Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EVERY RALLIES FOR FIRST TOUR WIN AT BAY HILL, SPORTS B1 MOUNT DORA: Electric bills will see slight decline A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Diabetic snowboarder rides seven continents C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 24, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 83 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D2 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 73 / 63 Periods of rain and a T-storm. 50 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T he Association of Mature American Citizens (AMAC) plans to open a call center and relocate its Lady Lake headquar ters to Leesburg, add ing 70 new jobs. Dan Weber, AMACs president and found er, said the company currently has 19 em ployees, in addition to himself, at two Lady Lake ofces, and the goal will be for them to move to Leesburg, where the company will aim for a total of 90 employees. One of the Lady Lake ofces will close, and the cur rent main location will be used by the sepa rate AMAC Founda tion that helps provide information and ad vice on Social Security, Weber said. In addition to call center representatives, AMAC will look to hire management posi tions and representa tives to help advocate to local and nation al politicians, Weber said. AMAC also will look for paid college in terns in addition to the 70 other new posi tions. Employees at the call center will reach out to sign people up for AMAC. The com pany will be taking over a former Waste Management call cen ter on Tally Road, where Weber said he will contact some for mer Waste Manage ment workers for pos sible jobs. The Leesburg lo cation will be 10,500 square feet, while the current Lady Lake of ces are 2,600 square feet and approximate ly 1,600 square feet, Weber said. He expects the Lees burg facility to be up and running by May 1 and would like to hire 30 people right away, reaching the full staff of 90 within a year. Weber said the em ployee expansion is fueled by growth. People are joining AMAC to be represent ed for the things they LEESBURG AMAC call center expanding PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: The Association of Mature American Citizens will be moving to this facility off of Talley Road in Leesburg. BELOW: Dan Weber, the founder of the Association of Mature American Citizens, poses in the Lady Lake facility in on March 17. TAKING NEW GROUND JIM HEINTZ Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine A Ukrainian air force commander is being held after his base in Crimea was stormed by pro-Russian forc es, and the acting pres ident called for his re lease Sunday. Col. Yuliy Mamchur is the commander of the Belbek Air Force base near Sevastopol, which was taken over Saturday by forces who sent armored person nel carriers smash ing through the bases walls and red shots and stun grenades. One Ukrainian serviceman was reported wounded in the clash. It was unclear if the forces, who didnt bear Ukraine says top commander held after base stormed PAVEL GOLOVKIN / AP Pro-Russian soldiers in unmarked uniforms arrange a position near Ukrainian marines base in Feodosia, Crimea, on Sunday. MARK SHERMAN Associated Press WASHINGTON The Obama adminis tration and its oppo nents are renewing the Supreme Court battle over President Barack Obamas health care law in a case that pits the religious rights of employers against the rights of women to the birth control of their choice. Two years after the entire law survived the justices review by a single vote, the court is hearing argu ments Tuesday in a re ligion-based challenge from family-owned companies that object Health law birth control coverage before justices JIM FITZGERALD Associated Press NEW YORK Andrea Esteban tried to smile with half her face, crossing her eyes in the process, and her third-grade classmates giggled. Matthew Velez struggled to speak, Luh, luh, uh, gronk, and the kids erupted in laughter. But the funny faces, the gib berish and some arm apping were all part of a serious les son to help kids learn the tell tale signs of a stroke by imitat ing them. The idea is to enlist children, particularly those who may live with older relatives, as an army of eyes to help recog nize the warning signs, get help for victims more quickly and hopefully save lives. If my mom has a stroke, Ill know what to do, said 10-yearold Madison Montes. Run to the phone and call 911. The experimental health ed ucation program at Monteore Medical Center in the Bronx is aimed at the most crucial factor when it comes to a stroke: time. Each year, about 795,000 Americans have a stroke and about 130,000 die. Some are caused by bleeding in the brain, but the vast majority is caused by a clot that blocks blood ow, starving brain cells. The drug TPA can dissolve those clots and reduce disability but only if its given within three to four hours of the rst symptoms, and the sooner the better. Yet only about 5 percent of patients receive it, in part because many stroke suf ferers dont get to the hospital in time for testing to tell if theyre a candidate. The early warning signs in clude a droopy side of the face, slurred or strange speech, and the inability to keep arms raised. Kids learn stroke signs in class through imitation The experimental health education program at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx is aimed at the most crucial factor when it comes to a stroke: time. SEE AMAC | A2 SEE BASE | A2 SEE STROKE | A2 SEE LAW | A2 JIM FITZGERALD / AP Third-grader Andrea Esteban tries to imitate the droopy smile of a stroke victim.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 23 CASH 3 ............................................... 7-0-8 Afternoon .......................................... 4-5-4 PLAY 4 ............................................. 6-9-2-1 Afternoon ....................................... 3-5-2-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY MARCH 22 FANTASY 5 ......................... 13-19-21-22-36 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 1-8-10-16-52-53 POWERBALL .................. 13-28-31-55-5815 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. believe in, Weber said. For example, AMAC stands for less govern ment, smaller govern ment. We think the Con stitution is the best instrument ever devised by man to govern man and today, the people in Washington are not fol lowing the Constitution. Weber said he found ed the company because he was disappointed in AARP not representing us. He added the Afford able Care Act motivated him to work harder on AMAC. I formed it before the Affordable Care Act, but that made me devote full time to AMAC, Weber said. AMAC employs ap proximately 60 people nationally, with other of ces in New York and New Mexico, represent ing 1.1 million members. Weber said AMAC mem bers receive advocacy with benets by joining. Americas a great country, Weber said. Here I am, a retired old guy from New York (who) wanted to do something for my kids and grand kids, and it wound up being a large enterprise. Robert Sargent, Pub lic Information Ofcer for the city of Leesburg, said the buildings pre vious use as a call center allows for AMAC to move in quickly and easily. He noted the proposed use of the building does not require any extra permit ting from the city. Weber said the compa ny was looking to build expansions on its current headquarters in Lady Lake when the opportu nity for the new Leesburg location came up. It was a godsend, Weber said. It was just a very fortunate occur rence. We were actual ly looking at expanding the building were in in Lady Lake when the real tor made us aware of the building being vacant. Sargent said it is good for the city to have a na tionally known company come in. Sandi Moore, the ex ecutive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said hir ing 70 people is note worthy. When you have a sit uation where people had lost jobs for what ever reason then you can have someone that comes in and can ll the void thats obviously a huge win for the city, Moore said. Its really good that this company is willing to pursue that, too. Sixty-seven employ ees were affected by the closing of the Waste Management center, according to a Florida WARN notice. AMAC FROM PAGE A1 insignia, were Russian military or local pro-Rus sia militia. Ukraine President Oleksandr Turchynov, in a statement, said Mam chur was abducted by the forces. He didnt specify where Mamchur is believed to be held. However, prominent politician Vitali Klitschko said Sunday that Mam chur is being held by the Russian military in a jail in Sevastopol, the Crime an city that is the base of Russias Black Sea Fleet. Klitschko was one of the leaders of the three months of protests in Ukraine that culminat ed in late February with President Viktor Yanu kovych eeing the coun try and interim authori ties taking power before a May 25 presidential election. The protests were triggered by Yanu kovychs decision to re ject a deal for closer ties with the European Union and turn to Mos cow instead. Yanukovychs oust er was denounced by Russia and much of Ukraines ethnic Russian population as a coup. Soon thereafter, Rus sian forces took control of Crimea and the re gion held a referendum to break off from Ukraine and join Russia. Russia formally an nexed Crimea last week, a move that Western countries say is illegiti mate. The U.S. and the EU have imposed sanc tions on Russia in the dispute, but Moscow ap pears unmoved. On Sunday, the Russian Defense Ministry said the Russian ag was now y ing over 189 military fa cilities in Crimea. It didnt specify whether any Ukrainian military opera tions there remained un der Ukrainian control. At a Ukrainian marines base in Feodosia, troops were negotiating with Russian forces on hand ing over the base, Lt. Anatoly Mozgovoi told The Associated Press. The marines were load ing 50-caliber machine guns into armored per sonnel carriers to take them to the base armory, but Mozgovoi said they hope to hold on to heavy weapons such as rock et-propelled grenades and cannon. I think from my per sonal opinion, the Russian Federation has enough weapons, he said. In Donetsk, one of the major cities in east ern Ukraine, about 5,000 people demonstrated in favor of holding a refer endum on secession and absorption into Russia. Eastern Ukraine is the countrys industri al heartland and was Ya nukovychs support base. Donetsk authorities on Friday formed a work ing group to hold a refer endum, but no date for it has been set. Russia has deployed thousands of troops in its regions near the Ukrainian border and concerns are high that it could use unrest in the east as a pretext for crossing the border. On Sunday, Russian deputy defense min ister Anatoly Antonov was quoted by Russian news agencies as saying the number of Russian troops in the area of the Ukrainian border does not exceed international treaty limits. BASE FROM PAGE A1 SERGEI GRITS / AP Men wave Russian national and Soviet ags as Ukrainian riot police block the entrance of the regional administrative building during a pro-Russian rally in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday. Theres a pretty good chance some children might wit ness a parent or a grandparent hav ing a stroke, said Jim Baranski, CEO of the National Stroke Association. So if theyre armed with the signs and symp toms, they could likely save a life. Monteores pro gram, one of a hand ful tried across the country, has been used since 2012 with private schools in its neighborhood, where children are often in a grandparents care because parents are absent or both work ing. The goal is to study the results and, if successful, replicate the program across the country. Dr. Kathryn Kir choff-Torres, who led the class from St. Anns School in the Bronx, said the kids are already little message machines bringing home from school what they learn about the ben ets of exercise, not smoking and eating well. One parent in at tendance, Jason Sawtelle, said he felt the lesson plants the seed. Maybe not every 8-year-old is capable of this, he said, but some certainly are. STROKE FROM PAGE A1 to covering certain contraceptives in their health plans as part of the laws preventive care requirement. Health plans must offer a range of services at no extra charge, in cluding all forms of birth con trol for women that have been ap proved by federal regulators. Some of the nearly 50 busi nesses that have sued over cover ing contraceptives object to pay ing for all forms of birth control. But the companies involved in the high court case are willing to cov er most methods of contracep tion, as long as they can exclude drugs or devices that the govern ment says may work after an egg has been fertilized. The largest company among them, Hobby Lobby Stores Inc., and the Green family that owns it, say their religious beliefs prohib it them from providing health cov erage for contraceptive drugs and devices that end human life after conception. Oklahoma City-based Hob by Lobby has more than 15,000 full-time employees in more than 600 crafts stores in 41 states. The Greens are evangelical Christians who also own Mardel, a Christian bookstore chain. The other company is Conesto ga Wood Specialties Corp. of East Earl, Pa., owned by a Mennonite family and employing 950 people in making wood cabinets. The administration says a victo ry for the companies would pre vent women who work for them from making decisions about birth control based on whats best for their health, not whether they can afford it. The governments sup porters point to research showing that nearly one-third of women would change their contraceptive if cost were not an issue; a very ef fective means of birth control, the intrauterine device, can cost up to $1,000. Women already have an in come gap. If these companies prevail, theyll have a health in surance gap, too, said Marcia Greenberger, co-president of the National Womens Law Center. The contraceptives at issue be fore the court are the emergen cy contraceptives Plan B and ella, and two IUDs. The government also argues that employers would be able to invoke religious objections under the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act to opt out of other laws, including those governing immunizations, minimum wages and Social Secu rity taxes. The Supreme Court pre viously has rejected some of these claims in cases decided before the laws enactment. The issue is largely conned to family-controlled businesses with a small number of shareholders. LAW FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO In this May 22, 2013 photo, customers enter and exit a Hobby Lobby store in Denver. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. is a family-owned company that objects to covering certain contraceptives in its health plans as part of the laws preventive care requirement. JIM FITZGERALD / AP In this Feb. 25 photo, pencil erasers in the shape of the human brain lie on a table at Monteore Hospital in the Bronx, N.Y.

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Rotary Club to host Dragon Boat Festival Teamwork is the theme for the 22-member teams competing at Wooton Park on Lake Dora in the Rotary Club of Lake County Golden Triangles 2014 Central Florida Dragon Boat Festival. The festival will be at 9 a.m. on April 5, and will include teams from all over Central Florida. Gates open to the public at 5 p.m., as teams gather on April 4 for the pre-race Awakening of the Dragon ceremony with a performance by the Orlando Taiko Drummers, re works over Lake Dora and the festi val banquet. Tickets for the banquet are $12, and are available at www.cfdrag onboat.org or by calling Colleen McGinley at the Tavares Chamber ofce, at 352-343-2531. TAVARES Additional road closures planned in Tavares Due to upcoming work on the Florida Central Railroad tracks in Tavares, road closures will be in ef fect for 48 hours at County Drive on Wednesday and Thursday. R.J. Corman, contractor for the railroads construction, will post road closure and detour signs redi recting trafc through downtown. Motorists are encouraged to exhibit caution when traveling in the area. For information, call Michelle Bilbrey, at 352-483-9020. TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension presents diabetes class The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting a threepart class, Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes, from 10 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays, March 26-April 9, at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., in Tavares. Participation in all three is sug gested. Registration must be nal ized today at lakediabetes2014. eventbrite.com or by calling 352343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721. The materials fee for the class is $10. Those unable to pay should call ahead. TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension to offer Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers class The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers, from 10 a.m. to noon on April 5 at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., in Tavares. The class is part of the Saturday in the Garden speaker series and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, resi dential horticulture agent. Online registration is available at saturdayinthegardenapril2014. eventbrite.com. The fee for the class is $5 for adults and free for children under the age of 16. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 CINDY DIAN Special to the Daily Commercial T he annual Spring Antiques, Col lectibles and Craft Show in Mount Dora on Saturday and Sunday delivered an all-time high at tendance with more than 250 vendors taking part. This show has been bigger and bet ter than ever before, event coordinator Janice Gamache said Sunday morning. The streets are lled with people right now. It was estimated that more than 50,000 people attended the event on Saturday and the same num ber was expected on Sunday. The amount of people that has come through here already has been wonderful, local artist Wanda Anderson said. This is our fourth year at tending and we al ways look forward to coming to this show. Many of the ven dors make the show a part of their Florida tour each year. Staff Report Heather Livengoods seventh-grade civics class learned rsthand how government works on be half of its citizens no matter their age when Lake County Commis sioner Welton Cadwell presented the students with the countys only sandhill crane crossing sign. As part of their class project to resolve a local issue, the Umatilla Mid dle School students de veloped a presentation requesting help in pro tecting sandhill cranes from trafc along Rog er Giles Road and Coun ty Road 450. The students approached Umatil la Mayor Laura Wright, who then met with Com missioner Cadwell to de termine how the county could step in. Government can work at your local level, and it only works because you care, said Commission er Cadwell, who present ed the sign at a March 18 Umatilla City Council meeting. I am inspired by the students at Umatil la Middle School and en courage them to remain active within their com munity. Floridas sandhill cranes are a protected subspe cies because it has been estimated only 5,000 re main. They are most threatened by habitat de struction. The sign was paid for by the countys gas tax, and was designed and made by Lake County Trafc Operations. The sign was scheduled to be installed on Friday and will be county maintained. I am very proud of my students at UMS, said Livengood. They came up with this and many other positive communi ty service projects. UMATILLA Civics class makes successful appeal for cranes SUBMITTED PHOTO From left are Heather Livengood, County Commissioner Welton Cadwell, Sam Miller, Principal Kelly Sanders, Desiree Schildroth and Mayor Laura Wright. MOUNT DORA Craft show sets record in vendor attendance PHOTOS BY CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: More than 250 vendors participated in the Spring Antiques, Collectibles and Craft Show on Saturday and Sunday in Mount Dora. BELOW: Dean Santini demonstrates his leather purses and bags. Staff Report The city of Mount Do ras electric customers will soon see a 0.3-percent de crease in their electric bills beginning April 1. The utility bills for cus tomers receiving electric service from the city will reect a lower Power Cost Charge (PCC) rate start ing on April 1, according to a press release from the city. Customers PCC will de crease from $0.07340 per kWh to $0.07303 per kWh. The electric bill for a typ ical residential custom er using 1,000 kWh per month will decrease by about 0.3 percent. Com mercial customers will see a 0.3 to 0.4 percent decrease in their electric bills depending on their monthly electricity con sumption. The PCC is used to re cover the cost of whole sale power that the city purchases from Duke En ergy. It is normally calcu lated for April 1 and Octo ber 1 and applies for the following six-month pe riod. The PCC formula has an automatic true-up feature that ensures that electric customers only pay for actual power costs. The city does not make a prot on the PCC; it is simply a billing mech anism to pass along actu al power costs to the citys electric customers. For information, con tact the citys Custom er Service department at 352-735-7105. Meanwhile, the city will soon begin inspection on its utility customers elec tric meters, a process that should take only minutes and will not result in a power outage. City staff will inspect the electric meter and panel, the meter seal and MOUNT DORA Electric bills will see slight decline SEE BILLS | A4 Staff Report The city of Eustis is changing the way it delivers the Consumer Con dence Report (CCR), the citys an nual report on the quality of its drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a new in terpretation of the CCR delivery rule to allow Community Water Systems to deliver reports electron ically. Eustis will follow this new rule for the 2013 CCR as a cost-saving EUSTIS Water report accessible on the Web Staff Report The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will give the city of Eustis $72,878 to make improvements to its 60-unit public housing complex. According to a press release from HUD, the money is earmarked for improvements such as roof repairs or making energy-efcient up grades to replace old plumbing and electrical systems. This funding is critically import ant to public housing agencies as they work to provide the best hous ing possible for their residents, EUSTIS City to get funds for public housing SEE CRAFT | A4 SEE WATER | A4 SEE HOUSING | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 OBITUARIES Letitia J. Rapisardi Letitia J. Rapisar di passed away Thurs day, March 20, in Lees burg, Florida. She was born on May 24, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York. In 1993, she moved to Leesburg from North Haledon, New Jersey. She was a catholic and a homemaker. In her youth she was a New York model, who main tained a special elo quence and grace her entire life. She was a devoted animal lover and a lover of nature. Letitia was a wonder ful wife of 43 years to her husband, Edward V. Rapisardi, of Lees burg, Florida, who she leaves behind. A Cele bration of Life will take place Saturday, March 29, 2014 at 3:00PM at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg, Flor ida with Deacon Fred Giel ofciating. Ar rangements entrust ed to Beyers Funeral Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg, FL. On line condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.com. IN MEMORY THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Backyard chickens and adult gaming centers will be up for second readings tonight at the Leesburg City Commission, where commissioners will con sider approving amendment revisions on both ordinances already on the books. Public comment is wel comed. The meeting is slated for 5:30 p.m. on the third oor commission chambers of Lees burg City Hall. The city wants to add a new subsection on its domestic an imals and fowl ordinance to al low chickens in residential dis tricts. On March 10, the city revised the number of permit ted chickens from ve to 15, and the ordinance outlines the type and size of a mov able, fenced henhouse/chick en coop that will be accepted. The ordinance also notes the sale of eggs or any oth er chicken products generat ed with the keeping of chick ens in a residential district may not be advertised. For resi dents keeping chickens, city of cials recommend a two-hour course, Chicken University, of fered by UF/IFAS Lake Exten sion Ofce in Tavares. Concerned about the adverse impact of gaming devices on res idents, Leesburg highly regulat ed adult Internet/sweepstakes redemption cafs when they were in operation in the city. Bill Wiley, community devel opment director, said in a memo that on April 10, 2013, Gov. Rick Scott signed a bill banning In ternet cafs in Florida. Only months after the state closed them down, Internet cafs have reopened with new comput er software that has reported ly changed them from a game of chance to a game of skill. Wiley said the city staff has taken action to prepare a land development code amend ment to restrict this type of ac tivity but protect amusement arcades and bingo games that are lawfully conducted. The community develop ment director also said in the memo that many law enforce ment authorities in other juris dictions have conducted inves tigations and are closing down adult gaming centers. LEESBURG Backyard chickens, gaming centers on commissions agenda the electric service to the premises. Typically, the electric meter panel is locat ed on the side of the premises, which en ables staff to complete the inspection without customer assistance. If the electric meter is behind a locked gate or other obstruction, city staff will contact the customer to make pri or arrangements for ac cess. City staff will be carrying city identica tion. Any safety or main tenance issues found during the meter in spection will be ad dressed during a sepa rate visit. Some customers have older electric me ters that will need to be replaced, requiring a power outage of about ve minutes. In these situations, staff will contact customers in advance and will strive to minimize inconve nience. For information, call the Public Works and Utilities department at 352-735-7151, option 4. BILLS FROM PAGE A3 We have been at tending this show for eight years now, Dee Baich of New Smyrna Beach said. We only sell at craft shows, and this one brings in a lot of people. Many rst-tim ers, like Kathie Paglia ro of Plant City, have heard the news as well. Pagliaro started a small business selling her homemade laundry detergent last August. It started out as a project for my fami ly, but all my friends wanted to buy the product from me, she said. Thats when my husband and I got the idea to sell it locally. Pagliaro has attend ed four craft shows and already has had great success. This has been the best one so far, she said. Weve had great sales and expo sure with businesses who want to carry my product. We cant wait to come back for the fall show. The show also ben ets the communi ty with increased sales for local businesses. It attracts people who are serious about shopping, vendor Alan Anderson of The Ear Vinery said. Peo ple come from all over the state. They get to experience Mount Dora and fall in love with its eclectic and homey atmosphere, and it makes them want to come back. CRAFT FROM PAGE A3 CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Aziz and Jessica Morales of Orlando talk about their line of jewelry cleaner to a group of women. measure that is also bet ter for the environment. We will be sending a message in (each cus tomers) utility bill with instructions on how to access the CCR online, Richard Hoon, assistant to the city manager, said in a press release. The citys website will also have a link to access the report at www.eustis.org. Customers who want a paper copy of the re port can contact Bran don Pennington at the Water Department by calling 352-357-5618 ext. 4, or emailing pen ningtonb@ci.eustis. .us. The federal Consum er Condence Rule re quires public water suppliers that serve the same people year round to provide CCRs to their customers, ac cording to the EPA. These reports also are known as annual wa ter quality reports or drinking water quality reports. The CCR summarizes information regarding sources used (i.e., riv ers, lakes, reservoirs or aquifers), any detected contaminants, compli ance and educational information. The reports are due to customers by July 1 of each year. WATER FROM PAGE A3 HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan said. The nation loses ap proximately 10,000 public housing units each year, primarily due to disrepair, HUD stated. In 2011, the agency released a study that found the na tions 1.1 million pub lic housing units are facing an estimated $25.6 billion in largescale capital needs re pairs. Unlike routine maintenance, capital needs are extensive im provements required to make the housing de cent and economically sustainable. Eustis has a 60-unit income-based housing unit funded by HUD and a separate 56-unit complex funded by the United States Depart ment of Agriculture. The latter complex of fers rental assistance with priority given to farm worker families. The housing author ity is located at 1000 Wall St. Call 352-3574851 for information. HOUSING FROM PAGE A3 TALLAHASSEE The U.S. Department of Educations Ofce for Civil Rights has re vived a probe into Flor idas Bright Futures scholarship program, which critics charge is increasingly out of reach for the students who need it most. A spokesman for the department told The Miami Herald the of ce had requested in formation from some Florida school districts, including Miami-Dade, the nations fourth larg est district. He said the ofce was investigat ing allegations the state uses eligibility criteria that could have the ef fect of discriminating against Latino and Afri can-American students on the basis of national origin and race. The popular program has awarded more than $4 billion in scholar ships, and an outsized share of those have gone to white or afuent fam ilies. Some of those re cipients are from fam ilies that were wealthy enough to pay for col lege without any help. In recent years, state lawmakers have raised the standards to obtain a Bright Futures schol arship, increasing the minimum SAT and ACT scores to levels that critics complain will further exclude poor and minority students. Department of Ed revives probe into Bright Futures

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb JILL LAWLESS Associated Press GULBERWICK, Scot land In the late win ter dusk, hundreds of Vi kings are marching down to the beach, bearing am ing torches. Their studded leather breastplates glint in the relight as they roar and sing. Its a scene that would have struck terror into the hearts of Dark Age Britons and also perhaps an un settling one for modern poli ticians on both sides of Scot lands independence debate. The fearsome-looking par ticipants in a Viking re fes tival known as Up Helly Aa live in Scotlands remote Shetland Islands, a windwhipped northern archipel ago where many claim de scent from Scandinavian raiders. They are cool to the idea of Scotland leaving Brit ain to form an independent nation, and determined that their rugged islands clos er to Norway than to Ed inburgh will retain their autonomy, whatever the outcome of Septembers ref erendum. Shetland is different. We have Viking blood in our veins, said the processions magnicently bearded chief Viking, or Jarl by day a lo cal authority housing ofcer named Keith Lobban. There are only 23,000 Shetlanders, too few to make much difference to the out come of the independence vote. But they have Vi king-sized condence, and a big bargaining chip: a chunk of Britains oil and gas re serves lie beneath Shetland waters. Shetlanders are seeking new powers and ofcial rec ognition of their special sta tus possibly along the lines of the Faroe Islands, a self-governing dependen cy of Denmark. The island ers feel their moment may have come, as Scotlands u id constitutional status gives them opportunities to seek concessions from both sides of the independence battle. Tavish Scott, Shetlands rep resentative in the Scottish Par liament, said an independent Scotland doesnt have an economy if oil and gas doesnt happen. And that gives Shet land some leverage. A yes vote for indepen dence on Sept. 18 would trigger complex negotia tions between Edinburgh and London over Scotlands share of Britains offshore oil and gas and of its tril lion-pound national debt. A no vote is likely to lead to talks about giving Scotland more control over its econ omy and resources espe cially its energy reserves. Authorities in Shetland, who currently have lo cal-government powers such as collecting property taxes and running schools, see the referendum as a chance to drive a hard bargain some thing at which they have con siderable experience. For centuries, Shetland was a poor place, ignored by governments far to the south and reliant on the un predictable shery indus try and on making knitwear from sturdy local sheep. But the islands have prospered since large reserves of oil were discovered offshore in the 1960s. Construction of Sullom Voe, one of Europes largest oil and gas terminals, brought jobs and new mi grants who reversed decades of population decline. Amid the rush of discovery, Shetland negotiated a gen erous compensation agree ment with eager oil compa nies creating an oil fund that has helped give the is land chain well-paved roads, plentiful swimming pools and well-equipped commu nity centers. These days, oil production is dwindling, but French en ergy company Total is build ing a new natural gas plant on the islands. Shetlanders are keen to have control over their re sources oil, gas, sh and even wind and are wary of government meddling, no matter where that govern ment is based. Whether decisions are made in Edinburgh or in London, they are still distant from Shetland, said Adam Civico, editor of the Shetland Times newspaper. An online petition on the Scottish government web site calls for residents of Shetland, neighboring Or kney and Scotlands Western Isles to hold separate refer enda on whether to join an independent Scotland, stick with Britain or declare inde pendence although any of those moves would require protracted negotiations, and the petition has only 525 sig natories so far. Scotlands Vikings go own way in independence vote JILL LAWLESS / AP In this photo taken March 14, locals dressed as Vikings carry torches as they take part in the annual Up Helly Aa, Viking re festival in Gulberwick, Shetland Islands, north of mainland Scotland. SAMEER N. YACOUB and SINAN SALAHEDDIN Associated Press BAGHDAD Iraqs al-Qaida-inspired mili tants who took over the city of Fallujah are now trying to show they can run it, providing social services, policing the streets and implement ing Shariah rulings in a bid to win the sup port of its Sunni Mus lim population. Gunmen in ski masks and Afghan-style tu nics patrol the streets, but also perform a sort of community out reach. On a recent day, they were seen repair ing damaged electrici ty poles and operating bulldozers to remove concrete blast walls and clear garbage. Others planted ow ers in a highway medi an, and some ghters approached residents in the street and apol ogized for gaps in ser vices, promising to ad dress them. The Islamic militants have also made them selves the law in the city and aim to show they are acting to pre vent crime. On Thurs day, militants cut off the right hand of a man accused of rob bing a mobile phone shop and paraded him through Fallujah in the back of a pickup truck, forcing him to raise his stump to show people, according to witnesses in the city. The push by the al-Qaida breakaway group, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, marks an effort to bol ster their standing in a community that re mains under siege and exhausted by three months of clashes be tween the insurgents and government forces. The group is try ing to increase its ap peal among the broad er Sunni minority in Iraq, where resentment against the Shiite-led government runs deep and it is trying to correct past mistakes. In the 2007, many ma jor Sunni tribes turned against al-Qaida mili tants and formed U.S.backed militias to bat tle the group, angered by its rampant killings during the height of the countrys sectari an bloodbath following the 2003 U.S.-led inva sion. Many in the Sun ni community still bit terly hate the militants, and some tribes have joined government forces in ghting the group in Fallujah. Gauging whether the outreach is improv ing the groups image among Fallujah resi dents is difcult. Sever al residents who spoke to The Associated Press said they fear the mil itants and want police control to return. Some said they are happy with the groups activities, but all spoke on condi tion of anonymity, fear ing for their own safety. The ISIL people are providing security to Fallujah residents af ter policemen left, said Abu Abdullah, a shop owner who offered only his nickname. He said shoppers can reach his store more easily after ghters removed blast walls blocking the street. Militants launch social support in Fallujah AP PHOTO In this Feb. 11 photo, masked anti-government gunmen help an elderly woman in Fallujah, Iraq.

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 O n the cover of four mag azines on the newsstand this month is a version of the headline: What Does Your Partner Want In Bed? How do I know this? I mem orized the magazine covers be cause I was waiting on line at the checkout stand at my supermar ket for what felt like two days, my cart piled high with orange juice, cereal, toilet paper and kit ty litter. Yes, I lead a glamorous life. Frankly, I thought the maga zines were asking a dumb ques tion. What do people want in bed? Clean sheets. Really, thats the rst thing. Unless youre a guy under 23 who was raised by jackals, everybody wants cleans sheets. Also, people want enough room in bed. A person needs to stretch and scratch without hit ting a wall or irritating another person. And, yes, sometimes a per son wants sex. Sometimes a per son wants sex, but then some times maybe a person might like a sandwich, followed by sleep. Uninterrupted sleep with no crumbs from the sandwich to in terfere, either. Thats the real answer to what your partner wants in bed, and none of those feature articles fo cused on anything except item number No. 3 above, which, in case you forgot, was sex. But apart from whether asking what somebody wants in bed is good question, the supermarket checkout counter is an absurd place to ask it. Maybe I wasnt focused on ro mance because I was stand ing behind a small, very well-dressed and expensive ly accessorized elderly wom an who had enough coupons for one product Renuzit Odor Killer to not only eradicate the national decit but to send her Davos next year as a nan cial superpower. She was actu ally getting money back because she had so many. It was like a hold-up, except Ma Barker here was using coupons instead of a handgun for a weapon. Obviously, whatever time she had left on this earth, Ma Bark er was prepared to spend it at this particular register. Just as bifocal glasses dont necessari ly give you a clearer view of the universe, age doesnt necessarily bring wisdom. You dont always get smarter as you get older and she was proof. This woman insisted the man ager initial every coupon as the teenage checkout attendant scanned it through. Imagine the expression on this young mans face as she whispered, You didnt triple that one, honey. Do it again and do it more slowly this time. Therefore we can all agree the supermarket is the wrong place to think sexy. Or maybe I lost interest in dis covering what my partner wants in bed (after 23 years, youd have thought I already knew) because a highly freckled and decided ly vicious little girl behind me in line started inging herself at my leg as if I were a bouncy castle. (No, the fact that I was wearing a pink coat and might have gained a little weight over the winter did not justify her error. Bouncy cas tle indeed.) Her father was a man whose indifference to his offsprings be havior was matched only by his contempt for the products he was about to purchase: cans of Alpo and Manwich were piled on top of cupcakes and cherry tomatoes. While she was throwing her self against my leg, he thumbed through a copy of People maga zine and landed on a story about Soa Vergaras thighs. It was hard to be certain of the storys con tent since I was being savaged by his Honey Boo-Boo/WWE hy brid. They werent the only reason I wasnt in the mood, however. Had a person one aisle over not been shouting, Honey, did you get the anchovy paste and the Preparation H? I might have felt better. But lets think about this for a minute: Is a supermarket check out aisle really the best place to get romantic and sexual advice? Youre frantic, youre impatient, youre annoyed and youre feel ing trapped. So the answer, obviously, is yes: it is exactly like dating and relationships. But we should remember that love offers no discounts, no buyin-bulk savings and no special lane for those with fewer items; romance rarely hides its truth inside the covers of glossy maga zines; and marriage lasts longer if you bring your own non-dis posable bag not to mention your own sandwich. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a femi nist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Cou rant. She can be reached through her website at www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Sex tips on special in supermarket line The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. S ome calming words from Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. may lower the political temperature of a confronta tion between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Ca lif., and the CIA. But Feinsteins allegation that the agency improperly searched Sen ate Intelligence Committee computers and tried to trigger a criminal investigation of committee staffers still calls for a thorough investigation by the Obama administration. Moreover, President Obama needs to in tervene personally to ensure that the public nally gets to see the document at the center of the controversy: a voluminous report by the committee on the CIAs detention and in terrogation of suspected terrorists after 9/11, a policy that we already know involved wa terboarding and other acts of torture. On Wednesday, Holder commented on two issues that have been referred to the Justice Department for a possible crimi nal investigation: the search of Intelligence Committee computers by CIA employees and the allegation that committee staffers improperly accessed an internal CIA report about the detention and interrogation pro gram. Holder said the department hadnt decided whether to pursue either. In a speech on the Senate oor last week, Feinstein, the committee chair, criticized the CIAs former acting general counsel, Robert Eatinger, for referring the conduct of the staffers to the FBI for a possible criminal investigation, noting that Eatinger had been a lawyer in the unit that carried out the in terrogation and detention program. Feinsteins accusations were especially dramatic given her previously staunch sup port for the intelligence community, par ticularly in connection with the National Security Agencys electronic surveillance ac tivities. But the senator also has been a crit ic of the detention and interrogation pro gram, and presided over an investigation that resulted in the 6,300-page report ap proved by the Intelligence Committee on a mostly party-line vote in December 2012. Those who have read the report describe it as a blistering indictment that concludes the CIAs notorious enhanced interrogation techniques yielded little valuable intelli gence. The agency, however, has claimed that the report contains signicant errors, and it seems content for it to remain under wraps. Its long past time that the report was declassied and released so the public can draw its own conclusions. Obama, who has said he is committed to declassifying the re port, can and must make that happen. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE Spy wars on Capitol Hill: Feinstein versus the CIA Classic DOONESBURY 1970 Or maybe I lost interest in discovering what my partner wants in bed (after 23 years, youd have thought I already knew) because a highly freckled and decidedly vicious little girl behind me in line started flinging herself at my leg as if I were a bouncy castle. (No, the fact that I was wearing a pink coat and might have gained a little weight over the winter did not justify her error. Bouncy castle indeed.)

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NCAA: Kentucky upsets No. 1 seed Wichita St. / B3 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Professional golf has come to Lake County. The Lake Coun ty Clas sic, a stop on the Na tional Golf Associa tion Profes sional Golf Tour will be played at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake this week, the highlight event of a week chock full of golf-related activities. A 72-hole event, the Lake County Classic is set to begin at about 7:30 a.m. (or sufcient light) on Thursday and will conclude on Sunday. In addition, two practice rounds, a free clinic and a ProAm is scheduled for the week. As is the case with all NGA events, admis sion for the Lake County Classic is free and open to the public. On-site parking will be avail able, according to NGA ofcials. The main purpose of the NGA Tour is to prepare our players to move on to the Web. com and PGA Tours, NGA brings pro golf to Harbor Hills Country Club DENNIS PASSA Associated Press SYDNEY Yasi el Puig and Paul Gold schmidt hadnt left the stadium before work ers began dismantling what was quite an im pressive place to play baseball. For a week, at least. Home plate was dug up, the pitchers mound attened and the 8-foot-high perim eter home run fence taken down within an hour after Puigs Los Angeles Dodgers beat Goldschmidts Arizo na Diamondbacks 7-5 Sunday. It was a two-game Dodgers sweep of Major League Base balls opening week end at Sydney Cricket Ground. The Dodgers and Clayton Kershaw won the Saturday opener 3-1, sending the Dia mondbacks back to the U.S. 0-2 to start the sea son and with the L.A. team holding a very early two-game lead in the NL West over their Arizona adversaries. The regular season will resume next week end for both teams, with a few exhibition games scheduled this week while they recov er from jet lag after the 15-hour ights Down Under and back. The cricket ground, and Australian baseball fans, meanwhile, may never be the same. Nearly 80,000 fans at tended the weekend games at the 162-yearold ground in leafy Moore Park, minutes from downtown Syd ney. Clearly, sports-mad Australia loved having the worlds best base ball players in Sydney. Locals love it as MLB makes trip Down Under RICK RYCROFT / AP The Los Angeles Dodgers Yasiel Puig is tagged out by the Arizona Diamondbacks Aaron Hill as umpire Laz Diaz watches on Sunday in Sydney, Australia. And the upsets continue PHOTOS BY JEFF ROBERSON / AP Stanfords Josh Huestis (24) and Dwight Powell (33) celebrate as Kansas Conner Frankamp, right, heads toward the sideline at the end of a third-round game of the NCAA college tournament on Sunday in St. Louis. Stanford won 60-57. R.B. FALLSTROM Associated Press ST. LOUIS Kansas knows all about Stan ford now. The Cardinal couldnt deny a slight at a news conference a day ear lier fueled them just a bit before pulling their second and much bigger upset of the NCAA tournament. Kansas freshmen Andrew Wiggins and Wayne Selden Jr. ducked their heads and giggled Saturday when asked about Chasson Randle, Stanfords lead ing scorer. We denitely saw that video, Randle said Sunday after the No. 10 seed Cardinal beat the second-seeded Jayhawks 60-57 to ad vance to the Sweet 16 in the South Regional. Coach told me not to talk about it but I de nitely took it as a chal lenge. It was a little big extra motivation. Enough for the Car dinal to make the Jay hawks the second No. 2 seed to be knocked out of this tournament in the third round and enough for them to reach the round of 16 for the rst time since 2008. Wiggins was held to four points on 1-for-6 shooting in what could have been his nal col lege game. He accepted his share of the respon sibility for the loss. I let a lot of people down, Wiggins said. If I would have played better, we wouldnt be in this situation, you know? I blame myself for this. Dwight Powell had 15 points and seven re bounds despite play ing with four fouls much of the second half and Randle added 13 points, six steals and four assists for the Car dinal (23-12), who were making their rst NCAA appearance since 2008. To beat a team like this, a storied program with great coaching, great players, always feels amazing, Powell said. So as of right now were still in the race and were still playing in March, and it feels great. Stanford beat No. 7 seed New Mexico on Friday and will have a higher seed for the rst time when it faces 11th-seeded Dayton in the regional seminal in Memphis, Tenn. The Flyers beat No. 3 Syra cuse 55-53. Stanford knocks off No. 2 Kansas 60-57 to advance to Sweet 16 Kansass Jamari Traylor (31) and Perry Ellis try to steal the ball from Heustis during the second half. CHRIS OMEARA / AP Arnold Palmer, left, hands the trophy to Matt Every after Every won at Bay Hill on Sunday in Orlando. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer ORLANDO Matt Every always believed he would nally win on the PGA Tour. He couldnt have imagined it happening Sunday at Bay Hill. Nine shots out of the lead going into the weekend, still four shots behind Adam Scott going into the nal round, Ev ery took advantage of a sur prising collapse by the Mas ters champion and held on to the very end for a 2-under 70 to win the Arnold Palmer In vitational. Every made two bogeys in the last three holes, including a 4-foot par putt he missed on the 18th hole. That forced him to wait 10 excruciat ing minutes to see if Keegan Bradley could force a playoff. Bradleys 30-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole missed on the left side. Cocky by nature, Every choked back tears when he realized he had won in his 92nd try as a professional. Its hard, he said, stop ping to compose himself. Its tough, man. You just never know if its going to happen. You get there so many times. Its nice to get it done. GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer FONTANA, Calif. Kyle Busch won at Fon tana for the second straight year Sunday, hold ing off Kyle Larson, Tony Stewart and his older brother Kurt on a frantic two-lap sprint to the nish. Kyle Busch capably blocked Larson and out lasted Stewart and Kurt Busch to win a wacky race featuring a track-record 35 lead changes and numerous tire problems. With his 29th ca reer Sprint Cup victory in his Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota, Kyle Busch is NASCARs fth winner in ve races already this season. Holy cow, what do you expect when youve got a green-white-checkered nish and every body has to come down pit road and put four tires on? Busch asked after his third career win at Fontana. That was Days of Thunder right there. Unbelievable day. Jimmie Johnson was comfortably in front when he blew a tire with seven laps left, pre cipitating the wild nish. Jeff Gordon moved in SEE MLB | B2 SEE GOLF | B2 SEE NCAA | B2 Every rallies for first tour win SEE PGA | B2 Kyle Busch wins again at Fontana SEE NASCAR | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Tampa Bay 15 5 .750 Cleveland 16 7 .696 Seattle 16 9 .640 Baltimore 12 7 .632 New York 15 10 .600 Los Angeles 14 10 .583 Oakland 12 10 .545 Detroit 12 11 .522 Toronto 12 11 .522 Kansas City 11 11 .500 Chicago 7 12 .368 Minnesota 7 13 .350 Boston 8 15 .348 Houston 8 15 .348 Texas 7 14 .333 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Miami 16 9 .640 San Francisco 14 9 .609 Pittsburgh 12 9 .571 Arizona 11 9 .550 New York 13 11 .542 Colorado 12 12 .500 St. Louis 10 10 .500 Washington 12 12 .500 Cincinnati 12 14 .462 Milwaukee 12 14 .462 Chicago 11 15 .423 Atlanta 10 16 .385 Los Angeles 6 10 .375 San Diego 7 12 .368 Philadelphia 7 15 .318 Sundays Games Miami 8, Detroit 4 Toronto 3, N.Y. Yankees 1 Tampa Bay 9, Boston 2 Philadelphia 5, Minnesota 1 Atlanta 4, N.Y. Mets (ss) 1 Baltimore 7, Pittsburgh 7, tie, 10 innings St. Louis 6, Houston 3 N.Y. Mets (ss) 3, Washington 1 Seattle 6, Oakland (ss) 4 L.A. Angels 5, Cleveland 2 Milwaukee 9, Cincinnati 1 Todays Games Boston vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Oakland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Houston vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 6:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. Tuesdays Games Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 7:05 p.m. Seattle vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. NASCAR Sprint Cup-Auto Club 400 Results Sunday At Auto Club Speedway Fontana, Calif. Lap length: 2 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 206 laps, 123.1 rat ing, 47 points. 2. (11) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 206, 89.4, 42. 3. (17) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 206, 104.5, 42. 4. (1) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 206, 117.1, 41. 5. (10) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 206, 82.2, 39. 6. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 206, 95.7, 38. 7. (19) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 206, 111.9, 38. 8. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 206, 86.7, 36. 9. (30) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 206, 84.1, 35. 10. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 206, 88.4, 34. 11. (20) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 206, 74.4, 33. 12. (15) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 206, 83.6, 32. 13. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 206, 114, 32. 14. (27) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 206, 63.9, 30. 15. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 206, 67.7, 29. 16. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 206, 100.5, 29. 17. (13) Sam Hornish Jr., Toyota, 206, 66.6, 0. 18. (34) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 206, 53.3, 26. 19. (23) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 206, 59.5, 25. 20. (16) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 206, 86.7, 25. 21. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 206, 42.3, 24. 22. (40) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 206, 46.9, 22. 23. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 206, 55.9, 21. 24. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 206, 127.4, 22. 25. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 205, 43, 0. 26. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 205, 94.2, 19. 27. (41) David Ragan, Ford, 205, 39.1, 18. 28. (28) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 205, 49.4, 16. 29. (33) David Reutimann, Ford, 205, 36.7, 16. 30. (8) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 205, 63.9, 14. 31. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 205, 31.3, 13. 32. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 205, 30.4, 0. 33. (35) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 205, 30.9, 11. 34. (22) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 204, 56.5, 10. 35. (37) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 204, 37.3, 0. 36. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 204, 82.7, 8. 37. (38) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 204, 44.2, 7. 38. (29) David Gilliland, Ford, 202, 35.6, 7. 39. (7) Joey Logano, Ford, 195, 72.1, 5. 40. (24) Greg Bife, Ford, 193, 62.9, 4. 41. (26) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 180, 70, 3. 42. (32) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, accident, 85, 43.4, 2. 43. (21) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 68, 53, 1. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 39 30 .565 Brooklyn 36 31 .537 2 New York 29 40 .420 10 Boston 23 47 .329 16 Philadelphia 15 55 .214 24 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 47 21 .691 Washington 36 33 .522 11 Charlotte 34 36 .486 14 Atlanta 31 37 .456 16 Orlando 19 51 .271 29 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 51 19 .729 Chicago 39 31 .557 12 Cleveland 26 44 .371 25 Detroit 25 44 .362 25 Milwaukee 13 56 .188 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 53 16 .768 Houston 47 22 .681 6 Dallas 42 28 .600 11 Memphis 41 28 .594 12 New Orleans 29 40 .420 24 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 Portland 45 25 .643 6 Minnesota 34 34 .500 16 Denver 31 38 .449 20 Utah 23 47 .329 28 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 49 21 .700 Golden State 44 27 .620 5 Phoenix 41 29 .586 8 Sacramento 24 45 .348 24 L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324 26 x-clinched playoff spot Saturdays Games Charlotte 124, Portland 94 Houston 118, Cleveland 111 Chicago 91, Philadelphia 81 Memphis 82, Indiana 71 New Orleans 105, Miami 95 Utah 89, Orlando 88 San Antonio 99, Golden State 90 L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103 Sundays Games Toronto 96, Atlanta 86 Phoenix 127, Minnesota 120 Washington at Denver, late Milwaukee at Sacramento, late Brooklyn at Dallas, late Cleveland at New York, late Orlando at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Houston at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Portland at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Portland at Orlando, 7 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPNU Virginia at Miami MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN Preseason, Detroit vs. Pittsburgh, at Bradenton MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN NIT, second round, Georgetown at Florida State 9 p.m. ESPN NIT, second round, LSU at SMU 11 p.m. ESPN2 NIT, second round, Arkansas at California NBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. SUN Portland at Miami NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Montreal at Boston WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, second round, DePaul at Duke; Syracuse at Kentucky; Arizona St. vs. Notre Dame at Toledo, Ohio; Oklahoma St. at Purdue 9 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, second round, St. Johns at Tennessee; BYU vs. Nebraska; California at Baylor; Oklahoma St. at Purdue said Robin L. Waters, NGA Tour president. By adding another top-notch course like Harbor Hills Country Club, our players will have yet another op portunity to prepare themselves for the next level. The weeklong pres ence of the NGA be gins today with the rst of two practice days for players. On Tuesday, a free golf clinic will by offered at 4:30 p.m. and a oneday pro-am tourna ment on Wednesday will cap off the list of activities heading into the Lake County Clas sic. Like most pro-ams, the Lake County Clas sic Pro-Am will con sist of teams made up of three amateurs and one NGA profes sional competing in a scramble format that often produces an ar ray of exciting shots and clutch putts. We are excited to announce that the NGA Tour exemp tion into the Web. com Tour Price Cut ter Charity Champi onship will be on the line at the Lake Coun ty Classic, said Todd Barbee, NGA Tour Se nior Tournament Di rector. The NGA Tour is the No. 3 Mens profes sional tour in the U.S. after the PGA and Web. com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmental tour by PGA and Web.com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hundreds of professionals ac quire their cards PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Cham pions Tour. NGA Tour alum ni include: 2012 Mas ters champion Bub ba Watson; 2011 PGA Championship win ner Keegan Bradley; 2010 PGA TOUR Play er of the Year and 2003 US Open Champion Jim Furyk; 2009 Brit ish Open Champi on Stewart Cink; 2009 U.S. Open Champi on Lucas Glover; 2007 Masters Champion Zach Johnson; 2003 PGA Champion Shaun Micheel; 2003 British Open Champion Ben Curtis; two-time U.S. Open Champion Lee Janzen; British Open and PGA Champion John Daly. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running developmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was award ed ve Web.com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions Re no-Tahoe Open and the Sanderson Farms Championship the most of any tour in the history of devel opmental golf. Harbor Hills Coun try Club is a par-72 championship lay out designed by Lloyd Clifton. It measures 6,823 yards from the from the back tees and has a 72.5 rat ing and carries a 126 slope rating. Area ofcials wel come the NGA to Lake County and hope the tournament becomes an annual affair. Lake County is a golf ers paradise and we are thrilled to welcome the NGA to Harbor Hills, one of the countys pre mier golf course, said Robert Chandler, di rector of Lake Coun tys Economic Devel opment and Tourism Department. For information, visit www.ngatour. com or contact the NGA Tour ofce at 800-992-8748. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Scott, in his nal tournament before he defends his title at Au gusta National, came undone. Along with two quick bogeys to start his round, he didnt make a birdie over the nal 14 holes. Nothing summed up his awful day like the par-5 16th, the easiest at Bay Hill. Every made a bogey to fall to 14-under par. Scott, playing behind him in the nal group, had a 20-foot eagle putt on the 16th to tie for the lead. He ran it 4 feet by, and then missed that for a three-putt par. Scott closed with a 76 to nish third. He had to win to reach No. 1 when he arrived at the Masters. Now, the No. 1 spot held by Tiger Woods for the last year will be up for grabs at Augusta among Woods, Scott and Henr ik Stenson, who tied for fth at Bay Hill. Every grew up about 90 minutes away in Daytona Beach. This was the rst PGA Tour event he attended as a kid, coming with his fa ther to watch Mark Cal cavecchia, his favorite player. After a wild nal hour, Every donned the blue blazer on the 18th green and had an audience with The King tournament host Ar nold Palmer. I kept telling myself, Maybe its going to be somewhere special, Every said about going for his rst win. This is really cool. I still cant believe it. Every nished at 13-under 275, one shot ahead of Bradley, who needed two late birdies for a 72. PGA FROM PAGE B1 So did their rugby, cricket, soccer and Aussie Rules football stars who took time to mingle with Kershaw and Puig, among oth ers, for photo shoots. It was a mutual ad miration society, with Kershaw posing on his birthday with a kanga roo and kicking around a rugby ball on the eve of his opener. Puig and Goldschmidt even tried their hand at cricket. Cracker Jack and twofoot-long hotdogs be came part of the menu at the SCG snack bars, and MLB commission er Bud Selig was non committal about a re turn to Australia in the near future. Australian fans might like to see it soon er than later. Nev er were foul balls into the stands more heart ily cheered, because they could keep them. In cricket, where balls are changed only af ter a predetermined amount of play, they must be returned to the eld. This event was out standing, really cool, Diamondbacks man ager Kirk Gibson said. The crowds were great. The preparation from the city of Sydney was outstanding. They treated us well. Mattingly says a con cern after the teams re turn to the U.S. will be avoiding complacency. Theyll have a few days off, then three exhibi tion games before re turning to the regular season next Sunday for a three-game series in San Diego. My biggest fear is when you start games, games that dont count are tough to get ready to play, he said. MLB FROM PAGE B1 The 6-foot-8 Wiggins, a likely NBA lottery pick if he decides to leave school, was saddled with four turnovers for Kansas (25-10). Wig gins had averaged 28 points the previous four games but the Jay hawks were missing 7-foot freshman Joel Embiid who was side lined by a stress frac ture in his back. Coach Bill Self thought Stanfords height up front both ered Wiggins, but add ed, I think he had an off-game, too. Give them credit for that, we put him in position to make some plays. Josh Huestis, who had the primary re sponsibility for guard ing Wiggins, played 39 minutes and had six points, eight rebounds and two blocks. That was Joshs as signment and he took it to heart, Dawkins said. He had help. We just tried to make it as difcult as we could for him to score. Self said the game seemed like a struggle from the opening tip. Everything didnt go right for Stanford, either. The Cardinal were 0 for 9 from 3-point range. We can make 3s but thats not what we rely on, Dawkins said. I didnt even notice it be cause thats not what weve been. Tarik Black had 18 points and six rebounds for the Jayhawks, but he fouled out with 5:25 to go. Conner Frankamp had 12 points on four 3-pointers, the last two in the nal 23 seconds to make it close after Stanford had pulled ahead by seven. Stanford was 9 for 12 at the free throw line over the nal 2:04 and needed all those points. Frankamps second 3-pointer narrowed the gap to 59-57 with 14.9 seconds left. Anthony Brown hit one of two free throws with 12.9 seconds to go and Frankamp banged a third 3-point attempt off the glass near the buzzer in a bid to tie it. NCAA FROM PAGE B1 PGA-Bay Hill Leading Scores Sunday At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course Orlando Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72 Matt Every (500), $1,116,000 69-70-66-70 275 Keegan Bradley (300), $669,600 71-67-66-72 276 Adam Scott (190), $421,600 62-68-71-76 277 Jason Kokrak (135), $297,600 67-71-67-73 278 Erik Compton (100), $226,300 72-68-70-69 279 Francesco Molinari, $226,300 67-70-69-73 279 Henrik Stenson (100), $226,300 69-73-69-68 279 Ryo Ishikawa (83), $186,000 65-74-70-71 280 Brandt Snedeker (83), $186,000 67-71-74-68 280 J.B. Holmes (68), $148,800 68-69-72-73 282 Freddie Jacobson (68), $148,800 71-68-70-73 282 Graeme McDowell (68), $148,800 68-77-67-70 282 Sean OHair (68), $148,800 71-75-69-67 282 Kevin Chappell (55), $102,300 71-70-71-71 283 Harris English (55), $102,300 69-71-75-68 283 Lucas Glover (55), $102,300 72-74-68-69 283 Matt Jones (55), $102,300 71-71-69-72 283 George McNeill (55), $102,300 71-72-69-71 283 Kevin Na (55), $102,300 70-71-71-71 283 Brian Davis (49), $67,167 70-74-71-69 284 Vijay Singh (49), $67,167 72-73-68-71 284 Camilo Villegas (49), $67,167 71-73-73-67 284 Gary Woodland (49), $67,167 73-71-70-70 284 Ian Poulter (49), $67,167 68-71-69-76 284 Brendan Steele (49), $67,167 68-74-70-72 284 Chesson Hadley (43), $45,880 69-68-69-79 285 Trevor Immelman (43), $45,880 69-72-71-73 285Brooks Koepka, $45,880 74-70-72-69 285 Davis Love III (43), $45,880 70-73-69-73 285 Nicholas Thompson (43), $45,880 71-73-71-70 285 Retief Goosen (39), $37,588 70-75-68-73 286 Danny Lee (39), $37,588 71-72-73-70 286 Marc Leishman (39), $37,588 72-74-69-71 286 Chris Stroud (39), $37,588 73-69-72-72 286 Aaron Baddeley (33), $28,636 70-70-70-77 287 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (33), $28,636 66-77-74-70 287 Luke Guthrie (33), $28,636 71-71-74-71 287 Peter Hanson (33), $28,636 75-69-71-72 287 Morgan Hoffmann (33), $28,636 67-71-71-78 287 Charles Howell III (33), $28,636 68-71-72-76 287 Bryce Molder (33), $28,636 72-72-69-74 287 Seung-Yul Noh (33), $28,636 72-68-74-73 287 Charlie Beljan (24), $18,476 72-72-70-74 288 Jamie Donaldson, $18,476 67-71-74-76 288 Billy Horschel (24), $18,476 70-74-69-75 288 Zach Johnson (24), $18,476 71-71-73-73 288 Russell Knox (24), $18,476 71-71-72-74 288 Will MacKenzie (24), $18,476 71-75-72-70 288 John Merrick (24), $18,476 65-74-76-73 288 front until Clint Bow yer spun with two laps to go, setting up an overtime nish. Gordon was hoping to nish on old tires when Bowyer spun, but then elected to pit along with most of the leaders. Kurt Busch gambled with just two tires, allowing him to restart in second, but his younger brother came up from fth in the nal two laps to win. I came off the fourth turn in disbelief that we won this thing, be cause we were medio cre all day, Kyle Bus ch said. It was really weird for us, not a race that were typically used to. But now theres a load off your shoul ders that you can go out the rest of the sea son and race the way you want to. He barely held off Larson, the 21-yearold rookie who held off Kyle Busch on Saturday to win the Nationwide race. I dont know where everybody went, but I somehow ended up in second and it entered my mind, We might sweep the weekend, Larson said. He had to settle for the best nish of his Sprint Cup career in the No. 42 Chevrolet for Chip Ganassi Racing. Kyle Busch, who went to Larsons car Saturday to congratu late him on his Nation wide win, pointed out his window at Larson after Sundays nish, pumping his st in ap proval. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 COLLEGE BASKETBALL Kentucky takes down No. 1 WSU DAVE SKRETTA Associated Press ST. LOUIS It took a program stocked with NBA prospects to nal ly end Wichita States perfect run. Andrew Harrison scored 20 points, twin brother Aaron had 19 and Kentucky survived a potential winning 3-pointer at the buzz er by Fred VanVleet to knock off the undefeat ed Shockers with a 7876 victory Sunday in the NCAA tournament. Julius Randle add ed 13 points and 10 re bounds, and James Young also had 13 points for the No. 8 seed Wildcats (26-10), who made a series of clutch free throws in the closing minutes to advance to the Sweet 16 in arguably the most captivating game of a thrilling rst weekend. Now, Big Blue Na tion gets to jump right into another high-pro le matchup: Louisville awaits in the Sweet 16 on Friday in Indianap olis. The Wildcats beat their bitter in-state ri val in December. Cleanthony Early scored 31 points and Ron Baker had 20 for the Shockers (35-1), who hadnt lost since last years Final Four while taking an entire city and state on quite a ride. Kentucky took the lead for good at 73-71 when Young knocked down a 3-pointer with less than 2 minutes to go. Early answered with a basket for Wich ita State, and Andrew Harrison made two free throws for Ken tucky. Baker banked in a 3-pointer and Randle made two more foul shots. Earlys two free throws with 9.8 sec onds left got the Shock ers within 77-76, and they still had a chance when Andrew Harri son missed the second of two free throws and Early got the rebound. VanVleet raced up court and called time out with 3.2 seconds left. Wichita State coach Gregg Marshall drew up a play that had Te kele Cotton inbound ing the ball to VanV leet, who took a shot from the top of the key. But the shot was wide the entire way, and it clanked off the rim as the buzzer sounded and Kentucky began to celebrate. The team full of blue-chip prospects had nally ended the blue-collared teams dream. The Midwest Region al showdown came af ter an entertaining un dercard matchup that saw Stanford knock off Kansas, and it lived up to every expectation. Kentucky was suc cessful early using its superior size, not only in the paint but also on the perimeter, where the 6-foot-6 Harrison twins dwarfed the 5-11 VanVleet. But after the Wildcats took a 19-15 lead midway through the half, Wichita State ramped up its trade mark defense, forcing a series of turnovers and getting right back in the game. VanVleet was the catalyst. On one se quence late in the half, he stripped Aaron Harrison and hit Ear ly in transition, and he was fouled slamming over 7-foot Willie Cau ley-Stein. CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Kentucky guard Jarrod Polson (3) drives past Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet (23) during the rst half of a third-round game of the NCAA college basketball tournament on Sunday in St. Louis. DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Iowa States Matt Thomas (21) and North Carolinas Nate Britt (0) scramble for a loose ball on Sunday, in San Antonio. No. 3 seed Iowa State battles to win over North Carolina Tennessee ends Mercers NCAA run PAUL J. WEBER AP Sports Writer SAN ANTONIO DeAndre Kane drove for the game-winning layup with 1.6 sec onds left and No. 3 seed Iowa State beat North Carolina 85-83 on Sunday, advancing to the Sweet 16 for the rst time since 2000. The Cyclones (287) head to Madison Square Garden next week to face No. 7 seed Connecticut in the East Regional semis. The Tar Heels (24-10) are gone in the NCAA tournaments opening weekend for the rst time in consecutive seasons under coach Roy Williams. North Caroli nas Nate Britt raced the ball up court af ter Kanes basket, but time expired before he could reach mid court and call a time out. Ofcials huddled for several minutes reviewing clock re plays before ruling the game was over. Right away Williams who collapsed his hands on his knees as Britt dribbled toward him and the buzz er sounded shook Iowa State coach Fred Hoibergs hand as North Carolina began absorbing a last-sec ond heartbreaker. Kane nished with 24 points and 10 re bounds. It was just the kind of big game the Cyclones need ed without forward Georges Niang, who broke his foot in Fri days win against North Carolina Cen tral. The 6-foot-7 sophomore sat on the bench wearing a bulky boot while the Cyclones tried their best without their third-leading scorer and tallest starter. CHUCK BURTON / AP The Tennessee bench cheers after Tennessee guard Antonio Bartons 3-point shot against Mercer on Sunday in Raleigh, N.C. JOEDY MCCREARY AP Sports Writer RALEIGH, N.C. Tennessee came to To bacco Road and turned it into Raleigh Top. Jarnell Stokes had 17 points and a ca reer-high-tying 18 rebounds, and the Volunteers denied Mercer a second straight upset in the NCAA tournament by routing the Bears 8363 on Sunday night. Josh Richardson had a career-high 26 points and Antonio Barton had 18 for the 11th-seeded Vols (2412), who outrebound ed Mercer 41-19 and kept the Southeastern Conference perfect in the tournament. They joined Florida and Kentucky in the round of 16 the rst time three SEC teams made it that far since 2007. Tennessee will face second-seeded Mich igan (27-8) in a Mid west Regional semi nal on Friday night. Stokes broke his two-day-old school tournament record for rebounds. Langston Hall had 15 points to lead the 14th-seeded Bears (279). They knocked off Duke in the signature upset of the tourna ment but couldnt an swer Tennessees size. Mercer trailed by double gures for the entire second half be fore the Bears threat ened to give them selves yet another fantastic nish. They had the ball down 12 with about 2 minutes left when Jakob Gollon one of the heroes of the Duke upset two days earlier threw the ball away in the lane, then fouled out a few seconds later. Jordan McRae hit two free throws, and Richardson added a fast-break layup to push the Tennessee lead to 77-61 with 1 minutes left. GOLF DAVID BRANDT AP Sports Writer SAUCIER, Miss. Jeff Maggert admit ted his decisive putt on No. 17 at Fallen Oak wasnt supposed to be one that actually dropped. He was just trying to get it close. So when the 50-foot putt rolled up and down a big ridge as it broke from left to right and then fell into the hole the Cham pions Tour rookie was as surprised as any one. He had been consis tent all week. Now just a little bit of luck had pushed him to victory at the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic at Fallen Oak on Sunday. You cant count on those going in very often, Maggert said with a grin. Maggert became the 17th player in Cham pions Tour history to win in his debut, shooting a 4-under 68 to capture his rst vic tory since the 2006 St. Judes Classic on the PGA Tour. The 50-year-old fell into a tie for the lead with Billy Andrade af ter making bogey on No. 16, but responded with the astonishing putt that pushed him back ahead. I was just trying to hit an easy lag putt, Maggert said. I want ed an easy tap-in for par and it was just one of those things the ball found the hole. When it dropped, Maggert shook his head in disbelief. He nished the tourna ment with an 11-un der 205. Maggert is a threetime PGA Tour win ner who turned 50 in February. His consis tent weekend includ ed a 68 on Friday, a 69 on Saturday and he capped his debut performance at Fall en Oak with four bird ies on the back nine on Sunday to earn the $240,000 paycheck. I had expectations to play well, but I didnt know if I would play well enough to win, Maggert said. Id been struggling a little with my game, but every thing just kind of came together. It was one of the best tournaments, as far as ball striking, that Ive had in a few years in any event. That really carried me through. Andrade, who start ed the day tied with Fred Funk for the lead, shot a 71 to nish in second two strokes back. Jeff Maggert wins at Fallen Oak in Tour debut TIM ISBELL / SUN HERALD Jeff Maggert holds his championship trophy for the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic Sunday at Fallen Oak in Saucier, Mississippi. Associated Press PANAMA CITY Mexicos Carlos Ortiz won the Panama Claro Championship on Sun day for his rst Web. com Tour title, closing with a 6-under 64 for a four-stroke victory. The 22-year-old for mer North Texas play er nished at 12-un der 268 at Panama Golf Club and earned $112,500 to jump from seventh to second on the money list with $171,500. Jason Gore was sec ond after a 66. Daniel Berger, Derek Fathau er and Aron Price, the second-round leader, tied for third at 7 under. Berger and Fathauer shot 67, and Price had a 70. Alex Cejka, the win ner of the season-open ing Colombia Cham pionship and second last week in the Bra zil Champions, tied for 11th at 4 under after a 69. He earned $13,750 to push his tour-lead ing total to $235,150. Mexicos Ortiz wins first title

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer KEY BISCAYNE Andy Murray won Sunday while Ivan Lendl watched as a fan rather than as a coach. With Lendl among the stadium specta tors, Murray advanced to the fourth round at the Sony Open by beating Feliciano Lo pez 6-4, 6-1. The tour nament is the rst for the two-time Key Bis cayne champion since he parted with Lendl, who coached Mur ray for two years and helped him become a Grand Slam champi on. Were back togeth er again. It was only a fouror ve-day split, Murray joked. No, its a shame he wont be watching many more of my matches from the stands. Roger Federer also advanced easily, beat ing qualier Thiemo de Bakker 6-3, 6-3. Lendl helped Mur ray win Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, an Olympic gold med al and last years Key Biscayne title. Lendl said he decided to step down because he wanted to concentrate on other projects, among them playing more senior events. Murray was unhap py about the split and said Lendl will be dif cult to replace. Be fore their partner ship, Murray was 0-4 in Grand Slam nals although he did win Key Biscayne in 2009. The No. 6-seeded Murray moved one round closer to a po tential quarternal against Novak Djokov ic. Murray returned well and made the most of his chances at the net to improve to 9-0 against Lopez, seeded 32nd. The victory came on a sunny, 85-degree af ternoon. Murray con rmed it was hot, al though the Scotsman who lives part-time in nearby Miami said Fahrenheit tempera tures give him pause because hes more fa miliar with Celsius. I started using Fahrenheit a bit more, but I dont know the conversion, he said. If I speak to someone back home and they say, How hot was it?, and I say, Its 85 today, and they say, What is that?, I have absolute ly no idea. Murrays next op ponent will be No. 11-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, who outlasted Marcos Baghdatis 4-6, 7-6 (6), 7-5. Tsonga ral lied from a 5-1 decit in the tiebreaker. Federer didnt face a break point against de Bakker, and after two matches has lost only 10 points in 20 service games. The win gave Federer 43 career vic tories at Key Biscayne, one more than Pete Sampras and second in only to Andre Agas sis 61. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Associated Press FORT MYERS Matt Moore walked off the eld after being hit in the mouth by a line drive that he par tially blocked with his glove in the fourth inning of the Tampa Bay Rays 9-2 win over the Boston Red Sox. Moore got his glove up just in time to deect a line shot by Bostons Xander Bogaerts, recovering to throw out Bo gaerts for the nal out of the inning. Moore lifted his jer sey up to his lip, which was bleeding. But that also ended Moores outing as he was driven from the eld, sitting up in a cart. The Rays said Moore re ceived a couple of stitch es, but had no concussion symptoms. He will continue to be monitored. Moores injury comes just four days after Reds closer Aroldis Chapman was hit in the face by a liner and had surgery to repair a broken bone above his eye. Moore earned the win, go ing four innings without giv ing up a hit but allowing a run and four walks and four strikeouts and a wild pitch. Moore and right-handers Brandon Gomes and Juan Carlos Oviedo combined to hold the Red Sox hitless into the seventh inning before Bogaerts one-out single. Red Sox left-hander Fe lix Doubront had anoth er rough outing, his second in as many starts, going 4 1/3 innings, giving up eight runs and 10 hits, including a home run, and two walks with six strikeouts and a balk. BRAVES 4, METS 1 KISSIMMEE Freddy Garcia bounced back from two rough outings, allow ing two hits while pitching into the sixth inning Sunday as the Atlanta Braves beat a New York Mets split-squad 4-1 on Sunday. Justin Upton homered for the Braves while Fred die Freeman and B.J. Upton each were 2 for 3 with an ex tra-base hit and a walk. Garcia, bidding begin the season as the No. 3 starter in the Braves injury-deplet ed rotation, had allowed 10 runs over 6 2/3 innings in his previous two starts. But the veteran right-hander kept the Mets off balance with his assortment of pitches as he struck out four and walked one in 5 1/3 innings. He al lowed an unearned run. Carlos Torres, who had al lowed just one run in 10 in nings, made his rst start of the spring for the Mets, al lowing six hits and two runs over four innings. The righthander had four strikeouts and no walks. BLUE JAYS 3, YANKEES 1 TAMPA Yankees fth starter candidate Michael Pi neda allowed three runs and six hits over six innings Sun day in New Yorks 3-1 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays. Dioner Navarro had an RBI single in the second, which ended Pinedas score less streak at 10 innings. The right-hander avoided fur ther damage by getting an inning-ending double play from Ryan Goins with the bases loaded. Toronto scored twice in the fth, on Pinedas throw ing error after elding a bunt and a wild pitch. Considered the front run ner, Pineda is competing with David Phelps, Adam Warren and Vidal Nuno for the nal rotation spot be hind opening day starter CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Masahiro Tanaka and Ivan Nova. Manager Joe Girardi is expected to announce the choice Tuesday. MARLINS 8, TIGERS 4 LAKELAND Joe Nathan allowed four runs while only getting one out in the ninth inning as the Miami Marlins rallied for an 8-4 win over the Detroit tigers on Sunday. Nathan entered without having allowed a run in eight games. Jeff Mathis, who went 4 for 5, had a tiebreak ing two-run double for Mi ami Jacob Turner allowed one run in six innings for the Marlins. He gave up three hits and struck out ve. The Marlins Mathis and Gi ancarlo Stanton homered off Drew Smyly. PHILLIES 5, TWINS 1 CLEARWATER Jim my Rollins homered for the second straight day and the Philadelphia Phillies cruised to a 5-1 victory over the Min nesota Twins on Sunday. Rollins nished 2 for 2 with two RBIs and a walk. Roll ins is 6 for 13 since snapping out of an 0-for-23 slump this spring on Wednesday. Rollins is hitting .211 (8 for 38) in 14 games this spring. Domonic Brown and Mar lon Byrd each had two hits and Ryan Howard nished 1 for 3 with a walk and an RBI. Minnesota right-hander Phil Hughes allowed ve runs and nine hits in ve in nings. Hughes, in his rst season with the Twins after signing a three-year, $24 million free agent deal, struck out three and walked one. PIRATES 7, ORIOLES 7 SARASOTA Andrew Mc Cutchen hit a ninth-inning home run and the Pittsburgh Pirates and Baltimore Ori oles played to a 7-7, 10-in ning tie on Sunday. McCutchen, who also doubled, is batting .529 this spring. Gerrit Cole allowed six runs and eight hits in 6 2-3 innings. Cole, who will probably be Pittsburghs No. 2 start er this season, allowed three home runs among his eight hits: a leadoff homer to Nick Markakis in the rst, a twoout blast to Chris Davis, his fourth this spring, and a tworun shot by Ryan Flaherty in the sixth. In three spring starts, Cole has allowed eight earned runs in 11 2/3 innings. Kevin Gausman allowed a leadoff homer to Starling Marte in the rst. He gave up the run and three hits in four innings, walking two and striking out eight. CARDINALS 6, ASTROS 3 JUPITER Joe Kelly al lowed his rst hit in a tworun sixth inning and Matt Holliday homered, leading the St. Louis Cardinals to a 6-3 victory Sunday over the Houston Astros. Kellys control uctuat ed in his fourth spring start, striking out ve but also walking four. He did not get an out in the sixth. Kel lys Grapefruit League ERA dropped to 6.29. Moore hit by line drive; Rays hammer Sox GERALD HERBERT / AP Tampa Bay Rays Wil Myers reaches second on a double as the ball slips out of the glove of Boston Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts in the rst inning of an exhibition game on Sunday in Fort Myers. NBA Kyle Lowry scores 25 as Raptors defeat Hawks 96-86 Associated Press TORONTO Kyle Lowry scored 25 points, Jonas Valanciunas had 13 points and 13 re bounds and the Toron to Raptors beat the At lanta Hawks 96-86 on Sunday. DeMar DeRozan scored 21 points, Greivis Vasquez had 12 and Terrence Ross 10 as the Raptors avoided their rst three-game home losing streak since dropping games against Brooklyn, Mi ami and Denver be tween Nov. 26 and Dec. 1. Toronto fell in dou ble overtime to Okla homa City on Friday and lost to Phoenix last Sunday. Lowry, who had 13 points as Toron to erased an 11-point decit in the fourth quarter, has scored 19 points or more in a ca reer-high nine consec utive games. DeMarre Car roll and Paul Millsap each scored 17 as the Hawks lost their sec ond straight following a ve-game winning streak. SUNS 127, WOLVES 120 MINNEAPOLIS Markieff Morris scored 25 points off the bench to lead the Phoenix Suns to their biggest comeback of the sea son, a 127-120 victory against the Minnesota Timberwolves on Sun day. Phoenix trailed by 22 in the rst half but shot a season-high 57 per cent from the oor to overcome Kevin Love 36 points and 14 re bounds. Love fell an assist short of a triple double and committed a crucial turnover in the nal minute. With the game tied at 118, Love lost the ball in the paint and Eric Bledsoe made a fastbreak layup. Gerald Green, Bled soe and P.J. Tucker each hit a pair of free throws in the closing seconds to help the Suns pull within a half game of eighth-place Memphis in the Western Confer ence. NUGGETS 105, WIZARDS 102 DENVER Kenneth Faried had 20 points and Aaron Brooks hit four straight free throws in the nal 12 seconds, helping the injury-rid dled Denver Nuggets hold off the Washing ton Wizards 105-102 on Sunday night. Randy Foye added 17 for a Nuggets team that was missing J.J. Hick son, who suffered torn ligament in his right knee on Friday. Wilson Chandler also didnt play (strained left hip) and Jan Vesely didnt re turn after bruising his rib cage late in the third quarter. NATHAN DENETTE / THE CANADIAN PRESS Atlanta Hawks guard Dennis Schroder, left, drives to the net past Toronto Raptors guard Nando de Colo during the second half on Sunday in Toronto. TENNIS ALAN DIAZ / AP Andy Murray returns to Feliciano Lopez on Sunday at the Sony Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne. Andy Murray reaches fourth round at Sony Open tourney

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 MENTAL HEALTH: Newtown struggles to meet demand / C4 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer It wont be nearly as much fun as eating candy bars, but a big study is being launched to see if pills con taining the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes. The pills are so packed with nutrients that youd have to eat a gazillion candy bars to get the amount being tested in this study, which will enroll 18,000 men and women nationwide. People eat chocolate be cause they enjoy it, not be cause they think its good for them, and the idea of the study is to see wheth er there are health bene ts from chocolates ingre dients minus the sugar and fat, said Dr. JoAnn Man son, preventive medicine chief at Harvard-afliated Brigham and Womens Hos pital in Boston. The study will be the rst large test of cocoa avanols, which in previous small er studies improved blood pressure, cholesterol, the bodys use of insulin, artery health and other heart-re lated factors. A second part of the study will test multivitamins to help prevent cancer. Earli er research suggested this benet but involved just older, unusually healthy men. Researchers want to see if multivitamins lower Study to test pills containing nutrients found in dark chocolate for heart health AP FILE PHOTO A worker collects sun-dried cocoa beans to be put into into sacks for export in Guiglo, Ivory Coast. EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer W hile a few of his former teammates were competing for gold, silver and bronze, Sean Busby was rounding out a set hardly any Olym pian can dream of. It started 10,500 feet high at a base camp and ended hours later on his snowboard in Moroccos Toubkal National Park. By riding the highest mountain range in North Africa, Busby became the rst person with Type 1 diabetes to snowboard the backcountry on all seven continents. When I nally got back, I got texts about Vic getting double gold med als and that sort of stuff, Busby said of his friend, Vic Wild, the Ameri can-born rider who won two snowboarding golds for his adopted coun try of Russia. But while I was up there, I had no connection to the outside world. At one point, Busby dreamed it might be him climbing to the top of the Olympic podium as a snowboard racer. But his out-of-control and misdiagnosed illness that hit more than 10 years ago, at age 19, held him back. Vomiting. Dangerous weight loss 30 pounds in the span of 12 days. Pneumonia that set in as a result of doctors inability to control the other symp toms. Busby lived with an incorrect diagnosis for three months doctors rst told him he had Type 2 diabetes. Turned out, he had Type 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and sufferers are dependent on insulin; Type 2 diabe tes, which accounts for more than 90 percent of all diabetes, is often as sociated with older age, obesity and physical in activity. Sufferers can of ten feel better by con trolling their diets and dont always need insulin. While Busby was in search for a correct diag nosis, his sponsors left him in droves. One of them told me they didnt want to sup port an athlete who was chronically sick, he said. After he got the right di agnosis, and the insulin to combat it, Busby started looking for his second act. In search of something different than racing, he took his cue from some of the great adventurers in his sport among then, Jeremy Jones and the late Craig Kelly. To the back country he went. Its the reason I got in volved in the sport when I was 12 in the rst place, said Busby, who lives in Whitesh, Mont. Its the sense of adventure. The sense of getting away from it all. Its the true spirit of snowboarding. Busby founded a char itable organization, Rid ing on Insulin, that rais es money to give kids with Type 1 diabetes the same chance at adventure Bus by has enjoyed. Busby also Diabetic snowboarder Sean Busby rides 7 continents AP FILE PHOTOS Sean Busby splitboards through the High Atlas Mountains near Marrakech, Morocco. By riding the highest mountain range in North Africa, Busby became the rst person with Type 1 diabetes to snowboard on all seven continents. Sean Busby checks his insulin pump at base camp. SEE DIABETIC | C4 SEE HEART | C4 UMATILLA World Tuberculosis Day to be observed today The Lake County Health Department will observe World Tuberculosis Day from 1 to 4 p.m. today at the Umatilla Health Center, 249 E. Collins St. Educational mate rials will be available. For information, call the Florida Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5554. LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program seeks volunteers Lake and Sumter County resi dents age 55 and older are needed by the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) to help with a va riety of ongoing efforts in the community. Volunteers tutor elementary stu dents, mentor low-income high school students who are college bound, deliver meals, make phone calls to home-bound seniors, pro vide transportation for cancer pa tients and sort and distribute food to the needy. For information, call 352-365-1995. TAVARES Health seminars to be offered at Waterman Florida Hospital Waterman will offer a series of seminars on an array of health topics. They are: Living with Knee Pain? You May Not Have To, with Samire Guru, DO, from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday at the Mattison Conference Center at Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way in Tavares. Minimally Invasive Hernia Repair, with Dan Tran, M.D., at 1 p.m. on April 2, also at the Mattison Conference Center. Call 352-323-3635 to register and for information. EUSTIS Crafts for Cancer group scheduled to meet The Crafts for Cancer volun teer group meets at 9:30 a.m. on the third Monday of every summer month at the First United Methodist Church in Eustis. For information, call 352-735-7704. TAVARES Amputee support group meeting scheduled for today The Waterman Amputee and Limb Lost Konnections (W.A.L.K.) for amputees and those with limb loss will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. today and every fourth Monday at the Mattison Conference Center, Room B, at Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way in Tavares. For information, call Tracey Estok at 352-253-3892.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Lawn Services Electrical Services

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi north of Kmart)(352) 347-0403 or Fax (352) 347-2034 Fax: (352) 347-2034cdrx441@gmail.com GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted touts the OmniP od, a tubeless insulin pump that allows him to reg ulate his insulin with out the constant injec tions that many who have the disease need. If something went wrong while Im in Antarctica, I might as well be on the moon if I need help, he said. I couldnt af ford to have my gear fail on me. My life de pends on my gear. Among other plac es, Busby has ridden the backcountry in Tasmania, Norways Lyngen Alps, Kyrgyz stan, Patagonia and throughout the Ca nadian Yukon, New foundland and the United States. Though the ascent in Morocco allowed him to cross the last continent off his list, hes not done with his adventure. He plans on lead ing a backcountry trip through Norway for people who have Type 1 diabetes. Theres a trip to Greenland in the works. Hes sur rounding himself with people who have the same disease he has spreading the word that anything is pos sible. Youre moving at your own pace and its your own two feet guiding you through it, he said. Ive been able to meet amaz ing people, see amaz ing cultures and learn amazing things. DIABETIC FROM PAGE C1 cancer risk in a broader population. The study will be sponsored by the Na tional Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Mars Inc., maker of M&Ms and Snickers bars. The candy com pany has patented a way to extract ava nols from cocoa in high concentration and put them in capsules. Mars and some other compa nies sell cocoa extract capsules, but with less active ingredient than those that will be tested in the study; candy con tains even less. Youre not going to get these protective a vanols in most of the candy on the market. Cocoa avanols are of ten destroyed by the processing, said Man son, who will lead the study with Howard Ses so at Brigham and oth ers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Cen ter in Seattle. Participants will get dummy pills or two capsules a day of co coa avanols for four years, and neither they nor the study leaders will know who is taking what during the study. The avanol capsules are coated and have no taste, said Manson, who tried them herself. In the other part of the study, participants will get dummy pills or daily multivitamins containing a broad range of nutrients. Participants will be recruited from exist ing studies, which saves money and lets the study proceed much more quickly, Manson said, although some ad ditional people with a strong interest in the re search may be allowed to enroll. The wom en will come from the Womens Health Initia tive study, the long-run ning research project best known for showing that menopause hor mone pills might raise heart risks rather than lower them as had long been thought. Men will be recruited from other large studies. Manson also is leading a govern ment-funded study testing vitamin D pills in 26,000 men and women. Results are ex pected in three years. People love vitamin supplements but its important not to jump on the bandwagon and take pills before they are rigorously test ed, she warned. More is not neces sarily better, and re search has shown sur prising harm from some nutrients that once looked promis ing, she said. HEART FROM PAGE C1 AP FILE PHOTO Balloons y outside a doctors ofce on the rst anniversary of the Sandy Hook massacre, in Newtown, Conn. PAT EATON-ROBB Associated Press HARTFORD, Conn. Some of the charities paying for men tal health care for children and families affected by the San dy Hook massacre are running short of money and ofcials dont know how much theyll need and for how long to repair the psychological scars from the mass shooting. Newtown ofcials are apply ing for a federal grant and char ities are pooling their resources in an attempt to ensure that free long-term mental health care remains available following the December 2012 shooting that left 20 rst graders and six edu cators dead. We hear in the media, Well Sandy Hook was 14 months ago, isnt everything ne? said Can dice Bohr, executive director of the Newtown Youth and Fami ly Services. Well, no its not and we get calls every day from the school wanting to address an is sue. I would love to say that in 10 years were going to see a huge drop and everyones better and weve moved on, but thats not the case. Three of the charities that have Newtown struggles to meet mental health demand SEE NEWTOWN | C8

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeat ed numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, March 24 the 83rd day of 2014. There are 282 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On March 24, 1989, the supertanker Exxon Valdez (vahl-DEEZ) ran aground on a reef in Alaskas Prince William Sound and began leaking an estimat ed 11 million gallons of crude oil. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 24, 2014: This year you open up to change and become more realistic than you have been in the past. You often take the lead, which is natural for you, but you become more controlling in guiding oth ers toward a goal. Success stems from your focus and endurance. Learn to gath er information before naliz ing your decisions. If you are single, you project one atti tude yet act in a conicting manner. These two paradox ical dimensions could pose a problem in a potential re lationship. Try to integrate these different ideas. If you are attached, as a couple, you nd 2014 to be very dy namic and exciting. The two of you relate closely, espe cially come summer. Enjoy this period. CAPRICORN is stubborn but willing to do whatever is necessary to come out on top. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You handle tension well. Somewhere along the way today, you might decide that you dont care how someone feels about you. You sur prise people when you do a reversal, because you are so passionate about nearly ev erything you do. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your instincts could pre vent a collision of wills. You see the big picture, whereas others cannot. As a result, youll see many solutions to x the situation. You will change perspective as the day goes on. Be open to hav ing various conversations. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) One-on-one relating takes you down a new path to new possibilities. You might want to change di rections after you have a much-needed discussion. Youll see too many options that could work, and you know that yours is not the only one. T CANCER (June 21-July 22) Others often challenge you, and you nd these con trary moments revealing, as they help you identify your priorities. You could nd someone offensive in how he or she pushes for what he or she wants. A positive attitude will go far. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Pace yourself. Others seem to be obsessive, and you might want to derail the whole matter. Your instincts will help you nd out more about what exactly is going on. Someone from a dis tance could surprise you and lead you down a new path. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your creativity will come out, even with a discouraged or pessimistic person in your life. This person has a way of getting your imagination going. Your nances could be off-kilter, if you choose not to take charge of them. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Stay centered and di rect in your dealings. A child or loved one will add some variety to the moment. Be willing to ex and come to a natural conclusion. You are likely to keep produc ing more and more, which will impress an associate or higher-up. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You could be taken aback by someones need to have certain matters go a certain way. You, too, can be quite controlling about out comes, yet you recognize that you can control only yourself. Have a talk with this person. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Be aware of your spending habits, as you could nd that a partner wants the same ability to buy as you do. This conver sation could cause some upset if you are not careful. Understand your limitations. Consider a different ap proach to your nances. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll beam in what ever you want, but later you will have to deal with the im plications of your actions. A family member could be upset by your choices and where you are heading. A discussion is likely to elim inate at least some of the problem. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Step back from a prob lem rather than add to it. Given some time, the situ ation will unravel itself. You could be surprised by some ones efforts to reach out to you. Understand that this person means well. Listen to your instincts. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You seem to have walked into a situation with a lot of power plays, and you might be wondering why. Know what is happening be yond the obvious. If you at tempt to enlighten others, they might be resentful. Find out what is happening with a child. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: My boy friend, Caleb, and I have been dating for three years. Im sure hell propose within the next few months. Im having a prob lem with this because Calebs best friend, A.J., will be propos ing to his girlfriend in the next month. They should be able to en joy their time and let all their friends know. Caleb has always followed A.J.s lead. When A.J. buys his girlfriend jewelry, I get jewelry. It makes me feel like an after thought and that the gifts are not sincere. If Caleb does pro pose close to the time that A.J. does, Im go ing to say no. I dont want a copycat en gagement so my boy friend can keep up with his best friend. Please advise. COM ING IN SECOND IN NEW YORK DEAR COMING IN SEC OND: You appear to be frustrated because your boyfriend has a recessive personality and is a follower. It is unlikely that he is go ing to change. Frank ly, Caleb doesnt ap pear to be mature enough to be making decisions with lifelong consequences. You might be much happi er with someone who is his own man. DEAR ABBY: A year and a half ago, my doctor diagnosed me with ADHD. The med ication I take is a stim ulant and it curbs my appetite. I take it be fore school and it wears off by mid-af ternoon. Because of this, I dont feel hun gry at lunchtime. My teachers and schoolmates have no ticed. They try to per suade me to eat, but I tell them I had a big breakfast or Im just not hungry. I know they mean well, but I want them to understand that Im not anorexic. I dont want them to know I have ADHD because some of them make fun of people who do. Do you have any sug gestions? ANONY MOUS IN IOWA DEAR ANONYMOUS: The principal of your school should be told that you are on doc tor-prescribed medi cation that suppresses your appetite so that information can be shared with the teach ers who supervise the cafeteria. That way you will receive less pressure to eat from the adults. Your class mates do not have to know. If someone accuses you of being anorexic, just say that your doc tor has told you your weight is normal. Its a shame they would tease someone who has ADHD because its a condition that so many students and adults share. Howev er, because you feel it would make you a tar get, youre wise to say nothing. Dear Abby is written by Ab igail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pau line Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Copycat boyfriend gets some growling from his girlfriend 748-7300 Saturday, March 29th 9am 4pmCAPEZIOSHOEREPWILLBEPRESENT! Dance InstructorsAll Current Dance Shoes$10 OFFClearance Dance Shoes$19.95 Starting At And Up

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 been providing funds for services have started working together, while the charity that has raised the most money the Newtown-San dy Hook Community Foundation says that it will likely join the alli ance soon. The Newtown Li ons Club, which raised $350,000 for men tal-health services in the wake of the shoot ing, has told the 250 people it served that it could no longer di rectly pay their men tal health bills because fundraising was being outpaced by demand. The demand was well beyond anything we could have predict ed, said Peter McNulty, president of the Lions Club. Other charities are picking up the slack. The towns Rotary Club and the Newtown Me morial Fund, which had been spending a combined $30,000 a month on mental health care for 150 fam ilies, partnered with the Lions Club, said Brian Mauriello, founder of the Newtown Memori al Fund. Those who need help are being steered to the states Ofce of Victim Services, which pro cesses applications for money from a pool cre ated by all three chari ties. So far, nobody has been turned down. I dont think anybody has a crystal ball to say whether theres going to be enough money or not, said Linda Cimi no, the director of the state Ofce of Victims Services I do know that the plan is for a 15-year horizon. The Newtown-San dy Hook Community Foundation has about $4 million left after giv ing more than $7 mil lion to the 40 families most affected by the shooting. Much of the remain ing money likely will go into the mental health care pool, said Jennifer Barahona, the founda tions executive direc tor. She said they ex pect to announce an alliance with the Lions/ Rotary/Newtown Me morial Fund group in the coming weeks. We recognize that as the largest of the funds, we will need to pick up the slack over the years as some of the other funds really dwindle as the Lions has, she said. The idea is to still have money available as those who were in elementary school at the time of the shoot ing reach adulthood. Meanwhile, the town is seeking more than $7 million in a fed eral grant, in part to help cover the next 18 months of costs for the nonprot agencies providing free mental health care. The grant also would create a re covery and resiliency board, which would help match people with specic services and programs. This is about building a safety net of ongoing support for those in the mental health system, and to capture new peo ple who have needs, Pat Llodra, the towns rst selectwoman, told town ofcials when announc ing the grant application last month. Bohr said her organi zation saw an 85 per cent jump in clients after the Sandy Hook shooting, and had to quadruple its staff, adding 29 positions. They have been pro viding everything from intense one-on-one therapy, to simple ad vice to parents who come in asking how to deal with their chil drens questions about the shooting. Another nonprot, the Resiliency Center of Newtown, opened in September. It has served about 500 peo ple with free programs such as art and mu sic therapy, grief coun seling, and parenting classes. Stephanie Cinque, the executive director, said they have been funded with private donations, but she is counting on the feder al grant money to keep the programing going. While they await a re sponse to the grant re quest, Cinque said its clear the services are having an impact. After all the therapy shed been through since 12/14 we never thought wed have her back, the mother of a Sandy Hook student who completed a self-esteem program wrote in an email shared by Cinque. And we have our daughter back. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com NEWTOWN FROM PAGE C4

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbr rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rffnftbrfbbfff bffbbrfffff bfffffff fbfrbfnf tf bff n f t n t f t f f t f f f f n b f b fn f trfbbffnbffbft fffffrfb ffftbffffftfb ffffrffffbrrf rrffrfrf rrfr frfffffbb ffrfbfrfbbfffbr ffrfffff bffbffrbfff bbfffbfbrfrf fffrfrbf f f f t fftbfr ffbfbb tf bffff f f b f r f rffrffbfff ftbffff bfrfbbffffr ffbfrff bffbbrfbfbf ffff tbffffbbrff fffffr fffff tf bffffff f f f n f f n n f t f f ft fn f t f f n t f t f f tfft ftfttfttft fnfftt fffft tfntf r fftfttf tftfttft r f n fn f t ffffbrfffn ffnbrbffbf ffbffftfff bfbfffnffbf fbfffnbfbf tfttfttftf nffttf ffftft fntfffr ffffft ttfftftt tffn fttff tfttfttftf nffttf ffftft fntff bffrffrffb 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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 rfntbn rffr fnrtftfn btfff brfft nbfnf fr n f nffffr nb nr f r f f t f f f f fn rftb b n f f n f b t f f r f r f b f n b f f f n f n n b f n n f b f f f f f n r f f n n f f n f f b f f n r f b t n b f n f f r bb rb rb n f f f f n f f t t b t f t f f f f f t n f t f f b b n f f f r n f f f f f n f n f f t n b f n f f f b t r f t f f f t f f n n rf ftffr nntn t tffn b r b r f n b t r n n t f b b r f f f r n f r f n f r b t r f f b b n n f rt f b rt r b f t f f n f r b t r f b b f f b f f r f n f f b f r f rb b f n f b f b f b f b n b n b b f f n b b b b f n b n f f n ftb f f b f t f f b f f fbn rffrtnbf n t f b f f f f f t n n f t t f f f b b f n f n b f r f n t n t f n t f r f n f f n f f f r t f n n f b f f n f r t f t f f n f f n f b f n t f f f f n n n r r n b f r f r n b f n f f b f f f n f f n n r n n t f f f t f n n f n f f r f b n n r f f n f t f n f r t f b f f n f f f b f n t f f f t f n r f f b f n f n f f b f f n t f r f b n n f f n b f f f n b f t n t f t f f r b n b f f n n f n t n f n f f n n f f t n b f t f n r f b n f f n n f f f t f f f b f n n f r r f b f f n n f f r n f n f f n f b r f r t f n r n f n n r f f f t r r n n f n f f n f n f n f f b f n f t n f t f n f t f f r b f f n b f r t n f f f f f t n f f b b f f f r b t f f f r f n n n f r b f b t f n t f n r b n n t b f f n f r b n f t t f f n n n f n f f f f nb ftffn tfnf f nfn f f f f t n ffbbf bttbb rbftfnfb fnft rnfn tb ntff f f f r fb rbft tfbff ff t f f r b fnfnf nbnrfbn f r b f t f r f f f n f b n n b n t nnt nnbn t f ffffrt ftbnnbn rfbn f r b f t f r f n b f f f n t f n b f f f b f f f n t f f t f t t f fb nnfn f fnntfft ftn f bfbn bfn tftnnf fnnftff f n f f b f t r b fb f b n n f t f f t f n n t f f r b f f r n f t b f f b f f t f f f t t f n f n n f t t r t f f t f f r b f f n f t f n r f n f n n f b f n n f f f r f f f f n f r f b n t f f r b f nfbffnt nf fbnnb nfrtfn ftftfn f f n r f f f f n n b t f f f f f t f n n n f f f f n f n f f n f n t f f n b n f b r f f f n f f f f n f n r b f f f f f n f f f f b f t f f n f f f r t f t b f b b f f f n n t r f fnnrft fnfnnff rfffrft nbbfnn nftf ffnf fnffn ft ftfnrf tfb n f n n f n f t f f n f t t b f n n n f f f f r n r f f r f f n t b t b rfrn tbf

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbr rfntbbbt frrnf bnttfnb nrtnb rtft tbr t f r t b r f b t rfnt bnttt ffff tftft t t b r r t t f f b t ftf t tbtfn b b r f t rt tr bbt ftf tbtr tr bf tf n b t t t tbtftbt t t tn b r t r f f r r t r t b r f f b t n t f f f t f r t f f t f t t f f t t f b t f b b b t t t t ff rtfffnf tt r t t f tbt tttt tff rbt brft rbb t btnfr btf t btbtbb bfr tf b nbft b ftrtt tft b ftf t rrt b t t btt tft rb br r tb brt rt tb tft nnrtbtf brfft ttt b tb t ftnt bbrf f t n f t b tbtt fbtff b f tf t ftb b n t t f b f n t f r f t f f f f f r t t f f f t f f f t ftfff rn n bb rnbr bb rnbr t ntf t tf brnb brftff t br bt ft btb nff bt br frf bt ftbr b t bbf tr t ft rrt tbbfff tffbtbtf tf n b r f f f t f b n f t b r ttt nbrb bnn f tbt n t fb b n t r fb b b tr t b t tfff ntf ttt tnn t ntb ftff tt ttt b t tff t btt tfn b bbr ttrr tntfbt b tfttb b tftf nn nrfft nrff nftff t tfttr bbr tft brn tfff ftt rfbrftfftf ft tftf nn t f t t t f n nftntb nb brff tnt ntb ftt tnn tt b tbf ft tbt t nffb b ftft trtt bt b f n rff n b ft btb tt b rfnt tbbbr ttf bn bt tffn nntrb tf fb b fftt ntf trfbtfff ft fftrftrf ffttr r btffbt t f t nnf t r tt ttfr nr b t tt t tbtntb t trrntfbfnb ft tbbntf t b rfnt t t f tfftffrtf t ttft t tbt f n t t f n tfn tt ttf t tfntnf bf tfttr bbr nbtt t fbf bb tb t fftff fr ttb ttfb tffff t ftbtft t t b r t b r b f t bbf t fntf bb t tbt brf f b rb bbtf tbtft nnf nnn ftn tf ftt tf t tbt bft ft nt t bb r t rb bb t b ff f bn tff tf trft btf t t b f f bf t t trfftb tf btf f t fbb t tft btnft tr btntbt brbrf ftftn rf fnf fr fn ftbtr tfn ttffn t r t t t f tftf tft t f btf f fff t t tr nfftnbfttb brfbrtbbbb t tt ftbb t bff nftb b tff nt nf t b b fbb b tftb t btntb t n rfn bf t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t tb ft tfbf ft tt fbrt tbftr fbnbt rt fbrnf tffbrf tfbt f t b t b b n t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t t fbt fb t t b t t b b r t b t f t b b r n t b t t r f f t b b t n b t f f f f t f r btrbtb rfnftbr bbn t t b t r b b b r b t t n r r r f t f b tfnf nft t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t ff ff tftfn rbttt tnnb ffnf t t f t r r f b t t t f b f n f f fnt nttft rfbn nfrtnt t t b b f f r f n bf f t r f f b f r n f t f t b fn t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t nt t rn nft r f t f b f r f t f b n rfnt f rfnt tt ffbnbtftf ttf tnnf b t t t t t t t t b bf n tbt brft tb f nf rfnt nt bttfb tb t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t nt t fnrff ttnt t n t r t t b b f f

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 rfntbn rfnf tbtfttf ftf fnf fbtf n ttfn tf fbftf tt r f f f f n r ft ft nbff tt rf ntbf t tfttb tt n f t n ftfr tt fb fttn fb tfntftf nt fftfntf nf ffnnf ftftt fbt fnftf b bf br b bttftft f bf nftt ntb ftt bf br b fft nttt tf ftt tfftnff rtffffft nt tt ftftff tfnffff fnftn ff fnftn tt b nfbf nt t nntfb tbf fb tnf n fttbf t t t ffbnb tfbf fff ftt r r nt t tffft fnff ntft f ttffn f fnftn tt r ttf tftff tt r ftf n btbf nnr ttfff f nnr r ft tnrbf fnftn r f b t nntfb n btt nftn r b tf tt ft bftt bftf btn t t nn r t f f n t t b n tt nnnft r fn tntff ftt ff fn t rtf fftt rbfff b t b f f f tff ffftt fntffff ftt rbff nnfnbftb tt rtbf nbf tff rfnrtb rn r fn tr



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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EVERY RALLIES FOR FIRST TOUR WIN AT BAY HILL, SPORTS B1MOUNT DORA: Electric bills will see slight decline, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Diabetic snowboarder rides seven continents, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 24, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 83 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D2 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.73 / 63Periods of rain and a T-storm. 50 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe Association of Mature American Citizens (AMAC) plans to open a call center and relocate its Lady Lake headquar ters to Leesburg, add ing 70 new jobs. Dan Weber, AMACs president and founder, said the company currently has 19 employees, in addition to himself, at two Lady Lake ofces, and the goal will be for them to move to Leesburg, where the company will aim for a total of 90 employees. One of the Lady Lake ofces will close, and the cur rent main location will be used by the separate AMAC Foundation that helps provide information and advice on Social Security, Weber said. In addition to call center representatives, AMAC will look to hire management positions and representatives to help advocate to local and national politicians, Weber said. AMAC also will look for paid college interns in addition to the 70 other new positions. Employees at the call center will reach out to sign people up for AMAC. The company will be taking over a former Waste Management call center on Tally Road, where Weber said he will contact some for mer Waste Management workers for possible jobs. The Leesburg location will be 10,500 square feet, while the current Lady Lake ofces are 2,600 square feet and approximately 1,600 square feet, Weber said. He expects the Leesburg facility to be up and running by May 1 and would like to hire 30 people right away, reaching the full staff of 90 within a year. Weber said the employee expansion is fueled by growth. People are joining AMAC to be represented for the things they LEESBURGAMAC call center expanding PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: The Association of Mature American Citizens will be moving to this facility off of Talley Road in Leesburg. BELOW: Dan Weber, the founder of the Association of Mature American Citizens, poses in the Lady Lake facility in on March 17. TAKING NEW GROUND JIM HEINTZAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine A Ukrainian air force commander is being held after his base in Crimea was stormed by pro-Russian forces, and the acting pres ident called for his re lease Sunday. Col. Yuliy Mamchur is the commander of the Belbek Air Force base near Sevastopol, which was taken over Saturday by forces who sent armored person nel carriers smash ing through the bases walls and red shots and stun grenades. One Ukrainian serviceman was reported wounded in the clash. It was unclear if the forces, who didnt bear Ukraine says top commander held after base stormed PAVEL GOLOVKIN / AP Pro-Russian soldiers in unmarked uniforms arrange a position near Ukrainian marines base in Feodosia, Crimea, on Sunday. MARK SHERMANAssociated PressWASHINGTON The Obama adminis tration and its oppo nents are renewing the Supreme Court battle over President Barack Obamas health care law in a case that pits the religious rights of employers against the rights of women to the birth control of their choice. Two years after the entire law survived the justices review by a single vote, the court is hearing argu ments Tuesday in a re ligion-based challenge from family-owned companies that object Health law birth control coverage before justices JIM FITZGERALDAssociated PressNEW YORK Andrea Esteban tried to smile with half her face, crossing her eyes in the process, and her third-grade classmates giggled. Matthew Velez struggled to speak, Luh, luh, uh, gronk, and the kids erupted in laughter. But the funny faces, the gib berish and some arm apping were all part of a serious les son to help kids learn the tell tale signs of a stroke by imitat ing them. The idea is to enlist children, particularly those who may live with older relatives, as an army of eyes to help recog nize the warning signs, get help for victims more quickly and hopefully save lives. If my mom has a stroke, Ill know what to do, said 10-yearold Madison Montes. Run to the phone and call 911. The experimental health education program at Monteore Medical Center in the Bronx is aimed at the most crucial factor when it comes to a stroke: time. Each year, about 795,000 Americans have a stroke and about 130,000 die. Some are caused by bleeding in the brain, but the vast majority is caused by a clot that blocks blood ow, starving brain cells. The drug TPA can dissolve those clots and reduce disability but only if its given within three to four hours of the rst symptoms, and the sooner the better. Yet only about 5 percent of patients receive it, in part because many stroke suf ferers dont get to the hospital in time for testing to tell if theyre a candidate. The early warning signs in clude a droopy side of the face, slurred or strange speech, and the inability to keep arms raised.Kids learn stroke signs in class through imitationThe experimental health education program at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx is aimed at the most crucial factor when it comes to a stroke: time.SEE AMAC | A2SEE BASE | A2SEE STROKE | A2SEE LAW | A2 JIM FITZGERALD / AP Third-grader Andrea Esteban tries to imitate the droopy smile of a stroke victim.

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 23CASH 3 . ............................................... 7-0-8 Afternoon . .......................................... 4-5-4 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 6-9-2-1 Afternoon . ....................................... 3-5-2-6FLORIDALOTTERY MARCH 22FANTASY 5 . ......................... 13-19-21-22-36 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 1-8-10-16-52-53 POWERBALL .................. 13-28-31-55-5815 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.believe in, Weber said. For example, AMAC stands for less government, smaller government. We think the Constitution is the best instrument ever devised by man to govern man and today, the people in Washington are not following the Constitution. Weber said he founded the company because he was disappointed in AARP not representing us. He added the Affordable Care Act motivated him to work harder on AMAC. I formed it before the Affordable Care Act, but that made me devote full time to AMAC, Weber said. AMAC employs approximately 60 people nationally, with other ofces in New York and New Mexico, representing 1.1 million members. Weber said AMAC members receive advocacy with benets by joining. Americas a great country, Weber said. Here I am, a retired old guy from New York (who) wanted to do something for my kids and grandkids, and it wound up being a large enterprise. Robert Sargent, Public Information Ofcer for the city of Leesburg, said the buildings previous use as a call center allows for AMAC to move in quickly and easily. He noted the proposed use of the building does not require any extra permitting from the city. Weber said the company was looking to build expansions on its current headquarters in Lady Lake when the opportunity for the new Leesburg location came up. It was a godsend, Weber said. It was just a very fortunate occur rence. We were actually looking at expanding the building were in in Lady Lake when the realtor made us aware of the building being vacant. Sargent said it is good for the city to have a nationally known company come in. Sandi Moore, the executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said hir ing 70 people is noteworthy. When you have a situation where people had lost jobs for whatever reason then you can have someone that comes in and can ll the void thats obviously a huge win for the city, Moore said. Its really good that this company is willing to pursue that, too. Sixty-seven employ ees were affected by the closing of the Waste Management center, according to a Florida WARN notice. AMAC FROM PAGE A1 insignia, were Russian military or local pro-Russia militia. Ukraine President Oleksandr Turchynov, in a statement, said Mam chur was abducted by the forces. He didnt specify where Mamchur is believed to be held. However, prominent politician Vitali Klitschko said Sunday that Mamchur is being held by the Russian military in a jail in Sevastopol, the Crime an city that is the base of Russias Black Sea Fleet. Klitschko was one of the leaders of the three months of protests in Ukraine that culminated in late February with President Viktor Yanukovych eeing the coun try and interim authorities taking power before a May 25 presidential election. The protests were triggered by Yanukovychs decision to reject a deal for closer ties with the European Union and turn to Mos cow instead. Yanukovychs ouster was denounced by Russia and much of Ukraines ethnic Russian population as a coup. Soon thereafter, Russian forces took control of Crimea and the re gion held a referendum to break off from Ukraine and join Russia. Russia formally an nexed Crimea last week, a move that Western countries say is illegiti mate. The U.S. and the EU have imposed sanctions on Russia in the dispute, but Moscow ap pears unmoved. On Sunday, the Russian Defense Ministry said the Russian ag was now y ing over 189 military facilities in Crimea. It didnt specify whether any Ukrainian military operations there remained under Ukrainian control. At a Ukrainian marines base in Feodosia, troops were negotiating with Russian forces on handing over the base, Lt. Anatoly Mozgovoi told The Associated Press. The marines were load ing 50-caliber machine guns into armored per sonnel carriers to take them to the base armory, but Mozgovoi said they hope to hold on to heavy weapons such as rocket-propelled grenades and cannon. I think from my per sonal opinion, the Russian Federation has enough weapons, he said. In Donetsk, one of the major cities in east ern Ukraine, about 5,000 people demonstrated in favor of holding a refer endum on secession and absorption into Russia. Eastern Ukraine is the countrys industrial heartland and was Ya nukovychs support base. Donetsk authorities on Friday formed a working group to hold a refer endum, but no date for it has been set. Russia has deployed thousands of troops in its regions near the Ukrainian border and concerns are high that it could use unrest in the east as a pretext for crossing the border. On Sunday, Russian deputy defense minister Anatoly Antonov was quoted by Russian news agencies as saying the number of Russian troops in the area of the Ukrainian border does not exceed international treaty limits. BASE FROM PAGE A1 SERGEI GRITS / AP Men wave Russian national and Soviet ags as Ukrainian riot police block the entrance of the regional administrative building during a pro-Russian rally in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday. Theres a pretty good chance some children might wit ness a parent or a grandparent having a stroke, said Jim Baranski, CEO of the National Stroke Association. So if theyre armed with the signs and symp toms, they could likely save a life. Monteores program, one of a hand ful tried across the country, has been used since 2012 with private schools in its neighborhood, where children are often in a grandparents care because parents are absent or both working. The goal is to study the results and, if successful, replicate the program across the country. Dr. Kathryn Kir choff-Torres, who led the class from St. Anns School in the Bronx, said the kids are already little message machines bringing home from school what they learn about the ben ets of exercise, not smoking and eating well. One parent in at tendance, Jason Sawtelle, said he felt the lesson plants the seed. Maybe not every 8-year-old is capable of this, he said, but some certainly are. STROKE FROM PAGE A1 to covering certain contraceptives in their health plans as part of the laws preventive care requirement. Health plans must offer a range of services at no extra charge, in cluding all forms of birth control for women that have been approved by federal regulators. Some of the nearly 50 busi nesses that have sued over cover ing contraceptives object to pay ing for all forms of birth control. But the companies involved in the high court case are willing to cover most methods of contraception, as long as they can exclude drugs or devices that the govern ment says may work after an egg has been fertilized. The largest company among them, Hobby Lobby Stores Inc., and the Green family that owns it, say their religious beliefs prohib it them from providing health coverage for contraceptive drugs and devices that end human life after conception. Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby has more than 15,000 full-time employees in more than 600 crafts stores in 41 states. The Greens are evangelical Christians who also own Mardel, a Christian bookstore chain. The other company is Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. of East Earl, Pa., owned by a Mennonite family and employing 950 people in making wood cabinets. The administration says a victo ry for the companies would pre vent women who work for them from making decisions about birth control based on whats best for their health, not whether they can afford it. The governments supporters point to research showing that nearly one-third of women would change their contraceptive if cost were not an issue; a very ef fective means of birth control, the intrauterine device, can cost up to $1,000. Women already have an in come gap. If these companies prevail, theyll have a health in surance gap, too, said Marcia Greenberger, co-president of the National Womens Law Center. The contraceptives at issue before the court are the emergency contraceptives Plan B and ella, and two IUDs. The government also argues that employers would be able to invoke religious objections under the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act to opt out of other laws, including those governing immunizations, minimum wages and Social Secu rity taxes. The Supreme Court pre viously has rejected some of these claims in cases decided before the laws enactment. The issue is largely conned to family-controlled businesses with a small number of shareholders. LAW FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO In this May 22, 2013 photo, customers enter and exit a Hobby Lobby store in Denver. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. is a family-owned company that objects to covering certain contraceptives in its health plans as part of the laws preventive care requirement. JIM FITZGERALD / AP In this Feb. 25 photo, pencil erasers in the shape of the human brain lie on a table at Monteore Hospital in the Bronx, N.Y.

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT TAVARES Rotary Club to host Dragon Boat FestivalTeamwork is the theme for the 22-member teams competing at Wooton Park on Lake Dora in the Rotary Club of Lake County Golden Triangles 2014 Central Florida Dragon Boat Festival. The festival will be at 9 / a.m. on April 5, and will include teams from all over Central Florida. Gates open to the public at 5 / p.m., as teams gather on April 4 for the pre-race Awakening of the Dragon ceremony with a performance by the Orlando Taiko Drummers, reworks over Lake Dora and the festival banquet. Tickets for the banquet are $12, and are available at www.cfdragonboat.org or by calling Colleen McGinley at the Tavares Chamber ofce, at 352-343-2531.TAVARES Additional road closures planned in TavaresDue to upcoming work on the Florida Central Railroad tracks in Tavares, road closures will be in effect for 48 hours at County Drive on Wednesday and Thursday. R.J. Corman, contractor for the railroads construction, will post road closure and detour signs redirecting trafc through downtown. Motorists are encouraged to exhibit caution when traveling in the area. For information, call Michelle Bilbrey, at 352-483-9020.TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension presents diabetes classThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting a threepart class, Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes, from 10 / a.m. to noon on Wednesdays, March 26-April 9, at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., in Tavares. Participation in all three is suggested. Registration must be nalized today at lakediabetes2014. eventbrite.com or by calling 352343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721. The materials fee for the class is $10. Those unable to pay should call ahead.TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension to offer Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers classThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers, from 10 / a.m. to noon on April 5 at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., in Tavares. The class is part of the Saturday in the Garden speaker series and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticulture agent. Online registration is available at saturdayinthegardenapril2014. eventbrite.com. The fee for the class is $5 for adults and free for children under the age of 16.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 CINDY DIANSpecial to the Daily CommercialThe annual Spring Antiques, Col lectibles and Craft Show in Mount Dora on Saturday and Sunday delivered an all-time high at tendance with more than 250 vendors taking part. This show has been bigger and better than ever before, event coordinator Janice Gamache said Sunday morning. The streets are lled with people right now. It was estimated that more than 50,000 people attended the event on Saturday and the same number was expected on Sunday. The amount of people that has come through here already has been wonderful, local artist Wanda Anderson said. This is our fourth year attending and we always look forward to coming to this show. Many of the vendors make the show a part of their Florida tour each year. Staff ReportHeather Livengoods seventh-grade civics class learned rsthand how government works on behalf of its citizens no matter their age when Lake County Commis sioner Welton Cadwell presented the students with the countys only sandhill crane crossing sign. As part of their class project to resolve a local issue, the Umatilla Mid dle School students developed a presentation requesting help in pro tecting sandhill cranes from trafc along Rog er Giles Road and Coun ty Road 450. The students approached Umatilla Mayor Laura Wright, who then met with Com missioner Cadwell to determine how the county could step in. Government can work at your local level, and it only works because you care, said Commissioner Cadwell, who presented the sign at a March 18 Umatilla City Council meeting. I am inspired by the students at Umatil la Middle School and en courage them to remain active within their community. Floridas sandhill cranes are a protected subspecies because it has been estimated only 5,000 re main. They are most threatened by habitat de struction. The sign was paid for by the countys gas tax, and was designed and made by Lake County Trafc Operations. The sign was scheduled to be installed on Friday and will be county maintained. I am very proud of my students at UMS, said Livengood. They came up with this and many other positive community service projects.UMATILLACivics class makes successful appeal for cranes SUBMITTED PHOTO From left are Heather Livengood, County Commissioner Welton Cadwell, Sam Miller, Principal Kelly Sanders, Desiree Schildroth and Mayor Laura Wright.MOUNT DORACraft show sets record in vendor attendance PHOTOS BY CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALABOVE: More than 250 vendors participated in the Spring Antiques, Collectibles and Craft Show on Saturday and Sunday in Mount Dora. BELOW: Dean Santini demonstrates his leather purses and bags. Staff ReportThe city of Mount Doras electric customers will soon see a 0.3-percent decrease in their electric bills beginning April 1. The utility bills for cus tomers receiving electric service from the city will reect a lower Power Cost Charge (PCC) rate start ing on April 1, according to a press release from the city. Customers PCC will decrease from $0.07340 per kWh to $0.07303 per kWh. The electric bill for a typ ical residential customer using 1,000 kWh per month will decrease by about 0.3 percent. Commercial customers will see a 0.3 to 0.4 percent decrease in their electric bills depending on their monthly electricity con sumption. The PCC is used to re cover the cost of whole sale power that the city purchases from Duke Energy. It is normally calcu lated for April 1 and October 1 and applies for the following six-month period. The PCC formula has an automatic true-up feature that ensures that electric customers only pay for actual power costs. The city does not make a prot on the PCC; it is simply a billing mechanism to pass along actu al power costs to the citys electric customers. For information, contact the citys Customer Service department at 352-735-7105. Meanwhile, the city will soon begin inspection on its utility customers electric meters, a process that should take only minutes and will not result in a power outage. City staff will inspect the electric meter and panel, the meter seal and MOUNT DORAElectric bills will see slight declineSEE BILLS | A4 Staff ReportThe city of Eustis is changing the way it delivers the Consumer Con dence Report (CCR), the citys an nual report on the quality of its drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a new in terpretation of the CCR delivery rule to allow Community Water Systems to deliver reports electron ically. Eustis will follow this new rule for the 2013 CCR as a cost-saving EUSTISWater report accessible on the Web Staff ReportThe U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will give the city of Eustis $72,878 to make improvements to its 60-unit public housing complex. According to a press release from HUD, the money is earmarked for improvements such as roof repairs or making energy-efcient upgrades to replace old plumbing and electrical systems. This funding is critically import ant to public housing agencies as they work to provide the best hous ing possible for their residents, EUSTISCity to get funds for public housingSEE CRAFT | A4SEE WATER | A4SEE HOUSING | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 OBITUARIESLetitia J. RapisardiLetitia J. Rapisar di passed away Thursday, March 20, in Lees burg, Florida. She was born on May 24, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York. In 1993, she moved to Leesburg from North Haledon, New Jersey. She was a catholic and a homemaker. In her youth she was a New York model, who maintained a special elo quence and grace her entire life. She was a devoted animal lover and a lover of nature. Letitia was a wonder ful wife of 43 years to her husband, Edward V. Rapisardi, of Lees burg, Florida, who she leaves behind. A Cele bration of Life will take place Saturday, March 29, 2014 at 3:00PM at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg, Flor ida with Deacon Fred Giel ofciating. Ar rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. On line condolences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.com.IN MEMORY THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comBackyard chickens and adult gaming centers will be up for second readings tonight at the Leesburg City Commission, where commissioners will consider approving amendment revisions on both ordinances already on the books. Public comment is wel comed. The meeting is slated for 5:30 / p.m. on the third oor commission chambers of Lees burg City Hall. The city wants to add a new subsection on its domestic an imals and fowl ordinance to al low chickens in residential dis tricts. On March 10, the city revised the number of permitted chickens from ve to 15, and the ordinance outlines the type and size of a mov able, fenced henhouse/chicken coop that will be accepted. The ordinance also notes the sale of eggs or any oth er chicken products generated with the keeping of chick ens in a residential district may not be advertised. For resi dents keeping chickens, city ofcials recommend a two-hour course, Chicken University, of fered by UF/IFAS Lake Exten sion Ofce in Tavares. Concerned about the adverse impact of gaming devices on res idents, Leesburg highly regulat ed adult Internet/sweepstakes redemption cafs when they were in operation in the city. Bill Wiley, community devel opment director, said in a memo that on April 10, 2013, Gov. Rick Scott signed a bill banning In ternet cafs in Florida. Only months after the state closed them down, Internet cafs have reopened with new comput er software that has reported ly changed them from a game of chance to a game of skill. Wiley said the city staff has taken action to prepare a land development code amendment to restrict this type of ac tivity but protect amusement arcades and bingo games that are lawfully conducted. The community develop ment director also said in the memo that many law enforce ment authorities in other juris dictions have conducted investigations and are closing down adult gaming centers.LEESBURGBackyard chickens, gaming centers on commissions agendathe electric service to the premises. Typically, the electric meter panel is located on the side of the premises, which enables staff to complete the inspection without customer assistance. If the electric meter is behind a locked gate or other obstruction, city staff will contact the customer to make prior arrangements for ac cess. City staff will be carrying city identication. Any safety or main tenance issues found during the meter in spection will be addressed during a separate visit. Some customers have older electric me ters that will need to be replaced, requiring a power outage of about ve minutes. In these situations, staff will contact customers in advance and will strive to minimize inconve nience. For information, call the Public Works and Utilities department at 352-735-7151, option 4. BILLS FROM PAGE A3 We have been attending this show for eight years now, Dee Baich of New Smyrna Beach said. We only sell at craft shows, and this one brings in a lot of people. Many rst-timers, like Kathie Pagliaro of Plant City, have heard the news as well. Pagliaro started a small business selling her homemade laundry detergent last August. It started out as a project for my family, but all my friends wanted to buy the product from me, she said. Thats when my husband and I got the idea to sell it locally. Pagliaro has attended four craft shows and already has had great success. This has been the best one so far, she said. Weve had great sales and exposure with businesses who want to carry my product. We cant wait to come back for the fall show. The show also benets the community with increased sales for local businesses. It attracts people who are serious about shopping, vendor Alan Anderson of The Ear Vinery said. People come from all over the state. They get to experience Mount Dora and fall in love with its eclectic and homey atmosphere, and it makes them want to come back. CRAFT FROM PAGE A3 CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Aziz and Jessica Morales of Orlando talk about their line of jewelry cleaner to a group of women.measure that is also bet ter for the environment. We will be sending a message in (each customers) utility bill with instructions on how to access the CCR online, Richard Hoon, assistant to the city manager, said in a press release. The citys website will also have a link to access the report at www.eustis.org. Customers who want a paper copy of the re port can contact Brandon Pennington at the Water Department by calling 352-357-5618 ext. 4, or emailing penningtonb@ci.eustis. .us. The federal Consumer Condence Rule requires public water suppliers that serve the same people year round to provide CCRs to their customers, according to the EPA. These reports also are known as annual water quality reports or drinking water quality reports. The CCR summarizes information regarding sources used (i.e., riv ers, lakes, reservoirs or aquifers), any detected contaminants, compliance and educational information. The reports are due to customers by July 1 of each year. WATER FROM PAGE A3 HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan said. The nation loses approximately 10,000 public housing units each year, primarily due to disrepair, HUD stated. In 2011, the agency released a study that found the nations 1.1 million public housing units are facing an estimated $25.6 billion in largescale capital needs re pairs. Unlike routine maintenance, capital needs are extensive im provements required to make the housing decent and economically sustainable. Eustis has a 60-unit income-based housing unit funded by HUD and a separate 56-unit complex funded by the United States Department of Agriculture. The latter complex offers rental assistance with priority given to farm worker families. The housing author ity is located at 1000 Wall St. Call 352-3574851 for information. HOUSING FROM PAGE A3 TALLAHASSEE The U.S. Department of Educations Ofce for Civil Rights has re vived a probe into Flor idas Bright Futures scholarship program, which critics charge is increasingly out of reach for the students who need it most. A spokesman for the department told The Miami Herald the ofce had requested information from some Florida school districts, including Miami-Dade, the nations fourth larg est district. He said the ofce was investigat ing allegations the state uses eligibility criteria that could have the effect of discriminating against Latino and African-American students on the basis of national origin and race. The popular program has awarded more than $4 billion in scholar ships, and an outsized share of those have gone to white or afuent families. Some of those re cipients are from families that were wealthy enough to pay for col lege without any help. In recent years, state lawmakers have raised the standards to obtain a Bright Futures scholarship, increasing the minimum SAT and ACT scores to levels that critics complain will further exclude poor and minority students.Department of Ed revives probe into Bright Futures

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb JILL LAWLESSAssociated PressGULBERWICK, Scotland In the late winter dusk, hundreds of Vi kings are marching down to the beach, bearing aming torches. Their studded leather breastplates glint in the relight as they roar and sing. Its a scene that would have struck terror into the hearts of Dark Age Britons and also perhaps an un settling one for modern poli ticians on both sides of Scot lands independence debate. The fearsome-looking par ticipants in a Viking re fes tival known as Up Helly Aa live in Scotlands remote Shetland Islands, a windwhipped northern archipelago where many claim de scent from Scandinavian raiders. They are cool to the idea of Scotland leaving Britain to form an independent nation, and determined that their rugged islands clos er to Norway than to Ed inburgh will retain their autonomy, whatever the outcome of Septembers ref erendum. Shetland is different. We have Viking blood in our veins, said the processions magnicently bearded chief Viking, or Jarl by day a lo cal authority housing ofcer named Keith Lobban. There are only 23,000 Shetlanders, too few to make much difference to the out come of the independence vote. But they have Vi king-sized condence, and a big bargaining chip: a chunk of Britains oil and gas re serves lie beneath Shetland waters. Shetlanders are seeking new powers and ofcial recognition of their special status possibly along the lines of the Faroe Islands, a self-governing dependency of Denmark. The islanders feel their moment may have come, as Scotlands uid constitutional status gives them opportunities to seek concessions from both sides of the independence battle. Tavish Scott, Shetlands representative in the Scottish Par liament, said an independent Scotland doesnt have an economy if oil and gas doesnt happen. And that gives Shet land some leverage. A yes vote for independence on Sept. 18 would trigger complex negotia tions between Edinburgh and London over Scotlands share of Britains offshore oil and gas and of its tril lion-pound national debt. A no vote is likely to lead to talks about giving Scotland more control over its econ omy and resources especially its energy reserves. Authorities in Shetland, who currently have lo cal-government powers such as collecting property taxes and running schools, see the referendum as a chance to drive a hard bargain some thing at which they have con siderable experience. For centuries, Shetland was a poor place, ignored by governments far to the south and reliant on the un predictable shery industry and on making knitwear from sturdy local sheep. But the islands have prospered since large reserves of oil were discovered offshore in the 1960s. Construction of Sullom Voe, one of Europes largest oil and gas terminals, brought jobs and new mi grants who reversed decades of population decline. Amid the rush of discovery, Shetland negotiated a gen erous compensation agreement with eager oil compa nies creating an oil fund that has helped give the is land chain well-paved roads, plentiful swimming pools and well-equipped commu nity centers. These days, oil production is dwindling, but French en ergy company Total is building a new natural gas plant on the islands. Shetlanders are keen to have control over their resources oil, gas, sh and even wind and are wary of government meddling, no matter where that govern ment is based. Whether decisions are made in Edinburgh or in London, they are still distant from Shetland, said Adam Civico, editor of the Shetland Times newspaper. An online petition on the Scottish government website calls for residents of Shetland, neighboring Or kney and Scotlands Western Isles to hold separate refer enda on whether to join an independent Scotland, stick with Britain or declare inde pendence although any of those moves would require protracted negotiations, and the petition has only 525 signatories so far.Scotlands Vikings go own way in independence voteJILL LAWLESS / APIn this photo taken March 14, locals dressed as Vikings carry torches as they take part in the annual Up Helly Aa, Viking re festival in Gulberwick, Shetland Islands, north of mainland Scotland. SAMEER N. YACOUB and SINAN SALAHEDDINAssociated PressBAGHDAD Iraqs al-Qaida-inspired militants who took over the city of Fallujah are now trying to show they can run it, providing social services, policing the streets and implement ing Shariah rulings in a bid to win the sup port of its Sunni Mus lim population. Gunmen in ski masks and Afghan-style tunics patrol the streets, but also perform a sort of community out reach. On a recent day, they were seen repair ing damaged electricity poles and operating bulldozers to remove concrete blast walls and clear garbage. Others planted owers in a highway medi an, and some ghters approached residents in the street and apol ogized for gaps in ser vices, promising to ad dress them. The Islamic militants have also made themselves the law in the city and aim to show they are acting to prevent crime. On Thursday, militants cut off the right hand of a man accused of robbing a mobile phone shop and paraded him through Fallujah in the back of a pickup truck, forcing him to raise his stump to show people, according to witnesses in the city. The push by the al-Qaida breakaway group, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, marks an effort to bolster their standing in a community that remains under siege and exhausted by three months of clashes between the insurgents and government forces. The group is try ing to increase its ap peal among the broader Sunni minority in Iraq, where resentment against the Shiite-led government runs deep and it is trying to correct past mistakes. In the 2007, many ma jor Sunni tribes turned against al-Qaida militants and formed U.S.backed militias to bat tle the group, angered by its rampant killings during the height of the countrys sectarian bloodbath following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. Many in the Sun ni community still bitterly hate the militants, and some tribes have joined government forces in ghting the group in Fallujah. Gauging whether the outreach is improv ing the groups image among Fallujah resi dents is difcult. Sever al residents who spoke to The Associated Press said they fear the mil itants and want police control to return. Some said they are happy with the groups activities, but all spoke on condition of anonymity, fear ing for their own safety. The ISIL people are providing security to Fallujah residents after policemen left, said Abu Abdullah, a shop owner who offered only his nickname. He said shoppers can reach his store more easily after ghters removed blast walls blocking the street.Militants launch social support in Fallujah AP PHOTO In this Feb. 11 photo, masked anti-government gunmen help an elderly woman in Fallujah, Iraq.

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 O n the cover of four mag azines on the newsstand this month is a version of the headline: What Does Your Partner Want In Bed? How do I know this? I memorized the magazine covers because I was waiting on line at the checkout stand at my supermar ket for what felt like two days, my cart piled high with orange juice, cereal, toilet paper and kitty litter. Yes, I lead a glamorous life. Frankly, I thought the magazines were asking a dumb question. What do people want in bed? Clean sheets. Really, thats the rst thing. Unless youre a guy under 23 who was raised by jackals, everybody wants cleans sheets. Also, people want enough room in bed. A person needs to stretch and scratch without hitting a wall or irritating another person. And, yes, sometimes a per son wants sex. Sometimes a per son wants sex, but then sometimes maybe a person might like a sandwich, followed by sleep. Uninterrupted sleep with no crumbs from the sandwich to interfere, either. Thats the real answer to what your partner wants in bed, and none of those feature articles focused on anything except item number No. 3 above, which, in case you forgot, was sex. But apart from whether asking what somebody wants in bed is good question, the supermarket checkout counter is an absurd place to ask it. Maybe I wasnt focused on romance because I was standing behind a small, very well-dressed and expensively accessorized elderly woman who had enough coupons for one product Renuzit Odor Killer to not only eradicate the national decit but to send her Davos next year as a nancial superpower. She was actually getting money back because she had so many. It was like a hold-up, except Ma Barker here was using coupons instead of a handgun for a weapon. Obviously, whatever time she had left on this earth, Ma Barker was prepared to spend it at this particular register. Just as bifocal glasses dont necessarily give you a clearer view of the universe, age doesnt necessarily bring wisdom. You dont always get smarter as you get older and she was proof. This woman insisted the manager initial every coupon as the teenage checkout attendant scanned it through. Imagine the expression on this young mans face as she whispered, You didnt triple that one, honey. Do it again and do it more slowly this time. Therefore we can all agree the supermarket is the wrong place to think sexy. Or maybe I lost interest in discovering what my partner wants in bed (after 23 years, youd have thought I already knew) because a highly freckled and decidedly vicious little girl behind me in line started inging herself at my leg as if I were a bouncy castle. (No, the fact that I was wearing a pink coat and might have gained a little weight over the winter did not justify her error. Bouncy castle indeed.) Her father was a man whose indifference to his offsprings behavior was matched only by his contempt for the products he was about to purchase: cans of Alpo and Manwich were piled on top of cupcakes and cherry tomatoes. While she was throwing her self against my leg, he thumbed through a copy of People magazine and landed on a story about Soa Vergaras thighs. It was hard to be certain of the storys content since I was being savaged by his Honey Boo-Boo/WWE hy brid. They werent the only reason I wasnt in the mood, however. Had a person one aisle over not been shouting, Honey, did you get the anchovy paste and the Preparation H? I might have felt better. But lets think about this for a minute: Is a supermarket checkout aisle really the best place to get romantic and sexual advice? Youre frantic, youre impatient, youre annoyed and youre feeling trapped. So the answer, obviously, is yes: it is exactly like dating and relationships. But we should remember that love offers no discounts, no buyin-bulk savings and no special lane for those with fewer items; romance rarely hides its truth inside the covers of glossy magazines; and marriage lasts longer if you bring your own non-disposable bag not to mention your own sandwich.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her website at www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Sex tips on special in supermarket line The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Some calming words from Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. may lower the political temperature of a confronta tion between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Ca lif., and the CIA. But Feinsteins allegation that the agency improperly searched Sen ate Intelligence Committee computers and tried to trigger a criminal investigation of committee staffers still calls for a thorough investigation by the Obama administration. Moreover, President Obama needs to in tervene personally to ensure that the public nally gets to see the document at the center of the controversy: a voluminous report by the committee on the CIAs detention and in terrogation of suspected terrorists after 9/11, a policy that we already know involved wa terboarding and other acts of torture. On Wednesday, Holder commented on two issues that have been referred to the Justice Department for a possible criminal investigation: the search of Intelligence Committee computers by CIA employees and the allegation that committee staffers improperly accessed an internal CIA report about the detention and interrogation program. Holder said the department hadnt decided whether to pursue either. In a speech on the Senate oor last week, Feinstein, the committee chair, criticized the CIAs former acting general counsel, Robert Eatinger, for referring the conduct of the staffers to the FBI for a possible criminal investigation, noting that Eatinger had been a lawyer in the unit that carried out the interrogation and detention program. Feinsteins accusations were especially dramatic given her previously staunch support for the intelligence community, par ticularly in connection with the National Security Agencys electronic surveillance activities. But the senator also has been a critic of the detention and interrogation program, and presided over an investigation that resulted in the 6,300-page report approved by the Intelligence Committee on a mostly party-line vote in December 2012. Those who have read the report describe it as a blistering indictment that concludes the CIAs notorious enhanced interrogation techniques yielded little valuable intelligence. The agency, however, has claimed that the report contains signicant errors, and it seems content for it to remain under wraps. Its long past time that the report was declassied and released so the public can draw its own conclusions. Obama, who has said he is committed to declassifying the report, can and must make that happen.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICESpy wars on Capitol Hill: Feinstein versus the CIA Classic DOONESBURY 1970Or maybe I lost interest in discovering what my partner wants in bed (after 23 years, youd have thought I already knew) because a highly freckled and decidedly vicious little girl behind me in line started flinging herself at my leg as if I were a bouncy castle. (No, the fact that I was wearing a pink coat and might have gained a little weight over the winter did not justify her error. Bouncy castle indeed.)

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNCAA: Kentucky upsets No. 1 seed Wichita St. / B3 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comProfessional golf has come to Lake County. The Lake County Classic, a stop on the Na tional Golf Association Professional Golf Tour will be played at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake this week, the highlight event of a week chock full of golf-related activities. A 72-hole event, the Lake County Classic is set to begin at about 7:30 / a.m. (or sufcient light) on Thursday and will conclude on Sunday. In addition, two practice rounds, a free clinic and a ProAm is scheduled for the week. As is the case with all NGA events, admission for the Lake County Classic is free and open to the public. On-site parking will be avail able, according to NGA ofcials. The main purpose of the NGA Tour is to prepare our players to move on to the Web. com and PGA Tours, NGA brings pro golf to Harbor Hills Country Club DENNIS PASSAAssociated PressSYDNEY Yasiel Puig and Paul Gold schmidt hadnt left the stadium before work ers began dismantling what was quite an im pressive place to play baseball. For a week, at least. Home plate was dug up, the pitchers mound attened and the 8-foot-high perimeter home run fence taken down within an hour after Puigs Los Angeles Dodgers beat Goldschmidts Arizona Diamondbacks 7-5 Sunday. It was a two-game Dodgers sweep of Major League Baseballs opening weekend at Sydney Cricket Ground. The Dodgers and Clayton Kershaw won the Saturday opener 3-1, sending the Diamondbacks back to the U.S. 0-2 to start the sea son and with the L.A. team holding a very early two-game lead in the NL West over their Arizona adversaries. The regular season will resume next weekend for both teams, with a few exhibition games scheduled this week while they recov er from jet lag after the 15-hour ights Down Under and back. The cricket ground, and Australian baseball fans, meanwhile, may never be the same. Nearly 80,000 fans at tended the weekend games at the 162-yearold ground in leafy Moore Park, minutes from downtown Syd ney. Clearly, sports-mad Australia loved having the worlds best baseball players in Sydney. Locals love it as MLB makes trip Down Under RICK RYCROFT / AP The Los Angeles Dodgers Yasiel Puig is tagged out by the Arizona Diamondbacks Aaron Hill as umpire Laz Diaz watches on Sunday in Sydney, Australia. And the upsets continue PHOTOS BY JEFF ROBERSON / AP Stanfords Josh Huestis (24) and Dwight Powell (33) celebrate as Kansas Conner Frankamp, right, heads toward the sideline at the end of a third-round game of the NCAA college tournament on Sunday in St. Louis. Stanford won 60-57. R.B. FALLSTROMAssociated PressST. LOUIS Kansas knows all about Stan ford now. The Cardinal couldnt deny a slight at a news conference a day ear lier fueled them just a bit before pulling their second and much bigger upset of the NCAA tournament. Kansas freshmen Andrew Wiggins and Wayne Selden Jr. ducked their heads and giggled Saturday when asked about Chasson Randle, Stanfords lead ing scorer. We denitely saw that video, Randle said Sunday after the No. 10 seed Cardinal beat the second-seeded Jayhawks 60-57 to ad vance to the Sweet 16 in the South Regional. Coach told me not to talk about it but I denitely took it as a chal lenge. It was a little big extra motivation. Enough for the Car dinal to make the Jay hawks the second No. 2 seed to be knocked out of this tournament in the third round and enough for them to reach the round of 16 for the rst time since 2008. Wiggins was held to four points on 1-for-6 shooting in what could have been his nal college game. He accepted his share of the respon sibility for the loss. I let a lot of people down, Wiggins said. If I would have played better, we wouldnt be in this situation, you know? I blame myself for this. Dwight Powell had 15 points and seven re bounds despite play ing with four fouls much of the second half and Randle added 13 points, six steals and four assists for the Car dinal (23-12), who were making their rst NCAA appearance since 2008. To beat a team like this, a storied program with great coaching, great players, always feels amazing, Powell said. So as of right now were still in the race and were still playing in March, and it feels great. Stanford beat No. 7 seed New Mexico on Friday and will have a higher seed for the rst time when it faces 11th-seeded Dayton in the regional seminal in Memphis, Tenn. The Flyers beat No. 3 Syra cuse 55-53.Stanford knocks off No. 2 Kansas 60-57 to advance to Sweet 16 Kansass Jamari Traylor (31) and Perry Ellis try to steal the ball from Heustis during the second half. CHRIS OMEARA / AP Arnold Palmer, left, hands the trophy to Matt Every after Every won at Bay Hill on Sunday in Orlando. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterORLANDO Matt Every always believed he would nally win on the PGA Tour. He couldnt have imagined it happening Sunday at Bay Hill. Nine shots out of the lead going into the weekend, still four shots behind Adam Scott going into the nal round, Ev ery took advantage of a sur prising collapse by the Mas ters champion and held on to the very end for a 2-under 70 to win the Arnold Palmer In vitational. Every made two bogeys in the last three holes, including a 4-foot par putt he missed on the 18th hole. That forced him to wait 10 excruciating minutes to see if Keegan Bradley could force a playoff. Bradleys 30-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole missed on the left side. Cocky by nature, Every choked back tears when he realized he had won in his 92nd try as a professional. Its hard, he said, stopping to compose himself. Its tough, man. You just never know if its going to happen. You get there so many times. Its nice to get it done. GREG BEACHAMAP Sports WriterFONTANA, Calif. Kyle Busch won at Fon tana for the second straight year Sunday, hold ing off Kyle Larson, Tony Stewart and his older brother Kurt on a frantic two-lap sprint to the nish. Kyle Busch capably blocked Larson and outlasted Stewart and Kurt Busch to win a wacky race featuring a track-record 35 lead changes and numerous tire problems. With his 29th ca reer Sprint Cup victory in his Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota, Kyle Busch is NASCARs fth winner in ve races already this season. Holy cow, what do you expect when youve got a green-white-checkered nish and every body has to come down pit road and put four tires on? Busch asked after his third career win at Fontana. That was Days of Thunder right there. Unbelievable day. Jimmie Johnson was comfortably in front when he blew a tire with seven laps left, precipitating the wild nish. Jeff Gordon moved in SEE MLB | B2SEE GOLF | B2SEE NCAA | B2Every rallies for first tour winSEE PGA | B2Kyle Busch wins again at FontanaSEE NASCAR | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Tampa Bay 15 5 .750 Cleveland 16 7 .696 Seattle 16 9 .640 Baltimore 12 7 .632 New York 15 10 .600 Los Angeles 14 10 .583 Oakland 12 10 .545 Detroit 12 11 .522 Toronto 12 11 .522 Kansas City 11 11 .500 Chicago 7 12 .368 Minnesota 7 13 .350 Boston 8 15 .348 Houston 8 15 .348 Texas 7 14 .333 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Miami 16 9 .640 San Francisco 14 9 .609 Pittsburgh 12 9 .571 Arizona 11 9 .550 New York 13 11 .542 Colorado 12 12 .500 St. Louis 10 10 .500 Washington 12 12 .500 Cincinnati 12 14 .462 Milwaukee 12 14 .462 Chicago 11 15 .423 Atlanta 10 16 .385 Los Angeles 6 10 .375 San Diego 7 12 .368 Philadelphia 7 15 .318 Sundays Games Miami 8, Detroit 4 Toronto 3, N.Y. Yankees 1 Tampa Bay 9, Boston 2 Philadelphia 5, Minnesota 1 Atlanta 4, N.Y. Mets (ss) 1 Baltimore 7, Pittsburgh 7, tie, 10 innings St. Louis 6, Houston 3 N.Y. Mets (ss) 3, Washington 1 Seattle 6, Oakland (ss) 4 L.A. Angels 5, Cleveland 2 Milwaukee 9, Cincinnati 1 Todays Games Boston vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Oakland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Houston vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 6:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. Tuesdays Games Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 7:05 p.m. Seattle vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05 p.m.NASCAR Sprint Cup-Auto Club 400 ResultsSunday At Auto Club Speedway Fontana, Calif. Lap length: 2 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (14) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 206 laps, 123.1 rat ing, 47 points. 2. (11) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 206, 89.4, 42. 3. (17) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 206, 104.5, 42. 4. (1) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 206, 117.1, 41. 5. (10) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 206, 82.2, 39. 6. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 206, 95.7, 38. 7. (19) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 206, 111.9, 38. 8. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 206, 86.7, 36. 9. (30) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 206, 84.1, 35. 10. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 206, 88.4, 34. 11. (20) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 206, 74.4, 33. 12. (15) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 206, 83.6, 32. 13. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 206, 114, 32. 14. (27) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 206, 63.9, 30. 15. (31) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 206, 67.7, 29. 16. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 206, 100.5, 29. 17. (13) Sam Hornish Jr., Toyota, 206, 66.6, 0. 18. (34) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 206, 53.3, 26. 19. (23) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 206, 59.5, 25. 20. (16) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 206, 86.7, 25. 21. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 206, 42.3, 24. 22. (40) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 206, 46.9, 22. 23. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 206, 55.9, 21. 24. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 206, 127.4, 22. 25. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 205, 43, 0. 26. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 205, 94.2, 19. 27. (41) David Ragan, Ford, 205, 39.1, 18. 28. (28) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 205, 49.4, 16. 29. (33) David Reutimann, Ford, 205, 36.7, 16. 30. (8) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 205, 63.9, 14. 31. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 205, 31.3, 13. 32. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 205, 30.4, 0. 33. (35) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 205, 30.9, 11. 34. (22) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 204, 56.5, 10. 35. (37) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 204, 37.3, 0. 36. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 204, 82.7, 8. 37. (38) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 204, 44.2, 7. 38. (29) David Gilliland, Ford, 202, 35.6, 7. 39. (7) Joey Logano, Ford, 195, 72.1, 5. 40. (24) Greg Bife, Ford, 193, 62.9, 4. 41. (26) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 180, 70, 3. 42. (32) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, accident, 85, 43.4, 2. 43. (21) Aric Almirola, Ford, accident, 68, 53, 1. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 39 30 .565 Brooklyn 36 31 .537 2 New York 29 40 .420 10 Boston 23 47 .329 16 Philadelphia 15 55 .214 24 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 47 21 .691 Washington 36 33 .522 11 Charlotte 34 36 .486 14 Atlanta 31 37 .456 16 Orlando 19 51 .271 29 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 51 19 .729 Chicago 39 31 .557 12 Cleveland 26 44 .371 25 Detroit 25 44 .362 25 Milwaukee 13 56 .188 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 53 16 .768 Houston 47 22 .681 6 Dallas 42 28 .600 11 Memphis 41 28 .594 12 New Orleans 29 40 .420 24 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 Portland 45 25 .643 6 Minnesota 34 34 .500 16 Denver 31 38 .449 20 Utah 23 47 .329 28 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 49 21 .700 Golden State 44 27 .620 5 Phoenix 41 29 .586 8 Sacramento 24 45 .348 24 L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324 26 x-clinched playoff spot Saturdays Games Charlotte 124, Portland 94 Houston 118, Cleveland 111 Chicago 91, Philadelphia 81 Memphis 82, Indiana 71 New Orleans 105, Miami 95 Utah 89, Orlando 88 San Antonio 99, Golden State 90 L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103 Sundays Games Toronto 96, Atlanta 86 Phoenix 127, Minnesota 120 Washington at Denver, late Milwaukee at Sacramento, late Brooklyn at Dallas, late Cleveland at New York, late Orlando at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Houston at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Portland at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Portland at Orlando, 7 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPNU Virginia at MiamiMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN Preseason, Detroit vs. Pittsburgh, at BradentonMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN NIT, second round, Georgetown at Florida State9 p.m.ESPN NIT, second round, LSU at SMU11 p.m.ESPN2 NIT, second round, Arkansas at CaliforniaNBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m.SUN Portland at MiamiNHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Montreal at BostonWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, second round, DePaul at Duke; Syracuse at Kentucky; Arizona St. vs. Notre Dame at Toledo, Ohio; Oklahoma St. at Purdue9 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, second round, St. Johns at Tennessee; BYU vs. Nebraska; California at Baylor; Oklahoma St. at Purduesaid Robin L. Waters, NGA Tour president. By adding another top-notch course like Harbor Hills Country Club, our players will have yet another op portunity to prepare themselves for the next level. The weeklong presence of the NGA be gins today with the rst of two practice days for players. On Tuesday, a free golf clinic will by offered at 4:30 / p.m. and a oneday pro-am tournament on Wednesday will cap off the list of activities heading into the Lake County Classic. Like most pro-ams, the Lake County Classic Pro-Am will consist of teams made up of three amateurs and one NGA profes sional competing in a scramble format that often produces an ar ray of exciting shots and clutch putts. We are excited to announce that the NGA Tour exemption into the Web. com Tour Price Cut ter Charity Championship will be on the line at the Lake Coun ty Classic, said Todd Barbee, NGA Tour Senior Tournament Director. The NGA Tour is the No. 3 Mens professional tour in the U.S. after the PGA and Web. com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmental tour by PGA and Web.com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hundreds of professionals acquire their cards PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Cham pions Tour. NGA Tour alumni include: 2012 Masters champion Bubba Watson; 2011 PGA Championship winner Keegan Bradley; 2010 PGA TOUR Play er of the Year and 2003 US Open Champion Jim Furyk; 2009 Brit ish Open Champion Stewart Cink; 2009 U.S. Open Champi on Lucas Glover; 2007 Masters Champion Zach Johnson; 2003 PGA Champion Shaun Micheel; 2003 British Open Champion Ben Curtis; two-time U.S. Open Champion Lee Janzen; British Open and PGA Champion John Daly. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running developmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was award ed ve Web.com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions Re no-Tahoe Open and the Sanderson Farms Championship the most of any tour in the history of devel opmental golf. Harbor Hills Country Club is a par-72 championship lay out designed by Lloyd Clifton. It measures 6,823 yards from the from the back tees and has a 72.5 rat ing and carries a 126 slope rating. Area ofcials wel come the NGA to Lake County and hope the tournament becomes an annual affair. Lake County is a golf ers paradise and we are thrilled to welcome the NGA to Harbor Hills, one of the countys premier golf course, said Robert Chandler, di rector of Lake Countys Economic Development and Tourism Department. For information, visit www.ngatour. com or contact the NGA Tour ofce at 800-992-8748. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Scott, in his nal tournament before he defends his title at Augusta National, came undone. Along with two quick bogeys to start his round, he didnt make a birdie over the nal 14 holes. Nothing summed up his awful day like the par-5 16th, the easiest at Bay Hill. Every made a bogey to fall to 14-under par. Scott, playing behind him in the nal group, had a 20-foot eagle putt on the 16th to tie for the lead. He ran it 4 feet by, and then missed that for a three-putt par. Scott closed with a 76 to nish third. He had to win to reach No. 1 when he arrived at the Masters. Now, the No. 1 spot held by Tiger Woods for the last year will be up for grabs at Augusta among Woods, Scott and Henr ik Stenson, who tied for fth at Bay Hill. Every grew up about 90 minutes away in Daytona Beach. This was the rst PGA Tour event he attended as a kid, coming with his fa ther to watch Mark Cal cavecchia, his favorite player. After a wild nal hour, Every donned the blue blazer on the 18th green and had an audience with The King tournament host Ar nold Palmer. I kept telling myself, Maybe its going to be somewhere special, Every said about going for his rst win. This is really cool. I still cant believe it. Every nished at 13-under 275, one shot ahead of Bradley, who needed two late birdies for a 72. PGA FROM PAGE B1 So did their rugby, cricket, soccer and Aussie Rules football stars who took time to mingle with Kershaw and Puig, among oth ers, for photo shoots. It was a mutual ad miration society, with Kershaw posing on his birthday with a kangaroo and kicking around a rugby ball on the eve of his opener. Puig and Goldschmidt even tried their hand at cricket. Cracker Jack and twofoot-long hotdogs be came part of the menu at the SCG snack bars, and MLB commission er Bud Selig was noncommittal about a return to Australia in the near future. Australian fans might like to see it sooner than later. Nev er were foul balls into the stands more heart ily cheered, because they could keep them. In cricket, where balls are changed only af ter a predetermined amount of play, they must be returned to the eld. This event was out standing, really cool, Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson said. The crowds were great. The preparation from the city of Sydney was outstanding. They treated us well. Mattingly says a con cern after the teams return to the U.S. will be avoiding complacency. Theyll have a few days off, then three exhibition games before returning to the regular season next Sunday for a three-game series in San Diego. My biggest fear is when you start games, games that dont count are tough to get ready to play, he said. MLB FROM PAGE B1 The 6-foot-8 Wiggins, a likely NBA lottery pick if he decides to leave school, was saddled with four turnovers for Kansas (25-10). Wiggins had averaged 28 points the previous four games but the Jay hawks were missing 7-foot freshman Joel Embiid who was sidelined by a stress fracture in his back. Coach Bill Self thought Stanfords height up front bothered Wiggins, but add ed, I think he had an off-game, too. Give them credit for that, we put him in position to make some plays. Josh Huestis, who had the primary re sponsibility for guarding Wiggins, played 39 minutes and had six points, eight rebounds and two blocks. That was Joshs as signment and he took it to heart, Dawkins said. He had help. We just tried to make it as difcult as we could for him to score. Self said the game seemed like a struggle from the opening tip. Everything didnt go right for Stanford, either. The Cardinal were 0 for 9 from 3-point range. We can make 3s but thats not what we rely on, Dawkins said. I didnt even notice it because thats not what weve been. Tarik Black had 18 points and six rebounds for the Jayhawks, but he fouled out with 5:25 to go. Conner Frankamp had 12 points on four 3-pointers, the last two in the nal 23 seconds to make it close after Stanford had pulled ahead by seven. Stanford was 9 for 12 at the free throw line over the nal 2:04 and needed all those points. Frankamps second 3-pointer narrowed the gap to 59-57 with 14.9 seconds left. Anthony Brown hit one of two free throws with 12.9 seconds to go and Frankamp banged a third 3-point attempt off the glass near the buzzer in a bid to tie it. NCAA FROM PAGE B1 PGA-Bay Hill Leading Scores Sunday At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course Orlando Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72 Matt Every (500), $1,116,000 69-70-66-70 275 Keegan Bradley (300), $669,600 71-67-66-72 276 Adam Scott (190), $421,600 62-68-71-76 277 Jason Kokrak (135), $297,600 67-71-67-73 278 Erik Compton (100), $226,300 72-68-70-69 279 Francesco Molinari, $226,300 67-70-69-73 279 Henrik Stenson (100), $226,300 69-73-69-68 279 Ryo Ishikawa (83), $186,000 65-74-70-71 280 Brandt Snedeker (83), $186,000 67-71-74-68 280 J.B. Holmes (68), $148,800 68-69-72-73 282 Freddie Jacobson (68), $148,800 71-68-70-73 282 Graeme McDowell (68), $148,800 68-77-67-70 282 Sean OHair (68), $148,800 71-75-69-67 282 Kevin Chappell (55), $102,300 71-70-71-71 283 Harris English (55), $102,300 69-71-75-68 283 Lucas Glover (55), $102,300 72-74-68-69 283 Matt Jones (55), $102,300 71-71-69-72 283 George McNeill (55), $102,300 71-72-69-71 283 Kevin Na (55), $102,300 70-71-71-71 283 Brian Davis (49), $67,167 70-74-71-69 284 Vijay Singh (49), $67,167 72-73-68-71 284 Camilo Villegas (49), $67,167 71-73-73-67 284 Gary Woodland (49), $67,167 73-71-70-70 284 Ian Poulter (49), $67,167 68-71-69-76 284 Brendan Steele (49), $67,167 68-74-70-72 284 Chesson Hadley (43), $45,880 69-68-69-79 285 Trevor Immelman (43), $45,880 69-72-71-73 285Brooks Koepka, $45,880 74-70-72-69 285 Davis Love III (43), $45,880 70-73-69-73 285 Nicholas Thompson (43), $45,880 71-73-71-70 285 Retief Goosen (39), $37,588 70-75-68-73 286 Danny Lee (39), $37,588 71-72-73-70 286 Marc Leishman (39), $37,588 72-74-69-71 286 Chris Stroud (39), $37,588 73-69-72-72 286 Aaron Baddeley (33), $28,636 70-70-70-77 287 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (33), $28,636 66-77-74-70 287 Luke Guthrie (33), $28,636 71-71-74-71 287 Peter Hanson (33), $28,636 75-69-71-72 287 Morgan Hoffmann (33), $28,636 67-71-71-78 287 Charles Howell III (33), $28,636 68-71-72-76 287 Bryce Molder (33), $28,636 72-72-69-74 287 Seung-Yul Noh (33), $28,636 72-68-74-73 287 Charlie Beljan (24), $18,476 72-72-70-74 288 Jamie Donaldson, $18,476 67-71-74-76 288 Billy Horschel (24), $18,476 70-74-69-75 288 Zach Johnson (24), $18,476 71-71-73-73 288 Russell Knox (24), $18,476 71-71-72-74 288 Will MacKenzie (24), $18,476 71-75-72-70 288 John Merrick (24), $18,476 65-74-76-73 288 front until Clint Bow yer spun with two laps to go, setting up an overtime nish. Gordon was hoping to nish on old tires when Bowyer spun, but then elected to pit along with most of the leaders. Kurt Busch gambled with just two tires, allowing him to restart in second, but his younger brother came up from fth in the nal two laps to win. I came off the fourth turn in disbelief that we won this thing, be cause we were medio cre all day, Kyle Busch said. It was really weird for us, not a race that were typically used to. But now theres a load off your shoul ders that you can go out the rest of the sea son and race the way you want to. He barely held off Larson, the 21-yearold rookie who held off Kyle Busch on Saturday to win the Nationwide race. I dont know where everybody went, but I somehow ended up in second and it entered my mind, We might sweep the weekend, Larson said. He had to settle for the best nish of his Sprint Cup career in the No. 42 Chevrolet for Chip Ganassi Racing. Kyle Busch, who went to Larsons car Saturday to congratulate him on his Nation wide win, pointed out his window at Larson after Sundays nish, pumping his st in ap proval. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 COLLEGE BASKETBALL Kentucky takes down No. 1 WSU DAVE SKRETTAAssociated PressST. LOUIS It took a program stocked with NBA prospects to nally end Wichita States perfect run. Andrew Harrison scored 20 points, twin brother Aaron had 19 and Kentucky survived a potential winning 3-pointer at the buzzer by Fred VanVleet to knock off the undefeated Shockers with a 7876 victory Sunday in the NCAA tournament. Julius Randle added 13 points and 10 re bounds, and James Young also had 13 points for the No. 8 seed Wildcats (26-10), who made a series of clutch free throws in the closing minutes to advance to the Sweet 16 in arguably the most captivating game of a thrilling rst weekend. Now, Big Blue Nation gets to jump right into another high-prole matchup: Louisville awaits in the Sweet 16 on Friday in Indianapolis. The Wildcats beat their bitter in-state ri val in December. Cleanthony Early scored 31 points and Ron Baker had 20 for the Shockers (35-1), who hadnt lost since last years Final Four while taking an entire city and state on quite a ride. Kentucky took the lead for good at 73-71 when Young knocked down a 3-pointer with less than 2 minutes to go. Early answered with a basket for Wich ita State, and Andrew Harrison made two free throws for Kentucky. Baker banked in a 3-pointer and Randle made two more foul shots. Earlys two free throws with 9.8 sec onds left got the Shock ers within 77-76, and they still had a chance when Andrew Harrison missed the second of two free throws and Early got the rebound. VanVleet raced up court and called time out with 3.2 seconds left. Wichita State coach Gregg Marshall drew up a play that had Tekele Cotton inbounding the ball to VanV leet, who took a shot from the top of the key. But the shot was wide the entire way, and it clanked off the rim as the buzzer sounded and Kentucky began to celebrate. The team full of blue-chip prospects had nally ended the blue-collared teams dream. The Midwest Regional showdown came after an entertaining un dercard matchup that saw Stanford knock off Kansas, and it lived up to every expectation. Kentucky was suc cessful early using its superior size, not only in the paint but also on the perimeter, where the 6-foot-6 Harrison twins dwarfed the 5-11 VanVleet. But after the Wildcats took a 19-15 lead midway through the half, Wichita State ramped up its trade mark defense, forcing a series of turnovers and getting right back in the game. VanVleet was the catalyst. On one se quence late in the half, he stripped Aaron Harrison and hit Ear ly in transition, and he was fouled slamming over 7-foot Willie Cauley-Stein. CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Kentucky guard Jarrod Polson (3) drives past Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet (23) during the rst half of a third-round game of the NCAA college basketball tournament on Sunday in St. Louis. DAVID J. PHILLIP / APIowa States Matt Thomas (21) and North Carolinas Nate Britt (0) scramble for a loose ball on Sunday, in San Antonio. No. 3 seed Iowa State battles to win over North CarolinaTennessee ends Mercers NCAA run PAUL J. WEBERAP Sports WriterSAN ANTONIO DeAndre Kane drove for the game-winning layup with 1.6 sec onds left and No. 3 seed Iowa State beat North Carolina 85-83 on Sunday, advancing to the Sweet 16 for the rst time since 2000. The Cyclones (287) head to Madison Square Garden next week to face No. 7 seed Connecticut in the East Regional semis. The Tar Heels (24-10) are gone in the NCAA tournaments opening weekend for the rst time in consecutive seasons under coach Roy Williams. North Carolinas Nate Britt raced the ball up court af ter Kanes basket, but time expired before he could reach midcourt and call a time out. Ofcials huddled for several minutes reviewing clock re plays before ruling the game was over. Right away Williams who collapsed his hands on his knees as Britt dribbled toward him and the buzz er sounded shook Iowa State coach Fred Hoibergs hand as North Carolina began absorbing a last-second heartbreaker. Kane nished with 24 points and 10 re bounds. It was just the kind of big game the Cyclones needed without forward Georges Niang, who broke his foot in Fridays win against North Carolina Central. The 6-foot-7 sophomore sat on the bench wearing a bulky boot while the Cyclones tried their best without their third-leading scorer and tallest starter. CHUCK BURTON / AP The Tennessee bench cheers after Tennessee guard Antonio Bartons 3-point shot against Mercer on Sunday in Raleigh, N.C. JOEDY MCCREARYAP Sports WriterRALEIGH, N.C. Tennessee came to Tobacco Road and turned it into Raleigh Top. Jarnell Stokes had 17 points and a ca reer-high-tying 18 rebounds, and the Volunteers denied Mercer a second straight upset in the NCAA tournament by routing the Bears 8363 on Sunday night. Josh Richardson had a career-high 26 points and Antonio Barton had 18 for the 11th-seeded Vols (2412), who outrebounded Mercer 41-19 and kept the Southeastern Conference perfect in the tournament. They joined Florida and Kentucky in the round of 16 the rst time three SEC teams made it that far since 2007. Tennessee will face second-seeded Michigan (27-8) in a Mid west Regional semi nal on Friday night. Stokes broke his two-day-old school tournament record for rebounds. Langston Hall had 15 points to lead the 14th-seeded Bears (279). They knocked off Duke in the signature upset of the tourna ment but couldnt an swer Tennessees size. Mercer trailed by double gures for the entire second half be fore the Bears threat ened to give themselves yet another fantastic nish. They had the ball down 12 with about 2 minutes left when Jakob Gollon one of the heroes of the Duke upset two days earlier threw the ball away in the lane, then fouled out a few seconds later. Jordan McRae hit two free throws, and Richardson added a fast-break layup to push the Tennessee lead to 77-61 with 1 minutes left.GOLF DAVID BRANDTAP Sports WriterSAUCIER, Miss. Jeff Maggert admit ted his decisive putt on No. 17 at Fallen Oak wasnt supposed to be one that actually dropped. He was just trying to get it close. So when the 50-foot putt rolled up and down a big ridge as it broke from left to right and then fell into the hole the Cham pions Tour rookie was as surprised as any one. He had been consis tent all week. Now just a little bit of luck had pushed him to victory at the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic at Fallen Oak on Sunday. You cant count on those going in very often, Maggert said with a grin. Maggert became the 17th player in Cham pions Tour history to win in his debut, shooting a 4-under 68 to capture his rst victory since the 2006 St. Judes Classic on the PGA Tour. The 50-year-old fell into a tie for the lead with Billy Andrade af ter making bogey on No. 16, but responded with the astonishing putt that pushed him back ahead. I was just trying to hit an easy lag putt, Maggert said. I want ed an easy tap-in for par and it was just one of those things the ball found the hole. When it dropped, Maggert shook his head in disbelief. He nished the tourna ment with an 11-under 205. Maggert is a threetime PGA Tour win ner who turned 50 in February. His consis tent weekend included a 68 on Friday, a 69 on Saturday and he capped his debut performance at Fall en Oak with four birdies on the back nine on Sunday to earn the $240,000 paycheck. I had expectations to play well, but I didnt know if I would play well enough to win, Maggert said. Id been struggling a little with my game, but every thing just kind of came together. It was one of the best tournaments, as far as ball striking, that Ive had in a few years in any event. That really carried me through. Andrade, who started the day tied with Fred Funk for the lead, shot a 71 to nish in second two strokes back.Jeff Maggert wins at Fallen Oak in Tour debut TIM ISBELL / SUN HERALD Jeff Maggert holds his championship trophy for the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic Sunday at Fallen Oak in Saucier, Mississippi. Associated PressPANAMA CITY Mexicos Carlos Ortiz won the Panama Claro Championship on Sun day for his rst Web. com Tour title, closing with a 6-under 64 for a four-stroke victory. The 22-year-old for mer North Texas play er nished at 12-under 268 at Panama Golf Club and earned $112,500 to jump from seventh to second on the money list with $171,500. Jason Gore was sec ond after a 66. Daniel Berger, Derek Fathauer and Aron Price, the second-round leader, tied for third at 7 under. Berger and Fathauer shot 67, and Price had a 70. Alex Cejka, the winner of the season-open ing Colombia Championship and second last week in the Bra zil Champions, tied for 11th at 4 under after a 69. He earned $13,750 to push his tour-lead ing total to $235,150.Mexicos Ortiz wins first title

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterKEY BISCAYNE Andy Murray won Sunday while Ivan Lendl watched as a fan rather than as a coach. With Lendl among the stadium specta tors, Murray advanced to the fourth round at the Sony Open by beating Feliciano Lopez 6-4, 6-1. The tour nament is the rst for the two-time Key Bis cayne champion since he parted with Lendl, who coached Mur ray for two years and helped him become a Grand Slam champi on. Were back togeth er again. It was only a fouror ve-day split, Murray joked. No, its a shame he wont be watching many more of my matches from the stands. Roger Federer also advanced easily, beating qualier Thiemo de Bakker 6-3, 6-3. Lendl helped Mur ray win Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, an Olympic gold medal and last years Key Biscayne title. Lendl said he decided to step down because he wanted to concentrate on other projects, among them playing more senior events. Murray was unhappy about the split and said Lendl will be dif cult to replace. Be fore their partner ship, Murray was 0-4 in Grand Slam nals although he did win Key Biscayne in 2009. The No. 6-seeded Murray moved one round closer to a po tential quarternal against Novak Djokovic. Murray returned well and made the most of his chances at the net to improve to 9-0 against Lopez, seeded 32nd. The victory came on a sunny, 85-degree af ternoon. Murray conrmed it was hot, al though the Scotsman who lives part-time in nearby Miami said Fahrenheit tempera tures give him pause because hes more fa miliar with Celsius. I started using Fahrenheit a bit more, but I dont know the conversion, he said. If I speak to someone back home and they say, How hot was it?, and I say, Its 85 today, and they say, What is that?, I have absolute ly no idea. Murrays next op ponent will be No. 11-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, who outlasted Marcos Baghdatis 4-6, 7-6 (6), 7-5. Tsonga ral lied from a 5-1 decit in the tiebreaker. Federer didnt face a break point against de Bakker, and after two matches has lost only 10 points in 20 service games. The win gave Federer 43 career victories at Key Biscayne, one more than Pete Sampras and second in only to Andre Agassis 61.MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Associated PressFORT MYERS Matt Moore walked off the eld after being hit in the mouth by a line drive that he par tially blocked with his glove in the fourth inning of the Tampa Bay Rays 9-2 win over the Boston Red Sox. Moore got his glove up just in time to deect a line shot by Bostons Xander Bogaerts, recovering to throw out Bo gaerts for the nal out of the inning. Moore lifted his jer sey up to his lip, which was bleeding. But that also ended Moores outing as he was driven from the eld, sitting up in a cart. The Rays said Moore re ceived a couple of stitches, but had no concussion symptoms. He will continue to be monitored. Moores injury comes just four days after Reds closer Aroldis Chapman was hit in the face by a liner and had surgery to repair a broken bone above his eye. Moore earned the win, go ing four innings without giving up a hit but allowing a run and four walks and four strikeouts and a wild pitch. Moore and right-handers Brandon Gomes and Juan Carlos Oviedo combined to hold the Red Sox hitless into the seventh inning before Bogaerts one-out single. Red Sox left-hander Fe lix Doubront had another rough outing, his second in as many starts, going 4 1/3 innings, giving up eight runs and 10 hits, including a home run, and two walks with six strikeouts and a balk.BRAVES 4, METS 1KISSIMMEE Freddy Garcia bounced back from two rough outings, allowing two hits while pitching into the sixth inning Sunday as the Atlanta Braves beat a New York Mets split-squad 4-1 on Sunday. Justin Upton homered for the Braves while Fred die Freeman and B.J. Upton each were 2 for 3 with an ex tra-base hit and a walk. Garcia, bidding begin the season as the No. 3 starter in the Braves injury-depleted rotation, had allowed 10 runs over 6 2/3 innings in his previous two starts. But the veteran right-hander kept the Mets off balance with his assortment of pitches as he struck out four and walked one in 5 1/3 innings. He al lowed an unearned run. Carlos Torres, who had allowed just one run in 10 innings, made his rst start of the spring for the Mets, al lowing six hits and two runs over four innings. The righthander had four strikeouts and no walks.BLUE JAYS 3, YANKEES 1TAMPA Yankees fth starter candidate Michael Pineda allowed three runs and six hits over six innings Sun day in New Yorks 3-1 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays. Dioner Navarro had an RBI single in the second, which ended Pinedas scoreless streak at 10 innings. The right-hander avoided fur ther damage by getting an inning-ending double play from Ryan Goins with the bases loaded. Toronto scored twice in the fth, on Pinedas throwing error after elding a bunt and a wild pitch. Considered the front run ner, Pineda is competing with David Phelps, Adam Warren and Vidal Nuno for the nal rotation spot be hind opening day starter CC Sabathia, Hiroki Kuroda, Masahiro Tanaka and Ivan Nova. Manager Joe Girardi is expected to announce the choice Tuesday.MARLINS 8, TIGERS 4LAKELAND Joe Nathan allowed four runs while only getting one out in the ninth inning as the Miami Marlins rallied for an 8-4 win over the Detroit tigers on Sunday. Nathan entered without having allowed a run in eight games. Jeff Mathis, who went 4 for 5, had a tiebreak ing two-run double for Miami Jacob Turner allowed one run in six innings for the Marlins. He gave up three hits and struck out ve. The Marlins Mathis and Gi ancarlo Stanton homered off Drew Smyly.PHILLIES 5, TWINS 1CLEARWATER Jim my Rollins homered for the second straight day and the Philadelphia Phillies cruised to a 5-1 victory over the Min nesota Twins on Sunday. Rollins nished 2 for 2 with two RBIs and a walk. Rollins is 6 for 13 since snapping out of an 0-for-23 slump this spring on Wednesday. Rollins is hitting .211 (8 for 38) in 14 games this spring. Domonic Brown and Mar lon Byrd each had two hits and Ryan Howard nished 1 for 3 with a walk and an RBI. Minnesota right-hander Phil Hughes allowed ve runs and nine hits in ve in nings. Hughes, in his rst season with the Twins after signing a three-year, $24 million free agent deal, struck out three and walked one.PIRATES 7, ORIOLES 7 SARASOTA Andrew Mc Cutchen hit a ninth-inning home run and the Pittsburgh Pirates and Baltimore Ori oles played to a 7-7, 10-in ning tie on Sunday. McCutchen, who also doubled, is batting .529 this spring. Gerrit Cole allowed six runs and eight hits in 6 2-3 innings. Cole, who will probably be Pittsburghs No. 2 start er this season, allowed three home runs among his eight hits: a leadoff homer to Nick Markakis in the rst, a twoout blast to Chris Davis, his fourth this spring, and a tworun shot by Ryan Flaherty in the sixth. In three spring starts, Cole has allowed eight earned runs in 11 2/3 innings. Kevin Gausman allowed a leadoff homer to Starling Marte in the rst. He gave up the run and three hits in four innings, walking two and striking out eight.CARDINALS 6, ASTROS 3JUPITER Joe Kelly al lowed his rst hit in a tworun sixth inning and Matt Holliday homered, leading the St. Louis Cardinals to a 6-3 victory Sunday over the Houston Astros. Kellys control uctuat ed in his fourth spring start, striking out ve but also walking four. He did not get an out in the sixth. Kel lys Grapefruit League ERA dropped to 6.29.Moore hit by line drive; Rays hammer Sox GERALD HERBERT / AP Tampa Bay Rays Wil Myers reaches second on a double as the ball slips out of the glove of Boston Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts in the rst inning of an exhibition game on Sunday in Fort Myers. NBAKyle Lowry scores 25 as Raptors defeat Hawks 96-86 Associated PressTORONTO Kyle Lowry scored 25 points, Jonas Valanciunas had 13 points and 13 re bounds and the Toron to Raptors beat the At lanta Hawks 96-86 on Sunday. DeMar DeRozan scored 21 points, Greivis Vasquez had 12 and Terrence Ross 10 as the Raptors avoided their rst three-game home losing streak since dropping games against Brooklyn, Mi ami and Denver be tween Nov. 26 and Dec. 1. Toronto fell in dou ble overtime to Okla homa City on Friday and lost to Phoenix last Sunday. Lowry, who had 13 points as Toron to erased an 11-point decit in the fourth quarter, has scored 19 points or more in a ca reer-high nine consec utive games. DeMarre Car roll and Paul Millsap each scored 17 as the Hawks lost their second straight following a ve-game winning streak. SUNS 127, WOLVES 120MINNEAPOLIS Markieff Morris scored 25 points off the bench to lead the Phoenix Suns to their biggest comeback of the season, a 127-120 victory against the Minnesota Timberwolves on Sunday. Phoenix trailed by 22 in the rst half but shot a season-high 57 per cent from the oor to overcome Kevin Love 36 points and 14 re bounds. Love fell an assist short of a triple double and committed a crucial turnover in the nal minute. With the game tied at 118, Love lost the ball in the paint and Eric Bledsoe made a fastbreak layup. Gerald Green, Bledsoe and P.J. Tucker each hit a pair of free throws in the closing seconds to help the Suns pull within a half game of eighth-place Memphis in the Western Confer ence.NUGGETS 105, WIZARDS 102DENVER Kenneth Faried had 20 points and Aaron Brooks hit four straight free throws in the nal 12 seconds, helping the injury-rid dled Denver Nuggets hold off the Washing ton Wizards 105-102 on Sunday night. Randy Foye added 17 for a Nuggets team that was missing J.J. Hick son, who suffered torn ligament in his right knee on Friday. Wilson Chandler also didnt play (strained left hip) and Jan Vesely didnt re turn after bruising his rib cage late in the third quarter. NATHAN DENETTE / THE CANADIAN PRESSAtlanta Hawks guard Dennis Schroder, left, drives to the net past Toronto Raptors guard Nando de Colo during the second half on Sunday in Toronto. TENNIS ALAN DIAZ / AP Andy Murray returns to Feliciano Lopez on Sunday at the Sony Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne.Andy Murray reaches fourth round at Sony Open tourney

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014MENTAL HEALTH: Newtown struggles to meet demand / C4 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterIt wont be nearly as much fun as eating candy bars, but a big study is being launched to see if pills con taining the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes. The pills are so packed with nutrients that youd have to eat a gazillion candy bars to get the amount being tested in this study, which will enroll 18,000 men and women nationwide. People eat chocolate because they enjoy it, not be cause they think its good for them, and the idea of the study is to see wheth er there are health benets from chocolates ingre dients minus the sugar and fat, said Dr. JoAnn Man son, preventive medicine chief at Harvard-afliated Brigham and Womens Hos pital in Boston. The study will be the rst large test of cocoa avanols, which in previous smaller studies improved blood pressure, cholesterol, the bodys use of insulin, artery health and other heart-related factors. A second part of the study will test multivitamins to help prevent cancer. Earli er research suggested this benet but involved just older, unusually healthy men. Researchers want to see if multivitamins lower Study to test pills containing nutrients found in dark chocolate for heart health AP FILE PHOTO A worker collects sun-dried cocoa beans to be put into into sacks for export in Guiglo, Ivory Coast. EDDIE PELLSAP National WriterWhile a few of his former teammates were competing for gold, silver and bronze, Sean Busby was rounding out a set hardly any Olym pian can dream of. It started 10,500 feet high at a base camp and ended hours later on his snowboard in Moroccos Toubkal National Park. By riding the highest mountain range in North Africa, Busby became the rst person with Type 1 diabetes to snowboard the backcountry on all seven continents. When I nally got back, I got texts about Vic getting double gold medals and that sort of stuff, Busby said of his friend, Vic Wild, the American-born rider who won two snowboarding golds for his adopted country of Russia. But while I was up there, I had no connection to the outside world. At one point, Busby dreamed it might be him climbing to the top of the Olympic podium as a snowboard racer. But his out-of-control and misdiagnosed illness that hit more than 10 years ago, at age 19, held him back. Vomiting. Dangerous weight loss 30 pounds in the span of 12 days. Pneumonia that set in as a result of doctors inability to control the other symptoms. Busby lived with an incorrect diagnosis for three months doctors rst told him he had Type 2 diabetes. Turned out, he had Type 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and sufferers are dependent on insulin; Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for more than 90 percent of all diabetes, is often associated with older age, obesity and physical inactivity. Sufferers can often feel better by controlling their diets and dont always need insulin. While Busby was in search for a correct diagnosis, his sponsors left him in droves. One of them told me they didnt want to support an athlete who was chronically sick, he said. After he got the right diagnosis, and the insulin to combat it, Busby started looking for his second act. In search of something different than racing, he took his cue from some of the great adventurers in his sport among then, Jeremy Jones and the late Craig Kelly. To the backcountry he went. Its the reason I got involved in the sport when I was 12 in the rst place, said Busby, who lives in Whitesh, Mont. Its the sense of adventure. The sense of getting away from it all. Its the true spirit of snowboarding. Busby founded a char itable organization, Riding on Insulin, that raises money to give kids with Type 1 diabetes the same chance at adventure Busby has enjoyed. Busby also Diabetic snowboarder Sean Busby rides 7 continents AP FILE PHOTOS Sean Busby splitboards through the High Atlas Mountains near Marrakech, Morocco. By riding the highest mountain range in North Africa, Busby became the rst person with Type 1 diabetes to snowboard on all seven continents. Sean Busby checks his insulin pump at base camp. SEE DIABETIC | C4SEE HEART | C4 UMATILLA World Tuberculosis Day to be observed todayThe Lake County Health Department will observe World Tuberculosis Day from 1 to 4 p.m. today at the Umatilla Health Center, 249 E. Collins St. Educational materials will be available. For information, call the Florida Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5554.LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program seeks volunteersLake and Sumter County residents age 55 and older are needed by the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) to help with a variety of ongoing efforts in the community. Volunteers tutor elementary students, mentor low-income high school students who are college bound, deliver meals, make phone calls to home-bound seniors, provide transportation for cancer patients and sort and distribute food to the needy. For information, call 352-365-1995. TAVARES Health seminars to be offered at WatermanFlorida Hospital Waterman will offer a series of seminars on an array of health topics. They are: %  %  Living with Knee Pain? You May Not Have To, with Samire Guru, DO, from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday at the Mattison Conference Center at Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way in Tavares. %  %  Minimally Invasive Hernia Repair, with Dan Tran, M.D., at 1 p.m. on April 2, also at the Mattison Conference Center. Call 352-323-3635 to register and for information. EUSTIS Crafts for Cancer group scheduled to meet The Crafts for Cancer volunteer group meets at 9:30 a.m. on the third Monday of every summer month at the First United Methodist Church in Eustis. For information, call 352-735-7704.TAVARES Amputee support group meeting scheduled for todayThe Waterman Amputee and Limb Lost Konnections (W.A.L.K.) for amputees and those with limb loss will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. today and every fourth Monday at the Mattison Conference Center, Room B, at Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way in Tavares. For information, call Tracey Estok at 352-253-3892.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Lawn Services Electrical Services

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICESSAVE UP TO80%OFFPHARMACY PRICES YOUR COST!Cialis 20mg.24 count.......$89.95Flomax 4mg.90 count.......$68.00Viagra 100mg.20 count.......$65.95NO SHIPPING COST ON THESE PRODUCTS. ALL ADVERTISED MEDICATIONS ARE GENERIC. VALUECALL US FIRST OR CALL US LAST... Our prices on prescription medicines are competitive with other mail order or internet prices. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi north of Kmart)(352) 347-0403 or Fax (352) 347-2034 Fax: (352) 347-2034cdrx441@gmail.com GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted touts the OmniP od, a tubeless insulin pump that allows him to regulate his insulin without the constant injections that many who have the disease need. If something went wrong while Im in Antarctica, I might as well be on the moon if I need help, he said. I couldnt afford to have my gear fail on me. My life depends on my gear. Among other places, Busby has ridden the backcountry in Tasmania, Norways Lyngen Alps, Kyrgyzstan, Patagonia and throughout the Canadian Yukon, Newfoundland and the United States. Though the ascent in Morocco allowed him to cross the last continent off his list, hes not done with his adventure. He plans on leading a backcountry trip through Norway for people who have Type 1 diabetes. Theres a trip to Greenland in the works. Hes sur rounding himself with people who have the same disease he has spreading the word that anything is possible. Youre moving at your own pace and its your own two feet guiding you through it, he said. Ive been able to meet amazing people, see amazing cultures and learn amazing things. DIABETIC FROM PAGE C1 cancer risk in a broader population. The study will be sponsored by the Na tional Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Mars Inc., maker of M&Ms and Snickers bars. The candy com pany has patented a way to extract avanols from cocoa in high concentration and put them in capsules. Mars and some other compa nies sell cocoa extract capsules, but with less active ingredient than those that will be tested in the study; candy con tains even less. Youre not going to get these protective a vanols in most of the candy on the market. Cocoa avanols are of ten destroyed by the processing, said Manson, who will lead the study with Howard Ses so at Brigham and oth ers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Participants will get dummy pills or two capsules a day of co coa avanols for four years, and neither they nor the study leaders will know who is taking what during the study. The avanol capsules are coated and have no taste, said Manson, who tried them herself. In the other part of the study, participants will get dummy pills or daily multivitamins containing a broad range of nutrients. Participants will be recruited from existing studies, which saves money and lets the study proceed much more quickly, Manson said, although some ad ditional people with a strong interest in the research may be allowed to enroll. The wom en will come from the Womens Health Initiative study, the long-running research project best known for showing that menopause hor mone pills might raise heart risks rather than lower them as had long been thought. Men will be recruited from other large studies. Manson also is leading a govern ment-funded study testing vitamin D pills in 26,000 men and women. Results are ex pected in three years. People love vitamin supplements but its important not to jump on the bandwagon and take pills before they are rigorously test ed, she warned. More is not necessarily better, and re search has shown sur prising harm from some nutrients that once looked promis ing, she said. HEARTFROM PAGE C1 AP FILE PHOTO Balloons y outside a doctors ofce on the rst anniversary of the Sandy Hook massacre, in Newtown, Conn. PAT EATON-ROBBAssociated PressHARTFORD, Conn. Some of the charities paying for men tal health care for children and families affected by the Sandy Hook massacre are running short of money and ofcials dont know how much theyll need and for how long to repair the psychological scars from the mass shooting. Newtown ofcials are apply ing for a federal grant and char ities are pooling their resources in an attempt to ensure that free long-term mental health care remains available following the December 2012 shooting that left 20 rst graders and six edu cators dead. We hear in the media, Well Sandy Hook was 14 months ago, isnt everything ne? said Can dice Bohr, executive director of the Newtown Youth and Family Services. Well, no its not and we get calls every day from the school wanting to address an is sue. I would love to say that in 10 years were going to see a huge drop and everyones better and weve moved on, but thats not the case. Three of the charities that have Newtown struggles to meet mental health demandSEE NEWTOWN | C8

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, March 24, the 83rd day of 2014. There are 282 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On March 24, 1989, the supertanker Exxon Valdez (vahl-DEEZ) ran aground on a reef in Alaskas Prince William Sound and began leaking an estimated 11 million gallons of crude oil. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 24, 2014: This year you open up to change and become more realistic than you have been in the past. You often take the lead, which is natural for you, but you become more controlling in guiding others toward a goal. Success stems from your focus and endurance. Learn to gather information before nalizing your decisions. If you are single, you project one attitude yet act in a conicting manner. These two paradoxical dimensions could pose a problem in a potential relationship. Try to integrate these different ideas. If you are attached, as a couple, you nd 2014 to be very dynamic and exciting. The two of you relate closely, especially come summer. Enjoy this period. CAPRICORN is stubborn but willing to do whatever is necessary to come out on top. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You handle tension well. Somewhere along the way today, you might decide that you dont care how someone feels about you. You surprise people when you do a reversal, because you are so passionate about nearly everything you do. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your instincts could prevent a collision of wills. You see the big picture, whereas others cannot. As a result, youll see many solutions to x the situation. You will change perspective as the day goes on. Be open to hav ing various conversations. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)One-on-one relating takes you down a new path to new possibilities. You might want to change directions after you have a much-needed discussion. Youll see too many options that could work, and you know that yours is not the only one. T CANCER (June 21-July 22) Others often challenge you, and you nd these contrary moments revealing, as they help you identify your priorities. You could nd someone offensive in how he or she pushes for what he or she wants. A positive attitude will go far. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Pace yourself. Others seem to be obsessive, and you might want to derail the whole matter. Your instincts will help you nd out more about what exactly is going on. Someone from a distance could surprise you and lead you down a new path. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your creativity will come out, even with a discouraged or pessimistic person in your life. This person has a way of getting your imagination going. Your nances could be off-kilter, if you choose not to take charge of them. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Stay centered and direct in your dealings. A child or loved one will add some variety to the moment. Be willing to ex and come to a natural conclusion. You are likely to keep producing more and more, which will impress an associate or higher-up. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)You could be taken aback by someones need to have certain matters go a certain way. You, too, can be quite controlling about outcomes, yet you recognize that you can control only yourself. Have a talk with this person. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Be aware of your spending habits, as you could nd that a partner wants the same ability to buy as you do. This conversation could cause some upset if you are not careful. Understand your limitations. Consider a different approach to your nances. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll beam in whatever you want, but later you will have to deal with the implications of your actions. A family member could be upset by your choices and where you are heading. A discussion is likely to eliminate at least some of the problem. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Step back from a problem rather than add to it. Given some time, the situation will unravel itself. You could be surprised by someones efforts to reach out to you. Understand that this person means well. Listen to your instincts. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You seem to have walked into a situation with a lot of power plays, and you might be wondering why. Know what is happening beyond the obvious. If you attempt to enlighten others, they might be resentful. Find out what is happening with a child. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: My boy friend, Caleb, and I have been dating for three years. Im sure hell propose within the next few months. Im having a problem with this because Calebs best friend, A.J., will be proposing to his girlfriend in the next month. They should be able to enjoy their time and let all their friends know. Caleb has always followed A.J.s lead. When A.J. buys his girlfriend jewelry, I get jewelry. It makes me feel like an after thought and that the gifts are not sincere. If Caleb does propose close to the time that A.J. does, Im going to say no. I dont want a copycat engagement so my boy friend can keep up with his best friend. Please advise. COMING IN SECOND IN NEW YORK DEAR COMING IN SECOND: You appear to be frustrated because your boyfriend has a recessive personality and is a follower. It is unlikely that he is going to change. Frankly, Caleb doesnt appear to be mature enough to be making decisions with lifelong consequences. You might be much happier with someone who is his own man. DEAR ABBY: A year and a half ago, my doctor diagnosed me with ADHD. The medication I take is a stimulant and it curbs my appetite. I take it before school and it wears off by mid-afternoon. Because of this, I dont feel hungry at lunchtime. My teachers and schoolmates have noticed. They try to per suade me to eat, but I tell them I had a big breakfast or Im just not hungry. I know they mean well, but I want them to understand that Im not anorexic. I dont want them to know I have ADHD because some of them make fun of people who do. Do you have any suggestions? ANONYMOUS IN IOWA DEAR ANONYMOUS: The principal of your school should be told that you are on doctor-prescribed medication that suppresses your appetite so that information can be shared with the teachers who supervise the cafeteria. That way you will receive less pressure to eat from the adults. Your classmates do not have to know. If someone accuses you of being anorexic, just say that your doc tor has told you your weight is normal. Its a shame they would tease someone who has ADHD because its a condition that so many students and adults share. However, because you feel it would make you a tar get, youre wise to say nothing.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Copycat boyfriend gets some growling from his girlfriend 748-7300 Saturday, March 29th 9am 4pmCAPEZIOSHOEREPWILLBEPRESENT! Dance InstructorsAll Current Dance Shoes$10 OFFClearance Dance Shoes$19.95 Starting At And Up

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 been providing funds for services have started working together, while the charity that has raised the most money the Newtown-Sandy Hook Community Foundation says that it will likely join the alli ance soon. The Newtown Lions Club, which raised $350,000 for men tal-health services in the wake of the shooting, has told the 250 people it served that it could no longer directly pay their men tal health bills because fundraising was being outpaced by demand. The demand was well beyond anything we could have predicted, said Peter McNulty, president of the Lions Club. Other charities are picking up the slack. The towns Rotary Club and the Newtown Me morial Fund, which had been spending a combined $30,000 a month on mental health care for 150 families, partnered with the Lions Club, said Brian Mauriello, founder of the Newtown Memorial Fund. Those who need help are being steered to the states Ofce of Victim Services, which processes applications for money from a pool cre ated by all three chari ties. So far, nobody has been turned down. I dont think anybody has a crystal ball to say whether theres going to be enough money or not, said Linda Cimi no, the director of the state Ofce of Victims Services I do know that the plan is for a 15-year horizon. The Newtown-Sandy Hook Community Foundation has about $4 million left after giv ing more than $7 mil lion to the 40 families most affected by the shooting. Much of the remain ing money likely will go into the mental health care pool, said Jennifer Barahona, the foundations executive direc tor. She said they ex pect to announce an alliance with the Lions/ Rotary/Newtown Memorial Fund group in the coming weeks. We recognize that as the largest of the funds, we will need to pick up the slack over the years as some of the other funds really dwindle as the Lions has, she said. The idea is to still have money available as those who were in elementary school at the time of the shoot ing reach adulthood. Meanwhile, the town is seeking more than $7 million in a fed eral grant, in part to help cover the next 18 months of costs for the nonprot agencies providing free mental health care. The grant also would create a recovery and resiliency board, which would help match people with specic services and programs. This is about building a safety net of ongoing support for those in the mental health system, and to capture new peo ple who have needs, Pat Llodra, the towns rst selectwoman, told town ofcials when announcing the grant application last month. Bohr said her organization saw an 85 per cent jump in clients after the Sandy Hook shooting, and had to quadruple its staff, adding 29 positions. They have been pro viding everything from intense one-on-one therapy, to simple ad vice to parents who come in asking how to deal with their chil drens questions about the shooting. Another nonprot, the Resiliency Center of Newtown, opened in September. It has served about 500 people with free programs such as art and music therapy, grief coun seling, and parenting classes. Stephanie Cinque, the executive director, said they have been funded with private donations, but she is counting on the feder al grant money to keep the programing going. While they await a re sponse to the grant re quest, Cinque said its clear the services are having an impact. After all the therapy shed been through since 12/14 we never thought wed have her back, the mother of a Sandy Hook student who completed a self-esteem program wrote in an email shared by Cinque. And we have our daughter back. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com NEWTOWNFROM PAGE C4

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbr rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rffnftbrfbbfff bffbbrfffff bfffffff fbfrbfnf tf bff n f t n t f t f f t f f f f n b f b fn f trfbbffnbffbft fffffrfb ffftbffffftfb ffffrffffbrrf rrffrfrf rrfr frfffffbb ffrfbfrfbbfffbr ffrfffff bffbffrbfff bbfffbfbrfrf fffrfrbf f f f t fftbfr ffbfbb tf bffff f f b f r f rffrffbfff ftbffff bfrfbbffffr ffbfrff bffbbrfbfbf ffff tbffffbbrff fffffr fffff tf bffffff f f f n f fn n f t f f ft fn f t f fn t f t f f tfft ftfttfttft fnfftt fffft tfntf r fftfttf tftfttft r f n fn f t ffffbrfffn ffnbrbffbf ffbffftfff bfbfffnffbf fbfffnbfbf tfttfttftf nffttf ffftft fntfffr ffffft ttfftftt tffn fttff tfttfttftf nffttf ffftft fntff bffrffrffb ffbfbffrfffrf 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fbrrfrfffbff fbfnffff brrfrffrrff bftbrffbfr b fn fftffbffr fbffrfbf bfrrrfbrfffff ffbfnbff rfffrfbrrf fbffbftbff fbffrffb bffff bbfbff fbfrfff rfffbbrfb ffnffbrfbrr fffbftbr bfbfbffbf fbrrfffbfrf ffbfrffr rfbfffff r rrbrrr r f f f f r r ft b f b ff bftbfrfffrf frrffbfrbfbff fbffbfrbf ffrfbfbr rrbffbffbr fffbrffb ffffbfff fbbfbrrffbrf fffff fntfffbftbf rrffnfbffbff rfffbrfbfb rrffffbffrb bfrffbfrff fnfbfrrff bffbffrf brrfffbfrfbffr ffbrfbfr r fffbftbf fbfrfbf brfbfbfbffbfffr bffffffrf ffbfrfrffb ffbftbffrf rrrffffbfbfff ffbfffbfr bfbrfffrfff bfbffbftbfr brffbfbffbbf fbfffft rffffffb fr r fftfbrfrfrr brrfbffffbr bfrfffbf rbfbffbf rffffn rffffbrrfbf rfffbffbf fnfrfffffr ffffffbfb ffbffbfbrfbr bfffnfbf brffrffbftb bffffffff ffrffbfff bbrrffffffft bfrfffffff ffffbrrff fffffftffb rbfbfrff bfrfbfffrff bffftfbfff fbfrff bffrrfnb ftbrr bfffffbff brfffffffbb fbfrfrffbff brrfbffbrffrb bfbfbfr fffnfbffbf rfbffbfrffbf fftfrrfbff bfffbfbff fffbfffbrfb ffffffff ffnt tfffrrffbfrf ffbftbrffr rfrffffb ffffbrrfff fffrffb fbffff fbrrfffbrrf bfffrfbff bfffbrrff brrffbff rfbfffbr bbrffffrff brrfbfrbfbrrfbf brfffbfff fffbrfrrfbrr ffffffb ftfrfffff bfbffff fbfbrfrfftfr ffrfrrrffbfff bfbffffrfrf ftfrfrffffr fffrfrf bfrfbbfbbrfb fffrfbrf ftfrfffrfbrfb rrffbfrfbb bbrfbffffr brfffff fffrfbfffr brfbfrrffftfrff bfrfffbfr brffffbfrrf ffffbrfffr brffftfffrf rffbfrfff bftbrffrfrfr rfffrfrfbffrf brfrfffrfb rfrfbffrfbbfff fnt rffrbfbfbrr rfrffbfff fffffrff bftbrffff bfbffrfffffr

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 rfntbn rffr fnrtftfn btfff brfft nbfnf fr n f nffffr nb nr f r f f t f f f f fn rftb b n f f n f b t f f r f r f b f n b f f f n f n n b f n n f b f f f f f n r f f n n f f n f f b f f n r f b t n b f n f f r bb rb rb n f f f f n f f t t b t f t f f f f f t n f t f f b b n f f f r n f f f f f n f n f f t n b f n f f f b t r f t f f f t f f n n rf ftffr nntn t tffn b r b r f n b t r n n t f b b r f f f r n f r f n f r b t r f f b b n n f rt f b rt r b f t f f n f r b t r f b b f f b f f r f n f f b f r f rb b f n f b f b f b f b n b n b b f f n b b b b f n b n f f n ftb f f b f t f f b f f fbn rffrtnbf n t f b f f f f f t n n f t t f f f b b f n f n b f r f n t n t f n t f r f n f f n f f f r t f n n f b f f n f r t f t f f n f f n f b f n t f f f f n n n r r n b f r f r n b f n f f b f f f n f f n n r n n t f f f t f n n f n f f r f b n n r f f n f t f n f r t f b f f n f f f b f n t f f f t f n r f f b f n f n f f b f f n t f r f b n n f f n b f f f n b f t n t f t f f r b n b f f n n f n t n f n f f n n f f t n b f t f n r f b n f f n n f f f t f f f b f n n f r r f b f f n n f f r n f n f f n f b r f r t f n r n f n n r f f f t r r n n f n f f n f n f n f f b f n f t n f t f n f t f f r b f f n b f r t n f f f f f t n f f b b f f f r b t f f f r f n n n f r b f b t f n t f n r b n n t b f f n f r b n f t t f f n n n f n f f f f nb ftffn tfnf f nfn f f f f t n ffbbf bttbb rbftfnfb fnft rnfn tb ntff f f f r fb rbft tfbff ff t f f r b fnfnf nbnrfbn f r b f t f r f f f n f b n n b n t nnt nnbn t f ffffrt ftbnnbn rfbn f r b f t f r f n b f f f n t f n b f f f b f f f n t f f t f t t f fb nnfn f fnntfft ftn f bfbn bfn tftnnf fnnftff f n f f b f t r b fb f b n n f t f f t f n n t f f r b f f r n f t b f f b f f t f f f t t f n f n n f t t r t f f t f f r b f f n f t f n r f n f n n f b f n n f f f r f f f f n f r f b n t f f r b f nfbffnt nf fbnnb nfrtfn ftftfn f f n r f f f f n n b t f f f f f t f n n n f f f f n f n f f n f n t f f n b n f b r f f f n f f f f n f n r b f f f f f n f f f f b f t f f n f f f r t f t b f b b f f f n n t r f fnnrft fnfnnff rfffrft nbbfnn nftf ffnf fnffn ft ftfnrf tfb n f n n f n f t f f n f t t b f n n n f f f f r n r f f r f f n t b t b rfrn tbf

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Monday, March 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbr rfntbbbt frrnf bnttfnb nrtnb rtft tbr t f r t b r f b t rfnt bnttt ffff tftft t t b r r t t f f b t ftf t tbtfn b b r f t rt tr bbt ftf tbtr tr bf tf n b t t t tbtftbt t t tn br t r f f r r t r t b r f f b t n t f f f t f r t f f t f t t f f t t f b t f b b b t t t t ff rtfffnf tt r t t f tbt tttt tff rbt brft rbb t btnfr btf t btbtbb bfr tf b nbft b ftrtt tft b ftf t rrt b t t btt tft rb br r tb brt rt tb tft nnrtbtf brfft ttt b tb t ftnt bbrf f t n f t b tbtt fbtff b f tf t ftb b n t t f b f n t f r f t f f f f f r t t f f f t f f f t ftfff rn n bb rnbr bb rnbr t ntf t tf brnb brftff t br bt ft btb nff bt br frf bt ftbr b t bbf tr t ft rrt tbbfff tffbtbtf tf n b r f f f t f b n f t b r ttt nbrb bnn f tbt n t fb b n t r fb b b tr t b t tfff ntf ttt tnn t ntb ftff tt ttt b t tff t btt tfn b bbr ttrr tntfbt b tfttb b tftf nn nrfft nrff nftff t tfttr bbr tft brn tfff ftt rfbrftfftf ft tftf nn t f t t t f n nftntb nb brff tnt ntb ftt tnn tt b tbf ft tbt t nffb b ftft trtt bt bf n rff n b ft btb tt b rfnt tbbbr ttf bn bt tffn nntrb tf fb b fftt ntf trfbtfff ft fftrftrf ffttr r btffbt t f t nnf t r tt ttfr nr b t tt t tbtntb t trrntfbfnb ft tbbntf t b rfnt t t f tfftffrtf t ttft t tbt f n t t f n tfn tt ttf t tfntnf bf tfttr bbr nbtt t fbf bb tb t fftff fr ttb ttfb tffff t ftbtft t t b r t b r b f t bbf t fntf bb t tbt brf f b rb bbtf tbtft nnf nnn ftn tf ftt tf t tbt bft ft nt t bb r t rb bb t b ff f bn tff tf trft btf t t b f f bf t t trfftb tf btf f t fbb t tft btnft tr btntbt brbrf ftftn rf fnf fr fn ftbtr tfn ttffn t r t t t f tftf tft t f btf f fff t t tr nfftnbfttb brfbrtbbbb t tt ftbb t bff nftb b tff nt nf t b b fbb b tftb t btntb t n rfn bf t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t tb ft tfbf ft tt fbrt tbftr fbnbt rt fbrnf tffbrf tfbt f t b t b b n t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t t fbt fb t t b t t b b r t b t f t b b r n t b t t r f f t b b t n b t f f f f t f r btrbtb rfnftbr bbn t t b t r b b b r b t t n r r r f t f b tfnf nft t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t ff ff tftfn rbttt tnnb ffnf t t f t r r f b t t t f b f n f f fnt nttft rfbn nfrtnt t t b b f f r f n bf f t r f f b f r n f t f t b fn t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t nt t rn nft r f t f b f r f t f b n rfnt f rfnt tt ffbnbtftf ttf tnnf b t t t t t t t t b bf n tbt brft tb f nf rfnt nt bttfb tb t ft t b t b t f t t t n b t f tf t nt t fnrff ttnt t n t r t t b b f f

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 24, 2014 rfntbn rfnf tbtfttf ftf fnf fbtf n ttfn tf fbftf tt r f f f f n r ft ft nbff tt rf ntbf t tfttb tt n f t n ftfr tt fb fttn fb tfntftf nt fftfntf nf ffnnf ftftt fbt fnftf b bf br b bttftft f bf nftt ntb ftt bf br b fft nttt tf ftt tfftnff rtffffft nt tt ftftff tfnffff fnftn ff fnftn tt b nfbf nt t nntfb tbf fb tnf n fttbf t t t ffbnb tfbf fff ftt r r nt t tffft fnff ntft f ttffn f fnftn tt r ttf tftff tt r ftf n btbf nnr ttfff f nnr r ft tnrbf fnftn r f b t nntfb n btt nftn r b tf tt ft bftt bftf btn t t nn r t f f n t t b n tt nnnft r fn tntff ftt ff fn t rtf fftt rbfff b t b f f f tff ffftt fntffff ftt rbff nnfnbftb tt rtbf nbf tff rfnrtb rn r fn tr