Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Care and Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson WILBEKIN LEADS GATORS PAST PITTSBURGH, SPORTS B1FLORIDA HOSPITAL WATERMAN: Doctors day features rare display, A3 OFFICER DOWN: Windermere cop killed after calling for help, A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 82 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C3 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C3 MONEY E1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.82 / 63Sunny with occasional clouds$1 ON THE WAYThe Wellness Way Sector Plan has to clear several hurdles before it breaks ground. %  enOn April 22, the Lake County Commission meets with the City of Clermont to discuss the plan. %  enIn June, the commission votes on the plan. %  enIf approved, the plan goes to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for review and comments. %  enA branding and marketing campaign will then take place to advertise the plan, inviting developers to submit proposals. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAs Lake County of cials creep to ward approv al of the massive Wellness Way Sector Plan near Cl ermont, supporters say it is carefully designed to prevent the kinds of headaches communities experience from scatter shot, low-density devel opment. At the same time, sever al landowners in the sector plan area say exibility and the market should dictate the plans direction. While county ofcials agree parts of the plan should include exibil ity, there are aspects of the plan that are ironclad, they say. The plan will allow for market exibili ty but there are key planning principles that cant be compromised such as the protection of water resources and topogra phy and the jobs to hous ing ratio, Commissioner Sean Parks said. Jobs is one of them. The plan allows for 16,000 residential units and requires 1.5 jobs per house hold. And ofcials do not want potable water used for irrigating landscaping. The sector plan area, which has multiple landowners, has been called the last big chunk of unde veloped land in the coun ty. The area is bounded by State Road 50 to the north, U.S. Highway 192 to the south, U.S. Highway 27 to the west and the Orange County line to the east). Surrounded by major throughways and within close proximity to the city of Orlando and the theme parks, it is the prime spot to bring jobs to the region, Parks said We have one shot at this, said John Arnold, one of the landowners who owns Showcase of Citrus, which grows 60 varieties of citrus. Once it is approved and development starts coming in, if we make any mistakes we are going to have to live with that for eternity. Arnold agreed with county ofcials that the area should include both housing and commer cial. But he wants county 91 19 44 19 27 441 33 50 27 LEESBURG TAVARES MOUNT DORA UMATILLA GROVELAND CLERMONT N Wellness Way Sector Plan In Wellness Way Sector Plan, landowners and county hope to avoid headaches of massive developmentTaming the beastWHITNEY WILLARD /STAFF GRAPHIC BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL John Arnold, owner of Showcase Citrus, checks on his oranges in Clermont on Thursday. Arnold, one of the landowners in the Wellness Way Sector Plan, believes the highly planned concept should have enough exibility to respond to changes in the housing market. We have one shot at this, he said. Once it is approved and development starts coming in, if we make any mistakes, we are going to have to live with that for eternity. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comA review of all 2,999 violations recorded by trafc cameras for turning right on red lights in Clermont has resulted in 2,373 or about 70 percent of them being rejected, city ofcials say. Some 52 of these vi olations were already paid and $8,216 in nes will be refunded. The review called for by City Manag er Darren Gray near ly a month ago covered all right-on-red violations recorded by the cameras between Jan. 3, when they rst became operational, through Feb. 11, when city ofcials responded to complaints by ticketed drivers. Be ginning Feb. 12, Cler mont police said they would be using more discretion when re viewing violations forwarded to them by the camera compa ny, American Trafc Solutions. Now that the process is complete, we believe we have a sound public-safety program that is better understood by the public, because we now have very few complaints, Gray said. Arnold Ceballos of Clermont was one of those drivers who believes he was wrong fully ticketed at the intersection of State Road 50 and Hancock Road, where the majority of right-on-red violations were recorded. He said he stopped at the red light, couldnt see ve hicles coming from his left because of a car next to him, and inched forward to get a better look before turning right. Thats when the camera snapped his picture, Ceballos said. AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comTavares Economic Development Director Bill Neron says he sees Wooton Park as Tavares version of New Yorks Central Park. Construction is expected to begin late this year on addition al work that will ex pand the citys main park, Neron said. It nishes off our Central Park, he added. The additional work will take place on 3.61 acres the city pur chased adjacent to Wooton Park with a little more than $2.3 million in bond money, Neron said. The expansion project includes a new re stroom, picnic pavilion and storage building, a parking lot, entrance road, a three bay loading area boat ramp, an extension of the TavLee Trail, 2.6 acres of grass-covered open space, and a shoreline clearing that has al ready taken place, according to documents from the city. The construction work has a proposed budget of $2.05 million. The city plans to pay for this with a combined $2.08 million in bond mon ey, the sale of water taxis, two grants, and another pending grant, the documents show. The city Expansion coming to Wooton ParkSEE SECTOR | A2CLERMONTAbout 70 percent of citys red-light tickets dismissedSEE TICKETS | A2TAVARESSEE PARK | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 22CASH 3 . ............................................... 8-1-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 0-2-3 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 4-2-4-7 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-0-3-4FLORIDALOTTERY MARCH 21FANTASY 5 . ................................. 3-5-6-8-21 MEGA MONEY . ................... 13-24-38-42-13 MEGA MILLIONS . .............. 2-23-30-35-5310 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.ofcials heading the charge to be exible enough to adapt to the changing market, allowing apartments, for instance, if the need arises years from now. Parks said the plan is exible. Developers will submit proposals for develop ing pieces of the 16,000acre tract. Each proposal will be a planned development that will have to adhere to the concepts overarching principles but can differ in many other ways. You have to plan out for commercial space, open space and the infrastructure, he said, but within each PUD, a developer can decide the type of development. The exibility lies entirely within the detailed specic area plan pro cess. With each plan, den sity will be determined based on a number of factors, primarily the open space requirements and jobs-to-housing ratio. Scott Bollens, professor of urban plan ning at the University of California, Irvine, said if housing is clus tered and development includes both a mixture of homes and business es, it would prevent ur ban sprawl, a planning term that describes scattershot, low-density development. In particular, Bollens said the open space requirements are going to encourage builders to build at pretty high den sities because half the area is going to be open space. That would lead to a denser and clustered de velopment pattern, he said. Sprawl is low den sity and unclustered, characterless development. Wellness Way requires 50 percent open space in each development. The jobs-to-housing ratio is important as well, said Bollens, who has taught urban plan ning for 26 years and has read a previous article on the sector plan. They are trying to prevent it from being built out as a bunch of homes, he said. That is an attempt to create a balanced, integrat ed community out there where there are homes and also jobs. Bollens said having the jobs closer to housing will minimize commutes for residents. People will live clos er to their jobs sites and stores they shop in, he said. They are creating a balanced community of multiple uses. Jim Karr, another landowner in the sector plan area, said he wanted to make sure there are more single-family homes than multi-fami ly homes. We dont want to see multi-story family housing dominate the housing down there, he said. The real estate values for residential portions is dramatically affected by having all multi-family units. Rex Clonts, a landowner who owns Clonts Groves Inc., expressed concerns about the jobsto-housing ratio. We want to make sure that it is not overly re strictive for what the market wants, he said. This, however, will not be changed in the plan, ofcials have noted. Commissioner Leslie Campione said she pre ferred lower densities for housing. I am not a proponent of high densities in the majority of the sector plan, she said. I would think there are particular areas that it might be ap propriate. Campione said staff is making sure there is ex ibility within the plan. When people on one hand say they want exibility and on the other hand there are people concerned about sprawl and overdevelopment (that think) exibili ty means that anything goes, she said. That is the delicate balance you have to strike between anything goes and having exibility. Robert Chandler, Lakes Economic Development Director of Tourism, said health and life sciences, warehouse and distribution, business services and nance and light manu facturing are the target industries for the area. If the maximum num ber of residential units are built, the minimum number of jobs created would be 24,300, county ofcials said. Parks said if the plan was not in place you would have 100-acre to 500-acre subdivisions being built haphazardly over the next 25 years. This plan will prohibit the lowest common denominator growth patterns we have, he said. It will encour age visionary leadership for growth into the next generation. SECTOR FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL John Arnold checks on his oranges at Showcase of Citrus in Clermont. They dismissed my case and so many others because we shouldnt have gotten them since the beginning, he said. But its not only Cler mont where this is hap pening, its all over Flor ida. Ofcials previously said other reasons for dismissing tickets would be if drivers made righton-red turns in a care ful and prudent manner at less than 12 mph or if they stopped beyond the stop bar, or white line at an intersection. This (installing the cameras) is the biggest mistake and the city never educated the pub lic properly before doing it, Ceballos said. Since the cameras became operational on Jan. 3, roughly 90 percent of the citations have been for right-on-red turns. At the city council meeting in February, some 59 drivers com plained about their right-on-red tickets and Gray asked Police Chief Charles Broadway to re view those citations. Broadway later rescinded 51 of those, causing Gray to call for all cita tions to be reviewed. The city recently installed signs at intersections, warning drivers about turning right on red with cameras present. Broadway said ofcers are seeing fewer violations, so something is working. We believe more drivers are now obeying the law, he said. We continue to emphasize that drivers should stop before turning right on red. Ceballos said he simply avoids the camer as by taking alternative routes and suspects other drivers are doing that, too. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1 also approved the ling for another grant at Wednesdays city coun cil meeting, Neron said. Neron expects the bidding process for the construction to take place late this summer or early fall. Although a Florida Department of Transportation grant for the Tav-Lee trail extension is currently scheduled for the 2016-17 scal year, the city is working with the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organization to move that fund ing up to the 2014-15 scal year, which begins in July, Neron said. If the FDOT grant does not come in this summer, Neron said they would do the boat ramp and as much work as they could on the other work without the grant. Im hoping we can bid it all at once in one big bid. I think well get a better price, he said. Neron said the citys goal has been to make Tavares the waterfront event venue capital of Central Florida. Terry Fiest, the chair man for the Sunnyland Antique Boat Festival that will be taking place next weekend, said the park expansions will al low for the event to expand and have more ex hibits in the future. It gives us the lati tude to grow our show, Fiest said. We actually have some limitations right now on space and how we work everybody into the show. Fiest said the event would be able to ll in the planned open area with exhibits. Tavares Mayor Robert Wolfe said the park ex pansions will be a great addition to the city. It will just open up the park that much more for the large events we have and, by having the boat ramp separated from the seaplane base, it will be a little safer, I think, in the long run, he said. Plus, well be able to have more boat parking down at the west end of the park, which the boaters will appreciate a lot. Wolfe added he thought the park additions would help boost business in the water front area. Before the city pur chased the property for the Wooton Park expan sion, a private proper ty owner was talking about developing the waterfront tract with townhomes and covered boat docks. Voters approved the city pur chase in a special elec tion in 2012. PARK FROM PAGE A1 SCOTT MCDONALDAssociated PressKUALA LUM PUR, Malaysia Search planes headed back out to a desolate patch of the southern Indian Ocean on Sunday in hopes of nding answers to the fate of the missing Malay sia Airlines jet, af ter China released a satellite image showing a large object oating in the search zone. The object, which appeared to be 22 meters (72 feet) by 13 me ters (43 feet), was captured by satellite on Tuesday in a location that falls within the search zone that planes and ships have been crisscrossing since similar images from another satellite emerged earlier in the week. But ofcials have found no trace of it. Australian Mar itime Safety Au thority spokeswoman Andrea Hayward-Maher said she did not know whether the precise coordinates of the lo cation had been searched, but said ofcials would use the information to rene the search area on Sunday.Satellite detects object in search area

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Hospice Hope Chest readies for EasterWomen of Hospice will open the annual Easter Room on March 31 at the Hospice Hope Chest store, which offers a variety of holiday decorations, gifts and baked goods to help the public get ready for Easter. The Easter Room will remain open through April 12, and will be open Monday-Saturday from 10 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., at 351 N. Donnelly St. Visitors can also honor or memorialize a loved one by pur chasing an angel for the Tree of Remembrance which is displayed in the room. For information, call Florence Codding at 352-589-5591 or Sue Ellen Ibach at 352-735-2933.TAVARES Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers classThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension in Lake County is hosting Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers, from 10 / a.m. to noon on April 5 at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Road. The class is part of the Saturday in the Garden speaker series and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticulture agent. Online registration is available at www. saturdayinthegardenapril2014.eventbrite.com, and the fee for the class is $5 for adults and free for children under the age of 16.TAVARES Railroad work will lead to additional road closures Due to upcoming work on the Florida Central Railroad tracks in Tavares, road closures will be in effect for 48 hours at County Drive on Wednesday and Thursday. Contractor for the railroads construction, R.J. Corman, will post road closure and detour signs redirecting trafc through downtown. Motorists are encouraged to exhibit caution when traveling in the area. For information, call Michelle Bilbrey, at 352-483-9020.WILDWOOD Fundraiser Above Par For Animals tourney scheduledThe 2nd annual Above Par For Animals golf ball drop with all proceeds beneting the Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County is from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m., April 5. At the event, contestants will wait to see if their golf ball is one of the 3,000 dropped that will generate three big prizes. The numbered golf balls are available through April 3, and are $5 each, or ve for $20. Other events include live music, food, silent auction and a live auction for assorted items. For information or to purchase golf balls, call the Humane Society at 352-793-9117, or go to www.hsspca.org.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comMore than three dozen motorcycle police had the chance to put their biker skills on public display in Leesburg on Saturday and they werent handing out trafc tickets. A highlight of the 9th annual Cops and Kids Day at Gator Harley-Da vidson was the Motorcy cle Skills Challenge that allowed about 40 law en forcement ofcers from several area counties, in cluding Lake, to compete through a winding course as audience members as well as fellow ofcers cheered them on. It really helps you hone in your skills, said Mor nas Colston, a deputy with the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce and a vet eran of the annual event. Wearing black boots, uniform white dress shirts and green biker pants and straddling Harley-Davidson bikes, Lake Coun ty entered six of its sev en motorcycle deputies in the contest. Ofcers had three tries to take on the course that was lled with tight turns, small circles and narrow lanes passing through hundreds of or ange cones. Expert and intermediate categories were rep resented and those with the fastest times won. But contestants were docked ve seconds for running into or over cones and let ting their feet or bikes hit the ground. And there were some spills and crashes into cones while Back in Black by AC/DC blared through speakers. You can really see why we need to stress safe ty when riding motorcy cles or driving near one, said Troy Jackson, of Clermont, an owner of two motorcycles and three cars who was sitting in the LEESBURG Cops and Kids Day at Gator Harley Staff reportTwenty-four years ago, facing a possible four-year prison term, Rob ert Eugene Hendrix killed his cousin and the mans wife in Sorrento to prevent him from testifying in court. The murders landed the now 47-year-old Hendrix on death row where, after 23 years, he has been given an April 23 execu tion date. Hendrix and his cousin, Elmer Scott, were ar rested for breaking into a house in 1990. Scott accepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he tes tied against Hendrix, who was of fered a plea agreement of four years imprisonment and ve years proba tion. Hendrix did not want to accept a plea and told several friends prior to his court date that he was going to kill Scott to keep him from testify ing, court documents state. Hendrix didnt want to go back to prison, where he had spent 15 months beginning in 1986 after being convicted of burglary, grand theft and dealing in stolen property in Or ange County, the documents state. On Aug. 27, 1990, the day before his court date, Hendrix went to Scotts home in Sorrento and shot him in the head. His wife, Michelle, tried to inter vene and Hendrix slashed her throat. The deaths orphaned the couples 5-month-old daughter. Several witnesses, including (Hen drixs girlfriend) Denise (Turbyville), testied that Hendrix admitted com mitting the murders to silence Scott, the documents state. MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Deputy Randy Hon, with the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, competes in the Law Enforcement Motorcycle Skills Challenge at Gator Harley-Davidson in Leesburg on Saturday.BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALAn antique doctors bag, and all of the equipment usually inside it, is displayed at Doctors Day on Friday at Florida Hospital Waterman in Tavares. AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLeslie Sarmiento, marketing and physician relations for Flor ida Hospital Waterman, said she was going through a doctors bag, temporarily donated for a Doc tors Day display, when she found among the contents containers of old penicillin that had expired in 1947. It was like going back in time, Sarmiento said. The doctors bag, lent to the hospital by Dr. Dan Boggus, was just one of a number of objects, including a dissecting magnify ing glass, more than 100-yearold forceps, and a civil war bone saw, that were on display Friday at Florida Hospital Waterman as part of Doctors Day. Its to honor them. Its their day for what they do for the patients and for the community and for our hospital, Sarmiento said. The event usually includes a breakfast and lunch for the doc tors, and this year the display was added. Sarmiento said the display was both convenient for the doctors busy schedules and something they would be interested in. We did it for the doctors really. We did it for them to have a look back in time, she said. Dr. Richard Bosshardt lent a re fraction kit for optometry to the event. He said he bought the object around 1990, thinking he would start an antique medical instrument collection, but the kit end ed up being the only object he collected. Bosshardt has a private practice and works out of South Lake Hospital, Florida Hospital Wa terman, and Leesburg Regional Medical Center.TAVARESSEE DOCTORS | A6Doctors Day features unique medical displaySORRENTOKiller faces April 23 execution date HENDRIX MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comSumter County Sheriffs Ofce deputies are serv ing more than warrants this month. Deputies have been helping to serve meals to cus tomers in various restaurants during March as part of the departments annual fundraiser, Tip-A-Cop, which benets the countys Special Olympics athletes. Almost a dozen deputies helped to serve salads, chicken, and other dishes and drinks to various ta bles at City Fire restaurant on Wednesday in Lake Sumter Landing in The Villages. Deputy Jeff Cohen said the event allows the pub lic to see that law enforcement is more than just MILLARD K. IVES/ DAILY COMMERCIAL Sumter County Deputy Jeff Cohen talks to City Fire Grill customer Joe Beauregard about his order on Thursday in The Villages. THE VILLAGESTip-A-Cop helps area Special OlympiansSEE COPS | A6 SEE KIDS | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 THE WORLDS NUMBER 1SELLING TRACTOR$210PER MONTH MAX 28XL WITH MAX 5 BOX BLADE *W.A.C. (352) 357-79501255 E. CR Eustis | cobbstractor.com IN MEMORY OBITUARIESCherie Lynn AuriemmaCherie Lynn Auriemma, 54, of Fruitland Park, FL, passed away on March 12, 2014. Cherie was born in Ft. Lauderdale, FL on February, 28, 1960. She graduated from Lees burg High School and continued on to receive a Medical Technology Degree from Kai ser University. Cherie was married to Doug las Auriemma on Oc tober 10, 1981. She enjoyed Fishing, Boating, Racing and anything adventurous that add ed a spark to her life. She was also active ly involved in supporting local re, police and wounded war riors. Cherie is survived by Husband; Doug las Auriemma, Moth er in law; Marilyn Au riemma, Sister in Law; Carol Brady, Brother in Law; Rick Auriemma, Nephew; Cal Col linsworth, Nieces; Erin Ellis Ouellette, Katie El lis Shultz, Meredith El lis Patrick, Michelle Auriemma; 7 great nieces, 7 great nephews, and 2 four legged kids Sierra and Ab bygail and other fam ily and friends. Cherie Auriemma is preceded in death by Parents, Linda and Robert Wer beach, Grandmother, Betty Bizjak and Brother, Jeffrey Werbeach. In lieu of owers memorial donations may be given to The Wounded Warriors Project. Online condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.com Ar rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Samuel D. LewisSamuel D. Lewis (79) went to be with the Lord on February 4 while on a visit with family in Ohio. Sam was born in Rural Alabama, graduated from Florida Sothern College, and received his M.Div. degree from Candler School of The ology in Atlanta. He was a retired Unit ed Methodist Pastor, having served churches across the Flori da Conference, in Ter ra Ceia, Bradenton, Ft. Myers, Perry, Tallahassee and Riverview. He was presently an active on Community United Methodist Church in Fruitland Park with a passion for working with children and lead ing Bible Study. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Rev. Charlotte Lewis, four children: Kathy Pierce (Steve) of Dahlonega, Geor gia, Robby (Blanche Marie) of Winter Park, Randy (Nancy) of Kent, Ohio, and Jimmy (Kar ol) of Kent, Ohio: and seven grandchildren: Mark, Lance, Ange la, Ben, Matt, Kristopher and Kaitlyn. Memorial Services will be held on Friday, March 28, at 2:00 pm, followed by burial in the Me morial Garden at the Church. In lieu of owers, please make do nations, either to the childrens ministries of Community Unit ed Methodist Church, Fruitland Park, or the National Heart Association.William Tschida Jr.William (Bill) Joseph Tschida Jr. born in St. Paul, Minnesota on July 18, 1935, died on March 18th as a result of injuries sustained in a hit and run car crash on March 8th in Zell wood, Florida. Bill en joyed a 50 year career in many aspects of Real Estate, retiring in 2011 as Vice President of Reality Operations for Hawthorne at Leesburg. Bill realized a lifelong goal of attending the Masters Golf Tournament in Augus ta, Georgia with his sons. He also achieved the dream of making a Hole in One on September 23, 2006. Bill loved his church, his home and was devoted to his family. He is sur vived by his wife Shir ley; they were mar ried for 61 years. Also surviving are his seven children; Bill (Geri) Tschida, Cindy (Bruce) Clark, Steve (Coleen) Tschida, Jean (Bud dy) Martin, Joe (Darla) Tschida, Larry (Lynette) Tschida and Shirley (Bill) Peacock, there are 12 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren and Bills sister Sharon (Steve) Dooly. Mass of Christian Burial will be held in St. Patrick Catholic Church, 6803 Old Hwy 441, Mt. Dora on Thursday, March 27th at 9 AM. You may share your own special thoughts and memories by visiting hamlin hilbish.com. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors 326 E. Orange Av enue, Eustis. 352-3574193.Bud WarrenGarland Glenn Bud Warren Jr. was born in Mount Airy, North Car olina Sept. 11, 1936. He passed quietly in slum ber Wednesday morn ing in his home in Lake Placid. He is survived by his wife, Jean Keyes Warren; son, Chris L. Warren and wife, Char lotte Meeks of Ocoee; daughter, Diana W. Alarcon and husband Jorge A. of Plantation; son, G. Glenn War ren III, esq. and wife Lori Foley of Orange Park; daughter Janet W. Middleton of Winter Springs; granddaughters Choyce and Chelsea Middleton; Katherine S. and Emma I. Warren; Mary Elizabeth Warren; and grandsons John L. Warren, and Miguel and George A. Alarcon. G.G. Bud Warren graduated in 1959 from North Car olina State University in Raleigh, N.C., where he met his wife, Jean. Bud was employed by Southern Bell Telephone Co. and retired from Bellsouth as an assistant vice-president after 35 years of ser vice. The family moved to Miami in 1968. Lat er assignments took Bud and family to Jack sonville, Atlanta, Ga., and Birmingham, Ala. Upon retirement in Jacksonville in 1994, Bud and Jean relocated in Lake Placid permanently in 2005 at pres ent address. Bud was an active member of Kiwanis, Miami-Mid town and served as president from 197576. While in Jacksonville, the family lived in Orange Park and Bud served as a member of Orange Park Rotary Club, as well as Direc tor of the Black Creek District Boys Scouts of America. Buds inter est in the Scouting began in his youth and he earned his Eagle Scout from Old Hickory Council while in Mount Airy, N.C. He contin ued his lifelong ser vices with Boy Scouts of America and earned the Silver Beaver (highest award to a ci vilian) while in Orange Park. Bud served in the U.S. Army Corps and Army Reserves from 1960 to 1965. He was an ham radio operator, call sign, KD4-APE, and a member of ARRL, the national association for amateur radio, for 40 years. This interest and skill rendered untold assistance to victims of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Upon retirement, Bud became a Master Gardener and when re locating to Lake Placid he continued his in terest in Highlands County Master Gar dener Program volunteering weekly at the Bert Harris Ag Cen ter on George Blvd. He was a prudent advo cate of Florida friendly landscaping and natural habitats for birds. He served as President of Highlands County Audubon Society and reinstated the Bluebird Data Collection Proj ect at Royce Ranch, which he spearheaded until his illness in 2011 forced him to turn over the project to dedicated friends of blue birds. On Feb. 11, 2013, Bud submitted a proc lamation to the mayor and council members TSCHIDA SEE OBITS | A6

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED!SERVING CENTRAL FLORIDA FOR OVER 25 YEARS! Its Not Just a Floor...Its a Masterpiece!Come visit our5,000 sq. ft. showroom! #1IN SALES AND SERVICE LAMINATE $3.29InstalledStarting at DONT BE FOOLED BY SMALL PRINT! OUR LAMINATE INSTALLATIONS INCLUDE FREE: Transitions Move Furniture 1/4 Round Carpet Removal Upgrade PadIMMEDIATE INSTALLATIONSTOCK IMMEDIATE INSTALLATIONCeramic Tile$3.79Installedrf13 Colors 18x18 IN STOCK SALE$1449STARTING AT SQ. YD. INSTALLED W/PAD IN STOCK SALE $1299LANAI CARPET SQ. YD. INSTALLED BRING THIS AD IN AND TAKE AN ADDITIONAL$50 OFF HANDSCRAPED 12MM DONT BE FOOLED BY SMALL PRINT! OUR LAMINATE INSTALLATIONS INCLUDE FREE:TransitionsMove Furniture1/4 RoundCarpet Removal Upgrade Pad IMMEDIATE INSTALLATIONLAMINATE$4.99InstalledSTOCK PORCELAIN TILE$4.798 Colors 20x20Installed PAY MORE? 352-787-4036 352-771-2364Back row left to right: Phil Minnick, Shannon Chastain, Melinda Bradley, Derek Johnson, Ed Johnson, James Johnson, Ronnie Blue, Chris Johnson, Donna Johnson Front Row left to right: Christina Holman, Alisa Johnson, Monica Johnson, Olivia Hendricks, Rick Merrick, Derek Striker NEW STORE Now Open! GROW AGAIN. 352-787-4036352-771-2364 Any order of $1,000 or moreDoes not apply to previously written sales. Expires 3/31/14.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 declaring the Town of Lake Placid a Bluebird Sanctuary. With a lifelong interest in owers and nature, Bud suc cessfully grew orchids and maintained an interest in orchid growing for 45 years. He was a member of Saint James Catholic Church in Lake Placid, and a 4th degree member of the Knights of Columbus, Council #7245. A Memorial Mass Cele bration for Bud will be held on April 4, 2014 at Saint James Catholic Church, 3380 Placid View Drive, Lake Plac id at 11 / a.m. In lieu of owers, the family re quests donations be sent to Cornerstone Hospice, 209 North Ridgewood Dr., Suite 3, Sebring, 33870 and/or St. Vincent de Paul So ciety, St. James Catho lic Church, 3380 Placid View Dr. Lake Placid, 33852.DEATH NOTICESMarvin James BlackwellMarvin James Blackwell, 53, of Fruitland Park died Friday, March 21, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Nada Cary FlintNada Cary Flint, 88, of Grand Island, died Thursday, March 20, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. OBITS FROM PAGE A4 Its just nice to be ap preciated, Bosshardt said of Doctors Day. He said he was a gen eral surgeon in the Navy before he became Lake Countys rst plastic surgeon in 1989. They werent sure I could make a living do ing this in Lake County, Bosshardt said. Doctors Day is ofcially March 30, but Waterman celebrated early to ensure as many doctors as possible would be able to attend, Sarmiento said. Florida Hospital Waterman is a 269-bed, all private-room hospital with approximately 270 doctors. DOCTORS FROM PAGE A3 arresting people. It shows us in a dif ferent light, Cohen said. Deputies of all ranks are participating, including Sheriff Bill Farmer, who greeted customers at the door on Thursday. The deputies last Tip-A-Cop event will be from 5:30 / p .m. to 7:30 / p.m. on Tuesday at the City Fire American Oven & Bar at Brown woods Paddock Square in the Wildwood section of The Villages. Money raised by the events will help with transportation needs of the countys 68 Special Olympics athletes. COPS FROM PAGE A3 stands. Lakes Sgt. Michael Marden, who coordinated the event, said they make every effort to mirror the same road conditions that ofcers face as they ride through aggres sive trafc, smoothly and safely This really builds your riding skills, Marden said. The event was a fund raiser for the March of Dimes and not all the activities were centered around law-enforcement bikers. Saturdays fun-lled event featured more childrens activities this year, including rock climbing, face painting, games, and a scouting Soapbox Derby. There was no bikini bike wash this year, but there was a chil drens bicycle obstacle course which was a lot easier than the mo torcycle course. KIDS FROM PAGE A3 Associated PressWINDERMERE A police ofcer was shot and killed early Sat urday after stopping two people and calling for help in an Or lando suburb, author ities said. Windermere Police Department Ofcer Robert German called for backup after stop ping a young man and woman on foot shortly before 4 / a.m., inv es tigators said. German, 31, reported his location and was found lying on the ground when a deputy arrived at the scene, Orange County Sher iffs Ofce spokeswom an Jane Watrel said. He just said he was doing a subject stop and then all the tragic events unfolded, Watrel said. The deputy put Ger man in his squad car and rushed him to the re department. Ger man was then taken to Orlando Regional Med ical Center, where he was pronounced dead. As ofcers responded to the scene, they heard shots red and found two individuals deceased nearby matching the description of the man and woman German had stopped, Watrel said. They are believed to have committed suicide. Their identities have not been released. Windermere is located 15 miles west of Orlando. It has a pop ulation of about 3,000 people and one of the lowest crime rates in Florida, Mayor Gary Bruhn said. He said it was the rst lineof-duty death in the towns history. Violent crime is just not something that happens in the town of Windermere, Bruhn said. German had been with the department for ve years and just recently returned from desk duty after falling and injuring his shoulder, Bruhn said. He loved working as a police ofcer and he loved working at Windermere, Bruhn said. The investigation is ongoing.Fla. officer shot, killed after calling for backup WINDERMERE P.D. / AP In this undated photo provided by the Windermere Police Department, Ofcer Robert German is shown. ANGELA DELLI SANTIAssociated PressTRENTON, N.J. Critics of Republican Gov. Chris Christie are becoming more vocal and more visible. Opponents are showing up at his public and private events, hurling crit icisms on a range of topics and questioning his knowledge of a plot orchestrated by his aides to tie up traf c near the bridge. As his poll num bers slipped, his second-term agenda stalled and questions about his viability as a 2016 presidential candidate arose amid the scandal, people who opposed his policies or his politics want ed to make their voices heard. Christie has done his best to project a sense of normalcy, said Rob Duffy, a spokesman for New Jersey Working Families.Christies dissenters more vocal

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YURAS KARMANAUAssociated PressBELBEK AIR BASE, Crimea Ukraines armed forces took what may prove to be one of their nal stands Saturday in Crimea, as pro-Russian forces stormed and seized control of an air force base amid a barrage of gunre and explosions. A tense blockade of the Belbek air base base that has endured for more than a week looked set for an inev itable culmination fol lowing the seizure of one Ukrainian-held military facility after another in recent days. It was the last major Ukrainian military facility in Crimea to fall into the hands of pro-Russian forces. The Ukrainian Defense Ministry hasnt provid ed details of how many bases it still controls on the peninsula. Crimea residents voted last week to secede from Ukraine and join Russia a process that was formalized this week with the blessing of President Vladimir Putin. The vote, which was held under condi tion akin to martial law under the gaze of ap parently Moscow-led militia forces, has been rejected as illegitimate by the international community. The assault on the Belbek base mir rored events at oth er Ukrainian-held mil itary facilities on the peninsula in recent days. In footage provided by the Ukrainian De fense ministry, a Rus sian-made BTR-80 ar mored personnel carrier could be seen smashing open a front gate at Belbek, a base across the bay from the port city of Sevastopol. APCs crashed through walls at two other locations and were followed by armed personnel, who advanced in crouching position as they se cured the area. Four BTR-80s were in volved in the assault, Ukrainian ofcials said. Ukrainian troops offered no resistance. Later, a separate mot ley group arrived at the scene. The crowd appeared to be made up of professional sol diers, members of a recently-formed militia unit and Cossacks. The cause of the explosions wasnt imme diately clear, although Ukrainian ofcials said they were stun gre nades used to disperse any potential resistance. Two ambulances ar rived and then departed shortly after. Ukraines Defense Min istry said one reporter and a Ukrainian soldier were injured in the raid. After the takeover, Belbek base commander Col. Yuliy Mamchur called together his men, who sang the Ukrainian national anthem and then stood at ease. He then told his men to put their weap ons in the bases ar mory. A few hours before, Mamchur attended a wedding between two lieutenants serving at Belbek. Soldiers drank champagne and toasted the couple, despite the looming threat of a raid on the base. Earlier, a crowd stormed the Novofedorivka base, about 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Crimeas capital, Simferopol, Ukraines Defense Min istry said. Ukrainian television station TSN said troops inside the base hurled smoke grenades in an attempt to disperse groups of burly young men attempting to break through the front gates. There were con icting reports about whether the base was eventually taken over.Pro-Russian forces storm Ukrainian air base in Crimea ANDREW LUBIMOV / AP Pro-Russian militia members guard the Belbek airbase after Russian troops used at least four armored vehicles to break into an air base here, seizing control of one of the last Ukrainian military outposts in Crimea.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014www.dailycommercial.comMLB: Kershaw lifts Dodgers past D-backs / B4 PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTVERDE ACADEMY Montverde Academy Athletic Director and Boys Soccer Coach Mike Potempa speaks with and instructs area youth using the schools Cruyff Court facility. Since opening in January, the miniature soccer eld has become a popular addition to the school.MONTVERDE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMontverde Academys Cruyff Court has become a popular fa cility. Since opening in Jan uary, the miniature soccer eld has pro vided students at the school and various groups with a place to rene their soccer skills or to get some exercise. It also has become a place for youth groups to come together and develop a love for the sport. The Soccer Institute of Montverde Academy (SIMA) recently helped elementary school members of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Cen tral Floridas Walt Dis ney World Clubhouse to the Cruyff Court and led them through a va riety of drills. For many of the youngsters, it marked their introduc tion to soccer under the tutelage of Montverde Academy Athletic Director and Boys Soccer Coach Mike Po tempa. In addition, SIMA also welcomed a group MVAs Cruyff Court a popular facility FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe struggles for the Lake-Sumter State College baseball team continue to plague the Lakehawks. LSSC dropped two more games to St. Johns River State Col lege an 11-1 decision on Friday in Palat ka and an 8-2 game on Saturday at the LSSC baseball complex to extend the teams losing streak to nine games. After winning their rst game in Mid-Flor ida Conference play this season, LSSC has fallen to 1-9 in the conference and 14-13 overall. Fridays game was halted after seven innings due to the 10-run mercy rule. On Saturday, the Vikings built an 8-0 lead before LSSC avoided its second shutout in three games with a pair of runs in the ninth in ning. St. Johns Riv er State built an eightrun lead over the rst ve innings and made it stand up behind four pitchers who com bined on a three hitter. The Vikings car ried a no hitter into the eighth inning before Tanner Elsbernd legged out an ineld single against reliever Daniel Moritz. Mitch ell Cody started for St. Johns River State and went six innings before Trae Ratliff pitched a hitless seventh inning. Shane Crouse (2-4) started for LSSC and was tagged for six runs three earned in three innings. He allowed only one hit, but walked four. Five Lakehawks pitchers surrendered only six hits, but were victimized by four LSSC errors. Only four of the eight runs al lowed by the Lakehawks were earned. Dan Autiello accounted for LSSCs run production with a tworun homer to left. It was Autiellos second home run of the sea son. On Friday, a six-run fourth inning buried the Lakehawks. David Wood (1-3) started for the Lakehawks and allowed six runs in 3 2/3 innings. Only two of the runs were earned. Only ve of the 11 runs given up by the Lakehawks on Friday were earned. Elsbernd provided most of the pop for LSSC at the plate. He went 3-for-3. Jack Curtis scored the Lakehawks lone run. LSSC will wrap up the three-game set with St. Johns River State at 6 / p.m. Monday in Palatka. MARK LONGAssociated PressORLANDO Top-seeded seeded Florida played with a lot more energy and intensi ty this time around. Scottie Wilbekin spear headed the effort. Wilbekin scored 21 points, including eight straight down the stretch, and the Gators beat Pittsburgh 6145 in the NCAA tournament Saturday. Floridas 28th consecutive win put it in the Sweet 16 for the fourth consecutive year. Coming off a lackluster performance in its NCAA opener against Albany, Flor ida (34-2) vowed to play better against the Panthers (2610). Wilbekin surely did. He took over in the second half, JOHN RAOUX / AP TOP: Florida guard Scottie Wilbekin (5) and Florida center Patric Young (4) run off the court after Wilbekin made a 3-point shot against Pittsburgh during Saturdays NCAA tournament third-round game in Orlando. BELOW: Wilbekin drives to the basket past Pittsburgh forward Lamar Patterson (21). SEE CRUYFF | B2No. 1 Gators dance their way to Sweet 16Wilbekin scores 21, Florida beats PittSEE UF | B2 LEESBURG LSSC loses pair to St. Johns River

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Auto Club 400 After Friday qualifying; race today At Auto Club Speedway Fontana, Calif. Lap length: 2 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 187.315 mph. 2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 187.105. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 186.935. 4. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 186.901. 5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 186.461. 6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 186.384. 7. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 186.273. 8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 186.013. 9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.878. 10. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 185.792. 11. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 185.773. 12. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 185.725. 13. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 185.323. 14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 185.314. 15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 185.29. 16. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 185.209. 17. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 185.166. 18. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 184.715. 19. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 184.521. 20. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 183.96. 21. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.955. 22. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 183.861. 23. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 183.491. 24. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 185.095. 25. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 184.525. 26. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.322. 27. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 184.299. 28. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 183.983. 29. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 183.922. 30. (27) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 183.641. 31. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 183.58. 32. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 182.918. 33. (35) David Reutimann, Ford, 182.219. 34. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 181.525. 35. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 181.507. 36. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 181.365. 37. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. BASEBALL Spring Training Saturdays Games Toronto 9, Detroit 4 N.Y. Mets 10, Miami (ss) 2 Washington 6, Miami (ss) 5 Atlanta 6, Boston 3 St. Louis 5, Houston 2 Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 3, tie, 10 innings N.Y. Yankees 5, Minnesota 4 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 3 San Diego 3, Chicago White Sox (ss) 3, tie L.A. Angels 9, Milwaukee 6 Colorado (ss) 14, Cleveland 6 Oakland 6, Seattle (ss) 5 Kansas City 8, Texas 4 Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 3 San Francisco 8, Chicago White Sox (ss) 5 Colorado (ss) 4, Seattle (ss) 3 Todays Games Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 38 30 .559 Brooklyn 36 31 .537 1 New York 29 40 .420 9 Boston 23 47 .329 16 Philadelphia 15 54 .217 23 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 47 20 .701 Washington 36 33 .522 12 Charlotte 33 36 .478 15 Atlanta 31 36 .463 16 Orlando 19 50 .275 29 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 51 18 .739 Chicago 38 31 .551 13 Cleveland 26 43 .377 25 Detroit 25 43 .368 25 Milwaukee 13 56 .188 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 52 16 .765 Houston 46 22 .676 6 Dallas 42 28 .600 11 Memphis 40 28 .588 12 New Orleans 28 40 .412 24 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 Portland 45 24 .652 6 Minnesota 34 33 .507 16 Denver 31 38 .449 20 Utah 22 47 .319 29 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 48 21 .696 Golden State 44 26 .629 4 Phoenix 40 29 .580 8 Sacramento 24 45 .348 24 L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324 25 x-clinched playoff spot Fridays Games Indiana 91, Chicago 79 New York 93, Philadelphia 92 Oklahoma City 119, Toronto 118,2OT Brooklyn 114, Boston 98 Miami 91, Memphis 86 New Orleans 111, Atlanta 105 Dallas 122, Denver 106 Phoenix 98, Detroit 92 San Antonio 99, Sacramento 79 Washington 117, L.A. Lakers 107 Saturdays Games Portland at Charlotte, late Houston at Cleveland, late Philadelphia at Chicago, late Indiana at Memphis, late Miami at New Orleans, late Orlando at Utah, late San Antonio at Golden State, late Detroit at L.A. Clippers, late Todays Games Atlanta at Toronto, 1 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Denver, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament FIRST ROUND At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, March 18 Albany (N.Y.) 71, Mount St. Marys 64 N.C. State 74, Xavier 59 Wednesday, March 19 Cal Poly 81, Texas Southern 69 Tennessee 78, Iowa 65, OT EAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. UConn 89, Saint Josephs 81, OT Villanova 73, Milwaukee 53 At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. Harvard 61, Cincinnati 57 Michigan State 93, Delaware 78 Friday, March 21 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Memphis 71, George Washington 66 Virginia 70, Coastal Carolina 59 At The AT&T Center San Antonio North Carolina 79, Providence 77 Iowa State 93, North Carolina Central 75 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Villanova (29-4) vs. UConn (27-8), late At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. Michigan State (27-8) vs. Harvard (27-4), late Sunday, March 23 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Virginia (29-6) vs. Memphis (24-9), 8:40 p.m. At The AT&T Center San Antonio Iowa State (27-7) vs. North Carolina (24-9), 5:15 p.m. SOUTH REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Dayton 60, Ohio State 59 Syracuse 77, Western Michigan 53 At The Amway Center Orlando Pittsburgh 77, Colorado 48 Florida 67, Albany (N.Y.) 55 Friday, March 21 At Scottrade Center St. Louis Stanford 58, New Mexico 53 Kansas 80, Eastern Kentucky 69 At Viejas Arena San Diego Stephen F. Austin 77, VCU 75, OT UCLA 76, Tulsa 59 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Dayton 55, Syracuse 53 At The Amway Center Orlando Florida 61, Pittsburgh 45 Sunday, March 23 At Scottrade Center St. Louis Kansas (25-9) vs. Stanford (22-12), 12:15 p.m. At Viejas Arena San Diego UCLA (27-8) vs. Stephen F. Austin (32-2), 7:10 p.m. MIDWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At The Amway Center Orlando Saint Louis 83, N.C. State 80, OT Louisville 71, Manhattan 64 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Michigan 57, Wofford 40 Texas 87, Arizona State 85 Friday, March 21 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Mercer 78, Duke 71 Tennessee 86, UMass 67 At Scottrade Center St. Louis Wichita State 64, Cal Poly 37 Kentucky 56, Kansas State 49 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At The Amway Center Orlando Louisville 66, Saint Louis 51 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Michigan 79, Texas 65 Sunday, March 23 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Mercer (27-8) vs. Tennessee (23-12), 6:10 p.m. At Scottrade Center St. Louis Wichita State (35-0) vs. Kentucky (25-10), 2:45 p.m. WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Wisconsin 75, American 35 Oregon 87, BYU 68 At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. North Dakota State 80, Oklahoma 75, OT San Diego State 73, New Mexico State 69, OT Friday, March 21 At The AT&T Center San Antonio Baylor 74, Nebraska 60 Creighton 76, Louisiana-Lafayette 66 At Viejas Arena San Diego Arizona 68, Weber State 59 Gonzaga 85, Oklahoma State 77 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Wisconsin (27-7) vs. Oregon (24-9), late At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. San Diego State 63, North Dakota State 44 Sunday, March 23 At The AT&T Center San Antonio Creighton (27-7) vs. Baylor (25-11), 7:40 p.m. At Viejas Arena San Diego Arizona (31-4) vs. Gonzaga (29-6), 9:40 p.m. NCAA Womens Basketball Tournament LINCOLN REGIONAL Saturday, March 22 At Durham, N.C. Duke 87, Winthrop 45 DePaul 104, Oklahoma 100 At Los Angeles Nebraska 74, Fresno State 55 N.C. State (25-7) vs. BYU (26-6), late Sunday, March 23 At Storrs, Conn. Georgia (20-11) vs. Saint Josephs (22-9), 5:30 p.m. UConn (34-0) vs. Prairie View (14-17), 8 p.m. At College Station, Texas Gonzaga (29-4) vs. James Madison (28-5), 5:30 p.m. Texas A&M (24-8) vs. North Dakota (22-9), 8 p.m. Second Round Monday, March 24 At Los Angeles N.C. State-BYU winner vs. Nebraska (26-6), TBA At Durham, N.C. DePaul (28-6) vs. Duke (28-6), 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 25 At Storrs, Conn. UConn-Prairie View winner vs. Georgia-Saint Josephs winner, TBA At College Station, Texas Gonzaga-James Madison winner vs. Texas A&MNorth Dakota winner, TBA STANFORD REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 22 At Ames, Iowa Florida State 55, Iowa State 44 Stanford (28-3) vs. South Dakota (19-13), late Sunday, March 23 At Seattle South Carolina (27-4) vs. Cal State Northridge (1814), 5:30 p.m. Middle Tennessee (29-4) vs. Oregon State (2310), 8 p.m. At Chapel Hill, N.C. Michigan State (22-9) vs. Hampton (28-4), 12:30 p.m. North Carolina (24-9) vs. UT-Martin (24-7), 3 p.m. At State College, Pa. Penn State (22-7) vs. Wichita State (26-6), 12:30 p.m. Dayton (23-7) vs. Florida (19-12), 3 p.m. Second Round Monday, March 24 At Ames, Iowa Florida State (21-11) vs. Stanford-South Dakota winner, TBA Tuesday, March 25 At Seattle South Carolina-Cal State Northridge winner vs. Mid dle Tennessee-Oregon State winner, TBA At Chapel Hill, N.C. Michigan State-Hampton winner vs. North Caroli na-UT-Martin winner, TBA At State College, Pa. Dayton-Florida winner vs. Penn State-Wichita State winner, TBA NOTRE DAME REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 22 At Toledo, Ohio Arizona State 69, Vanderbilt 61 Notre Dame 93, Robert Morris 42 At West Lafayette, Ind. Oklahoma State 61, Florida Gulf Coast 60, OT Purdue 84, Akron 55 At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky 106, Wright State 60 Syracuse 59, Chattanooga 53 At Waco, Texas California 64, Fordham 63 Baylor (29-4) vs. Western Kentucky (24-8), late Second Round Monday, March 24 At Toledo, Ohio Notre Dame (33-0) vs. Arizona State (23-9), 6:30 p.m. At West Lafayette, Ind. Oklahoma State (24-8) vs. Purdue (22-8), 6:30 p.m. At Lexington, Ky. Syracuse (23-9) vs. Kentucky (25-8), 6:30 p.m. At Waco, Texas California (22-9) vs. Baylor-Western Kentucky win ner, TBA LOUISVILLE REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 22 At Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee 70, Northwestern State 46 St. Johns (22-10) vs. Southern Cal (22-12), late Sunday, March 23 At College Park, Md. Maryland (24-6) vs. Army (25-7), 12:30 p.m. Texas (21-11) vs. Pennsylvania (22-6), 3 p.m. At Iowa City, Iowa Louisville (30-4) vs. Idaho (25-8), 5:30 p.m. Iowa (26-8) vs. Marist (27-6), 8 p.m. At Baton Rouge, La. LSU (19-12) vs. Georgia Tech (20-11), 12:30 p.m. West Virginia (29-4) vs. Albany (N.Y.) (28-4), 3 p.m. Second Round Monday, March 24 At Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee (27-5) vs. St. Johns-Southern Cal win ner, TBA Tuesday, March 25 At College Park, Md. Texas-Pennsylvania winner vs. Maryland-Army winner, TBA At Iowa City, Iowa Iowa-Marist vs. Louisville-Idaho winner, TBA At Baton Rouge, La. LSU-Georgia Tech winner vs. West Virginia-Albany (N.Y.) winner, TBA HOCKEY NHL Fridays Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Columbus 1 Chicago 3, Carolina 2 Boston 2, Colorado 0 Nashville 6, Calgary 5 Saturdays Games Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 1 Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 3, OT Detroit 3, Minnesota 2 Dallas 3, Ottawa 1 Florida at Los Angeles, late Montreal at Toronto, late N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, late Carolina at Winnipeg, late Boston at Phoenix, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Wa shington at San Jose, late Todays Games Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Florida at Anaheim, 8 p.m.GOLF PGA Tour Arnold Palmer Invitational Saturday At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course Orlando Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72 Third Round a-amateur Adam Scott 62-68-71 201 Keegan Bradley 71-67-66 204 Matt Every 69-70-66 205 Jason Kokrak 67-71-67 205 Chesson Hadley 69-68-69 206 Francesco Molinari 67-70-69 206 Ian Poulter 68-71-69 208 Ryo Ishikawa 65-74-70 209 Morgan Hoffmann 67-71-71 209 Freddie Jacobson 71-68-70 209 J.B. Holmes 68-69-72 209 Pat Perez 70-70-70 210 Erik Compton 72-68-70 210 Aaron Baddeley 70-70-70 210 Matt Jones 71-71-69 211 Henrik Stenson 69-73-69 211 Sam Saunders 69-71-71 211 Charles Howell III 68-71-72 211 TV2DAY AUTO RACING 3 p.m.FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Auto Club 400, at Fontana, Calif.GOLF 12:30 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, nal round, at Orlando2 p.m.NBC PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, nal round, at Orlando5 p.m.TGC Champions Tour, Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, nal round, at Saucier, Miss.7 p.m.TGC LPGA, Founders Cup, nal round, at PhoenixMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.MLB Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees4 p.m.WGN Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland MLB Cleveland vs. L.A. AngelesMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m.ESPN NIT, second round, Illinois at ClemsonNoonCBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Kansas vs. Stanford, at St. Louis2:30 p.m.CBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Wichita State vs. Kentucky, at St. Louis5 p.m.CBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Iowa State vs. North Carolina, at San Antonio ESPNU NIT, second round, Southern Miss at Missouri6 p.m.TNT NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Mercer vs. Tennessee, at Raleigh, N.C.7 p.m.TBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, UCLA vs. Stephen F. Austin, at San Diego7:30 p.m.TRUTV NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Creighton vs. Baylor, at San Antonio8:30 p.m.TNT NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Virginia vs. Memphis, at Raleigh, N.C.9:30 p.m.TBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Arizona vs. Gonzaga, at San DiegoNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 9:30 p.m.FS-Florida Orlando at L.A. LakersNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Minnesota at DetroitSOCCER 9:25 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Southampton at Tottenham12:25 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Stoke City at Aston VillaWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m.ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, Georgia Tech at LSU; Hampton vs. Michigan State at Chapel Hill, N.C.; Army at Maryland; and Wichita State at Penn State3 p.m.ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, Albany vs. West Virginia at Baton Rouge, La.; UT Martin at North Carolina; Pennsylvania vs. Texas at College Park, Md.; and Florida vs. Dayton at State College, Pa.5:30 p.m.ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, James Madison vs. Gonzaga at College Station, Texas; Idaho vs. Louisville at Iowa City, Iowa; Cal State Northridge vs. South Carolina at Seattle; and Saint Josephs vs. Georgia at Storrs, Conn.8 p.m.ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, Prairie View at UConn ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, North Dakota at Texas A&M; Marist at Iowa; and Oregon State vs. Middle Tennessee at SeattleSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED from the Boys and Girls Club of Clermont re cently, which included children with Down syndrome. Potempa said he has already noticed how word has spread about the Cruyff Court and how it is helping local youth build an interest in soccer. Its great for us to come out with children of the community and provide an exercise and play the game we have a passion for, Potempa said. Most impor tantly, its great to see so many youngsters hav ing fun and spend an hour or hour-and-a-half with smiles on their fac es. (The Cruyff Court) has allowed Montverde Academy to give back something to the community and children from surrounding re gions of central Florida learn more about the game of soccer. Its really great to see them having fun. The visit by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Florida actually served a number of functions, according to Yesenia Maysonet, program director for the organization. She said it allowed many of the youngsters an opportunity to travel away from their homes for the rst time, in addition to the chance to learn more about a game that is considered the most popular sport in the world. Maysonet also said it introduced the chil dren to the concept of an international private school. We serve elementa ry, middle school and high school youth in Or ange, Osceola, Seminole and Brevard counties, said Yesenia Maysonet, program director for the Boys and Girls Club of Central Florida. We have 13 traditional clubs and 13 middle school-specic clubs, with programs that range in interests in the arts, technology, sports, tness, and healthy habits. This trip exposed our youth to nearly all of those interests. The Cruyff Court at Montverde Academy is the only one of its kind in the United States and is one of only 180 scattered throughout the world, according to the Johan Cruyff Foundation (JCF). The court is, essentially, a min iature soccer eld designed to help children learn the game and improve their physical tness. While it is used pre dominantly as a soc cer facility at Montverde Academy, Cruyff Courts have been used to help disadvantage youth and youngsters with disabili ties by providing an area for others sports, such as wheelchair hockey. All Cruyff Court fa cilities promote healthy living and provide op portunities for young sters to improve their physical health and per sonal development to increase activity and combat childhood obesity, Potempa said. Founded in 1997, the JCF was started by Cruyff, a European soc cer legend and standout in the 1970s and 1980s in the defunct North American Soccer League. The idea for the JCF, Cruyff said, began when he was playing in the NASL. A neighbor had a child with Down syndrome who, was al ways alone, watching other kids playing and having fun. Over time, Cruyff said he befriended the boy and taught him basic soccer skills to get him to become more active. As time passed, Cruyff said, he began playing soccer with the rest of the kids in the neighborhood. Through the JCF, Cruyff said he has realized his dream of giving more children, including those with disabilities, the opportunity to play together through sport while making a contribution to healthy living, quality of life and values. The JCF also supports sports projects for children with disabilities and it organizes unique sporting events for youth, according to the JCF website. Potempa said SIMA operates independently from the Montverde Academy boys soccer team and is accessible to all students at Mont verde Academy. SIMA was established as an elite level soccer specic training experience for anyone who possesses the passion to challenge themselves at the highest lev el academically and athletically, Potempa said. It also provides a professional training environment for any passionate athlete with the desire to work hard and improve. CRUYFF FROM PAGE B1 scoring 11 of the team s 13 points during a 7-minute stretch. Patri c Young wasnt too shabby, either, finishing with seven points and eight rebounds. Michael Frazier II chipped in 10 points for the Gators. Frazier was just 2-of-9 shooting from 3-point range. Had Florida not been cold from behind the arc, the game would have been essentially over much sooner than it was. The Gators finished 5 of 20 from 3-point range, with at least five of those rim ming in and out. Florida will play either fourth-seeded UCLA or 12th-seeded Stephen F. Austin on Thursday in Memphis, Tenn. The Bruins and Lumberjacks play Sunday in San Diego. Talib Zanna led the Panthers with 10 points, their only player in double figures. A lot was made of the inside matchup be tween Young and Zanna, two ripped centers who played well Thursday. But Wilbekin was the story in this one. He hit a running 3-pointer at the first-half buzzer and drained a back-breaking 3 with 8:24 remaining that gave Florida its largest lead at that point, 45-31. His consecutive floaters inside 5 minutes to play were equal ly troublesome for Pitt. UF FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available Tee time 5 days in advance. Expires 3/31/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$34 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT NOAH TRISTERAssociated PressTOLEDO, Ohio Ev ery now and then, No tre Dame coach Muf fet McGraw will let her team practice without any fouls being called. We want to make them tougher. We dont want them listening to the whistle, we dont want them complaining to the referees, McGraw said. We do that pretty frequently. Its not easy for a team like the Fighting Irish to stay sharp when so many of their games turn quickly into routs, but top-seeded Notre Dame showed no sign of any real weakness Saturday in its NCAA tournament opener, beating 16th-seed ed Robert Morris 93-42. The unbeaten Irish led 50-15 at halftime. Michaela Mabrey scored 11 of her 16 points in the rst half for Notre Dame (33-0), and Jewell Loyd and Natalie Achonwa nished with 15 each. The Irish are trying for their fourth straight Final Four appearance this year. Theyll take on ninth-seeded Arizona State in the second round Monday. In the tournament, you cant take anyone lightly, said Ariel Brak er, who had 10 points and eight rebounds. Upsets happen all the time. Maybe so, but the Irish will have to wait at least one more game and possibly lon ger for a signicant challenge in this tour nament. Notre Dame won its previous two rstround games at the NCAA tournament by 31 and 33 points. The margin was wider than that at halftime of this one, with the Irish up by 35. Mabrey made back-to-back 3-point ers during a 25-4 run that made the score 328. Robert Morris (21-12) shot 27 percent from the eld. Greek star Artemis Spanou, one of the top players in Northeast Conference history, was held to sev en points and attempted only four shots from the eld. After the game, coach Sal Buscaglia let loose with an emotional opening statement at his news conference, his voice choking up as he went on for about three minutes about his team. Notre Dames great, and all these other peo ple are great, but they do the same thing that they do. They work their tail off for me, Buscaglia said. Just because were not No tre Dame and theyre great because were Robert Morris doesnt mean that these young ladies dont do every thing that they do. Ev erything they do! Did you ever go and work so hard for two-anda-half hours, and then have to take an ice bath? Try it. Thats what they do. Thats what they do for me, and they do for their school. Spanou became the third player in NEC history to earn play er of the year honors in back-to-back sea sons, but Notre Dame was ready for her. She played 39 minutes and nished with six rebounds and four assists. But she also turned the ball over eight times. With less than a min ute to play, she came out of the game and went down the line of coaches and team mates on the Robert Morris sideline, receiving hugs. The Irish did not have any player ex ceed Mabreys total of 23 minutes. She shot 6 of 7 from the eld and made four 3-pointers. Madison Cable scored 13 points for Notre Dame, and Ariel Braker contributed 10. The Irish outscored Robert Morris 50-8 in the paint. Anna Niki Stamolamprou led the Colonials with 12 points. Five Notre Dame players reached double gures in scoring, and 10 played at least 12 minutes. Any hope Robert Morris had of keeping this game close was pretty much dashed by Notre Dames outside shooting. The Irish, who came in shooting 34 percent from 3-point range, went 10 of 18 from beyond the arc. Cable went 3 of 4 from long distance, part of an efcient overall per formance for the heavy favorites. Loyd shot 7 of 11 from the eld and had seven rebounds. Freshman Lindsay Allen had seven assists in 20 minutes. You never know with the rst NCAA tourna ment, how the freshmen are going to re spond, McGraw said. Lindsay, she has that poise and that person ality of just a steady demeanor the whole game.Unbeaten Notre Dame routs Robert Morris RICK OSENTOSKI / AP Notre Dame guard Jewell Loyd (32) shoots past Robert Morris forward Artemis Spanou (15) during Saturdays NCAA womens tournament rst-round game in Toledo, Ohio. FRED GOODALLAssociated PressORLANDO Louisville didnt need a big game from Russ Smith to get back to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament. Luke Hancock scored 21 points and the defending national champions shrugged off a cold shooting performance to beat Saint Louis 66-51 on Saturday and advance to the round of 16 for the third straight year. The fourth-seeded Cardinals (31-5) shot under 45 per cent, had 19 turnovers and only got 11 points from Smith, their star. It didnt matter with the fth-seeded Billik ens (27-7) going 0 for 15 from 3-point range and struggling to take care of the basketball. Louisville moves on the Midwest Region al seminals in Indianapolis against either No. 1 seed Wichita State or No. 8 seed Kentucky. The unbeaten Shockers and Wildcats meet Sunday in St. Louis. Saint Louis, which has never been to the Sweet 16, lost in the third round for the third consecutive year. Dwayne Evans led the Billikens with 16 points and Atlantic 10 player of the year Jor dair Jett nished with 15. Chris Jones made a couple of huge shots and scored 11 points for Louisville. Montrezl Harrell put a punctuation mark on the victory with a dunk that enabled him to nish with 10 points and 11 rebounds. Louisville coach Rick Pitino improved to 5016 in the NCAA tour nament, including 41-6 when his team is the higher seed. The Cardinals are in the round of 16 for the 20th time, matching Kansas and trailing only North Carolina (25), Kentucky (24) and Duke (23). Smith struggled shooting the ball for the second straight game, missing his rst four attempts and going scoreless until his 3-pointer put the Car dinals up 25-14 in the nal minute of the opening half. The Louisville star scored 18 points in the second-round win over Manhattan, however he was just 3 of 9 from the eld and had six turnovers. Saint Louis is one of only a handful of teams that start ve seniors, and their ex perience and cohesion showed in weath ering a slow start and methodically working its way back into the game after falling down by 11 points. The Billikens began the second half with a 13-2 run, holding Louisville without a eld goal for nearly 7 minutes to take a 29-27 lead. But Smith hit a oater in the lane, then made two free throws to restore order for the Cardinals, who forced 18 turnovers and limited Saint Louis to 39.6 percent shooting. Louisville rebuilt their lead to 13 over the next 9 minutes, with Hancock making two long 3-pointers and Jones delivering a 3-pointer and acrobatic layup before Smith nished a 23-8 surge with a driving layup that put his team up 50-37. Smith nished 3 of 10 from the eld and had a team-high seven turnovers. The senior whos averaging more than 18 points led the Cardinals with seven assists. Saint Louis got 22 points and a ca reer-high 15 rebounds from Rob Loe to over came a 16-point second-half decit to beat North Carolina State in overtime on Thursday. Louisville survived a second-round scare, too, using a late spurt led by Smith, Hancock and Harrell to turn back a challenge from No. 13 seed Manhat tan. Loe had just 10 points and ve rebounds Saturday. The Billikens, in the NCAA tournament for a school-record third straight year, lost to Michigan State and Oregon in the third round the past two seasons.Defending champ Louisville returning to Sweet 16 PHELAN M. EBENHACK / AP Louisville coach Rick Pitino, right, yells at guard Russ Smith (2) during the second half Saturdays NCAA tournament third-round game against Saint Louis in Orlando. GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAssociated PressORLANDO Adam Scott still had the lead at Bay Hill on Saturday. At least ve other players suddenly have a realistic chance at winning. Scott, who started the third round with a sev en-shot lead, missed three par putts inside 8 feet and had to settle for a 1-under 71, which nar rowed his lead to three shots over Keegan Bradley going into the nal round at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. The greens were rmer than ever after three days of sunshine, though the pins were accessible and allowed for good scoring. Several players took advantage. Scott did not. His score was helped by a pair of long birdie putts on the back nine. Bradleys approach to the 18th narrow ly cleared the rocks that frame the lake, leaving him a 4-foot birdie putt for a 6-under 66. He will be paired with Scott in the nal round, with much at stake for both of them. A victory for Scott should push him to No. 1 in the world when he arrives at Augusta Na tional to defend his ti tle in the Masters. Brad ley hasnt won anywhere in the world since the Bridgestone Invitational in 2012. Scott was at 15-under 201. Bradley isnt the only player who now has a chance. Matt Every (66) and Jason Kokrak (67) were four shots behind, both going for their rst PGA Tour victory. Chesson Hadley and Francesco Molinari of Italy each had a 69 and were another shot behind. Hadley, who won the Puer to Rico Open two weeks ago, can qualify for the Masters with a high n ish. He likely would need to be in sixth place or better to be solidly in side the top 50 in the world. Scott was never sat ised with the seven-shot lead, and he still felt comfortable with a three-shot advantage going to Sunday. When youve got the lead, you have to work for it, he said. Im still in good shape. Five holes into the third round, his seven-shot lead already had been trimmed to one. Scott three-putted from 60 feet on the opening hole, an indication of how fast the greens have become at Bay Hill, and he hit a poor chip to 12 feet on the fth hole to drop another shot. Scott comes back to the field at Bay Hill

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SANDYS BAIT AND TACKLE | TAVARESCrappie are being caught by spider-rigging rods baited with pink or chartreuse jigs tipped with minnows. Lake Dora has been particularly good. Bass are biting well, they have moved into deeper water. They are being caught on RatL-Traps and soft plastics in June bug or green pumpkin colors. Shell cracker are starting to bite on red worms and crickets. Bill Brooker and Mike Strauss won the open bass tournament sponsored by Sandys Bait& Tackle last Saturday with 19.49 pounds. Vern Kemp and Randy Hamrick took second place with 15.25 pounds. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee claimed dual honors with third place at 14.04 pounds and big sh at 7.59 pounds. Sandys bass tour nament, open to all, is held on the 3rd Saturday monthly at the buzzard beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30pm; any questions about the tournament call the shop at 352742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKSeveral patrons are catching bass on minnows, shrimp and worms. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESSpecks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They have moved outside of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water, but could still go to the beds one more time if nice weather prevails. Bass and striper action has fallen off. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALESpeck activity has been very good; they are biting on minnows and jigs. Bass have been slow with the most recent weather change. The bass bedding appears to have subsided and they have moved back out into open water. Come check out the next generation bass in pond by Nelsons. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests are catching bass and crappie. Several large bass have been caught in Haynes Creek at the locks. The bass are hitting on articial baits primarily while the crappie are biting on minnows and jigs. Fish are starting to bite in Lake Yale. Minnows and worm sales have been very good. Small boats can launch from Black Bass boat ramps. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLECrappie shing has been good, weather permitting. Lake Dora and the Apopka-Beauclaire canal have been noteworthy. So good in fact, limits caught on jigs tipped minnows are being reported. Good jig colors have been chartreuse, or ange and hot pink. Quite a few crappie are being caught in Lake Monroe, Lake Dora, Lake Beauclaire and Lake Carlton. Fish are on the beds and biting on jigs, lizards, crawdads, small worms and small baits in general. Remember to practice catch/ release with bedding bass. Colors of baits for bass are crawdad colors, black/blue or watermelon red. It is beautiful weather to get out on the lake and catch a few. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfn tbf brb t tf tr fnn rnn tbf brb tn nnf tnnnf trnn rffrff nn rnnn tbnn brbnn tnn nnn tnn trnnnn MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL DENNIS PASSAAssociated PressSYDNEY Opening day turned out to be a pretty gday for the Los Angeles Dodgers and ace Clayton Kershaw. Kershaw ashed his Cy Young form, Scott Van Slyke ho mered and the NL West champi ons opened the Major League Baseball season with a 3-1 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday night at Sydney Cricket Ground. A crowd of about 40,000 watched as MLB played its rst regu lar-season game in Aus tralia. Kershaw, who signed a seven-year, $215 mil lion contract in January, allowed one run and ve hits in 6 2-3 innings. Van Slyke hit a two-run ho mer and also doubled. The rst pitch was de layed because of rain for 14 minutes. By then, the long trip Down Under had taken even longer for some Arizona play ers. A team bus had a at tire, and the Diamond backs said a handful of players decided to walk the last half-mile to the stadium instead of wait ing for a replacement bus. Kershaw was im pressive while making his fourth consecutive opening-day start. He struck out seven, walked one and was pulled by manager Don Mattingly after throwing his 102nd pitch. Quite a turnaround from spring training, when the two-time NL Cy Young winner went 0-3 with a 9.20 ERA in four starts. Sometimes you just need the adrenaline of a regular-season game, and I just kind of feel re lieved to get this one under my belt, he said. Its always good to get results, obviously, he said. This one counted. In his previous opening-day starts, Kershaw was 2-0 with 19 strike outs in 19 scoreless innings. Kershaw did a good job keeping us in the middle of the diamond, Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson said. He threw a good ballgame against us. We know theyre always going to be close. Three relievers kept the Diamondbacks scoreless with hitless work. Chris Perez, a vetime All-Star with Cleveland before joining the Dodgers in the offsea son, got the last out in the seventh. Brian Wilson pitched the eighth and closer Kenley Jansen got the save. Jansen walked a batter before getting Gerardo Parra to ground out to end the game. Clayton was real ly good, kind of as al ways ... kind of doing his thing, Mattingly said. Hes a tough guy to take out of the game, he al ways wants to stay in. And I thought our bullpen was really good to night. Chris comes in and gets a big out for us there and Wilson did a good job and Jansen in closing the door. There were plenty of Dodgers and Diamond backs uniforms in the crowd, some worn by American visitors and others by Australians who had own across the country to watch the opener and Sundays second game, when an other capacity crowd was expected. They feasted on base ball-style treats like na chos stuffed in batting helmets and Cracker Jack, which is not usu ally sold in Australia. If you could afford the cost and the calories, a 2-foot-long hot dog sold for $36. Van Slyke, playing because of an injury to Matt Kemp and pater nity leave to Carl Craw ford, nearly cleared the left-eld fence in the second inning. His double set up a grounder by Andre Ethier that scored Adrian Gonzalez with the Dodgers rst run. In his next at-bat in the fourth, Van Slyke connected off losing pitcher Wade Miley for a drive over the right-eld fence just inside the foul pole with Gonza lez again on base to put the Dodgers up 3-0.Dodgers 3, Diamondbacks 1 Los Angeles Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Puig rf 5 0 0 0 P ollock cf 4 0 0 0 JuTrnr 2b 4 0 1 0 A.Hill 2b 3 0 1 0 HRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 2 0 AdGnzl 1b 3 2 1 0 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 VnSlyk lf 3 1 2 2 T rumo lf 4 0 0 1 Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 Monter c 4 0 1 0 Ethier cf 4 0 0 1 Owings ss 3 0 0 0 A.Ellis c 2 0 0 0 GP arra rf 4 0 1 0 Kershw p 3 0 1 0 Mile y p 1 0 0 0 C.Perez p 0 0 0 0 Gregr s ph 1 0 0 0 BWilsn p 0 0 0 0 Har ris p 0 0 0 0 Guerrr ph 0 0 0 0 ErChvz ph 1 0 0 0 Baxter ph 1 0 0 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 OP erez p 0 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 5 3 T otals 33 1 5 1 Los Angeles 010 200 000 3 Arizona 000 001 000 1 EJu.Turner (1), Prado (1). LOBLos Angeles 7, Arizona 7. 2BAd.Gonzalez (1), Van Slyke (1), Gold schmidt (1). HRVan Slyke (1). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Kershaw W,1-0 6 2/3 5 1 1 1 7 C.Perez H,1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 B.Wilson H,1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Jansen S,1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 Arizona Miley L,0-1 5 3 3 3 2 8 Harris 2 1 0 0 0 3 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 1 0 O.Perez 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 Putz 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby O.Perez (A.Ellis). WPKershaw, Miley. UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Dale Scott; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Mark Carlson. T:49. A,266 (47,000).Kershaw, Dodgers top D-backs in season opener RICK RYCROFT / AP Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw pitches during Saturdays season-opening game between Dodgers and Arizona at the Sydney Cricket ground in Sydney.

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Progress has a priceI wanted to say what a good ar ticle it was on Wildwood being a boom town and that many people do not realize that The Villages isnt the only growing area. Progress is going faster and faster. The concern is the added drain on the aquifer, not only from many thousands of new homes in Central Florida but from the granting of permits to bottlers of water. We are going to be begging other states for water in time. Not in my time because Im 82 years old, but it will come sooner than later. BROOKY PETERS | Wildwood Voiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third par ties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to ar chive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to let ters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEKC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 T he recent news that Florida schools will mandate instruction in cursive writing next school year was a head scratcher, principally because many of us werent aware schools arent teach ing this most basic skill. In reality, schools havent quit teaching cursive completely. The state Board of Education currently requires that students begin learning cursive writing in the third grade, but the policy isnt explicit. Individual school districts deter mine how much to emphasize cursive. But some school administrators admit there has been a signicant shift away from it to accommodate anti-drug and anti-bullying instruction now required by the state. One parent told Daily Commercial Staff Writer Millard Ives last week that her fth grader didnt start learning cursive until she pulled her out of public school, and another said her child couldnt sign his name. It might seem progressive at some level to de-emphasize handwriting in favor of more contemporary skills. This generation is growing up in the technology age, after all, and so much of their communication occurs through keyboards. And yet the entire business world still requires this skill. You cant apply for a mortgage, get a drivers license or ll out a basic job application without signing your name. We have to wonder about an education system that skimps on instruction for such a fundamental skill. That, and the recent revelation that most schools in Lake County wont give any child a grade less than 50 in hopes of improving students chances of passing, gives us reason to pause and reect on the direction of public education. Schools exist to pass knowledge to children, to teach them critical thinking skills and to help them learn to socialize. But they also exist to prepare students for the adult world, where they will need basic skills to compete in the job market and where merit is rewarded. When we fail to provide adequate instruction in something as basic as cur sive writing, and when we give students signicant handicaps that enable them to pass without putting forth strong effort, we impede their growth and diminish their chances of success later. That is not to say that the public education system is failing. It continues to produce some of the brightest minds in the world. But at a time when educators are forced to adapt to changing cultural and social norms, they would be wise to carefully assess what skills and values remain relevant in todays world and continue to teach those aggressively. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL New buildings are being added to Brownwood Paddock Square in Wildwood.OTHERVOICESFlorida has a proud recent his tory of strong open govern ment laws, and so it is appro priate as the nation celebrates Sunshine Week to raise aware ness about the importance of government in the sunshine, that the Sunshine State remains a leader in ensuring public ac cess to the dealings and deci sion-making of its elected and appointed ofcials. It is also appropriate that last week the Florida Senate moved along Senate bill 1648 that would strengthen Floridas Sunshine Law. A nal vote is expected next week. While our states Sunshine Law and Open Government laws provide broad access to both public records and meetings, there are always efforts afoot in the Legislature to weaken them, as there are this year. But SB 1648 has been praised by open government advocates as one of the more meaningful advances in Floridas Sunshine Law since the 1990s. Among other things, it would limit fees for record searches so government ofcials could not intimidate people through overpricing. It also would dene more clearly what records are exempt, based on court rulings. And, an element of SB 1648 that is maybe its most important one, is that it would require training on public records laws for all public employees. We urge the Senate, then the House, to approve SB 1648 and its House counterpart, HB 1151, to further the cause of providing relatively easy and affordable access to city, county and state public records. It is important for not only the news media but everyday citizens to have access to information about how their government is doing the peoples business and why. Simply, without an informed citizenry, government cannot be held accountable or responsive. James Madison, the father of the Constitution whose birthday on Sunday marked the beginning of Sunshine Week, put it this way: A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. Madison would undoubtedly be amazed at not only the amount of government that exists today but the amount of information about our government that is available. The abundance and relative access to public information is a tribute to, rst, technology, and, second, the ideals of the Sunshine Law and the vigilance of its supporters. Awareness and support for open government, of course, should not be limited to a single week a year. How government regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them.From Ocala.com.Celebrating the Sunshine How government regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them.Keeping education relevant and challenging

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 OTHERVOICESVoices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHERVOICESOTHERVOICES W ith a variety of topics to write about, I have found that often times if I ask a ques tion of an individu al or group (public or private sector) I will not get a response if the question seems to challenge their point of view. For instance, I have written the U.S. Department of Transpor tation and the Califor nia High-Speed Rail Authority asking one simple question: How do you protect hundreds of miles of highspeed rail from a ter rorist attack? These projects are usually multi-billion dollar endeavors and seemingly very vulner able to a terrorist attack that would not take a lot of sophistication. Thankfully, Gov. Rick Scott vetoed the high-speed rail proposal between Tampa and Orlando. Not only do I believe it would have been nancially unstable, but easily susceptible to terror ist attacks. A few successful attacks would have meant that billions of taxpayers dollars would have been wasted. After at least two years, I have yet to get a reply to my question. The next issue is man-made global warming (now climate change). Since global warming has been at for the past 15 years, its advocates need a new all-encompassing title like climate change, which would embrace any kind of weather such as hurricanes, drought, tornadoes, oods or arctic air fronts. I have written to these groups and asked two questions. First: When a good part of North America was covered with glaciers, what caused them to recede before mankind was any factor? Second: If man can warm the earth, does this mean we can prevent the next ice age? Im still waiting for a response. In the realm of politics, I often experience the same non-response syndrome. When President Barack Obama was a senator, he railed against President George W. Bush raising the debt ceiling, even stating it was un-American to do so. He also excoriated Bush regarding his presidential executive orders. Now Obama castigates the Republicans for not dramatically raising the debt ceiling and also openly states that he will by pass Congress whenever necessary to govern by at and executive orders. Pharaoh would be so proud. When I write the president about his complete change of senate positions all I get is silence. From time to time, I see classroom presentations condemning our use of the atomic bomb to end World War II. The presentations rarely mention how many lives, on both sides, would have been lost had we invaded Japan. But the main question, which is never answered, is this: If Japan had developed an atomic bomb, would they have used it against us? Be prepared for an awkward silence. Throughout the Obama presidency, he has constantly state that the rich are not paying their fair share. Really? U.S. tax data for 2011 shows that the top 1 percent of taxpayers paid 35 percent of the federal income tax, the top 10 percent paid slightly over 62 percent and the bottom 50 percent paid 2.89 percent. There are many denitions listed under the word fair, but it is hard to argue against the denition without irregularity or unevenness. Is it fair that 50 percent of the taxpay ers, who pay less than 3 percent of total income taxes, can vote for the other 50 per cent to pay even more of the 97 percent that they already pay? As yet, Ive not been able to get a response of what is fair when it comes to the amount of taxes our citizens should pay. I believe that about 47 percent pay no federal income tax. Is that fair? My experience has been that the large contingent of big-government advocates are too often reluctant to respond to questions that dont support their agenda. But we did recently get a response from the Director of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius. After telling a congressional committee that 4.2 million people had signed up for Obamacare, she asked, How many have paid? She replied, I dont know. Perhaps answers like this prevent more liberals from responding to a simple question. Ill wager that McDonalds can tell you how many Big Macs they sell on any given day. But, I know it was silly of me to expect the head of HHS to know how many of the 4.2 million supposed enrollees have paid. RUSS SLOANGUEST COLUMNIST Many questions but no replies from the liberal left Florida wants to be known as the friendliest state for military vet erans. It moved a step closer to that goal this month when the Leg islature approved a bill that will cut college costs for veterans. The measure, part of an omnibus package for military-related items, is a welcome step, although it will cost state colleges, universities and career centers an estimated $11.5 million in forgone tuition. The measure would waive out-ofstate tuition fees for honorably discharged veterans. This portion of the legislation is named after the late U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young, a Republican who represented Pinellas County in Congress for decades. The legislation also would boost scholarship funding for members of the National Guard and Reserves. Attracting veterans as well as keeping those already here is benecial because of their contributions to Floridas workforce, economic vitality and quality of life. Gov. Rick Scott is expected to sign the measure, which also includes funds for armory renovations and several land purchases near bases (a move designed to protect them from future closure). The legislation also expands veter an preference rules for government hiring, allows service members fami lies to use out-of-state driver licenses under some circumstances, removes a one-year residency requirement for veterans to be admitted to state veterans nursing homes and more. In scal year 2012, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs education-program payment to Florida beneciaries exceeded $702 million, according to the National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics. Thats just one of the many ways that veterans positively impact our states economy. For a summary of veterans benets, consult the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs guide. Online, it can be found atwww.bit.ly/1gHtdc3 (PDF). Other information is also available from the department: www.oridavets.org. Even with Floridas effort to make veterans a high priority, they make up a population that too often has difculty accessing the benets and services that are meant for them. At both the state and national level, that shortcoming must be cured.From The Ledger in Lakeland.Cut college cost for vetsWho is to blame for rising food prices? Theres drought, always a factor and can have a ripple effect, es pecially with feed prices for livestock and farmers who must have rain to raise their crops proper ly. Theres uncertainty in the world, and commod ities traders worry about whats happening in the Middle East. Traders bid up the price of gas contracts at commodities futures markets hoping to make money. Most have no intention of ever taking ownership of gasoline. They hope to sell any contracts they buy for a prot. Thats capitalism. There was Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf of Mexico in 2005. Scores of oil rigs were either destroyed or partially destroyed. There is government regulation. And of course, theres President Obama. More on Obama later. Food prices mainly rise in response to high gas and diesel prices. Especially diesel. Remember the good old days when diesel was cheaper than gas? Today one can easily pay 80 cents a gallon more for diesel. Transportation to get food to market is a large cost of the food we buy at the store. The American economy runs on diesel trucks. When you notice prices at the gas pump rising, expect to see the same thing happen in about six weeks at the grocery store. Because of environmental concerns, Obama has declared war on both coal and gas. In 2010, Obama lied when he said, With only 2 per cent of the worlds oil reserves, we cant just drill our way to lower gas prices ... not when we consume 20 percent of the worlds oil. Data compiled by the Institute for Energy Research has estimated North Americas land ar eas contain twice the combined proven oil reserves of all OPEC nations and enough natural gas to provide for our electricity for the next 500 years. Companies applying for new permits to drill for oil on private land can sometimes get those per mits within 10 days. Applying on federal lands takes over 300 days and as often as not, the per mit is denied. Only the very largest companies can survive the bureaucratic and legal hassles of drilling on federal lands. Annual revenue for sales, leases, and royalties on federal lands are down over $12 billion per year since 2008. It has been estimated that if most new permits had been approved, government would be taking in an additional $85 billion a year in new taxes. After the BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, the Obama administration was so slow in renewing permits that scores of oil well rigs already there were dismantled and moved to other parts of the world. The Keystone oil pipe line from Canada is being studied. Right before the 2012 presidential election, and reacting to criticisms of high gas prices under his administration, Obama threatened to release oil inventories to bring the cost of gasoline prices down. Prices dropped. After winning the election, Obama did nothing to increase oil production, and the cost of gas and diesel have skyrocketed ever since. Instead of trying to solve Americas economic problems, the Obama administration has been working overtime listening to our phone conver sations, taking over the auto industry, banks and brokerage houses, and of course health care. Besides bowing to Saudi monarchs, Obama bows to every left-wing special interest presented to him.Sonny Heninger lives in Leesburg.Presidents energy policies to blame for rising food prices

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rfntbtfr rfnttbbb r f frr rrfr r r r rr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr r rrrrr rr r rrf f r r bb r r t r r n r r f b f n t b bfr n b bbf b f f bf rf rfff rrbb rfrnn tntb r r r r r r r r r f r r r r n n t b t b b t t t b b t t b f bbnbb nnbb r f n t t r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r f f f r r f f r r r bbb rbf rfn b r r r r r b r r r r r n f n t t f rr b f ff nrrn nnb bbnb nnbb r rf bbbbn ntnbnf rfr f f bn b bbnbn nb rfntt rrffr rr rrr rbbtnrr rrtr rrbbtn f rff f r r r r bb fntt rr ffrr rr rrr bbtnrr rrtrrrbbtn rf br nbb ffbf r rr r r r r rnrr rr rbfnb rr rf rrfbn bbrn rfrr r rr r rnrr rbbfbb r rr rnrr rbbfbb rfnnrbbfbb bbrn rrf rrf br nbbr nbf rn rnb btttbbbbbbbnbb f b f b f rff bbrrnb nnb ntbb fbbnb nnbb r rfbbttbbb f rr rf rbbt rrt rrbbt f r r r bf bbttbbb r rr fr bbtrrt rrbbt r rrrrr r f rbf rfrnbbff b bfr f r r r n r rr r br rf rfbr r rr rrf bf rf ff bbrb nnb nntb f fbbn nnbb r r rfntbbttbbb rr rrrbb rf frrf r r r r bfntbbtt bbb rr rrr bbf rrfff bbff bf rfn b r r r r r r n r f rr rrr r rrr rbr rf b rf btf f f b b b f r n n n t b f f ff rrbbb nbn bbnbn nnbb rfbbbbnn rr rfr rfrr rrr rrrf fr rb rr rrfrr rrf rr rfrf rr b f r r r bfbb bbnn br fn r bbb rt r r r r t f b f b f brr nnnb btb fbbn nnbb r r rfbbbb rrrf ff f f r r bbt f bbff b rfbbb ff b r r n b r f b n r r n rr rrr r rrr brrf f f f b b b f r n n n t b f rr bf rf ff bbrb fnnnb bbnb nnbb rbbbb ff f f r r rr f r r r rff b rffr nnnbnb f rr b r rff r brffr nnnb f f r n n t b b n t b n n t b n b t b r n t b f n nnbb r fntbttbbn r f rr rrrrrr rrrr r r f f r b n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r n r r r r r r n r f b r b b r b r r f b r r r r b b b r r r n f b r r b r r r r b b b r r r b f b r r n b r r b b b r r b r r n b r b b b r r r r r r r r n f f ff b b r r b f n n n b nb f f br bbn nntb f tbbttf btb rr b r bbnb nnbb rfbttbbbb frfrr f f r r r r rr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrr r rrrrf f r r b r bb r r b r f r r f n n bfr n n b b bbf b f f bf rf rfff rrbb rfrnn tntb r r r r r r r r r f r r r r n n t b t b b t t t b b t t b f bbnb nnbb fbbb rrrr rrr rrfr rrbbtn f rrr rf rf r r r r bfb bb f br nbb b t r r f b f f ff bbbfr nnntb f bf f bbrrbb nnb t tb fbbb fbbnb nnbb r fntbttbbn frfrrr rrr rrrr rrrbbtrrt rrrbbt f rrff r r r nb fntbttbbn frf rrrr rr rrrrrr rbbtrrt rrrbbt rr rfr rrrf rrr rr rr r r rr rrrrrrrr rr f bbff br nn b n r r f b f f b f rr bf f fff nbrbb nn ntn ntn r r r f n n t b f fbbnb nnbb r bttbbn rr t rbbt tft f rfr f f r r bb fbttbbn r r t rbbtf r rbfr rr bbffb t rrr r rf r r r r r r r r r b r r f r r r r f b r b b n n n t b f t b b t t f b f rr rnb nnn tbb tb tnb fbbnbn nnbb r fntbttbb rr rrr rbbtrrt rrrbbt f frrf rrf rrfrrf rrf rr r rrrrrr r rr r r r r rrrrrrrr rr r r r b fntbttbb rr rrr rbbtrrt rrrbbt frrf rrf rrf rrfrr frr r rr rrrrr r

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Lawn Services Electrical Services

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbtfr rfntbfn rfnftr bnfr rr trf btr rtrff bn r ttr ft n bf tfr t rrr nr tff nntnr trt ft rnnt fn r ftnf rttr r ftnr tftn nt ft f f f btrt rr rfnt f r ttf b r ntrn trr fr t tff b tr nnrt rt rt n tff nnr r nr tt rtrt t nrf ftr n br rt r fnt tft rr rtt rr nf tftff r nfrt trttt rrr b r r trf ttt tnt b r rtr rr rtff ft r ft ft ft brr tntrtf brr rft rtff tn tt t t rtr nr r n trnttt tffr t rt trr trr rr frrr trt nr rtf trr nt btr ttt fn ftrr r ft f trt rr bfr trr rn t tnr nt tff rr ftrf f bft t rrtr bfft br t r rttn tn t trr trtr n nb rr rr r rtt tt rnn trt rtr tf tr rf ft t tt r b r r tft r n t t rtf t f t rr f rr rrr tnr tftrt rrtfn r rtftr tnr t f tttt rtf bt rtnr rr tr t ttr rf nr fft rf b t t rnf rr ttrt rnfrtf t rfn tb rnn r rntbb r fntr r r f r n r n t b t r t b f t t f t t t n b n n t r r t n t f r r r f r t r r b t t t r r n t r t t r t n b r b r r t t n t t t n bfrrn trbnrt tbt rbrrr trrnr t r t f r frr t r t r r t f n n b n r t f n r f f t f n n t f b r t r n t f t t r t r t t f t r r r t r t n r r r t r t r r fn f n t n t n t n n n t r b t t r t t r t r b b n b r b r b r t r f f f t r b r n r b r t r t t n n n t t t n t t r n t t f n n t n t f r t t t r rrn b n brr rrttrrr rrbn trtr rbbtrtttf ntftrt rrnrtt rr r t r r t r rrrttttb rtnr rrtnnttrr ttrtf ntfrtrt br nt trrrt rttbr tnrtbrb r nt nntrft tb n n t r t f r t r n t n b b n bfrn t t b r r r r t n t r r brn rr nrrf tbtr t r n brn r r r r n t n n t t t r t r r f r r t r b n f t t r t r t n n r r t t t r t t b r f t r f r t t t t f f b n r b t r t t b n t t r n r n n f r t b b f r t b t n r r b r r t t r n r r r t r r t r b t r n r f t t n t t t t r r t r t r r f r r t n t t r b r r t f n r r t b r r r b r t r r r t r r t b t t t n n t t r r b t r b b b t t t n r r r t r t n n r b b t n t r n r t t b r n n t f f t t n t t n b t b t b n n r t f t t t t n t f r t r n n n t f r f t r t n f n n r r r b t r n n t r t f n t r f n t t r r r b t n t n n b r r t f n t r n r t t r t r b r t n r t t n n t t t r t r r f n b t f n f t t t b b r r r t r t t b r t n f t f b f t n n b b t r r t t n r n r t r n n n n r t r n n n t r f f t r r b bt n f ttttrttt rrrtbtr tt rttfntrt rtrrtrtrt rrtrrrtrrt rtbrttr r b r n t b t r n bfrn b r n r t r b t r n r n b b r b t t t r t b r r n t r n t f r f r t t n t r n t r t f r brrft rfbtb rr t r n n r b b n tbt nrtr b n t t t r t t r f f b r t n n t n t b n b b t n b r b r n t t ftbb ntnnbf tbtnt r n nbbt r n n t r t bfrn t r b r b t r b r n r t r t t r t t r f r n t r t r r t t r t r t r t r n r t r t r n f tn ttrtbt rtrffff tftt rttb fbrrft tbnt tnn r n r n n b n t b t r b t t b n n n r r b r b r t r n r b t n t t t t r b b n r f t b r t n b t r t b n r n r n r r b r t f r b b n f r r r t r b r r t r b r t t r t r b t r n r t n t t b t t r b b n r t n b t r t b n r n r n r r b r t f r b b f r bfr rtntr tttrb trtrrr r t r t n r f r f tt tt t r f n n n bfr r t r t t t r t t f r r f bfrrn btbr t tt btt t t r f n n n t b t n t r b n t r t f t r t r b n t r t f b t r t r t f n tf ttrr n rttf tbtrtr rtt tbr rr tr bfrrt ntfrf fftrf rt b n r t r t t t r t r t n n r f brn t t t r f t r t t t b r t t r t r t n t n t r r t f r rrf

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 rfntnb rf nf n n nn t ntr nn t n rr nr rfrr rf r f n t f b f b f f r f b f r f r f r n f f f f n n r f f f f r n t r n n r f r n f r f f r f r n f r r f f f f f r f b f f r r f b f f f t b f r f b f r t f r n f b f f f r r rffffrbfn bffrff ffb ffrnrbf fbnffffn ffbfrr r f f f f f f f r f f r f r r f f n r f f n r f r r r f f f f r f f f f f f f r f r b f n f r r f f f t f f f r r f f f r f t r r f f f f f r r r f f r f f f f f f b f f f f f f f r n f f f f f f f r f f r r f f n f f n f r r f f f f r f f f r n f r r rnff rfff fbrrfn rffff rrnff rfff f fnff fbfnff nff f f f f r r n r f f f r n r n f f f r f f f f f f f f f r r f f r r f r fffnfrf ffrrf ffrrfnfffff fffrr brfrfr r f f r f rf ntb ffrbrf rtf ffrftrf rr r f r f n r r r r frrf rr rfff r r f rr fr rbfff ffrr rfn f r tr r ff f r f f t rr rr f nr f f n f f f n f b f f b n f t f f r n f r f n n f f f f r b f n b r r f fffr frbf rff frf t ffrf frr f ffrf fff nrfr r rr rrrf f rrf rr n rft ffr rrfrf bf f fft frr f rffr r f nr f ff frftrf rr fbfrff rrff f r r rf f rf rf rr ffrnrr rrft fffff rf f frft rr rrff t rr t frrf rff ffrrrn f t r f f b n f f r f n brrf bfrrrffn f r r f f rr frr r fn r f r f f b f f r f n r f f t n f n b f t f f f r r rfffrfbf rr ffr ff ffr ff rr fnr rr bfbf ff rf b rf ff ff bffr rrfnf ff f ff ff ff ffr f tr rr ff ff rnf f r f f r f f f t r f bf fr bb rrr rf r f ff brfr r f ff brfr r rf fff rr rr r r frr frr rrf r rr f ffr rrr frr fffff rr t ff f nf rf rfr frffrr b t fbffrrff fffr tf f fbrf fn rrfrfrrbf rbffff fftrf tf rft frfrt ffrrtrf t rbff rff frf f ffff ftffrt f rffr fr frrfff t frr rr bf nrfff rfff nff ffrr rr fr frrf f f n r f frf ffr rfffrr ffrr ffrr ffrr r f f rft rr f ffrffr frr rrr frr tf br f rff ffrr fff rtr ffrr r ntb frr rrffn f rr f ff r ntb frffrrf fr fffrnt ff trr ffb bffrrrf trff rrrrf frrff r r f f nf rrrr rffrfrrrf rf f f f r r rfr rf rrn f r r frfrr ff frfr rr f f f rr ftff f rrfrr rr rfnbf rr ffrfrf ffrr r f f f f frffff rfrr rfnbrf rff rfrff bf nrfff n rr fff ffr rrnfff frrr f frf ftr frrff rfrbf frr nfrr r r r r r f n r ffr rr frrffr fr r ffrrrr rfr ftf r f frrfr f ffn fff f f fr rr fr rr rfrffn ff ffffbfn rr r nr r fr r r f f fft f rbrf ff rf frf rf rbrf rr f rf rr f n r f t f brt t rt rf ffffr rr fnf frr ffrfbnnr nrr ffrff ff nfrf fff frfn ffff frr rrn fff rr f f r f r f f t f tf rr bff f n frfr frffrfrfr fftbffr rr rrrr frffr rr tt r frrt ff frrff ff rr f f r r f f frffr ffr rr rn rr b ntb t r ffbfr rffrf f f r r ffrf r b r n f r t ffrrn r r rf rfrft rf frr frf fnrrrr fn trr f frf rtfnrrfrr rffrr t f r n f f r n bf r ffbfr rffrf f f r r ffrf r b r n f r t ffrrn r r

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbtfr rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb r r f n t b b n b b nb b b b n t r n f n f b t f n b r n fr n b r f t n t ntbb r f n r f b f n b nb r t n t n t b n t t t f f r tb r f n r f b f n b n t r b b nb b b t ft ft nf b b b f n f r n t r b t b f r r ft f f n t b t r r ftb r f n r f b f n b n t r b n t t b r tb b b tr b b r tr ft n f b f b n f f b n b f bf b t f n f f n b t f n f f n f b b r t f n n b t f n f f n n b f f n r f f b b n f t t n b b f b r n b b r n f f r b t f f f r t f n b f n n b b t b t b b f b b b f b b r n f b b n n r n b f n f n b b t f n b b b f n b f t r b f n b f n r f f b b b b r n t b r n f r f b t b b n f r t r r t b f f b b f n n b f f b b b f t t b t b b b b b b b b f r t b r b f rb f r b

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E1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014Moneyscott.callahan@dailycommercial.com RETIREMENT: Baby boomers savor living on boats / E2 www.dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comFrugals co-owner Benjamin Moseley says people shop in Leesburg for entertain ment. What better entertainment than having 100 shops to entertain you instead of four big department stores, he said. Moseley co-owns Mount Doras Frugals Vintage Boutique and Salon and Leesburgs Frugals The Collection stores with his wife Lindy Colvin. They are planning on opening a new home decoration store and a small shopping mall in downtown Leesburg, which will include another one of their stores as well. The mall, which will be called The Shoppes on Main, will have eight spots, and Moseley expects it to open before the Leesburg Bikefest begins on April 25. The Leesburg Herb Shoppe will be one of the rst businesses moving into the new mall and will be taking up two of the spots there, according to Moseley. He said a photography studio, a European food store, a purse shop currently located in Mount Dora and a gift and candle store will have spaces there, too. Moseleys new store in the building will be called Frugals Crystal Couture and will sell crystal items, such as jewelry and high heels. Lots of bling. Its all crystal, Moseley said. Anything thats over the top: the ve inch heels with crystals all over them and the jewelry and the necklaces, and the big glittery glass crystal belts that everybody wears with their old jeans, cowboy boots. There is still one opening in the building and there will also be space for people to sit in the front of the mall, Moseley said. The building housing the mall is owned by Anita and Ross Valdez. Moseley said he will design and manage the mini-mall. The entire building is just under 4,000 square feet. Leesburg Herb Shoppe owner Darla Miller said she wanted to move to Main Street and was sold on the mall location by Moseleys vision for the project. Ive known Ben since he came into town and I like the way he thinks, Miller said. She added she will be on the back side of the mall, but she will have a Main Street address. The address will make it easier for people to nd the s tore, which was an issue at Moseley bringing shopping changes to downtown Leesburg PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALBenjamin Moseley gives a tour of the small shopping mall called The Shoppes on Main being built in Leesburg. Tonia Kelley, 41, organizes jeans at Moseleys store Frugals, which he co-owns with his wife Lindy Colivn.Having that many different options and different stores coming into one little place, it just adds a little bit more of a buzz. It creates a little bit more of a shopping feel for the area. I just think it really helps with the draw.Sandi Moore,Executive Director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of CommerceNowI got debts no honest man could pay The bank was holdin my mortgage and they was takin my house away. Johnny 99 by Bruce SpringsteenThe latest jobs re port, released in early March, re veals that new job cre ation rose from a re vised January gure of 129,000 to 175,000 in February. This means that 46,000 more jobs were created last month than the month before. Sounds like good news, right? Well, as my sons favor ite sportscaster says each autumn Saturday morning, Not so fast, my friend. Many economists view the total number of hours worked as a better measuring stick of the health of the U.S. labor market. As Ed Lazear writes in the Wall Street Jour nal, An employer who replaces 100 40-hourper-week workers with 120 20-hour-per-week workers is contracting, not expanding operations Thus, although the U.S. economy added about 900,000 jobs since September, the shortened workweek is equivalent to losing about one million jobs during the same period. The difference between the loss of the equivalent of one MARGARET MCDOWELLGUEST COLUMNIST Structural changes may portend high unemployment PATRICK MAYSan Jose Mercury NewsApple is not going to like this new book about Apple. The title Haunt ed Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs pretty much says it all. While author Yukari Iwatani Kane does say on page 336 of her 338-page book that its not too late for Apple to daz zle the world again, by that point shes made her conclusion clear Apple Inc.s long slide began the day Jobs died. Without him, the former Wall Street Jour nal reporter wrote in her book, which hit stores Tuesday, every thing changed. The dilemmas multiply and deepen. Solutions slip further out of reach. Kane is certainly not the rst to predict the decline of the Cuper tino, Calif., tech giant. And she fails to drop any bombshells, other than a quote from Jobs calling television a ter rible business, suggesting an Apple TV may not be in the companys future after all. Instead, Kane serves up anecdotes from other books and media accounts, along with some origi nal reporting. Yet the author makes a cogent case that with the loss of Jobs mer curial genius, the lin gering legal battles and patent wars, and the thickening competi tion from tech compa nies on all sides, the innovative powerhouse that Jobs created may be slowly fading in his absence. Neither Kanes publisher, HarperCollins, nor Apple responded to interview requests, al though CEO Tim Cook did release a statement saying this nonsense belongs with some of the other books Ive read about Apple. It fails to capture Apple, Steve or anyone else in the company, adding that he feels very condent about our future.New book says Apples best days are behind itSEE APPLE | E2 STEVE ALEXANDERStar TribuneThe view from the base ment laboratory is breath taking. Not the one out the tiny windows of the half-un derground ofce. Its on a smartphone that computer science Prof. Stergios Roumeliotis is using while walking around the depths of the University of Minne sotas Walter Library. On the screen, a three-di mensional map of a nearby hallway has taken shape. The map was made by holding the smartphones camera while moving. The camera and the phones motion sensor worked to gether to create a grid of data points that became a 3-D image. Its a radical new ability for smartphones and promises to enable con sumers to create 3-D maps on the y. The software development is being handled by UM grad students who are funded by $1.35 million grant from Google Inc. The work is part of the companys recently an nounced Project Tango, a cellphone optimized for 3-D mapping. We will soon be able to get smartphone directions for how to go from one place to another in a building, such as how to go from the entrance to my classroom, Roumeliotis said. Well also be able to ask the phone questions, such as, Where is the closest place within the airport where I can get coffee? In addition, homeowners could use the software to create a virtual tour of their houses before put ting them up for sale, Roumeliotis said. The software could also help the blind walk through a building or aid a drone aircraft in navigating. While the software is be ing designed to work on a prototype of the new Google smartphone, it will Building an indoor 3-D map on the spot, via smartphone MARLIN LEVISON / MCT A smartphone with the 3-D program running showed a hallway in a University of Minnesota building. SEE MAP | E4SEE DOWNTOWN | E4SEE MCDOWELL | E2

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrr$50 OFF 3ROOMS& A HALL$99fntbrt The book, which Kane says was crafted from interviews with nearly 200 sources, including past and present Apple em ployees, lays much of the blame for Apples woes at Cooks feet. Was Cook the best choice to chart Apples future? Kane asks midway through her tale. She obviously be lieves he was not, al though she doesnt suggest a suitable alternative, implying that anyone running Ap ple in Jobs wake would have been doomed to fail. Forgetting him was like trying to for get the sun, she writes. He still reigned over every hour of every day. That was his blessing, and their curse. Starting with a brief history of Jobs at the helm, including his resentful tirade against his appointed succes sor when he felt Cook was getting too big for his britches, Kane quickly moves on to the post-Jobs era. She focuses on the challenges Apple has faced since Jobs death and portrays Cook, despite his prowess at sup ply-side management, as stumbling from one pickle to the next. Cook was a seasoned businessman and arguably a better manager than Jobs, Kane writes. He was organized, prepared, and was more realistic about the bur dens of a company of Apples current size. Many even considered him a genius in his own right. But no one could beat Jobs at being Steve Jobs, espe cially Cook, who was his polar opposite. While Kanes book was praised by Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson for her great insight and unparalleled reporting, other observers complained that the book did little to shine light on whats truly going on behind the Apple curtain. I thought there was very little that was new in the book, said Cult of Mac blog publisher Leander Kahney, au thor of Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apples Products. Its basically a rehash of public events over the past few years, and I dont think theres anything new to learn here. The book does ll in some of Cooks biography, and she talks to some of his former school teachers, but theres nothing really revealing. Kahney, who said Isaacsons book also failed to truly pierce Apples infamous wall of secrecy, noted that he was hard-pressed to nd a single quote from a named cur rent Apple employee, calling the book one more failed attempt to really shed any light on Apple. APPLEFROM PAGE E1 million jobs and the gain of 900,000 new jobs yields a net effectof 100,000 lost jobs. There is growing sentiment in the economic community that the Affordable Care Act may be negatively impacting employ ment. Employers may be trimming employee hours in order to avoid complying with the mandates of providing health care insurance to full-time workers. None of this is headline news to job seekers, the underemployed or workers with reduced hours. The real news is that a high unemployment level is likely to accompany us long into the future. Our true current unemployment rate may be close to 12 percent. Globalization cannot be ignored as a contributing factor. Homegrown manufacturing is retrenching in the U.S., but industries like call centers in India are not making their way back here. Automation may prove to be the larger job killer. I read recently of a soft drink distributor in the Amer ican Southwest who employs only 10-15 percent of the personnel he once utilized. All other tasks are accomplished robotically. Heres the irony: For investors, this isnt all bad. Companies that keep labor costs down are normally more protable than those with higher costs. So corporate protability is up. Share prices have risen. Dividend pay ments have been met and, in many cases, are increasing. The problem is that as middle-class jobs disappear, one wonders what will ultimately drive consumer spending, the largest contributor to GDP. And how then, if consumers stop buying, will the markets hold up? When the government is no longer pumping money monthly into the system through Quantitative Easing, will markets ignore a downtrodden job mar ket then? Is there middle ground in this economic tug owar between the economy and the markets? Time will tell.Margaret R. McDowell, a syndicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 ALFREDO CORCHADOThe Dallas Morning NewsLA PAZ, Mexico Theyre no mads, sailing freely, crossing inter national waters, guided by one principle: Just oat. Good thing is, we dont have a schedule, said Allyson van Os of Dallas. We just do the things we like to do, when we want to do them. Thats our schedule. Van Os, 62, is one of millions of baby boomers living part of their lives on boats, inspired by a life style that she acknowledges is hard er than it seems. She and her husband, Ed, and two dogs, Dexter and Pequena, dock their 65-foot boat, the Virginia Reel, in the waters of La Paz in the Baja Penin sula, the same place where Span ish conquistador Hernan Cortes rst docked his boat in 1535. They are joined there by more than 100 other boat owners, part of a growing nau tical tourism business in Mexico that isnt without legal hassles, including tax agents, but that is a dream many boat owners say is worth pursuing. With an estimated 80 million baby boomers retiring in the com ing years, Mexico looms large as an alternative place to live not just on land, but on sea. Recreational boat ing industry experts predict that the number of boomer boat owners will grow, although nding exact gures anywhere from 10 million to 17 million, by some estimates is dif cult in part because of their nomadic existence. Many of these retirees are living seasonally or year-round on boats, lured by the simplicity of life and lower cost of living. They are also searching for tranquility, a place away from the fast pace and hec tic life increasingly dominated, they say, by time pressures in an age of social media. You come here to check out on a life thats not yours anymore, said Leanne Lawrence, 61, originally from Texas and now commuting between La Paz and Oregon with her husband, Jack Jandreau. You come here to reconnect with yourself and Baby boomers savor retirement living on boats in Mexico ALFREDO CORCHADO / MCT Allyson van Os of Dallas walks on the dock with her dog Pequena. She and her husband, Ed, live on their boat in La Paz, Mexico, from October to June.SEE BOOMERS | E3

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 ADAM BELZStar TribuneGabe Ciuraru doesnt see many good options for people his age. At 23, hes waited tables, driven tanks for the Isr aeli army, taken community college classes and taught He brew in St. Paul, Minn. Lately hes been selling cosmetics from a kiosk at the Mall of America. This fall he plans to pursue a degree in sports management at the University of Minnesota. But hell have to take on a lot of debt, and hes not optimistic it will lead to a good-paying job. I have friends that still live at home be cause theyre paying off their student loans, Ciuraru said. Youre chained to your desk. And if youre not, the debt gets bigger. People who nished high school or college in the past few years came into the job mar ket at the wrong time. The economic downturn slashed pay for young workers and left more of them jobless, even after many went deep into debt to pay for college. Economists believe they may never recover what they lost in wages and experience. If we look over peo ples likely futur e lives, when youre part of a generation that comes in with a tough job market and your wages are not so great, you dont recover, said Richard Freeman, a Harvard University la bor economist. They are going to be at a per manently lower stan dard of living than they would have been had we either avoided this catastrophe or had we had a successful jobs recovery. Demand for college-educated workers probably peak ed around 2000, and the decline since then has affected all young workers, Canadian economists Paul Beaudry and Benjamin Sand say. As the number of col lege diplomas in the job market keeps rising, high-skilled workers are forced to take less er jobs, pushing lowskilled workers even further down the occu pational ladder and, to some degree, out of the labor force altogeth er, Beaudry and Sand wrote in 2013. The phenomenon was partly hidden by the housing bubble in the 2000s, but then laid bare by its bursting. This has been a ter rible decade, said Phil Gardner, director of the Collegiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State Univer sity. Theres only been three years where employers have aggres sively hired in the last 12 years. Morgan Moore, 28, realized in 2008, less than a year into law school at the University of Illinois, that he prob ably wouldnt end up working as a lawyer. He had hoped to work as legal counsel for a corporation, but the prospect grew dis tant as the economy sank into recession. That amount of time grew from ve to 10 years, to longer than that, to maybe impossible, Moore said. So rather than wait and see, I decided to pursue other opportunities. He nished law school so he wouldnt regret quitting, but when he graduat ed in 2011 he didnt have the money for bar exam prep classes. He couldnt nd any work near Chicago, let alone at a law rm. So he spent the summer in his ancees moth ers basement, collecting food stamps. Ultimately he moved back to Minnesotas Twin Cities, where he grew up, in search of any kind of work. He did part-time stints on the sales oor at Sears, at a Byerlys grocery store and parking cars for a valet service. In February 2012, he started selling cars full time. He doesnt regret his expensive law de gree, but it will take a long time to pay down his $80,000 in student debt. He has no plans to buy a house, and he had to sign up for health insurance through MNsure, the state exchange. Those of us who were negatively affected by the economy are faced with the conse quences of a lost three or four years, Moore Count on us for a comprehensive range of quality services to meet the unique healthcare needs of you and your family. Abu Azizullah, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Maria A. Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Internal Medicine Practices the nature around you, the sunsets, sunrises and the welcoming people of Mexico. Hence La Paz, The Peace, a seaside town known for sports shing, whales, seafood and, increasingly, Americans seeking to reinvent themselves, much the way author John Steinbeck did when he stayed here and was inspired to pen some of his classic books, including The Pearl and Sea of Cor tez. The community is just right, feels right, said Jandreau, 64, who with his wife has been sailing to La Paz for more than 20 years. In the shadow of Cabo San Lucas, just an hour or so down a new highway, La Paz is booming into something not quite dened yet, but with some cer tainty that it wont be come another tourist trap like Cabo or Cancun. Instead, La Paz re tains its Mexican aura of familial ties, even with a makeover that includes bike lanes, pricey condos with stunning ocean views, an 18-hole Gary Player golf course and a list of hotels. That list is headed by CostaBaja Re sort, which includes a marina for more highend clients, including Hollywood actors who dock and quietly mingle on their own. We have all types of clients, said Maria del Mar Bueno Riestra, the CostaBaja public relations event manager. Whether on sea or on ground, all are looking for security, tranquility, and this is what we of fer, peace. BOOMERSFROM PAGE E2 New workers are starting behind and cant get ahead DAVID JOLES / MCT Gabe Ciuraru, 23, at the Mall of America, where he works at a cosmetics kioskn in Bloomington, Minn.SEE WORKERS | E6

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 Representing Mesothelioma & Lung Cancer Victims for Over 25 Years Throughout FloridaFlorida Lawyers Representing FloridiansTerrell Hogan( 904 ) www.FloridaAsbestos.comAlan Pickert Anita Pryor CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) her last location. The hardest part for me where I am right now is because Im on Orange Avenue and nobody knows where Or ange Avenue is. It takes me 10 minutes in a conversation to tell them where I am, Miller said. The Leesburg Herb Shoppe will cover about 700 square feet. The current location is 1,200 square feet, according to Miller, but she said there is extra space that is not used for merchandise. The Leesburg Herb Shoppe has one additional employee. Miller said she likes the camaraderie of downtown Leesburg and she thinks the stores in the mall will feed off each other. And it will be fun, Miller said. Sandi Moore, the executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said businesses in downtown become a family. Having that many different options and different stores coming into one little place, it just adds a little bit more of a buzz. It creates a little bit more of a shopping feel for the area, Moore said. I just think it really helps with the draw. She said she agreed, to an extent, with Moseley that people shop downtown for enter tainment. Its part of the atmosphere, Moore said. Its like why you go to a farmers market. You do that because of the atmosphere as well. Its why, like during fall, youre willing to go to a pumpkin patch (instead of a store) and buy a pumpkin because its all part of the experience. Moseley also expects to open a home decoration store called The Art of Dcor during the third week of April. It will occupy the 3,400-squarefoot space that former ly housed Swan Creek Candle at 707 Main St. The Art of Dcor will sell decorating items like furniture, art and chandeliers, Moseley said. He also plans to hang and sell local art on the brick walls. I love the juxtaposition, Moseley said of hanging paintings on the brick backdrop. Shiny, fresh, new, clean, and old and rough. Its a cool look. The Art of Dcor will be located across Main Street from his current Leesburg Frugals store. Moseley said he is doing these projects in Leesburg because of its true small town nature and the quantity of customers that come from The Villages. Leesburgs truly a small town, he said. Its truly people who grew up here, who care about the town. They come and shop in my business to make sure I stay in business. Moseley also called the residents of The Villages, A force to be reckoned with. They have a lot of money. They spend it, Moseley said. Moore said Moseleys projects have a positive effect on downtown. He already has a business If he wasnt doing well in that business then theres no way he would be trying to open more and do more, she said. Moore said Moseley is the type of business owner cities should want in their downtowns. Ben is a good business person, she said. Hes had very successful businesses in the past and, of course, Leesburg is lucky to have him want to come and invest in our town. Wed love to have, throughout the whole city, 10 more Bens. Moseley also has plans to host a shopping social in The Shoppes on Main and an event where he invites local decorators to meet with customers at The Art of Dcor. DOWNTOWN FROM PAGE E1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Shoes are on display at Benjamin Moseleys store Frugals. also work on existing smartphones. Notably, it doesnt use much processing power, about as much as the game Angry Birds, Roumeliotis said. I think this is as big a revo lution as when Google Maps rst came out or even big ger, said the professor, who is 43 and has been working on map technology since 1995. It has the potential to become the Google Maps of the indoor world, and this is where we spend most of our time. Scott Strawn, senior Google analyst for Massachusetts research rm IDC, said Roumeliotis may be right about the signicance of 3-D mapping. Besides its use on smart phones, the University of Minnesota software is likely to play a major role in 3-D imaging for Google Glass, the companys wearable computer that has a tiny display above the right eye, Strawn said. For Glass, the software could create much better 3-D augmented reality, a name used today for over laying a camera image with explanatory information. One of the key features of the University of Minne sota software is that it cre ates a map almost instant ly without slowing down the phones other operations or drawing much battery power, Roumeliotis said. To do that, the Universi ty of Minnesota team had to try some novel design ideas. For example, unlike most smartphone maps, the new software doesnt rely on global positioning system data because satellite signals arent typically available in side buildings. It also does more with less by combining data from the phones builtin motion sensor with just a fraction of the images pro duced by the phones camera. We pick which information to process, Roumelio tis said. That way we dont choke the phones processor chip or drain the battery. The technology is built on some of the universitys ear lier work with NASA to create navigational software for Mars landing vehicles, Rou meliotis said. His group got involved in Googles Project Tango after one of his former students went to work at the compa ny and recommended the U researchers. The university signed a contract with Goo gle last spring. Roumeliotis said the soft ware that his group is de veloping for Google will be ready within less than a year. But Strawn thinks Goo gle wont offer the Univer sity of Minnesota software as mainstream product for several years. That would give app developers time to come up with 3-D applica tions that can take advan tage of the technique. It will be introduced in the same way that Google released Glass, years before it anticipated the product would be broadly distributed, Strawn said. Its not unusual for Goo gle to reach out to universi ties for help in creating new technology, Strawn said. Theres a lot of valuable brainpower in the univer sity system, and thats what Google needs to move these projects forward, he said. Were on the frontier of this kind of mapping, Rou meliotis said. You could map the inside of the Mall of America today using a com puting center with a lot of processing power and a lot of time. Our plan is to do that on a cellphone in almost real time, with the time lag getting smaller and smaller. MAPFROM PAGE E1You could map the inside of the Mall of America today using a computing center with a lot of processing power and a lot of time. Our plan is to do that on a cellphone in almost real time, with the time lag getting smaller and smaller.Prof. Stergios Roumeliotis

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 (352) 787-3013CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT TODAY!Box Office HoursMonday-Friday 9:00am-1:00pm(also 1 hour before show time)$18 Adult/$9 StudentShow TimesAll Fridays @ 8pm Sat. Mar. 22 & 29 @ 8pm Sat. April 5 @ 2pm All Sundays @ 2pmMELONPATCHTHEATREpresentsSweeney ToddThe Demon Barber of Fleet StreetMusic & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Hugh Wheeler Based on a version of Sweeney Todd by Christopher Bond March 21-23; 28-30, April 4-6, 2014 Supporting sponsors: Franks Place and Insight Financial Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE Today is Sunday, March 23, the 82nd day of 2014. There are 283 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On March 23, 1914, the rst installment of The Perils of Pauline, the legendary silent lm serial starring Pearl White, premiered at theaters in the greater New York City area, including movie houses in New Jersey, Connecticut and Massachusetts. On this date: In 1775, Patrick Henry delivered an address to the Virginia Provincial Convention in which he is said to have declared, Give me liberty, or give me death! In 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, having reached the Pacic coast, began their journey back east. In 1919, Benito Mussolini founded his Fascist political movement in Milan, Italy. In 1933, the German Reichstag adopted the Enabling Act, which effectively granted Adolf Hitler dictatorial powers. In 1942, the rst Japanese-Americans evacuated by the U.S. Army during World War II arrived at the internment camp in Manzanar, Calif. In 1956, Pakistan became an Islamic republic. In 1964, actor Peter Lorre, 59, died in Los Angeles. In 1973, before sentencing a group of Watergate break-in defendants, Chief U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica read aloud a letter to him from James W. McCord Jr. which said there had been political pressure to plead guilty and remain silent. In 1983, President Ronald Reagan rst proposed developing technology to intercept incoming enemy missiles an idea that came to be known as the Strategic Defense Initiative. Dr. Barney Clark, recipient of a Jarvik permanent articial heart, died at the University of Utah Medical Center after 112 days with the device.DEAR ABBY: My husband and I were both married previously. We have been together for seven years. When we rst started dating, we would sometimes go to one of the casinos after dinner as a fun outing. We never spent much money and went only occasionally. Our game of choice was the slot machine. Over the last few years, it seems like the casino has taken over our lives. We go there to the exclusion of almost everything else and spend money we cant afford to lose. We both have the mentality that the big win is right around the cor ner. How can we break this habit? Its causing unbearable nancial and emotional stress in our marriage. Im afraid it wont last another year. IN OVER MY HEAD IN NEW YORK DEAR IN OVER YOUR HEAD: In case you are not aware, there is a name for the habit you and your husband have acquired. Its compulsive gambling, and its an addiction in much the same way as the abuse of alcohol or drugs. Fortunately, you have nally reached a point where you have realized this fun outing is out of control. Gamblers Anony mous can help you break this destructive cycle. Its a 12-step program based on the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous. Its members support one another by sharing their strength and experiences with one another. The website is www. gamblersanonymous. org. Many people have experienced what youre going through, and this well-established organization has helped them. To locate a meeting near you, visit the website or check your telephone directory. DEAR ABBY: My mom and stepfather are divorcing. They were married for 25 years. He was always a great father gure to me and has been a very active grandfather to my children. The reason for the divorce is his indelity and the disrespect he has shown my mother. We are his only family, and he wants to be involved with us as if nothing is differ ent, even showing up at family gatherings. I want to be loyal to my mother and I do feel he betrayed us but I still recognize that he has also been good to me and the kids. He doesnt deserve to be cut out of our lives. How does one handle a situation like this? SEEING THE BIG PICTURE DEAR SEEING: Your stepdad may want to pretend that nothing is different, but something IS different. He hurt your mother so badly they will no longer be married. If you want to be loy al to your mother and still have a relationship with him, then you need to have a talk with him. Explain that because he is no longer married to your mother, he will no longer be invited to family gatherings where your mother will be present. Be sure to tell him you regard him with affection, but will be seeing him separately for the foreseeable future.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Fun outings at the casino become costly compulsion TODAY IN HISTORY How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, March 23, 2014: This year you open up to new possibilities. After having discussions with the right people, you will be able to develop a new interest or walk through a new door. If you are single, you will open up to dating a different type of person. Get to know someone well before you start dating him or her, as this person could be emotionally unavailable. Someone could easily pull the wool over your eyes. If you are attached, the two of you might want more time together. Schedule several weekends away together from the daily grind. CAPRICORN likes to show his or her authority over others. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Opt for a late movie and a hamburger with an older friend. For some of you, making an appearance could be more important than what you are doing. Tension builds as you recognize someone elses needs. You can do only so much! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Realize what is happening between you and someone else. After some reection, you will recognize how important this individual is to you. Be wise, and keep an eye on the long-term ramications of your words and actions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Others will toss a challenge at you that youll want to run with. Recognize your limits and the results of pushing yourself too hard. You might want to take some needed time off, for a snooze or to relax with a favorite person. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might have gone beyond the call of duty in handling responsibilities and helping others out. By mid afternoon, decide to make time to pursue your desires. Many of you would be quite satised with just a nap! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make hay while the sun shines. Someone might become argumentative. How you handle this person could be more important than you realize. Ask yourself whether you really support these disagreeable moments. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Pressure from a parent or roommate could drive you wild. You might choose to have an argument, but ask yourself whether it would be helpful. Think in terms of your personal goals and desires regarding this person. Is this the picture you paint in your mind? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Listen to the drumbeats. Do you really want to follow them down the warpath? Stop acting on impulse. Pausing and rethinking your goals will help you stay more levelheaded. Distract yourself, if necessary. Get some fresh air. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Overindulging is a wellknown characteristic of your sign, especially when wanting to evade certain emotions and/or situations. Listen to your feelings more often, and you will nd that there is logic behind them. Do not postpone an overdue chat. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Taking a risk happens more easily with you than with many other signs. Weigh the pros and cons, and ask yourself whether you can take a loss if it should occur. Only you have the answer. Avoid a quarrel with a friend. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might create a quarrel in order to distance yourself from someone. Your sense of humor will emerge and lighten the mood. You do understand where this person is coming from. A little laughter will make both of your days better. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) News could be provocative. Before you say or do anything, root out the issue surrounding the stress or opt for a stress-reducing experience. Your instincts will guide you with a money offer, though using a little caution wouldnt hurt. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Invite friends to join you to see a movie. Getting together afterward also could add to the moment. You might hear news that will have you shaking your head. You will be all ears on this matter later. A partner could be unusually jealous. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 With two wisdom teeth extractions or more.Lake Advanced Dentistryrfnftbrf(352) 205-8355www.lakeadvanceddentistry.com NEW PATIENT SPECIAL$79 Where insurance is not applicableIncludes: (90150) Comprehensive Exam, (0210) Complete Series X-Rays, (0350) Oral/Facial Photographic Images & Oral Cancer Screening.IV services are rendered by general dentist.This special will end April 30th, 2014. 365-255024 Hour Answering Service 1501 N. US Hwy 441 Suite 1836, Bldg 1800 The VillagesPunya Clinic 1070 Flagler Avenue Leesburg PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE TROUBLE SLEEPING?Shakti Narain, M.D. FCCP Accepting New Patients LRDA SLP DSRDRSCenterLRDA SLP DSRDRSCenter said. Thats denitely left an impact. Since 2008, rst-time job seekers have faced a market more difcult than anything their older siblings or par ents have seen. Unemployment for people under 25 hit 21 percent in 2010 and still is well above its prerecession high at 15.6 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The situation is worse for workers under 25 with no col lege education, whose unemployment rate is 18.6 percent. Young people who are working have fewer opportunities for advancement, in part because fewer older workers are voluntarily quitting their jobs. The longer this goes on, and the longer theyre not attached to something meaningful and theres a lot of young people who still arent then theyre wasting their human resource investment, which is their educa tion, said Phil Gardner, director of the Col legiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State Univer sity. Repeated studies show that people who look for their rst job during a recession take as much as a 9 percent wage cut. These losses can be permanent, and even when theyre not, may fade only after a decade. The fault lines run through families. Laura Franklin, 27, and her sister Emily, 32, both went to the Col lege of St. Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn. Emily didnt seriously con sider her career until her senior year, yet got a good job four days after she graduated in 2004. Laura, with a 3.9 GPA and a semes ter as a full-time sub stitute teacher under her belt, couldnt crack the teaching market in 2009 or 2010. She wanted to teach third-graders, she said, because they like to learn and are old enough to work independently. She applied for more than 100 jobs in Minnesota and Colo rado through the sum mer of 2009. She drove to job fairs where lines formed out the door for one opening. Youd just hang your head when you walked in, she said. The rst few weeks without a job offer turned into months, and then the summer passed, and her com puter lled with folders of rejected cover letters. I was just so de feated, she said. My self-esteem was just blown. I said, I give up. Im going to take care of babies. This is my life. OK. She worked at a day care called New Hori zon Academy, and a year later, took a job as an early childhood teaching assistant for St. Paul public schools, hoping that might lead to full-time teaching. She worked both jobs 12 hours a day to cover her bills, including payments on $18,000 in student debt. The teaching job never materialized, so she took a job at a UnitedHealth call cen ter, which led to a bet ter position at Optum Health. She gave up hopes of teaching but believes those years made her stronger. I can look back and think, OK, that was awful and such a hard struggle, but Im so happy with where I am now because of it, she said. It makes you appreciate it that much more. One reason for optimism is that as more baby boomers leave the workforce, more jobs should open up for younger workers. The biggest cohort of baby boomers is now in its mid-50s, said Susan Brower, Minnesotas state demographer. So she expects the number of retirements to rise over the next 10 to 15 years. We do expect to get this boost in terms of replacement job openings, Brower said. We dont know exact ly what the size of it will be. For now, many college students appear to have accepted that it wont be easy to get a good job. If you go down to people 22 or 23 years old now, they dont feel quite as disillusioned, said Richard Freeman, the economist. They understood. The signal was coming out from society. Its amazing, to me at least, how easily people adjust to whatever the current situation is. WORKERSFROM PAGE E3



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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Care and Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson WILBEKIN LEADS GATORS PAST PITTSBURGH, SPORTS B1 FLORIDA HOSPITAL WATERMAN: Doctors day features rare display A3 OFFICER DOWN: Windermere cop killed after calling for help A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 82 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C3 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C3 MONEY E1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 82 / 63 Sunny with occasional clouds $1 ON THE WAY The Wellness Way Sector Plan has to clear several hurdles before it breaks ground. On April 22, the Lake County Commission meets with the City of Clermont to discuss the plan. In June, the commission votes on the plan. If approved, the plan goes to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for review and comments. A branding and marketing campaign will then take place to advertise the plan, inviting developers to submit proposals. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A s Lake County of cials creep to ward approv al of the massive Wellness Way Sector Plan near Cl ermont, supporters say it is carefully designed to prevent the kinds of headaches communities experience from scatter shot, low-density devel opment. At the same time, sever al landowners in the sec tor plan area say exibili ty and the market should dictate the plans direc tion. While county ofcials agree parts of the plan should include exibil ity, there are aspects of the plan that are ironclad, they say. The plan will al low for market exibili ty but there are key plan ning principles that cant be compromised such as the protection of water resources and topogra phy and the jobs to hous ing ratio, Commissioner Sean Parks said. Jobs is one of them. The plan allows for 16,000 residential units and re quires 1.5 jobs per house hold. And ofcials do not want potable water used for irrigating landscap ing. The sector plan area, which has multiple land owners, has been called the last big chunk of unde veloped land in the coun ty. The area is bounded by State Road 50 to the north, U.S. Highway 192 to the south, U.S. High way 27 to the west and the Orange County line to the east). Surrounded by major throughways and within close proximity to the city of Orlando and the theme parks, it is the prime spot to bring jobs to the re gion, Parks said We have one shot at this, said John Arnold, one of the landowners who owns Showcase of Citrus, which grows 60 varieties of citrus. Once it is approved and devel opment starts coming in, if we make any mistakes we are going to have to live with that for eterni ty. Arnold agreed with county ofcials that the area should include both housing and commer cial. But he wants county 91 19 44 19 27 441 33 50 27 LEESBURG TAVARES MOUNT DORA UMATILLA GROVELAND CLERMONT N Wellness Way Sector Plan In Wellness Way Sector Plan, landowners and county hope to avoid headaches of massive development Taming the beast WHITNEY WILLARD /STAFF GRAPHIC BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL John Arnold, owner of Showcase Citrus, checks on his oranges in Clermont on Thursday. Arnold, one of the landowners in the Wellness Way Sector Plan, believes the highly planned concept should have enough exibility to respond to changes in the housing market. We have one shot at this, he said. Once it is approved and development starts coming in, if we make any mistakes, we are going to have to live with that for eternity. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com A review of all 2,999 violations recorded by trafc cameras for turning right on red lights in Clermont has resulted in 2,373 or about 70 percent of them being rejected, city ofcials say. Some 52 of these vi olations were already paid and $8,216 in nes will be refunded. The review called for by City Manag er Darren Gray near ly a month ago cov ered all right-on-red violations recorded by the cameras between Jan. 3, when they rst became operational, through Feb. 11, when city ofcials respond ed to complaints by ticketed drivers. Be ginning Feb. 12, Cler mont police said they would be using more discretion when re viewing violations forwarded to them by the camera compa ny, American Trafc Solutions. Now that the pro cess is complete, we believe we have a sound public-safety program that is bet ter understood by the public, because we now have very few complaints, Gray said. Arnold Ceballos of Clermont was one of those drivers who be lieves he was wrong fully ticketed at the intersection of State Road 50 and Hancock Road, where the ma jority of right-on-red violations were re corded. He said he stopped at the red light, couldnt see ve hicles coming from his left because of a car next to him, and inched forward to get a better look before turning right. Thats when the camera snapped his picture, Ceballos said. AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Tavares Econom ic Development Di rector Bill Neron says he sees Wooton Park as Tavares version of New Yorks Central Park. Construction is ex pected to begin late this year on addition al work that will ex pand the citys main park, Neron said. It nishes off our Central Park, he add ed. The additional work will take place on 3.61 acres the city pur chased adjacent to Wooton Park with a little more than $2.3 million in bond mon ey, Neron said. The expansion proj ect includes a new re stroom, picnic pa vilion and storage building, a parking lot, entrance road, a three bay loading area boat ramp, an extension of the TavLee Trail, 2.6 acres of grass-covered open space, and a shoreline clearing that has al ready taken place, ac cording to documents from the city. The construction work has a proposed budget of $2.05 mil lion. The city plans to pay for this with a combined $2.08 mil lion in bond mon ey, the sale of wa ter taxis, two grants, and another pend ing grant, the docu ments show. The city Expansion coming to Wooton Park SEE SECTOR | A2 CLERMONT About 70 percent of citys red-light tickets dismissed SEE TICKETS | A2 TAVARES SEE PARK | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 22 CASH 3 ............................................... 8-1-7 Afternoon .......................................... 0-2-3 PLAY 4 ............................................. 4-2-4-7 Afternoon ....................................... 2-0-3-4 FLORIDA LOTTERY MARCH 21 FANTASY 5 ................................. 3-5-6-8-21 MEGA MONEY ................... 13-24-38-42-13 MEGA MILLIONS .............. 2-23-30-35-5310 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. ofcials heading the charge to be exible enough to adapt to the changing market, allow ing apartments, for in stance, if the need arises years from now. Parks said the plan is exible. Developers will submit proposals for develop ing pieces of the 16,000acre tract. Each proposal will be a planned devel opment that will have to adhere to the concepts overarching principles but can differ in many other ways. You have to plan out for commercial space, open space and the in frastructure, he said, but within each PUD, a developer can decide the type of development. The exibility lies en tirely within the detailed specic area plan pro cess. With each plan, den sity will be determined based on a number of factors, primarily the open space require ments and jobs-to-hous ing ratio. Scott Bollens, pro fessor of urban plan ning at the Universi ty of California, Irvine, said if housing is clus tered and development includes both a mixture of homes and business es, it would prevent ur ban sprawl, a planning term that describes scat tershot, low-density de velopment. In particular, Bollens said the open space re quirements are going to encourage builders to build at pretty high den sities because half the area is going to be open space. That would lead to a denser and clustered de velopment pattern, he said. Sprawl is low den sity and unclustered, characterless develop ment. Wellness Way requires 50 percent open space in each development. The jobs-to-hous ing ratio is important as well, said Bollens, who has taught urban plan ning for 26 years and has read a previous article on the sector plan. They are trying to prevent it from being built out as a bunch of homes, he said. That is an attempt to cre ate a balanced, integrat ed community out there where there are homes and also jobs. Bollens said having the jobs closer to housing will minimize commutes for residents. People will live clos er to their jobs sites and stores they shop in, he said. They are creating a balanced community of multiple uses. Jim Karr, another land owner in the sector plan area, said he want ed to make sure there are more single-family homes than multi-fami ly homes. We dont want to see multi-story family hous ing dominate the hous ing down there, he said. The real estate values for residential portions is dramatically affected by having all multi-fam ily units. Rex Clonts, a land owner who owns Clonts Groves Inc., expressed concerns about the jobsto-housing ratio. We want to make sure that it is not overly re strictive for what the market wants, he said. This, however, will not be changed in the plan, ofcials have noted. Commissioner Leslie Campione said she pre ferred lower densities for housing. I am not a proponent of high densities in the majority of the sector plan, she said. I would think there are particular areas that it might be ap propriate. Campione said staff is making sure there is ex ibility within the plan. When people on one hand say they want ex ibility and on the oth er hand there are people concerned about sprawl and overdevelopment (that think) exibili ty means that anything goes, she said. That is the delicate balance you have to strike between anything goes and hav ing exibility. Robert Chandler, Lakes Economic De velopment Director of Tourism, said health and life sciences, ware house and distribution, business services and nance and light manu facturing are the target industries for the area. If the maximum num ber of residential units are built, the minimum number of jobs created would be 24,300, county ofcials said. Parks said if the plan was not in place you would have 100-acre to 500-acre subdivisions being built haphazardly over the next 25 years. This plan will prohib it the lowest common denominator growth patterns we have, he said. It will encour age visionary leadership for growth into the next generation. SECTOR FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL John Arnold checks on his oranges at Showcase of Citrus in Clermont. They dismissed my case and so many oth ers because we shouldnt have gotten them since the beginning, he said. But its not only Cler mont where this is hap pening, its all over Flor ida. Ofcials previous ly said other reasons for dismissing tickets would be if drivers made righton-red turns in a care ful and prudent manner at less than 12 mph or if they stopped beyond the stop bar, or white line at an intersection. This (installing the cameras) is the biggest mistake and the city never educated the pub lic properly before doing it, Ceballos said. Since the cameras be came operational on Jan. 3, roughly 90 percent of the citations have been for right-on-red turns. At the city council meeting in February, some 59 drivers com plained about their right-on-red tickets and Gray asked Police Chief Charles Broadway to re view those citations. Broadway later rescind ed 51 of those, causing Gray to call for all cita tions to be reviewed. The city recently in stalled signs at intersec tions, warning drivers about turning right on red with cameras pres ent. Broadway said of cers are seeing fewer vi olations, so something is working. We believe more driv ers are now obeying the law, he said. We con tinue to emphasize that drivers should stop be fore turning right on red. Ceballos said he sim ply avoids the camer as by taking alternative routes and suspects oth er drivers are doing that, too. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1 also approved the l ing for another grant at Wednesdays city coun cil meeting, Neron said. Neron expects the bidding process for the construction to take place late this summer or early fall. Although a Florida Department of Transportation grant for the Tav-Lee trail ex tension is current ly scheduled for the 2016-17 scal year, the city is working with the Lake-Sumter Metropol itan Planning Organiza tion to move that fund ing up to the 2014-15 scal year, which begins in July, Neron said. If the FDOT grant does not come in this summer, Neron said they would do the boat ramp and as much work as they could on the other work without the grant. Im hoping we can bid it all at once in one big bid. I think well get a better price, he said. Neron said the citys goal has been to make Tavares the waterfront event venue capital of Central Florida. Terry Fiest, the chair man for the Sunnyland Antique Boat Festival that will be taking place next weekend, said the park expansions will al low for the event to ex pand and have more ex hibits in the future. It gives us the lati tude to grow our show, Fiest said. We actually have some limitations right now on space and how we work everybody into the show. Fiest said the event would be able to ll in the planned open area with exhibits. Tavares Mayor Robert Wolfe said the park ex pansions will be a great addition to the city. It will just open up the park that much more for the large events we have and, by having the boat ramp separated from the sea plane base, it will be a little safer, I think, in the long run, he said. Plus, well be able to have more boat parking down at the west end of the park, which the boaters will appreciate a lot. Wolfe added he thought the park addi tions would help boost business in the water front area. Before the city pur chased the property for the Wooton Park expan sion, a private proper ty owner was talking about developing the waterfront tract with townhomes and cov ered boat docks. Voters approved the city pur chase in a special elec tion in 2012. PARK FROM PAGE A1 SCOTT MCDONALD Associated Press KUALA LUM PUR, Malaysia Search planes headed back out to a desolate patch of the southern Indi an Ocean on Sun day in hopes of nding answers to the fate of the missing Malay sia Airlines jet, af ter China released a satellite image showing a large object oating in the search zone. The object, which appeared to be 22 meters (72 feet) by 13 me ters (43 feet), was captured by satel lite on Tuesday in a location that falls within the search zone that planes and ships have been crisscrossing since similar im ages from another satellite emerged earlier in the week. But ofcials have found no trace of it. Australian Mar itime Safety Au thority spokes woman Andrea Hayward-Ma her said she did not know wheth er the precise co ordinates of the lo cation had been searched, but said ofcials would use the information to rene the search area on Sunday. Satellite detects object in search area

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Hospice Hope Chest readies for Easter Women of Hospice will open the annual Easter Room on March 31 at the Hospice Hope Chest store, which offers a variety of holiday decorations, gifts and baked goods to help the public get ready for Easter. The Easter Room will remain open through April 12, and will be open Monday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 351 N. Donnelly St. Visitors can also honor or me morialize a loved one by pur chasing an angel for the Tree of Remembrance which is displayed in the room. For information, call Florence Codding at 352-589-5591 or Sue Ellen Ibach at 352-735-2933. TAVARES Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers class The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension in Lake County is hosting Flowers, Flowers and More Flowers, from 10 a.m. to noon on April 5 at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Road. The class is part of the Saturday in the Garden speak er series and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticul ture agent. Online registration is avail able at www. saturdayinthegarde napril2014.eventbrite.com, and the fee for the class is $5 for adults and free for children under the age of 16. TAVARES Railroad work will lead to additional road closures Due to upcoming work on the Florida Central Railroad tracks in Tavares, road closures will be in ef fect for 48 hours at County Drive on Wednesday and Thursday. Contractor for the railroads con struction, R.J. Corman, will post road closure and detour signs redi recting trafc through downtown. Motorists are encouraged to exhibit caution when traveling in the area. For information, call Michelle Bilbrey, at 352-483-9020. WILDWOOD Fundraiser Above Par For Animals tourney scheduled The 2nd annual Above Par For Animals golf ball drop with all proceeds beneting the Humane Society/SPCA of Sumter County is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., April 5. At the event, contestants will wait to see if their golf ball is one of the 3,000 dropped that will generate three big prizes. The numbered golf balls are avail able through April 3, and are $5 each, or ve for $20. Other events include live music, food, silent auction and a live auc tion for assorted items. For information or to purchase golf balls, call the Humane Society at 352-793-9117, or go to www.hssp ca.org. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com More than three dozen motorcycle police had the chance to put their biker skills on public display in Leesburg on Saturday and they werent handing out trafc tickets. A highlight of the 9th annual Cops and Kids Day at Gator Harley-Da vidson was the Motorcy cle Skills Challenge that allowed about 40 law en forcement ofcers from several area counties, in cluding Lake, to compete through a winding course as audience members as well as fellow ofcers cheered them on. It really helps you hone in your skills, said Mor nas Colston, a depu ty with the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce and a vet eran of the annual event. Wearing black boots, uniform white dress shirts and green biker pants and straddling Harley-David son bikes, Lake Coun ty entered six of its sev en motorcycle deputies in the contest. Ofcers had three tries to take on the course that was lled with tight turns, small circles and narrow lanes passing through hundreds of or ange cones. Expert and intermedi ate categories were rep resented and those with the fastest times won. But contestants were docked ve seconds for running into or over cones and let ting their feet or bikes hit the ground. And there were some spills and crashes into cones while Back in Black by AC/DC blared through speakers. You can really see why we need to stress safe ty when riding motorcy cles or driving near one, said Troy Jackson, of Cl ermont, an owner of two motorcycles and three cars who was sitting in the LEESBURG Cops and Kids Day at Gator Harley Staff report Twenty-four years ago, facing a possible four-year prison term, Rob ert Eugene Hendrix killed his cous in and the mans wife in Sorrento to prevent him from testifying in court. The murders landed the now 47-year-old Hendrix on death row where, after 23 years, he has been given an April 23 execu tion date. Hendrix and his cous in, Elmer Scott, were ar rested for breaking into a house in 1990. Scott accepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he tes tied against Hendrix, who was of fered a plea agreement of four years imprisonment and ve years proba tion. Hendrix did not want to accept a plea and told several friends prior to his court date that he was going to kill Scott to keep him from testify ing, court documents state. Hendrix didnt want to go back to prison, where he had spent 15 months beginning in 1986 after be ing convicted of burglary, grand theft and dealing in stolen property in Or ange County, the documents state. On Aug. 27, 1990, the day before his court date, Hendrix went to Scotts home in Sorrento and shot him in the head. His wife, Michelle, tried to inter vene and Hendrix slashed her throat. The deaths orphaned the couples 5-month-old daughter. Several witnesses, including (Hen drixs girlfriend) Denise (Turbyville), testied that Hendrix admitted com mitting the murders to silence Scott, the documents state. MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Deputy Randy Hon, with the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, competes in the Law Enforcement Motorcycle Skills Challenge at Gator Harley-Davidson in Leesburg on Saturday. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL An antique doctors bag, and all of the equipment usually inside it, is displayed at Doctors Day on Friday at Florida Hospital Waterman in Tavares. AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Leslie Sarmiento, marketing and physician relations for Flor ida Hospital Waterman, said she was going through a doctors bag, temporarily donated for a Doc tors Day display, when she found among the contents containers of old penicillin that had expired in 1947. It was like going back in time, Sarmiento said. The doctors bag, lent to the hospital by Dr. Dan Boggus, was just one of a number of objects, including a dissecting magnify ing glass, more than 100-yearold forceps, and a civil war bone saw, that were on display Friday at Florida Hospital Waterman as part of Doctors Day. Its to honor them. Its their day for what they do for the patients and for the community and for our hospital, Sarmiento said. The event usually includes a breakfast and lunch for the doc tors, and this year the display was added. Sarmiento said the display was both convenient for the doctors busy schedules and something they would be interested in. We did it for the doctors really. We did it for them to have a look back in time, she said. Dr. Richard Bosshardt lent a re fraction kit for optometry to the event. He said he bought the object around 1990, thinking he would start an antique medical instru ment collection, but the kit end ed up being the only object he collected. Bosshardt has a private prac tice and works out of South Lake Hospital, Florida Hospital Wa terman, and Leesburg Regional Medical Center. TAVARES SEE DOCTORS | A6 Doctors Day features unique medical display SORRENTO Killer faces April 23 execution date HENDRIX MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Sumter County Sheriffs Ofce deputies are serv ing more than warrants this month. Deputies have been helping to serve meals to cus tomers in various restaurants during March as part of the departments annual fundraiser, Tip-A-Cop, which benets the countys Special Olympics athletes. Almost a dozen deputies helped to serve salads, chicken, and other dishes and drinks to various ta bles at City Fire restaurant on Wednesday in Lake Sumter Landing in The Villages. Deputy Jeff Cohen said the event allows the pub lic to see that law enforcement is more than just MILLARD K. IVES/ DAILY COMMERCIAL Sumter County Deputy Jeff Cohen talks to City Fire Grill customer Joe Beauregard about his order on Thursday in The Villages. THE VILLAGES Tip-A-Cop helps area Special Olympians SEE COPS | A6 SEE KIDS | A6

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 THE WORLDS NUMBER 1SELLING TRACTOR$210PER MONTH MAX 28XL WITH MAX 5 BOX BLADE *W.A.C. (352) 357-79501255 E. CR Eustis | cobbstractor.com IN MEMORY OBITUARIES Cherie Lynn Auriemma Cherie Lynn Auriem ma, 54, of Fruitland Park, FL, passed away on March 12, 2014. Cherie was born in Ft. Lauderdale, FL on Feb ruary, 28, 1960. She graduated from Lees burg High School and continued on to receive a Medical Technolo gy Degree from Kai ser University. Cherie was married to Doug las Auriemma on Oc tober 10, 1981. She en joyed Fishing, Boating, Racing and anything adventurous that add ed a spark to her life. She was also active ly involved in support ing local re, police and wounded war riors. Cherie is survived by Husband; Doug las Auriemma, Moth er in law; Marilyn Au riemma, Sister in Law; Carol Brady, Brother in Law; Rick Auriem ma, Nephew; Cal Col linsworth, Nieces; Erin Ellis Ouellette, Katie El lis Shultz, Meredith El lis Patrick, Michelle Auriemma; 7 great nieces, 7 great neph ews, and 2 four legged kids Sierra and Ab bygail and other fam ily and friends. Cherie Auriemma is preced ed in death by Parents, Linda and Robert Wer beach, Grandmother, Betty Bizjak and Broth er, Jeffrey Werbeach. In lieu of owers memo rial donations may be given to The Wounded Warriors Project. On line condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.com Ar rangements entrust ed to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. Samuel D. Lewis Samuel D. Lew is (79) went to be with the Lord on February 4 while on a visit with family in Ohio. Sam was born in Rural Ala bama, graduated from Florida Sothern Col lege, and received his M.Div. degree from Candler School of The ology in Atlanta. He was a retired Unit ed Methodist Pastor, having served church es across the Flori da Conference, in Ter ra Ceia, Bradenton, Ft. Myers, Perry, Tallahas see and Riverview. He was presently an active on Community Unit ed Methodist Church in Fruitland Park with a passion for working with children and lead ing Bible Study. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Rev. Charlotte Lewis, four children: Kathy Pierce (Steve) of Dahlonega, Geor gia, Robby (Blanche Marie) of Winter Park, Randy (Nancy) of Kent, Ohio, and Jimmy (Kar ol) of Kent, Ohio: and seven grandchildren: Mark, Lance, Ange la, Ben, Matt, Kristo pher and Kaitlyn. Me morial Services will be held on Friday, March 28, at 2:00 pm, followed by burial in the Me morial Garden at the Church. In lieu of ow ers, please make do nations, either to the childrens ministries of Community Unit ed Methodist Church, Fruitland Park, or the National Heart Associ ation. William Tschida Jr. William (Bill) Joseph Tschida Jr. born in St. Paul, Minnesota on July 18, 1935, died on March 18th as a result of injuries sustained in a hit and run car crash on March 8th in Zell wood, Florida. Bill en joyed a 50 year career in many aspects of Real Estate, retiring in 2011 as Vice President of Re ality Op erations for Haw thorne at Leesburg. Bill real ized a life long goal of attend ing the Masters Golf Tournament in Augus ta, Georgia with his sons. He also achieved the dream of making a Hole in One on Sep tember 23, 2006. Bill loved his church, his home and was devoted to his family. He is sur vived by his wife Shir ley; they were mar ried for 61 years. Also surviving are his sev en children; Bill (Geri) Tschida, Cindy (Bruce) Clark, Steve (Coleen) Tschida, Jean (Bud dy) Martin, Joe (Darla) Tschida, Larry (Lynette) Tschida and Shirley (Bill) Peacock, there are 12 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren and Bills sister Sharon (Steve) Dooly. Mass of Christian Burial will be held in St. Patrick Cath olic Church, 6803 Old Hwy 441, Mt. Dora on Thursday, March 27th at 9 AM. You may share your own special thoughts and memo ries by visiting hamlin hilbish.com. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Direc tors 326 E. Orange Av enue, Eustis. 352-3574193. Bud Warren Garland Glenn Bud Warren Jr. was born in Mount Airy, North Car olina Sept. 11, 1936. He passed quietly in slum ber Wednesday morn ing in his home in Lake Placid. He is survived by his wife, Jean Keyes Warren; son, Chris L. Warren and wife, Char lotte Meeks of Ocoee; daughter, Diana W. Alarcon and husband Jorge A. of Plantation; son, G. Glenn War ren III, esq. and wife Lori Foley of Orange Park; daughter Janet W. Middleton of Winter Springs; granddaugh ters Choyce and Chel sea Middleton; Kath erine S. and Emma I. Warren; Mary Elizabeth Warren; and grandsons John L. Warren, and Miguel and George A. Alarcon. G.G. Bud Warren graduated in 1959 from North Car olina State University in Raleigh, N.C., where he met his wife, Jean. Bud was employed by Southern Bell Tele phone Co. and retired from Bellsouth as an as sistant vice-president after 35 years of ser vice. The family moved to Miami in 1968. Lat er assignments took Bud and family to Jack sonville, Atlanta, Ga., and Birmingham, Ala. Upon retirement in Jacksonville in 1994, Bud and Jean relocated in Lake Placid perma nently in 2005 at pres ent address. Bud was an active member of Kiwanis, Miami-Mid town and served as president from 197576. While in Jackson ville, the family lived in Orange Park and Bud served as a member of Orange Park Rotary Club, as well as Direc tor of the Black Creek District Boys Scouts of America. Buds inter est in the Scouting be gan in his youth and he earned his Eagle Scout from Old Hickory Council while in Mount Airy, N.C. He contin ued his lifelong ser vices with Boy Scouts of America and earned the Silver Beaver (highest award to a ci vilian) while in Orange Park. Bud served in the U.S. Army Corps and Army Reserves from 1960 to 1965. He was an ham radio operator, call sign, KD4-APE, and a member of ARRL, the national association for amateur radio, for 40 years. This interest and skill rendered untold assistance to victims of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Upon retirement, Bud became a Master Gardener and when re locating to Lake Plac id he continued his in terest in Highlands County Master Gar dener Program volun teering weekly at the Bert Harris Ag Cen ter on George Blvd. He was a prudent advo cate of Florida friendly landscaping and nat ural habitats for birds. He served as President of Highlands County Audubon Society and reinstated the Bluebird Data Collection Proj ect at Royce Ranch, which he spearheaded until his illness in 2011 forced him to turn over the project to dedi cated friends of blue birds. On Feb. 11, 2013, Bud submitted a proc lamation to the mayor and coun cil members TSCHIDA SEE OBITS | A6

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 declaring the Town of Lake Placid a Bluebird Sanctuary. With a life long interest in owers and nature, Bud suc cessfully grew orchids and maintained an in terest in orchid grow ing for 45 years. He was a member of Saint James Catholic Church in Lake Placid, and a 4th degree member of the Knights of Colum bus, Council #7245. A Memorial Mass Cele bration for Bud will be held on April 4, 2014 at Saint James Catho lic Church, 3380 Placid View Drive, Lake Plac id at 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, the family re quests donations be sent to Cornerstone Hospice, 209 North Ridgewood Dr., Suite 3, Sebring, 33870 and/or St. Vincent de Paul So ciety, St. James Catho lic Church, 3380 Plac id View Dr. Lake Placid, 33852. DEATH NOTICES Marvin James Blackwell Marvin James Black well, 53, of Fruitland Park died Friday, March 21, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Nada Cary Flint Nada Cary Flint, 88, of Grand Island, died Thursday, March 20, 2014. Harden/Pauli Fu neral Home, Eustis. OBITS FROM PAGE A4 Its just nice to be ap preciated, Bosshardt said of Doctors Day. He said he was a gen eral surgeon in the Navy before he became Lake Countys rst plastic surgeon in 1989. They werent sure I could make a living do ing this in Lake Coun ty, Bosshardt said. Doctors Day is of cially March 30, but Waterman celebrat ed early to ensure as many doctors as possi ble would be able to at tend, Sarmiento said. Florida Hospital Wa terman is a 269-bed, all private-room hospital with approximately 270 doctors. DOCTORS FROM PAGE A3 arresting people. It shows us in a dif ferent light, Cohen said. Deputies of all ranks are participating, in cluding Sheriff Bill Farmer, who greeted customers at the door on Thursday. The deputies last Tip-A-Cop event will be from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday at the City Fire American Oven & Bar at Brown woods Paddock Square in the Wildwood sec tion of The Villages. Money raised by the events will help with transportation needs of the countys 68 Special Olympics athletes. COPS FROM PAGE A3 stands. Lakes Sgt. Michael Marden, who coordi nated the event, said they make every ef fort to mirror the same road conditions that ofcers face as they ride through aggres sive trafc, smoothly and safely This really builds your riding skills, Marden said. The event was a fund raiser for the March of Dimes and not all the activities were cen tered around law-en forcement bikers. Saturdays fun-lled event featured more childrens activities this year, including rock climbing, face painting, games, and a scouting Soapbox Derby. There was no biki ni bike wash this year, but there was a chil drens bicycle obstacle course which was a lot easier than the mo torcycle course. KIDS FROM PAGE A3 Associated Press WINDERMERE A police ofcer was shot and killed early Sat urday after stopping two people and call ing for help in an Or lando suburb, author ities said. Windermere Police Department Ofcer Robert German called for backup after stop ping a young man and woman on foot short ly before 4 a.m., inves tigators said. German, 31, report ed his location and was found lying on the ground when a depu ty arrived at the scene, Orange County Sher iffs Ofce spokeswom an Jane Watrel said. He just said he was doing a subject stop and then all the trag ic events unfolded, Watrel said. The deputy put Ger man in his squad car and rushed him to the re department. Ger man was then taken to Orlando Regional Med ical Center, where he was pronounced dead. As ofcers responded to the scene, they heard shots red and found two individuals de ceased nearby match ing the description of the man and woman German had stopped, Watrel said. They are believed to have com mitted suicide. Their identities have not been released. Windermere is lo cated 15 miles west of Orlando. It has a pop ulation of about 3,000 people and one of the lowest crime rates in Florida, Mayor Gary Bruhn said. He said it was the rst lineof-duty death in the towns history. Violent crime is just not something that happens in the town of Windermere, Bruhn said. German had been with the department for ve years and just recently returned from desk duty after falling and injuring his shoulder, Bruhn said. He loved working as a police ofcer and he loved working at Wind ermere, Bruhn said. The investigation is ongoing. Fla. officer shot, killed after calling for backup WINDERMERE P.D. / AP In this undated photo provided by the Windermere Police Department, Ofcer Robert German is shown. ANGELA DELLI SANTI Associated Press TRENTON, N.J. Critics of Republican Gov. Chris Christie are becoming more vocal and more visible. Opponents are showing up at his public and private events, hurling crit icisms on a range of topics and question ing his knowledge of a plot orchestrated by his aides to tie up traf c near the bridge. As his poll num bers slipped, his second-term agen da stalled and ques tions about his vi ability as a 2016 presidential candi date arose amid the scandal, people who opposed his policies or his politics want ed to make their voices heard. Christie has done his best to project a sense of normal cy, said Rob Duffy, a spokesman for New Jersey Working Families. Christies dissenters more vocal

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YURAS KARMANAU Associated Press BELBEK AIR BASE, Crimea Ukraines armed forces took what may prove to be one of their nal stands Saturday in Crimea, as pro-Russian forc es stormed and seized control of an air force base amid a barrage of gunre and explosions. A tense blockade of the Belbek air base base that has endured for more than a week looked set for an inev itable culmination fol lowing the seizure of one Ukrainian-held military facility after another in recent days. It was the last ma jor Ukrainian mili tary facility in Crimea to fall into the hands of pro-Russian forces. The Ukrainian Defense Ministry hasnt provid ed details of how many bases it still controls on the peninsula. Crimea residents vot ed last week to secede from Ukraine and join Russia a process that was formalized this week with the blessing of President Vladimir Putin. The vote, which was held under condi tion akin to martial law under the gaze of ap parently Moscow-led militia forces, has been rejected as illegitimate by the international community. The assault on the Belbek base mir rored events at oth er Ukrainian-held mil itary facilities on the peninsula in recent days. In footage provided by the Ukrainian De fense ministry, a Rus sian-made BTR-80 ar mored personnel carrier could be seen smashing open a front gate at Belbek, a base across the bay from the port city of Sevastopol. APCs crashed through walls at two other locations and were followed by armed personnel, who advanced in crouch ing position as they se cured the area. Four BTR-80s were in volved in the assault, Ukrainian ofcials said. Ukrainian troops of fered no resistance. Later, a separate mot ley group arrived at the scene. The crowd appeared to be made up of professional sol diers, members of a re cently-formed militia unit and Cossacks. The cause of the ex plosions wasnt imme diately clear, although Ukrainian ofcials said they were stun gre nades used to disperse any potential resis tance. Two ambulances ar rived and then de parted shortly after. Ukraines Defense Min istry said one report er and a Ukrainian sol dier were injured in the raid. After the takeover, Belbek base command er Col. Yuliy Mam chur called together his men, who sang the Ukrainian national an them and then stood at ease. He then told his men to put their weap ons in the bases ar mory. A few hours before, Mamchur attended a wedding between two lieutenants serving at Belbek. Soldiers drank champagne and toast ed the couple, despite the looming threat of a raid on the base. Earlier, a crowd stormed the Novofe dorivka base, about 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Crimeas cap ital, Simferopol, Ukraines Defense Min istry said. Ukrainian television station TSN said troops inside the base hurled smoke grenades in an attempt to disperse groups of burly young men attempting to break through the front gates. There were con icting reports about whether the base was eventually taken over. Pro-Russian forces storm Ukrainian air base in Crimea ANDREW LUBIMOV / AP Pro-Russian militia members guard the Belbek airbase after Russian troops used at least four armored vehicles to break into an air base here, seizing control of one of the last Ukrainian military outposts in Crimea.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com MLB: Kershaw lifts Dodgers past D-backs / B4 PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTVERDE ACADEMY Montverde Academy Athletic Director and Boys Soccer Coach Mike Potempa speaks with and instructs area youth using the schools Cruyff Court facility. Since opening in January, the miniature soccer eld has become a popular addition to the school. MONTVERDE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Montverde Acade mys Cruyff Court has become a popular fa cility. Since opening in Jan uary, the miniature soccer eld has pro vided students at the school and various groups with a place to rene their soccer skills or to get some exercise. It also has become a place for youth groups to come together and develop a love for the sport. The Soccer Institute of Montverde Academy (SIMA) recently helped elementary school members of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Cen tral Floridas Walt Dis ney World Clubhouse to the Cruyff Court and led them through a va riety of drills. For many of the youngsters, it marked their introduc tion to soccer under the tutelage of Mont verde Academy Ath letic Director and Boys Soccer Coach Mike Po tempa. In addition, SIMA also welcomed a group MVAs Cruyff Court a popular facility FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The struggles for the Lake-Sumter State College baseball team continue to plague the Lakehawks. LSSC dropped two more games to St. Johns River State Col lege an 11-1 deci sion on Friday in Palat ka and an 8-2 game on Saturday at the LSSC baseball complex to extend the teams losing streak to nine games. After winning their rst game in Mid-Flor ida Conference play this season, LSSC has fallen to 1-9 in the conference and 14-13 overall. Fridays game was halted after seven in nings due to the 10-run mercy rule. On Saturday, the Vi kings built an 8-0 lead before LSSC avoided its second shutout in three games with a pair of runs in the ninth in ning. St. Johns Riv er State built an eightrun lead over the rst ve innings and made it stand up behind four pitchers who com bined on a three hitter. The Vikings car ried a no hitter into the eighth inning be fore Tanner Elsbernd legged out an ineld single against reliever Daniel Moritz. Mitch ell Cody started for St. Johns River State and went six innings before Trae Ratliff pitched a hitless seventh inning. Shane Crouse (2-4) started for LSSC and was tagged for six runs three earned in three innings. He al lowed only one hit, but walked four. Five Lakehawks pitchers surrendered only six hits, but were victimized by four LSSC errors. Only four of the eight runs al lowed by the Lake hawks were earned. Dan Autiello ac counted for LSSCs run production with a tworun homer to left. It was Autiellos second home run of the sea son. On Friday, a six-run fourth inning buried the Lakehawks. David Wood (1-3) started for the Lake hawks and allowed six runs in 3 2/3 innings. Only two of the runs were earned. Only ve of the 11 runs given up by the Lakehawks on Friday were earned. Elsbernd provid ed most of the pop for LSSC at the plate. He went 3-for-3. Jack Curtis scored the Lakehawks lone run. LSSC will wrap up the three-game set with St. Johns River State at 6 p.m. Monday in Palatka. MARK LONG Associated Press ORLANDO Top-seeded seeded Florida played with a lot more energy and intensi ty this time around. Scottie Wilbekin spear headed the effort. Wilbekin scored 21 points, including eight straight down the stretch, and the Gators beat Pittsburgh 6145 in the NCAA tournament Saturday. Floridas 28th con secutive win put it in the Sweet 16 for the fourth con secutive year. Coming off a lackluster performance in its NCAA opener against Albany, Flor ida (34-2) vowed to play bet ter against the Panthers (2610). Wilbekin surely did. He took over in the second half, JOHN RAOUX / AP TOP: Florida guard Scottie Wilbekin (5) and Florida center Patric Young (4) run off the court after Wilbekin made a 3-point shot against Pittsburgh during Saturdays NCAA tournament third-round game in Orlando. BELOW: Wilbekin drives to the basket past Pittsburgh forward Lamar Patterson (21). SEE CRUYFF | B2 No. 1 Gators dance their way to Sweet 16 Wilbekin scores 21, Florida beats Pitt SEE UF | B2 LEESBURG LSSC loses pair to St. Johns River

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Auto Club 400 After Friday qualifying; race today At Auto Club Speedway Fontana, Calif. Lap length: 2 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 187.315 mph. 2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 187.105. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 186.935. 4. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 186.901. 5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 186.461. 6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 186.384. 7. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 186.273. 8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 186.013. 9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.878. 10. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 185.792. 11. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 185.773. 12. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 185.725. 13. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 185.323. 14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 185.314. 15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 185.29. 16. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 185.209. 17. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 185.166. 18. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 184.715. 19. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 184.521. 20. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 183.96. 21. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.955. 22. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 183.861. 23. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 183.491. 24. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 185.095. 25. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 184.525. 26. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.322. 27. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 184.299. 28. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 183.983. 29. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 183.922. 30. (27) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 183.641. 31. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 183.58. 32. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 182.918. 33. (35) David Reutimann, Ford, 182.219. 34. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 181.525. 35. (32) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 181.507. 36. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 181.365. 37. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. BASEBALL Spring Training Saturdays Games Toronto 9, Detroit 4 N.Y. Mets 10, Miami (ss) 2 Washington 6, Miami (ss) 5 Atlanta 6, Boston 3 St. Louis 5, Houston 2 Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 3, tie, 10 innings N.Y. Yankees 5, Minnesota 4 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 3 San Diego 3, Chicago White Sox (ss) 3, tie L.A. Angels 9, Milwaukee 6 Colorado (ss) 14, Cleveland 6 Oakland 6, Seattle (ss) 5 Kansas City 8, Texas 4 Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 3 San Francisco 8, Chicago White Sox (ss) 5 Colorado (ss) 4, Seattle (ss) 3 Todays Games Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 38 30 .559 Brooklyn 36 31 .537 1 New York 29 40 .420 9 Boston 23 47 .329 16 Philadelphia 15 54 .217 23 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 47 20 .701 Washington 36 33 .522 12 Charlotte 33 36 .478 15 Atlanta 31 36 .463 16 Orlando 19 50 .275 29 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 51 18 .739 Chicago 38 31 .551 13 Cleveland 26 43 .377 25 Detroit 25 43 .368 25 Milwaukee 13 56 .188 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 52 16 .765 Houston 46 22 .676 6 Dallas 42 28 .600 11 Memphis 40 28 .588 12 New Orleans 28 40 .412 24 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 Portland 45 24 .652 6 Minnesota 34 33 .507 16 Denver 31 38 .449 20 Utah 22 47 .319 29 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 48 21 .696 Golden State 44 26 .629 4 Phoenix 40 29 .580 8 Sacramento 24 45 .348 24 L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324 25 x-clinched playoff spot Fridays Games Indiana 91, Chicago 79 New York 93, Philadelphia 92 Oklahoma City 119, Toronto 118,2OT Brooklyn 114, Boston 98 Miami 91, Memphis 86 New Orleans 111, Atlanta 105 Dallas 122, Denver 106 Phoenix 98, Detroit 92 San Antonio 99, Sacramento 79 Washington 117, L.A. Lakers 107 Saturdays Games Portland at Charlotte, late Houston at Cleveland, late Philadelphia at Chicago, late Indiana at Memphis, late Miami at New Orleans, late Orlando at Utah, late San Antonio at Golden State, late Detroit at L.A. Clippers, late Todays Games Atlanta at Toronto, 1 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Denver, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament FIRST ROUND At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, March 18 Albany (N.Y.) 71, Mount St. Marys 64 N.C. State 74, Xavier 59 Wednesday, March 19 Cal Poly 81, Texas Southern 69 Tennessee 78, Iowa 65, OT EAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. UConn 89, Saint Josephs 81, OT Villanova 73, Milwaukee 53 At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. Harvard 61, Cincinnati 57 Michigan State 93, Delaware 78 Friday, March 21 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Memphis 71, George Washington 66 Virginia 70, Coastal Carolina 59 At The AT&T Center San Antonio North Carolina 79, Providence 77 Iowa State 93, North Carolina Central 75 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Villanova (29-4) vs. UConn (27-8), late At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. Michigan State (27-8) vs. Harvard (27-4), late Sunday, March 23 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Virginia (29-6) vs. Memphis (24-9), 8:40 p.m. At The AT&T Center San Antonio Iowa State (27-7) vs. North Carolina (24-9), 5:15 p.m. SOUTH REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Dayton 60, Ohio State 59 Syracuse 77, Western Michigan 53 At The Amway Center Orlando Pittsburgh 77, Colorado 48 Florida 67, Albany (N.Y.) 55 Friday, March 21 At Scottrade Center St. Louis Stanford 58, New Mexico 53 Kansas 80, Eastern Kentucky 69 At Viejas Arena San Diego Stephen F. Austin 77, VCU 75, OT UCLA 76, Tulsa 59 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At First Niagara Center Buffalo, N.Y. Dayton 55, Syracuse 53 At The Amway Center Orlando Florida 61, Pittsburgh 45 Sunday, March 23 At Scottrade Center St. Louis Kansas (25-9) vs. Stanford (22-12), 12:15 p.m. At Viejas Arena San Diego UCLA (27-8) vs. Stephen F. Austin (32-2), 7:10 p.m. MIDWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At The Amway Center Orlando Saint Louis 83, N.C. State 80, OT Louisville 71, Manhattan 64 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Michigan 57, Wofford 40 Texas 87, Arizona State 85 Friday, March 21 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Mercer 78, Duke 71 Tennessee 86, UMass 67 At Scottrade Center St. Louis Wichita State 64, Cal Poly 37 Kentucky 56, Kansas State 49 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At The Amway Center Orlando Louisville 66, Saint Louis 51 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Michigan 79, Texas 65 Sunday, March 23 At PNC Arena Raleigh, N.C. Mercer (27-8) vs. Tennessee (23-12), 6:10 p.m. At Scottrade Center St. Louis Wichita State (35-0) vs. Kentucky (25-10), 2:45 p.m. WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 20 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Wisconsin 75, American 35 Oregon 87, BYU 68 At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. North Dakota State 80, Oklahoma 75, OT San Diego State 73, New Mexico State 69, OT Friday, March 21 At The AT&T Center San Antonio Baylor 74, Nebraska 60 Creighton 76, Louisiana-Lafayette 66 At Viejas Arena San Diego Arizona 68, Weber State 59 Gonzaga 85, Oklahoma State 77 Third Round Saturday, March 22 At BMO Harris Bradley Center Milwaukee Wisconsin (27-7) vs. Oregon (24-9), late At Spokane Arena Spokane, Wash. San Diego State 63, North Dakota State 44 Sunday, March 23 At The AT&T Center San Antonio Creighton (27-7) vs. Baylor (25-11), 7:40 p.m. At Viejas Arena San Diego Arizona (31-4) vs. Gonzaga (29-6), 9:40 p.m. NCAA Womens Basketball Tournament LINCOLN REGIONAL Saturday, March 22 At Durham, N.C. Duke 87, Winthrop 45 DePaul 104, Oklahoma 100 At Los Angeles Nebraska 74, Fresno State 55 N.C. State (25-7) vs. BYU (26-6), late Sunday, March 23 At Storrs, Conn. Georgia (20-11) vs. Saint Josephs (22-9), 5:30 p.m. UConn (34-0) vs. Prairie View (14-17), 8 p.m. At College Station, Texas Gonzaga (29-4) vs. James Madison (28-5), 5:30 p.m. Texas A&M (24-8) vs. North Dakota (22-9), 8 p.m. Second Round Monday, March 24 At Los Angeles N.C. State-BYU winner vs. Nebraska (26-6), TBA At Durham, N.C. DePaul (28-6) vs. Duke (28-6), 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 25 At Storrs, Conn. UConn-Prairie View winner vs. Georgia-Saint Jo sephs winner, TBA At College Station, Texas Gonzaga-James Madison winner vs. Texas A&MNorth Dakota winner, TBA STANFORD REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 22 At Ames, Iowa Florida State 55, Iowa State 44 Stanford (28-3) vs. South Dakota (19-13), late Sunday, March 23 At Seattle South Carolina (27-4) vs. Cal State Northridge (1814), 5:30 p.m. Middle Tennessee (29-4) vs. Oregon State (2310), 8 p.m. At Chapel Hill, N.C. Michigan State (22-9) vs. Hampton (28-4), 12:30 p.m. North Carolina (24-9) vs. UT-Martin (24-7), 3 p.m. At State College, Pa. Penn State (22-7) vs. Wichita State (26-6), 12:30 p.m. Dayton (23-7) vs. Florida (19-12), 3 p.m. Second Round Monday, March 24 At Ames, Iowa Florida State (21-11) vs. Stanford-South Dakota winner, TBA Tuesday, March 25 At Seattle South Carolina-Cal State Northridge winner vs. Mid dle Tennessee-Oregon State winner, TBA At Chapel Hill, N.C. Michigan State-Hampton winner vs. North Caroli na-UT-Martin winner, TBA At State College, Pa. Dayton-Florida winner vs. Penn State-Wichita State winner, TBA NOTRE DAME REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 22 At Toledo, Ohio Arizona State 69, Vanderbilt 61 Notre Dame 93, Robert Morris 42 At West Lafayette, Ind. Oklahoma State 61, Florida Gulf Coast 60, OT Purdue 84, Akron 55 At Lexington, Ky. Kentucky 106, Wright State 60 Syracuse 59, Chattanooga 53 At Waco, Texas California 64, Fordham 63 Baylor (29-4) vs. Western Kentucky (24-8), late Second Round Monday, March 24 At Toledo, Ohio Notre Dame (33-0) vs. Arizona State (23-9), 6:30 p.m. At West Lafayette, Ind. Oklahoma State (24-8) vs. Purdue (22-8), 6:30 p.m. At Lexington, Ky. Syracuse (23-9) vs. Kentucky (25-8), 6:30 p.m. At Waco, Texas California (22-9) vs. Baylor-Western Kentucky win ner, TBA LOUISVILLE REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 22 At Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee 70, Northwestern State 46 St. Johns (22-10) vs. Southern Cal (22-12), late Sunday, March 23 At College Park, Md. Maryland (24-6) vs. Army (25-7), 12:30 p.m. Texas (21-11) vs. Pennsylvania (22-6), 3 p.m. At Iowa City, Iowa Louisville (30-4) vs. Idaho (25-8), 5:30 p.m. Iowa (26-8) vs. Marist (27-6), 8 p.m. At Baton Rouge, La. LSU (19-12) vs. Georgia Tech (20-11), 12:30 p.m. West Virginia (29-4) vs. Albany (N.Y.) (28-4), 3 p.m. Second Round Monday, March 24 At Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee (27-5) vs. St. Johns-Southern Cal win ner, TBA Tuesday, March 25 At College Park, Md. Texas-Pennsylvania winner vs. Maryland-Army win ner, TBA At Iowa City, Iowa Iowa-Marist vs. Louisville-Idaho winner, TBA At Baton Rouge, La. LSU-Georgia Tech winner vs. West Virginia-Albany (N.Y.) winner, TBA HOCKEY NHL Fridays Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Columbus 1 Chicago 3, Carolina 2 Boston 2, Colorado 0 Nashville 6, Calgary 5 Saturdays Games Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 1 Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 3, OT Detroit 3, Minnesota 2 Dallas 3, Ottawa 1 Florida at Los Angeles, late Montreal at Toronto, late N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, late Carolina at Winnipeg, late Boston at Phoenix, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Wa shington at San Jose, late Todays Games Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Florida at Anaheim, 8 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour Arnold Palmer Invitational Saturday At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course Orlando Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72 Third Round a-amateur Adam Scott 62-68-71 201 Keegan Bradley 71-67-66 204 Matt Every 69-70-66 205 Jason Kokrak 67-71-67 205 Chesson Hadley 69-68-69 206 Francesco Molinari 67-70-69 206 Ian Poulter 68-71-69 208 Ryo Ishikawa 65-74-70 209 Morgan Hoffmann 67-71-71 209 Freddie Jacobson 71-68-70 209 J.B. Holmes 68-69-72 209 Pat Perez 70-70-70 210 Erik Compton 72-68-70 210 Aaron Baddeley 70-70-70 210 Matt Jones 71-71-69 211 Henrik Stenson 69-73-69 211 Sam Saunders 69-71-71 211 Charles Howell III 68-71-72 211 TV 2 DAY AUTO RACING 3 p.m. FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Auto Club 400, at Fontana, Calif. GOLF 12:30 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, nal round, at Orlando 2 p.m. NBC PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, nal round, at Orlando 5 p.m. TGC Champions Tour, Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, nal round, at Saucier, Miss. 7 p.m. TGC LPGA, Founders Cup, nal round, at Phoenix MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. MLB Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees 4 p.m. WGN Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland MLB Cleveland vs. L.A. Angeles MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN NIT, second round, Illinois at Clemson Noon CBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Kansas vs. Stanford, at St. Louis 2:30 p.m. CBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Wichita State vs. Kentucky, at St. Louis 5 p.m. CBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Iowa State vs. North Carolina, at San Antonio ESPNU NIT, second round, Southern Miss at Missouri 6 p.m. TNT NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Mercer vs. Tennessee, at Raleigh, N.C. 7 p.m. TBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, UCLA vs. Stephen F. Austin, at San Diego 7:30 p.m. TRUTV NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Creighton vs. Baylor, at San Antonio 8:30 p.m. TNT NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Virginia vs. Memphis, at Raleigh, N.C. 9:30 p.m. TBS NCAA Division I tournament, third round, Arizona vs. Gonzaga, at San Diego NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 9:30 p.m. FS-Florida Orlando at L.A. Lakers NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Minnesota at Detroit SOCCER 9:25 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Southampton at Tottenham 12:25 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Stoke City at Aston Villa WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, Georgia Tech at LSU; Hampton vs. Michigan State at Chapel Hill, N.C.; Army at Maryland; and Wichita State at Penn State 3 p.m. ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, Albany vs. West Virginia at Baton Rouge, La.; UT Martin at North Carolina; Pennsylvania vs. Texas at College Park, Md.; and Florida vs. Dayton at State College, Pa. 5:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, James Madison vs. Gonzaga at College Station, Texas; Idaho vs. Louisville at Iowa City, Iowa; Cal State Northridge vs. South Carolina at Seattle; and Saint Josephs vs. Georgia at Storrs, Conn. 8 p.m. ESPN NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, Prairie View at UConn ESPN2 NCAA Division I tournament, rst round, regional coverage, North Dakota at Texas A&M; Marist at Iowa; and Oregon State vs. Middle Tennessee at Seattle SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED from the Boys and Girls Club of Clermont re cently, which includ ed children with Down syndrome. Potempa said he has already noticed how word has spread about the Cruyff Court and how it is helping local youth build an interest in soccer. Its great for us to come out with children of the community and provide an exercise and play the game we have a passion for, Potem pa said. Most impor tantly, its great to see so many youngsters hav ing fun and spend an hour or hour-and-a-half with smiles on their fac es. (The Cruyff Court) has allowed Montverde Academy to give back something to the com munity and children from surrounding re gions of central Flori da learn more about the game of soccer. Its really great to see them having fun. The visit by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Cen tral Florida actual ly served a number of functions, according to Yesenia Maysonet, pro gram director for the organization. She said it allowed many of the youngsters an opportu nity to travel away from their homes for the rst time, in addition to the chance to learn more about a game that is considered the most popular sport in the world. Maysonet also said it introduced the chil dren to the concept of an international private school. We serve elementa ry, middle school and high school youth in Or ange, Osceola, Seminole and Brevard counties, said Yesenia Mayson et, program director for the Boys and Girls Club of Central Florida. We have 13 tradition al clubs and 13 middle school-specic clubs, with programs that range in interests in the arts, technology, sports, tness, and healthy habits. This trip exposed our youth to nearly all of those interests. The Cruyff Court at Montverde Academy is the only one of its kind in the United States and is one of only 180 scat tered throughout the world, according to the Johan Cruyff Founda tion (JCF). The court is, essentially, a min iature soccer eld designed to help children learn the game and improve their physical tness. While it is used pre dominantly as a soc cer facility at Montverde Academy, Cruyff Courts have been used to help disadvantage youth and youngsters with disabili ties by providing an area for others sports, such as wheelchair hockey. All Cruyff Court fa cilities promote healthy living and provide op portunities for young sters to improve their physical health and per sonal development to increase activity and combat childhood obe sity, Potempa said. Founded in 1997, the JCF w as started by Cruyff, a European soc cer legend and stand out in the 1970s and 1980s in the defunct North American Soccer League. The idea for the JCF, Cruyff said, began when he was playing in the NASL. A neighbor had a child with Down syndrome who, was al ways alone, watching other kids playing and having fun. Over time, Cruyff said he befriended the boy and taught him basic soccer skills to get him to become more active. As time passed, Cruyff said, he began playing soccer with the rest of the kids in the neighborhood. Through the JCF, Cruyff said he has real ized his dream of giving more children, includ ing those with disabili ties, the opportunity to play together through sport while making a contribution to healthy living, quality of life and values. The JCF also supports sports projects for children with dis abilities and it organizes unique sporting events for youth, according to the JCF website. Potempa said SIMA operates independent ly from the Montverde Academy boys soccer team and is accessible to all students at Mont verde Academy. SIMA was estab lished as an elite level soccer specic training experience for anyone who possesses the pas sion to challenge them selves at the highest lev el academically and athletically, Potempa said. It also provides a professional training environment for any passionate athlete with the desire to work hard and improve. CRUYFF FROM PAGE B1 scoring 11 of the team s 13 points during a 7-minute stretch. Patri c Young wasnt too shabby, either, finishing with seven points and eight rebounds. Michael Frazier II chipped in 10 points for the Gators. Frazier was just 2-of-9 shooting from 3-point range. Had Florida not been cold from behind the arc, the game would have been essentially over much sooner than it was. The Gators finished 5 of 20 from 3-point range, with at least five of those rim ming in and out. Florida will play either fourth-seeded UCLA or 12th-seeded Stephen F. Austin on Thursday in Memphis, Tenn. The Bruins and Lumberjacks play Sunday in San Diego. Talib Zanna led the Panthers with 10 points, their only player in double figures. A lot was made of the inside matchup be tween Young and Zanna, two ripped centers who played well Thursday. But Wilbekin was the story in this one. He hit a running 3-pointer at the first-half buzzer and drained a back-breaking 3 with 8:24 remaining that gave Florida its larg est lead at that point, 45-31. His consecutive floaters inside 5 minutes to play were equal ly troublesome for Pitt. UF FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available Tee time 5 days in advance. Expires 3/31/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$34 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT NOAH TRISTER Associated Press TOLEDO, Ohio Ev ery now and then, No tre Dame coach Muf fet McGraw will let her team practice without any fouls being called. We want to make them tougher. We dont want them listening to the whistle, we dont want them complain ing to the referees, McGraw said. We do that pretty frequently. Its not easy for a team like the Fighting Irish to stay sharp when so many of their games turn quickly into routs, but top-seeded Notre Dame showed no sign of any real weakness Saturday in its NCAA tournament open er, beating 16th-seed ed Robert Morris 93-42. The unbeaten Irish led 50-15 at halftime. Michaela Mabrey scored 11 of her 16 points in the rst half for Notre Dame (33-0), and Jewell Loyd and Natalie Achonwa n ished with 15 each. The Irish are trying for their fourth straight Fi nal Four appearance this year. Theyll take on ninth-seeded Arizo na State in the second round Monday. In the tournament, you cant take anyone lightly, said Ariel Brak er, who had 10 points and eight rebounds. Upsets happen all the time. Maybe so, but the Irish will have to wait at least one more game and possibly lon ger for a signicant challenge in this tour nament. Notre Dame won its previous two rstround games at the NCAA tournament by 31 and 33 points. The margin was wider than that at halftime of this one, with the Irish up by 35. Mabrey made back-to-back 3-point ers during a 25-4 run that made the score 328. Robert Morris (21-12) shot 27 percent from the eld. Greek star Artemis Spanou, one of the top players in Northeast Conference history, was held to sev en points and attempt ed only four shots from the eld. After the game, coach Sal Buscaglia let loose with an emotional opening statement at his news conference, his voice choking up as he went on for about three minutes about his team. Notre Dames great, and all these other peo ple are great, but they do the same thing that they do. They work their tail off for me, Buscaglia said. Just because were not No tre Dame and theyre great because were Robert Morris doesnt mean that these young ladies dont do every thing that they do. Ev erything they do! Did you ever go and work so hard for two-anda-half hours, and then have to take an ice bath? Try it. Thats what they do. Thats what they do for me, and they do for their school. Spanou became the third player in NEC history to earn play er o f the year honors in back-to-back sea sons, but Notre Dame was ready for her. She played 39 minutes and nished with six re bounds and four as sists. But she also turned the ball over eight times. With less than a min ute to play, she came out of the game and went down the line of coaches and team mates on the Robert Morris sideline, receiv ing hugs. The Irish did not have any player ex ceed Mabreys total of 23 minutes. She shot 6 of 7 from the eld and made four 3-pointers. Madison Cable scored 13 points for Notre Dame, and Ariel Braker contributed 10. The Irish outscored Robert Morris 50-8 in the paint. Anna Niki Stamolam prou led the Colonials with 12 points. Five Notre Dame players reached dou ble gures in scoring, and 10 played at least 12 minutes. Any hope Robert Morris had of keep ing this game close was pretty much dashed by Notre Dames outside shooting. The Irish, who came in shoot ing 34 percent from 3-point range, went 10 of 18 from beyond the arc. Cable went 3 of 4 from long distance, part of an efcient overall per formance for the heavy favorites. Loyd shot 7 of 11 from the eld and had seven rebounds. Freshman Lindsay Al len had seven assists in 20 minutes. You never know with the rst NCAA tourna ment, how the fresh men are going to re spond, McGraw said. Lindsay, she has that poise and that person ality of just a steady demeanor the whole game. Unbeaten Notre Dame routs Robert Morris RICK OSENTOSKI / AP Notre Dame guard Jewell Loyd (32) shoots past Robert Morris forward Artemis Spanou (15) during Saturdays NCAA womens tournament rst-round game in Toledo, Ohio. FRED GOODALL Associated Press ORLANDO Louis vil le didnt need a big game from Russ Smith to get back to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament. Luke Hancock scored 21 points and the defending national champions shrugged off a cold shooting performance to beat Saint Louis 66-51 on Saturday and advance to the round of 16 for the third straight year. The fourth-seed ed Cardinals (31-5) shot under 45 per cent, had 19 turnovers and only got 11 points from Smith, their star. It didnt matter with the fth-seeded Billik ens (27-7) going 0 for 15 from 3-point range and struggling to take care of the basketball. Louisville moves on the Midwest Region al seminals in In dianapolis against either No. 1 seed Wich ita State or No. 8 seed Kentucky. The unbeat en Shockers and Wild cats meet Sunday in St. Louis. Saint Louis, which has never been to the Sweet 16, lost in the third round for the third consecutive year. Dwayne Evans led the Billikens with 16 points and Atlantic 10 player of the year Jor dair Jett nished with 15. Chris Jones made a couple of huge shots and scored 11 points for Louisville. Montre zl Harrell put a punc tuation mark on the victory with a dunk that enabled him to nish with 10 points and 11 rebounds. Louisville coach Rick Pitino improved to 5016 in the NCAA tour nament, including 41-6 when his team is the higher seed. The Cardinals are in the round of 16 for the 20th time, match ing Kansas and trail ing only North Caroli na (25), Kentucky (24) and Duke (23). Smith struggled shooting the ball for the second straight game, missing his rst four attempts and go ing scoreless until his 3-pointer put the Car dinals up 25-14 in the nal minute of the opening half. The Louisville star scored 18 points in the sec ond-round win over Manhattan, however he was just 3 of 9 from the eld and had six turnovers. Saint Louis is one of only a handful of teams that start ve seniors, and their ex perience and cohe sion showed in weath ering a slow start and methodically work ing its way back into the game after falling down by 11 points. The Billikens began the second half with a 13-2 run, holding Louisville without a eld goal for nearly 7 minutes to take a 29-27 lead. But Smith hit a oat er in the lane, then made two free throws to restore order for the Cardinals, who forced 18 turnovers and lim ited Saint Louis to 39.6 percent shooting. Louisville rebuilt their lead to 13 over the next 9 minutes, with Hancock making two long 3-pointers and Jones delivering a 3-pointer and acrobat ic layup before Smith nished a 23-8 surge with a driving layup that put his team up 50-37. Smith nished 3 of 10 from the eld and had a team-high seven turnovers. The senior whos averaging more than 18 points led the Cardinals with seven assists. Saint Louis got 22 points and a ca reer-high 15 rebounds from Rob Loe to over came a 16-point sec ond-half decit to beat North Carolina State in overtime on Thursday. Louisville survived a second-round scare, too, using a late spurt led by Smith, Hancock and Harrell to turn back a challenge from No. 13 seed Manhat tan. Loe had just 10 points and ve rebounds Sat urday. The Billikens, in the NCAA tournament for a school-record third straight year, lost to Michigan State and Oregon in the third round the past two seasons. Defending champ Louisville returning to Sweet 16 PHELAN M. EBENHACK / AP Louisville coach Rick Pitino, right, yells at guard Russ Smith (2) during the second half Saturdays NCAA tournament third-round game against Saint Louis in Orlando. GOLF DOUG FERGUSON Associated Press ORLANDO Adam Scott still had the lead at Bay Hill on Saturday. At least ve other players suddenly have a realistic chance at winning. Scott, who started the third round with a sev en-shot lead, missed three par putts inside 8 feet and had to settle for a 1-under 71, which nar rowed his lead to three shots over Keegan Brad ley going into the nal round at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. The greens were rmer than ever after three days of sunshine, though the pins were accessible and allowed for good scoring. Several players took advantage. Scott did not. His score was helped by a pair of long birdie putts on the back nine. Bradleys approach to the 18th narrow ly cleared the rocks that frame the lake, leaving him a 4-foot birdie putt for a 6-under 66. He will be paired with Scott in the nal round, with much at stake for both of them. A victory for Scott should push him to No. 1 in the world when he arrives at Augusta Na tional to defend his ti tle in the Masters. Brad ley hasnt won anywhere in the world since the Bridgestone Invitational in 2012. Scott was at 15-under 201. Bradley isnt the only player who now has a chance. Matt Every (66) and Jason Kokrak (67) were four shots behind, both going for their rst PGA Tour victory. Chesson Hadley and Francesco Molinari of Italy each had a 69 and were an other shot behind. Had ley, who won the Puer to Rico Open two weeks ago, can qualify for the Masters with a high n ish. He likely would need to be in sixth place or better to be solidly in side the top 50 in the world. Scott was never sat ised with the sev en-shot lead, and he still felt comfortable with a three-shot advantage going to Sunday. When youve got the lead, you have to work for it, he said. Im still in good shape. Five holes into the third round, his sev en-shot lead already had been trimmed to one. Scott three-putted from 60 feet on the opening hole, an indication of how fast the greens have become at Bay Hill, and he hit a poor chip to 12 feet on the fth hole to drop another shot. Scott comes back to the field at Bay Hill

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SANDYS BAIT AND TACKLE | TAVARES Crappie are being caught by spi der-rigging rods baited with pink or ch artreuse jigs tipped with min nows. Lake Dora has been partic ularly good. Bass are biting well, they have moved into deeper wa ter. They are being caught on RatL-Traps and soft plastics in June bug or green pumpkin colors. Shell cracker are starting to bite on red worms and crickets. Bill Brook er and Mike Strauss won the open bass tournament sponsored by San dys Bait& Tackle last Saturday with 19.49 pounds. Vern Kemp and Ran dy Hamrick took second place with 15.25 pounds. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee claimed dual honors with third place at 14.04 pounds and big sh at 7.59 pounds. Sandys bass tour nament, open to all, is held on the 3rd Saturday monthly at the buz zard beach ramp. Sandys next reg ular bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30pm; any questions about the tournament call the shop at 352742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Several patrons are catching bass on minnows, shrimp and worms. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or com ing off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Specks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They have moved outside of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water, but could still go to the beds one more time if nice weather prevails. Bass and striper action has fallen off. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Speck activity has been very good; they are biting on minnows and jigs. Bass have been slow with the most recent weather change. The bass bedding appears to have subsid ed and they have moved back out into open water. Come check out the next generation bass in pond by Nelsons. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests are catching bass and crappie. Several large bass have been caught in Haynes Creek at the locks. The bass are hitting on arti cial baits primarily while the crap pie are biting on minnows and jigs. Fish are starting to bite in Lake Yale. Minnows and worm sales have been very good. Small boats can launch from Black Bass boat ramps. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE Crappie shing has been good, weather permitting. Lake Dora and the Apopka-Beauclaire canal have been noteworthy. So good in fact, limits caught on jigs tipped min nows are being reported. Good jig colors have been chartreuse, or ange and hot pink. Quite a few crap pie are being caught in Lake Mon roe, Lake Dora, Lake Beauclaire and Lake Carlton. Fish are on the beds and biting on jigs, lizards, crawdads, small worms and small baits in gen eral. Remember to practice catch/ release with bedding bass. Colors of baits for bass are crawdad colors, black/blue or watermelon red. It is beautiful weather to get out on the lake and catch a few. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfn tbf brb t tf tr fnn r nn tbf brb t n nnf tnnnf trnn rf f rf f nn rnnn tbnn brbnn t nn n n n t n n trnnnn MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL DENNIS PASSA Associated Press SYDNEY Opening day turned out to be a pretty gday for the Los Angeles Dodgers and ace Clayton Kershaw. Kershaw ashed his Cy Young form, Scott Van Slyke ho mered and the NL West champi ons opened the Major League Baseball season with a 3-1 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday night at Sydney Cricket Ground. A crowd of about 40,000 watched as MLB played its rst regu lar-season game in Aus tralia. Kershaw, who signed a se ven-year, $215 mil lion contract in January, allowed one run and ve hits in 6 2-3 innings. Van Slyke hit a two-run ho mer and also doubled. The rst pitch was de layed because of rain for 14 minutes. By then, the long trip Down Under had taken even longer for some Arizona play ers. A team bus had a at tire, and the Diamond backs said a handful of players decided to walk the last half-mile to the stadium instead of wait ing for a replacement bus. Kershaw was im pressive while making his fourth consecutive opening-day start. He struck out seven, walked one and was pulled by manager Don Mattingly after throwing his 102nd pitch. Quite a turnaround from spring training, when the two-time NL Cy Young winner went 0-3 with a 9.20 ERA in four starts. Sometimes you just need the adrenaline of a regular-season game, and I just kind of feel re lieved to get this one un der my belt, he said. Its always good to get results, obviously, he said. This one count ed. In his previous open ing-day starts, Kershaw was 2-0 with 19 strike outs in 19 scoreless in nings. Kershaw did a good job keeping us in the middle of the diamond, Diamondbacks manag er Kirk Gibson said. He threw a good ballgame against us. We know theyre always going to be close. Three relievers kept the Diamondbacks scoreless with hitless work. Chris Perez, a vetime All-Star with Cleve land before joining the Dodgers in the offsea son, got the las t out in the seventh. Brian Wilson pitched the eighth and closer Kenley Jansen got the save. Jansen walked a batter before getting Ge rardo Parra to ground out to end the game. Clayton was real ly good, kind of as al ways ... kind of doing his thing, Mattingly said. Hes a tough guy to take out of the game, he al ways wants to stay in. And I thought our bull pen was really good to night. Chris comes in and gets a big out for us there and Wilson did a good job and Jansen in closing the door. There were plenty of Dodgers and Diamond backs uniforms in the crowd, some worn by American visitors and others by Australians who had own across th e country to watch the opener and Sundays second game, when an other capacity crowd was expected. They feasted on base ball-style treats like na chos stuffed in batting helmets and Cracker Jack, which is not usu ally sold in Australia. If you could afford the cost and the calories, a 2-foot-long hot dog sold for $36. Van Slyke, playing be cause of an injury to Matt Kemp and pater nity leave to Carl Craw ford, nearly cleared the left-eld fence in the second inning. His dou ble set up a grounder by Andre Ethier that scored Adrian Gonzalez with the Dodgers rst run. In his next at-bat in the fourth, Van Slyke connected off losing pitcher Wade Miley for a drive over the right-eld fence just inside the foul pole with Gonza lez again on base to put the Dodgers up 3-0. Dodgers 3, Diamondbacks 1 Los Angeles Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Puig rf 5 0 0 0 Pollock cf 4 0 0 0 JuTrnr 2b 4 0 1 0 A.Hill 2b 3 0 1 0 HRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 Gldsch 1b 4 1 2 0 AdGnzl 1b 3 2 1 0 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 VnSlyk lf 3 1 2 2 Trumo lf 4 0 0 1 Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 Monter c 4 0 1 0 Ethier cf 4 0 0 1 Owings ss 3 0 0 0 A.Ellis c 2 0 0 0 GParra rf 4 0 1 0 Kershw p 3 0 1 0 Miley p 1 0 0 0 C.Perez p 0 0 0 0 Gregrs ph 1 0 0 0 BWilsn p 0 0 0 0 Harris p 0 0 0 0 Guerrr ph 0 0 0 0 ErChvz ph 1 0 0 0 Baxter ph 1 0 0 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 5 3 Totals 33 1 5 1 Los Angeles 010 200 000 3 Arizona 000 001 000 1 EJu.Turner (1), Prado (1). LOBLos Angeles 7, Arizona 7. 2BAd.Gonzalez (1), Van Slyke (1), Gold schmidt (1). HRVan Slyke (1). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Kershaw W,1-0 6 2 / 3 5 1 1 1 7 C.Perez H,1 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 B.Wilson H,1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Jansen S,1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 Arizona Miley L,0-1 5 3 3 3 2 8 Harris 2 1 0 0 0 3 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 1 0 O.Perez 1 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 Putz 2 / 3 0 0 0 0 0 HBPby O.Perez (A.Ellis). WPKershaw, Miley. UmpiresHome, Tim Welke; First, Dale Scott; Sec ond, Laz Diaz; Third, Mark Carlson. T:49. A,266 (47,000). Kershaw, Dodgers top D-backs in season opener RICK RYCROFT / AP Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw pitches during Saturdays season-opening game between Dodgers and Arizona at the Sydney Cricket ground in Sydney.

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Progress has a price I wanted to say what a good ar ticle it was on Wildwood being a boom town and that many peo ple do not realize that The Villages isnt the only growing area. Progress is going faster and faster. The concern is the added drain on the aquifer, not only from many thousands of new homes in Central Florida but from the granting of permits to bottlers of water. We are going to be begging other states for water in time. Not in my time because Im 82 years old, but it will come soon er than later. BROOKY PETERS | Wildwood Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third par ties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to ar chive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to let ters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 T he recent news that Florida schools will mandate instruction in cursive writing next school year was a head scratcher, principally because many of us werent aware schools arent teach ing this most basic skill. In reality, schools havent quit teach ing cursive completely. The state Board of Education currently requires that stu dents begin learning cursive writing in the third grade, but the policy isnt ex plicit. Individual school districts deter mine how much to emphasize cursive. But some school administrators ad mit there has been a signicant shift away from it to accommodate anti-drug and anti-bullying instruction now re quired by the state. One parent told Dai ly Commercial Staff Writer Millard Ives last week that her fth grader didnt start learning cursive until she pulled her out of public school, and another said her child couldnt sign his name. It might seem progressive at some lev el to de-emphasize handwriting in favor of more contemporary skills. This gen eration is growing up in the technology age, after all, and so much of their com munication occurs through keyboards. And yet the entire business world still requires this skill. You cant apply for a mortgage, get a drivers license or ll out a basic job application without signing your name. We have to wonder about an educa tion system that skimps on instruction for such a fundamental skill. That, and the recent revelation that most schools in Lake County wont give any child a grade less than 50 in hopes of improving students chances of passing, gives us reason to pause and reect on the direc tion of public education. Schools exist to pass knowledge to children, to teach them critical thinking skills and to help them learn to socialize. But t hey also exist to prepare students for the adult world, where they will need basic skills to compete in the job market and where merit is rewarded. When we fail to provide adequate in struction in something as basic as cur sive writing, and when we give students signicant handicaps that enable them to pass without putting forth strong ef fort, we impede their growth and dimin ish their chances of success later. That is not to say that the public edu cation system is failing. It continues to produce some of the brightest minds in the world. But at a time when educators are forced to adapt to changing cultural and social norms, they would be wise to carefully assess what skills and val ues remain relevant in todays world and continue to teach those aggressively. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL New buildings are being added to Brownwood Paddock Square in Wildwood. OTHER VOICES F lorida has a proud recent his tory of strong open govern ment laws, and so it is appro priate as the nation celebrates Sunshine Week to raise aware ness about the importance of government in the sunshine, that the Sunshine State remains a leader in ensuring public ac cess to the dealings and deci sion-making of its elected and appointed ofcials. It is also appropriate that last week the Florida Senate moved along Senate bill 1648 that would strengthen Floridas Sunshine Law. A nal vote is expected next week. While our states Sunshine Law and Open Government laws provide broad access to both public records and meetings, there are always efforts afoot in the Legislature to weaken them, as there are this year. But SB 1648 has been praised by open government advocates as one of the more meaningful ad vances in Floridas Sunshine Law since the 1990s. Among other things, it would limit fees for re cord searches so government of cials could not intimidate people through overpricing. It also would dene more clearly what records are exempt, based on court rul ings. And, an element of SB 1648 that is maybe its most important one, is that it would require train ing on public records laws for all public employees. We urge the Senate, then the House, to approve SB 1648 and its House counterpart, HB 1151, to further the cause of providing rel atively easy and affordable access to city, county and state public re cords. It is important for not only the news media but everyday cit izens to have access to informa tion about how their government is doing the peoples business and why. Simply, without an informed citizenry, government cannot be held accountable or responsive. James Madison, the father of the Constitution whose birth day on Sunday marked the be ginning of Sunshine Week, put it this way: A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. Madison would undoubtedly be amazed at not only the amount of government that exists today but the amount of information about our government that is available. The abundance and relative ac cess to public information is a tribute to, rst, technology, and, second, the ideals of the Sunshine Law and the vigilance of its sup porters. Awareness and support for open government, of course, should not be limited to a sin gle week a year. How government regulates our daily lives, pro tects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the peo ple can be sure to have a say in them. From Ocala.com. Celebrating the Sunshine How government regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them. Keeping education relevant and challenging

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 OTHER VOICES Voices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHER VOICES OTHER VOICES W ith a variety of topics to write about, I have found that often times if I ask a ques tion of an individu al or group (public or private sector) I will not get a response if the question seems to challenge their point of view. For instance, I have written the U.S. De partment of Transpor tation and the Califor nia High-Speed Rail Authority asking one simple question: How do you protect hun dreds of miles of highspeed rail from a ter rorist attack? These projects are usually multi-billion dollar endeavors and seemingly very vulner able to a terrorist at tack that would not take a lot of sophistica tion. Thankfully, Gov. Rick Scott vetoed the high-speed rail pro posal between Tampa and Orlando. Not only do I believe it would have been nancial ly unstable, but easily susceptible to terror ist attacks. A few suc cessful attacks would have meant that bil lions of taxpayers dol lars would have been wasted. After at least two years, I have yet to get a reply to my ques tion. The next issue is man-made global warming (now climate change). Since global warming has been at for the past 15 years, its advocates need a new all-encompass ing title like climate change, which would embrace any kind of weather such as hurri canes, drought, torna does, oods or arctic air fronts. I have written to these groups and asked two questions. First: When a good part of North America was covered with glaciers, what caused them to recede before mankind was any factor? Sec ond: If man can warm the earth, does this mean we can prevent the next ice age? Im still waiting for a re sponse. In the realm of pol itics, I often experi ence the same non-re sponse syndrome. When President Barack Obama was a senator, he railed against Pres ident George W. Bush raising the debt ceil ing, even stating it was un-American to do so. He also excoriat ed Bush regarding his presidential executive orders. Now Obama cas tigates the Republi cans for not dramati cally raising the debt ceiling and also open ly states that he will by pass Congress whenev er necessary to govern by at and executive orders. Pharaoh would be so proud. When I write the president about his complete change of senate posi tions all I get is silence. From time to time, I see classroom presen tations condemning our use of the atom ic bomb to end World War II. The presentations rarely mention how many lives, on both sides, would have been lost had we invaded Japan. But the main question, which is nev er answered, is this: If Japan had devel oped an atomic bomb, would they have used it against us? Be pre pared for an awkward silence. Throughout the Obama presidency, he has constantly state that the rich are not paying their fair share. Really? U.S. tax data for 2011 shows that the top 1 percent of tax payers paid 35 percent of the federal income tax, the top 10 percent paid slightly over 62 percent and the bot tom 50 percent paid 2.89 percent. There are many denitions list ed under the word fair, but it is hard to argue against the denition without irregularity or unevenness. Is it fair that 50 percent of the taxpay ers, who pay less than 3 percent of total in come taxes, can vote for the other 50 per cent to pay even more of the 97 percent that they already pay? As yet, Ive not been able to get a response of what is fair when it comes to the amount of taxes our citizens should pay. I believe that about 47 percent pay no federal income tax. Is that fair? My experience has been that the large contingent of big-gov ernment advocates are too often reluctant to respond to questions that dont support their agenda. But we did recent ly get a response from the Director of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius. Af ter telling a congres sional committee that 4.2 million peo ple had signed up for Obamacare, she asked, How many have paid? She replied, I dont know. Perhaps answers like this prevent more liberals from re sponding to a sim ple question. Ill wager that McDonalds can tell you how many Big Macs they sell on any given day. But, I know it was silly of me to ex pect the head of HHS to know how many of the 4.2 million sup posed enrollees have paid. RUSS SLOAN GUEST COLUMNIST Many questions but no replies from the liberal left F lorida wants to be known as the friendliest state for military vet erans. It moved a step closer to that goal this month when the Leg islature approved a bill that will cut college costs for veterans. The measure, part of an omnibus package for military-related items, is a welcome step, although it will cost state colleges, universities and ca reer centers an estimated $11.5 mil lion in forgone tuition. The measure would waive out-ofstate tuition fees for honorably dis charged veterans. This portion of the legislation is named after the late U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young, a Republi can who represented Pinellas Coun ty in Congress for decades. The legislation also would boost scholarship funding for members of the National Guard and Reserves. Attracting veterans as well as keeping those already here is ben ecial because of their contributions to Floridas workforce, economic vi tality and q uality of life. Gov. Rick Scott is expected to sign the measure, which also includes funds for armory renovations and several land purchases near bases (a move designed to protect them from future closure). The legislation also expands veter an preference rules for government hiring, allows service members fami lies to use out-of-state driver licenses under some circumstances, removes a one-year residency requirement for veterans to be admitted to state vet erans nursing homes and more. In scal year 2012, the U.S. De partment of Veterans Affairs edu cation-program payment to Florida beneciaries exceeded $702 million, according to the National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics. Thats just one of the many ways that veterans positively impact our states economy. For a summary of veterans bene ts, consult the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs guide. Online, it can be found atwww.bit.ly/1gHt dc3 (PDF). Other information is also available from the department: www.oridavets.org. Even with Floridas effort to make veterans a high priority, they make up a population that too often has difculty accessing the benets and services that are meant for them. At both the state and national level, that shortcoming must be cured. From The Ledger in Lakeland. Cut college cost for vets W ho is to blame for rising food prices? Theres drought, always a factor and can have a ripple effect, es pecially with feed prices for livestock and farmers who must have rain to raise their crops proper ly. Theres uncertainty in the world, and commod ities traders worry about whats happening in the Middle East. Traders bid up the price of gas contracts at com modities futures markets hoping to make money. Most have no intention of ever taking ownership of gasoline. They hope to sell any contracts they buy for a prot. Thats capitalism. There was Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf of Mexico in 2005. Scores of oil rigs were either de stroyed or partially de stroyed. There is government regulation. And of course, theres President Obama. More on Obama later. Food prices mainly rise in response to high gas and diesel prices. Espe cially diesel. Remember the good old days when diesel was cheaper than gas? Today one can eas ily pay 80 cents a gallon more for diesel. Transportation to get food to market is a large cost of the food we buy at the store. The American economy runs on diesel trucks. When you notice prices at the gas pump rising, expect to see the same thing happen in about six weeks at the grocery store. Because of environ mental concerns, Obama has declared war on both coal and gas. In 2010, Obama lied when he said, With only 2 per cent of the worlds oil re serves, we cant just drill our way to lower gas pric es ... not when we con sume 20 percent of the worlds oil. Data compiled by the Institute for Energy Re search has estimated North Americas land ar eas contain twice the combined proven oil re serves of all OPEC na tions and enough natu ral gas to provide for our electricity for the next 500 years. Companies applying for new permits to drill for oil on private land can sometimes get those per mits within 10 days. Ap plying on federal lands takes over 300 days and as often as not, the per mit is denied. Only the very largest companies can survive the bureau cratic and legal hassles of drilling on federal lands. Annual revenue for sales, leases, and royal ties on federal lands are down over $12 billion per year since 2008. It has been estimated that if most new permits had been approved, govern ment would be taking in an additional $85 billion a year in new taxes. After the BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, the Obama administra tion was so slow in re newing permits that scores of oil well rigs al ready there were disman tled and moved to other parts of the world. The Keystone oil pipe line from Canada is being studied. Right before the 2012 presidential election, and reacting to criticisms of high gas prices under his administration, Obama threatened to release oil inventories to bring the cost of gasoline prices down. Prices dropped. After winning the elec tion, Obama did nothing to increase oil produc tion, and the cost of gas and diesel have skyrock eted ever since. Instead of trying to solve Americas econom ic problems, the Obama administration has been working overtime listen ing to our phone conver sations, taking over the auto industry, banks and brokerage houses, and of course health care. Besides bowing to Sau di monarchs, Obama bows to every left-wing special interest presented to him. Sonny Heninger lives in Leesburg. Presidents energy policies to blame for rising food prices

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rfntbtfr rfnttbbb r f frr rrfr r r r rr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr r rrrrr rr r rrf f r r bb r r t r r n r r f b f n t b bfr n b bbf b f f bf rf rfff rrbb rfrnn tntb r r r r r r r r r f r r r r n n t b t b b t t t b b t t b f bbnbb nnbb r f n t t r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r f f f r r f f r r r bbb rbf rfn b r r r r r b r r r r r n f n t t f rr b f ff nrrn nnb bbnb nnbb r rf bbbbn ntnbnf rfr f f bn b bbnbn nb rfntt rrffr rr rrr rbbtnrr rrtr rrbbtn f rff f r r r r bb fntt rr ffrr rr rrr bbtnrr rrtrrrbbtn rf br nbb ffbf r rr r r r r rnrr rr rbfnb rr rf rrfbn bbrn rfrr r rr r rnrr rbbfbb r rr rnrr rbbfbb rfnnrbbfbb bbrn rrf rrf br nbbr nbf rn rnb btttbbbbbbbnbb f b f b f rff bbrrnb nnb ntbb fbbnb nnbb r rfbbttbbb f rr rf rbbt rrt rrbbt f r r r bf bbttbbb r rr fr bbtrrt rrbbt r rrrrr r f rbf rfrnbbff b bfr f r r r n r rr r br rf rfbr r rr rrf bf rf ff bbrb nnb nntb f fbbn nnbb r r rfntbbttbbb rr rrrbb rf frrf r r r r bfntbbtt bbb rr rrr bbf rrfff bbff bf rfn b r r r r r r n r f rr rrr r rrr rbr rf b rf btf f f b b b f r n n n t b f f ff rrbbb nbn bbnbn nnbb rfbbbbnn rr rfr rfrr rrr rrrf fr rb rr rrfrr rrf rr rfrf rr b f r r r bfbb bbnn br fn r bbb rt r r r r t f b f b f brr nnnb btb fbbn nnbb r r rfbbbb rrrf ff f f r r bbt f bbff b rfbbb ff b r r n b r f b n r r n rr rrr r rrr brrf f f f b b b f r n n n t b f rr bf rf ff bbrb fnnnb bbnb nnbb rbbbb ff f f r r rr f r r r rff b rffr nnnbnb f rr b r rff r brffr nnnb f f r n n t b b n t b n n t b n b t b r n t b f n nnbb r fntbttbbn r f rr rrrrrr rrrr r r f f r b n r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r r n r r r r r r n r f b r b b r b r r f b r r r r b b b r r r n f b r r b r r r r b b b r r r b f b r r n b r r b b b r r b r r n b r b b b r r r r r r r r n f f ff b b r r b f n n n b nb f f br bbn nntb f tbbttf btb rr b r bbnb nnbb rfbttbbbb frfrr f f r r r r rr rrrrr rrrrr rrrrr r rrrrf f r r b r bb r r b r f r r f n n bfr n n b b bbf b f f bf rf rfff rrbb rfrnn tntb r r r r r r r r r f r r r r n n t b t b b t t t b b t t b f bbnb nnbb fbbb rrrr rrr rrfr rrbbtn f rrr rf rf r r r r bfb bb f br nbb b t r r f b f f ff bbbfr nnntb f bf f bbrrbb nnb t tb fbbb fbbnb nnbb r fntbttbbn frfrrr rrr rrrr rrrbbtrrt rrrbbt f rrff r r r nb fntbttbbn frf rrrr rr rrrrrr rbbtrrt rrrbbt rr rfr rrrf rrr rr rr r r rr rrrrrrrr rr f bbff br nn b n r r f b f f b f rr bf f fff nbrbb nn ntn ntn r r r f n n t b f fbbnb nnbb r bttbbn rr t rbbt tft f rfr f f r r bb fbttbbn r r t rbbtf r rbfr rr bbffb t rrr r rf r r r r r r r r r b r r f r r r r f b r b b n n n t b f t b b t t f b f rr rnb nnn tbb tb tnb fbbnbn nnbb r fntbttbb rr rrr rbbtrrt rrrbbt f frrf rrf rrfrrf rrf rr r rrrrrr r rr r r r r rrrrrrrr rr r r r b fntbttbb rr rrr rbbtrrt rrrbbt frrf rrf rrf rrfrr frr r rr rrrrr r

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Lawn Services Electrical Services

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbtfr rfntb f n rfnftr bnfr rr trf btr rtrff bn r ttr ft n bf tfr t rrr nr tff nntnr trt ft rnnt fn r ftnf rttr r ftnr tftn nt ft f f f btrt rr rfnt f r ttf b r ntrn trr fr t tff b tr nnrt rt rt n tff nnr r nr tt rtrt t nrf ftr n br rt r fnt tft rr rtt rr nf tftff r nfrt trttt rrr b r r trf ttt tnt b r rtr rr rtff ft r ft ft ft brr tntrtf brr rft rtff tn tt t t rtr nr r n trnttt tffr t rt trr trr rr frrr trt nr rtf trr nt btr ttt fn ftrr r ft f trt rr bfr trr rn t tnr nt tff rr ftrf f bft t rrtr bfft br t r rttn tn t trr trtr n nb rr rr r rtt tt rnn trt rtr tf tr rf ft t tt r b r r tft r n t t rtf t f t rr f rr rrr tnr tftrt rrtfn r rtftr tnr t f tttt rtf bt rtnr rr tr t ttr rf nr fft rf b t t rnf rr ttrt rnfrtf t rfn tb rnn r rntbb r fntr r r f r n r n t b t r t b f t t f t t t n b n n t r r t n t f r r r f r t r r b t t t r r n t r t t r t n b r b r r t t n t t t n bfrrn trbnrt tbt rbrrr trrnr t r t f r frr t r t r r t f n n b n r t f n r f f t f n n t f b r t r n t f t t r t r t t f t r r r t r t n r r r t r t r r f n f n t n t n t n n n t r b t t r t t r t r b b n b r b r b r t r f f f t r b r n r b r t r t t n n n t t t n t t r n t t f n n t n t f r t t t r rrn b n brr rrttrrr rrbn trtr rbbtrtttf ntftrt rrnrtt rr r t r r t r rrrttttb rtnr rrtnnttrr ttrtf ntfrtrt br nt trrrt rttbr tnrtbrb r nt nntrft tb n n t r t f r t r n t n b b n bf rn t t b r r r r t n t r r b rn rr nrrf tbtr t r n brn r r r r n t n n t t t r t r r f r r t r b n f t t r t r t n n r r t t t r t t b r f t r f r t t t t f f b n r b t r t t b n t t r n r n n f r t b b f r t b t n r r b r r t t r n r r r t r r t r b t r n r f t t n t t t t r r t r t r r f r r t n t t r b r r t f n r r t b r r r b r t r r r t r r t b t t t n n t t r r b t r b b b t t t n r r r t r t n n r b b t n t r n r t t b r n n t f f t t n t t n b t b t b n n r t f t t t t n t f r t r n n n t f r f t r t n f n n r r r b t r n n t r t f n t r f n t t r r r b t n t n n b r r t f n t r n r t t r t r b r t n r t t n n t t t r t r r f n b t f n f t t t b b r r r t r t t b r t n f t f b f t n n b b t r r t t n r n r t r n n n n r t r n n n t r f f t r r b bt n f ttttrttt rrrtbtr tt rttfntrt rtrrtrtrt rrtrrrtrrt rtbrttr r b r n t b t r n bfrn b r n r t r b t r n r n b b r b t t t r t b r r n t r n t f r f r t t n t r n t r t f r brrft rfbtb rr t r n n r b b n tbt nrtr b n t t t r t t r f f b r t n n t n t b n b b t n b r b r n t t ftbb ntnnbf tbtnt r n nbbt r n n t r t bfrn t r b r b t r b r n r t r t t r t t r f r n t r t r r t t r t r t r t r n r t r t r n f tn ttrtbt rtrffff tftt rttb fbrrft tbnt tnn r n r n n b n t b t r b t t b n n n r r b r b r t r n r b t n t t t t r b b n r f t b r t n b t r t b n r n r n r r b r t f r b b n f r r r t r b r r t r b r t t r t r b t r n r t n t t b t t r b b n r t n b t r t b n r n r n r r b r t f r b b f r bfr rtntr tttrb trtrrr r t r t n r f r f tt tt t r f n n n bfr r t r t t t r t t f r r f bfrrn btbr t tt btt t t r f n n n t b t n t r b n t r t f t r t r b n t r t f b t r t r t f n tf ttrr n rttf tbtrtr rtt tbr rr tr bfrrt ntfrf fftrf rt b n r t r t t t r t r t n n r f brn t t t r f t r t t t b r t t r t r t n t n t r r t f r rrf

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 rfntnb rf nf n n nn t ntr nn t n rr nr rfrr rf r f n t f b f b f f r f b f r f r f r n f f f f n n r f f f f r n t r n n r f r n f r f f r f r n f r r f f f f f r f b f f r r f b f f f t b f r f b f r t f r n f b f f f r r rffffrbfn bffrff ffb ffrnrbf fbnffffn ffbfrr r f f f f f f f r f f r f r r f f n r f f n r f r r r f f f f r f f f f f f f r f r b f n f r r f f f t f f f r r f f f r f t r r f f f f f r r r f f r f f f f f f b f f f f f f f r n f f f f f f f r f f r r f f n f f n f r r f f f f r f f f r n f r r rnff rfff fbrrfn rffff rrnff rfff f fnff fbfnff nff f f f f r r n r f f f r n r n f f f r f f f f f f f f f r r f f r r f r fffnfrf ffrrf ffrrfnfffff fffrr brfrfr r f f r f rf ntb ffrbrf rtf ffrftrf rr r f r f n r r r r frrf rr rfff r r f rr fr rbfff ffrr rfn f r tr r ff f r f f t rr rr f nr f f n f f f n f b f f b n f t f f r n f r f n n f f f f r b f n b r r f fffr frbf rff frf t ffrf frr f ffrf fff nrfr r rr rrrf f rrf rr n rft ffr rrfrf bf f fft frr f rffr r f nr f ff frftrf rr fbfrff rrff f r r rf f rf rf rr ffrnrr rrft fffff rf f frft rr rrff t rr t frrf rff ffrrrn f t r f f b n f f r f n brrf bfrrrffn f r r f f rr frr r fn r f r f f b f f r f n r f f t n f n b f t f f f r r rfffrfbf rr ffr ff ffr ff rr fnr rr bfbf ff rf b rf ff ff bffr rrfnf ff f ff ff ff ffr f tr rr ff ff rnf f r f f r f f f t r f bf fr bb rrr rf r f ff brfr r f ff brfr r rf fff rr rr r r frr frr rrf r rr f ffr rrr frr fffff rr t ff f nf rf rfr frffrr b t fbffrrff fffr tf f fbrf fn rrfrfrrbf rbffff fftrf tf rft frfrt ffrrtrf t rbff rff frf f ffff ftffrt f rffr fr frrfff t frr rr bf nrfff rfff nff ffrr rr fr frrf f f n r f frf ffr rfffrr ffrr ffrr ffrr r f f rft rr f ffrffr frr rrr frr tf br f rff ffrr fff rtr ffrr r ntb frr rrffn f rr f ff r ntb frffrrf fr fffrnt ff trr ffb bffrrrf trff rrrrf frrff r r f f nf rrrr rffrfrrrf rf f f f r r rfr rf rrn f r r frfrr ff frfr rr f f f rr ftff f rrfrr rr rfnbf rr ffrfrf ffrr r f f f f frffff rfrr rfnbrf rff rfrff bf nrfff n rr fff ffr rrnfff frrr f frf ftr frrff rfrbf frr nfrr r r r r r f n r ffr rr frrffr fr r ffrrrr rfr ftf r f frrfr f ffn fff f f fr rr fr rr rfrffn ff ffffbfn rr r nr r fr r r f f fft f rbrf ff rf frf rf rbrf rr f rf rr f n r f t f brt t rt rf ffffr rr fnf frr ffrfbnnr nrr ffrff ff nfrf fff frfn ffff frr rrn fff rr f f r f r f f t f tf rr bff f n frfr frffrfrfr fftbffr rr rrrr frffr rr tt r frrt ff frrff ff rr f f r r f f frffr ffr rr rn rr b ntb t r ffbfr rffrf f f r r ffrf r b r n f r t ffrrn r r rf rfrft rf frr frf fnrrrr fn trr f frf rtfnrrfrr rffrr t f r n f f r n bf r ffbfr rffrf f f r r ffrf r b r n f r t ffrrn r r

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbtfr rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb r r f n t b b n b b nb b b b n t r n f n f b t f n b r n fr n b r f t n t ntbb r f n r f b f n b nb r t n t n t b n t t t f f r tb r f n r f b f n b n t r b b nb b b t ft ft nf b b b f n f r n t r b t b f r r ft f f n t b t r r ftb r f n r f b f n b n t r b n t t b r tb b b tr b b r tr ft n f b f b n f f b n b f bf b t f n f f n b t f n f f n f b b r t f n n b t f n f f n n b f f n r f f b b n f t t n b b f b r n b b r n f f r b t f f f r t f n b f n n b b t b t b b f b b b f b b r n f b b n n r n b f n f n b b t f n b b b f n b f t r b f n b f n r f f b b b b r n t b r n f r f b t b b n f r t r r t b f f b b f n n b f f b b b f t t b t b b b b b b b b f r t b r b f rb f r b

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E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 Money scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com RETIREMENT: Baby boomers savor living on boats / E2 www.dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com F rugals co-owner Benjamin Moseley says people shop in Leesburg for entertain ment. What better entertainment than having 100 shops to en tertain you instead of four big department stores, he said. Moseley co-owns Mount Do ras Frugals Vintage Boutique and Salon and Leesburgs Fru gals The Collection stores with his wife Lindy Colvin. They are planning on opening a new home decoration store and a small shopping mall in down town Leesburg, which will in clude another one of their stores as well. The mall, which will be called The Shoppes on Main, will have eight spots, and Mo seley expects it to open before the Leesburg Bikefest begins on April 25. The Leesburg Herb Shoppe will be one of the rst busi nesses moving into the new mall and will be taking up two of the spots there, according to Moseley. He said a photography stu dio, a European food store, a purse shop currently located in Mount Dora and a gift and candle store will have spaces there, too. Moseleys new store in the building will be called Frugals Crystal Couture and will sell crystal items, such as jewelry and high heels. Lots of bling. Its all crystal, Moseley said. Anything thats over the top: the ve inch heels with crystals all over them and the jewelry and the necklaces, and the big glittery glass crys tal belts that everybody wears with their old jeans, cowboy boots. There is still one opening in the building and there will also be space for people to sit in the front of the mall, Moseley said. The building housing the mall is owned by Anita and Ross Valdez. Moseley said he will design and manage the mini-mall. The entire building is just under 4,000 square feet. Leesburg Herb Shoppe own er Darla Miller said she wanted to move to Main Street and was sold on the mall location by Moseleys vision for the project. Ive known Ben since he came into town and I like the way he thinks, Miller said. She added she will be on the back side of the mall, but she will have a Main Street ad dress. The address will make it easier for people to nd the s tore, which was an issue at Moseley bringing shopping changes to downtown Leesburg PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Benjamin Moseley gives a tour of the small shopping mall called The Shoppes on Main being built in Leesburg. Tonia Kelley, 41, organizes jeans at Moseleys store Frugals, which he co-owns with his wife Lindy Colivn. Having that many different options and different stores coming into one little place, it just adds a little bit more of a buzz. It creates a little bit more of a shopping feel for the area. I just think it really helps with the draw. Sandi Moore, Executive Director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce NowI got debts no honest man could pay The bank was holdin my mortgage and they was takin my house away. Johnny 99 by Bruce Springsteen T he latest jobs re port, released in early March, re veals that new job cre ation rose from a re vised January gure of 129,000 to 175,000 in February. This means that 46,000 more jobs were created last month than the month before. Sounds like good news, right? Well, as my sons favor ite sportscaster says each autumn Saturday morning, Not so fast, my friend. Many economists view the total num ber of hours worked as a better measuring stick of the health of the U.S. labor market. As Ed Lazear writes in the Wall Street Jour nal An employer who replaces 100 40-hourper-week workers with 120 20-hour-per-week workers is contracting, not expanding opera tions Thus, although the U.S. economy add ed about 900,000 jobs since September, the shortened workweek is equivalent to los ing about one million jobs during the same period. The difference between the loss of the equivalent of one MARGARET MCDOWELL GUEST COLUMNIST Structural changes may portend high unemployment PATRICK MAY San Jose Mercury News Apple is not going to like this new book about Apple. The title Haunt ed Empire: Apple Af ter Steve Jobs pretty much says it all. While author Yukari Iwatani Kane does say on page 336 of her 338-page book that its not too late for Apple to daz zle the world again, by that point shes made her conclusion clear Apple Inc.s long slide began the day Jobs died. Without him, the former Wall Street Jour nal reporter wrote in her book, which hit stores Tuesday, every thing changed. The di lemmas multiply and deepen. Solutions slip further out of reach. Kane is certainly not the rst to predict the decline of the Cuper tino, Calif., tech giant. And she fails to drop any bombshells, other than a quote from Jobs calling television a ter rible business, suggest ing an Apple TV may not be in the companys future after all. Instead, Kane serves up anec dotes from other books and media accounts, along with some origi nal reporting. Yet the author makes a cogent case that with the loss of Jobs mer curial genius, the lin gering legal battles and patent wars, and the thickening competi tion from tech compa nies on all sides, the in novative powerhouse that Jobs created may be slowly fading in his absence. Neither Kanes pub lisher, HarperCollins, nor Apple responded to interview requests, al though CEO Tim Cook did release a statement saying this nonsense belongs with some of the other books Ive read about Apple. It fails to capture Apple, Steve or anyone else in the company, adding that he feels very condent about our future. New book says Apples best days are behind it SEE APPLE | E2 STEVE ALEXANDER Star Tribune The view from the base ment laboratory is breath taking. Not the one out the tiny windows of the half-un derground ofce. Its on a smartphone that comput er science Prof. Stergios Roumeliotis is using while walking around the depths of the University of Minne sotas Walter Library. On the screen, a three-di mensional map of a nearby hallway has taken shape. The map was made by holding the smartphones camera while moving. The camera and the phones motion sensor worked to gether to create a grid of data points that became a 3-D image. Its a radical new abil ity for smartphones and promises to enable con sumers to create 3-D maps on the y. The software de velopment is being han dled by UM grad students who are funded by $1.35 million grant from Goo gle Inc. The work is part of the companys recently an nounced Project Tango, a cellphone optimized for 3-D mapping. We will soon be able to get smartphone direc tions for how to go from one place to another in a building, such as how to go from the entrance to my classroom, Roumeliotis said. Well also be able to ask the phone questions, such as, Where is the clos est place within the airport where I can get coffee? In addition, homeown ers could use the software to create a virtual tour of their houses before put ting them up for sale, Rou meliotis said. The software could also help the blind walk through a building or aid a drone aircraft in nav igating. While the software is be ing designed to work on a prototype of the new Goo gle smartphone, it will Building an indoor 3-D map on the spot, via smartphone MARLIN LEVISON / MCT A smartphone with the 3-D program running showed a hallway in a University of Minnesota building. SEE MAP | E4 SEE DOWNTOWN | E4 SEE MCDOWELL | E2

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMER|stanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrr$50 OFF 3ROOMS& A HALL$99fntbrt The book, which Kane says was crafted from interviews with nearly 200 sources, including past and present Apple em ployees, lays much of the blame for Apples woes at Cooks feet. Was Cook the best choice to chart Ap ples future? Kane asks midway through her tale. She obviously be lieves he was not, al though she doesnt suggest a suitable al ternative, implying that anyone running Ap ple in Jobs wake would have been doomed to fail. Forgetting him was like trying to for get the sun, she writes. He still reigned over every hour of every day. That was his blessing, and their curse. Starting with a brief history of Jobs at the helm, including his re sentful tirade against his appointed succes sor when he felt Cook was getting too big for his britches, Kane quickly moves on to the post-Jobs era. She focuses on the chal lenges Apple has faced since Jobs death and portrays Cook, despite his prowess at sup ply-side management, as stumbling from one pickle to the next. Cook was a sea soned businessman and arguably a better manager than Jobs, Kane writes. He was organized, prepared, and was more real istic about the bur dens of a company of Apples current size. Many even consid ered him a genius in his own right. But no one could beat Jobs at being Steve Jobs, espe cially Cook, who was his polar opposite. While Kanes book was praised by Jobs bi ographer Walter Isaa cson for her great in sight and unparalleled reporting, other ob servers complained that the book did little to shine light on whats truly going on behind the Apple curtain. I thought there was very little that was new in the book, said Cult of Mac blog publish er Leander Kahney, au thor of Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apples Products. Its basical ly a rehash of public events over the past few years, and I dont think theres anything new to learn here. The book does ll in some of Cooks biography, and she talks to some of his former school teachers, but theres nothing re ally revealing. Kahney, who said Isaacsons book also failed to truly pierce Apples infamous wall of secrecy, noted that he was hard-pressed to nd a single quote from a named cur rent Apple employee, calling the book one more failed attempt to really shed any light on Apple. APPLE FROM PAGE E1 million jobs and the gain of 900,000 new jobs yields a net ef fectof 100,000 lost jobs. There is growing sen timent in the econom ic community that the Affordable Care Act may be negative ly impacting employ ment. Employers may be trimming employee hours in order to avoid complying with the mandates of providing health care insurance to full-time workers. None of this is head line news to job seek ers, the underem ployed or workers with reduced hours. The real news is that a high unemployment level is likely to accompany us long into the future. Our true current un employment rate may be close to 12 percent. Globalization cannot be ignored as a con tributing factor. Home grown manufacturing is retrenching in the U.S., but industries like call centers in India are not making their way back here. Automation may prove to be the larger job killer. I read recent ly of a soft drink dis tributor in the Amer ican Southwest who employs only 10-15 percent of the person nel he once utilized. All other tasks are accom plished robotically. Heres the irony: For investors, this isnt all bad. Companies that keep labor costs down are normally more protable than those with higher costs. So corporate protability is up. Share prices have risen. Dividend pay ments have been met and, in many cases, are increasing. The problem is that as middle-class jobs disappear, one won ders what will ulti mately drive consum er spending, the largest contributor to GDP. And how then, if con sumers stop buying, will the markets hold up? When the gov ernment is no lon ger pumping money monthly into the sys tem through Quan titative Easing, will markets ignore a downtrodden job mar ket then? Is there mid dle ground in this economic tug owar between the economy and the markets? Time will tell. Margaret R. McDowell, a syn dicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Ar bor Wealth Management LLC, a fee-only registered invest ment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 ALFREDO CORCHADO The Dallas Morning News LA PAZ, Mexico Theyre no mads, sailing freely, crossing inter national waters, guided by one prin ciple: Just oat. Good thing is, we dont have a schedule, said Allyson van Os of Dallas. We just do the things we like to do, when we want to do them. Thats our schedule. Van Os, 62, is one of millions of baby boomers living part of their lives on boats, inspired by a life style that she acknowledges is hard er than it seems. She and her husband, Ed, and two dogs, Dexter and Pequena, dock their 65-foot boat, the Virginia Reel, in the waters of La Paz in the Baja Penin sula, the same place where Span ish conquistador Hernan Cortes rst docked his boat in 1535. They are joined there by more than 100 other boat owners, part of a growing nau tical tourism business in Mexico that isnt without legal hassles, including tax agents, but that is a dream many boat owners say is worth pursuing. With an estimated 80 million baby boomers retiring in the com ing years, Mexico looms large as an alternative place to live not just on land, but on sea. Recreational boat ing industry experts predict that the number of boomer boat owners will grow, although nding exact gures anywhere from 10 million to 17 million, by some estimates is dif cult in part because of their nomad ic existence. Many of these retirees are living seasonally or year-round on boats, lured by the simplicity of life and lower cost of living. They are also searching for tranquility, a place away from the fast pace and hec tic life increasingly dominated, they say, by time pressures in an age of social media. You come here to check out on a life thats not yours anymore, said Leanne Lawrence, 61, originally from Texas and now commuting be tween La Paz and Oregon with her husband, Jack Jandreau. You come here to reconnect with yourself and Baby boomers savor retirement living on boats in Mexico ALFREDO CORCHADO / MCT Allyson van Os of Dallas walks on the dock with her dog Pequena. She and her husband, Ed, live on their boat in La Paz, Mexico, from October to June. SEE BOOMERS | E3

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 ADAM BELZ Star Tribune Gabe Ciuraru doesnt see many good options for people his age. At 23, hes waited ta bles, driven tanks for the Isr aeli army, tak en community college classes and taught He brew in St. Paul, Minn. Lately hes been selling cosmetics from a kiosk at the Mall of America. This fall he plans to pursue a degree in sports management at the University of Minnesota. But hell have to take on a lot of debt, and hes not op timistic it will lead to a good-paying job. I have friends that still live at home be cause theyre paying off their student loans, Ciuraru said. Youre chained to your desk. And if youre not, the debt gets bigger. People who nished high school or college in the past few years came into the job mar ket at the wrong time. The economic down turn slashed pay for young workers and left more of them jobless, even after many went deep into debt to pay for college. Economists believe they may never recover what they lost in wages and experience. If we look over peo ples likely futur e lives, when youre part of a generation that comes in with a tough job market and your wag es are not so great, you dont recover, said Richard Freeman, a Harvard University la bor economist. They are going to be at a per manently lower stan dard of living than they would have been had we either avoided this catastrophe or had we had a successful jobs recovery. Demand for col lege-educated work ers probably peak ed around 2000, and the decline since then has affected all young workers, Canadian economists Paul Beau dry and Benjamin Sand say. As the number of col lege diplomas in the job market keeps rising, high-skilled workers are forced to take less er jobs, pushing lowskilled workers even further down the occu pational ladder and, to some degree, out of the labor force altogeth er, Beaudry and Sand wrote in 2013. The phenomenon was partly hidden by the housing bubble in the 2000s, but then laid bare by its bursting. This has been a ter rible decade, said Phil Gardner, director of the Collegiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State Univer sity. Theres only been three years where em ployers have aggres sively hired in the last 12 years. Morgan Moore, 28, realized in 2008, less than a year into law school at the University of Illinois, that he prob ably wouldnt end up working as a lawyer. He had hoped to work as legal counsel for a corporation, but the prospect grew dis tant as the economy sank into recession. That amount of time grew from ve to 10 years, to longer than that, to maybe impos sible, Moore said. So rather than wait and see, I decided to pursue other opportunities. He nished law school so he wouldnt regret quitting, but when he graduat ed in 2011 he didnt have the money for bar exam prep class es. He couldnt nd any work near Chicago, let alone at a law rm. So he spent the summer in his ancees moth ers basement, collect ing food stamps. Ultimately he moved back to Minnesotas Twin Cities, where he grew up, in search of any kind of work. He did part-time stints on the sales oor at Sears, at a Byerlys grocery store and parking cars for a valet service. In February 2012, he started selling cars full time. He doesnt regret his expensive law de gree, but it will take a long time to pay down his $80,000 in stu dent debt. He has no plans to buy a house, and he had to sign up for health insurance through MNsure, the state exchange. Those of us who were negatively affect ed by the economy are faced with the conse quences of a lost three or four years, Moore Count on us for a comprehensive range of quality services to meet the unique healthcare needs of you and your family. Abu Azizullah, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Maria A. Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Internal Medicine Practices the nature around you, the sunsets, sunris es and the welcoming people of Mexico. Hence La Paz, The Peace, a seaside town known for sports sh ing, whales, seafood and, increasingly, Americans seeking to reinvent themselves, much the way author John Steinbeck did when he stayed here and was inspired to pen some of his classic books, including The Pearl and Sea of Cor tez. The community is just right, feels right, said Jandreau, 64, who with his wife has been sailing to La Paz for more than 20 years. In the shadow of Cabo San Lucas, just an hour or so down a new highway, La Paz is booming into some thing not quite dened yet, but with some cer tainty that it wont be come another tourist trap like Cabo or Can cun. Instead, La Paz re tains its Mexican aura of familial ties, even with a makeover that includes bike lanes, pricey condos with stunning ocean views, an 18-hole Gary Player golf course and a list of hotels. That list is head ed by CostaBaja Re sort, which includes a marina for more highend clients, including Hollywood actors who dock and quietly min gle on their own. We have all types of clients, said Maria del Mar Bueno Riestra, the CostaBaja public rela tions event manager. Whether on sea or on ground, all are looking for security, tranquility, and this is what we of fer, peace. BOOMERS FROM PAGE E2 New workers are starting behind and cant get ahead DAVID JOLES / MCT Gabe Ciuraru, 23, at the Mall of America, where he works at a cosmetics kioskn in Bloomington, Minn. SEE WORKERS | E6

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) her last location. The hardest part for me where I am right now is because Im on Orange Avenue and no body knows where Or ange Avenue is. It takes me 10 minutes in a con versation to tell them where I am, Miller said. The Leesburg Herb Shoppe will cover about 700 square feet. The current location is 1,200 square feet, ac cording to Miller, but she said there is extra space that is not used for merchandise. The Leesburg Herb Shoppe has one addi tional employee. Miller said she likes the camaraderie of downtown Leesburg and she thinks the stores in the mall will feed off each other. And it will be fun, Miller said. Sandi Moore, the ex ecutive director of the Leesburg Area Cham ber of Commerce, said businesses in down town become a family. Having that many different options and different stores coming into one little place, it just adds a little bit more of a buzz. It cre ates a little bit more of a shopping feel for the area, Moore said. I just think it really helps with the draw. She said she agreed, to an extent, with Mo seley that people shop downtown for enter tainment. Its part of the atmo sphere, Moore said. Its like why you go to a farmers market. You do that because of the atmosphere as well. Its why, like during fall, youre willing to go to a pumpkin patch (in stead of a store) and buy a pumpkin be cause its all part of the experience. Moseley also expects to open a home dec oration store called The Art of Dcor during the third week of April. It will occu py the 3,400-squarefoot space that former ly housed Swan Creek Candle at 707 Main St. The Art of Dcor will sell decorating items like furniture, art and chandeliers, Moseley said. He also plans to hang and sell local art on the brick walls. I love the juxtapo sition, Moseley said of hanging paintings on the brick backdrop. Shiny, fresh, new, clean, and old and rough. Its a cool look. The Art of Dcor will be located across Main Street from his current Leesburg Frugals store. Moseley said he is doing these projects in Leesburg because of its true small town nature and the quantity of customers that come from The Villages. Leesburgs truly a small town, he said. Its truly people who grew up here, who care about the town. They come and shop in my business to make sure I stay in business. Moseley also called the residents of The Villages, A force to be reckoned with. They have a lot of money. They spend it, Moseley said. Moore said Moseleys projects have a positive effect on downtown. He already has a business If he wasnt doing well in that busi ness then theres no way he would be trying to open more and do more, she said. Moore said Moseley is the type of business owner cities should want in their downtowns. Ben is a good busi ness person, she said. Hes had very success ful businesses in the past and, of course, Leesburg is lucky to have him want to come and invest in our town. Wed love to have, throughout the whole city, 10 more Bens. Moseley also has plans to host a shop ping social in The Shoppes on Main and an event where he in vites local decorators to meet with custom ers at The Art of Dcor. DOWNTOWN FROM PAGE E1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Shoes are on display at Benjamin Moseleys store Frugals. also work on existing smart phones. Notably, it doesnt use much processing power, about as much as the game Angry Birds, Roumeliotis said. I think this is as big a revo lution as when Google Maps rst came out or even big ger, said the professor, who is 43 and has been working on map technology since 1995. It has the potential to become the Google Maps of the indoor world, and this is where we spend most of our time. Scott Strawn, senior Goo gle analyst for Massachu setts research rm IDC, said Roumeliotis may be right about the signicance of 3-D mapping. Besides its use on smart phones, the University of Minnesota software is like ly to play a major role in 3-D imaging for Google Glass, the companys wearable computer that has a tiny display above the right eye, Strawn said. For Glass, the software could create much better 3-D augmented reality, a name used today for over laying a camera image with explanatory information. One of the key features of the University of Minne sota software is that it cre ates a map almost instant ly without slowing down the phones other operations or drawing much battery pow er, Roumeliotis said. To do that, the Universi ty of Minnesota team had to try some novel design i deas. For example, unlike most smartphone maps, the new software doesnt rely on global positioning system data because satellite signals arent typically available in side buildings. It also does more with less by combining data from the phones builtin motion sensor with just a fraction of the images pro duced by the phones cam era. We pick which informa tion to process, Roumelio tis said. That way we dont chok e the phones processor chip or drain the battery. The technology is built on some of the universitys ear lier work with NASA to cre ate navigational software for Mars landing vehicles, Rou meliotis said. His group got involved in Googles Project Tango after one of his former students went to work at the compa ny and recommended the U researchers. The university signed a contract with Goo gle last spring. Roumeliotis said the soft ware that his group is de veloping for Google will be ready within less than a year. But Strawn thinks Goo gle wont offer the Univer sity of Minnesota software as mainstream product for several years. That would give app developers time to come up with 3-D applica tions that can take advan tage of the technique. It will be introduced in the same way that Google released Glass, years before it anticipated the product would be broadly distribut ed, Strawn said. Its not unusual for Goo gle to reach out to universi ties for help in creating new technology, Strawn said. Theres a lot of valuable brainpower in the univer sity system, and thats what Google needs to move these projects forward, he said. Were on the frontier of this kind of mapping, Rou meliotis said. You could map the inside of the Mall of America today using a com puting center with a lot of processing power and a lot of time. Our plan is to do that on a cellphone in almost real time, with the time lag get ting smaller and smaller. MAP FROM PAGE E1 You could map the inside of the Mall of America today using a computing center with a lot of processing power and a lot of time. Our plan is to do that on a cellphone in almost real time, with the time lag getting smaller and smaller. Prof. Stergios Roumeliotis

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Sunday, March 23, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 (352) 787-3013CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT TODAY!Box Office HoursMonday-Friday 9:00am-1:00pm(also 1 hour before show time)$18 Adult/$9 StudentShow TimesAll Fridays @ 8pm Sat. Mar. 22 & 29 @ 8pm Sat. April 5 @ 2pm All Sundays @ 2pmMELONPATCHTHEATREpresentsSweeney ToddThe Demon Barber of Fleet StreetMusic & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Hugh Wheeler Based on a version of Sweeney Todd by Christopher Bond March 21-23; 28-30, April 4-6, 2014 Supporting sponsors: Franks Place and Insight Financial Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE Today is Sunday, March 23 the 82nd day of 2014. There are 283 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On March 23, 1914, the rst installment of The Per ils of Pauline, the legend ary silent lm serial starring Pearl White, premiered at theaters in the greater New York City area, including mov ie houses in New Jersey, Con necticut and Massachusetts. On this date : In 1775 Patrick Henry de livered an address to the Vir ginia Provincial Convention in which he is said to have de clared, Give me liberty, or give me death! In 1806 explorers Meri wether Lewis and William Clark, having reached the Pa cic coast, began their jour ney back east. In 1919 Benito Mussolini founded his Fascist political movement in Milan, Italy. In 1933 the German Re ichstag adopted the Enabling Act, which effectively granted Adolf Hitler dictatorial pow ers. In 1942 the rst Japa nese-Americans evacuat ed by the U.S. Army during World War II arrived at the in ternment camp in Manzanar, Calif. In 1956 Pakistan became an Islamic republic. In 1964 actor Peter Lorre, 59, died in Los Angeles. In 1973 before sentenc ing a group of Watergate break-in defendants, Chief U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica read aloud a letter to him from James W. McCord Jr. which said there had been political pressure to plead guilty and remain silent. In 1983 President Ron ald Reagan rst proposed developing technology to in tercept incoming enemy mis siles an idea that came to be known as the Strate gic Defense Initiative. Dr. Bar ney Clark, recipient of a Jar vik permanent articial heart, died at the University of Utah Medical Center after 112 days with the device. DEAR ABBY: My hus band and I were both married previously. We have been together for seven years. When we rst start ed dating, we would sometimes go to one of the casinos after din ner as a fun outing. We never spent much money and went only occasionally. Our game of choice was the slot machine. Over the last few years, it seems like the casino has taken over our lives. We go there to the exclusion of al most everything else and spend money we cant afford to lose. We both have the mental ity that the big win is right around the cor ner. How can we break this habit? Its causing unbearable nancial and emotional stress in our marriage. Im afraid it wont last an other year. IN OVER MY HEAD IN NEW YORK DEAR IN OVER YOUR HEAD: In case you are not aware, there is a name for the hab it you and your hus band have acquired. Its compulsive gam bling, and its an ad diction in much the same way as the abuse of alcohol or drugs. Fortunately, you have nally reached a point where you have real ized this fun outing is out of control. Gamblers Anony mous can help you break this destruc tive cycle. Its a 12-step program based on the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous. Its mem bers support one an other by sharing their strength and experi ences with one anoth er. The website is www. gamblersanonymous. org. Many people have experienced what youre going through, and this well-estab lished organization has helped them. To locate a meeting near you, visit the website or check your telephone directory. DEAR ABBY: My mom and stepfather are di vorcing. They were married for 25 years. He was always a great father gure to me and has been a very active grandfather to my chil dren. The reason for the divorce is his in delity and the disre spect he has shown my mother. We are his only fam ily, and he wants to be involved with us as if nothing is differ ent, even showing up at family gatherings. I want to be loyal to my mother and I do feel he betrayed us but I still recognize that he has also been good to me and the kids. He doesnt deserve to be cut out of our lives. How does one handle a situation like this? SEEING THE BIG PICTURE DEAR SEEING: Your stepdad may want to pretend that nothing is different, but some thing IS different. He hurt your mother so badly they will no lon ger be married. If you want to be loy al to your mother and still have a relation ship with him, then you need to have a talk with him. Explain that because he is no lon ger married to your mother, he will no lon ger be invited to family gatherings where your mother will be present. Be sure to tell him you regard him with affec tion, but will be seeing him separately for the foreseeable future. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Fun outings at the casino become costly compulsion TODAY IN HISTORY How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeat ed numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, March 23, 2014: This year you open up to new possibilities. After hav ing discussions with the right people, you will be able to develop a new inter est or walk through a new door. If you are single, you will open up to dating a dif ferent type of person. Get to know someone well be fore you start dating him or her, as this person could be emotionally unavailable. Someone could easily pull the wool over your eyes. If you are attached, the two of you might want more time together. Schedule sever al weekends away together from the daily grind. CAPRI CORN likes to show his or her authority over others. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Opt for a late movie and a hamburger with an older friend. For some of you, mak ing an appearance could be more important than what you are doing. Tension builds as you recognize someone elses needs. You can do only so much! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Realize what is happen ing between you and some one else. After some reec tion, you will recognize how important this individual is to you. Be wise, and keep an eye on the long-term ram ications of your words and actions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Others will toss a challenge at you that youll want to run with. Recognize your limits and the results of pushing yourself too hard. You might want to take some needed time off, for a snooze or to relax with a favorite person. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might have gone be yond the call of duty in han dling responsibilities and helping others out. By mid afternoon, decide to make time to pursue your desires. Many of you would be quite satised with just a nap! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make hay while the sun shines. Someone might be come argumentative. How you handle this person could be more important than you realize. Ask yourself whether you really support these dis agreeable moments. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Pressure from a parent or roommate could drive you wild. You might choose to have an argument, but ask yourself whether it would be helpful. Think in terms of your personal goals and de sires regarding this person. Is this the picture you paint in your mind? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Listen to the drumbeats. Do you really want to follow them down the warpath? Stop acting on impulse. Pausing and rethinking your goals will help you stay more levelheaded. Distract your self, if necessary. Get some fresh air. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Overindulging is a wellknown characteristic of your sign, especially when want ing to evade certain emo tions and/or situations. Lis ten to your feelings more often, and you will nd that there is logic behind them. Do not postpone an over due chat. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Taking a risk hap pens more easily with you than with many other signs. Weigh the pros and cons, and ask yourself wheth er you can take a loss if it should occur. Only you have the answer. Avoid a quarrel with a friend. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might create a quarrel in order to distance yourself from someone. Your sense of humor will emerge and lighten the mood. You do understand where this person is coming from. A lit tle laughter will make both of your days better. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) News could be provoc ative. Before you say or do anything, root out the issue surrounding the stress or opt for a stress-reducing ex perience. Your instincts will guide you with a money offer, though using a little caution wouldnt hurt. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Invite friends to join you to see a movie. Getting to gether afterward also could add to the moment. You might hear news that will have you shaking your head. You will be all ears on this matter later. A partner could be unusually jealous. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, March 23, 2014 With two wisdom teeth extractions or more.Lake Advanced Dentistryrfnftbrf(352) 205-8355www.lakeadvanceddentistry.com NEW PATIENT SPECIAL$79 Where insurance is not applicableIncludes: (90150) Comprehensive Exam, (0210) Complete Series X-Rays, (0350) Oral/Facial Photographic Images & Oral Cancer Screening.IV services are rendered by general dentist.This special will end April 30th, 2014. 365-255024 Hour Answering Service 1501 N. US Hwy 441 Suite 1836, Bldg 1800 The VillagesPunya Clinic 1070 Flagler Avenue Leesburg PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE TROUBLE SLEEPING?Shakti Narain, M.D. FCCP Accepting New Patients LRDA SLP DSRDRSCenterLRDA SLP DSRDRSCenter said. Thats denitely left an impact. Since 2008, rst-time job seekers have faced a market more dif cult than anything their older siblings or par ents have seen. Unemployment for people under 25 hit 21 percent in 2010 and still is well above its prerecession high at 15.6 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The situation is worse for workers under 25 with no col lege education, whose unemployment rate is 18.6 percent. Young people who are working have few er opportunities for advancement, in part because fewer older workers are voluntarily quitting their jobs. The longer this goes on, and the longer theyre not attached to something meaningful and theres a lot of young people who still arent then theyre wasting their human resource investment, which is their educa tion, said Phil Gard ner, director of the Col legiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State Univer sity. Repeated studies show that people who look for their rst job during a recession take as much as a 9 percent wage cut. These losses can be permanent, and even when theyre not, may fade only after a decade. The fault lines run through families. Laura Franklin, 27, and her sister Emily, 32, both went to the Col lege of St. Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn. Emi ly didnt seriously con sider her career un til her senior year, yet got a good job four days after she graduat ed in 2004. Laura, with a 3.9 GPA and a semes ter as a full-time sub stitute teacher under her belt, couldnt crack the teaching market in 2009 or 2010. She wanted to teach third-graders, she said, because they like to learn and are old enough to work inde pendently. She applied for more than 100 jobs in Minnesota and Colo rado through the sum mer of 2009. She drove to job fairs where lines formed out the door for one opening. Youd just hang your head when you walked in, she said. The rst few weeks without a job offer turned into months, and then the summer passed, and her com puter lled with folders of rejected cover letters. I was just so de feated, she said. My self-esteem was just blown. I said, I give up. Im going to take care of babies. This is my life. OK. She worked at a day care called New Hori zon Academy, and a year later, took a job as an early childhood teaching assistant for St. Paul public schools, hoping that might lead to full-time teaching. She worked both jobs 12 hours a day to cover her bills, in cluding payments on $18,000 in student debt. The teaching job never materialized, so she took a job at a UnitedHealth call cen ter, which led to a bet ter position at Optum Health. She gave up hopes of teaching but believes those years made her stronger. I can look back and think, OK, that was awful and such a hard struggle, but Im so happy with where I am now because of it, she said. It makes you appreciate it that much more. One reason for opti mism is that as more baby boomers leave the workforce, more jobs should open up for younger workers. The biggest cohort of baby boomers is now in its mid-50s, said Susan Brower, Minnesotas state demographer. So she expects the num ber of retirements to rise over the next 10 to 15 years. We do expect to get this boost in terms of replacement job open ings, Brower said. We dont know exact ly what the size of it will be. For now, many col lege students appear to have accepted that it wont be easy to get a good job. If you go down to people 22 or 23 years old now, they dont feel quite as disillusioned, said Richard Freeman, the economist. They understood. The signal was coming out from society. Its amazing, to me at least, how easily people adjust to what ever the current situa tion is. WORKERS FROM PAGE E3