Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties WORLD WAR II: Re-enactors breathe life into history, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Centralizing organ removal may benet transplants, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 3, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 62 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.81 / 60Partly sunny.50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comSeveral times a day, Burkes BBQs driveway is blocked by eastbound trafc on County Road 466A, frustrating driv ers at the restaurant. It is hard to get in and out of the proper ty, unless you are going westbound, said Tim Burke, owner of the Fruitland Park eatery. I have personally sat in the driveway for ve minutes before getting out on more than one occasion. Burke said he is hopeful once CR 466A is widened to four lanes from U.S. Highway 27 west to the Sumter County line, it will help clear up trafc congestion in front of the restaurant. It would denitely be more simplistic and allow our customers to get in and out of the property, he said. While progress has been made on securing funding for the project, there currently still is not enough to complete a large portion of it, county ofcials said. The revenue stream is not there from impact fees to get enough money to build this road locally, said Jim Stivender, Lakes public works director. We are going to have to rely on some state funding. Beginning in January, impact fees were reinstated in the county, with the northern part of the countys fees at a lower percentage than in south Lake. In the next year, county ofcials expect only $300,000 will be collected in revenues from impact fees in northern Lake. However, transpor tation and county BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALCars drive on County Road 466A in Fruitland Park on Feb. 26. Plans are under way to widen the road from U.S. Highway 27/441 in Fruitland Park, west to the Sumter County line. 466A ROAD WIDENING Plans are under way to four-lane County Road 466A from U.S. Highway 27/441 in Fruitland Park, west to the Sumter County line. The project will run past the proposed Villages of Fruitland Park development. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC N FRUITLAND PARK 466A 500Morse Blvd.Pine Ridge Dairy Rd. Timbertop Ln. Section of road to be widened 27 441Proposed Villages of Fruitland Park DALTON BENNETT and DAVID MCHUGHAssociated PressPEREVALNE, Ukraine Igniting a tense standoff, Russian forces surround ed a Ukrainian army base Sunday just as the coun try began mobilizing in re sponse to the surprise Rus sian takeover of Crimea. Outrage over Russias tac tics mounted in world capitals, with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry calling on President Vladimir Putin to pull back from an in credible act of aggression. Fearing that Europes borders were being re written by force, world leaders rushed to nd a diplomatic solution to the dispute. But there was no denying what had already happened on the ground: Russia captured the Black Sea peninsula on Saturday without ring a shot. Ukrainian Prime Minis ter Arseniy Yatsenyuk said there was no reason for Russia to invade Ukraine and warned that we are on the brink of disaster. We believe that our western partners and the entire global communi ty will support the territo rial integrity and unity of Ukraine, he said Sunday in Kiev. NATO held an emergen cy meeting in Brussels, Britains foreign minister ew to Kiev to support its new government and the U.S., France and Britain debat ed the possibility of boycot ting the next Group of Eight economic summit, being CONNIE CASSAssociated PressWASHINGTON Sick of hearing about the health care law? Plenty of people have tuned out after all the political jabber and website woes. But now is the time to tune back in, before its too late. The big deadline is coming March 31. By that day, for the rst time, nearly ev eryone in the United States is required to be signed up for health insurance or risk paying a ne. Heres what you need to know about this months open enrollment countdown:ALREADY COVERED? NO WORRIESMost people dont need to do any thing. Even before the health care law passed in 2010, more than 8 out of 10 U.S. residents had cover age, usually through their workplace plans or the governments Medicare or Medicaid programs. Some have private policies that meet the laws re quirements. If youre already covered that way, you meet the laws re quirements. Since October, about 4 million people have signed up for private plans through the new state and federal marketplaces, the Obama administration says, although its not clear how many were already insured elsewhere. In addition, many poor adults now have Medicaid cover age for the rst time FRUITLAND PARKMPO chief: Widening project will enhance economic developmentRussia tightens its grip on CrimeaDARKO VOJINOVIC / APA Russian convoy moves from Sevastopol to Sinferopol in the Crimea, Ukraine, on Sunday. Staff ReportThe city of Umatilla, which has issues with its water and sewer lines, will address some sewer prob lems soon, thanks to a $1.22 million ap propriation from the Florida Legislature last year. The city council will meet Tuesday night to consider a staff recommendation to award J & H Waterstop Utilities of Orange City a $509,801 contract to put new linings into aging sewer pipes. The staff wants anoth er $16,395 to be given to Utility Technicians Inc. of Umatilla to re habilitate some old manhole covers.UMATILLACity looking at water and sewer upgradesWhat you need to know about March health deadlineSEE PROJECT | A2SEE UPGRADES | A6SEE CRIMEA | A2SEE DEADLINE | A6 RUSSELL HENLEY WINS PLAYOFF AT HONDA CLASSIC, SPORTS B1

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 3, 2014: This year you might not always be comfortable with what happens. Your ego could take a beating. Curb a tendency to overindulge, especially when youre upset. Learn to take in the big picture. If you are single, use care when dating, as you might be prone to meeting emotionally unavailable people this year. Before committing, get to know someone well. The best period for meeting someone of signicance will be through July 2014. If you are attached, the two of you might not always be on the same emotional frequency. When you are, you have a great time together. ARIES can get you riled up! ARIES (March 21-April 19) Dont be surprised to wake up in a cranky mood, as your dreamtime occurred under some hard planetary vibes. Try not to act on your feelings. A discussion with someone very similar to you could open up an interesting issue. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could be strongwilled about a personal matter and end up bullying everyone into his or her respective corners. Is that what you really want? By late afternoon, once you have calmed down, you will need to act. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Zero in on what you want. A partner could become controlling, which might provoke quite a response from you. Is it possible that you are channeling some of your distress about another situation into this one? Try to look at the long term. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Pressure seems to build to an unprecedented level. The unexpected could occur when dealing with a key associate. A partner might get very controlling as well. Keep your cool, and know that everything could change quickly. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You tend to be present in the moment while still gaining an overview of the situation. Someone might push you hard to get his or her way. The results will be that you distance yourself from this person. Honor a change of pace. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Deal directly with someone whom you care a lot about. You might want to tap into your creativity when dealing with this person. Push comes to shove with a new friendship. Someone could be jealous of the time you spend with your new friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might need to defer to a key person in your life. An effort to work together could seem feasible initially, but youll need one person to be in charge; let it be the other person. Use your intuitive sense with a health or work matter. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You have the strength to continue like the Energizer Bunny. Just the same, someone could throw a boomerang in your path. Jump over it, and dont let it trip you up. Be aware of what others are asking, but dont interfere with the completion of a project. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to let go of plans and let your spontaneous personality take over. Passion consumes much of your time, whether it be a certain topic, person, pastime or sport. Consider incorporating more passion into your daily life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll want to understand what is happening with a close loved one. You can push and prod to get answers, but know that this manipulation could backre. Though you might nd it difcult to play it loose with this person, youll need to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Keep communication open, and try not to make any judgments. Listen to what others are saying, and imagine what it must be like to be in their shoes; your understanding will evolve as a result. A boss or parent could be touchy or withdrawn. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You might not like what you hear at rst, and youll wonder what would be best to do. Keep a conversation lively yet open. Refuse to replay a difcult situation over and over again in your head. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US MARCH 2CASH 3 . ............................................... 2-5-3 Afternoon . .......................................... 0-6-8 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 6-6-9-4 Afternoon . ......................................... 0-3-3-3FLORIDALOTTERY MARCH 1FANTASY 5 . ......................... 23-27-29-30-33 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................... 2-7-9-16-19-45 POWERBALL ...................... 3-8-25-30-4713 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. ofcials remain hopeful an agreement will be made with The Villages to fund construction costs for phase two of the project. Lake County, the city of Fruitland Park and The Villages development are in discussions to construct phase two along their frontage, but we dont have a written agreement, said Fred Schneider, director of engineering for the countys Public Works Department. They are going to send us a proposal. Once constructed, the road will run past the 987-acre Pine Ridge Dairy Tract where The Villages of Lake-Sumter Inc. recently purchased 700 acres for a 2,038home development. This week, Lake County commissioners approved instituting imminent domain proceedings for the acquisition of property for phases one and two of the project. Once widened, CR 466A eventually will connect with the completed section of CR 466A in The Villages in Sumter County. Just over the Sumter line, CR 466A intersects with Morse Boulevard. Plans call for Morse Boulevard to be widened to four lanes and extended south to State Road 44 and hook up with County Road 468. Plans are already under way to widen CR 468 to four lanes from SR 44 south to the Florida Turnpike, where a new interchange will be built. This means motorists would be able to get off the turnpike and easily access SR 44 and travel to Leesburg or stay on Morse Boulevard and easily access The Villages or take CR 466A east to Fruitland Park. The 3.05-mile 466A widening project will be done in three phases: Phase one, covering .045 miles, will span from Sunny Court to US 27; phase two will cover 1.8 miles, from the Sumter County line to Cutoff Road and phase three will cover 0.8 miles, from Marguerite Avenue to Sunny Court. Recently, a Transpor tation Regional Incentive Program agreement was made between Lake County and the FDOT for funding $4.35 million to complete the rightof-way acquisitions on phases one and two. Schneider said the project is estimated to cost $25 million, and so far, the county only has the right-of-way and construction costs to complete phase one of the project. While the county has funds for right-of-way for phase two, funding for construction costs is contingent on the agreement with The Villages and state funding. Phase two construction costs, estimated at $9 million, make up the most expensive part of the project, according to county documents. Meanwhile, phase three remains completely unfunded, according to Schneider. T.J. Fish, executive director of the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organization, said if The Villages agreement comes through, it will enable the MPO to go back to the FDOT for an additional grant to complete the project. They would be our local match to ask for an additional grant for phase three, he said. The Villages has been a partner over the years on numerous transportation projects, including being directly involved in build ing portions of US 301 and County Road 466. Construction of phase one could begin as early as 2015, ofcials said. Commissioner Welton Cadwell said he is hopeful that since The Villages recently bought property in Fruitland Park, the road will be completed sooner. He cited horrible trafc conditions at Micro Racetrack Road and CR 466A, where a trafc signal is needed at the intersection. You could be waiting 15 minutes before getting through that inter section, he said. County ofcials conducted a trafc study at the intersection, concluding a trafc signal was warranted there. This also would become part of the widening project. The study showed the number of vehicles per day on Micro Racetrack Road in 2013 increased by nearly 40 percent compared to 2012. Fish said currently Micro Racetrack Road is heavily congested because there are no breaks in trafc. The signal will help regulate the trafc to give everybody the opportunity to go through the intersection, he said. However, before a signal can be installed, public works ofcials must rst complete a formal signal warrant study and acquire the rest of the right-of-way for phase two, Schneider said. Once the road is widened, economic development will be enhanced, Fish said. One of the hindrances of locating a business on the corridor right now is everybody knows the road needs to be widened and it has not happened yet, he said. PROJECT FROM PAGE A1 held in June at Sochi, the host of Russias successful Winter Olympics. In Kiev, Moscow and other cities, thousands of protesters took to the streets to either decry the Russian occupation or celebrate Crimeas return to its former ruler. Support us, America! protesters chanted outside the U.S. Embassy in Kiev. One young girl held up a placard reading: No Russian aggression! Russia! Russia! the crowd chanted in Moscow. Kerry, interviewed Sunday on U.S. television news shows, talked about boycotting the G-8 sum mit, as well as possible visa bans, asset freezes and trade and investment penalties against Russia. Kerry said all the foreign ministers he had talked to were prepared to go to the hilt to isolate Russia. Still, politicians were treading carefully, knowing it was a delicate time for Europe. We are on a very dangerous track of increasing tensions, German For eign Minister Frank-Wal ter Steinmeier said. (But) it is still possible to turn around. A new divi sion of Europe can still be prevented. So far, however, Ukraines new government and other coun tries have been powerless to counter Russias tac tics. Armed men in uniforms without insignia have moved freely about Crimea for days, occu pying airports, smash ing equipment at an air base and besieging a Ukrainian infantry base. Putin has deed calls from the West to pull back his troops, insisting that Russia has a right to protect its interests and those of Russian-speak ers in Crimea and else where in Ukraine. His condence is matched by the knowledge that Ukraines 46 million peo ple have divided loyal ties. While much of western Ukraine wants closer ties with the 28-nation European Union, its eastern and southern regions like Crimea look to Russia for support. CRIMEA FROM PAGE A1 Associated PressFALLON, Nev. A ghter jet that crashed during a training exercise in western Nevada is a total loss and the pilots condition is unknown, a spokes woman for the Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet, said Sunday. It took rescue crews several hours to reach the site after the 3 / p .m. Satur day crash because of a snow storm and mountainous, remote terrain, Lt. Reagan Lauritzen said. The F/A-18C, a U.S. Marine jet on loan to the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Cen ter, went down on a Navy range train ing complex about 70 miles east of Na val Air Station Fallon, she said. The Navy reported incorrectly on Saturday that the jet was a U.S. Navy Hornet. The name of the pilot will be withheld for 24 hours, she said. The cause of the crash was under in vestigation. There were no reports of any other injuries or damage as a result of the crash and the jet was not carrying any weapons or munitions on the train ing ight, the Navy said.Navy: Fighter jet crash in western Nevada total loss

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT SUMTER COUNTY Driver killed in traffic accident identifiedThe Florida Highway Patrol has released the name of a man killed in a trafc accident last Wednesday in Sumter Country. It took several days to identify Nolan Martinson, 23, because he sustained severe burns, the FHP said. The accident happened at about 10:20 / a.m. along State Road 50 near the intersection of County Road 757. The FHP stated Martinson was driving a 2009 Pontiac G6 eastbound when he drove off the road and hit a fence. His car burst into ames after slamming into a tree. Martinson was pronounced dead at the scene. The car received more than $15,000 in damage, the FHP stated.CLERMONT Building Blocks to host annual dinner and auctionThe theme for Building Blocks Ministries 5th Annual Dinner and Charity Auction is Take Me Out to the Ballgame Hitting Obstacles Out of the Park, at 6 / p.m., on Saturday at the Clermont Community Center, 620 Montrose St., across from Clermont City Hall. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-10, and are available at Building Blocks Ministries, 548 S. U.S. Highway 27, Suite C, in Minneola. For information, call Veronica Whetro at 352-536-9264.THE VILLAGES Bicycle Club hosts We Bike for Kids eventThe Villages Bicycle Club will host the third annual We Bike for Kids Charity Bicycle Ride on March 15, presented by Parady Financial Group. Events begin and end at the SeaBreeze Recreation Center and will feature three routes: metric century (62 miles) at 8:30 / a.m., a 30mile route at 9:30 / a.m. and a 10-mile route at 10 / a.m. Riders of all abilities are welcome to participate. Proceeds from the ride benet the nonprot organizations Project Legacy and the Sumter County Youth Center. For information or to register, call Wally Kurz at 352-430-2189 or go to www.webikeforkids.com.EUSTIS Tickets now available for Jazz Revue band fundraiserTickets are now on sale for the 4th Annual Jazz Revue band fundraiser presented by the Eustis Band program. The event will take place at 6:30 / p.m. on March 21 at the First Baptist Church, 3551 E. Orange Ave. A three-course meal will be served and the evening will be lled with the jazz sounds of the Eustis High Panther Band and the Middle School Mustang Jazz Ensembles, student soloists and a special guest artist. Band students have also assembled their original pieces of art to be displayed at the venue. Tickets are $30, and can be pur chased by calling Andrea Jauschneg at 352-357-3921.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportLake County commission ers recently honored 43 volunteers who have contributed more than 150 hours of service to various county departments. The Lake County Board of County Commissioners is ex tremely appreciative of the more than 350 volunteers and their dedicated volunteer ser vice during calendar year 2013, Robert Anderson, Lake County human resources director, said in a press release. These contributions from vol unteers assist in fullling the countys goal of providing ex cellent customer service to the citizens and businesses of Lake County. The county has received more than 25,000 hours of vol unteer assistance in the Litera cy Program, Teen Court, Emer gency Services, Parks & Trails Division and Animal Services, to name a few. Recognized were: Kathleen Weaver volunteered 153 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cooper Me morial Library; Linda Perrine volunteered 156 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cooper Memorial Li brary; Sondra Surface vol unteered 158 hours with the Lake County honors 43 for volunteer service SUBMITTED PHOTO County Manager David Heath, left, and County Commissioner Jimmy Conner thank Craig Smith, right, for his 509 volunteer hours.SEE SERVICE | A5 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comRe-enactors al lowed World War II veterans a chance to travel back to the 1940s over the weekend at Dade Bat tleeld Historic State Park in Bushnell, and the event brought his tory books to life for younger generations. The timing of the World War II Commemorative Weekend was tting. Seventy years ago, Dade Memorial Park, as it was called back then, was home to the 62nd Signal Air Warning Company that was stationed in Bushnell from January to June 1944. Re-enactors said it was their duty to honor those who served in the largest conict in human history. Unfortunately, many of our World War II veterans are going away, re-enactor Christopher R. Tenaro of Brooksville said Sunday. This is our way to keep their memory alive and to really show kids what their generation did for this country and the world. It was a very pivotal time in our world. Tenaro treasures every opportunity to talk to surviving World War II veterans, including his BUSHNELLRe-enactors breathe life into World War II history PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Visitors look over a jeep from World War II on Sunday at Dade Battleeld Historic Park in Bushnell, site of the annual World War II Commemorative Weekend. BELOW: World War II re-enactors, left to right, Richard Curran of Hudson, Rick Rees of Orlando and Nick Price of West Palm Beach, are on the lookout for enemy. Staff ReportSeven years after it rst upheld the death sen tence for a Lake County man who shot and killed a security guard in 2001, during an 11-day crime spree that saw anoth er man murdered and an elderly woman bashed in the head with a ham mer, the Florida Supreme Court has rejected another appeal led by Quawn Franklin. Franklin, 36, claimed he received ineffective trial counsel, Floridas method of execution is cruel and unusual and that he may be incompetent at the time of his execution. The Supreme Court rejected those claims, as it did with a similar appeal in 2007. Franklin was 16 years old when he was sentenced to prison for 10 years for robbing a man. He was released in October 2001 and began his crime spree here just two months later. According to court documents, on Dec. 18, 2001, Franklin called for a piz za delivery, bound driver John Horans hands with duct tape and shot him in the back, kill ing him for pock et change. Franklin received a life sentence. On Dec. 27 or 28, he forced his way into the home of Al ice Johnson and hit her in the head with a hammer before stealing her car, for which he received another life sentence.Supreme Court rejects killers appeal FRANKLIN SEE APPEAL | A4 Staff ReportThe Umatilla Chamber of Commerce presents its rst North Lake SportsFest & Jam March 28-30 at North Lake Park. The event will include youth baseball and soccer tournaments, as well as a youth girls fastpitch softball tournament, according to a press release. The SportsFest will also fea ture a 50or 100-mile Centuri on Biking Challenge, where rid ers can enjoy themselves on the scenic roadways deep within the Ocala National Forest, through Alexander Springs and along the St. Johns River. The jam portion will offer live music, day and night. The SportsFest & Jam demonstrates that Lake County is an ideal destination for sports tour ism while shining a spotlight on the natural resources of north Lake County, said Jason Mabry, Lake County Economic Devel opment & Tourism coordinator. North Lake Community Park is the largest recreational complex managed by the Lake County Parks & Trails Division. The park opened in May 2009 and features many amenities, including an ex pansive playground area, picnic pavilions, basketball courts, tennis courts, sand volleyball courts, nine athletic elds, concession stands, a 1.4-mile perimeter trail loop, a .75-mile nature trail and two restroom facilities. The park, at 40730 Roger Giles Rd., is located east of Umatilla, off East Collins Street. The parks primary purpose is to offer recreational sports elds. The ball elds can be reserved for league play for a fee, or are otherwise open for general use. The park is a former orange grove. Many cit rus trees still make up its proper ty boundaries and the landscap ing is native to Florida. For information, go to www. umatillachamber.org/SportsFestJam or call 352-669-3511. UMATILLAInaugural SportsFest & Jam plannedSEE HISTORY | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 Activities for the Day: $25 Value $150 Value Everyone is encouraged to come out with family and friends.SEE YOU THERE!WHEN: WHERE: Invite you to come out and enjoy the day with us, as we celebrate our First Annual Open House and Patient Appreciation Day.Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care OBITUARIESRuth Louise Kinzer HamiltonRuth Louise Kinzer Hamilton, age 89, was born June 20, 1924 in Jenkins, KY and passed away February 5, 2014, at Wuest hoff Medical Center, Melbourne, FL. Survi vors include ve chil dren: Robert B. (Paula) Hamilton Jr., Noblesville, IN; Elizabeth Ann (Ray) Peterson, Mel bourne, FL; William C. (Sissy) Hamilton, Sewickley, PA; Richard D. (Susie) Hamilton, Chehalis, WA and Su san Carol (Bill) Den ny, Beaver Falls, PA. Twelve grandchildren, ten great-grandchildren and numerous nephews and nieces also survive her. Ruth moved to Pittsburgh, PA at a young age and then to Glen Osborne, PA in her teen years. She graduated from Se wickley High School in 1942, spent one year at Allegheny College in Meadville, PA and then married Robert B. Hamilton on September 24, 1943. They raised their family in Sewickley, PA where they were active members of the Se wickley United Meth odist Church for 40 years. In addition to being a homemaker, Ruth worked in the of ce at a car dealership part-time and then full-time at Sewickley Valley Hospital for 15 years. After retirement, they moved to Sun lake Estates in Grand Island, FL where they became active members of the First Unit ed Methodist Church, Eustis, regularly attending the Friendship Class and Bible Study. Ruth enjoyed doing devotions for the Sisters In Christ meetings and teaching lessons. They both enjoyed visiting family, playing cards and participating in church activities. After her hus band of 63 years passed away, Ruth moved to Lake Ridge Village in Eustis, FL where she lived for one year be fore moving in April 2012 into assisted liv ing at the Brookshire in Melbourne. At the Brookshire, she was a faithful attendee of the Monday night church service and Tuesday morning Bible Study. She also enjoyed play ing bingo, card games, scrabble, crossword puzzles, eating out and going to the mov ies. She traveled regularly to visit family and friends. However, she also kept up with fam ily and friends by us ing her IPad for Skype, Face time, Facebook and e-mail. Ruth will be sorely missed as the gentle and comforting matriarch of her family. In addition to her hus band, she is preced ed in death by an in fant sister, Annie Laura Kinzer, her brother, Jack Kinzer, and two other sisters, Julia Tubbs and Alice Groves. A Cele bration of Life Service will be held at 1 / p .m. on Friday, March 7, 2014 in the Sturm Chapel, First United Methodist Church, Eustis. An ad ditional service will be held in June in Sewick ley, PA where she will be interred next to her husband in the Sewick ley Cemetery. Donations may be made to the First United Meth odist Church, Eustis.DEATH NOTICESRosemarie T. ChristRosemarie Therese Christ, 75, died Satur day March 1, 2014 in Fruitland Park. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg.IN MEMORY HAMILTON SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com Johnson suf fered severe injuries from the attack when pieces of her skull imbedded in her brain, the documents state. On Dec. 28, Frank lin drove Johnsons car to St. Peters burg to visit relatives, but decided to APPEAL FROM PAGE A3 return to Lake County. Once here, he stopped to ask directions from crate company security guard Jerry Law ley, later telling a woman he was going to get the man, court papers show. On Dec. 29, Franklin ordered Lawley out of his vehicle at gunpoint, made him kneel in the parking lot and shot him in the back before nding nothing of value on the man or in his vehicle, the documents state. Lawley later died and Franklin received the death penalty for the killing. Franklin drove back to St. Petersburg, where he fell asleep in his car in somebodys drive way and was arrested by police there in the early morning hours of Dec. 30. LARRY NEUMEISTERAssociated PressNEW YORK Amid unusually tight secu rity, Osama bin Lad ens son-in-law goes to trial today on charges he conspired to kill Americans in his role as al-Qaidas mouth piece after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Spectators at the trial of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith the high est-ranking al-Qaida gure to face trial on U.S. soil since the attacks will pass through a metal de tector before entering a Manhattan courtroom where prosecutors will try to prove to an anonymous jury that the one-time ter ror network spokesman tried to rally oth ers to kill Americans. Prosecutors say they plan to show jurors during their opening statement a picture of Abu Ghaith seated with bin Laden and other al-Qaida leaders on the day after Sept. 11, 2001, as they make statements about the attacks. They say Abu Ghaith described the circumstances of the lming in his post-ar rest statement.NY jury selection starts for bin Laden son-in-law

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comCelebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOMJust 10 miles south of The Villages ANNUAL LAMP SALEMarch 3rd March 7th% offLIST50 All Table & Floor Lamps, Mirrors, Prints & Accessories In Stock recent meeting with some of the remaining members from the 101st Airborne Division chronicled in the book and television series Band of Brothers. They parachuted into Normandy in the ear ly hours June 6, 1944, and were followed by hundreds of thousands of Allied troops for the D-Day invasion. Just to sit down and talk to those guys just chokes you up. It was absolutely Re-enactors incredible, said Tenaro, who was touched to hear the veterans offer praise in return to the re-enactor: Youre keeping the memory alive representing us. Clermont resident Eddie Bedoya said he was impressed by the re-enactors authentic items. Im looking for real stuff that was used back then, and the way that everybody is acting here, they really are doing a good job and theyre really into it, Bedoya said as he tried on an Army helmet and checked out a rie. Nina Mattei of Dunnellon portrayed one of 92 civilian World War II female journalists who left their ofce jobs to cover the war as correspondents. They had an adventurous spirit, she said. They wanted to go and see a part of it and be accurate and authentic. It took a lot of courage. Re-enactor Richard Curran of Hudson said the joy of being in Bushnell over the weekend was the chance to meet more veterans in the area and reminisce about the war years. Were hearing the inside story that you never read in the history books, Curran said. HISTORYFROM PAGE A3 Public Resources Department at Coo per Memorial Library; Strait Hollis volunteered 168 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Division; Stephen Fly nn volunteered 183 hours with the Public Safety Department in the Emergency Man agement Division; Emil Vandevelde volunteered 187 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Division; David Hasun uma volunteered 188 Hours with the Public Resources Department at Cooper Memorial Library; Carl DePoy volunteered 194 hours with the Public Safe ty Department in the Emergency Management Division; Robert Putman volunteered 196 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Parks & Trails Division; Lanny Villinis volunteered 199 hours with the Fa cilities & Fleet Management Department in the Facilities Division; Peg Lindsay volun teered 208 hours with the Public Resourc es Department in the Parks & Trails Division; Paul Branch volunteered 210 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Di vision; Tom Merchant volunteered 218 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Library Services Administrative ofce; John Walton volun teered 240 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Di vision. Fred Fitte volunteered 243 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Division; Wanda Klaas volunteered 257 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Program; Doug Rehman volunteered 271 hours with the Public Safe ty Department in the Emergency Management Division; Whitney Luckhart volunteered 285 hours with the Community Safe ty and Compliance De partment in the Ani mal Services Division; Charles Keller volunteered 354 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Library Services Administrative ofce; Jane Smith volunteered 375 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Community Library; Paul Hemby volunteered 383 hours with the Public Safety Department in the Emergency Man agement Division; George Wingate vol unteered 397 hours with the Community Safety and Compliance Department in the Probation Division; Michelle Brady volun teered 400 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Cooper Memorial Library; Craig Smith volunteered 509 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Ca gan Crossings Community Library; Howard Youngmeyer volunteered 579 hours with the Public Resourc es Department in the Literacy Program; Peg Urban volunteered over 150 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Parks & Trails Division; Kevin Bertelsen volunteered 152 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Ca gan Crossings Com munity Library; Gerald Blackburn volunteered 171 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Program. Abdullah Derosier volunteered 171 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Community Library; Carl Mullins volunteered 182 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Program; Sally Fish er volunteered 185 hours with the Public Resources Department at Astor County Library; Jarold Michael volunteered 189 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Community Library; Constance Gibb volun teered 232 hours with the Public Resourc es Department in the Literacy Program; Patricia Davis volun teered 250 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Program; Chitkumari Budram volunteered 253 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library; Michael Grovac volunteered 255 hours with the Pub lic Works Department in the Environmen tal Services Division; Gary Davis volunteered 260 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Lit eracy Program; Nancy Puckett volunteered 287 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Community Library; Judith Geh rke volunteered 313 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Community Library; Jay Boehme volunteered 317 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Di vision; Neil Wasserman volunteered 423 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Program; Mary Sturdivant volunteered 426 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Agricultural Ed ucation Services Division; Barney O. Rae volunteered 574 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Agricultural Educa tion Services Division. For information on volunteer opportuni ties with Lake County, visit www.lakecounty .gov/volunteer or call Lake Countys Human Resources at 352-3439596. SERVICE FROM PAGE A3

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. Seven companies bid on the lining project, with J & H coming in the lowest. The highest bid was $1.94 million for the work. Four companies bid on the manhole proj ect, with Utility Technicians offering the best price. The highest bid was $31,927. Umatilla received $1.22 million from the legislature last year for sewer line rehabilitation work. Some $52,000 of this was designated for design, project bidding and engineering costs, with the rest designated for actual construction. Its unclear at this point how the rest of the sewer line rehabilitation funds will be spent. Last month, the council agreed to spend around $20,000 to x water line cutoff valves to prevent problems seen last October when a water main broke. The entire city was left without water for several hours because some valves didnt op erate and all water out put had to be shut off at the water plant. The city has about 360 of these valves. Utility Service Company of Atlanta has es timated that up to 80 percent of the valves can function with a lit tle work, meaning only 20 percent may have to be replaced. City of cials expect the Atlanta company to complete the work sometime next month. Water lines across the city are 40 to 60 years old and need to be re placed, City Manag er Glenn Irby previ ously told the council. This could cost about $8 million, but Irby be lieves that price could be cut in half if city crews do the work with the help of some temporary workers. The city is conduct ing a rate study for all utilities before deter mining how to pay for the water line work. The city is in a position to where it is going to have to do something with both (its) water and waste water utility, Irby said earlier. The city cannot do anything until this rate study is com plete, because it antic ipates borrowing up to UPGRADES FROM PAGE A1 $5 million to replace or x the aging infra structure. Higher rates are needed for another reason, the city manager said. The utilities are not standing on their own as to revenues and expenses, Irby said. The city is apply ing for a $650,000 Community Development Block Grant needed for significant upgrades to the citys main wa ter plant north of the Save-A-Lot plaza. The council Tuesday night also will con sider paying $44,000 to Wicks Engineer ing Services of Tav ares for engineering work needed to help secure the grant. According to Wicks, plant upgrades are needed because re hydrant ow is decient, as well as the ability to meet potable (water) demand in some sections of the dis tribution system, a company letter to the council states. In order to improve water pressure, Wicks is recommending the city get rid of its ex isting elevated water storage tank and replace it with a new 150,000-gallon stor age tank on the ground. This will allow for higher distribu tion system operat ing pressure and will eliminate approximately $10,000 to $12,000 per year that is currently expend ed for (elevated) tank maintenance and inspections, the letter states. through expansions of the program in about half the states. President Barack Obama is urging peo ple who have coverage to help any uninsured friends and relatives get signed up.NEED COVERAGE? ITS CRUNCH TIMEChances are youll hear more reminders about health care this month. The push is on to reach millions of un insured people. A big hurdle for the effort: As recently as last month, three-fourths of the uninsured didnt know there was a March 31 deadline, according to polling conducted for the Kaiser Family Foundation. Most said they didnt know much about the law and had an unfavorable opinion of it. Plus, many worry they wont be able to afford the new plans. The enrollment campaign is emphasiz ing that subsidies are available on a sliding scale to help low-income and middle-class households pay for their insurance. How to enroll? Start at HealthCare.gov or by calling 1-800-318-2596. Residents of states running their own market places will be directed there; people in other states go through the federal exchange. After March 31, many people wont be able to get subsidized coverage this year, even if they become seriously ill. The next open enroll ment period is set to begin Nov. 15, for cov erage in 2015.DEADLINE DETAILSThere are exceptions. The big one is the Medicaid program for the poor. People who meet the requirements can sign up anytime, with no deadline. Also, people remain eligible for Medicare whenever they turn 65. If you are insured now and lose your coverage during the year, by get ting laid off from your job, for example, you can use an exchange to nd a new policy then. People can sign up out side the open enrollment period in special situations such as having a baby or moving to another state. You can choose to buy insurance outside the marketplaces and still benet from consumer protections in the law. People who do that wouldnt normally be eligible for premium subsidies. But the Obama administration says exceptions will be made for people whose attempts to buy mar ketplace insurance on time were stymied by continuing problems with some enrollment websites.MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WONT GET COVEREDSome 12 million people could gain health coverage this year be cause of the law, if con gressional auditors predictions dont prove overly optimistic. Even so, tens of mil lions still would go without. DEADLINE FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTOYvette Calderon, an In Person Counselor for President Obamas new health care law, speaks with taxi driver David Bilewu, a 39-year-old Nigerian immigrant, at a city ofce where Chicago taxi drivers go to renew their license.

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY FlashbackHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hen advocates of samesex marriage pushed their case in the courts of both public opinion and law, they made sure to read the fol lowing language from that lit tle card provided to them by the tolerance police: No one will be forced to violate their religious beliefs if Adam can marry Steve and Madame can marry Eve. Much like the Miranda warnings that became famous after the Supremes decided that mag ic words were all that were needed to protect the right against self-incrimination, this nuptial disclaimer was supposed to make us all breathe easier about that pesky First Amendment right to free exercise. Well, you can start choking. Yielding to pressures reminiscent of Tony Soprano, Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed Arizonas new conscience law, the one that protected people of faith from having to provide services to gay and lesbian couples who wanted a wedding cake, a commemorative photo album, a gossamer bridal gown or a jazzy band. The violent pushback against the law shows just how hollow that your religious beliefs are safe promise really is. A law that would have simply per mitted private business owners to refuse to provide services that violated deeply held religious principles was called a subversive attempt to codify bigotry. And where, pray tell, was the bigot hiding? Why, in the kitchen, where the baked goods are kept. And in the darkroom, where the photos are developed. And in the basement, where the musical instruments are stored. And in the dressing room, where the measurements are taken. These are the safe houses of hate and prejudice, places where evil believers take refuge from the same-sex juggernaut. This reasoning was both predictable and troubling. You just knew that when the Supreme Court dismantled part of the Defense of Marriage Act last year, and some states took up the crusade by passing laws to legalize gay nuptials, any hint of opposition would be labeled bigotry. In fact, this isnt news. From the time that the rst man took his boyfriends hand and said I do ... want a domestic partnership, opposition to same-sex unions (whether based on the law or in faith) was considered tantamount to Bull Connor hosing someone down. Its not that I dont get the anger from the LGBT community at the idea of some judgmental bakers, photographers and wedding planners. My ancestors were treated like trash because they ngered rosaries and believed that a virgin appeared in grottos. (She did, by the way.) Anytime we are discriminated against because of something we hold dear, it rankles the soul. But discrimination, hurtful as it can often be, is not necessarily illegal. It is also not necessar ily bigotry. We make exceptions all the time for those who have certain spiritual do not cross lines, like the Quakers who were excused from combat duty because of their pacism. This was not about legal bars to same-sex marriage. This was about protecting someone against a lawsuit if he refused to bake a wedding cake. Telling people that they cant get married is very different from telling them that you wont celebrate their union. Not everyone has to like you, not everyone has to agree with you and not everyone has to serve you. But, you will say, this was just like those segregated lunch counters in the South, when those racist crackers refused to break bread with black folk. Appealing as that analogy might be to the lazy mind, its not the same thing. Racial discrimination was never ofcially motivated by religious principle. Yes, there were some miscreants who tried to use the Bible to say that a black man and a white woman couldnt eat soup and touch elbows, but the racism that motivated the segregation now, segregation forever movement was very different from the faith-based belief that marriage is a sacred union be tween one man and one woman. Why? Because some people who dont have a bigoted bone in their bodies believe that mar riage is a sacred union designed for procreation and the glorication of God. You can disagree with that, you can even nd it laughable and antiquated. But it is a legitimate belief. Congress passed the Restoration of Religious Freedom Act to protect that belief, and others like it. On the other hand, theres nothing legitimate in pointing to the Bible to refuse dinner to an African-American. Similarly, laws that protect religious freedom cant be expanded to allow a business to exclude any person for any imsy reason just because he can point to a Bible verse. The belief must be fundamental, and the requested service must directly violate that belief. Theres no reason to believe that this law wouldnt have been narrowly applied. We cannot legislate against hurt feelings. We can only hope that people learn to accept one another. Until then, no one should be compelled to choose between a courthouse bench and a wooden pew. Its a shame that Gov. Brewer let the noise distract her from that truth.Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Readers may send her email at cowers1961@gmail.com.OTHERVOICES Christine M. FlowersMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Bigotry killed Arizonas conscience law The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. The U.S. Food and Drug administration broke new ground in consumer pro tection when it required, more than 20 years ago, the now-familiar nutrition labels on virtually every bit of packaged food. Now, the labels are being revamped in ways that have both benets and downsides. One of the most noticeable changes and the least justiable would be the addition of a new sub-category: the number of grams of added sugar in the food, in addition to the existing measure of total sugar. But why make such a change? Doctors and dietitians have declared that there is no nutritional difference between naturally occurring sugars such as fructose (in fruit juice) and the sugars that are added. All are processed the same way by the body; the only difference, some scientists have found, is when the sugar occurs in a whole, unprocessed food such as an apple. The same isnt true, though, of the sugar in soda or that in apple juice, though the proposed labels would imply otherwise. If people want to avoid added sugar, they just need to look at the ingredients list. The FDA proposal is on rmer footing when it suggests listing the number of calories, the number of servings in a container and the size of each serving in more prominent type. The number of calories is the number most consumers want to check, so it should be easy to locate and read. Similarly, some shoppers think that the number of calories listed is the total for the package rather than for the serving size; they dont notice that even a relatively small bag of chips might contain two or three servings, although that information is included on the label. A consumer who is not looking closely might think he is eating a 100-calorie snack when he is actually consuming more like 300 calories. For the same reason, the FDA wants pack ages of food that might be consumed by one person at a sitting to be relabeled as a single serving, with the total calorie count. In oth er words, a 20-ounce bottle of soda, which most people probably drink at a sitting, could no longer be counted as 2 1/2 servings. The goal is a good one: to keep consumers from being misled. But the proposed change on these smaller packages would mean that there are no real standards of what constitutes a serving. A 12-ounce can of Coke would be designated a single serving, as would a 20-ounce bottle of Coke which is at least as confusing as the current system. Also, one of the chief obstacles in whittling the nations waistline is the great American food portion. Once labels say that 20 ounces of soda is a single serving, consumers might start thinking of that as a standard, reasonable size. They shouldnt.From the Los Angeles Times.AVOICEFrom the FDA, a mixed bag of food labels

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Creamer sinks 75-foot putt for victory / B3 Staff ReportLakehawks bats came alive on Sunday, pro ducing six runs over the nal three innings to complete a 10-3 rout of the Rollins College JV squad in Leesburg. Dakota Higdon and Tanner Long each nished with a pair of hits on the day while Tan ner Barnhard, Jack Curtis and Walker Sheller each drove in two runs for LSSC. Kyle Schackne started the game for the Lake hawks, surrendering all three runs for Rollins while giving up ve hits and recording ve strikeouts and a single walk. LSSC coach Josh Holt turned to his bull pen in the fth inning and was rewarded with a one-hit performance by four relievers. Mi chael Hennessey got the win for the Lakehawks Lakehawks drub Rollins College JV squad 10-3SEE LSSC | B2 ROSS D. FRANKLIN / AP Kevin Harvick celebrates in Victory Lane with his crew after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup race on Sunday in Avondale, Ariz. JOHN MARSHALLAssociated PressAVONDALE, Ariz. Kev in Harvick charged to the front early and dominat ed the rest of the way Sun day for his second straight Sprint Cup victory at Phoenix International Raceway. Coming off a disappointing nish at the Daytona 500, Harvick had the fast est car in practice and kept it rolling in the race, leading 224 of 312 laps on the oddshaped mile oval. Harvick won the fall race at PIR for Richard Childress Racing after Carl Edwards ran out of fuel at the white ag. Harvick needed no help Sunday, quickly moving to the front after starting 13th and pulling away on a series of late restarts to win in his second race with Harvick dominates at Phoenix, wins second consecutive race PHOTOS BY WILFREDO LEE / AP Rory McIlroy hits from near the sixth green during the nal round of the Honda Classic on Sunday in Palm Beach Gardens. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterPALM BEACH GAR DENS Russell Henley made good on his second chance at the 18th hole Sunday and won the Honda Classic after a wild day that be gan with Tiger Woods walking off the course with a back injury and ended with a four-man playoff. The closing hour at PGA National was a se ries of blunders by the contenders and even the winner. Henley was in a three-way tie for the lead, 40 yards left of the ag on the par-5 18th in regulation, when he chunked a chip so bad ly that it only got halfway to the hole. He had to two-putt for par, and then watched as Rory McIlroy nearly made a great escape from an otherwise bad after noon. McIlroy, who lost a two-shot lead, hit a 5-wood from 236 yards to just inside 12 feet for an eagle and the win. It narrowly slid by on the right. In the playoff, Hen ley was the only play er to reach the 549-yard hole in two, and he two-putted from about 40 feet for birdie. Ryan Palmer missed a 10foot birdie putt. McIlroy went from the back bunker to the front col lar and had to scram ble for par, and Rus sell Knox laid up and missed a 20-foot birdie attempt. This isnt going to sink in for a while, Henley said. Thousands of fans who spent hours in the warmth and wind of south Florida surely felt the same way. Woods abruptly quit after 13 holes and was driven straight to his car. He later said he had lower back pain and spasms, and was unsure if he could play at Doral next week. And then came all the mis takes by four guys try ing to win. Palmer missed a 5-foot par in regulation that would have won it. He closed with a 69, the only player in the last six groups to break par. Knox needed a birdie on the last hole, but he went from the fairway bunker to the rough, well over the green and then calmly made a par putt just inside 10 feet for a 71 to get in the playoff. They all nished at 8-under 272. The conditions were tough. The play was so underwhelming that McIlroy said that if he had won, It would have felt undeserved in a way.From out of the blueSEE NASCAR | B2Henley comes from behind to defeat McIlroy, two others in playoff Russell Henley kisses the trophy after winning the Honda Classic golf tournament.SEE GOLF | B2 Associated Press ORLANDO Tobias Harris scored a ca reer-high 31 points and the Orlando Magic beat the 76ers for the second time in less than a week, winning 92-81 Sunday night to extend Philadelphias losing streak to 14 games. Nikola Vucevic had 18 points and 17 re bounds for Orlando, which outscored Phila delphia 26-12 in the fourth quarter to earn the win. The 76ers skid is their longest since 1994, when they lost 15 straight, and includes a loss last Monday to the Milwaukee Bucks, the NBAs worst team. The 76ers have the NBAs second-worst record, while the Magic have the third-worst. Thaddeus Young had 29 points for Philadel phia and Michael Carter-Williams added 17 points and 11 rebounds. Magic guards Jameer Nelson and Arron LEESBURGHarris has 31 as Magic extend Sixers skid 92-81SEE MAGIC | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-The Prot on CNBC 500 ResultsSunday At Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Ariz. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 312 laps, 149.9 rating, 48 points. 2. (5) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 312, 122.5, 42. 3. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 312, 115.9, 42. 4. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 312, 124.3, 41. 5. (17) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 312, 108.1, 40. 6. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 312, 111.8, 38. 7. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 312, 98.8, 38. 8. (23) Carl Edwards, Ford, 312, 96.5, 37. 9. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 312, 101.5, 35. 10. (3) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 312, 93.5, 34. 11. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 312, 78.4, 33. 12. (19) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 312, 90, 32. 13. (14) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 312, 83.2, 32. 14. (18) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 312, 71.2, 30. 15. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 312, 88, 29. 16. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 312, 81.7, 28. 17. (6) Greg Bife, Ford, 312, 80.8, 27. 18. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 312, 62.7, 26. 19. (12) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 312, 79.9, 25. 20. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 312, 74.7, 24. 21. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 311, 62.6, 23. 22. (27) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 311, 66.4, 22. 23. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 311, 68.1, 21. 24. (24) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 311, 55.1, 20. 25. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 311, 67.1, 19. 26. (25) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 310, 64.4, 18. 27. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 310, 44.2, 17. 28. (30) David Ragan, Ford, 310, 53.5, 16. 29. (28) David Gilliland, Ford, 309, 52.4, 16. 30. (43) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 309, 46.3, 14. 31. (39) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 308, 38.5, 13. 32. (32) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 308, 42.9, 0. 33. (26) Michael McDowell, Ford, 307, 42.5, 11. 34. (41) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 307, 43.2, 10. 35. (34) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 307, 34.1, 9. 36. (33) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 306, 51.7, 8. 37. (37) Blake Koch, Ford, 306, 30, 0. 38. (40) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 302, 30.2, 6. 39. (10) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, engine, 292, 73.6, 5. 40. (38) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 292, 25.9, 0. 41. (35) Alex Bowman, Toyota, brakes, 230, 40.6, 3. 42. (36) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, engine, 226, 29.4, 2. 43. (42) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, brakes, 28, 25.3, 0. Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EST AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Cleveland 3 1 .750 Kansas City 3 1 .750 Seattle 3 1 .750 Baltimore 2 1 .667 Houston 2 1 .667 Minnesota 2 1 .667 Oakland 2 1 .667 Detroit 3 2 .600 New York 3 2 .600 Toronto 3 2 .600 Los Angeles 1 1 .500 Tampa Bay 1 1 .500 Texas 1 1 .500 Boston 1 2 .333 Chicago 0 1 .000 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Washington 3 0 1.000 Miami 3 1 .750 Pittsburgh 3 1 .750 Milwaukee 3 2 .600 Arizona 3 3 .500 Cincinnati 2 2 .500 Los Angeles 2 2 .500 San Francisco 2 2 .500 Colorado 1 2 .333 St. Louis 1 2 .333 Philadelphia 1 4 .200 Atlanta 0 5 .000 Chicago 0 3 .000 New York 0 3 .000 San Diego 0 3 .000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Sundays Games N.Y. Yankees 8, Toronto 2 Houston 7, Atlanta (ss) 4 Atlanta (ss) 0, Detroit 0, tie, 10 innings St. Louis 7, N.Y. Mets 1 Tampa Bay 6, Minnesota 3 Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 1 Boston 8, Baltimore 6 Washington 10, Miami 3 San Francisco 5, Arizona 3 L.A. Dodgers 3, San Diego (ss) 3, tie Kansas City 5, Chicago Cubs 3 Cleveland 6, Seattle 3 Milwaukee 6, Colorado 5 Todays Games N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Colorado vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 9:10 p.m. Baltimore vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 7:05 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 33 26 .559 Brooklyn 28 29 .491 4 New York 21 39 .350 12 Boston 20 40 .333 13 Philadelphia 15 45 .250 18 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 42 14 .750 Washington 31 28 .525 12 Charlotte 27 31 .466 16 Atlanta 26 31 .456 16 Orlando 19 43 .306 26 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 45 13 .776 Chicago 33 26 .559 12 Cleveland 24 37 .393 22 Detroit 23 36 .390 22 Milwaukee 11 47 .190 34 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 42 16 .724 Houston 40 19 .678 2 Dallas 36 24 .600 7 Memphis 33 25 .569 9 New Orleans 23 36 .390 19 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 44 15 .746 Portland 41 18 .695 3 Minnesota 29 29 .500 14 Denver 25 33 .431 18 Utah 21 37 .362 22 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 41 20 .672 Golden State 36 24 .600 4 Phoenix 34 24 .586 5 L.A. Lakers 20 39 .339 20 Sacramento 20 39 .339 20 Saturdays Games Washington 122, Philadelphia 103 Miami 112, Orlando 98 Houston 118, Detroit 110 Indiana 102, Boston 97 Brooklyn 107, Milwaukee 98 Memphis 110, Cleveland 96 Portland 102, Denver 96 Minnesota 108, Sacramento 97 L.A. Clippers 108, New Orleans 76 Sundays Games Chicago 109, New York 90 Toronto 104, Golden State 98 Orlando 92, Philadelphia 81 Indiana 94, Utah 91 Charlotte at Oklahoma City, late Dallas at San Antonio, late Atlanta at Phoenix, late Todays Games Memphis at Washington, 7 p.m. Chicago at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m. New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10 p.m. New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Sundays College Basketball Major Scores EAST George Washington 66, George Mason 58 Hartford 67, UMBC 56 Iona 97, Rider 81 Maine 73, New Hampshire 69 Manhattan 68, Canisius 63 Marist 103, Quinnipiac 72 Siena 70, Monmouth (NJ) 54 St. Johns 72, DePaul 64 St. Peters 71, Niagara 67 Stony Brook 73, Albany (NY) 68 Vermont 92, Binghamton 82, OT Villanova 73, Marquette 56 Wisconsin 71, Penn St. 66 SOUTH Charlotte 74, Old Dominion 63 Clemson 77, Maryland 73, 2OT FIU 73, Tulane 47 Louisiana Tech 67, UAB 58 Louisiana-Lafayette 102, South Alabama 76 Marshall 64, East Carolina 61 Southern Miss. 60, FAU 49 MIDWEST Indiana 72, Ohio St. 64 Iowa 83, Purdue 76 SOUTHWEST Tulsa 72, UTSA 70, OT UTEP 74, North Texas 54 Sundays Womens Basketball Scores EAST Canisius 66, Rider 63 Faireld 74, Niagara 62 Fordham 58, Saint Josephs 53 Hofstra 60, Drexel 58 Marist 79, Iona 67 Monmouth (NJ) 80, Siena 57 Northeastern 54, Delaware 53 Towson 75, Coll. of Charleston 63 SOUTH Alabama 78, LSU 60 Chattanooga 77, UNC-Greensboro 56 Davidson 83, Wofford 67 Elon 44, Samford 43 Florida St. 82, Virginia 70 Furman 78, Georgia Southern 68 Georgia 77, Mississippi St. 48 Georgia Tech 84, Boston College 74 James Madison 83, William & Mary 42 Kentucky 65, Vanderbilt 63 Maryland 87, Virginia Tech 48 Miami 67, Pittsburgh 54 Mississippi 73, Auburn 71, OT North Carolina 64, Duke 60 Notre Dame 84, NC State 60 Syracuse 64, Wake Forest 54 Tennessee 73, South Carolina 61 Texas A&M 83, Florida 72 MIDWEST Akron 80, Kent St. 66 Bowling Green 63, Ohio 39 Cent. Michigan 80, Toledo 77 E. Michigan 54, N. Illinois 45 Illinois St. 69, Loyola of Chicago 61 Indiana St. 73, Bradley 60 Iowa 81, Illinois 56 Minnesota 74, Ohio St. 57 N. Iowa 99, Drake 97, OT Northwestern 77, Wisconsin 73, OT Purdue 82, Nebraska 66 S. Dakota St. 99, South Dakota 88 Saint Louis 87, UMass 68 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 72, Missouri 70 Oral Roberts 80, Sam Houston St. 50 West Virginia 71, Baylor 69 FAR WEST Oregon 90, Arizona 78 Oregon St. 66, Arizona St. 43 Southern Cal 66, Colorado 59 UCLA 62, Utah 52 Tshwane Open Leading Scores Sunday At Copperleaf Golf and Country Estate (The Els Club) Centurion, South Africa Purse: $2.06 million Yardage: 7,964; Par: 72 Final Ross Fisher, England 66-65-67-70 268 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-65-69-68 271 Danie van Tonder, South Africa 66-70-69-66 271 Carlos del Moral, Spain 68-65-71-68 272 Hennie Otto, South Africa 71-65-69-68 273 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 66-68-71-70 275 Kevin Phelan, Ireland 68-69-68-70 275 Chris Wood, England 67-68-72-68 275 Merrick Bremner, South Africa 69-69-67-71 276 Simon Dyson, England 65-68-71-73 277 Trevor Fisher Jr., South Africa 65-69-71-72 277 Edoardo Molinari, Italy 70-65-70-72 277 Morten Orum Madsen, Denmark 67-65-75-71 278 Robert Rock, England 70-71-65-73 279 Matthew Baldwin, England 72-69-68-71 280 Oliver Bekker, South Africa 70-67-69-74 280 Keith Horne, South Africa 74-67-67-72 280 David Howell, England 69-69-74-68 280 Shiv Kapur, India 67-74-70-69 280 Jake Roos, South Africa 69-65-72-74 280 HSBC Womens Champions Scores Sunday At Sentosa Golf Club (Serapong Course) Singapore Purse: $1.4 million Yardage: 6,611; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Creamer won on second playoff hole Paula Creamer, $210,000 67-73-69-69 278 Azahara Munoz, $133,681 69-72-67-70 278 Karrie Webb, $96,976 66-69-70-74 279 Morgan Pressel, $52,477 71-69-70-71 281 Suzann Pettersen, $52,477 71-70-70-70 281 Angela Stanford, $52,477 68-69-69-75 281 So Yeon Ryu, $52,477 71-71-73-66 281 Inbee Park, $52,477 70-72-71-68 281 Teresa Lu, $31,106 68-70-70-75 283 Michelle Wie, $31,106 73-71-69-70 283 Eun-Hee Ji, $25,689 71-73-71-69 284 Na Yeon Choi, $25,689 71-70-71-72 284 Chella Choi, $25,689 73-71-69-71 284 Ha Na Jang, $22,542 73-69-71-72 285 TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3 p.m.FS1 Preseason, L.A. Angels vs. Arizona, at Scottsdale, Ariz.MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Notre Dame at North Carolina ESPNU Savannah St. at NC Central FS1 Xavier at Seton Hall9 p.m.ESPN Kansas St. at Oklahoma St. ESPNU NC State at PittsburghNBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m.SUN Charlotte at MiamiNHL HOCKEY 8 p.m.NBCSN Buffalo at DallasSWIMMING 3 p.m.ESPNU SEC Womens Swimming and Diving Championships, at Athens, Ga. 4:30 p.m.ESPNU SEC Mens Swimming and Diving Championships, at Athens, Ga. TENNIS 9 p.m.ESPN2 Exhibition, BNP Paribas Showdown, Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray, at N.Y.WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 UConn at Louisville8 p.m.FSN Texas Tech at Oklahoma while Michael Howe, David Webb and Steve McClellan held Roll ins at bay the rest of the way. Two big innings put the game out of reach. In the sixth, Long sin gled to right and stole second. Taylor Saris drew a walk to put runners on rst and second before Kris Hodges singled to right, scoring Long and moving Saris to third. Sam Thomas ground ball scored Saris while Hodges moved to second. Hig don then managed an ineld hit and Hodges scored on a throwing error. In the eighth, Ba ziel Cabrera reached on an error, then advanced to second on Hodges sacrice bunt and to third on a elders choice. Hig don walked, setting the stage for Barnhard, who singled through the hole at short to score Cabrera. Barnhard ad vanced to second on the throw while Hig don took third. Sheller then doubled to deep right-center, scor ing both Higdon and Barnhard. LSSC (12-4) returns to the diamond at 3 / p.m. today to face the Flagler JVs. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 Stewart-Haas Racing. It was Harvicks fth Sprint Cup win at PIR, most on the career list. Daytona 500 winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. nished second, pole sit ter Brad Keselowski was third and Penske Racing teammate Joey Logano fourth. Jeff Gordon rounded out the top ve on a warm and partly cloudy day after downpours wiped out the nal 32 laps of Saturdays Nationwide race, won by Kyle Busch Harvick won at Phoenix during the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship in the fall, giv ing him an outside shot at catching Jimmie Johnson for the series title in his nal season with Richard Childress Racing. He came up short, but the victory and a third-place nish in the standings gave him a bit of mo mentum heading into for his rst season with Stewart-Haas. Harvick had a solid nish in his sights at Daytona last week before a last-lap crash dropped him to 13th. At Phoenix, Harvick just missed the nal stage of knockout qual ifying, nipped by 0.001 seconds, but had the fastest car in Saturday mornings nal practice session. He started 13th and quickly moved his way through the eld from the green ag, passing Keselowski on the apron, then Logano for the lead on lap 74. Harvick maintained the lead coming out of green-ag pit stops with just under 200 laps left and again with about 70 laps left. A series of cautions came out late in the race and Harvick easily pulled away each time to earn a quick win with SHR on the same weekend he celebrated his 13th wedding anni versary with wife DeLana. Earnhardt had a whirlwind week af ter winning his second Daytona 500, needing his girlfriend to get him extra clothes while he went on a media tour. He had a solid fol low-up, putting the dis tractions aside to qualify fth. Earnhardt worked his way up in the opening third of the race, pass ing Logano and Keselowski to pull up behind Harvick. He dropped back a couple times and fought back to get Harvick within his sights again, but didnt have enough to track him down. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 He wont know that feeling. Instead, the 24-yearold from Northern Ire land closed with a 74. It was his second straight tournament in stroke play that he played in the nal group and shot 74. He tied for ninth in the Dubai Desert Classic. His undo ing came on the 16th, when McIlroy missed on a 6-iron from the bunker and went into the water, making double bogey. He fell out of the lead for the rst time with a bogey from the bunker on the 17th. What should ease the pain was his nish a 5-wood he couldnt afford to miss that dropped from the sky to 12 feet left of the hole. I was fortunate I was in the playoff, McIl roy said. Seventy-four wasnt good enough to get the job done. To go out with a twoshot lead, you have to play well enough to win the thing. If I had won today, I would have counted myself as lucky. Ill pick myself up, get back it, try to get back at it at Doral and try to get the job done. Henley, who closed with a 72, won for the second time and quali ed for the Masters. He also moves into the top 50 in the world ranking, making him eligible for the Cadillac Championship next week at Doral. It was the rst playoff at PGA National since 2007, which also fea tured four players. McIlroy was at 13 under after a birdie on the fth hole and appeared to be on his way, even after twice making bogey from the bunker to close out the front nine. PGA National was tougher than ever after a weekend of sunshine, and the stiff breeze in south Florida. The average score was 71.8, two shots harder than the third round. The contenders made it look like a beast. Henley tied for the lead by chipping in for birdie on the 14th, only to deposit his tee shot on the par-3 15th into the water for double bogey. Palmer missed a 6-foot birdie putt on the 14th hole, which wasnt nearly as dam aging as the par putts he missed from 8 feet on the 16th and 5 feet on the 18th. Knox fell out of a brief share of the lead when he tried to play from the right rough on the 14th and had his shot carom into the water for a double bogey. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Honda Classic Leading Scores Sunday At PGA National Resort and Spa, The Champion Palm Beach Gardens Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,140; Par 70 Final (x-won on rst playoff hole) Russell Henley (500), $1,080,000 64-68-68-72 272 Russell Knox (208), $448,000 70-63-68-71 272 Rory McIlroy (208), $448,000 63-66-69-74 272 Ryan Palmer (208), $448,000 68-66-69-69 272 Billy Hurley III (110), $240,000 70-67-67-69 273 David Hearn (95), $208,500 67-70-70-67 274 Will MacKenzie (95), $208,500 67-68-69-70 274 Stuart Appleby (78), $168,000 69-69-65-72 275 Luke Donald (78), $168,000 67-68-68-72 275 Sergio Garcia (78), $168,000 72-68-68-67 275 David Lingmerth (78), $168,000 69-68-68-70 275 Keegan Bradley (54), $94,800 69-68-66-73 276 Paul Casey (54), $94,800 72-68-69-67 276 Martin Flores (54), $94,800 69-70-68-69 276 Freddie Jacobson (54), $94,800 69-69-67-71 276 Chris Kirk (54), $94,800 69-67-72-68 276 Matteo Manassero, $94,800 67-71-71-67 276 George McNeill (54), $94,800 70-67-69-70 276 Andres Romero (54), $94,800 70-68-71-67 276 Adam Scott (54), $94,800 68-69-70-69 276 Chris Stroud (54), $94,800 69-66-73-68 276 Daniel Summerhays (54), $94,800 70-65-69-72 276 Jhonattan Vegas (54), $94,800 70-66-66-74 276 Matt Every (43), $45,400 66-73-65-73 277 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (43), $45,400 71-69-68-69 277 Rickie Fowler (43), $45,400 69-69-69-70 277 Luke Guthrie (43), $45,400 67-73-65-72 277 Chesson Hadley (43), $45,400 73-66-69-69 277 Patrick Reed (43), $45,400 71-67-70-69 277 Brian Stuard (43), $45,400 72-68-65-72 277 Tyrone Van Aswegen (43), $45,400 67-71-68-71 277 Nick Watney (43), $45,400 71-69-70-67 277 Derek Ernst (35), $30,375 66-69-71-72 278 Zach Johnson (35), $30,375 67-70-68-73 278 Brooks Koepka, $30,375 71-68-68-71 278 Seung-Yul Noh (35), $30,375 69-68-72-69 278 Rory Sabbatini (35), $30,375 65-71-68-74 278 Brendan Steele (35), $30,375 69-66-71-72 278 Josh Teater (35), $30,375 70-68-71-69 278 Nicholas Thompson (35), $30,375 68-70-66-74 278 Jason Kokrak (28), $22,200 70-66-70-73 279 Ted Potter, Jr. (28), $22,200 71-66-67-75 279 Cameron Tringale (28), $22,200 69-69-66-75 279 Camilo Villegas (28), $22,200 71-68-69-71 279 Boo Weekley (28), $22,200 68-67-73-71 279 Thomas Bjorn, $15,600 69-66-70-75 280 James Driscoll (21), $15,600 68-71-70-71 280 Graeme McDowell (21), $15,600 70-67-72-71 280 Troy Merritt (21), $15,600 68-69-72-71 280 Carl Pettersson (21), $15,600 72-67-68-73 280 John Senden (21), $15,600 72-63-73-72 280 Lee Westwood (21), $15,600 68-65-73-74 280 Charlie Wi (21), $15,600 69-71-68-72 280 Mark Wilson (21), $15,600 67-69-73-71 280 Jamie Donaldson, $13,680 65-69-72-75 281 Charles Howell III (15), $13,680 72-68-69-72 281 Tim Wilkinson (15), $13,680 70-69-67-75 281 Afalo were out with injuries. Both Orlando and Philadelphia have been clear that they are in rebuilding phases, and the 76ers traded two of their best players center Spencer Hawes and guard-forward Evan Turner on Feb. 20. Philadelphia coach Brett Brown has at tributed the 76ers new-look lineup to their recent woes, pointing to it as a rea son behind his squads turnover problems against Orlando. We had 19 turnovers and six came from our point guards, Brown said. A lot of that hap pened when we had three of ve guys on the court who have only been with each other four days. Our offense hurt us more than our defense. We were throw ing the ball away or not knowing who to turn to. We poked our selves in the eye with our turnovers. But give Orlando credit for raising the intensity in the fourth quarter. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1 JOHN RAOUX / AP Philadelphia 76ers Michael Carter-Williams (1) drives around Orlando Magics Victor Oladipo (5) during the rst quarter on Sunday in Orlando.

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL FRED GOODALLAP Sports WriterPORT CHARLOTTE Evan Longoria hit a tworun homer and Grant Balfour was perfect in his rst appearance in a Tampa Bay uniform since 2010, helping the Rays beat the Minnesota Twins 6-3 on Sunday. Jerry Sands also hom ered for the Rays, who got a quick third inning from Balfour, as well as 1 2-3 score less innings from starter Alex Cobb. Offseason acquisition Ricky Nolasco allowed two hits in two scoreless innings for the Twins, who signed him to a $49 million, fouryear deal this winter and are counting on the righthander to help bolster a struggling pitching staff that posted a major league-worst 5.26 ERA last season. Oswaldo Arcia and Brandon Waring hit solo homers for the Twins. Warings shot was a mammoth drive that struck the roof of an is land-themed bar and gathering spot beyond the left centereld wall.DODGERS 3, PADRES 3GLENDALE, Ariz. Josh Becketts comeback from surgery got off to a promising start Sunday with three strikeouts over two score less innings as the Los Angeles Dodgers and a San Diego split squad played to a 3-all tie. The game was stopped af ter nine innings. Beckett allowed one hit in his rst spring training ap pearance since having a rib and muscle tissue removed last July in a procedure to alleviate a nerve problem. He is competing to reclaim a spot in the Dodgers rota tion. Becketts biggest rival for a spot, Paul Maholm, allowed one hit over two scoreless innings. The Dodgers signed Maholm on Feb. 8 after he went 10-11 with a 4.41 ERA in Atlanta.YANKEES 8, BLUE JAYS 2DUNEDIN Carlos Bel tran homered for his rst hit this spring, leading the New York Yankees past the Toronto Blue Jays 8-2 on Sunday. Jose Bautista hit his sec ond homer in exhibition play for the Blue Jays. Beltrans solo home run came in the third off reliever Todd Redmond and landed far over the right-eld fence. It capped a four-run inning that included a two-run ho mer by Eduardo Nunez. Bautista connected off Vidal Nuno in the rst. Nuno struck out three and gave up two hits in two innings. Toronto starter Esmil Rog ers tossed two innings and allowed an earned run. The right-hander gave up three hits and struck out one. Jose Reyes, Edwin Encar nacion, Melky Cabrera and Adam Lind each doubled for the Blue Jays.RED SOX 8, ORIOLES 6FORT MYERS Red Sox Hall of Famer Carl Yas trzemski was in the stands and watched his grandson score a run for the Baltimore Orioles on Sunday in their 8-6 loss to Boston. Mike Yastrzemski played in his rst major league spring training game. The 23-year-old entered as a pinch runner in the sixth in ning, scored and then played right eld. He was hitless in one at-bat. The younger Yaz was the Orioles 14th-round draft pick last June from Vander bilt. He hit .273 with three homers and 25 RBIs in 57 games in short-season Class A. The Red Sox drafted him late in 2009 out of a Massa chusetts high school, but he went to college. Mike Napoli hit his rst homer of the spring for Boston. Felix Doubront started for Boston, going two scoreless innings with a hit and three strikeouts.ROYALS 5, CUBS 3 MESA, Ariz. Mike Moustakas homered twice, Eric Hosmer added three hits and the Kansas City Roy als beat the Chicago Cubs 5-3 on Sunday. Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro left after the rst inning with a slight strain of his right hamstring. He hurt himself trying to steal a base. Moustakas hit a drive off Cubs starter Edwin Jackson to lead off the second inning. He hit a two-run shot off Carlos Villanueva in the third. Hosmer doubled twice, and all of his hits went to the opposite eld. Lorenzo Cain had two hits for the Royals. Kansas City starter Wade Davis gave up one hit in two scoreless innings. CARDINALS 7, METS 1 JUPITER Matt Holliday doubled in both at-bats and drove in two runs Sunday for the St. Louis Cardinals in a 7-1 win over the New York Mets. Holiday didnt play in the Cardinals spring training opener on Friday. He singled and walked in two plate ap pearances as the designated hitter Saturday. Hollidays rst double came off starter Daisuke Matsuzaka. STEVEN SENNE / AP Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria, right, celebrates with teammate David DeJesus, center, as Minnesota Twins catcher Eric Fryer, left, looks on after Longoria hit a two-run home run in the third inning on Sunday in Port Charlotte.Longoria homers, Balfour perfect as Rays top Twins GOLF COLLEGE FOOTBALL JUSTIN BERGMANAssociated PressSINGAPORE Paula Creamer sank a 75foot eagle putt on the second playoff hole against Azahara Munoz to win the HSBC Womens Champions on Sunday for her rst LPGA title since the 2010 U.S. Womens Open. Creamers putt curled across the 18th green and then rolled slowly down the slope and directly into the hole. She ran across the green, then fell to her knees and put her head on the ground, laughing and pounding the grass. Its one of those putts where if you just get it in the right spot, its going to fall down, she said. But I could stand there all day long and putt that and I dont think get it with in six, seven feet. Creamer and Munoz nished 72 holes tied at 10-under 278, one stroke ahead of Kar rie Webb, who led af ter every round but bo geyed three of her last six holes to give up a three-shot lead and nish third.EUROPEAN TOURCENTURION, South Africa English golf er Ross Fisher secured his rst European Tour title in four years with a three-shot victory in the Tshwane Open on Sunday. Fisher, who started the day with a vestroke lead, saw off a challenge from Michael Hoey that briey cut his advantage to one shot. Fisher responded with an eagle at the long 15th from 25 feet to see off the Northern Irishman, who nished on 17 under for a share of second place with South Africas Danie van Tonder. Spains Carlos Del Moral was a shot behind in fourth. Fisher, who now has ve European Tour ti tles, said Im just thrilled to get over the line. It was a testing day with the weather conditions and play ing with Mike he put up a great challenge for me.Creamers 75-foot putt seals victory at HSBC Champions JOSEPH NAIR / AP Paula Creamer of the U.S. poses with the trophy during the award ceremony of the HSBC Womens Champions golf tournament on Sunday in Singapore. JOHN ZENORAP Sports WriterBIRMINGHAM, Ala. Auburn coach Gus Malzahn was in his second year leading a high school program when he watched Florida States Bobby Bowden turn up the tempo with a quarter back who was on his way to the Heisman Trophy. He gures maybe that Charlie Ward-led offense in 1993 was a pre cursor to the wave of fast-paced offenses that have helped Malzahn and others win big and even sparked a proposal to change the rules. I was telling Coach on the way over here, I was watching Char lie Ward when they were playing shotgun and theyd go back and theyd start play ing with pace, Mal zahn said Sunday. I think Coach is one of those guys that kind of started a lot of this wide-open offense, so (Ward) could denitely run our offense. On Sunday, Malzahn received the Bowden Award named after the former Seminoles coach, a Birmingham native who coached them to the rst of his two national titles in 1993. The 5-year-old award is selected by the Na tional Sports Writers and Sports Broadcasters of America and the Over The Mountain Touchdown Club. Former Georgia coach Vince Dooley received the lifetime achievement award. Florida State beat Auburn 34-31 on a touchdown pass by another Heisman win ner, Jameis Winston, with 13 seconds left. Nearly two months later, tempo is a hot topic. The NCAA playing rules oversight panel could vote Thursday on a proposal to allow defenses time to sub stitute between plays by prohibiting offenses from snapping the ball until 29 seconds are left on the 40-second play clock. Bowdens against the rule until its shown that the fast pace leads to more players getting hurt, as proponents like Arkansas Bret Bielema and Alabamas Nick Saban have argued. People like of fense, Bowden said. Unless they can just show me evidence that boys are injured by doing that, I say leave it alone. Leave it like it is. Dooley ended his 24-year tenure as Georgias head coach in 1988. He said some times defenses just take some time to catch up with offensive innovations and when they do, coaches come up with a new way to get an edge. Dooley asked Malzahn to explain the 10-second rule, which would penalize offenses 5 yards for snapping too quickly. It was an exchange be tween an old-school coach and one whos part of the vanguard of no-huddle offenses. Dooley: What is the normal time yall have been snapping? Malzahn: It varies. Dooley: Have you ever gone under 10? Malzahn: At times. AP FILE PHOTO Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn talks about his class of recruits during an NCAA college football National Signing Day news conference in Auburn, Ala. Gus Malzahn, Bobby Bowden agree on slow-down rule

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 Regional Urgent Care LAKE We at LRUC have made it affordable for you to receive the care you want and need For REAL medicine by REAL DOCTORS with CBC$25 Urine$15 Analysis HCG$208404 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 352.315.8881O.V.$95 X-Rays$50 Cardiac$100 Testing CMP$35 EKG$25 Strep$15 Test Pricing PricingSTRAIGHT STRAIGHT 352.259.4322 Associated PressSTATE COLLEGE, Pa. Josh Gasser scored 15 points to lead a balanced Wisconsin offense and the 14th-ranked Badgers beat Penn State 71-66 on Sunday for their seventh straight vic tory. Wisconsin (24-5, 11-5 Big Ten) held onto third place in the Big Ten as Ben Brust scored 14 points and Traevon Jackson, who made four clutch free throws down the stretch, added 13. D.J. Newbill had 23 points for Penn State (1415, 5-11), which dropped to 2-5 against ranked teams this season. The redshirt junior became Penn States 31st career 1,000-point scorer. He leads the Big Ten this season with 178 eld goals. Tim Frazier and Ross Travis scored 10 points each for Penn State, which is 4-7 in games de cided by ve points or fewer. The Nittany Lions closed within 66-64 with 18 seconds left but was forced to foul. Jackson went 4 for 4 from the line during the closing seconds and Gasser was 2 for 2. Newbill committed two turnovers after Penn State had drawn within three points and Wis consin was able to hold on. The Badgers were 8 for 24 from 3-point range and held Penn State to 1-for-13 shooting from behind the arc. Penn State outrebounded the Badgers 34-28. COLLEGE BASKETBALL NBA JAY COHENAP Sports WriterCHICAGO Joakim Noah had 13 points, 12 rebounds and 14 as sists for his fth career triple-double, leading the streaking Chicago Bulls to a 109-90 vic tory over the New York Knicks on Sunday. Chicago had seven players score in double gures in its ninth win in the last 10 games. The Bulls also reached 100 points for the fourth consecutive game for the rst time since Oct. 30-Nov. 5, 2010. D.J. Augustin had 21 of his 23 points in the fourth quarter as Chi cago (33-26) improved to 21-8 since Jan. 1 and a season-high sev en games above .500 overall. Jimmy Butler scored 19 points and Carlos Boozer had 14. While the Bulls are galloping through the weak Eastern Confer ence, the Knicks are oundering. Carmelo Anthony scored 21 points and Tyson Chandler had 22 rebounds, but New York dropped its sixth consecutive game. The Knicks (21-39) are just 6-16 since Jan. 14.RAPTORS 104, WARRIORS 98 TORONTO DeMar DeRozan scored 32 points, Kyle Lowry had 13 and the Toronto Raptors beat Golden State 104-98 on Sun day, their rst victory in eight tries against War riors guard Stephen Curry. Greivis Vasquez and Patrick Patterson each added 12 points and Jonas Valanciuas had 10 for the Raptors, who had lost 11 of their previous 13 meetings with the Warriors. Torontos only previ ous victory over Golden State since Cur ry was drafted was an 83-75 home win on March 4, 2012, a victory that came while the guard was sidelined by a strained tendon in his foot. Curry scored 34 points and David Lee had 20 points and 11 rebounds as the War riors lost for just the second time in their past seven games.PACERS 94, JAZZ 91 INDIANAPOLIS David West scored 25 points, Paul George added 22, and the In diana Pacers beat the Utah Jazz 94-91 on Sunday night for their fth straight victory. Indianapolis native Gordon Hayward had 21 points and Derrick Favors scored 17 for the Jazz, nine of them in the rst eight minutes as Utah opened a 14-4 lead. A dunk from Favors cut the Pacers lead to 89-86 with a minute left to play, and West missed a jumper to give Utah a chance to tie with 35 seconds remaining. Hayward cut the Indiana lead to one, but Lance Stephenson sank two free throws to seal the win. Ian Mahinmi came off the bench to score nine points for the Pacers and provide key minutes, as Roy Hib bert struggled to con tain Favors.No. 14 Wisconsin beats Penn St. 71-66Noah leads Bulls past Knicks JEFF HAYNES / AP Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah, left, shoots over New York Knicks power forward Amare Stoudemire (1) during the fourth quarter on Sunday in Chicago.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014FOOD LABELS: Proposal aims to make healthy shopping easy / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterFor decades, surgeons have traveled to faroff hospitals to re move organs from braindead donors and then rushed back to trans plant them. Now an ex periment in the Midwest suggests there may be a better way: Bring the do nors to the doctors in stead. A study out Tuesday reports on liver transplants from the nations rst free-standing or gan retrieval center. Nearly all organ donors now are transported to Mid-America Transplant Services in St. Louis from a region including parts of Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. Removing organs at this central location near the four hospitals that do transplants saves money, the study found. The livers spent less time outside the donors body, which at least in theory improves the odds of success. Doctors also think they are getting more usable organs from each donor, though this study only looked at livers. Transplant experts say this could become a new standard, and groups in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Denver, Chicago and Ann Arbor, Mich., have started or are exploring similar ventures. Its kind of a foreign concept so its taken some time for this to catch on, but I think it will. It makes so much sense, said Dr. William Chapman, a transplant surgeon at Washington University in St. Louis, which uses the Mid-America center. Theres no question in my mind this should be done everywhere, said Dr. Majella Doyle, also of Washington University. It will increase the number of organs that are used and it will increase efciency and decrease costs. She led the study, published in the American Journal of Transplantation. About 28,000 transplants were done in the United States in 2012; more than 121,000 people are on the waiting list now. Organs have a nite shelf life livers, 6 to 10 hours after removal; hearts and lungs, even less. Kidneys last about a day. Transplants are not done at every hospital only a few in any major city have that capability. Surgeons usually travel to wherever the donor is to retrieve organs, performing these hurried, complex operations in unfamiliar settings, often assisted by staffs at hospitals that dont have transplant expertise. Donors provide three organs on average but can give six or more. Each specialist lung, heart, kidney wants to test and inspect an organ to ensure viability before committing to the transplant. Sometimes multiple doctors make the trip to retrieve organs, or there is redundant test ing and inspection when an organ thats been removed by one doctor gets to another hospital where it will be transplanted. Mid-America, the regions organ procurement organization, thought that having a retrieval center a commercial building with two oper ating rooms and testing equipment near the four St. Louis hospitals that do transplants would improve coordination. In Centralizing organ removal may benefit transplants PHOTOS BY WHITNEY CURTIS / AP Organ procurement coordinators Lindsey Cook, left, and Josh Skelton work with the body of a potential organ donor at Mid-America Transplant Services in St. Louis. Organ donation paperwork sits in a tray at Mid-America Transplant Services.Theres no question in my mind this should be done everywhere. It will increase the number of organs that are used and it will increase efficiency and decrease costs.Dr. Majella Doyle,Washington UniversitySEE ORGANS | C2 THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer education and support group meetingThe guest speaker for the meeting is Michael W. Chancellor, M.D., radiation oncologist specializing in IMRT/IGRT radiation therapy discussing this option for prostate cancer at 7 p.m., Wednesday at Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr. For details, call 352-259-9433 or 352-446-4194. LEESBURG LIFE Social Support Group meetings setThe LIFE luncheon in Leesburg will be held at 11:30 a.m., Thursday at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 East Dixie Ave., in Venetian Gardens, boasting a buffet-style lunch and entertainment by banjo players Second Time Around. In Eustis, the luncheon will be held 11:30 a.m., March 19 at the Lake Tech Vocational School, 2100 Kurt St., in Eustis in the faculty dining room on the north side of the building. Lake Techs Culinary Arts Program will prepare the lunch and Second Time Around will entertain. Cost is $10 and an RSVP is needed by calling 352-787-0403, or by emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com. LAKE COUNTY AARP driver safety class scheduled for MarchRene your driving skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits at the AARP classes. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, and includes workbooks and a completion certicate. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. The two-day course will be offered at the following locations: %  %  From 1 to 4 p.m., today and Wednesday at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St. To register, call 352-326-3540. %  %  From 9 a.m. to noon, today and Wednesday at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Register by calling 352-735-7180. MOUNT DORA Power over polio support group meeting scheduled Learn about issues many polio pa tients face in later years and connect with other polio survivors at 1 p.m., on the second Friday of every month at the Seabreeze Recreation Center, Buena Vista Blvd., in The Villages. For information, call at 352-7537188, or email dianaruthk@aol.com.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 2001, the rst year it was open, it handled 36 percent of liver donations in the region. By 2011, it was up to 93 percent. Two staffers, usually nurses, go to the donors hospital by ambulance if within 80 miles and by plane if farther to bring brain-dead donors on life support to St. Louis. After any organs and tissues are removed, the body is returned, according to the familys wishes. The study looked at 583 livers donations from 2001 through 2011 407 procured at the organ retrieval center, 94 at St. Louis hospitals and 82 from ights to other hospitals in the region. Patient and organ survival rates were similar. Removing livers at the central facility shaved an hour and a half off the time they were outside the donors body. Costs dropped 37 percent $7,876 for liver removal at a hospital ver sus $4,957 at the organ center. We can save more lives by doing the management and recovery here, said Diane Brockmeier, Mid-Americas chief operating ofcer. Its a huge benet for donor hospitals. Were freeing up resources they can use on other patients because their intensive care units and operating rooms are not tied up with organ retrieval, she said. Donor families have not balked at sending their loved ones bodies out of town. At rst it bothered us, said Stacey Smith, whose 21-year-old son, Cameron Greenwood, became an organ donor in 2010 after dying of complications from diabetes. But she said Mid-Americas staff explained why it was best to move him from the small hospital in Branson, Mo., to St. Louis, a four-hour drive away. These people sat down and prayed with us, they cried with us, they treated us like he was their own child, and that just made a huge difference, Smith said. They called and let us know when the plane left. They called and let us know when it landed. They called at 2 / a.m. to say his heart and both kidneys had gone to three different recipients, plus tissue and bones to help 50 others, she said. It really made us realize how much or gan donors are heroes. We had no clue how many lives one per son could save and change. Its not just transplant recipients lives that could be saved. Fewer staffers need to make the trip. A report found the risk of dying while ying to retrieve organs is 1,000 times greater than on a commercial ight; there have been at least 30 such deaths since 1990. In 2007, a plane car rying two surgeons and two transplant donation specialists crashed on its way from Milwaukee to Michigan with donated lungs. All four plus the two pilots were killed. In 2011, a pilot, a doctor and a medical technician on their way from Jacksonville to Gainesville to pick up a heart died when their helicopter crashed. In 1990, a sur geon and an assistant picking up a heart were killed in a plane crash in New Mexico. Sadly, our teams are doing a lot of running around like that. We do put team members at risk, said Charlie Alexander, executive director at The Living Legacy, the organ procurement group for Maryland. There are clear ly benets in safety to having a single organ retrieval center and fewer people traveling, he said. CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. 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MostMajor Insurances Accepted ORGANS FROM PAGE C1 WHITNEY CURTIS / MCT Organ procurement coordinator Lindsey Cook reads a printout showing information on the health of the kidneys of a brain-dead potential organ donor. LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK Is the anti-obesity message nally getting through? A marked drop in the obesity rate among preschoolers in the U.S. has researchers and parents pointing to a variety of possible factors. Among them: pub lic-awareness campaigns to get parents to serve healthier food to their children; a drop in soda consumption; healthier menus at fastfood chains; more access to fruits and vegetables in some neighborhoods; changes in government food aid; and longer breast-feeding, which is often associated with improved weight con trol. Were not done yet, but this does show that parents really need to be the commanders of their own ship and manage the food envi ronment for their kids at home, said Keith Ayoob, a registered di etitian and associate professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein Col lege of Medicine in the Bronx. The glimmer of hope was contained in a gov ernment report issued Tuesday that showed that the obesity rate among children 2 to 5 years old dropped by nearly half over a decade, from 14 percent to 8 percent. That is en couraging in part because obese preschool ers are more likely to be obese as they get older. Overall, though, both adult and childhood obesity rates have been at in the past decade, and dietitians, weight experts and doctors warned that the prob lem is not going away. This is the problem of our generation. We are starting to make some progress, but theres really still a lot more to do, said Scott Kahan, an obesi ty treatment and pre vention specialist and public health researcher at George Washington University. For example, while rst lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move campaign and other ef forts over the past 10 years have raised aware ness, stumbling blocks remain for the poor and for working parents. They know their chil dren should be more active, but its hard for them to get them to the park. Theyre tired, and its complicated, said Sarah Barlow, di rector of the Center for Childhood Obesity at Texas Childrens Hospital in Houston and an associate professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. Its an ordeal to get out of the house.Study shows obesity drop among preschoolers EVAN VUCCI / AP First lady Michelle Obama tends the White House garden in Washington, with a group of children as part of the Lets Move! campaign.SEE OBESITY | C3

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 DARLENE SUPERVILLE and MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON Ice cream lovers beware: The government knows youre unlikely to stop after half a cup. New nutrition labels proposed Thursday for many popular foods, including ice cream, aim to more accurately reect what people actually eat. And the pro posal would make calorie counts on labels more prominent, too, reecting that nutritionists now focus more on calories than fat. For the rst time, la bels also would be required to list any sugars that are added by man ufacturers. In one example of the change, the estimated serving size for ice cream would jump from a half cup to a cup, so the calorie list ing on the label would double as well. The idea behind the change, the rst over haul of the labels in two decades, isnt that the government thinks people should be eating twice as much; its that they should understand how many calories are in what they already are eating. The Food and Drug Administration says that, by law, serving sizes must be based on ac tual consumption, not some ideal. Our guiding principle here is very sim ple, that you as a par ent and a consumer should be able to walk into your local grocery store, pick up an item off the shelf and be able to tell whether its good for your family, said rst lady Michelle Obama, who joined the FDA in announcing the proposed changes at the White House. Mrs. Obama made the announcement as part of her Lets Move initiative to combat child obesity, which is marking its fourth an niversary. On Tuesday, she announced new Agriculture Department rules that would reduce marketing of less-healthful foods in schools. The new labels would be less cluttered. FDA Commissioner Mar garet Hamburg called them a more us er-friendly version. But they are proba bly several years away. The FDA will take comments on the proposal for 90 days, and a nal rule could take another year. Once its nal, the agency has proposed giving industry two years to comply. The agency projects food companies will have to pay around $2 billion to revise labels. Companies have resisted some of the changes in the past, includ ing listing added sugars, but the industry is so far withholding criticism. Pamela Bailey of the Grocery Manufactur ers Association, the in dustry group that rep resents the nations largest food compa nies, called the pro posal a thoughtful re view. It is still not yet clear what the nal labels will look like. The FDA offered two labels in its proposal one that looks similar to the cur rent version but is short er and clearer and an other that groups the nutrients into a quick facts category for things like fat, carbohydrates, sugars and proteins. There also would be an avoid too much category for saturat ed fats, trans fats, cho lesterol, sodium and added sugar, and a get enough section with vitamin D, potassium, calcium, iron and ber. Potassium and vitamin D are would be additions, based on current thinking that Amer icans arent getting enough of those nutrients. Vitamin C and vi tamin A listings are no longer required. Heres a look at the changing health-related landscape that may have contributed to the drop in preschool obe sity:PARENTS SETTING THE EXAMPLESherlyn Pang Luedtke, a parenting coach, said parents can improve their childrens eating habits, even if their own were less than stellar. I was raised eating fried eggs and rice almost every day for breakfast, said Luedtke, who grew up near downtown Los Angeles and now lives in the suburban San Fernan do Valley. She and her hus band have a 9-year-old son and a 4-year-old daughter, and the fami ly sticks mostly to vege tarian fare. We have smoothies with greens, axseed and blueberries with breakfast. We eat whole-grain products, she said. We feel great about our health choic es that we model for our kids. Lyndsay Meyer is a rst-time mom of a 16-month-old son, living just outside Washington, D.C. She and her husband have not fed their child any processed sugar. His rst birthday cake was made with bananas and applesauce. They feed him only whole foods and try to stick to organic ones. Its growing increasingly difcult, though, as he makes friends and goes to parties or on play dates, she said. Its also difcult to go out with him because most places dont offer good, healthy food for toddlers.SUGARY DRINKSConsumption of car bonated soft drinks has been in decline in the U.S. since 2005, said John Sicher, editor and publisher of the news and data service Beverage Digest. It has de creased from 10.2 bil lion cases a year to 9.2 billion. In 2004, the average American drank 52.4 gallons of carbonat ed soft drinks a year. In 2012, that was down to 43.8 gallons. Consump tion of bottled water has grown consistently over that period. Between 1999 and 2010, daily calories from soda consumed by 2to 5-year-olds decreased on average from 106 to 69, accord ing to the government.FAST FOODMcDonalds, Dunkin Donuts and other chains have changed their menus in recent years. They havent stopped serving Big Macs and french fries, but they are offering more foods to appeal to health-conscious diners, such as apple slices in Happy Meals, egg whites for breakfast sandwiches and wholegrain bread.GOVERNMENT BENEFITSChanges in the fed eral Women, Infants and Children program, which provides food vouchers for the poor, may also be encour aging healthier eating. The changes insti tuted in 2009 elimi nated juice from infant food packages, provided less saturated fat and made it easier to buy fruits and vegeta bles.BREAST-FEEDINGWomen are breast-feeding their babies longer, according to government gures. And some researchers believe breast-feeding helps children regulate their intake of food, thereby lowering their risk of obesity later on. Of infants born in 2010, 49 percent were breast-feeding at 6 months, up from 35 percent in 2000. The breast-feeding rate at 12 months increased from 16 percent to 27 percent during that time period. Judy Dodd, a University of Pittsburgh assistant professor in nutrition and dietetics, said government programs and other services have encouraged breast-feeding by providing free or lowcost breast pumps, ac cess to refrigeration and more ofces with private, comfortable rooms where new moms can pump on the job. When a woman goes back to work, how does she continue to breastfeed? Thats the biggest challenge Im hear ing, and there have been improvements, Dodd said. GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com OBESITY FROM PAGE C2 KEITH SRAKOCIC / AP This photo shows a McDonalds Cheeseburger Happy Meal with the apple slices option in Pittsburgh. New food labels aim to make healthy shopping easy

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DEAR ABBY: Before my ex-husband and I were mar ried, I became pregnant with his baby. We decided together that we werent ready for the responsibility and made the mutual decision to end the pregnancy early in the rst trimester. We did marry eventually and had a baby girl a few years ago who is now in college. We divorced many years ago because of his many affairs, including one with his best friends wife. I have come to believe that my ex told our daughter about our decision out of spite because I told her about the affairs when she was old enough to under stand since she may have a half-sister. Should I ask my daughter about this or let it go? It was a very private decision, and I think he is a creep for hurting her by telling her. FURIOUS IN ILLINOIS DEAR FURIOUS: Why do you think you ex spilled the beans to your daughter? Has she been behaving differently toward you? Why do you think she may have a half-sister? Are you sure it isnt more than one or a brother or two? The fact that you terminated a pregnancy before your daughters birth has nothing to do with her. If you think there is something festering between you and your daughter, my advice is to clear the air before it gets worse. DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I have been together since August 2012 and have lived together since last summer. He is perfect in every way. He wakes me every morning with a smile and a kiss and pours me a cup of tea. He never goes anywhere without letting me know he thinks Im beautiful and telling me how much he loves me. He gets home before I do most nights, has a glass of wine and a hot bath waiting for me, and cooks dinner while Im in the tub. Hes amazing! The only problem is, I was with sooo many of the wrong men for years, I have forgotten how to spoil a man in return. I want him to know how much I appreciate and love him, but I dont know how. I just want him to know hes the one I want to sit on the porch with one day, watching our grandchildren play. I dont want to lose him because he thinks I dont appreciate all he does. Please help. KNOWS A GOOD THING IN NEW JERSEY DEAR KNOWS: When your boyfriend does something for you, thank him for it. Tell him you love him and give him affection in abundance. Express how fortunate you feel to have him in your life. Look for things you can do that will make his life easier, and put forth an effort to reciprocate the many thoughtful things he does for you. Every man is different, but this would be a good start in getting your message across. DEAR ABBY: Is it too late for me to go back to school and get a degree and pursue a career I would enjoy? Im 53, married and the mother of two children, 19 and 23. I didnt nish college, and I dont know what to do with my life. The only jobs I have ever had were as a retail salesperson. With one child just out of college, I am unsure if I could even afford to continue my education. Where would I go to nd answers about returning to school at my age, choosing a major and nding the money to pay for it? Any advice would be appreciated. TOO OLD 4 NEW TRICKS? DEAR TOO OLD?: Contact the nearest university or college and ask if it offers career counseling and aptitude testing to determine what you would need to complete your education and nd a career youd be suited for. Many schools offer this service. As for it being too late to do this at 53 its never too late. People in their 90s have earned degrees and been enriched by it, and so can you.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.comThe war of words continues long after divorce is over

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbnrf nttfb r f n t b f f r f r r f r n t b f f f t t r r f f r t b f f r t t t r r f n t b f f f f r f t t r r f t b t t t r r f r t rtt fff f r t r ff frf f r fff r rrrfrr rrf r f r ffr rrr f f rt t f frtt ft f r r f r f r f r r f n n r f r r f n f r f f r f f f r r f r f r f f r f r ttntt ff rf f f r f f rfff rrt ttntt rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 rfntb rfnntrbnrfr bnntnbt bffnn t r f t r n f t n b b nnrtnfn nfftrtnf tffn ffnfrntrnn nffnffttf tfftrftnnf ftftfnntntr ntnffnft nbffnn n b n f r f r b b nfb trrtn b n n f f n f n n n r t b b ftr fnbnnfftfr ftfnrntt n b b b r f n f n f n r f n f f t r n n b nfbt tf t r n n n n t n b b r r t b n n f r f n f f t r n n f r t f r f t f t n t n f r n n f b b b b tftf rtrnntrftn rftftffnft rntr t r f n n t n n n f b r r f f t b t f b n b n t n t r t f t n n n t t n b f f t b n f n t f nttnftnftf trrtn nfftntftr ftftf nrnttrrtnft rntrnfnrrft ntrnnftftn ftntrtnnntrt nftnfttnft nftftrtf f f n n f r n f t r t f n f t r f n n f f r n t r r r f n r f f f r f t f t r t r n f t n t n f n n r n n n n n n f t n b nntfftn f t t f n n n n b n n n f n n n t b t f f f t n r n f n n t r f r r n t t n n n f n t r f n r t f n n f t r t r t b f f t n t r t t f n t f n f r n f r f t t t n n f n n n n f n r n n t f r r n n f t n f r n t r f n r t n f t t r f f t n f t n f n f f t r f n f f t f n t n f t f n n n n f n r f f t n f f n f t n rf b nttfntft tnfnf tffff ftr nrftfnftntntfr fftrnnt tftntn trnf frtfn nntrntn rfftt nfn frftnbfrr ftnfrr rnftftr n n f f f t f f f n f r t n n t t f r n n ntffn bn b b b f t r f t f f t n n r f t f t n r f t f t r b n n t r b n f t n f f t n f t n f t f t r f t b r b b n t r n f f n f t n f f t b b b b n f n f t b t f t t n n f f t n f f n f b b b nnt b b f f t b n t n b t n f r n t f f b b f t r r n t f t n b f n t r n t n r f n f t n r f t f t t f f f f t r r n f f t f f t n t n f t f b b btnfnfnt rtfrftr tnffnr b b t f t f n n n f n n n f t t f n n f t t n t f b n b f r n n n f n f r n t n t t f t f t f t t f t n n n n n n f r n n f n f t f f f t f r n t f f n f n f r n n n t n n r f n f r n n f f f f t r f t f f t n r f t n n n t f t t n f f n n f n t t f n t t n r f r f t f f nr ntftnr n fnf b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b r nfb b t n n n n n nf n n b f t f ftffftfn ffn bnnfft nnftntnft frfnrn nftfttft frfnrnt nftrtnftnfn n r n nf b b tff nn trfnnrnn ntft frnnb bfnntr ntrnfr r n b b b b b b b b b bb bb b bb b nftf n trnt b b b b bb frttttntrffftftrft ntttttrntf nfrntrfnfrtrntfrnr fftttfrf ntnftrfftntr ntrntnfft trnnfttnr trntntrntftrtnr trntntrntftr ttttrntntr ttttntrntnnftnt fttftff nntnft nntft rfrf b b b b b b tttn b fnftntfrnnftntr nfrn ftrtfntftnftf ntb bnrrf bntrfbnn trnnrn ffnfttrntrf fftnfbbffb fftnftfnt frfnnfnrn ftrnnftf rntrrftbnft ntrntrnfbt rn bb btfrn b n nffnt bnfnt trnt b bntnt rrnrntntrft bffbnb bffbrffnbffftntr nbtfrnftn ntnftnfnftn rnttt rntt nn bffnfnftfntr nfnrnntrfnrrn fntrntrntrfn ntrnfnnrtrntb bfff ntrfrrn bb t fftrfr nftnfrftnrt f b bb b bbb b b b n n t f n r f n f f t r n t n r n f t f t r n f f n f t f r f t n t f r n t f f t n f t n f n t n t n b r f t n n f f n b r f t f n n f t f n n f r n t f f t f t r n f f t f n n f t f f n f r n f bbbb nbtfrn bb b rnfnf nntfrn b r n nf b b b b b b b b bnb ffft nntnftnfnftn rn tttrn ttn nbffnf nftf nfnrnntrfnrrnf ntrntrntrfnntr nfntttfn tttnfn tnftbttt nfftftfftntrn tttnfnffttr ntrnnftntnrtrnt ntttrnrnf nfrtttnfnnfnt ftnffnt bnfnttttnfft ftfftntrnttt nfnffttrntr nnftntnrtrnt ntttrnrnf nfrtttnfnnfntft b b b b b b b b bb b nftf b b trnt b b bntn b ntrtrft bnbbff brffnbffftntr btbf nftfntrb b nrtrntf fntrfrrnn b b nt rnbft rfrnftnfrftn rtf b b b b b b tnfftntftft nfntnt tnrnftrt fnnffftrnnn nrfrn bnfrb b f t f f f r r n t r f t f n f r t n r n t f f n t f f n f f f f n n t f n r f n f f t r n t n r n f t f t r n f f n f t f r f t n t f r n t f f t n f t n f n t n t n b r f t f n n n f t n n t f f t f t r n f f t f n r f t f n n f t f n f r n f n f f n f r n f n f r n n f fr nntfn nr ntnft t nff ftnrfnftfnntntr nfn r b ntfrnnftntrn frnft rtfntftbfn tnftfnrrf tnrn fffftfrnnf fnftffft bbntrffftnf bfbfft nftfntfrfnn fnrnftrnnft frntrrftnft nntfnrfnff trntnrnftftr nffnftfrftn tfrntfft nftnfntntn brftnnffnb rftfnnft fnnfrn tfft ftrnffrf tfnnftffnfr n ntrntrrn bb b r n nf b b b b b b b b bnb nftf n trnt b b b b b b nttrr btfrt nntnft ntft rfr b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b bb b nftf n trnt b b bntnt rrftnrnr ntrtrftbn bbffb rffnbffftntrbt frnbfnftf ntr ttt fnfr nrtrntffntr frrnn bb b nntrn ftrfr nftnfrftnrt f b b b b b b f t b b b b tnfftntftft nfntnt tnrnftrt fnnffrnnn nrfrn bnfrb b f t f f f r r n t r f t f n f r t n r n t f f n t f f n f f f f n n t f n r f n f f t r n t n r n f t f t r n f f n f t f r f t n t f r n t f f t n f t n f n t n t n b r f t f n n n f t n n t f f t f t r n f f t f n r f t f n n f t f n f r n f n f f n f r n f n f r n n f fr nntfn nr ntnft t nff f r b nftnfntntnb rftfnnnft nnt fftftrnf ftfnrftfnnft fnfrnf nffnfrn fnfrnnf fr nntfn nr ntnft t nff ftnrfnftfnntntr nfn r b nf

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbnrf rrfnt bttt rt tt rb tntt nr ntt rnrn t n f n t t ttn nttt frt btt n r n r b t t rfrn ffnnttt br tt tb frfrtbt t t fnf nrbrn rnrt t nbt ntt tb btt ntttt ftt ftnnn rrtt r tt nfrnrt ttt nt rrntt f n r r r t f t t nt rt tt n t t t rfrnf rrbrntt ftn rntt r ftt tr nrntt nrrnn tt t rnn t rnntt t t rt nrt rrn nrntt nnrn tt nft n nnrtft rf rn n rn n ntb b nn rtt n f tfnn nntnttt tt n nt rnt t ttrt t t rnft tt ntr nrtt f nnn ntt nrt nrtnbt ffnbtnrntt rft tt r frt t nrtt ffnbt rnt n ffnfnn tt nfnntt rnnrtt fft t fr t r r n n t f t r r r r r n n b t n n t n fnrnfrtrn nrt t btr bf tftt nfrnt tt t t b rntt f t fnt tt rn rntt rnt fr bb nr rtt ffnrtrt ttt tt nt t t t t nrrnrf ntt nfr t rnt rntt rrftt n t nrfrntt nt t n n r t nnnt t nt bft r r nnt t t nt nftnr tfnnrnt tntt nttrt n nt rtnttt n bt nnt n nnfnrtt f n n r f n n r r r b r n n n n bbr ft ntt nrfnrn ntt rfnr ntbtt ntnb nrttn ntbt t rrnt tt nt t nnt t t nrt ftbt t ntt r n nrrtt n t t t ftn rfnnrrtnt tbt t t bt bbt b t b t b t t frrf nrntt tf nrt n rntt n rtbtt tnnt frt nnttt rnt tt nb t rft rft r rrrtt nt fn ttn rtt nr tt r n r n r n n n r f r r r n r n n n r n t tt r n nrntt t nffnr rtt f n b t t nnrbt ntt n b nrt n ft tttt n tt n t r rf btt bb t tt bttrr bbrtt r rnrnnrr tt bb r n n t r t rt nftfnrr rr rnntrn rrrnrnnf rrrrrt f f f n r t t n r n f f n r n r r n n n t n t n t n r r n r n t r n r n r f n t r r r n r r t b f n f t f n b f t f r r t b t t n r r f r r r t f r n b f n n n t f f f n n n r n n f f r n t f f n n n t r t n n n n n n t f n n t r r n r n f n r r n n t n f n t r n f n r r n f f t t t t r t f f r n r r n r t n r r t n n t r n nrrrrn rntnrnrn rfrtntr rnnt rfnrbn rbftft nfnnnrbfnr ntnrt n n n r n r n t n rf r rn frn nr t t f r r r f t n t r n nnrnnnr nnnt f f r n r n f r r r r n r t f f t t t n t nntbft nntnnnnt nrn t t bfrrrnn rn ntrfnr tt rrft rrtrn rnftbr rnnt r r n n r f r r n t r f n r t f

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 rfntb rfntnrbntbn bfn rfrf fbrfnf fr fr bnn brb bb rb nbnnnnbb rrf nf bnr brnfrr f b b r b n n ntbf brfn bntnb rn b n r b t bn fb bf rn nt nbn nr b fn nt nbnr b bnbfn b fnbn bnbntt nn n nrrf f nbbt b rbn r b b n r b bnr n nn tbt tn brb nbr nbbbn n f tn br bn f nbtf b bf b bbfbrbr rfnnf nffn nfnb bn f nfrfbrb r fbrrnn nbrf t fbbrf bbfb rnfn n nn frfbt tbr nb nn f t f tbt nft t nb nrnfbn b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb rtb fbbbn tbt nnf f nnntrf f bb fb n ff tf t b b b f t b b b r b b n f n r b b n b n n b t r n t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b tfbn nnn nf f nnff f t n t n b b r r r n r n n b ftt t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb b b t b b b n n t n trf fft f n n t n b n n t t f t brbb f r n fbfbnn bnnb n bn bnffbt tfrfnbbb fbn n n fnbn nn r bb frb f bfnfnf b f f b r n r f n n b t n n tbb bt b ft tnb nt ttn bnn bnnrbbn btf tn b b r t tf b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nff t tnnnrb f n b n f t f t nf tf r b b b b t t t b t b b b t nft tbf n n b b n n b n n n b b b r b b b n b n b f b n t t t t t f t t t t f t n b f n t t b nbb nbrb b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nft ttbf tbb bbbbtn n brf ftbn nfnfbrt n n b b bbrn nfnn tbrff t b t t b b n t rttr brfftn tbb nbn rbnt fntn rbfb n nf ttbf b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nf ttbf nnff ft n b nbf nbbnbn rb nbb tnrnb br b bb f nbr t rnnb f n nbn rbtf nbn b b bnn nrbn nnbn br f n f r n b fbbn nr fbbn nr fbbn nr nrnn nb rb tnn n brnbn nbr brnnbr n frfbt nbb bnn tbn nnbb nb frbfbft tn t b rb tf tnf tf b nbrf tbf bf n nfb br tft nbr brf f



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BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties WORLD WAR II: Re-enactors breathe life into history A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Centralizing organ removal may benet transplants C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, March 3, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 62 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 81 / 60 Partly sunny. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com S everal times a day, Burkes BBQs driveway is blocked by eastbound trafc on County Road 466A, frustrating driv ers at the restaurant. It is hard to get in and out of the proper ty, unless you are going westbound, said Tim Burke, owner of the Fruitland Park eatery. I have personally sat in the driveway for ve minutes before getting out on more than one occasion. Burke said he is hopeful once CR 466A is widened to four lanes from U.S. High way 27 west to the Sumter County line, it will help clear up traf c congestion in front of the restaurant. It would denitely be more simplistic and allow our customers to get in and out of the property, he said. While progress has been made on securing funding for the proj ect, there currently still is not enough to com plete a large portion of it, county ofcials said. The revenue stream is not there from im pact fees to get enough money to build this road locally, said Jim Stivender, Lakes public works director. We are going to have to rely on some state funding. Beginning in January, impact fees were rein stated in the county, with the northern part of the countys fees at a lower percentage than in south Lake. In the next year, county ofcials expect only $300,000 will be collected in revenues from impact fees in northern Lake. However, transpor tation and county BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cars drive on County Road 466A in Fruitland Park on Feb. 26. Plans are under way to widen the road from U.S. Highway 27/441 in Fruitland Park, west to the Sumter County line. 466A ROAD WIDENING Plans are under way to four-lane County Road 466A from U.S. Highway 27/441 in Fruitland Park, west to the Sumter County line. The project will run past the proposed Villages of Fruitland Park development. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC N FRUITLAND PARK 466A 500Morse Blvd.Pine Ridge Dairy Rd. Timbertop Ln. Section of road to be widened 27 441Proposed Villages of Fruitland Park DALTON BENNETT and DAVID MCHUGH Associated Press PEREVALNE, Ukraine Igniting a tense standoff, Russian forces surround ed a Ukrainian army base Sunday just as the coun try began mobilizing in re sponse to the surprise Rus sian takeover of Crimea. Outrage over Russias tac tics mounted in world cap itals, with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry calling on President Vladimir Putin to pull back from an in credible act of aggression. Fearing that Europes borders were being re written by force, world leaders rushed to nd a diplomatic solution to the dispute. But there was no denying what had already happened on the ground: Russia captured the Black Sea peninsula on Saturday without ring a shot. Ukrainian Prime Minis ter Arseniy Yatsenyuk said there was no reason for Russia to invade Ukraine and warned that we are on the brink of disaster. We believe that our western partners and the entire global communi ty will support the territo rial integrity and unity of Ukraine, he said Sunday in Kiev. NATO held an emergen cy meeting in Brussels, Brit ains foreign minister ew to Kiev to support its new government and the U.S., France and Britain debat ed the possibility of boycot ting the next Group of Eight economic summit, being CONNIE CASS Associated Press WASHINGTON Sick of hearing about the health care law? Plenty of people have tuned out after all the political jabber and website woes. But now is the time to tune back in, before its too late. The big deadline is coming March 31. By that day, for the rst time, nearly ev eryone in the Unit ed States is required to be signed up for health insurance or risk paying a ne. Heres what you need to know about this months open en rollment countdown: ALREADY COVERED? NO WORRIES Most people dont need to do any thing. Even before the health care law passed in 2010, more than 8 out of 10 U.S. residents had cover age, usually through their workplace plans or the governments Medicare or Medic aid programs. Some have private policies that meet the laws re quirements. If youre already covered that way, you meet the laws re quirements. Since October, about 4 million peo ple have signed up for private plans through the new state and fed eral marketplaces, the Obama administra tion says, although its not clear how many were already insured elsewhere. In addition, many poor adults now have Medicaid cover age for the rst time FRUITLAND PARK MPO chief: Widening project will enhance economic development Russia tightens its grip on Crimea DARKO VOJINOVIC / AP A Russian convoy moves from Sevastopol to Sinferopol in the Crimea, Ukraine, on Sunday. Staff Report The city of Umatilla, which has issues with its water and sew er lines, will address some sewer prob lems soon, thanks to a $1.22 million ap propriation from the Florida Legislature last year. The city council will meet Tuesday night to consider a staff recommendation to award J & H Waterstop Utilities of Orange City a $509,801 contract to put new linings into aging sewer pipes. The staff wants anoth er $16,395 to be given to Utility Technicians Inc. of Umatilla to re habilitate some old manhole covers. UMATILLA City looking at water and sewer upgrades What you need to know about March health deadline SEE PROJECT | A2 SEE UPGRADES | A6 SEE CRIMEA | A2 SEE DEADLINE | A6 RUSSELL HENLEY WINS PLAYOFF AT HONDA CLASSIC, SPORTS B1

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 3, 2014: This year you might not always be comfortable with what happens. Your ego could take a beating. Curb a tendency to overindulge, especially when youre up set. Learn to take in the big picture. If you are single, use care when dating, as you might be prone to meet ing emotionally unavailable people this year. Before committing, get to know someone well. The best period for meeting some one of signicance will be through July 2014. If you are attached, the two of you might not always be on the same emotional frequency. When you are, you have a great time together. ARIES can get you riled up! ARIES (March 21-April 19) Dont be surprised to wake up in a cranky mood, as your dreamtime occurred under some hard planetary vibes. Try not to act on your feelings. A discussion with someone very similar to you could open up an interest ing issue. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could be strongwilled about a person al matter and end up bul lying everyone into his or her respective corners. Is that what you really want? By late afternoon, once you have calmed down, you will need to act. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Zero in on what you want. A partner could be come controlling, which might provoke quite a re sponse from you. Is it pos sible that you are channel ing some of your distress about another situation into this one? Try to look at the long term. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Pressure seems to build to an unprecedented level. The unexpected could occur when dealing with a key associate. A partner might get very controlling as well. Keep your cool, and know that everything could change quickly. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You tend to be present in the moment while still gain ing an overview of the sit uation. Someone might push you hard to get his or her way. The results will be that you distance yourself from this person. Honor a change of pace. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Deal directly with some one whom you care a lot about. You might want to tap into your creativity when dealing with this person. Push comes to shove with a new friendship. Someone could be jealous of the time you spend with your new friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might need to defer to a key person in your life. An effort to work together could seem feasible initially, but youll need one person to be in charge; let it be the other person. Use your intu itive sense with a health or work matter. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You have the strength to continue like the Ener gizer Bunny. Just the same, someone could throw a boo merang in your path. Jump over it, and dont let it trip you up. Be aware of what others are asking, but dont interfere with the comple tion of a project. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You might want to let go of plans and let your spontaneous person ality take over. Passion con sumes much of your time, whether it be a certain topic, person, pastime or sport. Consider incorporat ing more passion into your daily life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Youll want to un derstand what is happening with a close loved one. You can push and prod to get answers, but know that this manipulation could backre. Though you might nd it dif cult to play it loose with this person, youll need to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Keep communication open, and try not to make any judgments. Listen to what others are saying, and imagine what it must be like to be in their shoes; your understanding will evolve as a result. A boss or par ent could be touchy or with drawn. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You might not like what you hear at rst, and youll wonder what would be best to do. Keep a conversation lively yet open. Refuse to replay a difcult situation over and over again in your head. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US MARCH 2 CASH 3 ............................................... 2-5-3 Afternoon .......................................... 0-6-8 PLAY 4 ............................................. 6-6-9-4 Afternoon ......................................... 0-3-3-3 FLORIDA LOTTERY MARCH 1 FANTASY 5 ......................... 23-27-29-30-33 FLORIDA LOTTO ................... 2-7-9-16-19-45 POWERBALL ...................... 3-8-25-30-4713 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. ofcials remain hope ful an agreement will be made with The Villag es to fund construction costs for phase two of the project. Lake County, the city of Fruitland Park and The Villages develop ment are in discussions to construct phase two along their frontage, but we dont have a written agreement, said Fred Schneider, director of en gineering for the coun tys Public Works Depart ment. They are going to send us a proposal. Once constructed, the road will run past the 987-acre Pine Ridge Dairy Tract where The Villages of Lake-Sumter Inc. recently purchased 700 acres for a 2,038home development. This week, Lake County commission ers approved institut ing imminent domain proceedings for the ac quisition of property for phases one and two of the project. Once widened, CR 466A eventually will con nect with the complet ed section of CR 466A in The Villages in Sum ter County. Just over the Sumter line, CR 466A in tersects with Morse Bou levard. Plans call for Morse Boulevard to be widened to four lanes and extend ed south to State Road 44 and hook up with Coun ty Road 468. Plans are al ready under way to wid en CR 468 to four lanes from SR 44 south to the Florida Turnpike, where a new interchange will be built. This means motorists would be able to get off the turnpike and easi ly access SR 44 and trav el to Leesburg or stay on Morse Boulevard and easily access The Villages or take CR 466A east to Fruitland Park. The 3.05-mile 466A widening project will be done in three phases: Phase one, covering .045 miles, will span from Sunny Court to US 27; phase two will cover 1.8 miles, from the Sum ter County line to Cut off Road and phase three will cover 0.8 miles, from Marguerite Avenue to Sunny Court. Recently, a Transpor tation Regional Incen tive Program agreement was made between Lake County and the FDOT for funding $4.35 million to complete the rightof-way acquisitions on phases one and two. Schneider said the project is estimated to cost $25 million, and so far, the county only has the right-of-way and construction costs to complete phase one of the project. While the county has funds for right-of-way for phase two, funding for construction costs is contingent on the agree ment with The Villages and state funding. Phase two construc tion costs, estimated at $9 million, make up the most expensive part of the project, according to county documents. Meanwhile, phase three remains complete ly unfunded, according to Schneider. T.J. Fish, executive di rector of the Lake-Sum ter Metropolitan Plan ning Organization, said if The Villages agreement comes through, it will enable the MPO to go back to the FDOT for an additional grant to com plete the project. They would be our local match to ask for an additional grant for phase three, he said. The Villages has been a partner over the years on numerous transportation projects, including being directly involved in build ing portions of US 301 and County Road 466. Construction of phase one could begin as early as 2015, ofcials said. Commissioner Welton Cadwell said he is hope ful that since The Villag es recently bought prop erty in Fruitland Park, the road will be complet ed sooner. He cited horrible traf c conditions at Micro Racetrack Road and CR 466A, where a trafc sig nal is needed at the in tersection. You could be waiting 15 minutes before get ting through that inter section, he said. County ofcials con ducted a trafc study at the intersection, con cluding a trafc signal was warranted there. This also would become part of the widening project. The study showed the number of vehicles per day on Micro Racetrack Road in 2013 increased by nearly 40 percent compared to 2012. Fish said currently Mi cro Racetrack Road is heavily congested be cause there are no breaks in trafc. The signal will help regulate the trafc to give everybody the op portunity to go through the intersection, he said. However, before a sig nal can be installed, public works ofcials must rst complete a formal signal warrant study and acquire the rest of the right-of-way for phase two, Schnei der said. Once the road is wid ened, economic de velopment will be en hanced, Fish said. One of the hindranc es of locating a business on the corridor right now is everybody knows the road needs to be wid ened and it has not hap pened yet, he said. PROJECT FROM PAGE A1 held in June at Sochi, the host of Russias successful Winter Olympics. In Kiev, Moscow and other cities, thousands of protesters took to the streets to either decry the Russian occupation or celebrate Crimeas return to its former ruler. Support us, America! protesters chanted out side the U.S. Embassy in Kiev. One young girl held up a placard reading: No Russian aggression! Russia! Russia! the crowd chanted in Mos cow. Kerry, interviewed Sun day on U.S. television news shows, talked about boycotting the G-8 sum mit, as well as possible visa bans, asset freezes and trade and investment penalties against Russia. Kerry said all the foreign ministers he had talked to were prepared to go to the hilt to isolate Russia. Still, politicians were treading carefully, know ing it was a delicate time for Europe. We are on a very dan gerous track of increasing tensions, German For eign Minister Frank-Wal ter Steinmeier said. (But) it is still possible to turn around. A new divi sion of Europe can still be prevented. So far, however, Ukraines new govern ment and other coun tries have been powerless to counter Russias tac tics. Armed men in uni forms without insignia have moved freely about Crimea for days, occu pying airports, smash ing equipment at an air base and besieging a Ukrainian infantry base. Putin has deed calls from the West to pull back his troops, insisting that Russia has a right to protect its interests and those of Russian-speak ers in Crimea and else where in Ukraine. His condence is matched by the knowledge that Ukraines 46 million peo ple have divided loyal ties. While much of west ern Ukraine wants closer ties with the 28-nation European Union, its eastern and southern re gions like Crimea look to Russia for support. CRIMEA FROM PAGE A1 Associated Press FALLON, Nev. A ghter jet that crashed during a training exercise in western Nevada is a total loss and the pilots condition is unknown, a spokes woman for the Naval Air Force, U.S. Pa cic Fleet, said Sunday. It took rescue crews several hours to reach the site after the 3 p.m. Satur day crash because of a snow storm and mountainous, remote terrain, Lt. Reagan Lauritzen said. The F/A-18C, a U.S. Marine jet on loan to the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Cen ter, went down on a Navy range train ing complex about 70 miles east of Na val Air Station Fallon, she said. The Navy reported incorrectly on Saturday that the jet was a U.S. Navy Hornet. The name of the pilot will be withheld for 24 hours, she said. The cause of the crash was under in vestigation. There were no reports of any other injuries or damage as a result of the crash and the jet was not carrying any weapons or munitions on the train ing ight, the Navy said. Navy: Fighter jet crash in western Nevada total loss

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT SUMTER COUNTY Driver killed in traffic accident identified The Florida Highway Patrol has released the name of a man killed in a trafc accident last Wednesday in Sumter Country. It took several days to identi fy Nolan Martinson, 23, because he sustained severe burns, the FHP said. The accident happened at about 10:20 a.m. along State Road 50 near the intersection of County Road 757. The FHP stated Martinson was driv ing a 2009 Pontiac G6 eastbound when he drove off the road and hit a fence. His car burst into ames after slamming into a tree. Martinson was pronounced dead at the scene. The car received more than $15,000 in damage, the FHP stated. CLERMONT Building Blocks to host annual dinner and auction The theme for Building Blocks Ministries 5th Annual Dinner and Charity Auction is Take Me Out to the Ballgame Hitting Obstacles Out of the Park, at 6 p.m., on Saturday at the Clermont Community Center, 620 Montrose St., across from Clermont City Hall. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-10, and are avail able at Building Blocks Ministries, 548 S. U.S. Highway 27, Suite C, in Minneola. For information, call Veronica Whetro at 352-536-9264. THE VILLAGES Bicycle Club hosts We Bike for Kids event The Villages Bicycle Club will host the third annual We Bike for Kids Charity Bicycle Ride on March 15, presented by Parady Financial Group. Events begin and end at the SeaBreeze Recreation Center and will feature three routes: metric cen tury (62 miles) at 8:30 a.m., a 30mile route at 9:30 a.m. and a 10-mile route at 10 a.m. Riders of all abilities are welcome to participate. Proceeds from the ride benet the nonprot organizations Project Legacy and the Sumter County Youth Center. For information or to register, call Wally Kurz at 352-430-2189 or go to www.webikeforkids.com. EUSTIS Tickets now available for Jazz Revue band fundraiser Tickets are now on sale for the 4th Annual Jazz Revue band fundrais er presented by the Eustis Band pro gram. The event will take place at 6:30 p.m. on March 21 at the First Baptist Church, 3551 E. Orange Ave. A three-course meal will be served and the evening will be lled with the jazz sounds of the Eustis High Panther Band and the Middle School Mustang Jazz Ensembles, student soloists and a special guest artist. Band students have also as sembled their original pieces of art to be displayed at the venue. Tickets are $30, and can be pur chased by calling Andrea Jauschneg at 352-357-3921. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report Lake County commission ers recently honored 43 vol unteers who have contributed more than 150 hours of service to various county departments. The Lake County Board of County Commissioners is ex tremely appreciative of the more than 350 volunteers and their dedicated volunteer ser vice during calendar year 2013, Robert Anderson, Lake County human resources di rector, said in a press release. These contributions from vol unteers assist in fullling the countys goal of providing ex cellent customer service to the citizens and businesses of Lake County. The county has received more than 25,000 hours of vol unteer assistance in the Litera cy Program, Teen Court, Emer gency Services, Parks & Trails Division and Animal Services, to name a few. Recognized were: Kathleen Weaver volunteered 153 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Cooper Me morial Library; Linda Perrine volunteered 156 hours with the Public Resources Depart ment at Cooper Memorial Li brary; Sondra Surface vol unteered 158 hours with the Lake County honors 43 for volunteer service SUBMITTED PHOTO County Manager David Heath, left, and County Commissioner Jimmy Conner thank Craig Smith, right, for his 509 volunteer hours. SEE SERVICE | A5 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com R e-enactors al lowed World War II veterans a chance to travel back to the 1940s over the weekend at Dade Bat tleeld Historic State Park in Bushnell, and the event brought his tory books to life for younger generations. The timing of the World War II Com memorative Weekend was tting. Seventy years ago, Dade Me morial Park, as it was called back then, was home to the 62nd Sig nal Air Warning Com pany that was sta tioned in Bushnell from January to June 1944. Re-enactors said it was their duty to hon or those who served in the largest conict in human history. Unfortunately, many of our World War II veterans are going away, re-en actor Christopher R. Tenaro of Brooksville said Sunday. This is our way to keep their memory alive and to really show kids what their generation did for this country and the world. It was a very pivotal time in our world. Tenaro treasures every opportuni ty to talk to surviv ing World War II vet erans, including his BUSHNELL Re-enactors breathe life into World War II history PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Visitors look over a jeep from World War II on Sunday at Dade Battleeld Historic Park in Bushnell, site of the annual World War II Commemorative Weekend. BELOW: World War II re-enactors, left to right, Richard Curran of Hudson, Rick Rees of Orlando and Nick Price of West Palm Beach, are on the lookout for enemy. Staff Report Seven years after it rst upheld the death sen tence for a Lake County man who shot and killed a security guard in 2001, during an 11-day crime spree that saw anoth er man murdered and an elderly woman bashed in the head with a ham mer, the Florida Supreme Court has rejected anoth er appeal led by Quawn Franklin. Franklin, 36, claimed he received ineffective trial counsel, Floridas meth od of execution is cruel and unusual and that he may be incompetent at the time of his execution. The Supreme Court re jected those claims, as it did with a similar appeal in 2007. Franklin was 16 years old when he was sen tenced to prison for 10 years for robbing a man. He was re leased in October 2001 and began his crime spree here just two months later. According to court doc uments, on Dec. 18, 2001, Franklin called for a piz za delivery, bound driver John Horans hands with duct tape and shot him in the back, kill ing him for pock et change. Franklin received a life sen tence. On Dec. 27 or 28, he forced his way into the home of Al ice Johnson and hit her in the head with a hammer before stealing her car, for which he received anoth er life sentence. Supreme Court rejects killers appeal FRANKLIN SEE APPEAL | A4 Staff Report The Umatilla Chamber of Commerce presents its rst North Lake SportsFest & Jam March 28-30 at North Lake Park. The event will include youth baseball and soccer tourna ments, as well as a youth girls fastpitch softball tournament, according to a press release. The SportsFest will also fea ture a 50or 100-mile Centuri on Biking Challenge, where rid ers can enjoy themselves on the scenic roadways deep within the Ocala National Forest, through Alexander Springs and along the St. Johns River. The jam portion will offer live music, day and night. The SportsFest & Jam demon strates that Lake County is an ideal destination for sports tour ism while shining a spotlight on the natural resources of north Lake County, said Jason Mabry, Lake County Economic Devel opment & Tourism coordinator. North Lake Community Park is the largest recreational complex managed by the Lake County Parks & Trails Division. The park opened in May 2009 and features many amenities, including an ex pansive playground area, picnic pavilions, basketball courts, ten nis courts, sand volleyball courts, nine athletic elds, concession stands, a 1.4-mile perimeter trail loop, a .75-mile nature trail and two restroom facilities. The park, at 40730 Roger Giles Rd., is located east of Umatilla, off East Collins Street. The parks primary purpose is to offer rec reational sports elds. The ball elds can be reserved for league play for a fee, or are otherwise open for general use. The park is a former orange grove. Many cit rus trees still make up its proper ty boundaries and the landscap ing is native to Florida. For information, go to www. umatillachamber.org/Sports FestJam or call 352-669-3511. UMATILLA Inaugural SportsFest & Jam planned SEE HISTORY | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 Activities for the Day: $25 Value $150 Value Everyone is encouraged to come out with family and friends.SEE YOU THERE!WHEN: WHERE: Invite you to come out and enjoy the day with us, as we celebrate our First Annual Open House and Patient Appreciation Day.Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care Mid-Florida Primary Care and Central Florida Express Care OBITUARIES Ruth Louise Kinzer Hamilton Ruth Louise Kinzer Hamilton, age 89, was born June 20, 1924 in Jenkins, KY and passed away Febru ary 5, 2014, at Wuest hoff Medical Center, Melbourne, FL. Survi vors include ve chil dren: Robert B. (Paula) Hamilton Jr., Nobles ville, IN; Elizabeth Ann (Ray) Peterson, Mel bourne, FL; William C. (Sissy) Hamilton, Se wickley, PA; Richard D. (Susie) Hamilton, Chehalis, WA and Su san Carol (Bill) Den ny, Beaver Falls, PA. Twelve grandchildren, ten great-grandchil dren and numerous nephews and nieces also survive her. Ruth moved to Pittsburgh, PA at a young age and then to Glen Osborne, PA in her teen years. She graduated from Se wickley High School in 1942, spent one year at Allegheny College in Meadville, PA and then married Robert B. Ham ilton on September 24, 1943. They raised their family in Sewickley, PA where they were ac tive members of the Se wickley United Meth odist Church for 40 years. In addition to being a homemaker, Ruth worked in the of ce at a car dealership part-time and then full-time at Sewickley Valley Hospital for 15 years. After retirement, they moved to Sun lake Estates in Grand Island, FL where they became active mem bers of the First Unit ed Methodist Church, Eustis, regularly at tending the Friendship Class and Bible Study. Ruth enjoyed doing de votions for the Sisters In Christ meetings and teach ing les sons. They both en joyed vis iting fami ly, playing cards and participating in church activities. After her hus band of 63 years passed away, Ruth moved to Lake Ridge Village in Eustis, FL where she lived for one year be fore moving in April 2012 into assisted liv ing at the Brookshire in Melbourne. At the Brookshire, she was a faithful attendee of the Monday night church service and Tuesday morning Bible Study. She also enjoyed play ing bingo, card games, scrabble, crossword puzzles, eating out and going to the mov ies. She traveled regu larly to visit family and friends. However, she also kept up with fam ily and friends by us ing her IPad for Skype, Face time, Facebook and e-mail. Ruth will be sorely missed as the gentle and comforting matriarch of her family. In addition to her hus band, she is preced ed in death by an in fant sister, Annie Laura Kinzer, her brother, Jack Kinzer, and two other sisters, Julia Tubbs and Alice Groves. A Cele bration of Life Service will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, March 7, 2014 in the Sturm Chapel, First United Methodist Church, Eustis. An ad ditional service will be held in June in Sewick ley, PA where she will be interred next to her husband in the Sewick ley Cemetery. Dona tions may be made to the First United Meth odist Church, Eustis. DEATH NOTICES Rosemarie T. Christ Rosemarie Therese Christ, 75, died Satur day March 1, 2014 in Fruitland Park. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg. IN MEMORY HAMILTON SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com Johnson suf fered severe inju ries from the attack when pieces of her skull imbedded in her brain, the docu ments state. On Dec. 28, Frank lin drove Johnsons car to St. Peters burg to visit rela tives, but decided to APPEAL FROM PAGE A3 return to Lake County. Once here, he stopped to ask directions from crate company secu rity guard Jerry Law ley, later telling a wom an he was going to get the man, court papers show. On Dec. 29, Franklin ordered Lawley out of his vehicle at gunpoint, made him kneel in the parking lot and shot him in the back before nding nothing of val ue on the man or in his vehicle, the documents state. Lawley later died and Franklin received the death penalty for the killing. Franklin drove back to St. Petersburg, where he fell asleep in his car in somebodys drive way and was arrested by police there in the early morning hours of Dec. 30. LARRY NEUMEISTER Associated Press NEW YORK Amid unusually tight secu rity, Osama bin Lad ens son-in-law goes to trial today on charges he conspired to kill Americans in his role as al-Qaidas mouth piece after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Spectators at the tri al of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith the high est-ranking al-Qa ida gure to face trial on U.S. soil since the attacks will pass through a metal de tector before entering a Manhattan court room where prosecu tors will try to prove to an anonymous jury that the one-time ter ror network spokes man tried to rally oth ers to kill Americans. Prosecutors say they plan to show jurors during their opening statement a picture of Abu Ghaith seated with bin Laden and other al-Qaida leaders on the day after Sept. 11, 2001, as they make statements about the attacks. They say Abu Ghaith described the circumstances of the lming in his post-ar rest statement. NY jury selection starts for bin Laden son-in-law

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comCelebrating 60 Years In BusinessVISIT OUR SHOWROOMJust 10 miles south of The Villages ANNUAL LAMP SALEMarch 3rd March 7th% offLIST50 All Table & Floor Lamps, Mirrors, Prints & Accessories In Stock recent meeting with some of the remain ing members from the 101st Airborne Divi sion chronicled in the book and television se ries Band of Brothers. They parachuted into Normandy in the ear ly hours June 6, 1944, and were followed by hundreds of thousands of Allied troops for the D-Day invasion. Just to sit down and talk to those guys just chokes you up. It was absolutely Re-enactors incredible, said Ten aro, who was touched to hear the veterans of fer praise in return to the re-enactor: Youre keeping the memory alive representing us. Clermont resident Ed die Bedoya said he was impressed by the re-en actors authentic items. Im looking for real stuff that was used back then, and the way that everybody is act ing here, they really are doing a good job and theyre really into it, Bedoya said as he tried on an Army helmet and checked out a rie. Nina Mattei of Dun nellon portrayed one of 92 civilian World War II female journal ists who left their ofce jobs to cover the war as correspondents. They had an adven turous spirit, she said. They wanted to go and see a part of it and be accurate and au thentic. It took a lot of courage. Re-enactor Rich ard Curran of Hud son said the joy of be ing in Bushnell over the weekend was the chance to meet more veterans in the area and reminisce about the war years. Were hearing the inside story that you never read in the histo ry books, Curran said. HISTORY FROM PAGE A3 Public Resources De partment at Coo per Memorial Library; Strait Hollis volun teered 168 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Division; Stephen Fly nn volunteered 183 hours with the Public Safety Department in the Emergency Man agement Division; Emil Vandevelde volun teered 187 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Division; David Hasun uma volunteered 188 Hours with the Public Resources Department at Cooper Memorial Library; Carl DePoy volunteered 194 hours with the Public Safe ty Department in the Emergency Manage ment Division; Robert Putman volunteered 196 hours with the Public Resources De partment in the Parks & Trails Division; Lanny Villinis volunteered 199 hours with the Fa cilities & Fleet Manage ment Department in the Facilities Division; Peg Lindsay volun teered 208 hours with the Public Resourc es Department in the Parks & Trails Division; Paul Branch volun teered 210 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Di vision; Tom Merchant volunteered 218 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Library Services Administrative ofce; John Walton volun teered 240 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Di vision. Fred Fitte volun teered 243 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Division; Wanda Klaas volunteered 257 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Pro gram; Doug Rehman volunteered 271 hours with the Public Safe ty Department in the Emergency Manage ment Division; Whit ney Luckhart volun teered 285 hours with the Community Safe ty and Compliance De partment in the Ani mal Services Division; Charles Keller vol unteered 354 hours with the Public Re sources Department in the Library Services Administrative ofce; Jane Smith volun teered 375 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Communi ty Library; Paul Hem by volunteered 383 hours with the Public Safety Department in the Emergency Man agement Division; George Wingate vol unteered 397 hours with the Community Safety and Compliance Department in the Probation Division; Mi chelle Brady volun teered 400 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Coo per Memorial Library; Craig Smith volun teered 509 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Ca gan Crossings Commu nity Library; Howard Youngmeyer volun teered 579 hours with the Public Resourc es Department in the Literacy Program; Peg Urban volunteered over 150 hours with the Public Resources De partment in the Parks & Trails Division; Kev in Bertelsen volun teered 152 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at Ca gan Crossings Com munity Library; Gerald Blackburn volun teered 171 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Lit eracy Program. Abdullah Derosier volunteered 171 hours with the Public Re sources Department at Cagan Crossings Com munity Library; Carl Mullins volunteered 182 hours with the Public Resources De partment in the Litera cy Program; Sally Fish er volunteered 185 hours with the Public Resources Department at Astor County Li brary; Jarold Michael volunteered 189 hours with the Public Re sources Department at Cagan Crossings Com munity Library; Con stance Gibb volun teered 232 hours with the Public Resourc es Department in the Literacy Program; Pa tricia Davis volun teered 250 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Lit eracy Program; Chitku mari Budram volun teered 253 hours with the Public Resourc es Department at the Marion Baysinger Me morial Library; Michael Grovac volunteered 255 hours with the Pub lic Works Department in the Environmen tal Services Division; Gary Davis volun teered 260 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Lit eracy Program; Nan cy Puckett volun teered 287 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Communi ty Library; Judith Geh rke volunteered 313 hours with the Public Resources Department at Cagan Crossings Community Library; Jay Boehme volun teered 317 hours with the Public Safety De partment in the Emer gency Management Di vision; Neil Wasserman volunteered 423 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Literacy Pro gram; Mary Sturdivant volunteered 426 hours with the Public Resources Department in the Agricultural Ed ucation Services Divi sion; Barney O. Rae volunteered 574 hours with the Public Re sources Department in the Agricultural Educa tion Services Division. For information on volunteer opportuni ties with Lake County, visit www.lakecounty .gov/volunteer or call Lake Countys Human Resources at 352-3439596. SERVICE FROM PAGE A3

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. Seven companies bid on the lining project, with J & H coming in the lowest. The highest bid was $1.94 million for the work. Four companies bid on the manhole proj ect, with Utility Techni cians offering the best price. The highest bid was $31,927. Umatilla received $1.22 million from the legislature last year for sewer line reha bilitation work. Some $52,000 of this was designated for design, project bidding and engineering costs, with the rest designated for actual construction. Its unclear at this point how the rest of the sewer line rehabilita tion funds will be spent. Last month, the council agreed to spend around $20,000 to x water line cutoff valves to prevent problems seen last October when a water main broke. The entire city was left without water for sev eral hours because some valves didnt op erate and all water out put had to be shut off at the water plant. The city has about 360 of these valves. Utility Service Com pany of Atlanta has es timated that up to 80 percent of the valves can function with a lit tle work, meaning only 20 percent may have to be replaced. City of cials expect the Atlanta company to complete the work sometime next month. Water lines across the city are 40 to 60 years old and need to be re placed, City Manag er Glenn Irby previ ously told the council. This could cost about $8 million, but Irby be lieves that price could be cut in half if city crews do the work with the help of some tem porary workers. The city is conduct ing a rate study for all utilities before deter mining how to pay for the water line work. The city is in a posi tion to where it is going to have to do something with both (its) water and waste water utility, Irby said earlier. The city cannot do anything un til this rate study is com plete, because it antic ipates borrowing up to UPGRADES FROM PAGE A1 $5 million to replace or x the aging infra structure. Higher rates are needed for anoth er reason, the city manager said. The utilities are not standing on their own as to reve nues and expenses, Irby said. The city is apply ing for a $650,000 Community Devel opment Block Grant needed for signif icant upgrades to the citys main wa ter plant north of the Save-A-Lot plaza. The council Tuesday night also will con sider paying $44,000 to Wicks Engineer ing Services of Tav ares for engineering work needed to help secure the grant. According to Wicks, plant up grades are needed because re hydrant ow is decient, as well as the ability to meet potable (wa ter) demand in some sections of the dis tribution system, a company letter to the council states. In order to improve water pressure, Wicks is recommending the city get rid of its ex isting elevated wa ter storage tank and replace it with a new 150,000-gallon stor age tank on the ground. This will allow for higher distribu tion system operat ing pressure and will eliminate approx imately $10,000 to $12,000 per year that is currently expend ed for (elevated) tank maintenance and inspections, the letter states. through expansions of the program in about half the states. President Barack Obama is urging peo ple who have coverage to help any uninsured friends and relatives get signed up. NEED COVERAGE? ITS CRUNCH TIME Chances are youll hear more reminders about health care this month. The push is on to reach millions of un insured people. A big hurdle for the effort: As recently as last month, three-fourths of the uninsured didnt know there was a March 31 deadline, accord ing to polling conduct ed for the Kaiser Family Foundation. Most said they didnt know much about the law and had an unfavorable opinion of it. Plus, many worry they wont be able to af ford the new plans. The enrollment cam paign is emphasiz ing that subsidies are available on a sliding scale to help low-in come and middle-class households pay for their insurance. How to enroll? Start at HealthCare.gov or by calling 1-800-318-2596. Residents of states run ning their own market places will be directed there; people in other states go through the federal exchange. After March 31, many people wont be able to get subsidized coverage this year, even if they become seriously ill. The next open enroll ment period is set to begin Nov. 15, for cov erage in 2015. DEADLINE DETAILS There are exceptions. The big one is the Med icaid program for the poor. People who meet the requirements can sign up anytime, with no deadline. Also, people remain eligible for Medicare whenever they turn 65. If you are insured now and lose your coverage during the year, by get ting laid off from your job, for example, you can use an exchange to nd a new policy then. People can sign up out side the open enroll ment period in special situations such as hav ing a baby or moving to another state. You can choose to buy insurance outside the marketplaces and still benet from consumer protections in the law. People who do that wouldnt normally be eligible for premi um subsidies. But the Obama administration says exceptions will be made for people whose attempts to buy mar ketplace insurance on time were stymied by continuing problems with some enrollment websites. MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WONT GET COVERED Some 12 million peo ple could gain health coverage this year be cause of the law, if con gressional auditors predictions dont prove overly optimistic. Even so, tens of mil lions still would go without. DEADLINE FROM PAGE A1 AP PHOTO Yvette Calderon, an In Person Counselor for President Obamas new health care law, speaks with taxi driver David Bilewu, a 39-year-old Nigerian immigrant, at a city ofce where Chicago taxi drivers go to renew their license.

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY Flashback HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 W hen advocates of samesex marriage pushed their case in the courts of both public opinion and law, they made sure to read the fol lowing language from that lit tle card provided to them by the tolerance police: No one will be forced to violate their religious beliefs if Adam can marry Steve and Madame can marry Eve. Much like the Miranda warn ings that became famous after the Supremes decided that mag ic words were all that were need ed to protect the right against self-incrimination, this nup tial disclaimer was supposed to make us all breathe easier about that pesky First Amendment right to free exercise. Well, you can start choking. Yielding to pressures reminis cent of Tony Soprano, Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed Arizonas new con science law, the one that protect ed people of faith from having to provide services to gay and lesbi an couples who wanted a wed ding cake, a commemorative pho to album, a gossamer bridal gown or a jazzy band. The violent push back against the law shows just how hollow that your religious beliefs are safe promise really is. A law that would have simply per mitted private business owners to refuse to provide services that vi olated deeply held religious prin ciples was called a subversive at tempt to codify bigotry. And where, pray tell, was the bigot hiding? Why, in the kitchen, where the baked goods are kept. And in the darkroom, where the photos are developed. And in the basement, where the musical instruments are stored. And in the dressing room, where the measurements are taken. These are the safe houses of hate and prejudice, places where evil believers take refuge from the same-sex juggernaut. This reasoning was both pre dictable and troubling. You just knew that when the Supreme Court dismantled part of the De fense of Marriage Act last year, and some states took up the cru sade by passing laws to legalize gay nuptials, any hint of oppo sition would be labeled bigotry. In fact, this isnt news. From the time that the rst man took his boyfriends hand and said I do ... want a domestic partnership, opposition to same-sex unions (whether based on the law or in faith) was considered tanta mount to Bull Connor hosing someone down. Its not that I dont get the an ger from the LGBT communi ty at the idea of some judgmen tal bakers, photographers and wedding planners. My ances tors were treated like trash be cause they ngered rosaries and believed that a virgin appeared in grottos. (She did, by the way.) Anytime we are discriminated against because of something we hold dear, it rankles the soul. But discrimination, hurtful as it can often be, is not necessari ly illegal. It is also not necessar ily bigotry. We make exceptions all the time for those who have certain spiritual do not cross lines, like the Quakers who were excused from combat duty be cause of their pacism. This was not about legal bars to same-sex marriage. This was about protecting someone against a lawsuit if he refused to bake a wedding cake. Telling people that they cant get married is very dif ferent from telling them that you wont celebrate their union. Not everyone has to like you, not ev eryone has to agree with you and not everyone has to serve you. But, you will say, this was just like those segregated lunch counters in the South, when those racist crackers refused to break bread with black folk. Ap pealing as that analogy might be to the lazy mind, its not the same thing. Racial discrimination was never ofcially motivated by re ligious principle. Yes, there were some miscreants who tried to use the Bible to say that a black man and a white woman couldnt eat soup and touch elbows, but the racism that motivated the seg regation now, segregation forev er movement was very different from the faith-based belief that marriage is a sacred union be tween one man and one woman. Why? Because some people who dont have a bigoted bone in their bodies believe that mar riage is a sacred union designed for procreation and the glori cation of God. You can disagree with that, you can even nd it laughable and antiquated. But it is a legitimate belief. Congress passed the Restoration of Re ligious Freedom Act to protect that belief, and others like it. On the other hand, theres noth ing legitimate in pointing to the Bible to refuse dinner to an Afri can-American. Similarly, laws that protect religious freedom cant be expanded to allow a business to exclude any person for any imsy reason just because he can point to a Bible verse. The belief must be fundamental, and the request ed service must directly violate that belief. Theres no reason to believe that this law wouldnt have been narrowly applied. We cannot legislate against hurt feelings. We can only hope that people learn to accept one another. Until then, no one should be compelled to choose between a courthouse bench and a wooden pew. Its a shame that Gov. Brew er let the noise distract her from that truth. Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Dai ly News. Readers may send her email at cowers1961@gmail.com. OTHER VOICES Christine M. Flowers MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Bigotry killed Arizonas conscience law The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. T he U.S. Food and Drug administration broke new ground in consumer pro tection when it required, more than 20 years ago, the now-familiar nutrition labels on virtually every bit of packaged food. Now, the labels are being revamped in ways that have both benets and downsides. One of the most noticeable changes and the least justiable would be the ad dition of a new sub-category: the number of grams of added sugar in the food, in addi tion to the existing measure of total sugar. But why make such a change? Doctors and dietitians have declared that there is no nutritional difference between natural ly occurring sugars such as fructose (in fruit juice) and the sugars that are added. All are processed the same way by the body; the only difference, some scientists have found, is when the sugar occurs in a whole, unpro cessed food such as an apple. The same isnt true, though, of the sug ar in soda or that in apple juice, though the proposed labels would imply otherwise. If people want to avoid added sugar, they just need to look at the ingredients list. The FDA proposal is on rmer footing when it suggests listing the number of calories, the number of servings in a container and the size of each serving in more prominent type. The number of calories is the number most consumers want to check, so it should be easy to locate and read. Similarly, some shoppers think that the number of calories listed is the total for the package rather than for the serv ing size; they dont notice that even a rela tively small bag of chips might contain two or three servings, although that information is included on the label. A consumer who is not looking closely might think he is eating a 100-calorie snack when he is actually con suming more like 300 calories. For the same reason, the FDA wants pack ages of food that might be consumed by one person at a sitting to be relabeled as a single serving, with the total calorie count. In oth er words, a 20-ounce bottle of soda, which most people probably drink at a sitting, could no longer be counted as 2 1/2 servings. The goal is a good one: to keep consum ers from being misled. But the proposed change on these smaller packages would mean that there are no real standards of what constitutes a serving. A 12-ounce can of Coke would be designated a single serv ing, as would a 20-ounce bottle of Coke which is at least as confusing as the current system. Also, one of the chief obstacles in whittling the nations waistline is the great American food portion. Once labels say that 20 ounces of soda is a single serving, con sumers might start thinking of that as a standard, reasonable size. They shouldnt. From the Los Angeles Times. A VOICE From the FDA, a mixed bag of food labels

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Creamer sinks 75-foot putt for victory / B3 Staff Report Lakehawks bats came alive on Sunday, pro ducing six runs over the nal three innings to complete a 10-3 rout of the Rollins College JV squad in Leesburg. Dakota Higdon and Tanner Long each n ished with a pair of hits on the day while Tan ner Barnhard, Jack Curtis and Walker Sheller each drove in two runs for LSSC. Kyle Schackne started the game for the Lake hawks, surrendering all three runs for Rollins while giving up ve hits and recording ve strikeouts and a single walk. LSSC coach Josh Holt turned to his bull pen in the fth inning and was rewarded with a one-hit performance by four relievers. Mi chael Hennessey got the win for the Lakehawks Lakehawks drub Rollins College JV squad 10-3 SEE LSSC | B2 ROSS D. FRANKLIN / AP Kevin Harvick celebrates in Victory Lane with his crew after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup race on Sunday in Avondale, Ariz. JOHN MARSHALL Associated Press AVONDALE, Ariz. Kev in Harvick charged to the front early and dominat ed the rest of the way Sun day for his second straight Sprint Cup victory at Phoe nix International Raceway. Coming off a disappoint ing nish at the Daytona 500, Harvick had the fast est car in practice and kept it rolling in the race, leading 224 of 312 laps on the oddshaped mile oval. Harvick won the fall race at PIR for Richard Childress Racing after Carl Edwards ran out of fuel at the white ag. Harvick needed no help Sunday, quickly mov ing to the front after start ing 13th and pulling away on a series of late restarts to win in his second race with Harvick dominates at Phoenix, wins second consecutive race PHOTOS BY WILFREDO LEE / AP Rory McIlroy hits from near the sixth green during the nal round of the Honda Classic on Sunday in Palm Beach Gardens. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PALM BEACH GAR DENS Russell Hen ley made good on his second chance at the 18th hole Sunday and won the Honda Classic after a wild day that be gan with Tiger Woods walking off the course with a back injury and ended with a four-man playoff. The closing hour at PGA National was a se ries of blunders by the contenders and even the winner. Henley was in a three-way tie for the lead, 40 yards left of the ag on the par-5 18th in regulation, when he chunked a chip so bad ly that it only got half way to the hole. He had to two-putt for par, and then watched as Rory McIlroy nearly made a great escape from an otherwise bad after noon. McIlroy, who lost a two-shot lead, hit a 5-wood from 236 yards to just inside 12 feet for an eagle and the win. It narrowly slid by on the right. In the playoff, Hen ley was the only play er to reach the 549-yard hole in two, and he two-putted from about 40 feet for birdie. Ryan Palmer missed a 10foot birdie putt. McIl roy went from the back bunker to the front col lar and had to scram ble for par, and Rus sell Knox laid up and missed a 20-foot birdie attempt. This isnt going to sink in for a while, Henley said. Thousands of fans who spent hours in the warmth and wind of south Florida surely felt the same way. Woods abruptly quit after 13 holes and was driven straight to his car. He later said he had lower back pain and spasms, and was unsure if he could play at Doral next week. And then came all the mis takes by four guys try ing to win. Palmer missed a 5-foot par in regulation that would have won it. He closed with a 69, the only player in the last six groups to break par. Knox needed a birdie on the last hole, but he went from the fairway bunker to the rough, well over the green and then calmly made a par putt just inside 10 feet for a 71 to get in the playoff. They all nished at 8-under 272. The conditions were tough. The play was so underwhelming that McIlroy said that if he had won, It would have felt undeserved in a way. From out of the blue SEE NASCAR | B2 Henley comes from behind to defeat McIlroy, two others in playoff Russell Henley kisses the trophy after winning the Honda Classic golf tournament. SEE GOLF | B2 Associated Press ORLANDO Tobias Harris scored a ca reer-high 31 points and the Orlando Magic beat the 76ers for the second time in less than a week, winning 92-81 Sunday night to extend Philadelphias losing streak to 14 games. Nikola Vucevic had 18 points and 17 re bounds for Orlando, which outscored Phila delphia 26-12 in the fourth quarter to earn the win. The 76ers skid is their longest since 1994, when they lost 15 straight, and includes a loss last Monday to the Milwaukee Bucks, the NBAs worst team. The 76ers have the NBAs second-worst record, while the Magic have the third-worst. Thaddeus Young had 29 points for Philadel phia and Michael Carter-Williams added 17 points and 11 rebounds. Magic guards Jameer Nelson and Arron LEESBURG Harris has 31 as Magic extend Sixers skid 92-81 SEE MAGIC | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup-The Prot on CNBC 500 Results Sunday At Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Ariz. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 312 laps, 149.9 rating, 48 points. 2. (5) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 312, 122.5, 42. 3. (1) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 312, 115.9, 42. 4. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 312, 124.3, 41. 5. (17) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 312, 108.1, 40. 6. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 312, 111.8, 38. 7. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 312, 98.8, 38. 8. (23) Carl Edwards, Ford, 312, 96.5, 37. 9. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 312, 101.5, 35. 10. (3) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 312, 93.5, 34. 11. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 312, 78.4, 33. 12. (19) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 312, 90, 32. 13. (14) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 312, 83.2, 32. 14. (18) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 312, 71.2, 30. 15. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 312, 88, 29. 16. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 312, 81.7, 28. 17. (6) Greg Bife, Ford, 312, 80.8, 27. 18. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 312, 62.7, 26. 19. (12) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 312, 79.9, 25. 20. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 312, 74.7, 24. 21. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 311, 62.6, 23. 22. (27) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 311, 66.4, 22. 23. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 311, 68.1, 21. 24. (24) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 311, 55.1, 20. 25. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 311, 67.1, 19. 26. (25) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 310, 64.4, 18. 27. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 310, 44.2, 17. 28. (30) David Ragan, Ford, 310, 53.5, 16. 29. (28) David Gilliland, Ford, 309, 52.4, 16. 30. (43) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 309, 46.3, 14. 31. (39) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 308, 38.5, 13. 32. (32) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 308, 42.9, 0. 33. (26) Michael McDowell, Ford, 307, 42.5, 11. 34. (41) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 307, 43.2, 10. 35. (34) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 307, 34.1, 9. 36. (33) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 306, 51.7, 8. 37. (37) Blake Koch, Ford, 306, 30, 0. 38. (40) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 302, 30.2, 6. 39. (10) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, engine, 292, 73.6, 5. 40. (38) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 292, 25.9, 0. 41. (35) Alex Bowman, Toyota, brakes, 230, 40.6, 3. 42. (36) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, engine, 226, 29.4, 2. 43. (42) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, brakes, 28, 25.3, 0. Major League Baseball Spring Training Glance All Times EST AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Cleveland 3 1 .750 Kansas City 3 1 .750 Seattle 3 1 .750 Baltimore 2 1 .667 Houston 2 1 .667 Minnesota 2 1 .667 Oakland 2 1 .667 Detroit 3 2 .600 New York 3 2 .600 Toronto 3 2 .600 Los Angeles 1 1 .500 Tampa Bay 1 1 .500 Texas 1 1 .500 Boston 1 2 .333 Chicago 0 1 .000 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Washington 3 0 1.000 Miami 3 1 .750 Pittsburgh 3 1 .750 Milwaukee 3 2 .600 Arizona 3 3 .500 Cincinnati 2 2 .500 Los Angeles 2 2 .500 San Francisco 2 2 .500 Colorado 1 2 .333 St. Louis 1 2 .333 Philadelphia 1 4 .200 Atlanta 0 5 .000 Chicago 0 3 .000 New York 0 3 .000 San Diego 0 3 .000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Sundays Games N.Y. Yankees 8, Toronto 2 Houston 7, Atlanta (ss) 4 Atlanta (ss) 0, Detroit 0, tie, 10 innings St. Louis 7, N.Y. Mets 1 Tampa Bay 6, Minnesota 3 Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 1 Boston 8, Baltimore 6 Washington 10, Miami 3 San Francisco 5, Arizona 3 L.A. Dodgers 3, San Diego (ss) 3, tie Kansas City 5, Chicago Cubs 3 Cleveland 6, Seattle 3 Milwaukee 6, Colorado 5 Todays Games N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 1:05 p.m. Toronto vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. Houston vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. San Diego vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Colorado vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 9:10 p.m. Baltimore vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, 7:05 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 33 26 .559 Brooklyn 28 29 .491 4 New York 21 39 .350 12 Boston 20 40 .333 13 Philadelphia 15 45 .250 18 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 42 14 .750 Washington 31 28 .525 12 Charlotte 27 31 .466 16 Atlanta 26 31 .456 16 Orlando 19 43 .306 26 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 45 13 .776 Chicago 33 26 .559 12 Cleveland 24 37 .393 22 Detroit 23 36 .390 22 Milwaukee 11 47 .190 34 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 42 16 .724 Houston 40 19 .678 2 Dallas 36 24 .600 7 Memphis 33 25 .569 9 New Orleans 23 36 .390 19 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 44 15 .746 Portland 41 18 .695 3 Minnesota 29 29 .500 14 Denver 25 33 .431 18 Utah 21 37 .362 22 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 41 20 .672 Golden State 36 24 .600 4 Phoenix 34 24 .586 5 L.A. Lakers 20 39 .339 20 Sacramento 20 39 .339 20 Saturdays Games Washington 122, Philadelphia 103 Miami 112, Orlando 98 Houston 118, Detroit 110 Indiana 102, Boston 97 Brooklyn 107, Milwaukee 98 Memphis 110, Cleveland 96 Portland 102, Denver 96 Minnesota 108, Sacramento 97 L.A. Clippers 108, New Orleans 76 Sundays Games Chicago 109, New York 90 Toronto 104, Golden State 98 Orlando 92, Philadelphia 81 Indiana 94, Utah 91 Charlotte at Oklahoma City, late Dallas at San Antonio, late Atlanta at Phoenix, late Todays Games Memphis at Washington, 7 p.m. Chicago at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m. New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10 p.m. New Orleans at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Sundays College Basketball Major Scores EAST George Washington 66, George Mason 58 Hartford 67, UMBC 56 Iona 97, Rider 81 Maine 73, New Hampshire 69 Manhattan 68, Canisius 63 Marist 103, Quinnipiac 72 Siena 70, Monmouth (NJ) 54 St. Johns 72, DePaul 64 St. Peters 71, Niagara 67 Stony Brook 73, Albany (NY) 68 Vermont 92, Binghamton 82, OT Villanova 73, Marquette 56 Wisconsin 71, Penn St. 66 SOUTH Charlotte 74, Old Dominion 63 Clemson 77, Maryland 73, 2OT FIU 73, Tulane 47 Louisiana Tech 67, UAB 58 Louisiana-Lafayette 102, South Alabama 76 Marshall 64, East Carolina 61 Southern Miss. 60, FAU 49 MIDWEST Indiana 72, Ohio St. 64 Iowa 83, Purdue 76 SOUTHWEST Tulsa 72, UTSA 70, OT UTEP 74, North Texas 54 Sundays Womens Basketball Scores EAST Canisius 66, Rider 63 Faireld 74, Niagara 62 Fordham 58, Saint Josephs 53 Hofstra 60, Drexel 58 Marist 79, Iona 67 Monmouth (NJ) 80, Siena 57 Northeastern 54, Delaware 53 Towson 75, Coll. of Charleston 63 SOUTH Alabama 78, LSU 60 Chattanooga 77, UNC-Greensboro 56 Davidson 83, Wofford 67 Elon 44, Samford 43 Florida St. 82, Virginia 70 Furman 78, Georgia Southern 68 Georgia 77, Mississippi St. 48 Georgia Tech 84, Boston College 74 James Madison 83, William & Mary 42 Kentucky 65, Vanderbilt 63 Maryland 87, Virginia Tech 48 Miami 67, Pittsburgh 54 Mississippi 73, Auburn 71, OT North Carolina 64, Duke 60 Notre Dame 84, NC State 60 Syracuse 64, Wake Forest 54 Tennessee 73, South Carolina 61 Texas A&M 83, Florida 72 MIDWEST Akron 80, Kent St. 66 Bowling Green 63, Ohio 39 Cent. Michigan 80, Toledo 77 E. Michigan 54, N. Illinois 45 Illinois St. 69, Loyola of Chicago 61 Indiana St. 73, Bradley 60 Iowa 81, Illinois 56 Minnesota 74, Ohio St. 57 N. Iowa 99, Drake 97, OT Northwestern 77, Wisconsin 73, OT Purdue 82, Nebraska 66 S. Dakota St. 99, South Dakota 88 Saint Louis 87, UMass 68 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 72, Missouri 70 Oral Roberts 80, Sam Houston St. 50 West Virginia 71, Baylor 69 FAR WEST Oregon 90, Arizona 78 Oregon St. 66, Arizona St. 43 Southern Cal 66, Colorado 59 UCLA 62, Utah 52 Tshwane Open Leading Scores Sunday At Copperleaf Golf and Country Estate (The Els Club) Centurion, South Africa Purse: $2.06 million Yardage: 7,964; Par: 72 Final Ross Fisher, England 66-65-67-70 268 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-65-69-68 271 Danie van Tonder, South Africa 66-70-69-66 271 Carlos del Moral, Spain 68-65-71-68 272 Hennie Otto, South Africa 71-65-69-68 273 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 66-68-71-70 275 Kevin Phelan, Ireland 68-69-68-70 275 Chris Wood, England 67-68-72-68 275 Merrick Bremner, South Africa 69-69-67-71 276 Simon Dyson, England 65-68-71-73 277 Trevor Fisher Jr., South Africa 65-69-71-72 277 Edoardo Molinari, Italy 70-65-70-72 277 Morten Orum Madsen, Denmark 67-65-75-71 278 Robert Rock, England 70-71-65-73 279 Matthew Baldwin, England 72-69-68-71 280 Oliver Bekker, South Africa 70-67-69-74 280 Keith Horne, South Africa 74-67-67-72 280 David Howell, England 69-69-74-68 280 Shiv Kapur, India 67-74-70-69 280 Jake Roos, South Africa 69-65-72-74 280 HSBC Womens Champions Scores Sunday At Sentosa Golf Club (Serapong Course) Singapore Purse: $1.4 million Yardage: 6,611; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Creamer won on second playoff hole Paula Creamer, $210,000 67-73-69-69 278 Azahara Munoz, $133,681 69-72-67-70 278 Karrie Webb, $96,976 66-69-70-74 279 Morgan Pressel, $52,477 71-69-70-71 281 Suzann Pettersen, $52,477 71-70-70-70 281 Angela Stanford, $52,477 68-69-69-75 281 So Yeon Ryu, $52,477 71-71-73-66 281 Inbee Park, $52,477 70-72-71-68 281 Teresa Lu, $31,106 68-70-70-75 283 Michelle Wie, $31,106 73-71-69-70 283 Eun-Hee Ji, $25,689 71-73-71-69 284 Na Yeon Choi, $25,689 71-70-71-72 284 Chella Choi, $25,689 73-71-69-71 284 Ha Na Jang, $22,542 73-69-71-72 285 TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3 p.m. FS1 Preseason, L.A. Angels vs. Arizona, at Scottsdale, Ariz. MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Notre Dame at North Carolina ESPNU Savannah St. at NC Central FS1 Xavier at Seton Hall 9 p.m. ESPN Kansas St. at Oklahoma St. ESPNU NC State at Pittsburgh NBA BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. SUN Charlotte at Miami NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN Buffalo at Dallas SWIMMING 3 p.m. ESPNU SEC Womens Swimming and Diving Championships, at Athens, Ga. 4:30 p.m. ESPNU SEC Mens Swimming and Diving Championships, at Athens, Ga. TENNIS 9 p.m. ESPN2 Exhibition, BNP Paribas Showdown, Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray, at N.Y. WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 UConn at Louisville 8 p.m. FSN Texas Tech at Oklahoma while Michael Howe, David Webb and Steve McClellan held Roll ins at bay the rest of the way. Two big innings put the game out of reach. In the sixth, Long sin gled to right and stole second. Taylor Sa ris drew a walk to put runners on rst and second before Kris Hodges singled to right, scoring Long and moving Saris to third. Sam Thomas ground ball scored Saris while Hodges moved to second. Hig don then managed an ineld hit and Hodg es scored on a throw ing error. In the eighth, Ba ziel Cabrera reached on an error, then ad vanced to second on Hodges sacrice bunt and to third on a elders choice. Hig don walked, setting the stage for Barn hard, who singled through the hole at short to score Cabre ra. Barnhard ad vanced to second on the throw while Hig don took third. Sheller then doubled to deep right-center, scor ing both Higdon and Barnhard. LSSC (12-4) returns to the diamond at 3 p.m. today to face the Flagler JVs. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 Stewart-Haas Racing. It was Harvicks fth Sprint Cup win at PIR, most on the career list. Daytona 500 winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. n ished second, pole sit ter Brad Keselowski was third and Penske Racing teammate Joey Logano fourth. Jeff Gordon round ed out the top ve on a warm and partly cloudy day after down pours wiped out the nal 32 laps of Saturdays Nationwide race, won by Kyle Busch Harvick won at Phoe nix during the Chase for the Sprint Cup champi onship in the fall, giv ing him an outside shot at catching Jimmie Johnson for the series title in his nal season with Richard Childress Racing. He came up short, but the victory and a third-place n ish in the standings gave him a bit of mo mentum heading into for his rst season with Stewart-Haas. Harvick had a sol id nish in his sights at Daytona last week before a last-lap crash dropped him to 13th. At Phoenix, Harvick just missed the nal stage of knockout qual ifying, nipped by 0.001 seconds, but had the fastest car in Saturday mornings nal prac tice session. He started 13th and quickly moved his way through the eld from the green ag, pass ing Keselowski on the apron, then Logano for the lead on lap 74. Harvick maintained the lead coming out of green-ag pit stops with just under 200 laps left and again with about 70 laps left. A series of cautions came out late in the race and Harvick easily pulled away each time to earn a quick win with SHR on the same weekend he celebrated his 13th wedding anni versary with wife DeLa na. Earnhardt had a whirlwind week af ter winning his second Daytona 500, need ing his girlfriend to get him extra clothes while he went on a media tour. He had a solid fol low-up, putting the dis tractions aside to qual ify fth. Earnhardt worked his way up in the opening third of the race, pass ing Logano and Kesel owski to pull up behind Harvick. He dropped back a couple times and fought back to get Harvick within his sights again, but didnt have enough to track him down. NASCAR FROM PAGE B1 He wont know that feeling. Instead, the 24-yearold from Northern Ire land closed with a 74. It was his second straight tournament in stroke play that he played in the nal group and shot 74. He tied for ninth in the Dubai Des ert Classic. His undo ing came on the 16th, when McIlroy missed on a 6-iron from the bunker and went into the water, making dou ble bogey. He fell out of the lead for the rst time with a bogey from the bunker on the 17th. What should ease the pain was his n ish a 5-wood he couldnt afford to miss that dropped from the sky to 12 feet left of the hole. I was fortunate I was in the playoff, McIl roy said. Seventy-four wasnt good enough to get the job done. To go out with a twoshot lead, you have to play well enough to win the thing. If I had won today, I would have counted myself as lucky. Ill pick myself up, get back it, try to get back at it at Doral and try to get the job done. Henley, who closed with a 72, won for the second time and quali ed for the Masters. He also moves into the top 50 in the world ranking, making him eligible for the Cadillac Champi onship next week at Doral. It was the rst playoff at PGA National since 2007, which also fea tured four players. McIlroy was at 13 un der after a birdie on the fth hole and appeared to be on his way, even after twice making bo gey from the bunker to close out the front nine. PGA National was tougher than ever after a weekend of sunshine, and the stiff breeze in south Florida. The av erage score was 71.8, two shots harder than the third round. The contenders made it look like a beast. Henley tied for the lead by chipping in for birdie on the 14th, only to deposit his tee shot on the par-3 15th into the water for double bogey. Palmer missed a 6-foot birdie putt on the 14th hole, which wasnt nearly as dam aging as the par putts he missed from 8 feet on the 16th and 5 feet on the 18th. Knox fell out of a brief share of the lead when he tried to play from the right rough on the 14th and had his shot carom into the water for a double bogey. GOLF FROM PAGE B1 Honda Classic Leading Scores Sunday At PGA National Resort and Spa, The Champion Palm Beach Gardens Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,140; Par 70 Final (x-won on rst playoff hole) Russell Henley (500), $1,080,000 64-68-68-72 272 Russell Knox (208), $448,000 70-63-68-71 272 Rory McIlroy (208), $448,000 63-66-69-74 272 Ryan Palmer (208), $448,000 68-66-69-69 272 Billy Hurley III (110), $240,000 70-67-67-69 273 David Hearn (95), $208,500 67-70-70-67 274 Will MacKenzie (95), $208,500 67-68-69-70 274 Stuart Appleby (78), $168,000 69-69-65-72 275 Luke Donald (78), $168,000 67-68-68-72 275 Sergio Garcia (78), $168,000 72-68-68-67 275 David Lingmerth (78), $168,000 69-68-68-70 275 Keegan Bradley (54), $94,800 69-68-66-73 276 Paul Casey (54), $94,800 72-68-69-67 276 Martin Flores (54), $94,800 69-70-68-69 276 Freddie Jacobson (54), $94,800 69-69-67-71 276 Chris Kirk (54), $94,800 69-67-72-68 276 Matteo Manassero, $94,800 67-71-71-67 276 George McNeill (54), $94,800 70-67-69-70 276 Andres Romero (54), $94,800 70-68-71-67 276 Adam Scott (54), $94,800 68-69-70-69 276 Chris Stroud (54), $94,800 69-66-73-68 276 Daniel Summerhays (54), $94,800 70-65-69-72 276 Jhonattan Vegas (54), $94,800 70-66-66-74 276 Matt Every (43), $45,400 66-73-65-73 277 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (43), $45,400 71-69-68-69 277 Rickie Fowler (43), $45,400 69-69-69-70 277 Luke Guthrie (43), $45,400 67-73-65-72 277 Chesson Hadley (43), $45,400 73-66-69-69 277 Patrick Reed (43), $45,400 71-67-70-69 277 Brian Stuard (43), $45,400 72-68-65-72 277 Tyrone Van Aswegen (43), $45,400 67-71-68-71 277 Nick Watney (43), $45,400 71-69-70-67 277 Derek Ernst (35), $30,375 66-69-71-72 278 Zach Johnson (35), $30,375 67-70-68-73 278 Brooks Koepka, $30,375 71-68-68-71 278 Seung-Yul Noh (35), $30,375 69-68-72-69 278 Rory Sabbatini (35), $30,375 65-71-68-74 278 Brendan Steele (35), $30,375 69-66-71-72 278 Josh Teater (35), $30,375 70-68-71-69 278 Nicholas Thompson (35), $30,375 68-70-66-74 278 Jason Kokrak (28), $22,200 70-66-70-73 279 Ted Potter, Jr. (28), $22,200 71-66-67-75 279 Cameron Tringale (28), $22,200 69-69-66-75 279 Camilo Villegas (28), $22,200 71-68-69-71 279 Boo Weekley (28), $22,200 68-67-73-71 279 Thomas Bjorn, $15,600 69-66-70-75 280 James Driscoll (21), $15,600 68-71-70-71 280 Graeme McDowell (21), $15,600 70-67-72-71 280 Troy Merritt (21), $15,600 68-69-72-71 280 Carl Pettersson (21), $15,600 72-67-68-73 280 John Senden (21), $15,600 72-63-73-72 280 Lee Westwood (21), $15,600 68-65-73-74 280 Charlie Wi (21), $15,600 69-71-68-72 280 Mark Wilson (21), $15,600 67-69-73-71 280 Jamie Donaldson, $13,680 65-69-72-75 281 Charles Howell III (15), $13,680 72-68-69-72 281 Tim Wilkinson (15), $13,680 70-69-67-75 281 Afalo were out with injuries. Both Orlando and Philadelphia have been clear that they are in rebuilding phases, and the 76ers traded two of their best players center Spencer Hawes and guard-forward Evan Turner on Feb. 20. Philadelphia coach Brett Brown has at tributed the 76ers new-look lineup to their recent woes, pointing to it as a rea son behind his squads turnover problems against Orlando. We had 19 turn overs and six came from our point guards, Brown said. A lot of that hap pened when we had three of ve guys on the court who have only been with each other four days. Our offense hurt us more than our defense. We were throw ing the ball away or not knowing who to turn to. We poked our selves in the eye with our turnovers. But give Orlando credit for raising the intensity in the fourth quarter. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1 JOHN RAOUX / AP Philadelphia 76ers Michael Carter-Williams (1) drives around Orlando Magics Victor Oladipo (5) during the rst quarter on Sunday in Orlando.

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL FRED GOODALL AP Sports Writer PORT CHARLOTTE Evan Longoria hit a tworun homer and Grant Bal four was perfect in his rst appearance in a Tampa Bay uniform since 2010, helping the Rays beat the Minnesota Twins 6-3 on Sunday. Jerry Sands also hom ered for the Rays, who got a quick third inning from Bal four, as well as 1 2-3 score less innings from starter Alex Cobb. Offseason acquisition Ricky Nolasco allowed two hits in two scoreless innings for the Twins, who signed him to a $49 million, fouryear deal this winter and are counting on the righthander to help bolster a struggling pitching staff that posted a major league-worst 5.26 ERA last season. Oswaldo Arcia and Bran don Waring hit solo hom ers for the Twins. Warings shot was a mammoth drive that struck the roof of an is land-themed bar and gath ering spot beyond the left centereld wall. DODGERS 3, PADRES 3 GLENDALE, Ariz. Josh Becketts comeback from surgery got off to a promis ing start Sunday with three strikeouts over two score less innings as the Los Ange les Dodgers and a San Diego split squad played to a 3-all tie. The game was stopped af ter nine innings. Beckett allowed one hit in his rst spring training ap pearance since having a rib and muscle tissue removed last July in a procedure to alleviate a nerve problem. He is competing to reclaim a spot in the Dodgers rota tion. Becketts biggest rival for a spot, Paul Maholm, allowed one hit over two scoreless innings. The Dodgers signed Maholm on Feb. 8 after he went 10-11 with a 4.41 ERA in Atlanta. YANKEES 8, BLUE JAYS 2 DUNEDIN Carlos Bel tran homered for his rst hit this spring, leading the New York Yankees past the Toron to Blue Jays 8-2 on Sunday. Jose Bautista hit his sec ond homer in exhibition play for the Blue Jays. Beltrans solo home run came in the third off reliever Todd Redmond and landed far over the right-eld fence. It capped a four-run inning that included a two-run ho mer by Eduardo Nunez. Bautista connected off Vidal Nuno in the rst. Nuno struck out three and gave up two hits in two innings. Toronto starter Esmil Rog ers tossed two innings and allowed an earned run. The right-hander gave up three hits and struck out one. Jose Reyes, Edwin Encar nacion, Melky Cabrera and Adam Lind each doubled for the Blue Jays. RED SOX 8, ORIOLES 6 FORT MYERS Red Sox Hall of Famer Carl Yas trzemski was in the stands and watched his grandson score a run for the Baltimore Orioles on Sunday in their 8-6 loss to Boston. Mike Yastrzemski played in his rst major league spring training game. The 23-year-old entered as a pinch runner in the sixth in ning, scored and then played right eld. He was hitless in one at-bat. The younger Yaz was the Orioles 14th-round draft pick last June from Vander bilt. He hit .273 with three homers and 25 RBIs in 57 games in short-season Class A. The Red Sox drafted him late in 2009 out of a Massa chusetts high school, but he went to college. Mike Napoli hit his rst homer of the spring for Bos ton. Felix Doubront started for Boston, going two scoreless innings with a hit and three strikeouts. ROYALS 5, CUBS 3 MESA, Ariz. Mike Moustakas homered twice, Eric Hosmer added three hits and the Kansas City Roy als beat the Chicago Cubs 5-3 on Sunday. Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro left after the rst in ning with a slight strain of his right hamstring. He hurt himself trying to steal a base. Moustakas hit a drive off Cubs starter Edwin Jackson to lead off the second in ning. He hit a two-run shot off Carlos Villanueva in the third. Hosmer doubled twice, and all of his hits went to the opposite eld. Lorenzo Cain had two hits for the Royals. Kansas City starter Wade Davis gave up one hit in two scoreless innings. CARDINALS 7, METS 1 JUPITER Matt Holliday doubled in both at-bats and drove in two runs Sunday for the St. Louis Cardinals in a 7-1 win over the New York Mets. Holiday didnt play in the Cardinals spring training opener on Friday. He singled and walked in two plate ap pearances as the designated hitter Saturday. Hollidays rst double came off starter Daisuke Matsuzaka. STEVEN SENNE / AP Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria, right, celebrates with teammate David DeJesus, center, as Minnesota Twins catcher Eric Fryer, left, looks on after Longoria hit a two-run home run in the third inning on Sunday in Port Charlotte. Longoria homers, Balfour perfect as Rays top Twins GOLF COLLEGE FOOTBALL JUSTIN BERGMAN Associated Press SINGAPORE Pau la Creamer sank a 75foot eagle putt on the second playoff hole against Azahara Mu noz to win the HSBC Womens Champi ons on Sunday for her rst LPGA title since the 2010 U.S. Womens Open. Creamers putt curled across the 18th green and then rolled slowly down the slope and directly into the hole. She ran across the green, then fell to her knees and put her head on the ground, laughing and pound ing the grass. Its one of those putts where if you just get it in the right spot, its going to fall down, she said. But I could stand there all day long and putt that and I dont think get it with in six, seven feet. Creamer and Munoz nished 72 holes tied at 10-under 278, one stroke ahead of Kar rie Webb, who led af ter every round but bo geyed three of her last six holes to give up a three-shot lead and nish third. EUROPEAN TOUR CENTURION, South Africa English golf er Ross Fisher secured his rst European Tour title in four years with a three-shot victory in the Tshwane Open on Sunday. Fisher, who start ed the day with a vestroke lead, saw off a challenge from Michael Hoey that briey cut his advantage to one shot. Fisher responded with an eagle at the long 15th from 25 feet to see off the Northern Irishman, who nished on 17 under for a share of second place with South Africas Danie van Tonder. Spains Carlos Del Moral was a shot behind in fourth. Fisher, who now has ve European Tour ti tles, said Im just thrilled to get over the line. It was a testing day with the weather conditions and play ing with Mike he put up a great challenge for me. Creamers 75-foot putt seals victory at HSBC Champions JOSEPH NAIR / AP Paula Creamer of the U.S. poses with the trophy during the award ceremony of the HSBC Womens Champions golf tournament on Sunday in Singapore. JOHN ZENOR AP Sports Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Auburn coach Gus Malzahn was in his second year leading a high school program when he watched Florida States Bobby Bowden turn up the tempo with a quarter back who was on his way to the Heisman Trophy. He gures maybe that Charlie Ward-led of fense in 1993 was a pre cursor to the wave of fast-paced offenses that have helped Malzahn and others win big and even sparked a propos al to change the rules. I was telling Coach on the way over here, I was watching Char lie Ward when they were playing shotgun and theyd go back and theyd start play ing with pace, Mal zahn said Sunday. I think Coach is one of those guys that kind of started a lot of this wide-open offense, so (Ward) could denite ly run our offense. On Sunday, Malzahn received the Bowden Award named after the former Seminoles coach, a Birmingham native who coached them to the rst of his two national titles in 1993. The 5-year-old award is selected by the Na tional Sports Writers and Sports Broadcast ers of America and the Over The Mountain Touchdown Club. Former Georgia coach Vince Dooley received the lifetime achievement award. Florida State beat Auburn 34-31 on a touchdown pass by another Heisman win ner, Jameis Winston, with 13 seconds left. Nearly two months later, tempo is a hot topic. The NCAA playing rules oversight panel could vote Thursday on a proposal to allow defenses time to sub stitute between plays by prohibiting offens es from snapping the ball until 29 seconds are left on the 40-sec ond play clock. Bowdens against the rule until its shown that the fast pace leads to more players getting hurt, as pro ponents like Arkan sas Bret Bielema and Alabamas Nick Saban have argued. People like of fense, Bowden said. Unless they can just show me evidence that boys are injured by doing that, I say leave it alone. Leave it like it is. Dooley ended his 24-year tenure as Georgias head coach in 1988. He said some times defenses just take some time to catch up with offen sive innovations and when they do, coach es come up with a new way to get an edge. Dooley asked Mal zahn to explain the 10-second rule, which would penal ize offenses 5 yards for snapping too quickly. It was an exchange be tween an old-school coach and one whos part of the vanguard of no-huddle offenses. Dooley: What is the normal time yall have been snapping? Malzahn: It varies. Dooley: Have you ever gone under 10? Malzahn: At times. AP FILE PHOTO Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn talks about his class of recruits during an NCAA college football National Signing Day news conference in Auburn, Ala. Gus Malzahn, Bobby Bowden agree on slow-down rule

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 Regional Urgent Care LAKE We at LRUC have made it affordable for you to receive the care you want and need For REAL medicine by REAL DOCTORS with CBC$25 Urine$15 Analysis HCG$208404 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 352.315.8881O.V.$95 X-Rays$50 Cardiac$100 Testing CMP$35 EKG$25 Strep$15 Test Pricing PricingSTRAIGHT STRAIGHT 352.259.4322 Associated Press STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Josh Gasser scored 15 points to lead a balanced Wisconsin offense and the 14th-ranked Badgers beat Penn State 71-66 on Sunday for their seventh straight vic tory. Wisconsin (24-5, 11-5 Big Ten) held onto third place in the Big Ten as Ben Brust scored 14 points and Traevon Jackson, who made four clutch free throws down the stretch, added 13. D.J. Newbill had 23 points for Penn State (1415, 5-11), which dropped to 2-5 against ranked teams this season. The redshirt junior became Penn States 31st career 1,000-point scorer. He leads the Big Ten this season with 178 eld goals. Tim Frazier and Ross Travis scored 10 points each for Penn State, which is 4-7 in games de cided by ve points or fewer. The Nittany Lions closed within 66-64 with 18 seconds left but was forced to foul. Jackson went 4 for 4 from the line during the closing seconds and Gasser was 2 for 2. Newbill committed two turnovers after Penn State had drawn within three points and Wis consin was able to hold on. The Badgers were 8 for 24 from 3-point range and held Penn State to 1-for-13 shooting from behind the arc. Penn State outrebounded the Badgers 34-28. COLLEGE BASKETBALL NBA JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer CHICAGO Joakim Noah had 13 points, 12 rebounds and 14 as sists for his fth career triple-double, leading the streaking Chicago Bulls to a 109-90 vic tory over the New York Knicks on Sunday. Chicago had sev en players score in double gures in its ninth win in the last 10 games. The Bulls also reached 100 points for the fourth consecutive game for the rst time since Oct. 30-Nov. 5, 2010. D.J. Augustin had 21 of his 23 points in the fourth quarter as Chi cago (33-26) improved to 21-8 since Jan. 1 and a season-high sev en games above .500 overall. Jimmy Butler scored 19 points and Carlos Boozer had 14. While the Bulls are galloping through the weak Eastern Confer ence, the Knicks are oundering. Carmelo Anthony scored 21 points and Tyson Chandler had 22 rebounds, but New York dropped its sixth consecutive game. The Knicks (21-39) are just 6-16 since Jan. 14. RAPTORS 104, WARRIORS 98 TORONTO De Mar DeRozan scored 32 points, Kyle Lowry had 13 and the Toron to Raptors beat Gold en State 104-98 on Sun day, their rst victory in eight tries against War riors guard Stephen Curry. Greivis Vasquez and Patrick Patterson each added 12 points and Jonas Valanciuas had 10 for the Raptors, who had lost 11 of their pre vious 13 meetings with the Warriors. Torontos only previ ous victory over Gold en State since Cur ry was drafted was an 83-75 home win on March 4, 2012, a victo ry that came while the guard was sidelined by a strained tendon in his foot. Curry scored 34 points and David Lee had 20 points and 11 rebounds as the War riors lost for just the second time in their past seven games. PACERS 94, JAZZ 91 INDIANAPOLIS David West scored 25 points, Paul George added 22, and the In diana Pacers beat the Utah Jazz 94-91 on Sunday night for their fth straight victory. Indianapolis native Gordon Hayward had 21 points and Derrick Favors scored 17 for the Jazz, nine of them in the rst eight minutes as Utah opened a 14-4 lead. A dunk from Favors cut the Pacers lead to 89-86 with a minute left to play, and West missed a jumper to give Utah a chance to tie with 35 seconds re maining. Hayward cut the Indiana lead to one, but Lance Stephenson sank two free throws to seal the win. Ian Mahinmi came off the bench to score nine points for the Pac ers and provide key minutes, as Roy Hib bert struggled to con tain Favors. No. 14 Wisconsin beats Penn St. 71-66 Noah leads Bulls past Knicks JEFF HAYNES / AP Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah, left, shoots over New York Knicks power forward Amare Stoudemire (1) during the fourth quarter on Sunday in Chicago.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 FOOD LABELS: Proposal aims to make healthy shopping easy / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer F or decades, surgeons have traveled to faroff hospitals to re move organs from braindead donors and then rushed back to trans plant them. Now an ex periment in the Midwest suggests there may be a better way: Bring the do nors to the doctors in stead. A study out Tuesday reports on liver trans plants from the nations rst free-standing or gan retrieval center. Nearly all organ donors now are transported to Mid-America Transplant Services in St. Louis from a region including parts of Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. Removing organs at this central location near the four hospitals that do transplants saves mon ey, the study found. The livers spent less time out side the donors body, which at least in theory improves the odds of suc cess. Doctors also think they are getting more us able organs from each donor, though this study only looked at livers. Transplant experts say this could become a new standard, and groups in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Denver, Chicago and Ann Arbor, Mich., have start ed or are exploring simi lar ventures. Its kind of a foreign concept so its taken some time for this to catch on, but I think it will. It makes so much sense, said Dr. William Chapman, a transplant surgeon at Washington University in St. Louis, which uses the Mid-America center. Theres no question in my mind this should be done everywhere, said Dr. Majella Doyle, also of Washington University. It will increase the num ber of organs that are used and it will increase efciency and decrease costs. She led the study, published in the Ameri can Journal of Transplan tation. About 28,000 trans plants were done in the United States in 2012; more than 121,000 peo ple are on the waiting list now. Organs have a nite shelf life livers, 6 to 10 hours after removal; hearts and lungs, even less. Kid neys last about a day. Transplants are not done at every hospital only a few in any major city have that capability. Surgeons usually travel to wherever the donor is to retrieve organs, perform ing these hurried, com plex operations in un familiar settings, often assisted by staffs at hospi tals that dont have trans plant expertise. Donors provide three organs on average but can give six or more. Each specialist lung, heart, kidney wants to test and inspect an organ to ensure viability before committing to the trans plant. Sometimes mul tiple doctors make the trip to retrieve organs, or there is redundant test ing and inspection when an organ thats been re moved by one doctor gets to another hospital where it will be transplanted. Mid-America, the re gions organ procurement organization, thought that having a retrieval center a commercial building with two oper ating rooms and testing equipment near the four St. Louis hospitals that do transplants would improve coordination. In Centralizing organ removal may benefit transplants PHOTOS BY WHITNEY CURTIS / AP Organ procurement coordinators Lindsey Cook, left, and Josh Skelton work with the body of a potential organ donor at Mid-America Transplant Services in St. Louis. Organ donation paperwork sits in a tray at Mid-America Transplant Services. Theres no question in my mind this should be done everywhere. It will increase the number of organs that are used and it will increase efficiency and decrease costs. Dr. Majella Doyle, Washington University SEE ORGANS | C2 THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer education and support group meeting The guest speaker for the meet ing is Michael W. Chancellor, M.D., radiation oncologist specializing in IMRT/IGRT radiation therapy dis cussing this option for prostate can cer at 7 p.m., Wednesday at Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Dr. For details, call 352-259-9433 or 352-446-4194. LEESBURG LIFE Social Support Group meetings set The LIFE luncheon in Leesburg will be held at 11:30 a.m., Thursday at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 East Dixie Ave., in Venetian Gardens, boasting a buffet-style lunch and entertainment by banjo players Second Time Around. In Eustis, the luncheon will be held 11:30 a.m., March 19 at the Lake Tech Vocational School, 2100 Kurt St., in Eustis in the faculty dining room on the north side of the building. Lake Techs Culinary Arts Program will prepare the lunch and Second Time Around will entertain. Cost is $10 and an RSVP is need ed by calling 352-787-0403, or by emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com. LAKE COUNTY AARP driver safety class scheduled for March Rene your driving skills and de velop safer and smarter driving habits at the AARP classes. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligi ble for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, and in cludes workbooks and a completion certicate. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. The two-day course will be of fered at the following locations: From 1 to 4 p.m., today and Wednesday at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St. To register, call 352-326-3540. From 9 a.m. to noon, today and Wednesday at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Register by calling 352-735-7180. MOUNT DORA Power over polio support group meeting scheduled Learn about issues many polio pa tients face in later years and connect with other polio survivors at 1 p.m., on the second Friday of every month at the Seabreeze Recreation Center, Buena Vista Blvd., in The Villages. For information, call at 352-7537188, or email dianaruthk@aol.com.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 2001, the rst year it was open, it handled 36 percent of liver do nations in the region. By 2011, it was up to 93 percent. Two staffers, usual ly nurses, go to the do nors hospital by ambulance if within 80 miles and by plane if farther to bring brain-dead donors on life support to St. Lou is. After any organs and tissues are removed, the body is returned, according to the fami lys wishes. The study looked at 583 livers donations from 2001 through 2011 407 procured at the organ retrieval center, 94 at St. Louis hospitals and 82 from ights to other hospi tals in the region. Patient and organ survival rates were similar. Removing liv ers at the central fa cility shaved an hour and a half off the time they were outside the donors body. Costs dropped 37 percent $7,876 for liver remov al at a hospital ver sus $4,957 at the organ center. We can save more lives by doing the man agement and recov ery here, said Di ane Brockmeier, Mid-Americas chief operating ofcer. Its a huge benet for donor hospitals. Were freeing up resources they can use on other patients because their intensive care units and operat ing rooms are not tied up with organ retrieval, she said. Donor families have not balked at sending their loved ones bod ies out of town. At rst it bothered us, said Stacey Smith, whose 21-year-old son, Cameron Greenwood, became an organ do nor in 2010 after dying of complications from diabetes. But she said Mid-Americas staff ex plained why it was best to move him from the small hospital in Bran son, Mo., to St. Louis, a four-hour drive away. These people sat down and prayed with us, they cried with us, they treated us like he was their own child, and that just made a huge difference, Smith said. They called and let us know when the plane left. They called and let us know when it landed. They called at 2 a.m. to say his heart and both kid neys had gone to three different recipients, plus tissue and bones to help 50 others, she said. It really made us realize how much or gan donors are heroes. We had no clue how many lives one per son could save and change. Its not just trans plant recipients lives that could be saved. Fewer staffers need to make the trip. A report found the risk of dying while ying to retrieve organs is 1,000 times greater than on a com mercial ight; there have been at least 30 such deaths since 1990. In 2007, a plane car rying two surgeons and two transplant dona tion specialists crashed on its way from Mil waukee to Michigan with donated lungs. All four plus the two pilots were killed. In 2011, a pilot, a doctor and a medical technician on their way from Jack sonville to Gainesville to pick up a heart died when their helicopter crashed. In 1990, a sur geon and an assistant picking up a heart were killed in a plane crash in New Mexico. Sadly, our teams are doing a lot of running around like that. We do put team members at risk, said Charlie Al exander, executive di rector at The Living Legacy, the organ pro curement group for Maryland. There are clear ly benets in safety to having a single organ retrieval center and fewer people traveling, he said. CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. 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MostMajor Insurances Accepted ORGANS FROM PAGE C1 WHITNEY CURTIS / MCT Organ procurement coordinator Lindsey Cook reads a printout showing information on the health of the kidneys of a brain-dead potential organ donor. LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press NEW YORK Is the anti-obesity message nally getting through? A marked drop in the obesity rate among preschoolers in the U.S. has researchers and parents pointing to a variety of possible factors. Among them: pub lic-awareness cam paigns to get parents to serve healthier food to their children; a drop in soda consumption; healthier menus at fastfood chains; more access to fruits and vegetables in some neighborhoods; changes in government food aid; and longer breast-feeding, which is often associated with improved weight con trol. Were not done yet, but this does show that parents really need to be the commanders of their own ship and manage the food envi ronment for their kids at home, said Keith Ayoob, a registered di etitian and associate professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein Col lege of Medicine in the Bronx. The glimmer of hope was contained in a gov ernment report issued Tuesday that showed that the obesity rate among children 2 to 5 years old dropped by nearly half over a de cade, from 14 percent to 8 percent. That is en couraging in part be cause obese preschool ers are more likely to be obese as they get older. Overall, though, both adult and childhood obesity rates have been at in the past decade, and dietitians, weight experts and doctors warned that the prob lem is not going away. This is the prob lem of our genera tion. We are starting to make some progress, but theres really still a lot more to do, said Scott Kahan, an obesi ty treatment and pre vention specialist and public health research er at George Washing ton University. For example, while rst lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move campaign and other ef forts over the past 10 years have raised aware ness, stumbling blocks remain for the poor and for working parents. They know their chil dren should be more active, but its hard for them to get them to the park. Theyre tired, and its complicated, said Sarah Barlow, di rector of the Center for Childhood Obesity at Texas Childrens Hos pital in Houston and an associate professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. Its an ordeal to get out of the house. Study shows obesity drop among preschoolers EVAN VUCCI / AP First lady Michelle Obama tends the White House garden in Washington, with a group of children as part of the Lets Move! campaign. SEE OBESITY | C3

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 DARLENE SUPERVILLE and MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press WASHINGTON Ice cream lovers beware: The government knows youre unlikely to stop after half a cup. New nutrition labels proposed Thursday for many popular foods, including ice cream, aim to more accurately reect what people ac tually eat. And the pro posal would make cal orie counts on labels more prominent, too, reecting that nutri tionists now focus more on calories than fat. For the rst time, la bels also would be re quired to list any sugars that are added by man ufacturers. In one example of the change, the esti mated serving size for ice cream would jump from a half cup to a cup, so the calorie list ing on the label would double as well. The idea behind the change, the rst over haul of the labels in two decades, isnt that the government thinks people should be eat ing twice as much; its that they should un derstand how many calories are in what they already are eating. The Food and Drug Ad ministration says that, by law, serving sizes must be based on ac tual consumption, not some ideal. Our guiding prin ciple here is very sim ple, that you as a par ent and a consumer should be able to walk into your local grocery store, pick up an item off the shelf and be able to tell whether its good for your family, said rst lady Michelle Obama, who joined the FDA in announcing the proposed changes at the White House. Mrs. Obama made the announcement as part of her Lets Move initiative to combat child obesity, which is marking its fourth an niversary. On Tuesday, she announced new Agriculture Depart ment rules that would reduce marketing of less-healthful foods in schools. The new labels would be less cluttered. FDA Commissioner Mar garet Hamburg called them a more us er-friendly version. But they are proba bly several years away. The FDA will take com ments on the proposal for 90 days, and a nal rule could take anoth er year. Once its nal, the agency has pro posed giving industry two years to comply. The agency projects food companies will have to pay around $2 billion to revise labels. Companies have resist ed some of the chang es in the past, includ ing listing added sugars, but the industry is so far withholding criticism. Pamela Bailey of the Grocery Manufactur ers Association, the in dustry group that rep resents the nations largest food compa nies, called the pro posal a thoughtful re view. It is still not yet clear what the nal labels will look like. The FDA of fered two labels in its proposal one that looks similar to the cur rent version but is short er and clearer and an other that groups the nutrients into a quick facts category for things like fat, carbohydrates, sugars and proteins. There also would be an avoid too much category for saturat ed fats, trans fats, cho lesterol, sodium and added sugar, and a get enough section with vitamin D, potassium, calcium, iron and ber. Potassium and vitamin D are would be addi tions, based on current thinking that Amer icans arent getting enough of those nutri ents. Vitamin C and vi tamin A listings are no longer required. Heres a look at the changing health-relat ed landscape that may have contributed to the drop in preschool obe sity: PARENTS SETTING THE EXAMPLE Sherlyn Pang Luedt ke, a parenting coach, said parents can im prove their childrens eating habits, even if their own were less than stellar. I was raised eat ing fried eggs and rice almost every day for breakfast, said Luedt ke, who grew up near downtown Los Ange les and now lives in the suburban San Fernan do Valley. She and her hus band have a 9-year-old son and a 4-year-old daughter, and the fami ly sticks mostly to vege tarian fare. We have smooth ies with greens, ax seed and blueberries with breakfast. We eat whole-grain products, she said. We feel great about our health choic es that we model for our kids. Lyndsay Meyer is a rst-time mom of a 16-month-old son, liv ing just outside Wash ington, D.C. She and her husband have not fed their child any pro cessed sugar. His rst birthday cake was made with bananas and applesauce. They feed him only whole foods and try to stick to organic ones. Its growing increas ingly difcult, though, as he makes friends and goes to parties or on play dates, s he said. Its also difcult to go out with him because most places dont offer good, healthy food for toddlers. SUGARY DRINKS Consumption of car bonated soft drinks has been in decline in the U.S. since 2005, said John Sicher, editor and publisher of the news and data service Bev erage Digest. It has de creased from 10.2 bil lion cases a year to 9.2 billion. In 2004, the average American drank 52.4 gallons of carbonat ed soft drinks a year. In 2012, that was down to 43.8 gallons. Consump tion of bottled water has grown consistently over that period. Between 1999 and 2010, daily calories from soda consumed by 2to 5-year-olds decreased on average from 106 to 69, accord ing to the government. FAST FOOD McDonalds, Dunkin Donuts and other chains have changed their menus in recent years. They havent stopped serving Big Macs and french fries, but they are offering more foods to appeal to health-conscious diners, such as apple slices in Happy Meals, egg whites for breakfast sandwiches and wholegrain bread. GOVERNMENT BENEFITS Changes in the fed eral Women, Infants and Children program, which provides food vouchers for the poor, may also be encour aging healthier eating. The changes insti tuted in 2009 elimi nated juice from infant food packages, provid ed less saturated fat and made it easier to buy fruits and vegeta bles. BREAST-FEEDING Women are breast-feeding their ba bies longer, according to government gures. And some researchers believe breast-feeding helps children regulate their intake of food, thereby lowering their risk of obesity later on. Of infants born in 2010, 49 percent were breast-feeding at 6 months, up from 35 percent in 2000. The breast-feeding rate at 12 months increased from 16 percent to 27 percent during that time period. Judy Dodd, a Universi ty of Pittsburgh assistant professor in nutrition and dietetics, said gov ernment programs and other services have en couraged breast-feeding by providing free or lowcost breast pumps, ac cess to refrigeration and more ofces with pri vate, comfortable rooms where new moms can pump on the job. When a woman goes back to work, how does she continue to breastfeed? Thats the big gest challenge Im hear ing, and there have been improvements, Dodd said. GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com OBESITY FROM PAGE C2 KEITH SRAKOCIC / AP This photo shows a McDonalds Cheeseburger Happy Meal with the apple slices option in Pittsburgh. New food labels aim to make healthy shopping easy

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DEAR ABBY: Before my ex-husband and I were mar ried, I became pregnant with his baby. We decided together that we werent ready for the responsibility and made the mutual decision to end the pregnancy early in the rst trimester. We did marry even tually and had a baby girl a few years ago who is now in college. We divorced many years ago because of his many af fairs, including one with his best friends wife. I have come to believe that my ex told our daughter about our decision out of spite because I told her about the affairs when she was old enough to under stand since she may have a half-sister. Should I ask my daughter about this or let it go? It was a very private decision, and I think he is a creep for hurting her by telling her. FURIOUS IN ILLINOIS DEAR FURIOUS: Why do you think you ex spilled the beans to your daughter? Has she been behaving differently to ward you? Why do you think she may have a half-sister? Are you sure it isnt more than one or a brother or two? The fact that you terminat ed a pregnancy before your daughters birth has nothing to do with her. If you think there is something festering between you and your daugh ter, my advice is to clear the air before it gets worse. DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I have been togeth er since August 2012 and have lived together since last summer. He is perfect in ev ery way. He wakes me every morning with a smile and a kiss and pours me a cup of tea. He never goes anywhere without letting me know he thinks Im beautiful and tell ing me how much he loves me. He gets home before I do most nights, has a glass of wine and a hot bath waiting for me, and cooks dinner while Im in the tub. Hes amazing! The only problem is, I was with sooo many of the wrong men for years, I have forgotten how to spoil a man in return. I want him to know how much I appreciate and love him, but I dont know how. I just want him to know hes the one I want to sit on the porch with one day, watching our grandchildren play. I dont want to lose him because he thinks I dont appreciate all he does. Please help. KNOWS A GOOD THING IN NEW JERSEY DEAR KNOWS: When your boyfriend does something for you, thank him for it. Tell him you love him and give him af fection in abundance. Ex press how fortunate you feel to have him in your life. Look for things you can do that will make his life easier, and put forth an effort to reciprocate the many thoughtful things he does for you. Every man is different, but this would be a good start in getting your message across. DEAR ABBY: Is it too late for me to go back to school and get a degree and pursue a ca reer I would enjoy? Im 53, married and the mother of two children, 19 and 23. I didnt nish college, and I dont know what to do with my life. The only jobs I have ever had were as a retail salesperson. With one child just out of college, I am un sure if I could even afford to continue my education. Where would I go to nd answers about returning to school at my age, choosing a major and nding the mon ey to pay for it? Any advice would be appreciated. TOO OLD 4 NEW TRICKS? DEAR TOO OLD?: Contact the nearest university or col lege and ask if it offers ca reer counseling and aptitude testing to determine what you would need to complete your education and nd a ca reer youd be suited for. Many schools offer this service. As for it being too late to do this at 53 its never too late. People in their 90s have earned degrees and been en riched by it, and so can you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com The war of words continues long after divorce is over

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbnrf nttfb r f n t b f f r f r r f r n t b f f f t t r r f f r t b f f r t t t r r f n t b f f f f r f t t r r f t b t t t r r f r t rtt fff f r t r ff frf f r fff r rrrfrr rrf r f r ffr rrr f f rt t f frtt ft f r r f r f r f r r f n n r f r r f n f r f f r f f f r r f r f r f f r f r ttntt ff rf f f r f f rfff rrt ttntt rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 rfntb rfnntrbnrfr bnntnbt bffnn t r f t r n f t n b b nnrtnfn nfftrtnf tffn ffnfrntrnn nffnffttf tfftrftnnf ftftfnntntr ntnffnft nbffnn n b n f r f r b b nfb trrtn b n n f f n f n n n r t b b ftr fnbnnfftfr ftfnrntt n b b b r f n f n f n r f n f f t r n n b nfbt tf t r n n n n t n b b r r t b n n f r f n f f t r n n f r t f r f t f t n t n f r n n f b b b b tftf rtrnntrftn rftftffnft rntr t r f n n t n n n f b r r f f t b t f b n b n t n t r t f t n n n t t n b f f t b n f n t f nttnftnftf trrtn nfftntftr ftftf nrnttrrtnft rntrnfnrrft ntrnnftftn ftntrtnnntrt nftnfttnft nftftrtf f f n n f r n f t r t f n f t r f n n f f r n t r r r f n r f f f r f t f t r t r n f t n t n f n n r n n n n n n f t n b nntfftn f t t f n n n n b n n n f n n n t b t f f f t n r n f n n t r f r r n t t n n n f n t r f n r t f n n f t r t r t b f f t n t r t t f n t f n f r n f r f t t t n n f n n n n f n r n n t f r r n n f t n f r n t r f n r t n f t t r f f t n f t n f n f f t r f n f f t f n t n f t f n n n n f n r f f t n f f n f t n rf b nttfntft tnfnf tffff ftr nrftfnftntntfr fftrnnt tftntn trnf frtfn nntrntn rfftt nfn frftnbfrr ftnfrr rnftftr n n f f f t f f f n f r t n n t t f r n n ntffn bn b b b f t r f t f f t n n r f t f t n r f t f t r b n n t r b n f t n f f t n f t n f t f t r f t b r b b n t r n f f n f t n f f t b b b b n f n f t b t f t t n n f f t n f f n f b b b nnt b b f f t b n t n b t n f r n t f f b b f t r r n t f t n b f n t r n t n r f n f t n r f t f t t f f f f t r r n f f t f f t n t n f t f b b btnfnfnt rtfrftr tnffnr b b t f t f n n n f n n n f t t f n n f t t n t f b n b f r n n n f n f r n t n t t f t f t f t t f t n n n n n n f r n n f n f t f f f t f r n t f f n f n f r n n n t n n r f n f r n n f f f f t r f t f f t n r f t n n n t f t t n f f n n f n t t f n t t n r f r f t f f nr ntftnr n fnf b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b r nfb b t n n n n n nf n n b f t f ftffftfn ffn bnnfft nnftntnft frfnrn nftfttft frfnrnt nftrtnftnfn n r n nf b b tff nn trfnnrnn ntft frnnb bfnntr ntrnfr r n b b b b b b b b b bb bb b bb b nftf n trnt b b b b bb frttttntrffftftrft ntttttrntf nfrntrfnfrtrntfrnr fftttfrf ntnftrfftntr ntrntnfft trnnfttnr trntntrntftrtnr trntntrntftr ttttrntntr ttttntrntnnftnt fttftff nntnft nntft rfrf b b b b b b tttn b fnftntfrnnftntr nfrn ftrtfntftnftf ntb bnrrf bntrfbnn trnnrn ffnfttrntrf fftnfbbffb fftnftfnt frfnnfnrn ftrnnftf rntrrftbnft ntrntrnfbt rn bb btfrn b n nffnt bnfnt trnt b bntnt rrnrntntrft bffbnb bffbrffnbffftntr nbtfrnftn ntnftnfnftn rnttt rntt nn bffnfnftfntr nfnrnntrfnrrn fntrntrntrfn ntrnfnnrtrntb bfff ntrfrrn bb t fftrfr nftnfrftnrt f b bb b bbb b b b n n t f n r f n f f t r n t n r n f t f t r n f f n f t f r f t n t f r n t f f t n f t n f n t n t n b r f t n n f f n b r f t f n n f t f n n f r n t f f t f t r n f f t f n n f t f f n f r n f bbbb nbtfrn bb b rnfnf nntfrn b r n nf b b b b b b b b bnb ffft nntnftnfnftn rn tttrn ttn nbffnf nftf nfnrnntrfnrrnf ntrntrntrfnntr nfntttfn tttnfn tnftbttt nfftftfftntrn tttnfnffttr ntrnnftntnrtrnt ntttrnrnf nfrtttnfnnfnt ftnffnt bnfnttttnfft ftfftntrnttt nfnffttrntr nnftntnrtrnt ntttrnrnf nfrtttnfnnfntft b b b b b b b b bb b nftf b b trnt b b bntn b ntrtrft bnbbff brffnbffftntr btbf nftfntrb b nrtrntf fntrfrrnn b b nt rnbft rfrnftnfrftn rtf b b b b b b tnfftntftft nfntnt tnrnftrt fnnffftrnnn nrfrn bnfrb b f t f f f r r n t r f t f n f r t n r n t f f n t f f n f f f f n n t f n r f n f f t r n t n r n f t f t r n f f n f t f r f t n t f r n t f f t n f t n f n t n t n b r f t f n n n f t n n t f f t f t r n f f t f n r f t f n n f t f n f r n f n f f n f r n f n f r n n f fr nntfn nr ntnft t nff ftnrfnftfnntntr nfn r b ntfrnnftntrn frnft rtfntftbfn tnftfnrrf tnrn fffftfrnnf fnftffft bbntrffftnf bfbfft nftfntfrfnn fnrnftrnnft frntrrftnft nntfnrfnff trntnrnftftr nffnftfrftn tfrntfft nftnfntntn brftnnffnb rftfnnft fnnfrn tfft ftrnffrf tfnnftffnfr n ntrntrrn bb b r n nf b b b b b b b b bnb nftf n trnt b b b b b b nttrr btfrt nntnft ntft rfr b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b bb b nftf n trnt b b bntnt rrftnrnr ntrtrftbn bbffb rffnbffftntrbt frnbfnftf ntr ttt fnfr nrtrntffntr frrnn bb b nntrn ftrfr nftnfrftnrt f b b b b b b f t b b b b tnfftntftft nfntnt tnrnftrt fnnffrnnn nrfrn bnfrb b f t f f f r r n t r f t f n f r t n r n t f f n t f f n f f f f n n t f n r f n f f t r n t n r n f t f t r n f f n f t f r f t n t f r n t f f t n f t n f n t n t n b r f t f n n n f t n n t f f t f t r n f f t f n r f t f n n f t f n f r n f n f f n f r n f n f r n n f fr nntfn nr ntnft t nff f r b nftnfntntnb rftfnnnft nnt fftftrnf ftfnrftfnnft fnfrnf nffnfrn fnfrnnf fr nntfn nr ntnft t nff ftnrfnftfnntntr nfn r b nf

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Monday, March 3, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbnrf rrfnt bttt rt tt rb tntt nr ntt rnrn t n f n t t ttn nttt frt btt n r n r b t t rfrn ffnnttt br tt tb frfrtbt t t fnf nrbrn rnrt t nbt ntt tb btt ntttt ftt ftnnn rrtt r tt nfrnrt ttt nt rrntt f n r r r t f t t nt rt tt n t t t rfrnf rrbrntt ftn rntt r ftt tr nrntt nrrnn tt t rnn t rnntt t t rt nrt rrn nrntt nnrn tt nft n nnrtft rf rn n rn n ntb b nn rtt n f tfnn nntnttt tt n nt rnt t ttrt t t rnft tt ntr nrtt f nnn ntt nrt nrtnbt ffnbtnrntt rft tt r frt t nrtt ffnbt rnt n ffnfnn tt nfnntt rnnrtt fft t fr t r r n n t f t r r r r r n n b t n n t n fnrnfrtrn nrt t btr bf tftt nfrnt tt t t b rntt f t fnt tt rn rntt rnt fr bb nr rtt ffnrtrt ttt tt nt t t t t nrrnrf ntt nfr t rnt rntt rrftt n t nrfrntt nt t n n r t nnnt t nt bft r r nnt t t nt nftnr tfnnrnt tntt nttrt n nt rtnttt n bt nnt n nnfnrtt f n n r f n n r r r b r n n n n bbr ft ntt nrfnrn ntt rfnr ntbtt ntnb nrttn ntbt t rrnt tt nt t nnt t t nrt ftbt t ntt r n nrrtt n t t t ftn rfnnrrtnt tbt t t bt bbt b t b t b t t frrf nrntt tf nrt n rntt n rtbtt tnnt frt nnttt rnt tt nb t rft rft r rrrtt nt fn ttn rtt nr tt r n r n r n n n r f r r r n r n n n r n t tt r n nrntt t nffnr rtt f n b t t nnrbt ntt n b nrt n ft tttt n tt n t r rf btt bb t tt bttrr bbrtt r rnrnnrr tt bb r n n t r t rt nftfnrr rr rnntrn rrrnrnnf rrrrrt f f f n r t t n r n f f n r n r r n n n t n t n t n r r n r n t r n r n r f n t r r r n r r t b f n f t f n b f t f r r t b t t n r r f r r r t f r n b f n n n t f f f n n n r n n f f r n t f f n n n t r t n n n n n n t f n n t r r n r n f n r r n n t n f n t r n f n r r n f f t t t t r t f f r n r r n r t n r r t n n t r n nrrrrn rntnrnrn rfrtntr rnnt rfnrbn rbftft nfnnnrbfnr ntnrt n n n r n r n t n rf r rn frn nr t t f r r r f t n t r n nnrnnnr nnnt f f r n r n f r r r r n r t f f t t t n t nntbft nntnnnnt nrn t t bfrrrnn rn ntrfnr tt rrft rrtrn rnftbr rnnt r r n n r f r r n t r f n r t f

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, March 3, 2014 rfntb rfntnrbntbn bfn rfrf fbrfnf fr fr bnn brb bb rb nbnnnnbb rrf nf bnr brnfrr f b b r b n n ntbf brfn bntnb rn b n r b t bn fb bf rn nt nbn n r b fn n t nbnr b bnbfn b fnbn bnbntt nn n nrrf f nbbt b rbn r b b n r b bnr n nn tbt tn brb nbr nbbbn n f tn br bn f nbtf b bf b bbfbrbr rfnnf nffn nfnb bn f nfrfbrb r fbrrnn nbrf t fbbrf bbfb rnfn n nn frfbt tbr nb nn f t f tbt nft t nb nrnfbn b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb rtb fbbbn tbt nnf f nnntrf f bb fb n ff tf t b b b f t b b b r b b n f n r b b n b n n b t r n t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b tfbn nnn n f f nnff f t n t n b b r r r n r n n b ftt t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb b b t b b b n n t n trf fft f n n t n b n n t t f t brbb f r n fbfbnn bnnb n bn bnffbt tfrfnbbb fbn n n fnbn nn r bb frb f bfnfnf b f f b r n r f n n b t n n tbb bt b ft tnb nt ttn bnn bnnrbbn btf tn b b r t tf b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nff t tnnnrb f n b n f t f t nf tf r b b b b t t t b t b b b t nft tbf n n b b n n b n n n b b b r b b b n b n b f b n t t t t t f t t t t f t n b f n t t b nbb nbrb b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nft ttbf tbb bbbbtn n brf ftbn nfnfbrt n n b b bbrn nfnn tbrff t b t t b b n t rttr brfftn tbb nbn rbnt fntn rbfb n nf ttbf b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nf ttbf nnff ft n b nbf nbbnbn rb nbb tnrnb br b bb f nbr t rnnb f n nbn rbtf nbn b b bnn nrbn nnbn br f n f r n b fbbn nr fbbn nr fbbn nr nrnn nb rb tnn n brnbn nbr brnnbr n frfbt nbb bnn tbn nnbb nb frbfbft tn t b rb tf tnf tf b nbrf tbf bf n nfb br tft nbr brf f