Daily Commercial

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Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution.
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AA00019282:00192


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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrf rf$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EXTENDED OFFERS! BUBBA WATSON WINS AGAIN AT AUGUSTA, SPORTS B1BEARS: On the move in Florida, FWC says, A3 UKRAINE: Deploys armed forces to quash pro-Russian insurgency, A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 14, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 104 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D4 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.87 / 69Sun and clouds with showers. 50 MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comAfter completing a 22-year prison sentence in Sep tember, Eustis High graduate Michael C. Nieves was adamant about getting on the road to a productive life. In a January interview with the Daily Commercial on his release, the 43-year-old said he hoped the culinary skills he acquired in prison would lead to a job in the food industry. He found a job at Wendys restaurant, talked to his former English teacher about being a motivational speaker to her students and moved in with a woman and her two children in a small white home at 109 E. Caroline Street in Tavares. And when Tavares police couldnt nd any drugs in his car during a trafc stop earlier this month, ofcers said he assured them he was on the straight and narrow path, according to a detective. I fell short, said Nieves, sitting in the Lake County jail Saturday, attired in an or ange inmate jumpsuit and handcuffs and shackles. Nieves landed back in the Lake County jail on several drug charges after Tavares police said they raided his home April 5 as he ushed crack-cocaine and marijuana down the toilet. Police detective Sar ah Coursey said Nieves had been the focus of a long-time investigation after police believed he was selling drugs. She alleges that he traded drugs for EBT cards (food assistance) and dealing in stolen property. He remained in jail Sunday on no bond, because he violated his conditional release from prison. He now Back to square one STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated PressWASHINGTON As millions of Ameri cans race to meet Tuesdays tax deadline, their chances of getting audited are lower than they have been in years. Budget cuts and new responsibilities are straining the Internal Revenue Services abili ty to police tax returns. This year, the IRS will have fewer agents au diting returns than at any time since at least the 1980s. Taxpayer services are suffering, too, with mil lions of phone calls to the IRS going unanswered. We keep going af ter the people who look like the worst of the bad guys, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said in an interview. But there are going to be some people that we should Staff ReportUmatilla police will have to vacate their headquarters on Central Avenue because of mold and mildew problems, according to City Manager Glenn Irby. The warehouse build ing adjacent to the po lice department wall has a higher roof and is dumping rainwa ter onto the police de partments roof, Irby BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Michael Nieves poses at his home in Tavares, on Feb. 6. People look at my tattoos, Nieves said. But its not whats on you. Its whats in you.Chances of being audited by the IRS lowest in yearsUMATILLAMold, mildew causing police to relocate AP FILE PHOTO Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen testies on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 26. NEDRA PICKLERAssociated PressWASHINGTON After months on the defensive over his health law, a more combative President Barack Obama has emerged to ght about gender politics, lead ing to an election-year com petition with Republicans for support from women. No single group will be more important to Democrats for tunes, say White House advisers, than unmarried women, who are likely to go Demo cratic if they vote, and thats far from certain when trust in Washington is low. The president is trying to convince women that Dem ocrats are more concerned about improving their nancial standing in difcult eco nomic times, and he charges Republicans with standing in the way. Republicans in Congress have been gumming up the works, he said at White House event on equal pay. This isnt just about treat ing women fairly. This is about Republicans seemingly opposing any efforts to even the playing eld for working families, Obama said. Republicans say they have learned important lessons from previous elections where women helped put Obama, GOP compete for support of women AP FILE PHOTO This April 8, 2014 photo shows President Barack Obama, with pending Senate legislation aimed at closing a compensation gender gap that favors men.This isnt just about treating women fairly. This is about Republicans seemingly opposing any efforts to even the playing field for working families.President Barack ObamaSEE AUDIT | A2SEE MOLD | A2SEE WOMEN | A2Fresh off of a 22-year sentence, Michael Nieves faces new charges MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Michael Nieves is back in the Lake County jail after Tavares police broke into his Caroline Street home, now boarded up, during a drug raid.SEE NIEVES | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 HOW TO REACH US APRIL 13CASH 3 . ............................................... 3-4-8 Afternoon . .......................................... 3-1-7 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 1-7-2-3 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-3-4-1FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 12FANTASY 5 . ......................... 13-15-17-25-34 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 6-9-14-21-28-29 POWERBALL .................. 14-26-45-54-5520 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. catch, either in terms of collecting the revenue from them or prosecuting them, that were not going to catch. Better technology is helping to offset some budget cuts. If you report making $40,000 in wages and your employer tells the IRS you made $50,000, the agencys computers probably will catch that. The same is true for investment income and many common deductions that are reported to the IRS by nancial institutions. But if you operate a business that deals in cash, with income or expenses that are not independently reported to the IRS, your chances of getting caught are lower than they have been in years. Last year, the IRS audited less than 1 percent of all returns from individuals, the low est rate since 2005. This year, Koskinen said, The numbers will go down. Koskinen was conrmed as IRS commissioner in December. He took over an agency under siege on several fronts. Last year, the IRS acknowl edged agents improperly sin gled out conservative groups for extra scrutiny when they applied for tax-exempt status from 2010 to 2012. The revela tion has led to ve ongoing in vestigations, including three by congressional committees, and outraged lawmakers who control the agencys budget. The IRS also is implementing large parts of President Barack Obamas health law, includ ing enforcing the mandate that most people get health insur ance. Republicans in Congress abhor the law, putting another bulls-eye on the agencys back. The animosity is reected in the IRS budget, which has de clined from $12.1 billion in 2010 to $11.3 billion in the cur rent budget year. Obama has proposed a 10 percent increase for next year; Republicans are balking. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Fla., chairman of the House subcommittee that oversees the IRS budget, called the request both meaningless and pointless because it exceeds spending caps already set by Congress. Koskinen said he suspects some people think that if they cut funds to the IRS, the agen cy wont be able to implement the health law. Theyre wrong, he said. The IRS is legally obligated to enforce the health law, Koskinen said. That means budget savings will have to be found elsewhere. Koskinen said he can cut spending in three areas: enforcement, taxpayer services and technology. Technology upgrades can only be put off for so long, he said, so enforce ment and taxpayer services are suffering. Last year, only 61 percent of taxpayers calling the IRS for help got it. This year, Koskinen said he expects the numbers to be similar. To help free up op erators, callers with complicated tax questions are directed to the agencys website. AUDIT FROM PAGE A1 explained in a report to city council members. The water runs down the police departments southern wall and satu rates the ground. The missionary block has absorbed the dampness for, evidently, sever al years, and has caused an apparent mold and mildew issue inside the building, Irby wrote. Because this is viewed by the administration of the city to be a possible danger to the employees work ing within this building, it is believed necessary to nd the department temporary headquarters. Local businessman Leon Stricklen is retir ing and willing to lease his nearby ofce on Cen tral Avenue to the city for $1,780 per month, Irby wrote. The 1,780-squarefoot space is furnished, and the rent includes all utilities. Its not known how long the move will take, but city employees will do as much physical moving as possible to save costs, Irby noted. Once police are out of their headquarters, a mold, mildew and asbestos examination of the building will take place. A contractor will be hired to address any problems, including the roof on the south side that needs to be replaced and some interior design work. The overall workspace is long overdue for re modeling, Irby wrote. This work could take at least a year, and costs are unknown at this time. The council will review the city managers report at 7 / p.m. Tuesday when it meets in the Umatilla El ementary School Cafeteria, 401 Lake St. MOLD FROM PAGE A1 Obama and other Democrats in of ce. This year, the GOP is promis ing an aggressive counterattack. The Republican National Com mittee plans to a new initiative, in , to recruit and train wom en under age 40 to help spread the partys message in the nal 14 weeks of the campaign. Representatives from all the party committees the RNC and those supporting GOP candidates for Senate, House, governors and state legislators meet regularly to plan strategy and advise candidates. They are encouraging candi dates to include their wives and daughters in campaign ads, have women at their events and build a Facebook-like internal database of women willing to campaign on their behalf. Responding to Obamas equal pay event, Republicans cried hy pocrisy and pointed out that wom en on average make less than men on the White House staff. When the Senate voted on an equal pay mea sure the next day, every Republican voted no and said the law already protects women from being paid less than men. The Republican Party commit tees are circulating gures showing that poverty among women has risen during Obamas time in of ce, while womens average wages have dropped. They say they are targeting older women, who are more likely to vote Republican than younger wom en, in part by highlighting cuts to Medicare Advantage plans that the Obama administration proposed and then reversed under pressure. They say they will continue to press the case that the health law has in creased costs for some people and affected their health care plans. Obama cites the Affordable Care Act as an example of improved gender equality. Tens of millions of women are now guaranteed free preventive care like mammograms and contraceptive care, and the days when you could be charged more just for being a woman are over for good, he said in his week ly address this weekend. Obama has promoted womens economic issues at White House events and in recent trips to Flor ida and Michigan, tightly contest ed states. He embraced six original Rosie the Riveters women who took on tra ditionally male jobs during World War II on a recent White House visit, and holds them up as an exam ple of equal pay for equal work. He held the rst White House event on combating campus sexual assault. Aides say the president will fo cus more in the coming weeks on workplace exibility and the need for child care, including universal prekindergarten. WOMEN FROM PAGE A1 faces 10 more years in prison. He said he was on the straight and narrow but he wasnt, he was selling drugs, Coursey said. In an interview at the Lake County jail Saturday, Nieves admitted he had drugs in his possession, but said they were for his personal use. He denied selling any drugs or know ing that any items he had on his property were stolen, including EBT cards. Some people give me gifts, he said. He attributes what he said is a drug addiction to depression caused by being unable to nd a job as a result of his felon status. They dont want to know how well I can cook, they want to know about my felony, Nieves said of his job search. Nieves played football for Eustis High in the late 1980s and has Panther tattoos, the schools mascot, etched over his body. The 1989 graduate said several schools were interested in recruiting him to play football, including Florida A&M Univer sity, University of Central Florida and Florida State University. Nancy Velez, now principal at Eustis High, was one of his English teachers. He was a bright student, Velez said during an interview in March. But Nieves said he fell in with the wrong crowd, and instead of going to college to play football, he went to prison after he was arrested on a number of charges, including burglary and grand theft. His lawyer, Mark NeJame, said Nieves had been offered probation in exchange for a guilty plea but he decided to take his chances on a trial. With prior convictions of selling cocaine, he was considered an habitual offender, found guilty and sentenced to 40 years in prison. NeJame said he felt the sentence was a gross injustice. But shortly after his release from prison in September and in spite of an expressed desire to live right, Nieves said life wasnt working out. He said in the earlier inter view with the Daily Commercial that he had problems nding jobs and people who said they would help him after his release had reneged on their promises. He found a job at a nearby Wendys, but said he was red after the supervisor had a problem with him dating a higher ranking employee there, the same one he moved in with after his release. During his stay at the Lake County jail in the late 2000s, while he was appealing some of his convictions, he participated in a jail program similar to Scared Straight, which allows inmates to speak with troubled youth as part of a jail tour to steer them to the right way. While Nieves had talked with Velez about giving motivational speeches to her students, no commitment was ever reached. I do think he has a good story to tell, said Velez, in the March inter view. Detectives said they started an investigation into Nieves selling drugs, which led to the trafc stop but resulted in nothing illegal being found. However, when ofcers surrounded his home about 6:30 / p.m. on April 5, armed with search war rants, they said Nieves refused to come out. When ofcers spotted him ushing drugs down the toilet, they broke the windows out to distract him before crashing into the home. Coursey said Nieves is believed to have gotten rid of 90 percent of the drugs before they reached him. NeJame sided with Nieves on how difcult it is for ex-felons who are trying to follow the right path to nd jobs. Who is going to hire them? This can put their self-esteem in the toilet, he said. Coursey said she didnt believe problems with nding a job should lead to anyone sell drugs. Theres plenty of legitimate jobs out there, she said. Police said Nieves is suspected of being part of a larger operation. However, Nieves said during Saturdays inter view he wasnt willing to snitch. When asked if it would be even more difcult for him to nd a job in light of the new charges and possible new convictions, Nieves remained adamant he will start living a productive life when he gets back on the outside. He said if he goes back to prison, he hopes to learn more trades that could lead to a civilian career. This will not be my mark in life, he said. NIEVES FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis High School graduate Michael Nieves gives an interview from the Lake County jail.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Ladies Chorus set to perform When Radio WasComprised of singers from all over Lake County for more than 60 years, the Ladies Chorus, a talented group of female vocalists, will present When Radio Was at 7 / p.m., Tuesday at the Paul P. Williams Auditorium, Lake-Sumter State College, U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. The group invites the public to be a part of an imaginary studio audience at a local radio station from days gone by, enjoying a variety of gospel music songs, 60s medleys and love songs. Tickets are $10 and are available by calling Helen Ribbe at 352-392-7029.LADY LAKE Uncle Donalds Farm will host Easter eventsVisit the Easter Bunnys country cousin, from 10 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., on Saturday at Uncle Donalds Farm, 2713 Grifn Ave., in Lady Lake. Kids can participate in the egg hunt at 1 / p.m. and pet a rabbit, milk a goat, bottle feed the farms kids and take a hayride. Uncle Donalds Farm will be closed on Easter. Admission is $9.75 per person plus tax. For information, call Uncle Donalds Farm 352-753-2882.MOUNT DORA Easter Bunny to appear at W.T. Bland libraryThe Easter Bunny will make a special appearance at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., for the Easter egg hunt beginning at 10 / a.m. Saturday for all kids through age 10. The day will be lled with snow cones, face painting and photos with the Easter bunny. Parents should accompany children and bring their own camera. A balloon artist also will be on the grounds. Guests are also asked to bring a non-perishable food item for donation to the Lake Cares Food Pantry. Call the library at 352-735-7180 for details.LEESBURG Cleanup will support student volunteer fffortsStudents from around the world converged on Leesburg this year to support local neighborhoods by spending weeks volunteering their spare time to paint homes, cut grass and collect unwanted trash. The city of Leesburg and the West Leesburg Community Development Corporation, which assisted the National Relief Network in coordinating the student volunteer projects, invites the community to continue that support with the Keep Leesburg Beautiful neighborhood cleanup event from 8 / a.m. to noon Saturday. Cleanup areas include the Carver Heights and Montclair neighbor hoods. Volunteers will meet at Berry Park, 2121 Johns Ave. in Leesburg. For information, call the West Leesburg CDC at 352-787-2896 or 352-365-0947.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportRural/Metro Ambulance Service in Sumter Coun ty recently went live with a full secondary Public Safe ty Answering Point (PSAP) in the countys 911 communication center. Most primary PSAPs can locate landline callers, but secondary PSAPs can locate mobile phone call ers as well, Yaima Acosta, market development man ager for Rural/Metro Am bulance, said in a press release. Some secondar ies also can send out voice messages to many phone numbers at once, alerting people to a local emergen cy, such as a chemical spill. With the new PSAP, we have TTY capabilities and conferencing capabilities for our callers in our com munication center, Acosta said in an email. A TTY is a special device that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired use the telephone to communicate, by allowing them to type text messages. Sumter County Fire and EMS PSAP serves as the primary communica tion center for all local re sponders. The implementation of the PSAP capabilities within our re and EMS com munications center is an upgrade that was included in our latest performance contract renewal with Ru ral/Metro and comes as no added cost to the cit izens of Sumter County, said Leland Greek, Sumter County re chief. The Sumter County Board of Commissioners recently voted to extend Rural/Metro as their primary emergency services provider for an additional ve years.BUSHNELLRural/Metro upgrades Sumter call system Staff ReportThe St. Johns River Water Management District set a road map for meeting the districts water re source challenges over the next ve years when the governing board re cently approved an update to its Strategic Plan. With the governing boards en dorsement of the plan, which sets goals and strategic priorities, the district will continue its focus on 12 key initiatives and eight continuing core programs. The district covers all or part of 18 counties in northeast and east-cen tral Florida, including Lake. The Strategic Plan includes the following 12 key initiatives: %  %  Develop and implement sound science-based solutions to ensure the availability of sufcient water for existing and future uses %  %  Protect water resources from signicant harm due to water with drawals by establishing necessary and sufcient minimum ows and levels %  %  Ensure sustainable water supplies and protect groundwater systems in the districts north Florida region %  %  Work in partnership with the Central Florida Water Initiative to identify and further develop the Regional Water Supply Plan %  %  Protect the water quality and ecological value of the middle and lower St. Johns River %  %  Enhance and protect the water quality and ecological habitat of the coastal basins of northeast Florida %  %  Restore the ecological, recreational and economic value of Lake LAKE COUNTYWater managers update Strategic Plan Staff ReportThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) says bears are now or soon will be on the move as they leave their winter dens, and there are things people can do over the next few months to reduce negative interactions with Floridas largest land mammal. Now is the time to expect bears to show up looking for food, Dave Tele sco, who directs the FWCs bear man agement program, said in a press re lease. If they cant nd food in your neighborhood, theyll move on. Female bears that gave birth to cubs that were only 12 ounces in Jan uary are beginning to move around with their babies, which are now around 5 pounds. As the cubs contin ue to grow, the family unit will roam farther and could be more visible to people, the press release stated. The FWC offers the following tips: %  %  While black bears generally are not aggressive, a mother bear may try to defend her cubs. Never intention ally approach a bear. Do not assume when you see a lone adult bear that there are no cubs, because the cubs may be hidden nearby. When walking dogs, keep them close and be aware of your surroundings. Dogs can trig ger defensive behavior from bears. %  %  Keep human sources of food, such as garbage, birdseed and pet food, secure from bears so they wont wander into your neighborhood this spring looking for an easy meal. Use a bear-resistant trash can, build a bear-resistant trash can shed or modify your existing trash can with hardware to make it more resistant. %  %  As females and cubs increase their movements this time of year, they also increase the number of roads they cross. For the safety of yourself and bears, slow down when driving, particularly on rural high ways at dawn or dusk. Watch for road signs identifying bear crossing areas. Having conicts with bears? Call one of the FWCs ve regional ofces. Go to MyFWC.com/Contact, and click on Regional Ofces to nd the phone number for your region. Need to re port harm to or intentional feeding of bears? Call the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922).TALLAHASSEEFWC: Bears on the move in Florida Staff ReportThe Lake County Public Safety De partments Fire Rescue Division has begun a new tradition that is steeped in his tory, dedicating three new re trucks in cer emonious fashion. Assistant Chief Jim Dickerson explained that in the 1800s, re truck dedications were like a Fourth of July party in communities, with everyone coming out to take a peek and celebrate the ar rival of the new engine, according to a press release from Elisha Pappacoda, a county public information ofcer. Fire service is rich in tradition, Dickerson said. There are quite a few customs that were LEESBURGLake dedicates new fire trucks the old way SUBMITTED PHOTO Fireghter Heather Bauchman and Lt. Matthew Price welcome engine Fran to Lake County Fire Rescue Station 71 in Leesburg. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comLocal seniors wishing to compete in the Florida Se nior Games State Champi onship used to have to trav el to other counties to take part in qualifying events. Now, thanks to local businessman and senior athlete Gary Perigo, who has been participating in the senior games golf tournament for four years, qualifying events will take place in Clermont begin ning this week. Im excited to be bringing the senior games to Lake County, he said. Polk County has been doing it for 30 years, and I felt it was something needed here, because the senior popula tion has continued to grow so much and I know how much the se niors like to stay active. Qualifying events, from April 15 to May 31, include popular senior activities like golng, archery and bowl ing. Helping Perigo run the qualifying events are Mont verde archery instructor Joe Steed and Dot Richard sons organization, the Pro Fastpitch X-treme Tour, which brings athletes from all over the world to Clermont for tour naments. Perigo said seniors will come from all over the state for a chance to take part in the Lake CLERMONTSenior athletes can qualify locally for state event PERIGO SEE TRUCKS | A4SEE WATER | A4SEE SENIORS | A4SEE UPGRADE | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 www.LakeENT.net Call 352-728-2404 today to reserve your seat for the seminar most convenient for you.(Limited Seating. Reservations strongly recommended. Light snacks and beverages provided) Join Lake Ear, Nose & Throats Dr. Michael Freedman for one of two FREE SEMINARS : Tuesday, April 15 at 6pmFlorida Hospital Waterman 1000 Waterman Way Tavares, FLThursday, April 17 at 6pmLake ENT The Villages Office 1501 U.S. Highway 441 N. Suite 1402or Pain and pressure from chronic sinusitis can make everyday life unbearable, but for many patients, relief may be as easy as the innovative Balloon Sinuplasty procedure. Want Sinus Relief? Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 Elegance andValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb OBITUARIESWillard (Will) R. SnyderMr. Willard (Will) R. Snyder, 82 of Leesburg, Florida passed away Wednesday, April 9, 2014. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, he moved to Leesburg from Kan sas City, MO in 1997. He was a mechanic for Cincinnati Bell Telephone Company. He was a volunteer reman, a U. S. Army Vet eran of the Korean Con ict, a member of DAV and the First Presbyte rian Church of Uma tilla. He is survived by his wife: Erleen Snyder, Leesburg, FL; sons: Wil lard T. (Debbie) Snyder, Hamilton, OH; James A. (Karen) Snyder, Fish ers, IN; daughter: Cyn thia A. (James) Walther, Aurora, IN; brothers: Kenneth Snyder, Cincinnati, OH; Armand Snyder, Goshen, OH; 9 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. A Memorial Service will be held 5:30 / p .m. Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at the First Presby terian Church of Umatilla with Reverend Bill Birdsall ofciating. Online condolences can be made at www.beyersfu neralhome.com. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la.DEATH NOTICESLinda Kristeff HermanLinda Kristeff Her man, 54, of Umatilla, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Irene W. KreftIrene W. Kreft, 76, of Leesburg, died on Sat urday, April 12, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.IN MEMORYimplemented by the founders of the re ser vice, which are still in place today. In line with the dedications of horsedrawn re trucks in the early 19th century, reghters at each location unveiled the trucks new name, shined its tires and pushed it back into the rehouse with the help of dignitaries and members of the community. Engine 71 in Leesburg recently was dedicated and named Fran, while Engine 54 in Lady Lake was dubbed Brandy and Engine 39 in Sorrento was dedi cated as Eleanor. Lake County Commission members Welton Cadwell and Leslie Campione were in attendance at Stations 54 and 39, respectively, to support the new tradition. At Station 39, more than two dozen people came out to celebrate as Pastor Earl Wright of the Sor rento Christian Center blessed the engine. Its a great time for the Fire Rescue Division and for the community as we dedicated three new re rescue engines, said Lake County Public Safety Department Chief John Jolliff. The three new trucks will serve their respective communities for many years to come. TRUCKS FROM PAGE A3 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA fatal Lake County crash on County Road 42 killed a baby girl and injured two other peo ple, according to Florida High way Patrol. The FHP police report said the child less than a year old was a passenger in a 1994 Toy ota Tacoma driven by Kimberly Kinggard, 40, of DeLand. Troopers said Kinggard was driving westbound on County Road 42 around 7:08 / p .m. Sat urday, when the car swerved to the right onto the paved shoul der. FHP said Kinggard over-cor rected her steering and rotated counter-clockwise into the east bound lanes of CR 42, where the front of the Toyota hit the right side of a 2001 Chevy pick up driven by Jesus G. Vela, 65, of Eustis. The baby girl was pronounced dead at Florida Hos pital DeLand, while the infants name was not released, pending notication of her family. Kinggard was taken to Orlando Re gional Medical Center in critical condition. Vela was transported to Florida Hospital DeLand in serious condition. FHP said alcohol was not a factor for Vela, but the results are still pending for Kinggard. FHP said the crash remains under investigation.Baby dies in Lake County crash Apopka and the Upper Ocklawaha River Basin %  en Optimize ood control, protect and enhance natural ecosystems and improve water quality in the upper St. Johns River %  en Protect and restore the water quality and eco logical habitat of the Indian River Lagoon %  en Utilize district resources to develop and co ordinate the protection and restoration of major springs %  en Develop a framework for levee and water-con trol structure maintenance and restoration %  en Identify and implement restoration and veg etation management projects on district-owned lands WATER FROM PAGE A3 County qualiers, providing an economic boost for the area that will continue to grow. The buzz that Im getting from senior ath letes who look for these types of competitions is that they are happy that Clermont is partici pating in the senior games, because theyll have a new venue for competitions, he said. And as we continue to add more games in the future, we will continue to attract more people here. Anyone over the age of 50 can sign up to com pete in the senior games for the following sports and dates: golf on April 15, a 5K race on May 4, archery on May 10, bowling on May 14-15 and bag toss and cycling, both on May 18. Venues include Waterfront Park, Revolution Off Road, Bowling Triangle and Epic Cycles. The location for golng has yet to be determined. Dates also will be scheduled for pickle ball, billiards, bocce ball and croquet. Register online at www.lakeseniorgames.com. The Florida Inter national Senior Games & State Championships are scheduled for December 6-14 in Lee County. SENIORS FROM PAGE A3 Sumter Countys 911 communications center processed a total of 19,868 calls in 2012 and 25,583 calls in 2013. The addition of the PSAP technology will assist in surpassing the NFPA (National Fire Protec tion Association) requirements regarding 911 call center process es, Acosta said. We are committed to investing in industry-leading infrastructure and technology that not only supports, but elevates our stateof-the-art medical transportation services throughout the country, Rural/Metros Chief Relations Ofcer John P. Karolzak said. Rural/Metro operates more than 1,600 ambulances and employs 10,000 eld providers in about 700 communities in 21 states. UPGRADE FROM PAGE A3 Associated PressBROOKSVILLE Authorities have suspended their ground search for a pilot whose small plane went missing at it ew from north Florida to the Tampa Bay area. Theodore Weiss of Zephyrhills was ying a xed-wing, single-en gine Sonex two-seater with white and green stripes. The Marion County Sheriffs ofce says Weiss left the Dun nellon Airport on April 5, bound for Zephyrhills. Weiss last known coordinates were over the dense Withlacoochee State Forest. On Satur day, Hernando County Sheriffs Ofce spokeswoman Denise Moloney said a ground search involving multiple law enforcement agencies was being suspended after failing to nd Weiss. Moloney says air searches for Weiss plane will continue.Authorities suspend search for missing pilot

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient PETER LEONARDAssociated PressDONETSK, Ukraine Turning to force to try to restore its author ity in the vital industrial east, Ukraines government announced Sun day it was sending in troops to try to quash an increasingly bra zen pro-Russian insur gency, despite repeated warnings from the Kremlin. Accusing Moscow of fomenting the unrest, Ukrainian President Oleksandr Turchynov said in a televised ad dress that such a largescale anti-terrorist op eration would ensure Russia did not repeat the Crimean scenario in Ukraines east. Turchy nov pledged to offer amnesty to anyone sur rendering their weapons by Monday morn ing. Reliance on the mil itary is a response that hints at concerns over the reliability of the po lice, who have often proven unable or un willing to repel pro-Russian gunmen and other Moscow loyalists from seizing key state facili ties. With tens of thou sands of Russian troops massed along Ukraines eastern border, there are fears that Moscow might use unrest in the mainly Russian-speaking region as a pretext for an invasion. Speaking late Sunday on Russian state televi sion, ousted president Viktor Yanukovych accused the CIA of being behind the new govern ments decision to turn to force, a claim the CIA denied as completely false. Yanukovych claimed that CIA director John Brennan met with Ukraines new leader ship and in fact sanc tioned the use of weap ons and provoked bloodshed. CIA spokesman Dean Boyd said that while the agency doesnt comment on Brennans trav el itinerary, the claim that director Brennan encouraged Ukrainian authorities to conduct tactical operations in side Ukraine is com pletely false. Ukraine now has one foot into a civil war, Yanukovych declared, anked by his former prosecutor general and interior minister, the two associates most de spised by the protesters whose monthslong demonstrations were ignited by Yanukovychs decision to back away from closer relations with the European Union and turn toward Russia. Yanukovych ed to Russia in February, saying he feared for his life. Earlier Sunday, Ukrainian special forces exchanged gunre with a pro-Russia militia outside the eastern city of Slovyansk the rst reported gunbattle in the east, where armed pro-Russian men have seized a number of key government buildings to press their demands for referendums on autonomy and possible annexation by Russia, following the pattern set by the vote in Crimea last month. A Ukrainian security of cer was killed and at least two others wounded. Calling such attacks a Russian aggression, Interior Minister Arsen Avakov said in a Face book post Sunday that special forces of up to 12,000 people will be drawn from volunteers who will be tasked with resisting attacks from pro-Russian forces in their local areas. Russias Foreign Ministry was quick to dis miss Turchynovs decree as criminal and accused Ukrainian ofcials of using radical neo-Nazi forces. Unrest has spread to several municipalities in eastern Ukraine, including the major in dustrial city of Donetsk, which has a large Rus sian-speaking population and was the support base for Yanukovych. Ethnic Russians in Ukraines east widely fear that the new pro-Western Ukrainian government will suppress them. Several town halls and other government buildings were occupied by crowds of supporters of the refer endum drive to give eastern regions wide powers of autonomy. A police station and the local security ser vices headquarters in Slovyansk, some 90 miles west of the Rus sian border, were the latest to fall to storming Saturday by well-armed and effectively coordinated militia. Both were still in the hands of gunmen Sun day, despite a govern ment drive to retake them. The police station was surrounded by a reinforced line of bar ricades, but there was a less noticeable presence of the automatic rie-toting pro-Russian gunmen of the day be fore. Hundreds of residents beyond the bar ricades sang songs and shouted in support of the men seizing the building. The only conrmed casualties in Slovyansk were among Ukrainian government forces. Turchynov said a Se curity Service captain was killed and two col onels were wounded in Sundays gun battle. An Associated Press reporter saw a bullet-ridden SUV on the side of the road and a pool of blood by the front pas senger seat door, where the clash was reported to have occurred. Turchynov said pro-Russia militiamen were responsible for the attack.Kiev government to deploy troops in Ukraines east OLGA IVASHCHENKO / AP Pro-Russia supporters beat a pro-Western activist who lies on the stairs during a pro-Russian rally in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Sunday. Two rival rallies in Kharkiv turned violent after a group of pro-Russian protesters followed several pro-Ukrainian activists, beating them with baseball bats and sticks.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hen Afghans went to the polls last week to elect a new president, Afghan so cial media enthusiasts sent out some incredible photos of wom en voters. The long, snaking lines of women in burkas, holding up sheets of plastic for protection from freezing rain, were a stunning repudiation of Taliban misogyny and violence. My favor ite photo, tweeted by an Afghan journalist named Sha Shari, showed an elderly, black-draped lady in a wheelchair, holding up a forenger stained with indelible ink, saying: I voted because women cant expect things to improve if they dont vote. Cynics take note: These elections matter, not just for Afghan women but for the future of the country. And they show why the United States should maintain strong economic and security ties to Kabul. I know youve seen those pur ple ngers before, in Iraq, where 2005 elections were supposed to pave the way to democracy but led to more sectarian violence. Elections havent turned out well in Egypt, either. I also know this election isnt over preliminary results wont be known until the end of April and, if none of the eight candidates gets more than 50 percent of the votes, there will be a runoff. Moreover, the Taliban remain a threat especially because neighboring Pakistan gives them safe haven. But this election proved that Afghanistan is not the hopeless case many Americans believe it to be. First, the vote showed that most Afghans want change by ballot, not the bullet meaning they want better government, better security, and less corruption. This was Afghanistans third presidential election, and the last, in 2009, was marked by such fraud that it disillusioned many voters. Yet this time election observers say the level of fraud was way down, and voter turnout was double that of 2009, including 60 percent of eligible voters. So many voted that several polling places ran out of ballots, and the numbers would have been even higher had there not been Taliban intimidation in some rural areas. The desire for change is so gigantic, says the Carnegie Endowments Sarah Chayes, an Afghan expert who lived for years in Kandahar and advised top U.S. commanders. It was remarkable how people really turned out. Second, This vote was a strong No to the Taliban, and a reaction to the violence, according to the well-known Afghan human-rights activist Sima Samar, whom I reached by phone in Kabul. Voters disregarded Taliban demands that they stay home. As Ive heard repeatedly on trips to Afghanistan, even from village elders who share the same Pashtun ethnic background as the Taliban, Afghans dont want a return of harsh Taliban rule. Nor do most Afghans agree with the militants ban on girls education. Will the Taliban, or their Pakistani backers, heed the voters wishes? Some of the Taliban might get the message, says Samar. And Pakistan should under stand that the Afghan people are not the same as in 1992. She was referring to the period after the Soviets quit Afghanistan, when Pakistan helped bring the Taliban to power in an effort to strengthen its hand against archenemy India. Afghans today are more sensitive to Pakistani interference and have many more contacts with the outside world. Third, the election indicated that most Afghans want a continued alliance with the West. All the leading candidates pledged to sign a bilateral security agreement (BSA) with the United States that would permit a small force of around 10,000 troops to stay on to train Afghans. (Current President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign the accord, which leads many Afghans to believe he wants a dangerous deal with the Taliban.) The voters made clear that the BSA has real importance to them. This election is a strong sign of peoples desire for a link to the international community, Samar says. Finally, the election seems to be a repudiation of the rampant corruption of Karzais administration. His favored candidate, Zalmay Rasoul, appears to be running third, behind former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani and the former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah. The next president may not be able to shake the venal political culture that has grown up over the past decade, fed by billions in foreign aid. But Afghan voters have shown they are far more politically aware than in the past. They dont want their country to once more become a safe haven for Islamist extremists who threaten them and the West. Nor do they want to be part of Pakistans proxy war with India. If they see (leaders) they can identi fy with and see less predatory behavior, there is nothing Pakistan can throw at them they couldnt turn around, says Chayes. Can Ghani or Abdullah deliver? Will President Obama stay committed after 2014? We dont know yet. But the Afghan elections demonstrate why its worth giving Kabul another chance.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial-board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Why Afghan elections matter The United States is irked that Iran has chosen as its representative to the United Nations a diplomat who apparently was involved with a student group that seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979. The embas sy takeover, a violation of international law that led to the 444-day captivity of 52 Amer ican hostages, contributed to hostility be tween the two countries that only recently has begun to abate. But the Obama administration is making a mistake in publicly labeling as not viable the posting to the United Nations of Hamid Aboutalebi, an experienced diplomat aligned with Irans reformist President Hassan Rouhani. The ominous implication is that the State Department would deny Aboutalebi a visa necessary to enter this country. Aboutalebi was 22 years old when he served as an interpreter for the students who had seized the embassy out of pent-up anger over long-standing U.S. support for the autocratic shah of Iran. Its not unknown for youthful rad icals to mature into middle-age statesmen. As a young leftist in 1970s West Germany, Josch ka Fischer took part in violent street demon strations and was photographed attacking a policeman. Decades later, he served as foreign minister of a united Germany. But even if the Aboutalebi of today were an unreconstructed anti-American, the United States would be wrong to try to prevent him from taking up a position at the United Nations. Having agreed to serve as host country of the international organization, the United States shouldnt interfere in decisions by member states about their representation in that body any more than it should block for eign leaders it objects to from addressing the U.N. (Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat, Cuban President Fidel Castro and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad are among those who have spoken at the organizations New York headquarters.) Finally, the administrations xation on Aboutalebi may be unintentionally under mining efforts by several nations to induce Iran to abandon efforts to produce nuclear weapons. Some of the U.S. senators who approved a bill this week purporting to bar Aboutalebi from entering this country also support additional sanctions legislation that the administration believes would derail the current talks with Iran. The more the administration trumpets its opposition to Aboutalebi, the easier it will be for congressional critics to cite that grievance as a justication for new sanctions. The administration has registered its displeasure with Aboutalebis appointment. Now it should refocus on more important matters, including the nuclear negotiations.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEIrans U.N. envoy isnt a threat to our country Classic DOONESBURY 1972

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Pacers a game away from clinching East / B4 Staff ReportIn a game that saw all nine Lake-Sumter State College hurlers contribute by pitching an inning each by prior agreement, the visiting Lakehawks cruised to an 8-4 vic tory over Team Canada. Shane Crouse (36) struck out two of the three batters he faced to earn the win. Team Canada struck rst with a two-out rally that in volved just two plays when Louis-Phillippe Pelletier singled to shallow left-center and came in to score when Royce Ando lined a double deep down the left-eld line. But the lead was short-lived.SEE LSSC | B2 AL BEHRMAN / AP Cincinnati Reds Billy Hamilton gets a hit off Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Cesar Ramos in the third inning on Sunday in Cincinnati. JOE KAYAP Baseball WriterCINCINNATI Chris Heisey hit his rst grand slam and Devin Mesoraco homered and drove in career high-tying four runs as the Cincinnati Reds took advantage of Tampa Bays depleted pitching staff for a 12-4 victory on Sunday. The Reds best offensive showing of the season fea tured Mesoracos three-run homer, Joey Vottos two-run shot and Heiseys pinch-hit slam in the eighth. Jay Bruce doubled, walked four times and scored four runs. Zack Cozart got it going with a bases-loaded double off Ce sar Ramos (0-1), making his rst start of the season because of injuries. The Reds salvaged the nal game of their interleague se ries but remained in last place in the NL Central at 4-8. The hitters have been the biggest problem, tied for last in the majors heading into the game. The Reds had season highs in runs they hadnt scored more than six in any previous game Heisey hits slam, Mesoraco drives in four more as Reds defeat Rays 12-4SEE RAYS | B2 Associated Press NEW YORK Mirza Teletovic scored a team-high 20 points off the bench, Joe John son and Mason Plumlee each added 17 and the Brooklyn Nets beat the Orlando Magic 97-88 Sunday night. Deron Williams also had 17 points, ve as sists and four steals for the Nets, whose vic tory gave them a two-game lead for the fth spot in the Eastern Conference playoff race over the idle Washington Wizards. Tobias Harris came off the bench to lead the Magic with 18 points, who have lost their last two games. KATHY KMONICEK / AP Brooklyn Nets Mason Plumlee (1) shoots as Orlando Magics ETwaun Moore (55) watches on Sunday in New York. PHOTOS BY DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Defending Masters champion Adam Scott helps Bubba Watson with his green jacket after winning the Masters golf tournament on Sunday in Augusta, Ga. Bubba Watson wins another green jacket at Augusta DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterAUGUSTA, Ga. Bubba Watsons second Masters title was nothing like the green jacket he won two years ago. The only daring shot Watson hit was one he really didnt need. The wild swing in momen tum came on the front nine, not the back nine of Augusta National. And the sweetest differ ence of all Sunday was seeing his 2-year-old son walk toward him on the edge of the 18th green after his threeshot victory over Jordan Spieth. Watson turned in an other masterpiece and joined an elusive group as the 17th player to win the Masters more than once. He turned a two-shot decit into a two-shot lead on the nal two holes of the front nine, then kept Spieth, 20, and everyone else at safe dis tance the rest of the way. Watson closed with a 3-under 69 to beat a pair of Masters rookies in Spieth and Jonas Blixt of Sweden. Two years ago, when he hit that wild hook out of the trees on the 10th hole to win in a playoff, his wife and newly ad opted son were watch ing at home in Florida. This time, young Caleb was decked out in a green-and-white striped Masters shirt and green tennis shoes as he wad dled over to his father. This ones a lot differ ent, Watson said. The rst one, for me, it was almost like I lucked into it. After high-ving the crowd on his way to sign his card, Watson returned to Butler Cabin to take back that green jacket he slipped on Adam Scott a year ago. After giving it away Bubba Watson carries his son Caleb after winning the Masters golf tournament.SEE MASTERS | B2Teletovic scores 20 as Nets beat MagicSEE MAGIC | B2 Sloppy defense helps LSSC down Team Canada 8-4

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Bojangles Southern 500 ResultsSaturday At Darlington Raceway Darlington, S.C. Lap length: 1.366 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 374 laps, 148.9 rat ing, 48 points. 2. (15) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 374, 120, 43. 3. (26) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 374, 101.2, 42. 4. (25) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 374, 114.2, 41. 5. (19) Greg Bife, Ford, 374, 90, 40. 6. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 374, 104.9, 38. 7. (9) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 374, 120.2, 38. 8. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 374, 81.7, 36. 9. (23) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 374, 74.8, 35. 10. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 374, 95.7, 34. 11. (20) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 374, 77.6, 33. 12. (16) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 374, 85.2, 32. 13. (21) Carl Edwards, Ford, 374, 69.2, 31. 14. (4) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 374, 71, 30. 15. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 374, 72, 29. 16. (6) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 374, 82.4, 28. 17. (5) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 374, 100.6, 28. 18. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 374, 63.1, 26. 19. (10) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 374, 92.4, 26. 20. (28) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 374, 56.4, 24. 21. (29) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 374, 56.3, 23. 22. (33) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 374, 54.5, 22. 23. (24) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 372, 61, 21. 24. (3) Aric Almirola, Ford, 372, 67.9, 20. 25. (35) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 372, 46.2, 0. 26. (14) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 371, 80.6, 19. 27. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 371, 70.9, 17. 28. (27) David Gilliland, Ford, 370, 43.9, 16. 29. (34) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 369, 39.6, 15. 30. (38) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 369, 40.7, 14. 31. (13) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 368, 75, 13. 32. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 367, 44.5, 13. 33. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 367, 32.9, 11. 34. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 366, 29.8, 0. 35. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, front hub, 359, 84.5, 10. 36. (37) David Stremme, Chevrolet, brakes, 326, 34.1, 8. 37. (22) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 323, 87, 8. 38. (42) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 301, 31.5, 6. 39. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, overheating, 289, 42.3, 5. 40. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 274, 25, 4. 41. (11) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 270, 60.8, 3. 42. (30) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, accident, 101, 44.6, 2. 43. (36) Dave Blaney, Ford, brakes, 65, 28, 1. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB y-Toronto 47 33 .588 x-Brooklyn 43 36 .544 3 New York 34 45 .430 12 Boston 25 55 .313 22 Philadelphia 17 63 .213 30 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 54 26 .675 x-Washington 42 38 .525 12 x-Charlotte 41 39 .513 13 x-Atlanta 37 43 .463 17 Orlando 23 56 .291 30 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 55 26 .679 x-Chicago 47 32 .595 7 Cleveland 32 49 .395 23 Detroit 29 52 .358 26 Milwaukee 15 65 .188 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB z-San Antonio 62 18 .775 x-Houston 53 27 .663 9 x-Dallas 49 32 .605 13 Memphis 47 32 .595 14 New Orleans 32 48 .400 30 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 58 22 .725 x-Portland 52 28 .650 6 Minnesota 40 39 .506 17 Denver 36 44 .450 22 Utah 24 56 .300 34 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 56 24 .700 x-Golden State 49 30 .620 6 Phoenix 47 33 .588 9 Sacramento 27 53 .338 29 L.A. Lakers 25 54 .316 30 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers 117, Sacramento 101 Washington 104, Milwaukee 91 Charlotte 111, Philadelphia 105 Boston 111, Cleveland 99 Atlanta 98, Miami 85 Houston 111, New Orleans 104 Dallas 101, Phoenix 98 Denver 101, Utah 94 Sundays Games Indiana 102, Oklahoma City 97 Toronto 116, Detroit 107 Brooklyn 87, Orlando 88 Chicago at New York, late Golden State at Portland, late Minnesota at Sacramento, late Memphis at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Miami at Washington, 7 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games New York at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 82 54 19 9 117 261 177 x-Tampa Bay 82 46 27 9 101 240 215 x-Montreal 82 46 28 8 100 215 204 x-Detroit 82 39 28 15 93 222 230 Ottawa 81 36 31 14 86 233 263 Toronto 82 38 36 8 84 231 256 Florida 82 29 45 8 66 196 268 Buffalo 81 21 51 9 51 154 244 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 81 51 24 6 108 247 204 x-N.Y. Rangers 82 45 31 6 96 218 193 x-Philadelphia 82 42 30 10 94 236 235 x-Columbus 82 43 32 7 93 231 216 Washington 82 38 30 14 90 235 240 New Jersey 82 35 29 18 88 197 208 Carolina 82 36 35 11 83 207 230 N.Y. Islanders 81 33 37 11 77 221 264 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Colorado 81 52 22 7 111 248 217 x-St. Louis 82 52 23 7 111 248 191 x-Chicago 82 46 21 15 107 267 220 x-Minnesota 81 43 26 12 98 204 199 x-Dallas 81 40 30 11 91 234 226 Nashville 81 37 32 12 86 209 239 Winnipeg 82 37 35 10 84 227 237 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Anaheim 81 53 20 8 114 263 207 x-San Jose 82 51 22 9 111 249 200 x-Los Angeles 82 46 28 8 100 206 174 Phoenix 81 36 30 15 87 214 230 Vancouver 81 35 35 11 81 191 222 Calgary 81 35 39 7 77 208 236 Edmonton 82 29 44 9 67 203 270 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Saturdays Games Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 3, SO Boston 4, Buffalo 1 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Montreal 1, N.Y. Rangers 0, OT Ottawa 1, Toronto 0 Columbus 3, Florida 2 Nashville 7, Chicago 5 San Jose 3, Phoenix 2 Edmonton 5, Vancouver 2 Sundays Games Carolina 6, Philadelphia 5, SO Tampa Bay 1, Washington 0, SO Detroit 3, St. Louis 0 New Jersey 3, Boston 2 N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Todays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games No games scheduled WTA Claro Open Colsanitas Results Sunday At Club Campestre el Rancho Bogota, Colombia Purse: $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Caroline Garcia (5), France, def. Jelena Jankovic (1), Serbia, 6-3, 6-4. ATP World Tour Grand Prix Hassan II ResultsSunday At Complexe Sportif al Amal Casablanca, Morocco Purse: $665,600 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (8), Spain, def. Marcel Gra nollers (4), Spain, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3. ATP World Tour U.S. Mens Clay Court Championships ResultsSunday At River Oaks Country Club Houston Purse: $539,730 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Fernando Verdasco (4), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (3), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Optioned SS Justin Sellers to Columbus (IL). Reinstated 3B Lonnie Chisenhall from paternity leave. LOS ANGELES ANGELS Transferred LHP Brian Moran to the 60-day DL. Optioned RHPs Dane De La Rosa and Matt Shoemaker to Salt Lake (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Yoslan Herrera from Salt Lake. Recalled LHP Jose Alvarez from Salt Lake. TAMPA BAY RAYS Optioned OF Kevin Kiermaier to Durham (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Erik Be dard from Durham. Placed RHP Alex Cobb on the 15day DL. Recalled LHP Jeff Beliveau from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS Placed 3B Adrian Beltre on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 9. National League CHICAGO CUBS Optioned LHP Chris Rusin to Iowa (PCL). Recalled RHP Blake Parker from Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES Optioned INF Charlie Culberson to Colorado Springs (PCL). Reinstated RHP Tyler Chatwood from the 15-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Placed RHP Brandon Kintzler on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 9. Recalled RHP Rob Wooten from Nashville (PCL). NEW YORK METS Sent OF Chris Young to Las Vegas (PCL) for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Assigned RHP Brad Lincoln outright to Lehigh Valley (PCL). Recalled RHP Jonathan Pettibone and RHP Luis Garcia from Lehigh Valley. Optioned RHP Justin De Fratus to Lehigh Valley. ST. LOUIS CARDIONALS Sent 2B Mark Ellis to Memphis (PCL) for a rehab assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Placed 3B Ryan Zimmerman on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Zach Wal ters from Syracuse (IL). HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS Recalled Fs Craig Cunningham, Justin Florek, Alexander Khokhlachev and Matt Lind blad from Providence (AHL) on an emergency basis. BUFFALO SABRES Called up G Andrey Makarov, F Nicolas Deslauriers and D Mark Pysyk from Rochester (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS Returned Fs Vincent Trocheck, Quinton Howden and Drew Shore to San Antonio (AHL). American Hockey League AHL Suspended Hartford LW Micheal Haley and Portland LW Darian Dziurzynski three games and Manchester D Andrew Bodnarchuk one game. WORCESTER SHARKS Assigned F Matt Nieto to Ontario (ECHL). ECHL CINCINNATI CYCLONES Released F Colin Mulvey. FORT WAYNE KOMETS Released D Steven Shamanski from an amateur tryout agreement. SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Released F David Gerths.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 9 p.m.FS1 Lightweights, Jose Arambula (6-0-0) vs. David Diaz (4-0-1); featherweights, Julian Ramirez (10-0-0) vs. Carlos Rodriguez (22-13-3); junior lightweights, Ronny Rios (22-0-0) vs. Andrew Cancio (15-2-2), at ChicagoMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Atlanta at Philadelphia10 p.m.ESPN Oakland at L.A. AngelsNBA 7 p.m.SUN Miami at Washington8 p.m.FS-Florida Orlando at ChicagoWNBA 8 p.m.ESPN2 Draft, at Uncasville, Conn.9 p.m.ESPNU Draft, at Uncasville, Conn.Masters ScoresSunday At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Bubba Watson 69-68-74-69 Jonas Blixt 70-71-71-71 Jordan Spieth 71-70-70-72 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76-66-71 Rickie Fowler 71-75-67-73 Matt Kuchar 73-71-68-74 Lee Westwood 73-71-70-73 Bernhard Langer 72-74-73-69 Rory McIlroy 71-77-71-69 Jimmy Walker 70-72-76-70 John Senden 72-68-75-73 Kevin Stadler 70-73-72-73 Thomas Bjorn 73-68-73-74 Stewart Cink 73-72-76-68 Jamie Donaldson 73-70-76-70 Henrik Stenson 73-72-74-70 Chris Kirk 75-72-71-72 Adam Scott 69-72-76-72 Justin Rose 76-70-69-74 Jim Furyk 74-68-72-75 Bill Haas 68-78-74-70 Jason Day 75-73-70-72 Ian Poulter 76-70-70-74 Fred Couples 71-71-73-75 Louis Oosthuizen 69-75-75-72 Joost Luiten 75-73-77-67 Steven Bowditch 74-72-74-72 Hunter Mahan 74-72-74-72 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 75-69-74-74 Gary Woodland 70-77-69-76 Martin Kaymer 75-72-73-73 Russell Henley 73-70-75-75 Steve Stricker 72-73-73-75 Stephen Gallacher 71-72-81-70 K.J. Choi 70-75-78-71 Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74-73-73 Brandt Snedeker 70-74-80-71 Brendon de Jonge 74-72-76-73 Thongchai Jaidee 73-74-75-73 Billy Horschel 75-72-75-73 Vijay Singh 75-71-74-75 Lucas Glover 75-69-77-75 Kevin Streelman 72-71-74-79 Mike Weir 73-72-79-73 Sandy Lyle 76-72-76-73 Nick Watney 72-75-76-74 Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72-76-75 Darren Clarke 74-74-73-76 a-Oliver Goss 76-71-76-75 LSSC scored two runs in the fth and three each in the sixth and seventh innings to take a lead they would never surrender. Tanner Elsbernd led off the fth with a dou ble to right and came around to score on a long base hit to left center by third baseman Jack Curtis. After Curtis was cut down stealing, Team Canada pitcher Kristjan Storrie lost his control. Tanner Barnhard was hit by a pitch and advanced to second on Chris Blantons sacrice bunt and to third when Storrie uncorked a wild pitch. After Tanner Long drew a walk, Barnhard scored the innings second run when Stor rie unleashed another wild throw. The Lakehawks struck again in the sixth, managing three runs on a single hit when Storrie lost control again. Austin Sim mons was rst to be hit and went to sec ond on Dakota Higdons ineld hit. Stor ries wild pitch allowed Simmons to score, with Higdon advancing to third. Elsber nd drew another walk and promptly stole second. When Storrie unleashed yet another wild pitch, Higdon scored and Elsber nd went to third. Cur tis reached on a walk and the Canadians sent Storrie back to the bench. Barnhard grounded into a dou ble play, scoring Els bernd and mercifully ending the inning. LSSCs scoring in the seventh almost mir rored the sixth. A base hit by Taylor Saris, a long triple to left center by Simmons and an assortment of mistakes and wildness on the part of Team Can ada accounted for the nal Lakehawks runs of the game. Although the Cana dians struck for two runs in the eighth and another in the ninth, the outcome was never in doubt. LSSC returns to action today, hosting Daytona State College. Game time is 3 / p.m. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 and hits with 13. Left-hander Tony Cingrani (1-1) gave up ve hits in 6 1-3 in nings. Ben Zobrist homered from both sides of the plate, hit ting two-run shots off Cingrani and righthander Nick Christiani. The Rays are 3-3 on a trip that has been tough on their rotation. Matt Moore went on the disabled list with a sore elbow on Tuesday, and Alex Cobb joined him Sunday with a strained oblique. Also, reliever Joel Peralta was sick, leaving him unavailable. The injuries affect ed the nal game of the series. Ramos, who had made four relief ap pearances this season, started in Moores place and helped the Reds offense get unstuck. Cincinnati came into the game tied with San Diego for fewest runs in the majors with 28. Ramos walked the bases loaded in the second, and Cozart hit a ground-rule double for his third hit of the season and a 2-0 lead. Vottos second homer of the series sparked a 10-batter, ve-run third inning. Ramos left af ter throwing 45 pitch es. Brandon Gomes re lieved and gave up the homer. Mesoraco add ed a sacrice y in the fth. The catcher opened the season on the disabled list with a strained oblique. In four games the past week, he went 7 for 14 with three doubles, two homers and six RBIs. Heisey connected in the eighth off Josh Lu eke for his seventh ca reer pinch-hit homer. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 last year, I wanted it back, Watson said. I told Adam we could just swap it back and forth every year. Spieth, trying to become the youngest Masters champion, could only watch from the side of the green. He dazzled the massive crowd early by holing out for birdie from the front bunker on No. 4, and making back-toback birdies to build a two-shot lead through seven holes. Bidding to become the rst play er in 35 years to win a green jacket in his rst try, Spieth looked to be well on his way. But he three-putted for bogey on No. 8 the rst 6 on his card all week as Watson got up-and-down for bird ie to tie for the lead. Spi eth then made a rook ie mistake, leaving his approach below the agstick on No. 9 and watching it roll back into the fairway, setting up another bogey and two-shot swing. Whatever prayer he had might have ended at Amen Corner. His tee shot on No. 12 found Raes Creek. He missed a short birdie attempt on the 13th. Watson was too pow erful, too experienced, too tough to beat. Spi eth closed with six pars for a 72 and tied for second with Blixt, who nev er went away but never really threatened. Blixt shot a 71. That was fun, but at the same time, it hurts right now, Spieth said. I wanted to get in con tention on the back nine Sunday, but didnt come out on top. Watson nished at 8-under 280 and goes to a career-best No. 4 in the world. Miguel Angel Jimenez, the 50-year-old wonder from Spain, shot 71 and nished alone in fourth. Matt Kuchar lost a share of the lead with a fourputt double bogey on the fourth hole and nev er challenged again. He closed with a 74 and tied for fth with Rickie Fowler (73). This was nine holes of theater everyone expected out of Sunday at Augusta National except it was the front nine. Nine players were separated by three shots at the start of the nal round only for this to turn into a two-man show. After trading pars on the opening hole, ei ther Watson or Spieth sometimes both made birdie or bogey over the next nine holes. They matched birdies on the par-3 fourth hole when Spieth holed out from the front bunker and Watson hit his tee shot into 4 feet. Spieth led by as many as two shots for most of the front nine, and his spectacular overshadowed a steady hand from Watson. Two holes to close out the back nine changed everything. Amen Cor ner swung the Masters in Watsons favor for good. About the only excitement came on the par-5 15th hole, when Watson had a threeshot lead. He hit his tee shot well left, blocked by a few pine trees. Instead of laying up safely in front of the water, he hit through the trees with a shot that just cleared the false front of the green and went just over the back. All he got was a par. Over the nal hour, thats all he really needed. It was his second win this year, and the vic tory puts Watson at the top of the Ryder Cup standings. He was guid ed all week by a sim ple game plan of hitting fairways and greens, and he was calmed by knowing that regardless of how it turned out, he still had a green jacket. Now he has two of them. MASTERS FROM PAGE B1 CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Bubba Watson, carrying his son Caleb, is kissed by his wife Angie after winning the Masters on Sunday in Augusta, Ga. Trailing 59-55 with 6:59 remaining in the third quarter, Brook lyn went on an 13-0 run, highlighted by ve points from Teletovic, to take a 70-59 lead with 3:23 left in the quarter. Ronnie Price then hit a 3-pointer to end Orlandos scoring drought. Brooklyn coach Jason Kidd pulled most of his regulars after the end of the third, leading 7970. But Kidd was then forced to bring most of them back after Orlando scored six straight points to pull to 87-81 with 5:27 remaining. Kidd called a timeout soon after and the Nets responded with a 10-3 run to extend the lead to 97-84 with 1:07 to go. Orlando led throughout most of the rst half, shooting 54 per cent from the oor, good enough for a 4946 lead at halftime. Brooklyn C Brook Lopez, who broke his foot earlier this season, greet ed fans on Fan Appreci ation Night. Lopez, who fractured the fth meta tarsal bone in his right foot during a game on Dec. 20 at Philaldephia, watched from the bench. Lopez also had a procedure on March 3 to repair a torn tendon and tighten the ligaments in his left ankle. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Tampa Bay 7 6 .538 6-4 L-1 4-3 3-3 Toronto 7 6 .538 5-5 W-1 3-3 4-3 New York 6 6 .500 6-4 W-1 3-3 3-3 Baltimore 5 7 .417 1 1 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-3 Boston 5 7 .417 1 1 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-3 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 6 4 .600 6-4 L-1 4-1 2-3 Chicago 6 6 .500 1 4-6 L-1 4-2 2-4 Cleveland 6 6 .500 1 5-5 W-1 3-3 3-3 Minnesota 6 6 .500 1 6-4 W-3 3-3 3-3 Kansas City 4 7 .364 2 2 4-6 L-3 4-2 0-5 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 8 4 .667 7-3 W-2 3-3 5-1 Seattle 6 5 .545 1 5-5 L-2 2-3 4-2 Los Angeles 6 6 .500 2 6-4 W-1 2-4 4-2 Texas 6 6 .500 2 5-5 W-1 4-2 2-4 Houston 5 8 .385 3 2 3-7 L-1 3-4 2-4 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 8 4 .667 7-3 W-3 4-2 4-2 Washington 7 5 .583 1 5-5 L-3 4-2 3-3 Philadelphia 6 6 .500 2 1 5-5 W-3 3-3 3-3 New York 5 6 .455 2 1 5-5 W-1 2-4 3-2 Miami 5 8 .385 3 2 3-7 L-7 5-2 0-6 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 10 2 .833 9-1 W-9 4-2 6-0 St. Louis 7 5 .583 3 6-4 W-2 4-2 3-3 Pittsburgh 6 6 .500 4 1 4-6 L-3 4-2 2-4 Chicago 4 8 .333 6 3 4-6 L-2 2-4 2-4 Cincinnati 4 8 .333 6 3 3-7 W-1 2-4 2-4 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 8 4 .667 6-4 W-2 2-3 6-1 San Francisco 8 5 .615 6-4 W-1 3-3 5-2 Colorado 6 7 .462 2 1 5-5 L-1 4-2 2-5 San Diego 5 7 .417 3 2 4-6 W-1 3-3 2-4 Arizona 4 10 .286 5 4 3-7 L-2 1-7 3-3 SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 7, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 6 Minnesota 7, Kansas City 1 Baltimore 2, Toronto 1, 12 innings Houston 6, Texas 5, 10 innings Detroit 6, San Diego 2 N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Angels 6, 13 innings Oakland 3, Seattle 1SATURDAYS GAMESTampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 1, San Francisco 0 Philadelphia 5, Miami 4, 10 innings Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 6, Washington 3 L.A. Dodgers 8, Arizona 5 Detroit 6, San Diego 2 N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Angels 6, 13 inningsSUNDAYS GAMESCincinnati 12, Tampa Bay 4 Toronto 11, Baltimore 3 Minnesota 4, Kansas City 3 Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 3 Texas 1, Houston 0 L.A. Angels 14, N.Y. Mets 2 San Diego 5, Detroit 1 Oakland 3, Seattle 0 Boston at N.Y. Yankees, lateSUNDAYS GAMESCincinnati 12, Tampa Bay 4 Philadelphia 4, Miami 3 Atlanta 10, Washington 2 Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 4 L.A. Angels 14, N.Y. Mets 2 San Francisco 5, Colorado 4, 10 innings San Diego 5, Detroit 1 L.A Dodgers at Arizona, late TOM MIHALEK / AP Philadelphia Phillies Tony Gwynn, Jr., left, is tagged out by Miami Marlins Jeff Mathis as he tries to score on Chase Utleys double on Sunday in Philadelphia.TODAYS GAMESTampa Bay (Archer 1-0) at Baltimore (W.Chen 1-1), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Elias 0-1) at Texas (R.Ross 0-0), 8:05 p.m. Oakland (J.Chavez 0-0) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 0-2), 10:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESAtlanta (E.Santana 1-0) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 0-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 0-0) at Miami (Undecided), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 2-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 0-1), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 0-2) at Arizona (Collmenter 0-0), 9:40 p.m. Colorado (Lyles 2-0) at San Diego (Stults 0-2), 10:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: AlRamirez, Chicago, .413; Kubel, Minnesota, .405; SPerez, Kansas City, .375; Ellsbury, New York, .372; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .367; Solarte, New York, .359; Eaton, Chicago, .354. RUNS: Eaton, Chicago, 14; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Bautista, Toronto, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; Plouffe, Minnesota, 9; Abreu, Chicago, 8; Kinsler, Detroit, 8; Lowrie, Oakland, 8; Mauer, Minnesota, 8; Semien, Chicago, 8. RBI: Abreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Minnesota, 14; Moss, Oakland, 11; Ibanez, Los Angeles, 10; DavMurphy, Cleveland, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; 6 tied at 9. HITS: AlRamirez, Chicago, 19; MeCabrera, Toronto, 18; Eaton, Chicago, 17; Ellsbury, New York, 16; Kubel, Minnesota, 15; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 15; Plouffe, Minnesota, 15. DOUBLES: DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Solarte, New York, 6; ACabrera, Cleveland, 5; Colabello, Minnesota, 5; SPerez, Kansas City, 5; 10 tied at 4. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 29 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Abreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista, Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; Dozier, Minnesota, 4; 7 tied at 3. STOLEN BASES: Ellsbury, New York, 6; RDavis, Detroit, 5; Altuve, Houston, 4; Andrus, Texas, 4; Dozier, Minne sota, 3; Kipnis, Cleveland, 3; Morgan, Cleveland, 3; AlRamirez, Chicago, 3; Rios, Texas, 3; Villar, Houston, 3. PITCHING: Sale, Chicago, 3-0; FHernandez, Seattle, 3-0; 15 tied at 2. ERA: Darvish, Texas, 0.00; Feldman, Houston, 0.44; Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84; Gray, Oakland, 0.95; Scherzer, Detroit, 1.20; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.20. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 30; Price, Tampa Bay, 22; Sabathia, New York, 21; Lester, Boston, 20; Gray, Oakland, 19; Sale, Chicago, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18. SAVES: Santos, Toronto, 4; Axford, Cleveland, 4; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 4; Holland, Kansas City, 3; TomHunter, Balti more, 3; Rodney, Seattle, 3; 5 tied at 2.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .500; Utley, Philadelphia, .472; Bonifacio, Chicago, .435; Freeman, Atlanta, .425; DGordon, Los Angeles, .405; Pagan, San Francisco, .404; Cuddyer, Colorado, .386. RUNS: Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; CGomez, Milwaukee, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado, 10; LaRoche, Washington, 10; Prado, Arizona, 10; 11 tied at 9. RBI:Stanton, Miami, 16; Trumbo, Arizona, 15; CGonza lez, Colorado, 13; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 11; 7 tied at 10. HITS: Bonifacio, Chicago, 20; Blackmon, Colorado, 19; Pagan, San Francisco, 19; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; CGomez, Milwaukee, 18; Hechavarria, Miami, 18; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 18; Uribe, Los Angeles, 18. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 7; Uribe, Los Angeles, 7; Hill, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 6; Adams, St. Louis, 5; ECabrera, San Diego, 5; BCrawford, San Francisco, 5; KDavis, Milwaukee, 5; Utley, Philadelphia, 5. TRIPLES: 31 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt, San Francisco, 5; Trumbo, Arizona, 5; CGomez, Milwaukee, 4; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 4; CGonzalez, Colorado, 4; Stanton, Miami, 4. STOLEN BASES: Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; DGordon, Los Angeles, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4; Owings, Arizona, 4; 8 tied at 3. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 3-0; 20 tied at 2. ERA:Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; Harang, Atlanta, 0.71; GGonzalez, Washington, 0.75; Haren, Los Angeles, 0.75; JKelly, St. Louis, 0.79; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 0.96; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.15. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 28; Wainwright, St. Louis, 24; Fernandez, Miami, 23; Cueto, Cincinnati, 23; Cashner, San Diego, 22; Ryu, Los Angeles, 22; Gre inke, Los Angeles, 21; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 21. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 5; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 3; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 3; Street, San Diego, 3; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 3; AReed, Arizona, 3; Jansen, Los Angeles, 3. Reds 12, Rays 4 T ampa Bay Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist lf 5 2 2 4 BHmltn cf 5 1 1 0 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 V otto 1b 4 2 1 2 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 5 0 3 0 Lueke p 0 0 0 0 F razier 3b 5 2 0 0 DeJess ph 0 0 0 0 Br uce rf 1 4 1 0 Longori 3b 5 0 0 0 Lud wck lf 3 1 1 0 Myers rf-cf 4 0 1 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 4 0 1 0 Heise y ph 1 1 1 4 YEscor ss 3 0 2 0 P artch p 0 0 0 0 Hanign c 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 3 1 2 4 CRams p 1 0 0 0 Cozar t ss 4 0 2 2 BGoms p 0 0 0 0 Cingr n p 3 0 1 0 Belivea p 0 0 0 0 Christn p 0 0 0 0 Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 Ber ndn ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Bedard p 0 0 0 0 Joyce ph-rf 1 0 0 0 SRdrgz 1b 1 1 0 0 Loney ph-1b 2 1 1 0 Totals 33 4 7 4 T otals 35 12 13 12 Tampa Bay 002 000 200 4 Cincinnati 025 010 04x 12 EMyers (1). DPTampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB Tampa Bay 8, Cincinnati 8. 2BLoney (3), Bruce (1), Cozart (2). HRZobrist 2 (3), Votto (2), Heisey (1), Mesoraco (2). SFMesoraco. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay C.Ramos L,0-1 2 3 4 4 3 1 B.Gomes 1 4 3 3 1 1 Beliveau 1 0 0 0 0 0 Bedard 2 2 1 0 1 0 H.Bell 1 3 2 2 1 1 Lueke 1 1 2 2 1 1 Cincinnati Cingrani W,1-1 6 1/3 5 2 2 3 6 Christiani 2/3 2 2 2 0 1 LeCure 1 0 0 0 1 0 Partch 1 0 0 0 2 1 C.Ramos pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. H.Bell pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBPby H.Bell (Votto). UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Tim Welke. T:41. A,307 (42,319). Phillies 4, Marlins 3 Miami Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 1 1 1 GwynJ cf 5 0 3 0 Hchvrr ss 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 Utle y 2b 4 2 3 1 GJones 1b 3 1 1 1 How ard 1b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 2 1 Mayrry pr-1b 0 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 0 1 0 JeBakr 2b 4 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 3 1 1 0 Mathis c 2 1 1 0 Nie ves c 4 0 3 2 Sltlmch ph 1 0 0 0 Asche 3b 2 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 1 0 1 0 Kndrck p 2 0 1 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Re vere ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 P apeln p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 T otals 34 4 13 4 Miami 110 010 000 3 Philadelphia 001 020 01x 4 EH.Alvarez (2), Howard (3). DPMiami 1. LOBMiami 7, Philadelphia 13. 2BMcGehee (5), Utley (6), Nieves (1). HRG.Jones (1), Utley (3), Howard (2). SBD.Brown (2). SH.Alvarez 2, K.Kendrick. IP H R ER BB SO Miami H.Alvarez 6 12 3 3 3 5 A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 2 2 M.Dunn L,0-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Philadelphia K.Kendrick 6 6 3 2 3 7 Rosenberg 1 0 0 0 0 2 Bastardo W,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Papelbon S,3-4 1 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:12. A,272 (43,651). Cardinals 6, Cubs 4 Chicago St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Bonifac 2b-cf 5 0 0 0 MCr pnt 3b 4 1 1 3 Ruggin cf-rf 3 1 1 0 W ong 2b 4 0 2 1 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 2 Hollidy lf 2 0 2 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 0 0 BParkr p 0 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 1 2 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 Craig rf 3 2 1 0 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 JhP erlt ss 4 1 2 1 Lake lf 4 2 2 0 Bourjos cf 3 1 1 1 Olt 3b 3 0 2 1 W acha p 2 0 0 0 Castillo c 3 0 1 1 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr pr 0 0 0 0 Ja y ph 1 0 0 0 EJcksn p 2 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Sweeny ph 0 0 0 0 Barney ph 1 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Valuen 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 7 4 T otals 31 6 11 6 Chicago 200 100 001 4 St. Louis 030 100 02x 6 EOlt (1), M.Carpenter (1). DPChicago 2. LOBChi cago 6, St. Louis 7. 2BOlt (1), Jh.Peralta (1). 3B Lake (1), Bourjos (1). HRRizzo (2). SBM.Carpenter (1). CSRuggiano (1), Holliday (1). SWacha. SFM. Carpenter. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago E.Jackson L,0-1 6 8 4 4 3 5 Russell 1 0 0 0 1 0 B.Parker 2/3 3 2 2 0 0 W.Wright 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Wacha W,2-0 6 1/3 5 3 3 1 8 Siegrist H,3 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Rosenthal S,4-4 1 2 1 1 0 1 HBPby Rosenthal (Castillo), by Wacha (Olt). UmpiresHome, Jerry Layne; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Mike Estabrook. T:10 (Rain delay: 0:46). A,135 (45,399). Blue Jays 11, Orioles 3 T oronto Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi MeCarr lf 6 2 2 0 Mar kks rf 4 1 1 0 Rasms cf 4 2 3 3 Cle vngr 1b 1 0 0 0 Sierra rf 1 1 1 0 D Yong lf 4 0 2 0 Bautist rf-cf 5 1 2 3 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 1 Lind dh 3 2 3 0 Lough cf 0 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 3 2 C.Da vis 1b 3 1 1 1 Navarr c 5 0 0 1 Flahr ty rf 0 0 0 0 Kratz pr-c 0 0 0 0 Wieter s c 4 1 1 1 Izturis 2b 0 0 0 0 P earce dh 4 0 1 0 Diaz ss 4 0 0 1 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 Lawrie 3b 5 1 2 1 Lmrdzz 2b 4 0 0 0 Goins ss-2b 4 1 1 0 Schoop 3b 4 0 1 0 Totals 41 11 17 11 T otals 36 3 8 3 Toronto 100 205 030 11 Baltimore 100 000 020 3 EBuehrle (1). LOBToronto 8, Baltimore 7. 2BMe. Cabrera (4), Rasmus (4), Encarnacion 2 (4), D.Young (2), Pearce (1), Schoop (4). HRRasmus (3), Bautista (5), Lawrie (2), C.Davis (1), Wieters (3). SDiaz. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Buehrle W,3-0 7 5 1 1 0 2 Rogers 2 3 2 2 0 2 Baltimore Jimenez L,0-3 5 1/3 10 5 5 2 3 Stinson 2 7 6 6 1 0 Matusz 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 R.Webb 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Buehrle (C.Davis). WPJimenez. UmpiresHome, Chris Conroy; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel. T:45. A,281 (45,971). Braves 10, Nationals 2 W ashington Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 He ywrd rf 4 3 1 1 Harper cf 2 0 2 0 BUpton cf 5 1 2 0 Werth rf 4 0 0 0 F remn 1b 3 2 2 4 LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 1 J.Upton lf 3 2 2 2 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0 Smmns ss 5 1 2 3 Frndsn lf-2b 4 1 2 0 Laird c 4 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 1 0 R.P ena 3b 4 0 1 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 Pstr nck 2b 3 1 1 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Harang p 3 0 0 0 Walters ph 1 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Loaton c 3 0 0 1 JW aldn p 0 0 0 0 GGnzlz p 1 0 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Souza lf 1 0 0 0 Schlssr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 T otals 35 10 11 10 Washington 000 010 001 2 Atlanta 330 000 04x 10 EDesmond (5), G.Gonzalez (1), Harper (2). LOB Washington 5, Atlanta 8. 2BHarper (1), Frandsen (1), Heyward (1), Freeman (4). 3BSimmons (1), Pastornicky (1). HRLaRoche (3), Freeman (4), J.Upton (4), Simmons (1). SBHeyward (3). SG.Gonzalez. SFFreeman. IP H R ER BB SO Washington G.Gonzalez L,2-1 6 9 6 6 4 6 Detwiler 1 2/3 2 4 0 1 3 Blevins 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta Harang W,2-1 6 5 1 1 1 5 Thomas 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Walden 1 0 0 0 1 2 Schlosser 1 1 1 1 0 3 HBPby G.Gonzalez (Freeman). UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Larry Vanover. T:56. A,919 (49,586). Brewers 4, Pirates 1 Pittsburgh Milw aukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Marte lf 4 1 1 0 CGomz cf 3 0 1 1 Tabata rf 4 0 1 0 Segura ss 4 0 1 0 AMcCt cf 3 0 1 1 Braun rf 4 1 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 1 1 1 NWalkr 2b 3 0 0 0 Overa y 1b 3 1 1 0 TSnchz c 3 0 1 0 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 Ishikaw 1b 3 0 0 0 LSchfr lf 4 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Maldnd c 2 1 1 0 Morton p 2 0 0 0 Lohse p 1 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 T otals 28 4 7 2 Pittsburgh 000 100 000 1 Milwaukee 001 102 00x 4 EMercer (2), T.Sanchez (2). DPPittsburgh 1. LOB Pittsburgh 3, Milwaukee 6. 2BBraun (1), Overbay (2), Maldonado (1). SBGennett (1). SLohse. SFA. McCutchen, C.Gomez. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Morton L,0-1 7 6 4 2 3 3 Ju.Wilson 1 1 0 0 0 1 Milwaukee Lohse W,2-1 8 2/3 4 1 1 0 9 W.Smith S,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Morton (Lohse). WPMorton. UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Bill Miller. T:11. A,152 (41,900). Twins 4, Royals 3 Kansas City Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 3 0 0 1 Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 0 2 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 Colaell rf 2 0 0 0 AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Hr mnn lf 1 0 0 0 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 K ubel lf 2 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 3 1 1 0 Mstrnn pr-rf 1 1 0 0 L.Cain cf 3 1 2 0 Pinto dh 3 1 1 2 AEscor ss 3 1 2 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 1 0 Flor mn ss 2 1 0 0 Totals 32 3 7 2 T otals 27 4 5 2 Kansas City 000 000 030 3 Minnesota 000 000 22x 4 EW.Davis (1), Correia (2), Plouffe (1). DPKansas City 3, Minnesota 1. LOBKansas City 4, Minnesota 5. 2BHosmer (3), Moustakas (2). HRPinto (3). SB Mauer (1), A.Hicks (1), Florimon (3). SAoki. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Vargas 7 5 2 2 3 4 Crow L,0-1 0 0 2 0 2 0 W.Davis BS,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 3 Minnesota Correia 7 6 3 3 1 2 Duensing BS,1-1 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Fien W,1-0 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Perkins S,3-4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Correia pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Crow pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:47. A,878 (39,021). Rangers 1, Astros 0 Houston T exas ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 4 0 0 0 Choo dh 4 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Andr us ss 2 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 3 0 1 0 DMr ph 2b 1 0 0 1 Carter dh 2 0 0 0 Rios rf 3 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 0 1 0 F ielder 1b 3 0 0 0 Hoes rf 2 0 0 0 Kzmnff 3b 3 0 2 0 Grssmn lf 3 0 1 0 Choice lf 3 0 1 0 Corprn c 3 0 1 0 Chirins c 3 0 0 0 Villar ss 2 0 0 0 LMar tn cf 3 0 0 0 JoWilsn 2b-ss 3 1 1 0 Totals 26 0 5 0 T otals 28 1 5 1 Houston 000 000 000 0 Texas 000 001 00x 1 DPTexas 4. LOBHouston 2, Texas 4. 2BKouzmanoff (1). CSM.Dominguez (1), Villar (1). SF Do.Murphy. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Oberholtzer L,0-3 7 5 1 1 0 7 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 1 Texas M.Perez W,2-0 8 5 0 0 3 2 Ogando S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:15. A,698 (48,114). Giants 5, Rockies 4, 10 innings Colorado San F rancisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 3 0 1 0 P agan cf 4 0 2 2 Stubbs ph-cf 1 0 1 1 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 0 0 0 Sando vl 3b 4 1 2 1 CGnzlz lf 4 0 0 0 P osey c 4 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 3 0 0 0 P ence rf 3 1 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Mor se lf 3 1 1 0 Rosario c 4 1 1 1 Blanco lf 1 0 1 0 Arenad 3b 4 1 1 0 BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 2 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 1 B.Hicks 2b 2 1 2 0 Chatwd p 2 0 0 0 THudsn p 3 0 0 0 Morals p 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Barnes ph 0 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Logan p 0 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 7 4 T otals 31 5 9 5 Colorado 010 000 120 0 4 San Francisco 000 031 000 1 5 No outs when winning run scored. DPColorado 3, San Francisco 2. LOBColorado 2, San Francisco 2. 2BArenado (3), LeMahieu (2). 3B Blanco (1). HRMorneau (1), Rosario (1), Sandoval (2), B.Crawford (1). CSLeMahieu (1), B.Hicks (1). S Barnes. SFB.Crawford. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chatwood 6 6 4 4 0 5 Morales 1 0 0 0 1 2 Logan 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ottavino 1 1 0 0 0 1 Brothers L,1-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 San Francisco T.Hudson 7 1/3 5 4 4 0 5 J.Lopez BS,1-1 0 1 0 0 0 0 Casilla 1 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 Romo W,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Brothers pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. HBPby Chatwood (Pence). WPChatwood. UmpiresHome, Hal Gibson; First, Dale Scott; Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Marvin Hudson. T:41. A,490 (41,915).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 AUTO RACING PETE IACOBELLIAP Sports WriterDARLINGTON, S.C. Kevin Harvick knew his rst-year Stew art-Haas Racing team was better than it had shown the past few weeks. After taking the Southern 500 at Dar lington Raceway on Saturday night, Har vick is convinced the group has exactly what it takes to win a Sprint Cup championship. Im excited about it and I think thats why everybody on this team came here, Harvick said. We came here to race for wins, to be in a position to contend for a championship. I really feel like everybody on this team feels like we bettered ourselves by coming together. They took a major step to proving that with Harvicks rst victory in 18 races at the track Too Tough To Tame. It made Har vick the rst this season with two victories and a lock for the sea son-ending, 16-team Chase for a Sprint Cup championship. The victory also end ed a maddening slump where Harvick had nishes of 41st, 39th, 36th, seventh and 42nd in the races since the teams breakthrough win at Phoenix last month. Harvick said such a stretch mightve devastated a lesser team he pointed to the cha os thats been the NBAs Indiana Pacers in recent weeks but thought his crew kept each oth ers spirits up through the down times. The team had a near aw less performance at Darlington, capturing Harvicks rst-ever pole here before his domi nating performance (he led 238 of 374 laps) that was capped when he passed Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the second greenwhite-checkered nish. Sometimes it just doesnt go your way and you have to be able to put that behind you whether you win or lose, he explained. Come Monday morn ing, we have to put this behind us and say, What do we need to do to get better? The team will have a bit more time for those decisions since the cir cuit takes its traditional Easter weekend off before resuming at Richmond International Raceway on April 26. Harvicks crew chief Rodney Childers blamed the failings on mistakes he will ensure get corrected. Without mechanical issues, we couldve won three races, four races, may be ve races, Childers said. Here are two oth er things to take away from the Southern 500:FRESH TIRES ARE THE BEST TIRES Nothing beats fresh rubber, especially at Darlington. Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Jimmie Johnson each chose to take just two tires on a pit stop after a caution 10 laps from the end. Harvick and Childers decided on a full set and that was the differ ence as the No. 4 Chev rolet moved past Earn hardt on the next to last lap for the victory. The just had new tires, Earnhardt said. We had 30-something laps on our lefts and that just wasnt going to get the job done with him right behind us.YOUNG GUNS ON THE RISE The weekend also fea tured a couple of young racers who look as if theyll make a mark on this sport. 18-year-old high-schooler Chase Elliott was the talk of the track after his dash to the top on Friday for his second straight victory in the Nationwide Series. On the Sprint Cup side, 21-year-old Kyle Larson made it through a harrowing weekend where he struck the wall in practice twice and had to use a backup car. Still, he wound up eighth, an impressive run at a track that typi cally chews up and spits out untested drivers. ALEX GALLARDO / APDrivers Kurt Busch (41), Tony Stewart (14) and Kyle Busch (18) race down the front stretch recently in Fontana, Calif. Kyle Busch (18) won the race on the 206th lap. BOXINGHarvick marks himself a serious contender with Darlington victory CHUCK BURTON / AP; Kevin Harvick celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race on Saturday at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C. JIM VERTUNOAP Sports WriterAUSTIN, Texas NASCAR driver Kurt Busch said team own er Gene Haas is serious about making a strong entry into Formula One, a move that could expand the series foot print in the U.S. It will be an in credible challenge. He knows that, Busch said Sunday at the MotoGP motorcycle race in Texas. Its a matter of the fans getting behind it, supporting Gene and trying to give F1 another chance, he said. Weve had Mi chael Andretti, before him was his dad. We had Scott Speed as a driver. Now we have an (American) own er. It will be interesting to see how the driver lineup shapes up. Haas announced Friday he had been granted a license from Formula Ones governing body to start a team as early as 2015, which would be the rst U.S. entry for the series in decades. At 35, Busch said it wont be him racing a Haas Formula One car. My time has passed to be a competitive driver in F1, Busch said. But a test session? Id jump on that every time. Theyre go ing to have hard time keeping me out of the shop, from hanging out. The last attempt for an American For mula One team came in 2010, but the en try lacked funding and development to join. The last U.S.based team was Par nelli Jones Racing in 1974-76, when Mario Andretti drove. Carl Haas (no relation to Gene) and Teddy May er elded an American team in 1985 and 1986, although they were based in London. Money is not expect ed to be a problem for the deep-pocketed Gene Haas, owner of CNC machine man ufacturer Haas Auto mation and the Wind shear wind tunnel in North Carolina.Kurt Busch says Haas serious about fielding F1 entry GREG BEACHAMAP Sports WriterLAS VEGAS The old Manny Pacquiao returned for thrilling bursts, hounding Timothy Bradley onto the ropes and battering the welterweight champion with whip-quick combinations that recalled the Pacmans magical prime. The older Pacquiao couldnt nish the trick, however. Although he tried mightily, Pacquiao didnt stop or even re ally hurt Bradley during 12 mostly exciting rounds Saturday night, settling for the lucrative revenge of a unan imous-decision victory. I didnt want to get careless, Pacquiao said. Pacquiao (56-5-2) proved he is still one of the worlds most exciting boxers with his sec ond straight win, even if he might never recapture his most destruc tive form. His hands and footwork are still inimitable, but the eight-division world champi ons power and timing werent good enough to stop Bradley or any of his opponents since late 2009, the date of his last knockout. Pacquiao apologetically showed up to his post-ght news conference well after mid night at the MGM Grand Garden, a large bandage concealing 32 stitches in a deep gash on his left eyebrow from a head-butt. Trainer Freddie Roach had lled the time by prais ing his ghter while simultaneously acknowledging Pacquiaos days of highlight-reel knock outs have faded. I think he was do ing his best to stop him, Roach said. He was throwing combi nations. I told him, All you have to do is outbox this guy. You can outbox him in and out, all night long. ... I thought he had the killer instinct. When he had (Bradley) on the ropes, he opened up pretty well. It just didnt seem like he had the power he usually has. It was a little bit slower than he seemed in the past. I dont know why, because in the dressing room, he was on re. Bradley, still classy after his rst career de feat, gave a mixed re view of Pacquiaos physical skills in comparison to their rst ght. He still has the real sharp snap on his punches, Bradley said. (But) I believe in the rst ght, his punching power was way harder. I was able to take it. He went for the knockout, he denitely did. Pacquiao still beat up one of the worlds best boxers with relative ease, and his next bout in the fall will be among the biggest happenings in sports. His mostly likely opponent is a fth meeting with Juan Manuel Marquez.NBA MICHAEL MAROTAP Sports WriterINDIANAPOLIS David West scored 21 points and Lance Stephenson had his league-best fth triple-double of the season, leading Indiana past Oklahoma City 102-97 Sunday put ting the Pacers one win away from clinch ing the Eastern Conferences top seed. The Pacers (55-26) lead two-time defend ing champion Miami by a half game with one to play and hold the tiebreaker based on conference record. Kevin Durant n ished with 38 points for Oklahoma City (58-22) on a day it could have locked up the second seed in the West. Oklahoma City rallied from a 10-point fourth-quarter decit, tying the score at 89 with 2:46 to go. But Paul George hit a 3 and Stephenson made one with 34.2 seconds to go to make it 97-91. It was the rst time since Indianas win March 26 over Miami that the Pacers looked like their old selves. They scored, defend ed well and played with energy a combina tion that kept them atop the Eastern Conference standings from late October until the nal week of March. And they answered every challenge, too, even though Roy Hibbert was kept score less and nished 0 of 9 from the eld. George had 20 points and 12 rebounds. Ste phenson nished with 17 points, 11 assists and 10 rebounds to set a new franchise re cord with his fth tri ple-double of the season. Detlef Schrempf set the previous mark with four in 1992-93. What was different Sunday? Indiana was back on its home court, where it nished with a league-best 35-6 mark. Plus, the Pacers didnt allow this one to get away early. But the biggest reason for the change may have been that the Pacers starters were well-rested after taking most of four days off last week and the backups were bursting with condence after winning at Milwaukee. It showed all day. After C.J. Watson closed the rst half with a layup to give the Pacers a 47-45 lead, Russell Westbrooks quick scoring urry in the second half gave the Thunder a 55-52 lead. Indiana charged back with an 8-0 run to make it 60-55 and still led 74-66 after three. Pacers hold off Thunders late run for 102-97 victory MICHAEL CONROY / AP Indiana Pacers guard Lance Stephenson, left, shoots under Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka in the second half on Sunday in Indianapolis. Manny Pacquiao back on top after win over Timothy Bradley ISAAC BREKKEN / AP Manny Pacquiao, left, of the Philippines, trades blows with Timothy Bradley in their WBO welterweight title boxing match on Saturday in Las Vegas.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014HEART ATTACK: Doctors examine symptoms in young people / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Tickets available for Dining in the DarkThe fourth annual Dining in the Dark event is an expedition into the world of smell, taste, sound and texture as guests experience dinner served in darkness May 2 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora. The dinner is designed to raise awareness and funds for New Vision for Independence, a local non-profit organization. For information or to purchase tickets, $60 for general seating and a private table of eight for $440, go to www.newvision.org or call Chantel Buck at 352-435-5040. GAINESVILLE The Elder Options Grant Review Committee to meet A meeting of the Elder Options Grant Review Committee has been scheduled for 10 a.m., May 7 at the Elder Options ofce, 100 S.W. 74th St., Suite 301 in Gainesville. The committee will discuss and adopt recommendations regarding the applications received by Elder Options for funding for the program year beginning July 1. People with disabilities attending the meeting should call 352-6925260 for information. LAKE COUNTY AARP Driver Safety Programs scheduledThe AARP Driver Safety Programs help participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits with a new six-hour curriculum. The two-day course, consisting of three hours each day will be offered at the following location: %  %  From 1 to 4 p.m., Monday and Wednesday, at the Lady Lake Library 225 W. Guava St. To register, call 352-753-2957, ext. 114. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted.OXFORD Florida Guardian Ad Litem hosts volunteer training A Guardian Ad Litem volunteer is appointed by the courts to advocate for a child who has been removed from a home due to alleged abuse, abandonment or neglect. Training will be available June 9 at the Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301 in Oxford. For information, or an application go to www.guardianadlitem.org or call Sarah Jay at 352-274-5231, or email Sarah.Jay@gal..gov. EUSTIS Davids Circle Support Group meeting scheduledDavids Circle Support Group meetings welcome those who have suffered a miscarriage or lost an infant on the rst Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m., at the Lake Eustis Christian Church, 315 E. Orange Ave. Call 352-274-4470 for information. MARIA CHENGAssociated PressIn a north London hos pital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in a bold at tempt to make body parts in the laboratory. Its far from the only lab in the world that is pursuing the futuristic idea of growing organs for transplant. But the London work was showcased Tuesday as Mayor Boris Johnson announced a plan to attract more labs to do cutting-edge health and science research in the area. While only a handful of patients have received the British lab-made organs so far including tear ducts, blood vessels and windpipes researchers hope they will soon be able to transplant more types of body parts into patients, including what would be the worlds rst nose made partly from stem cells. Its like making a cake, said Alexander Seifalian at University College London, the scientist leading the effort. We just use a different kind of oven. British authorities have invested nearly $6.7 million in the plan to stimulate research in the London-Oxford-Cambridge area. It aims to attract companies to the area to foster collaboration and promote research and manufacturing. A major center for biological research will open in London next year. University College London is a partner in the campaign. During a recent visit to his lab there, Seifalian showed off a sophisticated machine used to make molds from a poly mer material for various organs. Last year, he and his team used that material to mold a nose for a British man who lost his to cancer. Then they added a salt and sugar solution to the mold to mimic the somewhat sponge-like texture of a natural nose. Stem cells were taken from the patients fat and grown in the lab for two weeks before being used to cover the nose scaffold. Later, the nose was implanted into the mans forearm so that skin would grow to cover it. Seifalian said he and his team are waiting for approval from regulatory authorities to transfer the nose onto the patients face Growing noses, growing science?UK campaign to attract research cites lab-created body parts MATT DUNHAM / AP Dr. Michelle Grifn, a plastic research fellow, poses for photographs with a synthetic polymer ear at her research facility in the Royal Free Hospital in London. MATT DUNHAM / AP A synthetic polymer nose, left, and ear are posed to be photographed at a research facility in the Royal Free Hospital in London. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Chances are youve heard of mapping genes to diagnose rare diseases, predict your risk of cancer and tell your ancestry. But to uncover food poisonings? The nations disease detectives are beginning a program to try to out smart outbreaks by routinely decod ing the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target is listeria, the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning and bacteria that are especially dangerous to pregnant women. Already, the government credits the technology with helping to solve a listeria outbreak that killed one person in California and sick ened seven others in Maryland. This really is a new way to nd and ght infections, said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One way to think of it is, is it iden tifying a suspect by a lineup or by a ngerprint? Whole genome sequencing, or mapping all of an organisms DNA, has become a staple of medical re search. But in public health, it has been used more selectively, to inves tigate particularly vexing outbreaks or emerging pathogens, such as a worrisome new strain of bird u. For day-to-day outbreak detection, ofcials rely instead on decades-old tests that use pieces of DNA and ar ent as precise. Now, with genome sequencing becoming faster and cheaper, the CDC is armed with $30 million from Con gress to broaden its use with a pro gram called advanced molecu lar detection. The hope is to solve outbreaks faster, foodborne and other types, and maybe prevent Experts decode germs DNA to fight food poisoningThis really is a new way to find and fight infections. One way to think of it is, is it identifying a suspect by a lineup or by a fingerprint?Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionSEE GERMS | C2SEE GROWING | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark infections, too, by bet ter understanding how they spread. Frankly, in public health, we have some catching up to do, said the CDCs Dr. Christopher Braden, who is helping to lead the work. As a rst step, feder al and state ofcials are rapidly decoding the DNA of all the listeria in fections diagnosed in the U.S. this year, along with samples found in tainted foods or factories. Its the rst time the technology has been used for routine disease surveillance, looking for people with matching strains who may have gotten sick from the same source. If this pilot project works, the CDC says it sets the stage to even tually overhaul how public health laborato ries around the coun try keep watch on food safety, and to use the technology more routinely against other out breaks. Genome sequencing really is the ulti mate DNA ngerprint, said George Washington University micro biologist Lance Price, who uses it to study the spread of antibiotic-re sistant bacteria and says the CDCs move is long overdue. Especially in food borne outbreaks, the technology will increase investigators ability to nab the right culprit, he said. The faster that happens, the fewer peo ple may get sick. This is going to change everything as far as source attribu tion, Price added. Re calls are expensive, the industry doesnt like them, and theyve got to be accurate. Todays standard tests sometimes miss linked cases or provide false leads. For example, U.S. ofcials in 2012 ini tially thought a salmonella outbreak in the Netherlands, associated with smoked salm on, was linked to cases here. Later sequencing showed the bugs were different. The current methods of subtyping salmo nella arent very good, said epidemiologist Da vid Boxrud of the Minnesota Department of Health, part of a pilot Food and Drug Admin istration network that has begun sequencing that germ and certain others when theyre discovered in food. State labs in Arizona, Florida, Maryland, New York, Virginia and Washington also participate. Sequencing also promises to reveal drug resistance and how vir ulent a germ is more quickly than todays tests, and track how its spreading from one per son to another through tiny genetic changes that act like footprints. Key to making it work is the computing power of a massive feder al database being used to store the gene maps, said Duncan MacCan nell, the CDCs senior adviser for bioinfor matics. Its one thing to analyze bacterial DNA culled from a few dozen sick people during an outbreak, and another to compare samples from thousands. Until recently, the CDC didnt have the tools and approaches to make sense of this much data, he said. The listeria project began as ofcials were investigating some sick Maryland newborns and their mothers. Genome sequenc ing showed those cases were linked to a Califor nia death, helping in vestigators determine which foods to focus on, said Dr. Robert Tauxe, CDCs leading foodborne disease sleuth. Standard tests prompted recall of the FDAs suspect, a brand of Hispanic-style cheese. Last month, the government announced that sequenc ing also conrmed liste ria from the recalled cheese matched germs from the patients. We expect to be able to match more and more of what we nd in people to what we nd in food, as the project grows, Tauxe said. GERMS FROM PAGE C1 DAVID GOLDMAN / AP Microbiologist Dr. Molly Freeman is shown pulling Listeria bacteria from a tube to be tested for its DNA ngerprinting in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. ANDREA K. WALKERThe Baltimore SunBAL TIMORE Car rie OConnor thought she was a fairly healthy 35-year-old who went on daily jogs and ate well. Then, more than a year ago, she suffered back-to-back heart attacks. The rst hit while she was treating herself to baubles at Smyth Jew elers in Timonium, Md. The project manager at T. Rowe Price suddenly felt nauseated and severe pain consumed her stomach. Pain shot up her arm and her jaw ached. All were com mon symptoms of a heart attack, the paramedics later told her. The second happened later that day when doctors tried to insert a stent to open a blocked left artery they believed had caused the rst attack. During the proce dure, two of her other arteries began to spasm and she had a massive heart attack. Heart disease is often seen as an older per sons afiction. Nation wide, the average age at a rst heart attack is 64 for men and 72 for women, according to the American Heart Association. About 10 years ago, the average ages were 65.8 for men and 70.4 for women. But heart attacks also can occur in young er patients like OCon nor who are seeming ly healthy, caught off guard by the life-chang ing illness. They nd themselves dealing with problems more typical of people their parents age, taking loads of pills and limiting strenuous activity to protect their weakened hearts. It was not something I expected at all, OConnor said. We dont have family history. I dont have any typical risk factors. Im not overweight. I dont smoke. I eat ne. At Anne Arundel Medical Center, where OConnor received cardiac rehabilitation, the hospital saw such a surge in young patients that it started a support group to help them cope. In 2009, the average age of heart attack patients at the hospital was 70 years. In 2012, it was 60. In addition to the bread-and-butter standard cases, we are see ing it in younger folks and it is not completely clear why that is, said Scott Katzen, a general and interventional car diologist with Cardiology Associates who has privileges at Anne Arundel Medical Center. In recent years, some high-prole deaths have brought further attention to the issue. James Gandolni, who starred in the popular The Sopranos televi sion series, died at age 51 from a massive heart attack. Actor Michael Clarke Duncan died at age 54 after suffering a heart attack. Doctors believe some of the attacks are brought on by genetic causes, but doctors also point to the nations obesity problem as a factor. Stress also could play a role, although further study needs to be done, some doctors said. Doctors have started to pay bette r attention to possible symptoms in younger patients and not discount signs because of the per sons age, said Jeffrey L. Quartner, chief of cardi ology at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital and a board member of the American Heart Association Maryland. We have changed our sensitivity to real ize young people have heart attacks as well, Quartner said. Ana Pendleton Duhon, a 37-year-old teacher, was riding in the car with her mother in June 2012. That is the last thing she remem bers from that day. Her mother would lat er tell her she slumped over in mid-conver sation. Paramedics shocked Duhons heart three times to revive her. Doctors would de termine later she went into cardiac arrest. At the hospital, they reduced her body tem perature to near freezing, a procedure Doctors examine heart attack symptoms in young people KENNETH K. LAM / MCT Ana Duhon, center, and Carrie OConnor, right, both had heart attacks in their 30s and were treated at Anne Arundel Medical Center, where they met.SEE SYMPTOMS | C3

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com but couldnt say when that might happen. The polymer material Seifalian uses for his organ scaffolds has been patented and hes also applied for patents for their blood vessels, tear ducts and windpipes. He and his team are creating other or gans including coronary arteries and ears. Later this year, a trial is scheduled to start in India and London to test lab-made ears for people born without them. Ears are harder to make than noses because you have to get all the contours right and the skin is pulled tight so you see its entire structure, said Dr. Michelle Grifn, a plastic surgeon who has made dozens of ears and noses in Seifalians lab. At the moment, children who need new ears have to go through a really invasive procedure involving taking cartilage from their ribs, Grifn said. She added they plan to eventually create an entirely synthetic face but must rst prove their polymer scaffolds wont accidentally burst out of the skin. Scientists have to get things like noses and ears right before we can move onto something like a kidney, lungs or a liver, which is much more complicated, said Eileen Gentleman, a stem cell expert at Kings College London, who is not involved in Seifalians research. What (Seifalian) has created is the correct structure and the fact that its good enough for his patients to have a functional (windpipe), tear duct, etc. is pretty amazing, she said. Some scientists predicted certain lab-made organs will soon cease to be experimental. Im convinced engineered organs are going to be on the mar ket soon, said Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, a professor of transplantation biology at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. She has transferred labmade blood vessels into a handful of patients and plans to offer them more widely by 2016, pending regulatory approval. Seifalian hopes labmade organs will one day be available for a few hundred dollars. If people are not that fussy, we could manufacture different sizes of noses so the sur geon could choose a size and tailor it for patients before implanting it, he said. People think your nose is very individual and personal but this is something that we could mass produce like in a factory one day. GROWING FROM PAGE C1 sometimes used on heart-attack patients to induce a coma and calm the body to help with healing. Duhon recovered, but doctors ar ent 100 percent sure what caused the attack and the incident has changed her life forever. Her heart only operates at 30 percent of its function and she takes numerous med ications. Doctors implanted a debrillator on her heart so if she suffers another attack it will automatically shock the organ. The biggest change has been the emotion al effect. Once a per sonal trainer in tip-top health, Duhon now sometimes worries whether her heart will fail again. She and OConnor were the rst members of the support group started at Anne Arundel Medical Center to help young people cope af ter a heart attack. We needed a com munity to talk about this, Duhon said. Were young women who didnt expect any of this to happen. Dianne Walters, a nurse in the cardiac re hab unit at Anne Arun del Medical Center who helps run the support group, said younger patients may go into depression and start to question their mortal ity. Talking to people their age helps them accept their situation, she said. They can also gain tips from one an others experiences. John Weitzel, a 48-year-old Crownsville, Md., contractor, felt symptoms for al most two days before having a heart attack in 2013. He felt numb ness in his arms and jaw, a tightness in his chest and felt as if he had bad indigestion. His body was achy all over. He visited an ur gent-care center and was sent home. Weitzel was walking to the bathroom when he fell in the hallway. His wife heard his body crash and called an ambulance. Weitzel was over weight and didnt eat well before suffering his heart attack. He has since lost 30 pounds and is trying to live better. SYMPTOMSFROM PAGE C2 MARY MEEHANLexington Herald-LeaderLEXINGTON, Ky. If Freida Downey, aka the Caped Condom Crusader, had a super power, it would be super chatter. Need to learn about using a dental dam during oral sex? Shes happy to tell you. Want tips for proper condom usage? Shell gladly oblige. Need to inquire about obtain ing an HIV/AIDS test? No wor ries. Its your health, she says, youve got to be able to talk about it. A full-gured beauty with a penchant for curly, dark wigs, Downey favors phrases like you better check it before you wreck it and you dont swim in the shark tank without putting on your life preserver while expanding her condom crusade as a volunteer for the Lexington-Fayette County, Ky., Health Department. She has adapted the work of Beyonc if you like it then you better put a condom on it and Aretha p-r-o-t-e-c-t, pro tect yourself, yeah, baby for her own purposes, and she will sing her versions in an enthusi astic a cappella groove whenever asked. So passionate is she about reaching her self-imposed goal of signing up 2,014 people for HIV/AIDS testing in 2014 that she repeatedly contacted the White House to request that President Barack Obama join her on the White House lawn to get a quick cheek swab. (The White House politely declined.) You have to ask, says Downey, grinning at the thought of the photo op that could have been. It is a Thursday morning, and she is fully made up, with a black hat at a jaunty angle on her head. In her small, tidy apart ment, platters lled with artfully arrayed packaged condoms and bowls overowing with them in their glittering wrappers are interspersed among the more traditional decorative touches. And then there are the capes. Burberry plaid, pink and uffy, silvery and shiny, chic, blackand-white houndstooth; she has a closet lled with costumes for every occasion. She is happy to employ them if thats what it takes to draw people in. You give a little bit of quick energy (and a condom) and you walk away, she says as she pantomiming her technique. Lauren Newsome, an HIV/ AIDS outreach specialist at the health department, is a fan of Downey. She certainly has a vibrant personality, Newsome said, Caped crusader of a different sort MATT GOINS / MCT Freida Downey, aka Caped Condom Crusader, poses for a portrait in one of her fashionable capes at her home in Lexington, Ky.SEE CRUSADER | C4

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 adding that Downeys outsize personality al lows her to draw people in. Her ability to talk frankly with no embar rassment about sexual health, sexuality and sexually transmitted disease makes others feel comfortable about sharing. She has no fear, Newsome said. Downey became the Caped Condom Cru sader in 2011. Although she studied social work at Eastern Kentucky University and spent many years working in a factory and in parking enforcement, she was unemployed. In 1999 she suffered a head injury when a drunken driver plowed into a crowd at a Lexington, Ky., Wal-Mart. The man was convicted, but his three escapes from Kentucky prisons caused Downey stress. There was some depression, too, and she found she went out less and less. Then she went to a health fair hoping to get some leads on a job. She saw a young person loi tering near the health department display. She took it upon herself to make an introduction and illustrate the prop er use of a dental dam, a latex sheet used as pro tection during oral sex. Newsome took notice of Downeys ease with the subject matter and invited her to become a gatekeeper. That is the ofcial term for Downey and seven other community volunteers who help distribute condoms, encourage HIV/AIDS testing and let people know about health department services. Downey and the other volun teers were trained, and Newsome meets with Downey about twice a month to discuss Downeys outreach efforts. The volunteers do not provide medical advice or testing; they act as a referral service to connect people with health department professionals. They are able to reach parts of the com munity that we cant be cause they already have established relationships, Newsome says. Downeys mantra about HIV/AIDS testing is: Its safe, its anony mous and tell them the Caped Condom Cru sader sent you. Do you know a lot people dont even know the health department exists? say says. Single with no chil dren, Downey, 45, takes special joy in reaching out to young peo ple. Shes been known to provide curbside in terventions and offer latex therapy to couples on the street. Shes not sure where her open-minded attitude comes from, but she is thrilled to be of ser vice. A certicate lauding her efforts holds a place of honor in her living room. Its frame is adorned, of course, with several condom wrappers. Her caped persona is accepted as part of her personality, says Downey, a member of Main Street Baptist Church. Everybody knows me from way back, she says. Still hoping to nd a paying job, she gets by, for now, with help from family. But she stays busy. She estimates she has attended hundreds of events health fairs, bar trivia nights, gather ings in homes to give out condoms. Sometimes, she says, people come up to her and ask for some. So, she will keep up this volunteer work. She recently started a Facebook page. Shes think ing about going over seas to spread HIV/ AIDS awareness. She might try a Kickstarter campaign to help fund the travel, she said. She is reaching out to the Wonderful Pistachios folks, the creative team behind those wacky commercials with off beat celebrities. Theyve got that lady that does Prancercise, Downey says, why not the Caped Condom Crusader? CRUSADERFROM PAGE C3 MATT GOINS / MCT Condoms to be distributed Freida Downey, aka Caped Condom Crusader.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Lots of apps claim they can help you ght jet lag. Now Michigan re searchers say mathematical formulas suggest its possible to adjust to new time zones a bit faster than previously thought, and they created their own free app to help. Doctors have long said exposure to light is key. But how much, and when? If you get light in the wrong time or wrong way, itll send you the wrong direction, said University of Michigan math professor Daniel Forger, who led the research published Thursday. A master biological clock, called a circadian rhythm, regulates when we become sleepy and when were more alert. Travel across time zones and the body clock has to reset itself. Light is that clocks strongest regulator. In a study partly fund ed by the Air Force, the Michigan team used two equations proven to predict someones circadian rhythm, and with computer model ing calculated different schedules of light ex posure for more than 1,000 possible trips. Its possible to customize a block of time each day when you should be in light, the brighter the better, and another when you should avoid it, Forgers team reported in the journal PLoS Computational Biology. (It didnt address other potential remedies such as melatonin.) An example: Fly from Detroit to London, ve hours ahead, arriving at 11 / a.m. London time. Generally, its thought to take a day per time zone to fully adjust. But the study suggests a threeday adjustment sched ule, if you can stick with it: On the day after ar rival, get light from 7:40 / a.m. to 9 / p .m.; from 6:20 / a.m. to 7:40 / p .m. on Day 2; and from 5 / a.m. until 7:20 / p.m. on Day 3. A free iPhone app named Entrain does the calculations. Stay indoors, or stay up later, and it adjusts the ad vice. The app hasnt been tested with travelers to see whether it real ly helps more than gen eral advice, such as to seek morning light when tr aveling eastward. But after using it, travelers will be given a choice of submitting their data to a Universi ty of Michigan study. Before we really believe it, it has to go through testing, cautioned sleep-medicine specialist Dr. Steven Altchuler, an assistant professor of psychia try at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who wasnt involved in the project. But theres very little risk of harm if someone wants to try these things. Most people adjust ne with general advice, but adjusting faster may be more import ant if travelers must be at their best for, say, sports competitions or a business negotiation, Altchuler added. I think it makes sense, said Dr. Charles Bae of the Cleveland Clinics sleep disorder center. Anything you could do to optimize your adjustment is wel come, without medications.Researchers using math to whittle away at jet lag

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 14, the 104th day of 2014. There are 261 days left in the year. The Jewish holiday Passover begins at sunset. Todays Highlight in History: On April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while watching a performance of Our American Cousin at Fords Theater in Washington. On this date: In 1775, the rst American society for the abolition of slavery was formed in Philadelphia. In 1828, the rst edition of Noah Websters American Dictionary of the English Language was published. In 1910, President William Howard Taft became the rst U.S. chief executive to throw the ceremonial rst pitch at a baseball game as the Washington Senators beat the Philadelphia Athletics 3-0. In 1912, the British liner RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg in the North Atlantic at 11:40 / p.m. ships time and began sinking. (The ship went under two hours and 40 minutes later with the loss of 1,514 lives.) In 1939, the John Steinbeck novel The Grapes of Wrath was rst published by Viking Press. In 1949, the Wilhelmstrasse Trial in Nuremberg ended with 19 former Nazi Foreign Ofce ofcials sentenced by an American tribunal to prison terms ranging from four to 25 years. In 1956, Ampex Corp. demonstrated its videotape recorder at the National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters Convention in Chicago. In 1964, conservationist Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, died in Silver Spring, Md., at age 56. In 1965, the state of Kansas hanged Richard Hickock and Perry Smith for the 1959 murders of four members of Herbert Clutters family. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 14, 2014: This year you see many different situations unfold. Your willingness to give 100 percent marks your most successful ventures. If a circum stance does not go in the direction you would like, at least youll know that you did your best. If you are single, you will be delighted by your choices; however, you often might experience discomfort when someone pulls the reins too tight. The person you choose will need to have similar freedom and intimacy needs. A good period to meet this person will be anytime after spring. If you are attached, you will defer more of ten to your sweetie this year. Your closeness will grow. LIBRA has the same core issues, but he or she manifests them in different ways. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could have a heavy underpinning of fatigue as you start your day. Your dream life likely has been quite active, which could leave you feeling somewhat uneasy. You might react to a close partner by unleashing a snappy comment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might be more irritable than you realize. Listen carefully to feedback from an associate without passing judgment. You are likely to cast a sour perspective on any matter right now. A sudden insight could put you on a steadier course. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Know that you are not seeing the big picture right now. You often strive to gain a more creative perspective. Today you will need to detach from any ingrained views; you will create a more dynamic plan if you do. Brainstorm with a trusted buddy. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You tend to come from a secure place, even when youre in an argument. Keep an eye on someones offbeat energy, and acknowledge what you need to do in order to keep the peace. For some people, it could be as simple as doing some spring cleaning. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Initiate a conversation, but give yourself an exit strategy if the other party seems to be unduly difcult. You are unlikely to run into a receptive au dience, as those around you might be unusually aggressive or sensitive. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your concern might be your budget. Certainly a risk seems tempting. You might not be able to say no. If you were to gamble and lose, what would the damage be? Would you be able to handle it? If you feel you could, then consider it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could nd others to be somewhat difcult. Might you be coming across more provocatively than you had intended? Your fuse has been short lately, and news might be overwhelming, but know that alls well that ends well. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might want to defer any interactions with certain people to others. You often suppress your anger, and it easily could be triggered. Unexpected demands at work or from others could send you into a tizzy. Treat yourself as a fragile object today. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You ourish when loved ones and friends come together. Gather your cohorts together for a meeting, as it could trigger a ow of ideas. Deal with a partner directly. Do not negotiate a nancial matter. You know what is good for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) A take-charge attitude will get you far, and it also will al low you to greet unusual success and change. Still, someone might be undermining you on some level. Use care with a personal matter. You inadvertently could trigger a situation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might want to step out of your comfort zone in order to nd the answers you need. Confusion seems to surround communication. Someone could be looking for you in the wrong spot or at the wrong time. Conrm plans. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Be direct with a partner. It appears as if you cant make a change without this person by your side. On some level, you believe that you can charm someone to your side of an issue. Realize that you could be taken aback by what you trigger. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I recently exchanged pleasantries via email and text messaging with a lady I met on a website. One day later, I received a message from her stating shed prefer our method of communication be kept to email and texting because she wasnt much of a phone talker. Over the past few months, I have been out a number of times with other women who also expressed their prefer ence to keep communication limited to email and texting. Is this becoming common? I may be old-fashioned because I feel interpersonal relationships especially initially should include the element of voice inection. I think its more effective than a guessing game that only a full page of text can provide. Am I wrong? WANTS TO TALK IN RENO DEAR WANTS TO TALK: I dont think you are wrong, and I happen to agree with you. I, too, usually learn more from a spoken conversation than from an email or text because I can distinguish whether the per son is joking or being serious. But you and I are becoming the minority. Today many younger people feel more comfortable communicating online at least initially. DEAR ABBY: My husband recently returned to the family business to become the general manager. He is in control of hiring new employees, and he recently told me they need to hire more people. I have mentioned several times my interest in working there as an administrative assistant. However, my husband either changes the subject or gets angry when I ask about it. It hurts my feelings that I am the person raising his children, but am not good enough to work in the family business! I also know its not because of lack of experience. This makes me question the strength and value of our mar riage. HURT FEELINGS IN OREGON DEAR HURT FEELINGS: While I can see that you might be disappointed, what I regard as your problem may be the lack of honest communication between you and your husband. He may have reasons for preferring you not work in the family business that have nothing to do with the strength or value of your marriage. It might be that he is new in his position as gener al manager, that working in ANY family business can be stressful, that hed prefer separation between his working life and his family life, or that other family members might object. Let the subject rest for a while, and when you do raise it again, try to do it in a non-confrontational manner. If you do, he may be more open and less defensive with you about what his reasons are. And if you would prefer to work outside the home in addition to raising the children, consider submitting your resumes to other companies. DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are approaching our 25th anniversary. We dont have a lot of money to spend on a large party (our sons are 14 and 17). Are there inexpensive solutions? Id prefer not to have it at our house. STUMPED IN GEORGIA DEAR STUMPED: Be cause you dont want to entertain at your home, consider holding the celebration at a park, limiting the guest list and making it a potluck.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Communication online lacks personal touch for some users JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX INDEX art#: order#: 6 X 12 Black TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS: www.dailycommercial.com WITH US. EVERYTHING

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX HELP art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 CROSSWORD PUZZLE



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BUBBA WATSON WINS AGAIN AT AUGUSTA, SPORTS B1 BEARS: On the move in Florida, FWC says A3 UKRAINE: Deploys armed forces to quash pro-Russian insurgency A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 14, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 104 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D4 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 87 / 69 Sun and clouds with showers. 50 MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com A fter completing a 22-year prison sentence in Sep tember, Eustis High graduate Michael C. Nieves was adamant about getting on the road to a productive life. In a January interview with the Daily Com mercial on his release, the 43-year-old said he hoped the culinary skills he acquired in prison would lead to a job in the food industry. He found a job at Wen dys restaurant, talked to his former English teacher about being a motivational speak er to her students and moved in with a wom an and her two children in a small white home at 109 E. Caroline Street in Tavares. And when Tavares police couldnt nd any drugs in his car during a trafc stop earli er this month, ofcers said he assured them he was on the straight and narrow path, ac cording to a detective. I fell short, said Nieves, sitting in the Lake County jail Sat urday, attired in an or ange inmate jump suit and handcuffs and shackles. Nieves landed back in the Lake Coun ty jail on several drug charges after Tavares police said they raided his home April 5 as he ushed crack-cocaine and marijuana down the toilet. Police detective Sar ah Coursey said Nieves had been the focus of a long-time investigation after police believed he was selling drugs. She alleges that he trad ed drugs for EBT cards (food assistance) and dealing in stolen prop erty. He remained in jail Sunday on no bond, because he violated his conditional release from prison. He now Back to square one STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press WASHINGTON As millions of Ameri cans race to meet Tues days tax deadline, their chances of getting au dited are lower than they have been in years. Budget cuts and new responsibilities are straining the Internal Revenue Services abili ty to police tax returns. This year, the IRS will have fewer agents au diting returns than at any time since at least the 1980s. Taxpayer services are suffering, too, with mil lions of phone calls to the IRS going unanswered. We keep going af ter the people who look like the worst of the bad guys, IRS Commission er John Koskinen said in an interview. But there are going to be some people that we should Staff Report Umatilla police will have to vacate their headquarters on Cen tral Avenue because of mold and mildew prob lems, according to City Manager Glenn Irby. The warehouse build ing adjacent to the po lice department wall has a higher roof and is dumping rainwa ter onto the police de partments roof, Irby BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Michael Nieves poses at his home in Tavares, on Feb. 6. People look at my tattoos, Nieves said. But its not whats on you. Its whats in you. Chances of being audited by the IRS lowest in years UMATILLA Mold, mildew causing police to relocate AP FILE PHOTO Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen testies on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 26. NEDRA PICKLER Associated Press WASHINGTON Af ter months on the defensive over his health law, a more combative President Barack Obama has emerged to ght about gender politics, lead ing to an election-year com petition with Republicans for support from women. No single group will be more important to Democrats for tunes, say White House advis ers, than unmarried women, who are likely to go Demo cratic if they vote, and thats far from certain when trust in Washington is low. The president is trying to convince women that Dem ocrats are more concerned about improving their nan cial standing in difcult eco nomic times, and he charges Republicans with standing in the way. Republicans in Congress have been gum ming up the works, he said at White House event on equal pay. This isnt just about treat ing women fairly. This is about Republicans seem ingly opposing any efforts to even the playing eld for working families, Obama said. Republicans say they have learned important lessons from previous elections where women helped put Obama, GOP compete for support of women AP FILE PHOTO This April 8, 2014 photo shows President Barack Obama, with pending Senate legislation aimed at closing a compensation gender gap that favors men. This isnt just about treating women fairly. This is about Republicans seemingly opposing any efforts to even the playing field for working families. President Barack Obama SEE AUDIT | A2 SEE MOLD | A2 SEE WOMEN | A2 Fresh off of a 22-year sentence, Michael Nieves faces new charges MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Michael Nieves is back in the Lake County jail after Tavares police broke into his Caroline Street home, now boarded up, during a drug raid. SEE NIEVES | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 HOW TO REACH US APRIL 13 CASH 3 ............................................... 3-4-8 Afternoon .......................................... 3-1-7 PLAY 4 ............................................. 1-7-2-3 Afternoon ....................................... 2-3-4-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 12 FANTASY 5 ......................... 13-15-17-25-34 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 6-9-14-21-28-29 POWERBALL .................. 14-26-45-54-5520 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. catch, either in terms of col lecting the revenue from them or prosecuting them, that were not going to catch. Better technology is helping to offset some budget cuts. If you report making $40,000 in wages and your employer tells the IRS you made $50,000, the agencys computers prob ably will catch that. The same is true for investment income and many common deduc tions that are reported to the IRS by nancial institutions. But if you operate a business that deals in cash, with income or expenses that are not inde pendently reported to the IRS, your chances of getting caught are lower than they have been in years. Last year, the IRS audited less than 1 percent of all returns from individuals, the low est rate since 2005. This year, Koskinen said, The numbers will go down. Koskinen was conrmed as IRS commissioner in Decem ber. He took over an agency under siege on several fronts. Last year, the IRS acknowl edged agents improperly sin gled out conservative groups for extra scrutiny when they applied for tax-exempt status from 2010 to 2012. The revela tion has led to ve ongoing in vestigations, including three by congressional committees, and outraged lawmakers who control the agencys budget. The IRS also is implementing large parts of President Barack Obamas health law, includ ing enforcing the mandate that most people get health insur ance. Republicans in Congress abhor the law, putting another bulls-eye on the agencys back. The animosity is reected in the IRS budget, which has de clined from $12.1 billion in 2010 to $11.3 billion in the cur rent budget year. Obama has proposed a 10 percent increase for next year; Republicans are balking. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Fla., chairman of the House sub committee that oversees the IRS budget, called the request both meaningless and pointless be cause it exceeds spending caps already set by Congress. Koskinen said he suspects some people think that if they cut funds to the IRS, the agen cy wont be able to implement the health law. Theyre wrong, he said. The IRS is legally obligated to enforce the health law, Koskinen said. That means budget savings will have to be found elsewhere. Koskinen said he can cut spending in three areas: en forcement, taxpayer services and technology. Technology upgrades can only be put off for so long, he said, so enforce ment and taxpayer services are suffering. Last year, only 61 percent of taxpayers calling the IRS for help got it. This year, Koskinen said he expects the numbers to be similar. To help free up op erators, callers with complicat ed tax questions are directed to the agencys website. AUDIT FROM PAGE A1 explained in a report to city council members. The water runs down the police departments southern wall and satu rates the ground. The missionary block has absorbed the damp ness for, evidently, sever al years, and has caused an apparent mold and mildew issue inside the building, Irby wrote. Be cause this is viewed by the administration of the city to be a possible danger to the employees work ing within this building, it is believed necessary to nd the department tem porary headquarters. Local businessman Leon Stricklen is retir ing and willing to lease his nearby ofce on Cen tral Avenue to the city for $1,780 per month, Irby wrote. The 1,780-squarefoot space is furnished, and the rent includes all utilities. Its not known how long the move will take, but city employees will do as much physical moving as possible to save costs, Irby noted. Once police are out of their headquarters, a mold, mildew and asbes tos examination of the building will take place. A contractor will be hired to address any problems, including the roof on the south side that needs to be replaced and some in terior design work. The overall workspace is long overdue for re modeling, Irby wrote. This work could take at least a year, and costs are unknown at this time. The council will review the city managers report at 7 p.m. Tuesday when it meets in the Umatilla El ementary School Cafete ria, 401 Lake St. MOLD FROM PAGE A1 Obama and other Democrats in of ce. This year, the GOP is promis ing an aggressive counterattack. The Republican National Com mittee plans to a new initiative, in , to recruit and train wom en under age 40 to help spread the partys message in the nal 14 weeks of the campaign. Representatives from all the party committees the RNC and those supporting GOP candidates for Senate, House, governors and state legislators meet regularly to plan strategy and advise candidates. They are encouraging candi dates to include their wives and daughters in campaign ads, have women at their events and build a Facebook-like internal database of women willing to campaign on their behalf. Responding to Obamas equal pay event, Republicans cried hy pocrisy and pointed out that wom en on average make less than men on the White House staff. When the Senate voted on an equal pay mea sure the next day, every Republican voted no and said the law already protects women from being paid less than men. The Republican Party commit tees are circulating gures show ing that poverty among women has risen during Obamas time in of ce, while womens average wages have dropped. They say they are targeting older women, who are more likely to vote Republican than younger wom en, in part by highlighting cuts to Medicare Advantage plans that the Obama administration proposed and then reversed under pressure. They say they will continue to press the case that the health law has in creased costs for some people and affected their health care plans. Obama cites the Affordable Care Act as an example of improved gender equality. Tens of millions of women are now guaranteed free preventive care like mammograms and contraceptive care, and the days when you could be charged more just for being a woman are over for good, he said in his week ly address this weekend. Obama has promoted womens economic issues at White House events and in recent trips to Flor ida and Michigan, tightly contest ed states. He embraced six original Rosie the Riveters women who took on tra ditionally male jobs during World War II on a recent White House visit, and holds them up as an exam ple of equal pay for equal work. He held the rst White House event on combating campus sexual assault. Aides say the president will fo cus more in the coming weeks on workplace exibility and the need for child care, including universal prekindergarten. WOMEN FROM PAGE A1 faces 10 more years in prison. He said he was on the straight and narrow but he wasnt, he was selling drugs, Coursey said. In an interview at the Lake County jail Saturday, Nieves admitted he had drugs in his possession, but said they were for his personal use. He denied selling any drugs or know ing that any items he had on his property were sto len, including EBT cards. Some people give me gifts, he said. He attributes what he said is a drug addiction to depression caused by being unable to nd a job as a result of his felon sta tus. They dont want to know how well I can cook, they want to know about my felony, Nieves said of his job search. Nieves played football for Eustis High in the late 1980s and has Panther tattoos, the schools mas cot, etched over his body. The 1989 graduate said several schools were in terested in recruiting him to play football, includ ing Florida A&M Univer sity, University of Central Florida and Florida State University. Nancy Velez, now princi pal at Eustis High, was one of his English teachers. He was a bright stu dent, Velez said during an interview in March. But Nieves said he fell in with the wrong crowd, and instead of going to college to play football, he went to prison after he was arrested on a num ber of charges, including burglary and grand theft. His lawyer, Mark Ne Jame, said Nieves had been offered probation in exchange for a guilty plea but he decided to take his chances on a trial. With prior convictions of sell ing cocaine, he was con sidered an habitual of fender, found guilty and sentenced to 40 years in prison. NeJame said he felt the sentence was a gross in justice. But shortly after his re lease from prison in Sep tember and in spite of an expressed desire to live right, Nieves said life wasnt working out. He said in the earlier inter view with the Daily Com mercial that he had prob lems nding jobs and people who said they would help him after his release had reneged on their promises. He found a job at a nearby Wendys, but said he was red after the su pervisor had a problem with him dating a higher ranking employee there, the same one he moved in with after his release. During his stay at the Lake County jail in the late 2000s, while he was ap pealing some of his con victions, he participated in a jail program similar to Scared Straight, which al lows inmates to speak with troubled youth as part of a jail tour to steer them to the right way. While Nieves had talk ed with Velez about giv ing motivational speech es to her students, no commitment was ever reached. I do think he has a good story to tell, said Velez, in the March inter view. Detectives said they started an investigation into Nieves selling drugs, which led to the trafc stop but resulted in noth ing illegal being found. However, when of cers surrounded his home about 6:30 p.m. on April 5, armed with search war rants, they said Nieves re fused to come out. When ofcers spotted him ush ing drugs down the toilet, they broke the windows out to distract him before crashing into the home. Coursey said Nieves is be lieved to have gotten rid of 90 percent of the drugs be fore they reached him. NeJame sided with Nieves on how difcult it is for ex-felons who are trying to follow the right path to nd jobs. Who is going to hire them? This can put their self-esteem in the toilet, he said. Coursey said she didnt believe problems with nding a job should lead to anyone sell drugs. Theres plenty of legit imate jobs out there, she said. Police said Nieves is suspected of being part of a larger operation. However, Nieves said during Saturdays inter view he wasnt willing to snitch. When asked if it would be even more dif cult for him to nd a job in light of the new charges and possible new convictions, Nieves re mained adamant he will start living a productive life when he gets back on the outside. He said if he goes back to prison, he hopes to learn more trades that could lead to a civilian career. This will not be my mark in life, he said. NIEVES FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis High School graduate Michael Nieves gives an interview from the Lake County jail.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Ladies Chorus set to perform When Radio Was Comprised of singers from all over Lake County for more than 60 years, the Ladies Chorus, a talented group of female vocalists, will present When Radio Was at 7 p.m., Tuesday at the Paul P. Williams Auditorium, Lake-Sumter State College, U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. The group invites the public to be a part of an imaginary studio audience at a local radio station from days gone by, enjoying a variety of gospel music songs, 60s medleys and love songs. Tickets are $10 and are available by calling Helen Ribbe at 352-392-7029. LADY LAKE Uncle Donalds Farm will host Easter events Visit the Easter Bunnys country cousin, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., on Saturday at Uncle Donalds Farm, 2713 Grifn Ave., in Lady Lake. Kids can participate in the egg hunt at 1 p.m. and pet a rabbit, milk a goat, bottle feed the farms kids and take a hayride. Uncle Donalds Farm will be closed on Easter. Admission is $9.75 per person plus tax. For information, call Uncle Donalds Farm 352-753-2882. MOUNT DORA Easter Bunny to appear at W.T. Bland library The Easter Bunny will make a spe cial appearance at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., for the Easter egg hunt beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday for all kids through age 10. The day will be lled with snow cones, face painting and photos with the Easter bunny. Parents should ac company children and bring their own camera. A balloon artist also will be on the grounds. Guests are also asked to bring a non-perishable food item for dona tion to the Lake Cares Food Pantry. Call the library at 352-735-7180 for details. LEESBURG Cleanup will support student volunteer ffforts Students from around the world converged on Leesburg this year to support local neighborhoods by spending weeks volunteering their spare time to paint homes, cut grass and collect unwanted trash. The city of Leesburg and the West Leesburg Community Development Corporation, which assisted the National Relief Network in coordi nating the student volunteer proj ects, invites the community to con tinue that support with the Keep Leesburg Beautiful neighborhood cleanup event from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday. Cleanup areas include the Carver Heights and Montclair neighbor hoods. Volunteers will meet at Berry Park, 2121 Johns Ave. in Leesburg. For information, call the West Leesburg CDC at 352-787-2896 or 352-365-0947. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report Rural/Metro Ambulance Service in Sumter Coun ty recently went live with a full secondary Public Safe ty Answering Point (PSAP) in the countys 911 com munication center. Most primary PSAPs can locate landline callers, but secondary PSAPs can lo cate mobile phone call ers as well, Yaima Acosta, market development man ager for Rural/Metro Am bulance, said in a press release. Some secondar ies also can send out voice messages to many phone numbers at once, alerting people to a local emergen cy, such as a chemical spill. With the new PSAP, we have TTY capabilities and conferencing capabilities for our callers in our com munication center, Acos ta said in an email. A TTY is a special device that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired use the telephone to communi cate, by allowing them to type text messages. Sumter County Fire and EMS PSAP serves as the primary communica tion center for all local re sponders. The implementation of the PSAP capabilities with in our re and EMS com munications center is an upgrade that was included in our latest performance contract renewal with Ru ral/Metro and comes as no added cost to the cit izens of Sumter County, said Leland Greek, Sumter County re chief. The Sumter County Board of Commissioners recently voted to extend Rural/Metro as their pri mary emergency services provider for an additional ve years. BUSHNELL Rural/Metro upgrades Sumter call system Staff Report The St. Johns River Water Man agement District set a road map for meeting the districts water re source challenges over the next ve years when the governing board re cently approved an update to its Strategic Plan. With the governing boards en dorsement of the plan, which sets goals and strategic priorities, the district will continue its focus on 12 key initiatives and eight continuing core programs. The district covers all or part of 18 counties in northeast and east-cen tral Florida, including Lake. The Strategic Plan includes the following 12 key initiatives: Develop and implement sound science-based solutions to ensure the availability of sufcient water for existing and future uses Protect water resources from signicant harm due to water with drawals by establishing necessary and sufcient minimum ows and levels Ensure sustainable water sup plies and protect groundwater sys tems in the districts north Florida region Work in partnership with the Central Florida Water Initiative to identify and further develop the Regional Water Supply Plan Protect the water quality and ecological value of the middle and lower St. Johns River Enhance and protect the water quality and ecological habitat of the coastal basins of northeast Florida Restore the ecological, recre ational and economic value of Lake LAKE COUNTY Water managers update Strategic Plan Staff Report The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con servation Commission (FWC) says bears are now or soon will be on the move as they leave their winter dens, and there are things people can do over the next few months to reduce negative interactions with Floridas largest land mammal. Now is the time to expect bears to show up looking for food, Dave Tele sco, who directs the FWCs bear man agement program, said in a press re lease. If they cant nd food in your neighborhood, theyll move on. Female bears that gave birth to cubs that were only 12 ounces in Jan uary are beginning to move around with their babies, which are now around 5 pounds. As the cubs contin ue to grow, the family unit will roam farther and could be more visible to people, the press release stated. The FWC offers the following tips: While black bears generally are not aggressive, a mother bear may try to defend her cubs. Never intention ally approach a bear. Do not assume when you see a lone adult bear that there are no cubs, because the cubs may be hidden nearby. When walking dogs, keep them close and be aware of your surroundings. Dogs can trig ger defensive behavior from bears. Keep human sources of food, such as garbage, birdseed and pet food, secure from bears so they wont wander into your neighborhood this spring looking for an easy meal. Use a bear-resistant trash can, build a bear-resistant trash can shed or modify your existing trash can with hardware to make it more resistant. As females and cubs increase their movements this time of year, they also increase the number of roads they cross. For the safety of yourself and bears, slow down when driving, particularly on rural high ways at dawn or dusk. Watch for road signs identifying bear crossing areas. Having conicts with bears? Call one of the FWCs ve regional ofces. Go to MyFWC.com/Contact, and click on Regional Ofces to nd the phone number for your region. Need to re port harm to or intentional feeding of bears? Call the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922). TALLAHASSEE FWC: Bears on the move in Florida Staff Report T he Lake County Public Safety De partments Fire Rescue Division has begun a new tradition that is steeped in his tory, dedicating three new re trucks in cer emonious fashion. Assistant Chief Jim Dickerson explained that in the 1800s, re truck dedications were like a Fourth of July party in communities, with everyone com ing out to take a peek and celebrate the ar rival of the new engine, according to a press re lease from Elisha Pap pacoda, a county pub lic information ofcer. Fire service is rich in tradition, Dickerson said. There are quite a few customs that were LEESBURG Lake dedicates new fire trucks the old way SUBMITTED PHOTO Fireghter Heather Bauchman and Lt. Matthew Price welcome engine Fran to Lake County Fire Rescue Station 71 in Leesburg. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Local seniors wishing to compete in the Florida Se nior Games State Champi onship used to have to trav el to other counties to take part in qualifying events. Now, thanks to local businessman and senior athlete Gary Perigo, who has been participating in the senior games golf tournament for four years, qualifying events will take place in Clermont begin ning this week. Im excited to be bring ing the senior games to Lake County, he said. Polk County has been doing it for 30 years, and I felt it was something needed here, because the senior popula tion has continued to grow so much and I know how much the se niors like to stay ac tive. Qualifying events, from April 15 to May 31, include popular senior activities like golng, archery and bowl ing. Helping Perigo run the qualifying events are Mont verde archery instructor Joe Steed and Dot Richard sons organization, the Pro Fastpitch X-treme Tour, which brings athletes from all over the world to Clermont for tour naments. Perigo said se niors will come from all over the state for a chance to take part in the Lake CLERMONT Senior athletes can qualify locally for state event PERIGO SEE TRUCKS | A4 SEE WATER | A4 SEE SENIORS | A4 SEE UPGRADE | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 www.LakeENT.net Call 352-728-2404 today to reserve your seat for the seminar most convenient for you.(Limited Seating. Reservations strongly recommended. Light snacks and beverages provided) Join Lake Ear, Nose & Throats Dr. Michael Freedman for one of two FREE SEMINARS : Tuesday, April 15 at 6pmFlorida Hospital Waterman 1000 Waterman Way Tavares, FLThursday, April 17 at 6pmLake ENT The Villages Office 1501 U.S. Highway 441 N. Suite 1402or Pain and pressure from chronic sinusitis can make everyday life unbearable, but for many patients, relief may be as easy as the innovative Balloon Sinuplasty procedure. Want Sinus Relief? Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 Elegance andValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb OBITUARIES Willard (Will) R. Snyder Mr. Willard (Will) R. Snyder, 82 of Leesburg, Florida passed away Wednesday, April 9, 2014. Born in Cincin nati, Ohio, he moved to Leesburg from Kan sas City, MO in 1997. He was a mechanic for Cincinnati Bell Tele phone Company. He was a volunteer re man, a U. S. Army Vet eran of the Korean Con ict, a member of DAV and the First Presbyte rian Church of Uma tilla. He is survived by his wife: Erleen Snyder, Leesburg, FL; sons: Wil lard T. (Debbie) Snyder, Hamilton, OH; James A. (Karen) Snyder, Fish ers, IN; daughter: Cyn thia A. (James) Walther, Aurora, IN; brothers: Kenneth Snyder, Cin cinnati, OH; Armand Snyder, Goshen, OH; 9 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. A Memorial Service will be held 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at the First Presby terian Church of Uma tilla with Reverend Bill Birdsall ofciating. On line condolences can be made at www.beyersfu neralhome.com. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. DEATH NOTICES Linda Kristeff Herman Linda Kristeff Her man, 54, of Umatilla, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Irene W. Kreft Irene W. Kreft, 76, of Leesburg, died on Sat urday, April 12, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. IN MEMORY implemented by the founders of the re ser vice, which are still in place today. In line with the ded ications of horsedrawn re trucks in the early 19th centu ry, reghters at each location unveiled the trucks new name, shined its tires and pushed it back into the rehouse with the help of dignitaries and members of the com munity. Engine 71 in Lees burg recently was dedi cated and named Fran, while Engine 54 in Lady Lake was dubbed Brandy and Engine 39 in Sorrento was dedi cated as Eleanor. Lake County Com mission members Welton Cadwell and Leslie Campione were in attendance at Sta tions 54 and 39, respec tively, to support the new tradition. At Sta tion 39, more than two dozen people came out to celebrate as Pastor Earl Wright of the Sor rento Christian Center blessed the engine. Its a great time for the Fire Rescue Divi sion and for the com munity as we dedi cated three new re rescue engines, said Lake County Pub lic Safety Department Chief John Jolliff. The three new trucks will serve their respective communities for many years to come. TRUCKS FROM PAGE A3 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A fatal Lake County crash on County Road 42 killed a baby girl and injured two other peo ple, according to Florida High way Patrol. The FHP police report said the child less than a year old was a passenger in a 1994 Toy ota Tacoma driven by Kimberly Kinggard, 40, of DeLand. Troopers said Kinggard was driving westbound on County Road 42 around 7:08 p.m. Sat urday, when the car swerved to the right onto the paved shoul der. FHP said Kinggard over-cor rected her steering and rotated counter-clockwise into the east bound lanes of CR 42, where the front of the Toyota hit the right side of a 2001 Chevy pick up driven by Jesus G. Vela, 65, of Eustis. The baby girl was pro nounced dead at Florida Hos pital DeLand, while the infants name was not released, pending notication of her family. King gard was taken to Orlando Re gional Medical Center in critical condition. Vela was transported to Florida Hospital DeLand in serious condition. FHP said alcohol was not a factor for Vela, but the results are still pending for Kinggard. FHP said the crash remains un der investigation. Baby dies in Lake County crash Apopka and the Upper Ocklawaha River Basin Optimize ood control, protect and enhance natural ecosystems and improve water quality in the upper St. Johns River Protect and restore the water quality and eco logical habitat of the Indian River Lagoon Utilize district resources to develop and co ordinate the protection and restoration of major springs Develop a framework for levee and water-con trol structure maintenance and restoration Identify and implement restoration and veg etation management projects on district-owned lands WATER FROM PAGE A3 County qualiers, providing an economic boost for the area that will continue to grow. The buzz that Im getting from senior ath letes who look for these types of competitions is that they are happy that Clermont is partici pating in the senior games, because theyll have a new venue for competitions, he said. And as we continue to add more games in the future, we will continue to attract more people here. Anyone over the age of 50 can sign up to com pete in the senior games for the following sports and dates: golf on April 15, a 5K race on May 4, archery on May 10, bowling on May 14-15 and bag toss and cycling, both on May 18. Venues include Waterfront Park, Revolution Off Road, Bowling Triangle and Epic Cycles. The location for golng has yet to be determined. Dates also will be scheduled for pickle ball, bil liards, bocce ball and croquet. Register online at www.lakeseniorgames.com. The Florida Inter national Senior Games & State Championships are scheduled for December 6-14 in Lee County. SENIORS FROM PAGE A3 Sumter Countys 911 communications cen ter processed a total of 19,868 calls in 2012 and 25,583 calls in 2013. The addition of the PSAP technology will assist in surpassing the NFPA (National Fire Protec tion Association) re quirements regarding 911 call center process es, Acosta said. We are committed to investing in indus try-leading infrastruc ture and technology that not only supports, but elevates our stateof-the-art medical transportation services throughout the coun try, Rural/Metros Chief Relations Ofcer John P. Karolzak said. Rural/Metro operates more than 1,600 am bulances and employs 10,000 eld providers in about 700 communities in 21 states. UPGRADE FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press BROOKSVILLE Au thorities have suspend ed their ground search for a pilot whose small plane went missing at it ew from north Florida to the Tampa Bay area. Theodore Weiss of Zephyrhills was ying a xed-wing, single-en gine Sonex two-seat er with white and green stripes. The Marion County Sheriffs ofce says Weiss left the Dun nellon Airport on April 5, bound for Zephyrhills. Weiss last known co ordinates were over the dense Withlacoochee State Forest. On Satur day, Hernando County Sheriffs Ofce spokes woman Denise Moloney said a ground search in volving multiple law en forcement agencies was being suspended after failing to nd Weiss. Moloney says air searches for Weiss plane will continue. Authorities suspend search for missing pilot

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient PETER LEONARD Associated Press DONETSK, Ukraine Turning to force to try to restore its author ity in the vital industrial east, Ukraines govern ment announced Sun day it was sending in troops to try to quash an increasingly bra zen pro-Russian insur gency, despite repeat ed warnings from the Kremlin. Accusing Moscow of fomenting the unrest, Ukrainian President Oleksandr Turchynov said in a televised ad dress that such a largescale anti-terrorist op eration would ensure Russia did not repeat the Crimean scenario in Ukraines east. Turchy nov pledged to offer amnesty to anyone sur rendering their weap ons by Monday morn ing. Reliance on the mil itary is a response that hints at concerns over the reliability of the po lice, who have often proven unable or un willing to repel pro-Rus sian gunmen and other Moscow loyalists from seizing key state facili ties. With tens of thou sands of Russian troops massed along Ukraines eastern border, there are fears that Moscow might use unrest in the mainly Russian-speak ing region as a pretext for an invasion. Speaking late Sunday on Russian state televi sion, ousted president Viktor Yanukovych ac cused the CIA of being behind the new govern ments decision to turn to force, a claim the CIA denied as completely false. Yanukovych claimed that CIA director John Brennan met with Ukraines new leader ship and in fact sanc tioned the use of weap ons and provoked bloodshed. CIA spokesman Dean Boyd said that while the agency doesnt com ment on Brennans trav el itinerary, the claim that director Brennan encouraged Ukrainian authorities to conduct tactical operations in side Ukraine is com pletely false. Ukraine now has one foot into a civil war, Yanukovych declared, anked by his former prosecutor general and interior minister, the two associates most de spised by the protest ers whose monthslong demonstrations were ignited by Yanukovychs decision to back away from closer relations with the European Union and turn toward Russia. Yanukovych ed to Russia in February, saying he feared for his life. Earlier Sunday, Ukrainian special forces exchanged gunre with a pro-Russia militia outside the eastern city of Slovyansk the rst reported gunbattle in the east, where armed pro-Russian men have seized a number of key government build ings to press their de mands for referendums on autonomy and pos sible annexation by Russia, following the pattern set by the vote in Crimea last month. A Ukrainian security of cer was killed and at least two others wound ed. Calling such attacks a Russian aggression, Interior Minister Arsen Avakov said in a Face book post Sunday that special forces of up to 12,000 people will be drawn from volunteers who will be tasked with resisting attacks from pro-Russian forces in their local areas. Russias Foreign Min istry was quick to dis miss Turchynovs de cree as criminal and accused Ukrainian of cials of using radical neo-Nazi forces. Unrest has spread to several municipalities in eastern Ukraine, in cluding the major in dustrial city of Donetsk, which has a large Rus sian-speaking pop ulation and was the support base for Ya nukovych. Ethnic Rus sians in Ukraines east widely fear that the new pro-Western Ukrainian government will sup press them. Several town halls and other government buildings were occu pied by crowds of sup porters of the refer endum drive to give eastern regions wide powers of autonomy. A police station and the local security ser vices headquarters in Slovyansk, some 90 miles west of the Rus sian border, were the latest to fall to storming Saturday by well-armed and effectively coordi nated militia. Both were still in the hands of gunmen Sun day, despite a govern ment drive to retake them. The police station was surrounded by a reinforced line of bar ricades, but there was a less noticeable pres ence of the automatic rie-toting pro-Russian gunmen of the day be fore. Hundreds of resi dents beyond the bar ricades sang songs and shouted in support of the men seizing the building. The only conrmed casualties in Slovyansk were among Ukrainian government forces. Turchynov said a Se curity Service captain was killed and two col onels were wounded in Sundays gun battle. An Associated Press re porter saw a bullet-rid den SUV on the side of the road and a pool of blood by the front pas senger seat door, where the clash was reported to have occurred. Turchynov said pro-Russia militiamen were responsible for the attack. Kiev government to deploy troops in Ukraines east OLGA IVASHCHENKO / AP Pro-Russia supporters beat a pro-Western activist who lies on the stairs during a pro-Russian rally in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Sunday. Two rival rallies in Kharkiv turned violent after a group of pro-Russian protesters followed several pro-Ukrainian activists, beating them with baseball bats and sticks.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hen Afghans went to the polls last week to elect a new president, Afghan so cial media enthusiasts sent out some incredible photos of wom en voters. The long, snaking lines of women in burkas, holding up sheets of plastic for protection from freezing rain, were a stun ning repudiation of Taliban mi sogyny and violence. My favor ite photo, tweeted by an Afghan journalist named Sha Shari, showed an elderly, black-draped lady in a wheelchair, holding up a forenger stained with indeli ble ink, saying: I voted because women cant expect things to im prove if they dont vote. Cynics take note: These elec tions matter, not just for Afghan women but for the future of the country. And they show why the United States should maintain strong economic and security ties to Kabul. I know youve seen those pur ple ngers before, in Iraq, where 2005 elections were supposed to pave the way to democracy but led to more sectarian violence. Elections havent turned out well in Egypt, either. I also know this election isnt over preliminary results wont be known until the end of April and, if none of the eight candi dates gets more than 50 percent of the votes, there will be a run off. Moreover, the Taliban remain a threat especially because neighboring Pakistan gives them safe haven. But this election proved that Afghanistan is not the hopeless case many Americans believe it to be. First, the vote showed that most Afghans want change by ballot, not the bullet meaning they want better government, better security, and less corruption. This was Afghanistans third presiden tial election, and the last, in 2009, was marked by such fraud that it disillusioned many voters. Yet this time election observers say the level of fraud was way down, and voter turnout was double that of 2009, including 60 percent of el igible voters. So many voted that several polling places ran out of ballots, and the numbers would have been even higher had there not been Taliban intimidation in some rural areas. The desire for change is so gi gantic, says the Carnegie En dowments Sarah Chayes, an Af ghan expert who lived for years in Kandahar and advised top U.S. commanders. It was remarkable how people really turned out. Second, This vote was a strong No to the Taliban, and a reaction to the violence, according to the well-known Afghan human-rights activist Sima Samar, whom I reached by phone in Kabul. Vot ers disregarded Taliban demands that they stay home. As Ive heard repeatedly on trips to Afghanistan, even from village elders who share the same Pashtun ethnic background as the Taliban, Afghans dont want a return of harsh Taliban rule. Nor do most Afghans agree with the militants ban on girls education. Will the Taliban, or their Pa kistani backers, heed the vot ers wishes? Some of the Taliban might get the message, says Sa mar. And Pakistan should under stand that the Afghan people are not the same as in 1992. She was referring to the period after the Soviets quit Afghanistan, when Pa kistan helped bring the Taliban to power in an effort to strengthen its hand against archenemy India. Afghans today are more sensi tive to Pakistani interference and have many more contacts with the outside world. Third, the election indicated that most Afghans want a con tinued alliance with the West. All the leading candidates pledged to sign a bilateral security agree ment (BSA) with the United States that would permit a small force of around 10,000 troops to stay on to train Afghans. (Current President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign the accord, which leads many Af ghans to believe he wants a dan gerous deal with the Taliban.) The voters made clear that the BSA has real importance to them. This election is a strong sign of peoples desire for a link to the international community, Samar says. Finally, the election seems to be a repudiation of the ram pant corruption of Karzais ad ministration. His favored candi date, Zalmay Rasoul, appears to be running third, behind former World Bank economist Ashraf Ghani and the former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah. The next president may not be able to shake the venal political culture that has grown up over the past decade, fed by billions in foreign aid. But Afghan voters have shown they are far more po litically aware than in the past. They dont want their country to once more become a safe hav en for Islamist extremists who threaten them and the West. Nor do they want to be part of Paki stans proxy war with India. If they see (leaders) they can identi fy with and see less predatory be havior, there is nothing Pakistan can throw at them they couldnt turn around, says Chayes. Can Ghani or Abdullah deliver? Will President Obama stay com mitted after 2014? We dont know yet. But the Afghan elections demonstrate why its worth giv ing Kabul another chance. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and edi torial-board member for the Philadel phia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Why Afghan elections matter T he United States is irked that Iran has chosen as its representative to the United Nations a diplomat who apparently was involved with a student group that seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979. The embas sy takeover, a violation of international law that led to the 444-day captivity of 52 Amer ican hostages, contributed to hostility be tween the two countries that only recently has begun to abate. But the Obama administration is making a mistake in publicly labeling as not viable the posting to the United Nations of Hamid Aboutalebi, an experienced diplomat aligned with Irans reformist President Hassan Rou hani. The ominous implication is that the State Department would deny Aboutalebi a visa necessary to enter this country. Aboutalebi was 22 years old when he served as an interpreter for the students who had seized the embassy out of pent-up anger over long-standing U.S. support for the autocratic shah of Iran. Its not unknown for youthful rad icals to mature into middle-age statesmen. As a young leftist in 1970s West Germany, Josch ka Fischer took part in violent street demon strations and was photographed attacking a policeman. Decades later, he served as foreign minister of a united Germany. But even if the Aboutalebi of today were an unreconstructed anti-American, the United States would be wrong to try to prevent him from taking up a position at the United Na tions. Having agreed to serve as host country of the international organization, the Unit ed States shouldnt interfere in decisions by member states about their representation in that body any more than it should block for eign leaders it objects to from addressing the U.N. (Palestine Liberation Organization lead er Yasser Arafat, Cuban President Fidel Castro and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadine jad are among those who have spoken at the organizations New York headquarters.) Finally, the administrations xation on Aboutalebi may be unintentionally under mining efforts by several nations to induce Iran to abandon efforts to produce nucle ar weapons. Some of the U.S. senators who approved a bill this week purporting to bar Aboutalebi from entering this country also support additional sanctions legislation that the administration believes would derail the current talks with Iran. The more the admin istration trumpets its opposition to Aboutale bi, the easier it will be for congressional crit ics to cite that grievance as a justication for new sanctions. The administration has registered its dis pleasure with Aboutalebis appointment. Now it should refocus on more important matters, including the nuclear negotiations. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE Irans U.N. envoy isnt a threat to our country Classic DOONESBURY 1972

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Pacers a game away from clinching East / B4 Staff Report In a game that saw all nine Lake-Sumter State College hurlers contribute by pitch ing an inning each by prior agreement, the visiting Lakehawks cruised to an 8-4 vic tory over Team Cana da. Shane Crouse (36) struck out two of the three batters he faced to earn the win. Team Canada struck rst with a two-out rally that in volved just two plays when Louis-Phil lippe Pelletier singled to shallow left-center and came in to score when Royce Ando lined a double deep down the left-eld line. But the lead was short-lived. SEE LSSC | B2 AL BEHRMAN / AP Cincinnati Reds Billy Hamilton gets a hit off Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Cesar Ramos in the third inning on Sunday in Cincinnati. JOE KAY AP Baseball Writer CINCINNATI Chris Heisey hit his rst grand slam and Devin Mesoraco homered and drove in career high-tying four runs as the Cincinnati Reds took advantage of Tampa Bays depleted pitching staff for a 12-4 victory on Sunday. The Reds best offensive showing of the season fea tured Mesoracos three-run ho mer, Joey Vottos two-run shot and Heiseys pinch-hit slam in the eighth. Jay Bruce doubled, walked four times and scored four runs. Zack Cozart got it going with a bases-loaded double off Ce sar Ramos (0-1), making his rst start of the season because of injuries. The Reds salvaged the nal game of their interleague se ries but remained in last place in the NL Central at 4-8. The hitters have been the biggest problem, tied for last in the ma jors heading into the game. The Reds had season highs in runs they hadnt scored more than six in any previous game Heisey hits slam, Mesoraco drives in four more as Reds defeat Rays 12-4 SEE RAYS | B2 Associated Press NEW YORK Mirza Teletovic scored a team-high 20 points off the bench, Joe John son and Mason Plumlee each added 17 and the Brooklyn Nets beat the Orlando Magic 97-88 Sunday night. Deron Williams also had 17 points, ve as sists and four steals for the Nets, whose vic tory gave them a two-game lead for the fth spot in the Eastern Conference playoff race over the idle Washington Wizards. Tobias Harris came off the bench to lead the Magic with 18 points, who have lost their last two games. KATHY KMONICEK / AP Brooklyn Nets Mason Plumlee (1) shoots as Orlando Magics ETwaun Moore (55) watches on Sunday in New York. PHOTOS BY DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Defending Masters champion Adam Scott helps Bubba Watson with his green jacket after winning the Masters golf tournament on Sunday in Augusta, Ga. Bubba Watson wins another green jacket at Augusta DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer AUGUSTA, Ga. Bubba Watsons second Masters title was noth ing like the green jacket he won two years ago. The only daring shot Watson hit was one he really didnt need. The wild swing in momen tum came on the front nine, not the back nine of Augusta National. And the sweetest differ ence of all Sunday was seeing his 2-year-old son walk toward him on the edge of the 18th green after his threeshot victory over Jordan Spieth. Watson turned in an other masterpiece and joined an elusive group as the 17th player to win the Masters more than once. He turned a two-shot decit into a two-shot lead on the nal two holes of the front nine, then kept Spieth, 20, and everyone else at safe dis tance the rest of the way. Watson closed with a 3-under 69 to beat a pair of Masters rookies in Spieth and Jonas Blixt of Sweden. Two years ago, when he hit that wild hook out of the trees on the 10th hole to win in a playoff, his wife and newly ad opted son were watch ing at home in Florida. This time, young Ca leb was decked out in a green-and-white striped Masters shirt and green tennis shoes as he wad dled over to his father. This ones a lot differ ent, Watson said. The rst one, for me, it was almost like I lucked into it. After high-ving the crowd on his way to sign his card, Watson re turned to Butler Cabin to take back that green jacket he slipped on Adam Scott a year ago. After giving it away Bubba Watson carries his son Caleb after winning the Masters golf tournament. SEE MASTERS | B2 Teletovic scores 20 as Nets beat Magic SEE MAGIC | B2 Sloppy defense helps LSSC down Team Canada 8-4

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Bojangles Southern 500 Results Saturday At Darlington Raceway Darlington, S.C. Lap length: 1.366 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (1) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 374 laps, 148.9 rat ing, 48 points. 2. (15) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 374, 120, 43. 3. (26) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 374, 101.2, 42. 4. (25) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 374, 114.2, 41. 5. (19) Greg Bife, Ford, 374, 90, 40. 6. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 374, 104.9, 38. 7. (9) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 374, 120.2, 38. 8. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 374, 81.7, 36. 9. (23) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 374, 74.8, 35. 10. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 374, 95.7, 34. 11. (20) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 374, 77.6, 33. 12. (16) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 374, 85.2, 32. 13. (21) Carl Edwards, Ford, 374, 69.2, 31. 14. (4) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 374, 71, 30. 15. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 374, 72, 29. 16. (6) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 374, 82.4, 28. 17. (5) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 374, 100.6, 28. 18. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 374, 63.1, 26. 19. (10) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 374, 92.4, 26. 20. (28) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 374, 56.4, 24. 21. (29) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 374, 56.3, 23. 22. (33) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 374, 54.5, 22. 23. (24) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 372, 61, 21. 24. (3) Aric Almirola, Ford, 372, 67.9, 20. 25. (35) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 372, 46.2, 0. 26. (14) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 371, 80.6, 19. 27. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 371, 70.9, 17. 28. (27) David Gilliland, Ford, 370, 43.9, 16. 29. (34) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 369, 39.6, 15. 30. (38) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 369, 40.7, 14. 31. (13) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 368, 75, 13. 32. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 367, 44.5, 13. 33. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 367, 32.9, 11. 34. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 366, 29.8, 0. 35. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, front hub, 359, 84.5, 10. 36. (37) David Stremme, Chevrolet, brakes, 326, 34.1, 8. 37. (22) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 323, 87, 8. 38. (42) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 301, 31.5, 6. 39. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, overheating, 289, 42.3, 5. 40. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 274, 25, 4. 41. (11) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 270, 60.8, 3. 42. (30) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, accident, 101, 44.6, 2. 43. (36) Dave Blaney, Ford, brakes, 65, 28, 1. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB y-Toronto 47 33 .588 x-Brooklyn 43 36 .544 3 New York 34 45 .430 12 Boston 25 55 .313 22 Philadelphia 17 63 .213 30 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 54 26 .675 x-Washington 42 38 .525 12 x-Charlotte 41 39 .513 13 x-Atlanta 37 43 .463 17 Orlando 23 56 .291 30 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 55 26 .679 x-Chicago 47 32 .595 7 Cleveland 32 49 .395 23 Detroit 29 52 .358 26 Milwaukee 15 65 .188 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB z-San Antonio 62 18 .775 x-Houston 53 27 .663 9 x-Dallas 49 32 .605 13 Memphis 47 32 .595 14 New Orleans 32 48 .400 30 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 58 22 .725 x-Portland 52 28 .650 6 Minnesota 40 39 .506 17 Denver 36 44 .450 22 Utah 24 56 .300 34 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 56 24 .700 x-Golden State 49 30 .620 6 Phoenix 47 33 .588 9 Sacramento 27 53 .338 29 L.A. Lakers 25 54 .316 30 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers 117, Sacramento 101 Washington 104, Milwaukee 91 Charlotte 111, Philadelphia 105 Boston 111, Cleveland 99 Atlanta 98, Miami 85 Houston 111, New Orleans 104 Dallas 101, Phoenix 98 Denver 101, Utah 94 Sundays Games Indiana 102, Oklahoma City 97 Toronto 116, Detroit 107 Brooklyn 87, Orlando 88 Chicago at New York, late Golden State at Portland, late Minnesota at Sacramento, late Memphis at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Miami at Washington, 7 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games New York at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 82 54 19 9 117 261 177 x-Tampa Bay 82 46 27 9 101 240 215 x-Montreal 82 46 28 8 100 215 204 x-Detroit 82 39 28 15 93 222 230 Ottawa 81 36 31 14 86 233 263 Toronto 82 38 36 8 84 231 256 Florida 82 29 45 8 66 196 268 Buffalo 81 21 51 9 51 154 244 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 81 51 24 6 108 247 204 x-N.Y. Rangers 82 45 31 6 96 218 193 x-Philadelphia 82 42 30 10 94 236 235 x-Columbus 82 43 32 7 93 231 216 Washington 82 38 30 14 90 235 240 New Jersey 82 35 29 18 88 197 208 Carolina 82 36 35 11 83 207 230 N.Y. Islanders 81 33 37 11 77 221 264 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Colorado 81 52 22 7 111 248 217 x-St. Louis 82 52 23 7 111 248 191 x-Chicago 82 46 21 15 107 267 220 x-Minnesota 81 43 26 12 98 204 199 x-Dallas 81 40 30 11 91 234 226 Nashville 81 37 32 12 86 209 239 Winnipeg 82 37 35 10 84 227 237 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Anaheim 81 53 20 8 114 263 207 x-San Jose 82 51 22 9 111 249 200 x-Los Angeles 82 46 28 8 100 206 174 Phoenix 81 36 30 15 87 214 230 Vancouver 81 35 35 11 81 191 222 Calgary 81 35 39 7 77 208 236 Edmonton 82 29 44 9 67 203 270 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Saturdays Games Anaheim 4, Los Angeles 3, SO Boston 4, Buffalo 1 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Montreal 1, N.Y. Rangers 0, OT Ottawa 1, Toronto 0 Columbus 3, Florida 2 Nashville 7, Chicago 5 San Jose 3, Phoenix 2 Edmonton 5, Vancouver 2 Sundays Games Carolina 6, Philadelphia 5, SO Tampa Bay 1, Washington 0, SO Detroit 3, St. Louis 0 New Jersey 3, Boston 2 N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Todays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games No games scheduled WTA Claro Open Colsanitas Results Sunday At Club Campestre el Rancho Bogota, Colombia Purse: $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Caroline Garcia (5), France, def. Jelena Jankovic (1), Serbia, 6-3, 6-4. ATP World Tour Grand Prix Hassan II Results Sunday At Complexe Sportif al Amal Casablanca, Morocco Purse: $665,600 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (8), Spain, def. Marcel Gra nollers (4), Spain, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3. ATP World Tour U.S. Mens Clay Court Championships Results Sunday At River Oaks Country Club Houston Purse: $539,730 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Fernando Verdasco (4), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (3), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Optioned SS Justin Sellers to Columbus (IL). Reinstated 3B Lonnie Chisenhall from paternity leave. LOS ANGELES ANGELS Transferred LHP Brian Moran to the 60-day DL. Optioned RHPs Dane De La Rosa and Matt Shoemaker to Salt Lake (PCL). Se lected the contract of RHP Yoslan Herrera from Salt Lake. Recalled LHP Jose Alvarez from Salt Lake. TAMPA BAY RAYS Optioned OF Kevin Kiermaier to Durham (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Erik Be dard from Durham. Placed RHP Alex Cobb on the 15day DL. Recalled LHP Jeff Beliveau from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS Placed 3B Adrian Beltre on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 9. National League CHICAGO CUBS Optioned LHP Chris Rusin to Iowa (PCL). Recalled RHP Blake Parker from Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES Optioned INF Charlie Culber son to Colorado Springs (PCL). Reinstated RHP Tyler Chatwood from the 15-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS Placed RHP Brandon Kint zler on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 9. Recalled RHP Rob Wooten from Nashville (PCL). NEW YORK METS Sent OF Chris Young to Las Ve gas (PCL) for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Assigned RHP Brad Lincoln outright to Lehigh Valley (PCL). Recalled RHP Jonathan Pettibone and RHP Luis Garcia from Lehigh Valley. Optioned RHP Justin De Fratus to Le high Valley. ST. LOUIS CARDIONALS Sent 2B Mark Ellis to Memphis (PCL) for a rehab assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Placed 3B Ryan Zim merman on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Zach Wal ters from Syracuse (IL). HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS Recalled Fs Craig Cunningham, Justin Florek, Alexander Khokhlachev and Matt Lind blad from Providence (AHL) on an emergency basis. BUFFALO SABRES Called up G Andrey Makarov, F Nicolas Deslauriers and D Mark Pysyk from Roch ester (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS Returned Fs Vincent Tro check, Quinton Howden and Drew Shore to San Antonio (AHL). American Hockey League AHL Suspended Hartford LW Micheal Haley and Portland LW Darian Dziurzynski three games and Manchester D Andrew Bodnarchuk one game. WORCESTER SHARKS Assigned F Matt Nieto to Ontario (ECHL). ECHL CINCINNATI CYCLONES Released F Colin Mulvey. FORT WAYNE KOMETS Released D Steven Sha manski from an amateur tryout agreement. SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Released F Da vid Gerths. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 9 p.m. FS1 Lightweights, Jose Arambula (6-0-0) vs. David Diaz (4-0-1); featherweights, Julian Ramirez (10-0-0) vs. Carlos Rodriguez (22-13-3); junior lightweights, Ronny Rios (22-0-0) vs. Andrew Cancio (15-2-2), at Chicago MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Atlanta at Philadelphia 10 p.m. ESPN Oakland at L.A. Angels NBA 7 p.m. SUN Miami at Washington 8 p.m. FS-Florida Orlando at Chicago WNBA 8 p.m. ESPN2 Draft, at Uncasville, Conn. 9 p.m. ESPNU Draft, at Uncasville, Conn. Masters Scores Sunday At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Bubba Watson 69-68-74-69 Jonas Blixt 70-71-71-71 Jordan Spieth 71-70-70-72 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76-66-71 Rickie Fowler 71-75-67-73 Matt Kuchar 73-71-68-74 Lee Westwood 73-71-70-73 Bernhard Langer 72-74-73-69 Rory McIlroy 71-77-71-69 Jimmy Walker 70-72-76-70 John Senden 72-68-75-73 Kevin Stadler 70-73-72-73 Thomas Bjorn 73-68-73-74 Stewart Cink 73-72-76-68 Jamie Donaldson 73-70-76-70 Henrik Stenson 73-72-74-70 Chris Kirk 75-72-71-72 Adam Scott 69-72-76-72 Justin Rose 76-70-69-74 Jim Furyk 74-68-72-75 Bill Haas 68-78-74-70 Jason Day 75-73-70-72 Ian Poulter 76-70-70-74 Fred Couples 71-71-73-75 Louis Oosthuizen 69-75-75-72 Joost Luiten 75-73-77-67 Steven Bowditch 74-72-74-72 Hunter Mahan 74-72-74-72 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 75-69-74-74 Gary Woodland 70-77-69-76 Martin Kaymer 75-72-73-73 Russell Henley 73-70-75-75 Steve Stricker 72-73-73-75 Stephen Gallacher 71-72-81-70 K.J. Choi 70-75-78-71 Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74-73-73 Brandt Snedeker 70-74-80-71 Brendon de Jonge 74-72-76-73 Thongchai Jaidee 73-74-75-73 Billy Horschel 75-72-75-73 Vijay Singh 75-71-74-75 Lucas Glover 75-69-77-75 Kevin Streelman 72-71-74-79 Mike Weir 73-72-79-73 Sandy Lyle 76-72-76-73 Nick Watney 72-75-76-74 Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72-76-75 Darren Clarke 74-74-73-76 a-Oliver Goss 76-71-76-75 LSSC scored two runs in the fth and three each in the sixth and seventh innings to take a lead they would never surrender. Tanner Elsbernd led off the fth with a dou ble to right and came around to score on a long base hit to left center by third base man Jack Curtis. After Curtis was cut down stealing, Team Canada pitcher Kristjan Storrie lost his control. Tanner Barnhard was hit by a pitch and advanced to second on Chris Blan tons sacrice bunt and to third when Storrie uncorked a wild pitch. After Tanner Long drew a walk, Barnhard scored the innings second run when Stor rie unleashed another wild throw. The Lakehawks struck again in the sixth, managing three runs on a single hit when Storrie lost con trol again. Austin Sim mons was rst to be hit and went to sec ond on Dakota Hig dons ineld hit. Stor ries wild pitch allowed Simmons to score, with Higdon advanc ing to third. Elsber nd drew another walk and promptly stole second. When Storrie unleashed yet anoth er wild pitch, Higdon scored and Elsber nd went to third. Cur tis reached on a walk and the Canadians sent Storrie back to the bench. Barnhard grounded into a dou ble play, scoring Els bernd and mercifully ending the inning. LSSCs scoring in the seventh almost mir rored the sixth. A base hit by Taylor Saris, a long triple to left cen ter by Simmons and an assortment of mis takes and wildness on the part of Team Can ada accounted for the nal Lakehawks runs of the game. Although the Cana dians struck for two runs in the eighth and another in the ninth, the outcome was nev er in doubt. LSSC returns to ac tion today, hosting Daytona State College. Game time is 3 p.m. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 and hits with 13. Left-hander Tony Cingrani (1-1) gave up ve hits in 6 1-3 in nings. Ben Zobrist homered from both sides of the plate, hit ting two-run shots off Cingrani and righthander Nick Christiani. The Rays are 3-3 on a trip that has been tough on their rotation. Matt Moore went on the dis abled list with a sore el bow on Tuesday, and Alex Cobb joined him Sunday with a strained oblique. Also, reliev er Joel Peralta was sick, leaving him unavailable. The injuries affect ed the nal game of the series. Ramos, who had made four relief ap pearances this season, started in Moores place and helped the Reds offense get unstuck. Cincinnati came into the game tied with San Diego for fewest runs in the majors with 28. Ramos walked the bases loaded in the second, and Cozart hit a ground-rule double for his third hit of the season and a 2-0 lead. Vottos second homer of the series sparked a 10-batter, ve-run third inning. Ramos left af ter throwing 45 pitch es. Brandon Gomes re lieved and gave up the homer. Mesoraco add ed a sacrice y in the fth. The catcher opened the season on the disabled list with a strained oblique. In four games the past week, he went 7 for 14 with three doubles, two homers and six RBIs. Heisey connected in the eighth off Josh Lu eke for his seventh ca reer pinch-hit homer. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 last year, I wanted it back, Watson said. I told Adam we could just swap it back and forth every year. Spieth, trying to be come the youngest Masters champion, could only watch from the side of the green. He dazzled the mas sive crowd early by hol ing out for birdie from the front bunker on No. 4, and making back-toback birdies to build a two-shot lead through seven holes. Bidding to become the rst play er in 35 years to win a green jacket in his rst try, Spieth looked to be well on his way. But he three-putted for bogey on No. 8 the rst 6 on his card all week as Watson got up-and-down for bird ie to tie for the lead. Spi eth then made a rook ie mistake, leaving his approach below the agstick on No. 9 and watching it roll back into the fairway, setting up another bogey and two-shot swing. Whatever prayer he had might have ended at Amen Corner. His tee shot on No. 12 found Raes Creek. He missed a short birdie at tempt on the 13th. Watson was too pow erful, too experienced, too tough to beat. Spi eth closed with six pars for a 72 and tied for sec ond with Blixt, who nev er went away but never really threatened. Blixt shot a 71. That was fun, but at the same time, it hurts right now, Spieth said. I wanted to get in con tention on the back nine Sunday, but didnt come out on top. Watson nished at 8-under 280 and goes to a career-best No. 4 in the world. Miguel Angel Jimenez, the 50-year-old wonder from Spain, shot 71 and nished alone in fourth. Matt Kuchar lost a share of the lead with a fourputt double bogey on the fourth hole and nev er challenged again. He closed with a 74 and tied for fth with Rickie Fowler (73). This was nine holes of theater everyone ex pected out of Sunday at Augusta National except it was the front nine. Nine players were separated by three shots at the start of the nal round only for this to turn into a two-man show. After trading pars on the opening hole, ei ther Watson or Spieth sometimes both made birdie or bogey over the next nine holes. They matched birdies on the par-3 fourth hole when Spieth holed out from the front bunker and Watson hit his tee shot into 4 feet. Spieth led by as many as two shots for most of the front nine, and his spec tacular overshadowed a steady hand from Wat son. Two holes to close out the back nine changed everything. Amen Cor ner swung the Masters in Watsons favor for good. About the only ex citement came on the par-5 15th hole, when Watson had a threeshot lead. He hit his tee shot well left, blocked by a few pine trees. In stead of laying up safe ly in front of the water, he hit through the trees with a shot that just cleared the false front of the green and went just over the back. All he got was a par. Over the nal hour, thats all he really needed. It was his second win this year, and the vic tory puts Watson at the top of the Ryder Cup standings. He was guid ed all week by a sim ple game plan of hitting fairways and greens, and he was calmed by knowing that regardless of how it turned out, he still had a green jacket. Now he has two of them. MASTERS FROM PAGE B1 CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Bubba Watson, carrying his son Caleb, is kissed by his wife Angie after winning the Masters on Sunday in Augusta, Ga. Trailing 59-55 with 6:59 remaining in the third quarter, Brook lyn went on an 13-0 run, highlighted by ve points from Teletovic, to take a 70-59 lead with 3:23 left in the quarter. Ronnie Price then hit a 3-pointer to end Orlan dos scoring drought. Brooklyn coach Jason Kidd pulled most of his regulars after the end of the third, leading 7970. But Kidd was then forced to bring most of them back after Orlan do scored six straight points to pull to 87-81 with 5:27 remaining. Kidd called a timeout soon after and the Nets responded with a 10-3 run to extend the lead to 97-84 with 1:07 to go. Orlando led through out most of the rst half, shooting 54 per cent from the oor, good enough for a 4946 lead at halftime. Brooklyn C Brook Lo pez, who broke his foot earlier this season, greet ed fans on Fan Appreci ation Night. Lopez, who fractured the fth meta tarsal bone in his right foot during a game on Dec. 20 at Philalde phia, watched from the bench. Lopez also had a procedure on March 3 to repair a torn tendon and tighten the ligaments in his left ankle. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Tampa Bay 7 6 .538 6-4 L-1 4-3 3-3 Toronto 7 6 .538 5-5 W-1 3-3 4-3 New York 6 6 .500 6-4 W-1 3-3 3-3 Baltimore 5 7 .417 1 1 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-3 Boston 5 7 .417 1 1 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-3 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 6 4 .600 6-4 L-1 4-1 2-3 Chicago 6 6 .500 1 4-6 L-1 4-2 2-4 Cleveland 6 6 .500 1 5-5 W-1 3-3 3-3 Minnesota 6 6 .500 1 6-4 W-3 3-3 3-3 Kansas City 4 7 .364 2 2 4-6 L-3 4-2 0-5 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Oakland 8 4 .667 7-3 W-2 3-3 5-1 Seattle 6 5 .545 1 5-5 L-2 2-3 4-2 Los Angeles 6 6 .500 2 6-4 W-1 2-4 4-2 Texas 6 6 .500 2 5-5 W-1 4-2 2-4 Houston 5 8 .385 3 2 3-7 L-1 3-4 2-4 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 8 4 .667 7-3 W-3 4-2 4-2 Washington 7 5 .583 1 5-5 L-3 4-2 3-3 Philadelphia 6 6 .500 2 1 5-5 W-3 3-3 3-3 New York 5 6 .455 2 1 5-5 W-1 2-4 3-2 Miami 5 8 .385 3 2 3-7 L-7 5-2 0-6 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 10 2 .833 9-1 W-9 4-2 6-0 St. Louis 7 5 .583 3 6-4 W-2 4-2 3-3 Pittsburgh 6 6 .500 4 1 4-6 L-3 4-2 2-4 Chicago 4 8 .333 6 3 4-6 L-2 2-4 2-4 Cincinnati 4 8 .333 6 3 3-7 W-1 2-4 2-4 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 8 4 .667 6-4 W-2 2-3 6-1 San Francisco 8 5 .615 6-4 W-1 3-3 5-2 Colorado 6 7 .462 2 1 5-5 L-1 4-2 2-5 San Diego 5 7 .417 3 2 4-6 W-1 3-3 2-4 Arizona 4 10 .286 5 4 3-7 L-2 1-7 3-3 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 7, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 6 Minnesota 7, Kansas City 1 Baltimore 2, Toronto 1, 12 innings Houston 6, Texas 5, 10 innings Detroit 6, San Diego 2 N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Angels 6, 13 innings Oakland 3, Seattle 1 SATURDAYS GAMES Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 1, San Francisco 0 Philadelphia 5, Miami 4, 10 innings Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 6, Washington 3 L.A. Dodgers 8, Arizona 5 Detroit 6, San Diego 2 N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Angels 6, 13 innings SUNDAYS GAMES Cincinnati 12, Tampa Bay 4 Toronto 11, Baltimore 3 Minnesota 4, Kansas City 3 Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 3 Texas 1, Houston 0 L.A. Angels 14, N.Y. Mets 2 San Diego 5, Detroit 1 Oakland 3, Seattle 0 Boston at N.Y. Yankees, late SUNDAYS GAMES Cincinnati 12, Tampa Bay 4 Philadelphia 4, Miami 3 Atlanta 10, Washington 2 Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 4 L.A. Angels 14, N.Y. Mets 2 San Francisco 5, Colorado 4, 10 innings San Diego 5, Detroit 1 L.A Dodgers at Arizona, late TOM MIHALEK / AP Philadelphia Phillies Tony Gwynn, Jr., left, is tagged out by Miami Marlins Jeff Mathis as he tries to score on Chase Utleys double on Sunday in Philadelphia. TODAYS GAMES Tampa Bay (Archer 1-0) at Baltimore (W.Chen 1-1), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Elias 0-1) at Texas (R.Ross 0-0), 8:05 p.m. Oakland (J.Chavez 0-0) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 0-2), 10:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Atlanta (E.Santana 1-0) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 0-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 0-0) at Miami (Undecided), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 2-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 0-1), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 0-2) at Arizona (Collmenter 0-0), 9:40 p.m. Colorado (Lyles 2-0) at San Diego (Stults 0-2), 10:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: AlRamirez, Chicago, .413; Kubel, Minnesota, .405; SPerez, Kansas City, .375; Ellsbury, New York, .372; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .367; Solarte, New York, .359; Eaton, Chicago, .354. RUNS: Eaton, Chicago, 14; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Bau tista, Toronto, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; Plouffe, Min nesota, 9; Abreu, Chicago, 8; Kinsler, Detroit, 8; Lowrie, Oakland, 8; Mauer, Minnesota, 8; Semien, Chicago, 8. RBI: Abreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Minnesota, 14; Moss, Oakland, 11; Ibanez, Los Angeles, 10; DavMur phy, Cleveland, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; 6 tied at 9. HITS: AlRamirez, Chicago, 19; MeCabrera, Toronto, 18; Eaton, Chicago, 17; Ellsbury, New York, 16; Kubel, Min nesota, 15; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 15; Plouffe, Minne sota, 15. DOUBLES: DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Solarte, New York, 6; ACabrera, Cleveland, 5; Colabello, Minnesota, 5; SPerez, Kansas City, 5; 10 tied at 4. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 29 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Abreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista, Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; Dozier, Minnesota, 4; 7 tied at 3. STOLEN BASES: Ellsbury, New York, 6; RDavis, Detroit, 5; Altuve, Houston, 4; Andrus, Texas, 4; Dozier, Minne sota, 3; Kipnis, Cleveland, 3; Morgan, Cleveland, 3; Al Ramirez, Chicago, 3; Rios, Texas, 3; Villar, Houston, 3. PITCHING: Sale, Chicago, 3-0; FHernandez, Seattle, 3-0; 15 tied at 2. ERA: Darvish, Texas, 0.00; Feldman, Houston, 0.44; Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84; Gray, Oakland, 0.95; Scherzer, Detroit, 1.20; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.20. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 30; Price, Tampa Bay, 22; Sabathia, New York, 21; Lester, Boston, 20; Gray, Oakland, 19; Sale, Chicago, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18. SAVES: Santos, Toronto, 4; Axford, Cleveland, 4; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 4; Holland, Kansas City, 3; TomHunter, Balti more, 3; Rodney, Seattle, 3; 5 tied at 2. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .500; Utley, Philadelphia, .472; Bonifacio, Chicago, .435; Freeman, Atlanta, .425; DGordon, Los Angeles, .405; Pagan, San Francisco, .404; Cuddyer, Colorado, .386. RUNS: Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; CGomez, Milwaukee, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado, 10; LaRoche, Washington, 10; Prado, Arizona, 10; 11 tied at 9. RBI:Stanton, Miami, 16; Trumbo, Arizona, 15; CGonza lez, Colorado, 13; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 11; 7 tied at 10. HITS: Bonifacio, Chicago, 20; Blackmon, Colorado, 19; Pagan, San Francisco, 19; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 18; CGomez, Milwaukee, 18; Hechavarria, Miami, 18; Ar Ramirez, Milwaukee, 18; Uribe, Los Angeles, 18. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 7; Uribe, Los Angeles, 7; Hill, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 6; Adams, St. Louis, 5; ECabrera, San Diego, 5; BCrawford, San Francisco, 5; KDavis, Milwaukee, 5; Utley, Philadelphia, 5. TRIPLES: 31 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt, San Fran cisco, 5; Trumbo, Arizona, 5; CGomez, Milwaukee, 4; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 4; CGonzalez, Colorado, 4; Stanton, Miami, 4. STOLEN BASES: Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; DGordon, Los Angeles, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4; Owings, Arizona, 4; 8 tied at 3. PITCHING: Greinke, Los Angeles, 3-0; 20 tied at 2. ERA:Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; Harang, Atlanta, 0.71; GGonzalez, Washington, 0.75; Haren, Los Angeles, 0.75; JKelly, St. Louis, 0.79; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 0.96; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.15. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 28; Wainwright, St. Louis, 24; Fernandez, Miami, 23; Cueto, Cincinnati, 23; Cashner, San Diego, 22; Ryu, Los Angeles, 22; Gre inke, Los Angeles, 21; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 21. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 5; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 3; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 3; Street, San Diego, 3; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 3; AReed, Arizona, 3; Jansen, Los Angeles, 3. Reds 12, Rays 4 Tampa Bay Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Zobrist lf 5 2 2 4 BHmltn cf 5 1 1 0 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 Votto 1b 4 2 1 2 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 5 0 3 0 Lueke p 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 5 2 0 0 DeJess ph 0 0 0 0 Bruce rf 1 4 1 0 Longori 3b 5 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 1 1 0 Myers rf-cf 4 0 1 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 4 0 1 0 Heisey ph 1 1 1 4 YEscor ss 3 0 2 0 Partch p 0 0 0 0 Hanign c 3 0 0 0 Mesorc c 3 1 2 4 CRams p 1 0 0 0 Cozart ss 4 0 2 2 BGoms p 0 0 0 0 Cingrn p 3 0 1 0 Belivea p 0 0 0 0 Christn p 0 0 0 0 Guyer ph 1 0 0 0 Berndn ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Bedard p 0 0 0 0 Joyce ph-rf 1 0 0 0 SRdrgz 1b 1 1 0 0 Loney ph-1b 2 1 1 0 Totals 33 4 7 4 Totals 35 12 13 12 Tampa Bay 002 000 200 4 Cincinnati 025 010 04x 12 EMyers (1). DPTampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB Tampa Bay 8, Cincinnati 8. 2BLoney (3), Bruce (1), Cozart (2). HRZobrist 2 (3), Votto (2), Heisey (1), Mesoraco (2). SFMesoraco. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay C.Ramos L,0-1 2 3 4 4 3 1 B.Gomes 1 4 3 3 1 1 Beliveau 1 0 0 0 0 0 Bedard 2 2 1 0 1 0 H.Bell 1 3 2 2 1 1 Lueke 1 1 2 2 1 1 Cincinnati Cingrani W,1-1 6 1 / 3 5 2 2 3 6 Christiani 2 / 3 2 2 2 0 1 LeCure 1 0 0 0 1 0 Partch 1 0 0 0 2 1 C.Ramos pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. H.Bell pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBPby H.Bell (Votto). UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Tim Welke. T:41. A,307 (42,319). Phillies 4, Marlins 3 Miami Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Yelich lf 4 1 1 1 GwynJ cf 5 0 3 0 Hchvrr ss 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 2 3 1 GJones 1b 3 1 1 1 Howard 1b 4 1 1 1 McGeh 3b 4 0 2 1 Mayrry pr-1b 0 0 0 0 Ozuna cf 4 0 0 0 Byrd rf 4 0 1 0 JeBakr 2b 4 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 3 1 1 0 Mathis c 2 1 1 0 Nieves c 4 0 3 2 Sltlmch ph 1 0 0 0 Asche 3b 2 0 0 0 HAlvrz p 1 0 1 0 Kndrck p 2 0 1 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0 Rosnrg p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Revere ph 1 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 34 4 13 4 Miami 110 010 000 3 Philadelphia 001 020 01x 4 EH.Alvarez (2), Howard (3). DPMiami 1. LOBMi ami 7, Philadelphia 13. 2BMcGehee (5), Utley (6), Nieves (1). HRG.Jones (1), Utley (3), Howard (2). SBD.Brown (2). SH.Alvarez 2, K.Kendrick. IP H R ER BB SO Miami H.Alvarez 6 12 3 3 3 5 A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 2 2 M.Dunn L,0-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Philadelphia K.Kendrick 6 6 3 2 3 7 Rosenberg 1 0 0 0 0 2 Bastardo W,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Papelbon S,3-4 1 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Mark Ripperger; First, Gary Ced erstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Lance Barksdale. T:12. A,272 (43,651). Cardinals 6, Cubs 4 Chicago St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Bonifac 2b-cf 5 0 0 0 MCrpnt 3b 4 1 1 3 Ruggin cf-rf 3 1 1 0 Wong 2b 4 0 2 1 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 2 Hollidy lf 2 0 2 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0 MAdms 1b 4 0 0 0 BParkr p 0 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 1 2 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 Craig rf 3 2 1 0 SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 2 1 Lake lf 4 2 2 0 Bourjos cf 3 1 1 1 Olt 3b 3 0 2 1 Wacha p 2 0 0 0 Castillo c 3 0 1 1 Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 JoBakr pr 0 0 0 0 Jay ph 1 0 0 0 EJcksn p 2 0 0 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Sweeny ph 0 0 0 0 Barney ph 1 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Valuen 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 7 4 Totals 31 6 11 6 Chicago 200 100 001 4 St. Louis 030 100 02x 6 EOlt (1), M.Carpenter (1). DPChicago 2. LOBChi cago 6, St. Louis 7. 2BOlt (1), Jh.Peralta (1). 3B Lake (1), Bourjos (1). HRRizzo (2). SBM.Carpenter (1). CSRuggiano (1), Holliday (1). SWacha. SFM. Carpenter. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago E.Jackson L,0-1 6 8 4 4 3 5 Russell 1 0 0 0 1 0 B.Parker 2 / 3 3 2 2 0 0 W.Wright 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis Wacha W,2-0 6 1 / 3 5 3 3 1 8 Siegrist H,3 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Rosenthal S,4-4 1 2 1 1 0 1 HBPby Rosenthal (Castillo), by Wacha (Olt). UmpiresHome, Jerry Layne; First, Hunter Wendelst edt; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Mike Estabrook. T:10 (Rain delay: 0:46). A,135 (45,399). Blue Jays 11, Orioles 3 Toronto Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi MeCarr lf 6 2 2 0 Markks rf 4 1 1 0 Rasms cf 4 2 3 3 Clevngr 1b 1 0 0 0 Sierra rf 1 1 1 0 DYong lf 4 0 2 0 Bautist rf-cf 5 1 2 3 A.Jones cf 4 0 1 1 Lind dh 3 2 3 0 Lough cf 0 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 3 2 C.Davis 1b 3 1 1 1 Navarr c 5 0 0 1 Flahrty rf 0 0 0 0 Kratz pr-c 0 0 0 0 Wieters c 4 1 1 1 Izturis 2b 0 0 0 0 Pearce dh 4 0 1 0 Diaz ss 4 0 0 1 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 Lawrie 3b 5 1 2 1 Lmrdzz 2b 4 0 0 0 Goins ss-2b 4 1 1 0 Schoop 3b 4 0 1 0 Totals 41 11 17 11 Totals 36 3 8 3 Toronto 100 205 030 11 Baltimore 100 000 020 3 EBuehrle (1). LOBToronto 8, Baltimore 7. 2BMe. Cabrera (4), Rasmus (4), Encarnacion 2 (4), D.Young (2), Pearce (1), Schoop (4). HRRasmus (3), Bautista (5), Lawrie (2), C.Davis (1), Wieters (3). SDiaz. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Buehrle W,3-0 7 5 1 1 0 2 Rogers 2 3 2 2 0 2 Baltimore Jimenez L,0-3 5 1 / 3 10 5 5 2 3 Stinson 2 7 6 6 1 0 Matusz 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 R.Webb 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Buehrle (C.Davis). WPJimenez. UmpiresHome, Chris Conroy; First, Jordan Baker; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel. T:45. A,281 (45,971). Braves 10, Nationals 2 Washington Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 4 3 1 1 Harper cf 2 0 2 0 BUpton cf 5 1 2 0 Werth rf 4 0 0 0 Fremn 1b 3 2 2 4 LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 1 J.Upton lf 3 2 2 2 Dsmnd ss 4 0 0 0 Smmns ss 5 1 2 3 Frndsn lf-2b 4 1 2 0 Laird c 4 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 0 1 0 R.Pena 3b 4 0 1 0 Detwilr p 0 0 0 0 Pstrnck 2b 3 1 1 0 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 Harang p 3 0 0 0 Walters ph 1 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Loaton c 3 0 0 1 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0 GGnzlz p 1 0 0 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Souza lf 1 0 0 0 Schlssr p 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 35 10 11 10 Washington 000 010 001 2 Atlanta 330 000 04x 10 EDesmond (5), G.Gonzalez (1), Harper (2). LOB Washington 5, Atlanta 8. 2BHarper (1), Frandsen (1), Heyward (1), Freeman (4). 3BSimmons (1), Pas tornicky (1). HRLaRoche (3), Freeman (4), J.Upton (4), Simmons (1). SBHeyward (3). SG.Gonzalez. SFFreeman. IP H R ER BB SO Washington G.Gonzalez L,2-1 6 9 6 6 4 6 Detwiler 1 2 / 3 2 4 0 1 3 Blevins 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta Harang W,2-1 6 5 1 1 1 5 Thomas 1 0 0 0 0 1 J.Walden 1 0 0 0 1 2 Schlosser 1 1 1 1 0 3 HBPby G.Gonzalez (Freeman). UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Larry Vanover. T:56. A,919 (49,586). Brewers 4, Pirates 1 Pittsburgh Milwaukee ab r h bi ab r h bi Marte lf 4 1 1 0 CGomz cf 3 0 1 1 Tabata rf 4 0 1 0 Segura ss 4 0 1 0 AMcCt cf 3 0 1 1 Braun rf 4 1 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 3 1 1 1 NWalkr 2b 3 0 0 0 Overay 1b 3 1 1 0 TSnchz c 3 0 1 0 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 0 Ishikaw 1b 3 0 0 0 LSchfr lf 4 0 0 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 Maldnd c 2 1 1 0 Morton p 2 0 0 0 Lohse p 1 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 28 4 7 2 Pittsburgh 000 100 000 1 Milwaukee 001 102 00x 4 EMercer (2), T.Sanchez (2). DPPittsburgh 1. LOB Pittsburgh 3, Milwaukee 6. 2BBraun (1), Overbay (2), Maldonado (1). SBGennett (1). SLohse. SFA. McCutchen, C.Gomez. IP H R ER BB SO Pittsburgh Morton L,0-1 7 6 4 2 3 3 Ju.Wilson 1 1 0 0 0 1 Milwaukee Lohse W,2-1 8 2 / 3 4 1 1 0 9 W.Smith S,1-1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 HBPby Morton (Lohse). WPMorton. UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Bill Miller. T:11. A,152 (41,900). Twins 4, Royals 3 Kansas City Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 3 0 0 1 Dozier 2b 3 1 1 0 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0 Mauer 1b 4 0 2 0 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 1 Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 0 0 0 Colaell rf 2 0 0 0 AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Hrmnn lf 1 0 0 0 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 Kubel lf 2 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 3 1 1 0 Mstrnn pr-rf 1 1 0 0 L.Cain cf 3 1 2 0 Pinto dh 3 1 1 2 AEscor ss 3 1 2 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf 3 0 1 0 Flormn ss 2 1 0 0 Totals 32 3 7 2 Totals 27 4 5 2 Kansas City 000 000 030 3 Minnesota 000 000 22x 4 EW.Davis (1), Correia (2), Plouffe (1). DPKansas City 3, Minnesota 1. LOBKansas City 4, Minnesota 5. 2BHosmer (3), Moustakas (2). HRPinto (3). SB Mauer (1), A.Hicks (1), Florimon (3). SAoki. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Vargas 7 5 2 2 3 4 Crow L,0-1 0 0 2 0 2 0 W.Davis BS,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 3 Minnesota Correia 7 6 3 3 1 2 Duensing BS,1-1 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 0 Fien W,1-0 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Perkins S,3-4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Correia pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Crow pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Mark Carlson; Sec ond, Scott Barry; Third, Jeff Nelson. T:47. A,878 (39,021). Rangers 1, Astros 0 Houston Texas ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 4 0 0 0 Choo dh 4 0 1 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Andrus ss 2 0 0 0 Guzmn 1b 3 0 1 0 DMrph 2b 1 0 0 1 Carter dh 2 0 0 0 Rios rf 3 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 0 1 0 Fielder 1b 3 0 0 0 Hoes rf 2 0 0 0 Kzmnff 3b 3 0 2 0 Grssmn lf 3 0 1 0 Choice lf 3 0 1 0 Corprn c 3 0 1 0 Chirins c 3 0 0 0 Villar ss 2 0 0 0 LMartn cf 3 0 0 0 JoWilsn 2b-ss 3 1 1 0 Totals 26 0 5 0 Totals 28 1 5 1 Houston 000 000 000 0 Texas 000 001 00x 1 DPTexas 4. LOBHouston 2, Texas 4. 2BKouz manoff (1). CSM.Dominguez (1), Villar (1). SF Do.Murphy. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Oberholtzer L,0-3 7 5 1 1 0 7 Williams 1 0 0 0 0 1 Texas M.Perez W,2-0 8 5 0 0 3 2 Ogando S,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Rob Drake. T:15. A,698 (48,114). Giants 5, Rockies 4, 10 innings Colorado San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 3 0 1 0 Pagan cf 4 0 2 2 Stubbs ph-cf 1 0 1 1 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 1 2 1 CGnzlz lf 4 0 0 0 Posey c 4 0 0 0 Tlwtzk ss 3 0 0 0 Pence rf 3 1 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 1 1 1 Morse lf 3 1 1 0 Rosario c 4 1 1 1 Blanco lf 1 0 1 0 Arenad 3b 4 1 1 0 BCrwfr ss 3 1 1 2 LeMahi 2b 4 1 2 1 B.Hicks 2b 2 1 2 0 Chatwd p 2 0 0 0 THudsn p 3 0 0 0 Morals p 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Barnes ph 0 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Logan p 0 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 4 7 4 Totals 31 5 9 5 Colorado 010 000 120 0 4 San Francisco 000 031 000 1 5 No outs when winning run scored. DPColorado 3, San Francisco 2. LOBColorado 2, San Francisco 2. 2BArenado (3), LeMahieu (2). 3B Blanco (1). HRMorneau (1), Rosario (1), Sandoval (2), B.Crawford (1). CSLeMahieu (1), B.Hicks (1). S Barnes. SFB.Crawford. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chatwood 6 6 4 4 0 5 Morales 1 0 0 0 1 2 Logan 1 1 0 0 0 1 Ottavino 1 1 0 0 0 1 Brothers L,1-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 San Francisco T.Hudson 7 1 / 3 5 4 4 0 5 J.Lopez BS,1-1 0 1 0 0 0 0 Casilla 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 0 Romo W,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 J.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Brothers pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. HBPby Chatwood (Pence). WPChatwood. UmpiresHome, Hal Gibson; First, Dale Scott; Sec ond, Dan Iassogna; Third, Marvin Hudson. T:41. A,490 (41,915).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 AUTO RACING PETE IACOBELLI AP Sports Writer DARLINGTON, S.C. Kevin Harvick knew his rst-year Stew art-Haas Racing team was better than it had shown the past few weeks. After taking the Southern 500 at Dar lington Raceway on Saturday night, Har vick is convinced the group has exactly what it takes to win a Sprint Cup championship. Im excited about it and I think thats why everybody on this team came here, Harvick said. We came here to race for wins, to be in a position to contend for a championship. I real ly feel like everybody on this team feels like we bettered ourselves by coming together. They took a major step to proving that with Harvicks rst vic tory in 18 races at the track Too Tough To Tame. It made Har vick the rst this season with two victories and a lock for the sea son-ending, 16-team Chase for a Sprint Cup championship. The victory also end ed a maddening slump where Harvick had n ishes of 41st, 39th, 36th, seventh and 42nd in the races since the teams breakthrough win at Phoenix last month. Harvick said such a stretch mightve devas tated a lesser team he pointed to the cha os thats been the NBAs Indiana Pacers in recent weeks but thought his crew kept each oth ers spirits up through the down times. The team had a near aw less performance at Darlington, capturing Harvicks rst-ever pole here before his domi nating performance (he led 238 of 374 laps) that was capped when he passed Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the second greenwhite-checkered nish. Sometimes it just doesnt go your way and you have to be able to put that behind you whether you win or lose, he explained. Come Monday morn ing, we have to put this behind us and say, What do we need to do to get better? The team will have a bit more time for those decisions since the cir cuit takes its traditional Easter weekend off be fore resuming at Rich mond International Raceway on April 26. Harvicks crew chief Rodney Childers blamed the failings on mistakes he will ensure get corrected. With out mechanical issues, we couldve won three races, four races, may be ve races, Childers said. Here are two oth er things to take away from the Southern 500: FRESH TIRES ARE THE BEST TIRES Nothing beats fresh rubber, especially at Darlington. Dale Earn hardt Jr. and Jimmie Johnson each chose to take just two tires on a pit stop after a caution 10 laps from the end. Harvick and Childers decided on a full set and that was the differ ence as the No. 4 Chev rolet moved past Earn hardt on the next to last lap for the victory. The just had new tires, Earnhardt said. We had 30-something laps on our lefts and that just wasnt going to get the job done with him right behind us. YOUNG GUNS ON THE RISE The weekend also fea tured a couple of young racers who look as if theyll make a mark on this sport. 18-year-old high-schooler Chase El liott was the talk of the track after his dash to the top on Friday for his sec ond straight victory in the Nationwide Series. On the Sprint Cup side, 21-year-old Kyle Larson made it through a harrowing weekend where he struck the wall in practice twice and had to use a backup car. Still, he wound up eighth, an impressive run at a track that typi cally chews up and spits out untested drivers. ALEX GALLARDO / AP Drivers Kurt Busch (41), Tony Stewart (14) and Kyle Busch (18) race down the front stretch recently in Fontana, Calif. Kyle Busch (18) won the race on the 206th lap. BOXING Harvick marks himself a serious contender with Darlington victory CHUCK BURTON / AP; Kevin Harvick celebrates in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race on Saturday at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C. JIM VERTUNO AP Sports Writer AUSTIN, Texas NASCAR driver Kurt Busch said team own er Gene Haas is serious about making a strong entry into Formula One, a move that could expand the series foot print in the U.S. It will be an in credible challenge. He knows that, Busch said Sunday at the Mo toGP motorcycle race in Texas. Its a matter of the fans getting behind it, supporting Gene and trying to give F1 another chance, he said. Weve had Mi chael Andretti, before him was his dad. We had Scott Speed as a driver. Now we have an (American) own er. It will be interesting to see how the driver lineup shapes up. Haas announced Friday he had been granted a license from Formula Ones gov erning body to start a team as early as 2015, which would be the rst U.S. entry for the series in decades. At 35, Busch said it wont be him racing a Haas Formula One car. My time has passed to be a competitive driver in F1, Busch said. But a test ses sion? Id jump on that every time. Theyre go ing to have hard time keeping me out of the shop, from hanging out. The last attempt for an American For mula One team came in 2010, but the en try lacked funding and development to join. The last U.S.based team was Par nelli Jones Racing in 1974-76, when Mario Andretti drove. Carl Haas (no relation to Gene) and Teddy May er elded an American team in 1985 and 1986, although they were based in London. Money is not expect ed to be a problem for the deep-pocketed Gene Haas, owner of CNC machine man ufacturer Haas Auto mation and the Wind shear wind tunnel in North Carolina. Kurt Busch says Haas serious about fielding F1 entry GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer LAS VEGAS The old Manny Pacquiao returned for thrilling bursts, hounding Tim othy Bradley onto the ropes and battering the welterweight champion with whip-quick combi nations that recalled the Pacmans magical prime. The older Pacquiao couldnt nish the trick, however. Although he tried mightily, Pacquiao didnt stop or even re ally hurt Bradley during 12 mostly exciting rounds Saturday night, settling for the lucra tive revenge of a unan imous-decision victory. I didnt want to get careless, Pacquiao said. Pacquiao (56-5-2) proved he is still one of the worlds most excit ing boxers with his sec ond straight win, even if he might never recap ture his most destruc tive form. His hands and footwork are still inimi table, but the eight-di vision world champi ons power and timing werent good enough to stop Bradley or any of his opponents since late 2009, the date of his last knockout. Pacquiao apologeti cally showed up to his post-ght news con ference well after mid night at the MGM Grand Garden, a large bandage concealing 32 stitches in a deep gash on his left eyebrow from a head-butt. Train er Freddie Roach had lled the time by prais ing his ghter while si multaneously acknowl edging Pacquiaos days of highlight-reel knock outs have faded. I think he was do ing his best to stop him, Roach said. He was throwing combi nations. I told him, All you have to do is outbox this guy. You can outbox him in and out, all night long. ... I thought he had the killer instinct. When he had (Bradley) on the ropes, he opened up pretty well. It just didnt seem like he had the power he usual ly has. It was a little bit slower than he seemed in the past. I dont know why, because in the dressing room, he was on re. Bradley, still classy af ter his rst career de feat, gave a mixed re view of Pacquiaos physical skills in com parison to their rst ght. He still has the real sharp snap on his punches, Bradley said. (But) I believe in the rst ght, his punching power was way harder. I was able to take it. He went for the knockout, he denitely did. Pacquiao still beat up one of the worlds best boxers with relative ease, and his next bout in the fall will be among the biggest happenings in sports. His most ly likely opponent is a fth meeting with Juan Manuel Marquez. NBA MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS David West scored 21 points and Lance Stephenson had his league-best fth tri ple-double of the sea son, leading Indiana past Oklahoma City 102-97 Sunday put ting the Pacers one win away from clinch ing the Eastern Con ferences top seed. The Pacers (55-26) lead two-time defend ing champion Miami by a half game with one to play and hold the tiebreaker based on conference record. Kevin Durant n ished with 38 points for Oklahoma City (58-22) on a day it could have locked up the second seed in the West. Oklahoma City ral lied from a 10-point fourth-quarter de cit, tying the score at 89 with 2:46 to go. But Paul George hit a 3 and Stephenson made one with 34.2 seconds to go to make it 97-91. It was the rst time since Indianas win March 26 over Miami that the Pacers looked like their old selves. They scored, defend ed well and played with energy a combina tion that kept them atop the Eastern Con ference standings from late October until the nal week of March. And they answered every challenge, too, even though Roy Hib bert was kept score less and nished 0 of 9 from the eld. George had 20 points and 12 rebounds. Ste phenson nished with 17 points, 11 assists and 10 rebounds to set a new franchise re cord with his fth tri ple-double of the sea son. Detlef Schrempf set the previous mark with four in 1992-93. What was different Sunday? Indiana was back on its home court, where it nished with a league-best 35-6 mark. Plus, the Pacers didnt allow this one to get away early. But the biggest rea son for the change may have been that the Pacers starters were well-rested after tak ing most of four days off last week and the backups were bursting with condence after winning at Milwaukee. It showed all day. After C.J. Watson closed the rst half with a layup to give the Pacers a 47-45 lead, Russell Westbrooks quick scoring urry in the second half gave the Thunder a 55-52 lead. Indiana charged back with an 8-0 run to make it 60-55 and still led 74-66 after three. Pacers hold off Thunders late run for 102-97 victory MICHAEL CONROY / AP Indiana Pacers guard Lance Stephenson, left, shoots under Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka in the second half on Sunday in Indianapolis. Manny Pacquiao back on top after win over Timothy Bradley ISAAC BREKKEN / AP Manny Pacquiao, left, of the Philippines, trades blows with Timothy Bradley in their WBO welterweight title boxing match on Saturday in Las Vegas.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 HEART ATTACK: Doctors examine symptoms in young people / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Tickets available for Dining in the Dark The fourth annual Dining in the Dark event is an expedition into the world of smell, taste, sound and tex ture as guests experience dinner served in darkness May 2 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora. The dinner is designed to raise awareness and funds for New Vision for Independence, a local non-prof it organization. For information or to purchase tickets, $60 for general seating and a private table of eight for $440, go to www.newvision.org or call Chantel Buck at 352-435-5040. GAINESVILLE The Elder Options Grant Review Committee to meet A meeting of the Elder Options Grant Review Committee has been scheduled for 10 a.m., May 7 at the Elder Options ofce, 100 S.W. 74th St., Suite 301 in Gainesville. The committee will discuss and adopt recommendations regarding the applications received by Elder Options for funding for the program year beginning July 1. People with disabilities attending the meeting should call 352-6925260 for information. LAKE COUNTY AARP Driver Safety Programs scheduled The AARP Driver Safety Programs help participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driv ing habits with a new six-hour curriculum. The two-day course, consisting of three hours each day will be offered at the following location: From 1 to 4 p.m., Monday and Wednesday, at the Lady Lake Library 225 W. Guava St. To register, call 352-753-2957, ext. 114. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-mem bers. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. OXFORD Florida Guardian Ad Litem hosts volunteer training A Guardian Ad Litem volunteer is appointed by the courts to advocate for a child who has been removed from a home due to alleged abuse, abandonment or neglect. Training will be available June 9 at the Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. Highway 301 in Oxford. For information, or an applica tion go to www.guardianadlitem.org or call Sarah Jay at 352-274-5231, or email Sarah.Jay@gal..gov. EUSTIS Davids Circle Support Group meeting scheduled Davids Circle Support Group meetings welcome those who have suffered a miscarriage or lost an in fant on the rst Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m., at the Lake Eustis Christian Church, 315 E. Orange Ave. Call 352-274-4470 for information. MARIA CHENG Associated Press I n a north London hos pital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in a bold at tempt to make body parts in the laboratory. Its far from the only lab in the world that is pursu ing the futuristic idea of growing organs for trans plant. But the London work was showcased Tues day as Mayor Boris John son announced a plan to attract more labs to do cutting-edge health and science research in the area. While only a handful of patients have received the British lab-made organs so far including tear ducts, blood vessels and wind pipes researchers hope they will soon be able to transplant more types of body parts into patients, including what would be the worlds rst nose made partly from stem cells. Its like making a cake, said Alexander Seifalian at University College Lon don, the scientist leading the effort. We just use a different kind of oven. British authorities have invested nearly $6.7 mil lion in the plan to stimu late research in the Lon don-Oxford-Cambridge area. It aims to attract companies to the area to foster collaboration and promote research and manufacturing. A major center for biological re search will open in Lon don next year. University College Lon don is a partner in the campaign. During a recent visit to his lab there, Sei falian showed off a sophis ticated machine used to make molds from a poly mer material for various organs. Last year, he and his team used that material to mold a nose for a British man who lost his to can cer. Then they added a salt and sugar solution to the mold to mimic the some what sponge-like texture of a natural nose. Stem cells were taken from the patients fat and grown in the lab for two weeks be fore being used to cov er the nose scaffold. Lat er, the nose was implanted into the mans forearm so that skin would grow to cover it. Seifalian said he and his team are waiting for ap proval from regulatory au thorities to transfer the nose onto the patients face Growing noses, growing science? UK campaign to attract research cites lab-created body parts MATT DUNHAM / AP Dr. Michelle Grifn, a plastic research fellow, poses for photographs with a synthetic polymer ear at her research facility in the Royal Free Hospital in London. MATT DUNHAM / AP A synthetic polymer nose, left, and ear are posed to be photographed at a research facility in the Royal Free Hospital in London. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Chances are youve heard of mapping genes to diagnose rare diseases, predict your risk of cancer and tell your ancestry. But to uncover food poisonings? The nations disease detectives are beginning a program to try to out smart outbreaks by routinely decod ing the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target is listeria, the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning and bacteria that are especially dangerous to pregnant women. Already, the government credits the technology with helping to solve a listeria outbreak that killed one person in California and sick ened seven others in Maryland. This really is a new way to nd and ght infections, said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One way to think of it is, is it iden tifying a suspect by a lineup or by a ngerprint? Whole genome sequencing, or mapping all of an organisms DNA, has become a staple of medical re search. But in public health, it has been used more selectively, to inves tigate particularly vexing outbreaks or emerging pathogens, such as a worrisome new strain of bird u. For day-to-day outbreak detection, ofcials rely instead on decades-old tests that use pieces of DNA and ar ent as precise. Now, with genome sequencing be coming faster and cheaper, the CDC is armed with $30 million from Con gress to broaden its use with a pro gram called advanced molecu lar detection. The hope is to solve outbreaks faster, foodborne and other types, and maybe prevent Experts decode germs DNA to fight food poisoning This really is a new way to find and fight infections. One way to think of it is, is it identifying a suspect by a lineup or by a fingerprint? Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention SEE GERMS | C2 SEE GROWING | C3

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark infections, too, by bet ter understanding how they spread. Frankly, in public health, we have some catching up to do, said the CDCs Dr. Chris topher Braden, who is helping to lead the work. As a rst step, feder al and state ofcials are rapidly decoding the DNA of all the listeria in fections diagnosed in the U.S. this year, along with samples found in tainted foods or factories. Its the rst time the technology has been used for routine disease surveillance, looking for people with matching strains who may have gotten sick from the same source. If this pilot project works, the CDC says it sets the stage to even tually overhaul how public health laborato ries around the coun try keep watch on food safety, and to use the technology more rou tinely against other out breaks. Genome sequenc ing really is the ulti mate DNA ngerprint, said George Washing ton University micro biologist Lance Price, who uses it to study the spread of antibiotic-re sistant bacteria and says the CDCs move is long overdue. Especially in food borne outbreaks, the technology will increase investigators ability to nab the right culprit, he said. The faster that happens, the fewer peo ple may get sick. This is going to change everything as far as source attribu tion, Price added. Re calls are expensive, the industry doesnt like them, and theyve got to be accurate. Todays standard tests sometimes miss linked cases or provide false leads. For example, U.S. ofcials in 2012 ini tially thought a salmo nella outbreak in the Netherlands, associat ed with smoked salm on, was linked to cases here. Later sequencing showed the bugs were different. The current meth ods of subtyping salmo nella arent very good, said epidemiologist Da vid Boxrud of the Min nesota Department of Health, part of a pilot Food and Drug Admin istration network that has begun sequencing that germ and certain others when theyre dis covered in food. State labs in Arizona, Florida, Maryland, New York, Virginia and Washing ton also participate. Sequencing also promises to reveal drug resistance and how vir ulent a germ is more quickly than todays tests, and track how its spreading from one per son to another through tiny genetic changes that act like footprints. Key to making it work is the computing pow er of a massive feder al database being used to store the gene maps, said Duncan MacCan nell, the CDCs senior adviser for bioinfor matics. Its one thing to analyze bacterial DNA culled from a few dozen sick people during an outbreak, and anoth er to compare samples from thousands. Until recently, the CDC didnt have the tools and approach es to make sense of this much data, he said. The listeria project began as ofcials were investigating some sick Maryland new borns and their moth ers. Genome sequenc ing showed those cases were linked to a Califor nia death, helping in vestigators determine which foods to focus on, said Dr. Robert Tauxe, CDCs leading food borne disease sleuth. Standard tests prompted recall of the FDAs suspect, a brand of Hispanic-style cheese. Last month, the government an nounced that sequenc ing also conrmed liste ria from the recalled cheese matched germs from the patients. We expect to be able to match more and more of what we nd in people to what we nd in food, as the project grows, Tauxe said. GERMS FROM PAGE C1 DAVID GOLDMAN / AP Microbiologist Dr. Molly Freeman is shown pulling Listeria bacteria from a tube to be tested for its DNA ngerprinting in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. ANDREA K. WALKER The Baltimore Sun BAL TIMORE Car rie OConnor thought she was a fairly healthy 35-year-old who went on daily jogs and ate well. Then, more than a year ago, she suffered back-to-back heart at tacks. The rst hit while she was treating herself to baubles at Smyth Jew elers in Timonium, Md. The project manager at T. Rowe Price sudden ly felt nauseated and severe pain consumed her stomach. Pain shot up her arm and her jaw ached. All were com mon symptoms of a heart attack, the para medics later told her. The seco nd happened later that day when doctors tried to insert a stent to open a blocked left artery they believed had caused the rst at tack. During the proce dure, two of her other arteries began to spasm and she had a massive heart attack. Heart disease is often seen as an older per sons afiction. Nation wide, the average age at a rst heart attack is 64 for men and 72 for women, according to the American Heart As sociation. About 10 years ago, the average ages were 65.8 for men and 70.4 for women. But heart attacks also can occur in young er patients like OCon nor who are seeming ly healthy, caught off guard by the life-chang ing illness. They nd themselves dealing with problems more typical of people their parents age, taking loads of pills and limiting strenuous activity to protect their weakened hearts. It was not some thing I expected at all, OConnor said. We dont have family his tory. I dont have any typical risk factors. Im not overweight. I dont smoke. I eat ne. At Anne Arundel Medi cal Center, where OCon nor received cardiac rehabilitation, the hos pital saw such a surge in young patients that it started a support group to help them cope. In 2009, the average age of heart attack patients at the hospital was 70 years. In 2012, it was 60. In addition to the bread-and-butter stan dard cases, we are see ing it in younger folks and it is not completely clear why that is, said Scott Katzen, a general and interventional car diologist wit h Cardiol ogy Associates who has privileges at Anne Arun del Medical Center. In recent years, some high-prole deaths have brought further attention to the issue. James Gandolni, who starred in the popular The Sopranos televi sion series, died at age 51 from a massive heart attack. Actor Michael Clarke Duncan died at age 54 after suffering a heart attack. Doctors believe some of the attacks are brought on by genetic causes, but doctors also point to the nations obesity prob lem as a factor. Stress also could play a role, although further study needs to be done, some doctors said. Doctors have started to pay bette r attention to possible symptoms in younger patients and not discount signs because of the per sons age, said Jeffrey L. Quartner, chief of cardi ology at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital and a board member of the American Heart Associ ation Maryland. We have changed our sensitivity to real ize young people have heart attacks as well, Quartner said. Ana Pendleton Duhon, a 37-year-old teacher, was riding in the car with her mother in June 2012. That is the last thing she remem bers from that day. Her mother would lat er tell her she slumped over in mid-conver sation. Paramedics shocked Duhons heart three times to revive her. Doctors would de termine later she went into cardiac arrest. At the hospital, they reduced her body tem perature to near freez ing, a procedure Doctors examine heart attack symptoms in young people KENNETH K. LAM / MCT Ana Duhon, center, and Carrie OConnor, right, both had heart attacks in their 30s and were treated at Anne Arundel Medical Center, where they met. SEE SYMPTOMS | C3

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com but couldnt say when that might happen. The polymer mate rial Seifalian uses for his organ scaffolds has been patented and hes also applied for patents for their blood vessels, tear ducts and wind pipes. He and his team are creating other or gans including coro nary arteries and ears. Later this year, a trial is scheduled to start in In dia and London to test lab-made ears for peo ple born without them. Ears are harder to make than noses be cause you have to get all the contours right and the skin is pulled tight so you see its entire structure, said Dr. Mi chelle Grifn, a plastic surgeon who has made dozens of ears and nos es in Seifalians lab. At the moment, chil dren who need new ears have to go through a really invasive pro cedure involving tak ing cartilage from their ribs, Grifn said. She added they plan to eventually create an en tirely synthetic face but must rst prove their polymer scaffolds wont accidentally burst out of the skin. Scientists have to get things like noses and ears right before we can move onto something like a kidney, lungs or a liver, which is much more complicated, said Eileen Gentleman, a stem cell expert at Kings College London, who is not involved in Seifalians research. What (Seifalian) has created is the correct structure and the fact that its good enough for his patients to have a functional (wind pipe), tear duct, etc. is pretty amazing, she said. Some scientists pre dicted certain lab-made organs will soon cease to be experimental. Im convinced engi neered organs are go ing to be on the mar ket soon, said Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, a professor of trans plantation biology at the University of Go thenburg in Sweden. She has transferred labmade blood vessels into a handful of pa tients and plans to offer them more widely by 2016, pending regulato ry approval. Seifalian hopes labmade organs will one day be available for a few hundred dollars. If people are not that fussy, we could man ufacture different siz es of noses so the sur geon could choose a size and tailor it for pa tients before implant ing it, he said. People think your nose is very individual and person al but this is something that we could mass produce like in a facto ry one day. GROWING FROM PAGE C1 sometimes used on heart-attack patients to induce a coma and calm the body to help with healing. Duhon recov ered, but doctors ar ent 100 percent sure what caused the at tack and the incident has changed her life forever. Her heart only operates at 30 percent of its function and she takes numerous med ications. Doctors im planted a debrillator on her heart so if she suffers another attack it will automatically shock the organ. The biggest change has been the emotion al effect. Once a per sonal trainer in tip-top health, Duhon now sometimes worries whether her heart will fail again. She and OConnor were the rst members of the support group started at Anne Arundel Medical Center to help young people cope af ter a heart attack. We needed a com munity to talk about this, Duhon said. Were young women who didnt expect any of this to happen. Dianne Walters, a nurse in the cardiac re hab unit at Anne Arun del Medical Center who helps run the sup port group, said young er patients may go into depression and start to question their mortal ity. Talking to people their age helps them accept their situation, she said. They can also gain tips from one an others experiences. John Weitzel, a 48-year-old Crowns ville, Md., contractor, felt symptoms for al most two days before having a heart attack in 2013. He felt numb ness in his arms and jaw, a tightness in his chest and felt as if he had bad indigestion. His body was achy all over. He visited an ur gent-care center and was sent home. Weitzel was walking to the bathroom when he fell in the hallway. His wife heard his body crash and called an ambulance. Weitzel was over weight and didnt eat well before suffering his heart attack. He has since lost 30 pounds and is trying to live better. SYMPTOMS FROM PAGE C2 MARY MEEHAN Lexington Herald-Leader LEXINGTON, Ky. If Freida Downey, aka the Caped Condom Crusader, had a super power, it would be super chatter. Need to learn about using a dental dam during oral sex? Shes happy to tell you. Want tips for proper condom usage? Shell gladly oblige. Need to inquire about obtain ing an HIV/AIDS test? No wor ries. Its your health, she says, youve got to be able to talk about it. A full-gured beauty with a penchant for curly, dark wigs, Downey favors phrases like you better check it before you wreck it and you dont swim in the shark tank without putting on your life preserver while ex panding her condom crusade as a volunteer for the Lexing ton-Fayette County, Ky., Health Department. She has adapted the work of Beyonc if you like it then you better put a condom on it and Aretha p-r-o-t-e-c-t, pro tect yourself, yeah, baby for her own purposes, and she will sing her versions in an enthusi astic a cappella groove whenev er asked. So passionate is she about reaching her self-imposed goal of signing up 2,014 people for HIV/AIDS testing in 2014 that she repeatedly contacted the White House to request that President Barack Obama join her on the White House lawn to get a quick cheek swab. (The White House politely declined.) You have to ask, says Downey, grinning at the thought of the photo op that could have been. It is a Thursday morning, and she is fully made up, with a black hat at a jaunty angle on her head. In her small, tidy apart ment, platters lled with artfully arrayed packaged condoms and bowls overowing with them in their glittering wrappers are in terspersed among the more tra ditional decorative touches. And then there are the capes. Burberry plaid, pink and uffy, silvery and shiny, chic, blackand-white houndstooth; she has a closet lled with costumes for every occasion. She is happy to employ them if thats what it takes to draw people in. You give a little bit of quick energy (and a condom) and you walk away, she says as she pan tomiming her technique. Lauren Newsome, an HIV/ AIDS outreach specialist at the health department, is a fan of Downey. She certainly has a vibrant personality, Newsome said, Caped crusader of a different sort MATT GOINS / MCT Freida Downey, aka Caped Condom Crusader, poses for a portrait in one of her fashionable capes at her home in Lexington, Ky. SEE CRUSADER | C4

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 adding that Downeys outsize personality al lows her to draw peo ple in. Her ability to talk frankly with no embar rassment about sexu al health, sexuality and sexually transmitted disease makes others feel comfortable about sharing. She has no fear, Newsome said. Downey became the Caped Condom Cru sader in 2011. Although she studied social work at Eastern Kentucky University and spent many years working in a fa ctory and in parking enforcement, she was unemployed. In 1999 she suffered a head injury when a drunken driver plowed into a crowd at a Lex ington, Ky., Wal-Mart. The man was convicted, but his three escapes from Kentucky prisons caused Downey stress. There was some depres sion, too, and she found she went out less and less. Then she went to a health fair hoping to get some leads on a job. She saw a young person loi tering near the health department display. She took it upon herself to make an introduction and illustrate the prop er use of a dental dam, a latex sheet used as pro tection during oral sex. Newsome took notice of Downeys ease with the subject matter and invited her to bec ome a gatekeeper. That is the ofcial term for Downey and seven other communi ty volunteers who help distribute condoms, en courage HIV/AIDS test ing and let people know about health depart ment services. Downey and the other volun teers were trained, and Newsome meets with Downey about twice a month to discuss Downeys outreach ef forts. The volunteers do not provide medical advice or testing; they act as a referral service to connect people with health department pro fessionals. They are able to reach parts of the com munity that we cant be cause they already have established relation ships, Newsome says. Downeys mantra about HIV/AIDS testing is: Its safe, its anony mous and tell them the Caped Condom Cru sader sent you. Do you know a lot people dont even know the health department exists? say says. Single with no chil dren, Downey, 45, takes special joy in reach ing out to young peo ple. Shes been known to provide curbside in terventions and offer latex therapy to cou ples on the street. Shes not sure where her open-minded attitude comes from, but she is thrilled to be of ser vice. A certicate laud ing her efforts holds a place of honor in her living room. Its frame is adorned, of course, with several condom wrappers. Her caped perso na is accepted as part of her personality, says Downey, a member of Main Street Baptist Church. Everybody knows me from way back, she says. Still hoping to nd a paying job, she gets by, for now, with help from family. But she stays busy. She estimates she has attended hundreds of events health fairs, bar trivia nights, gather ings in homes to give out condoms. Some times, she says, people come up to her and ask for some. So, she will keep up this volunteer work. She recently started a Face book page. Shes think ing about going over seas to spread HIV/ AIDS awareness. She might try a Kickstarter campaign to help fund the travel, she said. She is reaching out to the Wonderful Pistachios folks, the creative team behind those wacky commercials with off beat celebrities. Theyve got that lady that does Prancercise, Downey says, why not the Caped Condom Crusader? CRUSADER FROM PAGE C3 MATT GOINS / MCT Condoms to be distributed Freida Downey, aka Caped Condom Crusader.

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Lots of apps claim they can help you ght jet lag. Now Michigan re searchers say mathe matical formulas sug gest its possible to adjust to new time zones a bit faster than previously thought, and they created their own free app to help. Doctors have long said exposure to light is key. But how much, and when? If you get light in the wrong time or wrong way, itll send you the wrong direction, said University of Michigan math professor Dan iel Forger, who led the research published Thursday. A master biological clock, called a circadian rhythm, regulates when we become sleepy and when were more alert. Travel across time zones and the body clock has to reset itself. Light is that clocks strongest regulator. In a study partly fund ed by the Air Force, the Michigan team used two equations proven to predict someones circadian rhythm, and with computer model ing calculated different schedules of light ex posure for more than 1,000 possible trips. Its possible to cus tomize a block of time each day when you should be in light, the brighter the better, and another when you should avoid it, Forgers team reported in the journal PLoS Computa tional Biology. (It didnt address other potential remedies such as mela tonin.) An example: Fly from Detroit to London, ve hours ahead, arriving at 11 a.m. London time. Generally, its thought to take a day per time zone to fully adjust. But the study suggests a threeday adjustment sched ule, if you can stick with it: On the day after ar rival, get light from 7:40 a.m. to 9 p.m.; from 6:20 a.m. to 7:40 p.m. on Day 2; and from 5 a.m. until 7:20 p.m. on Day 3. A free iPhone app named Entrain does the calculations. Stay in doors, or stay up later, and it adjusts the ad vice. The app hasnt been tested with travelers to see whether it real ly helps more than gen eral advice, such as to seek morning light when tr aveling east ward. But after using it, travelers will be given a choice of submitting their data to a Universi ty of Michigan study. Before we really be lieve it, it has to go through testing, cau tioned sleep-medicine specialist Dr. Steven Al tchuler, an assistant professor of psychia try at the Mayo Clin ic College of Medicine, who wasnt involved in the project. But theres very little risk of harm if someone wants to try these things. Most people adjust ne with general ad vice, but adjusting fast er may be more import ant if travelers must be at their best for, say, sports competitions or a business negotiation, Altchuler added. I think it makes sense, said Dr. Charles Bae of the Cleveland Clinics sleep disorder center. Anything you could do to optimize your adjustment is wel come, without medica tions. Researchers using math to whittle away at jet lag

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 14, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 14, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 14 the 104th day of 2014. There are 261 days left in the year. The Jewish holiday Passover begins at sunset. Todays Highlight in His tory : On April 14, 1865, Pres ident Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while watching a performance of Our American Cousin at Fords Theater in Washing ton. On this date : In 1775 the rst Ameri can society for the abolition of slavery was formed in Philadelphia. In 1828 the rst edition of Noah Websters Amer ican Dictionary of the En glish Language was pub lished. In 1910 President Wil liam Howard Taft became the rst U.S. chief executive to throw the ceremonial rst pitch at a baseball game as the Washington Senators beat the Philadelphia Athlet ics 3-0. In 1912 the British liner RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg in the North Atlantic at 11:40 p.m. ships time and began sinking. (The ship went under two hours and 40 minutes later with the loss of 1,514 lives.) In 1939 the John Stein beck novel The Grapes of Wrath was rst published by Viking Press. In 1949 the Wilhelm strasse Trial in Nuremberg ended with 19 former Nazi Foreign Ofce ofcials sen tenced by an American tribu nal to prison terms ranging from four to 25 years. In 1956 Ampex Corp. demonstrated its videotape recorder at the National As sociation of Radio and Tele vision Broadcasters Conven tion in Chicago. In 1964 conservation ist Rachel Carson, author of Silent Spring, died in Sil ver Spring, Md., at age 56. In 1965 the state of Kan sas hanged Richard Hick ock and Perry Smith for the 1959 murders of four mem bers of Herbert Clutters family. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 14, 2014: This year you see many dif ferent situations unfold. Your willingness to give 100 per cent marks your most suc cessful ventures. If a circum stance does not go in the direction you would like, at least youll know that you did your best. If you are single, you will be delighted by your choices; however, you often might experience discom fort when someone pulls the reins too tight. The person you choose will need to have similar freedom and intimacy needs. A good period to meet this person will be anytime after spring. If you are at tached, you will defer more of ten to your sweetie this year. Your closeness will grow. LI BRA has the same core is sues, but he or she mani fests them in different ways. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could have a heavy un derpinning of fatigue as you start your day. Your dream life likely has been quite active, which could leave you feel ing somewhat uneasy. You might react to a close partner by unleashing a snappy com ment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might be more irritable than you realize. Listen care fully to feedback from an as sociate without passing judg ment. You are likely to cast a sour perspective on any matter right now. A sudden insight could put you on a steadier course. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Know that you are not seeing the big picture right now. You often strive to gain a more creative perspective. Today you will need to detach from any ingrained views; you will create a more dynamic plan if you do. Brainstorm with a trusted buddy. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You tend to come from a se cure place, even when youre in an argument. Keep an eye on someones offbeat energy, and acknowledge what you need to do in order to keep the peace. For some people, it could be as simple as do ing some spring cleaning. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Ini tiate a conversation, but give yourself an exit strategy if the other party seems to be un duly difcult. You are unlike ly to run into a receptive au dience, as those around you might be unusually aggres sive or sensitive. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your concern might be your budget. Certainly a risk seems tempting. You might not be able to say no. If you were to gamble and lose, what would the damage be? Would you be able to handle it? If you feel you could, then consider it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could nd others to be somewhat difcult. Might you be coming across more provocatively than you had in tended? Your fuse has been short lately, and news might be overwhelming, but know that alls well that ends well. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might want to defer any interactions with certain people to others. You often suppress your anger, and it easily could be triggered. Un expected demands at work or from others could send you into a tizzy. Treat yourself as a fragile object today. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You ourish when loved ones and friends come together. Gather your cohorts together for a meeting, as it could trigger a ow of ideas. Deal with a partner direct ly. Do not negotiate a nan cial matter. You know what is good for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) A take-charge attitude will get you far, and it also will al low you to greet unusual suc cess and change. Still, some one might be undermining you on some level. Use care with a personal matter. You inadvertently could trigger a situation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might want to step out of your comfort zone in order to nd the answers you need. Confusion seems to surround communication. Someone could be looking for you in the wrong spot or at the wrong time. Conrm plans. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Be direct with a part ner. It appears as if you cant make a change without this person by your side. On some level, you believe that you can charm someone to your side of an issue. Realize that you could be taken aback by what you trigger. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I recently exchanged pleasantries via email and text mes saging with a lady I met on a website. One day later, I received a mes sage from her stating shed prefer our meth od of communication be kept to email and tex ting because she wasnt much of a phone talker. Over the past few months, I have been out a number of times with other women who also expressed their prefer ence to keep communi cation limited to email and texting. Is this be coming common? I may be old-fash ioned because I feel interpersonal rela tionships especial ly initially should in clude the element of voice inection. I think its more effective than a guessing game that only a full page of text can provide. Am I wrong? WANTS TO TALK IN RENO DEAR WANTS TO TALK: I dont think you are wrong, and I happen to agree with you. I, too, usually learn more from a spoken conversation than from an email or text because I can distin guish whether the per son is joking or being se rious. But you and I are becoming the minori ty. Today many younger people feel more com fortable communicating online at least initially. DEAR ABBY: My hus band recently returned to the family business to become the general manager. He is in con trol of hiring new em ployees, and he recent ly told me they need to hire more people. I have mentioned several times my interest in working there as an administra tive assistant. Howev er, my husband either changes the subject or gets angry when I ask about it. It hurts my feelings that I am the person raising his children, but am not good enough to work in the family busi ness! I also know its not because of lack of expe rience. This makes me question the strength and value of our mar riage. HURT FEELINGS IN OREGON DEAR HURT FEELINGS: While I can see that you might be disappoint ed, what I regard as your problem may be the lack of honest communica tion between you and your husband. He may have reasons for pre ferring you not work in the family business that have nothing to do with the strength or val ue of your marriage. It might be that he is new in his position as gener al manager, that working in ANY family business can be stressful, that hed prefer separation be tween his working life and his family life, or that other family mem bers might object. Let the subject rest for a while, and when you do raise it again, try to do it in a non-con frontational manner. If you do, he may be more open and less defensive with you about what his reasons are. And if you would prefer to work outside the home in ad dition to raising the chil dren, consider submit ting your resumes to other companies. DEAR ABBY: My hus band and I are ap proaching our 25th an niversary. We dont have a lot of money to spend on a large party (our sons are 14 and 17). Are there inexpensive solu tions? Id prefer not to have it at our house. STUMPED IN GEORGIA DEAR STUMPED: Be cause you dont want to entertain at your home, consider holding the cel ebration at a park, lim iting the guest list and making it a potluck. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Communication online lacks personal touch for some users JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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