Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 UCONN UPSETS MICHIGAN STATE 60-54, SPORTS B1 FAMILY WALK NIGHT: Participants strengthen bonds and bodies A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Married folks are less likely to have heart problems C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 31, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 90 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C8 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 78 / 53 Mostly sunny. 50 BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Seven ty-nine. In the rain. With no headlights on. With those words, Flori da Highway Patrol Trooper John Schultz sped onto In terstate 10 and ipped on his red, white and blue ashing lights and pulled over a black Nissan Maxima. He told the driver she was getting a tick et for exceeding the 70 mph speed limit. She said, I had the cruise control set at 79. Yeah, its working, Schultz said as he wrote the ticket. She said I just assumed I could go 10 over. So if we change the limit to 75, shed be going 85. Highway safety advocates say that if the Florida Leg islature passes a bill that would allow the state to raise the speed limit to 75 mph there could be more crash es, injuries and deaths. The bills supporters say people are already driving that fast and the speed limit should reect reality and would actually be safer. If you articially force lower speed limits on roads that can accommodate fast er speed limits, what youre going to have is a greater disparity between the fast est drivers and the slowest drivers and thats actually a much more unsafe environ ment than having everybody going faster together, Sen. Jeff Clemens said. The bill (SB 392) Clemens, D-Lake Worth, sponsored along with Republican Sen. Jeff Brandes of St. Petersburg sailed through committees with little opposition and is ready to be considered by the full Senate. A House bill (HB 761) sponsored by Re publican Rep. Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres has also re ceived little opposition and has one more committee stop before being ready for a House vote. The measures would allow the Department of Transpor tation to raise the speed lim it on interstate and limited access highways from 70 to 75 mph, from 65 to 70 mph Bill could raise state speed limit to 75 mph PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Pastor Charles Granger, 82, and his wife, Joyce, center, greet New York visitors Yvonne Webster, left, and her husband Ardell at Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis. BELOW: Bill Myer, at microphone, leads prayer at Southern Palms RV Resort, joined by Ruth Karper, Dave Walcott and Marian Shank. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com F or three decades, from November to March, the South ern Palms RV Resort in Eustis has offered Sunday worship ser vice for travelers from all over the country and Canada. Sundays 10 a.m. service was the last of the 30th season, with a closing service and communion in the parks fellowship hall, led by the Rev. Charles Granger, 82, of DeLand. An average of 150 to 200 people just about all of the RVers have attend ed on Sundays over the years. I love meeting such a wonderful group of people, a cross-sec tion of Americana and the number of Cana dians who come down here, too, Granger said. Christmas Eve is one of the biggest services, along with a memori al service on the rst Sunday in February. We memorialize all of the people who have died the previous year who were a part of this fellowship here, the pastor said. They call it a church, but there is no membership, Grang er said of the services at the resort, locat ed near Lake County Fairgrounds. This is just people coming to gether. Granger recalled the park belonged to the city of Eustis before it was sold to individu als who owned parks all over the coun try. Granger had been serving as interim pas tor at the First Bap tist Church in Eustis when he was asked if he could preach at the RV park. My rst Sunday, 82 people were sitting here, Granger said. And what they told me was 80 percent of the people who were here for that service did not go to church anywhere on Sunday. I came back the next Sunday and we had 150 or so. During his time of ministering at South ern Palms, Granger was serving as chap lain and campus min ister at Stetson Uni versity. It was a great time; I was working with both age groups, he said of ministering to college kids during the week and to seniors on Sun days. I was 52 when I started (at Southern Palms) and I thought they were a bunch of old folks, and now Im older than most of them over here. EUSTIS RV park church draws hundreds STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press WASHINGTON Even if Democrats re cruit great candidates, raise gobs of money and run smart cam paigns, they face an up hill ght to retake con trol of the House in this years congressional elections, regardless of the political climate in November. The reason? Repub lican strategists spent years developing a plan to take advantage of the 2010 census, rst by winning key state legislatures and then redrawing House dis tricts to tilt the playing eld in their favor. In states like Ohio, Michigan and North Carolina, Republicans GOP has a builtin advantage in fight for House MIKE SCHNEIDER Associated Press ORLANDO Florida is a politically divided state. The Republicans have won the last four gu bernatorial elections, but the Democrats have carried the state in the last two presidential elec tions. One U.S. senator is a Republican, while the other is a Democrat. The Democrats hold a slight edge in voter registration. But that narrow divide becomes a chasm in Flori das congressional delegation and in the Legislature. Geography influences redistricting in Florida AP FILE PHOTO On Jan. 5, 2011, then-outgoing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. hands the gavel to the new House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio during the rst session of the 112th Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. SEE CHURCH | A2 SEE SPEED | A2 SEE HOUSE | A2 SEE DISTRICT | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 30 CASH 3 ............................................... 9-1-5 Afternoon .......................................... 1-6-6 PLAY 4 ............................................. 1-6-3-0 Afternoon ....................................... 1-6-2-3 FLORIDA LOTTERY MARCH 29 FANTASY 5 ........................... 5-10-15-22-24 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 4-8-13-36-38-45 POWERBALL ...................... 2-3-12-27-3817 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. In those early years, he ar ranged for some Stetson students to preach at the RV park. Every one of them would come to my ofce on Mon day morning saying, Let me go again! They loved com ing over here, Granger said. He remained at the private college for 21 years before retiring in 1996 at age 65. The Florida native recalled living three blocks from a Jacksonville church during his youth as the oldest of ve children, yet his family did not attend church. We had never been in anybodys church, he said. No one ever invited me to church because of my lan guage. I used to cuss as good as any sailor at Jacksonville Naval Air Station, he said. I could out-cuss them. The turning point in Grangers life was his junior year of high school. God spoke to me in a Jewish grocery store on a Saturday afternoon, said Granger, who was sacking potatoes when he heard an audible voice saying, You go to church tomorrow. I looked around the store be cause I thought there was a ventriloquist practicing a voice. I looked around the store and there wasnt a soul in sight near where I was. I was in the produce section all by myself. He put the message out of his mind. I went out and raised hell, caroused with the guys, just like I did every Satur day night with a bunch of high school boys, he said. The next morning I was wide awake by 8 oclock. It was just gnawing at me that I had to go to church, and I literally sneaked out of the house and went up to the little Baptist church three blocks away. When I walked in the church, people said, What is he doing here? Granger was baptized that same school year, in De cember of 1946. Eventual ly, all four of my siblings and my mother and father came into the church, he said. He was working in a shop repairing telephones when he said the Lord spoke to him a second time. I got stopped in my tracks when I heard, I want you to go preach. And I thought I didnt want to be a part of it, he said. Now the Baptist minis ter is glad he listened to the Lord. And that is what I encour age people to do listen to the spirit that is speaking to you, not what somebody else is telling you, Granger said. The pastor has gone through hip and knee re placements and a battle with lymphoma cancer, but strives to continue inspiring people with his tell-it-likeit-is sermons. Pastor Granger is just wonderful. Thirty years he has been with us, said Judy Kryder of Michigan, who sings in the choir and cher ishes the friendship she has forged with others at South ern Palms, the park that has been her winter home since 1998. Floridas glorious weather is what brings her back each year, she said, and she and hundreds of others hope to reunite with their pastor in November for the parks 2014-15 season. CHURCH FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Joyce Granger sings during worship service at Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis. Sunday marked the resorts last church service of the 30th season. The resort will resume its weekly worship service on the rst Sunday in November. on rural, four-lane divid ed highways and up to 65 mph on other roads. It does not automatical ly raise the speed limits. If you look back to when we rescinded the national speed limit (of 55 mph) in the mids until now, its been 20 years of history and I think in only one year have fatalities actually increased. So the predic tions of doom and gloom that we had in the mids just didnt come true, Clemens said. But a National Highway Trafc Safety Administra tion report showed that trafc fatalities on rural interstates increased by 10 percent in 1996, the year after the national speed limit was lifted and states were allowed to set their own standards. And the fear of high way safety advocates is that another increase in Florida will result in more deaths because people will drive faster and be that much more at risk of losing control. The higher speeds also create more violent colli sions, they say. Its clear that inju ries and fatalities go up whenever someone rais es the speed limit, John Ulczycki, a vice pres ident of the National Safety Council, said in a press release opposing the bills. Raising speed limits will increase the likelihood of a crash, and the government would in effect be telling people its safe to drive faster. Schultz, who patrols an area near Tallahassee, estimates most drivers on Interstate 10 are driv ing between 75 and 80 mph, and he thinks that will increase with a high er limit. Driving in the rain, he clocked a string of trafc going in the op posite direction. Seventy-eight, he said after the rst ra dar reading. Theres 79 on the truck. That mo torcycle right there is 82. Where Im going with this is its raining out and no one reduces their speed. And a higher speed limit will make the situa tion more dangerous, he said. He also pointed out that the speed limit now is essentially 75 mph be cause the state only al lows for warnings and not nes for the rst ve miles per hour above the speed limit. Theyre going to take it to the next extreme and go up even higher, Schultz said. We want to keep people safe. SPEED FROM PAGE A1 were able to shape con gressional maps to pack as many Democratic voters as possible into the few est House districts. The process, called gerryman dering, left fertile ground elsewhere in each state to spread Republican voters among more districts, in creasing the GOPs chanc es of winning more seats. Geography helped, too, in some states. Democrat ic voters are more like ly to live in densely popu lated urban areas, making it easier to pack them into fewer districts. The rst payoff came in 2012, when Republicans kept control of the House despite Democratic sup port that swept President Barack Obama to a second term. The next payoff is likely to come this fall. Gerrymandering has a long history in the Unit ed States, pursued enthu siastically by both Dem ocrats and Republicans. But the GOPs success at it this decade has been his toric: In 2012, Republicans achieved a 33-seat ma jority in the House, even though GOP candidates as a group got 1.4 mil lion fewer votes than their Democratic opponents. It was only the second time since World War II that the party receiving the most votes failed to win a major ity of House seats, accord ing to statistics compiled by the House Clerk. Demo crats gained eight seats but were still a minority. The fact that Republi cans controlled redistrict ing (after 2010) meant that they were able to build up a wall, stopping a lot of the tide from running out, said Justin Levitt, a law pro fessor and redistricting ex pert at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. They were able to shore up a lot of the districts that had been won by, in many cases, tea party freshmen or other Republi can freshmen. The Republicans advan tage will fade as the decade wears on and the popula tion changes. In the mean time, Democrats control the White House and the Senate, while Republicans control the House, giving the GOP powerful lever age to block Obamas sec ond-term agenda. HOUSE FROM PAGE A1 STEVE HELBER / AP Chris Jankowski, the architect of the GOPs gerrymandering effort in Virginia, poses in the gallery of the Virginia House of Delegates at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. Sixteen of Floridas 26 U.S. representatives are Republicans, with one vacancy that will almost assuredly be lled by a Republican. Republicans also hold a 26-14 advantage in the Florida Senate and a 76-44 margin in the state House. Some Democrats ar gue that the discrep ancies are caused by gerrymandering the Republican-con trolled Legislature drawing districts to give the GOP an un fair advantage, which would be illegal under Florida law. But two political sci ence professors say the discrepancies arent so simple or nefarious they have used the Sunshine State to pop ularize their argument that large concentra tions of Democrats liv ing in cities have given Republicans a redis tricting advantage not just in Florida but na tionwide. Jowei Chen of the University of Mich igan and Jonathan Rodden of Stanford University say no amount of reforms is going to change an in herent bias based on where people live. Human geography plays a far greater role in generating elec toral bias in the Unit ed States than com monly thought, they wrote in an inuential 2013 paper. Reformers in Flori da have tried to stamp out gerrymander ing. They successful ly convinced voters in 2010 to approve two amendments to the Florida Constitution that would reduce the opportunities for law makers to make leg islative and congres sional districts that benet one party over the other. The amend ments require districts to be compact and contiguous whenever possible and to follow existing city and coun ty boundaries. Chen and Rodden argue that Democrats tend to live in dense ly populated cities while Republicans are more evenly scat tered throughout sub urban and rural areas. They also argue that Democratic precincts tend to be next to oth er highly Democrat ic precincts, more so than Republican pre cincts, which tend to be located in polit ically-mixed neigh borhoods. As a result, Demo crats tend to be tight ly packed into few er districts than Republicans. Repub lican-dominated dis tricts tend to be more diverse than Demo cratic precincts since pro-Republican ru ral areas often include Democrats in small cities to reach the population thresh old needed to create a district. In Florida, this translates into high ly-Democratic dis tricts along Floridas southeastern coast in and around Fort Lau derdale, Miami and West Palm Beach. Meanwhile Demo cratic precincts in in terior cities like Ocala, and college towns like Gainesville and Talla hassee, are swallowed up by more rural, Re publican districts, es sentially drowning out Democratic votes. DISTRICT FROM PAGE A1 Gerrymandering has a long history in the United States, pursued enthusiastically by both Democrats and Republicans. But the GOPs success at it this decade has been historic.

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT EUSTIS Amazing Race for Charity is Saturday The Amazing Race for Charity, Saturday in Eustis, is a unique rac ing event with teams of two compet ing on a 5-mile course to complete 20 fun, messy and wacky challenges. The race is designed for serious athletes, casual walkers and joggers ages 13 and up. Proceeds from this years event, which will be run completely by vol unteers, go to local charities includ ing The Boys & Girls Clubs of Lake and Sumter Counties, LifeStream Behavioral Center Foundation and Cornerstone Hospice. For registration ($125) and spon sor information, go to www.amaz ingraceforcharity.com or call 352-242-8111. MOUNT DORA Library will celebrate National Poetry Month The W.T. Bland Public Library wel comes special guest and Pulitzer Prize-nominee Vivian Shipley to kick off National Poetry Month in April. Shipley a two-time recipient of the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and other awards, will present The Spiritual Quest of Writing Poetry, at 10 a.m. on Thursday at the library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. in Mount Dora. Admission for the event is free. A poetry reading hosted by Shipley and members of One Flight Up will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on Friday. A reception for Shipley will take place following the reading, from 5 to 7 p.m., and will feature guitarist Shane Billette. Call the library at 352-735-7180, option 5 or go to www.mylakeli brary.org for information. LAKE COUNTY Immunization program begins in area schools The Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools through May for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Upcoming dates for immuniza tions are: Umatilla Middle School on Thursday, Tavares Middle School on April 8 and Mount Dora Middle on April 10. For information, call the Department of Health at 352-7715500 or go to www.lakechd.com. LEESBURG LSSC Foundation accepting scholarship applications Lake-Sumter State College Foundation, Inc. is accepting appli cations for student scholarships for the summer 2014 semester. The foundation will be award ing $87,800 in scholarships. Applications are available online at www.lssc.scholarships.ngwebsolu tions.com. The deadline for submitting appli cations is today at 4:30 p.m. Classes begin May 5. For information, call 352-365-3539. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report Lake County recently unveiled its new slogan, Real Florida. Real Close, and to showcase the area as a tourism destination, the Lake County Econom ic Development & Tour ism Department is host ing its rst Tourism Expo in June. The event from 2-7 p.m. on June 11 at Lake-Sumter State Col lege at 9501 U.S. High way 441 in Leesburg is open to the public, Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public information of cer, said in a press release. It will feature businesses and agencies that support local tourism initiatives, like chambers of com merce, hoteliers, dining establishments and event planners. Lake County boasts unparalleled natural re sources, state-of-theart sports facilities and quaint downtowns all within a short driving dis tance of Central Flori das major attractions and beaches on both the At lantic and Gulf coasts, said Robert Chandler, di rector of Lake Countys Economic Development & Tourism Department. For this expo, we are seeking to educate partic ipants about the unique support the county offers local businesses, as well as foster networking re lationships between our various tourism-related industries. Chandler, along with Brandy Hastings of VIS IT FLORIDA, will be the LEESBURG Lake County sets first Tourism Expo SEE EXPO | A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com S even years ago, Becky Parks, the physical ed ucation teacher at Cypress Ridge El ementary School, was participating in a popular evening event there called Family Reading Night. She looked around, saw families interact ing, and thats when a light came on in her head. I thought, if there can be a family read ing night, there can be a family walk night, Parks said, pleased the event has grown into some thing hundreds of families participate in every year. With the help of Pam Hamilton and Trish Sproule, Parks has been inviting Cy press Ridge teachers, administrators, par ents, students and other family mem bers to Waterfront Park in Clermont to walk the trail togeth er one night each month. The event not only creates bonds between fam ilies, but boosts their overall health and t ness. In September, when the school year starts, participants begin by walking one mile, then ev ery month after that, agree to increase their distances by a quarter-mile each time. By the end of the school year, partic ipants, including CLERMONT Walkers strengthen bonds and bodies ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Becky Parks helps Fred Owusu-Ofori and his daughter, Paige, 9, sign in at Marchs Family Walking Night at Waterfront Park. PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sherie Ismain and her daughter, Rafeeye Hussein, 8, at left, attend Cypress Ridge Elementary Schools Family Walking night for March, led by physical education teacher Becky Parks. Staff Report Lake County Animal Services and Hurricane Dockside Grill have teamed up with shelter animals best interests at heart to host the WOOF pet adoption carnival from 11 a.m.3 p.m., April 12, at the restaurant, 3351 W. Burleigh Blvd. in Tavares. Animal Services will have pets available for on-the-spot adoptions and, as an extra incentive, Hurricane Dockside is offering $25 gift certi cates to people who take home a pet from the carnival. We are thankful for the support of community partners and friends like Hurricane Dockside Grill, Brian Sheahan, director of Lake Countys Department of Community Safety & Compliance, said in a press release. Together, we hope to accomplish one of Animal Services top prior ities to get shelter pets adopted into loving forever homes. The outdoor, family-friendly event will be held on Hurricanes patio and will feature live music, and a balloon animal artist and face painter for children. Hurricane Dockside is the largest of the pet-friendly restaurants in Ta vares, said Derrick Haggerty, gener al manager of Hurricane Dockside Grill. It just made sense for Hur ricane to co-host an event like the adoption carnival. Our goal is to get as many of the animals adopted as possible. To nd out more about Lake County Animal Services, or to make a donation to the shelter, go to www. lakecounty.gov/adopt, visit the shelter at 28123 County Road 561, Tavares, or call 352-343-9688. For information on Hurricane Dockside Grill, go to www.hurri canedocksidegrill.com or facebook. com/hurricanedocksidegrill. TAVARES Adoption carnival planned for pets Staff Report From master gardeners to children, Lake Countys 3rd Annual Central Flori da Landscape & Garden Fair has something for ev eryone. The fair will be May 3-4 at Discovery Gar dens, at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. The fair will be open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on May 3 and from 10 a.m.3 p.m. on May 4, Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public information of cer, said in a press release. Saturdays present ers include Teresa Wat kins on Florida-Friendly Landscaping, Steve Earls on Square-Foot Garden ing, Tom MacCubbin on Edible Landscapes, Anne Keller on Geocaching and Jonathan Squires on NoTurf Landscapes. On Sun day, presentations include Native Plants by Karina Veaudry and Hot Plants, Cool Looks by residential horticulture agent Brooke Mofs with the UF/IFAS Extension in Lake County. The free event will pro vide visitors an opportu nity to browse and pur chase goods from dozens of exhibitors specializing in landscaping, garden ing, irrigation, fertilizer, composting, hardscapes and more. This years fair brings back the popular Chil drens Passport, which children can ll in by vis iting designated locations on the map. Exhibitor booths rang ing from 10 feet by 10 feet to 10 feet by 20 feet and food vendor spaces are available, as well as spon sorships ranging in cost from $250 for silver lev el to $750 for platinum level. Vendors and spon sors may register at www. lakecounty.gov/garden fair. The deadline to regis ter is Thursday. For infor mation, call Tina Chavez at 352-343-9647 or email tchavez@lakecounty.gov. Discovery Gardens is nestled on over 4 acres behind the Lake County Agricultural Center and features 20 themed gar dens, including a string of lush courtyards and six specially designed chil drens gardens. TAVARES Third annual garden fair scheduled for May 3-4 SEE WALKERS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 OBITUARIES William N. Dickerson William N. Bill Dickerson, 76, of Cen ter Hill, passed away Saturday, March 29, 2014, in Leesburg Re gional Medical Center. Born March 29, 1938 in Houston Co., Ala bama to James Henry and Nettie (Huff) Dick erson, he moved to Florida from Alabama in 1958. Bill retired in 1990 from the Florida State Highway Depart ment and was a mem ber of Center Hill Bap tist Church. Surviving with his wife, Marga ret Joyce (Foster) Dick erson of Center Hill are a daughter, Helen Dickerson, Lake Pana soffkee; 2 sons: Bry an Keith (Lisa) Dick erson, Bushnell and William Jason (Melissa) Dickerson, Plant City; 7 grandchildren; 2 broth ers: James and Dennis Dickerson, of Center Hill; 3 sisters: Maryel len Hart, Wildwood, Virginia Price, Center Hill and Faye Scrubs, Georgia. Bill is pre ceded in death by his parents and 1 broth er, David. Friends may call after 1 pm Tues day, April 1, 2014 at the Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell where Fu neral Services will be gin at 2pm with Pastor Bill Johnson ofciat ing. Bill will be buried in the Center Hill Cem etery. In lieu of owers the family suggests me morials be made to the Gideons. Condolenc es may be left at www. purcellfuneralhome. com, Purcell Funer al Home, Bushnell, FL entrusted with all ar rangements. DEATH NOTICES Judy Shook Judy Shook, 74, of Leesburg, died Satur day, March 29, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. IN MEMORY keynote speaker at the expo. Hastings is VIS IT FLORIDAs Market ing Solutions and Sales manager for the cen tral and central east re gions and works with tourism partners to ed ucate them on the mar keting opportunities available through VISIT FLORIDA. VISIT FLORIDA is the states ofcial tour ism marketing corpo ration with a mission to promote travel to and within the state. Tourism-related busi nesses and attractions, chambers of commerce and government agen cies are encouraged to attend and participate by setting up a booth in the exhibit hall, Pap pacoda said. For details on being an exhibitor, contact Debi Dyer at 352-3433918 or email ddy er@lakecounty.gov. To register, go to www. lakecounty.gov/tour ismexpo. There is no fee, but space is limited. Each exhibitor will have a 6-foot table and two chairs. All table setups must be broken down and removed no later than 7:30 p.m. follow ing the event. EXPO FROM PAGE A3 students, are walking three miles. Parks said each month sees more than 100 participants on av erage, a number that she said sometimes dwindles slightly as the walking distance in creases. (Family Walk Night) gives us a reason to ex ercise together. It pro vides us with an incen tive because, truthfully, sometimes we need to be forced into it, said parent Matthew Gos selin, who came after work to meet his wife, Nicole Gosselin, and their children Evan, Aiden and Emma. When we can, we come together as a family, Nicole Goss elin said. Melanie Ressler, a mother of three stu dents, called the pro gram a great initiative to help kids be active. It gets them out of the house and keeps them from being in front of the television or playing video games all afternoon, she said. Katie Ciccotelli, also there with her two girls and with Resslers fam ily, has participated ev ery month since the start of school. Cicco telli said she also likes the venue (Waterfront Park) because of its natural beauty. After walking, the kids enjoy playing on the beach and in park areas. The two moms also like that participating counts as school volun teer hours for parents. Coming keeps us in shape and then after wards, we can spend time with our families, friends and play with each other, Sebastien Ressler, 9, said. Joshua Phillips, there with his 6-yearold daughter Eliza beth, said he feels the program provides a WALKERS FROM PAGE A3 great opportunity to get some exercise, spend time with family and friends and show support for the school, but most of all, he likes the challenge. They lay it out for you and they in crease it each time we come. It gets tougher, and its ex citing to see how far we can go, Phillips said. In March, in hon or of the city of Cl ermont police de partments newly instated waterfront/ downtown Cler mont task force pa trol initiative, the kids, parents and teachers at Fami ly Walk Night were greeted by Ofcers James Rooney, Bren da Teets and Chief Charles Broadway. They congratulated the walkers for their efforts and reward ed the students with wrist bands. Associated Press OCALA A 13-year-old cen tral Florida girl will be tried as an adult for her alleged role in a conspiracy to kill her moth er that authorities say she planned with her teenage boy friend. Yaquelin Galvez Don was indicted by a grand jury Fri day. Typically grand juries in dict defendants on rst-de gree murder charges, but state law required it in this case be cause the defendant is young er than 15. During her rst court ap pearance Saturday, the Oc ala Star-Banner (http://ti nyurl.com/mqqaam8) reports a judge ordered the girl to be held without bond. The judge said the girl, who wore shackles and a red jumpsuit, faces life in prison if convicted. When someone is at that age, you have to evaluate the case differently, said the girls attorney, Tania Alavi, who ex pressed disappointment in the decision. Sheriffs detectives say Don lured her mother to the garage on March 9 and that her boy friend, 15-year-old Pedro Solis, slit the womans throat. Accord ing to an arrest report, Solis then went inside the home and held a knife to the throat of the girls father. But ultimately, he was not injured and convinced Solis to drive the injured woman to a hospital, authorities said. On the way to the hospital, Luz Galvez told detectives she promised Pedro she wouldnt sue him and that he could be with her daughter. She under went surgery and was able to speak with detectives with the help of a physical therapist. Authorities say Solis told them he and Don had dis cussed killing her parents so they could be together. Detective said the girl ad mitted discussing the plan for about a week and giving her boyfriend the knife. Solis was indicted on March 18 on the same charges and was also denied bond. Teen charged in alleged attack on mom

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hen Bashar Assads forc es gassed the Damascus suburb of Moadamiyeh in August, the fumes penetrat ed Qusai Zakarias apartment within minutes. A female neigh bor knocked on his door with two unconscious children, but he couldnt breathe or talk. The 29-year-old struggled to the street, where women and children were running about wildly and dropping dead; he saw a young teenager with pale blue eyes on the ground star ing at nothing. Then his heart stopped, and his body was thrown on a pile of corpses with white foam dripping from their mouths. Miraculously, Zakaria revived (about 1,300 other civilians died) and he became a voice for civil ian survivors. Recently, he es caped Syria and I spoke with him in Washington. He bears witness to a shameful global fail ure to confront what U.N. Secre tary-General Ban Ki-moon calls the biggest humanitarian and peace and security crisis facing the world. As Zakaria makes clear, the re gime was starving residents of Moadamiyeh for a year before the gas attack and continues to besiege survivors, along with more than 220,000 civilians in other areas held by rebels. This in direct deance of a U.N. Se curity Council resolution last month. When the Syrian uprising be gan, civilians in Moadamiyeh demonstrated peacefully for an end to a corrupt Assad fam ily dictatorship that had lasted more than four decades. A mid dle-class suburb of four-sto ry apartment houses, adjacent to open farmland, the suburb sat between key regime military bases, and the government forc es began arresting, torturing, and raping residents. They would beat young men and throw them in garbage cans, and tell them to stay there, or they would go to houses and beat people, recounts Zakaria, a former hotel worker. It was too much humiliation to handle. In mid-2012, regime tanks rolled into Moadamiyeh, killing about 500 civilians and arresting 600 to 700, including some women and kids. It was only after the regime brutalized civilians that resi dents of Moadamiyeh decided they must defend their commu nity. Ordinary people sold their jewelry and the rich donated, and we bought weapons from smugglers and corrupt ofcers, mostly AK-47s. We recruited young men who had done mili tary service, Zakaria said. Most of his family ed, but he joined the local relief committee that distributed food and medicine to the needy. In November 2012, the regime laid siege to the suburb and its remaining 13,000 people (in cluding 3,000 women and chil dren), cut off electricity, and barred any food from entering or people from leaving. On a qui et day, we got shelled with 6070 mortars, recounts Zakaria, while helicopters shot missiles into apartment buildings and jet ghters dropped bombs, smashing schools, hospitals, and mosques. Zakarias relief council scoured abandoned apartments for bags of our or pasta to distribute to residents. By mid-2013, starva tion set in. By then we had only grape leaves, olives, and herbs from the ground, adding salt and pepper to make a sort of soup, he said. Malnutrition started. We were telling the world, but all we got was speeches, which we couldnt eat. After the gas attack, on Aug. 21, 2013, residents hoped they would be rescued. We knew any kind of strike would shake the regime. When President Barack Obama opted instead for the chemical-weapons accord we were disappointed and angry, says Zakaria. We felt like he was telling Assad to do more, to use new means of death. In other words, the accord brokered by Washington and Moscow to de stroy Syrias chemical arsenal gave Assad a green light to kill by other means. And thats what he did, again starving Moadamiyeh after the Geneva talks ended. Zakaria, who spoke English and had met Western journalists, went on hunger strike for 33 days. He sent desperate messages about Moadamiyehs plight to the West. During talks in Geneva in Jan uary and February, the regime let some food in, letting thou sands of residents return. But as soon as the talks ended, Assad stopped the humanitarian aid convoys. I know the United States is one of the main donors, Zakaria told me, but the aid is going to organizations that work under the regime, which gives him (As sad) more cards to force civil ians or rebels to surrender. They should nd a way to get the aid into besieged towns. Heres my suggestion: Instead of sending video cameras to ci vilian rebels to lm the carnage, or ambulances to take victims to gutted hospitals (the latest idea), the United States should get real. Send vetted rebel groups the heavy weapons they need to shoot down planes that bomb civilians, and to ensure that aid reaches the needy. Doing less makes us complicit in Assads war crimes. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorialboard member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Lets get real and help Syrians under siege The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. F ifteen months ago, as the nation re coiled in horror from the massacre of 20 children and six adults by a mental ly ill man armed with three semiautomat ic weapons, there were rm proclamations that this time would be different. The vio lence at that Newtown, Conn., elementa ry school, it was said, would nally lead the nation to come together and embrace some reasonable gun control laws. Well, that didnt last long. If anything, the national gun frenzy, fueled by the irrespon sible lobbyists at the National Rie Associ ation, has intensied. Though some states have adopted laws tightening access to guns since Newtown, others have actually loos ened their gun control regulations. The latest state to move in the wrong di rection is Georgia, where the Legislature last week approved the most extreme indeed bizarre set of gun laws in the nation. The bill is awaiting the governors signature. Among the laws absurdities: People with gun permits would be allowed to carry their weapons in unsecured areas of airports. It would allow loaded guns in bars (South Car olina recently approved that as well), unless the owner of the bar specically objects. In some cases, guns could be brought into churches. The law would offer an absolute defense if a gun was used in the face of a violent attack, though it doesnt appear to dene exactly what constitutes a violent act. Georgia is already a stand your ground state. So envision this scenario: A gun-tot ing Georgian tries to enter a bar that bans guns and is confronted by a bouncer. Who, incidentally, may also be armed under the new law. You can imagine how that might play out. This page has been rm in its opposi tion to the NRAs abject disdain of the pub lic good in pursuing its warped view of the 2nd Amendments right to bear arms and its bullying approach to the political pro cess. But the blame for this national insani ty should not be placed entirely on the NRA. Politicians respond to the groups pressure out of fear, knowing that their jobs often de pend on low-turnout, one-party primaries in which fringe passions are amplied. At the same time, public opinion has tak en a puzzling, and depressing, turn. Accord ing to Gallup, in the weeks after the New town massacre, support for stricter gun control rose to 58 percent. By last October, it had ebbed to 49 percent. To twist a cliche, with that attitude we and Georgia are getting the gun laws we deserve. But the next time an avoidable kill ing occurs in Georgia, an awful lot of people are going to have gunpowder residue mixed in with the blood on their hands. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE Gun madness in Georgia Classic DOONESBURY 1972

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 SHRUB/PALM PROGRAM LAWN PROGRAM PEST PROGRAM PEST/LAWN/SHRUB PACKAGE LAWN/SHRUB PACKAGE PEST/LAWN PACKAGE H20 YEARLY SERVICE H20 CHECK-UPTRIMMING/WEEDING PROGRAMTERMITE RENEWALAERATION YEARLY SERVICEAERATION SERVICETERMIDOR TERMITE TREATMENT $295 up to 1/4 acre lot*Service Calls are always FREE $245 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE $245 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE$390WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$540 $490WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$540 $590WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$785 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE $495Most Homes$69 Most Homes$199 Most HomesMust have been treated within the past 4 years$125 Most Homes1 Spring (March-May) and 1 Fall (September-November)$175 Most Homes$595Most Homes(You choose the month)$99

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NCAA: Kentucky heads to Final Four / B3 Staff report Down by eight runs when they came to bat in the bottom of the eighth inning, Lake-Sum ter State College made a game of it with a sixrun outburst against the College of Central Florida on Tuesday. But the rally fell short and the Lakehawks dropped below the .500 mark (15-16) for the rst time this season as the Pa triots managed to hold on for a 9-7 victory. Six LSSC hurlers were pounded for 10 hits with starter Shane Crouse taking the loss af ter giving up three runs in his single inning of work. That said, the Lakehawks managed 11 hits of their own but, with the single exception of the eighth-inning explosion, were unable Lakehawks come up short in loss to CCF SEE LSSC | B2 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dominic Bozzelli, of Pittsford, N.Y., drives the ball at the Lake County Classic golf tournament at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Making history isnt sup posed to be easy. Dominic Bozzellis drive to establish himself as one of the best golfers in National Golf Association history was about as difcult as it gets. Bozzelli birdied his nal three holes on Sunday to n ish with a four-day total of 269, 19-under-par, to win the Lake County Classic at Har bor Hills County Club by two shots over Jack Newman. With the win, he is only the second golfer in NGA history to win three straight tourna ments. Zach Johnson, an 11time winner on the PGA Tour and the 2007 Masters cham pion, was the rst to do so, having won three straight in 2001. Bozzelli had to battle through the pack for the win under sunny skies over the nearly 7,000-yard par 72 lay out. Unable to nish his third STEVE SHEPPARD / AP Kurt Busch celebrates after winning at Martinsville. HANK KURZ JR. AP Sports Writer MARTINSVILLE, Va. Kurt Busch passed Martinsville master Jimmie Johnson for the lead with 10 laps to go Sunday and held off the eight-time winner to win at Martinsville Speedway for the rst time since October 2002. Johnson, with eight wins in 25 career starts on the 0.526-mile oval, led 11 times for 296 laps. He seemed on his way to another vic tory when he took the lead from Busch with 17 laps remaining. But Busch stayed close, ducked underneath Johnson seven laps PHOTOS BY SETH WENIG / AP Connecticut players celebrate after beating Michigan State 60-54 in a regional nal at the NCAA college basketball tournament on Sunday in New York. RACHEL COHEN Associated Press NEW YORK Shaba zz Napier scored 17 of his 25 points in the sec ond half, and UConn beat Michigan State 6054 to return to the Fi nal Four a year after the Huskies were barred from the NCAA tourna ment. Napier, the East Re gionals most outstand ing player, hit three huge free throws with 37.6 seconds left at Madison Square Gar den to carry UConn to the Final Four just as Kemba Walker did in Napiers freshman year. The Huskies (30-8) rallied from a ninepoint second-half de cit to become the rst No. 7 seed to reach the Final Four since the tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985. Fourth-seeded Mich igan States seniors be come the rst fouryear players recruited by Tom Izzo to fail to reach the Final Four. Gary Harris led the Spartans (29-9) with 22 points. The undersized Hus kies matched Michigan States physical play box-out for box-out, holding the Spartans to just six offensive re bounds and six points in the paint. UConn dared Michigan State to shoot 3-pointers, and the Spartans near ly made enough, going 11 for 29 from behind the arc. Trailing 51-49 with more than two minutes left, Michigan State had a chance to tie or take the lead. But Adreian Payne fumbled the ball away, and Napier drilled a jumper on the other end. After Payne hit a pair of free throws to pull the Spartans back with in two, Keith Appling was called for a foul on Napiers 3-point at tempt. The senior ex tended the lead to 5651, and after Travis Trice missed a 3, Michi gan State couldnt get to UConn to foul. Phillip Nolan slipped free for a dunk that clinched the victory and had thou sands of Huskies fans in the Garden leaping up and down. UConn won its third national title in 2011, but the Huskies were UConn upsets Michigan State 60-54, back to Final Four Connecticut head coach Kevin Ollie cuts the netting on the rim after his team defeated Michigan State. SEE UCONN | B2 Kurt Busch bests Johnson at Martinsville SEE NASCAR | B2 Bozzelli wins at Harbor Hills SEE NGA | B2 LADY LAKE

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-STP 500 Results Sunday At Martinsville Speedway Martinsville, Va. Lap length: .526 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (22) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 500 laps, 115.8 rat ing, 47 points, $147,210. 2. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 500, 140.9, 44, $180,546. 3. (26) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 500, 116.8, 42, $114,210. 4. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 500, 121.2, 41, $142,476. 5. (17) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 500, 110.2, 40, $128,265. 6. (6) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 500, 95.8, 39, $137,456. 7. (18) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 500, 98.9, 38, $127,053. 8. (20) Aric Almirola, Ford, 500, 93.8, 36, $126,106. 9. (12) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 500, 108.5, 36, $123,461. 10. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 500, 83.3, 34, $116,384. 11. (15) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 500, 90, 34, $105,458. 12. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 500, 82, 32, $129,811. 13. (8) Carl Edwards, Ford, 500, 98.1, 31, $101,975. 14. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 500, 79.2, 31, $136,491. 15. (34) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 500, 72, 29, $133,461. 16. (13) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 500, 90.9, 28, $117,900. 17. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 500, 72.4, 27, $120,158. 18. (11) Greg Bife, Ford, 500, 82.7, 27, $125,450. 19. (2) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 500, 81, 25, $94,475. 20. (16) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 500, 78.5, 24, $93,325. 21. (31) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 500, 60.6, 23, $111,708. 22. (27) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 500, 70.4, 22, $99,375. 23. (25) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 500, 57.1, 21, $107,433. 24. (23) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 500, 63.4, 20, $105,133. 25. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 500, 56.2, 0, $79,950. 26. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, 499, 49.5, 18, $102,058. 27. (28) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 498, 62.7, 17, $108,420. 28. (24) David Ragan, Ford, 497, 50.7, 16, $99,322. 29. (35) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 497, 38.4, 15, $78,500. 30. (38) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 496, 43.9, 14, $82,875. 31. (40) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 495, 38.5, 13, $81,225. 32. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 494, 52.4, 12, $88,575. 33. (29) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 493, 35.8, 12, $77,850. 34. (42) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 492, 36.1, 10, $77,725. 35. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 492, 34.7, 9, $77,675. 36. (19) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 488, 46.3, 8, $77,625. 37. (32) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 474, 35.9, 7, $77,527. 38. (14) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 469, 46.6, 6, $118,508. 39. (37) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 440, 29.1, 5, $69,100. 40. (30) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 409, 49.8, 4, $100,925. 41. (41) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 408, 25.1, 3, $66,500. 42. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 396, 80.9, 2, $94,314. 43. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 310, 26.4, 0, $61,600. Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg Results Sunday At St. Petersburg Street Circuit St. Petersburg Lap length: 1.8 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (4) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 2. (3) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 3. (10) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 4. (5) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 5. (14) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 6. (2) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Run ning. 7. (1) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 8. (16) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 9. (22) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 10. (9) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 11. (11) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 12. (15) Mikhail Aleshin, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 13. (13) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 14. (21) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 15. (18) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 16. (12) Mike Conway, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 17. (7) Carlos Munoz, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 18. (17) Carlos Huertas, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 19. (19) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 109, Running. 20. (20) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Chevrolet, 108, Running. 21. (8) Jack Hawksworth, Dallara-Honda, 83, Contact. 22. (6) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 82, Contact. Race Statistics Winners average speed: 93.572. Time of Race: 2:06:57.6288. Margin of Victory: 1.9475 seconds. Cautions: 2 for 10 laps. Lead Changes: 7 among 4 drivers. Lap Leaders: Sato 1-26, Castroneves 27-28, Sato 29-30, Power 31-52, Sato 53-57, Power 58-76, Con way 77, Power 78-110. Points: Power 53, Hunter-Reay 40, Castroneves 36, Dixon 32, Pagenaud 30, Kanaan 28, Sato 28, Wil son 24, Newgarden 22, Briscoe 20. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 41 31 .569 Brooklyn 38 33 .535 2 New York 30 43 .411 11 Boston 23 49 .319 18 Philadelphia 16 57 .219 25 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 50 22 .694 Washington 38 35 .521 12 Charlotte 35 38 .479 15 Atlanta 31 41 .431 19 Orlando 21 52 .288 29 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 52 22 .703 x-Chicago 40 32 .556 11 Cleveland 30 45 .400 22 Detroit 26 47 .356 25 Milwaukee 14 59 .192 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 57 16 .781 Houston 49 23 .681 7 Memphis 43 29 .597 13 Dallas 44 30 .595 13 New Orleans 32 41 .438 25 Northwest W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 54 19 .740 Portland 47 27 .635 7 Minnesota 36 35 .507 17 Denver 32 41 .438 22 Utah 23 51 .311 31 Pacic W L Pct GB x-L.A. Clippers 52 22 .703 Golden State 45 27 .625 6 Phoenix 44 29 .603 7 Sacramento 25 48 .342 26 L.A. Lakers 24 48 .333 27 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturdays Games Philadelphia 123, Detroit 98 L.A. Clippers 118, Houston 107 Washington 101, Atlanta 97 Dallas 103, Sacramento 100 Miami 88, Milwaukee 67 San Antonio 96, New Orleans 80 Sundays Games Oklahoma City 116, Utah 96 Cleveland 90, Indiana 76 Toronto at Orlando, late Minnesota at Brooklyn, late Chicago at Boston, late New York at Golden State,late Memphis at Portland, late Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, late Tondays Games San Antonio at Indiana, 7 p.m. Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 9 p.m. New York at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games Houston at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Boston 75 52 17 6 110 241 158 Montreal 76 43 26 7 93 199 189 Tampa Bay 74 41 24 9 91 221 198 Detroit 74 34 26 14 82 199 211 Toronto 76 36 32 8 80 220 239 Ottawa 73 30 29 14 74 210 246 Florida 75 27 40 8 62 179 244 Buffalo 74 20 45 9 49 142 222 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Pittsburgh 74 47 22 5 99 228 184 Philadelphia 74 39 27 8 86 213 210 N.Y. Rangers 75 41 30 4 86 200 183 Columbus 74 38 30 6 82 208 200 Washington 74 34 28 12 80 214 222 New Jersey 74 31 28 15 77 178 192 Carolina 74 32 32 10 74 186 208 N.Y. Islanders 74 29 35 10 68 206 247 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 74 50 17 7 107 240 168 x-Colorado 74 47 21 6 100 227 202 x-Chicago 75 42 18 15 99 247 196 Minnesota 75 38 26 11 87 186 189 Dallas 74 36 27 11 83 214 212 Nashville 75 32 32 11 75 186 226 Winnipeg 75 33 33 9 75 208 220 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Anaheim 74 48 18 8 104 239 187 x-San Jose 76 47 20 9 103 232 184 Los Angeles 75 44 25 6 94 189 159 Phoenix 75 36 27 12 84 206 212 Vancouver 76 34 31 11 79 184 206 Calgary 74 31 36 7 69 189 217 Edmonton 74 26 39 9 61 184 244 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturdays Games N.Y. Islanders 2, New Jersey 1, SO Boston 4, Washington 2 Colorado 3, San Jose 2 Tampa Bay 4, Buffalo 3, OT Detroit 4, Toronto 2 Montreal 4, Florida 1 Columbus 3, Carolina 2, OT Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Minnesota 3, Phoenix 1 Anaheim 5, Vancouver 1 Los Angeles 4, Winnipeg 2 Sundays Games Boston 4, Philadelphia 3, SO Calgary at Ottawa, late Tampa Bay at Detroit, late Chicago at Pittsburgh, late Washington at Nashville, late N.Y. Rangers at Edmonton, late Todays Games Carolina at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Florida at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games New Jersey at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Calgary at Toronto, 7 p.m. Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 7 p.m. Colorado at Columbus, 7 p.m. Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Winnipeg at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed INFs Michael Al manzar and Manny Machado and OFs Francisco Peguero and Nolan Reimold on the 15-day DL; Machado and Peguero retroactive to March 21, Almanzar to March 23 and Reimold to March 26. Placed RHP Edgmer Escalona on the 60-day DL. Se lected the contracts of OF Delmon Young and RHP Evan Meek from Norfolk (IL). Designated LHP Mike Belore for assignment. Reassigned LHP Johan Santana to minor league camp. CHICAGO WHITE SOX Placed INFs Gordon Beck ham and Jeff Keppinger on the 15-day DL, retroac tive to March 21. CLEVELAND INDIANS Selected the contracts of RHP Scott Atchison, DH Jason Giambi and OF Nyjer Morgan from Columbus (IL). Placed Giambi and OF Michael Bourn on the 15-day DL. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh WGN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh 3 p.m. ESPN2 Boston at Baltimore 4 p.m. ESPN St. Louis at Cincinnati 7 p.m. ESPN2 Colorado at Miami 10 p.m. ESPN2 Seattle at L.A. Angels NBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. SUN Toronto at Miami NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Florida at New Jersey 10 p.m. NBCSN Minnesota at Los Angeles WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, regional nal, Baylor vs. Notre Dame, at South Bend, Ind. 9:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, regional nal, UConn vs. Texas A&M, at Lincoln, Neb. score consistently. By the time winning pitcher Mike Cetta left the mound, CCF had built up a 4-1 lead and the game seemed well in hand. Cetta had surrendered just one run on four hits for CCF in his six-inning stint, managing to keep Lakehawks hit ters off balance. It was the Patriots relievers who would manage to keep the game close. In the bottom of the eighth, the Lake hawks began a bar rage of two-base hits. Tanner Elsbernd sliced a double down the right-eld line. Then, with two out, Walker Sheller dou bled in Elsbernd and Dan Autiello kept the rally alive with anoth er double, this one to left, scoring Sheller. Baziel Cabre ra slammed anoth er two-bagger to right to allow Autiello to come scampering across the plate. Aus tin Simmons base hit to left-center scored Cabrera before Kris Hodges drew a walk to put two men on still with two out. Sam Thomas sent a hard ground ball to third, which was misplayed to load the bases. Dakota Higdon, who came into the game leading all LSSC batters with a .325 av erage, plated both Simmons and Hodg es with a line single to center. But there the rally ended when, with Elsbernd at bat for the second time in the inning, Higdon was caught stealing for the nal out. The Lakehawks re turn to action today as they travel to Ocala for a return engagement against the Patriots. Game time is 3 p.m. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 ineligible for last years tournament be cause of previous low scores on the NCAAs academic progress measure. Ryan Boatright made four steals as UConn used its quickness to force 16 turnovers. DeAndre Daniels shut down Branden Dawson, who scored 24 points in Michigan States Sweet 16 win over top-seeded Virginia. Dawson attempted just three eld goals, making one, to nish with ve points. The 6-foot-10, 245-pound Payne hit two long jumpers to put Michigan State up 32-23 less than four minutes into the sec ond half. But Napier started driving, get ting the bigger Ap pling in foul trouble and UConn back in the game. After hitting four straight free throws to tie the score at 32 with 12:38 left, Napi er was struck in the face by Gary Harris the UConn guard was called for a foul on the play and left the court with his nose gushing blood. He was back less than minute later when Daniels completed a three-point play to give the Huskies the lead for good. Boatright hit a con tested 3-pointer with the shot clock wind ing down to put UCo nn up 49-39 with less than seven minutes left. But the Spartans rallied behind their long-range shooting. UCONN FROM PAGE B1 later and Johnson nev er made a good run at the lead again. I didnt know if wed be able to do it, you know? The 48 car is king here, him or the 24, Busch said in Vic tory Lane, referring to Johnson and his Hen drick Motorsports teammate, Jeff Gor don, who also has eight Martinsville victories. Buschs 25th career victory ended a winless streak that had reached 83, and in the least like ly of places. Ive been on this journey for a while and every time you come to Martinsville, you just kind of draw a line through it like theres no way Ill be able to challenge those Hen drick guys or be up in the top 10, Busch said. This Stewart-Hass team gave me a car to do it. It was Buschs rst victory in his rst sea son driving for Stew art-Haas Racing in a car funded solely by Gene Haas, who handpicked the 2004 series champion because he said he wanted to see a team win with his name on the car. Its a dream come true to have Gene Haas call you and tell you he wants you to drive, Busch said. He wants to go for trophies and wins. Its just an unbe lievable feeling to de liver for Haas Automa tion. The race featured an event-record 33 lead changes, and Johnson expected there would be one more, but on a slippery day on the smallest circuit in NA SCARs premier se ries, the cars at the end werent conducive to typical short-track rac ing. Man, we were so on edge slipping and sliding, Johnson said about the nal laps duel, during which there was very little of the beating and bang ing that usually typi es racing at Martins ville. I think the lack of security in our own car kept us from feeling more racy and putting a bumper to someone or really getting inside someone aggressively. Dale Earnhardt Jr. was third, followed by Joey Logano and Mar cos Ambrose. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 round on Saturday due to inclement weather, Bozzelli was forced to complete it on Sunday and then immediately begin his nal loop. He responded to the chal lenge of a golng mara thon by carding a 5-un der-par 67 in his third round for a two -shot lead over Newman at 15-under. He backed that up with a 4 -under 68 in his fourth round to secure the win. Bozzelli and New man battled for the lead throughout the nal round, with each play er owning it on mul tiple occasions. Both players were tied at 17 under after exchang ing birdies on the par3 16th hole, the longest par 3 on the course at 210 yards and one that involved a carry over water to an undulating green. On the 17th, a 400yard par 4, Bozzelli set himself up for a make able putt that would put him in the drivers seat heading to the nal hole. The Pittsford, N.Y., golfer drained the putt and took a one -shot lead to the 18th. Newman was able to look down the fair way and watch Bozzel lis nearly awless play down the stretch. On the 18th, a 579yard nishing hole that was set up for scoring, Bozzelli worked his way down the fairway and drained an insurance birdie, forcing New man to make an eagle to take the tournament to sudden death. Newman put him self in position for an eagle from the fairway with his third shot, but missed left, giving Boz zelli a shared entry with Johnson in the NGA Pro Tour history books. He will have chance to win an unprecedented four straight tournaments beginning Thursday at the Ocala/Marion County NGA Pro Golf tour at Ocala National. In his nal round, Bozzelli nished with six birdies and two bo geys. The three bird ies he had on his nal three holes of the tour nament were, ironi cally, the only time he put together three red numbers in succession. For the tourna ment, Bozzelli card ed 20 birdies, three ea gles and seven bogeys. He played par-3 holes to average score of 2.79 and par 4s to 3.93. On the par 5s, however, Bozzelli averaged near ly a full stroke below par at 4.19. He had sev en birdies, three eagles and ve pars on the four par 5 holes on the course. He did not have bogey on a par 5. Bozzelli earned $16,000 for the win, giv ing him $52,700 for the year and an exemption in the Web.com Tour Price Cutter Charity Championship in Au gust in Springeld, Mo. Newman won $8,000 for nishing second to raise his season to tal to $12,200. Bozzelli extended his lead over Crawford Reeves, No. 2 on the money list by more than $30,000. Brian Richey nished third at 272 after a nal round 66, the low round of the day. Da vid Skinns was 274, good for a fourth place tie with Phillip Mollica. Skinns and Mollica be gan the nal round in a three way tie with New man for second place. Phillip Hutchinson, the rstand secondround leader, struggled to 76 in his nal round. Formerly known as the Hooters Tour, the NGA Tour is the No. 3-mens profession al tour in the U.S. after the PGA and Web.com Tours, and has proven to be the top develop mental tour by PGA and Web.com Tour Profes sionals. The NGA Tour has helped hundreds of professionals acquire their cards PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Champions Tour. NGA Tour alumni in clude: Johnson, Bubba Watson, the 2012 Mas ters champion Jim Fu ryk, the 2010 PGA Tour Player of the Year and 2003 U.S. Open cham pion Keegan Brad ley, 2011 PGA cham pionship winner 2009 British Open champi on Stewart Cink 2009 U.S. Open champi on Lucas Glover 2003 PGA Champion Shaun Micheel, 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis and two time U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running devel opmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was awarded ve Web. com Tour event exemp tions and two PGA Tour event exemptions. NGA FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 COLLEGE BASKETBALL EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer INDIANAPOLIS Aaron Harrison made a 3-pointer from NBA range with 2.3 seconds left Sunday to lift Ken tucky and its freshmen to a 75-72 win over Michigan and a trip to the Final Four. After Harrisons team mate, Julius Randle, in advertently tipped in the tying shot on Mich igans previous posses sion, the eighth-seed ed Wildcats got the ball to the 6-foot-6 guard, whose twin broth er, Andrew, is anoth er of the ve freshmen in Kentuckys starting lineup. Standing a good three feet behind the arc, Harrison elevated over Caris LeVert and took a bit of contact on the arm from the Mich igan guard as he shot. No matter. The shot rattled in, and for the second straight game in the Midwest Region al, Harrison had the goahead points in a tense game for the Wildcats (28-10). In this one, he scored all 12 of his points off four 3-pointers over the last 8:05. I hit a couple be fore that, so coach said to get the shot we were looking for, Harrison said. They put it in my hands and I wanted to deliver for them out there. Nik Stauskas missed a halfcourt heave at the buzzer for sec ond-seeded Michi gan (28-9), and mo ments later, Harrison was under a dog pile or make that a pup py pile. This is the rst all-freshman starting lineup to make the Fi nal Four since another well-known group, the Fab Five of Michigan, did it in 1992. Im gonna see every one in Dallas this year, coach John Calipari said, with his version of a Texas twang, as he addressed the crowd before the nets came down. The Wildcats will play Wisconsin next Satur day outside of Big D. Stauskas nished with 24 points for the Wolverines, who n ished a win shy of their second straight Final Four. Randle had 16 points and 11 rebounds for his 24th double-double and was named the re gions most outstand ing player. But he was just one of the freshmen stars for the Wildcats Sunday. While Harrison was being completely shut down early, it was un heralded Marcus Lee keeping the Wildcats in the game. Lee, one of the six McDonalds All-Amer ican freshmen on Cali paris roster, had scored a total of nine points since the beginning of January. But he got minutes that would have normally gone to the injured Willie Cau ley-Stein, and nished with 10 points and eight rebounds. Eight of those points came on put-back dunks that were part of Kentuckys 18 offensive rebounds. Harrisons rst 3 gave Kentucky a 58-55 lead and was part of an 11-0 run that put the Wol verines in catch-up mode, behind 62-55 with 6:30 left. They fought back, and during a nine-pos session stretch of sub lime basketball that covered more than four minutes, each team scored every time they got the ball. The rst stop in the sequence gave the Wol verines the ball with about a minute left, trailing 72-70. Stauskas missed a layup and a 3-point er and Derrick Walton then missed an open 3. But the fourth attempt went in with 31 sec onds left and got cred ited to Jordan Morgan on a scramble under the basket, though it was Randles hand that tipped the ball in. Calipari called a tim eout. Michigan burned a foul. And the end game started with 10 seconds left. DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Kentuckys Aaron Harrison and his teammates hold up their trophy after an NCAA Midwest Regional nal against Michigan on Sunday in Indianapolis. MENS HOOPS Associated Press TUCSON, Ariz. Tucson police said Sat urday night that they shot pepper spray at several hundred fans who took to the streets and threw beer bottles and recrackers at of cers after the Universi ty of Arizona basketball teams overtime loss in the NCAA tournament. Fifteen people were arrested for offenses such as resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and unlawful assembly, Tucson police Sgt. Pete Dugan said. Of those, 14 were released, and one was sent to Pima County jail. He said those who advanced on ofcers were arrested. No ofcers or fans were injured. The majority of the crowd did not respond to the dispersal order and began throwing beer bottles, beer cans and recrackers at the ofcers, Dugan said. Several of the re crackers rolled under neath a patrol vehicle that was deployed with the Mobile Field Fo rce Units. TENNIS STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer KEY BISCAYNE No vak Djokovic won his fourth Key Biscayne title, while Rafael Nadal failed again trying for his rst. Djokovic dominat ed from the start and closed out the victory by winning a remarkable exchange to beat Nadal 6-3, 6-3 Sunday in the nal of the Sony Open. Nadal fell to 0-4 in nals at Key Biscayne, one of just three ATP Mas ters 1000 events he has yet to win. As for Djokov ic, only six-time champi on Andre Agassi has won the mens event more. Djokovic erased the only break point he faced, committed just 15 unforced errors and won a scrambling, 30shot rally on the nal point. He completed a Nadal stood six feet be hind the baseline to re turn and often remained on the defensive from there, with his shots lack ing their normal depth. Djokovic was quick to step into the court and even won a point playing serve and volley. Djokovic also had the superior serve, this al lowed him to chase down shots Nadal usu ally counts as winners. Nadals lone breakpoint chance came in the opening game, and he failed to con vert. Djokovic broke in the sixth game, hitting three consecutive win ners before Nadal put a backhand in the net. Djokovic broke again in the opening game of the second set by winning a 22-shot ex change, and he held serve the rest of the way. Rafael Nadal, left, and Novak Djokovic pose with their trophies after Djokovic defeated Nadal 6-3, 6-3 at the Sony Open Tennis tournament, on Sunday, in Key Biscayne. LYNNE SLADKY / AP MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL FRED GOODALL AP Sports Writer ST. PETERSBURG The Tampa Bay Rays are launching anoth er season with expec tations of playing into October. The Toronto Blue Jays have to es cape the AL East cellar before reviving talk of playoff aspirations. The division rivals open the season Mon day at Tropicana Field, with David Price and R.A. Dickey taking the mound in a match up of 2012 Cy Young Award winners. The Rays are com ing off a year in which they won 92 games and made the playoffs for the fourth time in six seasons. The Blue Jays would just as soon forget 2013, when they bat tled injuries and n ished in last place after being a popular pre season pick to contend for a championship. Toronto failed to bolster its starting pitching this winter and returns with es sentially the same lineup as a year ago, yet Dickey thinks the results will be better. Only the Yankees, Cardinals and Phillies have earned as many postseason berths as the Rays over the past six seasons. And af ter hiking one of base balls lowest payrolls above $80 million to keep most of last years roster intact, Tampa Bay anticipates anoth er strong run. Price was 10-8 with a 3.33 ERA in 2013 after winning AL Cy Young honors two years ago, but he went 9-4 with a 2.53 ERA in 18 starts. The 28-year-old lefty was the subject of trade speculation much of the winter before agreeing to a $14 million, one-year contract to contin ue anchoring one of the ALs strongest ro tations. The Rays, often over shadowed in the AL East by the big-spending Yankees and Red Sox, dont shy away from taking about how good they believe they can be. To be honest with you, I thought last year we had more expecta tions going into the season than we do this year only because the Red Sox won the World Series and the Yankees have made some pretty big acqui sitions. So, that kind of puts us in the shadows again, third baseman Evan Longoria said. There are a lot of expectations from within this team, he added. But from an overall perspec tive, well probably be picked down the lad der a little bit more this year ... which is perfectly ne with me. NBA JOHN RAOUX / AP Toronto Raptors guard Nando de Colo (3) fouls Orlando Magics Tobias Harris (12) in the rst half on Sunday in Orlando. KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated Press ORLANDO De Mar DeRozan had 28 points, Jonas Valanci unas added 20 points and nine rebounds, and the Toronto Rap tors escaped with a 98-93 victory over the Orlando Magic on Sunday night. Kyle Lowry added 16 points. Trailing 96-93 with 8.9 seconds to play, the Magic had the ball and an opportunity to tie the game. But com ing out of a timeout they failed to inbound the ball, turning it over on a 5-second vi olation. DeRozan was fouled and hit a pair of free throws to pro vide the nal margin The win was the Raptors third in a row and seventh straight over the Magic. To ronto swept the sea son series 3-0. Nik Vucevic led the Magic with 22 points and 10 rebounds. Ja meer Nelson and Vic tor Oladipo each add ed 16 points. After struggling of fensively for most of the second half, the Magic cut a 21-point decit all the way down to 76-73 on a layup by Tobias Har ris with 9:53 to play in the game. Orlando had a chance to take the lead, but came up empty on a pair of 3-pointers. Cops pepper spray fans after game Rays-Jays opener features pair of Cy Young winners GERALD HERBERT / AP Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price pitches in the second inning of an exhibition game recently. Djokovic beats Nadal at Key Biscayne Harrison lifts Wildcats to win over Michigan Raptors escape with victory over Magic

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 TIM PRICE Associated Press SAN ANTONIO Steven Bowditch held on to win the Texas Open in windy con ditions Sunday for his rst PGA Tour victory and a spot in the Mas ters. The 30-year-old Aus tralian bogeyed the par-5 18th for a 4-over 76 the highest clos ing score by a winner since Vijay Singh n ished with a 4-over 76 in the 2004 PGA Cham pionship for a onestroke victory. Im over the moon, Bowditch said. I really cant believe it. Bowditch nished at 8-under 280 at TPC San Antonio and earned $1,116,000. Will MacKenzie and Daniel Summerhays tied for second. MacK enzie shot 70, and Summerhays had a 71. Chesson Hadley and Ryan Palmer missed chances to get into the Masters through the top 50 in the world ranking. Hadley, the Puerto Rico Open win ner, needed at least a sixth-place nish, but closed with an 80 to tie for 56th at 5 over. Palmer needed a topthree nish and had an 82 to also tie for 56th. Bowditch entered the week 339th in the world and had only two top-10 nishes in eight years on the tour in a career marked by bouts of depression. He won once on the Australasian circuit and twice on the Web. Com Tour. Bowditch played the front nine in 3-over 39, making a double bogey on the par-4 fourth. He countered a bogey on the par-3 13th with a birdie on the par-5 14th and made three pars before missing a 3-foot par putt and set tling for a bogey on 18. On the par-3 16th, he got up-and-down af ter missing the green. He pushed his drive on the par-4 17th, hit his approach on the green and two-putted, then pulled his tee shot left on 18, recovered with a shot to the fairway and reached the green in three. I just drew back on some experience, Bowditch said. MacKenzie made a 13-foot birdie putt on the 17th to pull within a stroke of Bowditch, but the Australian tapped in from 2 feet for his birdie at No. 14 to push the advantage back to two. Matt Kuchar and Andrew Loupe shot 75s to tie for fourth at 6-under. Steven Bowditch holds on to win Texas Open ERIC GAY / AP Steven Bowditch, of Australia, poses with his trophy after winning the Texas Open golf tournament on Sunday in San Antonio. Valero Texas Open Scores Sunday At TPC San Antonio San Antonio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Final Steven Bowditch (500), $1,116,000 69-67-68-76 280 Will MacKenzie (245), $545,600 69-72-70-70 281 Daniel Summerhays (245), $545,600 72-68-70-71 281 Matt Kuchar (123), $272,800 70-72-65-75 282 Andrew Loupe (123), $272,800 67-70-70-75 282 Jim Furyk (89), $200,725 70-74-68-71 283 Zach Johnson (89), $200,725 70-71-70-72 283 Jerry Kelly (89), $200,725 71-71-70-71 283 Brendon Todd (89), $200,725 71-76-68-68 283 Jordan Spieth (75), $167,400 75-70-68-71 284 Charley Hoffman (63), $136,400 70-75-70-70 285 Kevin Na (63), $136,400 70-70-69-76 285 Geoff Ogilvy (63), $136,400 74-69-69-73 285 Pat Perez (63), $136,400 68-71-69-77 285 Justin Hicks (56), $111,600 69-73-72-72 286 Stephen Ames (51), $78,740 74-71-68-74 287 Martin Flores (51), $78,740 71-71-73-72 287 James Hahn (51), $78,740 71-70-76-70 287 Brian Harman (51), $78,740 70-72-75-70 287 Freddie Jacobson (51), $78,740 70-70-73-74 287 Seung-Yul Noh (51), $78,740 69-76-71-71 287 Carl Pettersson (51), $78,740 70-73-71-73 287 Wes Roach (51), $78,740 75-66-72-74 287 Michael Thompson (51), $78,740 70-75-71-71 287 Jimmy Walker (51), $78,740 76-71-71-69 287 Chad Collins (43), $45,880 71-66-73-78 288 Russell Knox (43), $45,880 74-70-71-73 288 Andrew Svoboda (43), $45,880 73-73-67-75 288 Bo Van Pelt (43), $45,880 69-73-71-75 288 Johnson Wagner (43), $45,880 73-73-71-71 288 Brice Garnett (38), $36,766 70-73-71-75 289 Trevor Immelman (38), $36,766 70-71-74-74 289 Jason Kokrak (38), $36,766 71-71-77-70 289 Justin Leonard (38), $36,766 76-69-71-73 289 William McGirt (38), $36,766 72-71-72-74 289 Cameron Beckman (33), $28,572 69-70-77-74 290 Scott Brown (33), $28,572 70-74-73-73 290 Brendon de Jonge (33), $28,572 73-72-71-74 290 Jamie Lovemark (33), $28,572 73-72-72-73 290 Brooks Koepka, $28,572 71-74-73-72 290 Josh Teater (33), $28,572 71-70-77-72 290 Kevin Foley (28), $22,320 74-73-70-74 291 Joe Ogilvie (28), $22,320 74-73-71-73 291 Michael Putnam (28), $22,320 72-71-73-75 291 John Senden (28), $22,320 72-73-73-73 291 Briny Baird (21), $15,934 72-72-72-76 292 Miguel Angel Carballo (21), $15,934 69-76-74-73 292 Ben Curtis (21), $15,934 70-75-72-75 292 Brian Davis (21), $15,934 71-72-76-73 292 Bronson LaCassie (21), $15,934 74-73-70-75 292 John Mallinger (21), $15,934 74-73-70-75 292 Troy Matteson (21), $15,934 72-73-74-73 292 Troy Merritt (21), $15,934 73-72-74-73 292 Andres Romero (21), $15,934 71-74-73-74 292 Cameron Tringale (21), $15,934 71-74-72-75 292 Greg Chalmers (13), $13,826 73-73-74-73 293 Brian Gay (13), $13,826 73-71-73-76 293 Chesson Hadley (13), $13,826 69-73-71-80 293 Jeff Maggert (13), $13,826 72-74-72-75 293 Ryan Palmer (13), $13,826 72-71-68-82 293 Mike Weir (13), $13,826 76-71-72-74 293 Richard H. Lee (9), $13,330 72-75-73-74 294

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 STUDY: Many preteens have high cholesterol / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com THE VILLAGES Alzheimers Family Caregiver Support Walk is Saturday The Alzheimers Family Support Walk was created to raise need ed funds for caregivers, numbering around 20,000 in Lake, Sumter and Marion counties. The group offers respite care, emotional support and education for them to care for their loved ones aficted with this debili tating disease. Make a difference in the life of a caregiver by joining the walk with a friend or in a team from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday at The Villages Polo Field, 703 Buena Vista Blvd. Cost for individuals in a team of six or more is $15 each, and $20 for individual walkers. To register, call 888-496-8004 or go to http://bit.ly/1cz0Bwf. LEESBURG LIFE anniversary luncheon scheduled for April 10 LIFE, a social support program for the widowed, will celebrate its 17th anniversary 11:30 a.m., on April 10 with a combined luncheon of its Leesburg and Tavares groups at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 East Dixie Ave., at Venetian Gardens in Leesburg. After the buffet-style lunch, enter tainment will be provided by Keith Manson, who bills himself as a mu sical humorist. Though complete ly blind since the age of 12, Manson has entertained at Disney World, Silver Springs and other theme parks. The luncheon costs $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling program director Rick Reed at 352-787-0403. TAVARES Health seminar offered at Waterman Hospital Florida Hospital Waterman will offer a seminar on Minimally Invasive Hernia Repair, with Dan Tran, MD, at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Mattison Conference Center. Call 352-323-3635 to register and for information. THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer education and support group meeting Dr. Saumil Karavadia, MD, surgi cal urologist with Advanced Urology Specialists, is the guest and will speak on advanced technology and treatments for prostate cancer, at this meeting at 7 p.m., Wednesday at the Laural Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr., in The Villages. Meetings are free. Call Tom Vajda at 352-446-4194 for details. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer L ove can sometimes break a heart but marriage seems to do it a lot of good. A study of more than 3.5 mil lion Americans nds that married people are less likely than singles, divorced or widowed folks to suffer any type of heart or blood vessel problem. This was true at any age, for women as well as for men, and regardless of other heart disease risk factors they had such as high cholesterol or diabe tes, researchers found. It might be that if someone is married, they have a spouse who en courages them to take better care of them selves, said Dr. Jeffrey Berger, a preventive car diologist at NYU Langone Medical Center. This is the largest look at marriage and heart health, said Dr. Carlos Al viar, a cardiology fellow who led the study with Berger. Previous studies mostly compared mar ried to single people and lacked information on divorced and widowed ones. Or they just looked at heart attacks, where as this one included a full range from clogged arter ies and abdominal aneu rysms to stroke risks and circulation problems in the legs. Researchers used health questionnaires that peo ple lled out when they sought various types of tests in community set tings around the country from an Ohio company, Life Line Screening Inc. Some of these screening tests, for various types of cancer and other diseas es or conditions, are not recommended by leading medical groups, but peo ple can still get them and pay for them themselves. The study authors have no nancial ties to the company and are not endorsing this type of screening, Berger said. Life Line gave its data to the Society of Vascular Study: Married folks less likely to have heart problems CINDY SKOP / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP For 14 years David and Alice Wilson couldnt be happier in their second marriage and show their affection in front of their home in Lake Wales. Healthy vows It might be that if someone is married, they have a spouse who encourages them to take better care of themselves. Dr. Jeffrey Berger, Preventive cardiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center MIKE STOBBE Associated Press NEW YORK The gov ernments estimate of au tism has moved up again to 1 in 68 U.S. children, a 30 percent increase in two years. But health ofcials say the new number may not mean autism is more com mon. Much of the increase is believed to be from a cultural and medical shift, with doctors diagnosing autism more frequently, especially in children with milder problems. We cant dismiss the numbers. But we cant in terpret it to mean more people are getting the disorder, said Marisela Huerta, a psychologist at the New York-Presbyterian Center for Autism and the Developing Brain in sub urban White Plains, N.Y. The Centers for Dis ease Control and Pre vention released the lat est estimate Thursday. The Atlanta-based agency said its calculation means autism affects roughly 1.2 million Americans un der 21. Two years ago, the CDC put the estimate at 1 in 88 children, or about 1 million. The cause or causes of autism are still not known. Without any blood test or other medical tests for au tism, diagnosis is not an exact science. Its identi ed by making judgments about a childs behavior. Thursdays report is con sidered the most compre hensive on the frequen cy of autism. Researchers gathered data in 2010 from areas in 11 states Ala bama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Mary land, Missouri, New Jer sey, North Carolina, Utah and Wisconsin. The report focused on 8-year-olds because most autism is diagnosed by that age. The research ers checked health and school records to see US autism estimate rises to 1 in 68 children SEE AUTISM | C10 SEE HEART | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer Theres fresh ev idence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trou ble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams. The results seem to support recent guide lines that call for every child to have a choles terol test between 9 and 11 the ages of the 13,000 youths in this study. Many doctors and adults have balked at screening all chil dren that young, but researchers say studies like this may convince them its worthwhile. A concerning num ber of children are at risk of heart problems later in life, and more needs to be done to prevent this at an ear lier age, said Dr. Thom as Seery of Texas Chil drens Hospital and Baylor College of Med icine. He led the study, which will be present ed at an American Col lege of Cardiology con ference in Washington this weekend. Estimates are that by the fourth grade, 10 to 13 percent of U.S. chil dren will have high cholesterol. Half of them will go on to have it as adults, raising their risk for heart at tacks, strokes and oth er problems. High cholesterol rare ly causes symptoms in kids. Many genes and inherited conditions also cause high choles terol but not obesity, so it can be missed espe cially in youths who are slim or athletic. The new study in volved children hav ing routine physicals from January 2010 to July 2011 at the largest pediatric primary care network in the nation, more than 45 clinics in the Houston area. Onethird were Hispanic, about one-third were white, and 18 percent were black. About onethird were obese. Unhealthy total cho lesterol levels were found in 34 percent. LDL or bad cholester ol was borderline or too high in 46 percent, and HDL or good cholesterol was border line or too low in 44 per cent. Just over half had normal triglycerides, another type of fat in the blood. Boys were more likely than girls to have high er total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides, Seery said. Hispan ics were more likely to have higher cholesterol and triglycerides. I would hope that data like these would get the attention of general pediatricians, because many cas es of disease are being missed now, said Dr. Elaine Urbina, director of preventive cardiol ogy at Cincinnati Chil drens Hospital Medical Center. She was on the expert panel appointed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute that wrote the screen ing guidelines issued in 2011 and endorsed by the American Academ y of Pediatrics. They call for screening everyone rffrfnrrftfb 5 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.pma-physicians.com www.pmaflorida.com1580 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages Urgent Care Center 910 Old Camp Rd., Suite 196, The Villages 1004 N. 14th St., Leesburg (Next to Wolfys & McDonalds) Urgent Care Center 2403 SE 17th St., Suite 101, Ocala 411 N. West Street, Bushnell Urgent Care CenterANDPREMIER URGENT CAREURGENTCAREOPEN365 DAYS! We are providers for the following Medicare Plans:Freedom, Optimum, Preferred Care Partners, PUP, United Health Care.Most Other Insurances Accepted Including BCBS, UNH, PHP, Cigna, Medicare and other Medicare HMOs.DISCOUNTS TO PATIENTS WITHOUT INSURANCE Introducing the Newest Member of Our Medical Team...Dr. Carrsquillo joins us from Bushnell, Florida where he practiced Family Medicine for many years. Were excited to have him on board, and look forward to serving the healthcare needs of our community as a team.Fausto Carrsquillo, PA-CDinesh Khanna, MD Eldar Baigabatov, MD Hazem El-Arousy, MD Florian Gegaj, MD Sundeep Shah, MD Amir Etemadnia, MD Michele Hornstein, DO Alfred Soto, MD Ramy Lbrahim, MD Ana Karovska, MD Somi Ansari, MD Michelle Madonna, ARNP Tim Chan, DPM Fausto Carrsquillo, PA-CDelivering premmier medical care with compassion and understanding has been our golden standard for almost two decades. Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.* Computer imaging measures areas of low impedance known to be associated with pain. Concentrated electrical stimulation relieves pain noninvasively.Fruitland Park (352) 365-1191 The Villages (352) 750-1200 www.ecdoctors.com*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Patent Pending GOLF CART ACCESS Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol SEE STUDY | C3

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Now I can eat what I want, worry free!rf nftbfr tfrr rt ffn r tt f nrnfr tf tn t rr r t rn t f rttb MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Surgery and New York University to help pro mote research. The results are from people who sought screening from 2003 through 2008. Their av erage age was 64, near ly two-thirds were fe male and 80 percent were white. They gave information on smok ing, diabetes, family history, obesity, exer cise and other factors, and researchers had blood pressure and other health measures. The study found: Married people had a 5 percent low er risk of any cardio vascular disease com pared to single people. Widowed people had a 3 percent greater risk of it and divorced peo ple, a 5 percent greater risk, compared to mar ried folks. Marriage seemed to do the most good for those under age 50; they had a 12 percent lower risk of heart-re lated disease than sin gle people their age. Smoking, a major heart risk, was highest among divorced peo ple and lowest in wid owed ones. Obesi ty was most common in those single and di vorced. Widowed peo ple had the highest rates of high blood pressure, diabetes and inadequate exercise. Researchers dont know how long any study participants were married or how recently they were di vorced or became widowed. But the re sults drive home the message that a per sons heart risks cant be judged by physical measures alone so cial factors and stress also matter, said Dr. Vera Bittner, a cardiol ogist at the University of Alabama at Birming ham. She heads the heart disease prevention committee of the American College of Cardiology. The study results were released on Friday ahead of pre sentation this weekend at the groups annual meeting in Washington. We dont really have a clear explanation for why marriage may be protective, Bittner said. You may be more willing to follow up with medical appoint ments, take recom mended drugs, diet and exercise if you have a spouse, she said. HEART FROM PAGE C1 between age 9 to 11 and again 17 to 21. Very few people know their entire fam ily history, and many forms of high choles terol occur in people who are not obese, so screening is needed to catch more cases, she said. High cholester ol doesnt necessarily mean the child needs medicines like statin drugs, she said. The guidelines stress diet and lifestyle changes as the rst step. STUDY FROM PAGE C2

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 JEREMY OLSON Star Tribune MINNEAPOLIS A new test that requires people to send stool samples in the mail for laboratory analysis is proving nearly as reli able as a colonoscopy in identifying potential ly fatal colon can cers. The DNA screening test, invented at the Mayo Clinic, could be come an alternative to the colonoscopy or at least an option for the millions of Americans who ignore their doc tors recommendations because they are squea mish about the rec tal exam or concerned about its cost, said Dr. David Ahlquist, a Mayo gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Co loguard system. The test was 92 per cent accurate at iden tifying patients with colon cancer and 69 percent accurate at identifying patients with the kinds of bow el lesions or polyps that indicate a high risk for cancer, according to clinical trial results published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Time will tell, Ahlquist said. Its our hope that many indi viduals who are not be ing screened because of their reticence to undergo colonoscopy will choose to undergo screening with a nonin vasive option like this. Regular screening for colon cancer is recom mended at age 50 earlier for people with family histories or great er risks and was cred ited in a report Monday by the American Can cer Society for a decline over the past decade in the U.S. rate of colon cancer mortality. But the lack of up take is also why co lon cancer remains the third-leading cause of cancer mortality, and contributes to 50,000 deaths in the nation each year. The DNA test comes with its own eww! factor, in that people would need to sh out their own stool samples and package them to send in for testing. But market research by the test kit manufacturer, Exact Sciences of Madi son, Wis., indicates that people arent bothered as long as the test is ef fective and covered by health insurance. Sur veys showed only 3 per cent of people being put off by having to col lect a stool sample. Our kit comes in its own sturdy box and the patient also uses it to return the sample to the lab, said Exact Sciences spokeswom an Cara Tucker. Test re sults would be sent to doctors in about two weeks. The ndings pub lished Wednesday come from a compa ny-funded clinical tri al of 10,023 people who were at normal risk for colon cancer. They come about two weeks before a U.S. Food and Drug Administration committee is sched uled to decide whether the test is safe and ef fective for clinical use. In an unusual step, the U.S. Centers for Medi care and Medicaid Ser vices are reviewing the test before the FDA re view is complete an indication that the fed eral agency might ex pedite Medicare cover age of the test for the nations elderly popu lation. Federal approv al could mean the Co loguard test would be available as early as midsummer. The study was a head-to-head compar ison with an existing test called FIT, which detects cancer by nd ing hidden blood in stools, and showed that the new DNA screen ing found more cancers and cancer risks. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. An alternative to the traditional colonoscopy Its our hope that many individuals who are not being screened because of their reticence to undergo colonoscopy will choose to undergo screening with a noninvasive option like this. Dr. David Ahlquist, Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist SEE TEST | C5

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Cologuard works be cause tumors and pol yps in the colon shed cells that are detect able in human waste, Ahlquist explained. However, the DNA test resulted in some false positives about one in 10 tests suggested patients had colon can cer or an imminent risk for it, when they didnt. In clinical care, pa tients with positive re sults from Cologuard would undergo colo noscopies to conrm the results, said Dr. Thomas Imperiale, an Indiana gastroenterol ogist who was lead au thor of the study. False positives do cause stress and anxi ety, he said, but in the end they would di rect patients to receive colonoscopies that they would have likely received anyway if the DNA test didnt exist. The rate of false neg atives was low, and would likely be over come if patients re peated the test over time, he said. Whether the test would be rec ommended annually, or less frequently, is un clear. The cost remains unclear as well, though it would presumably be cheaper than a colo noscopy that requires a visit to a specialty clinic or hospital. Dr. Cathleen Clouse, a HealthEast family prac tice doctor in Maple wood, Minn., said she would welcome a new alternative for the many patients who are un easy about colonosco pies or dislike the volu minous uids they must consume in advance to clean out their bowels. 352.530.2256 803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionCall today to schedule your appointment The Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159 Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology 352-253-0059Visitpetlodgeandspa.comIn Leesburg, next to Home DepotDiscover why pet owners trust us for their boarding, day care and grooming needs. TEST FROM PAGE C4 Staff Report AARP Driver Safety Programs help partici pants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving hab its with a new 6-hour curriculum, and upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. The two-day course, consisting of three hours each day will be offered at the following locations: April 7 and 9, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., Leesburg. Register by calling 352-326-3540. April 7 and 9, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora. Register by call ing 352-735-7180. April 7 and 8, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Live Well campus at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr. in Clermont, a Spanish language class. To reg ister call 352-394-0250. AARP Driver Safety Progams slated for April Thank you for reading the local paper!

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Land Clearing Services

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeat ed numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, March 31 the 90th day of 2014. There are 275 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On March 31, 1814, Paris was occupied by a coalition of Russian, Prus sian and Austrian forc es; the surrender of the French capital forced the abdication of Emperor Na poleon. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 31, 2014: This year your libido en ergies peak to an unprec edented level. You seem to sleuth your way through problems and come up with remarkable solutions. Oth ers will come to you for help more often; they admire your ingenuity. You will tend to be me-oriented this year, so try to temper any excessive ego tism. If you are single, you could open up to a very in triguing person who you feel you have a lot to learn from. The two of you could be come quite the dynamic duo. If you are attached, your re lationship quality will depend on your ability to remain sen sitive to your sweetie. A fel low ARIES could become even more important to you this year. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Someone is likely to sense your strength. As a re sult, this person will push you to get a reaction. You might decide to give him or her that reaction, just to catch him or her off guard. From there, you can continue with your day. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You might prefer not to have to give explanations or deal with much. On some level, you could be experi encing a knee-jerk reaction regarding what is happening around you. You also might not feel a need to redene or rethink your response. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You feel destined to achieve certain goals. You could be a little tired or feel pushed by someone else. You might want to put this person in his or her place. Keep your eye on the long term, and be more forthright with a loved one. CANCER (June 21-July 22) All eyes turn to you whenever others question what to do next, as your leadership qualities are rath er evident. You could be at tered that your judgment is so valued. Understand what might be needed to get past an immediate hassle. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Re alize what is happening with those around you. One per son seems determined to have things go his or her way. This individual could push beyond any normal lev el. If you see this behavior setting up, detach. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Deal with a loved one direct ly. You could want and need to rethink your interactions with this person, as he or she seems to have copped an attitude as of late. Your sense of direction and knowledge will cause a posi tive change. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be far grump ier than you realize. Look around and note others re actions to you. Rather than growl and grumble, root out what is really going on with you. Only then will you be able to get more control over your feelings. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Dive into work or a proj ect. With concentration and focus, youll accomplish much more than you previ ously might have thought possible. As a side benet, you will work off some frus tration. Make a call to a new friend. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your playfulness and ability to honor a quick change will make all the dif ference in your choices. Re-evaluate what needs to happen between you and a new irtation. As always, ev ery bond has its limitations. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll want to un derstand why someone is behaving a certain way be fore you make a judgment. This person seems to be all over the place. Get feedback from a friend, but realize that you might not feel comfort able with all of his or her opinions. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Reach out to someone at a distance who might be searching for some feed back. Try to understand what is going on. Do not be adverse to picking up the phone and making some calls. You need more infor mation. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might be more sen sitive to a loved one than you usually would deem nec essary. Your ability to under stand mood changes proba bly could be applied here. Do not personalize a comment. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: I have been married for sev en years and have two children. My husband has what I can only de scribe as an Internet addiction. Hes literal ly online from the time I go to bed until I wake up to take our kids to school. I checked and discovered many pro les he has made up on different dating sites. When I confront ed him, he told me he has no interest in hav ing an affair. He said he has been depressed for some time, and its his way of escaping reality. I recommended he talk to a therapist, but he keeps trying to justify his behavior by telling me I have no reason to feel hurt because its all make-believe. Our relationship has taken a serious dive since I found out. I no longer trust him alone on the computer. I am also no longer attract ed to him, and I no lon ger feel attractive. I dont know what I can do to be a supportive partner if he wont ad mit he has a problem. Please help me. Im at a total loss. SECOND TO A SCREEN NAME DEAR SECOND: May I be frank? First on your agenda should be to take care of yourself and your own emerg ing depression. If that means talking to a pro fessional, then go for it. You have every right to be angry about what your husband has been doing. It isnt harm less, and it isnt effec tive therapy for his de pression. Much as you might wish to, you cant x his prob lem which is trying to escape from reali ty. Only he can do that. Lets hope hell nd the courage to face what hes trying to escape from while your mar riage is still salvage able. DEAR ABBY: I am not suicidal, but I do think about death, in the sense of what hap pens when one dies. I believe in the heav en-and-hell theory. Al though Im not sure I want to go to heaven, I AM sure I dont want to go to hell. My reason for not wanting to go to heav en is because of the rel atives who have gone before me. I come from a very abusive family but, like so many, most of them have been able to do what I call the last-minute re demption. With that in mind, I do not want to spend all of eternity with the same people I could not wait to have exit this Earth. I am also not a big believer in this forgive ness thing forgiving adults who do these things to children and expect them to forget about it. I sure havent, and I never will! Do you, or the clergy, think its possible for God to just let some of us sleep through eter nity without meeting up with family on the other side? OWENS BORO, KY., READER DEAR READER: Be cause I am more in volved with whats go ing on in this life rather than the next, I took your question to Rev. Canon Mark Stanger of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He suggests that you stop think ing about heaven as a place or that you need a scorecard to get there. He also said: A merciful God will make heaven what you need and in your case, heaven may be libera tion from these trou bled people. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Husbands depression wont be cured by acting out online

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 which children met the criteria for autism, even if they hadnt been for mally diagnosed. Then, the researchers calcu lated how common au tism was in each place an d overall. The CDC started us ing this method in 2007 when it came up with an estimate of 1 in 150 children. Two years lat er, it went to 1 in 110. In 2012, it went to 1 in 88. Last year, the CDC re leased results of a less reliable calculation from a survey of par ents which suggest ed as many as 1 in 50 children have autism. Experts arent sur prised by the growing numbers, and some say all it reects is that doc tors, teachers and par ents are increasingly likely to say a child with learning and behav ior problems is autis tic. Some CDC experts say screening and diag nosis are clearly major drivers, but that they cant rule out some ac tual increase as well. We cannot say what portion is from bet ter diagnosis and im proved understanding versus if theres a real change, said Coleen Boyle, the CDC ofcial overseeing research into childrens develop mental disabilities. For decades, autism meant kids with se vere language, intellec tual and social impair ments and unusual, repetitious behaviors. But the denition has gradually expanded and now includes mild er, related conditions. One sign of that: In the latest study, almost half of autistic kids had average or above aver age IQs. Thats up from a third a decade ago and can be taken as an indi cation that the autism label is more common ly given to higher-func tioning children, CDC ofcials acknowledged. Aside from that, much in the latest CDC report echoes earli er ndings. Autism and related disorders continue to be diag nosed far more often in boys than girls, and in whites than blacks or Hispanics. The racial and ethnic differences probably reects white communities greater focus on looking for au tism and white parents access to doctors, be cause theres no biolog ical reason to believe whites get autism more than other people, CDC ofcials said at a press brieng Thursday. One change CDC of cials had hoped to see, but didnt, was a drop in the age of di agnosis. Experts say a diagnosis can now be made at age 2 or even earlier. But the new re port said the majority of children continue to be diagnosed after they turn 4. We know the earlier a child is identied and connected with ser vices, the better, Boyle said. The American Acade my of Pediatrics issued a statement Thursday, saying the nation needs to step up screening for the condition and re search into autisms causes. Its critical that we as a society do not be come numb to these numbers, said Dr. Su san Hyman, head of the groups autism sub committee. 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Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) AUTISM 032714: Graphic compares prevalence in children with autism or related disorders since 2007; 2c x 2 1/2 inches; with BC-US-MED--Autism Estimate; PH; E T A 5 p.m. Editors Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when a or editing it for publication Autism prevalence growing in U.S.One in 68 U.S. children is believed to have autism or a related disorder, according to the latest estimate a 30 percent jump from the 2012 federal estimate 2014 2012 2009 2007 1 in 68based on 2010 data1 in 882008 data1 in 1002006 data1 in 150 2002 data SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention AP AUTISM FROM PAGE C1

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbnrf nttfb rff nntrnnn ttbtbb btfnfn nnnb nf tb btbrn nbfnn ff b ttfnffnnff nfbrffbff tfntn trf nbttb tbnt bnnbnr nb fbt fbrnbn fbrb tfnfnnnt rnrnnn bnr trb nnnft rbntn bfbtfn tfffntt ttfnbbbnb ft bn frbfb nbrnfn ffrf fbfffb nfbtf bbff tftrttt tbffnr tb bbn b tnbbtntt tnbbtrff fttftbn tfntfnr f tbtfn rnn bnffr tttbr tft btn tfn n fnn tnfbb fbfb fbbfb fbf bbbtf ft n f ntftnf fftfntnb f tbbntff fbtnfbbbnb ntftnfnfb nnffb fttfn bbttfn nfnbfnbb nbt nn tnbbf bbbtfb bbfnnnt bnffffrr trrrbtftb bft n n nnt ttfntnbnb ttfntbbf ntttb trffbftn fbtnrffntfr ffttttt b rff fnnbnr nbttb fftb fbbnb ftfnn nbnnbnrn fbbnn nnb f n n fbtf nbn fnnn n n ffbnf fb t t f n ttfntn ffb ttfnbtb fbb tbr ffb b fb n f n f fbtf fbnfrnfnb b fbfb n n fffb rbntbrnrffnfb rfffb rbrbntfb ttnnf rffbnb fnnnfb nffnbnt t ttfn nntnr nnbnrtt fbbt bfb bbttb tntt btb rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff n tbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 rfntbn rfnrtbn n rtnrrn rb r fnf r r r r n n rt r r r tbfn rn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f rf n r r rrr rrrrn r r f n r n r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r n r t b t r r r r r r r r r r r n r n r r r n r r r r r n r r r r n r f r r r r r r r n r r r n r r b r r r b r r r n r t n r r n r r r rf n r r n b r r r r rrrrrnrrr rrnrr rr rrrrrr nrrr rrrrrn rrrn r r r n n r r b b r r r r b r n rf r n r r r r r r f rf n r r r r r r r r r b r n rf r n r r r n r r r r r n r r r r r r n f f r r r r n r r r r r b r r f r n r r r n r r r b r r r n n b n n n f n r r r n r r n f r r r n r r n r r r r r f r r r r r n r r b r r n n bnn rnrrrr nrrrr rnr r f rrrr nrrrn frrrnrnr r r r r r n n b n r r r nrrrnrfrr rnrrr rn f r f r r r n rf r n r r n r n r r r f r r f r r n f r r r r n r r n f r rnrrrrfr rrrr rrrn r r r r r r n r r r r r r n r r n r r r f r f r r r r r r r n r n r f n r r n r r b rrrrr rrr rrfrrrr r rr rr r r n n n r f r r n r r r r r n r r r r r r n n r r r n r nn f f f rf r r r r b r r r r r r r r r r r r r rf r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r f r r r n r r r r r n r r r f r r r n r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r b r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b r n r f r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r n fn nb tnf r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r n r b r r r r r r r r r r n r ff r r r r rf r r r rf r n r r r r n r b b r bb b r r r r r r n r r r r n r r f r n r r r n b n r n r b bb b r n r r r r n r b r r r n r r r f n r n r r b rn r f n r r r r r r r rf b r r r r n r n r f b r r r r n n r f r r r n r r r r r n r r n r r rb b f r r r r r r r n r rrrrrr rrrrrn rrnrnrrr rrrrn r r r n r tn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r rb r r r r n n bf f rrr rrrrfr rrrrrr rrrnrnr rbn r r n r r r n r r r r r r r r n r rf r r n r rbb r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f f r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r f r f f r b r r b n r r f r r r r r r f f r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r rf r rf r r r r r r rf rf r f r r r fn b b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rrb nnrrrrr rrrrrr rrrr rrfrrr rrrr rrrr rrrr rr n rrrrrn rnrrrr rrrrnrrn rrr rnrr rnrrr rbrrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr r n r r rrrrrr rrrrbrr rrnrbrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrnnr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr frrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrr rrrrr rnrrnrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrrr brrrr rrnrfr rrrrfr rbbrnfnrrfrbrbr rrrrrr rrr rbrrrrbr rrrrrr rrbrrrrr rrrrn r r f r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r f r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r b r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r b b n r rrrrr rr nr rrr rr rfrr rrrrr rrrb br br brbr rnrbb frrrbrb b b r r r r r r rrrtn rrbrrr rr bbbrrr rr b rrbb frrrrrb nb r f r r r r f r r b r r r r r b r r r r r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r n rr rrrrrr rbrrrrr rbrbrrrnnrrrr rrrrfrnrrr rrrrr brrrrrrrb brrrnnrrrrrrn rrfrn rrrrrb rrrrrrr rrrrrnrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrrr nrrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr nbn rrrrr rrrrrrnn rrnnrrrrrrnrr frnrrrr rrn rrrfrrrr rrrrrrrrn rrfrrr rrrrnnrrrnn r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n rnrb frbrb r r rrrrrrr rrrrrrr rrbrrrr brrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr brrbrrrrrr rrnrrr rrnrnrrnn rr rfr rfb rr rn frbrrbrb r r rrrnrrr rrrrrrr rrbbrrrrbb rrrrr rrrrbn rrrnrrr nrrrrrrrr rrn r bb rb frbrb rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrnrr rrrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrrrr rrrrrrr rrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rnrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr bnbrnnn rrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrrrn rrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrrr rrrr rrrn f rrfrrrrr n rr frbrrbrrrrrr rrrbr nb

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbnrf rrf ntb r r r bfttrt t rt br tr rf n tt t rr rrtbr n r ftr rf r t trtbr rttb rtb tr r b t b n b r rt rt rr nrtr tftr tr r rtrt t rtrb t n tr n n rf rr t rtr bt nt fr ntb b n r t b r t r f n t n bbrf b t r rt t n n rtrrr f f fr r fr t bbfr btr frtt t fr rtr r ffrfr r r t b n rftr b n bt b t fr nr ftrr ttt bf n t n r f t r r n n tb n n bbrrrt n n rft tbt frn ttftf brt t btr n n f n bt tt n trb n rrrt tt tb t t n fr bb tt nfr t n n b nbr br fr n btbr r rrt btb bf tt f ntt tt ft f n f tr nt tffr rn n n n tfrtr rf n nr nbr brrb t nrr nrtb tfr tt n bbr r rf rbt n r rr tfbrr t n t r r n t r r r t b t n t t b n t n trr t bbrn n br f r tb tt tr rt b btrtrbt ttbbrr r t rtr t tt r t tr t br trrtftrtr bt rbt t t b t rbtb ttr btrtb t n bt n r frr frbt tbr t br r r trb f fr rrtrrtt t t rtr tfr r t r n b n f t r r t r t b t r r t r f f t f f f t r r n rf tt b r f t r t t t t t t tr fbt n rf n ntbtr ntr tb trtf ttt r

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 rfntbn rfr ntbbtr nnt ff ntb nnff t b n n f f tntb trfr nn nf ffrtf r bt rrrrf nnnn rr nftff rf bnnnb frr f b r f rrf n t n t n n b n b ntbf nt nfrf rf nntnrrf ntb r f f r f r t nfnt tbnbttnb trf bf n rnr frf nr b f f n r r nt tbtrt frrrf nn rrf r t ftnttntbnt nb rfrr nbt brfr nrrf f nbbt bb tffr rnbr nbtbbtb ft bnnbttff ntrrf ntn ftrnbf rf r f f f n nn tbt nnn nf btn r n f tt nbnrrr ttn nbnrr f rf bfr nbtf b bf f ntn bt bnf r ftnbbntn nnnn brrfr n rfbt frrf bbnnr nnn nbbntn rn fb ffbn nnnn nbn nfr rfrb nbn rfrfr n nn frfbt nn f t f rftbnn bnntnn btb rrff ffnf nnnnn nnrbnbb rrr n r n t n b n n n b n n t n r f n n n t t n n b f r r ttn rrtntn bfbr rfbnn ntbtt fnrfr bnnttt nrff rrbnb nbtnr ntttnn bffffr fntbbnn nnnbbt nb ntt r trnttt ttnb f rr nnf f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nn f f nnntrf f r r nttf r n n t t f r n t r n f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f nf f nnff f n r n t n b n n n b n ftt rrn rtnnb tnrfr n r n t n b n n n b n r f n n n t t n n b f n t t r r nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r trf fft n b b t b r f r n t t f f f r b n b t n f f r frb f n t b b t t t n b t b n b r r f r f nntnr nttr rr ft nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nff n r n t n b n n n b n f n t n t t t t r f n t r r nft tbf f r r f fftt bbn rf rf nft tbf b t b r r n n n t b n t b f r n t b f b n t n b f r n n n r f r f n t t t t t b t r f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nft ttbf r b n n t n nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r n f ttbf nnff ft tb ntbtbf r t frrff tb rrfr rn r nn fbtf rbtbtfr rr rb rbtntr f nbn brrf ntbn fbr frfr r nnb nfr rbtf f r r rnr f tnt nbbttb bnn rff nnrrf f nbtbtnb r f r b t f r f r tb frr fbftb brnrffr frfbt n t n b f f r btbt rr bnfb r brt rfbrf rbt bb nb bbr tr rbnn nbrrff bn rrf frfbt ntbbtn nbfr f rf fnrff t r r r f b fr t t n t b n b t r r r nn rrf nnb bfr rf ntnbtr bb brr frbfbft bbt brr frfr nbrf tbf bf nntn rrfr tn brff tnfff rr btf frf btf frf btff brr fbtn bntn f ftb nbtf trf t bfr br tft tb tbnrfr bttnb rrf bt rrf n t t f n b t r nbnr bbbbr b trr nbn rr nt brr bbnbbr r nbt tbtbnbbt frfrrrr fbtr rrf f rrff nttt frf tbnb r r r nn rrrff tbtbnt bbbtf tbnntb brfr ntb nfrrf brf f



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Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 UCONN UPSETS MICHIGAN STATE 60-54, SPORTS B1FAMILY WALK NIGHT: Participants strengthen bonds and bodies, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Married folks are less likely to have heart problems, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 31, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 90 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C8 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.78 / 53Mostly sunny. 50 BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Seventy-nine. In the rain. With no headlights on. With those words, Flori da Highway Patrol Trooper John Schultz sped onto In terstate 10 and ipped on his red, white and blue ashing lights and pulled over a black Nissan Maxima. He told the driver she was getting a ticket for exceeding the 70 mph speed limit. She said, I had the cruise control set at 79. Yeah, its working, Schultz said as he wrote the ticket. She said I just assumed I could go 10 over. So if we change the limit to 75, shed be going 85. Highway safety advocates say that if the Florida Leg islature passes a bill that would allow the state to raise the speed limit to 75 mph there could be more crashes, injuries and deaths. The bills supporters say people are already driving that fast and the speed limit should reect reality and would actually be safer. If you articially force lower speed limits on roads that can accommodate faster speed limits, what youre going to have is a greater disparity between the fastest drivers and the slowest drivers and thats actually a much more unsafe environ ment than having everybody going faster together, Sen. Jeff Clemens said. The bill (SB 392) Clemens, D-Lake Worth, sponsored along with Republican Sen. Jeff Brandes of St. Petersburg sailed through committees with little opposition and is ready to be considered by the full Senate. A House bill (HB 761) sponsored by Republican Rep. Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres has also re ceived little opposition and has one more committee stop before being ready for a House vote. The measures would allow the Department of Transpor tation to raise the speed lim it on interstate and limited access highways from 70 to 75 mph, from 65 to 70 mph Bill could raise state speed limit to 75 mph PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Pastor Charles Granger, 82, and his wife, Joyce, center, greet New York visitors Yvonne Webster, left, and her husband Ardell at Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis. BELOW: Bill Myer, at microphone, leads prayer at Southern Palms RV Resort, joined by Ruth Karper, Dave Walcott and Marian Shank. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comFor three decades, from November to March, the South ern Palms RV Resort in Eustis has offered Sunday worship ser vice for travelers from all over the country and Canada. Sundays 10 / a.m. service was the last of the 30th season, with a closing service and communion in the parks fellowship hall, led by the Rev. Charles Granger, 82, of DeLand. An average of 150 to 200 people just about all of the RVers have attended on Sundays over the years. I love meeting such a wonderful group of people, a cross-section of Americana and the number of Canadians who come down here, too, Granger said. Christmas Eve is one of the biggest services, along with a memorial service on the rst Sunday in February. We memorialize all of the people who have died the previous year who were a part of this fellowship here, the pastor said. They call it a church, but there is no membership, Granger said of the services at the resort, located near Lake County Fairgrounds. This is just people coming together. Granger recalled the park belonged to the city of Eustis before it was sold to individuals who owned parks all over the country. Granger had been serving as interim pastor at the First Baptist Church in Eustis when he was asked if he could preach at the RV park. My rst Sunday, 82 people were sitting here, Granger said. And what they told me was 80 percent of the people who were here for that service did not go to church anywhere on Sunday. I came back the next Sunday and we had 150 or so. During his time of ministering at Southern Palms, Granger was serving as chaplain and campus minister at Stetson University. It was a great time; I was working with both age groups, he said of ministering to college kids during the week and to seniors on Sundays. I was 52 when I started (at Southern Palms) and I thought they were a bunch of old folks, and now Im older than most of them over here.EUSTISRV park church draws hundreds STEPHEN OHLEMACHERAssociated PressWASHINGTON Even if Democrats re cruit great candidates, raise gobs of money and run smart campaigns, they face an uphill ght to retake con trol of the House in this years congressional elections, regardless of the political climate in November. The reason? Repub lican strategists spent years developing a plan to take advantage of the 2010 census, rst by winning key state legislatures and then redrawing House districts to tilt the playing eld in their favor. In states like Ohio, Michigan and North Carolina, Republicans GOP has a builtin advantage in fight for House MIKE SCHNEIDERAssociated PressORLANDO Florida is a politically divided state. The Republicans have won the last four gu bernatorial elections, but the Democrats have carried the state in the last two presidential elec tions. One U.S. senator is a Republican, while the other is a Democrat. The Democrats hold a slight edge in voter registration. But that narrow divide becomes a chasm in Flori das congressional delegation and in the Legislature. Geography influences redistricting in Florida AP FILE PHOTO On Jan. 5, 2011, then-outgoing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. hands the gavel to the new House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio during the rst session of the 112th Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. SEE CHURCH | A2SEE SPEED | A2SEE HOUSE | A2SEE DISTRICT | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 30CASH 3 . ............................................... 9-1-5 Afternoon . .......................................... 1-6-6 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 1-6-3-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 1-6-2-3FLORIDALOTTERY MARCH 29FANTASY 5 . ........................... 5-10-15-22-24 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 4-8-13-36-38-45 POWERBALL ...................... 2-3-12-27-3817 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.In those early years, he ar ranged for some Stetson students to preach at the RV park. Every one of them would come to my ofce on Monday morning saying, Let me go again! They loved coming over here, Granger said. He remained at the private college for 21 years before retiring in 1996 at age 65. The Florida native recalled living three blocks from a Jacksonville church during his youth as the oldest of ve children, yet his family did not attend church. We had never been in anybodys church, he said. No one ever invited me to church because of my language. I used to cuss as good as any sailor at Jacksonville Naval Air Station, he said. I could out-cuss them. The turning point in Grangers life was his junior year of high school. God spoke to me in a Jewish grocery store on a Saturday afternoon, said Granger, who was sacking potatoes when he heard an audible voice saying, You go to church tomorrow. I looked around the store because I thought there was a ventriloquist practicing a voice. I looked around the store and there wasnt a soul in sight near where I was. I was in the produce section all by myself. He put the message out of his mind. I went out and raised hell, caroused with the guys, just like I did every Satur day night with a bunch of high school boys, he said. The next morning I was wide awake by 8 oclock. It was just gnawing at me that I had to go to church, and I literally sneaked out of the house and went up to the little Baptist church three blocks away. When I walked in the church, people said, What is he doing here? Granger was baptized that same school year, in December of 1946. Eventually, all four of my siblings and my mother and father came into the church, he said. He was working in a shop repairing telephones when he said the Lord spoke to him a second time. I got stopped in my tracks when I heard, I want you to go preach. And I thought I didnt want to be a part of it, he said. Now the Baptist minister is glad he listened to the Lord. And that is what I encour age people to do listen to the spirit that is speaking to you, not what somebody else is telling you, Granger said. The pastor has gone through hip and knee replacements and a battle with lymphoma cancer, but strives to continue inspiring people with his tell-it-likeit-is sermons. Pastor Granger is just wonderful. Thirty years he has been with us, said Judy Kryder of Michigan, who sings in the choir and cher ishes the friendship she has forged with others at Southern Palms, the park that has been her winter home since 1998. Floridas glorious weather is what brings her back each year, she said, and she and hundreds of others hope to reunite with their pastor in November for the parks 2014-15 season. CHURCH FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Joyce Granger sings during worship service at Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis. Sunday marked the resorts last church service of the 30th season. The resort will resume its weekly worship service on the rst Sunday in November.on rural, four-lane divid ed highways and up to 65 mph on other roads. It does not automatical ly raise the speed limits. If you look back to when we rescinded the national speed limit (of 55 mph) in the mids until now, its been 20 years of history and I think in only one year have fatalities actually increased. So the predic tions of doom and gloom that we had in the mids just didnt come true, Clemens said. But a National Highway Trafc Safety Administration report showed that trafc fatalities on rural interstates increased by 10 percent in 1996, the year after the national speed limit was lifted and states were allowed to set their own standards. And the fear of high way safety advocates is that another increase in Florida will result in more deaths because people will drive faster and be that much more at risk of losing control. The higher speeds also create more violent colli sions, they say. Its clear that inju ries and fatalities go up whenever someone rais es the speed limit, John Ulczycki, a vice pres ident of the National Safety Council, said in a press release opposing the bills. Raising speed limits will increase the likelihood of a crash, and the government would in effect be telling people its safe to drive faster. Schultz, who patrols an area near Tallahassee, estimates most drivers on Interstate 10 are driving between 75 and 80 mph, and he thinks that will increase with a high er limit. Driving in the rain, he clocked a string of trafc going in the op posite direction. Seventy-eight, he said after the rst ra dar reading. Theres 79 on the truck. That mo torcycle right there is 82. Where Im going with this is its raining out and no one reduces their speed. And a higher speed limit will make the situation more dangerous, he said. He also pointed out that the speed limit now is essentially 75 mph be cause the state only allows for warnings and not nes for the rst ve miles per hour above the speed limit. Theyre going to take it to the next extreme and go up even higher, Schultz said. We want to keep people safe. SPEED FROM PAGE A1 were able to shape con gressional maps to pack as many Democratic voters as possible into the few est House districts. The process, called gerrymandering, left fertile ground elsewhere in each state to spread Republican voters among more districts, increasing the GOPs chances of winning more seats. Geography helped, too, in some states. Democratic voters are more like ly to live in densely popu lated urban areas, making it easier to pack them into fewer districts. The rst payoff came in 2012, when Republicans kept control of the House despite Democratic support that swept President Barack Obama to a second term. The next payoff is likely to come this fall. Gerrymandering has a long history in the Unit ed States, pursued enthu siastically by both Dem ocrats and Republicans. But the GOPs success at it this decade has been historic: In 2012, Republicans achieved a 33-seat ma jority in the House, even though GOP candidates as a group got 1.4 mil lion fewer votes than their Democratic opponents. It was only the second time since World War II that the party receiving the most votes failed to win a major ity of House seats, according to statistics compiled by the House Clerk. Democrats gained eight seats but were still a minority. The fact that Republi cans controlled redistrict ing (after 2010) meant that they were able to build up a wall, stopping a lot of the tide from running out, said Justin Levitt, a law professor and redistricting ex pert at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. They were able to shore up a lot of the districts that had been won by, in many cases, tea party freshmen or other Republican freshmen. The Republicans advan tage will fade as the decade wears on and the popula tion changes. In the mean time, Democrats control the White House and the Senate, while Republicans control the House, giving the GOP powerful lever age to block Obamas second-term agenda. HOUSE FROM PAGE A1 STEVE HELBER / AP Chris Jankowski, the architect of the GOPs gerrymandering effort in Virginia, poses in the gallery of the Virginia House of Delegates at the Capitol in Richmond, Va.Sixteen of Floridas 26 U.S. representatives are Republicans, with one vacancy that will almost assuredly be lled by a Republican. Republicans also hold a 26-14 advantage in the Florida Senate and a 76-44 margin in the state House. Some Democrats ar gue that the discrep ancies are caused by gerrymandering the Republican-controlled Legislature drawing districts to give the GOP an unfair advantage, which would be illegal under Florida law. But two political science professors say the discrepancies arent so simple or nefarious they have used the Sunshine State to popularize their argument that large concentrations of Democrats liv ing in cities have given Republicans a redis tricting advantage not just in Florida but na tionwide. Jowei Chen of the University of Michigan and Jonathan Rodden of Stanford University say no amount of reforms is going to change an in herent bias based on where people live. Human geography plays a far greater role in generating electoral bias in the United States than com monly thought, they wrote in an inuential 2013 paper. Reformers in Florida have tried to stamp out gerrymander ing. They successful ly convinced voters in 2010 to approve two amendments to the Florida Constitution that would reduce the opportunities for law makers to make leg islative and congressional districts that benet one party over the other. The amendments require districts to be compact and contiguous whenever possible and to follow existing city and coun ty boundaries. Chen and Rodden argue that Democrats tend to live in densely populated cities while Republicans are more evenly scattered throughout suburban and rural areas. They also argue that Democratic precincts tend to be next to oth er highly Democratic precincts, more so than Republican precincts, which tend to be located in politically-mixed neighborhoods. As a result, Democrats tend to be tightly packed into few er districts than Republicans. Repub lican-dominated districts tend to be more diverse than Democratic precincts since pro-Republican rural areas often include Democrats in small cities to reach the population threshold needed to create a district. In Florida, this translates into high ly-Democratic districts along Floridas southeastern coast in and around Fort Lauderdale, Miami and West Palm Beach. Meanwhile Democratic precincts in in terior cities like Ocala, and college towns like Gainesville and Tallahassee, are swallowed up by more rural, Re publican districts, essentially drowning out Democratic votes. DISTRICT FROM PAGE A1 Gerrymandering has a long history in the United States, pursued enthusiastically by both Democrats and Republicans. But the GOPs success at it this decade has been historic.

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT EUSTIS Amazing Race for Charity is SaturdayThe Amazing Race for Charity, Saturday in Eustis, is a unique racing event with teams of two compet ing on a 5-mile course to complete 20 fun, messy and wacky challenges. The race is designed for serious athletes, casual walkers and joggers ages 13 and up. Proceeds from this years event, which will be run completely by volunteers, go to local charities including The Boys & Girls Clubs of Lake and Sumter Counties, LifeStream Behavioral Center Foundation and Cornerstone Hospice. For registration ($125) and sponsor information, go to www.amazingraceforcharity.com or call 352-242-8111.MOUNT DORA Library will celebrate National Poetry MonthThe W.T. Bland Public Library welcomes special guest and Pulitzer Prize-nominee Vivian Shipley to kick off National Poetry Month in April. Shipley a two-time recipient of the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and other awards, will present The Spiritual Quest of Writing Poetry, at 10 / a.m. on Thursday at the library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. in Mount Dora. Admission for the event is free. A poetry reading hosted by Shipley and members of One Flight Up will be held from 2 to 4 / p.m. on Friday. A reception for Shipley will take place following the reading, from 5 to 7 / p.m., and will feature guitarist Shane Billette. Call the library at 352-735-7180, option 5 or go to www.mylakelibrary.org for information.LAKE COUNTY Immunization program begins in area schoolsThe Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools through May for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Upcoming dates for immunizations are: Umatilla Middle School on Thursday, Tavares Middle School on April 8 and Mount Dora Middle on April 10. For information, call the Department of Health at 352-7715500 or go to www.lakechd.com.LEESBURG LSSC Foundation accepting scholarship applicationsLake-Sumter State College Foundation, Inc. is accepting applications for student scholarships for the summer 2014 semester. The foundation will be awarding $87,800 in scholarships. Applications are available online at www.lssc.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com. The deadline for submitting applications is today at 4:30 / p.m. Classes begin May 5. For information, call 352-365-3539.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportLake County recently unveiled its new slogan, Real Florida. Real Close, and to showcase the area as a tourism destination, the Lake County Economic Development & Tour ism Department is host ing its rst Tourism Expo in June. The event from 2-7 / p.m. on June 11 at Lake-Sumter State Col lege at 9501 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg is open to the public, Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public information of cer, said in a press release. It will feature businesses and agencies that support local tourism initiatives, like chambers of commerce, hoteliers, dining establishments and event planners. Lake County boasts unparalleled natural resources, state-of-theart sports facilities and quaint downtowns all within a short driving distance of Central Flori das major attractions and beaches on both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, said Robert Chandler, director of Lake Countys Economic Development & Tourism Department. For this expo, we are seeking to educate partic ipants about the unique support the county offers local businesses, as well as foster networking re lationships between our various tourism-related industries. Chandler, along with Brandy Hastings of VISIT FLORIDA, will be the LEESBURGLake County sets first Tourism ExpoSEE EXPO | A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comSeven years ago, Becky Parks, the physical ed ucation teacher at Cypress Ridge El ementary School, was participating in a popular evening event there called Family Reading Night. She looked around, saw families interacting, and thats when a light came on in her head. I thought, if there can be a family reading night, there can be a family walk night, Parks said, pleased the event has grown into something hundreds of families participate in every year. With the help of Pam Hamilton and Trish Sproule, Parks has been inviting Cy press Ridge teachers, administrators, par ents, students and other family members to Waterfront Park in Clermont to walk the trail together one night each month. The event not only creates bonds between families, but boosts their overall health and tness. In September, when the school year starts, participants begin by walking one mile, then every month after that, agree to increase their distances by a quarter-mile each time. By the end of the school year, participants, including CLERMONTWalkers strengthen bonds and bodies ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Becky Parks helps Fred Owusu-Ofori and his daughter, Paige, 9, sign in at Marchs Family Walking Night at Waterfront Park. PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sherie Ismain and her daughter, Rafeeye Hussein, 8, at left, attend Cypress Ridge Elementary Schools Family Walking night for March, led by physical education teacher Becky Parks. Staff ReportLake County Animal Services and Hurricane Dockside Grill have teamed up with shelter animals best interests at heart to host the WOOF pet adoption carnival from 11 / a.m.3 / p.m., April 12, at the restaurant, 3351 W. Burleigh Blvd. in Tavares. Animal Services will have pets available for on-the-spot adoptions and, as an extra incentive, Hurricane Dockside is offering $25 gift certi cates to people who take home a pet from the carnival. We are thankful for the support of community partners and friends like Hurricane Dockside Grill, Brian Sheahan, director of Lake Countys Department of Community Safety & Compliance, said in a press release. Together, we hope to accomplish one of Animal Services top prior ities to get shelter pets adopted into loving forever homes. The outdoor, family-friendly event will be held on Hurricanes patio and will feature live music, and a balloon animal artist and face painter for children. Hurricane Dockside is the largest of the pet-friendly restaurants in Ta vares, said Derrick Haggerty, gener al manager of Hurricane Dockside Grill. It just made sense for Hur ricane to co-host an event like the adoption carnival. Our goal is to get as many of the animals adopted as possible. To nd out more about Lake County Animal Services, or to make a donation to the shelter, go to www. lakecounty.gov/adopt, visit the shelter at 28123 County Road 561, Tavares, or call 352-343-9688. For information on Hurricane Dockside Grill, go to www.hurri canedocksidegrill.com or facebook. com/hurricanedocksidegrill.TAVARESAdoption carnival planned for pets Staff ReportFrom master gardeners to children, Lake Countys 3rd Annual Central Flori da Landscape & Garden Fair has something for ev eryone. The fair will be May 3-4 at Discovery Gar dens, at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. The fair will be open from 9 / a.m.-4 / p.m. on May 3 and from 10 / a.m.3 / p.m. on May 4, Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public information of cer, said in a press release. Saturdays presenters include Teresa Watkins on Florida-Friendly Landscaping, Steve Earls on Square-Foot Gardening, Tom MacCubbin on Edible Landscapes, Anne Keller on Geocaching and Jonathan Squires on NoTurf Landscapes. On Sun day, presentations include Native Plants by Karina Veaudry and Hot Plants, Cool Looks by residential horticulture agent Brooke Mofs with the UF/IFAS Extension in Lake County. The free event will pro vide visitors an opportu nity to browse and pur chase goods from dozens of exhibitors specializing in landscaping, gardening, irrigation, fertilizer, composting, hardscapes and more. This years fair brings back the popular Childrens Passport, which children can ll in by vis iting designated locations on the map. Exhibitor booths ranging from 10 feet by 10 feet to 10 feet by 20 feet and food vendor spaces are available, as well as spon sorships ranging in cost from $250 for silver level to $750 for platinum level. Vendors and sponsors may register at www. lakecounty.gov/gardenfair. The deadline to register is Thursday. For infor mation, call Tina Chavez at 352-343-9647 or email tchavez@lakecounty.gov. Discovery Gardens is nestled on over 4 acres behind the Lake County Agricultural Center and features 20 themed gar dens, including a string of lush courtyards and six specially designed childrens gardens.TAVARESThird annual garden fair scheduled for May 3-4SEE WALKERS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 OBITUARIESWilliam N. DickersonWilliam N. Bill Dickerson, 76, of Cen ter Hill, passed away Saturday, March 29, 2014, in Leesburg Re gional Medical Center. Born March 29, 1938 in Houston Co., Ala bama to James Henry and Nettie (Huff) Dick erson, he moved to Florida from Alabama in 1958. Bill retired in 1990 from the Florida State Highway Department and was a member of Center Hill Bap tist Church. Surviving with his wife, Marga ret Joyce (Foster) Dick erson of Center Hill are a daughter, Helen Dickerson, Lake Panasoffkee; 2 sons: Bry an Keith (Lisa) Dick erson, Bushnell and William Jason (Melissa) Dickerson, Plant City; 7 grandchildren; 2 brothers: James and Dennis Dickerson, of Center Hill; 3 sisters: Maryel len Hart, Wildwood, Virginia Price, Center Hill and Faye Scrubs, Georgia. Bill is pre ceded in death by his parents and 1 brother, David. Friends may call after 1 pm Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at the Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell where Funeral Services will be gin at 2pm with Pastor Bill Johnson ofciating. Bill will be buried in the Center Hill Cem etery. In lieu of owers the family suggests me morials be made to the Gideons. Condolences may be left at www. purcellfuneralhome. com, Purcell Funer al Home, Bushnell, FL entrusted with all ar rangements.DEATH NOTICESJudy ShookJudy Shook, 74, of Leesburg, died Satur day, March 29, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.IN MEMORYkeynote speaker at the expo. Hastings is VIS IT FLORIDAs Marketing Solutions and Sales manager for the central and central east re gions and works with tourism partners to ed ucate them on the mar keting opportunities available through VISIT FLORIDA. VISIT FLORIDA is the states ofcial tour ism marketing corpo ration with a mission to promote travel to and within the state. Tourism-related businesses and attractions, chambers of commerce and government agencies are encouraged to attend and participate by setting up a booth in the exhibit hall, Pap pacoda said. For details on being an exhibitor, contact Debi Dyer at 352-3433918 or email ddy er@lakecounty.gov. To register, go to www. lakecounty.gov/tour ismexpo. There is no fee, but space is limited. Each exhibitor will have a 6-foot table and two chairs. All table setups must be broken down and removed no later than 7:30 / p .m. follow ing the event. EXPO FROM PAGE A3 students, are walking three miles. Parks said each month sees more than 100 participants on average, a number that she said sometimes dwindles slightly as the walking distance increases. (Family Walk Night) gives us a reason to exercise together. It provides us with an incentive because, truthfully, sometimes we need to be forced into it, said parent Matthew Gosselin, who came after work to meet his wife, Nicole Gosselin, and their children Evan, Aiden and Emma. When we can, we come together as a family, Nicole Gosselin said. Melanie Ressler, a mother of three students, called the program a great initiative to help kids be active. It gets them out of the house and keeps them from being in front of the television or playing video games all afternoon, she said. Katie Ciccotelli, also there with her two girls and with Resslers family, has participated every month since the start of school. Ciccotelli said she also likes the venue (Waterfront Park) because of its natural beauty. After walking, the kids enjoy playing on the beach and in park areas. The two moms also like that participating counts as school volunteer hours for parents. Coming keeps us in shape and then after wards, we can spend time with our families, friends and play with each other, Sebastien Ressler, 9, said. Joshua Phillips, there with his 6-yearold daughter Elizabeth, said he feels the program provides a WALKERS FROM PAGE A3 great opportunity to get some exercise, spend time with family and friends and show support for the school, but most of all, he likes the challenge. They lay it out for you and they increase it each time we come. It gets tougher, and its exciting to see how far we can go, Phillips said. In March, in honor of the city of Clermont police departments newly instated waterfront/ downtown Cler mont task force patrol initiative, the kids, parents and teachers at Family Walk Night were greeted by Ofcers James Rooney, Brenda Teets and Chief Charles Broadway. They congratulated the walkers for their efforts and rewarded the students with wrist bands. Associated PressOCALA A 13-year-old cen tral Florida girl will be tried as an adult for her alleged role in a conspiracy to kill her mother that authorities say she planned with her teenage boy friend. Yaquelin Galvez Don was indicted by a grand jury Fri day. Typically grand juries indict defendants on rst-de gree murder charges, but state law required it in this case be cause the defendant is younger than 15. During her rst court appearance Saturday, the Ocala Star-Banner (http://tinyurl.com/mqqaam8) reports a judge ordered the girl to be held without bond. The judge said the girl, who wore shackles and a red jumpsuit, faces life in prison if convicted. When someone is at that age, you have to evaluate the case differently, said the girls attorney, Tania Alavi, who expressed disappointment in the decision. Sheriffs detectives say Don lured her mother to the garage on March 9 and that her boy friend, 15-year-old Pedro Solis, slit the womans throat. Accord ing to an arrest report, Solis then went inside the home and held a knife to the throat of the girls father. But ultimately, he was not injured and convinced Solis to drive the injured woman to a hospital, authorities said. On the way to the hospital, Luz Galvez told detectives she promised Pedro she wouldnt sue him and that he could be with her daughter. She under went surgery and was able to speak with detectives with the help of a physical therapist. Authorities say Solis told them he and Don had dis cussed killing her parents so they could be together. Detective said the girl admitted discussing the plan for about a week and giving her boyfriend the knife. Solis was indicted on March 18 on the same charges and was also denied bond.Teen charged in alleged attack on mom

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hen Bashar Assads forc es gassed the Damascus suburb of Moadamiyeh in August, the fumes penetrat ed Qusai Zakarias apartment within minutes. A female neigh bor knocked on his door with two unconscious children, but he couldnt breathe or talk. The 29-year-old struggled to the street, where women and children were running about wildly and dropping dead; he saw a young teenager with pale blue eyes on the ground star ing at nothing. Then his heart stopped, and his body was thrown on a pile of corpses with white foam dripping from their mouths. Miraculously, Zakaria revived (about 1,300 other civilians died) and he became a voice for civilian survivors. Recently, he escaped Syria and I spoke with him in Washington. He bears witness to a shameful global failure to confront what U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon calls the biggest humanitarian and peace and security crisis facing the world. As Zakaria makes clear, the regime was starving residents of Moadamiyeh for a year before the gas attack and continues to besiege survivors, along with more than 220,000 civilians in other areas held by rebels. This in direct deance of a U.N. Security Council resolution last month. When the Syrian uprising began, civilians in Moadamiyeh demonstrated peacefully for an end to a corrupt Assad family dictatorship that had lasted more than four decades. A middle-class suburb of four-story apartment houses, adjacent to open farmland, the suburb sat between key regime military bases, and the government forces began arresting, torturing, and raping residents. They would beat young men and throw them in garbage cans, and tell them to stay there, or they would go to houses and beat people, recounts Zakaria, a former hotel worker. It was too much humiliation to handle. In mid-2012, regime tanks rolled into Moadamiyeh, killing about 500 civilians and arresting 600 to 700, including some women and kids. It was only after the regime brutalized civilians that residents of Moadamiyeh decided they must defend their community. Ordinary people sold their jewelry and the rich donated, and we bought weapons from smugglers and corrupt ofcers, mostly AK-47s. We recruited young men who had done military service, Zakaria said. Most of his family ed, but he joined the local relief committee that distributed food and medicine to the needy. In November 2012, the regime laid siege to the suburb and its remaining 13,000 people (including 3,000 women and children), cut off electricity, and barred any food from entering or people from leaving. On a quiet day, we got shelled with 6070 mortars, recounts Zakaria, while helicopters shot missiles into apartment buildings and jet ghters dropped bombs, smashing schools, hospitals, and mosques. Zakarias relief council scoured abandoned apartments for bags of our or pasta to distribute to residents. By mid-2013, starvation set in. By then we had only grape leaves, olives, and herbs from the ground, adding salt and pepper to make a sort of soup, he said. Malnutrition started. We were telling the world, but all we got was speeches, which we couldnt eat. After the gas attack, on Aug. 21, 2013, residents hoped they would be rescued. We knew any kind of strike would shake the regime. When President Barack Obama opted instead for the chemical-weapons accord we were disappointed and angry, says Zakaria. We felt like he was telling Assad to do more, to use new means of death. In other words, the accord brokered by Washington and Moscow to destroy Syrias chemical arsenal gave Assad a green light to kill by other means. And thats what he did, again starving Moadamiyeh after the Geneva talks ended. Zakaria, who spoke English and had met Western journalists, went on hunger strike for 33 days. He sent desperate messages about Moadamiyehs plight to the West. During talks in Geneva in January and February, the regime let some food in, letting thousands of residents return. But as soon as the talks ended, Assad stopped the humanitarian aid convoys. I know the United States is one of the main donors, Zakaria told me, but the aid is going to organizations that work under the regime, which gives him (Assad) more cards to force civilians or rebels to surrender. They should nd a way to get the aid into besieged towns. Heres my suggestion: Instead of sending video cameras to civilian rebels to lm the carnage, or ambulances to take victims to gutted hospitals (the latest idea), the United States should get real. Send vetted rebel groups the heavy weapons they need to shoot down planes that bomb civilians, and to ensure that aid reaches the needy. Doing less makes us complicit in Assads war crimes.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorialboard member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Lets get real and help Syrians under siege The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Fifteen months ago, as the nation re coiled in horror from the massacre of 20 children and six adults by a mental ly ill man armed with three semiautomat ic weapons, there were rm proclamations that this time would be different. The vio lence at that Newtown, Conn., elementa ry school, it was said, would nally lead the nation to come together and embrace some reasonable gun control laws. Well, that didnt last long. If anything, the national gun frenzy, fueled by the irresponsible lobbyists at the National Rie Association, has intensied. Though some states have adopted laws tightening access to guns since Newtown, others have actually loosened their gun control regulations. The latest state to move in the wrong direction is Georgia, where the Legislature last week approved the most extreme indeed bizarre set of gun laws in the nation. The bill is awaiting the governors signature. Among the laws absurdities: People with gun permits would be allowed to carry their weapons in unsecured areas of airports. It would allow loaded guns in bars (South Car olina recently approved that as well), unless the owner of the bar specically objects. In some cases, guns could be brought into churches. The law would offer an absolute defense if a gun was used in the face of a violent attack, though it doesnt appear to dene exactly what constitutes a violent act. Georgia is already a stand your ground state. So envision this scenario: A gun-toting Georgian tries to enter a bar that bans guns and is confronted by a bouncer. Who, incidentally, may also be armed under the new law. You can imagine how that might play out. This page has been rm in its opposition to the NRAs abject disdain of the public good in pursuing its warped view of the 2nd Amendments right to bear arms and its bullying approach to the political process. But the blame for this national insanity should not be placed entirely on the NRA. Politicians respond to the groups pressure out of fear, knowing that their jobs often depend on low-turnout, one-party primaries in which fringe passions are amplied. At the same time, public opinion has taken a puzzling, and depressing, turn. According to Gallup, in the weeks after the Newtown massacre, support for stricter gun control rose to 58 percent. By last October, it had ebbed to 49 percent. To twist a cliche, with that attitude we and Georgia are getting the gun laws we deserve. But the next time an avoidable killing occurs in Georgia, an awful lot of people are going to have gunpowder residue mixed in with the blood on their hands.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEGun madness in Georgia Classic DOONESBURY 1972

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 SHRUB/PALM PROGRAM LAWN PROGRAM PEST PROGRAM PEST/LAWN/SHRUB PACKAGE LAWN/SHRUB PACKAGE PEST/LAWN PACKAGE H20 YEARLY SERVICE H20 CHECK-UPTRIMMING/WEEDING PROGRAMTERMITE RENEWALAERATION YEARLY SERVICEAERATION SERVICETERMIDOR TERMITE TREATMENT $295 up to 1/4 acre lot*Service Calls are always FREE $245 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE $245 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE$390WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$540 $490WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$540 $590WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$785 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE $495Most Homes$69 Most Homes$199 Most HomesMust have been treated within the past 4 years$125 Most Homes1 Spring (March-May) and 1 Fall (September-November)$175 Most Homes$595Most Homes(You choose the month)$99

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNCAA: Kentucky heads to Final Four / B3 Staff reportDown by eight runs when they came to bat in the bottom of the eighth inning, Lake-Sum ter State College made a game of it with a sixrun outburst against the College of Central Florida on Tuesday. But the rally fell short and the Lakehawks dropped below the .500 mark (15-16) for the rst time this season as the Pa triots managed to hold on for a 9-7 victory. Six LSSC hurlers were pounded for 10 hits with starter Shane Crouse taking the loss af ter giving up three runs in his single inning of work. That said, the Lakehawks managed 11 hits of their own but, with the single exception of the eighth-inning explosion, were unable Lakehawks come up short in loss to CCFSEE LSSC | B2 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dominic Bozzelli, of Pittsford, N.Y., drives the ball at the Lake County Classic golf tournament at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMaking history isnt supposed to be easy. Dominic Bozzellis drive to establish himself as one of the best golfers in National Golf Association history was about as difcult as it gets. Bozzelli birdied his nal three holes on Sunday to nish with a four-day total of 269, 19-under-par, to win the Lake County Classic at Har bor Hills County Club by two shots over Jack Newman. With the win, he is only the second golfer in NGA history to win three straight tourna ments. Zach Johnson, an 11time winner on the PGA Tour and the 2007 Masters cham pion, was the rst to do so, having won three straight in 2001. Bozzelli had to battle through the pack for the win under sunny skies over the nearly 7,000-yard par 72 lay out. Unable to nish his third STEVE SHEPPARD / AP Kurt Busch celebrates after winning at Martinsville. HANK KURZ JR.AP Sports WriterMARTINSVILLE, Va. Kurt Busch passed Martinsville master Jimmie Johnson for the lead with 10 laps to go Sunday and held off the eight-time winner to win at Martinsville Speedway for the rst time since October 2002. Johnson, with eight wins in 25 career starts on the 0.526-mile oval, led 11 times for 296 laps. He seemed on his way to another vic tory when he took the lead from Busch with 17 laps remaining. But Busch stayed close, ducked underneath Johnson seven laps PHOTOS BY SETH WENIG / APConnecticut players celebrate after beating Michigan State 60-54 in a regional nal at the NCAA college basketball tournament on Sunday in New York. RACHEL COHENAssociated PressNEW YORK Shaba zz Napier scored 17 of his 25 points in the sec ond half, and UConn beat Michigan State 6054 to return to the Final Four a year after the Huskies were barred from the NCAA tournament. Napier, the East Re gionals most outstand ing player, hit three huge free throws with 37.6 seconds left at Madison Square Gar den to carry UConn to the Final Four just as Kemba Walker did in Napiers freshman year. The Huskies (30-8) rallied from a ninepoint second-half decit to become the rst No. 7 seed to reach the Final Four since the tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985. Fourth-seeded Michigan States seniors be come the rst fouryear players recruited by Tom Izzo to fail to reach the Final Four. Gary Harris led the Spartans (29-9) with 22 points. The undersized Hus kies matched Michigan States physical play box-out for box-out, holding the Spartans to just six offensive rebounds and six points in the paint. UConn dared Michigan State to shoot 3-pointers, and the Spartans near ly made enough, going 11 for 29 from behind the arc. Trailing 51-49 with more than two minutes left, Michigan State had a chance to tie or take the lead. But Adreian Payne fumbled the ball away, and Napier drilled a jumper on the other end. After Payne hit a pair of free throws to pull the Spartans back within two, Keith Appling was called for a foul on Napiers 3-point at tempt. The senior extended the lead to 5651, and after Travis Trice missed a 3, Michi gan State couldnt get to UConn to foul. Phillip Nolan slipped free for a dunk that clinched the victory and had thou sands of Huskies fans in the Garden leaping up and down. UConn won its third national title in 2011, but the Huskies were UConn upsets Michigan State 60-54, back to Final Four Connecticut head coach Kevin Ollie cuts the netting on the rim after his team defeated Michigan State.SEE UCONN | B2Kurt Busch bests Johnson at MartinsvilleSEE NASCAR | B2Bozzelli wins at Harbor HillsSEE NGA | B2LADY LAKE

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-STP 500 Results Sunday At Martinsville Speedway Martinsville, Va. Lap length: .526 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (22) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 500 laps, 115.8 rat ing, 47 points, $147,210. 2. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 500, 140.9, 44, $180,546. 3. (26) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 500, 116.8, 42, $114,210. 4. (3) Joey Logano, Ford, 500, 121.2, 41, $142,476. 5. (17) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 500, 110.2, 40, $128,265. 6. (6) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 500, 95.8, 39, $137,456. 7. (18) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 500, 98.9, 38, $127,053. 8. (20) Aric Almirola, Ford, 500, 93.8, 36, $126,106. 9. (12) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 500, 108.5, 36, $123,461. 10. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 500, 83.3, 34, $116,384. 11. (15) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 500, 90, 34, $105,458. 12. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 500, 82, 32, $129,811. 13. (8) Carl Edwards, Ford, 500, 98.1, 31, $101,975. 14. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 500, 79.2, 31, $136,491. 15. (34) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 500, 72, 29, $133,461. 16. (13) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 500, 90.9, 28, $117,900. 17. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 500, 72.4, 27, $120,158. 18. (11) Greg Bife, Ford, 500, 82.7, 27, $125,450. 19. (2) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 500, 81, 25, $94,475. 20. (16) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 500, 78.5, 24, $93,325. 21. (31) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 500, 60.6, 23, $111,708. 22. (27) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 500, 70.4, 22, $99,375. 23. (25) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 500, 57.1, 21, $107,433. 24. (23) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 500, 63.4, 20, $105,133. 25. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 500, 56.2, 0, $79,950. 26. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, 499, 49.5, 18, $102,058. 27. (28) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 498, 62.7, 17, $108,420. 28. (24) David Ragan, Ford, 497, 50.7, 16, $99,322. 29. (35) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 497, 38.4, 15, $78,500. 30. (38) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 496, 43.9, 14, $82,875. 31. (40) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 495, 38.5, 13, $81,225. 32. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 494, 52.4, 12, $88,575. 33. (29) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 493, 35.8, 12, $77,850. 34. (42) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 492, 36.1, 10, $77,725. 35. (33) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 492, 34.7, 9, $77,675. 36. (19) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 488, 46.3, 8, $77,625. 37. (32) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 474, 35.9, 7, $77,527. 38. (14) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 469, 46.6, 6, $118,508. 39. (37) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 440, 29.1, 5, $69,100. 40. (30) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 409, 49.8, 4, $100,925. 41. (41) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 408, 25.1, 3, $66,500. 42. (9) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 396, 80.9, 2, $94,314. 43. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 310, 26.4, 0, $61,600. Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg ResultsSunday At St. Petersburg Street Circuit St. Petersburg Lap length: 1.8 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (4) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 2. (3) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 3. (10) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 4. (5) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 5. (14) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 6. (2) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 7. (1) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 8. (16) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 9. (22) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 10. (9) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 11. (11) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 12. (15) Mikhail Aleshin, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 13. (13) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 14. (21) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 15. (18) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 16. (12) Mike Conway, Dallara-Chevrolet, 110, Running. 17. (7) Carlos Munoz, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 18. (17) Carlos Huertas, Dallara-Honda, 110, Running. 19. (19) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 109, Running. 20. (20) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Chevrolet, 108, Running. 21. (8) Jack Hawksworth, Dallara-Honda, 83, Contact. 22. (6) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 82, Contact. Race Statistics Winners average speed: 93.572. Time of Race: 2:06:57.6288. Margin of Victory: 1.9475 seconds. Cautions: 2 for 10 laps. Lead Changes: 7 among 4 drivers. Lap Leaders: Sato 1-26, Castroneves 27-28, Sato 29-30, Power 31-52, Sato 53-57, Power 58-76, Con way 77, Power 78-110. Points: Power 53, Hunter-Reay 40, Castroneves 36, Dixon 32, Pagenaud 30, Kanaan 28, Sato 28, Wil son 24, Newgarden 22, Briscoe 20. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 41 31 .569 Brooklyn 38 33 .535 2 New York 30 43 .411 11 Boston 23 49 .319 18 Philadelphia 16 57 .219 25 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 50 22 .694 Washington 38 35 .521 12 Charlotte 35 38 .479 15 Atlanta 31 41 .431 19 Orlando 21 52 .288 29 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 52 22 .703 x-Chicago 40 32 .556 11 Cleveland 30 45 .400 22 Detroit 26 47 .356 25 Milwaukee 14 59 .192 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 57 16 .781 Houston 49 23 .681 7 Memphis 43 29 .597 13 Dallas 44 30 .595 13 New Orleans 32 41 .438 25 Northwest W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 54 19 .740 Portland 47 27 .635 7 Minnesota 36 35 .507 17 Denver 32 41 .438 22 Utah 23 51 .311 31 Pacic W L Pct GB x-L.A. Clippers 52 22 .703 Golden State 45 27 .625 6 Phoenix 44 29 .603 7 Sacramento 25 48 .342 26 L.A. Lakers 24 48 .333 27 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturdays Games Philadelphia 123, Detroit 98 L.A. Clippers 118, Houston 107 Washington 101, Atlanta 97 Dallas 103, Sacramento 100 Miami 88, Milwaukee 67 San Antonio 96, New Orleans 80 Sundays Games Oklahoma City 116, Utah 96 Cleveland 90, Indiana 76 Toronto at Orlando, late Minnesota at Brooklyn, late Chicago at Boston, late New York at Golden State,late Memphis at Portland, late Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, late Tondays Games San Antonio at Indiana, 7 p.m. Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 9 p.m. New York at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games Houston at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Boston 75 52 17 6 110 241 158 Montreal 76 43 26 7 93 199 189 Tampa Bay 74 41 24 9 91 221 198 Detroit 74 34 26 14 82 199 211 Toronto 76 36 32 8 80 220 239 Ottawa 73 30 29 14 74 210 246 Florida 75 27 40 8 62 179 244 Buffalo 74 20 45 9 49 142 222 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Pittsburgh 74 47 22 5 99 228 184 Philadelphia 74 39 27 8 86 213 210 N.Y. Rangers 75 41 30 4 86 200 183 Columbus 74 38 30 6 82 208 200 Washington 74 34 28 12 80 214 222 New Jersey 74 31 28 15 77 178 192 Carolina 74 32 32 10 74 186 208 N.Y. Islanders 74 29 35 10 68 206 247 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 74 50 17 7 107 240 168 x-Colorado 74 47 21 6 100 227 202 x-Chicago 75 42 18 15 99 247 196 Minnesota 75 38 26 11 87 186 189 Dallas 74 36 27 11 83 214 212 Nashville 75 32 32 11 75 186 226 Winnipeg 75 33 33 9 75 208 220 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Anaheim 74 48 18 8 104 239 187 x-San Jose 76 47 20 9 103 232 184 Los Angeles 75 44 25 6 94 189 159 Phoenix 75 36 27 12 84 206 212 Vancouver 76 34 31 11 79 184 206 Calgary 74 31 36 7 69 189 217 Edmonton 74 26 39 9 61 184 244 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturdays Games N.Y. Islanders 2, New Jersey 1, SO Boston 4, Washington 2 Colorado 3, San Jose 2 Tampa Bay 4, Buffalo 3, OT Detroit 4, Toronto 2 Montreal 4, Florida 1 Columbus 3, Carolina 2, OT Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Minnesota 3, Phoenix 1 Anaheim 5, Vancouver 1 Los Angeles 4, Winnipeg 2 Sundays Games Boston 4, Philadelphia 3, SO Calgary at Ottawa, late Tampa Bay at Detroit, late Chicago at Pittsburgh, late Washington at Nashville, late N.Y. Rangers at Edmonton, late Todays Games Carolina at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Florida at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games New Jersey at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Calgary at Toronto, 7 p.m. Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 7 p.m. Colorado at Columbus, 7 p.m. Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Winnipeg at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed INFs Michael Almanzar and Manny Machado and OFs Francisco Peguero and Nolan Reimold on the 15-day DL; Machado and Peguero retroactive to March 21, Almanzar to March 23 and Reimold to March 26. Placed RHP Edgmer Escalona on the 60-day DL. Selected the contracts of OF Delmon Young and RHP Evan Meek from Norfolk (IL). Designated LHP Mike Belore for assignment. Reassigned LHP Johan Santana to minor league camp. CHICAGO WHITE SOX Placed INFs Gordon Beckham and Jeff Keppinger on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 21. CLEVELAND INDIANS Selected the contracts of RHP Scott Atchison, DH Jason Giambi and OF Nyjer Morgan from Columbus (IL). Placed Giambi and OF Michael Bourn on the 15-day DL.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh WGN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh3 p.m.ESPN2 Boston at Baltimore4 p.m.ESPN St. Louis at Cincinnati7 p.m.ESPN2 Colorado at Miami10 p.m.ESPN2 Seattle at L.A. AngelsNBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m.SUN Toronto at MiamiNHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Florida at New Jersey10 p.m.NBCSN Minnesota at Los AngelesWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m.ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, regional nal, Baylor vs. Notre Dame, at South Bend, Ind.9:30 p.m.ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, regional nal, UConn vs. Texas A&M, at Lincoln, Neb. score consistently. By the time winning pitcher Mike Cetta left the mound, CCF had built up a 4-1 lead and the game seemed well in hand. Cetta had surrendered just one run on four hits for CCF in his six-inning stint, managing to keep Lakehawks hit ters off balance. It was the Patriots relievers who would manage to keep the game close. In the bottom of the eighth, the Lake hawks began a bar rage of two-base hits. Tanner Elsbernd sliced a double down the right-eld line. Then, with two out, Walker Sheller doubled in Elsbernd and Dan Autiello kept the rally alive with anoth er double, this one to left, scoring Sheller. Baziel Cabrera slammed anoth er two-bagger to right to allow Autiello to come scampering across the plate. Aus tin Simmons base hit to left-center scored Cabrera before Kris Hodges drew a walk to put two men on still with two out. Sam Thomas sent a hard ground ball to third, which was misplayed to load the bases. Dakota Higdon, who came into the game leading all LSSC batters with a .325 average, plated both Simmons and Hodges with a line single to center. But there the rally ended when, with Elsbernd at bat for the second time in the inning, Higdon was caught stealing for the nal out. The Lakehawks return to action today as they travel to Ocala for a return engagement against the Patriots. Game time is 3 / p .m. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 ineligible for last years tournament be cause of previous low scores on the NCAAs academic progress measure. Ryan Boatright made four steals as UConn used its quickness to force 16 turnovers. DeAndre Daniels shut down Branden Dawson, who scored 24 points in Michigan States Sweet 16 win over top-seeded Virginia. Dawson attempted just three eld goals, making one, to nish with ve points. The 6-foot-10, 245-pound Payne hit two long jumpers to put Michigan State up 32-23 less than four minutes into the sec ond half. But Napier started driving, getting the bigger Appling in foul trouble and UConn back in the game. After hitting four straight free throws to tie the score at 32 with 12:38 left, Napi er was struck in the face by Gary Harris the UConn guard was called for a foul on the play and left the court with his nose gushing blood. He was back less than minute later when Daniels completed a three-point play to give the Huskies the lead for good. Boatright hit a con tested 3-pointer with the shot clock winding down to put UCo nn up 49-39 with less than seven minutes left. But the Spartans rallied behind their long-range shooting. UCONN FROM PAGE B1 later and Johnson never made a good run at the lead again. I didnt know if wed be able to do it, you know? The 48 car is king here, him or the 24, Busch said in Vic tory Lane, referring to Johnson and his Hen drick Motorsports teammate, Jeff Gor don, who also has eight Martinsville victories. Buschs 25th career victory ended a winless streak that had reached 83, and in the least like ly of places. Ive been on this journey for a while and every time you come to Martinsville, you just kind of draw a line through it like theres no way Ill be able to challenge those Hendrick guys or be up in the top 10, Busch said. This Stewart-Hass team gave me a car to do it. It was Buschs rst victory in his rst sea son driving for Stewart-Haas Racing in a car funded solely by Gene Haas, who handpicked the 2004 series champion because he said he wanted to see a team win with his name on the car. Its a dream come true to have Gene Haas call you and tell you he wants you to drive, Busch said. He wants to go for trophies and wins. Its just an unbelievable feeling to deliver for Haas Automa tion. The race featured an event-record 33 lead changes, and Johnson expected there would be one more, but on a slippery day on the smallest circuit in NA SCARs premier se ries, the cars at the end werent conducive to typical short-track racing. Man, we were so on edge slipping and sliding, Johnson said about the nal laps duel, during which there was very little of the beating and banging that usually typi es racing at Martinsville. I think the lack of security in our own car kept us from feeling more racy and putting a bumper to someone or really getting inside someone aggressively. Dale Earnhardt Jr. was third, followed by Joey Logano and Mar cos Ambrose. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 round on Saturday due to inclement weather, Bozzelli was forced to complete it on Sunday and then immediately begin his nal loop. He responded to the challenge of a golng marathon by carding a 5-under-par 67 in his third round for a two -shot lead over Newman at 15-under. He backed that up with a 4 -under 68 in his fourth round to secure the win. Bozzelli and Newman battled for the lead throughout the nal round, with each play er owning it on mul tiple occasions. Both players were tied at 17 under after exchang ing birdies on the par3 16th hole, the longest par 3 on the course at 210 yards and one that involved a carry over water to an undulating green. On the 17th, a 400yard par 4, Bozzelli set himself up for a make able putt that would put him in the drivers seat heading to the nal hole. The Pittsford, N.Y., golfer drained the putt and took a one -shot lead to the 18th. Newman was able to look down the fair way and watch Bozzel lis nearly awless play down the stretch. On the 18th, a 579yard nishing hole that was set up for scoring, Bozzelli worked his way down the fairway and drained an insurance birdie, forcing New man to make an eagle to take the tournament to sudden death. Newman put him self in position for an eagle from the fairway with his third shot, but missed left, giving Boz zelli a shared entry with Johnson in the NGA Pro Tour history books. He will have chance to win an unprecedented four straight tournaments beginning Thursday at the Ocala/Marion County NGA Pro Golf tour at Ocala National. In his nal round, Bozzelli nished with six birdies and two bogeys. The three birdies he had on his nal three holes of the tour nament were, ironically, the only time he put together three red numbers in succession. For the tournament, Bozzelli carded 20 birdies, three ea gles and seven bogeys. He played par-3 holes to average score of 2.79 and par 4s to 3.93. On the par 5s, however, Bozzelli averaged near ly a full stroke below par at 4.19. He had sev en birdies, three eagles and ve pars on the four par 5 holes on the course. He did not have bogey on a par 5. Bozzelli earned $16,000 for the win, giv ing him $52,700 for the year and an exemption in the Web.com Tour Price Cutter Charity Championship in August in Springeld, Mo. Newman won $8,000 for nishing second to raise his season total to $12,200. Bozzelli extended his lead over Crawford Reeves, No. 2 on the money list by more than $30,000. Brian Richey nished third at 272 after a nal round 66, the low round of the day. Da vid Skinns was 274, good for a fourth place tie with Phillip Mollica. Skinns and Mollica began the nal round in a three way tie with Newman for second place. Phillip Hutchinson, the rstand secondround leader, struggled to 76 in his nal round. Formerly known as the Hooters Tour, the NGA Tour is the No. 3-mens professional tour in the U.S. after the PGA and Web.com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmental tour by PGA and Web.com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hundreds of professionals acquire their cards PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Champions Tour. NGA Tour alumni in clude: Johnson, Bubba Watson, the 2012 Masters champion Jim Furyk, the 2010 PGA Tour Player of the Year and 2003 U.S. Open cham pion Keegan Brad ley, 2011 PGA cham pionship winner 2009 British Open champion Stewart Cink 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover 2003 PGA Champion Shaun Micheel, 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis and two time U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running devel opmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was awarded ve Web. com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions. NGA FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 COLLEGE BASKETBALL EDDIE PELLSAP National WriterINDIANAPOLIS Aaron Harrison made a 3-pointer from NBA range with 2.3 seconds left Sunday to lift Ken tucky and its freshmen to a 75-72 win over Michigan and a trip to the Final Four. After Harrisons team mate, Julius Randle, in advertently tipped in the tying shot on Michigans previous possession, the eighth-seeded Wildcats got the ball to the 6-foot-6 guard, whose twin broth er, Andrew, is anoth er of the ve freshmen in Kentuckys starting lineup. Standing a good three feet behind the arc, Harrison elevated over Caris LeVert and took a bit of contact on the arm from the Michigan guard as he shot. No matter. The shot rattled in, and for the second straight game in the Midwest Regional, Harrison had the goahead points in a tense game for the Wildcats (28-10). In this one, he scored all 12 of his points off four 3-pointers over the last 8:05. I hit a couple be fore that, so coach said to get the shot we were looking for, Harrison said. They put it in my hands and I wanted to deliver for them out there. Nik Stauskas missed a halfcourt heave at the buzzer for second-seeded Michigan (28-9), and moments later, Harrison was under a dog pile or make that a puppy pile. This is the rst all-freshman starting lineup to make the Fi nal Four since another well-known group, the Fab Five of Michigan, did it in 1992. Im gonna see every one in Dallas this year, coach John Calipari said, with his version of a Texas twang, as he addressed the crowd before the nets came down. The Wildcats will play Wisconsin next Satur day outside of Big D. Stauskas nished with 24 points for the Wolverines, who n ished a win shy of their second straight Final Four. Randle had 16 points and 11 rebounds for his 24th double-double and was named the regions most outstanding player. But he was just one of the freshmen stars for the Wildcats Sunday. While Harrison was being completely shut down early, it was un heralded Marcus Lee keeping the Wildcats in the game. Lee, one of the six McDonalds All-Amer ican freshmen on Cali paris roster, had scored a total of nine points since the beginning of January. But he got minutes that would have normally gone to the injured Willie Cau ley-Stein, and nished with 10 points and eight rebounds. Eight of those points came on put-back dunks that were part of Kentuckys 18 offensive rebounds. Harrisons rst 3 gave Kentucky a 58-55 lead and was part of an 11-0 run that put the Wol verines in catch-up mode, behind 62-55 with 6:30 left. They fought back, and during a nine-possession stretch of sub lime basketball that covered more than four minutes, each team scored every time they got the ball. The rst stop in the sequence gave the Wol verines the ball with about a minute left, trailing 72-70. Stauskas missed a layup and a 3-point er and Derrick Walton then missed an open 3. But the fourth attempt went in with 31 sec onds left and got cred ited to Jordan Morgan on a scramble under the basket, though it was Randles hand that tipped the ball in. Calipari called a tim eout. Michigan burned a foul. And the end game started with 10 seconds left. DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Kentuckys Aaron Harrison and his teammates hold up their trophy after an NCAA Midwest Regional nal against Michigan on Sunday in Indianapolis. MENS HOOPS Associated Press TUCSON, Ariz. Tucson police said Sat urday night that they shot pepper spray at several hundred fans who took to the streets and threw beer bottles and recrackers at of cers after the Universi ty of Arizona basketball teams overtime loss in the NCAA tournament. Fifteen people were arrested for offenses such as resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and unlawful assembly, Tucson police Sgt. Pete Dugan said. Of those, 14 were released, and one was sent to Pima County jail. He said those who advanced on ofcers were arrested. No ofcers or fans were injured. The majority of the crowd did not respond to the dispersal order and began throwing beer bottles, beer cans and recrackers at the ofcers, Dugan said. Several of the recrackers rolled under neath a patrol vehicle that was deployed with the Mobile Field Force Units.TENNIS STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterKEY BISCAYNE Novak Djokovic won his fourth Key Biscayne title, while Rafael Nadal failed again trying for his rst. Djokovic dominated from the start and closed out the victory by winning a remarkable exchange to beat Nadal 6-3, 6-3 Sunday in the nal of the Sony Open. Nadal fell to 0-4 in nals at Key Biscayne, one of just three ATP Mas ters 1000 events he has yet to win. As for Djokov ic, only six-time champi on Andre Agassi has won the mens event more. Djokovic erased the only break point he faced, committed just 15 unforced errors and won a scrambling, 30shot rally on the nal point. He completed a Nadal stood six feet be hind the baseline to re turn and often remained on the defensive from there, with his shots lack ing their normal depth. Djokovic was quick to step into the court and even won a point playing serve and volley. Djokovic also had the superior serve, this allowed him to chase down shots Nadal usu ally counts as winners. Nadals lone breakpoint chance came in the opening game, and he failed to con vert. Djokovic broke in the sixth game, hitting three consecutive winners before Nadal put a backhand in the net. Djokovic broke again in the opening game of the second set by winning a 22-shot ex change, and he held serve the rest of the way. Rafael Nadal, left, and Novak Djokovic pose with their trophies after Djokovic defeated Nadal 6-3, 6-3 at the Sony Open Tennis tournament, on Sunday, in Key Biscayne.LYNNE SLADKY / APMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL FRED GOODALLAP Sports WriterST. PETERSBURG The Tampa Bay Rays are launching another season with expec tations of playing into October. The Toronto Blue Jays have to es cape the AL East cellar before reviving talk of playoff aspirations. The division rivals open the season Mon day at Tropicana Field, with David Price and R.A. Dickey taking the mound in a match up of 2012 Cy Young Award winners. The Rays are com ing off a year in which they won 92 games and made the playoffs for the fourth time in six seasons. The Blue Jays would just as soon forget 2013, when they bat tled injuries and n ished in last place after being a popular pre season pick to contend for a championship. Toronto failed to bolster its starting pitching this winter and returns with es sentially the same lineup as a year ago, yet Dickey thinks the results will be better. Only the Yankees, Cardinals and Phillies have earned as many postseason berths as the Rays over the past six seasons. And af ter hiking one of base balls lowest payrolls above $80 million to keep most of last years roster intact, Tampa Bay anticipates another strong run. Price was 10-8 with a 3.33 ERA in 2013 after winning AL Cy Young honors two years ago, but he went 9-4 with a 2.53 ERA in 18 starts. The 28-year-old lefty was the subject of trade speculation much of the winter before agreeing to a $14 million, one-year contract to continue anchoring one of the ALs strongest ro tations. The Rays, often over shadowed in the AL East by the big-spending Yankees and Red Sox, dont shy away from taking about how good they believe they can be. To be honest with you, I thought last year we had more expecta tions going into the season than we do this year only because the Red Sox won the World Series and the Yankees have made some pretty big acqui sitions. So, that kind of puts us in the shadows again, third baseman Evan Longoria said. There are a lot of expectations from within this team, he added. But from an overall perspec tive, well probably be picked down the lad der a little bit more this year ... which is perfectly ne with me.NBA JOHN RAOUX / AP Toronto Raptors guard Nando de Colo (3) fouls Orlando Magics Tobias Harris (12) in the rst half on Sunday in Orlando. KYLE HIGHTOWERAssociated PressORLANDO DeMar DeRozan had 28 points, Jonas Valanciunas added 20 points and nine rebounds, and the Toronto Rap tors escaped with a 98-93 victory over the Orlando Magic on Sunday night. Kyle Lowry added 16 points. Trailing 96-93 with 8.9 seconds to play, the Magic had the ball and an opportunity to tie the game. But coming out of a timeout they failed to inbound the ball, turning it over on a 5-second vi olation. DeRozan was fouled and hit a pair of free throws to pro vide the nal margin. The win was the Raptors third in a row and seventh straight over the Magic. To ronto swept the season series 3-0. Nik Vucevic led the Magic with 22 points and 10 rebounds. Ja meer Nelson and Victor Oladipo each added 16 points. After struggling offensively for most of the second half, the Magic cut a 21-point decit all the way down to 76-73 on a layup by Tobias Har ris with 9:53 to play in the game. Orlando had a chance to take the lead, but came up empty on a pair of 3-pointers. Cops pepper spray fans after gameRays-Jays opener features pair of Cy Young winners GERALD HERBERT / AP Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price pitches in the second inning of an exhibition game recently.Djokovic beats Nadal at Key BiscayneHarrison lifts Wildcats to win over Michigan Raptors escape with victory over Magic

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 TIM PRICEAssociated PressSAN ANTONIO Steven Bowditch held on to win the Texas Open in windy con ditions Sunday for his rst PGA Tour victory and a spot in the Mas ters. The 30-year-old Australian bogeyed the par-5 18th for a 4-over 76 the highest closing score by a winner since Vijay Singh nished with a 4-over 76 in the 2004 PGA Championship for a onestroke victory. Im over the moon, Bowditch said. I really cant believe it. Bowditch nished at 8-under 280 at TPC San Antonio and earned $1,116,000. Will MacKenzie and Daniel Summerhays tied for second. MacK enzie shot 70, and Summerhays had a 71. Chesson Hadley and Ryan Palmer missed chances to get into the Masters through the top 50 in the world ranking. Hadley, the Puerto Rico Open winner, needed at least a sixth-place nish, but closed with an 80 to tie for 56th at 5 over. Palmer needed a topthree nish and had an 82 to also tie for 56th. Bowditch entered the week 339th in the world and had only two top-10 nishes in eight years on the tour in a career marked by bouts of depression. He won once on the Australasian circuit and twice on the Web. Com Tour. Bowditch played the front nine in 3-over 39, making a double bogey on the par-4 fourth. He countered a bogey on the par-3 13th with a birdie on the par-5 14th and made three pars before missing a 3-foot par putt and settling for a bogey on 18. On the par-3 16th, he got up-and-down af ter missing the green. He pushed his drive on the par-4 17th, hit his approach on the green and two-putted, then pulled his tee shot left on 18, recovered with a shot to the fairway and reached the green in three. I just drew back on some experience, Bowditch said. MacKenzie made a 13-foot birdie putt on the 17th to pull within a stroke of Bowditch, but the Australian tapped in from 2 feet for his birdie at No. 14 to push the advantage back to two. Matt Kuchar and Andrew Loupe shot 75s to tie for fourth at 6-under.Steven Bowditch holds on to win Texas Open ERIC GAY / AP Steven Bowditch, of Australia, poses with his trophy after winning the Texas Open golf tournament on Sunday in San Antonio. Valero Texas Open Scores Sunday At TPC San Antonio San Antonio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Final Steven Bowditch (500), $1,116,000 69-67-68-76 280 Will MacKenzie (245), $545,600 69-72-70-70 281 Daniel Summerhays (245), $545,600 72-68-70-71 281 Matt Kuchar (123), $272,800 70-72-65-75 282 Andrew Loupe (123), $272,800 67-70-70-75 282 Jim Furyk (89), $200,725 70-74-68-71 283 Zach Johnson (89), $200,725 70-71-70-72 283 Jerry Kelly (89), $200,725 71-71-70-71 283 Brendon Todd (89), $200,725 71-76-68-68 283 Jordan Spieth (75), $167,400 75-70-68-71 284 Charley Hoffman (63), $136,400 70-75-70-70 285 Kevin Na (63), $136,400 70-70-69-76 285 Geoff Ogilvy (63), $136,400 74-69-69-73 285 Pat Perez (63), $136,400 68-71-69-77 285 Justin Hicks (56), $111,600 69-73-72-72 286 Stephen Ames (51), $78,740 74-71-68-74 287 Martin Flores (51), $78,740 71-71-73-72 287 James Hahn (51), $78,740 71-70-76-70 287 Brian Harman (51), $78,740 70-72-75-70 287 Freddie Jacobson (51), $78,740 70-70-73-74 287 Seung-Yul Noh (51), $78,740 69-76-71-71 287 Carl Pettersson (51), $78,740 70-73-71-73 287 Wes Roach (51), $78,740 75-66-72-74 287 Michael Thompson (51), $78,740 70-75-71-71 287 Jimmy Walker (51), $78,740 76-71-71-69 287 Chad Collins (43), $45,880 71-66-73-78 288 Russell Knox (43), $45,880 74-70-71-73 288 Andrew Svoboda (43), $45,880 73-73-67-75 288 Bo Van Pelt (43), $45,880 69-73-71-75 288 Johnson Wagner (43), $45,880 73-73-71-71 288 Brice Garnett (38), $36,766 70-73-71-75 289 Trevor Immelman (38), $36,766 70-71-74-74 289 Jason Kokrak (38), $36,766 71-71-77-70 289 Justin Leonard (38), $36,766 76-69-71-73 289 William McGirt (38), $36,766 72-71-72-74 289 Cameron Beckman (33), $28,572 69-70-77-74 290 Scott Brown (33), $28,572 70-74-73-73 290 Brendon de Jonge (33), $28,572 73-72-71-74 290 Jamie Lovemark (33), $28,572 73-72-72-73 290 Brooks Koepka, $28,572 71-74-73-72 290 Josh Teater (33), $28,572 71-70-77-72 290 Kevin Foley (28), $22,320 74-73-70-74 291 Joe Ogilvie (28), $22,320 74-73-71-73 291 Michael Putnam (28), $22,320 72-71-73-75 291 John Senden (28), $22,320 72-73-73-73 291 Briny Baird (21), $15,934 72-72-72-76 292 Miguel Angel Carballo (21), $15,934 69-76-74-73 292 Ben Curtis (21), $15,934 70-75-72-75 292 Brian Davis (21), $15,934 71-72-76-73 292 Bronson LaCassie (21), $15,934 74-73-70-75 292 John Mallinger (21), $15,934 74-73-70-75 292 Troy Matteson (21), $15,934 72-73-74-73 292 Troy Merritt (21), $15,934 73-72-74-73 292 Andres Romero (21), $15,934 71-74-73-74 292 Cameron Tringale (21), $15,934 71-74-72-75 292 Greg Chalmers (13), $13,826 73-73-74-73 293 Brian Gay (13), $13,826 73-71-73-76 293 Chesson Hadley (13), $13,826 69-73-71-80 293 Jeff Maggert (13), $13,826 72-74-72-75 293 Ryan Palmer (13), $13,826 72-71-68-82 293 Mike Weir (13), $13,826 76-71-72-74 293 Richard H. Lee (9), $13,330 72-75-73-74 294

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014STUDY: Many preteens have high cholesterol / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com THE VILLAGES Alzheimers Family Caregiver Support Walk is Saturday The Alzheimers Family Support Walk was created to raise needed funds for caregivers, numbering around 20,000 in Lake, Sumter and Marion counties. The group offers respite care, emotional support and education for them to care for their loved ones aficted with this debilitating disease. Make a difference in the life of a caregiver by joining the walk with a friend or in a team from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday at The Villages Polo Field, 703 Buena Vista Blvd. Cost for individuals in a team of six or more is $15 each, and $20 for individual walkers. To register, call 888-496-8004 or go to http://bit.ly/1cz0Bwf. LEESBURG LIFE anniversary luncheon scheduled for April 10LIFE, a social support program for the widowed, will celebrate its 17th anniversary 11:30 a.m., on April 10 with a combined luncheon of its Leesburg and Tavares groups at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 East Dixie Ave., at Venetian Gardens in Leesburg. After the buffet-style lunch, enter tainment will be provided by Keith Manson, who bills himself as a musical humorist. Though completely blind since the age of 12, Manson has entertained at Disney World, Silver Springs and other theme parks. The luncheon costs $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling program director Rick Reed at 352-787-0403.TAVARES Health seminar offered at Waterman HospitalFlorida Hospital Waterman will offer a seminar on Minimally Invasive Hernia Repair, with Dan Tran, MD, at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Mattison Conference Center. Call 352-323-3635 to register and for information. THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer education and support group meetingDr. Saumil Karavadia, MD, surgical urologist with Advanced Urology Specialists, is the guest and will speak on advanced technology and treatments for prostate cancer, at this meeting at 7 p.m., Wednesday at the Laural Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr., in The Villages. Meetings are free. Call Tom Vajda at 352-446-4194 for details. MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterLove can sometimes break a heart but marriage seems to do it a lot of good. A study of more than 3.5 mil lion Americans nds that married people are less likely than singles, divorced or widowed folks to suffer any type of heart or blood vessel problem. This was true at any age, for women as well as for men, and regardless of other heart disease risk factors they had such as high cholesterol or diabetes, researchers found. It might be that if someone is married, they have a spouse who encourages them to take better care of themselves, said Dr. Jeffrey Berger, a preventive car diologist at NYU Langone Medical Center. This is the largest look at marriage and heart health, said Dr. Carlos Alviar, a cardiology fellow who led the study with Berger. Previous studies mostly compared mar ried to single people and lacked information on divorced and widowed ones. Or they just looked at heart attacks, whereas this one included a full range from clogged arter ies and abdominal aneurysms to stroke risks and circulation problems in the legs. Researchers used health questionnaires that people lled out when they sought various types of tests in community settings around the country from an Ohio company, Life Line Screening Inc. Some of these screening tests, for various types of cancer and other diseases or conditions, are not recommended by leading medical groups, but people can still get them and pay for them themselves. The study authors have no nancial ties to the company and are not endorsing this type of screening, Berger said. Life Line gave its data to the Society of Vascular Study: Married folks less likely to have heart problems CINDY SKOP / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP For 14 years David and Alice Wilson couldnt be happier in their second marriage and show their affection in front of their home in Lake Wales.Healthy vowsIt might be that if someone is married, they have a spouse who encourages them to take better care of themselves. Dr. Jeffrey Berger, Preventive cardiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressNEW YORK The governments estimate of au tism has moved up again to 1 in 68 U.S. children, a 30 percent increase in two years. But health ofcials say the new number may not mean autism is more com mon. Much of the increase is believed to be from a cultural and medical shift, with doctors diagnosing autism more frequently, especially in children with milder problems. We cant dismiss the numbers. But we cant in terpret it to mean more people are getting the disorder, said Marisela Huerta, a psychologist at the New York-Presbyterian Center for Autism and the Developing Brain in suburban White Plains, N.Y. The Centers for Dis ease Control and Pre vention released the lat est estimate Thursday. The Atlanta-based agency said its calculation means autism affects roughly 1.2 million Americans un der 21. Two years ago, the CDC put the estimate at 1 in 88 children, or about 1 million. The cause or causes of autism are still not known. Without any blood test or other medical tests for autism, diagnosis is not an exact science. Its identi ed by making judgments about a childs behavior. Thursdays report is considered the most comprehensive on the frequency of autism. Researchers gathered data in 2010 from areas in 11 states Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Mary land, Missouri, New Jer sey, North Carolina, Utah and Wisconsin. The report focused on 8-year-olds because most autism is diagnosed by that age. The researchers checked health and school records to see US autism estimate rises to 1 in 68 childrenSEE AUTISM | C10SEE HEART | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterTheres fresh ev idence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trou ble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams. The results seem to support recent guidelines that call for every child to have a choles terol test between 9 and 11 the ages of the 13,000 youths in this study. Many doctors and adults have balked at screening all chil dren that young, but researchers say studies like this may convince them its worthwhile. A concerning num ber of children are at risk of heart problems later in life, and more needs to be done to prevent this at an ear lier age, said Dr. Thom as Seery of Texas Childrens Hospital and Baylor College of Med icine. He led the study, which will be present ed at an American Col lege of Cardiology conference in Washington this weekend. Estimates are that by the fourth grade, 10 to 13 percent of U.S. children will have high cholesterol. Half of them will go on to have it as adults, raising their risk for heart attacks, strokes and oth er problems. High cholesterol rarely causes symptoms in kids. Many genes and inherited conditions also cause high cholesterol but not obesity, so it can be missed espe cially in youths who are slim or athletic. The new study in volved children having routine physicals from January 2010 to July 2011 at the largest pediatric primary care network in the nation, more than 45 clinics in the Houston area. Onethird were Hispanic, about one-third were white, and 18 percent were black. About onethird were obese. Unhealthy total cholesterol levels were found in 34 percent. LDL or bad cholester ol was borderline or too high in 46 percent, and HDL or good cholesterol was border line or too low in 44 per cent. Just over half had normal triglycerides, another type of fat in the blood. Boys were more likely than girls to have high er total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides, Seery said. Hispan ics were more likely to have higher cholesterol and triglycerides. I would hope that data like these would get the attention of general pediatricians, because many cas es of disease are being missed now, said Dr. Elaine Urbina, director of preventive cardiology at Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center. She was on the expert panel appointed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute that wrote the screening guidelines issued in 2011 and endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. They call for screening everyone rffrfnrrftfb 5 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.pma-physicians.com www.pmaflorida.com1580 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages Urgent Care Center 910 Old Camp Rd., Suite 196, The Villages 1004 N. 14th St., Leesburg (Next to Wolfys & McDonalds) Urgent Care Center 2403 SE 17th St., Suite 101, Ocala 411 N. West Street, Bushnell Urgent Care CenterANDPREMIER URGENT CAREURGENTCAREOPEN365 DAYS! We are providers for the following Medicare Plans:Freedom, Optimum, Preferred Care Partners, PUP, United Health Care.Most Other Insurances Accepted Including BCBS, UNH, PHP, Cigna, Medicare and other Medicare HMOs.DISCOUNTS TO PATIENTS WITHOUT INSURANCE Introducing the Newest Member of Our Medical Team...Dr. Carrsquillo joins us from Bushnell, Florida where he practiced Family Medicine for many years. Were excited to have him on board, and look forward to serving the healthcare needs of our community as a team.Fausto Carrsquillo, PA-CDinesh Khanna, MD Eldar Baigabatov, MD Hazem El-Arousy, MD Florian Gegaj, MD Sundeep Shah, MD Amir Etemadnia, MD Michele Hornstein, DO Alfred Soto, MD Ramy Lbrahim, MD Ana Karovska, MD Somi Ansari, MD Michelle Madonna, ARNP Tim Chan, DPM Fausto Carrsquillo, PA-CDelivering premmier medical care with compassion and understanding has been our golden standard for almost two decades. Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.* Computer imaging measures areas of low impedance known to be associated with pain. Concentrated electrical stimulation relieves pain noninvasively.Fruitland Park (352) 365-1191 The Villages (352) 750-1200 www.ecdoctors.com*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Patent Pending GOLF CART ACCESS Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Study finds many preteens have high cholesterol SEE STUDY | C3

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Now I can eat what I want, worry free!rf nftbfr tfrr rt ffn r tt f nrnfr tf tn t rr r t rn t f rttb MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Surgery and New York University to help promote research. The results are from people who sought screening from 2003 through 2008. Their average age was 64, near ly two-thirds were female and 80 percent were white. They gave information on smoking, diabetes, family history, obesity, exer cise and other factors, and researchers had blood pressure and other health measures. The study found: %  en Married people had a 5 percent lower risk of any cardiovascular disease compared to single people. Widowed people had a 3 percent greater risk of it and divorced people, a 5 percent greater risk, compared to mar ried folks. %  en Marriage seemed to do the most good for those under age 50; they had a 12 percent lower risk of heart-related disease than single people their age. %  en Smoking, a major heart risk, was highest among divorced people and lowest in widowed ones. Obesity was most common in those single and divorced. Widowed people had the highest rates of high blood pressure, diabetes and inadequate exercise. Researchers dont know how long any study participants were married or how recently they were divorced or became widowed. But the results drive home the message that a per sons heart risks cant be judged by physical measures alone social factors and stress also matter, said Dr. Vera Bittner, a cardiologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She heads the heart disease prevention committee of the American College of Cardiology. The study results were released on Friday ahead of presentation this weekend at the groups annual meeting in Washington. We dont really have a clear explanation for why marriage may be protective, Bittner said. You may be more willing to follow up with medical appointments, take recommended drugs, diet and exercise if you have a spouse, she said. HEART FROM PAGE C1 between age 9 to 11 and again 17 to 21. Very few people know their entire family history, and many forms of high cholesterol occur in people who are not obese, so screening is needed to catch more cases, she said. High cholester ol doesnt necessarily mean the child needs medicines like statin drugs, she said. The guidelines stress diet and lifestyle changes as the rst step. STUDY FROM PAGE C2

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 JEREMY OLSONStar TribuneMINNEAPOLIS A new test that requires people to send stool samples in the mail for laboratory analysis is proving nearly as reliable as a colonoscopy in identifying potentially fatal colon cancers. The DNA screening test, invented at the Mayo Clinic, could be come an alternative to the colonoscopy or at least an option for the millions of Americans who ignore their doctors recommendations because they are squeamish about the rec tal exam or concerned about its cost, said Dr. David Ahlquist, a Mayo gastroenterologist and co-inventor of the Co loguard system. The test was 92 per cent accurate at iden tifying patients with colon cancer and 69 percent accurate at identifying patients with the kinds of bow el lesions or polyps that indicate a high risk for cancer, according to clinical trial results published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Time will tell, Ahlquist said. Its our hope that many indi viduals who are not be ing screened because of their reticence to undergo colonoscopy will choose to undergo screening with a nonin vasive option like this. Regular screening for colon cancer is recommended at age 50 earlier for people with family histories or greater risks and was cred ited in a report Monday by the American Can cer Society for a decline over the past decade in the U.S. rate of colon cancer mortality. But the lack of up take is also why co lon cancer remains the third-leading cause of cancer mortality, and contributes to 50,000 deaths in the nation each year. The DNA test comes with its own eww! factor, in that people would need to sh out their own stool samples and package them to send in for testing. But market research by the test kit manufacturer, Exact Sciences of Madi son, Wis., indicates that people arent bothered as long as the test is ef fective and covered by health insurance. Sur veys showed only 3 per cent of people being put off by having to col lect a stool sample. Our kit comes in its own sturdy box and the patient also uses it to return the sample to the lab, said Exact Sciences spokeswoman Cara Tucker. Test re sults would be sent to doctors in about two weeks. The ndings published Wednesday come from a company-funded clinical tri al of 10,023 people who were at normal risk for colon cancer. They come about two weeks before a U.S. Food and Drug Administration committee is scheduled to decide whether the test is safe and ef fective for clinical use. In an unusual step, the U.S. Centers for Medi care and Medicaid Ser vices are reviewing the test before the FDA re view is complete an indication that the fed eral agency might ex pedite Medicare cover age of the test for the nations elderly popu lation. Federal approval could mean the Cologuard test would be available as early as midsummer. The study was a head-to-head compar ison with an existing test called FIT, which detects cancer by nd ing hidden blood in stools, and showed that the new DNA screen ing found more cancers and cancer risks. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. An alternative to the traditional colonoscopy Its our hope that many individuals who are not being screened because of their reticence to undergo colonoscopy will choose to undergo screening with a noninvasive option like this.Dr. David Ahlquist, Mayo Clinic gastroenterologistSEE TEST | C5

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Cologuard works because tumors and polyps in the colon shed cells that are detectable in human waste, Ahlquist explained. However, the DNA test resulted in some false positives about one in 10 tests suggested patients had colon cancer or an imminent risk for it, when they didnt. In clinical care, patients with positive re sults from Cologuard would undergo colonoscopies to conrm the results, said Dr. Thomas Imperiale, an Indiana gastroenterologist who was lead au thor of the study. False positives do cause stress and anxi ety, he said, but in the end they would direct patients to receive colonoscopies that they would have likely received anyway if the DNA test didnt exist. The rate of false negatives was low, and would likely be over come if patients repeated the test over time, he said. Whether the test would be rec ommended annually, or less frequently, is un clear. The cost remains unclear as well, though it would presumably be cheaper than a colo noscopy that requires a visit to a specialty clinic or hospital. Dr. Cathleen Clouse, a HealthEast family practice doctor in Maplewood, Minn., said she would welcome a new alternative for the many patients who are uneasy about colonosco pies or dislike the volu minous uids they must consume in advance to clean out their bowels. 352.530.2256 803 E. Dixie Avenue Leesburg, FL 34748Sanjeev Bhatta M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology Peripheral InterventionCall today to schedule your appointment The Villages: Leesburg:1149 Main Street The Villages, FL 32159 Ronnie Sabbah, M.D.Consultative and Invasive Cardiology 352-253-0059Visitpetlodgeandspa.comIn Leesburg, next to Home DepotDiscover why pet owners trust us for their boarding, day care and grooming needs. TESTFROM PAGE C4 Staff ReportAARP Driver Safety Programs help participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits with a new 6-hour curriculum, and upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. The two-day course, consisting of three hours each day will be offered at the following locations: %  en April 7 and 9, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., Leesburg. Register by calling 352-326-3540. %  en April 7 and 9, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora. Register by calling 352-735-7180. %  en April 7 and 8, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Live Well campus at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr. in Clermont, a Spanish language class. To register call 352-394-0250.AARP Driver Safety Progams slated for AprilThank you for reading the local paper!

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Land Clearing Services

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, March 31, the 90th day of 2014. There are 275 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On March 31, 1814, Paris was occupied by a coalition of Russian, Prussian and Austrian forces; the surrender of the French capital forced the abdication of Emperor Napoleon. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 31, 2014: This year your libido energies peak to an unprecedented level. You seem to sleuth your way through problems and come up with remarkable solutions. Others will come to you for help more often; they admire your ingenuity. You will tend to be me-oriented this year, so try to temper any excessive egotism. If you are single, you could open up to a very intriguing person who you feel you have a lot to learn from. The two of you could become quite the dynamic duo. If you are attached, your relationship quality will depend on your ability to remain sensitive to your sweetie. A fellow ARIES could become even more important to you this year. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Someone is likely to sense your strength. As a result, this person will push you to get a reaction. You might decide to give him or her that reaction, just to catch him or her off guard. From there, you can continue with your day. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)You might prefer not to have to give explanations or deal with much. On some level, you could be experiencing a knee-jerk reaction regarding what is happening around you. You also might not feel a need to redene or rethink your response. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You feel destined to achieve certain goals. You could be a little tired or feel pushed by someone else. You might want to put this person in his or her place. Keep your eye on the long term, and be more forthright with a loved one. CANCER (June 21-July 22) All eyes turn to you whenever others question what to do next, as your leadership qualities are rather evident. You could be attered that your judgment is so valued. Understand what might be needed to get past an immediate hassle. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Realize what is happening with those around you. One person seems determined to have things go his or her way. This individual could push beyond any normal lev el. If you see this behavior setting up, detach. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Deal with a loved one directly. You could want and need to rethink your interactions with this person, as he or she seems to have copped an attitude as of late. Your sense of direction and knowledge will cause a positive change. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be far grumpier than you realize. Look around and note others reactions to you. Rather than growl and grumble, root out what is really going on with you. Only then will you be able to get more control over your feelings. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Dive into work or a project. With concentration and focus, youll accomplish much more than you previously might have thought possible. As a side benet, you will work off some frustration. Make a call to a new friend. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your playfulness and ability to honor a quick change will make all the difference in your choices. Re-evaluate what needs to happen between you and a new irtation. As always, every bond has its limitations. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll want to understand why someone is behaving a certain way before you make a judgment. This person seems to be all over the place. Get feedback from a friend, but realize that you might not feel comfortable with all of his or her opinions. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Reach out to someone at a distance who might be searching for some feedback. Try to understand what is going on. Do not be adverse to picking up the phone and making some calls. You need more information. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might be more sensitive to a loved one than you usually would deem necessary. Your ability to understand mood changes probably could be applied here. Do not personalize a comment. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: I have been married for seven years and have two children. My husband has what I can only describe as an Internet addiction. Hes literally online from the time I go to bed until I wake up to take our kids to school. I checked and discovered many proles he has made up on different dating sites. When I confronted him, he told me he has no interest in having an affair. He said he has been depressed for some time, and its his way of escaping reality. I recommended he talk to a therapist, but he keeps trying to justify his behavior by telling me I have no reason to feel hurt because its all make-believe. Our relationship has taken a serious dive since I found out. I no longer trust him alone on the computer. I am also no longer attracted to him, and I no longer feel attractive. I dont know what I can do to be a supportive partner if he wont admit he has a problem. Please help me. Im at a total loss. SECOND TO A SCREEN NAME DEAR SECOND: May I be frank? First on your agenda should be to take care of yourself and your own emerging depression. If that means talking to a professional, then go for it. You have every right to be angry about what your husband has been doing. It isnt harmless, and it isnt effective therapy for his depression. Much as you might wish to, you cant x his problem which is trying to escape from reality. Only he can do that. Lets hope hell nd the courage to face what hes trying to escape from while your mar riage is still salvageable. DEAR ABBY: I am not suicidal, but I do think about death, in the sense of what happens when one dies. I believe in the heaven-and-hell theory. Although Im not sure I want to go to heaven, I AM sure I dont want to go to hell. My reason for not wanting to go to heaven is because of the relatives who have gone before me. I come from a very abusive family but, like so many, most of them have been able to do what I call the last-minute redemption. With that in mind, I do not want to spend all of eternity with the same people I could not wait to have exit this Earth. I am also not a big believer in this forgiveness thing forgiving adults who do these things to children and expect them to forget about it. I sure havent, and I never will! Do you, or the clergy, think its possible for God to just let some of us sleep through eter nity without meeting up with family on the other side? OWENSBORO, KY., READER DEAR READER: Be cause I am more involved with whats going on in this life rather than the next, I took your question to Rev. Canon Mark Stanger of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He suggests that you stop thinking about heaven as a place or that you need a scorecard to get there. He also said: A merciful God will make heaven what you need and in your case, heaven may be liberation from these troubled people.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Husbands depression wont be cured by acting out online

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 which children met the criteria for autism, even if they hadnt been for mally diagnosed. Then, the researchers calcu lated how common autism was in each place and overall. The CDC started us ing this method in 2007 when it came up with an estimate of 1 in 150 children. Two years lat er, it went to 1 in 110. In 2012, it went to 1 in 88. Last year, the CDC re leased results of a less reliable calculation from a survey of par ents which suggested as many as 1 in 50 children have autism. Experts arent sur prised by the growing numbers, and some say all it reects is that doc tors, teachers and par ents are increasingly likely to say a child with learning and behav ior problems is autistic. Some CDC experts say screening and diagnosis are clearly major drivers, but that they cant rule out some ac tual increase as well. We cannot say what portion is from bet ter diagnosis and im proved understanding versus if theres a real change, said Coleen Boyle, the CDC ofcial overseeing research into childrens developmental disabilities. For decades, autism meant kids with se vere language, intellectual and social impair ments and unusual, repetitious behaviors. But the denition has gradually expanded and now includes milder, related conditions. One sign of that: In the latest study, almost half of autistic kids had average or above aver age IQs. Thats up from a third a decade ago and can be taken as an indi cation that the autism label is more common ly given to higher-functioning children, CDC ofcials acknowledged. Aside from that, much in the latest CDC report echoes earli er ndings. Autism and related disorders continue to be diagnosed far more often in boys than girls, and in whites than blacks or Hispanics. The racial and ethnic differences probably reects white communities greater focus on looking for au tism and white parents access to doctors, be cause theres no biolog ical reason to believe whites get autism more than other people, CDC ofcials said at a press brieng Thursday. One change CDC of cials had hoped to see, but didnt, was a drop in the age of diagnosis. Experts say a diagnosis can now be made at age 2 or even earlier. But the new re port said the majority of children continue to be diagnosed after they turn 4. We know the earlier a child is identied and connected with ser vices, the better, Boyle said. The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement Thursday, saying the nation needs to step up screening for the condition and re search into autisms causes. Its critical that we as a society do not be come numb to these numbers, said Dr. Su san Hyman, head of the groups autism sub committee. The best medical team in Central Florida just got better with the addition of Dr. Barry Weinstock Florida Heart & Vascular Multi-Specialty Group is proud to offer the expert services of Dr. Barry Weinstock. With world class training from Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and more than twenty years of experience practicing in Florida, Dr. Weinstock's renowned consultative and interventional cardiology skills are now available in Lake and Sumter Counties. With the addition of Dr. Weinstock, Florida Heart and Vascular Multi-Specialty Group has more experienced cardiologists than any practice in Central Florida. 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Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) AUTISM 032714: Graphic compares prevalence in children with autism or related disorders since 2007; 2c x 2 1/2 inches; with BC-US-MED--Autism Estimate; PH; ETA 5 p.m. Editors Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when a or editing it for publication Autism prevalence growing in U.S.One in 68 U.S. children is believed to have autism or a related disorder, according to the latest estimate a 30 percent jump from the 2012 federal estimate 2014201220092007 1 in 68based on 2010 data1 in 882008 data1 in 1002006 data1 in 150 2002 data SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention AP AUTISM FROM PAGE C1

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbnrf nttfb rff nntrnnn ttbtbb btfnfn nnnb nf tb btbrn nbfnn ff b ttfnffnnff nfbrffbff tfntn trf nbttb tbnt bnnbnr nb fbt fbrnbn fbrb tfnfnnnt rnrnnn bnr trb nnnft rbntn bfbtfn tfffntt ttfnbbbnb ft bn frbfb nbrnfn ffrf fbfffb nfbtf bbff tftrttt tbffnr tb bbn b tnbbtntt tnbbtrff fttftbn tfntfnr f tbtfn rnn bnffr tttbr tft btn tfn n fnn tnfbb fbfb fbbfb fbf bbbtf ft n f ntftnf fftfntnb f tbbntff fbtnfbbbnb ntftnfnfb nnffb fttfn bbttfn nfnbfnbb nbt nn tnbbf bbbtfb bbfnnnt bnffffrr trrrbtftb bft n n nnt ttfntnbnb ttfntbbf ntttb trffbftn fbtnrffntfr ffttttt b rff fnnbnr nbttb fftb fbbnb ftfnn nbnnbnrn fbbnn nnb f n n fbtf nbn fnnn n n ffbnf fb t t f n ttfntn ffb ttfnbtb fbb tbr ffb b fb n f n f fbtf fbnfrnfnb b fbfb n n fffb rbntbrnrffnfb rfffb rbrbntfb ttnnf rffbnb fnnnfb nffnbnt t ttfn nntnr nnbnrtt fbbt bfb bbttb tntt btb rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff n tbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 rfntbn rfnrtbn n rtnrrn rb r fnf r r r r n n rt r r r tbfn rn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f rf n r r rrr rrrrn r r f n r n r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r n rr r r r n rt b t r r r r r r r r r r r n r n r r r n r r r r r n r r r r n rf r r r r r r r n r r r n r r b r r r b r r r n rt n r r n r r r rf n r r n b r r r r rrrrrnrrr rrnrr rr rrrrrr nrrr rrrrrn rrrn r r r n n r r b b r r r r b r n rf r n r r r r r r f rf n r r r r r r r r r b r n rf r n r r r n r r r r r n r r r r r r n f f r r r r n r r r r r b r rf r n r r r n r r r b r r r n n b n n n f n r r r n r r n f r r r n r r n r r r r r f r r r r r n r r b r r n n bnn rnrrrr nrrrr rnr r f rrrr nrrrn frrrnrnr r r r r r n n b n r r r nrrrnrfrr rnrrr rn f r f r r r n rf r n r r n r n r r r f r r f r r n f r r r r n r r n f r rnrrrrfr rrrr rrrn r r r r r r n r r r r r r n r r n r r r f r f r r r r r r r n r n r f n r r n r r b rrrrr rrr rrfrrrr r rr rr r r n n n r f r r n r r r r r n r r r r r r n n r r r n r nn f f f rf r r r r b r r r r r r r r r r r r r rf r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n rf r r r n r r r r r n r r rf r r r n r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r b r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b r n rf r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r n fn nb tnf r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r n r b r r r r r r r r r r n r ff r r r r rf r r r rf r n r r r r n r b b r bb b r r r r r r n r r r r n r rf r n r r r n b n r n r b bb b r n r r r r n r b r r r n r r r f n r n r r b rn r f n r r r r r r r rf b r r r r n r n r f b r r r r n n r f r r r n r r r r r n r r n r r rb b f r r r r r r r n r rrrrrr rrrrrn rrnrnrrr rrrrn r r r n r tn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r rb r r r r n n bf f rrr rrrrfr rrrrrr rrrnrnr rbn r r n r r r n r r r r r r r r n r rf r r n r rbb r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f f r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r f r f f r b r r b n r r f r r r r r r f f r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r rf r rf r r r r r r rf rf r f r r r fn b b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rrb nnrrrrr rrrrrr rrrr rrfrrr rrrr rrrr rrrr rr n rrrrrn rnrrrr rrrrnrrn rrr rnrr rnrrr rbrrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr r n r r rrrrrr rrrrbrr rrnrbrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrnnr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr frrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrr rrrrr rnrrnrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrrr brrrr rrnrfr rrrrfr rbbrnfnrrfrbrbr rrrrrr rrr rbrrrrbr rrrrrr rrbrrrrr rrrrn r r f r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rf r r f r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r r r r rf r r r r r r r r r b r r r r r r r r r r n r r r r r r r rb b n r rrrrr rr nr rrr rr rfrr rrrrr rrrb br br brbr rnrbb frrrbrb b b r r r r r r rrrtn rrbrrr rr bbbrrr rr b rrbb frrrrrb nb rf r r r r f r r b r r r r r b r r r r r r r r rf r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r n rr rrrrrr rbrrrrr rbrbrrrnnrrrr rrrrfrnrrr rrrrr brrrrrrrb brrrnnrrrrrrn rrfrn rrrrrb rrrrrrr rrrrrnrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrrr nrrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr nbn rrrrr rrrrrrnn rrnnrrrrrrnrr frnrrrr rrn rrrfrrrr rrrrrrrrn rrfrrr rrrrnnrrrnn r r r r r r r r r r r rf r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r n rnrb frbrb r r rrrrrrr rrrrrrr rrbrrrr brrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr brrbrrrrrr rrnrrr rrnrnrrnn rr rfr rfb rr rn frbrrbrb r r rrrnrrr rrrrrrr rrbbrrrrbb rrrrr rrrrbn rrrnrrr nrrrrrrrr rrn r bb rb frbrb rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrnrr rrrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrr rrrrr rrrrrrr rrrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rnrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr bnbrnnn rrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrr rrrrrrrn rrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrrr rrrr rrrn f rrfrrrrr n rr frbrrbrrrrrr rrrbr nb

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Monday, March 31, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbnrf rrf ntb r r r bfttrt t rt br tr rf n tt t rr rrtbr n r ftr rf r t trtbr rttb rtb tr r b t b n b r rt rt rr nrtr tftr tr r rtrt t rtrb t n tr n n rf rr t rtr bt nt fr ntb b n r t b r t r f n t n bbrf b t r rt t n n rtrrr f f fr r fr t bbfr btr frtt t fr rtr r ffrfr r r t b n rftr b n bt b t fr nr ftrr ttt bf n t n r f t r r n n tb n n bbrrrt n n rft tbt frn ttftf brt t btr n n f n bt tt n trb n rrrt tt tb t t n fr bb tt nfr t n n b nbr br fr n btbr r rrt btb bf tt f ntt tt ft f n f tr nt tffr rn n n n tfrtr rf n nr nbr brrb t nrr nrtb tfr tt n bbr r rf rbt n r rr tfbrr t n t r r n t r r r t b t n t t b n t n trr t bbrn n br f r tb tt tr rt b btrtrbt ttbbrr r t rtr t tt r t tr t br trrtftrtr bt rbt t t b t rbtb ttr btrtb t n bt n r frr frbt tbr t br r r trb f fr rrtrrtt t t rtr tfr r t r n b n f t r r t r t b t r r t r f f t f f f t r r n rf tt b r f t r t t t t t t tr fbt n rf n ntbtr ntr tb trtf ttt r

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 31, 2014 rfntbn rfr ntbbtr nnt ff ntb nnff t b n n f f tntb trfr nn nf ffrtf r bt rrrrf nnnn rr nftff rf bnnnb frr f b r f rrf n t n t n n b n b ntbf nt nfrf rf nntnrrf ntb r f f r f r t nfnt tbnbttnb trf bf n rnr frf nr b f f n r r nt tbtrt frrrf nn rrf r t ftnttntbnt nb rfrr nbt brfr nrrf f nbbt bb tffr rnbr nbtbbtb ft bnnbttff ntrrf ntn ftrnbf rf r f f f n nn tbt nnn nf btn r n f tt nbnrrr ttn nbnrr f rf bfr nbtf b bf f ntn bt bnf r ftnbbntn nnnn brrfr n rfbt frrf bbnnr nnn nbbntn rn fb ffbn nnnn nbn nfr rfrb nbn rfrfr n nn frfbt nn f t f rftbnn bnntnn btb rrff ffnf nnnnn nnrbnbb rrr n r n t n b n n n b n n t n r f n n n t t n n b f r r ttn rrtntn bfbr rfbnn ntbtt fnrfr bnnttt nrff rrbnb nbtnr ntttnn bffffr fntbbnn nnnbbt nb ntt r trnttt ttnb f rr nnf f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nnf f nnntrf f r r nttf r n n t t f r n t r n f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f nf f nnff f n r n t n b n n n b n ftt rrn rtnnb tnrfr n r n t n b n n n b n r f n n n t t n n b f n t t r r nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r trf fft n b b t b r f r n t t f f f r b n b t n f f r frb f n t b b t t t n b t b n b r r f r f nntnr nttr rr ft nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nff n r n t n b n n n b n f n t n t t t t r f n t r r nft tbf f r r f fftt bbn rf rf nft tbf b t b r r n n n t b n t b f r n t b f b n t n b f r n n n r f r f n t t t t t b t r f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nft ttbf r b n n t n nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nf ttbf nnff ft tb ntbtbf r t frrff tb rrfr rn r nn fbtf rbtbtfr rr rb rbtntr f nbn brrf ntbn fbr frfr r nnb nfr rbtf f r r rnr f tnt nbbttb bnn rff nnrrf f nbtbtnb r f r b t f r f r tb frr fbftb brnrffr frfbt n t n b f f r btbt rr bnfb r brt rfbrf rbt bb nb bbr tr rbnn nbrrff bn rrf frfbt ntbbtn nbfr f rf fnrff t r r r f b fr t t n t b n b t r r r nn rrf nnb bfr rf ntnbtr bb brr frbfbft bbt brr frfr nbrf tbf bf nntn rrfr tn brff tnfff rr btf frf btf frf btff brr fbtn bntn f ftb nbtf trf t bfr br tft tb tbnrfr bttnb rrf bt rrf n t t f n b t r nbnr bbbbr b trr nbn rr nt brr bbnbbr r nbt tbtbnbbt frfrrrr fbtr rrf f rrff nttt frf tbnb r r r nn rrrff tbtbnt bbbtf tbnntb brfr ntb nfrrf brf f