Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties JASON COLLINS IS FIRST OPENLY GAY NBA PLAYER, SPORTS B1 LAKE APOPKA LOOP: Phase 2 of the trail set to open A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Kids with seizures use marijuana as treatment C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, February 24, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 55 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 78 / 62 Partly sunny with brief showers. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A new Lake Coun ty schools dis trict-wide an ti-bullying initiative has been instrumen tal in making it easier for students to report bullying, school of cials said. Implemented at the beginning of the 2013-14 school year, the initiative pro vides an anti-bullying curriculum for each school, which is man aged under the Safe Schools department. The initiative is comprehensive about educating about di versity and differenc es in students, said Bill Mathias, school board member. We have also made it eas ier for students to feel comfortable reporting it. Those students that feel threatened are coming forward. The initiative is unique in that admin istrators and ofcials know how to spot bul lying wherever it takes place in the school, said Pam Beeler, pro gram specialist for Safe Schools. School ofcials have reported 28 cases of bullying so far this school year. By com parison, eight fewer cases were reported in the 2012-13 school year. A number of high ly publicized anti-bul lying measures have been attempted in the school district in the last two years: Two students at Carv er Middle School have been trying for two years to establish a GayStraight Alliance club to prevent bullying. Stormy Rich, an 18-year-old Umatilla High School student, Lake County schools initiative addressing bullying district wide PHOTOS BY PETER BAUER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP ABOVE, BELOW: Singer Lizzie Sider relays her anti-bullying message through music, song and dance, with some help from her student band, at South Daytona Elementary School, in South Daytona, on February 3. LUCAS L. JOHNSON II Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. With possibly hundreds of thousands of rape kits untested across the country, a number of states are proposing legislation to address backlogs that in at least one case dates back nearly three decades. In Memphis, Tenn., alone, there are more than 12,000 untested rape kits going back to the 1980s, according to the New York-based Rape Kit Action Proj ect, which has been tracking the backlogs nationwide. In the en tire state of Texas, there KATHY GANNON Associated Press ISLAMABAD Afghan istans Taliban said Sun day they had suspended mediation with the Unit ed States to exchange cap tive Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for ve senior Taliban prison ers held at Guantanamo Bay, halting at least temporar ily what was considered the best chance yet of secur ing the 27-year-old soldiers freedom since his capture in 2009. In a terse Pashto language statement emailed to The Associated Press Taliban spokesman Zabi hullah Mujahid blamed the current complex political situation in the country for the suspension. A U.S. ofcial with knowl edge of the talks said the cause of the suspension was not the result of any issue between the United States and Taliban. He declined to elaborate and spoke on con dition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to journalists. Bergdahl, of Hailey, Ida ho, was last seen in a video released in December, foot age seen as proof of life de manded by the U.S. Berg dahl is believed to be held in the border regions between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Mujahid said the indirect talks with the U.S. had been mediated by Qatar, where the Taliban established a po litical ofce last June. The video of Bergdahl was part of the negotiations which were to lead to the eventual trans fer of the ve Taliban leaders Taliban says it suspends talks to exchange US soldier for Gitmo prisoners INTELCENTER / AP This Dec. 8, 2010 image shows a frame grab from a video released by the Taliban containing footage of a man believed to be Bowe Bergdahl, left. Bills seek to tackle backlog of untested rape kits ADRIAN SAINZ / AP Meaghan Ybos discusses Memphis backlog of untested rape kits on Thursday in Memphis, Tenn. Staff Report The Lake County Public Safety Depart ment and the Grove land Fire Department will sign an automat ic aid agreement this morning at Grovelands Fire Station 94 at 193 Cherry Valley Trail. County ofcials hope additional pacts with others cities will be signed. The Groveland agree ment states that the closest emergency unit, whether Lake County Fire or Groveland Fire, will respond to emer gency incidents within the Inter-local Service Boundary Agreement, GROVELAND Lake to sign mutual aid pact; envisions others SEE BULLYING | A2 SEE AID | A2 SEE BACKLOG | A2 SEE SOLDIER | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 24, 2014: This year your networking and interpersonal skills pay off in a way that you had not anticipated. You see the power of social media in your life as well. Maintain control over your nances, as the unexpected is like ly to happen when taking risks. Use care with emo tional and nancial mat ters. If you are single, you could meet someone whose company you thoroughly enjoy. Recognize what you need in a long-term relation ship. If you are attached, as a couple, you will man ifest a goal, but you might be taken aback by its im plications. CAPRICORN can be sly at times and wise at other times. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Encourage others to verbalize their thoughts. Be as direct as possible when dealing with an associate with whom you often get in volved. Steer clear of any nancial agreements for now. You might be uncomfortable with what is happening. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Decide to head in a new direction. Detach rst, so that you can gain a broader perspective of what is possible. Your long-term goals will take the lead right now; let them guide you in making important choices. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Deal with a loved one directly. You need to fol low through on what is im portant to you. A partner or close friend will ask for more feedback, so share your thoughts. At the same time, make sure that you are on the course you want to be on. CANCER (June 21July 22) You might feel as though someone is crossing the line. You know your lim its, but this person seems to have forgotten what they are. In your most car ing manner, do your best to communicate your bound aries; hopefully you will be heard. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) When are you focused, lit tle can disrupt you. Under stand your limits with a partner who might not be as enthusiastic as you are. Jump into what you want to do. Deal with surprising news rst. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Tap into your endless well of ingenuity when mak ing plans with someone who has a difcult person ality. Understand that the unexpected seems to sur round this person. Com munication could have an overserious tone. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might want to have a discussion, but a loved one always seems to change the topic or not be avail able. Could you be getting a hint that this person might not want to talk? Let go of the issue for now. Youll make an excellent impres sion on a boss. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are full of enthusi asm, but you tend to hold a lot back. A key person might think you are too seri ous. Make it a point to ver balize the extent of your imagination and express more of your innate pas sion. Think positively. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) A friend could push you to react or go along with his or her pres sure. Your response should be based on whether you are for or against the issue in question. The unexpect ed will occur with a child or a new friend be pre pared. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might feel as if you cant be stopped, no matter what you do. Share a vision with others, wheth er it involves your personal life or work. The unexpected could occur with close loved ones. Understand that you cant control anyone but yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might want to face a problem after revisiting former solutions. You could get an urge to be rebel lious and do the unexpect ed, yet your good sense will point to a different solution. Share your softer feelings with a child or loved one. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Youll beam in much more of what you want. Peo ple also seem more open and friendly. Use caution around a purchase or mon ey matter. Though you might think you know about the pros and cons of the situa tion, a fact could be hidden. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US FEB. 23 CASH 3 ............................................... 2-3-0 Afternoon .......................................... 4-6-0 PLAY 4 ............................................. 5-2-5-5 Afternoon ....................................... 3-0-0-7 FLORIDA LOTTERY FEB. 22 FANTASY 5 ........................... 5-18-22-25-33 FLORIDA LOTTO ................. 4-5-14-33-39-46 POWERBALL ........................ 2-3-13-14-544 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. intervened to stop bully ing of a girl with mental disabilities on a bus. As a result, she was kicked off the bus. In 2013, the Lake County School Board recognized Cypress Ele mentary students Kristo pher Ganesh, Jamie Mu noz and Marleen Ryan for starting Bully Block ers, an anti-bullying pro gram that includes Bud dy, a mailbox fashioned out of cardboard to look like a huge osprey, the schools mascot. Stu dents can use the mail box to deposit notes with concerns and questions related to bullying. Now, 15-year-old coun try singer Lizzie Sider is speaking on the issue lo cally, where is she is ad dressing more than 100 schools all over the state. On Wednesday, she is planning a presentation at Tavares Elementary School, and on Thursday she will give presenta tions at Seminole Springs Elementary in Eustis and Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. According to an arti cle in the Daytona Beach News-Journal Sider said the issue is important to her because I had ex perience with bullying when I was in elementa ry school. The News-Journal re ported that her father gave her advice when she was dreading going to school. Nobody has the pow er to ruin your day, he told her, according to the News-Journal School ofcials said the hardest issue to con front currently is cyber bullying found on social media sites and in other areas on the Internet. It is very difcult for the school district to track it, said Chris Pat ton, spokesman for the school district. Many times, it is occurring off campus and after school hours. Stuart Klatte, presi dent of the Lake County Education Association, agreed. That is a delicate bal ance, dealing with cyber bullying especially, he said. The schools have tried to take a stand and deal with it when they can. Bullying is a complex problem, and it is hard to gauge how big of an is sue it is in Lake County, Klatte said. A lot of it is going to be follow through from the administrators af ter the report has been made by either the stu dent or teacher who has knowledge of it, he said of tackling each case of bullying. Tod Howard, school board member, said be cause there are so many programs on bullying it is imperative to identify which ones are working and which ones are not. Instead of doing all the programs, we need to identify which ones are working and make sure they are being resourced properly, he said. BULLYING FROM PAGE A1 or ISBA area. This agreement is a win-win situation for our citizens, said Lake County Com missioner Jimmy Conner. Together, we can better protect lives and property and reduce insurance costs for residents in unincorporated Lake County, and with in participating cities. The county is also implementing an Au tomatic Vehicle Location or AVL system, which is similar to a GPS monitoring sys tem that will dispatch the closest unit to any emergency, whether county or city. We will share a centralized dispatch and the costs of responding to emergen cies in the Groveland area, said Lake County Public Safety Department Chief John Jolliff. This agreement will im prove response times and offer citizens an improved level of protection. The agreement with Groveland goes into effect on Saturday. Lake County is also working with other municipalities in the hopes of striking similar agreements throughout the county. This is truly a big deal for the citi zens of Lake County, said Commission er Welton Cadwell. I hope every city in Lake County that has a re department will sign onto this agreement. AID FROM PAGE A1 are about 16,000 untest ed kits collecting dust in police evidence rooms. Tennessee is among at least 17 states with pro posals that range from requiring law enforce ment agencies to inven tory their rape kits to an alyzing them in a certain amount of time. Three states Colorado, Illi nois and Texas have passed laws that man date a statewide account ing of untested rape kits. Most of the other states proposals favor the inventory measure that would require all law enforcement agen cies that store rape kits to count the number of untested kits. Rape Proj ect spokeswoman Nata sha Alexenko estimates there are about 400,000 nationwide that fall into that category. Until we enact this kind of legislation where were counting them, we really have no idea, said Alexenko, a rape victim whose rape kit was nally tested after nearly 10 years, and her attack er arrested after a match was found. Rape victim Mea ghan Ybos of Memphis has been crusading for legislation to address the backlogs for sever al years. The 27-yearold was 16 when she was sexually assaulted in her suburban home in 2003. She underwent a foren sic rape exam, but nev er heard anything else about her kit. In 2012, she was watch ing the local news and learned police had ar rested a suspected serial rapist in the same neigh borhood where she lived. I just knew it was the same person, recalled Ybos, who called police, told them about her as sault and persuaded them to reopen her case. Her rape kit was eventu ally examined and the suspects DNA and that in her kit matched. The suspect pleaded guilty in her case and is currently incarcerated. But Ybos, who is also supporting a proposal to lift Tennessees eightyear statute of limitation on rapes, said it shouldnt have taken her that long to get justice. They never tried to process it until I called ... and asked them, Ybos said of her rape kit. BACKLOG FROM PAGE A1 held since 2002 in Guan tanamo Bay. The leadership of the Islamic Emirate has de cided to suspend the process for some time due to the current com plex political situation in the country, the state ment read. The process will remain suspended without the exchange of the prisoners until our decision to resume. Mujahed did not elab orate on what political situation in Afghanistan led to the suspension of talks or say when they might resume. Afghan istan is in the middle of a presidential campaign ahead of an April 5 elec tion. Two-term Presi dent Hamid Karzai can not run again for ofce under the Afghan consti tution. The U.S. State Depart ment has refused to ac knowledge the negotia tions, but the U.S. ofcial previously told the AP that indirect talks were underway. In response to the Tal iban statement Sunday, U.S. Embassy spokes man in Afghanistan Rob ert Hilton said: Sgt. Bergdahl has been gone far too long, however we cant discuss the efforts were taking to obtain his return. Col. Tim Marsano, spokesman for the Idaho National Guard, said he spoke Sunday with Berg dahls family and said they declined to com ment further. The family has no more words, Marsano said. Efforts at a swap are also seen as a conces sion to Karzai. Wash ington would like to see him back away from his refusal to sign a securi ty pact that is necessary for the U.S. to leave a re sidual force behind in Afghanistan. Karzai says he wants Washington to push reconciliation be tween the Afghan gov ernment and the Taliban forward, without offer ing specics. The ve Taliban de tainees at the heart of the proposal are the most se nior Afghans still held at the prison at the U.S. base in Cuba. Each has been held since 2002. They include Moham mad Fazl, Abdul Haq Wasiq, Mullah Norul lah Nori, Khairullah Khairkhwa and Moham med Nabi. SOLDIER FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LADY LAKE Waste Division to hold collection event The Lake County Solid Waste Division will host a Household Hazardous Waste Collection event, from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday at the Lady Lake Convenience Center, 1200 Jackson St. Representatives will be on hand to collect small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products such as lawn and garden, photo and swim ming pool chemicals, paint and re lated products, cleaning solutions, motor oil and used gas, batteries, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks. Excessive amounts of hazard ous materials will not be accepted due to limited space in the mobile unit. To schedule a drop-off day, call 352-343-3776. For information, go to www.lake county.gov/hazardouswaste or call 352-343-3776. WILDWOOD Young artists sought for showcase The Young Performing Artists or ganization is seeking young danc ers, vocalists and instrumentalists for the upcoming showcase, March 22 at Wildwood Country Resort, where competitors can win valuable scholarship awards. Interested young people can get an application to audition by calling 352-748-2008, at www.youngper formingartists.org or by emailing to youngartists@aol.com. Applications must be turned in by Feb. 24. EUSTIS GeorgeFest 2014 is slated for this weekend The 112th celebration of George Washingtons birthday will be in full swing at the annual GeorgeFest event, at 5 p.m. Feb. 28, and from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. March 1 in downtown Eustis at Ferran Park, 1520 S. Bay St. Events include music and re works, Dog Jog, parade and vendors. The festival is free, however, tick ets for the on-site carnival require payment. On Sunday a patriotic service will be held in Ferran Park. For information, call the Chamber at 352-357-3434 or email Info@ EustisChamber.org. For a listing of the full schedule of events, go to www.eustischamber.org. TAVARES Extension to host Spring Vegetable Gardening class The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting a Spring Vegetable Gardening class at 10 a.m. on March 1 at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. The hour-long class is part of the Saturday in the Garden speaker se ries and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticulture agent. Online registration is available at / www.eventbrite.com. Class fee is $5 for adults and free for those under the age of 16. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report The last phase of con struction on the U.S. Highway 441 widening project in Fruitland Park is about to get under way. The Florida Depart ment of Transportation (FDOT) and contrac tor D.A.B. Constructors Inc. are days away from switching southbound US 441 trafc onto a newly paved southbound road, according to a press re lease. Both northbound and southbound traf c have been sharing the northbound section of US 441. The trafc switch, which is necessary to facilitate the approximate 12-week construction time of the median, is proposed to take place sometime be tween late February and early March. Immediately following the trafc switch, a oneto two-day lane closure and lane shift will be im plemented on the north bound side of US 441 at Spring Lake Road. The purpose is to allow the contractor to repair a loss of pressure in the 16-inch water main. The contractor is sched uling this temporary pat tern change on a week day between the hours of 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mes sage boards and other trafc alerts will be post ed along the roadway, as well as added to the Lane Closures tab on www.c roads.com. Once the water main repair and median con struction are complet ed, the entire project will be capped with the nal friction course of asphalt. Provided there are no ma jor weather events or oth er unpredictable delays, FDOT is estimating a June end time for the project. For additional informa tion, call Irina Lallemand, public involvement coor dinator, at 352-427-4054 or email irina.lallemand@ dot.state..us. FRUITLAND PARK Last U.S. 441 widening phase set to begin THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Car windows were tar geted and shot out with BB or pellet guns in the area of Sailsh Lane in Fruitland Park over the weekend, and Lake Coun ty Sherriffs Ofce ofcials said there have been a to tal of 65 incidents of van dalized vehicles through out the county. Sgt. Jim Vachon, spokesman for LCSO, said a newspaper deliv ery person made the 911 call after he reported see ing several car windows smashed out in the area shortly before 4 a.m. Sat urday. As deputies investigat ed the crimes, Vachon said vandalism also was documented in other ju risdictions in Lake Coun ty, including Leesburg, Eustis and Umatilla. Carl Underwood told WESH 2 News that his neighbors were upset by the vandalism spree. At least 12 cars were vandal ized up and down Sailsh Lane, and Underwood said he had two cars van dalized, each parked in a different location. I want them to per sonally take care of ev erybodys window nan cial responsibility, rst and foremost, and then if there is any kind of pro bation or whatever, stick it to them. They need to pay, Underwood said to WESH about the perpe trators of the crime. Vachon said investiga tors have no suspects. Investigators are asking anyone with information regarding these incidents to contact the Lake Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce at 353343-2101 or CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS. FRUITLAND PARK 65 incidents of vandalized vehicles reported in Lake County PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE One of the vandalized vehicles discovered in Fruitland Park over the weekend. Staff Report F lanked by mem bers of The Mount Dora Roadrun ners Club, Lake County Commission er Leslie Campione on Thursday helped open Phase 2 of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail. As a Lake County commissioner, and a proponent of protect ing our areas natural resources for both ec otourism and quali ty of life for residents, I am proud to be here today at the ofcial opening of the ex tension of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, Campione said in a press release. The ribbon cutting opened 6.3 miles of trail in the St. Johns River Water Manage ment Districts (SJR WMD) scenic Lake Apopka North Shore Restoration Area. The area is a haven for hundreds of species of wildlife and is consid ered a premier bird ing destination, said Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public infor mation ofcer. Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Orange County Com missioner Frederick C. Brummer, Orange County Parks Man ager Matt Suedmey er, Mount Dora Mayor Cathy Hoechst, Apop ka Vice Mayor Bill Ar rowsmith and Robert Christianson, director of SJRWMDs Division of Strategic Planning and Financial Ser vices, all spoke at the event. By summer, Lake County plans to nish a trailhead and dra matic overlook along the north shore of Lake Apopka. When completed, the trails will eventually link up to the South Lake Trail and the West Or ange Trail. We are happy to do our part in expanding APOPKA Lake Apopka Loop trail section opens SUBMITTED PHOTO Lake County Commissioner Leslie Campione, second from right, was among the dignitaries who cut the ribbon on Phase 2 of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail. SEE LOOP | A4 STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily Commercial Fruitland Park commission ers held a rare Saturday morning workshop session to discuss the citys needs as its population dou bles over the next three years. Mayor Chris Bell set the tone for the 9 a.m. session: Weve made suggestions that (The Villages pro posed development) will benet our residents, Bell said. I think we should be able to show them the benets. Bell urged commissioners to fo cus on the big picture. What Im looking at is something at 30,000 feet, not 500 feet, Bell said ref erencing a scale used in aerial photography. Fruitland Park brainstorms fiveyear growth plan SEE GROWTH | A4 Staff Report The Florida Department of Health in Lake County is seeking nominations for the 2014 Hidden Heroes of Public Health awards. The awards recognize an indi vidual and an organization out side of the Health Department that worked to improve the health and well-being of Lake Coun ty residents during 2013 and are part of the departments efforts to bring attention to National Public Health Week, April 7-13. Public health encompasses more than just the county health TAVARES Nominees sought for health heroes SEE HEROES | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 59 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb the trail, and look forward to the day when the entire Lake Apopka Loop Trail is complete, Campione said. Following the ceremony, she toured the res toration areas uplands, where the wildlife shifts from alligators to deer and turkey, Pappacoda said. This area in Lake County is one of the only shaded parts surrounding Lake Apopka. For more than 15 years, The Friends of Lake Apopka has worked with local governments and the SJRWMD on ecotourism in the area, including construction of the loop trail, which began two years ago. Phase 1 of the trail, a four-mile stretch beginning at Magnolia Park, opened in June. This trail will provide our residents and ec otourism visitors with another wonderful op tion to enjoy Central Floridas gorgeous scen ery and outdoors, Jacobs said. LOOP FROM PAGE A3 City Manager Gary La Vinia said commission ers should brainstorm. Talk about what the commission would like to see your vi sion over the next ve years, La Vinia said. That vision includes the proposed Villages of Fruitland Park, with more than 2,000 homes valued at more than $1 billion, according to projections by The Vil lages, and about 4,000 new city residents all of whom could arrive next year. Commissioners will review the rst round of The Villages de velopment plans at their meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday. The project is expected to generate $1 million to $1.4 mil lion in what a former city ofcial called dis posable revenues. The Villages is on the way, but The Villag es is what it is, La Vin ia told commissioners. The real impact is de velopment outside The Villages, he said. Community Devel opment Director Char lie Rector agreed. Forget The Villages, Rector said. Theyll take care of themselves. The thing we need to focus on is everything else, he said. Last month Rec tor told commission ers that more than 500 new homes planned and approved in Fruit land Park could start development soon. The homes, in proj ects that went dormant when real estate values plummeted ve years ago, are back on the drawing boards. I spend hours on the phone every day now with property owners and developers who want to talk over their options, Rector said. Its like a horse race. Theyre all lining up at the gate and were wait ing to see whos the rst off the line, and ev ery new conversation starts with The Villag es, Rector said. After a two-hour dis cussion, commission ers agreed that im provements to the citys wastewater facili ties, street paving and a new Public Works facil ity should get the citys rst attention, then public amenities, in cluding a community center complex, expan sion of the recreation department and a new swimming pool north of Miller Blvd. (County Road 466A). Bell added a histori cal museum, space for a Chamber of Commerce and a visitors center, all of which could be housed in buildings the city already owns. Commissioners also agreed to look at new design standards for future projects that will focus on enhance ments embellish ments to improve the appearance and func tion of upcoming proj ects without restricting developers and build ers to specic architec tural themes. GROWTH FROM PAGE A3 department, Paul Butler, interim pub lic information ofcer, said in a press release. This person, orga nization or business embodies the follow ing criteria: Public health ef forts make a signi cant difference in the lives of the people served by monitoring health status to iden tify and solve commu nity health problems. Public health ef forts build on individ ual and community strengths and assets by informing, educating and empowering peo ple about health issues. Public health ef forts mobilize individ uals and community groups to identify and solve health problems and work in collabo ration/cooperation to promote public health. Public health ef forts are unique, inno vative or ll an identi ed gap in a specic community, i.e., child obesity, physical ac tivity, etc. Nominees contri butions must have oc curred in 2013 in Lake County. To nominate an individual or or ganization, a com pleted nomination form must be submit ted to the Health De partment by 5 p.m. on March 21. Nomination forms are available at the Florida Department of Health in Lake Coun ty Administration Of ce, 16140 U.S. High way 441, in Eustis, or at www.lakechd.com. For information, call 352-589-6424, ex tension 2265. HEROES FROM PAGE A3 OBITUARIES Owen N. Hietpas Owen N. Hietpas, Leesburg, FL, age 88, died at home Friday, February 21, 2014, with his family at his side. Owen was born May 9, 1925 in the Town of Van denBroek, Wiscon sin; son of the late William P. and Mar garet (Verhagen) Hi etpas. Owen married Irene N. Weyenberg August 21, 1946 at St. John Catholic Church, Little Chute, WI. He moved to Florida in 1973 and shortly there after began develop ing Corley Island Mo bile Home Park with his brother-in-law Jer ry Hietpas. Owen and Irene were very active in the St. Paul Catho lic Community and in 2001 they received the Father Phillip J. Stege man Memorial Volun teer Award. They spent many years traveling in their motorhome throughout the Unit ed States and Cana da. They were proud to say they visited all fty states as well as many foreign countries. Owen enjoyed bowl ing, shing, and nev er missed a Wednesday night poker game at the clubhouse. He will al ways be remembered for his big smile and his eagerness for help ing family, friends, and neighbors. Owen is sur vived by his wife Irene, a son, Ronald (Donna) Hietpas, Waukesha, WI; a daughter, Charlotte (Gene) Sullivan, Winter Park, FL; grandchildren David (Jodie) Hietpas, Jeremy (Claudine) Hi etpas, Katie (Antho ny) Sullivan Bellia; great-grandchildren Mackenzie and Owen Hietpas, Benjamin and Irene Hietpas, and Ab igail Bellia; a brother Mark (Gladys) Hietpas, sisters-in-law Sister Catherine Weyenberg and Shirley Weyenberg, brother-in-law Bill (Sandra) Mattern. He is further survived by many nieces and neph ews. Owen was pre ceded in death by his son Randy, brothers and sisters-in-law Art (Irene), Paul (Ethel), Bill (Yvonne) and Den nis; sisters and broth ers-in-law Patricia (Henry) Tatro, Bernice (Ted) Larson, Shirley Mattern, Betty (Casey) Vander Sanden, Marga ret, sister-in-law Ruth Hietpas and mem bers of Irenes family: father and mother in law George and Hattie Weyenberg, Betty (Pe ter) Schumacher, Mary (Woodrow) Diedrick, Lester (Elaine) Wey enberg, Julia (Gerald) Hietpas and Clarence Weyenberg. The family would like to thank ev eryone for their kind ness and support. A special thank you to Cornerstone Hospice, Owens caregivers, and nephews Russ and Steve Hietpas and niece Gina Stalvey for all they did to help. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Thursday, Febru ary 27, 2014, 8:30AM, at St. Pauls Catholic Church in Leesburg, Florida with Father John Giel, Celebrant. Inurnment will be in St. Johns Cemetery in Little Chute, Wiscon sin. In lieu of owers, memorial contribu tions may be made to Cornerstone Hospice Foundation, 2445 Lane Park Road, Tavares, FL 32778. Yvonne E. Parham Rice Mrs. Yvonne Eliz abeth Parham Rice, 90, of Umatilla passed away Friday, February 21, 2014. She was born at Ozone, Tennessee on October 2, 1923. A graduate of Cum berland Coun ty High School and teach er preparation at Car son-Newman College, she taught at Cumber land Homesteads Ele mentary for two years before moving to Lake County, Florida. In 1944, Yvonne married Augustus M. Rice. In 1949 they moved to the Umatilla area where she has lived since. She earned her BAE de gree at the Universi ty of Florida in 1965, and taught at Umatil la Elementary for 25 years. Since her retire ment in1990 she has been active in nature and conservation orga nizations, Lake Coun ty Conservation Coun cil, Audubon, The PEAR Association, Trout Lake Nature Center, the Beautyberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Florida Wildlife Federation, Defend ers of the Environment and the Nature Conser vancy. A member of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, she has served as pres ident of Rho Chapter, Director of District IV, president of Mu State (Florida), as Mu State parliamentarian for 10 years and as a mem ber of 3 internation al committees. While teaching she served as president of the Lake County Education As sociation, chairman of the Lake Association of Media Specialists and president of the Lake County Reading Asso ciation. Yvonnes hob bies included conchol ogy, edible wild plants, birding and native plant identication. She gave many work shops and programs on all the above. She is survived by loving niec es and nephews in Ten nessee. There will be no local services. Her ashes will be interred at the Ozone Ceme tery, Ozone, Tennes see. Those wishing to do so may send me morial contributions to the Trout Lake Nature Center, Inc. Endow ment Fund, P. O. Box 641, Eustis, FL 327270641. Online condo lences may be made at www.beyersfuneral home.com. Beyers Fu neral Home, Umatilla. DEATH NOTICES Richard Buck Barnes Richard Buck Barnes, of Paisley, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Barbara Ann Coffelt Barbara Ann Cof felt, 71, of Talking Rock, Georgia, died Friday, February 21, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwoodl Johnnie B. Finzelber Johnnie B. Finzel ber, 86, of Eustis, died Saturday, February 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. IN MEMORY HIETPAS RICE KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press MIAMI Roughly 1 million uninsured Flo ridians who repeatedly heard affordable health insurance was just around the corner for them thanks to Presi dent Barack Obamas new law are nding a harsh reality theyre too poor to qualify. The Florida House voted last year not to expand Medicaid un der the Affordable Care Act because of fears that it could eventual ly cost the state hun dreds of millions an nually, meaning those earning below the pov erty line, $11,490 for an individual or $23,550 for a family of four, ar ent eligible for tax credits through the on line marketplace. Without those tax credits, most people living below the pov erty line cant afford coverage. In Florida, generally only chil dren, pregnant wom en, the disabled and single parents or care takers of underage children are eligible for Medicaid, the gov ernments free health plan for the poor. Its the hardest thing to explain to a consum er that theyre falling in this gap, said Juani ta Mainster, a Miami counselor who helps consumers sign up for health insurance. She and other coun selors estimate only 30 percent of applicants at their Miami ofce end up signing up for a health plan because they cant afford it. Christina Coello, a 27-year-old full-time law student with a pre-existing medical condition, hasnt had insurance for seven years. So when I heard about Obamacare, I thought this is a really good thing for people that have pre-existing conditions. But when Coel la tried to enroll, she learned she was about $2,500 shy of quali fying for a tax credit, making the premiums impossible to af ford on her part-time paralegal salary. Yet, her meager salary is still a bit too much to qualify for Medicaid. Its very frustrating because (the Florida House) doesnt want to cover people who are supposedly lazy. Its not only lazy peo ple who need insur ance. A lot of students fall into that catego ry, said Coello, who has a 7-year-old son. Health advocates are doing what they can so consumers dont leave appointments feel ing hopeless. Florida CHAIN and navigator groups like the Epilep sy Foundation of Flor ida, which received a federal grant to sign people up for health coverage, are referring consumers to local health departments and community health centers that treat pa tients on a sliding scale and offer discounted drug programs. Theyll keep say ing, Im poor. I should qualify for something. And theyre right they should but the fact is this is a state that chose not to expand Medicaid, said coun selor Adrian Madriz. Poor Floridians fall into Medical expansion gap

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY Flashback HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I have this recurring dream where have you stopped reading yet? If youre a guy, I bet you have. If youre a woman, I bet youre saying, Oh, please, just wait un til you hear my recurring dream! Ive had it since I was 6. It only happens if Im stressed plus Ive eaten cilantro. Fresh cilan tro. The dried stuff doesnt do anything and its never really as good; I dont care what they say. But tell me about yours rst be cause my dream takes a long time. If there are any men still left in the room, by this point theyre tying ropes to lighting xtures because theyre planning to hang themselves. Theyre think ing that death might well be quicker and probably signi cantly more pleasant than wait ing for these two to stop talking about what happened when they were asleep. Havent you found men to be less than fascinated by the de tailed recollections of the un conscious and haphazard expe riences that constitute dreams? For a few years, I had a male shrink. Even he didnt want to hear my dreams. And when recurring dreams happen over, say, 10, 20 or even 30 years of marriage and are rit ually recited over breakfast as if they were somehow break ing news, Ive known men to get downright irritated and take their coffee to another room. (Thats where he is now: the other room. I told my husband what I was writing about and he decided to go to an entirely dif ferent section of the house. Its not as if I was reading out loud or sounding out my words. I wasnt asking him how to spell labyrinth or polyp al though both appear regularly in the dream, in case youre inter ested.) Men dont want to hear about dreams. When somebody says, I was playing Barbies with Mad eleine Albright and we were ei ther in a circus or a brothel when suddenly I started to cut my hair with manicure scissors and Albright says, Shouldnt a priest read you your rights be fore he hears your confession? which is what she always says in the dream but this time I an swered, These are not my walls, but my paintings are on them, the natural question is, What do you think it means? And a lot of men dont like to analyze things. Ive rarely encountered that problem with women: We crave the kind of weird details dreams deliver. We want to hear when old boyfriends and dead rela tives show up; we want to deci pher possible prognostications and omens. Maybe this reects my Sicil ian and French-Canadian back ground maybe WASPs hav ent done this kind of thing since Hawthorne was writing but my aunts used to gather over morning coffee and talk over their nocturnal visions the way Wall Street nanciers talk about the market forecasts. In part, they also did it for the same reason: They would play any combination of num bers that appeared in some bodys dream. Aunt Rose would start, Last night, I was back at 3072 Emmons Avenue and before she could get in another word, Aunt Clara would yell, Im playing those numbers! Theyre mine! Since most of the family lived in walk-up tenements, I dont think dreams turned out to be as reliable an economic indica tor as either, say, the Dow Jones or the price of copper futures (which the aunts measured by use of the penny jar), but that didnt undermine the serious ness or regularity of the daily re view. It also didnt prevent them from regarding any information they received from the other side as entirely reliable. Somebody dreamt a toddler died in a car accident? That poor kid didnt leave the house for a month. The fact that he didnt die was then used as proof proof you could not dispute that the dream saved his life. I used to think that was hi larious. Now, if I have a dream about falling down the stairs, I hold onto banisters. Perhaps the dreams that come to us even while were on this mortal coil should at least occa sionally give us pause if only just long enough to write down the numbers. (Look whos come back into the room. Hi, honey! Columns done!) Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a femi nist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Cou rant. She can be reached through her website at www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Women unravel dreams to mens dismay The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. T he United States has the right and a duty to try to tamp down political vi olence in Ukraine, which continued early Thursday despite the announcement of a truce between the government and op position leaders. It was appropriate for Vice President Joe Biden to telephone President Viktor Yanukovich earlier this week to coun sel restraint, and for the State Department to announce that some Ukrainian leaders involved in repressing protesters wont be allowed to travel to the United States. But even as it seeks to inuence events in Ukraine, the Obama administration needs to avoid the impression that it is making that country a front in a new Cold War. Pres ident Obama is aware of the delicacy of the situation. On Wednesday, he said he didnt view Ukraine as part of some Cold War chessboard in which were in competition with Russia. Wisely, the administration is allowing European nations to take the lead in mediation efforts, which gained new im portance with this weeks shocking violence in Kiev, some of it perpetrated by opponents of the government. As many as 100 people may have been killed Thursday. One can argue that it is Russian Presi dent Vladimir Putin who has insisted on re enacting the Cold War by offering econom ic incentives to Yanukovich as a way to keep Ukraine, once a Soviet republic, in Russias sphere of inuence. Although the immedi ate cause of the convulsions in Ukraine is the repression of peaceful protest, the crisis is rooted in the governments failure to con clude an association agreement with the European Union that would have included the creation of a free-trade zone and coop eration in law enforcement. Many Ukraini ans who voted for Yanukovich in 2010 feel that he has betrayed their trust and under mined Ukraines sovereignty. The political divide in Ukraine has deep his torical roots and cant be wholly blamed on Putins interference. Many Ukrainians, most ly in the eastern part of the country, feel an afnity for Russia, while others long for in tegration with Western Europe. Ultimately, Ukrainians will have to resolve their political identity crisis themselves, but other nations, including the U.S., can play a constructive role in defusing the current conict and hold ing the Ukrainian government to internation al standards of civil conduct. That requires di plomacy that is deft as well as determined. From the Los Angeles Times. A VOICE Ukraine must not become a front in a new Cold War Havent you found men to be less than fascinated by the detailed recollections of the unconscious and haphazard experiences that constitute dreams? For a few years, I had a male shrink. Even he didnt want to hear my dreams. And when recurring dreams happen over, say, 10, 20 or even 30 years of marriage and are ritually recited over breakfast as if they were somehow breaking news, Ive known men to get downright irritated and take their coffee to another room.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com SOCHI: Canada tops Sweden for hockey gold / B3 PETR DAVID JOSEK / AP The Olympic Rings are silhouetted during closing ceremonies on Sunday. in Sochi, Russia. Minnesota Timberwolves center Jason Collins, left, defends San Antonio Spurs center Kurt Thomas in a 2009 game in San Antonio. Collins has signed with the Brooklyn Nets to become the rst gay active player in NBA history. AP FILE PHOTO BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer Jason Collins became the NBAs rst active openly gay player Sunday, signing a 10-day contract with the Brooklyn Nets. Collins will join the Nets for their game Sunday night in Los Angeles against the Lakers. The 35-year-old center revealed at the end of last season he is gay, but he was a free agent and had remained unsigned. With a need for anoth er big man, the Nets turned to the 7-foot Collins, who helped them reach two NBA Finals in the early 2000s. The decision to sign Ja son was a basketball deci sion, general manager Bil ly King said in a statement. We needed to increase our depth inside, and with his experience and size, we felt he was the right choice for a 10-day contract. Collins has played 12 NBA seasons, including his rst seven with the Nets, when they were in New Jersey and Jason Kidd was their point guard. Kidd is now the Nets coach and Collins has been a teammate of several other Collins is first openly gay player in NBA SEE NBA | B2 KEITH SRAKOCIC / AP Florida States Aaron Thomas, bottom, loses the ball as Pittsburghs Michael Young, top, defends during the rst half on Sunday in Pittsburgh. JOHN LEICESTER AP Sports Writer SOCHI, Russia Flushed with pride after a spectacular showing at the costliest Olym pics ever, Russia celebrated 17 days of sport-driven glob al unity on Sunday night with a farewell show that hands off the Winter Games to their next host, Pyeongchang in South Ko rea. Said the head of the Inter national Olympic Committee: Russia delivered all what it had promised. Raucous spectators chanted Ro-ssi-ya! Ro-ssi-ya! Rus sia! Russia! before being sur rounded by multicolored re works and carried through a visually stunning, sometimes surrealistic panorama of Rus sian history and culture. The crowd was in a party mood after the high-security games passed off safely without feared terror attacks. This is the new face of Rus sia our Russia, said Dmitry Chernyshenko, head of the So chi organizing committee. He called the games a moment to cherish and pass on to the next generations. In a charming touch, the So chi organizers used the cere mony to make a joke at their own expense. Dancers in shim mering silver costumes formed themselves into four rings and a clump in the center of the stadi um. That was a wink to a tech nical glitch in the Feb. 7 open ing ceremony, when one of the ve Olympic rings in a wintry opening scene failed to open. The rings were supposed to join together and erupt in reworks. This time, it worked: As Rus sian President Vladimir Putin watched from the stands, the dancers in the clump waited a few seconds and then formed a ring of their own, making ve, drawing laughs from the crowd. The closing ceremony, a fare well from Russia with love, pag eantry and protocol, started at 20:14 local time a nod to the year that Putin seized upon to remake Russias image with the Olympics power to wow and concentrate global attention and massive resources. Now we can see our country is very friendly, said Boris Kozikov of St. Petersburg, Russia. This is very important for other coun tries around the world to see. The nations $51 billion invest ment topping even Beijings estimated $40 billion layout Associated Pres PITTSBURGH, Pa. Okaro White scored 22 points and Florida State played stiing defense to beat Pitts burgh 71-66 on Sun day. Ian Miller added 19 points and Aar on Thomas 14 for the Seminoles (16-11, 7-8 Atlantic Coast Con ference), who have won two of their past three. Lamar Patterson led Pitt (20-7, 8-6) with 22 points. The Pan thers have lost three in a row and ve of their past seven. They are in danger of fall ing out of contention for the NCAA tourna ment after winning 15 of 16 games to start the season. Florida State led 37-31 at halftime. Af ter making 13 of 24 DAVE CAMPBELL AP Pro Football Writer INDIANAPOLIS The NFL locker room has long been an unforgiving place. Theres a reason the popular behind-thescenes training camp reality show on HBO is called Hard Knocks, right? The aggression and condence inherent with elite athletes play ing a physically punishing sport can bring about a boys-will-beboys atmosphere that, consider ing the case in Miami last season, has the potential to turn brutal. But with Michael Sam on the verge of becoming the leagues rst openly gay player, maybe hell t in just ne. This is 2014, after all. Sexual orientation isnt as big of a deal for Sams generation as it was for their fathers. Though the stigma of the offensive linemen bullying scandal was still swarming the Dol phins, there were signs at the NFL scouting Will Michael Sam fit in with NFL locker room? SAM Track personnel attempt to dry the track during the NASCAR Daytona 500 auto race on Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. PHELAN M. EBENHACK / AP DAN GELSTON Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH Daytona could use a dome. From rain, potholes, soap and re, the Daytona 500 has had all sorts of delays the last ve years. The latest one came Sunday, with rain shutting down the sea son opener at Daytona Interna tional Speedway for 6 hours, 22 minutes. The race resumed under the lights with 162 laps left in the 200-lap race. It needed to hit 100 laps (halfway) to become ofcial. If not, and rain resumes, then the second Monday race in three years remains in play. The Great American Race has become more known for its laps es than laps or leaders. Farewell, Sochi! Russia closes costliest Olympic Winter Games DMITRY LOVETSKY / AP Sochi 2014 mascots, a polar bear, a hare and a leopard, approach a ame, representing the burning Olympic cauldron, during the closing ceremony. SEE SAM | B2 SEE GAMES | B2 FSU defense keys 71-66 win over Pitt SEE FSU | B2 Daytona 500 delays now common in NASCARs opener SEE NASCAR | B2 The Daytona 500 was not completed by press time. See dailycommercial.com for full details.

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 31 25 .554 Brooklyn 25 28 .472 4 New York 21 35 .375 10 Boston 19 38 .333 12 Philadelphia 15 41 .268 16 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 40 14 .741 Washington 28 28 .500 13 Charlotte 27 30 .474 14 Atlanta 26 29 .473 14 Orlando 17 41 .293 25 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 42 13 .764 Chicago 29 26 .527 13 Detroit 23 33 .411 19 Cleveland 22 35 .386 21 Milwaukee 10 45 .182 32 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 40 16 .714 Houston 37 18 .673 2 Dallas 34 23 .596 6 Memphis 31 24 .564 8 New Orleans 23 32 .418 16 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 14 .754 Portland 37 18 .673 5 Minnesota 27 28 .491 15 Denver 25 29 .463 16 Utah 19 36 .345 23 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 38 20 .655 Phoenix 33 21 .611 3 Golden State 34 22 .607 3 L.A. Lakers 19 36 .345 17 Sacramento 19 36 .345 17 Saturdays Games Washington 94, New Orleans 93 Charlotte 92, Memphis 89 Dallas 113, Detroit 102 Atlanta 107, New York 98 Indiana 110, Milwaukee 100 Minnesota 121, Utah 104 Sacramento 105, Boston 98 Golden State 93, Brooklyn 86 Sundays Games L.A. Clippers 125, Oklahoma City 117 Miami 93, Chicago 79 Washington 96, Cleveland 83 Toronto 105, Orlando 90 Sacramento at Denver, late Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers, late Minnesota at Portland, late Houston at Phoenix, late. Mondays Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Golden State at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at New York, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Boston at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Portland at Denver, 9 p.m. Houston at Sacramento, 10 p.m. WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship Results Sunday At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club Marana, Ariz. Purse: $9 million Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72 (Seedings in parentheses) Championship Jason Day (8), Australia, def. Victor Dubuisson (27), France, 23 holes. Consolation Match Rickie Fowler (53), United States, def. Ernie Els (31), South Africa, 19 holes. Seminals Jason Day (8), Australia, def. Rickie Fowler (53), United States, 3 and 2. Victor Dubuisson (27), France, def. Ernie Els (31), South Africa, 1 up. Honda LPGA Thailand Scores Sunday At Siam Country Club (Pattaya Old Course) Chonburi, Thailand Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,568; Par: 72 a-amateur Final Anna Nordqvist, $225,000 66-72-67-68 273 Inbee Park, $139,933 71-71-67-66 275 Catriona Matthew, $101,512 76-71-65-65 277 Michelle Wie, $78,527 67-73-69-69 278 Stacy Lewis, $46,044 71-69-73-66 279 Gerina Piller, $46,044 70-73-70-66 279 Lexi Thompson, $46,044 68-74-69-68 279 Yani Tseng, $46,044 72-73-66-68 279 Julieta Granada, $46,044 71-68-71-69 279 Suzann Pettersen, $31,028 69-73-72-66 280 Azahara Munoz, $27,771 71-68-74-68 281 So Yeon Ryu, $27,771 69-72-71-69 281 Jenny Shin, $25,128 72-70-70-70 282 Thidapa Suwannapura, $22,268 73-70-70-70 283 Sandra Gal, $22,268 69-70-73-71 283 Angela Stanford, $22,268 68-73-71-71 283 Na Yeon Choi, $19,460 75-73-72-64 284 Se Ri Pak, $19,460 72-72-68-72 284 Caroline Hedwall, $17,621 69-73-70-73 285 Karrie Webb, $17,621 71-70-71-73 285 Lydia Ko, $17,621 72-70-69-74 285 Eun-Hee Ji, $15,215 70-78-70-68 286 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $15,215 71-73-74-68 286 Morgan Pressel, $15,215 70-73-74-69 286 Shanshan Feng, $15,215 71-72-69-74 286 Cristie Kerr, $15,215 71-72-68-75 286 Mariajo Uribe, $13,560 75-69-71-72 287 Brittany Lang, $12,756 73-69-76-70 288 Brittany Lincicome, $12,756 74-79-65-70 288 Paula Creamer, $11,338 72-77-72-68 289 Meena Lee, $11,338 79-71-69-70 289 Hee Young Park, $11,338 71-76-70-72 289 Jennifer Johnson, $11,338 68-73-71-77 289 Chella Choi, $10,189 73-74-74-69 290 Mamiko Higa, $9,807 77-71-71-72 291 Mina Harigae, $8,504 70-76-76-70 292 Jessica Korda, $8,504 74-77-71-70 292 Carly Booth, $8,504 72-74-74-72 292 Candie Kung, $8,504 73-77-70-72 292 Sun Young Yoo, $8,504 74-72-74-72 292 Pornanong Phatlum, $8,504 71-73-73-75 292 Pernilla Lindberg, $7,048 74-77-72-70 293 Natsuka Hori, $7,048 75-72-75-71 293 Haeji Kang, $7,048 75-72-73-73 293 Alison Walshe, $5,937 73-77-76-68 294 Amy Yang, $5,937 74-77-73-70 294 Katherine Kirk, $5,937 75-75-73-71 294 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $5,937 74-75-73-72 294 Danielle Kang, $5,937 74-72-72-76 294 Ai Miyazato, $5,937 74-70-74-76 294 Irene Coe, $5,133 77-76-71-71 295 Ariya Jutanugarn, $5,133 72-77-74-72 295 Nicole Castrale, $4,826 74-76-77-69 296 Karine Icher, $4,826 78-70-74-74 296 a-Supamas Sangchan 75-75-78-69 297 Chie Arimura, $4,367 78-75-73-71 297 Hee Kyung Seo, $4,367 76-74-75-72 297 Carlota Ciganda, $4,367 72-76-76-73 297 Moriya Jutanugarn, $4,367 77-71-71-78 297 P.K. Kongkraphan, $3,812 78-77-75-69 299 Beatriz Recari, $3,812 75-77-76-71 299 Lizette Salas, $3,812 73-79-73-74 299 Giulia Sergas, $3,812 71-81-73-74 299 Ayako Uehara, $3,601 80-78-75-67 300 Mika Miyazato, $3,448 77-78-74-73 302 Ilhee Lee, $3,448 79-74-75-74 302 Caroline Masson, $3,448 72-78-77-75 302 Mo Martin, $3,295 75-76-77-75 303 Shinobu Moromizato, $3,179 75-77-78-74 304 Dani Holmqvist, $3,179 75-73-79-77 304 ATP World Tour Open 13 Results Sunday At Palais des Sports Marseille, France Purse: $850,900 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Ernests Gulbis (3), Latvia, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (2), France, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Doubles Championship Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (2), France, def. Paul Hanley, Australia, and Jonathan Marray, Britain, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 13-11. Rio Open Results Sunday At Jockey Club Brasileiro Rio de Janeiro Purse: Men, $1.99 million (WT500) Women, $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Women Championship Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Klara Zakopalova (1), Czech Republic, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1. Doubles Men Championship Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah, Colombia, def. David Marrero, Spain, and Marcelo Melo (2), Brazil, 6-4, 6-2. MORE ATP World Tour Delray Beach International Results Sunday At Delray Beach Stadium & Tennis Center Delray Beach Purse: $539,730 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Marin Cilic (7), Croatia, def. Kevin Anderson (4), South Africa, 7-6 (6), 6-7 (7), 6-4. Doubles Championship Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Fran tisek Cermak, Czech Republic, and Mikhail Elgin, Russia, 6-2, 6-3. 2014 Winter Olympic Medals Table At Sochi, Russia Final (98 events) Nation G S B Tot Russia 13 11 9 33 United States 9 7 12 28 Norway 11 5 10 26 Canada 10 10 5 25 Netherlands 8 7 9 24 Germany 8 6 5 19 Austria 4 8 5 17 France 4 4 7 15 Sweden 2 7 6 15 Switzerland 6 3 2 11 China 3 4 2 9 South Korea 3 3 2 8 Czech Republic 2 4 2 8 Slovenia 2 2 4 8 Japan 1 4 3 8 Italy 0 2 6 8 Belarus 5 0 1 6 Poland 4 1 1 6 Finland 1 3 1 5 Britain 1 1 2 4 Latvia 0 2 2 4 Australia 0 2 1 3 Ukraine 1 0 1 2 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Croatia 0 1 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1 Sundays U.S. Olympians Fared BOBSLEIGH Mens Four-Man 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah; Curt Tomasevicz, Shelby, Neb.; Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.; Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 3:40.99. BRONZE 12. United States 2 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif.; Justin Olsen, San Antonio; Johnny Quinn, McKinney, Texas; Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 3:42.70. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Mens 50km Mass Start Free 26. Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., 1:48:04.3. 51. Brian Gregg, Winthrop, Wash., 1:55:02.3. 57. Kris Freeman, Thornton, N.H., 1:59:46.7. NR. Torin Koos, Leavenworth, Wash., DNS. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES Agreed to terms with OF Brett Gardner on a four-year contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS Designated SS Justin Sellers for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW JERSEY NETS Signed C Jason Collins to a 10-day contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Claimed D Mike Kostka off waivers from Chicago. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE Recalled D Josh McFad den from Cincinnati (ECHL). Loaned G Rob Madore to Cincinnati. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Syracuse at Maryland ESPNU Oklahoma St. at TCU 9 p.m. ESPN Oklahoma at Kansas WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 Penn St. at Nebraska FS1 Oklahoma at Baylor 7 p.m. ESPN Teams TBA ESPN2 Teams TBA FS1 Charlotte at East Carolina 8 p.m. ESPNU Green Bay at Oakland NBCSN Duquesne at Saint Louis 9 p.m. ESPN Teams TBA ESPN2 Teams TBA FS1 Georgetown at Marquette 10 p.m. ESPNU Gonzaga at Pacic current Nets. Jason told us that his goal was to earn another contract with an NBA team. Today, I want to commend him on achieving his goal. I know everyone in the NBA family is excit ed for him and proud that our league fosters an inclusive and re spectful environment, Commissioner Adam Silver said. The Nets worked out Collins during the AllStar break and met with him again Sunday, with his twin brother, Jarron, hinting that his tory would be made. Hope everyone is enjoying their Sunday. Today should be a pret ty cool day! Jarron Col lins wrote on Twitter. Jason Collins played 38 games last season with Boston and Washington and averaged 1.1 points and 1.6 rebounds in lim ited minutes. For his ca reer, the 7-foot Collins averages 3.6 points and 3.8 rebounds. The Nets had an opening for a big man after trading Reggie Ev ans along with Jason Terry to Sacramento on Wednesday for guard Marcus Thornton. The news on Collins comes as Michael Sam, the SEC defensive player of the year from Missou ri who recently revealed he is gay, is taking part in the NFL draft combine. Sams on-eld work outs in Indianapolis are scheduled for today. NBA FROM PAGE B1 for the 2008 Summer Games transformed a decaying resort town on the Black Sea into a household name. Allnew facilities, unthink able in the Soviet era of drab shoddiness, show cased how far Russia has come in the two de cades since it turned its back on communism. But the Olympic show didnt win over critics of Russias backsliding on democracy and human rights under Putin and its institutionalized in tolerance of gays. And while security was a po tential problem going in, it appeared to be a big success coming out: Feared attacks by Islam ic militants who threat ened to target the games didnt materialize. Despite the bumps along the way, IOC President Thomas Bach used the closing ceremony to deliver an robustly upbeat verdict of the games, his rst as IOC president. He was particularly enthusias tic about the host city itself. What took decades in other parts of the world was achieved here in So chi in just seven years, Bach said in declaring the games closed. As dusk fell, Rus sians and internation al visitors streamed into the stadium for the ceremony featur ing the extinguishing of the Olympic ame. Day and night, the ame became a favor ite backdrop for So chi seles, a buzzword born at these games for the fad of athletes and spectators taking DIY souvenir photos of themselves. Russia celebrated it self and its rich gifts to the worlds of mu sic and literature in the ceremony. Performers in smart tails and puffy white wigs performed a ballet of grand pi anos, pushing 62 of them around the stadi um oor while soloist Denis Matsuev played thunderous bars from Sergei Rachmaninoffs Concerto No.2. There was, of course, also ballet, with danc ers from the Bolshoi and the Mariinsky, among the worlds old est ballet companies. The faces of Russian au thors through the ages were projected onto enormous screens, and a pile of books trans formed into a swirling tornado of loose pages. Athletes were say ing goodbye to rivalsturned-friends from far off places, savoring their achievements or lamenting what might have been and, for some, looking ahead to 2018. Winners of Russias re cord 13 gold medals marched into the stadi um carrying the coun trys white, blue and red ag, which was raised alongside the Olympic ag. Athletes streamed by their hundreds into the stadium, danc ing and taking photos of themselves. Earlier, giant screens ashed highlights of their Olympic exploits. With a 3-0 victory over Swe den in the mens hock ey nal Sunday, Can ada claimed the last gold from the 98 med al events. Absent were six com petitors caught by what was the most extensive anti-doping program in Winter Olympic history, with the IOC conduct ing a record 2,631 tests nearly 200 more than originally planned. Putin smiled as he stood beside Bach, and he had reason to be pleased. Russias athletes topped the Sochi med als table, both in golds and total 33. That represented a stunning turnaround from the 2010 Vancouver Games. GAMES FROM PAGE B1 combine this week end that the locker room is a more mod ern, tolerant environ ment it might be giv en credited for. Those problems in Miami, those surprise me because I think that we never had those is sues in Denver when it came down to the things that went on in that locker room and the things that were said, said Hall of Fam er John Elway, Denvers executive vice pres ident of football op erations and general manager. I think every locker room that Ive ever been in in the NFL and the guys Ive been around have always respected the right of other players. There is a line you dont cross. I still believe thats the way the majority of the NFL is. Sams former Mis souri teammate, wide receiver LDamian Washington, won dered what all the fuss was about with ques tions about wheth er Sam would be wel comed by his peers in the league when the Tigers had no prob lem doing so. Most of the guys al ready knew him and it wasnt a big deal, but we had freshmen on the team who were 17 years old out of high school 17 years out of high school youre pretty immature, Washington said. They just could be like, Aw, weve got a gay guy on our team. But those guys em braced it, because he was a great team mate. He was a great guy. He never brought any of that to the lock er room. I feel like if a 17-year-old freshman can accept the fact that a teammate has a different preference in sex, then why cant 33-year-old vets ac cept that fact? SAM FROM PAGE B1 shots in the rst half, the Seminoles started the second half 1 for 11 from the eld and went 7 minutes without a eld goal. Despite those struggles, Flori da State never lost the lead. Pitts own offensive problems during that stretch were the rea son for that. The Pan thers could only man age two eld goals during the Seminoles drought. They brief ly tied the score at 42, but the Seminoles quickly regained con trol of the contest with back-to-back dunks by White, who was 7 for 13 from the eld and also grabbed eight re bounds. Pitt came back to tie the score again at 48, but the Seminoles made the big plays down the stretch. White scored nine points in the nal 6:50, includ ing a 3-pointer as the shot clock expired for a 58-52 lead that took the air out of the Panthers sails. The Panthers shot 37 percent from the eld. They have shot more than 40 percent just twice in the past seven games. The Seminoles used an 11-1 run midway through the rst half to begin to pull away from the Panthers. The score was tied at 18 when the Seminoles held the Panthers without a eld goal for almost 5 minutes. Miller scored ve of his 12 rst-half points in that stretch. White gave Florida State its biggest lead of the half at 29-19 with 4:07 to go before intermission. Pitt, which made 10 of its 26 shots from the eld in the rst half, used a 7-0 run to make it 34-31 late in the half, but Thomas made a 3-pointer from the cor ner at the buzzer for the six-point lead at the break. FSU FROM PAGE B1 Matt Kenseth won a rain-shortened Day tona 500 in 2009. The 2010 Daytona 500 was interrupted for more than two hours be cause of a pothole in the track. Rain forced the 2012 race to be run on a Monday night for the rst time. Juan Pablo Montoya slammed into a jet dryer that night, ignit ing a raging inferno that caused another two-hour delay. Safe ty workers used Tide laundry detergent to clean up the track. Fans ocked for shel ter Sunday at the track or left for their cars. The National Weather Service is sued a tornado warn ing in the area and ad vised people to take shelter. Air Titan, the system designed to reduce track drying time, provided the only ac tion on the track. But there was plen ty of fun going on be hind the scenes. Kyle Busch tweeted, Rain rain go away. Let me lead my way to victory. His wife, Saman tha, posted a pho to of her sticking out her tongue while Kyle frowned with the cap tion, Rain delay sad/ mad faces w @kyle busch. Andrea Perry, who works the public re lations account for Ricky Stenhouse Jr.s team, snapped a pic of the Nationwide Se ries crew lined up in side the hauler on their knee with hands on their heads prep ping for a Tornado drill!!! NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 GREG BEACHAM Associated Press SOCHI, Russia Sid ney Crosby skated in alone on Henrik Lundqvist, fak ing Swedens goalie to the ice with a textbook-quality deke and sliding a perfect back hand into the net. Canada did everything by the book at the Sochi Olym pics, winning all six games with a ferocious commit ment to defense and disci pline. When Canadas cap tain nally got his rst goal of the games Sunday, it had none of the dramatics of Crosbys last Olympic goal four years ago in Vancouver. But it was every bit as golden. Jonathan Toews scored in the rst period, Carey Price made 24 saves in his second consecutive shutout, and Canada defended its Olym pic mens hockey title with a 3-0 victory over Sweden. Were just an amazing team to watch, the way we work together, Toews said. We were just all over them. Its fun to be a part of. Chris Kunitz also scored as the Canadians conrmed their worldwide dominance in their national game by winning the gold for the third time in the last four Olym pics. No team in the NHL era has controlled a tournament like this group, which allowed just three goals in six games and never trailed at any point in the 12-day tournament on the shores of the Black Sea. Not quite as dramat ic as the other one, Crosby said. Just real solid all the way through. We knew the way we wanted to play, and the last couple of games, we were solid. With each game, we seemed to build more and more condence. By the nal event of the So chi Olympics, that condence was unshakable. Canada be came the only repeat Olym pic champ in the NHL era and the rst team to go unbeaten through the Olympic tourna ment since the Soviet Union in Sarajevo in 1984. Canada won its record ninth Olympic hockey gold medal its rst outside North America since 1952 and joined the womens team to complete Canadas second straight Olympic hockey sweep. The Canadians didnt al low a goal in their nal 164plus minutes at the Bolshoy Ice Dome after the rst pe riod of the quarternals against Latvia, shutting out the U.S. and Sweden. Steve Yzerman, the archi tect of this roster for Hockey Canada, called it the greatest display of defensive hock ey by any Canadian national team. Yzerman also said hes stepping down as Canadas Olympic executive director. The Swedes also were un beaten until the nal, but they couldnt compete with Canadas formidable defense and Price, a rst-time gold medalist who played splen didly in Sochi, allowing three goals in ve games. That was the hard est-working team Ive ever seen, Price said. I really cant say enough about that group of defensemen and that overall team in front of me. Our work ethic was what won us this championship. The Canadians exchanged hugs and leaped over the boards at the nal horn, gathering at Prices net for a celebration that had seemed inevitable since Crosby scored in the second period. Toews, who scored on a rst-period tip-in, and Cros by are among Canadas 11 returning players from the 2010 championship team. Kunitz, widely criticized for failing to nish chances ear lier in Sochi, capped the scoring in the third. If these games were the last with NHL players join ing their national teams, Canadas pros put on a land mark show. WINTER OLYMPICS CHRIS YOUNG / THE CANADIAN PRESS Hockey fans celebrate in Torontos Maple Leaf Square after the nal buzzer as Canada beat Sweden 3-0 on Sunday to win the Gold Medal in the mens Olympic Hockey nal. Canada beats Sweden 3-0 for Olympic hockey gold NBA NFL ASSOCIATED PRESS Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater, right, talks with UCF quarterback Blake Bortles at the NFL football scouting combine on Sunday in Indianapolis. MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS Teddy Bridgewater will spend the next 2 months trying to con vince NFL scouts hes the No. 1 quarterback No. 1 player in this years draft. Tajh Boyd is just itching to show scouts hes still the quar terback they once thought he could be. Yes, the two college stars were on opposite ends of the spectrum at the combine. While Boyds draft stock has plummeted over the past four months, Bridgewaters con dence is booming as he appears to be locking himself into the top 10. I feel that Im the best quarterback in this draft, he said at his weekends NFL scouting combine. Im not just going to sit up here and say it, theres obviously ac tions that have to back up these words. Im just going to go out there and prove that Im the best guy. Scouts will have to wait to see if Bridge water can live up to the boasts. He never planned to throw during Sun days workouts at Lucas Oil Stadium and also pulled out of the 40yard dash after telling reporters he would run. But that hasnt hurt Bridgewater yet. He measured in at 6-foot-2, 214 pounds, good size for an NFL quarterback with room to even add a few more pounds. And despite questions about hand size, Bridgewaters completion percentage and touchdown pass es continued to steadi ly increase each of the past three seasons at the same time his inter ception totals declined. Teams searching for a new franchise quarterback, such as Houston, which has the top pick in May, will spend these next 10 weeks trying to de termine who to take in this three-man race Bridgewater, Blake Bortles or 2012 Heisman Trophy win ner Johnny Manziel. I havent studied him (Bridgewater) enough, and com ing from defense, I dont consider myself a quarterback expert, said Browns coach Mike Pettine. Bridgewater, Boyd go opposite directions in draft STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI With LeB ron James watching from the bench in a suit and tie, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade powered the Miami Heat to a 9379 victory over the Chi cago Bulls on Sunday. James was a late scratch after he broke his nose in Thursdays win at Oklahoma City, and his teammates picked up the slack, with reserves Chris An dersen, Michael Beas ley and Ray Allen help ing the Heat pull away in the second half. Bosh tied a career high with four 3-point ers and had 28 points and 10 rebounds. Wade added 23 points, 10 rebounds and sev en assists, while Mario Chalmers contributed 12 points and nine as sists. But the Heat most ly won with defense against the offensively challenged Bulls, who were also short-hand ed. Starter Jimmy But ler was a late scratch because of bruised ribs. The Bulls shot 36 per cent, went 6 for 21 from 3-point range and were called for a 24-second violation at least six times, including twice in a row. Joakim Noah had 20 points, 15 re bounds and four blocks for Chicago, which had won ve in a row. RAPTORS 105, MAGIC 90 TORONTO Kyle Lowry scored 28 points, DeMar DeRozan had 24 and the Toronto Rap tors beat Orlando 10590 Sunday night, hand ing the Magic their 15th straight road loss. Terrence Ross scored 16 and Amir Johnson had 12 points and eight rebounds before leav ing with a sprained right ankle in the Rap tors fth victory in six games Toronto improved to 12-3 in its past 15 home games and moved six games above .500 for the rst time since Feb 24, 2010, when their re cord was also 31-25. Tobias Harris scored 28 points and ETwaun Moore had 16 as the Magic opened a four game trip with their fourth loss in ve games. Nikola Vucevic and Kyle OQuinn each had 11. CLIPPERS 125, THUNDER 117 OKLAHOMA CITY Jamal Crawford scored 36 points to help the Los Angeles Clippers beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 125-117 on Sunday afternoon. Matt Barnes scored 24 points, Chris Paul had 18 points, 12 as sists and eight re bounds, Blake Grifn scored 20 points and DeAndre Jordan add ed 18 points and 12 re bounds for the Clip pers, who snapped a two-game skid. Kevin Durant had 42 points and 10 assists and Serge Ibaka added 20 points for the Thun der, who lost their sec ond straight. It was the most points the Thun der have allowed this season. Oklahoma City over came a 15-point decit late in the third quarter to take a 115-112 lead on a 3-pointer by Du rant with 2:43 to play, but the Clippers con trolled the game from there. A 3-pointer by Craw ford with 1:30 remain ing gave Los Angeles a 119-115 lead. Craw ford scored again on a oating jumper in the nal minute to push the lead to 121-117. Westbrook missed a 3-pointer, and Paul made two free throws to extend the Clippers lead to six and put Clip pers in charge with 29.7 seconds left. Paul sprained his right thumb against Memphis this past Fri day and coach Doc Rivers said before the game it was 50-50 if he would play. The Clippers shot 66 percent in the rst half to take a 72-66 lead at the break. Barnes made a 3-pointer with 9.8 seconds left in the rst half, and a loose ball foul was called on Iba ka away from the shot. Grifn made the free throw to give the Clip pers a 72-64 lead. WIZARDS 96, CAVALIERS 83 CLEVELAND John Wall scored 21 points, Bradley Beal had 17 and the Washington Wizards beat the Cleve land Cavaliers 96-83 on Sunday night. The Wizards held the Cavaliers to 11 fourth-quarter points to return to .500 at 2828 on the season. They also strengthened their hold on the fth spot in the Eastern Conference standings. The strong defensive performance in the nal period came after Washington lost Nene to a sprained left knee midway through the third quarter. Without LeBron, Bosh and Wade lead Heat to win over Bulls LYNNE SLADKY / AP Miami Heats LeBron James, right, high-ves Dwyane Wade (3) during a time-out in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls on Sunday in Miami. The Heat defeated the Bulls 93-79.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 GOLF BASEBALL MATT YORK / AP Jason Day, of Australia, celebrates on the 23rd hole after winning his match against Victor Dubuisson, of France, during the Match Play Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Marana, Ariz. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer MARANA, Ariz. Ja son Day never stopped believing he would win the Match Play Cham pionship, even in the midst of so many shots by Victor Dubuisson that simply deed be lief. With his ball at the base of a cactus, Dubuisson took an all-or-nothing swing though the sharp nee dles and a TV ca ble and incredibly hit it to 4 feet to save par. Seemingly out of it on the next play off hole, the 23-yearold Frenchman some how whacked a wedge through a desert bush and rocks and onto the green for another par. Day nally ended the madness Sunday on the 23rd hole with a pitch to 4 feet on No. 15 for birdie. Mon dieu! It was the rst time the championship match went overtime since the inaugural year in 1999 at La Cos ta, when Jeff Maggert chipped on the sec ond extra hole of a 36hole nal. That was like watching paint dry compared to the show Dubuisson put on. Day, with his rst World Golf Champion ship, walked away with his second PGA Tour title that will take the Australian to No. 4 in the world. This tournament might better be re membered for Dubuis sons magical escapes. Vic, man, he has a lot of guts, Day said. He has a great short game straight out of the cactus twice. For a 23-year-old kid, hes got a lot of game. Were go ing to see a lot of him for years to come. Even the great Seve Ballesteros would have saluted this perfor mance. Two holes down with two holes to play, Dubuisson rapped in a 15-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole and then took advantage of a rare lapse by Day, who bogeyed the 18th hole with a three-putt from 50 feet on the up per tier. The French man saved par from the bunker to force ex tra holes. It looked like it would be over quickly. From the rst fairway, Dubuisson went so far long that bounced hard off the back of the green and into the desert, the ball nestled at the base of a cholla. During reg ulation, he would have taken a penalty drop. In this case, he felt he had no choice. He stepped up to the ball and, with nothing to lose, swung away. The club got caught on a TV cable, and the ball scooted up the slope of 3-inch grass and onto the green. It was reminiscent of the shot Bill Haas pulled off at East Lake from shallow water on the 17th hole. This was better. MARK DIDTLER Associated Press TAMPA Outeld er Brett Gardner and the New York Yan kees agreed Sunday to a four-year contract worth $52 million. The new pact starts in 2015 and includes a fth-year club option for $12.5 million and a $2 million buyout. If traded, Gardner would receive $1 million. It shows the level of condence, belief and trust, and the type of player and person he is, Yankees general manager Brian Cash man said. Were ex cited to know that hes going to be a part of this team going for ward. Were a better team with Gardy on it, thats the bottom line. This is a good day for him, and we believe it makes the future for us better. Gardner has a $5.6 million, one-year con tract for this season. He would have been eligible for free agency after the 2014 season. Free agency is something that, it kind of intrigued me, but it also kind of scared me, Gardner said. Ive never been any where else. I love it here. I love putting on the pinstripes every day. Cashman said talks about the contract started at the winter meetings in Decem ber. The Yankees are moving Gardner to left eld this year after the signing of free agent center elder Jacoby Ellsbury to a $153 mil lion, seven-year con tract in December. Gardner did have questions in his mind about his Yankees fu ture after the Ellsbury signing. When they signed Jacoby, your name gets thrown out in the trade rumors and all that, Gardner said. Its kind of annoying, really. I didnt want to get trad ed. I dont want to go anywhere else, and I let them know that. The 30-year-old Gardner hit .273 last year with eight home runs, 52 RBIs and 24 stolen bases. I like what he brings, Cashman said. The speed dy namic, the defense, and I think the offense is there as well. Also, the Yankees agreed to a minor league contract with injured closer Andrew Bailey, who was with Boston last year and is coming back from houlder surgery last July. CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP New York Yankees center elder Brett Gardner bunts during spring training on Friday in Tampa. RICK EYMER Associated Press SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Barry Bonds is all set to return to the San Francisco Giants. As a spring train ing instructor, that is. The all-time home run leader who never ofcially retired is ex pected to arrive during the second week of March. Manager Bruce Bo chy said Saturday that hes looking forward to having the 49-year-old Bonds in camp and thinks he can help the hitters. Bonds spent his last 15 seasons with the Giants, nishing in 2007. He has not been elected to the Hall of Fame, with many voters saying his lofty numbers were boosted by performance-enhancing drugs. Bonds set major league records with 762 career home runs and 73 in 2001. He also had a .444 career onbase percentage and a .607 slugging percentage and stole 514 bases. Hell join former Giants Jeff Kent, Robb Nen, Will Clark and J.T. Snow as special instructors. Kent and Bonds were involved in a highly publicized feud during the 2002 season, which reached its peak in June, when the two en gaged in a shoving match in the dugout that was caught on camera. Bonds nal contract with the Giants included a 10-year ser vices deal following his retirement, which included spring training vis its. The seven-time MVP has made limited public appearances since his nal season. Bonds remains a fan favorite in San Francisco, enjoying a warm re ception any time hes introduced at AT&T Park, the Giants home park. Matt Cain, the Giants longest active tenured player, was Bonds teammate between 2005-07. Tim Lincecum made his major league debut in 2007. Barry Bonds will be SF Giants spring training instructor Yanks, Gardner agree on $52M, four-year deal Associated Press CHONBURI, Thai land Anna Nord qvist won the LPGA Thailand on Sunday to end a ve-year victo ry drought, holding off top-ranked Inbee Park at Siam County Club. Nordqvist, the LPGA Championship and LPGA Tour Champion ship winner in 2009, led wire-to-wire. The 26-year-old Swede closed with a 4-under 68 to beat defending champion Park by two strokes. Im speechless to be honest, Nordqvist said. Its been a cou ple years since I won. Ive been working very hard. Had my ups and downs. Just couldnt be happier to be here. It was such a hard push on the back nine. Nordqvist nished at 15-under 273 on the Pattaya Old Course. Park, making her rst start of the year, had a bogey-free 66. The South Korean player won six times last year. I feel good, Park said. Today, my ball-striking wasnt as good as yesterday. I putted better than yes terday. So I feel like my putter is coming back. I played one shot bet ter than last year and didnt win. Still a very good result. Tells me I improved a little. Scotlands Catriona Matthew was third at 11 under after a 65, and Michelle Wie was 10 under after a 69. Inbee kept making birdies and Michelle was playing great, said Nordqvist, four strokes ahead of Park and Wie entering the round. I couldnt really breathe until the last putt, so obviously I could just let go on the last putt. Wie cut the lead to one with a three-stroke swing on the par-4 fth hole. Nordqvist had a double bogey on the hole and Wie made a birdie. Nordqvist rebound ed with a 12-foot birdie putt on No. 7 to extend her lead two shots. She birdied ve of the rst seven holes on the back nine to open a threestroke lead and closed with a bogey on the par-5 18th. I just really had to stay strong, Nordqvist said. Projected to jump to 14th in the world rank ing, Nordqvist changed equipment and started working with instruc tor Jorje Parada during the offseason after con sidering leaving the tour. Swedens Anna Nordqvist wins LPGA Thailand SIAMSPORT / AP Anna Nordqvist of Sweden shows off her winners trophy during the award ceremony of the LPGA Thailand golf tournament on Sunday in Pattaya, Thailand. Day survives the magic of Dubuisson in Match Play AP FILE PHOTO Barry Bonds acknowledges the crowd before throwing out a ceremonial rst pitch before Game 3 of baseballs 2010 NLCS.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 FLU SEASON: Younger adults hit hardest / C4 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Jazz musicians are famous for their musical conver sations one improvis es a few bars and anoth er plays an answer. Now research shows some of the brains language re gions enable that musical back-and-forth much like a spoken conversation. It gives new meaning to the idea of music as a uni versal language. The nding, published Wednesday in the journal PLoS One, is the latest in the growing eld of mu sical neuroscience: Re searchers are using how we play and hear music to illuminate different ways that the brain works. And to Dr. Charles Limb, a saxophonist-turned-hear ing specialist at Johns Hopkins University, the spontaneity that is a hall mark of jazz offered a rare chance to compare music and language. They appear to be talking to one anoth er through their instru ments, Limb explained. What happens when you have a musical conversa tion? Watching brains on jazz requires getting musicians to lie at inside a cramped MRI scanner that mea sures changes in oxygen use by different parts of the brain as they play. An MRI machine con tains a giant magnet meaning no trumpet or sax. So Limb had a special metal-free keyboard man ufactured, and then re cruited 11 experienced jazz pianists to play it inside the scanner. They watched their ngers through stra tegically placed mirrors during 10-minute music stretches. Sometimes they played scales. Other times, they did whats called trad ing fours, where the pi anist made up four bars, and then Limb or anoth er musician-scientist in Jazz study shows link between music and language SEE STUDY | C2 NICHOLAS RICCARDI Associated Press C OLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. The doctors were out of ideas to help 5-year-old Charlotte Figi. Suffering from a rare genetic dis order, she had as many as 300 grand mal seizures a week, used a wheel chair, went into repeated cardiac ar rest and could barely speak. As a last resort, her mother began calling medical marijuana shops. Two years later, Charlotte is large ly seizure-free and able to walk, talk and feed herself after taking oil in fused with a special pot strain. Her recovery has inspired both a name for the strain of marijuana she takes that is bred not to make users high Kids with seizures use pot as treatment BRENNAN LINSLEY / AP Matt Figi hugs and tickles his once severely ill 7-year-old daughter Charlotte, as they wander around inside a greenhouse for a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlottes Web, which was named after the girl early in her treatment, in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo. BRENNAN LINSLEY / AP Aileen Burger holds up a bottle of cannabis-infused oil used as medicine for her 4-year-old daughter Elizabeth, who suffers from severe epilepsy and is receiving the experimental treatment with a special strain of medical marijuana. Charlottes Web SEE MOVING | C2 TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman to host events this week Community health events at Flor ida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Water man Way, in Tavares include Cardiac Devices: Cardiac Rhythm Manage ment with Miguel Bryce, MD, from 1 to 2 p.m., Wednesday, at the Mat tison Conference Center. Call 352253-3635 to register or for informa tion. W.A.L.K., the Waterman Amputee and Limb Loss Konnections sup port group for amputees and people with limb loss, meets on the fourth Monday of each month, from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Mattison Conference Room B. Call Tracey Estok at 352253-3892 for information. LADY LAKE Nourish Your Body series set for today at the library The Nourish Your Body series at the Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W. Guava St., continues with eating for eye health from 1 to 2:30 p.m., to day. Julie England, family and consumer sciences extension agent with UF/IFAS Extension Lake County, will present the program. Registration is available at www.yesladylake.eventbrite.com, by calling 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721, or by emailing julieeng@u. edu. LEESBURG HIV/AIDS 101 workshop scheduled for today The National Association of So cial Workers Lake/Sumter Unit will host a meeting and workshop from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., today at the Lees burg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., downtown Leesburg. Diana Cheffer of the Department of Health will lead the workshop and refreshments will be served. For information, email Suzanne Howard at wingslcsw@comcast.net, or call 800-352-6279. LADY LAKE New active aging center set to open on March 3 A new Active Aging Center is set to open on March 3 at the TLC Med ical Arts Building at 201 W. Guava St., in Lady Lake offering the Acti veRx System, based upon more than a decade of scientic research on the correlation between strength and aging. The center will provide full ser vices proven to facilitate longterm, meaningful lifestyle changes. For information, call 352-2847470 or go to www.activerx.com.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 the lab improvised four bars in return, and the pianist responded with still new notes. That conversa tion-like improvisation activated brain areas that normally process the syntax of language, the way that words are put together into phrases and sentenc es. Even between their turns playing, the brain wasnt resting. The mu sicians were processing what they were hear ing to come up with new sounds that were a good t. At the same time, cer tain other regions of the brain involved with language those that process the meaning of words were tuned down, Limb found. That makes sense be cause the richness of the structure of music is what gives it its signi cance, Limb said. You can have substantive discourse using music, without any words, yet language areas of the brain are involved in this unique way. One ultimate goal of musical neuroscience is to better understand the brains circuit ry, and how it can re wire itself, in hopes of eventually nding new treatments for neural disorders. Limb made headlines several years ago when he measured jazz musicians riffs longer, solo improvisa tions to study cre ativity in the brain. We know nothing about how the brain in novates, he said. This is one way to learn what innovation means neu rologically. Stay tuned: Next he hopes to study children who are just learning music, and to compare amateurs to profession als, as he explores how people become creative. Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. 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She can walk, talk; she ate chili in the car, her mother, Paige Figi, said as her dark-haired daughter strolled through a cavernous greenhouse full of mar ijuana plants that will later be broken down into their anti-sei zure components and mixed with olive oil so patients can consume them. So Ill ght for whomever wants this. Doctors warn there is no proof that Char lottes Web is effective, or even safe. In the frenzy to nd the drug, there have been reports of non-authorized sup pliers offering bogus strains of Charlottes Web. In one case, a doctor said, parents were told they could replicate the strain by cooking marijuana in butter. Their child went into heavy seizures. We dont have any peer-reviewed, pub lished literature to sup port it, Dr. Larry Wolk, the state health depart ments chief medical ofcer, said of Char lottes Web. Still, more than 100 families have relocated since Charlottes story rst began spreading last summer, accord ing to Figi and her hus band. The relocated families have formed a close-knit group in Colorado Springs, the law-and-order town where the dispensary selling the drug is lo cated. They meet for lunch, support ses sions and hikes. Its the most hope lots of us have ever had, said Holli Brown, whose 9-year-old daughter, Sydni, began speaking in sentenc es and laughing since moving to Colorado from Kansas City and taking the marijuana strain. Amy Brooks-Kay al, vice president of the American Epilep sy Society, warned that a few miraculous sto ries may not mean anything epileptic seizures come and go for no apparent rea son and scientists do not know what sort of damage Charlottes Web could be doing to young brains. Until we have that information, as physi cians, we cant follow our rst creed, which is do no harm, she said, suggesting that parents relocate so their chil dren can get treated at one of the nations 28 top-tier pediatric ep ilepsy centers rather than move to Colorado. However, the soci ety urges more study of pots possibilities. The families using Char lottes Web, as well as the brothers who grow it, say they want the drug rigorously test ed, and their efforts to ensure its purity have won them praise from skeptics like Wolk. For many, Charlottes story was something they couldnt ignore. Charlotte is a twin, but her sister, Chase, doesnt have Dravets syndrome, which kills kids before they reach adulthood. In early 2012, it seemed Charlotte would be added to that grim roster. Her vital signs at-lined three times, leading her par ents to begin prepar ing for her death. They even signed an or der for doctors not to take heroic measures to save her life again should she go into car diac arrest. Her father, Matt, a former Green Be ret who took a job as a contractor working in Afghanistan, started looking online for ways to help his daugh ter and thought they should give pot a try. But there was a danger: Marijuanas psychoac tive ingredient, THC, can trigger seizures. The drug also con tains another chemi cal known as CBD that may have seizure-ght ing properties. In Octo ber, the Food and Drug Administration ap proved testing a British pharmaceutical rms marijuana-derived drug that is CBD-based and has all its THC re moved. Few dispensaries stock CBD-heavy weed that doesnt get you high. Then Paige Figi found Joel Stanley. One of 11 siblings raised by a single moth er and their grand mother in Oklahoma, Stanley and four of his brothers had found themselves in the med ical marijuana business after moving to Colora do. Almost as an exper iment, they bred a lowTHC, high-CBD plant after hearing it could ght tumors. Stanley went to the Figis house with res ervations about giving pot to a child. But she had done her homework, Stan ley said of Paige Figi. She wasnt a pot ac tivist or a hippy, just a conservative mom. Now, Stanley and his brothers provide the marijuana to nearly 300 patients and have a waitlist of 2,000. The CBD is extracted by a chemist who once worked for drug giant Pzer, mixed with ol ive oil so it can be in gested through the mouth or the feeding tube that many suffer ers from childhood ep ilepsy use, then sent to a third-party lab to test its purity. Charlotte takes the medication twice a day. A year ago, she could only say one word, her father said. Now she says com plete sentences. The recovery of Charlotte and oth er kids has inspired the Figis and others to travel the country, pushing for medical marijuana laws or stat utes that would allow high-CBD, low-THC pot strains. Donald Burger re cently urged a New York state legislative panel to legalize med ical marijuana while his wife, Aileen, was in the familys new rent al house in Colorado Springs, giving Char lottes Web to their daughter Elizabeth, 4. The family only relo cated to Colorado after neurologists told them Elizabeths best hope brain surgery could only stop some of her seizures. Its a very big strain being away from the rest of our family, Ai leen Burger said re cently while waiting for her husband to return from a trip to sell their Long Island house. But she doesnt have to have pieces of her brain removed. MOVING FROM PAGE C1 BRENNAN LINSLEY / AP A worker cultivates a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlottes Web inside a greenhouse, in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo.

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 MICHELLE L. PRICE Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY A proposal advancing in the Utah Legislature could make the state the rst in the country to raise the age people can buy tobacco prod ucts from 19 to 21. The Senate Health and Human Services Committee voted 4-1 on Thursday morning to approve the mea sure, forwarding it to the full Senate for a vote. Sen. Stuart Reid, R-Ogden, is sponsoring the bill, which he said could prevent young people from becoming addicted to tobacco be cause it delays their ac cess to it. His bill would take ef fect in 2016, which he said gives the 18-, 19and 20-year-olds who already smoke enough time to reach the new minimum age. Opponents of his bill argue theres no evi dence to support that. Instead, they say the measure infringes on the freedom of young adults. Utah is already among a handful of states that ban sales for those under 19 years old, instead of 18. Last year, New York City became the rst large city or state in the country to bar tobac co sa les to people un der 21. Reids bill could make Utah the rst state to follow New York Citys ban, though Colorado legislators are also con sidering a similar mea sure this year. Lehi resident Marla Brannum, a mother of three children, urged lawmakers to pass the bill, saying it would drastically eliminate the ability of her kids to access cigarettes. By raising the age limit, it puts them in a situation where theyre not going to pick it up until a much later age, she said. About 1 in 10 adults in Utah smokes, ac cording to the most re cent report from Utah Department of Healths Tobacco Prevention and Control Program. Of those rough ly 200,000 smokers, al most 90 percent of them started before age 18, according to the report. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON A special blend of moth ers milk just for girls? New research shows animal moms are cus tomizing their milk in surprising ways de pending on wheth er they have a boy or a girl. The studies raise questions for human babies, too about how to choose the do nor milk thats used for hospitalized preemies, or whether we should explore gender-specif ic infant formula. Theres been this myth that mothers milk is pretty stan dard, said Harvard University evolution ary biologist Katie Hin de, whose research suggests thats far from true in monkeys and cows, at least. Instead, the biolog ical recipes for sons and daughters may be different, she told a meeting of the Ameri can Association for the Advancement of Sci ence on Friday. Pediatricians have long stressed that breast milk is best when it comes to babys rst food. Breast-fed infants are healthier, suffering fewer illnesses such as diarrhea, earaches or pneumonia during the rst year of life and less likely to develop asth ma or obesity later on. But beyond gen eral nutrition, there have been few studies of the content of hu man breast milk, and how it might vary from one birth to the next or even over the course of one babys growth. That research is difcult to conduct in people. So Hinde studies the milk that rhesus mon key mothers make for their babies. The milk is richer in fat when mon keys have male babies, especially when its moms rst birth, she found. But they made a lot more milk when they had daughters, Hinde discovered. Do daugh ters nurse more, spur ring production? Or does something signal mom prenatally to pro duce more? To tell, Hinde paired with Kansas State Uni versity researchers to examine lactation re cords of nearly 1.5 mil lion Holstein cows. Un like monkey babies, calves are separated from their mothers ear ly on, meaning any dif ference should be pre natal. Sure enough, cows that bore daughters produced about 1.6 percent more milk. Since cows lactate for 305 days, that adds up. More interest ing, cows often lactate while pregnant and those that bore a sec ond daughter in a row produced almost 1,000 more pounds of milk over nearly two years than those that pro duced only sons, Hinde calculated. Back to the monkeys where Hinde found still more differences in the quality of the milk. Milk produced for monkey daughters contains more calcium, she found. One expla nation: Female mon keys skeletons mature faster than males do, suggesting they need a bigger infusion of this bone-strengthening mineral. Human girls skeletons mature fast er than boys, too, but there havent been sim ilar studies of calcium in human breast milk, Hinde said. Mothers milk even affects babies behav ior, she said. High er levels of the natural stress hormone corti sol in milk can make in fants more nervous and less condent. But boys and girls appear sensi tive to the hormones effects at different ages, her latest monkey re search suggests. One previous study of human babies has linked higher cortisol levels in breast milk to cranky daughters, not sons, but Hinde cau tioned that testing cor tisol reactions at only one point in time could have missed an effect on younger or older boys. What about boy and girl twins? Hinde cant answer; the monkeys she studies seldom have twins. Nor can she explain why the ani mals show these gen der differences. Its something high ly personalized for that mother and that in fant at that time point. Thats an exquisite thing, Hinde said, who wants to see similar study of human breast milk. Because high-qual ity breast milk is par ticularly important to the most vulnerable infants, she wonders whether premature ba bies in intensive care might fare better with gender-matched donor milk. Then theres the formula question. We think its import ant and its not to make different deodor ants for men and wom en, and yet we kind of approach formula as though boys and girls have the same develop mental priorities, Hin de said with a laugh. Animal moms customize milk depending on babys sex KATHY WEST / AP This photo provided by the California National Primate Research Center shows a nursing rhesus macaque monkey in 2013. Panel advances bill raising Utah smoking age to 21

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 MIKE STOBBE Associated Press ATLANTA Flu sea son seems to be wind ing down, and its been an odd one. It hasnt been as bad as last year and the vac cine worked a little bet ter. And it has been a fairly mild one for the elderly traditional ly the most vulnerable group. But its been a differ ent story for young and middle-age adults, who have been hit harder than expected because of a s urge in swine u. Most u seasons, only one-third of the people who land in the hospital with the u are adults ages 18-64. This winter, they have ac counted for two-thirds, most of them adults who were obese or had another ailment. The numbers are painful reminders that u can be serious for anyone, not just infants and the very old, said Dr. Tom Frieden, direc tor of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC released new information Thursday about the u season, which started around mid-Decem ber, a bit earlier than usual, and apparent ly peaked by mid-Janu ary. Last winter, it start ed even earlier. For weeks, u has been waning in some parts of the country, al though health ofcials say theres still a lot of u virus going around and u season is capa ble of getting a second wind. One way the CDC measures the us se verity is by rates of hos pitalizations for u and its complications. Overall, they have been only half what they were last winter de spite the higher rates in younger adults. Health ofcials say thats because the u strain that is making most people sick this winter is swine u, or H1N1. That kind rst showed up in 2009 and caused a global pan demic that was par ticularly dangerous to younger adults. Since then, the vi rus has been around each winter but most ly has been a backstage presence. Experts say the virus hasnt mutat ed. Its simply encoun tering a lot of younger adults who never were infected before and ha vent been vaccinated, said CDC u expert Dr. Joseph Bresee. The annual u vac cine is modied each year, and swine u is now included in the mix of seasonal strains. Working-age adults have the lowest vacci nation rates, CDC of cials noted. Among infectious diseases, u is consid ered one of the nations leading killers. On av erage, about 24,000 Americans die each u season, according to the CDC. The agen cy doesnt keep an ex act count of u deaths. But health ofcials es timates that 60 percent of u deaths this sea son have been in peo ple ages 25 to 64, sim ilar to the numbers from 2009-2010. The government also released data on this years u vaccine. A u vaccine thats 60 to 70 percent effective in the U.S. is considered pret ty good and this years falls in that range. Overall, it was a mod erate 61 percent. That means those who got a shot have a 61 percent lower chance of wind ing up at the doctor with the u. Last year, it was 56 percent effec tive. Those numbers re ect how good the vaccine was against swine u. There wasnt enough data to real ly gauge how well it worked in the elderly against a strain thats more dangerous to old er adults. Regional Urgent Care LAKE We at LRUC have made it affordable for you to receive the care you want and need For REAL medicine by REAL DOCTORS with CBC$25 Urine$15 Analysis HCG$208404 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 352.315.8881O.V.$95 X-Rays$50 Cardiac$100 Testing CMP$35 EKG$25 Strep$15 Test Pricing PricingSTRAIGHT STRAIGHT 352.259.4322 Flu season waning; younger adults hit hardest MATT ROURKE / AP As the u season winds down, health ofcials say it wasnt as bad as last year.

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The recom mendations are the lat est in years of efforts to prevent unnecessary C-sections. Labor takes a lit tle longer than we may have thought, said Dr. Aaron Caughey, who co-authored the guidelines for the American College of Obstetricians and Gy necologists. The recommenda tions are being pub lished jointly Thurs day by two groups of pregnancy specialists ACOG and the Soci ety for Maternal-Fetal Medicine amid grow ing concern that C-sec tions are overused. Nearly 1 in 3 women in the U.S. gives birth by cesarean. Yes, C-sec tions can be life-saving for mother or baby. But they also can be done for convenience or fear of lawsuits, and the surgery can bring some serious health risks. And having one cesar ean greatly increases the chances that a next pregnancy will end in one, too. One of the main rea sons for a rst-time C-section is labor thats progressing too slowly, ACOGs analysis found. How long should la bor take? Theres no clear-cut deadline, and every woman is differ ent, stressed Caughey, obstetrics chairman at the Oregon Health and Sciences University. My patients ask this every day, he said. He tells them it can run the gamut from six hours long, start to n ish, to three and four days at the other ex treme. Whether labor is too slow is assessed at dif ferent time points and what doctors were taught in medical school about the differ ent stages may not be the most up-to-date. A 2012 study from the National Institutes of Health found that one particular stage takes up to 2 hours longer now than it did in the 1960s, when many la bor denitions were set. Partly thats be cause todays moth ers-to-be tend to be older and weigh more. But its also because of some changes in ob stetric practice, such as more use of painkilling epidurals that can slow labor. So the obstetricians group took a closer look. Among the rec ommendations for oth erwise low-risk moth ers and babies: Dont order a C-section just because the rst and longest phase of labor is pro longed. This so-called latent phase is when contractions are mild and far apart, and the mothers cervix is bare ly dilated. Historical ly doctors considered it stalled if it lasted lon ger than 20 hours for a rst-time mom, or 14 hours for other moth ers. Active labor be gins later than once thought, not until the cervix is dilated 6 cen timeters. Active labor is when contractions become stronger and more frequent, and the cervix begins to di late more rapidly until the woman eventually is ready to push. Doc tors once thought ac tive labor began when the cervix was dilated 4 centimeters, but recent research shows that di lation remains pretty slow until reaching the new threshold. Thats an important change because many doctors wont admit women to the hospital until theyre in active labor, unless they need more care for another reason. As soon as someone is admitted to the hos pital, theyre kind of on the clock, Caughey said. If women arent too tired, allow them to push at least two hours if they have delivered before, three hours if its their rst baby. They may push longer if they had an epidural as long as the doctor can see progress. Forceps can offer a safe alternative to cer tain cesareans if used by an experienced, well-trained physician. Few physicians today undergo the training. The advice shouldnt be a surprise to doc tors whove been pay ing attention to re cent research about labor times, but its hard to predict how quickly theyll change long-term practices, Caughey said. Some womens groups have long warned that rushed la bor was fueling cesar eans, and Lamaze In ternational welcomed the guidelines and said mothers-to-be need to know them, too. They need to have a better understanding of what normal labor is, said Lamaze presi dent Michele Ondeck. She advised expect ant mothers to ask about the cesarean rate before choosing an ob stetric practice, and then before the due date to discuss how the doctor supports wom en in labor and what he or she considers too long. If the doctor says labor has stalled, its OK to ask if mom or baby is in danger and if there are alternatives to an immediate cesarean, Ondeck said. Guidelines to reduce C-section births urge waiting D.C. R.I. Del. SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention APCesarean birthsThe percentage of births in the United States by cesarean section has leveled off after rising for more than a decade. 20% 25 30 35 40 45 CESAREAN BIRTHS 021914: Graphic shows rate of cesarean births in U.S. and by state; 2c x 5 inches; with BC-MED--Waiting for Baby; KSV; E T A 5 p.m. Editors Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication 15 20 25 30 35 percent 2012: 32.8% 1992: 22.3% Cesarean sections as a percentage of all deliveries in the U.S. Cesarean deliveries in 2012 by state Louisiana: 40.2% Utah: 22.6%

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: Can you be sex ually harassed/abused by your spouse? My husband talks dirty to me and grabs at my breasts. I have repeated ly asked him to stop, but he doesnt listen and continues to do it. We have two small kids at home, and by the time they go to bed, I could care less about being intimate. His behavior disgusts me, and to be honest, I dont want to have sex with him. I have fe male problems and have told him it hurts, but it makes no difference to him. He touch es me in front of the kids, and I have to slap his hand away. I cant leave him because I dont have a car or income for myself, nor do I have family or friends close by. I cant go to his family because they see him in a different light. What would you suggest, and is it harass ment and could I press charges? LEAVE MY AURA ALONE DEAR AURA: You have men tioned so many problems in your short letter that its hard to know where to begin. While your husbands attempts at foreplay are beyond clumsy and ineffective, I cant help but feel some sympathy for him because it appears you have him on a starvation diet. How long this can continue for either of you is uncertain. Rather than try to charge ha rassment, why not schedule an appointment with your gyne cologist and nd out WHY hav ing sex is painful for you. It is not supposed to be, and your doctor may be able to help you resolve the problem. Marriage counseling might also help, because its clear you and your husband arent communicat ing on any meaningful level. If these problems are not resolvable, you cant contin ue living like this and neither can he. Because your fami ly isnt nearby and you have no transportation, call or write them and let them know you may need their help to return. If they are unable to help you, contact a domestic abuse ho tline. Unwanted sexual ad vances could be considered harassment, and sex without consent is rape. DEAR ABBY: It absolutely frosts me when parents head for the toy department so their chil dren will have something to play with while they shop. Then, after the kids have spent time drooling, teething, sneez ing, etc., they leave the dirty toys at the end of the aisle for someone else to buy. Yesterday I saw a child suck ing on the paw of a stuffed an imal. When I commented on how that must be the childs favorite toy, the mother said it wasnt theirs she was just keeping the little boy quiet while she shopped. Last week I stood behind someone in the checkout line. In her childs mouth was the ribbon from a Mylar balloon. When the mother nished loading her groceries onto the conveyor belt, she said, Time to put this back now! Its my pet peeve: First the germs they get from sucking on this stuff, then the ones ev eryone else is exposed to from the child. And on top of that theres the stealing, because I have seen children break toys. This is wrong, and were all paying for it. Why cant these parents throw something in the diaper bag before they leave home? PUT IT DOWN! IN VIRGINIA DEAR PUT IT DOWN: Because the parents arent doing their job they are forgetful or lazy, and have no consideration for the store owners or oth er shoppers. Sadly, parents like the ones you have described raise children who are just like themselves. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Wife weighs charging coarse husband with harassment

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE.

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbbfn brn r f n r t b n r r r f r r f f f t f r r f b f r r b n f r t r t r r t f r f t f f t n r f f frfn ffrb b rrffbb b r f t n f f r t b f f b f f r r r f t f f b f r r r r t f r t f f r r b b b f r f r f f f f f b t f f b b r f n r r f t b r r f f r f r f f f r f f f f r r r f n f r f b b r f f r f r f f rf ntbf ff t f ffff brttnrr nrf brfb f f n r t n r f r f f f f f f f f r f f f b f t f f f n f f t b f t b f t f r n f f f b t f f b f f nfbb fb t r f r r f b f n r b f f b nfbb t n b n t frn t fff t ttfbff fftrft nffffrn ff ftrttrf brbfbr bfnr rrf btrf fb fftfrfrfff rrf btrf ftfrf rfff t fbnrfffff t rbf t t rf rfrf f rtrf rb frrfbnrr rbf fftrf nt b t fft ffft rtfffb ftbfrr fft b ttf ffr ffffrfff trftf fftf ffttrff rtfffb ft ttrtfrrrtfrr rrfnnf t ttrrffnbb fffrtf t t t t t t t t b f f n f r f f f b f f b f f b f t f r t t b f f f f r f f f r f f t f t f t t r f r b t f f f f b f f f f f b f t r r frrr trf br nfn t t rftf trf t b b rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtf rfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rf nrtbt rfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 rfntbt rfntbrfffrn nnbrnrff tnbntnbnrrfrfb bnbrtn r f n b r r f r r f n t b r f rrbbbrnbtrb rfr rrfbffb trtbnffnnnr tnbb rrfrbffbbn tbbnrfr r n r b b t b t t r f n b r f n f n r r b n t r t n r b b f r b n f r r n n n n f f n b b n b n f f b r b b t n n b f r b b r r b b r f r f n t r t f n r f f n t n n b r b n b n r f f b t tnbrrfrfnb frfrfbfbtbfn brntbntrf bfbtffrbnbr rbrrfr f r n r n b t b rb rnr rnrfn b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf r b f t t f r f n r f r f r b n r f r n r f r f f t r r n n r f r r b n n b r f r f b r n t b r b n n n b r r n r f n n b r b f n b r f f r b r f r n n r t r b f n r n t b r b t t f f f r f n t t f b f n r bbrbbrf nbnfrbbrf nnnbtbbn bnnrfnnrnf nbtbfr bftrtfn ntnrfnfrbtb rnnnb n r n b n r n b n n n fnt nnrfrnnb rnbrrfr t t f b n r b t b b b b r b t r f f n t f r n n b r f b n b r f f b t r r f b n r t t f t n r n n bn bbrnn tbrbnttb ftrbtrfbn trfrnrrb r f f b r f n r f f r t b b r n b n t f r b f f r n b r t t f t n r n b r f f r r n f rbr bbtnbrrfrf fftrfn bffnbn brntbrbtr nbbrfbr rtnnrf bbrf rbnffn b n b f f r f f n n b b bn r f r b t f r f t r n b rrrtbrff trbfrttf ffbnbnnffnr tnbrbbbrrfbrb nnrtnb bnfrfbr nbrffrr trtrbtrb rtbbnrfr r n b r f b f f n r f r f r b r f f f b r r n n f r f f fnt n b r r f b r f f f b r r t t r f b r n n t b b n b r t b b b t n f f n r n b n n r f r t t r r f f r f n b r f r ff rt tt b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf fnt t n n b r r f t r b n r f b b t r f t n n r f t n n b r f b f b b r n r r r f nbbrfbffr rnbtrbtb nffnrnbbbn r f n b n r n t ffbtnbrrf rfrbrbfnnn nnrfrfr nttbbnbnffn rfrb ttrfr brfbbffb bn r f n r f r b n b f r f n r f b r b f f r r t rrbrb nbrnft nbrbbbbbrfn n b b n r ft n b t t t f t n b b n r b r f n r r b t n r r f f r n r f r f n t r n n r n f b r b b r f r t b n b t n b f r n t t b b r f b b n t r r n n b b r r f r f t t f r b r r f r r t t r f r b fftnbrrnrb tnrrfrfrbb nrfnttffrfrf trnntrtnnrf rfnrntnb ffbfnnffnrrt brbnffbrt fnrr nnnfnrfnbrrr ffnnbfrffbrb btnrrr brbbnb rnnnfrnr rfbrrb ttbbnbrrnntr tfrntrrn nnrfbnr rrbtrrrrrf rtrbrfnt nrfnrfbffrr rrb bbrfntrb brrbfrnrtbbr ntrbrrbbnrfn bbbff t t f t n r b f f t n b r n r f r b r f b ft f tt b t r f f r n r n r f f r f r r f r t r f b t n b b t n r t r n f b r f f n f r b n f n f n n r f f f f r n n b b r t r n f n f r b b b r f n n b t f f f t r r b b r f f r f rt b n r f f n n n f f r n n r f f t rf ntb n

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbbfn rfntb rn nnnnt nb rtb rnnffrn fntbb n nftb n r n t b b rt b fnt nrtbb rff n tb rfnfnffnf tb fnnft nnnnf nrtbb fnb tbb frt b ffnrn ftb nbn tb r nrrftn t rnfr fnnntb f r t b n tbb nt b nffnft b nnt fnfb ffnfnnf tb fnfnf tb fnnrr fffnnft r f n f r n b b f f n t b nfr rnrntb t b nrf nnt r n n n n n r t b nnfffff nnt nnr nrft t nnnnfr fnrt nnrn rnnfntbb ffnff frnft nf nffrnt nrrnn rntbb nnr t tb nbbb nnft r t b rf nnnt frfrnn nnnrftbb nfrn rnntbb rf tb n f n n n t b b nnnfnrn rt nrntb b ftb n r f r f n n n n t b b f nbftbbb rnfnnf ftnrn n r n t b n t b b rnfrn nrnt f bfrftbb nrrfnn btb nnnff rtbb frnrn tb r n f n b n t b rfr tbb ffn ntbnrnt rrn tbb fnt b tb nfnbn rt bt rnt b rrn t nnrnfnn nt nrf rfrnt b nfffnnf rnfntbbb b n fnt b nbfnb rbrf fnft nn rrnnfntb nn fnt nnn ft nrnrnfnnf ntbbb frnffffn t bb fnt fnnrn tb t b r t b nnnt nftb b nnnf ntb ff tb ft nrn nnb nnt frfn nnnrntb b nnt b bn nnrnt frnrn rt r rtbb rnt b bbrrnrr rnt nfnnr frnrntb fft t b t rnr rnnffftb ftb bn tb b tbn b nf rtbb nnrrnr tb fnrnt fntb t b t b b b rfnrnfrf nftbb rrnnff nrnnft b f ntbbbb frb ftb n f nntb nbrnn nt rf t rfrt b nnt r f t t rnnf nrt b n ntb rrrnrt fr t r tbb b nnn fnt tn ffnnrrr ftb nnrff ftb nb nrntb nrnb ftbb nnnr nnnntb n n f n n f n f t f f r f f n f f r n r f n f n f f n r r f n n n r f b b ffrf rt nnnff fnnft b f nrnnrn t r f f f t b rnt rtbb nnnr tb nrtb nr tb rr tb nrnr tb nrrt f r f t r b rn rt rn nnfnfnrn fnbrrtb bb rr tb f rntb nnrr tbb nnnrn rntb n nnt bt b b t b fnf fnt f t f brfnftb ft b f nnntbb f r t b nnrrn tb rrtb frn rntb fnfnf ntb rn rtbb b ff ftbb nftb fnrtb b rfnnnfn rrt rn fntbb f frnfnftbb b r n n f b n n f b b b n r n f n f r f f n f r f r n r f f n n r f n n f f n f f r n n n n n bnnrfnf rftb nfnfbn nrt bbb nrrn nfnrtbb bfnnr t b bbt nf rnffrnfr rtb r nfrnt bbb nf fnftbb nf nffnn rtbb tb fnf fftbb t frtnnf b nrnf bbbtb rfrr t tb nbft brnnn fffnnr n n n nrn nnnb fnfffnnrt tb nb n f n n n r n n r n n f n r n f n b n r r n b n n n b

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 rfntbt rfnr trb br fnrn bbbr rbb rrfn b nn br rfnnrbnn nb rrfnnr bfnn rbn nrr rfnnrn bb rfnr nrfrb n n tbbrrfnrn n nnt brfnnn t t n rbrr fnnnrn brfrb rrf br rfnrr bb rr fnrfnnr ntf t r b nrfnn ntf fnnbn t br fnrnn t r f r n br rfb t r nnnb rbn brrf f btt bbnr rfr brfn rb b brbrfnr bn nrrr rfnnr t t nrnnr bbrfnnr nr nnrfnnr b b r f n n r t t r b b bb nt t t rr rbb rbrfnnr b f t fr t n brfr btf t tf rr rbr fnnrn t t nnb rb bbbrn bbbbrnr bbnnb bbbrfnnn b nn bbbrfnn rnr b bb frft bb f f rb rbbrb brfnnnb t b bbbr rrbrbr tbbr fnnnb br rbr brr rnnbrr fnnbn b nrfnnnr n t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b t rb bb brfnnnfnr bb f f bbbrf f brbb bbb rb rrbr fnnrn b rf t t r r r f n t t t r b b n n r b r bf f bbff f t t t r b b n n r b r fn t bb bfnn rbn t t t r b b n n r b r r t r f n r b r r b r n t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b t t t t t r b t b r f n r t r b n rf ff b r n n n r b b f n n r n r f n n n n frt f t b b r b r r r b b b r f n r t r f nf b rfn t r nnrbbr br fnnnfnnnrb n b r nf t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b bff b f n r r n n b f f t rf rbrrr rn r t b b r r r b r f n n r b r f n n r r f n n r t t t r t t t t t r t r t t t t r bf tf t r b r b b t b t t r b b b r t b r r b b r b b b b n n n t f t f n n r f n r f n n r b b fnnrr b bbb rfnr t t t b r f n r n t bbr rfnn brr bf tf t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b bf tf bbrb bbrfn rbnn nbbr b rf fnnrbnn t t t t r t t t r n b b r b b b b b r f n n r n n n bbtb rrbbbr brb fnnfnnr brn r f n n n r t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b bf tf bbff f t t b nrfnnb n t brfnr t t br fnrb bn brfnrn n rfnrbn brfrb nn t bbr bbbrfnr n rtf brr fnrbn bb brfnr brrr fnrbn t rb rbbbr bbbbrb rfrn t rfn bn r b b b r f n r n nrrfnnr n rrb rfnrbn nfnn bn bbr fnr brb brfnrn r bbrfrn rfnrnn frft br rrfnnr t t b rfnr t t rfnr n n n b brfnnrn frtftf



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BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties JASON COLLINS IS FIRST OPENLY GAY NBA PLAYER, SPORTS B1LAKE APOPKA LOOP: Phase 2 of the trail set to open, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Kids with seizures use marijuana as treatment, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, February 24, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 55 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.78 / 62Partly sunny with brief showers. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comA new Lake Coun ty schools dis trict-wide an ti-bullying initiative has been instrumen tal in making it easier for students to report bullying, school of cials said. Implemented at the beginning of the 2013-14 school year, the initiative provides an anti-bullying curriculum for each school, which is managed under the Safe Schools department. The initiative is comprehensive about educating about diversity and differences in students, said Bill Mathias, school board member. We have also made it easier for students to feel comfortable reporting it. Those students that feel threatened are coming forward. The initiative is unique in that administrators and ofcials know how to spot bullying wherever it takes place in the school, said Pam Beeler, program specialist for Safe Schools. School ofcials have reported 28 cases of bullying so far this school year. By comparison, eight fewer cases were reported in the 2012-13 school year. A number of highly publicized anti-bullying measures have been attempted in the school district in the last two years: Two students at Carver Middle School have been trying for two years to establish a GayStraight Alliance club to prevent bullying. Stormy Rich, an 18-year-old Umatilla High School student, Lake County schools initiative addressing bullying district wide PHOTOS BY PETER BAUER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP ABOVE, BELOW: Singer Lizzie Sider relays her anti-bullying message through music, song and dance, with some help from her student band, at South Daytona Elementary School, in South Daytona, on February 3. LUCAS L. JOHNSON IIAssociated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. With possibly hundreds of thousands of rape kits untested across the country, a number of states are proposing legislation to address backlogs that in at least one case dates back nearly three decades. In Memphis, Tenn., alone, there are more than 12,000 untested rape kits going back to the 1980s, according to the New York-based Rape Kit Action Project, which has been tracking the backlogs nationwide. In the en tire state of Texas, there KATHY GANNONAssociated PressISLAMABAD Afghanistans Taliban said Sun day they had suspended mediation with the Unit ed States to exchange cap tive Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for ve senior Taliban prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay, halting at least temporar ily what was considered the best chance yet of secur ing the 27-year-old soldiers freedom since his capture in 2009. In a terse Pashto language statement emailed to The Associated Press Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid blamed the current complex political situation in the country for the suspension. A U.S. ofcial with knowledge of the talks said the cause of the suspension was not the result of any issue between the United States and Taliban. He declined to elaborate and spoke on con dition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to journalists. Bergdahl, of Hailey, Idaho, was last seen in a video released in December, foot age seen as proof of life demanded by the U.S. Bergdahl is believed to be held in the border regions between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Mujahid said the indirect talks with the U.S. had been mediated by Qatar, where the Taliban established a political ofce last June. The video of Bergdahl was part of the negotiations which were to lead to the eventual trans fer of the ve Taliban leaders Taliban says it suspends talks to exchange US soldier for Gitmo prisoners INTELCENTER / AP This Dec. 8, 2010 image shows a frame grab from a video released by the Taliban containing footage of a man believed to be Bowe Bergdahl, left.Bills seek to tackle backlog of untested rape kits ADRIAN SAINZ / APMeaghan Ybos discusses Memphis backlog of untested rape kits on Thursday in Memphis, Tenn. Staff ReportThe Lake County Public Safety Department and the Groveland Fire Department will sign an automat ic aid agreement this morning at Grovelands Fire Station 94 at 193 Cherry Valley Trail. County ofcials hope additional pacts with others cities will be signed. The Groveland agreement states that the closest emergency unit, whether Lake County Fire or Groveland Fire, will respond to emer gency incidents within the Inter-local Service Boundary Agreement, GROVELANDLake to sign mutual aid pact; envisions othersSEE BULLYING | A2SEE AID | A2SEE BACKLOG | A2SEE SOLDIER | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 24, 2014: This year your networking and interpersonal skills pay off in a way that you had not anticipated. You see the power of social media in your life as well. Maintain control over your nances, as the unexpected is likely to happen when taking risks. Use care with emotional and nancial matters. If you are single, you could meet someone whose company you thoroughly enjoy. Recognize what you need in a long-term relationship. If you are attached, as a couple, you will manifest a goal, but you might be taken aback by its implications. CAPRICORN can be sly at times and wise at other times. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Encourage others to verbalize their thoughts. Be as direct as possible when dealing with an associate with whom you often get involved. Steer clear of any nancial agreements for now. You might be uncomfortable with what is happening. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Decide to head in a new direction. Detach rst, so that you can gain a broader perspective of what is possible. Your long-term goals will take the lead right now; let them guide you in making important choices. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Deal with a loved one directly. You need to follow through on what is important to you. A partner or close friend will ask for more feedback, so share your thoughts. At the same time, make sure that you are on the course you want to be on. CANCER (June 21July 22) You might feel as though someone is crossing the line. You know your limits, but this person seems to have forgotten what they are. In your most caring manner, do your best to communicate your boundaries; hopefully you will be heard. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) When are you focused, little can disrupt you. Understand your limits with a partner who might not be as enthusiastic as you are. Jump into what you want to do. Deal with surprising news rst. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Tap into your endless well of ingenuity when making plans with someone who has a difcult personality. Understand that the unexpected seems to surround this person. Communication could have an overserious tone. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might want to have a discussion, but a loved one always seems to change the topic or not be available. Could you be getting a hint that this person might not want to talk? Let go of the issue for now. Youll make an excellent impression on a boss. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are full of enthusiasm, but you tend to hold a lot back. A key person might think you are too serious. Make it a point to ver balize the extent of your imagination and express more of your innate passion. Think positively. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) A friend could push you to react or go along with his or her pressure. Your response should be based on whether you are for or against the issue in question. The unexpected will occur with a child or a new friend be prepared. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might feel as if you cant be stopped, no matter what you do. Share a vision with others, whether it involves your personal life or work. The unexpected could occur with close loved ones. Understand that you cant control anyone but yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might want to face a problem after revisiting former solutions. You could get an urge to be rebellious and do the unexpected, yet your good sense will point to a different solution. Share your softer feelings with a child or loved one. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Youll beam in much more of what you want. People also seem more open and friendly. Use caution around a purchase or money matter. Though you might think you know about the pros and cons of the situation, a fact could be hidden. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US FEB. 23CASH 3 . ............................................... 2-3-0 Afternoon . .......................................... 4-6-0 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 5-2-5-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 3-0-0-7FLORIDALOTTERY FEB. 22FANTASY 5 . ........................... 5-18-22-25-33 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................. 4-5-14-33-39-46 POWERBALL ........................ 2-3-13-14-544 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. intervened to stop bully ing of a girl with mental disabilities on a bus. As a result, she was kicked off the bus. In 2013, the Lake County School Board recognized Cypress Elementary students Kristopher Ganesh, Jamie Munoz and Marleen Ryan for starting Bully Blockers, an anti-bullying program that includes Buddy, a mailbox fashioned out of cardboard to look like a huge osprey, the schools mascot. Students can use the mailbox to deposit notes with concerns and questions related to bullying. Now, 15-year-old country singer Lizzie Sider is speaking on the issue locally, where is she is addressing more than 100 schools all over the state. On Wednesday, she is planning a presentation at Tavares Elementary School, and on Thursday she will give presentations at Seminole Springs Elementary in Eustis and Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. According to an article in the Daytona Beach News-Journal, Sider said the issue is important to her because I had experience with bullying when I was in elementary school. The News-Journal re ported that her father gave her advice when she was dreading going to school. Nobody has the power to ruin your day, he told her, according to the News-Journal. School ofcials said the hardest issue to confront currently is cyber bullying found on social media sites and in other areas on the Internet. It is very difcult for the school district to track it, said Chris Patton, spokesman for the school district. Many times, it is occurring off campus and after school hours. Stuart Klatte, president of the Lake County Education Association, agreed. That is a delicate balance, dealing with cyber bullying especially, he said. The schools have tried to take a stand and deal with it when they can. Bullying is a complex problem, and it is hard to gauge how big of an issue it is in Lake County, Klatte said. A lot of it is going to be follow through from the administrators after the report has been made by either the student or teacher who has knowledge of it, he said of tackling each case of bullying. Tod Howard, school board member, said because there are so many programs on bullying it is imperative to identify which ones are working and which ones are not. Instead of doing all the programs, we need to identify which ones are working and make sure they are being resourced properly, he said. BULLYING FROM PAGE A1 or ISBA area. This agreement is a win-win situation for our citizens, said Lake County Commissioner Jimmy Conner. Together, we can better protect lives and property and reduce insurance costs for residents in unincorporated Lake County, and within participating cities. The county is also implementing an Au tomatic Vehicle Location or AVL system, which is similar to a GPS monitoring sys tem that will dispatch the closest unit to any emergency, whether county or city. We will share a centralized dispatch and the costs of responding to emergen cies in the Groveland area, said Lake County Public Safety Department Chief John Jolliff. This agreement will im prove response times and offer citizens an improved level of protection. The agreement with Groveland goes into effect on Saturday. Lake County is also working with other municipalities in the hopes of striking similar agreements throughout the county. This is truly a big deal for the citi zens of Lake County, said Commission er Welton Cadwell. I hope every city in Lake County that has a re department will sign onto this agreement. AID FROM PAGE A1 are about 16,000 untested kits collecting dust in police evidence rooms. Tennessee is among at least 17 states with proposals that range from requiring law enforcement agencies to inven tory their rape kits to an alyzing them in a certain amount of time. Three states Colorado, Illi nois and Texas have passed laws that mandate a statewide account ing of untested rape kits. Most of the other states proposals favor the inventory measure that would require all law enforcement agen cies that store rape kits to count the number of untested kits. Rape Proj ect spokeswoman Natasha Alexenko estimates there are about 400,000 nationwide that fall into that category. Until we enact this kind of legislation where were counting them, we really have no idea, said Alexenko, a rape victim whose rape kit was nally tested after nearly 10 years, and her attacker arrested after a match was found. Rape victim Mea ghan Ybos of Memphis has been crusading for legislation to address the backlogs for sever al years. The 27-yearold was 16 when she was sexually assaulted in her suburban home in 2003. She underwent a forensic rape exam, but never heard anything else about her kit. In 2012, she was watch ing the local news and learned police had ar rested a suspected serial rapist in the same neighborhood where she lived. I just knew it was the same person, recalled Ybos, who called police, told them about her assault and persuaded them to reopen her case. Her rape kit was eventu ally examined and the suspects DNA and that in her kit matched. The suspect pleaded guilty in her case and is currently incarcerated. But Ybos, who is also supporting a proposal to lift Tennessees eightyear statute of limitation on rapes, said it shouldnt have taken her that long to get justice. They never tried to process it until I called ... and asked them, Ybos said of her rape kit. BACKLOG FROM PAGE A1 held since 2002 in Guan tanamo Bay. The leadership of the Islamic Emirate has de cided to suspend the process for some time due to the current com plex political situation in the country, the state ment read. The process will remain suspended without the exchange of the prisoners until our decision to resume. Mujahed did not elab orate on what political situation in Afghanistan led to the suspension of talks or say when they might resume. Afghan istan is in the middle of a presidential campaign ahead of an April 5 elec tion. Two-term President Hamid Karzai cannot run again for ofce under the Afghan constitution. The U.S. State Depart ment has refused to ac knowledge the negotia tions, but the U.S. ofcial previously told the AP that indirect talks were underway. In response to the Tal iban statement Sunday, U.S. Embassy spokesman in Afghanistan Robert Hilton said: Sgt. Bergdahl has been gone far too long, however we cant discuss the efforts were taking to obtain his return. Col. Tim Marsano, spokesman for the Idaho National Guard, said he spoke Sunday with Berg dahls family and said they declined to comment further. The family has no more words, Marsano said. Efforts at a swap are also seen as a conces sion to Karzai. Washington would like to see him back away from his refusal to sign a securi ty pact that is necessary for the U.S. to leave a re sidual force behind in Afghanistan. Karzai says he wants Washington to push reconciliation be tween the Afghan gov ernment and the Taliban forward, without offer ing specics. The ve Taliban de tainees at the heart of the proposal are the most senior Afghans still held at the prison at the U.S. base in Cuba. Each has been held since 2002. They include Mohammad Fazl, Abdul Haq Wasiq, Mullah Norullah Nori, Khairullah Khairkhwa and Mohammed Nabi. SOLDIER FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LADY LAKE Waste Division to hold collection eventThe Lake County Solid Waste Division will host a Household Hazardous Waste Collection event, from 9 / a.m. to noon Thursday at the Lady Lake Convenience Center, 1200 Jackson St. Representatives will be on hand to collect small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products such as lawn and garden, photo and swimming pool chemicals, paint and related products, cleaning solutions, motor oil and used gas, batteries, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks. Excessive amounts of hazardous materials will not be accepted due to limited space in the mobile unit. To schedule a drop-off day, call 352-343-3776. For information, go to www.lakecounty.gov/hazardouswaste or call 352-343-3776.WILDWOOD Young artists sought for showcaseThe Young Performing Artists or ganization is seeking young dancers, vocalists and instrumentalists for the upcoming showcase, March 22 at Wildwood Country Resort, where competitors can win valuable scholarship awards. Interested young people can get an application to audition by calling 352-748-2008, at www.youngper formingartists.org or by emailing to youngartists@aol.com. Applications must be turned in by Feb. 24.EUSTIS GeorgeFest 2014 is slated for this weekendThe 112th celebration of George Washingtons birthday will be in full swing at the annual GeorgeFest event, at 5 / p.m. Feb. 28, and from 9:30 / a.m. to 10:30 / p.m. March 1 in downtown Eustis at Ferran Park, 1520 S. Bay St. Events include music and reworks, Dog Jog, parade and vendors. The festival is free, however, tickets for the on-site carnival require payment. On Sunday a patriotic service will be held in Ferran Park. For information, call the Chamber at 352-357-3434 or email Info@ EustisChamber.org. For a listing of the full schedule of events, go to www.eustischamber.org.TAVARES Extension to host Spring Vegetable Gardening classThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County is hosting a Spring Vegetable Gardening class at 10 / a.m. on March 1 at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd. The hour-long class is part of the Saturday in the Garden speaker series and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticulture agent. Online registration is available at / www.eventbrite.com. Class fee is $5 for adults and free for those under the age of 16.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportThe last phase of con struction on the U.S. Highway 441 widening project in Fruitland Park is about to get under way. The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and contractor D.A.B. Constructors Inc. are days away from switching southbound US 441 trafc onto a newly paved southbound road, according to a press re lease. Both northbound and southbound traf c have been sharing the northbound section of US 441. The trafc switch, which is necessary to facilitate the approximate 12-week construction time of the median, is proposed to take place sometime between late February and early March. Immediately following the trafc switch, a oneto two-day lane closure and lane shift will be implemented on the north bound side of US 441 at Spring Lake Road. The purpose is to allow the contractor to repair a loss of pressure in the 16-inch water main. The contractor is sched uling this temporary pattern change on a week day between the hours of 7 / a.m. and 5 / p .m. Mes sage boards and other trafc alerts will be post ed along the roadway, as well as added to the Lane Closures tab on www.c roads.com. Once the water main repair and median con struction are complet ed, the entire project will be capped with the nal friction course of asphalt. Provided there are no major weather events or oth er unpredictable delays, FDOT is estimating a June end time for the project. For additional information, call Irina Lallemand, public involvement coor dinator, at 352-427-4054 or email irina.lallemand@ dot.state..us.FRUITLAND PARKLast U.S. 441 widening phase set to begin THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comCar windows were tar geted and shot out with BB or pellet guns in the area of Sailsh Lane in Fruitland Park over the weekend, and Lake County Sherriffs Ofce ofcials said there have been a to tal of 65 incidents of vandalized vehicles through out the county. Sgt. Jim Vachon, spokesman for LCSO, said a newspaper deliv ery person made the 911 call after he reported see ing several car windows smashed out in the area shortly before 4 / a.m. S at urday. As deputies investigated the crimes, Vachon said vandalism also was documented in other ju risdictions in Lake County, including Leesburg, Eustis and Umatilla. Carl Underwood told WESH 2 News that his neighbors were upset by the vandalism spree. At least 12 cars were vandalized up and down Sailsh Lane, and Underwood said he had two cars van dalized, each parked in a different location. I want them to per sonally take care of ev erybodys window nancial responsibility, rst and foremost, and then if there is any kind of pro bation or whatever, stick it to them. They need to pay, Underwood said to WESH about the perpetrators of the crime. Vachon said investiga tors have no suspects. Investigators are asking anyone with information regarding these incidents to contact the Lake Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce at 353343-2101 or CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS.FRUITLAND PARK 65 incidents of vandalized vehicles reported in Lake County PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE One of the vandalized vehicles discovered in Fruitland Park over the weekend. Staff ReportFlanked by mem bers of The Mount Dora Roadrun ners Club, Lake County Commission er Leslie Campione on Thursday helped open Phase 2 of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail. As a Lake County commissioner, and a proponent of protecting our areas natural resources for both ecotourism and quality of life for residents, I am proud to be here today at the ofcial opening of the extension of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, Campione said in a press release. The ribbon cutting opened 6.3 miles of trail in the St. Johns River Water Management Districts (SJR WMD) scenic Lake Apopka North Shore Restoration Area. The area is a haven for hundreds of species of wildlife and is considered a premier birding destination, said Elisha Pappacoda, the countys public infor mation ofcer. Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Orange County Commissioner Frederick C. Brummer, Orange County Parks Manager Matt Suedmey er, Mount Dora Mayor Cathy Hoechst, Apopka Vice Mayor Bill Ar rowsmith and Robert Christianson, director of SJRWMDs Division of Strategic Planning and Financial Ser vices, all spoke at the event. By summer, Lake County plans to nish a trailhead and dramatic overlook along the north shore of Lake Apopka. When completed, the trails will eventually link up to the South Lake Trail and the West Or ange Trail. We are happy to do our part in expanding APOPKALake Apopka Loop trail section opens SUBMITTED PHOTO Lake County Commissioner Leslie Campione, second from right, was among the dignitaries who cut the ribbon on Phase 2 of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail.SEE LOOP | A4 STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily CommercialFruitland Park commissioners held a rare Saturday morning workshop session to discuss the citys needs as its population dou bles over the next three years. Mayor Chris Bell set the tone for the 9 / a.m. session: Weve made suggestions that (The Villages pro posed development) will benet our residents, Bell said. I think we should be able to show them the benets. Bell urged commissioners to fo cus on the big picture. What Im looking at is something at 30,000 feet, not 500 feet, Bell said ref erencing a scale used in aerial photography.Fruitland Park brainstorms fiveyear growth planSEE GROWTH | A4 Staff ReportThe Florida Department of Health in Lake County is seeking nominations for the 2014 Hidden Heroes of Public Health awards. The awards recognize an individual and an organization out side of the Health Department that worked to improve the health and well-being of Lake County residents during 2013 and are part of the departments efforts to bring attention to National Public Health Week, April 7-13. Public health encompasses more than just the county health TAVARESNominees sought for health heroesSEE HEROES | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 59 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb the trail, and look forward to the day when the entire Lake Apopka Loop Trail is complete, Campione said. Following the ceremony, she toured the res toration areas uplands, where the wildlife shifts from alligators to deer and turkey, Pappacoda said. This area in Lake County is one of the only shaded parts surrounding Lake Apopka. For more than 15 years, The Friends of Lake Apopka has worked with local governments and the SJRWMD on ecotourism in the area, including construction of the loop trail, which began two years ago. Phase 1 of the trail, a four-mile stretch beginning at Magnolia Park, opened in June. This trail will provide our residents and ecotourism visitors with another wonderful option to enjoy Central Floridas gorgeous scenery and outdoors, Jacobs said. LOOP FROM PAGE A3 City Manager Gary La Vinia said commissioners should brainstorm. Talk about what the commission would like to see your vi sion over the next ve years, La Vinia said. That vision includes the proposed Villages of Fruitland Park, with more than 2,000 homes valued at more than $1 billion, according to projections by The Villages, and about 4,000 new city residents all of whom could arrive next year. Commissioners will review the rst round of The Villages development plans at their meeting at 7 / p .m. Thursday. The project is expected to generate $1 million to $1.4 mil lion in what a former city ofcial called dis posable revenues. The Villages is on the way, but The Villages is what it is, La Vinia told commissioners. The real impact is de velopment outside The Villages, he said. Community Development Director Char lie Rector agreed. Forget The Villages, Rector said. Theyll take care of themselves. The thing we need to focus on is everything else, he said. Last month Rector told commissioners that more than 500 new homes planned and approved in Fruit land Park could start development soon. The homes, in proj ects that went dormant when real estate values plummeted ve years ago, are back on the drawing boards. I spend hours on the phone every day now with property owners and developers who want to talk over their options, Rector said. Its like a horse race. Theyre all lining up at the gate and were waiting to see whos the rst off the line, and every new conversation starts with The Villages, Rector said. After a two-hour dis cussion, commissioners agreed that im provements to the citys wastewater facili ties, street paving and a new Public Works facil ity should get the citys rst attention, then public amenities, including a community center complex, expan sion of the recreation department and a new swimming pool north of Miller Blvd. (County Road 466A). Bell added a histori cal museum, space for a Chamber of Commerce and a visitors center, all of which could be housed in buildings the city already owns. Commissioners also agreed to look at new design standards for future projects that will focus on enhancements embellishments to improve the appearance and function of upcoming proj ects without restricting developers and builders to specic architectural themes. GROWTHFROM PAGE A3department, Paul Butler, interim pub lic information ofcer, said in a press release. This person, orga nization or business embodies the following criteria: %  en Public health efforts make a signicant difference in the lives of the people served by monitoring health status to iden tify and solve commu nity health problems. %  en Public health efforts build on individual and community strengths and assets by informing, educating and empowering people about health issues. %  en Public health efforts mobilize individ uals and community groups to identify and solve health problems and work in collabo ration/cooperation to promote public health. %  en Public health ef forts are unique, innovative or ll an identi ed gap in a specic community, i.e., child obesity, physical activity, etc. Nominees contributions must have oc curred in 2013 in Lake County. To nominate an individual or or ganization, a com pleted nomination form must be submitted to the Health De partment by 5 / p .m. on March 21. Nomination forms are available at the Florida Department of Health in Lake Coun ty Administration Ofce, 16140 U.S. Highway 441, in Eustis, or at www.lakechd.com. For information, call 352-589-6424, extension 2265. HEROES FROM PAGE A3 OBITUARIESOwen N. HietpasOwen N. Hietpas, Leesburg, FL, age 88, died at home Friday, February 21, 2014, with his family at his side. Owen was born May 9, 1925 in the Town of VandenBroek, Wisconsin; son of the late William P. and Mar garet (Verhagen) Hietpas. Owen married Irene N. Weyenberg August 21, 1946 at St. John Catholic Church, Little Chute, WI. He moved to Florida in 1973 and shortly there after began develop ing Corley Island Mo bile Home Park with his brother-in-law Jer ry Hietpas. Owen and Irene were very active in the St. Paul Catho lic Community and in 2001 they received the Father Phillip J. Stege man Memorial Volunteer Award. They spent many years traveling in their motorhome throughout the United States and Canada. They were proud to say they visited all fty states as well as many foreign countries. Owen enjoyed bowling, shing, and never missed a Wednesday night poker game at the clubhouse. He will always be remembered for his big smile and his eagerness for help ing family, friends, and neighbors. Owen is sur vived by his wife Irene, a son, Ronald (Donna) Hietpas, Waukesha, WI; a daughter, Charlotte (Gene) Sullivan, Winter Park, FL; grandchildren David (Jodie) Hietpas, Jeremy (Claudine) Hietpas, Katie (Antho ny) Sullivan Bellia; great-grandchildren Mackenzie and Owen Hietpas, Benjamin and Irene Hietpas, and Ab igail Bellia; a brother Mark (Gladys) Hietpas, sisters-in-law Sister Catherine Weyenberg and Shirley Weyenberg, brother-in-law Bill (Sandra) Mattern. He is further survived by many nieces and neph ews. Owen was pre ceded in death by his son Randy, brothers and sisters-in-law Art (Irene), Paul (Ethel), Bill (Yvonne) and Dennis; sisters and broth ers-in-law Patricia (Henry) Tatro, Bernice (Ted) Larson, Shirley Mattern, Betty (Casey) Vander Sanden, Margaret, sister-in-law Ruth Hietpas and mem bers of Irenes family: father and mother in law George and Hattie Weyenberg, Betty (Peter) Schumacher, Mary (Woodrow) Diedrick, Lester (Elaine) Wey enberg, Julia (Gerald) Hietpas and Clarence Weyenberg. The family would like to thank ev eryone for their kind ness and support. A special thank you to Cornerstone Hospice, Owens caregivers, and nephews Russ and Steve Hietpas and niece Gina Stalvey for all they did to help. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Thursday, February 27, 2014, 8:30AM, at St. Pauls Catholic Church in Leesburg, Florida with Father John Giel, Celebrant. Inurnment will be in St. Johns Cemetery in Little Chute, Wiscon sin. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to Cornerstone Hospice Foundation, 2445 Lane Park Road, Tavares, FL 32778.Yvonne E. Parham RiceMrs. Yvonne Elizabeth Parham Rice, 90, of Umatilla passed away Friday, February 21, 2014. She was born at Ozone, Tennessee on October 2, 1923. A graduate of Cumberland County High School and teacher preparation at Car son-Newman College, she taught at Cumber land Homesteads Ele mentary for two years before moving to Lake County, Florida. In 1944, Yvonne married Augustus M. Rice. In 1949 they moved to the Umatilla area where she has lived since. She earned her BAE de gree at the Universi ty of Florida in 1965, and taught at Umatil la Elementary for 25 years. Since her retirement in1990 she has been active in nature and conservation orga nizations, Lake County Conservation Coun cil, Audubon, The PEAR Association, Trout Lake Nature Center, the Beautyberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Florida Wildlife Federation, Defenders of the Environment and the Nature Conser vancy. A member of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, she has served as pres ident of Rho Chapter, Director of District IV, president of Mu State (Florida), as Mu State parliamentarian for 10 years and as a mem ber of 3 international committees. While teaching she served as president of the Lake County Education Association, chairman of the Lake Association of Media Specialists and president of the Lake County Reading Association. Yvonnes hobbies included conchology, edible wild plants, birding and native plant identication. She gave many work shops and programs on all the above. She is survived by loving nieces and nephews in Ten nessee. There will be no local services. Her ashes will be interred at the Ozone Ceme tery, Ozone, Tennessee. Those wishing to do so may send me morial contributions to the Trout Lake Nature Center, Inc. Endowment Fund, P. O. Box 641, Eustis, FL 327270641. Online condo lences may be made at www.beyersfuneralhome.com. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.DEATH NOTICESRichard Buck BarnesRichard Buck Barnes, of Paisley, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Barbara Ann CoffeltBarbara Ann Coffelt, 71, of Talking Rock, Georgia, died Friday, February 21, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, WildwoodlJohnnie B. FinzelberJohnnie B. Finzelber, 86, of Eustis, died Saturday, February 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.IN MEMORY HIETPAS RICE KELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressMIAMI Roughly 1 million uninsured Floridians who repeatedly heard affordable health insurance was just around the corner for them thanks to Presi dent Barack Obamas new law are nding a harsh reality theyre too poor to qualify. The Florida House voted last year not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act because of fears that it could eventual ly cost the state hun dreds of millions annually, meaning those earning below the pov erty line, $11,490 for an individual or $23,550 for a family of four, ar ent eligible for tax credits through the online marketplace. Without those tax credits, most people living below the pov erty line cant afford coverage. In Florida, generally only children, pregnant wom en, the disabled and single parents or care takers of underage children are eligible for Medicaid, the governments free health plan for the poor. Its the hardest thing to explain to a consumer that theyre falling in this gap, said Juanita Mainster, a Miami counselor who helps consumers sign up for health insurance. She and other coun selors estimate only 30 percent of applicants at their Miami ofce end up signing up for a health plan because they cant afford it. Christina Coello, a 27-year-old full-time law student with a pre-existing medical condition, hasnt had insurance for seven years. So when I heard about Obamacare, I thought this is a really good thing for people that have pre-existing conditions. But when Coella tried to enroll, she learned she was about $2,500 shy of quali fying for a tax credit, making the premiums impossible to afford on her part-time paralegal salary. Yet, her meager salary is still a bit too much to qualify for Medicaid. Its very frustrating because (the Florida House) doesnt want to cover people who are supposedly lazy. Its not only lazy peo ple who need insur ance. A lot of students fall into that catego ry, said Coello, who has a 7-year-old son. Health advocates are doing what they can so consumers dont leave appointments feeling hopeless. Florida CHAIN and navigator groups like the Epilep sy Foundation of Flor ida, which received a federal grant to sign people up for health coverage, are referring consumers to local health departments and community health centers that treat patients on a sliding scale and offer discounted drug programs. Theyll keep say ing, Im poor. I should qualify for something. And theyre right they should but the fact is this is a state that chose not to expand Medicaid, said counselor Adrian Madriz.Poor Floridians fall into Medical expansion gap

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY FlashbackHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I have this recurring dream where have you stopped reading yet? If youre a guy, I bet you have. If youre a woman, I bet youre saying, Oh, please, just wait until you hear my recurring dream! Ive had it since I was 6. It only happens if Im stressed plus Ive eaten cilantro. Fresh cilantro. The dried stuff doesnt do anything and its never really as good; I dont care what they say. But tell me about yours rst because my dream takes a long time. If there are any men still left in the room, by this point theyre tying ropes to lighting xtures because theyre planning to hang themselves. Theyre thinking that death might well be quicker and probably signicantly more pleasant than waiting for these two to stop talking about what happened when they were asleep. Havent you found men to be less than fascinated by the detailed recollections of the unconscious and haphazard experiences that constitute dreams? For a few years, I had a male shrink. Even he didnt want to hear my dreams. And when recurring dreams happen over, say, 10, 20 or even 30 years of marriage and are ritually recited over breakfast as if they were somehow breaking news, Ive known men to get downright irritated and take their coffee to another room. (Thats where he is now: the other room. I told my husband what I was writing about and he decided to go to an entirely different section of the house. Its not as if I was reading out loud or sounding out my words. I wasnt asking him how to spell labyrinth or polyp although both appear regularly in the dream, in case youre inter ested.) Men dont want to hear about dreams. When somebody says, I was playing Barbies with Madeleine Albright and we were either in a circus or a brothel when suddenly I started to cut my hair with manicure scissors and Albright says, Shouldnt a priest read you your rights before he hears your confession? which is what she always says in the dream but this time I answered, These are not my walls, but my paintings are on them, the natural question is, What do you think it means? And a lot of men dont like to analyze things. Ive rarely encountered that problem with women: We crave the kind of weird details dreams deliver. We want to hear when old boyfriends and dead relatives show up; we want to decipher possible prognostications and omens. Maybe this reects my Sicilian and French-Canadian background maybe WASPs havent done this kind of thing since Hawthorne was writing but my aunts used to gather over morning coffee and talk over their nocturnal visions the way Wall Street nanciers talk about the market forecasts. In part, they also did it for the same reason: They would play any combination of numbers that appeared in somebodys dream. Aunt Rose would start, Last night, I was back at 3072 Emmons Avenue and before she could get in another word, Aunt Clara would yell, Im playing those numbers! Theyre mine! Since most of the family lived in walk-up tenements, I dont think dreams turned out to be as reliable an economic indicator as either, say, the Dow Jones or the price of copper futures (which the aunts measured by use of the penny jar), but that didnt undermine the seriousness or regularity of the daily review. It also didnt prevent them from regarding any information they received from the other side as entirely reliable. Somebody dreamt a toddler died in a car accident? That poor kid didnt leave the house for a month. The fact that he didnt die was then used as proof proof you could not dispute that the dream saved his life. I used to think that was hilarious. Now, if I have a dream about falling down the stairs, I hold onto banisters. Perhaps the dreams that come to us even while were on this mortal coil should at least occasionally give us pause if only just long enough to write down the numbers. (Look whos come back into the room. Hi, honey! Columns done!)Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her website at www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Women unravel dreams to mens dismay The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. The United States has the right and a duty to try to tamp down political vi olence in Ukraine, which continued early Thursday despite the announcement of a truce between the government and op position leaders. It was appropriate for Vice President Joe Biden to telephone President Viktor Yanukovich earlier this week to coun sel restraint, and for the State Department to announce that some Ukrainian leaders involved in repressing protesters wont be allowed to travel to the United States. But even as it seeks to inuence events in Ukraine, the Obama administration needs to avoid the impression that it is making that country a front in a new Cold War. President Obama is aware of the delicacy of the situation. On Wednesday, he said he didnt view Ukraine as part of some Cold War chessboard in which were in competition with Russia. Wisely, the administration is allowing European nations to take the lead in mediation efforts, which gained new importance with this weeks shocking violence in Kiev, some of it perpetrated by opponents of the government. As many as 100 people may have been killed Thursday. One can argue that it is Russian President Vladimir Putin who has insisted on reenacting the Cold War by offering economic incentives to Yanukovich as a way to keep Ukraine, once a Soviet republic, in Russias sphere of inuence. Although the immediate cause of the convulsions in Ukraine is the repression of peaceful protest, the crisis is rooted in the governments failure to conclude an association agreement with the European Union that would have included the creation of a free-trade zone and cooperation in law enforcement. Many Ukrainians who voted for Yanukovich in 2010 feel that he has betrayed their trust and under mined Ukraines sovereignty. The political divide in Ukraine has deep historical roots and cant be wholly blamed on Putins interference. Many Ukrainians, mostly in the eastern part of the country, feel an afnity for Russia, while others long for integration with Western Europe. Ultimately, Ukrainians will have to resolve their political identity crisis themselves, but other nations, including the U.S., can play a constructive role in defusing the current conict and holding the Ukrainian government to international standards of civil conduct. That requires diplomacy that is deft as well as determined.From the Los Angeles Times.AVOICEUkraine must not become a front in a new Cold War Havent you found men to be less than fascinated by the detailed recollections of the unconscious and haphazard experiences that constitute dreams? For a few years, I had a male shrink. Even he didnt want to hear my dreams. And when recurring dreams happen over, say, 10, 20 or even 30 years of marriage and are ritually recited over breakfast as if they were somehow breaking news, Ive known men to get downright irritated and take their coffee to another room.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014www.dailycommercial.comSOCHI: Canada tops Sweden for hockey gold / B3 PETR DAVID JOSEK / AP The Olympic Rings are silhouetted during closing ceremonies on Sunday. in Sochi, Russia. Minnesota Timberwolves center Jason Collins, left, defends San Antonio Spurs center Kurt Thomas in a 2009 game in San Antonio. Collins has signed with the Brooklyn Nets to become the rst gay active player in NBA history.AP FILE PHOTO BRIAN MAHONEYAP Basketball WriterJason Collins became the NBAs rst active openly gay player Sunday, signing a 10-day contract with the Brooklyn Nets. Collins will join the Nets for their game Sunday night in Los Angeles against the Lakers. The 35-year-old center revealed at the end of last season he is gay, but he was a free agent and had remained unsigned. With a need for another big man, the Nets turned to the 7-foot Collins, who helped them reach two NBA Finals in the early 2000s. The decision to sign Ja son was a basketball decision, general manager Billy King said in a statement. We needed to increase our depth inside, and with his experience and size, we felt he was the right choice for a 10-day contract. Collins has played 12 NBA seasons, including his rst seven with the Nets, when they were in New Jersey and Jason Kidd was their point guard. Kidd is now the Nets coach and Collins has been a teammate of several other Collins is first openly gay player in NBA SEE NBA | B2 KEITH SRAKOCIC / AP Florida States Aaron Thomas, bottom, loses the ball as Pittsburghs Michael Young, top, defends during the rst half on Sunday in Pittsburgh. JOHN LEICESTERAP Sports WriterSOCHI, Russia Flushed with pride after a spectacular showing at the costliest Olym pics ever, Russia celebrated 17 days of sport-driven global unity on Sunday night with a farewell show that hands off the Winter Games to their next host, Pyeongchang in South Korea. Said the head of the Inter national Olympic Committee: Russia delivered all what it had promised. Raucous spectators chanted Ro-ssi-ya! Ro-ssi-ya! Rus sia! Russia! before being sur rounded by multicolored re works and carried through a visually stunning, sometimes surrealistic panorama of Rus sian history and culture. The crowd was in a party mood after the high-security games passed off safely without feared terror attacks. This is the new face of Russia our Russia, said Dmitry Chernyshenko, head of the So chi organizing committee. He called the games a moment to cherish and pass on to the next generations. In a charming touch, the So chi organizers used the ceremony to make a joke at their own expense. Dancers in shim mering silver costumes formed themselves into four rings and a clump in the center of the stadi um. That was a wink to a technical glitch in the Feb. 7 open ing ceremony, when one of the ve Olympic rings in a wintry opening scene failed to open. The rings were supposed to join together and erupt in reworks. This time, it worked: As Rus sian President Vladimir Putin watched from the stands, the dancers in the clump waited a few seconds and then formed a ring of their own, making ve, drawing laughs from the crowd. The closing ceremony, a fare well from Russia with love, pag eantry and protocol, started at 20:14 local time a nod to the year that Putin seized upon to remake Russias image with the Olympics power to wow and concentrate global attention and massive resources. Now we can see our country is very friendly, said Boris Kozikov of St. Petersburg, Russia. This is very important for other coun tries around the world to see. The nations $51 billion investment topping even Beijings estimated $40 billion layout Associated PresPITTSBURGH, Pa. Okaro White scored 22 points and Florida State played stiing defense to beat Pitts burgh 71-66 on Sun day. Ian Miller added 19 points and Aar on Thomas 14 for the Seminoles (16-11, 7-8 Atlantic Coast Conference), who have won two of their past three. Lamar Patterson led Pitt (20-7, 8-6) with 22 points. The Panthers have lost three in a row and ve of their past seven. They are in danger of falling out of contention for the NCAA tourna ment after winning 15 of 16 games to start the season. Florida State led 37-31 at halftime. Af ter making 13 of 24 DAVE CAMPBELLAP Pro Football WriterINDIANAPOLIS The NFL locker room has long been an unforgiving place. Theres a reason the popular behind-thescenes training camp reality show on HBO is called Hard Knocks, right? The aggression and condence inherent with elite athletes play ing a physically punishing sport can bring about a boys-will-beboys atmosphere that, consider ing the case in Miami last season, has the potential to turn brutal. But with Michael Sam on the verge of becoming the leagues rst openly gay player, maybe hell t in just ne. This is 2014, after all. Sexual orientation isnt as big of a deal for Sams generation as it was for their fathers. Though the stigma of the offensive linemen bullying scandal was still swarming the Dolphins, there were signs at the NFL scouting Will Michael Sam fit in with NFL locker room? SAM Track personnel attempt to dry the track during the NASCAR Daytona 500 auto race on Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. PHELAN M. EBENHACK / AP DAN GELSTONAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH Daytona could use a dome. From rain, potholes, soap and re, the Daytona 500 has had all sorts of delays the last ve years. The latest one came Sunday, with rain shutting down the season opener at Daytona Interna tional Speedway for 6 hours, 22 minutes. The race resumed under the lights with 162 laps left in the 200-lap race. It needed to hit 100 laps (halfway) to become ofcial. If not, and rain resumes, then the second Monday race in three years remains in play. The Great American Race has become more known for its laps es than laps or leaders.Farewell, Sochi! Russia closes costliest Olympic Winter Games DMITRY LOVETSKY / AP Sochi 2014 mascots, a polar bear, a hare and a leopard, approach a ame, representing the burning Olympic cauldron, during the closing ceremony. SEE SAM | B2SEE GAMES | B2FSU defense keys 71-66 win over PittSEE FSU | B2Daytona 500 delays now common in NASCARs openerSEE NASCAR | B2 The Daytona 500 was not completed by press time. See dailycommercial.com for full details.

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 31 25 .554 Brooklyn 25 28 .472 4 New York 21 35 .375 10 Boston 19 38 .333 12 Philadelphia 15 41 .268 16 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 40 14 .741 Washington 28 28 .500 13 Charlotte 27 30 .474 14 Atlanta 26 29 .473 14 Orlando 17 41 .293 25 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 42 13 .764 Chicago 29 26 .527 13 Detroit 23 33 .411 19 Cleveland 22 35 .386 21 Milwaukee 10 45 .182 32 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 40 16 .714 Houston 37 18 .673 2 Dallas 34 23 .596 6 Memphis 31 24 .564 8 New Orleans 23 32 .418 16 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 14 .754 Portland 37 18 .673 5 Minnesota 27 28 .491 15 Denver 25 29 .463 16 Utah 19 36 .345 23 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 38 20 .655 Phoenix 33 21 .611 3 Golden State 34 22 .607 3 L.A. Lakers 19 36 .345 17 Sacramento 19 36 .345 17 Saturdays Games Washington 94, New Orleans 93 Charlotte 92, Memphis 89 Dallas 113, Detroit 102 Atlanta 107, New York 98 Indiana 110, Milwaukee 100 Minnesota 121, Utah 104 Sacramento 105, Boston 98 Golden State 93, Brooklyn 86 Sundays Games L.A. Clippers 125, Oklahoma City 117 Miami 93, Chicago 79 Washington 96, Cleveland 83 Toronto 105, Orlando 90 Sacramento at Denver, late Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers, late Minnesota at Portland, late Houston at Phoenix, late. Mondays Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Golden State at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at New York, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Boston at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m. Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Portland at Denver, 9 p.m. Houston at Sacramento, 10 p.m. WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship ResultsSunday At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club Marana, Ariz. Purse: $9 million Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72 (Seedings in parentheses) Championship Jason Day (8), Australia, def. Victor Dubuisson (27), France, 23 holes. Consolation Match Rickie Fowler (53), United States, def. Ernie Els (31), South Africa, 19 holes. Seminals Jason Day (8), Australia, def. Rickie Fowler (53), United States, 3 and 2. Victor Dubuisson (27), France, def. Ernie Els (31), South Africa, 1 up. Honda LPGA Thailand Scores Sunday At Siam Country Club (Pattaya Old Course) Chonburi, Thailand Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,568; Par: 72 a-amateur Final Anna Nordqvist, $225,000 66-72-67-68 273 Inbee Park, $139,933 71-71-67-66 275 Catriona Matthew, $101,512 76-71-65-65 277 Michelle Wie, $78,527 67-73-69-69 278 Stacy Lewis, $46,044 71-69-73-66 279 Gerina Piller, $46,044 70-73-70-66 279 Lexi Thompson, $46,044 68-74-69-68 279 Yani Tseng, $46,044 72-73-66-68 279 Julieta Granada, $46,044 71-68-71-69 279 Suzann Pettersen, $31,028 69-73-72-66 280 Azahara Munoz, $27,771 71-68-74-68 281 So Yeon Ryu, $27,771 69-72-71-69 281 Jenny Shin, $25,128 72-70-70-70 282 Thidapa Suwannapura, $22,268 73-70-70-70 283 Sandra Gal, $22,268 69-70-73-71 283 Angela Stanford, $22,268 68-73-71-71 283 Na Yeon Choi, $19,460 75-73-72-64 284 Se Ri Pak, $19,460 72-72-68-72 284 Caroline Hedwall, $17,621 69-73-70-73 285 Karrie Webb, $17,621 71-70-71-73 285 Lydia Ko, $17,621 72-70-69-74 285 Eun-Hee Ji, $15,215 70-78-70-68 286 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $15,215 71-73-74-68 286 Morgan Pressel, $15,215 70-73-74-69 286 Shanshan Feng, $15,215 71-72-69-74 286 Cristie Kerr, $15,215 71-72-68-75 286 Mariajo Uribe, $13,560 75-69-71-72 287 Brittany Lang, $12,756 73-69-76-70 288 Brittany Lincicome, $12,756 74-79-65-70 288 Paula Creamer, $11,338 72-77-72-68 289 Meena Lee, $11,338 79-71-69-70 289 Hee Young Park, $11,338 71-76-70-72 289 Jennifer Johnson, $11,338 68-73-71-77 289 Chella Choi, $10,189 73-74-74-69 290 Mamiko Higa, $9,807 77-71-71-72 291 Mina Harigae, $8,504 70-76-76-70 292 Jessica Korda, $8,504 74-77-71-70 292 Carly Booth, $8,504 72-74-74-72 292 Candie Kung, $8,504 73-77-70-72 292 Sun Young Yoo, $8,504 74-72-74-72 292 Pornanong Phatlum, $8,504 71-73-73-75 292 Pernilla Lindberg, $7,048 74-77-72-70 293 Natsuka Hori, $7,048 75-72-75-71 293 Haeji Kang, $7,048 75-72-73-73 293 Alison Walshe, $5,937 73-77-76-68 294 Amy Yang, $5,937 74-77-73-70 294 Katherine Kirk, $5,937 75-75-73-71 294 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $5,937 74-75-73-72 294 Danielle Kang, $5,937 74-72-72-76 294 Ai Miyazato, $5,937 74-70-74-76 294 Irene Coe, $5,133 77-76-71-71 295 Ariya Jutanugarn, $5,133 72-77-74-72 295 Nicole Castrale, $4,826 74-76-77-69 296 Karine Icher, $4,826 78-70-74-74 296 a-Supamas Sangchan 75-75-78-69 297 Chie Arimura, $4,367 78-75-73-71 297 Hee Kyung Seo, $4,367 76-74-75-72 297 Carlota Ciganda, $4,367 72-76-76-73 297 Moriya Jutanugarn, $4,367 77-71-71-78 297 P.K. Kongkraphan, $3,812 78-77-75-69 299 Beatriz Recari, $3,812 75-77-76-71 299 Lizette Salas, $3,812 73-79-73-74 299 Giulia Sergas, $3,812 71-81-73-74 299 Ayako Uehara, $3,601 80-78-75-67 300 Mika Miyazato, $3,448 77-78-74-73 302 Ilhee Lee, $3,448 79-74-75-74 302 Caroline Masson, $3,448 72-78-77-75 302 Mo Martin, $3,295 75-76-77-75 303 Shinobu Moromizato, $3,179 75-77-78-74 304 Dani Holmqvist, $3,179 75-73-79-77 304 ATP World Tour Open 13 Results Sunday At Palais des Sports Marseille, France Purse: $850,900 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Ernests Gulbis (3), Latvia, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (2), France, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Doubles Championship Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (2), France, def. Paul Hanley, Australia, and Jonathan Marray, Britain, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 13-11. Rio Open Results Sunday At Jockey Club Brasileiro Rio de Janeiro Purse: Men, $1.99 million (WT500) Women, $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Women Championship Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Klara Zakopalova (1), Czech Republic, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1. Doubles Men Championship Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah, Colombia, def. David Marrero, Spain, and Marcelo Melo (2), Brazil, 6-4, 6-2. MORE ATP World Tour Delray Beach International ResultsSunday At Delray Beach Stadium & Tennis Center Delray Beach Purse: $539,730 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Marin Cilic (7), Croatia, def. Kevin Anderson (4), South Africa, 7-6 (6), 6-7 (7), 6-4. Doubles Championship Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def. Frantisek Cermak, Czech Republic, and Mikhail Elgin, Russia, 6-2, 6-3. 2014 Winter Olympic Medals Table At Sochi, Russia Final (98 events) Nation G S B T ot Russia 13 11 9 33 United States 9 7 12 28 Norway 11 5 10 26 Canada 10 10 5 25 Netherlands 8 7 9 24 Germany 8 6 5 19 Austria 4 8 5 17 France 4 4 7 15 Sweden 2 7 6 15 Switzerland 6 3 2 11 China 3 4 2 9 South Korea 3 3 2 8 Czech Republic 2 4 2 8 Slovenia 2 2 4 8 Japan 1 4 3 8 Italy 0 2 6 8 Belarus 5 0 1 6 Poland 4 1 1 6 Finland 1 3 1 5 Britain 1 1 2 4 Latvia 0 2 2 4 Australia 0 2 1 3 Ukraine 1 0 1 2 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Croatia 0 1 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1 Sundays U.S. Olympians Fared BOBSLEIGH Mens Four-Man 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah; Curt Tomasevicz, Shelby, Neb.; Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.; Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 3:40.99. BRONZE 12. United States 2 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif.; Justin Olsen, San Antonio; Johnny Quinn, McKinney, Texas; Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 3:42.70. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Mens 50km Mass Start Free 26. Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., 1:48:04.3. 51. Brian Gregg, Winthrop, Wash., 1:55:02.3. 57. Kris Freeman, Thornton, N.H., 1:59:46.7. NR. Torin Koos, Leavenworth, Wash., DNS. Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES Agreed to terms with OF Brett Gardner on a four-year contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS Designated SS Justin Sellers for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW JERSEY NETS Signed C Jason Collins to a 10-day contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Claimed D Mike Kostka off waivers from Chicago. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE Recalled D Josh McFadden from Cincinnati (ECHL). Loaned G Rob Madore to Cincinnati.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Syracuse at Maryland ESPNU Oklahoma St. at TCU9 p.m.ESPN Oklahoma at KansasWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 Penn St. at Nebraska FS1 Oklahoma at Baylor 7 p.m.ESPN Teams TBA ESPN2 Teams TBA FS1 Charlotte at East Carolina8 p.m.ESPNU Green Bay at Oakland NBCSN Duquesne at Saint Louis9 p.m.ESPN Teams TBA ESPN2 Teams TBA FS1 Georgetown at Marquette10 p.m.ESPNU Gonzaga at Pacic current Nets. Jason told us that his goal was to earn another contract with an NBA team. Today, I want to commend him on achieving his goal. I know everyone in the NBA family is excited for him and proud that our league fosters an inclusive and re spectful environment, Commissioner Adam Silver said. The Nets worked out Collins during the AllStar break and met with him again Sunday, with his twin brother, Jarron, hinting that his tory would be made. Hope everyone is enjoying their Sunday. Today should be a pretty cool day! Jarron Col lins wrote on Twitter. Jason Collins played 38 games last season with Boston and Washington and averaged 1.1 points and 1.6 rebounds in lim ited minutes. For his career, the 7-foot Collins averages 3.6 points and 3.8 rebounds. The Nets had an opening for a big man after trading Reggie Ev ans along with Jason Terry to Sacramento on Wednesday for guard Marcus Thornton. The news on Collins comes as Michael Sam, the SEC defensive player of the year from Missouri who recently revealed he is gay, is taking part in the NFL draft combine. Sams on-eld workouts in Indianapolis are scheduled for today. NBA FROM PAGE B1 for the 2008 Summer Games transformed a decaying resort town on the Black Sea into a household name. Allnew facilities, unthinkable in the Soviet era of drab shoddiness, showcased how far Russia has come in the two de cades since it turned its back on communism. But the Olympic show didnt win over critics of Russias backsliding on democracy and human rights under Putin and its institutionalized intolerance of gays. And while security was a po tential problem going in, it appeared to be a big success coming out: Feared attacks by Islam ic militants who threatened to target the games didnt materialize. Despite the bumps along the way, IOC President Thomas Bach used the closing ceremony to deliver an robustly upbeat verdict of the games, his rst as IOC president. He was particularly enthusiastic about the host city itself. What took decades in other parts of the world was achieved here in So chi in just seven years, Bach said in declaring the games closed. As dusk fell, Russians and internation al visitors streamed into the stadium for the ceremony featur ing the extinguishing of the Olympic ame. Day and night, the ame became a favor ite backdrop for So chi seles, a buzzword born at these games for the fad of athletes and spectators taking DIY souvenir photos of themselves. Russia celebrated it self and its rich gifts to the worlds of mu sic and literature in the ceremony. Performers in smart tails and puffy white wigs performed a ballet of grand pi anos, pushing 62 of them around the stadium oor while soloist Denis Matsuev played thunderous bars from Sergei Rachmaninoffs Concerto No.2. There was, of course, also ballet, with dancers from the Bolshoi and the Mariinsky, among the worlds oldest ballet companies. The faces of Russian au thors through the ages were projected onto enormous screens, and a pile of books trans formed into a swirling tornado of loose pages. Athletes were say ing goodbye to rivalsturned-friends from far off places, savoring their achievements or lamenting what might have been and, for some, looking ahead to 2018. Winners of Russias re cord 13 gold medals marched into the stadium carrying the coun trys white, blue and red ag, which was raised alongside the Olympic ag. Athletes streamed by their hundreds into the stadium, danc ing and taking photos of themselves. Earlier, giant screens ashed highlights of their Olympic exploits. With a 3-0 victory over Sweden in the mens hock ey nal Sunday, Canada claimed the last gold from the 98 medal events. Absent were six competitors caught by what was the most extensive anti-doping program in Winter Olympic history, with the IOC conducting a record 2,631 tests nearly 200 more than originally planned. Putin smiled as he stood beside Bach, and he had reason to be pleased. Russias athletes topped the Sochi medals table, both in golds and total 33. That represented a stunning turnaround from the 2010 Vancouver Games. GAMES FROM PAGE B1 combine this weekend that the locker room is a more modern, tolerant environment it might be giv en credited for. Those problems in Miami, those surprise me because I think that we never had those is sues in Denver when it came down to the things that went on in that locker room and the things that were said, said Hall of Fam er John Elway, Denvers executive vice pres ident of football op erations and general manager. I think every locker room that Ive ever been in in the NFL and the guys Ive been around have always respected the right of other players. There is a line you dont cross. I still believe thats the way the majority of the NFL is. Sams former Mis souri teammate, wide receiver LDamian Washington, wondered what all the fuss was about with ques tions about whether Sam would be wel comed by his peers in the league when the Tigers had no prob lem doing so. Most of the guys already knew him and it wasnt a big deal, but we had freshmen on the team who were 17 years old out of high school 17 years out of high school youre pretty immature, Washington said. They just could be like, Aw, weve got a gay guy on our team. But those guys em braced it, because he was a great teammate. He was a great guy. He never brought any of that to the locker room. I feel like if a 17-year-old freshman can accept the fact that a teammate has a different preference in sex, then why cant 33-year-old vets accept that fact? SAM FROM PAGE B1 shots in the rst half, the Seminoles started the second half 1 for 11 from the eld and went 7 minutes without a eld goal. Despite those struggles, Flori da State never lost the lead. Pitts own offensive problems during that stretch were the rea son for that. The Pan thers could only manage two eld goals during the Seminoles drought. They briefly tied the score at 42, but the Seminoles quickly regained control of the contest with back-to-back dunks by White, who was 7 for 13 from the eld and also grabbed eight re bounds. Pitt came back to tie the score again at 48, but the Seminoles made the big plays down the stretch. White scored nine points in the nal 6:50, includ ing a 3-pointer as the shot clock expired for a 58-52 lead that took the air out of the Panthers sails. The Panthers shot 37 percent from the eld. They have shot more than 40 percent just twice in the past seven games. The Seminoles used an 11-1 run midway through the rst half to begin to pull away from the Panthers. The score was tied at 18 when the Seminoles held the Panthers without a eld goal for almost 5 minutes. Miller scored ve of his 12 rst-half points in that stretch. White gave Florida State its biggest lead of the half at 29-19 with 4:07 to go before intermission. Pitt, which made 10 of its 26 shots from the eld in the rst half, used a 7-0 run to make it 34-31 late in the half, but Thomas made a 3-pointer from the cor ner at the buzzer for the six-point lead at the break. FSU FROM PAGE B1 Matt Kenseth won a rain-shortened Day tona 500 in 2009. The 2010 Daytona 500 was interrupted for more than two hours be cause of a pothole in the track. Rain forced the 2012 race to be run on a Monday night for the rst time. Juan Pablo Montoya slammed into a jet dryer that night, ignit ing a raging inferno that caused another two-hour delay. Safe ty workers used Tide laundry detergent to clean up the track. Fans ocked for shelter Sunday at the track or left for their cars. The National Weather Service issued a tornado warn ing in the area and advised people to take shelter. Air Titan, the system designed to reduce track drying time, provided the only ac tion on the track. But there was plenty of fun going on be hind the scenes. Kyle Busch tweeted, Rain rain go away. Let me lead my way to victory. His wife, Samantha, posted a pho to of her sticking out her tongue while Kyle frowned with the caption, Rain delay sad/ mad faces w @kyle busch. Andrea Perry, who works the public relations account for Ricky Stenhouse Jr.s team, snapped a pic of the Nationwide Series crew lined up in side the hauler on their knee with hands on their heads prepping for a Tornado drill!!! NASCAR FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 GREG BEACHAMAssociated PressSOCHI, Russia Sidney Crosby skated in alone on Henrik Lundqvist, fak ing Swedens goalie to the ice with a textbook-quality deke and sliding a perfect backhand into the net. Canada did everything by the book at the Sochi Olym pics, winning all six games with a ferocious commit ment to defense and disci pline. When Canadas cap tain nally got his rst goal of the games Sunday, it had none of the dramatics of Crosbys last Olympic goal four years ago in Vancouver. But it was every bit as golden. Jonathan Toews scored in the rst period, Carey Price made 24 saves in his second consecutive shutout, and Canada defended its Olympic mens hockey title with a 3-0 victory over Sweden. Were just an amazing team to watch, the way we work together, Toews said. We were just all over them. Its fun to be a part of. Chris Kunitz also scored as the Canadians conrmed their worldwide dominance in their national game by winning the gold for the third time in the last four Olym pics. No team in the NHL era has controlled a tournament like this group, which allowed just three goals in six games and never trailed at any point in the 12-day tournament on the shores of the Black Sea. Not quite as dramatic as the other one, Crosby said. Just real solid all the way through. We knew the way we wanted to play, and the last couple of games, we were solid. With each game, we seemed to build more and more condence. By the nal event of the So chi Olympics, that condence was unshakable. Canada became the only repeat Olym pic champ in the NHL era and the rst team to go unbeaten through the Olympic tournament since the Soviet Union in Sarajevo in 1984. Canada won its record ninth Olympic hockey gold medal its rst outside North America since 1952 and joined the womens team to complete Canadas second straight Olympic hockey sweep. The Canadians didnt al low a goal in their nal 164plus minutes at the Bolshoy Ice Dome after the rst pe riod of the quarternals against Latvia, shutting out the U.S. and Sweden. Steve Yzerman, the architect of this roster for Hockey Canada, called it the greatest display of defensive hock ey by any Canadian national team. Yzerman also said hes stepping down as Canadas Olympic executive director. The Swedes also were un beaten until the nal, but they couldnt compete with Canadas formidable defense and Price, a rst-time gold medalist who played splen didly in Sochi, allowing three goals in ve games. That was the hardest-working team Ive ever seen, Price said. I really cant say enough about that group of defensemen and that overall team in front of me. Our work ethic was what won us this championship. The Canadians exchanged hugs and leaped over the boards at the nal horn, gathering at Prices net for a celebration that had seemed inevitable since Crosby scored in the second period. Toews, who scored on a rst-period tip-in, and Crosby are among Canadas 11 returning players from the 2010 championship team. Kunitz, widely criticized for failing to nish chances ear lier in Sochi, capped the scoring in the third. If these games were the last with NHL players join ing their national teams, Canadas pros put on a land mark show. WINTER OLYMPICS CHRIS YOUNG / THE CANADIAN PRESS Hockey fans celebrate in Torontos Maple Leaf Square after the nal buzzer as Canada beat Sweden 3-0 on Sunday to win the Gold Medal in the mens Olympic Hockey nal.Canada beats Sweden 3-0 for Olympic hockey gold NBA NFL ASSOCIATED PRESS Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater, right, talks with UCF quarterback Blake Bortles at the NFL football scouting combine on Sunday in Indianapolis. MICHAEL MAROTAP Sports WriterINDIANAPOLIS Teddy Bridgewater will spend the next 2 months trying to con vince NFL scouts hes the No. 1 quarterback No. 1 player in this years draft. Tajh Boyd is just itching to show scouts hes still the quar terback they once thought he could be. Yes, the two college stars were on opposite ends of the spectrum at the combine. While Boyds draft stock has plummeted over the past four months, Bridgewaters condence is booming as he appears to be locking himself into the top 10. I feel that Im the best quarterback in this draft, he said at his weekends NFL scouting combine. Im not just going to sit up here and say it, theres obviously ac tions that have to back up these words. Im just going to go out there and prove that Im the best guy. Scouts will have to wait to see if Bridgewater can live up to the boasts. He never planned to throw during Sundays workouts at Lucas Oil Stadium and also pulled out of the 40yard dash after telling reporters he would run. But that hasnt hurt Bridgewater yet. He measured in at 6-foot-2, 214 pounds, good size for an NFL quarterback with room to even add a few more pounds. And despite questions about hand size, Bridgewaters completion percentage and touchdown passes continued to steadily increase each of the past three seasons at the same time his inter ception totals declined. Teams searching for a new franchise quarterback, such as Houston, which has the top pick in May, will spend these next 10 weeks trying to de termine who to take in this three-man race Bridgewater, Blake Bortles or 2012 Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel. I havent studied him (Bridgewater) enough, and com ing from defense, I dont consider myself a quarterback expert, said Browns coach Mike Pettine.Bridgewater, Boyd go opposite directions in draft STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterMIAMI With LeB ron James watching from the bench in a suit and tie, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade powered the Miami Heat to a 9379 victory over the Chi cago Bulls on Sunday. James was a late scratch after he broke his nose in Thursdays win at Oklahoma City, and his teammates picked up the slack, with reserves Chris An dersen, Michael Beasley and Ray Allen help ing the Heat pull away in the second half. Bosh tied a career high with four 3-point ers and had 28 points and 10 rebounds. Wade added 23 points, 10 rebounds and sev en assists, while Mario Chalmers contributed 12 points and nine as sists. But the Heat most ly won with defense against the offensively challenged Bulls, who were also short-handed. Starter Jimmy Butler was a late scratch because of bruised ribs. The Bulls shot 36 per cent, went 6 for 21 from 3-point range and were called for a 24-second violation at least six times, including twice in a row. Joakim Noah had 20 points, 15 re bounds and four blocks for Chicago, which had won ve in a row. RAPTORS 105, MAGIC 90TORONTO Kyle Lowry scored 28 points, DeMar DeRozan had 24 and the Toronto Rap tors beat Orlando 10590 Sunday night, hand ing the Magic their 15th straight road loss. Terrence Ross scored 16 and Amir Johnson had 12 points and eight rebounds before leaving with a sprained right ankle in the Rap tors fth victory in six games Toronto improved to 12-3 in its past 15 home games and moved six games above .500 for the rst time since Feb 24, 2010, when their re cord was also 31-25. Tobias Harris scored 28 points and ETwaun Moore had 16 as the Magic opened a four game trip with their fourth loss in ve games. Nikola Vucevic and Kyle OQuinn each had 11. CLIPPERS 125, THUNDER 117OKLAHOMA CITY Jamal Crawford scored 36 points to help the Los Angeles Clippers beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 125-117 on Sunday afternoon. Matt Barnes scored 24 points, Chris Paul had 18 points, 12 as sists and eight re bounds, Blake Grifn scored 20 points and DeAndre Jordan add ed 18 points and 12 re bounds for the Clip pers, who snapped a two-game skid. Kevin Durant had 42 points and 10 assists and Serge Ibaka added 20 points for the Thunder, who lost their sec ond straight. It was the most points the Thunder have allowed this season. Oklahoma City over came a 15-point decit late in the third quarter to take a 115-112 lead on a 3-pointer by Du rant with 2:43 to play, but the Clippers controlled the game from there. A 3-pointer by Craw ford with 1:30 remain ing gave Los Angeles a 119-115 lead. Crawford scored again on a oating jumper in the nal minute to push the lead to 121-117. Westbrook missed a 3-pointer, and Paul made two free throws to extend the Clippers lead to six and put Clip pers in charge with 29.7 seconds left. Paul sprained his right thumb against Memphis this past Friday and coach Doc Rivers said before the game it was 50-50 if he would play. The Clippers shot 66 percent in the rst half to take a 72-66 lead at the break. Barnes made a 3-pointer with 9.8 seconds left in the rst half, and a loose ball foul was called on Iba ka away from the shot. Grifn made the free throw to give the Clip pers a 72-64 lead. WIZARDS 96, CAVALIERS 83 CLEVELAND John Wall scored 21 points, Bradley Beal had 17 and the Washington Wizards beat the Cleve land Cavaliers 96-83 on Sunday night. The Wizards held the Cavaliers to 11 fourth-quarter points to return to .500 at 2828 on the season. They also strengthened their hold on the fth spot in the Eastern Conference standings. The strong defensive performance in the nal period came after Washington lost Nene to a sprained left knee midway through the third quarter. Without LeBron, Bosh and Wade lead Heat to win over Bulls LYNNE SLADKY / AP Miami Heats LeBron James, right, high-ves Dwyane Wade (3) during a time-out in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls on Sunday in Miami. The Heat defeated the Bulls 93-79.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 GOLF BASEBALL MATT YORK / AP Jason Day, of Australia, celebrates on the 23rd hole after winning his match against Victor Dubuisson, of France, during the Match Play Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Marana, Ariz. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterMARANA, Ariz. Jason Day never stopped believing he would win the Match Play Championship, even in the midst of so many shots by Victor Dubuisson that simply deed belief. With his ball at the base of a cactus, Dubuisson took an all-or-nothing swing though the sharp needles and a TV ca ble and incredibly hit it to 4 feet to save par. Seemingly out of it on the next play off hole, the 23-yearold Frenchman somehow whacked a wedge through a desert bush and rocks and onto the green for another par. Day nally ended the madness Sunday on the 23rd hole with a pitch to 4 feet on No. 15 for birdie. Mon dieu! It was the rst time the championship match went overtime since the inaugural year in 1999 at La Costa, when Jeff Maggert chipped on the second extra hole of a 36hole nal. That was like watching paint dry compared to the show Dubuisson put on. Day, with his rst World Golf Championship, walked away with his second PGA Tour title that will take the Australian to No. 4 in the world. This tournament might better be re membered for Dubuis sons magical escapes. Vic, man, he has a lot of guts, Day said. He has a great short game straight out of the cactus twice. For a 23-year-old kid, hes got a lot of game. Were going to see a lot of him for years to come. Even the great Seve Ballesteros would have saluted this perfor mance. Two holes down with two holes to play, Dubuisson rapped in a 15-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole and then took advantage of a rare lapse by Day, who bogeyed the 18th hole with a three-putt from 50 feet on the up per tier. The Frenchman saved par from the bunker to force ex tra holes. It looked like it would be over quickly. From the rst fairway, Dubuisson went so far long that bounced hard off the back of the green and into the desert, the ball nestled at the base of a cholla. During regulation, he would have taken a penalty drop. In this case, he felt he had no choice. He stepped up to the ball and, with nothing to lose, swung away. The club got caught on a TV cable, and the ball scooted up the slope of 3-inch grass and onto the green. It was reminiscent of the shot Bill Haas pulled off at East Lake from shallow water on the 17th hole. This was better. MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressTAMPA Outelder Brett Gardner and the New York Yan kees agreed Sunday to a four-year contract worth $52 million. The new pact starts in 2015 and includes a fth-year club option for $12.5 million and a $2 million buyout. If traded, Gardner would receive $1 million. It shows the level of condence, belief and trust, and the type of player and person he is, Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said. Were excited to know that hes going to be a part of this team going for ward. Were a better team with Gardy on it, thats the bottom line. This is a good day for him, and we believe it makes the future for us better. Gardner has a $5.6 million, one-year contract for this season. He would have been eligible for free agency after the 2014 season. Free agency is something that, it kind of intrigued me, but it also kind of scared me, Gardner said. Ive never been any where else. I love it here. I love putting on the pinstripes every day. Cashman said talks about the contract started at the winter meetings in Decem ber. The Yankees are moving Gardner to left eld this year after the signing of free agent center elder Jacoby Ellsbury to a $153 million, seven-year contract in December. Gardner did have questions in his mind about his Yankees future after the Ellsbury signing. When they signed Jacoby, your name gets thrown out in the trade rumors and all that, Gardner said. Its kind of annoying, really. I didnt want to get trad ed. I dont want to go anywhere else, and I let them know that. The 30-year-old Gardner hit .273 last year with eight home runs, 52 RBIs and 24 stolen bases. I like what he brings, Cashman said. The speed dy namic, the defense, and I think the offense is there as well. Also, the Yankees agreed to a minor league contract with injured closer Andrew Bailey, who was with Boston last year and is coming back from houlder surgery last July. CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP New York Yankees center elder Brett Gardner bunts during spring training on Friday in Tampa. RICK EYMERAssociated PressSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Barry Bonds is all set to return to the San Francisco Giants. As a spring training instructor, that is. The all-time home run leader who never ofcially retired is ex pected to arrive during the second week of March. Manager Bruce Bo chy said Saturday that hes looking forward to having the 49-year-old Bonds in camp and thinks he can help the hitters. Bonds spent his last 15 seasons with the Giants, nishing in 2007. He has not been elected to the Hall of Fame, with many voters saying his lofty numbers were boosted by performance-enhancing drugs. Bonds set major league records with 762 career home runs and 73 in 2001. He also had a .444 career onbase percentage and a .607 slugging percentage and stole 514 bases. Hell join former Giants Jeff Kent, Robb Nen, Will Clark and J.T. Snow as special instructors. Kent and Bonds were involved in a highly publicized feud during the 2002 season, which reached its peak in June, when the two en gaged in a shoving match in the dugout that was caught on camera. Bonds nal contract with the Giants included a 10-year ser vices deal following his retirement, which included spring training vis its. The seven-time MVP has made limited public appearances since his nal season. Bonds remains a fan favorite in San Francisco, enjoying a warm re ception any time hes introduced at AT&T Park, the Giants home park. Matt Cain, the Giants longest active tenured player, was Bonds teammate between 2005-07. Tim Lincecum made his major league debut in 2007.Barry Bonds will be SF Giants spring training instructorYanks, Gardner agree on $52M, four-year deal Associated PressCHONBURI, Thailand Anna Nordqvist won the LPGA Thailand on Sunday to end a ve-year victo ry drought, holding off top-ranked Inbee Park at Siam County Club. Nordqvist, the LPGA Championship and LPGA Tour Championship winner in 2009, led wire-to-wire. The 26-year-old Swede closed with a 4-under 68 to beat defending champion Park by two strokes. Im speechless to be honest, Nordqvist said. Its been a cou ple years since I won. Ive been working very hard. Had my ups and downs. Just couldnt be happier to be here. It was such a hard push on the back nine. Nordqvist nished at 15-under 273 on the Pattaya Old Course. Park, making her rst start of the year, had a bogey-free 66. The South Korean player won six times last year. I feel good, Park said. Today, my ball-striking wasnt as good as yesterday. I putted better than yes terday. So I feel like my putter is coming back. I played one shot bet ter than last year and didnt win. Still a very good result. Tells me I improved a little. Scotlands Catriona Matthew was third at 11 under after a 65, and Michelle Wie was 10 under after a 69. Inbee kept making birdies and Michelle was playing great, said Nordqvist, four strokes ahead of Park and Wie entering the round. I couldnt really breathe until the last putt, so obviously I could just let go on the last putt. Wie cut the lead to one with a three-stroke swing on the par-4 fth hole. Nordqvist had a double bogey on the hole and Wie made a birdie. Nordqvist rebounded with a 12-foot birdie putt on No. 7 to extend her lead two shots. She birdied ve of the rst seven holes on the back nine to open a threestroke lead and closed with a bogey on the par-5 18th. I just really had to stay strong, Nordqvist said. Projected to jump to 14th in the world rank ing, Nordqvist changed equipment and started working with instructor Jorje Parada during the offseason after considering leaving the tour.Swedens Anna Nordqvist wins LPGA Thailand SIAMSPORT / AP Anna Nordqvist of Sweden shows off her winners trophy during the award ceremony of the LPGA Thailand golf tournament on Sunday in Pattaya, Thailand.Day survives the magic of Dubuisson in Match Play AP FILE PHOTO Barry Bonds acknowledges the crowd before throwing out a ceremonial rst pitch before Game 3 of baseballs 2010 NLCS.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014FLU SEASON: Younger adults hit hardest / C4 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Jazz musicians are famous for their musical conver sations one improvis es a few bars and anoth er plays an answer. Now research shows some of the brains language regions enable that musical back-and-forth much like a spoken conversation. It gives new meaning to the idea of music as a uni versal language. The nding, published Wednesday in the journal PLoS One, is the latest in the growing eld of mu sical neuroscience: Researchers are using how we play and hear music to illuminate different ways that the brain works. And to Dr. Charles Limb, a saxophonist-turned-hear ing specialist at Johns Hopkins University, the spontaneity that is a hall mark of jazz offered a rare chance to compare music and language. They appear to be talking to one anoth er through their instru ments, Limb explained. What happens when you have a musical conversa tion? Watching brains on jazz requires getting musicians to lie at inside a cramped MRI scanner that mea sures changes in oxygen use by different parts of the brain as they play. An MRI machine con tains a giant magnet meaning no trumpet or sax. So Limb had a special metal-free keyboard manufactured, and then recruited 11 experienced jazz pianists to play it inside the scanner. They watched their ngers through stra tegically placed mirrors during 10-minute music stretches. Sometimes they played scales. Other times, they did whats called trad ing fours, where the pi anist made up four bars, and then Limb or anoth er musician-scientist in Jazz study shows link between music and languageSEE STUDY | C2 NICHOLAS RICCARDIAssociated PressCOLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. The doctors were out of ideas to help 5-year-old Charlotte Figi. Suffering from a rare genetic disorder, she had as many as 300 grand mal seizures a week, used a wheelchair, went into repeated cardiac ar rest and could barely speak. As a last resort, her mother began calling medical marijuana shops. Two years later, Charlotte is largely seizure-free and able to walk, talk and feed herself after taking oil infused with a special pot strain. Her recovery has inspired both a name for the strain of marijuana she takes that is bred not to make users high Kids with seizures use pot as treatment BRENNAN LINSLEY / AP Matt Figi hugs and tickles his once severely ill 7-year-old daughter Charlotte, as they wander around inside a greenhouse for a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlottes Web, which was named after the girl early in her treatment, in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo. BRENNAN LINSLEY / AP Aileen Burger holds up a bottle of cannabis-infused oil used as medicine for her 4-year-old daughter Elizabeth, who suffers from severe epilepsy and is receiving the experimental treatment with a special strain of medical marijuana.Charlottes WebSEE MOVING | C2 TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman to host events this weekCommunity health events at Flor ida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Water man Way, in Tavares include Cardiac Devices: Cardiac Rhythm Management with Miguel Bryce, MD, from 1 to 2 p.m., Wednesday, at the Mattison Conference Center. Call 352253-3635 to register or for information. W.A.L.K., the Waterman Amputee and Limb Loss Konnections support group for amputees and people with limb loss, meets on the fourth Monday of each month, from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Mattison Conference Room B. Call Tracey Estok at 352253-3892 for information.LADY LAKE Nourish Your Body series set for today at the libraryThe Nourish Your Body series at the Lady Lake Public Library, 225 W. Guava St., continues with eating for eye health from 1 to 2:30 p.m., today. Julie England, family and consumer sciences extension agent with UF/IFAS Extension Lake County, will present the program. Registration is available at www.yesladylake.eventbrite.com, by calling 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721, or by emailing julieeng@u. edu.LEESBURG HIV/AIDS 101 workshop scheduled for todayThe National Association of Social Workers Lake/Sumter Unit will host a meeting and workshop from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., today at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St., downtown Leesburg. Diana Cheffer of the Department of Health will lead the workshop and refreshments will be served. For information, email Suzanne Howard at wingslcsw@comcast.net, or call 800-352-6279.LADY LAKE New active aging center set to open on March 3A new Active Aging Center is set to open on March 3 at the TLC Medical Arts Building at 201 W. Guava St., in Lady Lake offering the ActiveRx System, based upon more than a decade of scientic research on the correlation between strength and aging. The center will provide full ser vices proven to facilitate longterm, meaningful lifestyle changes. For information, call 352-2847470 or go to www.activerx.com.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 the lab improvised four bars in return, and the pianist responded with still new notes. That conversation-like improvisation activated brain areas that normally process the syntax of language, the way that words are put together into phrases and sentences. Even between their turns playing, the brain wasnt resting. The mu sicians were processing what they were hear ing to come up with new sounds that were a good t. At the same time, cer tain other regions of the brain involved with language those that process the meaning of words were tuned down, Limb found. That makes sense be cause the richness of the structure of music is what gives it its signi cance, Limb said. You can have substantive discourse using music, without any words, yet language areas of the brain are involved in this unique way. One ultimate goal of musical neuroscience is to better understand the brains circuit ry, and how it can rewire itself, in hopes of eventually nding new treatments for neural disorders. Limb made headlines several years ago when he measured jazz musicians riffs longer, solo improvisations to study cre ativity in the brain. We know nothing about how the brain in novates, he said. This is one way to learn what innovation means neurologically. Stay tuned: Next he hopes to study children who are just learning music, and to compare amateurs to profession als, as he explores how people become creative. Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) STUDY FROM PAGE C1 Charlottes Web and an inux of families with seizure-stricken children to Colorado from states that ban the drug. She can walk, talk; she ate chili in the car, her mother, Paige Figi, said as her dark-haired daughter strolled through a cavernous greenhouse full of mar ijuana plants that will later be broken down into their anti-seizure components and mixed with olive oil so patients can consume them. So Ill ght for whomever wants this. Doctors warn there is no proof that Char lottes Web is effective, or even safe. In the frenzy to nd the drug, there have been reports of non-authorized suppliers offering bogus strains of Charlottes Web. In one case, a doctor said, parents were told they could replicate the strain by cooking marijuana in butter. Their child went into heavy seizures. We dont have any peer-reviewed, published literature to support it, Dr. Larry Wolk, the state health departments chief medical ofcer, said of Char lottes Web. Still, more than 100 families have relocated since Charlottes story rst began spreading last summer, according to Figi and her husband. The relocated families have formed a close-knit group in Colorado Springs, the law-and-order town where the dispensary selling the drug is located. They meet for lunch, support sessions and hikes. Its the most hope lots of us have ever had, said Holli Brown, whose 9-year-old daughter, Sydni, began speaking in sentences and laughing since moving to Colorado from Kansas City and taking the marijuana strain. Amy Brooks-Kay al, vice president of the American Epilepsy Society, warned that a few miraculous stories may not mean anything epileptic seizures come and go for no apparent reason and scientists do not know what sort of damage Charlottes Web could be doing to young brains. Until we have that information, as physicians, we cant follow our rst creed, which is do no harm, she said, suggesting that parents relocate so their children can get treated at one of the nations 28 top-tier pediatric epilepsy centers rather than move to Colorado. However, the society urges more study of pots possibilities. The families using Char lottes Web, as well as the brothers who grow it, say they want the drug rigorously tested, and their efforts to ensure its purity have won them praise from skeptics like Wolk. For many, Charlottes story was something they couldnt ignore. Charlotte is a twin, but her sister, Chase, doesnt have Dravets syndrome, which kills kids before they reach adulthood. In early 2012, it seemed Charlotte would be added to that grim roster. Her vital signs at-lined three times, leading her par ents to begin prepar ing for her death. They even signed an or der for doctors not to take heroic measures to save her life again should she go into car diac arrest. Her father, Matt, a former Green Beret who took a job as a contractor working in Afghanistan, started looking online for ways to help his daughter and thought they should give pot a try. But there was a danger: Marijuanas psychoactive ingredient, THC, can trigger seizures. The drug also contains another chemical known as CBD that may have seizure-ghting properties. In October, the Food and Drug Administration approved testing a British pharmaceutical rms marijuana-derived drug that is CBD-based and has all its THC removed. Few dispensaries stock CBD-heavy weed that doesnt get you high. Then Paige Figi found Joel Stanley. One of 11 siblings raised by a single mother and their grandmother in Oklahoma, Stanley and four of his brothers had found themselves in the medical marijuana business after moving to Colorado. Almost as an exper iment, they bred a lowTHC, high-CBD plant after hearing it could ght tumors. Stanley went to the Figis house with reservations about giving pot to a child. But she had done her homework, Stanley said of Paige Figi. She wasnt a pot activist or a hippy, just a conservative mom. Now, Stanley and his brothers provide the marijuana to nearly 300 patients and have a waitlist of 2,000. The CBD is extracted by a chemist who once worked for drug giant Pzer, mixed with olive oil so it can be ingested through the mouth or the feeding tube that many suffer ers from childhood epilepsy use, then sent to a third-party lab to test its purity. Charlotte takes the medication twice a day. A year ago, she could only say one word, her father said. Now she says complete sentences. The recovery of Charlotte and other kids has inspired the Figis and others to travel the country, pushing for medical marijuana laws or statutes that would allow high-CBD, low-THC pot strains. Donald Burger recently urged a New York state legislative panel to legalize medical marijuana while his wife, Aileen, was in the familys new rental house in Colorado Springs, giving Char lottes Web to their daughter Elizabeth, 4. The family only relocated to Colorado after neurologists told them Elizabeths best hope brain surgery could only stop some of her seizures. Its a very big strain being away from the rest of our family, Aileen Burger said recently while waiting for her husband to return from a trip to sell their Long Island house. But she doesnt have to have pieces of her brain removed. MOVING FROM PAGE C1 BRENNAN LINSLEY / AP A worker cultivates a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlottes Web inside a greenhouse, in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo.

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 MICHELLE L. PRICEAssociated PressSALT LAKE CITY A proposal advancing in the Utah Legislature could make the state the rst in the country to raise the age people can buy tobacco products from 19 to 21. The Senate Health and Human Services Committee voted 4-1 on Thursday morning to approve the mea sure, forwarding it to the full Senate for a vote. Sen. Stuart Reid, R-Ogden, is sponsoring the bill, which he said could prevent young people from becoming addicted to tobacco because it delays their ac cess to it. His bill would take ef fect in 2016, which he said gives the 18-, 19and 20-year-olds who already smoke enough time to reach the new minimum age. Opponents of his bill argue theres no evi dence to support that. Instead, they say the measure infringes on the freedom of young adults. Utah is already among a handful of states that ban sales for those under 19 years old, instead of 18. Last year, New York City became the rst large city or state in the country to bar tobacco sales to people un der 21. Reids bill could make Utah the rst state to follow New York Citys ban, though Colorado legislators are also considering a similar mea sure this year. Lehi resident Marla Brannum, a mother of three children, urged lawmakers to pass the bill, saying it would drastically eliminate the ability of her kids to access cigarettes. By raising the age limit, it puts them in a situation where theyre not going to pick it up until a much later age, she said. About 1 in 10 adults in Utah smokes, ac cording to the most re cent report from Utah Department of Healths Tobacco Prevention and Control Program. Of those roughly 200,000 smokers, al most 90 percent of them started before age 18, according to the report. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON A special blend of mothers milk just for girls? New research shows animal moms are cus tomizing their milk in surprising ways de pending on wheth er they have a boy or a girl. The studies raise questions for human babies, too about how to choose the do nor milk thats used for hospitalized preemies, or whether we should explore gender-specific infant formula. Theres been this myth that mothers milk is pretty standard, said Harvard University evolutionary biologist Katie Hin de, whose research suggests thats far from true in monkeys and cows, at least. Instead, the biological recipes for sons and daughters may be different, she told a meeting of the Ameri can Association for the Advancement of Sci ence on Friday. Pediatricians have long stressed that breast milk is best when it comes to babys rst food. Breast-fed infants are healthier, suffering fewer illnesses such as diarrhea, earaches or pneumonia during the rst year of life and less likely to develop asthma or obesity later on. But beyond general nutrition, there have been few studies of the content of hu man breast milk, and how it might vary from one birth to the next or even over the course of one babys growth. That research is difcult to conduct in people. So Hinde studies the milk that rhesus monkey mothers make for their babies. The milk is richer in fat when monkeys have male babies, especially when its moms rst birth, she found. But they made a lot more milk when they had daughters, Hinde discovered. Do daugh ters nurse more, spur ring production? Or does something signal mom prenatally to pro duce more? To tell, Hinde paired with Kansas State Uni versity researchers to examine lactation re cords of nearly 1.5 mil lion Holstein cows. Un like monkey babies, calves are separated from their mothers ear ly on, meaning any difference should be pre natal. Sure enough, cows that bore daughters produced about 1.6 percent more milk. Since cows lactate for 305 days, that adds up. More interest ing, cows often lactate while pregnant and those that bore a sec ond daughter in a row produced almost 1,000 more pounds of milk over nearly two years than those that produced only sons, Hinde calculated. Back to the monkeys where Hinde found still more differences in the quality of the milk. Milk produced for monkey daughters contains more calcium, she found. One explanation: Female monkeys skeletons mature faster than males do, suggesting they need a bigger infusion of this bone-strengthening mineral. Human girls skeletons mature fast er than boys, too, but there havent been sim ilar studies of calcium in human breast milk, Hinde said. Mothers milk even affects babies behavior, she said. High er levels of the natural stress hormone corti sol in milk can make infants more nervous and less condent. But boys and girls appear sensi tive to the hormones effects at different ages, her latest monkey research suggests. One previous study of human babies has linked higher cortisol levels in breast milk to cranky daughters, not sons, but Hinde cau tioned that testing cor tisol reactions at only one point in time could have missed an effect on younger or older boys. What about boy and girl twins? Hinde cant answer; the monkeys she studies seldom have twins. Nor can she explain why the animals show these gender differences. Its something highly personalized for that mother and that infant at that time point. Thats an exquisite thing, Hinde said, who wants to see similar study of human breast milk. Because high-quality breast milk is par ticularly important to the most vulnerable infants, she wonders whether premature babies in intensive care might fare better with gender-matched donor milk. Then theres the formula question. We think its important and its not to make different deodor ants for men and wom en, and yet we kind of approach formula as though boys and girls have the same develop mental priorities, Hinde said with a laugh.Animal moms customize milk depending on babys sex KATHY WEST / AP This photo provided by the California National Primate Research Center shows a nursing rhesus macaque monkey in 2013. Panel advances bill raising Utah smoking age to 21

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressATLANTA Flu sea son seems to be wind ing down, and its been an odd one. It hasnt been as bad as last year and the vaccine worked a little better. And it has been a fairly mild one for the elderly traditionally the most vulnerable group. But its been a differ ent story for young and middle-age adults, who have been hit harder than expected because of a surge in swine u. Most u seasons, only one-third of the people who land in the hospital with the u are adults ages 18-64. This winter, they have accounted for two-thirds, most of them adults who were obese or had another ailment. The numbers are painful reminders that u can be serious for anyone, not just infants and the very old, said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC released new information Thursday about the u season, which started around mid-December, a bit earlier than usual, and apparently peaked by mid-Janu ary. Last winter, it start ed even earlier. For weeks, u has been waning in some parts of the country, al though health ofcials say theres still a lot of u virus going around and u season is capa ble of getting a second wind. One way the CDC measures the us se verity is by rates of hos pitalizations for u and its complications. Overall, they have been only half what they were last winter de spite the higher rates in younger adults. Health ofcials say thats because the u strain that is making most people sick this winter is swine u, or H1N1. That kind rst showed up in 2009 and caused a global pan demic that was par ticularly dangerous to younger adults. Since then, the vi rus has been around each winter but mostly has been a backstage presence. Experts say the virus hasnt mutated. Its simply encoun tering a lot of younger adults who never were infected before and havent been vaccinated, said CDC u expert Dr. Joseph Bresee. The annual u vac cine is modied each year, and swine u is now included in the mix of seasonal strains. Working-age adults have the lowest vacci nation rates, CDC ofcials noted. Among infectious diseases, u is considered one of the nations leading killers. On av erage, about 24,000 Americans die each u season, according to the CDC. The agen cy doesnt keep an exact count of u deaths. But health ofcials estimates that 60 percent of u deaths this sea son have been in peo ple ages 25 to 64, similar to the numbers from 2009-2010. The government also released data on this years u vaccine. A u vaccine thats 60 to 70 percent effective in the U.S. is considered pretty good and this years falls in that range. Overall, it was a mod erate 61 percent. That means those who got a shot have a 61 percent lower chance of wind ing up at the doctor with the u. Last year, it was 56 percent effec tive. Those numbers reect how good the vaccine was against swine u. There wasnt enough data to really gauge how well it worked in the elderly against a strain thats more dangerous to old er adults. Regional Urgent Care LAKE We at LRUC have made it affordable for you to receive the care you want and need For REAL medicine by REAL DOCTORS with CBC$25 Urine$15 Analysis HCG$208404 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 352.315.8881O.V.$95 X-Rays$50 Cardiac$100 Testing CMP$35 EKG$25 Strep$15 Test Pricing PricingSTRAIGHT STRAIGHT 352.259.4322 Flu season waning; younger adults hit hardest MATT ROURKE / AP As the u season winds down, health ofcials say it wasnt as bad as last year.

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The recommendations are the latest in years of efforts to prevent unnecessary C-sections. Labor takes a little longer than we may have thought, said Dr. Aaron Caughey, who co-authored the guidelines for the American College of Obstetricians and Gy necologists. The recommendations are being published jointly Thursday by two groups of pregnancy specialists ACOG and the Soci ety for Maternal-Fetal Medicine amid grow ing concern that C-sections are overused. Nearly 1 in 3 women in the U.S. gives birth by cesarean. Yes, C-sections can be life-saving for mother or baby. But they also can be done for convenience or fear of lawsuits, and the surgery can bring some serious health risks. And having one cesar ean greatly increases the chances that a next pregnancy will end in one, too. One of the main rea sons for a rst-time C-section is labor thats progressing too slowly, ACOGs analysis found. How long should la bor take? Theres no clear-cut deadline, and every woman is differ ent, stressed Caughey, obstetrics chairman at the Oregon Health and Sciences University. My patients ask this every day, he said. He tells them it can run the gamut from six hours long, start to n ish, to three and four days at the other ex treme. Whether labor is too slow is assessed at dif ferent time points and what doctors were taught in medical school about the differ ent stages may not be the most up-to-date. A 2012 study from the National Institutes of Health found that one particular stage takes up to 2 hours longer now than it did in the 1960s, when many la bor denitions were set. Partly thats be cause todays mothers-to-be tend to be older and weigh more. But its also because of some changes in obstetric practice, such as more use of painkilling epidurals that can slow labor. So the obstetricians group took a closer look. Among the rec ommendations for oth erwise low-risk mothers and babies: %  en Dont order a C-section just because the rst and longest phase of labor is prolonged. This so-called latent phase is when contractions are mild and far apart, and the mothers cervix is bare ly dilated. Historically doctors considered it stalled if it lasted lon ger than 20 hours for a rst-time mom, or 14 hours for other mothers. %  en Active labor begins later than once thought, not until the cervix is dilated 6 cen timeters. Active labor is when contractions become stronger and more frequent, and the cervix begins to di late more rapidly until the woman eventually is ready to push. Doc tors once thought active labor began when the cervix was dilated 4 centimeters, but recent research shows that dilation remains pretty slow until reaching the new threshold. Thats an important change because many doctors wont admit women to the hospital until theyre in active labor, unless they need more care for another reason. As soon as someone is admitted to the hos pital, theyre kind of on the clock, Caughey said. %  en If women arent too tired, allow them to push at least two hours if they have delivered before, three hours if its their rst baby. They may push longer if they had an epidural as long as the doctor can see progress. %  en Forceps can offer a safe alternative to cer tain cesareans if used by an experienced, well-trained physician. Few physicians today undergo the training. The advice shouldnt be a surprise to doc tors whove been pay ing attention to recent research about labor times, but its hard to predict how quickly theyll change long-term practices, Caughey said. Some womens groups have long warned that rushed labor was fueling cesar eans, and Lamaze In ternational welcomed the guidelines and said mothers-to-be need to know them, too. They need to have a better understanding of what normal labor is, said Lamaze president Michele Ondeck. She advised expect ant mothers to ask about the cesarean rate before choosing an obstetric practice, and then before the due date to discuss how the doctor supports wom en in labor and what he or she considers too long. If the doctor says labor has stalled, its OK to ask if mom or baby is in danger and if there are alternatives to an immediate cesarean, Ondeck said.Guidelines to reduce C-section births urge waiting D.C. R.I. Del. SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention APCesarean birthsThe percentage of births in the United States by cesarean section has leveled off after rising for more than a decade. 20% 2530354045 CESAREAN BIRTHS 021914: Graphic shows rate of cesarean births in U.S. and by state; 2c x 5 inches; with BC-MED--Waiting for Baby; KSV; ETA 5 p.m. Editors Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication 15 20 25 30 35 percent 2012: 32.8% 1992: 22.3% Cesarean sections as a percentage of all deliveries in the U.S. Cesarean deliveries in 2012 by state Louisiana: 40.2% Utah: 22.6%

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: Can you be sexually harassed/abused by your spouse? My husband talks dirty to me and grabs at my breasts. I have repeatedly asked him to stop, but he doesnt listen and continues to do it. We have two small kids at home, and by the time they go to bed, I could care less about being intimate. His behavior disgusts me, and to be honest, I dont want to have sex with him. I have female problems and have told him it hurts, but it makes no difference to him. He touches me in front of the kids, and I have to slap his hand away. I cant leave him because I dont have a car or income for myself, nor do I have family or friends close by. I cant go to his family because they see him in a different light. What would you suggest, and is it harassment and could I press charges? LEAVE MY AURA ALONE DEAR AURA: You have mentioned so many problems in your short letter that its hard to know where to begin. While your husbands attempts at foreplay are beyond clumsy and ineffective, I cant help but feel some sympathy for him because it appears you have him on a starvation diet. How long this can continue for either of you is uncertain. Rather than try to charge harassment, why not schedule an appointment with your gynecologist and nd out WHY having sex is painful for you. It is not supposed to be, and your doctor may be able to help you resolve the problem. Marriage counseling might also help, because its clear you and your husband arent communicating on any meaningful level. If these problems are not resolvable, you cant continue living like this and neither can he. Because your family isnt nearby and you have no transportation, call or write them and let them know you may need their help to return. If they are unable to help you, contact a domestic abuse hotline. Unwanted sexual advances could be considered harassment, and sex without consent is rape. DEAR ABBY: It absolutely frosts me when parents head for the toy department so their children will have something to play with while they shop. Then, after the kids have spent time drooling, teething, sneezing, etc., they leave the dirty toys at the end of the aisle for someone else to buy. Yesterday I saw a child sucking on the paw of a stuffed animal. When I commented on how that must be the childs favorite toy, the mother said it wasnt theirs she was just keeping the little boy quiet while she shopped. Last week I stood behind someone in the checkout line. In her childs mouth was the ribbon from a Mylar balloon. When the mother nished loading her groceries onto the conveyor belt, she said, Time to put this back now! Its my pet peeve: First the germs they get from sucking on this stuff, then the ones everyone else is exposed to from the child. And on top of that theres the stealing, because I have seen children break toys. This is wrong, and were all paying for it. Why cant these parents throw something in the diaper bag before they leave home? PUT IT DOWN! IN VIRGINIA DEAR PUT IT DOWN: Because the parents arent doing their job they are forgetful or lazy, and have no consideration for the store owners or other shoppers. Sadly, parents like the ones you have described raise children who are just like themselves.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Wife weighs charging coarse husband with harassment

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfntbbfn brn r f n r t b n r r r f r r f f f t f r r f b f r r b n f r t r t r r t f r f t f f t n r f f frfn ffrb b rrffbb b r f t n f f r t b f f b f f r r r f t f f b f r r r r t f r t f f r r b b b f r f r f f f f f b t f f b b r f n r r f t b r r f f r f r f f f r f f f f r r r f n f r f b b r f f r f r f f rf ntbf ff t f ffff brttnrr nrf brfb f f n r t n r f r f f f f f f f f r f f f b f t f f f n f f t b f t b f t f r n f f f b t f f b f f nfbb fb t r f r r f b f n r b f f b nfbb t n b n t frn t fff t ttfbff fftrft nffffrn ff ftrttrf brbfbr bfnr rrf btrf fb fftfrfrfff rrf btrf ftfrf rfff t fbnrfffff t rbf t t rf rfrf f rtrf rb frrfbnrr rbf fftrf nt b t fft ffft rtfffb ftbfrr fft b ttf ffr ffffrfff trftf fftf ffttrff rtfffb ft ttrtfrrrtfrr rrfnnf t ttrrffnbb fffrtf t t t t t t t t b f f n f r f f f b f f b f f b f t f r t t b f f f f r f f f r f f t f t f t t r f r b t f f f f b f f f f f b f t r r frrr trf br nfn t t rftf trf t b b rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtf rfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rf nrtbt rfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 rfntbt rfntbrfffrn nnbrnrff tnbntnbnrrfrfb bnbrtn r f n b r r f r r f n t b r f rrbbbrnbtrb rfr rrfbffb trtbnffnnnr tnbb rrfrbffbbn tbbnrfr r n r b b t b t t r f n b r f n f n r r b n t r t n r b b f r b n f r r n n n n f f n b b n b n f f b r b b t n n b f r b b r r b b r f r f n t r t f n r f f n t n n b r b n b n r f f b t tnbrrfrfnb frfrfbfbtbfn brntbntrf bfbtffrbnbr rbrrfr f r n r n b t b rb rnr rnrfn b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf r b f t t f r f n r f r f r b n r f r n r f r f f t r r n n r f r r b n n b r f r f b r n t b r b n n n b r r n r f n n b r b f n b r f f r b r f r n n r t r b f n r n t b r b t t f f f r f n t t f b f n r bbrbbrf nbnfrbbrf nnnbtbbn bnnrfnnrnf nbtbfr bftrtfn ntnrfnfrbtb rnnnb n r n b n r n b n n n fnt nnrfrnnb rnbrrfr t t f b n r b t b b b b r b t r f f n t f r n n b r f b n b r f f b t r r f b n r t t f t n r n n bn bbrnn tbrbnttb ftrbtrfbn trfrnrrb r f f b r f n r f f r t b b r n b n t f r b f f r n b r t t f t n r n b r f f r r n f rbr bbtnbrrfrf fftrfn bffnbn brntbrbtr nbbrfbr rtnnrf bbrf rbnffn b n b f f r f f n n b b bn r f r b t f r f t r n b rrrtbrff trbfrttf ffbnbnnffnr tnbrbbbrrfbrb nnrtnb bnfrfbr nbrffrr trtrbtrb rtbbnrfr r n b r f b f f n r f r f r b r f f f b r r n n f r f f fnt n b r r f b r f f f b r r t t r f b r n n t b b n b r t b b b t n f f n r n b n n r f r t t r r f f r f n b r f r ff rt tt b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf fnt t n n b r r f t r b n r f b b t r f t n n r f t n n b r f b f b b r n r r r f nbbrfbffr rnbtrbtb nffnrnbbbn r f n b n r n t ffbtnbrrf rfrbrbfnnn nnrfrfr nttbbnbnffn rfrb ttrfr brfbbffb bn r f n r f r b n b f r f n r f b r b f f r r t rrbrb nbrnft nbrbbbbbrfn n b b n r ft n b t t t f t n b b n r b r f n r r b t n r r f f r n r f r f n t r n n r n f b r b b r f r t b n b t n b f r n t t b b r f b b n t r r n n b b r r f r f t t f r b r r f r r t t r f r b fftnbrrnrb tnrrfrfrbb nrfnttffrfrf trnntrtnnrf rfnrntnb ffbfnnffnrrt brbnffbrt fnrr nnnfnrfnbrrr ffnnbfrffbrb btnrrr brbbnb rnnnfrnr rfbrrb ttbbnbrrnntr tfrntrrn nnrfbnr rrbtrrrrrf rtrbrfnt nrfnrfbffrr rrb bbrfntrb brrbfrnrtbbr ntrbrrbbnrfn bbbff t t f t n r b f f t n b r n r f r b r f b ft f tt b t r f f r n r n r f f r f r r f r t r f b t n b b t n r t r n f b r f f n f r b n f n f n n r f f f f r n n b b r t r n f n f r b b b r f n n b t f f f t r r b b r f f r f rt b n r f f n n n f f r n n r f f t rf ntb n

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Monday, February 24, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntbbfn rfntb rn nnnnt nb rtb rnnffrn fntbb n nftb n r n t b b rt b fnt nrtbb rff n tb rfnfnffnf tb fnnft nnnnf nrtbb fnb tbb frt b ffnrn ftb nbn tb r nrrftn t rnfr fnnntb f r t b n tbb nt b nffnft b nnt fnfb ffnfnnf tb fnfnf tb fnnrr fffnnft r f n f r n b b f f n t b nfr rnrntb t b nrf nnt r n n n n n r t b nnfffff nnt nnr nrft t nnnnfr fnrt nnrn rnnfntbb ffnff frnft nf nffrnt nrrnn rntbb nnr t tb nbbb nnft r t b rf nnnt frfrnn nnnrftbb nfrn rnntbb rf tb n f n n n t b b nnnfnrn rt nrntb b ftb n r f r f n n n n t b b f nbftbbb rnfnnf ftnrn n r n t b n t b b rnfrn nrnt f bfrftbb nrrfnn btb nnnff rtbb frnrn tb r n f n b n t b rfr tbb ffn ntbnrnt rrn tbb fnt b tb nfnbn rt bt rnt b rrn t nnrnfnn nt nrf rfrnt b nfffnnf rnfntbbb b n fnt b nbfnb rbrf fnft nn rrnnfntb nn fnt nnn ft nrnrnfnnf ntbbb frnffffn t bb fnt fnnrn tb t b r t b nnnt nftb b nnnf ntb ff tb ft nrn nnb nnt frfn nnnrntb b nnt b bn nnrnt frnrn rt r rtbb rnt b bbrrnrr rnt nfnnr frnrntb fft t b t rnr rnnffftb ftb bn tb b tbn b nf rtbb nnrrnr tb fnrnt fntb t b t b b b rfnrnfrf nftbb rrnnff nrnnft b f ntbbbb frb ftb n f nntb nbrnn nt rf t rfrt b nnt r f t t rnnf nrt b n ntb rrrnrt fr t r tbb b nnn fnt tn ffnnrrr ftb nnrff ftb nb nrntb nrnb ftbb nnnr nnnntb n n f n n f n f t f f r f f n f f r n r f n f n f f n r r f n n n r f b b ffrf rt nnnff fnnft b f nrnnrn t r f f f t b rnt rtbb nnnr tb nrtb nr tb rr tb nrnr tb nrrt f r f t r b rn rt rn nnfnfnrn fnbrrtb bb rr tb f rntb nnrr tbb nnnrn rntb n nnt bt b b t b fnf fnt f t f brfnftb ft b f nnntbb f r t b nnrrn tb rrtb frn rntb fnfnf ntb rn rtbb b ff ftbb nftb fnrtb b rfnnnfn rrt rn fntbb f frnfnftbb b r n n f b n n f b b b n r n f n f r f f n f r f r n r f f n n r f n n f f n f f r n n n n n bnnrfnf rftb nfnfbn nrt bbb nrrn nfnrtbb bfnnr t b bbt nf rnffrnfr rtb r nfrnt bbb nf fnftbb nf nffnn rtbb tb fnf fftbb t frtnnf b nrnf bbbtb rfrr t tb nbft brnnn fffnnr n n n nrn nnnb fnfffnnrt tb nb n f n n n r n n r n n f n r n f n b n r r n b n n n b

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 24, 2014 rfntbt rfnr trb br fnrn bbbr rbb rrfn b nn br rfnnrbnn nb rrfnnr bfnn rbn nrr rfnnrn bb rfnr nrfrb n n tbbrrfnrn n nnt brfnnn t t n rbrr fnnnrn brfrb rrf br rfnrr bb rr fnrfnnr ntf t r b nrfnn ntf fnnbn t br fnrnn t r f r n br rfb t r nnnb rbn brrf f btt bbnr rfr brfn rb b brbrfnr bn nrrr rfnnr t t nrnnr bbrfnnr nr nnrfnnr b b r f n n r t t r b b bb nt t t rr rbb rbrfnnr b f t fr t n brfr btf t tf rr rbr fnnrn t t nnb rb bbbrn bbbbrnr bbnnb bbbrfnnn b nn bbbrfnn rnr b bb frft bb f f rb rbbrb brfnnnb t b bbbr rrbrbr tbbr fnnnb br rbr brr rnnbrr fnnbn b nrfnnnr n t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b t rb bb brfnnnfnr bbf f bbbrf f brbb bbb rb rrbr fnnrn b rf t t r r r f n t t t r b b n n r b r bf f bbff f t t t r b b n n r b r fn t bb bfnn rbn t t t r b b n n r b r r t r f n r b r r b r n t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b t t t t t r b t b r f n r t r b n rf ff b r n n n r b b f n n r n r f n n n n frt f t b b r b r r r b b b r f n r t r f nf b rfn t r nnrbbr br fnnnfnnnrb n b r nf t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b bff b f n r r n n bf f t rf rbrrr rn r t b b r r r b r f n n r b r f n n r r f n n r t t t r t t t t t r t r t t t t r bf tf t r b r b b t b t t r b b b r t b r r b b r b b b b n n n t f t f n n r f n r f n n r b b fnnrr b bbb rfnr t t t b r f n r n t bbr rfnn brr bf tf t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b bf tf bbrb bbrfn rbnn nbbr b rf fnnrbnn t t t t r t t t r n b b r b b b b b r f n n r n n n bbtb rrbbbr brb fnnfnnr brn r f n n n r t r n b b b b n b t fnn f f n f f b r b b b f f f b b bf tf bbff f t t b nrfnnb n t brfnr t t br fnrb bn brfnrn n rfnrbn brfrb nn t bbr bbbrfnr n rtf brr fnrbn bb brfnr brrr fnrbn t rb rbbbr bbbbrb rfrn t rfn bn r b b b r f n r n nrrfnnr n rrb rfnrbn nfnn bn bbr fnr brb brfnrn r bbrfrn rfnrnn frft br rrfnnr t t b rfnr t t rfnr n n n b brfnnrn frtftf