Daily Commercial

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Daily Commercial
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Halifax Media Group
Publisher:
Rod Dixon
Place of Publication:
Leesburg, Floirda
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00019282:00157


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of service. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 REED HOLDS ON TO WIN CADILLAC CHAMPIONSHIP, SPORTS B1LEESBURG ART FESTIVAL: Man with local ties wins Best of Show, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Doctors hope for a cure for baby born with HIV, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 10, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 69 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C2 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C2 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.79 / 56Pleasant with sunshine. 50 JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LYNN BERRYAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine Russian President Vladimir Putin on Sunday defended the separatist drive in the disput ed Crimean Peninsula as in keeping with international law, but Ukraines prime minister vowed not to relinquish a single centimeter of his countrys territory. Over the weekend, the Kremlin beefed up its military presence in Crimea, a part of Ukraine since 1954, and pro-Russia forces keep push ing for a vote in favor of reuni cation with Moscow in a ref erendum the local parliament has scheduled for Sunday. President Barack Obama has warned that the March 16 vote would violate inter national law. But in Moscow, Putin made it clear that he supports the referendum in phone calls with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Minister David Cameron. The steps taken by the legitimate leadership of Crimea are based on the norms of international law and aim to ensure the legal interests of the population of the peninsula, said Putin, according to the Kremlin. Following an extraordinary Sunday meeting of the Ukrainian government, Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk announced that he will meet with Obama in CHRIS BRUMMITT and EILEEN NGAssociated PressKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Vietnamese aircraft spotted what they suspected was one of the doors of a missing Boe ing 777 on Sunday, while troubling ques tions emerged about how two passengers managed to board the ill-fated aircraft using stolen passports. Interpol conrmed it knew about the stolen passports but said no authorities checked its vast databases on stolen documents be fore the Boeing jetliner departed Saturday en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Warning only a handful of countries routinely make such checks, Interpol MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comCowboy bar ghts, steers and live western mu sic helped the annu al Sumter County Fair get off to a great coun try start this weekend. Celebrating its 97th year, the fair opened Friday and runs through March 15. The festivities include rodeos as well as amusement rides, auctions, beauty pageants, a smorgasboard of cotton candy, candy apples and other car nival food. But beef shows that allowed students to parade their livestock in front of judges were one of the highlights this weekend. This allows kids to show off their prized animals, said Larry Wells, an ofcial with the beef show. Filled with mostly heifers, more than 90 head of cattle participated in the beef shows Saturday. Many of the students, wearing jeans, boots and cowboy hats, who brought the cattle to the show, washed and groomed their animals in the holding barn as they prepared to lead them into the show ring. Cheyanne White, a 15-year-old South Sumter High School student, could be seen running an or ange comb through her black-colored heifer named Belle ear ly Saturday afternoon. She raised the animal on her familys Oxford farm. She smiled when asked what got her interested in the show. My father was a cowboy, she said. Many of the students were from Future Farmers of America (FFA), and were making return appearances. Show veteran Matthew Staples, a South Lake High School student and vice president of the district FFA, brought his heifer, Cassidy, from his familys 12-acre farm. We get to show how well we have taken care of our animals and how well-trained they are, Staples said. Saturdays show also included the debut of Webster Elementary Schools Cody Walton and D.J., his heifer. Walton is a member of 4H, a youth development and empower ment program. I just thought it would be fun, said BUSHNELLWestern sketches, livestock shows open county fair in style PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIALABOVE: Matthew Staples, a South Lake High School student and vice president of the district FFA, shows off his heifer, Cassidy, during a beef show at the Sumter County Fair on Saturday in Bushnell. The fair runs through March 15. BELOW: Riders take a whirl on the Vertigo carnival ride. Vietnam says it may have found missing jets door ANDY WONG / AP A relative of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, center, cries as she leaves a hotel room in Beijing, China on Sunday. Associated PressWASHINGTON Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist on Sunday stuck to his support of President Baracks health care overhaul, saying its been great for the state despite a difcult rollout. In an interview with CNNs State of the Union Crist said Obama has a compas sionate heart and pre dicted the public would eventually embrace the health care law. At the end of the day this is going to be a very popular pro gram because its do ing the right thing for the people of our coun try and my state, Crist said. The president is a smart guy and hes Crist defends President Obama, blasts ScottPutin defends Crimean separatist drive SERGEI CHUZAVKOV / AP People shout slogans during a pro Russian rally at a central square in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday.SEE FAIR | A2SEE CRIST | A2SEE JET | A2SEE PUTIN | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 10, 2014: This year a lot happens very quickly in your life. You barely have enough time to adjust to one surprise before another one pops again. Stay exible, and be willing to look at the glass as being half-full rather than half-empty. If you are single, you might nearly commit several times, possibly to different people. Take your time, and get to know your potential suitors. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy a more playful and fun time together, as if you were just starting to date. Give up being rigid or determined to have your way. Just enjoy your sweetie. CANCER is as emotional as you are! ARIES (March 21-April 19) You have a air for creating tension, as people nd you to be unpredictable. However, a role reversal seems to be at play: A partner or loved one could decide that impulsiveness is a great way to go. Strap on your seat belt! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) How you handle the key people in your daily environment reects who you are. You intuitively know what others want or need. Even still, your best bet is to allow others to ask for your help before rushing in to fulll an anticipated need. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You are able to juggle your nances with the best of them. You are likely to discover how difcult a situation can be, especially if it revolves around a friend or loved one. A meeting also could be provocative, but on a different level. CANCER (June 21-July 22) While others play out their Monday-itis, you seem to be full of unusual and effective ideas. Test them out on several people before launching into action. Your sense of well-being will emerge when dealing with a loved one at a distance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might not want to share too many of your thoughts right now; instead, listen carefully to a partner or friend. This person will have a lot of great ideas to share, and you could get feedback that might surprise you. Unexpected news heads your way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You seem to know what to do in order to achieve specic results. Listen to a loved one when discussing an unpredictable associate or partner. This person sees the issue differently from how you do. You will like whats about to happen. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Others expect you to come to the rescue for them when they arent able to help themselves. You could be a little ticked off by this attitude. Your plate is full, and you have a lot of ground to cover. Refuse to take on any extra work for now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are bound to make a difference by expressing a more complete perspective of a problem. Know that you dont need to be so vested in the outcome. Others will be impressed by your drive and determination. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Someone gladly would take up all of your time and attention, if you would allow it. Only you can decide if this is OK. State your boundaries clearly. If a loved one is involved, do not be surprised if you receive a volatile response. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Others cant seem to get enough of you. However, you have a strong need to go a certain way, and you dont want anyone holding you back. You could have some difculty explaining this desire to a needy friend or loved one. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You seem more than capable of staying away from problems today, as long as you dont take an unusual nancial risk. Incoming news could shock you, or you could surprise someone else. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You could be taken aback by a sudden and unexpected nancial change. Tap into your creativity in order to nd the right solution. As a result, youll nd the right person with whom to connect regarding a project in the near future. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US MARCH 9CASH 3 . ............................................... 9-8-1 Afternoon . .......................................... 9-9-1 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 5-4-1-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 5-9-4-8FLORIDALOTTERY MARCH 8 FANTASY 5 . ........................... 6-20-21-24-32 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 7-9-13-17-21-43 POWERBALL .................. 10-14-24-32-4130 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. Walton, feeding his heifer. Staged western shows were also among Saturdays activities. One act, full of comedy, featured a gunslinger entering a saloon fully dressed and armed only to come out in his underwear, gunless and drunk. Having no idea how he lost his valuables, the gunslinger was ready to start a ght, eliciting a quick response from the sheriff. Its a lot of family fun, said Mike Sheperd, who played the sheriff with replicas of a .45 and sawed-off shotgun by his side. As for the children, there was no lack of fun available between the 35 carnival rides that twist, roll, tilt, splash, surf and crash into each other and those that jet high into the air. Rides include Surfs-Up, during which patrons hop on a giant surfboard; the Drag Strip Slide, a giant sliding board and Bumble Bee Bop, a childrens ride, as well as the Sizzler, Tilt-a-Wheel, Ferris wheel and Wacky Shack. The fairgrounds is located at 7620 State Road 471, in Bushnell. Gate admission is free for children ages 5 and under, $3 for children 6 to 12 and $5 for ages 13 and older. A list of fair activities is available at wwww.sumterfair.net. Call 352-793-2750 for information. FAIR FROM PAGE A1 doing the right thing. During the interview Crist also acknowledged that Floridas economy has improved under in cumbent Gov. Rick Scott but he still said he could have done more to help Floridians. He also said that the economy was helped by his decision while governor to accept federal assistance that was part of the feder al stimulus package that was passed in 2009. The former Republican, who is trying to win back his old ofce as a Demo crat, urged members of his new party to fully sup port Obama during the midterm elections. Crist said Obama was leading and leading well. In recent weeks Scott has ratcheted up his crit icism of the overhaul even though the former health care executive has himself has altered his stance over the last two years. Scott, who before run ning for governor in 2010 led a group opposed to the overhaul, initially said he would not im plement the law, or back the expansion of Medic aid that was a part of the overhaul. But last year Scott called on Florida legislators to accept bil lions in federal funding and expand Medic aid eligibility. But Scott stopped pushing for ex pansion after GOP legis lators rejected it and in recent months has re turned to criticizing the overhaul. Scott this week even took time during a Cabinet meeting to criticize potential rate cuts to Medicare Advantage which lets seniors enroll in Medicare through private insurance plans. During his CNN inter view Crist did acknowl edge Floridas econo my had improved under Scotts watch but said it could be doing a lot bet ter. Crist also said that a turnaround started at the end of his term in 2010 and he said part of the reasons was because he accepted feder al stimulus money. He faulted Scott for not pushing harder to accept federal Medicaid funds which could have been used to provide health in surance coverage to near ly 1 million Floridians. Crist also criticized Scott for opposing feder al money for high-speed rail and for opposing a hike in the minimum wage. CRIST FROM PAGE A1 secretary general Ronald Noble chided authorities for waiting for a tragedy to put prudent security measures in place at bor ders and boarding gates. More than a day and half after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing, no conrmed debris from the jetliner had been found and the nal minutes before its disappear ance remained a mystery. The plane lost contact with ground controllers somewhere between Ma laysia and Vietnam. However, searchers in a low-ying plane spot ted an object that ap peared to be one of the planes doors, the staterun Thanh Nien news paper said, citing the deputy chief of staff of Vietnams army, Lt. Gen. Vo Van Tuan. Two ships from the maritime police were headed to the site, in wa ters about 60 miles (90 kilometers) south of Tho Chu island, in the same area where oil slicks were spotted Saturday. The missing plane apparently fell from the sky at cruising altitude in ne weather, and the pi lots were either unable or had no time to send a distress signal unusual circumstances under which a modern jetliner operated by a profession al airline would crash. Authorities were also checking on the identities of the two passengers who boarded the plane with stolen passports. On Saturday, the foreign ministries in Italy and Austria said the names of two citizens listed on the ights manifest matched the names on two pass ports reported stolen in Thailand. In a forceful statement, the Interpol chief, who has called passport fraud one of the worlds great est threats, said he hoped that governments and airlines worldwide will learn from the tragedy. The thefts of the two passports one belong ing to Austrian Christian Kozel and the other to Luigi Maraldi of Italy were entered into Inter pols database after they were stolen in Thailand in 2012 and last year, the police body said. But no authorities in Malay sia or elsewhere checked the passports against the database of 40 mil lion stolen or lost trav el documents before the Malaysian Airlines plane took off. Troubling details also emerged Sunday about the itineraries of the two passengers traveling on the stolen passports. A telephone opera tor on a China-based KLM hotline conrmed Sunday that passengers named Maraldi and Ko zel had been booked on one-way tickets on the same KLM ight, ying from Beijing to Amster dam on Saturday. Maraldi was to y on to Copen hagen, Denmark, and Kozel to Frankfurt, Ger many. She said the pair booked the tickets through China Southern Airlines, but she had no information on where they bought them. As holders of EU passports with onward ights to Europe, the passengers would not have needed visas for China. In addition to the planes sudden disap pearance, which experts said was consistent with a possible onboard explosion, the stolen pass ports strengthened concerns about terrorism as a possible cause. Al-Qaida militants have used similar tactics to try to disguise their identities. JET FROM PAGE A1 Washington on Wednesday on a resolution of the situation in Ukraine, the Interfax news agency reported. The White House conrmed the meeting. Our country and our people are facing the big gest challenges in the history of modern indepen dent Ukraine, the prime minister said earlier in the day. Will we be able to deal with these challenges? There should only be one answer to this question and that is: yes. Its Crimea, a strategic peninsula in the Black Sea, that has become the chief ashpoint in the battle for Ukraine, where three months of protests sparked by President Vic tor Yanukovychs decision to ditch a signicant treaty with the 28-nation Eu ropean Union after strong pressure from Russia led to his downfall. A majority of people in Crimea identify with Rus sia, and Moscows Black Sea Fleet is based in Sevastopol, as is Ukraines. In Simferopol, Crimeas capital, a crowd of more than 4,000 people turned out Sunday to endorse unication with Russia. On Lenin Square, a naval band played World War II songs as old women sang along, and dozens of tri color Russian ags ut tered in the cold wind. Russians are our brothers, Crimean Par liament speaker Vladimir Konstantinov said. He asked the crowd how it would vote in the refer endum a week hence. Russia! Russia! came the loud answer. We are going back home to the mother land, said Konstantinov. PUTIN FROM PAGE A1

PAGE 3

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG LSSC to host LC and Friends concertThe annual LC and Friends Concert will feature friends and family members of the band, at 3 / p.m. Sunday, at the Paul Williams Auditorium of the Lake Sumter State College, U.S. Highway 441. A highlight of the concert will be the 17-piece big band performing Westside Suite, featuring drummer Dave Caudill, trombonist Sid Davis and tenor saxophonist Dave Flanigan. Vocalist Ali Dickson will also per form. Master of Ceremonies is Harlous Wilson. Tickets are $12 and can purchased at the door, or in advance by calling 352-728-8414.LAKE COUNTY Contestants sought for county fair pageantApplications are available for the 25th annual Miss Lake County Fair Pageant, April 6 at the Lake County Fairgrounds. With eight age divisions, girls from infants to age 18 are eligible and can register on or before April 5. Winners in each age division will receive a crown and sash, and all contestants will receive a trophy. Go to www.lakecofair.com or call 352-326-4217 for an application.TAVARES Road closures planned for downtown TavaresUpcoming work on the Florida Central Railroad tracks in downtown Tavares will cause road closures at the intersections of Dora Avenue and Lake Dora Drive, Wednesday and Thursday, and at the roundabout on Disston Avenue and Main Street, March 17-18. Detours will be established to redi rect trafc during the closures, and motorists are encouraged to exhibit caution when traveling in the area. For information, call 352-483-9020.TAVARES TLNC naturalist group to host paddling excursionPaddle the Apopka/Beauclair Canal with the Trout Lake Nature Center naturalist group on Saturday for a three-mile trip up the canal to the lock and dam. Guests should pack their kayak or canoe, otation device, whistle, water and a snack, and meet at 9 / a.m. at the Lake Jem Park and boat ramp, 16141 County Road 448. To register, leave a message at 352-357-7536.THE VILLAGES Bicycle Club to host We Bike for Kids eventThe Villages Bicycle Club will host the third annual We Bike for Kids Charity Bicycle Ride on March 15, presented by Parady Financial Group. Events begin and end at the SeaBreeze Recreation Center and will feature three routes: metric century (62 miles) at 8:30 / a.m., a 30mile route at 9:30 / a.m. and a 10-mile route at 10 / a.m. Riders of all abilities are welcome to participate. Proceeds from the ride benet the nonprot organizations Project Legacy and the Sumter County Youth Center. For information or to register, call 352-430-2189 or go to www.webikeforkids.com.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Sculptor J.T. Smalley won the $1,500 Best of Show award at the 37th annual Leesburg Art Festival, a juried show featuring more than 70 artists from around the country. BELOW: Art patrons took advantage of picture-perfect weather on Sunday to visit the festival on Main Street in downtown Leesburg. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA Lake-Sumter State College graduate who is now furthering his art education at the University of Flori da, won the coveted $1,500 Best of Show prize at the 37th an nual Leesburg Art Festival for Safari bot, a robot-riding sculpture made from old metal forks, spat ulas, pitchers and a worn clock. J.T. Smalleys forte is taking old, worn metal items and giving them new life as artistic sculptures. It was a huge sur prise to win, Smalley said Sunday from his tent on Main Street, where he was one of more than 70 artists from around the country who participated in the juried show. People tell me that I have a great imagination to be able to turn a pile a stuff into all of these different things. His imagination also appealed to children attending the festival as Smalley received four Kids Choice awards from youths who presented him with handmade paper-ribbon prizes at the event. It was awesome to receive awards from the kids. They know what they like, he said. Smalley is eager to spend some of his prize money today at the Webster Flea Market, a popular Sumter County event held every Monday for more than 50 years, and he knows its a place where hes bound to nd more items made before the 1960s that can be repurposed into new works of art. My whole work is commentary on the fact that we dont make anything LEESBURGLSSC grad wins Best of Show at art festival LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County School Board members will de cide tonight whether to approve a $20,000 contract with Carr, Riggs & In gram, LLC to perform a re view of the school districts class-size compliance pol icies and procedures. During a press confer ence in February, Super intendent Susan Moxley called for an independent review of all schools in the district to determine whether any class-size vi olations were knowingly made. This follows the determination that six school principals broke the law by in accurately reporting their class sizes to the state. Several school board members said while the costs of the independent review would affect the districts budget, it is nec essary to address whether principals knowingly co erced teachers to falsify their class rosters during Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) week, when schools are required to provide an accurate count of student enrollment to the state. We need to know whether it was intentionally done, said Tod Howard, school board mem ber. We need to know who was involved. Was the district administration involved in it? Howard added: We need to be open and TAVARESSchool board calls for independent review MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comMotorists in the area of the White Hair Bridge on State Road 44 at the Volusia/Lake county line should be aware of trafc congestion, the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce stated. Lt. John Herrell, sher iffs spokesman, said they have responded to vehicle crashes at that location as trafc is backed up because the bridge, which is under construction, has only one lane open. With Bike Week starting today in Daytona Beach, we are seeing large num bers of motorcycles traveling through Lake County into the affected area and are concerned that more accidents will occur, Her rell said Friday. Motorists are being asked to avoid the area if at all possible. If unable to avoid the bridge, Herrell said, motorists should be aware that back-ups are likely and remain calm and cautious. Bike Week, which has been going on in Daytona Beach for more than 70 years, draws thousands of motorcyclists from across the nation. The festivities include motorcycle racing, concerts, parties and street festivals. Leesburgs 18th Annual Bikefest is from April 2527 in downtown Leesburg.Daytona Bike Week impacting Lake County traffic Staff ReportThe Lake County Library Sys tems 11th annual Lake BookFest kicks off today at libraries across the county. Events include:TODAY 6 / p.m., W.T. Bland Public Library, Mount Dora Dangerously Deli cious has best-selling author Lisa Black providing a glimpse into the world of forensic science.TUESDAY 2 / p.m., Leesburg Library Friends of the Library Tea will celebrate the outstanding contribu tions the friends have made to the libraries in the Lake County Li brary System. 4 / p.m., Umatilla Public Library Pizza Party with author Chris Tozier, winner of the Florida Publishers Association Silver Medal award. 6 / p.m., Marion Baysinger Memo rial County Library, Groveland The New Soul Food Cookbook for People with Diabetes will feature cooking sensation Roniece Weaver. 6 / p.m., East Lake County Li brary, Sorrento Murder in the Library will involve attendees in a murder mystery.WEDNESDAY 10 / a.m., Lady Lake Libr ary Legendary Writers in Florida will feature Dr. James C. Clark, author of six books. 2 to 4 / p.m., W.T. Bland Public Li brary Authors Going Rogue, will feature authors Julie Compton, Vicki Landis and Ann Meier discussing why some authors have left traditional publishing for the wild world of do-it-yourself. 4 / p.m., Leesburg Library Be ing a Writer Is Cooler Than Luke Skywalker + Voldemort + Katniss Everdeen, will discuss options for teens to express themselves. 6 / p.m., Paisley Library Cen tral Floridas Civil War Veterans, features author and historian Bob Grenier talking about the book he wrote as a memorial and tribute to those courageous veterans.THURSDAY 1 to 3:30 / p.m., Leesburg Library Northern Exposure: Canadian Crime Fiction, R.J. Harlick brings back character Meg Harris for her series fth book. 2 / p.m., Cooper Memorial Li brary Florida Writers: Moon Rockets and Tropical Rain, featur ing author Jim Clark.Week-long Lake Bookfest starts todaySEE BOOKFEST | A4SEE REVIEW | A4SEE FESTIVAL | A5

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 OBITUARIESWilliam R. (Bill) PopePope, William Rufus (Bill), 83 of Howey-inthe-Hills, FL went to be with the Lord on Satur day, March 8, 2014. He was happily married to Barbara Ellen Worrell for 58 yrs. He was the father of two sons, Bill and Bob. For the com plete obituary please visit WWW.pagetheus. comAmy Ruth SchallerAmy Ruth Schaller, 63 of Fruitland Park, died Friday March 7, 2014. She was born to Willard and Bethel VanOr der in Wellsboro, PA, on October 28, 1950. She married John Schaller on November 16, 1974. Amy was a member of Trinity Evangelical Free Church in Eu stis, FL; and the Ladies Auxiliary of the Gideons International Amy is survived by her father Willard VanOrder; Husband John Schaller; Sons Chris Ponds and Jason Schaller; daugh ters Jamie Vick and Jenifer Schaller; and 7 Grandchildren. A view ing will be held at the Page-Theus Funeral Home in Leesburg, FL from 6:00 8:00 PM, Monday. Funeral Ser vices are planned for 2:00 P. M. Tuesday at the funeral Home. The family suggests that in lieu of owers do nations be made in Amys name to: Amer ican Cancer Society HOPE LODGE Attn: Nancy Dohn, 2121 S. W. 16th St., Gainesville, FL 32608. Arrangements entrusted to PageTheus Funeral Home, Leesburg, Florida.DEATH NOTICESEdward Anthony HillEdward Anthony Hill, 69, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Amy Ruth SchallerAmy Ruth Schaller, 63, of Fruitland Park, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations.IN MEMORY transparent. In order to maintain public trust, (this review) has to be done. The cost of the review could result in the district cutting back on something else, said Howard, without citing specics. We will nd other places to save mon ey, he said. It is about priorities. This will take greater priority than something else. By Florida law, pub lic schools are not per mitted to exceed cer tain class-size limits: 18 students per class in grades pre-kinder garten through grade 3, 22 per class in grades 4 through 8 and 25 in grades 9 through 12. Schools that violate the class-size limits are subject to nes. Simone Maduro-Fer guson, a teacher at Lake Minneola High School, recently tipped off the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) about the classsize violations. In her complaint, she states she was asked to remove kids from her class roster during FTE counting week. School district ofcials subsequently launched an investigation and found additional report ing problems in ve oth er schools. Principals at Mount Dora High School, Tavares Elementary School, Sawgrass Bay Elementary in Clermont, Sorrento Elementary, Lake Minneola High School and Grassy Lake Elementa ry in Minneola, report ed to the FLDOE that their average class sizes were smaller than they actually are. School Board Member Bill Mathias said the whole purpose of the review is to bring some clarity on how the mistake happened and whether it was intentional. When it comes to the creditability of the system, it is $20,000 well spent, he said. Rosanne Brandeburg, school board member, said she also supports the review. I dont think anyone maliciously set out to do harm to our school district, she said of the class-size violations. We need to go through the due process. In its proposal to the school district, the accounting rm acknowledged it did not have any experience working with the class-size amendment. However, Sumner Reed, the client service partner, wrote the rm has audited ve other school districts in the state. The board meets to night at 6 / p .m. in the Commission Chambers of the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St., Tavares. REVIEW FROM PAGE A3 5 to 7 / p.m., Astor Library Part-Time Writer: A Workshop for the Rest of Us, fea turing award-winning author Chris Tozier. 6:30 / p.m., Tavares City Hall Author and historian Bob Grenier. 7 / p.m., Historic State The atre, Eustis Murder on Bay Street.FRIDAY 10 / a.m., Fruitland Park Li brary How to Get Pub lished. 10 / a.m., Lady Lake Libr ary The Sisterhood: Strong Female Characters, with authors Robin Burcell, Elaine Viets and Deborah Sharp. 1 / p.m., W.T. Bland Library Across the Border, from the Capital Crime Writers of Ottawa, features best-selling authors Vicki Delany, C.B. Forrest and R.J. Harlick. 2:30 / p.m., W.T. Bland Li brary Killer Releases, Award-Winning Authors, featuring Robin Burcell, Nancy J. Cohen, Deborah Sharp and Elaine Viets talking about their latest re leases. 6 / p.m., Leesburg Library Authors Reception.SATURDAY 10 / a.m. to 3 / p .m., East Lake County Library Bluegrass Festival with Blackwater Creek Bluegrass Band. 10 / a.m., W.T. Bland Library Mystery Writing: the Basics. 10 / a.m. to noon, C ooper Memorial Library Creating Memorable Characters, fea turing authors Vicki Delany, C.B. Forrest and R.J. Harlick. 10 / a.m., Astor Libr ary Florida History: Presidents, Politics and Writers, featur ing author Jim Clark. 11 / a.m., Helen Lehmann Memorial Library, Mont verde A Monster, a Pirate Execution and a Massacre, featuring award-winning author and educator Doug Dillon. 11 / a.m., W.T. Bland Library Nancy Cohens Plotting Made Perfect. Noon, W.T. Bland Library Deborah Sharps Settings That Sizzle. 1 / p.m., W.T. Bland Library Robin Burcells Forensics and Fiction. BOOKFEST FROM PAGE A3 MICHAEL J. MISHAKAssociated PressCLEARWATER Voters in this stretch of beach towns and retirement communities provide the rst 2014 campaign test of whether Democrats can counter GOP attacks on the presidents health care over haul by accusing Republicans of threatening popular benet programs for the elderly. Democrat Alex Sink and her allies in the spirited race to re place the late Rep. Bill Young in the U.S. House have spent mil lions of dollars on TV ads ahead of Tuesdays special election painting Republican David Jol ly as an extremist who wants to privatize Social Security and gut Medicare. Jolly has responded with a TV spot featuring his elderly mother and aunt, in which he says protecting their Social Securi ty means everything to me. Jolly argues that it is Sink who would undermine Medicare because of Democratic-passed cuts to the program under President Barack Obamas health care law. The suburban St. Petersburg district is considered a proving ground for each partys po litical messages and a possi ble bellwether for the midterm elections. Ofcials in both par ties have said in recent days that private polls show the race to be close. Each has made late appeals for campaign cash. In all, the candidates, their party committees and several outside groups have collectively spent almost $10 million blan keting the airwaves with largely negative ads focused on health care costs and Social Security. Part of the reason is the large percentage of seniors in this district, which is 37 percent Re publican, 35 percent Democrat and 24 percent independent. More than one in four regis tered voters is older than 65, a population that could make up more than half of those who cast ballots. But in an effort to deect Republican attacks on the health care law and rollout problems, Democrats also plan to prominently feature proposed Repub lican curbs on Social Securi ty and Medicare in competitive races across the country. Those issues are para mount, said Rep. Steve Israel of New York, who chairs the House Democrats campaign operation. Having Republicans say that they want to cut Medicare but continue to fund massive subsidies to big oil companies ... that will be a dening theme.House race early test of fall strategy AP FILE PHOTO This Nov. 23, 2013 photo shows Florida Republican Congressional candidate David Jolly, right, speaking in Indian Rocks Beach.

PAGE 5

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Activities for the Day: $25 Value $150 Value Everyone is encouraged to come out with family and friends.SEE YOU THERE!WHEN: WHERE: Invite you to come out and enjoy the day with us, as we celebrate our First Annual Open House and Patient Appreciation Day.Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care anymore that lasts, Smalley said, noting back to when crackers could be purchased in tin cans rather than todays cardboard boxes. I had bought this big box of old tins at a garage sale, and I also bought clock parts, Smalley said of when he began making his unique sculptures in 2011, during his winter break from LSSC. I started building, and I kept building and building. I wanted to get 12 different ones Now Im way past 12. Ive known J.T. before he knew that he was an artist, said Amy Painter, executive director of the Leesburg Art Center, host of the annual art festival. It was a thrill and a surprise when the judges told me that they had picked J.T. He is so creative. His heart and soul goes into every piece, and you can tell. Smalley was in the festivals emerging artist program two years ago, and last year he was a $250 prize winner before capturing the 2014 grand prize. I have seen his work grow from the beginning from when he started, Painter said. And every year that he has participated, the judges have always stopped and talked to him about his artwork and given him feedback. Hes listened to them and has grown his work in a whole new way. He is currently working on an 8-foot-tall metal sculpture, his largest to date. Smalleys advice to others: Keep doing what you want to do, what you are passionate about, because that is the only work that is going to make it for you. If you do it for money, it is never going to be what it needs to be. Youve got to have the passion and love behind it and love what you do, because if you dont, it shows. His passion is his robot sculptures. My Bots are bringing new life to old items, not letting things be tossed into the trash and lost for ever to rot in some landll, he said in his artist statement. As a society, we have been trained to consume and throw away, even if the item is still useful. I take those items and bring them together giving them a new life and a new pur pose. Some religions believe that every living thing has a soul. Well the earth is living, and metal comes from the earth; therefore, metal has a soul no matter what shape it comes in. That soul in the metal then holds memories of every thing and everyone it touched. Bringing these objects together gives them a new life to go on and collect new memories together as a new soul. I think my Bots would thank me for this new life. FESTIVAL FROM PAGE A3

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb LISA LEFFAssociated PressSAN FRANCISCO Law and order may soon be com ing to the Wild West of weed. A California lawmaker has introduced legislation to reg ulate the states free-wheeling medical marijuana in dustry the farmers that grow the drug, the hundreds of storefront shops that sell it and especially the doctors who write recommendations allowing people to use it. The state in 1996 was the rst to authorize marijuana use for health purposes there are now 20. But to this day no one knows how many dispensaries and pa tients California has or what conditions pot is being used to treat because the loosely worded law did not give gov ernment agencies a role in tracking the information. The bill introduced by state Sen. Lou Correa marks a milestone not only because it would provide sig nicant state oversight of the multi-billion dollar industry for the rst time, but because it is likely to get serious con sideration in Sacramento af ter years of inaction. SB1262 is the brainchild of the California Police Chiefs Association and the League of California Cities, two politically inuential groups that have stood in the way of previous efforts to legitimize pot growers and dispensa ries by subjecting them to state control and taxation. Medical marijuana ad vocates, who have lobbied unsuccessfully for a state wide regulatory scheme they hoped would make the industry less susceptible to federal raids and arrests, is taking a wait-and-see approach on Correas legislation. They prefer a bill held over from last year, co-sponsored by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano and Sens. Darryl Steinberg and Mark Leno, that calls for regulating and taxing medical marijuana like alcohol and places fewer restrictions on doctors than Correas measure does, but are prepared to hammer out a compromise, said Lynne Lyman, California director for the Drug Policy Alliance. We are very encouraged by law enforcement coming to the table with their proposals and we think we can all work together and come up with some model legis lation in the state, nally, 18 years later, Lyman said.State oversight may tame California pot shops AP FILE PHOTOSamuel Bagdorf of San Francisco, who suffers from anxiety disorders, lights his marijuana pipe at the San Francisco Medical Cannabis Clinic in San Francisco, in October 2009. ERIC TUCKERAssociated PressWASHINGTON The data breach at Target Corp. that exposed millions of credit card numbers has focused attention on the patchwork of state consumer notica tion laws and renewed a push for a single nation al standard. Most states have laws that require retailers to disclose data breaches, but the laws vary wildly. Consumers in one state might learn immediately that their per sonal information had been exposed, but that might not happen in another state, and no tication requirements for businesses depend on where their customers are located. Attor ney General Eric Holder has joined the call for a nationwide noti cation standard, but di visions persist, making a consensus questionable this year. Were stuck with the state-by-state approach unless some compromise gets done at the federal level, said Peter Swire, a pri vacy expert at Geor gia Tech and a former White House privacy ofcial. Despite general agreement on the value of a national standard, there are obstacles to a straightforward com promise: %  en Consumer groups dont want to weaken existing protections in states with the strongest laws. %  en Retailers want laws that are less bur densome to comply with and say too much notication could cause consumers to tune out the problem. %  en Congress is looking at different propos als for how any feder al standard should be enforced and what the threshold should be before notication requirements kick in. The issue gained fresh urgency as part of a larger security debate after data breaches involving retailers Neiman Marcus and Tar get. Target, the nations second-largest retail discounter, has said 40 million credit and debit card accounts were ex posed between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15. The company went public with the breach on Dec. 19, sever al days after it said it learned of the problem and soon after the news began leaking on line. Since then, sales, prot and stock prices have dropped, the companys chief infor mation ofcer has resigned and banks and retailers are facing con tinued scrutiny about what more can be done to protect consumer data. The Justice Depart ment is investigating the data theft, and Holder urged Congress in a video statement last month to adopt a national notication standard that would include exemptions for harmless breaches. This would empow er the American peo ple to protect themselves if they are at risk of identity theft. It would enable law enforcement to better investigate these crimes and to hold compromised entities account able when they fail to keep sensitive information safe, he said in the statement. Such proposals have been around for years. An Obama adminis tration plan from 2011 would have required businesses that col lect personal infor mation on more than 10,000 people in any 12-month period to disclose potentially harmful breaches and for breaches that affect more than 5,000 people to be reported to con sumer credit reporting agencies and the feder al government.No consensus on how to notify data breach victims

PAGE 7

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY FlashbackHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 A merica is deeply engaged in a debate about marriage. But its not the most urgent dialogue worth having about an institution that has served to or der society for millennia. What the current discussion about expanding matrimony obscures is the bigger picture about traditional marriage, namely, that its in decline and that this decline has dramatic and devastating consequences for society, children in particular. The connection between mar riage and improved economic outcomes is not novel. In 1965, as President Lyndon B. Johnson was declaring war on poverty, a highly controver sial report by Labor Secretary Daniel Patrick Moynihan identied the deterioration of the family in the African-American community as one of several major catalysts for growing economic and social inequality. At the time, more than half of all black women and about two-thirds of Hispanic and Anglo women were married; and just over 20 percent of black infants and between 2 percent and 3 percent of Anglo infants were born to single mothers. Half a century later, those numbers have not declined they have exploded. According to government statistics, 40.7 percent of all 2012 births were out of wedlock, including 72.2 percent in the Afri can-American community; 53.5 percent of Hispanic children; and 29.4 percent of Anglo children. Revisiting the Moynihan report last year, the Urban Institute found that the social trends that concerned Moynihan have worsened for blacks and nonblacks alike, suggesting that the factors driving the decline (of marriage) do not lie solely within the black community but in the larger social and economic context. The numbers themselves are alarming and they raise serious questions about why marriage is disintegrating. But it is the bounty of research correlating family structure to the economic mobility of children or lack thereof that makes concerns about the declining marriage culture a public policy crisis. A report by the Pew Charitable Trusts Economic Mobility Project looked at the impact of single parenthood on a childs economic opportunities. It found that both children of divorced mothers or (those) who were born to unmarried mothers are less likely to be upwardly mobile in relative terms than are children of continuously married mothers. It seems obvious that two-par ent households advantage children, as they tend to have greater resources both nancial and so cial (time, energy, attention) that make kids more likely to graduate and get well-paying jobs and less likely to be incarcerated or become single parents. But the impact of family structure has ripple effects that extend well beyond individual households, according to new comprehensive data by Har vard economist Raj Chetty. Chetty and his co-authors found that family structure correlates with upward mobility not just at the individual level but also at the community level, perhaps because the stability of the social environment affects childrens outcomes more broadly. The Brookings Institution warns that marriage has become a mechanism through which advantage is protected and passed on, as wealthier, committed parents tend to get and stay married and raise their children together, while less afuent women are more likely to have children outside of marriage and raise them on their own, often in communities of similar structure, where they enter vicious cycles of downward mobility for themselves and their progeny. Marriage is not a silver bullet. Encouraging more single mothers to wed the fathers of their children will not magically reduce poverty. Nor is the decimated marriage culture the only factor limiting economic mobility, which is also affected by racial and economic segregation, school quality and low levels of social capital. But attempts to redistribute income and expand the welfare state, including those called for in Moynihans report 50 years ago, have not had the success that lawmakers expected. As Ron Haskins, director of Brookings Center on Children and Families, told The Washington Post, We are not going to have an effective solution to the growing inequality and poverty in the U.S. unless we can do something about family structure. In the war on inequality, sup porting policies that promote more stable family environments may not be a bad place to start.Cynthia M. Allen is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Readers may send her email at cmallen@star-telegram.com.OTHERVOICES Cynthia M. AllenMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE The conversation we should be having about marriage The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. President Obama unveiled a budget pro posal Tuesday thats more of a Dem ocratic Party wish list than a realistic spending blueprint for a divided govern ment. Higher taxes on the wealthy? Check. More spending on anti-poverty programs, research, infrastructure and schools? Check. But while Republicans in Congress were quick to dismiss Obamas proposal (P)er haps his most irresponsible budget yet, as serted House Speaker John A. Boehner, con ceding only the vague possibility that Obama had done worse before they should at the very least act on his suggestions for promot ing employment and economic growth that dovetail with their own ideas. Washington faces at least three inter twined scal problems: a sluggish economy thats not creating enough good jobs, large annual budget decits left over from the recession and rising healthcare costs that could cause the decit to grow uncontrollably in the not-too-distant future. As in his previous budgets, Obama made no her culean efforts to bring the budget into balance or solve the long-term problems in entitlements. His main effort instead was on breathing more life into the economy now. Obamas problem is that so many of his ideas for promoting growth are nonstarters with the House Republican majority. Within Obamas $3.9-trillion budget, though, are at least two proposals that make economic and political sense, and that the Republicans might be persuaded to support. One is to expand the tax credit for individu al low-income workers without children. Republicans invented the earned income tax credit as an alternative to welfare payments, and unlike some other benet programs, it gives participants a nancial incentive to work their way out of poverty. Although Republicans wont like how Obama proposes to pay for it by raising taxes on hedge fund managers and some self-employed individ uals they should seize the opportunity to strike a deal to expand the credit. The president has also called, again, for beeng up infrastructure investments. With more fuel-efcient cars on the road, the amount of gas tax dollars available to repair Americas crumbling roads and bridges has been shrinking. Yet lawmakers have been unable to agree on how to replenish those funds. The president offered a temporary x: using one-time revenue from overhauling the corporate tax code to pay for a new round of projects. This stopgap approach would let lawmakers spend more now while costs are still low, rather than waiting to agree on a long-term solution.From the Los Angeles Times.AVOICECan Democrats and Republicans agree on anything in Obamas budget?

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741

PAGE 9

SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Chesson Hadley wins Puerto Rico Open / B4 Staff ReportThe third annual Congregational Sinai golf tournament is scheduled to take place on May 3 at Legends Country Club in Clermont. Registration will begin at 7:15 / a.m. with play set to begin at 8:30 / a.m. Entry fee is $75, which includes breakfast on the y, 18 holes of golf, range balls, a deli lunch buffet, contests, prizes and awards. A refund able deposit of $25 will hold a spot in the tour nament eld. Players can sign up as a foursome and tour nament organizers will place individual players with a group. Entry forms can be printed out at www.con gregational-sinai.org click on Golf Tourna ment under News items. Interested players also may contact Barbara Salsitz, event administra tor at 352-432-6008. Congregational Sinai golf tourney set for May 3 AP FILE PHOTO In this Oct. 26, 2008, le photo, Detroit Lions owner and chairman William Clay Ford walks on the sidelines in Detroit. Lions owner William Clay Ford dies at 88 LARRY LAGEAssociated PressDETROIT William Clay Ford, the last sur viving grandchild of au tomotive pioneer Henry Ford and owner of the Detroit Lions, has died. He was 88. Ford Motor Co. said in a statement Sunday that Ford died of pneumo nia at his home in Grosse Pointe, Mich. Ford helped steer the family business for more than ve de cades. He bought one of his own, the NFL franchise in the Motor City, a half-century ago. He served as an employee and board member of the automaker for more than half of its 100year history. My father was a great business leader and hu manitarian who dedicated his life to the company and the community, William Clay Ford Jr., ex ecutive chairman of Ford Motor Co. and Lions vice chairman, said in a statement. He also was a wonderful family man, a loving husband, fa ther, grandfather and great-grandfather. He will be greatly missed by everyone who knew him, yet he will continue to in spire us all. Ford was regarded as a dignied man by the se lect few who seemed to know him well. To the He was the last surviving grandson of legendary Ford Motor Company founder SEE FORD | B2 Chicago Bulls Joakim Noah reacts after being fouled by Miami Heats Greg Oden during the rst half on Sunday in Chicago.PAUL BEATY / AP ANDREW SELIGMANAP Sports WriterCHICAGO Joakim Noah had 20 points and 12 re bounds, D.J. Augustin scored 22 and the Chicago Bulls beat the Miami Heat 95-88 in over time Sunday after Jimmy Butler blocked LeBron James at the end of regulation. Dwyane Wade scored 25 for Miami, but with James strug gling again, the Heat dropped their third straight to match their longest losing streak of the season. James scored 17 points on 8-of-23 shooting and couldnt come through after Miami blew a 12-point lead down the stretch. With a chance to win it at the end of regulation, he got stripped by Butler on a layup attempt. In overtime, it was all Bulls. Chicago outscored Miami 9-2, starting with Augustins 3 just under a minute in. Butler added a jumper from the wing, Noah scored on a putback and Butler added two free throws to make it 95-86 GREG BEACHAMAP Sports WriterLAS VEGAS Brad Keselowski surged ahead on the nal lap when Dale Earnhardt Jr. ran out of fuel, claiming a dramatic victory Sunday in the NASCAR race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. When Earnhardts Chevy slowed in the nal miles, Keselows ki roared past in his Penske Ford for the rst weekend sweep in his career. He fol lowed up Saturdays Nationwide Series victory with his rst Vegas Cup win. Keselowski, the 2012 Sprint Cup champion, also virtually assured himself of a spot in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship after miss ing it entirely last season, a thought was already on his mind immediately after the nish. Locked in the Chase early, Keselowski said. I dont have to hear all that crap about not being in the Chase. Earnhardt was just a few ounces of fuel shy of earning his sec ond victory in three races to start the sea son. The Daytona 500 champion also nished second last week at Phoenix be fore improving the best start to a season in his NASCAR career. We werent supposed to make it, Earnhardt said. We were trying to save as much as we can and make it work, but we knew we were short. We wouldnt have finished second if we didnt have that strategy. Paul Menard PHOTOS BY WILFREDO LEE / AP Patrick Reed and his wife Justine hold The Gene Sarazen Cup after winning the Cadillac Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Doral. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterDORAL Patrick Reed felt he belongs among the best in the world. He beat them all Sunday in the Cadillac Championship. Dressed in a red shirt that he always wears in the nal round with Tiger Woods in the group ahead of him Reed made back-toback birdies early on the front nine to build a big lead and showed off a great short game when the pressure was building on the new Blue Monster at Doral. Equipped with a twoshot lead, the 23-yearold Texan wisely played the nal hole conser vatively. He two-putt ed for bogey and closed with an even-par 72 for a one-shot victo ry over Bubba Watson and Jamie Donaldson of Wales. Reed became the youngest winner of a World Golf Championship, his third win in his last 14 tournaments. Woods, only three shots behind going into the nal round in his best chance this year to win a tournament, said his back ared up after an awkward shot out of the bunker on the sixth hole. He failed to make a birdie in the nal round for the rst time in his PGA Tour career, and his 78 was his worst Sunday score ever. Reed is expected to go to No. 20 in the Patrick Reed, right, and his caddie Kessler Karain talk on the third tee during the nal round. Cadillac Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Trump National Doral (Blue Monster) Doral Purse: $9 million Yardage: 7,481; Par: 72 Final Patrick Reed (550), $1,530,000 68-75-69-72 284 Jamie Donaldson, $753,000 74-70-71-70 285 Bubba Watson (258), $753,000 73-72-72-68 285 Dustin Johnson (128), $395,000 69-74-73-72 288 Richard Sterne, $395,000 74-73-70-71 288 Thongchai Jaidee, $248,333 73-74-74-68 289 Stephen Gallacher, $248,333 75-75-70-69 289 Bill Haas (96), $248,333 73-76-69-71 289 Jason Dufner (76), $151,250 69-77-68-76 290 Hunter Mahan (76), $151,250 69-74-71-76 290 Graeme McDowell (76), $151,250 73-71-73-73 290 Charl Schwartzel (76), $151,250 70-76-76-68 290 Miguel A. Jimenez, $110,000 70-77-69-75 291 Matt Kuchar (62), $110,000 69-74-74-74 291 Joost Luiten, $110,000 76-72-71-72 291 Jonas Blixt (51), $90,667 79-72-75-66 292 George Coetzee, $90,667 74-74-73-71 292 Sergio Garcia (51), $90,667 74-76-73-69 292 Scott Hend, $90,667 72-76-73-71 292 Henrik Stenson (51), $90,667 73-76-74-69 292 Gary Woodland (51), $90,667 72-78-71-71 292 Harris English (51), $90,667 69-77-74-72 292 Zach Johnson (51), $90,667 70-75-71-76 292 Phil Mickelson (51), $90,667 74-75-69-74 292 Luke Donald (42), $76,000 70-82-72-69 293 Rory McIlroy (42), $76,000 70-74-75-74 293 Francesco Molinari, $76,000 69-75-76-73 293 Ryan Moore (42), $76,000 70-79-69-75 293 Adam Scott (42), $76,000 75-73-72-73 293 Kevin Streelman (42), $76,000 75-74-72-72 293 Peter Uihlein, $76,000 73-77-71-72 293 Jimmy Walker (42), $76,000 73-77-67-76 293 Tiger Woods (42), $76,000 76-73-66-78 293 Graham DeLaet (35), $68,500 78-72-70-74 294 Hyung-Sung Kim, $68,500 72-74-74-74 294 Hideki Matsuyama (35), $68,500 72-77-71-74 294 Justin Rose (35), $68,500 74-77-70-73 294 Jordan Spieth (35), $68,500 73-79-73-69 294 Lee Westwood (35), $68,500 75-79-70-70 294 Darren Fichardt, $63,500 73-78-72-72 295 Branden Grace, $63,500 75-74-69-77 295 Chris Kirk (30), $63,500 75-71-76-73 295 Louis Oosthuizen (30), $63,500 72-78-71-74 295 Noah, Augustin lead Bulls over Heat in 95-88 overtime battleSEE HEAT | B2Reed holds on to win his third title in seven monthsKeselowski edges Junior on last lap to win in Las VegasSEE NASCAR | B2 Puerto Rico Open scoreboard, Page B2SEE REED | B2

PAGE 10

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Kobalt 400 ResultsSunday At Las Vegas Motor Speedway Las Vegas, Nev. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267 laps, 134.6 rat ing, 48 points. 2. (14) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 121.7, 43. 3. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 267, 108.1, 42. 4. (1) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 109.8, 41. 5. (11) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 88.2, 40. 6. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 124.8, 39. 7. (10) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 94, 37. 8. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 91.2, 36. 9. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267, 102.7, 35. 10. (29) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 92.6, 35. 11. (20) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 108.1, 34. 12. (27) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267, 83.1, 33. 13. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 267, 83.1, 31. 14. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 96.6, 30. 15. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 267, 76.4, 29. 16. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 267, 82.4, 28. 17. (19) Jeff Burton, Toyota, 267, 71.1, 27. 18. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 267, 67.7, 26. 19. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 266, 76.6, 25. 20. (34) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 266, 65.9, 0. 21. (22) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 266, 58, 23. 22. (25) Greg Bife, Ford, 266, 52.5, 22. 23. (3) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 266, 84.4, 21. 24. (43) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 266, 56, 20. 25. (8) Aric Almirola, Ford, 264, 60.3, 19. 26. (23) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 264, 62.9, 18. 27. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 264, 68.8, 17. 28. (30) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 264, 54.6, 16. 29. (38) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 264, 50.8, 15. 30. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 264, 54.1, 14. 31. (37) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 264, 42.1, 13. 32. (26) David Ragan, Ford, 263, 45.2, 12. 33. (24) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 263, 40.3, 11. 34. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 262, 41.7, 10. 35. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 261, 33.5, 9. 36. (28) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 261, 41.5, 8. 37. (36) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 259, 33.1, 7. 38. (41) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 258, 27.3, 6. 39. (42) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 253, 27.9, 5. 40. (32) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 240, 28.9, 4. 41. (16) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 237, 92.4, 4. 42. (31) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 212, 27.9, 2. 43. (35) Michael McDowell, Ford, engine, 141, 33.4, 1. Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Cleveland 9 1 .900 Baltimore 8 2 .800 Seattle 9 3 .750 Tampa Bay 5 2 .714 New York 7 4 .636 Oakland 6 4 .600 Minnesota 5 4 .556 Detroit 6 5 .545 Kansas City 5 5 .500 Toronto 5 6 .455 Houston 4 6 .400 Los Angeles 4 6 .400 Chicago 3 5 .375 Boston 3 7 .300 Texas 2 6 .250 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Washington 7 3 .700 Miami 6 3 .667 Pittsburgh 7 4 .636 San Francisco 6 4 .600 Arizona 7 6 .538 Colorado 6 6 .500 Milwaukee 6 6 .500 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 New York 4 5 .444 Chicago 4 6 .400 San Diego 3 6 .333 Cincinnati 4 9 .308 St. Louis 2 5 .286 Philadelphia 2 8 .200 Atlanta 2 9 .182 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Saturdays Games Pittsburgh 10, Tampa Bay 5 Washington (ss) 8, Atlanta (ss) 2 N.Y. Mets 3, Detroit 2 Baltimore (ss) 7, Boston (ss) 3 N.Y. Yankees 9, Houston (ss) 6 Atlanta (ss) 6, Miami 6, tie Toronto 4, Minnesota 3 Philadelphia 11, Houston (ss) 3 St. Louis 4, Washington (ss) 4, tie, 10 innings Texas 5, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5, tie Milwaukee 7, Kansas City 6 Arizona (ss) 6, Chicago White Sox 4 Arizona (ss) 5, L.A. Angels 2 San Diego 4, Cleveland 4, tie, 10 innings Seattle (ss) 18, San Francisco 3 Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 0 Colorado 5, Oakland 4 Baltimore (ss) 13, Boston (ss) 2 Seattle (ss) 8, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5 Sundays Games Minnesota 1, Philadelphia 1, tie N.Y. Yankees 3, Tampa Bay 3, tie, 10 innings Washington 11, St. Louis 1 Baltimore 9, Pittsburgh (ss) 2 Detroit 3, Miami 1 Houston 4, Toronto 3 Boston 4, Pittsburgh (ss) 1 N.Y. Mets 8, Atlanta 2 L.A. Angels 3, Cincinnati 1 Cleveland 4, Milwaukee (ss) 2 Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 2, tie Colorado 10, Kansas City 1 Milwaukee (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., late San Francisco vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., late San Diego vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., late Todays Games Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Houston vs. Washington at Viera, 6:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 10:10 p.m. Tuesdays Games Toronto vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Boston (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Boston (ss) at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 34 26 .567 Brooklyn 30 30 .500 4 New York 24 40 .375 12 Boston 21 41 .339 14 Philadelphia 15 47 .242 20 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 43 17 .717 Washington 33 29 .532 11 Charlotte 29 34 .460 15 Atlanta 26 35 .426 17 Orlando 19 45 .297 26 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 46 16 .742 Chicago 35 28 .556 11 Detroit 24 38 .387 22 Cleveland 24 40 .375 23 Milwaukee 12 50 .194 34 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 46 16 .742 Houston 43 19 .694 3 Dallas 37 26 .587 9 Memphis 36 26 .581 10 New Orleans 25 37 .403 21 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 46 17 .730 Portland 42 20 .677 3 Minnesota 31 30 .508 14 Denver 27 34 .443 18 Utah 22 41 .349 24 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 44 20 .688 Golden State 39 24 .619 4 Phoenix 36 25 .590 6 Sacramento 22 40 .355 21 L.A. Lakers 22 42 .344 22 x-clinched playoff spot Saturdays Games Utah 104, Philadelphia 92 New York 107, Cleveland 97 Memphis 111, Charlotte 89 San Antonio 121, Orlando 112 Washington 114, Milwaukee 107 L.A. Clippers 109, Atlanta 108 Sundays Games Chicago 95, Miami 88, OT L.A. Lakers 114, Oklahoma City 110 Denver at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 6 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, late Portland at Houston, late Indiana at Dallas, late Phoenix at Golden State, late Todays Games Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Utah, 9 p.m. Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. Dallas at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. National Hock ey League All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 63 41 17 5 87 199 141 Montreal 66 35 24 7 77 166 166 Toronto 65 34 23 8 76 193 198 Tampa Bay 64 34 24 6 74 183 167 Detroit 64 29 22 13 71 171 179 Ottawa 64 28 25 11 67 182 209 Florida 63 24 32 7 55 154 201 Buffalo 63 19 36 8 46 127 186 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 63 42 17 4 88 201 157 N.Y. Rangers 65 35 26 4 74 171 162 Philadelphia 64 33 24 7 73 183 188 Columbus 64 33 26 5 71 186 178 Washington 65 30 25 10 70 191 197 New Jersey 65 28 24 13 69 161 167 Carolina 64 27 28 9 63 160 184 N.Y. Islanders 66 24 33 9 57 181 224 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 63 43 14 6 92 208 143 Chicago 64 37 13 14 88 221 171 Colorado 64 41 18 5 87 196 170 Minnesota 63 34 22 7 75 156 154 Dallas 64 31 23 10 72 185 179 Winnipeg 65 30 28 7 67 180 189 Nashville 64 26 28 10 62 152 191 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 64 43 14 7 93 207 157 San Jose 65 41 17 7 89 199 157 Los Angeles 64 36 22 6 78 155 135 Phoenix 64 29 24 11 69 177 185 Vancouver 66 29 27 10 68 153 174 Calgary 64 25 32 7 57 150 191 Edmonton 64 22 34 8 52 160 208 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3, SO Ottawa 5, Winnipeg 3 St. Louis 2, Colorado 1 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, OT New Jersey 5, Carolina 4 Washington 3, Phoenix 2 Columbus 1, Nashville 0 Dallas 4, Minnesota 3 Vancouver 2, Calgary 1 San Jose 4, Montreal 0 Sundays Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Detroit 0 Boston at Florida, late Chicago at Buffalo, late St. Louis at Minnesota, late Los Angeles at Edmonton, late Todays Games Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m. Nashville at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Colorado, 9 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 9 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Toronto at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Reassigned RHP Fabio Castillo, RHP Mike Wright, and INF Chris Marrero to their minor league camp. MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned LHPs Logan Darnell, Edgar Ibarra and Brooks Raley and RHP Trevor May to Rochester (IL); 1B Kennys Vargas to New Britain (EL); INF Jorge Polanco and OF Max Kepler to Fort Myers (FSL). Reassigned RHPs Alex Meyer, Lester Oliveros and Yohan Pino; Cs Kyle Knudson, Matt Koch and Stuart Turner; OFs Byron Buxton and Chris Rahl and INF Miguel Sano to their minor league camp. NEW YORK YANKEES Optioned RHP Jose Ramirez to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Reassigned LHP Francisco Rondon to their minor league camp. National League CINCINNATI REDS Named Chris Speier special assistant to the president of baseball operations and general manager. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Reassigned RHP Gabriel Alfaro, C Jeff Howell, LHP Tyler Robertson and 1B-3B Matt Skole to their minor-league camp. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS Reassigned G Troy Daniels to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). MIAMI HEAT Assigned G DeAndre Liggins to Sioux Falls (NBADL) for one game. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW YORK JETS Released CB Antonio Cromartie.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, championship, Iona-Canisius winner vs. Manhattan-Quinnipiac-Marist winner, at Springeld, Mass. NBCSN Colonial Athletic Association, championship, Delaware-Northeastern winner vs. Towson-William & Mary winner, at Baltimore9 p.m.ESPN West Coast Conference, seminal, S.F vs. BYU, at Las Vegas ESPN2 Southern Conference, championship, Davidson-Western Carolina winner vs. Georgia Southern-Wofford winner, at Asheville, N.C.11:30 p.m.ESPN2 West Coast Conference, seminal, Gonzaga vs. Saint Marys-Pepperdine winner, at Las VegasNBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m.SUN Washington at Miami8 p.m.FS-Florida Orlando at MilwaukeeSOCCER 3:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Sunderand at LiverpoolWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4 p.m.FS1 Big East Conference, seminal, St. Johns-Seton Hall winner vs. Creighton-But ler winner, at Rosemont, Ill.6:30 p.m.FS1 Big East Conference, seminal, DePaul-Georgetown winner vs. Villanova-Marquette winner, at Rosemont, Ill.7 p.m.ESPN American Athletic Conference, championship, Rutgers-UConn winner vs. Louisville-South Florida winner, at Uncasville, Conn.9 p.m.FS1 Big 12 Conference, championship, Oklahoma State-Baylor winner vs. West Virginia-Texas-Oklahoma winner, at Oklahoma CityWINTER PARALYMPICS At Sochi, Russia NoonNBCSN Events TBA 2 a.m.NBCSN Biathlon masses in Detroit, he was simply the own er of the Lions who struggled to achieve success on the eld despite showing his passion for winning by spending money on free agents, coaches, executives and fa cilities. Fords rst full season leading the Lions was in 1964, seven years af ter the franchise won the NFL title. The lone playoff victory he enjoyed was in 1992. The Lions are the only team to go 0-16 in a season, hitting rock bottom in 2008. After an 11year drought, the Lions improved enough to make the playoffs in 2011 only to lose a combined 21 games over the next two sea sons. No owner loved his team more than Mr. Ford loved the Li ons, Lions President Tom Lewand said in a statement released by the team. Those of us who had the oppor tunity to work for Mr. Ford knew of his un yielding passion for his family, the Lions and the city of Detroit. His leadership, integrity, kindness, humility and good humor were matched only by his desire to bring a Super Bowl championship to the Lions and to our community. Each of us in the organization will continue to relentlessly pursue that goal in his honor. Born into an automotive fortune in 1925 bearing what was already a house hold name, Ford was 23 when he joined the Ford Motor Co. board of directors in 1948, one year after the death of his grandfa ther, Henry Ford. He maintained as low a prole as his name would allow, serving on various ex ecutive committees and spearheading the design, develop ment and introduction of the Continental Mark II in 1956. He was elected a Ford vice chairman in 1980 and retired with that title in 1989. Ford re mained a company director until 2005, later taking the title of director emeritus. Mr. Ford had a pro found impact on Ford Motor Company, Ford CEO Alan Mulally said in a state ment. The company extends its deepest sympathies to the many members of the extended Ford family at this difcult time. While we mourn Mr. Fords death, we also are grateful for his many contributions to the company and the auto indus try. He helped institutionalize the practice of professional management atop the company that began with the naming of Philip Caldwell as Ford CEO in 1979 and as Ford chairman in March 1980, without relinquishing the Ford familys control. FORD FROM PAGE B1 with 1:33 left before James made a layup. Noah also had seven assists and ve blocks with his dad tennis great Yannick Noah looking on. Butler added 16 points and 11 rebounds. Wade tried to car ry the load for Miami, particularly in the ear ly going. Chris Bosh scored 15, but James had another rough afternoon. The four-time MVP is 23 for 59 in the three games since his career-high and franchise-record 61-point effort against Charlotte last week. James also went with out a mask from the start to protect his bro ken nose, after ditch ing it during the previ ous game. He said it was simply uncomfortable, so he decided to play without it even though he was not cleared to do so. The Heat led by 12 in the third quarter, but the Bulls hung in. Augustins 3-pointer and Butlers steal and two free throws put Chicago ahead 7574 midway through the fourth. It was 82-82 with just over two minutes left when Noah blocked a layup by James. Taj Gibson raced the other way for a thunder ous dunk while get ting fouled by Mario Chalmers, drawing a roar from the crowd. James tied it again on a layup with 1:10 left. Wade then stole the ball from Butler and hit two free throws after getting fouled in side by Noah to give Miami an 86-84 lead with 29.2 seconds re maining. But Kirk Hin rich quickly scooped in a runner to knot it at 86 with 20.1 seconds left. After a timeout, James took the in bounds and got stripped driving along the right side by But ler to send this one to overtime. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 Puerto Rico Open Leading Scores Sunday At Trump International Golf Club-Puerto Rico Rio Grande, Puerto Rico Purse: $3.5 million Yardage: 7,506; Par: 72 Final Chesson Hadley (300), $630,000 68-65-67-67 267 Danny Lee (165), $378,000 67-68-66-68 269 Ben Martin (105), $238,000 68-67-70-66 271 Jason Gore (62), $131,950 67-69-66-70 272 Richard H. Lee (62), $131,950 69-68-68-67 272 Carl Pettersson (62), $131,950 71-66-66-69 272 Wes Roach (62), $131,950 69-66-70-67 272 David Toms (62), $131,950 72-64-67-69 272 Ricky Barnes (41), $94,500 68-68-69-68 273 Jerry Kelly (41), $94,500 69-67-67-70 273 Chris Stroud (41), $94,500 73-67-68-65 273 Jonathan Byrd (34), $77,000 69-66-67-72 274 Andrew Loupe (34), $77,000 70-70-65-69 274 James Driscoll (30), $59,500 69-63-75-69 276 Robert Karlsson, $59,500 71-67-69-69 276 Peter Malnati (30), $59,500 73-68-69-66 276 Tim Petrovic (30), $59,500 68-72-66-70 276 Robert Streb (30), $59,500 69-72-66-69 276 Martin Flores (28), $42,420 72-69-69-67 277 Ryo Ishikawa (28), $42,420 70-69-69-69 277 Brooks Koepka, $42,420 72-68-69-68 277 Scott Langley (28), $42,420 72-70-70-65 277 George McNeill (28), $42,420 69-67-68-73 277 Eric Axley (25), $29,050 68-66-72-72 278 Rafael Cabrera Bello, $29,050 69-67-68-74 278 David Hearn (25), $29,050 70-68-69-71 278 Greg Owen (25), $29,050 69-67-71-71 278 Andrew Svoboda (25), $29,050 74-66-68-70 278 Rafael Campos, $21,306 74-69-67-69 279 Bud Cauley (22), $21,306 69-67-72-71 279 Nicolas Colsaerts (22), $21,306 70-69-73-67 279 Brad Fritsch (22), $21,306 71-68-67-73 279 Emiliano Grillo, $21,306 71-71-71-66 279 William McGirt (22), $21,306 68-71-69-71 279 nished third in front of Kesel owskis teammate, pole-sitter Joey Logano. Carl Edwards was fth, and Jimmie Johnson came in sixth. The Las Vegas race is the rst of 11 on 1.5-mile tracks, and NASCAR spent much of the off season working on ways to im prove the racing on these tracks with a new aerodynamics package and other improvements. The changes resulted in 23 driv ers breaking the track speed re cord during qualifying, but the racing wasnt particularly thrilling until that nal lap. Keselowski and Earnhardt are the only two drivers to nish in the top ve in each of the sea sons rst three races, and they dueled down the stretch after Earnhardt passed him for the lead on a restart with 42 laps to go. Earnhardt had gone to the pits on the 211th lap and at tempted to stick it out, while Ke selowski had pitted several laps later. Earnhardt praised NASCARs new Chase setup, which allowed him to take a fuel gam ble in Vegas after winning al ready this season. Additional wins are worth bonus points in the Chase, while a second-place nish doesnt help his posi tion much hence the motiva tion to go for broke on an emp ty tank. Keselowski was in ne form after his third-place nish in Phoenix last week without crew chief Paul Wolfe, who had returned home for his childs birth. Keselowski also nished third at Daytona. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 world ranking. In his own ranking, he feels he belongs in the top ve. He cited an ama teur career that includes going 6-0 in matches to lead Augus ta State to two NCAA ti tles, followed by three PGA Tour wins in seven months. I dont see a lot of guys that have done that besides Tiger Woods and the legends of the game, Reed said. I believe in myself, es pecially with how hard Ive worked. Im one of the top ve players in the world. I feel like Ive proven myself. He joined some ex clusive company. Since 1990, only Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory McIlroy and Sergio Gar cia had three PGA Tour wins before turning 24. This was not an accident, either. Reed has had a share of the lead going into the nal round of all three of his victories the Wyndham Championship last August, the Humana Challenge in January and a World Golf Championship at Doral that featured the strongest eld so far this year. Watson, who won at Riviera three weeks ago, went bogey-free over the nal 27 holes, a strong performance on the overhauled Trump National Doral. REED FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLArcher works three innings as Rays, Yanks tie MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressTAMPA David Phelps boosted his bid to be the New York Yankees fth start er, pitching ve scoreless innings Sunday during a 3-3 tie with the Tampa Bay Rays in 10 innings. Phelps, who gave up three hits and struck out one, is competing with Michael Pi neda, Adam Warren and Vidal Nuno for the nal rota tion spot behind CC Sabath ia, Hiroki Kuroda, Masahi ro Tanaka and Ivan Nova. The right-hander has been touched for two runs over 9 2-3 innings in three spring training starts. Chris Archer allowed two hits and had two strikeouts in 3 1-3 shutout innings for the Rays. Archer struck out his rst two batters, Jacoby Ellsbury and Derek Jeter. Alfonso Soriano had an in eld single and Ellsbury dou bled off the Tampa Bay righthander, who went 9-7 with a 3.22 ERA over 23 starts during his rookie season last year. RED SOX 4, PIRATES 1BRADENTON Clay Buchholz pitched three hitless innings, Mike Carp hit a long homer and the Boston Red Sox beat a Pittsburgh Pirates split squad 4-1 on Sunday. Buchholz faced nine bat ters and got ve outs on grounders. He walked one and struck out one. Jackie Bradley Jr., trying to win the starting job in cen ter eld, gave the Red Sox a 2-0 lead in the second by grounding a two-run single into right eld. In the third, Carp hit his second home run of the spring onto the boardwalk in right-center. Pirates right-hander Char lie Morton worked the rst three innings and allowed three runs (one earned) on ve hits. Pittsburgh was hitless un til the sixth, when Gregory Polanco led off with an in eld single.METS 8, BRAVES 2PORT ST. LUCIE Braves pitcher Kris Medlen left in the fourth inning with a strained forearm and the New York Mets went on to beat Atlanta 8-2 on Sunday. The Mets scored seven un earned runs in the eighth inning to break open a tie game. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was in attendance with his family while on va cation. Facing New York rst base man Matt Clark with two outs, Medlen threw a pitch, grabbed his right elbow and turned his back to home plate. He then removed him self from the game. Medlen was examined by Mets physician Dr. Struan Coleman and was diagnosed with a right forearm strain pending an evaluation back in Disney on Monday.ASTROS 4, BLUE JAYS 3KISSIMMEE R.A. Dickey pitched ve shutout innings Sunday before the Houston Astros came back to beat the Toronto Blue Jays 4-3 in an exhibition game. Dickey threw 82 pitches in ve innings in his third spring start, giving up four hits and a walk while strik ing out four. The Astros got a runner into scoring position against him only with the help of a wild pitch. Marwin Gonzalez and Car los Perez drove in runs for the Astros in the eighth inning off losing pitcher Jere my Jeffress. Eric Kratz had two hits and drove in two for the Blue Jays while catching Dickeys knuckleball through the rst ve innings. Jason Castro tied it for the Astros with a two-run home run in the sixth. Left-hander Rudy Owens, a 26-year-old rookie who has yet to pitch in the major leagues, pitched ve shutout innings for the Astros. TWINS 1, PHILLIES 1FORT MYERS Joe Mauer drove in the games rst run with a rst-inning single, and four Minnesota Twins pitchers combined to twohit the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1-1 tie Sunday. Mauer, who also ied out twice, is batting .250 through ve spring games after mak ing the full-time switch to rst base. The Phillies fell to 2-8-1 this spring, among the worst records in the majors. A two-base throwing er ror by Twins third baseman Brandon Waring opened the door for the Phillies to tie the game in the eighth inning against Twins right-hander Kyle Gibson.NATIONALS 11, CARDINALS 1VIERA Stephen Strasburg overcame a shaky rst inning and the Washington Nationals offense came up big again in an 11-1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday. Making his second start of the spring, Strasburg walked two and gave up an RBI sin gle to his rst three batters before settling down. He went three innings, allowing two hits while throwing 28 of 48 pitches for strikes. Anthony Rendon homered and Wilson Ramos had two hits and three RBIs for the Nationals, who have scored 27 runs in their last three games. KATHY WILLENS / AP Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon, left, congratulates Rays starting pitcher Chris Archer (22) during a fourth-inning pitching change against the New York Yankees on Sunday in Tampa. COLLEGE BASKETBALL KAREEM COPELANDAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE C.J. Fair scored 22 points and No. 7 Syracuse closed the regular season with a 74-58 victory in the programs rst trip to Florida State. Jerami Grant, who had been bothered by back problems recent ly, had 16 points and eight rebounds while Tyler Ennis nished with 16 points for Syr acuse (27-4, 14-4 Atlantic Coast Conference). Okaro White led Flor ida State with 20 points and 10 rebounds. Fel low senior Ian Miller scored 16 points in his last home game while Aaron Thomas chipped in 14. The bubble may have burst for Florida State (18-12, 9-9) which desperately needed a signature win at this point of the season to earn a berth in the NCAA tournament.NO. 2 WICHITA ST. 83, INDIANA ST. 69ST. LOUIS Fred VanVleet scored 22 points including sev eral key baskets late to lead another strong ensemble effort and No. 2 Wichita State remained the nations lone un beaten after defeating Indiana State 83-69 on Sunday in the Missou ri Valley Conference tournament nal. Tekele Cotton added 20 points with four 3-pointers and Ron Baker had 14 points for the Shockers (34-0), who got tested in the second half before put ting the title game out of reach with a 13-0 run capped by two 3-point ers from VanVleet that put them up by 18 points with 5:38 to go. Wichita State matched the NCAA re cord for victories to start the season held by UNLV in 1990-91 with its third straight con vincing tournament win after going 18-0 in the conference regular season. The Shockers won their rst confer ence tournament since 1987. Manny Arop and Justin Gant had 18 points apiece for sec ond-seeded Indiana State (23-10), which has one of the clos er calls against Wich ita State with a sev en-point loss at home in early February.MARYLAND 75, NO. 5 VIRGINIA 69COLLEGE PARK, Md. Maryland closed out its 61st and nal Atlan tic Coast Conference regular season in stunning fashion, outlast ing No. 5 Virginia 75-69 in overtime Sunday to end the Cavaliers 13game winning streak. After blowing a seemingly secure lead in the closing seconds of regulation, the Terrapins never trailed in the ex tra session in front of an emotional sellout crowd of 17,950 at the schools nal home basketball game in a conference it joined as a charter member in 1953. Seth Allen scored ve of his 20 points in over time and Dez Wells n ished with 18 for the Terrapins (17-14, 9-9 ACC), who will play in the Big Ten next season. Maryland had lost six straight to Virginia, including a 61-53 decision in February that was part of the Cav aliers school-record winning streak against ACC competition.NO. 17 SAINT LOUIS 64, UMASS 62AMHERST, Mass. Jordair Jett scored on a driving layup with 3 seconds to play and No. 17 Saint Louis snapped a three-game losing streak with a 64-62 vic tory over Massachusetts on Sunday as the Billikens won the Atlantic 10 regular season title outright for the second straight season. Jett nished with 17 points, including the Billikens last six of the game. PHIL SEARS / AP Florida State guard Aaron Thomas (25) makes a layup over the defense of Syracuse center Baye Moussa Keita, left, on Sunday in Tallahassee.NBA DANNY MOLOSHOK / AP Oklahoma City Thunders Russell Westbrook is called for an offensive foul and then a technical foul after colliding with Los Angeles Lakers Ryan Kelly (4) on Sunday in Los Angeles. JOE RESNICKAssociated PressLOS ANGELES Jodie Meeks scored 24 of his career-high 42 points in the second half, and the Los Angeles Lakers beat Oklahoma City 114110 on Sunday de spite a triple-double by Thunder star Kevin Durant. Pau Gasol added 20 points and 11 re bounds for the in jury-ravaged Lakers, who had lost 29 of their previous 37 games. Meeks was 11 of 18 from the eld and 14 for 14 at the line while becoming the third player to reach the 30-point mark this season for Los Angeles.CELTICS 118, PISTONS 111BOSTON Rajon Rondo had 11 points and a season-high 18 assists, Jeff Green scored 27 points and the Boston Celtics had their second-highest scoring output of the season in a 118111 win over the De troit Pistons on Sun day night. Kris Humphries added a season-high 20 points, including two free throws with 25 seconds left to help Boston seal the win after the Pis tons closed to 113109. Humphries also led Boston with 11 rebounds. NETS 104, KINGS 89NEW YORK Mar cus Thornton scored 15 of his 27 points in the fourth quarter against his old team and Joe Johnson add ed 18 points, help ing the Brooklyn Nets overcome an injury to Paul Pierce in a 104-89 victory over the Sacra mento Kings on Sunday night. Alan Anderson had 11 points and Shaun Livingston and Deron Williams each scored 10 points as the Nets won for the fth time in six games. DeMarcus Cousins had 20 points and 28 rebounds to lead the Kings.No. 7 Syracuse ends losing streak with 74-58 win over Florida StateMeeks powers Lakers past Thunder

PAGE 12

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 GOLF Associated PressRIO GRANDE, Puer to Rico Chesson Hadley won the Puer to Rico Open on Sunday for his rst PGA Tour victory, holding off Danny Lee by two strokes in wind gusting to 25 mph. Making his 13th PGA Tour start, the 26-yearold Hadley birdied the nal two holes at Trump International for a 5-under 67. Hes the rst rookie winner since Jordan Spieth in July in the John Deere Classic. I was so nervous, Hadley said. I did not eat well last night. I did not eat well this morning. Hadley nished at 21-under 267 and earned $630,000, a twoyear tour exemption and spots in The Play ers Championship, PGA Championship and Tournament of Cham pions. He will move into the mid-60s in the world ranking, giving him a chance to get into the Masters if he can crack the top 50 at the end of the Texas Open. It opens up a lot of doors, Hadley said. It guarantees me a ma jor. Ive never played in a major before. He birdied three of the rst ve holes, chipping in on the par-5 fth. Its all about the start and I got off to a great start, Had ley said. Probably the shot that won me the tournament was the chip in on 5. I mean I was dead over there and I hit the nastiest little nipper over there, and it snuck in the left door. Lee birdied three of the last four holes for a 68. The South Korean-born New Zealand er won the 2008 U.S. Amateur and also has European and Web. com victories. I really felt like I did my best. I gave it my best, but Chesson was just playing rock solid, Lee said. He made a couple of good up-and-downs from bad tee shots. When he plays like that, its just really hard to catch. He just didnt make any silly mistakes at all. Hadley won twice last year on the Web. com Tour.NHL FRANK FRANKLIN II / AP New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist (30) deects a shot on goal during the third period of an NHL hockey game against the Detroit Red Wings on Sunday in New York. IRA PODELLAP Sports WriterNEW YORK Henr ik Lundqvist earned his 300th NHL victory and 49th career shutout in the New York Rang ers 3-0 victory over the Detroit Red Wings on Sunday. Lundqvist made 30 saves in shutting out the Red Wings for the second time this sea son, as New York completed a three-game season sweep of its Original Six rival. The Swedish goalie is one win shy of tying Mike Richters franchise record of 301. He caught Rangers great Ed Giacomin for the club mark in shutouts. Lundqvist was ser enaded by the crowd with chants of Henrik, Hen-rik in the games nal minute. Brian Boyle scored in the rst period and Chris Kreider had two third-period goals for the Rangers, who won their second straight after an 0-2-1 skid and moved into second place in the Metropolitan Division. Derek Stepan and Ryan McDonagh both assisted on each of Kreiders goals. Jimmy Howard stopped 28 shots for the Red Wings, who have lost three of four. Kreider provided all the insurance Lund qvist would need for his milestone win. He made it 2-0 just 14 sec onds into the third by deecting in Mc Donaghs shot from the left point and pushed the lead to three goals at 12:12, beating Howard with a shot as he drove down the left wing for his 16th this season.Lundqvist gets 300th win as N.Y. Rangers blank Red Wings 3-0Chesson Hadley wins Puerto Rico Open by two over Danny Lee RICARDO ARDUENGO / AP U.S. Chesson Hadley poses for pictures with his Puerto Rico Open PGA trophy on Sunday after winning the tournament in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico.

PAGE 13

LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014STUDY: Surgery helps some prostate cancer patients / C5 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Support group for the widowed to meetThe LIFE-Social Support Group for the Widowed will hold a luncheon at 11:30 a.m., March 19 at the Lake Tech Vocational School, 2100 Kurt St., Eustis. Lunch will be prepared by Lake Techs Culinary Arts program and will be served in the dining room on the north side of the building. Second Time Around will entertain. The cost is $10. Reservations may be made by calling 352-787-0403 or by emailing rreed@beyersfhc.comTAVARES Childhood sexual abuse support group set to meetAdult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, which offers the 12step program, meets at 7 p.m., every Tuesday in Tavares. For information, call 352-406-7485, or go to www.siawso.org.LAKE COUNTY AARP driver safety classes to be offeredRene your driving skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits through AARP. Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts after completing the class. The cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, and payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. The two-day course will be offered from 1 to 4 p.m., today and Wednesday at Lady Lake Library, 225 W. Guava St. Register by calling 352-753-2957, ext. 114; and 1 to 4 p.m., March 18 and 20 at HardenPauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis. Register by calling 352-394-0250. THE VILLAGES Moffitt Cancer Center to host support group meetingThe Moftt Cancer Center at The Villages Regional Hospital will offer a support program for newly diagnosed and long-term survivors of advanced cancer. Topics will cover managing the illness and treatment decisions. The programs are offered twice a month on the rst and third Friday, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., at the Moftt Cancer Center. Register by calling 800-227-2345.LEESBURG Doctors to talk about health care issuesPhysicians and other medical professionals will talk about health care issues during the Chart Your Course Peoples Medical School series at Lake-Sumter State College, 9501 U.S. 441 in Leesburg. Exercise in Motion will be the topic from 3 to 4 p.m., Thursday with dietetic intern Kylee Gumm, and from 4 to 5 p.m., Fluids to Power Your Exercise Routine will be discussed by Kimberly Krisan, a Juice Plus wellness coach. Call 352365-3556 for details.LEESBURG Cholesterol, blood sugar testing to be offered SaturdayMid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care invite the public to an open house from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Saturday at 401 and 501 North Blvd. West in Leesburg. Patients get free cholesterol lipid test and blood sugar testing at the event. MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterA second baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treat ment in this instance, four hours after birth. Doctors revealed the case Wednesday at an AIDS conference in Bos ton. The girl was born in suburban Los Angeles last April, a month after researchers announced the rst case from Mississippi. That was a medical rst that led doctors worldwide to rethink how fast and hard to treat in fants born with HIV, and the California doctors followed that example. In another AIDS-related development, scientists have modied genes in the blood cells of a dozen adults to help them re sist HIV. The results give hope that this approach might one day free at least some people from needing medicines to keep HIV un der control, a form of cure. That study was published in Thursdays New England Journal of Medicine. The Mississippi baby is now 3 1/2 and seems HIVfree despite no treatment for about two years. The Los Angeles baby is still getting AIDS medicines, so the status of her infection is not as clear. A host of sophisticated tests at multiple times sug gest the LA baby has completely cleared the virus, said Dr. Deborah Persaud, a Johns Hopkins University physician who led the test ing. The babys signs are different from what doctors see in patients whose infections are merely sup pressed by successful treat ment, she said. We dont know if the baby is in remission ... but it looks like that, said Dr. Yvonne Bryson, an infec tious disease specialist at Mattel Childrens Hospital UCLA who consulted on the girls care. Doctors are cautious about suggesting she has been cured, but thats ob viously our hope, Bryson said. Most HIV-infected moms in the U.S. get AIDS medicines during preg nancy, which greatly cuts the chances they will pass the virus to their babies. The Mississippi babys mom received no prena tal care and her HIV was discovered during labor. Doctors started the baby on treatment 30 hours af ter birth, even before tests could determine whether she was infected. The LA baby was born at Miller Childrens Hospital Long Beach, and we knew this mother from a previous pregnancy and that she was not taking her HIV medicines, said Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pe diatric infectious disease specialist at the hospital. The mom was given AIDS drugs during labor to try to prevent trans mission of the virus, and Deveikis started the baby on them a few hours af ter birth. Tests later con rmed she had been infected, but does not ap pear to be now, nearly a year later. The baby is continu ing treatment, is in foster care and looking very healthy, Bryson said. The Mississippi girl was treated until she was 18 months old, when doctors lost contact with her. Ten months later when she Doctors hope for cure in a second baby born with HIV JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE / APIn this undated image, Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins Childrens Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. PENN MEDICINE / AP Technicians in Penn Medicines Clinical Cell and Vaccine Production Facility in Philadelphia hold up a bag of modied T cells genetically modied to resist HIV infection. MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressATLANTA Home births have risen to their highest level in about four decades but are still only a fraction of all births, ac cording to a recent gov ernment. A little more than 1 per cent of U.S. births occur at home, the Centers for Dis ease Control and Preven tion reported. Experts say they remain largely a phe nomenon of white wom en and those who live in remote areas. In the 20th century, births shifted from homes to hospitals. Out-of-hos pital deliveries were down to 1 percent by 1969. But around 2004, they began inching up again and reached about 1.36 percent in 2012. That translates to about 35,000 births in homes and an other 16,000 in freestand ing, birthing centers While more birthing centers have opened, per haps the main driver was an increase in out-of-hospital births involving white mothers, said T.J. Mathews, one of the au thors of the new report. The proportion of white moms delivering out side hospitals rose to 1 in 49. For Hispanic, black and Asian mothers, it is around 1 in 200. Experts believe theres been a culture shift among many white women, who question high rates of ce sarean sections in hospitals and have come to think of home births with midwives as a preferable alternative. Alaska had the most out-of-hospital births about 1 in 17. Women in remote locations may not able to get to hospitals in time for delivery.Home births still rising, driven by white momsSEE HIV | C5The ultimate goal is to create an immune system in the body thats been edited genetically so the cells are not capable of being infected with HIV, but we are a long way from there at this point.Dr. Anthony Fauci

PAGE 14

C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: I thought I was a healthy 40-year-old until I was diagnosed with high blood pressure. My doctor began treating it as a stand-alone condition, without consider ing that high blood pressure is a major risk factor for kidney disease. At rst, I wasnt even tested for kidney disease. But eventually, he gave me a urine test, and it was discovered that I had protein in my urine one of the earliest signs of kidney damage. Apparently, my high blood pressure had damaged my kidneys. Healthy kidneys lter out wastes and toxins, but my kidneys ability to do so began to decrease at an alarming rate. I continued to manage my blood pressure with medication and decided to make a few lifestyle changes, as well, that helped me avoid the progression of kidney disease to kidney failure. I limited my salt intake, started eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, decreased the amount of meat I was eating and began swimming every day. I began to feel better, and when I went to the doctor, it turned out my kidney function had stabilized. Please tell your readers that if they have high blood pressure they should be proactive and ask their doctor to check their kidneys. Early detection and lifestyle change can make a major impact on your health, as I have learned. DUANE SUNWOLD, SPOKANE, WASH. DEAR DUANE: It is generous of you to share your medical history in an effort to caution my readers. The National Kidney Foundation urges everyone to learn about these vital organs and whether they might be at risk. The three major risk factors for kidney disease are: high blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of kidney failure. People who have these risk factors should ask their doctor to check their kidney function with a simple blood and urine test. Readers, March is National Kidney Month, and March 13 is World Kidney Day. If you are at risk, schedule an appointment with your doctor. For anyone who needs more information, the National Kidney Foundations website is kidney.org. DEAR ABBY: Im a member of the clergy who enjoys study ing for my ministry and doctor al work at a local coffee shop. Three men who go there every day have found out that Im a minister, and they each want to talk with me while Im there. Although all three are members of the same religion, none of them is afliated with a church. I have invited them to visit my worship services, as well as call the ofce and set up an appointment with me. I have also tried to diplomatically explain that I go to the coffee shop to study. One of them ignores it, another appears hurt and the third one gets offended. When theyre not around, I am productive. When they show up, they want me to be their chaplain. Because of where I live, nding another coffee shop is not a viable option. How can I set a boundary with them and still do my studying there? Thank you. REVEREND KEN IN NEW YORK DEAR REVEREND: Do it the same way doctors or lawyers do with people who approach them for free advice outside the ofce. As soon as you are approached, say rmly, Im studying right now. If you want to talk, please call my ofce and Ill schedule an appointment with you. Right now Im busy. And then refuse to be intimidated by their reaction. Unless you draw the line, theyll suck you dry.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS High blood pressure can quietly damage kidneys

PAGE 15

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

PAGE 16

C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO At age 80, retired Chicago physician and educator Dan Winship is getting a bittersweet last chance to teach about medicine only this time hes the subject. In the early stages of Alz heimers disease, Winship is giving a young medical student a close-up look at a devastating illness affect ing millions of patients worldwide. The two are part of a buddy program pair ing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pioneered at Northwest ern University and ad opted at a handful of other medical schools. Besides offering students a unique per spective on a disease theyre likely to en counter during their careers, the programs give patients a sense of purpose and a chance to stay socially engaged before their illness eventually robs their minds. Winship and his buddy, rst-year medical student Jar ed Worthington, are building a friendship dining together, visiting museums, chat ting about Winships medical career and Worthingtons plans for his own. The programs help erase the stigma of Alz heimers and are laud able for introducing students to medical opportunities related to aging and dementia, said Beth Kallmyer, an Alzheimers Association vice president who over sees outreach services. More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimers or some oth er form of dementia, a number that could triple by 2050, the group estimates. Data presented at an Alzheimers Association conference last year showed the pro grams are increasing medical students knowledge of the disease beyond what they learn in the classroom. About 75 percent of Northwestern students who participate become doctors in elds that deal with Alzheimers patients, said program director Dar by Morhardt. For everyone, the di agnosis is a cruel blow. For Winship, it was nothing less. You cant remember anything, Winship said, sometimes faltering to nd the right words. You lose your ability ... to keep your wits about you. Alzheimers wreaks havoc, he said. But Winship has grown to see it as a chance to meld his loves of med icine and teaching. A gastroenterology specialist, Winship spent nearly 10 years as medical school dean at Chicago-based Loyola University. His career also included stints at the University of Missouri in Columbia and the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C. He re tired in 2010, from the American Medical Association. Early last year, he got the dreaded diagnosis. Jean Schmidt Winship, 53, his wife of 10 years, says at rst she thought his occasional forget fulness and difculty learning new comput er programs were just signs of aging. But his symptoms gradually worsened. Jean Winship scrambled to learn more about their options af ter the diagnosis and found the buddy program online. Everyone in the buddy program is very committed to under standing that people at this stage of any kind of dementia still need to live and enjoy life, she said. Alzheimers is not Dan, its just a disease that he has. And so, that was huge for us ... realizing we have a lot of living to do here. In the program, rst-year students are matched for a school year with patients, based mostly on com mon interests. Winship is an open, engaging man with twinkly dark eyes and a groomed salt-and-pep per beard. He was the rst choice for many students who joined the program last fall, said Morhardt, the program founder and director. She had a hunch, though, that he and Jared Worthington would click. Worthington, 25, a native Canadian born in Sarnia, Ontario, is perhaps more reserved than his Texas-born mentor, but with obvious earnestness and empathy for what Winship is going through. Worthingtons grandmother is in the later stages of Alzheimers. He said he hopes being a buddy will inform how I inter act with patients and hopefully treat them with more compassion and understanding. Its something scary and difcult but just because you have Alz heimers doesnt mean that ... your life is over, Worthington said. You can still contribute and give back and partici pate meaningfully. 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Thank you for giving me my SMILE BACK!rfrrfnt fbffffbfrbfr bfntfrrr fbffbffrffbfrrnb fbrrnfbbfrrrfrfbf ffbfr bfnrrr fffrfn rbffb brf fbrffbbff fbfff nrbrffb frbfffb fffn rrfrn nrrrf fbbn rffbb ffbfn bfrbrrf n bfn MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Alzheimers buddy program pairs patients, students TERESA CRAWFORD / AP First-year Northwestern University medical student Jared Worthington, right, walks with his Alzheimers buddy, retired physician Dan Winship, after eating lunch in Chicagos Streeterville neighborhood.

PAGE 17

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted returned, they could nd no sign of infection even though the mom had stopped giving her AIDS medicines. Bryson is one of the leaders of a federally funded study just get ting underway to see if very early treatment can cure HIV infection. About 60 babies in the U.S. and other coun tries will get very ag gressive treatment that will be discontinued if tests over a long time, possibly two years, sug gest no active infection. These kids obvious ly will be followed very, very closely for signs of the virus, said Per saud, who described the LA case at the Con ference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic In fections. The study in adults was prompted by an AIDS patient who appears cured after getting a cell transplant seven years ago in Ber lin from a donor with natural immunity to the virus. Only about 1 percent of people have two copies of the gene that gives this protection, and researchers have been seeking a more practical way to get similar results. HIV usually infects blood cells through a protein on their surface called CCR5. A Cali fornia company, San gamo BioSciences Inc., makes a treatment that can knock out a gene that makes CCR5. Dr. Carl June at the University of Pennsylvania tested it in 12 HIV patients who had their blood ltered to remove some of their cells. The treated cells were infused back into the patients. Four weeks later, half of the patients were temporarily taken off AIDS medicines to see the gene therapys ef fect. The virus returned in all but one of them; that patient turned out to have one copy of the protective gene. We knew that the vi rus was going to come back in most of the pa tients, but the hope is that the modied cells eventually will outnumber the rest and give the patient a way to control viral lev els without medicines, said Dr. Pablo Tebas, one of the Penn researchers. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored the work with Sangamo and Penn. The ultimate goal is to create an immune system in the body thats been edited genetically so the cells are not capable of be ing infected with HIV, said director Dr. Antho ny Fauci, but we are a long way from there at this point. Jay Johnson, 53, who works for Action AIDS, an advocacy and ser vice organization in Philadelphia, had the treatment more than three years ago. Although the virus rebounded when he tem porarily went off HIV medicines, tests show his modied blood cells are still multiplying. Hopefully one day Ill be able to say Im HIV negative again, he said. HIV FROM PAGE C1 MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterSurgery to remove the prostate sav es lives compared to watchful waiting for some men whose cancers were found because they were causing symptoms, long-term results from a Scandi navian study suggest. However, U.S. men should not assume that immedi ate treatment is best, doctors warn, because the study was done before PSA testing became common, and a newer study found the opposite. PSA blood tests are not rec ommended for screening by leading medical groups but are widely used in the U.S. That has led to a dramatic increase in the number of prostate can cers found at a very early stage. Whether to treat them is a big question. Most tumors grow too slowly to threaten a mans life and there is no good way to tell which ones will. Treatments can cause impotence, inconti nence and other problems. In Europe, PSA testing is far less common, and most prostate cancers are found when they cause symptoms such as trouble urinating. Symptoms like this suggest a larger or more advanced tumor. The study involved 695 such men in Sweden, Finland and Iceland, diagnosed between 1989 and 1999. Half were given surgery to remove their prostates and the rest were closely monitored and given surgery only if symptoms or signs of cancer worsened. Earlier results suggested that the surgery group fared better. That trend strengthened as time went on. By the end of 2012, 200 men in the surgery group and 247 in the group assigned to monitor ing had died 56 percent and 69 percent, respectively. Immediate surgery most benetted men younger than 65; it didnt reduce deaths in those over that age. This study tells us we should be very careful about treating anyone over the age of 65 ... and anyone who has low-grade disease, said Dr. Otis Braw ley, chief medical ofcer of the American Cancer Society. In the U.S., fewer men are getting treatment right away, and thats a good trend and we need to continue that, he said.Swedish study: Surgery helps some prostate cancer patients

PAGE 18

C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services Lawn Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services

PAGE 19

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Professional Services Psychic Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Roofing Services Restoration

PAGE 20

C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com LINDSEY TANNERAssociated PressCHICAGO Most p eople who abuse ad dictive prescription painkillers get them for free from friends or relatives, while drug dealers are a relatively un common source for those at highest risk for deadly overdoses, a government study found. People who abuse the most frequently often doctor-shop; more than 1 in 4 who used these drugs almost dai ly said they had been prescribed by one or more physicians. Almost as many said they got them for free from friends or relatives; only 15 percent of the most frequent abusers said they bought the drugs from dealers or other strangers. Those abusers are probably using at much greater volumes and simply asking a friend for a pill now and then is not going to be sufcient, said Dr. Leonard Paulozzi, a researcher at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the study, two-thirds of abusers said they used the drugs infrequently and well over half of these users said they got them free from friends or relatives. Paulozzi and CDC colleagues analyzed four years of nation wide health surveys on nonmedical use of pain relievers including oxy codone and hydroco done. These include the brand-name pills Oxy Contin and Vicodin, in a family of drugs called opioids chemically similar to opium. The study was pub lished online March 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Paulozzi said overall prevalence of nonmedical use of prescription opioid painkillers has held steady in recent years, at about 12 mil lion, or 1 in 20 people aged 12 and older. But previous CDC data show overdose deaths involving these drugs more than tripled from 1999 to 2010, with more than 16,000 deaths that year. By contrast, overdose deaths that in volved heroin and co caine totaled less than 8,000, and deaths that involved often-abused prescription drugs that include anti-anxi ety medication totaled about 6,500. A separate study in the same journal pres ents Tennessee among states hardest hit by prescription drug abuse as a snapshot of the problem. From 2007 through 2011, one-third of Tennes sees population lled an opioid prescription each year, the study found. Nearly 8 per cent had used more than four prescribers and these abusers were more than six times more likely to have fatal overdoses than the least frequent users. The larger nation wide study included data from annual gov ernment health sur veys for 2008-2011 that included questions about use of these powerful painkillers. Nonmedical use was dened as use without a prescription or use with a prescription for the feeling or experience caused by the drug, the researchers said. Paulozzi said the data dont indicate wheth er friends and relatives who offered free drugs shared their own pre scriptions or had ob tained the medication in some other way. Public health messag es have urged patients with legitimate prescriptions for addictive painkillers not to share the drugs and to turn in any leftovers to desig nated drop-off sites.Most abusers of addictive prescription meds get them free from friends, relatives

PAGE 21

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbr bnnbrt r f f ntb f r n t rbn bbnt r r r r f f r f nr t bn bbnt ftnn bbtbbtbnbnb rnbbbntb rb bnn rn r f tnn f f rnbbbnttb bbtnbtbntn r rfrnbtnbbr frr rnnrrb btbbnttb tnnbr r f r r r r r r btnnbbtbtt btnbrnrbnbb bntbnbbtbbtt bnnntnbbtnb nbtnr tbtn t tbb t b t b t n t n b b n n b b b n t t n b t r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b r n b b b r n t r t t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b t n n b t n b b r n n b t r r b n t b b t b b n n b b n n b r n n b b n b r n f f n n b n b b t b nnbttnbtr bbtnr b nnr bbb bbntb b r r r f f r nr t bn bbnt ftnn bbtbbtbnbnb rnbbbntb rbb nnr nrtn n rttb rnb nbbbnttbbbtn btbntn r rfrr rnnrn rrbbtb bnttbtnnbr r r r r r r r r r r f r btnnbbtbtt btnbrnrbnbb bntbnbbtbbtt bnnntnbbtnb nbtnr tbtn t tbb t b t b t n t n b b n n b b b n t t n b t r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b r n b b b r n t r t t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b t n n b t n b b r n n b t r r b n t b b t b b n n b b n n b r n n b b n b r n f f n n b n b b t b nnbttnbtr bbtnr b nnr bbb bbntb b r ntbb tbbnnbbn nbrn nbbnbrnf fnnbnbbt b nnbttnbtr bbtnr b nnr bbb bbntb btnbtbbbnbnnbn nttnbt r r r f f fr fr nr t bbnt ftnn b rrnbbb ntbb bnn rfr frtnn r r f fr rr fr nbbbnttbbbtn btbntn r rfr rfr rnrbn rrbbtb bnttbtnnbr f f r r r r r r r r r r f r r f r r r r btnnbbtbtt btnbrnrbnbb bntbnbbtbbtt bnnntnbbtnb nbtnr tbtn t tbb tbtbtn tnbb nnbbbnt tnbtrnbnbtn tnbbtnnn bnnbtbbr nbbbrntrtt bnntttnbbntbnb tnnbtnbbr nnbtrrb rrf rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

PAGE 22

D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 rfntnb r f n r t t r f b f n n n n nfntfr nnfrfrrfn fnrfnr r f n f t n r f n f r r f r n n n n r r r f n n n t fn trnrrfrf r f n f f f n r n n n nftrt nrrfnftr ftnnrr rrrfn nnrrrrffnr frrfrfnr rfrtfrntff tfnrrrfn trrn n t n t r n t r t rfn nrtnnnrrfttnr rnfrnftf n t b n t r r t r t r r r f t r f n n n r r f n n n n t r t b b n n f n t r t r r r f t f n t r f t t t n f f f r f f f n t n n t rfrnrb nrffnrtfrf bnrnrr n t n r f n r r r f r b n r n r r n r f n r f f n r f n f t t r n r t n n n t frtnbrtr rbrrftrrff nrfnnn n t fr frfnrtt nnfrnn n t n t r f n r f t r n t t f f t f f r f t n fnt n r f r b r f t n r n n f r f f n r f n t n f n n r n t f t t f r r f r f f n n r f t r n f r r f n b f f t t r r f f f n f r f r r r f b r r f f n f r n n f r n n b t n b b t n r f r f n n r t t r f b t r f r f b n r f r b f n f n r f n t n r t t r f b r f r f b t n r f r f n f r n r r f b r t r b f r r f b f n r f f r n r f r r t n r bt b n r t r f t f t n f n n r t n t n t n f n r r nt n n r f t n b n f r f t r f f r r f n n r f r f f n r r t n n t r n n t r f n t n r r f n n r t t r f n f t r f r frnrtf frnrf nnn fnrtrn n f r f n n r t r t n r f n t f r n r f t n f n f r fnr n r r t r t f n n f n f r f r f n r f f r f n n t n t r n t r r f n r n r n r f r n t f r n r r n r n f n r r n r r r r f r f r r f n r t f n f r f f t n r r r f f r t n f f n r r f r n t fnr bn fn r f r f n n n f n n n f f f n r n t f n n f r f f n r r f r r f n r f n f r r r f r r n n r f r r f n f r f n f f f r r f n t f r f n r f n t f n r n f n n b n r r n t f n r f n n n t n r f r r f f r t b rfrfrt nnrfrrffntr n rfntfrf b b b n f r f n r t n n n b b fn n r f r rfrrrfntr rnr nnnrrf nrffrf rntrnnnn rfrffrf nrtrnnf rffrfr nb rrnbnnnr frrnnrff rffrf t nfrfnr rrnfnn nrfnnnrn nffnr nfnnrfft fffntfrfft fffntfrf ffffff fffftfftrff rftfnnrfrnr frf ntnfrf nrnnr tnttfff rrffrrff nnrnnn nrffrfrfrfr nf nr fnrnn fnnn rnrrfnffr nrrfrnrnrn rnnnrfrfrnfn rttrnnnr rfnrfnnr tfrftrf tffrnf nn fnr n nb t rfr ff rfffffrrrfrfrf ffffffr ntnnrfrrffr rnnrfffrnr nfrfnrnrfnf nfnnfrtrf rrrf nfrfrrf nnnnn ftffnnn ftfnn nnrrnr rfr nrnfrnnr fffrnnf nrnfffr nnfffnr nftrffff nrrfrfrrff fffnrrtrfnfn frfftff nfffnr nrfffnrtrtf rfnrnrnf nnrtffffnrrf rfrrfffff nrrtrfnfnf rfftff nfffnrn rfffnrtrtfrfn rnrnfn nrtf ff nff nnfnfnrf rr rnrnrrrnrrff nfnrnrfn frfrrfnn nnnftff nnnftf nnn nrrnrrfrf nrnfrnn rfffrnn fnrnnffn nrrr frnn f nrrfnr nnnrfrrftf r n n f r r r r f f t t r f r f n n n r r r f r n r f n f r f n r r f n r f r f f n r f n r n r n t r f r n n r f n r n n r f r r f n r f n n r r f r n n r f n r r t r n r fnr nnrr fnr nb rnr nrrrnrrffn fr rfrf nffr rfrnn f rf nrnnnrfrrf tfr nfrtrffrfnrfn ntrfnfnn fnrfft rrtrrfn r nrn n r f r r n r n f t r f r n r n n f n f r t n r f r r r r r r n n f r r r r f f t t r f r f n n n r r r f r n r f n f r f n r r f n r f r f f n t r f r n n r f n n f r r f n r f n n r r f r n r f r n n r f r t r n r n r r t r n r n r n r tr fbr n frf f rtr rfnrtrfrff rt b t rfr ff nf ffnrf rfr ff nff nnnttnrftf nnfnf fnrf rnr nrffnfnr nrfrrfr f f n ffrrf rnnrnnfntrf frrfn rfnnnrt fn rfnrnnnrf rnnnrftfr fnfrtnrfr rrrrnffrf rttrfnrrrfr nrffn nfnfrrfnrn nrffrr fnfn rnrnr nnrf nrnrn n n nfnrfr nn f nrtrfnnt b ffn nnfrf frfn nnnfrf nrnn frrffn nrnnnnrf frfrfrn nfnrfrnr fnn rrrrfrnnrn rrfrrrf frnrrfr nrnrnnnrf rfrnfnrttrnn nrrfnrf nnrtfrftrf nnfrrrr ffttrfrfnn nrrrfrnrfn frfnrrf nrfrff nrfnrnrn trfrnnrfn rnnr frrf nrfnnrrnr frnnrfnrrtrn tff nn n nb t

PAGE 23

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbr rfntb n nn nn t n n r rf rfnn brr nn r rfn bn n t n n b n n n n nrfn b nn r nrn r nnn n n ntnn nn n nnn n n n n bn b n rf n rn rr ftnnn n ntb b nrfnn nnn bn nnr n n n f nnn rf nr rn nn n b t nnnrnnn ff f nnn tn nn nrnnn n r f n nn nn nt nn rfr nn nrnn n rnnn r n n nn n t n n n n b t b n r nntb rr nnbrnn rf nrf nnn r n r t n rfb nn t n r n nn n nn rtrf r nn b n t n r n n f n rfn rn n nn rfnnn bnn n r nnn nnnnn nn r b n nnn n ntrfnn nr nrf nnnn t n rf t n r r n t n t n n n b n n n n n t t t n r n nn f nnn n rnn nn n tf rftfn n tf b nnnnn n nnrn n nn f nfr n n t f n r n t r n t t t n n r n n n t f r n n n n n n n b n b n n n n f r f f n n b n n n n n n n r t n n t b rnn fnnnn rnnn n b n n n n t n n n n n n n r r r b b r t nnrnn nt n n n r n n nn tn r nbtn n n f n t n n n nrr nnn b n n n n n n n



PAGE 1

Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALr r$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 REED HOLDS ON TO WIN CADILLAC CHAMPIONSHIP, SPORTS B1 LEESBURG ART FESTIVAL: Man with local ties wins Best of Show A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Doctors hope for a cure for baby born with HIV C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 10, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 69 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C2 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C2 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 79 / 56 Pleasant with sunshine. 50 JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LYNN BERRY Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine Russian President Vladimir Putin on Sunday defended the sep aratist drive in the disput ed Crimean Peninsula as in keeping with internation al law, but Ukraines prime minister vowed not to relin quish a single centimeter of his countrys territory. Over the weekend, the Kremlin beefed up its military presence in Crimea, a part of Ukraine since 1954, and pro-Russia forces keep push ing for a vote in favor of reuni cation with Moscow in a ref erendum the local parliament has scheduled for Sunday. President Barack Obama has warned that the March 16 vote would violate inter national law. But in Mos cow, Putin made it clear that he supports the referendum in phone calls with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Minister David Cameron. The steps taken by the legitimate leadership of Crimea are based on the norms of international law and aim to ensure the legal interests of the population of the peninsula, said Putin, according to the Kremlin. Following an extraordi nary Sunday meeting of the Ukrainian government, Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk announced that he will meet with Obama in CHRIS BRUMMITT and EILEEN NG Associated Press KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Vietnam ese aircraft spotted what they suspected was one of the doors of a missing Boe ing 777 on Sunday, while troubling ques tions emerged about how two passengers managed to board the ill-fated aircraft using stolen passports. Interpol conrmed it knew about the sto len passports but said no authorities checked its vast databases on stolen documents be fore the Boeing jetliner departed Saturday en route from Kuala Lum pur to Beijing. Warning only a handful of coun tries routinely make such checks, Interpol MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com C owboy bar ghts, steers and live western mu sic helped the annu al Sumter County Fair get off to a great coun try start this weekend. Celebrating its 97th year, the fair opened Friday and runs through March 15. The festivities in clude rodeos as well as amusement rides, auctions, beauty pag eants, a smorgasboard of cotton candy, candy apples and other car nival food. But beef shows that allowed students to parade their livestock in front of judges were one of the highlights this weekend. This allows kids to show off their prized animals, said Larry Wells, an ofcial with the beef show. Filled with mostly heifers, more than 90 head of cattle partici pated in the beef shows Saturday. Many of the students, wearing jeans, boots and cow boy hats, who brought the cattle to the show, washed and groomed their animals in the holding barn as they prepared to lead them into the show ring. Cheyanne White, a 15-year-old South Sumter High School student, could be seen running an or ange comb through her black-colored heif er named Belle ear ly Saturday afternoon. She raised the animal on her familys Oxford farm. She smiled when asked what got her in terested in the show. My father was a cowboy, she said. Many of the students were from Future Farmers of America (FFA), and were mak ing return appearanc es. Show veteran Mat thew Staples, a South Lake High School stu dent and vice pres ident of the district FFA, brought his heif er, Cassidy, from his familys 12-acre farm. We get to show how well we have tak en care of our animals and how well-trained they are, Staples said. Saturdays show also included the debut of Webster Elementa ry Schools Cody Wal ton and D.J., his heifer. Walton is a member of 4H, a youth develop ment and empower ment program. I just thought it would be fun, said BUSHNELL Western sketches, livestock shows open county fair in style PHOTOS BY MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Matthew Staples, a South Lake High School student and vice president of the district FFA, shows off his heifer, Cassidy, during a beef show at the Sumter County Fair on Saturday in Bushnell. The fair runs through March 15. BELOW: Riders take a whirl on the Vertigo carnival ride. Vietnam says it may have found missing jets door ANDY WONG / AP A relative of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, center, cries as she leaves a hotel room in Beijing, China on Sunday. Associated Press WASHINGTON Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist on Sunday stuck to his support of President Baracks health care overhaul, saying its been great for the state despite a difcult rollout. In an interview with CNNs State of the Union Crist said Obama has a compas sionate heart and pre dicted the public would eventually embrace the health care law. At the end of the day this is going to be a very popular pro gram because its do ing the right thing for the people of our coun try and my state, Crist said. The president is a smart guy and hes Crist defends President Obama, blasts Scott Putin defends Crimean separatist drive SERGEI CHUZAVKOV / AP People shout slogans during a pro Russian rally at a central square in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Sunday. SEE FAIR | A2 SEE CRIST | A2 SEE JET | A2 SEE PUTIN | A2

PAGE 2

A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 10, 2014: This year a lot happens very quickly in your life. You barely have enough time to adjust to one surprise before another one pops again. Stay exible, and be willing to look at the glass as being half-full rather than half-empty. If you are single, you might nearly commit several times, possibly to different people. Take your time, and get to know your potential suitors. If you are attached, the two of you en joy a more playful and fun time together, as if you were just starting to date. Give up being rigid or determined to have your way. Just enjoy your sweetie. CANCER is as emotional as you are! ARIES (March 21-April 19) You have a air for cre ating tension, as people nd you to be unpredict able. However, a role rever sal seems to be at play: A partner or loved one could decide that impulsiveness is a great way to go. Strap on your seat belt! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) How you handle the key people in your daily environ ment reects who you are. You intuitively know what others want or need. Even still, your best bet is to al low others to ask for your help before rushing in to ful ll an anticipated need. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You are able to juggle your nances with the best of them. You are likely to discover how difcult a situ ation can be, especially if it revolves around a friend or loved one. A meeting also could be provocative, but on a different level. CANCER (June 21-July 22) While others play out their Monday-itis, you seem to be full of unusual and effective ideas. Test them out on several people be fore launching into action. Your sense of well-being will emerge when dealing with a loved one at a distance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might not want to share too many of your thoughts right now; instead, lis ten carefully to a partner or friend. This person will have a lot of great ideas to share, and you could get feedback that might sur prise you. Unexpected news heads your way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You seem to know what to do in order to achieve specic results. Listen to a loved one when discuss ing an unpredictable associ ate or partner. This person sees the issue different ly from how you do. You will like whats about to happen. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Others expect you to come to the rescue for them when they arent able to help themselves. You could be a little ticked off by this attitude. Your plate is full, and you have a lot of ground to cover. Refuse to take on any extra work for now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are bound to make a difference by expressing a more complete perspective of a problem. Know that you dont need to be so vested in the outcome. Others will be impressed by your drive and determination. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Someone glad ly would take up all of your time and attention, if you would allow it. Only you can decide if this is OK. State your boundaries clearly. If a loved one is involved, do not be surprised if you re ceive a volatile response. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Others cant seem to get enough of you. How ever, you have a strong need to go a certain way, and you dont want anyone holding you back. You could have some difculty explain ing this desire to a needy friend or loved one. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You seem more than capable of staying away from problems today, as long as you dont take an unusual nancial risk. In coming news could shock you, or you could surprise someone else. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You could be taken aback by a sudden and un expected nancial change. Tap into your creativity in order to nd the right solu tion. As a result, youll nd the right person with whom to connect regarding a proj ect in the near future. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US MARCH 9 CASH 3 ............................................... 9-8-1 Afternoon .......................................... 9-9-1 PLAY 4 ............................................. 5-4-1-9 Afternoon ....................................... 5-9-4-8 FLORIDA LOTTERY MARCH 8 FANTASY 5 ........................... 6-20-21-24-32 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 7-9-13-17-21-43 POWERBALL .................. 10-14-24-32-4130 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. Walton, feeding his heifer. Staged western shows were also among Saturdays activities. One act, full of com edy, featured a gunslinger entering a sa loon fully dressed and armed only to come out in his underwear, gunless and drunk. Having no idea how he lost his valuables, the gunslinger was ready to start a ght, eliciting a quick response from the sheriff. Its a lot of family fun, said Mike Shep erd, who played the sheriff with replicas of a .45 and sawed-off shotgun by his side. As for the children, there was no lack of fun available between the 35 carnival rides that twist, roll, tilt, splash, surf and crash into each other and those that jet high into the air. Rides include Surfs-Up, during which patrons hop on a giant surfboard; the Drag Strip Slide, a giant sliding board and Bumble Bee Bop, a childrens ride, as well as the Sizzler, Tilt-a-Wheel, Ferris wheel and Wacky Shack. The fairgrounds is located at 7620 State Road 471, in Bushnell. Gate admission is free for children ages 5 and under, $3 for children 6 to 12 and $5 for ages 13 and older. A list of fair activities is available at wwww.sumterfair.net. Call 352-793-2750 for information. FAIR FROM PAGE A1 doing the right thing. During the interview Crist also acknowledged that Floridas economy has improved under in cumbent Gov. Rick Scott but he still said he could have done more to help Floridians. He also said that the economy was helped by his decision while governor to accept federal assistance that was part of the feder al stimulus package that was passed in 2009. The former Republican, who is trying to win back his old ofce as a Demo crat, urged members of his new party to fully sup port Obama during the midterm elections. Crist said Obama was leading and leading well. In recent weeks Scott has ratcheted up his crit icism of the overhaul even though the former health care executive has himself has altered his stance over the last two years. Scott, who before run ning for governor in 2010 led a group opposed to the overhaul, initial ly said he would not im plement the law, or back the expansion of Medic aid that was a part of the overhaul. But last year Scott called on Florida legislators to accept bil lions in federal fund ing and expand Medic aid eligibility. But Scott stopped pushing for ex pansion after GOP legis lators rejected it and in recent months has re turned to criticizing the overhaul. Scott this week even took time during a Cab inet meeting to criti cize potential rate cuts to Medicare Advantage which lets seniors enroll in Medicare through pri vate insurance plans. During his CNN inter view Crist did acknowl edge Floridas econo my had improved under Scotts watch but said it could be doing a lot bet ter. Crist also said that a turnaround start ed at the end of his term in 2010 and he said part of the reasons was be cause he accepted feder al stimulus money. He faulted Scott for not pushing harder to accept federal Medicaid funds which could have been used to provide health in surance coverage to near ly 1 million Floridians. Crist also criticized Scott for opposing feder al money for high-speed rail and for opposing a hike in the minimum wage. CRIST FROM PAGE A1 secretary general Ronald Noble chided authorities for waiting for a tragedy to put prudent security measures in place at bor ders and boarding gates. More than a day and half after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went miss ing, no conrmed debris from the jetliner had been found and the nal min utes before its disappear ance remained a mystery. The plane lost contact with ground controllers somewhere between Ma laysia and Vietnam. However, searchers in a low-ying plane spot ted an object that ap peared to be one of the planes doors, the staterun Thanh Nien news paper said, citing the deputy chief of staff of Vietnams army, Lt. Gen. Vo Van Tuan. Two ships from the maritime police were headed to the site, in wa ters about 60 miles (90 kilometers) south of Tho Chu island, in the same area where oil slicks were spotted Saturday. The missing plane ap parently fell from the sky at cruising altitude in ne weather, and the pi lots were either unable or had no time to send a distress signal unusu al circumstances under which a modern jetliner operated by a profession al airline would crash. Authorities were also checking on the identi ties of the two passengers who boarded the plane with stolen passports. On Saturday, the foreign ministries in Italy and Austria said the names of two citizens listed on the ights manifest matched the names on two pass ports reported stolen in Thailand. In a forceful statement, the Interpol chief, who has called passport fraud one of the worlds great est threats, said he hoped that governments and airlines worldwide will learn from the tragedy. The thefts of the two passports one belong ing to Austrian Christian Kozel and the other to Luigi Maraldi of Italy were entered into Inter pols database after they were stolen in Thailand in 2012 and last year, the police body said. But no authorities in Malay sia or elsewhere checked the passports against the database of 40 mil lion stolen or lost trav el documents before the Malaysian Airlines plane took off. Troubling details also emerged Sunday about the itineraries of the two passengers traveling on the stolen passports. A telephone opera tor on a China-based KLM hotline conrmed Sunday that passengers named Maraldi and Ko zel had been booked on one-way tickets on the same KLM ight, ying from Beijing to Amster dam on Saturday. Maral di was to y on to Copen hagen, Denmark, and Kozel to Frankfurt, Ger many. She said the pair booked the tickets through China South ern Airlines, but she had no information on where they bought them. As holders of EU pass ports with onward ights to Europe, the passen gers would not have needed visas for China. In addition to the planes sudden disap pearance, which experts said was consistent with a possible onboard ex plosion, the stolen pass ports strengthened con cerns about terrorism as a possible cause. Al-Qa ida militants have used similar tactics to try to disguise their identities. JET FROM PAGE A1 Washington on Wednes day on a resolution of the situation in Ukraine, the Interfax news agency re ported. The White House conrmed the meeting. Our country and our people are facing the big gest challenges in the his tory of modern indepen dent Ukraine, the prime minister said earlier in the day. Will we be able to deal with these chal lenges? There should only be one answer to this question and that is: yes. Its Crimea, a strategic peninsula in the Black Sea, that has become the chief ashpoint in the battle for Ukraine, where three months of protests sparked by President Vic tor Yanukovychs decision to ditch a signicant trea ty with the 28-nation Eu ropean Union after strong pressure from Russia led to his downfall. A majority of people in Crimea identify with Rus sia, and Moscows Black Sea Fleet is based in Sev astopol, as is Ukraines. In Simferopol, Crimeas capital, a crowd of more than 4,000 people turned out Sunday to endorse unication with Russia. On Lenin Square, a naval band played World War II songs as old women sang along, and dozens of tri color Russian ags ut tered in the cold wind. Russians are our brothers, Crimean Par liament speaker Vladi mir Konstantinov said. He asked the crowd how it would vote in the refer endum a week hence. Russia! Russia! came the loud answer. We are going back home to the mother land, said Konstantinov. PUTIN FROM PAGE A1

PAGE 3

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG LSSC to host LC and Friends concert The annual LC and Friends Concert will feature friends and family members of the band, at 3 p.m. Sunday, at the Paul Williams Auditorium of the Lake Sumter State College, U.S. Highway 441. A highlight of the concert will be the 17-piece big band performing Westside Suite, featuring drummer Dave Caudill, trombonist Sid Davis and tenor saxophonist Dave Flanigan. Vocalist Ali Dickson will also per form. Master of Ceremonies is Harlous Wilson. Tickets are $12 and can purchased at the door, or in ad vance by calling 352-728-8414. LAKE COUNTY Contestants sought for county fair pageant Applications are available for the 25th annual Miss Lake County Fair Pageant, April 6 at the Lake County Fairgrounds. With eight age divi sions, girls from infants to age 18 are eligible and can register on or before April 5. Winners in each age division will receive a crown and sash, and all contestants will receive a trophy. Go to www.lakecofair.com or call 352-326-4217 for an application. TAVARES Road closures planned for downtown Tavares Upcoming work on the Florida Central Railroad tracks in downtown Tavares will cause road closures at the intersections of Dora Avenue and Lake Dora Drive, Wednesday and Thursday, and at the round about on Disston Avenue and Main Street, March 17-18. Detours will be established to redi rect trafc during the closures, and motorists are encouraged to exhibit caution when traveling in the area. For information, call 352-483-9020. TAVARES TLNC naturalist group to host paddling excursion Paddle the Apopka/Beauclair Canal with the Trout Lake Nature Center naturalist group on Saturday for a three-mile trip up the canal to the lock and dam. Guests should pack their kayak or canoe, otation device, whistle, water and a snack, and meet at 9 a.m. at the Lake Jem Park and boat ramp, 16141 County Road 448. To register, leave a message at 352-357-7536. THE VILLAGES Bicycle Club to host We Bike for Kids event The Villages Bicycle Club will host the third annual We Bike for Kids Charity Bicycle Ride on March 15, presented by Parady Financial Group. Events begin and end at the SeaBreeze Recreation Center and will feature three routes: metric cen tury (62 miles) at 8:30 a.m., a 30mile route at 9:30 a.m. and a 10-mile route at 10 a.m. Riders of all abilities are welcome to participate. Proceeds from the ride benet the nonprot organizations Project Legacy and the Sumter County Youth Center. For information or to register, call 352-430-2189 or go to www.webikeforkids.com. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Sculptor J.T. Smalley won the $1,500 Best of Show award at the 37th annual Leesburg Art Festival, a juried show featuring more than 70 artists from around the country. BELOW: Art patrons took advantage of picture-perfect weather on Sunday to visit the festival on Main Street in downtown Leesburg. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A Lake-Sumter State College graduate who is now furthering his art education at the University of Flori da, won the coveted $1,500 Best of Show prize at the 37th an nual Leesburg Art Festival for Safari bot, a robot-riding sculpture made from old metal forks, spat ulas, pitchers and a worn clock. J.T. Smalleys forte is taking old, worn met al items and giving them new life as artis tic sculptures. It was a huge sur prise to win, Smalley said Sunday from his tent on Main Street, where he was one of more than 70 artists from around the coun try who participated in the juried show. Peo ple tell me that I have a great imagination to be able to turn a pile a stuff into all of these different things. His imagination also appealed to chil dren attending the festival as Smalley received four Kids Choice awards from youths who presented him with handmade paper-ribbon prizes at the event. It was awesome to receive awards from the kids. They know what they like, he said. Smalley is eager to spend some of his prize money today at the Webster Flea Market, a popular Sumter County event held every Mon day for more than 50 years, and he knows its a place where hes bound to nd more items made before the 1960s that can be repurposed into new works of art. My whole work is commentary on the fact that we dont make anything LEESBURG LSSC grad wins Best of Show at art festival LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County School Board members will de cide tonight whether to approve a $20,000 con tract with Carr, Riggs & In gram, LLC to perform a re view of the school districts class-size compliance pol icies and procedures. During a press confer ence in February, Super intendent Susan Moxley called for an independent review of all schools in the district to determine whether any class-size vi olations were knowingly made. This follows the determi nation that six school prin cipals broke the law by in accurately reporting their class sizes to the state. Several school board members said while the costs of the independent review would affect the districts budget, it is nec essary to address whether principals knowingly co erced teachers to falsify their class rosters during Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) week, when schools are required to provide an accurate count of student enrollment to the state. We need to know whether it was intention ally done, said Tod How ard, school board mem ber. We need to know who was involved. Was the district administra tion involved in it? Howard added: We need to be open and TAVARES School board calls for independent review MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Motorists in the area of the White Hair Bridge on State Road 44 at the Volusia/Lake county line should be aware of traf c congestion, the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce stated. Lt. John Herrell, sher iffs spokesman, said they have responded to vehi cle crashes at that loca tion as trafc is backed up because the bridge, which is under construction, has only one lane open. With Bike Week starting today in Daytona Beach, we are seeing large num bers of motorcycles travel ing through Lake County into the affected area and are concerned that more accidents will occur, Her rell said Friday. Motorists are being asked to avoid the area if at all possible. If unable to avoid the bridge, Herrell said, motorists should be aware that back-ups are likely and remain calm and cautious. Bike Week, which has been going on in Daytona Beach for more than 70 years, draws thousands of motorcyclists from across the nation. The festivities include motorcycle rac ing, concerts, parties and street festivals. Leesburgs 18th Annual Bikefest is from April 2527 in downtown Leesburg. Daytona Bike Week impacting Lake County traffic Staff Report The Lake County Library Sys tems 11th annual Lake BookFest kicks off today at libraries across the county. Events include: TODAY 6 p.m., W.T. Bland Public Library, Mount Dora Dangerously Deli cious has best-selling author Lisa Black providing a glimpse into the world of forensic science. TUESDAY 2 p.m., Leesburg Library Friends of the Library Tea will cel ebrate the outstanding contribu tions the friends have made to the libraries in the Lake County Li brary System. 4 p.m., Umatilla Public Library Pizza Party with author Chris Tozi er, winner of the Florida Publishers Association Silver Medal award. 6 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memo rial County Library, Groveland The New Soul Food Cookbook for People with Diabetes will feature cooking sensation Roniece Weaver. 6 p.m., East Lake County Li brary, Sorrento Murder in the Library will involve attendees in a murder mystery. WEDNESDAY 10 a.m., Lady Lake Library Legendary Writers in Florida will feature Dr. James C. Clark, author of six books. 2 to 4 p.m., W.T. Bland Public Li brary Authors Going Rogue, will feature authors Julie Compton, Vicki Landis and Ann Meier dis cussing why some authors have left traditional publishing for the wild world of do-it-yourself. 4 p.m., Leesburg Library Be ing a Writer Is Cooler Than Luke Skywalker + Voldemort + Katniss Everdeen, will discuss options for teens to express themselves. 6 p.m., Paisley Library Cen tral Floridas Civil War Veterans, features author and historian Bob Grenier talking about the book he wrote as a memorial and tribute to those courageous veterans. THURSDAY 1 to 3:30 p.m., Leesburg Library Northern Exposure: Canadian Crime Fiction, R.J. Harlick brings back character Meg Harris for her series fth book. 2 p.m., Cooper Memorial Li brary Florida Writers: Moon Rockets and Tropical Rain, featur ing author Jim Clark. Week-long Lake Bookfest starts today SEE BOOKFEST | A4 SEE REVIEW | A4 SEE FESTIVAL | A5

PAGE 4

A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 OBITUARIES William R. (Bill) Pope Pope, William Rufus (Bill), 83 of Howey-inthe-Hills, FL went to be with the Lord on Satur day, March 8, 2014. He was happily married to Barbara Ellen Worrell for 58 yrs. He was the father of two sons, Bill and Bob. For the com plete obituary please visit WWW.pagetheus. com Amy Ruth Schaller Amy Ruth Schaller, 63 of Fruitland Park, died Friday March 7, 2014. She was born to Wil lard and Bethel VanOr der in Wellsboro, PA, on October 28, 1950. She married John Schaller on November 16, 1974. Amy was a member of Trinity Evangeli cal Free Church in Eu stis, FL; and the Ladies Auxiliary of the Gide ons International Amy is survived by her fa ther Willard VanOrder; Husband John Schaller; Sons Chris Ponds and Jason Schaller; daugh ters Jamie Vick and Jenifer Schaller; and 7 Grandchildren. A view ing will be held at the Page-Theus Funeral Home in Leesburg, FL from 6:00 8:00 PM, Monday. Funeral Ser vices are planned for 2:00 P. M. Tuesday at the funeral Home. The family suggests that in lieu of owers do nations be made in Amys name to: Amer ican Cancer Society HOPE LODGE Attn: Nancy Dohn, 2121 S. W. 16th St., Gainesville, FL 32608. Arrangements entrusted to PageTheus Funeral Home, Leesburg, Florida. DEATH NOTICES Edward Anthony Hill Edward Anthony Hill, 69, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. Amy Ruth Schaller Amy Ruth Schaller, 63, of Fruitland Park, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. IN MEMORY transparent. In order to maintain public trust, (this review) has to be done. The cost of the review could result in the dis trict cutting back on something else, said Howard, without citing specics. We will nd oth er places to save mon ey, he said. It is about priorities. This will take greater priority than something else. By Florida law, pub lic schools are not per mitted to exceed cer tain class-size limits: 18 students per class in grades pre-kinder garten through grade 3, 22 per class in grades 4 through 8 and 25 in grades 9 through 12. Schools that violate the class-size limits are subject to nes. Simone Maduro-Fer guson, a teacher at Lake Minneola High School, recently tipped off the Florida Depart ment of Education (FL DOE) about the classsize violations. In her complaint, she states she was asked to remove kids from her class roster during FTE counting week. School district ofcials subsequently launched an investigation and found additional report ing problems in ve oth er schools. Principals at Mount Dora High School, Tavares Elementa ry School, Sawgrass Bay Elementary in Cl ermont, Sorrento Ele mentary, Lake Minne ola High School and Grassy Lake Elementa ry in Minneola, report ed to the FLDOE that their average class sizes were smaller than they actually are. School Board Mem ber Bill Mathias said the whole purpose of the review is to bring some clarity on how the mistake happened and whether it was in tentional. When it comes to the creditability of the system, it is $20,000 well spent, he said. Rosanne Brande burg, school board member, said she also supports the review. I dont think anyone maliciously set out to do harm to our school district, she said of the class-size violations. We need to go through the due process. In its proposal to the school district, the ac counting rm acknowl edged it did not have any experience work ing with the class-size amendment. However, Sumner Reed, the client service partner, wrote the rm has audited ve other school districts in the state. The board meets to night at 6 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of the Lake County Ad ministration Building, 315 W. Main St., Tavares. REVIEW FROM PAGE A3 5 to 7 p.m., Astor Library Part-Time Writer: A Work shop for the Rest of Us, fea turing award-winning au thor Chris Tozier. 6:30 p.m., Tavares City Hall Author and historian Bob Grenier. 7 p.m., Historic State The atre, Eustis Murder on Bay Street. FRIDAY 10 a.m., Fruitland Park Li brary How to Get Pub lished. 10 a.m., Lady Lake Library The Sisterhood: Strong Female Characters, with au thors Robin Burcell, Elaine Viets and Deborah Sharp. 1 p.m., W.T. Bland Library Across the Border, from the Capital Crime Writers of Ottawa, features best-selling authors Vicki Delany, C.B. Forrest and R.J. Harlick. 2:30 p.m., W.T. Bland Li brary Killer Releases, Award-Winning Authors, featuring Robin Burcell, Nancy J. Cohen, Debo rah Sharp and Elaine Viets talking about their latest re leases. 6 p.m., Leesburg Library Authors Reception. SATURDAY 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., East Lake County Library Bluegrass Festival with Blackwater Creek Bluegrass Band. 10 a.m., W.T. Bland Library Mystery Writing: the Basics. 10 a.m. to noon, Cooper Memorial Library Creating Memorable Characters, fea turing authors Vicki Delany, C.B. Forrest and R.J. Harlick. 10 a.m., Astor Library Florida History: Presidents, Politics and Writers, featur ing author Jim Clark. 11 a.m., Helen Lehmann Memorial Library, Mont verde A Monster, a Pirate Execution and a Massacre, featuring award-winning author and educator Doug Dillon. 11 a.m., W.T. Bland Library Nancy Cohens Plotting Made Perfect. Noon, W.T. Bland Library Deborah Sharps Settings That Sizzle. 1 p.m., W.T. Bland Library Robin Burcells Forensics and Fiction. BOOKFEST FROM PAGE A3 MICHAEL J. MISHAK Associated Press CLEARWATER Voters in this stretch of beach towns and retirement communities pro vide the rst 2014 campaign test of whether Democrats can counter GOP attacks on the presidents health care over haul by accusing Republicans of threatening popular benet programs for the elderly. Democrat Alex Sink and her allies in the spirited race to re place the late Rep. Bill Young in the U.S. House have spent mil lions of dollars on TV ads ahead of Tuesdays special election painting Republican David Jol ly as an extremist who wants to privatize Social Security and gut Medicare. Jolly has responded with a TV spot featuring his elderly moth er and aunt, in which he says protecting their Social Securi ty means everything to me. Jolly argues that it is Sink who would undermine Medicare because of Democratic-passed cuts to the program under Pres ident Barack Obamas health care law. The suburban St. Petersburg district is considered a prov ing ground for each partys po litical messages and a possi ble bellwether for the midterm elections. Ofcials in both par ties have said in recent days that private polls show the race to be close. Each has made late appeals for campaign cash. In all, the candidates, their party committees and several outside groups have collectively spent almost $10 million blan keting the airwaves with largely negative ads focused on health care costs and Social Security. Part of the reason is the large percentage of seniors in this district, which is 37 percent Re publican, 35 percent Democrat and 24 percent independent. More than one in four regis tered voters is older than 65, a population that could make up more than half of those who cast ballots. But in an effort to deect Re publican attacks on the health care law and rollout problems, Democrats also plan to promi nently feature proposed Repub lican curbs on Social Securi ty and Medicare in competitive races across the country. Those issues are para mount, said Rep. Steve Israel of New York, who chairs the House Democrats campaign opera tion. Having Republicans say that they want to cut Medicare but continue to fund massive subsidies to big oil companies ... that will be a dening theme. House race early test of fall strategy AP FILE PHOTO This Nov. 23, 2013 photo shows Florida Republican Congressional candidate David Jolly, right, speaking in Indian Rocks Beach.

PAGE 5

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Activities for the Day: $25 Value $150 Value Everyone is encouraged to come out with family and friends.SEE YOU THERE!WHEN: WHERE: Invite you to come out and enjoy the day with us, as we celebrate our First Annual Open House and Patient Appreciation Day.Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care anymore that lasts, Smalley said, noting back to when crackers could be purchased in tin cans rather than to days cardboard boxes. I had bought this big box of old tins at a garage sale, and I also bought clock parts, Smalley said of when he began making his unique sculptures in 2011, during his win ter break from LSSC. I started building, and I kept building and building. I wanted to get 12 different ones Now Im way past 12. Ive known J.T. be fore he knew that he was an artist, said Amy Painter, executive director of the Lees burg Art Center, host of the annual art festi val. It was a thrill and a surprise when the judges told me that they had picked J.T. He is so creative. His heart and soul goes into ev ery piece, and you can tell. Smalley was in the festivals emerging art ist program two years ago, and last year he was a $250 prize win ner before capturing the 2014 grand prize. I have seen his work grow from the begin ning from when he started, Painter said. And every year that he has participated, the judges have always stopped and talked to him about his artwork and given him feed back. Hes listened to them and has grown his work in a whole new way. He is currently work ing on an 8-foot-tall metal sculpture, his largest to date. Smalleys advice to others: Keep doing what you want to do, what you are passion ate about, because that is the only work that is going to make it for you. If you do it for money, it is never go ing to be what it needs to be. Youve got to have the passion and love behind it and love what you do, because if you dont, it shows. His passion is his ro bot sculptures. My Bots are bring ing new life to old items, not letting things be tossed into the trash and lost for ever to rot in some landll, he said in his artist statement. As a society, we have been trained to consume and throw away, even if the item is still use ful. I take those items and bring them togeth er giving them a new life and a new pur pose. Some religions believe that every liv ing thing has a soul. Well the earth is liv ing, and metal comes from the earth; there fore, metal has a soul no matter what shape it comes in. That soul in the metal then holds memories of every thing and everyone it touched. Bringing these objects together gives them a new life to go on and collect new memories together as a new soul. I think my Bots would thank me for this new life. FESTIVAL FROM PAGE A3

PAGE 6

A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 60 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb LISA LEFF Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO Law and order may soon be com ing to the Wild West of weed. A California lawmaker has introduced legislation to reg ulate the states free-wheel ing medical marijuana in dustry the farmers that grow the drug, the hundreds of storefront shops that sell it and especially the doc tors who write recommen dations allowing people to use it. The state in 1996 was the rst to authorize marijua na use for health purposes there are now 20. But to this day no one knows how many dispensaries and pa tients California has or what conditions pot is being used to treat because the loosely worded law did not give gov ernment agencies a role in tracking the information. The bill introduced by state Sen. Lou Correa marks a milestone not only be cause it would provide sig nicant state oversight of the multi-billion dollar industry for the rst time, but because it is likely to get serious con sideration in Sacramento af ter years of inaction. SB1262 is the brainchild of the California Police Chiefs Association and the League of California Cities, two po litically inuential groups that have stood in the way of previous efforts to legitimize pot growers and dispensa ries by subjecting them to state control and taxation. Medical marijuana ad vocates, who have lobbied unsuccessfully for a state wide regulatory scheme they hoped would make the in dustry less susceptible to federal raids and arrests, is taking a wait-and-see ap proach on Correas legisla tion. They prefer a bill held over from last year, co-spon sored by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano and Sens. Darryl Steinberg and Mark Leno, that calls for regulating and taxing medical marijuana like alcohol and places fewer restrictions on doctors than Correas measure does, but are prepared to hammer out a compromise, said Lynne Lyman, California director for the Drug Policy Alliance. We are very encouraged by law enforcement coming to the table with their pro posals and we think we can all work together and come up with some model legis lation in the state, nally, 18 years later, Lyman said. State oversight may tame California pot shops AP FILE PHOTO Samuel Bagdorf of San Francisco, who suffers from anxiety disorders, lights his marijuana pipe at the San Francisco Medical Cannabis Clinic in San Francisco, in October 2009. ERIC TUCKER Associated Press WASHINGTON The data breach at Target Corp. that exposed mil lions of credit card num bers has focused atten tion on the patchwork of state consumer notica tion laws and renewed a push for a single nation al standard. Most states have laws that require retailers to disclose data breaches, but the laws vary wildly. Consumers in one state might learn immedi ately that their per sonal information had been exposed, but that might not happen in another state, and no tication requirements for businesses depend on where their custom ers are located. Attor ney General Eric Hold er has joined the call for a nationwide noti cation standard, but di visions persist, making a consensus question able this year. Were stuck with the state-by-state ap proach unless some compromise gets done at the federal level, said Peter Swire, a pri vacy expert at Geor gia Tech and a former White House privacy ofcial. Despite general agreement on the value of a national standard, there are obstacles to a straightforward com promise: Consumer groups dont want to weaken existing protections in states with the stron gest laws. Retailers want laws that are less bur densome to comply with and say too much notication could cause consumers to tune out the problem. Congress is look ing at different propos als for how any feder al standard should be enforced and what the threshold should be before notication re quirements kick in. The issue gained fresh urgency as part of a larger security debate after data breaches in volving retailers Nei man Marcus and Tar get. Target, the nations second-largest retail discounter, has said 40 million credit and debit card accounts were ex posed between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15. The company went public with the breach on Dec. 19, sever al days after it said it learned of the prob lem and soon after the news began leaking on line. Since then, sales, prot and stock pric es have dropped, the companys chief infor mation ofcer has re signed and banks and retailers are facing con tinued scrutiny about what more can be done to protect consumer data. The Justice Depart ment is investigat ing the data theft, and Holder urged Congress in a video statement last month to adopt a national notication standard that would in clude exemptions for harmless breaches. This would empow er the American peo ple to protect them selves if they are at risk of identity theft. It would enable law en forcement to better in vestigate these crimes and to hold compro mised entities account able when they fail to keep sensitive informa tion safe, he said in the statement. Such proposals have been around for years. An Obama adminis tration plan from 2011 would have required businesses that col lect personal infor mation on more than 10,000 people in any 12-month period to disclose potentially harmful breaches and for breaches that affect more than 5,000 people to be reported to con sumer credit reporting agencies and the feder al government. No consensus on how to notify data breach victims

PAGE 7

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY Flashback HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 A merica is deeply engaged in a debate about marriage. But its not the most urgent dialogue worth having about an institution that has served to or der society for millennia. What the current discus sion about expanding matrimo ny obscures is the bigger pic ture about traditional marriage, namely, that its in decline and that this decline has dra matic and devastating conse quences for society, children in particular. The connection between mar riage and improved economic outcomes is not novel. In 1965, as President Lyndon B. Johnson was declaring war on poverty, a highly controver sial report by Labor Secretary Daniel Patrick Moynihan identi ed the deterioration of the fam ily in the African-American com munity as one of several major catalysts for growing economic and social inequality. At the time, more than half of all black women and about two-thirds of Hispanic and An glo women were married; and just over 20 percent of black in fants and between 2 percent and 3 percent of Anglo infants were born to single mothers. Half a century later, those numbers have not declined they have exploded. According to government sta tistics, 40.7 percent of all 2012 births were out of wedlock, in cluding 72.2 percent in the Afri can-American community; 53.5 percent of Hispanic children; and 29.4 percent of Anglo children. Revisiting the Moynihan re port last year, the Urban Insti tute found that the social trends that concerned Moynihan have worsened for blacks and non blacks alike, suggesting that the factors driving the decline (of marriage) do not lie solely with in the black community but in the larger social and economic context. The numbers themselves are alarming and they raise serious questions about why marriage is disintegrating. But it is the bounty of research correlating family structure to the economic mobility of chil dren or lack thereof that makes concerns about the de clining marriage culture a public policy crisis. A report by the Pew Charitable Trusts Economic Mobility Proj ect looked at the impact of single parenthood on a childs econom ic opportunities. It found that both children of divorced moth ers or (those) who were born to unmarried mothers are less likely to be upwardly mobile in relative terms than are children of con tinuously married mothers. It seems obvious that two-par ent households advantage chil dren, as they tend to have greater resources both nancial and so cial (time, energy, attention) that make kids more likely to gradu ate and get well-paying jobs and less likely to be incarcerated or become single parents. But the impact of family struc ture has ripple effects that ex tend well beyond individual households, according to new comprehensive data by Har vard economist Raj Chetty. Chet ty and his co-authors found that family structure correlates with upward mobility not just at the individual level but also at the community level, perhaps be cause the stability of the social environment affects childrens outcomes more broadly. The Brookings Institution warns that marriage has become a mechanism through which advantage is protected and passed on, as wealthier, com mitted parents tend to get and stay married and raise their chil dren together, while less afuent women are more likely to have children outside of marriage and raise them on their own, often in communities of similar struc ture, where they enter vicious cycles of downward mobility for themselves and their progeny. Marriage is not a silver bullet. Encouraging more single moth ers to wed the fathers of their children will not magically re duce poverty. Nor is the deci mated marriage culture the only factor limiting economic mobil ity, which is also affected by ra cial and economic segregation, school quality and low levels of social capital. But attempts to redistribute income and expand the welfare state, including those called for in Moynihans report 50 years ago, have not had the success that lawmakers expected. As Ron Haskins, director of Brookings Center on Children and Families, told The Washing ton Post, We are not going to have an effective solution to the growing inequality and poverty in the U.S. unless we can do some thing about family structure. In the war on inequality, sup porting policies that promote more stable family environments may not be a bad place to start. Cynthia M. Allen is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Readers may send her email at cmallen@star-telegram.com. OTHER VOICES Cynthia M. Allen MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE The conversation we should be having about marriage The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. P resident Obama unveiled a budget pro posal Tuesday thats more of a Dem ocratic Party wish list than a realistic spending blueprint for a divided govern ment. Higher taxes on the wealthy? Check. More spending on anti-poverty programs, research, infrastructure and schools? Check. But while Republicans in Congress were quick to dismiss Obamas proposal (P)er haps his most irresponsible budget yet, as serted House Speaker John A. Boehner, con ceding only the vague possibility that Obama had done worse before they should at the very least act on his suggestions for promot ing employment and economic growth that dovetail with their own ideas. Washington faces at least three inter twined scal problems: a sluggish econo my thats not creating enough good jobs, large annual budget decits left over from the recession and rising healthcare costs that could cause the decit to grow uncon trollably in the not-too-distant future. As in his previous budgets, Obama made no her culean efforts to bring the budget into bal ance or solve the long-term problems in en titlements. His main effort instead was on breathing more life into the economy now. Obamas problem is that so many of his ideas for promoting growth are nonstarters with the House Republican majority. Within Obamas $3.9-trillion budget, though, are at least two proposals that make economic and political sense, and that the Republicans might be persuaded to support. One is to expand the tax credit for individu al low-income workers without children. Re publicans invented the earned income tax credit as an alternative to welfare payments, and unlike some other benet programs, it gives participants a nancial incentive to work their way out of poverty. Although Re publicans wont like how Obama proposes to pay for it by raising taxes on hedge fund managers and some self-employed individ uals they should seize the opportunity to strike a deal to expand the credit. The president has also called, again, for beeng up infrastructure investments. With more fuel-efcient cars on the road, the amount of gas tax dollars available to repair Americas crumbling roads and bridges has been shrinking. Yet lawmakers have been unable to agree on how to replenish those funds. The president offered a temporary x: using one-time revenue from overhaul ing the corporate tax code to pay for a new round of projects. This stopgap approach would let lawmakers spend more now while costs are still low, rather than waiting to agree on a long-term solution. From the Los Angeles Times. A VOICE Can Democrats and Republicans agree on anything in Obamas budget?

PAGE 8

A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741

PAGE 9

SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Chesson Hadley wins Puerto Rico Open / B4 Staff Report The third annual Congregational Sinai golf tournament is scheduled to take place on May 3 at Legends Country Club in Clermont. Registration will begin at 7:15 a.m. with play set to begin at 8:30 a.m. Entry fee is $75, which includes breakfast on the y, 18 holes of golf, range balls, a deli lunch buffet, contests, prizes and awards. A refund able deposit of $25 will hold a spot in the tour nament eld. Players can sign up as a foursome and tour nament organizers will place individual players with a group. Entry forms can be printed out at www.con gregational-sinai.org click on Golf Tourna ment under News items. Interested players also may contact Barbara Salsitz, event administra tor at 352-432-6008. Congregational Sinai golf tourney set for May 3 AP FILE PHOTO In this Oct. 26, 2008, le photo, Detroit Lions owner and chairman William Clay Ford walks on the sidelines in Detroit. Lions owner William Clay Ford dies at 88 LARRY LAGE Associated Press DETROIT William Clay Ford, the last sur viving grandchild of au tomotive pioneer Hen ry Ford and owner of the Detroit Lions, has died. He was 88. Ford Motor Co. said in a statement Sunday that Ford died of pneumo nia at his home in Grosse Pointe, Mich. Ford helped steer the family business for more than ve de cades. He bought one of his own, the NFL fran chise in the Motor City, a half-century ago. He served as an em ployee and board mem ber of the automaker for more than half of its 100year history. My father was a great business leader and hu manitarian who dedicat ed his life to the compa ny and the community, William Clay Ford Jr., ex ecutive chairman of Ford Motor Co. and Lions vice chairman, said in a state ment. He also was a wonderful family man, a loving husband, fa ther, grandfather and great-grandfather. He will be greatly missed by ev eryone who knew him, yet he will continue to in spire us all. Ford was regarded as a dignied man by the se lect few who seemed to know him well. To the He was the last surviving grandson of legendary Ford Motor Company founder SEE FORD | B2 Chicago Bulls Joakim Noah reacts after being fouled by Miami Heats Greg Oden during the rst half on Sunday in Chicago. PAUL BEATY / AP ANDREW SELIGMAN AP Sports Writer CHICAGO Joakim Noah had 20 points and 12 re bounds, D.J. Augustin scored 22 and the Chicago Bulls beat the Miami Heat 95-88 in over time Sunday after Jimmy But ler blocked LeBron James at the end of regulation. Dwyane Wade scored 25 for Miami, but with James strug gling again, the Heat dropped their third straight to match their longest losing streak of the season. James scored 17 points on 8-of-23 shooting and couldnt come through after Miami blew a 12-point lead down the stretch. With a chance to win it at the end of regulation, he got stripped by Butler on a layup attempt. In overtime, it was all Bulls. Chicago outscored Miami 9-2, starting with Augustins 3 just under a minute in. But ler added a jumper from the wing, Noah scored on a put back and Butler added two free throws to make it 95-86 GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer LAS VEGAS Brad Keselowski surged ahead on the nal lap when Dale Earnhardt Jr. ran out of fuel, claiming a dramatic victory Sunday in the NASCAR race at Las Vegas Motor Speed way. When Earnhardts Chevy slowed in the nal miles, Keselows ki roared past in his Penske Ford for the rst weekend sweep in his career. He fol lowed up Saturdays Nationwide Series victory with his rst Vegas Cup win. Keselowski, the 2012 Sprint Cup champion, also virtu ally assured himself of a spot in the Chase for the Sprint Cup cham pionship after miss ing it entirely last sea son, a thought was already on his mind immediately after the nish. Locked in the Chase early, Kesel owski said. I dont have to hear all that crap about not being in the Chase. Earnhardt was just a few ounces of fuel shy of earning his sec ond victory in three races to start the sea son. The Daytona 500 champion also nished second last week at Phoenix be fore improving the best start to a season in his NASCAR career. We werent sup posed to make it, Earnhardt said. We were trying to save as much as we can and make it work, but we knew we were short. We wouldnt have finished second if we didnt have that strategy. Paul Menard PHOTOS BY WILFREDO LEE / AP Patrick Reed and his wife Justine hold The Gene Sarazen Cup after winning the Cadillac Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Doral. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer DORAL Patrick Reed felt he belongs among the best in the world. He beat them all Sunday in the Cadillac Championship. Dressed in a red shirt that he always wears in the nal round with Tiger Woods in the group ahead of him Reed made back-toback birdies early on the front nine to build a big lead and showed off a great short game when the pressure was building on the new Blue Monster at Doral. Equipped with a twoshot lead, the 23-yearold Texan wisely played the nal hole conser vatively. He two-putt ed for bogey and closed with an even-par 72 for a one-shot victo ry over Bubba Watson and Jamie Donaldson of Wales. Reed became the youngest winner of a World Golf Champion ship, his third win in his last 14 tournaments. Woods, only three shots behind going into the nal round in his best chance this year to win a tournament, said his back ared up after an awkward shot out of the bunker on the sixth hole. He failed to make a birdie in the nal round for the rst time in his PGA Tour career, and his 78 was his worst Sunday score ever. Reed is expected to go to No. 20 in the Patrick Reed, right, and his caddie Kessler Karain talk on the third tee during the nal round. Cadillac Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Trump National Doral (Blue Monster) Doral Purse: $9 million Yardage: 7,481; Par: 72 Final Patrick Reed (550), $1,530,000 68-75-69-72 284 Jamie Donaldson, $753,000 74-70-71-70 285 Bubba Watson (258), $753,000 73-72-72-68 285 Dustin Johnson (128), $395,000 69-74-73-72 288 Richard Sterne, $395,000 74-73-70-71 288 Thongchai Jaidee, $248,333 73-74-74-68 289 Stephen Gallacher, $248,333 75-75-70-69 289 Bill Haas (96), $248,333 73-76-69-71 289 Jason Dufner (76), $151,250 69-77-68-76 290 Hunter Mahan (76), $151,250 69-74-71-76 290 Graeme McDowell (76), $151,250 73-71-73-73 290 Charl Schwartzel (76), $151,250 70-76-76-68 290 Miguel A. Jimenez, $110,000 70-77-69-75 291 Matt Kuchar (62), $110,000 69-74-74-74 291 Joost Luiten, $110,000 76-72-71-72 291 Jonas Blixt (51), $90,667 79-72-75-66 292 George Coetzee, $90,667 74-74-73-71 292 Sergio Garcia (51), $90,667 74-76-73-69 292 Scott Hend, $90,667 72-76-73-71 292 Henrik Stenson (51), $90,667 73-76-74-69 292 Gary Woodland (51), $90,667 72-78-71-71 292 Harris English (51), $90,667 69-77-74-72 292 Zach Johnson (51), $90,667 70-75-71-76 292 Phil Mickelson (51), $90,667 74-75-69-74 292 Luke Donald (42), $76,000 70-82-72-69 293 Rory McIlroy (42), $76,000 70-74-75-74 293 Francesco Molinari, $76,000 69-75-76-73 293 Ryan Moore (42), $76,000 70-79-69-75 293 Adam Scott (42), $76,000 75-73-72-73 293 Kevin Streelman (42), $76,000 75-74-72-72 293 Peter Uihlein, $76,000 73-77-71-72 293 Jimmy Walker (42), $76,000 73-77-67-76 293 Tiger Woods (42), $76,000 76-73-66-78 293 Graham DeLaet (35), $68,500 78-72-70-74 294 Hyung-Sung Kim, $68,500 72-74-74-74 294 Hideki Matsuyama (35), $68,500 72-77-71-74 294 Justin Rose (35), $68,500 74-77-70-73 294 Jordan Spieth (35), $68,500 73-79-73-69 294 Lee Westwood (35), $68,500 75-79-70-70 294 Darren Fichardt, $63,500 73-78-72-72 295 Branden Grace, $63,500 75-74-69-77 295 Chris Kirk (30), $63,500 75-71-76-73 295 Louis Oosthuizen (30), $63,500 72-78-71-74 295 Noah, Augustin lead Bulls over Heat in 95-88 overtime battle SEE HEAT | B2 Reed holds on to win his third title in seven months Keselowski edges Junior on last lap to win in Las Vegas SEE NASCAR | B2 Puerto Rico Open scoreboard, Page B2 SEE REED | B2

PAGE 10

B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-Kobalt 400 Results Sunday At Las Vegas Motor Speedway Las Vegas, Nev. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 267 laps, 134.6 rat ing, 48 points. 2. (14) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 121.7, 43. 3. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 267, 108.1, 42. 4. (1) Joey Logano, Ford, 267, 109.8, 41. 5. (11) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 88.2, 40. 6. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 267, 124.8, 39. 7. (10) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 267, 94, 37. 8. (13) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 267, 91.2, 36. 9. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 267, 102.7, 35. 10. (29) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 267, 92.6, 35. 11. (20) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 108.1, 34. 12. (27) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 267, 83.1, 33. 13. (9) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 267, 83.1, 31. 14. (12) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 267, 96.6, 30. 15. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 267, 76.4, 29. 16. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 267, 82.4, 28. 17. (19) Jeff Burton, Toyota, 267, 71.1, 27. 18. (18) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 267, 67.7, 26. 19. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 266, 76.6, 25. 20. (34) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 266, 65.9, 0. 21. (22) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 266, 58, 23. 22. (25) Greg Bife, Ford, 266, 52.5, 22. 23. (3) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 266, 84.4, 21. 24. (43) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 266, 56, 20. 25. (8) Aric Almirola, Ford, 264, 60.3, 19. 26. (23) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 264, 62.9, 18. 27. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 264, 68.8, 17. 28. (30) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 264, 54.6, 16. 29. (38) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 264, 50.8, 15. 30. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 264, 54.1, 14. 31. (37) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 264, 42.1, 13. 32. (26) David Ragan, Ford, 263, 45.2, 12. 33. (24) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 263, 40.3, 11. 34. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 262, 41.7, 10. 35. (39) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 261, 33.5, 9. 36. (28) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 261, 41.5, 8. 37. (36) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 259, 33.1, 7. 38. (41) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 258, 27.3, 6. 39. (42) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 253, 27.9, 5. 40. (32) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 240, 28.9, 4. 41. (16) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 237, 92.4, 4. 42. (31) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 212, 27.9, 2. 43. (35) Michael McDowell, Ford, engine, 141, 33.4, 1. Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Cleveland 9 1 .900 Baltimore 8 2 .800 Seattle 9 3 .750 Tampa Bay 5 2 .714 New York 7 4 .636 Oakland 6 4 .600 Minnesota 5 4 .556 Detroit 6 5 .545 Kansas City 5 5 .500 Toronto 5 6 .455 Houston 4 6 .400 Los Angeles 4 6 .400 Chicago 3 5 .375 Boston 3 7 .300 Texas 2 6 .250 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Washington 7 3 .700 Miami 6 3 .667 Pittsburgh 7 4 .636 San Francisco 6 4 .600 Arizona 7 6 .538 Colorado 6 6 .500 Milwaukee 6 6 .500 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 New York 4 5 .444 Chicago 4 6 .400 San Diego 3 6 .333 Cincinnati 4 9 .308 St. Louis 2 5 .286 Philadelphia 2 8 .200 Atlanta 2 9 .182 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Saturdays Games Pittsburgh 10, Tampa Bay 5 Washington (ss) 8, Atlanta (ss) 2 N.Y. Mets 3, Detroit 2 Baltimore (ss) 7, Boston (ss) 3 N.Y. Yankees 9, Houston (ss) 6 Atlanta (ss) 6, Miami 6, tie Toronto 4, Minnesota 3 Philadelphia 11, Houston (ss) 3 St. Louis 4, Washington (ss) 4, tie, 10 innings Texas 5, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5, tie Milwaukee 7, Kansas City 6 Arizona (ss) 6, Chicago White Sox 4 Arizona (ss) 5, L.A. Angels 2 San Diego 4, Cleveland 4, tie, 10 innings Seattle (ss) 18, San Francisco 3 Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 0 Colorado 5, Oakland 4 Baltimore (ss) 13, Boston (ss) 2 Seattle (ss) 8, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5 Sundays Games Minnesota 1, Philadelphia 1, tie N.Y. Yankees 3, Tampa Bay 3, tie, 10 innings Washington 11, St. Louis 1 Baltimore 9, Pittsburgh (ss) 2 Detroit 3, Miami 1 Houston 4, Toronto 3 Boston 4, Pittsburgh (ss) 1 N.Y. Mets 8, Atlanta 2 L.A. Angels 3, Cincinnati 1 Cleveland 4, Milwaukee (ss) 2 Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 2, tie Colorado 10, Kansas City 1 Milwaukee (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., late San Francisco vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., late San Diego vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., late Todays Games Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. Detroit vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. Houston vs. Washington at Viera, 6:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 10:10 p.m. Tuesdays Games Toronto vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Boston (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. Boston (ss) at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 34 26 .567 Brooklyn 30 30 .500 4 New York 24 40 .375 12 Boston 21 41 .339 14 Philadelphia 15 47 .242 20 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 43 17 .717 Washington 33 29 .532 11 Charlotte 29 34 .460 15 Atlanta 26 35 .426 17 Orlando 19 45 .297 26 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 46 16 .742 Chicago 35 28 .556 11 Detroit 24 38 .387 22 Cleveland 24 40 .375 23 Milwaukee 12 50 .194 34 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 46 16 .742 Houston 43 19 .694 3 Dallas 37 26 .587 9 Memphis 36 26 .581 10 New Orleans 25 37 .403 21 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 46 17 .730 Portland 42 20 .677 3 Minnesota 31 30 .508 14 Denver 27 34 .443 18 Utah 22 41 .349 24 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 44 20 .688 Golden State 39 24 .619 4 Phoenix 36 25 .590 6 Sacramento 22 40 .355 21 L.A. Lakers 22 42 .344 22 x-clinched playoff spot Saturdays Games Utah 104, Philadelphia 92 New York 107, Cleveland 97 Memphis 111, Charlotte 89 San Antonio 121, Orlando 112 Washington 114, Milwaukee 107 L.A. Clippers 109, Atlanta 108 Sundays Games Chicago 95, Miami 88, OT L.A. Lakers 114, Oklahoma City 110 Denver at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 6 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, late Portland at Houston, late Indiana at Dallas, late Phoenix at Golden State, late Todays Games Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Utah, 9 p.m. Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. Dallas at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 63 41 17 5 87 199 141 Montreal 66 35 24 7 77 166 166 Toronto 65 34 23 8 76 193 198 Tampa Bay 64 34 24 6 74 183 167 Detroit 64 29 22 13 71 171 179 Ottawa 64 28 25 11 67 182 209 Florida 63 24 32 7 55 154 201 Buffalo 63 19 36 8 46 127 186 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 63 42 17 4 88 201 157 N.Y. Rangers 65 35 26 4 74 171 162 Philadelphia 64 33 24 7 73 183 188 Columbus 64 33 26 5 71 186 178 Washington 65 30 25 10 70 191 197 New Jersey 65 28 24 13 69 161 167 Carolina 64 27 28 9 63 160 184 N.Y. Islanders 66 24 33 9 57 181 224 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 63 43 14 6 92 208 143 Chicago 64 37 13 14 88 221 171 Colorado 64 41 18 5 87 196 170 Minnesota 63 34 22 7 75 156 154 Dallas 64 31 23 10 72 185 179 Winnipeg 65 30 28 7 67 180 189 Nashville 64 26 28 10 62 152 191 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 64 43 14 7 93 207 157 San Jose 65 41 17 7 89 199 157 Los Angeles 64 36 22 6 78 155 135 Phoenix 64 29 24 11 69 177 185 Vancouver 66 29 27 10 68 153 174 Calgary 64 25 32 7 57 150 191 Edmonton 64 22 34 8 52 160 208 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3, SO Ottawa 5, Winnipeg 3 St. Louis 2, Colorado 1 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, OT New Jersey 5, Carolina 4 Washington 3, Phoenix 2 Columbus 1, Nashville 0 Dallas 4, Minnesota 3 Vancouver 2, Calgary 1 San Jose 4, Montreal 0 Sundays Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Detroit 0 Boston at Florida, late Chicago at Buffalo, late St. Louis at Minnesota, late Los Angeles at Edmonton, late Todays Games Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m. Nashville at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Colorado, 9 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 9 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Toronto at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Reassigned RHP Fabio Castillo, RHP Mike Wright, and INF Chris Marrero to their minor league camp. MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned LHPs Logan Dar nell, Edgar Ibarra and Brooks Raley and RHP Trevor May to Rochester (IL); 1B Kennys Vargas to New Britain (EL); INF Jorge Polanco and OF Max Kepler to Fort Myers (FSL). Reassigned RHPs Alex Meyer, Lester Oliveros and Yohan Pino; Cs Kyle Knudson, Matt Koch and Stuart Turner; OFs Byron Buxton and Chris Rahl and INF Miguel Sano to their minor league camp. NEW YORK YANKEES Optioned RHP Jose Ramirez to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Reassigned LHP Francisco Rondon to their minor league camp. National League CINCINNATI REDS Named Chris Speier special assistant to the president of baseball operations and general manager. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Reassigned RHP Ga briel Alfaro, C Jeff Howell, LHP Tyler Robertson and 1B-3B Matt Skole to their minor-league camp. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS Reassigned G Troy Daniels to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). MIAMI HEAT Assigned G DeAndre Liggins to Sioux Falls (NBADL) for one game. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW YORK JETS Released CB Antonio Cromartie. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, championship, Iona-Canisius winner vs. Manhattan-Quinnipiac-Marist winner, at Springeld, Mass. NBCSN Colonial Athletic Association, championship, Delaware-Northeastern winner vs. Towson-William & Mary winner, at Baltimore 9 p.m. ESPN West Coast Conference, seminal, S.F vs. BYU, at Las Vegas ESPN2 Southern Conference, championship, Davidson-Western Carolina winner vs. Georgia Southern-Wofford winner, at Asheville, N.C. 11:30 p.m. ESPN2 West Coast Conference, seminal, Gonzaga vs. Saint Marys-Pepperdine winner, at Las Vegas NBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. SUN Washington at Miami 8 p.m. FS-Florida Orlando at Milwaukee SOCCER 3:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Sunderand at Liverpool WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4 p.m. FS1 Big East Conference, seminal, St. Johns-Seton Hall winner vs. Creighton-But ler winner, at Rosemont, Ill. 6:30 p.m. FS1 Big East Conference, seminal, DePaul-Georgetown winner vs. Villanova-Mar quette winner, at Rosemont, Ill. 7 p.m. ESPN American Athletic Conference, championship, Rutgers-UConn winner vs. Louisville-South Florida winner, at Uncasville, Conn. 9 p.m. FS1 Big 12 Conference, championship, Oklahoma State-Baylor winner vs. West Virginia-Texas-Oklahoma winner, at Oklahoma City WINTER PARALYMPICS At Sochi, Russia Noon NBCSN Events TBA 2 a.m. NBCSN Biathlon masses in Detroit, he was simply the own er of the Lions who struggled to achieve success on the eld despite showing his passion for winning by spending money on free agents, coach es, executives and fa cilities. Fords rst full season leading the Lions was in 1964, seven years af ter the franchise won the NFL title. The lone playoff victory he en joyed was in 1992. The Lions are the only team to go 0-16 in a season, hitting rock bottom in 2008. After an 11year drought, the Li ons improved enough to make the playoffs in 2011 only to lose a combined 21 games over the next two sea sons. No owner loved his team more than Mr. Ford loved the Li ons, Lions President Tom Lewand said in a statement released by the team. Those of us who had the oppor tunity to work for Mr. Ford knew of his un yielding passion for his family, the Lions and the city of Detroit. His leadership, integri ty, kindness, humility and good humor were matched only by his desire to bring a Super Bowl championship to the Lions and to our community. Each of us in the organization will con tinue to relentlessly pursue that goal in his honor. Born into an au tomotive fortune in 1925 bearing what was already a house hold name, Ford was 23 when he joined the Ford Motor Co. board of directors in 1948, one year after the death of his grandfa ther, Henry Ford. He maintained as low a prole as his name would allow, serving on various ex ecutive committees and spearheading the design, develop ment and introduc tion of the Continen tal Mark II in 1956. He was elected a Ford vice chairman in 1980 and retired with that title in 1989. Ford re mained a company director until 2005, later taking the title of director emeritus. Mr. Ford had a pro found impact on Ford Motor Company, Ford CEO Alan Mu lally said in a state ment. The com pany extends its deepest sympathies to the many members of the extended Ford family at this difcult time. While we mourn Mr. Fords death, we also are grateful for his many contribu tions to the company and the auto indus try. He helped institu tionalize the prac tice of profession al management atop the company that be gan with the nam ing of Philip Caldwell as Ford CEO in 1979 and as Ford chairman in March 1980, with out relinquishing the Ford familys control. FORD FROM PAGE B1 with 1:33 left before James made a layup. Noah also had seven assists and ve blocks with his dad tennis great Yannick Noah looking on. Butler added 16 points and 11 rebounds. Wade tried to car ry the load for Miami, particularly in the ear ly going. Chris Bosh scored 15, but James had another rough af ternoon. The four-time MVP is 23 for 59 in the three games since his career-high and fran chise-record 61-point effort against Charlotte last week. James also went with out a mask from the start to protect his bro ken nose, after ditch ing it during the previ ous game. He said it was simply uncomfortable, so he decided to play without it even though he was not cleared to do so. The Heat led by 12 in the third quarter, but the Bulls hung in. Augustins 3-point er and Butlers steal and two free throws put Chicago ahead 7574 midway through the fourth. It was 82-82 with just over two minutes left when Noah blocked a layup by James. Taj Gibson raced the oth er way for a thunder ous dunk while get ting fouled by Mario Chalmers, drawing a roar from the crowd. James tied it again on a layup with 1:10 left. Wade then stole the ball from Butler and hit two free throws af ter getting fouled in side by Noah to give Miami an 86-84 lead with 29.2 seconds re maining. But Kirk Hin rich quickly scooped in a runner to knot it at 86 with 20.1 seconds left. After a timeout, James took the in bounds and got stripped driving along the right side by But ler to send this one to overtime. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 Puerto Rico Open Leading Scores Sunday At Trump International Golf Club-Puerto Rico Rio Grande, Puerto Rico Purse: $3.5 million Yardage: 7,506; Par: 72 Final Chesson Hadley (300), $630,000 68-65-67-67 267 Danny Lee (165), $378,000 67-68-66-68 269 Ben Martin (105), $238,000 68-67-70-66 271 Jason Gore (62), $131,950 67-69-66-70 272 Richard H. Lee (62), $131,950 69-68-68-67 272 Carl Pettersson (62), $131,950 71-66-66-69 272 Wes Roach (62), $131,950 69-66-70-67 272 David Toms (62), $131,950 72-64-67-69 272 Ricky Barnes (41), $94,500 68-68-69-68 273 Jerry Kelly (41), $94,500 69-67-67-70 273 Chris Stroud (41), $94,500 73-67-68-65 273 Jonathan Byrd (34), $77,000 69-66-67-72 274 Andrew Loupe (34), $77,000 70-70-65-69 274 James Driscoll (30), $59,500 69-63-75-69 276 Robert Karlsson, $59,500 71-67-69-69 276 Peter Malnati (30), $59,500 73-68-69-66 276 Tim Petrovic (30), $59,500 68-72-66-70 276 Robert Streb (30), $59,500 69-72-66-69 276 Martin Flores (28), $42,420 72-69-69-67 277 Ryo Ishikawa (28), $42,420 70-69-69-69 277 Brooks Koepka, $42,420 72-68-69-68 277 Scott Langley (28), $42,420 72-70-70-65 277 George McNeill (28), $42,420 69-67-68-73 277 Eric Axley (25), $29,050 68-66-72-72 278 Rafael Cabrera Bello, $29,050 69-67-68-74 278 David Hearn (25), $29,050 70-68-69-71 278 Greg Owen (25), $29,050 69-67-71-71 278 Andrew Svoboda (25), $29,050 74-66-68-70 278 Rafael Campos, $21,306 74-69-67-69 279 Bud Cauley (22), $21,306 69-67-72-71 279 Nicolas Colsaerts (22), $21,306 70-69-73-67 279 Brad Fritsch (22), $21,306 71-68-67-73 279 Emiliano Grillo, $21,306 71-71-71-66 279 William McGirt (22), $21,306 68-71-69-71 279 nished third in front of Kesel owskis teammate, pole-sitter Joey Logano. Carl Edwards was fth, and Jimmie Johnson came in sixth. The Las Vegas race is the rst of 11 on 1.5-mile tracks, and NASCAR spent much of the off season working on ways to im prove the racing on these tracks with a new aerodynamics pack age and other improvements. The changes resulted in 23 driv ers breaking the track speed re cord during qualifying, but the racing wasnt particularly thrill ing until that nal lap. Keselowski and Earnhardt are the only two drivers to nish in the top ve in each of the sea sons rst three races, and they dueled down the stretch after Earnhardt passed him for the lead on a restart with 42 laps to go. Earnhardt had gone to the pits on the 211th lap and at tempted to stick it out, while Ke selowski had pitted several laps later. Earnhardt praised NASCARs new Chase setup, which al lowed him to take a fuel gam ble in Vegas after winning al ready this season. Additional wins are worth bonus points in the Chase, while a second-place nish doesnt help his posi tion much hence the motiva tion to go for broke on an emp ty tank. Keselowski was in ne form after his third-place nish in Phoenix last week without crew chief Paul Wolfe, who had re turned home for his childs birth. Keselowski also nished third at Daytona. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 world ranking. In his own ranking, he feels he belongs in the top ve. He cited an ama teur career that in cludes going 6-0 in matches to lead Augus ta State to two NCAA ti tles, followed by three PGA Tour wins in seven months. I dont see a lot of guys that have done that besides Tiger Woods and the legends of the game, Reed said. I believe in myself, es pecially with how hard Ive worked. Im one of the top ve players in the world. I feel like Ive proven myself. He joined some ex clusive company. Since 1990, only Woods, Phil Mickelson, Rory McIl roy and Sergio Gar cia had three PGA Tour wins before turning 24. This was not an acci dent, either. Reed has had a share of the lead going into the nal round of all three of his victories the Wyndham Cham pionship last August, the Humana Challenge in January and a World Golf Championship at Doral that featured the strongest eld so far this year. Watson, who won at Riviera three weeks ago, went bogey-free over the nal 27 holes, a strong performance on the overhauled Trump National Doral. REED FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 11

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Archer works three innings as Rays, Yanks tie MARK DIDTLER Associated Press TAMPA David Phelps boosted his bid to be the New York Yankees fth start er, pitching ve scoreless in nings Sunday during a 3-3 tie with the Tampa Bay Rays in 10 innings. Phelps, who gave up three hits and struck out one, is competing with Michael Pi neda, Adam Warren and Vidal Nuno for the nal rota tion spot behind CC Sabath ia, Hiroki Kuroda, Masahi ro Tanaka and Ivan Nova. The right-hander has been touched for two runs over 9 2-3 innings in three spring training starts. Chris Archer allowed two hits and had two strikeouts in 3 1-3 shutout innings for the Rays. Archer struck out his rst two batters, Jacoby Ellsbury and Derek Jeter. Alfonso Soriano had an in eld single and Ellsbury dou bled off the Tampa Bay righthander, who went 9-7 with a 3.22 ERA over 23 starts during his rookie season last year. RED SOX 4, PIRATES 1 BRADENTON Clay Bu chholz pitched three hitless innings, Mike Carp hit a long homer and the Boston Red Sox beat a Pittsburgh Pirates split squad 4-1 on Sunday. Buchholz faced nine bat ters and got ve outs on grounders. He walked one and struck out one. Jackie Bradley Jr., trying to win the starting job in cen ter eld, gave the Red Sox a 2-0 lead in the second by grounding a two-run single into right eld. In the third, Carp hit his second home run of the spring onto the boardwalk in right-center. Pirates right-hander Char lie Morton worked the rst three innings and allowed three runs (one earned) on ve hits. Pittsburgh was hitless un til the sixth, when Gregory Polanco led off with an in eld single. METS 8, BRAVES 2 PORT ST. LUCIE Braves pitcher Kris Medlen left in the fourth inning with a strained forearm and the New York Mets went on to beat Atlanta 8-2 on Sunday. The Mets scored seven un earned runs in the eighth inning to break open a tie game. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was in attendance with his family while on va cation. Facing New York rst base man Matt Clark with two outs, Medlen threw a pitch, grabbed his right elbow and turned his back to home plate. He then removed him self from the game. Medlen was examined by Mets physician Dr. Struan Coleman and was diagnosed with a right forearm strain pending an evaluation back in Disney on Monday. ASTROS 4, BLUE JAYS 3 KISSIMMEE R.A. Dickey pitched ve shutout innings Sunday before the Houston Astros came back to beat the Toronto Blue Jays 4-3 in an exhibition game. Dickey threw 82 pitches in ve innings in his third spring start, giving up four hits and a walk while strik ing out four. The Astros got a runner into scoring posi tion against him only with the help of a wild pitch. Marwin Gonzalez and Car los Perez drove in runs for the Astros in the eighth in ning off losing pitcher Jere my Jeffress. Eric Kratz had two hits and drove in two for the Blue Jays while catching Dickeys knuckleball through the rst ve innings. Jason Castro tied it for the Astros with a two-run home run in the sixth. Left-hander Rudy Owens, a 26-year-old rookie who has yet to pitch in the major leagues, pitched ve shutout innings for the Astros. TWINS 1, PHILLIES 1 FORT MYERS Joe Mauer drove in the games rst run with a rst-inning single, and four Minnesota Twins pitchers combined to twohit the Philadelphia Phillies in a 1-1 tie Sunday. Mauer, who also ied out twice, is batting .250 through ve spring games after mak ing the full-time switch to rst base. The Phillies fell to 2-8-1 this spring, among the worst records in the majors. A two-base throwing er ror by Twins third baseman Brandon Waring opened the door for the Phillies to tie the game in the eighth inning against Twins right-hander Kyle Gibson. NATIONALS 11, CARDINALS 1 VIERA Stephen Stras burg overcame a shaky rst inning and the Washington Nationals offense came up big again in an 11-1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on Sunday. Making his second start of the spring, Strasburg walked two and gave up an RBI sin gle to his rst three batters before settling down. He went three innings, allowing two hits while throwing 28 of 48 pitches for strikes. Anthony Rendon homered and Wilson Ramos had two hits and three RBIs for the Nationals, who have scored 27 runs in their last three games. KATHY WILLENS / AP Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon, left, congratulates Rays starting pitcher Chris Archer (22) during a fourth-inning pitching change against the New York Yankees on Sunday in Tampa. COLLEGE BASKETBALL KAREEM COPELAND Associated Press TALLAHASSEE C.J. Fair scored 22 points and No. 7 Syra cuse closed the regu lar season with a 74-58 victory in the programs rst trip to Florida State. Jerami Grant, who had been bothered by back problems recent ly, had 16 points and eight rebounds while Tyler Ennis nished with 16 points for Syr acuse (27-4, 14-4 Atlan tic Coast Conference). Okaro White led Flor ida State with 20 points and 10 rebounds. Fel low senior Ian Miller scored 16 points in his last home game while Aaron Thomas chipped in 14. The bubble may have burst for Florida State (18-12, 9-9) which des perately needed a sig nature win at this point of the season to earn a berth in the NCAA tournament. NO. 2 WICHITA ST. 83, INDIANA ST. 69 ST. LOUIS Fred VanVleet scored 22 points including sev eral key baskets late to lead another strong en semble effort and No. 2 Wichita State remained the nations lone un beaten after defeating Indiana State 83-69 on Sunday in the Missou ri Valley Conference tournament nal. Tekele Cotton added 20 points with four 3-pointers and Ron Baker had 14 points for the Shockers (34-0), who got tested in the second half before put ting the title game out of reach with a 13-0 run capped by two 3-point ers from VanVleet that put them up by 18 points with 5:38 to go. Wichita State matched the NCAA re cord for victories to start the season held by UNLV in 1990-91 with its third straight con vincing tournament win after going 18-0 in the conference regular season. The Shockers won their rst confer ence tournament since 1987. Manny Arop and Justin Gant had 18 points apiece for sec ond-seeded Indiana State (23-10), which has one of the clos er calls against Wich ita State with a sev en-point loss at home in early February. MARYLAND 75, NO. 5 VIRGINIA 69 COLLEGE PARK, Md. Maryland closed out its 61st and nal Atlan tic Coast Conference regular season in stun ning fashion, outlast ing No. 5 Virginia 75-69 in overtime Sunday to end the Cavaliers 13game winning streak. After blowing a seem ingly secure lead in the closing seconds of reg ulation, the Terrapins never trailed in the ex tra session in front of an emotional sellout crowd of 17,950 at the schools nal home basketball game in a conference it joined as a charter member in 1953. Seth Allen scored ve of his 20 points in over time and Dez Wells n ished with 18 for the Terrapins (17-14, 9-9 ACC), who will play in the Big Ten next sea son. Maryland had lost six straight to Virginia, including a 61-53 de cision in February that was part of the Cav aliers school-record winning streak against ACC competition. NO. 17 SAINT LOUIS 64, UMASS 62 AMHERST, Mass. Jordair Jett scored on a driving layup with 3 seconds to play and No. 17 Saint Louis snapped a three-game losing streak with a 64-62 vic tory over Massachu setts on Sunday as the Billikens won the At lantic 10 regular season title outright for the second straight season. Jett nished with 17 points, including the Billikens last six of the game. PHIL SEARS / AP Florida State guard Aaron Thomas (25) makes a layup over the defense of Syracuse center Baye Moussa Keita, left, on Sunday in Tallahassee. NBA DANNY MOLOSHOK / AP Oklahoma City Thunders Russell Westbrook is called for an offensive foul and then a technical foul after colliding with Los Angeles Lakers Ryan Kelly (4) on Sunday in Los Angeles. JOE RESNICK Associated Press LOS ANGELES Jodie Meeks scored 24 of his career-high 42 points in the sec ond half, and the Los Angeles Lakers beat Oklahoma City 114110 on Sunday de spite a triple-double by Thunder star Kevin Durant. Pau Gasol added 20 points and 11 re bounds for the in jury-ravaged Lak ers, who had lost 29 of their previous 37 games. Meeks was 11 of 18 from the eld and 14 for 14 at the line while becom ing the third player to reach the 30-point mark this season for Los Angeles. CELTICS 118, PISTONS 111 BOSTON Rajon Rondo had 11 points and a season-high 18 assists, Jeff Green scored 27 points and the Boston Celtics had their second-high est scoring output of the season in a 118111 win over the De troit Pistons on Sun day night. Kris Humphries added a season-high 20 points, includ ing two free throws with 25 seconds left to help Boston seal the win after the Pis tons closed to 113109. Humphries also led Boston with 11 re bounds. NETS 104, KINGS 89 NEW YORK Mar cus Thornton scored 15 of his 27 points in the fourth quarter against his old team and Joe Johnson add ed 18 points, help ing the Brooklyn Nets overcome an injury to Paul Pierce in a 104-89 victory over the Sacra mento Kings on Sun day night. Alan Anderson had 11 points and Shaun Livingston and Deron Williams each scored 10 points as the Nets won for the fth time in six games. DeMarcus Cousins had 20 points and 28 rebounds to lead the Kings. No. 7 Syracuse ends losing streak with 74-58 win over Florida State Meeks powers Lakers past Thunder

PAGE 12

B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 GOLF Associated Press RIO GRANDE, Puer to Rico Chesson Hadley won the Puer to Rico Open on Sun day for his rst PGA Tour victory, holding off Danny Lee by two strokes in wind gust ing to 25 mph. Making his 13th PGA Tour start, the 26-yearold Hadley birdied the nal two holes at Trump International for a 5-under 67. Hes the rst rookie winner since Jordan Spieth in July in the John Deere Classic. I was so nervous, Hadley said. I did not eat well last night. I did not eat well this morning. Hadley nished at 21-under 267 and earned $630,000, a twoyear tour exemption and spots in The Play ers Championship, PGA Championship and Tournament of Cham pions. He will move into the mid-60s in the world ranking, giving him a chance to get into the Masters if he can crack the top 50 at the end of the Texas Open. It opens up a lot of doors, Hadley said. It guarantees me a ma jor. Ive never played in a major before. He birdied three of the rst ve holes, chipping in on the par-5 fth. Its all about the start and I got off to a great start, Had ley said. Probably the shot that won me the tournament was the chip in on 5. I mean I was dead over there and I hit the nastiest little nipper over there, and it snuck in the left door. Lee birdied three of the last four holes for a 68. The South Kore an-born New Zealand er won the 2008 U.S. Amateur and also has European and Web. com victories. I really felt like I did my best. I gave it my best, but Chesson was just playing rock solid, Lee said. He made a couple of good up-and-downs from bad tee shots. When he plays like that, its just really hard to catch. He just didnt make any silly mis takes at all. Hadley won twice last year on the Web. com Tour. NHL FRANK FRANKLIN II / AP New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist (30) deects a shot on goal during the third period of an NHL hockey game against the Detroit Red Wings on Sunday in New York. IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer NEW YORK Henr ik Lundqvist earned his 300th NHL victory and 49th career shutout in the New York Rang ers 3-0 victory over the Detroit Red Wings on Sunday. Lundqvist made 30 saves in shutting out the Red Wings for the second time this sea son, as New York com pleted a three-game season sweep of its Original Six rival. The Swedish goalie is one win shy of tying Mike Richters franchise re cord of 301. He caught Rangers great Ed Gi acomin for the club mark in shutouts. Lundqvist was ser enaded by the crowd with chants of Henrik, Hen-rik in the games nal minute. Brian Boyle scored in the rst period and Chris Kreider had two third-period goals for the Rangers, who won their second straight after an 0-2-1 skid and moved into second place in the Metropolitan Division. Derek Stepan and Ryan McDonagh both assisted on each of Kreiders goals. Jimmy Howard stopped 28 shots for the Red Wings, who have lost three of four. Kreider provided all the insurance Lund qvist would need for his milestone win. He made it 2-0 just 14 sec onds into the third by deecting in Mc Donaghs shot from the left point and pushed the lead to three goals at 12:12, beating Howard with a shot as he drove down the left wing for his 16th this season. Lundqvist gets 300th win as N.Y. Rangers blank Red Wings 3-0 Chesson Hadley wins Puerto Rico Open by two over Danny Lee RICARDO ARDUENGO / AP U.S. Chesson Hadley poses for pictures with his Puerto Rico Open PGA trophy on Sunday after winning the tournament in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico.

PAGE 13

Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 STUDY: Surgery helps some prostate cancer patients / C5 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Support group for the widowed to meet The LIFE-Social Support Group for the Widowed will hold a luncheon at 11:30 a.m., March 19 at the Lake Tech Vocational School, 2100 Kurt St., Eustis. Lunch will be prepared by Lake Techs Culinary Arts program and will be served in the dining room on the north side of the building. Second Time Around will entertain. The cost is $10. Reservations may be made by calling 352-787-0403 or by emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com TAVARES Childhood sexual abuse support group set to meet Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, which offers the 12step program, meets at 7 p.m., every Tuesday in Tavares. For informa tion, call 352-406-7485, or go to www.siawso.org. LAKE COUNTY AARP driver safety classes to be offered Rene your driving skills and de velop safer and smarter driving habits through AARP. Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts after complet ing the class. The cost is $15 for AARP mem bers and $20 for non-members, and payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. The two-day course will be of fered from 1 to 4 p.m., today and Wednesday at Lady Lake Library, 225 W. Guava St. Register by call ing 352-753-2957, ext. 114; and 1 to 4 p.m., March 18 and 20 at HardenPauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St., in Eustis. Register by calling 352-394-0250. THE VILLAGES Moffitt Cancer Center to host support group meeting The Moftt Cancer Center at The Villages Regional Hospital will offer a support program for newly diag nosed and long-term survivors of advanced cancer. Topics will cover managing the illness and treatment decisions. The programs are offered twice a month on the rst and third Friday, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., at the Moftt Cancer Center. Register by calling 800-227-2345. LEESBURG Doctors to talk about health care issues Physicians and other medical pro fessionals will talk about health care issues during the Chart Your Course Peoples Medical School series at Lake-Sumter State College, 9501 U.S. 441 in Leesburg. Exercise in Motion will be the topic from 3 to 4 p.m., Thursday with dietetic intern Kylee Gumm, and from 4 to 5 p.m., Fluids to Power Your Exercise Routine will be discussed by Kimberly Krisan, a Juice Plus wellness coach. Call 352365-3556 for details. LEESBURG Cholesterol, blood sugar testing to be offered Saturday Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care invite the public to an open house from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Saturday at 401 and 501 North Blvd. West in Leesburg. Patients get free cholesterol lipid test and blood sugar testing at the event. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer A second baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treat ment in this instance, four hours after birth. Doctors revealed the case Wednesday at an AIDS conference in Bos ton. The girl was born in suburban Los Angeles last April, a month after researchers announced the rst case from Mis sissippi. That was a med ical rst that led doctors worldwide to rethink how fast and hard to treat in fants born with HIV, and the California doctors fol lowed that example. In another AIDS-relat ed development, scien tists have modied genes in the blood cells of a doz en adults to help them re sist HIV. The results give hope that this approach might one day free at least some people from needing medicines to keep HIV un der control, a form of cure. That study was published in Thursdays New England Journal of Medicine. The Mississippi baby is now 3 1/2 and seems HIVfree despite no treatment for about two years. The Los Angeles baby is still getting AIDS medicines, so the status of her infec tion is not as clear. A host of sophisticated tests at multiple times sug gest the LA baby has com pletely cleared the virus, said Dr. Deborah Persaud, a Johns Hopkins University physician who led the test ing. The babys signs are different from what doc tors see in patients whose infections are merely sup pressed by successful treat ment, she said. We dont know if the baby is in remission ... but it looks like that, said Dr. Yvonne Bryson, an infec tious disease specialist at Mattel Childrens Hospital UCLA who consulted on the girls care. Doctors are cautious about suggesting she has been cured, but thats ob viously our hope, Bryson said. Most HIV-infected moms in the U.S. get AIDS medicines during preg nancy, which greatly cuts the chances they will pass the virus to their babies. The Mississippi babys mom received no prena tal care and her HIV was discovered during labor. Doctors started the baby on treatment 30 hours af ter birth, even before tests could determine whether she was infected. The LA baby was born at Miller Childrens Hos pital Long Beach, and we knew this mother from a previous pregnancy and that she was not taking her HIV medicines, said Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pe diatric infectious disease specialist at the hospital. The mom was given AIDS drugs during labor to try to prevent trans mission of the virus, and Deveikis started the baby on them a few hours af ter birth. Tests later con rmed she had been infected, but does not ap pear to be now, nearly a year later. The baby is continu ing treatment, is in fos ter care and looking very healthy, Bryson said. The Mississippi girl was treated until she was 18 months old, when doctors lost contact with her. Ten months later when she Doctors hope for cure in a second baby born with HIV JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE / AP In this undated image, Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins Childrens Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. PENN MEDICINE / AP Technicians in Penn Medicines Clinical Cell and Vaccine Production Facility in Philadelphia hold up a bag of modied T cells genetically modied to resist HIV infection. MIKE STOBBE Associated Press ATLANTA Home births have risen to their highest level in about four decades but are still only a fraction of all births, ac cording to a recent gov ernment. A little more than 1 per cent of U.S. births occur at home, the Centers for Dis ease Control and Preven tion reported. Experts say they remain largely a phe nomenon of white wom en and those who live in remote areas. In the 20th century, births shifted from homes to hospitals. Out-of-hos pital deliveries were down to 1 percent by 1969. But around 2004, they began inching up again and reached about 1.36 percent in 2012. That translates to about 35,000 births in homes and an other 16,000 in freestand ing, birthing centers While more birthing centers have opened, per haps the main driver was an increase in out-of-hos pital births involving white mothers, said T.J. Mathews, one of the au thors of the new report. The proportion of white moms delivering out side hospitals rose to 1 in 49. For Hispanic, black and Asian mothers, it is around 1 in 200. Experts believe theres been a culture shift among many white women, who question high rates of ce sarean sections in hospitals and have come to think of home births with midwives as a preferable alternative. Alaska had the most out-of-hospital births about 1 in 17. Women in remote locations may not able to get to hospitals in time for delivery. Home births still rising, driven by white moms SEE HIV | C5 The ultimate goal is to create an immune system in the body thats been edited genetically so the cells are not capable of being infected with HIV, but we are a long way from there at this point. Dr. Anthony Fauci

PAGE 14

C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: I thought I was a healthy 40-year-old un til I was diagnosed with high blood pressure. My doctor be gan treating it as a stand-alone condition, without consider ing that high blood pressure is a major risk factor for kidney disease. At rst, I wasnt even tested for kidney disease. But even tually, he gave me a urine test, and it was discovered that I had protein in my urine one of the earliest signs of kidney damage. Apparently, my high blood pressure had damaged my kidneys. Healthy kidneys lter out wastes and toxins, but my kid neys ability to do so began to decrease at an alarming rate. I continued to manage my blood pressure with medica tion and decided to make a few lifestyle changes, as well, that helped me avoid the progres sion of kidney disease to kid ney failure. I limited my salt intake, start ed eating more fruits, vege tables and whole grains, de creased the amount of meat I was eating and began swim ming every day. I began to feel better, and when I went to the doctor, it turned out my kidney function had stabilized. Please tell your readers that if they have high blood pres sure they should be proactive and ask their doctor to check their kidneys. Early detection and lifestyle change can make a major impact on your health, as I have learned. DUANE SUN WOLD, SPOKANE, WASH. DEAR DUANE: It is generous of you to share your medical his tory in an effort to caution my readers. The National Kidney Foundation urges everyone to learn about these vital organs and whether they might be at risk. The three major risk factors for kidney disease are: high blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of kidney fail ure. People who have these risk factors should ask their doc tor to check their kidney func tion with a simple blood and urine test. Readers, March is National Kidney Month, and March 13 is World Kidney Day. If you are at risk, schedule an appointment with your doctor. For anyone who needs more information, the National Kidney Founda tions website is kidney.org. DEAR ABBY: Im a member of the clergy who enjoys study ing for my ministry and doctor al work at a local coffee shop. Three men who go there ev ery day have found out that Im a minister, and they each want to talk with me while Im there. Although all three are members of the same religion, none of them is afliated with a church. I have invited them to visit my worship services, as well as call the ofce and set up an ap pointment with me. I have also tried to diplomatically explain that I go to the coffee shop to study. One of them ignores it, another appears hurt and the third one gets offended. When theyre not around, I am pro ductive. When they show up, they want me to be their chap lain. Because of where I live, nd ing another coffee shop is not a viable option. How can I set a boundary with them and still do my studying there? Thank you. REVEREND KEN IN NEW YORK DEAR REVEREND: Do it the same way doctors or law yers do with people who ap proach them for free advice outside the ofce. As soon as you are approached, say rm ly, Im studying right now. If you want to talk, please call my ofce and Ill schedule an ap pointment with you. Right now Im busy. And then refuse to be intimidated by their reac tion. Unless you draw the line, theyll suck you dry. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS High blood pressure can quietly damage kidneys

PAGE 15

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

PAGE 16

C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHICAGO At age 80, retired Chicago physician and educa tor Dan Winship is get ting a b ittersweet last chance to teach about medicine only this time hes the subject. In the early stages of Alz heimers disease, Win ship is giving a young medical student a close-up look at a dev astating illness affect ing millions of patients worldwide. The two are part of a buddy program pair ing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pi oneered at Northwest ern University and ad opted at a handful of other medical schools. Besides offering stu dents a unique per spective on a disease theyre likely to en counter during their careers, the programs give patients a sense of purpose and a chance to stay socially engaged before their illness eventually robs their minds. Winship and his buddy, rst-year medical student Jar ed Worthington, are building a friendship dining together, vis iting museums, chat ting about Winships medical career and Worthingtons plans for his own. The programs help erase the stigma of Alz heimers and are laud able for introducing students to medical op portunities related to aging and dementia, said Beth Kallmyer, an Alzheimers Association vice president who over sees outreach services. More than 5 million Americans have Alz heimers or some oth er form of dementia, a number that could tri ple by 2050, the group estimates. Data presented at an Alzheimers Associ ation conference last year showed the pro grams are increas ing medical students knowledge of the dis ease beyond what they learn in the classroom. About 75 percent of Northwestern students who participate be come doctors in elds that deal with Alzhei mers patients, said program director Dar by Morhardt. For everyone, the di agnosis is a cruel blow. For Winship, it was nothing less. You cant remem ber anything, Winship said, sometimes fal tering to nd the right words. You lose your ability ... to keep your wits about you. Alzheimers wreaks havoc, he said. But Winship has grown to see it as a chance to meld his loves of med icine and teaching. A gastroenterolo gy specialist, Winship spent nearly 10 years as medical school dean at Chicago-based Loyola University. His career also included stints at the University of Mis souri in Columbia and the Department of Vet erans Affairs in Wash ington, D.C. He re tired in 2010, from the American Medical As sociation. Early last year, he got the dreaded diagnosis. Jean Schmidt Winship, 53, his wife of 10 years, says at rst she thought his occasional forget fulness and difculty learning new comput er programs were just signs of aging. But his symptoms gradually worsened. Jean Winship scram bled to learn more about their options af ter the diagnosis and found the buddy pro gram online. Everyone in the buddy program is very committed to under standing that people at this stage of any kind of dementia still need to live and enjoy life, she said. Alzheimers is not Dan, its just a dis ease that he has. And so, that was huge for us ... realizing we have a lot of living to do here. In the program, rst-year students are matched for a school year with patients, based mostly on com mon interests. Winship is an open, engaging man with twinkly dark eyes and a groomed salt-and-pep per beard. He was the rst choice for many students who joined the program last fall, said Morhardt, the program founder and director. She had a hunch, though, that he and Jared Worthington would click. Worthington, 25, a native Canadian born in Sarnia, Ontario, is perhaps more reserved than his Texas-born mentor, but with ob vious earnestness and empathy for what Win ship is going through. Worthingtons grand mother is in the later stages of Alzheimers. He said he hopes being a buddy will inform how I inter act with patients and hopefully treat them with more compassion and understanding. Its something scary and difcult but just because you have Alz heimers doesnt mean that ... your life is over, Worthington said. You can still contribute and give back and partici pate meaningfully. 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center Thank you for giving me my SMILE BACK!rfrrfnt fbffffbfrbfr bfntfrrr fbffbffrffbfrrnb fbrrnfbbfrrrfrfbf ffbfr bfnrrr fffrfn rbffb brf fbrffbbff fbfff nrbrffb frbfffb fffn rrfrn nrrrf fbbn rffbb ffbfn bfrbrrf n bfn MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Alzheimers buddy program pairs patients, students TERESA CRAWFORD / AP First-year Northwestern University medical student Jared Worthington, right, walks with his Alzheimers buddy, retired physician Dan Winship, after eating lunch in Chicagos Streeterville neighborhood.

PAGE 17

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted returned, they could nd no sign of infec tion even though the mom had stopped giv ing her AIDS medi cines. Bryson is one of the leaders of a federally funded study just get ting underway to see if very early treatment can cure HIV infection. About 60 babies in the U.S. and other coun tries will get very ag gressive treatment that will be discontinued if tests over a long time, possibly two years, sug gest no active infection. These kids obvious ly will be followed very, very closely for signs of the virus, said Per saud, who described the LA case at the Con ference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic In fections. The study in adults was prompted by an AIDS patient who ap pears cured after get ting a cell transplant seven years ago in Ber lin from a donor with natural immunity to the virus. Only about 1 percent of people have two copies of the gene that gives this protec tion, and researchers have been seeking a more practical way to get similar results. HIV usually infects blood cells through a protein on their surface called CCR5. A Cali fornia company, San gamo BioSciences Inc., makes a treatment that can knock out a gene that makes CCR5. Dr. Carl June at the University of Pennsyl vania tested it in 12 HIV patients who had their blood ltered to remove some of their cells. The treated cells were infused back into the patients. Four weeks later, half of the patients were temporarily taken off AIDS medicines to see the gene therapys ef fect. The virus returned in all but one of them; that patient turned out to have one copy of the protective gene. We knew that the vi rus was going to come back in most of the pa tients, but the hope is that the modied cells eventually will out number the rest and give the patient a way to control viral lev els without medicines, said Dr. Pablo Tebas, one of the Penn re searchers. The National Insti tute of Allergy and In fectious Diseases spon sored the work with Sangamo and Penn. The ultimate goal is to create an immune system in the body thats been edited ge netically so the cells are not capable of be ing infected with HIV, said director Dr. Antho ny Fauci, but we are a long way from there at this point. Jay Johnson, 53, who works for Action AIDS, an advocacy and ser vice organization in Philadelphia, had the treatment more than three years ago. Al though the virus re bounded when he tem porarily went off HIV medicines, tests show his modied blood cells are still multiplying. Hopefully one day Ill be able to say Im HIV negative again, he said. HIV FROM PAGE C1 MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer Surgery to remove the prostate sav es lives compared to watch ful waiting for some men whose cancers were found because they were causing symptoms, long-term results from a Scandi navian study suggest. However, U.S. men should not assume that immedi ate treatment is best, doctors warn, because the study was done before PSA testing be came common, and a newer study found the opposite. PSA blood tests are not rec ommended for screening by leading medical groups but are widely used in the U.S. That has led to a dramatic increase in the number of prostate can cers found at a very early stage. Whether to treat them is a big question. Most tumors grow too slowly to threaten a mans life and there is no good way to tell which ones will. Treatments can cause impotence, inconti nence and other problems. In Europe, PSA testing is far less common, and most pros tate cancers are found when they cause symptoms such as trouble urinating. Symptoms like this suggest a larger or more advanced tumor. The study involved 695 such men in Sweden, Finland and Ice land, diagnosed between 1989 and 1999. Half were given surgery to remove their prostates and the rest were closely monitored and given surgery only if symptoms or signs of cancer worsened. Earlier results suggested that the surgery group fared better. That trend strengthened as time went on. By the end of 2012, 200 men in the surgery group and 247 in the group assigned to monitor ing had died 56 percent and 69 percent, respectively. Immediate surgery most benetted men younger than 65; it didnt reduce deaths in those over that age. This study tells us we should be very careful about treating anyone over the age of 65 ... and anyone who has low-grade disease, said Dr. Otis Braw ley, chief medical ofcer of the American Cancer Society. In the U.S., fewer men are getting treatment right away, and thats a good trend and we need to continue that, he said. Swedish study: Surgery helps some prostate cancer patients

PAGE 18

C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services Lawn Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services

PAGE 19

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 Professional Services Psychic Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Roofing Services Restoration

PAGE 20

C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com LINDSEY TANNER Associated Press CHICAGO Most p eople who abuse ad dictive prescription painkillers get them for free from friends or rel atives, while drug deal ers are a relatively un common source for those at highest risk for deadly overdoses, a gov ernment study found. People who abuse the most frequently of ten doctor-shop; more than 1 in 4 who used these drugs almost dai ly said they had been prescribed by one or more physicians. Al most as many said they got them for free from friends or relatives; only 15 percent of the most frequent abusers said they bought the drugs from dealers or other strangers. Those abusers are probably using at much greater volumes and simply asking a friend for a pill now and then is not going to be suf cient, said Dr. Leonard Paulozzi, a researcher at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the study, two-thirds of abusers said they used the drugs infrequent ly and well over half of these users said they got them free from friends or relatives. Paulozzi and CDC colleagues analyzed four years of nation wide health surveys on nonmedical use of pain relievers including oxy codone and hydroco done. These include the brand-name pills Oxy Contin and Vicodin, in a family of drugs called opioids chemically similar to opium. The study was pub lished online March 3 in JAMA Internal Med icine. Paulozzi said overall prevalence of nonmed ical use of prescription opioid painkillers has held steady in recent years, at about 12 mil lion, or 1 in 20 people aged 12 and older. But previous CDC data show overdose deaths involving these drugs more than tripled from 1999 to 2010, with more than 16,000 deaths that year. By contrast, overdose deaths that in volved heroin and co caine totaled less than 8,000, and deaths that involved often-abused prescription drugs that include anti-anxi ety medication totaled about 6,500. A separate study in the same journal pres ents Tennessee among states hardest hit by prescription drug abuse as a snapshot of the problem. From 2007 through 2011, one-third of Tennes sees population lled an opioid prescription each year, the study found. Nearly 8 per cent had used more than four prescribers and these abusers were more than six times more likely to have fa tal overdoses than the least frequent users. The larger nation wide study included data from annual gov ernment health sur veys for 2008-2011 that included questions about use of these pow erful painkillers. Nonmedical use was dened as use without a prescription or use with a prescription for the feeling or experience caused by the drug, the researchers said. Paulozzi said the data dont indicate wheth er friends and relatives who offered free drugs shared their own pre scriptions or had ob tained the medication in some other way. Public health messag es have urged pa tients with legitimate pre scriptions for addictive painkillers not to share the drugs and to turn in any leftovers to desig nated drop-off sites. Most abusers of addictive prescription meds get them free from friends, relatives

PAGE 21

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbr bnnbrt r f f ntb f r n t rbn bbnt r r r r f f r f nr t bn bbnt ftnn bbtbbtbnbnb rnbbbntb rb bnn rn r f tnn f f rnbbbnttb bbtnbtbntn r rfrnbtnbbr frr r nnrrb btbbnttb tnnbr r f r r r r r r btnnbbtbtt btnbrnrbnbb bntbnbbtbbtt bnnntnbbtnb nbtnr tbtn t tbb t b t b t n t n b b n n b b b n t t n b t r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b r n b b b r n t r t t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b t n n b t n b b r n n b t r r b n t b b t b b n n b b n n b r n n b b n b r n f f n n b n b b t b nnbttnbtr bbtnr b nnr bbb bbntb b r r r f f r nr t bn bbnt ftnn bbtbbtbnbnb rnbbbntb rbb nnr nrtn n rttb rnb nbbbnttbbbtn btbntn r rf r r rnnrn rrbbtb bnttbtnnbr r r r r r r r r r r f r btnnbbtbtt btnbrnrbnbb bntbnbbtbbtt bnnntnbbtnb nbtnr tbtn t tbb t b t b t n t n b b n n b b b n t t n b t r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b r n b b b r n t r t t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b t n n b t n b b r n n b t r r b n t b b t b b n n b b n n b r n n b b n b r n f f n n b n b b t b nnbttnbtr bbtnr b nnr bbb bbntb b r ntbb tbbnnbbn nbrn nbbnbrnf fnnbnbbt b nnbttnbtr bbtnr b nnr bbb bbntb btnbtbbbnbnnbn nttnbt r r r f f fr fr nr t bbnt ftnn b rrnbbb ntbb bnn rfr frtnn r r f fr rr fr nbbbnttbbbtn btbntn r rfr rfr rnrbn rrbbtb bnttbtnnbr f f r r r r r r r r r r f r r f r r r r btnnbbtbtt btnbrnrbnbb bntbnbbtbbtt bnnntnbbtnb nbtnr tbtn t tbb tbtbtn tnbb nnbbbnt tnbtrnbnbtn tnbbtnnn bnnbtbbr nbbbrntrtt bnntttnbbntbnb tnnbtnbbr nnbtrrb rrf rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

PAGE 22

D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 10, 2014 rfntnb r f n r t t r f b f n n n n nfntfr nnfrfrrfn fnrfnr r f n f t n r f n f r r f r n n n n r r r f n n n t fn trnrrfrf r f n f f f n r n n n nftrt nrrfnftr ftnnrr rrrfn nnrrrrffnr frrfrfnr rfrtfrntff tfnrrrfn trrn n t n t r n t r t rfn nrtnnnrrfttnr rnfrnftf n t b n t r r t r t r r r f t r f n n n r r f n n n n t r t b b n n f n t r t r r r f t f n t r f t t t n f f f r f f f n t n n t rfrnrb nrffnrtfrf bnrnrr n t n r f n r r r f r b n r n r r n r f n r f f n r f n f t t r n r t n n n t frtnbrtr rbrrftrrff nrfnnn n t fr frfnrtt nnfrnn n t n t r f n r f t r n t t f f t f f r f t n fnt n r f r b r f t n r n n f r f f n r f n t n f n n r n t f t t f r r f r f f n n r f t r n f r r f n b f f t t r r f f f n f r f r r r f b r r f f n f r n n f r n n b t n b b t n r f r f n n r t t r f b t r f r f b n r f r b f n f n r f n t n r t t r f b r f r f b t n r f r f n f r n r r f b r t r b f r r f b f n r f f r n r f r r t n r b t b n r t r f t f t n f n n r t n t n t n f n r r nt n n r f t n b n f r f t r f f r r f n n r f r f f n r r t n n t r n n t r f n t n r r f n n r t t r f n f t r f r frnrtf frnrf nnn fnrtrn n f r f n n r t r t n r f n t f r n r f t n f n f r fnr n r r t r t f n n f n f r f r f n r f f r f n n t n t r n t r r f n r n r n r f r n t f r n r r n r n f n r r n r r r r f r f r r f n r t f n f r f f t n r r r f f r t n f f n r r f r n t fnr b n fn r f r f n n n f n n n f f f n r n t f n n f r f f n r r f r r f n r f n f r r r f r r n n r f r r f n f r f n f f f r r f n t f r f n r f n t f n r n f n n b n r r n t f n r f n n n t n r f r r f f r t b rfrfrt nnrfrrffntr n rfntfrf b b b n f r f n r t n n n b b fn n r f r rfrrrfntr rnr nnnrrf nrffrf rntrnnnn rfrffrf nrtrnnf rffrfr nb rrnbnnnr frrnnrff rffrf t nfrfnr rrnfnn nrfnnnrn nffnr nfnnrfft fffntfrfft fffntfrf ffffff fffftfftrff rftfnnrfrnr frf ntnfrf nrnnr tnttfff rrffrrff nnrnnn nrffrfrfrfr nf nr fnrnn fnnn rnrrfnffr nrrfrnrnrn rnnnrfrfrnfn rttrnnnr rfnrfnnr tfrftrf tffrnf nn fnr n nb t rfr ff rfffffrrrfrfrf ffffffr ntnnrfrrffr rnnrfffrnr nfrfnrnrfnf nfnnfrtrf rrrf nfrfrrf nnnnn ftffnnn ftfnn nnrrnr rfr nrnfrnnr fffrnnf nrnfffr nnfffnr nftrffff nrrfrfrrff fffnrrtrfnfn frfftff nfffnr nrfffnrtrtf rfnrnrnf nnrtffffnrrf rfrrfffff nrrtrfnfnf rfftff nfffnrn rfffnrtrtfrfn rnrnfn nrtf ff nff nnfnfnrf rr rnrnrrrnrrff nfnrnrfn frfrrfnn nnnftff nnnftf nnn nrrnrrfrf nrnfrnn rfffrnn fnrnnffn nrrr frnn f nrrfnr nnnrfrrftf r n n f r r r r f f t t r f r f n n n r r r f r n r f n f r f n r r f n r f r f f n r f n r n r n t r f r n n r f n r n n r f r r f n r f n n r r f r n n r f n r r t r n r fnr nnrr fnr nb rnr nrrrnrrffn fr rfrf nffr rfrnn f rf nrnnnrfrrf tfr nfrtrffrfnrfn ntrfnfnn fnrfft rrtrrfn r nrn n r f r r n r n f t r f r n r n n f n f r t n r f r r r r r r n n f r r r r f f t t r f r f n n n r r r f r n r f n f r f n r r f n r f r f f n t r f r n n r f n n f r r f n r f n n r r f r n r f r n n r f r t r n r n r r t r n r n r n r tr fbr n frf f rtr rfnrtrfrff rt b t rfr ff nf ffnrf rfr ff nff nnnttnrftf nnfnf fnrf rnr nrffnfnr nrfrrfr f f n ffrrf rnnrnnfntrf frrfn rfnnnrt fn rfnrnnnrf rnnnrftfr fnfrtnrfr rrrrnffrf rttrfnrrrfr nrffn nfnfrrfnrn nrffrr fnfn rnrnr nnrf nrnrn n n nfnrfr nn f nrtrfnnt b ffn nnfrf frfn nnnfrf nrnn frrffn nrnnnnrf frfrfrn nfnrfrnr fnn rrrrfrnnrn rrfrrrf frnrrfr nrnrnnnrf rfrnfnrttrnn nrrfnrf nnrtfrftrf nnfrrrr ffttrfrfnn nrrrfrnrfn frfnrrf nrfrff nrfnrnrn trfrnnrfn rnnr frrf nrfnnrrnr frnnrfnrrtrn tff nn n nb t

PAGE 23

Monday, March 10, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbr rfntb n nn nn t n n r rf rfnn brr nn r rfn bn n t n n b n n n n nrfn b nn r nrn r nnn n n ntnn nn n nnn n n n n bn b n rf n rn rr ftnnn n ntb b nrfnn nnn bn nnr n n n f nnn rf nr rn nn n b t nnnrnnn ff f nnn tn nn nrnnn n r f n nn nn nt nn rfr nn nrnn n rnnn r n n nn n t n n n n b t b n r nntb rr nnbrnn rf nrf nnn r n r t n rfb nn t n r n nn n nn rtrf r nn b n t n r n n f n rfn rn n nn rfnnn bnn n r nnn nnnnn nn r b n nnn n ntrfnn nr nrf nnnn t n rf t n r r n t n t n n n b n n n n n t t t n r n nn f nnn n rnn nn n tf rftfn n tf b nnnnn n nnrn n nn f nfr n n t f n r n t r n t t t n n r n n n t f r n n n n n n n b n b n n n n f r f f n n b n n n n n n n r t n n t b rnn fnnnn rnnn n b n n n n t n n n n n n n r r r b b r t nnrnn nt n n n r n n nn tn r nbtn n n f n t n n n nrr nnn b n n n n n n n