Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Care and Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson SPIETH JOINS WATSON AT MASTERS HELM, SPORTS B1PRICE HIKES: Water, sewage rates could be going up in next few years, A3 UKRAINE: US orders new sanctions over Crimea, A7 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, April 13, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 103 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C7 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C6 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C7 MONEY E1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A884 / 66Mostly sunny$1 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comTo ge t a sense of how the new owner of Lake Square Mall hopes to breathe new life into the struggling shopping center in Leesburg, it helps to look around the United States at some of the 13 other malls under the umbrella of Kohan Retail Investment Group. A glance at those Kohan proper ties reveals an interesting, somewhat unorthodox strategy that features a mix of traditional anchor stores and retail outlets, but also a heavy dose of entertainment as well as a sprinkling of government, non-prot and political hubs meant to attract non-shoppers who might not otherwise venture inside. The nearby Crystal River Mall is one such building that Kohan has transformed into a community space that uses events to draw people there. Kohan bought the mall in Crystal River two years ago, according to Millie Bresnahan, the manager at the Crystal River Mall. Citrus County Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Josh Wooten said Kohan bought the mall out of foreclosure. They essentially bought a distressed piece of property, Wooten said. Mike Kohan, head of the company, said he tries to make malls destinations. You got to give them a hope, and you got to give them a reason to come and shop in this mall, and thats what Im trying to do, Kohan said. The Crystal River Mall has a Disabled American Veterans chapter and a putt-putt golf course and also hosts a farmers market, according to Bresnahan and the Kohan Retail Investment Groups website. Wooten said the Crystal River Mall under Kohan has been very community oriented. They have catered more to mom and pops to ll up some of the spaces and they put in a miniature putt-putt, Wooten said. Bresnahan said the mom and pop stores in the Crystal River Mall are there partly to ll the malls vacancies but also for their community impact. Weve kind of taken the thinking of, you know, its the Crystal River Mall, but its also a community space. Its a place to gather. Its a place to do things, she said. Rural King has recently bought an anchor store at the Crystal River Mall, Bresnahan said. Crystal River Mayor Jim Farley agreed that the Crystal River Mall has a hometown feel. Theres malls all over the country and not taking anything away from them, but theyre mostly chain stores and ... I dont think UNIQUE STORESWhile its commonplace to see stores like Hallmark, Radio Shack and Foot Locker in malls, which Kohans properties have, the company also has an eclectic group of tenants not usually seen in indoor shopping venues %  enDriving school %  enUnited States Postal Service branch %  enDance academy %  enTwo churches %  enRed Cross bingo room %  enA virtual school %  enCounty Republican club headquarters %  enGoodwill ofce %  enA Court Appointed Special Advocates ofce to help local children caught up in the legal systemInside a Kohan mall Lake Square Mall owner uses unorthodox methods to draw patrons The Crystal River Mall has a miniature golf course and other entertainment in what used to be an anchor store in Crystal River. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALThe Crystal River Malls food court is a tented area in the center of the mall in Crystal River.SEE MALL | A2 Staff reportAn Orlando group that promotes religious freedom is suing the Lake County School Board, say ing its controversial student club policy is dis criminating against members of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) at Mount Dora High School. The School Board already is facing another suit led last December by the American Civil Liber ties Union to allow a gay-straight club to meet at Carver Middle School in Leesburg. Fridays suit, led in U.S. District Court by Liber ty Counsel, claims the FCA has been refused equal access to school facilities given to other student clubs, such as: %  en Announcements in the hallways and on the schools marquee %  en Flyers in and outside of classrooms where clubs meet %  en Club announcements over the schools pub lic address system %  en Club webpage on the Districts website %  en Members to wear a colored cord at gradua tion to signify club membership %  en Club section in the school yearbookMOUNT DORALake County School Board sued again over its club policy LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWhile lake levels on the Harris Chain of Lakes have recovered slightly, they continue to be below regulatory levels, water experts say. Mike Perry, executive director of the Lake Coun ty Water Authority, said lack of rainfall is the main cause of low lake levels, while groundwater with drawals from the Floridan Aquifer also play a role. Rainfall has been below average since 2005 and that results in the lower lake levels simply due to lack of rain, Perry said. Hank Largin, spokesman for the St. Johns River Water Management District, agreed. By far the largest factor on lake levels, in par ticular those that exist in south Lake County is rainfall, he said. Estimates of the percentage of current groundwater pumping on lake levels is estimated to be about 5 to 15 percent. Current pumping is very close to the allowable sustainable limit. Perry said the cumulative rainfall decit since 2005 is 63.28 inches, equivalent to 5.2 feet. All lakes in the Harris Chain are below the regulatory level as adopted by the St. Johns River Water Man agement District, Perry conrmed. Lake Apopka is currently 1.8 feet below the reg ulatory level, he said. Further, there is particular concern about Lake Grifn, which is at 56.95 feet. We hope it doesnt get much lower, Perry said. Otherwise, there could be potentially environmental damage. Perry shared the latest numbers on lake levels at the Lake County Commission meeting this week. The Clermont Chain of Lakes has seen some increases in its lake levels.Lake levels are up but nowhere near normalSEE SUITS | A2SEE LAKES | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 you get the hometown feel that you get in our mall with the mom and pop stores, Farley said. He added the mall has been transforming under Kohan. Several months ago, before we even knew that Rural King was coming in, people were crying the blues to some degree, saying the mall was dying, and they didnt want to see that happen. And I said publicly that the mall is not dying, that its simply in the process of reinventing itself. I think that was true then and its even more true now, he said. Bresnahan said the Crystal River Mall tries to do one large event each month and to offer entertainment weekly. For right now, its very important. Its whats helping us, you know, sustain. Its keeping people aware that we are in business. You know, just because we lost a Belk or we lost a Sears, were still here, Bresnahan said. Kohan agreed the events are, very, very important because they drive trafc into the mall. You got to give them a reason. You cant just advertise and say, OK, come and shop in Crystal River or come and shop (at the) Lake Square Mall. Youve got to have a reason for them to come in, Kohan said. When they know theres a band thats playing on Saturday, so they bring the kids, they bring the wife, their family, and everybody, and they (are) just making it a fun day for themselves. Bresnahan believes that Lake Square Mall should adopt some of the strategies employed by Crystal River. They should do the farmers market, she said, and that can be done inside, where you can attract people in, out of the sun, and they also shop at the same time. It benets all of your stores. A food truck event also attracted 4,500 people, she said. They all came in the mall and shopped. She added that she tries to involve the malls stores in the events. We just did a prom fashion show, and so our tuxedo-prom shop did all the dresses and tuxedos for that, she said. The Crystal River Mall also has a weekly dance event that draws about 80 participants, she said. Lake Square Mall General Manager Jennifer Glidewell said the mall will eventually follow Crystal Rivers lead with regard to events. Wooten believes Kohan has brought value back to the mall. I would certainly give them props for taking what, as I said, was a dis tressed asset with major tenants leaving and turn ing it into something that is of value to the commu nity, Wooten said. Already, new tenants are beginning to ll up vacant space. The mall recently nal ized negotiations with Cuba Pichys Cuisine, Dunkin Donuts, Mammas Pizza Express, and Boba Galaxy Smoothies. Cuba Pichys Cui sine will be a ne-dining Cuban restaurant in the space that once housed Garelds restaurant, and the Dunkin Donuts store will be in a space that formerly housed a KFC. Glidewell said the smoothie store will be near the Books-AMillion, and the pizza restaurant will be in the space that formerly housed Sbarro. The gross leasable area at the Lake Square Mall, including out-parcels, is 559,000 square feet, according to Glidewell. Gross leasable space in the mall itself is 520,177 square feet. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 12CASH 3 . ............................................... 5-9-6 Afternoon . .......................................... 2-3-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-4-1-7 Afternoon . ....................................... 5-6-7-1FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 11FANTASY 5 . ......................... 10-15-21-24-35 MEGA MONEY . ...................... 14-15-23-299 MEGA MILLIONS . ................ 3-42-44-47-578 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The outside of Crystal River Mall is shown. MALL FROM PAGE A1 %  en Stipend for the clubs faculty advisor The Federal Equal Ac cess Act and the First Amendment prohibit discrimination against public school clubs, Mat Staver, founder and chairman of Liberty Counsel, said in a press release. Equal Access means exactly what it says equal access to every school facility used by other clubs, he said. This includes the use of classroom facilities, intercom systems, bulletin boards, yearbook, nancial sponsorship and any other benet afforded to secular clubs. After settling an ini tial lawsuit led by the ACLU last May over the gay-straight club at Carver Middle, the School Board came up with a new policy that dened student clubs. According to the Liber ty Counsel suit, clubs like the Art Club and Drama Club at Mount Dora High are classied as curricular clubs, clubs like the Future Business Leaders of America and Na tional Honor Society are classied as co-curricular clubs, and clubs like the FCA and Key Club are classied as non-curricular with little or no rights. The FCA has been desig nated non-curricular. The gay-straight club at Carver Middle also has been classied non-cur ricular, which resulted in a second ACLU suit in December because club members have not been allowed to meet on school grounds this school year. The initial ACLU suit in May was settled within days when the School Board allowed the club to meet for three weeks until the end of last years school year. FCA is an international Christian organization and the largest Christian sports ministry in the world. FCA is instilling com munity responsibility, leadership, morality and character development in the hearts of young people, Staver said. Why Mount Dora High School refuses to support this kind of club is be yond absurd. Also named as de fendants in the Liberty Counsel suit are Superin tendent Dr. Susan Moxley and school Principal Pam Chateauneuf. In addition to the FCA, plaintiffs in the suit are four students a 10th grader, an 11th grader and two 12th graders and club faculty advisor Gerald Buell, who also claims discrimination. According to the suit, other club faculty advisors receive stipends of at least $500 a year. Buell said he did, too, prior to the 200809 school year, but hes received nothing since because the FCA is considered a religious club. Buell, a history teacher at Mount Dora High, was in the news in 2011 when he was suspended concerning anti-gay comments he made on his Facebook page. He was returned to the classroom when Moxley sided with Buells argument that he had a First Amendment right to make such com ments. Buell was assisted in his defense by a lawyer from Liberty Counsel. The FCA is asking the court to grant it co-cur ricular club status and benets. The suit also seeks damages, saying the club policy is view point-based and thus discriminatory. School ofcials could not be reached for comment Saturday. It has been a School Board policy in the past to refuse com ment on pending court action. SUITS FROM PAGE A1 Lake Minnehaha is about a foot and a quar ter higher than it was at this time last year, he said. The downside is it is slightly 3 feet below the bottom end of our regula tory range. In addition, because the water district wanted to keep as much water as possible in the Harris Chain of Lakes, ofcials have closed the three dams between the lakes, which has resulted in no water moving through the chain of lakes, Perry said. We have not been able to take advantage of the nutrient reduction facility and its ability to send high quality water down stream from Lake Apopka because there has been no ow from the system, he added. Water experts have cautioned that Central Florida has just ve years or so to nd an alterna tive water supply before withdrawals from the Floridan Aquifer could begin impacting lakes, wetlands and springs. There will be a demand of an additional 300 million gallons of water by 2035 and there is only an additional 50 million gallons that can be met from the aquifer, water experts have said. Perry said currently withdrawals are a minor component in relation to lake levels, explain ing water taken from the lakes for irrigation pur poses has an impact, too. For example, he said, if all 259 homes around Lake Minnehaha irrigat ed from the lake two days a week year round, the loss would result in the use of 202 million gal lons per year, amounting to 1.7 percent of the lakes volume. Withdrawals are a component, he said, ex plaining those who take water from the lakes for irrigation purposes are also contributing to low lake levels. Commissioner Sean Parks said he is con cerned there may be oth er things that are blocking or altering the ow of water into the Clermont Chain of Lakes, resulting in potentially lower lake levels. Perry said the LCWA is unaware of any of these. We are still evaluating the area, but we have not found anything at this time, he said. Commissioner Leslie Campione also expressed concern about low levels in the Holly Chain. I do wonder about withdrawals happening with the sand mine in the area, she said. Perry said there is no indication sand mines have an effect on lake levels. However, he said north ern Lake County, where the Holly Chain is located, has had the least amount of rainfall throughout the entire county. LAKES FROM PAGE A1 MARTIN GRIFFITHAssociated PressFederal land managers abruptly ended the roundup of cattle on public land in southern Nevada owned by a ranch er who has refused to recognize their au thority, citing a serious concern for the safety of employees and the public. Bureau of Land Management chief Neil Kornze made the announcement Satur day morning as hundreds of people, in cluding militia members, gathered near the roundup area to protest the removal of hundreds of Cliven Bundys cattle. The ght between Bundy and the Bu reau of Land Management has widened into a debate about states rights and federal land-use policy. The bureau revoked Bundys grazing rights after he stopped paying grazing fees and disregarded fed eral court orders to remove his animals. Kornzes announcement came after Bundy repeatedly promised to do whatever it takes to protect his property.Feds end cattle roundup in Nevada Every Wednesday in

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Tickets still available for Dining in the DarkThis unique dinner is an expedition into the world of smell, taste, sound and texture as guests experience dinner served in darkness at the fourth annual Dining in the Dark event on May 2 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora. The dinner is designed to raise awareness and funds for New Vision for Independence, the local non-prot that provides rehabilitation, community education and support services for people dealing with blindness or low vision. For information or to purchase tickets, $60 for general seating and $440 for a private table of eight, go to www.newvision.org, or call Chantel Buck at 352-435-5040.WILDWOOD Annual The Villages Craft Festival at BrownwoodThe Brownwood Paddock Square will host the annual The Villages Craft Festival, from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p .m., Saturday and April 20 with free admission to guests. The Festival at Brownwood continues to grow and highlight the talents of many unique crafters, while enjoying the streets of this community. Find great one-of-a-kind craft items and sample great food while listening to live music. For information, call 352-753-2270.LADY LAKE Uncle Donalds Farm hosts Easter eventsVisit the Easter Bunnys country cousin, from 10 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., on Saturday at Uncle Donalds Farm, 2713 Grifn Ave. Kids can participate in the egg hunt at 1 / p.m., and pet a rabbit, milk a goat, bottle-feed the farms kids and take a hayride. Uncle Donalds Farm will be closed on Easter. Admission is $9.75 per person plus tax. For information, call Uncle Donalds Farm at 352-753-2882.EUSTIS Earth Day cleanup, planting planned for Marsh Park Lake County park rangers invite residents to celebrate Earth Day by helping to plant owers and cleanup debris from 8:30 to 10:30 / a.m. on April 22 at Marsh Park and Boat Ramp, 36545 Yale Retreat Road. Garbage bags, trash pickers and rubber gloves will be provided. For information or to register for the cleanup, call the Lake County Parks & Trails Division, at 352-2534950, or email parksandtrails@lakecounty.govSORRENTO Poetry month contest ongoingThe East Lake County Library is sponsoring the 12th Annual Poetry Contest open to all ages in three age groups: Children to age; Teens age 1318; and the adult group, age 19 and up. For information, call 352 -383-9980.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comUmatilla needs to raise water and wastewater rates by more than 70 per cent over the next three years, according to its city manager. All customers would ex perience the rate increase, City Manager Glenn Irby said. A rate study by Public Resources Management Group recommended, for both the water and waste water systems, a rst rev enue adjustment of 22 percent as soon as prac tical, and then another 12 percent increase starting on the rst day of Oc tober each year in 2015, 2016 and 2017. The chang es would amount to a cu mulative increase of 71.4 percent from the present rates, according to the study. The revenue adjustment would come from differ ent sources, according to Irby, including meter sizes and amount of water used. The 22 percent is a blended rate increase overall, Irby said of the rst adjustment. He explained the base rate for all meters right now is $7.70, and that would be going up for everyone. If you own a large retail establishment and you need a six-inch me ter for volume your abil ity to use a greater volume of water over me, at my house, is tremendous, Irby said. So, the system has been established, the entire city system has been established on volume and its believed and the rate study is based on the fact that because you have bigger abilities than I do, then you should pay more for the availability, Irby said. There is also a charge ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lost Lake Elementary School Principal Rhonda Hunt leans to kiss Chris P. Bacon.Principal puckers up for Crisp P. BaconCLERMONT UMATILLA Water, sewage costs could go upSEE RATES | A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAn alternative name for what now is being called The Celebra tion Center in Clermont is still up in the air, but the citys name on the structure might turn out to be decisive. So far, thats the consensus of many residents and city ofcials as they continue debating the 140 suggested names for the for mer Celebration of Praise church property purchased by Clermont in December for use as a commu nity center. According to city records, 82 of those suggesting names expressed their wish that Clermont be CLERMONTWhats in a new name? SEE NAME | A6 Staff reportThe Young Families Health Ini tiative Committee of Lake County is hosting its upcoming 25th An nual Baby Fair: An Event for First Time Parents. The event will be held on April 29, at the Lake County Agricultur al Center, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares and on May 7, at the Lees burg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave. in Leesburg. New parents will have an oppor tunity to learn about child safe ty, early learning, positive parent ing and healthy lifestyles at both events, Elisha Pappacoda, a coun ty public information ofcer for the county, said in a press release. The fairs are open to rsttime or special-needs parents in cluding women who are current ly pregnant as well as parents of LEESBURGBaby Fair set for April 29SEE FAIR | A6 MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIALJason Cochran, of Press For Time in Tavares, tends to some pulled pork on the grill during the citys annual Planes, Trains & BBQ on Saturday in Wooton Park. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comThousands showed up to cele brate some of the Souths favor ite foods on Saturday at the annu al Planes, Trains & BBQ in Wooton Park in Tavares. From ribs, pork and brisket to deep-fried bacon and Devils Blood hot sauce, pork lovers had their choice. A big focus of the day were the 28 barbecue vendors who showed up for the Florida B-B-Q Associa tion-sanctioned event. These in cluded: Ring of Fire, Backyard Brothers, Smoked Butt BBQ and Big Papas Country Kitchen. Its all about using the right grill, said Charlie Hall, of Smoked Butt, using a Lang grill, heated with wood. For $5 each, more than 200 people waddled through the line to pick up a tiny cup of barbecue from pans, which didnt identify the cook, then voting for the barbecue they liked the best. It took taster John Lamb about two minutes to get through all the pork samples, but he made it clear none tasted the same. They all have a distinct southern avor, he said. There also was plenty of enter tainment, including an air show, seaplane rides, a vintage car show and live musical acts. The live air show was comprised of four acts, including performer Patty Wagstaff, a six-time member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team and winner of gold, silver and bronze medals. She thrilled audiences with complex daredevil stunts such as eight-point rolls and death-defying rollovers in her Extra-300S plane. Her stunts reached speeds up to 250 mph and heights of about 3,000 feet and left smoke loops and lines in the air that garnered several oohs and aahs from the crowd gathered in the park and on near by streets. You dont even have to be there to enjoy it, said Thomas Lang, watching the show from nearby Caroline Avenue. In addition to the aerial exhibitions, the U.S. Special Ops Para chute Team executed precision freefall parachute maneuvers. Back this year was a train ride where dozens of residents climbed aboard the Orange Blossom Can nonball and watched a staged robbery complete with cowboys and bad guys.TAVARESBBQ draws crowds to Wooton Park ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comFresh off a spate of recent public and television appearances, Chris P. Bacon a Clermont pig born with no hind legs visited Lost Lake Elementary School for the second consecutive year. School Principal Rhonda Hunt puckered up, kissing Chris P.s pink snout in front of her entire student body of almost 1,000, as a way to reward them for the hard work they put into raising money for a school playground recently. I missed my piggy boyfriend, she said. I hadnt seen him for a whole year. Chris P. weighed about 5 pounds then; now, he weighs about 73. Veterinarian Dr. Len Lucero said Chris P. loves the attention but gets spooked by too much noise. On Thursday, the children chanting Kiss the pig, kiss the pig, be fore Hunt nally obliged. The kids really love seeing Chris P. Bacon. They remember him vis iting, they remember the kiss and at the same time, they get the wonderful message he inspires to never give up, Hunt said.

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 OBITUARIESRobert E. NormanRobert E. Norman, January 8, 1934-March 31, 2014. Robert (Bob) Norman, 80, of Cassopolis, MI and Yalaha, FL, passed into the arms of his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, on March 31, 2014. He spent 30+ years at Eastman Kodak in Rochester, N.Y., in various staff and supervisory positions. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Barbara (Bobbi); daughters, Andrea Posey, and Kristen Haigh, 3 grandchildren, Isabeau, Alex, and Bastian Posey. A Memori al service will be held 7:30 / p.m., Fri day, April 18, 2014, at Welsheimer Family Fu neral Home North, 17033 Cleveland Rd. Friends may visit with the family one hour prior to the service. Any gifts in his memory may be directed to Mishawaka First Baptist Church, 724 N. Main St., Mishawaka, IN 46545. Family and friends may leave e-mail condolences at www.welsheimer.com.William Ray RogersWilliam Ray Rogers, at the age of 88, died Wednesday, April 19, 2014 in Tavares, Florida, of a pre-existing med ical condition. He has been a residence of Tavares for over 40 years. Ray was born January 13, 1926 at St. Peters burg, Florida to Wil liam Cleveland WC and Ruby Pearl Rogers. He was the oldest of four children. He is sur vived by a sister, Ginger Arnold of Pennsylvania: three children, Debra Hayes of South Carolina, Pamela MacSorley of Georgia: Ray mond Scott Rogers of Arkansas; a companion, Charlotte Sue Evans of Tavares, Florida; and Sues daughter, Anna Kornhaus of Clermont, Florida. He was the proud grandfa ther of eight grandchil dren and eleven great grandchildren. Ray was in the U.S. Army during World War II and at tended Tri-State College in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He began a career as a chemical engineer at Davisson Chemicals of Florida and many oth er companies through out his life time. He re tired and opened up Mr. Rays Mini Mart of Tava res and became known for Mr. Rays Barbeque sauce. Afterwards, he as a familiar face at United Southern Bank as a security ofcer. Ray was a life time member of the Mason, National Rie Association and the Lions Club. He was a sup porter of organizations such as Stop Turning Out Prisoners and Wooten Park. He enjoyed photography, family, shing and cooking. To sum up Rays life is to say that he enjoyed life to the fullest including sky-diving at the age of 70. A memorial ceremony will be held on Monday, April 14, 2014 at 1:00 / p.m. in the fu neral home chapel. Ar rangements are entrusted to Steverson, Hamiln and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL, (352) 343-4444. Condolences, memories and photos may be shared on the tribute wall at www.SteversonHamilinHilbish.comMr. Willard R. SnyderMr. Willard (Will) R. Snyder, 82 of Lees burg, Florida passed away Wednesday, April 9, 2014. Born in Cincin nati, Ohio, he moved to Leesburg from Kansas City, MO in 1997. He was a mechanic for Cin cinnati Bell Telephone Company. He was a vol unteer reman, a U. S. Army Veteran of the Ko rean Conict, a member of the DAV and the First Presbyterian Church of Umatilla. He is survived by his wife: Erleen Sny der, Leesburg, FL; sons: Willard T. (Debbie) Sny der, Hamilton, OH; James A. (Karen) Snyder, Fishers, IN; daughter: Cynthia A. (James) Walther, Aurora, IN; broth ers: Kenneth Snyder, Cincinnati, OH; Armand Snyder, Goshen, OH; 9 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren.Ernest A. SotoErnest A. Soto (Er nie) 84, of Globe, AZ passed away peacefully at home on April 6, 2014, with his daughter and caregiver, Maria-Elena Soto at his side. Born in Miami, AZ October 2, 1929, to Anthony and Angela (Alvarez) Soto. Ernie graduated from Miami High School in 1947 and joined the Army Air Corps. He re tired from the Air Force as MSGT, Intelligence Specialist, in 1967. Er nie graduated from the University of Maryland, from Boston Universi ty with a MA in political science, and completed Russian Language School at Syracuse Uni versity. He relished teaching government for 25 years at Leesburg High School in Florida. He loved his students and felt it a privilege to be their instructor. Er nie served the commu nity as a Lion, and as Past District Governor of District 21 B in 20012002. He was currently a member of the Palm Coast Lions in Florida, and the Mesa Host Li ons in Arizona. He had received several Lions International Presidential awards over the years, was a Lion of the Year in Lions District 21 B, served on the Melvin Jones Memorial Board and C. Kirby Smithe In ternational Lions Youth Camp Board, and also as district chairper son for Lions Quest Youth programs in Ar izona. Ernie enjoyed years of deep sea sh ing with Maria-Elena, David and other family members and friends on the Fluffy Series especially Fluffy III in the Atlantic off the Cen tral Florida Coast, never forgetting the rst exiting of a very con fused Ponce Inlet! Er nie is predeceased by his parents, and his brother Marcello Soto. He is survived by his daughter, Maria-Elena Soto, of Globe, AZ, his former spouse of 36 years and mother of Maria-Elena Soto, Janet White Soto, David Bai ley and wife Bonnie and family, of Palm Coast, Florida; his sons; Michael Soto and wife Me lissa, of Ohio, and Ran dall Soto, his sister Alma Nina, his granddaughter Jasmine (Soto) Ur ban, his grandson Jared A. Soto; his great grandson Miles D. Urban. A memorial celebration of Ernies life is planned for Saturday, October 4, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. at a park-like setting TBA a few weeks prior. Assist ing the family; Lamont Mortuary of Globe.DEATH NOTICESRoy BeltonRoy Belton, 77, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations.Linda Lee RountreeLinda Lee Rountree, 74, of Ferndale, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors.Joseph Neil SmithJoseph Neil Smith, 81, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors.Edward Lodge WilsonEdward Lodge Wilson, 66, of Tavares died Thursday, April 10, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! IN MEMORY SOTO based on how much water customers use, and that rate will be go ing up as well, Irby said. He added that dormant accounts, such as places where snowbirds live, will also be charged with a minimal amount under the current proposal. On city utility bills are charges for alternative water, storm water and garbage, which will not go up, as well as water, sewage and utility taxes, which will go up, according to city documents. For the rst year un der the recommended increases, a user with av erage monthly usage of 2,000 gallons would see his or her utility bill in crease from the current $70.18 to $76.95. Someone with an average of 4,000 gallons would see an increase from a cur rent $79.05 to $86.86 and someone who uses 8,000 gallons would see an in crease from a current $98.51 to $108.71. There are approximately $12.4 million in necessary repairs and upgrades that city staff have identied, according to the study. Of that number, $6.3 mil lion of these are to be completed during scal 2018, with $1.23 million of that coming from a Florida grant. Weve got an aged sys tem, Irby said, adding it was somewhere between 40 and 60 years old. The system is not sustainable as it is, Irby said. The study also rec ommends, without additional future rate studies, a minimum rate increase. The current ordinance includes all the recommended increases, according to Irby. The current water and wastewater rates in Umatilla have been con stant since 2008, according to the rate study. Two public hearings will he held to talk about the increases. The second hearing will only happen if the council does not vote down the revenue increases at the rst hearing, and the council can also change the recommended framework outlined in the rate study, Irby said. A notice on the hear ings will go out in the next utility bill, and the rst hearing will be on June 2, Irby said. RATES FROM PAGE A3

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrfrf$50 OFF 3ROOMS& A HALL$99ntfbfrb EXTENDED OFFERS! Se Habla Espaol (352) 735-6941CALL US OR STOP IN OVER 33 YEARS*******SAME LOCATION 17 YEARS US 441Old 44119A K SPECIAL LOAN RATES GOODUSEDSTUFFNeed Cash for Your Gold Jewelry? No Need to Sell It! You Can Borrow on It!PAWNNEED CASH?10%15%Conditions apply offer expires Aug 31, 2014CALL FOR DETAILS newborns, she said. The free events include educational programs and opportunities to visit informational booths of local agencies and non-prot organi zations. The programs are the same at each location, so participants are asked to choose the most convenient ses sion. Registration for each event is from 5:15 6 / p.m. and the pro gram begins at 6:15 / p .m. The 25th annual Baby Fair is made possible through a partnership with agencies such as The Florida Department of Health in Lake County, UF/IFAS Exten sion Lake County, Ear ly Learning Coalition, Healthy Families and Kids Central, Inc. Major sponsors in clude Central Florida Health Alliance/Leesburg Regional Medical Center, Florida Hospi tal Waterman, Kiwanis Clubs, Staywell and Lake County quilting groups. For more information, contact Stacy Mor gan at 352-314-6933 or Stacy.Morgan@kidscentralinc.org. FAIR FROM PAGE A3 included in the name of the center, 15 wanted to include Gem of the Hills or Gem in the name and 15 wanted to keep the word Celebration or Celebrate. City spokesperson Doris Bloodsworth, whose background in cludes marketing, gave city commissioners a few things to think about last week as they decide on the new name. She said a num ber of people wanted to include Summit, Hill or Mountain in the name and that some wanted the building named after a person, either living or dead. Clear is better than clever, she said. Clear is the new sexy because, unless you have Nikes marketing budget, its often better to choose a name that says what you are. The police station will always be the Clermont Police Sta tion. So, with that said, you may want to con sider a name such as The Clermont Center for Culture & Rec reation. If you choose a name that doesnt in clude Clermont, or de nes what the build ing is, just know that it will take more time for the name to catch on, and that opportunities will be lost when peo ple search on Google or other search engines for recreation or Cler mont facilities. Bloodsworth also rec ommended that a name should stand the test of time, noting that South Clermont or sim ilar locater names, such as South Annex, may change if population increases grow to the south. If people feel strongly about the name Gem of the Hills, because it has such long ties to the city, then that could be used when naming something like the facil itys performance hall, Bloodsworth suggested. The three most pop ular names suggested were Clermont Civic Center, Clermont Complex and Celebrate Cl ermont Center, Bloodsworth said. Mayor Hall Turville wasnt excited about any of them. He suggested the names City of Cler mont South Annex, or The City of Clermont Multiplex and agreed the word Clermont needs to be included in the name. Keith Mullins said hed like to see the main facility named after its main function The Clermont Arts and Rec reation Center with individual names for each center or inside fa cility. The discussion was tabled until May 13, to go along with the discussion of a what fees might be charged for use of the associated recreational facilities, such as the swimming pool and event hall. Recreations Director Dave Teske also pre sented the council with a preliminary fee schedule overview as suggest ed by city staff based on a determination of what similar centers charge. Membership fees, Teske said, may include $1 per day membership fee for residents. Suggested weekly passes would be $5, monthly would be $15, individual season pass would be $40 and family pass (for as many as ve) on a seasonal basis would be $120 for six months. Tentatively, Teske said the season for the pool would probably be June 7 to Sept 28. The center is scheduled to open on June 7 with an ofcial ribbon-cutting celebration on June 6. NAME FROM PAGE A3 MARCIA DUNNAP Aerospace WriterCAPE CANAVERAL NASA has ordered spacewalking repairs for a serious comput er outage at the Inter national Space Station. A backup computer for some robotic sys tems failed Friday. The main computer is ne and the six-man crew is safe, but the mal function puts next weeks supply run in jeopardy. Mission managers agreed Saturday that a spacewalk is needed to replace the bad computer. But ofcials want one more day before deciding whether the situation is safe enough in orbit to proceed with Mondays SpaceX launch as planned. NASA promised to decide today whether to delay the delivery mission. No date for the spacewalk has been set yet; ofcials indicated it could occur sometime in the next week or so. The job is among those practiced by the astronauts be fore ight. The SpaceX Drag on capsule holds more than 2 tons of sta tion supplies and sci ence experiments at Cape Canaveral. The shipment is already a month late for unrelat ed reasons. If the Dragon soars Monday launch time is 4:58 / p .m. EDT then it would reach the orbiting lab on Wednesday. Flight controllers want to make sure enough redundancy exists at the space sta tion before commit ting to the launch. The bad computer, called an MDM or mul tiplexer-demultiplexer, is among more than a dozen located on the outside of the space station, used to route commands to various systems. Ofcials said the fail ure has had no impact on the scientic and other work being conducted by the astro nauts: three Russians, two Americans and one Japanese.NASA orders spacewalk to deal with computer outage

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This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) PETER LEONARDAssociated PressDONETSK, Ukraine Men in the uniforms of Ukraines now-defunct riot police on Saturday occupied police headquarters in Donetsk, the eastern city that is one of the ashpoints of a wave of pro-Russia protests, hours after armed men seized local police headquarters and local branch of the Security Service in a nearby city. Interior Minister Arsen Avakov described the unrest as Russian aggression and said Ukraines security ofcials would be gathering for an ex traordinary meeting late Satur day evening. The unrest in Donetsk and the city of Slovyansk, about 90 kilometers (55 miles) to the north, were the latest shows of spiraling anger in eastern Ukraine, which has a large Russian-speaking population and was also the support base for Viktor Yanukovych, the Ukrainian president who was ousted in February after months of protests in the capital, Kiev. Ethnic Russians in Ukraines east widely fear that the authorities who took over after Yanukovychs fall will suppress them. In Slovyansk, the mayor said the men who seized the police station were demanding a ref erendum on autonomy and possible annexation by Rus sia. Protesters in other eastern cities have made similar de mands after a referendum in Crimea last month in which voters opted to split off from Ukraine, leading to annexation by Russia. Witnesses said the men who entered the police building in Donetsk were wearing the uniforms of the Berkut, the feared riot police squad that was dis banded in February after Ya nukovychs ouster. Berkut of cers violent dispersal of a demonstration in Kiev in No vember set off vast protests in the capital that culminated in bloodshed in February when more than 100 people died in sniper re; the acting govern ment says the snipers were po lice. It was not immediately clear if the men who occupied the Donetsk police building had made any demands, but the Donetsk police chief said on national television that he was forced to offer his resignation. AP FILE PHOTO Crimeas Russian-backed leader Sergey Aksyonov gestures as people celebrate in Lenin Square recently, in downtown Simferopol, Ukraine. DEB RIECHMANNAssociated PressWASHINGTON The Treasury Department on Friday sanctioned the former vice speaker of the Ukrainian par liament, six Crimean separatist leaders and a Crimea-based gas company over Russias takeover of the Crimean Peninsula. Crimea is occupied territory, said David Cohen, the undersecre tary for terrorism and nancial intelligence. We will continue to impose costs on those involved in ongoing violations of Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity. In March, President Barack Obama slapped new visa restrictions on Russian and other opponents of Ukraines gov ernment in Kiev and au thorized wider nancial penalties against those involved in the military intervention or in steal ing state assets. On April 1, Congress sent the president a bill to provide $1 billion to cashpoor Ukraine and targeted sanctions to punish Russia for its bold an nexation of part of the former Soviet republic. Those sanctioned were: Pyotr Zima, the head of the Security Service of Ukraines main directorate in Crimea, who was dis missed by the interim Ukrainian president for taking an oath of loyalty to the new Crimean authorities. Aleksei Chaliy, the chairman of a coor dinating council that worked on setting up administration for the city of Sevastopol, who signed the March agree ment to unite Crimea and the city with Russia. Temirgaliev Rustam, Yuriy Zherebtsov, Mikhail Malyshev and Valery Medvedev, who are accused of playing roles in the March refer endum, paving the way for Russias annexation of Crimea. Sergey Tsekov, the former vice speaker of Ukraines parliament, who allegedly was re sponsible for facilitating the referendum. The gas compa ny, Chernomorneftegaz, was sanctioned for being allegedly complicit in the misappropriation of state assets of Ukraine.Ukrainian police HQ occupied ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO / AP Men in the uniforms of Ukraines nowdefunct riot police on Saturday occupied police headquarters in Donetsk. US levies more sanctions on Russia

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB Leesburg, FL34748 NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatrist

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014www.dailycommercial.comMLB: Schedule for rst half of season / B4-B5 LC HOOPS HONORS REFEREE LEESBURGPHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX LUDICKMiguel Carrion, center, holds Jim Frana Award, presented to one of the top volunteers in Lake County Hoops, a recreational basketball league based in Clermont. The award is named for Jim Frana, a longtime LC Hoops member, who died in 2012. Standing with Carrion is (from left) Alex Ludick, co-founder of the organization and its current director, and Franas son, Trevor. LC Hoops recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake County is a lot of things and one of those might be the un ofcial shufeboard capital of Florida. And to be even more precise, Leesburg is home to some of the top players in the state. The ladies of the Hawthorne Shufeboard Club laid claim to that title recently at the Northern District Shufeboard Associa tion Masters Tournament in New Smyrna Beach at the Coronado Mainland Shufe board Club. A trio of players rep resenting Hawthorne took top honors in the Pro division and one nished as the top amateur. Sue McLaughlin, Donna King and Sha ron Upson won at the Womens Pro Division with Nancy Andrews earning a win among amateurs. Marion Lohbusch, a member of Florida Shufeboard Hall of Fame, nished second in the Pro division, and Carol Adams, who like ly will become a Hall of Famer, nished third. Among the men who compete for Hawthorne, Gary Mc Laughlin nished second and Pat King was third in the Mens Pro Division. The Masters Tournament is a tournament lasting anywhere from two to four days. It pits the best eight play ers in each division against each other.Local shuffleboarders step up at Masters AL BEHRMAN / AP Tampa Bay starting pitcher Alex Cobb throws against the Reds in the rst inning of Saturdays game in Cincinnati. The Rays won 1-0. JOE KAYAssociated PressCINCINNATI Alex Cobb went seven in nings on Saturday, extending Tampa Bays run of solid starting pitching, and James Loney homered for a 1-0 victory over the slumping Cincinnati Reds. The Rays came into the interleague series with a 1-8 mark against Cincinnati. Theyve taken the rst two games with shut down pitching and just enough offense. Cobb (1-1) pitched seven shutout inning against Texas on Sunday but got a no-de cision. He kept the scoreless streak go ing Saturday, limit ing Cincinnatis strug gling lineup to four hits without walking a batter. Grant Balfour, who fanned Brayan Pena with the bases loaded to end Friday nights game, got three outs for his fourth save in as many chances, nishing off the four-hitter. Loney led off the second inning with his rst homer against Alfredo Simon (1-1), who matched his ca reer high with eight in nings and allowed only ve hits. Cincinnati stranded a pair at third base and had runners thrown out at third and home, extending its run of wasteful offense. The Reds have lost all four of their series this sea son, falling to 3-8 for the rst time since Cobb goes 7 strong, Rays beat Reds 1-0 CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Jordan Spieth hits to the 13th green during Saturdays third round at the Masters in Augusta, Ga. Speith and Bubba Watson begin todays nal round in a tie for rst place. PAUL NEWBERRYAssociated PressAUGUSTA, Ga. Young and old. Even without Tiger Woods, this Masters has a little bit of everything. Twenty-year-old Jor dan Spieth is making quite a bid to become golfs youngest ma jor champion in more than 80 years with three straight sub-par rounds in his Augusta National debut. Hell have to fend off 50-year-old Mi guel Angel Jimenez and 54-year-old Fred Cou ples, both hoping to be come the sports oldest major champion. And lets not forget Bubba Watson, who stumbled a bit on mov ing day but will go for his second green jacket in three years from the nal group. Spieth, who last year became the youngest MASTERS Bubba Watson -5 Jordan Spieth -5 Matt Kuchar -4 Jonas Blixt -4 MIguel Angel-Jimenez -3 Rickie Fowler -3 Lee Westwood -2 Jim Furyk -2 Thomas Bjorn -2 Justin Rose -1 Kevin Stadler -1 Spieth, Watson tied for lead at the MastersSEE MASTERS | B2SEE RAYS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 AUTO RACING Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach After Saturday qualifying; race today At Long Beach Street Circuit Long Beach, Calif. Lap length: 1.968 miles (Car number in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 104.462 mph. 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 104.28. 3. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 104.253. 4. (67) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 104.173. 5. (98) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 104.108. 6. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 104.076. 7. (9) Scott Dixon, Chevrolet, 104.191. 8. (25) Marco Andretti, Honda, 104.161. 9. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 104.017. 10. (19) Justin Wilson, Honda, 104.002. 11. (34) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 103.958. 12. (16) Oriol Servia, Honda, 103.65. 13. (10) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 103.515. 14. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 104.011. 15. (14) Takuma Sato, Honda, 103.328. 16. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 103.632. 17. (20) Mike Conway, Chevrolet, 103.322. 18. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 103.625. 19. (83) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 103.201. 20. (7) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 103.53. 21. (18) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 103.119. 22. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 102.735. 23. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 102.595. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB y-Toronto 46 33 .582 x-Brooklyn 43 36 .544 3 New York 34 45 .430 12 Boston 24 55 .304 22 Philadelphia 17 62 .215 29 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 54 25 .684 x-Washington 41 38 .519 13 x-Charlotte 40 39 .506 14 Atlanta 36 43 .456 18 Orlando 23 56 .291 31 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 54 26 .675 x-Chicago 47 32 .595 6 Cleveland 32 48 .400 22 Detroit 29 51 .363 25 Milwaukee 15 64 .190 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB z-San Antonio 62 18 .775 x-Houston 52 27 .658 9 Dallas 48 32 .600 14 Memphis 47 32 .595 14 New Orleans 32 47 .405 29 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 58 21 .734 x-Portland 52 28 .650 6 Minnesota 40 39 .506 18 Denver 35 44 .443 23 Utah 24 55 .304 34 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 56 24 .700 x-Golden State 49 30 .620 6 Phoenix 47 32 .595 8 Sacramento 27 53 .338 29 L.A. Lakers 25 54 .316 30 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Fridays Games Washington 96, Orlando 86 New York 108, Toronto 100 Atlanta 93, Brooklyn 88 Boston 106, Charlotte 103 Miami 98, Indiana 86 Chicago 106, Detroit 98 Minnesota 112, Houston 110 Oklahoma City 116, New Orleans 94 Memphis 117, Philadelphia 95 Milwaukee 119, Cleveland 116 San Antonio 112, Phoenix 104 Portland 111, Utah 99 Golden State 112, L.A. Lakers 95 Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers 117, Sacramento 101 Milwaukee at Washington, late Philadelphia at Charlotte, late Boston at Cleveland, late Miami at Atlanta, late New Orleans at Houston, late Phoenix at Dallas, late Utah at Denver, late Todays Games Oklahoma City at Indiana, 1 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. Orlando at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Chicago at New York, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Mondays Games Miami at Washington, 7 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. FOOTBALL Arena League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF P A Arizona 3 0 0 1.000 193 142 Los Angeles 2 1 0 .667 148 141 San Antonio 0 4 0 .000 122 222 Pacic W L T Pct PF P A Spokane 2 1 0 .667 186 165 San Jose 2 2 0 .500 243 188 Portland 0 3 0 .000 104 148 AMERICAN CONFERENCE South W L T Pct PF P A Orlando 3 2 0 .600 285 293 Tampa Bay 3 2 0 .600 266 267 Jacksonville 2 2 0 .500 208 175 New Orleans 1 3 0 .250 159 210 East W L T Pct PF P A Cleveland 3 0 0 1.000 154 126 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 227 141 Iowa 1 2 0 .333 122 154 Philadelphia 1 3 0 .250 206 251 Thursdays Games Philadelphia 69, Orlando 56 Fridays Games Pittsburgh 56, New Orleans 14 Jacksonville 60, Tampa Bay 41 Saturdays Games San Antonio at Iowa, late Cleveland at Los Angeles, late Portland at Spokane, late Arizona at San Jose, late Friday, April 18 San Antonio at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. San Jose at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday, April 19 Jacksonville at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Orlando, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Iowa, 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 9 p.m. Cleveland at Spokane, 10 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 81 54 18 9 117 259 174 x-Tampa Bay 81 45 27 9 99 239 215 x-Montreal 81 45 28 8 98 214 204 x-Detroit 81 38 28 15 91 219 230 Ottawa 80 35 31 14 84 232 263 Toronto 81 38 35 8 84 231 255 Florida 81 29 44 8 66 194 265 Buffalo 81 21 51 9 51 154 244 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 81 51 24 6 108 247 204 x-N.Y. Rangers 81 45 31 5 95 218 192 x-Philadelphia 81 42 30 9 93 231 229 x-Columbus 81 42 32 7 91 228 214 Washington 81 38 30 13 89 235 239 New Jersey 81 34 29 18 86 194 206 Carolina 81 35 35 11 81 201 225 N.Y. Islanders 81 33 37 11 77 221 264 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Colorado 81 52 22 7 111 248 217 x-St. Louis 81 52 22 7 111 248 188 x-Chicago 81 46 20 15 107 262 213 x-Minnesota 81 43 26 12 98 204 199 x-Dallas 81 40 30 11 91 234 226 Nashville 80 36 32 12 84 202 234 Winnipeg 82 37 35 10 84 227 237 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Anaheim 80 52 20 8 112 259 204 x-San Jose 81 50 22 9 109 246 198 x-Los Angeles 81 46 28 7 99 203 170 Phoenix 80 36 29 15 87 212 227 Vancouver 80 35 34 11 81 189 217 Calgary 81 35 39 7 77 208 236 Edmonton 81 28 44 9 65 198 268 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Fridays Games N.Y. Islanders 3, New Jersey 2, SO Washington 4, Chicago 0 Carolina 2, Detroit 1 Tampa Bay 3, Columbus 2 Dallas 3, St. Louis 0 Winnipeg 5, Calgary 3 San Jose 5, Colorado 1 Saturdays Games Boston 4, Buffalo 1 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, late Toronto at Ottawa, late Columbus at Florida, late Chicago at Nashville, late San Jose at Phoenix, late Vancouver at Edmonton, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late Todays Games Detroit at St. Louis, 12:30 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 3 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 3 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m. SOCCER MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 3 1 0 9 7 4 Toronto FC 3 2 0 9 5 5 Sport ing Kansas City 2 1 2 8 5 4 Philadelphia 1 1 4 7 8 8 Houston 2 2 0 6 7 6 Chicago 0 1 5 5 9 10 D.C. 1 2 1 4 4 6 New England 1 3 1 4 2 8 New York 0 1 4 4 6 9 Montreal 0 3 3 3 6 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 4 0 1 13 13 6 Colorado 3 1 1 10 8 5 Real Salt Lake 2 0 4 10 10 6 Vancouver 2 1 2 8 8 5 Seattle 2 2 1 7 9 8 Chivas USA 1 2 2 5 6 10 Los Angeles 1 1 1 4 4 2 Portland 0 2 3 3 7 10 San Jose 0 2 1 1 4 6 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturdays Games Philadelphia 2, Real Salt Lake 2, tie Colorado 1, Toronto FC 0 Montreal 1, Chicago 1, tie Houston at New England, late New York at D.C. United, late Seattle FC at FC Dallas, late Vancouver at Los Angeles, late Chivas USA at Portland, late Todays Games Columbus at San Jose, 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 16 Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19 New England at Chicago, 4 p.m. Houston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7 p.m. D.C. United at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Montreal at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m. GOLF Masters At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Third Round a-amateur Jordan Spieth 71-70-70 211 Bubba Watson 69-68-74 211 Jonas Blixt 70-71-71 212 Matt Kuchar 73-71-68 212 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76-66 213 Rickie Fowler 71-75-67 213 Thomas Bjorn 73-68-73 214 Jim Furyk 74-68-72 214 Lee Westwood 73-71-70 214 Fred Couples 71-71-73 215 Justin Rose 76-70-69 215 John Senden 72-68-75 215 Kevin Stadler 70-73-72 215 Ian Poulter 76-70-70 216 Gary Woodland 70-77-69 216 Adam Scott 69-72-76 217 Kevin Streelman 72-71-74 217 Jason Day 75-73-70 218 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 75-69-74 218 Russell Henley 73-70-75 218 Chris Kirk 75-72-71 218 Steve Stricker 72-73-73 218 Jimmy Walker 70-72-76 218 Jamie Donaldson 73-70-76 219 Bernhard Langer 72-74-73 219 Rory McIlroy 71-77-71 219 Louis Oosthuizen 69-75-75 219 Henrik Stenson 73-72-74 219 Steven Bowditch 74-72-74 220 Martin Kaymer 75-72-73 220 Hunter Mahan 74-72-74 220 Bill Haas 68-78-74 220 Vijay Singh 75-71-74 220 Stewart Cink 73-72-76 221 Lucas Glover 75-69-77 221 Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74-73 221 Darren Clarke 74-74-73 221 Brendon de Jonge 74-72-76 222 Billy Horschel 75-72-75 222 Thongchai Jaidee 73-74-75 222 Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72-76 222 K.J. Choi 70-75-78 223 a-Oliver Goss 76-71-76 223 Francesco Molinari 71-76-76 223 Nick Watney 72-75-76 223 Sandy Lyle 76-72-76 224 Brandt Snedeker 70-74-80 224 Mike Weir 73-72-79 224 Stephen Gallacher 71-72-81 224 Joost Luiten 75-73-77 225 Larry Mize 74-72-79 225 TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Sent DH Jason Giambi to Akron (EL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS Placed RHP Scott Feldman on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City (PCL). Optioned RHP Josh Zeid to Oklahoma City. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Recalled LHP Danny Duffy from Omaha (PCL). Optioned 2B Johnny Giavotella to Omaha. MINNESOTA TWINS Placed OF Josh Willingham on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 7. Recalled RHP Michael Tonkin from Rochester (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS Designated OF Sam Fuld for assignment. Reinstated OF Craig Gentry from the 15-day DL. SEATTLE MARINERS Traded RHP Hector Noesi to Texas for a player to be named or cash considerations. TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled OF Kevin Kiermaier from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS Transferred INF Jurickson Profar to the 60-day DL. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Sent LHP Mike Minor to Rome (SAL) for a rehab assignment. CHICAGO CUBS Optioned RHP Brian Schlitter to Iowa (PCL). Recalled LHP Chris Rusin from Iowa. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Sent RHP Mike Adams to Lehigh Valley (IL) for a rehab assignment. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Signed general manager John Mozeliak to a two-year contract extension through the 2018 season. SAN DIEGO PADRES Sent OF Cameron Maybin to El Paso (PCL) for a rehab assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Selected the contract of RHP Blake Treinen from Syracuse (IL). Optioned RHP Aaron Barrett to Syracuse. Placed OF Denard Span on the 7-day DL. Recalled OF Steven Souza Jr. from Syracuse. Recalled INF/OF Jeff Kobernus from Syracuse and placed him on the 60-day DL. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES Reassigned F Zach Boychuk to Charlotte (AHL). DALLAS STARS Recalled F Chris Mueller from Texas (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS Rassigned G Scott Clemmensen to San Antonio (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS Signed G Dustin Tokarski to a two-year contract extension. NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned D Eric Gelinas to Albany (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled F Tyler Gaudet from Sault Ste. Marie (OHL). Signed F Dan ODonoghue to a two-year, entry-level contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS Recalled C Peter LeBlanc from Hershey (AHL). Signed C Chandler Stephenson to a three-year, entry-level contract. American Hockey League ABBOTSFORD HEAT Recalled F David Eddy from Alaska (ECHL). CHICAGO WOLVES Recalled F Yannick Veil leux from Kalamazoo (ECHL). ECHL FORT WAYNE KOMETS Signed D Justin Sefton. LAS VEGAS WRANGLERS Claimed F Michael Neal off waivers from Bakerseld. SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Signed G Pheonix Copley.TV2DAY AUTO RACING 2:30 p.m.NBCSN Indy Lights, at Long Beach, Calif.4 p.m.NBCSN IndyCar, Grand Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif.8 p.m.ESPN2 NHRA, Four-Wide Nationals, at Concord, N.C.COLLEGE BASEBALL 3:30 p.m.ESPNU Texas at OklahomaGOLF 2 p.m.CBS Masters Tournament, nal round, at Augusta, Ga.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Cincinnati1:30 p.m.MLB Washington at Atlanta FS-Florida Miami at Philadelphia2 p.m.WGN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis8 p.m.ESPN Boston at N.Y. YankeesNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 1 p.m.ABC Oklahoma City at Indiana9:30 p.m.NBA Memphis at L.A. LakersNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 12:30 p.m.NBC Detroit at St. Louis7:30 p.m.NBCSN Ottawa at Pittsburgh9 p.m.NBCSN Dallas at PhoenixSOCCER 8:30 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Manchester City at Liverpool11 a.m.FS1 FA Cup, seminal, Hull City vs. Shefeld, at London NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Swansea CitySCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED PGA tour winner since the Depression at age 19, shot a 2-under 70 on Saturday to share the lead with Watson. This is the place Ive always dreamt about, said Spieth, who was 5 under for the tourna ment. I thought it was a good t for my game. So far, so good. He has a shot at becoming the youngest major winner since Tom Creavey, just a few months younger when he won the PGA Cham pionship in 1931. Watson had four bo geys on the front side Saturday twice as many as he had in the rst two rounds com bined and slid back to an emboldened group of challengers with a 74. Hell go out in the last group with Spieth on Sunday. Were pretty good friends, Watson said. Its going to be fun. It will be interesting, but be fun. Hopefully one of us wins, if not me hopefully him. Matt Kuchar (68) and Jonax Blixt (71) were one shot back at 212. Jimenez (66) and Ricky Fowler (67) were another shot behind. Watson, the 2012 Masters champion, posted two rounds in the 60s to start the tour nament, giving him a three-stroke lead and the largest 36-hole edge since Chad Campbell in 2006. By the time he made the turn in front of the historic clubhouse and that big oak tree, the edge was gone. He got it back with a birdie at the 10th, but a threeputt par at the par-5 13th kept things close, another par at the par-5 15th was a disappointment, and a bogey at the 16th left him staggering to the nish. It shaped up to be a wide-open Sunday with Woods on the sideline for the rst time in his career, recovering from back surgery. Lee Westwood (70), Jim Furyk (72) and Thomas Bjorn (73) were all in the mix. And Cou ples did enough to hang around, managing a 73 that kept him within ve strokes of the lead. Watson bogeyed the rst hole, then struck a brilliant approach shot that rolled up about 5 feet from the ag to set up an eagle 3 at the sec ond. That would be one of his few highlights. Jimenez posted the best round of the tour nament thus far and matched the lowest score ever for a senior golfer at Augusta National. Ben Hogan was 54 when he shot 66 during the third round of the 1967 tournament, and Couples matched it at age 50 during the opening round in 2010. The Spaniard known as The Mechanic nished up with a par at the 18th about the time Watson was teeing off at the adjacent rst hole, having sliced into a 10-shot decit by tak ing advantage of warm, sunny conditions. There was barely a hint of the swirling breezes that can make Augusta so treacherous. Jimenez has never won a major champion ship but hes been a pe rennial contender, cap turing a new generation of fans with his unique stretching routine before each round, his red ponytail, and his fondness for wine and ci gars. Just because you are 50 does not mean you cannot play golf, said Jimenez, one of six 50-and-older golfers to make the Masters cut. Im still exible. I hit the ball longer than ever. His wasnt the only new entry in the Mas ters record book. Gary Woodland matched the lowest score ever on the front nine with a 6-under 30, and actually got his score to 7 under with another birdie at the 10th. But the 29-yearold American couldnt keep it going through Amen Corner, where a bogey at the 11th and a double bogey on 12 sti ed his momentum. Woodland struggled down the stretch and settled for a 69, which left him at 216. Defending champion Adam Scott couldnt get anything going, his chances of becoming only the fourth backto-back winner in Mas ters history fading away with an ugly 40 on the front side. He faced a six-stroke decit heading to Sunday, a daunt ing challenge with so many players in between him and the lead. But plenty of others were ready to seize the spotlight. MASTERS FROM PAGE B1 1995, when they won the NL Central. The Rays opened the series with a 2-1 win Friday night, when David Price took a shut out into the ninth before Joey Votto homered with one out. Rays start ers have thrown at least seven shutout innings four times in the last six games. It was Tampa Bays second shutout of the season, and the second time the Reds have been shut out. The Reds also were blanked 1-0 by the Cardinals on opening day. Both managers changed their lineups, looking for some runs. The Rays have scored only nine in their last six games, but managed to win three of them be cause of the impressive pitching. The Reds have scored 28 runs all sea son, second-fewest in the National League. Rays manager Joe Maddon stocked his lineup with left-handers against Simon. Reds manager Bryan Price moved Votto from third to second in the batting order, the rst time hed batted second since 2008. Neither move made much of a difference. Nice defense by both teams also kept it close. Votto led off the fourth with a ground-rule dou ble. Kevin Kiermaier threw out Votto at the plate as he tried to score on Brandon Phillips single to center. Phillips went to second on the play and was thrown out trying to steal third. The Reds wasted an other chance in the sixth, when Zack Cozart was hit by a pitch and advanced on a wild pitch and a sacrice. Bil ly Hamilton hit a shallow y and Votto grounded out. NOTES: LHP Erik Bedard will be added to the Rays roster Sunday when LHP Cesar Ramos moves from the bullpen to the rotation, taking the place of injured Matt Moore. Ramos will make his fourth career start. RAYS FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents TOUR TECHNIQUESCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen WreshShort Game Series(Chipping, Pitching, Putting & Bunkers)orFull Swing Series(reg. $200)$180Four 40-Minute Sessions Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available Tee time 5 days in advance. Expires 4/30/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$22 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Tampa Bay 7 5 .583 6-4 W-2 4-3 3-2 Toronto 6 5 .545 6-4 W-1 3-3 3-2 New York 6 6 .500 1 6-4 W-1 3-3 3-3 Boston 5 7 .417 2 1 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-3 Baltimore 4 6 .400 2 1 4-6 L-1 1-3 3-3 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 5 3 .625 5-3 L-1 4-1 1-2 Chicago 6 6 .500 1 4-6 L-1 4-2 2-4 Cleveland 6 6 .500 1 5-5 W-1 3-3 3-3 Minnesota 5 6 .455 1 1 5-5 W-2 2-3 3-3 Kansas City 4 6 .400 2 1 4-6 L-2 4-2 0-4 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Seattle 6 3 .667 6-3 W-1 2-1 4-2 Oakland 6 4 .600 6-4 L-1 3-3 3-1 Los Angeles 5 5 .500 1 5-5 W-2 1-3 4-2 Texas 5 5 .500 1 5-5 W-1 3-1 2-4 Houston 4 7 .364 3 2 3-7 L-1 3-4 1-3 NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 7 3 .700 7-3 L-1 4-2 3-1 Atlanta 6 4 .600 1 6-4 W-1 2-2 4-2 Miami 5 6 .455 2 1 4-6 L-5 5-2 0-4 New York 4 6 .400 3 2 4-6 L-1 2-4 2-2 Philadelphia 4 6 .400 3 2 4-6 W-1 1-3 3-3 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 8 2 .800 8-2 W-7 2-2 6-0 Pittsburgh 6 4 .600 2 6-4 L-1 4-2 2-2 St. Louis 6 5 .545 2 5-5 W-1 3-2 3-3 Chicago 4 7 .364 4 2 4-6 L-1 2-4 2-3 Cincinnati 3 8 .273 5 3 3-7 L-2 1-4 2-4 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 7 4 .636 6-4 W-1 2-3 5-1 San Francisco 7 5 .583 6-4 L-1 2-3 5-2 Colorado 6 6 .500 1 1 6-4 W-1 4-2 2-4 San Diego 4 6 .400 2 2 4-6 W-2 2-2 2-4 Arizona 4 9 .308 4 3 4-6 L-1 1-6 3-3 FRIDAYS GAMESBoston 4, N.Y. Yankees 2 Toronto 2, Baltimore 0 Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1 Texas 1, Houston 0, 12 innings Chicago White Sox 9, Cleveland 6 Minnesota 10, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 5, N.Y. Mets 4, 11 innings San Diego 6, Detroit 0 Seattle 6, Oakland 4FRIDAYS GAMESPhiladelphia 6, Miami 3 Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 7, Washington 6, 10 innings Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 2 Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 3, 11 innings L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 0 L.A. Angels 5, N.Y. Mets 4, 11 innings San Diego 6, Detroit 0 San Francisco 6, Colorado 5SATURDAYS GAMESN.Y. Yankees 7, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 6 Minnesota 7, Kansas City 1 Toronto at Baltimore, late Houston at Texas, late Detroit at San Diego, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late Oakland at Seattle, lateSUNDAYS GAMESTampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 1, San Francisco 0 Miami at Philadelphia, late Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, late Washington at Atlanta, late L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late Detroit at San Diego, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late NAM Y. HUH / AP Clevelands David Murphy watches after hitting a three-run triple during the ninth inning of Saturdays game against the Chicago White Sox in Chicago. The Indians won 12-6. TODAYS GAMESTampa Bay (C.Ramos 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-1), 1:10 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 2-0) at Baltimore (Jimenez 0-2), 1:35 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 1-1) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Vargas 1-0) at Minnesota (Correia 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Houston (Oberholtzer 0-2) at Texas (M.Perez 1-0), 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 1-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 1-1), 3:35 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at San Diego (T.Ross 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 2-0) at Seattle (C.Young 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Boston (Doubront 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 1-1), 8:05 p.m.TODAYS GAMESTampa Bay (C.Ramos 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-1), 1:10 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-1), 1:35 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 2-0) at Atlanta (Harang 1-1), 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 0-0) at Milwaukee (Lohse 1-1), 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 1-0), 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 1-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 1-1), 3:35 p.m. Colorado (Chatwood 0-0) at San Francisco (Hudson 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at San Diego (T.Ross 0-2), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 1-0) at Arizona (Cahill 0-3), 4:10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: JHamilton, Los Angeles, .444; AlRamirez, Chi cago, .429; Kubel, Minnesota, .412; SPerez, Kansas City, .393; Plouffe, Minnesota, .375. RUNS: Eaton, Chicago, 12; Bautista, Toronto, 10; Dozier, Minnesota, 10; Plouffe, Minnesota, 9; AlRamirez, Chi cago, 9; Lowrie, Oakland, 8; Semien, Chicago, 8. RBI: Abreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Minnesota, 14; Moss, Oakland, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; AGordon, Kansas City, 9; Smoak, Seattle, 9; 6 tied at 8. HITS: AlRamirez, Chicago, 18; MeCabrera, Toronto, 16; Eaton, Chicago, 15; Plouffe, Minnesota, 15. DOUBLES: DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Solarte, New York, 6; Colabello, Minnesota, 5; 9 tied at 4. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 26 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Abreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista, Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; De Aza, Chicago, 3; Dozier, Minnesota, 3; Hart, Seattle, 3; TorHunter, Detroit, 3; BMiller, Seattle, 3; Trout, Los Angeles, 3. STOLEN BASES: RDavis, Detroit, 5; Ellsbury, New York, 5; Altuve, Houston, 3; Andrus, Texas, 3; Dozier, Minne sota, 3; Kipnis, Cleveland, 3; AlRamirez, Chicago, 3; Rios, Texas, 3; Villar, Houston, 3. PITCHING: FHernandez, Seattle, 3-0; Sale, Chicago, 3-0; 11 tied at 2. ERA: Darvish, Texas, 0.00; Feldman, Houston, 0.44; Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Gray, Oakland, 0.75; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 30; Price, Tampa Bay, 22; Sabathia, New York, 21; Lester, Boston, 20; Sale, Chicago, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18; Tillman, Baltimore, 15; Scherzer, Detroit, 15; CWilson, Los Angeles, 15; Darvish, Texas, 15. SAVES: Santos, Toronto, 4; Axford, Cleveland, 4; Holland, Kansas City, 3; Rodney, Seattle, 3; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 3; TomHunter, Baltimore, 3; Perkins, Minnesota, 2; Uehara, Boston, 2; Robertson, New York, 2.NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERSBATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .486; Utley, Philadelphia, .469; Pagan, San Francisco, .442; Bonifacio, Chicago, .435; DGordon, Los Angeles, .405. RUNS: Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado, 10; LaRoche, Washington, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; Prado, Arizona, 9; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 9; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 9; Werth, Washington, 9. RBI: CGonzalez, Colorado, 13; Stanton, Miami, 13; Trumbo, Arizona, 13; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; McGehee, Miami, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 10. HITS: Bonifacio, Chicago, 20; Pagan, San Francisco, 19; Blackmon, Colorado, 17; Cuddyer, Colorado, 17; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17; Ar Ramirez, Milwaukee, 17. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 6; Adams, St. Louis, 5; KDa vis, Milwaukee, 5; Hill, Arizona, 5; Uribe, Los Angeles, 5. TRIPLES: 31 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt, San Francisco, 5; Trumbo, Arizona, 5; CGonzalez, Colorado, 4;. STOLEN BASES: Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; DGordon, Los Angeles, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4. PITCHING: 18 tied at 2. ERA: Gallardo, Milwaukee, 0.00; Harang, Atlanta, 0.71; Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; GGonzalez, Washington, 0.75; Haren, Los Angeles, 0.75; JKelly, St. Louis, 0.79. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 28; Fernandez, Miami, 23; Cueto, Cincinnati, 23; Cashner, San Diego, 22; Ryu, Los Angeles, 22; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 21. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 3; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 3; Street, San Diego, 3; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 3; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 3; AReed, Arizona, 3. Rays 1, Reds 0 Tampa Bay Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi DeJess lf 4 0 0 0 BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 3 0 1 0 V otto 1b 3 0 1 0 Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 1 0 McGee p 0 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 Balfour p 0 0 0 0 F razier 3b 3 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 0 1 0 Lud wck lf 3 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 1 1 1 B.P ena c 3 0 0 0 Kiermr cf-rf 4 0 0 0 Cozar t ss 2 0 1 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Simon p 1 0 0 0 Hanign c 3 0 0 0 Heise y ph 1 0 0 0 Cobb p 2 0 0 0 MP arr p 0 0 0 0 Forsyth ph 1 0 1 0 DJnngs cf 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 T otals 27 0 4 0 Tampa Bay 010 000 000 1 Cincinnati 000 000 000 0 DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 5, Cincinnati 3. 2BY.Escobar (2), Forsythe (2), Votto (3), Cozart (1). HRLoney (1). CSPhillips (2). SSimon. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Cobb W,1-1 7 4 0 0 0 5 McGee H,1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour S,4-4 1 0 0 0 1 0 Cincinnati Simon L,1-1 8 5 1 1 1 4 M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Cobb (Cozart). WPCobb. UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Dan Bellino; Sec ond, D.J. Reyburn; Third, A.J. Johnson.Yankees 7, Red Sox 4 Boston Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Gardnr lf 5 0 1 0 Nava rf 4 1 1 0 BRor ts 2b 4 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 Ellsur y cf 3 1 2 0 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 Beltran dh 4 2 2 2 Carp lf 4 0 1 2 McCnn c 4 2 2 3 Bogarts ss 4 1 1 0 ASorin rf 4 1 2 1 Przyns c 4 1 2 2 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 JHerrr 3b 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 4 1 2 1 BrdlyJr cf 3 1 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 0 2 0 Anna ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 34 4 7 4 T otals 36 7 14 7 Boston 020 000 200 4 New York 200 202 01x 7 EA.Soriano (1). DPBoston 1. LOBBoston 7, New York 7. 2BPedroia (3), Beltran (4), Anna (1). HR Pierzynski (1), Beltran (2), McCann 2 (2), A.Soriano (3), K.Johnson (3). SBNava (1), Bradley Jr. (2), Ellsbury (6). CSCarp (1). SB.Roberts. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lackey L,2-1 5 2/3 10 6 6 0 6 Breslow 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 A.Miller 2/3 0 0 0 1 1 Badenhop 1 3 1 1 0 1 New York Kuroda W,2-1 6 1/3 6 4 4 3 5 Thornton H,3 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 Betances H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Warren H,4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Kelley S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Thornton (Napoli). WPBreslow. UmpiresHome, John Tumpane; First, Brian ONora; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Brian Gorman.Rockies 1, Giants 0 Colorado San F rancisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 3 1 2 0 P agan cf 4 0 0 0 Barnes rf 3 0 1 0 P ence rf 3 0 1 0 CGnzlz lf 4 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 1 0 Tlwtzk ss 3 0 0 1 P osey 1b 3 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 0 Mor se lf 4 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 0 0 HSnchz c 4 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 1 0 Arias 2b 3 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 1 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 1 0 Andrsn p 2 0 0 0 M.Cain p 1 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks ph 0 0 0 0 Culersn ph 1 0 0 0 P etit p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 4 1 T otals 29 0 3 0 Colorado 001 000 000 1 San Francisco 000 000 000 0 EM.Cain (1). DPColorado 1. LOBColorado 6, San Francisco 6. 2BBlackmon (4), Arenado (2), Sandoval (2), B.Crawford (5). SBBlackmon (3), Barnes (1). S Barnes. SFTulowitzki. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Anderson 3 1 0 0 1 2 Kahnle W,2-0 2 1 0 0 1 2 Belisle H,2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ottavino H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 Brothers H,3 1 1 0 0 2 1 Hawkins S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 San Francisco M.Cain L,0-2 7 4 1 1 3 8 Machi 1 0 0 0 0 1 Petit 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Hal Gibson; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:48. A,917 (41,915).Indians 12, White Sox 6 Cleveland Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Morgan cf 5 1 1 0 Eaton cf 3 2 2 1 Swisher 1b 6 2 2 1 LGarci 2b 5 1 0 0 Kipn is 2b 4 2 2 1 Gillaspi 3b 3 1 1 1 CSantn c 3 2 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 1 0 0 Brantly lf 3 1 1 2 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 2 ACarer ss 4 1 1 1 AlRmrz ss 4 1 1 0 Raburn dh 4 1 1 2 De Aza lf 5 0 2 1 DvMrp rf 5 2 2 4 Nieto c 4 0 0 0 Aviles 3b 5 0 2 1 JrDnks rf 4 0 1 1 To tals 39 12 12 12 T otals 36 6 8 6 Cleveland 310 020 204 12 Ch icago 410 010 000 6 EAviles (1), Kipnis (1), L.Garcia (2). DPCleveland 1, Chicago 1. LOBCleveland 8, Chicago 10. 2BA. Cabrera (5), Eaton (3). 3BDav.Murphy (1). HR Swisher (2), Kipnis (2), Dav.Murphy (2), Eaton (1). SBMorgan (3). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland M asterson 4 2/3 7 6 5 5 7 Outman W,2-0 1 1/3 0 0 0 1 2 Shaw H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Allen H,2 1 1 0 0 0 3 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Paulino 5 6 6 6 3 3 Belisario L,1-1 1 1/3 2 2 2 1 1 Downs 0 0 0 0 1 0 D.Webb 1 1 0 0 0 0 Veal 1 2/3 3 4 4 3 3 Downs pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBPby Masterson (A.Dunn). WPMasterson, Belisario. UmpiresHome, Quinn Wolcott; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Brian Knight. T:28. A,332 (40,615).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 2014 day-by-day schedule Monday, April 14 Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Tuesday, April 15 Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Wednesday, April 16 Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 12:35 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 12:35 / p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 1:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 3:40 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Thursday, April 17 Cleveland at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 1:10 / p.m. Seattle at Texas, 2:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 3:45 / p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 6:40 / p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Friday, April 18 Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Seattle at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Houston at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Saturday, April 19 Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 / p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 1:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 1:35 / p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Houston at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Seattle at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:10 / p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 8:40 / p.m. Sunday, April 20 Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Seattle at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 1:35 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 1:35 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 1:40 / p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 3:05 / p.m. Houston at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 / p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 4:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:05 / p.m. Monday, April 21 Baltimore at Boston, 11:05 / a.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Tuesday, April 22 Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Wednesday, April 23 Miami at Atlanta, 12:10 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Texas at Oakland, 3:35 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 3:40 / p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, April 24 Kansas City at Cleveland, 12:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 12:35 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1:10 / p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 4:20 / p.m. San Diego at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Friday, April 25 L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. San Diego at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Boston at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:35 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Oakland at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Saturday, April 26 L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1:05 / p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 4:05 / p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Boston at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Houston, 7:10 / p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 7:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Seattle, 9:10 / p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 / p.m. Sunday, April 27 Boston at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 1:35 / p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 1:35 / p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1:35 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Oakland at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. Texas at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:10 / p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 8:05 / p.m. Monday, April 28 Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Tuesday, April 29 Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Washington at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Wednesday, April 30 Milwaukee at St. Louis, 1:45 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Washington at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Thursday, May 1 L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 1:10 / p.m. Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Friday, May 2 St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:35 / p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Seattle at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Saturday, May 3 St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Oakland at Boston, 1:35 / p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Seattle at Houston, 4:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 6:05 / p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 8:40 / p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 9:05 / p.m. Sunday, May 4 Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 1:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. Oakland at Boston, 1:35 / p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 1:35 / p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 1:35 / p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Seattle at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 3:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 4:10 / p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 4:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, TBD Monday, May 5 Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Houston at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Arizona at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Tuesday, May 6 Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Houston at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Cincinnati at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Arizona at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Wednesday, May 7 San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 12:35 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 12:40 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 1:05 / p.m. Arizona at Milwaukee, 1:10 / p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 3:35 / p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 3:40 / p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Houston at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Cincinnati at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Colorado at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Thursday, May 8 Minnesota at Cleveland, 12:05 / p.m. Houston at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Colorado at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Miami at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Friday, May 9 Houston at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 7:35 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Boston at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Washington at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Miami at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Saturday, May 10 L.A. Angels at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 7:10 / p.m. Boston at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Miami at San Diego, 8:40 / p.m. Washington at Oakland, 9:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 9:10 / p.m. Houston at Baltimore, TBD Sunday, May 11 L.A. Angels at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 1:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 1:35 / p.m. Houston at Baltimore, 1:35 / p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 1:40 / p.m. Arizona at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. Boston at Texas, 3:05 / p.m. Washington at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 / p.m. Miami at San Diego, 4:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 8:05 / p.m. Monday, May 12 Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Washington at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Tuesday, May 13 Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Colorado at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Washington at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Wednesday, May 14 Detroit at Baltimore, 12:35 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Philadelphia, 1:05 / p.m. Colorado at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 3:35 / p.m. Washington at Arizona, 3:40 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 3:40 / p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 3:45 / p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, May 15 San Diego at Cincinnati, 12:35 / p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 1:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 1:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 1:45 / p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Friday, May 16 Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Detroit at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Toronto at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Saturday, May 17 Atlanta at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 / p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 4:10 / p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Detroit at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Toronto at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 8:10 / p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 9:05 / p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 9:05 / p.m. Sunday, May 18 Pittsburgh at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 1:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:35 / p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 1:35 / p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. Toronto at Texas, 3:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 3:35 / p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 4:10 / p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. Detroit at Boston, 8:05 / p.m. Monday, May 19 Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Tuesday, May 20 Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Minnesota at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Wednesday, May 21 Detroit at Cleveland, 12:05 / p.m. Seattle at Texas, 2:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 4:05 / p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Minnesota at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, May 22 Philadelphia at Miami, 12:40 / p.m. Texas at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 3:10 / p.m. Toronto at Boston, 4:05 / p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 4:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Friday, May 23 Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Oakland at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Texas at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 7:35 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Saturday, May 24 Oakland at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 3:05 / p.m. Texas at Detroit, 4:08 / p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 4:10 / p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 / p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 4:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 4:10 / p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 7:15 / p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:15 / p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:15 / p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 10:05 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, TBD Sunday, May 25 Oakland at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Texas at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 1:35 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 1:35 / p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 1:35 / p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 1:40 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 3:35 / p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 4:15 / p.m. Houston at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 5:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 8:05 / p.m. Monday, May 26 Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 1:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 1:10 / p.m. Miami at Washington, 1:35 / p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 4:15 / p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 5:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 8:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 / p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Tuesday, May 27 Miami at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Wednesday, May 28 Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 3:45 / p.m. Miami at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, May 29 Texas at Minnesota, 1:10 / p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 3:35 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Friday, May 30 Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Colorado at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Texas at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. San Diego at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Saturday, May 31 Texas at Washington, 12:05 / p.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. San Diego at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 3:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 4:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 4:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 4:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:15 / p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 7:15 / p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Colorado at Cleveland, TBD Sunday, June 1 Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Colorado at Cleveland, 1:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. Texas at Washington, 1:35 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 1:35 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 1:35 / p.m. San Diego at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. MICHAEL PEREZ / AP Milwaukee catcher and former Umatilla High School standout Jonathan Lucroy (20) hits during a game on April 8 against Philadelphia in Philadelphia. SCHEDULE CONTINUES ON PAGE B5

PAGE 13

Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Baltimore at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 4:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, TBD Monday, June 2 Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Tuesday, June 3 Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Kansas City at St. Louis, 7:15 / p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Wednesday, June 4 Seattle at Atlanta, 12:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 6:40 / p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at Co lorado, 8:40 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, June 5 San Francisco at Cincinnati, 12:35 / p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 4:05 / p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 4:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Friday, June 6 Miami at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 / p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. St. Louis at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Boston at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Washington at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Saturday, June 7 St. Louis at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 4:05 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:05 / p.m. Miami at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 / p.m. Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 4:10 / p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 7:15 / p.m. Boston at Detroit, 7:15 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 7:15 / p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 9:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:05 / p.m. Washington at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Sunday, June 8 St. Louis at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Boston at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 1:10 / p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 1:35 / p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 1:35 / p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:40 / p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Miami at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 3:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 3:35 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 4:10 / p.m. Washington at San Diego, 4:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. Monday, June 9 Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:10 / p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Hous ton at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Tuesday, June 10 Houston at Arizona, 3:40 / p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Miami at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Wednesday, June 11 Minnesota at Toronto, 12:07 / p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Miami at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Thursday, June 12 L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 12:35 / p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 1:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 3:10 / p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 3:45 / p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Arizona at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Friday, June 13 Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 7:35 / p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Saturday, June 14 Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 4:05 / p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 4:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 4:05 / p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 4:08 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Houston, 4:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 4:10 / p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 7:15 / p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 7:15 / p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 7:15 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Sunday, June 15 Minnesota at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 1:35 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 1:35 / p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 1:35 / p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 1:35 / p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. Texas at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 / p.m. Monday, June 16 L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Tuesday, June 17 San Diego at Seattle, 3:40 / p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Houston at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Wednesday, June 18 Philadelphia at Atlanta, 12:10 / p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 1:08 / p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 1:35 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 1:45 / p.m. San Francisco at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 / p.m. Texas at Oakland, 3:35 / p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Houston at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, June 19 L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 12:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 12:35 / p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 3:40 / p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 6:40 / p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Boston at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Friday, June 20 Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 / p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 / p.m. Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Toronto at Cincinnati, 7:10 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 / p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Boston at Oakland, 10:05 / p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Saturday, June 21 Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Boston at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 4:10 / p.m. Toronto at Cincinnati, 4:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 4:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 4:15 / p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 7:15 / p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 7:15 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 7:15 / p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 10:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Sunday, June 22 Detroit at Cleveland, 1:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. Toronto at Cincinnati, 1:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 1:35 / p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 1:40 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2:10 / p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 2:15 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 / p.m. Boston at Oakland, 4:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 4:10 / p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 4:10 / p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 4:10 / p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, TBD Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, TBD Monday, June 23 Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Tuesday, June 24 Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:10 / p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Detroit at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 8:40 / p.m. Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Wednesday, June 25 Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 12:10 / p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 3:10 / p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 3:45 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 / p.m. Detroit at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 / p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 / p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Thursday, June 26 Atlanta at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 3:35 / p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 / p.m. Detroit at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Friday, June 27 Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 / p.m. Oakland at Miami, 7:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 8:05 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, 8:10 / p.m. Detroit at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 8:10 / p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 / p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, TBD Saturday, June 28 Washington at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 / p.m. Chicago W hite Sox at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 3:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:05 / p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 4:05 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 4:05 / p.m. Detroit at Houston, 4:10 / p.m. Oakland at Miami, 4:10 / p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 4:10 / p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 7:15 / p.m. Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:15 / p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, 7:15 / p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:05 / p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, TBD Sunday, June 29 Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 1:07 / p.m. Oakland at Miami, 1:10 / p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:35 / p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 1:35 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, 2:10 / p.m. Detroit at Houston, 2:10 / p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 2:10 / p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 3:05 / p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 4:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 4:05 / p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 4:10 / p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, TBD Boston at N.Y. Yankees, TBD Monday, June 30 Colorado at Washington, 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 / p.m. Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 / p.m. Oakland at Detroit, 7:08 / p.m. Chicago Cubs at Boston, 7:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 / p.m. Seattle at Houston, 8:10 / p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 / p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:10 / p.m. REMAINDER OF SCHEDULE WILL APPEAR ON APRIL 20 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESBass have started biting in the main portions of the lake on crank baits such as Rat-L-Traps and soft plastic worms in June bug or green pumpkin. Crappie are biting in the deep parts of the lakes on pink or chartreuse jigs tipped with minnows. Shell cracker are starting to bite on yellow tail worms, grass shrimp or crickets. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee won the Wednesday night tournament with a big bass weighing 6.28 pounds and a total weight of 9-plus pounds. The Wednesday night open bass tournament has resumed with the time change. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 on Wednesday evening. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held Saturday with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352-742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKStripers are being caught on Dead River on silver spoons and salt water shrimp. Some specks are still being picked up on minnows and jigs. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESSpecks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are still at the edge of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEBass action has been hot and heavy even with them having moved off the beds. They are biting on grass shrimp and black, blue and silver plastic worms. Shellcracker are starting to move in. A few specks are still being caught. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests from Michigan have rented a rowboat all week and are catvhing bass and crappie. Minnow and worm sales still continue to be strong. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLESpecks and bass have moved off the beds and out into other areas of the lakes. Try shing the mouths of residential canals early in the morning and later in the afternoon with shiners and crank baits like Rat-L-Traps. Crappie are back in open water and biting on tight lined minnow and jig combinations. A few specks and bass are being caught post-spawn in the Apopka-Beauclaire Canal feeding with minnows and shiners. Lots of hybrid bass are being caught in the St. Johns River. Schooling bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feeder creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rrf ntrbbrb nntbbbrff tbfb ffb rfr f bfbr bf ntffb nntff tr b ffbfb rrffrf rffrff bbfrf bfbfbfrf ntbbfb nntbbb tbbf rbf rbrrr rbbb

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014

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Bring back MuttsI see that your comics page has been slightly revamped. The comic strip Mutts has, I gather, been given the axe. I wish to register my regret for that decision. Mutts is a wonder ful comic strip that not only affords an occasional chuckle, but the strips Zen-like qualities lend a sense of peace and goodwill to my mornings. Thats pretty amazing functionality for a mere seven-square inches of news print. I understand, of course, that this move is likely a matter of economics. If that is the case, Id like to put in my two cents regarding the worthiness of the strips on your comics page. I wonder why you would choose to drop a comic strip with new, original content, rather than drop one that is recycled. As delightful as they were in their day, Peanuts and For Better or Worse have long been in reruns. Given the average age of your readers, I dare say most of us have already read and enjoyed these strips before. Shouldnt we give preference to original, new content on the comics page? For that matter, are you aware that Shoe has been cobbled together on a computer from bits and pieces of old strips for more than a decade? Then there are strips like Snuffy Smith, B.C., Hagar, Heathcliff, Dennis the Menace and more which are drawn by lackluster hired hands, their original creators having died years ago. Id prefer to read comic strips drawn by their original creators, those which sink or swim based on their own merits rather than the hazy recollection that the strip used to be funny. So as not to be too negative, let me mention that I applaud the recent addition of Luann. Although at rst this seemed like a strip that wouldnt interest me, I nd it has quickly become one of my favor ites. Congratulations on a ne choice. ALLAN HOLTZ | TavaresPoor service from the DMVI thought Lake County had come into the 21st Century, the same as the rest of the world did. I just returned from the ofce of the Department of Motor Vehicles in Astatula, and after a 3 1/2 hour wait to renew my drivers license, the receptionist made the excuse that they were so busy because it was spring break and all of those on break were there. But, that was not so. Every age bracket was very well represented, from young people with babies to senior citizens, and Im a senior citizen. I followed the instructions that came with the paperwork from Tallahassee about making an appointment on the web page, about having my eyes tested and also called ahead to the phone number listed. I was told all the appointments were taken and to call back, and all of the clerks were busy. Both of their printers were not working and it would take over an hour for the repairman to get there and over two-dozen people were given temporary licenses. This is the only Department of Motor Vehicles in this area because the powers that be closed a perfectly good ofce on U.S. Highway 27 near State Road 50. Our politicians and the people who work for them have a customer be damned attitude. HELEN NEWTON | ClermontAre we entering a new era in world evolution?Who would have thought a for mer communist country would have a majority of citizens that believed in and practiced pure democracy. Would the politicians in Washington, D.C. have been so anxious to destroy the Soviet Union if they knew that people were not going to set up an oligar chy like we have in America? The rulers in Washington envisioned a small group of rulers in post-Soviet countries that they could set up sweetheart deals with and together rule the common citizen worldwide surprise, oligarchy. The Crimean people believe in one man, one vote and majority rules. This sets a bad example for American politics. What if California citizens vote to join Mexico? Maine and Washington State residents vote to join Canada? Texas citizens vote to return to a separate country with pure democracy and Florida citizens vote to join Puerto Rico, a new pure democracy? Are we entering a new era in world evolution? Our national debt is unpayable, ever! Why not leave it behind and start new with a clean slate? Let the rest of the nation join Israel as a new nation called nevermore. Their ag could be white with an outstretched begging hand. VERNON HALL | UmatillaThe government should provide total health care for wounded warriorsHas no one questioned why our present governmental regime does not provide total health care for our wounded amputees/military personnel? Instead, we are bombarded with TV commercials like those soliciting $19 per month by groups such as Wounded Warriors. The prime benefactors of this charity are entertainment gures and money-hungry TV networks, not the soldiers who were put in harms way by the same regime Commander-in-Chief. This regime seems dead set on bankrupting our country by spending borrowed or newly printed money on every deadbeat reason, but never for this one legitimate cause our fallen war heroes. Jeff Foxworthy recently published a treatise dening reasons why our nation was founded by geniuses but is now run by idiots. These are some of his points which show the basis for my previous sentence. 1) Our government believes the best way to eradicate trillions of dollars in debt is to spend trillions more. 2) Hard work and success are met with higher taxes, regulations and intrusion, while not working is rewarded with food stamps, WIC checks, Medicaid, subsidized housing, and free cell phones. 3) The government plan for getting people back to work is to provide 99 weeks of unemploy ment checks without proof of looking for work. 4) You pay your mortgage faithfully while denying yourself the newest big-screen TV, while your neighbor buys iPhones, timeshares, a huge TV and new cars, and the government for gives his mortgage debt when he defaults. 5) You must show your picture ID to board a plane, cash a check, buy liquor, and rent a video, but not to vote for who runs the country. Our country has masterfully spent us into $17 trillion in debt while endlessly buying votes with continuously growing entitlement programs. If you dont understand the extent of ination and the impact of printing and borrowing money from your visits to groceries and gas stations, just consider this: In 1964, IBM spent $5 billion on a make-or-break gamble, the introduction of the rst Solid Logic computer system. Due to ination, that $5 billion would be $38 billion today. Do not vote democrat. CLINTON G. FISH | Tavares Voiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clar ity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@ dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEKIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANSC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORThere is a saying that the denition of in sanity is doing the same thing over and over and e xpecting a different result. Yet that seems to be what the Lake County School Board did last week when it opened the door to considering a controversial student uniform proposal that parents have vehemently opposed and the School Board subsequently rejected several times before. To be clear, the School Board did not actually propose or recommend such a change in the districts dress code during its meeting last week. But board members inexplicably opened the door a crack when they recommended that Superintendent Susan Moxley have a committee study the idea. But why? There are strong points to be made pro and con. Opponents have argued that enforcing uniformity sties creativity and individuality, and some have said the burden of having to buy and maintain a separate school wardrobe for their kids is nancially taxing. To be sure, there are some solid arguments to be made in favor of a uniform dress code, and supporters of the idea have made them. They insist that uniforms improve morale and student conduct and can even have a positive inuence on academic achievement. Even the head of the esteemed Montverde Academy weighed in via letter, say ing that requiring school uniforms would initiate positive change in the culture of your school communities in a relatively short time. All that may be true, although Montverde Academy, a small private institution, is not truly analogous to a large public school. Still, the Lake County school system might want to consider whether this is the time to implement such a signicant and controversial change. The School Board is already mired with signicant budget issues, decaying school buildings, obsolete technology, busing challenges and a number of other problems. In fact, the board is waging a tense debate with Lake County government ofcials right now over how much of the local penny sales tax should go toward schools, which they say have a backlog of needs totaling $1 billion or more. It would behoove the School Board to focus its attention on the pressing matters that lay ahead rather than inviting a ght that will surely draw signicant time and energy. Put another way, would you worry about painting the kitchen if your house was falling down? Of course you wouldnt. We encourage the School Board to roll up its sleeves and bear down on the challenges ahead xing their budget hole, shoring up tired old school buildings, planning for a projected surge in student enrollment and elevating academic standards district-wide. No, the school uniform debate can wait for another day. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTSchool uniform discussion is a distraction

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 OTHERVOICESVoices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHERVOICESOTHERVOICES B rer Rabbit (some times spelled Brer or Brer Rabbit) was a main charac ter in the famous Un cle Remus folk tales lat er made into a Disney movie classic called the Song of the South. In one of the famous Uncle Remus stories, Brer Fox was trying to capture and kill Brer Rabbit. Brer Fox devised a clever plan in which he made a sculpture of a baby composed of tar and tur pentine and topped off with a hat. He placed the tar baby in the middle of the road and awaited the arrival of Brer Rabbit. When Brer Rabbit did arrive he cheerfully said good morning to the cute baby but received no response. Brer Rabbit then inquired about the weather and how the baby was feeling, but again no response. Brer Rabbit, now beginning to get a bit ir ritated, asked the same questions in a much louder voice, but got no response. Brer Rabbit was now angry and asked the baby, Are you deaf or just rude? Still no response. This lack of response prompted Brer Rabbit to tell the baby that he was going to give him a real licking for being so rude. His rst paw punch thrust into the tar baby and immediately got stuck. The second paw punch resulted in the same predicament. Then two foot kicks and a head bump and suddenly Brer Rabbit found himself covered in tar and trapped. Brer Fox now had captured his tar get, Brer Rabbit. For tunately Brer Rabbits quick thinking and reverse psychology convinced Brer Fox that tossing Brer Rabbit into the thorny Briar Patch would be his doom, only to nd out that Brer Rabbit had grown up in that Briar Patch and escaped death at the hands of Brer Fox. As I watched the recent congressional hearing on Benghazi and the testimony of Mike Morell, former deputy CIA director, regarding the death of our ambassador and three other brave Americans, it seemed I was watching Brer Rabbit getting more engulfed in tar by his own actions. In sworn testimony, Morell acknowledged that he made several key changes in the Benghazi talking points following the attack. His reasoning was puzzling as he admitted that he ignored the on-the-ground intelligence from Libya in favor of listening to an analyst in Washington D.C. The D.C. analyst said the attack was the result of a spontaneous mob attack while the analyst in Libya said no, that it was an organized terrorist attack. Morell a 30-year CIA veter an, ignored his best analyst in Libya. Why? As more testimony came forth, Morell admitted that he deferred to the concerns of the State Department headed by Hillary Clinton, who feared that we would all learn that the ambassador had made sever al requests for added security only to be ignored. It appears that Morell fell on the Benghazi sword to protect Secretary Clinton and President Obama, who was in the home stretch of his 2012 presidential campaign. After all, he had been telling us that Osama was dead and al-Qaeda was on the run. Oops, four mur dered Americans due to a terrorist attack, not some spontaneous mob action. On Nov. 16, 2012, CIA Director David Petraeous told Congress that the CIA did not remove terrorism and al-Qaeda from the talking points. But on April 2, 2014 Morell testied that he removed al-Qaeda and made other edits. He also acknowledged that he sat silent in a previous congressional hearing when this same subject was asked of Director of National Intelligence James Clapper sitting at the same table with Morell. Later, in November of 2012, Morell told Senators McCain, Graham and Ayotte that the FBI made the changes. When McCain then asked the FBI about this they became unglued, stating that they did no such thing. Morell also admitted deleting the phrase Islamic extremists and the disclosure that the CIA had provided warnings to the Clinton-led State Department prior to the attack. Im sure that the next revelation will come as a real shocker. Mike Morell now has been hired by a PR rm (Beacon Global Strategies), operated primarily by former Clinton and Obama administration ofcials. Amazing coincidence. Yes, Brer Rabbit got covered with tar through his own actions and Mike Morell got covered in his own tar by ignoring his intelligence in Libya, deleting the truth from the talking points and remaining silent at a congressional hear ing when he knew the truth. But, he now has a great job with the Clinton and Obama loyalists. And after all, What difference does it make now? as was so famously uttered by Hillary Clinton. RUSS SLOANGUEST COLUMNIST Brer Rabbit, the tar baby and Benghazi The art icle, Innocents Lost: Pre serving Families But Losing Chil dren, which was written by Car ol Marbin Miller and Audra Burch and published in the Miami Herald on March 16, depicts the ndings of an exhaustive investigation into 477 child deaths. All of these children were the victims of abuse and neglect and most were ve years of age or younger. The story is difcult to read. In gruesome and graphic detail, it depicts our failed attempts to protect those who in most instances cannot protect themselves. It makes clear that par enting and drug or alcohol abuse is a lethal combination. And the past is indeed a predictor of the future. Child after child, case after case, the writers reveal a harsh and ugly truth, a truth that most of us wish to deny. The truth is that even well-intended legisla tion, policies and procedures and ded icated child welfare professionals are no match for the severely and chronically addicted or those who would de liberately injure, maim or kill children. The article also begs the question, what can we do to remove ourselves from being ranked as a state with one of the highest rate of child deaths in the nation? What can we do to prevent these unfathom able, horric tragedies? The answer may in-part, rest with the Guardian ad Litem Program. Employing skilled staff, but relying on trained volunteers, who have a passion for kids and have lived and witnessed life, the Program advocates for the best interests of abused and neglected children. Once removed from their alleged abuser, the Guardian assigned to the case, seeks to determine what happened and what needs to happen before the child can be reunied with his/her parent. Sometimes, the Guardians conclusion is that the child should not be reunited with the par ents. The Guardian then submits his/ her recommendations to the court overseeing the case. Local dependency judges refer to these volunteers as the eyes and ears of the court. Children assigned to such individuals say, She/hes my Guardian angel. Although child deaths at the hands of parents and caregivers will never be 100 percent preventable, by becoming involved with the Guardian ad Litem Program, theres a good chance you can indeed save a life. Marcia Hilty is the Guardian ad Litem 5th Judicial Circuit Director in Ocala.Guardians ad litem save livesCan you imagine a scenario where more than 50 percent of all Americans living now could be dead a year from today? Congress has known of this specic terrorist threat for more than a decade. For $2 billion, (in 2001 dollars) Congress, which spends more than that every 17 hours to fund government, could have eliminated this threat. What have Congress and presidents, past and present, done about this possible terrorist threat? Nothing. Its unimaginable that government doesnt want you to know about it, and its just as bad the mainstream media doesnt want to report on it also. In 2001, the Electro-magnetic Pulse commission (EMP) was formed and instructed to identify steps it believes should be taken by the U.S. to better protect its military and civilian systems from an EMP attack. Findings were reported to Congress. An EMP attack could destroy not only Americas military defenses, but would destroy virtually 100 percent of our civilian civilization. We probably wouldnt even know who did it. How would this attack come? Here is the most common possibility: One or more ocean freighters would position their ships just off Americas coast. From there an atomic weapon would be red into our lower atmosphere. Three, spaced evenly over the entire U.S., would destroy Americas entire electric grid. Anything digital would no longer work. Planes ying would drop like rocks from the sky. There would be no electricity. You would not be able to smell, taste, or feel the radiation. No TV. No radio. Your car wont start, unless it was built before 1978. Where would you get gasoline? Pumps wont work. Within a week, there wouldnt be one grocery store in America with food to sell. What would you do then? Welcome to the 1700s. How long do you think you could sur vive? Without turning to crime, probably not very long. Unclassied documents have shown Iran, Russia, China and North Korea have all been studying how to orchestrate such an attack. Three of those countries already have atomic weapons and the technology to carry out such an attack. Its been estimated a larger-than-average solar are from the sun could also knock out part of an electric grid, and it could take up to four years to x it. How long would it take to replace one of the electric transformers? America used to make our own. Not anymore. Only Ger many and South Korea make the transformers that we would need. They are put together by hand and take 18 months to 2 years to build. How would you get it to America? A sailing vessel? Who is in charge of xing this potential threat? The DOE says its the DOD, and the DOD passes the buck to the DHS which says, well, you get the idea. No department wants to take responsibility. Responsibility lies with the president and Congress. I, for one, would not like to be a congressman after an EMP attack.Sonny Heninger lives in Leesburg.America quit ignoring the threat

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Cruisin352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com MARK GLOVERThe Sacramento BeeBack in the days when President Ronald Reagan was staring down the Soviet Union, buy ing a car was often a prolonged process re quiring considerable patience and mental endurance from both buyer and salesperson. A typical visit to an auto dealership might start with a scrum of salespeople usual ly all men vying for your attention. And why not? Sometimes sizable sales commissions were on the line. The salesman you ul timately hooked up with was likely to be your friend for the bet ter part of a day as you spent hours haggling over prices, test-drove multiple vehicles, compared car interiors, eyed dozens of paint jobs and met a cluster of deal ership ofcials summoned by your primary salesman as you methodically worked toward a deal. By the end of the day, maybe you had a car. Or it might have been just Round 1 in a days-long process. Oh, how things have changed. Face-to-face car sell ing has evolved into Internet is a game changer for buyers and sellers SUSAN CARPENTERThe Orange County RegisterFord is getting a lot of mileage out of its Fiesta. For the past year, the Detroit automak er has been rolling out the 2014 update of its popular subcompact in dribs and drabs: start ing with its 38 mpg S last summer, followed by its street-legal rallycrosser the 35 mpg ST, last fall and, most recent ly, a 45 mpg 1-liter SFE thats been on sale since December but was only made available to the media in March. To put the 1-liter in context, it is so com pact that a Ford engi neer packed the engine block in a carry-on suit case and took it through TSA security without a hitch. One liter is a displace ment more common ly found in motorcy cles. And, as motorcycle engines go these days, its actually fairly small. Harley-Davidsons stock motor is a 1.6-liter. Triumph makes a bike with a gargantuan 2.3. But the Fiesta 1-liter is the mule for an entire car one that not only carries two more wheels and an entire steel cage, Ford Fiestas tiny engine is no shrinking violetSEE INTERNET | C4 MCT PHOTO The 2014 Ford Fiesta SFE comes with a 1-liter engine thats so compact, a Ford engineer packed the engine block in a carry-on suitcase and took it through TSA security. JERRY HIRSCH and DAVID UNDERCOFFLERLos Angeles TimesCars cost a lot of money. With an average sales price of about $32,000, we know a new car is out of reach for many. The au tomakers know this too, which is why they contin ue to roll out bottom-rung cars for buyers on way-be low-average budgets. The three least expensive cars on the market are the Nissan Versa at $12,800, the Chevrolet Spark at $12,995 and the Mitsubishi Mirage at $13,790. Prices are for the most basic cars with no op tions but do include desti nation charges. In that lowly range, their chief competition is a re liable used car say, a 3-year-old Honda Civic or Mazda3, with low miles. But some buyers get more peace of mind from buy ing new. These are the cars for people who want noth ing more than the cheap est possible transporta tion, who view driving as a chore. They would take the train if they could. These are the cars, in oth er words, for people who dont like cars. Theres no shortage of these consumers in this post-recession age, buyers who increasingly prize fru gality and efciency over performance or amenities. Mitsubishi brought out its Mirage late last year and it has sold at a decent clip, well over 1,000 vehicles a month. Meanwhile, the Chevy Spark sold more than 34,000 copies in 2013, while the Nissan Versa se dan and Note hatchback sold a total of 117,000 cars in the same year. But cheapness doesnt necessarily equate to good value, as we found out in a week of testing these three budget-mobiles. Heres how they stacked up, from worst to rst. %  %  MITSUBISHI MIRAGE: En gines are getting smaller and smaller. This is good thing. And a wave of new three-cylinder motors is showing just how good automakers have gotten at wringing more power and renement out of tiny en gines. But the three-cylinder in the Mirage is neither re ned nor powerful. When you hear this thing coming down the street, you expect to see an aging Auto review: Cheap cars arent always worthwhile MCT PHOTO The 2014 Mitsubishi Mirage weighs just 2,000 pounds. MCT PHOTO The 2014 Land Rover Range Rover Sport has a new aluminum architecture that reduces weight by up to 800 pounds from the old model. MARK PHELANDetroit Free PressReports of Land Rovers death were greatly ex aggerated. The SUV brand Ford struggled to sell just a few years ago has become one of the auto industrys most desirable names. The three-star 2014 Land Rover Range Rover Sport V-8 Super charged simultaneously demonstrates why the British brand has come so far and that some of Rovers old problems linger. The Land Rover Range Rover Sport V-8 Supercharged crikey, even the Inter nets not big enough to keep using that name; lets call it the Sport shares its aluminum-intensive construction, drivetrain and many systems with the 5-inch longer Range Rover. The aluminum architecture reduced weight up to 800 pounds from the old model. That gives the 2014 Sport better performance, handling and fuel economy. Prices start at $62,600. All Sports have full-time all-wheel-drive and an eight-speed automatic transmission. The base model uses a 340-horsepower, supercharged, 3.0-liter V-6 engine. The top model is the V-8 Supercharged, which has a 510-horsepower, 5.0-liter V-8. Despite the fact that all Sports have super charged engines, only the V-8 is called super charged. The V-6 is the SE. I tested a Range Rover Sport V-8 Super charged with features including adaptive cruise control, automatic collision-avoiding brakes, voice recognition and 825-watt Meridian sound. It stickered at $87,690. All prices exclude destination charges. The V-8 Sport competes with high-perfor mance luxury SUVs like the BMW X5 M, Mer cedes ML 63 AMG and Porsche Cayenne turbo. The Sport I tested was at the lower end of that price range, despite having a roomy and luxurious interior, more power than the ML 63 AMG and Cay enne turbo and better fuel economy than the X5 M and ML 63. Its hard to call a SUV nudging $90,000 a bargain, but versus that competition, the concept of good value can be stretched far enough to use on the Sport without wincing.Range Rover Sport improves performance, handling LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT V-8 SUPERCHARGED TYPE OF VEHICLE: Allwheel-drive ve-passenger crossover SUV RATING: Three out of four stars REASONS TO BUY: Performance, off-road capability, looks, comfort SHORTCOMINGS: No blind spot alert; hands-free phone connection failure, poor response of touchpad controls ENGINE: Supercharged 5.0-liter 32-valve DOHC V-8 POWER: 510 horsepower at 6,200-6,500 rpm; 461 pound-feet of torque at 2,500-5,500 rpm TRANSMISSION: Eightspeed automatic WHEELBASE: 115.1 inches LENGTH: 191.0 inches WIDTH: 78.1 inches HEIGHT: 70.1 inches CURB WEIGHT: 5,093 lbs. BASE PRICE: $62,600 PRICE AS TESTED: $87,690Prices exclude destination charge.SEE ROVER | C4SEE FIESTA | C4SEE CHEAP | C4

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 something resembling speed dating. According to numerous indus try sources, a typical car-buying experience can be done in as little as two hours, including the trip to the nance ofce and signing all re quired documents. As it has with so many industries, the Inter net has changed every thing. Consumers who once had little to work with beyond the manufac turers suggested retail price, or MSRP, and oth er basics listed on a ve hicles window sticker now have oceans of data available to them via car sites like Edmunds.com, Cars.com and AutoTrader.com. Prospective car buy ers can easily obtain MSRPs on any vehicle, along with the invoice price, exhaustive lists of standard features and thousands of available options. Today, its not unusu al for a car buyer to walk onto a dealer lot knowing the exact motor ve hicle model and fea tures they want, right down to the exterior paint color. And theyre typically versed in just how much the dealer paid for the car. I would say the No. 1 change from a gen eration ago and now is the explosion of in formation available to consumers, said Brian Maas, president of the Sacramento-based California New Car Dealers Association. Even in just the last ve years, everyone walking into a dealership has a smart phone. They can take a picture, go on the In ternet, check the price on any comparable car or check out all the fea tures, all while theyre standing there at the dealership. The result, Maas said, is that ultra-informed consumers have adjusted the burden to the salesperson on the sales lot. In some cases, (the customer) is more knowledgeable than the salesperson. Sacramento resident David Kelly, shopping for pickups last week at the Folsom (Calif.) Automall, is typical of to days consumer. He was carrying an inchthick stack of comput er printouts from var ious auto websites. If I know the answers in advance, I think it makes the sale go quicker. And actu ally, I dont mind hag gling over price. Over at the Roseville (Calif.) Automall, Rocklin, Calif., resident Bob Fosters homework included a couple of pag es torn out of a recent edition of Motor Trend magazine. Ive been working on this for a week or two. I want the right car and the best deal. And I wont pay a penny more than what I have in mind. Ill walk out if I dont get the price I want. To match that kind of determination, car dealers and their sales staffs have likewise turned to technology. Using laptops and tablet computers, sales per sonnel regularly keep in touch with custom ers via email and conduct searches for specic auto models with a few quick keystrokes. INTERNETFROM PAGE C3 but ve passengers, plus gro ceries, while remaining the most fuel-efcient, nonhy brid vehicle on the road. I wasnt sure what to expect when I showed up at Fords West Coast headquar ters in Irvine, Calif., on a recent Wednesday for a morn ings spin in the automakers smallest car powered with its smallest engine. At best, I an ticipated the driving equiva lent of lukewarm coffee at worst, something as limp and underpowered as the Nissan Versa Note. So I was pretty surprised when I strapped in, threw the car in gear and it took off with verve. The thing has spunk, but theres a caveat. Part of that spunk is attributable to the 1 liters manual transmission, which improves its acceleration and overall fun factor. The 1-liter Fiesta is not available as an automatic in the U.S. The manual on the Fiesta is a tall-geared ve-speed, the shift quality of which is quite smooth. The clutch pedal is pliable, and the stick shift eas ily slides into gear. Consumer Reports reported last month that manual trans missions can improve gas mile age by 2 to 5 mpg. The maga zine also reported that manual transmissions often cut a cars sticker price by $800 to $1,200 a situation that does not ap ply to the 1-liter Fiesta. It actu ally comes with a price premi um, adding $995 to the $14,100 base-model price. Despite being offered only with a manual transmission that many Americans dont even know how to operate, the 1-liter, since quietly going on sale in December, now accounts for one-third of all Fi esta sales in California, the No. 1 market for small cars in the country. Small cars being the largest market segment in the auto industry overall, Ford is pur suing it with a laserlike fo cus. Its growth rate in small cars is double that of its com petitors, due in part to an ul tralow starting price for its base-model Fiesta. The price can remain low because the engine doesnt add cost-inating technologies such as electric motors and lithi um-ion batteries to help improve fuel economy, which is the most important factor in consumers small car pur chase decisions. Ford offers a plug-in hybrid (C-Max), as well as an all-elec tric (Focus), but thats dabbling. Almost all of the auto makers energy is channeled into eking as much efciency out of gas-powered engines as possible. And its doing that with EcoBoost powertrains like the 1-liter small-displacement engines that are both turbocharged and di rect-injected for improved mpgs. Ford uses its more power ful 1.6-liter, 4-cylinder EcoBoost engine in the peppy, 197-horsepower Fiesta ST. It will use 2.7and 3.5-liter Eco Boost engines in its highly an ticipated aluminum-bodied F-150 pickup truck this fall. Before the year is out, Ford says 80 percent of all vehicles it sells globally will be availFIESTAFROM PAGE C3 2014 FORD FIESTA 1-LITER ECOBOOST POWERTRAIN: Turbocharged, direct-injected, 1-liter, three-cylinder, 4 valves per cylinder, DOHC, variable valve timing, 5-speed manual transmission HORSEPOWER: 123 at 6,000 rpm TORQUE: 125 at 2,500 rpm WHEELBASE: 98 inches CURB WEIGHT: 2,552 pounds EPA-ESTIMATED FUEL ECONOMY: 32 mpg city, 45 mpg highway, 37 mpg combined ROAD TEST FUEL ECONOMY (BASED ON 32 MILES OF DRIVING AT 53 MPH AVERAGE SPEED): 31.1 mpg BASE PRICE: $15,095Surprisingly, it did not offer blind spot alert, a feature common on vehicles priced far below the Sport. The Sports exterior styling walks the line between Land Rovers old boxy look and the sleek Evoque that began to reshape the brand a few years ago. The interior is spacious and luxurious The Sport I tested seated ve, with plenty of passenger and cargo space. An optional third row with two small seats is available. I havent tried the third seat, but even Land Rov er admits its for occasional use, so caveat emptor. The interior materials look and feel great. Perforated grey leather covered the seats, while ne wood and brushed aluminum adorn the consoles and controls. The Sports connectivity and controls could use some work. In a weeklong test, it never downloaded my iPhones contact list, so I couldnt use voice recognition to initiate phone calls. I had to dial the numbers manually. Thatll get you an expensive ticket in many jurisdictions. The touch screen is big and clear, but the touch points surrounding it respond poorly when you want to switch from navigation to the home screen, audio or phone. The engine delivers effortless acceleration, with 461 pound-feet of torque at just 2,500 rpm. The steering is direct and nicely weighted, with good on-center feel. The Sport uses Land Rovers tried-and-true AWD system and has plenty of ground clearance. You can expect offroad capability that matches its highway performance. The Sport rated 14 mpg in the city, 19 on the highway and 16 combined in EPA tests. That wont make anybody trade in their Prius, but its very good for a 500-plus-horsepower SUV. Six years after Ford sold Land Rover to Indias Tata Group, the brand is alive and well. With a few improvements to its connectivity and controls, Rover is poised to make life miserable for the makers of other luxury SUVs. ROVERFROM PAGE C3dump truck rather than a shiny new hatchback. Its that loud, and it sounds like some thing is about to break. Inside, the motor vibrates the oor board and pedals, giving the driver the sensation of a foot massage. Previously, we have driv en the European version of the Volkswagen Up with its slow but smooth three-cyl inder and the Ford Fies ta equipped with a spright ly turbo-charged three. Both are more rened than the 74-horsepower engine Mit subishi packed into this econobox. The CVT transmission, a $1,000 option, is the better of the two transmissions (the base offering is a ve-speed manual). But the automatic still has its issues, and it acts more like early ex amples of CVTs, producing an irritating hum as the clattering en gine wanders through the rev range. The Mirage is not without its merits. It came nicely equipped for the low stick er price, including climate control, power windows and locks, keyless entry, power side mirrors, oor mats and a USB port. The styling is functional, if uninspired. %  en NISSAN VERSA: The Versa is the best-selling car in this group as well as the lowest priced vehicle in the U.S. auto market. And though the base model brings new meaning to the term stripped, its a better value than the Mirage. The highlight of this car is its size. Four adults can slide into the Versa with leg room and headroom to spare. You can sardine a fth in a pinch, but make sure every one showered recently. The Versas 102.4-inch wheelbase, compared with 96.5 inches for the Mirage and 93.5 inches for the Spark, also helped the car track better at high speeds and over rough roads. But you give up a lot for the interior space and slight ly better drive. Nissan doesnt hide the budget nature of this car. It has crank windows we didnt think those still ex isted in new cars sold in the U.S. manual locks and an entertainment system with all the delity of a 1960s tran sistor radio. The knobs on the dashboard would have looked cheap and basic 20 years ago; now they look as if theyre go ing to melt during the next heat wave. A sixth gear on the manu al transmission would have been nice during freeway cruising to keep the engine from droning on. And the car peting at your feet looks and feels like a classrooms worth of chalkboard erasers stitched together. Except for noise, the drive train on the Versa is ade quate for an extreme economy car. The transmission ranked second of these three in terms of feel and rene ment. Its biggest drawback was the clutch pedal, which seemed to engage unpredict ably. The four-cylinder engine has the most horsepower of our cheapo trio, though it also has the most mass to move around. For many budget buyers, the Versa will get the job done. But wed still suggest consid ering a nicer used car for the same money or spending a few thousand dollars more on, for instance, a new base model Honda Fit, Mazda3 or Toyota Corolla. %  en CHEVROLET SPARK: Chevrolets Spark is the pick of this litter. Despite being the smallest in this group and one of the smallest cars on the U.S. mar ket, Chevy manages to pack a lot of value into this car. The smoothness of the tiny, 1.3-liter, four-cylinder engine is a welcome relief after shud dering around in the Mitsubishi. Eighty-four horsepower may sound quaint, but it was more than enough to zip around town. The ve-speed manual transmission allowed quick, crisp shifts with little drama. The Sparks interior also impresses with renement and relatively quiet ride. This Chevy hides its price tag and its size well. Yet with space at such a premium, there are a few ergonomic oversights. Tall drivers will hit their knees on the climate control knob, and the shifter brushes their leg in rst and second gear. But the benet of this cars size is immediately evident the rst time you go to park it. You can squeeze this thing be tween two badly parked cars. We also liked the tight turning radius. The seats were comfortable and supportive, the best of the bunch here. Still, the Spark leaves some thing to be desired. Like the other cars, its performance suffers at highway speeds. Noise climbs quickly even if the speed doesnt. A roaring truck in the next lane drowns out any conversation. It bounces on rough roads. Fuel economy was the one area where all three cars shined. They all topped 40 miles per gallon in highway driving and climbed into the mid-30s mpg in mixed city and highway use. Although the Spark was the best of the bunch, these are not great cars. In part because they are lightweight and have tiny 14and 15-inch wheels, they dont track well on the Southlands grooved, wash board freeways. Theres a temptation to buy a car such as these as a third vehicle, especially for a teen driver. Resist that urge. In the nal analysis, the super-cheap segment doesnt hold up well against the prospect of a high-quality used car with a similar price tag. CHEAPFROM PAGE C3 MCT PHOTO The diminutive 2014 Chevrolet Spark carries a 1.3-liter engine.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 AT TIMESBY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0406RELEASE DATE: 4/13/2014 ACROSS1 Improvisational music4 Brick color10 Bibliographical abbr.14 Indigenous people known for their tattoos19 NPR journalist Shapiro20 1986 girls-name song by Boston21 Catch-22 profiteer Minderbinder22 DuPont trademark of 194123 Clumsy pharmacist, at times?26 Easily misled27 String section members28 Dressage rider, at times?30 Smidgen31 Suffix with social34 ___ suit35 Maintain36 Grant for a filmmaker?38 Indonesian tourist haven39 London ___ (British Ferris wheel)40 Reminiscent of41 Tucked away42 Some supplies for Hersheys44 Overzealous sorts47 Old-fashioned barber, at times?49 Missile launched at Goliath51 National Book Mo.53 Circus performer Kelly54 Inexperienced shucker, at times?58 Low pair60 Out of fashion61 Subject of a van Gogh series62 Software users shortcut65 No-limit Texas holdem player, at times?69 People may be down on them70 TWA competitor71 Dual-sport athlete Sanders72 Answers that may anger74 Farmer, at times?78 Unfettered82 Knowledge83 Shall we proceed?84 Sleeping sunbather, at times?87 Buyers final figure90 Spirits in Scandinavia91 New Haven alum92 Breaks down93 Stanford rival, informally95 Job everyone wants96 Sound at a horror film97 Florentine dynasty name100 Cut that out!101 West African vegetable102 Double-handed cooking vessel103 Dieter, at times?106 Fall stopper109 French : merci :: German : ___110 Person getting out of a tub, at times?114 Transpire115 Memo opener116 Detestable117 Something that may be amalgamated118 Manual parts?119 Giants or Titans120 Porcelain purchase, perhaps121 As matters stand DOWN1 Entrance side2 Department3 Current location?4 Brought to tears, possibly5 Times Arrow novelist Martin6 Took off7 Wedded8 Unconventional9 Person moving against traffic?10 Bring on11 Go quietly12 Fully attentive13 Some hand-medowns?14 Snowboard relative15 Polluted Asian lake16 Peridot color17 Vehicle on Mars18 Lifeless24 Goodness me!25 Exudes29 Less humble31 One of four in As I Was Going to St. Ives32 Problematic roomie33 Sal of Rebel Without a Cause36 Lunch spot37 Thing that might decay38 Bearded comic strip bully40 Old cavalrymen42 Illustrations, e.g.43 In need of spicing up, say44 ---. ... .45 News analyst Roberts46 Word on a clapperboard48 Like some measuring units49 Right away50 Its got problems52 Valrys very55 Disburse56 Goes to court?57 Offensive line striker59 Melancholy62 Flood residue63 Ghostly64 The Ipcress File star, 196566 ___ cest moi67 Told stories68 Way too thin73 Not a single thing?75 Blue76 Diminish77 Opposite of smooth79 Take by surprise80 Mud ___ (bottom-dwelling fish)81 Total bore85 Slurpee flavor86 Supermodel Heidi88 Dress in fancy duds89 Long-eared dogs, informally90 Reshape93 Fuerza Democrtica Nicaragense member94 Its played in ballparks96 Viscous substance97 PC platform of old98 Ratify99 The Harlem Shake or the Dougie100 One of the Allman Brothers102 Flick site?104 Expiration notice105 Fundamental part106 Modelists need107 Julio-Claudian dynasty ruler108 Attracted111 Horatian ___112 Hamm of soccer113 Signal that replaced CQD 123 456789 101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31323334 35 3637 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 4546 47 48 4950 5152 53 5455 5657 58 59 60 61 626364 65666768 69 70 71 7273 74 75 7677 78 798081 82 83 848586 878889 90 91 92 9394 95 96 979899 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107108 109 110 111112113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Sunday Crossword PuzzleCrossword puzzle answers are on page D3.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Has your job become extinct? Classied line ads are continued on page D3.

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 SERVICES Come Join UsSaturday, April 19th at 11:00amChildrens Easter Egg Hunt & Family PicnicSunday, April 20thEaster Worship Services Sunrise Service 6:45am Traditional Worship 8:00am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:30am (child care provided)Community United Methodist ChurchCorner of College Ave. & 466A, Fruitland Park352-787-1829 christumclsbg@gmail.com4/18 Tenebrae Service at 6:00 pm. 4/20 Easter Sunday Services at 8:30 am & 10:45 am**There will be Childrens Church during 10:45 Service.Christ United Methodist Church1313 Griffin Road Leesburg, FL(352) 365-0622 Services at7am Sunrise Outside 9am & 11amKids Club at 9 a.m. Service Nursery at Both ServicesMessage by Pastor John Blake400 Executive Blvd.www.goodnewschurchcf.org352.315.1695 Come as you are, Contemporary, Bible Teaching Church Join us to celebrate the miraculous resurrection of our Lord. A Celebration of the Resurrection April 13th Palm Sunday Services-8:30am & 10:30am Palm Sunday Cantata-2:00pm April 17th Maundy Thursday Service-7:00pm April 18th Good Friday Tenebrae Service-3:00pm April 20th Easter Sunday Service-9:30pm 204 North Lee Street Leesburg, Florida 34748(352) 787-1981website www.stjames-leesburg.orgSt. JamesEpiscopal ChurchHOLY WEEK SERVICESMAUNDY THURSDAY 10am & 7pm GOOD FRIDAY Liturgy 12:00pmWalking The Way Of The Cross 5:30pmEASTER SUNDAY 7:30am, 9:00am & 11:00am Easter Egg Hunt at 10:00am HOLY WEEK SCHEDULEHoly Thursday, April 17th 7pm-Mass of the Lords Supper 8pm-Altar of Repose Adoration Good Friday, April 18th 3pm-Veneration of the Cross 6pm-Stations of the Cross Holy Saturday, April 19th 12 Noon-Blessing of Easter Food 8:30pm-Easter Vigil Easter Mass Schedule Sunday, April 20th6:30am-Sports Pavilion Sunrise Mass 7:00am-Church 9:00am-Church or Pavilion 11:00am-Church or Pavilion 12:30pm-Church Palm Sunday, April 138:30 First Light (casual, traditional) 9:30 The Crossing (casual, contemporary childrens palm processional 11:00 Traditions (traditional worship) childrens palm processional (Gold Handbell Choir at 8:30 & 11:00; Chancel Choir at 11:00)Maundy Thursday, April 17 7:30 PMTenebraeA Service of Darkness Holy Communion Music led by Chancel Choir and Chamber OrchestraEASTER CELEBRATION8:30 First Light with Chancel Choir, Gold Handbell Choir, Brass, Timpani 9:30 The Crossing (Casual, Contemporary Worship) 11:00 Traditions with Chancel Choir, Gold Handbell Choir, Brass, Timpani Holy Week and Easter Services Bethany Lutheran Church, LCMS 352-787-7275Palm Sunday, April 13thWorship Services, 8am and 10:30am After 10:30 Service-a special presentation by Rev. Paul Wheelhouse on A Journey Through the Holy LandMaundy Thursday, April 17thWorship with Holy Communion, 3pmGood Friday, April 18thWorship Service, 3pmEaster Sunday, April 20thFestival Service with Holy Communion, 8am & 10:30am Join us for Holy Week at South LakePalm Sunday, April 13th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalMaundy Thursday, April 17th7:00 pm Communion ServiceEaster Sunday, April 20th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalSouth Lake Presbyterian Church131 Chestnut Street Clermont, Fl 34711 April 13 Palm Sunday 8 am & 11 am April 17 Maundy Thursday 8:15 am & 7:00 pm April 18 Good Friday Tenebrae Worship Service 7:00 pm April 19 Easter Vigil 7:00 pm April 20 EASTER SUNDAY Sunrise Service (with communion) 6:30 am Festival Services (with communion) 8 am & 11 am Easter Breakfast (at Christian Life Center) at 9:30 am Childrens Easter Egg Hunt at 10 am352-589-5433

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2 Black AMINDETNASBCCBATON SANTOTWICELAUDATORY SUBSISTENCEOUTERMOST ORATIERTHECLOCKCOO CADENTKINERKFCDANL SMOKENORSEFADER THEWATEREARNSOMENS GEARAXEDTAOLOOFAS MRPIBBOVITZSTARDUST TOELOOPIKESEATBELT LOATEENAGERVE BEDSTRAWEFTSILVERS TIMETIMESTABSALLDAY SEPTETBAHRIPAAIRS PRIORYOUINLAMBASTE RUSSOSNOOKPOLIO AMIRTUETOROSSACRAL DOCBARROOMSAPODINE DRIVENMADDICKANDJANE ISSUEDATEANGELILLER TETESNODBOISENOSES Sunday crossword puzzle is on page C6. Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 5 X 11.25 Black

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 4 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.5 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014

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Pay Me My Money Down Traditional Georgia Sea Island stevedores songYears ago, Fram au tomotive prod ucts developed an extremely effective marketing campaign for its oil lters. The commercial pictured a distraught motorist having his engine re placed, ostensibly be cause he didnt change his oil and lter reg ularly. The mechanic holds up a new oil lter and tells the customer: You can pay me now, or pay me later. Utilizing traditional and Roth IRAs is somewhat analogous: You can pay Uncle Sam today, or pay him down the road. With a traditional or back end IRA, one doesnt pay taxes until such time as withdrawals (called distributions) are made. But when you do indeed withdraw some or all of your money, you pay taxes (at your tax rate that year) on the total amount withdrawn from the IRA, including contributions and growth. G LD STANDARDTHE IN LAKE COUNTY FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTTHE JOINT COMMISSIONS GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The certication award recognizes Florida Hospital Waterman Joint Replacement Centers dedication to The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. Visit FHWatermanOrtho.com for more information. E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014Businessscott.callahan@dailycommercial.com GOOGLE GLASS: Users get mostly warm response / E3 www.dailycommercial.com MARGARET MCDOWELLGUEST COLUMNIST Pay me now or later: traditional vs. Roth IRAs RYAN FAUGHNDERLos Angeles TimesNick Stepka knew what gift would make his daughters third birthday a hit, and it wasnt a toy or doll. He gave her a tablet not a sleek new iPad or a hand-me-down Sam sung, but one specical ly designed and marketed for little ones. It even came with a purple pro tective casing and load ed with kids applications and games. Her eyes lit up when she opened it, said Stepka, 34, a Shakopee, Minn., father of three. Everything else got put to the side. Thats exactly what tablet makers and com panies that create childrens entertainment were hoping for. Stepkas household is part of a growing group of consumers for whom traditional childrens toys and games are not enough. In the United States, the percentage of kids ages 8 and un der using mobile devic es has almost doubled in the past two years, according to a report by San Francisco nonprot Common Sense Media. Children are also spending more time on these devices 15 minutes a day on average last year, up from ve minutes in 2011. Meanwhile, kids use of tra ditional screen-based entertainment, as in Tablets, apps for children are on the riseSEE APPS | E2SEE MCDOWELL | E2 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe city of Lee sburg is seek ing a foreign trade zone designation, and city and county ofcials say local busi nesses already are interested in the zones ability to make im porting and exporting cheaper and easier. A foreign trade zone allows, delayed or reduced duty pay ments on foreign merchandise, as well as other savings, according to the website enforcement.trade.gov. The designation allows businesses to pay no duties on imported goods that are later re-exported, defer duties on goods entering the U.S. mar ket and pay no duties on waste, scrap, rejected or defective parts. The designation also requires customers to pay just one customs entry per week instead of doing it multiple times during the week. Leo Treggi, the Leesburg International Airport Manager, said the Foreign Trade Zone for Leesburg would be authorized to serve all of Lake County. He said the main sites in the zone right now are Leesburg International Airport and the Leesburg Industrial Technology Park, but they can assign other proper ties in the county to the zone as well. Treggi said the zone could be a good economic development tool, attracting manufacturers and businesses who import and export, which at least one at the airport currently does. So, the motivator here is denitely attracting more business and creating more jobs for the area, Treggi said. He added that existing companies have already shown interest in using the zone, which could help them expand. Treggi said the airport will operate the zone. There are no plans to add staff or facilities at the airport but, as it grows they could add staff in the future. Adam Sumner, manager of Lake Countys Economic Development and Tourism Department, said businesses across the county have shown interest LEESBURGPotential foreign trade zone could benefit business BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Airport Manager Leo Treggi poses for a photo at the Leesburg International Airport in Leesburg on Wednesday. The city is seeking a Foreign Trade Zone designation.In this economy, its a difficult national economy out there, and local governments like the city of Leesburg, Lake County, we need to do everything that we can that will make the area more advantageous for businesses coming in. Having a foreign trade zone is just another tool that we can use to become attractive for businesses.Robert Sargent, public information ofcer for the city of Leesburg HEATHER SOMERVILLESan Jose Mercury NewsIts getting easier for con sumers to buy and spend bitcoin, the cybercurrency that has captured much of the tech world. With each passing month, entrepreneurs are rolling out new technol ogy for consumers to buy and store bitcoin, shop online with the virtual currency and send it to friends. Last week, a bitcoin ATM was unveiled in Mountain View, Calif. put in a few hundred bucks, out comes a bitcoin. And more retailers from consumer elec tronics to coffee roasters and pizza delivery are accepting bitcoin, making it easier for consumers to choose the Internet curren cy over dollars. Its all about to change over the next 12 to 24 months, said Marshall Hayner, a San Francis co entrepreneur who this month will launch bitcoin app QuickCoin. We are going to see all kinds of peo ple adopt it. Its going to power transactions on the Internet. Bitcoin is a cybercur rency and payments net work created in 2009 by a mathematical formula as an alternative to banks and government-controlled currency systems. Bitcoins are added one at a time to the network by computer programmers around the world, and most bitcoins are bought and traded on global Internet exchanges. The San Francisco Bay Area bitcoin community is lled with entrepreneurs and investors pouring mil lions of dollars into their projects. But for the rest of us, still buying with cash and plastic, bitcoin is a bit of a mystery. Youve got people out there who are software engi neers who dont understand it, said Vinny Lingham, co-founder of Gyft, a San Francisco digital gift card app that accepts bitcoin. Bitcoin cybercurrency gets easier for consumers to buy, spend GARY REYES / MCT Hami Oerner and Itzik Lerner, right, learn how to use a new bitcoin ATM machine at Hacker Dojo in Mountain View, Calif.SEE TRADE | E4SEE BITCOIN | E4

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 Call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Wednesday April 16th, at 11:00 amComfort Suites 1 Palm Reading 1721 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 917 S. US HWY 27 Minneola, FL352.787.7075NOW$1050%2 LocationsREG$20 televisions, video games and computers, has declined, the group said. Thats the reason Jim Mitchell started Fuhu Inc., an E l Segundo, Calif., company that makes tablets for consumers ages 3 to 14. We were tired of giving our kids the iPad when it rst came out, and there really wasnt anything else, he said. They wanted to play with all the games on the iPad, and it would come back all smudged, or if they dropped it, for heavens sakes, it would shatter. Fuhu makes Nabi tab lets, which major retailers sell for between $100 and $300. The company posted $200 million in sales last year, and executives are betting that demand from chil dren and parents will continue for high-pow ered devices that sport kid-friendly content and thick plastic bumpers to prevent damage. Kids can customize the machines with stickers featuring lm and TV characters, as well as accessories such as alphabet letters that attach to the tablet. They can use the tablets to watch TV shows and movies, play games and explore the Web, but only the features and sites that their parents approve. Competition in the eld of childrens tablets is growing. Companies such as LeapFrog Enterprises Inc. in Emeryville, Ca lif.; Toys R Us Inc., based in Wayne, N.J.; and tech giant Samsung Elec tronics Co. have tried to market devices to youngsters. Even traditional toy makers such as El Segundos Mattel Inc. have entered the app industry. Hollywood has tak en notice too. Walt Dis ney Co., DreamWorks Animation and Viacom Inc.s Nickelodeon are putting out tablet and mobile apps. Education-focused cable channel Baby FirstTV, which is car ried in 40 million U.S. homes, has unleashed 27 apps aimed at young children. Sharon Rech ter, co-founder and executive vice president of BabyFirstTV, said she expects the reach of her app business to match her traditional TV business in the next two years. Parents are constantly looking for good educational content, she said. Kids apps and devices are denitely here to stay, and theyre going to grow. Kids can learn from using a tablet, and they have fun with it. Entertainment companies and tablet mak ers are teaming up. For instance, BabyFirst has co-developed a series called Albert & Junior specically for use on Fuhus tablets. Fuhu also has made deals with Disney and Nickelodeon for spe cial-edition tablets. And the company is taking the technology and en tertainment relationship further with its next device, the Dream Tab, which it built with DreamWorks Animation. The $269 DreamTab, which runs on Google Inc.s Android operating system, will be released in some stores this month before a wider retail launch in June. APPSFROM PAGE E1 FRANCINE ORR / MCT Jim Mitchell, chief executive of Fuhu, shows off a DreamTab tablet, which his El Segundo, Calif., company built with DreamWorks Animation. With a Roth or front end IRA, you pay income tax now on contributions, just as you would on other income, and never pay taxes again on these funds, assuming you have held the Roth IRA account for a period of no less than ve years and you have reached the age of 59. This is one of the advantages of contributing to a Roth IRA: Taxes are likely to increase, so you are pay ing taxes today at a lesser rate. While intended for retirement use, you may withdraw your contributions to a Roth account both penaltyand tax-free at any time. However, any growth on the account is both penalized and taxed if you do not meet the two requirements above. Roth IRAs are an attractive retirement funding option for younger earners who plan on a growing income. The Roth allows you to lock in todays income tax rates and your tax bracket. Most of us would rather pay taxes on our Roth contributions when were in a 20-percent tax bracket than pay when we enter the 35-percent tax bracket. Investing in a traditional IRA will cause you to be taxed at a probable higher rate later on and on the growth accumulated in your account. Since its introduction in 1997, the Roth IRA has been extremely popular for just this reason. Another reason investors have been drawn to a Roth IRA is that there is no required minimum distribution (RMD) by the account owner. However, many people do not realize that this benet does not transfer to beneciaries, only the owner. President Obama has suggested imposing the annual RMD on Roth IRA accounts as well as traditional IRAs, as part of his 2015 scal budget. This would be a game-changer for retirement planning and would make Roth IRAs less desirable for many investors.Margaret R. McDowell, a syndicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 Roth IRAs are an attractive retirement funding option for younger earners who plan on a growing income. The Roth allows you to lock in todays income tax rates and your tax bracket. Most of us would rather pay taxes on our Roth contributions when were in a 20-percent tax bracket than pay when we enter the 35-percent tax bracket.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 438 E Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, Fl 32778 352-343-8080 801 S. Eustis St, Eustis, Fl 32726 352-357-7575 10601 US Hwy 441 Unit A-6, Leesburg, Fl 34788 352-314-0435 931 Central Ave, Umatilla, Fl 32784 352-669-3747 18846A US Hwy 441 Mount Dora, FL 32757 352-383-2105 1328 W. North Blvd., Leesburg, Fl 34788 352-787-3273 208 S. Hwy 27/441, Lady Lake, FL 32157 352-750-3669 522B B Hwy 27/441, The Villages, FL 32159 352-259-5708 17860 SE 109th Ave., Summerfield, FL 34491 352-347-6736 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hr Dr. Vaziri & StaffShoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLicense# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFinancing Available FREEExam & X-RaysMust present ad$190valueNEW PATIENTS BRIAN VAN DER BRUG / MCT JR Curley uses his Google Glass at the Manhattan Beach Pier, Calif. JESSICA GUYNNLos Angeles TimesSAN FRANCISCO At 6 feet 4 inches, J.R. Curley is used to getting noticed. Just not like this. Ever since he got a pair of Google Glass in November, he has been turning heads at the grocery store, in restaurants, on the street, even at Disneyland. People approach him all the time to ask about his head-mounted, In ternet-connected computer, which is worn like a pair of glasses. He spends so much time letting them try on Glass that his wife has begun referring to herself as the Glass bystander. For all the controversy Glass has generated for its ability to take pic tures or lm video with a simple gesture or voice command, Curley says the attention Glass gets on the streets of Los Angeles has been positive. Not once has he been asked to take off Glass in an establishment and no one has expressed discomfort that he might be taking photographs of them or video recording them, he said. In fact, hes the one who has had to get accustomed to people whipping out their smartphones and tak ing pictures of him without rst ask ing permission. As with any new technology, the more people have it, the more it generates a broad understanding, said Curley, 41, a design studio director of an accounting rm who lives in Man hattan Beach, Calif. Curley and dozens of others who are early testers of the device report little or no backlash from the public. In fact, they say a series of high-prole yet isolated incidents have given Glass an unfair rap. Glass users have been tossed from movie theaters. The device has been banned in bars, restaurants and casi nos. A San Diego woman was pulled over for driving with Glass, and a few states are considering banning driv ers from using Glass out of concern that the small screen will distract them on the road. One of the most notorious inci dents took place in a San Francisco bar in February when social media consultant Sarah Slocum said she was attacked for wearing Glass. Despite allegations from bar patrons, Slocum denied surreptitiously recording any one there. But court records show that in 2012 her neighbors got a restraining order against her for crouching outside their open window and re cording them with her smartphone. All of which has raised the ques tion: Is Glass really about to strip away the last shreds of privacy, as some people suggest? Glass users chalk up any anxiety to a natural fear of the unknown. They say that fear will subside when the technology is in more hands and the social norms have been sussed out. Besides, they say, there are far less expensive and more effective ways to covertly record someone than wear ing a computer on your face. Andrew Barash, 33, a software developer with OpenTable who lives in Marin County, Calif., says he has yet to have a negative encounter while wearing Glass. People who run into him in store aisles occasionally joke with him: Am I being recorded? I say, Yes, theres a security camera right over there, Barash said. Mostly, he said, people are excited to see it and try it. Once they see it in person and how it works, it general ly dissipates any concerns about recording. Google is betting that Glass the most hotly anticipated technology since the iPhone and the iPad will lead a revolution in wearable devices that will change how people interact with technology and one another. But rst it has to win over the public. Curley is just the kind of post er child Google wants for Glass. He wears it between six and eight hours a day to send text messages to his wife, take photographs and videos of his two daughters, and look up direc tions. He even taught his 3-year-old to take pictures with it. When his Glass broke and he was without it for a few days, he could not bear to pull the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 out of his pocket. I cant imagine my life without it, he said of Glass. Even with those kinds of testimo nials, Google has been rolling out the device slowly and cautiously.Google Glass users get mostly warm reception

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 in the zone and approached his ofce. In economic development, its all about building your tool kit, as we call it, and a for eign trade zone is a tremendous asset to have in that tool kit, Sumner said. Sumner said trade zones historically lower the cost of doing business for companies that import and export. We truly believe its a very valuable asset to our economic development plan for the whole county, Sumner said. Robert Sargent, public information ofcer for the city of Leesburg, said Leesburg International Airport is a general purpose airport but is also an economic engine. You dont have to be in the aviation business to benet from the air port, and the Foreign Trade Zone is a good example of that, Sar gent said. Sargent said the air port does a fair amount of shipping, and he hoped the zone would benet business already here and help attract more. In this economy, its a difcult national economy out there, and local governments like the city of Leesburg, Lake County, we need to do everything that we can that will make the area more advantageous for businesses coming in, Sargent said. Having a foreign trade zone is just another tool that we can use to become attractive for businesses. He added the Customs ofce at the inter national airport is key to making Leesburg eligible for the Foreign Trade Zone status. Sargent said the city applied for the foreign trade zone in November 2013. It has been docketed and waiting on public comment until May 27. Sometime around June 10, the city can respond to public concern or questions. After that, the city should be qualied to get nal approval for the zone and the city expects to be approved barring any major concerns raised, Sargent said. There are nearby For eign Trade Zones in Or lando, Daytona Beach, Sanford, Tampa, St. Petersburg and Port Canaveral, according to enforcement.trade.gov. 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Country Music 6pm-9pm, Karaoke 9-closeWEEKDAY SPECIALS ALL DAY & NIGHT Quality Inn Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. TRADE FROM PAGE E1 Its far too complicated out there for the average consumer to under stand. But that will change. Cary Peters is hoping to uncomplicate bitcoin for consumers with the ATM he unveiled at Hacker Dojo, a nonprot shared tech space in Mountain View. His is the rst bitcoin ATM in California, and anyone can use it by setting up an account with a phone number, ID, and face and palm scan, which is used to run a background check to rule out po tential fraud. Regulation has to be implemented, Peters said, a position rarely heard in the libertarian bitcoin community, but one that experts say is necessary to gain the trust of con sumers. After about ve minutes, the machine sends a text message that the user can start buying and selling bitcoins. Many bitcoin websites take about four or more days for transac tions, and that delay doesnt work for everyone. Something you decide you want to do today you may not want to do in four days, said Hami Lerner, a Sunnyvale, Calif., resident who works in tech and visited the ATM on Tues day. Bitcoin valuation can uctuate wildly on any day; in February, it fell more than 85 percent in less than two hours. Recently valuation has ranged between about $450 and $500, about half its all-time high of more than $1,200 in November. After youve bought your bitcoins, you move them to a bitcoin wal let, an app that manages the curren cy, where you can hold onto them or spend them. Overstock.com was the rst major online retailer to start accepting bitcoin in January. Only about 1 percent of consumers are buying with bitcoin, but revenue from bitcoin purchases is expected to reach $15 million this year, exceeding company expectations by about $10 million, said Jonathan Johnson, vice chairman of the board of directors for Overstock.com. In all disrup tive technology, theres early adopt ers and more mainstream adopters, Johnson said. I remember thinking in the early s I needed to gure out what this Google thing is. Now everyone walks around with the Inter net in their hip pocket or their purse. Were at the early adopters stage. Other retailers accepting bitcoin: consumer electronics retailer Tiger Direct, handmade goods seller Etsy, online gaming company Zynga and electric car company Tesla. BITCOINFROM PAGE E1 ADDING BITCOIN TO YOUR WALLET:WHERE TO BUY: Bitcoin ATM (Mountain View, Calif.); online exchanges (Coinbase, Bitstamp, CoinCafe, BitQuick) WHAT IT COSTS: In the last week, the price of one bitcoin has ranged from $460 to $480 WHERE TO SPEND: Overstock.com, Pizza for Coins, TigerDirect, Etsy, Wordpress, Zynga, Tesla, OkCupid, Reddit, Gyft and the Sacramento Kings. BITCOIN FOR A CAUSE: Hack Cancer, a group of philanthropic young professionals in San Francisco, has held bitcoin fundraisers for cancer research, and has several more bitcoin events planned this year. Bitcoin Not Bombs, an activist organization to help social entrepreneurs start using the virtual currency, has used bitcoin to buy sweatshirts for homeless people in San Francisco.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Todays Highlight in History: On April 13, 1964, Sidney Poitier became the rst black performer in a leading role to win an Academy Award for his performance in Lilies of the Field. (Patricia Neal was named best actress for Hud; best picture went to Tom Jones.) On this date: In 1613, Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, was captured by English Capt. Samuel Argall in the Virginia Colony and held in exchange for English prisoners and stolen weapons. (During a yearlong captivity, Pocahontas converted to Christianity and ultimately opted to stay with the English. ) In 1742, Handels Messiah had its rst public performance in Dublin, Ireland. In 1743, the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, was born in Shadwell in the Virginia Colony. In 1861, at the start of the Civil War, Fort Sumter in South Carolina fell to Confederate forces. In 1912, the Royal Flying Corps, a predecessor of Britains Royal Air Force, was created. In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C., on the 200th anniversary of the third American presidents birth. Radio Berlin announced the discovery of thousands of graves of massacred Polish ofcers in Russias Katyn Forest; the Nazis blamed the killings on the Soviets, who in turn blamed the Nazis. (Post-Soviet Russia has acknowledged the massacre was carried out by Josef Stalins secret police.) In 1958, Van Cliburn of the United States won the rst International Tchaikovsky Competition for piano in Moscow; Russian Valery Klimov won the violin competition. In 1970, Apollo 13, fourfths of the way to the moon, was crippled when a tank containing liquid oxygen burst. (The astronauts managed to return safely.) In 1974, NASA launched Westar 1, Americas rst commercial communications satellite, for Western Union. In 1986, Pope John Paul II visited the Great Synagogue of Rome in the rst recorded papal visit of its kind to a Jewish house of worship. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, April 13, 2014: This year you have wonderful ideas only, before you can share them, others seem to move on. You might want to allow others to give you feedback sooner. How you handle a personal matter could change as a result. If you are single, this summer could prove to be very exciting, as you are in a period when you are likely to meet someone important to your life history. Fall and winter will carry the same theme. If you are attached, the two of you act like newfound lovers this summer. LIBRA looks at life very differently from how you do. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Let a loved one take the lead. You might have a sense that a choice seems to be off, but let it be. The other party needs to see what will happen. You are likely to be in the mood to snooze and overindulge a little. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could be so easygoing that you might miss a scheduled get-together. A friend could be quite disconcerted when you dont show up. Make a phone call quickly, and adjust your plans. Consider making a caring gesture toward this person. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your playful spirit might emerge, which will allow for great fun and interpersonal relating. You actually could become childlike and expressive. You have the ability to pull the wool over a parents or older relatives eyes. Be careful. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Invite several friends over for an early dinner. You could be taken aback by someones response. Let it go, as nearly everyone has been under unusual pressure lately. Be careful when dealing with a loved one at a distance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Dont worry about making the rst move just do it. Someone you care about can be quite slack when it comes to money. Be careful to keep your funds separate if you decide to let this relationship evolve into something more. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be more aware of someone elses spending needs as well his or her tendency to take risks. In any case, make today your treat, and invite several friends to brunch or a movie. You will note a difference in how you feel when you are with your pals. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be a lot more content than you have been in a while. Try to better understand a friend and gure out what is getting to him or her. Your sensitivity will help this person understand his or her limits within a relationship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Slow down. You often jump to conclusions based on what you would do in the same situation. Remain sensitive to a loved one who adores you. Explain that you need some time to yourself. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Play it low-key with a personal matter. Go off and enjoy your friends, wherever they might be. You could end up at several different events as a result. You could make a big difference and help someone feel comfortable with himor herself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) A must-show event or family happening could dene your day. Remain sensitive to a sibling or close person in your life. Make time for this person, and you might gain a greater sense of levity around him or her. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Make a call to a friend at a distance that you have been putting off. Understand what is going on with this person before you decide to visit. You could be surprised by what you hear. Decide whether it is wise to get together right now. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: Im in a tricky situation. My boy friend of four years, Ian, and I took a break from our relationship for two months because he was scared hed miss out on the single life. We started hanging out again soon after, and everything fell into place. We were talking recently, and he mentioned that hes planning to move across the country to San Francisco to be near his family. He made it plain he wants to live on the West Coast forever. I am close to my family closer than Ian is to his. Were both 24, and while were not going to get engaged anytime soon, Im not sure what to do. We love each other, but the geography is causing so many issues. Please advise. NEW YORK GIRL DEAR N.Y. GIRL: Its good that you and Ian arent planning on becoming engaged anytime soon, because you have some serious thinking to do. If you plan on having a family and want your parents to be close to their grandchildren, it would be better for you to nd another boy friend. Im advising you and Ian to take another break this time for YOUR benet to see which is more important to you: the man or the location. DEAR ABBY: This issue with my wife may seem trivial, but its making me crazy. I like to cook; she doesnt. When I cook its an expression of love, and our family sits down together to enjoy the meal. We dont watch TV and we dont answer the phone. Sounds ideal, wouldnt you say? The problem is, after I put the food on the table, my wife gets up and starts pulling other food from the fridge to microwave. Or shell start making a salad. These last-minute additions make me furious. She knows it, but wont stop. Either she doesnt want the leftover to go bad or she thinks something is missing from the table. I say she should prepare these additions while Im making dinner so everything will be on the table at the same time, or else forget it. What do you think? STEAMING IN THE KITCHEN IN TEXAS DEAR STEAMING: Is the layout of your kitchen conducive to tandem cooking? If its not, that may be why your wife goes in there after youre no longer using it. Do you tell your wife what you will be preparing for dinner and ask if there is anything else she wants included? That may prompt her to think ahead so she wouldnt have to get up and leave the table. If the answer to my questions is yes, then there may be something going on in your relationship for which shes trying to punish you. DEAR ABBY: My daughter goes to a preschool in a church where we are not members. Pastor Joe is very involved with the classes, often chatting with the par ents and calling them by their rst names. I have seen him around town various times, but Im never sure how to address him. I feel strange calling him Pastor since he isnt my minister. On the other hand, calling him Joe doesnt quite seem right either. How should a man of the cloth be greeted on the street? FEELING AWKWARD IN JAMESTOWN, N.Y. DEAR FEELING AWKWARD: I think youre asking the wrong person. Why not ask HIM how hed like to be addressed? I remember a delightful priest in Chicago, who when meeting people would immediately say, Call me John. I used to refer to him as Father CallMe-John.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Boyfriend heading west may cause girlfriend to move on JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 JOAN VERDONThe RecordCreating a hit toy is like trying to catch light ning. Marty Abrams has done it at least ve times over the past 50 years. Now, at age 71, he is hoping to do it again. Abrams, who is in the midst of launching a new type of soft plush toy, called AniMei, which comes to life with sounds and lights, is an example of a small toy manufacturer who needs the Wayne, N.J.based retail chain, Toys R Us, to continue to exist. Abrams calls Toys R Us a crucial springboard for ideas from smaller companies. Abrams, chief executive of I-Star Entertain ment in Great N eck, N.Y., has seen the toy world change dramatically since the 1950s, when his father found ed the now-defunct Mego Toy Co. Abrams, as a young man in the 1960s, helped Mego give birth to the action-gure genre with a line of superheroes. Mego also brought the rst Nintendo games to this country in the form of the Mego Nintendo Timeout games credit-card-sized LCD games. In addition, Abrams played a role in the launch of crafts toy Magna Doodle, Micro nauts action gures and the 1990s hit Sky Danc ers ying dolls. Abrams says all of his hot toys had one thing in common the rest of the toy industry was cold to them originally. His latest launch, AniMei, seems to be fol lowing that pattern. The toys, which Abrams de scribed as huggable, animated friends that kids can take to bed with them, use an algorithm that syncs lights and sounds to make a doll or pillow appear to wake up and talk. Abrams plans to have the rst U.S. Ani-Mei products in Toys R Us and other retailers this summer. Abrams spoke with The Record about taking a toy from idea to launch, and why toy inventors and manufacturers need Toys R Us to survive. (Interview edited and condensed.) Q: How was Ani-Mei born? A: A lady walked in with what we call a bread board a work ing piece of what AniMei does. I looked at it and instantly saw what I wanted to do with it. For me, when the match is lit and the dynamites in the room, I dont blow the match out. I just light the dynamite. The woman who de veloped this had been turned down by every body in the toy indus try not once but twice. They were clueless what to do with it. Q: What was it you instantly wanted to do with it? A: I said I had to go get every (childrens car toon and character) license there ever was in the world. It creates so much emotion and such warm and fuzzy feelings, and it goes across a wide range of ages and different li censes. When it lights up, and theres nothing hard in there and the eyes come alive and the language or singing is absolutely in sync with the moving of the lips, its magical for the child. Q: Youve said that all your toy hits got a cold response from the industry at rst. Why is that? A: When its new and you dont quite get it, you pull back. Every body talks about thinking outside the box, but when you think outside the box, the territory becomes very tough to navigate. There are no trailblazers. The clos est thing to a trailblaz er today is Toys R Us because they buy so much across the board. Theyve got 50,000 SKUs (stock-keeping units or different toys) while everyone else has 2,000. The problem is they dont buy enough to make it happen. So the risk is always on the new guy coming up with the product. Q: You talk about learning to enjoy the journey of rejection. Whats that? A: Thats where the kick is when ev erybody says no, no, no and then the toy comes out and its yes, yes, yes. You saw that happen with Cabbage Patch (dolls). Every body turned Sky Danc ers down. Everybody turned this Ani-Mei down. Q: What about someone stealing the idea or copying it? A: Ive locked it up so tight, nobody can steal this. I have non-disclo sures from all the com panies in America who saw it. And we have issued patents. I also have the licenses. Be tween the non-disclosures, the patents, and the licenses were pretty well positioned. Q: Compared with when you rst started working in toys, how hard is it to sell toys to day in terms of getting them into stores? A: Much more difcult. Those days, there were so many more retailers. Just in New York you had Alexanders, Mays, Times Square stores, Caldor. You had a hundred more retailers. Those 100 retailers are now basically Wal-Mart. So if you dont sell Wal-Mart, youre in big trouble. Q: Do you think the U.S. can continue to support a specialty toy chain like Toys R Us? A: Let me rephrase that. I think the toy in dustry has to support a specialty toy chain like Toys R Us, because if they dont, how are they going to launch products? Where are they going to be able to sell the unique prod ucts that can start off at Toys R Us and then roll out to a major distribu tion? There are millions rooting for this company. It is essential that it survive and work and be protable. But they have to get their house in order. If (the new management) under stands what needs to be done and works with their marketing group and the industry, they can be successful. For toy inventor, big business gives small ideas a boost KEVIN R. WEXLER / MCT I-Star Entertainment CEO Marty Abrams and friends pose for a portrait at the International Toy Fair in New York in February.Abrams says all of his hot toys had one thing in common the rest of the toy industry was cold to them originally. His latest launch, Ani-Mei, seems to be following that pattern. The toys, which Abrams described as huggable, animated friends that kids can take to bed with them, use an algorithm that syncs lights and sounds to make a doll or pillow appear to wake up and talk. 352.530.2256803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionCall today to schedule your appointmentThe Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial.

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CONVERSION CHART (client will ll) 2 TV Week April 13 19, 2014 FEATURE STORY Michael C. Hall surveys climate change Dangerously By Jay Bobbin Zap2itWhen Dexter ended, Michael C. Hall wanted a new challenge ... and found one that took him not only far away from that series but also from home. The actor went to Bangladesh as one of the celebrity correspondents for Years of Living Dangerously, a Showtime documentary miniseries offering on-location explorations of the impact of climate change around the world. Starting a weekly fourSunday run April 13, the program also enlists Harrison Ford, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle, Jessica Alba, Ian Somerhalder, Olivia Munn, America Ferrera and journalist Lesley Stahl as reporters. Schwarzenegger is an executive producer of the miniseries as well, as are filmmaker James Cameron and entertainment impresario Jerry Weintraub (Behind the Candelabra). Drought, carbon emissions and the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy are among the topics within the larger subject, also seen being covered by author and New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, political commentator and MSNBC host Chris Hayes, and others. Michael C. Hall is among the celebrity correspondents in Years of Living Dangerously, premiering Sunday on Showtime. 2 x 3.5 ad Captain Mike's Halls social concerns are demonstrated by his ties to such organizations as the Somalia Aid Societys Feed the People initiative and the Waterkeeper Alliance. He says his Years of Living Dangerously involvement started with Showtime contacting me about the project and letting me know a couple of slots that were available for correspondents. One of the two was Bangladesh, and I saw that it coincided with the (end of the) work on Dexter. I think theres a growing collective awareness surrounding this issue, Hall notes, but I also jumped at the chance to kind of reboot my own system when the series ended." Comcast Marion Comcast Lake Co.Brighthouse Cable Direct TVFL. Cable Astatula / Tavares / LeesburgFL. Cable Astor / PiersonHawthorne Sunview CablevisionFriendship Cable Lake Co. F riendship Cable Sumter Co.Cable Development Corp.VCR Plus CodesTVWEEKCONVERSION CHARTTVWEEKCONVERSION CHART



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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Care and Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson SPIETH JOINS WATSON AT MASTERS HELM, SPORTS B1 PRICE HIKES: Water, sewage rates could be going up in next few years A3 UKRAINE: US orders new sanctions over Crimea A7 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, April 13, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 103 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C7 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C6 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C7 MONEY E1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8 84 / 66 Mostly sunny $1 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T o ge t a sense of how the new owner of Lake Square Mall hopes to breathe new life into the struggling shopping center in Leesburg, it helps to look around the United States at some of the 13 other malls under the umbrella of Kohan Retail Investment Group. A glance at those Kohan proper ties reveals an interesting, some what unorthodox strategy that features a mix of traditional an chor stores and retail outlets, but also a heavy dose of entertain ment as well as a sprinkling of gov ernment, non-prot and political hubs meant to attract non-shop pers who might not otherwise ven ture inside. The nearby Crystal River Mall is one such building that Kohan has transformed into a communi ty space that uses events to draw people there. Kohan bought the mall in Crys tal River two years ago, according to Millie Bresnahan, the manag er at the Crystal River Mall. Cit rus County Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Josh Wooten said Kohan bought the mall out of foreclosure. They essentially bought a dis tressed piece of property, Wooten said. Mike Kohan, head of the compa ny, said he tries to make malls des tinations. You got to give them a hope, and you got to give them a reason to come and shop in this mall, and thats what Im trying to do, Ko han said. The Crystal River Mall has a Dis abled American Veterans chap ter and a putt-putt golf course and also hosts a farmers market, ac cording to Bresnahan and the Ko han Retail Investment Groups website. Wooten said the Crystal River Mall under Kohan has been very community oriented. They have catered more to mom and pops to ll up some of the spaces and they put in a minia ture putt-putt, Wooten said. Bresnahan said the mom and pop stores in the Crystal River Mall are there partly to ll the malls va cancies but also for their commu nity impact. Weve kind of taken the thinking of, you know, its the Crystal Riv er Mall, but its also a communi ty space. Its a place to gather. Its a place to do things, she said. Rural King has recently bought an anchor store at the Crystal River Mall, Bresnahan said. Crystal River Mayor Jim Farley agreed that the Crystal River Mall has a hometown feel. Theres malls all over the coun try and not taking anything away from them, but theyre most ly chain stores and ... I dont think UNIQUE STORES While its commonplace to see stores like Hallmark, Radio Shack and Foot Locker in malls, which Kohans properties have, the company also has an eclectic group of tenants not usually seen in indoor shopping venues Driving school United States Postal Service branch Dance academy Two churches Red Cross bingo room A virtual school County Republican club headquarters Goodwill ofce A Court Appointed Special Advocates ofce to help local children caught up in the legal system Inside a Kohan mall Lake Square Mall owner uses unorthodox methods to draw patrons The Crystal River Mall has a miniature golf course and other entertainment in what used to be an anchor store in Crystal River. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The Crystal River Malls food court is a tented area in the center of the mall in Crystal River. SEE MALL | A2 Staff report An Orlando group that promotes religious free dom is suing the Lake County School Board, say ing its controversial student club policy is dis criminating against members of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) at Mount Dora High School. The School Board already is facing another suit led last December by the American Civil Liber ties Union to allow a gay-straight club to meet at Carver Middle School in Leesburg. Fridays suit, led in U.S. District Court by Liber ty Counsel, claims the FCA has been refused equal access to school facilities given to other student clubs, such as: Announcements in the hallways and on the schools marquee Flyers in and outside of classrooms where clubs meet Club announcements over the schools pub lic address system Club webpage on the Districts website Members to wear a colored cord at gradua tion to signify club membership Club section in the school yearbook MOUNT DORA Lake County School Board sued again over its club policy LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com While lake levels on the Harris Chain of Lakes have recovered slightly, they continue to be below regulatory levels, water experts say. Mike Perry, executive director of the Lake Coun ty Water Authority, said lack of rainfall is the main cause of low lake levels, while groundwater with drawals from the Floridan Aquifer also play a role. Rainfall has been below average since 2005 and that results in the lower lake levels simply due to lack of rain, Perry said. Hank Largin, spokesman for the St. Johns River Water Management District, agreed. By far the largest factor on lake levels, in par ticular those that exist in south Lake County is rainfall, he said. Estimates of the percentage of current groundwater pumping on lake levels is estimated to be about 5 to 15 percent. Current pumping is very close to the allowable sustainable limit. Perry said the cumulative rainfall decit since 2005 is 63.28 inches, equivalent to 5.2 feet. All lakes in the Harris Chain are below the regulatory level as adopted by the St. Johns River Water Man agement District, Perry conrmed. Lake Apopka is currently 1.8 feet below the reg ulatory level, he said. Further, there is particular concern about Lake Grifn, which is at 56.95 feet. We hope it doesnt get much lower, Perry said. Otherwise, there could be potentially environ mental damage. Perry shared the latest numbers on lake levels at the Lake County Commission meeting this week. The Clermont Chain of Lakes has seen some in creases in its lake levels. Lake levels are up but nowhere near normal SEE SUITS | A2 SEE LAKES | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 you get the hometown feel that you get in our mall with the mom and pop stores, Farley said. He added the mall has been transforming un der Kohan. Several months ago, before we even knew that Rural King was coming in, people were crying the blues to some degree, saying the mall was dying, and they didnt want to see that happen. And I said pub licly that the mall is not dying, that its simply in the process of reinvent ing itself. I think that was true then and its even more true now, he said. Bresnahan said the Crystal River Mall tries to do one large event each month and to offer entertainment weekly. For right now, its very important. Its whats helping us, you know, sustain. Its keeping peo ple aware that we are in business. You know, just because we lost a Belk or we lost a Sears, were still here, Bresnahan said. Kohan agreed the events are, very, very important because they drive trafc into the mall. You got to give them a reason. You cant just advertise and say, OK, come and shop in Crys tal River or come and shop (at the) Lake Square Mall. Youve got to have a reason for them to come in, Kohan said. When they know theres a band thats playing on Saturday, so they bring the kids, they bring the wife, their fam ily, and everybody, and they (are) just making it a fun day for them selves. Bresnahan believes that Lake Square Mall should adopt some of the strategies employed by Crystal River. They should do the farmers market, she said, and that can be done inside, where you can attract people in, out of the sun, and they also shop at the same time. It benets all of your stores. A food truck event also attracted 4,500 peo ple, she said. They all came in the mall and shopped. She added that she tries to involve the malls stores in the events. We just did a prom fashion show, and so our tuxedo-prom shop did all the dresses and tuxe dos for that, she said. The Crystal River Mall also has a weekly dance event that draws about 80 participants, she said. Lake Square Mall Gen eral Manager Jennifer Glidewell said the mall will eventually follow Crystal Rivers lead with regard to events. Wooten believes Ko han has brought value back to the mall. I would certainly give them props for taking what, as I said, was a dis tressed asset with major tenants leaving and turn ing it into something that is of value to the commu nity, Wooten said. Already, new tenants are beginning to ll up vacant space. The mall recently nal ized negotiations with Cuba Pichys Cuisine, Dunkin Donuts, Mam mas Pizza Express, and Boba Galaxy Smooth ies. Cuba Pichys Cui sine will be a ne-dining Cuban restaurant in the space that once housed Garelds restaurant, and the Dunkin Donuts store will be in a space that formerly housed a KFC. Glidewell said the smoothie store will be near the Books-AMillion, and the piz za restaurant will be in the space that formerly housed Sbarro. The gross leasable area at the Lake Square Mall, including out-parcels, is 559,000 square feet, ac cording to Glidewell. Gross leasable space in the mall itself is 520,177 square feet. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 12 CASH 3 ............................................... 5-9-6 Afternoon .......................................... 2-3-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-4-1-7 Afternoon ....................................... 5-6-7-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 11 FANTASY 5 ......................... 10-15-21-24-35 MEGA MONEY ...................... 14-15-23-299 MEGA MILLIONS ................ 3-42-44-47-578 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The outside of Crystal River Mall is shown. MALL FROM PAGE A1 Stipend for the clubs faculty advisor The Federal Equal Ac cess Act and the First Amendment prohib it discrimination against public school clubs, Mat Staver, founder and chairman of Liberty Counsel, said in a press release. Equal Access means exactly what it says equal access to every school facility used by other clubs, he said. This includes the use of classroom facilities, in tercom systems, bulletin boards, yearbook, nan cial sponsorship and any other benet afforded to secular clubs. After settling an ini tial lawsuit led by the ACLU last May over the gay-straight club at Carver Middle, the School Board came up with a new policy that dened student clubs. According to the Liber ty Counsel suit, clubs like the Art Club and Drama Club at Mount Dora High are classied as curricu lar clubs, clubs like the Future Business Lead ers of America and Na tional Honor Society are classied as co-curricu lar clubs, and clubs like the FCA and Key Club are classied as non-curricu lar with little or no rights. The FCA has been desig nated non-curricular. The gay-straight club at Carver Middle also has been classied non-cur ricular, which result ed in a second ACLU suit in December because club members have not been allowed to meet on school grounds this school year. The initial ACLU suit in May was settled within days when the School Board allowed the club to meet for three weeks until the end of last years school year. FCA is an internation al Christian organization and the largest Christian sports ministry in the world. FCA is instilling com munity responsibility, leadership, morality and character development in the hearts of young people, Staver said. Why Mount Dora High School refuses to support this kind of club is be yond absurd. Also named as de fendants in the Liberty Counsel suit are Superin tendent Dr. Susan Moxley and school Principal Pam Chateauneuf. In addition to the FCA, plaintiffs in the suit are four students a 10th grader, an 11th grader and two 12th graders and club faculty advisor Gerald Buell, who also claims discrimination. According to the suit, other club faculty advisors receive stipends of at least $500 a year. Buell said he did, too, prior to the 200809 school year, but hes received nothing since because the FCA is con sidered a religious club. Buell, a history teacher at Mount Dora High, was in the news in 2011 when he was suspended con cerning anti-gay com ments he made on his Facebook page. He was returned to the classroom when Moxley sided with Buells argument that he had a First Amendment right to make such com ments. Buell was assisted in his defense by a lawyer from Liberty Counsel. The FCA is asking the court to grant it co-cur ricular club status and benets. The suit also seeks damages, saying the club policy is view point-based and thus discriminatory. School ofcials could not be reached for com ment Saturday. It has been a School Board policy in the past to refuse com ment on pending court action. SUITS FROM PAGE A1 Lake Minnehaha is about a foot and a quar ter higher than it was at this time last year, he said. The downside is it is slightly 3 feet below the bottom end of our regula tory range. In addition, because the water district want ed to keep as much water as possible in the Harris Chain of Lakes, ofcials have closed the three dams between the lakes, which has resulted in no water moving through the chain of lakes, Perry said. We have not been able to take advantage of the nutrient reduction facil ity and its ability to send high quality water down stream from Lake Apopka because there has been no ow from the system, he added. Water experts have cautioned that Central Florida has just ve years or so to nd an alterna tive water supply before withdrawals from the Floridan Aquifer could begin impacting lakes, wetlands and springs. There will be a demand of an additional 300 mil lion gallons of water by 2035 and there is only an additional 50 million gal lons that can be met from the aquifer, water experts have said. Perry said currently withdrawals are a minor component in relation to lake levels, explain ing water taken from the lakes for irrigation pur poses has an impact, too. For example, he said, if all 259 homes around Lake Minnehaha irrigat ed from the lake two days a week year round, the loss would result in the use of 202 million gal lons per year, amounting to 1.7 percent of the lakes volume. Withdrawals are a component, he said, ex plaining those who take water from the lakes for irrigation purposes are also contributing to low lake levels. Commissioner Sean Parks said he is con cerned there may be oth er things that are block ing or altering the ow of water into the Clermont Chain of Lakes, resulting in potentially lower lake levels. Perry said the LCWA is unaware of any of these. We are still evaluating the area, but we have not found anything at this time, he said. Commissioner Leslie Campione also expressed concern about low levels in the Holly Chain. I do wonder about withdrawals happening with the sand mine in the area, she said. Perry said there is no indication sand mines have an effect on lake lev els. However, he said north ern Lake County, where the Holly Chain is located, has had the least amount of rainfall throughout the entire county. LAKES FROM PAGE A1 MARTIN GRIFFITH Associated Press Federal land managers abruptly end ed the roundup of cattle on public land in southern Nevada owned by a ranch er who has refused to recognize their au thority, citing a serious concern for the safety of employees and the public. Bureau of Land Management chief Neil Kornze made the announcement Satur day morning as hundreds of people, in cluding militia members, gathered near the roundup area to protest the removal of hundreds of Cliven Bundys cattle. The ght between Bundy and the Bu reau of Land Management has widened into a debate about states rights and fed eral land-use policy. The bureau revoked Bundys grazing rights after he stopped paying grazing fees and disregarded fed eral court orders to remove his animals. Kornzes announcement came after Bundy repeatedly promised to do what ever it takes to protect his property. Feds end cattle roundup in Nevada Every Wednesday in

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Tickets still available for Dining in the Dark This unique dinner is an expedi tion into the world of smell, taste, sound and texture as guests ex perience dinner served in dark ness at the fourth annual Dining in the Dark event on May 2 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora. The dinner is designed to raise awareness and funds for New Vision for Independence, the local non-prot that provides rehabili tation, community education and support services for people dealing with blindness or low vision. For information or to purchase tickets, $60 for general seating and $440 for a private table of eight, go to www.newvision.org, or call Chantel Buck at 352-435-5040. WILDWOOD Annual The Villages Craft Festival at Brownwood The Brownwood Paddock Square will host the annual The Villages Craft Festival, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday and April 20 with free ad mission to guests. The Festival at Brownwood con tinues to grow and highlight the tal ents of many unique crafters, while enjoying the streets of this commu nity. Find great one-of-a-kind craft items and sample great food while listening to live music. For information, call 352-753-2270. LADY LAKE Uncle Donalds Farm hosts Easter events Visit the Easter Bunnys country cousin, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., on Saturday at Uncle Donalds Farm, 2713 Grifn Ave. Kids can participate in the egg hunt at 1 p.m., and pet a rabbit, milk a goat, bottle-feed the farms kids and take a hayride. Uncle Donalds Farm will be closed on Easter. Admission is $9.75 per person plus tax. For information, call Uncle Donalds Farm at 352-753-2882. EUSTIS Earth Day cleanup, planting planned for Marsh Park Lake County park rangers invite residents to celebrate Earth Day by helping to plant owers and clean up debris from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. on April 22 at Marsh Park and Boat Ramp, 36545 Yale Retreat Road. Garbage bags, trash pickers and rubber gloves will be provided. For information or to register for the cleanup, call the Lake County Parks & Trails Division, at 352-2534950, or email parksandtrails@lake county.gov SORRENTO Poetry month contest ongoing The East Lake County Library is sponsoring the 12th Annual Poetry Contest open to all ages in three age groups: Children to age; Teens age 1318; and the adult group, age 19 and up. For information, call 352 -383-9980. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Umatilla needs to raise water and wastewater rates by more than 70 per cent over the next three years, according to its city manager. All customers would ex perience the rate increase, City Manager Glenn Irby said. A rate study by Public Resources Management Group recommended, for both the water and waste water systems, a rst rev enue adjustment of 22 percent as soon as prac tical, and then another 12 percent increase start ing on the rst day of Oc tober each year in 2015, 2016 and 2017. The chang es would amount to a cu mulative increase of 71.4 percent from the pres ent rates, according to the study. The revenue adjustment would come from differ ent sources, according to Irby, including meter siz es and amount of water used. The 22 percent is a blended rate increase overall, Irby said of the rst adjustment. He explained the base rate for all meters right now is $7.70, and that would be going up for ev eryone. If you own a large re tail establishment and you need a six-inch me ter for volume your abil ity to use a greater volume of water over me, at my house, is tremendous, Irby said. So, the sys tem has been established, the entire city system has been established on vol ume and its believed and the rate study is based on the fact that because you have bigger abilities than I do, then you should pay more for the availability, Irby said. There is also a charge ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lost Lake Elementary School Principal Rhonda Hunt leans to kiss Chris P. Bacon. Principal puckers up for Crisp P. Bacon CLERMONT UMATILLA Water, sewage costs could go up SEE RATES | A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com An alternative name for what now is being called The Celebra tion Center in Clermont is still up in the air, but the citys name on the structure might turn out to be decisive. So far, thats the consensus of many residents and city ofcials as they continue debating the 140 suggested names for the for mer Celebration of Praise church property purchased by Clermont in December for use as a commu nity center. According to city records, 82 of those suggesting names expressed their wish that Clermont be CLERMONT Whats in a new name? SEE NAME | A6 Staff report The Young Families Health Ini tiative Committee of Lake County is hosting its upcoming 25th An nual Baby Fair: An Event for First Time Parents. The event will be held on April 29, at the Lake County Agricultur al Center, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares and on May 7, at the Lees burg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave. in Leesburg. New parents will have an oppor tunity to learn about child safe ty, early learning, positive parent ing and healthy lifestyles at both events, Elisha Pappacoda, a coun ty public information ofcer for the county, said in a press release. The fairs are open to rsttime or special-needs parents in cluding women who are current ly pregnant as well as parents of LEESBURG Baby Fair set for April 29 SEE FAIR | A6 MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Jason Cochran, of Press For Time in Tavares, tends to some pulled pork on the grill during the citys annual Planes, Trains & BBQ on Saturday in Wooton Park. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Thousands showed up to cele brate some of the Souths favor ite foods on Saturday at the annu al Planes, Trains & BBQ in Wooton Park in Tavares. From ribs, pork and brisket to deep-fried bacon and Devils Blood hot sauce, pork lovers had their choice. A big focus of the day were the 28 barbecue vendors who showed up for the Florida B-B-Q Associa tion-sanctioned event. These in cluded: Ring of Fire, Backyard Brothers, Smoked Butt BBQ and Big Papas Country Kitchen. Its all about using the right grill, said Charlie Hall, of Smoked Butt, using a Lang grill, heated with wood. For $5 each, more than 200 peo ple waddled through the line to pick up a tiny cup of barbecue from pans, which didnt identify the cook, then voting for the barbecue they liked the best. It took taster John Lamb about two minutes to get through all the pork samples, but he made it clear none tasted the same. They all have a distinct southern avor, he said. There also was plenty of enter tainment, including an air show, seaplane rides, a vintage car show and live musical acts. The live air show was comprised of four acts, including perform er Patty Wagstaff, a six-time mem ber of the U.S. Aerobatic Team and winner of gold, silver and bronze medals. She thrilled audiences with complex daredevil stunts such as eight-point rolls and death-defying rollovers in her Extra-300S plane. Her stunts reached speeds up to 250 mph and heights of about 3,000 feet and left smoke loops and lines in the air that garnered several oohs and aahs from the crowd gathered in the park and on near by streets. You dont even have to be there to enjoy it, said Thomas Lang, watching the show from nearby Caroline Avenue. In addition to the aerial exhibi tions, the U.S. Special Ops Para chute Team executed precision freefall parachute maneuvers. Back this year was a train ride where dozens of residents climbed aboard the Orange Blossom Can nonball and watched a staged rob bery complete with cowboys and bad guys. TAVARES BBQ draws crowds to Wooton Park ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Fresh off a spate of recent pub lic and television appearances, Chris P. Bacon a Clermont pig born with no hind legs visited Lost Lake Elementary School for the second consecutive year. School Principal Rhonda Hunt puckered up, kissing Chris P.s pink snout in front of her entire student body of almost 1,000, as a way to reward them for the hard work they put into raising money for a school playground recently. I missed my piggy boyfriend, she said. I hadnt seen him for a whole year. Chris P. weighed about 5 pounds then; now, he weighs about 73. Veterinarian Dr. Len Lucero said Chris P. loves the attention but gets spooked by too much noise. On Thursday, the children chant ing Kiss the pig, kiss the pig, be fore Hunt nally obliged. The kids really love seeing Chris P. Bacon. They remember him vis iting, they remember the kiss and at the same time, they get the wonderful message he inspires to never give up, Hunt said.

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 OBITUARIES Robert E. Norman Robert E. Norman, January 8, 1934-March 31, 2014. Robert (Bob) Norman, 80, of Cassop olis, MI and Yalaha, FL, passed into the arms of his Lord and Savior, Je sus Christ, on March 31, 2014. He spent 30+ years at East man Kodak in Roch ester, N.Y., in various staff and su pervisory positions. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Barbara (Bobbi); daughters, An drea Posey, and Kristen Haigh, 3 grandchildren, Isabeau, Alex, and Bas tian Posey. A Memori al service will be held 7:30 p.m., Fri day, April 18, 2014, at Welsheimer Family Fu neral Home North, 17033 Cleveland Rd. Friends may visit with the family one hour pri or to the service. Any gifts in his memory may be directed to Mishawa ka First Baptist Church, 724 N. Main St., Misha waka, IN 46545. Fami ly and friends may leave e-mail condolences at www.welsheimer.com. William Ray Rogers William Ray Rogers, at the age of 88, died Wednesday, April 19, 2014 in Tavares, Florida, of a pre-existing med ical condition. He has been a residence of Ta vares for over 40 years. Ray was born January 13, 1926 at St. Peters burg, Florida to Wil liam Cleveland WC and Ruby Pearl Rog ers. He was the oldest of four children. He is sur vived by a sister, Gin ger Arnold of Pennsyl vania: three children, Debra Hayes of South Carolina, Pamela Mac Sorley of Georgia: Ray mond Scott Rogers of Arkansas; a compan ion, Charlotte Sue Ev ans of Tavares, Flori da; and Sues daughter, Anna Kornhaus of Cl ermont, Florida. He was the proud grandfa ther of eight grandchil dren and eleven great grandchildren. Ray was in the U.S. Army during World War II and at tended Tri-State College in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He began a career as a chemical engineer at Davisson Chemicals of Florida and many oth er companies through out his life time. He re tired and opened up Mr. Rays Mini Mart of Tava res and became known for Mr. Rays Barbeque sauce. Afterwards, he as a familiar face at United Southern Bank as a se curity ofcer. Ray was a life time member of the Mason, National Rie Association and the Li ons Club. He was a sup porter of organizations such as Stop Turning Out Prisoners and Woo ten Park. He enjoyed photography, family, shing and cooking. To sum up Rays life is to say that he enjoyed life to the fullest including sky-diving at the age of 70. A memorial ceremo ny will be held on Mon day, April 14, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. in the fu neral home chapel. Ar rangements are entrust ed to Steverson, Hamiln and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res, FL, (352) 343-4444. Condolences, memo ries and photos may be shared on the tribute wall at www.Steverson HamilinHilbish.com Mr. Willard R. Snyder Mr. Willard (Will) R. Snyder, 82 of Lees burg, Florida passed away Wednesday, April 9, 2014. Born in Cincin nati, Ohio, he moved to Leesburg from Kan sas City, MO in 1997. He was a mechanic for Cin cinnati Bell Telephone Company. He was a vol unteer reman, a U. S. Army Veteran of the Ko rean Conict, a member of the DAV and the First Presbyterian Church of Umatilla. He is survived by his wife: Erleen Sny der, Leesburg, FL; sons: Willard T. (Debbie) Sny der, Hamilton, OH; James A. (Karen) Snyder, Fishers, IN; daughter: Cynthia A. (James) Wal ther, Aurora, IN; broth ers: Kenneth Snyder, Cincinnati, OH; Armand Snyder, Goshen, OH; 9 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Ernest A. Soto Ernest A. Soto (Er nie) 84, of Globe, AZ passed away peacefully at home on April 6, 2014, with his daughter and caregiver, Maria-Ele na Soto at his side. Born in Miami, AZ October 2, 1929, to Anthony and Angela (Alvarez) Soto. Ernie graduated from Miami High School in 1947 and joined the Army Air Corps. He re tired from the Air Force as MSGT, Intelligence Specialist, in 1967. Er nie graduated from the University of Maryland, from Boston Universi ty with a MA in political science, and complet ed Russian Language School at Syracuse Uni versity. He relished teaching government for 25 years at Leesburg High School in Florida. He loved his students and felt it a privilege to be their instructor. Er nie served the commu nity as a Lion, and as Past District Governor of District 21 B in 20012002. He was currently a member of the Palm Coast Lions in Florida, and the Mesa Host Li ons in Arizona. He had received several Lions International Presi dential awards over the years, was a Lion of the Year in Lions District 21 B, served on the Melvin Jones Memorial Board and C. Kirby Smithe In ternational Lions Youth Camp Board, and also as district chairper son for Lions Quest Youth programs in Ar izona. Ernie enjoyed years of deep sea sh ing with Maria-Elena, David and other fami ly members and friends on the Fluffy Series especially Fluffy III in the Atlantic off the Cen tral Florida Coast, nev er forgetting the rst exiting of a very con fused Ponce Inlet! Er nie is predeceased by his parents, and his brother Marcello Soto. He is survived by his daughter, Maria-Ele na Soto, of Globe, AZ, his former spouse of 36 years and mother of Maria-Elena Soto, Janet White Soto, David Bai ley and wife Bonnie and family, of Palm Coast, Florida; his sons; Mi chael Soto and wife Me lissa, of Ohio, and Ran dall Soto, his sister Alma Nina, his granddaugh ter Jasmine (Soto) Ur ban, his grandson Jared A. Soto; his great grand son Miles D. Urban. A memorial celebration of Ernies life is planned for Saturday, October 4, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. at a park-like setting TBA a few weeks prior. Assist ing the family; Lamont Mortuary of Globe. DEATH NOTICES Roy Belton Roy Belton, 77, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Linda Lee Rountree Linda Lee Rountree, 74, of Ferndale, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors. Joseph Neil Smith Joseph Neil Smith, 81, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors. Edward Lodge Wilson Edward Lodge Wil son, 66, of Tavares died Thursday, April 10, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! IN MEMORY SOTO based on how much water customers use, and that rate will be go ing up as well, Irby said. He added that dormant accounts, such as plac es where snowbirds live, will also be charged with a minimal amount under the current proposal. On city utility bills are charges for alternative water, storm water and garbage, which will not go up, as well as water, sewage and utility taxes, which will go up, accord ing to city documents. For the rst year un der the recommended increases, a user with av erage monthly usage of 2,000 gallons would see his or her utility bill in crease from the current $70.18 to $76.95. Some one with an average of 4,000 gallons would see an increase from a cur rent $79.05 to $86.86 and someone who uses 8,000 gallons would see an in crease from a current $98.51 to $108.71. There are approxi mately $12.4 million in necessary repairs and upgrades that city staff have identied, ac cording to the study. Of that number, $6.3 mil lion of these are to be completed during scal 2018, with $1.23 million of that coming from a Florida grant. Weve got an aged sys tem, Irby said, adding it was somewhere between 40 and 60 years old. The system is not sustainable as it is, Irby said. The study also rec ommends, without additional future rate studies, a minimum rate increase. The current ordi nance includes all the recommended increas es, according to Irby. The current water and wastewater rates in Umatilla have been con stant since 2008, accord ing to the rate study. Two public hearings will he held to talk about the increases. The sec ond hearing will only happen if the council does not vote down the revenue increases at the rst hearing, and the council can also change the recommended framework outlined in the rate study, Irby said. A notice on the hear ings will go out in the next utility bill, and the rst hearing will be on June 2, Irby said. RATES FROM PAGE A3

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrfrf$50 OFF 3ROOMS& A HALL$99ntfbfrb EXTENDED OFFERS! Se Habla Espaol (352) 735-6941CALL US OR STOP IN OVER 33 YEARS*******SAME LOCATION 17 YEARS US 441Old 44119A K SPECIAL LOAN RATES GOODUSEDSTUFFNeed Cash for Your Gold Jewelry? No Need to Sell It! You Can Borrow on It!PAWNNEED CASH?10%15%Conditions apply offer expires Aug 31, 2014CALL FOR DETAILS newborns, she said. The free events include educational programs and opportunities to visit informational booths of local agencies and non-prot organi zations. The programs are the same at each loca tion, so participants are asked to choose the most convenient ses sion. Registration for each event is from 5:15 6 p.m. and the pro gram begins at 6:15 p.m. The 25th annual Baby Fair is made possible through a partnership with agencies such as The Florida Depart ment of Health in Lake County, UF/IFAS Exten sion Lake County, Ear ly Learning Coalition, Healthy Families and Kids Central, Inc. Major sponsors in clude Central Florida Health Alliance/Lees burg Regional Medical Center, Florida Hospi tal Waterman, Kiwan is Clubs, Staywell and Lake County quilting groups. For more informa tion, contact Stacy Mor gan at 352-314-6933 or Stacy.Morgan@kidscen tralinc.org. FAIR FROM PAGE A3 included in the name of the center, 15 wanted to include Gem of the Hills or Gem in the name and 15 wanted to keep the word Celebra tion or Celebrate. City spokesperson Doris Bloodsworth, whose background in cludes marketing, gave city commissioners a few things to think about last week as they decide on the new name. She said a num ber of people wanted to include Summit, Hill or Mountain in the name and that some wanted the building named after a person, either living or dead. Clear is better than clever, she said. Clear is the new sexy because, unless you have Nikes marketing budget, its often better to choose a name that says what you are. The police sta tion will always be the Clermont Police Sta tion. So, with that said, you may want to con sider a name such as The Clermont Cen ter for Culture & Rec reation. If you choose a name that doesnt in clude Clermont, or de nes what the build ing is, just know that it will take more time for the name to catch on, and that opportunities will be lost when peo ple search on Google or other search engines for recreation or Cler mont facilities. Bloodsworth also rec ommended that a name should stand the test of time, noting that South Clermont or sim ilar locater names, such as South Annex, may change if population increases grow to the south. If people feel strongly about the name Gem of the Hills, because it has such long ties to the city, then that could be used when naming something like the facil itys performance hall, Bloodsworth suggested. The three most pop ular names suggest ed were Clermont Civic Center, Clermont Com plex and Celebrate Cl ermont Center, Blood sworth said. Mayor Hall Turville wasnt excited about any of them. He suggested the names City of Cler mont South Annex, or The City of Clermont Multiplex and agreed the word Clermont needs to be included in the name. Keith Mullins said hed like to see the main facility named after its main function The Clermont Arts and Rec reation Center with individual names for each center or inside fa cility. The discussion was tabled until May 13, to go along with the dis cussion of a what fees might be charged for use of the associated recreational facilities, such as the swimming pool and event hall. Recreations Direc tor Dave Teske also pre sented the council with a preliminary fee sched ule overview as suggest ed by city staff based on a determination of what similar centers charge. Membership fees, Teske said, may include $1 per day membership fee for residents. Suggested weekly passes would be $5, monthly would be $15, individual season pass would be $40 and family pass (for as many as ve) on a seasonal basis would be $120 for six months. Tentatively, Teske said the season for the pool would probably be June 7 to Sept 28. The center is sched uled to open on June 7 with an ofcial rib bon-cutting celebration on June 6. NAME FROM PAGE A3 MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL NASA has ordered spacewalking repairs for a serious comput er outage at the Inter national Space Station. A backup computer for some robotic sys tems failed Friday. The main computer is ne and the six-man crew is safe, but the mal function puts next weeks supply run in jeopardy. Mission managers agreed Saturday that a spacewalk is need ed to replace the bad computer. But of cials want one more day before deciding whether the situation is safe enough in orbit to proceed with Mon days SpaceX launch as planned. NASA promised to decide today wheth er to delay the delivery mission. No date for the spacewalk has been set yet; ofcials indi cated it could occur sometime in the next week or so. The job is among those practiced by the astronauts be fore ight. The SpaceX Drag on capsule holds more than 2 tons of sta tion supplies and sci ence experiments at Cape Canaveral. The shipment is already a month late for unrelat ed reasons. If the Dragon soars Monday launch time is 4:58 p.m. EDT then it would reach the orbiting lab on Wednesday. Flight controllers want to make sure enough redundancy exists at the space sta tion before commit ting to the launch. The bad computer, called an MDM or mul tiplexer-demultiplex er, is among more than a dozen located on the outside of the space station, used to route commands to various systems. Ofcials said the fail ure has had no impact on the scientic and other work being con ducted by the astro nauts: three Russians, two Americans and one Japanese. NASA orders spacewalk to deal with computer outage

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This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) PETER LEONARD Associated Press DONETSK, Ukraine Men in the uniforms of Ukraines now-defunct riot police on Saturday occupied police headquarters in Donetsk, the eastern city that is one of the ashpoints of a wave of pro-Russia protests, hours af ter armed men seized local police headquarters and local branch of the Security Service in a nearby city. Interior Minister Arsen Ava kov described the unrest as Russian aggression and said Ukraines security ofcials would be gathering for an ex traordinary meeting late Satur day evening. The unrest in Donetsk and the city of Slovyansk, about 90 kilometers (55 miles) to the north, were the latest shows of spiraling anger in eastern Ukraine, which has a large Russian-speaking popula tion and was also the support base for Viktor Yanukovych, the Ukrainian president who was ousted in February after months of protests in the cap ital, Kiev. Ethnic Russians in Ukraines east widely fear that the authorities who took over after Yanukovychs fall will sup press them. In Slovyansk, the mayor said the men who seized the police station were demanding a ref erendum on autonomy and possible annexation by Rus sia. Protesters in other eastern cities have made similar de mands after a referendum in Crimea last month in which voters opted to split off from Ukraine, leading to annexation by Russia. Witnesses said the men who entered the police building in Donetsk were wearing the uni forms of the Berkut, the feared riot police squad that was dis banded in February after Ya nukovychs ouster. Berkut of cers violent dispersal of a demonstration in Kiev in No vember set off vast protests in the capital that culminated in bloodshed in February when more than 100 people died in sniper re; the acting govern ment says the snipers were po lice. It was not immediately clear if the men who occupied the Donetsk police building had made any demands, but the Donetsk police chief said on national television that he was forced to offer his resignation. AP FILE PHOTO Crimeas Russian-backed leader Sergey Aksyonov gestures as people celebrate in Lenin Square recently, in downtown Simferopol, Ukraine. DEB RIECHMANN Associated Press WASHINGTON The Treasury Department on Friday sanctioned the former vice speak er of the Ukrainian par liament, six Crimean separatist leaders and a Crimea-based gas com pany over Russias take over of the Crimean Peninsula. Crimea is occupied territory, said David Cohen, the undersecre tary for terrorism and nancial intelligence. We will continue to impose costs on those involved in ongoing vi olations of Ukraines sovereignty and territo rial integrity. In March, President Barack Obama slapped new visa restrictions on Russian and other oppo nents of Ukraines gov ernment in Kiev and au thorized wider nancial penalties against those involved in the military intervention or in steal ing state assets. On April 1, Congress sent the president a bill to pro vide $1 billion to cashpoor Ukraine and target ed sanctions to punish Russia for its bold an nexation of part of the former Soviet republic. Those sanctioned were: Pyotr Zima, the head of the Securi ty Service of Ukraines main directorate in Crimea, who was dis missed by the interim Ukrainian president for taking an oath of loyalty to the new Crimean au thorities. Aleksei Chaliy, the chairman of a coor dinating council that worked on setting up administration for the city of Sevastopol, who signed the March agree ment to unite Crimea and the city with Russia. Temirgaliev Rus tam, Yuriy Zherebtsov, Mikhail Malyshev and Valery Medvedev, who are accused of playing roles in the March refer endum, paving the way for Russias annexation of Crimea. Sergey Tsekov, the former vice speaker of Ukraines parliament, who allegedly was re sponsible for facilitat ing the referendum. The gas compa ny, Chernomorneftegaz, was sanctioned for being allegedly complicit in the misappropriation of state assets of Ukraine. Ukrainian police HQ occupied ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO / AP Men in the uniforms of Ukraines nowdefunct riot police on Saturday occupied police headquarters in Donetsk. US levies more sanctions on Russia

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB Leesburg, FL34748 NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatrist

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com MLB: Schedule for rst half of season / B4-B5 LC HOOPS HONORS REFEREE LEESBURG PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX LUDICK Miguel Carrion, center, holds Jim Frana Award, presented to one of the top volunteers in Lake County Hoops, a recreational basketball league based in Clermont. The award is named for Jim Frana, a longtime LC Hoops member, who died in 2012. Standing with Carrion is (from left) Alex Ludick, co-founder of the organization and its current director, and Franas son, Trevor. LC Hoops recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake County is a lot of things and one of those might be the un ofcial shufeboard capital of Florida. And to be even more precise, Leesburg is home to some of the top players in the state. The ladies of the Hawthorne Shufe board Club laid claim to that title recently at the Northern District Shufeboard Associa tion Masters Tourna ment in New Smyrna Beach at the Corona do Mainland Shufe board Club. A trio of players rep resenting Hawthorne took top honors in the Pro division and one nished as the top am ateur. Sue McLaughlin, Donna King and Sha ron Upson won at the Womens Pro Division with Nancy Andrews earning a win among amateurs. Marion Lohbusch, a member of Florida Shufeboard Hall of Fame, nished second in the Pro division, and Carol Adams, who like ly will become a Hall of Famer, nished third. Among the men who compete for Haw thorne, Gary Mc Laughlin nished sec ond and Pat King was third in the Mens Pro Division. The Masters Tourna ment is a tournament lasting anywhere from two to four days. It pits the best eight play ers in each division against each other. Local shuffleboarders step up at Masters AL BEHRMAN / AP Tampa Bay starting pitcher Alex Cobb throws against the Reds in the rst inning of Saturdays game in Cincinnati. The Rays won 1-0. JOE KAY Associated Press CINCINNATI Alex Cobb went seven in nings on Saturday, ex tending Tampa Bays run of solid starting pitching, and James Loney homered for a 1-0 victory over the slumping Cincinnati Reds. The Rays came into the interleague se ries with a 1-8 mark against Cincinnati. Theyve taken the rst two games with shut down pitching and just enough offense. Cobb (1-1) pitched seven shutout inning against Texas on Sun day but got a no-de cision. He kept the scoreless streak go ing Saturday, limit ing Cincinnatis strug gling lineup to four hits without walking a batter. Grant Balfour, who fanned Brayan Pena with the bases loaded to end Friday nights game, got three outs for his fourth save in as many chances, nish ing off the four-hitter. Loney led off the second inning with his rst homer against Alfredo Simon (1-1), who matched his ca reer high with eight in nings and allowed only ve hits. Cincinnati stranded a pair at third base and had runners thrown out at third and home, extending its run of wasteful offense. The Reds have lost all four of their series this sea son, falling to 3-8 for the rst time since Cobb goes 7 strong, Rays beat Reds 1-0 CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Jordan Spieth hits to the 13th green during Saturdays third round at the Masters in Augusta, Ga. Speith and Bubba Watson begin todays nal round in a tie for rst place. PAUL NEWBERRY Associated Press AUGUSTA, Ga. Young and old. Even without Tiger Woods, this Masters has a little bit of everything. Twenty-year-old Jor dan Spieth is making quite a bid to become golfs youngest ma jor champion in more than 80 years with three straight sub-par rounds in his Augusta National debut. Hell have to fend off 50-year-old Mi guel Angel Jimenez and 54-year-old Fred Cou ples, both hoping to be come the sports oldest major champion. And lets not forget Bubba Watson, who stumbled a bit on mov ing day but will go for his second green jacket in three years from the nal group. Spieth, who last year became the youngest MASTERS Bubba Watson -5 Jordan Spieth -5 Matt Kuchar -4 Jonas Blixt -4 MIguel Angel-Jimenez -3 Rickie Fowler -3 Lee Westwood -2 Jim Furyk -2 Thomas Bjorn -2 Justin Rose -1 Kevin Stadler -1 Spieth, Watson tied for lead at the Masters SEE MASTERS | B2 SEE RAYS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 AUTO RACING Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach After Saturday qualifying; race today At Long Beach Street Circuit Long Beach, Calif. Lap length: 1.968 miles (Car number in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 104.462 mph. 2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 104.28. 3. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 104.253. 4. (67) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 104.173. 5. (98) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 104.108. 6. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 104.076. 7. (9) Scott Dixon, Chevrolet, 104.191. 8. (25) Marco Andretti, Honda, 104.161. 9. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 104.017. 10. (19) Justin Wilson, Honda, 104.002. 11. (34) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 103.958. 12. (16) Oriol Servia, Honda, 103.65. 13. (10) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 103.515. 14. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 104.011. 15. (14) Takuma Sato, Honda, 103.328. 16. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 103.632. 17. (20) Mike Conway, Chevrolet, 103.322. 18. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 103.625. 19. (83) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 103.201. 20. (7) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 103.53. 21. (18) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 103.119. 22. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 102.735. 23. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 102.595. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB y-Toronto 46 33 .582 x-Brooklyn 43 36 .544 3 New York 34 45 .430 12 Boston 24 55 .304 22 Philadelphia 17 62 .215 29 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 54 25 .684 x-Washington 41 38 .519 13 x-Charlotte 40 39 .506 14 Atlanta 36 43 .456 18 Orlando 23 56 .291 31 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 54 26 .675 x-Chicago 47 32 .595 6 Cleveland 32 48 .400 22 Detroit 29 51 .363 25 Milwaukee 15 64 .190 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB z-San Antonio 62 18 .775 x-Houston 52 27 .658 9 Dallas 48 32 .600 14 Memphis 47 32 .595 14 New Orleans 32 47 .405 29 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 58 21 .734 x-Portland 52 28 .650 6 Minnesota 40 39 .506 18 Denver 35 44 .443 23 Utah 24 55 .304 34 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 56 24 .700 x-Golden State 49 30 .620 6 Phoenix 47 32 .595 8 Sacramento 27 53 .338 29 L.A. Lakers 25 54 .316 30 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Fridays Games Washington 96, Orlando 86 New York 108, Toronto 100 Atlanta 93, Brooklyn 88 Boston 106, Charlotte 103 Miami 98, Indiana 86 Chicago 106, Detroit 98 Minnesota 112, Houston 110 Oklahoma City 116, New Orleans 94 Memphis 117, Philadelphia 95 Milwaukee 119, Cleveland 116 San Antonio 112, Phoenix 104 Portland 111, Utah 99 Golden State 112, L.A. Lakers 95 Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers 117, Sacramento 101 Milwaukee at Washington, late Philadelphia at Charlotte, late Boston at Cleveland, late Miami at Atlanta, late New Orleans at Houston, late Phoenix at Dallas, late Utah at Denver, late Todays Games Oklahoma City at Indiana, 1 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. Orlando at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Chicago at New York, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Mondays Games Miami at Washington, 7 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. FOOTBALL Arena League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF PA Arizona 3 0 0 1.000 193 142 Los Angeles 2 1 0 .667 148 141 San Antonio 0 4 0 .000 122 222 Pacic W L T Pct PF PA Spokane 2 1 0 .667 186 165 San Jose 2 2 0 .500 243 188 Portland 0 3 0 .000 104 148 AMERICAN CONFERENCE South W L T Pct PF PA Orlando 3 2 0 .600 285 293 Tampa Bay 3 2 0 .600 266 267 Jacksonville 2 2 0 .500 208 175 New Orleans 1 3 0 .250 159 210 East W L T Pct PF PA Cleveland 3 0 0 1.000 154 126 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 227 141 Iowa 1 2 0 .333 122 154 Philadelphia 1 3 0 .250 206 251 Thursdays Games Philadelphia 69, Orlando 56 Fridays Games Pittsburgh 56, New Orleans 14 Jacksonville 60, Tampa Bay 41 Saturdays Games San Antonio at Iowa, late Cleveland at Los Angeles, late Portland at Spokane, late Arizona at San Jose, late Friday, April 18 San Antonio at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. San Jose at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday, April 19 Jacksonville at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Orlando, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Iowa, 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 9 p.m. Cleveland at Spokane, 10 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 81 54 18 9 117 259 174 x-Tampa Bay 81 45 27 9 99 239 215 x-Montreal 81 45 28 8 98 214 204 x-Detroit 81 38 28 15 91 219 230 Ottawa 80 35 31 14 84 232 263 Toronto 81 38 35 8 84 231 255 Florida 81 29 44 8 66 194 265 Buffalo 81 21 51 9 51 154 244 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 81 51 24 6 108 247 204 x-N.Y. Rangers 81 45 31 5 95 218 192 x-Philadelphia 81 42 30 9 93 231 229 x-Columbus 81 42 32 7 91 228 214 Washington 81 38 30 13 89 235 239 New Jersey 81 34 29 18 86 194 206 Carolina 81 35 35 11 81 201 225 N.Y. Islanders 81 33 37 11 77 221 264 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Colorado 81 52 22 7 111 248 217 x-St. Louis 81 52 22 7 111 248 188 x-Chicago 81 46 20 15 107 262 213 x-Minnesota 81 43 26 12 98 204 199 x-Dallas 81 40 30 11 91 234 226 Nashville 80 36 32 12 84 202 234 Winnipeg 82 37 35 10 84 227 237 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Anaheim 80 52 20 8 112 259 204 x-San Jose 81 50 22 9 109 246 198 x-Los Angeles 81 46 28 7 99 203 170 Phoenix 80 36 29 15 87 212 227 Vancouver 80 35 34 11 81 189 217 Calgary 81 35 39 7 77 208 236 Edmonton 81 28 44 9 65 198 268 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Fridays Games N.Y. Islanders 3, New Jersey 2, SO Washington 4, Chicago 0 Carolina 2, Detroit 1 Tampa Bay 3, Columbus 2 Dallas 3, St. Louis 0 Winnipeg 5, Calgary 3 San Jose 5, Colorado 1 Saturdays Games Boston 4, Buffalo 1 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, late Toronto at Ottawa, late Columbus at Florida, late Chicago at Nashville, late San Jose at Phoenix, late Vancouver at Edmonton, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late Todays Games Detroit at St. Louis, 12:30 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 3 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 3 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m. SOCCER MLS EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 3 1 0 9 7 4 Toronto FC 3 2 0 9 5 5 Sport ing Kansas City 2 1 2 8 5 4 Philadelphia 1 1 4 7 8 8 Houston 2 2 0 6 7 6 Chicago 0 1 5 5 9 10 D.C. 1 2 1 4 4 6 New England 1 3 1 4 2 8 New York 0 1 4 4 6 9 Montreal 0 3 3 3 6 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 4 0 1 13 13 6 Colorado 3 1 1 10 8 5 Real Salt Lake 2 0 4 10 10 6 Vancouver 2 1 2 8 8 5 Seattle 2 2 1 7 9 8 Chivas USA 1 2 2 5 6 10 Los Angeles 1 1 1 4 4 2 Portland 0 2 3 3 7 10 San Jose 0 2 1 1 4 6 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturdays Games Philadelphia 2, Real Salt Lake 2, tie Colorado 1, Toronto FC 0 Montreal 1, Chicago 1, tie Houston at New England, late New York at D.C. United, late Seattle FC at FC Dallas, late Vancouver at Los Angeles, late Chivas USA at Portland, late Todays Games Columbus at San Jose, 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 16 Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19 New England at Chicago, 4 p.m. Houston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7 p.m. D.C. United at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Montreal at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m. GOLF Masters At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Third Round a-amateur Jordan Spieth 71-70-70 211 Bubba Watson 69-68-74 211 Jonas Blixt 70-71-71 212 Matt Kuchar 73-71-68 212 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76-66 213 Rickie Fowler 71-75-67 213 Thomas Bjorn 73-68-73 214 Jim Furyk 74-68-72 214 Lee Westwood 73-71-70 214 Fred Couples 71-71-73 215 Justin Rose 76-70-69 215 John Senden 72-68-75 215 Kevin Stadler 70-73-72 215 Ian Poulter 76-70-70 216 Gary Woodland 70-77-69 216 Adam Scott 69-72-76 217 Kevin Streelman 72-71-74 217 Jason Day 75-73-70 218 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 75-69-74 218 Russell Henley 73-70-75 218 Chris Kirk 75-72-71 218 Steve Stricker 72-73-73 218 Jimmy Walker 70-72-76 218 Jamie Donaldson 73-70-76 219 Bernhard Langer 72-74-73 219 Rory McIlroy 71-77-71 219 Louis Oosthuizen 69-75-75 219 Henrik Stenson 73-72-74 219 Steven Bowditch 74-72-74 220 Martin Kaymer 75-72-73 220 Hunter Mahan 74-72-74 220 Bill Haas 68-78-74 220 Vijay Singh 75-71-74 220 Stewart Cink 73-72-76 221 Lucas Glover 75-69-77 221 Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74-73 221 Darren Clarke 74-74-73 221 Brendon de Jonge 74-72-76 222 Billy Horschel 75-72-75 222 Thongchai Jaidee 73-74-75 222 Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72-76 222 K.J. Choi 70-75-78 223 a-Oliver Goss 76-71-76 223 Francesco Molinari 71-76-76 223 Nick Watney 72-75-76 223 Sandy Lyle 76-72-76 224 Brandt Snedeker 70-74-80 224 Mike Weir 73-72-79 224 Stephen Gallacher 71-72-81 224 Joost Luiten 75-73-77 225 Larry Mize 74-72-79 225 TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS Sent DH Jason Giambi to Akron (EL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS Placed RHP Scott Feld man on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Paul Clemens from Oklahoma City (PCL). Op tioned RHP Josh Zeid to Oklahoma City. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Recalled LHP Danny Duffy from Omaha (PCL). Optioned 2B Johnny Giavotella to Omaha. MINNESOTA TWINS Placed OF Josh Will ingham on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 7. Recalled RHP Michael Tonkin from Roch ester (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS Designated OF Sam Fuld for assignment. Reinstated OF Craig Gen try from the 15-day DL. SEATTLE MARINERS Traded RHP Hector Noesi to Texas for a player to be named or cash considerations. TAMPA BAY RAYS Recalled OF Kevin Kier maier from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS Transferred INF Jurickson Profar to the 60-day DL. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Sent LHP Mike Minor to Rome (SAL) for a rehab assignment. CHICAGO CUBS Optioned RHP Brian Schlit ter to Iowa (PCL). Recalled LHP Chris Rusin from Iowa. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Sent RHP Mike Adams to Lehigh Valley (IL) for a rehab as signment. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Signed general man ager John Mozeliak to a two-year contract ex tension through the 2018 season. SAN DIEGO PADRES Sent OF Cameron May bin to El Paso (PCL) for a rehab assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Selected the contract of RHP Blake Treinen from Syracuse (IL). Optioned RHP Aaron Barrett to Syracuse. Placed OF Denard Span on the 7-day DL. Re called OF Steven Souza Jr. from Syracuse. Recalled INF/OF Jeff Kobernus from Syracuse and placed him on the 60-day DL. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES Reassigned F Zach Boychuk to Charlotte (AHL). DALLAS STARS Recalled F Chris Mueller from Texas (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS Rassigned G Scott Clemmensen to San Antonio (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS Signed G Dustin Tokarski to a two-year contract extension. NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned D Eric Geli nas to Albany (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled F Tyler Gaudet from Sault Ste. Marie (OHL). Signed F Dan ODonoghue to a two-year, entry-level contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS Recalled C Peter LeBlanc from Hershey (AHL). Signed C Chan dler Stephenson to a three-year, entry-level contract. American Hockey League ABBOTSFORD HEAT Recalled F David Eddy from Alaska (ECHL). CHICAGO WOLVES Recalled F Yannick Veil leux from Kalamazoo (ECHL). ECHL FORT WAYNE KOMETS Signed D Justin Sefton. LAS VEGAS WRANGLERS Claimed F Mi chael Neal off waivers from Bakerseld. SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Signed G Pheonix Copley. TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 2:30 p.m. NBCSN Indy Lights, at Long Beach, Calif. 4 p.m. NBCSN IndyCar, Grand Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif. 8 p.m. ESPN2 NHRA, Four-Wide Nationals, at Concord, N.C. COLLEGE BASEBALL 3:30 p.m. ESPNU Texas at Oklahoma GOLF 2 p.m. CBS Masters Tournament, nal round, at Augusta, Ga. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Cincinnati 1:30 p.m. MLB Washington at Atlanta FS-Florida Miami at Philadelphia 2 p.m. WGN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis 8 p.m. ESPN Boston at N.Y. Yankees NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 1 p.m. ABC Oklahoma City at Indiana 9:30 p.m. NBA Memphis at L.A. Lakers N ATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 12:30 p.m. NBC Detroit at St. Louis 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Ottawa at Pittsburgh 9 p.m. NBCSN Dallas at Phoenix SOCCER 8:30 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Manchester City at Liverpool 11 a.m. FS1 FA Cup, seminal, Hull City vs. Shefeld, at London NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Swansea City SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED PGA tour winner since the Depression at age 19, shot a 2-under 70 on Saturday to share the lead with Watson. This is the place Ive always dreamt about, said Spieth, who was 5 under for the tourna ment. I thought it was a good t for my game. So far, so good. He has a shot at be coming the young est major winner since Tom Creavey, just a few months younger when he won the PGA Cham pionship in 1931. Watson had four bo geys on the front side Saturday twice as many as he had in the rst two rounds com bined and slid back to an emboldened group of challengers with a 74. Hell go out in the last group with Spieth on Sunday. Were pretty good friends, Watson said. Its going to be fun. It will be interesting, but be fun. Hopefully one of us wins, if not me hope fully him. Matt Kuchar (68) and Jonax Blixt (71) were one shot back at 212. Jimenez (66) and Ricky Fowler (67) were anoth er shot behind. Watson, the 2012 Masters champion, posted two rounds in the 60s to start the tour nament, giving him a three-stroke lead and the largest 36-hole edge since Chad Campbell in 2006. By the time he made the turn in front of the historic clubhouse and that big oak tree, the edge was gone. He got it back with a birdie at the 10th, but a threeputt par at the par-5 13th kept things close, another par at the par-5 15th was a disappoint ment, and a bogey at the 16th left him stag gering to the nish. It shaped up to be a wide-open Sunday with Woods on the sideline for the rst time in his career, recovering from back surgery. Lee Westwood (70), Jim Furyk (72) and Thomas Bjorn (73) were all in the mix. And Cou ples did enough to hang around, managing a 73 that kept him within ve strokes of the lead. Watson bogeyed the rst hole, then struck a brilliant approach shot that rolled up about 5 feet from the ag to set up an eagle 3 at the sec ond. That would be one of his few highlights. Jimenez posted the best round of the tour nament thus far and matched the lowest score ever for a senior golfer at Augusta Na tional. Ben Hogan was 54 when he shot 66 during the third round of the 1967 tournament, and Couples matched it at age 50 during the opening round in 2010. The Spaniard known as The Mechanic n ished up with a par at the 18th about the time Watson was teeing off at the adjacent rst hole, having sliced into a 10-shot decit by tak ing advantage of warm, sunny conditions. There was barely a hint of the swirling breezes that can make Augusta so treacherous. Jimenez has never won a major champion ship but hes been a pe rennial contender, cap turing a new generation of fans with his unique stretching routine be fore each round, his red ponytail, and his fond ness for wine and ci gars. Just because you are 50 does not mean you cannot play golf, said Jimenez, one of six 50-and-older golf ers to make the Masters cut. Im still exible. I hit the ball longer than ever. His wasnt the only new entry in the Mas ters record book. Gary Woodland matched the lowest score ever on the front nine with a 6-under 30, and actually got his score to 7 under with another birdie at the 10th. But the 29-yearold American couldnt keep it going through Amen Corner, where a bogey at the 11th and a double bogey on 12 sti ed his momentum. Woodland struggled down the stretch and settled for a 69, which left him at 216. Defending champi on Adam Scott couldnt get anything going, his chances of becoming only the fourth backto-back winner in Mas ters history fading away with an ugly 40 on the front side. He faced a six-stroke decit head ing to Sunday, a daunt ing challenge with so many players in be tween him and the lead. But plenty of others were ready to seize the spotlight. MASTERS FROM PAGE B1 1995, when they won th e NL Central. The Rays opened the series with a 2-1 win Friday night, when Da vid Price took a shut out into the ninth be fore Joey Votto homered with one out. Rays start ers have thrown at least seven shutout innings four times in the last six games. It was Tampa Bays second shutout of the season, and the second time the Reds have been shut out. The Reds also were blanked 1-0 by the Cardinals on opening day. Both managers changed their lineups, looking for some runs. The Rays have scored only nine in their last six games, but managed to win three of them be cause of the impressive pitching. The Reds have scored 28 runs all sea son, second-fewest in the National League. Rays manager Joe Maddon stocked his lineup with left-handers against Simon. Reds manager Bryan Price moved Votto from third to second in the bat ting order, the rst time hed batted second since 2008. Neither move made much of a difference. Nice defense by both teams also kept it close. Votto led off the fourth with a ground-rule dou ble. Kevin Kiermaier threw out Votto at the plate as he tried to score on Brandon Phillips single to center. Phillips went to second on the play and was thrown out trying to steal third. The Reds wasted an other chance in the sixth, when Zack Cozart was hit by a pitch and advanced on a wild pitch and a sacrice. Bil ly Hamilton hit a shallow y and Votto grounded out. NOTES: LHP Erik Be dard will be added to the Rays roster Sunday when LHP Cesar Ramos moves from the bullpen to the rotation, taking the place of injured Matt Moore. Ramos will make his fourth career start. RAYS FROM PAGE B1

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Expires 4/30/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$22 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC Box scores and results for games ending after 10 p.m. will appear in our next edition. AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Tampa Bay 7 5 .583 6-4 W-2 4-3 3-2 Toronto 6 5 .545 6-4 W-1 3-3 3-2 New York 6 6 .500 1 6-4 W-1 3-3 3-3 Boston 5 7 .417 2 1 4-6 L-1 2-4 3-3 Baltimore 4 6 .400 2 1 4-6 L-1 1-3 3-3 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Detroit 5 3 .625 5-3 L-1 4-1 1-2 Chicago 6 6 .500 1 4-6 L-1 4-2 2-4 Cleveland 6 6 .500 1 5-5 W-1 3-3 3-3 Minnesota 5 6 .455 1 1 5-5 W-2 2-3 3-3 Kansas City 4 6 .400 2 1 4-6 L-2 4-2 0-4 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Seattle 6 3 .667 6-3 W-1 2-1 4-2 Oakland 6 4 .600 6-4 L-1 3-3 3-1 Los Angeles 5 5 .500 1 5-5 W-2 1-3 4-2 Texas 5 5 .500 1 5-5 W-1 3-1 2-4 Houston 4 7 .364 3 2 3-7 L-1 3-4 1-3 NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 7 3 .700 7-3 L-1 4-2 3-1 Atlanta 6 4 .600 1 6-4 W-1 2-2 4-2 Miami 5 6 .455 2 1 4-6 L-5 5-2 0-4 New York 4 6 .400 3 2 4-6 L-1 2-4 2-2 Philadelphia 4 6 .400 3 2 4-6 W-1 1-3 3-3 CENTRAL W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 8 2 .800 8-2 W-7 2-2 6-0 Pittsburgh 6 4 .600 2 6-4 L-1 4-2 2-2 St. Louis 6 5 .545 2 5-5 W-1 3-2 3-3 Chicago 4 7 .364 4 2 4-6 L-1 2-4 2-3 Cincinnati 3 8 .273 5 3 3-7 L-2 1-4 2-4 WEST W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Los Angeles 7 4 .636 6-4 W-1 2-3 5-1 San Francisco 7 5 .583 6-4 L-1 2-3 5-2 Colorado 6 6 .500 1 1 6-4 W-1 4-2 2-4 San Diego 4 6 .400 2 2 4-6 W-2 2-2 2-4 Arizona 4 9 .308 4 3 4-6 L-1 1-6 3-3 FRIDAYS GAMES Boston 4, N.Y. Yankees 2 Toronto 2, Baltimore 0 Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1 Texas 1, Houston 0, 12 innings Chicago White Sox 9, Cleveland 6 Minnesota 10, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 5, N.Y. Mets 4, 11 innings San Diego 6, Detroit 0 Seattle 6, Oakland 4 FRIDAYS GAMES Philadelphia 6, Miami 3 Tampa Bay 2, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 7, Washington 6, 10 innings Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 2 Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 3, 11 innings L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 0 L.A. Angels 5, N.Y. Mets 4, 11 innings San Diego 6, Detroit 0 San Francisco 6, Colorado 5 SATURDAYS GAMES N.Y. Yankees 7, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 6 Minnesota 7, Kansas City 1 Toronto at Baltimore, late Houston at Texas, late Detroit at San Diego, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late Oakland at Seattle, late SUNDAYS GAMES Tampa Bay 1, Cincinnati 0 St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 1, San Francisco 0 Miami at Philadelphia, late Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, late Washington at Atlanta, late L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late Detroit at San Diego, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late NAM Y. HUH / AP Clevelands David Murphy watches after hitting a three-run triple during the ninth inning of Saturdays game against the Chicago White Sox in Chicago. The Indians won 12-6. TODAYS GAMES Tampa Bay (C.Ramos 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-1), 1:10 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 2-0) at Baltimore (Jimenez 0-2), 1:35 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 1-1) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Vargas 1-0) at Minnesota (Correia 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Houston (Oberholtzer 0-2) at Texas (M.Perez 1-0), 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 1-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 1-1), 3:35 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at San Diego (T.Ross 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 2-0) at Seattle (C.Young 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Boston (Doubront 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 1-1), 8:05 p.m. TODAYS GAMES Tampa Bay (C.Ramos 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-1), 1:10 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 0-2) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-1), 1:35 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 2-0) at Atlanta (Harang 1-1), 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 0-0) at Milwaukee (Lohse 1-1), 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 1-0), 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 1-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 1-1), 3:35 p.m. Colorado (Chatwood 0-0) at San Francisco (Hudson 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at San Diego (T.Ross 0-2), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 1-0) at Arizona (Cahill 0-3), 4:10 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: JHamilton, Los Angeles, .444; AlRamirez, Chi cago, .429; Kubel, Minnesota, .412; SPerez, Kansas City, .393; Plouffe, Minnesota, .375. RUNS: Eaton, Chicago, 12; Bautista, Toronto, 10; Dozier, Minnesota, 10; Plouffe, Minnesota, 9; AlRamirez, Chi cago, 9; Lowrie, Oakland, 8; Semien, Chicago, 8. RBI: Abreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Minnesota, 14; Moss, Oakland, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; AGordon, Kansas City, 9; Smoak, Seattle, 9; 6 tied at 8. HITS: AlRamirez, Chicago, 18; MeCabrera, Toronto, 16; Eaton, Chicago, 15; Plouffe, Minnesota, 15. DOUBLES: DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Solarte, New York, 6; Colabello, Minnesota, 5; 9 tied at 4. TRIPLES: Aoki, Kansas City, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 26 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Abreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista, Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; De Aza, Chicago, 3; Dozier, Min nesota, 3; Hart, Seattle, 3; TorHunter, Detroit, 3; BMiller, Seattle, 3; Trout, Los Angeles, 3. STOLEN BASES: RDavis, Detroit, 5; Ellsbury, New York, 5; Altuve, Houston, 3; Andrus, Texas, 3; Dozier, Minne sota, 3; Kipnis, Cleveland, 3; AlRamirez, Chicago, 3; Rios, Texas, 3; Villar, Houston, 3. PITCHING: FHernandez, Seattle, 3-0; Sale, Chicago, 3-0; 11 tied at 2. ERA: Darvish, Texas, 0.00; Feldman, Houston, 0.44; Buehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Gray, Oakland, 0.75; Tillman, Baltimore, 0.84. STRIKEOUTS: FHernandez, Seattle, 30; Price, Tampa Bay, 22; Sabathia, New York, 21; Lester, Boston, 20; Sale, Chicago, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18; Tillman, Balti more, 15; Scherzer, Detroit, 15; CWilson, Los Angeles, 15; Darvish, Texas, 15. SAVES: Santos, Toronto, 4; Axford, Cleveland, 4; Hol land, Kansas City, 3; Rodney, Seattle, 3; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 3; TomHunter, Baltimore, 3; Perkins, Minnesota, 2; Uehara, Boston, 2; Robertson, New York, 2. NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Blackmon, Colorado, .486; Utley, Philadelphia, .469; Pagan, San Francisco, .442; Bonifacio, Chicago, .435; DGordon, Los Angeles, .405. RUNS: Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado, 10; LaRoche, Washington, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Bon ifacio, Chicago, 9; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; Prado, Ari zona, 9; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 9; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 9; Werth, Washington, 9. RBI: CGonzalez, Colorado, 13; Stanton, Miami, 13; Trumbo, Arizona, 13; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; McGehee, Mi ami, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10; ArRamirez, Milwau kee, 10. HITS: Bonifacio, Chicago, 20; Pagan, San Francisco, 19; Blackmon, Colorado, 17; Cuddyer, Colorado, 17; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 17; CGomez, Milwaukee, 17; Ar Ramirez, Milwaukee, 17. DOUBLES: Goldschmidt, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6; HRamirez, Los Angeles, 6; Adams, St. Louis, 5; KDa vis, Milwaukee, 5; Hill, Arizona, 5; Uribe, Los Angeles, 5. TRIPLES: 31 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt, San Fran cisco, 5; Trumbo, Arizona, 5; CGonzalez, Colorado, 4;. STOLEN BASES: Bonifacio, Chicago, 7; DGordon, Los Angeles, 5; Revere, Philadelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4. PITCHING: 18 tied at 2. ERA: Gallardo, Milwaukee, 0.00; Harang, Atlanta, 0.71; Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; GGonzalez, Washington, 0.75; Haren, Los Angeles, 0.75; JKelly, St. Louis, 0.79. STRIKEOUTS: Strasburg, Washington, 28; Fernandez, Miami, 23; Cueto, Cincinnati, 23; Cashner, San Diego, 22; Ryu, Los Angeles, 22; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 21. SAVES: Kimbrel, Atlanta, 4; Romo, San Francisco, 3; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 3; Street, San Diego, 3; FRodriguez, Milwaukee, 3; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 3; AReed, Arizona, 3. Rays 1, Reds 0 Tampa Bay Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi DeJess lf 4 0 0 0 BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 3 0 1 0 Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 1 0 McGee p 0 0 0 0 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 Balfour p 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 3 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 0 1 0 Ludwck lf 3 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 1 1 1 B.Pena c 3 0 0 0 Kiermr cf-rf 4 0 0 0 Cozart ss 2 0 1 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Simon p 1 0 0 0 Hanign c 3 0 0 0 Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 Cobb p 2 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Forsyth ph 1 0 1 0 DJnngs cf 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 27 0 4 0 Tampa Bay 010 000 000 1 Cincinnati 000 000 000 0 DPTampa Bay 1. LOBTampa Bay 5, Cincinnati 3. 2BY.Escobar (2), Forsythe (2), Votto (3), Cozart (1). HRLoney (1). CSPhillips (2). SSimon. IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Cobb W,1-1 7 4 0 0 0 5 McGee H,1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour S,4-4 1 0 0 0 1 0 Cincinnati Simon L,1-1 8 5 1 1 1 4 M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBPby Cobb (Cozart). WPCobb. UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Dan Bellino; Sec ond, D.J. Reyburn; Third, A.J. Johnson. Yankees 7, Red Sox 4 Boston New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Gardnr lf 5 0 1 0 Nava rf 4 1 1 0 BRorts 2b 4 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 3 1 2 0 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 Beltran dh 4 2 2 2 Carp lf 4 0 1 2 McCnn c 4 2 2 3 Bogarts ss 4 1 1 0 ASorin rf 4 1 2 1 Przyns c 4 1 2 2 ISuzuki rf 0 0 0 0 JHerrr 3b 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 4 1 2 1 BrdlyJr cf 3 1 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 0 2 0 Anna ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 34 4 7 4 Totals 36 7 14 7 Boston 020 000 200 4 New York 200 202 01x 7 EA.Soriano (1). DPBoston 1. LOBBoston 7, New York 7. 2BPedroia (3), Beltran (4), Anna (1). HR Pierzynski (1), Beltran (2), McCann 2 (2), A.Soriano (3), K.Johnson (3). SBNava (1), Bradley Jr. (2), Ellsbury (6). CSCarp (1). SB.Roberts. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lackey L,2-1 5 2 / 3 10 6 6 0 6 Breslow 2 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 A.Miller 2 / 3 0 0 0 1 1 Badenhop 1 3 1 1 0 1 New York Kuroda W,2-1 6 1 / 3 6 4 4 3 5 Thornton H,3 1 / 3 1 0 0 0 1 Betances H,2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Warren H,4 1 0 0 0 0 2 Kelley S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby Thornton (Napoli). WPBreslow. UmpiresHome, John Tumpane; First, Brian ONora; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Brian Gorman. Rockies 1, Giants 0 Colorado San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn cf 3 1 2 0 Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 Barnes rf 3 0 1 0 Pence rf 3 0 1 0 CGnzlz lf 4 0 0 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 1 0 Tlwtzk ss 3 0 0 1 Posey 1b 3 0 0 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 0 Morse lf 4 0 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 0 0 HSnchz c 4 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 4 0 1 0 Arias 2b 3 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 1 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 1 0 Andrsn p 2 0 0 0 M.Cain p 1 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 B.Hicks ph 0 0 0 0 Culersn ph 1 0 0 0 Petit p 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 1 4 1 Totals 29 0 3 0 Colorado 001 000 000 1 San Francisco 000 000 000 0 EM.Cain (1). DPColorado 1. LOBColorado 6, San Francisco 6. 2BBlackmon (4), Arenado (2), Sandoval (2), B.Crawford (5). SBBlackmon (3), Barnes (1). S Barnes. SFTulowitzki. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Anderson 3 1 0 0 1 2 Kahnle W,2-0 2 1 0 0 1 2 Belisle H,2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Ottavino H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 Brothers H,3 1 1 0 0 2 1 Hawkins S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 San Francisco M.Cain L,0-2 7 4 1 1 3 8 Machi 1 0 0 0 0 1 Petit 1 0 0 0 0 1 UmpiresHome, Marvin Hudson; First, Hal Gibson; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Dan Iassogna. T:48. A,917 (41,915). Indians 12, White Sox 6 Cleveland Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Morgan cf 5 1 1 0 Eaton cf 3 2 2 1 Swisher 1b 6 2 2 1 LGarci 2b 5 1 0 0 Kipn is 2b 4 2 2 1 Gillaspi 3b 3 1 1 1 CSantn c 3 2 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 1 0 0 Brantly lf 3 1 1 2 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 2 ACarer ss 4 1 1 1 AlRmrz ss 4 1 1 0 Raburn dh 4 1 1 2 De Aza lf 5 0 2 1 DvMrp rf 5 2 2 4 Nieto c 4 0 0 0 Aviles 3b 5 0 2 1 JrDnks rf 4 0 1 1 To tals 39 12 12 12 Totals 36 6 8 6 Cleveland 310 020 204 12 Ch icago 410 010 000 6 EAviles (1), Kipnis (1), L.Garcia (2). DPCleveland 1, Chicago 1. LOBCleveland 8, Chicago 10. 2BA. Cabrera (5), Eaton (3). 3BDav.Murphy (1). HR Swisher (2), Kipnis (2), Dav.Murphy (2), Eaton (1). SBMorgan (3). IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland M asterson 4 2 / 3 7 6 5 5 7 Outman W,2-0 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 1 2 Shaw H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Allen H,2 1 1 0 0 0 3 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Paulino 5 6 6 6 3 3 Belisario L,1-1 1 1 / 3 2 2 2 1 1 Downs 0 0 0 0 1 0 D.Webb 1 1 0 0 0 0 Veal 1 2 / 3 3 4 4 3 3 Downs pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBPby Masterson (A.Dunn). WPMasterson, Be lisario. UmpiresHome, Quinn Wolcott; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Brian Knight. T:28. A,332 (40,615).

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 2014 day-by-day schedule Monday, April 14 Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Tuesday, April 15 Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 16 Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 3:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Thursday, April 17 Cleveland at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 2:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 6:40 p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Friday, April 18 Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Miami, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Houston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Saturday, April 19 Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Miami, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 8:40 p.m. Sunday, April 20 Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Seattle at Miami, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at Washington, 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:05 p.m. Monday, April 21 Baltimore at Boston, 11:05 a.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Tuesday, April 22 Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Wednesday, April 23 Miami at Atlanta, 12:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 3:35 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 3:40 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, April 24 Kansas City at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 4:20 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Friday, April 25 L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, April 26 L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1:05 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Houston, 7:10 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 9:10 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m. Sunday, April 27 Boston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1:35 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Oakland at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 8:05 p.m. Monday, April 28 Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Tuesday, April 29 Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Washington at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 30 Milwaukee at St. Louis, 1:45 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Washington at Houston, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Thursday, May 1 L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Friday, May 2 St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Boston, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 7:10 p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Saturday, May 3 St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 8:40 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m. Sunday, May 4 Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Oakland at Boston, 1:35 p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, TBD Monday, May 5 Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 p.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Arizona at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Tuesday, May 6 Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Cincinnati at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Arizona at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Wednesday, May 7 San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 12:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 3:35 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 3:40 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Houston at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Cincinnati at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Thursday, May 8 Minnesota at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m. Houston at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Miami at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Friday, May 9 Houston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Arizona at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Miami at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Saturday, May 10 L.A. Angels at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Miami at San Diego, 8:40 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 9:05 p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 9:10 p.m. Houston at Baltimore, TBD Sunday, May 11 L.A. Angels at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Houston at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. Arizona at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Boston at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. Miami at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 8:05 p.m. Monday, May 12 Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 13 Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Colorado at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, May 14 Detroit at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m. L.A. Angels at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. Colorado at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 3:35 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 3:40 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 3:40 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Miami at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, May 15 San Diego at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 1:45 p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Friday, May 16 Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, May 17 Atlanta at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 8:10 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m. Sunday, May 18 Pittsburgh at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:35 p.m. Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Baltimore at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Toronto at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 8:05 p.m. Monday, May 19 Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Tuesday, May 20 Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Minnesota at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Wednesday, May 21 Detroit at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Cincinnati at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Minnesota at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, May 22 Philadelphia at Miami, 12:40 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 4:05 p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Friday, May 23 Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Oakland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, May 24 Oakland at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 3:05 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 7:15 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:15 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:15 p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 10:05 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, TBD Sunday, May 25 Oakland at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 4:15 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 5:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 8:05 p.m. Monday, May 26 Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 1:10 p.m. Miami at Washington, 1:35 p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Tuesday, May 27 Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, May 28 Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, May 29 Texas at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 3:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 8:10 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Friday, May 30 Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Colorado at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Texas at Washington, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Saturday, May 31 Texas at Washington, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. San Diego at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 3:05 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 7:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Colorado at Cleveland, TBD Sunday, June 1 Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Colorado at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Atlanta at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Texas at Washington, 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 1:35 p.m. San Diego at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. MICHAEL PEREZ / AP Milwaukee catcher and former Umatilla High School standout Jonathan Lucroy (20) hits during a game on April 8 against Philadelphia in Philadelphia. SCHEDULE CONTINUES ON PAGE B5

PAGE 13

Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Baltimore at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, TBD Monday, June 2 Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Tuesday, June 3 Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Miami, 7:10 p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Kansas City at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Wednesday, June 4 Seattle at Atlanta, 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at San Diego, 6:40 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at Co lorado, 8:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, June 5 San Francisco at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Friday, June 6 Miami at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. St. Louis at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Washington at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, June 7 St. Louis at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Miami at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 7:15 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 7:15 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 7:15 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 9:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:05 p.m. Washington at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Sunday, June 8 St. Louis at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Miami at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. Washington at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. Monday, June 9 Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Hous ton at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Tuesday, June 10 Houston at Arizona, 3:40 p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Miami at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, June 11 Minnesota at Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Miami at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Thursday, June 12 L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m. San Diego at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at Houston, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Friday, June 13 Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, June 14 Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 4:05 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Tampa Bay at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 4:10 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 7:15 p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 7:15 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Sunday, June 15 Minnesota at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. L.A. Angels at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. Monday, June 16 L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Tuesday, June 17 San Diego at Seattle, 3:40 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. San Francisco at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Wednesday, June 18 Philadelphia at Atlanta, 12:10 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 1:08 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at St. Louis, 1:45 p.m. San Francisco at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 3:35 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, June 19 L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 3:40 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 6:40 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Boston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Friday, June 20 Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Boston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Saturday, June 21 Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Boston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Toronto at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 7:15 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 7:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 7:15 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 10:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Sunday, June 22 Detroit at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Toronto at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 1:35 p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Boston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, TBD Baltimore a t N.Y. Yankees, TBD Monday, June 23 Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Tuesday, June 24 Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, June 25 Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 12:10 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Boston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Thursday, June 26 Atlanta at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Friday, June 27 Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Oakland at Miami, 7:10 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, TBD Saturday, June 28 Washington at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m. Chicago W hite Sox at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 3:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Oakland at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 7:15 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:15 p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, 7:15 p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, TBD Sunday, June 29 Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Oakland at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. L.A. Angels at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, TBD Boston at N.Y. Yankees, TBD Monday, June 30 Colorado at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Oakland at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Boston, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. REMAINDER OF SCHEDULE WILL APPEAR ON APRIL 20 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Bass have started biting in the mai n portions of the lake on crank baits such as Rat-L-Traps and soft plastic worms in June bug or green pumpkin. Crappie are biting in the deep parts of the lakes on pink or chartreuse jigs tipped with min nows. Shell cracker are starting to bite on yellow tail worms, grass shrimp or crickets. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee won the Wednesday night tournament with a big bass weigh ing 6.28 pounds and a total weight of 9-plus pounds. The Wednesday night open bass tournament has re sumed with the time change. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 on Wednesday evening. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held Saturday with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352-742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Stripers are being caught on Dead River on silver spoons and salt wa ter shrimp. Some specks are still be ing picked up on minnows and jigs. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Specks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are still at the edge of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Bass action has been hot and heavy even with them having moved o ff the beds. They are biting on grass shrimp and black, blue and silver plastic worms. Shellcracker are starting to move in. A few specks are still being caught. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests from Michigan have rented a rowboat all week and are catvhing bass and crappie. Minnow and worm sales still continue to be strong. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE Specks and bass have moved off the beds and out into other areas of the lakes. Try shing the mouths of res idential canals early in the morning and later in the afternoon with shin ers and crank baits like Rat-L-Traps. Crappie are back in open water and biting on tight lined minnow and jig combinations. A few specks and bass are being caught post-spawn in the Apopka-Beauclaire Canal feeding with minnows and shiners. Lots of hybrid bass are being caught in the St. Johns River. Schooling bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feeder creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rrf ntrbbrb nntbbbrff t bfb ffb rfr f bfbr bf ntffb nntff t r b ffbfb rrffrf rf f rf f bbfrf bfbfbfrf ntbbfb nntbbb t bbf r b f r br r r rbbb

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014

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Bring back Mutts I see that your comics page has been slightly revamped. The comic strip Mutts has, I gather, been given the axe. I wish to register my regret for that decision. Mutts is a wonder ful comic strip that not only af fords an occasional chuckle, but the strips Zen-like qualities lend a sense of peace and goodwill to my mornings. Thats pretty amaz ing functionality for a mere sev en-square inches of news print. I understand, of course, that this move is likely a matter of econom ics. If that is the case, Id like to put in my two cents regarding the worthiness of the strips on your comics page. I wonder why you would choose to drop a comic strip with new, original content, rather than drop one that is recycled. As delightful as they were in their day, Peanuts and For Better or Worse have long been in reruns. Given the average age of your readers, I dare say most of us have already read and enjoyed these strips before. Shouldnt we give preference to original, new con tent on the comics page? For that matter, are you aware that Shoe has been cobbled to gether on a computer from bits and pieces of old strips for more than a decade? Then there are strips like Snuffy Smith, B.C., Hagar, Heathcliff, Dennis the Menace and more which are drawn by lackluster hired hands, their original creators having died years ago. Id prefer to read comic strips drawn by their original cre ators, those which sink or swim based on their own merits rather than the hazy recollection that the strip used to be funny. So as not to be too negative, let me mention that I applaud the re cent addition of Luann. Although at rst this seemed like a strip that wouldnt interest me, I nd it has quickly become one of my favor ites. Congratulations on a ne choice. ALLAN HOLTZ | Tavares Poor service from the DMV I thought Lake County had come into the 21st Century, the same as the rest of the world did. I just returned from the ofce of the Department of Motor Vehicles in Astatula, and after a 3 1/2 hour wait to renew my drivers license, the receptionist made the excuse that they were so busy because it was spring break and all of those on break were there. But, that was not so. Every age bracket was very well represented, from young people with babies to senior citizens, and Im a senior citizen. I followed the instructions that came with the paperwork from Tallahassee about making an ap pointment on the web page, about having my eyes tested and also called ahead to the phone number listed. I was told all the appoint ments were taken and to call back, and all of the clerks were busy. Both of their printers were not working and it would take over an hour for the repairman to get there and over two-dozen people were given temporary licenses. This is the only Department of Motor Vehicles in this area be cause the powers that be closed a perfectly good ofce on U.S. Highway 27 near State Road 50. Our politicians and the people who work for them have a cus tomer be damned attitude. HELEN NEWTON | Clermont Are we entering a new era in world evolution? Who would have thought a for mer communist country would have a majority of citizens that believed in and practiced pure democracy. Would the politicians in Washington, D.C. have been so anxious to destroy the Soviet Union if they knew that people were not going to set up an oligar chy like we have in America? The rulers in Washington envi sioned a small group of rulers in post-Soviet countries that they could set up sweetheart deals with and together rule the common citizen worldwide surprise, oligarchy. The Crimean people believe in one man, one vote and majority rules. This sets a bad example for American politics. What if California citizens vote to join Mexico? Maine and Washington State residents vote to join Canada? Texas citizens vote to return to a separate country with pure democracy and Florida cit izens vote to join Puerto Rico, a new pure democracy? Are we entering a new era in world evolution? Our nation al debt is unpayable, ever! Why not leave it behind and start new with a clean slate? Let the rest of the nation join Israel as a new na tion called nevermore. Their ag could be white with an out stretched begging hand. VERNON HALL | Umatilla The government should provide total health care for wounded warriors Has no one questioned why our present governmental re gime does not provide total health care for our wounded am putees/military personnel? Instead, we are bombard ed with TV commercials like those soliciting $19 per month by groups such as Wounded Warriors. The prime benefactors of this charity are entertainment g ures and money-hungry TV net works, not the soldiers who were put in harms way by the same regime Commander-in-Chief. This regime seems dead set on bankrupting our country by spending borrowed or newly printed money on every dead beat reason, but never for this one legitimate cause our fall en war heroes. Jeff Foxworthy recently pub lished a treatise dening rea sons why our nation was found ed by geniuses but is now run by idiots. These are some of his points which show the basis for my pre vious sentence. 1) Our government believes the best way to eradicate trillions of dollars in debt is to spend tril lions more. 2) Hard work and success are met with higher taxes, regulations and intrusion, while not work ing is rewarded with food stamps, WIC checks, Medicaid, subsidized housing, and free cell phones. 3) The government plan for getting people back to work is to provide 99 weeks of unemploy ment checks without proof of looking for work. 4) You pay your mortgage faithfully while denying yourself the newest big-screen TV, while your neighbor buys iPhones, timeshares, a huge TV and new cars, and the government for gives his mortgage debt when he defaults. 5) You must show your pic ture ID to board a plane, cash a check, buy liquor, and rent a video, but not to vote for who runs the country. Our country has masterfully spent us into $17 trillion in debt while endlessly buying votes with continuously growing enti tlement programs. If you dont understand the extent of ination and the im pact of printing and borrowing money from your visits to gro ceries and gas stations, just con sider this: In 1964, IBM spent $5 billion on a make-or-break gamble, the introduction of the rst Solid Logic computer sys tem. Due to ination, that $5 bil lion would be $38 billion today. Do not vote democrat. CLINTON G. FISH | Tavares Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clar ity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@ dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR T here is a saying that the denition of in sanity is doing the same thing over and over and e xpecting a different result. Yet that seems to be what the Lake County School Board did last week when it opened the door to considering a con troversial student uniform proposal that parents have vehemently opposed and the School Board subsequently rejected several times before. To be clear, the School Board did not actually propose or recommend such a change in the districts dress code during its meeting last week. But board mem bers inexplicably opened the door a crack when they recommended that Superin tendent Susan Moxley have a committee study the idea. But why? There are strong points to be made pro and con. Opponents have argued that enforcing uniformity sties creativity and individual ity, and some have said the burden of hav ing to buy and maintain a separate school wardrobe for their kids is nancially taxing. To be sure, there are some solid argu ments to be made in favor of a uniform dress code, and supporters of the idea have made them. They insist that uni forms improve morale and student con duct and can even have a positive inu ence on academic achievement. Even the head of the esteemed Mont verde Academy weighed in via letter, say ing that requiring school uniforms would initiate positive change in the culture of your school communities in a relatively short time. All that may be true, although Mont verde Academy, a small private institu tion, is not truly analogous to a large pub lic school. Still, the Lake County school system might want to consider whether this is the time to implement such a signicant and controversial change. The School Board is already mired with signicant budget issues, decaying school buildings, obso lete technology, busing challenges and a number of other problems. In fact, the board is waging a tense de bate with Lake County government of cials right now over how much of the local penny sales tax should go toward schools, which they say have a backlog of needs totaling $1 billion or more. It would behoove the School Board to focus its attention on the pressing matters that lay ahead rather than inviting a ght that will surely draw signicant time and energy. Put another way, would you worry about painting the kitchen if your house was falling down? Of course you wouldnt. We encourage the School Board to roll up its sleeves and bear down on the chal lenges ahead xing their budget hole, shoring up tired old school buildings, planning for a projected surge in student enrollment and elevating academic stan dards district-wide. No, the school uniform debate can wait for another day. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST School uniform discussion is a distraction

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 OTHER VOICES Voices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHER VOICES OTHER VOICES B rer Rabbit (some times spelled Brer or Brer Rabbit) was a main charac ter in the famous Un cle Remus folk tales lat er made into a Disney movie classic called the Song of the South. In one of the famous Uncle Remus stories, Brer Fox was trying to capture and kill Brer Rabbit. Brer Fox de vised a clever plan in which he made a sculp ture of a baby com posed of tar and tur pentine and topped off with a hat. He placed the tar baby in the mid dle of the road and awaited the arrival of Brer Rabbit. When Brer Rabbit did arrive he cheerfully said good morning to the cute baby but received no response. Brer Rab bit then inquired about the weather and how the baby was feeling, but again no response. Brer Rabbit, now be ginning to get a bit ir ritated, asked the same questions in a much louder voice, but got no response. Brer Rab bit was now angry and asked the baby, Are you deaf or just rude? Still no response. This lack of response prompted Brer Rabbit to tell the baby that he was going to give him a real licking for being so rude. His rst paw punch thrust into the tar baby and imme diately got stuck. The second paw punch re sulted in the same pre dicament. Then two foot kicks and a head bump and suddenly Brer Rabbit found him self covered in tar and trapped. Brer Fox now had captured his tar get, Brer Rabbit. For tunately Brer Rabbits quick thinking and re verse psychology con vinced Brer Fox that tossing Brer Rabbit into the thorny Briar Patch would be his doom, only to nd out that Brer Rabbit had grown up in that Briar Patch and escaped death at the hands of Brer Fox. As I watched the re cent congressional hearing on Benghazi and the testimony of Mike Morell, former deputy CIA director, re garding the death of our ambassador and three other brave Americans, it seemed I was watch ing Brer Rabbit getting more engulfed in tar by his own actions. In sworn testimo ny, Morell acknowl edged that he made several key changes in the Benghazi talking points following the attack. His reasoning was puzzling as he ad mitted that he ignored the on-the-ground in telligence from Libya in favor of listening to an analyst in Washing ton D.C. The D.C. analyst said the attack was the re sult of a spontaneous mob attack while the analyst in Libya said no, that it was an organized terrorist attack. Mo rell a 30-year CIA veter an, ignored his best an alyst in Libya. Why? As more testimony came forth, Morell admitted that he deferred to the concerns of the State Department headed by Hillary Clinton, who feared that we would all learn that the ambas sador had made sever al requests for added security only to be ig nored. It appears that Mo rell fell on the Benghazi sword to protect Secre tary Clinton and Presi dent Obama, who was in the home stretch of his 2012 presidential campaign. After all, he had been telling us that Osama was dead and al-Qaeda was on the run. Oops, four mur dered Americans due to a terrorist attack, not some spontaneous mob action. On Nov. 16, 2012, CIA Director David Petrae ous told Congress that the CIA did not remove terrorism and al-Qae da from the talking points. But on April 2, 2014 Morell testi ed that he removed al-Qaeda and made other edits. He also ac knowledged that he sat silent in a previous congressional hearing when this same subject was asked of Director of National Intelligence James Clapper sitting at the same table with Morell. Later, in November of 2012, Morell told Sen ators McCain, Graham and Ayotte that the FBI made the chang es. When McCain then asked the FBI about this they became un glued, stating that they did no such thing. Morell also admitted deleting the phrase Is lamic extremists and the disclosure that the CIA had provided warn ings to the Clinton-led State Department prior to the attack. Im sure that the next revelation will come as a real shocker. Mike Morell now has been hired by a PR rm (Bea con Global Strategies), operated primarily by former Clinton and Obama administration ofcials. Amazing coin cidence. Yes, Brer Rabbit got covered with tar through his own ac tions and Mike Morell got covered in his own tar by ignoring his in telligence in Libya, de leting the truth from the talking points and remaining silent at a congressional hear ing when he knew the truth. But, he now has a great job with the Clin ton and Obama loyal ists. And after all, What difference does it make now? as was so fa mously uttered by Hil lary Clinton. RUSS SLOAN GUEST COLUMNIST Brer Rabbit, the tar baby and Benghazi T he art icle, Innocents Lost: Pre serving Families But Losing Chil dren, which was written by Car ol Marbin Miller and Audra Burch and published in the Miami Herald on March 16, depicts the ndings of an exhaustive investigation into 477 child deaths. All of these children were the victims of abuse and neglect and most were ve years of age or younger. The story is difcult to read. In grue some and graphic detail, it depicts our failed attempts to protect those who in most instances cannot protect themselves. It makes clear that par enting and drug or alcohol abuse is a lethal combination. And the past is in deed a predictor of the future. Child after child, case after case, the writers reveal a harsh and ugly truth, a truth that most of us wish to deny. The truth is that even well-intended legisla tion, policies and procedures and ded icated child welfare professionals are no match for the severely and chron ically addicted or those who would de liberately injure, maim or kill children. The article also begs the question, what can we do to remove ourselves from being ranked as a state with one of the highest rate of child deaths in the nation? What can we do to prevent these unfathom able, horric tragedies? The answer may in-part, rest with the Guardian ad Litem Program. Em ploying skilled staff, but relying on trained volunteers, who have a pas sion for kids and have lived and wit nessed life, the Program advocates for the best interests of abused and ne glected children. Once removed from their alleged abuser, the Guardian assigned to the case, seeks to determine what happened and what needs to hap pen before the child can be reunied with his/her parent. Sometimes, the Guardians conclusion is that the child should not be reunited with the par ents. The Guardian then submits his/ her recommendations to the court overseeing the case. Local dependency judges refer to these volunteers as the eyes and ears of the court. Children assigned to such individuals say, She/hes my Guardian angel. Although child deaths at t he hands of parents and caregivers will never be 100 percent preventable, by becoming involved with the Guardian ad Litem Program, theres a good chance you can indeed save a life. Marcia Hilty is the Guardian ad Litem 5th Judicial Circuit Director in Ocala. Guardians ad litem save lives C an you imagine a scenario where more than 50 percent of all Americans living now could be dead a year from today? Congress has known of this specic terrorist threat for more than a decade. For $2 billion, (in 2001 dollars) Congress, which spends more than that every 17 hours to fund government, could have eliminated this threat. What have Congress and presidents, past and present, done about this possible terrorist threat? Nothing. Its unimag inable that government doesnt want you to know about it, and its just as bad the mainstream me dia doesnt want to report on it also. In 2001, the Elec tro-magnetic Pulse com mission (EMP) was formed and instructed to identify steps it believes should be taken by the U.S. to better protect its military and civilian sys tems from an EMP attack. Findings were reported to Congress. An EMP attack could destroy not only Ameri cas military defenses, but would destroy virtually 100 percent of our civilian civilization. We probably wouldnt even know who did it. How would this attack come? Here is the most common possibility: One or more ocean freighters would position their ships just off Americas coast. From there an atomic weapon would be red into our lower atmosphere. Three, spaced evenly over the entire U.S., would destroy Americas entire electric grid. Anything digital would no longer work. Planes ying would drop like rocks from the sky. There would be no electricity. You would not be able to smell, taste, or feel the radiation. No TV. No ra dio. Your car wont start, unless it was built before 1978. Where would you get gasoline? Pumps wont work. Within a week, there wouldnt be one grocery store in America with food to sell. What would you do then? Welcome to the 1700s. How long do you think you could sur vive? Without turning to crime, probably not very long. Unclassied documents have shown Iran, Rus sia, China and North Ko rea have all been studying how to orchestrate such an attack. Three of those countries already have atomic weapons and the technology to carry out such an attack. Its been estimated a larger-than-average solar are from the sun could also knock out part of an electric grid, and it could take up to four years to x it. How long would it take to replace one of the elec tric transformers? Ameri ca used to make our own. Not anymore. Only Ger many and South Ko rea make the transform ers that we would need. They are put together by hand and take 18 months to 2 years to build. How would you get it to Ameri ca? A sailing vessel? Who is in charge of x ing this potential threat? The DOE says its the DOD, and the DOD pass es the buck to the DHS which says, well, you get the idea. No department wants to take responsi bility. Responsibility lies with the president and Con gress. I, for one, would not like to be a congress man after an EMP attack. Sonny Heninger lives in Leesburg. America quit ignoring the threat

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Cruisin 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com MARK GLOVER The Sacramento Bee Back in the days when President Ronald Rea gan was staring down the Soviet Union, buy ing a car was often a prolonged process re quiring considerable patience and mental endurance from both buyer and salesperson. A typical visit to an auto dealership might start with a scrum of salespeople usual ly all men vying for your attention. And why not? Sometimes sizable sales commissions were on the line. The salesman you ul timately hooked up with was likely to be your friend for the bet ter part of a day as you spent hours haggling over prices, test-drove multiple vehicles, com pared car interiors, eyed dozens of paint jobs and met a cluster of deal ership ofcials sum moned by your primary salesman as you me thodically worked to ward a deal. By the end of the day, maybe you had a car. Or it might have been just Round 1 in a days-long process. Oh, how things have changed. Face-to-face car sell ing has evolved into Internet is a game changer for buyers and sellers SUSAN CARPENTER The Orange County Register Ford is getting a lot of mileage out of its Fi esta. For the past year, the Detroit automak er has been rolling out the 2014 update of its popular subcompact in dribs and drabs: start ing with its 38 mpg S last summer, followed by its street-legal rallycross er the 35 mpg ST, last fall and, most recent ly, a 45 mpg 1-liter SFE thats been on sale since December but was only made available to the media in March. To put the 1-liter in context, it is so com pact that a Ford engi neer packed the engine block in a carry-on suit case and took it through TSA security without a hitch. One liter is a displace ment more common ly found in motorcy cles. And, as motorcycle engines go these days, its actually fairly small. Harley-Davidsons stock motor is a 1.6-liter. Tri umph makes a bike with a gargantuan 2.3. But the Fiesta 1-liter is the mule for an entire car one that not only carries two more wheels and an entire steel cage, Ford Fiestas tiny engine is no shrinking violet SEE INTERNET | C4 MCT PHOTO The 2014 Ford Fiesta SFE comes with a 1-liter engine thats so compact, a Ford engineer packed the engine block in a carry-on suitcase and took it through TSA security. JERRY HIRSCH and DAVID UNDERCOFFLER Los Angeles Times Cars cost a lot of money. With an average sales price of about $32,000, we know a new car is out of reach for many. The au tomakers know this too, which is why they contin ue to roll out bottom-rung cars for buyers on way-be low-average budgets. The three least expensive cars on the market are the Nissan Versa at $12,800, the Chevrolet Spark at $12,995 and the Mitsubishi Mirage at $13,790. Prices are for the most basic cars with no op tions but do include desti nation charges. In that lowly range, their chief competition is a re liable used car say, a 3-year-old Honda Civic or Mazda3, with low miles. But some buyers get more peace of mind from buy ing new. These are the cars for people who want noth ing more than the cheap est possible transporta tion, who view driving as a chore. They would take the train if they could. These are the cars, in oth er words, for people who dont like cars. Theres no shortage of these consumers in this post-recession age, buyers who increasingly prize fru gality and efciency over performance or amenities. Mitsubishi brought out its Mirage late last year and it has sold at a decent clip, well over 1,000 vehi cles a month. Meanwhile, the Chevy Spark sold more than 34,000 copies in 2013, while the Nissan Versa se dan and Note hatchback sold a total of 117,000 cars in the same year. But cheapness doesnt necessarily equate to good value, as we found out in a week of testing these three budget-mobiles. Heres how they stacked up, from worst to rst. MITSUBISHI MIRAGE: En gines are getting smaller and smaller. This is good thing. And a wave of new three-cylinder motors is showing just how good au tomakers have gotten at wringing more power and renement out of tiny en gines. But the three-cylinder in the Mirage is neither re ned nor powerful. When you hear this thing coming down the street, you expect to see an aging Auto review: Cheap cars arent always worthwhile MCT PHOTO The 2014 Mitsubishi Mirage weighs just 2,000 pounds. MCT PHOTO The 2014 Land Rover Range Rover Sport has a new aluminum architecture that reduces weight by up to 800 pounds from the old model. MARK PHELAN Detroit Free Press R eports of Land Rovers death were greatly ex aggerated. The SUV brand Ford struggled to sell just a few years ago has become one of the auto industrys most desirable names. The three-star 2014 Land Rover Range Rov er Sport V-8 Super charged simultaneous ly demonstrates why the British brand has come so far and that some of Rovers old problems linger. The Land Rov er Range Rover Sport V-8 Supercharged crikey, even the Inter nets not big enough to keep using that name; lets call it the Sport shares its alumi num-intensive con struction, drivetrain and many systems with the 5-inch longer Range Rover. The aluminum archi tecture reduced weight up to 800 pounds from the old model. That gives the 2014 Sport bet ter performance, han dling and fuel economy. Prices start at $62,600. All Sports have full-time all-wheel-drive and an eight-speed automatic transmission. The base model uses a 340-horse power, supercharged, 3.0-liter V-6 engine. The top model is the V-8 Su percharged, which has a 510-horsepower, 5.0-li ter V-8. Despite the fact that all Sports have super charged engines, only the V-8 is called super charged. The V-6 is the SE. I tested a Range Rov er Sport V-8 Super charged with features including adaptive cruise control, auto matic collision-avoid ing brakes, voice rec ognition and 825-watt Meridian sound. It stickered at $87,690. All prices exclude destina tion charges. The V-8 Sport com petes with high-perfor mance luxury SUVs like the BMW X5 M, Mer cedes ML 63 AMG and Porsche Cayenne turbo. The Sport I tested was at the lower end of that price range, de spite having a roomy and luxurious interior, more power than the ML 63 AMG and Cay enne turbo and better fuel economy than the X5 M and ML 63. Its hard to call a SUV nudging $90,000 a bargain, but versus that competition, the concept of good val ue ca n be stretched far enough to use on the Sport without wincing. Range Rover Sport improves performance, handling LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER SPORT V-8 SUPERCHARGED TYPE OF VEHICLE: Allwheel-drive ve-passen ger crossover SUV RATING: Three out of four stars REASONS TO BUY: Perfor mance, off-road capabili ty, looks, comfort SHORTCOMINGS: No blind spot alert; hands-free phone connection fail ure, poor response of touchpad controls ENGINE: Supercharged 5.0-liter 32-valve DOHC V-8 POWER: 510 horsepow er at 6,200-6,500 rpm; 461 pound-feet of torque at 2,500-5,500 rpm TRANSMISSION: Eightspeed automatic WHEELBASE: 115.1 inch es LENGTH: 191.0 inches WIDTH: 78.1 inches HEIGHT: 70.1 inches CURB WEIGHT: 5,093 lbs. BASE PRICE: $62,600 PRICE AS TESTED: $87,690 Prices exclude destination charge. SEE ROVER | C4 SEE FIESTA | C4 SEE CHEAP | C4

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 something resembling speed dating. Accord ing to numerous indus try sources, a typical car-buying experience can be done in as little as two hours, including the trip to the nance ofce and signing all re quired documents. As it has with so many industries, the Inter net has changed every thing. Consumers who once had little to work with beyond the manufac turers suggested retail price, or MSRP, and oth er basics listed on a ve hicles window stick er now have oceans of data available to them via car sites like Ed munds.com, Cars.com and AutoTrader.com. Prospective car buy ers can easily obtain MSRPs on any vehicle, along with the invoice price, exhaustive lists of standard features and thousands of available options. Today, its not unusu al for a car buyer to walk onto a dealer lot know ing the exact motor ve hicle model and fea tures they want, right down to the exterior paint color. And theyre typically versed in just how much the dealer paid for the car. I would say the No. 1 change from a gen eration ago and now is the explosion of in formation available to consumers, said Brian Maas, president of the Sacramento-based Cal ifornia New Car Deal ers Association. Even in just the last ve years, everyone walking into a dealership has a smart phone. They can take a picture, go on the In ternet, check the price on any comparable car or check out all the fea tures, all while theyre standing there at the dealership. The result, Maas said, is that ultra-informed consumers have ad justed the burden to the salesperson on the sales lot. In some cases, (the customer) is more knowledgeable than the salesperson. Sacramento resident David Kelly, shopping for pickups last week at the Folsom (Calif.) Au tomall, is typical of to days consumer. He was carrying an inchthick stack of comput er printouts from var ious auto websites. If I k now the answers in advance, I think it makes the sale go quicker. And actu ally, I dont mind hag gling over price. Over at the Roseville (Calif.) Automall, Rock lin, Calif., resident Bob Fosters homework in cluded a couple of pag es torn out of a recent edition of Motor Trend magazine. Ive been working on this for a week or two. I want the right car and the best deal. And I wont pay a penny more than what I have in mind. Ill walk out if I dont get the price I want. To match that kind of determination, car dealers and their sales staffs have likewise turned to technology. Using laptops and tablet computers, sales per sonnel regularly keep in touch with custom ers via email and con duct searches for s pe cic auto models with a few quick keystrokes. INTERNET FROM PAGE C3 but ve passengers, plus gro ceries, while remaining the most fuel-efcient, nonhy brid vehicle on the road. I wasnt sure what to ex pect when I showed up at Fords West Coast headquar ters in Irvine, Calif., on a re cent Wednesday for a morn ings spin in the automakers smallest car powered with its smallest engine. At best, I an ticipated the driving equiva lent of lukewarm coffee at worst, something as limp and underpowered as the Nissan Versa Note. So I was pretty surprised when I strapped in, threw the car in gear and it took off with verve. The thing has spunk, but theres a caveat. Part of that spunk is attributable to the 1 liters manual transmission, which improves its accelera tion and overall fun factor. The 1-liter Fiesta is not available as an automatic in the U.S. The manual on the Fiesta is a tall-geared ve-speed, the shift quality of which is quite smooth. The clutch pedal is pliable, and the stick shift eas ily slides into gear. Consumer Reports reported last month that manual trans missions can improve gas mile age by 2 to 5 mpg. The maga zine also reported that manual transmissions often cut a cars sticker price by $800 to $1,200 a situation that does not ap ply to the 1-liter Fiesta. It actu ally comes with a price premi um, adding $995 to the $14,100 base-model price. Despite being offered only with a manual transmission that many Americans dont even know how to operate, the 1-liter, since quietly going on sale in December, now ac counts for one-third of all Fi esta sales in California, the No. 1 market for small cars in the country. Small cars being the largest market segment in the auto industry overall, Ford is pur suing it with a laserlike fo cus. Its growth rate in small cars is double that of its com petitors, due in part to an ul tralow starting price for its base-model Fiesta. The price can remain low because the engine doesnt add cost-in ating technologies such as electric motors and lithi um-ion batteries to help im prove fuel economy, which is the most important factor in consumers small car pur chase decisions. Ford offers a plug-in hybrid (C-Max), as well as an all-elec tric (Focus), but thats dab bling. Almost all of the auto makers energy is channeled into eking as much efciency out of gas-powered engines as possible. And its doing that with EcoBoost powertrains like the 1-liter small-dis placement engines that are both turbocharged and di rect-injected for improved mpgs. Ford uses its more power ful 1.6-liter, 4-cylinder Eco Boost engine in the peppy, 197-horsepower Fiesta ST. It will use 2.7and 3.5-liter Eco Boost engines in its highly an ticipated aluminum-bodied F-150 pickup truck this fall. Before the year is out, Ford says 80 percent of all vehicles it sells globally will be avail FIESTA FROM PAGE C3 2014 FORD FIESTA 1-LITER ECOBOOST POWERTRAIN: Turbocharged, di rect-injected, 1-liter, three-cylin der, 4 valves per cylinder, DOHC, variable valve timing, 5-speed manual transmission HORSEPOWER: 123 at 6,000 rpm TORQUE: 125 at 2,500 rpm WHEELBASE: 98 inches CURB WEIGHT: 2,552 pounds EPA-ESTIMATED FUEL ECONOMY: 32 mpg city, 45 mpg highway, 37 mpg combined ROAD TEST FUEL ECONOMY (BASED ON 32 MILES OF DRIVING AT 53 MPH AVERAGE SPEED): 31.1 mpg BASE PRICE: $15,095 Surprisingly, it did not of fer blind spot alert, a feature common on vehicles priced far below the Sport. The Sports exterior styling walks the line between Land Rovers old boxy look and the sleek Evoque that began to reshape the brand a few years ago. The interior is spacious and luxurious The Sport I tested seated ve, with plenty of passenger and cargo space. An optional third row with two small seats is available. I havent tried the third seat, but even Land Rov er admits its for occasional use, so caveat emptor. The interior materials look and feel great. Perforated grey leather covered the seats, while ne wood and brushed aluminum adorn the con soles and controls. The Sports connectivity and controls could use some work. In a weeklong test, it nev er downloaded my iPhones contact list, so I couldnt use voice recognition to initiate phone calls. I had to dial the numbers manually. Thatll get you an expensive ticket in many jurisdictions. The touch screen is big and clear, but the touch points surrounding it respond poorly when you want to switch from naviga tion to the home screen, au dio or phone. The engine delivers effort less acceleration, with 461 pound-feet of torque at just 2,500 rpm. The steering is di rect and nicely weighted, with good on-center feel. The Sport uses Land Rov ers tried-and-true AWD sys tem and has plenty of ground clearance. You can expect offroad capability that matches its highway performance. The Sport rated 14 mpg in the city, 19 on the high way and 16 combined in EPA tests. That wont make anybody trade in their Pri us, but its very good for a 500-plus-horsepower SUV. Six years after Ford sold Land Rover to Indias Tata Group, the brand is alive and well. With a few improve ments to its connectivity and controls, Rover is poised to make life miserable for the makers of other luxury SUVs. ROVER FROM PAGE C3 dump truck rather than a shiny new hatchback. Its that loud, and it sounds like some thing is about to break. Inside, the motor vibrates the oor board and pedals, giving the driver the sensation of a foot massage. Previously, we have driv en the European version of the Volkswagen Up with its slow but smooth three-cyl inder and the Ford Fies ta equipped with a spright ly turbo-charged three. Both are more rened than the 74-horsepower engine Mit subishi packed into this econobox. The CVT transmission, a $1,000 option, is the better of the two transmissions (the base offering is a ve-speed manual). But the automatic still has its issues, and it acts more like early ex amples of CVTs, producing an irritat ing hum as the clattering en gine wanders through the rev range. The Mirage is not with out its merits. It came nice ly equipped for the low stick er price, including climate control, power windows and locks, keyless entry, power side mirrors, oor mats and a USB port. The styling is func tional, if uninspired. NISSAN VERSA: The Versa is the best-selling car in this group as well as the lowest priced vehicle in the U.S. auto market. And though the base model brings new meaning to the term stripped, its a bet ter value than the Mirage. The highlight of this car is its size. Four adults can slide into the Versa with leg room and headroom to spare. You can sardine a fth in a pinch, but make sure every one showered recently. The Versas 102.4-inch wheelbase, compared with 96.5 inches for the Mirage and 93.5 inches for the Spark, also helped the car track better at high speeds and over rough roads. But you give up a lot for the interior space and slight ly better drive. Nissan doesnt hide the budget nature of this car. It has crank windows we didnt think those still ex isted in new cars sold in the U.S. manual locks and an entertainment system with all the delity of a 1960s tran sistor radio. The knobs on the dashboard would have looked cheap and basic 20 years ago; now they look as if theyre go ing to melt during the next heat wave. A sixth gear on the manu al transmission would have been nice during freeway cruising to keep the engine from droning on. And the car peting at your feet looks and feels like a classrooms worth of chalkboard erasers stitched together. Except for noise, the drive train on the Versa is ade quate for an extreme econ omy car. The transmission ranked second of these three in terms of feel and rene ment. Its biggest drawback was the clutch pedal, which seemed to engage unpredict ably. The four-cylinder engine has the most horsepower of our cheapo trio, though it also has the most mass to move around. For many budget buyers, the Versa will get the job done. But wed still suggest consid ering a nicer used car for the same money or spending a few thousand dollars more on, for instance, a new base model Honda Fit, Mazda3 or Toyota Corolla. CHEVROLET SPARK: Chev rolets Spark is the pick of this litter. Despite being the small est in this group and one of the smallest cars on the U.S. mar ket, Chevy manages to pack a lot of value into this car. The smoothness of the tiny, 1.3-liter, four-cylinder engine is a welcome relief after shud dering around in the Mitsub ishi. Eighty-four horsepow er may sound quaint, but it was more than enough to zip around town. The ve-speed manual transmission allowed quick, crisp shifts with little drama. The Sparks interior also impresses with renement and relatively quiet ride. This Chevy hides its price tag and its size well. Yet with space at such a premium, there are a few ergonomic oversights. Tall drivers will hit their knees on the climate control knob, and the shifter brushes their leg in rst and second gear. But the benet of this cars size is immediately evident the rst time you go to park it. You can squeeze this thing be tween two badly parked cars. We also liked the tight turning radius. The seats were com fortable and supportive, the best of the bunch here. Still, the Spark leaves some thing to be desired. Like the other cars, its performance suffers at highway speeds. Noise climbs quickly even if the speed doesnt. A roaring truck in the next lane drowns out any conversation. It bounces on rough roads. Fuel economy was the one area where all three cars shined. They all topped 40 miles per gallon in highway driving and climbed into the mid-30s mpg in mixed city and highway use. Although the Spark was the best of the bunch, these are not great cars. In part because they are lightweight and have tiny 14and 15-inch wheels, they dont track well on the Southlands grooved, wash board freeways. Theres a temptation to buy a car such as these as a third vehicle, especially for a teen driver. Resist that urge. In the nal analysis, the su per-cheap segment doesnt hold up well against the pros pect of a high-quality used car with a similar price tag. CHEAP FROM PAGE C3 MCT PHOTO The diminutive 2014 Chevrolet Spark carries a 1.3-liter engine.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 AT TIMESBY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0406RELEASE DATE: 4/13/2014 ACROSS1 Improvisational music4 Brick color10 Bibliographical abbr.14 Indigenous people known for their tattoos19 NPR journalist Shapiro20 1986 girls-name song by Boston21 Catch-22 profiteer Minderbinder22 DuPont trademark of 194123 Clumsy pharmacist, at times?26 Easily misled27 String section members28 Dressage rider, at times?30 Smidgen31 Suffix with social34 ___ suit35 Maintain36 Grant for a filmmaker?38 Indonesian tourist haven39 London ___ (British Ferris wheel)40 Reminiscent of41 Tucked away42 Some supplies for Hersheys44 Overzealous sorts47 Old-fashioned barber, at times?49 Missile launched at Goliath51 National Book Mo.53 Circus performer Kelly54 Inexperienced shucker, at times?58 Low pair60 Out of fashion61 Subject of a van Gogh series62 Software users shortcut65 No-limit Texas holdem player, at times?69 People may be down on them70 TWA competitor71 Dual-sport athlete Sanders72 Answers that may anger74 Farmer, at times?78 Unfettered82 Knowledge83 Shall we proceed?84 Sleeping sunbather, at times?87 Buyers final figure90 Spirits in Scandinavia91 New Haven alum92 Breaks down93 Stanford rival, informally95 Job everyone wants96 Sound at a horror film97 Florentine dynasty name100 Cut that out!101 West African vegetable102 Double-handed cooking vessel103 Dieter, at times?106 Fall stopper109 French : merci :: German : ___110 Person getting out of a tub, at times?114 Transpire115 Memo opener116 Detestable117 Something that may be amalgamated118 Manual parts?119 Giants or Titans120 Porcelain purchase, perhaps121 As matters stand DOWN1 Entrance side2 Department3 Current location?4 Brought to tears, possibly5 Times Arrow novelist Martin6 Took off7 Wedded8 Unconventional9 Person moving against traffic?10 Bring on11 Go quietly12 Fully attentive13 Some hand-medowns?14 Snowboard relative15 Polluted Asian lake16 Peridot color17 Vehicle on Mars18 Lifeless24 Goodness me!25 Exudes29 Less humble31 One of four in As I Was Going to St. Ives32 Problematic roomie33 Sal of Rebel Without a Cause36 Lunch spot37 Thing that might decay38 Bearded comic strip bully40 Old cavalrymen42 Illustrations, e.g.43 In need of spicing up, say44 ---. ... .45 News analyst Roberts46 Word on a clapperboard48 Like some measuring units49 Right away50 Its got problems52 Valrys very55 Disburse56 Goes to court?57 Offensive line striker59 Melancholy62 Flood residue63 Ghostly64 The Ipcress File star, 196566 ___ cest moi67 Told stories68 Way too thin73 Not a single thing?75 Blue76 Diminish77 Opposite of smooth79 Take by surprise80 Mud ___ (bottom-dwelling fish)81 Total bore85 Slurpee flavor86 Supermodel Heidi88 Dress in fancy duds89 Long-eared dogs, informally90 Reshape93 Fuerza Democrtica Nicaragense member94 Its played in ballparks96 Viscous substance97 PC platform of old98 Ratify99 The Harlem Shake or the Dougie100 One of the Allman Brothers102 Flick site?104 Expiration notice105 Fundamental part106 Modelists need107 Julio-Claudian dynasty ruler108 Attracted111 Horatian ___112 Hamm of soccer113 Signal that replaced CQD 123 456789 101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31323334 35 3637 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 4546 47 48 4950 5152 53 5455 5657 58 59 60 61 626364 65666768 69 70 71 7273 74 75 7677 78 798081 82 83 848586 878889 90 91 92 9394 95 96 979899 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107108 109 110 111112113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Sunday Crossword Puzzle Crossword puzzle answers are on page D3.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Has your job become extinct? Classied line ads are continued on page D3.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 SER VICES Come Join UsSaturday, April 19th at 11:00amChildrens Easter Egg Hunt & Family PicnicSunday, April 20thEaster Worship Services Sunrise Service 6:45am Traditional Worship 8:00am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:30am (child care provided)Community United Methodist ChurchCorner of College Ave. & 466A, Fruitland Park352-787-1829 christumclsbg@gmail.com4/18 Tenebrae Service at 6:00 pm. 4/20 Easter Sunday Services at 8:30 am & 10:45 am**There will be Childrens Church during 10:45 Service.Christ United Methodist Church1313 Griffin Road Leesburg, FL(352) 365-0622 Services at7am Sunrise Outside 9am & 11amKids Club at 9 a.m. Service Nursery at Both ServicesMessage by Pastor John Blake400 Executive Blvd.www.goodnewschurchcf.org352.315.1695 Come as you are, Contemporary, Bible Teaching Church Join us to celebrate the miraculous resurrection of our Lord. A Celebration of the Resurrection April 13th Palm Sunday Services-8:30am & 10:30am Palm Sunday Cantata-2:00pm April 17th Maundy Thursday Service-7:00pm April 18th Good Friday Tenebrae Service-3:00pm April 20th Easter Sunday Service-9:30pm 204 North Lee Street Leesburg, Florida 34748(352) 787-1981website www.stjames-leesburg.orgSt. JamesEpiscopal ChurchHOLY WEEK SERVICESMAUNDY THURSDAY 10am & 7pm GOOD FRIDAY Liturgy 12:00pmWalking The Way Of The Cross 5:30pmEASTER SUNDAY 7:30am, 9:00am & 11:00am Easter Egg Hunt at 10:00am HOLY WEEK SCHEDULEHoly Thursday, April 17th 7pm-Mass of the Lords Supper 8pm-Altar of Repose Adoration Good Friday, April 18th 3pm-Veneration of the Cross 6pm-Stations of the Cross Holy Saturday, April 19th 12 Noon-Blessing of Easter Food 8:30pm-Easter Vigil Easter Mass Schedule Sunday, April 20th6:30am-Sports Pavilion Sunrise Mass 7:00am-Church 9:00am-Church or Pavilion 11:00am-Church or Pavilion 12:30pm-Church Palm Sunday, April 138:30 First Light (casual, traditional) 9:30 The Crossing (casual, contemporary childrens palm processional 11:00 Traditions (traditional worship) childrens palm processional (Gold Handbell Choir at 8:30 & 11:00; Chancel Choir at 11:00)Maundy Thursday, April 17 7:30 PMTenebraeA Service of Darkness Holy Communion Music led by Chancel Choir and Chamber OrchestraEASTER CELEBRATION8:30 First Light with Chancel Choir, Gold Handbell Choir, Brass, Timpani 9:30 The Crossing (Casual, Contemporary Worship) 11:00 Traditions with Chancel Choir, Gold Handbell Choir, Brass, Timpani Holy Week and Easter Services Bethany Lutheran Church, LCMS 352-787-7275Palm Sunday, April 13thWorship Services, 8am and 10:30am After 10:30 Service-a special presentation by Rev. Paul Wheelhouse on A Journey Through the Holy LandMaundy Thursday, April 17thWorship with Holy Communion, 3pmGood Friday, April 18thWorship Service, 3pmEaster Sunday, April 20thFestival Service with Holy Communion, 8am & 10:30am Join us for Holy Week at South LakePalm Sunday, April 13th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalMaundy Thursday, April 17th7:00 pm Communion ServiceEaster Sunday, April 20th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalSouth Lake Presbyterian Church131 Chestnut Street Clermont, Fl 34711 April 13 Palm Sunday 8 am & 11 am April 17 Maundy Thursday 8:15 am & 7:00 pm April 18 Good Friday Tenebrae Worship Service 7:00 pm April 19 Easter Vigil 7:00 pm April 20 EASTER SUNDAY Sunrise Service (with communion) 6:30 am Festival Services (with communion) 8 am & 11 am Easter Breakfast (at Christian Life Center) at 9:30 am Childrens Easter Egg Hunt at 10 am352-589-5433

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2 Black A M I N D E T N A S B C C B A T O N S A N T O T W I C E L A U D A T O R Y S U B S I S T E N C E O U T E R M O S T O R A T I E R T H E C L O C K C O O C A D E N T K I N E R K F C D A N L S M O K E N O R S E F A D E R T H E W A T E R E A R N S O M E N S G E A R A X E D T A O L O O F A S M R P I B B O V I T Z S T A R D U S T T O E L O O P I K E S E A T B E L T L O A T E E N A G E R V E B E D S T R A W E F T S I L V E R S T I M E T I M E S T A B S A L L D A Y S E P T E T B A H R I P A A I R S P R I O R Y O U I N L A M B A S T E R U S S O S N O O K P O L I O A M I R T U E T O R O S S A C R A L D O C B A R R O O M S A P O D I N E D R I V E N M A D D I C K A N D J A N E I S S U E D A T E A N G E L I L L E R T E T E S N O D B O I S E N O S E S Sunday crossword puzzle is on page C6. Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 4 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.5 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014

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Pay Me My Money Down Traditional Georgia Sea Island stevedores song Y ears ago, Fram au tomotive prod ucts developed an extremely effective marketing campaign for its oil lters. The commercial pictured a distraught motorist having his engine re placed, ostensibly be cause he didnt change his oil and lter reg ularly. The mechanic holds up a new oil lter and tells the customer: You can pay me now, or pay me later. Utilizing traditional and Roth IRAs is some what analogous: You can pay Uncle Sam to day, or pay him down the road. With a traditional or back end IRA, one doesnt pay taxes un til such time as with drawals (called distri butions) are made. But when you do indeed withdraw some or all of your money, you pay taxes (at your tax rate that year) on the to tal amount withdrawn from the IRA, includ ing contributions and growth. G LD STANDARDTHE IN LAKE COUNTY FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTTHE JOINT COMMISSIONS GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The certication award recognizes Florida Hospital Waterman Joint Replacement Centers dedication to The Joint Commissions state-of-the-art standards. Visit FHWatermanOrtho.com for more information. E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 Business scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com GOOGLE GLASS: Users get mostly warm response / E3 www.dailycommercial.com MARGARET MCDOWELL GUEST COLUMNIST Pay me now or later: traditional vs. Roth IRAs RYAN FAUGHNDER Los Angeles Times Nick Stepka knew what gift would make his daughters third birthday a hit, and it wasnt a toy or doll. He gave her a tablet not a sleek new iPad or a hand-me-down Sam sung, but one specical ly designed and market ed for little ones. It even came with a purple pro tective casing and load ed with kids applica tions and games. Her eyes lit up when she opened it, said Stepka, 34, a Shakopee, Minn., father of three. Everything else got put to the side. Thats exactly what tablet makers and com panies that create chil drens entertainment were hoping for. Stepkas household is part of a growing group of consumers for whom traditional childrens toys and games are not enough. In the United States, the percentage of kids ages 8 and un der using mobile devic es has almost doubled in the past two years, according to a report by San Francisco nonprot Common Sense Media. Children are also spending more time on these devices 15 min utes a day on average last year, up from ve minutes in 2011. Mean while, kids use of tra ditional screen-based entertainment, as in Tablets, apps for children are on the rise SEE APPS | E2 SEE MCDOWELL | E2 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T he city of Lee sburg is seek ing a foreign trade zone designation, and city and county ofcials say local busi nesses already are interested in the zones ability to make im porting and exporting cheaper and easier. A foreign trade zone allows, delayed or reduced duty pay ments on foreign merchandise, as well as other savings, ac cording to the website enforce ment.trade.gov. The designation allows busi nesses to pay no duties on im ported goods that are later re-exported, defer duties on goods entering the U.S. mar ket and pay no duties on waste, scrap, rejected or defective parts. The designation also re quires customers to pay just one customs entry per week in stead of doing it multiple t imes during the week. Leo Treggi, the Leesburg In ternational Airport Manager, said the Foreign Trade Zone for Leesburg would be authorized to serve all of Lake County. He said the main sites in the zone right now are Leesburg Interna tional Airport and the Leesburg Industrial Technology Park, but they can assign other proper ties in the county to the zone as well. Treggi said the zone could be a good economic development tool, attracting manufacturers and businesses who import and export, which at least one at the airport currently does. So, the motivator here is denitely attracting more busi ness and creating more jobs for the area, Treggi said. He added that existing com panies have already shown in terest in using the zone, which could help them expand. Treggi said the airport will operate the zone. There are no plans to add staff or facilities at the airport but, as it grows they could add staff in the future. Adam Sumner, manager of Lake Countys Economic Devel opment and Tourism Depart ment, said businesses across the county have shown interest LEESBURG Potential foreign trade zone could benefit business BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Airport Manager Leo Treggi poses for a photo at the Leesburg International Airport in Leesburg on Wednesday. The city is seeking a Foreign Trade Zone designation. In this economy, its a difficult national economy out there, and local governments like the city of Leesburg, Lake County, we need to do everything that we can that will make the area more advantageous for businesses coming in. Having a foreign trade zone is just another tool that we can use to become attractive for businesses. Robert Sargent, public information ofcer for the city of Leesburg HEATHER SOMERVILLE San Jose Mercury News Its getting easier for con sumers to buy and spend bitcoin, the cybercurrency that has captured much of the tech world. With each passing month, entrepreneurs are rolling out new technol ogy for consumers to buy and store bitcoin, shop on line with the virtual curren cy and send it to friends. Last week, a bitcoin ATM was unveiled in Mountain View, Calif. put in a few hundred bucks, out comes a bitcoin. And more retail ers from consumer elec tronics to coffee roasters and pizza delivery are accepting bitcoin, making it e asier for consumers to choose the Internet curren cy over dollars. Its all about to change over the next 12 to 24 months, said Marshall Hayner, a San Francis co entrepreneur who this month will launch bitcoin app QuickCoin. We are go ing to see all kinds of peo ple adopt it. Its going to power transactions on the Internet. Bitcoin is a cybercur rency and payments net work created in 2009 by a mathematical formula as an alternative to banks and government-controlled currency systems. Bitcoins are added one at a time to the network by computer programmers around the world, and most bitcoins are bought and traded on global Internet exchanges. The San Francisco Bay Area bitcoin community is lled with entrepreneurs and investors pouring mil lions of dollars into their projects. But for the rest of us, still buying with cash and plastic, bitcoin is a bit of a mystery. Youve got people out there who are software engi neers who dont understand it, said Vinny Lingham, co-founder of Gyft, a San Francisco digital gift card app that accepts bitcoin. Bitcoin cybercurrency gets easier for consumers to buy, spend GARY REYES / MCT Hami Oerner and Itzik Lerner, right, learn how to use a new bitcoin ATM machine at Hacker Dojo in Mountain View, Calif. SEE TRADE | E4 SEE BITCOIN | E4

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 Call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Wednesday April 16th, at 11:00 amComfort Suites 1 Palm Reading 1721 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 917 S. US HWY 27 Minneola, FL352.787.7075NOW$1050%2 LocationsREG$20 televisions, video games and computers, has de clined, the group said. Thats the reason Jim Mitchell started Fuhu Inc., an E l Segundo, Calif., company that makes tablets for con sumers ages 3 to 14. We were tired of giv ing our kids the iPad when it rst came out, and there really wasnt anything else, he said. They wanted to play with all the games on the iPad, and it would come back all smudged, or if they dropped it, for heavens sakes, it would shatter. Fuhu makes Nabi tab lets, which major retail ers sell for between $100 and $300. The compa ny posted $2 00 million in sales last year, and executives are betting that demand from chil dren and parents will continue for high-pow ered devices that sport kid-friendly content and thick plastic bum pers to prevent damage. Kids can custom ize the machines with stickers featuring lm and TV characters, as well as accessories such as alphabet letters that attach to the tablet. They can use the tablets to watch TV shows and movies, play games and explore the Web, but only the features and sites that their parents approve. Competition in the eld of childrens tab lets is growing. Companies such as LeapFrog Enterprises Inc. in Emeryville, Ca lif.; Toys R Us Inc., based in Wayne, N.J.; and tech giant Samsung Elec tronics Co. have tried to market devices to youngsters. Even tradi tional toy makers such as El Segundos Mattel Inc. have entered the app industry. Hollywood has tak en notice too. Walt Dis ney Co., DreamWorks Animation and Viacom Inc.s Nickelodeon are putting out tablet and mobile apps. Education-focused cable channel Baby FirstTV, which is car ried in 40 million U.S. homes, has unleashed 27 apps aimed at young children. Sharon Rech ter, co-founder and ex ecutive vice president of BabyFirstTV, said she expects the reach of her app business to match her traditional TV busi ness in the next two years. Parents are constant ly looking for good edu cational content, she said. Kids apps and devices are denitely here to stay, and theyre going to grow. Kids can learn from using a tab let, and they have fun with it. Entertainment com panies and tablet mak ers are teaming up. For instance, BabyFirst has co-developed a series called Albert & Junior specically for use on Fuhus tablets. Fuhu also has made deals with Disney and Nickelodeon for spe cial-edition tablets. And the company is taking the technology and en tertainment relation ship further with its next device, the Dream Tab, which it built with DreamWorks Anima tion. The $269 DreamTab, which runs on Google Inc.s Android operating system, will be released in some stores this month before a wider retail launch in June. APPS FROM PAGE E1 FRANCINE ORR / MCT Jim Mitchell, chief executive of Fuhu, shows off a DreamTab tablet, which his El Segundo, Calif., company built with DreamWorks Animation. With a Roth or front end IRA, you pay in come tax now on con tributions, just as you would on other in come, and never pay taxes again on these funds, assuming you have held the Roth IRA account for a period of no less than ve years and you have reached the age of 59. This is one of the ad vantages of contrib uting to a Roth IRA: Taxes are likely to in crease, so you are pay ing taxes today at a lesser rate. While in tended for retirement use, you may withdraw your contributions to a Roth account both penaltyand tax-free at any time. However, any growth on the ac count is both penalized and taxed if you do not meet the two require ments above. Roth IRAs are an at tractive retirement funding option for younger earners who plan on a growing in come. The Roth allows you to lock in todays income tax rates and your tax bracket. Most of us would rather pay taxes on our Roth con tributions when were in a 20-percent tax bracket than pay when we enter the 35-percent tax bracket. Investing in a tradi tional IRA will cause you to be taxed at a probable higher rate later on and on the growth accumulated in your account. Since its introduction in 1997, the Roth IRA has been extremely popular for just this reason. Another reason in vestors have been drawn to a Roth IRA is that there is no re quired minimum dis tribution (RMD) by the account owner. Howev er, many people do not realize that this bene t does not transfer to beneciaries, only the owner. President Obama has suggested imposing the annual RMD on Roth IRA accounts as well as traditional IRAs, as part of his 2015 scal budget. This would be a game-changer for re tirement planning and would make Roth IRAs less desirable for many investors. Margaret R. McDowell, a syn dicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Ar bor Wealth Management LLC, a fee-only registered invest ment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 Roth IRAs are an attractive retirement funding option for younger earners who plan on a growing income. The Roth allows you to lock in todays income tax rates and your tax bracket. Most of us would rather pay taxes on our Roth contributions when were in a 20-percent tax bracket than pay when we enter the 35-percent tax bracket.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 438 E Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, Fl 32778 352-343-8080 801 S. Eustis St, Eustis, Fl 32726 352-357-7575 10601 US Hwy 441 Unit A-6, Leesburg, Fl 34788 352-314-0435 931 Central Ave, Umatilla, Fl 32784 352-669-3747 18846A US Hwy 441 Mount Dora, FL 32757 352-383-2105 1328 W. North Blvd., Leesburg, Fl 34788 352-787-3273 208 S. Hwy 27/441, Lady Lake, FL 32157 352-750-3669 522B B Hwy 27/441, The Villages, FL 32159 352-259-5708 17860 SE 109th Ave., Summerfield, FL 34491 352-347-6736 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for paym ent for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the a dvertisement for treatment. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hr Dr. Vaziri & StaffShoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLicense# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFinancing Available FREEExam & X-RaysMust present ad$190valueNEW PATIENTS BRIAN VAN DER BRUG / MCT JR Curley uses his Google Glass at the Manhattan Beach Pier, Calif. JESSICA GUYNN Los Angeles Times SAN FRANCISCO At 6 feet 4 inches, J.R. Curley is used to getting noticed. Just not like this. Ever since he got a pair of Google Glass in November, he has been turning heads at the grocery store, in restaurants, on the street, even at Disneyland. People approach him all the time to ask about his head-mounted, In ternet-connected computer, which is worn like a pair of glasses. He spends so much time letting them try on Glass that his wife has begun referring to herself as the Glass bystander. For all the controversy Glass has generated for its ability to take pic tures or lm video with a simple ges ture or voice command, Curley says the attention Glass gets on the streets of Los Angeles has been positive. Not once has he been asked to take off Glass in an establishment and no one has expressed discomfort that he might be taking photographs of them or video recording them, he said. In fact, hes the one who has had to get accustomed to people whip ping out their smartphones and tak ing pictures of him without rst ask ing permission. As with any new technology, the more people have it, the more it gen erates a broad understanding, said Curley, 41, a design studio director of an accounting rm who lives in Man hattan Beach, Calif. Curley and dozens of others who are early testers of the device report little or no backlash from the public. In fact, they say a series of high-pro le yet isolated incidents have given Glass an unfair rap. Glass users have been tossed from movie theaters. The device has been banned in bars, restaurants and casi nos. A San Diego woman was pulled over for driving with Glass, and a few states are considering banning driv ers from using Glass out of concern that the small screen will distract them on the road. One of the most notorious inci dents took place in a San Francisco bar in February when social media consultant Sarah Slocum said she was attacked for wearing Glass. Despite allegations from bar patrons, Slocum denied surreptitiously recording any one there. But court records show that in 2012 her neighbors got a restrain ing order against her for crouching outside their open window and re cording them with her smartphone. All of which has raised the ques tion: Is Glass really about to strip away the last shreds of privacy, as some people suggest? Glass users chalk up any anxiety to a natural fear of the unknown. They say that fear will subside when the technology is in more hands and the social norms have been sussed out. Besides, they say, there are far less expensive and more effective ways to covertly record someone than wear ing a computer on your face. Andrew Barash, 33, a software de veloper with OpenTable who lives in Marin County, Calif., says he has yet to have a negative encounter while wearing Glass. People who run into him in store aisles occasionally joke with him: Am I being recorded? I say, Yes, theres a security camera right over there, Barash said. Mostly, he said, people are excited to see it and try it. Once they see it in person and how it works, it general ly dissipates any concerns about re cording. Google is betting that Glass the most hotly anticipated technology since the iPhone and the iPad will lead a revolution in wearable devices that will change how people interact with technology and one another. But rst it has to win over the public. Curley is just the kind of post er child Google wants for Glass. He wears it between six and eight hours a day to send text messages to his wife, take photographs and videos of his two daughters, and look up direc tions. He even taught his 3-year-old to take pictures with it. When his Glass broke and he was without it for a few days, he could not bear to pull the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 out of his pocket. I cant imagine my life without it, he said of Glass. Even with those kinds of testimo nials, Google has been rolling out the device slowly and cautiously. Google Glass users get mostly warm reception

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 in the zone and ap proached his ofce. In economic devel opment, its all about building your tool kit, as we call it, and a for eign trade zone is a tre mendous asset to have in that tool kit, Sumner said. Sumner said trade zones historically lower the cost of doing busi ness for companies that import and export. We truly believe its a very valuable asset to our economic devel opment plan for the whole county, Sumner said. Robert Sargent, pub lic information ofcer for the city of Leesburg, said Leesburg Interna tional Airport is a gen eral purpose airport but is also an economic en gine. You dont have to be in the aviation business to benet from the air port, and the Foreign Trade Zone is a good example of that, Sar gent said. Sargent said the air port does a fair amount of shipping, and he hoped the zone would benet business al ready here and help at tract more. In this economy, its a difcult national economy out there, and local governments like the city of Leesburg, Lake County, we need to do everything that we can that will make the area more advan tageous for business es coming in, Sargent said. Having a foreign trade zone is just an other tool that we can use to become attrac tive for businesses. He added the Cus toms ofce at the inter national airport is key to making Leesburg el igible for the Foreign Trade Zone status. Sargent said the city applied for the foreign trade zone in Novem ber 2013. It has been docketed and waiting on public comment un til May 27. Sometime around June 10, the city can respond to public concern or questions. After that, the city should be qualied to get nal approval for the zone and the city expects to be approved barring any major con cerns raised, Sargent said. There are nearby For eign Trade Zones in Or lando, Daytona Beach, Sanford, Tampa, St. Pe tersburg and Port Ca naveral, according to enforcement.trade.gov. When its Heart Disease It Makes A Difference Where You Start. ~ Barry Weinstock, MD, FACC MD: Yale Medical School Fellowship Trained: Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles Board Certified www.FLHeartCenter.com 511 Medical Plaza Dr., Suite 101, Leesburg | 352-728-6808 1560 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages | 352-750-5000 Most Insurances Accepted Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP Dr. Weinstock has more than 25 years of experience in interventions for cardiac and peripheral disease, pacemaker implantation and treatment of heart attacks. He has joined our expert team to strengthen our fight against heart disease, and is accepting new patients. Start where renowned cardiac and peripheral vascular disease specialists work together with one focus the best possible outcomes for their patients.Start here. Experience Our Integrity and Compassionate CareMULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP Where The Good Times Roll Since 1932DINNER SPECIALS Mon. Meatloaf Dinner $9.95 Tue. 50 Wings Wed. $3.00 Off All Steaks $6 Burgers All Day Thur. $3.00 Off Crab Cakes Fri. Fish Fry Dinner $12.95 or All You Can Eat $16.95 Sat. Free Dessert with any Steak Dinner Sun. 50 Wings & $6 Burgers DRINK SPECIALS Mon. $5 Captain Morgan Monday Tue. 2-4-1 Domestic Drafts $3 Pinnacle Flavors Vodka Wed. $5 Whisky Wed. You Name It Thur. $6 Ciroc, Ketel One Fri. 2-4-1 Domestic Drafts $6 Crown Royal & Grey Goose Sat. $6 Ci-Rockin (Ciroc) Saturday Sun. Service Industry $3 Wells, $4 Calls Wed. Karaoke & Country Music 6pm-close Thur. Live DJ, Ladies Drink 2-4-1 8pm-close Fri. Live Music 6pm-11pm Sat. Country Music 6pm-9pm, Karaoke 9-closeWEEKDAY SPECIALS ALL DAY & NIGHT Quality Inn Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. TRADE FROM PAGE E1 Its far too complicated out there for the average consumer to under stand. But that will change. Cary Peters is hoping to uncom plicate bitcoin for consumers with the ATM he unveiled at Hacker Dojo, a nonprot shared tech space in Mountain View. His is the rst bit coin ATM in California, and anyone can use it by setting up an account with a phone number, ID, and face and palm scan, which is used to run a background check to rule out po tential fraud. Regulation has to be implement ed, Peters said, a position rarely heard in the libertarian bitcoin com munity, but one that experts say is necessary to gain the trust of con sumers. After about ve minutes, the machine sends a text message that the user can start buying and selling bitcoins. Many bitcoin websites take about four or more days for transac tions, and that delay doesnt work for everyone. Something you decide you want to do today you may not want to do in four days, said Hami Lerner, a Sunnyvale, Calif., resident who works in tech and visited the ATM on Tues day. Bitcoin valuation can uctuate wildly on any day; in February, it fell more than 85 percent in less than two hours. Recently valuation has ranged between about $450 and $500, about half its all-time high of more than $1,200 in November. After youve bought your bitcoins, you move them to a bitcoin wal let, an app that manages the curren cy, where you can hold onto them or spend them. Overstock.com was the rst major online retailer to start accepting bitcoin in January. Only about 1 percent of consumers are buying with bitcoin, but revenue from bitcoin purchases is expected to reach $15 million this year, exceeding company expectations by about $10 million, said Jonathan Johnson, vice chairman of the board of directors for Overstock.com. In all disrup tive technology, theres early adopt ers and more mainstream adopters, Johnson said. I remember thinking in the early s I needed to gure out what this Google thing is. Now ev eryone walks around with the Inter net in their hip pocket or their purse. Were at the early adopters stage. Other retailers accepting bitcoin: consumer electronics retailer Tiger Direct, handmade goods seller Etsy, online gaming company Zynga and electric car company Tesla. BITCOIN FROM PAGE E1 ADDING BITCOIN TO YOUR WALLET: WHERE TO BUY: Bitcoin ATM (Mountain View, Calif.); online exchanges (Coin base, Bitstamp, CoinCafe, BitQuick) WHAT IT COSTS: In the last week, the price of one bitcoin has ranged from $460 to $480 WHERE TO SPEND: Overstock.com, Pizza for Coins, TigerDirect, Etsy, Wordpress, Zynga, Tesla, OkCupid, Reddit, Gyft and the Sacramento Kings. BITCOIN FOR A CAUSE: Hack Cancer, a group of philanthropic young profes sionals in San Francisco, has held bit coin fundraisers for cancer research, and has several more bitcoin events planned this year. Bitcoin Not Bombs, an activist organization to help so cial entrepreneurs start using the vir tual currency, has used bitcoin to buy sweatshirts for homeless people in San Francisco.

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Sunday, April 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Todays Highlight in His tory : On April 13, 1964, Sid ney Poitier became the rst black performer in a lead ing role to win an Academy Award for his performance in Lilies of the Field. (Pa tricia Neal was named best actress for Hud; best pic ture went to Tom Jones.) On this date : In 1613 Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, was captured by English Capt. Samuel Argall in the Virginia Colony and held in exchange for English prisoners and sto len weapons. (During a year long captivity, Pocahontas converted to Christianity and ultimately opted to stay with the English. ) In 1742, Handels Mes siah had its rst public per formance in Dublin, Ireland. In 1743 the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, was born in Shad well in the Virginia Colony. In 1861, at the start of the Civil War, Fort Sumter in South Carolina fell to Con federate forces. In 1912 the Royal Flying Corps, a predecessor of Brit ains Royal Air Force, was created. In 1943 President Frank lin D. Roosevelt dedicat ed the Jefferson Memori al in Washington, D.C., on the 200th anniversary of the third American presi dents birth. Radio Berlin an nounced the discovery of thousands of graves of mas sacred Polish ofcers in Rus sias Katyn Forest; the Nazis blamed the killings on the Soviets, who in turn blamed the Nazis. (Post-Soviet Rus sia has acknowledged the massacre was carried out by Josef Stalins secret police.) In 1958 Van Cliburn of the United States won the rst International Tchaikovsky Competition for piano in Mos cow; Russian Valery Klimov won the violin competition. In 1970 Apollo 13, fourfths of the way to the moon, was crippled when a tank containing liquid oxygen burst. (The astronauts man aged to return safely.) In 1974 NASA launched Westar 1, Americas rst commercial communications satellite, for Western Union. In 1986 Pope John Paul II visited the Great Synagogue of Rome in the rst record ed papal visit of its kind to a Jewish house of worship. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, April 13, 2014: This year you have won derful ideas only, before you can share them, oth ers seem to move on. You might want to allow others to give you feedback soon er. How you handle a per sonal matter could change as a result. If you are sin gle, this summer could prove to be very exciting, as you are in a period when you are likely to meet some one important to your life history. Fall and winter will carry the same theme. If you are attached, the two of you act like newfound lovers this summer. LIBRA looks at life very differently from how you do. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Let a loved one take the lead. You might have a sense that a choice seems to be off, but let it be. The other party needs to see what will happen. You are likely to be in the mood to snooze and overindulge a little. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could be so easy going that you might miss a scheduled get-together. A friend could be quite dis concerted when you dont show up. Make a phone call quickly, and adjust your plans. Consider making a caring gesture toward this person. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your playful spirit might emerge, which will allow for great fun and interpersonal relating. You actually could become childlike and ex pressive. You have the abil ity to pull the wool over a parents or older relatives eyes. Be careful. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Invite several friends over for an early dinner. You could be taken aback by someones response. Let it go, as nearly everyone has been under unusual pres sure lately. Be careful when dealing with a loved one at a distance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Dont worry about making the rst move just do it. Someone you care about can be quite slack when it comes to money. Be careful to keep your funds separate if you decide to let this rela tionship evolve into some thing more. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be more aware of someone elses spending needs as well his or her ten dency to take risks. In any case, make today your treat, and invite several friends to brunch or a movie. You will note a difference in how you feel when you are with your pals. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be a lot more content than you have been in a while. Try to better un derstand a friend and gure out what is getting to him or her. Your sensitivity will help this person understand his or her limits within a rela tionship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Slow down. You often jump to conclusions based on what you would do in the same situation. Remain sensitive to a loved one who adores you. Explain that you need some time to yourself. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Play it low-key with a personal matter. Go off and enjoy your friends, wherever they might be. You could end up at several dif ferent events as a result. You could make a big dif ference and help someone feel comfortable with himor herself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) A must-show event or family happening could dene your day. Re main sensitive to a sibling or close person in your life. Make time for this person, and you might gain a great er sense of levity around him or her. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Make a call to a friend at a distance that you have been putting off. Under stand what is going on with this person before you de cide to visit. You could be surprised by what you hear. Decide whether it is wise to get together right now. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: Im in a tricky situation. My boy friend of four years, Ian, and I took a break from our relationship for two months because he was scared hed miss out on the single life. We started hanging out again soon after, and ev erything fell into place. We were talking re cently, and he men tioned that hes plan ning to move across the country to San Francis co to be near his fami ly. He made it plain he wants to live on the West Coast forever. I am close to my family closer than Ian is to his. Were both 24, and while were not going to get engaged anytime soon, Im not sure what to do. We love each oth er, but the geography is causing so many issues. Please advise. NEW YORK GIRL DEAR N.Y. GIRL: Its good that you and Ian arent planning on becoming engaged anytime soon, because you have some serious thinking to do. If you plan on having a family and want your parents to be close to their grandchildren, it would be better for you to nd another boy friend. Im advising you and Ian to take anoth er break this time for YOUR benet to see which is more import ant to you: the man or the location. DEAR ABBY: This issue with my wife may seem trivial, but its making me crazy. I like to cook; she doesnt. When I cook its an expression of love, and our family sits down together to enjoy the meal. We dont watch TV and we dont answer the phone. Sounds ideal, wouldnt you say? The problem is, after I put the food on the ta ble, my wife gets up and starts pulling other food from the fridge to mi crowave. Or shell start making a salad. These last-minute ad ditions make me furi ous. She knows it, but wont stop. Either she doesnt want the left over to go bad or she thinks something is missing from the ta ble. I say she should pre pare these additions while Im making din ner so everything will be on the table at the same time, or else forget it. What do you think? STEAMING IN THE KITCHEN IN TEXAS DEAR STEAMING: Is the layout of your kitchen conducive to tandem cooking? If its not, that may be why your wife goes in there after youre no longer using it. Do you tell your wife what you will be preparing for dinner and ask if there is anything else she wants included? That may prompt her to think ahead so she wouldnt have to get up and leave the table. If the answer to my questions is yes, then there may be something going on in your rela tionship for which shes trying to punish you. DEAR ABBY: My daugh ter goes to a preschool in a church where we are not members. Pas tor Joe is very involved with the classes, often chatting with the par ents and calling them by their rst names. I have seen him around town vari ous times, but Im nev er sure how to address him. I feel strange call ing him Pastor since he isnt my minister. On the other hand, calling him Joe doesnt quite seem right either. How should a man of the cloth be greet ed on the street? FEEL ING AWKWARD IN JAMES TOWN, N.Y. DEAR FEELING AWKWARD: I think youre asking the wrong person. Why not ask HIM how hed like to be addressed? I remem ber a delightful priest in Chicago, who when meeting people would immediately say, Call me John. I used to re fer to him as Father CallMe-John. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Boyfriend heading west may cause girlfriend to move on JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, April 13, 2014 JOAN VERDON The Record Creating a hit toy is like trying to catch light ning. Marty Abrams has done it at least ve times over the past 50 years. Now, at age 71, he is hoping to do it again. Abrams, who is in the midst of launch ing a new type of soft plush toy, called AniMei, which comes to life with sounds and lights, is an example of a small toy manufacturer who needs the Wayne, N.J.based retail chain, Toys R Us, to continue to ex ist. Abrams calls Toys R Us a crucial spring board for ideas from smaller companies. Abrams, chief execu tive of I-Star Entertain ment in Great N eck, N.Y., has seen the toy world change dramat ically since the 1950s, when his father found ed the now-defunct Mego Toy Co. Abrams, as a young man in the 1960s, helped Mego give birth to the action-g ure genre with a line of superheroes. Mego also brought the rst Nintendo games to this country in the form of the Mego Ninten do Timeout games credit-card-sized LCD games. In addition, Abrams played a role in the launch of crafts toy Magna Doodle, Micro nauts action gures and the 1990s hit Sky Danc ers ying dolls. Abrams says all of his hot toys had one thing in common the rest of the toy industry was cold to them originally. His latest launch, AniMei, seems to be fol lowing that pattern. The toys, which Abrams de scribed as huggable, animated friends that kids can take to bed with them, use an algo rithm that syncs lights and sounds to make a doll or pillow appear to wake up and talk. Abrams plans to have the rst U.S. Ani-Mei products in Toys R Us and other retailers this summer. Abrams spoke with The Record about taking a toy from idea to launch, and why toy in ventors and manufac turers need Toys R Us to survive. (Interview edit ed and condensed.) Q: How was Ani-Mei born? A: A lady walked in with what we call a bread board a work ing piece of what AniMei does. I looked at it and instantly saw what I wanted to do with it. For me, when the match is lit and the dynamites in the room, I dont blow the match out. I just light the dynamite. The woman who de veloped this had been turned down by every body in the toy indus try not once but twice. They were clueless what to do with it. Q: What was it you in stantly wanted to do with it? A: I said I had to go get every (childrens car toon and character) li cense there ever was in the world. It creates so much emotion and such warm and fuzzy feelings, and it goes across a wide range of ages and different li censes. When it lights up, and theres nothing hard in there and the eyes come alive and the language or singing is absolutely in sync with the moving of the lips, its magical for the child. Q: Youve said that all your toy hits got a cold response from the in dustry at rst. Why is that? A: When its new and you dont quite get it, you pull back. Every body talks about think ing outside the box, but when you think outside the box, the territory becomes very tough to navigate. There are no trailblazers. The clos est thing to a trailblaz er today is Toys R Us because they buy so much across the board. Theyve got 50,000 SKUs (stock-keeping units or different toys) while everyone else has 2,000. The problem is they dont buy enough to make it happen. So the risk is always on the new guy coming up with the product. Q: You talk about learning to enjoy the journey of rejection. Whats that? A: Thats where the kick is when ev erybody says no, no, no and then the toy comes out and its yes, yes, yes. You saw that happen with Cabbage Patch (dolls). Every body turned Sky Danc ers down. Everybody turned this Ani-Mei down. Q: What about some one stealing the idea or copying it? A: Ive locked it up so tight, nobody can steal this. I have non-disclo sures from all the com panies in America who saw it. And we have is sued patents. I also have the licenses. Be tween the non-disclo sures, the patents, and the licenses were pretty well positioned. Q: Compared with when you rst start ed working in toys, how hard is it to sell toys to day in terms of get ting them into stores? A: Much more dif cult. Those days, there were so many more re tailers. Just in New York you had Alexanders, Mays, Times Square stores, Caldor. You had a hundred more re tailers. Those 100 re tailers are now basical ly Wal-Mart. So if you dont sell Wal-Mart, youre in big trouble. Q: Do you think the U.S. can continue to support a specialty toy chain like Toys R Us? A: Let me rephrase that. I think the toy in dustry has to support a specialty toy chain like Toys R Us, because if they dont, how are they going to launch products? Where are they going to be able to sell the unique prod ucts that can start off at Toys R Us and then roll out to a major distribu tion? There are millions rooting for this compa ny. It is essential that it survive and work and be protable. But they have to get their house in order. If (the new management) under stands what needs to be done and works with their marketing group and the industry, they can be successful. For toy inventor, big business gives small ideas a boost KEVIN R. WEXLER / MCT I-Star Entertainment CEO Marty Abrams and friends pose for a portrait at the International Toy Fair in New York in February. Abrams says all of his hot toys had one thing in common the rest of the toy industry was cold to them originally. His latest launch, Ani-Mei, seems to be following that pattern. The toys, which Abrams described as huggable, animated friends that kids can take to bed with them, use an algorithm that syncs lights and sounds to make a doll or pillow appear to wake up and talk. 352.530.2256803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionCall today to schedule your appointmentThe Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial.

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CONVERSION CHART (client will ll) 2 TV Week April 13 19, 2014 FEATURE STORY Michael C. Hall surveys climate change Dangerously By Jay Bobbin Zap2itWhen Dexter ended, Michael C. Hall wanted a new challenge ... and found one that took him not only far away from that series but also from home. The actor went to Bangladesh as one of the celebrity correspondents for Years of Living Dangerously, a Showtime documentary miniseries offering on-location explorations of the impact of climate change around the world. Starting a weekly fourSunday run April 13, the program also enlists Harrison Ford, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Matt Damon, Don Cheadle, Jessica Alba, Ian Somerhalder, Olivia Munn, America Ferrera and journalist Lesley Stahl as reporters. Schwarzenegger is an executive producer of the miniseries as well, as are filmmaker James Cameron and entertainment impresario Jerry Weintraub (Behind the Candelabra). Drought, carbon emissions and the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy are among the topics within the larger subject, also seen being covered by author and New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, political commentator and MSNBC host Chris Hayes, and others. Michael C. Hall is among the celebrity correspondents in Years of Living Dangerously, premiering Sunday on Showtime. 2 x 3.5 ad Captain Mike's Halls social concerns are demonstrated by his ties to such organizations as the Somalia Aid Societys Feed the People initiative and the Waterkeeper Alliance. He says his Years of Living Dangerously involvement started with Showtime contacting me about the project and letting me know a couple of slots that were available for correspondents. One of the two was Bangladesh, and I saw that it coincided with the (end of the) work on Dexter. I think theres a growing collective awareness surrounding this issue, Hall notes, but I also jumped at the chance to kind of reboot my own system when the series ended." Comcast Marion Comcast Lake Co.Brighthouse Cable Direct TVFL. Cable Astatula / Tavares / LeesburgFL. Cable Astor / PiersonHawthorne Sunview CablevisionFriendship Cable Lake Co. F riendship Cable Sumter Co.Cable Development Corp.VCR Plus CodesTVWEEKCONVERSION CHARTTVWEEKCONVERSION CHART