Grandl ph 1 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 1 0 0 Hundly c 4 1 2 1 BCrwfr ss 2 1 1 0 Amar st 2b 1 0 0 0 Linccm p 1 0 0 0 Denor ph 1 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 V incent p 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Stauffr p 0 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Er lin p 2 0 0 0 A Torrs p 0 0 0 0 Gyor ko ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 4 3 4 T otals 30 3 7 3 San Francisco 220 000 000 4 San Diego 002 000 100 3 DPSan Francisco 2. LOBSan Francisco 3, San Diego 5. 2BHeadley (3). HRPosey (4), Hundley (1). CSE.Cabrera (3). SLincecum. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Lincecum W,1-1 6 7 3 3 3 7 Affeldt H,1 1 0 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez H,4 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 Casilla H,4 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 Romo S,5-5 1 0 0 0 1 0 San Diego Erlin L,1-2 6 3 4 4 3 3 A.Torres 1 0 0 0 1 0 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 1 Stauffer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lincecum pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPLincecum, Romo. UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Hunter Wendelst edt; Second, Tom Woodring; Third, Gabe Morales. T:59. A,035 (42,302).Athletics 4, Astros 1 Houston Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Crisp cf 5 1 0 0 Fowler cf 2 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 3 2 2 0 JCastro c 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 3 3 Springr rf 4 0 1 0 Moss 1b 3 0 1 0 Krauss 1b 3 0 0 0 Bar ton 1b 0 0 0 0 Guzmn ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Cespds lf 2 0 0 0 Carter dh 4 0 0 0 Gentr y lf 1 0 0 0 Hoes lf 4 0 0 0 Callasp dh 4 0 1 0 MGnzlz 3b 4 1 2 1 Reddck rf 4 0 1 0 Villar ss 4 0 0 0 Jaso c 3 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 4 0 2 0 Totals 33 1 5 1 T otals 33 4 10 3 Houston 000 100 000 1 Oakland 200 000 20x 4 ELowrie (3), Donaldson (5). DPHouston 1. LOB Houston 9, Oakland 9. 2BAltuve (3), Donaldson 2 (7), Reddick (1), Sogard (2). HRMa.Gonzalez (1), Donaldson (4). SBAltuve (8), Fowler (1). CSAl tuve (1). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Peacock L,0-2 5 5 2 2 3 4 Williams 3 5 2 1 1 1 Oakland J.Chavez W,1-0 6 4 1 1 3 6 Ji.Johnson H,2 2/3 1 0 0 1 0 Doolittle H,5 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 2 Gregerson S,3-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 PBJ.Castro. UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher; First, Seth Buckminster; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Mike Winters. T:54. A,382 (35,067).Indians 6, Blue Jays 4 Toronto Cle veland ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 2 1 Bour n cf 4 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 4 1 2 0 Swisher 1b 3 0 1 1 Bautist rf 3 1 1 1 Kipnis 2b 3 1 0 0 Encrnc dh 4 0 0 0 CSantn c 3 1 0 0 Frncsc 1b 3 0 1 1 Brantly lf 3 2 2 2 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 1 A Carer ss 2 1 0 0 Rasms cf 4 0 0 0 DvMr p rf 4 0 1 3 Thole c 4 1 2 0 Rabur n dh 3 0 0 0 Goins 2b 2 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 2 1 0 0 Navarr ph 1 0 1 0 Diaz pr 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 T otals 27 6 5 6 Toronto 000 310 000 4 Cleveland 010 103 10x 6 LOBToronto 9, Cleveland 4. 2BReyes (1), Brantley (4), Dav.Murphy (4). HRBrantley (3). SBMe.Cabrera (3), Bourn (2). CSKipnis (1). SGoins. SFSwisher. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Morrow 5 3 2 2 2 6 Loup L,1-1 BS,1-1 2/3 1 3 3 3 0 Wagner 2/3 1 1 1 1 0 Cecil 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Happ 1 0 0 0 0 0 Cleveland Carrasco 5 2/3 6 4 4 3 5 Outman W,3-0 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw H,4 1 0 0 0 0 1 Allen H,4 1 0 0 0 1 0 Axford S,6-7 1 2 0 0 1 1 Morrow pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa; First, CB Bucknor; Second, Tripp Gibson; Third, Dale Scott. T:55. A,716 (42,487).Marlins 3, Mariners 2 Seattle Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Almont cf 4 0 0 0 Y elich lf 4 1 1 0 Blmqst 3b 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 2 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 2 0 Stanton rf 3 1 0 0 Hart rf 4 1 2 0 McGeh 3b 3 0 1 0 BMiller pr 0 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 1 1 1 Ackley lf 3 0 0 1 Hchvr r ss 2 0 0 1 Smoak 1b 2 0 1 1 Solano 2b 4 0 1 1 Frnkln ss 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 Buck c 2 0 1 0 Slow ey p 1 0 0 0 MSndrs ph 1 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Maurer p 1 0 0 0 Caminr p 0 0 0 0 Leone p 0 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 0 Mar ml p 0 0 0 0 Romer ph 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 Seager ph 1 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 0 0 0 Farqhr p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Furush p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Wlhlms p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 2 6 2 T otals 27 3 4 3 Seattle 010 100 000 2 Miami 000 010 02x 3 DPSeattle 1. LOBSeattle 6, Miami 7. 2BCano (3), Hart 2 (3), Yelich (5). CSCano (1). SMaurer. SF Ackley, Smoak, Hechavarria. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Maurer 4 1/3 2 1 1 2 4 Leone 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 2 Beimel H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Farquhar H,2 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 Furbush H,5 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 Wilhelmsen L,0-1 BS,2-2 1 0 1 1 2 0 Miami Slowey 5 3 2 2 0 3 Caminero 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Da.Jennings 1/3 1 0 0 2 1 Marmol 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 M.Dunn W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cishek S,3-3 1 1 0 0 1 2 Furbush pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Ed Hickox; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Toby Basner. T:58. A,228 (37,442).Nationals 3, Cardinals 2 St. Louis W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Span cf 5 0 1 1 Jay rf 4 0 1 0 Har per lf 4 0 1 0 Craig lf 4 0 1 0 W erth rf 3 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 0 LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 0 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 5 0 1 1 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 4 1 3 1 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Loaton c 5 0 3 0 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 Strasrg p 1 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 W alters ph 1 0 0 0 Roinsn ph 1 0 0 0 Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 F rndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 2 1 0 0 Ble vins p 0 0 0 0 SMiller p 2 0 1 1 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 0 0 0 0 Descals 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 7 1 T otals 37 3 11 3 St. Louis 010 010 000 2 Washington 000 000 201 3 Two outs when winning run scored. EM.Carpenter (4). DPWashington 1. LOBSt. Louis 5, Washington 17. 2BMa.Adams 2 (8), S.Miller (1). SBHarper (1). SFSpan. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis S.Miller 5 1/3 4 0 0 5 7 Choate H,3 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 C.Martinez BS,1-1 1 4 2 2 0 0 Siegrist 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 Neshek 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Maness L,0-1 2/3 2 1 1 1 1 Washington Strasburg 6 5 2 2 1 9 Stammen 1 0 0 0 0 0 Blevins 1 2 0 0 0 2 R.Soriano W,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby S.Miller (Werth). UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Bill Miller; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Adam Hamari. T:18. A,653 (41,408).SEE BOXES | B4

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Editors Note: Saturdays nal round of the LPGA LOTTE Championship was not completed in time for Sundays edition.KAITLIN SAWYERAssociated PressKAPOLEI, Hawaii Michelle Wie ral lied from four strokes back entering the day to shoot a 5-under 67 on Saturday and win the LPGA LOTTE Champi onship. The 24-year-old American nished at 14-under 274 after coming into the nal round trailing third-round leader Angela Stanford by four shots after Fridays play. It was Wies third career victory on the LPGA Tour, and rst since taking the CN Canadian Womens Open in 2010 snapping a 79-event winless drought. And, Wie did it at home. Im just having fun out there, said Wie, who grew up in Honolu lu. I was out there and nervous. Every time I felt nervous out there, I was looking around, I felt there was no place Id rather be. Stanford had her worst round of the tour nament, shooting a 1-over 73 that put her at 12-under 276 and two shots behind Wie. Top-ranked Inbee Park nished third with an 11-under 277. Today, just didnt make the putts that Ive been making, Stan ford said. I wasnt hit ting it great today. Just misclubbed a couple of times. Just didnt make good decisions. Wie came to LOTTE and her home state of Hawaii coming off a runner-up nish two weeks ago in the Kraft Nabisco Championship when she closed with a 71 for her best position of the season. The highlight of this week was to come back home, Wie said. There wasnt just one moment. From the rst tee shot that I made to the last putt, the aloha that I felt from everyone was unbelievable. Stanford, the leader after the second and third rounds at breezy Ko Olina, came out strong with a birdie on the par -4 third hole to set herself up at 14-un der early in the day. A bogey for Stanford and a birdie for Wie on the par-4 sixth closed the gap to within a stroke. The par-3 eighth brought Stanford, Wie and South Koreas Hyo Joo Kim to tie at 12 un der. A birdie for Wie on the par-3 12th gave her the outright lead, and she gave a small trium phant st pump to the crowd. I really think a lot of times, they willed the ball in, Wie said of the fans. I give a lot of cred it to them this week. Another birdie on the par-5 13th put Wie two strokes ahead of twoday leader Stanford and three strokes ahead of Kim. Stanford and Kim were unable to close that gap as Wie won for the rst time on American soil. Shes been playing great, Stanford said. Shes having a great year, so it was bound to happen. I just hap pened to be the one that caught the buzz saw. Trade winds contin ued to challenge golfers all day, gusting upward of 20 mph, according to the National Weather Service. Well, my caddy isnt one for pep talks, but he gave a good one today, Wie said. He said, Its windy out there today, but play your game, and thats really what I did. I didnt try to force anything. I had a num ber in my head that I thought I needed to shoot, and I got it. Kim came in fourth with 1-under 71 for 10-under 278 overall.Wie shoots 67, wins LPGA LOTTE Championship EUGENE TANNER / AP Michelle Wie watches her drive off the second tee during Saturdays nal round of the LPGA LOTTE Championship at Ko Olina Golf Club in Kapolei, Hawaii. RAUL DOMINGUEZAssociated PressSAN ANTONIO Tim Duncan scored 27 points, and the San An tonio Spurs held the Dallas Mavericks to one eld goal in the nal seven minutes to rally for a 90-85 victory Sun day in Game 1 of their rst-round playoff se ries. The Mavericks also went scoreless for 5 minutes during that stretch, their lone eld goal coming as time expired. Tony Parker had 21 points, and Manu Gi nobili added 17. Kawhi Leonard had 11 points and 10 rebounds and Tiago Splitter pulled down 11 rebounds for top-seeded San Anto nio, which has won 10 straight against Dallas. Devin Harris scored 19 points for the Maver icks, who nearly pulled off a huge upset. The Spurs had insisted that what happens in the regular sea son doesnt matter, and they were proven right for much of the game much to the home fans dismay. Absent were the crisp passing, aggressive defense and 3-point shooting that made for the leagues best record. San Antonio returned to its winning formu la over the nal seven minutes, taking an 8681 lead with a 15-0 run. Splitter tied the game with about ve minutes remaining, rolling to the basket off a screen for an easy layup off a pass from Parker. The All-Star point guard then drove the lane for a layup and drained a 13-foot jumper, which he punctuat ed with a loud scream after Dallas called time out with 2:45 to go. Duncan, wearing a heavy brace on his left knee, walked off the court gingerly with 3:24 remaining in the third quarter after banging knees with Ellis. He did not get up as he cus tomarily does during a timeout to greet his teammates. Duncan later left the court, followed closely by trainer Will Sevening and team doctor Dr. David Schmidt, re turning a minute lat er limping slightly less, and he played big down the stretch. NOTES: Referee Joey Crawford screamed twice at a pair of scoring ofcials during a timeout, telling them at one point to do their jobs. Spurs 90, Mavs 85 DALLAS (85) Marion 4-11 0-0 8, Nowitzki 4-14 3-4 11, Dalembert 1-2 0-0 2, Calderon 3-9 0-0 7, Ellis 4-14 3-4 11, Harris 8-16 0-0 19, Carter 5-11 0-0 10, Blair 0-0 0-0 0, Crowder 2-3 0-0 6, Wright 4-5 3-5 11. Totals 35-85 9-13 85. SAN ANTONIO (90) Leonard 4-11 3-4 11, Duncan 12-20 3-5 27, Splitter 3-6 2-4 8, Parker 9-16 3-3 21, Green 0-2 0-0 0, Ginobili 4-10 6-6 17, Belinelli 0-4 0-0 0, Diaw 2-8 0-0 4, Mills 1-4 0-0 2, Bonner 0-0 0-0 0, Ayres 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-81 17-22 90. Dallas 12 32 21 20 85 San Antonio 21 22 22 25 90 3-Point GoalsDallas 6-18 (Harris 3-7, Crowder 2-2, Calderon 1-2, Nowitzki 0-1, Marion 0-2, Ellis 0-2, Carter 0-2), San Antonio 3-17 (Ginobili 3-6, Diaw 0-1, Parker 0-1, Green 0-1, Belinelli 0-2, Mills 0-3, Leonard 0-3). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsDallas 44 (Dalembert, Nowitzki 8), San Antonio 61 (Splitter 11). AssistsDallas 15 (Harris 5), San Antonio 14 (Parker 6). Total FoulsDallas 19, San Antonio 16. A,581 (18,797). GOLFMets 4, Braves 3 14 innings Atlanta Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 6 1 3 0 EY ong lf 6 1 0 0 BUpton cf 6 1 1 1 Gr ndrs rf 6 0 0 1 Fremn 1b 5 0 1 1 D Wrght 3b 6 1 4 1 J.Upton lf 6 0 1 0 DnMr p 2b 6 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 6 0 1 0 CY oung cf 5 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 5 0 1 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 Smmns ss 6 0 0 0 dAr nad ph-c 1 0 0 0 Laird c 1 0 0 0 Duda 1b 5 1 2 1 Pstrnck pr 0 0 0 0 Reck er c 6 0 1 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 V alvrd p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 Quntnll ss 1 0 0 0 R.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 ABrwn ph 1 0 0 0 Schlssr p 1 0 1 0 F rnswr p 0 0 0 0 Hale p 2 1 0 0 Niwnhs cf 1 1 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 1 0 Wheelr p 2 0 0 1 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Satin ph 1 0 0 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Ger mn p 0 0 0 0 Gattis ph-c 3 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 CT orrs p 0 0 0 0 Tejada ph-ss 2 0 1 0 Totals 49 3 10 2 T otals 49 4 9 4 Atlanta 000 030 000 000 00 3 New York 110 001 000 000 01 4 Two outs when winning run scored. EUggla 2 (5), J.Upton (2), Granderson (1). DPAt lanta 2, New York 2. LOBAtlanta 9, New York 11. 2BHeyward (2), B.Upton (2), Freeman (7). 3BJ. Upton (1). SBDuda (1). CSHeyward (1). STejada. SFGranderson. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Hale 6 6 3 2 2 5 Thomas 1 1 0 0 0 0 D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 2 Avilan 1 1 0 0 0 1 Varvaro 1 1 0 0 0 2 Schlosser L,0-1 3 2/3 0 1 1 2 1 New York Wheeler 6 6 3 3 3 6 Germen 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 Rice 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 C.Torres 2 0 0 0 1 2 Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 1 Matsuzaka 3 0 0 0 1 5 Valverde W,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Schlosser (Duda). WPSchlosser. UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Eric Cooper. T:37. A,131 (41,922).Twins 8, Royals 3 Minnesota Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 6 1 3 0 Aoki rf 5 0 2 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 0 0 Infante 2b 5 0 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 2 3 2 Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 0 Colaell rf 4 0 1 1 S.P erez c 4 0 0 0 Hrmnn rf 1 0 0 0 Ha yes c 0 0 0 0 Kubel lf 4 1 1 1 A Gordn lf 4 0 0 0 Pinto dh 3 2 1 1 BButler dh 4 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 2 2 Mostks 3b 4 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 4 1 0 0 Maxwll cf 4 1 2 0 EEscor ss 4 0 2 1 AEscor ss 3 2 2 2 Totals 38 8 13 8 T otals 37 3 11 3 Minnesota 200 120 300 8 Kansas City 000 010 200 3 EVentura (2). DPMinnesota 1, Kansas City 2. LOBMinnesota 11, Kansas City 8. 2BPlouffe 2 (7), K.Suzuki (3), Maxwell (1), A.Escobar (5). 3BPlouffe (1). HRPinto (4), A.Escobar (1). CSColabello (2). IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Hughes W,1-1 6 9 3 3 1 3 Duensing 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 Fien 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 2 Kansas City Ventura L,1-1 4 6 4 4 4 6 Coleman 1 1 1 1 0 1 Marks 2 4 3 3 3 2 Mariot 2 2 0 0 1 2 Ventura pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Hughes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. WPVentura. UmpiresHome, Brian Gorman; First, Jim Wolf; Second, David Rackley; Third, Bill Welke. T:08. A,710 (37,903).Tigers 2, Angels 1 Los Angeles Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Shuck lf 4 0 0 0 RDa vis lf 4 0 0 0 Trout cf 3 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 2 1 0 0 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 0 MiCar r dh 3 0 0 0 IStewrt 3b 4 0 1 0 VMrtnz 1b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 3 1 T rHntr rf 4 0 2 0 Freese dh 3 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 2 1 0 0 Ibanez ph 1 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 1 1 Conger c 3 0 0 0 A vila c 3 0 0 0 Boesch rf 2 0 1 0 AnRmn ss 2 0 2 0 Cowgill ph-rf 1 0 1 0 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 7 1 T otals 28 2 5 1 Los Angeles 100 000 000 1 Detroit 100 001 00x 2 EConger 2 (2), H.Santiago (1), Trout (1). DPLos Angeles 1, Detroit 1. LOBLos Angeles 5, Detroit 8. 2BBoesch (1). SBTor.Hunter (1), An.Romine 2 (3). CSH.Kendrick (2). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles H.Santiago L,0-3 5 2/3 2 2 0 5 7 Jepsen 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Kohn 1 1 0 0 1 1 J.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 1 Detroit Porcello W,2-1 7 5 1 1 1 4 Krol H,4 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Alburquerque H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Nathan S,3-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T:28. A,921 (41,681).Late Saturday Rays 16, Yankees 1 New York T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 3 0 1 0 DeJess cf-lf 6 0 0 0 SSizmr 1b-3b 1 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-ss 5 3 3 0 Gardnr lf-cf 4 0 0 0 Jo yce dh 4 2 2 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b 3 2 2 4 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 Guyer cf 1 0 0 0 McCnn c 2 0 0 0 Lone y 1b 4 3 2 1 JMrphy ph-c 1 0 0 0 Myer s rf 4 4 3 4 ASorin rf-lf 3 1 1 0 SRdrgz lf-2b 5 0 0 0 Solarte 3b-ss 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 KJhnsn 1b-lf-1b 3 0 1 1 F orsyth 3b 1 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 3 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 2 3 6 Anna ss-p 3 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 3 1 T otals 40 16 16 15 New York 000 010 000 1 Tampa Bay 013 244 02x 16 ESolarte (1). LOBNew York 1, Tampa Bay 6. 2BK. Johnson (3), Zobrist (2), Joyce (4), Loney (6), Myers (3). HRLongoria (2), Myers 2 (2), Hanigan 2 (3). CS Ellsbury (2). SFLongoria. IP H R ER BB SO New York Nova L,2-2 4 8 8 8 1 4 Daley 1 1/3 5 6 4 2 0 Betances 1 2/3 0 0 0 2 3 Anna 1 3 2 2 0 0 Tampa Bay Archer W,2-1 6 2/3 3 1 1 0 4 Riefenhauser 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Lueke 1 0 0 0 0 2 Nova pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Clint Fagan; Sec ond, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West. T:15. A,159 (31,042).Padres 3, Giants 1 San Francisco San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 ECarer ss 4 0 2 1 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 V enale rf 4 1 2 0 Posey c 4 0 0 0 Grandl c 4 0 0 0 Morse lf 3 1 1 1 S.Smith lf 3 1 2 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 Denor ph-lf 0 0 0 1 Belt 1b 3 0 1 0 Headly 3b 4 0 1 0 Arias 2b 2 0 1 0 Gyor ko 2b 3 0 0 0 Blanco ph 1 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 1 Adrianz 2b 0 0 0 0 Amar st cf 3 1 1 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Stults p 1 0 0 0 THudsn p 2 0 1 0 V incent p 0 0 0 0 HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Medica ph 1 0 0 0 Huff p 0 0 0 0 Tha yer p 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Benoit p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 T otals 30 3 9 3 San Francisco 000 010 000 1 San Diego 010 010 01x 3 ET.Hudson (1). DPSan Francisco 1, San Diego 1. LOBSan Francisco 2, San Diego 5. 2BVenable (4). 3BE.Cabrera (1). HRMorse (3). SBHeadley (1), Alonso (2). SDenora, Stults. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco T.Hudson L,2-1 7 8 2 2 0 4 Huff 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 Machi 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 San Diego Stults W,1-2 6 3 1 1 0 2 Vincent H,1 1 0 0 0 0 3 Thayer H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Benoit S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Tom Woodring. T:36. A,405 (42,302).Dodgers 8, Diamondbacks 6 Arizona Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi GParra cf 5 1 0 1 DGordn 2b 4 1 2 0 Hill 2b 4 0 2 0 Crwfrd lf 4 1 1 0 Gldsch 1b 5 2 1 2 HRmrz ss 4 1 0 1 Monter c 3 1 1 1 AdGnzl 1b 4 2 2 2 C.Ross rf 4 0 0 0 K emp cf 4 1 2 2 Prado 3b 4 0 2 2 Ethier rf 4 1 1 3 Trumo lf 4 1 2 0 Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 Owings ss 3 0 1 0 Butera c 4 0 0 0 Bolsngr p 2 1 1 0 Haren p 2 1 1 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 BWilsn p 0 0 0 0 Cahill p 1 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 Campn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 10 6 T otals 34 8 9 8 Arizona 004 000 020 6 Los Angeles 000 350 00x 8 EPrado (4), Goldschmidt (2), Uribe (2), H.Ramirez (5). DPLos Angeles 1. LOBArizona 6, Los Angeles 3. 2BMontero (3), Prado (5), Owings (3), Kemp (3). HREthier (2). SBKemp (2). SOwings. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Bolsinger L,0-1 4 7 7 6 1 5 O.Perez 1 2 1 0 0 2 Cahill 3 0 0 0 0 4 Los Angeles Haren W,3-0 7 1/3 7 5 2 0 5 B.Wilson 2/3 2 1 1 1 1 Jansen S,6-8 1 1 0 0 0 1 Bolsinger pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBPby Haren (Hill). UmpiresHome, Jeff Nelson; First, Marcus Pattillo; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Scott Barry. T:48. A,541 (56,000).Braves 7, Mets 5 Atlanta Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 5 1 1 0 EY ong lf 2 2 0 0 BUpton cf 4 1 1 0 DnMr p 2b 5 2 3 0 Fremn 1b 4 1 3 1 DWrght 3b 5 1 3 2 J.Upton lf 5 2 3 3 Gr ndrs rf 5 0 0 0 Gattis c 5 0 0 0 CY oung cf 5 0 3 2 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 0 1 0 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 dAr nad c 5 0 2 1 Uggla 2b 3 0 1 0 T ejada ss 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 0 Colon p 2 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 0 Niwnhs ph 1 0 0 0 ESantn p 3 1 0 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 V alvrd p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 1 0 0 Quntnll ph 1 0 0 0 Laird c 0 0 0 0 Totals 38 7 11 4 T otals 39 5 13 5 Atlanta 002 010 013 7 New York 100 000 022 5 EB.Upton (1), Colon (1), Valverde (2). DPNew York 1. LOBAtlanta 7, New York 11. 2BFreeman (6), D.Wright (2), C.Young (1), Duda (1). HRJ.Upton (5). SBJ.Upton (2), J.Schafer (2), E.Young (10), C.Young (1). CSE.Young (1). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta E.Santana W,2-0 7 6 1 1 2 7 D.Carpenter H,5 1 4 2 2 0 0 Kimbrel 2/3 3 2 2 1 1 J.Walden S,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 New York Colon L,1-3 7 8 3 3 1 6 Matsuzaka 1 2 1 1 1 1 Valverde 1 1 3 0 1 1 HBPby Kimbrel (E.Young). WPE.Santana, Matsuzaka. UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Tom Hallion. T:13. A,476 (41,922).Brewers 8, Pirates 7 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 5 0 0 0 Mar te lf 5 0 2 0 Segura ss 5 2 2 0 RMar tn c 5 1 1 0 Braun rf 5 4 3 3 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 1 ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 1 P Alvrz 3b 4 1 0 0 Lucroy c 5 1 3 2 T abata rf 5 1 2 1 KDavis lf 5 0 1 1 I.Da vis 1b 3 2 2 0 MrRynl 1b 3 1 1 1 NW alkr 2b 3 0 1 1 Weeks 2b 2 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4 1 1 2 Gennett ph-2b 1 0 0 0 WRdrg p 1 0 0 0 Garza p 2 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 1 2 Bianchi ph 1 0 1 0 Mor ris p 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ph 1 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 W atson p 0 0 0 0 EHerrr ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Totals 39 8 12 8 T otals 37 7 11 7 Milwaukee 012 110 102 8 Pittsburgh 010 501 000 7 EWeeks (2). DPMilwaukee 2, Pittsburgh 1. LOB Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 7. 2BSegura (3), Lucroy 3 (9), A.McCutchen (6), I.Davis (2). HRBraun 2 (5), Mar.Reynolds (4). SBMarte (7). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Garza 5 8 6 5 3 2 Wooten 1 1/3 2 1 1 0 3 Duke 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 Henderson W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh W.Rodriguez 4 6 4 4 1 3 Morris 2 2 1 1 1 0 Watson H,4 1 2 1 1 0 1 Melancon H,7 1 0 0 0 0 2 Grilli L,0-1 BS,2-6 1 2 2 2 0 1 HBPby Fr.Rodriguez (P.Alvarez), by Grilli (Ar.Ramirez). WPMorris. UmpiresHome, Jim Reynolds; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Sean Barber. T:04. A,490 (38,362).Marlins 7, Mariners 0 Seattle Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Almont cf 4 0 0 0 Y elich lf 3 2 1 0 BMiller ss 3 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 1 2 4 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 1 1 MSndrs rf 3 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 JeBakr 1b 4 0 0 0 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 Hchvr r ss 4 2 3 0 Ackley lf 3 0 1 0 Solano 2b 4 1 2 0 Zunino c 3 0 1 0 HAlvrz p 2 1 1 1 Elias p 2 0 0 0 Farqhr p 0 0 0 0 Frnkln 3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 0 2 0 T otals 31 7 10 6 Seattle 000 000 000 0 Miami 001 104 01x 7 EAlmonte (1). DPSeattle 1, Miami 1. LOBSeattle 1, Miami 8. 2BZunino (3), Yelich (4), Hechavarria (4). HROzuna (3). SH.Alvarez 2. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Elias L,1-2 5 2/3 8 6 4 5 5 Farquhar 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 2 Rodney 1 2 1 1 0 1 Miami H.Alvarez W,1-2 9 2 0 0 0 4 WPRodney. PBZunino. BalkElias. UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Dana DeMuth. T:20. A,003 (37,442). This date in baseball April 21 1910 The Cleveland Indians played their rst game at League Park and lost to the Detroit Tigers 5-0, in front of 19,867. 1955 The Brooklyn Dodgers beat the Philadelphia Phillies 14-4 at Ebbets Field for their 10th consecu tive victory from the start of the season a major league record that lasted until 1981. 1967 After 737 consecutive games, the Dodgers were rained out for the rst time since moving to Los Angeles. The St. Louis Cardinals were scheduled. 1982 The Atlanta Braves beat the Cincinnati Reds 4-3 for their 13th straight victory. 1984 In his second start since August 1982, Montreal pitcher David Palmer threw ve perfect innings against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 4-0 victory stopped by rain. 1987 The Milwaukee Brewers 13-game winning streak from the start of the season ended with a 7-1 loss to the Chicago White Sox. Milwaukee shared the major league streak of 13 straight, set by the Atlanta Braves in 1982. 1994 Eddie Murray set a major league record with his 11th switch-hit home run game as the Cleveland Indians beat the Minnesota Twins 10-6. 1996 Brady Anderson led off the rst inning with a home run for the fourth straight game for Balti more. The Texas Rangers overcame that homer, beating the Orioles 9-6. BOXES FROM PAGE B3 Duncan scores 27 points, Spurs beat Mavs ERIC GAY / AP San Antonios Tony Parker (9) walks past Dallas Monta Ellis (11) as he reacts to scoring a three-point shot during the second half of Game 1 of an opening-round playoff series on Sunday in San Antonio.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014HEALTH: Man uses metal scraps to pay for insurance / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LADY LAKE Essential Tremor Support Group to meet WednesdayThe Essential Tremor Support Group meets at 2 p.m., Wednesday at St. Timothy Church ministry building, 1351 Paige Place, in Lady Lake. Guests can share with others who have the disease, learn methods of coping, get information about medications, helpful hints and understanding. The guest speaker is Susan Schwager, CVS pharmacist. Call 352-787-3866 or email kstay lor62@usa2net.net for information.ORLANDO Disability Employment Expo scheduled for May 2The Agency for Persons with Disabilities is hosting the fourth annual Disability Employment Expo, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 2, at the Fashion Square Mall, State Road 50 in Orlando. Employers will host sessions on job opportunities, critiquing resumes and doing effective interviews. Some of the employers scheduled to participate are Lockheed Martin, Hilton Worldwide, Orlando Veterans Administration Medical Center, Krystal Company and Walgreens Distribution Center. This event is open to those with all types of disabilities. For information or to register, call 321-474-0015 or 1-866-273-2273, email maryjane.wysocki@apdcares. org, or go to APDcares.org.THE VILLAGES Oncologist to speak about prostate cancer treatmentDr. Patrick Acevedo, an oncologist with Florida Cancer Specialists in The Villages, will be the guest speaker at the Prostate Cancer Education and Support Group meeting at 7 p.m. May 7, at the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr. in The Villages. Dr. Acevedo will speak about recent developments in the treatment of prostate cancer. Meetings are free and open to men, their spouses and family members. Call Dan Bard at 352-2599433 for information. LAKE COUNTY Health Department offers basic physicalsThe Florida Department of Health in Lake County is offering basic physicals on an ongoing basis for children from 3-18 for school, camp, sports and other activities. The Health Department requires that any student enrolling in a Florida school for grades K-12 have documentation of a physical exam in the last year. The physicals will be offered by appointment Monday through Friday at the Umatilla Health Center, at 249 E. Collins St. The cost is $25. A copy of a participants immunization record is required, and all children must be accompanied by an adult. For information or to schedule an appointment, call the Umatilla Health Center at 352-771-5500. MALCOLM RITTERAP Science WriterNEW YORK A small study of ca sual marijuana smokers has turned up evidence of changes in the brain, a possible sign of trouble ahead, re searchers say. The young adults who volunteered for the study were not dependent on pot, nor did they show any marijua na-related problems. What we think we are seeing here is a very early indication of what be comes a problem later on with pro longed use, things like lack of focus and impaired judgment, said Dr. Hans Breiter, a study author. Longer-term studies will be needed to see if such brain changes cause Study finds signs of brain changes in pot smokers AP FILE PHOTO A grower holds a marijuana plant, in Montevideo, Uruguay. AMY WILSONThe Orange County RegisterWorship requires neither proper place nor prop er clothing. For believ ers, the same could be said of Gods grace. It requires no invitation and is necessitated by no particular Sunday morning ritual. It can sometimes show itself ostentatiously on a Monday morning or slyly reveal itself entirely unbidden on a Thursday at 3:15. And sometimes it can show up when you are in an uncomfortable yoga position where you started by doing a push-up, then your left knee dropped to the oor near your right hip and your forearms lowered to the mat and then your right leg fell to the oor and your right foots circulation is about done and youre supposed to be lifting your chest up at the same time. And there it is. What every one here has come for, really. That moment that Im with God by myself, explains Courtney Scantlin, a working mother of two from Lake Forest, Calif., who is not so unfamiliar with Gods grace that she is blinded by the fact that she is also multitasking while doing Holy Yoga at Mariners Church in Mission Viejo, Calif., on a Tuesday night. But, say its adherents, Holy Yoga is hardly an attempt to make worship more convenient for the overtaxed 21st-century tness-minded set. Imagined Yoga and prayer combine for full-body worship experience KEVIN SULLIVAN / MCTABOVE: Brooke Thompson, center, leads a Holy Yoga class at Mariners Church in Mission Viejo, Calif. Our sole purpose is to combine world-class yoga with a Christ-honoring experience that offers an opportunity to believers and non-believers alike to authentically connect with God, the groups mission statement says. BELOW: Attendees at a Holy Yoga class participate in Mariners Church. In our culture, we like to compartmentalize our lives. Books are for the mind. Spirituality is for church. Fitness is in the gym. You can let them out of their boxes here. You can place them all in one bowl. Brooke ThompsonSEE YOGA | C2SEE CHANGES | C2

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Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com 10 years ago by Brooke Boon, a yogi before she was a Christian, its mission statement is designed to put a halt to those Christian groups that might nd the traditional Eastern practice of yoga somehow suspect as a vehicle for Christian reverence. Holy Yoga, the statement reads, is experiential worship specically created to deepen your connection to Christ. Our sole purpose is to combine world-class yoga with a Christ-honoring experience that offers an opportunity to believers and non-believers alike to authentically connect with God. We do this by integrating His Word, prayer, worship and the physical practice of yoga to contemporary and Christian music. With their hair banded, bar retted and bandeaued into place, 17 women of varying ages join two brave men for 90 minutes of this unique brand of yoga led by instructor Brooke Thompson in a room thats painted to resemble the interior of a submarine. Sufce to know, its the exact exercise experience youd expect if you know yoga. Tonight, well downward dog, strike the warrior and tree poses, form a bridge with our bodies and make like a pigeon see circulation loss, above. All while Thompson exhorts and leads like a normal instructor. Except for this, for starters: The class begins with a prayer. Thompson is bouncy and fun, t and encouraging. She was once a runner. I was running away from my house, the mother of three daughters laughs. Thompson says her rst Holy Yoga session was one she went to reluctantly. Yoga looked boring to me. It turned out to be the most powerful experience of wor ship Id ever had, Thompson says now. I cried through half of it. When I got back in the car, I told my sister-in-law who went with me I wanted to become an instructor. Within two weeks, shed signed up. Within two months, shed taken daily training and was ready to teach a beginning-level class. She calls this full-body wor ship, but is emphatic that she is not a pastor. Im not interpreting Scripture, Thompson wants made clear. I give a life story. Or I read a devotional. Sometimes, when we strike a pose, I suggest that each of us thank God for 10 things instead of counting to 10. I remind them not to compare themselves to others, that God accepts us as we are. I remind them to leave things on their mat. I also tell them that in a balance pose, chose a focus point that does not move. They can take that with them in life. Focus on God, the one who does not move. The yoga is gentle at rst, then more intense, if youre willing. The breathing is rhythmic. In our culture, Thompson said earlier, we like to compartmentalize our lives. Books are for the mind. Spirituality is for church. Fitness is in the gym. You can let them out of their boxes here. You can place them all in one bowl. Downward dog, she instructs, and is then on to the next move. She reminds that no one is keeping score. No one is timing anyone. No one is looking but God, and he doesnt care how extended your leg is. Almost everyone tonight is wearing black Capri tights and a tank or T-shirt in varying hues of pinks and aquas. There are a lot of painted toenails, a few tattoos and generous dollops of laughter. Ten minutes in, Thompson begins to discuss I Chronicles, Chapter 4, better known these days as the Prayer of Jabez: Oh, that you would bless me and expand my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I may be free from pain. And God granted his request. Thompson talks, throughout the 90 minutes of continual exercise and stretching and posing, about Jabez and his lesson. About bless, in the biblical sense. About asking God for more of what he wants for you. She asks her class if they think this rises about to the level of selshness. She knows this is radical, this selshness prayer, in a group mostly made of women, women who are stealing time from their children to be here to do this one thing for themselves. Scantlin, the mother of two, laughs later about that notion. A woman who has always exer cised, she says she is multitasking, of course. Im a woman. But, she adds, she never thought to bring God into exer cise before this. I just did my due diligence. I exercised. I now put him in that space where you dont usually nd him and it ts so well. I am here to pray to my lord and savior. Every pose has a healing attitude. I am facing God here. It heals my soul. Jessica Somers, a Ladera Ranch, Calif., mother of two, says everything in her life is God-driven, and that the Christian music that runs throughout the class and the words spoken to uplift her all my favorite things are here cannot help but weave well with her familys larger goals. Somers quotes Acts 17:28: For we live, move and exist because of Him The class ends the usual way, with back-bend, lights dimmed, a cool-down and another prayer. This one is more a challenge to use your newfound strength to be more like Jabez, to ask for more blessings from God, to not just drink from the cup of water offered by the riverside but to jump into the river and experience that which is life. Its what tness is supposed to be about, says Thompson. So, too, what a spiritual life can and should be. Extend, extend further, she has said repeatedly through the session. Amen to that. YOGAFROM PAGE C1 KEVIN SULLIVAN / MCT I give a life story. Or I read a devotional. Sometimes, when we strike a pose, I suggest that each of us thank God for 10 things instead of counting to 10. I remind them not to compare themselves to others, that God accepts us as we are, said Brooke Thompson.any symptoms over time, said Breiter, of the Northwestern Univer sity Feinberg School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital. Previous studies have shown mixed results in looking for brain changes from marijuana use, perhaps because of dif ferences in the tech niques used, he and others noted in Wednes days issue of the Journal of Neurosciences. The study is among the rst to focus on pos sible brain effects in recreational pot smok ers, said Dr. Nora Vol kow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The federal agency helped pay for the work. She called the work important but preliminary. The 20 pot users in the study, ages 18 to 25, said they smoked mar ijuana an average of about four days a week, for an average total of about 11 joints. Half of them smoked fewer than six joints a week. Researchers scanned their brains and compared the results to those of 20 non-users who were matched for age, sex and other traits. The results showed differences in two brain areas associated with emotion and motivation the amygdala and the nucleus ac cumbens. Users showed higher density than non-users, as well as differences in shape of those areas. Both differ ences were more pro nounced in those who reported smoking more marijuana. Volkow said larger studies are needed to explore whether casual to moderate marijuana use really does cause anatomical brain changes, and if so, whether that leads to any impairment. The current work doesnt determine whether casual to mod erate marijuana use is harmful to the brain, she said. Murat Yucel of Monash University in Australia, who has stud ied the brains of mar ijuana users but didnt participate in the new study, said in an email that the new results sug gest the effects of mar ijuana can occur much earlier than previous ly thought. Some of the effect may depend on a persons age when marijuana use starts, he said. Another brain researcher, Krista Lisdahl of the University of Wis consin-Milwaukee, said her own work has found similar results. I think the clear message is we see brain alterations before you develop dependence, she said. CHANGES FROM PAGE C1

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Start here. www.FLHeartCenter.com 511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg | 352-728-6808 1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages | 352-750-5000 Most Insurances Accepted Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP When its Heart Disease It Makes A Difference Where You Start. ~ Barry Weinstock, MD, FACC MD: Yale Medical School Fellowship Trained: Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles Board Certified NICOLE PAITSELDaily PressNEWPORT NEWS, Va. A wedding cake costs about 14,400 aluminum cans. Jim Ridenhour, a re tired Newport News, Va., reghter, discovered that when he turned to metal scrapping as a way to pay for his daughters wedding about two years ago. Since then, his parttime hobby has turned into a full-blown profession, earning him more than $1,000 in February alone. Ridenhour, a Carrollton, Va., resident, pri marily picks up scrap metal from personal contacts and referenc es. He also responds to ads on websites like Craigslist and solicits friends on Facebook for scrap pick-ups. Im getting it out of the way for someone who would just throw it in a landll, he says. This way, the stuff gets recycled. I feel like its free money out there, but my wife tells me that Ive earned it with my time and labor, he said. Most often, metal scrapping is referenced in relation to a crime, a fact that Ridenhour says makes it hard for the people legitimately recycling the materials. Copper theft, in par ticular, is a longstanding regional problem, the Isle of Wight County, Va., sheriffs ofce said in a December statement, referencing the theft of outdoor heating and air conditioning units and pipes from several county churches. Metal theft insur ance claims increased by 36 percent when reviewing claims made in 2010-2012 over insur ance claims reported in the three-year period between 2009 and 2011, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau. During this period (2010-2012), 33,775 insurance claims for the theft of copper, bronze, brass or aluminum were handled 32,568 of them (96 percent) for copper alone, according to the report. Ridenhour said local scrap yards ask for ngerprints and copies of your drivers license when you turn in metal scrap. This way, he said, theres an attempt to separate the honest scrappers from the thieves. But even for 64-yearold Ridenhour, scrap ping can be a bit of a wild world. Drivers eye one anothers truck loads as they enter the scrap yard, sometimes negotiating swaps be fore moving on to have their scraps weighed. Sharing secrets about where they found the metal is never a part of the transaction. If someone calls me, and they tell me that theyve seen something on the curb, I dont even try to get it, he says. I know it will be gone before I can get there. But scrapping is more work than sim ply nding someone elses trash. Scrappers can make more mon ey when they tear apart appliances, lawn mowers and other items and sell back the compo nents piece by piece. During a recent scrap dump, for example, Ridenhour dropped off an electric wheelchair. Dumped whole, the chair earned 7 cents a pound. By taking out the batteries which earn 20 cents per pound Ridenhour earned an additional $20.80. This time, he decided not to take apart the rest of the wheelchair to separate the steel from the aluminum. You have to decide how much it is worth it to take some things apart, he said. Ive gured out the fastest way to disassemble many things. Like with dryers, now I just cut out a hole in the back and yank all of the wiring out. I used to undo the whole thing, bolt by bolt. The cashier at Carrollton Metals said she was not allowed to provide a pricing list for met als because the pay outs change every day. During a recent run to the scrap yard, steel earned 7 cents a pound, motors earned 20 cents a pound and copper the most protable earned $2 a pound. Mid-afternoon on a recent weekday, busi ness was fairly slow at Carrollton Metals, but most days the scrap yard sees more than 100 people, said Lamar Harris, an employee who weighs the smaller scrap pieces like copper wiring and batteries. Now that his daugh ters wedding is paid for, the money that Riden hour earns goes toward his $930 monthly health insurance premium. On a $2,200 (month ly) retirement (from the re department), thats a huge chunk, he said. So, Im out here off-set ting it. Ive never been one to sit around on my days off.Man pays for health insurance with metal scraps NICOLE PAITSEL / MCT Jim Ridenhour loads a lamp from a neighbor to carry to a recycler in Carrollton, Va.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Thank you for giving me my SMILE BACK!rfrrfnt fbffffbfrbfr bfntfrrr fbffbffrffbfrrnb fbrrnfbbfrrrfrfbf ffbfr bfnrrr fffrfn rbffb brf fbrffbbff fbfff nrbrffb frbfffb fffn rrfrn nrrrf fbbn rffbb ffbfn bfrbrrf n bfn MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. JOE SMYDOPittsburgh Post-GazettePITTSBURGH Onagain, off-again stom ach pain had bothered home remodeler Jerome Holiday for more than a year, but in January, it worsened to the point of slowing him down. If I was up on a lad der, I would have to come down, the 59-year-old Pittsburgh resident said. If I was doing something strenuous, I would have to stop. Holiday had a poten tially fatal abdominal aortic aneurysm, which doctors at Allegheny General Hospital repaired with an experimental procedure that could prove more effec tive and patient-friendly than the one thats standard now. Allegheny General is one of about 30 sites in the United States, Can ada and Europe taking part in a clinical trial of the new technology, developed by Califor nia-based Endologix Inc. Holiday, who had the procedure March 4, was the rst to undergo the procedure in Pitts burgh. Dr. Satish Muluk, chief of vascular surgery at AGH and lead inves tigator of the Pittsburgh study, said the proce dure could be revolutionary. An abdominal aortic aneurysm a leading cause of death among older patients, the doctor said is a balloon ing of the bodys main artery near the kidneys. Because of the expan sion, the artery wall be comes so thin that it ruptures, causing in ternal bleeding. At that point, the patient faces long odds. We estimate the mor tality is around 80 per cent, Muluk said, noting many patients have no symptoms before an aneurysm bursts. Emphysema, genetics, high cholester ol and blood pressure, obesity and smoking are among the factors believed to contribute to aneurysms, according to the National Li brary of Medicine. Men are more prone than women. However, the problem can be detected ahead of time with an ultra sound, which is part of the covered package of care for new Medicare enrollees. The Medicare years are when the an eurysms are most likely to develop, Muluk said. Muluk said Allegheny General repairs about 150 of the aneurysms annually. The standard treatment, developed in the late 1990s, is mini mally invasive endovas cular surgery in which a stent, shaped like an inverted Y, is inserted to bypass the damaged section of aorta. But 15 percent to 20 percent of patients later require another proce dure because their stent moves or blood leaks into the aneurysm. The new procedure involves the insertion of two stents one to cir culate blood in each leg inside the aneurysm and the ination of two polymer-lled bags to ll up the rest of the swollen area. The technique is designed to hold the stents in place and prevent blood leak age. In short, whereas the standard procedure by passes the aneurysm, the new procedure obliterates it, said Dr. Jeffrey Carpenter, glob al principal investigator for the trial and professor and chairman of sur gery at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University in Camden, N.J. So far, 24 trial partic ipants have undergone the procedure. Each case has been technically successful, without complications, Car penter said. Its a very simple procedure, much simpler than one we current ly do, and its likely to help a larger, more di verse group of patients than is medically eligi ble for the standard re pair, he said. The trial procedure takes about 90 minutes, compared to the 2 hours or so needed for the standard treatment, and has the potential to be done on an outpa tient basis, Muluk said. Participants in the trial, however, are spending one or two days in the hospital. The new repair also has the potential to be done under a local an esthetic instead of the general anesthetic used in the standard procedure. Dr. Carpenter said he recently used a local while performing the repair on a 90-year-old man. Holiday, who also has a heart condition, said he isnt sure when he might be able to return to work. Muluk said patients undergoing the standard or new treatment for repairing the aneurysms generally are able to resume regular activities.Experimental treatment repairs abdominal aortic aneurysmsThe new procedure involves the insertion of two stents one to circulate blood in each leg inside the aneurysm and the inflation of two polymer-filled bags to fill up the rest of the swollen area.

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 21, the 111th day of 2014. There are 254 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On April 21, 1789, John Adams was sworn in as the rst vice president of the United States. On this date: In 1509, Englands King Henry VII died; he was succeeded by his 17-year-old son, Henry VIII.HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 21, 2014: This year you are able to fulll a wish, mainly because of an artistic or creative friend who walks into your life. This person will encourage you to liberate yourself and develop a talent that has remained hidden until now. If you are single, you often will feel as if you have met The One, only to discard that person later in order to meet someone better. Trust that you will know when you have found Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, your signicant other might be distant. You will want to draw him or her closer to you. Know that someone will only change when he or she is ready and willing. CAPRICORN often keeps you anchored and helps you see the big picture. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might sense that someones eyes are on you. A partner could be unusually touchy or difcult. Do not allow this behavior to color a project. Be willing to make a necessary adjustment, but re alize that you might want to hold back your feelings. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Make the effort to get past a hassle. You could feel as if you are at an impasse. Understand what is happening with a partner who might be depressed or withdrawn. You might feel stuck, but know that you are about to have a breakthrough. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Deal with a loved one directly. Recognize what is happening behind the scenes with a money matter. Walk away from a controlling individual who makes your life more difcult. Ultimately, you will be happier if you do. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Listen to feedback from someone you respect. This person might be very different from you, but because of that fact, he or she will present a different way of thinking about life. Allow a child a little more freedom if you do not want to get into a power play. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You have certain matters to handle immediately. You might want to relate to someone on a one-on-one level. A domestic situation could be weigh ing you down. Understand that working through this problem will take patience. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Where others get stuck, you seem to make it through because of your resourcefulness. You recognize the importance of following through. Honor a need to be somewhat reclusive. You might not always understand your feelings, but trust them. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You will be more grounded than you have been in a while. Consider moving in a new direction. Make a point to recognize your limits, especially when it comes to your nances. Honor boundaries, and you will nd a way to remove them. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Someone might want to spend time with you, but youll have little choice, as you likely already have established plans. You might not want to reveal everything you are thinking right now. Be sensitive to your schedule and its limitations. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You could be over serious about a money matter and its implications to you. Recognize what needs to happen in order to gain greater strength professionally. A family member will remain receptive to your ideas. Do nothing halfway. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You could go over someones head if you so choose. You could be a bit more tied to a problem than you realize. When you have to make a herculean effort to maintain the status quo, you will see how attached to the issue you really are. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your intuition could be unusually accurate with money and risk-tasking. You might be reacting to a boss far more than you realize. Someone could be pushing you beyond your limits, so you might want to change how you approach this person. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A meeting could play a bigger role in your day than you might have intended. Seeking out new information could be difcult, as you cant seem to touch base with someone who often offers you his or her perspective. Use caution with a decision. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: My 83-year-old mother has decided she wants to die. She says shes miserable, but I think shes causing her own misery. She has medications to address her physical ailments none of which are critical. My siblings live in other states. Mom feels its a burden for them to travel to see her, and she refuses to travel. Mom is in assisted living and is now refusing to bathe, trying not to eat, and doesnt want to talk to anyone or have visitors. Shes obviously depressed, but refuses counseling. If she continues being uncooperative, Im afraid shell have to go to a nursing home where they might let her starve herself to death. One sister says I should force Mom to do fun things, but I dont know what she wants. We used to go out to eat, but she no longer wants to do that. I have tried to honor Moms wishes, but Im at a loss about what to do for her. Do you have any suggestions? ALMOST AT WITS END DEAR ALMOST: I have one. You and your siblings should have your mother evaluated by a geriatrician IMMEDIATELY. Its apparent that she is depressed, but the question is whether she also has something physically wrong with her that is affecting her mental state. Then let the doctor be your guide. DEAR ABBY: I dated my ex for six years, but we broke up recently. The problem is, we signed a lease on our apartment that wont be up until next year. He still lives here, and I dont have the heart to kick him out. Financially, our living together makes sense, and Id rather live with him than with a stranger. Abby, this living ar rangement has made it tough to get over him. Our breakup was amicable somewhat and we remain civil to each other. I have no desire to get back together with him. I just nd it hard because Im not sure how to survive this weird situation Im in. Is it a good idea to keep living together? REMAINING CIVIL IN CANADA DEAR REMAINING CIVIL: It depends upon how high your toler ance is for pain. If seeing your ex with others hurts to the extent that you shed tears on your pillow, or obsess about who hes with and where hes going, then its not a good idea. However, if the situation cant be changed, then its important that you ll your time with activities and opportunities that allow you to meet new people and make new friends. DEAR ABBY: My new husbands family informed him they were coming to visit us for seven to 10 days. This was eight relatives, and I was not asked whether this was convenient or not. They were so noisy that our neighbors nally asked, When are they leaving? How can I prevent this from happening again in the future without offending anyone? My husband said after they had left, You dont handle chaos and confusion well, do you? NEEDS TO BE CONSULTED IN GEORGIA DEAR NEEDS TO BE CONSULTED: Revisit the question your husband asked you. And when you do, tell him the answer is not only do you NOT handle chaos, confusion and eight surprise houseguests well, neither do your neighbors. Then set some boundaries for the next time they say they are coming. His rst response should always be, Ill check with my wife to see if its convenient.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Aging mom who wants to die may find relief from doctor JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins. rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services rfntbb b tnfnrb rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services Lawn Services BrocksLAWN SERVICE352-242-7864Mowing Trimming Mulching

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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HEAT BEAT CHARLOTTE IN SERIES OPENER, SPORTS B1 EASTER: Groveland couple provides meals for the needy A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Yoga and prayer a full-body worship experience C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 111 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D2 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 NATION A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 79 / 59 Partly sunny. 50 MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Law enforcement will beef up its ranks for the thousands of motorcycles expected to zoom into Leesburg for the three-day Bikefest event this weekend. For the event, which is ex pected to bring more than a quarter of a million peo ple into the city, Capt. Rob ert Hicks, Leesburg police spokesman, said all available ofcers from his department would work in several capac ities, including vehicle and foot patrols. We want a robust pres ence out there, Hicks said. As usual, car trafc as well as golf carts that just be came legal to drive in parts of downtown Leesburg will be prohibited from traveling on much of downtown Main Street, the main thorough fare for the event. That area will be reserved for motorcy cles. In addition to Leesburg police, deputies from the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce will patrol the area in side and outside the city lim its. Sandi Chessher, with the sheriffs motorcycle patrol, said they will have addition al DUI units from surround ing county agencies and the Florida Highway Patrol. There will denitely be a very visible police presence, said Chessher, who in recent LEESBURG Law enforcement ranks will swell for Bikefest SEE BIKEFEST | A2 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com C rews worked through Easter morning to ll a massive 60-foot deep sinkhole with a mix ture of sand and ce ment in efforts to save two homes in The Vil lages that were on the edge of destruction. This is the big gest sinkhole that Ive seen, Casey Rankin, grout foreman from Helicon Property Res toration of Tampa, said on Sunday about the 25-foot-wide cra ter that forced the resi dents to evacuate. We put in 400 yards (of grout) and did ev erything that we could (to save the prop erties); that is why we stayed all night, Rankin said of working through the night on Saturday and into Sun day in the 2000 block of Chalmer Terrace. He said it could take up to 45 days for the concrete to harden. Helicon rst be gan working in the neighborhood around two weeks ago after a homeowner was con cerned about a depres sion in his yard. We were already xing and remediat ing the swell under neath the house, said Rankin. They noticed a few telltale signs of YURAS KARMANAU Associated Press BYLBASIVKA, Ukraine Within hours of an Eas ter morning shootout at a checkpoint manned by pro-Russia insurgents in eastern Ukraine, Russias Foreign Ministry issued a statement blaming mili tant Ukrainian nationalists and Russian state tele vision stations aired pictures of supposed proof of their involvement in the attack that left at least three people dead. The Ukrainian Security Service, however, said the attack was staged by provocateurs from 25-foot-wide sinkhole opens between two homes in The Villages THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Casey Rankin of Helicon Property Restoration of Tampa works Sunday morning to ll a large sinkhole in The Villages with a mixture of sand and cement. PHOTO COURTESY OF HELICON A sinkhole that opened Saturday in The Villages threatened two homes on Chalmer Terrace. DID YOU KNOW? Lake County has had three other sinkholes in the past three years that have generated media attention: In February, a 15-foot-wide sinkhole opened up near a bus stop at the intersection of Powderhorn Place and Peaceful Valley Drive in Clermonts Hart wood Reserve subdivision. In August 2013, a 100 foot-wide sinkhole swal lowed a section of the Summer Bay Resort near Cl ermont. Thirty ve of the guests were in the building when it started breaking apart. In July 2011, a 60 foot-wide sinkhole destroyed Main Street Hair & Beauty Salon in Leesburg, which Rafeek Mohamid had owned for 17 years. Part of the building collapsed. Dangerous ground Ukraine, Russia trade blame for shootout in east MAX VETROV / AP Masked pro-Russia insurgents show a detained man to people gathered at barricades in front of a regional administration building that was seized by pro-Russian activists earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday. FRANCES DEMILIO Associated Press VATICAN CITY Marking Christianitys most hopeful day, Pope Francis made an Easter Sunday plea for peace and dialogue in Ukraine and Syria, for an end to terrorist attacks against Christians in Nigeria and for more attention to the hungry and need iest close to home. Well over 150,000 tourists Romans and pilgrims, young and old turned out for the Mass that Francis cele brated at an altar set up under a canopy on the steps of St. Peters Basil ica. So great were their numbers that they over owed from sprawling St. Peters Square, which was bedecked with row after row of potted daf fodils, sprays of blue hyacinths and bunch es of white roses. Wav ing ags from the popes native Argentina as well as from Brazil, Mexi co, Britain, Poland and Pope Francis, huge crowd celebrate Easter SEE SINKHOLE | A2 SEE UKRAINE | A2 SEE EASTER | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 HOW TO REACH US APRIL 20 CASH 3 ............................................... 7-2-7 Afternoon .......................................... 7-6-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 1-9-0-3 Afternoon ....................................... 6-8-9-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 19 FANTASY 5 ............................. 2-3-12-35-36 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 9-11-12-14-21-39 POWERBALL ...................... 5-6-29-35-5121 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. years successfully applied for a $100,000 Florida De partment of Transporta tion grant to pay depu ties overtime so they could conduct extra DUI patrols. Chessher, who will be leading the DUI patrol, added they are aiming to be highly visible and stop suspected intoxicat ed motorists for any vio lations they observe, not just weaving and such. She said they will not tol erate drunk driving. My goal is to have zero trafc fatalities or injuries, she said. We will have zero tolerance for DUI, and if they are impaired and de cide to drive in on a motor cycle, they will go to jail. Some activities of Bike fest will be held Thursday night, but the event of cially kicks off Friday. City ofcials are encour aging residents to take ad vantage of the Lake Ex press shuttle service, which will be traveling throughout the county. Hicks added the police department has developed successful partnerships for the event with outside public safety agencies, in cluding Lake EMS, Lake County Emergency Man agement and Leesburg Regional Medical Center in case of unexpected medical needs. We have to make sure we are prepared in every way, Hicks said. Hicks added that in Leesburgs biggest annual event, he wants all Bikef est patrons to have a good time, but act responsibly. We want everyone to act like an adult and we will treat them like an adult, Hicks said. BIKEFEST FROM PAGE A1 activity underneath the house as far as cracks. The company was near n ished lling a smaller sinkhole on the property before Fridays heavy rains loosened the soil and caused the sinkhole to expand. Neighbors walking in the area Saturday morning noticed the sinkhole and reported it to author ities. Helicon arrived by noon. Villagers Mike and Margaret Remsha were among curious res idents who drove by in their golf cart to check out the situation. Thank goodness for sinkhole insurance, said Mike, adding that after he and his wife moved to The Villages two years ago from Wis consin, they were encouraged to buy sinkhole insurance. We did it right away, he said. Rankin said several Villagers have asked for an inspection of their homes, regarding the possi ble risk of sinkholes on their land. Im sure well be doing more in spections, he said, while noting some residents asked if they could go ahead and have cement poured under their homes. Rankin credits the residents at Chalmer Terrace for being proactive in noticing questionable areas of concern. Cracks are your number one sign, he said, adding they may appear on the exterior of a stucco home or pop up in the driveway. SINKHOLE FROM PAGE A1 outside the country. And the presented evidence particularly a pris tine business card said to have been left behind by the attackers was met with widespread rid icule in Ukraine, where it soon had its own Twitter hashtag. The armed clash ear ly Sunday near the city of Slovyansk appeared to be the rst since an inter national agreement was reached last week in Ge neva to ease tensions in eastern Ukraine, where armed pro-Russia activ ists have seized govern ment buildings in at least 10 cities. Ukraines new lead ers and many in the West fear that such clashes could provide a pretext for Russia to seize more Ukrainian territory. Russia, which annexed the Crimean Peninsu la last month, has tens of thousands of troops along its border with Ukraine. Russian ofcials, including President Vlad imir Putin, originally said the troops were there for military exercises, but Pu tins spokesman on Sat urday acknowledged that some were there because of instability in eastern Ukraine. The self-proclaimed mayor of Slovyansk ap pealed to Putin on Sun day to send in peace keeping troops to protect Russian speakers from Ukrainian nationalists. They want to make us slaves. They dont talk to us, but simply kill us, Vyacheslav Ponomary ov said during a news conference in Slovyansk shown on Rossiya state television. Yuri Zhadobin, who co ordinates the pro-Russia unit manning the check point in the village of Byl basivka, told The Associ ated Press he was with about 20 men celebrating Eas ter when unknown men drove up in four vehicles and opened re about 3 a.m. We began to shoot back from behind the bar ricades and we threw Mo lotov cocktails at them, Zhadobin said. Two of the vehicles caught re and the attackers ed in the other two, he said. The Ukrainian Interi or Ministrys ofce in the eastern Donetsk region said three people died in the attack and three oth ers were wounded. The statement said some of the attackers were also killed or wounded, but the number wasnt known. Russian state television reported that two of the attackers were killed. In Moscow, the Russian Foreign Ministry quickly blamed the clash on the Right Sector, a nationalist Ukrainian group that has supported the pro-West ern interim government in Kiev, the capital. But a spokesman for Right Sector, Artyom Skoropatskiy, denied any involvement in Sundays shootout, which he called a provocation staged by Russian special services. Ukraines Security Ser vice also called the attack a cynical provocation staged from the outside. Russian state and oth er Kremlin-friendly tele vision channels showed pictures of items said to have been seized from the attackers and the two captured vehicles, which were pockmarked by bul lets and gutted by re. The items included weap ons, ammunition, maps and the business card of Right Sector leader Dmy tro Yarosh. This gave rise to a ood of humorous posts on Ukrainian Twitter with the hashtag VizitkaYarosha, or Yaroshs business card. A man said to be a member of Right Sector and one of the attackers was later paraded before the television cameras in the custody of an in surgent wearing camou age fatigues and a black balaclava. The man said he would advise oth er Right Sector activists against coming to eastern Ukraine. There is a war here, he said in footage broadcast by Russias Channel One. People here are defend ing their land, defend ing their home and their rights. Putin has rejected claims that Russian spe cial forces are direct ing or encouraging the insurgents. Putin also has said he hopes not to send troops into eastern Ukraine, but he retains the right to intervene if necessary to protect eth nic Russians living there. UKRAINE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Helicon Property Restoration crew members work Sunday to nish stabilizing a sinkhole between two properties in The Villages. many other countries, they also lled the broad boule vard leading from the square to the Tiber River. Easter is the culmination of Holy Week and marks Chris tian belief that Jesus rose from the dead after his cru cixion. Francis noted that this year the Catholic churchs cele bration of Easter coincid ed with that of Orthodox churches, which have many followers in Ukraine. Francis prayed that God would enlighten and inspire the initiatives that promote peace in Ukraine, so that all those involved, with the support of the international community, will make every effort to prevent violence. In eastern Ukraine, the hol iday was marred by a deadly shooting Sunday fueled by tensions between pro-Rus sian supporters in the east and those loyal to an inter im government in Kiev. The clash appeared to defy an international agreement reached last week in hopes of ending months of unrest. Francis also prayed that all sides in Syria will be moved to boldly negotiate the peace long awaited and long overdue. Syria has been wracked by a three-year civ il war that has cost 150,000 lives and forced millions to ee the country. Christians make up about 5 percent of Syrias population. In comments to mark Eas ter there, the Greek Orthodox patriarch vowed that Chris tians there will not submit to extremists who attack our people and holy places. Francis makes a pilgrimage to Jordan, the Palestinian ter ritories and Israel next month, so on Easter he prayed that hopes sparked by the resump tion of Mideast peace negotia tions will be sustained. Thousands of pilgrims from around the world ocked to the celebrate Eas ter in the Holy Land, where Christian communities, as well as elsewhere in the Mid dle East, have been declin ing as the faithful ee region al turmoil. Francis also spoke of those suffering in Africa from an epidemic of deadly Ebola and urged a halt to brutal terrorist attacks in parts of Nigeria. Nigerians marked Eas ter with heightened securi ty against a spreading Islam ic uprising, mourning the deaths of 75 bomb blast vic tims and fearful of the fate of 85 abducted schoolgirls. The homegrown terror network Boko Haram has claimed re sponsibility for last weeks rush-hour explosion in the capital, Abuja, and threat ened more attacks. In Venezuela, there have been hopes Vatican media tion can help end the coun trys violent political un rest, and Francis urged that hearts be turned to recon ciliation and fraternal con cord there. But Francis Easter mes sage also urged people to pay attention to the needy close to home. He said the good news of Easters joy means leaving ourselves behind and encountering others, be ing close to those crushed by lifes troubles, sharing with the needy, standing at the side of the sick, elderly and the outcast. Cheering and applaud ing, the crowd tried to catch a glimpse of the pontiff as he circled around in his white popemobile before going to the basilicas balcony to de liver his commentary. EASTER FROM PAGE A1 ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis, center, arrives to celebrate an Easter Sunday Mass in St. Peters Square at the Vatican Sunday.

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Tickets available for Dining in the Dark This unique dinner is an expedi tion into the world of smell, taste, sound and texture as guests ex perience dinner served in dark ness at the fourth annual Dining in the Dark event on May 2 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora. The dinner is designed to raise awareness and funds for New Vision for Independence, a local nonprof it that provides rehabilitation, com munity education and support services for people dealing with blindness or low vision. For information or to purchase tickets, which are $60 for gener al seating and $440 for a private table of eight, go to www.newvi sion.org or call Chantel Buck at 352-435-5040. SORRENTO East Lake library will sponsor poetry contest In honor of Aprils National Poetry Month, the East Lake County Library is sponsoring the 12th Annual Poetry Contest that is open to all ages, di vided into three groups: children up to age 12, teens age 13-18 and adults age 19 and older. There is no limit to how many en tries one person can submit, and qualifying entries can be on any topic or any style of writing but must be typed on one page of 8 x 11-inch paper. Deadline for entries is May 3. Download the entry form at www. mylakelibrary.org, and deliver the completed entry form with your original poetry or mail it to the East Lake County Library, 31340 County Road 437 South, Sorrento, FL 32776. Call 352 -383-9980 for information. EUSTIS Eagle Rider group to sell breakfast for charity Members of the Golden Triangle Eagle Rider group will be selling a bis cuits and gravy breakfast, along with a fresh cinnamon biscuit to go, begin ning at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Eagle Aerie, at 999 N. Bay St. The home made breakfasts are $5. Proceeds benet Eagle Rider charities. For in formation, call 352-348-1909. TAVARES Tavares to host annual spring Seaplane Fly-In The city of Tavares is hosting its annual spring Seaplane Fly-In from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday at the Tavares Seaplane Base on Lake Dora in Wooton Park, 100 E. Ruby St. Admission is free and the public is encouraged to come view and pho tograph the wide variety of seaplanes that will start arriving at 9 a.m. along the shoreline and on the tarmac. In conjunction with the y-in, Tavares is celebrating 100 Years of Seaplanes, and will showcase his torical exhibits and memorabil ia, historical re-enactors and ying demonstrations by a typical sea plane of the early 1900s. The Wooton Park boat launch in downtown Tavares will be closed to the public for this event. For information, go to www. Tavares.org or call 352-742-6267. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report The upcoming Cen tral Florida Landscape & Garden Fair is a fami ly-friendly weekend event, featuring not only ex pert gardening classes for adults, but a range of edu cational activities for chil dren. Free childrens activi ties include the Childrens Passport, a seed necklace craft and entrance into the buttery garden, maze and ve senses area, Eli sha Pappacoda, a county public information ofcer, said in a press release. Kids under 16 may com plete the Childrens Pass port by stopping at the six designated locations on the events program map. After visiting each gar den, they can exchange the completed passport for a free meal voucher from Chick-l-A in Mount Dora. The Central Florida Landscape & Garden Fair is designed to be a fun, ed ucational event for the en tire family, said Brooke Mofs, Residential Horti culture Agent. The fair will be held May 3-4 at Discovery Gardens, located at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. in Tavares, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and from 10 a.m. R etired cater ers Pete and Sue Joiner have been providing food for the needy in south Lake for the past 30 years, mainly for Thanks giving and Christ mas. For the rst time in years, their minis try on Saturday did an Easter meal con sisting of ham, beans, macaroni and cheese, rolls and homemade desserts. Most of the food is donated. The Joiners credited the Clermont Meth odist Church for a do nation of 22 hams, the Lake County Sher iffs Ofce for produce from the jails garden and South Lake Pres byterian Church for the rolls. Couple provides Easter meals for the needy PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Bonnie Ray carries Easter dinners, ve to a bag, as Dolly Ott supervises. Peggy Weaver lls a plate on the Easter dinner assembly line. Rod Jemison is delivering 150 Easter dinners to folks in Groveland. Ive been doing this for years, he says. I know people who need them. GROVELAND Halifax Media Group The company that owns San Se bastian Winery in St. Augustine and Lakeridge Winery in Clermont Floridas largest premium winery has been working closely with University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences as its racks up award after award. IFAS biologist Dennis Gray com mends Jeanne Burgess and Gary Cox, the founder of Seavin Inc., for developing a good market for wine production in Florida. Jeanne and Gary Cox were the pioneers, showing that you can re ally make a good business in grow ing grapes and wine, Gray said. San Sebastian recently won 10 awards at the 26th annual Florida State Fair International Wine and ST. AUGUSTINE Alliance with UF a good choice for winemaker GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Hidden be hind live oaks and magnolias near the Florida Governors Mansion, an historic house that symbolizes much of the states terrible past and transformation will soon have its doors opened to the public. Crews and contractors are put ting the nal touches on a substan tial renovation of the antebellum mansion known as the Grove just a few blocks north of the state Cap itol. Built by one of Floridas early ter ritorial governors using slave la bor, the Grove would later serve as home to the governor who shep herded the state through the civil rights era. The state at a cost of nearly $6 million is turning the Greek Re vival style mansion and its 10-acre grounds into a museum designed to document the lives of the states governors as well as an architectur al classroom for visitors. The house, which had settled over the years, needed brickwork repairs and updating to meet mod ern building codes. It is scheduled to open this fall. The fact that the Grove has re mained standing for so long is also a reminder that Florida did not en dure the same type of destruc tion associated with the Civil War. Governors mansion back in spotlight TAVARES Kids not overlooked at Landscape & Garden Fair SUBMITTED PHOTO A variety of free childrens activities will be available at the 3rd Annual Central Florida Landscape & Garden Fair. SEE FAIR | A4 SEE WINE | A4 SEE MANSION | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Discovery Gardens is nestled on over 4 acres behind the Lake Coun ty Agricultural Cen ter and features 20 themed gardens, in cluding a string of lush courtyards and six spe cially designed chil drens gardens. For adults, expert guest speakers will present on a variety of garden and landscape topics including native plants, edible plants, no-turf landscaping and geocaching. The fair will also pro vide visitors an oppor tunity to browse and purchase goods from exhibitors specializing in landscaping, gar dening, irrigation, fer tilizer, composting and hardscapes. For information or to register as a vendor or sponsor, contact Tina Chavez at 352-3439647 or tchavez@lake county.gov or vis it www.lakecounty. gov/gardenfair. FAIR FROM PAGE A3 Grape Juice Competi tion in Tampa, while Lakeridge won eight. Tim Fannin and his wife, Andrea Lavorie, have toured San Sebas tian ve times before, but their recent sixth visit was the rst time they saw the wine they love being bottled. Fannin, a 60-yearold from South Deer eld, Mass., said they visit the nations oldest city a couple of times a year to see family and briey escape the cold, eventually making their way to San Sebastian to sample the winerys dif ferent products before buying a case. What is usually a qui et, guided tour quickly turned into an assem bly line of hissing ma chinery. After Fannin walked up 20 stairs to the cat walk above the facto ry, he looked down and watched the wine be ing bottled. The bot tling aerated the room in a deep, fruity cloud as employees lled, corked and sealed San Sebas tians Port Ruby, which is barrel-aged for one year. Four employees pushed about 28 to 32 bottles through the pro duction line, which is the size of a large dining room table, every min ute and boxed up about 115 cases in an hour, at 12 bottles per case. After seeing and smelling the bottling, Fanning said he wished he had the same setup at home. Of the dozen or so dif ferent wines San Sebas tian makes, only a hand ful are bottled at the St. Augustine location: the Port Ruby, Cream Sherry and 2-year Port. Most of the other bottling takes place at the companys Clermont vineyard. One wine in particu lar thats bottled there is made from hybrid grapes bred out of the IFAS program in Apopka. One of the programs hybrid grapes, called Blanc Du Bois, was crossbred to thrive in Floridas humid climate and to resist Pierces dis ease, which kills grape vines and is caused by a bug called a glassywinged sharpshooter. They go and they ac tually feed on the vine. When they do that, they basically leave behind a disease, Cox said. Some grapevines are resistant to the dis ease and some are not, he said. But what IFAS researchers also were looking for was a grape that would make a dri er wine because the Southeast is more suit ed to growing sweet er muscadine grapes. Researchers blend ed those characteris tics together and made a grape that was more acidic and could thrive in Florida. St. Sebastian Direc tor of Winemaking Jeanne Burgess said the Blanc Du Bois wine named after Emile Du Bois, a winemaker in Tallahassee in the late 1800s has an aroma of apricots and offers a spiciness that people recognize as a grape fruit. It pairs well with seafood and is light on the palate, she said. Burgess, who has been with the company for 31 years, has had a long standing relationship with UFs IFAS program. We evaluated 11 different varieties (of grapes), and Blanc Du Bois was the one that captured our interest, she said. IFAS researchers have been proud to watch Blanc Du Bois win in competitions across the U.S., and Burgess hopes the program will be suc cessful with grapes for red wines in the future. WINE FROM PAGE A3 HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP PHOTO Kenny Savage, 33, manages the bottling production equipment at San Sebastian Winery in St. Augustine.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.com Celebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOM JUST 10 MILES SOUTH OF THE VILLAGES Your LED Headquarters!$34.95each We honor all competitors sale ads for same brand items! 711 South 14th Street (Hwy 27) Leesburg, FLMon. Fri. 7:30 5:00 After Hours By Appointment Tallahassee was the only state capital east of the Mississippi that was not captured during the war. Even today the front windows have some of the same glass used when the home was built. This is one of the most remarkable plac es in the state, said Rob Bendus, the director of the states Division of Historical Resources. We are in the middle of an urban area and its still intact the way it was 200 years ago. Situated atop one of Tallahassees hills, the Grove was once part of a 640-acre tract includ ing the land that now contains the Governors Mansion. Richard Keith Call, an ofcer on Gen. Andrew Jacksons personal staff, modeled his home af ter Jacksons Hermitage in Tennessee and is be lieved to have nished building it by 1831. The mansion features a wide main hallway found in many South ern homes, pinewood oors and a winding cy press staircase. It was at the Grove in 1861 that Call chas tised a group when they came to tell him Flori da had voted to secede from the United States. Well, gentlemen, you have unlocked the gates to hell, from which shall ow the curses of the damned, Call report edly told them. Almost a century lat er, another owner of the Grove would have to confront the turbulence of the civil rights era. Gov. LeRoy Collins, who married Calls great-granddaughter Mary, entered ofce in 1955. He would earn a reputation for try ing to chart a moderate course on race relations instead of adopting the confrontational stance of other Southern gov ernors. Collins blasted state legislators when they passed an interposi tion resolution in 1957 contending the U.S. Su preme Court decision ordering the desegre gation of schools to be null and void in Florida. I decry it as an evil thing, whipped up by the demagogues and carried on the hot and erratic winds of pas sion, prejudice, and hysteria, Collins wrote. Collins and his wife, Mary Call Darby Collins, bought the Grove in the early s. By that time, the home was far re moved from its glorious past. Over the years, the land surrounding the mansion and the fur niture inside had been sold off. At one point, it was turned into a room ing house. Collins and his fam ily wound up living at the Grove while he was governor after the state tore down the original Governors Mansion and replaced it with the one now standing. Signs of the family life there include Collins son writing on the wall how much he hated damned homework. The state paid more than $2 million in the s to acquire the 10 acres and the mansion, but it included a pro vision that the state would not physically begin work on the prop erty until Mary Collins died. Former Gov. Col lins died in the home in 1991; his wife passed away in 2009. Both are buried on the estate. It was a place we all loved, not only because of its history, said Col lins daughter Mary Call Collins, who recalled sliding down the ban nister of the stairs as a child. Even though the Col lins family helped re pair the home during the decades they lived there, transforming the mansion to a pub lic museum has been a time-consuming un dertaking. There also have been legal battles after Gov. Rick Scott and state ofcials supported a move to acquire prop erty next to the site for parking. The case is still in court. The rear of the home, which is an addition built in the s, was modied to make it ac cessible to the disabled. An elevator was placed where a bathroom once stood and crews have made the old home en ergy efcient. Its been like birthing a child, Bendus said. MANSION FROM PAGE A3 STEVE CANNON / AP The Grove is a historical mansion that once belonged to former Florida Gov. LeRoy Collins in Tallahassee. KAREN MATTHEWS Associated Press NEW YORK Just Do It has been a fa miliar Nike slogan for years, but some parents are wondering what it was doing on some of New Yorks Common Core standardized En glish tests. Brands including Bar bie, iPod, Mug Root Beer and Life Savers showed up on the tests more than a million students in grades 3 through 8 took this month, lead ing to speculation it was some form of product placement advertising. New York state edu cation ofcials and the test publisher say the brand references were not paid product place ment but just happened to be contained in pre viously published pas sages selected for the tests. Some critics arent so sure and questioned why specic brand names would be men tioned at all. It just seems so un necessary, said Josh Golin, associate direc tor of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, which mon itors marketing directed at children. It would be horri ble if they were getting paid for it, he said. But even if theyre not, its taking something that should not be a com mercial experience and commercializing it. The test questions have not been made public, and teach ers and principals are barred from discuss ing them. But teachers posting anonymous ly on education blogs have complained that students were confused by the brand names, which were accompa nied by trademark sym bols. The Nike question was about being a risk taker and included the line, Just Do It is a registered trademark of Nike, according to stu dents who took the test. Sam Pirozzolo, of Staten Island, whose fth-grader encoun tered the Nike question, said there was appar ently no reason for such a specic brand. Im sure they could have used a historical gure who took risks and invented things, Pirozzolo said. Im sure they could have found something other than Nike to express their point. Brand names in New York standardized tests vex parents

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 D espite Russias Crimean landgrab and its massing of troops on the Ukrainian border, Western leaders still re fuse to recognize the mind-set of Vladimir Putin. U.S. ofcials still hope he will negotiate a compromise with the Kiev government rather than engineer the dismemberment of Ukraine. Anyone who still believes this pap should be sentenced to a week of watching the gross an ti-Western propaganda on Rus sian state TV (nearly all national media are now state-controlled), which distorts the facts on Ukraine while whipping up na tionalist fervor. This kind of ag itprop, which hasnt been seen since the worst days of Joseph Sta lin, proves that dealing with Putin requires a tougher approach. Under President Boris Yeltsin in the 1990s, Russian media were privatized and were pretty free wheeling. Putin took back con trol of national television net works still the most important news vehicle for the Russian heartland along with nearly all of the independent newspapers. On a visit to Moscow in 2012 in the run-up to the last Russian elections, I was astonished at the level of anti-Western vitriol on TV political talk shows: The most astonishing tales of Western con spiracies to wreck Russia were discussed as if they were fact. But that was nothing compared with what is going on now. Never, even in Soviet times, did we have such propaganda, a Russian colleague told me by phone from Moscow. If I listen I have a heart attack. (I havent named her because, for the rst time in 25 years, there is a vi cious Russian campaign against fth columnists and traitors who voice any criticism of their government.) Indeed, the Kremlin campaign on Crimea and eastern Ukraine has taken propaganda to a new level. The Kremlin shut off or took control of most of the few re maining independent media voices, including the last inde pendent TV channel, Dozhd, and online sites. The state-owned but respected RIA Novosti news agency was suddenly shut and reinvented as Russia Today, un der the direction of the notori ous Dmitry Kiselyov. He made headlines recently by suggesting that Russia could turn the United States into radioactive ash. With near-total media control, the Kremlin set about selling its narrative of Ukraine to its own people and the world. Russian news outlets relent lessly painted the demonstra tions and government turnover in Kiev as a coup engineered by the West with the aid of an ti-Semitic Nazis and fas cists. In reality, while right-wing groups did demonstrate, they were only a small part of the pro tests, which were ignited by the pro-Russian governments cor ruption and decision, under Kremlin pressure, to turn away from Europe. The government fell not because of a plot, but be cause special Ukrainian forc es, with advisers from Moscow, killed dozens of demonstrators. The new Ukrainian govern ment has cracked down on the far right (which is less virulent than neo-Nazi groups in Russia) and has offered ethnic Russians language and autonomy rights. Youd never hear this on Russian media. Nor would you hear that Ukraines Jewish leaders have publicly asked Putin to stop dis torting the facts about the treat ment of Jews. Instead, Russian media broad cast nonstop, frenzied reports, with doctored lm and fake claims of casualties, that whip up fear of fascists among Rus sians at home and in eastern Ukraine (who watch Moscow TV stations). The media hysteria gal vanizes domestic support for Pu tin and convinced Russians their government had to intervene in Crimea and may need to do so again in eastern Ukraine. Putin brazenly denies he sent troops to Crimea and has 40,000 troops ready to invade on Ukraines border (they are ful ly on display in satellite photos). But President Obama, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and company dont seem to grasp the importance of Putins big lies. The Russian leader couldnt care less about world opinion. His Ukrainian adventure has sent his popularity soaring at home and sends a clear message to Kiev: Either you come back under Russias wing, or I will ruin you whether by destabilizing the country or by invasion. Putin is not interested in com promise, says the Brookings In stitutions Fiona Hill, co-author of Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin. Hes playing the long game. Hes willing to push things to the end. This is not World War III. Pu tin cant afford to attack NATO countries. He is leading Russia toward bankruptcy, and his pow er will wane when Russias gas income drops as more U.S. gas comes on line. But Western lead ers should not underestimate his intent to re-exert control over Ukraine; he wont think twice unless they give Ukraine more aid and take a much tougher stance on sanctions. Watch a lit tle Russian TV and that becomes very clear. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and edi torial-board member for the Philadel phia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Putin is playing a long game T he rst open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended with rough ly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchang es, including more than 1.3 million at Cov ered California. Thats an amazing and wel come result, considering how badly many of the exchanges stumbled when sign-ups began in October. Nevertheless, its far too early to judge the success or failure of the health care law, given that key tests of the programs sus tainability have yet to be passed. Almost all of the exchanges got off to a wretched start, particularly the federally managed ones that shared a mind-boggling ly dysfunctional website. And yet, as Cov ered California Executive Director Peter V. Lee predicted last year, sign-ups increased dra matically as the deadline for enrolling ap proached. The results are signicantly bet ter than had been projected in California, and modestly better for the country as a whole. Its hard to say how much headway the law is making toward insuring the uninsured, however. The exchanges didnt measure how many of their new enrollees had previous ly lacked coverage, as opposed to the num ber who signed up because their old poli cies had been canceled or because they were no longer covered at work. Although two re cent surveys show a sharp drop in the overall percentage of uninsured Americans, analysts at Rand Corp. say most of the increase came from people gaining coverage through an em ployer, not the exchanges. And the refusal of about half the states to expand their Medicaid programs has left millions of poor American adults unable to afford coverage. Nor do we know yet whether the exchanges customers will nd their new plans adequate. Many of those who signed up have yet to seek treatment from their new plans more restrict ed (or narrow) networks of providers, one of the key cost-saving steps insurers took in Year One. Another outstanding question is what will happen to premiums at the exchanges, which will depend to a great degree on the demand for healthcare from the new enrollees. Covered Californias early results bode well for future premiums because they suggest that insurers signed up more consumers who are compara tively young and healthy than expected. But the rst real indication wont come until June, when insurers actually le their rates for 2015. With any complex law, some pitfalls dont become clear until after implementation be gins in earnest. That process is well under way now for the Affordable Care Act, and its en couraging to see the exchanges exceed their enrollment targets despite the manifold prob lems theyve experienced. And we clearly are making progress toward the goal of increased insurance coverage. Its just too early to tell whether that progress is truly sustainable. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE No need for a rush to judgment on Obamacare Classic DOONESBURY 1973

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Late push lifts Spurs past Mavs / B4 MARK DIDTLER Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG Dean Anna drew a bas es-loaded walk on a full-count pitch with two outs in the 12th in ning and Carlos Beltran followed with a two-run single as the New York Yankees beat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-1 on Sunday. Yangervis Solarte was walked by Heath Bell (01) to open the 12th. Af ter failing twice to bunt against C.J. Riefen hauser, Brett Gard ner reached on a eld ers choice and went to third on Brian McCanns two-out single. Jacoby Ellsbury was intention ally walked before Anna checked his swing to complete an eight-pitch at-bat and score the goahead run. Beltran had his hit off Josh Leuke before Al fonso Soriano added an RBI single that made it 5-1. Preston Claiborne (10) went two scoreless innings for the Yankees. The teams split a wild four-game series. After the Yankees beat David Price and the Rays 10-2 in Thursdays opener, Tampa Bay rebounded for 11-5 and 16-1 victo ries Friday and Satur day. Derek Jeter opened the 11th with a sin gle off Bell. Ichiro Su zuki pinch-ran for Jeter stole second with one out, but Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon MIKE CARLSON / AP New York Yankees Brett Gardner, right, follows through on a y ball to Tampa Bay right elder Wil Myers during the fourth inning of Sundays game in St. Petersburg. Originally called a catch, the play was overturned on appeal and Garner was awarded a double with Alfonso Soriano scoring on the play. LYNNE SLADKY / AP Miamis LeBron James, center, is fouled by Charlottes Bismack Biyombo (0) as teammate Chris Douglas-Roberts (55) looks on during the rst half in Game 1 of the teams opening-round playoff series on Sunday in Miami. TIM REYNOLDS Associated Press MIAMI LeBron James scored 27 points, Dwyane Wade added 23 and the Miami Heat used a late charge to beat the Charlotte Bob cats 99-88 on Sunday in Game 1 of their Eastern Conference rst-round series. Chris Bosh scored 13 points and James Jones had 12 for the Heat. Game 2 of the best-ofseven series is Wednes day. Kemba Walker scored 20 points for the Bob cats, who led by nine early and led again in the third. Al Jefferson missed eight of his nal 13 shots after get ting hurt in the rst quarter. He nished with 18 points and 10 rebounds for the Bob cats, who got 17 from Gary Neal and 15 from Josh McRoberts. Miami sealed it with an 18-4 run in the fourth, all but three of those points coming with James getting a rest. Luke Ridnour made a high-arcing baseline jumper with 10:29 left to get Charlotte within 74-69 before Jones an swered with a 3-point er to put Miami up by PETE IACOBELLI Associated Press HILTON HEAD IS LAND, S.C. Matt Kuchar overcame a four-stroke decit to nally nish on top, when his stunning chip-in on the 18th hole gave him a 64 and a vic tory at the RBC Heritage on Sunday. Kuchar was four shots behind Luke Donald at the start but made that up with seven birdies on his rst 10 holes. He had a birdie putt of less than eight feet at the par-3 17th, but three-putted for bogey to fall into a tie for rst. Kuchar was in more trouble in a bunker at Harbour Town Golf Links closing light house hole. Thats when he blasted out and watched the ball rat tle in for birdie. Kuchar punched the air and raised his arms in cele bration of what would be his seventh career PGA Tour win. Donald had two holes STEPHEN B. MORTON / AP Matt Kuchar watches his drive off the third tee during Sundays nal round of the RBC Heritage in Hilton Head Island, S.C. GREG BEACHAM Associated Press TORONTO Ru bin Hurricane Carter, the boxer whose wrongful murder conviction be came an interna tional symbol of racial injustice, has died at 76. John Artis, a longtime friend and caregiver, said Car ter died in his sleep Sun day. Carter had been stricken with prostate cancer in Toronto, the New Jersey natives ad opted home. Carter spent 19 years in prison for three mur ders at a tavern in Paterson, N.J., in 1966. He was convicted along side Artis in 1967 and again in a new trial in 1976. Carter was freed in Novem ber 1985 when his con victions were set aside after years of appeals and public advocacy. His ordeal and the al leged racial motivations behind it were publi cized in Bob Dylans 1975 song Hurricane, several books and a 1999 lm starring Den zel Washington, who received an Acade my Award nomination for playing the boxer turned prisoner. Carters murder con victions abruptly end ed the boxing career of a former petty crimi nal who became an un dersized middleweight contender largely on ferocity and punching power. Although never a world champion, Car ter went 27-12-1 with 19 knockouts, memora bly stopping two-divi sion champ Emile Grif th in the rst round in 1963. He also fought for a middleweight title in December 1964, losing a unanimous decision to Joey Giardello. In June 1966, three white people were shot by two black men at the Lafayette Bar and Grill in Paterson. Carter and Artis were convicted by an all-white jury largely on the testimony of two thieves who later re canted their stories. Carter was granted a new trial and brief ly freed in 1976, but sent back for nine more years after being con victed in a second trial. I wouldnt give up, Carter said in an inter view on PBS in 2011. No matter that they sentenced me to three life terms in prison. I wouldnt give up. Just because a jury of 12 misinformed people ... found me guilty did not make me guilty. And be cause I was not guilty, I refused to act like a guilty person. Dylan became aware of Carters plight after reading the boxers au tobiography. He met Carter and co-wrote Hurricane, which he performed on his Boxer Rubin Hurricane Carter, subject of Bob Dylan song, dies at 76 CARTER SEE CARTER | B2 Heat start sluggish, finish in stride to beat Bobcats SEE HEAT | B2 Anna, Beltran key Yankees 12-inning win SEE RAYS | B2 Kuchar chips in to win Heritage SEE PGA | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 1, Indiana 0 Saturday, April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 Tuesday, April 22: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Indiana at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Miami 1, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 Wednesday, April 23: Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Brooklyn 1, Toronto 0 Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 Tuesday, April 22: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Chicago vs. Washington Sunday, April 20: Washington at Chicago, late Tuesday, April 22: Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Chicago at Washington, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 1, Dallas 0 Sunday, April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 Wednesday, April 23: Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: San Antonio at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City 1, Memphis 0 Saturday, April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 Monday, April 21: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. Golden State 1, L.A. Clippers 0 Saturday, April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clip pers 105 Monday, April 21: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Houston vs. Portland Sunday, April 20: Portland at Houston, late Wednesday, April 23: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Detroit 1, Boston 1 Friday, April 18: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, April 20: Boston 4, Detroit 1 Tuesday, April 22: Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Boston at Detroit, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Detroit at Boston, 3 p.m. Montreal 2, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 1 Sunday, April 20: Tampa Bay at Montreal, late Tuesday, April 22: Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh 1, Columbus 1 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2OT Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Columbus at Pittsburgh, TBD N.Y. Rangers 1, Philadelphia 1 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Friday, April 25: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, Noon WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 2, Minnesota 0 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Monday, April 21: Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Colorado at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. St. Louis 2, Chicago 0 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, OT Monday, April 21: St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: St. Louis at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Anaheim 2, Dallas 0 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Anaheim 3, Dallas 2 Monday, April 21: Anaheim at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: Los Angeles at San Jose, late Tuesday, April 22: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Thursday, April 24: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour RBC Heritage Sunday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,101; Par: 71 Final Matt Kuchar 66-73-70-64 273 Luke Donald 70-69-66-69 274 John Huh 71-68-68-68 275 Ben Martin 69-68-71-67 275 Scott Brown 70-69-71-67 277 Brian Stuard 69-72-68-68 277 Jim Furyk 71-66-71-70 278 Brian Harman 69-71-69-69 278 Russell Knox 69-72-68-70 279 William McGirt 66-76-71-66 279 Rory Sabbatini 69-72-70-68 279 Stuart Appleby 73-73-67-67 280 Matt Every 69-70-70-71 280 Jason Kokrak 71-73-66-70 280 Charl Schwartzel 70-70-68-72 280 Jordan Spieth 69-74-70-67 280 Nicholas Thompson70-70-68-72 280 Paul Casey 74-67-72-68 281 J.B. Holmes 72-71-69-69 281 Ryo Ishikawa 77-68-67-69 281 Pat Perez 74-69-74-64 281 Ted Potter, Jr. 70-69-71-71 281 Robert Allenby 69-72-70-71 282 Martin Kaymer 73-67-72-70 282 Graeme McDowell71-69-72-70 282 Matthew Fitzpatrick71-71-69-71 282 Tim Herron 69-72-72-70 283 Chris Kirk 71-72-71-69 283 Geoff Ogilvy 72-68-71-72 283 Camilo Villegas 72-71-73-67 283 Jonathan Byrd 71-73-73-67 284 K.J. Choi 70-67-74-73 284 Harris English 68-73-75-68 284 Billy Hurley III 70-69-73-72 284 Jerry Kelly 76-70-67-71 284 Richard H. Lee 70-69-71-74 284 Steve Marino 72-72-72-68 284 Ricky Barnes 72-73-72-68 285 Tim Clark 72-71-71-71 285 Chesson Hadley 72-67-73-73 285 Justin Hicks 75-70-68-72 285 Charley Hoffman 73-71-68-73 285 Kevin Kisner 73-72-68-72 285 Scott Langley 66-73-75-71 285 Spencer Levin 72-74-70-69 285 Kevin Stadler 71-69-72-73 285 Brendon Todd 75-71-71-68 285 Ken Duke 72-71-69-74 286 Andrew Loupe 70-73-72-71 286 Patrick Reed 71-72-70-73 286 Chris Stroud 71-71-74-70 286 Bo Van Pelt 69-70-73-74 286 Woody Austin 74-71-67-75 287 Champions Tour Greater Gwinnett Championship Sunday At TPC Sugarloaf Duluth, Ga. Purse: $1.8 million Yardage: 7,131; Par: 72 Final Miguel A. Jimenez (270), $270,000 65-70-67 202 Bernhard Langer (158), $158,400 68-68-68 204 Jay Haas (130), $129,600 71-68-67 206 Fred Couples (107), $107,100 69-68-70 207 David Frost (74), $74,100 72-68-69 209 Steve Pate (74), $74,100 68-71-70 209 Duffy Waldorf (74), $74,100 71-68-70 209 Chien Soon Lu (50), $49,500 71-68-71 210 Colin Montgomerie (50), $49,500 70-72-68 210 Kenny Perry (50), $49,500 68-71-71 210 Willie Wood (50), $49,500 74-70-66 210 Billy Andrade (0), $36,600 72-72-67 211 Scott Dunlap (0), $36,600 73-68-70 211 Fred Funk (0), $36,600 72-69-70 211 Larry Mize (0), $32,400 73-71-68 212 Bart Bryant (0), $27,036 73-71-69 213 Mark Calcavecchia (0), $27,036 73-71-69 213 Roger Chapman (0), $27,036 71-74-68 213 Peter Senior (0), $27,036 72-73-68 213 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $27,036 73-69-71 213 Russ Cochran (0), $18,608 73-71-70 214 Marco Dawson (0), $18,608 71-69-74 214 Joe Durant (0), $18,608 74-73-67 214 Bill Glasson (0), $18,608 72-70-72 214 Mike Goodes (0), $18,608 72-73-69 214 Joey Sindelar (0), $18,608 72-69-73 214 Jeff Sluman (0), $18,608 69-75-70 214 Esteban Toledo (0), $18,608 72-73-69 214 Michael Allen (0), $13,320 72-70-73 215 Anders Forsbrand (0), $13,320 73-70-72 215 Dan Forsman (0), $13,320 76-70-69 215 Jim Rutledge (0), $13,320 75-73-67 215 Rod Spittle (0), $13,320 70-71-74 215 Bob Tway (0), $13,320 73-73-69 215 LPGA Tour LPGA-Lotte Championship Saturday At Ko Olina Golf Club Course Kapolei, Hawaii Purse: $1.7 million Yardage: 6,383; Par: 72 Final a-denotes amateur Michelle Wie, $255,000 70-67-70-67 274 Angela Stanford, $155,874 72-64-67-73 276 Inbee Park, $113,075 70-68-72-67 277 Hyo Joo Kim, $87,473 68-70-69-71 278 Chella Choi, $64,005 74-68-70-67 279 So Yeon Ryu, $64,005 68-70-72-69 279 Haru Nomura, $45,231 73-67-73-68 281 Amy Anderson, $45,231 70-72-68-71 281 Katherine Kirk, $33,602 73-70-71-68 282 Se Ri Pak, $33,602 68-71-74-69 282 Katie M. Burnett, $33,602 71-69-72-70 282 Cristie Kerr, $33,602 72-66-70-74 282 Christel Boeljon, $26,341 71-70-74-69 284 Shanshan Feng, $26,341 73-71-70-70 284 Julieta Granada, $26,341 74-72-67-71 284 Ariya Jutanugarn, $23,383 73-70-71-71 285 Eun-Hee Ji, $20,448 77-71-72-66 286 Tiffany Joh, $20,448 73-68-77-68 286 Brooke Pancake, $20,448 75-69-73-69 286 Na Yeon Choi, $20,448 75-70-69-72 286 Amelia Lewis, $20,448 77-66-70-73 286 Amy Yang, $17,260 74-73-73-67 287 Lizette Salas, $17,260 73-71-74-69 287 a-So Young Lee 70-70-75-72 287 Azahara Munoz, $17,260 73-70-71-73 287 Paula Reto, $17,260 72-69-73-73 287 Line Vedel, $14,525 76-71-72-69 288 Jenny Shin, $14525 73-72-73-70 288 TV 2 DAY COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPNU Notre Dame at Miami MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 11 a.m. MLB Baltimore at Boston 7 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Atlanta ESPN Cincinnati at Pittsburgh NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 8 p.m. TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 2, Memphis at Oklahoma City 10:30 p.m. TNT Playoffs, rst round, game 2, Golden State at L.A. Clippers NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 3, Pittsburgh at Columbus 9:30 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, game 3, Anaheim at Dallas SOCCER 2:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, West Bromwich at Manchester City SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975. Muhammad Ali also spoke out on Carters behalf, while advertis ing art director George Lois and other celebri ties also worked toward Carters release. With a network of friends and volunteers also advocating for him, Carter eventually won his release from U.S. District Judge H. Lee Sa rokin, who wrote that Carters prosecution had been predicated upon an appeal to rac ism rather than reason, and concealment rather than disclosure. Born on May 6, 1937, into a family of seven children, Carter strug gled with a hereditary speech impediment and was sent to a juve nile reform center at 12 after an assault. He es caped and joined the Army in 1954, experi encing racial segrega tion and learning to box while in West Germany. Carter then commit ted a series of muggings after returning home, spending four years in various state prisons. He began his pro box ing career in 1961 af ter his release, winning 20 of his rst 24 ghts mostly by stoppage. Carter was fairly short for a middleweight at 5-foot-8, but his aggres sion and high punch volume made him ef fective. His shaved head and menacing glower gave him an imposing ring presence, but also con tributed to a menacing aura outside the ring. He was also quoted as joking about killing po lice ofcers in a 1964 story in the Saturday Evening Post which was later cited by Carter as a cause of his troubles with police. Carter boxed regular ly on television at Mad ison Square Garden and overseas in Lon don, Paris and Johan nesburg. Although his career appeared to be on a downswing be fore he was implicated in the murders, Carter was hoping for a second middleweight title shot. Carter and Artis were questioned after being spotted in the area of the murders in Carters white car, which vague ly matched witnesses descriptions. Both cit ed alibis and were re leased, but were arrest ed months later. A case relying largely on the testimony of thieves Al fred Bello and Arthur Bradley resulted in a conviction in June 1967. Carter deed his pris on guards from the rst day of his incarceration, spending time in soli tary connement be cause of it. When I walked into prison, I refused to wear their stripes, Carter said. I refused to eat their food. I refused to work their jobs, and I would have refused to breathe the prisons air if I could have done so. Carter eventually wrote and spoke elo quently about his plight, publishing his autobi ography, The Sixteenth Round, in 1974. Ben et concerts were held for his legal defense. After his release, Car ter moved to Toronto, where he served as the executive director of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convict ed from 1993 to 2005. He received two hon orary doctorates for his work. Director Norman Jew ison made Carters sto ry into a well-reviewed biographical lm, with Washington working closely alongside Carter to capture the boxers transformation and re demption. Washington won a Golden Globe for the role. This man right here is love, Washington said while onstage with Carter at the Gold en Globes ceremony in early 2000. Hes all love. He lost about 7,300 days of his life, and hes love. Hes all love. But the makers of The Hurricane were widely criticized for factual inaccuracies and glossing over oth er parts of Carters story, including his criminal past and a reputation for a violent temper. Giardello sued the lms producers for its depic tion of a racist x in his victory over Carter, who acknowledged Giardel lo deserved the win. Carters weight and activity dwindled during his nal months, but he still advocat ed for prisoners he be lieved to be wrongfully convicted. Carter wrote an opin ion essay for the New York Daily News in Feb ruary, arguing vehe mently for the release of David McCallum, con victed of a kidnapping and murder in 1985. Carter also briey men tioned his health, say ing he was quite literal ly on my deathbed. Now Im looking death straight in the eye, Carter wrote. Hes got me on the ropes, but I wont back down. CARTER FROM PAGE B1 eight. Thats when James got a breather. He returned to tons of breathing room. Chris Andersen had a tip-in for a 12-point lead, Wade made a 3-pointer as the shot clock was winding down with 6:50 left to make it 85-70, and an other score by Anders en pushed the margin to 17. With that, Game 1 was secure. And just for good measure, James drilled a 3 on his rst possession after check ing back in, putting Mi ami up 20. It was a solid rst step for the two-time de fending champions, who lost 14 of their nal 25 games and earned only the No. 2 seed in the East. But James said before the game that the Heat felt like the season was starting anew, and that the playoffs were what matter most. So far, so good. Charlottes opening lineup had four play ers making their rst playoff starts three of them seeing their rst playoff action. It was also the rst nation al-television appear ance this season for the Bobcats, who seemed anything but over whelmed by the mo ment. Before long, they had a nine-point lead be hind Jefferson, who made his rst four shots. But he limped to the bench late in the rst quarter, tugged his left shoe off and began rub bing his heel before wobbling toward the Charlotte locker room. The team said he was bothered by a left plan tar fascia strain the pain of which some times forced him to resort to one-legged jumpers and general ly limping wherever he went. Still, Charlotte led by six midway through the second when the Heat embarked on what be came a 19-2 run. Miami scored the rst 12 in that stretch, and the Heat got a sur prise boost as well. Lit tle-used James Jones came off the bench to score four more late, and the Heat suddenly were up 47-36. Walker made a 3-pointer to beat the rst-half buzzer, draw ing Charlotte within 4942. That started an 11-0 answer by the Bobcats, who scored the rst eight of the third quar ter to reclaim a onepoint lead. And the third stayed close, neither team leading by more than three for the majority of the third. But a quick 7-2 Heat spurt in cluding a nifty drive by Jones, who had exact ly three two-pointers in the entire regular sea son gave Miami a 6661 cushion late in the period. James made a 3-point er with 0.6 seconds left, and it was 72-65 enter ing the fourth. Heat 99, Bobcats 88 CHARLOTTE (88) Kidd-Gilchrist 2-4 1-1 5, McRoberts 6-9 0-0 15, Jef ferson 9-17 0-0 18, Walker 6-15 5-6 20, Henderson 3-9 0-1 6, Zeller 2-3 0-0 4, Neal 7-16 1-2 17, Ridnour 1-5 0-0 2, Douglas-Roberts 0-1 1-2 1, Biyombo 0-0 0-0 0, Tolliver 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 8-12 88. MIAMI (99) James 8-16 7-10 27, Haslem 0-2 2-2 2, Bosh 4-13 3-4 13, Chalmers 3-7 0-0 7, Wade 10-16 2-3 23, Cole 3-5 0-0 7, Lewis 0-2 0-0 0, Allen 0-4 0-0 0, Andersen 3-5 2-4 8, Jones 4-6 2-3 12. Totals 3576 18-26 99. Charlotte 23 19 23 23 88 Miami 19 30 23 27 99 3-Point GoalsCharlotte 8-21 (McRoberts 3-5, Walker 3-6, Neal 2-5, Ridnour 0-1, Douglas-Roberts 0-1, Henderson 0-3), Miami 11-23 (James 4-8, Jones 2-3, Bosh 2-4, Cole 1-1, Wade 1-2, Chalmers 1-2, Allen 0-1, Lewis 0-2). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsChar lotte 50 (Jefferson 10), Miami 46 (Andersen 10). AssistsCharlotte 18 (Walker 6), Miami 14 (Wade 5). Total FoulsCharlotte 17, Miami 12. A,640 (19,600). HEAT FROM PAGE B1 challenged the call and after a 2 minute, 4 sec ond delay the umpires changed the close call to out. New York took a 1-0 lead in the fourth when Gardner was given an RBI double after a chal lenge by Yankees manager Joe Girardi. The um pires rst ruled that Rays right elder Wil My ers had caught Gardners drive at the wall for the third out. The call was overturned following a 2:17 delay after replays clearly showed Myers caught the ball after it hit off the top of the wall. Soriano, who opened the fourth with a dou ble, was on the third and was awarded home on the overturned decision. Tampa Bay tied it at 1 on pinch-hitter Matt Joyces two-out sacrice y in the seventh. The Rays capitalized after second baseman Brian Roberts dropped a throw on a force play earli er in the inning. New York starter Vidal Nuno, in the mix to take the spot of injured starter Ivan Nova, allowed three hits over ve shutout innings. The Yankees put Nova, who was hurt in Saturdays game, on the 15-day disabled list with a partial ulnar col lateral ligament tear in his right elbow that could require surgery. Cesar Ramos, who replaced the injured Matt Moore in the Rays rotation, gave up one run and four hits in ve innings. Moore is sched uled to have elbow ligament replacement sur gery Tuesday. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 to catch Kuchar after the chip but couldnt do it. He missed a 28-foot birdie putt at the 17th hole, then saw his own try at a chip-in birdie slide past the cup. Kuchar nished at 11-under 273 to win $1.044 million and his rst trophy since the Memori al last June. Kuchar has spent a month of Sundays in the thick of things, only to come up short. He was two strokes behind winner Steven Bowditch at the Texas Open on March 30, lost a playoff to Matt Jones 42-yard chip-in on the rst extra hole in Houston the next week, then was tied for the lead at Augusta National last Sunday before four-putting the fourth hole and nishing tied for fth. Donald shot 69 to nish at 10 under and earn his fth top-three nish in his past six appear ances at the RBC Heritage. Ben Martin, who turned pro in 2010, shot 67 to nish tied for third at 9 under with John Huh, who shot 68. At sixth in the world, Kuchar was the high est-ranked player competing the week after the seasons rst major, when most of golfs biggest names were taking a needed break. But Kuchar, smiling all the way, hoped to ride the momentum of his near misses. Sunday nally brought the sunshine the tour nament had lacked all week. Players got the bo nus of easy, softened greens from three days of moisture. PGA FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 11 8 .579 7-3 W-1 6-3 5-5 Toronto 10 9 .526 1 5-5 L-1 3-3 7-6 Baltimore 8 8 .500 1 6-4 L-1 4-4 4-4 Tampa Bay 9 10 .474 2 1 4-6 L-1 6-5 3-5 Boston 8 10 .444 2 1 5-5 W-1 3-5 5-5 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 9 6 .600 5-5 W-2 7-3 2-3 Kansas City 9 8 .529 1 6-4 L-1 6-3 3-5 Minnesota 9 9 .500 1 6-4 W-1 5-4 4-5 Chicago 9 10 .474 2 1 5-5 W-1 6-4 3-6 Cleveland 8 10 .444 2 1 3-7 W-1 4-5 4-5 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 13 5 .722 8-2 W-3 6-3 7-2 Texas 11 8 .579 2 7-3 L-1 9-4 2-4 Los Angeles 8 10 .444 5 1 5-5 L-2 3-6 5-4 Seattle 7 11 .389 6 2 2-8 L-6 2-3 5-8 Houston 5 14 .263 8 5 2-8 L-7 3-7 2-7 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 12 6 .667 7-3 L-1 4-2 8-4 Washington 11 8 .579 1 4-6 W-1 6-4 5-4 New York 9 9 .500 3 1 6-4 W-1 3-6 6-3 Miami 9 10 .474 3 2 4-6 W-3 9-4 0-6 Philadelphia 8 10 .444 4 2 5-5 W-1 4-5 4-5 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 14 5 .737 7-3 W-3 5-4 9-1 St. Louis 11 8 .579 3 6-4 L-1 4-2 7-6 Cincinnati 8 10 .444 5 2 6-4 W-1 4-5 4-5 Pittsburgh 8 11 .421 6 3 2-8 L-3 5-5 3-6 Chicago 5 12 .294 8 5 3-7 L-1 3-6 2-6 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 12 7 .632 6-4 W-2 4-4 8-3 San Francisco 11 8 .579 1 5-5 W-1 5-4 6-4 Colorado 10 10 .500 2 1 5-5 L-1 6-3 4-7 San Diego 9 10 .474 3 2 6-4 L-1 7-6 2-4 Arizona 5 16 .238 8 7 2-8 L-2 1-11 4-5 SATURDAYS GAMES Toronto 5, Cleveland 0 Detroit 5, L.A. Angels 2 Boston 4, Baltimore 2 Kansas City 5, Minnesota 4 Oakland 4, Houston 3 Tampa Bay 16, N.Y. Yankees 1 Miami 7, Seattle 0 Texas 6, Chicago White Sox 3 SATURDAYS GAMES St. Louis 4, Washington 3 Chicago Cubs 8, Cincinnati 4 Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 7 Atlanta 7, N.Y. Mets 5 Miami 7, Seattle 0 L.A. Dodgers 8, Arizona 6 Colorado 3, Philadelphia 1 San Diego 3, San Francisco 1 SUNDAYS GAMES Cleveland 6, Toronto 4 Detroit 2, L.A. Angels 1 Miami 3, Seattle 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 1, 12 innings Minnesota 8, Kansas City 3 Chicago White Sox 16, Texas 2 Oakland 4, Houston 1 Baltimore at Boston, late SUNDAYS GAMES N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 3, 14 innings Miami 3, Seattle 2 Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 2, 14 innings Washington 3, St. Louis 2 Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 2 L.A. Dodgers 4, Arizona 1 Philadelphia 10, Colorado 9 San Francisco 4, San Diego 3 GENE J. PUSKAR / AP Milwaukees Carlos Gomez (27) tries to get past umpire Fieldin Culbreth, center, and Pittsburgh third baseman Josh Harrison (5) to get to Pittsburgh starting pitcher Gerrit Cole in the third inning of Sundays game in Pittsburgh. A dugouts-clearing brawl ensued, with Gomez at the center of the fracas. He was later ejected from the game. TODAYS GAMES Baltimore (W.Chen 2-1) at Boston (Buchholz 0-1), 11:05 a.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-0), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at Washington (Roark 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 1-0) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 0-1), 7:08 p.m. Texas (Darvish 1-0) at Oakland (Straily 1-1), 10:05 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-0), 10:10 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Cincinnati (Leake 2-1) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at Washington (Roark 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Miami (Koehler 2-1) at Atlanta (Teheran 2-1), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lyons 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Mejia 2-0), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (Arroyo 1-1) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-2), 8:05 p.m. San Diego (Cashner 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-0), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 0-3), 8:40 p.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Maholm 0-1), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING : Ellsbury, New York, .365; Colabello, Minne sota, .359; AlRamirez, Chicago, .357; Solarte, New York, .351; Longoria, Tampa Bay, .348. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 18; Bautista, Toronto, 16; Ea ton, Chicago, 15; Trout, Los Angeles, 14; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 14; Donaldson, Oakland, 13; Mauer, Minnesota, 13; AlRamirez, Chicago, 13. RBI: Colabello, Minnesota, 19; Moss, Oakland, 15; Abreu, Chicago, 14; Brantley, Cleveland, 14; Pujols, Los Angeles, 14; AlRamirez, Chicago, 14. HITS: MeCabrera, Toronto, 28; AlRamirez, Chicago, 25; Rios, Texas, 24; Colabello, Minnesota, 23; Ellsbury, New York, 23; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 23; Trout, Los Angeles, 23. DOUBLES: Colabello, Minnesota, 9; SPerez, Kansas City, 7; Solarte, New York, 7; Beltran, New York, 6; AGordon, Kansas City, 6; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Lo ney, Tampa Bay, 6; Rios, Texas, 6; Schoop, Baltimore, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; LMartin, Texas, 2; Stewart, Los Ange les, 2; 39 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Bautista, Toronto, 6; Pujols, Los Angeles, 6; Dozier, Minnesota, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5. STOLEN BASES: Andrus, Texas, 8; Ellsbury, New York, 8; Altuve, Houston, 7; RDavis, Detroit, 6; Dozier, Minne sota, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 4; Florimon, Minnesota, 4; Rios, Texas, 4; Villar, Houston, 4. PITCHING: Buehrle, Toronto, 4-0; Gray, Oakland, 3-0; Gibson, Minnesota, 3-0; Sale, Chicago, 3-0; MPerez, Texas, 3-0; Otero, Oakland, 3-0; FHernandez, Seattle, 3-0. ERA: Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Darvish, Texas, 0.82; Gib son, Minnesota, 0.93; Pineda, New York, 1.00; Ross Jr, Texas, 1.00; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.24. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 39; Scherzer, De troit, 34; Lester, Boston, 29; Sale, Chicago, 29. SAVES: Holland, Kansas City, 6; Axford, Cleveland, 5; Santos, Toronto, 5; TomHunter, Baltimore, 4; Uehara, Boston, 4; Kelley, New York, 4; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 4. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Utley, Philadelphia, .417; Blackmon, Colorado, .415; Freeman, Atlanta, .413; DGordon, Los Angeles, .375; Pagan, San Francisco, .362. RUNS: Braun, Milwaukee, 15; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 14; Freeman, Atlanta, 14; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 14; Stanton, Miami, 14; JUpton, Atlanta, 14; Yelich, Miami, 14; EYoung, New York, 14. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 26; Trumbo, Arizona, 18; AdGonza lez, Los Angeles, 17; McGehee, Miami, 15; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 15; Rendon, Washington, 14; 5 tied at 13. HITS: Blackmon, Colorado, 27; Freeman, Atlanta, 26; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 25; Pagan, San Francisco, 25; Ar Ramirez, Milwaukee, 25; Uribe, Los Angeles, 25; Utley, Philadelphia, 25. DOUBLES: Lucroy, Milwaukee, 9; Goldschmidt, Ari zona, 8; Uribe, Los Angeles, 8; ECabrera, San Diego, 7; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 7; Utley, Philadelphia, 7. TRIPLES: Denora, San Diego, 2; Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 6; Belt, San Fran cisco, 6; Stanton, Miami, 6; Trumbo, Arizona, 6; Braun, Milwaukee, 5; Freeman, Atlanta, 5; CGomez, Milwau kee, 5; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 5; JUpton, Atlanta, 5; Walker, Pittsburgh, 5. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 10; EYoung, New York, 10; Bonifacio, Chicago, 8; Marte, Pittsburgh, 7; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 6; Blackmon, Colorado, 5; Re vere, Philadelphia, 5. PITCHING: Lynn, St. Louis, 4-0; 10 tied at 3. ERA: Harang, Atlanta, 0.70; ESantana, Atlanta, 0.86; Simon, Cincinnati, 0.86; Cashner, San Diego, 1.27; Sa mardzija, Chicago, 1.29; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.46. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 35; Strasburg, Wash ington, 33; Fernandez, Miami, 33; Wainwright, St. Louis, 32; Greinke, Los Angeles, 29; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 28; ClLee, Philadelphia, 28. SAVES: Jansen, Los Angeles, 6; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 6; Street, San Diego, 6; Hawkins, Colorado, 5; Rosen thal, St. Louis, 5; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 5; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 4; RSoriano, Washington, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 4; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 4. Yankees 5, Rays 1 12 innings New York Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 5 1 0 0 SRdrgz lf 3 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 1 0 DeJess ph 1 0 0 0 ISuzuki pr 0 0 0 0 JMolin c 1 0 0 0 Anna ss 0 1 0 1 Zobrist dh 5 0 1 0 Beltran rf 6 0 2 2 Forsyth 2b 6 0 1 0 ASorin dh 5 1 2 1 Longori 3b 5 0 0 0 Teixeir 1b 6 0 2 0 Myers rf 5 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 1 2 0 Gardnr lf 5 1 2 1 Guyer cf 3 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 5 0 0 0 YEscor ss 5 0 2 0 JMrphy c 3 0 0 0 Hanign c 2 0 0 0 McCnn ph-c 2 1 1 0 Joyce ph-lf 1 0 0 1 Totals 45 5 10 5 Totals 41 1 6 1 New York 000 100 000 004 5 Tampa Bay 000 000 100 000 1 EB.Roberts (2), Teixeira (3), Anna (1). DPNew York 1. LOBNew York 9, Tampa Bay 11. 2BA.Soriano (3), Gardner (3), Forsythe (3), Y.Escobar (4). CSI.Su zuki (1), Myers (1). SGuyer. SFJoyce. IP H R ER BB SO New York Nuno 5 3 0 0 2 6 Phelps H,5 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Thornton 0 1 1 0 0 0 Warren BS,2-3 1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Kelley 2 0 0 0 2 4 Claiborne W,1-0 2 1 0 0 1 2 Tampa Bay C.Ramos 5 4 1 1 1 3 B.Gomes 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 0 McGee 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 Jo.Peralta 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour 2 0 0 0 0 1 H.Bell L,0-1 1 1 1 1 2 2 Riefenhauser 2 / 3 1 3 3 2 0 Lueke 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 0 H.Bell pitched to 1 batter in the 12th. Thornton pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Rob Drake; Sec ond, Joe West; Third, Marty Foster. T:23. A,462 (31,042). Reds 8, Cubs 2 Cincinnati Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 5 0 1 0 Bonifac cf 4 1 2 0 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 Sweeny lf 4 1 2 1 Phillips 2b 5 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 2 0 Bruce rf 5 2 2 1 Schrhlt rf 5 0 2 1 Frazier 3b 5 2 2 1 SCastro ss 5 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 4 0 2 1 Olt 3b 4 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Castillo c 5 0 1 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 2 0 0 0 N.Soto ph 1 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 SMrshll p 0 0 0 0 Kalish ph 1 0 1 0 Mesorc c 4 2 3 1 Veras p 0 0 0 0 Cozart ss 5 2 3 3 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Bailey p 3 0 1 1 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 Heisey ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Villanv p 1 0 0 0 Valuen 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 8 15 8 Totals 36 2 11 2 Cincinnati 000 320 300 8 Chicago 000 000 200 2 DPCincinnati 1. LOBCincinnati 10, Chicago 14. 2BBruce (3), Frazier (2), Ludwick (1), Mesoraco (6), Cozart (3), Bonifacio (4), Kalish (2). HRBruce (3), Cozart (1). SBB.Hamilton (7), Bonifacio (9). CS Bonifacio (2). IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Bailey W,1-1 6 6 0 0 3 8 M.Parra 1 / 3 3 2 2 2 1 LeCure 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 S.Marshall 1 2 0 0 0 1 Chicago Villanueva L,1-4 4 2 / 3 9 5 5 1 7 W.Wright 1 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 1 Veras 1 2 3 3 2 2 Russell 1 0 0 0 0 1 Grimm 1 2 0 0 0 1 HBPby Bailey (Sweeney). WPVillanueva. UmpiresHome, Cory Blaser; First, Jim Joyce; Sec ond, Doug Eddings; Third, Marvin Hudson. T:50. A,927 (41,072). White Sox 16, Rangers 2 Chicago Texas ab r h bi ab r h bi Semien 2b 6 2 4 4 Choo lf 1 0 0 1 Gillaspi 3b 5 1 1 3 Andrus ss 2 1 0 0 Abreu 1b 6 2 3 3 Sardins ss 1 0 1 0 A.Dunn dh 6 0 0 0 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 Viciedo rf 5 3 3 2 Fielder 1b 2 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 5 2 2 0 Kzmnff 3b 3 0 0 0 De Aza lf 5 1 1 2 DMrph ph 1 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 3 3 0 Morlnd dh 4 0 0 0 JrDnks cf 4 2 1 2 JoWilsn 2b 1 1 0 0 LMartn cf 2 0 1 0 Choice cf 1 0 0 0 Arencii c 2 0 0 0 Totals 46 16 18 16 Totals 24 2 2 1 Chicago 002 033 107 16 Texas 001 100 000 2 EFlowers (1), Kouzmanoff (2). DPChicago 2. LOB Chicago 6, Texas 4. 2BGillaspie (6), Abreu 2 (5), Viciedo (5), Al.Ramirez (5). 3BSemien (1). HR Abreu (5), Viciedo (1), Jor.Danks (1). SBAl.Ramirez (4), Andrus (9), L.Martin (3). CSChoo (2). SFGil laspie, Choo. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Er.Johnson W,1-1 5 1 2 1 5 2 Belisario 2 0 0 0 0 1 Rienzo 1 1 0 0 1 1 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 1 Texas Ross Jr. L,1-1 5 1 / 3 7 7 4 0 8 Tolleson 1 2 / 3 2 2 2 1 2 Figueroa 1 2 0 0 0 1 Noesi 1 7 7 7 1 1 HBPby Belisario (Choo), by Rienzo (Arencibia). WP Er.Johnson, Ross Jr.. UmpiresHome, James Hoye; First, John Tumpane; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Bob Davidson. T:16. A,402 (48,114). Giants 4, Padres 3 San Francisco San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 4 0 1 2 ECarer ss 4 0 2 0 Pence rf 3 1 0 0 Venale cf 4 1 1 0 Posey c 4 1 1 2 S.Smith lf 2 1 1 0 Morse lf 3 0 0 0 Nady rf 3 0 0 0 Blanco lf 1 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 0 1 2 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Medica 1b 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 4 0 0 0 Grandl ph 1 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 1 0 0 Hundly c 4 1 2 1 BCrwfr ss 2 1 1 0 Amarst 2b 1 0 0 0 Linccm p 1 0 0 0 Denor ph 1 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Vincent p 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Stauffr p 0 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Erlin p 2 0 0 0 ATorrs p 0 0 0 0 Gyorko ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 29 4 3 4 Totals 30 3 7 3 San Francisco 220 000 000 4 San Diego 002 000 100 3 DPSan Francisco 2. LOBSan Francisco 3, San Di ego 5. 2BHeadley (3). HRPosey (4), Hundley (1). CSE.Cabrera (3). SLincecum. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Lincecum W,1-1 6 7 3 3 3 7 Affeldt H,1 1 0 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez H,4 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Casilla H,4 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Romo S,5-5 1 0 0 0 1 0 San Diego Erlin L,1-2 6 3 4 4 3 3 A.Torres 1 0 0 0 1 0 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 1 Stauffer 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lincecum pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WPLincecum, Romo. UmpiresHome, Mike DiMuro; First, Hunter Wendelst edt; Second, Tom Woodring; Third, Gabe Morales. T:59. A,035 (42,302). Athletics 4, Astros 1 Houston Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Crisp cf 5 1 0 0 Fowler cf 2 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 3 2 2 0 JCastro c 3 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 3 3 Springr rf 4 0 1 0 Moss 1b 3 0 1 0 Krauss 1b 3 0 0 0 Barton 1b 0 0 0 0 Guzmn ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Cespds lf 2 0 0 0 Carter dh 4 0 0 0 Gentry lf 1 0 0 0 Hoes lf 4 0 0 0 Callasp dh 4 0 1 0 MGnzlz 3b 4 1 2 1 Reddck rf 4 0 1 0 Villar ss 4 0 0 0 Jaso c 3 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 4 0 2 0 Totals 33 1 5 1 Totals 33 4 10 3 Houston 000 100 000 1 Oakland 200 000 20x 4 ELowrie (3), Donaldson (5). DPHouston 1. LOB Houston 9, Oakland 9. 2BAltuve (3), Donaldson 2 (7), Reddick (1), Sogard (2). HRMa.Gonzalez (1), Donaldson (4). SBAltuve (8), Fowler (1). CSAl tuve (1). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Peacock L,0-2 5 5 2 2 3 4 Williams 3 5 2 1 1 1 Oakland J.Chavez W,1-0 6 4 1 1 3 6 Ji.Johnson H,2 2 / 3 1 0 0 1 0 Doolittle H,5 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Gregerson S,3-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 PBJ.Castro. UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher; First, Seth Buckmin ster; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Mike Winters. T:54. A,382 (35,067). Indians 6, Blue Jays 4 Toronto Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 5 1 2 1 Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 4 1 2 0 Swisher 1b 3 0 1 1 Bautist rf 3 1 1 1 Kipnis 2b 3 1 0 0 Encrnc dh 4 0 0 0 CSantn c 3 1 0 0 Frncsc 1b 3 0 1 1 Brantly lf 3 2 2 2 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 1 ACarer ss 2 1 0 0 Rasms cf 4 0 0 0 DvMrp rf 4 0 1 3 Thole c 4 1 2 0 Raburn dh 3 0 0 0 Goins 2b 2 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 2 1 0 0 Navarr ph 1 0 1 0 Diaz pr 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 27 6 5 6 Toronto 000 310 000 4 Cleveland 010 103 10x 6 LOBToronto 9, Cleveland 4. 2BReyes (1), Brantley (4), Dav.Murphy (4). HRBrantley (3). SBMe.Cabrera (3), Bourn (2). CSKipnis (1). SGoins. SFSwisher. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Morrow 5 3 2 2 2 6 Loup L,1-1 BS,1-1 2 / 3 1 3 3 3 0 Wagner 2 / 3 1 1 1 1 0 Cecil 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Happ 1 0 0 0 0 0 Cleveland Carrasco 5 2 / 3 6 4 4 3 5 Outman W,3-0 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Shaw H,4 1 0 0 0 0 1 Allen H,4 1 0 0 0 1 0 Axford S,6-7 1 2 0 0 1 1 Morrow pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa; First, CB Bucknor; Sec ond, Tripp Gibson; Third, Dale Scott. T:55. A,716 (42,487). Marlins 3, Mariners 2 Seattle Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Almont cf 4 0 0 0 Yelich lf 4 1 1 0 Blmqst 3b 4 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 2 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 2 0 Stanton rf 3 1 0 0 Hart rf 4 1 2 0 McGeh 3b 3 0 1 0 BMiller pr 0 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 1 1 1 Ackley lf 3 0 0 1 Hchvrr ss 2 0 0 1 Smoak 1b 2 0 1 1 Solano 2b 4 0 1 1 Frnkln ss 3 0 0 0 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 Buck c 2 0 1 0 Slowey p 1 0 0 0 MSndrs ph 1 0 0 0 RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Maurer p 1 0 0 0 Caminr p 0 0 0 0 Leone p 0 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0 Romer ph 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 0 0 0 0 Seager ph 1 0 0 0 JeBakr ph 1 0 0 0 Farqhr p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Furush p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Wlhlms p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 2 6 2 Totals 27 3 4 3 Seattle 010 100 000 2 Miami 000 010 02x 3 DPSeattle 1. LOBSeattle 6, Miami 7. 2BCano (3), Hart 2 (3), Yelich (5). CSCano (1). SMaurer. SF Ackley, Smoak, Hechavarria. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Maurer 4 1 / 3 2 1 1 2 4 Leone 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 1 2 Beimel H,2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Farquhar H,2 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Furbush H,5 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Wilhelmsen L,0-1 BS,2-2 1 0 1 1 2 0 Miami Slowey 5 3 2 2 0 3 Caminero 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Da.Jennings 1 / 3 1 0 0 2 1 Marmol 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 M.Dunn W,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cishek S,3-3 1 1 0 0 1 2 Furbush pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Ed Hickox; First, Lance Barrett; Sec ond, Dana DeMuth; Third, Toby Basner. T:58. A,228 (37,442). Nationals 3, Cardinals 2 St. Louis Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Span cf 5 0 1 1 Jay rf 4 0 1 0 Harper lf 4 0 1 0 Craig lf 4 0 1 0 Werth rf 3 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 1 2 0 LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 0 YMolin c 4 0 1 0 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 JhPerlt ss 4 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 5 0 1 1 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 4 1 3 1 CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Loaton c 5 0 3 0 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 Strasrg p 1 0 0 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 Walters ph 1 0 0 0 Roinsn ph 1 0 0 0 Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Maness p 0 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 2 1 0 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 SMiller p 2 0 1 1 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 0 0 0 0 Descals 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 7 1 Totals 37 3 11 3 St. Louis 010 010 000 2 Washington 000 000 201 3 Two outs when winning run scored. EM.Carpenter (4). DPWashington 1. LOBSt. Louis 5, Washington 17. 2BMa.Adams 2 (8), S.Miller (1). SBHarper (1). SFSpan. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis S.Miller 5 1 / 3 4 0 0 5 7 Choate H,3 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 C.Martinez BS,1-1 1 4 2 2 0 0 Siegrist 2 / 3 1 0 0 1 1 Neshek 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Maness L,0-1 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 1 Washington Strasburg 6 5 2 2 1 9 Stammen 1 0 0 0 0 0 Blevins 1 2 0 0 0 2 R.Soriano W,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby S.Miller (Werth). UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson; First, Bill Miller; Sec ond, Vic Carapazza; Third, Adam Hamari. T:18. A,653 (41,408). SEE BOXES | B4

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Editors Note: Saturdays nal round of the LPGA LOTTE Championship was not complet ed in time for Sundays edition. KAITLIN SAWYER Associated Press KAPOLEI, Hawaii Michelle Wie ral lied from four strokes back entering the day to shoot a 5-under 67 on Saturday and win the LPGA LOTTE Champi onship. The 24-year-old American nished at 14-under 274 after com ing into the nal round trailing third-round leader Angela Stanford by four shots after Fri days play. It was Wies third career victory on the LPGA Tour, and rst since taking the CN Canadian Womens Open in 2010 snap ping a 79-event winless drought. And, Wie did it at home. Im just having fun out there, said Wie, who grew up in Honolu lu. I was out there and nervous. Every time I felt nervous out there, I was looking around, I felt there was no place Id rather be. Stanford had her worst round of the tour nament, shooting a 1-over 73 that put her at 12-under 276 and two shots behind Wie. Top-ranked Inbee Park nished third with an 11-under 277. Today, just didnt make the putts that Ive been making, Stan ford said. I wasnt hit ting it great today. Just misclubbed a couple of times. Just didnt make good decisions. Wie came to LOTTE and her home state of Hawaii coming off a runner-up nish two weeks ago in the Kraft Nabisco Championship when she closed with a 71 for her best position of the season. The highlight of this week was to come back home, Wie said. There wasnt just one mo ment. From the rst tee shot that I made to the last putt, the aloha that I felt from everyone was unbelievable. Stanford, the lead er after the second and third rounds at breezy Ko Olina, came out strong with a birdie on the par -4 third hole to set herself up at 14-un der early in the day. A bogey for Stanford and a birdie for Wie on the par-4 sixth closed the gap to within a stroke. The par-3 eighth brought Stanford, Wie and South Koreas Hyo Joo Kim to tie at 12 un der. A birdie for Wie on the par-3 12th gave her the outright lead, and she gave a small trium phant st pump to the crowd. I really think a lot of times, they willed the ball in, Wie said of the fans. I give a lot of cred it to them this week. Another birdie on the par-5 13th put Wie two strokes ahead of twoday leader Stanford and three strokes ahead of Kim. Stanford and Kim were unable to close that gap as Wie won for the rst time on Ameri can soil. Shes been playing great, Stanford said. Shes having a great year, so it was bound to happen. I just hap pened to be the one that caught the buzz saw. Trade winds contin ued to challenge golfers all day, gusting upward of 20 mph, according to the National Weather Service. Well, my caddy isnt one for pep talks, but he gave a good one today, Wie said. He said, Its windy out there today, but play your game, and thats really what I did. I didnt try to force anything. I had a num ber in my head that I thought I needed to shoot, and I got it. Kim came in fourth with 1-under 71 for 10-under 278 overall. Wie shoots 67, wins LPGA LOTTE Championship EUGENE TANNER / AP Michelle Wie watches her drive off the second tee during Saturdays nal round of the LPGA LOTTE Championship at Ko Olina Golf Club in Kapolei, Hawaii. RAUL DOMINGUEZ Associated Press SAN ANTONIO Tim Duncan scored 27 points, and the San An tonio Spurs held the Dallas Mavericks to one eld goal in the nal seven minutes to rally for a 90-85 victory Sun day in Game 1 of their rst-round playoff se ries. The Mavericks also went scoreless for 5 minutes during that stretch, their lone eld goal coming as time ex pired. Tony Parker had 21 points, and Manu Gi nobili added 17. Kawhi Leonard had 11 points and 10 rebounds and Tiago Splitter pulled down 11 rebounds for top-seeded San Anto nio, which has won 10 straight against Dallas. Devin Harris scored 19 points for the Maver icks, who nearly pulled off a huge upset. The Spurs had in sisted that what hap pens in the regular sea son doesnt matter, and they were proven right for much of the game much to the home fans dismay. Absent were the crisp passing, aggressive defense and 3-point shooting that made for the leagues best record. San Antonio returned to its winning formu la over the nal seven minutes, taking an 8681 lead with a 15-0 run. Splitter tied the game with about ve minutes remaining, rolling to the basket off a screen for an easy layup off a pass from Parker. The All-Star point guard then drove the lane for a layup and drained a 13-foot jump er, which he punctuat ed with a loud scream after Dallas called time out with 2:45 to go. Duncan, wearing a heavy brace on his left knee, walked off the court gingerly with 3:24 remaining in the third quarter after banging knees with Ellis. He did not get up as he cus tomarily does during a timeout to greet his teammates. Duncan later left the court, followed close ly by trainer Will Seve ning and team doctor Dr. David Schmidt, re turning a minute lat er limping slightly less, and he played big down the stretch. NOTES: Referee Joey Crawford screamed twice at a pair of scoring ofcials during a time out, telling them at one point to do their jobs. Spurs 90, Mavs 85 DALLAS (85) Marion 4-11 0-0 8, Nowitzki 4-14 3-4 11, Dalembert 1-2 0-0 2, Calderon 3-9 0-0 7, Ellis 4-14 3-4 11, Harris 8-16 0-0 19, Carter 5-11 0-0 10, Blair 0-0 0-0 0, Crowder 2-3 0-0 6, Wright 4-5 3-5 11. Totals 35-85 9-13 85. SAN ANTONIO (90) Leonard 4-11 3-4 11, Duncan 12-20 3-5 27, Splitter 3-6 2-4 8, Parker 9-16 3-3 21, Green 0-2 0-0 0, Gi nobili 4-10 6-6 17, Belinelli 0-4 0-0 0, Diaw 2-8 0-0 4, Mills 1-4 0-0 2, Bonner 0-0 0-0 0, Ayres 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-81 17-22 90. Dallas 12 32 21 20 85 San Antonio 21 22 22 25 90 3-Point GoalsDallas 6-18 (Harris 3-7, Crowder 2-2, Calderon 1-2, Nowitzki 0-1, Marion 0-2, Ellis 0-2, Carter 0-2), San Antonio 3-17 (Ginobili 3-6, Diaw 0-1, Parker 0-1, Green 0-1, Belinelli 0-2, Mills 0-3, Leonard 0-3). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsDallas 44 (Dalembert, Nowitzki 8), San Antonio 61 (Splitter 11). AssistsDallas 15 (Harris 5), San Antonio 14 (Parker 6). Total FoulsDallas 19, San Antonio 16. A,581 (18,797). GOLF Mets 4, Braves 3 14 innings Atlanta New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 6 1 3 0 EYong lf 6 1 0 0 BUpton cf 6 1 1 1 Grndrs rf 6 0 0 1 Fremn 1b 5 0 1 1 DWrght 3b 6 1 4 1 J.Upton lf 6 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 6 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 6 0 1 0 CYoung cf 5 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 5 0 1 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 Smmns ss 6 0 0 0 dArnad ph-c 1 0 0 0 Laird c 1 0 0 0 Duda 1b 5 1 2 1 Pstrnck pr 0 0 0 0 Recker c 6 0 1 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 Quntnll ss 1 0 0 0 R.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 ABrwn ph 1 0 0 0 Schlssr p 1 0 1 0 Frnswr p 0 0 0 0 Hale p 2 1 0 0 Niwnhs cf 1 1 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 1 0 Wheelr p 2 0 0 1 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Satin ph 1 0 0 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Germn p 0 0 0 0 Gattis ph-c 3 0 0 0 Rice p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 Tejada ph-ss 2 0 1 0 Totals 49 3 10 2 Totals 49 4 9 4 Atlanta 000 030 000 000 00 3 New York 110 001 000 000 01 4 Two outs when winning run scored. EUggla 2 (5), J.Upton (2), Granderson (1). DPAt lanta 2, New York 2. LOBAtlanta 9, New York 11. 2BHeyward (2), B.Upton (2), Freeman (7). 3BJ. Upton (1). SBDuda (1). CSHeyward (1). STejada. SFGranderson. IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta Hale 6 6 3 2 2 5 Thomas 1 1 0 0 0 0 D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 2 Avilan 1 1 0 0 0 1 Varvaro 1 1 0 0 0 2 Schlosser L,0-1 3 2 / 3 0 1 1 2 1 New York Wheeler 6 6 3 3 3 6 Germen 1 / 3 2 0 0 0 0 Rice 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 C.Torres 2 0 0 0 1 2 Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 1 Matsuzaka 3 0 0 0 1 5 Valverde W,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Schlosser (Duda). WPSchlosser. UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Eric Cooper. T:37. A,131 (41,922). Twins 8, Royals 3 Minnesota Kansas City ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 6 1 3 0 Aoki rf 5 0 2 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 0 0 Infante 2b 5 0 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 2 3 2 Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 0 Colaell rf 4 0 1 1 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 Hrmnn rf 1 0 0 0 Hayes c 0 0 0 0 Kubel lf 4 1 1 1 AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Pinto dh 3 2 1 1 BButler dh 4 0 2 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 2 2 Mostks 3b 4 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 4 1 0 0 Maxwll cf 4 1 2 0 EEscor ss 4 0 2 1 AEscor ss 3 2 2 2 Totals 38 8 13 8 Totals 37 3 11 3 Minnesota 200 120 300 8 Kansas City 000 010 200 3 EVentura (2). DPMinnesota 1, Kansas City 2. LOBMinnesota 11, Kansas City 8. 2BPlouffe 2 (7), K.Suzuki (3), Maxwell (1), A.Escobar (5). 3BPlouffe (1). HRPinto (4), A.Escobar (1). CSColabello (2). IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Hughes W,1-1 6 9 3 3 1 3 Duensing 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Fien 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 2 Kansas City Ventura L,1-1 4 6 4 4 4 6 Coleman 1 1 1 1 0 1 Marks 2 4 3 3 3 2 Mariot 2 2 0 0 1 2 Ventura pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Hughes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. WPVentura. UmpiresHome, Brian Gorman; First, Jim Wolf; Sec ond, David Rackley; Third, Bill Welke. T:08. A,710 (37,903). Tigers 2, Angels 1 Los Angeles Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Shuck lf 4 0 0 0 RDavis lf 4 0 0 0 Trout cf 3 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 2 1 0 0 Pujols 1b 4 1 1 0 MiCarr dh 3 0 0 0 IStewrt 3b 4 0 1 0 VMrtnz 1b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 3 1 TrHntr rf 4 0 2 0 Freese dh 3 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 2 1 0 0 Ibanez ph 1 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 1 1 Conger c 3 0 0 0 Avila c 3 0 0 0 Boesch rf 2 0 1 0 AnRmn ss 2 0 2 0 Cowgill ph-rf 1 0 1 0 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 7 1 Totals 28 2 5 1 Los Angeles 100 000 000 1 Detroit 100 001 00x 2 EConger 2 (2), H.Santiago (1), Trout (1). DPLos Angeles 1, Detroit 1. LOBLos Angeles 5, Detroit 8. 2BBoesch (1). SBTor.Hunter (1), An.Romine 2 (3). CSH.Kendrick (2). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles H.Santiago L,0-3 5 2 / 3 2 2 0 5 7 Jepsen 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Kohn 1 1 0 0 1 1 J.Smith 1 1 0 0 0 1 Detroit Porcello W,2-1 7 5 1 1 1 4 Krol H,4 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Alburquerque H,2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Nathan S,3-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 UmpiresHome, Brian Knight; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T:28. A,921 (41,681). Late Saturday Rays 16, Yankees 1 New York Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 3 0 1 0 DeJess cf-lf 6 0 0 0 SSizmr 1b-3b 1 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-ss 5 3 3 0 Gardnr lf-cf 4 0 0 0 Joyce dh 4 2 2 0 Beltran dh 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b 3 2 2 4 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 Guyer cf 1 0 0 0 McCnn c 2 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 3 2 1 JMrphy ph-c 1 0 0 0 Myers rf 4 4 3 4 ASorin rf-lf 3 1 1 0 SRdrgz lf-2b 5 0 0 0 Solarte 3b-ss 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 KJhnsn 1b-lf-1b 3 0 1 1 Forsyth 3b 1 0 0 0 BRorts 2b 3 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 2 3 6 Anna ss-p 3 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 3 1 Totals 40 16 16 15 New York 000 010 000 1 Tampa Bay 013 244 02x 16 ESolarte (1). LOBNew York 1, Tampa Bay 6. 2BK. Johnson (3), Zobrist (2), Joyce (4), Loney (6), Myers (3). HRLongoria (2), Myers 2 (2), Hanigan 2 (3). CS Ellsbury (2). SFLongoria. IP H R ER BB SO New York Nova L,2-2 4 8 8 8 1 4 Daley 1 1 / 3 5 6 4 2 0 Betances 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 2 3 Anna 1 3 2 2 0 0 Tampa Bay Archer W,2-1 6 2 / 3 3 1 1 0 4 Riefenhauser 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Lueke 1 0 0 0 0 2 Nova pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Clint Fagan; Sec ond, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West. T:15. A,159 (31,042). Padres 3, Giants 1 San Francisco San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 ECarer ss 4 0 2 1 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 Venale rf 4 1 2 0 Posey c 4 0 0 0 Grandl c 4 0 0 0 Morse lf 3 1 1 1 S.Smith lf 3 1 2 0 Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 Denor ph-lf 0 0 0 1 Belt 1b 3 0 1 0 Headly 3b 4 0 1 0 Arias 2b 2 0 1 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 0 Blanco ph 1 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 3 0 1 1 Adrianz 2b 0 0 0 0 Amarst cf 3 1 1 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Stults p 1 0 0 0 THudsn p 2 0 1 0 Vincent p 0 0 0 0 HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Medica ph 1 0 0 0 Huff p 0 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Benoit p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 30 3 9 3 San Francisco 000 010 000 1 San Diego 010 010 01x 3 ET.Hudson (1). DPSan Francisco 1, San Diego 1. LOBSan Francisco 2, San Diego 5. 2BVenable (4). 3BE.Cabrera (1). HRMorse (3). SBHeadley (1), Alonso (2). SDenora, Stults. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco T.Hudson L,2-1 7 8 2 2 0 4 Huff 1 / 3 1 1 1 0 0 Machi 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 San Diego Stults W,1-2 6 3 1 1 0 2 Vincent H,1 1 0 0 0 0 3 Thayer H,3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Benoit S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Gabe Morales; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Tom Woodring. T:36. A,405 (42,302). Dodgers 8, Diamondbacks 6 Arizona Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi GParra cf 5 1 0 1 DGordn 2b 4 1 2 0 Hill 2b 4 0 2 0 Crwfrd lf 4 1 1 0 Gldsch 1b 5 2 1 2 HRmrz ss 4 1 0 1 Monter c 3 1 1 1 AdGnzl 1b 4 2 2 2 C.Ross rf 4 0 0 0 Kemp cf 4 1 2 2 Prado 3b 4 0 2 2 Ethier rf 4 1 1 3 Trumo lf 4 1 2 0 Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 Owings ss 3 0 1 0 Butera c 4 0 0 0 Bolsngr p 2 1 1 0 Haren p 2 1 1 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 BWilsn p 0 0 0 0 Cahill p 1 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 Campn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 10 6 Totals 34 8 9 8 Arizona 004 000 020 6 Los Angeles 000 350 00x 8 EPrado (4), Goldschmidt (2), Uribe (2), H.Ramirez (5). DPLos Angeles 1. LOBArizona 6, Los Angeles 3. 2BMontero (3), Prado (5), Owings (3), Kemp (3). HREthier (2). SBKemp (2). SOwings. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Bolsinger L,0-1 4 7 7 6 1 5 O.Perez 1 2 1 0 0 2 Cahill 3 0 0 0 0 4 Los Angeles Haren W,3-0 7 1 / 3 7 5 2 0 5 B.Wilson 2 / 3 2 1 1 1 1 Jansen S,6-8 1 1 0 0 0 1 Bolsinger pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBPby Haren (Hill). UmpiresHome, Jeff Nelson; First, Marcus Pattillo; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Scott Barry. T:48. A,541 (56,000). Braves 7, Mets 5 Atlanta New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 5 1 1 0 EYong lf 2 2 0 0 BUpton cf 4 1 1 0 DnMrp 2b 5 2 3 0 Fremn 1b 4 1 3 1 DWrght 3b 5 1 3 2 J.Upton lf 5 2 3 3 Grndrs rf 5 0 0 0 Gattis c 5 0 0 0 CYoung cf 5 0 3 2 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Duda 1b 4 0 1 0 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 dArnad c 5 0 2 1 Uggla 2b 3 0 1 0 Tejada ss 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 0 Colon p 2 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 1 0 Niwnhs ph 1 0 0 0 ESantn p 3 1 0 0 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 DCrpnt p 0 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 1 0 0 Quntnll ph 1 0 0 0 Laird c 0 0 0 0 Totals 38 7 11 4 Totals 39 5 13 5 Atlanta 002 010 013 7 New York 100 000 022 5 EB.Upton (1), Colon (1), Valverde (2). DPNew York 1. LOBAtlanta 7, New York 11. 2BFreeman (6), D.Wright (2), C.Young (1), Duda (1). HRJ.Upton (5). SBJ.Upton (2), J.Schafer (2), E.Young (10), C.Young (1). CSE.Young (1). IP H R ER BB SO Atlanta E.Santana W,2-0 7 6 1 1 2 7 D.Carpenter H,5 1 4 2 2 0 0 Kimbrel 2 / 3 3 2 2 1 1 J.Walden S,1-1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 New York Colon L,1-3 7 8 3 3 1 6 Matsuzaka 1 2 1 1 1 1 Valverde 1 1 3 0 1 1 HBPby Kimbrel (E.Young). WPE.Santana, Mat suzaka. UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Mark Wegner; Second, Pat Hoberg; Third, Tom Hallion. T:13. A,476 (41,922). Brewers 8, Pirates 7 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 5 0 0 0 Marte lf 5 0 2 0 Segura ss 5 2 2 0 RMartn c 5 1 1 0 Braun rf 5 4 3 3 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 1 ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 1 PAlvrz 3b 4 1 0 0 Lucroy c 5 1 3 2 Tabata rf 5 1 2 1 KDavis lf 5 0 1 1 I.Davis 1b 3 2 2 0 MrRynl 1b 3 1 1 1 NWalkr 2b 3 0 1 1 Weeks 2b 2 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4 1 1 2 Gennett ph-2b 1 0 0 0 WRdrg p 1 0 0 0 Garza p 2 0 0 0 Snider ph 1 0 1 2 Bianchi ph 1 0 1 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ph 1 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 EHerrr ph 1 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0 GSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Totals 39 8 12 8 Totals 37 7 11 7 Milwaukee 012 110 102 8 Pittsburgh 010 501 000 7 EWeeks (2). DPMilwaukee 2, Pittsburgh 1. LOB Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 7. 2BSegura (3), Lucroy 3 (9), A.McCutchen (6), I.Davis (2). HRBraun 2 (5), Mar.Reynolds (4). SBMarte (7). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Garza 5 8 6 5 3 2 Wooten 1 1 / 3 2 1 1 0 3 Duke 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Henderson W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh W.Rodriguez 4 6 4 4 1 3 Morris 2 2 1 1 1 0 Watson H,4 1 2 1 1 0 1 Melancon H,7 1 0 0 0 0 2 Grilli L,0-1 BS,2-6 1 2 2 2 0 1 HBPby Fr.Rodriguez (P.Alvarez), by Grilli (Ar.Ramirez). WPMorris. UmpiresHome, Jim Reynolds; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Sean Barber. T:04. A,490 (38,362). Ma rlins 7, Mariners 0 Seattle Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Almont cf 4 0 0 0 Yelich lf 3 2 1 0 BMiller ss 3 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 1 2 4 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 1 1 MSndrs rf 3 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 3 0 0 0 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 JeBakr 1b 4 0 0 0 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss 4 2 3 0 Ackley lf 3 0 1 0 Solano 2b 4 1 2 0 Zunino c 3 0 1 0 HAlvrz p 2 1 1 1 Elias p 2 0 0 0 Farqhr p 0 0 0 0 Frnkln 3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 0 2 0 Totals 31 7 10 6 Seattle 000 000 000 0 Miami 001 104 01x 7 EAlmonte (1). DPSeattle 1, Miami 1. LOBSeattle 1, Miami 8. 2BZunino (3), Yelich (4), Hechavarria (4). HROzuna (3). SH.Alvarez 2. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Elias L,1-2 5 2 / 3 8 6 4 5 5 Farquhar 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 2 Rodney 1 2 1 1 0 1 Miami H.Alvarez W,1-2 9 2 0 0 0 4 WPRodney. PBZunino. BalkElias. UmpiresHome, Toby Basner; First, Ed Hickox; Sec ond, Lance Barrett; Third, Dana DeMuth. T:20. A,003 (37,442). This date in baseball April 21 1910 The Cleveland Indians played their rst game at League Park and lost to the Detroit Tigers 5-0, in front of 19,867. 1955 The Brooklyn Dodgers beat the Philadelphia Phillies 14-4 at Ebbets Field for their 10th consecu tive victory from the start of the season a major league record that lasted until 1981. 1967 After 737 consecutive games, the Dodgers were rained out for the rst time since moving to Los Angeles. The St. Louis Cardinals were scheduled. 1982 The Atlanta Braves beat the Cincinnati Reds 4-3 for their 13th straight victory. 1984 In his second start since August 1982, Montreal pitcher David Palmer threw ve perfect in nings against the St. Louis Cardinals in a 4-0 victory stopped by rain. 1987 The Milwaukee Brewers 13-game winning streak from the start of the season ended with a 7-1 loss to the Chicago White Sox. Milwaukee shared the major league streak of 13 straight, set by the Atlanta Braves in 1982. 1994 Eddie Murray set a major league record with his 11th switch-hit home run game as the Cleveland Indians beat the Minnesota Twins 10-6. 1996 Brady Anderson led off the rst inning with a home run for the fourth straight game for Balti more. The Texas Rangers overcame that homer, beat ing the Orioles 9-6. BOXES FROM PAGE B3 Duncan scores 27 points, Spurs beat Mavs ERIC GAY / AP San Antonios Tony Parker (9) walks past Dallas Monta Ellis (11) as he reacts to scoring a three-point shot during the second half of Game 1 of an opening-round playoff series on Sunday in San Antonio.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 21, 2014 HEALTH: Man uses metal scraps to pay for insurance / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LADY LAKE Essential Tremor Support Group to meet Wednesday The Essential Tremor Support Group meets at 2 p.m., Wednesday at St. Timothy Church ministry build ing, 1351 Paige Place, in Lady Lake. Guests can share with others who have the disease, learn methods of coping, get information about medications, helpful hints and un derstanding. The guest speaker is Susan Schwager, CVS pharmacist. Call 352-787-3866 or email kstay lor62@usa2net.net for information. ORLANDO Disability Employment Expo scheduled for May 2 The Agency for Persons with Disabilities is hosting the fourth an nual Disability Employment Expo, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 2, at the Fashion Square Mall, State Road 50 in Orlando. Employers will host sessions on job opportunities, critiqu ing resumes and doing effec tive interviews. Some of the em ployers scheduled to participate are Lockheed Martin, Hilton Worldwide, Orlando Veterans Administration Medical Center, Krystal Company and Walgreens Distribution Center. This event is open to those with all types of disabilities. For information or to register, call 321-474-0015 or 1-866-273-2273, email maryjane.wysocki@apdcares. org, or go to APDcares.org. THE VILLAGES Oncologist to speak about prostate cancer treatment Dr. Patrick Acevedo, an oncolo gist with Florida Cancer Specialists in The Villages, will be the guest speaker at the Prostate Cancer Education and Support Group meeting at 7 p.m. May 7, at the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr. in The Villages. Dr. Acevedo will speak about re cent developments in the treatment of prostate cancer. Meetings are free and open to men, their spouses and family members. Call Dan Bard at 352-2599433 for information. LAKE COUNTY Health Department offers basic physicals The Florida Department of Health in Lake County is offering basic physicals on an ongoing basis for children from 3-18 for school, camp, sports and other activities. The Health Department requires that any student enrolling in a Florida school for grades K-12 have documentation of a physical exam in the last year. The physicals will be offered by appointment Monday through Friday at the Umatilla Health Center, at 249 E. Collins St. The cost is $25. A copy of a participants immu nization record is required, and all children must be accompanied by an adult. For information or to schedule an appointment, call the Umatilla Health Center at 352-771-5500. MALCOLM RITTER AP Science Writer NEW YORK A small study of ca sual marijuana smokers has turned up evidence of changes in the brain, a possible sign of trouble ahead, re searchers say. The young adults who volunteered for the study were not dependent on pot, nor did they show any marijua na-related problems. What we think we are seeing here is a very early indication of what be comes a problem later on with pro longed use, things like lack of focus and impaired judgment, said Dr. Hans Breiter, a study author. Longer-term studies will be need ed to see if such brain changes cause Study finds signs of brain changes in pot smokers AP FILE PHOTO A grower holds a marijuana plant, in Montevideo, Uruguay. AMY WILSON The Orange County Register W orship requires neither proper place nor prop er clothing. For believ ers, the same could be said of Gods grace. It requires no invitation and is necessitated by no particular Sunday morning ritual. It can sometimes show itself ostenta tiously on a Monday morning or slyly reveal itself entirely un bidden on a Thursday at 3:15. And sometimes it can show up when you are in an uncom fortable yoga position where you started by doing a push-up, then your left knee dropped to the oor near your right hip and your forearms lowered to the mat and then your right leg fell to the oor and your right foots circulation is about done and youre supposed to be lifting your chest up at the same time. And there it is. What every one here has come for, real ly. That moment that Im with God by myself, explains Court ney Scantlin, a working mother of two from Lake Forest, Calif., who is not so unfamiliar with Gods grace that she is blinded by the fact that she is also mul titasking while doing Holy Yoga at Mariners Church in Mission Viejo, Calif., on a Tuesday night. But, say its adherents, Holy Yoga is hardly an attempt to make worship more convenient for the overtaxed 21st-century tness-minded set. Imagined Yoga and prayer combine for full-body worship experience KEVIN SULLIVAN / MCT ABOVE: Brooke Thompson, center, leads a Holy Yoga class at Mariners Church in Mission Viejo, Calif. Our sole purpose is to combine world-class yoga with a Christ-honoring experience that offers an opportunity to believers and non-believers alike to authentically connect with God, the groups mission statement says. BELOW: Attendees at a Holy Yoga class participate in Mariners Church. In our culture, we like to compartmentalize our lives. Books are for the mind. Spirituality is for church. Fitness is in the gym. You can let them out of their boxes here. You can place them all in one bowl. Brooke Thompson SEE YOGA | C2 SEE CHANGES | C2

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Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com 10 years ago by Brooke Boon, a yogi before she was a Chris tian, its mission statement is designed to put a halt to those Christian groups that might nd the traditional Eastern practice of yoga somehow suspect as a vehicle for Christian reverence. Holy Yoga, the statement reads, is experiential worship specically created to deep en your connection to Christ. Our sole purpose is to com bine world-class yoga with a Christ-honoring experience that offers an opportunity to believ ers and non-believers alike to authentically connect with God. We do this by integrating His Word, prayer, worship and the physical practice of yoga to con temporary and Christian mu sic. With their hair banded, bar retted and bandeaued into place, 17 women of varying ages join two brave men for 90 min utes of this unique brand of yoga led by instructor Brooke Thompson in a room thats painted to resemble the interior of a submarine. Sufce to know, its the exact exercise experience youd expect if you know yoga. Tonight, well downward dog, strike the warrior and tree pos es, form a bridge with our bod ies and make like a pigeon see circulation loss, above. All while Thompson exhorts and leads like a normal instruc tor. Except for this, for starters: The class begins with a prayer. Thompson is bouncy and fun, t and encouraging. She was once a runner. I was run ning away from my house, the mother of three daughters laughs. Thompson says her rst Holy Yoga session was one she went to reluctantly. Yoga looked boring to me. It turned out to be the most powerful experience of wor ship Id ever had, Thompson says now. I cried through half of it. When I got back in the car, I told my sister-in-law who went with me I wanted to become an instructor. Within two weeks, shed signed up. Within two months, shed taken daily train ing and was ready to teach a be ginning-level class. She calls this full-body wor ship, but is emphatic that she is not a pastor. Im not interpreting Scrip ture, Thompson wants made clear. I give a life story. Or I read a devotional. Sometimes, when we strike a pose, I sug gest that each of us thank God for 10 things instead of count ing to 10. I remind them not to compare themselves to others, that God accepts us as we are. I remind them to leave things on their mat. I also tell them that in a balance pose, chose a focus point that does not move. They can take that with them in life. Focus on God, the one who does not move. The yoga is gentle at rst, then more intense, if youre willing. The breathing is rhythmic. In our culture, Thompson said earlier, we like to compart mentalize our lives. Books are for the mind. Spirituality is for church. Fitness is in the gym. You can let them out of their boxes here. You can place them all in one bowl. Downward dog, she in structs, and is then on to the next move. She reminds that no one is keeping score. No one is timing anyone. No one is look ing but God, and he doesnt care how extended your leg is. Almost everyone tonight is wearing black Capri tights and a tank or T-shirt in varying hues of pinks and aquas. There are a lot of painted toenails, a few tattoos and generous dollops of laugh ter. Ten minutes in, Thompson begins to discuss I Chronicles, Chapter 4, better known these days as the Prayer of Jabez: Oh, that you would bless me and expand my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I may be free from pain. And God granted his request. Thompson talks, through out the 90 minutes of continu al exercise and stretching and posing, about Jabez and his les son. About bless, in the bibli cal sense. About asking God for more of what he wants for you. She asks her class if they think this rises about to the level of selshness. She knows this is radical, this selshness prayer, in a group mostly made of women, women who are stealing time from their children to be here to do this one thing for themselves. Scantlin, the mother of two, laughs later about that notion. A woman who has always exer cised, she says she is multitask ing, of course. Im a woman. But, she adds, she never thought to bring God into exer cise before this. I just did my due diligence. I exercised. I now put him in that space where you dont usually nd him and it ts so well. I am here to pray to my lord and savior. Every pose has a healing attitude. I am facing God here. It heals my soul. Jessica Somers, a Ladera Ranch, Calif., mother of two, says everything in her life is God-driven, and that the Chris tian music that runs throughout the class and the words spoken to uplift her all my favorite things are here cannot help but weave well with her familys larger goals. Somers quotes Acts 17:28: For we live, move and exist because of Him The class ends the usual way, with back-bend, lights dimmed, a cool-down and another prayer. This one is more a chal lenge to use your newfound strength to be more like Jabez, to ask for more blessings from God, to not just drink from the cup of water offered by the riv erside but to jump into the riv er and experience that which is life. Its what tness is supposed to be about, says Thompson. So, too, what a spiritual life can and should be. Extend, extend further, she has said repeatedly through the session. Amen to that. YOGA FROM PAGE C1 KEVIN SULLIVAN / MCT I give a life story. Or I read a devotional. Sometimes, when we strike a pose, I suggest that each of us thank God for 10 things instead of counting to 10. I remind them not to compare themselves to others, that God accepts us as we are, said Brooke Thompson. any symptoms over time, said Breiter, of the Northwestern Univer sity Feinberg School of Medicine and Massa chusetts General Hos pital. Previous studies have shown mixed results in looking for brain chang es from marijuana use, perhaps because of dif ferences in the tech niques used, he and others noted in Wednes days issue of the Journal of Neurosciences. The study is among the rst to focus on pos sible brain effects in recreational pot smok ers, said Dr. Nora Vol kow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The fed eral agency helped pay for the work. She called the work important but preliminary. The 20 pot users in the study, ages 18 to 25, said they smoked mar ijuana an average of about four days a week, for an average total of about 11 joints. Half of them smoked fewer than six joints a week. Researchers scanned their brains and com pared the results to those of 20 non-users who were matched for age, sex and other traits. The results showed differences in two brain areas associated with emotion and motiva tion the amygda la and the nucleus ac cumbens. Users showed higher density than non-users, as well as differences in shape of those areas. Both differ ences were more pro nounced in those who reported smoking more marijuana. Volkow said larg er studies are need ed to explore wheth er casual to moderate marijuana use really does cause anatomical brain changes, and if so, whether that leads to any impairment. The current work doesnt determine whether casual to mod erate marijuana use is harmful to the brain, she said. Murat Yucel of Monash University in Australia, who has stud ied the brains of mar ijuana users but didnt participate in the new study, said in an email that the new results sug gest the effects of mar ijuana can occur much earlier than previous ly thought. Some of the effect may depend on a persons age when marijuana use starts, he said. Another brain re searcher, Krista Lisdahl of the University of Wis consin-Milwaukee, said her own work has found similar results. I think the clear message is we see brain alterations be fore you develop de pendence, she said. CHANGES FROM PAGE C1

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Start here. www.FLHeartCenter.com 511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg | 352-728-6808 1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages | 352-750-5000 Most Insurances Accepted Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP When its Heart Disease It Makes A Difference Where You Start. ~ Barry Weinstock, MD, FACC MD: Yale Medical School Fellowship Trained: Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles Board Certified NICOLE PAITSEL Daily Press NEWPORT NEWS, Va. A wedding cake costs about 14,400 aluminum cans. Jim Ridenhour, a re tired Newport News, Va., reghter, dis covered that when he turned to metal scrap ping as a way to pay for his daughters wedding about two years ago. Since then, his parttime hobby has turned into a full-blown profes sion, earning him more than $1,000 in February alone. Ridenhour, a Carroll ton, Va., resident, pri marily picks up scrap metal from personal contacts and referenc es. He also responds to ads on websites like Craigslist and solicits friends on Facebook for scrap pick-ups. Im getting it out of the way for someone who would just throw it in a landll, he says. This way, the stuff gets recycled. I feel like its free money out there, but my wife tells me that Ive earned it with my time and labor, he said. Most often, metal scrapping is referenced in relation to a crime, a fact that Ridenhour says makes it hard for the people legitimately recycling the materials. Copper theft, in par ticular, is a longstand ing regional problem, the Isle of Wight County, Va., sheriffs ofce said in a December statement, referencing the theft of outdoor heating and air conditioning units and pipes from several coun ty churches. Metal theft insur ance claims increased by 36 percent when re viewing claims made in 2010-2012 over insur ance claims reported in the three-year period between 2009 and 2011, according to the Na tional Insurance Crime Bureau. During this period (2010-2012), 33,775 in surance claims for the theft of copper, bronze, brass or aluminum were handled 32,568 of them (96 percent) for copper alone, accord ing to the report. Ridenhour said local scrap yards ask for n gerprints and copies of your drivers license when you turn in met al scrap. This way, he said, theres an attempt to separate the hon est scrappers from the thieves. But even for 64-yearold Ridenhour, scrap ping can be a bit of a wild world. Drivers eye one anothers truck loads as they enter the scrap yard, sometimes negotiating swaps be fore moving on to have their scraps weighed. Sharing secrets about where they found the metal is never a part of the transaction. If someone calls me, and they tell me that theyve seen something on the curb, I dont even try to get it, he says. I know it will be gone be fore I can get there. But scrapping is more work than sim ply nding someone elses trash. Scrappers can make more mon ey when they tear apart appliances, lawn mow ers and other items and sell back the compo nents piece by piece. During a recent scrap dump, for example, Ridenhour dropped off an electric wheel chair. Dumped whole, the chair earned 7 cents a pound. By taking out the batteries which earn 20 cents per pound Ridenhour earned an additional $20.80. This time, he decid ed not to take apart the rest of the wheelchair to separate the steel from the aluminum. You have to decide how much it is worth it to take some things apart, he said. Ive g ured out the fastest way to disassemble many things. Like with dryers, now I just cut out a hole in the back and yank all of the wiring out. I used to undo the whole thing, bolt by bolt. The cashier at Carroll ton Metals said she was not allowed to provide a pricing list for met als because the pay outs change every day. During a recent run to the scrap yard, steel earned 7 cents a pound, motors earned 20 cents a pound and copper the most protable earned $2 a pound. Mid-afternoon on a recent weekday, busi ness was fairly slow at Carrollton Metals, but most days the scrap yard sees more than 100 people, said Lamar Harris, an employee who weighs the smaller scrap pieces like copper wiring and batteries. Now that his daugh ters wedding is paid for, the money that Riden hour earns goes toward his $930 monthly health insurance premium. On a $2,200 (month ly) retirement (from the re department), thats a huge chunk, he said. So, Im out here off-set ting it. Ive never been one to sit around on my days off. Man pays for health insurance with metal scraps NICOLE PAITSEL / MCT Jim Ridenhour loads a lamp from a neighbor to carry to a recycler in Carrollton, Va.

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The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. JOE SMYDO Pittsburgh Post-Gazette PITTSBURGH Onagain, off-again stom ach pain had bothered home remodeler Je rome Holiday for more than a year, but in Jan uary, it worsened to the point of slowing him down. If I was up on a lad der, I would have to come down, the 59-year-old Pittsburgh resident said. If I was doing something stren uous, I would have to stop. Holiday had a poten tially fatal abdominal aortic aneurysm, which doctors at Allegheny General Hospital re paired with an experi mental procedure that could prove more effec tive and patient-friend ly than the one thats standard now. Allegheny General is one of about 30 sites in the United States, Can ada and Europe taking part in a clinical trial of the new technology, developed by Califor nia-based Endologix Inc. Holiday, who had the procedure March 4, was the rst to undergo the procedure in Pitts burgh. Dr. Satish Muluk, chief of vascular surgery at AGH and lead inves tigator of the Pittsburgh study, said the proce dure could be revolu tionary. An abdominal aortic aneurysm a leading cause of death among older patients, the doc tor said is a balloon ing of the bodys main artery near the kidneys. Because of the expan sion, the artery wall be comes so thin that it ruptures, causing in ternal bleeding. At that point, the patient faces long odds. We estimate the mor tality is around 80 per cent, Muluk said, not ing many patients have no symptoms before an aneurysm bursts. Emphysema, genet ics, high cholester ol and blood pressure, obesity and smoking are among the factors believed to contribute to aneurysms, accord ing to the National Li brary of Medicine. Men are more prone than women. However, the problem can be detected ahead of time with an ultra sound, which is part of the covered package of care for new Medicare enrollees. The Medicare years are when the an eurysms are most likely to develop, Muluk said. Muluk said Allegheny General repairs about 150 of the aneurysms annually. The standard treatment, developed in the late 1990s, is mini mally invasive endovas cular surgery in which a stent, shaped like an inverted Y, is inserted to bypass the damaged section of aorta. But 15 percent to 20 percent of patients later require another proce dure because their stent moves or blood leaks into the aneurysm. The new procedure involves the insertion of two stents one to cir culate blood in each leg inside the aneurysm and the ination of two polymer-lled bags to ll up the rest of the swollen area. The tech nique is designed to hold the stents in place and prevent blood leak age. In short, whereas the standard procedure by passes the aneurysm, the new procedure obliterates it, said Dr. Jeffrey Carpenter, glob al principal investigator for the trial and profes sor and chairman of sur gery at Cooper Medical School of Rowan Uni versity in Camden, N.J. So far, 24 trial partic ipants have undergone the procedure. Each case has been techni cally successful, with out complications, Car penter said. Its a very simple pro cedure, much simpler than one we current ly do, and its likely to help a larger, more di verse group of patients than is medically eligi ble for the standard re pair, he said. The trial procedure takes about 90 minutes, compared to the 2 hours or so needed for the standard treatment, and has the potential to be done on an outpa tient basis, Muluk said. Participants in the trial, however, are spending one or two days in the hospital. The new repair also has the potential to be done under a local an esthetic instead of the general anesthetic used in the standard proce dure. Dr. Carpenter said he recently used a local while performing the repair on a 90-year-old man. Holiday, who also has a heart condition, said he isnt sure when he might be able to return to work. Muluk said patients undergoing the standard or new treatment for re pairing the aneurysms generally are able to re sume regular activities. Experimental treatment repairs abdominal aortic aneurysms The new procedure involves the insertion of two stents one to circulate blood in each leg inside the aneurysm and the inflation of two polymer-filled bags to fill up the rest of the swollen area.

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Monday, April 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 21 the 111th day of 2014. There are 254 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On April 21, 1789, John Adams was sworn in as the rst vice president of the United States. On this date : In 1509 Englands King Henry VII died; he was suc ceeded by his 17-year-old son, Henry VIII. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 21, 2014: This year you are able to fulll a wish, mainly because of an artistic or creative friend who walks into your life. This person will encour age you to liberate yourself and develop a talent that has remained hidden until now. If you are single, you often will feel as if you have met The One, only to discard that per son later in order to meet someone better. Trust that you will know when you have found Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, your signi cant other might be distant. You will want to draw him or her closer to you. Know that someone will only change when he or she is ready and willing. CAPRICORN of ten keeps you anchored and helps you see the big picture. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might sense that someones eyes are on you. A partner could be unusual ly touchy or difcult. Do not allow this behavior to color a project. Be willing to make a necessary adjustment, but re alize that you might want to hold back your feelings. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Make the effort to get past a hassle. You could feel as if you are at an impasse. Un derstand what is happening with a partner who might be depressed or withdrawn. You might feel stuck, but know that you are about to have a breakthrough. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Deal with a loved one direct ly. Recognize what is happen ing behind the scenes with a money matter. Walk away from a controlling individual who makes your life more dif cult. Ultimately, you will be happier if you do. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Listen to feedback from someone you respect. This person might be very differ ent from you, but because of that fact, he or she will pres ent a different way of think ing about life. Allow a child a little more freedom if you do not want to get into a pow er play. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You have certain matters to han dle immediately. You might want to relate to someone on a one-on-one level. A domes tic situation could be weigh ing you down. Understand that working through this problem will take patience. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Where others get stuck, you seem to make it through be cause of your resourceful ness. You recognize the im portance of following through. Honor a need to be some what reclusive. You might not always understand your feel ings, but trust them. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You will be more ground ed than you have been in a while. Consider moving in a new direction. Make a point to recognize your limits, espe cially when it comes to your nances. Honor boundaries, and you will nd a way to re move them. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Someone might want to spend time with you, but youll have little choice, as you likely already have es tablished plans. You might not want to reveal everything you are thinking right now. Be sensitive to your schedule and its limitations. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You could be over serious about a money mat ter and its implications to you. Recognize what needs to happen in order to gain greater strength profession ally. A family member will re main receptive to your ideas. Do nothing halfway. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You could go over some ones head if you so choose. You could be a bit more tied to a problem than you real ize. When you have to make a herculean effort to main tain the status quo, you will see how attached to the is sue you really are. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your intuition could be unusually accurate with mon ey and risk-tasking. You might be reacting to a boss far more than you realize. Some one could be pushing you be yond your limits, so you might want to change how you ap proach this person. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A meeting could play a bigger role in your day than you might have intended. Seeking out new informa tion could be difcult, as you cant seem to touch base with someone who often of fers you his or her perspec tive. Use caution with a de cision. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: My 83-year-old mother has decided she wants to die. She says shes mis erable, but I think shes causing her own mis ery. She has medica tions to address her physical ailments none of which are crit ical. My siblings live in other states. Mom feels its a burden for them to travel to see her, and she refuses to travel. Mom is in assisted living and is now re fusing to bathe, trying not to eat, and doesnt want to talk to anyone or have visitors. Shes obviously depressed, but refuses counsel ing. If she continues being uncooperative, Im afraid shell have to go to a nursing home where they might let her starve herself to death. One sister says I should force Mom to do fun things, but I dont know what she wants. We used to go out to eat, but she no longer wants to do that. I have tried to honor Moms wishes, but Im at a loss about what to do for her. Do you have any suggestions? AL MOST AT WITS END DEAR ALMOST: I have one. You and your sib lings should have your mother evaluated by a geriatrician IMME DIATELY. Its apparent that she is depressed, but the question is whether she also has something physical ly wrong with her that is affecting her mental state. Then let the doc tor be your guide. DEAR ABBY: I dated my ex for six years, but we broke up recently. The problem is, we signed a lease on our apartment that wont be up until next year. He still lives here, and I dont have the heart to kick him out. Financially, our living together makes sense, and Id rather live with him than with a stranger. Abby, this living ar rangement has made it tough to get over him. Our breakup was ami cable somewhat and we remain civil to each other. I have no desire to get back to gether with him. I just nd it hard because Im not sure how to survive this weird situ ation Im in. Is it a good idea to keep living to gether? REMAINING CIVIL IN CANADA DEAR REMAINING CIV IL: It depends upon how high your toler ance is for pain. If see ing your ex with others hurts to the extent that you shed tears on your pillow, or obsess about who hes with and where hes going, then its not a good idea. However, if the situa tion cant be changed, then its important that you ll your time with activities and opportu nities that allow you to meet new people and make new friends. DEAR ABBY: My new husbands family in formed him they were coming to visit us for seven to 10 days. This was eight relatives, and I was not asked whether this was convenient or not. They were so noisy that our neighbors nally asked, When are they leaving? How can I prevent this from happen ing again in the fu ture without offending anyone? My husband said after they had left, You dont handle cha os and confusion well, do you? NEEDS TO BE CONSULTED IN GEORGIA DEAR NEEDS TO BE CONSULTED: Revisit the question your husband asked you. And when you do, tell him the answer is not only do you NOT handle cha os, confusion and eight surprise houseguests well, neither do your neighbors. Then set some boundaries for the next time they say they are coming. His rst response should always be, Ill check with my wife to see if its convenient. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Aging mom who wants to die may find relief from doctor JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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