Daily Commercial

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00019282:00195


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

NBA PLAYOFFS BEGIN TODAY, SPORTS B1CRIME: Police release the name of Clermont bank robbery suspect, A3 GOOD FRIDAY: Pope Francis leads Via Crucis procession, A5 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, April 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 109 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D2 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D2 BUSINESS C5 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A5 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.74 / 55Most cloudy with showers50 LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comNothing could possibly pre pare Patrick Macri for what he would encounter when he helped liberate the concentration camp near Landsberg, Germany, in April 1945. Near the camps, the overpower ing smell of gas, used to burn the dead, lled the air. When Sgt. 1st Class Macri of the 101st Airborne Division entered the camp, the emaciated Jewish prisoners dressed in striped pajamas were holding onto the barbed wire fence, expressionless. Many were near death. This image is one that will forever haunt the 87-year-old. They were like the walking dead, the Crystal River resident said. To this day, he said he detests stripped pajamas Similar to Macri, Bill Whipp saw the aftermath of the Holocaust when he helped to liberate Dachau on April 28, 1945, which was the rst Nazi concentration camp in Germany. Serving with the 22nd Infantry Regime, 3rd Army in the 4th Infantry Division, under Gen. George Patton, Pfc. Whipp said each squad took a barrack. We were chasing the Germans, he said. Whipp, who lives in The Villages, said the prisoners looked like skeletons. We gave them all the chocolate bars we had in our pockets, he said. Whipp described how one Jewish prisoner opened the oor board and presented a bottle of vodka, which he gave to Whipp and the other soldiers as a symbol of gratitude. When we rst got there, they were staring at us and we were staring at them, he said. Then they relaxed and believed they were not dreaming. We did not want to look at them with pity. We wanted to treat them like they were normal people. Some possibly could not speak, holding onto the wire that kept them enclosed there, and looking out at the strange world, Macri said. I couldnt believe men could be so inhumane. The brain couldnt condense into a word or statement a feeling such as that. It is not prepared. This month marks the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps during World War II, when six million Jews were murdered at the hands of the Nazis. As he approached the prisoners a mere few weeks before the end of World War II, Macri heard the distinct moaning of the dying. Behind the prisoners, the then20-year-old Macri saw piles of burnt bodies. It was another jolt to our young sensibility, he said. It took us LADY LAKEThey were like the walking dead BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Bill Whipp poses at his home in Lady Lake on Thursday. When Whipp was a private rst class with the 22nd Infantry Regiment, he was part of the operation to liberate Dachau, one of the many concentration camps during World War II. IF YOU GOWHO: Public Interfaith Holocaust Remembrance Event: Eyewitnesses to history. WHAT: Four US Army liberators, who were at Buchenwald, Dachau and nearby Nazi concentration camps will speak as part of the Public Interfaith Holocaust Remembrance Event. WHEN: 4 / p.m. on April 29. Doors open at 3:30 / p.m. WHERE: St. Timothy Catholic Church, 1351 Paige Place, Lady Lake. DETAILS: For more information on this free event, contact Phyllis Kalter or Kathy Schachter at 352-748-1800.SEE HOLOCAUST | A2 Staff ReportLake Countys unemployment rate climbed a hair in March, bringing it to levels not seen since last fall. The unchanged jobless rate of 6.6 per cent in both January and February rose to 6.7 percent last month, while Sumter County stayed the same at 5 percent. Meanwhile, for the rst time since the middle of 2010, Floridas monthly job less rate went up in March. Jobs ofcials say the negative movement is in part be cause more people are in the labor pool. The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity announced Friday that while the number of people with jobs has increased statewide, the states un employment mark rose from 6.2 percent in February to 6.3 percent in March. The last time the states monthly mark in creased based on estimates of the num ber of people employed and actively seeking employment was in August 2010. At that time, the gure rose from 11.2 percent to 11.3 percent, and an estimated 1.03 mil lion Floridians were out of work. Floridas jobless rate, which remains below the national gure of 6.7 percent, had held at 6.2 percent the prior three months.LEESBURGLake, Florida jobless rates on the rise LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe Lake County Tax Collectors of ce is turning the former Golden Corral restaurant in Leesburg into a new and expanded service center. Beginning in September, the ofce will relocate from 1340 Citizens Blvd. to the former restaurant in order to comply with a 2010 Florida law, which requires all constitutional tax collectors to pro vide driver license services in their re spective counties by June 30, 2015. Tax collector Bob McKee said they will lease the 8,300-square-foot building LEESBURGTax collector office relocates to former Golden Corral building BRANDON LARRABEENews Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE The Capitol fell largely silent this week, as lawmakers, lobby ists and some reporters took time to relax after the open ing month and a half of the legislative session. The sniping between Gov. Rick Scott and his chief Democratic op ponent, former Gov. Charlie Crist, continued to generate emails and tweets. But for the most part, it was time to reect on where the sessions major bills stand and where they could be going. Here are some top is sues to watch as the nal two weeks approach.TOP PRIORITY: BUDGET NEGOTIATIONS BEGINOutside of once-a-decade redistricting sessions, law makers are fond of saying they have one constitutional duty every year: passing a bal anced budget. This year, with the week of Passover and Eas ter falling just two weeks be fore the end of the session, hammering out a spending plan is going to be a sprint. Thats because House and Senate budget writers have a nine-day window to ham mer out whatever differenc es might be left behind after leaders agree on allocations for different areas of the bud get. There could be a few side deals (announced or not) that would take some of the big-ticket issues off the table. But the budget has to be done by sometime April 29 in order for lawmakers to wait the re quired 72 hours and approve the spending plan on May 2, the last day of session. The plan is likely to settle in around $75 billion and make room for Scotts election-year promise of $500 million in tax and fee cuts. The Legislature has already decided to cut nearly $400 million in vehicle-registration fees, and the House and Senate are now ar guing over how to divvy up another $100 million or so in tax cuts, with potential breaks Lawmakers face flurry of bills in sessions final weeks AP FILE PHOTO Sen. Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, presides over the chamber temporarily during voting and debate on the oor of the Senate in Tallahassee. Gardiner will be the Senate president for the 2015-16 session.SEE OFFICE | A2SEE BUDGET | A2SEE JOBLESS | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 on everything from back-to-school supplies to cement mixers. Leaders on both sides say the dif ferences are small, with the Sen ate being more generous to higher education, while the House gives more to K-12 schools and construction projects. One thing thats unlikely to hap pen: the House and Senate confer ence committees agreeing to nd a way to draw down federal funds intended to expand Medicaid, as House Minority Leader Perry Thur ston, D-Fort Lauderdale, asked them to do in a letter Thursday. GOP leaders say the federal gov ernment has proven to be an un reliable partner in funding for joint programs like Medicaid, and theyve ruled out any Medicaid expansion.EDUCATION DEBATES: IMMIGRATION AND CHOICEOne of the most closely watched non-budget bills of the session has been a measure that would grant in-state tuition rates to some ille gal immigrants (SB 1400) and po tentially help the Republican Party get a toehold in the rapidly growing bloc of Hispanic voters. The prospects for the bill took a nose-dive later Thursday, when Senate Appropriations Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, announced that he would not put the measure on the committees agenda. The bill was scheduled to make a nal stop before that panel and then head to the oor. Meanwhile, House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, is still trying to push through a bill that would expand eligibility for the states de facto school-voucher system. But Gaetz sounded skepti cal about the measure (HB 7167). There is no accountability pro vision in the House bill, and I think I still want to be faithful to the un derstanding that Speaker Weather ford and I had, when we articulat ed our work plan, that we would try to expand school choice with ac countability, Gaetz said.SHOTS FIRED IN CULTURE WAR: GUNS AND ABORTIONWith the November elections only a few months away, Republicans are also looking for measures that will re up socially conservative voters such as restrictions on abortion and bills advancing Floridas reputa tion as a gun-friendly state. The main ashpoint on abortion is a measure (HB 1047) that would largely bar the procedures if doctors determine that fetuses have reached viability. The bill passed the House and is scheduled to be heard Monday by the Senate Rules Committee. Under current law, abortions in most cases are barred during the third trimester of pregnancy. But the bills would require that physicians conduct examinations before per forming abortions to determine if fetuses are viable. If viability is reached, abortions would generally not be al lowed a change that the bills sup porters say could prevent abortions around the 20th week of pregnancy. The culture wars could also emerge over legislation that would allow Floridians to carry concealed weapons without licenses during evacuations ordered by the gover nor. The House version (HB 209) has passed that chamber, and a counterpart (SB 296) could soon go to the oor.A PLETHORA OF OTHER ISSUESLawmakers will grapple with dozens of other bills as they look to get out of Tallahassee in early May and start campaigning for the November elections. The issues range from in dustry ghts, such as hospitals bat tling about new trauma centers, to quirky bills, such as creating the po sition of state poet laureate. But while the Capitol gets lled with political intrigue and lobby ing battles at the end of each ses sion, its important to remem ber that some legislation can have far-reaching effects. As an example, the House and Senate are still working on bills that would address gaps in Flor idas child-protection system after revelations about the deaths of children who had previously come to the attention of the state De partment of Children and Families. Lakes January rate put an end to six straight months of declining jobless numbers. The unemployment rate last July was 7.6 percent, followed by 7.3 per cent in August, 6.9 percent in September, 6.4 percent in October, 6.3 percent in No vember and 6 percent in December. Last year at this time, the unemploy ment rate in Lake was 7.7 percent and the rate in Sumter was 5.8 percent. In Lake, from a labor force of 131,729 people, 122,965 had jobs in March and 8,764 did not. In Sumter, the labor force was 43,034, with 39,916 employed and 2,118 unemployed. In March 2014, Monroe and Walton counties had the states lowest unemploy ment rate (3.8 percent each), followed by Okaloosa County (4.8 percent); and Alachua and Sumter counties (5.0 percent each). Many of the counties with the low est unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment, the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity reported. Flagler County had the highest unem ployment rate (9.3 percent) in Florida in March 2014, followed by Hendry County (9.1 percent); Hamilton County (8.7 per cent); and Hernando, Madison, and Put nam counties (8.5 percent each). There were no counties with double-digit un employment rates for March or February.The News Service of Florida contributed material to this report. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 18CASH 3 . ............................................... 3-0-6 Afternoon . .......................................... 1-4-9 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 7-3-3-7 Afternoon . ....................................... 8-1-1-5FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 17FANTASY 5 . ......................... 12-14-24-25-29 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comSPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268,. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comCALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. BUDGETFROM PAGE A1 JOBLESSFROM PAGE A1 OFFICEFROM PAGE A1located at 1720 Citrus Blvd., for $13,500 a month. There are substantial capital costs that are tied into the amount in the in terior build-out of the facility, he said. In addition, it is estimated to cost $225,000 to purchase furniture and electronic equipment that complies with the Department of Home land Security. McKee added of the relo cation: Our needs, space wise, have more than dou bled for the additional (eight) employees, and additional transactions to ac commodate a much higher volume of public business. We want to conduct the public business where the public conducts their business to minimize any inconvenience to them. David Jordan, chief deputy for the tax collec tor, said there are also in surance costs for security purposes. It is the electronic queuing system and other internal controls that are an enormous expense, he said. The legislature has handed the responsi bility to the tax collector that is enormous. McKee said the tax collector has enough revenue to cover the costs of the lease and operations, but the county commission could receive less funding, because less money would be returned to them at the end of the budget year. Every year we spend far less then what we could, he said. At the end of the scal year, unspent fees are sent back to the authorities that paid them. The tax collectors of ce returned more than $3 million during the s cal year 2012 budget to the county commission. We will be utilizing un spent fees and commis sion to meet these future expenses, McKee said. In addition to the current services it offers such as ve hicle tags, the new ofce will offer driver licenses, ID cards, road tests, medical road tests, vision tests and non-U.S. citizen driver li cense services, Mckee said. In February, the tax col lector opened a drivers li cense ofce in Clermont, but that ofce does not of fer non-U.S. citizen driver license services or medical road tests, said Mark OKeefe, manager of the tax collectors ofce. There is currently only one state ofce remaining in Lake County for driv er licenses located in As tatula, where tax collector ofcials have heard from customers that the wait has been as long as four hours. That ofce will close in June 2015. The general public will not tolerate a four-hour wait, said Jordan. Randy Van Alstine, di rector of motorist ser vices for the tax collec tors ofce, said the ofce conducted an analysis to make sure it has the right size building with the appropriate number of staff. For the month of March, the average pro cessing time for each customer was approximately 10 minutes. The customer expectation is when they come into the Lake County Tax Collector ofce they are go ing to be there for minutes, not for hours, he said. HOLOCAUSTFROM PAGE A1awhile for us to realize men could do something like that. The prisoners were astounded, Macri said. They were in a state of shock, believing they would never see the freedom on the other side, he said. Macri said the incident left a jarring impression on Gen. Maxwell Davenport Taylor. Some were denying the camp existed, the Normandy and Battle of the Bulge veteran said. (Gen. Taylor) demanded the leaders of the community come and go through the camp. Macri is one of several liberators who will speak at the Public Interfaith Holocaust Remembrance Event at 4 / p.m. on April 29 at St. Timothy Catholic Church in Lady Lake. Macri said he looks forward to speaking at the event for one reason above all others. Some people living today believe the Holocaust was all made up, he said. I am here as a witness to say it was not. It was real. Whipp said saving the prisoners made everything in the war worthwhile. We were happy we could get them before the Germans killed them, he said. It made the rest of the war worthwhile that we were able to save somebody. Steven Luckert, curator of the permanent exhibition at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and a historian, said 35 U.S. Army divisions have been recognized for liberating the prisoners from the Nazis. There were 20,000 concentration camps and many were liberated by American troops, Luckert said. As they were going into Germany to defeat the (Nazis) they would over run areas and discover these camps, he said. The U.S. Army divisions provided the prisoners with medical care and food, Luckert said. They saved these prisoners, he said. They rescued them from cer tain death. If they hadnt arrived, in some cases, you had last-ditch efforts by the Nazis to kill them off so they wouldnt be witnesses. Phyllis Kalter, co-chair of the Interfaith Holocaust Remembrance event, said the annual service is important as a response to hatred in the world. We recognize the importance of preserving freedom, promoting human dignity and confronting hate wherever and whenever it occurs, she said. With the recent killings of three people at the Jewish Community Center and Jewish assisted living facility in Overland Park, Kan., the Anti-Defamation League has recently reported such extreme incidents are on the increase. The audit recorded a total of 31 anti-Semitic assaults on Jewish individuals or those perceived as Jewish in 2013, up from 17 in 2012, according to a ADL press release. Meanwhile, the total number of anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. fell by 19 percent in 2013, the press release also reported. The audit found there was a 23 percent decrease in such incidents in Florida. We know the number reported to us is only a fraction of what goes on every year, said Robert Tanen, associate regional director of the ADL in Boca Raton. There is signicant problem with underreporting. There is growing concern about the rise of anti-Semitism in Europe, he said. We are well aware of the rising tide of anti-Semitic political parties in major European countries, such as Jobbik in Hungary and Golden Dawn in Greece, becoming more accepted into the mainstream, he said. This trend is troubling. There is an emerging climate where Jews in certain parts of Europe are feeling uncomfortable, with several families leaving, Tanen said. An ADL survey of 10 European countries found that anti-Semitic beliefs continue to be held by one third of those surveyed. Macri said the recent incidents in the world, including the shootings at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, keep him awake at night. It like an early replay, he said. Are we there again? It wont be in the form of concentration camps but in the form of one human being killing and mistreating another human being because they are different. DID YOU KNOW?There may have been as many as 6 million Holocaust victims. Besides Jews, the Nazis targeted Communists, Gypsies, homosexuals, Jehovahs Witnesses, the mentally and physically disabled, resistance ghters and others. The top countries in terms of number of victims were Poland and the Soviet Union (4.5 million), Hungary and the Ukraine (402,000), Czechoslovakia (277,000), Romania (220,000) and Germany (130,000).Source: www.deathcamps.com.

PAGE 3

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT ORLANDO Conference to be held for business womenWomen on a Mission to Earn Commission, a networking or ganization geared toward business women, is hosting a confer ence at the Rosen Plaza Hotel on International Drive. Seminars, a trade show, luncheon and silent auction will take place. The event includes special guest speakers Thursday and Friday. Registration is available at www. woamtec.com or via email to info@woamtec.com or by calling 407-767-5417.EUSTIS Lake Tech to host car show fundraiserThe rst car show raising funds to send SkillsUSA members to compe titions at Lake Tech will take place from 10:30 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., today at the Eustis campus, 2001 Kurt St., and will include food, contests, prizes and more. Show car owners are asked to donate $10, which includes a parking spot, a prize ticket and contest entry. Spectators are asked to bring canned food items for the Lake Cares Food Pantry and $5 to cover parking and a ticket to win a prize. Trophies will be awarded for best in show, best truck, best classic, domestic and foreign cars, as well as best bike. No alcohol, drugs or tobacco are allowed on the campus. Call James Brucker, 352-589-2250, ext. 1874 for information.TAVARES Extension offers classes on arthritis pain managementThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension in Lake County is hosting classes in Tavares and Groveland on arthritis pain management. The free program Put Pain in its Place: How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control will provide infor mation about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3:30 / p.m. on April 30 at the Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave. Register at tavarespain.eventbrite.com. Grovelands class will take place from 2 to 3:30 / p.m. on May 1 at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St. Register at grovelandpain.eventbrite.com. For information or to register, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721.MOUNT DORA Share your historic photos at the libraryThe Mount Dora Historical Society and the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., are co-sponsoring a preservation event, Share Your Historic Mount Dora Photos from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m., on April 2526, at the library. People are asked to bring histor ic photos or documents of Mount Dora to the library for documentation. Those items will be scanned and the library will give participants a CD of their images to keep.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMore than 100 people showed up for a meeting in Clermont this week to talk about stopping a 1,196acre sand mine from op erating in the middle of a proposed high-tech development in south Lake. Organizers said the meetings intent was to kick off the formation of what theyve dubbed The South Lake Citizens Co alition, a group of locals they hope will band to gether to represent common views when it comes to causes that could potentially impact resi dents and their communities. In this case, organiz ers are asking citizens to stand up publicly against the sand mines approval. According to Clermont City Councilman Ray Goodgame, if Cemex is granted a zoning change for the sand and gravel operation, it could doom the 16,000-acre Wellness Way Sector Plan, an area where county ofcials envision companies with high-pay ing, medical-related jobs. If we let a sand mine come in and destroy the ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comHope for the Children. Thats what Good Neigh bor Program founders Dianne and John Garvis have dubbed a makeover project they have embarked on for the Kiddie Land Academy daycare in Groveland. Leslie Campassano, who with husband Lou ie owns and runs the day care, said if it werent for the program, the center likely would have closed in June when the lease at the building they are renting for Kid die Land expires. They did own the rundown building across from it, they did not have the money to renovate it. We hadnt told anyone about closing yet but knew it was coming. Then Di anne came in one day just out of the blue. Shed nev er stopped in here before but said she was passing by when she noticed our sign, Campassano said. I mentioned to her about closing and after hearing our story and about how we cater to many low-in come families needs, asked if they could remodel the building, Campassa no said. I said, Are you cra zy? Do you have any idea about what that building needs done? And so started the Hope for the Children renovation project. Help poured in from many businesses and or ganizations. South Lake Hospitals LiveWell facility sponsored the build ing of an indoor play area and exercise room. Home Depot donated building and ooring supplies, BurgerFI, a new restau rant chain headed for Clermont, sponsored the kitchen and built an eat ing area. And more than 20 other contractors and companies helped with the renovations. Groveland ofcials waived all permitting fees. Betty Anne Hutchens, a childrens author and artist who lives in Delaware, was own in last week to paint a mural inside the new building. On Friday, locally re nowned artist Harry Gray painted a mural on an out side wall. A fence and playground were constructed Friday. A sign near the playground says it was built in memory of Lily Quintus, the four-year-old daughter of Groveland paramedic Brian Quintus, who was killed earlier this month when a car crashed into a KinderCare daycare in Or lando. The children of Grove land will no longer be in visible. An army of caring neighbors have teamed to gether to shower them with love, Dianne Garvis said. A ribbon cutting and of cial reveal of the new Kid die Land building will be 1 / p.m. today at the day care, 668 W. Broad Street, Groveland. Campassano said she and her husband are oored by the generosi ty of the the Good Neigh bor Program, all the donors and volunteers who had a hand in renovating the new daycare for them and the children who attend there. Danielle Damarest, a teacher at Kiddie Land, said she thinks the kids are going to love their new day care center. They (kids) will denite ly know the difference, Damarest said. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comAuthorities have released the identity of a man who reportedly robbed a Clermont bank and led law en forcement on a highspeed chase that ended when his car crashed. Brian Carl Richards, 41, was charged with armed robbery, grand theft, aggravated eeing and eluding, resisting arrest and reckless driving, according to an arrest afdavit released Friday morning. Richards, who has prior burglary, theft and other charges, re mained in the Lake County jail early Friday in lieu of $18,000 bail. According to the af davit, Richards walked into the Trustco Bank on High Grove Boulevard in Clermont about 1:15 / p.m. on Thursday in a tan short sleeve dress shirt, khaki pants and camouage hat and handed a teller a black bag and typed note de manding money. The afdavit indicates that Richards told the teller Im not kidding CLERMONTLocals fight proposed sand mineGROVELANDHope grows in Groveland ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Betty Anne Hutchens, a childrens author and illustrator, paints a mural at Kiddie Land Academy, a Groveland daycare center. Staff ReportFamily members and friends of Lake-Sum ter State College gradu ates will be able to watch the upcoming May com mencement ceremonies live on Lake Sumter Television. The 2014 LSSC Spring Commencement ceremonies will be aired live and in encore presentations, thanks to LSTVs partnership with the col lege and through production underwriting from PSL Construction, ERA Tom Grizzard Realty and Direct Connect to UCF, according to a press MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comA Mascotte man, believed to be high on methamphetamine, was arrested af ter barging into a local hospital and demanding to see his son who had been discharged more than a month ago. Michael Jacob Ebinger, 26, was arrest ed and treated at South Lake Hospital on Thursday after police said he tried to force his way through security guards into the facilitys emergency room to see his son. According to an arrest afdavit, police showed up at the emergency room just after 1 / p.m. Thursday and found secu rity guards struggling with a man who had injection marks on his arm. The guards told police that Ebinger had been running around the emergen cy room lobby screaming that he wanted to see his son. A records check revealed the son was in the hospi tal more than a month ago and released to his mother, but Ebinger continued try ing to force his way into the patient area of the emergency room to see the child. Security guards were able to con vince Ebinger to leave the lobby, but he Clermont bank robber identified RICHARDS LEESBURGGraduation ceremonies to air liveCLERMONTMan arrested after hospital disturbance EBINGER SEE LSTV | A4SEE MINE | A4SEE ARREST | A4SEE ROBBERY | A4

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 IN LOVING MEMORY Lenora M. BrockingtonSept. 17, 1928 April 19, 2002 Sweet Jesus, Please take this message to Lenora Brockington in Heaven up above; Tell her how much we miss her, and give her all our love. As we look Back, we find ourselves wonderingDid we remember to thank you enough for all you did for us? For all the times you were by our sides to help and support us. . To celebrate our successes, to understand our problems, and accept our defeats? Or for teaching us by your Example, the value of Hard Work, Good Judgment, Courage and Integrity? If we ever thanked you for the sacrifices you made, to let us have the very best? And for the simple things like laughter, smiles and great times we shared? Mom, If we forgot to show our Gratitude enough for all the things you did, We're thanking you now. And we are hoping you knew all along, How very special you are and much you meant to us. Dear Lord, If roses grow in Heaven, please pick a bunch for us Place them in Lenoras arms and tell her they're from us. Tell her that we love her and miss her, and when she smiles Place a kiss upon her cheek, hug her for us and hold her for awhile. . Love, Fredricka, Frank, Michael & Justin DEATH NOTICESEvelyn Elmira DickinsonEvelyn Elmira Dick inson, 88, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Kent A. LinesKent A. Lines, 73, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Leesburg.Eleanor M. McMahonEleanor M. McMa hon, 83, of St. Peters burg, died Wednesday, April 16, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.IN MEMORY release from the college. The Leesburg Campus graduation will be aired live at 10 / a.m. on M ay 3. The Sumter and South Lake Campus graduation will be shown at 2 / p.m. The ceremonies will re-air back-to-back on the following dates: 7 / p.m. on May 10; 10 / a.m. on May 11; and 2 / p .m. on May 14. LSTV can be watched on Comcast Channel 13 and Brighthouse Channel 199, Florida Cable 4, as well as online and through various community partnerships. LSTV FROM PAGE A3 sector plan, wed be ashamed of our selves, Goodgame said during the meeting. The Clermont City Council and City Manager Darren Gray, a former Lake Coun ty manager, oppose MINE FROM PAGE A3 the sand mine project. This weeks meeting at the Clermont Commu nity Center was chaired by Jack Martin, a former past president of the Kings Ridge Homeowners Association, where residents expressed concerns about trafc, noise and dust from the sand mine. They (Cemex) will tell their side of the sto ry and this is a meeting to organize a way for us to tell our side of the story, Martin said. Residents believe as many as 300 trucks a day will haul sand and gravel from the mine to the many road-building projects Cemex is involved with in Central Florida. The company recently asked Her nando County ofcials for permission to ex pand Cemexs 730-acre mining operation near Brooksville to keep up with business demands. Martin said residents are not opposed to Ce mex as a company. But three hundred trucks making round trips per day (600 trips total) is a lot, he said. We dont think its good for the surrounding area. Wellness Way received its name from the desire to attract health, tness, biomedical research and related industries to the area, capitalizing on the existing triathlon and health/tness in dustries in South Lake. County ofcials and key stakeholders in the area envision the area to be a major employment center for Central Flor ida, anchored by compact urban-growth centers, and surrounded by rolling hills and lakes. Wellness Way covers a huge tract east of U.S. Highway 27 along the Orange County bor der, running from south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. It has been called the largest tract of undeveloped land left in Lake County. Besides, trafc, noise and dust, sand-mine opponents have concerns about the project deterring other businesses from relocating to the area, and harming the environment and water table. CEMEXs application says the mine will be situated on abandoned agricultural land and that excavation only would occur on 623 acres of the site. Min ing over 30 years will take place in phases of 100 acres or less and all mined areas will be re claimed, the application states. Sara Engdahl, direc tor of communications for Cemex, previous ly said the mine would have no effect on water and would aid in eco nomic development, bringing in at least $4.7 million a year. Linda and David Hill, who own a blue berry farm adjacent to the proposed mining site, said the opera tion will hurt their crop, while Goodgame said 30 years of proposed mining, even after reclamation, would leave the land in sub-par condition. County commissioners will address the sand mine at 1:30 / p .m. on May 20 at the old courthouse building in Tavares. returned, reportedly pushed a security guard out the way and ran back into the lobby. Police were called and Ebinger was ar rested. Hospital staff examined Ebin ger and determined he was intoxicated by methamphet amine. He told ofcers he had been using the drug every day since he dropped his son off at the hospital. Ebinger was charged with disorderly intoxication and battery on uniformed security guards. He remained in the Lake County jail Friday in lieu of $2,150 bail. ARREST FROM PAGE A3 and the teller believed he was armed. After being given an undeter mined amount of cash, Rich ards allegedly ed in a red, four-door Toyota, which had its license plate covered with blue tape. However, a teller was able to take a photo of the car, which helped law enforcement nd the vehicle. Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, said deputies found the suspects vehicle in the area of a nearby shopping center. Richards allegedly led law enforcement, including the Flor ida Highway Patrol, on a pur suit that reached speeds up to 100 mph. He reportedly crossed over a median at one point and drove the wrong way into on coming trafc on Highway 27. Deputies were eventually able to stop him by laying spike sticks across the road in front of the vehicle. The sticks are designed to shred the tires of eeing vehicles. The suspect lost control of the vehicle and struck a 2007 Jeep in the area of Hancock and Hart wood Marsh roads and K-9s helped apprehend him. The suspect as well as the dog and the K-9 deputy were treated on the scene for minor injuries. The driver of the Jeep was not hurt. Tellers were able to identify him as the robber. Richards allegedly told detectives that a friend in the car told him to rob the bank, but the afdavit points out that deputies never saw any one else in the car. According to the jail website, Richards was arrested in January on charges of burglary and grand theft. He also was arrest ed in December on charges of grand theft, possession of bur glary tools and criminal mis chief and for violating his pro bation for assaulting a law enforcement ofcer in 2002 in Seminole County. ROBBERY FROM PAGE A3 MARCIA DUNNAP Aerospace WriterCAPE CANAVERAL A SpaceX supply ship rocket ed toward the International Space Station on Friday, set ting the stage for an Easter morning delivery and urgent spacewalking repairs later in the week. Following its midday launch through cloudy skies, the Dragon cargo carrier was shown drifting away in the blackness of space, against the blue backdrop of Earth. Its transporting 2 tons of goods, including a new spacesuit, spacesuit replacement parts, much-needed food, legs for NASAs humanoid, Robonaut, a bevy of mat ing ies, and germs gathered from sports arenas and his toric sites across the U.S. Neither NASA nor SpaceX packed any Easter goodies, but the families of the six as tronauts sent private care packages. It will be a surprise for all of us when they open the hatch, said NASAs human exploration chief, Bill Gerstenmaier. The Dragon will reach the orbiting lab on Sunday morn ing. That pushes urgent spacewalking repairs to Wednesday; NASA wants a bad backup computer replaced before something else breaks. This was the second launch attempt this week for SpaceX after a months delay. On Monday, NASAs com mercial supplier was foiled by a leaky rocket valve. The valve was replaced, and the com pany aimed for a Friday lift off despite a dismal forecast. Storms cleared out of Cape Canaveral just in time. SpaceXs billionaire chief executive ofcer, Elon Musk, was delighted with the successful launch for NASA, the customer. This was a happy day, he told reporters from company headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif. Last Friday, a critical back up computer failed outside the space station, and NASA considered postponing the SpaceX ight. The primary computer is working ne, but numerous systems would be seriously compromised if it broke, too. A double failure also would hinder visits by the Dragon and other vessels. Its imperative that we maintain backups for these external command-routing computer boxes, also called multiplexer-demultiplexers, or MDMs, said ight director Brian Smith said Friday. Right now, we dont have that. NASA decided late this week to use the gasket-like material already on board the space station for the repair, instead of waiting for the Dragon and the new, preci sion-cut material that NASA rushed on board for the computer swap. Astronauts trimmed their own thermal material Friday to t the bot tom of the replacement com puter, and inserted a fresh circuit card. The shipment is close to ve weeks late. Initially set for mid-March, the launch was delayed by extra prepping, then damage to an Air Force radar and, nally on Monday, the rocket leak. NASA is paying SpaceX Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and Virginias Orbital Sciences Corp. to keep the orbiting lab well stocked.SpaceX making Easter delivery of station supplies JOHN RAOUX / AP A rocket carrying the SpaceX Dragon ship lifts off from launch complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral. AP PHOTOThis image made from video shows the engine of the second stage of the rocket carrying the SpaceX Dragon capsule.

PAGE 5

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Electric Razor Repair Clinic Wed, April 23rd WILDWOOD CYCLERY rrffntfrb Bikes for Every Terain & Budget FRANCES DEMILIOAssociated PressROME Desperate migrants, suicidal failed business owners, battered women, torture victims and all people suffering in the world were remembered at a torch-lit Good Friday Way of the Cross pro cession presided over by Pope Francis at the Colosseum. With his head bowed and eyes often closed, Francis joined tens of thousands of faithful in listening to medita tions read aloud in the ancient arena in down town Rome. One meditation, read by Italian actress Virna Lisi, singled out the plight of child soldiers. Other readings recalled migrants who risk death in trying to reach the shores of afuent nations, women and chil dren enslaved by hu man trafckers and inmates in overcrowded prisons. The selection of sub jects reected the popes resolve to focus the Catholic churchs attention on those who suffer, often on the mar gins of society. The mo tif of the marginalized also mirrored much of Francis outreach in his rst year of his papa cy. His rst pilgrimage outside of Rome as pope took him to a tiny island near Sicily where thousands of migrants arrive on smugglers rickety boats. Francis wore a white overcoat over a plain white cassock against the chill of the night. Near the end of the 90-minute service, Francis told the crowd in brief remarks that the cross represented the weight of all our sins. He decried the mon strosity of man when he lets himself be guided by evil. But he sounded a note of optimism. Evil wont have the last word, but love, mercy and par don will, Francis said. He ended with a prayer that all those abandoned under the weight of the cross would nd the strength of hope. Then he blessed the faithful and headed back to the Vati can by car. Another of the meditations spoke of children whose health might be endangered by Italian mobsters dumping of toxic wastes in their neigh borhoods and farmland near Naples. Mothers of the children had written to the pope in hopes of drawing attention to the problem. Outside the Colosseum and along the broad boulevard approaching it, tens of thou sands of pilgrims, tour ists and Romans stood elbow-to-elbow. They clutched prayer books and candles, in holders fashioned from brightly colored paper. Many of them and tens of thousands more are expected to crowd into St. Peters Square on Sunday for Easter Mass celebrated by Francis at the Vatican.Pensive pope at Good Friday Colosseum procession ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis leads the Via Crucis torchlight procession celebrated in front of the Colosseum on Good Friday in Rome on Friday. FOSTER KLUG and YOUKYUNG LEEAssociated PressMOKPO, South Korea The captain of a sunken South Korean ferry was arrested Saturday on suspicion of negligence and abandoning people in need, as investigators looked into whether his evacuation order came too late to save lives. Two crew members were also arrested. The disaster three days ago left more than 270 people missing and at least 29 people dead. As the last bit of the sunken ferrys hull slipped Friday beneath the murky water off southern South Korea, there was a new victim: a vice principal of the high school whose students were among the passen gers was found hanged, an apparent suicide. The Sewol had left the northwestern port of Incheon on Tuesday on an overnight journey to the holiday island of Jeju in the south with 476 people aboard, includ ing 323 students from Danwon High School in Ansan. It capsized with in hours of the crew making a distress call to the shore a little before 9 / a.m. Wednesday. Only its dark blue keel jutted out over the surface. But by Friday night, even that had disappeared, and rescuers set two giant beige buoys to mark the area. Navy divers attached underwater air bags to the 6,852-ton ferry to prevent it from sink ing deeper, the Defense Ministry said. The coast guard said divers began pumping air into the ship to try to sustain any survivors. Strong currents and rain made it difcult to get inside the ferry. Div ers worked in shifts to try to get into the vessel, where most of the passengers were believed to have been trapped when it sank, guard spokes man Kim Jae-in said. Investigators said the accident came at a point where the ship had to make a turn, and prosecutor Park Jae-eok said investigators were looking at whether the third mate ordered a turn that was so sharp that it caused the vessel to list. The sharp turn came between 8:48 / a.m. and 8:49 / a.m., but it s not known whether it was done voluntarily or be cause of some external factor, said Nam Jaeheon, a spokesman for the Maritime Ministry. Another angle being probed is the role of the captain, 68-year-old Lee Joon-seok. Senior prosecutor Yang Jung-jin said Lee was detained early Saturday, along with the two crew members. Lee fac es ve charges includ ing negligence of duty and violation of maritime law, according to the Yonhap news agency. Yang said earlier that Lee was not on the bridge when the fer ry was passing through an area with many is lands clustered closely together, something he said is required by law so the captain can help a mate make a turn. The captain also abandoned people in need of help and rescue, he said. The captain escaped before the passengers, Yang said. Two crewmembers on the bridge of the ferry a 25-year-old woman and a 55-year-old helmsman also failed to reduce speed near the islands and conducted a sharp turn, Yang said. They also did not carry out necessary measures to save lives, he said. KEN THOMASAssociated PressWASHINGTON Thousands of pages of documents from President Bill Clintons White House afrm a longtime adage: The more things change, the more they stay the same. As Clinton prepared for an August 1994 news conference in which he hoped to build public support for his strug gling and ultimately unsuccessful health care overhaul, he told his advisers: A lot of them want to know they can keep their own plan if they like it. Later that fall, Clintons Democrats were routed in midterm elections and lost con trol of Congress. Nearly two decades later, President Barack Obama sought to reassure Americans about his own plan, which won approval in Congress in 2010, by telling them, If you like your plan you can keep it. A spate of private policy cancella tions forced Obama to recant his pledge that all Americans who liked their plans could simply keep them. More than 8 million people have signed up for health insurance un der the Obamacare law; how the overhaul is perceived could become a deciding point for the fate of Obamas fellow Democrats in the 2014 midterm elections. About 7,500 pages of records released Friday through the National Archives and the Clin ton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Ark., show the parallels between the Clinton era and the White House under Obama. The documents may also offer a glimpse into a future as former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who led her husbands health care task force, considers another pres idential campaign in 2016. One undated memo written after the 1994 elections offers advice on how Mrs. Clinton could soften her image. An unnamed aide told the rst lady, Its no sur prise that some Ameri cans cant handle smart, tough, independent women, and encour aged Clinton to pick issues and events accen tuating her personal side, not wonky inter ests, and recommended she do more listening. From Clinton to Obama, many parallelsCaptain of sunken S. Korean ferry arrested AHN YOUNG-JOON / AP Relatives of missing children in Ship Sewol weep at a gymnasium in Jindo, South Korea

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 7

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 Y ou know how you get into those moods where you con vince yourself that the only thing to do when youre absolute ly miserable is to make yourself even more miserable, as if misery were some kind of contest? And when youre in that kind of mood, theres some part of you determined to make your self so thoroughly unhappy you are guaranteed to take home the poor-me crown? Picture me, then, having a per fectly rotten day. Waking up to a washed-out gray morning, Id started to feel as if every decision carried with it the potential for a cataclysmic spiritual crisis. And I mean everything. Choosing the wrong font for cer tain emails, for example, might act as the harbinger of ruin; parking too close to the building where I work would mean somebody else would attempt to squeeze a vehicle so close to mine that it would simply be easier just park their car inside my car. Parking far away would prove I was the abject failure I always imagined myself to be. (Who but a schmuck pays $300 a year for parking and then walks three-quarters of a mile in the rain to get to the ofce? Sure, people do that all the time when they work in a city. But who does that when her building is located on acres and acres of open farmland and rolling hills? For sever al hundred bucks a year, I want access to what by implication is promised when the money is routinely deducted directly from my paycheck under the heading parking. Not that Im bitter.) I was facing a day lled with budget cuts at work, computer problems and calls from home about a repeatedly (not direly, only annoyingly) sick cat and I was fully intending to cap it all off by driving in the rain to pick up a cheap pre-cooked chicken for dinner. Youve had those chickens, right? They sort of look like very short extras from a zombie movie: Basically, theyre dried skin pulled tight over brittle bones with a little bit of ooze emerging from somewhere. Frankly, you dont want to make inquiries concerning the oozes origins. I dont even really like the cheap pre-cooked chicken, but it seemed like the kind of half-baked idea, literally and metaphorically, to signal the days nale. Then a stranger wrecked the whole thing. I was coming off a ramp and onto the highway, eyes nar rowed against the blur of rain, sts clamped around the steer ing wheel, radio news station in the background announcing the end of the civilized world as we know it (plus additional rain) and some guy actually permitted me to merge. Then he had the nerve to smile and wave. And without thinking about it, I smiled and waved back. It wasnt a fake. I meant it. I think I even said Ooh, thanks, mister! out loud in my car. It turns out that, when it comes to changing moods, Im a cheap date. When I realized that my fundamental perception of the day could pivot both immediately and entirely on the smallest of incidents, I admit to being star tled. I was happily surprised, of course, but still was it really just so easy to feel better after feeling bad? Not always, of course. Not when theres real cause for sadness or when Im caught by sense of loss or longing emerging from somewhere deep or damaged. Thats when I check in with the professionals the therapist, the doctor and the old friends who know me best to see if I need some kind of real tune-up. There was a small, inty part of me that wanted to clutch the misery and hold it close. But you cant wave with a clenched st and you cant really smile with gritted teeth. Maintaining unhappiness was too much work. Trust me when I say that I didnt mean to forget being frustrated, angry and sour-pussed. It just happened. One kind gesture and SHAZAM, there I was with my heart opening like a parachute and my hand waving like a 5-year-olds at a Fourth of July parade. I still picked up dinner on the way home, but decided to get fresh pizza. It went better with the parade.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her website at http://www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Sometimes a wave and smile are all it takes to make a day As home to a rst-magnitude spring in Al exander Springs, it is understandable that the springs legislation making its way through the Florida Senate has the sup port of many here in Lake County. With only about two weeks to go in the legislative session, however, what is not understandable, indeed inexplicable, is the obstinacy of the Florida House leadership, specically Speaker Will Weatherford, in moving that chambers ver sion of the bill forward. The House bill, a companion to SB 1576, sponsored by Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, has yet to be heard by a single House committee, and as a result Weather ford recently told reporters that it is very unlikely to pass this session. It is hard to comprehend that anyone with the power to make substantive strides toward helping Floridas springs, its 33 rst-magnitude springs in particular, recover from years of over pumping and overpollution would not do so. There is a growing consensus in the Legislature that time is running out to reverse the long-running degradation of Floridas springs. Deans bill, which was written with the input of four other Senate committee chairmen, would establish new regulations and protection zones for our springs, including mandated conversion to public wastewater systems where possible. It importantly also would set up a long-term funding source without raising taxes one cent. Weatherford has tried using funding as a reason why springs legislation will not be possible this year, but it is merely a smokescreen because Deans bill addresses it easily and smartly. That some of the states biggest business groups suddenly got concerned about our springs and water policy once Deans bill emerged is probably a better explanation for Weatherfords hesitance to push the measure forward. Associated Industries of Florida, the Florida Chamber and the Florida Homebuild ers Association, all of which have never shown an interest in springs protection, suddenly jumped into the discussion when they saw SB 1576 had some substance and support. Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scott, who has been blasting press releases across the state touting his support for the springs, has remained noticeably silent on the springs legislation and Weatherfords inaction. If the governor is truly interested in long-term springs protection and restoration, now would be a good time to raise his voice. Time is running out in this legislative session to bring meaningful springs restoration to fruition. We urge our state Reps. Larry Metz and Marlene OToole to urge Weather ford to open the way for the House version of the springs protection bill to move ahead. Its sensible and overdue.From the Halifax Media Group.AVOICETime running out on springs protection bill Classic DOONESBURY 1973When I realized that my fundamental perception of the day could pivot both immediately and entirely on the smallest of incidents, I admit to being startled. I was happily surprised, of course, but still was it really just so easy to feel better after feeling bad?

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 9

Cycles Cycles 352-330-00479807 N. HWY 301, WILDWOODWWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.COM 2007 HONDA SHADOW 750Only $4,300 2009 YAMAHA 950Only $5,700 2007 HONDA SHADOW 1100Only $4,300 2006 YAMAHA U-STAR 650Only $4,200Huge Selection of New & Pre-owned Bikes Only $6,500 2006 YAMAHA V-STAROnly $4,200 Service SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014www.dailycommercial.comBOXING: Bernard Hopkins to step in ring at 49 / B5 MONTVERDE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMontverde Academy added the latest jewel to its growing sports com plex on Thursday when the school held an open ing ceremony and rib bon cutting for its new aquatic center. School Headmaster Dr. Kasey Kesselring spoke at the ceremo ny, which was attended by former Headmas ter Walter L. Stephens, members of the schools Board of Trustees and ofcials from the South Lake Chamber of Commerce. The facility, which is located on the east side of The Nest, the Mont verde Academy Cen ter for Sportsmanship and Wellness, is 84-feet long, 62-feet wide. It is six-feet deep at each end and four-feet deep in the middle. Kesselring indicat ed the facility will be used as a training facility for Montverde Acade my Boys and Girls swim teams. As part of the cer emony, members of the schools swim teams swam a lap in the pool. In the past sever al years, Montverde Academy has upgraded its sports complex with a new football-soc cer-track facility, as well as new baseball and softball elds. The Nest, home to Montverde Montverde Academy opens swimming poolBRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALMembers of the Montverde Academy swim team dive into the schools new pool during opening ceremonies on Thursday at the school. MINNEOLA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake Minneola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole is conducting two youth basketball camps in May for play ers looking to improve their fundamentals and ability to perform in game situations. The two-day camps are May 2-3 and May 2324 at the Lake Minneo la High School gymnasium for boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 17. Cost of the camps is $50. The rst day for both camps will run from 5 to 8 / p .m. and the second day, which is a Satuday, will begin at 9 / a.m. and end at noon. Cole is the only boys basketball coach in Lake Minneolas history. He led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 201314 and the Florida High School Athletic Association Class 6A state championship game. After a college career at Bethune-Cookman in Daytona Beach, Cole played professionally overseas before becom ing a high-school coach. Lake Minneola is 60-22 during Coles three sea sons at the helm. Registration forms for the camp are available on request. Email coal are colef@lake.k12..us to obtain a registration form or for any ques tions. Cole said spots in both camps are lling fast. Ive had 15 people sign up the rst day I put out a sign-up sheet, Cole said. I planned to stop at 50, but I will gauge any additional in terest in the camp if we get to 50 registrations.LMHS hoops coach schedules 2 camps Orlando coach Jacque Vaughn calls out a play to his team during the rst half of Mondays game against Chicago at the United Center in Chicago. Vaughn led the Magic to a 23-59 record in his second season with the MagicJEFF HAYNES / AP KYLE HIGHTOWERAssociated PressORLANDO Its been two seasons since the Or lando Magic went through near-wholesale changes that included a franchise players exit and bringing in a new general manager and coaching staff. The two seasons since have produced just 20 and 23 victories, respectively, following Wednesday nights season nale. While fans havent seen a lot of positive on-court re sults yet, the new regime is hoping that it can remain patient entering what could the most pivotal off season to date of the cur rent rebuilding project. I think if you look back on the year, I think we made some positive strides. Strides in the right direction, Magic gener al manager Rob Hennigan said Thursday.Magic enter offseason with confidence LYNNE SLADKY / AP San Antonios Tony Parker, right, and Miamis LeBron James collide during Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals in Miami. A rematch of last years thrilling NBA Finals nish is possible, but the Spurs and Heat would have to get through tough paths to get there. TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI Before the season started, a poll suggested that the Miami Heat were the over whelming favorite to win the NBA title, col lecting a whopping 76 percent of ballots cast. The voters werent some know-nothings, either. No, this was a polling of NBA general manag ers. Things seem quite a bit different now. The Heat dont seem like locks for a third straight title anymore. San Antonio and Indiana are top seeds. Brooklyn, Chicago, the Los Angeles Clippers, Oklahoma City, Gold en State, Houston, Portland and the Heat all gure to have a legitimate chance at be ing the club to hoist the NBA playoffs look wide open SEE SWIM | B2SEE NBA | B2SEE MAGIC | B2

PAGE 10

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana vs. Atlanta Saturday, April 19: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Indiana at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Miami vs. Charlotte Sunday, April 20: Charlotte at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto vs. Brooklyn Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn at Toronto, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Chicago vs. Washington Sunday, April 20: Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Chicago at Washington, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Dallas Sunday, April 20: Dallas at San Antonio, 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: San Antonio at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City vs. Memphis Saturday, April 19: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Monday, April 21: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers vs. Golden State Saturday, April 19: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Monday, April 21: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Houston vs. Portland Sunday, April 20: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Detroit vs. Boston Friday, April 18: Detroit at Boston, late Sunday, April 20: Detroit at Boston, 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Boston at Detroit, 8 p.m. Montreal 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal at Tampa Bay, late Sunday, April 20: Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh 1, Columbus 0 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, Noon Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Friday, April 25: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 1, Minnesota 0 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Minnesota at Colorado, 9:30 p.m. Monday, April 21: Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Colorado at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. St. Louis 1, Chicago 0 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: Chicago at St. Louis, 3 p.m. Monday, April 21: St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: St. Louis at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Anaheim 1, Dallas 0 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Dallas at Anaheim, late Monday, April 21: Anaheim at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Thursday, April 24: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour RBC Heritage Friday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,101; Par 71 (36-35) Partial Second Round a-denotes amateur K.J. Choi 70-67 137 Scott Langley 66-73 139 Luke Donald 70-69 139 Billy Hurley III 70-69 139 Nicholas Thompson 70-70 140 Geoff Ogilvy 72-68 140 Charl Schwartzel 70-70 140 Tim Herron 69-72 141 Brian Stuard 69-72 141 Kevin Streelman 69-72 141 Harris English 68-73 141 William McGirt 66-76 142 Chris Stroud 71-71 142 Stewart Cink 70-72 142 Charles Howell III 69-73 142 a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 71-71 142 Camilo Villegas 72-71 143 John Mallinger 69-74 143 J.B. Holmes 72-71 143 Ken Duke 72-71 143 Jordan Spieth 69-74 143 Patrick Reed 71-72 143 Tim Clark 72-71 143 Pat Perez 74-69 143 Andrew Loupe 70-73 143 Briny Baird 72-72 144 Jonathan Byrd 71-73 144 Zach Johnson 71-73 144 Jason Kokrak 71-73 144 Robert Garrigus 71-74 145 Ryo Ishikawa 77-68 145 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 74-71 145 Ricky Barnes 72-73 145 Erik Compton 70-75 145 Kevin Kisner 73-72 145 David Toms 73-73 146 Brendon Todd 75-71 146 James Hahn 72-74 146 Mark Anderson 71-75 146 Charlie Beljan 73-74 147 Josh Teater 74-73 147 Mike Weir 73-74 147 Brendon de Jonge 72-75 147 Aaron Baddeley 71-76 147 Kevin Chappell 75-72 147 a-Hunter Stewart 74-73 147 Danny Lee 72-76 148 Jim Renner 75-73 148 Charlie Wi 73-75 148 Lucas Glover 69-79 148 Marc Leishman 72-76 148 Kevin Na 72-76 148 Tom Watson 75-73 148 Chad Collins 73-75 148 Mark Wilson 74-75 149 Hideki Matsuyama 71-79 150 Davis Love III 70-80 150 Kyle Stanley 77-73 150 Jason Bohn 74-76 150 Kevin Tway 70-80 150 Bryce Molder 74-78 152 Martin Laird 72-81 153 James Driscoll 77-76 153 Russell Henley 76-78 154 Ben Curtis 79-76 155 Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. K.J. Choi -5 F 2. Robert Allenby -4 5 3. Luke Donald -3 F 3. Billy Hurley III -3 F 3. Bo Van Pelt -3 5 3. Ben Martin -3 4 3. Scott Langley -3 F 8. Geoff Ogilvy -2 F 8. Graeme McDowell -2 6 8. Jim Furyk -2 7 8. Charl Schwartzel -2 F 8. Ted Potter, Jr. -2 7 8. Nicholas Thompson -2 F 8. Brian Harman -2 5 8. Matt Every -2 7 Champions Tour Greater Gwinnett Friday At TPC Sugarloaf Duluth, Ga. Purse: $1.8 million Yardage: 7,131; Par 72 First Round Miguel A. Jimenez 35-30 65 Steve Pate 33-35 68 Bernhard Langer 36-32 68 Kenny Perry 35-33 68 Fred Couples 35-34 69 Jeff Sluman 36-33 69 Rod Spittle 35-35 70 Colin Montgomerie 35-35 70 P.H. Horgan III 35-35 70 Jeff LeMaster 35-35 70 Chien Soon Lu 34-37 71 Duffy Waldorf 36-35 71 Gary Hallberg 34-37 71 Peter Jacobsen 35-36 71 Bob Gilder 36-35 71 Roger Chapman 38-33 71 Jay Haas 35-36 71 Marco Dawson 33-38 71 Joey Sindelar 38-34 72 Bill Glasson 38-34 72 Mike Goodes 35-37 72 Peter Senior 38-34 72 Billy Andrade 37-35 72 Brian Henninger 37-35 72 Joel Edwards 37-35 72 Kirk Triplett 37-35 72 Michael Allen 37-35 72 David Frost 34-38 72 Fred Funk 35-37 72 Mike Reid 37-35 72 Nick Price 37-35 72 Esteban Toledo 36-36 72 Mark McNulty 34-38 72 Anders Forsbrand 38-35 73 Larry Mize 35-38 73 Wes Short, Jr. 36-37 73 Rocco Mediate 37-36 73 Mark Calcavecchia 37-36 73 Bart Bryant 38-35 73 Hale Irwin 35-38 73 Russ Cochran 35-38 73 Olin Browne 35-38 73 Bob Tway 37-36 73 Scott Dunlap 38-35 73 Morris Hatalsky 36-38 74 Wayne Levi 36-38 74 TV2DAY AUTO RACING 2:30 a.m.NBCSN Formula One, Chinese Grand Prix, at ShanghaiBOXING 9:30 p.m.SHO Champion Peter Quillin (30-0-0) vs. Lukas Konecny (50-4-0), for WBO mid dleweight title; champion Shawn Porter (23-0-1) vs. Paulie Malignaggi (33-5-0), for IBF welterweight title; IBF champion Bernard Hopkins (54-6-2) vs. WBA champion Beibut Shumenov (14-1-0) for IBF/WBA light heavyweight titles, at WashingtonCOLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m.SUN LSU at Mississippi2 p.m.BHSN South Carolina at Auburn Note: BHSN is available to Bright House cable subscribers8 p.m.ESPNU Baylor at Kansas St.COLLEGE SOFTBALL 7:30 p.m.SUN Texas at OklahomaGOLF 6:30 a.m.TGC European PGA Tour, Malaysian Open, third round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, The Heritage, third round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C.3 p.m.CBS PGA Tour, The Heritage, third round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. TGC Champions Tour, Greater Gwinnett Championship, second round, at Duluth, Ga.6:30 p.m.TGC LPGA, LOTTE Championship, nal round, at Kapolei, HawaiiMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.FS1 L.A. Angels at Detroit4 p.m.MLB Houston at Oakland7 p.m.SUN N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay FS-Florida Seattle at Miami8 p.m.FS1 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers WGN Chicago White Sox at Texas9 p.m.FS1 Arizona at L.A. DodgersMIXED MARTIAL ARTS 8 p.m.FOX UFC, middleweights, Brad Tavares (12-2-0) vs. Yoel Romero (7-1-0); lightweights, Donald Cerrone (22-6-0) vs. Edson Barboza (13-1-0); bantamweights, Miesha Tate (135-0) vs. Liz Carmouche (8-4-0); heavyweights, Fabricio Werdum (17-5-1) vs. Travis Browne (16-1-1), at OrlandoNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 12:30 p.m.ESPN Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Brooklyn at Toronto3:30 p.m.ABC Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Golden State at L.A. Clippers7 p.m.ESPN Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Atlanta at Indiana9:30 p.m.ESPN Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Memphis at Oklahoma CityNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 3 p.m.NBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, Game 2, Chicago at St. Louis7 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, Game 2, Columbus at Pittsburgh9:30 p.m.NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, Game 2, Minnesota at ColoradoSOCCER 7:40 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Fulham at Tottenham9:55 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Stoke City at Cardiff City12:30 p.m.NBC Premier League, Sunderland at Chelsea4 p.m.NBCSN MLS, New England at ChicagoSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED Academys two-time national championship boys basketball team, opened in 2012. In his speech, Kesselring praised the efforts of everyone involved in the construction of the pool, including Brad Long, the schools business man ager, for his budgetary help and dedication in making the project a reality. SWIM FROM PAGE B1 Larry OBrien Trophy in a couple of months. Usually, the NBA play offs arent so wide open. Things might change over the next couple of months. There are 16 teams that have a chance to win it, said Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks, whose team is seeded No. 2 in the West. If youre in the play offs, you have a chance. There are some good teams. Any team can beat each other. The West is deep. There are two teams that are really good that didnt make it and had great years. Its denitely open. Theres a lot of good basketball teams that are ghting for the championship. For as good as San An tonio and Indiana were all year well, for most of the year in Indianas case, before the Pac ers faltered down the stretch its never a certainty that the No. 1 seeds reach the NBA Fi nals. Its happened that way only 11 times in the last 35 years. Then again, the last time that there wasnt either a No. 1 or a No. 2 in the title series was 1978. So while upsets can happen, its not all that common to see bracket craziness akin to a No. 7 and No. 8 seeds Connecticut and Kentucky playing for the NCAA title ear lier this month happening in the same NBA playoff season. It is going to be tre mendous from a fans standpoint, watching, Golden State coach Mark Jackson said. It going to be a lot of fun. Brooklyns Jason Kidd has plenty of postsea son experience as a player. He believes the NBA championship is up for grabs, but also probably knows his tory doesnt favor his sixth-seeded club. Since 1979, only ve teams seeded No. 4 or lower in their confer ence have reached the nals. But Kidd sees reason for hope. Its always wide open, said Kidd, the rst-year coach of the Nets a veteran-lad en team put together to win a title this season. You guys sometimes limit it to just two teams but guys that are play ing on a daily basis in the Western Conference and the Eastern Confer ence feel like theyve got a chance. This year, that doesnt just seem like coach speak. Take the East. On paper, the biggest mis match is No. 1 Indiana against No. 8 Atlanta, especially because the Hawks are the only sub.500 team in the play offs. And just a couple weeks ago, the Hawks went to Indianapolis and absolutely embar rassed the Pacers, running out to a 32-point halftime lead in one of the more stunning games of the entire NBA season. Theres some good teams out there, Pac ers coach Frank Vogel said. Every team in the playoffs have given us some problems. Weve been able to win against them as well. But its certainly shaped out to be a good conference. No. 5 Washington won the season series over No. 4 Chi cago. Out West, the third-seeded Clippers and sixth-seeded Golden State split four meet ings. Memphis ousted Oklahoma City a year ago and those clubs meet in the rst round. And San Antonios quest to avenge last years loss in the NBA Finals starts against Dallas the last team to beat Miami in a seven-game series, win ning the title in 2011. So there are some good stories, and theres intrigue with every rstround series. That doesnt mean everyone in the league thinks itll be a year laden with surprises. Philadelphia coach Brett Brown put it simply to him, the game changes in the playoffs, period. The regular season and the playoffs are like two different sports, Brown said. If you put me in a bubble and you drag me out in May, I can say this is different than the game Im seeing in November. Its just entirely different. Thats why Brown, a former Spurs assistant, thinks theres a very small number of teams capable of winning it all. To be the last man standing is so ridicu lously hard, Brown said. People have no idea what its like to play in June. NBA FROM PAGE B1 I think clearly the win-loss record was not very good. Were all aware of that. We all know that has to im prove. But I think there are some deeper layers to it, and I think that if you look at the way our guys competed consistently, I thought the spirit of the team was pretty good, he said. That spirit, combined with solid seasons from No. 2 overall draft pick Victor Oladipo and third-year center Nik Vucevic, gives team ofcials even more con dence as they head into a summer highlighted by two lottery picks in Junes draft, and lots of roster exibility to po tentially bring in veter an pieces as well. As has been his style, Hennigan was short on specics about what could happen in the coming months. But he reiterated that whatever happened, that it wouldnt be a devia tion from the process he had in mind when he took the job. I think well continue to try to do our work to identify the best ways to improve the team, Hennigan said. And what we dont want to do is skip any steps. So I think well be methodical, well continue to be very stra tegic in how we add to the team, how we im prove the team. The draft is certainly one area to do that. I also think that well continue to be oppor tunistic in actively exploring what options exist in free agency and trades. So were not bound to just one bas ket. Were looking for ways to improve all the way around, he said. Its a mantra that has clearly trickled down to and is being fully em braced his head coach as well. I think there are more steps than just the win and loss column. You can prepare to win. Theres also cultivating, Magic coach Jacque Vaughn said. Its similar to a garden. You have to cultivate, you have to feed it. You got to weed out some things. You got to fer tilize it. So theres steps to making that garden grow. And I think its the same way in cultivating a winning culture, he said. Orlandos current roster features just four players over the age of 25. Point guard Jameer Nelson, who has spent his entire 10-year ca reer in Orlando, is the Magics longest-tenured player at age 32. He embraced a mentorship role with Olad ipo this year, which Oladipo said was ben ecial in helping him navigate through the ups and downs of a rookie season. Still, there is uncer tainty about wheth er Nelson will be a part of the rebuild next sea son. He is due $8 million in the nal year of his contract in 2014-15, but the Magic would owe him only $2 mil lion if he is waived by July 15. Nelson acknowledged there have been internal conversations with team ofcials about his future with the team, but he de clined to elaborate. I would be lying to you if I said I didnt (have talks), Nelson said. I did, but Im not going to disclose that with you guys. Ill keep that internal. As Ive al ways done in the past. Like I said before, its the teams option. I would love to continue to play here and be here and see this thing turn around. Ill just keep my ngers crossed. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 10 6 .625 7-3 W-5 6-3 4-3 Toronto 8 8 .500 2 5-5 L-2 3-3 5-5 Baltimore 7 7 .500 2 6-4 W-2 4-4 3-3 Boston 7 9 .438 3 1 5-5 W-2 2-4 5-5 Tampa Bay 7 9 .438 3 1 3-7 L-4 4-4 3-5 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 7 5 .583 5-5 W-1 5-2 2-3 Minnesota 8 7 .533 6-4 W-2 5-4 3-3 Chicago 8 8 .500 1 5-5 L-2 6-4 2-4 Kansas City 7 7 .500 1 5-5 W-3 4-2 3-5 Cleveland 7 8 .467 1 1 4-6 L-1 3-3 4-5 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 10 5 .667 8-2 L-1 3-3 7-2 Texas 9 7 .563 1 6-4 W-3 7-3 2-4 Los Angeles 7 8 .467 3 1 5-5 W-1 3-6 4-2 Seattle 7 8 .467 3 1 3-7 L-3 2-3 5-5 Houston 5 11 .313 5 3 2-8 L-4 3-7 2-4 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 10 5 .667 6-4 L-1 4-2 6-3 Washington 9 7 .563 1 1 5-5 L-1 4-3 5-4 New York 8 7 .533 2 1 6-4 W-3 2-4 6-3 Philadelphia 7 8 .467 3 2 4-6 W-1 4-5 3-3 Miami 6 10 .375 4 4 1-9 L-1 6-4 0-6 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 11 5 .688 7-3 L-1 5-4 6-1 St. Louis 10 6 .625 1 7-3 W-1 4-2 6-4 Pittsburgh 8 8 .500 3 2 4-6 W-1 5-2 3-6 Cincinnati 7 9 .438 4 3 5-5 W-3 4-5 3-4 Chicago 4 11 .267 6 5 3-7 L-5 2-5 2-6 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 10 6 .625 6-4 W-1 2-3 8-3 San Francisco 10 6 .625 5-5 L-1 5-4 5-2 Colorado 8 9 .471 2 2 5-5 W-1 4-2 4-7 San Diego 7 9 .438 3 3 5-5 L-1 5-5 2-4 Arizona 4 14 .222 7 7 3-7 L-6 1-11 3-3 THURSDAYS GAMESDetroit 7, Cleveland 5 Minnesota 7, Toronto 0, 1st game Texas 8, Seattle 6 N.Y. Yankees 10, Tampa Bay 2 Minnesota 9, Toronto 5, 2nd game Boston 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Kansas City 5, Houston 1THURSDAYS GAMESPhiladelphia 1, Atlanta 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1 Colorado 3, San Diego 1 Pittsburgh 11, Milwaukee 2 St. Louis 8, Washington 0FRIDAYS GAMESToronto at Cleveland, late L.A. Angels at Detroit, late Baltimore at Boston, late N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, late Seattle at Miami, late Chicago White Sox at Texas, late Minnesota at Kansas City, late Houston at Oakland, lateFRIDAYS GAMESCincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 1 Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Washington, late Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, late Seattle at Miami, late Philadelphia at Colorado, late Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late San Francisco at San Diego, late STEVE NESIUS / AP New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter throws to rst after elding a ground ball hit by Tampa Bays Matt Joyce during the rst inning of Fridays game in St. Petersburg. TODAYS GAMESToronto (Buehrle 3-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 1-1), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 2-1) at Detroit (Scherzer 0-1), 1:08 p.m. Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1) at Boston (Doubront 1-2), 1:35 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 0-1) at Kansas City (B.Chen 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Houston (Oberholtzer 0-3) at Oakland (Kazmir 2-0), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nova 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Archer 1-1), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Elias 1-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-0) at Texas (Lewis 0-1), 8:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESSt. Louis (Lynn 3-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-0), 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Cingrani 1-1) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-1), 2:20 p.m. Milwaukee (Garza 0-2) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (E.Santana 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Colon 1-2), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Elias 1-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (Bolsinger 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 2-0), 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-1) at Colorado (Lyles 2-0), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (Hudson 2-0) at San Diego (Stults 0-2), 8:40 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: AlRamirez, Chicago, .381; Solarte, New York, .373; Ellsbury, New York, .364; Colabello, Minnesota, .357; Callaspo, Oakland, .357. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 18; Eaton, Chicago, 15; Bautista, Toronto, 14; AlRamirez, Chicago, 13; Calhoun, Los Angeles, 12; Mauer, Minnesota, 12; Trout, Los Angeles, 12. RBI: Colabello, Minnesota, 19; Moss, Oakland, 15; Abreu, Chicago, 14; Brantley, Cleveland, 14; AlRamirez, Chicago, 14. HITS: AlRamirez, Chicago, 24; MeCabrera, Toronto, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; Colabello, Minnesota, 20; Ells bury, New York, 20. DOUBLES: Colabello, Minnesota, 9; SPerez, Kansas City, 7; Solarte, New York, 7; Beltran, New York, 6; De Jennings, Tampa Bay, 6; ACabrera, Cleveland, 5; Ells bury, New York, 5; Kouzmanoff, Texas, 5; Lowrie, Oakland, 5. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 36 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Bautista, Toronto, 6; Dozier, Minnesota, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Abreu, Chicago, 4; Beltran, New York, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; Hart, Seattle, 4; Pujols, Los Angeles, 4; AlRamirez, Chicago, 4; ASoriano, New York, 4. STOLEN BASES: Ellsbury, New York, 7; Andrus, Texas, 6; Altuve, Houston, 5; RDavis, Detroit, 5; Dozier, Minne sota, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 4; Rios, Texas, 4. PITCHING: Gibson, Minnesota, 3-0; FHernandez, Seat tle, 3-0; Sale, Chicago, 3-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 3-0. ERA: Darvish, Texas, 0.82; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84; Buehrle, Toronto, 0.86; Gibson, Minnesota, 0.93; Gray, Oakland, 0.95; Pineda, New York, 1.00; Ross Jr, Texas, 1.00. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 39; Lester, Boston, 29; Sale, Chicago, 29; Price, Tampa Bay, 28; Tanaka, New York, 28; Sabathia, New York, 27. SAVES: Axford, Cleveland, 5; Holland, Kansas City, 5; Kelley, New York, 4; TomHunter, Baltimore, 4; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 4; Santos, Toronto, 4; Perkins, Minnesota, 3; Rodney, Seattle, 3; Uehara, Boston, 3.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Utley, Philadelphia, .462; Blackmon, Colorado, .411; Freeman, Atlanta, .389; Pagan, San Francisco, .377; Uribe, Los Angeles, .375; DGordon, Los Angeles, .373; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, .369. RUNS: MCarpenter, St. Louis, 13; Freeman, Atlanta, 12; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 12; CGomez, Milwaukee, 12; Marte, Pittsburgh, 12; Stanton, Miami, 12; EYoung, New York, 12. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 21; Trumbo, Arizona, 18; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 15; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 14; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 13; CGonzalez, Colorado, 13; McGehee, Miami, 13. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 24; Uribe, Los Angeles, 24; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; Blackmon, Colorado, 23; Pagan, San Francisco, 23. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 8; Uribe, Los Angeles, 8; ECabrera, San Diego, 7; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 7; Utley, Philadelphia, 7; Adams, St. Louis, 6; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 6; Hill, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6. TRIPLES: Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2; 41 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 6; Trumbo, Arizona, 6; Belt, San Francisco, 5; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 5; Stanton, Miami, 5; Walker, Pittsburgh, 5; 8 tied at 4. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 10; EYoung, New York, 9; Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 5; Marte, Pittsburgh, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5. PITCHING: Machi, San Francisco, 3-0; Lynn, St. Louis, 3-0; Greinke, Los Angeles, 3-0; Ryu, Los Angeles, 3-1; Avilan, Atlanta, 3-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 3-1. ERA: Simon, Cincinnati, 0.86; Harang, Atlanta, 0.96; Cashner, San Diego, 1.27; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.29; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.46; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.50. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 35; Strasburg, Washington, 33; Fernandez, Miami, 33; Wainwright, St. Louis, 32; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 28; ClLee, Philadelphia, 28; Cashner, San Diego, 27. SAVES: Street, San Diego, 5; Jansen, Los Angeles, 5; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 5; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 4; Hawkins, Colo rado, 4; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 4; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 4; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 4. Reds 4, Cubs 1 Cincinnati Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 0 1 1 Bonifac 2b 3 0 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 Lak e lf 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 2 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 2 0 RSantg 2b 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 5 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 1 1 0 Frazier 3b 3 1 0 0 Sw eeny cf 4 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 1 2 0 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 Berndn lf 0 0 0 0 V aluen 3b 2 0 1 1 Mesorc c 3 1 1 0 Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 1 Kalish ph 1 0 0 0 Simon p 3 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 N.Soto ph 1 0 1 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 8 2 T otals 33 1 6 1 Cincinnati 000 012 010 4 Chicago 000 000 100 1 EFrazier (3), Bonifacio (2), Castillo (1). LOBCin cinnati 9, Chicago 8. 2BB.Hamilton (2), Bruce (2), Castillo (2). SBB.Hamilton (5), Votto (1), Frazier (2), Mesoraco (1), N.Soto (1). SB.Hamilton. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Simon W,2-1 6 4 1 0 2 3 LeCure H,2 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 3 M.Parra H,2 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Broxton S,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 2 Chicago Samardzija L,0-2 7 6 3 1 2 7 Grimm 1 1 1 1 1 1 Russell 1 1 0 0 1 2 Simon pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. WPSamardzija, Grimm. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jim Joyce. T:09. A,699 (41,072).Late Thursday Red Sox 3, White Sox 1 Boston Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 1 1 Bogarts ss 3 1 1 1 Semien 3b 4 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 V iciedo rf 4 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 1 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0 K onerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Carp ph 1 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 GSizmr pr-lf 0 1 0 0 De Aza lf 3 0 1 0 D.Ross c 2 0 1 1 Abreu ph 1 0 0 0 Nava rf 3 0 0 0 Flowr s c 3 1 2 0 RRorts 3b 3 0 0 0 LeGarc 2b 2 0 1 0 JHerrr ph-3b 1 0 1 1 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 5 3 T otals 33 1 8 1 Boston 000 001 002 3 Chicago 000 001 000 1 DPChicago 2. LOBBoston 6, Chicago 6. 2BD. Ross (2), De Aza (1), Le.Garcia (1). HRBogaerts (1). SLe.Garcia. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lester W,2-2 8 7 1 1 0 9 Uehara S,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago Sale 7 1 1 1 3 10 Belisario L,1-2 1 1/3 3 2 2 2 1 Downs 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Sale (Bogaerts). UmpiresHome, Jim Joyce; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Cory Blaser. T:54. A,454 (40,615).Yankees 10, Rays 2 New York T ampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 4 2 2 2 Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 2 1 DJnngs dh 3 0 0 0 Anna ss 0 0 0 0 F orsyth lf-1b 4 1 1 0 Beltran rf 5 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 0 2 0 Gardnr lf 0 0 0 0 Myer s rf 2 0 0 0 ASorin dh 5 2 3 1 SRdrgz 1b 3 1 1 1 McCnn c 5 2 2 2 Jo yce ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 5 1 3 2 Guyer cf 4 0 0 0 SSizmr 1b 3 1 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 2 0 KJhnsn ph-1b 2 0 0 0 JMolin c 4 0 1 0 BRorts 2b 5 2 3 2 ISuzuki lf-rf 4 0 0 0 Totals 42 10 16 10 T otals 32 2 7 1 New York 130 021 102 10 Tampa Bay 000 100 100 2 EB.Roberts (1), Y.Escobar (1). DPNew York 1, Tampa Bay 1. TPNew York 1. LOBNew York 7, Tampa Bay 7. 2BJeter (3), Solarte (7), S.Sizemore (1), B.Roberts (1), Longoria (4), Y.Escobar (3). 3BEll sbury (1), B.Roberts (1). HRA.Soriano (4), McCann (3), Solarte (1), S.Rodriguez (2). SFEllsbury. IP H R ER BB SO New York Sabathia W,2-2 7 7 2 1 2 6 Betances 2 0 0 0 2 3 Tampa Bay Price L,2-1 5 10 6 6 1 6 H.Bell 1 2/3 3 2 1 0 1 Lueke 1 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 2 2 2 0 0 PBMcCann, J.Molina. UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Clint Fagan. T:13. A,085 (31,042).Cardinals 8, Nationals 0 St. Louis W ashington ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 5 2 2 0 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 Wong 2b 6 1 2 1 Har per lf 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 1 2 2 W erth rf 4 0 0 0 Roinsn rf 1 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 1 3 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 T.Cruz ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 6 0 1 1 McLoth cf 3 0 0 0 Craig rf-lf 5 0 1 0 Loaton c 2 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 5 1 2 0 Jordan p 2 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 2 1 0 T reinen p 0 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 3 1 2 1 Souza ph 0 0 0 0 Ble vins p 0 0 0 0 Totals 43 8 14 8 T otals 29 0 2 0 St. Louis 300 103 100 8 Washington 000 000 000 0 EWerth (2), Desmond 2 (7), Espinosa (2). DPWash ington 1. LOBSt. Louis 15, Washington 5. 2BHolliday (5), Jh.Peralta (3), Wainwright (1). SWainwright. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis Wainwright W,3-1 9 2 0 0 3 8 Washington Jordan L,0-2 5 1/3 7 7 5 2 4 Treinen 2 2/3 6 1 1 1 3 Blevins 1 1 0 0 2 0 HBPby Jordan (Jay). WPTreinen. UmpiresHome, Bill Miller; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Greg Gibson. T:10. A,987 (41,408).Pirates 11, Brewers 2 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 4 1 1 0 Mar te lf 4 3 2 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 RMar tn c 3 1 2 1 Braun rf 4 1 1 0 AMcCt cf 5 1 1 3 ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 1 P Alvrz 3b 3 1 2 3 Lucroy c 3 0 2 1 NW alkr 2b 5 0 0 0 KDavis lf 4 0 1 0 GSnchz 1b 4 1 1 1 MrRynl 1b 4 0 0 0 Snider rf 3 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 3 0 2 0 Mercer ss 4 2 2 0 Gallard p 1 0 0 0 V olquez p 2 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 1 0 0 0 JHr rsn ph 1 1 1 2 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 T abata ph 1 1 1 1 Wang p 0 0 0 0 Mor ris p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 8 2 T otals 35 11 12 11 Milwaukee 101 000 000 2 Pittsburgh 200 000 36x 11 ELucroy (1). LOBMilwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 6. 2B Braun (2), Tabata (2). HRA.McCutchen (1), P.Alvarez (6), G.Sanchez (3), J.Harrison (1). SBMarte 2 (5). CSLucroy (2), Gennett (1), P.Alvarez (1). SSegura, Gallardo. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo 6 3 2 2 4 6 Wooten L,0-1 1/3 3 3 3 1 0 Duke 2/3 0 0 0 1 1 Wang 1 6 6 6 0 0 Pittsburgh Volquez W,1-0 7 8 2 2 1 3 Melancon H,6 1 0 0 0 0 1 Morris 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPGallardo, Volquez. UmpiresHome, Manny Gonzalez; First, Sean Barber; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T:06. A,584 (38,362).Rockies 3, Padres 1 Colorado San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf-lf 4 0 0 0 ECarer ss 4 0 1 0 Cuddyr rf 3 0 0 0 Denor rf 4 0 2 0 Barnes rf 1 0 0 0 Gyor ko 2b 3 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 3 1 1 0 Nady lf 4 1 1 1 Logan p 0 0 0 0 Grandl c 3 0 1 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 0 0 Medica 1b 3 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 V enale cf 3 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 1 1 0 0 Amar st 3b 2 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Hundly ph 1 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 1 Alonso 3b 0 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 3 0 2 1 K enndy p 2 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 0 0 V incent p 0 0 0 0 Morals p 2 0 0 0 Headly ph 1 0 1 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Tha yer p 0 0 0 0 Stubbs ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 4 3 T otals 30 1 6 1 Colorado 000 000 300 3 San Diego 000 100 000 1 DPColorado 3, San Diego 1. LOBColorado 3, San Diego 3. 2BDickerson (1), Morneau (4), Arenado (5), E.Cabrera (7). HRNady (3). SBArenado (1). IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Morales W,1-1 6 4 1 1 1 5 Brothers H,4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Logan H,2 1 1 0 0 0 0 Hawkins S,4-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 San Diego Kennedy L,1-3 7 4 3 3 2 7 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 0 Thayer 1 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:38. A,557 (42,302).Twins 9, Blue Jays 5Second Game Toronto Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi MeCarr lf 4 1 1 0 Dozier 2b 4 3 2 1 Rasms dh 5 0 0 0 Mauer dh 3 2 0 0 Bautist rf 4 2 1 1 Colaell 1b 4 0 3 3 Encrnc 1b 3 1 2 1 K ubel lf 4 0 1 2 Navarr c 4 1 2 1 Pinto c 2 1 0 0 Lawrie 3b 5 0 1 1 Hr mnn rf 4 1 0 0 Gose cf 2 0 0 0 Nunez 3b 3 0 1 0 Goins 2b 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 1 0 Diaz ss 3 0 1 0 Plouffe ph 0 0 0 0 Flormn pr-ss 0 1 0 0 EEscor ss 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk ph 0 0 0 0 Mstr nn pr-cf 0 1 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 4 T otals 30 9 8 6 Toronto 200 030 000 5 Minnesota 100 020 06x 9 EDeduno (1), Dozier (1). DPMinnesota 2. LOBTo ronto 11, Minnesota 10. 2BColabello 2 (9). HR Bautista (6), Dozier (5). SBGose (1), Dozier 2 (5), Mastroianni (1). CSColabello (1). SGoins, Nunez. SFNavarro. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto McGowan 4 6 3 3 4 3 Loup 2 0 0 0 0 2 Wagner H,3 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Cecil H,5 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Delabar H,3 1/3 0 2 2 2 0 Santos L,0-1 BS,1-5 0 0 3 3 3 0 Happ 2/3 1 1 1 3 1 Minnesota Pelfrey 4 1/3 4 5 4 5 1 Deduno 2 2/3 3 0 0 2 3 Fien W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 McGowan pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Santos pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. HBPby Pelfrey (Diaz). WPSantos 3. UmpiresHome, Pat Hoberg; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Ben May; Third, Eric Cooper. T:37. A,698 (39,021).Royals 5, Astros 1 Kansas City Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 4 2 2 0 F owler cf 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 Springr rf 4 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 JCastro c 4 0 1 0 S.Perez c 4 0 1 1 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 AGordn lf 4 2 2 0 Krauss 1b 4 0 0 0 BButler dh 3 1 1 0 Car ter dh 3 1 0 0 Mostks 3b 4 0 1 1 MDmn 3b 3 0 1 0 AEscor ss 4 0 1 2 Presle y lf 2 0 1 1 Dyson cf 3 0 0 0 V illar ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 34 5 9 5 T otals 30 1 5 1 Kansas City 110 210 000 5 Houston 000 010 000 1 ESpringer (1). DPHouston 1. LOBKansas City 3, Houston 5. 2BAoki (3), S.Perez (7), A.Escobar (3). SBAoki (2). SFPresley. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,1-2 8 4 1 1 2 12 W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 1 Houston Feldman L,2-1 6 9 5 4 1 2 Bass 3 0 0 0 0 1 PBS.Perez. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Ron Kulpa. T:37. A,333 (42,060). Marty Foster; Third, Clint Fagan. T:13. A,085 (31,042). This Date In Baseball April 19 1900 The Philadelphia Phillies beat the Boston Braves 19-17 in 10 innings to set a major league record for most runs scored by two clubs on opening day. The Braves scored nine runs in the ninth inning to put the game into extra innings. 1920 Al Schacht, who later became the Clown Prince of Baseball, was all business in pitching the Senators to a 7-0 victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. 1938 Emmett Mueller of the Phillies and Ernie Koy of the visiting Dodgers homered in their rst major league at-bats as Brooklyn defeated Phila delphia 12-5. 1956 The Brooklyn Dodgers beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 in 10 innings at Jersey Citys Roosevelt Stadium, the rst major league game in New Jersey. 1981 In an International League night game, the Rochester Red Wings and Pawtucket Red Sox played to a 2-2 tie through 32 innings before play was sus pended at 4:07 a.m. The game was completed later in the season with Pawtucket scoring the winning run in the 33rd inning of the longest game in profes sional baseball history. 1987 Rob Deer hit a three-run homer to tie the score and Dale Sveum won the game with a two-run shot as the Milwaukee Brewers rallied for ve runs in the ninth inning to beat the Texas Rangers 6-4 and set an American League record with their 12th straight victory to start the season. 1996 Juan Gonzalez homered and drove in six runs as Texas beat Baltimore 26-7. The Rangers scored 16 runs in the eighth inning one short of the modern major league mark and scored the most runs by an AL team in 41 years. 2004 Seattle became the third team since 1974 to win a game on a balk in extra innings, edging the Oakland 2-1. With runners on rst and third and two out in the bottom of the 14th inning As reliever Jus tin Duchscherer was called for a balk to score Quentin McCracken from third.

PAGE 12

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL LUKE MEREDITHAssociated PressDES MOINES, Iowa One of the more re markable aspects of Connecticuts national title run was that poten tial star Rodney Purvis could only watch his Huskies teammates because of NCAA rules forcing transfers to sit out a year. Hes like a Ferrari sitting in the ga rage that I cant drive, UConn coach Kevin Ollie said. Ollie isnt the only coach watching their rosters fill up with players who have al ready made at least one stop at another college. A recent surge in transfers has turned the once-sleepy late signing period, which this year started Wednesday and runs through May 21, into a monthlong frenzy that has changed college basketball. According to STATS, the number of players who have appeared in a game for more than one Division I school has near ly tripled over the past decade, from 122 in 2004-05 to 325 or one for nearly every school in the country in 2013-14. It used to be that there was a stigma of some type attached to schools that recruit ed outside of the high school ranks, San Di ego State coach Steve Fisher said. You were not considered able to compete with the blue bloods. Well, now the blue bloods recruit transfers, They take one-and-dones. They take guys who have graduated and have one year left. The result is that the college hoops transfer market has exploded. For recent grads look ing for one last shot at the Final Four, dis gruntled players looking for more minutes and junior college stars hoping to land a high-major scholar ship, the late signing period offers hope for players and their new schools. Research by the NCAA shows that the number of transfers from two-year/junior college schools into Division I has re mained steady over the last 10 years or so, hovering between roughly 15 percent and 17 per cent of all Division I players. The real movement, though, is within Divi sion I. According to STATS, the number of trans fers from one Divi sion I school to an other jumped from 259 to 325 from 201213 to 2013-14 alone. That number could go much higher once this years transfers are tal lied. A lot of times kids arent transferring or leaving because of the environment theyre in, Florida coach Billy Donovan said. It generally comes down to one thing, and a lot of times its playing time. Kids now want that in stantaneous success. Negative connotations once associat ed with transfers have faded, and the use of the graduate transfer rule made popular by Super-Bowl winning quarterback Russell Wilson is growing. Wilson left North Carolina State and led Wisconsin to the Rose Bowl as a one-and-done senior. The rule allows im mediate participation to players who have graduated with a year of eligibility left, had yet to use a transfer and had their scholar ship or aid run out at their original school. Those who dont meet all the criteria can ap ply for a waiver. Though grad trans fers still represent a small portion of the transfer market, Iowa States DeAndre Kane highlighted the trend this season in basket ball by leading the Cy clones to their first Sweet 16 in 14 years. I just wanted to go somewhere where I can start over fresh, said Kane, a transfer from Marshall. I (had) one year of basketball left. Marshall and I, we did great things there. But we didnt win a lot. I had a lot of individu al awards. But I want ed to make the tournament. Iowa State has al ready lined up Kanes replacement in for mer UNLV star Bryce Dejean-Jones, and big man Jameel McKay who left Marquette without ever a game should bolster its front court. More high-profile schools are also get ting in on the transfer craze. Donovan, who went 13 years without a transfer, has had one in each of the past five seasons. Arizona transfer guard T.J. McConnell helped the Wildcats spend much of last season ranked No. 1, and Mississippi State transfer Rodney Hood averaged 16.1 points a game for Duke last season. Daytons run to the Elite Eight was sparked by Ohio State transfer Jordan Sibert. The Buckeyes landed for mer Temple forward and graduate trans fer Anthony Lee just weeks after losing to the Flyers in the NCAA tournament. The NCAA said Friday that its Division I Board of Directors next week will look at socalled hardship transfers involving players who change schools citing difficult life cir cumstances. Typically, some of those play ers have been allowed to play immediately but the board will re view a recommenda tion that such transfers sit out a season to focus on their new school and life situa tion while getting an extra year added to their eligibility. The NCAA said the change would provide consistency and reduce concerns about abuse of the waiver process something thats on the mind of Michigan State coach Tom Izzo. Its sad that were in that position, Izzo said. I understand it and everyone wants one. If its a fifth-year guy, I swallow it. But the underclassmen who are transferring and trying to be eligible immediately, I think its free agency and I think its going to hurt our game eventu ally.Hoops free agency? Transfer numbers are upAL BEHRMAN / APTemple forward Anthony Lee, left, pulls a rebound away from Xavier forward Jeff Robinson in a game in 2013 in Cincinnati. Division I coaches are realizing that they can win both now and later with transfers, who are suddenly viewed more like shiny new toys than damaged goods. A recent surge in player movement has turned the once-sleepy late signing period, which started on Wednesday and runs through May 21, into a month-long free agent frenzy thats transformed the game.

PAGE 13

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 BOXING KEVIN DUNLEAVYAssociated PressWASHINGTON As Bernard Hopkins snatched two champi onship belts displayed in front of Beibut Shumenov and moved them to his own spot on the dais, the light heavyweight from Ka zakhstan sat expressionless, seemingly un moved by the brashness of the ageless American. Confrontational showmanship is not unusual in boxing press confer ences. But Thursdays event, promoting a title unication bout, was a fascinating look at how the 49-year-old Hopkins tried to gain a psy chological edge on the 30-year-old Shumenov. Its an edge Hopkins hopes to exploit at the D.C. Armory on Satur day night, when he at tempts to become the oldest ghter to unify world titles. While Hop kins is the IBF champion, Shumenov holds the WBA and IBA belts. With a victory, Hopkins would be in line for a ght with WBC champion Adonis Stephenson. This is an opportu nity for me to represent the 40-and-up club, which is very much alive in the world, Hopkins said. Enjoy and understand that this is history. Im de fending something big ger than my title my legendary, 20-plus-year legacy. Thats more im portant than anything around my waist. Shumenov (14-1) came to the U.S. seven years ago. When he captured the WBA title in his 10th profession al ght, he was the least experienced boxer to win a world light heavy weight crown. Shumenovs star is rising, but leading up to this ght, it has been eclipsed by the charis ma and resume of Hopkins (54-6-2), who won his rst world champi onship when Shumenov was 11 years old. I know a little bit about him, but he knows a lot about me, Hopkins said. So get ready for school, stu dent. This is no disre spect. This is logic. I am the professor, with a PhD-slash-IQ. Hopkins remains true to his words in the ring, where he frustrates foes with experience, guile and, most of all, de fense. Since knocking out Oscar De La Hoya in 2004, 14 of Hopkins last 15 ghts have gone the distance. The only one that didnt was stopped on a foul in the nal round. When this is over with, lets pray he has a career going forward, because I have a track record, Hopkins said. Theres a whole list of names that didnt sur vive the mental beatdown. Physical is one thing. Its the mental. How can a 50-year-old man beat me like that? After the press con ference, Hopkins explained the difference between himself, raised in the projects in Phil adelphia, and Shumenov, who lives in opu lence in Las Vegas and says he has a law degree and speaks ve languages. This has something to do with your inner spirit. What do you have to lose? He has a lot to lose. Hes a lawyer by profession, Hopkins said. Youre not ghting to feed your family. Its a hobby. When a guy ghts for a hob by, they dont last long in the business of hard knocks. With a decline in the prole of the sport in recent decades, many in boxing believe that Hopkins age-defying feats are underappreciated. If Bernard Hopkins was an athlete in any other sport, youd be sick of seeing him on the front of magazines, said Hopkins trainer, Naazim Richardson. People dont know our sport. They dont recognize 30 years old is old in boxing. Promoters have dubbed Saturdays ght History at the Capital. His rst world title bout came at RFK Stadium in 1993 against Roy Jones Jr. Two years later at USAir Arena in Landover, Md., Hopkins won his rst world title when he knocked out Segundo Mercado. He also has had title ghts at the Washington Convention Center and the Showplace Arena in Up per Marlboro, Md. At the end of Thurs days press conference the soft-spoken Shumenov stepped out of character and went offscript, interrupting the events host with a gen tle nudge to his chest, and taking over the po dium. Youre mistaken if youre thinking Im thinking I am ght ing with (a ghter) 50 years old, Shumenov said moments before taking back his WBA and IBF belts. On Sat urday night, were see ing whos taking whose belt. But to the surprise of few, Hopkins had the last laugh, mocking Shumenov as he spoke. Hes got a pulse, Hopkins said. Hes got a pulse. NOTES: A black and white photograph of Hopkins, taken by Ger man photographer Hol ger Keifel, will become part of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gal lerys permanent collection. Hopkins also was presented a plaque of appreciation from the family of former boxing great Joe Frazier. Hopkins was instrumental in funding a statue in Philadelphia of the former heavyweight champion.40-and-up club: Hopkins after more belts MANUEL BALCE CENETA / AP IBF light heavyweight champion Bernard Hopkins, left, speaks during a news conference in Washington on Thursday about his 175-pound unication ght against WBA and IBA light heavyweight boxing champion Beibut Shumenov, front right. Hopkins and Shumenov will ght today at the DC Armory in Washington. TENNIS JEROME PUGMIREAssociated PressPARIS Rafael Nadals mastery of the Monte Carlo clay courts seems to be over. The top-ranked Span iard hopes his con dence isnt gone, too. Nadal lost to fellow Spaniard David Ferrer 7-6 (1), 6-4 in the quar ternals of the Monte Carlo Masters on Fri day, his earliest exit since 2003 at a tournament that helped build his reputation as perhaps the greatest clay-court player of all time. Nad al won eight consecutive titles here from 2005-12, before losing to Novak Djokovic in last years nal. This was Nadals rst loss on clay to Ferrer since 2004, and the 13time Grand Slam champion said he is still try ing to nd his best form after a disappointing loss to Stanislas Wawrinka in the Australian Open nal. After what happened in Australia, (it) was lit tle bit harder for me to nd again the intensity, the condence, the inside power that always I have, Nadal said. Even if I won Rio, I played the nal in Miami, you know, (this) remains something in my mind and in my game. Djokovic looked like he might follow him out, but the Serb nally got the better of the unseed ed Guillermo Garcia-Lo pez of Spain 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 to set up a 34th career meeting against 17-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer. Federer leads Djokovic 17-16 in head-to-heads and they are 1-1 this year, with Federer beat ing him in the Dubai Championship seminals and Djokovic win ning their nal at Indian Wells. The Serb was close to losing against Garcia-Lopez, saving a break point in the fth game of the second set and two more when trailing 15-40 in his next service game. Djokovic then made a crucial break to take a 5-3 lead, served out the set, and then broke Gar cia-Lopez twice at the start of the third. Ferrer hardly needed to dig deep as Nadal committed 44 unforced errors and gave away 10 break-point chances on his serve.Nadal loses in quarterfinals in Monte Carlo SEIZETHE DA Y SSPORTSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

PAGE 14

B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 15

Two trees. Used for very different purposes. One helped usher in life, the other death. As Mary stood at the foot of the cross, her heart felt ripped apart as she looked up at her son. Hed been on that cross almost six hours and had suffered unspeakable pain. That cross, that horrible cross. But it was as if every blow, every wound had been delivered to her. Tears streamed down her face, so sad, so weak that all she could do was fall prostrate. As the spear was thrust in Jesus side, it was as if it had pierced her very soul. The pain was worse than any shed ever felt as Jesus took His last breath saying, It is nished. Did her mind race back to His beginning, lying in the manger, the rough-hewn wood His rst bed? Did she remember when they presented Jesus in the temple and the words of Simeon, a devout man who received a revelation by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before seeing the Lords Messiah? When Simeon saw Jesus, then only 8 days old, he said, Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you may now dismiss your servant in peace. For my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the sight of all nations: a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of your people Israel. After Simeon blessed them he said to Mary: This child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too. It was as Simeon said. As she struggled with her feelings, Mary recalled all those things she treasured and pondered in her heart. At that moment Mary nally understood why Jesus had come and died. It wasnt His birth that was important, it was His death. It wasnt the manger that was important, it was the cross. It is nished. And she could hear the angels sing, Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests. Two trees. Used for very different purposes. One helped usher in life. And so did the other. As Oswald Chambers wrote, A man cannot redeem himself redemption is the work of God, and is absolutely nished and complete.Rick Reed is a columnist who lives in Mount Dora. To reach him call 352-383-1458, or email him at ricoh007@aol.com.FaithforLife www.dailycommercial.com352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.comC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 TODAYEASTER AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: From 8 to 10:30 a.m., pan -cake breakfast. Easter carnival from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on the front lawn with egg hunt at 10 a.m. Kids should bring their own basket. The church is located at 439 E. Fifth Ave., in Mount Dora. Call 352-383-2005 or go to www.mtdora -fumc.org. TRADITIONAL EASTER VIGIL AT ST. ED -WARDS EPISCOPAL CHURCH: At 7:30 p.m., at the church, 460 N. Grandview St. in Mount Dora. On Easter Sunday, 8 a.m. Holy Eucharist Service, or 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist Service with owering of the cross followed by an Easter egg hunt. Call the church at 352-383-2832 for information.PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE BREAKFAST COOKED BY BOY SCOUT TROOP 19: From 8 to 10:30 a.m. Tickets are $5 and avail -able at the door, at Friendship Hall on the corner of Grandview and Fifth Streets, in Mount Dora. Hosted by First United Methodist Church, 439 E. Fifth Ave. Call 352-383-2005.EASTER EVE WORSHIP, KIDSTYLE AND EGG HUNT AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: At 5 p.m., at the church, 600 S. Grove St., in Eustis. Engaging worhsip for the whole family, interactive Eas -ter story presentation and more. For information, call the church at 352-357-5830 or go to www.fumceustis.org. SUNDAYEASTER AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF MOUNT DORA: Services at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m., 439 E. Fifth Ave. Guests are invited to bring fresh ow -ers to place on the resurrection cross before the service, and butteries will be released after each service. For in -formation, call 352-383-2005 or go to www.mtdorafumc.org.FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH WORSHIP CELEBRATION: At 10 a.m., with Empty, an inspirational service featuring se-lected Scripture readings and musi -cal selections. Breakfast from 9 to 9:40 a.m., at the church, 1701 Vine St., in Leesburg. Guests eat free. For informa -tion, call the church at 352-250-9502 or go to rstchristianleesburg.com.LIFELINE QUARTET IN CONCERT AT FIRST CHURCH OF GOD: At 6 p.m., 1550 N. Highway 19, in Eustis. For informa tion, call the church at 352-357-0048. MONDAYFAIRWAY SINGLES MEET FOR PRAYERS & PRAISES AT FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH: At 6 p.m., at the church 251 Avenida Los Angelos, in The Villages. Call 352-259-9305 or go to www.fair -waycc.org. WEDNESDAYMENS WEDNESDAY MORNING BIBLE STUDY AT FAIRWAY: At 8 a.m., at the church, 251 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages. Call 352-259-9305. THURSDAYRABBI KAREN ALLEN OF CONGREGA -TION BETH SHOLOM IN LEESBURG LEADS TORAH DISCUSSION: At 11 a.m., at the Sumter County Administrative Build -ing, 7375 Powell Rd., in Wildwood. The informal, interactive discussion will fo -cus on topics of contemporary Jewish interest suggested by the Torah por -tion of the week. For information, call 352-326-3692. CHURCH CALENDAR RICK REEDREFLECTIONS For Jesus, one tree brought life, another tree brought death RICK REEDSpecial to the Daily CommercialBig Daddy Weave is coming to First Baptist Church of Uma tilla as part of The Only Name Tour. Their Redeemed won Song of The Year at the K-LOVE Fan Awards in June. The Only NameYours Will Be is their third straight hit to top the Christian music charts. Group 1 Crew will join the night of music, performing popular hit songs like He Said and current single Dangerous. This is also the opening tour for rising artist Tim Timmons, who has fought battles against cancer and presents a powerful testimony with songs like Starts With Me. The concert will be at 6:30 / p.m. on April 27 in the 650-seat sanctuary as part of the churchs ongoing mission to provide local Christian music fans with quality entertainment in their own backyard. Being a person from Lake County, you pretty much had to drive to Orlando if you wanted to hear the big names, said Brookes Braswell, pastor of the Umatilla church, one of Lake Countys largest. We consider the concerts a ministry to our church and the sur rounding community. Tickets for the event are $15 for general admission and $25 for VIP. Doors open at 5 / p.m. for VIP and 5:30 / p.m. for general admission. Russell Wambles, a church member and volunteer event manager, remembers the rst concert the church held several years ago. We got a good break and had Mandisa. Shes a huge name in Christian music, said Wambles. She was a nalist on American Idol and went into Christian music. We sold out in four or ve days and thought, This is easy. Lets do this some more. But its not that easy. They continued offering quality artists. Weve had a lot of great events with top names in American Christian music, Wambles said. Its been great for our church community. But its also been a ministry to the unchurched. For a lot people, the rst time they come to church is to see an event like this, he added. First Baptist has held a variety of concerts, including Southern Gospel. Its not just hymns or Southern Gospel anymore, Wambles said. Its contemporary, hip-hop, rock, some really hardcore rock. But at the end of the day the message is the same. Its attractive, a great opportunity to bring that message to people in a way that relates to them. Tickets have been selling well for The Only Name Tour. For more than a decade, Big Dad dy Weave has produced hits like In Christ, Audience of One, Youre Worthy of My Praise, Every Time I Breathe, What Life Would Be Like and You Found Me. Along the way they have won the ongoing respect of fans, press and the industry alike. Their musical journey began with a Dove Awards nomination for New Artist of the Year in 2002 and includes a 2010 Dove Award for the album Christ Has Come. They have been honored at ASCAPs Christian Music Awards, were chosen for the WOW Hits compilations in ve of the last six years and are one of the 10 most played artists on Christian radio over the past decade. To purchase tickets, go to the church website, www.fbcumatilla. org, or call 352-669-3214. First Baptist Church of Umatilla is located at 550 Hateld Dr. If you are coming from U.S. Highway 441, turn right onto State Road 19, heading north. Go about 8 miles, then turn right onto East Collins Street. Make an immediate right onto Hateld Drive. The entrance is on the left. If you are coming from Ocala, take SR 19 south toward Umatilla. Turn left onto East Collins Street. Make an immediate right onto Hateld Drive. The entrance is on the left. We can have a large crowd but its still very intimate, said Braswell. Youre going to be close enough to hug a neck or shake a hand.UMATILLAFirst Baptist Church of Umatilla is ministering through concerts COURTESY PHOTO Big Daddy Weaves Redeemed won Song of the Year at the K-LOVE Fan Awards in June. The Only NameYours Will Be is their third straight hit to top the Christian music charts.For more than a decade, Big Daddy Weave has produced hits like In Christ, Audience of One, Youre Worthy of My Praise, Every Time I Breathe, What Life Would Be Like and You Found Me. Along the way they have won the ongoing respect of fans, press and the industry alike. Their musical journey began with a Dove Awards nomination for New Artist of the Year in 2002 and includes a 2010 Dove Award for the album Christ Has Come.

PAGE 16

C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 rfntbr President Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co.,Inc. ofLEESBURG 352-365-1228Come visit our new location!rfnttb The Charlotte Mayfield Assisted Living Retirement CommunityrfAssisted Living, Independent Living, Day Stay Residency Combining Independence with Personal Care for over 40 yearsHoly Tr i ni ty Epi s copal Church2201 Spring Lake Road, Fruitland Park352-787-1 500Father Ted KoellnSunday Service 8:00am, 9:30am, 11:15amWednesday Healing Service 11:30am www.holytrinityfp.comLIFE Church Assem bly of God04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park352-787-7962Pastor Rick WelborneSunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am Sunday Evening 6:00pm Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service 7:00pm Sunday School 9:00am Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pmPi lgrims Un i ted Church of Chri st (UCC)509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park www.pucc.info352-365-2662 or office@pucc.infoRev. Ronal K.F. Nicholas, OSL, PastorRev. Camille F. Gianaris, Pastoral Assistant Sunday Worship 10:00amContact us or visit our website for more infoL i ghthouse Foundati on M i ni stri es Internat i onal INC .11282 SR 471, Webster352-793-2631Pastor Patricia T. BurnhamSunday Services 9:00am & 6:00pm Thursday Night 7:00pm 3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Waywww.lighthousefoundationministries.orgL i nden Church of God4309 CR 772, Webster Pastor Doyle D. GlassSunday Morning Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Sunday School 9:45amWednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pmAll Sa i nts Rom an Cathol ic Chapel11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11, Tavares407-391 -8678 352-385-3880Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00amFi rst Bapti st Church of Tavares124 N. Joanna Avenue, Tavares352-343-71 3 1Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30am Sunday Traditional Service 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am Wednesday Fellowship Meal 5:00pm Wednesday Life University 6:15pm Wednesday Prayer Service 6:15pm Providing direction for all generationswww.fbctavares.comTavares Fi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church (UMC)Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares352-343-2761Pastor John BarhamTraditional Service 8:30AM & 11:00am Contemporary Cafe Service 10:00am Children of Light-Youth & Family Service 1st Sunday of each month 6:00pmwww.fumctavares.com For information on listing your church on this page call Michelle at352-365-8233or e-mail tomichelle.fuller@dailycommercial.comBethany Lutheran Church1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg352-787-7275Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Bible Study 9:15amEmmanuel Bapti st Church of Leesburg1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg352-323-1 588Pastor Jeff CarneySunday Celebration Service 10:30am Wednesday Mens Prayer Breakfast 8:00am Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm Sunday Bible Study 9:15am Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pmwww.EmmanuelFL.comFi rst Bapti st Leesb urg220 N. 13th St., Leesburg352-787-1 005Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Sunday Bible Study 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pmwww.fbcleesburg.orgFi rst Church of Chri st, Sci enti st, Leesburg13th & Line St., Leesburg352-787-1 921Sunday Service 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Wednesday School 3:30pmFi rst Presbyter i an Curch of Leesburg200 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-787-5687Sunday Service 10:00pm Sunday School 8:45am www.firstpresleesburg.orgDisciples Making DisciplesGlor i a Dei L utheran Church130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg352-787-3223Sunday Worship October-April 8:00am & 10:30am Sunday Worship May-September 9:15am Christian Education October-April 9:15am www.gloriadeielca.netLakes and Hi lls Covenant ChurchRev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, PastorWorship Service 10:15am Bible Study 9:00am @ Womens Club of Leesburg 700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg Church Office 106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills352-552-0052www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.orgLegacy Communi ty ChurchLocated at Lake Square Mall, Leesburg (suite 331 next to JCPenney)Pastor Theo Bob-352-250-0 1 56 Pastor Buddy Walker-352-978-0509Spanish Pastor Luis Fuentes-352-5521 357Sunday Worship Service 9:30am Legacy is a multicultural, multiracial, generational, Christian Church www.legacycic.orgSt. Paul Rom an Cathol ic Church(In union with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orlando & The Vatican)1330 Sunshine Avenue, LeesburgWeekday Masses M-F 8:30amSacrament of Penance Saturday 2:30-3:30pm (or by appointment) Saturday Masses 4:00, 5:30, 7:00pm (Spanish)Sunday Masses 7:00, 9:00, 11:00am, 12:30pmOffice Hours M-F 8:00-12:00, 1:00-4:00Seventh Day Advent i st508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-326-41 09Worship Service 9:30am Sabbath School Service 11:00am Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pmSol i d Rock Evangel ic al Fellowshi p Evangel ic al Presbyteri an ChurchLeesburg Community Building 109 E. Dixie Avenue, Leesburg352-431 -3944Rev. Dr. John LodgeSunday Service 9:30am Sunday School 10:45amwww.solidrockef.comL i berty Bapt i st Church11043 True Life Way, Clermont 352-394-0708Senior Pastor Chris JohnsonSun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm, Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all serviceswww.lbcclermont.org ClermontFi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church of Eust i sA Place where You Matter600 S. Grove Street, Eustis352-357-5830Senior Pastor Beth FarabeeCoffee and Fellowship 9:00am Contemporary Worship 9:30am Traditional Worship 11:00amL i fe W i thout L imits Mini stri es150 E. Barnes Avenue, Eustis352-399-291 3Bishop Robert DixonSunday School 9:00am Sunday Worship Service 10:00am Wednesday Family Bible Study 7:00pmwww.lifewithout-limits.comSt. Thom as Epi s copal Church317 S. Mary St., Eustis(corner S. Mary & Lemon St.)352-357-4358Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, RectorSunday Holy Eucharist Services 8:00am & 10:30am Adult Sunday School 9:20am, Childrens Chapel Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service 10:00amwww.stthomaseustis.comUn i tari an Uni versal i st Congregati on of Lake CountyEustis Womans Club Building 227 North Center Street, Eustis352-728-1 631Sunday Adult Discussion Group 9:45am Sunday Celebration of Life Service 11:00amFacebook: www.facebook.com/UUlakeco Website:www.lakecountyuu.org Email: lakecountyuu@gmail.com Eustis Fruitland Park Leesburg Tavares Webster Mount DoraCongregati onal Church650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora352-383-2285Reverand Dr. Richard DonSunday 11:00am (Communion 1st Sunday of the month) Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pmFi rst Presbyter i an Church of Mount Dora222 W. 6th Avenue at Alexander, Mt. Dora352-383-4089The Well Informal Worship 9:00am Childrens Sunday School 9:00am Adult Sunday School 10:00am Sanctuary Worship 11:00am9:30amwww.fpcmtdora.orgSt. Phi l i p L utheran Church1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora352-383-5402Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan BerghSunday Service 9:30am (Childcare Provided) Fellowship 10:45amwww.stphiliplc.com OkahumpkaCorpus Chri st i Epi s copal Church3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka352-787-8430Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am Evening Prayer 4:00pm Fellowship following both services Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30amwww.corpuschristiepiscopal.org GrovelandMt Oli ve Missi onary Bapti st Church15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky(West of Mascotte)352-429-3888Rev. Clarence L. Southall-PastorSunday Worship Service 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm Youth Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pmZi on L utheran Church (ELCA)547 S. Main Ave., Groveland352-429-2960Pastor Ken StoyerSunday Worship Service 11:00am Adult Sunday School 9:30am LeesburgThe Heal i ng Place1012 W Main Street, Leesburg352-61 7-0569Facilitator: Phyllis GilbertSunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am Wednesday Bible Study and Kids Club 6:00pm (Nursey open for all services) Come as you are and leave different! MinneolaNew L i fe Presbyteri an Church, PCA18237 E. Apshawa Road, Minneola Music Ministries352-241 -81 8 1Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 10:45am

PAGE 17

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Associated PressFORT WAYNE, Ind. Jes Farris says it happens two or three times a day. Someone walks into Studio 13, a local tattoo shop he owns with his brother, Jake, and inquires about getting a religious tat too. Usually, he says, the po tential customer is an 18or 19-year-old male dipping into ink for the rst time. Its easier to justify a faithbased tattoo to parents than a tattoo of something else, he says, adding thats how he and his much-inked brother started. Of course, that was about a decade ago, when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks were still fresh and tats with Christian images and Scripture were frequently requested by enlistees before military deployment. Today, that craze has calmed somewhat. But reli gious images crosses, the Virgin Mary, Jesus and angels, especially the sword-wielding St. Michael the Archangel remain an enduring part of the business, The Journal Gazette reported. Right now its very popu lar to get the word faith in corporated into the Jesus sh, Farris says, referring to a symbol of early Christians. We get that more than prob ably anything right now. Another popular motif is the words of Philippians 4:13: I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me, as the verse is rendered in the New King James Version of the New Testament. That became popular af ter UFC ghters got it, he says, referring to an orga nization of top mixed-mar tial-arts competitors. It just boomed on the Internet. St. Michael, patron saint of seafarers, paratroopers and police, as well as the mem bers of the military, is popular with people in those professions, he says. Chad Bedwell, 34, is a youth minister at Sonrise United Methodist Church in Aboite Township. He has about a half-dozen faith-in spired tattoos. He says he likes participating in their design. He adds that their meaning isnt al ways immediately obvious the better to use the mark ings as an opportunity to tell others about his faith. On each of his arms he has images of a nail wrapped in ribbon. On one arm, the in scription reads Tougher. The other arm has the words Than Nails. Im kind of a big guy, and I work out, so people think thats what it refers to. People call me out about it Oh, so you think youre tough, huh? I tell them, No, Im refer ring to the nails of Christ on the cross. Its not me. Bedwell also has a tattoo of what he calls a shadow cross one thats hard to see on one wrist. The word Zombie is etched on his other wrist. That tattoo refers to how hes felt reborn from the dead after accepting Christ, while the other refers to living his life now in the shadow of the cross, he says. Im probably explaining them to people on a week ly basis, he says, adding: When they hear, Oh, hes a youth pastor, they want to look a little closer. Still, tattoos have the po tential to arouse controver sy within Christian circles, says Mike Mueller, 26, who, with his friend Erik Knopf, 31, started Armed with Truth, a Colorado-based Internet company that markets tem porary tattoos featuring col lections of Scripture verses. Mueller says the idea originally was to have the tat toos aid people in memorizing Scripture, and the market has included not only young people but teachers, coach es and youth ministers trying to inuence their charges in a positive way. People get tattoos because of emotions theres always a story behind them. They want to get something so theyll never forget, Mueller says. I think it comes from a deep spiritual place This is important to me, and Im going to keep it in front of me. But, Mueller says, even the temporary tattoos got pushback from people who saw them as blasphemous. When Christians object to tattoos, they usually point to Leviticus 19:28, which pro scribes cutting into ones body in memory of the dead or placing marks on the body. Many believe the New Tes tament writings about the body as the temple of the Holy Spirit reinforce the message. We thought no one would complain, because they were only temporary, but we were wrong. People were very vo cal. One woman said we were paving the way for the mark of the beast, Mueller says, referring to a symbol of evil in the New Testaments pro phetic book of Revelation. To me, thats just silly. Bedwell says that, for him, its important not to encour age the underage young peo ple with whom he works to get tattoos. One girl in his group keeps asking him to pick out a tat too for her, he says, but he has refused. I dont want to do that. I told her, You dont really want a tattoo until you know what you want to get, he says. I always tell them how bad they hurt, and that they dont go away, and getting tat tooed, its like being stung by a bee for two or three hours at a time. Farris says his shop also gets requests for tattoos of imagery from other religions. Weve probably done more tattoos of Buddha than we have of Jesus in the last three years, he says. Some people have also asked for Hindu imagery, though not, he says, for religious reasons. Lately, he says, hes also seen an increasing number of people who want religious images changed or covered. He and his brother are now undergoing laser removal of some of their religious images because they no longer re ect their beliefs, he notes. And removal is no picnic. Laser removal is probably one of the most painful processes Ive ever done, he says. While many people get tattoos out of sincere religious conviction, Farris thinks that when he got tattooed as a teen, it was because he was struggling to hold on to his faith. Its a scary thing, to waver with the faith of your grand parents and your parents, he says. You tried to lock it in with tattoos. But, he adds: The popular ity of faith tattoos isnt going anywhere. As long as there is faith, people will want to make it a permanent part of themselves.Popularity of religious tattoos seems enduring HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO This faith-based tattoo depicts a symbolic representation of the Holy Trinity. HANNAN ADELYThe RecordHACKENSACK, N.J. One of loneliest places in church these days is the confession line. The act of confessing ones sins, a require ment for Catholics, has sharply fallen over sev eral decades with evolving views on sin, penance and the stature of the priesthood. But now Pope Francis and church leaders, in a push to draw people back to confession, are highlighting what cler gy say are the healing, uplifting aspects of the sacrament and focusing less on themes like pun ishment and condem nation. Some churches are us ing websites, newspaper ads and highway billboards to get the mes sage out. Under dioce san guidance, churches have also added one ex tra day a week to hear confession during Lent, the period before Easter when penance is considered a Catholic duty. And the pope, in an im age seen and talked about around the world, confessed to a priest last month in public view. But will these ef forts change attitudes among Catholics, many of whom believe confession no longer is a nec essary part of the faith? Its not something I look at as something I need to do to be a good Catholic, but I always know its there if I feel a need to go, said Keith Ahearn, a churchgoer who lives in Oakland, N.J. Ahearn said seeing Pope Francis example of confession did cause him to think twice. I have to admit, he said, seeing the pope going to confession was a pretty powerful thing. Under church doctrine, Catholics should go to confession at least once a year, preferably during the Easter season. Those who commit mortal, or serious, sins like adultery and mur der should not receive Communion without rst going to confes sion. The point of con fession, according to the church, is to bring about a spiritual res urrection and to have people reconcile with the church community. Church leaders are trying to lure people back by putting out pos itive messages that con fession is about peace and joy and not fear or shame. Some dioceses are adding an extra day of confession during the Lenten season. The Paterson, N.J., Di ocese began a Welcome Home to Healing pro gram ve years ago to promote confession. The diocese added an extra day of confessions on Mondays at all 110 churches during Lent and advertised the program on billboards and lawn signs and in newspaper ads, bulletins and on a program website that offers guidance in English and Spanish about seeking confes sion. Last year, the Newark Archdiocese started a similar program The Light Is on for You that added a day each week, Wednesday, to hear confessions during Lent. The archdiocesan website also devotes an entire section to infor mation and resources about confession.With push from pope, Catholics see confession in a new light VIOREL FLORESCU / MCT The Rev. Arcadio Munoz giving absolution to a parishioner at St. Marys Church in Dumont. Confession can be heard out in the open, a departure from the standard confessionals of the past. ARON HELLERAssociated PressJERUSALEM Israeli police stormed a sensi tive holy site in Jerusalem on Wednesday, ring tear gas to disperse a protest by Palestinian Mus lim worshippers, ofcials said. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the crowd hurled stones and recrackers from atop the compound known to Jews as the Temple Mount, the holiest site in Judaism. Rosenfeld said police then entered the site and dispersed the group with tear gas and other non-lethal means. The compound is known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and is Islams third-holiest site. Israel captured the area along with the rest of east Jerusalem from Jordan in the 1967 war. Clashes often erupt at the site. Jews typically pray below, at the Western Wall, but tensions have grown lately with an increased number of Jews arriving to pray at the Temple Mount as well. Israel permits Jews to ascend to the Temple Mount for visits, but they are barred from praying at the site. These visits often stoke rumors that Israel is preparing to take over the site. Sheikh Azzam Tamimi, head of the Waqf, the Islamic authority that manages the site, said worshippers had barricaded themselves inside the Al-Aqsa Mosque to defend the site from Jewish groups. Israeli police disperse riot at Jerusalem holy site AP FILE PHOTO The Western Wall, right, and the gilded Dome of the Rock, among the holiest sites for Jews and Muslims, are covered in snow.

PAGE 18

C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants rr fntbnntnt r Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.ntnt rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services b b rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services

PAGE 19

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Fruitland Park, FL American Legion Post 219, Fruitland Park, FL, is sponsoring the formation of a new U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps. The Thomas R. Norris Battalion has openings for a limited number of young people ages 13-17 to join the crew of the new Sea Cadet Battalion. An information presentation and interviews will be held at the American Legion Post 219 Banquet Hall, located at 194 W. Fountain St., Fruitland Park, on April 26, 2014 at 7:00 pm. Appointments are necessary. The U.S. Sea Cadet Corps is comprised of everyday of young people who have an interest in seamanship, the military, or other seagoing careers. Cadet applicants must be crime-free, drug-free, physically fit and approved by their school. The Thomas R. Norris Battalion will represent Lake & Sumter Counties, and trains at the American Legion 219 post on the third weekend of each month. The program is managed by volunteers dedicated to instilling the core values of Pride, Service, and Patriotism. Future summer trainings will include small boat handling, SCUBA Certification, among other training. Cadets wear the various Navy Uniforms and can participate in a multitude of advanced training programs, including: training with Navy & Coast Guard while at-sea, submarine orientation. SEAL training, search and rescue, and international exchanges. Adult volunteers, with or without military experience, are needed to allow the Sea Cadet Program to grow. Those with seamanship, engineering, administrative, & fund-raising skills are especially needed. Interested adults are encourage to visit on April 26th. To set an appointment, contact 352-504-4219. For further information on the Naval Sea Cadet Corps, go to < www.seacadets.org > NAVAL SEA CADETS ACCEPTING NEW RECRUITS Business austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8263 www.dailycommercial.com DINA CAPPIELLO and JOSH LEDERMANAssociated PressWASHINGTON The Obama administration is extending indenitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Key stone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections. The State Department didnt say how much longer agencies will have to weigh in but cited a recent decision by a Nebras ka judge overturning a state law that allowed the pipe lines path through the state, prompting uncertainty and an ongoing legal battle. Nebraskas Supreme Court isnt expected to rule for another sev eral months, and there could be more legal maneuvering after that. The delay potentially frees President Barack Obama to avoid making a nal call on the pipeline until after the No vember election. The agency consultation process is not starting over. The process is ongoing, and the department and relevant agencies are actively con tinuing their work in assess ing the permit application, the State Department said in a statement. Republicans were quick to blast the latest delay in a review process that has dragged on for more than ve years. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., accused Obama of kowtowing to radical activists from the environmental community, while House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, called the decision shameful and said there were no credible reasons for further delay. This job-creating project has cleared every environmen tal hurdle and overwhelmingly passed the test of public opinion, yet its been blocked for more than 2,000 days, Boehner said in a statement. In an ironic show of bipar tisanship, prominent Demo crats from energy-dependent states joined Republicans in blasting the Obama adminis tration for delaying the decision once again. Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu, who fac es a difcult re-election this year in conservative-lean ing Louisiana, said Obama was signaling that a small minority of opponents can tie up the process forever in the courts, sacricing 42,000 jobs and billions in econom ic activity in the process. This decision is irrespon sible, unnecessary and unac ceptable, Landrieu said. But environmental groups ghting the pipeline hailed the delay, arguing that it shows the State Department is taking the arguments against the pipeline seriously. This is denitely great news, said Tiernan Sittenfeld, senior vice president for the League of Conservation Voters. We are very condent as they continue to examine the issues with the lack of le gal route in Nebraska and the terrible climate impacts, at the end of the day the pipe line will be rejected. State Department ofcials said other U.S. agencies will be notied of the new deadline to weigh in once the legal situation in Nebraska becomes clearer. At the core of the delay is a concern that the legal wrangling in Nebraska could lead to a change in the pipelines route that would affect agencies assessments, said the ofcials, who werent au thorized to comment by name and demanded anonymity. Ofcials declined Friday to say when a nal decision would take place but said the process should proceed as expeditiously as possible. They add ed that the State Department is moving forward with other aspects of its review that must take place before determining whether approving the pipeline is in the U.S. national interest. The White House has insist ed that Secretary of State John Kerry is in charge of the pro cess, since the pipeline cross es the U.S.-Canada border and falls under the State De partments jurisdiction. Associated PressBEIJING Chinese police hauled away dozens of work ers Friday to break up a march on a facto ry complex targeted by tens of thousands of laborers striking against the worlds largest maker of athletic shoes, while a government trade union said it would mediate the labor dispute. More than 40,000 workers went on strike this week against Yue Yuen Industrial (Holdings) Ltd., bringing production to a halt at the manufacturer, which makes shoes for companies includ ing Nike and Adidas. About 1,000 workers marched down a street Friday after workers rejected a company proposal. The Guangdong Fed eration of Trade Unions urged the workers to act rationally, but said it was taking a clear-cut stand that the workers rights must be pro tected. The federation said it had instructed its municipal agency in the southern city of Dong guan where the facto ry complex is located to mediate. The workers have been striking since April 5 to demand the Taiwanese-owned company make social se curity contributions as required by Chinese law and meet other de mands. In a public announce ment Thursday, the company offered to make social security payments only if the workers would agree to retroactively pay their own required contributions into the fund. JOYCE M. ROSENBERGAssociated PressNEW YORK When Tessemaes salad dressing quickly became a hit, the owners of the family-run condiment company were faced with the reality that they needed help navigating the grocery business. The company based in Annapolis, Md., got its start in 2009 selling dressing to a local Whole Foods and then worked its way into ve stores. By last summer it got into the chains nearly 375 locations. In Octo ber, it reached Safeway stores in Northern Cal ifornia and was on its way to a national rollout of 1,100 stores. Success brought chal lenges. A rm Tesse maes hired to help raise money from investors wasnt up to the task. The company had con tracts to buy ingredi ents that were priced too high and it didnt have enough cash to fund its growth. Enter Michael McDevitt, CEO of Tandem Legal Group, a law rm that advises companies on strategy. They were going to succeed, they had all the grit, all the tenacity in the world, says Mc Devitt, the former CEO of Medifast, a nutrition and weight loss compa ny. McDevitt helped Tessemaes work through its problems, and also became an investor. One of Tessemaes problems was the rm it hired to court investors, CEO Greg Vetter says. The sales presentation the rm put togeth er exaggerated Tessemaes sales prospects by tens of millions of dollars. Investors didnt buy it and Vetter wanted out of the contract.Tessemaes also wanted to re negotiate contracts with suppliers. The contracts were priced for small er quantities of ingre dients like olive oil, and didnt give discounts for larger purchases. Tandem ended the contract with the fundraiser and renegotiated supplier deals. Meanwhile, Tessemaes bank refused its request for a $1 million credit line increase. The company needed the money to fund its ex pansion into more Safe way stores. McDevitt decided to invest in Tessemaes. He and former Medifast colleague, Brendan Connors gave the bank a guarantee so Tes semaes could get the credit line. We pointed them in the right way, McDe vitt says. US delays review of Keystone XL pipeline AP FILE PHOTOA huge crop art image protesting the proposed Keystone XL pipline covers an 80-acre corneld outside of Neligh, Neb.Company gets help and is now dressed for success PATRICK SEMANSKY / AP Tessemaes CEO Greg Vetter, right, does a hand stand as he poses in national event manager Taylor Foleys ofce in Essex, Md. Chinese trade group to mediate shoe factory strike

PAGE 20

C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

PAGE 21

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Sharkys Vac n Sew700 N. Main St. Wildwood, Fl 34785352-330-2483sharkyssewnvac1@gmail.com www.sharkyssewnvac.comAsk AlI was asked recently by a customer about what needles she should buy for her sewing machine and when should they be changed. Over the last 48 years I have repaired thousands of sewing machines and have seen a lot of people with many different ideas on needles. But I have found that no matter what someone says, its the person with experience that I listen to because the saying, The proof is in the pudding, has been time tested. I have found that although manufacturers may tell you to change the needle after making three garments, you are the one to be the judge of that. Now dont get me wrong, I believe in being smart but I also am a penny pincher, if you will. There are a lot of factors that go into choosing the correct needle, from the manufacturer, the size for the job and the price to name a few. Of course, I first look at the fabric and decide which size to use. The finer the fabric the smaller the size and the heavier the fabric the larger the needle, thats a mute point but lets talk about the quality of needles. It has been my experience that Schmetz or Organ needles are the best needles to buy. Although Schmetz needles are made in Germany and are excellent quality needles, I mean come on BMW and Mercedes, but I still recommend Organ needles. They are made in Japan and are equal quality and my best part is that I can get twice as many for the same price as others! Remember I pinch pennies. And always remember, if you hit a pin while sewing and hear a klunck sound then that means the tip of the needle is flat and not sharp any more and you should definitely change the needle. I like the opportunity to buy twice as many needles for the same price then I can change them as needed without worrying about wasting money. If you buy a Mercedes or BMW you wouldnt or shouldnt worry about spending too much money on it. In so saying, if you spend thousands or hundreds on a good sewing machine you shouldnt worry about having to change a needle because of the cost. A bent or dull needle can cause it to break and that can lead to having your sewing machine knocked out of timing and you think a needle costs a lot! Well, you get the POINT... Anyway thats my story and I can tell it anyway I want to. Until next week... Sew What! Happy Sewing! Needles www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Saturday, April 19, the 109th day of 2014. There are 256 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On April 19, 1989, 47 sailors were killed when a gun turret exploded aboard the USS Iowa in the Caribbean. (The Navy initially suspected that a dead crew member, Clayton Hartwig, had deliberately sparked the blast, but later said there was no proof of that.) HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, April 19, 2014: This year you have an opportunity to break a pattern and become more dynamic; travel and a foreigner could be involved. Some of you might go back to school in order to learn more in your chosen eld or to develop a new interest. If you are single, you will open up to a new group of friends. It is likely that you will meet someone special through them. This will happen during the summer or the second part of your birthday year. If you are attached, plan on taking that special trip you often discuss. The summer would be the perfect time for the two of you to experience this adventure. CAPRICORN just seems to annoy you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Explore a new spot or visit an area you dont know well. Try to leave your hassles behind, at least for the moment. Contact a friend who lives at a distance. Youll enjoy catching up on news, plus you might want to plan a visit. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) A loved one will want to spend more time with you. Make it your pleasure. A discussion about a child or younger friend will give you some insight. Do not push someone away from you, even if you nd him or her to be intrusive. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Youll see life from a whole different perspective. You might realize that you seem to be excluding someone interesting from your life. Make it a point to take a break from being so assertive once in a while. Observe more. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Complete a project that has been hanging over your head for far too long. Ask for some help if you need it. Your determination and endurance need to be called upon. Once you are done with this task, you will have a big reason to celebrate. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) What you consider to be a fun happening might intimidate a dear friend. Though you are relaxed, this person might not be. A loved one will be full of ideas. Initiate a conversation and explore the limits of his or her imagination. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Tension will stem from having too many obligations to fulll. Ask for help. Make time to purchase a new item or two, perhaps for tonight. A loved one knows just how to appeal to you and lighten up the moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might want to stop at the gym while you do your normal Saturday errands. You could run into a special friend and have a strong reaction at rst. Invite this person to join you for lunch and a chat. You will enjoy catching up on news. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Visualize what you want, and make it so. Many of you might decide to organize an informal gathering at your place either tonight or tomorrow. Make calls in the late afternoon. Reach out to those at a distance as well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Remain sensitive to a friend or loved one. You might be having a great time on your own. This person might be unusually difcult and somewhat uptight right now. Treat him or her as you would like to be treated. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Allow your needs to call the shots right now. Take some time off today to nap. Perhaps you might want to schedule a massage, too. If you dont take good care of yourself, you will be worthless to others. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Be willing to take a risk and share what you feel. You could nd someones reaction to be revealing. Get together with friends at a game or go off to the movies. An invitation will come forward that youll want to say yes to. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might have to take care of a situation. Whether it involves work or a relative will make little difference. Others admire your diligence. Make plans for late this afternoon, when you will be more than ready to let loose. Let your weekend begin now. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: Im a 14-year-old girl with a problem. Because of my buzzed short hair, slim hips and flat chest, I frequently get mistaken for a boy. It really bothers me because, despite my haircut and body shape, I have a feminine face and I wear womens clothes and makeup. Im not too much of a tomboy. Sometimes when someone addresses me with a male pronoun or in some other way mistakes me for a male, Im too nervous to correct them. Is there a clever or witty way to cor rect the mistake? NOT A BOY IN BROOKLYN, N.Y. DEAR NOT A BOY: The person who made the mistake is the one who should be embarrassed, not you. If it happens again, all you need to do is smile and say, Im all girl. DEAR ABBY: I have been dating a woman, and I am considering proposing to her. We have discussed engagement rings and she wants to design her own, which I think is great. However, I am unsure exactly what to do regarding the actual proposal. What ring should I give her, knowing that whatever I give her will not be her ultimate engagement ring? SOON TO POP THE QUESTION DEAR SOON TO POP: Marriage proposals happen in many situations and in many ways. There are no rules, and dropping to one knee and offer ing a ring is optional. The engagement does not begin when a woman starts wearing a ring; it begins when she accepts the proposal. All you need to do is say, Will you marry me? When she says yes, you can then decide when you both would like to select a stone for her engagement ring. DEAR ABBY: A longtime friend asked me to be executor of her estate a few years ago, and I agreed. As time has passed, the details of the estate have changed several times. After the recent death of her husband, she again changed the beneficiaries and is now leaving almost half a million dollars to two animal shelters. Its her money to do with as she chooses, and I dont judge her. I do, however, have a problem executing an estate that gives that much money to animal care when it could help so many people. I dont fault her for wanting to do it; I just dont want to be part of it. Im afraid asking her to find another executor would damage or end our friendship. Please tell me what to do. DILEMMA IN TEXAS DEAR DILEMMA: Lets face it. You ARE judging the woman and you DO fault her for wanting to leave a fortune to four-footed needy creatures instead of bipeds. Because you are uncomfortable with her plan, you must tell her she needs to find another executor who is as committed to animal causes as she is. Youll be doing her a favor.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Teenage girls boyish figure is often deceiving to others JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

PAGE 22

C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 23

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1

PAGE 24

D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

PAGE 25

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2.125 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332

PAGE 26

D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr 888-904-9858 *PLUS TAX, TAG AND $599 DEALER FEE. www.billbryansubaru.comLARGEST PRE-OWNED INVENTORY IN CENTRAL FLORIDA2004 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS STK#S14196A .............................................$4,988*2003 KIA OPTIMA STK#140749A. ................................................................................................$5,882*2005 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY STK#140184A........................................$6,025*2002 HONDA ODYSSEY EX STK#140734A ......................................................................$6,271*2003 MAZDA TRIBUTE ES STK#S14378A ........................................................................$6,435*2004 BUICK CENTURY STK#S131006A .................................................................................$6,496*2006 FORD FOCUS ZX5 STK#KP2465A ...............................................................................$6,882*2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#140944A ......................................................................$6,882*2007 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS STK#140874G ...................................................................$6,886*2004 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM STK#140797A ......................................................$6,988*2004 JEEP LIBERT Y SPORT STK#140419A ...................................................................$7,284*2006 KIA SEDONA STK#S14410A ...............................................................................................$7,882*2007 HYUNDAI ENTOURAGE STK#140521A .................................................................$7,882*2005 BMW 3 SERIES 325i STK#S14262C .......................................................................$9,292*2008 FORD FUSION SEL STK#SC2436B .............................................................................$9,878*2006 JAGUAR S-TYPE 3.0 STK#150041A .......................................................................$9,882*2008 SCION xB STK#141053A .........................................................................................................$9,952*2008 TOYOTA PRIUS STK#140620A ..................................................................................$10,388*2004 TOYOTA TA COMA STK#SC2474A .........................................................................$10,473*2006 TOYOTA SIENNA STK#S14344A .............................................................................$10,984*2008 CHRYSLER PT CRU ISER STK#140833A .....................................................$11,282*FREE WASH & VAC WITH TEST DRIVE OF ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE IN STOCKValid only at Bill Bryan Subaru. Expires 5/15/14



PAGE 1

NBA PLAYOFFS BEGIN TODAY, SPORTS B1 CRIME: Police release the name of Clermont bank robbery suspect A3 GOOD FRIDAY: Pope Francis leads Via Crucis procession A5 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, April 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 109 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D2 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D2 BUSINESS C5 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A5 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 74 / 55 Most cloudy with showers 50 LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com N othing could possibly pre pare Patrick Macri for what he would encounter when he helped liberate the concentration camp near Landsberg, Germany, in April 1945. Near the camps, the overpower ing smell of gas, used to burn the dead, lled the air. When Sgt. 1st Class Macri of the 101st Airborne Division entered the camp, the emaciated Jewish prisoners dressed in striped paja mas were holding onto the barbed wire fence, expressionless. Many were near death. This image is one that will forev er haunt the 87-year-old. They were like the walking dead, the Crystal River resident said. To this day, he said he detests stripped pajamas Similar to Macri, Bill Whipp saw the aftermath of the Holo caust when he helped to liberate Dachau on April 28, 1945, which was the rst Nazi concentration camp in Germany. Serving with the 22nd Infantry Regime, 3rd Army in the 4th Infan try Division, under Gen. George Patton, Pfc. Whipp said each squad took a barrack. We were chasing the Germans, he said. Whipp, who lives in The Villages, said the prisoners looked like skel etons. We gave them all the choco late bars we had in our pockets, he said. Whipp described how one Jew ish prisoner opened the oor board and presented a bottle of vodka, which he gave to Whipp and the other soldiers as a symbol of gratitude. When we rst got there, they were staring at us and we were staring at them, he said. Then they relaxed and believed they were not dreaming. We did not want to look at them with pity. We wanted to treat them like they were normal people. Some possibly could not speak, holding onto the wire that kept them enclosed there, and look ing out at the strange world, Mac ri said. I couldnt believe men could be so inhumane. The brain couldnt condense into a word or statement a feeling such as that. It is not prepared. This month marks the 70th an niversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps during World War II, when six million Jews were murdered at the hands of the Nazis. As he approached the prisoners a mere few weeks before the end of World War II, Macri heard the dis tinct moaning of the dying. Behind the prisoners, the then20-year-old Macri saw piles of burnt bodies. It was another jolt to our young sensibility, he said. It took us LADY LAKE They were like the walking dead BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Bill Whipp poses at his home in Lady Lake on Thursday. When Whipp was a private rst class with the 22nd Infantry Regiment, he was part of the operation to liberate Dachau, one of the many concentration camps during World War II. IF YOU GO WHO: Public Interfaith Holocaust Re membrance Event: Eyewitnesses to history. WHAT: Four US Army liberators, who were at Buchenwald, Dachau and nearby Nazi concentration camps will speak as part of the Public In terfaith Holocaust Remembrance Event. WHEN: 4 p.m. on April 29. Doors open at 3:30 p.m. WHERE: St. Timothy Catholic Church, 1351 Paige Place, Lady Lake. DETAILS: For more information on this free event, contact Phyllis Kalter or Kathy Schachter at 352-748-1800. SEE HOLOCAUST | A2 Staff Report Lake Countys unemployment rate climbed a hair in March, bringing it to levels not seen since last fall. The unchanged jobless rate of 6.6 per cent in both January and February rose to 6.7 percent last month, while Sumter County stayed the same at 5 percent. Meanwhile, for the rst time since the middle of 2010, Floridas monthly job less rate went up in March. Jobs ofcials say the negative movement is in part be cause more people are in the labor pool. The Florida Department of Econom ic Opportunity announced Friday that while the number of people with jobs has increased statewide, the states un employment mark rose from 6.2 percent in February to 6.3 percent in March. The last time the states monthly mark in creased based on estimates of the num ber of people employed and actively seek ing employment was in August 2010. At that time, the gure rose from 11.2 percent to 11.3 percent, and an estimated 1.03 mil lion Floridians were out of work. Floridas jobless rate, which remains be low the national gure of 6.7 percent, had held at 6.2 percent the prior three months. LEESBURG Lake, Florida jobless rates on the rise LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The Lake County Tax Collectors of ce is turning the former Golden Corral restaurant in Leesburg into a new and expanded service center. Beginning in September, the ofce will relocate from 1340 Citizens Blvd. to the former restaurant in order to comply with a 2010 Florida law, which requires all constitutional tax collectors to pro vide driver license services in their re spective counties by June 30, 2015. Tax collector Bob McKee said they will lease the 8,300-square-foot building LEESBURG Tax collector office relocates to former Golden Corral building BRANDON LARRABEE News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE The Cap itol fell largely silent this week, as lawmakers, lobby ists and some reporters took time to relax after the open ing month and a half of the legislative session. The snip ing between Gov. Rick Scott and his chief Democratic op ponent, former Gov. Charlie Crist, continued to generate emails and tweets. But for the most part, it was time to reect on where the sessions major bills stand and where they could be go ing. Here are some top is sues to watch as the nal two weeks approach. TOP PRIORITY: BUDGET NEGOTIATIONS BEGIN Outside of once-a-decade redistricting sessions, law makers are fond of saying they have one constitutional duty every year: passing a bal anced budget. This year, with the week of Passover and Eas ter falling just two weeks be fore the end of the session, hammering out a spending plan is going to be a sprint. Thats because House and Senate budget writers have a nine-day window to ham mer out whatever differenc es might be left behind after leaders agree on allocations for different areas of the bud get. There could be a few side deals (announced or not) that would take some of the big-ticket issues off the table. But the budget has to be done by sometime April 29 in order for lawmakers to wait the re quired 72 hours and approve the spending plan on May 2, the last day of session. The plan is likely to settle in around $75 billion and make room for Scotts election-year promise of $500 million in tax and fee cuts. The Legislature has already decided to cut nearly $400 million in vehi cle-registration fees, and the House and Senate are now ar guing over how to divvy up another $100 million or so in tax cuts, with potential breaks Lawmakers face flurry of bills in sessions final weeks AP FILE PHOTO Sen. Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, presides over the chamber temporarily during voting and debate on the oor of the Senate in Tallahassee. Gardiner will be the Senate president for the 2015-16 session. SEE OFFICE | A2 SEE BUDGET | A2 SEE JOBLESS | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 on everything from back-to-school supplies to cement mixers. Leaders on both sides say the dif ferences are small, with the Sen ate being more generous to higher education, while the House gives more to K-12 schools and con struction projects. One thing thats unlikely to hap pen: the House and Senate confer ence committees agreeing to nd a way to draw down federal funds intended to expand Medicaid, as House Minority Leader Perry Thur ston, D-Fort Lauderdale, asked them to do in a letter Thursday. GOP leaders say the federal gov ernment has proven to be an un reliable partner in funding for joint programs like Medicaid, and theyve ruled out any Medicaid expansion. EDUCATION DEBATES: IMMIGRATION AND CHOICE One of the most closely watched non-budget bills of the session has been a measure that would grant in-state tuition rates to some ille gal immigrants (SB 1400) and po tentially help the Republican Party get a toehold in the rapidly growing bloc of Hispanic voters. The prospects for the bill took a nose-dive later Thursday, when Senate Appropriations Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, announced that he would not put the measure on the committees agenda. The bill was scheduled to make a nal stop before that panel and then head to the oor. Meanwhile, House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, is still trying to push through a bill that would expand eligibility for the states de facto school-voucher system. But Gaetz sounded skepti cal about the measure (HB 7167). There is no accountability pro vision in the House bill, and I think I still want to be faithful to the un derstanding that Speaker Weather ford and I had, when we articulat ed our work plan, that we would try to expand school choice with ac countability, Gaetz said. SHOTS FIRED IN CULTURE WAR: GUNS AND ABORTION With the November elections only a few months away, Republicans are also looking for measures that will re up socially conservative voters such as restrictions on abortion and bills advancing Floridas reputa tion as a gun-friendly state. The main ashpoint on abortion is a measure (HB 1047) that would largely bar the procedures if doc tors determine that fetuses have reached viability. The bill passed the House and is scheduled to be heard Monday by the Senate Rules Committee. Under current law, abortions in most cases are barred during the third trimester of pregnancy. But the bills would require that physicians conduct examinations before per forming abortions to determine if fe tuses are viable. If viability is reached, abortions would generally not be al lowed a change that the bills sup porters say could prevent abortions around the 20th week of pregnancy. The culture wars could also emerge over legislation that would allow Floridians to carry concealed weapons without licenses during evacuations ordered by the gover nor. The House version (HB 209) has passed that chamber, and a counterpart (SB 296) could soon go to the oor. A PLETHORA OF OTHER ISSUES Lawmakers will grapple with doz ens of other bills as they look to get out of Tallahassee in early May and start campaigning for the November elections. The issues range from in dustry ghts, such as hospitals bat tling about new trauma centers, to quirky bills, such as creating the po sition of state poet laureate. But while the Capitol gets lled with political intrigue and lobby ing battles at the end of each ses sion, its important to remem ber that some legislation can have far-reaching effects. As an example, the House and Senate are still working on bills that would address gaps in Flor idas child-protection system af ter revelations about the deaths of children who had previously come to the attention of the state De partment of Children and Families. Lakes January rate put an end to six straight months of declining jobless numbers. The unemployment rate last July was 7.6 percent, followed by 7.3 per cent in August, 6.9 percent in September, 6.4 percent in October, 6.3 percent in No vember and 6 percent in December. Last year at this time, the unemploy ment rate in Lake was 7.7 percent and the rate in Sumter was 5.8 percent. In Lake, from a labor force of 131,729 people, 122,965 had jobs in March and 8,764 did not. In Sumter, the labor force was 43,034, with 39,916 employed and 2,118 unemployed. In March 2014, Monroe and Walton counties had the states lowest unemploy ment rate (3.8 percent each), followed by Okaloosa County (4.8 percent); and Ala chua and Sumter counties (5.0 percent each). Many of the counties with the low est unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of govern ment employment, the Florida Depart ment of Economic Opportunity reported. Flagler County had the highest unem ployment rate (9.3 percent) in Florida in March 2014, followed by Hendry County (9.1 percent); Hamilton County (8.7 per cent); and Hernando, Madison, and Put nam counties (8.5 percent each). There were no counties with double-digit un employment rates for March or February. The News Service of Florida contributed material to this report. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 18 CASH 3 ............................................... 3-0-6 Afternoon .......................................... 1-4-9 PLAY 4 ............................................. 7-3-3-7 Afternoon ....................................... 8-1-1-5 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 17 FANTASY 5 ......................... 12-14-24-25-29 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268,. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@daily commercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1 JOBLESS FROM PAGE A1 OFFICE FROM PAGE A1 located at 1720 Citrus Blvd., for $13,500 a month. There are substantial capital costs that are tied into the amount in the in terior build-out of the fa cility, he said. In addition, it is esti mated to cost $225,000 to purchase furniture and electronic equipment that complies with the Department of Home land Security. McKee added of the relo cation: Our needs, space wise, have more than dou bled for the additional (eight) employees, and ad ditional transactions to ac commodate a much higher volume of public business. We want to conduct the public business where the public conducts their business to minimize any inconvenience to them. David Jordan, chief deputy for the tax collec tor, said there are also in surance costs for security purposes. It is the electronic queuing system and other internal controls that are an enormous expense, he said. The legislature has handed the responsi bility to the tax collector that is enormous. McKee said the tax col lector has enough revenue to cover the costs of the lease and operations, but the county commission could receive less funding, because less money would be returned to them at the end of the budget year. Every year we spend far less then what we could, he said. At the end of the scal year, unspent fees are sent back to the authorities that paid them. The tax collectors of ce returned more than $3 million during the s cal year 2012 budget to the county commission. We will be utilizing un spent fees and commis sion to meet these future expenses, McKee said. In addition to the current services it offers such as ve hicle tags, the new ofce will offer driver licenses, ID cards, road tests, medical road tests, vision tests and non-U.S. citizen driver li cense services, Mckee said. In February, the tax col lector opened a drivers li cense ofce in Clermont, but that ofce does not of fer non-U.S. citizen driver license services or med ical road tests, said Mark OKeefe, manager of the tax collectors ofce. There is currently only one state ofce remaining in Lake County for driv er licenses located in As tatula, where tax collector ofcials have heard from customers that the wait has been as long as four hours. That ofce will close in June 2015. The general public will not tolerate a four-hour wait, said Jordan. Randy Van Alstine, di rector of motorist ser vices for the tax collec tors ofce, said the ofce conducted an analysis to make sure it has the right size building with the ap propriate number of staff. For the month of March, the average pro cessing time for each cus tomer was approximately 10 minutes. The customer expec tation is when they come into the Lake County Tax Collector ofce they are go ing to be there for minutes, not for hours, he said. HOLOCAUST FROM PAGE A1 awhile for us to realize men could do something like that. The prisoners were as tounded, Macri said. They were in a state of shock, believing they would never see the free dom on the other side, he said. Macri said the incident left a jarring impression on Gen. Maxwell Daven port Taylor. Some were denying the camp existed, the Normandy and Battle of the Bulge veteran said. (Gen. Taylor) demanded the leaders of the com munity come and go through the camp. Macri is one of several liberators who will speak at the Public Interfaith Holocaust Remembrance Event at 4 p.m. on April 29 at St. Timothy Catholic Church in Lady Lake. Macri said he looks forward to speaking at the event for one reason above all others. Some people living today believe the Holo caust was all made up, he said. I am here as a witness to say it was not. It was real. Whipp said saving the prisoners made everything in the war worthwhile. We were happy we could get them before the Germans killed them, he said. It made the rest of the war worth while that we were able to save somebody. Steven Luckert, cura tor of the permanent ex hibition at the United States Holocaust Memo rial Museum in Wash ington, D.C., and a his torian, said 35 U.S. Army divisions have been rec ognized for liberating the prisoners from the Nazis. There were 20,000 con centration camps and many were liberated by American troops, Luck ert said. As they were going into Germany to defeat the (Nazis) they would over run areas and discover these camps, he said. The U.S. Army divi sions provided the pris oners with medical care and food, Luckert said. They saved these pris oners, he said. They rescued them from cer tain death. If they hadnt arrived, in some cases, you had last-ditch efforts by the Nazis to kill them off so they wouldnt be witnesses. Phyllis Kalter, co-chair of the Interfaith Holocaust Remembrance event, said the annual service is im portant as a response to hatred in the world. We recognize the im portance of preserving freedom, promoting hu man dignity and con fronting hate wherever and whenever it occurs, she said. With the recent killings of three people at the Jewish Community Cen ter and Jewish assisted living facility in Overland Park, Kan., the Anti-Def amation League has re cently reported such ex treme incidents are on the increase. The audit recorded a total of 31 anti-Semitic as saults on Jewish individ uals or those perceived as Jewish in 2013, up from 17 in 2012, according to a ADL press release. Meanwhile, the total number of anti-Semit ic incidents in the U.S. fell by 19 percent in 2013, the press release also reported. The audit found there was a 23 percent de crease in such incidents in Florida. We know the number reported to us is only a fraction of what goes on every year, said Robert Tanen, associate region al director of the ADL in Boca Raton. There is signicant problem with underreporting. There is growing con cern about the rise of an ti-Semitism in Europe, he said. We are well aware of the rising tide of anti-Se mitic political parties in major European coun tries, such as Jobbik in Hungary and Golden Dawn in Greece, becom ing more accepted into the mainstream, he said. This trend is troubling. There is an emerging climate where Jews in certain parts of Europe are feeling uncomfort able, with several fami lies leaving, Tanen said. An ADL survey of 10 Eu ropean countries found that anti-Semitic beliefs continue to be held by one third of those surveyed. Macri said the recent incidents in the world, including the shootings at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, keep him awake at night. It like an early replay, he said. Are we there again? It wont be in the form of concentration camps but in the form of one human being killing and mistreating anoth er human being because they are different. DID YOU KNOW? There may have been as many as 6 million Holo caust victims. Besides Jews, the Nazis target ed Communists, Gyp sies, homosexuals, Je hovahs Witnesses, the mentally and physical ly disabled, resistance ghters and others. The top countries in terms of number of victims were Poland and the Soviet Union (4.5 million), Hun gary and the Ukraine (402,000), Czechoslova kia (277,000), Romania (220,000) and Germany (130,000). Source: www.death camps.com.

PAGE 3

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT ORLANDO Conference to be held for business women Women on a Mission to Earn Commission, a networking or ganization geared toward busi ness women, is hosting a confer ence at the Rosen Plaza Hotel on International Drive. Seminars, a trade show, luncheon and silent auction will take place. The event includes special guest speakers Thursday and Friday. Registration is available at www. woamtec.com or via email to info@woamtec.com or by calling 407-767-5417. EUSTIS Lake Tech to host car show fundraiser The rst car show raising funds to send SkillsUSA members to compe titions at Lake Tech will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., today at the Eustis campus, 2001 Kurt St., and will include food, contests, prizes and more. Show car owners are asked to do nate $10, which includes a parking spot, a prize ticket and contest entry. Spectators are asked to bring canned food items for the Lake Cares Food Pantry and $5 to cover parking and a ticket to win a prize. Trophies will be awarded for best in show, best truck, best classic, do mestic and foreign cars, as well as best bike. No alcohol, drugs or tobacco are allowed on the campus. Call James Brucker, 352-589-2250, ext. 1874 for information. TAVARES Extension offers classes on arthritis pain management The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension in Lake County is hosting classes in Tavares and Groveland on arthritis pain management. The free program Put Pain in its Place: How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control will provide infor mation about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on April 30 at the Tavares Public Library, 314 N. New Hampshire Ave. Register at tavarespain.eventbrite.com. Grovelands class will take place from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on May 1 at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St. Register at grove landpain.eventbrite.com. For information or to register, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721. MOUNT DORA Share your historic photos at the library The Mount Dora Historical Society and the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., are co-spon soring a preservation event, Share Your Historic Mount Dora Photos from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., on April 2526, at the library. People are asked to bring histor ic photos or documents of Mount Dora to the library for documenta tion. Those items will be scanned and the library will give participants a CD of their images to keep. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com More than 100 people showed up for a meeting in Clermont this week to talk about stopping a 1,196acre sand mine from op erating in the middle of a proposed high-tech devel opment in south Lake. Organizers said the meetings intent was to kick off the formation of what theyve dubbed The South Lake Citizens Co alition, a group of locals they hope will band to gether to represent com mon views when it comes to causes that could potentially impact resi dents and their communi ties. In this case, organiz ers are asking citizens to stand up publicly against the sand mines approval. According to Clermont City Councilman Ray Goodgame, if Cemex is granted a zoning change for the sand and gravel op eration, it could doom the 16,000-acre Wellness Way Sector Plan, an area where county ofcials envision companies with high-pay ing, medical-related jobs. If we let a sand mine come in and destroy the ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Hope for the Children. Thats what Good Neigh bor Program founders Di anne and John Garvis have dubbed a makeover project they have embarked on for the Kiddie Land Academy daycare in Groveland. Leslie Campassano, who with husband Lou ie owns and runs the day care, said if it werent for the program, the center likely would have closed in June when the lease at the build ing they are renting for Kid die Land expires. They did own the run down building across from it, they did not have the money to renovate it. We hadnt told anyone about closing yet but knew it was coming. Then Di anne came in one day just out of the blue. Shed nev er stopped in here before but said she was passing by when she noticed our sign, Campassano said. I mentioned to her about closing and after hearing our story and about how we cater to many low-in come families needs, asked if they could remod el the building, Campassa no said. I said, Are you cra zy? Do you have any idea about what that building needs done? And so started the Hope for the Children renovation project. Help poured in from many businesses and or ganizations. South Lake Hospitals LiveWell facil ity sponsored the build ing of an indoor play area and exercise room. Home Depot donated build ing and ooring supplies, BurgerFI, a new restau rant chain headed for Cl ermont, sponsored the kitchen and built an eat ing area. And more than 20 other contractors and companies helped with the renovations. Groveland ofcials waived all permitting fees. Betty Anne Hutchens, a childrens author and artist who lives in Delaware, was own in last week to paint a mural inside the new build ing. On Friday, locally re nowned artist Harry Gray painted a mural on an out side wall. A fence and playground were constructed Friday. A sign near the playground says it was built in memory of Lily Quintus, the four-year-old daugh ter of Groveland paramed ic Brian Quintus, who was killed earlier this month when a car crashed into a KinderCare daycare in Or lando. The children of Grove land will no longer be in visible. An army of caring neighbors have teamed to gether to shower them with love, Dianne Garvis said. A ribbon cutting and of cial reveal of the new Kid die Land building will be 1 p.m. today at the day care, 668 W. Broad Street, Groveland. Campassano said she and her husband are oored by the generosi ty of the the Good Neigh bor Program, all the donors and volunteers who had a hand in renovating the new daycare for them and the children who attend there. Danielle Damarest, a teacher at Kiddie Land, said she thinks the kids are going to love their new day care center. They (kids) will denite ly know the difference, Damarest said. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Authorities have re leased the identity of a man who reported ly robbed a Clermont bank and led law en forcement on a highspeed chase that ended when his car crashed. Brian Carl Richards, 41, was charged with armed rob bery, grand theft, ag gravat ed eeing and elud ing, resist ing arrest and reck less driving, according to an arrest afdavit re leased Friday morning. Richards, who has prior burglary, theft and other charges, re mained in the Lake County jail early Friday in lieu of $18,000 bail. According to the af davit, Richards walked into the Trustco Bank on High Grove Boule vard in Clermont about 1:15 p.m. on Thursday in a tan short sleeve dress shirt, khaki pants and camouage hat and handed a teller a black bag and typed note de manding money. The afdavit indicates that Richards told the teller Im not kidding CLERMONT Locals fight proposed sand mine GROVELAND Hope grows in Groveland ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Betty Anne Hutchens, a childrens author and illustrator, paints a mural at Kiddie Land Academy, a Groveland daycare center. Staff Report Family members and friends of Lake-Sum ter State College gradu ates will be able to watch the upcoming May com mencement ceremonies live on Lake Sumter Tele vision. The 2014 LSSC Spring Commencement cere monies will be aired live and in encore presenta tions, thanks to LSTVs partnership with the col lege and through pro duction underwriting from PSL Construction, ERA Tom Grizzard Real ty and Direct Connect to UCF, according to a press MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com A Mascotte man, believed to be high on methamphetamine, was arrested af ter barging into a local hospital and de manding to see his son who had been discharged more than a month ago. Michael Jacob Ebinger, 26, was arrest ed and treated at South Lake Hospital on Thursday after police said he tried to force his way through security guards into the facilitys emergency room to see his son. According to an arrest afdavit, police showed up at the emergency room just after 1 p.m. Thursday and found secu rity guards struggling with a man who had injection marks on his arm. The guards told police that Ebinger had been run ning around the emergen cy room lobby screaming that he wanted to see his son. A records check revealed the son was in the hospi tal more than a month ago and released to his mother, but Ebinger continued try ing to force his way into the patient area of the emergency room to see the child. Security guards were able to con vince Ebinger to leave the lobby, but he Clermont bank robber identified RICHARDS LEESBURG Graduation ceremonies to air live CLERMONT Man arrested after hospital disturbance EBINGER SEE LSTV | A4 SEE MINE | A4 SEE ARREST | A4 SEE ROBBERY | A4

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 IN LOVING MEMORY Lenora M. BrockingtonSept. 17, 1928 April 19, 2002 Sweet Jesus, Please take this message to Lenora Brockington in Heaven up above; Tell her how much we miss her, and give her all our love. As we look Back, we find ourselves wonderingDid we remember to thank you enough for all you did for us? For all the times you were by our sides to help and support us. . To celebrate our successes, to understand our problems, and accept our defeats? Or for teaching us by your Example, the value of Hard Work, Good Judgment, Courage and Integrity? If we ever thanked you for the sacrifices you made, to let us have the very best? And for the simple things like laughter, smiles and great times we shared? Mom, If we forgot to show our Gratitude enough for all the things you did, We're thanking you now. And we are hoping you knew all along, How very special you are and much you meant to us. Dear Lord, If roses grow in Heaven, please pick a bunch for us Place them in Lenoras arms and tell her they're from us. Tell her that we love her and miss her, and when she smiles Place a kiss upon her cheek, hug her for us and hold her for awhile. . Love, Fredricka, Frank, Michael & Justin DEATH NOTICES Evelyn Elmira Dickinson Evelyn Elmira Dick inson, 88, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res. Kent A. Lines Kent A. Lines, 73, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, April 17, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Leesburg. Eleanor M. McMahon Eleanor M. McMa hon, 83, of St. Peters burg, died Wednesday, April 16, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg. IN MEMORY release from the college. The Leesburg Campus graduation will be aired live at 10 a.m. on May 3. The Sumter and South Lake Campus graduation will be shown at 2 p.m. The ceremonies will re-air back-to-back on the following dates: 7 p.m. on May 10; 10 a.m. on May 11; and 2 p.m. on May 14. LSTV can be watched on Comcast Channel 13 and Brighthouse Chan nel 199, Florida Cable 4, as well as online and through various com munity partnerships. LSTV FROM PAGE A3 sector plan, wed be ashamed of our selves, Goodgame said during the meet ing. The Clermont City Council and City Manager Darren Gray, a former Lake Coun ty manager, oppose MINE FROM PAGE A3 the sand mine project. This weeks meeting at the Clermont Commu nity Center was chaired by Jack Martin, a former past president of the Kings Ridge Homeown ers Association, where residents expressed concerns about trafc, noise and dust from the sand mine. They (Cemex) will tell their side of the sto ry and this is a meeting to organize a way for us to tell our side of the story, Martin said. Residents believe as many as 300 trucks a day will haul sand and gravel from the mine to the many road-building projects Cemex is in volved with in Central Florida. The compa ny recently asked Her nando County ofcials for permission to ex pand Cemexs 730-acre mining operation near Brooksville to keep up with business demands. Martin said residents are not opposed to Ce mex as a company. But three hundred trucks making round trips per day (600 trips total) is a lot, he said. We dont think its good for the surrounding area. Wellness Way received its name from the desire to attract health, tness, biomedical research and related industries to the area, capitalizing on the existing triathlon and health/tness in dustries in South Lake. County ofcials and key stakeholders in the area envision the area to be a major employment center for Central Flor ida, anchored by com pact urban-growth cen ters, and surrounded by rolling hills and lakes. Wellness Way cov ers a huge tract east of U.S. Highway 27 along the Orange County bor der, running from south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. It has been called the largest tract of undeveloped land left in Lake County. Besides, trafc, noise and dust, sand-mine opponents have con cerns about the project deterring other busi nesses from relocating to the area, and harm ing the environment and water table. CEMEXs application says the mine will be situated on abandoned agricultural land and that excavation only would occur on 623 acres of the site. Min ing over 30 years will take place in phases of 100 acres or less and all mined areas will be re claimed, the applica tion states. Sara Engdahl, direc tor of communications for Cemex, previous ly said the mine would have no effect on water and would aid in eco nomic development, bringing in at least $4.7 million a year. Linda and David Hill, who own a blue berry farm adjacent to the proposed min ing site, said the opera tion will hurt their crop, while Goodgame said 30 years of proposed mining, even after rec lamation, would leave the land in sub-par condition. County commission ers will address the sand mine at 1:30 p.m. on May 20 at the old courthouse building in Tavares. returned, reportedly pushed a security guard out the way and ran back into the lobby. Police were called and Ebinger was ar rested. Hospital staff examined Ebin ger and determined he was in toxicated by methamphet amine. He told ofcers he had been using the drug every day since he dropped his son off at the hospital. Ebinger was charged with dis orderly intoxication and battery on uniformed security guards. He remained in the Lake County jail Friday in lieu of $2,150 bail. ARREST FROM PAGE A3 and the teller believed he was armed. After being given an undeter mined amount of cash, Rich ards allegedly ed in a red, four-door Toyota, which had its license plate covered with blue tape. However, a teller was able to take a photo of the car, which helped law enforcement nd the vehicle. Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, said deputies found the suspects vehicle in the area of a nearby shopping center. Richards allegedly led law en forcement, including the Flor ida Highway Patrol, on a pur suit that reached speeds up to 100 mph. He reportedly crossed over a median at one point and drove the wrong way into on coming trafc on Highway 27. Deputies were eventually able to stop him by laying spike sticks across the road in front of the vehicle. The sticks are designed to shred the tires of eeing vehi cles. The suspect lost control of the vehicle and struck a 2007 Jeep in the area of Hancock and Hart wood Marsh roads and K-9s helped apprehend him. The sus pect as well as the dog and the K-9 deputy were treated on the scene for minor injuries. The driver of the Jeep was not hurt. Tellers were able to identi fy him as the robber. Richards allegedly told detectives that a friend in the car told him to rob the bank, but the afdavit points out that deputies never saw any one else in the car. According to the jail website, Richards was arrested in Janu ary on charges of burglary and grand theft. He also was arrest ed in December on charges of grand theft, possession of bur glary tools and criminal mis chief and for violating his pro bation for assaulting a law enforcement ofcer in 2002 in Seminole County. ROBBERY FROM PAGE A3 MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL A SpaceX supply ship rocket ed toward the International Space Station on Friday, set ting the stage for an Easter morning delivery and urgent spacewalking repairs later in the week. Following its midday launch through cloudy skies, the Dragon cargo carrier was shown drifting away in the blackness of space, against the blue backdrop of Earth. Its transporting 2 tons of goods, including a new spacesuit, spacesuit replace ment parts, much-needed food, legs for NASAs human oid, Robonaut, a bevy of mat ing ies, and germs gathered from sports arenas and his toric sites across the U.S. Neither NASA nor SpaceX packed any Easter goodies, but the families of the six as tronauts sent private care packages. It will be a surprise for all of us when they open the hatch, said NASAs human exploration chief, Bill Gerst enmaier. The Dragon will reach the orbiting lab on Sunday morn ing. That pushes urgent space walking repairs to Wednesday; NASA wants a bad backup computer replaced before something else breaks. This was the second launch attempt this week for SpaceX after a months delay. On Monday, NASAs com mercial supplier was foiled by a leaky rocket valve. The valve was replaced, and the com pany aimed for a Friday lift off despite a dismal forecast. Storms cleared out of Cape Canaveral just in time. SpaceXs billionaire chief executive ofcer, Elon Musk, was delighted with the suc cessful launch for NASA, the customer. This was a happy day, he told reporters from company headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif. Last Friday, a critical back up computer failed outside the space station, and NASA considered postponing the SpaceX ight. The primary computer is working ne, but numerous systems would be seriously compromised if it broke, too. A double failure also would hinder visits by the Dragon and other vessels. Its imperative that we maintain backups for these external command-routing computer boxes, also called multiplexer-demultiplexers, or MDMs, said ight director Brian Smith said Friday. Right now, we dont have that. NASA decided late this week to use the gasket-like material already on board the space station for the re pair, instead of waiting for the Dragon and the new, preci sion-cut material that NASA rushed on board for the computer swap. Astronauts trimmed their own thermal material Friday to t the bot tom of the replacement com puter, and inserted a fresh circuit card. The shipment is close to ve weeks late. Initially set for mid-March, the launch was delayed by extra prepping, then damage to an Air Force radar and, nally on Monday, the rocket leak. NASA is paying SpaceX Space Exploration Technol ogies Corp. and Virginias Orbital Sciences Corp. to keep the orbiting lab well stocked. SpaceX making Easter delivery of station supplies JOHN RAOUX / AP A rocket carrying the SpaceX Dragon ship lifts off from launch complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral. AP PHOTO This image made from video shows the engine of the second stage of the rocket carrying the SpaceX Dragon capsule.

PAGE 5

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Electric Razor Repair Clinic Wed, April 23rd WILDWOOD CYCLERY rrffntfrb Bikes for Every Terain & Budget FRANCES DEMILIO Associated Press ROME Desperate migrants, suicidal failed business owners, bat tered women, torture victims and all people suffering in the world were remembered at a torch-lit Good Friday Way of the Cross pro cession presided over by Pope Francis at the Colosseum. With his head bowed and eyes often closed, Francis joined tens of thousands of faithful in listening to medita tions read aloud in the ancient arena in down town Rome. One med itation, read by Ital ian actress Virna Lisi, singled out the plight of child soldiers. Oth er readings recalled mi grants who risk death in trying to reach the shores of afuent na tions, women and chil dren enslaved by hu man trafckers and inmates in overcrowded prisons. The selection of sub jects reected the popes resolve to focus the Catholic churchs attention on those who suffer, often on the mar gins of society. The mo tif of the marginalized also mirrored much of Francis outreach in his rst year of his papa cy. His rst pilgrimage outside of Rome as pope took him to a tiny island near Sicily where thousands of migrants arrive on smugglers rickety boats. Francis wore a white overcoat over a plain white cassock against the chill of the night. Near the end of the 90-minute service, Francis told the crowd in brief remarks that the cross represented the weight of all our sins. He decried the mon strosity of man when he lets himself be guided by evil. But he sounded a note of optimism. Evil wont have the last word, but love, mercy and par don will, Francis said. He ended with a prayer that all those abandoned under the weight of the cross would nd the strength of hope. Then he bless ed the faithful and headed back to the Vati can by car. Another of the med itations spoke of chil dren whose health might be endan gered by Italian mob sters dumping of toxic wastes in their neigh borhoods and farmland near Naples. Mothers of the children had writ ten to the pope in hopes of drawing attention to the problem. Outside the Colosse um and along the broad boulevard approach ing it, tens of thou sands of pilgrims, tour ists and Romans stood elbow-to-elbow. They clutched prayer books and candles, in holders fashioned from brightly colored paper. Many of them and tens of thousands more are expected to crowd into St. Peters Square on Sunday for Eas ter Mass celebrated by Francis at the Vatican. Pensive pope at Good Friday Colosseum procession ANDREW MEDICHINI / AP Pope Francis leads the Via Crucis torchlight procession celebrated in front of the Colosseum on Good Friday in Rome on Friday. FOSTER KLUG and YOUKYUNG LEE Associated Press MOKPO, South Korea The captain of a sunk en South Korean ferry was arrested Saturday on suspicion of negligence and abandoning people in need, as investigators looked into whether his evacuation order came too late to save lives. Two crew members were also arrested. The disaster three days ago left more than 270 people missing and at least 29 people dead. As the last bit of the sunken ferrys hull slipped Friday beneath the murky water off southern South Korea, there was a new victim: a vice principal of the high school whose students were among the passen gers was found hanged, an apparent suicide. The Sewol had left the northwestern port of Incheon on Tuesday on an overnight journey to the holiday island of Jeju in the south with 476 people aboard, includ ing 323 students from Danwon High School in Ansan. It capsized with in hours of the crew making a distress call to the shore a little before 9 a.m. Wednesday. Only its dark blue keel jutted out over the surface. But by Friday night, even that had disappeared, and rescu ers set two giant beige buoys to mark the area. Navy divers attached underwater air bags to the 6,852-ton ferry to prevent it from sink ing deeper, the Defense Ministry said. The coast guard said divers began pumping air into the ship to try to sustain any survivors. Strong currents and rain made it difcult to get inside the ferry. Div ers worked in shifts to try to get into the vessel, where most of the pas sengers were believed to have been trapped when it sank, guard spokes man Kim Jae-in said. Investigators said the accident came at a point where the ship had to make a turn, and pros ecutor Park Jae-eok said investigators were look ing at whether the third mate ordered a turn that was so sharp that it caused the vessel to list. The sharp turn came between 8:48 a.m. and 8:49 a.m., but its not known whether it was done voluntarily or be cause of some external factor, said Nam Jaeheon, a spokesman for the Maritime Ministry. Another angle be ing probed is the role of the captain, 68-year-old Lee Joon-seok. Senior prosecutor Yang Jung-jin said Lee was detained early Sat urday, along with the two crew members. Lee fac es ve charges includ ing negligence of duty and violation of mari time law, according to the Yonhap news agency. Yang said earlier that Lee was not on the bridge when the fer ry was passing through an area with many is lands clustered closely together, something he said is required by law so the captain can help a mate make a turn. The captain also aban doned people in need of help and rescue, he said. The captain escaped before the passengers, Yang said. Two crewmembers on the bridge of the ferry a 25-year-old wom an and a 55-year-old helmsman also failed to reduce speed near the islands and conducted a sharp turn, Yang said. They also did not carry out necessary measures to save lives, he said. KEN THOMAS Associated Press WASHINGTON Thousands of pages of documents from Presi dent Bill Clintons White House afrm a longtime adage: The more things change, the more they stay the same. As Clinton prepared for an August 1994 news conference in which he hoped to build public support for his strug gling and ultimately unsuccessful health care overhaul, he told his advisers: A lot of them want to know they can keep their own plan if they like it. Later that fall, Clintons Democrats were routed in midterm elections and lost con trol of Congress. Nearly two decades later, President Barack Obama sought to reas sure Americans about his own plan, which won approval in Congress in 2010, by telling them, If you like your plan you can keep it. A spate of private policy cancella tions forced Obama to recant his pledge that all Americans who liked their plans could simply keep them. More than 8 million people have signed up for health insurance un der the Obamacare law; how the overhaul is perceived could be come a deciding point for the fate of Obamas fellow Democrats in the 2014 midterm elections. About 7,500 pages of records released Friday through the National Archives and the Clin ton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Ark., show the parallels between the Clinton era and the White House under Obama. The documents may also offer a glimpse into a future as former Secretary of State Hil lary Rodham Clinton, who led her husbands health care task force, considers another pres idential campaign in 2016. One undated memo written after the 1994 elections offers advice on how Mrs. Clinton could soften her image. An unnamed aide told the rst lady, Its no sur prise that some Ameri cans cant handle smart, tough, independent women, and encour aged Clinton to pick is sues and events accen tuating her personal side, not wonky inter ests, and recommended she do more listening. From Clinton to Obama, many parallels Captain of sunken S. Korean ferry arrested AHN YOUNG-JOON / AP Relatives of missing children in Ship Sewol weep at a gymnasium in Jindo, South Korea

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 7

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 Y ou know how you get into those moods where you con vince yourself that the only thing to do when youre absolute ly miserable is to make yourself even more miserable, as if misery were some kind of contest? And when youre in that kind of mood, theres some part of you determined to make your self so thoroughly unhappy you are guaranteed to take home the poor-me crown? Picture me, then, having a per fectly rotten day. Waking up to a washed-out gray morning, Id started to feel as if every decision carried with it the potential for a cataclysmic spiritual crisis. And I mean everything. Choosing the wrong font for cer tain emails, for example, might act as the harbinger of ruin; parking too close to the building where I work would mean somebody else would attempt to squeeze a vehi cle so close to mine that it would simply be easier just park their car inside my car. Parking far away would prove I was the abject failure I always imagined myself to be. (Who but a schmuck pays $300 a year for parking and then walks three-quarters of a mile in the rain to get to the ofce? Sure, people do that all the time when they work in a city. But who does that when her building is located on acres and acres of open farm land and rolling hills? For sever al hundred bucks a year, I want access to what by implication is promised when the money is routinely deducted directly from my paycheck under the heading parking. Not that Im bitter.) I was facing a day lled with budget cuts at work, computer problems and calls from home about a repeatedly (not direly, only annoyingly) sick cat and I was fully intending to cap it all off by driving in the rain to pick up a cheap pre-cooked chicken for dinner. Youve had those chickens, right? They sort of look like very short extras from a zombie mov ie: Basically, theyre dried skin pulled tight over brittle bones with a little bit of ooze emerg ing from somewhere. Frankly, you dont want to make inquiries concerning the oozes origins. I dont even really like the cheap pre-cooked chicken, but it seemed like the kind of half-baked idea, literally and metaphorically, to sig nal the days nale. Then a stranger wrecked the whole thing. I was coming off a ramp and onto the highway, eyes nar rowed against the blur of rain, sts clamped around the steer ing wheel, radio news station in the background announcing the end of the civilized world as we know it (plus additional rain) and some guy actually permitted me to merge. Then he had the nerve to smile and wave. And without thinking about it, I smiled and waved back. It wasnt a fake. I meant it. I think I even said Ooh, thanks, mister! out loud in my car. It turns out that, when it comes to changing moods, Im a cheap date. When I realized that my fun damental perception of the day could pivot both immediate ly and entirely on the smallest of incidents, I admit to being star tled. I was happily surprised, of course, but still was it real ly just so easy to feel better after feeling bad? Not always, of course. Not when theres real cause for sad ness or when Im caught by sense of loss or longing emerging from somewhere deep or damaged. Thats when I check in with the professionals the therapist, the doctor and the old friends who know me best to see if I need some kind of real tune-up. There was a small, inty part of me that wanted to clutch the misery and hold it close. But you cant wave with a clenched st and you cant really smile with gritted teeth. Maintaining unhappiness was too much work. Trust me when I say that I didnt mean to forget being frus trated, angry and sour-pussed. It just happened. One kind gesture and SHAZAM, there I was with my heart opening like a para chute and my hand waving like a 5-year-olds at a Fourth of July parade. I still picked up dinner on the way home, but decided to get fresh pizza. It went better with the parade. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her web site at http://www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Sometimes a wave and smile are all it takes to make a day A s home to a rst-magnitude spring in Al exander Springs, it is understandable that the springs legislation making its way through the Florida Senate has the sup port of many here in Lake County. With only about two weeks to go in the legis lative session, however, what is not understand able, indeed inexplicable, is the obstinacy of the Florida House leadership, specically Speaker Will Weatherford, in moving that chambers ver sion of the bill forward. The House bill, a com panion to SB 1576, sponsored by Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, has yet to be heard by a sin gle House committee, and as a result Weather ford recently told reporters that it is very un likely to pass this session. It is hard to comprehend that anyone with the power to make substantive strides toward helping Floridas springs, its 33 rst-magnitude springs in particular, recover from years of over pumping and overpollution would not do so. There is a growing consensus in the Legis lature that time is running out to reverse the long-running degradation of Floridas springs. Deans bill, which was written with the input of four other Senate committee chairmen, would establish new regulations and protection zones for our springs, including mandated conversion to public wastewater systems where possible. It importantly also would set up a long-term funding source without raising taxes one cent. Weatherford has tried using funding as a rea son why springs legislation will not be possi ble this year, but it is merely a smokescreen be cause Deans bill addresses it easily and smartly. That some of the states biggest business groups suddenly got concerned about our springs and water policy once Deans bill emerged is probably a better explanation for Weatherfords hesitance to push the measure forward. Associated Industries of Florida, the Florida Chamber and the Florida Homebuild ers Association, all of which have never shown an interest in springs protection, suddenly jumped into the discussion when they saw SB 1576 had some substance and support. Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scott, who has been blasting press releases across the state touting his support for the springs, has remained no ticeably silent on the springs legislation and Weatherfords inaction. If the governor is tru ly interested in long-term springs protection and restoration, now would be a good time to raise his voice. Time is running out in this legislative ses sion to bring meaningful springs restoration to fruition. We urge our state Reps. Larry Metz and Marlene OToole to urge Weather ford to open the way for the House version of the springs protection bill to move ahead. Its sensible and overdue. From the Halifax Media Group. A VOICE Time running out on springs protection bill Classic DOONESBURY 1973 When I realized that my fundamental perception of the day could pivot both immediately and entirely on the smallest of incidents, I admit to being startled. I was happily surprised, of course, but still was it really just so easy to feel better after feeling bad?

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 9

Cycles Cycles 352-330-00479807 N. HWY 301, WILDWOODWWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.COM 2007 HONDA SHADOW 750Only $4,300 2009 YAMAHA 950Only $5,700 2007 HONDA SHADOW 1100Only $4,300 2006 YAMAHA U-STAR 650Only $4,200Huge Selection of New & Pre-owned Bikes Only $6,500 2006 YAMAHA V-STAROnly $4,200 Service SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com BOXING: Bernard Hopkins to step in ring at 49 / B5 MONTVERDE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Montverde Academy added the latest jewel to its growing sports com plex on Thursday when the school held an open ing ceremony and rib bon cutting for its new aquatic center. School Headmas ter Dr. Kasey Kesselring spoke at the ceremo ny, which was attend ed by former Headmas ter Walter L. Stephens, members of the schools Board of Trustees and ofcials from the South Lake Chamber of Com merce. The facility, which is located on the east side of The Nest, the Mont verde Academy Cen ter for Sportsmanship and Wellness, is 84-feet long, 62-feet wide. It is six-feet deep at each end and four-feet deep in the middle. Kesselring indicat ed the facility will be used as a training facili ty for Montverde Acade my Boys and Girls swim teams. As part of the cer emony, members of the schools swim teams swam a lap in the pool. In the past sever al years, Montverde Academy has upgrad ed its sports complex with a new football-soc cer-track facility, as well as new baseball and soft ball elds. The Nest, home to Montverde Montverde Academy opens swimming pool BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Members of the Montverde Academy swim team dive into the schools new pool during opening ceremonies on Thursday at the school. MINNEOLA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake Minneola boys basketball coach Fred die Cole is conducting two youth basketball camps in May for play ers looking to improve their fundamentals and ability to perform in game situations. The two-day camps are May 2-3 and May 2324 at the Lake Minneo la High School gymna sium for boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 17. Cost of the camps is $50. The rst day for both camps will run from 5 to 8 p.m. and the second day, which is a Satuday, will begin at 9 a.m. and end at noon. Cole is the only boys basketball coach in Lake Minneolas histo ry. He led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 201314 and the Florida High School Athletic Asso ciation Class 6A state championship game. After a college career at Bethune-Cookman in Daytona Beach, Cole played professionally overseas before becom ing a high-school coach. Lake Minneola is 60-22 during Coles three sea sons at the helm. Registration forms for the camp are available on request. Email coal are colef@lake.k12..us to obtain a registration form or for any ques tions. Cole said spots in both camps are lling fast. Ive had 15 people sign up the rst day I put out a sign-up sheet, Cole said. I planned to stop at 50, but I will gauge any additional in terest in the camp if we get to 50 registrations. LMHS hoops coach schedules 2 camps Orlando coach Jacque Vaughn calls out a play to his team during the rst half of Mondays game against Chicago at the United Center in Chicago. Vaughn led the Magic to a 23-59 record in his second season with the Magic JEFF HAYNES / AP KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated Press ORLANDO Its been two seasons since the Or lando Magic went through near-wholesale changes that included a franchise players exit and bringing in a new general manager and coaching staff. The two seasons since have produced just 20 and 23 victories, respective ly, following Wednesday nights season nale. While fans havent seen a lot of positive on-court re sults yet, the new regime is hoping that it can remain patient entering what could the most pivotal off season to date of the cur rent rebuilding project. I think if you look back on the year, I think we made some positive strides. Strides in the right direction, Magic gener al manager Rob Hennigan said Thursday. Magic enter offseason with confidence LYNNE SLADKY / AP San Antonios Tony Parker, right, and Miamis LeBron James collide during Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals in Miami. A rematch of last years thrilling NBA Finals nish is possible, but the Spurs and Heat would have to get through tough paths to get there. TIM REYNOLDS Associated Press MIAMI Before the season started, a poll suggested that the Mi ami Heat were the over whelming favorite to win the NBA title, col lecting a whopping 76 percent of ballots cast. The voters werent some know-nothings, either. No, this was a polling of NBA general manag ers. Things seem quite a bit different now. The Heat dont seem like locks for a third straight title anymore. San Antonio and In diana are top seeds. Brooklyn, Chicago, the Los Angeles Clippers, Oklahoma City, Gold en State, Houston, Port land and the Heat all gure to have a legit imate chance at be ing the club to hoist the NBA playoffs look wide open SEE SWIM | B2 SEE NBA | B2 SEE MAGIC | B2

PAGE 10

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Indiana vs. Atlanta Saturday, April 19: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Indiana at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Miami vs. Charlotte Sunday, April 20: Charlotte at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Monday, April 28: Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto vs. Brooklyn Saturday, April 19: Brooklyn at Toronto, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Brooklyn at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Toronto at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Chicago vs. Washington Sunday, April 20: Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Chicago at Washington, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Dallas Sunday, April 20: Dallas at San Antonio, 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: San Antonio at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 28: San Antonio at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City vs. Memphis Saturday, April 19: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Monday, April 21: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers vs. Golden State Saturday, April 19: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Monday, April 21: Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Houston vs. Portland Sunday, April 20: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Portland at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Friday, April 25: Houston at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 27: Houston at Portland, 9:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Detroit vs. Boston Friday, April 18: Detroit at Boston, late Sunday, April 20: Detroit at Boston, 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Boston at Detroit, 8 p.m. Montreal 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 16: Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 4, OT Friday, April 18: Montreal at Tampa Bay, late Sunday, April 20: Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh 1, Columbus 0 Wednesday, April 16: Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Saturday, April 19: Columbus at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Monday, April 21: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday, April 17: N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 1 Sunday, April 20: Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, Noon Tuesday, April 22: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Friday, April 25: N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 1, Minnesota 0 Thursday, April 17: Colorado 5, Minnesota 4, OT Saturday, April 19: Minnesota at Colorado, 9:30 p.m. Monday, April 21: Colorado at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday, April 24: Colorado at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. St. Louis 1, Chicago 0 Thursday, April 17: St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, 3OT Saturday, April 19: Chicago at St. Louis, 3 p.m. Monday, April 21: St. Louis at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: St. Louis at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Anaheim 1, Dallas 0 Wednesday, April 16: Anaheim 4, Dallas 3 Friday, April 18: Dallas at Anaheim, late Monday, April 21: Anaheim at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 23: Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday, April 17: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, April 20: Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 22: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Thursday, April 24: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour RBC Heritage Friday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,101; Par 71 (36-35) Partial Second Round a-denotes amateur K.J. Choi 70-67 137 Scott Langley 66-73 139 Luke Donald 70-69 139 Billy Hurley III 70-69 139 Nicholas Thompson 70-70 140 Geoff Ogilvy 72-68 140 Charl Schwartzel 70-70 140 Tim Herron 69-72 141 Brian Stuard 69-72 141 Kevin Streelman 69-72 141 Harris English 68-73 141 William McGirt 66-76 142 Chris Stroud 71-71 142 Stewart Cink 70-72 142 Charles Howell III 69-73 142 a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 71-71 142 Camilo Villegas 72-71 143 John Mallinger 69-74 143 J.B. Holmes 72-71 143 Ken Duke 72-71 143 Jordan Spieth 69-74 143 Patrick Reed 71-72 143 Tim Clark 72-71 143 Pat Perez 74-69 143 Andrew Loupe 70-73 143 Briny Baird 72-72 144 Jonathan Byrd 71-73 144 Zach Johnson 71-73 144 Jason Kokrak 71-73 144 Robert Garrigus 71-74 145 Ryo Ishikawa 77-68 145 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 74-71 145 Ricky Barnes 72-73 145 Erik Compton 70-75 145 Kevin Kisner 73-72 145 David Toms 73-73 146 Brendon Todd 75-71 146 James Hahn 72-74 146 Mark Anderson 71-75 146 Charlie Beljan 73-74 147 Josh Teater 74-73 147 Mike Weir 73-74 147 Brendon de Jonge 72-75 147 Aaron Baddeley 71-76 147 Kevin Chappell 75-72 147 a-Hunter Stewart 74-73 147 Danny Lee 72-76 148 Jim Renner 75-73 148 Charlie Wi 73-75 148 Lucas Glover 69-79 148 Marc Leishman 72-76 148 Kevin Na 72-76 148 Tom Watson 75-73 148 Chad Collins 73-75 148 Mark Wilson 74-75 149 Hideki Matsuyama 71-79 150 Davis Love III 70-80 150 Kyle Stanley 77-73 150 Jason Bohn 74-76 150 Kevin Tway 70-80 150 Bryce Molder 74-78 152 Martin Laird 72-81 153 James Driscoll 77-76 153 Russell Henley 76-78 154 Ben Curtis 79-76 155 Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. K.J. Choi -5 F 2. Robert Allenby -4 5 3. Luke Donald -3 F 3. Billy Hurley III -3 F 3. Bo Van Pelt -3 5 3. Ben Martin -3 4 3. Scott Langley -3 F 8. Geoff Ogilvy -2 F 8. Graeme McDowell -2 6 8. Jim Furyk -2 7 8. Charl Schwartzel -2 F 8. Ted Potter, Jr. -2 7 8. Nicholas Thompson -2 F 8. Brian Harman -2 5 8. Matt Every -2 7 Champions Tour Greater Gwinnett Friday At TPC Sugarloaf Duluth, Ga. Purse: $1.8 million Yardage: 7,131; Par 72 First Round Miguel A. Jimenez 35-30 65 Steve Pate 33-35 68 Bernhard Langer 36-32 68 Kenny Perry 35-33 68 Fred Couples 35-34 69 Jeff Sluman 36-33 69 Rod Spittle 35-35 70 Colin Montgomerie 35-35 70 P.H. Horgan III 35-35 70 Jeff LeMaster 35-35 70 Chien Soon Lu 34-37 71 Duffy Waldorf 36-35 71 Gary Hallberg 34-37 71 Peter Jacobsen 35-36 71 Bob Gilder 36-35 71 Roger Chapman 38-33 71 Jay Haas 35-36 71 Marco Dawson 33-38 71 Joey Sindelar 38-34 72 Bill Glasson 38-34 72 Mike Goodes 35-37 72 Peter Senior 38-34 72 Billy Andrade 37-35 72 Brian Henninger 37-35 72 Joel Edwards 37-35 72 Kirk Triplett 37-35 72 Michael Allen 37-35 72 David Frost 34-38 72 Fred Funk 35-37 72 Mike Reid 37-35 72 Nick Price 37-35 72 Esteban Toledo 36-36 72 Mark McNulty 34-38 72 Anders Forsbrand 38-35 73 Larry Mize 35-38 73 Wes Short, Jr. 36-37 73 Rocco Mediate 37-36 73 Mark Calcavecchia 37-36 73 Bart Bryant 38-35 73 Hale Irwin 35-38 73 Russ Cochran 35-38 73 Olin Browne 35-38 73 Bob Tway 37-36 73 Scott Dunlap 38-35 73 Morris Hatalsky 36-38 74 Wayne Levi 36-38 74 TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 2:30 a.m. NBCSN Formula One, Chinese Grand Prix, at Shanghai BOXING 9:30 p.m. SHO Champion Peter Quillin (30-0-0) vs. Lukas Konecny (50-4-0), for WBO mid dleweight title; champion Shawn Porter (23-0-1) vs. Paulie Malignaggi (33-5-0), for IBF welterweight title; IBF champion Bernard Hopkins (54-6-2) vs. WBA champion Beibut Shumenov (14-1-0) for IBF/WBA light heavyweight titles, at Washington COLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m. SUN LSU at Mississippi 2 p.m. BHSN South Carolina at Auburn Note: BHSN is available to Bright House cable subscribers 8 p.m. ESPNU Baylor at Kansas St. COLLEGE SOFTBALL 7:30 p.m. SUN Texas at Oklahoma GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC European PGA Tour, Malaysian Open, third round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, The Heritage, third round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. 3 p.m. CBS PGA Tour, The Heritage, third round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. TGC Champions Tour, Greater Gwinnett Championship, second round, at Duluth, Ga. 6:30 p.m. TGC LPGA, LOTTE Championship, nal round, at Kapolei, Hawaii MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. FS1 L.A. Angels at Detroit 4 p.m. MLB Houston at Oakland 7 p.m. SUN N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay FS-Florida Seattle at Miami 8 p.m. FS1 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers WGN Chicago White Sox at Texas 9 p.m. FS1 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 8 p.m. FOX UFC, middleweights, Brad Tavares (12-2-0) vs. Yoel Romero (7-1-0); lightweights, Donald Cerrone (22-6-0) vs. Edson Barboza (13-1-0); bantamweights, Miesha Tate (135-0) vs. Liz Carmouche (8-4-0); heavyweights, Fabricio Werdum (17-5-1) vs. Travis Browne (16-1-1), at Orlando NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 12:30 p.m. ESPN Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Brooklyn at Toronto 3:30 p.m. ABC Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Golden State at L.A. Clippers 7 p.m. ESPN Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Atlanta at Indiana 9:30 p.m. ESPN Playoffs, rst round, Game 1, Memphis at Oklahoma City NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 3 p.m. NBC Playoffs, conference quarternals, Game 2, Chicago at St. Louis 7 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, Game 2, Columbus at Pittsburgh 9:30 p.m. NBCSN Playoffs, conference quarternals, Game 2, Minnesota at Colorado SOCCER 7:40 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Fulham at Tottenham 9:55 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Stoke City at Cardiff City 12:30 p.m. NBC Premier League, Sunderland at Chelsea 4 p.m. NBCSN MLS, New England at Chicago SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED Academys two-time national championship boys basketball team, opened in 2012. In his speech, Kesselring praised the efforts of everyone involved in the construction of the pool, including Brad Long, the schools business man ager, for his budgetary help and dedication in making the project a reality. SWIM FROM PAGE B1 Larry OBrien Trophy in a couple of months. Usually, the NBA play offs arent so wide open. Things might change over the next couple of months. There are 16 teams that have a chance to win it, said Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks, whose team is seed ed No. 2 in the West. If youre in the play offs, you have a chance. There are some good teams. Any team can beat each other. The West is deep. There are two teams that are really good that didnt make it and had great years. Its denitely open. Theres a lot of good basketball teams that are ghting for the championship. For as good as San An tonio and Indiana were all year well, for most of the year in Indianas case, before the Pac ers faltered down the stretch its never a certainty that the No. 1 seeds reach the NBA Fi nals. Its happened that way only 11 times in the last 35 years. Then again, the last time that there wasnt either a No. 1 or a No. 2 in the title series was 1978. So while upsets can happen, its not all that common to see bracket craziness akin to a No. 7 and No. 8 seeds Connecticut and Kentucky playing for the NCAA title ear lier this month hap pening in the same NBA playoff season. It is going to be tre mendous from a fans standpoint, watching, Golden State coach Mark Jackson said. It going to be a lot of fun. Brooklyns Jason Kidd has plenty of postsea son experience as a player. He believes the NBA championship is up for grabs, but also probably knows his tory doesnt favor his sixth-seeded club. Since 1979, only ve teams seeded No. 4 or lower in their confer ence have reached the nals. But Kidd sees reason for hope. Its always wide open, said Kidd, the rst-year coach of the Nets a veteran-lad en team put together to win a title this season. You guys sometimes limit it to just two teams but guys that are play ing on a daily basis in the Western Conference and the Eastern Confer ence feel like theyve got a chance. This year, that doesnt just seem like coach speak. Take the East. On pa per, the biggest mis match is No. 1 Indiana against No. 8 Atlanta, especially because the Hawks are the only sub.500 team in the play offs. And just a couple weeks ago, the Hawks went to Indianapolis and absolutely embar rassed the Pacers, run ning out to a 32-point halftime lead in one of the more stunning games of the entire NBA season. Theres some good teams out there, Pac ers coach Frank Vogel said. Every team in the playoffs have given us some problems. Weve been able to win against them as well. But its certainly shaped out to be a good conference. No. 5 Washington won the season se ries over No. 4 Chi cago. Out West, the third-seeded Clippers and sixth-seeded Gold en State split four meet ings. Memphis ousted Oklahoma City a year ago and those clubs meet in the rst round. And San Antonios quest to avenge last years loss in the NBA Finals starts against Dallas the last team to beat Miami in a seven-game series, win ning the title in 2011. So there are some good stories, and theres intrigue with every rstround series. That doesnt mean everyone in the league thinks itll be a year laden with surpris es. Philadelphia coach Brett Brown put it sim ply to him, the game changes in the playoffs, period. The regular season and the playoffs are like two different sports, Brown said. If you put me in a bubble and you drag me out in May, I can say this is different than the game Im see ing in November. Its just entirely different. Thats why Brown, a former Spurs assistant, thinks theres a very small number of teams capable of winning it all. To be the last man standing is so ridicu lously hard, Brown said. People have no idea what its like to play in June. NBA FROM PAGE B1 I think clearly the win-loss record was not very good. Were all aware of that. We all know that has to im prove. But I think there are some deeper layers to it, and I think that if you look at the way our guys competed con sistently, I thought the spirit of the team was pretty good, he said. That spirit, combined with solid seasons from No. 2 overall draft pick Victor Oladipo and third-year center Nik Vucevic, gives team of cials even more con dence as they head into a summer highlighted by two lottery picks in Junes draft, and lots of roster exibility to po tentially bring in veter an pieces as well. As has been his style, Hennigan was short on specics about what could happen in the coming months. But he reiterated that what ever happened, that it wouldnt be a devia tion from the process he had in mind when he took the job. I think well contin ue to try to do our work to identify the best ways to improve the team, Hennigan said. And what we dont want to do is skip any steps. So I think well be methodical, well con tinue to be very stra tegic in how we add to the team, how we im prove the team. The draft is certain ly one area to do that. I also think that well continue to be oppor tunistic in actively ex ploring what options exist in free agency and trades. So were not bound to just one bas ket. Were looking for ways to improve all the way around, he said. Its a mantra that has clearly trickled down to and is being fully em braced his head coach as well. I think there are more steps than just the win and loss col umn. You can prepare to win. Theres also cul tivating, Magic coach Jacque Vaughn said. Its similar to a garden. You have to cultivate, you have to feed it. You got to weed out some things. You got to fer tilize it. So theres steps to making that garden grow. And I think its the same way in cultivat ing a winning culture, he said. Orlandos current roster features just four players over the age of 25. Point guard Jameer Nelson, who has spent his entire 10-year ca reer in Orlando, is the Magics longest-ten ured player at age 32. He embraced a men torship role with Olad ipo this year, which Oladipo said was ben ecial in helping him navigate through the ups and downs of a rookie season. Still, there is uncer tainty about wheth er Nelson will be a part of the rebuild next sea son. He is due $8 mil lion in the nal year of his contract in 2014-15, but the Magic would owe him only $2 mil lion if he is waived by July 15. Nelson acknowl edged there have been internal conversations with team ofcials about his future with the team, but he de clined to elaborate. I would be lying to you if I said I didnt (have talks), Nelson said. I did, but Im not going to disclose that with you guys. Ill keep that internal. As Ive al ways done in the past. Like I said before, its the teams option. I would love to continue to play here and be here and see this thing turn around. Ill just keep my ngers crossed. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 10 6 .625 7-3 W-5 6-3 4-3 Toronto 8 8 .500 2 5-5 L-2 3-3 5-5 Baltimore 7 7 .500 2 6-4 W-2 4-4 3-3 Boston 7 9 .438 3 1 5-5 W-2 2-4 5-5 Tampa Bay 7 9 .438 3 1 3-7 L-4 4-4 3-5 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 7 5 .583 5-5 W-1 5-2 2-3 Minnesota 8 7 .533 6-4 W-2 5-4 3-3 Chicago 8 8 .500 1 5-5 L-2 6-4 2-4 Kansas City 7 7 .500 1 5-5 W-3 4-2 3-5 Cleveland 7 8 .467 1 1 4-6 L-1 3-3 4-5 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 10 5 .667 8-2 L-1 3-3 7-2 Texas 9 7 .563 1 6-4 W-3 7-3 2-4 Los Angeles 7 8 .467 3 1 5-5 W-1 3-6 4-2 Seattle 7 8 .467 3 1 3-7 L-3 2-3 5-5 Houston 5 11 .313 5 3 2-8 L-4 3-7 2-4 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 10 5 .667 6-4 L-1 4-2 6-3 Washington 9 7 .563 1 1 5-5 L-1 4-3 5-4 New York 8 7 .533 2 1 6-4 W-3 2-4 6-3 Philadelphia 7 8 .467 3 2 4-6 W-1 4-5 3-3 Miami 6 10 .375 4 4 1-9 L-1 6-4 0-6 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 11 5 .688 7-3 L-1 5-4 6-1 St. Louis 10 6 .625 1 7-3 W-1 4-2 6-4 Pittsburgh 8 8 .500 3 2 4-6 W-1 5-2 3-6 Cincinnati 7 9 .438 4 3 5-5 W-3 4-5 3-4 Chicago 4 11 .267 6 5 3-7 L-5 2-5 2-6 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 10 6 .625 6-4 W-1 2-3 8-3 San Francisco 10 6 .625 5-5 L-1 5-4 5-2 Colorado 8 9 .471 2 2 5-5 W-1 4-2 4-7 San Diego 7 9 .438 3 3 5-5 L-1 5-5 2-4 Arizona 4 14 .222 7 7 3-7 L-6 1-11 3-3 THURSDAYS GAMES Detroit 7, Cleveland 5 Minnesota 7, Toronto 0, 1st game Texas 8, Seattle 6 N.Y. Yankees 10, Tampa Bay 2 Minnesota 9, Toronto 5, 2nd game Boston 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Kansas City 5, Houston 1 THURSDAYS GAMES Philadelphia 1, Atlanta 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1 Colorado 3, San Diego 1 Pittsburgh 11, Milwaukee 2 St. Louis 8, Washington 0 FRIDAYS GAMES Toronto at Cleveland, late L.A. Angels at Detroit, late Baltimore at Boston, late N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, late Seattle at Miami, late Chicago White Sox at Texas, late Minnesota at Kansas City, late Houston at Oakland, late FRIDAYS GAMES Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 1 Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Washington, late Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, late Seattle at Miami, late Philadelphia at Colorado, late Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late San Francisco at San Diego, late STEVE NESIUS / AP New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter throws to rst after elding a ground ball hit by Tampa Bays Matt Joyce during the rst inning of Fridays game in St. Petersburg. TODAYS GAMES Toronto (Buehrle 3-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 1-1), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 2-1) at Detroit (Scherzer 0-1), 1:08 p.m. Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1) at Boston (Doubront 1-2), 1:35 p.m. Minnesota (Correia 0-1) at Kansas City (B.Chen 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Houston (Oberholtzer 0-3) at Oakland (Kazmir 2-0), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nova 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Archer 1-1), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Elias 1-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-0) at Texas (Lewis 0-1), 8:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES St. Louis (Lynn 3-0) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-0), 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Cingrani 1-1) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-1), 2:20 p.m. Milwaukee (Garza 0-2) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 0-2), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (E.Santana 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Colon 1-2), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Elias 1-1) at Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (Bolsinger 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 2-0), 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-1) at Colorado (Lyles 2-0), 8:10 p.m. San Francisco (Hudson 2-0) at San Diego (Stults 0-2), 8:40 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: AlRamirez, Chicago, .381; Solarte, New York, .373; Ellsbury, New York, .364; Colabello, Minnesota, .357; Callaspo, Oakland, .357. RUNS: Dozier, Minnesota, 18; Eaton, Chicago, 15; Bau tista, Toronto, 14; AlRamirez, Chicago, 13; Calhoun, Los Angeles, 12; Mauer, Minnesota, 12; Trout, Los Angeles, 12. RBI: Colabello, Minnesota, 19; Moss, Oakland, 15; Abreu, Chicago, 14; Brantley, Cleveland, 14; AlRamirez, Chicago, 14. HITS: AlRamirez, Chicago, 24; MeCabrera, Toronto, 22; Trout, Los Angeles, 21; Colabello, Minnesota, 20; Ells bury, New York, 20. DOUBLES: Colabello, Minnesota, 9; SPerez, Kansas City, 7; Solarte, New York, 7; Beltran, New York, 6; De Jennings, Tampa Bay, 6; ACabrera, Cleveland, 5; Ells bury, New York, 5; Kouzmanoff, Texas, 5; Lowrie, Oak land, 5. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Aybar, Los Angeles, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 36 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Bautista, Toronto, 6; Dozier, Minnesota, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Abreu, Chicago, 4; Beltran, New York, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; Hart, Seattle, 4; Pujols, Los Angeles, 4; AlRamirez, Chicago, 4; ASoriano, New York, 4. STOLEN BASES: Ellsbury, New York, 7; Andrus, Texas, 6; Altuve, Houston, 5; RDavis, Detroit, 5; Dozier, Minne sota, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 4; Rios, Texas, 4. PITCHING: Gibson, Minnesota, 3-0; FHernandez, Seat tle, 3-0; Sale, Chicago, 3-0; Buehrle, Toronto, 3-0. ERA: Darvish, Texas, 0.82; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84; Buehrle, Toronto, 0.86; Gibson, Minnesota, 0.93; Gray, Oakland, 0.95; Pineda, New York, 1.00; Ross Jr, Texas, 1.00. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 39; Lester, Boston, 29; Sale, Chicago, 29; Price, Tampa Bay, 28; Tanaka, New York, 28; Sabathia, New York, 27. SAVES: Axford, Cleveland, 5; Holland, Kansas City, 5; Kelley, New York, 4; TomHunter, Baltimore, 4; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 4; Santos, Toronto, 4; Perkins, Minnesota, 3; Rodney, Seattle, 3; Uehara, Boston, 3. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Utley, Philadelphia, .462; Blackmon, Colorado, .411; Freeman, Atlanta, .389; Pagan, San Francisco, .377; Uribe, Los Angeles, .375; DGordon, Los Angeles, .373; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, .369. RUNS: MCarpenter, St. Louis, 13; Freeman, Atlanta, 12; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 12; CGomez, Milwaukee, 12; Marte, Pittsburgh, 12; Stanton, Miami, 12; EYoung, New York, 12. RBI: Stanton, Miami, 21; Trumbo, Arizona, 18; AdGonza lez, Los Angeles, 15; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 14; PAlva rez, Pittsburgh, 13; CGonzalez, Colorado, 13; McGehee, Miami, 13. HITS: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 24; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 24; Uribe, Los Angeles, 24; Utley, Philadelphia, 24; Blackmon, Colorado, 23; Pagan, San Francisco, 23. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 8; Uribe, Los Angeles, 8; ECabrera, San Diego, 7; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 7; Utley, Philadelphia, 7; Adams, St. Louis, 6; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 6; Hill, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6. TRIPLES: Hechavarria, Miami, 2; Rendon, Washington, 2; Simmons, Atlanta, 2; 41 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 6; Trumbo, Arizona, 6; Belt, San Francisco, 5; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 5; Stanton, Miami, 5; Walker, Pittsburgh, 5; 8 tied at 4. STOLEN BASES: DGordon, Los Angeles, 10; EYoung, New York, 9; Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; BHamilton, Cincin nati, 5; Marte, Pittsburgh, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5. PITCHING: Machi, San Francisco, 3-0; Lynn, St. Louis, 3-0; Greinke, Los Angeles, 3-0; Ryu, Los Angeles, 3-1; Avilan, Atlanta, 3-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 3-1. ERA: Simon, Cincinnati, 0.86; Harang, Atlanta, 0.96; Cashner, San Diego, 1.27; Samardzija, Chicago, 1.29; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 1.46; Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.50. STRIKEOUTS: Cueto, Cincinnati, 35; Strasburg, Wash ington, 33; Fernandez, Miami, 33; Wainwright, St. Louis, 32; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 28; ClLee, Philadelphia, 28; Cashner, San Diego, 27. SAVES: Street, San Diego, 5; Jansen, Los Angeles, 5; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 5; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 4; Hawkins, Colo rado, 4; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 4; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 4; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 4. Reds 4, Cubs 1 Cincinnati Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 0 1 1 Bonifac 2b 3 0 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 Lake lf 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 2 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 2 0 RSantg 2b 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 5 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 1 1 0 Frazier 3b 3 1 0 0 Sweeny cf 4 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 1 2 0 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 Berndn lf 0 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 2 0 1 1 Mesorc c 3 1 1 0 Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 1 Kalish ph 1 0 0 0 Simon p 3 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 N.Soto ph 1 0 1 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 8 2 Totals 33 1 6 1 Cincinnati 000 012 010 4 Chicago 000 000 100 1 EFrazier (3), Bonifacio (2), Castillo (1). LOBCin cinnati 9, Chicago 8. 2BB.Hamilton (2), Bruce (2), Castillo (2). SBB.Hamilton (5), Votto (1), Frazier (2), Mesoraco (1), N.Soto (1). SB.Hamilton. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Simon W,2-1 6 4 1 0 2 3 LeCure H,2 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 3 M.Parra H,2 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Broxton S,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 2 Chicago Samardzija L,0-2 7 6 3 1 2 7 Grimm 1 1 1 1 1 1 Russell 1 1 0 0 1 2 Simon pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. WPSamardzija, Grimm. UmpiresHome, Doug Eddings; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jim Joyce. T:09. A,699 (41,072). Late Thursday Red Sox 3, White Sox 1 Boston Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 0 1 1 Bogarts ss 3 1 1 1 Semien 3b 4 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 Viciedo rf 4 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 1 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 0 0 Carp ph 1 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 GSizmr pr-lf 0 1 0 0 De Aza lf 3 0 1 0 D.Ross c 2 0 1 1 Abreu ph 1 0 0 0 Nava rf 3 0 0 0 Flowrs c 3 1 2 0 RRorts 3b 3 0 0 0 LeGarc 2b 2 0 1 0 JHerrr ph-3b 1 0 1 1 BrdlyJr cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 5 3 Totals 33 1 8 1 Boston 000 001 002 3 Chicago 000 001 000 1 DPChicago 2. LOBBoston 6, Chicago 6. 2BD. Ross (2), De Aza (1), Le.Garcia (1). HRBogaerts (1). SLe.Garcia. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lester W,2-2 8 7 1 1 0 9 Uehara S,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago Sale 7 1 1 1 3 10 Belisario L,1-2 1 1 / 3 3 2 2 2 1 Downs 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 HBPby Sale (Bogaerts). UmpiresHome, Jim Joyce; First, Doug Eddings; Sec ond, Marvin Hudson; Third, Cory Blaser. T:54. A,454 (40,615). Yankees 10, Rays 2 New York Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsury cf 4 2 2 2 Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 2 1 DJnngs dh 3 0 0 0 Anna ss 0 0 0 0 Forsyth lf-1b 4 1 1 0 Beltran rf 5 0 0 0 Longori 3b 4 0 2 0 Gardnr lf 0 0 0 0 Myers rf 2 0 0 0 ASorin dh 5 2 3 1 SRdrgz 1b 3 1 1 1 McCnn c 5 2 2 2 Joyce ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 5 1 3 2 Guyer cf 4 0 0 0 SSizmr 1b 3 1 1 0 YEscor ss 4 0 2 0 KJhnsn ph-1b 2 0 0 0 JMolin c 4 0 1 0 BRorts 2b 5 2 3 2 ISuzuki lf-rf 4 0 0 0 Totals 42 10 16 10 Totals 32 2 7 1 New York 130 021 102 10 Tampa Bay 000 100 100 2 EB.Roberts (1), Y.Escobar (1). DPNew York 1, Tampa Bay 1. TPNew York 1. LOBNew York 7, Tampa Bay 7. 2BJeter (3), Solarte (7), S.Sizemore (1), B.Roberts (1), Longoria (4), Y.Escobar (3). 3BEll sbury (1), B.Roberts (1). HRA.Soriano (4), McCann (3), Solarte (1), S.Rodriguez (2). SFEllsbury. IP H R ER BB SO New York Sabathia W,2-2 7 7 2 1 2 6 Betances 2 0 0 0 2 3 Tampa Bay Price L,2-1 5 10 6 6 1 6 H.Bell 1 2 / 3 3 2 1 0 1 Lueke 1 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 2 2 2 0 0 PBMcCann, J.Molina. UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Clint Fagan. T:13. A,085 (31,042). Cardinals 8, Nationals 0 St. Louis Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi MCrpnt 3b 5 2 2 0 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 Wong 2b 6 1 2 1 Harper lf 4 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 1 2 2 Werth rf 4 0 0 0 Roinsn rf 1 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 1 3 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 T.Cruz ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 6 0 1 1 McLoth cf 3 0 0 0 Craig rf-lf 5 0 1 0 Loaton c 2 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 5 1 2 0 Jordan p 2 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 2 1 0 Treinen p 0 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 3 1 2 1 Souza ph 0 0 0 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Totals 43 8 14 8 Totals 29 0 2 0 St. Louis 300 103 100 8 Washington 000 000 000 0 EWerth (2), Desmond 2 (7), Espinosa (2). DPWash ington 1. LOBSt. Louis 15, Washington 5. 2BHolli day (5), Jh.Peralta (3), Wainwright (1). SWainwright. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis Wainwright W,3-1 9 2 0 0 3 8 Washington Jordan L,0-2 5 1 / 3 7 7 5 2 4 Treinen 2 2 / 3 6 1 1 1 3 Blevins 1 1 0 0 2 0 HBPby Jordan (Jay). WPTreinen. UmpiresHome, Bill Miller; First, Vic Carapazza; Sec ond, Adam Hamari; Third, Greg Gibson. T:10. A,987 (41,408). Pirates 11, Brewers 2 Milwaukee Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 4 1 1 0 Marte lf 4 3 2 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 RMartn c 3 1 2 1 Braun rf 4 1 1 0 AMcCt cf 5 1 1 3 ArRmr 3b 4 0 1 1 PAlvrz 3b 3 1 2 3 Lucroy c 3 0 2 1 NWalkr 2b 5 0 0 0 KDavis lf 4 0 1 0 GSnchz 1b 4 1 1 1 MrRynl 1b 4 0 0 0 Snider rf 3 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 3 0 2 0 Mercer ss 4 2 2 0 Gallard p 1 0 0 0 Volquez p 2 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 1 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph 1 1 1 2 Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0 Tabata ph 1 1 1 1 Wang p 0 0 0 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 8 2 Totals 35 11 12 11 Milwaukee 101 000 000 2 Pittsburgh 200 000 36x 11 ELucroy (1). LOBMilwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 6. 2B Braun (2), Tabata (2). HRA.McCutchen (1), P.Alvarez (6), G.Sanchez (3), J.Harrison (1). SBMarte 2 (5). CSLucroy (2), Gennett (1), P.Alvarez (1). SSegura, Gallardo. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Gallardo 6 3 2 2 4 6 Wooten L,0-1 1 / 3 3 3 3 1 0 Duke 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Wang 1 6 6 6 0 0 Pittsburgh Volquez W,1-0 7 8 2 2 1 3 Melancon H,6 1 0 0 0 0 1 Morris 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPGallardo, Volquez. UmpiresHome, Manny Gonzalez; First, Sean Barber; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T:06. A,584 (38,362). Rockies 3, Padres 1 Colorado San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf-lf 4 0 0 0 ECarer ss 4 0 1 0 Cuddyr rf 3 0 0 0 Denor rf 4 0 2 0 Barnes rf 1 0 0 0 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 3 1 1 0 Nady lf 4 1 1 1 Logan p 0 0 0 0 Grandl c 3 0 1 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 0 0 Medica 1b 3 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Venale cf 3 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 1 1 0 0 Amarst 3b 2 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Hundly ph 1 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 1 Alonso 3b 0 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 3 0 2 1 Kenndy p 2 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 3 0 0 0 Vincent p 0 0 0 0 Morals p 2 0 0 0 Headly ph 1 0 1 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Thayer p 0 0 0 0 Stubbs ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Totals 30 3 4 3 Totals 30 1 6 1 Colorado 000 000 300 3 San Diego 000 100 000 1 DPColorado 3, San Diego 1. LOBColorado 3, San Diego 3. 2BDickerson (1), Morneau (4), Arenado (5), E.Cabrera (7). HRNady (3). SBArenado (1). IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Morales W,1-1 6 4 1 1 1 5 Brothers H,4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Logan H,2 1 1 0 0 0 0 Hawkins S,4-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 San Diego Kennedy L,1-3 7 4 3 3 2 7 Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 0 Thayer 1 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Scott Barry; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Marcus Pattillo. T:38. A,557 (42,302). Twins 9, Blue Jays 5 Second Game Toronto Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi MeCarr lf 4 1 1 0 Dozier 2b 4 3 2 1 Rasms dh 5 0 0 0 Mauer dh 3 2 0 0 Bautist rf 4 2 1 1 Colaell 1b 4 0 3 3 Encrnc 1b 3 1 2 1 Kubel lf 4 0 1 2 Navarr c 4 1 2 1 Pinto c 2 1 0 0 Lawrie 3b 5 0 1 1 Hrmnn rf 4 1 0 0 Gose cf 2 0 0 0 Nunez 3b 3 0 1 0 Goins 2b 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 1 0 Diaz ss 3 0 1 0 Plouffe ph 0 0 0 0 Flormn pr-ss 0 1 0 0 EEscor ss 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk ph 0 0 0 0 Mstrnn pr-cf 0 1 0 0 Totals 33 5 8 4 Totals 30 9 8 6 Toronto 200 030 000 5 Minnesota 100 020 06x 9 EDeduno (1), Dozier (1). DPMinnesota 2. LOBTo ronto 11, Minnesota 10. 2BColabello 2 (9). HR Bautista (6), Dozier (5). SBGose (1), Dozier 2 (5), Mastroianni (1). CSColabello (1). SGoins, Nunez. SFNavarro. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto McGowan 4 6 3 3 4 3 Loup 2 0 0 0 0 2 Wagner H,3 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Cecil H,5 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Delabar H,3 1 / 3 0 2 2 2 0 Santos L,0-1 BS,1-5 0 0 3 3 3 0 Happ 2 / 3 1 1 1 3 1 Minnesota Pelfrey 4 1 / 3 4 5 4 5 1 Deduno 2 2 / 3 3 0 0 2 3 Fien W,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 McGowan pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Santos pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. HBPby Pelfrey (Diaz). WPSantos 3. UmpiresHome, Pat Hoberg; First, Tom Hallion; Sec ond, Ben May; Third, Eric Cooper. T:37. A,698 (39,021). Royals 5, Astros 1 Kansas City Houston ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 4 2 2 0 Fowler cf 4 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 Springr rf 4 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 JCastro c 4 0 1 0 S.Perez c 4 0 1 1 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 AGordn lf 4 2 2 0 Krauss 1b 4 0 0 0 BButler dh 3 1 1 0 Carter dh 3 1 0 0 Mostks 3b 4 0 1 1 MDmn 3b 3 0 1 0 AEscor ss 4 0 1 2 Presley lf 2 0 1 1 Dyson cf 3 0 0 0 Villar ss 2 0 0 0 Totals 34 5 9 5 Totals 30 1 5 1 Kansas City 110 210 000 5 Houston 000 010 000 1 ESpringer (1). DPHouston 1. LOBKansas City 3, Houston 5. 2BAoki (3), S.Perez (7), A.Escobar (3). SBAoki (2). SFPresley. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields W,1-2 8 4 1 1 2 12 W.Davis 1 1 0 0 0 1 Houston Feldman L,2-1 6 9 5 4 1 2 Bass 3 0 0 0 0 1 PBS.Perez. UmpiresHome, CB Bucknor; First, Tripp Gibson; Sec ond, Dale Scott; Third, Ron Kulpa. T:37. A,333 (42,060). Marty Foster; Third, Clint Fagan. T:13. A,085 (31,042). This Date In Baseball April 19 1900 The Philadelphia Phillies beat the Boston Braves 19-17 in 10 innings to set a major league record for most runs scored by two clubs on opening day. The Braves scored nine runs in the ninth inning to put the game into extra innings. 1920 Al Schacht, who later became the Clown Prince of Baseball, was all business in pitching the Senators to a 7-0 victory over the Philadelphia Athletics. 1938 Emmett Mueller of the Phillies and Ernie Koy of the visiting Dodgers homered in their rst major league at-bats as Brooklyn defeated Phila delphia 12-5. 1956 The Brooklyn Dodgers beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 in 10 innings at Jersey Citys Roosevelt Stadium, the rst major league game in New Jersey. 1981 In an International League night game, the Rochester Red Wings and Pawtucket Red Sox played to a 2-2 tie through 32 innings before play was sus pended at 4:07 a.m. The game was completed later in the season with Pawtucket scoring the winning run in the 33rd inning of the longest game in profes sional baseball history. 1987 Rob Deer hit a three-run homer to tie the score and Dale Sveum won the game with a two-run shot as the Milwaukee Brewers rallied for ve runs in the ninth inning to beat the Texas Rangers 6-4 and set an American League record with their 12th straight victory to start the season. 1996 Juan Gonzalez homered and drove in six runs as Texas beat Baltimore 26-7. The Rangers scored 16 runs in the eighth inning one short of the modern major league mark and scored the most runs by an AL team in 41 years. 2004 Seattle became the third team since 1974 to win a game on a balk in extra innings, edging the Oakland 2-1. With runners on rst and third and two out in the bottom of the 14th inning As reliever Jus tin Duchscherer was called for a balk to score Quen tin McCracken from third.

PAGE 12

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL LUKE MEREDITH Associated Press DES MOINES, Iowa One of the more re markable aspects of Connecticuts national title run was that poten ti al star Rodney Purvis could only watch his Huskies teammates because of NCAA rules forcing transfers to sit out a year. Hes like a Ferra ri sitting in the ga rage that I cant drive, UConn coach Kevin Ollie said. Ollie isnt the only coach watching their rosters fill up with players who have al ready made at least one stop at another college. A recent surge in transfers has turned the once-sleepy late signing period, which this year started Wednesday and runs through May 21, into a monthlong frenzy that has changed college basketball. According to STATS, the number of players who have appeared in a game for more than one Divi sion I school has near ly tripled over the past decade, from 122 in 2004-05 to 325 or one for nearly every school in the country in 2013-14. It used to be that there was a stigma of some type attached to schools that recruit ed outside of the high school ranks, San Di ego State coach Steve Fisher said. You were not considered able to compete with the blue bloods. Well, now the blue bloods recruit transfers, They take one-and-dones. They take guys who have graduated and have one year left. The result is that the college hoops transfer market has exploded. For recent grads look ing for one last shot at the Final Four, dis gruntled players look ing for more minutes and junior college stars hoping to land a high-major scholar ship, the late signing period offers hope for players and their new schools. Research by the NCAA shows that the number of transfers from two-year/ju nior college schools into Division I has re mained steady over the last 10 years or so, hov ering between roughly 15 percent and 17 per cent of all Division I players. The real movement, though, is within Divi sion I. According to STATS, the number of trans fers from one Divi sion I school to an other jumped from 259 to 325 from 201213 to 2013-14 alone. That number could go much higher once this years transfers are tal lied. A lot of times kids arent transferring or leaving because of the environment theyre in, Florida coach Billy Donovan said. It gen erally comes down to one thing, and a lot of times its playing time. Kids now want that in stantaneous success. Negative connota tions once associat ed with transfers have faded, and the use of the graduate transfer rule made popular by Super-Bowl winning quarterback Russell Wilson is growing. Wil son left North Carolina State and led Wiscon sin to the Rose Bowl as a one-and-done se nior. The rule allows im mediate participation to players who have graduated with a year of eligibility left, had yet to use a transfer and had their scholar ship or aid run out at their original school. Those who dont meet all the criteria can ap ply for a waiver. Though grad trans fers still represent a small portion of the transfer market, Iowa States DeAndre Kane highlighted the trend this season in basket ball by leading the Cy clones to their first Sweet 16 in 14 years. I just wanted to go somewhere where I can start over fresh, said Kane, a transfer from Marshall. I (had) one year of basketball left. Marshall and I, we did great things there. But we didnt win a lot. I had a lot of individu al awards. But I want ed to make the tourna ment. Iowa State has al ready lined up Kanes replacement in for mer UNLV star Bryce Dejean-Jones, and big man Jameel McKay who left Marquette without ever a game should bolster its front court. More high-profile schools are also get ting in on the transfer craze. Donovan, who went 13 years without a transfer, has had one in each of the past five seasons. Arizo na transfer guard T.J. McConnell helped the Wildcats spend much of last season ranked No. 1, and Mississippi State transfer Rodney Hood averaged 16.1 points a game for Duke last season. Daytons run to the Elite Eight was sparked by Ohio State trans fer Jordan Sibert. The Buckeyes landed for mer Temple forward and graduate trans fer Anthony Lee just weeks after losing to the Flyers in the NCAA tournament. The NCAA said Fri day that its Division I Board of Directors next week will look at socalled hardship trans fers involving players who change schools citing difficult life cir cumstances. Typical ly, some of those play ers have been allowed to play immediately but the board will re view a recommenda tion that such trans fers sit out a season to focus on their new school and life situa tion while getting an extra year added to their eligibility. The NCAA said the change would provide consistency and re duce concerns about abuse of the waiver process something thats on the mind of Michigan State coach Tom Izzo. Its sad that were in that position, Izzo said. I understand it and everyone wants one. If its a fifth-year guy, I swallow it. But the underclassmen who are transferring and trying to be eli gible immediately, I think its free agency and I think its going to hurt our game eventu ally. Hoops free agency? Transfer numbers are up AL BEHRMAN / AP Temple forward Anthony Lee, left, pulls a rebound away from Xavier forward Jeff Robinson in a game in 2013 in Cincinnati. Division I coaches are realizing that they can win both now and later with transfers, who are suddenly viewed more like shiny new toys than damaged goods. A recent surge in player movement has turned the once-sleepy late signing period, which started on Wednesday and runs through May 21, into a month-long free agent frenzy thats transformed the game.

PAGE 13

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 BOXING KEVIN DUNLEAVY Associated Press WASHINGTON As Bernard Hopkins snatched two champi onship belts displayed in front of Beibut Shu menov and moved them to his own spot on the dais, the light heavyweight from Ka zakhstan sat expres sionless, seemingly un moved by the brashness of the ageless American. Confrontational showmanship is not unusual in boxing press confer ences. But Thursdays event, promoting a title unication bout, was a fascinating look at how the 49-year-old Hop kins tried to gain a psy chological edge on the 30-year-old Shumenov. Its an edge Hopkins hopes to exploit at the D.C. Armory on Satur day night, when he at tempts to become the oldest ghter to unify world titles. While Hop kins is the IBF cham pion, Shumenov holds the WBA and IBA belts. With a victory, Hopkins would be in line for a ght with WBC champi on Adonis Stephenson. This is an opportu nity for me to represent the 40-and-up club, which is very much alive in the world, Hopkins said. Enjoy and understand that this is history. Im de fending something big ger than my title my legendary, 20-plus-year legacy. Thats more im portant than anything around my waist. Shumenov (14-1) came to the U.S. sev en years ago. When he captured the WBA title in his 10th profession al ght, he was the least experienced boxer to win a world light heavy weight crown. Shumenovs star is rising, but leading up to this ght, it has been eclipsed by the charis ma and resume of Hop kins (54-6-2), who won his rst world champi onship when Shumen ov was 11 years old. I know a little bit about him, but he knows a lot about me, Hopkins said. So get ready for school, stu dent. This is no disre spect. This is logic. I am the professor, with a PhD-slash-IQ. Hopkins remains true to his words in the ring, where he frustrates foes with experience, guile and, most of all, de fense. Since knocking out Oscar De La Hoya in 2004, 14 of Hopkins last 15 ghts have gone the distance. The only one that didnt was stopped on a foul in the nal round. When this is over with, lets pray he has a career going forward, because I have a track record, Hopkins said. Theres a whole list of names that didnt sur vive the mental beatdown. Physical is one thing. Its the mental. How can a 50-year-old man beat me like that? After the press con ference, Hopkins ex plained the difference between himself, raised in the projects in Phil adelphia, and Shumen ov, who lives in opu lence in Las Vegas and says he has a law degree and speaks ve lan guages. This has something to do with your inner spirit. What do you have to lose? He has a lot to lose. Hes a lawyer by profession, Hopkins said. Youre not ght ing to feed your fam ily. Its a hobby. When a guy ghts for a hob by, they dont last long in the business of hard knocks. With a decline in the prole of the sport in recent decades, many in boxing believe that Hopkins age-defying feats are underappreci ated. If Bernard Hopkins was an athlete in any other sport, youd be sick of seeing him on the front of magazines, said Hopkins train er, Naazim Richardson. People dont know our sport. They dont recog nize 30 years old is old in boxing. Promoters have dubbed Saturdays ght History at the Capi tal. His rst world title bout came at RFK Sta dium in 1993 against Roy Jones Jr. Two years later at USAir Arena in Landover, Md., Hopkins won his rst world title when he knocked out Segundo Mercado. He also has had title ghts at the Washington Con vention Center and the Showplace Arena in Up per Marlboro, Md. At the end of Thurs days press conference the soft-spoken Shu menov stepped out of character and went offscript, interrupting the events host with a gen tle nudge to his chest, and taking over the po dium. Youre mistaken if youre thinking Im thinking I am ght ing with (a ghter) 50 years old, Shumenov said moments before taking back his WBA and IBF belts. On Sat urday night, were see ing whos taking whose belt. But to the surprise of few, Hopkins had the last laugh, mocking Shumenov as he spoke. Hes got a pulse, Hopkins said. Hes got a pulse. NOTES: A black and white photograph of Hopkins, taken by Ger man photographer Hol ger Keifel, will become part of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gal lerys permanent collec tion. Hopkins also was presented a plaque of appreciation from the family of former boxing great Joe Frazier. Hop kins was instrumen tal in funding a statue in Philadelphia of the former heavyweight champion. 40-and-up club: Hopkins after more belts MANUEL BALCE CENETA / AP IBF light heavyweight champion Bernard Hopkins, left, speaks during a news conference in Washington on Thursday about his 175-pound unication ght against WBA and IBA light heavyweight boxing champion Beibut Shumenov, front right. Hopkins and Shumenov will ght today at the DC Armory in Washington. TENNIS JEROME PUGMIRE Associated Press PARIS Rafael Nad als mastery of the Monte Carlo clay courts seems to be over. The top-ranked Span iard hopes his con dence isnt gone, too. Nadal lost to fellow Spaniard David Ferrer 7-6 (1), 6-4 in the quar ternals of the Mon te Carlo Masters on Fri day, his earliest exit since 2003 at a tournament that helped build his reputation as perhaps the greatest clay-court player of all time. Nad al won eight consecutive titles here from 2005-12, before losing to Novak Djokovic in last years nal. This was Nadals rst loss on clay to Ferrer since 2004, and the 13time Grand Slam cham pion said he is still try ing to nd his best form after a disappointing loss to Stanislas Wawrinka in the Australian Open nal. After what happened in Australia, (it) was lit tle bit harder for me to nd again the intensity, the condence, the in side power that always I have, Nadal said. Even if I won Rio, I played the nal in Miami, you know, (this) remains some thing in my mind and in my game. Djokovic looked like he might follow him out, but the Serb nally got the better of the unseed ed Guillermo Garcia-Lo pez of Spain 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 to set up a 34th career meeting against 17-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer. Federer leads Djokovic 17-16 in head-to-heads and they are 1-1 this year, with Federer beat ing him in the Dubai Championship semi nals and Djokovic win ning their nal at Indian Wells. The Serb was close to losing against Garcia-Lo pez, saving a break point in the fth game of the second set and two more when trailing 15-40 in his next service game. Djokovic then made a crucial break to take a 5-3 lead, served out the set, and then broke Gar cia-Lopez twice at the start of the third. Ferrer hardly need ed to dig deep as Nadal committed 44 unforced errors and gave away 10 break-point chances on his serve. Nadal loses in quarterfinals in Monte Carlo SEIZETHE DA Y SSPOR TSNEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

PAGE 14

B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 15

T wo trees. Used for very different purposes. One helped usher in life, the other death. As Mary stood at the foot of the cross, her heart felt ripped apart as she looked up at her son. Hed been on that cross almost six hours and had suffered unspeak able pain. That cross, that horrible cross. But it was as if every blow, every wound had been deliv ered to her. Tears streamed down her face, so sad, so weak that all she could do was fall pros trate. As the spear was thrust in Jesus side, it was as if it had pierced her very soul. The pain was worse than any shed ever felt as Jesus took His last breath saying, It is nished. Did her mind race back to His beginning, lying in the manger, the rough-hewn wood His rst bed? Did she remember when they pre sented Jesus in the temple and the words of Simeon, a devout man who received a revelation by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before seeing the Lords Messiah? When Simeon saw Jesus, then only 8 days old, he said, Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you may now dis miss your servant in peace. For my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the sight of all nations: a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of your people Israel. After Simeon blessed them he said to Mary: This child is destined to cause the fall ing and rising of many in Is rael, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too. It was as Simeon said. As she struggled with her feelings, Mary recalled all those things she treasured and pondered in her heart. At that moment Mary nal ly understood why Jesus had come and died. It wasnt His birth that was important, it was His death. It wasnt the manger that was important, it was the cross. It is nished. And she could hear the angels sing, Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests. Two trees. Used for very different purposes. One helped usher in life. And so did the other. As Oswald Chambers wrote, A man cannot re deem himself redemption is the work of God, and is ab solutely nished and com plete. Rick Reed is a columnist who lives in Mount Dora. To reach him call 352-383-1458, or email him at ricoh007@aol.com. Faith for Life www.dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 TODAY EASTER AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: From 8 to 10:30 a.m., pan cake breakfast. Easter carnival from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on the front lawn with egg hunt at 10 a.m. Kids should bring their own basket. The church is located at 439 E. Fifth Ave., in Mount Dora. Call 352-383-2005 or go to www.mtdora fumc.org. TRADITIONAL EASTER VIGIL AT ST. ED WARDS EPISCOPAL CHURCH: At 7:30 p.m., at the church, 460 N. Grandview St. in Mount Dora. On Easter Sunday, 8 a.m. Holy Eucharist Service, or 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist Service with owering of the cross followed by an Easter egg hunt. Call the church at 352-383-2832 for information. PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE BREAKFAST COOKED BY BOY SCOUT TROOP 19: From 8 to 10:30 a.m. Tickets are $5 and avail able at the door, at Friendship Hall on the corner of Grandview and Fifth Streets, in Mount Dora. Hosted by First United Methodist Church, 439 E. Fifth Ave. Call 352-383-2005. EASTER EVE WORSHIP, KIDSTYLE AND EGG HUNT AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: At 5 p.m., at the church, 600 S. Grove St., in Eustis. Engaging worhsip for the whole family, interactive Eas ter story presentation and more. For information, call the church at 352357-5830 or go to www.fumceustis.org. SUNDAY EASTER AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF MOUNT DORA: Services at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m., 439 E. Fifth Ave. Guests are invited to bring fresh ow ers to place on the resurrection cross before the service, and butteries will be released after each service. For in formation, call 352-383-2005 or go to www.mtdorafumc.org. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH WORSHIP CELEBRATION: At 10 a.m., with Empty, an inspirational service featuring se lected Scripture readings and musi cal selections. Breakfast from 9 to 9:40 a.m., at the church, 1701 Vine St., in Leesburg. Guests eat free. For informa tion, call the church at 352-250-9502 or go to rstchristianleesburg.com. LIFELINE QUARTET IN CONCERT AT FIRST CHURCH OF GOD: At 6 p.m., 1550 N. Highway 19, in Eustis. For informa tion, call the church at 352-357-0048. MONDAY FAIRWAY SINGLES MEET FOR PRAYERS & PRAISES AT FAIRWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH: At 6 p.m., at the church 251 Avenida Los Angelos, in The Villages. Call 352-259-9305 or go to www.fair waycc.org. WEDNESDAY MENS WEDNESDAY MORNING BIBLE STUDY AT FAIRWAY: At 8 a.m., at the church, 251 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages. Call 352-259-9305. THURSDAY RABBI KAREN ALLEN OF CONGREGA TION BETH SHOLOM IN LEESBURG LEADS TORAH DISCUSSION: At 11 a.m., at the Sumter County Administrative Build ing, 7375 Powell Rd., in Wildwood. The informal, interactive discussion will fo cus on topics of contemporary Jewish interest suggested by the Torah por tion of the week. For information, call 352-326-3692. CHURCH CALENDAR RICK REED REFLECTIONS For Jesus, one tree brought life, another tree brought death RICK REED Special to the Daily Commercial B ig Daddy Weave is coming to First Baptist Church of Uma tilla as part of The Only Name Tour. Their Redeemed won Song of The Year at the K-LOVE Fan Awards in June. The Only NameYours Will Be is their third straight hit to top the Christian music charts. Group 1 Crew will join the night of music, performing popular hit songs like He Said and current single Dangerous. This is also the opening tour for rising artist Tim Timmons, who has fought battles against cancer and presents a powerful testimony with songs like Starts With Me. The concert will be at 6:30 p.m. on April 27 in the 650-seat sanctu ary as part of the churchs ongoing mission to provide local Christian music fans with quality entertain ment in their own backyard. Being a person from Lake Coun ty, you pretty much had to drive to Orlando if you wanted to hear the big names, said Brookes Braswell, pastor of the Umatilla church, one of Lake Countys largest. We consider the concerts a min istry to our church and the sur rounding community. Tickets for the event are $15 for general admission and $25 for VIP. Doors open at 5 p.m. for VIP and 5:30 p.m. for general admission. Russell Wambles, a church mem ber and volunteer event manag er, remembers the rst concert the church held several years ago. We got a good break and had Mandisa. Shes a huge name in Christian music, said Wambles. She was a nalist on American Idol and went into Christian mu sic. We sold out in four or ve days and thought, This is easy. Lets do this some more. But its not that easy. They continued offering quali ty artists. Weve had a lot of great events with top names in American Chris tian music, Wambles said. Its been great for our church commu nity. But its also been a ministry to the unchurched. For a lot people, the rst time they come to church is to see an event like this, he added. First Baptist has held a variety of concerts, including Southern Gos pel. Its not just hymns or Southern Gospel anymore, Wambles said. Its contemporary, hip-hop, rock, some really hardcore rock. But at the end of the day the message is the same. Its attractive, a great opportuni ty to bring that message to people in a way that relates to them. Tickets have been selling well for The Only Name Tour. For more than a decade, Big Dad dy Weave has produced hits like In Christ, Audience of One, Youre Worthy of My Praise, Every Time I Breathe, What Life Would Be Like and You Found Me. Along the way they have won the ongoing respect of fans, press and the industry alike. Their musical journey began with a Dove Awards nomination for New Artist of the Year in 2002 and includes a 2010 Dove Award for the album Christ Has Come They have been honored at AS CAPs Christian Music Awards, were chosen for the WOW Hits compilations in ve of the last six years and are one of the 10 most played artists on Christian radio over the past decade. To purchase tickets, go to the church website, www.fbcumatilla. org, or call 352-669-3214. First Baptist Church of Umatil la is located at 550 Hateld Dr. If you are coming from U.S. Highway 441, turn right onto State Road 19, heading north. Go about 8 miles, then turn right onto East Collins Street. Make an immediate right onto Hateld Drive. The entrance is on the left. If you are coming from Ocala, take SR 19 south toward Umatilla. Turn left onto East Collins Street. Make an immediate right onto Hateld Drive. The entrance is on the left. We can have a large crowd but its still very intimate, said Bras well. Youre going to be close enough to hug a neck or shake a hand. UMATILLA First Baptist Church of Umatilla is ministering through concerts COURTESY PHOTO Big Daddy Weaves Redeemed won Song of the Year at the K-LOVE Fan Awards in June. The Only NameYours Will Be is their third straight hit to top the Christian music charts. For more than a decade, Big Daddy Weave has produced hits like In Christ, Audience of One, Youre Worthy of My Praise, Every Time I Breathe, What Life Would Be Like and You Found Me. Along the way they have won the ongoing respect of fans, press and the industry alike. Their musical journey began with a Dove Awards nomination for New Artist of the Year in 2002 and includes a 2010 Dove Award for the album Christ Has Come.

PAGE 16

C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 rfntbr President Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co.,Inc. ofLEESBURG 352-365-1228Come visit our new location!rfnttb The Charlotte Mayfield Assisted Living Retirement CommunityrfAssisted Living, Independent Living, Day Stay Residency Combining Independence with Personal Care for over 40 yearsHoly Tr i ni ty Epi s copal Church2201 Spring Lake Road, Fruitland Park352-787-1 500Father Ted KoellnSunday Service 8:00am, 9:30am, 11:15amWednesday Healing Service 11:30am www.holytrinityfp.comLIFE Church Asse m bly of God04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park352-787-7962Pastor Rick WelborneSunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am Sunday Evening 6:00pm Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service 7:00pm Sunday School 9:00am Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pmPi lgrims Un i ted Church of Chri st (UCC)509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park www.pucc.info352-365-2662 or office@pucc.infoRev. Ronal K.F. Nicholas, OSL, PastorRev. Camille F. Gianaris, Pastoral Assistant Sunday Worship 10:00amContact us or visit our website for more infoL i ghthouse Foundati on M i ni stri es Internat i onal INC .11282 SR 471, Webster352-793-2631Pastor Patricia T. BurnhamSunday Services 9:00am & 6:00pm Thursday Night 7:00pm 3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Waywww.lighthousefoundationministries.orgL i nden Church of God4309 CR 772, Webster Pastor Doyle D. GlassSunday Morning Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Sunday School 9:45amWednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pmAll Sa i nts Rom an Cathol ic Chapel11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11, Tavares407-391 -8678 352-385-3880Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00amFi rst Bapti st Church of Tavares124 N. Joanna Avenue, Tavares352-343-71 3 1Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30am Sunday Traditional Service 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am Wednesday Fellowship Meal 5:00pm Wednesday Life University 6:15pm Wednesday Prayer Service 6:15pm Providing direction for all generationswww.fbctavares.comTavares Fi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church (UMC)Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares352-343-2761Pastor John BarhamTraditional Service 8:30AM & 11:00am Contemporary Cafe Service 10:00am Children of Light-Youth & Family Service 1st Sunday of each month 6:00pmwww.fumctavares.com For information on listing your church on this page call Michelle at352-365-8233or e-mail tomichelle.fuller@dailycommercial.comBethany Lutheran Church1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg352-787-7275Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Bible Study 9:15amEmmanuel Bapti st Church of Leesburg1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg352-323-1 588Pastor Jeff CarneySunday Celebration Service 10:30am Wednesday Mens Prayer Breakfast 8:00am Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm Sunday Bible Study 9:15am Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pmwww.EmmanuelFL.comFi rst Bapti st Leesb urg220 N. 13th St., Leesburg352-787-1 005Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Sunday Bible Study 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pmwww.fbcleesburg.orgFi rst Church of Chri st, Sci enti st, Leesburg13th & Line St., Leesburg352-787-1 921Sunday Service 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Wednesday School 3:30pmFi rst Presbyter i an Curch of Leesburg200 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-787-5687Sunday Service 10:00pm Sunday School 8:45am www.firstpresleesburg.orgDisciples Making DisciplesGlor i a Dei L utheran Church130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg352-787-3223Sunday Worship October-April 8:00am & 10:30am Sunday Worship May-September 9:15am Christian Education October-April 9:15am www.gloriadeielca.netLakes and Hi lls Covenant ChurchRev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, PastorWorship Service 10:15am Bible Study 9:00am @ Womens Club of Leesburg 700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg Church Office 106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills352-552-0052www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.orgLegacy Commu ni ty ChurchLocated at Lake Square Mall, Leesburg (suite 331 next to JCPenney)Pastor Theo Bob-352-250-0 1 56 Pastor Buddy Walker-352-978-0509Spanish Pastor Luis Fuentes-352-5521 357Sunday Worship Service 9:30am Legacy is a multicultural, multiracial, generational, Christian Church www.legacycic.orgSt. Paul Rom an Cathol ic Church(In union with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orlando & The Vatican)1330 Sunshine Avenue, LeesburgWeekday Masses M-F 8:30amSacrament of Penance Saturday 2:30-3:30pm (or by appointment) Saturday Masses 4:00, 5:30, 7:00pm (Spanish)Sunday Masses 7:00, 9:00, 11:00am, 12:30pmOffice Hours M-F 8:00-12:00, 1:00-4:00Seventh Day Advent i st508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-326-41 09Worship Service 9:30am Sabbath School Service 11:00am Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pmSol i d Rock Evangel ic al Fellowshi p Evangel ic al Presbyteri an ChurchLeesburg Community Building 109 E. Dixie Avenue, Leesburg352-431 -3944Rev. Dr. John LodgeSunday Service 9:30am Sunday School 10:45amwww.solidrockef.comL i berty Bapt i st Church11043 True Life Way, Clermont 352-394-0708Senior Pastor Chris JohnsonSun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm, Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all serviceswww.lbcclermont.org ClermontFi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church of Eust i sA Place where You Matter600 S. Grove Street, Eustis352-357-5830Senior Pastor Beth FarabeeCoffee and Fellowship 9:00am Contemporary Worship 9:30am Traditional Worship 11:00amL i fe W i thout L imits Mi ni stri es150 E. Barnes Avenue, Eustis352-399-291 3Bishop Robert DixonSunday School 9:00am Sunday Worship Service 10:00am Wednesday Family Bible Study 7:00pmwww.lifewithout-limits.comSt. Thom as Epi s copal Church317 S. Mary St., Eustis(corner S. Mary & Lemon St.)352-357-4358Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, RectorSunday Holy Eucharist Services 8:00am & 10:30am Adult Sunday School 9:20am, Childrens Chapel Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service 10:00amwww.stthomaseustis.comUn i tari an Uni versal i st Congregati on of Lake CountyEustis Womans Club Building 227 North Center Street, Eustis352-728-1 631Sunday Adult Discussion Group 9:45am Sunday Celebration of Life Service 11:00amFacebook: www.facebook.com/UUlakeco Website:www.lakecountyuu.org Email: lakecountyuu@gmail.com Eustis Fruitland Park Leesburg Tavares Webster Mount DoraCongregati onal Church650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora352-383-2285Reverand Dr. Richard DonSunday 11:00am (Communion 1st Sunday of the month) Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pmFi rst Presbyter i an Church of Mount Dora222 W. 6th Avenue at Alexander, Mt. Dora352-383-4089The Well Informal Worship 9:00am Childrens Sunday School 9:00am Adult Sunday School 10:00am Sanctuary Worship 11:00am9:30amwww.fpcmtdora.orgSt. Phi l i p L utheran Church1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora352-383-5402Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan BerghSunday Service 9:30am (Childcare Provided) Fellowship 10:45amwww.stphiliplc.com OkahumpkaCorpus Chri st i Epi s copal Church3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka352-787-8430Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am Evening Prayer 4:00pm Fellowship following both services Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30amwww.corpuschristiepiscopal.org GrovelandMt Oli ve Mi ssi onary Bapti st Church15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky(West of Mascotte)352-429-3888Rev. Clarence L. Southall-PastorSunday Worship Service 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm Youth Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pmZi on L utheran Church (ELCA)547 S. Main Ave., Groveland352-429-2960Pastor Ken StoyerSunday Worship Service 11:00am Adult Sunday School 9:30am LeesburgThe Heal i ng Place1012 W Main Street, Leesburg352-61 7-0569Facilitator: Phyllis GilbertSunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am Wednesday Bible Study and Kids Club 6:00pm (Nursey open for all services) Come as you are and leave different! MinneolaNew L i fe Presbyteri an Church, PCA18237 E. Apshawa Road, Minneola Music Ministries352-241 -81 8 1Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 10:45am

PAGE 17

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Associated Press FORT WAYNE, Ind. Jes Farris says it happens two or three times a day. Someone walks into Studio 13, a local tattoo shop he owns with his brother, Jake, and inquires about getting a religious tat too. Usually, he says, the po tential customer is an 18or 19-year-old male dipping into ink for the rst time. Its easier to justify a faithbased tattoo to parents than a tattoo of something else, he says, adding thats how he and his much-inked brother started. Of course, that was about a decade ago, when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks were still fresh and tats with Christian images and Scripture were frequently requested by enlistees before military deployment. Today, that craze has calmed somewhat. But reli gious images crosses, the Virgin Mary, Jesus and angels, especially the sword-wield ing St. Michael the Archangel remain an enduring part of the business, The Journal Gazette reported. Right now its very popu lar to get the word faith in corporated into the Jesus sh, Farris says, referring to a symbol of early Christians. We get that more than prob ably anything right now. Another popular motif is the words of Philippians 4:13: I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me, as the verse is rendered in the New King James Version of the New Testament. That became popular af ter UFC ghters got it, he says, referring to an orga nization of top mixed-mar tial-arts competitors. It just boomed on the Internet. St. Michael, patron saint of seafarers, paratroopers and police, as well as the mem bers of the military, is popu lar with people in those pro fessions, he says. Chad Bedwell, 34, is a youth minister at Sonrise United Methodist Church in Aboite Township. He has about a half-dozen faith-in spired tattoos. He says he likes participat ing in their design. He adds that their meaning isnt al ways immediately obvious the better to use the mark ings as an opportunity to tell others about his faith. On each of his arms he has images of a nail wrapped in ribbon. On one arm, the in scription reads Tougher. The other arm has the words Than Nails. Im kind of a big guy, and I work out, so people think thats what it refers to. People call me out about it Oh, so you think youre tough, huh? I tell them, No, Im refer ring to the nails of Christ on the cross. Its not me. Bedwell also has a tattoo of what he calls a shadow cross one thats hard to see on one wrist. The word Zombie is etched on his other wrist. That tattoo refers to how hes felt reborn from the dead after accepting Christ, while the other refers to living his life now in the shadow of the cross, he says. Im probably explaining them to people on a week ly basis, he says, adding: When they hear, Oh, hes a youth pastor, they want to look a little closer. Still, tattoos have the po tential to arouse controver sy within Christian circles, says Mike Mueller, 26, who, with his friend Erik Knopf, 31, started Armed with Truth, a Colorado-based Internet company that markets tem porary tattoos featuring col lections of Scripture verses. Mueller says the idea orig inally was to have the tat toos aid people in memoriz ing Scripture, and the market has included not only young people but teachers, coach es and youth ministers trying to inuence their charges in a positive way. People get tattoos because of emotions theres always a story behind them. They want to get something so theyll never forget, Mueller says. I think it comes from a deep spiritual place This is important to me, and Im going to keep it in front of me. But, Mueller says, even the temporary tattoos got push back from people who saw them as blasphemous. When Christians object to tattoos, they usually point to Leviticus 19:28, which pro scribes cutting into ones body in memory of the dead or placing marks on the body. Many believe the New Tes tament writings about the body as the temple of the Holy Spirit reinforce the mes sage. We thought no one would complain, because they were only temporary, but we were wrong. People were very vo cal. One woman said we were paving the way for the mark of the beast, Mueller says, referring to a symbol of evil in the New Testaments pro phetic book of Revelation. To me, thats just silly. Bedwell says that, for him, its important not to encour age the underage young peo ple with whom he works to get tattoos. One girl in his group keeps asking him to pick out a tat too for her, he says, but he has refused. I dont want to do that. I told her, You dont really want a tattoo until you know what you want to get, he says. I always tell them how bad they hurt, and that they dont go away, and getting tat tooed, its like being stung by a bee for two or three hours at a time. Farris says his shop also gets requests for tattoos of imagery from other religions. Weve probably done more tattoos of Buddha than we have of Jesus in the last three years, he says. Some people have also asked for Hindu imagery, though not, he says, for religious reasons. Lately, he says, hes also seen an increasing number of people who want religious images changed or covered. He and his brother are now undergoing laser removal of some of their religious imag es because they no longer re ect their beliefs, he notes. And removal is no picnic. Laser removal is proba bly one of the most painful processes Ive ever done, he says. While many people get tat toos out of sincere religious conviction, Farris thinks that when he got tattooed as a teen, it was because he was struggling to hold on to his faith. Its a scary thing, to waver with the faith of your grand parents and your parents, he says. You tried to lock it in with tattoos. But, he adds: The popular ity of faith tattoos isnt going anywhere. As long as there is faith, people will want to make it a permanent part of themselves. Popularity of religious tattoos seems enduring HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO This faith-based tattoo depicts a symbolic representation of the Holy Trinity. HANNAN ADELY The Record HACKENSACK, N.J. One of loneliest plac es in church these days is the confession line. The act of confessing ones sins, a require ment for Catholics, has sharply fallen over sev eral decades with evolv ing views on sin, pen ance and the stature of the priesthood. But now Pope Francis and church leaders, in a push to draw people back to confession, are highlighting what cler gy say are the healing, uplifting aspects of the sacrament and focusing less on themes like pun ishment and condem nation. Some churches are us ing websites, newspaper ads and highway bill boards to get the mes sage out. Under dioce san guidance, churches have also added one ex tra day a week to hear confession during Lent, the period before Easter when penance is con sidered a Catholic duty. And the pope, in an im age seen and talked about around the world, confessed to a priest last month in public view. But will these ef forts change attitudes among Catholics, many of whom believe confes sion no longer is a nec essary part of the faith? Its not something I look at as something I need to do to be a good Catholic, but I always know its there if I feel a need to go, said Keith Ahearn, a churchgoer who lives in Oakland, N.J. Ahearn said seeing Pope Francis example of confession did cause him to think twice. I have to admit, he said, seeing the pope going to confession was a pretty powerful thing. Under church doc trine, Catholics should go to confession at least once a year, preferably during the Easter sea son. Those who commit mortal, or serious, sins like adultery and mur der should not receive Communion without rst going to confes sion. The point of con fession, according to the church, is to bring about a spiritual res urrection and to have people reconcile with the church community. Church leaders are trying to lure people back by putting out pos itive messages that con fession is about peace and joy and not fear or shame. Some dioceses are adding an extra day of confession during the Lenten season. The Paterson, N.J., Di ocese began a Welcome Home to Healing pro gram ve years ago to promote confession. The diocese added an extra day of confessions on Mondays at all 110 churches during Lent and advertised the pro gram on billboards and lawn signs and in news paper ads, bulletins and on a program website that offers guidance in English and Spanish about seeking confes sion. Last year, the Newark Archdiocese started a similar program The Light Is on for You that added a day each week, Wednesday, to hear confessions during Lent. The archdiocesan website also devotes an entire section to infor mation and resources about confession. With push from pope, Catholics see confession in a new light VIOREL FLORESCU / MCT The Rev. Arcadio Munoz giving absolution to a parishioner at St. Marys Church in Dumont. Confession can be heard out in the open, a departure from the standard confessionals of the past. ARON HELLER Associated Press JERUSALEM Israeli police stormed a sensi tive holy site in Jerusalem on Wednesday, ring tear gas to disperse a protest by Palestinian Mus lim worshippers, ofcials said. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said the crowd hurled stones and recrackers from atop the compound known to Jews as the Temple Mount, the holiest site in Judaism. Rosenfeld said police then entered the site and dispersed the group with tear gas and other non-lethal means. The compound is known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and is Islams third-holiest site. Israel captured the area along with the rest of east Jerusalem from Jordan in the 1967 war. Clashes often erupt at the site. Jews typically pray below, at the Western Wall, but tensions have grown lately with an increased number of Jews arriving to pray at the Temple Mount as well. Israel permits Jews to ascend to the Temple Mount for visits, but they are barred from praying at the site. These visits often stoke rumors that Israel is preparing to take over the site. Sheikh Azzam Tamimi, head of the Waqf, the Islamic authority that manages the site, said worshippers had barricaded themselves inside the Al-Aqsa Mosque to defend the site from Jewish groups. Israeli police disperse riot at Jerusalem holy site AP FILE PHOTO The Western Wall, right, and the gilded Dome of the Rock, among the holiest sites for Jews and Muslims, are covered in snow.

PAGE 18

C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants rr fntbnntnt r Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.ntnt rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services b b rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services

PAGE 19

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Fruitland Park, FL American Legion Post 219, Fruitland Park, FL, is sponsoring the formation of a new U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps. The Thomas R. Norris Battalion has openings for a limited number of young people ages 13-17 to join the crew of the new Sea Cadet Battalion. An information presentation and interviews will be held at the American Legion Post 219 Banquet Hall, located at 194 W. Fountain St., Fruitland Park, on April 26, 2014 at 7:00 pm. Appointments are necessary. The U.S. Sea Cadet Corps is comprised of everyday of young people who have an interest in seamanship, the military, or other seagoing careers. Cadet applicants must be crime-free, drug-free, physically fit and approved by their school. The Thomas R. Norris Battalion will represent Lake & Sumter Counties, and trains at the American Legion 219 post on the third weekend of each month. The program is managed by volunteers dedicated to instilling the core values of Pride, Service, and Patriotism. Future summer trainings will include small boat handling, SCUBA Certification, among other training. Cadets wear the various Navy Uniforms and can participate in a multitude of advanced training programs, including: training with Navy & Coast Guard while at-sea, submarine orientation. SEAL training, search and rescue, and international exchanges. Adult volunteers, with or without military experience, are needed to allow the Sea Cadet Program to grow. Those with seamanship, engineering, administrative, & fund-raising skills are especially needed. Interested adults are encourage to visit on April 26th. To set an appointment, contact 352-504-4219. For further information on the Naval Sea Cadet Corps, go to < www.seacadets.org > NAVAL SEA CADETS ACCEPTING NEW RECRUITS Business austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8263 www.dailycommercial.com DINA CAPPIELLO and JOSH LEDERMAN Associated Press WASHINGTON The Obama administration is extending indenitely the amount of time federal agen cies have to review the Key stone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, like ly punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections. The State Department didnt say how much longer agencies will have to weigh in but cited a recent decision by a Nebras ka judge overturning a state law that allowed the pipe lines path through the state, prompting uncertainty and an ongoing legal battle. Nebras kas Supreme Court isnt ex pected to rule for another sev eral months, and there could be more legal maneuvering af ter that. The delay potentially frees President Barack Obama to avoid making a nal call on the pipeline until after the No vember election. The agency consultation process is not starting over. The process is ongoing, and the department and relevant agencies are actively con tinuing their work in assess ing the permit application, the State Department said in a statement. Republicans were quick to blast the latest delay in a re view process that has dragged on for more than ve years. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., accused Obama of kowtowing to rad ical activists from the envi ronmental community, while House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, called the decision shameful and said there were no credible reasons for further delay. This job-creating project has cleared every environmen tal hurdle and overwhelm ingly passed the test of public opinion, yet its been blocked for more than 2,000 days, Boehner said in a statement. In an ironic show of bipar tisanship, prominent Demo crats from energy-dependent states joined Republicans in blasting the Obama adminis tration for delaying the deci sion once again. Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu, who fac es a difcult re-election this year in conservative-lean ing Louisiana, said Obama was signaling that a small minority of opponents can tie up the process forever in the courts, sacricing 42,000 jobs and billions in econom ic activity in the process. This decision is irrespon sible, unnecessary and unac ceptable, Landrieu said. But environmental groups ghting the pipeline hailed the delay, arguing that it shows the State Depart ment is taking the arguments against the pipeline seriously. This is denitely great news, said Tiernan Sitten feld, senior vice president for the League of Conservation Voters. We are very condent as they continue to examine the issues with the lack of le gal route in Nebraska and the terrible climate impacts, at the end of the day the pipe line will be rejected. State Department ofcials said other U.S. agencies will be notied of the new deadline to weigh in once the legal sit uation in Nebraska becomes clearer. At the core of the de lay is a concern that the legal wrangling in Nebraska could lead to a change in the pipe lines route that would affect agencies assessments, said the ofcials, who werent au thorized to comment by name and demanded anonymity. Ofcials declined Friday to say when a nal decision would take place but said the process should proceed as expedi tiously as possible. They add ed that the State Department is moving forward with other aspects of its review that must take place before determining whether approving the pipeline is in the U.S. national interest. The White House has insist ed that Secretary of State John Kerry is in charge of the pro cess, since the pipeline cross es the U.S.-Canada border and falls under the State De partments jurisdiction. Associated Press BEIJING Chi nese police hauled away dozens of work ers Friday to break up a march on a facto ry complex targeted by tens of thousands of laborers striking against the worlds largest maker of ath letic shoes, while a government trade union said it would mediate the labor dispute. More than 40,000 workers went on strike this week against Yue Yuen Industrial (Hold ings) Ltd., bringing production to a halt at the manufacturer, which makes shoes for companies includ ing Nike and Adidas. About 1,000 work ers marched down a street Friday after workers rejected a com pany proposal. The Guangdong Fed eration of Trade Unions urged the workers to act rationally, but said it was taking a clear-cut stand that the work ers rights must be pro tected. The federation said it had instructed its municipal agency in the southern city of Dong guan where the facto ry complex is located to mediate. The workers have been striking since April 5 to demand the Tai wanese-owned com pany make social se curity contributions as required by Chinese law and meet other de mands. In a public announce ment Thursday, the company offered to make social securi ty payments only if the workers would agree to retroactively pay their own required contribu tions into the fund. JOYCE M. ROSENBERG Associated Press NEW YORK When Tessemaes salad dress ing quickly became a hit, the owners of the family-run condiment company were faced with the reality that they needed help navigating the grocery business. The company based in Annapolis, Md., got its start in 2009 selling dressing to a local Whole Foods and then worked its way into ve stores. By last summer it got into the chains nearly 375 locations. In Octo ber, it reached Safeway stores in Northern Cal ifornia and was on its way to a national rollout of 1,100 stores. Success brought chal lenges. A rm Tesse maes hired to help raise money from investors wasnt up to the task. The company had con tracts to buy ingredi ents that were priced too high and it didnt have enough cash to fund its growth. Enter Michael McDe vitt, CEO of Tandem Le gal Group, a law rm that advises companies on strategy. They were going to succeed, they had all the grit, all the tenacity in the world, says Mc Devitt, the former CEO of Medifast, a nutrition and weight loss compa ny. McDevitt helped Tes semaes work through its problems, and also became an investor. One of Tessemaes problems was the rm it hired to court investors, CEO Greg Vetter says. The sales presentation the rm put togeth er exaggerated Tesse maes sales prospects by tens of millions of dol lars. Investors didnt buy it and Vetter wanted out of the contract.Tesse maes also wanted to re negotiate contracts with suppliers. The contracts were priced for small er quantities of ingre dients like olive oil, and didnt give discounts for larger purchases. Tandem ended the contract with the fund raiser and renegotiated supplier deals. Meanwhile, Tesse maes bank refused its request for a $1 million credit line increase. The company needed the money to fund its ex pansion into more Safe way stores. McDevitt decided to invest in Tessemaes. He and former Medi fast colleague, Brendan Connors gave the bank a guarantee so Tes semaes could get the credit line. We pointed them in the right way, McDe vitt says. US delays review of Keystone XL pipeline AP FILE PHOTO A huge crop art image protesting the proposed Keystone XL pipline covers an 80-acre corneld outside of Neligh, Neb. Company gets help and is now dressed for success PATRICK SEMANSKY / AP Tessemaes CEO Greg Vetter, right, does a hand stand as he poses in national event manager Taylor Foleys ofce in Essex, Md. Chinese trade group to mediate shoe factory strike

PAGE 20

C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

PAGE 21

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Sharkys Vac n Sew700 N. Main St. Wildwood, Fl 34785352-330-2483sharkyssewnvac1@gmail.com www.sharkyssewnvac.comAsk AlI was asked recently by a customer about what needles she should buy for her sewing machine and when should they be changed. Over the last 48 years I have repaired thousands of sewing machines and have seen a lot of people with many different ideas on needles. But I have found that no matter what someone says, its the person with experience that I listen to because the saying, The proof is in the pudding, has been time tested. I have found that although manufacturers may tell you to change the needle after making three garments, you are the one to be the judge of that. Now dont get me wrong, I believe in being smart but I also am a penny pincher, if you will. There are a lot of factors that go into choosing the correct needle, from the manufacturer, the size for the job and the price to name a few. Of course, I first look at the fabric and decide which size to use. The finer the fabric the smaller the size and the heavier the fabric the larger the needle, thats a mute point but lets talk about the quality of needles. It has been my experience that Schmetz or Organ needles are the best needles to buy. Although Schmetz needles are made in Germany and are excellent quality needles, I mean come on BMW and Mercedes, but I still recommend Organ needles. They are made in Japan and are equal quality and my best part is that I can get twice as many for the same price as others! Remember I pinch pennies. And always remember, if you hit a pin while sewing and hear a klunck sound then that means the tip of the needle is flat and not sharp any more and you should definitely change the needle. I like the opportunity to buy twice as many needles for the same price then I can change them as needed without worrying about wasting money. If you buy a Mercedes or BMW you wouldnt or shouldnt worry about spending too much money on it. In so saying, if you spend thousands or hundreds on a good sewing machine you shouldnt worry about having to change a needle because of the cost. A bent or dull needle can cause it to break and that can lead to having your sewing machine knocked out of timing and you think a needle costs a lot! Well, you get the POINT... Anyway thats my story and I can tell it anyway I want to. Until next week... Sew What! Happy Sewing! Needles www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Saturday, April 19 the 109th day of 2014. There are 256 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On April 19, 1989, 47 sail ors were killed when a gun turret exploded aboard the USS Iowa in the Caribbean. (The Navy initially suspect ed that a dead crew member, Clayton Hartwig, had deliber ately sparked the blast, but later said there was no proof of that.) HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, April 19, 2014: This year you have an op portunity to break a pat tern and become more dynamic; travel and a for eigner could be involved. Some of you might go back to school in order to learn more in your chosen eld or to develop a new inter est. If you are single, you will open up to a new group of friends. It is likely that you will meet someone spe cial through them. This will happen during the summer or the second part of your birthday year. If you are at tached, plan on taking that special trip you often dis cuss. The summer would be the perfect time for the two of you to experience this ad venture. CAPRICORN just seems to annoy you. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Explore a new spot or visit an area you dont know well. Try to leave your has sles behind, at least for the moment. Contact a friend who lives at a distance. Youll enjoy catching up on news, plus you might want to plan a visit. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) A loved one will want to spend more time with you. Make it your pleasure. A discussion about a child or younger friend will give you some insight. Do not push someone away from you, even if you nd him or her to be intrusive. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Youll see life from a whole different perspective. You might realize that you seem to be excluding some one interesting from your life. Make it a point to take a break from being so as sertive once in a while. Ob serve more. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Complete a project that has been hanging over your head for far too long. Ask for some help if you need it. Your determination and en durance need to be called upon. Once you are done with this task, you will have a big reason to celebrate. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) What you consider to be a fun happening might intim idate a dear friend. Though you are relaxed, this person might not be. A loved one will be full of ideas. Initiate a conversation and explore the limits of his or her imag ination. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Tension will stem from having too many obligations to fulll. Ask for help. Make time to purchase a new item or two, perhaps for to night. A loved one knows just how to appeal to you and lighten up the moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might want to stop at the gym while you do your normal Saturday errands. You could run into a special friend and have a strong re action at rst. Invite this person to join you for lunch and a chat. You will enjoy catching up on news. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Visualize what you want, and make it so. Many of you might decide to orga nize an informal gathering at your place either tonight or tomorrow. Make calls in the late afternoon. Reach out to those at a distance as well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Remain sensi tive to a friend or loved one. You might be having a great time on your own. This per son might be unusually dif cult and somewhat up tight right now. Treat him or her as you would like to be treated. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Allow your needs to call the shots right now. Take some time off today to nap. Perhaps you might want to schedule a mas sage, too. If you dont take good care of yourself, you will be worthless to others. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Be willing to take a risk and share what you feel. You could nd someones reaction to be revealing. Get together with friends at a game or go off to the mov ies. An invitation will come forward that youll want to say yes to. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might have to take care of a situation. Wheth er it involves work or a rel ative will make little differ ence. Others admire your diligence. Make plans for late this afternoon, when you will be more than ready to let loose. Let your week end begin now. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: Im a 14-year-old girl with a problem. Because of my buzzed short hair, slim hips and flat chest, I frequent ly get mistaken for a boy. It really bothers me because, despite my haircut and body shape, I have a femi nine face and I wear womens clothes and makeup. Im not too much of a tomboy. Sometimes when someone addresses me with a male pro noun or in some oth er way mistakes me for a male, Im too nervous to correct them. Is there a clev er or witty way to cor rect the mistake? NOT A BOY IN BROOKLYN, N.Y. DEAR NOT A BOY: The person who made the mistake is the one who should be em barrassed, not you. If it happens again, all you need to do is smile and say, Im all girl. DEAR ABBY: I have been dating a wom an, and I am con sidering proposing to her. We have dis cussed engagement rings and she wants to design her own, which I think is great. However, I am un sure exactly what to do regarding the ac tual proposal. What ring should I give her, knowing that what ever I give her will not be her ultimate engagement ring? SOON TO POP THE QUES TION DEAR SOON TO POP: Marriage proposals happen in many sit uations and in many ways. There are no rules, and dropping to one knee and offer ing a ring is optional. The engagement does not begin when a woman starts wearing a ring; it begins when she accepts the pro posal. All you need to do is say, Will you marry me? When she says yes, you can then decide when you both would like to select a stone for her engage ment ring. DEAR ABBY: A long time friend asked me to be executor of her estate a few years ago, and I agreed. As time has passed, the details of the estate have changed sev eral times. After the recent death of her husband, she again changed the bene ficiaries and is now leaving almost half a million dollars to two animal shelters. Its her money to do with as she chooses, and I dont judge her. I do, however, have a problem executing an estate that gives that much money to animal care when it could help so many people. I dont fault her for wanting to do it; I just dont want to be part of it. Im afraid asking her to find another executor would damage or end our friendship. Please tell me what to do. DILEMMA IN TEXAS DEAR DILEMMA: Lets face it. You ARE judg ing the woman and you DO fault her for wanting to leave a fortune to four-foot ed needy creatures instead of bipeds. Be cause you are un comfortable with her plan, you must tell her she needs to find another executor who is as committed to animal causes as she is. Youll be doing her a favor. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Teenage girls boyish figure is often deceiving to others JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

PAGE 22

C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014

PAGE 23

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1

PAGE 24

D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

PAGE 25

Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2.125 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332

PAGE 26

D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 19, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr 888-904-9858 *PLUS TAX, TAG AND $599 DEALER FEE. www.billbryansubaru.comLARGEST PRE-OWNED INVENTORY IN CENTRAL FLORIDA2004 MERCUR Y GRAND MARQUIS STK#S14196A .............................................$4,988*2003 KIA OPTIMA STK#140749A. ................................................................................................$5,882*2005 CHR Y SLER TOWN & COUNTR Y STK#140184A ........................................$6,025*2002 HONDA OD Y SSEY EX STK#140734A ......................................................................$6,271*2003 MAZDA TRIBUTE ES STK#S14378A ........................................................................$6,435*2004 BUICK CENTUR Y STK#S131006A .................................................................................$6,496*2006 FORD FOCUS ZX5 STK#KP2465A ...............................................................................$6,882*2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA STK#140944A ......................................................................$6,882*2007 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS STK#140874G ...................................................................$6,886*2004 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM STK#140797A ......................................................$6,988*2004 JEEP LIBERT Y SPORT STK#140419A ...................................................................$7,284*2006 KIA SEDONA STK#S14410A ...............................................................................................$7,882*2007 HYUNDAI ENTOURAGE STK#140521A .................................................................$7,882*2005 BMW 3 SERIES 325i STK#S14262C .......................................................................$9,292*2008 FORD FUSION SEL STK#SC2436B .............................................................................$9,878*2006 JAGUAR S-TYPE 3.0 STK#150041A .......................................................................$9,882*2008 SCION xB STK#141053A .........................................................................................................$9,952*2008 TOYOTA PRIUS STK#140620A ..................................................................................$10,388*2004 TOYOTA TA COMA STK#SC2474A .........................................................................$10,473*2006 TOYOTA SIENNA STK#S14344A .............................................................................$10,984*2008 CHR Y SLER PT CRU ISER STK#140833A .....................................................$11,282*FREE WASH & VAC WITH TEST DRIVE OF ANY NEW OR PREOWNED VEHICLE IN STOCKValid only at Bill Bryan Subaru. Expires 5/15/14