Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 GATORS SWIPE SEC TITLE, NO. 1 SEED, SPORTS B1 UF STABBING: Report reveals details of attack, suspect death A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Volunteers cuddle babies too sick to leave hospital C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 17, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 76 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 79 / 65 Mostly cloudy with T-storms. 50 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lacrosse teams from Ithaca College and Stevenson warm up for a game on one of the new elds at the National Training Center in Clermont on Friday. TED BRIDIS and JACK GILLUM Associated Press WASHINGTON The Obama administration more often than ever censored government les or outright denied access to them last year under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, accord ing to a new analysis of fed eral data by The Associated Press. The administration cited more legal exceptions it said justied withholding ma terials and refused a record number of times to turn over les quickly that might be especially newsworthy. Most agencies also took longer to answer records requests, the analysis found. The governments own g ures from 99 federal agen cies covering six years show that half way through its sec ond term, the administra tion has made few meaning ful improvements in the way it releases records despite its promises from Day 1 to be come the most transparent administration in history. In category after category except for reducing num bers of old requests and a slight increase in how of ten it waived copying fees the governments efforts to be more open about its ac tivities last year were their worst since President Barack Obama took ofce. In a year of intense pub lic interest over the Nation al Security Agencys sur veillance programs, the government cited national security to withhold infor mation a record 8,496 times a 57 percent increase over a year earlier and more than double Obamas rst year, when it cited that reason 3,658 times. The Defense Department, including the NSA, and the CIA accounted for nearly all those. The Ag riculture Departments Farm J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / AP Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., leaves the chamber at the Capitol in Washington, on Tuesday. JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and MIKE ECKEL Associated Press SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine Fireworks exploded and Russian ags uttered above jubilant crowds Sun day after residents in Crimea voted over whelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The Unit ed States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabi lizing and were expect ed to slap sanctions against Russia for it. Ukraines new gov ernment in Kiev called the referen dum a circus di rected at gunpoint by Moscow referring to the thousands of Russian troops now in the strategic Black Sea peninsula after seiz ing it two weeks ago. But after the polls closed late Sunday, crowds of ethnic Rus sians in the region al Crimean capital of Simferopol erupted with jubilant chants in the main square, overjoyed at the pros pect of once again be coming part of Russia. The Crimea refer endum offered voters the choice of seeking annexation by Rus sia or remaining in Ukraine with great er autonomy. After 50 percent of the ballots were counted, Mikhail Malishev, head of the Associated Press Key events in Ukraines political cri sis: Nov. 21, 2013: Pres ident Viktor Yanu kovychs government announces its aban doning an agreement to strengthen ties with the European Union and instead seeking closer cooperation with Moscow. Protest ers take to the streets. Nov. 30: Images of protesters bloodied by police truncheons spread quickly and galvanize public sup port for the demon strations. Dec. 1: A pro test attracts around 300,000 people on Ki evs Independence Square, known as the Maidan, the largest since the 2004 Orange CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com T wo $400,000 multipur pose/World Cup soc cer elds were unveiled to the public last week at the National Training Center in Clermont. NTC spokesperson Kim Couch said the elds can be used for soccer, lacrosse, ag football and other sports. Paul Johns, NTCs chief op erating ofcer, said he be lieves the elds will bene t Lake County because they will attract even more teams along with sports fans and players families and friends who will spend money on food, lodging and other things. This certainly will be a big impact to south Lake County, he said. The NTC already has ve multipurpose elds, but more were needed because local groups and organizations use them, too. Thats why county ofcials contributed $400,000 from their county-wide parks and recreation budget to build them. We, along with the county, wanted to take care of com munity leagues and clubs, and were excited that we were able to provide them with what they needed, Johns said. Couch said the two World Cup soccer elds can also serve as four modied elds. Information provided by the chamber said the NTC wel comes more than 250,000 vis iting athletes to its facilities each year, which South Lake Chamber of Commerce Presi dent Ray San Fratello said en ergizes the local economy. South Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ec otourism, adventure tour ism and heritage tourism, he said. It is a true econom ic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the communi ty through visitors spending at our hotels, dining in our restaurants and buying goods and services typical of tourists from our stores. Timeline: Key events in Ukraines political crisis NTC adds World Cup fields South Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ecotourism, adventure tourism and heritage tourism. It is a true economic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the community.... Ray San Fratello South Lake Chamber of Commerce President US cites national security as reason to censor, deny records SEE RECORDS | A2 SEE TIMELINE | A2 Crimeans vote overwhelmingly for secession SEE VOTE | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 16 CASH 3 ............................................... 7-3-6 Afternoon .......................................... 2-6-1 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-2-5-0 Afternoon ....................................... 6-8-7-9 FLORIDA LOTTERY MARCH 15 FANTASY 5 ........................... 5-10-15-17-32 FLORIDA LOTTO ............. 16-24-26-40-41-45 POWERBALL ........................ 2-5-34-51-589 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. Service Agency cited na tional security six times, the Environmental Protection Agency did twice and the National Park Service once. And ve years after Obama directed agencies to less fre quently invoke a deliber ative process exception to withhold materials describ ing decision-making be hind the scenes, the govern ment did it anyway, a record 81,752 times. Im concerned the grow ing trend toward relying upon FOIA exemptions to with hold large swaths of govern ment information is hinder ing the publics right to know, said Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., chairman of the Senate Judi ciary Committee. It becomes too much of a temptation. If you screw up in government, just mark it top secret. Citizens, journalists, busi nesses and others last year made a record 704,394 re quests for information, an 8 percent increase over the previous year. The govern ment responded to 678,391 requests, an increase of 2 percent over the previous year. The AP analysis showed that the government more than ever censored materials it turned over or fully denied access to them, in 244,675 cases or 36 percent of all re quests. On 196,034 other oc casions, the government said it couldnt nd records, a per son refused to pay for cop ies or the government de termined the request to be unreasonable or improper. Sometimes, the govern ment censored only a few words or an employees phone number, but other times it completely marked out near ly every paragraph on pages. The White House said the governments gures demon strate that agencies are re sponding to the presidents call for greater transparency. White House spokesman Eric Schultz noted that the gov ernment responded to more requests than previously and said it released more infor mation. Over the past ve years, federal agencies have worked aggressively to im prove their responsiveness to FOIA requests, applying a presumption of openness and making it a priority to re spond quickly, Schultz said. Sunday was the start of Sunshine Week, when news organizations promote open government and freedom of information. The chief of the Justice De partments Ofce of Informa tion Policy, which oversees the open records law, told the Senate last week that some of the 99 agencies in the past ve years have released doc uments in full or in part in more than 90 percent of cas es. She noted the record number of requests for gov ernment records, which ex ceeded 700,000 for the rst time last year, and said deci sions are harder than ever. The requests are more complex than they were be fore, director Melanie Pus tay told the Senate Judiciary Committee. The governments respon siveness under the FOIA is widely viewed as a barometer of its transparency. Under the law, citizens and foreigners can compel the government to turn over copies of federal records for zero or little cost. Anyone who seeks informa tion through the law is gener ally supposed to get it unless disclosure would hurt nation al security, violate person al privacy or expose business secrets or condential deci sion-making in certain areas. It cited such exceptions a re cord 546,574 times last year. The public is frustrat ed and unhappy with the pace of responses and the amount of information pro vided, Sen. Richard Blu menthal, D-Conn., said at the same congressional hearing. Theres a common reaction for anybody who has any experience with it that it doesnt function well. John Cook, the incoming new editor at the Intercept, the online magazine found ed by investor Pierre Omid yar, said his experience un der the open records law was abysmal but not especial ly worse last year than pre viously. Its a bureaucra cy, Cook said. As often as its about trying to keep data from falling into the hands of reporters, its the contrac tor looking for ways to reduce the caseload. Its just bureau crats trying to get home earli er and have less to do. The AP could not deter mine whether the adminis tration was abusing the na tional security exception or whether the public asked for more documents about sen sitive subjects. The NSA said its 138 percent surge in re cords requests were from people asking whether it had collected their phone or email records, which it generally re fuses to conrm or deny. To do otherwise, the NSA said, would pose an an unaccept able risk because terrorists could check to see whether the U.S. had detected their ac tivities. It censored records or fully denied access to them in 4,246 out of 4,328 requests, or 98 percent of the time. RECORDS FROM PAGE A1 Revolution. Activists seize Kiev City Hall. Dec. 17: Russian President Vladimir Putin announces Moscow will buy $15 billion worth of Ukrainian govern ment bonds and cut the price Ukraine pays for Rus sian natural gas. Jan. 22, 2014: Three pro testers die during a con frontation with police. Jan. 28: The prime min ister resigns and parlia ment repeals harsh an ti-protest laws that set off the violence. Feb. 16: Opposition ac tivists end their occupa tion of Kiev City Hall in ex change for the release of all 234 jailed protesters. Feb. 18: Protesters attack police lines and set res out side parliament after it stalls on a constitutional reform to limit presidential powers. Riot police respond; at least 26 people die and hundreds are injured. Feb. 20: Hours after a truce is announced, vio lence resumes. More than 80 people, mainly protest ers, are killed by gunshots. Feb. 21: Under a Europe an-mediated plan, protest leaders and Yanukovych agree to form a new gov ernment and hold an early election. Parliament slash es his powers and votes to free his rival, Yulia Tymos henko, from prison. Yanu kovych ees Kiev. Feb. 22: Parliament votes to remove Yanukovych and hold new elections. Ty moshenko is freed. Feb. 23: Ukraines parlia ment assigns presidential powers to its new speak er, Oleksandr Turchynov, a Tymoshenko ally. Feb. 24: Ukraines inter im government draws up a warrant for Yanukovychs arrest. Russian Prime Min ister Dmitry Medvedev de rides the new leaders in Kiev as Kalashnikov-tot ing people in black masks. Feb. 26: Leaders of Ukraines protest move ment propose legislator Arseniy Yatsenyuk as prime minister. Putin orders ma jor military exercises just across the border. Feb. 27: Masked gunmen seize regional parliament and government buildings in Crimea. Ukraines gov ernment pledges to pre vent a national breakup with strong backing from the West. Yanukovych is granted refuge in Russia. Feb. 28: Ukraine says Russian troops have taken up positions around strate gic locations on the Crime an Peninsula. Ukraines parliament adopts a res olution demanding that Russia halt steps it says are aimed against Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity. March 1: Troops under apparent Russian com mand take over Crimea without ring a shot. The Kiev government and its Western supporters are powerless to react. Presi dent Barack Obama calls Putin to demand the troops withdrawal. March 2: Ukraine ap peals for international help, fearing a wider Rus sian invasion. March 3: Ukraine says there are up to 16,000 Rus sian troops in Crimea. Russia says it has approved troop deployment at the request of Yanukovych. March 6: Crimeas par liament declares the re gion wants to join Russia and will let voters decide in a March 16 referendum. March 12: Obama meets with Yatsenyuk in Washing ton in a show of support for the new Ukrainian govern ment and declares the U.S. would completely reject the Crimea referendum. March 14: A last-ditch diplomatic effort before the referendum fails in Lon don, where Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov met with U.S. counterpart John Kerry amid threats of sanc tions against Russia if it an nexes Crimea. March 16: Crimea votes in the referendum about whether to become inde pendent and seek to be come part of Russia. TIMELINE FROM PAGE A1 referendum commit tee, said more than 95 percent of voters had approved splitting off and joining Russia. Opponents of se cession appeared to have stayed away Sunday, denouncing the vote as a cynical power play and land grab by Russia. Russia was expect ed to face strong sanc tions Monday by the U.S. and Europe over the vote, which could also encourage ris ing pro-Russian sen timent in Ukraines east and lead to fur ther divisions in this nation of 46 million. Residents in western Ukraine and the cap ital, Kiev, are strong ly pro-West and Ukrainian nationalist. The Crimean parlia ment will meet Mon day to formally ask Moscow to be an nexed and Crimean lawmakers will y to Moscow later in the day for talks, Crimeas pro-Russia prime min ister said on Twitter. In Moscow, the speaker of the lower house of the Russian parliament, Sergei Naryshkin, suggest ed that joining Russia was a done deal. We understand that for 23 years after Ukraines formation as a sovereign state, Crimeans have been waiting for this day, Naryshkin was quot ed as saying by the state ITAR-Tass news agency. Russian lawmaker Vladimir Zhirinovsky said the annexation could take from three days to three months, according to Interfax. Some residents in Crimea said they feared the new Ukrainian govern ment that took over when President Vik tor Yanukovych ed to Russia last month will oppress them. Its like theyre cra zy Texans in western Ukraine. Imagine if the Texans sudden ly took over power (in Washington) and told everyone they should speak Texan, said Ilya Khlebanov, a vot er in Simferopol. In Sevastopol, the Crimean port where Russia now leases a major naval base from Ukraine for $98 mil lion a year, more than 70 people surged into a polling station in the rst 15 minutes of vot ing Sunday. Ukraines new prime minister insisted that neither Ukraine nor the West would recog nize the vote. Under the stage di rection of the Russian Federation, a circus performance is under way: the so-called ref erendum, Prime Min ister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said Sunday. Also tak ing part in the perfor mance are 21,000 Rus sian troops, who with their guns are trying to prove the legality of the referendum. As soon as the polls closed, the White House again de nounced the vote. The internation al community will not recognize the re sults of a poll admin istered under threats of violence, it said in a statement. VOTE FROM PAGE A1 EFREM LUKATSKY / AP Ukrainian soccer supporters create Ukraines Navy ag to support the countrys territorial integrity, during a soccer match between Dynamo Kyiv and Crimean Tavria at the Olympic stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, on Sunday. VADIM GHIRDA / AP A woman casts her ballot in the Crimean referendum in Simferopol, Ukraine, on Sunday. Its like theyre crazy Texans in western Ukraine. Imagine if the Texans suddenly took over power (in Washington) and told everyone they should speak Texan. Ilya Khlebanov Ukrainian voter

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Grantsmanship Network monthly meeting is Thursday The Lake-Sumter Grantsmanship Network, representing nonprof it and similar agencies in Lake and Sumter counties, will feature speaker Valerie Read of the Universal Orlando Foundation at its monthly member ship meeting. Read will discuss apply ing for funding from the foundation. The meeting will be at 10:30 a.m., Thursday, at the United Way ofce, 32644 Blossom Ln. For information, go to www.lsgn.org. TAVARES Coast Guard captain prep class to be offered The Triangle Boat Club and Adams Marine Seminars will host a cap tains prep course, today through March 28, at Triangle Boat Club, 12001 U.S. Highway 441. Passing the class and exam allows students to apply for a Coast Guard-issued license. Classes meet from 6 to 10 p.m., Monday-Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Pre-registration is required at 352-447-1950. EUSTIS Lake Tech Center to host Health and Wellness Fair Lake Technical Center will host a Health and Wellness Fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at the main campus, 2001 Kurt St. The fair will be supported by SkillsUSA and Lowes, and will feature health information booths, skin care advice and blood pressure checks, with live entertainment by Rockin Redemption. A silent auction will also be held to raise funds for Jay Ryon, the son of a Lake County reghter, who was diagnosed with leukemia. For information, go to www.lake tech.org, email LTCinfo@lake.k12. .us or call 352-589-2250. TAVARES Health and Human Services seeks grant applications Lake Countys Health and Human Services Division is accepting grant applications for funding up to $25,000 for youth intervention and prevention programs, and up to $10,000 for health and human ser vices programs. Deadline for sub mission is 5 p.m. on April 30. Bidders conferences will be from 9 a.m. to noon, Thursday, at the Lake County Agriculture Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., and from 9 a.m. to noon, March 24 at the Lake County Emergency Communications and Operations Center, 425 W. Alfred St. Call 352-742-6520 or go to www.lake county.gov/grant for information. CLERMONT Box car racing company to hold open house On March 28, the Clermont/ Minneola Box Car Racing company, 363 Sky Valley St., will host an open house at the community center from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The groups sanction ing body is National Derby Rallies. For information, call 352-708-4207, email cmboxcarracing@gmail.com or go to www.cmboxcarracing.com. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Jordan Baker, in F. Scott Fitzgeralds The Great Gats by said she likes large par ties. Theyre so intimate, she said. At small parties there isnt any privacy. Baker would be right at home at the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merces upcoming Great Gatsby-themed party. Planned for 6 to 11 p.m. on March 28, the party will combine the chambers annual Taste in Mount Dora and Casino Nights events. This will mark the rst time the events have been held together, which led the chamber to add a theme that suited both, according to Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merce President Rob En glish. We decided to kind of step it up a notch when we combined events, En glish said. We decided its (going to) be a themed event each year and so this year, we thought of a fun theme that everybody would enjoy because of the music thats associ ated with it, the apper dresses, and the gangster look for guys and stuff like that. We thought that a lot of people would pos sibly come dressed in the 20s-era clothing, and well see. MOUNT DORA Chamber plans Gatsby-themed party SEE GATSBY | A4 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Cornerstone Hos pice has made four leadership changes, promoting two em ployees and lling two other va cant positions. Rhonda White is the new Chief Op erations Of cer, Don na Loyko is the new chief compliance of cer, Tanya Holcomb is the new control ler and Ursu la Cutler is the new vice pres ident of sales and market ing, accord ing to a press release and a company of cial. White said she has been Cornerstone Hospices chief compliance ofce for the past six years. She took over the COO re sponsibilities on March 1 as former COO Mary Manrique will be retiring, accord ing to a press release. White said the adjust ment does not pose a signi cant challenge because of her experience at Cornerstone Hospice. Even though I ha vent been respon sible for the opera tions, when youre compliance ofcer you have to know ev erything about op erations. So, there wasnt a big learning curve for me coming into the position, White said. She said as COO she is now com pletely responsi ble for patient care. As a com pliance of cer, we were responsible for monitor ing the quali ty of the care, and also making sure that the care that was being delivered met all of the laws and reg ulations. So, not involved with the pa tient care it self in my pre vious role, White said of the differences be tween her previ ous job and her new COO position. She added, however, she has worked in hospice for 15 years and is glad to be coming back to the care side. I started my ca reer in patient care. I was actual ly delivering care to the pa tients and Ive been away from that for a long time, and I love what hospice does. I think we provide the best care, health care, and Im glad that I get to be more intimately involved in that, White said. Loyko said she TAVARES Cornerstone Hospice fills top positions LOYKO WHITE HOLCOMB CUTLER DOUG FINGER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Gainesville Police, University of Florida Police and the Alachua County Sheriffs Ofce work the scene of a shooting in Butler Plaza on March 3. MONIVETTE CORDEIRO Halifax Media Group M aureen Craveys son left ear ly the morning of the stabbing. He didnt sleep well the Sunday night before, get ting up sever al times. Michael Cravey, 28, left the house about 6:30 a.m., around the same time Mau reen was go ing to work. The note he wrote said he was going to drive around Gainesville, an hour from their Cross City home. She didnt think about it much. Mi chael was her el dest son, but to her, he would al ways be her baby. She didnt start to pan ic until the calls start ed. A family friend called Maureen and said he heard ofcials say Michaels name multiple times on the police scanner as they searched for him. UF stabbing, chase, death of suspect traced Staff Report The Mount Dora High School Band will have a din ner with live and silent auc tions on April 5 to raise money for uniforms and equipment. Helping to keep music in our schools is so import ant, auction chairman Terry Askins said in an email. Mu sic helps students learn disci pline, responsibility, charac ter and teamwork. The dinner will feature a three-course Italian dinner with live entertainment by the students. There will be a live auction and a silent auc tion of theme park tickets, sporting event tickets, gift cards and gift baskets. We have lots of golf pack ages, restaurant gift cards and local items that were donat ed, Askins said. Auction items can be pur chased with cash, checks or credit cards. The event is planned for 5 to 9 p.m. at Round Lake Chris tian Church, 31205 Round Lake Rd., near Round Lake El ementary School. Dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. Dinner tickets are $10 if purchased in advance and $15 at the door. Dessert will be available for purchase, and take-out dinners will also be available. For tickets, call Gayle Min nig at 352-383-9199, Michelle Dotto at 407-399-9683 or email bandmommd@gmail.com. Corporate tables of eight are available for $100 each, in cluding a table-top logo and a mention in the agenda pro gram. Askins will personally deliver these tickets. Call 352551-0133 for reservations. MDHS Band plans fundraiser CRAVEY SEE HOSPICE | A4 SEE STABBING | A5 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A Lady Lake man died from in juries after a truck in which he was a passenger was struck and over turned in a two-vehicle crash Sat urday night in Sumter County, said Florida Highway Patrol troopers. Arthur Miller, 59, of Lady Lake, died at The Villages Regional Hos pital, according to the police report. Sgt. Steve Gaskins, public affairs ofcer for FHP, said Clayton Andrew Dorey, 17, of Ocklawaha, was driving a 2000 Dodge Durango northbound at 6:09 p.m. Saturday on County Road 229 and approaching the inter section at County Road 466 when he failed to stop at a posted stop sign. As a result, FHP said, Doreys truck collided with the left side of a 2001 Dodge Ram driven by Robert W. Plunk, 65, of Umatilla. Upon impact, Plunks truck rotated and overturned. Miller, a passenger in the vehicle, died from his injuries. Plunk, along with two others in the same vehicle, Audrey Jean Mc Quay, 70, of Umatilla, and Janene Grace Miller, 60, of Lady Lake, re ported minor injuries and were tak en to TVRH. FHP said Dorey also had minor injuries and was taken to Marion County West Hospital. The crash was not alcohol-relat ed and everyone was wearing seat belts, according to the police report. Gaskins said the accident re mains under investigation and charges are pending. SUMTER COUNTY Passenger dies when vehicle is struck, overturned

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 DEATH NOTICES Ruth K. Carroll Ruth K. Carroll, 80, of the Villages, died Fri day, March 14, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. David Cifuni David Cifuni, 95, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 14, 2014. PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg James W. Fahnestock James William Fahne stock, 86, of Leesburg, died Saturday, March 15, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home Leesburg Richard Poirier Richard Poirier, 69, of the Villages, died on Saturday, March 15, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Leesburg. Paul Young Paul Young, 66, of Leesburg, died on Fri day, March 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. IN MEMORY joined Cornerstone Hospice a little over a year ago as a risk man ager. She has more than 30 years of nursing, lead ership and risk man agement experience in home care, hospice and corrections health care, according to a press release. Loyko said both her parents were at Corner stone Hospice, which motivated her career choice. I think it was at that point that I realized that this is something I think I want to do in my nursing career, and here I am, Loyko said. I saw the teamwork, I saw the caring, I saw the compassion and I really felt that this is someplace that I really wanted to work. She added she is very excited about the opportunity the pro motion brings. Holcomb previously worked for The Villages Health System, and has years of experience guiding teams in nan cial analysis, reporting, forecasting, auditing, budgeting and cash management for ser vice and healthcare in dustries, the press re lease states. The controller posi tion has been vacant for several months and the vice president of sales and marketing position has been va cant for two years, ac cording to the release. Cutler, as vice pres ident of sales in mar keting, will be in charge of outreach, includ ing marketing, adver tising and community and clinical outreach, a press release stated. Cornerstone Hospice covers seven coun ties and has more than 700 employees compa ny-wide, according to White. HOSPICE FROM PAGE A3 Staff Report Central Florida Health Alliance will host job fairs this week at Leesburg Region al Medical Center and The Villages Region al Hospital in efforts to recruit employees for open positions at both locations, of cials said. LRMC will have its job fair from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday at the hospitals west lob by, 600 E. Dixie Rd., Leesburg. TVRH job fair is slated for 12:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the hospitals main lobby, 1451 El Camino Real, The Villages. Candidates will be offered on-the-spot interviews at both lo cations as we try to ll a variety of clinical and non-clinical posi tions, said Lori Faries, director of recruit ment and human rela tions at Central Florida Health Alliance. Applicants are en couraged to dress pro fessionally and bring a current resume. Interested job-seek ers can download an application and pre-register for the event at www.cfhaca reers.com by clicking on the Spring Career Days link. Those who pre-register and at tend one of the events will be entered into a drawing for a $100 Visa gift card. LEESBURG Hospitals to host job fairs The event will in clude food samplings from area restaurants, searchlights in the sky, a 1920s car for photo opportunities, a black and white photo booth, a 10-piece jazz band in Sunset Park and casino games with play mon ey and prizes, English said. He added this will also be the rst time the events have live music. This year the party will again include the tasting event from Lake Receptions, according to English. The nights activities will take place on 4th Avenue, Alexander Av enue, in Sunset Park and on the chamber of commerces patio, ac GATSBY FROM PAGE A3 CHRISTINA VEIGA Miami Herald MIAMI BEACH Sometimes, preserva tionists say, it takes a martyr: A lovely but old building has to fall to the wrecking ball be fore cities move to save historically signicant structures. Preservationists will soon have another martyr. The white man sion that sits at the tip of Miami Beachs Star Island and designed by Walter deGarmo, Flor idas rst registered ar chitect, faces immi nent demolition. Its owners a plastic surgeon who calls him self the boob god and his wife, a star of The Real Housewives of Mi ami recently won a bitter, protracted legal battle to tear down their 1925 home to make way for a 20,000-square-foot estate. It will include six bedrooms, seven bath rooms, a home theater, game room, wine cel lar, ve-car garage and guest house. Just as the demoli tion of the Art Deco Senator Hotel in 1988 led to legislation aimed at protecting import ant buildings, a push to save the manse at 42 Star Island has forced Miami Beach to re-ex amine how it protects its historic resources. The home, which Leonard and Lisa Hoch stein purchased in a foreclosure sale, has be come a symbol of what preservationists say is a rush to tear down the Beachs historic homes and build massive new mansions on their ruins. With 42 Star held up as an example, Miami Beach ofcials engaged real estate agents, de velopers, homeowners and the historic pres ervation communi ty in more than a year of meetings about the citys preservation laws. As a result, the city re cently changed its build ing regulations to en courage homeowners to retain historically signif icant properties and to protect neighborhood character by restricting what kind of homes can be built in the rst place. Beach commissioners approved the changes in February. But some homeown ers and preservation ists say the new laws dont go far enough, and might even have the opposite effect. The Miami Design Preserva tion League, which led the crusade to preserve 42 Star Island, is ask ing elected ofcials to reconsider especial ly because the changes were introduced shortly before the second pub lic vote to approve the new rules. In city government, new laws usually re quire two public hear ings and votes before becoming nal. The league says the most controversial chang es were not discussed publicly before the nal vote, though it is not Battle to save old homes not over C.W. GRIFFIN / AP Dr. Leonard Hochstein, right, and his wife, Lisa Hochstein, of The Real Housewives of Miami, stand with their dog Leo in front of a mansion they bought on Star Island in Miami Beach. unusual for chang es to be proposed be tween the rst and second readings of the laws. It just shows how pathetic it is that we cannot have the vi sion . to try to pro tect these homes a little bit better, said Nancy Liebman, a for mer city commission er who now heads Mi ami Beach United, a citywide homeowners organization. Liebman and oth ers say that despite the new rules, old er homes will con tinue to be knocked down, and hulking structures that push from property line to property line will stand in their places. The preservation league wants Miami Beach to reconsider the changes, and is considering legal ac tion if it does not. Were a small town and we have our sym bols. And when cer tain symbols are lost, it kind of gets a com munity together and makes us think, What can we do to make sure this doesnt hap pen again? Ciraldo said. Somebodys got to do it. Its important to the city. cording to a press release. Proceeds from the events will go to continued res toration of the his toric train station owned and occu pied by the cham ber, English said. Tickets for the event are $50 per person and can be purchased at www. MountDora.com or by phone at 352383-2165. Staff Report Lake County high school students cur rently taking Advanced Placement courses are encouraged to sign up for district-wide AP seminars scheduled on April 5 and 26 from 8 to 11 a.m. and 12 to 3 p.m. The April 5 seminars will be held at Leesburg High School and Lake Minneola High School, according to a press release. The April 26 seminars will be held at Mount Dora High School and East Ridge High School. The three-hour ses sions are designed to give students ex tra practice and re view for AP exams. Stu dents can select times and subjects they want to attend. Subjects of fered include English Language Composi tion, English Literature Composition, Calcu lus, Human Geography, U.S. History and World History. The Satur day AP seminars in clude test-taking strat egies, practice exam questions and content overviews. They will be designed and taught by AP teachers from across the district. Students can receive more information from their AP teachers. There are 30 seats available per session, awarded on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Registration for the April 5 seminars runs through March 31 at www.surveymonkey. com/s/ap_seminar_ april5. Registration for the April 26 seminars runs through April 21 at www. surveymonkey.com/s/ ap_seminar_april26. LEESBURG Lake students urged to attend AP seminars

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb Maureen texted Mi chael, but he seemed to have no idea what she was talking about. Around 8:30 a.m., Mi chaels younger broth er, Mather Cravey, called Michael on the phone. Michael told Mather he was going through a McDonalds drive-th ru as they were speak ing. Mather asked his brother what he was doing and urged him to do whatever the po lice were asking of him or to go home if noth ing was going on. Im being set up, Michael told him. Ive got to gure this out. Maureen and Ma ther had no idea that at the time Mi chael was speaking to them, multiple agen cies in Gainesville were searching for him in connection with the stabbing of a Univer sity of Florida staff member in a campus parking lot. They didnt know then that over the course of the morn ing Michael would lead police on two danger ous high-speed chas es through the city that ofcers abandoned when the chases be came especially dan gerous. Or that later he would crash into an other car and escape into a nearby shopping center. And it wasnt until much later that police would tell them that Michael had run at an ofcer with a hatchet and that, seconds later, the ofcer red a volley of bullets at Michael, fatally wounding him. Details of the inci dents that led to Mi chaels death on March 3, including his fami lys recollections and the observations of the man whom police say Michael stabbed, are contained in a 69page incident report released this past week by the University of Florida Police Depart ment. After almost two weeks of searching, Maureen Cravey says she is not one step closer to understand ing why why Mi chael left her house, why he reportedly stabbed that man, why he didnt listen to po lice. The only person who knows the answers, she says, is her son and he kept that truth with him when he died that Monday morning in the hospital after the shooting. The rst thing Cliff Preston noticed when he pulled into the parking lot behind Leigh Hall that Mon day morning was the black Jeep. Preston, 59, and his wife, Beckie Preston, 60, both work at UF and park in the same parking lot around 6:55 a.m. every weekday morning. This morning was no different, ex cept for the unfamiliar vehicle parked south of his, Preston told UPD Detective Ellen Duffy. As Preston was get ting out of his blue car, he noticed the driv er of the unfamiliar ve hicle walking around the back of his car and looking at his license plate. Preston asked the younger man, who police have said was Michael Cravey, if there was a problem or if he needed help, the police report said. Do you have a gun? Cravey reportedly asked him. Preston told detec tives he was confused and said no. Cravey then made statements about meeting Mike Potter, but Pres ton told him he didnt know a Mike Potter, the report said. Thats when Cravey reportedly pulled out a 4-inch folding knife and Preston told his wife to run. As Beckie Preston locked herself in the car, Cliff Preston ran toward the sidewalk yelling for help. Cravey caught up to him quickly and knocked him to the ground, the report said. UF student Karah Mechlowitz was wait ing for her friend in the same parking lot when she saw Cravey chas ing Preston and laugh ing. She thought it was prank until she saw him stab Preston in the neck, the report said. The whole time, Cravey seemed to be enjoying himself, she said. Cliff Preston told po lice he didnt remem ber how many times he was stabbed. Doctors later said Preston had three stab and slash wounds to his neck, two to his back, one near his collarbone and one on his right forearm. His shoul der blade and collar bone were also cracked during the attack, the report said. After the stabbing, Beckie Preston said Cravey came back to her vehicle and de manded she get out of the car, slamming his st on the passenger window. Evelyn Wilson, a se nior operator at UPD, was coming into work when she saw Cliff Preston on the side walk. From her car, she asked him if he was OK, she said. No, I was stabbed, Preston told her, point ing twice at Cravey, who was near Pres tons car. He tried to kill me. Cravey stared blank ly at her, as though he was looking through her, Wilson said. Then he got into his Jeep and drove toward the entrance, going around Mechlowitz, who tried to block his path with her car. Wil son followed Cravey in her car down Buckman Drive to get his license plate, the report said. As other ofcers be gan chasing the man down Buckman Drive, Ofcer Timothy Peck applied pressure to Prestons wounds un til paramedics arrived and took Preston to UF Health Shands Hospital. Beckie Preston ran to her husband and be gan yelling and shak ing her hands as by stander Michael Santarsiero held her. Wilson said she stayed calm as she comforted Beckie Pres ton but later broke down. It was surreal, she said. Ive never expe rienced anything like it, and Ive been in dis patch 19 years. Ofcer Brian Smith was on his way to Leigh Hall when he saw the dark-colored Jeep speed past him on Stadium Road. Behind the Jeep, Smith saw UPDs Wil son following the Jeep in an attempt to get the tag. Ofcer Daymon Kizzar, who was be hind Smith, positioned his police car to block Cravey and pointed his gun at him, the report said. Cravey ducked but continued driving as Kizzar yelled at him to stop. Smith and Kiz zar began to pursue the Jeep down Stadium Road as Cravey ran red lights and stop signs, the report said. After making his way through the west side of campus, Cravey turned right onto Southwest 34th Street and headed north. Po lice chased him as he weaved through traf c going about 90 mph and drove on the wrong side, the report said. Ofcers stopped chasing Cravey around the 4300 block of New berry Road because it became too dangerous, they said. Although they lost him, they managed to get his tag and connect their sus pect to a name, the re port said. Around 8:30 a.m., Cravey went through the drive-thru at the campus McDonalds on Northwest 13th Street and got a meal, the report said. Police nally spot ted Cravey again at 9:42 a.m. near Tigert Hall on Southwest 13th Street. Deputy Chief Darren Baxley followed him down Southwest 13th Street, driving an unmarked police car, the report said. As they approached the entrance of the Kirkwood subdivision, Cravey made a sud den U-turn and start ed driving north. At the intersection of South west 13th Street and 16th Avenue, police said Cravey ran the red light, crossed in front of other vehicles and turned left onto 16th Avenue. As several police cars surrounded him at the intersection of South west 16th Avenue and Archer Road, Cravey drove across the me dian into the opposite lane and continued on Archer Road, the report said. Again, the pur suit had become too dangerous, according to police, and they let him speed away down Archer Road. Minutes later, police said Cravey crashed into another vehicle near Sonnys BBQ and Southwest 37th Boule vard. Bystanders told ofcials he had run into the Pier 1 Imports in Butler Plaza with a black-and-yellow hatchet. At 10:04 a.m., GPD Lt. Mike Schibuola ap proached Cravey with his gun pointed at him and ordered him to drop the hatchet. Cravey in stead sprinted to ward Schibuola with his hatchet raised, the report said. Schibuola red his weapon, shooting mul tiple times and hitting Cravey. Two women lying on the sidewalk near the PetSmart entrance said Cravey ignored precise commands from the police ofcer to show his hands and did not obey, the report said. After detaining Cravey in handcuffs, ofcers rolled him over and cut his shirt open. Craveys breathing was shallow, and he had blood coming out of his mouth, the report said. One ofcer per formed CPR as oth ers tried to control the bleeding until para medics arrived. STABBING FROM PAGE A3 DOUG FINGER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP A Gainesville police ofcer opened re and killed Michael Cravey, 28, of Cross City, after Cravey crashed his Jeep into a vehicle, pictured here on Archer Road.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. CENTRAL FLORIDAS LARGEST ST. PATRICKS DAY BASH! Live Entertainment 12pm 9pm Inside Stage 3pm 12am Outside Stage Open at 11am www.okeefesirishpub.net Downtown Tavares Waterfront Entertainment DistrictCelebrating Our 30th Anniversary CHRIS BRUMMITT and JIM GOMEZ Associated Press KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia When someone at the controls calmly said the last words heard from the missing Malaysian jet liner, one of the Boeing 777s communications systems had already been disabled, authori ties said Sunday, adding to sus picions that one or both of the pilots were involved in the dis appearance of the ight. Investigators also examined a ight simulator conscated from the home of one of the pi lots and dug through the back ground of all 239 people on board, as well as the ground crew that serviced the plane. The Malaysia Airlines jet took off from Kuala Lumpur in the wee hours of March 8, headed to Beijing. On Saturday, the Ma laysian government announced ndings that strongly suggest ed the plane was deliberate ly diverted and may have own as far north as Central Asia or south into the vast reaches of the Indian Ocean. Authorities have said some one on board the plane rst disabled one of its communi cations systems the Aircraft and Communications Address ing and Reporting System, or ACARS about 40 minutes af ter takeoff. The ACARS equip ment sends information about the jets engines and other data to the airline. Around 14 minutes later, the transponder that identies the plane to commercial radar sys tems was also shut down. The fact that both systems went dark separately offered strong evi dence that the planes disap pearance was deliberate. On Sunday, Malaysian De fense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein told a news conference that that the nal, reassuring words from the cockpit All right, good night were spo ken to air trafc controllers after the ACARS system was shut off. Whoever spoke did not mention any trouble on board. Air force Maj. Gen. Affendi Buang told reporters he did not know whether it was the pilot or co-pilot who spoke to air trafc controllers. Given the expanse of land and water that might need to be searched, nding the wreckage could take months or longer. Or it might never be located. Estab lishing what happened with any degree of certainty will probably require evidence from cockpit voice recordings and the planes ight-data recorders. The search area now includes 11 countries the plane might have own over, Hishammud din said, adding that the num ber of countries involved in the operation had increased from 14 to 25. The search was already a highly complex, multinational effort, he said. It has now be come even more difcult. The search effort initially fo cused on the relatively shallow waters of the South China Sea and the Strait of Malacca, where the plane was rst thought to be. Hishammuddin said he had asked governments to hand over sensitive radar and satellite data to try to get a better idea of the planes nal movements. With more information, he said, the search zone could be narrowed to an area that is more feasible. Malaysia is leading the search for the plane and the investiga tion into its disappearance. In the United States, Dan Pfeiffer, senior adviser to Presi dent Barack Obama, told NBCs Meet the Press that the FBI was supporting the criminal probe. Rep. Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Securi ty subcommittee on counter terrorism and intelligence, said on ABCs This Week that so far theres nothing out there indi cating its terrorists. Investigators are trying to an swer these questions: If the two pilots were involved in the dis appearance, were they working together or alone, or with one or more of the passengers or crew? Did they y the plane under du ress or of their own will? Did one or more of the passengers man age to break into the cockpit or use the threat of violence to gain entry and then seize the plane? And what possible motive could there be for diverting the jet? Malaysias police chief, Khalid Abu Bakar, said he asked coun tries with citizens on board the plane to investigate their back grounds, no doubt looking for anyone with terrorism ties, avi ation skills or prior contact with the pilots. He said that the intel ligence agencies of some coun tries had already done so and found nothing suspicious, but he was waiting for others to re spond. Final words from jet came after communications system shutdown ERIC A. PASTOR / AP U.S. Navy crew members on board an aircraft P-8A Poseidon assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines ight MH370 in the Indian Ocean on Sunday. HAMZA HENDAWI Associated Press CAIRO Egypts crackdown on Islamists has jailed 16,000 peo ple over the past eight months in the coun trys biggest round-up in nearly two decades, according to previous ly unreleased gures from security ofcials. Rights activists say re ports of abuses in pris ons are mounting, with prisoners describing systematic beatings and miserable condi tions for dozens packed into tiny cells. The Egyptian gov ernment has not re leased ofcial num bers for those arrested in the sweeps since the military ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in July. But four senior ofcials two from the Interior Min istry and two from the military gave The As sociated Press a count of 16,000, including about 3,000 topor mid-lev el members of Morsis Muslim Brotherhood. The count, which is consistent with recent estimates by human rights groups, was based on a tally kept by the In terior Ministry to which the military also has ac cess. It includes hun dreds of women and minors, though the of cials could not give ex act gures. The ofcials gave the gures to the AP on condition of an onymity because the government has not re leased them. The ood of arrests has swamped pris ons and the legal sys tem. Many are held for months in police sta tion lockups meant as temporary holding ar eas or in impromp tu jails set up in police training camps because prisons are overcrowd ed. Inmates are kept for months without charge. My son looks like a caveman now. His hair and nails are long, he has a beard and he is unclean, said Nagham Omar, describing to the AP the conditions that her 20-year-old son Salahideen Ayman Mo hammed has endured since his arrest in Jan uary while participat ing in a pro-Morsi pro test. He and 22 others are crammed in a 3-by3 meter (yard) cell in a police station in the southern city of Assiut, said Omar, who visits him once a week. Mo hammed has not yet been charged. The government says the police, run by the Interior Ministry, have changed their ways from the era of autocrat Hosni Mubarak, when the security forces be came notorious for tor ture and corruption. The assistant inte rior minister for hu man rights, Maj. Gen. Abu Bakr Abdel-Karim, told the newspaper AlWatan in an interview last month that it is possible that there is some use of cruelty and said anyone claim ing to be maltreated should le a complaint with either the ministry or the general prosecu tors ofce. But he said so far there had been no proof presented of maltreatment. BARBARA SURK and DIAA HADID Associated Press BEIRUT With reb els eeing into neigh boring Lebanon, Syri an government troops and Hezbollah ght ers captured a strategic town near the frontier Sunday, ousting op position ghters from their last stronghold in the vital border area. Yabroud was a ma jor smuggling hub for the rebels trying to overthrow President Bashar Assad. The towns fall is the latest in a string of strategic gains by Assads forc es that have consoli dated authority in the past months in Syrias major cities, including the capital, Damascus. Militants from Leb anons Shiite group Hezbollah have been instrumental to As sads success on the battleeld, and sup port from the Irani an-backed ghters ap pears to have tipped the balance into the governments favor in Yabroud. However, the fact that opposi tion ghters ed into Lebanon, where Hez bollah is a major force, suggests the conict could bleed further into Syrias neighbor. The civil war already has ignited polarizing sectarian tensions be tween Lebanons Sun nis and Shiites. Its a good day for Assad, said Fawaz A. Gerges, director of the Middle East Center at the London School of Economics. He has not only survived the past three years, but his army is intact and on a rebound, with his allies Hezbollah rm ly behind him. However, Gerg es warned the fall of Yabroud will rever berate in neighboring Lebanon, pouring gasoline on sectari an divisions and likely bring more violence into the country. Outgunned by As sads army and Hez bollah, rebels aban doned their positions on the hills surround ing Yabroud overnight Sunday, collapsing the ghter ranks inside the town and allowing government forces to move in from the east shortly after dawn, a spokesman for the rebel coalition and the Syrian army said. Yabroud was an im portant supply line for rebels into Lebanon. The town overlooks an important cross-coun try highway from Da mascus to the central city of Homs. Theres no doubt Yabroud had big stra tegic importance, said Capt. Islam Alloush, a spokesman of the Is lamic Front, a rebel co alition who had fought in Yabroud but were now streaming into Lebanon. The biggest immediate loss, Al loush said, would be that rebels now had no way of supplying ghters outside of Da mascus, where Syrian forces have surround ed a series of opposi tion-held areas, deny ing them food, power and clean water. Syrian Defense Min ister Gen. Fahd Jassem al-Freij hailed the ar mys latest triumph while inspecting troops in Yabroud on Sunday. We are mov ing from one victory to another, al-Freij said in comments carried by state news agen cy SANA. He said the army troops are now chasing terrorists and gangs, and soon, all their hideouts will be destroyed. Syrian army ousts rebels from border stronghold AP PHOTO Syrian government forces ride a motorcycle around the main square after being deployed in Yabroud town, Syria, on Sunday. Egypt crackdown brings most arrests in decades AP FILE PHOTO In this Jan. 8 photo, Egypts riot police ofcers arrest a man, center, following clashes between supporters of Egypts ousted President Mohammed Morsi and riot police in Cairo, Egypt.

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hy should people talk to reporters? Its a ques tion thats seldom raised among news people, which is too bad, because its an import ant one. When you think about it, that question goes to the founda tion of the entire edice of a free press. And that foundation, at the moment, is shaky. Lets back up. No honest press, whatever its sense of mission and however rm its legal protec tions, can outperform its sourc es. It cant be any better, stron ger, braver, more richly informed, or more dedicated to broad pub lic purpose than the people who swallow their misgivings, return the phone call, step forward, and risk embarrassment and reprisal to talk to the reporter. The mythology of journalism enshrines the sleuths, sometimes the editors, even the publishers, but sources are really the whole ball game. Press freedom is noth ing more than source freedom, one step removed. The right of a news organization to tell what it learns is an empty abstraction without the willingness of news sources to tell what they know. Considering how important sources are, its stunning how lit tle affection they get and how imsy the protections are that anybody claims for them. For starters, take the current na tional security cases, the un precedented Espionage Act prosecutions that the Obama administration is pursuing against whistleblowers who gave news reporters secret informa tion about governmental impro prieties and illegalities. Nowadays prosecutors, for the most part, prefer to leave the press alone, and happily em brace the idea that even if an in formant belongs in prison for handing over secrets for publi cation, the media organizations that actually make them public need not be answerable. That practice reects a cozy lit tle entente between government and big media: The government avoids a public fuss, and the me dia buy themselves immunity at the cost of their sources safety. Of course, as a matter of mor al logic, ignoring the press is ab surd. If publishing something causes real harm, those respon sible should be called to account whether theyre former secu rity contractor Edward Snowden or The New York Times More important, if the publi cation was, on balance, a pub lic benet nobody should be punished neither the mighty news organization nor its source. But news sources have few al lies nowadays. And, its not just in the national security realm. If you look at digital era news prac tices, the overall environment for sources has deteriorated, and po tential informants have better reason than ever to keep silent. Consider the channels through which reporters and informants communicate. News organiza tions routinely post email ad dresses for their reporters. But does anyone believe an email to a journalist is private, in the way a phone conversation would have been a decade ago? Can the reporter even safeguard his or her own electronic correspon dence? How many proprietors would pay to ght an outside lit igants attempt to see that corre spondence even if its nothing more than some ex-boss trying to enforce a cockamamie non-dis paragement clause that the source was pressured to sign on his way out the company door? And once the story is pub lished, even if the source knew enough to speak carefully and his or her comments were ac curately rendered and proper ly contextualized (no sure thing, that), what then? Then the sources contribution will be subjected to the boister ous give and take of the online multiverse, and his or her words, motives and integrity will be de nounced or impugned, often by pseudonymous dingbats, some of them undisclosed hirelings. None of that is fun. To be sure, many informants are essentially professional sources, people sophisticated in handling journalists. Theyre of cials who are in the game, who know how to negotiate terms be forehand, and who know that their continuing value to the re porter will guarantee that theyll be handled with consideration. But the source whos imperiled is the average Joe or Jane who has signicant information the pub lic should hear, but whose col laboration is a one-off thing; this person wont ever be on any re porters speed dial. This is the source who steps from obscuri ty off a cliff into public notoriety, hoping the landing will be soft, perhaps expecting that with pub licity will come some measure of protection, believing that speak ing out is doing the right thing. We dont make it easy for them. They arent honored in the press ethics books or the civics texts, and the sociologists dont bother studying how often they get hurt. Yet they matter, crucially. They understand that talking to the press is what a responsible per son does, an action that belongs among the indispensable ele ments of being a citizen, along side the right to vote and the duty to give evidence in court. That people talk to the press at all is something of a miracle, and its time sources began to get the respect and attention from the media that they deserve. Edward Wasserman is dean of the Uni versity of California-Berkeley Gradu ate School of Journalism. He wrote this for McClatchy Newspapers. His web site is www.edwardwasserman.com. OTHER VOICES Edward Wasserman MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE The plight of the medias sources The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. I t might be sound reasoning, but a Su preme Court decision this week on an ar cane legal-easement argument will likely have broad and regrettable consequenc es, particularly in the West, for the national movement to convert old railroad beds into bicycle paths. The case, Brandt v. U.S., is rooted in the General Railroad Right of Way Law of 1875, through which Congress established a uni form approach to granting easements on gov ernment land so railroad companies could extend tracks through the heart of the still-de veloping country. As the federal government deeded some of that land to homesteaders, the easements went with the property trans fer, meaning that the new landowners were required to let the railroads use their property. But that 1875 law didnt specify what would happen to the easement if the railroad line was abandoned, which is what occurred in 2004 to a 66-mile track running from Lara mie, Wyo., to the Colorado state line. Two years later, federal lawyers led legal papers asserting that the easement reverted to the government, part of a move to con vert the railroad bed into the Medicine Bow Rail Trail. The Brandt family, which owns 83 acres transected by the old railroad line, contest ed the governments claim, arguing that the easement died with the railroad. As a result, the government had no right to maintain the easement and thus no right to build a public bike trail on the familys land. The Supreme Court ruled 8 to 1 in favor of the Brandt family (with Justice Sonia So tomayor dissenting), and its hard to nd fault with the courts logic. But it may have the unfortunate effect of encouraging pri vate property owners to cut off public ac cess to bike trails established over old rail road easements, and to thwart efforts to build new ones. The Rails to Trails organization behind the efforts says there are more than 21,000 miles of rail-trails nationwide, but no one has kept track of how many were developed on easements under the 1875 law, so its un clear how many miles will be affected. This is the regrettable repercussion of the courts decision. Bike trails have added sig nicantly to the recreational offerings avail able around the country, and if they were built on a now indefensible legal presump tion, care must be taken to protect existing trails and create a mechanism for their con tinued development. That will likely take negotiations with property owners, and some federal park dollars to ensure the fu ture of the affected trails. If so, it would be a good investment, and smart policy. From the Los Angeles Times. A VOICE Supreme Court ruling may make it more difficult to establish certain bike trails Classic DOONESBURY 1971

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 SHRUB/PALM PROGRAM LAWN PROGRAM PEST PROGRAM PEST/LAWN/SHRUB PACKAGE LAWN/SHRUB PACKAGE PEST/LAWN PACKAGE H20 YEARLY SERVICE H20 CHECK-UPTRIMMING/WEEDING PROGRAMTERMITE RENEWALAERATION YEARLY SERVICEAERATION SERVICETERMIDOR TERMITE TREATMENT $295 up to 1/4 acre lot*Service Calls are always FREE $245 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE $245 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE$390WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$540 $490WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$540 $590WOW!per yearup to 1/4 acre lot$785 Most Homes*Service Calls are always FREE $495Most Homes$69 Most Homes$199 Most HomesMust have been treated within the past 4 years$125 Most Homes1 Spring (March-May) and 1 Fall (September-November)$175 Most Homes$595Most Homes(You choose the month)$99

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com TOURNEY TIME: NCAA brackets set / B3 Senden comes from behind to take title at Valspar John Senden, of Australia, holds up the trophy after winning Valspar Championship on Sunday at Innisbrook in Palm Harbor. CHRIS OMEARA / AP DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PALM HARBOR John Senden ended more than seven years without a victory by making two late bird ies, including a chipin from 70 feet on the toughest hole at Innis brook, for a one-shot victory on a wild and windy Sunday at the Valspar Champion ship. Senden, two shots behind going into the nal round, closed with a 1-under 70 for his rst PGA Tour win since the 2006 John Deere Classic. The timing couldnt have been better. The victo ry sends the 42-yearold Australian to the Masters next month. Kevin Na had a long birdie putt on the nal hole that would have forced a playoff, but it never came close. If I could just stay in the moment, I knew I was swinging well enough to give it a shake, Senden said. It took what he called a magic shot to shake loose from a trafc jam along the back nine of the Cop perhead course. The tournament was up for grabs over the nal two hours, with nine players separated TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI Ray Allen scored 14 of his 25 points in the fourth quarter on a milestone day for the veteran, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade each scored 24 and the Miami Heat beat the Hous ton Rockets 113-104 on Sunday to snap their worst skid in three years. Chris Bosh added 18 points for the Heat, who won for just the second time in their last sev en games. They were down 97-92 following a 3-pointer by James Harden midway through the fourth, then nished the game on a 21-7 run. Allen had 11 points during that late stretch, including a 3-pointer that allowed him to pass Allen Iverson for 21st on the NBAs scoring list. It was also the 750th regular-season win that Allen was a part of in his career. JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer BRISTOL, Tenn. Carl Edwards claimed a rain-soaked win at Bristol Motor Speed way, where weather wreaked havoc on yet another Sprint Cup race. The rain caused two delays lasting more than ve hours one that delayed the start Sunday by almost two hours, and one that stopped the race for 3 hours, 18 minutes. But when the drivers got on the track, they raced fast and furious. Much like the sea son-opening Day tona 500, which was stopped by rain for almost six hours, the threat of more bad weather bringing a sudden halt to the race forced the driv ers to go hard every single lap. So when a caution with 77 laps remain ing sent most of the eld to pit road, Ed wards crew chief, Jim my Fennig, made the call to leave his driv er on the track. The move gave Edwards Gators eke out 61-60 win over Wildcats for SEC title PAUL NEWBERRY AP Sports Writer ATLANTA Topranked Florida capped a perfect run through the Southeastern Con ference when Kentucky failed to get off a shot on its nal possession, allowing the Gators to escape with a 61-60 victory in the league championship game Sunday. Florida (32-2) built a 16-point lead early in the second half, but Kentucky nearly pulled off an improbable comeback to hand the Gators their rst loss since early December. Two missed free throws gave the Wildcats (2410) a nal posses sion, but James Young slipped trying to drive into the lane. The ball squirted loose, and the horn sounded while Flori das Scottie Wilbekin and Kentuckys Andrew Harrison dived for it. A giddy Wilbekin popped up and sprinted to ward the Gators bench in celebration. Harri son rolled over with the ball, then put his hands Florida fan cheers against Kentucky during the second half. SEE SEC | B2 SEE GOLF | B2 Allen gets hot late as Heat top Rockets 113-104 SEE HEAT | B2 Florida also gets No. 1 seed in South for tourney PHOTOS BY STEVE HELBER / AP Florida head coach Billy Donovan holds the SEC championship trophy after the SEC mens championship game on Sunday in Atlanta. Florida won 61-60 and was later awarded the No. 1 seed in the South in the NCAA tournament. Carl Edwards leads Ford sweep at rain-soaked Bristol SEE NASCAR | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 Sunday At Bristol Motor Speedway Bristol, Tenn. Lap length: .533 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (12) Carl Edwards, Ford 2. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 3. (23) Aric Almirola, Ford 4. (37) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet 5. (5) Marcos Ambrose, Ford 6. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota 7. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet 8. (10) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet 9. (38) Brian Vickers, Toyota 10. (20) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet 11. (26) Austin Dil lon, Chevrolet 12. (8) Greg Bife, Ford 13. (3) Matt Kenseth, Toyota 14. (2) Brad Keselowski 15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota 16. (9) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet 17. (30) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet 18. (36) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet 19. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet 20. (4) Joey Logano, Ford 21. (28) Paul Menard, Chevrolet 22. (16) David Gilliland, Ford 23. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet 24. (14) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet 25. (22) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 26. (34) Michael Annett, Chevrolet 27. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet 28. (35) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet 29. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota 30. (31) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet 31. (19) David Ragan, Ford. 32. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota 33. (39) Travis Kvapil, Ford 34. (41) Parker Kligerman, Toyota 35. (13) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet 36. (29) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet 37. (24) Michael McDowell, Ford 38. (17) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet 39. (27) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet 40. (18) Cole Whitt, Toyota 41. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota 42. (40) Ryan Truex, Toyota 43. (43) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet Formula One-Australian Grand Prix Results Sunday At Albert Park circuit Melbourne, Australia Lap length: 3.30 miles 1. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 57 laps, 1:32:58.710, 121.203 mph. 2. Kevin Magnussen, Denmark, McLaren, 57, 1:33:25.487. 3. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 57, 1:33:28.737. 4. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 57, 1:33:33.994. 5. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams, 57, 1:33:46.349. 6. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Force India, 57, 1:33:49.428. 7. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari, 57, 1:33:56.385. 8. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 57, 1:33:59.151. 9. Daniil Kvyat, Russia, Toro Rosso, 57, 1:34:02.295. 10. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India, 57, 1:34:24.626. 11. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Sauber, 56, +1 lap. 12. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber, 56, +1 lap. 13. Max Chilton, England, Marussia, 55, +2 laps. Not Classed 14. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia, 49, 1:34:32.241. 15. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 43, ERS. 16. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Lotus, 29, ERS. 17. Marcus Ericsson, Sweden, Caterham, 27, Oil Pressure. 18. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 3, Retired. 19. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes, 2, Engine. 20. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Williams, 0, Accident. 21. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Caterham, 0, Ac cident. 22. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Red Bull, 57, Dis qualied. Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Cleveland 14 3 .824 Seattle 14 5 .737 Tampa Bay 11 4 .733 Baltimore 10 6 .625 Detroit 10 7 .588 New York 10 9 .526 Kansas City 8 8 .500 Minnesota 7 7 .500 Oakland 8 8 .500 Los Angeles 8 9 .471 Houston 7 9 .438 Chicago 6 8 .429 Boston 7 10 .412 Toronto 7 10 .412 Texas 5 10 .333 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Miami 11 7 .611 San Francisco 11 7 .611 Pittsburgh 10 7 .588 Arizona 11 9 .550 Washington 10 9 .526 Chicago 9 10 .474 New York 8 9 .471 Colorado 8 10 .444 St. Louis 6 8 .429 Milwaukee 8 11 .421 Cincinnati 8 12 .400 Los Angeles 6 10 .375 San Diego 6 10 .375 Atlanta 7 12 .368 Philadelphia 5 12 .294 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Saturdays Games Tampa Bay (ss) 6, Pittsburgh 3 Tampa Bay (ss) 6, Toronto 3 St. Louis 6, Atlanta 2 Baltimore 2, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 1 Washington 2, Miami (ss) 1 Detroit 14, Houston 3 N.Y. Mets (ss) 3, Minnesota 3, tie Cincinnati 16, Milwaukee 4 N.Y. Mets (ss) 9, Chicago Cubs (ss) 4 Texas 16, Oakland (ss) 15 Arizona 4, Cleveland 2 Chicago Cubs (ss) 6, Kansas City 5 San Francisco (ss) 13, Seattle 6 L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5, San Diego 4 Colorado 4, L.A. Angels 4, tie, 10 innings Oakland (ss) 8, San Francisco (ss) 1 Philadelphia 4, Boston 1 Miami (ss) 5, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 0 Chicago White Sox 5, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 4 Sundays Games Minnesota 4, Miami (ss) 2 N.Y. Mets (ss) 10, St. Louis 4 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 4 Toronto 4, Baltimore 3, 10 innings Washington (ss) 4, Houston 3 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 7, Atlanta 4 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 0 Detroit 2, Washington (ss) 1 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 7, Miami (ss) 0 Cleveland (ss) 3, Chicago Cubs (ss) 2 Texas 14, Chicago White Sox 8 Cincinnati 7, Oakland 6 Chicago Cubs (ss) 6, N.Y. Mets (ss) 3 Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 3 Cleveland (ss) 5, San Francisco 1 L.A. Dodgers 3, Colorado 3, tie Kansas City 9, San Diego 6, 10 innings Arizona 6, Milwaukee 5 Todays Games N.Y. Yankees vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, 7:05 p.m. Texas vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m. Tuesdays Games Houston vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Texas (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Texas (ss) at Surprise, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 37 28 .569 Brooklyn 33 31 .516 3 New York 27 40 .403 11 Boston 22 44 .333 15 Philadelphia 15 51 .227 22 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 44 19 .698 Washington 35 31 .530 10 Charlotte 33 34 .493 13 Atlanta 29 35 .453 15 Orlando 19 48 .284 27 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 49 17 .742 Chicago 37 29 .561 12 Cleveland 26 40 .394 23 Detroit 25 41 .379 24 Milwaukee 13 54 .194 36 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 49 16 .754 Houston 44 21 .677 5 Dallas 39 27 .591 10 Memphis 39 27 .591 10 New Orleans 26 39 .400 23 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 48 17 .738 Portland 43 23 .652 5 Minnesota 32 32 .500 15 Denver 29 37 .439 19 Utah 22 44 .333 26 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 47 20 .701 Golden State 41 26 .612 6 Phoenix 38 28 .576 8 Sacramento 23 43 .348 23 L.A. Lakers 22 44 .333 24 x-clinched playoff spot Saturdays Games New York 115, Milwaukee 94 Washington 101, Brooklyn 94 Memphis 103, Philadelphia 77 Indiana 112, Detroit 104, OT Atlanta 97, Denver 92 Chicago 94, Sacramento 87 Sundays Games Charlotte 101, Milwaukee 92 Phoenix 121, Toronto 113 Miami 113, Houston 104 New Orleans 121, Boston 120 (OT) Sacramento at Minnesota, late Dallas at Oklahoma City, late Utah at San Antonio, late Golden State at Portland, late Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, late Tondays Games Philadelphia at Indiana, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Chicago, 8 p.m. Utah at Houston, 8 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Miami at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Portland, 10 p.m. Washington at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Orlando at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. loss. Trophee Hassan II Leading Scores Saturday At Golf du Palais Royal Agadir, Morocco Purse: $2.08 million Yardage: 6,951; Par: 72 Third Round Alejandro Canizares, Spain 62-68-69 199 Seve Benson, England 63-68-74 205 Robert-Jan Derksen, Netherlands 69-70-67 206 Magnus A. Carlsson, Sweden 65-71-72 208 David Horsey, England 72-64-72 208 Shiv Kapur, India 70-71-67 208 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 71-67-70 208 Paul Waring, England 72-69-67 208 Richard Bland, England 69-70-70 209 Wade Ormsby, Australia 68-71-70 209 Marc Warren, Scotland 66-73-70 209 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 68-67-75 210 Jorge Campillo, Spain 71-69-70 210 TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 8:30 p.m. FS1 Lightweights, Jamie Kavanagh (15-1-1) vs. Andres Navarro (9-4-1); bantam weights, John Joe Nevin (0-0-0) vs. Alberto Candelaria (3-0-1); heavyweights, Alexis Santos (12-0-0) vs. Sylvester Barron (8-3-0); junior middleweights, Julian Williams (14-0-1) vs. Freddy Hernandez (30-6-0), at Boston MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN Preseason, St. Louis vs. Boston, at Fort Myers NBA 8 p.m. ESPN Oklahoma City at Chicago 10:30 p.m. ESPN L.A. Clippers at Denver NHL 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Minnesota at Boston over his face in an guish. The Gators extend ed their school-record winning streak to 26 games and await ed a sure No. 1 seed when the NCAA pair ings were announced Sunday evening. Pat ric Young and Michael Frazier II led Florida with 14 points apiece, while Wilbekin and Casey Prather had 11 each. Kentucky, also headed for the NCAAs, was paced by Aaron Harrison with 16 points. Young add ed 13, while Willie Cauley-Stein had 10 points, 11 rebounds and ve blocks. Florida led 40-30 at halftime and scored the rst six points of the second half for its biggest lead. But Ken tucky used a 14-0 run to close within one point with just over 6 minutes remain ing. It was a nail-bit er the rest of the way, the Wildcats coming oh-so-close to beat ing the rst team to go 18-0 in SEC play during the regular season. First, Andrew Har rison drove down the middle of the lane and put up a running jump er with 33 seconds re maining, but the shot clanked off the rim. Dorian Finney-Smith grabbed the rebound for the Gators. Kentucky was forced to foul three times to get Flori da into the bonus. With 23 seconds left, Wilbekin missed the front end of a 1-and1, but Finney-Smith came up with anoth er huge rebound and was quickly fouled by the Wildcats. Fin ney-Smith missed the front end, too, giving Kentucky a chance to win it. Coming out of a timeout, the Wildcats didnt even get off a shot. SEC FROM PAGE B1 by three shots at one point, and Senden part of a three-way tie for the lead heading into the treacherous, threehole closing stretch at Innisbrook known as the Snake Pit. He went birdie-bird ie-par, and it took all he could muster. After driving into the trees and playing short of the green on the 16th, Senden lofted a pitch with perfect pace and watched it tumble into the cup for one of only two birdies in the nal round. Equipped with a one-shot lead, he followed that with a 20-foot birdie putt on the 17th. Equally import ant was the par on the 18th, which was just as difcult as the birdies. He needed two putts up a ridge and break ing slightly to the right before it went swift ly down the slope and breaking to the left. The 40-foot putt settled inches from the cup. Senden nished at 7-under 277, the third straight tournament on the Florida swing won with a single-digit score under par. Na played in the nal group and made sure pace of play was only a memory. He missed a 3-foot bogey putt late on the front nine that sent him plunging down a crowded lead erboard, but he played bogey-free on the back nine and came up with a key par save from 6 feet on the 16th and a 15-foot birdie putt on the 17th to get with in one. But his pitch ing wedge on the 18th was too strong, and his birdie putt never had a chance. He closed with a 72. Scott Langley, hit ting superb shots to account for the wind, didnt hit a green over the nal four holes and still managed to save par on three of them. The one bogey on the 16th hole, when he went long of the green from the middle of the fairway, proved costly. Langley was the only player who shot par or better all four days. He closed with a 70 to n ish alone in third. Robert Garrigus start ed the nal round with a one-shot lead, and that didnt last long. His tee shot on the third hole bounced off a lawn chair and against a tree, leading to a double bo gey. He made another double bogey on No. 6 and went out in 41. And he went 26 holes with out a birdie. By the time he made a birdie, it was too late. Garrigus, now 0-4 with at least a share of the 54-hole lead, had a 75 to tie for fourth at 4 under. Senden last won a tournament at the end of 2006 in the Austra lian Open. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 PGA-Valspar Championship Scores Sunday At Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club, Copperhead Course Palm Harbor Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,340; Par: 71 Final John Senden (500), $1,026,000 72-71-64-70 277 Kevin Na (300), $615,600 70-68-68-72 278 Scott Langley (190), $387,600 71-69-69-70 279 Luke Donald (115), $235,600 71-72-67-70 280 Robert Garrigus (115), $235,600 69-66-70-75 280 Will MacKenzie (115), $235,600 73-70-68-69 280 George McNeill (90), $190,950 73-71-67-70 281 Graham DeLaet (73), $148,200 75-68-71-68 282 Matt Every (73), $148,200 68-71-72-71 282 David Hearn (73), $148,200 71-70-70-71 282 Matteo Manassero, $148,200 69-70-71-72 282 Justin Rose (73), $148,200 71-68-69-74 282 Gary Woodland (73), $148,200 72-71-70-69 282 Sang-Moon Bae (55), $94,050 72-73-71-67 283 Jason Dufner (55), $94,050 72-73-68-70 283 Bill Haas (55), $94,050 69-73-72-69 283 Chesson Hadley (55), $94,050 75-70-67-71 283 Charles Howell III (55), $94,050 71-70-74-68 283 Jason Kokrak (55), $94,050 74-68-68-73 283 Jim Furyk (49), $64,068 71-69-71-73 284 Freddie Jacobson (49), $64,068 70-71-70-73 284 Carl Pettersson (49), $64,068 71-70-71-72 284 Ted Potter, Jr. (49), $64,068 73-71-67-73 284 Jordan Spieth (49), $64,068 71-70-71-72 284 Ryo Ishikawa (43), $42,587 73-72-72-68 285 Cameron Tringale (43), $42,587 74-71-70-70 285 Brian Harman (43), $42,587 71-70-73-71 285 Charley Hoffman (43), $42,587 70-72-67-76 285 Morgan Hoffmann (43), $42,587 74-69-71-71 285 Russell Knox (43), $42,587 70-73-70-72 285 Josh Teater (43), $42,587 73-70-70-72 285 Robert Allenby (37), $31,540 73-71-70-72 286 Jonathan Byrd (37), $31,540 70-73-70-73 286 Erik Compton (37), $31,540 72-73-72-69 286 Ben Crane (37), $31,540 70-72-71-73 286 Justin Hicks (37), $31,540 72-72-70-72 286 John Merrick (37), $31,540 70-70-72-74 286 Chad Collins (31), $23,940 73-71-69-74 287 Harris English (31), $23,940 72-69-74-72 287 James Hahn (31), $23,940 69-74-70-74 287 Matt Kuchar (31), $23,940 73-71-69-74 287 Kevin Streelman (31), $23,940 73-69-71-74 287 Y.E. Yang (31), $23,940 73-72-70-72 287 Woody Austin (23), $15,892 71-71-74-72 288 Greg Chalmers (23), $15,892 68-72-72-76 288 K.J. Choi (23), $15,892 72-72-69-75 288 Ben Curtis (23), $15,892 70-74-71-73 288 Tommy Gainey (23), $15,892 69-72-72-75 288 Retief Goosen (23), $15,892 72-73-64-79 288 Peter Hanson (23), $15,892 75-70-69-74 288 Pat Perez (23), $15,892 68-71-77-72 288 Nicholas Thompson (23), $15,892 76-69-69-74 288 Brendon Todd (23), $15,892 70-75-70-73 288 James Driscoll (16), $13,053 73-70-68-78 289 J.B. Holmes (16), $13,053 71-74-71-73 289 Justin Leonard (16), $13,053 71-71-71-76 289 Michael Putnam (16), $13,053 69-72-74-74 289 Stuart Appleby (10), $12,426 71-73-74-72 290 Darren Clarke (10), $12,426 71-74-73-72 290 Jerry Kelly (10), $12,426 76-68-71-75 290 D.H. Lee (10), $12,426 74-70-70-76 290 David Lingmerth (10), $12,426 73-72-71-74 290 Brandt Snedeker (10), $12,426 72-73-71-74 290 Michael Thompson (10), $12,426 72-69-72-77 290 Stephen Ames (4), $11,742 72-70-72-77 291 Jason Bohn (4), $11,742 71-74-73-73 291 Nicolas Colsaerts (4), $11,742 69-73-76-73 291 Padraig Harrington (4), $11,742 75-70-72-74 291 Marc Leishman (4), $11,742 75-69-74-73 291 Paul Goydos (1), $11,229 75-69-73-75 292 Davis Love III (1), $11,229 74-70-71-77 292 Rory Sabbatini (1), $11,229 70-72-72-78 292 Daniel Summerhays (1), $11,229 77-68-71-76 292 Sean OHair (1), $10,944 73-71-74-78 296 John Mallinger (1), $10,830 71-73-74-80 298 Harden nished with 30 points for Houston, which got 21 points and 14 rebounds from Dwight Howard. Pat rick Beverley add ed 15 points and Ter rence Jones scored 12 for the Rockets, whove dropped three straight. Wade helped spark the run with a 50-foot assist that set up a 3-pointer from the left corner by Allen, who also made three tech nical-foul free throws down the stretch. One came after a defensive three-second viola tion, another following Houstons second de lay-of-game whistle on the afternoon, and the third when Beverley was hit with a technical in the nal minute. James hit a pair of free throws with 46 seconds left for his rst points of the nal quarter, and that sealed it for Mi ami, which moved back within three games of Indiana for the No. 1 spot in the Eastern Conference. Allen took anoth er pass from Wade to score inside with 3:31 left, giving Miami the lead for good. Allen now has 24,370 points, two more than Iverson. The rst surprise of the day came about 20 minutes before tipoff, when the Heat an nounced Greg Oden who appeared in his 100th career game, nearly seven years after being the No. 1 overall pick in the 2007 draft would be starting at center. It was the sec ond start of the sea son for Oden, who also opened a game against Chicago last month in part because James was unavailable while deal ing with a broken nose. Oden had three re bounds in the games rst three minutes, and the Heat never trailed in the rst half, going into the break with a 57-54 lead. James had 15 in the half, Bosh and Wade each had 11, but both of Miamis point guards starter Mario Chalm ers and backup Norris Cole were saddled with three fouls. Houston missed nine of its rst 11 shots of the second quarter, helping Miami extend its lead to 44-33. But Houston got right back into it, rst off a fortu nate bounce when an alley-oop from Chan dler Parsons bounced off both Howard and Jones before nding its way to Harden, who hit a 3-pointer. Jones added a conventional three-point play on the next Houston posses sion, and just like that Miamis lead was down to ve. Harden and Howard combined for 15 in the third, and Houston led 81-79 entering the nal 12 minutes. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 the lead on the restart with 70 laps remain ing. He had no trouble pulling out to an easy lead and had victo ry in sight when the yellow caution lights came on with two laps remaining. No one was sure what the caution was for and Fennig even won dered if water dam age might have inad vertently caused the lights to turn on. Then the sky sud denly opened and NASCAR had no choice but to declare the race over. NASCAR said after the race that the lights malfunction triggered the nal caution, and ofcials made it a full caution because op eration of the lights was comprised. Edwards led Roush Fenway Racing team mate Ricky Stenhouse Jr. across the n ish line. Aric Almiro la from Richard Pet ty Motorsports was third as Ford drivers swept the top three spots one day after a Ford team won the Twelve Hours of Se bring sports car race for the rst time since 1969. Tony Stewart sal vaged a horric start to the weekend he qualied 37th by nishing a sea son-best fourth. Marcos Ambrose was fth as both of RPMs drivers nished inside the top ve. Pole-sitter Denny Hamlin was sixth in the highest-nishing Toyota and was fol lowed by Hendrick Motorsports team mates Jeff Gordon and Kasey Kahne. Bri an Vickers was ninth and rookie Kyle Lar son rounded out the top 10. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MARK LONG Associated Press Floridas path to the Final Four is lled with college basketball blue bloods. The Gators earned the tournaments overall No. 1 seed after beating Kentucky 61-60 in the Southeastern Conference championship game Sunday. Coach Billy Donovans team, which has won 26 consecutive games, is the top seed for the rst time since winning the sec ond of back-to-back nation al titles in 2007. Its kind of what we ex pected, said guard Scottie Wilbekin, the SECs player of the year and tournament MVP. It feels good. Obvi ously, it doesnt matter when the games start playing. Florida (32-2) will open tournament play Thursday in Orlando, in the South Re gion. The Gators will face the winner of Albany (1814) and Mount St. Marys (16-16), two 16 seeds that play Tuesday night in Day ton, Ohio. Weve got to stay locked in and not let it get to our heads, Wilbekin added. Floridas road to Dal las could get considerably tougher after that, with No. 2 seed Kansas, No. 3 seed Syra cuse and No. 4 seed UCLA all in the South. The Jayhawks, Orange and Bruins have a combined 15 national titles and plenty of experience on college basketballs biggest stage. Anybody in the country can come out and win it, Florida center Patric Young said. Kansas (24-9) opens the tournament Friday against 15th-seeded Eastern Ken tucky in St. Louis, a relative ly short trip for the Jayhawks. Eastern Kentucky (24-9) beat Belmont in the Ohio Valley Conference nal to earn its eighth NCAA tournament appearance and rst since 2007. Behind star freshman An drew Wiggins, Kansas cap tured its 10th straight Big 12 regular-season title but lost to eventual champi on Iowa State in the tourna ment seminals to dash any hopes of a No. 1 seed. The Jayhawks likely will be with out 7-footer Joel Embiid un til the tournaments second weekend. The Big 12 defen sive player of the year has a stress fracture in his lower back. You obviously worry about winning a two-game tournament, Kansas coach Bill Self said. You dont wor ry about what you could po tentially worry about next week. In our regional, you got the best team in the country, a team that four weeks ago was thought to be the best team in the country. You have a team in UCLA thats one of the hot test teams in the country. You could make a case that if everybody in our region al plays to their ceilings, it could be the hardest region of any of them. No. 7 New Mexico (27-6) and No. 10 Stanford (21-12) also meet in St. Louis. Its Stanfords 17th NCAA berth and rst since 2008, short ly before coach Johnny Daw kins was hired from Dukes staff to replace Trent John son. Last spring, athletic direc tor Bernard Muir said Stan ford needed to reach the NCAAs to show progress or Dawkins future could be in jeopardy. Coach always tells us never pay attention to whats being said, se nior forward Josh Huestis said. One thing Ive really learned about Coach Daw kins is he can stay very fo cused despite the chaos around him. Syracuse (27-5) will face 14th-seeded Western Mich igan (23-9) on Thursday in Buffalo, N.Y. The Orange gets a chance to end its late-season fade. Syracuse was 25-0 and No. 1 in the country last month, but lost four of six to close the regu lar season. The Broncos (23-9) are in the eld for the rst time since 2004 after beating To ledo for the Mid-American Conference championship. No. 6 seed Ohio State (259) and 11th-seeded Dayton (23-10) also play in Buffalo. UCLA (26-8) and 13th-seeded Tulsa (21-12) play Friday in San Diego. The Bruins, in their rst sea son under coach Steve Al ford, upset Arizona in the Pac-12 tournament cham pionship game Saturday. Tulsa closed with 11 con secutive wins under sec ond-year coach Danny Manning, a former Kansas star whose alma mater also is in the region. The Golden Hurricane se cured their berth by win ning the Conference USA tournament, earning their rst NCAA tournament berth since 2003. San Diego also will host No. 5 seed Virginia Com monwealth and 12th-seed ed Stephen F. Austin. The Lumberjacks (31-2), who have won 28 in a row, won the Southland Conference tournament and are making their rst NCAA tournament appearance since 2009. VCU (26-8) lost to Saint Josephs in the Atlantic 10 championship Sunday. The Rams are making their fourth consecutive trip to the NCAA tournament and have at least one win in each of their rst three trips. They advanced to the Final Four in 2011. Florida has come up just short of the Final Four the last three years, losing to Butler (2011), Louisville (2012) and Michigan (2013) in regional nals. The senior-laden Gators have had their sights set on the Final Four all year and now the last leg of the journey begins. Weve still got work to do, forward Dorian Fin ney-Smith said. Now weve got to start from the bottom and work our way back up. Gators No. 1 seed in NCAA South Region STEVE HELBER / AP Florida center Patric Young (4) celebrates with forward Will Yeguete (15) after the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Kentucky in the SEC title game on Sunday in Atlanta. Florida won 61-60.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL JOEDY MCCREARY Associated Press GREENSBORO, N.C. Malcolm Brogdon scored 23 points and No. 6 Virginia claimed its rst Atlantic Coast Conference tourna ment title since 1976 by beating No. 7 Duke 72-63 on Sunday. Tournament MVP Joe Harris added 15 points and hit the backbreaking 3-point er with just under 2 minutes remaining for the top-seeded Cava liers (28-6). They shot 45 per cent, pestered the Blue Devils into 38 percent shooting and used a late 12-3 run to pull away and claim the sec ond ACC tournament title in school history. Jabari Parker scored 23 points on 9-of24 shooting for the third-seeded Blue Devils (26-8), who were making their 31st appearance in the championship game but were denied their ACC-record 20th title. The Cavaliers came to Greensboro off of their rst outright reg ular-season title since 1981, and were trying to do something not even Ralph Sampson could do. It had been a long time 38 years since Wally Walker led Virginia to its only previous ACC tourna ment title. Now that trophy will have some company. With its pack line defense clicking and holding Duke 13 points below its scor ing average, Virgin ia was in control for most of the day, yet could never get any separation until the nal 2 minutes. Akil Mitchell hit a shot to make it 61-57, then stripped Parker at the other end to set up Harris wide-open 3 in transition that ex tended the lead to sev en and had Dukes Rodney Hood fuming. Harris gave Duke a nal chance when he rushed up a shot and Quinn Cook countered with a 3 with 1 min utes left to pull the Blue Devils back within four. Brogdon then drove through the Duke de fense for a momen tum-shifting layup that made it 66-60 with just over a minute to play and caused Duke as sistant Jeff Capel to tell ingly slump back on the bench in exasperation. No. 6 UVa tops No. 7 Duke 72-63 for ACC championship BOB LEVERONE / AP Virginia players celebrate after defeating Duke for the ACC title on Sunday in Greensboro, N.C. MICHAEL CONROY / AP Players on the Michigan State bench react to their victory in the Big Ten Conference tournament on Sunday in Indianapolis. MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS Adreian Payne scored 18 points and Gary Harris and Branden Dawson added 15 each to lead No. 22 Michigan State to its second Big Ten tournament title in three years with a 69-55 upset of No. 8 Michigan on Sunday. The third-seeded Spartans (26-8) are get ting healthy and will have some momen tum entering the NCAA tournament with four wins in ve games. Let me tell you, we beat two great teams. Both of them are worthy of a one seed, coach Tom Izzo told CBS, re ferring to the Wolver ines and No. 12 Wiscon sin. I hope they dont drop much because they are both deserving. Those guys have done it all year long. Top-seeded Michi gan (25-8) was led by Big Ten player of the year Nik Stauskas with 17 points and Derrick Walton Jr. had 11, but the Big Ten regular sea son champs had their seven-game winning streak come to an end. It was never really close. Michigan State took control with an ear ly 12-0 run, led 38-29 at halftime and opened the second half with an 8-0 spurt to make it 46-29. The Spartans had lost their previous two meetings with Michigan this season but werent about to lose again. For the rst time all season, Michigan State started the same ve players for a fth straight game. Harris, who hurt his left shoul der early in the second half, returned later. Harris, an Indiana na tive who never got to play for a state basket ball title at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, took ad vantage of this oppor tunity. He scored 13 of his 15 points in the rst half. Dawson, another Indiana native who was named the tournaments Most Outstanding Play er, scored 10 of his 15 points in the second. Michigan State has four tournament titles since the Big Ten start ed the event in 1998 two in Indy and pulled off a rare double by win ning the mens title less than a mile from Lucas Oil Stadium where the Spartans claimed the leagues football cham pionship in December. RACHEL COHEN AP Sports Writer NEW YORK Langston Galloway scored 19 points and hit yet another huge 3-pointer, and Saint Jo sephs beat No. 23 VCU 65-61 on Sunday to win its rst Atlantic 10 tournament title since 1997. The fourth-seeded Hawks (24-9) arrived in Brooklyn on the NCAA tournament bubble. They all but clinched an at-large berth with a win over fellow bub ble team Dayton in Fri days quarternals on Galloways go-ahead 3, then made that moot by capturing the con ferences automatic bid. The second-seed ed Rams (26-8) have reached the A-10 tour ney nals in both years in the league but lost both times. Fellow senior Ronald Roberts had 15 points on 6-of-6 shooting and 11 rebounds for Saint Josephs. Rob Brandenberg led VCU with 18 points, but Galloway got just enough separation on him to hit a tiebreaking 3-pointer with more than two minutes left. Briante Weber missed a 3 on the other end, and the Hawks broke down the Rams pres sure for Roberts dunk on a pass from DeAn dre Bembry for a 59-54 lead. Bembry, a freshman, had a brilliant defen sive game and a horric offensive outing in Sat urdays seminals. But against VCUs Hav oc full-court press, he kept his poise, scoring 13 points with eight as sists and just two turn overs. Halil Kanacevic, the third senior starter for Saint Josephs, won tournament MVP hon ors after another allaround performance. The forward from near by Staten Island had 11 points, 14 rebounds, four assists and two blocks. All ve starters played at least 37 minutes, with Galloway and Kanacev ic going the full 40. St. Josephs beats VCU 65-61 to earn A-10 championship SETH WENIG / AP Saint Josephs Langston Galloway, left, moves past VCUs Juvonte Reddic during the rst half of the Atlantic 10 Conference tournament on Sunday at the Barclays Center in New York. No. 22 Michigan St. upsets No. 8 Michigan to gain Big Ten title

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 CASH PRIZES! On Course Contests! Platinum Level Sponsor Gold Level Sponsor Silver Level SponsorCall Dwight Graber 750-4850 or Ed Riddle 267-5883 Registration Deadline: March 17th Million Dollar ShotHole-in-One CONTEST 2014 In Memory of Margaret Witt In Honor of Mildred Witt March 29th Arlington Ridge 7:00am Breakfast & Sign In 8:00am Shotgun Start$80 media sponsor Y our First Choice Beyers Funeral Home, Inc. Guys Roong of Lake County, Inc. Jims Golf Shop-The Villages Logan Sitework Contractors, Inc. Page Theus Funeral Home Highland Lakes Dental Riddle-Newman Engineering, Inc. CenterState Bank, Leesburg Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc. Inquirers Sunday School Class-MUMC Lenhart Electric James C. & Vickie Lenhart Leesburg Concrete Company, Inc. Integrated Financial Services of Central FL Subway Leesburg Sunrise Kiwanis Club J. Cecil Shumacker, PA Arlington Ridge Golf Club Harbor Hills Country Club Leware Construction CompanyLassiter-Ware Insurance Co. The Main Street Dentists Morrison Opportunity Thrift Shop Barnett Tire Service, Inc.Lil & Bob Schauseil & Lynne S. VonVillasTommy & Jeanine Treadway Lowell & Patricia Bond Peter Marzek, MD-Plastic Surgery The Moffett Family BB&T Bank Brodie Golf Mfg. Co. @ Harbor Hills CC Rich & Louise McFarlandJoel & Mildred Witt Climate Control Munns Sales & Service NBA Associated Press NEW ORLEANS Anthony Davis set ca reer highs with 40 points and 21 re bounds, and Eric Gor don made two crucial free throws in overtime to lead the New Orle ans Pelicans to a 121120 victory over the Boston Celtics on Sun day night. Tyreke Evans added 26 points and Gordon had 19 for the Pelicans, who had lost two consecutive games. Gordons foul shots with 9.4 seconds remaining gave the Peli cans a 121-117 lead. Davis did not score in overtime but con trolled the middle by grabbing six rebounds. He became the rst player in franchise his tory to have at least 40 points and 20 rebounds in the same game. His previous high for points was Friday night when he scored 36 in a loss against Portland. Davis 21 rebounds erased his previous ca reer high of 19 against Orlando on Jan. 26. Kris Humphries scored 16 points for the Celtics, including a long jumper to send the game into over time. Jared Sullinger added 14 points and Avery Bradley had 12. Davis jumper with 1.7 seconds remaining in regulation lifted the Pelicans to a 112-110 lead. But Humphries responded with a fade away from deep in the right corner. BOBCATS 101, BUCKS 92 MILWAUKEE Kemba Walker scored 21 points and Al Jeffer son added 16 of his 20 in the second half to help the Charlotte Bob cats beat the Milwau kee Bucks 101-92 on Sunday for their fourth straight victory. Gary Neal added 18 in his return to Milwaukee after the Bucks traded him to Charlotte last month. Gerald Hen derson scored 14 as the Bobcats matched their longest winning streak of the season, set Feb. 18-22. Brandon Knight scored 21 points and Ramon Sessions added 18. Jeff Adrien and John Henson each had 12, but it wasnt enough to stop the Bobcats from their rst sweep of a season series from the Bucks. Neal led the way in the fourth quarter as the Bobcats slowly pulled away. He scored seven the Bobcats rst 12 points and nished with 10 in the period. Josh McRoberts hit a 3-pointer and then Neal added a jumper that gave Charlotte an 88-85 lead. Khris Mid dleton answ ered with a basket to pull Mil waukee within one, but Jefferson scored on a hook shot and layup to end any chance of the Bucks win. SUNS 121, RAPTORS 113 TORONTO Mark ieff Morris had 16 points and 14 rebounds, Ger ald Green scored 13 of his 28 points in the fourth quarter, and the Phoenix Suns beat the Toronto Raptors 121113 on Sunday for their second straight victory. Goran Dragic scored 19 points, Eric Bledsoe had 14 and P.J. Tuck er 11 for the Suns, who had lost three of four. Bench scoring was a big edge for Phoenix, whose reserves out scored Torontos 59-11. Kyle Lowry had 28 points and 13 assists, as Toronto lost at home for the rst time since a triple-overtime de feat to Washington on Feb. 27. Davis powers Pelicans past Celts JONATHAN BACHMAN / AP Boston Celtics center Kris Humphries (43) and New Orleans Pelicans center Greg Stiemsma (34) go for a rebound during the second quarter in New Orleans on Sunday. BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW YORK Even before meeting with him, Knicks players like Phil Jacksons hir ing to run their fran chise. Im a chess play er, so that was a power move right there, Car melo Anthony said. So now were going to see whats the next move. But that was a great power move. The Knicks havent ofcially announced it yet, holding off un til a press conference Tuesday morning. But the 11-time champion as a coach was already the focus before and after the Knicks 11594 victory over Mil waukee on Saturday. Jackson was on the Knicks only two championship-win ning teams, in 1970 and 1973. He went on to win 11 more rings as a coach with the Chi cago Bulls and Los An geles Lakers, and the players are condent he can be a winner next as an executive. Phil knows what to do and how to build teams and how to win, thats the most important thing, An thony said. When you know how to win, whether youre a coach or whether youre in the front of ce, that stands out. Jackson will be re sponsible for trying to keep Anthony when the All-Star forward becomes a free agent this summer. Knicks players eager to see what Jackson can do AP FILE PHOTO In this undated photo, New York Knicks Phil Jackson warms up. Jackson will be introduced as the newest member of the Knicks front ofce on Tuesday.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. FORMULA ONE NEIL FRANKLAND AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Aus tralia Elation turned to desolation for Daniel Ricciardo at the Austra lian Grand Prix on Sun day after the Red Bull driver was stripped of his rst podium n ish due to a techni cal breach at Formula Ones season opener. Ricciardo initial ly nished second to Mercedes driver Nico Rosberg to become the rst homegrown driver to take to the podium in the 29-year history of the Australian GP. The celebrations did not last long as F1 stewards said his car breached fuel-ow rules introduced this year which limit cars to 100 kilograms of fuel during the race. World motorsport governing body FIA subsequent ly disqualied Ricciar do elevating McLaren drivers Kevin Magnus sen and Jenson Button to second and third. Red Bull immediate ly announced it will ap peal. Shortly after the end of the race, FIA For mula One technical delegate Jo Bauer said Ricciardos car had ex ceeded consistently the maximum allowed fuel ow and referred the matter to stewards. More than three and a half hours later, after Ricciardo had left the track, the stewards dis qualied the Australian saying Red Bull had not only breached techni cal regulations by ex ceeding the allowed fuel ow, but also had disregarded instruc tions before the race to change the fuel ow sensor and during the race to reduce the ow. The operation of the fuel-ow sensors had been a source of dispute between the teams and the FIA com ing into the rst race. After the ndings, Red Bull said Incon sistencies with the FIA fuel ow meter have been prevalent all weekend up and down the pit lane. The team and (engine-maker) Renault are condent the fuel supplied to the engine is in full compli ance with the regula tions. Horner further pro claimed the teams in nocence to reporters saying; It is no fault of Daniel. I dont believe it is the fault of the team. I am extremely disap pointed, quite surprised ... hopefully through the appeal process it will be quite clear that the car has conformed at all times to the regula tions, he added. We would not be appealing unless we were extreme ly condent that we have a defendable case. The Albert Park crowd earlier offered Ricciardo a thunderous applause as the stood on the podium in his rst race with Red Bull. Its a bit overwhelm ing for now, but just an unbelievable day, the 24-year-old said short ly after. Australia staged its rst Grand Prix of the F1 era in Adelaide in 1985, with the 1986 edi tion marking the nal race of Australian world championship winner Alan Jones. Mark Webbers rst F1 race was the 2002 Australian GP, and since then Australian fans have waited impa tiently for a top-three nish at Albert Park. MARK LONG AP Sports Writer GAINESVILLE John Force and An tron Brown were look ing to make history Sunday at the NHRA Gatornationals. Those plans went up in smoke quite literally. Force and Brown spun their tires in the nals, helping Robert Hight and Doug Kalitta record easy victories in the top two divisions. Hight beat his boss, 16-time champi on Force, in the Fun ny Car division. Kalit ta topped 2012 series champion Brown in Top Fuel. Im racing the alltime leader, John Force, 16-time champ, my boss, the guy that gave me the opportu nity to do this, Hight said. Its tough to race him. ... Its also a lot fun when you actual ly race in the nal and its your teammate and you guys can just go up there and have some fun. The 64-year-old Force was trying to become the fth driv er in Funny Car histo ry to win as the No. 16 qualier. He opened the day by upsetting top qualier Cruz Pe dregon, then knocked off Del Worsham and daughter Cort ney Force to reach his second nal in three events this year. That set up the Force nal. Daniel Ricciardo stripped of first podium finish at Aussie Grand Prix ROSS LAND / AP Caterham driver Kamui Kobayashi of Japan runs off the track after he crashed with Williams driver Felipe Massa of Brazil at the Australian F1 Grand Prix on Sunday at Melbourne, Australia. Kalitta, Hight win top two divisions at Gatornationals NHRA

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 CANCER: Patients nd romance, support online / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press A volunteer slips her arms into a gauzy yellow hospital gown and approaches a medical crib holding a tiny newborn hooked up to noisy machines. OK, she says, with a smile. Baby time. That means cuddle time in the neonatal in tensive care unit at the University of Chicagos Comer Childrens Hos pital. Here, as at sever al other hospitals around the country, strangers of fer a simple yet powerful service for newborns too tiny or sick to go home. When nurses are swamped with other pa tients and parents cannot make it to the hospital, grandmas, empty-nest ers, college students and other volunteers step in. They hold the babies, swaddle them, sing and coo to them, rock them, and treat them as if they were their own. A plaintive cry signals time to get to work. You can see them calm, you can see their heart rate drop, you can see their little brows re lax, said Kathleen Jones, 52, a cuddler at the Chi cago hospital. Theyre ghting so hard and theyre undergoing all this medical drama and trauma. My heart breaks for them a little bit. Newborn intensive care units are noisy, stress ful environments. There are babies born extremely prematurely, or with birth defects and other illness es. Some are too sick to be held but not too sick to touch. Cuddlers reach a nger inside their incubators and stroke tiny bare bellies. Scientic evidence on benets of cuddling pro grams is scarce, but the benets of human touch are well-known. In one study, gentle caress ing or placing a hand on preterm infants reduced levels of stress hormones. Other recent studies have suggested touch may benet preemies heart rates and sleep and per haps even shorten their hospital stays. Studies also suggest that early negative expe riences including pain, stress and separation from other humans may hamper brain devel opment, while research in animals shows that positive interactions en hance brain growth, said Dr. Jerry Schwartz, med ical director of medical neonatology at Torrance Memorial Medical Center near Los Angeles. The benet at the most supercial level is ob vious, he said. A baby is crying, moms not there, the nurse is busy with Volunteers cuddle babies too sick or tiny to leave hospital PHOTOS BY MARTHA IRVINE / AP ABOVE: Evelyn Steadman, 7 months old, sleeps on the chest of her grandmother, Kathleen Jones, at the babys home in Crete, Ill. Jones, 52, is a longtime volunteer who cuddles newborn babies in the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Chicagos Comer Childrens Hospital. BELOW: An infant grasps Jones hand at the hospital. SEE CUDDLE | C4 THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer support group meets The Prostate Cancer Education and Support Group meets at 7 p.m., Wednesday at the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Drive in The Villages. It is free and open to all men, res idents and non-residents. For de tails, call Tom Vajda at 352-446-4194 or Vince Felton at 352-259-7712. TAVARES Health seminars offered at Waterman Hospital Florida Hospital Waterman will offer a series of seminars on an array of health topics. They are: Living with Knee Pain? You May Not Have To, with Samire Guru, DO, orthopedic surgeon, from 1 to 2 p.m., Thursday at the Mattison Conference Center at Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way in Tavares. Call 352-323-3635 to register and for information. LADY LAKE Essential Tremor Support Group scheduled to meet The Essential Tremor Support Group will meet at 2 p.m.,March 26 at St. Timothy Ministry Building, 1351 Paige Place, Lady Lake, with information for those aficted with the disease. Guests will learn about methods of coping, medi cations, and will gain support and understanding. For information, call Ken Taylor at 787-3866 or email at kstaylor62@us a2net.net. TAVARES Extension office to offer diabetes prevention series The Lake County Extension ofce will offer a three-part series on diabe tes prevention from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays beginning on March 26 and continuing on April 2 and 9. The series will cover how diabetes affects your health, risks and symp toms, improving nutrition, planning meals and more. It will be held at the UF/IFAS Lake County Extension of ce, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares. Registration is required at https:// lakediabetes2014.eventbrite.com or by calling Julie England at 352-3434101, ext. 2719. TAVARES Sexual abuse support group scheduled to meet Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, which offers the 12step program, meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday in Tavares. For information, call 352-4067485, or go to www.siawso.org.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com NEAL ST. ANTHONY Star Tribune MINNEAPOLIS Preceptis Medical is a small company that has big designs to clip the costs and boost the safety for the 1.3 mil lion young children who undergo ear-tube surgeries each year. This is a simple sto ry, said Preceptis CEO Steve Anderson. Weve come up with an ef fective tool that allows us to do the procedure under conscious seda tion, avoiding the ex pense of the operating room, and avoiding the risk to young children of general anesthesia. Anderson said the procedure can be done in a clinic or doctors ofce for up to 70 per cent less than the near ly $5,000 cost of the traditional surgical re pair for infected ears in youngsters. Dr. Frank Rimell, a veteran pediatric sur geon and a principal investigator testing the Preceptis tool at the University of Minneso ta-Amplatz Childrens Hospital, said sever al ear-nose-and-throat surgeons are testing the tool at four Twin Cities hospitals. Rimell said he expects to pres ent the results of more than 50 procedures on children up to 5 years old at a May confer ence of pediatric ear, nose and throat sur geons in Las Vegas. I want to get this pro cedure out of the oper ating room for multiple reasons, he said. The goal, Rimell said, is to see if we can make this most-com mon procedure among children in the United States even safer. And it is a safe procedure now. But even safer and more economical. We want to remove poten tial risks and make it cheaper. Rimell said he is not a shareholder in the company and receives less than $5,000 annu ally for coordinating clinical trials. The tests are being done using nitrous ox ide, considered a safe and inexpensive seda tive used by dentists for decades, instead of a general anesthetic. The Preceptis tool was invented by Dr. Mi chael Loushin, a part ner in Twin Cities An esthesia Associates and an adjunct faculty member at the Univer sity of Minnesota med ical school, and Keith Leland, a mechanical engineer and vice pres ident of research and development at Pre ceptis. The compa ny is headquartered in Plymouth, Minn. According to Precep tis, the procedure re quires one precise pass at the ear, taking about 10 seconds. The patient remains awake, though sedated with the ni trous oxide. All these things are converging in a way that makes the timing right for us, said Anderson, 51, a biomedical engi neer who has worked for several medical-prod ucts companies. Anesthesiologists, who stand to lose busi ness, might not like this procedure. But its the type of innovation that can help reduce health care costs. With the Precep tis tool, surgeons are able to insert the tube on the rst pass 85 to 95 percent of the time, Rimell said. The goal is to get this done in the ofce, so the family doesnt have to come to the of ce for the initial visit and then come back for surgery and the child doesnt have to go for a surgical physical, and the parents dont have to take off a second day of work, Rimell said. Lets get the tube done that day. Preceptis, which still needs federal regulato ry clearance for its prod uct, hopes to be sell ing it by fall and would likely be a candidate for acquisition by medi cal-products companies looking to extend their product lines. Expensive ear-tube operations on kids moving out of the operating room MARY MACVEAN Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES Eri ca Eihl speaks in a voice that her kindergartners can hear only if they are as quiet as the church mice in childrens sto rybooks. And with a couple of squirrelly exceptions, they stay that quiet for 15 or 20 minutes a near eternity as Eihl guides them to use all their senses to consider a piece of apple, with di rections such as, Look ing at the apple, look on the outside. Look on the inside. Remem ber, keep it in your palm and just look at it. When she asks for their input, she gets raised hands and com ments such as: It smells juicy and ap ple-y and I see little tiny white spots. Mindful eating is just one of the mind ful practices at the Cit izens of the World char ter school in Mar Vista, Calif., with 160 chil dren in kindergarten through second grade. We are mindful and heartful is the gold en rule at the school, and the children prac tice mindful meditation in the mornings and af ter recess, among oth er times, often with 30 seconds to ve minutes of silence time when they can notice what is happening at the mo ment without judgment, which is at the heart of mindful meditation. Theyre very recep tive to it, Eihl says. Theyre so emotional at this age. Its allowing them to have the tools to be expressive about their emotions and cope with them. Educators are catch ing on to the benets of mindful meditation. Indeed, schools in 48 states, and hundreds of schools in California alone, have programs, says Chris McKenna, the program director at Mindful Schools in Em eryville, Calif., which has trained more than 2,000 teachers in mindfulness. One of the reasons its growing is because the kids are under so much pressure now, with the testing culture and the pressure put on them by teachers and parents to be success ful, says Vicki Zakrze wski, the education director at the Great er Good Science Cen ter at University of Cal ifornia-Berkeley, which studies the science be hind mindfulness. Mindfulness helps with focus, attention and calming the emo tions, she says. Teach ers and administrators, she adds, see it as a tool that also can boost school performance. Schools are abso lutely paying attention to the benets of mind fulness, says Lorraine Hobbs, the director of youth and family pro grams at the Univer sity of California-San Diegos School of Med icine and Center for Mindfulness. When we can teach kids to pay attention to this in ner landscape, they can learn kindness and compassion. Mindful meditation came to schools in part as they began to fo cus on social and emo tional aspects of learn ing, sometimes to cope with bullying and oth er behavioral prob lems, Zakrzewski says. We focus so much on cognitive develop ment, but the science is showing us how im portant the social and emotional aspects are. Its more than just a nice experience, says Sharon Salzberg, a meditation teacher and author of the re cent book Real Happi ness at Work. Just like with adults, stress takes its toll, and we need to take breaks and re group. And maybe its as simple as remem bering to breathe. Hobbs says its im portant for the adults in a school to develop a mindfulness practice. You cant teach what you dont know, she said. That might look like a daily meditation time, perhaps 20 minutes or so, using directions downloaded onto an iPhone. Or taking part in a group meditation program. And it also means teachers are aware of mindful ideas throughout the day. Several experts lik ened the current state ment of mindfulness to the way people ap proached yoga a few decades back. These days, childs pose is part of everyday lan guage, but not so long ago yoga was seen as kooky or, worse, some odd religious practice. Like yoga, mindfulness is rooted in contem plative religious prac tice and like yoga has been secularized and is used as a complemen tary medical treatment for many conditions, as well as in schools. Mindful meditation at school makes kids go ommm CHERYL A. GUERRERO / MCT Kindergarten teacher Erica Eihl, center, leads the meditation while Lucas Gold, left, and Husam Arab concentrate on deep breathing at Citizens of the World Mar Vista in Culver City, Calif.

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted MEREDITH COHN The Baltimore Sun BALTIMORE True heart4me was 5-foot9, spiritual but not re ligious, and a social drinker, her Match. com prole read. She loved the water, trav eling and a good belly laugh. There was one more thing she labeled full disclosure. She had cancer. I was very lucky in that it was caught early and un derwent surgery in ear ly November that was a complete success, the prole read. The can cer is now gone, how ever, Ill be in treatment for the next several months. I expect to be nished up in ear ly May, at which time I am also hoping my hair grows back! Patti Tolley had an aggressive breast can cer, invasive ductal car cinoma, which had spread to her lymph nodes. Shed recently had a large tumor re moved, along with her right breast and the nodes, and endured three of about 16 che motherapy sessions. Bored one night, the executive assistant at the technology compa ny Ciena bought a onemonth subscription to the online dating site. She typed out the pro le, posted pre-diagno sis pictures of herself and hit enter. Her friends joked about who might be attracted to a wom an who was bald as a cue ball and miss ing a breast. But Tolley felt she was more than the sum of her missing parts and she might get a chuckle from some of the mens responses. Several men respond ed as well as one wom an, Jodi Kinney, who had uploaded a prole for a friend, a nice man without a computer or interest in Internet dat ing. Kinney printed out several proles of bru nettes, which she knew her friend liked, and Tolley. Tolley was a blonde when she had a full mane, but Kinney just knew she was the one for David Parrish. Parrish, who worked for Kinney at the De partment of Defense, agreed to email, via Kinney, but Tolley ini tially put him off. She had some other dates lined up. But those didnt work out, and the two began emailing each other. The rst time they talked on the phone, he told her he had his own full disclosure. She never imagined he would say that he had had a double mas tectomy ve years be fore to treat his breast cancer. Only 1 percent of cases diagnosed are in men, though it is the most common kind of cancer diagnosed in women, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. I told her I was ne and shed be ne, too, Parrish said. Their rst date was a comfortable dinner and the Diane Keaton movie Because I Said So. It was like wed known each other for 30 years, Tolley said. Tolley was soon sick and tired from che motherapy, and dates consisted of Parrish bringing chicken noo dle soup to Tolleys Dundalk, Md., home. When they did leave the house together, it often was Parrish es corting her to appoint ments, procedures and surgeries including some that had noth ing to do with can cer. He once got a lit tle loud with a nurse he didnt feel was at tentive enough when Tolley was nauseated. And any time she had stitches, hed make her ride home in the back seat, believing she was safer if they were in an accident. When hes got your back, you know you are covered and in good hands, she said. Bless his heart. One night during her treatments, she fell asleep on the sofa and her wig slid to the side, revealing to Parrish for the rst time her hair less head. He said he couldnt take his eyes off her. Dr. Kristen Fernan dez, director of the Breast Center at Med Star Franklin Square Medical Center in Balti more, and Tolleys sur geon, said she shares Tolleys story often with other patients who tell her they are frightened of facing cancer alone. Fernandez doesnt necessarily recom mend signing up on a dating site, but she said patients should talk to someone. She points them to a hospital pro gram that matches breast cancer survivors with the newly diag nosed, created with the help of a survivor and the Maryland afliate of the Susan G. Komen foundation. They dont provide medical advice, but they provide support, Fernandez said. There are questions as a sur geon I cant answer, like what it feels like when your hair falls out. Wed be foolish if we thought we could cut the cancer out and thats it. Tolley and others say that support is essen tial, no matter where it comes from or how grand the gestures. Research shows that social support can help reduce stress and anx iety during treatment and that survivors with social connections for example, through marriage, close friend ships or membership in a religious organi zation may have fewer physical limita tions and less (of ) a decline in their abili ty to perform daily ac tivities, said Kelly Kes ler, Komen Marylands community health di rector. Sometimes the sim plest gestures, taking someone soup, just be ing there, may be what matters most to your friend or loved one, she said. Tolley said support came from all corners of her life, from friends, family, bosses and doc tors. Cancer now plays a big part in Tolleys life. She continues to take medications and gets annual checkups. She also spends time talking to others scared by their diagnosis, mostly refer rals from friends and family. And Parrish re mains in a leading role. Seven months after they met, she moved into his Severn, Md., home. Eight months later, he proposed with a diamond ring that his mother had won in a bingo game and had him stash away when he was a teen. And on Sept. 9, 2009, she became Pat ti Tolley Parrish. LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHICAGO These days, its faster and cheaper than ever to decipher a persons en tire DNA. But a small study suggests that looking for disease risks that way may not be ready for the masses. For one thing, the re search found that gene variants most likely linked with signicant disease were the least likely to be accurately identied. And analyzing the mass of data from the DNA scan is a daunting task, researchers said. Some experts think more targeted genemapping is a better ap proach. But while whole genome sequencing is mostly done for re search, it has far-reach ing potential for diag nosing and treating genetic diseases, even in people with no known risks. The new results show its promise and its challenges. Stanford University researchers performed whole genome se quencing in 12 healthy people. Most of the millions of genetic vari ants they found were of uncertain signicance, although one wom an was found to have a high genetic risk for cancer. DNA is recovered by a simple blood test and deciphered by ma chines. The difculty lies in interpreting the ndings and guring out which variants are important and which ones can be ignored. That takes days of so phisticated follow-up lab tests and interpre tation to reveal poten tially meaningful ge netic information, the researchers said. Dr. Euan Ashley, a senior co-author and Stanford associate pro fessor of medicine and genetics, likened the technology to an un ruly teenager who has grown up very fast. Theres huge potential. This paper is like pa rental tough love we have to be really honest about where we are in order to bring it up to clinical standards, he said. For the test, they used two commercially available instruments to sequence the DNA the second one to validate the initial nd ings. But less than onethird of variants in in herited disease genes were conrmed. Several specialists in cluding medical genet icists, genetic counsel ors and a pathologist examined the ndings and recommended fol low-up tests. Medical intervention was con sidered appropriate for one participant, a woman with no fami ly history of breast or ovarian cancer found to have a genetic vari ant strongly linked with those diseases. That nding led to surgery to remove her ovaries and increased breast cancer screening. Gene mapping study shows promise, challenges Breast cancer patients find romance and support online ALGERINA PERNA / MCT David, right, and Patti Parrish are pictured in their Severn, Md., home with their two labs, Mojo and Babe. They met when Patti who had just started chemotherapy, and was bald and sick, put an ad on Match.com. David had survived breast cancer.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 other sick babies, and its an unpleasant life experience to be cry ing and unattended to, and, voila! A cuddler comes over and the baby stops crying. Nancy Salcido has been a cuddler at Tor rance for a year. Her two daughters are grown, and she consid ers her three-hour cud dling shifts good prac tice for any potential grandchildren. I just kind of hold them close to me ... and talk to them, shar ing my day, or give them little pep talks, Salcido said. One of the nurses has nick named me the baby whisperer. Parents typical ly must consent for their babie s to be part of cuddling programs, and cuddlers must un dergo background checks and training be fore starting the job. At Chicagos Comer hos pital, that includes les sons in how to swaddle babies tight to make them feel safe and how to maneuver around intravenous lines, as well as instruction in hygiene including fre quent hand-washing. At the Golisano Chil drens Hospital in Roch ester, N.Y., one cud dler is a young man born there premature ly long ago. He just wants to come and give back, said Chris Tryon, a child life specialist at the hospital, part of the University of Rochester Medical Center. Comers cuddlers include 74-year-old Frank Dertz, a retired carpenter who heard about the program from his daughter, a Comer nurse. Its quite a blessing for me. I get more out of it than the babies, I think, Dertz said. Kathleen Jones says the same thing. A mother of three grown daughters and grand mother of two little girls, she joined Com ers program in 2012, working a couple after noons a week or some times at night. They say that I look so in love with them when Im there, but I cannot NOT crack an ear-to-ear smile when ever I pick that little guy or girl up. Her love seems ob vious as she rocks a strangers newborn, the baby girls tiny hand gripping Jones nger. Ooh, I want to take you home, Jones coos. Youre so brave ... youre going to be feisty, arent you? Jones used to won der why parents or other relatives ar ent comforting their own babies. But then, in August, her young est grandchild was born deaf, with brain damage doctors say was caused by a vi rus her mom contract ed before birth. Eve lyn Steadman spent her rst three weeks at Comer, and got cud dling care while she was there. While family mem bers visited often, life happens and you cant sit by a bedside for three weeks, Jones said. Erica Steadman had had a C-section, and already had her hands full with a toddler at home. She was being held and loved and watched over, she said. I felt a great sense of relief from that. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Hospital volunteer Gertie Rogers, 84, places a newborn baby back into a bed in the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Chicagos Comer Childrens Hospital in Chicago. MARTHA IRVINE / AP CUDDLE FROM PAGE C1 I just kind of hold them close to me ... and talk to them, sharing my day, or give them little pep talks. One of the nurses has nicknamed me the baby whisperer. Nancy Salcido

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeat ed numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, March 17, the 76th day of 2014. There are 289 days left in the year. This is St. Patricks Day. Todays Highlight in His tory : On March 17, 1776, Brit ish forces evacuated Bos ton during the Revolution ary War. On this date : In 1762 New Yorks rst St. Patricks Day parade took place. In 1861 Victor Emman uel II was proclaimed the rst king of a united Italy. In 1906, President Theo dore Roosevelt rst likened crusading journalists to a man with the muckrake in his hand in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Wash ington. In 1912, the Camp Fire Girls organization was in corporated in Washington, D.C., two years to the day after it was founded in Thet ford, Vt. (The group is now known as Camp Fire USA.) In 1943 the Taoiseach of Ireland, Eamon de Valera, delivered a radio speech about The Ireland That We Dreamed Of. In 1950 scientists at the University of California at Berkeley announced they had created a new radioac tive element, californium. In 1959 the Dalai Lama ed Tibet for India in the wake of a failed uprising by Tibetans against Chinese rule. In 1966 a U.S. midget submarine located a miss ing hydrogen bomb which had fallen from an American bomber into the Mediterra nean off Spain. In 1969 Golda Meir be came prime minister of Is rael. In 1970 the United States cast its rst veto in the U.N. Security Coun cil. (The U.S. killed a reso lution that would have con demned Britain for failure to use force to overthrow the white-ruled government of Rhodesia.) In 1973 U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm, a freed prisoner of the Viet nam War, was joyously greeted by his family at Tra vis Air Force Base in Califor nia in a scene captured in a Pulitzer Prize-winning AP photograph. In 1988 Avianca Flight 410, a Boeing 727, crashed after takeoff into a moun tain in Colombia, killing all 143 people on board. TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: My 11-year-old daugh ter, Gwen, just start ed middle school. She makes good grades, but shes strongwilled. Do kids grow up instantly when they start middle school? She wants to know if she can have a boy friend. I told her not until shes 15. Now shes irting with girls who ask her out. I told her to stay away from them, not because they are lesbians but because they are not good girls. They are al ways in trouble. Gwen says Im too strict, and if I dont stop, she will run away. I adopted her at birth (it was an open adoption), and she re cently asked me if I am going to place her for adoption. She was worried that I would. I am very concerned that she is hanging out with the wrong crowd. Any advice? SAN AN TONIO MOM DEAR MOM: People do not grow up in stantly. I know indi viduals who are im mature at 50, and Im sure if you think about it, so do you. From what you have told me about your daugh ter, its clear that she is far from the grown-up she thinks she is. If you do not to want Gwen to date until she is older, that is your prerogative as her par ent. The gender of the person isnt the issue. Because you think she is hanging out with the wrong crowd, my advice is to make sure she is so busy she doesnt have time to spend with them. In volve her in activities outside of school sports, scouting, mu sic or art. And be sure she knows that you are her forever mother and that nothing she could ever do will less en your love for her. DEAR ABBY: I am a 29-year-old woman who has just been di agnosed with multiple sclerosis. It has been a rough road, and Im lucky to have such a supportive group. My issue is, when people nd out, I get comments such as, Wow, you look so GOOD! or sugges tions on how I should cure my MS. The most hurtful one was that its all in my head. While I appreci ate that folks care and want to offer help, I nd their comments offensive and hurt ful. How do I respond tactfully, but also con vey that they should think twice before they say these things? UPSET IN OHIO DEAR UPSET: If some one says you look good, respond as you would to any oth er compliment say thank you. When someone offers a sug gestion about how you can cure yourself, youll save yourself a lot of frustration if you keep in mind that the person cares enough about you to try to be helpful. All you need to do is smile and say rmly that you are un der a doctors care and are satised with the treatment you are re ceiving. And, heaven for bid, if another indi vidual tells you that your MS is all in your head, remember that just because a jackass brays does not mean you have to pay atten tion. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Mom worries about 11-year-old daughter who acts grown up HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 17, 2014: This year you have to han dle more than your share of demands, especially those that revolve around a spe cial relationship. You often might not see eye-to-eye with this person, but you learn from each other, as you both present different perceptions that are valid. If you are sin gle, you probably will date a lot and grow as you come to understand the various per sonalities you will encounter. If you are attached, the two of you benet from a healthy dose of nostalgia and ro mance. You often wonder how much to give and when to say enough. Open up this discussion with your sig nicant other. LIBRA is as ro mantic as you are. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your instincts will help you understand a partners needs. Be sensitive with this person. Understand that you are capable of expressing unusual sensitivity. You might nd that youre not sure how much to give. Dont worry so much. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Speak your mind. Youll sense a change in some ones demeanor that could concern you. Your efforts count more than you real ize. Approach a new situa tion in a different way. Follow your intuition in order to un derstand someones odd re action. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might not be in the right shape to do what is neces sary. You could nd that re lating to a child tests your need to control a situation. Your creativity will charge any interaction you have now, es pecially if you embrace the Irish spirit. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Pressure builds, and there are many options. You have a strong intuitive sense today that youll put to good use. A discussion with a loved one could be dif cult. You might feel as if you have too much to juggle. Try to eliminate as much as you can. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make yourself available for calls and others inquiries. You will receive a sponta neous invitation that you would like to say yes to, but it might force you to cancel other established plans. Only you can choose what to do. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could go overboard when celebrating your Irish heritage. You might feel un comfortable when some one brings up your tendency to overindulge. A loved one might try to encourage this conversation, which he or she could feel is long over due. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might have made plans with someone, only to have a last-minute change occur. Be gracious, because you could have an even better time opt ing to be spontaneous. If you are unattached, the potential for meeting someone is high. Remain open. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) If you want to let go of a tradition or decide not join in with the shamrocks and the green-themed parties, make it OK. It is quite possible that you need a break from ritu als, so take it. By next year, you might be more up for participating. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Youll want to net work rather than be stuck in a meeting. You will feel 100 percent Irish today. Nothing makes you as happy as be ing the party animal you nat urally are. Try to get started early on in your Irish transfor mation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You naturally take the lead, whether youre at work or out socializing. Take charge be it at the ofce, at home or at a St. Paddys Day party. You might need to distance yourself from a sit uation that is evolving into a power play. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your mind wanders to day to distant places or peo ple far away You might need to carefully rethink a decision involving a personal matter. How much are you really will ing to reveal? Recognize a limitation instead of avoid ing it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) One-on-one relating could take a new twist, as long as you remain open-minded. Perhaps a dis cussion about long-term goals with a close friend needs to happen. You also might nd that you are changing your values and the kind of people you are with. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbnrf nttfb rfnftbtbt fbnft tbbb ffftfb tbtfbtb n tbtb tbtbn tn ffnntb ntntfb ffntbnt btbnttnt brb nrrtnnbntbt fb b r n b t b t b b n b n f r f n n t t b t b r r b t n t n r b b n f n t t b t n t n t tntt nf nrb nrf f t t r n b t n t b n t b t t b b r t r t b n r b f t b t b n f r n b t b t n n n t b t n b t b t t t f tb n t btbn nttbtbrr btntnrbbnfn tttntnt tnt nntf n nrf n b n r r f n f t b b n t b t t b t b n n t n f t t r n b t n t b n t b t t b b r t r t b n r b f t b t b n f r n b n t b t n n n t b t n b t f b n t t n t b t t n b b b t n f r n b r t b f t t b r t t f t r t t t t t n f ttbnntn nt tbtb rb tn tb n t btbn rfnftbtb nfbnftt tbbbtn ff ftfbtb fbt ntbtb tbtbnn ntbntnt tntb ttb bnrrtnnb ntbtfb rnbtbtbbnbnfrfn rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 rfntb r f n t b n f b n f f b n r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r b r r f f r t b f n b b f f n n f f f r r r r r r r r b f r f n r r f b r r r f rrr f rr r r b f n f r f f n b f f f t f f r r r r b r f f f n r r r f r r r f f r r f r b r r f f rbr rrtrrrr rr f f frb bbrr rfr rrrrrr r r r r r f n rr r r r rb rrrr rr rrrr rrr r rbr rr rrr rbb r b r n f r r rrr r f r r r f b f n f f r r f fr r r r r f f r f r f r rr rrb r rrbrb rbf bbr rr r r b r r f f f b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f b b r n r r f n r r r r r f r n t r r r r r f r r f r f r b f r r r r r r n f f b r r r r r rrb rr r t f r r f f t f r r r r t f rrr rrr rr rb b b r r r r rf f r r r r r r ntn rr rtfrb trrr r r r b f nf f t r b r r b t r f r f r r r t r r f f t r b b b f t r f r f r f bnnt f b r f r r r r n r r r f r r r f r f nf t n t b f r r r b r r r r b r b r b b r r b r f f n f r r rrr rr r b f r t n f f t r r r f f r b b r r b r r r r r r r r r b r r r b b r r r r r r r r r b r r b r r r r r r r r r f b fnf n f tr bf nff f n f f f f f n f n f f f f n f n f f f f f f n n f f f f n t n n b f f n n b nf n t r r r r r bnf b nf f r r rbbf rrrb fr rrrrrb b rbbrr f b rbbb n f f rr rb frtrb bt rrr rbr f rbbbf r rrr rrrrr rr brbr rrrr rtrbr b nf f n f b f n f t nf fbfb tf nft tf nfffn fnf ttf nf tff fn nf nff nt ft t rrr rb rbb bbr rrr bb b bbr rrr rr rrr r rbbr rrr rrbrr rrrb rrr rrrb rb rr rrr bb brrrrr r b bbrbrr r f t t n f f b f f n n f t rb f rr rrrr bffb bbb brb rrrb br rbr r r rb n f f rrrrb rrf b b f b f rr rrr rbrrrr rr f f b f b t b n f f n b f rr rrbbr rrr r rb rr fff r r r r r r r r r r b r b b r r r b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b r r r r r r r r b rbbf rr rr bf rb nf n n n f n f n b f t f n ttbffbb b nff nff nffb f n f tr rrrb br rrr rfbrbr ttbffbb nff nffn nnff nfff fn fbffnr r rr rrf rbr rbrbfb rb rrrr b f b f b f n f f b t f b n n n f n f n b f f fftbb b tnf f n n tr rrrr rrrbb r r rrfbrb rfftb tnb nn ffn ftbntbn t btft tbf br b rrrrr frb rbrbrb rbb rrrr rrrb n b n b t b f n b f b n t n f t f t t b n t n b n t n b n t n b n t n t n b n t n t t b t n b t t b f t n ft nfnfbb fnf ff rr br r rr rrrr rf rr rr rbrbnb fff rbrr f r ftr rr rfrbf rrr b r r b f r b r b r b r b b r r r r b r r r r r r r r b rbbf rr rbb bf rb nf

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rfntbnrf rf ntbfrrrf brf rrfr rr r bb f rrf r frr r rb ftf f tbrf nr rf rrr frr bfrr brf r brrnbf rf rrbrf rf ntbf f nt b rrff rrrt rr n frbrr t f nb nffr bb rnttrr bfb ff brrr brf rf t b trf r f rbrtb b rf rbftrf brbr rt rrrfb b t f n n r f r brtrr rf tf rff tf tb tffb brf rr nt frrb brfbtfrr brr r f t n r f f t r f r r tbfr bt nbrrr r r tbfr rfnrr rrbrf fn n rrfbrf f frrr n rrrf t ff ffr rr r r ntr rbbrf r n n rtrr b fr bbrr nf rtrr r f b t b t f f b r r bfb trr n f b f fr frr rfttr t n ff r ftrb bn ff rrrrbrf ftrb bbrf rr bbrf b r r f r r f f f f f r ff trfr b n rrt nb nbrrbrf rfrrrf nb brf frr brf rrrf ffb brf rrbrfr r r tbrr bfb bfb r r n rf nrf r rb rr rrrrbrf bffrr brf rrbrf nbrrbrf ntbfb tbrrrrbrf brfr f nb r trff bbrff rtnrf tt ffbrfb bbrf fbf fbrf ftn r f t f b r r b f f r f r r f r t t r f t r r t t b f r b b b t r bfbf r b f f f f f f r rf rb rrf tnf bbrf bbrf f f b f ff rbrrfrftrf rtrr rbfn rrrtfrt tt r r t f r t r t r b r r r t t b r t rbrrrfbrtf bfrrfrt rrf fbffff rffr rtfrrbf fbrfrfr frrfr brtfff rrfrbr f b f r r f f b r t f r b r t r f t r r b rffrtrf rrfff r r f b r f b r f r f f r r t r f n r b b f r n t t r r b r t r f r f r f b f r f r b r f r r r r b r t f r f f r b r f f r n r b r t t r f r r r b r f f r f b f b f r r f b r r n n n r f t t



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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 GATORS SWIPE SEC TITLE, NO. 1 SEED, SPORTS B1UF STABBING: Report reveals details of attack, suspect death, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Volunteers cuddle babies too sick to leave hospital, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 17, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 76 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.79 / 65Mostly cloudy with T-storms. 50 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALLacrosse teams from Ithaca College and Stevenson warm up for a game on one of the new elds at the National Training Center in Clermont on Friday. TED BRIDIS and JACK GILLUM Associated PressWASHINGTON The Obama administration more often than ever censored government les or outright denied access to them last year under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, according to a new analysis of fed eral data by The Associated Press. The administration cited more legal exceptions it said justied withholding materials and refused a record number of times to turn over les quickly that might be especially newsworthy. Most agencies also took longer to answer records requests, the analysis found. The governments own g ures from 99 federal agen cies covering six years show that half way through its sec ond term, the administra tion has made few meaning ful improvements in the way it releases records despite its promises from Day 1 to be come the most transparent administration in history. In category after category except for reducing num bers of old requests and a slight increase in how of ten it waived copying fees the governments efforts to be more open about its ac tivities last year were their worst since President Barack Obama took ofce. In a year of intense pub lic interest over the Nation al Security Agencys sur veillance programs, the government cited national security to withhold infor mation a record 8,496 times a 57 percent increase over a year earlier and more than double Obamas rst year, when it cited that reason 3,658 times. The Defense Department, including the NSA, and the CIA accounted for nearly all those. The Agriculture Departments Farm J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / AP Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., leaves the chamber at the Capitol in Washington, on Tuesday. JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and MIKE ECKELAssociated PressSIMFEROPOL, Ukraine Fireworks exploded and Russian ags uttered above jubilant crowds Sun day after residents in Crimea voted over whelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabi lizing and were expect ed to slap sanctions against Russia for it. Ukraines new gov ernment in Kiev called the referen dum a circus directed at gunpoint by Moscow referring to the thousands of Russian troops now in the strategic Black Sea peninsula after seiz ing it two weeks ago. But after the polls closed late Sunday, crowds of ethnic Rus sians in the region al Crimean capital of Simferopol erupted with jubilant chants in the main square, overjoyed at the pros pect of once again be coming part of Russia. The Crimea refer endum offered voters the choice of seeking annexation by Rus sia or remaining in Ukraine with greater autonomy. After 50 percent of the ballots were counted, Mikhail Malishev, head of the Associated PressKey events in Ukraines political crisis: Nov. 21, 2013: President Viktor Yanu kovychs government announces its aban doning an agreement to strengthen ties with the European Union and instead seeking closer cooperation with Moscow. Protesters take to the streets. Nov. 30: Images of protesters bloodied by police truncheons spread quickly and galvanize public sup port for the demonstrations. Dec. 1: A protest attracts around 300,000 people on Ki evs Independence Square, known as the Maidan, the largest since the 2004 Orange CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comTwo $400,000 multipur pose/World Cup soc cer elds were unveiled to the public last week at the National Training Center in Clermont. NTC spokesperson Kim Couch said the elds can be used for soccer, lacrosse, ag football and other sports. Paul Johns, NTCs chief operating ofcer, said he believes the elds will benet Lake County because they will attract even more teams along with sports fans and players families and friends who will spend money on food, lodging and other things. This certainly will be a big impact to south Lake County, he said. The NTC already has ve multipurpose elds, but more were needed because local groups and organizations use them, too. Thats why county ofcials contributed $400,000 from their county-wide parks and recreation budget to build them. We, along with the county, wanted to take care of community leagues and clubs, and were excited that we were able to provide them with what they needed, Johns said. Couch said the two World Cup soccer elds can also serve as four modied elds. Information provided by the chamber said the NTC welcomes more than 250,000 visiting athletes to its facilities each year, which South Lake Chamber of Commerce President Ray San Fratello said energizes the local economy. South Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ecotourism, adventure tour ism and heritage tourism, he said. It is a true economic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the community through visitors spending at our hotels, dining in our restaurants and buying goods and services typical of tourists from our stores.Timeline: Key events in Ukraines political crisisNTC adds World Cup fieldsSouth Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ecotourism, adventure tourism and heritage tourism. It is a true economic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the community....Ray San FratelloSouth Lake Chamber of Commerce PresidentUS cites national security as reason to censor, deny recordsSEE RECORDS | A2SEE TIMELINE | A2Crimeans vote overwhelmingly for secessionSEE VOTE | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 HOW TO REACH US MARCH 16CASH 3 . ............................................... 7-3-6 Afternoon . .......................................... 2-6-1 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-2-5-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 6-8-7-9FLORIDALOTTERY MARCH 15FANTASY 5 . ........................... 5-10-15-17-32 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............. 16-24-26-40-41-45 POWERBALL ........................ 2-5-34-51-589 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. Service Agency cited na tional security six times, the Environmental Protection Agency did twice and the National Park Service once. And ve years after Obama directed agencies to less fre quently invoke a deliber ative process exception to withhold materials describing decision-making behind the scenes, the govern ment did it anyway, a record 81,752 times. Im concerned the growing trend toward relying upon FOIA exemptions to withhold large swaths of govern ment information is hinder ing the publics right to know, said Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. It becomes too much of a temptation. If you screw up in government, just mark it top secret. Citizens, journalists, businesses and others last year made a record 704,394 re quests for information, an 8 percent increase over the previous year. The government responded to 678,391 requests, an increase of 2 percent over the previous year. The AP analysis showed that the government more than ever censored materials it turned over or fully denied access to them, in 244,675 cases or 36 percent of all re quests. On 196,034 other occasions, the government said it couldnt nd records, a per son refused to pay for copies or the government de termined the request to be unreasonable or improper. Sometimes, the government censored only a few words or an employees phone number, but other times it completely marked out near ly every paragraph on pages. The White House said the governments gures demonstrate that agencies are responding to the presidents call for greater transparency. White House spokesman Eric Schultz noted that the government responded to more requests than previously and said it released more infor mation. Over the past ve years, federal agencies have worked aggressively to im prove their responsiveness to FOIA requests, applying a presumption of openness and making it a priority to respond quickly, Schultz said. Sunday was the start of Sunshine Week, when news organizations promote open government and freedom of information. The chief of the Justice De partments Ofce of Informa tion Policy, which oversees the open records law, told the Senate last week that some of the 99 agencies in the past ve years have released doc uments in full or in part in more than 90 percent of cas es. She noted the record number of requests for government records, which exceeded 700,000 for the rst time last year, and said decisions are harder than ever. The requests are more complex than they were be fore, director Melanie Pustay told the Senate Judiciary Committee. The governments respon siveness under the FOIA is widely viewed as a barometer of its transparency. Under the law, citizens and foreigners can compel the government to turn over copies of federal records for zero or little cost. Anyone who seeks informa tion through the law is gener ally supposed to get it unless disclosure would hurt nation al security, violate person al privacy or expose business secrets or condential decision-making in certain areas. It cited such exceptions a re cord 546,574 times last year. The public is frustrated and unhappy with the pace of responses and the amount of information provided, Sen. Richard Blu menthal, D-Conn., said at the same congressional hearing. Theres a common reaction for anybody who has any experience with it that it doesnt function well. John Cook, the incoming new editor at the Intercept, the online magazine found ed by investor Pierre Omid yar, said his experience un der the open records law was abysmal but not especial ly worse last year than pre viously. Its a bureaucra cy, Cook said. As often as its about trying to keep data from falling into the hands of reporters, its the contrac tor looking for ways to reduce the caseload. Its just bureaucrats trying to get home earli er and have less to do. The AP could not deter mine whether the adminis tration was abusing the na tional security exception or whether the public asked for more documents about sensitive subjects. The NSA said its 138 percent surge in records requests were from people asking whether it had collected their phone or email records, which it generally refuses to conrm or deny. To do otherwise, the NSA said, would pose an an unacceptable risk because terrorists could check to see whether the U.S. had detected their ac tivities. It censored records or fully denied access to them in 4,246 out of 4,328 requests, or 98 percent of the time. RECORDS FROM PAGE A1 Revolution. Activists seize Kiev City Hall. Dec. 17: Russian President Vladimir Putin announces Moscow will buy $15 billion worth of Ukrainian government bonds and cut the price Ukraine pays for Rus sian natural gas. Jan. 22, 2014: Three pro testers die during a con frontation with police. Jan. 28: The prime min ister resigns and parliament repeals harsh anti-protest laws that set off the violence. Feb. 16: Opposition ac tivists end their occupation of Kiev City Hall in ex change for the release of all 234 jailed protesters. Feb. 18: Protesters attack police lines and set res out side parliament after it stalls on a constitutional reform to limit presidential powers. Riot police respond; at least 26 people die and hundreds are injured. Feb. 20: Hours after a truce is announced, vio lence resumes. More than 80 people, mainly protest ers, are killed by gunshots. Feb. 21: Under a European-mediated plan, protest leaders and Yanukovych agree to form a new gov ernment and hold an early election. Parliament slash es his powers and votes to free his rival, Yulia Tymoshenko, from prison. Yanu kovych ees Kiev. Feb. 22: Parliament votes to remove Yanukovych and hold new elections. Ty moshenko is freed. Feb. 23: Ukraines parliament assigns presidential powers to its new speak er, Oleksandr Turchynov, a Tymoshenko ally. Feb. 24: Ukraines inter im government draws up a warrant for Yanukovychs arrest. Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev derides the new leaders in Kiev as Kalashnikov-toting people in black masks. Feb. 26: Leaders of Ukraines protest move ment propose legislator Arseniy Yatsenyuk as prime minister. Putin orders major military exercises just across the border. Feb. 27: Masked gunmen seize regional parliament and government buildings in Crimea. Ukraines government pledges to pre vent a national breakup with strong backing from the West. Yanukovych is granted refuge in Russia. Feb. 28: Ukraine says Russian troops have taken up positions around strate gic locations on the Crime an Peninsula. Ukraines parliament adopts a resolution demanding that Russia halt steps it says are aimed against Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity. March 1: Troops under apparent Russian com mand take over Crimea without ring a shot. The Kiev government and its Western supporters are powerless to react. Presi dent Barack Obama calls Putin to demand the troops withdrawal. March 2: Ukraine ap peals for international help, fearing a wider Rus sian invasion. March 3: Ukraine says there are up to 16,000 Rus sian troops in Crimea. Russia says it has approved troop deployment at the request of Yanukovych. March 6: Crimeas par liament declares the re gion wants to join Russia and will let voters decide in a March 16 referendum. March 12: Obama meets with Yatsenyuk in Washington in a show of support for the new Ukrainian government and declares the U.S. would completely reject the Crimea referendum. March 14: A last-ditch diplomatic effort before the referendum fails in Lon don, where Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov met with U.S. counterpart John Kerry amid threats of sanctions against Russia if it an nexes Crimea. March 16: Crimea votes in the referendum about whether to become inde pendent and seek to be come part of Russia. TIMELINE FROM PAGE A1 referendum committee, said more than 95 percent of voters had approved splitting off and joining Russia. Opponents of se cession appeared to have stayed away Sunday, denouncing the vote as a cynical power play and land grab by Russia. Russia was expect ed to face strong sanctions Monday by the U.S. and Europe over the vote, which could also encourage rising pro-Russian sentiment in Ukraines east and lead to fur ther divisions in this nation of 46 million. Residents in western Ukraine and the capital, Kiev, are strong ly pro-West and Ukrainian nationalist. The Crimean parlia ment will meet Mon day to formally ask Moscow to be annexed and Crimean lawmakers will y to Moscow later in the day for talks, Crimeas pro-Russia prime minister said on Twitter. In Moscow, the speaker of the lower house of the Russian parliament, Sergei Naryshkin, suggested that joining Russia was a done deal. We understand that for 23 years after Ukraines formation as a sovereign state, Crimeans have been waiting for this day, Naryshkin was quoted as saying by the state ITAR-Tass news agency. Russian lawmaker Vladimir Zhirinovsky said the annexation could take from three days to three months, according to Interfax. Some residents in Crimea said they feared the new Ukrainian government that took over when President Viktor Yanukovych ed to Russia last month will oppress them. Its like theyre crazy Texans in western Ukraine. Imagine if the Texans suddenly took over power (in Washington) and told everyone they should speak Texan, said Ilya Khlebanov, a voter in Simferopol. In Sevastopol, the Crimean port where Russia now leases a major naval base from Ukraine for $98 million a year, more than 70 people surged into a polling station in the rst 15 minutes of voting Sunday. Ukraines new prime minister insisted that neither Ukraine nor the West would recognize the vote. Under the stage di rection of the Russian Federation, a circus performance is under way: the so-called ref erendum, Prime Min ister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said Sunday. Also taking part in the perfor mance are 21,000 Rus sian troops, who with their guns are trying to prove the legality of the referendum. As soon as the polls closed, the White House again de nounced the vote. The international community will not recognize the results of a poll admin istered under threats of violence, it said in a statement. VOTE FROM PAGE A1 EFREM LUKATSKY / AP Ukrainian soccer supporters create Ukraines Navy ag to support the countrys territorial integrity, during a soccer match between Dynamo Kyiv and Crimean Tavria at the Olympic stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, on Sunday. VADIM GHIRDA / APA woman casts her ballot in the Crimean referendum in Simferopol, Ukraine, on Sunday. Its like theyre crazy Texans in western Ukraine. Imagine if the Texans suddenly took over power (in Washington) and told everyone they should speak Texan.Ilya KhlebanovUkrainian voter

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Grantsmanship Network monthly meeting is ThursdayThe Lake-Sumter Grantsmanship Network, representing nonprofit and similar agencies in Lake and Sumter counties, will feature speaker Valerie Read of the Universal Orlando Foundation at its monthly member ship meeting. Read will discuss apply ing for funding from the foundation. The meeting will be at 10:30 / a.m., Thursday, at the United Way ofce, 32644 Blossom Ln. For information, go to www.lsgn.org.TAVARES Coast Guard captain prep class to be offeredThe Triangle Boat Club and Adams Marine Seminars will host a captains prep course, today through March 28, at Triangle Boat Club, 12001 U.S. Highway 441. Passing the class and exam allows students to apply for a Coast Guard-issued license. Classes meet from 6 to 10 / p.m., Monday-Friday, and from 9 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Pre-registration is required at 352-447-1950.EUSTIS Lake Tech Center to host Health and Wellness FairLake Technical Center will host a Health and Wellness Fair from 11 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. Friday at the main campus, 2001 Kurt St. The fair will be supported by SkillsUSA and Lowes, and will feature health information booths, skin care advice and blood pressure checks, with live entertainment by Rockin Redemption. A silent auction will also be held to raise funds for Jay Ryon, the son of a Lake County reghter, who was diagnosed with leukemia. For information, go to www.laketech.org, email LTCinfo@lake.k12. .us or call 352-589-2250.TAVARES Health and Human Services seeks grant applicationsLake Countys Health and Human Services Division is accepting grant applications for funding up to $25,000 for youth intervention and prevention programs, and up to $10,000 for health and human ser vices programs. Deadline for submission is 5 / p.m. on April 30. Bidders conferences will be from 9 / a.m. to noon, Thursday, at the Lake County Agriculture Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., and from 9 / a.m. to noon, March 24 at the Lake County Emergency Communications and Operations Center, 425 W. Alfred St. Call 352-742-6520 or go to www.lakecounty.gov/grant for information.CLERMONT Box car racing company to hold open houseOn March 28, the Clermont/ Minneola Box Car Racing company, 363 Sky Valley St., will host an open house at the community center from 7 to 8:30 / p.m. The groups sanction ing body is National Derby Rallies. For information, call 352-708-4207, email cmboxcarracing@gmail.com or go to www.cmboxcarracing.com.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comJordan Baker, in F. Scott Fitzgeralds The Great Gats by said she likes large par ties. Theyre so intimate, she said. At small parties there isnt any privacy. Baker would be right at home at the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merces upcoming Great Gatsby-themed party. Planned for 6 to 11 / p .m. on March 28, the party will combine the chambers annual Taste in Mount Dora and Casino Nights events. This will mark the rst time the events have been held together, which led the chamber to add a theme that suited both, according to Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merce President Rob En glish. We decided to kind of step it up a notch when we combined events, En glish said. We decided its (going to) be a themed event each year and so this year, we thought of a fun theme that everybody would enjoy because of the music thats associated with it, the apper dresses, and the gangster look for guys and stuff like that. We thought that a lot of people would pos sibly come dressed in the 20s-era clothing, and well see.MOUNT DORAChamber plans Gatsby-themed partySEE GATSBY | A4 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comCornerstone Hospice has made four leadership changes, promoting two em ployees and lling two other va cant positions. Rhonda White is the new Chief Operations Ofcer, Donna Loyko is the new chief compliance ofcer, Tanya Holcomb is the new control ler and Ursula Cutler is the new vice president of sales and marketing, according to a press release and a company ofcial. White said she has been Cornerstone Hospices chief compliance ofce for the past six years. She took over the COO responsibilities on March 1 as former COO Mary Manrique will be retiring, accord ing to a press release. White said the adjustment does not pose a signicant challenge because of her experience at Cornerstone Hospice. Even though I ha vent been responsible for the operations, when youre compliance ofcer you have to know ev erything about op erations. So, there wasnt a big learning curve for me coming into the position, White said. She said as COO she is now com pletely responsible for patient care. As a com pliance ofcer, we were responsible for monitor ing the quality of the care, and also making sure that the care that was being delivered met all of the laws and reg ulations. So, not involved with the patient care itself in my pre vious role, White said of the differences be tween her previ ous job and her new COO position. She added, however, she has worked in hospice for 15 years and is glad to be coming back to the care side. I started my ca reer in patient care. I was actual ly delivering care to the pa tients and Ive been away from that for a long time, and I love what hospice does. I think we provide the best care, healthcare, and Im glad that I get to be more intimately involved in that, White said. Loyko said she TAVARESCornerstone Hospice fills top positions LOYKO WHITE HOLCOMB CUTLER DOUG FINGER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Gainesville Police, University of Florida Police and the Alachua County Sheriffs Ofce work the scene of a shooting in Butler Plaza on March 3. MONIVETTE CORDEIROHalifax Media GroupMaureen Craveys son left ear ly the morning of the stabbing. He didnt sleep well the Sunday night before, getting up sever al times. Michael Cravey, 28, left the house about 6:30 a.m., around the same time Maureen was going to work. The note he wrote said he was going to drive around Gainesville, an hour from their Cross City home. She didnt think about it much. Michael was her eldest son, but to her, he would always be her baby. She didnt start to panic until the calls started. A family friend called Maureen and said he heard ofcials say Michaels name multiple times on the police scanner as they searched for him.UF stabbing, chase, death of suspect traced Staff ReportThe Mount Dora High School Band will have a din ner with live and silent auc tions on April 5 to raise money for uniforms and equipment. Helping to keep music in our schools is so import ant, auction chairman Terry Askins said in an email. Mu sic helps students learn disci pline, responsibility, character and teamwork. The dinner will feature a three-course Italian dinner with live entertainment by the students. There will be a live auction and a silent auc tion of theme park tickets, sporting event tickets, gift cards and gift baskets. We have lots of golf pack ages, restaurant gift cards and local items that were donat ed, Askins said. Auction items can be pur chased with cash, checks or credit cards. The event is planned for 5 to 9 / p.m. at Round Lake Chris tian Church, 31205 Round Lake Rd., near Round Lake El ementary School. Dinner will be served at 5:30 / p.m. Dinner tickets are $10 if purchased in advance and $15 at the door. Dessert will be available for purchase, and take-out dinners will also be available. For tickets, call Gayle Minnig at 352-383-9199, Michelle Dotto at 407-399-9683 or email bandmommd@gmail.com. Corporate tables of eight are available for $100 each, in cluding a table-top logo and a mention in the agenda pro gram. Askins will personally deliver these tickets. Call 352551-0133 for reservations.MDHS Band plans fundraiser CRAVEY SEE HOSPICE | A4SEE STABBING | A5 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA Lady Lake man died from in juries after a truck in which he was a passenger was struck and over turned in a two-vehicle crash Sat urday night in Sumter County, said Florida Highway Patrol troopers. Arthur Miller, 59, of Lady Lake, died at The Villages Regional Hospital, according to the police report. Sgt. Steve Gaskins, public affairs ofcer for FHP, said Clayton Andrew Dorey, 17, of Ocklawaha, was driving a 2000 Dodge Durango northbound at 6:09 / p.m. Saturday on County Road 229 and approaching the inter section at County Road 466 when he failed to stop at a posted stop sign. As a result, FHP said, Doreys truck collided with the left side of a 2001 Dodge Ram driven by Robert W. Plunk, 65, of Umatilla. Upon impact, Plunks truck rotated and overturned. Miller, a passenger in the vehicle, died from his injuries. Plunk, along with two others in the same vehicle, Audrey Jean Mc Quay, 70, of Umatilla, and Janene Grace Miller, 60, of Lady Lake, re ported minor injuries and were taken to TVRH. FHP said Dorey also had minor injuries and was taken to Marion County West Hospital. The crash was not alcohol-relat ed and everyone was wearing seatbelts, according to the police report. Gaskins said the accident re mains under investigation and charges are pending.SUMTER COUNTYPassenger dies when vehicle is struck, overturned

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 DEATH NOTICESRuth K. CarrollRuth K. Carroll, 80, of the Villages, died Friday, March 14, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.David CifuniDavid Cifuni, 95, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 14, 2014. PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, LeesburgJames W. FahnestockJames William Fahne stock, 86, of Leesburg, died Saturday, March 15, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home LeesburgRichard PoirierRichard Poirier, 69, of the Villages, died on Saturday, March 15, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Leesburg.Paul YoungPaul Young, 66, of Leesburg, died on Friday, March 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.IN MEMORY joined Cornerstone Hospice a little over a year ago as a risk manager. She has more than 30 years of nursing, lead ership and risk management experience in home care, hospice and corrections health care, according to a press release. Loyko said both her parents were at Corner stone Hospice, which motivated her career choice. I think it was at that point that I realized that this is something I think I want to do in my nursing career, and here I am, Loyko said. I saw the teamwork, I saw the caring, I saw the compassion and I really felt that this is someplace that I really wanted to work. She added she is very excited about the opportunity the promotion brings. Holcomb previously worked for The Villages Health System, and has years of experience guiding teams in nan cial analysis, reporting, forecasting, auditing, budgeting and cash management for ser vice and healthcare industries, the press release states. The controller position has been vacant for several months and the vice president of sales and marketing position has been vacant for two years, ac cording to the release. Cutler, as vice pres ident of sales in mar keting, will be in charge of outreach, including marketing, adver tising and community and clinical outreach, a press release stated. Cornerstone Hospice covers seven coun ties and has more than 700 employees company-wide, according to White. HOSPICE FROM PAGE A3 Staff ReportCentral Florida Health Alliance will host job fairs this week at Leesburg Regional Medical Center and The Villages Regional Hospital in efforts to recruit employees for open positions at both locations, ofcials said. %  en LRMC will have its job fair from 7:30 / a.m. to 2 / p.m. Tuesday at the hospitals west lob by, 600 E. Dixie Rd., Leesburg. %  en TVRH job fair is slated for 12:30 to 7 / p.m. Thursday at the hospitals main lobby, 1451 El Camino Real, The Villages. Candidates will be offered on-the-spot interviews at both lo cations as we try to ll a variety of clinical and non-clinical positions, said Lori Faries, director of recruitment and human rela tions at Central Florida Health Alliance. Applicants are en couraged to dress pro fessionally and bring a current resume. Interested job-seekers can download an application and pre-register for the event at www.cfhaca reers.com by clicking on the Spring Career Days link. Those who pre-register and at tend one of the events will be entered into a drawing for a $100 Visa gift card.LEESBURGHospitals to host job fairsThe event will in clude food samplings from area restaurants, searchlights in the sky, a 1920s car for photo opportunities, a black and white photo booth, a 10-piece jazz band in Sunset Park and casino games with play money and prizes, English said. He added this will also be the rst time the events have live music. This year the party will again include the tasting event from Lake Receptions, according to English. The nights activities will take place on 4th Avenue, Alexander Avenue, in Sunset Park and on the chamber of commerces patio, ac GATSBY FROM PAGE A3 CHRISTINA VEIGAMiami HeraldMIAMI BEACH Sometimes, preservationists say, it takes a martyr: A lovely but old building has to fall to the wrecking ball before cities move to save historically signicant structures. Preservationists will soon have another martyr. The white mansion that sits at the tip of Miami Beachs Star Island and designed by Walter deGarmo, Flor idas rst registered ar chitect, faces imminent demolition. Its owners a plastic surgeon who calls him self the boob god and his wife, a star of The Real Housewives of Mi ami recently won a bitter, protracted legal battle to tear down their 1925 home to make way for a 20,000-square-foot estate. It will include six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, a home theater, game room, wine cel lar, ve-car garage and guest house. Just as the demolition of the Art Deco Senator Hotel in 1988 led to legislation aimed at protecting import ant buildings, a push to save the manse at 42 Star Island has forced Miami Beach to re-ex amine how it protects its historic resources. The home, which Leonard and Lisa Hoch stein purchased in a foreclosure sale, has be come a symbol of what preservationists say is a rush to tear down the Beachs historic homes and build massive new mansions on their ruins. With 42 Star held up as an example, Miami Beach ofcials engaged real estate agents, de velopers, homeowners and the historic pres ervation community in more than a year of meetings about the citys preservation laws. As a result, the city recently changed its build ing regulations to encourage homeowners to retain historically significant properties and to protect neighborhood character by restricting what kind of homes can be built in the rst place. Beach commissioners approved the changes in February. But some homeown ers and preservationists say the new laws dont go far enough, and might even have the opposite effect. The Miami Design Preserva tion League, which led the crusade to preserve 42 Star Island, is ask ing elected ofcials to reconsider especial ly because the changes were introduced shortly before the second public vote to approve the new rules. In city government, new laws usually re quire two public hear ings and votes before becoming nal. The league says the most controversial changes were not discussed publicly before the nal vote, though it is not Battle to save old homes not over C.W. GRIFFIN / AP Dr. Leonard Hochstein, right, and his wife, Lisa Hochstein, of The Real Housewives of Miami, stand with their dog Leo in front of a mansion they bought on Star Island in Miami Beach.unusual for chang es to be proposed be tween the rst and second readings of the laws. It just shows how pathetic it is that we cannot have the vi sion . to try to protect these homes a little bit better, said Nancy Liebman, a for mer city commission er who now heads Mi ami Beach United, a citywide homeowners organization. Liebman and others say that despite the new rules, old er homes will continue to be knocked down, and hulking structures that push from property line to property line will stand in their places. The preservation league wants Miami Beach to reconsider the changes, and is considering legal ac tion if it does not. Were a small town and we have our sym bols. And when cer tain symbols are lost, it kind of gets a com munity together and makes us think, What can we do to make sure this doesnt happen again? Ciraldo said. Somebodys got to do it. Its important to the city. cording to a press release. Proceeds from the events will go to continued res toration of the his toric train station owned and occupied by the cham ber, English said. Tickets for the event are $50 per person and can be purchased at www. MountDora.com or by phone at 352383-2165. Staff ReportLake County high school students cur rently taking Advanced Placement courses are encouraged to sign up for district-wide AP seminars scheduled on April 5 and 26 from 8 to 11 / a.m. and 12 to 3 / p .m. The April 5 seminars will be held at Leesburg High School and Lake Minneola High School, according to a press release. The April 26 seminars will be held at Mount Dora High School and East Ridge High School. The three-hour ses sions are designed to give students ex tra practice and review for AP exams. Students can select times and subjects they want to attend. Subjects of fered include English Language Composition, English Literature Composition, Calculus, Human Geography, U.S. History and World History. The Satur day AP seminars in clude test-taking strategies, practice exam questions and content overviews. They will be designed and taught by AP teachers from across the district. Students can receive more information from their AP teachers. There are 30 seats available per session, awarded on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Registration for the April 5 seminars runs through March 31 at www.surveymonkey. com/s/ap_seminar_ april5. Registration for the April 26 seminars runs through April 21 at www. surveymonkey.com/s/ ap_seminar_april26.LEESBURGLake students urged to attend AP seminars

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb Maureen texted Mi chael, but he seemed to have no idea what she was talking about. Around 8:30 a.m., Michaels younger brother, Mather Cravey, called Michael on the phone. Michael told Mather he was going through a McDonalds drive-thru as they were speaking. Mather asked his brother what he was doing and urged him to do whatever the police were asking of him or to go home if nothing was going on. Im being set up, Michael told him. Ive got to gure this out. Maureen and Mather had no idea that at the time Michael was speaking to them, multiple agencies in Gainesville were searching for him in connection with the stabbing of a Univer sity of Florida staff member in a campus parking lot. They didnt know then that over the course of the morning Michael would lead police on two danger ous high-speed chases through the city that ofcers abandoned when the chases became especially dangerous. Or that later he would crash into another car and escape into a nearby shopping center. And it wasnt until much later that police would tell them that Michael had run at an ofcer with a hatchet and that, seconds later, the ofcer red a volley of bullets at Michael, fatally wounding him. Details of the incidents that led to Michaels death on March 3, including his familys recollections and the observations of the man whom police say Michael stabbed, are contained in a 69page incident report released this past week by the University of Florida Police Department. After almost two weeks of searching, Maureen Cravey says she is not one step closer to understanding why why Michael left her house, why he reportedly stabbed that man, why he didnt listen to police. The only person who knows the answers, she says, is her son and he kept that truth with him when he died that Monday morning in the hospital after the shooting. The rst thing Cliff Preston noticed when he pulled into the parking lot behind Leigh Hall that Monday morning was the black Jeep. Preston, 59, and his wife, Beckie Preston, 60, both work at UF and park in the same parking lot around 6:55 a.m. every weekday morning. This morning was no different, except for the unfamiliar vehicle parked south of his, Preston told UPD Detective Ellen Duffy. As Preston was getting out of his blue car, he noticed the driver of the unfamiliar vehicle walking around the back of his car and looking at his license plate. Preston asked the younger man, who police have said was Michael Cravey, if there was a problem or if he needed help, the police report said. Do you have a gun? Cravey reportedly asked him. Preston told detectives he was confused and said no. Cravey then made statements about meeting Mike Potter, but Preston told him he didnt know a Mike Potter, the report said. Thats when Cravey reportedly pulled out a 4-inch folding knife and Preston told his wife to run. As Beckie Preston locked herself in the car, Cliff Preston ran toward the sidewalk yelling for help. Cravey caught up to him quickly and knocked him to the ground, the report said. UF student Karah Mechlowitz was waiting for her friend in the same parking lot when she saw Cravey chasing Preston and laughing. She thought it was prank until she saw him stab Preston in the neck, the report said. The whole time, Cravey seemed to be enjoying himself, she said. Cliff Preston told police he didnt remember how many times he was stabbed. Doctors later said Preston had three stab and slash wounds to his neck, two to his back, one near his collarbone and one on his right forearm. His shoulder blade and collar bone were also cracked during the attack, the report said. After the stabbing, Beckie Preston said Cravey came back to her vehicle and demanded she get out of the car, slamming his st on the passenger window. Evelyn Wilson, a senior operator at UPD, was coming into work when she saw Cliff Preston on the sidewalk. From her car, she asked him if he was OK, she said. No, I was stabbed, Preston told her, pointing twice at Cravey, who was near Prestons car. He tried to kill me. Cravey stared blankly at her, as though he was looking through her, Wilson said. Then he got into his Jeep and drove toward the entrance, going around Mechlowitz, who tried to block his path with her car. Wilson followed Cravey in her car down Buckman Drive to get his license plate, the report said. As other ofcers began chasing the man down Buckman Drive, Ofcer Timothy Peck applied pressure to Prestons wounds until paramedics arrived and took Preston to UF Health Shands Hospital. Beckie Preston ran to her husband and began yelling and shaking her hands as by stander Michael Santarsiero held her. Wilson said she stayed calm as she comforted Beckie Preston but later broke down. It was surreal, she said. Ive never experienced anything like it, and Ive been in dispatch 19 years. Ofcer Brian Smith was on his way to Leigh Hall when he saw the dark-colored Jeep speed past him on Stadium Road. Behind the Jeep, Smith saw UPDs Wilson following the Jeep in an attempt to get the tag. Ofcer Daymon Kizzar, who was behind Smith, positioned his police car to block Cravey and pointed his gun at him, the report said. Cravey ducked but continued driving as Kizzar yelled at him to stop. Smith and Kizzar began to pursue the Jeep down Stadium Road as Cravey ran red lights and stop signs, the report said. After making his way through the west side of campus, Cravey turned right onto Southwest 34th Street and headed north. Police chased him as he weaved through trafc going about 90 mph and drove on the wrong side, the report said. Ofcers stopped chasing Cravey around the 4300 block of Newberry Road because it became too dangerous, they said. Although they lost him, they managed to get his tag and connect their suspect to a name, the report said. Around 8:30 a.m., Cravey went through the drive-thru at the campus McDonalds on Northwest 13th Street and got a meal, the report said. Police nally spotted Cravey again at 9:42 a.m. near Tigert Hall on Southwest 13th Street. Deputy Chief Darren Baxley followed him down Southwest 13th Street, driving an unmarked police car, the report said. As they approached the entrance of the Kirkwood subdivision, Cravey made a sudden U-turn and started driving north. At the intersection of Southwest 13th Street and 16th Avenue, police said Cravey ran the red light, crossed in front of other vehicles and turned left onto 16th Avenue. As several police cars surrounded him at the intersection of Southwest 16th Avenue and Archer Road, Cravey drove across the median into the opposite lane and continued on Archer Road, the report said. Again, the pur suit had become too dangerous, according to police, and they let him speed away down Archer Road. Minutes later, police said Cravey crashed into another vehicle near Sonnys BBQ and Southwest 37th Boulevard. Bystanders told ofcials he had run into the Pier 1 Imports in Butler Plaza with a black-and-yellow hatchet. At 10:04 a.m., GPD Lt. Mike Schibuola approached Cravey with his gun pointed at him and ordered him to drop the hatchet. Cravey instead sprinted toward Schibuola with his hatchet raised, the report said. Schibuola red his weapon, shooting multiple times and hitting Cravey. Two women lying on the sidewalk near the PetSmart entrance said Cravey ignored precise commands from the police ofcer to show his hands and did not obey, the report said. After detaining Cravey in handcuffs, ofcers rolled him over and cut his shirt open. Craveys breathing was shallow, and he had blood coming out of his mouth, the report said. One ofcer per formed CPR as others tried to control the bleeding until paramedics arrived. STABBING FROM PAGE A3 DOUG FINGER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUPA Gainesville police ofcer opened re and killed Michael Cravey, 28, of Cross City, after Cravey crashed his Jeep into a vehicle, pictured here on Archer Road.

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Live Entertainment 12pm 9pm Inside Stage 3pm 12am Outside Stage Open at 11am www.okeefesirishpub.net Downtown Tavares Waterfront Entertainment DistrictCelebrating Our 30th Anniversary CHRIS BRUMMITT and JIM GOMEZAssociated PressKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia When someone at the controls calmly said the last words heard from the missing Malaysian jet liner, one of the Boeing 777s communications systems had already been disabled, authorities said Sunday, adding to suspicions that one or both of the pilots were involved in the disappearance of the ight. Investigators also examined a ight simulator conscated from the home of one of the pilots and dug through the back ground of all 239 people on board, as well as the ground crew that serviced the plane. The Malaysia Airlines jet took off from Kuala Lumpur in the wee hours of March 8, headed to Beijing. On Saturday, the Ma laysian government announced ndings that strongly suggest ed the plane was deliberate ly diverted and may have own as far north as Central Asia or south into the vast reaches of the Indian Ocean. Authorities have said someone on board the plane rst disabled one of its communi cations systems the Aircraft and Communications Address ing and Reporting System, or ACARS about 40 minutes af ter takeoff. The ACARS equip ment sends information about the jets engines and other data to the airline. Around 14 minutes later, the transponder that identies the plane to commercial radar systems was also shut down. The fact that both systems went dark separately offered strong evi dence that the planes disap pearance was deliberate. On Sunday, Malaysian De fense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein told a news conference that that the nal, reassuring words from the cockpit All right, good night were spo ken to air trafc controllers after the ACARS system was shut off. Whoever spoke did not mention any trouble on board. Air force Maj. Gen. Affendi Buang told reporters he did not know whether it was the pilot or co-pilot who spoke to air trafc controllers. Given the expanse of land and water that might need to be searched, nding the wreckage could take months or longer. Or it might never be located. Estab lishing what happened with any degree of certainty will probably require evidence from cockpit voice recordings and the planes ight-data recorders. The search area now includes 11 countries the plane might have own over, Hishammud din said, adding that the number of countries involved in the operation had increased from 14 to 25. The search was already a highly complex, multinational effort, he said. It has now be come even more difcult. The search effort initially fo cused on the relatively shallow waters of the South China Sea and the Strait of Malacca, where the plane was rst thought to be. Hishammuddin said he had asked governments to hand over sensitive radar and satellite data to try to get a better idea of the planes nal movements. With more information, he said, the search zone could be narrowed to an area that is more feasible. Malaysia is leading the search for the plane and the investigation into its disappearance. In the United States, Dan Pfeiffer, senior adviser to Presi dent Barack Obama, told NBCs Meet the Press that the FBI was supporting the criminal probe. Rep. Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Security subcommittee on counter terrorism and intelligence, said on ABCs This Week that so far theres nothing out there indi cating its terrorists. Investigators are trying to answer these questions: If the two pilots were involved in the disappearance, were they working together or alone, or with one or more of the passengers or crew? Did they y the plane under du ress or of their own will? Did one or more of the passengers man age to break into the cockpit or use the threat of violence to gain entry and then seize the plane? And what possible motive could there be for diverting the jet? Malaysias police chief, Khalid Abu Bakar, said he asked coun tries with citizens on board the plane to investigate their back grounds, no doubt looking for anyone with terrorism ties, avi ation skills or prior contact with the pilots. He said that the intel ligence agencies of some coun tries had already done so and found nothing suspicious, but he was waiting for others to re spond.Final words from jet came after communications system shutdown ERIC A. PASTOR / APU.S. Navy crew members on board an aircraft P-8A Poseidon assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines ight MH370 in the Indian Ocean on Sunday. HAMZA HENDAWIAssociated PressCAIRO Egypts crackdown on Islamists has jailed 16,000 peo ple over the past eight months in the coun trys biggest round-up in nearly two decades, according to previously unreleased gures from security ofcials. Rights activists say reports of abuses in pris ons are mounting, with prisoners describing systematic beatings and miserable condi tions for dozens packed into tiny cells. The Egyptian gov ernment has not released ofcial numbers for those arrested in the sweeps since the military ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in July. But four senior ofcials two from the Interior Ministry and two from the military gave The Associated Press a count of 16,000, including about 3,000 topor mid-lev el members of Morsis Muslim Brotherhood. The count, which is consistent with recent estimates by human rights groups, was based on a tally kept by the In terior Ministry to which the military also has access. It includes hundreds of women and minors, though the ofcials could not give ex act gures. The ofcials gave the gures to the AP on condition of anonymity because the government has not re leased them. The ood of arrests has swamped pris ons and the legal system. Many are held for months in police station lockups meant as temporary holding ar eas or in impromptu jails set up in police training camps because prisons are overcrowded. Inmates are kept for months without charge. My son looks like a caveman now. His hair and nails are long, he has a beard and he is unclean, said Nagham Omar, describing to the AP the conditions that her 20-year-old son Salahideen Ayman Mohammed has endured since his arrest in January while participating in a pro-Morsi protest. He and 22 others are crammed in a 3-by3 meter (yard) cell in a police station in the southern city of Assiut, said Omar, who visits him once a week. Mo hammed has not yet been charged. The government says the police, run by the Interior Ministry, have changed their ways from the era of autocrat Hosni Mubarak, when the security forces be came notorious for tor ture and corruption. The assistant inte rior minister for hu man rights, Maj. Gen. Abu Bakr Abdel-Karim, told the newspaper AlWatan in an interview last month that it is possible that there is some use of cruelty and said anyone claiming to be maltreated should le a complaint with either the ministry or the general prosecu tors ofce. But he said so far there had been no proof presented of maltreatment. BARBARA SURK and DIAA HADIDAssociated PressBEIRUT With rebels eeing into neighboring Lebanon, Syri an government troops and Hezbollah ghters captured a strategic town near the frontier Sunday, ousting opposition ghters from their last stronghold in the vital border area. Yabroud was a ma jor smuggling hub for the rebels trying to overthrow President Bashar Assad. The towns fall is the latest in a string of strategic gains by Assads forces that have consolidated authority in the past months in Syrias major cities, including the capital, Damascus. Militants from Leb anons Shiite group Hezbollah have been instrumental to As sads success on the battleeld, and support from the Irani an-backed ghters appears to have tipped the balance into the governments favor in Yabroud. However, the fact that opposi tion ghters ed into Lebanon, where Hezbollah is a major force, suggests the conict could bleed further into Syrias neighbor. The civil war already has ignited polarizing sectarian tensions be tween Lebanons Sunnis and Shiites. Its a good day for Assad, said Fawaz A. Gerges, director of the Middle East Center at the London School of Economics. He has not only survived the past three years, but his army is intact and on a rebound, with his allies Hezbollah rmly behind him. However, Gerges warned the fall of Yabroud will rever berate in neighboring Lebanon, pouring gasoline on sectari an divisions and likely bring more violence into the country. Outgunned by Assads army and Hez bollah, rebels aban doned their positions on the hills surround ing Yabroud overnight Sunday, collapsing the ghter ranks inside the town and allowing government forces to move in from the east shortly after dawn, a spokesman for the rebel coalition and the Syrian army said. Yabroud was an im portant supply line for rebels into Lebanon. The town overlooks an important cross-country highway from Da mascus to the central city of Homs. Theres no doubt Yabroud had big stra tegic importance, said Capt. Islam Alloush, a spokesman of the Islamic Front, a rebel co alition who had fought in Yabroud but were now streaming into Lebanon. The biggest immediate loss, Alloush said, would be that rebels now had no way of supplying ghters outside of Da mascus, where Syrian forces have surrounded a series of opposi tion-held areas, deny ing them food, power and clean water. Syrian Defense Minister Gen. Fahd Jassem al-Freij hailed the ar mys latest triumph while inspecting troops in Yabroud on Sunday. We are moving from one victory to another, al-Freij said in comments carried by state news agen cy SANA. He said the army troops are now chasing terrorists and gangs, and soon, all their hideouts will be destroyed. Syrian army ousts rebels from border stronghold AP PHOTOSyrian government forces ride a motorcycle around the main square after being deployed in Yabroud town, Syria, on Sunday.Egypt crackdown brings most arrests in decades AP FILE PHOTO In this Jan. 8 photo, Egypts riot police ofcers arrest a man, center, following clashes between supporters of Egypts ousted President Mohammed Morsi and riot police in Cairo, Egypt.

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hy should people talk to reporters? Its a ques tion thats seldom raised among news people, which is too bad, because its an import ant one. When you think about it, that question goes to the foundation of the entire edice of a free press. And that foundation, at the moment, is shaky. Lets back up. No honest press, whatever its sense of mission and however rm its legal protections, can outperform its sourc es. It cant be any better, stronger, braver, more richly informed, or more dedicated to broad public purpose than the people who swallow their misgivings, return the phone call, step forward, and risk embarrassment and reprisal to talk to the reporter. The mythology of journalism enshrines the sleuths, sometimes the editors, even the publishers, but sources are really the whole ball game. Press freedom is nothing more than source freedom, one step removed. The right of a news organization to tell what it learns is an empty abstraction without the willingness of news sources to tell what they know. Considering how important sources are, its stunning how little affection they get and how imsy the protections are that anybody claims for them. For starters, take the current national security cases, the unprecedented Espionage Act prosecutions that the Obama administration is pursuing against whistleblowers who gave news reporters secret information about governmental improprieties and illegalities. Nowadays prosecutors, for the most part, prefer to leave the press alone, and happily embrace the idea that even if an informant belongs in prison for handing over secrets for publication, the media organizations that actually make them public need not be answerable. That practice reects a cozy little entente between government and big media: The government avoids a public fuss, and the media buy themselves immunity at the cost of their sources safety. Of course, as a matter of mor al logic, ignoring the press is absurd. If publishing something causes real harm, those responsible should be called to account whether theyre former security contractor Edward Snowden or The New York Times. More important, if the publication was, on balance, a public benet nobody should be punished neither the mighty news organization nor its source. But news sources have few allies nowadays. And, its not just in the national security realm. If you look at digital era news prac tices, the overall environment for sources has deteriorated, and po tential informants have better reason than ever to keep silent. Consider the channels through which reporters and informants communicate. News organizations routinely post email addresses for their reporters. But does anyone believe an email to a journalist is private, in the way a phone conversation would have been a decade ago? Can the reporter even safeguard his or her own electronic correspondence? How many proprietors would pay to ght an outside lit igants attempt to see that correspondence even if its nothing more than some ex-boss trying to enforce a cockamamie non-disparagement clause that the source was pressured to sign on his way out the company door? And once the story is published, even if the source knew enough to speak carefully and his or her comments were accurately rendered and proper ly contextualized (no sure thing, that), what then? Then the sources contribution will be subjected to the boister ous give and take of the online multiverse, and his or her words, motives and integrity will be denounced or impugned, often by pseudonymous dingbats, some of them undisclosed hirelings. None of that is fun. To be sure, many informants are essentially professional sources, people sophisticated in handling journalists. Theyre ofcials who are in the game, who know how to negotiate terms beforehand, and who know that their continuing value to the reporter will guarantee that theyll be handled with consideration. But the source whos imperiled is the average Joe or Jane who has signicant information the pub lic should hear, but whose collaboration is a one-off thing; this person wont ever be on any reporters speed dial. This is the source who steps from obscuri ty off a cliff into public notoriety, hoping the landing will be soft, perhaps expecting that with publicity will come some measure of protection, believing that speaking out is doing the right thing. We dont make it easy for them. They arent honored in the press ethics books or the civics texts, and the sociologists dont bother studying how often they get hurt. Yet they matter, crucially. They understand that talking to the press is what a responsible per son does, an action that belongs among the indispensable elements of being a citizen, alongside the right to vote and the duty to give evidence in court. That people talk to the press at all is something of a miracle, and its time sources began to get the respect and attention from the media that they deserve.Edward Wasserman is dean of the University of California-Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He wrote this for McClatchy Newspapers. His website is www.edwardwasserman.com.OTHERVOICES Edward WassermanMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE The plight of the medias sources The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. It might be sound reasoning, but a Su preme Court decision this week on an ar cane legal-easement argument will likely have broad and regrettable consequenc es, particularly in the West, for the national movement to convert old railroad beds into bicycle paths. The case, Brandt v. U.S., is rooted in the General Railroad Right of Way Law of 1875, through which Congress established a uniform approach to granting easements on government land so railroad companies could extend tracks through the heart of the still-developing country. As the federal government deeded some of that land to homesteaders, the easements went with the property transfer, meaning that the new landowners were required to let the railroads use their property. But that 1875 law didnt specify what would happen to the easement if the railroad line was abandoned, which is what occurred in 2004 to a 66-mile track running from Lara mie, Wyo., to the Colorado state line. Two years later, federal lawyers led legal papers asserting that the easement reverted to the government, part of a move to convert the railroad bed into the Medicine Bow Rail Trail. The Brandt family, which owns 83 acres transected by the old railroad line, contested the governments claim, arguing that the easement died with the railroad. As a result, the government had no right to maintain the easement and thus no right to build a public bike trail on the familys land. The Supreme Court ruled 8 to 1 in favor of the Brandt family (with Justice Sonia Sotomayor dissenting), and its hard to nd fault with the courts logic. But it may have the unfortunate effect of encouraging private property owners to cut off public access to bike trails established over old railroad easements, and to thwart efforts to build new ones. The Rails to Trails organization behind the efforts says there are more than 21,000 miles of rail-trails nationwide, but no one has kept track of how many were developed on easements under the 1875 law, so its unclear how many miles will be affected. This is the regrettable repercussion of the courts decision. Bike trails have added signicantly to the recreational offerings available around the country, and if they were built on a now indefensible legal presumption, care must be taken to protect existing trails and create a mechanism for their continued development. That will likely take negotiations with property owners, and some federal park dollars to ensure the future of the affected trails. If so, it would be a good investment, and smart policy.From the Los Angeles Times.AVOICESupreme Court ruling may make it more difficult to establish certain bike trails Classic DOONESBURY 1971

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014www.dailycommercial.comTOURNEY TIME: NCAA brackets set / B3 Senden comes from behind to take title at Valspar John Senden, of Australia, holds up the trophy after winning Valspar Championship on Sunday at Innisbrook in Palm Harbor.CHRIS OMEARA / AP DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterPALM HARBOR John Senden ended more than seven years without a victory by making two late birdies, including a chipin from 70 feet on the toughest hole at Innis brook, for a one-shot victory on a wild and windy Sunday at the Valspar Championship. Senden, two shots behind going into the nal round, closed with a 1-under 70 for his rst PGA Tour win since the 2006 John Deere Classic. The timing couldnt have been better. The victo ry sends the 42-yearold Australian to the Masters next month. Kevin Na had a long birdie putt on the nal hole that would have forced a playoff, but it never came close. If I could just stay in the moment, I knew I was swinging well enough to give it a shake, Senden said. It took what he called a magic shot to shake loose from a trafc jam along the back nine of the Copperhead course. The tournament was up for grabs over the nal two hours, with nine players separated TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterMIAMI Ray Allen scored 14 of his 25 points in the fourth quarter on a milestone day for the veteran, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade each scored 24 and the Miami Heat beat the Hous ton Rockets 113-104 on Sunday to snap their worst skid in three years. Chris Bosh added 18 points for the Heat, who won for just the second time in their last sev en games. They were down 97-92 following a 3-pointer by James Harden midway through the fourth, then nished the game on a 21-7 run. Allen had 11 points during that late stretch, including a 3-pointer that allowed him to pass Allen Iverson for 21st on the NBAs scoring list. It was also the 750th regular-season win that Allen was a part of in his career. JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterBRISTOL, Tenn. Carl Edwards claimed a rain-soaked win at Bristol Motor Speed way, where weather wreaked havoc on yet another Sprint Cup race. The rain caused two delays lasting more than ve hours one that delayed the start Sunday by almost two hours, and one that stopped the race for 3 hours, 18 minutes. But when the drivers got on the track, they raced fast and furious. Much like the season-opening Day tona 500, which was stopped by rain for almost six hours, the threat of more bad weather bringing a sudden halt to the race forced the driv ers to go hard every single lap. So when a caution with 77 laps remaining sent most of the eld to pit road, Ed wards crew chief, Jimmy Fennig, made the call to leave his driv er on the track. The move gave Edwards Gators eke out 61-60 win over Wildcats for SEC title PAUL NEWBERRYAP Sports WriterATLANTA Topranked Florida capped a perfect run through the Southeastern Conference when Kentucky failed to get off a shot on its nal possession, allowing the Gators to escape with a 61-60 victory in the league championship game Sunday. Florida (32-2) built a 16-point lead early in the second half, but Kentucky nearly pulled off an improbable comeback to hand the Gators their rst loss since early December. Two missed free throws gave the Wildcats (2410) a nal possession, but James Young slipped trying to drive into the lane. The ball squirted loose, and the horn sounded while Flori das Scottie Wilbekin and Kentuckys Andrew Harrison dived for it. A giddy Wilbekin popped up and sprinted toward the Gators bench in celebration. Harrison rolled over with the ball, then put his hands Florida fan cheers against Kentucky during the second half. SEE SEC | B2SEE GOLF | B2Allen gets hot late as Heat top Rockets 113-104SEE HEAT | B2Florida also gets No. 1 seed in South for tourney PHOTOS BY STEVE HELBER / AP Florida head coach Billy Donovan holds the SEC championship trophy after the SEC mens championship game on Sunday in Atlanta. Florida won 61-60 and was later awarded the No. 1 seed in the South in the NCAA tournament.Carl Edwards leads Ford sweep at rain-soaked BristolSEE NASCAR | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 Sunday At Bristol Motor Speedway Bristol, Tenn. Lap length: .533 miles (Start position in parentheses)1. (12) Carl Edwards, Ford 2. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 3. (23) Aric Almirola, Ford 4. (37) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet 5. (5) Marcos Ambrose, Ford 6. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota 7. (6) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet 8. (10) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet 9. (38) Brian Vickers, Toyota 10. (20) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet 11. (26) Austin Dil lon, Chevrolet 12. (8) Greg Bife, Ford 13. (3) Matt Kenseth, Toyota 14. (2) Brad Keselowski 15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota 16. (9) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet 17. (30) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet 18. (36) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet 19. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet 20. (4) Joey Logano, Ford 21. (28) Paul Menard, Chevrolet 22. (16) David Gilliland, Ford 23. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet 24. (14) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet 25. (22) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 26. (34) Michael Annett, Chevrolet 27. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet 28. (35) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet 29. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota 30. (31) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet 31. (19) David Ragan, Ford. 32. (33) Alex Bowman, Toyota 33. (39) Travis Kvapil, Ford 34. (41) Parker Kligerman, Toyota 35. (13) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet 36. (29) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet 37. (24) Michael McDowell, Ford 38. (17) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet 39. (27) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet 40. (18) Cole Whitt, Toyota 41. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota 42. (40) Ryan Truex, Toyota 43. (43) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet Formula One-Australian Grand Prix ResultsSunday At Albert Park circuit Melbourne, Australia Lap length: 3.30 miles 1. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 57 laps, 1:32:58.710, 121.203 mph. 2. Kevin Magnussen, Denmark, McLaren, 57, 1:33:25.487. 3. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 57, 1:33:28.737. 4. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 57, 1:33:33.994. 5. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams, 57, 1:33:46.349. 6. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Force India, 57, 1:33:49.428. 7. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Ferrari, 57, 1:33:56.385. 8. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 57, 1:33:59.151. 9. Daniil Kvyat, Russia, Toro Rosso, 57, 1:34:02.295. 10. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Force India, 57, 1:34:24.626. 11. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Sauber, 56, +1 lap. 12. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber, 56, +1 lap. 13. Max Chilton, England, Marussia, 55, +2 laps. Not Classed 14. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia, 49, 1:34:32.241. 15. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 43, ERS. 16. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Lotus, 29, ERS. 17. Marcus Ericsson, Sweden, Caterham, 27, Oil Pressure. 18. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 3, Retired. 19. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes, 2, Engine. 20. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Williams, 0, Accident. 21. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Caterham, 0, Accident. 22. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Red Bull, 57, Dis qualied. Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Cleveland 14 3 .824 Seattle 14 5 .737 Tampa Bay 11 4 .733 Baltimore 10 6 .625 Detroit 10 7 .588 New York 10 9 .526 Kansas City 8 8 .500 Minnesota 7 7 .500 Oakland 8 8 .500 Los Angeles 8 9 .471 Houston 7 9 .438 Chicago 6 8 .429 Boston 7 10 .412 Toronto 7 10 .412 Texas 5 10 .333 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Miami 11 7 .611 San Francisco 11 7 .611 Pittsburgh 10 7 .588 Arizona 11 9 .550 Washington 10 9 .526 Chicago 9 10 .474 New York 8 9 .471 Colorado 8 10 .444 St. Louis 6 8 .429 Milwaukee 8 11 .421 Cincinnati 8 12 .400 Los Angeles 6 10 .375 San Diego 6 10 .375 Atlanta 7 12 .368 Philadelphia 5 12 .294 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Saturdays Games Tampa Bay (ss) 6, Pittsburgh 3 Tampa Bay (ss) 6, Toronto 3 St. Louis 6, Atlanta 2 Baltimore 2, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 1 Washington 2, Miami (ss) 1 Detroit 14, Houston 3 N.Y. Mets (ss) 3, Minnesota 3, tie Cincinnati 16, Milwaukee 4 N.Y. Mets (ss) 9, Chicago Cubs (ss) 4 Texas 16, Oakland (ss) 15 Arizona 4, Cleveland 2 Chicago Cubs (ss) 6, Kansas City 5 San Francisco (ss) 13, Seattle 6 L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5, San Diego 4 Colorado 4, L.A. Angels 4, tie, 10 innings Oakland (ss) 8, San Francisco (ss) 1 Philadelphia 4, Boston 1 Miami (ss) 5, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 0 Chicago White Sox 5, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 4 Sundays Games Minnesota 4, Miami (ss) 2 N.Y. Mets (ss) 10, St. Louis 4 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 4 Toronto 4, Baltimore 3, 10 innings Washington (ss) 4, Houston 3 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 7, Atlanta 4 Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 0 Detroit 2, Washington (ss) 1 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 7, Miami (ss) 0 Cleveland (ss) 3, Chicago Cubs (ss) 2 Texas 14, Chicago White Sox 8 Cincinnati 7, Oakland 6 Chicago Cubs (ss) 6, N.Y. Mets (ss) 3 Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 3 Cleveland (ss) 5, San Francisco 1 L.A. Dodgers 3, Colorado 3, tie Kansas City 9, San Diego 6, 10 innings Arizona 6, Milwaukee 5 Todays Games N.Y. Yankees vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, 7:05 p.m. Texas vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m. Tuesdays Games Houston vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Texas (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Texas (ss) at Surprise, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 10:05 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 37 28 .569 Brooklyn 33 31 .516 3 New York 27 40 .403 11 Boston 22 44 .333 15 Philadelphia 15 51 .227 22 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 44 19 .698 Washington 35 31 .530 10 Charlotte 33 34 .493 13 Atlanta 29 35 .453 15 Orlando 19 48 .284 27 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 49 17 .742 Chicago 37 29 .561 12 Cleveland 26 40 .394 23 Detroit 25 41 .379 24 Milwaukee 13 54 .194 36 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 49 16 .754 Houston 44 21 .677 5 Dallas 39 27 .591 10 Memphis 39 27 .591 10 New Orleans 26 39 .400 23 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 48 17 .738 Portland 43 23 .652 5 Minnesota 32 32 .500 15 Denver 29 37 .439 19 Utah 22 44 .333 26 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 47 20 .701 Golden State 41 26 .612 6 Phoenix 38 28 .576 8 Sacramento 23 43 .348 23 L.A. Lakers 22 44 .333 24 x-clinched playoff spot Saturdays Games New York 115, Milwaukee 94 Washington 101, Brooklyn 94 Memphis 103, Philadelphia 77 Indiana 112, Detroit 104, OT Atlanta 97, Denver 92 Chicago 94, Sacramento 87 Sundays Games Charlotte 101, Milwaukee 92 Phoenix 121, Toronto 113 Miami 113, Houston 104 New Orleans 121, Boston 120 (OT) Sacramento at Minnesota, late Dallas at Oklahoma City, late Utah at San Antonio, late Golden State at Portland, late Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, late Tondays Games Philadelphia at Indiana, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Chicago, 8 p.m. Utah at Houston, 8 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Miami at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Portland, 10 p.m. Washington at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Orlando at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. loss. Trophee Hassan II Leading Scores Saturday At Golf du Palais Royal Agadir, Morocco Purse: $2.08 million Yardage: 6,951; Par: 72 Third Round Alejandro Canizares, Spain 62-68-69 199 Seve Benson, England 63-68-74 205 Robert-Jan Derksen, Netherlands 69-70-67 206 Magnus A. Carlsson, Sweden 65-71-72 208 David Horsey, England 72-64-72 208 Shiv Kapur, India 70-71-67 208 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 71-67-70 208 Paul Waring, England 72-69-67 208 Richard Bland, England 69-70-70 209 Wade Ormsby, Australia 68-71-70 209 Marc Warren, Scotland 66-73-70 209 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 68-67-75 210 Jorge Campillo, Spain 71-69-70 210 TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 8:30 p.m.FS1 Lightweights, Jamie Kavanagh (15-1-1) vs. Andres Navarro (9-4-1); bantam weights, John Joe Nevin (0-0-0) vs. Alberto Candelaria (3-0-1); heavyweights, Alexis Santos (12-0-0) vs. Sylvester Barron (8-3-0); junior middleweights, Julian Williams (14-0-1) vs. Freddy Hernandez (30-6-0), at BostonMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.ESPN Preseason, St. Louis vs. Boston, at Fort MyersNBA 8 p.m.ESPN Oklahoma City at Chicago10:30 p.m.ESPN L.A. Clippers at DenverNHL 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Minnesota at Bostonover his face in anguish. The Gators extended their school-record winning streak to 26 games and awaited a sure No. 1 seed when the NCAA pair ings were announced Sunday evening. Patric Young and Michael Frazier II led Florida with 14 points apiece, while Wilbekin and Casey Prather had 11 each. Kentucky, also headed for the NCAAs, was paced by Aaron Harrison with 16 points. Young add ed 13, while Willie Cauley-Stein had 10 points, 11 rebounds and ve blocks. Florida led 40-30 at halftime and scored the rst six points of the second half for its biggest lead. But Kentucky used a 14-0 run to close within one point with just over 6 minutes remaining. It was a nail-bit er the rest of the way, the Wildcats coming oh-so-close to beating the rst team to go 18-0 in SEC play during the regular season. First, Andrew Har rison drove down the middle of the lane and put up a running jump er with 33 seconds re maining, but the shot clanked off the rim. Dorian Finney-Smith grabbed the rebound for the Gators. Kentucky was forced to foul three times to get Florida into the bonus. With 23 seconds left, Wilbekin missed the front end of a 1-and1, but Finney-Smith came up with anoth er huge rebound and was quickly fouled by the Wildcats. Finney-Smith missed the front end, too, giving Kentucky a chance to win it. Coming out of a timeout, the Wildcats didnt even get off a shot. SEC FROM PAGE B1 by three shots at one point, and Senden part of a three-way tie for the lead heading into the treacherous, threehole closing stretch at Innisbrook known as the Snake Pit. He went birdie-birdie-par, and it took all he could muster. After driving into the trees and playing short of the green on the 16th, Senden lofted a pitch with perfect pace and watched it tumble into the cup for one of only two birdies in the nal round. Equipped with a one-shot lead, he followed that with a 20-foot birdie putt on the 17th. Equally important was the par on the 18th, which was just as difcult as the birdies. He needed two putts up a ridge and breaking slightly to the right before it went swiftly down the slope and breaking to the left. The 40-foot putt settled inches from the cup. Senden nished at 7-under 277, the third straight tournament on the Florida swing won with a single-digit score under par. Na played in the nal group and made sure pace of play was only a memory. He missed a 3-foot bogey putt late on the front nine that sent him plunging down a crowded leaderboard, but he played bogey-free on the back nine and came up with a key par save from 6 feet on the 16th and a 15-foot birdie putt on the 17th to get with in one. But his pitching wedge on the 18th was too strong, and his birdie putt never had a chance. He closed with a 72. Scott Langley, hitting superb shots to account for the wind, didnt hit a green over the nal four holes and still managed to save par on three of them. The one bogey on the 16th hole, when he went long of the green from the middle of the fairway, proved costly. Langley was the only player who shot par or better all four days. He closed with a 70 to n ish alone in third. Robert Garrigus start ed the nal round with a one-shot lead, and that didnt last long. His tee shot on the third hole bounced off a lawn chair and against a tree, leading to a double bogey. He made another double bogey on No. 6 and went out in 41. And he went 26 holes with out a birdie. By the time he made a birdie, it was too late. Garrigus, now 0-4 with at least a share of the 54-hole lead, had a 75 to tie for fourth at 4 under. Senden last won a tournament at the end of 2006 in the Australian Open. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 PGA-Valspar Championship Scores Sunday At Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club, Copperhead Course Palm Harbor Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,340; Par: 71 Final John Senden (500), $1,026,000 72-71-64-70 277 Kevin Na (300), $615,600 70-68-68-72 278 Scott Langley (190), $387,600 71-69-69-70 279 Luke Donald (115), $235,600 71-72-67-70 280 Robert Garrigus (115), $235,600 69-66-70-75 280 Will MacKenzie (115), $235,600 73-70-68-69 280 George McNeill (90), $190,950 73-71-67-70 281 Graham DeLaet (73), $148,200 75-68-71-68 282 Matt Every (73), $148,200 68-71-72-71 282 David Hearn (73), $148,200 71-70-70-71 282 Matteo Manassero, $148,200 69-70-71-72 282 Justin Rose (73), $148,200 71-68-69-74 282 Gary Woodland (73), $148,200 72-71-70-69 282 Sang-Moon Bae (55), $94,050 72-73-71-67 283 Jason Dufner (55), $94,050 72-73-68-70 283 Bill Haas (55), $94,050 69-73-72-69 283 Chesson Hadley (55), $94,050 75-70-67-71 283 Charles Howell III (55), $94,050 71-70-74-68 283 Jason Kokrak (55), $94,050 74-68-68-73 283 Jim Furyk (49), $64,068 71-69-71-73 284 Freddie Jacobson (49), $64,068 70-71-70-73 284 Carl Pettersson (49), $64,068 71-70-71-72 284 Ted Potter, Jr. (49), $64,068 73-71-67-73 284 Jordan Spieth (49), $64,068 71-70-71-72 284 Ryo Ishikawa (43), $42,587 73-72-72-68 285 Cameron Tringale (43), $42,587 74-71-70-70 285 Brian Harman (43), $42,587 71-70-73-71 285 Charley Hoffman (43), $42,587 70-72-67-76 285 Morgan Hoffmann (43), $42,587 74-69-71-71 285 Russell Knox (43), $42,587 70-73-70-72 285 Josh Teater (43), $42,587 73-70-70-72 285 Robert Allenby (37), $31,540 73-71-70-72 286 Jonathan Byrd (37), $31,540 70-73-70-73 286 Erik Compton (37), $31,540 72-73-72-69 286 Ben Crane (37), $31,540 70-72-71-73 286 Justin Hicks (37), $31,540 72-72-70-72 286 John Merrick (37), $31,540 70-70-72-74 286 Chad Collins (31), $23,940 73-71-69-74 287 Harris English (31), $23,940 72-69-74-72 287 James Hahn (31), $23,940 69-74-70-74 287 Matt Kuchar (31), $23,940 73-71-69-74 287 Kevin Streelman (31), $23,940 73-69-71-74 287 Y.E. Yang (31), $23,940 73-72-70-72 287 Woody Austin (23), $15,892 71-71-74-72 288 Greg Chalmers (23), $15,892 68-72-72-76 288 K.J. Choi (23), $15,892 72-72-69-75 288 Ben Curtis (23), $15,892 70-74-71-73 288 Tommy Gainey (23), $15,892 69-72-72-75 288 Retief Goosen (23), $15,892 72-73-64-79 288 Peter Hanson (23), $15,892 75-70-69-74 288 Pat Perez (23), $15,892 68-71-77-72 288 Nicholas Thompson (23), $15,892 76-69-69-74 288 Brendon Todd (23), $15,892 70-75-70-73 288 James Driscoll (16), $13,053 73-70-68-78 289 J.B. Holmes (16), $13,053 71-74-71-73 289 Justin Leonard (16), $13,053 71-71-71-76 289 Michael Putnam (16), $13,053 69-72-74-74 289 Stuart Appleby (10), $12,426 71-73-74-72 290 Darren Clarke (10), $12,426 71-74-73-72 290 Jerry Kelly (10), $12,426 76-68-71-75 290 D.H. Lee (10), $12,426 74-70-70-76 290 David Lingmerth (10), $12,426 73-72-71-74 290 Brandt Snedeker (10), $12,426 72-73-71-74 290 Michael Thompson (10), $12,426 72-69-72-77 290 Stephen Ames (4), $11,742 72-70-72-77 291 Jason Bohn (4), $11,742 71-74-73-73 291 Nicolas Colsaerts (4), $11,742 69-73-76-73 291 Padraig Harrington (4), $11,742 75-70-72-74 291 Marc Leishman (4), $11,742 75-69-74-73 291 Paul Goydos (1), $11,229 75-69-73-75 292 Davis Love III (1), $11,229 74-70-71-77 292 Rory Sabbatini (1), $11,229 70-72-72-78 292 Daniel Summerhays (1), $11,229 77-68-71-76 292 Sean OHair (1), $10,944 73-71-74-78 296 John Mallinger (1), $10,830 71-73-74-80 298 Harden nished with 30 points for Houston, which got 21 points and 14 rebounds from Dwight Howard. Patrick Beverley added 15 points and Ter rence Jones scored 12 for the Rockets, whove dropped three straight. Wade helped spark the run with a 50-foot assist that set up a 3-pointer from the left corner by Allen, who also made three tech nical-foul free throws down the stretch. One came after a defensive three-second violation, another following Houstons second delay-of-game whistle on the afternoon, and the third when Beverley was hit with a technical in the nal minute. James hit a pair of free throws with 46 seconds left for his rst points of the nal quarter, and that sealed it for Mi ami, which moved back within three games of Indiana for the No. 1 spot in the Eastern Conference. Allen took another pass from Wade to score inside with 3:31 left, giving Miami the lead for good. Allen now has 24,370 points, two more than Iverson. The rst surprise of the day came about 20 minutes before tipoff, when the Heat an nounced Greg Oden who appeared in his 100th career game, nearly seven years after being the No. 1 overall pick in the 2007 draft would be starting at center. It was the sec ond start of the sea son for Oden, who also opened a game against Chicago last month in part because James was unavailable while deal ing with a broken nose. Oden had three rebounds in the games rst three minutes, and the Heat never trailed in the rst half, going into the break with a 57-54 lead. James had 15 in the half, Bosh and Wade each had 11, but both of Miamis point guards starter Mario Chalm ers and backup Norris Cole were saddled with three fouls. Houston missed nine of its rst 11 shots of the second quarter, helping Miami extend its lead to 44-33. But Houston got right back into it, rst off a fortunate bounce when an alley-oop from Chandler Parsons bounced off both Howard and Jones before nding its way to Harden, who hit a 3-pointer. Jones added a conventional three-point play on the next Houston posses sion, and just like that Miamis lead was down to ve. Harden and Howard combined for 15 in the third, and Houston led 81-79 entering the nal 12 minutes. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 the lead on the restart with 70 laps remaining. He had no trouble pulling out to an easy lead and had victo ry in sight when the yellow caution lights came on with two laps remaining. No one was sure what the caution was for and Fennig even won dered if water damage might have inadvertently caused the lights to turn on. Then the sky sud denly opened and NASCAR had no choice but to declare the race over. NASCAR said after the race that the lights malfunction triggered the nal caution, and ofcials made it a full caution because operation of the lights was comprised. Edwards led Roush Fenway Racing team mate Ricky Stenhouse Jr. across the n ish line. Aric Almirola from Richard Petty Motorsports was third as Ford drivers swept the top three spots one day after a Ford team won the Twelve Hours of Se bring sports car race for the rst time since 1969. Tony Stewart sal vaged a horric start to the weekend he qualied 37th by nishing a sea son-best fourth. Marcos Ambrose was fth as both of RPMs drivers nished inside the top ve. Pole-sitter Denny Hamlin was sixth in the highest-nishing Toyota and was fol lowed by Hendrick Motorsports teammates Jeff Gordon and Kasey Kahne. Bri an Vickers was ninth and rookie Kyle Lar son rounded out the top 10. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MARK LONGAssociated PressFloridas path to the Final Four is lled with college basketball blue bloods. The Gators earned the tournaments overall No. 1 seed after beating Kentucky 61-60 in the Southeastern Conference championship game Sunday. Coach Billy Donovans team, which has won 26 consecutive games, is the top seed for the rst time since winning the second of back-to-back nation al titles in 2007. Its kind of what we ex pected, said guard Scottie Wilbekin, the SECs player of the year and tournament MVP. It feels good. Obvi ously, it doesnt matter when the games start playing. Florida (32-2) will open tournament play Thursday in Orlando, in the South Re gion. The Gators will face the winner of Albany (1814) and Mount St. Marys (16-16), two 16 seeds that play Tuesday night in Day ton, Ohio. Weve got to stay locked in and not let it get to our heads, Wilbekin added. Floridas road to Dal las could get considerably tougher after that, with No. 2 seed Kansas, No. 3 seed Syra cuse and No. 4 seed UCLA all in the South. The Jayhawks, Orange and Bruins have a combined 15 national titles and plenty of experience on college basketballs biggest stage. Anybody in the country can come out and win it, Florida center Patric Young said. Kansas (24-9) opens the tournament Friday against 15th-seeded Eastern Kentucky in St. Louis, a relative ly short trip for the Jayhawks. Eastern Kentucky (24-9) beat Belmont in the Ohio Valley Conference nal to earn its eighth NCAA tournament appearance and rst since 2007. Behind star freshman An drew Wiggins, Kansas cap tured its 10th straight Big 12 regular-season title but lost to eventual champion Iowa State in the tourna ment seminals to dash any hopes of a No. 1 seed. The Jayhawks likely will be with out 7-footer Joel Embiid un til the tournaments second weekend. The Big 12 defen sive player of the year has a stress fracture in his lower back. You obviously worry about winning a two-game tournament, Kansas coach Bill Self said. You dont wor ry about what you could po tentially worry about next week. In our regional, you got the best team in the country, a team that four weeks ago was thought to be the best team in the country. You have a team in UCLA thats one of the hot test teams in the country. You could make a case that if everybody in our region al plays to their ceilings, it could be the hardest region of any of them. No. 7 New Mexico (27-6) and No. 10 Stanford (21-12) also meet in St. Louis. Its Stanfords 17th NCAA berth and rst since 2008, short ly before coach Johnny Daw kins was hired from Dukes staff to replace Trent Johnson. Last spring, athletic direc tor Bernard Muir said Stan ford needed to reach the NCAAs to show progress or Dawkins future could be in jeopardy. Coach always tells us never pay attention to whats being said, senior forward Josh Huestis said. One thing Ive really learned about Coach Dawkins is he can stay very fo cused despite the chaos around him. Syracuse (27-5) will face 14th-seeded Western Michigan (23-9) on Thursday in Buffalo, N.Y. The Orange gets a chance to end its late-season fade. Syracuse was 25-0 and No. 1 in the country last month, but lost four of six to close the regu lar season. The Broncos (23-9) are in the eld for the rst time since 2004 after beating Toledo for the Mid-American Conference championship. No. 6 seed Ohio State (259) and 11th-seeded Dayton (23-10) also play in Buffalo. UCLA (26-8) and 13th-seeded Tulsa (21-12) play Friday in San Diego. The Bruins, in their rst season under coach Steve Al ford, upset Arizona in the Pac-12 tournament championship game Saturday. Tulsa closed with 11 con secutive wins under sec ond-year coach Danny Manning, a former Kansas star whose alma mater also is in the region. The Golden Hurricane se cured their berth by win ning the Conference USA tournament, earning their rst NCAA tournament berth since 2003. San Diego also will host No. 5 seed Virginia Com monwealth and 12th-seeded Stephen F. Austin. The Lumberjacks (31-2), who have won 28 in a row, won the Southland Conference tournament and are making their rst NCAA tournament appearance since 2009. VCU (26-8) lost to Saint Josephs in the Atlantic 10 championship Sunday. The Rams are making their fourth consecutive trip to the NCAA tournament and have at least one win in each of their rst three trips. They advanced to the Final Four in 2011. Florida has come up just short of the Final Four the last three years, losing to Butler (2011), Louisville (2012) and Michigan (2013) in regional nals. The senior-laden Gators have had their sights set on the Final Four all year and now the last leg of the journey begins. Weve still got work to do, forward Dorian Fin ney-Smith said. Now weve got to start from the bottom and work our way back up.Gators No. 1 seed in NCAA South Region STEVE HELBER / AP Florida center Patric Young (4) celebrates with forward Will Yeguete (15) after the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Kentucky in the SEC title game on Sunday in Atlanta. Florida won 61-60.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL JOEDY MCCREARYAssociated PressGREENSBORO, N.C. Malcolm Brogdon scored 23 points and No. 6 Virginia claimed its rst Atlantic Coast Conference tournament title since 1976 by beating No. 7 Duke 72-63 on Sunday. Tournament MVP Joe Harris added 15 points and hit the backbreaking 3-pointer with just under 2 minutes remaining for the top-seeded Cava liers (28-6). They shot 45 per cent, pestered the Blue Devils into 38 percent shooting and used a late 12-3 run to pull away and claim the sec ond ACC tournament title in school history. Jabari Parker scored 23 points on 9-of24 shooting for the third-seeded Blue Devils (26-8), who were making their 31st appearance in the championship game but were denied their ACC-record 20th title. The Cavaliers came to Greensboro off of their rst outright reg ular-season title since 1981, and were trying to do something not even Ralph Sampson could do. It had been a long time 38 years since Wally Walker led Virginia to its only previous ACC tourna ment title. Now that trophy will have some company. With its pack line defense clicking and holding Duke 13 points below its scor ing average, Virginia was in control for most of the day, yet could never get any separation until the nal 2 minutes. Akil Mitchell hit a shot to make it 61-57, then stripped Parker at the other end to set up Harris wide-open 3 in transition that ex tended the lead to sev en and had Dukes Rodney Hood fuming. Harris gave Duke a nal chance when he rushed up a shot and Quinn Cook countered with a 3 with 1 min utes left to pull the Blue Devils back within four. Brogdon then drove through the Duke defense for a momentum-shifting layup that made it 66-60 with just over a minute to play and caused Duke as sistant Jeff Capel to tell ingly slump back on the bench in exasperation. No. 6 UVa tops No. 7 Duke 72-63 for ACC championship BOB LEVERONE / AP Virginia players celebrate after defeating Duke for the ACC title on Sunday in Greensboro, N.C. MICHAEL CONROY / AP Players on the Michigan State bench react to their victory in the Big Ten Conference tournament on Sunday in Indianapolis. MICHAEL MAROTAP Sports WriterINDIANAPOLIS Adreian Payne scored 18 points and Gary Harris and Branden Dawson added 15 each to lead No. 22 Michigan State to its second Big Ten tournament title in three years with a 69-55 upset of No. 8 Michigan on Sunday. The third-seeded Spartans (26-8) are getting healthy and will have some momen tum entering the NCAA tournament with four wins in ve games. Let me tell you, we beat two great teams. Both of them are worthy of a one seed, coach Tom Izzo told CBS, referring to the Wolver ines and No. 12 Wiscon sin. I hope they dont drop much because they are both deserving. Those guys have done it all year long. Top-seeded Michigan (25-8) was led by Big Ten player of the year Nik Stauskas with 17 points and Derrick Walton Jr. had 11, but the Big Ten regular sea son champs had their seven-game winning streak come to an end. It was never really close. Michigan State took control with an ear ly 12-0 run, led 38-29 at halftime and opened the second half with an 8-0 spurt to make it 46-29. The Spartans had lost their previous two meetings with Michigan this season but werent about to lose again. For the rst time all season, Michigan State started the same ve players for a fth straight game. Harris, who hurt his left shoul der early in the second half, returned later. Harris, an Indiana na tive who never got to play for a state basket ball title at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, took advantage of this oppor tunity. He scored 13 of his 15 points in the rst half. Dawson, another Indiana native who was named the tournaments Most Outstanding Play er, scored 10 of his 15 points in the second. Michigan State has four tournament titles since the Big Ten started the event in 1998 two in Indy and pulled off a rare double by win ning the mens title less than a mile from Lucas Oil Stadium where the Spartans claimed the leagues football cham pionship in December. RACHEL COHENAP Sports WriterNEW YORK Langston Galloway scored 19 points and hit yet another huge 3-pointer, and Saint Jo sephs beat No. 23 VCU 65-61 on Sunday to win its rst Atlantic 10 tournament title since 1997. The fourth-seeded Hawks (24-9) arrived in Brooklyn on the NCAA tournament bubble. They all but clinched an at-large berth with a win over fellow bub ble team Dayton in Fri days quarternals on Galloways go-ahead 3, then made that moot by capturing the con ferences automatic bid. The second-seeded Rams (26-8) have reached the A-10 tour ney nals in both years in the league but lost both times. Fellow senior Ronald Roberts had 15 points on 6-of-6 shooting and 11 rebounds for Saint Josephs. Rob Brandenberg led VCU with 18 points, but Galloway got just enough separation on him to hit a tiebreaking 3-pointer with more than two minutes left. Briante Weber missed a 3 on the other end, and the Hawks broke down the Rams pres sure for Roberts dunk on a pass from DeAn dre Bembry for a 59-54 lead. Bembry, a freshman, had a brilliant defen sive game and a horric offensive outing in Saturdays seminals. But against VCUs Havoc full-court press, he kept his poise, scoring 13 points with eight assists and just two turnovers. Halil Kanacevic, the third senior starter for Saint Josephs, won tournament MVP honors after another allaround performance. The forward from near by Staten Island had 11 points, 14 rebounds, four assists and two blocks. All ve starters played at least 37 minutes, with Galloway and Kanacevic going the full 40.St. Josephs beats VCU 65-61 to earn A-10 championship SETH WENIG / AP Saint Josephs Langston Galloway, left, moves past VCUs Juvonte Reddic during the rst half of the Atlantic 10 Conference tournament on Sunday at the Barclays Center in New York.No. 22 Michigan St. upsets No. 8 Michigan to gain Big Ten title

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 CASH PRIZES! On Course Contests! Platinum Level Sponsor Gold Level Sponsor Silver Level SponsorCall Dwight Graber 750-4850 or Ed Riddle 267-5883 Registration Deadline: March 17th Million Dollar ShotHole-in-One CONTEST 2014 In Memory of Margaret Witt In Honor of Mildred Witt March 29th Arlington Ridge 7:00am Breakfast & Sign In 8:00am Shotgun Start$80 media sponsor Your First Choice Beyers Funeral Home, Inc. Guys Roong of Lake County, Inc. Jims Golf Shop-The Villages Logan Sitework Contractors, Inc. Page Theus Funeral Home Highland Lakes Dental Riddle-Newman Engineering, Inc. CenterState Bank, Leesburg Ro-Mac Lumber & Supply, Inc. Inquirers Sunday School Class-MUMC Lenhart Electric James C. & Vickie Lenhart Leesburg Concrete Company, Inc. Integrated Financial Services of Central FL Subway Leesburg Sunrise Kiwanis Club J. Cecil Shumacker, PA Arlington Ridge Golf Club Harbor Hills Country Club Leware Construction CompanyLassiter-Ware Insurance Co. The Main Street Dentists Morrison Opportunity Thrift Shop Barnett Tire Service, Inc.Lil & Bob Schauseil & Lynne S. VonVillasTommy & Jeanine Treadway Lowell & Patricia Bond Peter Marzek, MD-Plastic Surgery The Moffett Family BB&T Bank Brodie Golf Mfg. Co. @ Harbor Hills CC Rich & Louise McFarlandJoel & Mildred Witt Climate Control Munns Sales & Service NBA Associated Press NEW ORLEANS Anthony Davis set career highs with 40 points and 21 re bounds, and Eric Gor don made two crucial free throws in overtime to lead the New Orleans Pelicans to a 121120 victory over the Boston Celtics on Sunday night. Tyreke Evans added 26 points and Gordon had 19 for the Pelicans, who had lost two consecutive games. Gordons foul shots with 9.4 seconds remaining gave the Peli cans a 121-117 lead. Davis did not score in overtime but controlled the middle by grabbing six rebounds. He became the rst player in franchise his tory to have at least 40 points and 20 rebounds in the same game. His previous high for points was Friday night when he scored 36 in a loss against Portland. Davis 21 rebounds erased his previous ca reer high of 19 against Orlando on Jan. 26. Kris Humphries scored 16 points for the Celtics, including a long jumper to send the game into over time. Jared Sullinger added 14 points and Avery Bradley had 12. Davis jumper with 1.7 seconds remaining in regulation lifted the Pelicans to a 112-110 lead. But Humphries responded with a fade away from deep in the right corner.BOBCATS 101, BUCKS 92MILWAUKEE Kemba Walker scored 21 points and Al Jeffer son added 16 of his 20 in the second half to help the Charlotte Bob cats beat the Milwaukee Bucks 101-92 on Sunday for their fourth straight victory. Gary Neal added 18 in his return to Milwaukee after the Bucks traded him to Charlotte last month. Gerald Hen derson scored 14 as the Bobcats matched their longest winning streak of the season, set Feb. 18-22. Brandon Knight scored 21 points and Ramon Sessions added 18. Jeff Adrien and John Henson each had 12, but it wasnt enough to stop the Bobcats from their rst sweep of a season series from the Bucks. Neal led the way in the fourth quarter as the Bobcats slowly pulled away. He scored seven the Bobcats rst 12 points and nished with 10 in the period. Josh McRoberts hit a 3-pointer and then Neal added a jumper that gave Charlotte an 88-85 lead. Khris Mid dleton answ ered with a basket to pull Mil waukee within one, but Jefferson scored on a hook shot and layup to end any chance of the Bucks win. SUNS 121, RAPTORS 113TORONTO Markieff Morris had 16 points and 14 rebounds, Ger ald Green scored 13 of his 28 points in the fourth quarter, and the Phoenix Suns beat the Toronto Raptors 121113 on Sunday for their second straight victory. Goran Dragic scored 19 points, Eric Bledsoe had 14 and P.J. Tuck er 11 for the Suns, who had lost three of four. Bench scoring was a big edge for Phoenix, whose reserves outscored Torontos 59-11. Kyle Lowry had 28 points and 13 assists, as Toronto lost at home for the rst time since a triple-overtime de feat to Washington on Feb. 27.Davis powers Pelicans past Celts JONATHAN BACHMAN / AP Boston Celtics center Kris Humphries (43) and New Orleans Pelicans center Greg Stiemsma (34) go for a rebound during the second quarter in New Orleans on Sunday. BRIAN MAHONEYAP Basketball WriterNEW YORK Even before meeting with him, Knicks players like Phil Jacksons hir ing to run their franchise. Im a chess play er, so that was a power move right there, Car melo Anthony said. So now were going to see whats the next move. But that was a great power move. The Knicks havent ofcially announced it yet, holding off un til a press conference Tuesday morning. But the 11-time champion as a coach was already the focus before and after the Knicks 11594 victory over Milwaukee on Saturday. Jackson was on the Knicks only two championship-winning teams, in 1970 and 1973. He went on to win 11 more rings as a coach with the Chi cago Bulls and Los An geles Lakers, and the players are condent he can be a winner next as an executive. Phil knows what to do and how to build teams and how to win, thats the most important thing, Anthony said. When you know how to win, whether youre a coach or whether youre in the front ofce, that stands out. Jackson will be responsible for trying to keep Anthony when the All-Star forward becomes a free agent this summer.Knicks players eager to see what Jackson can do AP FILE PHOTO In this undated photo, New York Knicks Phil Jackson warms up. Jackson will be introduced as the newest member of the Knicks front ofce on Tuesday.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. FORMULA ONE NEIL FRANKLANDAP Sports WriterMELBOURNE, Australia Elation turned to desolation for Daniel Ricciardo at the Austra lian Grand Prix on Sun day after the Red Bull driver was stripped of his rst podium nish due to a techni cal breach at Formula Ones season opener. Ricciardo initially nished second to Mercedes driver Nico Rosberg to become the rst homegrown driver to take to the podium in the 29-year history of the Australian GP. The celebrations did not last long as F1 stewards said his car breached fuel-ow rules introduced this year which limit cars to 100 kilograms of fuel during the race. World motorsport governing body FIA subsequently disqualied Ricciar do elevating McLaren drivers Kevin Magnussen and Jenson Button to second and third. Red Bull immediately announced it will ap peal. Shortly after the end of the race, FIA For mula One technical delegate Jo Bauer said Ricciardos car had exceeded consistently the maximum allowed fuel ow and referred the matter to stewards. More than three and a half hours later, after Ricciardo had left the track, the stewards disqualied the Australian saying Red Bull had not only breached techni cal regulations by exceeding the allowed fuel ow, but also had disregarded instructions before the race to change the fuel ow sensor and during the race to reduce the ow. The operation of the fuel-ow sensors had been a source of dispute between the teams and the FIA com ing into the rst race. After the ndings, Red Bull said Incon sistencies with the FIA fuel ow meter have been prevalent all weekend up and down the pit lane. The team and (engine-maker) Renault are condent the fuel supplied to the engine is in full compli ance with the regulations. Horner further pro claimed the teams innocence to reporters saying; It is no fault of Daniel. I dont believe it is the fault of the team. I am extremely disap pointed, quite surprised ... hopefully through the appeal process it will be quite clear that the car has conformed at all times to the regula tions, he added. We would not be appealing unless we were extreme ly condent that we have a defendable case. The Albert Park crowd earlier offered Ricciardo a thunderous applause as the stood on the podium in his rst race with Red Bull. Its a bit overwhelming for now, but just an unbelievable day, the 24-year-old said short ly after. Australia staged its rst Grand Prix of the F1 era in Adelaide in 1985, with the 1986 edi tion marking the nal race of Australian world championship winner Alan Jones. Mark Webbers rst F1 race was the 2002 Australian GP, and since then Australian fans have waited impatiently for a top-three nish at Albert Park. MARK LONGAP Sports WriterGAINESVILLE John Force and An tron Brown were look ing to make history Sunday at the NHRA Gatornationals. Those plans went up in smoke quite literally. Force and Brown spun their tires in the nals, helping Robert Hight and Doug Kalitta record easy victories in the top two divisions. Hight beat his boss, 16-time champion Force, in the Fun ny Car division. Kalitta topped 2012 series champion Brown in Top Fuel. Im racing the alltime leader, John Force, 16-time champ, my boss, the guy that gave me the opportu nity to do this, Hight said. Its tough to race him. ... Its also a lot fun when you actual ly race in the nal and its your teammate and you guys can just go up there and have some fun. The 64-year-old Force was trying to become the fth driver in Funny Car history to win as the No. 16 qualier. He opened the day by upsetting top qualier Cruz Pe dregon, then knocked off Del Worsham and daughter Cort ney Force to reach his second nal in three events this year. That set up the Force nal. Daniel Ricciardo stripped of first podium finish at Aussie Grand Prix ROSS LAND / AP Caterham driver Kamui Kobayashi of Japan runs off the track after he crashed with Williams driver Felipe Massa of Brazil at the Australian F1 Grand Prix on Sunday at Melbourne, Australia.Kalitta, Hight win top two divisions at GatornationalsNHRA

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014CANCER: Patients nd romance, support online / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressA volunteer slips her arms into a gauzy yellow hospital gown and approaches a medical crib holding a tiny newborn hooked up to noisy machines. OK, she says, with a smile. Baby time. That means cuddle time in the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Chicagos Comer Childrens Hospital. Here, as at sever al other hospitals around the country, strangers offer a simple yet powerful service for newborns too tiny or sick to go home. When nurses are swamped with other patients and parents cannot make it to the hospital, grandmas, empty-nesters, college students and other volunteers step in. They hold the babies, swaddle them, sing and coo to them, rock them, and treat them as if they were their own. A plaintive cry signals time to get to work. You can see them calm, you can see their heart rate drop, you can see their little brows relax, said Kathleen Jones, 52, a cuddler at the Chicago hospital. Theyre ghting so hard and theyre undergoing all this medical drama and trauma. My heart breaks for them a little bit. Newborn intensive care units are noisy, stressful environments. There are babies born extremely prematurely, or with birth defects and other illnesses. Some are too sick to be held but not too sick to touch. Cuddlers reach a nger inside their incubators and stroke tiny bare bellies. Scientic evidence on benets of cuddling programs is scarce, but the benets of human touch are well-known. In one study, gentle caressing or placing a hand on preterm infants reduced levels of stress hormones. Other recent studies have suggested touch may benet preemies heart rates and sleep and per haps even shorten their hospital stays. Studies also suggest that early negative experiences including pain, stress and separation from other humans may hamper brain development, while research in animals shows that positive interactions enhance brain growth, said Dr. Jerry Schwartz, medical director of medical neonatology at Torrance Memorial Medical Center near Los Angeles. The benet at the most supercial level is obvious, he said. A baby is crying, moms not there, the nurse is busy with Volunteers cuddle babies too sick or tiny to leave hospital PHOTOS BY MARTHA IRVINE / AP ABOVE: Evelyn Steadman, 7 months old, sleeps on the chest of her grandmother, Kathleen Jones, at the babys home in Crete, Ill. Jones, 52, is a longtime volunteer who cuddles newborn babies in the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Chicagos Comer Childrens Hospital. BELOW: An infant grasps Jones hand at the hospital. SEE CUDDLE | C4 THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer support group meetsThe Prostate Cancer Education and Support Group meets at 7 p.m., Wednesday at the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Drive in The Villages. It is free and open to all men, residents and non-residents. For details, call Tom Vajda at 352-446-4194 or Vince Felton at 352-259-7712. TAVARES Health seminars offered at Waterman HospitalFlorida Hospital Waterman will offer a series of seminars on an array of health topics. They are: Living with Knee Pain? You May Not Have To, with Samire Guru, DO, orthopedic surgeon, from 1 to 2 p.m., Thursday at the Mattison Conference Center at Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way in Tavares. Call 352-323-3635 to register and for information. LADY LAKE Essential Tremor Support Group scheduled to meetThe Essential Tremor Support Group will meet at 2 p.m.,March 26 at St. Timothy Ministry Building, 1351 Paige Place, Lady Lake, with information for those aficted with the disease. Guests will learn about methods of coping, medications, and will gain support and understanding. For information, call Ken Taylor at 787-3866 or email at kstaylor62@usa2net.net.TAVARES Extension office to offer diabetes prevention series The Lake County Extension ofce will offer a three-part series on diabetes prevention from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays beginning on March 26 and continuing on April 2 and 9. The series will cover how diabetes affects your health, risks and symp toms, improving nutrition, planning meals and more. It will be held at the UF/IFAS Lake County Extension ofce, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares. Registration is required at https:// lakediabetes2014.eventbrite.com or by calling Julie England at 352-3434101, ext. 2719. TAVARES Sexual abuse support group scheduled to meetAdult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, which offers the 12step program, meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday in Tavares. For information, call 352-4067485, or go to www.siawso.org.

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com NEAL ST. ANTHONYStar TribuneMINNEAPOLIS Preceptis Medical is a small company that has big designs to clip the costs and boost the safety for the 1.3 mil lion young children who undergo ear-tube surgeries each year. This is a simple sto ry, said Preceptis CEO Steve Anderson. Weve come up with an ef fective tool that allows us to do the procedure under conscious sedation, avoiding the ex pense of the operating room, and avoiding the risk to young children of general anesthesia. Anderson said the procedure can be done in a clinic or doctors ofce for up to 70 per cent less than the near ly $5,000 cost of the traditional surgical repair for infected ears in youngsters. Dr. Frank Rimell, a veteran pediatric sur geon and a principal investigator testing the Preceptis tool at the University of Minneso ta-Amplatz Childrens Hospital, said sever al ear-nose-and-throat surgeons are testing the tool at four Twin Cities hospitals. Rimell said he expects to pres ent the results of more than 50 procedures on children up to 5 years old at a May confer ence of pediatric ear, nose and throat sur geons in Las Vegas. I want to get this procedure out of the oper ating room for multiple reasons, he said. The goal, Rimell said, is to see if we can make this most-common procedure among children in the United States even safer. And it is a safe procedure now. But even safer and more economical. We want to remove potential risks and make it cheaper. Rimell said he is not a shareholder in the company and receives less than $5,000 annually for coordinating clinical trials. The tests are being done using nitrous oxide, considered a safe and inexpensive sedative used by dentists for decades, instead of a general anesthetic. The Preceptis tool was invented by Dr. Michael Loushin, a part ner in Twin Cities An esthesia Associates and an adjunct faculty member at the Univer sity of Minnesota med ical school, and Keith Leland, a mechanical engineer and vice pres ident of research and development at Pre ceptis. The company is headquartered in Plymouth, Minn. According to Precep tis, the procedure re quires one precise pass at the ear, taking about 10 seconds. The patient remains awake, though sedated with the nitrous oxide. All these things are converging in a way that makes the timing right for us, said Anderson, 51, a biomedical engi neer who has worked for several medical-products companies. Anesthesiologists, who stand to lose busi ness, might not like this procedure. But its the type of innovation that can help reduce health care costs. With the Preceptis tool, surgeons are able to insert the tube on the rst pass 85 to 95 percent of the time, Rimell said. The goal is to get this done in the ofce, so the family doesnt have to come to the ofce for the initial visit and then come back for surgery and the child doesnt have to go for a surgical physical, and the parents dont have to take off a second day of work, Rimell said. Lets get the tube done that day. Preceptis, which still needs federal regulato ry clearance for its product, hopes to be selling it by fall and would likely be a candidate for acquisition by medical-products companies looking to extend their product lines.Expensive ear-tube operations on kids moving out of the operating room MARY MACVEANLos Angeles TimesLOS ANGELES Eri ca Eihl speaks in a voice that her kindergartners can hear only if they are as quiet as the church mice in childrens sto rybooks. And with a couple of squirrelly exceptions, they stay that quiet for 15 or 20 minutes a near eternity as Eihl guides them to use all their senses to consider a piece of apple, with di rections such as, Look ing at the apple, look on the outside. Look on the inside. Remember, keep it in your palm and just look at it. When she asks for their input, she gets raised hands and comments such as: It smells juicy and ap ple-y and I see little tiny white spots. Mindful eating is just one of the mind ful practices at the Cit izens of the World char ter school in Mar Vista, Calif., with 160 children in kindergarten through second grade. We are mindful and heartful is the golden rule at the school, and the children prac tice mindful meditation in the mornings and after recess, among oth er times, often with 30 seconds to ve minutes of silence time when they can notice what is happening at the mo ment without judgment, which is at the heart of mindful meditation. Theyre very receptive to it, Eihl says. Theyre so emotional at this age. Its allowing them to have the tools to be expressive about their emotions and cope with them. Educators are catching on to the benets of mindful meditation. Indeed, schools in 48 states, and hundreds of schools in California alone, have programs, says Chris McKenna, the program director at Mindful Schools in Emeryville, Calif., which has trained more than 2,000 teachers in mindfulness. One of the reasons its growing is because the kids are under so much pressure now, with the testing culture and the pressure put on them by teachers and parents to be successful, says Vicki Zakrze wski, the education director at the Greater Good Science Center at University of California-Berkeley, which studies the science be hind mindfulness. Mindfulness helps with focus, attention and calming the emo tions, she says. Teach ers and administrators, she adds, see it as a tool that also can boost school performance. Schools are abso lutely paying attention to the benets of mind fulness, says Lorraine Hobbs, the director of youth and family pro grams at the Univer sity of California-San Diegos School of Medicine and Center for Mindfulness. When we can teach kids to pay attention to this inner landscape, they can learn kindness and compassion. Mindful meditation came to schools in part as they began to fo cus on social and emotional aspects of learn ing, sometimes to cope with bullying and other behavioral problems, Zakrzewski says. We focus so much on cognitive development, but the science is showing us how im portant the social and emotional aspects are. Its more than just a nice experience, says Sharon Salzberg, a meditation teacher and author of the re cent book Real Happiness at Work. Just like with adults, stress takes its toll, and we need to take breaks and regroup. And maybe its as simple as remembering to breathe. Hobbs says its im portant for the adults in a school to develop a mindfulness practice. You cant teach what you dont know, she said. That might look like a daily meditation time, perhaps 20 minutes or so, using directions downloaded onto an iPhone. Or taking part in a group meditation program. And it also means teachers are aware of mindful ideas throughout the day. Several experts likened the current statement of mindfulness to the way people ap proached yoga a few decades back. These days, childs pose is part of everyday lan guage, but not so long ago yoga was seen as kooky or, worse, some odd religious practice. Like yoga, mindfulness is rooted in contem plative religious practice and like yoga has been secularized and is used as a complementary medical treatment for many conditions, as well as in schools.Mindful meditation at school makes kids go ommm CHERYL A. GUERRERO / MCT Kindergarten teacher Erica Eihl, center, leads the meditation while Lucas Gold, left, and Husam Arab concentrate on deep breathing at Citizens of the World Mar Vista in Culver City, Calif.

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted MEREDITH COHNThe Baltimore SunBALTIMORE Trueheart4me was 5-foot9, spiritual but not re ligious, and a social drinker, her Match. com prole read. She loved the water, traveling and a good belly laugh. There was one more thing she labeled full disclosure. She had cancer. I was very lucky in that it was caught early and un derwent surgery in ear ly November that was a complete success, the prole read. The can cer is now gone, how ever, Ill be in treatment for the next several months. I expect to be nished up in ear ly May, at which time I am also hoping my hair grows back! Patti Tolley had an aggressive breast cancer, invasive ductal car cinoma, which had spread to her lymph nodes. Shed recently had a large tumor removed, along with her right breast and the nodes, and endured three of about 16 chemotherapy sessions. Bored one night, the executive assistant at the technology company Ciena bought a onemonth subscription to the online dating site. She typed out the pro le, posted pre-diagnosis pictures of herself and hit enter. Her friends joked about who might be attracted to a woman who was bald as a cue ball and missing a breast. But Tolley felt she was more than the sum of her missing parts and she might get a chuckle from some of the mens responses. Several men responded as well as one wom an, Jodi Kinney, who had uploaded a prole for a friend, a nice man without a computer or interest in Internet dat ing. Kinney printed out several proles of bru nettes, which she knew her friend liked, and Tolley. Tolley was a blonde when she had a full mane, but Kinney just knew she was the one for David Parrish. Parrish, who worked for Kinney at the De partment of Defense, agreed to email, via Kinney, but Tolley initially put him off. She had some other dates lined up. But those didnt work out, and the two began emailing each other. The rst time they talked on the phone, he told her he had his own full disclosure. She never imagined he would say that he had had a double mastectomy ve years be fore to treat his breast cancer. Only 1 percent of cases diagnosed are in men, though it is the most common kind of cancer diagnosed in women, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. I told her I was ne and shed be ne, too, Parrish said. Their rst date was a comfortable dinner and the Diane Keaton movie Because I Said So. It was like wed known each other for 30 years, Tolley said. Tolley was soon sick and tired from chemotherapy, and dates consisted of Parrish bringing chicken noodle soup to Tolleys Dundalk, Md., home. When they did leave the house together, it often was Parrish escorting her to appoint ments, procedures and surgeries including some that had nothing to do with can cer. He once got a lit tle loud with a nurse he didnt feel was at tentive enough when Tolley was nauseated. And any time she had stitches, hed make her ride home in the back seat, believing she was safer if they were in an accident. When hes got your back, you know you are covered and in good hands, she said. Bless his heart. One night during her treatments, she fell asleep on the sofa and her wig slid to the side, revealing to Parrish for the rst time her hair less head. He said he couldnt take his eyes off her. Dr. Kristen Fernan dez, director of the Breast Center at Med Star Franklin Square Medical Center in Baltimore, and Tolleys sur geon, said she shares Tolleys story often with other patients who tell her they are frightened of facing cancer alone. Fernandez doesnt necessarily recommend signing up on a dating site, but she said patients should talk to someone. She points them to a hospital pro gram that matches breast cancer survivors with the newly diagnosed, created with the help of a survivor and the Maryland afliate of the Susan G. Komen foundation. They dont provide medical advice, but they provide support, Fernandez said. There are questions as a sur geon I cant answer, like what it feels like when your hair falls out. Wed be foolish if we thought we could cut the cancer out and thats it. Tolley and others say that support is essen tial, no matter where it comes from or how grand the gestures. Research shows that social support can help reduce stress and anx iety during treatment and that survivors with social connections for example, through marriage, close friendships or membership in a religious organi zation may have fewer physical limita tions and less (of ) a decline in their abili ty to perform daily ac tivities, said Kelly Kesler, Komen Marylands community health di rector. Sometimes the simplest gestures, taking someone soup, just being there, may be what matters most to your friend or loved one, she said. Tolley said support came from all corners of her life, from friends, family, bosses and doctors. Cancer now plays a big part in Tolleys life. She continues to take medications and gets annual checkups. She also spends time talking to others scared by their diagnosis, mostly refer rals from friends and family. And Parrish remains in a leading role. Seven months after they met, she moved into his Severn, Md., home. Eight months later, he proposed with a diamond ring that his mother had won in a bingo game and had him stash away when he was a teen. And on Sept. 9, 2009, she became Patti Tolley Parrish. LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO These days, its faster and cheaper than ever to decipher a persons en tire DNA. But a small study suggests that looking for disease risks that way may not be ready for the masses. For one thing, the research found that gene variants most likely linked with signicant disease were the least likely to be accurately identied. And analyzing the mass of data from the DNA scan is a daunting task, researchers said. Some experts think more targeted genemapping is a better approach. But while whole genome sequencing is mostly done for research, it has far-reaching potential for diag nosing and treating genetic diseases, even in people with no known risks. The new results show its promise and its challenges. Stanford University researchers performed whole genome se quencing in 12 healthy people. Most of the millions of genetic vari ants they found were of uncertain signicance, although one wom an was found to have a high genetic risk for cancer. DNA is recovered by a simple blood test and deciphered by ma chines. The difculty lies in interpreting the ndings and guring out which variants are important and which ones can be ignored. That takes days of so phisticated follow-up lab tests and interpre tation to reveal poten tially meaningful ge netic information, the researchers said. Dr. Euan Ashley, a senior co-author and Stanford associate professor of medicine and genetics, likened the technology to an un ruly teenager who has grown up very fast. Theres huge potential. This paper is like pa rental tough love we have to be really honest about where we are in order to bring it up to clinical standards, he said. For the test, they used two commercially available instruments to sequence the DNA the second one to validate the initial nd ings. But less than onethird of variants in in herited disease genes were conrmed. Several specialists including medical geneticists, genetic counsel ors and a pathologist examined the ndings and recommended fol low-up tests. Medical intervention was considered appropriate for one participant, a woman with no fami ly history of breast or ovarian cancer found to have a genetic variant strongly linked with those diseases. That nding led to surgery to remove her ovaries and increased breast cancer screening.Gene mapping study shows promise, challengesBreast cancer patients find romance and support online ALGERINA PERNA / MCT David, right, and Patti Parrish are pictured in their Severn, Md., home with their two labs, Mojo and Babe. They met when Patti who had just started chemotherapy, and was bald and sick, put an ad on Match.com. David had survived breast cancer.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 other sick babies, and its an unpleasant life experience to be cry ing and unattended to, and, voila! A cuddler comes over and the baby stops crying. Nancy Salcido has been a cuddler at Tor rance for a year. Her two daughters are grown, and she considers her three-hour cuddling shifts good practice for any potential grandchildren. I just kind of hold them close to me ... and talk to them, shar ing my day, or give them little pep talks, Salcido said. One of the nurses has nicknamed me the baby whisperer. Parents typically must consent for their babies to be part of cuddling programs, and cuddlers must undergo background checks and training before starting the job. At Chicagos Comer hospital, that includes lessons in how to swaddle babies tight to make them feel safe and how to maneuver around intravenous lines, as well as instruction in hygiene including frequent hand-washing. At the Golisano Childrens Hospital in Rochester, N.Y., one cuddler is a young man born there prematurely long ago. He just wants to come and give back, said Chris Tryon, a child life specialist at the hospital, part of the University of Rochester Medical Center. Comers cuddlers include 74-year-old Frank Dertz, a retired carpenter who heard about the program from his daughter, a Comer nurse. Its quite a blessing for me. I get more out of it than the babies, I think, Dertz said. Kathleen Jones says the same thing. A mother of three grown daughters and grandmother of two little girls, she joined Comers program in 2012, working a couple after noons a week or sometimes at night. They say that I look so in love with them when Im there, but I cannot NOT crack an ear-to-ear smile whenever I pick that little guy or girl up. Her love seems obvious as she rocks a strangers newborn, the baby girls tiny hand gripping Jones nger. Ooh, I want to take you home, Jones coos. Youre so brave ... youre going to be feisty, arent you? Jones used to wonder why parents or other relatives ar ent comforting their own babies. But then, in August, her youngest grandchild was born deaf, with brain damage doctors say was caused by a virus her mom contracted before birth. Evelyn Steadman spent her rst three weeks at Comer, and got cuddling care while she was there. While family members visited often, life happens and you cant sit by a bedside for three weeks, Jones said. Erica Steadman had had a C-section, and already had her hands full with a toddler at home. She was being held and loved and watched over, she said. I felt a great sense of relief from that. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com Hospital volunteer Gertie Rogers, 84, places a newborn baby back into a bed in the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Chicagos Comer Childrens Hospital in Chicago.MARTHA IRVINE / AP CUDDLE FROM PAGE C1 I just kind of hold them close to me ... and talk to them, sharing my day, or give them little pep talks. One of the nurses has nicknamed me the baby whisperer.Nancy Salcido

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 PEANUTS Comicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, March 17, the 76th day of 2014. There are 289 days left in the year. This is St. Patricks Day. Todays Highlight in History: On March 17, 1776, British forces evacuated Boston during the Revolutionary War. On this date: In 1762, New Yorks rst St. Patricks Day parade took place. In 1861, Victor Emmanuel II was proclaimed the rst king of a united Italy. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt rst likened crusading journalists to a man with the muckrake in his hand in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington. In 1912, the Camp Fire Girls organization was incorporated in Washington, D.C., two years to the day after it was founded in Thetford, Vt. (The group is now known as Camp Fire USA.) In 1943, the Taoiseach of Ireland, Eamon de Valera, delivered a radio speech about The Ireland That We Dreamed Of. In 1950, scientists at the University of California at Berkeley announced they had created a new radioactive element, californium. In 1959, the Dalai Lama ed Tibet for India in the wake of a failed uprising by Tibetans against Chinese rule. In 1966, a U.S. midget submarine located a missing hydrogen bomb which had fallen from an American bomber into the Mediterranean off Spain. In 1969, Golda Meir became prime minister of Israel. In 1970, the United States cast its rst veto in the U.N. Security Council. (The U.S. killed a resolution that would have condemned Britain for failure to use force to overthrow the white-ruled government of Rhodesia.) In 1973, U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm, a freed prisoner of the Vietnam War, was joyously greeted by his family at Tra vis Air Force Base in California in a scene captured in a Pulitzer Prize-winning AP photograph. In 1988, Avianca Flight 410, a Boeing 727, crashed after takeoff into a mountain in Colombia, killing all 143 people on board. TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: My 11-year-old daughter, Gwen, just started middle school. She makes good grades, but shes strongwilled. Do kids grow up instantly when they start middle school? She wants to know if she can have a boy friend. I told her not until shes 15. Now shes irting with girls who ask her out. I told her to stay away from them, not because they are lesbians but because they are not good girls. They are always in trouble. Gwen says Im too strict, and if I dont stop, she will run away. I adopted her at birth (it was an open adoption), and she recently asked me if I am going to place her for adoption. She was worried that I would. I am very concerned that she is hanging out with the wrong crowd. Any advice? SAN ANTONIO MOM DEAR MOM: People do not grow up instantly. I know individuals who are immature at 50, and Im sure if you think about it, so do you. From what you have told me about your daughter, its clear that she is far from the grown-up she thinks she is. If you do not to want Gwen to date until she is older, that is your prerogative as her par ent. The gender of the person isnt the issue. Because you think she is hanging out with the wrong crowd, my advice is to make sure she is so busy she doesnt have time to spend with them. Involve her in activities outside of school sports, scouting, music or art. And be sure she knows that you are her forever mother and that nothing she could ever do will lessen your love for her. DEAR ABBY: I am a 29-year-old woman who has just been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. It has been a rough road, and Im lucky to have such a supportive group. My issue is, when people nd out, I get comments such as, Wow, you look so GOOD! or suggestions on how I should cure my MS. The most hurtful one was that its all in my head. While I appreciate that folks care and want to offer help, I nd their comments offensive and hurtful. How do I respond tactfully, but also convey that they should think twice before they say these things? UPSET IN OHIO DEAR UPSET: If someone says you look good, respond as you would to any other compliment say thank you. When someone offers a suggestion about how you can cure yourself, youll save yourself a lot of frustration if you keep in mind that the person cares enough about you to try to be helpful. All you need to do is smile and say rmly that you are under a doctors care and are satised with the treatment you are receiving. And, heaven for bid, if another individual tells you that your MS is all in your head, remember that just because a jackass brays does not mean you have to pay attention.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Mom worries about 11-year-old daughter who acts grown up HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 17, 2014: This year you have to handle more than your share of demands, especially those that revolve around a special relationship. You often might not see eye-to-eye with this person, but you learn from each other, as you both present different perceptions that are valid. If you are single, you probably will date a lot and grow as you come to understand the various personalities you will encounter. If you are attached, the two of you benet from a healthy dose of nostalgia and romance. You often wonder how much to give and when to say enough. Open up this discussion with your signicant other. LIBRA is as romantic as you are. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your instincts will help you understand a partners needs. Be sensitive with this person. Understand that you are capable of expressing unusual sensitivity. You might nd that youre not sure how much to give. Dont worry so much. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Speak your mind. Youll sense a change in someones demeanor that could concern you. Your efforts count more than you realize. Approach a new situation in a different way. Follow your intuition in order to understand someones odd reaction. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You might not be in the right shape to do what is necessary. You could nd that relating to a child tests your need to control a situation. Your creativity will charge any interaction you have now, especially if you embrace the Irish spirit. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Pressure builds, and there are many options. You have a strong intuitive sense today that youll put to good use. A discussion with a loved one could be difcult. You might feel as if you have too much to juggle. Try to eliminate as much as you can. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Make yourself available for calls and others inquiries. You will receive a spontaneous invitation that you would like to say yes to, but it might force you to cancel other established plans. Only you can choose what to do. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could go overboard when celebrating your Irish heritage. You might feel uncomfortable when someone brings up your tendency to overindulge. A loved one might try to encourage this conversation, which he or she could feel is long overdue. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might have made plans with someone, only to have a last-minute change occur. Be gracious, because you could have an even better time opting to be spontaneous. If you are unattached, the potential for meeting someone is high. Remain open. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) If you want to let go of a tradition or decide not join in with the shamrocks and the green-themed parties, make it OK. It is quite possible that you need a break from ritu als, so take it. By next year, you might be more up for participating. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Youll want to network rather than be stuck in a meeting. You will feel 100 percent Irish today. Nothing makes you as happy as being the party animal you naturally are. Try to get started early on in your Irish transformation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You naturally take the lead, whether youre at work or out socializing. Take charge be it at the ofce, at home or at a St. Paddys Day party. You might need to distance yourself from a situation that is evolving into a power play. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your mind wanders today to distant places or people far away You might need to carefully rethink a decision involving a personal matter. How much are you really willing to reveal? Recognize a limitation instead of avoiding it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) One-on-one relating could take a new twist, as long as you remain open-minded. Perhaps a discussion about long-term goals with a close friend needs to happen. You also might nd that you are changing your values and the kind of people you are with. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbnrf nttfb rfnftbtbt fbnft tbbb ffftfb tbtfbtb n tbtb tbtbntn ffnntb ntntfb ffntbnt btbnttnt brb nrrtnnbntbt fb b r n b t b t b b n b n f r f n n t t b t b r r b t n t n r b b n f n t t b t n t n t tntt nf nrb nrf f t t r n b t n t b n t b t t b b r t r t b n r b f t b t b n f r n b t b t n n n t b t n b t b t t t f tb n t btbn nttbtbrr btntnrbbnfn tttntnt tnt nntf n nrf n b n r r f n f t b b n t b t t b t b n n t n f t t r n b t n t b n t b t t b b r t r t b n r b f t b t b n f r n b n t b t n n n t b t n b t f b n t t n t b t t n b b b t n f r n b r t b f t t b r t t f t r t t t t t n f ttbnntn nt tbtb rb tn tb n t btbn rfnftbtb nfbnftt tbbbtn ff ftfbtb fbt ntbtb tbtbnn ntbntnt tntb ttb bnrrtnnb ntbtfb rnbtbtbbnbnfrfn rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 17, 2014 rfntb r f n t b n f b n f f b n r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r b r r f f r t b f n b b f f n n f f f r r r r r r r r b f r f n r r f b r r r f rrr f rr r r b f n f r f f n b f f f t f f r r r r b r f f f n r r r f r r r f f r r f r b r r f f rbr rrtrrrr rr f f frb bbrr rfr rrrrrr r r r r r f n rr r r r rb rrrr rr rrrr rrr r rbr rr rrr rbb r b r n f r r rrr r f r r r f b f n f f r r f fr r r r r f f r f r f r rr rrb r rrbrb rbf bbr rr r r b r r f f f b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f b b r n r r f n r r r r r f r n t r r r r r f r r f r f r b f r r r r r r n f f b r r r r r rrb rr r t f r r f f t f r r r r t f rrr rrr rr rb b b r r r r rf f r r r r r r ntn rr rtfrb trrr r r r bf nf f t r b r r b t r f r f r r r t r r f f t r b b b f t r f r f r f bnnt f b r f r r r r n r r r f r r r f r f nf t n t b f r r r b r r r r b r b r b b r r b r f f n f r r rrr rr r b f r t n f f t r r r f f r b b r r b r r r r r r r r r b r r r b b r r r r r r r r r b r r b r r r r r r r r r f b fnf n f tr bf nff f n f f f f f n f n f f f f n f n f f f f f f n n f f f f n t n n b f f n n b nf n t r r r r r bnf b nf f r r rbbf rrrb fr rrrrrb b rbbrr f b rbbb n f f rr rb frtrb bt rrr rbr f rbbbf r rrr rrrrr rr brbr rrrr rtrbr b nf f n f b f n f t nf fbfb tf nft tf nfffn fnf ttf nf tff fn nf nff nt ft t rrr rb rbb bbr rrr bb b bbr rrr rr rrr r rbbr rrr rrbrr rrrb rrr rrrb rb rr rrr bb brrrrr r b bbrbrr r f t t n f f b f f n n f t rb f rr rrrr bffb bbb brb rrrb br rbr r r rb n f f rrrrb rrf b b f b f rr rrr rbrrrr rr f f b f b t b n f f n b f rr rrbbr rrr r rb rr fff r r r r r r r r r r b r b b r r r b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b r r r r r r r r b rbbf rr rr bf rb nf n n n f n f n b f t f n ttbffbb b nff nff nffb f n f tr rrrb br rrr rfbrbr ttbffbb nff nffn nnff nfff fn fbffnr r rr rrf rbr rbrbfb rb rrrr b f b f b f n f f b t f b n n n f n f n b f f fftbb b tnf f n n tr rrrr rrrbb r r rrfbrb rfftb tnb nn ffn ftbntbn t btft tbf br b rrrrr frb rbrbrb rbb rrrr rrrb n b n b t b f n b f b n t n f t f t t b n t n b n t n b n t n b n t n t n b n t n t t b t n b t t b f t n ft nfnfbb fnf ff rr br r rr rrrr rf rr rr rbrbnb fff rbrr f r ftr rr rfrbf rrr b r r b f r b r b r b r b b r r r r b r r r r r r r r b rbbf rr rbb bf rb nf

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Monday, March 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rfntbnrf rf ntbfrrrf brf rrfr rr r bb f rrf r frr r rb ftf f tbrf nr rf rrr frr bfrr brf r brrnbf rf rrbrf rf ntbf f nt b rrff rrrt rr n frbrr t f nb nffr bb rnttrr bfb ff brrr brf rf t b trf r f rbrtb b rf rbftrf brbr rt rrrfb b t f n n r f r brtrr rf tf rff tf tb tffb brf rr nt frrb brfbtfrr brr r f t n r f f t r f r r tbfr bt nbrrr r r tbfr rfnrr rrbrf fn n rrfbrf f frrr n rrrf t ff ffr rr r r ntr rbbrf r n n rtrr b fr bbrr nf rtrr r f b t b t f f b r r bfb trr n f b f fr frr rfttr t n ff r ftrb bn ff rrrrbrf ftrb bbrf rr bbrf b r r f r r f f f f f r ff trfr b n rrt nb nbrrbrf rfrrrf nb brf frr brf rrrf ffb brf rrbrfr r r tbrr bfb bfb r r n rf nrf r rb rr rrrrbrf bffrr brf rrbrf nbrrbrf ntbfb tbrrrrbrf brfr f nb r trff bbrff rtnrf tt ffbrfb bbrf fbf fbrf ftn r f t f b r r b f f r f r r f r t t r f t r r t t b f r b b b t r bfbf r b f f f f f f r rf rb rrf tnf bbrf bbrf f f b f ff rbrrfrftrf rtrr rbfn rrrtfrt tt r r t f r t r t r b r r r t t b r t rbrrrfbrtf bfrrfrt rrf fbffff rffr rtfrrbf fbrfrfr frrfr brtfff rrfrbr f b f r r f f b r t f r b r t r f t r r b rffrtrf rrfff r r f b r f b r f r f f r r t r f n r b b f r n t t r r b r t r f r f r f b f r f r b r f r r r r b r t f r f f r b r f f r n r b r t t r f r r r b r f f r f b f b f r r f b r r n n n r f t t