Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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10% OFFAll options with this coupon rffnntb US ICE DANCERS BRING HOME THE GOLD, SPORTS B1COMMON GROUND: Nothing unites tea partyers, liberals more than the NSA, A6 HERE FISHY, FISHY: Attractors to help anglers make catch, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Tuesday, February 18, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 49 2 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED B6 COMICS B4 CROSSWORDS B6 DIVERSIONS B5 LEGALS B6 LOTTO A2 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 WORLD A9 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12.79 / 57Mostly sunny 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comEmilly Powell point ed to the bus stop at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive. The bus stops right here in the morning, she said. Luckily, the kids are off today. A 15-feet in diameter sinkhole opened up right next to the bus stop early this morning in the Clermont subdivision. I am kind of wor ried it might have been closer to my house or inside my home, said Powell, who was out for a walk with her two children and lives down the road from the sinkhole. I am little worried that it might happen, lets say, when I am driving the kids to school or something. The sinkhole, located in the Hartwood Reserve subdivision off of Hartwood Marsh Road, is four feet deep, according to Tim Rogers, project manager for Bechtol Engineering and Testing in DeLand, who did a preliminary CARLA K. JOHNSONAssociated PressCHICAGO For many older Amer icans who lost jobs during the recession, the quest for health care has been one ob stacle after another. Theyre unwanted by employers, rejected by insurers, struggling to cover rising medical costs and praying to reach Medicare age before a health crisis. These luckless people, most in their 50s and 60s, have emerged this month as early winners under the nations new health insurance system. Along with their peers who are self-employed or whose jobs do not of fer insurance, they have been signing up for coverage in large numbers, submitting new-patient forms at doctors ofces and lling prescriptions at pharmacies. I just cried I was so relieved, said Maureen Grey, a 58-yearold Chicagoan who nally saw a doctor this month after a fall in September left her in constant pain. Laid off twice from fulltime jobs in the past ve years, she saw her income drop from $60,000 to $17,800 a year. Now doing temp work, she was uninsured for 18 months Associated PressGAINESVILLE Florida was the world leader in un provoked shark attacks last year with 23, easily most in the United States and more than twice the number as any other country, according to a report released Monday. None of the Florida attacks was among the 10 fatal inci dents around the world, according to the University of Floridas International Shark Attack File. Worldwide there were 72 unprovoked shark attacks in 2013, down from 81 the year before and the lowest recorded since 67 attacks in 2009. The United States had 47 attacks, with 13 in Hawaii, six in South Carolina and one each in Alabama, California, North Carolina, Oregon and Texas. Australia had 10 unpro voked attacks last year and South Africa had ve. Sharks have a lot more to fear from us than we do from them, said George Burgess, who maintains the shark le. Statistically, shark attacks are extremely rare, especial ly considering the number of humans that enter the water each year. The International Shark Attack File investigated 125 shark incidents but deter mined many of them were provoked.Florida led world with 23 shark attacks in 2013 AP FILE PHOTOA Caribbean reef shark glides past scuba divers Jim Abernethy, left, and Heather Keith at a dive site called Shark Canyon off Juno Beach. Older people are early winners under new health law THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Neighbors observe a 15-feet in diameter sinkhole at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive in Clermont Monday. BELOW: Tim Rogers, with Bechtol Engineering and Testing, measures the depth of the sinkhole. Sinkhole opens at school bus stop WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC Hartwood Marsh Rd. Tumbling River Dr. Wind River RunPowderhorn Place Dr.Tumbling River Dr.Harts Cove Way N Peace Pipe Way Peaceful Valley Dr. SinkholeSINKHOLE LOCATIONA sinkhole opened at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive near Hartwood Marsh Road in Clermont. 15-foot-wide breach shocks Clermont residents STAVE FUSSELLSpecial to The CommercialFruitland Park city commissioners are discussing potential changes to the citys charter that could ease the citys expected transition from 4,000 residents many of whom grew up in the city to one with a majority of voters who live in the Villages of Fruitland Park. George Mackie McCabe, chair man of the Charter Review Committee, has told city commissioners the advisory board has already focused on developing some sort of districting plan. A straw poll of charter committee FRUITLAND PARKCity moving closer to districting rulesSEE SINKHOLE | A2SEE DISTRICTS | A5SEE CARE | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014: This year you often react in a childlike manner when it comes to your career and relationship matters. Try to think before you speak, and sit on automatic reactions. You frequently will nd yourself in stressful situations where a decision must be made. If you are single, the person you meet after mid-July will be more signicant than the person you meet prior to that time. If you are attached, working on a project together leaves both of you feeling satised. You enter a very special period come summer. Plan a long-desired vacation together. LIBRA loves batting around ideas as much as you do. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your sixth sense will help you sort through a higher-ups attitude. Clearly, you do not have the whole story. Defer to someone else, and try not to worry so much about a temporary issue. Take a stand with someone who tends to be deant. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Pace yourself without pressuring someone who has not given a lot of thought to a problem. You could feel as though someone is trying too hard to impress others. How you handle this person could change the balance of power. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will be full of fun as you seek to make a change, but a partner might not feel the same way. This person will view this adjustment more seriously. Relate to a loved one directly. A chat might not solve a problem, but it will show your compassion. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Take an overview of your nances. You know your limits with a domestic matter. If you are not as comfortable as you would like with an investment, say no. Remember how intuitive you usually are, and then follow through on your gut feeling. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your efforts will pay off, given some endurance and follow-through. A person who has been quite distant might start to open up. You could be delighted by this reversal. A family members serious attitude might unnerve you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In the next few weeks, you will get a read on how your year is going to go. Note what areas of your life might not be running smoothly right now. Communication could be off. If you believe someone has made an outrageous statement, speak up. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) How you get past an obstacle that seems to keep appearing will be the key to your success. You know what to do. Somehow, youll manage to get your way and not upset anyone in the process. You also might gain a former dissenters support. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The unexpected will occur, and you might be backpedaling for a while. Your response to a surprise could be more signicant than you realize. Take some time to consider all the potential options before declaring what you will do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Rethink a recent decision youve made. The unexpected might occur with a child or loved one. Maintain a sense of humor, and dont lose sight of your long-term goals. Your responses could be very different from what you had anticipated. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might want to understand what is happening with someone you respect, as this person could be acting out of sorts. Sometimes the best approach is to be subtle while indicating that you care and are there for him or her. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your sense of direction will help you sort out an issue. The more detached you are from a complication, the more likely you are to come up with a winning solution. Problems will surface, and fortunately, they will be minor. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) The Sun moves into your sign today and energizes you. In the next few weeks, you will note a positive change in your life. Test out what seems like an incredible offer with several trusted friends. You might not be as realistic as you need to be. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US FEB. 17CASH 3 . ............................................... 2-0-1 Afternoon . .......................................... 6-0-4 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 4-5-0-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 0-9-5-3FLORIDALOTTERY FEB. 16FANTASY 5 . ........................... 7-13-20-31-34 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. assessment of the sinkhole Monday morning. Rogers said it was too early to tell whether the sinkhole, which affected 15 homeowners in the Peaceful Valley Drive culdul-sac, would worsen or affect any of the near by homes. There is nothing to do but keep an eye on it to make sure it stabilizes, he said, as he measured the depth of the sinkhole, marking areas with orange spray paint. This is not the rst sinkhole in the subdivision: in July 2013, a smaller sinkhole, 10 feet across and 10 feet deep, developed on Powder horn Place Drive, down the street from the cur rent one, as the result of a leaking sprinkler line, Rogers said. Rogers said they were still determining the cause of the current sinkhole in front of the entrance of the cul-desac. Doris Bloodsworth, city spokeswoman, said the 15 homeowners are able to enter and exit the cul-de-sac because public works employees brought in ground-up asphalt to make a ramp over the curb. Sentry Management, which manages the subdivision, is working with the citys sanitation department to have the homeowners in the culde-sac label their gar bage cans and bring them to the Powder horn Place Drive side of the sinkhole so that city workers can pick up the garbage, which was scheduled Monday. Derek Morgan, division manager of Sentry, conrmed Monday it was too early to make judgment calls on whether the sinkhole would have any further impact. We are waiting for the engineers to come in and do a site evaluation, and we will be led by what they are recommending to the Hartwood Reserve board of directors, so they could go forward with a sensible, timely and more important than anything else safe x to the problem, he said. Sinkholes can develop quickly or slowly over time. Florida sits on limestone, a porous rock that easily dissolves in water, with a layer of clay on top. The clay is thicker in some locations, making them even more prone to sinkholes. Ofcials and residents collectively agree sinkholes have become an ongoing issue and problem in Florida. The fact of the matter is, they have happened from time to time, Mor gan said. On the upside, they dont happen too frequently. When they do, inevitably they cause some concern. RiskMeter, which is used by underwriters and agents to automate property lookups and provides online hazard mapping ser vices, released a report showing the top 10 sinkhole prone counties. Lake County is ranked 10th and Marion County fourth in the region. The number of property insurance sinkhole claims has increased substantially to 6,694 in 2010, an increase of 4,334 since 2006, RiskMeter reported. In August 2013, a 100foot sinkhole developed, swallowing a section of the Summer Bay Resort near Clermont. No one was injured and all 105 guests were evacuated safely. In June 2011, a sinkhole off of Main Street in Leeburg collapsed half of Main Street Beauty Supply. That hole was estimated to be 60 to 70 feet wide with an uncertain depth. Miles Hensley, who lives in the Peaceful Valley Drive cul-de-sac, ve houses down from Mondays sinkhole, said he is concerned about how long it will take to x the road. The last sinkhole that opened up took over six months to x, he said. The Hartwood Reserve Homeowners Association has not been receptive to the needs of the homeowners. Morgan said Monday afternoon in an email that Rogers is expected to be back on site Tuesday to take further measurements and begin the process of determining what are the next actions. Safety remains a key concern for Emily Hickey, who lives a few streets away from the sinkhole. You dont know when the sinkhole is going to happen and where it is going to be, she said. You want to be safe in your neighborhood. My in-laws were walking here last night, she said referring to the sinkhole. For Powell, she said her family in New York is becoming more concerned. They want me to move back to get away from it, she said. SINKHOLE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Emily Hickey, middle, guides her children, Clare, left, and Ryan Hickey, around the sinkhole in the Hartwood Reserve neighborhood Monday. The sinkhole is right next to a school bus stop at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive. Associated PressORLANDO Gov. Rick Scott on Mon day proposed spending more than $213 million for a transportation hub including a rail line at Orlando International Airport. The governor said at a Monday news conference that the project, called the South Airport People Mover Complex, would create 1,900 construction jobs and 380 permanent jobs at the new fa cility. The $213.5 million would be spent over three years, provided the state Leg islature also approves the spending plan. This project in Orlando, as well as oth ers statewide, makes Floridas airports among the best in the nation, keeping Florida competitive, and creating jobs and opportunities for future genera tions, Scott said. A key part of the project would use the new hub to link the Orlando airport with the private All Aboard Florida rail line that will run from South Florida to cen tral Florida. It is expected to begin ser vice as early as late 2015. The transportation hub will also pro vide links to air and ground transportation, including rental cars, taxis, buses and private vehicles.Scott calls for $213.5M Orlando airport transport hub

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Grantsmanship Network to hold monthly meetingThe Lake-Sumter Grantsmanship Network (LSGN) monthly member ship meeting will host Commissioner Sean Parks as its guest at 10:30 / a.m. Thursday at the United Way of Lake and Sumter Counties ofce, 32644 Blossom Lane. Parks will discuss updates to the grant process in Lake County. The LSGN meetings allow nonprot organizations to network with other businesses, learning more about the community, grant writing and available funding. For information, go to www.lsgn.org.LEESBURG Bloodapalooza seeks donations for OneBloodThe Bloodapalooza 2014 event is looking for blood donations for the OneBlood blood bank. Local country bands will perform from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p.m., Saturday at Gator HarleyDavidson, 1745 U.S. Highway 441. The OneBlood organization will have the Big Red Buses on site to handle blood donations as well as free hot dogs and refreshments. Those eligible to donate carry ing proper identication and weighing at least 110 pounds can sign up for rafe prizes, and those who donate double red blood cells will get a $10 gift card in the mail. For information, call 352-728-3433 or go to www.oneblood.org.LEESBURG LSSC to hold womens history event Feb. 26Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment is the theme for this Womens History Month event, at 4:30 / p.m., Feb. 26, in the Magnolia Room at Lake-Sumter State College, U.S. Highway 441. The event will feature a panel of local female business and community leaders, including Phyllis Baum, RN, MBA, vice president of the Central Florida Health Alliance; Rosanne Brandeburg, executive director, LSSC Institutional Advancement Foundation and member Lake County School Board; Emily Lee, Bates Avenue Community, member Lake-Sumter State College Board of Trustees and Donna Miller, Lake County Judge. Reservations are not required and light refreshments will be provided. For information, call 352-391-1182.TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension to host heart health seriesThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension in Lake County is hosting a three-part series called Keeping the Pressure Down to help residents decrease their risk of heart disease. Classes will be held from 1:30 to 3:30 / p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27 and March 6 at the Lake County Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Rd. Participants should plan on attending all three sessions. Cost for the class is $10 and registration is required by Tuesday at lakehbp. eventbrite.com. For information, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2721 or email julieeng@u.edu.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportA few hours after a re claimed the life of a Clermont woman last week, reghters responded to another blaze just a few miles away at a warehouse re portedly used to recycle cooking oil. This can literally add fuel to the re, said Lt. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Professional Fireghters of Lake County, adding rst responders usually dont know what to expect when they come to warehouses where the contents often change. You really never know what is inside these buildings and that creates a very dan gerous situation, he said. Fireghters from Lake County, Clermont and Orange County responded to battle the blaze, Gamble said. The rst arriving units reported heavy re showing at the two-story warehouse, which CLERMONTWarehouse containing cooking oil catches fire PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS OF LAKE COUNTY Fireghters from Lake County, Clermont and Orange County all responded to battle a warehouse blaze in Clermont last week. Halifax Media GroupMarion County could become the location of the states newest nursing home for aging mili tary veterans, including those in Lake and Sumter counties. The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs recent ly notied county ofcials that the community is on the short list as a possible location of the agencys seventh regional facility. Marion was among 10 counties that made the nal cut, DVA Executive Director Mike Prendergast told Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet earlier this month, according to a department news release. The DVA currently oper ates nursing homes in Day tona Beach, Land OLakes, Panama City, Pembroke Pines, Port Charlotte and St. Augustine.OCALAMarion could get next veterans home AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe rst largescale, comprehen sive evaluation by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of arti cial, recycled plas tic sh attractors in Florida is beginning in Lake Grifn. According to Florida Fish and Wildlife sheries biologist Brandon Thompson, the attractors are being assembled and taken into the lake from Leesburgs Herlong Park. Thompson said there will be 18 quarter-acre sites in the lake, with 100 structures in each site. Twelve of those sites are regular brush attractors that already have been deployed, while six of those are the recycled plastic attractors. Thompson said the usual oak brush attractors start to lose their complexity after three to ve years, while the plastic attractors could last for 10 to 20 years. The brush attractors were placed several weeks ago, and Thompson expects to be nished putting in the recycled plastic attractors by next week. The attractors will be both for research and to help concentrate sh for shermen. Thompson said in areas that are not over-harvested, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission wants to help people catch sh. Sometimes people view the FWC as putting in regulations to Staff ReportA 53-year-old Leesburg woman died Sunday afternoon when her car collided head on with another vehicle, causing a third vehicle to wreck along County Road 44, the Florida Highway Patrol said. Michelle Nickle was driving north on CR 44 about 1:30 / p .m. when her 2003 Buick crossed the center line and collided headon with a 2002 Mercury driven by Constance Kasey, 71, of Lees burg. The collision caused Ka seys vehicle to spin, clipping a 2000 Chevy pickup truck driven by Wilmer Bell, 81, of Lees burg, who was following Kasey, the FHP said. Nickle was pronounced dead at the scene. Kasey was admit ted to Ocala Regional Medical Center in serious condition, while Bell was injured, the FHP said. Bell had a passenger, Elizabeth Bell, 76, of Leesburg, who was admitted to Florida Hospital Waterman in Tavares with minor injuries. The accident remains under investigation.Woman dies in three-car accidentLEESBURG LEESBURGFish attractors being installed in Lake Griffin PHOTOS BY AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Fish attractors in Leesburgs Herlong Park await deployment. BELOW: Bill Connelly of the Hawthorne Fishing Club works on a sh attractor on Monday. CRAIG PITTMANTampa Bay TimesThis is a story about sex, sup ply and demand, global trade, corruption, government regulation and one of the ugliest sea creatures in Florida. Among the marine animals that live in the Florida Keys is the sea cucumber. It is animal, not vegetable a long and lumpy invertebrate that looks like a cross between a diseased zucchini and an overinated eclair. For decades, divers who strapped on scuba gear to collect Sea cucumber harvests could face new rulesSEE FIRE | A4SEE VETS | A5SEE FISH | A4SEE CUCUMBER | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Protect and Serve Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) OBITUARIESEdward M. LowderbaughEdward M. Lowder baugh passed away February 4, 2014 after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Born to Sarah Chapman and Richard Low derbaugh on April 30, 1937 in Fort Dodge, IA. Proud member of the U.S. Air Force, he re tired in 1997 after a long career of service. His dream of living in a warm climate came true when he and his beloved wife moved from St. Paul, Minnesota to Tavares, Florida in 2002. Devoted to family and country. Beloved husband, father, grandfather and uncle. Preceded in death by his mother Sarah Chapman, father and step-mother Richard and Alta Lowderbaugh, paternal grandmother Clarabell Lowderbaugh and sister Linda Stehr. Survived by his loving wife Sherry Lowder baugh (Tavares, FL), daughters Kimberly Lowderbaugh and Kristina Pelton, grandson Troy Pelton (Apple Val ley, MN) and nieces and nephews, Art, Richard and Steve Stehr, Cher yl Schraufnagel and Deborah Richter. This world has lost a strong and wonderful man who loved and protect ed all things great and small. He will be truly missed. Private memo rial will be held at a lat er date.Roxanna C ReeseRoxanna C Reese, 84, of Fruitland Park, FL and Lakewood, NJ was born October 14, 1929 in Point Pleasant, NJ and died February 15, 2014. She was a Cub Scout Den Mother and also an active support er of the Boy Scouts of America. She also provided transportation for the senior citi zen nutrition program and meals on wheels in New Jersey for many years. After retirement, she and her husband moved to Florida and they were volunteers at the Leesburg, FL Welcome Center. She at tended the Communi ty Methodist Church in Fruitland Park, FL. She is preceded in death by her husband of 65 years, George W. Reese. She is survived by her son George L Reese, her son Joseph (Anne) Reese, her granddaughter Michele (Chad) Potts, her grandson Ja son Reese, and 9 great grandchildren. Gathering of family and friends will be at Beyers Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, Feb ruary 19, 2014 from 6-8 PM. Funeral service will be held at the same location on Thursday, February 20, 2014 at 11 AM. In lieu of ow ers, donations can be made to the Corner stone Hospice Foundation. Online condo lences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.com. Arrangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.DEATH NOTICESRev. Calvin A. AshleyRev. Calvin Augustus Ashley, 84, of Deland, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Rocker-Cu sack Mortuary, Lees burg, FL. Gary Mark BeaulieuGary Mark Beaulieu, 75, of Coleman, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations.Donald A. ConnorsDonald A. Connors, 84, of Fruitland Park, died on February 12, 2014. National Cremation Society.Beatrice MileraBeatrice Milera, 84, of Eustis, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home.IN MEMORY LOWDERBAUGH REESE limit people, but really we work for the anglers and we want to see the highest populations of sh; we want to see them catching the most sh, he said. Thompson said any offshore structures and cover help attract sh, and more complex structures attract more sh. Theres gonna be a lot of different stuff growing on these, similar to how there would be on oak trees, that attracts the bait sh all the way up the food chain, Thompson said. Thompson added there are shortand long-term goals for the project, with an initial goal being to see how the plastic attractors compete with brush attractors in concentrating sh, and a long-term goal of seeing how the plastic attractors compete with brush once FISH FROM PAGE A3 contains more than 4,000 square feet, and they immediately called for help. Fire conditions were already well progressed by the time the 9-1-1 call was made, Gamble said. The occupants (of the warehouse) spent valuable time (before calling for help), trying to ex tinguish the re, and it delayed getting the trained professionals on scene. Fireghters set up a tower truck to access the re that was break ing through the roof and it took them sev eral hours to get the blaze under control. One man at the scene was treated for minor burns and one Orange County reghter was injured after he fell off a ladder inside the building, Gamble said. The re ghter was treated on the scene. Just hours earlier, reghters responded a few miles away after Pauline Muschette, 68, became trapped inside her house and died at a blaze in the Greater Hills subdivision. The res were unrelated. Both blazes are un der investigation by the State Fire Mar shals Ofce. FIREFROM PAGE A3 brush starts to break down. Twelve members of the Hawthorne Fishing Club volunteered to put together the articial attractors on Monday. I think its really, really important to involve the stakeholders, the people that are going to take advantage of these attractors and the people that are gonna be out there catching the sh on them, Thompson said. Bill Connelly, a member of the shing club, said the group of shermen wanted to do what they could to help Fish and Wildlife improve shing and the lakes. The articial attractors have 30 limbs on each. The plastic attractors have been used in other states and, from what Thompson has seen of those results, they look promising, he said. saltwater sh for aquariums have also scooped up the occasional sea cucumber. In 2012, they collected about 14,000 of them in the Keys, according to Melissa Recks of the Flor ida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Nobody got rich off of them they were going for about $1 each. Then, last year, Floridas sea cucumber catch more than tripled, hitting 54,000, Recks said. The reason for that astonishing jump lies in the Asian market, where they are eat en, not displayed in aquariums. In China in particular, the sea cucumber is used to treat joint pain and, more important ly, as an aphrodisiac. As a result, demand is heavy there for sea cucumbers, also known as trepang and bchede-mer and the vacuum cleaners of the sea. The demand is so heavy that worldwide 20 percent of sea cucumber sheries have been fully depleted. Thats bad news. Despite their alleged ability to boost human sexual perfor mance, sea cucumbers suffer from a major disadvantage in their own re production because they are broadcast spawners, Recks said. That means they eject their sperm and eggs out into the wa ter in the expectation that enough other sea cucumbers are close by doing the same thing so that they will mix. If there arent, no spawning occurs. If too many sea cucumbers are harvested, they may never bounce back. So many sea cucumbers were har vested in Costa Rica, Ecuador, India and eight other countries that the population collapsed, prompting those countries to ban further har vesting, Recks said. Even in areas that are supposed to be protected, such as the Great Barrier Reef and Galapagos Islands National Park, so many sea cucumbers were snatched up that their population crashed. Except for requiring a license to collect live sea creatures, Florida does not regulate sea cucumber collectors. Fearing disaster will occur in the Keys as it has elsewhere, the group that represents people collecting sea creatures there, the Florida Marine Life Association, asked state wildlife ofcials to create new regu lations to protect sea cucumbers. Because the association requested a limit of 200 sea cu cumbers per person per trip, thats the limit Recks recom mended to wildlife commissioners. To Eric Lee, a limit that small would be a disaster: I would denitely be out of business. CUCUMBER FROM PAGE A3

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 The agency reports that those facilities now boast an occupancy rate of 99 percent. The study looked at factors such as the population of elder ly veterans, the number of available nursing home beds within the community and the countys poverty rates. Analysts concluded that a skilled nursing facility was needed most in Collier and Lee counties, which are ex pected to have about 32,000 elderly veterans between them by 2015. That southwest Florida area was followed by the Polk-Manatee-Hill sborough region, which is projected to have roughly 72,000 veterans older than 65 next year, and then a district made up of Marion, Putnam and Sumter counties, which will be home to an estimated 29,000 el derly veterans in 2015. The departments records indicate the 120bed facility will cost around $17 million and take three to ve years to build. Counties are encouraged to chip in $500,000 toward the cost, but failure to do so would not necessar ily disqualify them, the DVAs letter adds. The facility is intended to serve veterans within a 75-mile radi us of its location, which would include Lake and Sumter counties. Once completed, the nursing home would add about 190 new jobs and operate on a $7 million yearly budget. The federal government would nance 65 percent of the new facilitys cost, while the state would cover the rest. The state is looking for a 20-acre site for the building, either gov ernment-owned or donated by a private land owner. VETS FROM PAGE A3 members last Tuesday showed all ve members favor district ing the city, McCabe said. McCabe, who serves as vice president of Hospitality in The Villages, grew up in Fruitland Park and earlier announced his support for districting as a way to preserve the citys character, traditions and history once the Villages of Fruitland Park brings a new majority into the city. Dr. Chris Cheshire, the com missions only rst-term mem ber, has suggested what could be a more effective solution: extending the residency re quirement for city commission candidates. Cheshire, an acu puncturist and Oriental Medicine practitioner, owns Mulber ry Integrative Medicine in The Villages. Currently, the citys charter re quires that candidates be resi dents for a period of one year pri or to ling for any elective ofce. City Attorney Scott Gerken plans to study the issue. There may be some [statuto ry] limitations [governing candi date residence requirements], Gerken said. I dont think you could say 20 years, but then I dont think the one-year requirement is written in stone either, he explained. Fruitland Parks new majori ty will begin arriving early next year. If the timeline projected by The Villages developers holds, 4,000 new voters will be able to cast ballots in the 2016 elections and the earliest arrivals could qualify to run for commission seats then or even for mayor. Extending the citys candidate residency requirement to two years would prevent Villages of Fruitland Park newcomers from qualifying for a city post until 2018, or the mayoral race in 2020. That transition period would give the city time to adjust to its new majority, and vice-versa, commissioners agreed. Legislation and court deci sions regarding residency requirements for municipal ofce are unclear. Residency requirements are certainly legal. The U.S. Constitution provides that members of the House of Representatives must be residents of the United States for seven years, Senators for nine years and the president 14 years. In state and local elections, residence requirements draw mixed reviews. A 1973 Supreme Court decision upheld a seven-year residency requirement for New Hampshire gubernato rial candidates and, two years later, okayed the same sev en-year residency requirement for state senators. The following year, a low er court struck down a fouryear residency requirement to run for the school board in Fort Worth, Texas. The issue may surface again at the Charter Review Committees next meeting Feb. 24 at 6 / p .m. in the city commission chambers. DISTRICTS FROM PAGE A1 before she chose a marketplace plan for $68 a month. Americans ages 55 to 64 make up 31 per cent of new enrollees in the new health insurance marketplaces, the largest segment by age group, according to the federal governments latest gures. They represent a glim mer of success for Pres ident Barack Obamas beleaguered law. The Great Recession hit them hard and for some its impact has lingered. Aging boomers are more likely to be in debt as they enter re tirement than were previous generations, with many having pur chased more expen sive homes with smaller down payments, said economist Olivia Mitchell of Univer sity of Pennsylvanias Wharton School. One in ve has unpaid med ical bills and 17 per cent are underwater with their home values. Fourteen percent are uninsured. As of December, 46 percent of older jobseekers were among the long-term unem ployed compared with less than 25 percent be fore the recession. And those nancial setbacks happened just as their health care needs became more acute. Americans in their mid-50s to mid60s are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than other age groups, younger or older, accounting for 3 in 10 of the adult diabetes diagnoses in the United States each year. And every year after age 50, the rate of cancer diag nosis climbs. The affordable cov erage is an answer to a prayer really, said Lau ra Ingle, a 57-year-old Houston attorney who had been denied coverage repeatedly because she has sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disease. She recently had back surgery for a painful condition thats been bothering her for months. One night in Septem ber, 64-year-old Glenn Nishimura woke up with wrenching pain that sent him to the emergency room. It was his gallbladder. A doctor recommended surgery. Instead, Nishimura went home. A con sultant to nonprot groups, he was self-em ployed and uninsured. I checked myself out because I had no idea what this was going to cost, the Little Rock, Ark., man said. They didnt want me to go, but they didnt stop me. Nishimura lost his coverage after leaving a full-time position with benets in 2007, thinking he could land another good job. The recession ruined that plan. After COBRA cov erage expired, he was denied coverage because of high blood pressure and other conditions. He made it until September without a major illness. A second night of gallbladder pain and a chat with a doctor persuaded him to have the surgery. Af ter getting the bills, he negotiated the fees down to $12,000, which he considered a big hit, but it could have been worse. The aver age cost of a gallblad der removal in Arkansas was listed at three times that. Nishimura dipped into his savings to cover the bill. In December, he chose a bronze plan on the new insurance marketplace that costs him $285 a month after a tax credit. The de ductible is $6,300, so he hopes he doesnt have to use his coverage. He can get on Medicare in April, just in time for his annual checkup. Now theres the peace of mind of know ing the limits of my ob ligation if I have cata strophic health needs, he said. Dr. Bernd Wollschlaeger said hes noticed a recent increase in patients in this age group at his family practice in Miami. Lots of them have untreated chronic conditions that have progressed to an ad vanced stage. Many have delayed necessary treatments due to costs and expect a total and quick workup on their rst visit, he said, adding they want referrals to specialists and tests in cluding colonoscopies and mammograms. CARE FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Maureen Grey poses for a photo in Chicago.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 558 S. U.S. Hwy. 441 Lady Lake352-561-4879$1500OFF ALL SHOES IN STOCKMust present coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person. Good 2-18-2014 thru 3-3-2014. www.shopshoebiz.com CANADIAN MEDSSave up to 80%on Your Meds Prices352-633-3301Call for a FREE quote today. WE MATCH LOCAL COMPETITIONWe ship anywhere in the USA. COUPON$10.00 OFFInitial Purchase of $100.00 or More 352-253-0059Visitpetlodgeandspa.comIn Leesburg, next to Home DepotDiscover why pet owners trust us for their boarding, day care and grooming needs. CONNIE CASSAssociated PressWASHINGTON Hoyt Sparks says he has no use for liberal Dem ocrats and their socialistic, Marxist, communist ways. Toni Lewis suspects tea party Republicans are a bunch of people who probably need some mental health treatment. Politically speaking, the tea-party support er in rural North Caro lina and the Massachu setts liberal live a world apart. Who or what could get them thinking the same? Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency. By exposing the NSAs vast surveillance web, Snowden created a link between tea par tyers and liberals two tribes camped on oppo site sides of the nations political chasm. These people to the right and left of main stream America sound a lot alike now. Sparks, a federal retiree in the Blue Ridge mountain town of Spar ta and a political independent, condemns the NSA programs as a breach of privacy which violates the Constitution. Lifetime Democrat Lewis, a social work er in the city of Brockton, near Boston, says, When were violating the rights of U.S. citizens, I think thats a dangerous line to be walking. Whether they are Re publicans, Democrats or independents, al most half of Americans say they support the tea party movement or call themselves liberal. Compared with their more moderate Republican or Democratic peers, tea partyers and liberals are signicantly more likely to oppose the collection of millions of ordinary citizens telephone and Internet data, an Associated Press-GfK poll shows. By a 2-to-1 margin, these two groups say the government should put protecting citizens rights and freedoms ahead of protecting them from terrorists. Nearly 6 in 10 Republicans support the tea party movement. Near ly 4 in 10 Democrats call themselves liber als. Combined, they are buoying a coalition of conservative and liberal lawmakers push ing to rein in the NSA, while party leaders balk at anything that might weaken the agencys ability to foil terrorists. Why does the NSA unite the right and left ends of the political spectrum? More extreme polit ical views lead to more distrust of government, said George Mason Uni versity law professor Ilya Somin, whos stud ied the tea partys fo cus on the Constitution. People at the far ends of the political spectrum are less likely than mid dle-of-the-road voters to feel government is re sponsive to them. On the ip side, Somin said, moderates generally dont follow politics as closely as people at the extremes, so they may be less aware of the scope of the NSAs activities. The whole thing is wrong, says Virginia Greeneld, a tea-par ty supporter in Cortland, N.Y. But, she says, most people dont want to be lieve that the government would do what its doing. Liberals, who tend to trust government to handle many matters, also tend to be suspicious of intrusions into privacy or civil liberties. That aligns them on some issues with liber tarians, the champions of individual rights who make up a substantial portion of the tea party movement. Another segment of the tea party social con servatives deeply mistrusts President Barack Obama and his administration, an attitude like ly to extend to the NSA while hes in charge. Obama is a point of contention in the anti-surveillance coalition. Eight in 10 tea par tyers dislike the way hes handled the issue; only about half of liber als disapprove. Still, the NSA brings liberals closer to the tea-party way of thinking than usu al: On other big issues, liberals approval for Obama generally hovers around 70 percent. When it comes to Snowden, tea-party supporters and liber als are back in step about half of each group says the former NSA contractor did the right thing. Among non-tea party Republicans and nonliberal Democrats, a strong majority thinks he was wrong to reveal classied programs. Christina Ott, who works on her familys farm near Woodbury, Tenn., found Snowdens action inspiring. I thought it was somebody taking a moral stand and a big risk, said Ott, a liberal Democrat.What can unite liberals and tea partyers? The NSA AP FILE PHOTO This le photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. DARLENE SUPERVILLEAssociated PressRANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. The costly $787 billion spending bill that President Barack Obama signed into law s oon after taking ofce boosted the economy and helped avoid another Great Depression, the White House said in a status report on Mon days fth anniversary of the laws enactment. Republican leaders in Congress took note of the anniversary, too, but argued that the bill spent too much for too little in return. White House eco nomic adviser Jason Furman said the Ameri can Recovery and Rein vestment Act made other targeted investments that will pay dividends for years to come. By itself, the stimulus bill saved or created an average of 1.6 million jobs a year for four years through the end of 2012, Furman said in a White House blog post. Half of the total scal support for the econo my, or about $689 billion, from the recov ery act and subsequent measures was in the form of tax cuts directed mostly at families. The remainder was spent on such things as rebuilding roads and bridges, preventing teacher lay offs and providing tem porary help for people who lost their jobs or needed other assis tance because of th e poor economy. The report said recov ery act spending will have a positive effect on long-run growth, boost the economys potential output and ultimately offset much of the laws initial cost. More than 40,000 miles of roads and more than 2,700 bridges have been upgraded, near ly 700 drinking water systems serving more than 48 million people have been brought into compliance with feder al clean water standards and high-speed Inter net was introduced to about 20,000 community institutions. While these gures are substantial, they still nevertheless un derstate the full magni tude of the administrations response to the crisis, Furman wrote. He noted that the re port focused solely on the effects of scal legislation. It did not evalu ate other administration policies that aided the recovery, such as stabilizing the nancial system, rescuing the auto industry and supporting the housing sector.White House: Stimulus bill was good for economy

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 GOD CAF Breakfast & LunchSoups Salads Wraps QuicheAMAZING HOLY CHEESECAKE!A Holy Spirit filled caf serving FAITH, HOPE & LOVE Any donations over and above the cost of the food we serve goes to the ministries we support in the local area.300 W. Main St., Leesburg728-5700 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties Trained TechniciansInsuredDrug FreeFurniture MovedUniformedPre-SprayPre-Vacuumed INCLUDES Call my daddy, hell treat you like family.FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED DAVID SHARPAssociated PressBATH, Maine Some of the Navys fu turistic weapons sound like something out of Star Wars, with lasers designed to shoot down aerial drones and electric guns that re projectiles at hyper sonic speeds. That future is now. The Navy plans to deploy its rst laser on a ship later this year, and it intends to test an electromagnetic rail gun prototype aboard a vessel within two years. For the Navy, its not so much about the whiz-bang technol ogy as it is about the economics of such ar maments. Both costs pennies on the dollar compared with mis siles and smart bombs, and the weapons can be red continuously, unlike missiles and bombs, which eventu ally run out. It fundamentally changes the way we ght, said Capt. Mike Ziv, program manager for directed energy and electric weapon systems for the Naval Sea Systems Command. The Navys laser technology has evolved to the point that a prototype to be deployed aboard the USS Ponce this summer can be operated by a sin gle sailor, he said. The solid-state Laser Weapon System is designed to target what the Navy describes as asymmetrical threats. Those include aerial drones, speed boats and swarm boats, all potential threats to warships in the Persian Gulf, where the Ponce, a oating staging base, is set to be deployed. Rail guns, which have been tested on land in Virginia, re a projec tile at six or seven times the speed of sound enough velocity to cause severe damage. The Navy sees them as re placing or supplementing old-school guns, r ing lethal projectiles from long distances. But both systems have shortcomings. Lasers tend to los er their effectiveness if its raining, if its dusty, or if theres turbulence in the atmosphere, and the rail gun requires vast amount of electricity to launch the projectile, said Loren Thompson, defense analyst at the Lexing ton Institute. The Navy says its found ways to deal with use of lasers in bad weather, but theres little doubt that the range of the weapon would be reduced by clouds, dust or precipitation, he said. Producing enough energy for a rail gun is another problem. The Navys new de stroyer, the Zumwalt, under construction at Bath Iron Works in Maine, is the only ship with enough electric power to run a rail gun. The stealthy ships gas turbine-powered gener ators can produce up to 78 megawatts of power. Thats enough electricity for a medium-size city and more than enough for a rail gun. Technology from the three ships in that DDG-1000 series will likely trickle down into future warships, said Capt. James Downey, the program manager. Engineers are also working on a battery system to store enough energy to allow a rail gun to be operated on warships. Both weapon systems are prized because they serve to get ahead of the cost curve, Ziv said. In other words, theyre cheap. Each interceptor missile costs at least $1 mil lion apiece, making it cost-prohibitive to de fend a ship in some hostile environments in which an enemy is using aircraft, drones, ar tillery, cruise missiles and artillery, Thompson said. DARLENE SUPERVILLEAssociated PressRANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. President Barack Obama warned Uganda Sunday over its plans to further criminalize homosexuality, saying it would complicate our valued rela tionship. Defending gay rights around the world, as he has done at home, Obama said a bill that President Yoweri Museveni has pledged to sign will mark a step backward for all Ugandans and reect poorly on the countrys commitment to protect the hu man rights of its people. It also would represent a serious setback for anyone committed to freedom, justice and equal rights, Obama said. Obama said the United States stands for the protection of fundamental freedoms and univer sal human rights and believes people everywhere should be treated equally. That is why I am so deeply disappointed that Uganda will shortly enact legislation that would criminalize homosexuality, Obama said in a written statement issued from Southern California, where he was spend ing the weekend. The Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda, once law, will be more than an affront and a danger to the gay commu nity in Uganda. It will be a step backward for all Ugandans and reect poorly on Ugandas commitment to protecting the hu man rights of its people. It also will mark a serious setback for all those around the world who share a commitment to free dom, justice and equal rights. US Navy ready to deploy laser; rail gun on the way AP FILE PHOTO A laser weapon sits temporarily installed aboard the guidedmissile destroyer USS Dewey in San Diego. Obama: Anti-gay bill step backward for Ugandans

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 LAURA MILLSAssociated PressMOSCOW A trade ban on lacy lingerie has Russian consumers and their neighbors with their knickers in a twist. The ban will outlaw any underwear con taining less than 6 per cent cotton from be ing imported, made, or sold in Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan. And it has struck a chord in societies where La Perla and Victorias Secret are panty paradises compared to Soviet-era cotton underwear, which was often about as at tering and shapely as drapery. On Sunday, 30 wom en protesters in Kazakhstan were arrested and thrown into police vans while wearing lace un derwear on their heads and shouting Freedom to panties! The ban in those three countries was rst outlined in 2010 by the Eurasian Economic Commission, which regulates the customs union, and it wont go into effect until July 1. But a consumer out cry against it already is reaching a fever pitch. Photographs compar ing sexy modern under wear to outdated, Soviet goods began spreading on Facebook and Twit ter on Sunday, as wom en and men alike railed against the prospective changes. As a rule, lacy un derwear ... is literally snatched off the shelves, said Alisa Sa pardiyeva, the manager of a lingerie store in Moscow, DD-Shop, as she icked through her colorful wares. If you take that away again, the buyer is going to be the one who suffers the most. According to the Rus sian Textile Businesses Union, more than $4 billion worth of under wear is sold in Russia annually, and 80 per cent of the goods sold are foreign made. Analysts have estimated that 90 percent of products would disappear from shelves, if the ban goes into effect this summer as planned. The Eurasian Eco nomic Commission declined to comment Monday, saying it was preparing to issue a statement about the underwear ban. While consumer outrage may force cus toms union ofcials to compromise, many see the underwear ban as yet another example of the misguided economic policies that have become a trademark of many post-So viet countries. Sundays panty pro test in Kazakhstan followed a larger demon stration the day before against a 19 percent de valuation of the countrys currency, the tenge. Other people laughed off the panty ban, seeing it as yet another at tempt to add regula tions and controls to an already byzantine bureaucracy in the three countries. NATALIYA VASILYEVAAssociated PressSOCHI, Russia An Italian activist shout ing Its OK to be gay and dressed in a rain bow-colored outt and large headdress was detained Monday as she entered an arena to watch an Olympic hockey game. Vladimir Luxuria, a former Communist lawmaker in the Italian parliament who has become a prominent transgender rights crusader, was stopped by four men and then driven away by police in a car with Olympic markings. Luxuria later told The Associated Press she was kept in the car for about 10 minutes, then released in the country side after the men had taken away her Olympic spectator pass. She eventually made it back to her hotel and said she was leaving Russia on Tuesday morning. They dont say any thing. They just were people who had to do this and they did it, Luxuria said. Earlier Monday, Luxuria walked around the Olympic Park in Sochi for about two hours. She was shouting Gay is OK and Its OK to be gay in both English and Russian. As she was being led away from Shayba Are na, she was shouting I have a ticket. Luxuria said she was detained on Sunday evening by Russian po lice who told her she should not wear clothes with slogans supporting gay rights. Police denied detaining her. The Italian activ ist walked around the Olympic Park on Mon day with a group of jour nalists, attracting onlookers. Some Russian fans stopped to pose for photos with her. Luxuria and her color ful outt did not attract much negative reaction except for a group of young Russian men who shouted to television cameras in broken En glish: Trans not good. Luxuria arrived at a ticket inspection barri er at the hockey arena just before an evening game was due to be gin. She passed through the barrier and was being given directions to her seat when four men who were not wearing any identication sur rounded her and start ed shouting take her away. They then led her out of the venue and to the parking lot. Trade ban has Russias knickers in a twist VLADIMIR TRETYAKOV / AP Women protest against the ban of lace underwear in Almaty, Kazakhstan. JOHN HEILPRINAssociated PressGENEVA A U.N. panel warned North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Monday that he may be held accountable for or chestrating widespread crimes against civilians in the se cretive Asian nation, ranging from system atic executions to tor ture, rape and mass starvation. It is unusual for a U.N. report to directly implicate a nations leader. But in a letter accompanying a yearlong investigative report, the chair man of a three-member U.N. commission of inquiry, retired Aus tralian judge Michael Kirby, directly warned Kim that international prosecution is need ed to render account able all those, includ ing possibly yourself, who may be responsible for crimes against humanity. Even without being directly involved in crimes against hu manity, a military commander may be held responsible for crimes against hu manity committed by forces under the commanders effective command and con trol, Kirby wrote. He urged Kim to take all necessary and reasonable measures to stop crimes against humanity and insure that they are properly investigated and pros ecuted. Kirby added, however, there was no indication the North Korea would do so. The investigative commissions 372-page report is a wide-ranging indictment of North Korea for policies including political prison camps with 80,000 to 120,000 people, state-sponsored abductions of North Korean, Japanese and other nationals, and lifelong indoctrination. They are wrongs that shock the con science of humanity, Kirby said. Kirby said it was impossible not to in clude Kims name in the list of suspects be cause of what he described as the gov ernments totalitarian nature.UN letter to Kim Jong Un warns of accountabilityGay-rights activist detained in Sochi DAVID GOLDMAN / AP Vladimir Luxuria, a former Communist lawmaker in the Italian parliament and prominent crusader for transgender rights, is detained by police after entering the Shayba Arena at the 2014 Winter Olympics on Monday in Sochi, Russia.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 GEIR MOULSON and JOHN HEILPRINAssociated PressGENEVA It seemed like a routine overnight ight until the Ethiopian Airlines jetliner went into a dive and oxygen masks dropped from the ceiling. Only then did the terried passengers bound for Italy from Addis Ababa realize something was terribly wrong. The co-pilot had locked his captain from the cockpit, commandeered the plane, and headed for Geneva, where he used a rope to lower himself out of a window, then asked for political asylum. Authorities say a prison cell is more likely. One passenger said the hijacker threatened to crash the plane if the pilot didnt stop pounding on the locked door. Another said he was terried for hours Monday as the plane careened across the sky. It seemed like it was falling from the sky, 45-year-old Italian Diego Carpelli said of the Boeing 767-300. The jetliner carry ing 200 passengers and crew took off from the Ethiopian capital on a ight to Milan and then Rome, but sent a distress message over Sudan that it had been hijacked, an Ethiopian ofcial said. Once the plane was over Europe, two Italian ght er jets and later French jets were scrambled to accompany it. Italian Air Force Col. Girolamo Iadiciccio said the order to scramble came from NATO to ensure the plane didnt harm national security and didnt stray offroute. The plane landed in Geneva at about 6 / a.m. Ofcials said no one on the ight was in jured and the hijack er was taken into cus tody after surrendering to Swiss police. The pilot went to the toilet and (the co-pilot) locked himself in the cockpit, Geneva airport chief executive Robert Deillon told reporters. He wanted asylum in Switzer land. It wasnt immediately clear why he chose Switzerland, where Swiss voters recently demanded curbs on immigration. However, Italy has a reputation among many Africans as not being hospitable to asylum seekers. Ethiopian Airlines is owned by Ethiopias government, which has faced persistent criticism over its rights record and its alleged intolerance of political dissent. The co-pilot was identied as Hailemedhin Abera, a 31-yearold Ethiopian man who had worked for Ethi opian Airlines for ve years and had no crim inal record, said Ethiopias communications minister, Redwan Hussein, adding that Ethiopia will seek his extra dition. Geneva police said he claimed he felt threatened at home. His action represents a gross betrayal of trust that needlessly endangered the lives of the very passengers that a pilot is moral ly and professionally obliged to safeguard, Redwan said. SETH BORENSTEINAP Science WriterWASHINGTON The Arctic isnt nearly as bright and white as it used to be because of more ice melting in the ocean, and thats turning out to be a global problem, a new study says. With more dark, open water in the summer, less of the suns heat is reected back into space. So the entire Earth is absorbing more heat than expected, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That extra absorbed ener gy is so big that it measures about one-quarter of the entire heat-trapping effect of carbon dioxide, said the studys lead author, Ian Eisenman, a climate sci entist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California. The Arctic grew 8 percent darker between 1979 and 2011, Eisenman found, measuring how much sunlight is reected back into space. Basically, it means more warming, Eisenman said in an interview. The North Pole region is an ocean that mostly is crusted at the top with ice that shrinks in the summer and grows back in the fall. At its peak melt in Sep tember, the ice has shrunk on average by nearly 35,000 square miles about the size of Maine per year since 1979. Ethiopian co-pilot hijacks plane to Geneva AP PHOTO Police stand on stairs after passengers were evacuated from a hijacked Ethiopian Airlines Plane on the airport in Geneva, Switzerland, on Monday.Study: Arctic getting darker, making Earth warmer AP PHOTO Arctic sea ice is shown in 2013.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 F ilmmaker Woody Allens in tegrity really, his decen cy and humanity was called into question on Feb. 1 when Nicholas Kristof, a promi nent columnist for the New York Times published on his blog an open letter from Dylan Far row, Allens 28-year-old adoptive daughter, accusing him of sex ually assaulting her when she was 7. On the same day, Kristof produced a column for the Times questioning whether its appropriate to honor with a Golden Globe lifetime achievement award someone who was accused of child molestation, even 21 years ago. He quotes Dylan Farrows open letter at length and describes the psychological trauma and pain with which she says she lives. Kristof suggests that guilt beyond a reasonable doubt might be the proper standard for sending someone to prison in our judicial system, but that the Golden Globes should apply a higher standard, honoring only those who are unimpeachably, well, honorable. Which, he implies, Woody Allen is not. But, he says, the Golden Globes sided with Allen, in effect accusing Dylan either of ly ing or not mattering. But are those the only two choices? A recent Time magazine article cites a Canadian study that nds that in the context of divorce or custody battles, unfounded allegations of sexual abuse, whether fabrications or in mistaken good faith, occur at a relatively high rate, perhaps as much as 50 percent. Even Kristof acknowledges that the evidence is ambiguous. A week after Kristofs column Allen defended himself in the Times, noting that the charges of molestation emerged during the bitter dissolution of his 12year relationship with Mia Far row. He points to various pieces of exculpatory evidence, most of which are ignored or dismissed by Kristof. In fact, in his column Kristof discloses his friendship with Mia Farrow and Dylans access to him through Farrow, and while he admits that none of us can be certain what happened, he suggests that the Golden Globes treat Allen as if we are. Surely this is a signicant jour nalistic lapse by Kristof and the Times, which on March 26, 1993, during the vicious child custody battle between Farrow and Allen, reported that Farrow conceded that the girl would not tell a doctor of the abuse, and that a medical examination a few days later showed no signs of it. Further, the story reports on an investigation by the Child Sexual Abuse Clinic at the Yale-New Haven hospital that concluded that Dylan had not been molested. Clearly, sympathy for Dylan Far row is in order. Whatever happened, she is a victim. Her earliest bad fortune was probably the dubious honor of having been adopted into the tempestuous, semi-functional Farrow/Allen household and subsequently becoming a pawn in an ugly custody battle. Furthermore, its difcult to imagine a crime more despicable than child molestation; I wouldnt want to come near the circle in Hell reserved for those who prey on children. But the ip side of our disgust with child molestation is the shame and embarrassment connected with a mistaken or false accusation of sexual misbehavior with a child, a charge almost impossible to eradicate. My admiration for Allens lms and writing is no more relevant than Kristofs friendship with Farrow. Its the presumption of innocence that must remain paramount. If sufcient evidence indicates Mr. Allens guilt, he should be prosecuted. If the statute of limitations has expired, he should be denounced and shunned. But his reputation and dignity shouldnt be collateral damage to a well-intended effort to encourage victims of child molestation to speak out. Are we sufciently certain about Allens guilt to continue to subject him to these unseemly suspicions? At the end of his column in the Times, Allen says, This piece will be my nal word on this entire matter and no one will be responding on my behalf to any further comments on it by any party. Enough people have been hurt. Perhaps the rest of us should put it behind us, as well.John M. Crisp, an op-ed columnist for McClatchy-Tribune, teaches in the English Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. Readers may send him email at jcrisp@delmar.edu.OTHERVOICES John CrispMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Is Woody Allen a child molester? The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. The three-day visit of French President Francois Hollande to the United States last week, once the uff about his love life was brushed away, underlined the importance of the relationship between America and France. France has had particular value to the United States as an ally, starting in Ameri cas revolutionary period. Perhaps its most useful characteristic as an ally across the years is that it wields credible military power and is willing and able to use it. The French president is able to send troops into difcult situations at the drop of a hat, generally without even grumbling from the parliament. France and Mr. Hollande have done so, most recently in two of Frances former Af rican colonies, Mali and the Central African Republic. France, with the United Kingdom, also signed on to President Barack Obamas intervention in support of rebels ghting against Moammar Gadhas regime in Libya. The Fezzan, Libyas third region after coastal Cyrenaica and Tripolitania, was also part of Frances colonial do main. Frances other value as an ally in 2014 is the fact that it is the strongest coun try, after Germany, in the 28-nation European Union and, after the United Kingdom, Americas most important partner in NATO, the trans-Atlantic military alliance. Its governments do not always agree with Washington, notably over the Iraq War, but are always an important interlocutor. This visit, apart from the fussing over who at the White House state dinner sat in the place that was to have been occupied by Mr. Hollandes former signicant other, Valerie Trierweiler the Obamas put him between them permitted discussion between the two presidents of a range of important issues. These included the problems presented by the continuing Syria conict, progress in the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations and growing pressure for boycotts against Israel, and the discussions with Iran on curtailing its nuclear ambi tions in return for easing the economic sanctions against it. Top-level U.S.-French contacts are always useful. These were particularly timely, given the critical issues on the tables at which both countries sit.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEU.S.-French ties get a boost at the White House Editors Note: Gary Trudeau is on vacation this week. Enjoy these strips from 2013. DOONESBURY Flashback

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A12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 LAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS PARTNERED WITH PROVIDING HEARINGSOLUTIONS FOR 135 YEARS. CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE HEARING CONSULTATION AND DIGITAL DEMONSTRATION. Family Owned & Operated1.FREEVIDEO OTOSCOPE INSPECTION.Take a journey into your ear. While you are watching, we will answer any questions you might have. 2.FREEAUDIO METRIC TESTING.Find out what your hearing and what you might be missing.3.FREEDEMONSTRATION. Ever wonder if a hearing aid would work for you? Experience the latest digital sound. Bring a spouse or friend so we can test with a familiar voice. DOES EARWAX LIMIT YOUR HEARING?Could it be nerve loss?Could your middle ear be the problem?AS EASY AS 1-2-3 STARTING AT$29500 Choose Any Size+FREE TRAIL PERIOD AND FREE LIFETIME SERVICE PROGRAM! HURRY!Offer Expires 2/24/2014Its Virtually Invisible! 2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) www.lakemedicalhearing.comMOSTINSURANCESCOVERED. 12 MONTHSAT0% FINANCINGAVAILABLEW.A.C. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointment Members of Florida Society of Health Care Professionals Members of International Hearing Society Board Certified In Hearing Instruments SciencesAlan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife LindaSee Alan and Save!2014 MODELS

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www.Leesburgdermatologyandmohssurgery.comEast Main StreetPine StreetEast Dixie AvenueLeesburg DERMATOLOGY & MOHS Surgery Leesburg Regional Medical Center S. Lake StreetJohnny Gurgen, DO FAOCDBoard Certified Dermatologist & Mohs SurgeonAward Winning Author & Lecturer of multiple World Renowned Dermatologic Publications. SPECIALIZING IN: rfnt bt t tt t NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSMost Insurance Plans Accepted Medicare Accepted ttt t tt ttt tttt ttt tttt SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014www.dailycommercial.comTW0-MAN BOBSLED: US garners bronze / B3 MARK LONGAP Sports WriterDAYTONA BEACH Richard Childress pumped his st above his head, emphatically celebrating his grandsons lat est accomplishment. It was a rare show of emotion from the usually stoic team owner. Then again, this moment was far from normal. Austin Dillon took the iconic No. 3 the number the late Dale Earnhardt drove to 67 wins and six of his seven championships out of pseudo-re tirement and put it back atop the scoring tower at Daytona International Speedway. Dillon might as well have grabbed the largest Earnhardt tribute ag ever made and waved it all around NA SCARs most famous track. The 3 is special to all of us, Childress said. The fam ily, the Earnhardt family, to every one of us, but I think its special because Austin, our family, is in the car. Dillon will be the talk of the Daytona 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race pole winner Austin Dillon poses by his car after his qualifying run on Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. TERRY RENNA / APAustin Dillon celebrates return of Dale Ernhardts No. 3 car to DaytonaSEE DAYTONA | B2 PHOTOS BY DARRON CUMMINGS / AP Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the United States pose for photographers with the U.S. ag after placing rst in the ice dance free dance gure skating nals on Monday at the Iceberg Skating Palace in Sochi, Russia. Davis, White win first US ice dancing gold medal RACHEL COHENAP Sports WriterSOCHI, Russia Meryl Davis and Char lie White won the ice dance gold medal Monday, the rst Olympic title in the event for the United States. Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada, the 2010 champions, took silver. Russias Elena Ilinykh and Nikita Katsalapov captured bronze. Davis and White won silver in Vancouver, but in the four years since they have overtaken the Canadians, their training partners in De troit. The Americans, the reigning world champs, scored 116.63 points in the free dance to nish with 195.52, 4.53 ahead of Virtue and Moir. When the music from Sheherazade ended with White on a knee, Davis rested her head on his back in exhaust ed elation. The two started skating together in 1997 in Michi gan, and on the biggest day of their career, they were nearly awless. That in itself justi ed 17 years of hard work, White, 26, said. As the music swelled over the nal minute of the program, their feet were in non stop motion yet every movement was intricately choreographed. Their lifts were a blur as White spun across the ice with Davis held aloft, their movements and expressions still erce despite the draining demands of the performance. As they told the sto ry of the Persian king and the woman who enchants him, White was regal in purple vel vet, Davis beguiling in a lavender dress with jewels shimmering on her midriff. They now have one medal of each color af ter winning bronze in the new team event in Sochi. We have grown up in Davis and White compete in the ice dance free dance gure skating nals.SEE GOLD | B2LSSC defeats Webber Intl JV Staff ReportDakota Higdon threw out the tying run at the plate on Monday to lead visiting Lake-Sumter State College to a 3-2 victo ry over Webber Inter national Universitys junior varsity. Mike Hennessey red 7.2 innings for the Lakehawks, allowing just three hits while striking out 11. David Winn nished the game to pick up his rst win of the season without a loss. Kris Hodges led LSSC at the plate with a 2-for-3 perfor mance, including a double. Higdon had a run-scoring base hit while Austin Simmons drove in the goahead run with two outs in the ninth in ning, setting the stage for Higdons defensive heroics. The Lakehawks (62) travel to Maryland on Wednesday to face CCBC-Dundalk in a doubleheader. The rst game begins at noon with the nightcap starting at 3 p.m. KAREEM COPELANDAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Roy Williams earned his 300th win at North Carolina with an 81-75 win against Florida State as the Tar Heels rallied from a 15-point rst-half decit to record its seventh consecutive victory. The win was North Carolinas biggest come back of the year. Freshman Kennedy Meeks scored a ca reer-high 23 points for North Carolina (18-7, 8-4 ACC), while Marcus Paige chipped in 20. James Michael McAdoo, who had scored dou ble gures in 17 consecutive games, fouled out without a point. That was about as bizarre of a game Ive ever been involved with early, nothing we did was very good, Williams said. But our guys just sort of hung in there. Florida State (15-11, 6-8) switched up the starting lineup with its NCAA Tournament chances dwindling after losing 6 of 9. Ian Miller made his rst start of the season and led the Seminoles with 22 points, including ve 3-pointers. His hot shooting out of the gate helped give Florida State a 21-6 lead. Montay Brandon nished with 18 points and Aaron Thomas added 16.North Carolina defeats Seminoles

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Baseball Calendar Today Voluntary reporting date for other teams other players. Feb. 25 Mandatory reporting date. March 12 Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 22-23 Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona, Sydney. March 26 Last day to request unconditional re lease waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2014 salary. March 30 Opening day in North America, Los An geles Dodgers at San Diego. Active rosters reduced to 25 players. June 5 Amateur draft. July 15 All-Star game, Minneapolis. July 18 Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign. July 27 Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players. Sept. 30 Postseason begins. Oct. 22 World Series begins. November TBA Deadline for teams to make qualifying offers to their eligible former players who be came free agents, fth day after World Series. November TBA Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 12th day after World Series. Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2015 con tracts to unsigned players. Dec. 8-11 Winter meetings, San Diego. Dec. 8 Hall of Fame golden era (1947-72) vote announced, San Diego. 2015 Jan. 13 Salary arbitration ling. Jan. 16 Salary arbitration gures exchanged. Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings. July 14 All-Star game, Cincinnati. July 17 Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign. July 31 Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players. Dec. 7-10 Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn. National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3 New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 37 14 .725 Atlanta 25 26 .490 12 Washington 25 27 .481 12 Charlotte 23 30 .434 15 Orlando 16 38 .296 22 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 Chicago 27 25 .519 13 Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20 Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 15 .717 Houston 36 17 .679 2 Dallas 32 22 .593 6 Memphis 29 23 .558 8 New Orleans 23 29 .442 14 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 12 .782 Portland 36 17 .679 6 Minnesota 25 28 .472 17 Denver 24 27 .471 17 Utah 19 33 .365 22 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 Phoenix 30 21 .588 5 Golden State 31 22 .585 5 L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18 Sacramento 18 35 .340 18 Sundays Games East 163, West 155 Mondays Games No games scheduled Todays Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. New York at Memphis, 8 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. New York at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Brooklyn at Utah, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 10 p.m. Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. tx $vmajorscores1 Mondays Womens Basketball Major Scores EAST Mount St. Marys 84, Bryant 78 NJIT 71, Rutgers-Newark 42 Robert Morris 79, LIU Brooklyn 43 Sacred Heart 77, St. Francis (NY) 53 Wagner 67, Fairleigh Dickinson 48 SOUTH Alcorn St. 57, Ark.-Pine Bluff 48 Appalachian St. 71, Elon 60 Chattanooga 64, Wofford 48 Duke 84, Maryland 63 Florida A&M 95, Delaware St. 79 Furman 51, Samford 45 Georgia St. 82, Texas St. 69 Md.-Eastern Shore 91, Morgan St. 46 Morehead St. 45, Jacksonville St. 43 NC A&T 73, SC State 49 Savannah St. 60, NC Central 53 Southern U. 70, MVSU 65 W. Carolina 63, UNC-Greensboro 51 MIDWEST Dayton 90, Saint Louis 74 SOUTHWEST Texas Southern 61, Jackson St. 54 National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 57 15 34 8 38 110 172 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 57 26 22 9 61 144 158 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 196 135 Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163 Colorado 58 37 16 5 79 174 153 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164 Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175 Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142 Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 139 128 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169 Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 146 160 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199 Mondays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games No games scheduled Wednesdays Games No games scheduled Winter Olympic Medals Table At Sochi, Russia Through Monday, Feb. 17 (60 of 98 total events) Nation G S B T ot Russia 5 7 6 18 United States 5 4 9 18 Netherlands 5 5 7 17 Norway 5 3 7 15 Canada 4 7 4 15 Germany 8 3 2 13 Sweden 2 5 2 9 Switzerland 5 2 1 8 Austria 2 5 1 8 Belarus 5 0 1 6 China 3 2 1 6 France 2 0 4 6 Japan 1 3 2 6 Czech Republic 1 3 1 5 Slovenia 1 1 3 5 Italy 0 2 3 5 Poland 4 0 0 4 South Korea 1 1 1 3 Australia 0 2 1 3 Latvia 0 1 2 3 Britain 1 0 1 2 Finland 0 2 0 2 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Croatia 0 1 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1 Ukraine 0 0 1 1 Mondays U.S. Olympians FaredBIATHLON Womens 12.5km (Mass Start) (Penalties in parentheses) 12. Susan Dunklee, Barton, Vt., 36:57.9 (3). BOBSLEIGH Mens Two-Man 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah, Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.), 3:46.27. BRONZE 12. United States 2 (Cory Butner, Yucaipa, Calif., Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 3:47.19. 13. United States 3 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif., Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 3:47.69. FIGURE SKATING Ice Dancing Final Ranking (Short and free programs in parentheses) 1. Meryl Davis, West Bloomeld, Mich., and Charlie White, Bloomeld Hills and Mich. (1, 78.89; 1, 116.63), 195.52. GOLD 8. Madison Chock, Redondo Beach, Calif., and Evan Bates, Ann Arbor, Mich. (8, 65.46; 8, 99.18), 164.64. 9. Maia and Alex Shibutani, Ann Arbor, Mich. (9, 64.47; 10, 90.70), 155.17. FREESTYLE SKIING Mens Aerials Qualication Jump 1 11. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., 104.79. Jump 2 6. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., (11, 104.79; 6, 110.18) 110.18 (q). Ranking 12. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., (11, 104.79; 6, 110.18) 110.18 (q). Final Round Jump 1 7. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., 105.21 (Q). Jump 2 5. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., 113.72. did not advance SKI JUMPING Mens Team Did Not Qualify for Final 10. United States (Peter Frenette, Saranac Lake, N.Y.; Nick Fairall, Andover, N.H.; Anders Johnson, Park City, Utah; Nick Alexander, Lebanon, N.H.), 402.5. Mondays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS Claimed OF Jimmy Paredes off waivers from Baltimore. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Claimed LHP Joe Savery off waivers from Philadelphia. Transferred LHP Eric OFlaherty to the 60-day DL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATSSigned LHP Carlos Rivas. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGSTraded RHP Patrick Mincey to Wichita for INF Abel Nieves. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS Signed LB Terrell Suggs to a four-year contract extension.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Kentucky at Mississippi ESPN2 Texas at Iowa St. ESPNU NC State at Clemson FS1 Villanova at Providence NBCSN George Washington at Richmond9 p.m.ESPN Iowa at Indiana ESPNU Georgia at Tennessee FS1 Butler at St. Johns11 p.m.ESPNU Utah St. at San Diego St.NBA 8 p.m.FS-Florida Orlando at Milwaukee8:30 p.m.SUN Miami at DallasSOCCER 2:30 p.m.FS1 UEFA Champions League, Barcelona at Manchester CityWINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live NBC 3 p.m.Mens Speedskating 10,000 Gold Medal Final; Mens Nordic Combined Individual K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final8 p.m.Womens Alpine Skiing Giant Slalom Gold Medal Final; Mens Freestyle Skiing Halfpipe Gold Medal Final; Womens Bobsled Competition; Womens Short Track 3000 Relay Gold Medal Final1 a.m.Womens Short Track 1000 CompetitionNBCSN 7 a.m.Mens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE)10 a.m.Mens Speedskating 10,000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Mens Nordic Combined Individual K-125 Large Hill, Cross-CountryNoonMens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE); Womens Bobsled Competition5 p.m.Game of the Day: Hockey3 a.m.Mens Hockey Quarternal (LIVE)5:30 a.m.Mens and Womens Snowboarding Parallel Giant Slalom Gold Medal Finals; Womens Cross-Country Team Sprint Gold Medal Final (LIVE)MSNBC NoonMens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE)CNBC 5 p.m.Mens and Womens Curling Tie BreakerUSA 5 a.m.Womens Curling Seminal (LIVE) Daytona and of all of racing for the next six days after winning the pole for Sundays season-opening Day tona 500. The famed number already was in the spot light as Childress decided to put it back on track in the Sprint Cup Series for the rst time since his driver and friends fatal accident in the 2001 Daytona 500. Dillon made its re turn an emphatic one. The legend of Dale has lived on for a long time and is going to continue to live on for ever, Dillon said before his pole-sitting run. Dale Earnhardt is not just famous be cause of the number. He is Dale Earnhardt. He was a hero in every bodys mind, including myself. ... Thats the coolest thing about ev erything thats going on. Fans still lamenting the loss of Earnhardt may have mixed emo tions about seeing an other driver in the No. 3. But those closest to the Intimidator welcomed its return. I think its great for Austin and Richard, grandson and grand father being able to come together and doing something like that with a number thats been in their family for so many years, Dale Earnhardt Jr. said. It has a lot of history in side their family. ... Im happy for them. DAYTONA FROM PAGE B1 every sense of the word, Davis, 27, said of the partnership that took them to Olympic gold. Virtue and Moir became the rst North American ice dance gold medalists at their home Olympics in Vancouver. Their free dance to Russian clas sical music told the story of their own partnership, which also stretches back to 1997. In a performance at times tender and oth ers triumphant, Moir kissed her hand at the start and again throughout the program. Dont think any one will love us less for bringing home a silver medal to Canada, Vir tue said. Ilinykh and Katsalapov were just ninth at last years world cham pionships but are now the latest Olympic ice dance medalists from Russia, nishing 7.51 points behind the Ca nadians. Shes only 19; hes 22. The home fans started cheering when the rst few notes of Swan Lake played for their free dance, and they were roar ing when it ended with Katsalapov collapsed on his knees and Il inykh weeping. Frances Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat were fourth, 6.26 points out of bronze. The other U.S. teams, Madison Chock and Evan Bates and siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani, were eighth and ninth. Russia has won 18 of 33 medals in ice dances Olympic history. GOLD FROM PAGE B1 BASEBALL Associated PressPORT CHARLOTTE David Price didnt think he would be in Port Charlotte this spring. For much of the offseason, the Tampa Bay Rays ace expected to be traded. Instead, the 2012 AL Cy Young Award winner signed a one-year contract to remain with the only team hes ever played for, a huge deal for the small-market club. It feels great. Every body knows how much I love this organization and how much they love me. The way the cities of St. Petersburg and Tampa have treated me over the course of six or seven years has been nothing short of incredible, Price said Saturday. I love it here. Im very comfortable. This is home for me. Theres still a chance that Price could get traded before the end of the season, but he thinks each day in Port Charlotte makes it less likely. Right now, I dont think theres a very good chance of being traded because Im here in spring training, he said. I felt like if I could make it to spring training, that would solidify my place on this team. Price isnt the only member of the Rays happy to see him re turn. His teammates say his contributions to the warm clubhouse atmosphere are as important as the pitches he throws. David has a great arm, new Rays catch er Ryan Hanigan said. Ive watched him pitch a lot. His per formances speak for themselves. Hes a great clubhouse guy, too. I got a text from him when I signed just say ing, Ill have (the pitch ers) ready for you. Thats awesome. Hes a leader. Manager Joe Maddon suggested the uncertainty of where the looming offsea son would take him weighed heavily on Price last season. He went 10-8 with a 3.33 ERA. Maddon expects Price will enjoy this season much more and could return to his form from 2012, when he went 20-5 with a 2.56 ERA. I can denitely see him not as edgy, Mad don said. Hes more comfortable here. He believes hes going to be here. Last year was a difcult year, coming off all the awards and coming back with all the uncertainty. If Price does return to that 2012 form, it could lead to something very big for the Rays.Price was right for Tampa Bays ace AP FILE PHOTO Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price throws to the Toronto Blue Jays on July 19 in Toronto. Associated PressSyracuse is still No. 1 in the AP college basketball poll, but it is no longer a unani mous choice. The Orange (25-0), who won two games in the nal seconds last week, are on top for a third straight week but they received 64 rst-place votes Monday from the 65-member national media panel. They were a unani mous choice the last two weeks. Florida (23-2), which won at Kentucky on Saturday, moved from third to second and re ceived the other rstplace vote. Wichita State (270), the only other un beaten Division I team, moved from fourth to third while Arizona, which lost to Arizona State last week, dropped from second to fourth. Duke moved from eighth to fth and was followed by San Diego State, Cincinnati, Kansas, Villanova and Saint Louis. UCLA, at No. 23, and Gonzaga, at No. 25, return to the rankings replacing SMU and Pittsburgh.Florida jumps to No. 2 in AP poll AP Top 25 PollThe top 25 teams in the AP mens college basketball poll, with rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 16, points based on 25 points for a rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Syracuse (32) 25-0 800 1 2. Florida 23-2 752 4 3. Wichita State 27-0 747 2 4. Arizona 23-2 679 3 5. Louisville 21-4 618 8 6. Duke 20-5 611 9 7. San Diego State 22-2 591 5 8. Kansas 19-6 554 7 9. Cincinnati 23-3 526 11 10. Saint Louis 23-2 513 12 11. Villanova 22-3 506 6 12. Creighton 21-4 423 17 13. Virginia 21-5 416 16 14. Michigan State 21-5 406 10 15. Iowa 19-6 375 15 16. Kentucky 19-6 302 13 17. Texas 20-5 278 19 18. Wisconsin 21-5 255 21 19. Iowa State 19-5 227 14 20. Michigan 18-7 159 18 21. UConn 20-5 158 22. Gonzaga 23-4 128 24 23. Ohio State 20-6 97 20 24. Memphis 19-6 85 22 25. UCLA 20-5 72 Others receiving votes: Oklahoma 31, North Carolina 22, Kansas State 19, Pittsburgh 17, SMU 7, Stephen F. Austin 7, Arizona State 6, New Mexico 6, Louisiana Tech 2, West Virginia 2, California 1, Nebraska 1, VCU 1.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 WINTER OLYMPICS TIM REYNOLDSAP Sports WriterKRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia Winless in the last three years in two-man bobsledding, Alexander Zubkov picked the perfect time and place to t that streak to an emphatic end. At the Olympics. On home ice. No one was even close, either. The 39-year-old Russian who carried his nations ag into the opening ceremony to start the Sochi Games found magic in all four of his runs, team ing with Alexey Voevo da to nish 0.66 sec onds ahead of the Swiss team of Beat Hefti and brakeman Alex Bau mann and win the gold medal Monday night. Long-awaited victory, said Dmitry Cherny shenko, head of the Sochi organizing committee. And it was a night 62 years in the making for the U.S., with the pair ing of Steven Holcomb of Park City, Utah, and Steve Langton of Mel rose, Mass., taking the bronze, the rst twoman medal showing by an American sled since 1952. It wasnt gold, but it was a medal savored by the Americans none theless. Holcomb wrapped U.S. coach Brian Shimer in a long embrace when he got out of his sled, as sever al teammates slapped each other on the back. Man, thank God, said Holcomb, who raced through a strained left calf that required treatment Sunday and Monday. There was a lot of pressure on me there. While the Ameri cans nally didnt leave a two-man race empty-handed, this competition was all about the Russian, who ap parently knows how to coax more speed out of this track than any other bobsledder in the world. The fact that Zubkov was competitive was no surprise. The fact that he won, maybe a little surprising. To win by such a wide margin, that was stunning. He had four perfect runs, Hefti said. Hes the winner and thats OK. Zubkovs last victory in an internation al two-man race was at the 2011 world cham pionships. Hed been 0-for-25 since, yet led this competition wire to wire, even though his two closest challengers have consistently been faster during the past three seasons. Head-to-head against Zubkov in two-man races since the start of the 201112 World Cup season, Holcomb had been 13-9. Hefti had simply owned the Russian, go ing 19-2. Over two damp and foggy nights at the San ki Sliding Center, none of that mattered. And neither Hefti nor Hol comb seemed disappointed with silver and bronze, either. This was our dream and the dream is real now, Hefti said. We can move on. Im happy. Zubkov has had many, many more runs than anyone else down the Sanki ice, and it showed. Zubkovs four-run time was 3 minutes, 45.39 seconds. Hefti nished in 3:46.05, and Holcomb was clocked in 3:46.27 a mere 0.03 sec onds ahead of another Russian sled that challenged for bronze. Zubkov is the third-oldest pilot to win two-man gold and was dominant, just like every other gold med alist crowned so far at the Sochi Olympics. All seven medal competi tions to date at the Sanki Sliding Center have been a blowout, with none decided by less than 0.476 seconds. Thats a massive gap in sports where hun dreths and thousandths of seconds typically make the difference. Germany, which had won the last three gold medals in two-man, had its top sled nish eighth, the worst showing for the sliding pow er in the event since 1956. If in 2010 we were sitting in a Formula One car, then this time we were sitting a trab by, brakeman Kevin Kuske said, referring to one of the least-popular cars ever sold in Germany. Its denitely an equipment issue. That used to be the case for the Americans. Not anymore.US two-man bobsled team garners bronze DITA ALANGKARA / APThe team from the United States USA-1, piloted by Steven Holcomb and brakeman Steven Langton, celebrate their bronze medal win after the mens two-man bobsled competition on Monday in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. NBA COLLEGE BASEBALL BRIAN MAHONEYAP Basketball WriterNEW ORLEANS LeBron James wont as sume the eventual date with Indiana that so many others expect. He denitely has an other one with Kevin Durant in just a few days. The NBAs two best players went their separate ways after the Easts 163-155 victo ry over the West in Sundays NBA All-Star game, but only temporarily. They will be back on the same oor Thursday in Oklahoma City, perhaps even joined by Russell West brook. Less than two months will remain in the regu lar season when play resumes Tuesday, with so much still to sort out in the loaded Western Conference. Things seem so much simpler in the East, where a Miami-Indiana matchup in the East ern Conference nals has seemed a certain ty since the opening weeks of the season except to James. This is more than a two-team race. Theres a lot of good teams in the Eastern Conference, he said. Its been a slow start for us as a whole, but theres so many good teams, you cant just count on us and one other team. I respect every team we go against. Miami went into the break 2 games be hind Indiana, with third-place Toronto having 10 more loss es than the Heat. The Pacers lost Game 7 of the East nals in Mi ami last June, and they want home-court ad vantage if when? the teams meet again this spring. The Heat are interested in it too, though only to a point. What matters more is that were healthy. Were going to compete for rst place of course, but were not going to make it this huge thing, Chris Bosh said. Were within striking distance, 2 back. We like our chances. The Thunder nally opened a little cushion atop the West with their strong nish to the rst half, winning their nal three games to take a four-game lead over injury-plagued San An tonio, the defending conference champion. Houston, the Los Angeles Clippers and Port land are all six games behind. Durant is the NBAs leading scorer and has a good chance to end James reign as the leagues MVP. The Thunder could get even stronger when Westbrook returns from knee surgery, per haps even Thursday in their rst game after the break. Durant scored 38 points in the All-Star game and has been unstoppable even in games where there is defense, averaging 31.5 points. He had 33 in the Thunders 112-95 victory in Miami last month, but scoring is only part of what hes done to help Oklahoma City to a league-best 43-12 record even with only 25 games from Westbrook. KD is a great player. Hes a great teammate. He does all the things that we have asked, Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. He doesnt want to be just a scorer. He wants to be a play maker, a defender and thats what hes done all season for us. The trade deadline also is Thursday. The Heat and Pacers have perhaps already made their moves with the signings of centers Greg Oden and Andrew Bynum, but other contenders may seek the opportunity to make a deal they feel could position themselves to end the Heats quest for a third straight championship.James-Durant matchup nears as NBA resumes play BILL HABER / AP East Teams LeBron James of the Miami Heat (6) heads to the hoop during the NBA All Star basketball game on Sunday in New Orleans. Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida States Jameis Winston made his 2014 college baseball debut this weekend with the Seminoles in a season-opening series against Niagara. The Heisman Trophy winner was not avail able Sunday for the nal game of the series. He had to leave for Tex as to accept the Dav ey OBrien Trophy giv en to the nations top quarterback during a ceremony in Fort Worth on Monday. A look at how the 20-year-old redshirt sophomore fared against Niagara:IN RELIEF The 6-foot-4, 225-pounder earned his rst save of the sea son in Game 2 on Sat urday. Winstons line: 2.0 innings pitched, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 1 K, 0 BB, 6 batters faced.AT THE PLATEWinston made just one plate appearance in the series. He drew a walk as a pinch-hit ter and scored a run in Game 1 on Friday. His line: 1 appearance, 0 H, 1 BB, 1 R, 1.000 OB percentageIN THE FIELDHe played left eld in the ninth of Fridays opener. With Florida State leading 13-2, he caught a y ball. Win ston threw a runner out at third after eld ing a bunt while pitch ing Saturday. That was the rst out of the eighth inning with the Seminoles leading 3-1.HIGHLIGHTS Winston recorded six consecutive outs in relief after enter ing Saturdays game in the eighth inning with runners on rst and second with no outs and Florida State leading 3-1.ON DECKFlorida State plays at Jacksonville on Tuesday.QUOTABLEI just wanted to get out there and pitch, Winston told Sem inoles.com. Obviously, I was excited and when they called down to the bullpen, I was ready.Heisman winner Winston records his first save of 2014 AP FILE PHOTO Florida State pitcher Jameis Winston (44) throws on June 9 in a super regional game against Indiana in Tallahassee.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Simon Sez: Time to Plant Purina Dealerrf787-4415 DEAR ABBY: You were wrong to advise Starting Anew in Ohio (Nov. 7), the mother of a 10-year-old girl who wanted the bigger bedroom in their new house, to have her kids draw straws. When the girl made the request, her older brother said he didnt care. The time to have drawn straws was when the girl rst made the request, not two months afterward. The girl is at an age when chil dren can be particularly sensitive about trust issues, and the boy is old enough to know that words have consequences. If the parents reverse course now, the girl will learn that her parents promises mean nothing, and the boy will learn that he doesnt have to worry about what he says because he can always change it later. These are not good lessons to teach children. That the father would bow to the boys request made the situation worse. May be hed think twice if he realized his daughter will now always doubt his word. JUDY IN OHIO DEAR JUDY: You are not the only reader who told me my answer wasnt up to my usual standards. In fact, not a single person who wrote to comment agreed with me, and their points were valid. Their comments: DEAR ABBY: Your solution wont keep the peace in that household; it will end it. The daughter will learn her parents cant be trusted to keep a promise; the son will think he can take anything he wants from his sister because, as the male, he gets his way. No, Abby, a promise is a promise. And if theres any lesson more important to teach our children, I cant imagine what it is. HOLLY IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR ABBY: This is the time to teach that 12-year-old young man to be a man of his word. He made the decision that his sister could have the room. The daughter had the guts to ask for what she wanted. Good for her for asking for what she wants. Now they should draw straws to determine the outcome? The message this sends to the children is, If youre older, you can get what you want. If you make a promise, you can break it. The daughter should not lose out on what she was promised. DANIELLE IN WISCONSIN DEAR ABBY: May I offer a suggestion? The children should be told that each year around the anniversary of their moving to the new house that they will change rooms. It may take some effort and energy, but the benet would be that both brother and sister get to experience the larger bedroom. It will teach them to compromise. TAMI IN COLORADO DEAR ABBY: Having been through this type of situation as a child, I can tell you it destroyed my trust in my mother. Believe me, this will have far-reaching and unintended repercussions in that little girls life. A promise is a promise! CANDACE IN THE ROCKIES DEAR ABBY: Whatever happened to respect for your elders? None of my six nieces and nephews has ever called me Uncle Sam, nor have any of their children called me Mr. B. When the 5-year-old called me Sammy, a name I loathe, I nearly snapped. Am I out of line? SAM IN SHEFFIELD, MASS. DEAR SAM: If Uncle Sam is what you prefer to be called, you should have made that clear to your siblings when the nieces and nephews were little. Children are imitative. If their parents call you and refer to you as just plain Sam, dont blame the children for doing the same. I dont know how old the kids are now, but it may be a little late for you to start complaining about this.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Dad who defers to son sends wrong message to daughter

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 rf ntbbntbn ffrnt r rrf ntttrr r rr rrr rrr rntfrn tttt rr rr r r rr rr rr rnt r rr r rrr r rrr f nn nn ttn nt fn nnf rr r r f rr rrr rffr r rrr rrr rnt ttt r rr r nnn tfn rr rn r r rr rr rr rr rr b rr r rr r f f f f f rrr btttb nrr rrr tnb r rr rr r f n fbrn frnft nnrnnfrn rrf frrfr r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 r f f ntb n t r bbnt rftnn bbtbbtbnbnbb nbnnbbb ntbb bnn nbnbb tb nn rnbbbntbbt tntbbbtnbtb ntnbr r nnbt bn bbtbbnttb tnnb r r r r f r f f ntb t n t rfr r bbnt btbbbtnn bbtbnbbb tntbrb nbn tbbbtnbnb nbtbnt fr r nnt fb nbnbtnbtnb bbntnbbbtn btbntnbtnbbb btbnb tbnnnbt nn bttnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbtnr r bb t bb nttb nn btbbbnttn bn r n t r r rr r nn bn bbnt rftnnn nbbtbnb rbbbntb b bnnnb nbb nn r r r nb bbnt tbbbtbnt btbnbnbtnb tbnbb nnbtnb nbbtbbn bnttbtnnn b f f r f r f f nbnbtnnt bnnbbtnbtbn nbbnbnnt nbbtnbnbnn bbbnbnt bntbbbnt bnbbtbbtnnb tt nnbtbnb r r bb bn ntnbtb tnb bttbn b bbbbn bbb ntb r r f f ntb f nbn n t bnbbtnb tnnbnb bbtttnbn nbtttbtt nnnbtn bnnntbnbnb bbntnbbbn nbbbtnnbtn nnbbtnttbbtbtbbt nbbtbnnt nbtttbttnn nbtnb nnntbnbnbbbnt nbbbnnb bbtnnbtnnn bbtnttbbtbtbbt nbbtbnnt bbnt rftnn bnbbbbbbb ntbb bnn nbnbbn bnnnb nbbtnbtnnb nbbbntbbb tbbbtnbtb ntr f nb btbbnttb tnnb r r r r r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n n b b b n t n b t n b b t b n n b t n b b b n t b b t b n b b n b n b n bb nbn t r nbbbb br bbnnb nnn bn r n f bn bbnt rfntnbb nbtnnbnn bnbntnnb nnntb bb nn nbbt bnn r r f f r f nbbbnt bbbtbbbt bntnb tbnnbtb bnb btbbnbnttbtn nnb f r b b t t r r r r nnbtbnb nn bb t bb bt bnt bttbbb bnbn bn n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b b b n b b b b t t n t b b t b n b b n b n b n bn nbtnnn r rtbt tbb fnbttn bbbbb bbbbnn b n r r r n t r r r f bbnt rftnnn bbtbnbnn nbbbntb bb nn n rbbnb n tnnr r r f f rfnb bbnttbbbtnbt bntnb bnb tbbtnbbnnbt nnnb bbtbbnttb tnnb r r f r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b n b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b t n t b b b n b n n n b b b r f f r n t f f r n n n nbbbntbbntbbbtn bbtbnbtbtttbbt btbbtnbbtbtnnb nbtnbnnt nbbnnbtbbnn btbbnttttbttt bbttbbtbbttn bnntnn bbnbnbntnbbn nnnntbttnbtnn nbtbbnbntntt nbnbnb nbbtbbbnt bbnt btbbbntnb bnbbbbt ntbbnb ntbbbtnb nbnbtbnt r b b t t n t n b n b n n b ntnbbbtnbtb ntnbbnb tbbtnbb nnbtnnn n r r r r t n b b r bb t bb bnn ntbbb bbbnb nn nnbbbnt tnbtbttbbtbn nnnnbt bbtnb nnbntbbnt bbbtnbnbn bbn r bb t bb bn tbbbtnbnb nbtbnt r r nnt fb nbnbtnbtnb bbntnbbbtn btbntnbtnbbb btbnb tbnnnbt nn bttnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbtn r bb t bb nttb nn btbbbnttn bn f r f f ntb t n t f bbnt btbbbtnn bbtbnbbb tntbf bnbn f r f f ntb t f rf n t f bbnt btbbbtnn bbtbnbbb tntbrb nbn tbbbtnbnb nbtbnt f r nnt b nbnbtnbtnbbb ntnbbbtnbtb ntnbtnbbbb tbnbtb nnnbt nn bttnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbtnnn r bb t bb nttb nn btbbbnttn bn r n f bn bbnt rfntnbb nbtnnbnn bnbntnnb nnntb bb nn nbb tbn n r rr nbbbnt bbbtbbbt bntnb tbnnbtb bnb btbbnbnttbtn nnb r r r r r r r nnbtbnb nn bb t bb bt bnt bttbbb bnbn bn n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b b b n b b b b t t n t b b t b n b b n b n b n bn nnbtbnb bn bb t bb bt bnt btnbnb nn b n n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b n b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b t n t b b b n b n n n b n b b t bn r nt t bn bbnt r f nnbb nbtnnbnn bnbntnnb ntb bb nn nbbb nn ff nbbbnt b b b tbbbt bntn n btbnb nbtbnbn bbbtnbbnnbt bbtbbnb nttbtnnnb f r f r r r r r f n r r r f f f bbnt btbbbntnb nnbbtb bbbbnbb btbbtbnbbbb bntntbb nbnb btntbbbtnbnb nbtbnt r n n f ntnbbbtnbtb nttbbbnb tbnbb tnnbtn bn btnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbnnnbtntn bn bb bb t bb ntn bbb bbt bn r r r r r f r r r r f bn nt r r nbtbbb nnn ntbbr r rbtn nnbtnbbtb ntnbbntbb tbnnbt btnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnbbttb nbnbbbbtnbb bnbbtnbtnbtb ntbbb nbnbtntn bbtnnnb nnbtbbnb bbntbt bnntttnbbntbnb nnbbbn tnnbtb nbbnnbt nbbb nbntntbbtbb nbnnbbnbbb tnbbbbb tbbnbnnbtbttnnt nbbnbnbn r r bb bb t bb bn r ntb f fr n rbn bbnt rfntn bnnbbtb bbbrbnb nbnbb tnbnbnbtb r n t r r r nn bn bbnt rftnnn nbbtbnb bbbbbntb bb nnnb nbb nn r r r nbbbnt tbbbtbnt btbnbnbtnb tbnbb nnbtnb nnb btbbnbnttbtn nnb r f nbnbtnnt bnnbbtnbtbn nbbnbnnt nbbtnbnbnn bbbnbnt bntbbbnt bnbbtbbtnnb tt nnbtbnb bb r t bb bn ntnbtb tnb bttbn b bbbbn bbb ntb bn r f ntb nbnbttbb bntbn bbntb n t nnbntb nnbnbfnb bbtttn bnbnbn bbnt rftnn bbtbbtbnbnb rbbbntb bb nnnb nbbnbn bttbbbnt bnbbnt btbnnnnb ntbnnb nbfnbbbt ttnbn bnnbbbbnt ntbbbtnbtb ntnbtbtb bnbnbtbtn bbnnbtbn bnrb btbbnttb tnnb r f r r nbtnr bb tbb tr tbb n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b b b n n b b b n t n n b n b b n b b n n b t n b b b n b n t n t b b t b b n b n n b b n b b b n b b b b b t b b n b n n b t b t t n n t n b b n b n b n ntb bttnnbtb b nbnb tnt r

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B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B9

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B10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 r fntbtb rfn f f f f f fr tbtb f f ff fff f fbbff rftn b n f f f b f b t f t ff nf b ttb tf t f f f f f r fntb rfn ffff ffff fff ff f f fr tb ff ffff ff fff ff fr fff f fbbff rftn n b r f r f b t f b f t t b b ff t nf n b ttb bbffr bb f f f f f t b b b f t n t b b b b b b ff nf b ttb tfff t f f f f f t b b b f t n t b b b b b t b r fntbt rfn f ff f f fr tbt f f fff fff fffr ff ffff f fbbf frft n n f f f f f b f r f t t r f t r fntbtb rfn f ff f f fr b tbtb f ff f f f rf rff fffff frfff ff ff f fbb ffrf tnb n b f f f b f t r r f t ff t n b ttb tfff t f f f f f t b b b f t n t b b b b b bt b f fff fff f fbbff rftn n f f f t f f t f t t b ff n n b ttb t f n t b b t b r fntb rfn f f f fr tb fntb fff ffr rf f f f b f r f tb fff ffr n fn f f f f t f f ff fff f fff ff ff f n bff ttb nbttnbtb t b b t t b b b bb r f rfn nf f t bb ft tff ftf fr f tf ff f ffftt r fff r ff f ff f fr b f f tbb ft t ntbtt n tt n b bbf ttbbt ff f fn fb ttt nb n b t bb t f ff rffffff ffff f f f f f rf r ff ffffffrff ff fff ffff ffff n f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f n f f f f f b f f n b f f r b b f f t fbttt t b f r f ftt ff fff rrf f f fr ttt fff ff fff f ff rrf bff ff rrf b f bbf tnt n f f f b f nf b b f t t b b t f f tt nb nb t b n t b b t fn f tft ttt nb nb nrt ttbt b r r f nttt ff f ff ff rffb r f fr rt nttt b f f fff ff rf fbr f ffff f f fbbf rff nt n f f f f t f t f f f f f f f f f f f f r f t rfn nf f t tb bb ft tff ftf fr f tf ff f ffftt r fff r ff f ff f fr b f f tbb ft t ntbtt n nf b nt b r r r f tb ff ff rffffff ffff ff ff ff ff f n t f f f t f nt t f bbf b nff f tt f n b n t b b t n b ftbtb f ff f f f f b frf f fttb tb f fff f fff fffff n bbf t f t r f r f f f f f f n f f f f t ff fff f fff ff ff ft tttt nbtt nbtb r r f n n f f f f r n f rff ffff rf rfff f ff ff rr f f n bbf t f n b f r f f b f f ff f n n tb f tt nbtbtb nbtbtbb f f f t b b t f f b b f t n t b b t b b t n fn f f ttt bbttb nbb nt bt n b

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B11 rfnntb ttffbb b rt tb tttt ttbb bb bbb nrb ntbb bbb t t r t n n t b nrbb r b r b r n b n r t n b n n r n t n r f b b nb bb ntnr bbb tbb tb bbbbnr tbb b bb n n r nrbb b t b b nrbn tbbbb nrb bb bb bb bb b b bb tt f f b tb ft b trb nrbb nbnnr nrb btnr nrbb rf ntb b b b f b nnrnrb rbb t trb trbb bb b r bb f nt tnnrbb nnbbr nb b b rnnrtttn nttnnbb b n n t b tttnn tbb r tnfb nrftbb trtrbb f nnbn ttbb n nnnnrb b fntb nn nnrbb f n t n r b b nb nnrf b nr fnnnb b n bt bb ntnttnb nnrnrbb nrfr ftrbb b nbbtb n tnnrb b n t t n t n t t n r n bb bfn nrbb n r n n f b b nbnnbbb tttnntn nrtbb bnrb b ttb fntb fbb nnrnnrnrb nnb nnrnrb nntb nnbb f n b b n b nn fnttrrb rntnb nnrnrb nrb b fnttnnnrnrb nnrb bb b b b b b fbb b nft bb bfr tb tbbb tnnr fntbnnb b b fttnnrbbb nnrnrbnb nrnnrnnr nrb tnb rbb trtb nnb ttbbb ntnrb f rttrb nttb bnt bnnb nrtbb t n t t n t n r t n t n n t n t n n n r n r t r b f rtb nbnbb n trbb bnfntbnb bb tbnn bb tnrr rnbb ft ntbb nntb rfrbb nn ntb r rnnrr b t bb b bb bnrbtftn tbb bntrnrb bb t nrbnb r nnfb rrtb b tb rntnnb nn f f n t n b r n b n n t n r rtnt btn nrtntrtnr nttb t n t t r n t t r t n t n n r b f b n n n b n n r n n t r t t b t t t n b t t n t r t n t b b n n r n r b f b t n t b t t n b b r r t n b n n n b t b n r n b n r n r r r b r r t t t n t t n b n r r b n t n n n t t n n n b b b b f tntttn tnbntnt ttbbtr ntnrrrb tntnrr ntnnbb ntrt brtb r r t n n r t b n n b r b n b f b r b n r t r b b n t n n n b nttfb nrftb t n t r n t t n t t b n n r r t n n t n ntr rttntnb bnrbb ttnn tnttnnb trtntrnr rnnb nnrtt ntnb t b t b n n r n r t n t b n r n r f t t r b n n r b f b b t t n t b t r t b n n b tt rrbb n t n r b t tnnn rntnftfrff tnnf rttnbtr nrt btnftt bnnn fnrb rbtbt nnb t n r n n b n ttrrtt tbnnttnt rnrtnn nbtnnrtnb t n b f r r n t b t n r t n r n n b n n t b n t n t r t t b n n n n r b t n r n n b n t t n n f f t t t b t t t n n r r r b b n b b b t b t n r n n b t r r r t r n n t r b n n n n t n r r n n n t t n t t b r r f n n b b n b n r rnnnnttnb tnnb ftntttntnrtb r t n t n n n b n r nb f t r n n r n r b r b r n t r t b r n n r t t n n n n b b n n n t t n b f t n n b t t n n b n n t b b b r b n b t t n r b n b b r n n t n n n n n b b n r r b b r r r n t f b r n b n t n n n n b t t n n n r n r t b b n t t n t r nttn rrnnrb bbnnnt nnrb n n n t n t t b rf t n n b f n b t n n t n n t t n t b n r t t t t t t r n n n n n t t n t n n t n t t t t n n t r n t n t n t n t t t t r t t b n r t t t t t n n r t r t t n t r t r t t t t t n n n t b t t t t n n t n t t r r t n b r r r n n n r n r n r r n n n b n t n t b n n n r n n t n b b b b b b b b t b t rtb ttn rtnntnnrtr rtrnb nttntn trtrn ntnr t tr ff trtn tnttnttrt rrnt tntrn tnnrrntt ntrrt b f f nttt ntnttt ntnntrtnt rttt rttb rtntnt n nttnt ffb t nrnntbb bbn nr t t t n n t n n n t r t n r n n r t n n r t n t t t n r n t t r t n n t t n n t n t n n n t t b n t t t n n r t n t t n t n n t t t t n t n n r n t t n n r n n t n t r b n r n n r b rnb b tttntrntnn n n n t rrn tt r tnrnrtn nnnttrtnt nbbnb bbbtttnttn nrr nrnnn rtnttn tnttnnt tttnnrttt ntrttrt nntrrrtnt nttnb b trntnt ffbt rnb n n t n n n t r t n r n n r t n n r t n t t t n r n t t r t n n t t n n t n t n n n t t b n t t t n n r t n t t n t n n t t t t n t n n r n t t n n r n n t n t r b n r n n r b b

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B12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 rf rntbftfbbftn rbntftb f n f fbrftf fbfr f b rrb trr ffrtr ft rrftbrft tbff rrf brtfr ntbf rtntft f nffb frbrf tfbf bf rrf rntfbtb rr r btrftb f rtf rrf nrrf f nbbt rftf rntrr n rrb rrfrrtnrr b f n nn tbt fr b fttfbb tftrfrr rf n f f rt nbtf b bf tn rrr rrfftb rbrrrt tftrrf rft tfttnttr rrtrr n nn frfbt nn f t f f r b f n f t n b b f f f r t t r f nntb fttrtftrtb fttbr trrtf tf ffrrtb frr nnf f rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nnf f nnntrf f bnrfrb rnfttrft ttb ftrtnfntb rbrff fb f b f n ff f f t r f t t r f f f t f f r tfr fftbrttb tfrrf nfftrnf rbrrb r f b f b r f r nf f nnff f t r n t r b r b f b t f b rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f t t f n f t n b b r n b r t t f trf fft f t r n b b b t n r b f t b f r r t r r r frb f t brtbfbbf tfrntrbrrn rbntf f r t tf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nff b r r r b f t r nf tf r r t f r f r n t n f r f r n t r n nft tbf n b b t t f r t f r f b t b t r r b b r r t r f t b f t t f t f r f t r n f f r b f n f f f r r n r r n f b r t f r f r n b n r trrfn t r b t r r b f b f t f rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nft ttbf fff ffrb bntf b r t f r t r t f r r nftf ftftr rt rnb rtr rb r r tbrtbrtrnb rf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nf ttbf r bnt nf tbf nnff ft tf brtf bf fr f fn f tfbbtt f rbf frf t f b f n r r r b f b f b b b b r b t f b r r ffbtrtf rrtr rbtf bftr f rf rr nbrrrbfrtf nbftrb rtft rrf f tnbb f t n f t f f b bftbftb nrrr rfbttfb rrrbrnbtn b frfbt bt fnbtb ft rbrf r ft frbfbft f tftb f ft nb nbrf tbf bf btftrb f frnbrrr br tft rrbbr bnf fnn rrf trffbfr nbtrr b r t f f nft fbbrtbf trf fbfb rtnt tftbfrr ftrnbbbb f fbfbftb f r f b b t f t b b ftfbr rtf ftfbr rtf ffb fnf t f t r f fttf tnb brbbrfnb bb f r t tb tfbbftf rftrr f ft b r r r fnftfttrbf btftbff tffttb ftfbr rft frtb r r t f f b fbnttrfbr rrr bnttb r fntffb rtf nfbb bt frfb n nbn rrtbtb ftrrtfbb rrr nbr f ftr rbb n n b r rfnb fbbf tf btbftrnbfnrtb rt btff brf f btf rrtf f nf b tf trtbnr bbbbt trrft bftbftrt fbr



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10% OFFAll options with this coupon rffnntb US ICE DANCERS BRING HOME THE GOLD, SPORTS B1 COMMON GROUND: Nothing unites tea partyers, liberals more than the NSA A6 HERE FISHY, FISHY: Attractors to help anglers make catch A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Tuesday, February 18, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 49 2 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED B6 COMICS B4 CROSSWORDS B6 DIVERSIONS B5 LEGALS B6 LOTTO A2 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 WORLD A9 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A12. 79 / 57 Mostly sunny 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com E milly Powell point ed to the bus stop at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive. The bus stops right here in the morning, she said. Luckily, the kids are off today. A 15-feet in diame ter sinkhole opened up right next to the bus stop early this morning in the Clermont subdi vision. I am kind of wor ried it might have been closer to my house or inside my home, said Powell, who was out for a walk with her two children and lives down the road from the sinkhole. I am little worried that it might happen, lets say, when I am driving the kids to school or something. The sinkhole, locat ed in the Hartwood Re serve subdivision off of Hartwood Marsh Road, is four feet deep, ac cording to Tim Rogers, project manager for Bechtol Engineering and Testing in DeLand, who did a preliminary CARLA K. JOHNSON Associated Press CHICAGO For many older Amer icans who lost jobs during the recession, the quest for health care has been one ob stacle after another. Theyre unwanted by employers, rejected by insurers, struggling to cover rising medi cal costs and praying to reach Medicare age before a health crisis. These luckless peo ple, most in their 50s and 60s, have emerged this month as early winners un der the nations new health insurance system. Along with their peers who are self-employed or whose jobs do not of fer insurance, they have been signing up for coverage in large numbers, submitting new-patient forms at doctors ofces and lling prescriptions at pharmacies. I just cried I was so relieved, said Mau reen Grey, a 58-yearold Chicagoan who nally saw a doctor this month after a fall in September left her in constant pain. Laid off twice from fulltime jobs in the past ve years, she saw her income drop from $60,000 to $17,800 a year. Now doing temp work, she was unin sured for 18 months Associated Press GAINESVILLE Florida was the world leader in un provoked shark attacks last year with 23, easily most in the United States and more than twice the number as any other country, according to a report released Monday. None of the Florida attacks was among the 10 fatal inci dents around the world, ac cording to the University of Floridas International Shark Attack File. Worldwide there were 72 unprovoked shark attacks in 2013, down from 81 the year before and the lowest record ed since 67 attacks in 2009. The United States had 47 at tacks, with 13 in Hawaii, six in South Carolina and one each in Alabama, California, North Carolina, Oregon and Texas. Australia had 10 unpro voked attacks last year and South Africa had ve. Sharks have a lot more to fear from us than we do from them, said George Burgess, who maintains the shark le. Statistically, shark attacks are extremely rare, especial ly considering the number of humans that enter the water each year. The International Shark At tack File investigated 125 shark incidents but deter mined many of them were provoked. Florida led world with 23 shark attacks in 2013 AP FILE PHOTO A Caribbean reef shark glides past scuba divers Jim Abernethy, left, and Heather Keith at a dive site called Shark Canyon off Juno Beach. Older people are early winners under new health law THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Neighbors observe a 15-feet in diameter sinkhole at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive in Clermont Monday. BELOW: Tim Rogers, with Bechtol Engineering and Testing, measures the depth of the sinkhole. Sinkhole opens at school bus stop WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC Hartwood Marsh Rd. Tumbling River Dr. Wind River RunPowderhorn Place Dr.Tumbling River Dr.Harts Cove Way N Peace Pipe Way Peaceful Valley D r SinkholeSINKHOLE LOCATIONA sinkhole opened at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive near Hartwood Marsh Road in Clermont. 15-foot-wide breach shocks Clermont residents STAVE FUSSELL Special to The Commercial Fruitland Park city commissioners are discussing potential changes to the citys charter that could ease the citys expect ed transition from 4,000 residents many of whom grew up in the city to one with a majority of voters who live in the Villages of Fruitland Park. George Mack ie McCabe, chair man of the Charter Review Committee, has told city commis sioners the advisory board has already fo cused on developing some sort of district ing plan. A straw poll of charter committee FRUITLAND PARK City moving closer to districting rules SEE SINKHOLE | A2 SEE DISTRICTS | A5 SEE CARE | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014: This year you often re act in a childlike manner when it comes to your ca reer and relationship mat ters. Try to think before you speak, and sit on automat ic reactions. You frequently will nd yourself in stressful situations where a decision must be made. If you are single, the person you meet after mid-July will be more signicant than the person you meet prior to that time. If you are attached, working on a project together leaves both of you feeling satis ed. You enter a very spe cial period come summer. Plan a long-desired vacation together. LIBRA loves bat ting around ideas as much as you do. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your sixth sense will help you sort through a higher-ups attitude. Clearly, you do not have the whole story. Defer to someone else, and try not to worry so much about a temporary issue. Take a stand with someone who tends to be deant. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Pace yourself with out pressuring someone who has not given a lot of thought to a problem. You could feel as though some one is trying too hard to impress others. How you handle this person could change the balance of pow er. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will be full of fun as you seek to make a change, but a partner might not feel the same way. This person will view this adjustment more seriously. Relate to a loved one directly. A chat might not solve a problem, but it will show your com passion. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Take an overview of your nances. You know your limits with a domes tic matter. If you are not as comfortable as you would like with an investment, say no. Remember how intu itive you usually are, and then follow through on your gut feeling. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your efforts will pay off, giv en some endurance and follow-through. A person who has been quite distant might start to open up. You could be delighted by this reversal. A family members serious attitude might un nerve you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In the next few weeks, you will get a read on how your year is going to go. Note what areas of your life might not be running smoothly right now. Commu nication could be off. If you believe someone has made an outrageous statement, speak up. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) How you get past an obsta cle that seems to keep ap pearing will be the key to your success. You know what to do. Somehow, youll manage to get your way and not upset anyone in the pro cess. You also might gain a former dissenters support. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The unexpected will oc cur, and you might be back pedaling for a while. Your re sponse to a surprise could be more signicant than you realize. Take some time to consider all the poten tial options before declaring what you will do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Rethink a recent decision youve made. The unexpected might occur with a child or loved one. Maintain a sense of humor, and dont lose sight of your long-term goals. Your re sponses could be very dif ferent from what you had anticipated. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might want to understand what is happen ing with someone you re spect, as this person could be acting out of sorts. Sometimes the best ap proach is to be subtle while indicating that you care and are there for him or her. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your sense of direction will help you sort out an is sue. The more detached you are from a complica tion, the more likely you are to come up with a winning solution. Problems will sur face, and fortunately, they will be minor. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) The Sun moves into your sign today and ener gizes you. In the next few weeks, you will note a posi tive change in your life. Test out what seems like an in credible offer with several trusted friends. You might not be as realistic as you need to be. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US FEB. 17 CASH 3 ............................................... 2-0-1 Afternoon .......................................... 6-0-4 PLAY 4 ............................................. 4-5-0-5 Afternoon ....................................... 0-9-5-3 FLORIDA LOTTERY FEB. 16 FANTASY 5 ........................... 7-13-20-31-34 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. assessment of the sink hole Monday morning. Rogers said it was too early to tell whether the sinkhole, which affected 15 homeowners in the Peaceful Valley Drive culdul-sac, would worsen or affect any of the near by homes. There is nothing to do but keep an eye on it to make sure it stabilizes, he said, as he measured the depth of the sink hole, marking areas with orange spray paint. This is not the rst sinkhole in the subdi vision: in July 2013, a smaller sinkhole, 10 feet across and 10 feet deep, developed on Powder horn Place Drive, down the street from the cur rent one, as the result of a leaking sprinkler line, Rogers said. Rogers said they were still determining the cause of the current sinkhole in front of the entrance of the cul-desac. Doris Bloodsworth, city spokeswoman, said the 15 homeowners are able to enter and exit the cul-de-sac because public works employees brought in ground-up asphalt to make a ramp over the curb. Sentry Management, which manages the sub division, is working with the citys sanitation de partment to have the homeowners in the culde-sac label their gar bage cans and bring them to the Powder horn Place Drive side of the sinkhole so that city workers can pick up the garbage, which was scheduled Monday. Derek Morgan, divi sion manager of Sen try, conrmed Mon day it was too early to make judgment calls on whether the sinkhole would have any further impact. We are waiting for the engineers to come in and do a site evalua tion, and we will be led by what they are recom mending to the Hart wood Reserve board of directors, so they could go forward with a sensi ble, timely and more important than anything else safe x to the problem, he said. Sinkholes can devel op quickly or slowly over time. Florida sits on limestone, a porous rock that easily dissolves in water, with a layer of clay on top. The clay is thick er in some locations, making them even more prone to sinkholes. Ofcials and residents collectively agree sink holes have become an ongoing issue and prob lem in Florida. The fact of the matter is, they have happened from time to time, Mor gan said. On the upside, they dont happen too frequently. When they do, inevitably they cause some concern. RiskMeter, which is used by underwrit ers and agents to au tomate property look ups and provides online hazard mapping ser vices, released a report showing the top 10 sink hole prone counties. Lake County is ranked 10th and Marion County fourth in the region. The number of prop erty insurance sinkhole claims has increased substantially to 6,694 in 2010, an increase of 4,334 since 2006, Risk Meter reported. In August 2013, a 100foot sinkhole developed, swallowing a section of the Summer Bay Resort near Clermont. No one was injured and all 105 guests were evacuated safely. In June 2011, a sink hole off of Main Street in Leeburg collapsed half of Main Street Beauty Sup ply. That hole was esti mated to be 60 to 70 feet wide with an uncertain depth. Miles Hensley, who lives in the Peaceful Val ley Drive cul-de-sac, ve houses down from Mon days sinkhole, said he is concerned about how long it will take to x the road. The last sinkhole that opened up took over six months to x, he said. The Hartwood Reserve Homeowners Associa tion has not been recep tive to the needs of the homeowners. Morgan said Monday afternoon in an email that Rogers is expected to be back on site Tues day to take further mea surements and begin the process of determin ing what are the next ac tions. Safety remains a key concern for Emily Hick ey, who lives a few streets away from the sinkhole. You dont know when the sinkhole is going to happen and where it is going to be, she said. You want to be safe in your neighborhood. My in-laws were walking here last night, she said referring to the sinkhole. For Powell, she said her family in New York is becoming more con cerned. They want me to move back to get away from it, she said. SINKHOLE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Emily Hickey, middle, guides her children, Clare, left, and Ryan Hickey, around the sinkhole in the Hartwood Reserve neighborhood Monday. The sinkhole is right next to a school bus stop at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive. Associated Press ORLANDO Gov. Rick Scott on Mon day proposed spending more than $213 million for a transportation hub including a rail line at Orlando International Airport. The governor said at a Monday news conference that the project, called the South Airport People Mover Complex, would create 1,900 construction jobs and 380 permanent jobs at the new fa cility. The $213.5 million would be spent over three years, provided the state Leg islature also approves the spending plan. This project in Orlando, as well as oth ers statewide, makes Floridas airports among the best in the nation, keeping Florida competitive, and creating jobs and opportunities for future genera tions, Scott said. A key part of the project would use the new hub to link the Orlando airport with the private All Aboard Florida rail line that will run from South Florida to cen tral Florida. It is expected to begin ser vice as early as late 2015. The transportation hub will also pro vide links to air and ground transporta tion, including rental cars, taxis, buses and private vehicles. Scott calls for $213.5M Orlando airport transport hub

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Grantsmanship Network to hold monthly meeting The Lake-Sumter Grantsmanship Network (LSGN) monthly member ship meeting will host Commissioner Sean Parks as its guest at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the United Way of Lake and Sumter Counties ofce, 32644 Blossom Lane. Parks will discuss updates to the grant process in Lake County. The LSGN meetings allow non prot organizations to network with other businesses, learning more about the community, grant writing and available funding. For informa tion, go to www.lsgn.org. LEESBURG Bloodapalooza seeks donations for OneBlood The Bloodapalooza 2014 event is looking for blood donations for the OneBlood blood bank. Local coun try bands will perform from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday at Gator HarleyDavidson, 1745 U.S. Highway 441. The OneBlood organization will have the Big Red Buses on site to handle blood donations as well as free hot dogs and refreshments. Those eligible to donate carry ing proper identication and weigh ing at least 110 pounds can sign up for rafe prizes, and those who donate double red blood cells will get a $10 gift card in the mail. For information, call 352-728-3433 or go to www.oneblood.org. LEESBURG LSSC to hold womens history event Feb. 26 Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment is the theme for this Womens History Month event, at 4:30 p.m., Feb. 26, in the Magnolia Room at Lake-Sumter State College, U.S. Highway 441. The event will feature a panel of local female business and com munity leaders, including Phyllis Baum, RN, MBA, vice presi dent of the Central Florida Health Alliance; Rosanne Brandeburg, ex ecutive director, LSSC Institutional Advancement Foundation and member Lake County School Board; Emily Lee, Bates Avenue Community, member Lake-Sumter State College Board of Trustees and Donna Miller, Lake County Judge. Reservations are not required and light refreshments will be provided. For information, call 352-391-1182. TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension to host heart health series The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension in Lake County is hosting a three-part series called Keeping the Pressure Down to help residents de crease their risk of heart disease. Classes will be held from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27 and March 6 at the Lake County Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Rd. Participants should plan on at tending all three sessions. Cost for the class is $10 and registration is required by Tuesday at lakehbp. eventbrite.com. For information, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2721 or email julieeng@u.edu. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report A few hours after a re claimed the life of a Clermont woman last week, reghters re sponded to another blaze just a few miles away at a warehouse re portedly used to recycle cooking oil. This can literally add fuel to the re, said Lt. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Pro fessional Fireghters of Lake County, adding rst responders usually dont know what to ex pect when they come to warehouses where the contents often change. You really nev er know what is inside these buildings and that creates a very dan gerous situation, he said. Fireghters from Lake County, Clermont and Orange County re sponded to battle the blaze, Gamble said. The rst arriving units reported heavy re showing at the two-sto ry warehouse, which CLERMONT Warehouse containing cooking oil catches fire PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS OF LAKE COUNTY Fireghters from Lake County, Clermont and Orange County all responded to battle a warehouse blaze in Clermont last week. Halifax Media Group Marion County could become the location of the states newest nurs ing home for aging mili tary veterans, including those in Lake and Sumter counties. The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs recent ly notied county ofcials that the community is on the short list as a possible location of the agencys seventh regional facility. Marion was among 10 counties that made the nal cut, DVA Executive Di rector Mike Prendergast told Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet earlier this month, according to a de partment news release. The DVA currently oper ates nursing homes in Day tona Beach, Land OLakes, Panama City, Pembroke Pines, Port Charlotte and St. Augustine. OCALA Marion could get next veterans home AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T he rst largescale, comprehen sive evaluation by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of arti cial, recycled plas tic sh attractors in Florida is beginning in Lake Grifn. According to Florida Fish and Wildlife sh eries biologist Brandon Thompson, the attrac tors are being assem bled and taken into the lake from Leesburgs Herlong Park. Thompson said there will be 18 quarter-acre sites in the lake, with 100 structures in each site. Twelve of those sites are regular brush attractors that already have been deployed, while six of those are the recycled plastic at tractors. Thompson said the usual oak brush attrac tors start to lose their complexity after three to ve years, while the plastic attractors could last for 10 to 20 years. The brush attrac tors were placed sev eral weeks ago, and Thompson expects to be nished putting in the recycled plastic at tractors by next week. The attractors will be both for research and to help concentrate sh for shermen. Thomp son said in areas that are not over-harvest ed, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission wants to help people catch sh. Sometimes people view the FWC as put ting in regulations to Staff Report A 53-year-old Leesburg wom an died Sunday afternoon when her car collided head on with another vehicle, causing a third vehicle to wreck along Coun ty Road 44, the Florida Highway Patrol said. Michelle Nickle was driving north on CR 44 about 1:30 p.m. when her 2003 Buick crossed the center line and collided headon with a 2002 Mercury driven by Constance Kasey, 71, of Lees burg. The collision caused Ka seys vehicle to spin, clipping a 2000 Chevy pickup truck driv en by Wilmer Bell, 81, of Lees burg, who was following Kasey, the FHP said. Nickle was pronounced dead at the scene. Kasey was admit ted to Ocala Regional Medi cal Center in serious condition, while Bell was injured, the FHP said. Bell had a passenger, Eliz abeth Bell, 76, of Leesburg, who was admitted to Florida Hospi tal Waterman in Tavares with minor injuries. The accident remains under investigation. Woman dies in three-car accident LEESBURG LEESBURG Fish attractors being installed in Lake Griffin PHOTOS BY AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Fish attractors in Leesburgs Herlong Park await deployment. BELOW: Bill Connelly of the Hawthorne Fishing Club works on a sh attractor on Monday. CRAIG PITTMAN Tampa Bay Times This is a story about sex, sup ply and demand, global trade, corruption, government regu lation and one of the ugliest sea creatures in Florida. Among the marine animals that live in the Florida Keys is the sea cucumber. It is animal, not vegetable a long and lumpy invertebrate that looks like a cross between a diseased zucchini and an overinated eclair. For decades, divers who strapped on scuba gear to collect Sea cucumber harvests could face new rules SEE FIRE | A4 SEE VETS | A5 SEE FISH | A4 SEE CUCUMBER | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Protect and Serve Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) OBITUARIES Edward M. Lowderbaugh Edward M. Lowder baugh passed away February 4, 2014 after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Born to Sarah Chap man and Richard Low derbaugh on April 30, 1937 in Fort Dodge, IA. Proud member of the U.S. Air Force, he re tired in 1997 after a long career of service. His dream of living in a warm climate came true when he and his be loved wife moved from St. Paul, Min nesota to Tavares, Florida in 2002. De voted to family and country. Be loved husband, father, grandfather and un cle. Preceded in death by his mother Sarah Chapman, father and step-mother Richard and Alta Lowderbaugh, paternal grandmother Clarabell Lowderbaugh and sister Linda Stehr. Survived by his loving wife Sherry Lowder baugh (Tavares, FL), daughters Kimberly Lowderbaugh and Kris tina Pelton, grandson Troy Pelton (Apple Val ley, MN) and nieces and nephews, Art, Richard and Steve Stehr, Cher yl Schraufnagel and Deborah Richter. This world has lost a strong and wonderful man who loved and protect ed all things great and small. He will be truly missed. Private memo rial will be held at a lat er date. Roxanna C Reese Roxanna C Reese, 84, of Fruitland Park, FL and Lakewood, NJ was born October 14, 1929 in Point Pleasant, NJ and died February 15, 2014. She was a Cub Scout Den Mother and also an active support er of the Boy Scouts of America. She also provided transporta tion for the senior citi zen nutrition program and meals on wheels in New Jersey for many years. After retirement, she and her husband moved to Florida and they were volunteers at the Leesburg, FL Wel come Center. She at tended the Communi ty Methodist Church in Fruitland Park, FL. She is preceded in death by her husband of 65 years, George W. Reese. She is survived by her son George L Reese, her son Joseph (Anne) Re ese, her grand daughter Michele (Chad) Potts, her grandson Ja son Reese, and 9 great grandchildren. Gath ering of family and friends will be at Beyers Funeral Home Chap el on Wednesday, Feb ruary 19, 2014 from 6-8 PM. Funeral service will be held at the same location on Thursday, February 20, 2014 at 11 AM. In lieu of ow ers, donations can be made to the Corner stone Hospice Foun dation. Online condo lences may be left at www.beyersfuneral home.com. Arrange ments entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg, FL. DEATH NOTICES Rev. Calvin A. Ashley Rev. Calvin Augustus Ashley, 84, of Deland, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Rocker-Cu sack Mortuary, Lees burg, FL. Gary Mark Beaulieu Gary Mark Beau lieu, 75, of Coleman, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Donald A. Connors Donald A. Connors, 84, of Fruitland Park, died on February 12, 2014. National Crema tion Society. Beatrice Milera Beatrice Milera, 84, of Eustis, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home. IN MEMORY LOWDERBAUGH REESE limit people, but real ly we work for the an glers and we want to see the highest popu lations of sh; we want to see them catching the most sh, he said. Thompson said any offshore structures and cover help attract sh, and more complex structures attract more sh. Theres gonna be a lot of different stuff growing on these, sim ilar to how there would be on oak trees, that attracts the bait sh all the way up the food chain, Thompson said. Thompson add ed there are shortand long-term goals for the project, with an initial goal being to see how the plas tic attractors com pete with brush attrac tors in concentrating sh, and a long-term goal of seeing how the plastic attractors com pete with brush once FISH FROM PAGE A3 contains more than 4,000 square feet, and they immediately called for help. Fire conditions were already well pro gressed by the time the 9-1-1 call was made, Gamble said. The oc cupants (of the ware house) spent valuable time (before calling for help), trying to ex tinguish the re, and it delayed getting the trained professionals on scene. Fireghters set up a tower truck to access the re that was break ing through the roof and it took them sev eral hours to get the blaze under control. One man at the scene was treated for minor burns and one Orange County re ghter was injured af ter he fell off a ladder inside the building, Gamble said. The re ghter was treated on the scene. Just hours earlier, reghters responded a few miles away af ter Pauline Muschette, 68, became trapped inside her house and died at a blaze in the Greater Hills subdi vision. The res were unrelated. Both blazes are un der investigation by the State Fire Mar shals Ofce. FIRE FROM PAGE A3 brush starts to break down. Twelve members of the Hawthorne Fishing Club volun teered to put togeth er the articial at tractors on Monday. I think its real ly, really important to involve the stake holders, the peo ple that are going to take advantage of these attractors and the people that are gonna be out there catching the sh on them, Thompson said. Bill Connelly, a member of the sh ing club, said the group of shermen wanted to do what they could to help Fish and Wildlife im prove shing and the lakes. The articial at tractors have 30 limbs on each. The plastic attrac tors have been used in other states and, from what Thomp son has seen of those results, they look promising, he said. saltwater sh for aquariums have also scooped up the oc casional sea cucum ber. In 2012, they col lected about 14,000 of them in the Keys, according to Melis sa Recks of the Flor ida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission. Nobody got rich off of them they were going for about $1 each. Then, last year, Floridas sea cu cumber catch more than tripled, hitting 54,000, Recks said. The reason for that astonishing jump lies in the Asian market, where they are eat en, not displayed in aquariums. In Chi na in particular, the sea cucumber is used to treat joint pain and, more important ly, as an aphrodisiac. As a result, de mand is heavy there for sea cucumbers, also known as tre pang and bchede-mer and the vacuum cleaners of the sea. The de mand is so heavy that worldwide 20 percent of sea cucumber sh eries have been fully depleted. Thats bad news. Despite their alleged ability to boost hu man sexual perfor mance, sea cucum bers suffer from a major disadvan tage in their own re production because they are broadcast spawners, Recks said. That means they eject their sperm and eggs out into the wa ter in the expectation that enough other sea cucumbers are close by doing the same thing so that they will mix. If there arent, no spawning occurs. If too many sea cucumbers are harvested, they may never bounce back. So many sea cu cumbers were har vested in Costa Rica, Ecuador, India and eight other countries that the population collapsed, prompt ing those countries to ban further har vesting, Recks said. Even in areas that are supposed to be pro tected, such as the Great Barrier Reef and Galapagos Is lands National Park, so many sea cucum bers were snatched up that their popula tion crashed. Except for requiring a license to collect live sea creatures, Florida does not regulate sea cucumber collectors. Fearing disaster will occur in the Keys as it has elsewhere, the group that represents people collecting sea creatures there, the Florida Marine Life Association, asked state wildlife ofcials to create new regu lations to protect sea cucumbers. Because the asso ciation requested a limit of 200 sea cu cumbers per person per trip, thats the limit Recks recom mended to wildlife commissioners. To Eric Lee, a limit that small would be a disaster: I would denitely be out of business. CUCUMBER FROM PAGE A3

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 The agency reports that those facilities now boast an occupancy rate of 99 percent. The study looked at factors such as the population of elder ly veterans, the num ber of available nurs ing home beds within the community and the countys poverty rates. Analysts conclud ed that a skilled nurs ing facility was needed most in Collier and Lee counties, which are ex pected to have about 32,000 elderly veterans between them by 2015. That southwest Flori da area was followed by the Polk-Manatee-Hill sborough region, which is projected to have roughly 72,000 veterans older than 65 next year, and then a district made up of Marion, Putnam and Sumter counties, which will be home to an estimated 29,000 el derly veterans in 2015. The departments re cords indicate the 120bed facility will cost around $17 million and take three to ve years to build. Counties are en couraged to chip in $500,000 toward the cost, but failure to do so would not necessar ily disqualify them, the DVAs letter adds. The facility is intend ed to serve veterans within a 75-mile radi us of its location, which would include Lake and Sumter counties. Once completed, the nursing home would add about 190 new jobs and operate on a $7 million yearly budget. The federal govern ment would nance 65 percent of the new facil itys cost, while the state would cover the rest. The state is looking for a 20-acre site for the building, either gov ernment-owned or do nated by a private land owner. VETS FROM PAGE A3 members last Tuesday showed all ve members favor district ing the city, McCabe said. McCabe, who serves as vice president of Hospitality in The Villages, grew up in Fruitland Park and earlier announced his support for districting as a way to preserve the citys character, traditions and history once the Villages of Fruitland Park brings a new majority into the city. Dr. Chris Cheshire, the com missions only rst-term mem ber, has suggested what could be a more effective solution: extending the residency re quirement for city commission candidates. Cheshire, an acu puncturist and Oriental Medi cine practitioner, owns Mulber ry Integrative Medicine in The Villages. Currently, the citys charter re quires that candidates be resi dents for a period of one year pri or to ling for any elective ofce. City Attorney Scott Gerken plans to study the issue. There may be some [statuto ry] limitations [governing candi date residence requirements], Gerken said. I dont think you could say 20 years, but then I dont think the one-year requirement is written in stone either, he explained. Fruitland Parks new majori ty will begin arriving early next year. If the timeline projected by The Villages developers holds, 4,000 new voters will be able to cast ballots in the 2016 elections and the earliest arrivals could qualify to run for commission seats then or even for mayor. Extending the citys candidate residency requirement to two years would prevent Villages of Fruitland Park newcomers from qualifying for a city post until 2018, or the mayoral race in 2020. That transition period would give the city time to adjust to its new majority, and vice-versa, commissioners agreed. Legislation and court deci sions regarding residency re quirements for municipal ofce are unclear. Residency requirements are certainly legal. The U.S. Constitu tion provides that members of the House of Representatives must be residents of the United States for seven years, Senators for nine years and the president 14 years. In state and local elections, residence requirements draw mixed reviews. A 1973 Supreme Court decision upheld a sev en-year residency requirement for New Hampshire gubernato rial candidates and, two years later, okayed the same sev en-year residency requirement for state senators. The following year, a low er court struck down a fouryear residency requirement to run for the school board in Fort Worth, Texas. The issue may surface again at the Charter Review Committees next meeting Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. in the city commission chambers. DISTRICTS FROM PAGE A1 before she chose a marketplace plan for $68 a month. Americans ages 55 to 64 make up 31 per cent of new enrollees in the new health in surance marketplaces, the largest segment by age group, according to the federal govern ments latest gures. They represent a glim mer of success for Pres ident Barack Obamas beleaguered law. The Great Recession hit them hard and for some its impact has lingered. Aging boomers are more likely to be in debt as they enter re tirement than were previous generations, with many having pur chased more expen sive homes with small er down payments, said economist Oliv ia Mitchell of Univer sity of Pennsylvanias Wharton School. One in ve has unpaid med ical bills and 17 per cent are underwater with their home values. Fourteen percent are uninsured. As of December, 46 percent of older job seekers were among the long-term unem ployed compared with less than 25 percent be fore the recession. And those nancial setbacks happened just as their health care needs became more acute. Americans in their mid-50s to mid60s are more likely to be diagnosed with di abetes than other age groups, younger or old er, accounting for 3 in 10 of the adult diabetes diagnoses in the United States each year. And every year after age 50, the rate of cancer diag nosis climbs. The affordable cov erage is an answer to a prayer really, said Lau ra Ingle, a 57-year-old Houston attorney who had been denied cov erage repeatedly be cause she has sarcoid osis, an autoimmune disease. She recently had back surgery for a painful condition thats been bothering her for months. One night in Septem ber, 64-year-old Glenn Nishimura woke up with wrenching pain that sent him to the emergency room. It was his gallbladder. A doctor recommended surgery. Instead, Nishimu ra went home. A con sultant to nonprot groups, he was self-em ployed and uninsured. I checked myself out because I had no idea what this was going to cost, the Little Rock, Ark., man said. They didnt want me to go, but they didnt stop me. Nishimura lost his coverage after leav ing a full-time position with benets in 2007, thinking he could land another good job. The recession ruined that plan. After COBRA cov erage expired, he was denied coverage be cause of high blood pressure and other conditions. He made it until Sep tember without a ma jor illness. A second night of gallbladder pain and a chat with a doctor persuaded him to have the surgery. Af ter getting the bills, he negotiated the fees down to $12,000, which he considered a big hit, but it could have been worse. The aver age cost of a gallblad der removal in Arkan sas was listed at three times that. Nishimura dipped into his savings to cover the bill. In December, he chose a bronze plan on the new insurance marketplace that costs him $285 a month af ter a tax credit. The de ductible is $6,300, so he hopes he doesnt have to use his coverage. He can get on Medicare in April, just in time for his annual checkup. Now theres the peace of mind of know ing the limits of my ob ligation if I have cata strophic health needs, he said. Dr. Bernd Wollschlae ger said hes noticed a recent increase in pa tients in this age group at his family practice in Miami. Lots of them have untreated chron ic conditions that have progressed to an ad vanced stage. Many have delayed necessary treatments due to costs and ex pect a total and quick workup on their rst visit, he said, adding they want referrals to specialists and tests in cluding colonoscopies and mammograms. CARE FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Maureen Grey poses for a photo in Chicago.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 558 S. U.S. Hwy. 441 Lady Lake352-561-4879$1500OFF ALL SHOES IN STOCKMust present coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person. Good 2-18-2014 thru 3-3-2014. www.shopshoebiz.com CANADIAN MEDSSave up to 80%on Your Meds Prices352-633-3301Call for a FREE quote today. WE MATCH LOCAL COMPETITIONWe ship anywhere in the USA. COUPON$10.00 OFFInitial Purchase of $100.00 or More 352-253-0059Visitpetlodgeandspa.comIn Leesburg, next to Home DepotDiscover why pet owners trust us for their boarding, day care and grooming needs. CONNIE CASS Associated Press WASHINGTON Hoyt Sparks says he has no use for liberal Dem ocrats and their social istic, Marxist, commu nist ways. Toni Lewis suspects tea party Republicans are a bunch of peo ple who probably need some mental health treatment. Politically speaking, the tea-party support er in rural North Caro lina and the Massachu setts liberal live a world apart. Who or what could get them thinking the same? Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency. By exposing the NSAs vast surveillance web, Snowden created a link between tea par tyers and liberals two tribes camped on oppo site sides of the nations political chasm. These people to the right and left of main stream America sound a lot alike now. Sparks, a federal re tiree in the Blue Ridge mountain town of Spar ta and a political inde pendent, condemns the NSA programs as a breach of privacy which violates the Constitu tion. Lifetime Democrat Lewis, a social work er in the city of Brock ton, near Boston, says, When were violating the rights of U.S. cit izens, I think thats a dangerous line to be walking. Whether they are Re publicans, Democrats or independents, al most half of Americans say they support the tea party movement or call themselves liberal. Compared with their more moderate Repub lican or Democratic peers, tea partyers and liberals are signicant ly more likely to oppose the collection of millions of ordinary citizens tele phone and Internet data, an Associated Press-GfK poll shows. By a 2-to-1 margin, these two groups say the government should put protecting citizens rights and freedoms ahead of protecting them from terrorists. Nearly 6 in 10 Repub licans support the tea party movement. Near ly 4 in 10 Democrats call themselves liber als. Combined, they are buoying a coalition of conservative and lib eral lawmakers push ing to rein in the NSA, while party leaders balk at anything that might weaken the agencys ability to foil terrorists. Why does the NSA unite the right and left ends of the political spectrum? More extreme polit ical views lead to more distrust of government, said George Mason Uni versity law professor Ilya Somin, whos stud ied the tea partys fo cus on the Constitution. People at the far ends of the political spectrum are less likely than mid dle-of-the-road voters to feel government is re sponsive to them. On the ip side, Somin said, moderates general ly dont follow politics as closely as people at the extremes, so they may be less aware of the scope of the NSAs activities. The whole thing is wrong, says Virgin ia Greeneld, a tea-par ty supporter in Cortland, N.Y. But, she says, most people dont want to be lieve that the government would do what its doing. Liberals, who tend to trust government to handle many matters, also tend to be suspi cious of intrusions into privacy or civil liberties. That aligns them on some issues with liber tarians, the champions of individual rights who make up a substantial portion of the tea party movement. Another segment of the tea party social con servatives deeply mis trusts President Barack Obama and his adminis tration, an attitude like ly to extend to the NSA while hes in charge. Obama is a point of contention in the an ti-surveillance coali tion. Eight in 10 tea par tyers dislike the way hes handled the issue; only about half of liber als disapprove. Still, the NSA brings liberals clos er to the tea-party way of thinking than usu al: On other big issues, liberals approval for Obama generally hovers around 70 percent. When it comes to Snowden, tea-party supporters and liber als are back in step about half of each group says the former NSA contractor did the right thing. Among non-tea party Republicans and nonliberal Democrats, a strong majority thinks he was wrong to reveal classied programs. Christina Ott, who works on her familys farm near Woodbury, Tenn., found Snowdens action inspiring. I thought it was somebody taking a moral stand and a big risk, said Ott, a liberal Democrat. What can unite liberals and tea partyers? The NSA AP FILE PHOTO This le photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. The costly $787 billion spending bill that President Barack Obama signed into law s oon after taking ofce boosted the economy and helped avoid an other Great Depression, the White House said in a status report on Mon days fth anniversary of the laws enactment. Republican leaders in Congress took note of the anniversary, too, but argued that the bill spent too much for too little in return. White House eco nomic adviser Jason Furman said the Ameri can Recovery and Rein vestment Act ma de oth er targeted investments th at will pay dividends for years to come. By itself, the stimu lus bill saved or created an average of 1.6 million jobs a year for four years through the end of 2012, Furman said in a White House blog post. Half of the total scal support for the econo my, or about $689 bil lion, from the recov ery act and subsequent measures was in the form of tax cuts directed mostly at families. The remainder was spent on such things as rebuild ing roads and bridges, preventing teacher lay offs and providing tem porary help for peo ple who lost their jobs or needed other assis tance because of th e poor economy. The report said recov ery act spending will have a positive effect on long-run growth, boost the economys potential output and ultimately offset much of the laws initial cost. More than 40,000 miles of roads and more than 2,700 bridges have been upgraded, near ly 700 drinking water systems serving more than 48 million people have been brought into compliance with feder al clean water standards and high-speed Inter net was introduced to about 20,000 commu nity institutions. While these gures are substantial, they still nevertheless un derstate the full magni tude of the administra tions response to the crisis, Furman wrote. He noted that the re port focused solely on the effects of scal leg islation. It did not evalu ate other administration policies that aided the recovery, such as stabi lizing the nancial sys tem, rescuing the auto industry and supporting the housing sector. White House: Stimulus bill was good for economy

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 GOD CAF Breakfast & LunchSoups Salads Wraps QuicheAMAZING HOLY CHEESECAKE!A Holy Spirit filled caf serving FAITH, HOPE & LOVE Any donations over and above the cost of the food we serve goes to the ministries we support in the local area.300 W. Main St., Leesburg728-5700 BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties Trained TechniciansInsuredDrug FreeFurniture MovedUniformedPre-SprayPre-Vacuumed INCLUDES Call my daddy, hell treat you like family.FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED DAVID SHARP Associated Press BATH, Maine Some of the Navys fu turistic weapons sound like something out of Star Wars, with la sers designed to shoot down aerial drones and electric guns that re projectiles at hyper sonic speeds. That future is now. The Navy plans to de ploy its rst laser on a ship later this year, and it intends to test an electromagnetic rail gun prototype aboard a vessel within two years. For the Navy, its not so much about the whiz-bang technol ogy as it is about the economics of such ar maments. Both costs pennies on the dollar compared with mis siles and smart bombs, and the weapons can be red continuous ly, unlike missiles and bombs, which eventu ally run out. It fundamental ly changes the way we ght, said Capt. Mike Ziv, program manager for directed energy and electric weapon sys tems for the Naval Sea Systems Command. The Navys laser tech nology has evolved to the point that a prototype to be deployed aboard the USS Ponce this summer can be operated by a sin gle sailor, he said. The solid-state Laser Weapon System is de signed to target what the Navy describes as asymmetrical threats. Those include aeri al drones, speed boats and swarm boats, all potential threats to warships in the Persian Gulf, where the Ponce, a oating staging base, is set to be deployed. Rail guns, which have been tested on land in Virginia, re a projec tile at six or seven times the speed of sound enough velocity to cause severe damage. The Navy sees them as re placing or supplement ing old-school guns, r ing lethal projectiles from long distances. But both systems have shortcomings. Lasers tend to los er their effectiveness if its raining, if its dusty, or if theres turbulence in the atmosphere, and the rail gun requires vast amount of elec tricity to launch the projectile, said Loren Thompson, defense analyst at the Lexing ton Institute. The Navy says its found ways to deal with use of lasers in bad weather, but theres lit tle doubt that the range of the weapon would be reduced by clouds, dust or precipitation, he said. Producing enough energy for a rail gun is another problem. The Navys new de stroyer, the Zumwalt, under construction at Bath Iron Works in Maine, is the only ship with enough electric power to run a rail gun. The stealthy ships gas turbine-powered gener ators can produce up to 78 megawatts of power. Thats enough electricity for a medium-size city and more than enough for a rail gun. Technology from the three ships in that DDG-1000 series will likely trickle down into future warships, said Capt. James Downey, the program manager. Engineers are also working on a battery system to store enough energy to allow a rail gun to be operated on warships. Both weapon sys tems are prized be cause they serve to get ahead of the cost curve, Ziv said. In other words, theyre cheap. Each interceptor mis sile costs at least $1 mil lion apiece, making it cost-prohibitive to de fend a ship in some hostile environments in which an enemy is us ing aircraft, drones, ar tillery, cruise missiles and artillery, Thomp son said. DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated Press RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. President Barack Obama warned Uganda Sunday over its plans to further criminalize homosexuality, saying it would complicate our valued rela tionship. Defending gay rights around the world, as he has done at home, Obama said a bill that President Yoweri Museveni has pledged to sign will mark a step backward for all Ugandans and reect poorly on the countrys commitment to protect the hu man rights of its people. It also would represent a serious set back for anyone committed to freedom, justice and equal rights, Obama said. Obama said the United States stands for the protection of fun damental freedoms and univer sal human rights and believes people everywhere should be treated equally. That is why I am so deeply disappointed that Uganda will shortly enact legislation that would criminalize homosexu ality, Obama said in a written statement issued from Southern California, where he was spend ing the weekend. The Anti-Ho mosexuality Bill in Uganda, once law, will be more than an affront and a danger to the gay commu nity in Uganda. It will be a step backward for all Ugandans and reect poorly on Ugandas com mitment to protecting the hu man rights of its people. It also will mark a serious setback for all those around the world who share a commitment to free dom, justice and equal rights. US Navy ready to deploy laser; rail gun on the way AP FILE PHOTO A laser weapon sits temporarily installed aboard the guidedmissile destroyer USS Dewey in San Diego. Obama: Anti-gay bill step backward for Ugandans

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 LAURA MILLS Associated Press MOSCOW A trade ban on lacy lingerie has Russian consumers and their neighbors with their knickers in a twist. The ban will outlaw any underwear con taining less than 6 per cent cotton from be ing imported, made, or sold in Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan. And it has struck a chord in societies where La Perla and Victorias Secret are panty paradises com pared to Soviet-era cot ton underwear, which was often about as at tering and shapely as drapery. On Sunday, 30 wom en protesters in Kazakh stan were arrested and thrown into police vans while wearing lace un derwear on their heads and shouting Freedom to panties! The ban in those three countries was rst outlined in 2010 by the Eurasian Econom ic Commission, which regulates the customs union, and it wont go into effect until July 1. But a consumer out cry against it already is reaching a fever pitch. Photographs compar ing sexy modern under wear to outdated, Soviet goods began spreading on Facebook and Twit ter on Sunday, as wom en and men alike railed against the prospective changes. As a rule, lacy un derwear ... is literal ly snatched off the shelves, said Alisa Sa pardiyeva, the manag er of a lingerie store in Moscow, DD-Shop, as she icked through her colorful wares. If you take that away again, the buyer is going to be the one who suffers the most. According to the Rus sian Textile Business es Union, more than $4 billion worth of under wear is sold in Russia annually, and 80 per cent of the goods sold are foreign made. An alysts have estimat ed that 90 percent of products would disap pear from shelves, if the ban goes into effect this summer as planned. The Eurasian Eco nomic Commission declined to comment Monday, saying it was preparing to issue a statement about the underwear ban. While consumer out rage may force cus toms union ofcials to compromise, many see the underwear ban as yet another exam ple of the misguided economic policies that have become a trade mark of many post-So viet countries. Sundays panty pro test in Kazakhstan fol lowed a larger demon stration the day before against a 19 percent de valuation of the coun trys currency, the tenge. Other people laughed off the panty ban, see ing it as yet another at tempt to add regula tions and controls to an already byzantine bu reaucracy in the three countries. NATALIYA VASILYEVA Associated Press SOCHI, Russia An Italian activist shout ing Its OK to be gay and dressed in a rain bow-colored outt and large headdress was detained Monday as she entered an arena to watch an Olympic hockey game. Vladimir Luxuria, a former Communist lawmaker in the Ital ian parliament who has become a promi nent transgender rights crusader, was stopped by four men and then driven away by police in a car with Olympic markings. Luxuria later told The Associated Press she was kept in the car for about 10 minutes, then released in the country side after the men had taken away her Olym pic spectator pass. She eventually made it back to her hotel and said she was leaving Russia on Tuesday morning. They dont say any thing. They just were people who had to do this and they did it, Luxuria said. Earlier Monday, Lux uria walked around the Olympic Park in Sochi for about two hours. She was shouting Gay is OK and Its OK to be gay in both English and Russian. As she was being led away from Shayba Are na, she was shouting I have a ticket. Luxuria said she was detained on Sunday evening by Russian po lice who told her she should not wear clothes with slogans supporting gay rights. Police denied detaining her. The Italian activ ist walked around the Olympic Park on Mon day with a group of jour nalists, attracting on lookers. Some Russian fans stopped to pose for photos with her. Luxuria and her color ful outt did not attract much negative reaction except for a group of young Russian men who shouted to television cameras in broken En glish: Trans not good. Luxuria arrived at a ticket inspection barri er at the hockey arena just before an evening game was due to be gin. She passed through the barrier and was be ing given directions to her seat when four men who were not wearing any identication sur rounded her and start ed shouting take her away. They then led her out of the venue and to the parking lot. Trade ban has Russias knickers in a twist VLADIMIR TRETYAKOV / AP Women protest against the ban of lace underwear in Almaty, Kazakhstan. JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press GENEVA A U.N. panel warned North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Monday that he may be held accountable for or chestrating wide spread crimes against civilians in the se cretive Asian nation, ranging from system atic executions to tor ture, rape and mass starvation. It is unusual for a U.N. report to direct ly implicate a nations leader. But in a let ter accompanying a yearlong investiga tive report, the chair man of a three-mem ber U.N. commission of inquiry, retired Aus tralian judge Michael Kirby, directly warned Kim that international prosecution is need ed to render account able all those, includ ing possibly yourself, who may be responsi ble for crimes against humanity. Even without be ing directly involved in crimes against hu manity, a military commander may be held responsible for crimes against hu manity committed by forces under the com manders effective command and con trol, Kirby wrote. He urged Kim to take all necessary and reasonable measures to stop crimes against humanity and insure that they are properly investigated and pros ecuted. Kirby added, however, there was no indication the North Korea would do so. The investiga tive commissions 372-page report is a wide-ranging indict ment of North Korea for policies including political prison camps with 80,000 to 120,000 people, state-spon sored abductions of North Korean, Japa nese and other na tionals, and lifelong indoctrination. They are wrongs that shock the con science of humanity, Kirby said. Kirby said it was im possible not to in clude Kims name in the list of suspects be cause of what he de scribed as the gov ernments totalitarian nature. UN letter to Kim Jong Un warns of accountability Gay-rights activist detained in Sochi DAVID GOLDMAN / AP Vladimir Luxuria, a former Communist lawmaker in the Italian parliament and prominent crusader for transgender rights, is detained by police after entering the Shayba Arena at the 2014 Winter Olympics on Monday in Sochi, Russia.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 GEIR MOULSON and JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press GENEVA It seemed like a routine overnight ight until the Ethiopi an Airlines jetliner went into a dive and oxygen masks dropped from the ceiling. Only then did the terried pas sengers bound for Italy from Addis Aba ba realize something was terribly wrong. The co-pilot had locked his captain from the cockpit, comman deered the plane, and headed for Geneva, where he used a rope to lower himself out of a window, then asked for political asylum. Authorities say a pris on cell is more likely. One passenger said the hijacker threat ened to crash the plane if the pilot didnt stop pounding on the locked door. Anoth er said he was terried for hours Monday as the plane careened across the sky. It seemed like it was falling from the sky, 45-year-old Italian Di ego Carpelli said of the Boeing 767-300. The jetliner carry ing 200 passengers and crew took off from the Ethiopian capital on a ight to Milan and then Rome, but sent a dis tress message over Su dan that it had been hijacked, an Ethiopi an ofcial said. Once the plane was over Eu rope, two Italian ght er jets and later French jets were scrambled to accompany it. Italian Air Force Col. Girolamo Iadiciccio said the order to scram ble came from NATO to ensure the plane didnt harm national securi ty and didnt stray offroute. The plane landed in Geneva at about 6 a.m. Ofcials said no one on the ight was in jured and the hijack er was taken into cus tody after surrendering to Swiss police. The pilot went to the toilet and (the co-pi lot) locked himself in the cockpit, Gene va airport chief execu tive Robert Deillon told reporters. He want ed asylum in Switzer land. It wasnt immediate ly clear why he chose Switzerland, where Swiss voters recent ly demanded curbs on immigration. However, Italy has a reputation among many Africans as not being hospitable to asylum seekers. Ethiopian Airlines is owned by Ethiopias government, which has faced persistent criticism over its rights record and its alleged intolerance of political dissent. The co-pilot was identied as Hailemed hin Abera, a 31-yearold Ethiopian man who had worked for Ethi opian Airlines for ve years and had no crim inal record, said Ethio pias communications minister, Redwan Hus sein, adding that Ethio pia will seek his extra dition. Geneva police said he claimed he felt threatened at home. His action rep resents a gross betrayal of trust that needless ly endangered the lives of the very passengers that a pilot is moral ly and professionally obliged to safeguard, Redwan said. SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer WASHINGTON The Arctic isnt nearly as bright and white as it used to be because of more ice melting in the ocean, and thats turning out to be a global problem, a new study says. With more dark, open water in the summer, less of the suns heat is reected back into space. So the entire Earth is absorbing more heat than expected, accord ing to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the Nation al Academy of Sciences. That extra absorbed ener gy is so big that it measures about one-quarter of the entire heat-trapping effect of carbon dioxide, said the studys lead au thor, Ian Eisenman, a climate sci entist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California. The Arctic grew 8 percent darker between 1979 and 2011, Eisenman found, measuring how much sunlight is reected back into space. Basically, it means more warming, Eisenman said in an interview. The North Pole region is an ocean that mostly is crusted at the top with ice that shrinks in the summer and grows back in the fall. At its peak melt in Sep tember, the ice has shrunk on average by nearly 35,000 square miles about the size of Maine per year since 1979. Ethiopian co-pilot hijacks plane to Geneva AP PHOTO Police stand on stairs after passengers were evacuated from a hijacked Ethiopian Airlines Plane on the airport in Geneva, Switzerland, on Monday. Study: Arctic getting darker, making Earth warmer AP PHOTO Arctic sea ice is shown in 2013.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 F ilmmaker Woody Allens in tegrity really, his decen cy and humanity was called into question on Feb. 1 when Nicholas Kristof, a promi nent columnist for the New York Times published on his blog an open letter from Dylan Far row, Allens 28-year-old adoptive daughter, accusing him of sex ually assaulting her when she was 7. On the same day, Kristof pro duced a column for the Times questioning whether its appro priate to honor with a Gold en Globe lifetime achievement award someone who was ac cused of child molestation, even 21 years ago. He quotes Dylan Farrows open letter at length and describes the psychological trauma and pain with which she says she lives. Kristof suggests that guilt be yond a reasonable doubt might be the proper standard for send ing someone to prison in our ju dicial system, but that the Gold en Globes should apply a higher standard, honoring only those who are unimpeachably, well, honorable. Which, he implies, Woody Allen is not. But, he says, the Golden Globes sided with Allen, in ef fect accusing Dylan either of ly ing or not mattering. But are those the only two choices? A recent Time magazine article cites a Canadian study that nds that in the context of divorce or custody battles, unfounded alle gations of sexual abuse, whether fabrications or in mistaken good faith, occur at a relatively high rate, perhaps as much as 50 percent. Even Kristof acknowl edges that the evidence is am biguous. A week after Kristofs column Allen defended himself in the Times noting that the charges of molestation emerged during the bitter dissolution of his 12year relationship with Mia Far row. He points to various pieces of exculpatory evidence, most of which are ignored or dismissed by Kristof. In fact, in his column Kris tof discloses his friendship with Mia Farrow and Dylans access to him through Farrow, and while he admits that none of us can be certain what happened, he suggests that the Golden Globes treat Allen as if we are. Surely this is a signicant jour nalistic lapse by Kristof and the Times which on March 26, 1993, during the vicious child custody battle between Farrow and Allen, reported that Farrow conceded that the girl would not tell a doc tor of the abuse, and that a med ical examination a few days later showed no signs of it. Further, the story reports on an investi gation by the Child Sexual Abuse Clinic at the Yale-New Haven hospital that concluded that Dylan had not been molested. Clearly, sympathy for Dylan Far row is in order. Whatever hap pened, she is a victim. Her earli est bad fortune was probably the dubious honor of having been adopted into the tempestuous, semi-functional Farrow/Allen household and subsequently be coming a pawn in an ugly custo dy battle. Furthermore, its difcult to imagine a crime more despi cable than child molestation; I wouldnt want to come near the circle in Hell reserved for those who prey on children. But the ip side of our disgust with child molestation is the shame and embarrassment con nected with a mistaken or false accusation of sexual misbehav ior with a child, a charge almost impossible to eradicate. My admiration for Allens lms and writing is no more relevant than Kristofs friendship with Farrow. Its the presumption of innocence that must remain paramount. If sufcient evidence indicates Mr. Allens guilt, he should be prosecuted. If the statute of lim itations has expired, he should be denounced and shunned. But his reputation and digni ty shouldnt be collateral dam age to a well-intended effort to encourage victims of child mo lestation to speak out. Are we sufciently certain about Allens guilt to continue to subject him to these unseemly suspicions? At the end of his column in the Times Allen says, This piece will be my nal word on this en tire matter and no one will be re sponding on my behalf to any further comments on it by any party. Enough people have been hurt. Perhaps the rest of us should put it behind us, as well. John M. Crisp, an op-ed columnist for McClatchy-Tribune, teaches in the En glish Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. Readers may send him email at jcrisp@delmar.edu. OTHER VOICES John Crisp MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Is Woody Allen a child molester? The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. T he three-day visit of French President Francois Hollande to the United States last week, once the uff about his love life was brushed away, underlined the importance of the relationship between America and France. France has had particular value to the United States as an ally, starting in Ameri cas revolutionary period. Perhaps its most useful characteristic as an ally across the years is that it wields credible military power and is willing and able to use it. The French president is able to send troops into difcult situations at the drop of a hat, generally without even grumbling from the parliament. France and Mr. Hollande have done so, most recently in two of Frances former Af rican colonies, Mali and the Central Af rican Republic. France, with the Unit ed Kingdom, also signed on to President Barack Obamas intervention in support of rebels ghting against Moammar Gadhas regime in Libya. The Fezzan, Libyas third region after coastal Cyrenaica and Tripoli tania, was also part of Frances colonial do main. Frances other value as an ally in 2014 is the fact that it is the strongest coun try, after Germany, in the 28-nation Eu ropean Union and, after the United King dom, Americas most important partner in NATO, the trans-Atlantic military alliance. Its governments do not always agree with Washington, notably over the Iraq War, but are always an important interlocutor. This visit, apart from the fussing over who at the White House state dinner sat in the place that was to have been occupied by Mr. Hollandes former signicant other, Valerie Trierweiler the Obamas put him between them permitted discussion be tween the two presidents of a range of im portant issues. These included the prob lems presented by the continuing Syria conict, progress in the Israeli-Palestin ian negotiations and growing pressure for boycotts against Israel, and the discussions with Iran on curtailing its nuclear ambi tions in return for easing the economic sanctions against it. Top-level U.S.-French contacts are al ways useful. These were particularly time ly, given the critical issues on the tables at which both countries sit. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE U.S.-French ties get a boost at the White House Editors Note: Gary Trudeau is on vacation this week. Enjoy these strips from 2013. DOONESBURY Flashback

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www.Leesburgdermatologyandmohssurgery.comEast Main StreetPine StreetEast Dixie AvenueLeesburg DERMATOLOGY & MOHS Surgery Leesburg Regional Medical Center S. Lake StreetJohnny Gurgen, DO FAOCDBoard Certified Dermatologist & Mohs SurgeonAward Winning Author & Lecturer of multiple World Renowned Dermatologic Publications. SPECIALIZING IN: rfnt bt t tt t NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSMost Insurance Plans Accepted Medicare Accepted ttt t tt ttt tttt ttt tttt SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com TW0-MAN BOBSLED: US garners bronze / B3 MARK LONG AP Sports Writer DAYTONA BEACH Rich ard Childress pumped his st above his head, emphatically celebrating his grandsons lat est accomplishment. It was a rare show of emo tion from the usually stoic team owner. Then again, this moment was far from normal. Austin Dillon took the iconic No. 3 the number the late Dale Earnhardt drove to 67 wins and six of his seven champi onships out of pseudo-re tirement and put it back atop the scoring tower at Daytona International Speedway. Dillon might as well have grabbed the largest Earn hardt tribute ag ever made and waved it all around NA SCARs most famous track. The 3 is special to all of us, Childress said. The fam ily, the Earnhardt family, to every one of us, but I think its special because Austin, our family, is in the car. Dillon will be the talk of the Daytona 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race pole winner Austin Dillon poses by his car after his qualifying run on Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. TERRY RENNA / AP Austin Dillon celebrates return of Dale Ernhardts No. 3 car to Daytona SEE DAYTONA | B2 PHOTOS BY DARRON CUMMINGS / AP Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the United States pose for photographers with the U.S. ag after placing rst in the ice dance free dance gure skating nals on Monday at the Iceberg Skating Palace in Sochi, Russia. Davis, White win first US ice dancing gold medal RACHEL COHEN AP Sports Writer SOCHI, Russia Meryl Davis and Char lie White won the ice dance gold medal Mon day, the rst Olympic title in the event for the United States. Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada, the 2010 champions, took silver. Russias Ele na Ilinykh and Niki ta Katsalapov captured bronze. Davis and White won silver in Vancouver, but in the four years since they have overtaken the Canadians, their training partners in De troit. The Americans, the reigning world champs, scored 116.63 points in the free dance to nish with 195.52, 4.53 ahead of Virtue and Moir. When the music from Sheherazade ended with White on a knee, Davis rested her head on his back in exhaust ed elation. The two started skating togeth er in 1997 in Michi gan, and on the biggest day of their career, they were nearly awless. That in itself justi ed 17 years of hard work, White, 26, said. As the music swelled over the nal min ute of the program, their feet were in non stop motion yet every movement was intri cately choreographed. Their lifts were a blur as White spun across the ice with Davis held aloft, their move ments and expressions still erce despite the draining demands of the performance. As they told the sto ry of the Persian king and the woman who enchants him, White was regal in purple vel vet, Davis beguiling in a lavender dress with jewels shimmering on her midriff. They now have one medal of each color af ter winning bronze in the new team event in Sochi. We have grown up in Davis and White compete in the ice dance free dance gure skating nals. SEE GOLD | B2 LSSC defeats Webber Intl JV Staff Report Dakota Higdon threw out the tying run at the plate on Monday to lead visit ing Lake-Sumter State College to a 3-2 victo ry over Webber Inter national Universitys junior varsity. Mike Hennessey red 7.2 innings for the Lakehawks, al lowing just three hits while striking out 11. David Winn n ished the game to pick up his rst win of the season without a loss. Kris Hodges led LSSC at the plate with a 2-for-3 perfor mance, including a double. Higdon had a run-scoring base hit while Austin Sim mons drove in the goahead run with two outs in the ninth in ning, setting the stage for Higdons defensive heroics. The Lakehawks (62) travel to Maryland on Wednesday to face CCBC-Dundalk in a doubleheader. The rst game begins at noon with the night cap starting at 3 p.m. KAREEM COPELAND Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Roy Williams earned his 300th win at North Carolina with an 81-75 win against Florida State as the Tar Heels rallied from a 15-point rst-half decit to record its seventh consecutive victory. The win was North Carolinas biggest come back of the year. Freshman Kennedy Meeks scored a ca reer-high 23 points for North Carolina (18-7, 8-4 ACC), while Marcus Paige chipped in 20. James Michael McAdoo, who had scored dou ble gures in 17 consecutive games, fouled out without a point. That was about as bizarre of a game Ive ever been involved with early, nothing we did was very good, Williams said. But our guys just sort of hung in there. Florida State (15-11, 6-8) switched up the starting lineup with its NCAA Tournament chances dwindling after losing 6 of 9. Ian Mill er made his rst start of the season and led the Seminoles with 22 points, including ve 3-pointers. His hot shooting out of the gate helped give Florida State a 21-6 lead. Montay Brandon nished with 18 points and Aaron Thomas added 16. North Carolina defeats Seminoles

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Baseball Calendar Today Voluntary reporting date for other teams other players. Feb. 25 Mandatory reporting date. March 12 Last day to place a player on uncondi tional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 22-23 Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona, Sydney. March 26 Last day to request unconditional re lease waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2014 salary. March 30 Opening day in North America, Los An geles Dodgers at San Diego. Active rosters reduced to 25 players. June 5 Amateur draft. July 15 All-Star game, Minneapolis. July 18 Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign. July 27 Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 Last day to trade a player without se curing waivers. Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players. Sept. 30 Postseason begins. Oct. 22 World Series begins. November TBA Deadline for teams to make qual ifying offers to their eligible former players who be came free agents, fth day after World Series. November TBA Deadline for free agents to ac cept qualifying offers, 12th day after World Series. Dec. 2 Last day for teams to offer 2015 con tracts to unsigned players. Dec. 8-11 Winter meetings, San Diego. Dec. 8 Hall of Fame golden era (1947-72) vote announced, San Diego. 2015 Jan. 13 Salary arbitration ling. Jan. 16 Salary arbitration gures exchanged. Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings. July 14 All-Star game, Cincinnati. July 17 Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign. July 31 Last day to trade a player without se curing waivers. Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players. Dec. 7-10 Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn. National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3 New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 37 14 .725 Atlanta 25 26 .490 12 Washington 25 27 .481 12 Charlotte 23 30 .434 15 Orlando 16 38 .296 22 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 Chicago 27 25 .519 13 Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20 Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 15 .717 Houston 36 17 .679 2 Dallas 32 22 .593 6 Memphis 29 23 .558 8 New Orleans 23 29 .442 14 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 12 .782 Portland 36 17 .679 6 Minnesota 25 28 .472 17 Denver 24 27 .471 17 Utah 19 33 .365 22 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 Phoenix 30 21 .588 5 Golden State 31 22 .585 5 L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18 Sacramento 18 35 .340 18 Sundays Games East 163, West 155 Mondays Games No games scheduled Todays Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. New York at Memphis, 8 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. New York at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Brooklyn at Utah, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 10 p.m. Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. tx $vmajorscores1 Mondays Womens Basketball Major Scores EAST Mount St. Marys 84, Bryant 78 NJIT 71, Rutgers-Newark 42 Robert Morris 79, LIU Brooklyn 43 Sacred Heart 77, St. Francis (NY) 53 Wagner 67, Fairleigh Dickinson 48 SOUTH Alcorn St. 57, Ark.-Pine Bluff 48 Appalachian St. 71, Elon 60 Chattanooga 64, Wofford 48 Duke 84, Maryland 63 Florida A&M 95, Delaware St. 79 Furman 51, Samford 45 Georgia St. 82, Texas St. 69 Md.-Eastern Shore 91, Morgan St. 46 Morehead St. 45, Jacksonville St. 43 NC A&T 73, SC State 49 Savannah St. 60, NC Central 53 Southern U. 70, MVSU 65 W. Carolina 63, UNC-Greensboro 51 MIDWEST Dayton 90, Saint Louis 74 SOUTHWEST Texas Southern 61, Jackson St. 54 National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 57 15 34 8 38 110 172 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 57 26 22 9 61 144 158 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 196 135 Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163 Colorado 58 37 16 5 79 174 153 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164 Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175 Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142 Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 139 128 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169 Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 146 160 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199 Mondays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games No games scheduled Wednesdays Games No games scheduled Winter Olympic Medals Table At Sochi, Russia Through Monday, Feb. 17 (60 of 98 total events) Nation G S B Tot Russia 5 7 6 18 United States 5 4 9 18 Netherlands 5 5 7 17 Norway 5 3 7 15 Canada 4 7 4 15 Germany 8 3 2 13 Sweden 2 5 2 9 Switzerland 5 2 1 8 Austria 2 5 1 8 Belarus 5 0 1 6 China 3 2 1 6 France 2 0 4 6 Japan 1 3 2 6 Czech Republic 1 3 1 5 Slovenia 1 1 3 5 Italy 0 2 3 5 Poland 4 0 0 4 South Korea 1 1 1 3 Australia 0 2 1 3 Latvia 0 1 2 3 Britain 1 0 1 2 Finland 0 2 0 2 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Croatia 0 1 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1 Ukraine 0 0 1 1 Mondays U.S. Olympians Fared BIATHLON Womens 12.5km (Mass Start) (Penalties in parentheses) 12. Susan Dunklee, Barton, Vt., 36:57.9 (3). BOBSLEIGH Mens Two-Man 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah, Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.), 3:46.27. BRONZE 12. United States 2 (Cory Butner, Yucaipa, Calif., Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 3:47.19. 13. United States 3 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif., Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 3:47.69. FIGURE SKATING Ice Dancing Final Ranking (Short and free programs in parentheses) 1. Meryl Davis, West Bloomeld, Mich., and Char lie White, Bloomeld Hills and Mich. (1, 78.89; 1, 116.63), 195.52. GOLD 8. Madison Chock, Redondo Beach, Calif., and Evan Bates, Ann Arbor, Mich. (8, 65.46; 8, 99.18), 164.64. 9. Maia and Alex Shibutani, Ann Arbor, Mich. (9, 64.47; 10, 90.70), 155.17. FREESTYLE SKIING Mens Aerials Qualication Jump 1 11. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., 104.79. Jump 2 6. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., (11, 104.79; 6, 110.18) 110.18 (q). Ranking 12. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., (11, 104.79; 6, 110.18) 110.18 (q). Final Round Jump 1 7. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., 105.21 (Q). Jump 2 5. Mac Bohonnon, Madison, Conn., 113.72. did not advance SKI JUMPING Mens Team Did Not Qualify for Final 10. United States (Peter Frenette, Saranac Lake, N.Y.; Nick Fairall, Andover, N.H.; Anders Johnson, Park City, Utah; Nick Alexander, Lebanon, N.H.), 402.5. Mondays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS Claimed OF Jimmy Pare des off waivers from Baltimore. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Claimed LHP Joe Savery off waivers from Philadelphia. Transferred LHP Eric OFlaherty to the 60-day DL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATSSigned LHP Car los Rivas. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGSTraded RHP Patrick Mincey to Wichita for INF Abel Nieves. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS Signed LB Terrell Suggs to a four-year contract extension. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Kentucky at Mississippi ESPN2 Texas at Iowa St. ESPNU NC State at Clemson FS1 Villanova at Providence NBCSN George Washington at Richmond 9 p.m. ESPN Iowa at Indiana ESPNU Georgia at Tennessee FS1 Butler at St. Johns 11 p.m. ESPNU Utah St. at San Diego St. NBA 8 p.m. FS-Florida Orlando at Milwaukee 8:30 p.m. SUN Miami at Dallas SOCCER 2:30 p.m. FS1 UEFA Champions League, Barcelona at Manchester City WINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live NBC 3 p.m. Mens Speedskating 10,000 Gold Medal Final; Mens Nordic Combined Individual K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final 8 p.m. Womens Alpine Skiing Giant Slalom Gold Medal Final; Mens Freestyle Skiing Halfpipe Gold Medal Final; Womens Bobsled Competition; Womens Short Track 3000 Relay Gold Medal Final 1 a.m. Womens Short Track 1000 Competition NBCSN 7 a.m. Mens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE) 10 a.m. Mens Speedskating 10,000 Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Mens Nordic Combined Individual K-125 Large Hill, Cross-Country Noon Mens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE); Womens Bobsled Competition 5 p.m. Game of the Day: Hockey 3 a.m. Mens Hockey Quarternal (LIVE) 5:30 a.m. Mens and Womens Snowboarding Parallel Giant Slalom Gold Medal Finals; Womens Cross-Country Team Sprint Gold Medal Final (LIVE) MSNBC Noon Mens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE) CNBC 5 p.m. Mens and Womens Curling Tie Breaker USA 5 a.m. Womens Curling Seminal (LIVE) Daytona and of all of racing for the next six days after winning the pole for Sundays season-opening Day tona 500. The famed number already was in the spot light as Childress de cided to put it back on track in the Sprint Cup Series for the rst time since his driver and friends fatal accident in the 2001 Daytona 500. Dillon made its re turn an emphatic one. The legend of Dale has lived on for a long time and is going to continue to live on for ever, Dillon said be fore his pole-sitting run. Dale Earnhardt is not just famous be cause of the number. He is Dale Earnhardt. He was a hero in every bodys mind, includ ing myself. ... Thats the coolest thing about ev erything thats going on. Fans still lamenting the loss of Earnhardt may have mixed emo tions about seeing an other driver in the No. 3. But those closest to the Intimidator wel comed its return. I think its great for Austin and Richard, grandson and grand father being able to come together and do ing something like that with a number thats been in their family for so many years, Dale Earnhardt Jr. said. It has a lot of history in side their family. ... Im happy for them. DAYTONA FROM PAGE B1 every sense of the word, Davis, 27, said of the partnership that took them to Olympic gold. Virtue and Moir be came the rst North American ice dance gold medalists at their home Olympics in Vancouver. Their free dance to Russian clas sical music told the story of their own part nership, which also stretches back to 1997. In a performance at times tender and oth ers triumphant, Moir kissed her hand at the start and again through out the program. Dont think any one will love us less for bringing home a silver medal to Canada, Vir tue said. Ilinykh and Katsal apov were just ninth at last years world cham pionships but are now the latest Olympic ice dance medalists from Russia, nishing 7.51 points behind the Ca nadians. Shes only 19; hes 22. The home fans started cheering when the rst few notes of Swan Lake played for their free dance, and they were roar ing when it ended with Katsalapov collapsed on his knees and Il inykh weeping. Frances Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat were fourth, 6.26 points out of bronze. The other U.S. teams, Madison Chock and Evan Bates and siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani, were eighth and ninth. Russia has won 18 of 33 medals in ice dances Olympic his tory. GOLD FROM PAGE B1 BASEBALL Associated Press PORT CHARLOTTE David Price didnt think he would be in Port Charlotte this spring. For much of the off season, the Tampa Bay Rays ace expected to be traded. Instead, the 2012 AL Cy Young Award win ner signed a one-year contract to remain with the only team hes ever played for, a huge deal for the small-market club. It feels great. Every body knows how much I love this organization and how much they love me. The way the cities of St. Petersburg and Tampa have treat ed me over the course of six or seven years has been nothing short of incredible, Price said Saturday. I love it here. Im very comfortable. This is home for me. Theres still a chance that Price could get traded before the end of the season, but he thinks each day in Port Charlotte makes it less likely. Right now, I dont think theres a very good chance of be ing traded because Im here in spring train ing, he said. I felt like if I could make it to spring training, that would solidify my place on this team. Price isnt the only member of the Rays happy to see him re turn. His teammates say his contributions to the warm clubhouse atmosphere are as im portant as the pitches he throws. David has a great arm, new Rays catch er Ryan Hanigan said. Ive watched him pitch a lot. His per formances speak for themselves. Hes a great clubhouse guy, too. I got a text from him when I signed just say ing, Ill have (the pitch ers) ready for you. Thats awesome. Hes a leader. Manager Joe Mad don suggested the un certainty of where the looming offsea son would take him weighed heavily on Price last season. He went 10-8 with a 3.33 ERA. Maddon expects Price will enjoy this season much more and could return to his form from 2012, when he went 20-5 with a 2.56 ERA. I can denitely see him not as edgy, Mad don said. Hes more comfortable here. He believes hes going to be here. Last year was a difcult year, coming off all the awards and coming back with all the uncertainty. If Price does return to that 2012 form, it could lead to something very big for the Rays. Price was right for Tampa Bays ace AP FILE PHOTO Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price throws to the Toronto Blue Jays on July 19 in Toronto. Associated Press Syracuse is still No. 1 in the AP college basketball poll, but it is no longer a unani mous choice. The Orange (25-0), who won two games in the nal seconds last week, are on top for a third straight week but they re ceived 64 rst-place votes Monday from the 65-member na tional media panel. They were a unani mous choice the last two weeks. Florida (23-2), which won at Kentucky on Saturday, moved from third to second and re ceived the other rstplace vote. Wichita State (270), the only other un beaten Division I team, moved from fourth to third while Arizona, which lost to Arizona State last week, dropped from second to fourth. Duke moved from eighth to fth and was followed by San Di ego State, Cincinnati, Kansas, Villanova and Saint Louis. UCLA, at No. 23, and Gonzaga, at No. 25, return to the rank ings replacing SMU and Pittsburgh. Florida jumps to No. 2 in AP poll AP Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the AP mens col lege basketball poll, with rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 16, points based on 25 points for a rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Syracuse (32) 25-0 800 1 2. Florida 23-2 752 4 3. Wichita State 27-0 747 2 4. Arizona 23-2 679 3 5. Louisville 21-4 618 8 6. Duke 20-5 611 9 7. San Diego State 22-2 591 5 8. Kansas 19-6 554 7 9. Cincinnati 23-3 526 11 10. Saint Louis 23-2 513 12 11. Villanova 22-3 506 6 12. Creighton 21-4 423 17 13. Virginia 21-5 416 16 14. Michigan State 21-5 406 10 15. Iowa 19-6 375 15 16. Kentucky 19-6 302 13 17. Texas 20-5 278 19 18. Wisconsin 21-5 255 21 19. Iowa State 19-5 227 14 20. Michigan 18-7 159 18 21. UConn 20-5 158 22. Gonzaga 23-4 128 24 23. Ohio State 20-6 97 20 24. Memphis 19-6 85 22 25. UCLA 20-5 72 Others receiving votes: Oklahoma 31, North Carolina 22, Kansas State 19, Pittsburgh 17, SMU 7, Stephen F. Austin 7, Arizona State 6, New Mexico 6, Loui siana Tech 2, West Virginia 2, California 1, Nebraska 1, VCU 1.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 WINTER OLYMPICS TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer KRASNAYA POLYA NA, Russia Winless in the last three years in two-man bobsled ding, Alexander Zubkov picked the perfect time and place to t that streak to an emphatic end. At the Olympics. On home ice. No one was even close, either. The 39-year-old Rus sian who carried his nations ag into the opening ceremony to start the Sochi Games found magic in all four of his runs, team ing with Alexey Voevo da to nish 0.66 sec onds ahead of the Swiss team of Beat Hefti and brakeman Alex Bau mann and win the gold medal Monday night. Long-awaited victo ry, said Dmitry Cherny shenko, head of the Sochi organizing committee. And it was a night 62 years in the making for the U.S., with the pair ing of Steven Holcomb of Park City, Utah, and Steve Langton of Mel rose, Mass., taking the bronze, the rst twoman medal showing by an American sled since 1952. It wasnt gold, but it was a medal savored by the Americans none theless. Holcomb wrapped U.S. coach Brian Shimer in a long embrace when he got out of his sled, as sever al teammates slapped each other on the back. Man, thank God, said Holcomb, who raced through a strained left calf that required treatment Sunday and Monday. There was a lot of pressure on me there. While the Ameri cans nally didnt leave a two-man race emp ty-handed, this com petition was all about the Russian, who ap parently knows how to coax more speed out of this track than any other bobsledder in the world. The fact that Zubkov was competitive was no surprise. The fact that he won, maybe a little surprising. To win by such a wide margin, that was stunning. He had four perfect runs, Hefti said. Hes the winner and thats OK. Zubkovs last victo ry in an internation al two-man race was at the 2011 world cham pionships. Hed been 0-for-25 since, yet led this competition wire to wire, even though his two closest challengers have consistently been faster during the past three seasons. Head-to-head against Zubkov in two-man races since the start of the 201112 World Cup season, Holcomb had been 13-9. Hefti had simply owned the Russian, go ing 19-2. Over two damp and foggy nights at the San ki Sliding Center, none of that mattered. And neither Hefti nor Hol comb seemed disap pointed with silver and bronze, either. This was our dream and the dream is real now, Hefti said. We can move on. Im happy. Zubkov has had many, many more runs than anyone else down the Sanki ice, and it showed. Zub kovs four-run time was 3 minutes, 45.39 sec onds. Hefti nished in 3:46.05, and Holcomb was clocked in 3:46.27 a mere 0.03 sec onds ahead of another Russian sled that chal lenged for bronze. Zubkov is the third-oldest pilot to win two-man gold and was dominant, just like every other gold med alist crowned so far at the Sochi Olympics. All seven medal competi tions to date at the San ki Sliding Center have been a blowout, with none decided by less than 0.476 seconds. Thats a massive gap in sports where hun dreths and thousandths of seconds typically make the difference. Germany, which had won the last three gold medals in two-man, had its top sled nish eighth, the worst show ing for the sliding pow er in the event since 1956. If in 2010 we were sitting in a Formula One car, then this time we were sitting a trab by, brakeman Kevin Kuske said, referring to one of the least-pop ular cars ever sold in Germany. Its denite ly an equipment issue. That used to be the case for the Americans. Not anymore. US two-man bobsled team garners bronze DITA ALANGKARA / AP The team from the United States USA-1, piloted by Steven Holcomb and brakeman Steven Langton, celebrate their bronze medal win after the mens two-man bobsled competition on Monday in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. NBA COLLEGE BASEBALL BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW ORLEANS LeBron James wont as sume the eventual date with Indiana that so many others expect. He denitely has an other one with Kevin Durant in just a few days. The NBAs two best players went their sep arate ways after the Easts 163-155 victo ry over the West in Sundays NBA All-Star game, but only tem porarily. They will be back on the same oor Thursday in Oklaho ma City, perhaps even joined by Russell West brook. Less than two months will remain in the regu lar season when play resumes Tuesday, with so much still to sort out in the loaded Western Conference. Things seem so much simpler in the East, where a Miami-Indiana matchup in the East ern Conference nals has seemed a certain ty since the opening weeks of the season except to James. This is more than a two-team race. Theres a lot of good teams in the Eastern Con ference, he said. Its been a slow start for us as a whole, but theres so many good teams, you cant just count on us and one other team. I respect every team we go against. Miami went into the break 2 games be hind Indiana, with third-place Toronto having 10 more loss es than the Heat. The Pacers lost Game 7 of the East nals in Mi ami last June, and they want home-court ad vantage if when? the teams meet again this spring. The Heat are interest ed in it too, though only to a point. What matters more is that were healthy. Were going to compete for rst place of course, but were not going to make it this huge thing, Chris Bosh said. Were within striking distance, 2 back. We like our chances. The Thunder nally opened a little cushion atop the West with their strong nish to the rst half, winning their nal three games to take a four-game lead over injury-plagued San An tonio, the defending conference champion. Houston, the Los Ange les Clippers and Port land are all six games behind. Durant is the NBAs leading scorer and has a good chance to end James reign as the leagues MVP. The Thunder could get even stronger when Westbrook returns from knee surgery, per haps even Thursday in their rst game after the break. Durant scored 38 points in the All-Star game and has been unstoppable even in games where there is defense, averaging 31.5 points. He had 33 in the Thunders 112-95 victo ry in Miami last month, but scoring is only part of what hes done to help Oklahoma City to a league-best 43-12 re cord even with only 25 games from Westbrook. KD is a great player. Hes a great teammate. He does all the things that we have asked, Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. He doesnt want to be just a scorer. He wants to be a play maker, a defender and thats what hes done all season for us. The trade deadline also is Thursday. The Heat and Pacers have perhaps already made their moves with the signings of centers Greg Oden and Andrew Bynum, but other con tenders may seek the opportunity to make a deal they feel could position themselves to end the Heats quest for a third straight cham pionship. James-Durant matchup nears as NBA resumes play BILL HABER / AP East Teams LeBron James of the Miami Heat (6) heads to the hoop during the NBA All Star basketball game on Sunday in New Orleans. Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida States Jam eis Winston made his 2014 college baseball debut this weekend with the Seminoles in a season-opening se ries against Niagara. The Heisman Trophy winner was not avail able Sunday for the nal game of the series. He had to leave for Tex as to accept the Dav ey OBrien Trophy giv en to the nations top quarterback during a ceremony in Fort Worth on Monday. A look at how the 20-year-old redshirt sophomore fared against Niagara: IN RELIEF The 6-foot-4, 225-pounder earned his rst save of the sea son in Game 2 on Sat urday. Winstons line: 2.0 innings pitched, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 1 K, 0 BB, 6 batters faced. AT THE PLATE Winston made just one plate appearance in the series. He drew a walk as a pinch-hit ter and scored a run in Game 1 on Friday. His line: 1 appearance, 0 H, 1 BB, 1 R, 1.000 OB percentage IN THE FIELD He played left eld in the ninth of Fridays opener. With Florida State leading 13-2, he caught a y ball. Win ston threw a runner out at third after eld ing a bunt while pitch ing Saturday. That was the rst out of the eighth inning with the Seminoles leading 3-1. HIGHLIGHTS Winston recorded six consecutive outs in relief after enter ing Saturdays game in the eighth inning with runners on rst and second with no outs and Florida State lead ing 3-1. ON DECK Florida State plays at Jacksonville on Tues day. QUOTABLE I just wanted to get out there and pitch, Winston told Sem inoles.com. Obvi ously, I was excited and when they called down to the bullpen, I was ready. Heisman winner Winston records his first save of 2014 AP FILE PHOTO Florida State pitcher Jameis Winston (44) throws on June 9 in a super regional game against Indiana in Tallahassee.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 Simon Sez: Time to Plant Purina Dealerrf787-4415 DEAR ABBY: You were wrong to advise Starting Anew in Ohio (Nov. 7), the mother of a 10-year-old girl who wanted the bigger bedroom in their new house, to have her kids draw straws. When the girl made the request, her older brother said he didnt care. The time to have drawn straws was when the girl rst made the request, not two months afterward. The girl is at an age when chil dren can be particularly sen sitive about trust issues, and the boy is old enough to know that words have consequenc es. If the parents reverse course now, the girl will learn that her parents promises mean noth ing, and the boy will learn that he doesnt have to worry about what he says because he can al ways change it later. These are not good lessons to teach children. That the father would bow to the boys request made the situation worse. May be hed think twice if he realized his daughter will now always doubt his word. JUDY IN OHIO DEAR JUDY: You are not the only reader who told me my answer wasnt up to my usu al standards. In fact, not a sin gle person who wrote to com ment agreed with me, and their points were valid. Their com ments: DEAR ABBY: Your solution wont keep the peace in that house hold; it will end it. The daugh ter will learn her parents cant be trusted to keep a promise; the son will think he can take anything he wants from his sis ter because, as the male, he gets his way. No, Abby, a promise is a promise. And if theres any les son more important to teach our children, I cant imagine what it is. HOLLY IN PENNSYLVA NIA DEAR ABBY: This is the time to teach that 12-year-old young man to be a man of his word. He made the decision that his sister could have the room. The daughter had the guts to ask for what she wanted. Good for her for asking for what she wants. Now they should draw straws to determine the outcome? The message this sends to the children is, If youre older, you can get what you want. If you make a promise, you can break it. The daughter should not lose out on what she was prom ised. DANIELLE IN WISCONSIN DEAR ABBY: May I offer a sug gestion? The children should be told that each year around the anniversary of their moving to the new house that they will change rooms. It may take some effort and energy, but the ben et would be that both broth er and sister get to experience the larger bedroom. It will teach them to compromise. TAMI IN COLORADO DEAR ABBY: Having been through this type of situation as a child, I can tell you it de stroyed my trust in my moth er. Believe me, this will have far-reaching and unintended repercussions in that little girls life. A promise is a promise! CANDACE IN THE ROCKIES DEAR ABBY: Whatever hap pened to respect for your el ders? None of my six nieces and nephews has ever called me Uncle Sam, nor have any of their children called me Mr. B. When the 5-year-old called me Sammy, a name I loathe, I nearly snapped. Am I out of line? SAM IN SHEFFIELD, MASS. DEAR SAM: If Uncle Sam is what you prefer to be called, you should have made that clear to your siblings when the nieces and nephews were little. Children are imitative. If their parents call you and refer to you as just plain Sam, dont blame the children for doing the same. I dont know how old the kids are now, but it may be a little late for you to start complaining about this. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Dad who defers to son sends wrong message to daughter

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 rf ntbbntbn ffrnt r rrf ntttrr r rr rrr rrr rntfrn tttt rr rr r r rr rr rr rnt r rr r rrr r rrr f nn nn ttn nt fn nnf rr r r f rr rrr rffr r rrr rrr rnt ttt r rr r nnn tfn rr rn r r rr rr rr rr rr b rr r rr r f f f f f rrr btttb nrr rrr tnb r rr rr r f n fbrn frnft nnrnnfrn rrf frrfr r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 r f f ntb n t r bbnt rftnn bbtbbtbnbnbb nbnnbbb ntbb bnn nbnbb tb nn rnbbbntbbt tntbbbtnbtb ntnbr r nnbt bn bbtbbnttb tnnb r r r r f r f f ntb t n t rfr r bbnt btbbbtnn bbtbnbbb tntbrb nbn tbbbtnbnb nbtbnt fr r nnt fb nbnbtnbtnb bbntnbbbtn btbntnbtnbbb btbnb tbnnnbt nn bttnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbtnr r bb t bb nttb nn btbbbnttn bn r n t r r rr r nn bn bbnt rftnnn nbbtbnb rbbbntb b bnnnb nbb nn r r r nb bbnt tbbbtbnt btbnbnbtnb tbnbb nnbtnb nbbtbbn bnttbtnnn b f f r f r f f nbnbtnnt bnnbbtnbtbn nbbnbnnt nbbtnbnbnn bbbnbnt bntbbbnt bnbbtbbtnnb tt nnbtbnb r r bb bn ntnbtb tnb bttbn b bbbbn bbb ntb r r f f ntb f nbn n t bnbbtnb tnnbnb bbtttnbn nbtttbtt nnnbtn bnnntbnbnb bbntnbbbn nbbbtnnbtn nnbbtnttbbtbtbbt nbbtbnnt nbtttbttnn nbtnb nnntbnbnbbbnt nbbbnnb bbtnnbtnnn bbtnttbbtbtbbt nbbtbnnt bbnt rftnn bnbbbbbbb ntbb bnn nbnbbn bnnnb nbbtnbtnnb nbbbntbbb tbbbtnbtb ntr f nb btbbnttb tnnb r r r r r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n n b b b n t n b t n b b t b n n b t n b b b n t b b t b n b b n b n b n bb nbn t r nbbbb br bbnnb nnn bn r n f bn bbnt rfntnbb nbtnnbnn bnbntnnb nnntb bb nn nbbt bnn r r f f r f nbbbnt bbbtbbbt bntnb tbnnbtb bnb btbbnbnttbtn nnb f r b b t t r r r r nnbtbnb nn bb t bb bt bnt bttbbb bnbn bn n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b b b n b b b b t t n t b b t b n b b n b n b n bn nbtnnn r rtbt tbb fnbttn bbbbb bbbbnn b n r r r n t r r r f bbnt rftnnn bbtbnbnn nbbbntb bb nn n rbbnb n tnnr r r f f rfnb bbnttbbbtnbt bntnb bnb tbbtnbbnnbt nnnb bbtbbnttb tnnb r r f r n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b n b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b t n t b b b n b n n n b b b r f f r n t f f r n n n nbbbntbbntbbbtn bbtbnbtbtttbbt btbbtnbbtbtnnb nbtnbnnt nbbnnbtbbnn btbbnttttbttt bbttbbtbbttn bnntnn bbnbnbntnbbn nnnntbttnbtnn nbtbbnbntntt nbnbnb nbbtbbbnt bbnt btbbbntnb bnbbbbt ntbbnb ntbbbtnb nbnbtbnt r b b t t n t n b n b n n b ntnbbbtnbtb ntnbbnb tbbtnbb nnbtnnn n r r r r t n b b r bb t bb bnn ntbbb bbbnb nn nnbbbnt tnbtbttbbtbn nnnnbt bbtnb nnbntbbnt bbbtnbnbn bbn r bb t bb bn tbbbtnbnb nbtbnt r r nnt fb nbnbtnbtnb bbntnbbbtn btbntnbtnbbb btbnb tbnnnbt nn bttnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbtn r bb t bb nttb nn btbbbnttn bn f r f f ntb t n t f bbnt btbbbtnn bbtbnbbb tntbf bnbn f r f f ntb t f rf n t f bbnt btbbbtnn bbtbnbbb tntbrb nbn tbbbtnbnb nbtbnt f r nnt b nbnbtnbtnbbb ntnbbbtnbtb ntnbtnbbbb tbnbtb nnnbt nn bttnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbtnnn r bb t bb nttb nn btbbbnttn bn r n f bn bbnt rfntnbb nbtnnbnn bnbntnnb nnntb bb nn nbb tbn n r rr nbbbnt bbbtbbbt bntnb tbnnbtb bnb btbbnbnttbtn nnb r r r r r r r nnbtbnb nn bb t bb bt bnt bttbbb bnbn bn n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b b b n b b b b t t n t b b t b n b b n b n b n bn nnbtbnb bn bb t bb bt bnt btnbnb nn b n n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b n b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b n b t n t b b b n b n n n b n b b t bn r nt t bn bbnt r f nnbb nbtnnbnn bnbntnnb ntb bb nn nbbb nn ff nbbbnt b b b tbbbt bntn n btbnb nbtbnbn bbbtnbbnnbt bbtbbnb nttbtnnnb f r f r r r r r f n r r r f f f bbnt btbbbntnb nnbbtb bbbbnbb btbbtbnbbbb bntntbb nbnb btntbbbtnbnb nbtbnt r n n f ntnbbbtnbtb nttbbbnb tbnbb tnnbtn bn btnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnb nbnnnbtntn bn bb bb t bb ntn bbb bbt bn r r r r r f r r r r f bn nt r r nbtbbb nnn ntbbr r rbtn nnbtnbbtb ntnbbntbb tbnnbt btnnbbtb ttbtnbnbnb bbntbnbbt bbttbnnnt nbbtnbbttb nbnbbbbtnbb bnbbtnbtnbtb ntbbb nbnbtntn bbtnnnb nnbtbbnb bbntbt bnntttnbbntbnb nnbbbn tnnbtb nbbnnbt nbbb nbntntbbtbb nbnnbbnbbb tnbbbbb tbbnbnnbtbttnnt nbbnbnbn r r bb bb t bb bn r ntb f fr n rbn bbnt rfntn bnnbbtb bbbrbnb nbnbb tnbnbnbtb r n t r r r nn bn bbnt rftnnn nbbtbnb bbbbbntb bb nnnb nbb nn r r r nbbbnt tbbbtbnt btbnbnbtnb tbnbb nnbtnb nnb btbbnbnttbtn nnb r f nbnbtnnt bnnbbtnbtbn nbbnbnnt nbbtnb nbnn bbbnbnt bntbbbnt bnbbtbbtnnb tt nnbtbnb bb r t bb bn ntnbtb tnb bttbn b bbbbn bbb ntb bn r f ntb nbnbttbb bntbn bbntb n t nnbntb nnbnbfnb bbtttn bnbnbn bbnt rftnn bbtbbtbnbnb rbbbntb bb nnnb nbbnbn bttbbbnt bnbbnt btbnnnnb ntbnnb nbfnbbbt ttnbn bnnbbbbnt ntbbbtnbtb ntnbtbtb bnbnbtbtn bbnnbtbn bnrb btbbnttb tnnb r f r r nbtnr bb tbb tr tbb n b n b t n t n b b t n n n b n n b t b b n b b b n t b t b n n t t t n b b n t b n b b b n n b b b n t n n b n b b n b b n n b t n b b b n b n t n t b b t b b n b n n b b n b b b n b b b b b t b b n b n n b t b t t n n t n b b n b n b n ntb bttnnbtb b nbnb tnt r

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B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B9

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B10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 r fntbtb rfn f f f f f fr tbtb f f ff fff f fbbff rftn b n f f f b f b t f t ff nf b ttb tf t f f f f f r fntb rfn ffff ffff fff ff f f fr tb ff ffff ff fff ff fr fff f fbbff rftn n b r f r f b t f b f t t b b ff t nf n b ttb bbffr bb f f f f f t b b b f t n t b b b b b b ff nf b ttb tfff t f f f f f t b b b f t n t b b b b b t b r fntbt rfn f ff f f fr tbt f f fff fff fffr ff ffff f fbbf frft n n f f f f f b f r f t t r f t r fntbtb rfn f ff f f fr b tbtb f ff f f f rf rff fffff frfff ff ff f fbb ffrf tnb n b f f f b f t r r f t ff t n b ttb tfff t f f f f f t b b b f t n t b b b b b bt b f fff fff f fbbff rftn n f f f t f f t f t t b ff n n b ttb t f n t b b t b r fntb rfn f f f fr tb fntb fff ffr rf f f f b f r f tb fff ffr n fn f f f f t f f ff fff f fff ff ff f n bff ttb nbttnbtb t b b t t b b b bb r f rfn nf f t bb ft tff ftf fr f tf ff f ffftt r fff r ff f ff f fr b f f tbb ft t ntbtt n tt n b bbf ttbbt ff f fn fb ttt nb n b t bb t f ff rffffff ffff f f f f f rf r ff ffffffrff ff fff ffff ffff n f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f n f f f f f b f f n b f f r b b f f t fbttt t b f r f ftt ff fff rrf f f fr ttt fff ff fff f ff rrf bff ff rrf b f bbf tnt n f f f b f nf b b f t t b b t f f tt nb nb t b n t b b t fn f tft ttt nb nb nrt ttbt b r r f nttt ff f ff ff rffb r f fr rt nttt b f f fff ff rf fbr f ffff f f fbbf rff nt n f f f f t f t f f f f f f f f f f f f r f t rfn nf f t tb bb ft tff ftf fr f tf ff f ffftt r fff r ff f ff f fr b f f tbb ft t ntbtt n nf b nt b r r r f tb ff ff rffffff ffff ff ff ff ff f n t f f f t f nt t f bbf b nff f tt f n b n t b b t n b ftbtb f ff f f f f b frf f fttb tb f fff f fff fffff n bbf t f t r f r f f f f f f n f f f f t ff fff f fff ff ff ft tttt nbtt nbtb r r f n n f f f f r n f rff ffff rf rfff f ff ff rr f f n bbf t f n b f r f f b f f ff f n n tb f tt nbtbtb nbtbtbb f f f t b b t f f b b f t n t b b t b b t n fn f f ttt bbttb nbb nt bt n b

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B11 rfnntb ttffbb b rt tb tttt ttbb bb bbb nrb ntbb bbb t t r t n n t b nrbb r b r b r n b n r t n b n n r n t n r f b b nb bb ntnr bbb tbb tb bbbbnr tbb b bb n n r nrbb b t b b nrbn tbbbb nrb bb bb bb bb b b bb tt f f b tb ft b trb nrbb nbnnr nrb btnr nrbb rf ntb b b b f b nnrnrb rbb t trb trbb bb b r bb f nt tnnrbb nnbbr nb b b rnnrtttn nttnnbb b n n t b tttnn tbb r tnfb nrftbb trtrbb f nnbn ttbb n nnnnrb b fntb nn nnrbb f n t n r b b nb nnrf b nr fnnnb b n bt bb ntnttnb nnrnrbb nrfr ftrbb b nbbtb n tnnrb b n t t n t n t t n r n bb bfn nrbb n r n n f b b nbnnbbb tttnntn nrtbb bnrb b ttb fntb fbb nnrnnrnrb nnb nnrnrb nntb nnbb f n b b n b nn fnttrrb rntnb nnrnrb nrb b fnttnnnrnrb nnrb bb b b b b b fbb b nft bb bfr tb tbbb tnnr fntbnnb b b fttnnrbbb nnrnrbnb nrnnrnnr nrb tnb rbb trtb nnb ttbbb ntnrb f rttrb nttb bnt bnnb nrtbb t n t t n t n r t n t n n t n t n n n r n r t r b f rtb nbnbb n trbb bnfntbnb bb tbnn bb tnrr rnbb ft ntbb nntb rfrbb nn ntb r rnnrr b t bb b bb bnrbtftn tbb bntrnrb bb t nrbnb r nnfb rrtb b tb rntnnb nn f f n t n b r n b n n t n r rtnt btn nrtntrtnr nttb t n t t r n t t r t n t n n r b f b n n n b n n r n n t r t t b t t t n b t t n t r t n t b b n n r n r b f b t n t b t t n b b r r t n b n n n b t b n r n b n r n r r r b r r t t t n t t n b n r r b n t n n n t t n n n b b b b f tntttn tnbntnt ttbbtr ntnrrrb tntnrr ntnnbb ntrt brtb r r t n n r t b n n b r b n b f b r b n r t r b b n t n n n b nttfb nrftb t n t r n t t n t t b n n r r t n n t n ntr rttntnb bnrbb ttnn tnttnnb trtntrnr rnnb nnrtt ntnb t b t b n n r n r t n t b n r n r f t t r b n n r b f b b t t n t b t r t b n n b tt rrbb n t n r b t tnnn rntnftfrff tnnf rttnbtr nrt btnftt bnnn fnrb rbtbt nnb t n r n n b n ttrrtt tbnnttnt rnrtnn nbtnnrtnb t n b f r r n t b t n r t n r n n b n n t b n t n t r t t b n n n n r b t n r n n b n t t n n f f t t t b t t t n n r r r b b n b b b t b t n r n n b t r r r t r n n t r b n n n n t n r r n n n t t n t t b r r f n n b b n b n r rnnnnttnb tnnb ftntttntnrtb r t n t n n n b n r nb f t r n n r n r b r b r n t r t b r n n r t t n n n n b b n n n t t n b f t n n b t t n n b n n t b b b r b n b t t n r b n b b r n n t n n n n n b b n r r b b r r r n t f b r n b n t n n n n b t t n n n r n r t b b n t t n t r nttn rrnnrb bbnnnt nnrb n n n t n t t b rf t n n b f n b t n n t n n t t n t b n r t t t t t t r n n n n n t t n t n n t n t t t t n n t r n t n t n t n t t t t r t t b n r t t t t t n n r t r t t n t r t r t t t t t n n n t b t t t t n n t n t t r r t n b r r r n n n r n r n r r n n n b n t n t b n n n r n n t n b b b b b b b b t b t rtb ttn rtnntnnrtr rtrnb nttntn trtrn ntnr t tr ff trtn tnttnttrt rrnt tntrn tnnrrntt ntrrt b f f nttt ntnttt ntnntrtnt rttt rttb rtntnt n nttnt ffb t nrnntbb bbn nr t t t n n t n n n t r t n r n n r t n n r t n t t t n r n t t r t n n t t n n t n t n n n t t b n t t t n n r t n t t n t n n t t t t n t n n r n t t n n r n n t n t r b n r n n r b rnb b tttntrntnn n n n t rrn tt r tnrnrtn nnnttrtnt nbbnb bbbtttnttn nrr nrnnn rtnttn tnttnnt tttnnrttt ntrttrt nntrrrtnt nttnb b trntnt ffbt rnb n n t n n n t r t n r n n r t n n r t n t t t n r n t t r t n n t t n n t n t n n n t t b n t t t n n r t n t t n t n n t t t t n t n n r n t t n n r n n t n t r b n r n n r b b

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B12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, February 18, 2014 rf rntbftfbbftn rbntftb f n f fbrftf fbfr f b rrb trr ffrtr ft rrftbrft tbff rrf brtfr ntbf rtntft f nffb frbrf tfbf bf rrf rntfbtb rr r btrftb f rtf rrf nrrf f nbbt rftf rntrr n rrb rrfrrtnrr b f n nn tbt fr b fttfbb tftrfrr rf n f f rt nbtf b bf tn rrr rrfftb rbrrrt tftrrf rft tfttnttr rrtrr n nn frfbt nn f t f f r b f n f t n b b f f f r t t r f nntb fttrtftrtb fttbr trrtf tf ffrrtb frr nnf f rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nn f f nnntrf f bnrfrb rnfttrft ttb ftrtnfntb rbrff fb f b f n ff f f t r f t t r f f f t f f r tfr fftbrttb tfrrf nfftrnf rbrrb r f b f b r f r nf f nnff f t r n t r b r b f b t f b rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f t t f n f t n b b r n b r t t f trf fft f t r n b b b t n r b f t b f r r t r r r frb f t brtbfbbf tfrntrbrrn rbntf f r t tf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nff b r r r b f t r nf tf r r t f r f r n t n f r f r n t r n n ft tbf n b b t t f r t f r f b t b t r r b b r r t r f t b f t t f t f r f t r n f f r b f n f f f r r n r r n f b r t f r f r n b n r trrfn t r b t r r b f b f t f rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nft ttbf fff ffrb bntf b r t f r t r t f r r nftf ftftr rt rnb rtr rb r r tbrtbrtrnb rf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nf ttbf r bnt nf tbf nnff ft tf brtf bf fr f fn f tfbbtt f rbf frf t f b f n r r r b f b f b b b b r b t f b r r ffbtrtf rrtr rbtf bftr f rf rr nbrrrbfrtf nbftrb rtft rrf f tnbb f t n f t f f b bftbftb nrrr rfbttfb rrrbrnbtn b frfbt bt fnbtb ft rbrf r ft frbfbft f tftb f ft nb nbrf tbf bf btftrb f frnbrrr br tft rrbbr bnf fnn rrf trffbfr nbtrr b r t f f nft fbbrtbf trf fbfb rtnt tftbfrr ftrnbbbb f fbfbftb f r f b b t f t b b ftfbr rtf ftfbr rtf ffb fnf t f t r f fttf tnb brbbrfnb bb f r t tb tfbbftf rftrr f ft b r r r fnftfttrbf btftbff tffttb ftfbr rft frtb r r t f f b fbnttrfbr rrr bnttb r fntffb rtf nfbb bt frfb n nbn rrtbtb ftrrtfbb rrr nbr f ftr rbb n n b r rfnb fbbf tf btbftrnbfnrtb rt btff brf f btf rrtf f nf b tf trtbnr bbbbt trrft bftbftrt fbr