Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Sponsored by Fran Haasch Law Group lawfran.com $ EUSTIS TOPS MOUNT DORA, SPORTS B1 LEGISLATURE: Proposal would have all textbooks approved by School Board A3 FAIR: One last day to see the sights, ride the rides A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, April 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 102 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D2 DIVERSIONS C7 FAITH C1 LEGALS D2 BUSINESS C3 NATION A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A5 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 83 / 63 Mostly sunny 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com F acing tough budget deci sions ahead, several Lake County commissioners said they are left with two op tions: raise taxes or cut ser vices. There has not been a tax in crease in the last ve years, county ofcials said. We knew this day was going to come and we have cut and cut and there is nowhere else, County Commissioner Welton Cadwell said. We are in a posi tion where we have to provide the basic services. We dont want public safety to suffer, so some tough decisions are going to have to be made. Cadwell said the countys past practice of tapping into reserves to balance the budget is not a vi able option anymore. The only other way is to cre ate additional revenues, he said. The countys budget has a $7 million shortfall because of de clining property values and an estimated $3 million increase to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce budget to replace aging vehicles and for pay raises for deputies whose salaries are falling behind other jurisdictions, county of cials said. In order to maintain 7 percent in reserves, that shortfall must be met, according to Stephen Koontz, budget director. Koontz said there could be an effect on any of the services the county provides, includ ing parks and libraries, depen dent on what the commission decides. In estimating the s cal year 2013-14 budget, Koontz said he has already taken into account a 3 percent increase in property values. I dont feel (property values) are going to be up more than 3 percent, he said of the values, which will be released on June 1. Whats more, Lake Emergency Medical Services is facing cuts to service beginning in October if the organization has to chop an additional $750,000 to balance its budget for scal year 2015. Meanwhile, county ofcials MIKE SCHNEIDER Associated Press ORLANDO A man who authorities say drove an SUV that crashed into anoth er vehicle, sending it spinning into a day care center where a girl was killed and 14 peo ple were injured, was ordered Friday to stay in jail until a judge can determine whether he is a ight risk. Robert Corchado, 28, will be held in jail until at least Monday when a judge will hear argu ments on whether he can be released on bail, Circuit Judge Jerry Brew er said during a rst ap pearance hearing. Bail was initial ly set for $100,000, but a pros ecutor told the judge that Corchado was a ight risk and that he should be held without bond. I have a witness here, a trooper, who can testify that he is a ight risk, prosecu tor Austin Price said. He has it on good au thority that this defen dant, is planning, once he posts bond, to leave the country. Officials: Taxes may be needed to fill budget gaps PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ambulances await repairs in the garage of the Lake Emergency Medical Services support services in Leesburg on Thursday. IN NEED OF SERVICE A worker performs maintenance on a Lake EMS ambulance. County leaders are concerned about a $7 million budget shortfall that could affect services. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com The Lake County Sher iffs Ofce reported Fri day afternoon they have identied a man seen at an Ocoee Walmart with a woman whose body was found two days lat er in Clermont. The man appeared to be walking with Cheri Amber Houston, 28, at the store at 6:15 p.m. on April 2. Lt. John Herrell, sher iffs spokesman, said de tectives received call-in tips of the mans iden tity after the media ran pictures of him starting Wednesday. Herrell would not re veal if they have locat ed or talked with the man, who has only been labeled as some one detectives want to speak with regarding Houstons disappear ance. Herrell did say the mans vehicle has been positively identied and crime scene investiga tors are currently pro cessing it. Houston was found on the morning of April 4 near the intersection of Hancock and Hart wood Marsh roads. A woman walking her dog discovered the body in a wooded area about 300 feet from the inter section. Detectives be lieve the body had been there less than 24 hours. Detectives have not said how she died. Detectives believe Houston, who was from Newnan, Ga., had been in the Ocoee and Win ter Garden areas along the Highway 50 corridor since March 31. Anyone with informa tion can call the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce at 352-343-2101, or Central Florida CRIME LINE at 1-800-423-TIPS, where callers may re main anonymous. Police ID man sought after body found in woods CLERMONT THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Local residents are sharing some great ideas for the future of Venetian Gardens, according to ofcials involved with the vision ing sessions Leesburg is hosting to create a master plan for the picturesque 110-acre waterside park on the shores of Lake Harris. The next visioning ses sion will be 9 a.m. to noon today at the Leesburg Community Building. The public is invited. Among the ideas bounced at the rst LEESBURG Planning sessions for Venetian Gardens bring plenty of ideas DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO Venetian Gardens is shown in Leesburg. We knew this day was going to come and we have cut and cut and there is nowhere else. Welton Cadwell County Commissioner No bail yet for man in deadly day care crash CORCHADO SEE TAXES | A2 SEE IDEAS | A2 SEE CRASH | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 visioning session last weekend: Restaurants on the grounds; a lighthouse; boardwalk to connect the entire park; connecting Ve netian Gardens to down town with both pedestri an and golf cart paths; and some special attractions on the islands, such as a dog park and childrens ac tivities. Most people made sug gestions to improve the park; there were not very many at all who said to leave it alone, said Rob ert Sargent, Leesburgs spokesman. The majori ty of the suggestions were ideas of what we can do to attract people to Venetian Gardens, and the good thing is that we had a good cross section of the com munity. ...The park really is there for the residents, so as we move forward and plan for improvements, we really want to do some thing that the community is going to be proud of. Greg Beliveau of LPG Planners was hired by the city of Leesburg to coor dinate the workshops, prepare a draft and con ceptual plan for Venetian Gardens. He was pleased by the turnout of 50 people who also discussed their wishes for the swimming pool and the community building. Among the rst session group attendees were residents from Pal mora Park, local business owners, city staff members and Commissioners Da vid Knowles, Bill Polk and Mayor John Christian. What was neat about the day is overall a lot of the discussion was the same, said Beliveau, who noted the group was bro ken down into six tables sharing their ideas. Even though all tables were working independently, there seemed to be some good consensus within the room. I was encouraged by the turnout, said San di Moore, executive direc tor for the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce. It was nice to see people really take the process se riously and really look ing down the line, not just what it is going to look like tomorrow or next week. Any visioning that you do, you really have to think about what its going to be like in ve years and 10 years from now. The Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce will host a one-day vision ing bus trip from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday for interested participants to visit Lake Mirror and Lake Morton in Lakeland; Cranes Roost in Altamonte Springs; and Wooton Park in Tavares to see the park improvements in these cities that may spur some ideas for Venetian Gar dens. It helps you to get out side of where you are to see what the possibilities are in other cities, and some times you pick up one lit tle idea and it can really change the course, Moore said. Its important to re alize what are the possibil ities and what is out there. Residents interested in going in the one-day vi sioning trip may call the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, 787-2131 by Monday. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 11 CASH 3 ............................................... 7-2-5 Afternoon .......................................... 6-4-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 9-4-7-9 Afternoon ....................................... 1-7-3-8 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 10 FANTASY 5 ............................. 1-4-20-27-30 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@daily commercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. said they are struggling to come up with funding to make needed repairs at county buildings and to replace obsolete tech nology. With 41 percent of the countys build ings more than 20 years old, the HVAC controls system and IT le serv ers must be replaced to avoid system and oper ational failures. There is a backlog of $12.2 million in facilities needs, while IT is report ing $950,000 for critical updates to le servers, data storage units and telephone systems. Moreover, county of cials are also project ing a $450,000 shortfall in the Parks and Storm water Municipal Ser vice Taxing Unit, which levies taxes to fund im provements. In 2012, commis sioners voted against the rollback rate, which would have allowed the county to raise tax es to generate the same amount of revenue as in the previous year. If commissioners had voted for the rollback rate, there could have been more revenues in reserves, one county of cial said. We have kind of cut all around the edges and it may be time where we are going to have to make the decision to probably raise tax es or cut services dras tically, Commissioner Tim Sullivan said. We put off capital improve ments. Putting off some of those decisions has now come back to haunt us. I dont see any huge increases in revenues coming in without rais ing taxes. But commissioners Jimmy Conner and Sean Parks said it is prema ture to speak about tax increases without know ing exactly what the property values will be. Even so, Conner said if the county is forced to raise property taxes in the name of public safe ty, it would be deemed essential. Cutting public safe ty means increasing re sponse times, he said. Increasing response times is the difference of people living or dy ing. I would rather be criticized for raising the millage than having to live with myself for not protecting the people who have condence in me. Jerry Smith, executive director of Lake EMS, said he was informed the ambulances alloca tion, which it receives through the Munici pal Service Taxing Unit, has been reduced by $400,000 for scal year 2014-15 because addi tional funds left over from the Lake-Sumter EMS split have been de pleted. Sumter County dis solved its contract with the organization in 2011. The allocation from the MSTU funds one third of Smiths budget with the ambulance ser vice collecting the re mainder of its revenue from user fees, which have not been increas ing at anticipated levels. Smith has to re place four truck chas sis, 16 LifePaks (known as cardiac monitors) and 14 stretchers by 2016. The cardiac mon itors are $30,000 apiece, and each stretcher is $14,000. To maintain our state of readiness, our current deployment of 19 am bulances and for cap ital, Lake EMS needs more than a million in additional revenue, Smith said. One option commis sioners could consider is to raise the MSTU for Lake EMS, Koontz said. If the ambulance or ganization is forced to make cuts, it could re sult in one or two few er ambulances on the road, Smith said. It could adverse ly impact our response times, he said. Further, with a third of its eet out of warranty, it could get more costly to x repairs. We currently have 10 ambulances out of war ranty, and we have ve above 200,000 miles, Smith said, adding that the more mileage on a vehicle, the more re pairs are needed. We put a million miles on our eet annually. Previously, Smith had added 12 oater po sitions to avoid am bulances being down when someone calls in sick. Some of those posi tions could be on the chopping block if rev enues are not raised, Smith said. This is why I have frozen ve positions, he said. TAXES FROM PAGE A1 IDEAS FROM PAGE A1 PHOTO COURTESY OF VISITCENTRALFLORIDA.ORG The Lake Mirror Complex is a multi-faceted entertainment complex located on Lakelands scenic Lake Mirror. Leesburg residents will visit Lake Mirror and other sites on Thursday to get ideas for Venetian Gardens. Corchados public defender, Jon de Armas, asked that the $100,000 bond remain in place. The judge said that if Corchado is released, he will be prohibited from driving a car as a condition. Police say Corchado crashed his Dodge Durango into a convertible, which in turn smashed into the KinderCare building on Wednes day. Corchado ed the scene, au thorities said. A manhunt across Florida end ed Thursday with Corchados ar rest. He was charged with leaving the scene of a deadly accident al most precisely 24 hours after the KinderCare facility in Winter Park was torn open in the wreck, kill ing 4-year-old Lily Quintus, who was sitting in a classroom await ing her afternoon snack. Fourteen others were injured, most of them children. Family members say Lily Quin tus loved princesses, ranch dress ing on everything and Star Wars. Families are emotionally de stroyed because of what he did, Nicole Quintus, Lilys mother, said in an interview with The Associat ed Press The mother softly sobbed as she spoke of her daughter. She said Lily also loved the TV series Doc tor Who and put ranch dressing on even pizza and hot dogs. Nicole Quintus said a teacher called her soon after the crash, screaming but unable to say what happened. One minute everything was normal, and the next there was an explosion and smoke and screams, she said. The girls 7-year-old brother is an aspiring engineer who wants to design a time machine to bring Lily back, the mother added. She was beautiful and passion ate and innocent, the mother said, and she deserved so much more. Eight patients, including Lily, were initially taken to Arnold Palmer Childrens Hospital in Or lando. One remained in critical condition Friday, and three were listed in fair condition, according to a statement. Three had been discharged. The remaining vic tims were taken to other hospitals. There were no updates on their conditions Friday. CRASH FROM PAGE A1 BRADLEY KLAPPER Associated Press WASHINGTON A controversial torture re port by the Senate Intel ligence Committee paints a pattern of CIA decep tion about the effective ness of waterboarding and other brutal interro gation methods used on terror suspects after the Sept. 11 attacks, accord ing to leaked ndings. The committee said it will ask the Justice Department to investigate how the mate rial was published. The McClatchy news service late Thursday published what it said are the voluminous, still-classied reviews 20 ndings. It concludes that the enhanced in terrogation techniques failed to produce valu able intelligence; the CIA misled the Bush adminis tration, Congress and the public about the value of the harsh treatment; the agency employed unau thorized techniques on detainees and improper ly detained others; and it never properly evaluated its own actions. Both the CIAs interro gation techniques and connement condi tions were brutal and far worse than the agency communicated to policy makers. The reported ndings are consistent with what senators have detailed about the investigation since its 2009 inception and with what numer ous news reports, hu man rights organizations and various governmen tal and non-governmen tal studies have suggest ed in the decade since the CIAs program started to coming to light. Pres ident Barack Obama has likened the harsh inter rogations to torture, but the spy agency defends its actions and says much in the Senate committees report is inaccurate. The committee voted last week to declassify the summary and conclusions of the 6,600-page review and is now waiting for the Obama administration to censor material sensitive to national security. The panels chairwom an, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said an investi gation into how the nd ings were published was underway. The two pag es of ndings published by McClatchy did not in clude the names of any U.S. government employ ees or terror detainees, lo cations of secret CIA pris ons or anything else that might threaten nation al security. They also did not indicate how or why the committee reached its conclusions. Leaks paint pattern of CIA deception

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Tickets available for Dancing with the Teachers fundraiser Mount Dora High School will host the fth annual Dancing with the Teachers fundraising event on at 7 p.m. on April 25, with eight pairs of teachers performing routines. Tickets are $5 for students and teachers, and $10 for adults and can be purchased at the school, 700 N. Highland St. Call the school at 352383-2177 or email deann@lake.k12. .us for information. Proceeds benet the junior class for prom expenses, and 10 percent of the proceeds will go to the David Dickson Memorial Scholarship Fund. TAVARES Planes, Trains & BBQ event celebrates seventh year Downtown Tavares will host the seventh annual Planes, Trains & BBQ event today with events from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. Two air shows at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., include performers such as Patty Wagstaff, member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team. Enjoy barbecue, and partici pate in the Peoples Choice tasteoff, where a $5 ticket will permit the tasting of entries, beginning at 3 p.m. There is free parking for the public at the Lake County Parking Garage at the intersection of Maud Street and Sinclair Avenue. For a complete listing of all events and for information, go to www. Tavares.org. TAVARES Historical Museum celebrates its re-opening A ribbon cutting and grand re-opening of the Lake County Historical Museum will take place at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the museum on the rst oor of the Lake County Courthouse, 317 W. Main St. The museum will be showing off the changes that have taken place over the past few months, and cu rator and local historian Bobby Grenier has put together displays of Lake County history. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. For information, call 352-343-9890. LAKE COUNTY Discover the wild side of the woods This one-day, Welcome to the Woods program offers an opportu nity for people of all ages to get out into the woods with a guide, where they can sh at Bear Pond, shoot a bow and arrow, hike along the Florida National Scenic Trail, enjoy a hayless hayride to Blackwater Creek, learn safe boating practices and take a short canoe trip along the creek. Space is free and limited for the event from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on April 26, at the Seminole Forest Wildlife Management Area in Lake County, on State Road 46 just west of the Wekiva River. Participants must register in ad vance by calling the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at 352-732-1225. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 CINDY DIAN Special to The Daily Commercial Although June Per ry has only been canning a year, the 58-year old Eustis resident entered ve canning entries in the Lake County Fair Creative Art com petition and four of them won rst-place awards. Perrys fth can ning entry took sec ond-place and three of her four rst-place entries went on to win Best of Show awards, for a total of eight awards for ve food entries. A sixth entry, one for a homemade blanket, also won a rst-place award. This is the rst time Ive ever entered anything in my life, she said. I am en couraged beyond be lief. The judges were raving over her rec ipes, Creative Arts Co-Chairman An nie Lewis said. They were begging for the recipe and asking her to bring more next time. However, Perry was very surprised at the outcome of her cre ations since she only started canning last year. I began canning and creating recipes for my family, she said. I started out just making jams but eventually made my way into canning ev erything from carrots to meats. It was her step daughter who rst encouraged her to enter the fair compe tition. I didnt have any expectations, since I was so new to this, Perry said. My step daughter really en couraged me to at least try. Perry attributes much of her suc cess to the support of her family. The reci pes were created for them and it was only with their encourage ment that they were entered. I told her when I came in with her to enter that no mat ter what happens, youre a winner in my book, Perrys hus band Charley Brad ley said. I knew she was very talented and am so proud of her for this accomplish ment. Perrys and other creative art winners awards are being dis played at the main art building for the duration of the fair. Novice canner wins nine awards at fair CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL June Perry shows off her nine awards. She won eight awards for food entries and one for a homemade blanket. STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily Commercial Fruitland Park commissioners gave Coral Gables developer Jonathan Pen ner tentative approval Thursday night to develop a 110-unit apartment proj ect on the northwest corner of Spring Lake Road and Poinsettia Avenue. The vote to amend the citys zoning and comprehensive plan is a rst read ing. The issue will come before the com mission for a public hearing on April 24. When Penner proposed a 156-unit project on the 14.28-acre site in Jan uary, residents near the site packed commission chambers and commis sioners voted to deny the proposal. About 20 residents attended Thurs day nights meeting, and ve spoke against the project. Commissioner Chris Chesshire agreed with project opponents. I dont think we need more apart ments, Chesshire said. We are a com munity of predominantly single-fam ily homes and I dont see a need for multi-family, Chesshire said. After a spirited discussion, commis sioners agreed to accept Penners pro posal for reconsideration. Once the proposal was on the table, discussion was brief. Commisisoners voted 4-1 to approve the development; Chesshire voted against the project. TODAY AT THE FAIR 1 p.m. Gates open 6 p.m. Youth plant sale 6:30 p.m. Swine awards 7 p.m. Swine sale 7:30 p.m. Talent show nals 10 to 11 p.m. Rabbit, poultry check-out Staff Report TALLAHASSEE Flor idas school districts will be required to review and select textbooks under a bill passed by the Florida Senate. The Senate voted 2119 for the bill which was pushed in response to a backlash over national education standards called Common Core on Friday. The bill was also in spired by complaints over a high school world histo ry textbook that some said gave too much attention to Islam. School boards currently select textbooks from a list drawn up by the Florida Department of Education. Sen. Alan Hays, R-Uma tilla, who introduced Senate Bill 864, said the legislation was needed so that school board mem bers will be accountable to parents and voters. Hays said the bill, which would shift responsibility for instructional materials from the state to county school boards, afrms lo cal control. He said parents have approached him with concerns about the con tent in instructional ma terials and that they have no voice in controlling it. The school board members are members of the community, just like you and I are, Hays said, adding school boards should be accountable to local citizens. Senate approves school book bill SEE BOOKS | A4 Staff Report The Clermont Downtown Part nership, the city of Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas and Creative Therapy are sponsor ing the Got Kidz? Festival from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. today on Mon trose Street in downtown Cler mont. This event features the Side walk Chalk Art contest, now in its eighth year, where people will line the sidewalks and create art on the spot. Participation is free but limited to the rst 50 artists, most of whom are preregistered. Those still interested can check for available spots before the start of the event. Got Kidz? will also showcase children friendly vendors. Other activities include entertainment and festival foods. While at the event, attendees will get the opportunity to watch art in progress as participating artists will be drawing on site, in cluding this years featured artist Emily Mason. According to organizers, Ma son has been developing her skills as a pencil and watercolor artist with the help of her mentor Christine Harris. Emilys prociencies and tech niques have improved so much over the past year. She is truly a natural talent, Harris said. Mason will be participating in the Sidewalk Chalk Art contest as well as displaying her work at the event. The Clermont Downtown CLERMONT Artists to take to the streets SEE ARTISTS | A4 Controversial development clears first approval hurdle MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com A man wanted by the Sumter Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce on charges of failing to appear in court on drug charges was arrested this week when authorities found him hiding in a house under neath a mattress. Bob Turner IV, 29, of Oxford, was tak en into custody Wednes day on arrest warrants for driving with a suspended license and failure to ap pear in court on charges of the sale of cocaine and possession of the drug with intent to sell and deliver, as well as resisting arrest. He remained in the Sumter County Jail Friday morning in lieu of $82,500 bail. Sheriffs spokesman Lt. Bobby Caruthers said Turner had been on their most wanted list since February. The importance of catching him in creased after they recently received tips that Turner had been walking around neighborhoods displaying a handgun and making threats toward law enforcement. With the assistance of the Wildwood Police Department and the U.S. Mar shals Service, Turner was located on High Street in Wildwood. The sheriffs tactical team surrounded the home and reportedly found Turner lodged between a mattress and box spring. Wanted man found hiding under mattress TURNER

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 But Sen. Dwight Bul lard, D-Miami, said the bill might cause an un due burden nancially on many districts. He said school boards did not request the mea sure. Sen. Bill Mont ford, D-Tallahassee, called it a bad bill. In part, he said the state Department of Educa tion has done a good job of working through the process of instruc tional materials. Montford said he is worried about added costs to school boards because the instruc tional material process is time-consuming. This is a monumen tal task to undertake this, he said. Montford also said he is worried about los ing continuity through out the state, with text books being chosen in 67 different school sys tems. Sen. Rob Bradley, R-Fleming Island, said local ofcials want control. This is one of my fa vorite bills of the ses sion, he said. Sen. Geraldine Thompson, D-Orlan do, said she thinks the bill opens the door to censorship. She said local school boards could object to such material as the works of Mark Twain. Other issues taken up by the Florida legis lature include: ABORTION RE STRICTIONS: A bill that would change the ex ceptions to late term abortion was passed by the House Friday, open ing the door to a legal framework that would take into account viability for life, rath er than a designated time period, for when the procedure could be performed. The bill (HB 1047) passed with a 7045 vote. At issue is when viability, dened in the bill as a point at which a fetus can survive out side the womb through standard medical care, can be determined. KILLING OF FETUS ES: Killing or injuring a fetus at any stage of development would be a crime under a bill passed by the Flori da House on Friday. The House voted 7442 for the bill that ex pands a current law, which allows for mur der or manslaughter charges if a fetus dies after it has developed to the point where it can survive outside the womb. DRUG SENTENCES LIGHTENED: The Florida House passed a bill in creasing the weight threshold for traf cking in oxycodone and hydrocodone in a move to ease what have been called over ly harsh sentencing guidelines. The mea sure (SB360) passed by a vote of 113-2 Fri day. It aims to distin guish between those selling drugs and those caught in possession. The bill moves the cur rent threshold of four grams of either drug to seven grams of oxyco done and 14 grams of hydrocodone. SPEED LIMITS: The House Econom ic Affairs Committee on Friday voted 12-4 to approve a mea sure (HB 761) that could push speeds on some state high ways from 70 mph to 75 mph. The measure, which now heads to the House oor, directs the state Department of Transportation to de termine the safe min imum and maximum speed limits on all di vided highways that have at least four lanes. A companion (SB 392) in the Senate where the proposal originat ed awaits an appear ance on the oor. FIREARMS DURING EMERGENCIES: The Florida House passed a bill that would al low the public to car ry concealed rearms while evacuating their home during an emer gency. The bill extends carry-and-conceal privileges to those ee ing during a mandato ry evacuation declared by the governor or lo cal ofcials. Compiled from reports by the Associated Press and the News Service of Florida. Partnership sponsors the event by providing the chalk and garden knee pads for all par ticipants. Individuals or teams will compete in age categories from age 6 through adult. Children 5 and un der will receive color ing books and crayons compliments of Lake Apopka Natural Gas. Cash prizes are given to the top three artists in each age division. Winning artwork will be displayed in City Hall during April and May. Admission and park ing are free. For more informa tion, go to www.cler montdowntownpart nership.com. BOOKS FROM PAGE A3 ARTISTS FROM PAGE A3 Halifax Media Group Five months ago, Doug Drymon was Leesburgs assistant city manager. A week ago, he was Winter Havens assistant city manager. Today, Drymon is un employed. Winter Haven City Manager Deric Feach er on Wednesday an nounced Drymons de parture after only ve months in an email to employees. Prior to be coming assistant city manager there in No vember, Drymon was second in com mand at Lees burg City Hall. Feachers email did not elaborate on why Drymon left or whether he resigned or was red. Drymon said it was an amicable split decided on mutually in a Tues day evening meeting he had with Feacher. (Feacher) point ed out that it just didnt seem like the commu nity and I were a good match for each other, Drymon said. We just felt that we proba bly needed to go different ways. I said, I under stand, I have been in your shoes be fore. Sometimes thats the way it works out. Feacher could not be reached for comment. City spokeswom an Joy Townsend con rmed Drymon is no longer employed by the city and said no resig nation letter exists. Drymon, 57, became assistant city manag er in November after the position sat vacant for months following Feachers promotion in February 2013 from as sistant city manager to city manager. Drymon, who was paid $95,014 per year, had not yet completed his six-month probation ary period. All employ ees are subject to a 6to 12-month probationary period, Townsend said. An employee can be re leased without cause during that time. Former Leesburg official out at Winter Haven DRYMON JULIE CARR SMYTH Associated Press COLUMBUS, Ohio Geologists in Ohio have for the rst time linked earthquakes in a geo logic formation deep under the Appalachians to hydraulic fracturing, leading the state to is sue new permit condi tions Friday in certain areas that are among the nations strictest. A state investiga tion of ve small trem ors last month in the Youngstown area, in the Appalachian foothills, found the injection of sand and water that ac companies hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the Utica Shale may have increased pressure on a small, unknown fault, said State Oil & Gas Chief Rick Simmers. He called the link probable. While earlier stud ies had linked earth quakes in the same re gion to deep-injection wells used for dispos al of fracking wastewa ter, this marks the rst time tremors in the re gion have been tied di rectly to fracking, Sim mers said. The ve seismic events in March couldnt be easily felt by people. The oil and gas drill ing boom targets wide ly different rock for mations around the nation, so the Ohio ndings may not have much relevance to oth er areas other than per haps inuencing public perception of frackings safety. The types of quakes connected to the industry are gener ally small and not eas ily felt, but the idea of human activity causing the earth to shake often doesnt sit well. The state says the company that set off the Ohio quakes was follow ing rules and appeared to be using common practices. It just got un lucky, Simmers said. Gerry Baker, associ ate executive director of the Interstate Oil and Gas Commission, said state regulators across the nation will study the Ohio case for any impli cations for the drilling industry. A consortium of states has already be gun discussions. Fracking involves pumping huge vol umes of water, sand and chemicals underground to split open rocks to al low oil and gas to ow. Improved technology has allowed energy com panies to gain access to huge stores of natural gas but has raised wide spread concerns that it might lead to ground water contamination and, yes, earthquakes. A U.S. govern ment-funded report re leased in 2012 found that two worldwide instanc es of shaking can be at tributed to actual ex traction of oil and gas, as opposed to wastewater disposal in the ground a magnitude-2.8 quake in Oklahoma and a magnitude-2.3 quake in England. Both were in 2011. Later, the Canadi an government tied quakes in British Co lumbias Horn River Ba sin between 2009 and 2011 to fracking. Those led to stricter regula tions, which news re ports indicated had lit tle effect on the pace or volume of drilling. Geologists link quakes to fracking AP FILE PHOTO Workers tend to a well head during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas Inc. gas well outside Rie, in western Colorado. JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON In a rare dip lomatic rebuke, the United States has blocked Irans controversial pick for envoy to the United Na tions, a move that could stir fresh animosity at a time when Wash ington and Tehran have been seeking a thaw in relations. The Obama administration said Friday that the U.S. had in formed Iran it would not grant a visa to Hamid Aboutalebi, a member of the group responsi ble for the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. While U.S. ofcials had been trying to persuade Iran to simply with draw Aboutalebis name, the an nouncement amounted to an acknowledgement that those ef forts had not been successful. Weve communicated with the Iranians at a number of levels and made clear our position on this and that includes our position that the selection was not viable, White House spokesman Jay Carney said. Our position is that we will not be issuing him a visa. Aboutalebi is alleged to have participated in a Muslim stu dent group that held 52 Ameri cans hostage for 444 days during the embassy takeover. He has insisted his involvement in the group Muslim Students Follow ing the Imams Line was limited to translation and negotiation. Hamid Babaei, a spokesman for the Iranian U.N. Mission, said the decision was not only regret table but in contravention of in ternational law, the obligation of the host country and the inherent right of sovereign member-states to designate their representatives to the United Nations. As host country for the United Nations, the U.S. must provide rights to persons invited to the New York headquarters. Howev er, exceptions can be made when a visa applicant is found to have engaged in spying against the U.S. or poses a threat to Ameri can national security. Denying visas to U.N. ambas sadorial nominees or to foreign heads of state who want to at tend United Nations events in the U.S. is extremely rare, though there appears to be precedent. According to a paper published by the Yale Law School, the Unit ed States rejected several Irani ans appointed to the U.N. in the 1980s who had played roles in the embassy hostage crisis or other acts against American citizens. Obama blocks Irans envoy to UN ABOUTALEBI

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 WILDWOOD CYCLERY rrffntfrb Bikes for Every Terain & Budget www.LakeENT.net Call 352-728-2404 today to reserve your seat for the seminar most convenient for you.(Limited Seating. Reservations strongly recommended. Light snacks and beverages provided) Join Lake Ear, Nose & Throats Dr. Michael Freedman for one of two FREE SEMINARS : Tuesday, April 15 at 6pmFlorida Hospital Waterman 1000 Waterman Way Tavares, FLThursday, April 17 at 6pmLake ENT The Villages Office 1501 U.S. Highway 441 N. Suite 1402or Pain and pressure from chronic sinusitis can make everyday life unbearable, but for many patients, relief may be as easy as the innovative Balloon Sinuplasty procedure. Want Sinus Relief? Hours are Mon Thur 10 11 or later Fri 10 Midnight Sat 9 Midnight Sun 9 10 or laterEVERY SATURDAY WEEKLY DART TOURNAMENTS Whimsical Wednesday 5 Close $1.00 nightCall 352.343.5333 Or visit our website www.breakpointalley.com Tuesday Ladies NightFriday College Night PETER LEONARD Associated Press DONETSK, Ukraine To reach the Peoples Repub lic of Donetsk, you need to pass a few club-wielding young men in masks, wind through a narrow corridor of sand-lled sacks and en ter a gray ofce tower stand ing in the heart of this east ern Ukrainian city. The self-styled autono mous territory really just an 11-story government building and its surround ings insists it is the true voice of the 4.3 million peo ple living in the Donetsk re gion. It has become the latest focus of protest in the largely Russian-speaking east since Kremlin-friendly President Viktor Yanukovych was over thrown in February. The patch of Donetsk real es tate where pro-Russia activists have been squatting for near ly a week is a hotbed of resent ment against the perceived chauvinist Ukrainian nation alism taking hold among the nations leadership. They hate us. They take it in with their mothers milk, said retiree Nelya Vladimirov na Ivanova, sitting along with hundreds of fellow rally members on the square. In its current form, the Donetsk Republic poses lit tle real threat to the central governments authority, and rallies demanding autono my have drawn at most a few thousand people. Nonetheless, Prime Minis ter Arseniy Yatsenyuk visit ed Donetsk on Friday with a pledge to give more powers to the regions. We must tell people that we know its tough, but we know how in the future to se cure jobs, increase salaries, attract investors, distribute more authority, and what to do so people are content with life, Yatsenyuk said, laying out what he described as a recipe for national unity. And some Donetsk resi dents say the Republics hos tility to western Ukraine doesnt represent their views. Vladlen Nebrat, a youth activist, said that most peo ple in the city see few differ ences between Russians and Ukrainians, and that younger generations see even less of a difference. The problems we see to day are problems created by political elites, Nebrat said. Its the same in Russia and Ukraine. I dont see a prob lem between the people themselves. Since Sunday, crowds of hundreds have been standing round the clock in and around barricades of tires, sandbags, bricks and razor wires lining the regional administration headquarters in nervous an ticipation of a raid that never arrives. Masked young men carrying bats and truncheons stand guard over the area. Groups huddle around bar rel-res for warmth against an early spring spell of drizzle and cold. On an improvised stage, or ators deliver angry speeches, often to chants of Referen dum! demanding a vote for total autonomy that con stitutes the only clear poli cy of the Donetsk Republic, whose leadership is a ragtag band of about dozen political unknowns. The movement is a pale imitation of the secession ist drive in Crimea that led to Russias annexation of the peninsula but the palpa ble unhappiness here points to deeper national tensions. Much of the conversation on the square revolves around well-rehearsed grievances over language, history and a sense of economic injustice. After Yanukoychs downfall, a nationalist party handed op ponents of the new authorities a valuable lifeline by pushing measures through parliament to strip the Russian language of its ofcial status in regions where it is widely spoken. Pro-Russian groups further rip Ukraine EFREM LUKATSKY / AP A pro-Russian activist with a Russian ag pass by a barricade at a regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine on Friday. JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press NEW YORK In an unsparing critique of Republicans, President Barack Obama on Fri day accused the GOP of using voting restrictions to keep voters from the polls and of jeopardiz ing 50 years of expanded ballot box access for mil lions of black Americans and other minorities. The stark, simple truth is this: The right to vote is threatened to day in a way that it has not been since the Vot ing Rights Act became law nearly ve decades ago, Obama said in a ery speech at civil rights activist and television talk host Al Sharptons National Action Net work conference. Obama waded into the acrid debate over voting access in an elec tion year where con trol of the Senate, now in the hands of Dem ocrats, is at stake, as is Obamas already lim ited ability to push his agenda through Con gress. Republicans say the voting measures guard against voter fraud, but Democrats say they erode the landmark 1965 law that helped pave Obamas path in politics. Across the coun try, Republicans have led efforts to pass laws making it harder, not easier, for people to vote, he said, relat ing anecdotes of vot ers turned away be cause they didnt have the right identication or because they needed a passport or birth cer ticate to register. About 60 percent of Americans dont have a passport, he said. Just because you cant have the money to trav el abroad doesnt mean you shouldnt be able to vote here at home. Obamas speech to a crowd of about 1,600 in a New York hotel ballroom came a day af ter he marked the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act at the LBJ Li brary in Austin, Texas, where he praised Pres ident Lyndon Johnsons understanding of pres idential power and its use to create new op portunities for millions of Americans. The president pinned efforts to curb access to the ballot box direct ly on the GOP, declar ing that the effort has not been led by both parties. Its been led by the Republican Party. Mocking the Repub licans, he said, What kind of political plat form is that? Why would you make that a part of your agenda, prevent ing people from vot ing? Obama: Right to vote under threat FENIT NIRAPPIL and MARTHA MENDOZA Associated Press ORLAND, Calif. It was a busload of opportunity: young, low-income, motivated students, destined to be come the rst in their families to go to college, journeying from the concrete sprawl of Los Angeles to a remote red wood campus 650 miles north. Those dreams shattered for some Thursday in an explosive freeway collision that left 10 dead stu dents, chaperones and both drivers and dozens hospitalized. Desperate families awaited word about loved ones Friday, while in vestigators tried to gure out why a southbound FedEx big rig swerved across the grassy divide of Califor nias key artery before sideswiping a car and slamming into the tour bus, which burst into a furious blaze. The Serrato family, whose identi cal twin 17-year-old daughters set off on the adventure on separate buses Thursday, had a panicked, sleepless night. Marisol made it to their destination, Humboldt State University, but there was no word from Marisa, who had been aboard the now-gutted bus. Friday morning when a sheriffs deputy asked for Marisas dental re cords, a grim request made to sev eral families, 23-year-old broth er Miguel Serrato said his family was getting a little bit scared. His mother booked a ight north. Humboldt alumni Michael Myvett, 29, and his ancee, Mathi son Haywood, who were chaper oning, also were killed. Myvett was a therapist at an autism treatment center. He just died, his grandmother Debra Loyd said, her voice break ing with emotion in the early af ternoon Friday. They have already conrmed it. Dreams dashed in fatal college tour bus crash ANDREAS FUHRMANN / AP A family leaves the Red Cross shelter at Veterans Memorial Hall on Friday, in Orland, Calif., after looking for their daughter who was involved in the ery crash between a FedEx semi and a tour bus.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 Sampathkumar Shanmugham, MD Elias Gizaw, MD Nitesh Shekhadia, MD Ramit Panara, MDIf you have memory problems We can help you at every stage. Please give us a call 352-508-5076 MARI YAMAGUCHI Associated Press TOKYO The inter national court ruling against Japanese whal ing last week may have given the government a convenient political out. The Antarctic pro gram was nearly bank rupt, but if the govern ment had overhauled it on its own, it would have incurred the wrath of a strong an ti-whaling lobby, and could have been crit icized for caving in to foreign anti-whal ing activists. Now of cials can say the court forced their hand. It seemed to me they were anxious to lose, said Masayu ki Komatsu, a former sheries ofcial known for his battles at the In ternational Whaling Commission to defend Japanese hunts. He ac cused Japanese of cials of losing passion and love for whaling and not ghting hard enough in court. In a March 31 ruling, the International Court of Justice in The Hague ordered Japan to stop granting permits for its Antarctic whaling pro gram, which allowed an annual cull of about 1,000 whales. The world court, upholding argu ments made by Aus tralia, rejected Japans contention that the program was scientic. Though top Japa nese ofcials called the ruling regretta ble, they announced within hours that Ja pan would abide by it. A day later, the Fisher ies Agency said Japan would skip the next Antarctic hunt. We didnt go to court in order to lose, a gov ernment ofcial close to the case said on con dition of anonymity, because he isnt autho rized to speak public ly about the issue. But it was obvious that the whaling program had to be changed. In a way, the rul ing was an example of gaiatsu, the external pressure that Japan has traditionally relied on to bring about change when vested interests are strong. It was the arrival of U.S. Com modore Matthew Perry and his warships that forced Japan to end a long period of isolation. More recently, gaiatsu (roughly pronounced gah-ee-aht-soo) has pushed market open ing and deregulation of the economy. NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press VATICAN CITY Pope Francis said Fri day he took personal re sponsibility for the evil of priests who raped and molested children, asking forgiveness from victims and saying the church must be even bolder in its efforts to protect the young. It was the rst time a pope has taken personal respon sibility for the sex crimes of his priests and begged forgiveness. Francis off-the-cuff remarks were the latest sign that he has become sensitized to the grav ity of the abuse scan dal after coming under criticism from victims advocacy groups for a perceived lack of at tention to, and under standing of, the toll it has taken on the church and its members. The evolution be gan last month when he named four women and an abuse survivor to a sex abuse advisory pan el that the Vatican has suggested will address the critical issue of sanc tioning bishops who cover up for pedophiles. Francis delivered the comments to members of the International Catholic Child Bureau, a French Catholic net work of organizations that protects childrens rights. Sitting with them in his library Friday, Francis spoke slowly, deliberately and soft ly in his native Spanish, deviating from his text. I feel compelled to take personal responsi bility for all the evil that some priests, many many in number, (al though) not in compar ison with the totality to assume person al responsibility and to ask forgiveness for the damage caused by the sexual abuse of the chil dren, he said. The church is aware of this damage, he con tinued. We dont want to take a step back in deal ing with this problem and the sanctions that must be imposed. On the contrary, I think we must be even stronger! You dont play around with the lives of children. No pope has ever tak en personal responsibil ity for the tens of thou sands of children who were molested by priests over decades as bishops moved them from par ish to parish rather than reporting them to po lice. Pope John Paul II denounced priests who abused children, saying there was no place for them in the priesthood. Pope Benedict XVI ex pressed sorrow and re gret to victims, met with them and even wept with them. But nei ther ever took person al responsibility for the crimes or begged for giveness as Francis did. Last month, Francis named the initial mem bers of a commission to advise him on best prac tices to combat sexual abuse in the church. Half of the eight members are women and one, Marie Collins, was assaulted by a priest as a child. Col lins, who became a wellknown activist in the ght for victims justice, had previously called on Benedict to ask personal forgiveness for the scan dal and those church leaders who put loyalty to the church ahead of the safety of children. The Vatican has said Collins and the other members will now draft the statutes of the com mission and would look into the legal duties and responsibilities of church personnel, a sug gestion that they might take up the critical ques tion of disciplining com plicit bishops. Church law provides for sanc tions if a bishop is neg ligent in carrying out his duties, but to date no bishop has been disci plined for protecting an abuser. NICK PERRY Associated Press PERTH, Austra lia Every day from the Perth airport and a nearby military base, about a dozen planes from several countries take ight to search for debris from miss ing Flight 370 so far without success. The U.S. Defense Depart ment alone committed $7.3 million to the effort in the rst month of the search, much of it spent on two U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon planes that cost $4,000 per hour to y. Lt. Cmdr. Adam Schantz is the ofcer in charge of the 32 air and ground crew manning the surveillance air craft, which are modi ed Boeing 737s. This is an edited version of the interview: Q: What does a typical day involve? A: The maintenance crew have to come in very early in the morn ing, well before the sun comes up, to prep the airplane for the days ight. Our typical mission is about nine hours. We y any where be tween 900 miles and 1,500 miles to the search zone and spend about ve hours out there searching. The air crew are often work ing 15-hour days and the maintenance crew sometimes even more. So we are putting in re ally long hours, but do ing well, and our crew and maintainers are motivated, and proud to be here. We havent missed a mission yet. Q: How do you con duct the search? A: So the P-8 has a very advanced set of sen sors, from radar to a se ries of cameras, both electro-optical and in frared, that allows us to search the ocean in dif ferent ways. And, in ad dition to that, we have our trained observers in the windows, mon itoring the ocean with binoculars and just their eyes. Its the nee dle in the haystack that we are looking for. Its a massive amount of area. I dont think any bodys ever really taken on a search of this much area before to nd such a small target. Q: What are you see ing? A: Its incredibly mo notonous out there searching. Thats one of the reasons Im so proud of our aircrew, and how well theyre doing, because it takes a lot of concentration to keep paying atten tion when hundreds and hundreds of miles of ocean are passing by. Weve found a collec tion of shing nets, sh ing equipment. Its just garbage. Q: Is that discourag ing? A: Absolutely not. When we go to search an area, if we dont nd anything, then we are able to eliminate that area from any addi tional searching and move on to the next one. So it gives a good way to be able to con centrate our search assets on new areas. Q: How low do you y when the visibility is bad? A: At times we go down to 200 feet. Q: Two hundred feet in a 737? Isnt that a bit crazy? A: Maybe not cra zy, but different. I dont know that anybody else has operated 737s in this manner. But its an excellent airplane, and it handles the mis sion very well. And its a standard part of our mission, particularly in the defense role. So we are practiced at it, and its not an issue for our aircrews to go down that low. Q: Did you ever think youd be working along side, say, crews from China? A: I did not. But the Chinese are great. Its a very unique opportuni ty for countries to come together. Were all unit ed in the same goal. Q: What would it mean to you to nd some wreckage from Flight 370? A: I think, beyond my self, it would mean clo sure for the families of these 239 victims. For every person who has gone missing on this plane, thats some bodys father, broth er, mother, son, daugh ter, friend or sister. So theres a lot of relation ships out there beyond the people who are missing. Theres a lot of other people affected by this tragedy. Pope assumes responsibility AP FILE PHOTO Pope Francis waves as he leaves after his weekly general audience in St. Peters Square at the Vatican. American describes search for missing plane AP FILE PHOTO A Royal Australian Air Force P-3 Orion ies past HMAS Success during the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in Southern Indian Ocean, near Australia. SCHANTZ Ruling could end Japanese whaling For first time, Francis takes the blame for sex abuse scandals

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 J eb Bush made some very provocative comments about immigration the other day. They were red meat for a conser vative base that thinks in broad brushstrokes about foreigners. Actually, they were more like a bullghters red cape, or scarlet blood in the water. Commenting on the wave of il legal bodies present in our coun try, this brother of one compas sionate conservative president and son of another observed: The way I look at this is some one who comes to our country because they couldnt come le gally, they come to our country because their families the dad who loved their children was worried that their children didnt have food on the table. ... They broke the law, but its not a felo ny. Its an act of love. Its an act of commitment to your family. Frankly, those observations were a little too Jean Valjean for me. It is a simplication to say that everyone who crosses the border does so to provide a better life for his children (unless you believe that drug trafckers are also loving parents). But on the whole, Bush is absolutely right: The men and women who take a short-cut around the legal pro cess generally do so for the most basic of reasons desperation. That doesnt mean we should just throw up our hands and let the oodgates open. Of course there needs to be order and, as the great Charles Krauthammer said, Americans have a right to decide who comes in and out of the country. But this brings me to another point about the whole immigra tion debate. There is a mean-spir itedness that infects the discus sion and keeps us from arriving at an equitable result. We dont need the saccharine comments of a presidential hope ful, but neither do we need the vitriol spewed by some of the an ti-immigrant groups who equate the other with disease, crime and a brownication of society. I think we need to take a step back for a moment and under stand the animating principles that dene this country and un dergird all the great religions. And, then, we need to remember a time when those principles, among them compassion, were horrically rejected. I hope we can take some philosophical les sons from that tragedy. Earlier this week, I listened to a radio interview with a man whose grandfather and uncle had been murdered in the Holocaust. The most wrenching part of the sto ry was the fact that they could have been saved had it not been for politics and politicians. In 1939, a group of German Jews at tempted to ee the Nazi regime on an ocean liner called the St. Louis. They sought admission at numerous ports, including the United States and Canada. Fear ing the political repercussions, FDR refused to allow the passen gers to disembark and, after hav ing the door closed in their fac es during a three week voyage of the damned, the ship returned to Europe. Not surprisingly, the majority of the passengers ended up dying in concentration camps. We obviously cant analogize the cross-border journey of a Mexican to the desperate ight from Hitler. The comparison is as ridiculous as Bushs comments about lov ing parents: too gross, too broad ly aimed, too discordant and po lemical. But its legitimate to point out the similarity in the way that Americans have come to ap proach the issue of immigration, one that echoes the not in my backyard anxiety of 75 years ago. Realistically, we cannot open our arms in a universal embrace. Emma Lazarus was a great poet, but she would have failed miser ably as a diplomat. In a world of limited resources, we have to do human triage. I spent four hours the other day in front of an immi gration judge trying to convince him that the deep scars on my clients face and the shadow in his eyes had earned him a grant of asylum. The judge had the dif cult job of deciding whether to believe his story and, even if cred ible, whether the tales of beatings and threats warranted a refugees welcome. Its not an easy calculus to make, and Im not one to sec ond-guess judges or, for that mat ter, crippled wartime presidents. Still, it does put things into a better perspective than any of the talking heads on television, the ones who might never in their lives have met a refugee or who think that turnstiles at the border are feasible. When Bush started talking about the loving father, I knew he was ring the opening sal vo for 2016. He might be sincere, but his timing leads me to be lieve that theres a lot more poli tics in his comments than prin ciple. And thats OK, since even the most revered among us, the ones with our names engraved in marble and on coinage, are ca pable of selling our souls for a few votes. But it would still be good for conservatives to soften the sharp edges of their tongues. And it would be good for liberals to re member that it was one of their own who padlocked the Golden Door. Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Readers may email her at cowers1961@gmail.com. OTHER VOICES Christine Flowers MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Our nations immigration prejudices T he news that a small percentage of the countrys physicians collected billions of dollars from Medicare in a single year may or may not be a testament to individu al greed; some of the top recipients are under investigation for allegedly bilking the sys tem, while others work long hours delivering costly care. But it is a powerful reminder that the program needs to stop rewarding doctors for the quantity of care they deliver rather than the quality. Happily, theres a bipartisan plan to do just that; unhappily, lawmakers havent been able to agree on how to cover its cost. If Congress needed any further in centive to settle its differences, the fact that 1,000 doctors raked in $3 billion from Medi care should provide it. The Obama administration released details Wednesday on $77 billion worth of payments made in 2012 by Medicare Part B, which pays for doctors and other health-care profession als. Part B is nanced mainly by the govern ment, so taxpayers have a keen interest in the programs nancial integrity. The new data, however, reveal some alarmingly large pay outs. For example, more than a dozen physi cians each collected more than $10 million from Medicare in 2012, and thousands of spe cialists in four disciplines three cancer-re lated elds and ophthalmology averaged more than $300,000. Its risky to leap to conclusions just from the numbers, given that the payments may in clude reimbursements for expensive drugs that doctors provided or services by multi ple members of a team. Yet the concentration of payments a mere 2 percent of the doc tors participating in the program took in al most a quarter of the fees exemplies the problem with Medicares fee for service pay ment system. This system ignores the value and effectiveness of the care provided, pay ing attention only to how many treatments are rendered. That gives doctors an incentive to provide the most expensive and intensive forms of care, not necessarily the treatments that work best. Earlier this year, the top Republicans and Democrats on three inuential congressio nal committees came up with a plan that would have encouraged Medicare doctors to switch from fee-for-service to alternative pay ment plans that reward quality and efcien cy. It also would have replaced an ineffective formula for slowing the growth in Part B costs by cutting the fees paid for most doctors ser vices. Unfortunately, the plan stalled because of a dispute over how to pay for the measure, and Congress enacted minor Medicare reforms that left the fee-for-service system intact for at least another year. The new disclosures about enormous Medicare payouts should send lawmakers back to work on the bill to steer doctors into payment plans that yield better results for patients and taxpayers. Distributed by MCT Information Services. A VOICE Medicares doctor payment problem Classic DOONESBURY 1972 I think we need to take a step back for a moment and understand the animating principles that define this country and undergird all the great religions.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Cycles Cycles 352-330-00479807 N. HWY 301, WILDWOODWWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.COM 2007 HONDA SHADOW 750Only $4,300 2009 YAMAHA 950Only $5,700 2007 HONDA SHADOW 1100Only $4,300 2006 YAMAHA U-STAR 650Only $4,200Huge Selection of New & Pre-owned Bikes Only $6,500 2006 YAMAHA V-STAROnly $4,200 Service SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com PISTORIUS: Blade Runner grilled on stand / B5 MOUNT DORA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The E ustis High School baseball team has dominated its dis trict in the four years since David Lee re turned to the Panthers dugout. Eustis entered Fri days Class 5A-Dis trict 13 contest against Mount Dora at Heim Field with a 34-1 dis trict record under Lee, including a 4-1 mark in the current campaign. Matthew Lusignan had two hits and ve RBIs, including a dou ble and a grand slam homer to power the Panthers to a 6-2 win against the Hurricanes. Lusignan was the only Eustis player with mul tiple hits. The win raised Eustis overall record to 14-8 and 5-1 in Class 5A-13. Mount Dora fell to 7-9 overall and 1-5 in dis trict play. Eustis also won the districts regular season title. T yler Perry started on the mound for Eustis and picked up the win. He went six innings and allowed both runs, al though only one was earned. Jeremy Migliori pitched the seventh for the Panthers and struck out three. Migliori also contrib uted at the plate with a hit in three at bats. Michael Koenig went 1-for-3, as well. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis Michael Koenig (6) and Jeremy Migliori (21) react to Matthew Lusignans grand slam after scoring during Fridays game against Mount Dora at Heim Field in Mount Dora. LEESBURG FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Sometimes a softball looks like a beach ball to hitters. That must have been the case in Thursdays game between Leesburg and Mount Dora high schools at the Yellow Jackets softball complex. In what has to be one of the wildest fast-pitch games played in Lake County in recent mem ory, Leesburg survived two four-innings and a ve-run frame by Mount Dora to win 19-17 in eight innings. Leesburg improved to 6-14 with the win, while Mount Dora dropped to 8-11. Jacinda Alvarez had the big hit for the Yellow Jackets. The junior blast ed a two-run walk off ho mer to seal the win. Alva rez had two hits and four RBIs in the game. She also scored four runs. After taking a 3-0 lead in the home half of the rst inning, Leesburg fell behind in the second and trailed 13-6 heading into the bottom of the Yellow Jackets outlast Hurricanes in softball thriller THE VILLAGES HOSTS 2A-6 TRACK BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Tavares sophomore Jordan Smith competes in the long jump during Fridays Class 2A-District 6 track and eld championships at The Villages Charter High School in The Villages. More photos can be seen in the sports section at www.dailycommercial.com. CHRIS CARLSON / AP Bubba Watson hits out of a bunker on the second hole during Fridays second round of the Masters in Augusta, Ga. PAUL NEWBERRY Associated Press AUGUSTA, Ga. Bubba Watson likes the way he looks in green. He wants to get that color back in his ward robe. Watson surged to the Masters lead with a spree of birdies on the back side Friday, posi tioning him for a week end run at his second green jacket in three years. Im trying to get the jacket back, Watson said. I want that feel ing again. The 2012 champi on at Augusta Nation al sparked the best run of the tournament so far when he stuck his tee shot at No. 12 with in 3 feet of the cup. He SEE SOFTBALL | B2 Bubba goes birdie hunting Watson takes 3-shot lead at halfway point MASTERS Bubba Watson 137 John Senden 140 Thomas Bjorn 141 Jonas Blixt 141 Adam Scott 141 Jordan Speith 141 SEE MASTERS | B2 Eustis tops MDHS

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Southern 500 After Friday qualifying; race today At Darlington Raceway Darlington, S.C. Lap length: 1.366 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 183.479 mph. 2. (22) Joey L ogano, Ford, 183.049. 3. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 182.946. 4. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 182.485. 5. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 182.059. 6. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 182.019. 7. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 181.985. 8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 181.763. 9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 181.756. 10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.548. 11. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 181.481. 12. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 181.2. 13. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 182.181. 14. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 181.985. 15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 181.689. 16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 181.247. 17. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 181.194. 18. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 181.127. 19. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 180.947. 20. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 180.914. 21. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 180.901. 22. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 180.787. 23. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 180.185. 24. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 178.958. 25. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 182.059. 26. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 181.911. 27. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 181.548. 28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 181.394. 29. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 180.549. 30. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 180.33. 31. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 180.31. 32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 180.204. 33. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 180.158. 34. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 179.993. 35. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 179.717. 36. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, 179.606. 37. (33) David Stremme, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, Owner Points. 39. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. BASEBALL American League East W L Pct GB New York 5 5 .500 Tampa Bay 5 5 .500 Toronto 5 5 .500 Baltimore 4 5 .444 Boston 4 6 .400 1 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 5 2 .714 Chicago 5 5 .500 1 Cleveland 5 5 .500 1 Kansas City 4 4 .500 1 Minnesota 3 6 .333 3 West W L Pct GB Oakland 6 3 .667 Seattle 5 3 .625 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 2 Texas 4 5 .444 2 Houston 4 6 .400 2 Thursdays Games Oakland 6, Minnesota 1 N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 1 Houston 6, Toronto 4 Chicago White Sox 7, Cleveland 3 Fridays Games Boston at N.Y. Yankees, late Toronto at Baltimore, late Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, late Houston at Texas, late Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, late Kansas City at Minnesota, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late Detroit at San Diego, late Oakland at Seattle, late Todays Games Boston (Lackey 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 1-1), 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1) at Cincinnati (Si mon 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 0-1) at Minnesota (Nolasco 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (Hutchison 1-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Houston (Cosart 1-1) at Texas (Schep pers 0-1), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 0-1) at San Diego (Kennedy 1-1), 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2), 9:05 p.m. Oakland (Gray 1-0) at Seattle (E.Ramirez 1-1), 9:10 p.m. Sundays Games Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Houston at Texas, 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Detroit at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 8:05 p.m. National League East W L Pct GB Washington 7 2 .778 Atlanta 5 4 .556 2 Miami 5 5 .500 2 New York 4 5 .444 3 Philadelphia 3 6 .333 4 Central W L Pct GB Milwaukee 7 2 .778 Pittsburgh 6 3 .667 1 St. Louis 5 4 .556 2 Chicago 3 6 .333 4 Cincinnati 3 6 .333 4 West W L Pct GB Los Angeles 6 4 .600 San Francisco 6 4 .600 Colorado 5 5 .500 1 San Diego 3 6 .333 2 Arizona 4 8 .333 3 Thursdays Games Pittsburgh 5, Chicago Cubs 4 Washington 7, Miami 1 Milwaukee 6, Philadelphia 2 N.Y. Mets 6, Atlanta 4 Arizona 6, San Francisco 5, 10 innings Fridays Games Miami at Philadelphia, late Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, late Washington at Atlanta, late Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, late Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, late L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late Detroit at San Diego, late Colorado at San Francisco, late Todays Games Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1) at Cincinnati (Si mon 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 1-2) at St. Louis (Wainwright 1-1), 2:15 p.m. Colorado (Anderson 0-2) at San Fran cisco (M.Cain 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Eovaldi 1-1) at Philadelphia (Petti bone 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 0-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-0), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Jordan 0-0) at Atlanta (A.Wood 1-1), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 2-0) at Arizona (Mi ley 2-1), 8:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 0-1) at San Diego (Ken nedy 1-1), 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2), 9:05 p.m. Sundays Games Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 46 32 .590 x-Brooklyn 43 35 .551 3 New York 33 45 .423 13 Boston 23 55 .295 23 Philadelphia 17 61 .218 29 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 53 25 .679 x-Charlotte 40 38 .513 13 x-Washington 40 38 .513 13 Atlanta 35 43 .449 18 Orlando 23 55 .295 30 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 54 25 .684 x-Chicago 46 32 .590 7 Cleveland 32 47 .405 22 Detroit 29 50 .367 25 Milwaukee 14 64 .179 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 61 18 .772 x-Houston 52 26 .667 8 Dallas 48 32 .600 13 Memphis 46 32 .590 14 New Orleans 32 46 .410 28 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 57 21 .731 x-Portland 51 28 .646 6 Minnesota 39 39 .500 18 Denver 35 44 .443 22 Utah 24 54 .308 33 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 55 24 .696 Golden State 48 30 .615 6 Phoenix 47 31 .603 7 Sacramento 27 52 .342 28 L.A. Lakers 25 53 .321 29 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Thursdays Games San Antonio 109, Dallas 100 Denver 100, Golden State 99 Fridays Games Washington at Orlando, late New York at Toronto, late Atlanta at Brooklyn, late Charlotte at Boston, late Indiana at Miami, late Detroit at Chicago, late Houston at Minnesota, late New Orleans at Oklahoma City, late Philadelphia at Memphis, late Cleveland at Milwaukee, late Phoenix at San Antonio, late Portland at Utah, late Golden State at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Utah at Denver, 9 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 80 53 18 9 115 255 173 x-Montreal 81 45 28 8 98 214 204 x-Tampa Bay 80 44 27 9 97 236 213 x-Detroit 80 38 27 15 91 218 228 Ottawa 80 35 31 14 84 232 263 Toronto 81 38 35 8 84 231 255 Florida 81 29 44 8 66 194 265 Buffalo 80 21 50 9 51 153 240 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 80 51 24 5 107 244 200 x-N.Y. Rangers 81 45 31 5 95 218 192 x-Philadelphia 80 41 30 9 91 227 226 x-Columbus 80 42 31 7 91 226 211 Washington 80 37 30 13 87 231 239 New Jersey 80 34 29 17 85 192 203 Carolina 80 34 35 11 79 199 224 N.Y. Islanders 80 32 37 11 75 218 262 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Colorado 80 52 21 7 111 247 212 x-St. Louis 80 52 21 7 111 248 185 x-Chicago 80 46 19 15 107 262 209 x-Minnesota 81 43 26 12 98 204 199 Dallas 80 39 30 11 89 231 226 Nashville 80 36 32 12 84 202 234 Winnipeg 81 36 35 10 82 222 234 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Anaheim 80 52 20 8 112 259 204 x-San Jose 80 49 22 9 107 241 197 x-Los Angeles 81 46 28 7 99 203 170 Phoenix 80 36 29 15 87 212 227 Vancouver 80 35 34 11 81 189 217 Calgary 80 35 38 7 77 205 231 Edmonton 81 28 44 9 65 198 268 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Thursdays Games Ottawa 2, New Jersey 1, SO Winnipeg 2, Boston 1, SO N.Y. Rangers 2, Buffalo 1 Washington 5, Carolina 2 N.Y. Islanders 2, Montreal 0 Tampa Bay 4, Philadelphia 2 Florida 4, Toronto 2 Nashville 2, Phoenix 0 Minnesota 4, St. Louis 2 Los Angeles 3, Edmonton 0 Colorado 4, Vancouver 2 Fridays Games Chicago at Washington, late Carolina at Detroit, late Columbus at Tampa Bay, late N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, late St. Louis at Dallas, late Winnipeg at Calgary, late Colorado at San Jose, late Todays Games Buffalo at Boston, 12:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Columbus at Florida, 7 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m. San Jose at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 10 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. GOLF Masters Friday At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Second Round a-amateur Bubba Watson 69-68 137 John Senden 72-68 140 Thomas Bjorn 73-68 141 Jonas Blixt 70-71 141 Adam Scott 69-72 141 Jordan Spieth 71-70 141 Fred Couples 71-71 142 Jim Furyk 74-68 142 Jimmy Walker 70-72 142 Jamie Donaldson 73-70 143 Stephen Gallacher 71-72 143 Russell Henley 73-70 143 Kevin Stadler 70-73 143 Kevin Streelman 72-71 143 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 75-69 144 Lucas Glover 75-69 144 Matt Kuchar 73-71 144 Louis Oosthuizen 69-75 144 Brandt Snedeker 70-74 144 Lee Westwood 73-71 144 K.J. Choi 70-75 145 Stewart Cink 73-72 145 Henrik Stenson 73-72 145 Steve Stricker 72-73 145 Mike Weir 73-72 145 Steven Bowditch 74-72 146 Brendon de Jonge 74-72 146 Rickie Fowler 71-75 146 Bill Haas 68-78 146 Bernhard Langer 72-74 146 Hunter Mahan 74-72 146 Larry Mize 74-72 146 Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72 146 Ian Poulter 76-70 146 Justin Rose 76-70 146 Vijay Singh 75-71 146 a-Oliver Goss 76-71 147 Billy Horschel 75-72 147 Thongchai Jaidee 73-74 147 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76 147 Martin Kaymer 75-72 147 Chris Kirk 75-72 147 Francesco Molinari 71-76 147 Nick Watney 72-75 147 Gary Woodland 70-77 147 Darren Cla rke 74-74 148 Jason Day 75-73 148 Sandy Lyle 76-72 148 Joost Luiten 75-73 148 Rory McIlroy 71-77 148 Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74 148 Failed to qualify Sang-Moon Bae 72-77 149 Luke Donald 79-70 149 Victor Dubuisson 74-75 149 Ernie Els 75-74 149 a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 76-73 149 Sergio Garcia 74-75 149 Marc Leishman 70-79 149 Phil Mickelson 76-73 149 Ryan Moore 77-72 149 Charl Schwartzel 73-76 149 Webb Simpson 74-75 149 Harris English 74-76 150 Zach Johnson 78-72 150 Graeme McDowell 72-78 150 D.A. Points 78-72 150 Ian Woosnam 77-73 150 Ken Duke 75-76 151 John Huh 75-76 151 Dustin Johnson 77-74 151 Hideki Matsuyama 80-71 151 Angel Cabrera 78-74 152 Graham DeLaet 80-72 152 Derek Ernst 76-76 152 Matt Jones 74-78 152 David Lynn 78-74 152 Matteo Manassero 71-81 152 Mark OMeara 75-77 152 Patrick Reed 73-79 152 Keegan Bradley 75-78 153 Robert Castro 73-80 153 Branden Grace 84-69 153 Trevor Immelman 79-74 153 a-Chang-woo Lee 80-73 153 Jason Dufner 80-74 154 Y.E. Yang 77-77 154 Matt Every 77-78 155 a-Jordan Niebrugge 81-74 155 Scott Stallings 75-80 155 a-Garrick Porteous 76-80 156 Boo Weekley 73-83 156 Tim Clark 79-78 157 Peter Hanson 78-81 159 Craig Stadler 82-77 159 Tom Watson 78-81 159 a-Michael McCoy 78-83 161 Ben Crenshaw 83-85 168 TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 6 p.m. FS1 United SportsCar Championship, at Long Beach, Calif. NBCSN IndyCar, qualifying for Grand Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif. 6:30 p.m. FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C. 9 p.m. ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Four-Wide Nationals, at Concord, N.C. COLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN2 Arkansas at LSU 10:30 p.m. ESPNU UCLA at Arizona COLLEGE SOFTBALL Noon SUN North Texas at Marshall 5 p.m. ESPN Oklahoma at Baylor 10 p.m. ESPN2 Washington at Stanford GOLF 3 p.m. CBS Masters Tournament, third round, at Augusta, Ga. HORSE RACING 4:30 p.m. FS1 Thoroughbreds, Blue Grass Stakes, at Lexington, Ky. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Cincinnati FS1 Boston at N.Y. Yankees 2 p.m. WGN Cleveland at Chicago White Sox 4 p.m. MLB Colorado at S.F 7 p.m. FS-Florida Miami at Philadelphia 8 p.m. MLB L.A. Dodgers at Arizona MENS COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Division I, playoffs, championship, Union (N.Y.) vs. Minnesota at Philadelphia MOTORSPORTS 10:30 p.m. FS1 AMA Supercross, at Seattle NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 7 p.m. NBA Milwaukee at Washington NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 3 p.m. NBC Philadelphia at Pittsburgh 8 p.m. NBCSN Chicago at Nashville PREP BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 Nike Hoop Summit, USA Junior National Select Team vs. World Select Team, at Portland, Ore. PREP SOFTBALL 6 p.m. BHSN Orlando Pine Castle Christian at St. Cloud 8 p.m. BHSN Winter Park Trinity Prep at Kissimmee Osceola Note: BHSN is available to Bright House cable subscribers. SOCCER 9:55 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Tottenham at West Bromwich SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED fth inning. Mount Dora built its advantage with four runs in the second and ve more in the fourth. In the bottom of the fth, the Yellow Jackets plated eight runs to take a 14-13 lead, but were unable to hold the lead, giving up the advantage when Mount Dora scored four in the top of the sixth. Leesburg tied the game at 17-all in the bot tom of the inning. Bethany Guild forced extra innings when she stole home for the Yellow Jackets to tie the game. The two teams combined for 37 hits, including 20 by Leesburg. Taylorose Long had ve hits to lead the Yellow Jackets. Guild and Sarah McKinney, who made a diving catch in her nal home game, had four hits apiece. Katrina Lanier had three hits. Alvarez and Long scored four runs apiece. McK inney, Lanier, Guild and Taylor Sullivan scored two runs each. Kailey Stephens earned the win in relief of La nier. Leesburg played at Ocala Lake Weir on Friday in both teams regular-season nale, but results of the game were not available at presstime. The Yel low Jackets will play next week in the Class 6A-Dis trict 6 tournament at Ocala Forest. SOFTBALL FROM PAGE B1 tapped in for the rst of ve straight birdies that propelled him to a 4-under 68. Even after making his second bogey of the tournament by miss ing a short putt at the 18th, Watson walked off with his second straight round in the 60s, a 36hole score of 7-under 137, and a three-stroke lead. Its not science here, Watson said. Its try to hit the greens, and if youre hitting the greens that means youre ob viously hitting your tee shots well. So thats all Im trying to do, just hit the greens. Look whos in the mix again, too: 54-year-old Fred Couples, who post ed his second straight 71. This is the fth straight year the 1992 winner has gone to the weekend in the top 10 he was leading two years ago but hes never been able to hang on. I cant panic, said Couples, looking to be come the oldest major champion in golf his tory. Youre not going to pick up two or three shots here because you want to. Its not that kind of course. Youve got to hang in there, ex pect a tough shot here and there. Its going to be a tough day tomor row. Watson opened Thursday with a 69 and went bogey-free through the rst 26 holes, nally stumbling at the ninth. But that bogey was quickly for gotten when he put on a dazzling display of the golf that had the pa trons roaring. He took advantage of both par 5s, sandwiched around a curling, 40-foot bird ie putt at the 14th that prompted him to throw both arms in the air. Watson made it ve in a row at the par-3 16th, pulling off anoth er magnicent tee shot with the 9-iron, the ball rolling up about 4 feet short of the ag. He be came only the fth play er in Masters history to run off nothing but birdies from the 12th to 16th holes. A year ago, the lefthander nished in a tie for 50th last year as the defending Masters champion, his worst showing in ve previ ous appearances. He likes being two years re moved from his cham pionship a whole lot better. I was in awe when I was the champion, Watson said. I didnt know how to handle it the best way, so I didnt play my best golf. Watsons closest pur suer was Australias John Senden, who birdied 14 and 15 on his way to a 68 and 140 ov erall. Defending champion Adam Scott rallied for a 72 after making the turn at 3 over, keeping him solidly in contention at the midway point with a 141. He was joined by Denmarks Thomas Bjorn, who birdied four of the last ve holes for a 68, and Swedens Jonas Blixt, who managed 71 despite a double-bogey at the 11th. Five shots back, Cou ples was joined at 142 by Jimmy Walker, a threetime PGA Tour winner this season who shot 72, and Jim Furyk, whose 68 matched Watson, Send en and Bjorn for the best round of the day. Twen ty-year-old Jordan Spi eth also was at 2 under as he headed to the 18th hole in the nal group of the day. First-round leader Bill Haas, teeing off on a warm, sunny afternoon with the wind picking up and the greens get ting rmer, was still at 4 under approaching the turn. Then came a mis erable stretch of holes starting at No. 9: bogey, bogey, double-bogey, bogey, bogey. He stag gered to a 78 10 shots higher than the day be fore, knocking him nine shots back. At least Haas gets to keep playing. Three-time winner Phil Mickelson missed the Augusta cut for the rst time since 1997. Lefty had a triple-bo gey at the 12th, where he knocked three straight shots in bun kers for his second tri ple of the tournament. Three birdies on the back side gave him a glimmer of hope, but 73 totaled up to 149 one shot too many. Its tough to over come those big num bers, said Mickelson, who had plenty of bigname company beyond the cut line. Sergio Garcia, Luke Donald, Ernie Els, Graeme McDowell, Dustin Johnson, An gel Cabrera and Charl Schwartzel were all headed home as well before the weekend. MASTERS FROM PAGE B1

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Late Thursday Astros 6, Blue Jays 4 Houston Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 0 1 0 MeCarr lf 5 0 2 0 Presley rf 4 0 0 0 Izturis 2b 4 0 0 0 JCastro c 4 1 2 1 Bautist rf 2 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 4 0 0 0 Carter dh 4 0 0 0 Navarr dh 3 1 0 0 Krauss 1b 3 1 1 0 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 1 1 0 Rasms cf 4 2 3 1 Grssmn lf 2 2 1 2 Thole c 2 0 1 0 Villar ss 4 1 1 3 Kratz ph-c 2 0 0 0 Diaz ss 2 0 1 0 Sierra ph 1 0 0 0 Goins ss 0 0 0 0 Lind ph 1 1 1 2 Totals 33 6 8 6 Totals 34 4 8 3 Houston 000 020 310 6 Toronto 000 010 003 4 EBass (1). DPHouston 1, Toronto 1. LOBHouston 4, Toronto 7. 2BKrauss (1), M.Dominguez (2), Me. Cabrera 2 (2), Lind (3). HRJ.Castro (2), Grossman (1), Villar (2), Rasmus (1). SIzturis. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Keuchel W,1-1 7 5 1 1 2 6 Qualls 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fields 2 / 3 2 3 2 1 1 Bass S,1-1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Toronto Dickey L,1-2 7 6 5 5 3 4 Rogers 1 2 1 1 0 3 Redmond 1 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Gabe Mo rales; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T:49. A,778 (49,282). Yankees 4, Red Sox 1 Boston New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Sizemr lf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 1 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 1 2 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 4 1 1 1 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 Beltran rf 3 1 1 0 Nava rf 4 1 1 1 McCnn c 3 0 1 1 Bogarts ss 4 0 2 0 ASorin dh 3 0 0 0 Przyns c 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 2 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 JHerrr 3b 2 0 0 0 Anna 2b 3 1 1 1 RRorts ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 1 4 1 Totals 30 4 7 3 Boston 000 000 100 1 New York 000 220 00x 4 EJ.Herrera (1). DPBoston 1. LOBBoston 5, New York 2. 2BD.Ortiz (3), Jeter (2). HRNava (1), Anna (1). SBBradley Jr. (1). IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz L,0-1 6 7 4 2 0 6 Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 0 Capuano 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Pineda W,1-1 6 4 1 1 2 7 Cabral H,1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 2 Phelps S,1-1 2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 Pineda pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. BalkCabral. UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson; First, John Tumpane; Second, Brian ONora; Third, James Hoye. T:55. A,821 (49,642). Mets 6, Braves 4 New York Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 5 4 3 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 2 3 3 BUpton cf 4 1 1 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 1 1 Fremn 1b 4 1 2 1 Grndrs rf 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 1 J.Upton lf 4 2 3 3 Lagars cf 5 0 1 1 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 dArnad c 4 0 0 0 Doumit c 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 R.Pena ss 4 0 1 0 Mejia p 2 0 0 0 Hale p 2 0 0 0 Satin ph 1 0 0 0 Varvar p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0 Duda ph 1 0 1 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Frnswr p 0 0 0 0 Schlssr p 0 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 9 6 Totals 33 4 7 4 New York 102 010 110 6 Atlanta 013 000 000 4 EDoumit (1). DPNew York 1. LOBNew York 9, At lanta 6. 2BDan.Murphy (2). 3BE.Young (1), B.Up ton (1). HRJ.Upton 2 (2). SBE.Young 3 (5), Dan. Murphy (1), Granderson (2), Heyward (2). IP H R ER BB SO New York Mejia 5 6 4 4 4 7 C.Torres W,2-0 2 1 0 0 0 3 Farnsworth H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Valverde S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Atlanta Hale 4 1 / 3 5 4 3 5 2 Varvaro 1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 3 Avilan L,1-1 2 / 3 1 1 1 1 1 Schlosser 1 1 / 3 3 1 1 0 0 Thomas 1 0 0 0 0 3 WPMejia 2, Avilan. UmpiresHome, Gary Cederstrom; First, Kerwin Dan ley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Mark Ripperger. T:26. A,470 (49,586). Brewers 6, Phillies 2 Milwaukee Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 5 1 3 1 Revere cf 4 0 0 0 Segura ss 5 0 1 1 Rollins ss 3 1 1 0 Braun rf 3 1 2 1 Utley 2b 4 0 2 0 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1 Howard 1b 2 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 Byrd rf 4 1 2 2 KDavis lf 4 0 2 2 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b 3 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Weeks 2b 4 1 1 0 Asche 3b 4 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Cl.Lee p 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz ph 1 0 0 0 Estrad p 2 0 0 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 0 1 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ ph 1 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 1 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 6 11 6 Totals 32 2 6 2 Milwaukee 000 201 300 6 Philadelphia 010 001 000 2 EAsche (2). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBMilwaukee 5, Philadelphia 6. 2BAr.Ramirez (2), Lucroy (6), K.Davis (5). 3BC.Gomez (1). HRByrd (2). CSSegura (3), Rollins (1). SL.Schafer. SFBraun. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Estrada W,1-0 6 5 2 2 2 6 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 2 W.Smith 1 1 0 0 1 2 Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 2 Philadelphia Cl.Lee L,2-1 6 8 3 3 0 8 Manship 0 2 3 3 0 0 Diekman 1 1 0 0 0 1 De Fratus 2 0 0 0 1 0 Manship pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Angel Hernandez. T:48. A,492 (43,651). Diamondbacks 6, Giants 5 10 innings Arizona San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Campn cf 6 0 4 1 Pagan cf 4 1 1 0 Hill 2b 6 0 1 0 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 1 0 Sandovl 3b 3 1 0 0 Prado 3b 4 1 1 0 Posey c 5 1 2 1 Monter c 4 1 1 2 Pence rf 5 1 2 0 Trumo lf 4 1 1 0 Morse lf 4 1 2 2 GParra rf 4 1 1 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 5 1 3 2 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Delgad p 2 0 0 0 Arias ph 1 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 Petit p 0 0 0 0 Harris p 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 2 1 Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 0 1 1 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 0 0 EChavz ph 1 0 0 0 Huff p 0 0 0 0 Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0 Adrianz ph 1 0 0 0 Owings ph 1 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 J.Perez lf 0 0 0 0 HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 6 13 5 Totals 37 5 10 5 Arizona 022 000 010 1 6 San Francisco 011 120 000 0 5 EPagan (1), Sandoval (2), B.Hicks (2). DPArizona 2, San Francisco 2. LOBArizona 11, San Fran cisco 10. 2BHill (5), Goldschmidt (6), Montero (1), Trumbo (2), Pence (3), Morse 2 (4), B.Crawford 2 (4). SBCampana (1), Pennington (1). CSCampana (1). SJ.Perez. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Delgado 3 1 / 3 6 3 3 3 0 O.Perez 1 0 1 1 1 0 Harris 2 / 3 2 1 1 0 1 Ziegler 2 1 0 0 1 1 Thatcher 1 1 0 0 2 0 Putz W,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 A.Reed S,3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 San Francisco Vogelsong 5 7 4 4 1 5 Huff H,1 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 J.Gutierrez H,1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Machi H,1 2 / 3 2 0 0 1 0 J.Lopez H,2 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 Casilla BS,1-1 1 2 1 0 1 0 Romo 1 0 0 0 0 1 Petit L,0-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 Vogelsong pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby Vogelsong (Montero Prado). UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny Gonza lez; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Sean Barber. T:10. A,577 (41,915). White Sox 7, Indians 3 Cleveland Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi ACarer ss 4 2 2 1 Eaton cf 4 1 2 1 Swisher 1b 3 1 0 0 Semien 2b 3 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 0 CSantn dh 4 0 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 2 2 3 Raburn lf 3 0 2 1 A.Dunn dh 2 0 0 0 Brantly cf 4 0 1 0 Viciedo rf 4 1 1 0 YGoms c 3 0 0 0 JrDnks rf 0 0 0 0 Aviles 3b 3 0 0 0 De Aza lf 3 1 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 1 2 3 Nieto c 4 1 1 0 Totals 31 3 6 2 Totals 32 7 9 7 Cleveland 201 000 000 3 Chicago 012 210 10x 7 EY.Gomes (3), De Aza (1), Semien (2). DPChicago 2. LOBCleveland 4, Chicago 5. 2BA.Cabrera (3), Brantley (3), Eaton (1), Al.Ramirez (4). HRA.Cabrera (1), Abreu 2 (4), Al.Ramirez (2). SFRaburn. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Salazar L,0-1 3 2 / 3 6 5 5 2 10 Outman 1 1 1 1 1 1 C.Lee 1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 1 B.Wood 1 2 1 1 1 1 Atchison 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Joh.Danks W,1-0 6 6 3 3 2 4 D.Webb H,1 2 0 0 0 0 2 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPSalazar, Joh.Danks. UmpiresHome, Phil Cuzzi; First, Brian Knight; Sec ond, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Gerry Davis. T:52. A,116 (40,615). League Leaders AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTINGSPerez, Kansas City, .458; Kubel, Minne sota, .448; JHamilton, Los Angeles, .444; AlRamirez, Chicago, .421; Solarte, New York, .387; Longoria, Tampa Bay, .371; Wieters, Baltimore, .367. RUNSBautista, Toronto, 9; Dozier, Minnesota, 9; Eaton, Chicago, 9; AlRamirez, Chicago, 8; Abreu, Chi cago, 7; Beltre, Texas, 7; CDavis, Baltimore, 7; JHam ilton, Los Angeles, 7; Lowrie, Oakland, 7; Plouffe, Minnesota, 7. RBIAbreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Minnesota, 11; AGordon, Kansas City, 9; Moss, Oakland, 9; Al Ramirez, Chicago, 9; Smoak, Seattle, 9; Napoli, Bos ton, 8; Ortiz, Boston, 8. HITSAlRamirez, Chicago, 16; MeCabrera, Toronto, 15; Eaton, Chicago, 13; Ellsbury, New York, 13; Kubel, Minnesota, 13; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 13; 8 tied at 12. DOUBLESDeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Solarte, New York, 6; Carter, Houston, 4; Colabello, Minnesota, 4; Kubel, Minnesota, 4; Navarro, Toronto, 4; SPerez, Kansas City, 4; Pujols, Los Angeles, 4; AlRamirez, Chicago, 4. TRIPLESAoki, Kansas City, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 25 tied at 1. HOME RUNSAbreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista, Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; De Aza, Chicago, 3; Dozier, Minnesota, 3; Hart, Seattle, 3; TorHunter, Detroit, 3. STOLEN BASESEllsbury, New York, 4; Altuve, Hous ton, 3; RDavis, Detroit, 3; Dozier, Minnesota, 3; Kip nis, Cleveland, 3; Villar, Houston, 3; 15 tied at 2. PITCHING tied at 2. ERABuehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Feldman, Houston, 0.66; Gray, Oakland, 0.75; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Scherzer, Detroit, 1.20; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.20; Tillman, Baltimore, 1.35. STRIKEOUTSFHernandez, Seattle, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18; Scherzer, Detroit, 15; CWilson, Los Angeles, 15; Sale, Chicago, 14; Lester, Boston, 14; Buehrle, Toronto, 14; Dickey, Toronto, 14; Salazar, Cleveland, 14. SAVESAxford, Cleveland, 4; TomHunter, Baltimore, 3; Holland, Kansas City, 3; Santos, Toronto, 3; Bal four, Tampa Bay, 2; Rodney, Seattle, 2; Robertson, New York, 2; Uehara, Boston, 2; Perkins, Minne sota, 2. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTINGBlackmon, Colorado, .471; Utley, Philadel phia, .464; Bonifacio, Chicago, .452; Pagan, San Francisco, .442; Freeman, Atlanta, .419; Cuddyer, Colorado, .415; Rendon, Washington, .412. RUNSCuddyer, Colorado, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9; CGonzalez, Colorado, 9; Prado, Arizona, 9; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 9; 12 tied at 8. RBIStanton, Miami, 13; Trumbo, Arizona, 13; CGon zalez, Colorado, 11; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; McGehee, Mi ami, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10. HITSBonifacio, Chicago, 19; Pagan, San Francisco, 19; Cuddyer, Colorado, 17; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 17; Blackmon, Colorado, 16; CGomez, Milwaukee, 16; Ar Ramirez, Milwaukee, 15; Uribe, Los Angeles, 15. DOUBLESGoldschmidt, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwau kee, 6; KDavis, Milwaukee, 5; Hill, Arizona, 5; Uribe, Los Angeles, 5; 11 tied at 4. TRIPLES tied at 1. HOME RUNSPAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt, San Fran cisco, 5; Trumbo, Arizona, 5; Braun, Milwaukee, 3; Cuddyer, Colorado, 3; Desmond, Washington, 3; CGo mez, Milwaukee, 3; CGonzalez, Colorado, 3; YMolina, St. Louis, 3; Posey, San Francisco, 3. STOLEN BASESBonifacio, Chicago, 7; Revere, Phil adelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4; DGordon, Los Angeles, 4; Amarista, San Diego, 3; Marte, Pittsburgh, 3; Owings, Arizona, 3; Segura, Milwaukee, 3; Yelich, Miami, 3. PITCHING tied at 2. ERAGallardo, Milwaukee, 0.00; Fernandez, Miami, 0.71; Harang, Atlanta, 0.71; Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; GGonzalez, Washington, 0.75; Haren, Los Angeles, 0.75; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.15. STRIKEOUTSStrasburg, Washington, 28; TWood, Chicago, 17; Fernandez, Miami, 17; Cueto, Cincinnati, 17; Wainwright, St. Louis, 16; Lee, Phila delphia, 15; Mejia, New York, 15; Miley, Arizona, 15. SAVESKimbrel, Atlanta, 4; AReed, Arizona, 3; Street, San Diego, 3; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 3; Grilli, Pitts burgh, 3; 6 tied at 2. This date in Baseball April 12 1906 Johnny Bates of Boston became the rst modern player to hit a home run in his rst major league at bat. Irv Young allowed one hit as Boston beat Brooklyn 2-0. 1912 The Chicago Cubs Tinker-EversChance double play combination played its nal major league game together. 1955 In their rst game in Kansas City, the transplanted Athletics defeated the Detroit Tigers 6-2 at Municipal Stadium. The stand ing-room crowd of 32,147 was the largest paid crowd for any event in Kansas City. 1965 The rst National League home run in the Houston Astrodome was hit by Richie Allen of the Philadelphia Phillies off Bob Bruce in a 2-0 victory over the Astros. 1966 A crowd of 50,671 welcomed the Braves to Atlanta, but Willie Stargell spoiled the occasion with a two-run homer in the 13th inning to give the Pirates a 3-2 victory. 1980 In an awesome display of power, Cecil Cooper and Don Money each hit grand slams in the second inning of Milwaukees 18-1 rout of the Boston Red Sox. 1992 Bostons Matt Young pitched eight no-hit innings at Cleveland but lost 2-1. In the second game, the Indians managed only two hits off Roger Clemens to set a major league record for fewest hits (2) in a doubleheader. 1994 Scott Cooper hit for the cycle and drove in ve runs to lead the Boston Red Sox to a 22-11 rout of the Kansas City Royals. 2003 The Detroit Tigers won for the rst time this season, getting a three-run homer from Shane Halter to beat the White Sox 4-3. The Tigers (1-9), the only team since 1900 to start back-to-back seasons with nine straight losses, started 0-11 last season. 2011 Dan Haren pitched a one-hitter, al lowing only Shin-Soo Choos clean single in the fourth inning, and the Los Angeles Angels beat Cleveland 2-0. Haren struck out eight and walked two in his third major league shut out. Choos single to center eld came with one out in the fourth. Todays birthdays: Justin Ruggiano 32; Hisashi Iwakuma 33. NOAH TRISTER Associated Press Michael Pineda is only the latest in a long line of pitchers suspect ed of nefario us conduct on the mound. After the New York Yankees right-hander kept Bostons offense in check for six innings Thursday night, post game talk centered on the dark, seeming ly tacky substance that had been on the lower palm of Pinedas pitch ing hand. The game was never stopped for an umpire to examine Pi neda. Previous hurlers hav ent been so lucky. Here are six other notewor thy controversies in volving the men of the mound: PERRY EJECTED Well after the end of his Hall of Fame career, Gaylord Perry could still joke about his infamous spitball. In 1982, the Se attle star was ejected for allegedly throwing the pitch against the Bos ton Red Sox. It was the rst ejection for Perry, who was subsequently suspended for 10 days. SANDY SITUATIONS In 1987, Philadelphia pitcher Kevin Gross was suspended for 10 days after he was caught with sandpaper in his glove. That same year, Min nesotas Joe Niekro also got 10 days for carry ing an emery board and sandpaper in his back pocket. PLAYOFF BAN Los Angeles Dodg ers reliever Jay How ell was suspended for two games during the 1988 NL championship series against the New York Mets after he was found to have pine tar on his glove. SUSPICIOUS SMUDGE Early in Game 2 of the 2006 World Series, umpires asked Detroit pitcher Kenny Rog ers to clean off his left hand, concerned about a brown smudge on the base of his thumb. Rog ers insisted it was just a mix of mud, resin, spit and dirt. Rogers hand was clean when he came out for the second inning, and he went on to pitch shutout ball in the Tigers only victory of the series against St. Louis. MANAGERIAL SQUABBLE Davey Johnson, who managed the Mets in the 1988 NLCS, was leading the Washing ton Nationals in 2012 when he raised ques tions about the glove of Tamp a Bay reliever Joel Peralta. Umpires found pine tar, Peralta was ejected. The incident led to a testy back-andforth between Johnson and Rays manager Joe Maddon, who insisted it was un derhanded of Johnson to use inside information against Peralta, who had pre viously pitched for the Nationals. Maddon said pine tar use is common knowledge in the indus try and doesnt help a pitcher that much anyway. Johnsons re sponse: Read the rule book. PLEADING IGNORANCE Last season, Mi amis Alex Sanabia was caught spitting direct ly onto the ball and said he didnt know that was illegal. His actions were so blatant that the ex planation seemed credi ble. He would pitch only once more for the Mar lins before going down with a groin inju ry. Foreign substances on mound nothing new AP FILE PHOTO Home plate umpire John Flaherty checks Cleveland pitcher Gaylord Perrys cap, at the request of Milwaukee manager Del Crandall, during a game in 1973 in Milwaukee. Well after the end of his Hall of Fame career, Perry could still joke about his infamous spitball, but in 1982, the Seattle star was ejected for allegedly throwing the pitch against Boston. NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION CHARLES ODUM Associated Press ATLANTA Dom inique Wilkins hopes young fans take the time to learn about Lou Hudson. Wilkins says theyll discover Sweet Lou was one of the best shooting guards in NBA history. Hudson, a smooth-shooting star for the Hawks who av eraged more than 20 points during 13 NBA seasons, died Friday. He was 69. He died in Atlan ta, where he was hos pitalized and listed in grave condition last month after a stroke, the Hawks said. Hudson was a sixtime All-Star while with the Hawks in St. Louis and Atlanta, often play ing away from the na tional spotlight. Young people to day dont know how good Lou Hudson real ly was, Wilkins, a Hall of Famer, told The As sociated Press. He was a hell of a player. The guy could score with the best in history. He was a phenomenal bas ketball player. He should be a Hall of Famer and its amaz ing to me hes not. He was one of the best (shooting) guards and thats a fact. You go back and look at his career and look at the numbers and see what he did and you under stand. Hudson was the rst face of the Hawks fran chise in Atlanta. He then passed the torch to Wilkins. Hudson, who at 6-foot-5 could play guard and forward, av eraged 20.2 points for his career. He spent 11 seasons with the Hawks and nished with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1979. His No. 23 was retired by the Hawks, joining Bob Pettit and Wilkins as the only other Hawks players so honored. His jersey is not re tired for nothing, Wilkins said. Only three jerseys are up there, so you know he had to be a heck of a player to have his jer sey hanging in that building. His No. 14 was re tired by the University of Minnesota, where he was one of the schools rst black players. Lou Hudson holds a special place in the Hawks family, in the hearts of our fans and in the history of our club, Hawks co-own er Michael Gearon said. As a fan growing up with this team, Im fortunate to say I was able to see almost ev ery game Sweet Lou played as a member of the Hawks. He was an inte gral part of successful Hawks teams for over a decade, and is deserv edly recognized with the ultimate symbol of his signicance to the franchise with the number 23 hanging in side Philips Arena. Beginning with the 1969-70 season, Hud son averaged at least 24 points in ve straight seasons. In his years with the Hawks, he averaged at least 20 points seven times. He set a career high with his 27.1 points per game in 1972-73. He scored 57 points against Chicago on Nov. 10, 1969, match ing the franchise re cord also set by Pettit and Wilkins. Hudson was a rstround pick by St. Lou is in 1966 and made the NBA all-rookie team. He missed part of his second season while serving in the Army. Following the teams move from St. Lou is, he scored the rst points for the new At lanta team in 1968. He helped lead the Hawks to the 1970 Western Di vision championship. Former Hawks All-Star Lou Hudson dies at 69 AP FILE PHOTO Los Angeles Lakers center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, left, reaches for the ball held by Seattles Marvin Webster, center, as Los Angeles Lou Hudson (23), right, defends during a 1978 playoff game in Los Angeles. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 DENISE LAVOIE and PAIGE SUTHERLAND Associated Press BOSTON Every time Roseann Sdoia comes home, she must climb 18 steps six stairs into the building, another 12 to her apart ment. It is an old build ing in Bostons North End, with doors that are big and heavy, not an easy place for an ampu tee to live. When she left the hospital, a month af ter the Boston mara thon bombing, she had a choice: She could nd another place to live, one more suitable for someone who wears a prosthetic that replaces most of her right leg. Or, she could stay. Early on when all this happened, so many people were telling me to move out of the city and move out of my apartment because of the stairs and I dont have an elevator and parking is not very con venient, she recalls. But I have been able to get past all of that. In that, she mirrors Boston itself. I have to tell you, honestly, Boston is a better city now than it was before, says Thomas Menino, Bos tons former mayor. People learned how to deal with each other, they had to deal with a tragedy. Not that its been easy. Three people were killed at last years Bos ton Marathon, and more than 260 were in jured, and the legacy of trauma and lost limbs remains as does the shock of having en dured a terrorist attack on Marathon Monday. Nor can Bostonians for get the fear that gripped a city locked down in the midst of a manhunt. But Boston has been able to get past all of that. Copley Square is no longer littered with impromptu tributes to the dead and injured; theyre now on dis play in an exhibit at the Boston Public Library, where Robert White of Lynn saw meaning in every teddy bear and pair of sneakers: Ev ery last one of the items says Boston Strong or I will return next year. Roseann Sdoia is 46 years old, a vice presi dent of property man agement for a Boston development company. She is a cheerful wom an; she smiles broad ly when she arrives at the Spaulding Reha bilitation Hospital in Charlestown for physi cal therapy. Its just my nature, she says. Im not a neg ative person. Im not a Debbie Downer. Still, she says, she cries every day. What is sinking in is that life has changed, she says, her face awash with tears. Sdoia is a runner, but she did not take part in the marathon. She was at the nish line on April 15, rooting for friends in the race, when the second bomb went off. Aside from her leg injury, she suffered hearing loss. Other than losing the bottom of my right leg, Im still me, she says. I havent changed, I am still the same person I was before. And yet, so much has changed. She had to take more leave from the job she loved. Win ter, and snow, were tough to handle. Shes had to tackle daily tasks showering, vacuum ing differently. Marc Fucarile, a 35-year-old roofer from Stoneham, also lost his right leg from above the knee; he has shrapnel in his heart, and still could lose his left leg. Everything has changed, he says. How I use the bath room, how I shower, how I brush my teeth, how I get in and out of bed. His 6-year-old son, Gavin, does not always understand. Gavin is like, Hey, you want to go out and play? and Im like, Theres a foot of snow. I cant do snow. Were not going out and playing right now, sor ry buddy. It breaks my heart. In the rst three months after the ex plosions, the One Fund collected nearly $61 million in donations. In the next ve months, another $12 million in contributions came in. This big-heartedness was mirrored by a sort of proud deance, ex emplied by Boston Strong. The amount of merchandise bearing the slogan was aston ishing. In the immediate af termath of the bomb ings, it became a peace ful mantra that people could repeat and be lieve in. And if they said it enough, tweeted it enough, hash-tagged it enough, it would actu ally be true, says Dan Soleau, a brand devel opment manager for Ma rathon Sports. Jennifer Lawrence, a social worker at Boston Medical Center, says the emphasis on Boston Strong had had some unhappy consequenc es. A lot of it is portray ing that people are so resilient and so strong. While that is absolutely true, we are neglecting that people still have hard days, she said. In the aftermath of the bombings, more than 600 people took advan tage of the medical cen ters mental health ser vices. And while most needed no help after the rst few months, she has seen an in crease in demand in re cent weeks, as the anni versary approached. Still, she says a vast majority of those who came through the hos pitals programs intend to attend this years marathon, either as by standers or runners. Nicole Lynch will be there. Her brother, Sean Collier, was the MIT of cer who was shot to death, allegedly by the two suspects in the bombings. She will be at the race with Team Col lier Strong a group of 25 friends and fami ly members, including two of her siblings, who will run to raise money for a scholarship fund to put one person a year through law enforce ment training. William Evans will be there, but he has lit tle choice. He has run the marathon 18 times including last year but this time he will be there as police com missioner, supervis ing beefed-up securi ty including more than 3,500 police ofcers (more than twice last years force), more se curity cameras, more bomb-snifng dogs, and restrictions on the kinds of bags run ners and spectators can bring. It weighs heavy on my mind, that I want this to go off well, he says. I dont want any one hurt. I dont ever want a repeat of the tragedy we saw that day. A year after, Boston and its people heal ELISE AMENDOLA / AP Boston Marathon bombing victim Marc Fucarile waves a Boston Strong ag with his ancee, Jen Regan, and their son, Gavin, partially obscured, on June 19, 2013, before Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals between Boston Bruins and Chicago in Boston. GERALD IMRAY and CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA Associated Press PRETORIA, South Af rica The prosecutor cross-examining Os car Pistorius at his mur der trial Friday tried to shred his version of events on the night he shot and killed his girl friend, saying they do not add up and go com pletely against how people would react in the situation the dou ble-amputee Olympian has described. Instead, chief pros ecutor Gerrie Nel said the only reasonable explanation for what happened in the predawn hours of Feb. 14 last year was that Pisto rius fatally shot Steen kamp multiple times through a toilet door from around three me ters away as they ar gued. She was standing behind the toilet door talking to you when you shot her, Nel put to Pis torius right at the end of the rst week of the ath letes testimony. Thats not true, re plied Pistorius, one of numerous denials he is sued to accusations that he was a liar through three days of rigorous cross-examination by the dogged prosecutor. Nel cited the trajec tory of the three bullets that hit the model in the hip, arm and head and which showed she was standing behind the door and facing it, and not backing away as she would have been if she thought there was an in truder in the house, Nel said. Steenkamp wasnt scared of anyone oth er than you Nel said to the 27-year-old athlete charged with premedi tated murder. Pistorius claims he shot Steenkamp, 29, by mistake, thinking she was an intruder about to come out the toi let and attack him. Pis torius, once the hero of disabled sport and a multiple Paralympic champion, faces going to prison for 25 years to life if convicted on the premeditated murder charge. Nel also scrutinized the positioning of items in the bedroom. They also indicated that Pis torius story was a fab rication, he argued. Nel said a duvet strewn on the oor in the bed room in police pho tos shows the pair was awake and arguing just before the shooting and not in bed as Pistorius has claimed. Pistorius says it was one of many items moved by police after the shooting. Nel led Pistorius through his own ac count of what hap pened moments before he shot Steenkamp. Pis torius said he heard a noise in the bathroom and moved down a pas sageway on his stumps toward the bathroom with his pistol while screaming to his girl friend to get down from the bed and call the po lice. Pistorius said he then heard a noise in the toilet that he per ceived to be the sound of wood on wood, which he said made him think someone was open ing the toilet door to at tack him. Then, Pistori us said, he opened re. At each stage, Nel ar gued that the account was improbable, ques tioning why Pistorius did not establish where Steenkamp was and make sure she was OK, why he would approach the alleged danger zone in the dark if he felt vul nerable on his stumps, why Steenkamp would not respond to him and why an intruder would close himself in a toilet stall. If you spoke to Ree va, the two of you could have taken lots of oth er steps, Nel said, add ing that they could have merely left the bed room. Pistorius said he wanted to put himself between the bathroom and the bed, where he said he thought Steen kamp was. Nel noted that throughout Pistori us version Steenkamp never uttered a word. Its not probable. Its not possible, the pros ecutor said, asking why Steenkamp never re sponded to Pistorius panicked shouts of an intruder when she was in the cubicle. I agree with Mr. Nel she would have been terried, Pistorius said, but I dont think she would have shouted out ... In her mind I must have been retreating to ward the bathroom. Nel responded that gave Steenkamp even more reason to talk to Pistorius, who was me ters away. Nel earlier argued that Pistorius was also pre pared to lie about an in cident as far back as ve or six years ago when he claims someone shot at him from another car on a highway to build a backstory that he had a long-held fear of be ing attacked. Pistorius said he saw a muzzle ash and heard a banging noise as a black Mercedes drove past him in the incident, which he said was in 2008 or 2009. Pis torius said he turned off the highway and went to a restaurant park ing lot and called some one to come and pick him up. Nel asked Pis torius who he called and Pistorius replied he couldnt remember. But it was such a traumatic incident, the prosecutor said. Nel said Pistorius fail ing to remember who he called was because it never happened. If I could remember who I phoned I would gladly give you their name, Pistorius said. Prosecutor: Pistorius story doesnt add up THEMBA HADEBE / AP Oscar Pistorius leaves the high court on Friday in Pretoria, South Africa, Friday. Pistorius is charged with the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, on Valentines Day in 2013.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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L ast week I wrote about prayer. One of my points was that its easy to study too much about prayer in stead of simply praying. The day after writing it I found something similar written by Oswald Cham bers. It sounds good to say that we pray, and we read books on prayer which tell us that prayer is benecial that our minds are quieted and our souls are uplifted when we pray, wrote Chambers. But Isaiah implied in this verse that God is amazed at such thoughts about prayer. The verse is Isaiah 59:16: He saw that there was no man, and wondered that there was no one to inter cede. Worship and interces sion go hand in hand, wrote Chambers. You cant have one without the other. Intercession means rais ing ourselves up to the point of getting the mind of Christ regarding the person for whom we are praying, add ed Chambers. The reason many of us stop praying and become hard toward God is that we only have an emo tional interest in prayer. While were told to pray about all things, including our wants and needs, we are to pray in accordance with Gods will. That should prob ably rule out getting a 2014 BMW when my 2003 Toyota Avalon is running ne. Are we worshipping God in our prayers, or reciting speeches about what were supposed to get? This is a sure sign that we are not worshiping, wrote Chambers. When we lose sight of God, we be come hard and dogmatic. We throw our petitions at His throne and dictate to Him what we want Him to do. We dont worship God, nor do we seek to conform our minds to the mind of Christ. And if we are hard toward God, we will become hard toward other people. Are we hard toward others, or do we lift them up in in tercession? It dawned on me recently that I am too hard on others if Im spending more time in my mind com plaining about them rather than praying for them. It makes me sad when I read letters to the editor that blast people and condemn a pet sin or threaten the res of hell if people dont suc cumb to a certain way of thinking. Are we living in a holy re lationship with God, or have we become hard and dog matic? asked Chambers. Are we worshiping God in a way that will raise us up to where we can take hold of Him, having such inti mate contact with Him that we know His mind about the ones for whom we pray? Our intimacy with God or the lack of intimacy will reect our prayer lives. Dont be a person who prays just for personal needs or doesnt pray at all. Be a person who worships God and lives in a holy rela tionship with Him, wrote Chambers. Get involved in the real work of interces sion, remembering that it truly is work work that de mands all your energy, but work which has no hidden pitfalls. Let us pray, continuously. Rick Reed is a columnist who lives in Mount Dora. To reach him call 352-383-1458, or email him at RICOH007@aol.com. Faith for Life www.dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 TODAY HOPE THE TRUE STORY OF LOVE AND TRIUMPH AT NEW LIFE PRESBY TERIAN CHURCH: At 3 and 7 p.m. at the church in Fruitland Park. Derric Johnson, creator of Candlelight Pro cessional and The Liberty Voices is the narrator. The event is free. Tickets are available at www.thelampstand. org/hope or by calling 352-728-1861. A love offering will be received. W.N. MCKINNEY GOSPEL CHOIR PER FORMANCE: At 7 p.m., New Jacobs Chapel M.B. Church, 410 W. State Road 50 in Clermont, celebrating 37 years. For information, call 352-3944995 or 352-603-0087. FREE EASTER EGG HUNT IN LADY LAKE: From 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Guava Street Sports Complex, 225 W. Guava St., with egg hunts for all kids by age, game stations and face painting. For information, call Heri tage Community Church at 352-2672939 or the town of Lady Lake at 352577-4433. SUNDAY FIRST BAPTIST PRESENTS RE DEEMED THE GOSPEL CHANGES EV ERYTHING: An Easter worship pre sentation, at 10:30 a.m., 402 Oxford St., in Wildwood. The event is free. Call the church at 352-748-1822 or go to www.fbcwildwood.org for in formation. EASTER CANTATA MY SAVIOR, MY GOD: At 8 a.m. and 10 a.m., and April 18 at 7 p.m., at the Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. Highway 301 in Ox ford. After the 10 a.m. performance Sunday there will be an Easter egg hunt for kids. Bring your own bas ket. Call the church at 352-748-6124 for information. PALM SUNDAY CELEBRATION AT MID-FLORIDA LAKES COMMUNITY: At 5 p.m., in the community hall, 199 Forest Dr., in Leesburg. Gospel mu sic with live groups and waving of the palms. To participate in the one-day gospel chorus, call Suzette DeGae tano at 352-357-2880. JOHNSON UNIVERSITY FLORIDA STU DENT SINGERS CONCERT: At 5:30 p.m., at the church, 251 Avenida Los Ange los, The Villages. A free will offering will be received. Call the church at 352-259-9305 for details. NEW PASTOR INSTALLED AT NEW JA COBS CHAPEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: At 5 p.m., at the church, 410 W. State Road 50 in Clermont. For information, call the church at 352394-4720. TWO CROWNS EASTER PRESENTA TION AT LAKE SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: At 6 p.m., at the church, 10200 Morningside Dr., in Leesburg. Admission is free. A free will offering will be received. Call the church at 352-430-7056 for details. PREACHING AND TEACHING SEMI NAR ON THE HOLY SPIRIT AT MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH, 32707 BLOSSOM LN. IN LEESBURG, AT 10: 30 a.m. and 6 p.m., with Rev. Dr. Reg Dunlap from Church Centered Ministries. Call 352-314-3080 for details. CHURCH CALENDAR RICK REED REFLECTIONS Oswald Chambers reminds us to pray about all things RICK REED Special to the Daily Commercial S ome men want to leave their children a living legacy. Not Don Baugher. Dying well. Thats be come the legacy I want to leave my children and my childrens children, said Baugher. I want to be a good example of how to die well. Baugher, 76, learned he had lung cancer on Valen tines Day 2013. It began when he went to his primary care doc tor with his wife Marlene for a little hacky cough. The physician decided he should get a chest X-ray. The imaging company sent Baugher right back to his doctor and friend, Dr. Frank Pelligino. His news wasnt good. Both lungs were full of cancer, Baugher said. Even at that point there was no apprehension. We looked at each other and said, We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, Romans 8:28. We both felt very comfortable letting God be God. They learned the cancer was incurable so chemo therapy was useless and they decided against it. I didnt want my last days to be sick, Baugh er said. Our dependence is on God being the Great Physician. We decided where to put our trust and faith and Hes been faith ful ever since. That didnt change when they learned the cancer had metastasized to his brain. Baugher was given six to eight months to live. They decided on radiolo gy therapy. That was October, he said. God has allowed me to live a little longer. His legacy quest began with some Bible research shortly after receiving his diagnosis. Baugher knew the church hasnt done a good job of preparing folks for dying. And he didnt think his response to his terminal diagnosis should be somber or sad. I came out of that time feeling strongly that the church had lost its way a bit on the subject of dy ing, he said. I began looking at the Wesleyan church. They are known for dying well. There, Baugher found dying members werent mournful of their im minent departure from earth. Instead, they were hopeful of the spiritual life to follow. Though the Wesleyans didnt use it as an evangelistic tool, thats what it became. People wanted to nd out about this hope they had, Baugher said. We are the only ones who should be dying with hope. The Wesleyans knew how to die and their church grew and pros pered because they had that hope. Baugher prayed, Lord what am I to be doing? The medical community indicates that I have six to eight months before com ing home to You. What should I be about? God made it quite clear to Baugher his mission was to be a demonstra tion to family, friends and others who were watching of total trust and depen dence on the security one has in Christ, which results in the ability to die well. So last April, Baugh er began studying about heaven and spiritu al things to prepare him for dying well. And then he began a log of his thoughts and posted them on Facebook. His idea was to collect his thoughts for his three children, eight grandchil dren and soon to be three great-grandchildren. I dont know what to call it, Baugher said. I just log stuff. He began writing on April 13, 2013, with discussions on heaven. He listed sever al reasons for folks unsure why they should want to go to heaven, including: For many of us, passing into Heaven is passing into the unknown. We have only a vague understanding of the place to which we are mov ing forever! Now that is in timidating. His purpose was to illu minate what God reveals to us about our nal ad dress. Let me assure you that He has not been silent, Baugher wrote. By the time we nish, you will be looking forward to Heav en not holding back from it! In addition to his log, a local videographer named Stan Severance offered to make a video of Baugh er speaking about dying well. He had no idea how far his quest for dying well would spread. I was telling some friends recently I now have my second view er in South Africa, said Baugher. The wonderful thing about social media is there is no limit to how far you can go and im pact peoples lives. I give all that credit to God. I ask Him to tell me what to say and Ill say it. The video, which has al most 700 hits, turned into a second video, Is Heav en Real? and they have plans for another. The Baughers be came members at South pointe Baptist Fellow ship in Leesburg in 2007, and Baugher feels his church has taken serious ly the charge for preparing members for their death. The Baughers have lived around the world as mis sionaries, with 30 moves in their 51 years of marriage, but he didnt become a be liever until he was 40. His life changed when he and Marlene participat ed in a Marriage Encoun ter weekend in St. Louis. It was that weekend I came to realize how Christ loved me even though I am black inside, like Marlene loved me, said Baugher. It was like an electric charge. I came back a renewed per son with a renewed mar riage. I wanted to know more about God. I couldnt be the same person. I was born again. That phrase was sel dom used in the Lutheran church. His conversion came one week before Thanks giving 1977. Though Baugher was just learning, he was put in position to lead a Bi ble study in their Luther an church. It quickly grew to 100 people meeting on a Monday night in a town of 8,000. They moved in 1984 and eventually start ed a music ministry where they traveled on week ends for seven years. Finally, after all those moves it was time to retire and the Baughers wound up in Leesburg. After receiving news that sends most people into desperation, it drove the Baughers to their knees and a purpose. And theyre enjoying the ride. The Holy Spirit is like a strong wind, and we need to lean back and trust Him to take us where need to go, Baugher said. When we do that, its just a peaceful time. I love it, I love living in Gods grace. There still has not been one day of apprehension. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Don Baugher poses at his home in Leesburg on April 1. LEESBURG Battling cancer and dying well

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 rfntbr President Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co.,Inc. ofLEESBURG 352-365-1228Come visit our new location!rfnttb The Charlotte Mayfield Assisted Living Retirement CommunityrfAssisted Living, Independent Living, Day Stay Residency Combining Independence with Personal Care for over 40 yearsHoly Tr i ni ty Epi s copal Church2201 Spring Lake Road, Fruitland Park352-787-1 500Father Ted KoellnSunday Service 8:00am, 9:30am, 11:15amWednesday Healing Service 11:30am www.holytrinityfp.comLIFE Church Asse m bly of God04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park352-787-7962Pastor Rick WelborneSunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am Sunday Evening 6:00pm Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service 7:00pm Sunday School 9:00am Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pmPi lgrims Un i ted Church of Chri st (UCC)509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park www.pucc.info352-365-2662 or office@pucc.infoRev. Ronal K.F. Nicholas, OSL, PastorRev. Camille F. Gianaris, Pastoral Assistant Sunday Worship 10:00amContact us or visit our website for more infoL i ghthouse Foundati on M i ni stri es Internat i onal INC .11282 SR 471, Webster352-793-2631Pastor Patricia T. BurnhamSunday Services 9:00am & 6:00pm Thursday Night 7:00pm 3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Waywww.lighthousefoundationministries.orgL i nden Church of God4309 CR 772, Webster Pastor Doyle D. GlassSunday Morning Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Sunday School 9:45amWednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pmAll Sa i nts Rom an Cathol ic Chapel11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11, Tavares407-391 -8678 352-385-3880Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00amFi rst Bapti st Church of Tavares124 N. Joanna Avenue, Tavares352-343-71 3 1Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30am Sunday Traditional Service 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am Wednesday Fellowship Meal 5:00pm Wednesday Life University 6:15pm Wednesday Prayer Service 6:15pm Providing direction for all generationswww.fbctavares.comTavares Fi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church (UMC)Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares352-343-2761Pastor John BarhamTraditional Service 8:30AM & 11:00am Contemporary Cafe Service 10:00am Children of Light-Youth & Family Service 1st Sunday of each month 6:00pmwww.fumctavares.com For information on listing your church on this page call Michelle at352-365-8233or e-mail tomichelle.fuller@dailycommercial.comBethany Lutheran Church1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg352-787-7275Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Bible Study 9:15amEmmanuel Bapti st Church of Leesburg1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg352-323-1 588Pastor Jeff CarneySunday Celebration Service 10:30am Wednesday Mens Prayer Breakfast 8:00am Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm Sunday Bible Study 9:15am Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pmwww.EmmanuelFL.comFi rst Bapti st Leesb urg220 N. 13th St., Leesburg352-787-1 005Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Sunday Bible Study 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pmwww.fbcleesburg.orgFi rst Church of Chri st, Sci enti st, Leesburg13th & Line St., Leesburg352-787-1 921Sunday Service 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Wednesday School 3:30pmFi rst Presbyter i an Curch of Leesburg200 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-787-5687Sunday Service 10:00pm Sunday School 8:45am www.firstpresleesburg.orgDisciples Making DisciplesGlor i a Dei L utheran Church130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg352-787-3223Sunday Worship October-April 8:00am & 10:30am Sunday Worship May-September 9:15am Christian Education October-April 9:15am www.gloriadeielca.netLakes and Hi lls Covenant ChurchRev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, PastorWorship Service 10:15am Bible Study 9:00am @ Womens Club of Leesburg 700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg Church Office 106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills352-552-0052www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.orgLegacy Commu ni ty ChurchLocated at Lake Square Mall, Leesburg (suite 331 next to JCPenney)Pastor Theo Bob-352-250-0 1 56 Pastor Buddy Walker-352-978-0509Spanish Pastor Luis Fuentes-352-5521 357Sunday Worship Service 9:30am Legacy is a multicultural, multiracial, generational, Christian Church www.legacycic.orgSt. Paul Rom an Cathol ic Church(In union with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orlando & The Vatican)1330 Sunshine Avenue, LeesburgWeekday Masses M-F 8:30amSacrament of Penance Saturday 2:30-3:30pm (or by appointment) Saturday Masses 4:00, 5:30, 7:00pm (Spanish)Sunday Masses 7:00, 9:00, 11:00am, 12:30pmOffice Hours M-F 8:00-12:00, 1:00-4:00Seventh Day Advent i st508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-326-41 09Worship Service 9:30am Sabbath School Service 11:00am Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pmThe Heal i ng Place1012 W Main Street, Leesburg352-61 7-0569Facilitator: Phyllis GilbertSunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am Wednesday Bible Study and Kids Club 6:00pm (Nursey open for all services) Come as you are and leave different!L i berty Bapt i st Church11043 True Life Way, Clermont 352-394-0708Senior Pastor Chris JohnsonSun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm, Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all serviceswww.lbcclermont.org ClermontFi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church of Eust i sA Place where You Matter600 S. Grove Street, Eustis352-357-5830Senior Pastor Beth FarabeeCoffee and Fellowship 9:00am Contemporary Worship 9:30am Traditional Worship 11:00amL i fe W i thout L imits Mi ni stri es150 E. Barnes Avenue, Eustis352-399-291 3Bishop Robert DixonSunday School 9:00am Sunday Worship Service 10:00am Wednesday Family Bible Study 7:00pmwww.lifewithout-limits.comSt. Thom as Epi s copal Church317 S. Mary St., Eustis(corner S. Mary & Lemon St.)352-357-4358Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, RectorSunday Holy Eucharist Services 8:00am & 10:30am Adult Sunday School 9:20am, Childrens Chapel Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service 10:00amwww.stthomaseustis.comUn i tari an Uni versal i st Congregati on of Lake CountyEustis Womans Club Building 227 North Center Street, Eustis352-728-1 631Sunday Adult Discussion Group 9:45am Sunday Celebration of Life Service 11:00amFacebook: www.facebook.com/UUlakeco Website:www.lakecountyuu.org Email: lakecountyuu@gmail.com Eustis Fruitland Park Leesburg Tavares Webster Mount DoraCongregati onal Church650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora352-383-2285Reverand Dr. Richard DonSunday 11:00am (Communion 1st Sunday of the month) Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pmFi rst Presbyter i an Church of Mount Dora222 W. 6th Avenue at Alexander, Mt. Dora352-383-4089The Well Informal Worship 9:00am Childrens Sunday School 9:00am Adult Sunday School 10:00am Sanctuary Worship 11:00am9:30amwww.fpcmtdora.orgSt. Phi l i p L utheran Church1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora352-383-5402Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan BerghSunday Service 9:30am (Childcare Provided) Fellowship 10:45amwww.stphiliplc.com OkahumpkaCorpus Chri st i Epi s copal Church3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka352-787-8430Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am Evening Prayer 4:00pm Fellowship following both services Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30amwww.corpuschristiepiscopal.org GrovelandMt Oli ve Mi ssi onary Bapti st Church15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky(West of Mascotte)352-429-3888Rev. Clarence L. Southall-PastorSunday Worship Service 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm Youth Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pmZi on L utheran Church (ELCA)547 S. Main Ave., Groveland352-429-2960Pastor Ken StoyerSunday Worship Service 11:00am Adult Sunday School 9:30am MinneolaNew L i fe Presbyteri an Church, PCA18237 E. Apshawa Road, Minneola Music Ministries352-241 -81 8 1Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 10:45am

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 BERNARD CONDON Associated Press NEW YORK Inves tors drove the stock mar ket lower for a second straight day Friday as they grew anxious that earnings growth was fal tering. Weaker earnings at JP Morgan Chase dragged bank stocks lower. And big drops in once-soar ing tech stocks pushed the Nasdaq composite down for a third week. The market has been trying to come back, but each time the selling just picks up, said Quincy Krosby, a market strate gist at Prudential. The buyers are just not step ping in. So much for buying on the dip. Stocks fell from the open on news that JP Morgan had missed ana lysts earnings estimates. Investors, who were wor ried that technology shares were overvalued, dumped those for a sec ond day, with some of the biggest gainers of late fall ing sharply. Facebook fell 1.1 percent, after a 5 per cent drop on Thursday. The rst-quarter earn ings season has just started, but investors already seem anxious about what lies ahead. Financial analysts expect earnings for companies in the Standard & Poors 500 index to drop 1.6 percent from a year ear lier, according to FactSet, a nancial data provid er. At the start of the year, they expected a jump of 4.3 percent. If prots do fall, it would be only the sec ond quarterly drop in three years. Earnings are going to come in on the sloppy side, said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capi tal. The market needs to correct, he added, refer ring to sharp downturn in stocks. JOSH BOAK PAUL WISEMAN AP Economics WritersAP Economics Writers WASHINGTON Its the silent enemy in our retirement accounts: High fees. And now a new study nds that the typical 401(k) fees adding up to a modest-sounding 1 percent a year would erase $70,000 from an average workers ac count over a four-de cade career compared with lower-cost options. To compensate for the higher fees, someone would have to work an extra three years before retiring. The study comes from the Center for Ameri can Progress, a liberal think tank. Its analysis, backed by industry and government data, sug gests that U.S. workers, already struggling to save enough for retire ment, are being further held back by fund costs. The corrosive effect of high fees in many of these retirement ac counts forces many Americans to work years longer than necessary or than planned, the report, being released Friday, concludes. Most savers have only a vague idea how much theyre paying in 401(k) fees or what alterna tives exist, though the information is provided in often dense and com plex fund statements. High fees seldom lead to high returns. And critics say they hurt or dinary investors much more so than, say, Wall Streets high-speed trading systems, which benet pros and have increasingly drawn the eye of regulators. Consider what would happen to a 25-yearold worker, earning the U.S. median income of $30,500, who puts 5 percent of his or her pay in a 401(k) account and whose employer chips in another 5 percent: If the plan charged 0.25 percent in annual fees, a widely available low-cost option, and the investment return averaged 6.8 percent a year, the account would equal $476,745 when the worker turned 67 (the age he or she could retire with full Social Se curity benets). If the plan charged the typical 1 percent, the account would reach only $405,454 a $71,000 shortfall. If the plan charged 1.3 percent com mon for 401 (k) plans at small companies the account would reach $380,649, a $96,000 shortfall. The worker would have to work four more years to make up the gap. (The analysis assumes the workers pay rises 3.6 percent a year.) The higher fees often accompany funds that try to beat market in dexes by actively buy ing and selling securi ties. Index funds, which track benchmarks such as the Standard & Poors 500, dont require active management and typi cally charge lower fees. With stocks having hit record highs before being clobbered in re cent days, many inves tors have been on edge over the markets ups and downs. But experts say timing the market is nearly impossible. By contrast, investors can increase their returns by limiting their funds fees. Most stock funds will match the performance of the entire market over time, so those with the lowest manage ment costs will gener ate better returns, said Russel Kinnel, director of research for Morn ingstar. Fees are a crucial de terminant of how well you do, Kinnel said. The difference in costs can be dramatic. Each fund disclos es its expense ratio. This is the cost of oper ating the fund as a per centage of its assets. It includes things like re cord-keeping and legal expenses. For one of its stock index funds, Vanguard lists an expense ratio of 0.05 percent. State Farm lists it at 0.76 per cent for a similar fund. The ratio jumps to 1.73 percent for a Nas daq-based investment managed by ProFunds. ProFunds are not typical index mutu al funds but are de signed for tactical in vestors who frequently purchase and redeem shares, said ProFunds spokesman Tuck er Hewes. The high er-than-normal ex pense ratios of these non-typical funds re ect the additional cost and efforts necessary to manage and operate them. Average fees also tend to vary based on the size of an employers 401(k) plan. The total management costs for individual companies with plans with more than $1 billion in assets has averaged 0.35 per cent a year, according to BrightScope, a rm that rates retirement plans. By contrast, cor porate plans with less than $50 million in as sets have total fees ap proaching 1 percent. Higher management costs do far more to erode a typical Amer icans long-term sav ings than does the high-speed trading highlighted in Michael Lewis new book, Flash Boys. CURRENCIES Dollar vs. Exchange Pvs Rate Day Yen 101.57 101.45 Euro $1.3887 $1.3891 Pound $1.6745 $1.6787 Swiss franc 0.8753 0.8762 Canadian dollar 1.0964 1.0923 Mexican peso 13.0631 13.0362 Business austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8263 DOW JONES 16,026.75 143.47 NASDAQ 3,999.73 54.38 S&P 500 1,815.69 17.39 GOLD 1,319.00 1.50 SILVER 19.95 0.145 CRUDE OIL 103.74 + 0.34 T-NOTE 10-year 2.62 + 0.01 www.dailycommercial.com Savers beware: Fees could shrink your 401(k) AP FILE PHOTO Freshly-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas. MARTIN CRUTSINGER and PAUL WISEMAN Associated Press WASHINGTON Finance ofcials of the worlds major economies ex pressed condence Friday that they can meet an ambitious goal of boost ing global growth by $2 trillion over the next ve years. Thats despite a variety of threats in cluding rising political tensions over Russias actions in Ukraine. Finance ministers and central bank presidents of the leading rich and de veloping nations issued a joint state ment that papered over substantial differences in such areas as central bank interest rate policies and wheth er to hit Russia with tougher sanctions because of its dealings with Ukraine. The nal Group of 20 communi que pledged to keep working on con crete economic reforms that could boost global growth by 2 percent over the next ve years. But nance of cials concede that the economic re forms needed to achieve that goal will in many cases be politically difcult. Australian Treasurer Joe Hock ey said all the nance ministers real ized that hard decisions would have to be made in terms of reforming la bor market policies and dealing with budget decits. It is hard but that is the only way we are going to grow the economy, Hockey, who is chairman of the G-20 this year, told reporters at news con ference following the groups two days of discussions. The nance ministers agreed to de velop concrete proposals for each of their countries and present those plans at a September meeting in Aus tralia in preparation for a G-20 lead ers summit on Nov. 15-16 in Brisbane that will be attended by President Barack Obama and leaders of the oth er nations. The United States was represented in the discussions Friday by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew and Federal Re serve Chair Janet Yellen. Lew on Thursday had raised the possibility in a meeting with Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov on Thursday that the Obama adminis tration was willing to impose addi tional signicant sanctions if Russia escalates the Ukraine situation. Major economies express confidence about growth AP PHOTO IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, left, talks with Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen prior to the G20 meeting at the IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings on Friday. Stocks fall on jitters over earnings, tech sector rout Staff Report This years commence ment speaker for Bea con College will be Patri cia Latham, a founding member of the school. Commencement ceremonies will be at 10 a.m. on May 3 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora, according to a press release from www.newswise.com. We are delighted that Pat Latham will be de livering the keynote ad dress to this years grad uates and to our college community, college President George J. Ha gerty said. Latham is a co-au thor, with her husband Peter Latham, of eight books on learning dis ability legal topics. She holds a bachelors de gree from Swarthmore College, and a doctor ate from the University of Chicago Law School. Beacon was the rst college in the Unit ed States to offer fouryear bachelor degree programs exclusively to students with learn ing disabilities. Beacon was established in 1989 with a mission that fo cuses on the academ ic and career success of students who learn dif ferently. LEESBURG Founding Beacon member will give commencement

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The Market In Review A-B-CABB Ltd.78e25.51-.07 ACE Ltd2.26e99.31+.72 ADT Corp.8029.74-.57 AES Corp.2014.15-.28 AFLAC1.4860.83-.93 AGCO.44f54.38-1.22 AGL Res1.96f49.93-.27 AK Steel...6.96-.34 AMC Ent n...23.60+.72 AOL...41.72-1.17 A10 Nwks n...13.56+.23 AU Optron...3.90-.02 Aarons.0830.23-.01 AbbottLab.88f37.02-.02 AbbVie1.68f46.46-.47 AberFitc.8035.74-.26 AbdAsPac.426.16-.01 AcadiaRlt.9225.99-.29 Accenture1.86e77.09+.26 AccoBrds...5.96-.04 Actavis...188.83-2.46 Actuant.0433.34-.42 Acuity.52123.56+1.16 AMD...3.65-.20 AecomTch...32.09-.75 Aegon.30e8.70-.17 AerCap...39.43-1.04 Aeropostl...d4.62-.28 Aetna.9070.82-1.05 AffilMgrs...179.30-2.73 Agilent.52m52.77-1.28 Agnico g.32m31.00-.30 Agrium g3.0091.60-1.01 AirLease.1236.00-.90 AirProd3.08f115.14-.71 Aircastle.8018.65-.12 Airgas1.92104.56+.16 AlaskaAir1.00f90.52-1.15 Albemarle1.10f64.86-.27 AlcatelLuc.18e3.77-.04 Alcoa.1212.54-.16 Alere...33.78-.58 AllegTch.7239.12+.16 Allegion n.3250.01-.67 Allergan.20120.89+4.26 Allete1.96f51.06-.25 AlliData...246.38-7.38 AlliantEgy2.0456.75+.23 AlliGblCv21.029.48-.04 AlldNevG...4.01-.19 AllisonTrn.4828.72-.17 Allstate1.12f55.29-.22 AllyFin n...u24.20+.22 AlonUSA.24a14.06-.66 AlphaNRs...4.31-.10 AlpToDv rs.688.30-.10 AlpsDvDog1.19e34.40-.35 AlpAlerMLP1.09e17.93+.17 AltisResid.75e27.75-.81 Altria1.9237.65-.17 Ambev n.22e7.80+.16 Ameren1.6040.50+.33 AMovilL.34e19.97-.01 AmApparel....49... 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Emulex...7.21-.10 EnableM n...22.20... EnbrdgEPt2.1728.97+.60 Enbridge1.40f46.60-.13 EnCana g.2822.42+.01 EndvSilv g...4.31-.12 Energen.60f78.14-1.19 Energizer2.0096.56-1.59 EngyTEq s1.39f47.81-.04 EngyTsfr3.68f55.00+.90 Enerpls g1.08u21.16+.17 Enersis.46e15.85-.05 ENSCO3.0048.59-.66 Entergy3.3270.35+.25 EntPrPt2.84f72.17+.55 Entravisn.10a5.93-.05 Envestnet...34.72-1.90 EqualEn g...4.68+.31 Equifax1.00f65.04-.97 EqtyOne.8822.02-.05 EqtyRsd2.0057.73-1.44 EssexPT4.84164.82-2.34 EsteeLdr.8068.18-.74 EverBank.1218.66-.39 EverestRe3.00153.47+.11 Evertec n.4023.06-.20 ExcoRes.205.84-.28 Exelis.4117.69-.48 Exelon1.2435.16+.07 Express...d15.06-.52 ExterranH.6042.70-.27 ExtraSpce1.6047.67-.49 ExxonMbl2.5296.72-.06 FMC Corp.60f74.30-1.23 FMC Tech...52.16-.91 FNBCp PA.4812.62-.13 FamilyDlr1.24fd56.10-1.07 Farmlnd n...12.98... 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WmsCos1.61f40.14-.10 WmsPtrs3.57f51.35+.68 WmsSon1.32f61.50-1.29 WillisGp1.20f41.77-.80 Wipro.14r13.20+.11 WiscEngy1.56f46.91+.02 WTJpHedg1.24e44.84-.04 WT India.16e19.19+.07 WolvWW s.2426.07-.65 Workday...71.86-3.76 WldW Ent.4820.29-.83 WuXi...35.06+.06 Wyndham1.40f69.43-1.17 XL Grp.64f30.95+.28 XPO Logis...26.14-.08 XcelEngy1.20f30.59+.02 Xylem.51f35.22-.69 YPF Soc.15e29.76-.34 Yamana g.15m8.53-.14 Yelp...61.72-1.75 YingliGrn...3.88-.27 YoukuTud...24.78-.39 YumBrnds1.4874.37-.82 ZaleCp...21.15-.07 Zimmer.88f91.50-1.17 ZoesKitch n...24.72... Zoetis.29d28.40-.46 Stocks in bold changed 5% or more in price from the previous day. Stock Footnotes:g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf Late filing with SEC. n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock issue. rs Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. vj Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the n ame.Dividend Footnotes:a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferre d. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent d ividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus st ock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes:q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months.Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.NameDivLastChg New York Stock Exchange Eye on ToylandMattels latest quarterly earnings should provide insight into the toymakers efforts to boost sales. In February, the worlds biggest toy company announced plans to buy Mega Bloks owner Mega Brands for about $460 million. The move came after a disappointing holiday season when sales of toys from Mattels key Barbie and Fisher-Price brands declined. Mattel reports first-quarter financial results on Thursday.More soda woes?Wall Street predicts Coca-Colas earnings and revenue fell in the first quarter from a year earlier. The worlds biggest beverage maker, due to report financial results on Tuesday, has been struggling with declining sales of soda in North America. Coca-Colas sales growth in emerging markets such as India and China also has slowed. To cope, the company has taken steps to boost marketing efforts.Online ad watchGoogle reports first-quarter earnings Wednesday. Investors will be looking for an update on how the Internet companys average ad rates, a key source of revenue, fared in the quarter. Googles online ad rates have been falling because more people are clicking on smartphones and tablets. Marketers so far have been unwilling to pay as much for ads on mobile devices because they have smaller screens than PCs. Source: FactSetPrice-earnings ratio: 15based on trailing 12 month results 350 450 550 $650 1Q Operating EPS 1Q est.$5.80 $6.32 GOOGL$537.76 $395.47 Today 1,650 1,700 1,750 1,800 1,850 1,900 OA NDJFM 1,800 1,860 1,920 S&P 500Close: 1,815.69 Change: -17.39 (-0.9%) 10 DAYS 14,800 15,200 15,600 16,000 16,400 16,800 OA NDJFM 16,000 16,320 16,640 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 16,026.75 Change: -143.47 (-0.9%) 10 DAYS Advanced867 Declined2217 New Highs22 New Lows52 Vol. (in mil.)3,695 Pvs. Volume3,659 2,223 2,370 537 2075 14 92NYSE NASDDOW16168.8716015.3216026.75-143.47-0.89%-3.32% DOW Trans.7447.407355.497362.39-68.84-0.93%-0.52% DOW Util.537.44533.43534.32-0.48-0.09%+8.92% NYSE Comp.10369.9610271.3610280.94-85.88-0.83%-1.15% NASDAQ4067.223991.643999.73-54.38-1.34%-4.23% S&P 5001835.071814.361815.69-17.39-0.95%-1.77% S&P 4001335.291316.031318.50-17.01-1.27%-1.79% Wilshire 500019543.4119298.5919321.15-203.30-1.04%-1.95% Russell 20001128.961107.931111.44-16.22-1.44%-4.49%HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AT&T Inc T31.74539.00 35.20+.08 +0.2sss+0.1-3.2111.84 Advance Auto Parts AAP77.988129.99 116.25-2.36 -2.0ttt+5.0+46.3210.24 Amer Express AXP63.43794.35 84.54-.82 -1.0ttt-6.8+31.9171.04f AutoNation Inc AN41.40955.40 52.73-.48 -0.9ttt+6.1+23.318... Brown & Brown BRO27.76235.13 29.01-.28 -1.0ttt-7.6-5.8200.40 CocaCola Co KO36.83343.43 38.63-.26 -0.7sst-6.5-2.5201.22f Comcast Corp A CMCSA38.75655.28 47.96-.46 -1.0ttt-7.7+18.3190.90f Darden Rest DRI44.78455.25 48.46-.97 -2.0ttt-10.9+2.9192.20 Disney DIS57.76883.65 77.01-.50 -0.6ttt+0.8+30.4210.86f Gen Electric GE21.11728.09 25.43-.15 -0.6tst-9.3+12.0190.88 General Mills GIS46.18853.07 51.15+.15 +0.3sst+2.5+7.2191.64f Harris Corp HRS41.08975.33 69.58-.33 -0.5ttt-0.3+56.2181.68 Home Depot HD69.78583.20 75.70-1.08 -1.4ttt-8.1+9.4201.88f IBM IBM172.196213.09 195.19-.49 -0.3sss+4.1-5.9133.80 Lowes Cos LOW37.09752.08 46.31-.48 -1.0ttt-6.5+21.7220.72 NY Times NYT8.71917.37 15.69-.18 -1.1ttt-1.1+64.3390.16 NextEra Energy NEE74.78097.31 95.15-.62 -0.6sst+11.1+23.3222.90f PepsiCo PEP77.01787.06 83.15-.47 -0.6sst+0.3+7.3192.27 Suntrust Bks STI27.18841.26 37.75-.37 -1.0ttt+2.6+32.2140.80f TECO Energy TE16.12419.22 17.22+.14 +0.8sss-0.1-2.7190.88 WalMart Strs WMT71.51681.37 76.50-.39 -0.5tss-2.8+1.8161.92f Xerox Corp XRX8.11712.65 11.06-.25 -2.2tst-9.1+28.9120.25f52-WK RANGE CLOSEYTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 CG Capital MarketsLgCapGro 19.93-.28+16.7CGMFocus 37.89-.51+15.0CRMMdCpVlIns 33.78-.49+17.5CalamosGrIncA m 32.26-.32+8.4 GrowA m 44.49-.67+18.8 MktNeuI 12.74-.04+3.2 MktNuInA m 12.87-.04+3.0CalvertEquityA m 46.03-.43+13.8CausewayIntlVlIns d 15.94-.16+18.0Cohen & SteersRealty 68.20-.51+0.4 RealtyIns 44.24-.32+0.7ColumbiaAcornA m 34.24-.42+13.8 AcornIntZ 46.70-.32+13.5 AcornZ 35.74-.44+14.1 CAModA m 12.11-.07+7.3 CAModAgrA m 13.09-.10+8.9 CntrnCoreZ 20.09-.23+17.3 ComInfoA m 50.47-.75+18.2 DivIncA m 18.07-.14+11.8 DivIncZ 18.08-.14+12.1 DivOppA m 10.10-.07+11.7 DivrEqInA m 13.52-.13+14.2 IncOppA m 10.18-.02+5.2 IntmBdA m 9.15+.01-0.2 IntmMuniBdZ 10.69+.02+0.6 LgCpGrowA m 31.91-.42+13.8 LgCrQuantA m 8.31-.08+17.9 MdCapIdxZ 14.82-.19+15.7 MdCpValZ 18.04-.22+20.8 SIIncZ 9.99...+0.7 ShrTrmMuniBdZ 10.48...+0.6 SmCaVaIIZ 18.09-.23+20.8 SmCapIdxZ 22.77-.29+22.6 StLgCpGrA m 17.80-.36+19.4 StLgCpGrZ 18.09-.36+19.8 TaxExmptA m 13.69+.02+0.1 ValRestrZ 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PilgrimsP...20.78+.27 Pixelwrks...5.43-.13 Polycom...13.13-.01 Popular...29.65+.14 PwShs QQQ1.30e84.11-.99 Pozen1.75e8.54+.05 PriceTR1.76f77.25-.87 Priceline...1156.21-21.09 Primoris.1426.80-1.21 PrUltBio s...65.87-3.93 PrUPQQQ s...53.89-1.95 PrognicsPh...3.46-.28 ProgrsSoft...21.34-.11 Proofpoint...31.67-.66 ProUShBio...20.84+1.02 PShtQQQ rs...61.45+2.14 ProspctCap1.3210.79+.02 QIAGEN...20.13-.26 QIWI n.61e30.96-.44 QlikTech...23.68-.86 Qlogic...12.10-.26 Qualcom1.68f78.01-.06 QualitySys.70d15.92-.07 Questcor1.2080.12-1.80 QuickLog...4.89-.01 Qunar n...28.91+.44 RF MicD...7.75-.09 RadNet...4.07+.03 Rambus...11.60+.42 Randgold.5077.31-.41 RaptorPhm...7.81-.47 Receptos n...37.73-2.49 Regenrn...288.36-5.26 Relypsa n...24.05-1.18 RentACt.9226.58-.23 Replgn...13.65-.03 RepubAir...d8.10-.19 RetailOpp.64f15.30-.03 RetailNot n...31.12-2.35 Retrophin...15.36-2.89 RexEnergy...19.10+.32 RigelPh...3.19-.16 RiverbedT...18.81-.61 RocketF n...d36.63-3.47 RockwllM...10.61-.35 RosettaR...46.75-.43 RossStrs.80f69.05-.81 Rovi Corp...21.49-.41 RoyGld.8466.04-.90 S-T-USBA Com...88.22-.86 SEI Inv.44f30.52-.33 SLM Cp.6024.81+.04 SVB FnGp...111.37-2.21 SalixPhm...99.07-1.77 SanDisk.9073.65-2.04 SangBio...14.00-.95 Sanmina...16.98-.37 Sapient...15.77-.53 SareptaTh...22.18-1.04 SciGames...11.37-.49 SeagateT1.7253.39-.56 SearsHldgs...32.62-1.78 SeattGen...37.17-2.20 Semtech...24.44-.70 Senomyx...9.19-.67 Sequenom...2.46-.04 SvcSource...6.99-.21 Shutterfly...40.92-.16 SierraWr...20.46-.59 SigmaAld.92f92.10-.79 SilicnImg1.00e6.22-.18 SilcnLab...49.91-.52 Slcnware.23e6.82-.18 SilvStd g...10.24-.35 Sina...52.46-.72 Sinclair.6027.11-.71 SiriusXM...3.16+.06 SironaDent...73.45-.01 Sky-mobi...7.56+.07 SkywksSol...34.90-.61 SmithWes...13.91-.25 SodaStrm...38.71-1.21 Sohu.cm...59.51-1.98 SolarCity...53.70-1.43 Solazyme...10.69-.21 SonicCorp...21.21-.13 Sonus...3.04-.14 Spectranet...23.57+.36 SpectPh...d6.79-.37 SpiritAir...57.25-.92 Splunk...57.68-.72 Sprouts n...34.63-.98 Staples.4811.83-.09 StarScient....77-.02 Starbucks1.0468.73-1.49 Starz A...30.63-.83 StlDynam.46f18.40-.03 Stericycle...109.33-2.29 SMadden s...34.76-.32 Stratasys...94.58-2.71 SunOpta...11.75+.25 SunPower...26.61-1.43 Supernus...7.93-.54 SusqBnc.3210.76-.17 Symantec.6020.01-.39 Synaptics...55.88-.30 SynrgyPh...4.25-.32 Synopsys...36.38-.61 SyntaPhm...4.01-.13 TFS Fncl...12.72-.09 TICC Cap1.169.53-.08 TTM Tch...7.49-.72 TakeTwo...19.78-.55 Tarena n...d7.71+.13 TASER...16.74+.31 TechData h...60.96-2.79 TlCmSys...2.49... TeslaMot...203.78-.41 TexInst1.2044.98-.55 Theravnce...27.99-.02 TibcoSft...19.35-.09 TitanMach...19.90+1.76 TiVo Inc...11.64-.34 TowerGp lf...2.45-.06 TractSup s.5267.09-.51 TrimbleN...36.63-.62 TripAdvis...78.99-2.91 TriQuint...13.22+.10 TuesMrn...13.15-.38 21stCFoxA.2531.91-.52 21stCFoxB.2531.01-.53 21Vianet...24.18-1.56 UTiWrldwd.0610.59+.07 Ubiquiti...37.20-.43 UltaSalon...91.05-3.80 Ultratech...24.77-.42 Umpqua.60a17.78-.09 Unilife...3.41-.07 UtdOnln rs.6010.87-.32 UtdTherap...92.78-3.37 UnwiredP...2.07+.04 UrbanOut...36.01-1.11 V-W-X-Y-ZVCA Ant...29.95-.36 VandaPhm...13.06-.97 Verisign...49.03-1.15 Verisk...56.55-1.53 VertxPh...63.06-2.63 ViacomA1.2082.22-.92 ViacomB1.2081.94-.89 Vical...1.16-.02 VimpelCm.45ed8.30+.08 Vivus...4.84-.07 Vocus...u17.97+.06 Vodafone...35.40-.69 Volcano...19.07-.53 WarrenRs...4.69-.03 Web.com...31.64-.53 WebMD...37.67-1.43 Wendys Co.208.51-.22 WernerEnt.2024.78-.22 WDigital1.2088.21+.04 WstptInn g...d13.14-.40 WetSeal...1.13-.01 WholeFd s.4849.50-.11 WilshBcp.20f10.73-.05 Windstrm1.008.51-.21 WisdomTr...11.35-.39 Wynn5.00f211.33+.49 XOMA...4.15-.16 Xilinx1.16f51.35-.71 Xoom...17.78-.14 YRC Wwde...19.19-.61 YY Inc...65.16-2.95 Yahoo...32.87-.53 Yandex...28.01-.37 Yongye n...u7.00+.03 ZeltiqAes...16.98-.86 Zillow...87.05-6.52 ZionBcp.1629.23-.35 Zogenix...2.63+.07 Zulily n...45.76-.77 Zumiez...24.73-.78 Zygo...u19.43+4.75 Zynga...4.07... 12-mo Name NAV Chg%RtnNameDivLastChg Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA not available. p previous days net asset value. s fund split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the week.Source:Morningstar and the Associated Press.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Sharkys Vac n Sew700 N. Main St. Wildwood, Fl 34785352-330-2483sharkyssewnvac1@gmail.com www.sharkyssewnvac.comAsk AlIf It Aint BrokeI have been in the sewingmachine and vacuum cleaner business for some 48 years and I have people ask me about when I should change my belt on my vacuum cleaner. Well there is an old adage that says, If it aint broke, dont fix it. While that may hold true for a lot of things, it surely doesnt for a vacuum cleaner! What so many people fail to realize is that a vacuum cleaner is made on the assembly line and placed in a carton or box. Then it is stored in a hot warehouse until it is sold, which may be months. Then it is loaded onto a hot tractor-trailer and carried across country inextreme temperatures where it is unloaded into a backroom or deep discount warehouse until it is sold. After all this time and heat, the belt is melted onto the motor shaft and brush roller and has stretched to that shape and size. Well, to say the least, you should change your belt as soon as you get it home and use it for the very first time. And then there are those people that say, Well my belt aint broke but my vacuum cleaner is hard to push. If you turn the vacuum cleaner upside down and turn it on and the brush roller turns but then when it is put on the carpet it stops then your belt is stretched, although it aint broke it needs replacing. It is the brush rollers job to turn so it can pick-up debris and open the carpet fibers to allow the suction of the vacuum cleaner to suck up the dirt. And lastly, be sure to purchase an extra belt so you can have a spare in case its the weekend and you have company coming over and the belt breaks with dirty carpet awaiting the guests! And Murphys Law of vacuum cleaners is...Guess what?? Yep. No Belt to be found. And be sure to put the extra belt around the handle of the vacuum cleaner so the Drawer Monster dont eat it!!!! Thats my story and Im sticking to it. Until next week, its a dirty job! www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sat urday, April 12, 2014: This year you enter a peri od where you want to accom plish a lot. You often could be challenged or distract ed by those in your daily life. Keep in mind that they enjoy their time with you. If you are single, it is impossible for a relationship to blossom when you are focused on other matters. Come summertime, you might want to become less focused on your goals and a little more aware of what is going on around you. Someone quite special could meander into your life during this period. If you are at tached, the two of you need to make fun plans for the summer. You might want go to the beach often or choose a different pastime you both enjoy. VIRGO sometimes irri tates you with details. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your intuition does not match up with what you are seeing. You could go back and forth when deciding which view to follow. A part ner will offer several options that could change your per spective, but you still might be uneasy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your ingenuity will take you down an interesting path, if you decide to go. A partner or loved one might present a different view perhaps one that is not as bold as yours. You could be at a standstill because of the disparity be tween both of your views. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will want to make a de cision regarding a domestic or personal issue. You might realize that the timing is not right for a discussion at this point. More information will be coming forward. How you see a situation could change as a result. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Wherever you go, you could end up in a lengthy conversa tion. You even might irritate a child or loved one with your socializing. This person will want to have your attention, so make that a high priority. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could feel pushed by a mon ey matter. You know your limits, and you understand what needs to happen. Un fortunately, a family member might not see eye to eye with you. A discussion needs to occur about your home and an investment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might be more deter mined than you realize, and that attitude could be push ing others away. Try to loosen up and be more open to oth ers suggestions. Not every thing needs to happen your way. You could be delighted by what someone offers. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You still could be overreact ing to someone you care about. Be aware of what an other person needs, and be willing to respond appropri ately. Still, you might need to take a personal day far away from the daily grind as soon as you can. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) A loved one is so charm ing that you might feel in clined to bend to his or her will. Though you might have other plans, you probably should cancel them. Some times a person needs to fol low his or her heart; you are no different. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might feel pres sured once more to visit with a family member. Consid er what would happen if you were to do what you wanted. You cant keep giving with out having some you time. Someone will let you know how much he or she cares. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) What might seem like an excellent plan could have its faults. Pull back and look at the pros and cons of hav ing someone from a distance visit you. Make a choice that you feel comfortable with, and it will work out for the best. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Youll have a chance to really enjoy a close friend. Screen your calls, and make this day just for the two of you. Catch up on news, and enjoy a favorite mutual pas time. This person is very im portant to you; time together means a lot to both of you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Be more forthright in sharing what you feel. A friend might feel as if he or she is in control. An of fer could take you away from your normal life. Take a lot of time to think through a deci sion that could have implica tions. HOROSCOPES Today is Saturday, April 12 the 102nd day of 2014. There are 263 days left in the year. Todays Highlights in His tory : On April 12, 1954, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission opened a hearing on wheth er Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientic director of the Man hattan Project, should have his security clearance rein stated amid questions about his loyalty (it wasnt). Bill Ha ley and His Comets recorded Rock Around the Clock in New York for Decca Records. TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I use a ser vice dog, and Im con stantly barraged with re quests to pet him. Other people who use ser vice dogs warned me this would happen. Al though the ADA does not require him to wear a vest, I bought one for him that reads, Do Not Pet, which he wears in public. They ask me any way! They also ask what I use the dog for. Some times Im tempted to say, First, tell me about your medical histo ry and then Ill tell you mine. I dont mind qui etly and discreetly dis cussing with a store owner what my dog does, but for a strang er to walk up and expect me to share personal in formation is rude. As excited as I am about how my dog has expanded my life, I do not want to spend my time answering strang ers questions or hearing about every dog theyve ever owned. Obviously, Im still learning what it means to live with a service dog. Would you kindly share with your readers prop er etiquette with service dogs and their owners? LIVING LARGER IN WASHING TON STATE DEAR LIVING LARGER: Im happy to. But you must be realistic. If you have a service dog, you must accept that peo ple will be curious. How ever, what many people fail to understand is that when a service dog is out in public, the animal is WORKING, and should not be distracted from its task which is en suring the well-being of the owner. The basics for interact ing with service dogs are: 1. Always speak to the person rst. Do not try to distract the dog. 2. Never touch the ser vice dog or ANY dog, for that matter with out rst asking for and receiving permission. 3. Do not offer food to the animal. 4. Do not ask person al questions about the handlers disability or otherwise intrude on his or her privacy. 5. Do not be offend ed if the handler refus es to chat about the ser vice dog. DEAR ABBY: My son John and daughter-inlaw Bree recently an nounced their second pregnancy via email, and asked that we keep the news in the immedi ate family for now. I was so happy and ex cited that I notied my sister. She is my best friend and lives in an other state. As it turns out, my sister shared the news with her daugh ter, who is good friends with Bree. My niece then texted congratulations to her. At the end of the day, I received a nasty, dramat ic phone call from Bree. She was furious that I had revealed her secret. My heart sank. It wasnt my intention to hurt her in any way. I apologized profusely, but now Im afraid that this may have solidied the wedge be tween us because our relationship was never very close to begin with. I realize I was wrong and apologized. What more can I do to make this the joyful occasion it should be? NOW WHAT? IN NORTH CAROLINA DEAR NOW WHAT?: Now you pay the penalty for leaking the news, and gracefully accept that you will be relegated to the second tier when it comes to announce ments from your son and daughter-in-law. Perhaps you can even tually get back in their good graces by respect ing their wishes in the future. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Joy of having a service dog is diminished by public attention JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital GREATER HILLS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALESSaturday,April12th8 A.M. TO ?East of Clermont Off Hwy. 50 Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332 SEIZETHE DA Y SSPOR TSNEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.5 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.5 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr

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8626 U.S. Hwy 441 ~ Leesburg, FL 34788Next to Leesburg International Airport352.435.6131SHOPFAMILYFURNITURE.COMMon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-6, Sun 12-5 LIVING ROOMS22 ON CLEARANCE SAVE UP TO BEDROOMS9 ON CLEARANCE SAVE UP TO RECLINERS25 ON CLEARANCE SAVE UP TO STORE-WIDE SAVE UP TOHURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! ALL ITEMS LIMITED QUANTITY NOW IS THE TIME TO SAVE ON BRAND NAMES YOU KNOW & TRUST! 18 MONTHINTEREST-FREEFINANCING E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 SOIL: Regular testing keeps plants healthy / E4 www.dailycommercial.com Home & Garden 352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com KIM COOK Associated Press Those drawn to 19th centu ry style may be pleased to learn that vintage garden decor is a trend this spring and summer. The look involves orals, weathered wood, wire, period typography, bird motifs and ac cessories, and other elements with a Victorian vibe, says Tom Mirabile, a trend watcher for Lifetime Brands. The appeal lies largely in the eras garden-as-haven aesthet ic, he says. We look at the Victorian age as an era when there was just a lot of time, he said at an indus try trends seminar earlier this year at the NY Now trade show. Conservatories, greenhous es and aviaries were popular in stately Victorian-era homes, but even modest residences might have a little birdcage. Fashion able too were ferns, palms and terrariums. Pottery Barns got miniature greenhouses this season made of white-painted distressed pine and glass, perfect terrariums for small plants. A replica of a vintage birdcage is made of wire painted Q: I am growing some blue berries, but the fruit never seems to ripen. A: Blueberries can be grown in Central Florida if you get the cultivars that are adapted to our short, warm winters. Southern highbush cultivars that grow well here include Emerald and Jewel, and more have been recent ly released. The main reason you are probably not getting the fruit is that other creatures are getting it rst. Birds and squirrels have an uncan ny ability to get the fruit just before it gets blue enough for you to pick it. I never got fruit off my bush until I cov ered it with chicken wire. Once you protect the fruit from critters, you will nal ly be able to enjoy the freshpicked blueberries when they are ripe. Q: I see trees loaded with orange fruit in the landscape now. Is the fruit edible? A: You are most likely seeing loquats, or Japanese plums, Eriobotrya japonica. Seedling trees are common in yards because they are very attrac tive and small with large, ever green leaves. However, if you want large, consistent fruit, you should get one of the many named cultivars. Loquats, even the small seedlings, can be eaten fresh off the tree or used in pies and jams. The fruit can be eat en peeled or unpeeled, like a peach, and has one to four seeds in the middle. It is a good source of vitamins and minerals and is very easy to grow. Birds like to eat it too. Q: I see crape myrtles be ing pruned back to stubs. Is Victorian garden style lives on PHOTOS BY POTTERY BARN / AP ABOVE: This large conservatory bird cage, made of mahogany and wire, is a statement piece due to its scale, and replicates similar designs of the Victorian era. BELOW: This terrarium made of distressed painted pine and glass replicates early greenhouses, popular during the Victorian era. Diagnosing diseases, unripe blueberries and other plant issues SUBMITTED PHOTO You may never see a ripe blueberry unless you protect the fruit from hungry critters. JOE LAMPL / MCT Knock Out roses are prolic yet undemanding. JOE LAMPL growingagreenerworld.com Every day that Im not on the road, I look out my ofce window to ward the garden, and walk the property at least once or twice. My mind never stops turn ing with all the projects and to-dos I see for my landscape. Im exhaust ed just thinking about it. My dream is to some day experience the term coined a few years back staycation. The concept applies to the notion of staying home in an environ ment that is so pleas ant, you feel like youre on vacation. In theory, I love the idea. But in re ality, its another sto ry. Fortunately, for the lawn and garden, there are some pretty helpful ideas along with a num ber of undemanding plants that can get us a few steps closer to a tru ly relaxing staycation in our own little corner of the world. TIPS AND TRICKS These are a few of my favorite tricks for get ting a little bit closer to nirvana. SOAKER HOSES: Keep ing up with watering can rob many hours of pre cious free time. An easy way to cut down on this time consuming event is to make sure your plants are getting water right where they need it by us ing soaker hoses. These porous hoses allow wa ter to seep out slowly and deeply. Roots have time to absorb the mois ture and there is less risk of over-watering. AUTOMATIC TIMERS: Simplify watering du ties even more by using automatic timers. Use these in conjunction with soaker hoses and drip irrigation systems and put your water ing woes on autopilot. Do this, plant that: Productivity tips in the garden SEE POPENOE | E2 SEE GARDEN | E2 SEE TIPS | E2 JUANITA POPENOE LAKE COUNTY EXTENSION

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 30THANNUALSUMTER SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENTSATURDAYAPRIL 26 thMiona Lake Golf Club AMLight BreakfastAMShotgun StartMiona Lake Golf ClubREGISTRATIONDEADLINE:WEDNESDAY, APRIL23RDSPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE Fee: $50/golferFormat: Scramble FOR SPONSORSHIP OR INFORMATION CONTACT: Ph: 352-748-2697Email: Ljwinchester@cfl.rr.com 30THANNUALSUMTER SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENTSATURDAYAPRIL 26 th Animal Clinic of Leesburg Charlotte Pipe SECO Energy Sumter County School District Sumter Tire & Auto The Villages Technology Solutions Group Anston-Greenlees, Inc. Ford & Associates, Inc. Hannah Foster Lake-Sumter State College this the proper way to prune them? A: There is no rea son to prune a healthy crape myrtle at all. Crape myrtles come in a range of sizes from 3 to 40 feet tall. Choose the cultivar that will reach the height you want and has the ow er color you want, then let it go. Only dead branches and possibly old ower heads need to be removed. Dont be fooled into thinking that these plants re quire annual pruning. Q: My date palm has some problems. All the older leaves are turning yellowish with dead tips. Does it have the Texas Phoe nix Palm Decline that I have read about? A: The Texas Phoe nix Palm Decline, or TPPD, is a very serious disease. It is similar to Lethal Yellowing that killed all the coconut palms in South Flori da. TPPD is caused by a phytoplasma, a bac terium without a cell wall, and is thought to be spread by a small leaf hopper insect. It has killed a lot of date palms in Lakeland, but not many cases have been ofcially report ed in Lake County. The symptoms of TPPD are premature rapid drop of all fruit, ower death, discol oration of the leaves beginning with the oldest leaves and then death of the spear leaf (the young est leaf). Leaf discolor ation can be confused with other problems like nutrient deciency or Ganoderma butt rot. The root system is also affected and decays, al lowing the palm to eas ily be rocked back and forth in the ground. Your symptoms sound more like potas sium deciency rather than TPPD, but check for the other symptoms of root rot and spear leaf death. You can do an assay to determine if it is TPPD, but the anal ysis costs $75 and re quires the collection of wood chips from a hole bored in the trunk. There is no cure for TPPD, although antibi otic injections for the life of the palm can pre vent it. Juanita Popenoe is the di rector of the UF/IFAS Lake County Extension ofce and Environmental Horti culture Production Agent III. Email: jpopenoe@u.edu. SUBMITTED PHOTO Loquats are easy-to-grow landscape trees with great edible fruit. POPENOE FROM PAGE E1 hunter green; its tall enough to house an el egant orchid, but would also work as a tabletop accent. On a grander scale is the retailers Conserva tory bird cage, a near ly 5-foot-long mahog any and wire piece that would t on a console table or atop a long shelf. While its dramat ic in and of itself, a col lection of objects would look amazing inside it. (www.potterybarn.com) Floral motifs and roses in particular were all the rage during the Victorian era. Art and textiles featured il lustrated ora and fau na from home and exot ic parts of the world. Bradbury & Brad bury now offers a cou ple of art wallpapers de rived from illustrations by period artists Wil liam Morris and Wal ter Crane. Fenway has an Art Nouveau-style pattern with irises at its heart, while Wood land showcases the art istry of both Morris and Crane winsome rab bits and long-legged deer cavort across a leafy landscape. (www. bradbury.com) Designer Voytek Bry lowski offers prints of works by Victorian il lustrators Mary and Elizabeth Kirby. Par rots, toucans, lilies and hummingbirds are hand-colored, vi brant examples that can be mounted in simple frames and placed near a patio door or any where the gentility and charm of the period might be appreciated. By digitally enhanc ing old images, I feel that I give them new life, and preserve his torically signicant il lustrations and draw ings by these famous naturalists, says Bry lowski, who is based in Wroclaw, Poland. (www. etsy.com/shop/Victori anWallArt) Jennifer Stuart, an artist in Tulsa, Oklaho ma, has designed a col lection of plates depict ing damask and oral prints of the 19th cen tury on patio-friendly melamine. (www.zaz zle.com) And Pier 1s Floria collection has a vin tage damask pattern in garnet, soft blue and grass-green in a collec tion of indoor/outdoor rugs and throw pillows. (www.pier1.com) Cast-iron and wick er furniture and con tainers were used both indoors and out in the late 19th century, just as today we use rat tan chairs in the family room and the garden, or iron plant stands in the kitchen as well as the patio. Restoration Hard wares Hampshire and Bar Harbor all-weath er wicker collections include chairs and so fas in restful shades of cream, gray and mocha. (www.restorationhard ware.com) Early visitors to re sorts in New Yorks Ad irondack Mountains discovered the epony mous big wooden chair thats withstood hun dreds of years of style changes. A good selec tion in both real wood and Polywood, a re cycled plastic resem bling wood, is at www. hayneedle.com West Elms collection of soft yet sturdy braid ed baskets, woven of bankuan grass, evoke French laundry bins. Use them as storage in any room; the natural col or makes them versatile. (www.westelm.com) Turquoise chick en-wire baskets and cloches can be found at www.farmhouse wares.com which also has a vintage-style gar den supply shop sign in the form of a hand. Galvanized planter pots in sets of six would make great receptacles for herbs or miniature blooms. GARDEN FROM PAGE E1 FARMHOUSE WARES / AP A chicken wire cloche adds vintage air to a small plant or tabletop display. Those drawn to 19th-century style may be happy to learn that vintage garden decor is a trend for spring and summer. The timers can be set to come on automati cally from several times a day to once a week. Then, whether you leave home for weeks or want more carefree time in the hammock, you wont have to worry about your plants or lawn not getting watered. MULCH: Usually the most dreaded task in any garden is the weed ing. One simple solu tion to cutting down on the amount of weeds your garden will have is to use mulch. A threeinch layer will block the sunlight most weed seeds need to germi nate. The added benet of mulch is that it keeps your soil cooler, cuts down on moisture loss and helps suppress dis ease. It even looks great and really shows off the plants. A GARDEN MAIL BOX: Even the most or ganized gardeners nd themselves running back to the shed or ga rage for that must-have tool for the job at hand. Placing a mailbox or similar storage box in the garden can elim inate those unneces sary trips back to the tool shed. Fill the mail box with your most im portant small tools and youll always have them close at hand. Consider adding a trowel, plant labels, waterproof pen, twine, scissors, pruners, insect spray and bottled water. PLANTS TO PLANT When it comes to high-impact, low-main tenance plants, here are three of my favorites. Just keep in mind, even the least demanding plants deserve our attention ev ery now and then. KNOCK OUT ROS ES: This is the un-fussy rose. If youve been in timidated by growing roses in the past or are tired of the work nec essary to keep them disease and pest-free, this is the rose for you. Knockout roses are pro lic bloomers and are very resistant to black spot and mildew prob lems typical of so many other roses. Provide full sun and well-drained soil and this rose will re ward you with months of carefree beauty. DAYLILIES: Theyre so easy, you can prac tically lay a daylily on the ground and watch it grow. Daylilies are beautiful and deer re sistant with thousands of varieties in a rainbow of colors. They bloom all summer and return the next year thicker and fuller than before. The only work youll have to do is to divide them every 3 to 5 years. HOSTAS: If youre looking for a showstop per for the shade garden, hostas are it. From min iature to massive, these plants known for their bold foliage are available in thousands of variet ies. Hostas offer many shades of green, from lemon-lime to bluegreen and every shade in between. TIPS FROM PAGE E1

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 MAUREEN GILMER McClatchy-Tribune News Service In early spring a mas sive wisteria in Califor nia is so large its con sidered among the great horticultural wonders of the world. This single vine that now shades an acre of ground in Sierra Madre was planted from a one gallon sized seed ling a century ago. To day the Guinness Book of World Records lists it as the largest owering plant in the world. This California plant is one of the exotic Asian species, but there also is a lovely native American species, Wisteria frute scens, from the South eastern states. Prob lems begin when exotic wisteria escapes to nat uralize in wild lands. Its causing serious prob lems in the Southeast because they share the same preferences as our native species. Es caped Asian wisterias are listed as potential ly invasive in 19 eastern states, primarily those in the southeast where abundant summer rain keeps every seedling growing vigorously all season long. Though we all love wisteria, think twice be fore planting because exotic wisteria have es caped to infest valu able wild lands which support old growth for ests and protected na tive species. When vines escape, they can cause unique damage to na tive plant communities and the wildlife they support. Sometimes invasive plants actually evolve once theyre natural ized in wild lands, a fact which can turn a mod erate problem to a se vere one over time. Its because all plants are programmed to adapt to changing climate and conditions through nat ural selection. One ex ample is Japanese hon eysuckle (Lonicera japonica), which has in vaded the Midwestern woodlands. It reproduc es by a prodigious crop of berries that travel long distances with the birds and other wildlife that consume them. In the past, cold er winters have lim ited this honeysuckle from naturalizing fur ther north. Today the sheer quantity of seed produced has resulted in rare individuals with greater cold resistance. Gradually they are mov ing into our most im portant forests. Wisteria gone wild in volve two exotic species, the Japanese (Wiste ria oribunda) and Chi nese species (Wistera sinensis). In the south east, species have cross pollinated, which re sults in naturally occur ring hybrids that exhibit new genetic character istics. If that character istic allows offspring to survive on less rain fall, exotic wisteria can move further west into arid regions of Texas and beyond. Wisteria runners can reach 60 feet or more in length, which easily climb into shrubs and treetops. When vine cloaks the entire can opy of a tree, it shades out the foliage to inter fere with photosynthe sis crucial to plant life. Wisteria becomes so large it can destroy cen turies old trees, often great oaks, tulip pop lar, beach, pine and elm. The sheer weight of large vines is enough to pull down old growth trees after periods of heavy rain or high winds. Wisteria is well known for spiraling around an arbor or porch post. When they twine around a tree trunk, the pressure eventually cuts through the host tree bark to girdle and kill it. Then after the tree falls, it leaves a gap in the for est canopy. This expos es thousands of wiste ria seeds to sun, which accumulated over years beneath the par ent plant. They sprout to become a thicket of young vines impenetra ble to both humans and wildlife. Theres another way that wisteria can repro duce to further its do main. Runners that contact earth strike roots at each leaf node. This is a process called layering, used in prop agation of vines. A sin gle wisteria gone wild can use this method to dominate several acres of ground. You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741 MELISSA RAYWORTH Associated Press The arrival of spring means that ea markets are reopen ing for business around the country. Shoppers will hunt for treasures amid acres of used goods. A few will come home with just the right vin tage art or quirky piece of furniture to make their home more beautiful. Jaime Rummereld, co-founder of Woodson & Rummerelds House of De sign in Los Angeles, some times mixes ea-market nds with high-end new furnish ings to decorate the homes of her celebrity clients. The beauty of ea mar kets, she says, is you nev er know what you will nd. Theres nothing like being outdoors or in a place off the beaten path rummaging through old treasures. Los Angeles-based interior designer Brian Patrick Flynn, creator of the FlynnsideOut design blog, also hunts for vintage pieces: I shop sec ond-hand regardless of my projects budget or clients level of taste, he says. Vin tage and thrift is the best way to add one-of-a-kind air to a space without insanely high cost. There is luck involved, of course. But skill also plays a role. As you browse crowd ed tables of used things this spring, how can you nd the treasures that will give your home an infusion of style while avoiding decorating di sasters? Here, Flynn, Rummereld and another interior designer who shops for vintage decor Lee Kleinhelter of the At lanta-based design rm and retail store Pieces tell how they do it. WHEN TO GO Winter and early spring are perfect for ea-market shop ping, says Flynn. Since thrifting and an tiquing are often associated with gorgeous weather and weekend shenanigans, many people shy away from hunt ing for their vintage nds when its cold or gloomy, he notes, so go now and go early. I usually show up just as the ea market opens to en sure I see every new item as its put out on display, he says. When you wait until the end of a ea markets run to check out its stuff, youre likely to nd mostly left overs, things priced too high ly which others passed over, or things that are just way too taste-specic for most peo ple to make offers on. TIME TRAVEL Rummereld occasionally nds signed artwork and ce ramics by noteworthy artists at ea markets and antique malls. It is amazing to see what people cast away, she says. I personally hunt for Sasha Brastoff ceramics because of his unique California her itage as a set decorator and artist. She has also found vintage Billy Haines chairs and Gio Ponti lighting at ea markets. So read up on the design ers and artists from your fa vorite periods, and then hunt for their work or impressive knockoffs. A single ea market might offer goods from every decade of the 20th century. Can you put a lamp from the 1970s on a table from 1950? Yes, if the shapes and colors work well together, Kleinhelter says. If your home has contem porary decor, Rummereld says it can be powerful to add one statement piece a side table, say, or a light xture from a previous era. But a little bit goes a long way. Use vintage in moder ation with contemporary spaces, Rummereld says. It will highlight the unique ness of the vintage item. You dont necessarily want to live in a time capsule. FIXER-UPPERS You may assume that old upholstered furniture should be avoided, especially if the fabric looks dirty or dam aged. But these designers say its actually a great thing to hunt for: Hands down, up holstery is the best deal to walk away with at ea mar kets. Just make sure you train your eye to pay no attention to the existing fabrics, Flynn says. Zero in on the lines of the frames instead. Kleinhelter agrees: I usual ly gravitate toward the bones and frames of vintage pieces, and I make them my own by adding fun fabric or lacquer ing the base. The same goes for lighting. Buy it if you love it, but get the wiring updated by a pro fessional. Flynn usually esti mates an extra $50 to $75 per xture for updating the wir ing, so keep that cost in mind as you bargain. MIX AND MATCH Be on the lookout for piec es you can use together. You dont need multiples of the same chair or sofa to make a room work, Flynn says. Stick with those which have similar scale and proportion, then recover them in the same fabric. Once you get home, use ea market nds sparingly, Flynn says, mixing them in with the pieces you already own: A few big pieces mixed with some smaller ones add ed to your existing stuff can instantly take an unnished space and make it feel way more nished and remark ably personal. Ask a designer: Tips for flea-market shoppers PHOTOS BY SARAH DORIO / AP Designer Brian Patrick Flynn furnished this Atlanta loft strictly using vintage seating found at ea markets. Caution: Wisteria are known for invading and running wild MAUREEN GILMER / MCT Wisteria grown on the porches of farm houses all over America became the genesis of plants that escaped into the wild. Shoppers will hunt for treasures amid acres of used goods. A few will come home with just the right vintage art or quirky piece of furniture to make their home more beautiful.

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 April 12, 2014Registration:5pm 6pmat Spanish Village-Clubhouse(Between Arlington Ridge & Plantation)1 El Presidente Blvd., Leesburg, FL 34748 TOP PRIZES INCLUDE*: 1st: $500 Gift Card 2nd: $250 Gift Card 3rd: $100 Gift Card Thomas Kinkade Painting Weekend Trip $50 Gift CardrPhone: (352) 326-0761 x1100 Email: info@MercyMail.org www.AngelFlightSE.orgSponsors COME PLAY WITH USLimited Seats Available Sign Up Today Sponsor a Table of 10 Call for InformationTo Register go to:www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events $60.00 Registration Includes FoodPlus Re-stacks and Add-on!Early Registration is Now Available Save $20.00 Off Your Entry!Deadline April 10th LEE REICH Associated Press If plants could squeal like hungry pigs, we gardeners would pay more attention to their fertilizer needs. But plants do tell us when they are hungry with poor or distorted growth and with leaf discolorations. Why wait for your plants to become so desperate? Test your soil ev ery few years. Testing can be done by you or by a private or state labora tory, and there are options in what to test for. At the least, test the acidity (pH), because if it is unsuitable, plants can not absorb certain nutrients, even if those nutrients are present. Most plants like a slightly acidic soil, with a pH about 6.5. A standard test checks levels of the so-called mac ronutrients phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magne sium and sulfur. A complete checkup would also include testing for micronutrients, such as iron, manganese and zinc, which are essential but required in only minute quantities. SAMPLING IS MOST IMPORTANT The accuracy of any soil test depends on how you take the sample. In even a mod est-size garden of 100 square feet, one cup of soil the amount used for the test represents only 0.001 percent of the top 6 inches of soil, so that sample must be as rep resentative as possible of the whole area to be tested. The test area should be rel atively uniform. Areas devot ed to very different kinds of plants vegetables versus lawn, for example require separate samples. Vegetable and ower gardens can be sampled together. Subdivide the area where obvious differences in topog raphy or soil exist, and stay away from walls, sites of old compost piles, etc. Even out small differences over even relatively uniform soil by taking a half-dozen samples from random spots. Sample the top 6 inches of vegeta ble and ower beds, and the top 2 inches of lawns, rst re moving any surface debris such as compost, weeds or sod. Whoa dont use that rst trowelful of soil. Its coneshaped, with a greater pro portion of soil from the sur face layers than from lower down. Take a slice, uniform ly thick from top to bottom, from along the edge of that hole you just made. Alter natively, use a soil sampling tube, home-made or bought, to get a uniform sample. Combine all your samples from a test area into a clean plastic bucket. Thorough ly mix the composited soil to average out differences be tween samples, crumbling it and discarding stones, sticks, insects and other debris as you mix. Spread the soil out on a clean baking pan to air dry for a day, then remove about a cup for testing. RESULTS COME IN If you are sending your sample out for testing, fol low any instructions sup plied by the laboratory about packing the soil. For test ing at home, use a portion of that 1 cup subsample you got from the combined sam ples. Home testing kits in volve mixing small amounts of your soil sample with vari ous solutions and noting col or changes, which you com pare against standards all detailed in the included in structions. If you are testing more than one area, label samples from each area and make a note to yourself of the locations. A testing laboratory may also want other information, such as past fertilization his tory, as well as what you in tend to grow. Indicate wheth er you wish any special tests, such as for micronutrients or toxic elements (such as lead) in the soil. Your completed soil test will give you information about your soils organic matter, texture (clay, sand, etc.), acid ity and levels of specic nutri ents, along with a recommen dation for fertilizer and lime. Fertilizer recommendations are based on what is in the soil and what kinds of plants you intend to grow. Follow fertilizer recommendations closely, because too much can be as harmful as too little, causing nutrient imbalances, even death, of plants. Keep in mind that a soil test determines fertility and acid ity, but does not address such problems as waterlogging, pests or insufcient sunlight. An observant eye over com ing months is a necessary ad junct to soil testing. Theres truth in the old saying that the best fertilizer is the gar deners shadow. If you are sending your sample out for testing, follow any instructions supplied by the laboratory about pack ing the soil. If you are test ing more than one area, la bel samples from each area and make a note to yourself of the locations. Equally im portant is to supply the lab oratory with any informa tion requested about past fertilization history, as well as what you intend to grow. Indicate whether you wish any special tests, such as for micronutrients or toxic ele ments (such as lead) in the soil. When your soil test is com plete, you will receive infor mation about your soils or ganic matter, texture (clay, sand, etc.), acidity and levels of specic nutrients, along with a recommendation for fertilizer and lime. Fertilizer recommendations are based on what is in the soil and what kinds of plants you in tend to grow. Follow fertiliz er recommendations closely, because too much can be as harmful as too little, causing nutrient imbalances, even death, of plants. Keep in mind that a soil test determines fertility and acid ity, but does not address such problems as waterlogging, pests or insufcient sunlight. An observant eye over com ing months is a necessary ad junct to soil testing. Theres truth in the old saying that the best fertilizer is the gar deners shadow. Regular soil testing helps keep plants healthy LEE REICH / AP A yellowing young leaf, though its veins remain green, indicates that this plant is hungry for iron.



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Sponsored by Fran Haasch Law Group lawfran.com $ EUSTIS TOPS MOUNT DORA, SPORTS B1LEGISLATURE: Proposal would have all textbooks approved by School Board, A3 FAIR: One last day to see the sights, ride the rides, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Saturday, April 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 102 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D2 DIVERSIONS C7 FAITH C1 LEGALS D2 BUSINESS C3 NATION A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A5 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.83 / 63Mostly sunny 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comFacing tough budget deci sions ahead, several Lake County commissioners said they are left with two op tions: raise taxes or cut ser vices. There has not been a tax increase in the last ve years, county ofcials said. We knew this day was going to come and we have cut and cut and there is nowhere else, County Commissioner Welton Cadwell said. We are in a position where we have to provide the basic services. We dont want public safety to suffer, so some tough decisions are going to have to be made. Cadwell said the countys past practice of tapping into reserves to balance the budget is not a viable option anymore. The only other way is to cre ate additional revenues, he said. The countys budget has a $7 million shortfall because of de clining property values and an estimated $3 million increase to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce budget to replace aging vehicles and for pay raises for deputies whose salaries are falling behind other jurisdictions, county ofcials said. In order to maintain 7 percent in reserves, that shortfall must be met, according to Stephen Koontz, budget director. Koontz said there could be an effect on any of the services the county provides, includ ing parks and libraries, dependent on what the commission decides. In estimating the scal year 2013-14 budget, Koontz said he has already taken into account a 3 percent increase in property values. I dont feel (property values) are going to be up more than 3 percent, he said of the values, which will be released on June 1. Whats more, Lake Emergency Medical Services is facing cuts to service beginning in October if the organization has to chop an additional $750,000 to balance its budget for scal year 2015. Meanwhile, county ofcials MIKE SCHNEIDERAssociated PressORLANDO A man who authorities say drove an SUV that crashed into another vehicle, sending it spinning into a day care center where a girl was killed and 14 peo ple were injured, was ordered Friday to stay in jail until a judge can determine whether he is a ight risk. Robert Corchado, 28, will be held in jail until at least Monday when a judge will hear argu ments on whether he can be released on bail, Circuit Judge Jerry Brew er said during a rst appearance hearing. Bail was initially set for $100,000, but a prosecutor told the judge that Corchado was a ight risk and that he should be held without bond. I have a witness here, a trooper, who can testify that he is a ight risk, prosecu tor Austin Price said. He has it on good au thority that this defendant, is planning, once he posts bond, to leave the country.Officials: Taxes may be needed to fill budget gaps PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ambulances await repairs in the garage of the Lake Emergency Medical Services support services in Leesburg on Thursday.IN NEED OF SERVICE A worker performs maintenance on a Lake EMS ambulance. County leaders are concerned about a $7 million budget shortfall that could affect services. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comThe Lake County Sher iffs Ofce reported Friday afternoon they have identied a man seen at an Ocoee Walmart with a woman whose body was found two days later in Clermont. The man appeared to be walking with Cheri Amber Houston, 28, at the store at 6:15 / p .m. on April 2. Lt. John Herrell, sher iffs spokesman, said de tectives received call-in tips of the mans iden tity after the media ran pictures of him starting Wednesday. Herrell would not reveal if they have locat ed or talked with the man, who has only been labeled as some one detectives want to speak with regarding Houstons disappear ance. Herrell did say the mans vehicle has been positively identied and crime scene investiga tors are currently pro cessing it. Houston was found on the morning of April 4 near the intersection of Hancock and Hart wood Marsh roads. A woman walking her dog discovered the body in a wooded area about 300 feet from the inter section. Detectives believe the body had been there less than 24 hours. Detectives have not said how she died. Detectives believe Houston, who was from Newnan, Ga., had been in the Ocoee and Win ter Garden areas along the Highway 50 corridor since March 31. Anyone with informa tion can call the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce at 352-343-2101, or Central Florida CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS, where callers may re main anonymous.Police ID man sought after body found in woodsCLERMONT THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLocal residents are sharing some great ideas for the future of Venetian Gardens, according to ofcials involved with the visioning sessions Leesburg is hosting to create a master plan for the picturesque 110-acre waterside park on the shores of Lake Harris. The next visioning session will be 9 / a.m. to noon today at the Leesburg Community Building. The public is invited. Among the ideas bounced at the rst LEESBURGPlanning sessions for Venetian Gardens bring plenty of ideas DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTOVenetian Gardens is shown in Leesburg.We knew this day was going to come and we have cut and cut and there is nowhere else. Welton CadwellCounty CommissionerNo bail yet for man in deadly day care crash CORCHADO SEE TAXES | A2SEE IDEAS | A2SEE CRASH | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 visioning session last weekend: Restaurants on the grounds; a lighthouse; boardwalk to connect the entire park; connecting Ve netian Gardens to downtown with both pedestri an and golf cart paths; and some special attractions on the islands, such as a dog park and childrens ac tivities. Most people made sug gestions to improve the park; there were not very many at all who said to leave it alone, said Rob ert Sargent, Leesburgs spokesman. The majority of the suggestions were ideas of what we can do to attract people to Venetian Gardens, and the good thing is that we had a good cross section of the com munity. ...The park really is there for the residents, so as we move forward and plan for improvements, we really want to do some thing that the community is going to be proud of. Greg Beliveau of LPG Planners was hired by the city of Leesburg to coor dinate the workshops, prepare a draft and con ceptual plan for Venetian Gardens. He was pleased by the turnout of 50 people who also discussed their wishes for the swimming pool and the community building. Among the rst session group attendees were residents from Pal mora Park, local business owners, city staff members and Commissioners Da vid Knowles, Bill Polk and Mayor John Christian. What was neat about the day is overall a lot of the discussion was the same, said Beliveau, who noted the group was broken down into six tables sharing their ideas. Even though all tables were working independently, there seemed to be some good consensus within the room. I was encouraged by the turnout, said San di Moore, executive director for the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce. It was nice to see people really take the process se riously and really look ing down the line, not just what it is going to look like tomorrow or next week. Any visioning that you do, you really have to think about what its going to be like in ve years and 10 years from now. The Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce will host a one-day vision ing bus trip from 7 / a.m. to 5:30 / p.m. on Thursday for interested participants to visit Lake Mirror and Lake Morton in Lakeland; Cranes Roost in Altamonte Springs; and Wooton Park in Tavares to see the park improvements in these cities that may spur some ideas for Venetian Gar dens. It helps you to get outside of where you are to see what the possibilities are in other cities, and sometimes you pick up one lit tle idea and it can really change the course, Moore said. Its important to realize what are the possibil ities and what is out there. Residents interested in going in the one-day vi sioning trip may call the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, 787-2131 by Monday. HOW TO REACH US APRIL 11CASH 3 . ............................................... 7-2-5 Afternoon . .......................................... 6-4-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 9-4-7-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 1-7-3-8FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 10FANTASY 5 . ............................. 1-4-20-27-30 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.said they are struggling to come up with funding to make needed repairs at county buildings and to replace obsolete technology. With 41 percent of the countys buildings more than 20 years old, the HVAC controls system and IT le serv ers must be replaced to avoid system and oper ational failures. There is a backlog of $12.2 million in facilities needs, while IT is report ing $950,000 for critical updates to le servers, data storage units and telephone systems. Moreover, county ofcials are also project ing a $450,000 shortfall in the Parks and Storm water Municipal Ser vice Taxing Unit, which levies taxes to fund im provements. In 2012, commissioners voted against the rollback rate, which would have allowed the county to raise taxes to generate the same amount of revenue as in the previous year. If commissioners had voted for the rollback rate, there could have been more revenues in reserves, one county ofcial said. We have kind of cut all around the edges and it may be time where we are going to have to make the decision to probably raise taxes or cut services dras tically, Commissioner Tim Sullivan said. We put off capital improve ments. Putting off some of those decisions has now come back to haunt us. I dont see any huge increases in revenues coming in without raising taxes. But commissioners Jimmy Conner and Sean Parks said it is prema ture to speak about tax increases without knowing exactly what the property values will be. Even so, Conner said if the county is forced to raise property taxes in the name of public safe ty, it would be deemed essential. Cutting public safety means increasing response times, he said. Increasing response times is the difference of people living or dy ing. I would rather be criticized for raising the millage than having to live with myself for not protecting the people who have condence in me. Jerry Smith, executive director of Lake EMS, said he was informed the ambulances allocation, which it receives through the Munici pal Service Taxing Unit, has been reduced by $400,000 for scal year 2014-15 because additional funds left over from the Lake-Sumter EMS split have been depleted. Sumter County dissolved its contract with the organization in 2011. The allocation from the MSTU funds one third of Smiths budget with the ambulance ser vice collecting the re mainder of its revenue from user fees, which have not been increasing at anticipated levels. Smith has to replace four truck chas sis, 16 LifePaks (known as cardiac monitors) and 14 stretchers by 2016. The cardiac monitors are $30,000 apiece, and each stretcher is $14,000. To maintain our state of readiness, our current deployment of 19 ambulances and for capital, Lake EMS needs more than a million in additional revenue, Smith said. One option commissioners could consider is to raise the MSTU for Lake EMS, Koontz said. If the ambulance or ganization is forced to make cuts, it could re sult in one or two few er ambulances on the road, Smith said. It could adversely impact our response times, he said. Further, with a third of its eet out of warranty, it could get more costly to x repairs. We currently have 10 ambulances out of war ranty, and we have ve above 200,000 miles, Smith said, adding that the more mileage on a vehicle, the more repairs are needed. We put a million miles on our eet annually. Previously, Smith had added 12 oater positions to avoid ambulances being down when someone calls in sick. Some of those positions could be on the chopping block if revenues are not raised, Smith said. This is why I have frozen ve positions, he said. TAXES FROM PAGE A1 IDEAS FROM PAGE A1 PHOTO COURTESY OF VISITCENTRALFLORIDA.ORG The Lake Mirror Complex is a multi-faceted entertainment complex located on Lakelands scenic Lake Mirror. Leesburg residents will visit Lake Mirror and other sites on Thursday to get ideas for Venetian Gardens.Corchados public defender, Jon de Armas, asked that the $100,000 bond remain in place. The judge said that if Corchado is released, he will be prohibited from driving a car as a condition. Police say Corchado crashed his Dodge Durango into a convertible, which in turn smashed into the KinderCare building on Wednesday. Corchado ed the scene, au thorities said. A manhunt across Florida ended Thursday with Corchados ar rest. He was charged with leaving the scene of a deadly accident al most precisely 24 hours after the KinderCare facility in Winter Park was torn open in the wreck, killing 4-year-old Lily Quintus, who was sitting in a classroom await ing her afternoon snack. Fourteen others were injured, most of them children. Family members say Lily Quin tus loved princesses, ranch dress ing on everything and Star Wars. Families are emotionally destroyed because of what he did, Nicole Quintus, Lilys mother, said in an interview with The Associat ed Press The mother softly sobbed as she spoke of her daughter. She said Lily also loved the TV series Doc tor Who and put ranch dressing on even pizza and hot dogs. Nicole Quintus said a teacher called her soon after the crash, screaming but unable to say what happened. One minute everything was normal, and the next there was an explosion and smoke and screams, she said. The girls 7-year-old brother is an aspiring engineer who wants to design a time machine to bring Lily back, the mother added. She was beautiful and passion ate and innocent, the mother said, and she deserved so much more. Eight patients, including Lily, were initially taken to Arnold Palmer Childrens Hospital in Or lando. One remained in critical condition Friday, and three were listed in fair condition, according to a statement. Three had been discharged. The remaining vic tims were taken to other hospitals. There were no updates on their conditions Friday. CRASH FROM PAGE A1 BRADLEY KLAPPERAssociated PressWASHINGTON A controversial torture report by the Senate Intel ligence Committee paints a pattern of CIA deception about the effectiveness of waterboarding and other brutal interro gation methods used on terror suspects after the Sept. 11 attacks, accord ing to leaked ndings. The committee said it will ask the Justice Department to investigate how the mate rial was published. The McClatchy news service late Thursday published what it said are the voluminous, still-classied reviews 20 ndings. It concludes that the enhanced interrogation techniques failed to produce valuable intelligence; the CIA misled the Bush adminis tration, Congress and the public about the value of the harsh treatment; the agency employed unauthorized techniques on detainees and improper ly detained others; and it never properly evaluated its own actions. Both the CIAs interrogation techniques and connement condi tions were brutal and far worse than the agency communicated to policy makers. The reported ndings are consistent with what senators have detailed about the investigation since its 2009 inception and with what numer ous news reports, hu man rights organizations and various governmen tal and non-governmental studies have suggest ed in the decade since the CIAs program started to coming to light. President Barack Obama has likened the harsh inter rogations to torture, but the spy agency defends its actions and says much in the Senate committees report is inaccurate. The committee voted last week to declassify the summary and conclusions of the 6,600-page review and is now waiting for the Obama administration to censor material sensitive to national security. The panels chairwom an, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said an investigation into how the ndings were published was underway. The two pages of ndings published by McClatchy did not in clude the names of any U.S. government employ ees or terror detainees, lo cations of secret CIA pris ons or anything else that might threaten nation al security. They also did not indicate how or why the committee reached its conclusions.Leaks paint pattern of CIA deception

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Tickets available for Dancing with the Teachers fundraiserMount Dora High School will host the fth annual Dancing with the Teachers fundraising event on at 7 / p.m. on April 25, with eight pairs of teachers performing routines. Tickets are $5 for students and teachers, and $10 for adults and can be purchased at the school, 700 N. Highland St. Call the school at 352383-2177 or email deann@lake.k12. .us for information. Proceeds benet the junior class for prom expenses, and 10 percent of the proceeds will go to the David Dickson Memorial Scholarship Fund.TAVARES Planes, Trains & BBQ event celebrates seventh yearDowntown Tavares will host the seventh annual Planes, Trains & BBQ event today with events from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. Admission is free. Two air shows at 11 / a.m. and 1 / p.m., include performers such as Patty Wagstaff, member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team. Enjoy barbecue, and participate in the Peoples Choice tasteoff, where a $5 ticket will permit the tasting of entries, beginning at 3 / p.m. There is free parking for the public at the Lake County Parking Garage at the intersection of Maud Street and Sinclair Avenue. For a complete listing of all events and for information, go to www. Tavares.org.TAVARES Historical Museum celebrates its re-openingA ribbon cutting and grand re-opening of the Lake County Historical Museum will take place at 5:30 / p.m. Thursday at the museum on the rst oor of the Lake County Courthouse, 317 W. Main St. The museum will be showing off the changes that have taken place over the past few months, and curator and local historian Bobby Grenier has put together displays of Lake County history. Museum hours are 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m. on Friday and Saturday. For information, call 352-343-9890.LAKE COUNTY Discover the wild side of the woodsThis one-day, Welcome to the Woods program offers an opportunity for people of all ages to get out into the woods with a guide, where they can sh at Bear Pond, shoot a bow and arrow, hike along the Florida National Scenic Trail, enjoy a hayless hayride to Blackwater Creek, learn safe boating practices and take a short canoe trip along the creek. Space is free and limited for the event from 9 / a.m. to 2 / p.m., on April 26, at the Seminole Forest Wildlife Management Area in Lake County, on State Road 46 just west of the Wekiva River. Participants must register in advance by calling the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at 352-732-1225.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 CINDY DIANSpecial to The Daily CommercialAlthough June Per ry has only been canning a year, the 58-year old Eustis resident entered ve canning entries in the Lake County Fair Creative Art competition and four of them won rst-place awards. Perrys fth can ning entry took second-place and three of her four rst-place entries went on to win Best of Show awards, for a total of eight awards for ve food entries. A sixth entry, one for a homemade blanket, also won a rst-place award. This is the rst time Ive ever entered anything in my life, she said. I am encouraged beyond be lief. The judges were raving over her rec ipes, Creative Arts Co-Chairman Annie Lewis said. They were begging for the recipe and asking her to bring more next time. However, Perry was very surprised at the outcome of her creations since she only started canning last year. I began canning and creating recipes for my family, she said. I started out just making jams but eventually made my way into canning everything from carrots to meats. It was her step daughter who rst encouraged her to enter the fair compe tition. I didnt have any expectations, since I was so new to this, Perry said. My stepdaughter really encouraged me to at least try. Perry attributes much of her suc cess to the support of her family. The reci pes were created for them and it was only with their encouragement that they were entered. I told her when I came in with her to enter that no mat ter what happens, youre a winner in my book, Perrys husband Charley Brad ley said. I knew she was very talented and am so proud of her for this accomplishment. Perrys and other creative art winners awards are being displayed at the main art building for the duration of the fair.Novice canner wins nine awards at fair CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL June Perry shows off her nine awards. She won eight awards for food entries and one for a homemade blanket. STEVE FUSSELLSpecial to the Daily CommercialFruitland Park commissioners gave Coral Gables developer Jonathan Pen ner tentative approval Thursday night to develop a 110-unit apartment proj ect on the northwest corner of Spring Lake Road and Poinsettia Avenue. The vote to amend the citys zoning and comprehensive plan is a rst read ing. The issue will come before the com mission for a public hearing on April 24. When Penner proposed a 156-unit project on the 14.28-acre site in Jan uary, residents near the site packed commission chambers and commis sioners voted to deny the proposal. About 20 residents attended Thursday nights meeting, and ve spoke against the project. Commissioner Chris Chesshire agreed with project opponents. I dont think we need more apart ments, Chesshire said. We are a community of predominantly single-fam ily homes and I dont see a need for multi-family, Chesshire said. After a spirited discussion, commissioners agreed to accept Penners proposal for reconsideration. Once the proposal was on the table, discussion was brief. Commisisoners voted 4-1 to approve the development; Chesshire voted against the project. TODAY AT THE FAIR1 p.m. Gates open 6 p.m. Youth plant sale 6:30 p.m. Swine awards 7 p.m. Swine sale 7:30 p.m. Talent show nals 10 to 11 p.m. Rabbit, poultry check-out Staff ReportTALLAHASSEE Flor idas school districts will be required to review and select textbooks under a bill passed by the Florida Senate. The Senate voted 2119 for the bill which was pushed in response to a backlash over national education standards called Common Core on Friday. The bill was also inspired by complaints over a high school world histo ry textbook that some said gave too much attention to Islam. School boards currently select textbooks from a list drawn up by the Florida Department of Education. Sen. Alan Hays, R-Uma tilla, who introduced Senate Bill 864, said the legislation was needed so that school board mem bers will be accountable to parents and voters. Hays said the bill, which would shift responsibility for instructional materials from the state to county school boards, afrms local control. He said parents have approached him with concerns about the content in instructional ma terials and that they have no voice in controlling it. The school board members are members of the community, just like you and I are, Hays said, adding school boards should be accountable to local citizens.Senate approves school book billSEE BOOKS | A4 Staff ReportThe Clermont Downtown Partnership, the city of Clermont, Lake Apopka Natural Gas and Creative Therapy are sponsor ing the Got Kidz? Festival from 9 / a.m. to 2 / p .m. today on Mon trose Street in downtown Cler mont. This event features the Side walk Chalk Art contest, now in its eighth year, where people will line the sidewalks and create art on the spot. Participation is free but limited to the rst 50 artists, most of whom are preregistered. Those still interested can check for available spots before the start of the event. Got Kidz? will also showcase children friendly vendors. Other activities include entertainment and festival foods. While at the event, attendees will get the opportunity to watch art in progress as participating artists will be drawing on site, in cluding this years featured artist Emily Mason. According to organizers, Ma son has been developing her skills as a pencil and watercolor artist with the help of her mentor Christine Harris. Emilys prociencies and tech niques have improved so much over the past year. She is truly a natural talent, Harris said. Mason will be participating in the Sidewalk Chalk Art contest as well as displaying her work at the event. The Clermont Downtown CLERMONTArtists to take to the streetsSEE ARTISTS | A4Controversial development clears first approval hurdle MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comA man wanted by the Sumter County Sheriffs Ofce on charges of failing to appear in court on drug charges was arrested this week when authorities found him hiding in a house under neath a mattress. Bob Turner IV, 29, of Oxford, was tak en into custody Wednesday on arrest warrants for driving with a suspended license and failure to ap pear in court on charges of the sale of cocaine and possession of the drug with intent to sell and deliver, as well as resisting arrest. He remained in the Sumter County Jail Friday morning in lieu of $82,500 bail. Sheriffs spokesman Lt. Bobby Caruthers said Turner had been on their most wanted list since February. The importance of catching him in creased after they recently received tips that Turner had been walking around neighborhoods displaying a handgun and making threats toward law enforcement. With the assistance of the Wildwood Police Department and the U.S. Mar shals Service, Turner was located on High Street in Wildwood. The sheriffs tactical team surrounded the home and reportedly found Turner lodged between a mattress and box spring.Wanted man found hiding under mattress TURNER

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 But Sen. Dwight Bul lard, D-Miami, said the bill might cause an undue burden nancially on many districts. He said school boards did not request the mea sure. Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, called it a bad bill. In part, he said the state Department of Educa tion has done a good job of working through the process of instructional materials. Montford said he is worried about added costs to school boards because the instructional material process is time-consuming. This is a monumen tal task to undertake this, he said. Montford also said he is worried about losing continuity throughout the state, with text books being chosen in 67 different school systems. Sen. Rob Bradley, R-Fleming Island, said local ofcials want control. This is one of my fa vorite bills of the ses sion, he said. Sen. Geraldine Thompson, D-Orlando, said she thinks the bill opens the door to censorship. She said local school boards could object to such material as the works of Mark Twain. Other issues taken up by the Florida legislature include: %  enABORTION RESTRICTIONS: A bill that would change the exceptions to late term abortion was passed by the House Friday, open ing the door to a legal framework that would take into account viability for life, rather than a designated time period, for when the procedure could be performed. The bill (HB 1047) passed with a 7045 vote. At issue is when viability, dened in the bill as a point at which a fetus can survive outside the womb through standard medical care, can be determined. %  enKILLING OF FETUSES: Killing or injuring a fetus at any stage of development would be a crime under a bill passed by the Flori da House on Friday. The House voted 7442 for the bill that ex pands a current law, which allows for mur der or manslaughter charges if a fetus dies after it has developed to the point where it can survive outside the womb. %  enDRUG SENTENCES LIGHTENED: The Florida House passed a bill in creasing the weight threshold for trafcking in oxycodone and hydrocodone in a move to ease what have been called over ly harsh sentencing guidelines. The measure (SB360) passed by a vote of 113-2 Friday. It aims to distin guish between those selling drugs and those caught in possession. The bill moves the cur rent threshold of four grams of either drug to seven grams of oxyco done and 14 grams of hydrocodone. %  enSPEED LIMITS: The House Economic Affairs Committee on Friday voted 12-4 to approve a mea sure (HB 761) that could push speeds on some state highways from 70 mph to 75 mph. The measure, which now heads to the House oor, directs the state Department of Transportation to determine the safe minimum and maximum speed limits on all divided highways that have at least four lanes. A companion (SB 392) in the Senate where the proposal originated awaits an appear ance on the oor. %  enFIREARMS DURING EMERGENCIES: The Florida House passed a bill that would allow the public to car ry concealed rearms while evacuating their home during an emer gency. The bill extends carry-and-conceal privileges to those eeing during a mandatory evacuation declared by the governor or lo cal ofcials.Compiled from reports by the Associated Press and the News Service of Florida.Partnership sponsors the event by providing the chalk and garden knee pads for all par ticipants. Individuals or teams will compete in age categories from age 6 through adult. Children 5 and un der will receive color ing books and crayons compliments of Lake Apopka Natural Gas. Cash prizes are given to the top three artists in each age division. Winning artwork will be displayed in City Hall during April and May. Admission and parking are free. For more information, go to www.cler montdowntownpartnership.com. BOOKSFROM PAGE A3 ARTISTSFROM PAGE A3 Halifax Media GroupFive months ago, Doug Drymon was Leesburgs assistant city manager. A week ago, he was Winter Havens assistant city manager. Today, Drymon is un employed. Winter Haven City Manager Deric Feach er on Wednesday an nounced Drymons departure after only ve months in an email to employees. Prior to be coming assistant city manager there in No vember, Drymon was second in command at Lees burg City Hall. Feachers email did not elaborate on why Drymon left or whether he resigned or was red. Drymon said it was an amicable split decided on mutually in a Tues day evening meeting he had with Feacher. (Feacher) pointed out that it just didnt seem like the community and I were a good match for each other, Drymon said. We just felt that we probably needed to go different ways. I said, I under stand, I have been in your shoes before. Sometimes thats the way it works out. Feacher could not be reached for comment. City spokeswoman Joy Townsend con rmed Drymon is no longer employed by the city and said no resig nation letter exists. Drymon, 57, became assistant city manag er in November after the position sat vacant for months following Feachers promotion in February 2013 from as sistant city manager to city manager. Drymon, who was paid $95,014 per year, had not yet completed his six-month probationary period. All employ ees are subject to a 6to 12-month probationary period, Townsend said. An employee can be re leased without cause during that time.Former Leesburg official out at Winter Haven DRYMON JULIE CARR SMYTHAssociated PressCOLUMBUS, Ohio Geologists in Ohio have for the rst time linked earthquakes in a geo logic formation deep under the Appalachians to hydraulic fracturing, leading the state to is sue new permit condi tions Friday in certain areas that are among the nations strictest. A state investiga tion of ve small trem ors last month in the Youngstown area, in the Appalachian foothills, found the injection of sand and water that ac companies hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the Utica Shale may have increased pressure on a small, unknown fault, said State Oil & Gas Chief Rick Simmers. He called the link probable. While earlier studies had linked earth quakes in the same re gion to deep-injection wells used for dispos al of fracking wastewater, this marks the rst time tremors in the re gion have been tied di rectly to fracking, Sim mers said. The ve seismic events in March couldnt be easily felt by people. The oil and gas drilling boom targets widely different rock for mations around the nation, so the Ohio ndings may not have much relevance to other areas other than per haps inuencing public perception of frackings safety. The types of quakes connected to the industry are gener ally small and not eas ily felt, but the idea of human activity causing the earth to shake often doesnt sit well. The state says the company that set off the Ohio quakes was following rules and appeared to be using common practices. It just got unlucky, Simmers said. Gerry Baker, associate executive director of the Interstate Oil and Gas Commission, said state regulators across the nation will study the Ohio case for any impli cations for the drilling industry. A consortium of states has already be gun discussions. Fracking involves pumping huge volumes of water, sand and chemicals underground to split open rocks to allow oil and gas to ow. Improved technology has allowed energy com panies to gain access to huge stores of natural gas but has raised wide spread concerns that it might lead to groundwater contamination and, yes, earthquakes. A U.S. govern ment-funded report re leased in 2012 found that two worldwide instances of shaking can be attributed to actual ex traction of oil and gas, as opposed to wastewater disposal in the ground a magnitude-2.8 quake in Oklahoma and a magnitude-2.3 quake in England. Both were in 2011. Later, the Canadian government tied quakes in British Co lumbias Horn River Ba sin between 2009 and 2011 to fracking. Those led to stricter regula tions, which news re ports indicated had lit tle effect on the pace or volume of drilling.Geologists link quakes to fracking AP FILE PHOTO Workers tend to a well head during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas Inc. gas well outside Rie, in western Colorado. JULIE PACEAP White House CorrespondentWASHINGTON In a rare dip lomatic rebuke, the United States has blocked Irans controversial pick for envoy to the United Na tions, a move that could stir fresh animosity at a time when Wash ington and Tehran have been seeking a thaw in relations. The Obama administration said Friday that the U.S. had in formed Iran it would not grant a visa to Hamid Aboutalebi, a member of the group responsi ble for the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. While U.S. ofcials had been trying to persuade Iran to simply with draw Aboutalebis name, the an nouncement amounted to an acknowledgement that those ef forts had not been successful. Weve communicated with the Iranians at a number of levels and made clear our position on this and that includes our position that the selection was not viable, White House spokesman Jay Carney said. Our position is that we will not be issuing him a visa. Aboutalebi is alleged to have participated in a Muslim stu dent group that held 52 Ameri cans hostage for 444 days during the embassy takeover. He has insisted his involvement in the group Muslim Students Follow ing the Imams Line was limited to translation and negotiation. Hamid Babaei, a spokesman for the Iranian U.N. Mission, said the decision was not only regret table but in contravention of in ternational law, the obligation of the host country and the inherent right of sovereign member-states to designate their representatives to the United Nations. As host country for the United Nations, the U.S. must provide rights to persons invited to the New York headquarters. Howev er, exceptions can be made when a visa applicant is found to have engaged in spying against the U.S. or poses a threat to Ameri can national security. Denying visas to U.N. ambas sadorial nominees or to foreign heads of state who want to at tend United Nations events in the U.S. is extremely rare, though there appears to be precedent. According to a paper published by the Yale Law School, the Unit ed States rejected several Iranians appointed to the U.N. in the 1980s who had played roles in the embassy hostage crisis or other acts against American citizens.Obama blocks Irans envoy to UN ABOUTALEBI

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 WILDWOOD CYCLERY rrffntfrb Bikes for Every Terain & Budget www.LakeENT.net Call 352-728-2404 today to reserve your seat for the seminar most convenient for you.(Limited Seating. Reservations strongly recommended. Light snacks and beverages provided) Join Lake Ear, Nose & Throats Dr. Michael Freedman for one of two FREE SEMINARS : Tuesday, April 15 at 6pmFlorida Hospital Waterman 1000 Waterman Way Tavares, FLThursday, April 17 at 6pmLake ENT The Villages Office 1501 U.S. Highway 441 N. Suite 1402or Pain and pressure from chronic sinusitis can make everyday life unbearable, but for many patients, relief may be as easy as the innovative Balloon Sinuplasty procedure. Want Sinus Relief? Hours are Mon Thur 10 11 or later Fri 10 Midnight Sat 9 Midnight Sun 9 10 or laterEVERY SATURDAY WEEKLY DART TOURNAMENTS Whimsical Wednesday 5 Close $1.00 nightCall 352.343.5333 Or visit our website www.breakpointalley.com Tuesday Ladies NightFriday College Night PETER LEONARDAssociated PressDONETSK, Ukraine To reach the Peoples Repub lic of Donetsk, you need to pass a few club-wielding young men in masks, wind through a narrow corridor of sand-lled sacks and en ter a gray ofce tower stand ing in the heart of this east ern Ukrainian city. The self-styled autono mous territory really just an 11-story government building and its surround ings insists it is the true voice of the 4.3 million peo ple living in the Donetsk re gion. It has become the latest focus of protest in the largely Russian-speaking east since Kremlin-friendly President Viktor Yanukovych was over thrown in February. The patch of Donetsk real es tate where pro-Russia activists have been squatting for near ly a week is a hotbed of resent ment against the perceived chauvinist Ukrainian nation alism taking hold among the nations leadership. They hate us. They take it in with their mothers milk, said retiree Nelya Vladimirov na Ivanova, sitting along with hundreds of fellow rally members on the square. In its current form, the Donetsk Republic poses little real threat to the central governments authority, and rallies demanding autonomy have drawn at most a few thousand people. Nonetheless, Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk visit ed Donetsk on Friday with a pledge to give more powers to the regions. We must tell people that we know its tough, but we know how in the future to se cure jobs, increase salaries, attract investors, distribute more authority, and what to do so people are content with life, Yatsenyuk said, laying out what he described as a recipe for national unity. And some Donetsk residents say the Republics hos tility to western Ukraine doesnt represent their views. Vladlen Nebrat, a youth activist, said that most people in the city see few differ ences between Russians and Ukrainians, and that younger generations see even less of a difference. The problems we see today are problems created by political elites, Nebrat said. Its the same in Russia and Ukraine. I dont see a prob lem between the people themselves. Since Sunday, crowds of hundreds have been standing round the clock in and around barricades of tires, sandbags, bricks and razor wires lining the regional administration headquarters in nervous anticipation of a raid that never arrives. Masked young men carrying bats and truncheons stand guard over the area. Groups huddle around bar rel-res for warmth against an early spring spell of drizzle and cold. On an improvised stage, or ators deliver angry speeches, often to chants of Referen dum! demanding a vote for total autonomy that con stitutes the only clear policy of the Donetsk Republic, whose leadership is a ragtag band of about dozen political unknowns. The movement is a pale imitation of the secessionist drive in Crimea that led to Russias annexation of the peninsula but the palpa ble unhappiness here points to deeper national tensions. Much of the conversation on the square revolves around well-rehearsed grievances over language, history and a sense of economic injustice. After Yanukoychs downfall, a nationalist party handed opponents of the new authorities a valuable lifeline by pushing measures through parliament to strip the Russian language of its ofcial status in regions where it is widely spoken.Pro-Russian groups further rip Ukraine EFREM LUKATSKY / AP A pro-Russian activist with a Russian ag pass by a barricade at a regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine on Friday. JIM KUHNHENNAssociated PressNEW YORK In an unsparing critique of Republicans, President Barack Obama on Friday accused the GOP of using voting restrictions to keep voters from the polls and of jeopardizing 50 years of expanded ballot box access for mil lions of black Americans and other minorities. The stark, simple truth is this: The right to vote is threatened today in a way that it has not been since the Voting Rights Act became law nearly ve decades ago, Obama said in a ery speech at civil rights activist and television talk host Al Sharptons National Action Network conference. Obama waded into the acrid debate over voting access in an election year where con trol of the Senate, now in the hands of Dem ocrats, is at stake, as is Obamas already limited ability to push his agenda through Con gress. Republicans say the voting measures guard against voter fraud, but Democrats say they erode the landmark 1965 law that helped pave Obamas path in politics. Across the country, Republicans have led efforts to pass laws making it harder, not easier, for people to vote, he said, relat ing anecdotes of voters turned away because they didnt have the right identication or because they needed a passport or birth cer ticate to register. About 60 percent of Americans dont have a passport, he said. Just because you cant have the money to trav el abroad doesnt mean you shouldnt be able to vote here at home. Obamas speech to a crowd of about 1,600 in a New York hotel ballroom came a day af ter he marked the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas, where he praised Pres ident Lyndon Johnsons understanding of pres idential power and its use to create new op portunities for millions of Americans. The president pinned efforts to curb access to the ballot box directly on the GOP, declar ing that the effort has not been led by both parties. Its been led by the Republican Party. Mocking the Republicans, he said, What kind of political plat form is that? Why would you make that a part of your agenda, preventing people from voting?Obama: Right to vote under threat FENIT NIRAPPIL and MARTHA MENDOZAAssociated PressORLAND, Calif. It was a busload of opportunity: young, low-income, motivated students, destined to be come the rst in their families to go to college, journeying from the concrete sprawl of Los Angeles to a remote red wood campus 650 miles north. Those dreams shattered for some Thursday in an explosive freeway collision that left 10 dead stu dents, chaperones and both drivers and dozens hospitalized. Desperate families awaited word about loved ones Friday, while investigators tried to gure out why a southbound FedEx big rig swerved across the grassy divide of Califor nias key artery before sideswiping a car and slamming into the tour bus, which burst into a furious blaze. The Serrato family, whose identi cal twin 17-year-old daughters set off on the adventure on separate buses Thursday, had a panicked, sleepless night. Marisol made it to their destination, Humboldt State University, but there was no word from Marisa, who had been aboard the now-gutted bus. Friday morning when a sheriffs deputy asked for Marisas dental records, a grim request made to several families, 23-year-old broth er Miguel Serrato said his family was getting a little bit scared. His mother booked a ight north. Humboldt alumni Michael Myvett, 29, and his ancee, Mathi son Haywood, who were chaper oning, also were killed. Myvett was a therapist at an autism treatment center. He just died, his grandmother Debra Loyd said, her voice breaking with emotion in the early af ternoon Friday. They have already conrmed it.Dreams dashed in fatal college tour bus crash ANDREAS FUHRMANN / AP A family leaves the Red Cross shelter at Veterans Memorial Hall on Friday, in Orland, Calif., after looking for their daughter who was involved in the ery crash between a FedEx semi and a tour bus.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 Sampathkumar Shanmugham, MD Elias Gizaw, MD Nitesh Shekhadia, MD Ramit Panara, MDIf you have memory problems We can help you at every stage. Please give us a call 352-508-5076 MARI YAMAGUCHIAssociated PressTOKYO The inter national court ruling against Japanese whal ing last week may have given the government a convenient political out. The Antarctic pro gram was nearly bankrupt, but if the govern ment had overhauled it on its own, it would have incurred the wrath of a strong an ti-whaling lobby, and could have been criticized for caving in to foreign anti-whal ing activists. Now ofcials can say the court forced their hand. It seemed to me they were anxious to lose, said Masayu ki Komatsu, a former sheries ofcial known for his battles at the International Whaling Commission to defend Japanese hunts. He accused Japanese ofcials of losing passion and love for whaling and not ghting hard enough in court. In a March 31 ruling, the International Court of Justice in The Hague ordered Japan to stop granting permits for its Antarctic whaling program, which allowed an annual cull of about 1,000 whales. The world court, upholding argu ments made by Aus tralia, rejected Japans contention that the program was scientic. Though top Japa nese ofcials called the ruling regrettable, they announced within hours that Japan would abide by it. A day later, the Fisher ies Agency said Japan would skip the next Antarctic hunt. We didnt go to court in order to lose, a gov ernment ofcial close to the case said on con dition of anonymity, because he isnt authorized to speak public ly about the issue. But it was obvious that the whaling program had to be changed. In a way, the rul ing was an example of gaiatsu, the external pressure that Japan has traditionally relied on to bring about change when vested interests are strong. It was the arrival of U.S. Com modore Matthew Perry and his warships that forced Japan to end a long period of isolation. More recently, gaiatsu (roughly pronounced gah-ee-aht-soo) has pushed market open ing and deregulation of the economy. NICOLE WINFIELDAssociated PressVATICAN CITY Pope Francis said Friday he took personal re sponsibility for the evil of priests who raped and molested children, asking forgiveness from victims and saying the church must be even bolder in its efforts to protect the young. It was the rst time a pope has taken personal respon sibility for the sex crimes of his priests and begged forgiveness. Francis off-the-cuff remarks were the latest sign that he has become sensitized to the gravity of the abuse scan dal after coming under criticism from victims advocacy groups for a perceived lack of attention to, and under standing of, the toll it has taken on the church and its members. The evolution began last month when he named four women and an abuse survivor to a sex abuse advisory pan el that the Vatican has suggested will address the critical issue of sanc tioning bishops who cover up for pedophiles. Francis delivered the comments to members of the International Catholic Child Bureau, a French Catholic network of organizations that protects childrens rights. Sitting with them in his library Friday, Francis spoke slowly, deliberately and soft ly in his native Spanish, deviating from his text. I feel compelled to take personal responsi bility for all the evil that some priests, many many in number, (although) not in compar ison with the totality to assume personal responsibility and to ask forgiveness for the damage caused by the sexual abuse of the chil dren, he said. The church is aware of this damage, he continued. We dont want to take a step back in deal ing with this problem and the sanctions that must be imposed. On the contrary, I think we must be even stronger! You dont play around with the lives of children. No pope has ever tak en personal responsibil ity for the tens of thou sands of children who were molested by priests over decades as bishops moved them from par ish to parish rather than reporting them to police. Pope John Paul II denounced priests who abused children, saying there was no place for them in the priesthood. Pope Benedict XVI expressed sorrow and re gret to victims, met with them and even wept with them. But nei ther ever took person al responsibility for the crimes or begged for giveness as Francis did. Last month, Francis named the initial mem bers of a commission to advise him on best practices to combat sexual abuse in the church. Half of the eight members are women and one, Marie Collins, was assaulted by a priest as a child. Collins, who became a wellknown activist in the ght for victims justice, had previously called on Benedict to ask personal forgiveness for the scandal and those church leaders who put loyalty to the church ahead of the safety of children. The Vatican has said Collins and the other members will now draft the statutes of the com mission and would look into the legal duties and responsibilities of church personnel, a suggestion that they might take up the critical question of disciplining com plicit bishops. Church law provides for sanctions if a bishop is neg ligent in carrying out his duties, but to date no bishop has been disci plined for protecting an abuser. NICK PERRYAssociated PressPERTH, Australia Every day from the Perth airport and a nearby military base, about a dozen planes from several countries take ight to search for debris from missing Flight 370 so far without success. The U.S. Defense Department alone committed $7.3 million to the effort in the rst month of the search, much of it spent on two U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon planes that cost $4,000 per hour to y. Lt. Cmdr. Adam Schantz is the ofcer in charge of the 32 air and ground crew manning the surveillance air craft, which are modi ed Boeing 737s. This is an edited version of the interview: Q: What does a typical day involve? A: The maintenance crew have to come in very early in the morn ing, well before the sun comes up, to prep the airplane for the days ight. Our typical mission is about nine hours. We y any where between 900 miles and 1,500 miles to the search zone and spend about ve hours out there searching. The air crew are often work ing 15-hour days and the maintenance crew sometimes even more. So we are putting in re ally long hours, but do ing well, and our crew and maintainers are motivated, and proud to be here. We havent missed a mission yet. Q: How do you con duct the search? A: So the P-8 has a very advanced set of sensors, from radar to a se ries of cameras, both electro-optical and in frared, that allows us to search the ocean in dif ferent ways. And, in ad dition to that, we have our trained observers in the windows, mon itoring the ocean with binoculars and just their eyes. Its the needle in the haystack that we are looking for. Its a massive amount of area. I dont think any bodys ever really taken on a search of this much area before to nd such a small target. Q: What are you see ing? A: Its incredibly mo notonous out there searching. Thats one of the reasons Im so proud of our aircrew, and how well theyre doing, because it takes a lot of concentration to keep paying attention when hundreds and hundreds of miles of ocean are passing by. Weve found a collec tion of shing nets, sh ing equipment. Its just garbage. Q: Is that discouraging? A: Absolutely not. When we go to search an area, if we dont nd anything, then we are able to eliminate that area from any additional searching and move on to the next one. So it gives a good way to be able to con centrate our search assets on new areas. Q: How low do you y when the visibility is bad? A: At times we go down to 200 feet. Q: Two hundred feet in a 737? Isnt that a bit crazy? A: Maybe not crazy, but different. I dont know that anybody else has operated 737s in this manner. But its an excellent airplane, and it handles the mis sion very well. And its a standard part of our mission, particularly in the defense role. So we are practiced at it, and its not an issue for our aircrews to go down that low. Q: Did you ever think youd be working along side, say, crews from China? A: I did not. But the Chinese are great. Its a very unique opportunity for countries to come together. Were all united in the same goal. Q: What would it mean to you to nd some wreckage from Flight 370? A: I think, beyond my self, it would mean clo sure for the families of these 239 victims. For every person who has gone missing on this plane, thats some bodys father, brother, mother, son, daugh ter, friend or sister. So theres a lot of relation ships out there beyond the people who are missing. Theres a lot of other people affected by this tragedy.Pope assumes responsibility AP FILE PHOTO Pope Francis waves as he leaves after his weekly general audience in St. Peters Square at the Vatican. American describes search for missing plane AP FILE PHOTO A Royal Australian Air Force P-3 Orion ies past HMAS Success during the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in Southern Indian Ocean, near Australia. SCHANTZ Ruling could end Japanese whalingFor first time, Francis takes the blame for sex abuse scandals

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 J eb Bush made some very provocative comments about immigration the other day. They were red meat for a conser vative base that thinks in broad brushstrokes about foreigners. Actually, they were more like a bullghters red cape, or scarlet blood in the water. Commenting on the wave of illegal bodies present in our country, this brother of one compassionate conservative president and son of another observed: The way I look at this is someone who comes to our country because they couldnt come legally, they come to our country because their families the dad who loved their children was worried that their children didnt have food on the table. ... They broke the law, but its not a felony. Its an act of love. Its an act of commitment to your family. Frankly, those observations were a little too Jean Valjean for me. It is a simplication to say that everyone who crosses the border does so to provide a better life for his children (unless you believe that drug trafckers are also loving parents). But on the whole, Bush is absolutely right: The men and women who take a short-cut around the legal pro cess generally do so for the most basic of reasons desperation. That doesnt mean we should just throw up our hands and let the oodgates open. Of course there needs to be order and, as the great Charles Krauthammer said, Americans have a right to decide who comes in and out of the country. But this brings me to another point about the whole immigration debate. There is a mean-spir itedness that infects the discus sion and keeps us from arriving at an equitable result. We dont need the saccharine comments of a presidential hope ful, but neither do we need the vitriol spewed by some of the anti-immigrant groups who equate the other with disease, crime and a brownication of society. I think we need to take a step back for a moment and under stand the animating principles that dene this country and undergird all the great religions. And, then, we need to remember a time when those principles, among them compassion, were horrically rejected. I hope we can take some philosophical lessons from that tragedy. Earlier this week, I listened to a radio interview with a man whose grandfather and uncle had been murdered in the Holocaust. The most wrenching part of the story was the fact that they could have been saved had it not been for politics and politicians. In 1939, a group of German Jews attempted to ee the Nazi regime on an ocean liner called the St. Louis. They sought admission at numerous ports, including the United States and Canada. Fear ing the political repercussions, FDR refused to allow the passengers to disembark and, after having the door closed in their fac es during a three week voyage of the damned, the ship returned to Europe. Not surprisingly, the majority of the passengers ended up dying in concentration camps. We obviously cant analogize the cross-border journey of a Mexican to the desperate ight from Hitler. The comparison is as ridiculous as Bushs comments about loving parents: too gross, too broadly aimed, too discordant and polemical. But its legitimate to point out the similarity in the way that Americans have come to approach the issue of immigration, one that echoes the not in my backyard anxiety of 75 years ago. Realistically, we cannot open our arms in a universal embrace. Emma Lazarus was a great poet, but she would have failed miser ably as a diplomat. In a world of limited resources, we have to do human triage. I spent four hours the other day in front of an immi gration judge trying to convince him that the deep scars on my clients face and the shadow in his eyes had earned him a grant of asylum. The judge had the dif cult job of deciding whether to believe his story and, even if credible, whether the tales of beatings and threats warranted a refugees welcome. Its not an easy calculus to make, and Im not one to second-guess judges or, for that mat ter, crippled wartime presidents. Still, it does put things into a better perspective than any of the talking heads on television, the ones who might never in their lives have met a refugee or who think that turnstiles at the border are feasible. When Bush started talking about the loving father, I knew he was ring the opening salvo for 2016. He might be sincere, but his timing leads me to believe that theres a lot more politics in his comments than principle. And thats OK, since even the most revered among us, the ones with our names engraved in marble and on coinage, are capable of selling our souls for a few votes. But it would still be good for conservatives to soften the sharp edges of their tongues. And it would be good for liberals to remember that it was one of their own who padlocked the Golden Door.Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Readers may email her at cowers1961@gmail.com.OTHERVOICES Christine FlowersMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Our nations immigration prejudices The news that a small percentage of the countrys physicians collected billions of dollars from Medicare in a single year may or may not be a testament to individu al greed; some of the top recipients are under investigation for allegedly bilking the sys tem, while others work long hours delivering costly care. But it is a powerful reminder that the program needs to stop rewarding doctors for the quantity of care they deliver rather than the quality. Happily, theres a bipartisan plan to do just that; unhappily, lawmakers havent been able to agree on how to cover its cost. If Congress needed any further in centive to settle its differences, the fact that 1,000 doctors raked in $3 billion from Medi care should provide it. The Obama administration released details Wednesday on $77 billion worth of payments made in 2012 by Medicare Part B, which pays for doctors and other health-care professionals. Part B is nanced mainly by the government, so taxpayers have a keen interest in the programs nancial integrity. The new data, however, reveal some alarmingly large pay outs. For example, more than a dozen physicians each collected more than $10 million from Medicare in 2012, and thousands of specialists in four disciplines three cancer-related elds and ophthalmology averaged more than $300,000. Its risky to leap to conclusions just from the numbers, given that the payments may include reimbursements for expensive drugs that doctors provided or services by multiple members of a team. Yet the concentration of payments a mere 2 percent of the doctors participating in the program took in almost a quarter of the fees exemplies the problem with Medicares fee for service pay ment system. This system ignores the value and effectiveness of the care provided, pay ing attention only to how many treatments are rendered. That gives doctors an incentive to provide the most expensive and intensive forms of care, not necessarily the treatments that work best. Earlier this year, the top Republicans and Democrats on three inuential congressional committees came up with a plan that would have encouraged Medicare doctors to switch from fee-for-service to alternative pay ment plans that reward quality and efciency. It also would have replaced an ineffective formula for slowing the growth in Part B costs by cutting the fees paid for most doctors ser vices. Unfortunately, the plan stalled because of a dispute over how to pay for the measure, and Congress enacted minor Medicare reforms that left the fee-for-service system intact for at least another year. The new disclosures about enormous Medicare payouts should send lawmakers back to work on the bill to steer doctors into payment plans that yield better results for patients and taxpayers.Distributed by MCT Information Services.AVOICEMedicares doctor payment problem Classic DOONESBURY 1972I think we need to take a step back for a moment and understand the animating principles that define this country and undergird all the great religions.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Cycles Cycles 352-330-00479807 N. HWY 301, WILDWOODWWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.COM 2007 HONDA SHADOW 750Only $4,300 2009 YAMAHA 950Only $5,700 2007 HONDA SHADOW 1100Only $4,300 2006 YAMAHA U-STAR 650Only $4,200Huge Selection of New & Pre-owned Bikes Only $6,500 2006 YAMAHA V-STAROnly $4,200 Service SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014www.dailycommercial.comPISTORIUS: Blade Runner grilled on stand / B5 MOUNT DORA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe E ustis High School baseball team has dominated its district in the four years since David Lee re turned to the Panthers dugout. Eustis entered Fri days Class 5A-Dis trict 13 contest against Mount Dora at Heim Field with a 34-1 dis trict record under Lee, including a 4-1 mark in the current campaign. Matthew Lusignan had two hits and ve RBIs, including a double and a grand slam homer to power the Panthers to a 6-2 win against the Hurricanes. Lusignan was the only Eustis player with mul tiple hits. The win raised Eustis overall record to 14-8 and 5-1 in Class 5A-13. Mount Dora fell to 7-9 overall and 1-5 in district play. Eustis also won the districts regular season title. T yler Perry started on the mound for Eustis and picked up the win. He went six innings and allowed both runs, al though only one was earned. Jeremy Migliori pitched the seventh for the Panthers and struck out three. Migliori also contrib uted at the plate with a hit in three at bats. Michael Koenig went 1-for-3, as well.BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALEustis Michael Koenig (6) and Jeremy Migliori (21) react to Matthew Lusignans grand slam after scoring during Fridays game against Mount Dora at Heim Field in Mount Dora. LEESBURG FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comSometimes a softball looks like a beach ball to hitters. That must have been the case in Thursdays game between Leesburg and Mount Dora high schools at the Yellow Jackets softball complex. In what has to be one of the wildest fast-pitch games played in Lake County in recent memory, Leesburg survived two four-innings and a ve-run frame by Mount Dora to win 19-17 in eight innings. Leesburg improved to 6-14 with the win, while Mount Dora dropped to 8-11. Jacinda Alvarez had the big hit for the Yellow Jackets. The junior blasted a two-run walk off ho mer to seal the win. Alva rez had two hits and four RBIs in the game. She also scored four runs. After taking a 3-0 lead in the home half of the rst inning, Leesburg fell behind in the second and trailed 13-6 heading into the bottom of the Yellow Jackets outlast Hurricanes in softball thriller THE VILLAGES HOSTS 2A-6 TRACK BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALTavares sophomore Jordan Smith competes in the long jump during Fridays Class 2A-District 6 track and eld championships at The Villages Charter High School in The Villages. More photos can be seen in the sports section at www.dailycommercial.com. CHRIS CARLSON / APBubba Watson hits out of a bunker on the second hole during Fridays second round of the Masters in Augusta, Ga. PAUL NEWBERRYAssociated PressAUGUSTA, Ga. Bubba Watson likes the way he looks in green. He wants to get that color back in his ward robe. Watson surged to the Masters lead with a spree of birdies on the back side Friday, posi tioning him for a weekend run at his second green jacket in three years. Im trying to get the jacket back, Watson said. I want that feel ing again. The 2012 champi on at Augusta National sparked the best run of the tournament so far when he stuck his tee shot at No. 12 within 3 feet of the cup. He SEE SOFTBALL | B2Bubba goes birdie huntingWatson takes 3-shot lead at halfway point MASTERS Bubba Watson 137 John Senden 140 Thomas Bjorn 141 Jonas Blixt 141 Adam Scott 141 Jordan Speith 141 SEE MASTERS | B2 Eustis tops MDHS

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Southern 500 After Friday qualifying; race today At Darlington Raceway Darlington, S.C. Lap length: 1.366 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 183.479 mph. 2. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 183.049. 3. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 182.946. 4. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 182.485. 5. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 182.059. 6. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 182.019. 7. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 181.985. 8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 181.763. 9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 181.756. 10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.548. 11. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 181.481. 12. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 181.2. 13. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 182.181. 14. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 181.985. 15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 181.689. 16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 181.247. 17. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 181.194. 18. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 181.127. 19. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 180.947. 20. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 180.914. 21. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 180.901. 22. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 180.787. 23. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 180.185. 24. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 178.958. 25. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 182.059. 26. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 181.911. 27. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 181.548. 28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 181.394. 29. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 180.549. 30. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 180.33. 31. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 180.31. 32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 180.204. 33. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 180.158. 34. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 179.993. 35. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 179.717. 36. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, 179.606. 37. (33) David Stremme, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, Owner Points. 39. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. BASEBALL American League East W L Pct GB New York 5 5 .500 Tampa Bay 5 5 .500 Toronto 5 5 .500 Baltimore 4 5 .444 Boston 4 6 .400 1 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 5 2 .714 Chicago 5 5 .500 1 Cleveland 5 5 .500 1 Kansas City 4 4 .500 1 Minnesota 3 6 .333 3 West W L Pct GB Oakland 6 3 .667 Seattle 5 3 .625 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 2 Texas 4 5 .444 2 Houston 4 6 .400 2 Thursdays Games Oakland 6, Minnesota 1 N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 1 Houston 6, Toronto 4 Chicago White Sox 7, Cleveland 3 Fridays Games Boston at N.Y. Yankees, late Toronto at Baltimore, late Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, late Houston at Texas, late Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, late Kansas City at Minnesota, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late Detroit at San Diego, late Oakland at Seattle, late Todays Games Boston (Lackey 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 1-1), 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1) at Cincinnati (Simon 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 0-1) at Minnesota (Nolasco 0-1), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (Hutchison 1-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Houston (Cosart 1-1) at Texas (Scheppers 0-1), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 0-1) at San Diego (Kennedy 1-1), 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2), 9:05 p.m. Oakland (Gray 1-0) at Seattle (E.Ramirez 1-1), 9:10 p.m. Sundays Games Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Houston at Texas, 3:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Detroit at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 8:05 p.m. National League East W L Pct GB Washington 7 2 .778 Atlanta 5 4 .556 2 Miami 5 5 .500 2 New York 4 5 .444 3 Philadelphia 3 6 .333 4 Central W L Pct GB Milwaukee 7 2 .778 Pittsburgh 6 3 .667 1 St. Louis 5 4 .556 2 Chicago 3 6 .333 4 Cincinnati 3 6 .333 4 West W L Pct GB Los Angeles 6 4 .600 San Francisco 6 4 .600 Colorado 5 5 .500 1 San Diego 3 6 .333 2 Arizona 4 8 .333 3 Thursdays Games Pittsburgh 5, Chicago Cubs 4 Washington 7, Miami 1 Milwaukee 6, Philadelphia 2 N.Y. Mets 6, Atlanta 4 Arizona 6, San Francisco 5, 10 innings Fridays Games Miami at Philadelphia, late Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, late Washington at Atlanta, late Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, late Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, late L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, late Detroit at San Diego, late Colorado at San Francisco, late Todays Games Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-1) at Cincinnati (Simon 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 1-2) at St. Louis (Wainwright 1-1), 2:15 p.m. Colorado (Anderson 0-2) at San Francisco (M.Cain 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Eovaldi 1-1) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 0-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-0), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Jordan 0-0) at Atlanta (A.Wood 1-1), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 2-0) at Arizona (Miley 2-1), 8:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 0-1) at San Diego (Kennedy 1-1), 8:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-2), 9:05 p.m. Sundays Games Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at San Diego, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 46 32 .590 x-Brooklyn 43 35 .551 3 New York 33 45 .423 13 Boston 23 55 .295 23 Philadelphia 17 61 .218 29 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 53 25 .679 x-Charlotte 40 38 .513 13 x-Washington 40 38 .513 13 Atlanta 35 43 .449 18 Orlando 23 55 .295 30 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 54 25 .684 x-Chicago 46 32 .590 7 Cleveland 32 47 .405 22 Detroit 29 50 .367 25 Milwaukee 14 64 .179 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 61 18 .772 x-Houston 52 26 .667 8 Dallas 48 32 .600 13 Memphis 46 32 .590 14 New Orleans 32 46 .410 28 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 57 21 .731 x-Portland 51 28 .646 6 Minnesota 39 39 .500 18 Denver 35 44 .443 22 Utah 24 54 .308 33 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 55 24 .696 Golden State 48 30 .615 6 Phoenix 47 31 .603 7 Sacramento 27 52 .342 28 L.A. Lakers 25 53 .321 29 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Thursdays Games San Antonio 109, Dallas 100 Denver 100, Golden State 99 Fridays Games Washington at Orlando, late New York at Toronto, late Atlanta at Brooklyn, late Charlotte at Boston, late Indiana at Miami, late Detroit at Chicago, late Houston at Minnesota, late New Orleans at Oklahoma City, late Philadelphia at Memphis, late Cleveland at Milwaukee, late Phoenix at San Antonio, late Portland at Utah, late Golden State at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Utah at Denver, 9 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 80 53 18 9 115 255 173 x-Montreal 81 45 28 8 98 214 204 x-Tampa Bay 80 44 27 9 97 236 213 x-Detroit 80 38 27 15 91 218 228 Ottawa 80 35 31 14 84 232 263 Toronto 81 38 35 8 84 231 255 Florida 81 29 44 8 66 194 265 Buffalo 80 21 50 9 51 153 240 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 80 51 24 5 107 244 200 x-N.Y. Rangers 81 45 31 5 95 218 192 x-Philadelphia 80 41 30 9 91 227 226 x-Columbus 80 42 31 7 91 226 211 Washington 80 37 30 13 87 231 239 New Jersey 80 34 29 17 85 192 203 Carolina 80 34 35 11 79 199 224 N.Y. Islanders 80 32 37 11 75 218 262 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Colorado 80 52 21 7 111 247 212 x-St. Louis 80 52 21 7 111 248 185 x-Chicago 80 46 19 15 107 262 209 x-Minnesota 81 43 26 12 98 204 199 Dallas 80 39 30 11 89 231 226 Nashville 80 36 32 12 84 202 234 Winnipeg 81 36 35 10 82 222 234 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Anaheim 80 52 20 8 112 259 204 x-San Jose 80 49 22 9 107 241 197 x-Los Angeles 81 46 28 7 99 203 170 Phoenix 80 36 29 15 87 212 227 Vancouver 80 35 34 11 81 189 217 Calgary 80 35 38 7 77 205 231 Edmonton 81 28 44 9 65 198 268 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Thursdays Games Ottawa 2, New Jersey 1, SO Winnipeg 2, Boston 1, SO N.Y. Rangers 2, Buffalo 1 Washington 5, Carolina 2 N.Y. Islanders 2, Montreal 0 Tampa Bay 4, Philadelphia 2 Florida 4, Toronto 2 Nashville 2, Phoenix 0 Minnesota 4, St. Louis 2 Los Angeles 3, Edmonton 0 Colorado 4, Vancouver 2 Fridays Games Chicago at Washington, late Carolina at Detroit, late Columbus at Tampa Bay, late N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, late St. Louis at Dallas, late Winnipeg at Calgary, late Colorado at San Jose, late Todays Games Buffalo at Boston, 12:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m. Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Columbus at Florida, 7 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m. San Jose at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 10 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. GOLF Masters Friday At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Second Round a-amateur Bubba Watson 69-68 137 John Senden 72-68 140 Thomas Bjorn 73-68 141 Jonas Blixt 70-71 141 Adam Scott 69-72 141 Jordan Spieth 71-70 141 Fred Couples 71-71 142 Jim Furyk 74-68 142 Jimmy Walker 70-72 142 Jamie Donaldson 73-70 143 Stephen Gallacher 71-72 143 Russell Henley 73-70 143 Kevin Stadler 70-73 143 Kevin Streelman 72-71 143 Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 75-69 144 Lucas Glover 75-69 144 Matt Kuchar 73-71 144 Louis Oosthuizen 69-75 144 Brandt Snedeker 70-74 144 Lee Westwood 73-71 144 K.J. Choi 70-75 145 Stewart Cink 73-72 145 Henrik Stenson 73-72 145 Steve Stricker 72-73 145 Mike Weir 73-72 145 Steven Bowditch 74-72 146 Brendon de Jonge 74-72 146 Rickie Fowler 71-75 146 Bill Haas 68-78 146 Bernhard Langer 72-74 146 Hunter Mahan 74-72 146 Larry Mize 74-72 146 Thorbjorn Olesen 74-72 146 Ian Poulter 76-70 146 Justin Rose 76-70 146 Vijay Singh 75-71 146 a-Oliver Goss 76-71 147 Billy Horschel 75-72 147 Thongchai Jaidee 73-74 147 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-76 147 Martin Kaymer 75-72 147 Chris Kirk 75-72 147 Francesco Molinari 71-76 147 Nick Watney 72-75 147 Gary Woodland 70-77 147 Darren Cla rke 74-74 148 Jason Day 75-73 148 Sandy Lyle 76-72 148 Joost Luiten 75-73 148 Rory McIlroy 71-77 148 Jose Maria Olazabal 74-74 148 Failed to qualify Sang-Moon Bae 72-77 149 Luke Donald 79-70 149 Victor Dubuisson 74-75 149 Ernie Els 75-74 149 a-Matthew Fitzpatrick 76-73 149 Sergio Garcia 74-75 149 Marc Leishman 70-79 149 Phil Mickelson 76-73 149 Ryan Moore 77-72 149 Charl Schwartzel 73-76 149 Webb Simpson 74-75 149 Harris English 74-76 150 Zach Johnson 78-72 150 Graeme McDowell 72-78 150 D.A. Points 78-72 150 Ian Woosnam 77-73 150 Ken Duke 75-76 151 John Huh 75-76 151 Dustin Johnson 77-74 151 Hideki Matsuyama 80-71 151 Angel Cabrera 78-74 152 Graham DeLaet 80-72 152 Derek Ernst 76-76 152 Matt Jones 74-78 152 David Lynn 78-74 152 Matteo Manassero 71-81 152 Mark OMeara 75-77 152 Patrick Reed 73-79 152 Keegan Bradley 75-78 153 Robert Castro 73-80 153 Branden Grace 84-69 153 Trevor Immelman 79-74 153 a-Chang-woo Lee 80-73 153 Jason Dufner 80-74 154 Y.E. Yang 77-77 154 Matt Every 77-78 155 a-Jordan Niebrugge 81-74 155 Scott Stallings 75-80 155 a-Garrick Porteous 76-80 156 Boo Weekley 73-83 156 Tim Clark 79-78 157 Peter Hanson 78-81 159 Craig Stadler 82-77 159 Tom Watson 78-81 159 a-Michael McCoy 78-83 161 Ben Crenshaw 83-85 168 TV2DAY AUTO RACING 6 p.m.FS1 United SportsCar Championship, at Long Beach, Calif. NBCSN IndyCar, qualifying for Grand Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif.6:30 p.m.FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C.9 p.m.ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Four-Wide Nationals, at Concord, N.C.COLLEGE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN2 Arkansas at LSU10:30 p.m.ESPNU UCLA at ArizonaCOLLEGE SOFTBALL NoonSUN North Texas at Marshall5 p.m.ESPN Oklahoma at Baylor10 p.m.ESPN2 Washington at StanfordGOLF 3 p.m.CBS Masters Tournament, third round, at Augusta, Ga.HORSE RACING 4:30 p.m.FS1 Thoroughbreds, Blue Grass Stakes, at Lexington, Ky.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Cincinnati FS1 Boston at N.Y. Yankees2 p.m.WGN Cleveland at Chicago White Sox4 p.m.MLB Colorado at S.F7 p.m.FS-Florida Miami at Philadelphia8 p.m.MLB L.A. Dodgers at ArizonaMENS COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m.ESPN NCAA Division I, playoffs, championship, Union (N.Y.) vs. Minnesota at PhiladelphiaMOTORSPORTS 10:30 p.m.FS1 AMA Supercross, at SeattleNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 7 p.m.NBA Milwaukee at WashingtonNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 3 p.m.NBC Philadelphia at Pittsburgh8 p.m.NBCSN Chicago at NashvillePREP BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 Nike Hoop Summit, USA Junior National Select Team vs. World Select Team, at Portland, Ore.PREP SOFTBALL 6 p.m.BHSN Orlando Pine Castle Christian at St. Cloud8 p.m.BHSN Winter Park Trinity Prep at Kissimmee Osceola Note: BHSN is available to Bright House cable subscribers.SOCCER 9:55 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Tottenham at West BromwichSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED fth inning. Mount Dora built its advantage with four runs in the second and ve more in the fourth. In the bottom of the fth, the Yellow Jackets plated eight runs to take a 14-13 lead, but were unable to hold the lead, giving up the advantage when Mount Dora scored four in the top of the sixth. Leesburg tied the game at 17-all in the bot tom of the inning. Bethany Guild forced extra innings when she stole home for the Yellow Jackets to tie the game. The two teams combined for 37 hits, including 20 by Leesburg. Taylorose Long had ve hits to lead the Yellow Jackets. Guild and Sarah McKinney, who made a diving catch in her nal home game, had four hits apiece. Katrina Lanier had three hits. Alvarez and Long scored four runs apiece. McK inney, Lanier, Guild and Taylor Sullivan scored two runs each. Kailey Stephens earned the win in relief of La nier. Leesburg played at Ocala Lake Weir on Friday in both teams regular-season nale, but results of the game were not available at presstime. The Yel low Jackets will play next week in the Class 6A-District 6 tournament at Ocala Forest. SOFTBALL FROM PAGE B1 tapped in for the rst of ve straight birdies that propelled him to a 4-under 68. Even after making his second bogey of the tournament by miss ing a short putt at the 18th, Watson walked off with his second straight round in the 60s, a 36hole score of 7-under 137, and a three-stroke lead. Its not science here, Watson said. Its try to hit the greens, and if youre hitting the greens that means youre ob viously hitting your tee shots well. So thats all Im trying to do, just hit the greens. Look whos in the mix again, too: 54-year-old Fred Couples, who post ed his second straight 71. This is the fth straight year the 1992 winner has gone to the weekend in the top 10 he was leading two years ago but hes never been able to hang on. I cant panic, said Couples, looking to become the oldest major champion in golf his tory. Youre not going to pick up two or three shots here because you want to. Its not that kind of course. Youve got to hang in there, ex pect a tough shot here and there. Its going to be a tough day tomor row. Watson opened Thursday with a 69 and went bogey-free through the rst 26 holes, nally stumbling at the ninth. But that bogey was quickly for gotten when he put on a dazzling display of the golf that had the pa trons roaring. He took advantage of both par 5s, sandwiched around a curling, 40-foot birdie putt at the 14th that prompted him to throw both arms in the air. Watson made it ve in a row at the par-3 16th, pulling off anoth er magnicent tee shot with the 9-iron, the ball rolling up about 4 feet short of the ag. He became only the fth play er in Masters history to run off nothing but birdies from the 12th to 16th holes. A year ago, the lefthander nished in a tie for 50th last year as the defending Masters champion, his worst showing in ve previous appearances. He likes being two years re moved from his championship a whole lot better. I was in awe when I was the champion, Watson said. I didnt know how to handle it the best way, so I didnt play my best golf. Watsons closest pur suer was Australias John Senden, who birdied 14 and 15 on his way to a 68 and 140 ov erall. Defending champion Adam Scott rallied for a 72 after making the turn at 3 over, keeping him solidly in contention at the midway point with a 141. He was joined by Denmarks Thomas Bjorn, who birdied four of the last ve holes for a 68, and Swedens Jonas Blixt, who managed 71 despite a double-bogey at the 11th. Five shots back, Cou ples was joined at 142 by Jimmy Walker, a threetime PGA Tour winner this season who shot 72, and Jim Furyk, whose 68 matched Watson, Senden and Bjorn for the best round of the day. Twen ty-year-old Jordan Spi eth also was at 2 under as he headed to the 18th hole in the nal group of the day. First-round leader Bill Haas, teeing off on a warm, sunny afternoon with the wind picking up and the greens get ting rmer, was still at 4 under approaching the turn. Then came a miserable stretch of holes starting at No. 9: bogey, bogey, double-bogey, bogey, bogey. He staggered to a 78 10 shots higher than the day be fore, knocking him nine shots back. At least Haas gets to keep playing. Three-time winner Phil Mickelson missed the Augusta cut for the rst time since 1997. Lefty had a triple-bogey at the 12th, where he knocked three straight shots in bun kers for his second tri ple of the tournament. Three birdies on the back side gave him a glimmer of hope, but 73 totaled up to 149 one shot too many. Its tough to over come those big num bers, said Mickelson, who had plenty of bigname company beyond the cut line. Sergio Garcia, Luke Donald, Ernie Els, Graeme McDowell, Dustin Johnson, Angel Cabrera and Charl Schwartzel were all headed home as well before the weekend. MASTERS FROM PAGE B1

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Late Thursday Astros 6, Blue Jays 4 Houston T oronto ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 0 1 0 MeCar r lf 5 0 2 0 Presley rf 4 0 0 0 Izturis 2b 4 0 0 0 JCastro c 4 1 2 1 Bautist rf 2 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Encrnc 1b 4 0 0 0 Carter dh 4 0 0 0 Na varr dh 3 1 0 0 Krauss 1b 3 1 1 0 La wrie 3b 4 0 0 0 MDmn 3b 3 1 1 0 Rasms cf 4 2 3 1 Grssmn lf 2 2 1 2 Thole c 2 0 1 0 Villar ss 4 1 1 3 Kratz ph-c 2 0 0 0 Diaz ss 2 0 1 0 Sier ra ph 1 0 0 0 Goins ss 0 0 0 0 Lind ph 1 1 1 2 Totals 33 6 8 6 T otals 34 4 8 3 Houston 000 020 310 6 Toronto 000 010 003 4 EBass (1). DPHouston 1, Toronto 1. LOBHouston 4, Toronto 7. 2BKrauss (1), M.Dominguez (2), Me. Cabrera 2 (2), Lind (3). HRJ.Castro (2), Grossman (1), Villar (2), Rasmus (1). SIzturis. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Keuchel W,1-1 7 5 1 1 2 6 Qualls 1 1 0 0 0 1 Fields 2/3 2 3 2 1 1 Bass S,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Toronto Dickey L,1-2 7 6 5 5 3 4 Rogers 1 2 1 1 0 3 Redmond 1 0 0 0 1 1 UmpiresHome, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Gabe Mo rales; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T:49. A,778 (49,282).Yankees 4, Red Sox 1 Boston Ne w York ab r h bi ab r h bi Sizemr lf 4 0 0 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 1 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 1 2 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 Ellsur y cf 4 1 1 1 Napoli 1b 3 0 0 0 Beltran rf 3 1 1 0 Nava rf 4 1 1 1 McCnn c 3 0 1 1 Bogarts ss 4 0 2 0 ASorin dh 3 0 0 0 Przyns c 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 2 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 3 0 0 0 JHerrr 3b 2 0 0 0 Anna 2b 3 1 1 1 RRorts ph-3b 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 1 4 1 T otals 30 4 7 3 Boston 000 000 100 1 New York 000 220 00x 4 EJ.Herrera (1). DPBoston 1. LOBBoston 5, New York 2. 2BD.Ortiz (3), Jeter (2). HRNava (1), Anna (1). SBBradley Jr. (1). IP H R ER BB SO Boston Buchholz L,0-1 6 7 4 2 0 6 Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 0 Capuano 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Pineda W,1-1 6 4 1 1 2 7 Cabral H,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2 Phelps S,1-1 2 1/3 0 0 0 0 3 Pineda pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. BalkCabral. UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson; First, John Tumpane; Second, Brian ONora; Third, James Hoye. T:55. A,821 (49,642).Mets 6, Braves 4 New York Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi EYong lf 5 4 3 0 He ywrd rf 3 0 0 0 DnMrp 2b 4 2 3 3 BUpton cf 4 1 1 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 1 1 F remn 1b 4 1 2 1 Grndrs rf 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 1 J.Upton lf 4 2 3 3 Lagars cf 5 0 1 1 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 dArnad c 4 0 0 0 Doumit c 3 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 R.P ena ss 4 0 1 0 Mejia p 2 0 0 0 Hale p 2 0 0 0 Satin ph 1 0 0 0 V arvar p 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0 Duda ph 1 0 1 0 A vilan p 0 0 0 0 Frnswr p 0 0 0 0 Schlssr p 0 0 0 0 Valvrd p 0 0 0 0 Thoms p 0 0 0 0 Gattis ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 6 9 6 T otals 33 4 7 4 New York 102 010 110 6 Atlanta 013 000 000 4 EDoumit (1). DPNew York 1. LOBNew York 9, At lanta 6. 2BDan.Murphy (2). 3BE.Young (1), B.Up ton (1). HRJ.Upton 2 (2). SBE.Young 3 (5), Dan. Murphy (1), Granderson (2), Heyward (2). IP H R ER BB SO New York Mejia 5 6 4 4 4 7 C.Torres W,2-0 2 1 0 0 0 3 Farnsworth H,2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Valverde S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Atlanta Hale 4 1/3 5 4 3 5 2 Varvaro 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 3 Avilan L,1-1 2/3 1 1 1 1 1 Schlosser 1 1/3 3 1 1 0 0 Thomas 1 0 0 0 0 3 WPMejia 2, Avilan. UmpiresHome, Gary Cederstrom; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Mark Ripperger. T:26. A,470 (49,586).Brewers 6, Phillies 2 Milwaukee Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi CGomz cf 5 1 3 1 Re vere cf 4 0 0 0 Segura ss 5 0 1 1 Rollins ss 3 1 1 0 Braun rf 3 1 2 1 Utle y 2b 4 0 2 0 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1 Howard 1b 2 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 Byrd rf 4 1 2 2 KDavis lf 4 0 2 2 DBrwn lf 4 0 0 0 MrRynl 1b 3 0 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Weeks 2b 4 1 1 0 Asche 3b 4 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Cl.Lee p 1 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 CHr ndz ph 1 0 0 0 Estrad p 2 0 0 0 Manshp p 0 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 0 1 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 GwynJ ph 1 0 0 0 Gennett 2b 1 0 0 0 DeF rts p 0 0 0 0 Totals 35 6 11 6 T otals 32 2 6 2 Milwaukee 000 201 300 6 Philadelphia 010 001 000 2 EAsche (2). DPPhiladelphia 1. LOBMilwaukee 5, Philadelphia 6. 2BAr.Ramirez (2), Lucroy (6), K.Davis (5). 3BC.Gomez (1). HRByrd (2). CSSegura (3), Rollins (1). SL.Schafer. SFBraun. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Estrada W,1-0 6 5 2 2 2 6 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 2 W.Smith 1 1 0 0 1 2 Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 2 Philadelphia Cl.Lee L,2-1 6 8 3 3 0 8 Manship 0 2 3 3 0 0 Diekman 1 1 0 0 0 1 De Fratus 2 0 0 0 1 0 Manship pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Angel Hernandez. T:48. A,492 (43,651).Diamondbacks 6, Giants 5 10 innings Arizona San F rancisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Campn cf 6 0 4 1 P agan cf 4 1 1 0 Hill 2b 6 0 1 0 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 1 0 Sandovl 3b 3 1 0 0 Prado 3b 4 1 1 0 P osey c 5 1 2 1 Monter c 4 1 1 2 P ence rf 5 1 2 0 Trumo lf 4 1 1 0 Mor se lf 4 1 2 2 GParra rf 4 1 1 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 5 1 3 2 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Delgad p 2 0 0 0 Arias ph 1 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 P etit p 0 0 0 0 Harris p 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 2 1 Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 3 0 1 1 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 0 0 EChavz ph 1 0 0 0 Huff p 0 0 0 0 Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 JGutr rz p 0 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0 Adrianz ph 1 0 0 0 Owings ph 1 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 A.Reed p 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 J.P erez lf 0 0 0 0 HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 42 6 13 5 T otals 37 5 10 5 Arizona 022 000 010 1 6 San Francisco 011 120 000 0 5 EPagan (1), Sandoval (2), B.Hicks (2). DPArizona 2, San Francisco 2. LOBArizona 11, San Francisco 10. 2BHill (5), Goldschmidt (6), Montero (1), Trumbo (2), Pence (3), Morse 2 (4), B.Crawford 2 (4). SBCampana (1), Pennington (1). CSCampana (1). SJ.Perez. IP H R ER BB SO Arizona Delgado 3 1/3 6 3 3 3 0 O.Perez 1 0 1 1 1 0 Harris 2/3 2 1 1 0 1 Ziegler 2 1 0 0 1 1 Thatcher 1 1 0 0 2 0 Putz W,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 A.Reed S,3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 San Francisco Vogelsong 5 7 4 4 1 5 Huff H,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 J.Gutierrez H,1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Machi H,1 2/3 2 0 0 1 0 J.Lopez H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Casilla BS,1-1 1 2 1 0 1 0 Romo 1 0 0 0 0 1 Petit L,0-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 Vogelsong pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBPby Vogelsong (Montero, Prado). UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Sean Barber. T:10. A,577 (41,915).White Sox 7, Indians 3 Cleveland Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi ACarer ss 4 2 2 1 Eaton cf 4 1 2 1 Swisher 1b 3 1 0 0 Semien 2b 3 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 1 0 CSantn dh 4 0 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 2 2 3 Raburn lf 3 0 2 1 A.Dunn dh 2 0 0 0 Brantly cf 4 0 1 0 V iciedo rf 4 1 1 0 YGoms c 3 0 0 0 JrDnks rf 0 0 0 0 Aviles 3b 3 0 0 0 De Aza lf 3 1 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 1 2 3 Nieto c 4 1 1 0 Totals 31 3 6 2 T otals 32 7 9 7 Cleveland 201 000 000 3 Chicago 012 210 10x 7 EY.Gomes (3), De Aza (1), Semien (2). DPChicago 2. LOBCleveland 4, Chicago 5. 2BA.Cabrera (3), Brantley (3), Eaton (1), Al.Ramirez (4). HRA.Cabrera (1), Abreu 2 (4), Al.Ramirez (2). SFRaburn. IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland Salazar L,0-1 3 2/3 6 5 5 2 10 Outman 1 1 1 1 1 1 C.Lee 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 B.Wood 1 2 1 1 1 1 Atchison 1 0 0 0 0 1 Chicago Joh.Danks W,1-0 6 6 3 3 2 4 D.Webb H,1 2 0 0 0 0 2 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 0 0 WPSalazar, Joh.Danks. UmpiresHome, Phil Cuzzi; First, Brian Knight; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Gerry Davis. T:52. A,116 (40,615). League LeadersAMERICAN LEAGUE BATTINGSPerez, Kansas City, .458; Kubel, Minnesota, .448; JHamilton, Los Angeles, .444; AlRamirez, Chicago, .421; Solarte, New York, .387; Longoria, Tampa Bay, .371; Wieters, Baltimore, .367. RUNSBautista, Toronto, 9; Dozier, Minnesota, 9; Eaton, Chicago, 9; AlRamirez, Chicago, 8; Abreu, Chicago, 7; Beltre, Texas, 7; CDavis, Baltimore, 7; JHam ilton, Los Angeles, 7; Lowrie, Oakland, 7; Plouffe, Minnesota, 7. RBIAbreu, Chicago, 14; Colabello, Minnesota, 11; AGordon, Kansas City, 9; Moss, Oakland, 9; AlRamirez, Chicago, 9; Smoak, Seattle, 9; Napoli, Bos ton, 8; Ortiz, Boston, 8. HITSAlRamirez, Chicago, 16; MeCabrera, Toronto, 15; Eaton, Chicago, 13; Ellsbury, New York, 13; Kubel, Minnesota, 13; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 13; 8 tied at 12. DOUBLESDeJennings, Tampa Bay, 6; Solarte, New York, 6; Carter, Houston, 4; Colabello, Minnesota, 4; Kubel, Minnesota, 4; Navarro, Toronto, 4; SPerez, Kansas City, 4; Pujols, Los Angeles, 4; AlRamirez, Chicago, 4. TRIPLESAoki, Kansas City, 2; Fuld, Oakland, 2; 25 tied at 1. HOME RUNSAbreu, Chicago, 4; Bautista, Toronto, 4; MeCabrera, Toronto, 4; De Aza, Chicago, 3; Dozier, Minnesota, 3; Hart, Seattle, 3; TorHunter, Detroit, 3. STOLEN BASESEllsbury, New York, 4; Altuve, Hous ton, 3; RDavis, Detroit, 3; Dozier, Minnesota, 3; Kip nis, Cleveland, 3; Villar, Houston, 3; 15 tied at 2. PITCHING tied at 2. ERABuehrle, Toronto, 0.64; Feldman, Houston, 0.66; Gray, Oakland, 0.75; Richards, Los Angeles, 0.75; Scherzer, Detroit, 1.20; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.20; Tillman, Baltimore, 1.35. STRIKEOUTSFHernandez, Seattle, 19; Tanaka, New York, 18; Scherzer, Detroit, 15; CWilson, Los Angeles, 15; Sale, Chicago, 14; Lester, Boston, 14; Buehrle, Toronto, 14; Dickey, Toronto, 14; Salazar, Cleveland, 14. SAVESAxford, Cleveland, 4; TomHunter, Baltimore, 3; Holland, Kansas City, 3; Santos, Toronto, 3; Balfour, Tampa Bay, 2; Rodney, Seattle, 2; Robertson, New York, 2; Uehara, Boston, 2; Perkins, Minnesota, 2. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTINGBlackmon, Colorado, .471; Utley, Philadelphia, .464; Bonifacio, Chicago, .452; Pagan, San Francisco, .442; Freeman, Atlanta, .419; Cuddyer, Colorado, .415; Rendon, Washington, .412. RUNSCuddyer, Colorado, 10; Belt, San Francisco, 9; Bonifacio, Chicago, 9; CGonzalez, Colorado, 9; Prado, Arizona, 9; Ruiz, Philadelphia, 9; 12 tied at 8. RBIStanton, Miami, 13; Trumbo, Arizona, 13; CGon zalez, Colorado, 11; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Cuddyer, Colorado, 10; McGehee, Miami, 10; Morse, San Francisco, 10. HITSBonifacio, Chicago, 19; Pagan, San Francisco, 19; Cuddyer, Colorado, 17; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 17; Blackmon, Colorado, 16; CGomez, Milwaukee, 16; Ar Ramirez, Milwaukee, 15; Uribe, Los Angeles, 15. DOUBLESGoldschmidt, Arizona, 6; Lucroy, Milwaukee, 6; KDavis, Milwaukee, 5; Hill, Arizona, 5; Uribe, Los Angeles, 5; 11 tied at 4. TRIPLES tied at 1. HOME RUNSPAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 5; Belt, San Francisco, 5; Trumbo, Arizona, 5; Braun, Milwaukee, 3; Cuddyer, Colorado, 3; Desmond, Washington, 3; CGomez, Milwaukee, 3; CGonzalez, Colorado, 3; YMolina, St. Louis, 3; Posey, San Francisco, 3. STOLEN BASESBonifacio, Chicago, 7; Revere, Philadelphia, 5; EYoung, New York, 5; CCrawford, Los Angeles, 4; DGordon, Los Angeles, 4; Amarista, San Diego, 3; Marte, Pittsburgh, 3; Owings, Arizona, 3; Segura, Milwaukee, 3; Yelich, Miami, 3. PITCHING tied at 2. ERAGallardo, Milwaukee, 0.00; Fernandez, Miami, 0.71; Harang, Atlanta, 0.71; Wacha, St. Louis, 0.71; GGonzalez, Washington, 0.75; Haren, Los Angeles, 0.75; Hudson, San Francisco, 1.15. STRIKEOUTSStrasburg, Washington, 28; TWood, Chicago, 17; Fernandez, Miami, 17; Cueto, Cincinnati, 17; Wainwright, St. Louis, 16; Lee, Philadelphia, 15; Mejia, New York, 15; Miley, Arizona, 15. SAVESKimbrel, Atlanta, 4; AReed, Arizona, 3; Street, San Diego, 3; Rosenthal, St. Louis, 3; Grilli, Pitts burgh, 3; 6 tied at 2.This date in BaseballApril 12 1906 Johnny Bates of Boston became the rst modern player to hit a home run in his rst major league at bat. Irv Young allowed one hit as Boston beat Brooklyn 2-0. 1912 The Chicago Cubs Tinker-EversChance double play combination played its nal major league game together. 1955 In their rst game in Kansas City, the transplanted Athletics defeated the Detroit Tigers 6-2 at Municipal Stadium. The standing-room crowd of 32,147 was the largest paid crowd for any event in Kansas City. 1965 The rst National League home run in the Houston Astrodome was hit by Richie Allen of the Philadelphia Phillies off Bob Bruce in a 2-0 victory over the Astros. 1966 A crowd of 50,671 welcomed the Braves to Atlanta, but Willie Stargell spoiled the occasion with a two-run homer in the 13th inning to give the Pirates a 3-2 victory. 1980 In an awesome display of power, Cecil Cooper and Don Money each hit grand slams in the second inning of Milwaukees 18-1 rout of the Boston Red Sox. 1992 Bostons Matt Young pitched eight no-hit innings at Cleveland but lost 2-1. In the second game, the Indians managed only two hits off Roger Clemens to set a major league record for fewest hits (2) in a doubleheader. 1994 Scott Cooper hit for the cycle and drove in ve runs to lead the Boston Red Sox to a 22-11 rout of the Kansas City Royals. 2003 The Detroit Tigers won for the rst time this season, getting a three-run homer from Shane Halter to beat the White Sox 4-3. The Tigers (1-9), the only team since 1900 to start back-to-back seasons with nine straight losses, started 0-11 last season. 2011 Dan Haren pitched a one-hitter, allowing only Shin-Soo Choos clean single in the fourth inning, and the Los Angeles Angels beat Cleveland 2-0. Haren struck out eight and walked two in his third major league shutout. Choos single to center eld came with one out in the fourth. Todays birthdays: Justin Ruggiano 32; Hisashi Iwakuma 33. NOAH TRISTERAssociated PressMichael Pineda is only the latest in a long line of pitchers suspect ed of nefarious conduct on the mound. After the New York Yankees right-hander kept Bostons offense in check for six innings Thursday night, post game talk centered on the dark, seeming ly tacky substance that had been on the lower palm of Pinedas pitching hand. The game was never stopped for an umpire to examine Pi neda. Previous hurlers hav ent been so lucky. Here are six other notewor thy controversies in volving the men of the mound:PERRY EJECTEDWell after the end of his Hall of Fame career, Gaylord Perry could still joke about his infamous spitball. In 1982, the Seattle star was ejected for allegedly throwing the pitch against the Bos ton Red Sox. It was the rst ejection for Perry, who was subsequently suspended for 10 days.SANDY SITUATIONSIn 1987, Philadelphia pitcher Kevin Gross was suspended for 10 days after he was caught with sandpaper in his glove. That same year, Min nesotas Joe Niekro also got 10 days for carry ing an emery board and sandpaper in his back pocket.PLAYOFF BANLos Angeles Dodgers reliever Jay Howell was suspended for two games during the 1988 NL championship series against the New York Mets after he was found to have pine tar on his glove.SUSPICIOUS SMUDGEEarly in Game 2 of the 2006 World Series, umpires asked Detroit pitcher Kenny Rogers to clean off his left hand, concerned about a brown smudge on the base of his thumb. Rog ers insisted it was just a mix of mud, resin, spit and dirt. Rogers hand was clean when he came out for the second inning, and he went on to pitch shutout ball in the Tigers only victory of the series against St. Louis.MANAGERIAL SQUABBLEDavey Johnson, who managed the Mets in the 1988 NLCS, was leading the Washington Nationals in 2012 when he raised questions about the glove of Tampa Bay reliever Joel Peralta. Umpires found pine tar, Peralta was ejected. The incident led to a testy back-andforth between Johnson and Rays manager Joe Maddon, who insisted it was underhanded of Johnson to use inside information against Peralta, who had previously pitched for the Nationals. Maddon said pine tar use is common knowledge in the industry and doesnt help a pitcher that much anyway. Johnsons response: Read the rulebook.PLEADING IGNORANCELast season, Mi amis Alex Sanabia was caught spitting directly onto the ball and said he didnt know that was illegal. His actions were so blatant that the ex planation seemed credi ble. He would pitch only once more for the Mar lins before going down with a groin injury.Foreign substances on mound nothing new AP FILE PHOTO Home plate umpire John Flaherty checks Cleveland pitcher Gaylord Perrys cap, at the request of Milwaukee manager Del Crandall, during a game in 1973 in Milwaukee. Well after the end of his Hall of Fame career, Perry could still joke about his infamous spitball, but in 1982, the Seattle star was ejected for allegedly throwing the pitch against Boston. NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION CHARLES ODUMAssociated PressATLANTA Dom inique Wilkins hopes young fans take the time to learn about Lou Hudson. Wilkins says theyll discover Sweet Lou was one of the best shooting guards in NBA history. Hudson, a smooth-shooting star for the Hawks who av eraged more than 20 points during 13 NBA seasons, died Friday. He was 69. He died in Atlan ta, where he was hos pitalized and listed in grave condition last month after a stroke, the Hawks said. Hudson was a sixtime All-Star while with the Hawks in St. Louis and Atlanta, often play ing away from the na tional spotlight. Young people to day dont know how good Lou Hudson real ly was, Wilkins, a Hall of Famer, told The Associated Press. He was a hell of a player. The guy could score with the best in history. He was a phenomenal bas ketball player. He should be a Hall of Famer and its amaz ing to me hes not. He was one of the best (shooting) guards and thats a fact. You go back and look at his career and look at the numbers and see what he did and you under stand. Hudson was the rst face of the Hawks fran chise in Atlanta. He then passed the torch to Wilkins. Hudson, who at 6-foot-5 could play guard and forward, averaged 20.2 points for his career. He spent 11 seasons with the Hawks and nished with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1979. His No. 23 was retired by the Hawks, joining Bob Pettit and Wilkins as the only other Hawks players so honored. His jersey is not retired for nothing, Wilkins said. Only three jerseys are up there, so you know he had to be a heck of a player to have his jer sey hanging in that building. His No. 14 was re tired by the University of Minnesota, where he was one of the schools rst black players. Lou Hudson holds a special place in the Hawks family, in the hearts of our fans and in the history of our club, Hawks co-own er Michael Gearon said. As a fan growing up with this team, Im fortunate to say I was able to see almost ev ery game Sweet Lou played as a member of the Hawks. He was an inte gral part of successful Hawks teams for over a decade, and is deservedly recognized with the ultimate symbol of his signicance to the franchise with the number 23 hanging in side Philips Arena. Beginning with the 1969-70 season, Hud son averaged at least 24 points in ve straight seasons. In his years with the Hawks, he averaged at least 20 points seven times. He set a career high with his 27.1 points per game in 1972-73. He scored 57 points against Chicago on Nov. 10, 1969, match ing the franchise record also set by Pettit and Wilkins. Hudson was a rstround pick by St. Lou is in 1966 and made the NBA all-rookie team. He missed part of his second season while serving in the Army. Following the teams move from St. Lou is, he scored the rst points for the new At lanta team in 1968. He helped lead the Hawks to the 1970 Western Division championship.Former Hawks All-Star Lou Hudson dies at 69 AP FILE PHOTO Los Angeles Lakers center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, left, reaches for the ball held by Seattles Marvin Webster, center, as Los Angeles Lou Hudson (23), right, defends during a 1978 playoff game in Los Angeles. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 DENISE LAVOIE and PAIGE SUTHERLANDAssociated PressBOSTON Every time Roseann Sdoia comes home, she must climb 18 steps six stairs into the building, another 12 to her apartment. It is an old build ing in Bostons North End, with doors that are big and heavy, not an easy place for an ampu tee to live. When she left the hospital, a month af ter the Boston marathon bombing, she had a choice: She could nd another place to live, one more suitable for someone who wears a prosthetic that replaces most of her right leg. Or, she could stay. Early on when all this happened, so many people were telling me to move out of the city and move out of my apartment because of the stairs and I dont have an elevator and parking is not very convenient, she recalls. But I have been able to get past all of that. In that, she mirrors Boston itself. I have to tell you, honestly, Boston is a better city now than it was before, says Thomas Menino, Bostons former mayor. People learned how to deal with each other, they had to deal with a tragedy. Not that its been easy. Three people were killed at last years Bos ton Marathon, and more than 260 were in jured, and the legacy of trauma and lost limbs remains as does the shock of having en dured a terrorist attack on Marathon Monday. Nor can Bostonians for get the fear that gripped a city locked down in the midst of a manhunt. But Boston has been able to get past all of that. Copley Square is no longer littered with impromptu tributes to the dead and injured; theyre now on display in an exhibit at the Boston Public Library, where Robert White of Lynn saw meaning in every teddy bear and pair of sneakers: Every last one of the items says Boston Strong or I will return next year. Roseann Sdoia is 46 years old, a vice presi dent of property man agement for a Boston development company. She is a cheerful wom an; she smiles broad ly when she arrives at the Spaulding Reha bilitation Hospital in Charlestown for physi cal therapy. Its just my nature, she says. Im not a negative person. Im not a Debbie Downer. Still, she says, she cries every day. What is sinking in is that life has changed, she says, her face awash with tears. Sdoia is a runner, but she did not take part in the marathon. She was at the nish line on April 15, rooting for friends in the race, when the second bomb went off. Aside from her leg injury, she suffered hearing loss. Other than losing the bottom of my right leg, Im still me, she says. I havent changed, I am still the same person I was before. And yet, so much has changed. She had to take more leave from the job she loved. Winter, and snow, were tough to handle. Shes had to tackle daily tasks showering, vacuuming differently. Marc Fucarile, a 35-year-old roofer from Stoneham, also lost his right leg from above the knee; he has shrapnel in his heart, and still could lose his left leg. Everything has changed, he says. How I use the bath room, how I shower, how I brush my teeth, how I get in and out of bed. His 6-year-old son, Gavin, does not always understand. Gavin is like, Hey, you want to go out and play? and Im like, Theres a foot of snow. I cant do snow. Were not going out and playing right now, sor ry buddy. It breaks my heart. In the rst three months after the ex plosions, the One Fund collected nearly $61 million in donations. In the next ve months, another $12 million in contributions came in. This big-heartedness was mirrored by a sort of proud deance, exemplied by Boston Strong. The amount of merchandise bearing the slogan was astonishing. In the immediate af termath of the bomb ings, it became a peace ful mantra that people could repeat and believe in. And if they said it enough, tweeted it enough, hash-tagged it enough, it would actu ally be true, says Dan Soleau, a brand devel opment manager for Ma rathon Sports. Jennifer Lawrence, a social worker at Boston Medical Center, says the emphasis on Boston Strong had had some unhappy consequences. A lot of it is portray ing that people are so resilient and so strong. While that is absolutely true, we are neglecting that people still have hard days, she said. In the aftermath of the bombings, more than 600 people took advan tage of the medical cen ters mental health ser vices. And while most needed no help after the rst few months, she has seen an in crease in demand in re cent weeks, as the anni versary approached. Still, she says a vast majority of those who came through the hospitals programs intend to attend this years marathon, either as by standers or runners. Nicole Lynch will be there. Her brother, Sean Collier, was the MIT ofcer who was shot to death, allegedly by the two suspects in the bombings. She will be at the race with Team Col lier Strong a group of 25 friends and family members, including two of her siblings, who will run to raise money for a scholarship fund to put one person a year through law enforcement training. William Evans will be there, but he has lit tle choice. He has run the marathon 18 times including last year but this time he will be there as police com missioner, supervising beefed-up security including more than 3,500 police ofcers (more than twice last years force), more security cameras, more bomb-snifng dogs, and restrictions on the kinds of bags run ners and spectators can bring. It weighs heavy on my mind, that I want this to go off well, he says. I dont want any one hurt. I dont ever want a repeat of the tragedy we saw that day.A year after, Boston and its people heal ELISE AMENDOLA / AP Boston Marathon bombing victim Marc Fucarile waves a Boston Strong ag with his ancee, Jen Regan, and their son, Gavin, partially obscured, on June 19, 2013, before Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals between Boston Bruins and Chicago in Boston. GERALD IMRAY and CHRISTOPHER TORCHIAAssociated PressPRETORIA, South Af rica The prosecutor cross-examining Oscar Pistorius at his mur der trial Friday tried to shred his version of events on the night he shot and killed his girlfriend, saying they do not add up and go com pletely against how people would react in the situation the double-amputee Olympian has described. Instead, chief prosecutor Gerrie Nel said the only reasonable explanation for what happened in the predawn hours of Feb. 14 last year was that Pisto rius fatally shot Steenkamp multiple times through a toilet door from around three me ters away as they ar gued. She was standing behind the toilet door talking to you when you shot her, Nel put to Pis torius right at the end of the rst week of the ath letes testimony. Thats not true, re plied Pistorius, one of numerous denials he issued to accusations that he was a liar through three days of rigorous cross-examination by the dogged prosecutor. Nel cited the trajec tory of the three bullets that hit the model in the hip, arm and head and which showed she was standing behind the door and facing it, and not backing away as she would have been if she thought there was an intruder in the house, Nel said. Steenkamp wasnt scared of anyone other than you Nel said to the 27-year-old athlete charged with premedi tated murder. Pistorius claims he shot Steenkamp, 29, by mistake, thinking she was an intruder about to come out the toi let and attack him. Pis torius, once the hero of disabled sport and a multiple Paralympic champion, faces going to prison for 25 years to life if convicted on the premeditated murder charge. Nel also scrutinized the positioning of items in the bedroom. They also indicated that Pis torius story was a fabrication, he argued. Nel said a duvet strewn on the oor in the bed room in police pho tos shows the pair was awake and arguing just before the shooting and not in bed as Pistorius has claimed. Pistorius says it was one of many items moved by police after the shooting. Nel led Pistorius through his own account of what hap pened moments before he shot Steenkamp. Pistorius said he heard a noise in the bathroom and moved down a passageway on his stumps toward the bathroom with his pistol while screaming to his girlfriend to get down from the bed and call the police. Pistorius said he then heard a noise in the toilet that he per ceived to be the sound of wood on wood, which he said made him think someone was open ing the toilet door to at tack him. Then, Pistori us said, he opened re. At each stage, Nel ar gued that the account was improbable, questioning why Pistorius did not establish where Steenkamp was and make sure she was OK, why he would approach the alleged danger zone in the dark if he felt vul nerable on his stumps, why Steenkamp would not respond to him and why an intruder would close himself in a toilet stall. If you spoke to Ree va, the two of you could have taken lots of oth er steps, Nel said, add ing that they could have merely left the bedroom. Pistorius said he wanted to put himself between the bathroom and the bed, where he said he thought Steen kamp was. Nel noted that throughout Pistorius version Steenkamp never uttered a word. Its not probable. Its not possible, the pros ecutor said, asking why Steenkamp never re sponded to Pistorius panicked shouts of an intruder when she was in the cubicle. I agree with Mr. Nel she would have been terried, Pistorius said, but I dont think she would have shouted out ... In her mind I must have been retreating to ward the bathroom. Nel responded that gave Steenkamp even more reason to talk to Pistorius, who was me ters away. Nel earlier argued that Pistorius was also pre pared to lie about an incident as far back as ve or six years ago when he claims someone shot at him from another car on a highway to build a backstory that he had a long-held fear of be ing attacked. Pistorius said he saw a muzzle ash and heard a banging noise as a black Mercedes drove past him in the incident, which he said was in 2008 or 2009. Pis torius said he turned off the highway and went to a restaurant park ing lot and called someone to come and pick him up. Nel asked Pis torius who he called and Pistorius replied he couldnt remember. But it was such a traumatic incident, the prosecutor said. Nel said Pistorius failing to remember who he called was because it never happened. If I could remember who I phoned I would gladly give you their name, Pistorius said.Prosecutor: Pistorius story doesnt add up THEMBA HADEBE / AP Oscar Pistorius leaves the high court on Friday in Pretoria, South Africa, Friday. Pistorius is charged with the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, on Valentines Day in 2013.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Last week I wrote about prayer. One of my points was that its easy to study too much about prayer in stead of simply praying. The day after writing it I found something similar written by Oswald Chambers. It sounds good to say that we pray, and we read books on prayer which tell us that prayer is benecial that our minds are quieted and our souls are uplifted when we pray, wrote Chambers. But Isaiah implied in this verse that God is amazed at such thoughts about prayer. The verse is Isaiah 59:16: He saw that there was no man, and wondered that there was no one to inter cede. Worship and intercession go hand in hand, wrote Chambers. You cant have one without the other. Intercession means raising ourselves up to the point of getting the mind of Christ regarding the person for whom we are praying, added Chambers. The reason many of us stop praying and become hard toward God is that we only have an emotional interest in prayer. While were told to pray about all things, including our wants and needs, we are to pray in accordance with Gods will. That should probably rule out getting a 2014 BMW when my 2003 Toyota Avalon is running ne. Are we worshipping God in our prayers, or reciting speeches about what were supposed to get? This is a sure sign that we are not worshiping, wrote Chambers. When we lose sight of God, we become hard and dogmatic. We throw our petitions at His throne and dictate to Him what we want Him to do. We dont worship God, nor do we seek to conform our minds to the mind of Christ. And if we are hard toward God, we will become hard toward other people. Are we hard toward others, or do we lift them up in intercession? It dawned on me recently that I am too hard on others if Im spending more time in my mind complaining about them rather than praying for them. It makes me sad when I read letters to the editor that blast people and condemn a pet sin or threaten the res of hell if people dont succumb to a certain way of thinking. Are we living in a holy relationship with God, or have we become hard and dogmatic? asked Chambers. Are we worshiping God in a way that will raise us up to where we can take hold of Him, having such intimate contact with Him that we know His mind about the ones for whom we pray? Our intimacy with God or the lack of intimacy will reect our prayer lives. Dont be a person who prays just for personal needs or doesnt pray at all. Be a person who worships God and lives in a holy relationship with Him, wrote Chambers. Get involved in the real work of intercession, remembering that it truly is work work that demands all your energy, but work which has no hidden pitfalls. Let us pray, continuously.Rick Reed is a columnist who lives in Mount Dora. To reach him call 352-383-1458, or email him at RICOH007@aol.com.FaithforLife www.dailycommercial.com352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.comC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 TODAYHOPE THE TRUE STORY OF LOVE AND TRIUMPH AT NEW LIFE PRESBY -TERIAN CHURCH: At 3 and 7 p.m. at the church in Fruitland Park. Derric Johnson, creator of Candlelight Pro -cessional and The Liberty Voices is the narrator. The event is free. Tickets are available at www.thelampstand.org/hope or by calling 352-728-1861. A love offering will be received. W.N. MCKINNEY GOSPEL CHOIR PER -FORMANCE: At 7 p.m., New Jacobs Chapel M.B. Church, 410 W. State Road 50 in Clermont, celebrating 37 years. For information, call 352-394-4995 or 352-603-0087. FREE EASTER EGG HUNT IN LADY LAKE: From 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Guava Street Sports Complex, 225 W. Guava St., with egg hunts for all kids by age, game stations and face painting. For information, call Heri-tage Community Church at 352-267-2939 or the town of Lady Lake at 352-577-4433. SUNDAYFIRST BAPTIST PRESENTS RE -DEEMED THE GOSPEL CHANGES EV-ERYTHING: An Easter worship pre -sentation, at 10:30 a.m., 402 Oxford St., in Wildwood. The event is free. Call the church at 352-748-1822 or go to www.fbcwildwood.org for in -formation. EASTER CANTATA MY SAVIOR, MY GOD: At 8 a.m. and 10 a.m., and April 18 at 7 p.m., at the Oxford Assembly of God, 12114 N. Highway 301 in Ox -ford. After the 10 a.m. performance Sunday there will be an Easter egg hunt for kids. Bring your own bas -ket. Call the church at 352-748-6124 for information. PALM SUNDAY CELEBRATION AT MID-FLORIDA LAKES COMMUNITY: At 5 p.m., in the community hall, 199 Forest Dr., in Leesburg. Gospel mu -sic with live groups and waving of the palms. To participate in the one-day gospel chorus, call Suzette DeGae -tano at 352-357-2880. JOHNSON UNIVERSITY FLORIDA STU -DENT SINGERS CONCERT: At 5:30 p.m., at the church, 251 Avenida Los Ange -los, The Villages. A free will offering will be received. Call the church at 352-259-9305 for details. NEW PASTOR INSTALLED AT NEW JA-COBS CHAPEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: At 5 p.m., at the church, 410 W. State Road 50 in Clermont. For information, call the church at 352394-4720. TWO CROWNS EASTER PRESENTA -TION AT LAKE SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: At 6 p.m., at the church, 10200 Morningside Dr., in Leesburg. Admission is free. A free will offering will be received. Call the church at 352-430-7056 for details. PREACHING AND TEACHING SEMI -NAR ON THE HOLY SPIRIT AT MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH, 32707 BLOSSOM LN. IN LEESBURG, AT 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., with Rev. Dr. Reg Dunlap from Church Centered Ministries. Call 352-314-3080 for details. CHURCH CALENDAR RICK REEDREFLECTIONS Oswald Chambers reminds us to pray about all things RICK REEDSpecial to the Daily CommercialSome men want to leave their children a living legacy. Not Don Baugher. Dying well. Thats become the legacy I want to leave my children and my childrens children, said Baugher. I want to be a good example of how to die well. Baugher, 76, learned he had lung cancer on Valentines Day 2013. It began when he went to his primary care doctor with his wife Marlene for a little hacky cough. The physician decided he should get a chest X-ray. The imaging company sent Baugher right back to his doctor and friend, Dr. Frank Pelligino. His news wasnt good. Both lungs were full of cancer, Baugher said. Even at that point there was no apprehension. We looked at each other and said, We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, Romans 8:28. We both felt very comfortable letting God be God. They learned the cancer was incurable so chemotherapy was useless and they decided against it. I didnt want my last days to be sick, Baugher said. Our dependence is on God being the Great Physician. We decided where to put our trust and faith and Hes been faithful ever since. That didnt change when they learned the cancer had metastasized to his brain. Baugher was given six to eight months to live. They decided on radiology therapy. That was October, he said. God has allowed me to live a little longer. His legacy quest began with some Bible research shortly after receiving his diagnosis. Baugher knew the church hasnt done a good job of preparing folks for dying. And he didnt think his response to his terminal diagnosis should be somber or sad. I came out of that time feeling strongly that the church had lost its way a bit on the subject of dy ing, he said. I began looking at the Wesleyan church. They are known for dying well. There, Baugher found dying members werent mournful of their imminent departure from earth. Instead, they were hopeful of the spiritual life to follow. Though the Wesleyans didnt use it as an evangelistic tool, thats what it became. People wanted to nd out about this hope they had, Baugher said. We are the only ones who should be dying with hope. The Wesleyans knew how to die and their church grew and prospered because they had that hope. Baugher prayed, Lord what am I to be doing? The medical community indicates that I have six to eight months before coming home to You. What should I be about? God made it quite clear to Baugher his mission was to be a demonstration to family, friends and others who were watching of total trust and dependence on the security one has in Christ, which results in the ability to die well. So last April, Baugher began studying about heaven and spiritual things to prepare him for dying well. And then he began a log of his thoughts and posted them on Facebook. His idea was to collect his thoughts for his three children, eight grandchildren and soon to be three great-grandchildren. I dont know what to call it, Baugher said. I just log stuff. He began writing on April 13, 2013, with discussions on heaven. He listed sever al reasons for folks unsure why they should want to go to heaven, including: For many of us, passing into Heaven is passing into the unknown. We have only a vague understanding of the place to which we are moving forever! Now that is intimidating. His purpose was to illuminate what God reveals to us about our nal address. Let me assure you that He has not been silent, Baugher wrote. By the time we nish, you will be looking forward to Heaven not holding back from it! In addition to his log, a local videographer named Stan Severance offered to make a video of Baugher speaking about dying well. He had no idea how far his quest for dying well would spread. I was telling some friends recently I now have my second viewer in South Africa, said Baugher. The wonderful thing about social media is there is no limit to how far you can go and impact peoples lives. I give all that credit to God. I ask Him to tell me what to say and Ill say it. The video, which has almost 700 hits, turned into a second video, Is Heaven Real? and they have plans for another. The Baughers became members at Southpointe Baptist Fellowship in Leesburg in 2007, and Baugher feels his church has taken seriously the charge for preparing members for their death. The Baughers have lived around the world as missionaries, with 30 moves in their 51 years of marriage, but he didnt become a believer until he was 40. His life changed when he and Marlene participated in a Marriage Encounter weekend in St. Louis. It was that weekend I came to realize how Christ loved me even though I am black inside, like Marlene loved me, said Baugher. It was like an electric charge. I came back a renewed per son with a renewed mar riage. I wanted to know more about God. I couldnt be the same person. I was born again. That phrase was seldom used in the Lutheran church. His conversion came one week before Thanksgiving 1977. Though Baugher was just learning, he was put in position to lead a Bible study in their Luther an church. It quickly grew to 100 people meeting on a Monday night in a town of 8,000. They moved in 1984 and eventually start ed a music ministry where they traveled on weekends for seven years. Finally, after all those moves it was time to retire and the Baughers wound up in Leesburg. After receiving news that sends most people into desperation, it drove the Baughers to their knees and a purpose. And theyre enjoying the ride. The Holy Spirit is like a strong wind, and we need to lean back and trust Him to take us where need to go, Baugher said. When we do that, its just a peaceful time. I love it, I love living in Gods grace. There still has not been one day of apprehension. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Don Baugher poses at his home in Leesburg on April 1.LEESBURGBattling cancer and dying well

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 rfntbr President Dunstan & Son Plumbing Co.,Inc. ofLEESBURG 352-365-1228Come visit our new location!rfnttb The Charlotte Mayfield Assisted Living Retirement CommunityrfAssisted Living, Independent Living, Day Stay Residency Combining Independence with Personal Care for over 40 yearsHoly Tr i ni ty Epi s copal Church2201 Spring Lake Road, Fruitland Park352-787-1 500Father Ted KoellnSunday Service 8:00am, 9:30am, 11:15amWednesday Healing Service 11:30am www.holytrinityfp.comLIFE Church Assem bly of God04001 Picciola Rd., Fruitland Park352-787-7962Pastor Rick WelborneSunday Deaf Impaired 10:00am Sunday Evening 6:00pm Wednesday Prayer and Youth Service 7:00pm Sunday School 9:00am Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pmPi lgrims Un i ted Church of Chri st (UCC)509 County Road 468, Fruitland Park www.pucc.info352-365-2662 or office@pucc.infoRev. Ronal K.F. Nicholas, OSL, PastorRev. Camille F. Gianaris, Pastoral Assistant Sunday Worship 10:00amContact us or visit our website for more infoL i ghthouse Foundati on M i ni stri es Internat i onal INC .11282 SR 471, Webster352-793-2631Pastor Patricia T. BurnhamSunday Services 9:00am & 6:00pm Thursday Night 7:00pm 3rd Saturday Food Basket Give-A-Waywww.lighthousefoundationministries.orgL i nden Church of God4309 CR 772, Webster Pastor Doyle D. GlassSunday Morning Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Sunday School 9:45amWednesday Night (Family Training Hour) 7:00pmAll Sa i nts Rom an Cathol ic Chapel11433 U.S. 441, River Plaza #11, Tavares407-391 -8678 352-385-3880Sunday Latin Mass 8:00am & 10:00amFi rst Bapti st Church of Tavares124 N. Joanna Avenue, Tavares352-343-71 3 1Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30am Sunday Traditional Service 11:00am & 6:00pm Sunday Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am Wednesday Fellowship Meal 5:00pm Wednesday Life University 6:15pm Wednesday Prayer Service 6:15pm Providing direction for all generationswww.fbctavares.comTavares Fi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church (UMC)Corner of Old 441 & SR 19, Tavares352-343-2761Pastor John BarhamTraditional Service 8:30AM & 11:00am Contemporary Cafe Service 10:00am Children of Light-Youth & Family Service 1st Sunday of each month 6:00pmwww.fumctavares.com For information on listing your church on this page call Michelle at352-365-8233or e-mail tomichelle.fuller@dailycommercial.comBethany Lutheran Church1334 Griffin Road, Leesburg352-787-7275Sunday Service 8:00am & 10:30am Wednesday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Bible Study 9:15amEmmanuel Bapti st Church of Leesburg1710 U.S. Hwy. 441 E., Leesburg352-323-1 588Pastor Jeff CarneySunday Celebration Service 10:30am Wednesday Mens Prayer Breakfast 8:00am Wednesday Praise & Prayer 6:30pm Sunday Bible Study 9:15am Wednesday Epic Youth Ministry 6:30pmwww.EmmanuelFL.comFi rst Bapti st Leesb urg220 N. 13th St., Leesburg352-787-1 005Sunday Service 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Sunday Bible Study 8:15am, 9:30am & 10:45am Wednesday Night Activities 6:00pmwww.fbcleesburg.orgFi rst Church of Chri st, Sci enti st, Leesburg13th & Line St., Leesburg352-787-1 921Sunday Service 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am Wednesday School 3:30pmFi rst Presbyter i an Curch of Leesburg200 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-787-5687Sunday Service 10:00pm Sunday School 8:45am www.firstpresleesburg.orgDisciples Making DisciplesGlor i a Dei L utheran Church130 S. Lone Oak Drive, Leesburg352-787-3223Sunday Worship October-April 8:00am & 10:30am Sunday Worship May-September 9:15am Christian Education October-April 9:15am www.gloriadeielca.netLakes and Hi lls Covenant ChurchRev. Ken Folmsbee, PhD, PastorWorship Service 10:15am Bible Study 9:00am @ Womens Club of Leesburg 700 S. 9th Street, Leesburg Church Office 106 S. Palm Ave., Howie-in-the-Hills352-552-0052www.lakeshillscovenantchurch.orgLegacy Communi ty ChurchLocated at Lake Square Mall, Leesburg (suite 331 next to JCPenney)Pastor Theo Bob-352-250-0 1 56 Pastor Buddy Walker-352-978-0509Spanish Pastor Luis Fuentes-352-5521 357Sunday Worship Service 9:30am Legacy is a multicultural, multiracial, generational, Christian Church www.legacycic.orgSt. Paul Rom an Cathol ic Church(In union with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orlando & The Vatican)1330 Sunshine Avenue, LeesburgWeekday Masses M-F 8:30amSacrament of Penance Saturday 2:30-3:30pm (or by appointment) Saturday Masses 4:00, 5:30, 7:00pm (Spanish)Sunday Masses 7:00, 9:00, 11:00am, 12:30pmOffice Hours M-F 8:00-12:00, 1:00-4:00Seventh Day Advent i st508 S. Lone Oak Dr., Leesburg352-326-41 09Worship Service 9:30am Sabbath School Service 11:00am Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7:00pmThe Heal i ng Place1012 W Main Street, Leesburg352-61 7-0569Facilitator: Phyllis GilbertSunday Service and Kids Club 11:00am Wednesday Bible Study and Kids Club 6:00pm (Nursey open for all services) Come as you are and leave different!L i berty Bapt i st Church11043 True Life Way, Clermont 352-394-0708Senior Pastor Chris JohnsonSun. Svc. 10:40am, Family Prayer Svc. 6:00pm Unashamed Students Service 6:00pm Sun. Bible Fellowship 9:30am Wed. Bible Study 6:30pm, Kids 4 Truth Clubs 6:30pm Groups for all ages, Nursery provided all serviceswww.lbcclermont.org ClermontFi rst Uni ted Methodi st Church of Eust i sA Place where You Matter600 S. Grove Street, Eustis352-357-5830Senior Pastor Beth FarabeeCoffee and Fellowship 9:00am Contemporary Worship 9:30am Traditional Worship 11:00amL i fe W i thout L imits Mini stri es150 E. Barnes Avenue, Eustis352-399-291 3Bishop Robert DixonSunday School 9:00am Sunday Worship Service 10:00am Wednesday Family Bible Study 7:00pmwww.lifewithout-limits.comSt. Thom as Epi s copal Church317 S. Mary St., Eustis(corner S. Mary & Lemon St.)352-357-4358Rev. John W. Lipscomb III, RectorSunday Holy Eucharist Services 8:00am & 10:30am Adult Sunday School 9:20am, Childrens Chapel Thurs. Holy Eucharist & Healing Service 10:00amwww.stthomaseustis.comUn i tari an Uni versal i st Congregati on of Lake CountyEustis Womans Club Building 227 North Center Street, Eustis352-728-1 631Sunday Adult Discussion Group 9:45am Sunday Celebration of Life Service 11:00amFacebook: www.facebook.com/UUlakeco Website:www.lakecountyuu.org Email: lakecountyuu@gmail.com Eustis Fruitland Park Leesburg Tavares Webster Mount DoraCongregati onal Church650 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora352-383-2285Reverand Dr. Richard DonSunday 11:00am (Communion 1st Sunday of the month) Monday Bible Study 9:00am & 6:00pmFi rst Presbyter i an Church of Mount Dora222 W. 6th Avenue at Alexander, Mt. Dora352-383-4089The Well Informal Worship 9:00am Childrens Sunday School 9:00am Adult Sunday School 10:00am Sanctuary Worship 11:00am9:30amwww.fpcmtdora.orgSt. Phi l i p L utheran Church1050 Boyd Drive, Mt. Dora352-383-5402Pastor Rev. Dr. Johan BerghSunday Service 9:30am (Childcare Provided) Fellowship 10:45amwww.stphiliplc.com OkahumpkaCorpus Chri st i Epi s copal Church3430 County Road 470, Okahumpka352-787-8430Sunday Eucharist Service 9:00am Evening Prayer 4:00pm Fellowship following both services Thursday Morning Prayer 9:30amwww.corpuschristiepiscopal.org GrovelandMt Oli ve Missi onary Bapti st Church15641 Stucky Loop, Stucky(West of Mascotte)352-429-3888Rev. Clarence L. Southall-PastorSunday Worship Service 11:00am Sunday School 9:30am Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pm Youth Bible Study-Wednesday 7:00pmZi on L utheran Church (ELCA)547 S. Main Ave., Groveland352-429-2960Pastor Ken StoyerSunday Worship Service 11:00am Adult Sunday School 9:30am MinneolaNew L i fe Presbyteri an Church, PCA18237 E. Apshawa Road, Minneola Music Ministries352-241 -81 8 1Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 10:45am

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 BERNARD CONDONAssociated PressNEW YORK Investors drove the stock mar ket lower for a second straight day Friday as they grew anxious that earnings growth was fal tering. Weaker earnings at JP Morgan Chase dragged bank stocks lower. And big drops in once-soar ing tech stocks pushed the Nasdaq composite down for a third week. The market has been trying to come back, but each time the selling just picks up, said Quincy Krosby, a market strategist at Prudential. The buyers are just not stepping in. So much for buying on the dip. Stocks fell from the open on news that JP Morgan had missed analysts earnings estimates. Investors, who were wor ried that technology shares were overvalued, dumped those for a sec ond day, with some of the biggest gainers of late fall ing sharply. Facebook fell 1.1 percent, after a 5 per cent drop on Thursday. The rst-quarter earnings season has just started, but investors already seem anxious about what lies ahead. Financial analysts expect earnings for companies in the Standard & Poors 500 index to drop 1.6 percent from a year ear lier, according to FactSet, a nancial data provid er. At the start of the year, they expected a jump of 4.3 percent. If prots do fall, it would be only the sec ond quarterly drop in three years. Earnings are going to come in on the sloppy side, said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capi tal. The market needs to correct, he added, refer ring to sharp downturn in stocks. JOSH BOAK PAUL WISEMANAP Economics WritersAP Economics WritersWASHINGTON Its the silent enemy in our retirement accounts: High fees. And now a new study nds that the typical 401(k) fees adding up to a modest-sounding 1 percent a year would erase $70,000 from an average workers account over a four-de cade career compared with lower-cost options. To compensate for the higher fees, someone would have to work an extra three years before retiring. The study comes from the Center for Ameri can Progress, a liberal think tank. Its analysis, backed by industry and government data, sug gests that U.S. workers, already struggling to save enough for retire ment, are being further held back by fund costs. The corrosive effect of high fees in many of these retirement ac counts forces many Americans to work years longer than necessary or than planned, the report, being released Friday, concludes. Most savers have only a vague idea how much theyre paying in 401(k) fees or what alterna tives exist, though the information is provided in often dense and complex fund statements. High fees seldom lead to high returns. And critics say they hurt or dinary investors much more so than, say, Wall Streets high-speed trading systems, which benet pros and have increasingly drawn the eye of regulators. Consider what would happen to a 25-yearold worker, earning the U.S. median income of $30,500, who puts 5 percent of his or her pay in a 401(k) account and whose employer chips in another 5 percent: %  en If the plan charged 0.25 percent in annual fees, a widely available low-cost option, and the investment return averaged 6.8 percent a year, the account would equal $476,745 when the worker turned 67 (the age he or she could retire with full Social Se curity benets). %  en If the plan charged the typical 1 percent, the account would reach only $405,454 a $71,000 shortfall. %  en If the plan charged 1.3 percent com mon for 401 (k) plans at small companies the account would reach $380,649, a $96,000 shortfall. The worker would have to work four more years to make up the gap. (The analysis assumes the workers pay rises 3.6 percent a year.) The higher fees often accompany funds that try to beat market indexes by actively buy ing and selling securi ties. Index funds, which track benchmarks such as the Standard & Poors 500, dont require active management and typi cally charge lower fees. With stocks having hit record highs before being clobbered in recent days, many investors have been on edge over the markets ups and downs. But experts say timing the market is nearly impossible. By contrast, investors can increase their returns by limiting their funds fees. Most stock funds will match the performance of the entire market over time, so those with the lowest management costs will gener ate better returns, said Russel Kinnel, director of research for Morningstar. Fees are a crucial de terminant of how well you do, Kinnel said. The difference in costs can be dramatic. Each fund disclos es its expense ratio. This is the cost of oper ating the fund as a per centage of its assets. It includes things like record-keeping and legal expenses. For one of its stock index funds, Vanguard lists an expense ratio of 0.05 percent. State Farm lists it at 0.76 per cent for a similar fund. The ratio jumps to 1.73 percent for a Nas daq-based investment managed by ProFunds. ProFunds are not typical index mutual funds but are de signed for tactical in vestors who frequently purchase and redeem shares, said ProFunds spokesman Tuck er Hewes. The high er-than-normal expense ratios of these non-typical funds reect the additional cost and efforts necessary to manage and operate them. Average fees also tend to vary based on the size of an employers 401(k) plan. The total management costs for individual companies with plans with more than $1 billion in assets has averaged 0.35 per cent a year, according to BrightScope, a rm that rates retirement plans. By contrast, cor porate plans with less than $50 million in as sets have total fees approaching 1 percent. Higher management costs do far more to erode a typical Amer icans long-term sav ings than does the high-speed trading highlighted in Michael Lewis new book, Flash Boys. CURRENCIES Dollar vs. Exchang e Pvs Rate Day Yen 101.57 101.45 Euro $1.3887 $1.3891 Pound $1.6745 $1.6787 Swiss franc 0.8753 0.8762 Canadian dollar 1.0964 1.0923 Mexican peso 13.0631 13.0362 Businessaustin.fuller@dailycommercial.com n 352-365-8263 DOW JONES 16,026.75 143.47 NASDAQ 3,999.73 54.38 S&P 500 1,815.69 17.39 GOLD 1,319.00 1.50 SILVER 19.95 0.145 CRUDE OIL 103.74 + 0.34T-NOTE 10-year2.62 + 0.01 www.dailycommercial.comSavers beware: Fees could shrink your 401(k) AP FILE PHOTO Freshly-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas. MARTIN CRUTSINGER and PAUL WISEMANAssociated PressWASHINGTON Finance ofcials of the worlds major economies expressed condence Friday that they can meet an ambitious goal of boost ing global growth by $2 trillion over the next ve years. Thats despite a variety of threats in cluding rising political tensions over Russias actions in Ukraine. Finance ministers and central bank presidents of the leading rich and de veloping nations issued a joint state ment that papered over substantial differences in such areas as central bank interest rate policies and wheth er to hit Russia with tougher sanctions because of its dealings with Ukraine. The nal Group of 20 communi que pledged to keep working on concrete economic reforms that could boost global growth by 2 percent over the next ve years. But nance ofcials concede that the economic re forms needed to achieve that goal will in many cases be politically difcult. Australian Treasurer Joe Hockey said all the nance ministers real ized that hard decisions would have to be made in terms of reforming la bor market policies and dealing with budget decits. It is hard but that is the only way we are going to grow the economy, Hockey, who is chairman of the G-20 this year, told reporters at news con ference following the groups two days of discussions. The nance ministers agreed to de velop concrete proposals for each of their countries and present those plans at a September meeting in Aus tralia in preparation for a G-20 lead ers summit on Nov. 15-16 in Brisbane that will be attended by President Barack Obama and leaders of the other nations. The United States was represented in the discussions Friday by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew and Federal Re serve Chair Janet Yellen. Lew on Thursday had raised the possibility in a meeting with Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov on Thursday that the Obama administration was willing to impose addi tional signicant sanctions if Russia escalates the Ukraine situation.Major economies express confidence about growth AP PHOTOIMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, left, talks with Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen prior to the G20 meeting at the IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings on Friday. Stocks fall on jitters over earnings, tech sector rout Staff ReportThis years commence ment speaker for Beacon College will be Patri cia Latham, a founding member of the school. Commencement ceremonies will be at 10 / a.m. on M ay 3 at Lake Receptions in Mount Dora, according to a press release from www.newswise.com. We are delighted that Pat Latham will be de livering the keynote ad dress to this years graduates and to our college community, college President George J. Hagerty said. Latham is a co-author, with her husband Peter Latham, of eight books on learning dis ability legal topics. She holds a bachelors degree from Swarthmore College, and a doctor ate from the University of Chicago Law School. Beacon was the rst college in the United States to offer fouryear bachelor degree programs exclusively to students with learn ing disabilities. Beacon was established in 1989 with a mission that focuses on the academ ic and career success of students who learn dif ferently.LEESBURGFounding Beacon member will give commencement

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The Market In Review A-B-CABB Ltd.78e25.51-.07 ACE Ltd2.26e99.31+.72 ADT Corp.8029.74-.57 AES Corp.2014.15-.28 AFLAC1.4860.83-.93 AGCO.44f54.38-1.22 AGL Res1.96f49.93-.27 AK Steel...6.96-.34 AMC Ent n...23.60+.72 AOL...41.72-1.17 A10 Nwks n...13.56+.23 AU Optron...3.90-.02 Aarons.0830.23-.01 AbbottLab.88f37.02-.02 AbbVie1.68f46.46-.47 AberFitc.8035.74-.26 AbdAsPac.426.16-.01 AcadiaRlt.9225.99-.29 Accenture1.86e77.09+.26 AccoBrds...5.96-.04 Actavis...188.83-2.46 Actuant.0433.34-.42 Acuity.52123.56+1.16 AMD...3.65-.20 AecomTch...32.09-.75 Aegon.30e8.70-.17 AerCap...39.43-1.04 Aeropostl...d4.62-.28 Aetna.9070.82-1.05 AffilMgrs...179.30-2.73 Agilent.52m52.77-1.28 Agnico g.32m31.00-.30 Agrium g3.0091.60-1.01 AirLease.1236.00-.90 AirProd3.08f115.14-.71 Aircastle.8018.65-.12 Airgas1.92104.56+.16 AlaskaAir1.00f90.52-1.15 Albemarle1.10f64.86-.27 AlcatelLuc.18e3.77-.04 Alcoa.1212.54-.16 Alere...33.78-.58 AllegTch.7239.12+.16 Allegion n.3250.01-.67 Allergan.20120.89+4.26 Allete1.96f51.06-.25 AlliData...246.38-7.38 AlliantEgy2.0456.75+.23 AlliGblCv21.029.48-.04 AlldNevG...4.01-.19 AllisonTrn.4828.72-.17 Allstate1.12f55.29-.22 AllyFin n...u24.20+.22 AlonUSA.24a14.06-.66 AlphaNRs...4.31-.10 AlpToDv rs.688.30-.10 AlpsDvDog1.19e34.40-.35 AlpAlerMLP1.09e17.93+.17 AltisResid.75e27.75-.81 Altria1.9237.65-.17 Ambev n.22e7.80+.16 Ameren1.6040.50+.33 AMovilL.34e19.97-.01 AmApparel....49... AmAxle...17.29-.64 AmCampus1.4437.15-.46 AEagleOut.50d11.00-.38 AEP2.0050.90-.09 AEqInvLf.18f21.99-.80 AHm4Rnt n.2016.03-.02 AmIntlGrp.50f49.40-.66 AResidPr n...17.01-.06 AmTower1.28f80.55-1.00 AmWtrWks1.1245.50-.03 Ameriprise2.08101.74-3.30 AmeriBrgn.9464.17-.83 Ametek.2450.32+.62 Amphenol.8090.53-.52 AmpioPhm...5.61-.12 Anadarko.7296.48-.10 AnglogldA.10e17.97-.14 ABInBev2.82e105.60+.07 Ann Inc...39.42-.82 Annaly1.35e11.46+.08 Annies...35.08-1.01 AnteroRs n...63.22-1.24 Anworth.49e5.30+.09 Aon plc.7079.43-.45 Apache1.00f82.09-.63 AptInv1.04f29.11-.49 ApolloGM3.98e27.49-.57 AquaAm s.6124.51-.37 ArcelorMit.2016.45+.01 ArchCoal.04m4.88-.05 ArchDan.96f44.41+.24 ArcosDor.249.88-.37 ArmcoMetl....36+.02 ArmourRsd.604.16-.03 ArmstrWld...53.09+.09 ArrowEl...57.70-1.54 ArtisanPtr2.20f55.61-1.44 AshfordHT.4810.19-.21 Ashland1.3695.00-.14 AssuredG.44f24.00-.22 AstoriaF.1612.86-.21 AstraZen2.80e62.60-1.04 AthlonEn n...37.95+.31 AtlPwr g.402.92-.04 ATMOS1.4848.52-.38 AtwoodOcn...45.70-.43 AuRico g.164.38-.03 Autohme n...34.00-1.06 Autoliv2.0899.73-.51 AvalonBay4.64f132.25-.57 AveryD1.1648.63-.54 AvivREIT1.4425.00+.17 Avnet.6044.88-1.33 Avon.2414.41-.53 Axiall.6445.92-1.48 AXIS Cap1.0846.18+.40 B2gold g...2.75-.07 BB&T Cp.9238.65-.24 BCE g2.4743.87-.12 BHP BillLt2.32e70.40-.13 BHPBil plc2.32e63.87-.49 BP PLC2.2847.45-.83 BP Pru9.84e83.99-3.68 BPZ Res...2.62-.13 BRF SA.39e21.95+.35 BabckWil.4032.84-.41 BakrHu.6063.37-.76 BallCorp.5253.94-.81 BallyTech...63.55-.27 BalticTrdg.07e6.10+.03 BcBilVArg.42e12.18-.03 BcoBrad pf.23e14.90+.29 BcoSantSA.82e9.58... BcoSBrasil.95e5.70+.04 BcpSouth.2023.24-.25 BkofAm.20f15.77-.35 BkIreland...17.18-.41 BkNYMel.68f33.12-.21 BankUtd.8432.55-.71 Banro g....49-.04 Barclay.41e15.72-.22 BiP SPVix...30.83-.17 BarVixMdT...15.14+.05 B iPVix rs...44.75+1.31 Bard.84137.27-1.02 BarnesNob...18.10-.50 Barnes.4437.65+.27 BarrickG.2018.62-.17 BasicEnSv...26.67-.04 Baxter1.9671.98-.28 Beam Inc.9083.27-.01 BeazerHm...18.97-.68 BectDck2.18111.18-1.46 Bemis1.08f39.58-.68 BerkH B...121.70-.57 BerryPlas...22.28-.86 BestBuy.6825.51-.70 BigLots...38.39-.07 BBarrett...23.28-.12 BioMedR1.0019.98-.26 BitautoH...31.92-1.37 BlackRock7.72f293.71-2.24 BlkDebtStr.30a4.08+.01 BlkEEqDv.567.83-.05 Blackstone1.34e30.14+.10 BlkstnMtg1.20e28.05-.06 BlockHR.8027.64-.78 BdwlkPpl.40m13.92-.16 Boeing2.92f122.07-1.57 BonanzaCE...45.44+.68 BoozAllnH.40a21.39-.55 BorgWrn s.5059.27-1.13 BostProp2.60a115.35+.90 BostonSci...12.69-.24 BoxShips.24m1.86-.04 BoydGm...12.12-.05 Brandyw.6013.83-.23 Brinks.4028.77-.46 BrMySq1.4448.83-.46 BroadrdgF.8435.61-.98 Brookdale...31.62-.15 BrkfldAs g.80f41.44+.42 BrkfldPr n1.0019.04-.04 BrownFB1.1687.42-1.81 Brunswick.4041.66-1.17 Buenavent.31e12.92-.22 BungeLt1.2078.25-1.15 BurgerKng.2825.08-.31 CBL Asc.9817.91-.03 CBRE Grp...26.27-.43 CBS A.4858.65-1.31 CBS B.4858.68-1.30 CBS Outd n...d27.93-1.27 CF Inds4.00237.72-8.04 CIT Grp.4046.61-.78 CMS Eng1.08f29.45+.07 CNO Fincl.24f16.78-.71 CPFL Eng.37e16.98+.17 CST Brds n.2530.35-.65 CSX.6028.01+.04 CVS Care1.1072.58-.35 CYS Invest1.288.77+.07 Cabelas...64.21-.54 CblvsnNY.6016.29-.73 CabotOG s.0832.41-.09 CallGolf.049.50-.10 CallonPet...8.75+.24 Calpine...20.72-.25 Cameco g.4022.96-.19 Cameron...60.66-1.18 CampSp1.2544.26-.43 CampusCC.668.57-.04 CdnNR gs1.00f54.65-.42 CdnNRs gs.90f39.40-.67 CP Rwy g1.40143.86-.74 CapOne1.2074.04-.03 CapsteadM1.27e12.69+.03 CardnlHlth1.2166.14-1.05 CareFusion...38.34-.56 CarMax...42.88-.88 Carnival1.0037.03-.39 CashAm.1444.12+.88 Castlight n...d17.08-1.23 Caterpillar2.40101.45-.81 CedarF2.8049.04-.56 CedarRlty.205.95+.03 CelSci rs...1.51-.05 Celanese.7254.65-.36 Cemex.45t12.83-.12 Cemig pf s2.02e7.26+.09 CenovusE1.06f29.02+.01 Centene...58.30+.11 CenterPnt.95f24.00+.04 CenElBras.18e3.22-.01 CFCda g.0114.01-.03 CntryLink2.1633.35-.08 ChambSt n.507.54-.03 ChanAdv n...30.41-.81 Chegg n...d5.72-.43 Chemtura...24.52-.22 CheniereEn...55.95-.92 ChesEng.3526.16-.29 Chevron4.00117.03+.34 ChicB&I.28f81.94-1.64 Chicos.3015.59-.71 Chimera.36a3.14+.01 ChiMYWnd...2.45-.19 ChinaMble2.24e47.76-.24 Chipotle...534.87+.86 Chubb2.00f88.69+.29 ChurchDwt1.24f67.92-.30 CienaCorp...19.41-.42 Cigna.0477.11-1.98 Cimarex.64f113.93-.48 CinciBell...3.45-.18 Cinemark1.0027.73-.01 Citigroup.0445.68-.55 CliffsNRs.6019.58-.65 Clorox2.8488.24-.63 CloudPeak...20.95-.33 Coach1.3548.81-.66 CobaltIEn...17.51-.25 CocaCE1.00f45.24-.72 Coeur...d8.85-.19 Colfax...67.98+.06 ColgPalm s1.44f65.31-.63 ColonyFncl1.4021.07-.28 Comerica.76f48.25-.66 CmclMtls.4818.62-.09 CmwREIT1.0025.97-.64 CmwRe pfD1.6325.75-.02 CmtyBkSy1.1237.37-.33 CmtyHlt...35.37-1.09 CBD-Pao.45e47.58+.12 CompSci.8058.05-.88 ComstkRs.5023.48+.10 Con-Way.4039.54-.36 ConAgra1.0030.50-.14 ConchoRes...125.32+1.59 ConocoPhil2.7670.87+1.16 ConsolEngy.25m40.11-.77 ConEd2.52f55.60+.20 ConstellA...78.03-2.08 Constellm n...27.48-1.15 ContainSt n...d31.25-.60 ContlRes...127.98+.28 Cnvrgys.2421.36-.26 CooperCo.06123.62-2.48 CooperTire.4223.81-.26 Copel.25e13.93+.22 CoreLogic...27.88-1.04 Corning.4020.38-.39 CorpOffP1.1026.97-.24 CorrectnCp2.04f31.51-.40 Cosan Ltd.30e12.33+.17 Coty n.2015.38-.15 Coupons n...d19.86-1.15 CousPrp.30f11.31-.09 Covance...96.37-1.55 CovantaH.72f17.53-.17 Covidien1.2869.03-1.16 CSVInvNG...3.04... CredSuiss.79e31.79-.34 CrstwdMid1.64f23.44+.80 CrwnCstle1.4072.10-1.27 CrownHold...44.19-.56 CubeSmart.5217.79... Cummins2.50142.05-2.04 D-E-FDCT Indl.287.59-.13 DDR Corp.62f16.27-.23 DHT Hldgs.087.77-.19 DNP Selct.789.78+.04 DR Horton.1521.61-.18 DSW Inc s.75f34.46-.71 DTE2.6274.86-.31 DanaHldg.2022.20-.34 Danaher.40f72.80-1.33 Darling...20.76-.04 DaVitaH s...67.30-.65 DeanFds rs.2815.10-.26 Deere2.0492.01-.73 DejourE g....26-.00 Delek.60a28.07-.86 DelphiAuto1.0064.90-1.73 DeltaAir.2432.52-.49 Demandw...52.44+.63 DenburyR.2516.37-.19 DenisnM g...1.52+.02 DeutschBk.97e43.31-.65 DevonE.96f67.55-1.06 DiaOffs.50a45.88-1.45 DiamRsts n...17.13-.31 DiamRk.41f11.51-.20 DianaShip...11.45-.31 DicksSptg.5052.06-.12 Diebold1.1538.95+.20 DigitalRlt3.32f51.68-1.20 DigitalGlb...d26.14-.88 Dillards.2489.95-2.30 DirSPBr rs...33.44+.86 DxGldBll rs...37.15-1.72 DrxFnBear...22.21+.73 DxEnBear...19.06+.13 DxEMBear...37.07-.01 DrxSCBear...17.99+.69 DirGMBear...23.88+1.87 DirGMnBull...20.29-1.65 Dx30TBear...53.95-1.34 DrxEMBull...27.64-.03 DrxFnBull...82.00-3.00 DirDGdBr s...23.58+.96 DrxSCBull1.19e66.24-2.85 DrxSPBull...60.22-1.70 Discover.8055.15-.56 DollarGen...54.74-.71 DomRescs2.40f69.42-.16 Dominos1.00f72.71-1.58 Domtar g2.2095.66-2.55 DoubIncSol1.8021.77+.02 DEmmett.8026.31-.35 Dover1.5080.78-1.40 DowChm1.48f46.95-.75 DrPepSnap1.64f51.19-.88 DresserR...57.32-.59 DuPont1.8066.09-.38 DuPFabros1.40f23.78-.38 DukeEngy3.1271.84+.25 DukeRlty.6816.70-.30 Dynegy...25.20-.25 DynexCap1.00m8.62-.05 E-CDang...12.60-.58 E-House.20e10.73-.22 EMC Cp.4026.65-.35 EOG Res s.50f98.63+.52 EP Engy n...18.47-.10 EPAM Sys...33.44+2.60 EPL O&G...37.94-.09 EQT Corp.12102.03-.48 EagleMat.4084.65-1.91 EastChem1.4084.66+.54 Eaton1.96f70.92-1.92 EatnVan.8835.90-.44 EV TxDiver1.0111.01-.06 EVTxMGlo.989.97-.09 Ecolab1.10103.70-1.32 EdisonInt1.4256.32-.24 EducRlty.449.70-.12 EdwLfSci...72.97-1.53 ElPasoPpl2.6031.86+.25 EldorGld g.06e5.90+.03 EllieMae...24.00-1.37 Embraer.38e34.64-.08 EmeraldO...6.68-.16 EmergBio...23.20-.46 Emeritus...29.57-.23 EmersonEl1.7265.40-.65 EmpStR n.3414.90... Emulex...7.21-.10 EnableM n...22.20... EnbrdgEPt2.1728.97+.60 Enbridge1.40f46.60-.13 EnCana g.2822.42+.01 EndvSilv g...4.31-.12 Energen.60f78.14-1.19 Energizer2.0096.56-1.59 EngyTEq s1.39f47.81-.04 EngyTsfr3.68f55.00+.90 Enerpls g1.08u21.16+.17 Enersis.46e15.85-.05 ENSCO3.0048.59-.66 Entergy3.3270.35+.25 EntPrPt2.84f72.17+.55 Entravisn.10a5.93-.05 Envestnet...34.72-1.90 EqualEn g...4.68+.31 Equifax1.00f65.04-.97 EqtyOne.8822.02-.05 EqtyRsd2.0057.73-1.44 EssexPT4.84164.82-2.34 EsteeLdr.8068.18-.74 EverBank.1218.66-.39 EverestRe3.00153.47+.11 Evertec n.4023.06-.20 ExcoRes.205.84-.28 Exelis.4117.69-.48 Exelon1.2435.16+.07 Express...d15.06-.52 ExterranH.6042.70-.27 ExtraSpce1.6047.67-.49 ExxonMbl2.5296.72-.06 FMC Corp.60f74.30-1.23 FMC Tech...52.16-.91 FNBCp PA.4812.62-.13 FamilyDlr1.24fd56.10-1.07 Farmlnd n...12.98... FedExCp.60131.23-.83 FedRlty3.12112.07-.51 FedInvst1.0028.59-.22 FelCor.088.76-.22 Ferrellgs2.0023.73+.10 Ferro...12.44-.51 FibriaCelu...10.58-.19 FidlNFin.7231.46-.14 FidNatInfo.96f51.28-.53 58.com n...43.29-.68 FstAFin n.96f25.72-.11 FstHorizon.2011.48-.25 FstInRT.41f18.41-.31 FMajSilv g...9.57-.32 FstRepBk.4852.46-.76 FTDJInet...54.71-1.11 FT HlthCr.01e47.76-.79 FirstEngy1.4433.15-.34 500.com n...33.77-.32 Fleetcor...109.57-3.82 Flotek...28.58+.42 FlowrsFd s.4520.11-.20 Flowserv s.64f75.15-.98 Fluor.84f74.47-1.47 FootLockr.88f44.02-.72 FordM.5015.63... ForestCA...18.46-.25 ForestLab...86.76-.63 ForestOil...1.83-.03 Fortress.32f6.97-.20 FBHmSec.48f40.45-.49 FrancoN g.80f46.34-1.00 FrankRes s.4851.80-.22 FMCG1.25a32.56-.32 Freescale...24.07-.60 Frontline...3.61-.18 Fusion-io...9.22-.30 G-H-IGFI Grp.203.56+.02 GNC.64f44.26-.25 Gafisa SA.07e3.43+.01 Gallaghr1.44f44.38+.72 GameStop1.32f40.52-.69 Gannett.8026.16-.74 Gap.88f38.40-.89 GasLog.48u25.53+.63 GastarExp...6.20+.01 GencoShip...1.92-.03 Generac5.00e56.00-1.49 GnCable.72d24.88-.40 GenDynam2.48f104.99-.72 GenGrPrp.60f22.07-.03 GenMoly....89+.02 GenMotors1.2031.93-1.37 GMot wtB...15.00-1.24 GM wt C...d2.10-.47 Genpact...16.94-.31 GenuPrt2.30f84.55-.91 Genworth...16.00-.64 GeoGrp2.28f32.18-.16 Gerdau.13e6.05-.11 GiantInter.65e11.62+.03 Gigamon n...d16.27-.55 GlaxoSKln2.47e51.76-.79 GlimchRt.409.88-.11 GlobalCash...6.72-.22 GlobPay.0865.82-.58 GlobusMed...22.97-.48 GolLinhas...5.47-.01 GoldFLtd.02e4.05... 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WmsCos1.61f40.14-.10 WmsPtrs3.57f51.35+.68 WmsSon1.32f61.50-1.29 WillisGp1.20f41.77-.80 Wipro.14r13.20+.11 WiscEngy1.56f46.91+.02 WTJpHedg1.24e44.84-.04 WT India.16e19.19+.07 WolvWW s.2426.07-.65 Workday...71.86-3.76 WldW Ent.4820.29-.83 WuXi...35.06+.06 Wyndham1.40f69.43-1.17 XL Grp.64f30.95+.28 XPO Logis...26.14-.08 XcelEngy1.20f30.59+.02 Xylem.51f35.22-.69 YPF Soc.15e29.76-.34 Yamana g.15m8.53-.14 Yelp...61.72-1.75 YingliGrn...3.88-.27 YoukuTud...24.78-.39 YumBrnds1.4874.37-.82 ZaleCp...21.15-.07 Zimmer.88f91.50-1.17 ZoesKitch n...24.72... Zoetis.29d28.40-.46 Stocks in bold changed 5% or more in price from the previous day. Stock Footnotes:g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf Late filing with SEC. n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock issue. rs Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. vj Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the n ame.Dividend Footnotes:a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent d ividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes:q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months.Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.NameDivLastChg New York Stock Exchange Eye on ToylandMattels latest quarterly earnings should provide insight into the toymakers efforts to boost sales. In February, the worlds biggest toy company announced plans to buy Mega Bloks owner Mega Brands for about $460 million. The move came after a disappointing holiday season when sales of toys from Mattels key Barbie and Fisher-Price brands declined. Mattel reports first-quarter financial results on Thursday.More soda woes?Wall Street predicts Coca-Colas earnings and revenue fell in the first quarter from a year earlier. The worlds biggest beverage maker, due to report financial results on Tuesday, has been struggling with declining sales of soda in North America. Coca-Colas sales growth in emerging markets such as India and China also has slowed. To cope, the company has taken steps to boost marketing efforts.Online ad watchGoogle reports first-quarter earnings Wednesday. Investors will be looking for an update on how the Internet companys average ad rates, a key source of revenue, fared in the quarter. Googles online ad rates have been falling because more people are clicking on smartphones and tablets. Marketers so far have been unwilling to pay as much for ads on mobile devices because they have smaller screens than PCs. Source: FactSetPrice-earnings ratio: 15based on trailing 12 month results 350 450 550 $650 1Q Operating EPS 1Q est.$5.80 $6.32 GOOGL$537.76 $395.47 Today 1,650 1,700 1,750 1,800 1,850 1,900 OA NDJFM 1,800 1,860 1,920 S&P 500Close: 1,815.69 Change: -17.39 (-0.9%) 10 DAYS 14,800 15,200 15,600 16,000 16,400 16,800 OA NDJFM 16,000 16,320 16,640 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 16,026.75 Change: -143.47 (-0.9%) 10 DAYS Advanced867 Declined2217 New Highs22 New Lows52 Vol. (in mil.)3,695 Pvs. Volume3,659 2,223 2,370 537 2075 14 92NYSE NASDDOW16168.8716015.3216026.75-143.47-0.89%-3.32% DOW Trans.7447.407355.497362.39-68.84-0.93%-0.52% DOW Util.537.44533.43534.32-0.48-0.09%+8.92% NYSE Comp.10369.9610271.3610280.94-85.88-0.83%-1.15% NASDAQ4067.223991.643999.73-54.38-1.34%-4.23% S&P 5001835.071814.361815.69-17.39-0.95%-1.77% S&P 4001335.291316.031318.50-17.01-1.27%-1.79% Wilshire 500019543.4119298.5919321.15-203.30-1.04%-1.95% Russell 20001128.961107.931111.44-16.22-1.44%-4.49%HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AT&T Inc T31.74539.00 35.20+.08 +0.2sss+0.1-3.2111.84 Advance Auto Parts AAP77.988129.99 116.25-2.36 -2.0ttt+5.0+46.3210.24 Amer Express AXP63.43794.35 84.54-.82 -1.0ttt-6.8+31.9171.04f AutoNation Inc AN41.40955.40 52.73-.48 -0.9ttt+6.1+23.318... Brown & Brown BRO27.76235.13 29.01-.28 -1.0ttt-7.6-5.8200.40 CocaCola Co KO36.83343.43 38.63-.26 -0.7sst-6.5-2.5201.22f Comcast Corp A CMCSA38.75655.28 47.96-.46 -1.0ttt-7.7+18.3190.90f Darden Rest DRI44.78455.25 48.46-.97 -2.0ttt-10.9+2.9192.20 Disney DIS57.76883.65 77.01-.50 -0.6ttt+0.8+30.4210.86f Gen Electric GE21.11728.09 25.43-.15 -0.6tst-9.3+12.0190.88 General Mills GIS46.18853.07 51.15+.15 +0.3sst+2.5+7.2191.64f Harris Corp HRS41.08975.33 69.58-.33 -0.5ttt-0.3+56.2181.68 Home Depot HD69.78583.20 75.70-1.08 -1.4ttt-8.1+9.4201.88f IBM IBM172.196213.09 195.19-.49 -0.3sss+4.1-5.9133.80 Lowes Cos LOW37.09752.08 46.31-.48 -1.0ttt-6.5+21.7220.72 NY Times NYT8.71917.37 15.69-.18 -1.1ttt-1.1+64.3390.16 NextEra Energy NEE74.78097.31 95.15-.62 -0.6sst+11.1+23.3222.90f PepsiCo PEP77.01787.06 83.15-.47 -0.6sst+0.3+7.3192.27 Suntrust Bks STI27.18841.26 37.75-.37 -1.0ttt+2.6+32.2140.80f TECO Energy TE16.12419.22 17.22+.14 +0.8sss-0.1-2.7190.88 WalMart Strs WMT71.51681.37 76.50-.39 -0.5tss-2.8+1.8161.92f Xerox Corp XRX8.11712.65 11.06-.25 -2.2tst-9.1+28.9120.25f52-WK RANGE CLOSEYTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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TeslaMot...203.78-.41 TexInst1.2044.98-.55 Theravnce...27.99-.02 TibcoSft...19.35-.09 TitanMach...19.90+1.76 TiVo Inc...11.64-.34 TowerGp lf...2.45-.06 TractSup s.5267.09-.51 TrimbleN...36.63-.62 TripAdvis...78.99-2.91 TriQuint...13.22+.10 TuesMrn...13.15-.38 21stCFoxA.2531.91-.52 21stCFoxB.2531.01-.53 21Vianet...24.18-1.56 UTiWrldwd.0610.59+.07 Ubiquiti...37.20-.43 UltaSalon...91.05-3.80 Ultratech...24.77-.42 Umpqua.60a17.78-.09 Unilife...3.41-.07 UtdOnln rs.6010.87-.32 UtdTherap...92.78-3.37 UnwiredP...2.07+.04 UrbanOut...36.01-1.11 V-W-X-Y-ZVCA Ant...29.95-.36 VandaPhm...13.06-.97 Verisign...49.03-1.15 Verisk...56.55-1.53 VertxPh...63.06-2.63 ViacomA1.2082.22-.92 ViacomB1.2081.94-.89 Vical...1.16-.02 VimpelCm.45ed8.30+.08 Vivus...4.84-.07 Vocus...u17.97+.06 Vodafone...35.40-.69 Volcano...19.07-.53 WarrenRs...4.69-.03 Web.com...31.64-.53 WebMD...37.67-1.43 Wendys Co.208.51-.22 WernerEnt.2024.78-.22 WDigital1.2088.21+.04 WstptInn g...d13.14-.40 WetSeal...1.13-.01 WholeFd s.4849.50-.11 WilshBcp.20f10.73-.05 Windstrm1.008.51-.21 WisdomTr...11.35-.39 Wynn5.00f211.33+.49 XOMA...4.15-.16 Xilinx1.16f51.35-.71 Xoom...17.78-.14 YRC Wwde...19.19-.61 YY Inc...65.16-2.95 Yahoo...32.87-.53 Yandex...28.01-.37 Yongye n...u7.00+.03 ZeltiqAes...16.98-.86 Zillow...87.05-6.52 ZionBcp.1629.23-.35 Zogenix...2.63+.07 Zulily n...45.76-.77 Zumiez...24.73-.78 Zygo...u19.43+4.75 Zynga...4.07... 12-mo Name NAV Chg%RtnNameDivLastChg Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA not available. p previous days net asset value. s fund split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the week.Source:Morningstar and the Associated Press.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Sharkys Vac n Sew700 N. Main St. Wildwood, Fl 34785352-330-2483sharkyssewnvac1@gmail.com www.sharkyssewnvac.comAsk AlIf It Aint BrokeI have been in the sewingmachine and vacuum cleaner business for some 48 years and I have people ask me about when I should change my belt on my vacuum cleaner. Well there is an old adage that says, If it aint broke, dont fix it. While that may hold true for a lot of things, it surely doesnt for a vacuum cleaner! What so many people fail to realize is that a vacuum cleaner is made on the assembly line and placed in a carton or box. Then it is stored in a hot warehouse until it is sold, which may be months. Then it is loaded onto a hot tractor-trailer and carried across country inextreme temperatures where it is unloaded into a backroom or deep discount warehouse until it is sold. After all this time and heat, the belt is melted onto the motor shaft and brush roller and has stretched to that shape and size. Well, to say the least, you should change your belt as soon as you get it home and use it for the very first time. And then there are those people that say, Well my belt aint broke but my vacuum cleaner is hard to push. If you turn the vacuum cleaner upside down and turn it on and the brush roller turns but then when it is put on the carpet it stops then your belt is stretched, although it aint broke it needs replacing. It is the brush rollers job to turn so it can pick-up debris and open the carpet fibers to allow the suction of the vacuum cleaner to suck up the dirt. And lastly, be sure to purchase an extra belt so you can have a spare in case its the weekend and you have company coming over and the belt breaks with dirty carpet awaiting the guests! And Murphys Law of vacuum cleaners is...Guess what?? Yep. No Belt to be found. And be sure to put the extra belt around the handle of the vacuum cleaner so the Drawer Monster dont eat it!!!! Thats my story and Im sticking to it. Until next week, its a dirty job! www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, April 12, 2014: This year you enter a period where you want to accomplish a lot. You often could be challenged or distracted by those in your daily life. Keep in mind that they enjoy their time with you. If you are single, it is impossible for a relationship to blossom when you are focused on other matters. Come summertime, you might want to become less focused on your goals and a little more aware of what is going on around you. Someone quite special could meander into your life during this period. If you are attached, the two of you need to make fun plans for the summer. You might want go to the beach often or choose a different pastime you both enjoy. VIRGO sometimes irritates you with details. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your intuition does not match up with what you are seeing. You could go back and forth when deciding which view to follow. A partner will offer several options that could change your perspective, but you still might be uneasy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your ingenuity will take you down an interesting path, if you decide to go. A partner or loved one might present a different view perhaps one that is not as bold as yours. You could be at a standstill because of the disparity between both of your views. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will want to make a decision regarding a domestic or personal issue. You might realize that the timing is not right for a discussion at this point. More information will be coming forward. How you see a situation could change as a result. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Wherever you go, you could end up in a lengthy conversation. You even might irritate a child or loved one with your socializing. This person will want to have your attention, so make that a high priority. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could feel pushed by a money matter. You know your limits, and you understand what needs to happen. Unfortunately, a family member might not see eye to eye with you. A discussion needs to occur about your home and an investment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might be more determined than you realize, and that attitude could be pushing others away. Try to loosen up and be more open to others suggestions. Not everything needs to happen your way. You could be delighted by what someone offers. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You still could be overreacting to someone you care about. Be aware of what another person needs, and be willing to respond appropriately. Still, you might need to take a personal day far away from the daily grind as soon as you can. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) A loved one is so charming that you might feel inclined to bend to his or her will. Though you might have other plans, you probably should cancel them. Sometimes a person needs to follow his or her heart; you are no different. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might feel pressured once more to visit with a family member. Consider what would happen if you were to do what you wanted. You cant keep giving without having some you time. Someone will let you know how much he or she cares. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) What might seem like an excellent plan could have its faults. Pull back and look at the pros and cons of having someone from a distance visit you. Make a choice that you feel comfortable with, and it will work out for the best. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Youll have a chance to really enjoy a close friend. Screen your calls, and make this day just for the two of you. Catch up on news, and enjoy a favorite mutual pastime. This person is very important to you; time together means a lot to both of you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Be more forthright in sharing what you feel. A friend might feel as if he or she is in control. An offer could take you away from your normal life. Take a lot of time to think through a decision that could have implications. HOROSCOPESToday is Saturday, April 12, the 102nd day of 2014. There are 263 days left in the year. Todays Highlights in History: On April 12, 1954, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission opened a hearing on whether Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientic director of the Manhattan Project, should have his security clearance reinstated amid questions about his loyalty (it wasnt). Bill Haley and His Comets recorded Rock Around the Clock in New York for Decca Records. TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I use a ser vice dog, and Im constantly barraged with requests to pet him. Other people who use ser vice dogs warned me this would happen. Although the ADA does not require him to wear a vest, I bought one for him that reads, Do Not Pet, which he wears in public. They ask me any way! They also ask what I use the dog for. Sometimes Im tempted to say, First, tell me about your medical history and then Ill tell you mine. I dont mind quietly and discreetly discussing with a store owner what my dog does, but for a stranger to walk up and expect me to share personal information is rude. As excited as I am about how my dog has expanded my life, I do not want to spend my time answering strangers questions or hearing about every dog theyve ever owned. Obviously, Im still learning what it means to live with a service dog. Would you kindly share with your readers proper etiquette with service dogs and their owners? LIVING LARGER IN WASHINGTON STATE DEAR LIVING LARGER: Im happy to. But you must be realistic. If you have a service dog, you must accept that people will be curious. However, what many people fail to understand is that when a service dog is out in public, the animal is WORKING, and should not be distracted from its task which is ensuring the well-being of the owner. The basics for interact ing with service dogs are: 1. Always speak to the person rst. Do not try to distract the dog. 2. Never touch the ser vice dog or ANY dog, for that matter without rst asking for and receiving permission. 3. Do not offer food to the animal. 4. Do not ask personal questions about the handlers disability or otherwise intrude on his or her privacy. 5. Do not be offended if the handler refuses to chat about the ser vice dog. DEAR ABBY: My son John and daughter-inlaw Bree recently announced their second pregnancy via email, and asked that we keep the news in the immediate family for now. I was so happy and excited that I notied my sister. She is my best friend and lives in another state. As it turns out, my sister shared the news with her daughter, who is good friends with Bree. My niece then texted congratulations to her. At the end of the day, I received a nasty, dramat ic phone call from Bree. She was furious that I had revealed her secret. My heart sank. It wasnt my intention to hurt her in any way. I apologized profusely, but now Im afraid that this may have solidied the wedge between us because our relationship was never very close to begin with. I realize I was wrong and apologized. What more can I do to make this the joyful occasion it should be? NOW WHAT? IN NORTH CAROLINA DEAR NOW WHAT?: Now you pay the penalty for leaking the news, and gracefully accept that you will be relegated to the second tier when it comes to announcements from your son and daughter-in-law. Perhaps you can eventually get back in their good graces by respecting their wishes in the future.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Joy of having a service dog is diminished by public attention JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 CROSSWORD PUZZLE TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! Classified IndexLegal Notices . . . . . .0001 Notices . . . . . . . . .1000 At Your Service . . . . .9000 Employment . . . . . .2000 Pets/Animals . . . . . .6865 Merchandise . . . . . .6000 Real Estate/For RENT . .3000 Real Estate/For SALE . . .4000 Recreation . . . . . . .7000 Transportation . . . . . .8000 DEADLINES For Insertion COPY DATE Friday Thursday, 5pm Saturday Friday, 3pm Sunday Friday, 5:00pm Monday Friday, 5:00pm Tues. Thurs. One day prior, 5:00pmCancellation for ads running Saturday must be made by 3pm Friday. Cancelations for Sunday & Monday must be made by 5:00pm Friday.ADJUSTMENTS department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS! PROFESSIONALSERVICE DIRECTORY$65FOR FIRST ADAND 2ND ADHALF OFF SPECIAL Ad must be non-commercial only with single item priced at $100 or less. Price must appear in ad. Two line maximum. Pets, animals, guns and ammo excluded. Some restrictions. Limit 1 per household per month. ONE FREE AD PER MONTH! 2 LINES/7 DAYS:

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 6 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 2 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital GREATER HILLS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALESSaturday,April12th8 A.M. TO ?East of Clermont Off Hwy. 50 Eustis1 Bedroom Private Patio 1 Story, Walk to PublixBring This Ad To Receive $100 OFF First Full Month Rent rfrntbb 352-357-7332 SEIZETHE DA Y SSPORTSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.5 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.5 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr

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8626 U.S. Hwy 441 ~ Leesburg, FL 34788Next to Leesburg International Airport352.435.6131SHOPFAMILYFURNITURE.COMMon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-6, Sun 12-5 LIVING ROOMS22 ON CLEARANCE SAVE UP TO BEDROOMS9 ON CLEARANCE SAVE UP TO RECLINERS25 ON CLEARANCE SAVE UP TO STORE-WIDE SAVE UP TOHURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION! ALL ITEMS LIMITED QUANTITY NOW IS THE TIME TO SAVE ON BRAND NAMES YOU KNOW & TRUST! 18 MONTHINTEREST-FREEFINANCING E1DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 SOIL: Regular testing keeps plants healthy / E4 www.dailycommercial.com Home &Garden352-365-8203 features@dailycommercial.com KIM COOKAssociated PressThose drawn to 19th centu ry style may be pleased to learn that vintage garden decor is a trend this spring and summer. The look involves orals, weathered wood, wire, period typography, bird motifs and ac cessories, and other elements with a Victorian vibe, says Tom Mirabile, a trend watcher for Lifetime Brands. The appeal lies largely in the eras garden-as-haven aesthetic, he says. We look at the Victorian age as an era when there was just a lot of time, he said at an indus try trends seminar earlier this year at the NY Now trade show. Conservatories, greenhouses and aviaries were popular in stately Victorian-era homes, but even modest residences might have a little birdcage. Fashion able too were ferns, palms and terrariums. Pottery Barns got miniature greenhouses this season made of white-painted distressed pine and glass, perfect terrariums for small plants. A replica of a vintage birdcage is made of wire painted Q: I am growing some blueberries, but the fruit never seems to ripen. A: Blueberries can be grown in Central Florida if you get the cultivars that are adapted to our short, warm winters. Southern highbush cultivars that grow well here include Emerald and Jewel, and more have been recently released. The main reason you are probably not getting the fruit is that other creatures are getting it rst. Birds and squirrels have an uncanny ability to get the fruit just before it gets blue enough for you to pick it. I never got fruit off my bush until I covered it with chicken wire. Once you protect the fruit from critters, you will nally be able to enjoy the freshpicked blueberries when they are ripe. Q: I see trees loaded with orange fruit in the landscape now. Is the fruit edible? A: You are most likely seeing loquats, or Japanese plums, Eriobotrya japonica. Seedling trees are common in yards because they are very attractive and small with large, ever green leaves. However, if you want large, consistent fruit, you should get one of the many named cultivars. Loquats, even the small seedlings, can be eaten fresh off the tree or used in pies and jams. The fruit can be eaten peeled or unpeeled, like a peach, and has one to four seeds in the middle. It is a good source of vitamins and minerals and is very easy to grow. Birds like to eat it too. Q: I see crape myrtles being pruned back to stubs. Is Victorian garden style lives on PHOTOS BY POTTERY BARN / AP ABOVE: This large conservatory bird cage, made of mahogany and wire, is a statement piece due to its scale, and replicates similar designs of the Victorian era. BELOW: This terrarium made of distressed painted pine and glass replicates early greenhouses, popular during the Victorian era. Diagnosing diseases, unripe blueberries and other plant issues SUBMITTED PHOTO You may never see a ripe blueberry unless you protect the fruit from hungry critters. JOE LAMPL / MCT Knock Out roses are prolic yet undemanding. JOE LAMPLgrowingagreenerworld.comEvery day that Im not on the road, I look out my ofce window to ward the garden, and walk the property at least once or twice. My mind never stops turn ing with all the projects and to-dos I see for my landscape. Im exhausted just thinking about it. My dream is to someday experience the term coined a few years back staycation. The concept applies to the notion of staying home in an environ ment that is so pleas ant, you feel like youre on vacation. In theory, I love the idea. But in reality, its another story. Fortunately, for the lawn and garden, there are some pretty helpful ideas along with a num ber of undemanding plants that can get us a few steps closer to a tru ly relaxing staycation in our own little corner of the world.TIPS AND TRICKSThese are a few of my favorite tricks for getting a little bit closer to nirvana. %  %  SOAKER HOSES: Keeping up with watering can rob many hours of pre cious free time. An easy way to cut down on this time consuming event is to make sure your plants are getting water right where they need it by us ing soaker hoses. These porous hoses allow wa ter to seep out slowly and deeply. Roots have time to absorb the moisture and there is less risk of over-watering. %  %  AUTOMATIC TIMERS: Simplify watering du ties even more by using automatic timers. Use these in conjunction with soaker hoses and drip irrigation systems and put your water ing woes on autopilot. Do this, plant that: Productivity tips in the gardenSEE POPENOE | E2SEE GARDEN | E2SEE TIPS | E2 JUANITA POPENOELAKE COUNTY EXTENSION

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 30THANNUALSUMTER SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENTSATURDAYAPRIL 26 thMiona Lake Golf Club AMLight BreakfastAMShotgun StartMiona Lake Golf ClubREGISTRATIONDEADLINE:WEDNESDAY, APRIL23RDSPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE Fee: $50/golferFormat: Scramble FOR SPONSORSHIP OR INFORMATION CONTACT: Ph: 352-748-2697Email: Ljwinchester@cfl.rr.com 30THANNUALSUMTER SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENTSATURDAYAPRIL 26 th Animal Clinic of Leesburg Charlotte Pipe SECO Energy Sumter County School District Sumter Tire & Auto The Villages Technology Solutions Group Anston-Greenlees, Inc. Ford & Associates, Inc. Hannah Foster Lake-Sumter State College this the proper way to prune them? A: There is no reason to prune a healthy crape myrtle at all. Crape myrtles come in a range of sizes from 3 to 40 feet tall. Choose the cultivar that will reach the height you want and has the ower color you want, then let it go. Only dead branches and possibly old ower heads need to be removed. Dont be fooled into thinking that these plants require annual pruning. Q: My date palm has some problems. All the older leaves are turning yellowish with dead tips. Does it have the Texas Phoenix Palm Decline that I have read about? A: The Texas Phoenix Palm Decline, or TPPD, is a very serious disease. It is similar to Lethal Yellowing that killed all the coconut palms in South Florida. TPPD is caused by a phytoplasma, a bacterium without a cell wall, and is thought to be spread by a small leaf hopper insect. It has killed a lot of date palms in Lakeland, but not many cases have been ofcially reported in Lake County. The symptoms of TPPD are premature rapid drop of all fruit, ower death, discoloration of the leaves beginning with the oldest leaves and then death of the spear leaf (the youngest leaf). Leaf discolor ation can be confused with other problems like nutrient deciency or Ganoderma butt rot. The root system is also affected and decays, allowing the palm to easily be rocked back and forth in the ground. Your symptoms sound more like potassium deciency rather than TPPD, but check for the other symptoms of root rot and spear leaf death. You can do an assay to determine if it is TPPD, but the analysis costs $75 and requires the collection of wood chips from a hole bored in the trunk. There is no cure for TPPD, although antibiotic injections for the life of the palm can prevent it. Juanita Popenoe is the director of the UF/IFAS Lake County Extension ofce and Environmental Horticulture Production Agent III. Email: jpopenoe@u.edu. SUBMITTED PHOTO Loquats are easy-to-grow landscape trees with great edible fruit. POPENOEFROM PAGE E1hunter green; its tall enough to house an el egant orchid, but would also work as a tabletop accent. On a grander scale is the retailers Conserva tory bird cage, a near ly 5-foot-long mahogany and wire piece that would t on a console table or atop a long shelf. While its dramatic in and of itself, a col lection of objects would look amazing inside it. (www.potterybarn.com) Floral motifs and roses in particular were all the rage during the Victorian era. Art and textiles featured illustrated ora and fauna from home and exot ic parts of the world. Bradbury & Bradbury now offers a couple of art wallpapers derived from illustrations by period artists William Morris and Walter Crane. Fenway has an Art Nouveau-style pattern with irises at its heart, while Woodland showcases the art istry of both Morris and Crane winsome rab bits and long-legged deer cavort across a leafy landscape. (www. bradbury.com) Designer Voytek Bry lowski offers prints of works by Victorian illustrators Mary and Elizabeth Kirby. Par rots, toucans, lilies and hummingbirds are hand-colored, vibrant examples that can be mounted in simple frames and placed near a patio door or any where the gentility and charm of the period might be appreciated. By digitally enhanc ing old images, I feel that I give them new life, and preserve historically signicant illustrations and draw ings by these famous naturalists, says Bry lowski, who is based in Wroclaw, Poland. (www. etsy.com/shop/VictorianWallArt) Jennifer Stuart, an artist in Tulsa, Oklahoma, has designed a col lection of plates depict ing damask and oral prints of the 19th century on patio-friendly melamine. (www.zazzle.com) And Pier 1s Floria collection has a vin tage damask pattern in garnet, soft blue and grass-green in a collec tion of indoor/outdoor rugs and throw pillows. (www.pier1.com) Cast-iron and wicker furniture and con tainers were used both indoors and out in the late 19th century, just as today we use rat tan chairs in the family room and the garden, or iron plant stands in the kitchen as well as the patio. Restoration Hardwares Hampshire and Bar Harbor all-weather wicker collections include chairs and sofas in restful shades of cream, gray and mocha. (www.restorationhardware.com) Early visitors to resorts in New Yorks Adirondack Mountains discovered the epony mous big wooden chair thats withstood hun dreds of years of style changes. A good selection in both real wood and Polywood, a re cycled plastic resem bling wood, is at www. hayneedle.com West Elms collection of soft yet sturdy braid ed baskets, woven of bankuan grass, evoke French laundry bins. Use them as storage in any room; the natural color makes them versatile. (www.westelm.com) Turquoise chicken-wire baskets and cloches can be found at www.farmhousewares.com which also has a vintage-style gar den supply shop sign in the form of a hand. Galvanized planter pots in sets of six would make great receptacles for herbs or miniature blooms. GARDEN FROM PAGE E1 FARMHOUSE WARES / AP A chicken wire cloche adds vintage air to a small plant or tabletop display. Those drawn to 19th-century style may be happy to learn that vintage garden decor is a trend for spring and summer.The timers can be set to come on automati cally from several times a day to once a week. Then, whether you leave home for weeks or want more carefree time in the hammock, you wont have to worry about your plants or lawn not getting watered. %  en MULCH: Usually the most dreaded task in any garden is the weed ing. One simple solution to cutting down on the amount of weeds your garden will have is to use mulch. A threeinch layer will block the sunlight most weed seeds need to germi nate. The added benet of mulch is that it keeps your soil cooler, cuts down on moisture loss and helps suppress dis ease. It even looks great and really shows off the plants. %  en A GARDEN MAIL BOX: Even the most or ganized gardeners nd themselves running back to the shed or garage for that must-have tool for the job at hand. Placing a mailbox or similar storage box in the garden can eliminate those unnecessary trips back to the tool shed. Fill the mailbox with your most im portant small tools and youll always have them close at hand. Consider adding a trowel, plant labels, waterproof pen, twine, scissors, pruners, insect spray and bottled water. PLANTS TO PLANTWhen it comes to high-impact, low-main tenance plants, here are three of my favorites. Just keep in mind, even the least demanding plants deserve our attention ev ery now and then. %  en KNOCK OUT ROS ES: This is the un-fussy rose. If youve been in timidated by growing roses in the past or are tired of the work necessary to keep them disease and pest-free, this is the rose for you. Knockout roses are pro lic bloomers and are very resistant to black spot and mildew problems typical of so many other roses. Provide full sun and well-drained soil and this rose will re ward you with months of carefree beauty. %  en DAYLILIES: Theyre so easy, you can prac tically lay a daylily on the ground and watch it grow. Daylilies are beautiful and deer re sistant with thousands of varieties in a rainbow of colors. They bloom all summer and return the next year thicker and fuller than before. The only work youll have to do is to divide them every 3 to 5 years. %  en HOSTAS: If youre looking for a showstop per for the shade garden, hostas are it. From miniature to massive, these plants known for their bold foliage are available in thousands of varieties. Hostas offer many shades of green, from lemon-lime to bluegreen and every shade in between. TIPS FROM PAGE E1

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Saturday, April 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 MAUREEN GILMERMcClatchy-Tribune News ServiceIn early spring a massive wisteria in Califor nia is so large its considered among the great horticultural wonders of the world. This single vine that now shades an acre of ground in Sierra Madre was planted from a one gallon sized seedling a century ago. Today the Guinness Book of World Records lists it as the largest owering plant in the world. This California plant is one of the exotic Asian species, but there also is a lovely native American species, Wisteria frutescens, from the Southeastern states. Problems begin when exotic wisteria escapes to nat uralize in wild lands. Its causing serious problems in the Southeast because they share the same preferences as our native species. Es caped Asian wisterias are listed as potentially invasive in 19 eastern states, primarily those in the southeast where abundant summer rain keeps every seedling growing vigorously all season long. Though we all love wisteria, think twice be fore planting because exotic wisteria have escaped to infest valu able wild lands which support old growth for ests and protected na tive species. When vines escape, they can cause unique damage to na tive plant communities and the wildlife they support. Sometimes invasive plants actually evolve once theyre naturalized in wild lands, a fact which can turn a moderate problem to a severe one over time. Its because all plants are programmed to adapt to changing climate and conditions through natural selection. One example is Japanese hon eysuckle (Lonicera japonica), which has in vaded the Midwestern woodlands. It reproduces by a prodigious crop of berries that travel long distances with the birds and other wildlife that consume them. In the past, colder winters have limited this honeysuckle from naturalizing fur ther north. Today the sheer quantity of seed produced has resulted in rare individuals with greater cold resistance. Gradually they are mov ing into our most im portant forests. Wisteria gone wild in volve two exotic species, the Japanese (Wiste ria oribunda) and Chi nese species (Wistera sinensis). In the south east, species have cross pollinated, which results in naturally occur ring hybrids that exhibit new genetic character istics. If that character istic allows offspring to survive on less rain fall, exotic wisteria can move further west into arid regions of Texas and beyond. Wisteria runners can reach 60 feet or more in length, which easily climb into shrubs and treetops. When vine cloaks the entire can opy of a tree, it shades out the foliage to inter fere with photosynthe sis crucial to plant life. Wisteria becomes so large it can destroy centuries old trees, often great oaks, tulip pop lar, beach, pine and elm. The sheer weight of large vines is enough to pull down old growth trees after periods of heavy rain or high winds. Wisteria is well known for spiraling around an arbor or porch post. When they twine around a tree trunk, the pressure eventually cuts through the host tree bark to girdle and kill it. Then after the tree falls, it leaves a gap in the for est canopy. This exposes thousands of wiste ria seeds to sun, which accumulated over years beneath the par ent plant. They sprout to become a thicket of young vines impenetra ble to both humans and wildlife. Theres another way that wisteria can repro duce to further its do main. Runners that contact earth strike roots at each leaf node. This is a process called layering, used in propagation of vines. A sin gle wisteria gone wild can use this method to dominate several acres of ground. You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741 MELISSA RAYWORTHAssociated PressThe arrival of spring means that ea markets are reopen ing for business around the country. Shoppers will hunt for treasures amid acres of used goods. A few will come home with just the right vintage art or quirky piece of furniture to make their home more beautiful. Jaime Rummereld, co-founder of Woodson & Rummerelds House of De sign in Los Angeles, some times mixes ea-market nds with high-end new furnishings to decorate the homes of her celebrity clients. The beauty of ea mar kets, she says, is you nev er know what you will nd. Theres nothing like being outdoors or in a place off the beaten path rummaging through old treasures. Los Angeles-based interior designer Brian Patrick Flynn, creator of the FlynnsideOut design blog, also hunts for vintage pieces: I shop sec ond-hand regardless of my projects budget or clients level of taste, he says. Vintage and thrift is the best way to add one-of-a-kind air to a space without insanely high cost. There is luck involved, of course. But skill also plays a role. As you browse crowded tables of used things this spring, how can you nd the treasures that will give your home an infusion of style while avoiding decorating di sasters? Here, Flynn, Rummereld and another interior designer who shops for vintage decor Lee Kleinhelter of the At lanta-based design rm and retail store Pieces tell how they do it.WHEN TO GOWinter and early spring are perfect for ea-market shopping, says Flynn. Since thrifting and antiquing are often associated with gorgeous weather and weekend shenanigans, many people shy away from hunt ing for their vintage nds when its cold or gloomy, he notes, so go now and go early. I usually show up just as the ea market opens to en sure I see every new item as its put out on display, he says. When you wait until the end of a ea markets run to check out its stuff, youre likely to nd mostly left overs, things priced too highly which others passed over, or things that are just way too taste-specic for most peo ple to make offers on.TIME TRAVELRummereld occasionally nds signed artwork and ce ramics by noteworthy artists at ea markets and antique malls. It is amazing to see what people cast away, she says. I personally hunt for Sasha Brastoff ceramics because of his unique California her itage as a set decorator and artist. She has also found vintage Billy Haines chairs and Gio Ponti lighting at ea markets. So read up on the design ers and artists from your fa vorite periods, and then hunt for their work or impressive knockoffs. A single ea market might offer goods from every decade of the 20th century. Can you put a lamp from the 1970s on a table from 1950? Yes, if the shapes and colors work well together, Kleinhelter says. If your home has contem porary decor, Rummereld says it can be powerful to add one statement piece a side table, say, or a light xture from a previous era. But a little bit goes a long way. Use vintage in moder ation with contemporary spaces, Rummereld says. It will highlight the uniqueness of the vintage item. You dont necessarily want to live in a time capsule.FIXER-UPPERSYou may assume that old upholstered furniture should be avoided, especially if the fabric looks dirty or dam aged. But these designers say its actually a great thing to hunt for: Hands down, upholstery is the best deal to walk away with at ea mar kets. Just make sure you train your eye to pay no attention to the existing fabrics, Flynn says. Zero in on the lines of the frames instead. Kleinhelter agrees: I usually gravitate toward the bones and frames of vintage pieces, and I make them my own by adding fun fabric or lacquer ing the base. The same goes for lighting. Buy it if you love it, but get the wiring updated by a pro fessional. Flynn usually esti mates an extra $50 to $75 per xture for updating the wir ing, so keep that cost in mind as you bargain.MIX AND MATCHBe on the lookout for piec es you can use together. You dont need multiples of the same chair or sofa to make a room work, Flynn says. Stick with those which have similar scale and proportion, then recover them in the same fabric. Once you get home, use ea market nds sparingly, Flynn says, mixing them in with the pieces you already own: A few big pieces mixed with some smaller ones add ed to your existing stuff can instantly take an unnished space and make it feel way more nished and remarkably personal.Ask a designer: Tips for flea-market shoppers PHOTOS BY SARAH DORIO / AP Designer Brian Patrick Flynn furnished this Atlanta loft strictly using vintage seating found at ea markets. Caution: Wisteria are known for invading and running wild MAUREEN GILMER / MCT Wisteria grown on the porches of farm houses all over America became the genesis of plants that escaped into the wild. Shoppers will hunt for treasures amid acres of used goods. A few will come home with just the right vintage art or quirky piece of furniture to make their home more beautiful.

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Saturday, April 12, 2014 April 12, 2014Registration:5pm 6pmat Spanish Village-Clubhouse(Between Arlington Ridge & Plantation)1 El Presidente Blvd., Leesburg, FL 34748 TOP PRIZES INCLUDE*: 1st: $500 Gift Card 2nd: $250 Gift Card 3rd: $100 Gift Card Thomas Kinkade Painting Weekend Trip $50 Gift CardrPhone: (352) 326-0761 x1100 Email: info@MercyMail.org www.AngelFlightSE.orgSponsors COME PLAY WITH USLimited Seats Available Sign Up Today Sponsor a Table of 10 Call for InformationTo Register go to:www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events $60.00 Registration Includes FoodPlus Re-stacks and Add-on!Early Registration is Now Available Save $20.00 Off Your Entry!Deadline April 10th LEE REICHAssociated PressIf plants could squeal like hungry pigs, we gardeners would pay more attention to their fertilizer needs. But plants do tell us when they are hungry with poor or distorted growth and with leaf discolorations. Why wait for your plants to become so desperate? Test your soil every few years. Testing can be done by you or by a private or state laboratory, and there are options in what to test for. At the least, test the acidity (pH), because if it is unsuitable, plants cannot absorb certain nutrients, even if those nutrients are present. Most plants like a slightly acidic soil, with a pH about 6.5. A standard test checks levels of the so-called macronutrients phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magne sium and sulfur. A complete checkup would also include testing for micronutrients, such as iron, manganese and zinc, which are essential but required in only minute quantities.SAMPLING IS MOST IMPORTANTThe accuracy of any soil test depends on how you take the sample. In even a mod est-size garden of 100 square feet, one cup of soil the amount used for the test represents only 0.001 percent of the top 6 inches of soil, so that sample must be as rep resentative as possible of the whole area to be tested. The test area should be rel atively uniform. Areas devoted to very different kinds of plants vegetables versus lawn, for example require separate samples. Vegetable and ower gardens can be sampled together. Subdivide the area where obvious differences in topography or soil exist, and stay away from walls, sites of old compost piles, etc. Even out small differences over even relatively uniform soil by taking a half-dozen samples from random spots. Sample the top 6 inches of vegeta ble and ower beds, and the top 2 inches of lawns, rst removing any surface debris such as compost, weeds or sod. Whoa dont use that rst trowelful of soil. Its coneshaped, with a greater proportion of soil from the sur face layers than from lower down. Take a slice, uniform ly thick from top to bottom, from along the edge of that hole you just made. Alter natively, use a soil sampling tube, home-made or bought, to get a uniform sample. Combine all your samples from a test area into a clean plastic bucket. Thoroughly mix the composited soil to average out differences between samples, crumbling it and discarding stones, sticks, insects and other debris as you mix. Spread the soil out on a clean baking pan to air dry for a day, then remove about a cup for testing.RESULTS COME INIf you are sending your sample out for testing, fol low any instructions sup plied by the laboratory about packing the soil. For test ing at home, use a portion of that 1 cup subsample you got from the combined samples. Home testing kits involve mixing small amounts of your soil sample with various solutions and noting col or changes, which you compare against standards all detailed in the included in structions. If you are testing more than one area, label samples from each area and make a note to yourself of the locations. A testing laboratory may also want other information, such as past fertilization his tory, as well as what you in tend to grow. Indicate wheth er you wish any special tests, such as for micronutrients or toxic elements (such as lead) in the soil. Your completed soil test will give you information about your soils organic matter, texture (clay, sand, etc.), acid ity and levels of specic nutri ents, along with a recommen dation for fertilizer and lime. Fertilizer recommendations are based on what is in the soil and what kinds of plants you intend to grow. Follow fertilizer recommendations closely, because too much can be as harmful as too little, causing nutrient imbalances, even death, of plants. Keep in mind that a soil test determines fertility and acidity, but does not address such problems as waterlogging, pests or insufcient sunlight. An observant eye over com ing months is a necessary ad junct to soil testing. Theres truth in the old saying that the best fertilizer is the gar deners shadow. If you are sending your sample out for testing, follow any instructions supplied by the laboratory about pack ing the soil. If you are test ing more than one area, label samples from each area and make a note to yourself of the locations. Equally im portant is to supply the lab oratory with any information requested about past fertilization history, as well as what you intend to grow. Indicate whether you wish any special tests, such as for micronutrients or toxic elements (such as lead) in the soil. When your soil test is complete, you will receive infor mation about your soils or ganic matter, texture (clay, sand, etc.), acidity and levels of specic nutrients, along with a recommendation for fertilizer and lime. Fertilizer recommendations are based on what is in the soil and what kinds of plants you in tend to grow. Follow fertiliz er recommendations closely, because too much can be as harmful as too little, causing nutrient imbalances, even death, of plants. Keep in mind that a soil test determines fertility and acidity, but does not address such problems as waterlogging, pests or insufcient sunlight. An observant eye over com ing months is a necessary ad junct to soil testing. Theres truth in the old saying that the best fertilizer is the gar deners shadow.Regular soil testing helps keep plants healthy LEE REICH / AP A yellowing young leaf, though its veins remain green, indicates that this plant is hungry for iron.