Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties KESSELS HAT TRICK LIFTS US HOCKEY, SPORTS B1 PRISONS: Use of smuggled cellphones on the rise A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Study ties weather to stroke rates C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, February 17, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 47 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C8 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 75 / 52 Partly sunny and pleasant. 50 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com M ike Evans Machinery Company (MEMCO), a 20-year-old fuel-tank manufacturer in Clermont, has grown to the point where it plans to move to Bushnell and create a facility with more than ve times the square footage it has in south Lake. Weve outgrown the place were in, Service and Admin istration Manager Curtis Ev ans said. Our production line is jammed up here (in Cler mont) because we are getting so much interest. The building were moving into (in Bushnell) is much larger and will allow us to produce the tanks fast er and more efciently. Theres also more room for us to grow out there. Doing business under the name Envirosafe, the compa ny has a 15,000-square-foot manufacturing facility at 901 12th St. in Clermont. It has be come the No. 1 manufacturer of above-ground fuel systems in the U.S., thanks in part to the worldwide attention it has re ceived on the Web since 2008. The fuel systems store gasoline, diesel fuel or liquid chemicals. The company has been leas ing its Clermont site since 2004, but recently bought a 50,000-square-foot building off of County Road 747 in Bush nell, where it plans to build CLERMONT Fuel-tank manufacturer plans large-scale expansion SUBMITTED PHOTO From left, MEMCO Production Manager Skeeter Glover, President Michael Evans, and Sales and Administration Manager Curtis Evans, oversee a workers progress on one of the companys above-ground fuel storage tanks being built in Clermont. TOM HAYS Associated Press NEW YORK The ac count information giv en by a new customer at Liberty Reserve read like a not-so-clever prank: Joe Bogus, 123 Fake Main Street, Completely Made Up City, N.Y. But at the multi billion-dollar virtual banking operation, it didnt matter. Mr. Bo gus in reality, an un dercover federal agent was free to begin transferring funds, no questions asked. Authorities say the re cent investigations of Liberty Reserve and the hidden website Silk MATTHEW LEE AP Diplomatic Writer JAKARTA, Indonesia Cli mate change may be the worlds most fearsome weap on of mass destruction and ur gent global action is needed to combat it, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Sun day, comparing those who deny its existence or question its causes to people who insist the Earth is at. In a speech to Indonesian stu dents, civic leaders and govern ment ofcials in Jakarta, Kerry laid into climate change skep tics, accusing them of using shoddy science and scientists to delay measures needed to re duce emissions of greenhouse gases at the risk of imperiling the planet. He also went after those who dispute who is re sponsible for such emissions, arguing that everyone and ev ery country must take responsi bility and act immediately. We simply dont have time to let a few loud interest groups hijack the climate conversa tion, he said, referring to what he called big companies that dont want to change and spend a lot of money to act to reduce the risks. He later sin gled out big oil and coal con cerns as the primary offenders. We should not allow a tiny minority of shoddy scientists and science and extreme ideo logues to compete with sci entic facts, Kerry told the audience gathered at a U.S. Embassy-run American Cen ter in a Jakarta shopping mall. Nor should we allow any room for those who think that the costs associated with doing the right thing outweigh the benets. The science is unequivo cal, and those who refuse to Kerry: Climate change is worlds most fearsome WMD EVAN VUCCI / AP U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, tours the Istiqlal Mosque with Grand Imam K.H. Ali Mustafa Yaqub on Sunday in Jakarta. DONNA CASSATA Associated Press WASHINGTON House Democrats are determined to cast an election-year spotlight on Republican opposi tion to raising the min imum wage and over hauling immigration laws. To try to accomplish that in the GOP-con trolled House, Demo crats are planning to rely on an infrequently used, rarely successful tactic known as a dis charge petition. It requires the mi nority party in this case, Democrats, who are unable to dictate the House agenda to persuade some two dozen Republicans to defy their leadership, AP FILE PHOTO House Minority Leader, Democrat Nancy Pelosi of California, calls for action on immigration reform on Capitol Hill in Washington with other lawmakers and activists. House Dems will use discharge petition, force vote NY officials: Virtual currency invites real crime Weve outgrown the place were in. Our production line is jammed up here because we are getting so much interest. The building were moving into is much larger and will allow us to produce the tanks faster and more efficiently. Theres also more room for us to grow out there. Curtis Evans Service and Administration Manager SEE CLIMATE | A2 SEE FUEL | A2 SEE VOTE | A2 SEE CURRENCY | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 17, 2014: This year you evolve and grow in a new way. At times you might feel as if you do not have a choice. If you feel that way, stop and re think your alternatives. Brainstorm more often with people who do not think like you. Seek to achieve your goals. If you are single, you will meet many people. Come summer, the possibil ity of meeting someone of signicance is likely. Do not commit unless you are sure of your choice. If you are at tached, your relationship could become even more signicant as your sweetie teams up with you to make a dream come true. You will enter a very romantic period during the summer. LIBRA likes the way you think. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You will accomplish more in the morning. In the evening, random calls and perhaps a visit with a loved one could take priority. Your instincts about a situa tion could be off. Someone might point you in the wrong direction. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Dive into a dynamic problem. You will enjoy the brainstorming involved with heading in a new direction. You could nd that someone is dealing with a level of dis comfort during this process. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will clear up a prob lem only after you detach and look at the big picture. At that point, the solution will permit resolution in an amiable manner. Once the air is cleared, you can direct your energy in a different di rection. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Listen to your sixth sense when speaking with a close loved one. There might be a lot more going on than meets the eye. This person might not be able to share what the issue is. Give him or her space to work it out. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might be concerned with a nancial matter that needs to be handled imme diately. Your domestic life could point to a different di rection and a new possibil ity. Listen to feedback, and make a decision accord ingly. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might feel strong ly about a certain matter, so dont hesitate to let others know where you are com ing from. Keep a personal matter quiet, and be willing to have a long-overdue con versation. Focus on your nances and effectiveness. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might feel out of sync in the morning, but by the af ternoon you will draw others to you. Use care with your nances; make smart choic es. Your personality and en ergy are likely to dominate the afternoon. You will be all smiles. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Decisions made in the afternoon might not be as sound as you would like them to be. Listen to news and respond accordingly. Recognize that you need to think carefully about the im plications involved, especial ly after you look at the big picture. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You could be full of energy. In the morning, maintain your focus on an important matter involving your career or an older rel ative. Your sense of humor emerges when dealing with a friend in the afternoon. A meeting will be instrumen tal. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Detaching will help you deal with a volatile sit uation. Recognize what is happening with a relation ship in which information might not be properly com municated between the par ties involved. Know that you can change this situation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could discover the benets of having a conver sation in the morning. Oneon-one relating resolves a problem better than any oth er method can. Use this op portunity. With new infor mation, youll gain a new perspective. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Rethink your interac tions with a key person. It can be great to act sponta neously, but sometimes you need to think more carefully about the actions you take. Make a point of having an important conversation later in the day. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US FEB. 16 CASH 3 ............................................... 1-1-7 Afternoon .......................................... 5-9-0 PLAY 4 ............................................. 5-7-1-0 Afternoon ....................................... 2-0-1-5 FLORIDA LOTTERY FEB. 15 FANTASY 5 ............................. 4-6-17-18-33 FLORIDA LOTTO ................... 1-3-5-10-38-49 POWERBALL ........................ 2-9-14-21-233 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. believe it are simply burying their heads in the sand, Kerry said. We dont have time for a meeting anywhere of the Flat Earth Society. Kerry, saying that 97 percent of scien tists who have weighed in on the issue agree that the phenomenon is real, ar gued that the cost of inaction to environ ments and economies will far outweigh the signicant expense of reducing greenhouse gas emissions that trap solar heat in the atmosphere and contribute to the Earths rising temperatures. He outlined a litany of recent weath er disasters, particularly ooding and typhoons in Asia, and their impact on commerce, agriculture, shing and dai ly living conditions for billions of people. This city, this country, this region, is really on the front lines of climate change, Kerry said. Its not an exagger ation to say that your entire way of life here is at risk. He added: In a sense, climate change can now be considered the worlds larg est weapon of mass destruction, perhaps even, the worlds most fearsome weapon of mass destruction. The solution, Kerry said, is a new glob al energy policy that shifts reliance from fossil fuels to cleaner technologies. CLIMATE FROM PAGE A1 another 30,000-squarefoot building. MEMCOs investment in the new building, which included the pur chase price, renovations and new equipment, is estimated at nearly $2 million. According to Ev ans, the building should be completed around April and will bring 22 to 35 new jobs to the area. Evans, along with com pany President Mike Evans and Production Manager Skeeter Glover, are unsure at this time if theyll keep the Clermont location open as well, but most of the workers there will be relocating. We have so much steel, big equipment and a lot of tanks. Its going to be a big move, Evans said. Were thinking about keeping our Clermont location, too, but well have to wait and see whether we need it or not. When the company rst began, Evans said the tanks were going to big ready-mix and waste companies, along with municipalities. Since appearing on the Web, the company has added contractors, farm ing operations, hospitals, trucking, aviation and marine companies and even governmental agen cies and the U.S. military to its customer list. Many are located outside the United States. Although the tanks MEMCO manufactures are for storing regular gas oline and diesel fuel, it also produces bio-die sel, oil, ethanol and dif ferent chemical tanks, Ev ans said, adding that the custom-built tanks are all manufactured using a double wall system and comply with all local, state and federal regulations. Tank sizes vary from 300 to 35,000 gallons. Were excited, Ev ans said of the move. Its a big step forward from where we started in 1992. We went from a lit tle place in Oakland to the facility in Clermont where weve been for 10 years, and now were looking forward to the new facility in Bushnell. For information, call 352-241-2302, 800555-4754 or visit abo vegroundfuelstorage tanks.com. FUEL FROM PAGE A1 join Democrats and force a vote on setting the fed eral minimum wage at $10.10 an hour. House Minority Lead er Nancy Pelosi of Cal ifornia said Democrats will push the wage issue when Congress returns from its break Feb. 24. Forcing a vote on a com prehensive overhaul of immigration laws could occur in a few months. Democratic leaders ar gue that a majority of Americans favor both steps, which are priori ties for President Barack Obama, and say the House GOP is the ob stacle. Republicans say Democrats are embarking on an approach that they know has little chance of success in an attempt to circumvent the will of the GOP-led House. The odds are daunting for Democrats in what clearly is political ma neuvering ahead of the elections this fall. Some questions and answers on how it works. Q What does a dis charge petition do? A It allows the minority or opposition party to bypass the House speak er and get a vote. First, 217 members one more than half the Houses current member ship of 432 have to sign a petition. A motion to consider the wage issue would then be placed on the legislative calendar, but it cant be acted on for at least seven days. Any lawmaker can then call it up but only on the sec ond or fourth Monday of the month. The motion is debated and if the House passes it, then lawmakers would consider and vote on the bill. Currently there are 232 Republicans, 200 Dem ocrats and three vacan cies in the House. All 200 Democrats would have to sign the petition, but Democrats would have a tough time getting 17 Re publicans to join them. Signing a discharge pe tition would be a breach of loyalty for Republi cans, certain to draw the wrath of the caucus, and a rebuke of Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Republicans large ly oppose any increase in the minimum wage. They say its an issue left to the states and that it could slow hiring in a struggling economy. Q What about immi gration? A number of House Republicans back a comprehensive ap proach. Would they sign a discharge petition? A Highly unlikely. Re publicans still are un willing to break ranks with the party and Boeh ner, despite the distinct ly different political forc es on the issue. Immigration overhaul has the support of an un usual coalition that in cludes some traditional backers of the GOP. They include the U.S. Cham ber of Commerce and business groups, reli gious organizations such as the U.S. Catholic Bish ops, evangelicals and la bor unions. VOTE FROM PAGE A1 Road, a vast black-mar ket bazaar for narcotics and other contraband, demonstrate how the an onymity inherent in the use of virtual currency is attracting a legion of eshand-blood criminals. The perpetrators feel they can more easi ly conceal their activity, their identities and their proceeds, Deputy U.S. Attorney Richard Za bel said at a hearing last month held by the New York State Department for Financial Services. Hard cash carries the burden of needing to be physically smuggled and hand-delivered, Za bel said. By contrast, in the Silk Road case, us ers were able to purchase drugs from drug dealers located anywhere in the world, essentially with a push of a button, he said. At the same hearing, Manhattan District At torney Cyrus Vance Jr. urged state regulators to put tighter controls on digital currency ex changes to tame a digi tal Wild West. New Yorks chief nan cial regulator, Benjamin Lawsky, said in a speech last week that hes con sidering new rules requir ing businesses to obtain a Bitlicense if they use the new currencies and com ply with know-your-cus tomer guidelines to pre vent money laundering activities. The dialogue comes at a time when Bitcoins and other virtual currencies have been gaining the backing of legitimate in vestors and mainstream businesses. Users exchange cash for digital money using online exchanges, then store it in a wallet pro gram in their computer. The program can trans fer payments directly to a merchant who accepts the currency or to private parties anywhere in the world, eliminating trans action fees and the need to provide bank or credit card information. In the past year, there are signs that the virtual currency phenomenon has moved beyond the early days when it was an oddity embraced by a small cadre of libertar ians and computer geeks and later by criminals during its vice phase, said Fred Wilson, a part ner in a Manhattan ven ture capital rm. Are people still doing bad things with Bitcoin? Wilson said. Sure. Is the majority of the Bitcoin ac tivity vi ce? Not a chance. CURRENCY FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Community Center to host Black Is Beautiful program A program focusing on the vari ous shades of the black race will be held at 7 p.m. tonight at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave. Titled Black Is Beautiful and pre sented by McCalls Beauty Salon and LaShay Inc., the program will focus on eight black women who vary in shades of color. The NAACP will also be part of the program. For information, call 352-787-0119. LEESBURG Party in the Street will host 12 hours of Mardi Gras Downtown Leesburg will come alive with the sights and sounds of Mardi Gras on Saturday with a variety of street entertainment, including stilt walkers, jugglers and games for kids. Radio Disney will also be a part of the festivities, bringing teen music artists The Vamps and Becky G to perform live at the Mardi Gras party on their way to the Radio Disney Music Awards in Los Angeles, Calif. For information, go to www.lees burgevent.com. MOUNT DORA Food trucks will return to downtown on Thursday Beginning Thursday, food trucks will visit downtown Mount Dora on the third Thursday of every month. Hosted by the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Commerce, the trucks will be located in the Chamber park ing lot and on Sunset Park at the cor ner of 4th and Alexander Streets, with tables and chairs set up to offer par ticipants a gathering and seating area. Ten to 15 unique food trucks offer ing a wide variety of different food styles will participate in the event, opening for service from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For information, call the Chamber ofce at 352-383-2165. NATIONWIDE Bob Evans offers free pancakes to veterans Veterans with proof of service and identication, or in uniform, can get free all-you-can-eat pancakes at Bob Evans restaurants today in a nation wide event honoring the men and women who serve our country. For details, go to www.bobevans.com. LEESBURG Rep. Metz sponsors bill for Korean War veterans State Representative Larry Metz (R-Yalaha) will speak at 2 p.m., Feb. 26, at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., to local Korean War Veterans about his Florida House Bill 559, entitled Military Veterans, which Metz says changes the term Korean Conict to Korean War in the statutes and on the authorized Florida license plate. HB 559 also addresses cer tain issues relating to the Vietnam War, the Combat Medical Badge, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal and Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal. For information, call 800-400-5959 or 352-408-6612. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press T heyre hidden in babies diapers, ramen noodle soup packages, foot balls, soda cans and even body cavities. Not drugs or weap ons, but cellphones. Theyre becoming a growing problem in prisons across the country as they are used to make threats, plan escapes and for inmates to continue to make money from illegal activity even while behind bars. You can pick states all across the country and youll see every thing from hits being ordered on individu als to criminal enter prises being run from inside institutions with cellphones, said Michael Crews, head of Floridas Depart ment of Corrections. When two murder ers serving life sen tences escaped from Florida Panhan dle prison last fall, a search of their cells turned up a cellphone used to help plan the getaway, drawing at tention to the bur geoning problem. It was just one of 4,200 cellphones conscat ed by prison ofcials last year, or 11 per day. Smuggled cellphone use on the rise in prisons FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS / AP A cellphone and cigarettes were found inside a camouage package on Jan. 25 near an undisclosed Florida state prison. Staff Report The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has ap proved staff recommenda tions for revisions to boat ing safety zones on the St. Johns River in Lake, Semi nole and Volusia counties. The rst proposal will change descriptions of some zones to match the physical locations of reg ulatory markers, some of which have been in place since 1995. These are technical changes to rule language and will include updat ing rule maps, said Capt. Gary Klein of the FWCs Boating and Waterways Section. The changes will also relieve these county governments from the re sponsibility of maintain ing markers for state-ad opted boating safety zones, as the FWC will take over maintenance. On the river, three af fected zones will remain as they have been physi cally marked since at least 2007. The rule language will be updated to match current marker locations by extending: The northern bound ary of the State Road 40 (As tor) Bridge zone by 350 feet. The northern bound ary of the SR 44 (Whitehair) Bridge zone by 100 feet. The eastern bound ary of the Interstate 4 (Lake Monroe) Bridge zone by 125 feet. The current rule lan guage is inconsistent with the markers and is not clear to the public, Klein said. These changes revise the rule language to cre ate safe boating conditions and areas that can be con sistently marked, under stood and enforced. St. Johns boat safety rules changed in Lake Staff Report A student-led effort in one of Lake Minneola High Schools Game, Simulation and Animation cours es continues to dene the techno logical ingenuity of the one-to-one iPad campus. James Martin, who teaches this Career-Technical Education course, challenged students to cre ate an informational mobile ap plication that would represent the high school. By Dec. 20, 2013, the students had accomplished their goal when the Lake Minneola High School App was approved by Goo gle and available for download on the Android Market. The informational app features Lake Minneola students create school app Staff Report The Sumter County Master Gardener Plant and Garden Festival, slat ed March 15 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Wildwood Community Center, has been expanded this year. New this year is our Gardeners Boutique, with stained glass, garden art, outdoor dcor, nature-in spired jewelry, minia ture gardens and gifts for gardeners, located in the Community Center build ing, said Kathy Porter, in charge of publicity for the event. Also, at the Com munity Center building, will be our extremely pop ular Ask the Master Gar dener booth to answer all your gardening questions. Festival vendors will fea ture a large selection of nursery plants, includ ing owers, herbs, shrubs, palms, citrus trees, bonsai and succulents. There also will be landscape design services, along with verti cal, hydroponic and move able gardens beds, Porter said in a press release. In addition, numerous choices of outdoor struc tures and garden pottery will be available. Master gardeners will be selling copies of the second edition of Gar dening in Sumter County Month-by-Month. They also will be selling rafe tickets for baskets load ed with garden items, gift certicates and one-of-akind articles. The 4-H Caf will be selling coffee, doughnuts and cold drinks. Admission is $1 per per son and children under 12 are admitted free. Free parking will be available. All proceeds will go to support University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Scienc es Sumter County Master Gardener events and out reach programs. The Community Cen ter is at 6500 Powell Rd., a mile south of Route 466A. For information, call the Sumter County Extension Ofce at 352-793-2728 x 223, or email plantclinic@ aol.com. Plant and garden fest coming to Wildwood Staff Report The Lake County Public Works Department is announcing that Al fred Street from State Road 19 to Sin clair Avenue in downtown Tavares will re-open to trafc on Tuesday. Storm-pipe installation will con tinue down Caroline Street. Sin clair Avenue will be closed at the intersection of Caroline Street for a twoto three-day period in the coming weeks. Detour signs will be placed accordingly to direct trafc through the area. The Alfred Street project, once complete, will establish one-way directional trafc between State Road 19 and Disston Avenue. The city of Tavares is also currently overseeing a utility project to re place water and sewer lines in the downtown area. For more information about the project, contact the Lake County Department of Public Works Road Operations Division at 352-4839007. EUSTIS Alfred Street to reopen Tuesday Staff Report Lake-Sumter State College will be one of the host sites on Sunday for a statewide program called College Goal Sunday, which will provide in formation to college-bound stu dents and their families applying for nancial aid. The event will be held from 1-4 p.m. in the Health Sciences Building at LSSCs Leesburg Cam pus. The schools nancial aid staff will be on hand to help college hopefuls complete nancial aid applications. College Goal Sunday is a free event for all and is not limited to students interested in attending LSSC, located at 9501 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. Audrey Williams, director of nancial aid, said completing the Free Application for Federal Stu dent Aid (FAFSA) is the rst step in applying for federal, state and LEESBURG LSSC plans college aid event Feb. 23 SEE APP | A4 SEE AID | A4 SEE RULES | A4 SEE PRISONS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com DEATH NOTICES Tammy D. Tique Tammy D. Tique, 44, of Leesburg, died Sun day, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. IN MEMORY up-to-date news from the school, calendar of events, bell schedule, course descriptions and more. Anything a student would need to learn about the school, Martin said, this app gives them the information right at their ngertips. Finding its way onto Apples App Store proved to be a greater challenge than the An droid Market. The rst time we submitted to Apple we got rejected, Martin said. Students stayed on task and nearly a month later, on Jan. 22, the Lake Minneola High School Mobile Application was cleared for the Apple App Store. The Android version (Android 2.3 or later), Apple iPad version (iOS 5.1 or later) and Apple iPhone version (iOS 5.1 or later) of the app are all currently available to download. They did an amazing job by remaining fo cused and professional throughout the entire effort, Martin said of the students. APP FROM PAGE A3 some institutional as sistance. Filling out the FAFSA form can be a daunting task for many, but hav ing one-on-one help simplies the process, she said. Most colleges and universities begin to award nancial aid as early as March 1, so the FAFSA should be completed as soon as possible. In addition to door prizes and refreshments, event attendees will be entered in a drawing for a $500 scholarship to be used at the school of your choice. The College Goal Sunday program was established in 1989 and has evolved from a one-time event offered in Indiana to a nation al effort including 40 states and the District of Columbia and more than 10,000 volunteers dedicated to assisting students and families in accessing nancial aid for college. Those interested in attending College Goal Sunday and getting as sistance with complet ing the FAFSA are asked to bring the following: Drivers license Social Security card (not necessary if you know the number) Alien registration number or permanent residence card 2013 W-2 Forms and other records of money earned 2013 Federal In come Tax Return IRS Form1040, 1040A, 1040EZ or foreign tax return If 2013 Tax Returns are not yet led, the FAFSA may be com pleted based on esti mates from W-2s 2013 untaxed in come records Social Security, Temporary As sistance to Needy Fami lies, TANF/SNAP or vet erans benets records AID FROM PAGE A3 Another change modies the regulat ed speed in the yearround boating safety zones currently in place from idle-speed, nowake to slow-speed, minimum-wake. This change will al low boaters to oper ate at a slightly fast er speed through the zones, but still requires them to create little or no wake, Klein said. The amendments will also repeal dupli cative regulations and make minor techni cal changes like clar ifying the denitions of shoreline-to-shore line zones, changing the measurement of some zones and chang ing the descriptions of some zones. The need for the revi sions originated from an FWC review of current state regulations, includ ing boating safety zone boundaries and water way marker locations. FWC staff received support for its proposed changes during previ ous public meetings. Those providing pub lic comment included local law enforcement personnel and boaters. The proposals amend Florida Administrative Code rule 68D-24.018. Staff will nalize the rules for adoption un less a meeting is re quested within 21 days of the notice of the pro posed rule appearing in the Florida Adminis trative Register. For ad ditional information, visit MyFWC.com/ Boating or call 850488-5600. RULES FROM PAGE A3 The scary part is, if we found 4,200, we know thats not all of them, Crews said. And while prison ofcials are try ing their best to keep cellphones out, its not such an easy task. Jam ming cellphone signals is prohibit ed by federal law, and it costs more than $1 million each for autho rized towers that control what cell phone calls can come in and out of prisons. Some prisons even have to police their own corrections of cers who sometimes help in mates receive contraband. In Texas, a death row inmate made several calls with a cellphone to state Sen. John Whitmire, who chairs the Criminal Justice Commit tee. Whitmire didnt believe it when he started receiving calls from death row inmate Richard Tabler. He held his phone out, I guess outside his cell and there was a very distinct prison noise. He said, Did you hear that? and I said, Yup. Thats a prison, Whitmire said. I said, Howd you get that phone? He said, I paid $2,100 for it. I said, How do you keep it charged? He said, I have a charger. The calls continued, and Whit mire had the phone investigat ed. The month before, Tabler used 2,800 minutes and was sharing the phone with other prisoners, Whit mire said. Tablers mother, in Geor gia, was paying the bill and col lecting payments from the other prisoners families. Tabler asked Whitmire if he could help arrange a visit with his moth er. When she arrived in Texas she was arrested for her part in the pris on cellphone scheme. Tabler wasnt happy about that and made another call to Whitmire. He said he was go ing to have me killed, Whitmire said. In other cases around the coun try, infamous murderer Charles Manson, imprisoned in California, was found with a cellphone under his mattress, twice. Two Indiana prisoners were convicted of using cellphones smuggled in by guards to run an operation that distributed meth amphetamine, heroin and oth er drugs. A prisoner in Georgia was accused this year of using two cell phones to impersonate a sheriffs lieutenant and scam elderly drivers who had received red light camera tickets, getting them each to pay about $500. In Oklahoma, a newspaper in vestigation found dozens of prisoners using cellphones to maintain Facebook pages. The Oklahoman found about three dozen inmates who were disci plined by prison ofcials and its reporters found about as many who hadnt been caught. Florida prisoners have also been using social media with cell phones. Those helping inmates smuggle phones into Florida prisons can be charged with a third-degree felony punishable by up to ve years in prison. In Mississippi, the penal ty can be 15 years for having a cell phone in prisons. As corrections departments keep looking for new ways to stop cell phone smuggling, prisoners are nding creative, new ways to get them in. You may get a prepackaged, sealed ramen noodle soup and its completely sealed the weight seems to be right, but when you open it, theres a cellphone inside, said Timothy Cannon, Floridas dep uty corrections secretary. Theyre very, very, very creative in the way they do some of these things. Phones have been hidden in the hollowed out centers of large stacks of legal documents. One correc tions ofcer found two liter soda bottles that were used as oats out side a prison. When he pulled them out of a pond, bags containing more than a dozen cellphones each were found tied to them. Weve found cellphones and drugs in babies diapers during visitations, Cannon said. If they think youd never search an infant child, that will be the next place they go to try to get it in. Phones hidden in body cavities cant always be picked up by tradi tional metal detectors, and many are wrapped in electrical tape to further avoid detection. We have found cellphones in the private area of visitors Im talking females and males, said Christo pher Epps, head of the Mississippi prison system and president of the American Corrections Association. He said its not unusual to nd three phones in a body cavity. States are looking for new ways to nd cellphones or to prevent their use. Epps said that includes recently installed netting held up by 50-foot poles to keep people from throwing bags over prison fences for prisoners to retrieve. Federal law prohibits jamming cellphone signals, but Texas, Mary land, California and Mississippi in stalled towers at some prisons that control what cellphone trafc is allowed. Phone signals reach the tower, but only authorized num bers are then passed through. Its not something Florida is con sidering because of the hefty price tag. Each system costs about $1.5 million, and with 49 major prisons, the state doesnt have the money to cover them all. Instead, its testing machines that detect a cellphones magnet ic elds. And like Indiana and oth er states, Florida is also using dogs trained to sniff out cellphones. Still, with 100,000 prisoners in Florida, Crews knows the problem will never be completely solved, especially with the prot that can be made. When youre talking about that kind of money, youre going to have a lot of people who are will ing to do just about anything to get them in, Crews said. For a large portion of these inmates, it is about making a dollar. PRISONS FROM PAGE A3 DAVE BREITENSTEIN The News-Press FORT MYERS The days of college librar ies featuring row upon row of dusty, tattered books are history. University libraries, including Florida Gulf Coast University, have been trading shelf space for study space, digitizing materials to free up square footage for other purposes. Another space-sav ing measure is on the horizon. Floridas public universities have designed a $26 million high-density storage facility, which would house 5.2 mil lion volumes that ar ent used on a regu lar basis. All books and reference materi als will be stored at 50 degrees with 35 per cent relative humidi ty, ideal conditions for preserving materials. The facility will be in Gainesville. FGCU has the new est library in the state university system, so its shelves arent load ed with dusty novels from the 19th centu ry. However, there are materials and spe cial collections that students and faculty rarely, if ever, retrieve from the shelves. FG CUs library features 22 study rooms, a writing center, com puter lab, Starbucks, tutoring lab, ofces ... and books. We have 250,000 physical items on shelves in this build ing, so we do still have a lot of stuff, said uni versity librarian Kath leen Miller. Library staff will be monitoring material usage to see how often patrons check out cer tain items. Those that rarely leave the shelves will be boxed up and shipped to Gaines ville, where items will be cataloged and pos sibly digitized before they are placed in the warehouse. The Dewey Decimal System of grouping books wont be used in the warehouse. In stead, book height will determine where an item is stored, maxi mizing the number of volumes that will t under a 35-foot ceil ing. A computerized retrieval device sim ilar to those in new er vending machines will remove items upon request. Every book has a bar code, every tray has a bar code, every shelf has a bar code, said Judith Russell, dean of libraries for the University of Flor ida. Its an efcient way to store low-use materials but still be able to retrieve them if necessary. Although the Flor ida Board of Gover nors, which oversees the university sys tem, approved the warehouse concept, legislators still must approve the bulk of funding. Russell hopes that happens this spring. The university sys tem, like local public libraries, has agree ments that allow pa trons to check out books on loan from other campuses. Its usually a two-day turnaround to ship items between the colleges, Russell said. Items that have been scanned and digitized can be transferred electronically. FGCU students and faculty wont see changes with highuse items, but the li brary is digitizing materials that arent retrieved as often. The university also maintains digital sub scriptions to dozens of newspapers, mag azines and journals, and provides access to electronic referenc es of all sorts. Thats allowed the universi ty to expand seating to turn the library into more of a study space than book place. Once Florida uni versities start send ing items to the ware house, only one copy will make it on the shelves. College libraries receive makeover

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 S ecretary of State John Kerry has done Israelis and Pal estinians a huge favor by pushing them to make one last try at negotiating a two-state solution. After months of effort, Kerry will soon present a draft frame work meant to serve as a basis for a nal agreement. Critics such as Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon have called Kerrys proj ect obsessive and messianic. Al though those remarks were quick ly refuted by Prime Minisiter Benjamin Netanyahu, Yaalon was correct: You really do have to be mad to try to close the current gap between Israelis and Palestinians. Yet Kerry has managed, by his obsession, to force both sides to face the consequences if his ef forts end in failure. The impor tance of Kerrys crusade was laid out to me by Amram Mitzna, a member of parliament from the centrist Hatnuah Party, whose leader, Tzipi Livni, represents Is rael at the talks. Never before has a secretary of state been so involved or such a believer, said Mitzna, who was visiting Philadelphia on a tour arranged by the liberal Jew ish group J Street. This is the last opportunity for the United States to be as involved as it is now. If these talks fail, I dont see when we will be able to get an agreement, because we need an outside force to push us ahead. Mitzna has had long experi ence with failed peace efforts. A retired general who became may or of the mixed Jewish-Arab city of Haifa, he later led the Labor Party when it lost badly to Ariel Sharon in the 2003 elections. Is raeli voters were skeptical about the prospects for peace then, and are even more so now. But Mitzna believes there are pressing reasons that Isra el cant afford to keep control of the West Bank and, indirectly, of Gaza. He thinks the relative qui et in those areas wont last. We are about to face a third Palestinian intifada, he says. The rst uprising was fought with stones, and the second with guns and suicide bombers. But this time, says Mitzna, the tac tics will be different, using me dia and world opinion against Israel. The atmosphere is more ready than ever to isolate Israel. Kerry recently raised this danger and was falsely accused by some Israeli hawks of promoting a boy cott. But, like Mitzna, he was only describing the real prospect if Is rael continues to occupy and settle the West Bank, with no further talks on two states and no political rights for Palestinians. To the world, this will look like South African apartheid redux. Id add something Mitzna didnt mention: The Palestinian Authority on the West Bank is nanced large ly by foreign aid, much of it from European sources. If the occupa tion continues indenitely, that aid will dry up, and Israel will become legally responsible for keeping the West Bank aoat. A framework accord, says Mitz na, would keep such prospects at bay, and keep negotiations going. He sees the current instability in the Arab world as a plus for a deal, because no Arab army is likely to threaten Israel for the next 15 years. He also thinks a new Pal estinian government, along with neighboring Jordan, would, for reasons of self-interest, keep any terrorist threat and the Jordan border under control. Mitzna doesnt believe Isra el needs formal recognition as a Jewish state, although he would like it. More important, he says, is a deal that formally declares the conict to be over, and species that Palestinian refugees must re turn to the new state of Palestine. If 1948 Palestinians and their de scendants ooded Israel, there re ally would be no more Jewish state. However, the leaked version of Kerrys framework doesnt look likely to meet either sides red line. Both might accept a demil itarized Palestinian state along pre-1967 borders, with territori al swaps so Israel can keep large West Bank settlements. But Palestinians wont agree to recognize Israel as a Jewish state, a provision reportedly includ ed in the framework; the Pales tinians say this marginalizes the 20 percent of Israeli citizens who are Arabs. Nor will they give up on a division of the city of Jeru salem. And they still insist on the absolute right of refugees to re turn to Israel, which is denitely not included. The best the secretary of state is likely to achieve is a Kerry Plan with loopholes, which each side can endorse with reserva tions. This would provide a cov er to keep talks going for six more months, but isnt likely to lead to a nal agreement. Still, as Mitzna made clear, the prospect of failed talks is hugely risky to both sides (the Palestinian option of taking their case to the United Nations will not gain them statehood). In the end, Israelis and Pales tinians need the obsessive Ker ry so badly they may agree to keep trying. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorialboard member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may email her at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Kerrys obsession with Israel, Palestine is beneficial to both The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. L ending the authority of his ofce to an important and increasingly biparti san cause, U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. this week called for states to do away with laws that prevent convicted fel ons from voting even after they have served their time. In a speech at Georgetown University, Holder noted that an estimated 5.8 million Americans are prohibited from voting be cause of felony convictions, and said that the impact of such exclusion on racial mi norities was disproportionate and unac ceptable. As a result of such laws, 2.2 mil lion black citizens nearly one in 13 adults are unable to vote. In Florida, Kentucky and Virginia, the ratio is one in ve. It isnt just that black Americans are incar cerated at rates higher than the rest of the population. Holder also noted that felony dis enfranchisement laws in some states have his torical roots in efforts during Reconstruction to target AfricaAmericans and diminish the electoral strength of newly freed populations. Holders emphasis on the racial implica tions of these laws is entirely appropriate. It is consistent with other initiatives he has taken to ameliorate disparities in law enforcement, including his directive to federal prosecutors to refrain from charging low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with crimes that would lead to draconian mandatory minimum sentenc es. Black defendants have disproportionately been harmed by excesses in the war on drugs. But redressing racial inequity isnt the only reason for allowing men and women who have paid their debt to society to rejoin their fellow citizens at the ballot box. As Holder pointed out, research suggests former pris oners who had their voting rights restored were less likely to offend again. And, empiri cal evidence aside, re-enfranchising citizens who have been returned to their communi ties is a matter of simple justice. In California, voting rights are restored to felons automatically after their release from prison and discharge from parole. That sys tem is a model for the entire nation. But, ac cording to the Brennan Center for Justice, 11 states permanently bar some or all con victed felons from voting (though most re leased prisoners can apply for a restoration of voting rights on an individual basis). As a federal ofcial, Holder has no direct inuence over state election laws. And in his speech, he didnt endorse periodic propos als in Congress to allow offenders who have served their time to vote in federal elections even if they were ineligible to participate in elections for state and local ofces. Still, the attorney general delivered a mes sage that state government should heed: that felon disenfranchisement laws undermine the reentry process and defy the principles of accountability and rehabilitation that guide our criminal justice policies. From the Los Angeles Times. A VOICE Restore the vote to felons DOONESBURY Flashback Editors Note: Gary Trudeau is on vacation this week. Enjoy these strips from 2013.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com GOLF: Bubba Watson wins at Riviera / B3 PETR DAVID JOSEK / AP USA goaltender Ryan Miller stops a shot on the goal during the 2014 Winter Olympics mens ice hockey game against Slovenia at Shayba Arena on Sunday in Sochi, Russia. LARRY LAGE AP Hockey Writer SOCHI, Russia Phil Kessel is the rst Amer ican in more than a de cade to score a hat trick in an Olympic hockey tournament. Hes more interested in something no Amer ican has accomplished on Olympic ice since 1980 winning a gold medal. Kessel scored two of his three goals within the opening ve min utes to lead the U.S. to a 5-1 win against Slove nia on Sunday. The U.S. is undefeated through three games and if it can win three more, the nation will celebrate its rst Olympic champi onship in hockey since the Miracle on Ice at the Lake Placid Games. Its about the wins, right? Kessel asked, rhetorically. We just want to win games. No members of Team USA was alive when the U.S. beat the Sovi et Union in 1980 in one of the biggest upsets in sports history. But if they end up with gold around their neck on Sunday, this title wont be regarded as a mira cle. Kessel and his team mates earned an auto matic spot in the quar ternals of the 12-team tournament by rout ing Slovenia and Slo vakia, and outlasting Russia in a shootout, to nish atop their group. Theyve scored 15 and allowed only four goals so far. Kessel scored 1:04 af ter the puck dropped, removing any thought the Americans would have a hangover after their much hyped vic tory against the host Russians on Saturday. I was certainly con cerned after the emo tional game, said coach Dan Bylsma. We were fortunate that we got right out of the gate with a couple great plays. Kessels third goal midway through the second period made him the rst U.S. play er to score a hat trick at the Olympics since John LeClair did it on Feb. 15, 2002, against Finland. I was saying right before the game, I hope somebody does some thing pretty cool, so that some of the focus gets off of me and onto someone else, said T.J. Phil Kessels hat trick helps US rout Slovenia 5-1 Lakehawks edge Broward CC in 15 Staff Report The game was so close for so long that it wasnt suprising to see it decided by a pair of throwing er rors in the 15th inning that gave Lake-Sum ter State College a 6-5 win over visiting Bro ward College. Kris Hodges and Sam Thomas led the Lakehaws with three hits apiece, but it was Tanner Barnhards fth-inning threerun homer that gave LSSC the early 4-2 advantage. Hodges began the inning the with a single to shallow right-center, then quickly stole second. With one out, Dakota Higdon reached base on a elders choice with Hodges advanc ing to third, setting the stage for Barn hard, who deposited Broward hurler Jamie Pozos rst pitch over the left eld fence. Broward tied the game in the top of the ninth on Austin Lang hams run-scoring single, and the teams remained deadlocked until the nal frame. Michael Howe picked up the win in relief for the Lake hawks while Ryan Gurerra was tagged with the loss. The Lakehawks (52) are back in action at 4 p.m. today when they travel to Bab son Park to take on Webber International University. RACHEL COHEN AP Sports Writer SOCHI, Russia Charlie White threw his arms in the air in celebration to try to describe how hed felt Sunday morning. After four years, the moment had nally ar rived for White and Meryl Davis, seeking to win the United States rst Olympic gold medal in ice dancing. I denitely woke up today ready, Davis said. And yes, its great to wake up with a smile on your face. They were grinning even more broadly af ter their short dance, when they set an interna tional personal best with 78.89 points to lead training partners Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada by 2.56. Davis and White won silver at the 2010 Games when Virtue and Moir became the rst Olympic ice dance champions from North America. The free dance is Monday, and Davis and White, both from Michigan, are one performance Davis, White of US closing in on gold SEE DANCE | B2 SEE USA | B2 Austin Dillon puts No. 3 car back on the track at Daytona Austin Dillon (3) drives through Turn 4 during qualifying for the Daytona 500 on Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. PHELAN EBANHACK / AP JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer DAYTONA BEACH With the No. 3 on his door and memories of the late Dale Earnhardt fresh in his mind, Austin Dillon took the fabled number out of hibernation and straight to the top at Daytona. Dillon won the pole for the sea son-opening Daytona 500 driving the No. 3 Chevrolet a car Rich ard Childress had refused to eld at NASCARs top level since Earn hardts fatal accident on the last lap of the 2001 race. But now that his 23-year-old grandson is ready to race in the Sprint Cup Series, Childress al lowed Dillon to use the number widely associated with the sev en-time champion. Earnhardt won 67 races, six championships and the 1998 Daytona 500 driving the No. 3. SEE DAYTONA | B2 MATT SLOCUM / AP USA forward Phil Kessel, right, watches as his third goal sails past Slovenia goaltender Luka Gracnar.

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 NASCAR-Sprint Cup-Daytona 500 Lineup After Sunday qualifying; race Feb. 23 At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019 mph. 2. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 195.852. Failed to Qualify 3. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 195.818. 4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.712. 5. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.296. 7. (88) Dale Earnhardt. Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211. 8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.042. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse. Jr., Ford, 195.004. 10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.919. 11. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894. 12. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 194.776. 13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658. 14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.637. 15. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582. 16. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 194.582. 17. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574. 18. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.574. 19. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544. 20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.523. 21. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502. 22. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.477. 23. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422. 24. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.410. 25. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.380. 26. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.334. 27. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108. 28. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 194.078. 29. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066. 30. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 193.815. 31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 193.736. 32. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193.732. 33. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.594. 34. (66) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 193.428. 35. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.365. 36. (35) Eric McClure, Ford, 192.905. 37. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.798. 38. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.695. 39. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 192.538. 40. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 192.328. 41. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 192.291. 42. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 192.135. 43. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.061. 44. (52) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 191.493. 45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.480. 46. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 190.347. 47. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.685. 48. (93) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, 189.542. National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3 New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 37 14 .725 Atlanta 25 26 .490 12 Washington 25 27 .481 12 Charlotte 23 30 .434 15 Orlando 16 38 .296 22 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 Chicago 27 25 .519 13 Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20 Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 15 .717 Houston 36 17 .679 2 Dallas 32 22 .593 6 Memphis 29 23 .558 8 New Orleans 23 29 .442 14 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 12 .782 Portland 36 17 .679 6 Minnesota 25 28 .472 17 Denver 24 27 .471 17 Utah 19 33 .365 22 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 Phoenix 30 21 .588 5 Golden State 31 22 .585 5 L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18 Sacramento 18 35 .340 18 Saturdays Games No games scheduled Sundays Games East vs. West, 8 p.m. Todays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. New York at Memphis, 8 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Winter Olympic Medals Table At Sochi, Russia Through Sunday (55 of 98 events) Nation G S B Tot Netherlands 5 5 7 17 Russia 4 7 5 16 United States 4 4 8 16 Norway 5 3 6 14 Canada 4 6 4 14 Germany 7 3 2 12 Sweden 2 5 2 9 Switzerland 5 1 1 7 Austria 2 4 1 7 France 2 0 4 6 China 3 2 0 5 Japan 1 3 1 5 Slovenia 1 1 3 5 Italy 0 2 3 5 Poland 4 0 0 4 Belarus 3 0 1 4 Czech Republic 1 2 1 4 South Korea 1 1 1 3 Latvia 0 1 2 3 Britain 1 0 1 2 Finland 0 2 0 2 Australia 0 1 1 2 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Croatia 0 1 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1 Ukraine 0 0 1 1 Sundays U.S. Olympians Fared ALPINE SKIING Mens Super-G (Start position in parentheses) 2. (29) Andrew Weibrecht, Lake Placid, N.Y., 1:18.44. 3. (13) Bode Miller, Easton, N.H., 1:18.67. 14. (9) Ted Ligety, Park City, Utah, 1:19.48. 23. (25) Travis Ganong, Squaw Valley, Calif., 1:20.02. BOBSLEIGH Mens Two-Man Through Two runs 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah, Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.), 1:53.18. 11. United States 2 (Cory Butner, Yucaipa, Calif., Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 1:53.56. 13. United States 3 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif., Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 1:53.80. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Mens 4x10km Relay 11. United States (Andy Newell, Shaftsbury, Vt., Erik Bjornsen, Winthrop, Wash., Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., Simi Hamilton, Aspen, Colo.), 1:33:15.1. FIGURE SKATING Ice Dancing Short Dance 1. Meryl Davis, West Bloomeld, Mich., and Charlie White, Bloomeld Hills, Mich., 78.89 (Q). 8. Madison Chock, Redondo Beach, Calif., and Evan Bates, Ann Arbor, Mich., 65.46 (Q). 9. Maia and Alex Shibutani, Ann Arbor and Mich., 64.47 (Q). SNOWBOARD Womens Cross Qualifying (First and second runs followed by best time) 2. (15) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn., (2, 1:21.40) 1:21.40, +0.79. 9. (2) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City, (9, 1:23.96) 1:23.96, +3.35. NR. (6) Jackie Hernandez, Londonderry, Vt., DNF. Quarternals Heat 1 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (Q). NR. (24) Jackie Hernandez, Londonderry, Vt., DNS. Heat 4 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (Q). Seminals Heat 1 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (A). Heat 2 6. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (B). Small Final 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. Medal Final 4. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City. SPEEDSKATING Womens 1500 7. Heather Richardson, High Point, N.C., 1:57.60. 14. Brittany Bowe, Ocala, 1:58.31. 18. Jilleanne Rookard, Woodhaven, Mich., 1:59.15. Sundays Winter Olympic Scores CURLING Men Canada 8, United States 6 Norway 7, Britain 6 Sweden 8, Russia 4 Norway 5, Switzerland 3 Canada 9, China 8 Denmark 6, Germany 3 Sweden 6, United States 4 Women Denmark 7, South Korea 4 Japan 9, Switzerland 7 Sweden 5, Russia 4 Canada 7, United States 6 ICE HOCKEY Men Austria 3, Norway 1 United States 5, Slovenia 1 Russia 1, Slovakia 0, SO Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX Agreed to terms with RHP Francisco Cordero on a minor league contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Agreed to terms with OF Josh Reddick on a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Agreed to terms with RHP Craig Kimbrel on a four-year contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms with RHP A.J. Burnett to a one-year contract. Designated LHP Joe Savery for assignment. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 10 p.m. FS1 Champion Paul Mendez (14-2-2) vs. Raul Casarez (20-4-0), for IBA Conti nental middleweight title; featherweights, Manuel Avila (13-0-0) vs. Enrique Quevedo (15-6-1), at Salinas, Calif. MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN North Carolina at Florida St. NBCSN Delaware at Towson 9 p.m. ESPN Oklahoma St. at Baylor ESPNU MVSU at Southern WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 Maryland at Duke WINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live NBC 3 p.m. Womens Biathlon 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final; Mens Snowboarding Cross Competition; Mens Freestyle Skiing Aerials Competition 8 p.m. Figure Skating Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final; Mens Snowboarding Cross Gold Medal Final; Mens Freestyle Skiing Aerials Gold Medal Final; Mens Ski Jumping Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final 1:01 a.m. Two-Man Bobsled Gold Medal Final Runs NBCSN 7 a.m. Womens Hockey Seminal, United States vs. Sweden (LIVE) 10 a.m. Figure Skating Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 1:30 p.m. Mens Ski Jumping Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Womens Biathlon 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final 5 p.m. Game of the Day: Hockey 3 a.m. Mens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE) 5:30 a.m. Mens Nordic Combined Individual K-125 Large Hill, Ski Jumping MSNBC Noon Womens Hockey Seminal, Canada vs. Switzerland (LIVE) CNBC 5 p.m. Womens Curling Denmark vs. Britain away from gold. I told Charlie in the middle of the pro gram I felt like I was in a dream, Davis said. It is such a surreal experience. Virtue and Moir re bounded from a shaky performance in the team event, but the Americans, skating last, have overtaken their ri vals over the last four years, and it was no dif ferent Sunday. A Russian team was in third, though it wasnt world bronze medal ists Ekaterina Bobro va and Dmitri Soloviev. Elena Ilinykh and Niki ta Katsalapov were 3.29 points behind Virtue and Moir. Frances Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat were fourth, just 0.26 out of the bronze position, with Bobrova and Soloviev fth. Davis and White will again skate on Monday. Their twizzles are at another speed from the rest of the eld, and yet they spin across the ice in perfect unison. Skat ing to My Fair Lady, they gaze at each other and into the crowd with an exuberant bliss. They y, said their coach, Marina Zoue va, who also works with Virtue and Moir. And you can see at the same time where they are strong. And they are so light at the same time and so owing. With Whites tuxe do and tails and Davis gauzy pink dress, they were decked out for a coronation. They really did the best this program can be done, with joy, Zoueva said. Total joy. When it was over, they held their em brace for a few extra seconds. We kept in the mo ment and neither of us was pushing it, White said. We were out there enjoying each others company. This was special for us. The other American teams, Madison Chock and Evan Bates and siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani, were eighth and ninth. Virtue had a bob ble on a twizzle during the team short dance, but on Sunday, she and Moir looked much more like the cou ple that charmed the home crowd in Van couver four years ago. Their footwork again crisp, they seemed to bounce over the ice as they performed to jazz standards from Lou is Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. In his black bow tie and suspenders, Moir, ever the show man, smiled coyly from start to nish, eyebrow arched. Virtues face beamed brighter than the sparkles on her apper-style dress. With the two still posed cheek to cheek just like the lyrics to the nal song in their med ley, Moir shouted out Yes! and pumped a st. He whirled across the ice in celebration, then lifted Virtue into the air, burying his face in her shoulder. That was more like it, Moir said afterward. The week between their programs seemed to drag on forever Moir called the waiting miserable. I just wanted my chance to be on the stage and do that, he said. So when the music ended, he let out all that tension, though Virtue teased him: You left me. I didnt get the memo on that, she joked later of his extra little dance. I get a little emo tional after we skate like that, he explained. Both couples have been together since they were little kids, and each talked about wanting to revel in the moment of these Olympics. That was ac complished Sunday. Weve been togeth er 17 years and that plays a huge part in just how comfortable you are on the ice in big moments, White said. We have been through so much to gether in competitions and in life. Its just hav ing that consistency in our training and our approach, and when it comes to big com petitions, being a little bit nervous. You want to be able to count on that. Oshie, who scored on four of six attempts in an eight-round shootout against Russia. He didnt need six shots in the shootout to do it. He did it in regular time. Slovenias Marcel Rodman scored with 17.6 seconds left in the game, denying U.S. goalie Ryan Miller a shutout. Miller made 17 saves in his Sochi debut. Yeah, I denitely had some nerves, Miller said. It was an important game to ensure that were at the top of our pool. With plenty of support at the other end of the rink, the 2010 silver medal winner didnt need to worry. They were stronger on the puck, Slove nia coach Matjaz Kopitar said. Theyre strong. Theyre fast. Ryan McDonagh scored about a minute af ter Kessels third goal to put the Americans up 4-0. David Backes gave them a ve-goal cush ion early in the third. Kessel is the rst American to score four goals in the three-game preliminary round of the Olympic tournament since Bill Cleary and Roger Christian in 1960. Fittingly, the native of Madison, Wis., and his teammates were sport ing throwback jerseys in the style Cleary and Christian wore at the games in Squaw Valley USA from right shoulder to left hip. Weve got grit and determination through out the lineup, but thats the type of speed and skill we need, Bylsma said. The U.S. also has two goalies, Quick and Mill er, who are potentially great, and a good one in Jimmy Howard. Who will be in net for the quar ternals, when its win-or-go-home? Im not going to tell you that now, Bylsma said after Sundays game. Luka Gracnar made 23 saves for Slovenia, who play in the qualication-playoff round Tuesday after beating Slovakia and losing to the U.S. and Russia. USA FROM PAGE B1 DANCE FROM PAGE B1 Childress has long been elding cars with the No. 3 for Dillon in other series, and he al ways knew if his grand son made it to the top, he could use Earn hardts number. He said it was something Earnhardt had given his blessing to long be fore his death. Dillon doesnt take the responsibility lightly. Everybody wants to see this number per form well, and thats what my goals are, Dil lon said. Dillon turned a lap at 196.019 mph to win the pole in Sundays ses sion, which is only used to set the front row for the kickoff to the 2014 season. Martin Truex Jr., driv ing a Chevrolet for Fur niture Row Racing, qualied second with a lap at 195.852 mph. Truexs engine is built by Earnhardt-Childress Racing, giving the com pany a sweep of the Daytona 500 front row. The rest of the eld is set Thursday through a pair of qualifying races. Childress knew he had a shot at the pole, if not with Dillon then from another one of his four Richard Childress Racing entries. All were fast in January testing, and again in two Satur day practice sessions. But it was Hendrick Motorsports driv er Dale Earnhardt Jr., the rst driver to make his qualifying attempt, who set the pace early and held down the pro visional pole for most of the session. RCR drivers Brian Scott and Paul Menard failed to bump Earnhardt, and it was surprisingly Ford driver Greg Bife who nally did it as the 33rd driver to take his turn. Ryan Newman then took his shot for RCR and missed, and Dillon was the next driver out. He shot to the top of the board and his grandfather pumped his fist in celebration. He then nervously watched as the final 10 drivers made their runs, and gave anoth er fist-pump in cele bration. We wanted to come down here and put on a good show with the 3, and to have another ECR engine with Fur niture Row on the front row, we couldnt be more proud, Childress said. So could he nally re lax? The pressure is al ways on when youve got grandsons rac ing for you, said Chil dress, who thanked all the sponsors who be lieved in this young kid, who took a chance on him. DAYTONA FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 WINTER OLYMPICS Associated Press A day after a tough shootout loss to the United States, Russia bounced back against Slovakia, thanks to Alexander Radulov and Ilya Kovalchuk. Another boister ous sellout crowd at Bolshoy Ice Dome grew increasing ly nervous throughout the scoreless game, but the Rus sian stars delivered in the shootout. The United States, meanwhile, easily handled Slovenia, winning 5-1 be hind Phil Kessels hat trick. DUTCH SWEEP 16 The Dutch got their third sweep in speedskating al beit a gold by Jorien ter Mors over favorite Ireen Wust in the womens 1,500. Lottevan Beek got the bronze. The Dutch have now won 16 speedskating medals in So chi, breaking the record haul of 13 by East Germany at the 1988 Calgary Olympics. The win by ter Mors sets her up for a shot at becoming the rst skater to win medials in both long and short track. NORWAY IS SUPER-G Kjetil Jansrud won the fourth straight Olympic su per-G gold medal for Nor way, nishing the chop py course in 1 minute, 18.14 seconds, with American ski er Andrew Weibrecht 0.30 seconds behind. Bode Mill er, at age 36, became the old est Alpine skier to win a med al when he and Jan Hudec of Canada tied for bronze. It was Millers sixth Olympic medal, moving the American two behind all-time Alpine leader Kjetil Andre Aamodt. SWEDEN GOLDEN AGAIN Sweden successfully de fended its Olympic title in the mens 4x10-kilometer cross-country relay to be come the rst country in 42 years to win both mens and womens team events in the same Winter Games. Russia took silver as President Vlad imir Putin looked on, and France was third. But it was another disappointment for Norway, which nished fourth a day after its heavily favored women failed to get a medal. BEST CZECH FINISH IN SNOWBOARDCROSS Eva Samkova won the gold medal in womens snow boardcross for the rst po dium nish in the Olympics by a Czech snowboarder. Dominique Maltais of Can ada became the rst multi ple-medal winner in wom ens snowboardcross when she nished a distant sec ond. Chloe Trespeuch of France earned bronze. Pe rennial gold medal contend er Lindsey Jacobellis again failed to win the title that has eluded the American at three straight Olympics. COURSE DANGER Barely 24 hours after Rus sian skicross racer Maria Komissarova severely in jured her spine while train ing on the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park, Jackie Her nandez sustained a concus sion when she smacked her head after catching an edge during qualifying for snow boardcross. The 21-year-old American was treated and released, but barred from competing in the elimina tion rounds. HOT. COOL. PEA SOUP More weather woes for the Sochi Games. The mens 15-kilometer mass-start bi athlon race was postponed until Monday because of fog. The race was initially delayed for an hour, but the visibility remained too poor to run the race. Martin Four cade of France will be aim ing for his third gold medal of the Sochi Olympics, while Ole Einar Bjoerndalen of Norway could win a record 13th Winter Olympic medal. MEDALS Another speedskating sweep boosted the Neth erlands, which now has 17 medals overall, ve of them gold. Russia and the United States both have 16 total and four gold. Norway and Can ada both have 14 in all, but the Scandinavians have the edge on golds, 5-4. Germa ny still has the most golds in Sochi with seven, but only 12 medals overall. TODAYS HIGHLIGHT Seven medals events are on tap, including the ice dance competition featuring favorites Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the U.S., taking on Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, the Canadian de fending champions. Russia bounces back after loss to US squad MARK HUMPHREY / AP Russia forward Ilya Kovalchuk scores the winning shot in a shootout against Slovakia goaltender Jan Laco in overtime on Sunday in Sochi, Russia. Russia won 1-0. Womens Australian Open Leading Scores Karrie Webb, $180,000 71-69-68-68 Chella Choi, $110,822 70-71-62-74 Paula Creamer, $64,213 68-69-73-68 Karine Icher, $64,213 69-68-70-71 Lydia Ko, $64,213 68-68-69-73 Stacy Lewis, $33,068 71-69-70-69 Amelia Lewis, $33,068 71-67-69-72 Morgan Pressel, $33,068 69-68-70-72 Jenny Shin, $33,068 74-67-66-72 Gerina Piller, $24,573 75-69-68-68 Azahara Munoz, $21,296 68-70-73-70 Jessica Speechley, $21,296 71-67-70-73 Mi Hyang Lee, $21,296 72-67-68-74 a-Minjee Lee, 68-67-68-78 Trish Johnson, $17,171 70-73-68-71 Sarah Kemp, $17,171 71-68-71-72 Perrine Delacour, $17,171 70-73-65-74 Caroline Hedwall, $17,171 68-65-74-75 Sandra Gal, $14,228 73-69-72-69 Giulia Sergas, $14,228 68-71-72-72 Jessica Korda, $14,228 67-70-72-74 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $14,228 70-68-71-74 Cheyenne Woods, $12,742 74-65-71-74 Africa Open Leading Scores Aiken won on rst playoff hole Thomas Aiken, South Africa 66-65-66-67 264 Oliver Fisher, England 66-63-66-69 264 John Hahn, United States 65-61-71-68 265 David Horsey, England 66-64-70-65 265 Richard Bland, England 64-69-64-69 266 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 66-67-67-66 266 Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 68-63-62-73 266 Jaco van Zyl, South Africa 69-65-67-65 266 Lucas Bjerregaard, Denmark 64-67-69-68 268 Keith Horne, South Africa 68-69-66-65 268 Damien McGrane, Ireland 67-69-67-65 268 Ulrich Van den Berg, South Africa 66-68-65-69 268 Stuart Manley, Wales 68-69-65-67 269 Adrian Otaegui, Spain 69-65-68-67 269 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 65-66-68-70 269 Jens Dantorp, Sweden 69-63-68-70 270 Jean Hugo, South Africa 68-66-67-69 270 Wade Ormsby, Australia 70-64-69-67 270 JJ Senekal, South Africa 66-71-69-64 270 Also Daniel Im, United States 69-67-66-69 271 Jason Knutzon, United States 71-66-72-70 279 ACE Group Classic Leading Scores Kirk Triplett (240), $240,000 67-67-66 200 Olin Browne (117), $117,067 66-69-66 201 Bernhard Langer (117), $117,067 64-70-67 201 Duffy Waldorf (117), $117,067 67-68-66 201 Jay Haas (76), $76,000 68-72-64 204 Michael Allen (61), $60,800 68-71-67 206 Colin Montgomerie (61), $60,800 70-67-69 206 Mark Calcavecchia (46), $45,867 73-69-66 208 Mike Goodes (46), $45,867 68-72-68 208 Billy Andrade (46), $45,867 71-69-68 208 Peter Senior, $32,000 75-69-65 209 Jim Rutledge, $32,000 72-73-64 209 Wes Short, Jr., $32,000 69-73-67 209 Tommy Armour III, $32,000 68-72-69 209 Rod Spittle, $32,000 70-70-69 209 Bob Tway, $32,000 65-72-72 209 Tom Pernice Jr., $25,600 69-71-70 210 Mark OMeara, $21,120 70-72-69 211 Rocco Mediate, $21,120 70-70-71 211 Tom Lehman, $21,120 70-70-71 211 Bill Glasson, $21,120 69-69-73 211 Dana Quigley, $3,440 74-75-70 219 Northern Trust Open Leading Scores Bubba Watson (500), $1,206,000 70-71-64-64 269 Dustin Johnson (300), $723,600 66-70-69-66 271 Jason Allred (0), $388,600 73-64-67-68 272 Brian Harman (163), $388,600 67-69-68-68 272 Charl Schwartzel (110), $268,000 69-68-68-68 273 Bryce Molder (89), $216,913 69-69-69-67 274 Matt Every (89), $216,913 69-69-69-67 274 William McGirt (89), $216,913 69-67-65-73 274 George McNeill (89), $216,913 69-68-66-71 274 Harris English (73), $174,200 70-69-69-67 275 Brendan Steele (73), $174,200 68-71-67-69 275 K.J. Choi (58), $127,300 69-72-67-68 276 Charley Hoffman (58), $127,300 67-71-68-70 276 Sang-Moon Bae (58), $127,300 67-66-72-71 276 Cameron Tringale (58), $127,300 68-70-67-71 276 Jordan Spieth (58), $127,300 72-66-67-71 276 Charlie Beljan (58), $127,300 67-68-68-73 276 Aaron Baddeley (53), $97,150 69-65-72-71 277 John Senden (53), $97,150 71-70-66-70 277 Keegan Bradley (50), $80,847 68-70-72-68 278 Lee Westwood (50), $80,847 69-70-68-71 278 Jimmy Walker (50), $80,847 67-71-67-73 278 Kevin Chappell (46), $57,955 71-70-69-69 279 Kevin Stadler (46), $57,955 69-69-74-67 279 Jim Furyk (46), $57,955 68-68-71-72 279 Robert Garrigus (46), $57,955 67-67-73-72 279 Hideki Matsuyama (46), $57,955 70-69-69-71 279 Bill Haas (46), $57,955 72-67-67-73 279 Robert Allenby (40), $42,601 71-69-71-69 280 Daniel Summerhays (40), $42,601 71-72-66-71 280 Geoff Ogilvy (40), $42,601 74-68-69-69 280 Blake Adams (40), $42,601 67-70-71-72 280 David Lingmerth (40), $42,601 70-69-70-71 280 James Hahn (40), $42,601 71-72-65-72 280 Brendon Todd (34), $33,031 71-70-69-71 281 Ernie Els (34), $33,031 71-70-68-72 281 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (34), $33,031 71-70-71-69 281 Kevin Streelman (34), $33,031 72-69-73-67 281 John Huh (34), $33,031 71-71-72-67 281 J.J. Henry (29), $26,130 70-69-71-72 282 Victor Dubuisson (0), $26,130 70-72-68-72 282 Jhonattan Vegas (29), $26,130 70-69-71-72 282 GOLF DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer LOS ANGELES Bubba Watson wasnt about to let another chance get away. Two weeks after Watson made a pair of late bogeys in the Phoenix Open, he delivered the best closing round at Riviera in some three decades. Watson played the nal 39 holes without a bogey and shot a 7-under 64 on Sunday to win the Northern Trust Open. It was his rst victory in 22 months and 41 tourna ments worldwide dating to the 2012 Masters. Watson wound up with a two-shot victory over Dustin Johnson, who closed with a 66 for the second straight week and got the same result. This wasnt Bubba golf as much as it was simply great golf. Watson, who also shot 64 on Saturday to start the nal round four shots behind William McGirt, made up ground so quick ly that he broke out of a four-way tie for the lead with a birdie on the eighth hole and made the turn in 30. Equally critical were a pair of par saves with 7-foot putts on the 12th and 13th holes. Johnson, who was sec ond at the AT&T Peb ble Beach National ProAm last week after a nal-round 66, made birdie on the 15th hole to get within one shot. He didnt give himself good birdie chances on the last three holes. Watson made a 15-foot birdie putt on the 18th to cap off the best closing round in this tournament since Doug Tewell shot a 63 in 1986. Even sweet er was going up the steps toward the famous club house to see his 2-yearold son, Caleb, whom Watson adopted just be fore his Masters victory. Watson nished at 15-under 269, and he wasnt the only big winner. Jason Allred, who went to college up the coast at Pepperdine, played bo gey-free for a 68 and tied for third with Brian Har man, who also had a 68. Allred was a Monday qual ier, and this was his rst regular PGA Tour event since he last had his card in 2008. The tie for third was a career-best for the 33-year-old Allred. He earned $388,600, which is more than he had made in his entire career, which included two full seasons on the PGA Tour. He now is exempt into the Hon da Classic, which starts in two weeks about the time his wife is due with their third child. Well have fun guring out what that looks like, Allred said. Watson won for the fth time in his career, and he had to earn it. With no margin for error over the closing holes, he managed to get out of a deep fairway bunker on the 15th hole to the front edge of the green. He smartly played to the middle of the green on the par-3 16th hole for a par. Facing the uphill tee shot on the 18th, he blasted his drive down the middle of the fairway and hit wedge into 15 feet to the right of the pin. And when it was over, he felt a lot better than he did two weeks ago in Phoe nix, where he missed a short par putt on the last hole to lose by one to Kev in Stadler. Johnson, meanwhile, now has nished among the top six in all four tournaments this sea son including a win in Shanghai and consecutive runner-up nishes. His other start was at Kapalua, where he tied for sixth. I had a chance there on the back nine, I just didnt have good looks on 16, 17 and 18 to give myself a chance, Johnson said. I was still right there. Thats all you can ask for. McGirt, who had a twoshot lead to start the nal round as he tried to win for the rst time, opened with a birdie and stalled after that. And on yet an other gorgeous day at Riv iera, this was not a day to stall. Watson hit a perfect tee shot on the par-3 fourth that rode the slope to 15 feet for birdie. He holed a bunker shot from left of the sixth green for bird ie. And a 15-footer on the eighth gave Watson his fth birdie of the round, and the outright lead. WOMENS AUSTRALIAN OPEN MELBOURNE, Austra lia Karrie Webb won the Womens Australian Open for the fth time Sunday, shooting a 4-under 68 in the nal round to beat Chella Choi by one stroke. Webb birdied the 18th hole to take the out right lead, then watched as Choi, who shot a course-record 62 on Sat urday to take a share of the third-round lead, pushed a 10-foot putt wide of the hole at 18 to miss the chance for a playoff. Webb, who clinched her 40th LPGA title, nished at 12-under 276 overall. She previously won the Australian Open in 2000, 2002, 2007 and 2008. CHAMPIONS TOUR NAPLES Kirk Triplett won the ACE Group Clas sic on Sunday for his third Champions Tour title, hol ing a 6-foot par putt on the nal hole for a onestroke victory. The 51-year-old Triplett shot a 6-under 66 to n ish at 16-under 200 on TwinEagles Talon Course. He won the 50-and-over tours Pebble Beach event the last two years after winning three times on the PGA Tour. Defending champion Bernhard Langer, Duffy Waldorf and Olin Browne tied for second. Playing in the nal threesome, Triplett, Langer and Wal dorf were tied for the lead with a hole to play. On the par-4 18th, Wal dorf drove into a bunker and wound up with a bo gey for a 66. REED SAXON / AP Bubba Watson watches his birdie putt roll in on the 18th green, which gave him the victory in the Northern Trust Open golf tournament on Sunday at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles. Bubba ends two-year winless drought

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 AP FILE PHOTO Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito (68) and tackle Jonathan Martin (71) look over plays during an NFL preseason football game on Aug. 24 in Miami Gardens. NFL ARNIE STAPLETON AP Pro Football Writer Now that the NFL knows the scope of the racially charged Miami Dolphins bullying scan dal, the league has been left to grapple with what its next steps should be. A report released Friday on the Miami case concluded with a one-paragraph call to action: As all must surely recognize, the NFL is not an ordinary work place. Profession al football is a rough, contact sport played by men of exception al size, speed, strength and athleticism. But even the largest, stron gest and eetest per son may be driven to despair by bullying, taunting and constant insults. We encour age the creation of new workplace conduct rules and guidelines that will help ensure that players respect each other as profes sionals and people. League executives agree steps need to be taken, and have vowed to take action. But it may be difcult to reg ulate locker room be havior by determin ing when something a player considers to be harmless locker room nonsense crosses the line. Players are part of a team, but they are also individuals with differ ent levels of sensitivity. And as the reports call to action points out, the NFL is not an ordinary workplace and locker rooms are sanctuaries with in those workplaces where even without the kinds of vicious taunts and racist insults cited in the report, behavior that would not be ac cepted in society is tol erated, and even con doned or encouraged. Still, Dolphins own er Stephen Ross wants his organization to lead the way to change the culture. I have made it clear to everyone within our organization that this situation must nev er happen again, Ross said in a statement re leased through the team after the report was released. We are committed to address this issue forcefully and to take a leader ship role in establish ing a standard that will be a benchmark in all of sports. Before the Super Bowl, NFL Commis sioner Roger Good ell had said hed be out in front on the issue of hazing. Our No. 1 priority has to make sure that we have a workplace environment thats professional, recogniz ing that we have some unique circumstances. But we have to make sure that our players, (and) other employ ees, have that kind of professional workplace environment, Goodell said then. After the report was released, the NFL did not mention any possi ble punishment stem ming from the case in a statement emailed by a league spokesman. The NFL Players As sociation said it will re view the ndings close ly, confer with players and all relevant parties involved. The report by lawyer Ted Wells said the be havior that occurred here was harmful to the players, the team and the league, but he noted the investigators werent asked to rec ommend discipline or determine legal liabili ty for the bullying. Wells concluded that offensive linemen John Jerry and Mike Pounc ey joined Richie Incog nito in harassing Jona than Martin, who left the team in October, and position coach Jim Turner participated in the taunting of a sec ond player. That player is Andrew McDonald, now with the Carolina Panthers. The report found no evidence that the Dol phins front ofce or head coach Joe Philbin were aware of the conduct Martin found abusive. There are lines even in a football lock er room that should not be crossed, as they were here, the report said. We leave the de termination of pre cisely where to draw those lines to those who spend their lives playing, coaching and managing the game of professional football. Players would like to police themselves. It is, after all, their locker room. Teams want a big say in setting those param eters. Like any other employer, they are re sponsible for maintain ing a safe and respect ful work environment that adheres to both the leagues policies and federal law. The league is taking a hard look at the re port, which details ho mophobic invective di rected at McDonald. That element in par ticular is a hot button issue in light of SEC co-defensive player of the year Michael Sams recent revelation that hes homosexual, put ting him in line to be come the leagues rst openly gay player. Being at the center of this scandal puts the Dolphins at the fore front of any bolstering of policies protecting players from bullying. The report said that in 2013, Dolphins players acknowledged receiv ing and understanding the personal conduct code and the workplace harassment and dis crimination policies, both taken from the NFL handbook. The latter policy states that harassment can include, but is not limited to: unwelcome contact; jokes, com ments and antics; gen eralizations and putdowns; pornographic or suggestive litera ture and language. In addition, harassment and discrimination are not limited to the workplace: they exam ple (sic), through calls, texts or emails, on a plane or team bus; at a team event; or at the team hotel. The policy encourag es reporting discrimi nation or harassment to the players union, a coach, human resourc es or NFL security. The report touches on a code against snitch ing that exists in NFL locker rooms, however, and Martin never did report the abuse be fore walking away from the team when hed had enough. The Dolphins have already pledged to im prove the teams work place conduct policies, which Wells called com mendable. The team has formed an inde pendent advisory group that includes Don Shula and Tony Dungy, along with several prominent retired players, to re view the organizations conduct policies and suggest improvements. Many questions facing NFL after bullying report

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 59 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. BASEBALL Rays add Bedard to highestpaid team in franchise history AP FILE PHOTO Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price delivers against the Boston Red Sox during Game 2 of baseballs American League division series in Boston. The three-time AL All-Star and the Rays have agreed to a $14 million, one-year contract Associated Press PORT CHARLOTTE When the Tam pa Bay Rays open the season in late March, theyll take the eld as the highest-paid team in franchise history. A smooth offseason for the AL wild-card winners saw them retain star pitcher David Price for at least one more season, contributing to a payroll expected to be around $80 million. Rays executive vice president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman says the players wont feel the pressure of living up to their salaries. I think thats some thing that guys dont really lock in all that much, Friedman said. They care much more about whos in the club house and who the tal ent is in there. Ever since 2008, weve all come to camp with the expec tation to win. Irrespec tive of what our payroll number is, I think the focus is on the talent. In addition to keep ing Price, Tampa Bay added veteran pitch ers Heath Bell, Erik Be dard and Grant Balfour, as well as catcher Ryan Hanigan. The Rays signed Be dard on Friday morn ing. The 34-year-old lefty is expected to re port to spring training in the next couple of days. Bedard went 4-12 with a 4.59 ERA for Houston last year. He is 67-76 overall in 10 sea sons with Baltimore, Seattle, Boston, Pitts burgh and the Astros. Hes a guy that weve liked in the past and were anxious to get him in here and be around him more, Friedman said. Hell come in to compete for the fth starter job. I dont know how that will transpire, but hes also a candi date to pitch out of the bullpen. Manager Joe Mad don said the Rays, as currently assembled, have every chance to be better than last years team, which lost in the division series to the eventual champion Boston Red Sox. The drive is to not have to go through the angst of the end of last season, to not have to go through (a high-pres sure series in) Toronto, then go to (one-game playoffs against) Texas and Cleveland to nal ly get to play Boston, Maddon said. That personies that you re ally want to win your division. Maddon said he wont rush into making lineups, but noted that the continuity of the Rays roster, which re turns an entire starting ineld and nearly ev ery key gure from last year, is a major boost to his planning process. To bring the same ineld back is unusu al and its kind of ex citing, Maddon said. Those four guys, all four were Gold Glove candidates. Thats real ly an exciting group to have. (First baseman) James (Loney) kind of anchors it in the sense that he provides so much condence for the other guys.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 Do it for yourself andFree yourself from home ownership worries and spend more quality time with those you love. Enjoy delightful dining companions in three distinct on-campus venues join your neighbors for a game of golf or bocce ball venture into Mount Dora with friends or take a dance class with the one you love. Choosing a secure, maintenance-free lifestyle at Waterman Village allows you stay connected with those who matter most. Contact us today!Call (352) 385-1126. 255 Waterman Avenue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www.WatermanVillage.com COLLEGE BASKETBALL Associated Press EAST LANSING, Mich. Terran Pette way scored 23 points and Walter Pitchford added 18 and Nebraska topped No. 9 Michigan State 60-51 on Sunday. Petteway had 16 points in the last 20 minutes after Pitchford had scored 12 before the break for the Cornhusk ers (14-10, 6-6 Big Ten). Gary Harris had 18 points and Adreian Payne 11 for the Spar tans (21-5, 10-3), who remain in a rst-place tie with Michigan. Har ris was 5 for 15 from the eld. Michigan State shot 34 percent from the eld and 20.8 per cent on 3-pointers. The Cornhuskers led 32-25 at the half and held off a second-half surge with a 9-2 clos ing run. The Spartans got a lift when point guard Keith Appling returned from a three-game absence with a sore right wrist. He played 19 minutes, but had just two points and one assist after not practicing for two weeks. Nebraska outhustled the Spartans for most of the game and won de spite a poor shooting day. The Cornhuskers shot 35.8 percent from the eld, 30 percent from 3-point range and 61.9 percent at the foul line. After Paynes layup cut Michigan States decit to 51-49, the Spartans grabbed a de fensive rebound and called timeout. After Kenny Ka minski airballed a 3 from the left wing, the Cornhuskers built the lead back to ve on a 3-pointer by Petteway. The Spartans never got closer than three the rest of the way. Nebraska scored the rst six points on 3s from Pitchford, a native of nearby Grand Rap ids, and David Rivers. Petteways rst 3 made it 11-4 and two free throws made it 13-4. Associated Press PHILADELPHIA Larry Brown has had a lot of success in Phila delphia. But on Sunday, his No. 23 SMU Mustangs took a clear step back, one that could drop them from the nation al polls just as quickly as they arrived. Despite 18 points from Markus Kennedy, SMU was upset, 71-64, by Temple. The Mustangs had a four-game winning streak snapped at the end of what has been an eventful week for Browns team. It started with SMU entering the poll for the rst time in 29 years. The Mustangs had their game at Rut gers pushed back from Thursday to Friday be cause of a winter storm in the northeast. They then made a short trip from Piscataway, N.J., to Philadelphia. All six of SMUs losses this season have come on the road. We didnt stay at the Ritz on the Four Sea sons. Weve been on the road six days, and I think we have $41, Brown joked. But I dont want to use that as an excuse. SMU came into the game with the best re bounding margin in the conference, while Temple came in with the worst. But on Sun day, Temple managed to beat SMU, 38-25, on the glass, scoring 15 second-chance points off 12 offensive boards. Making matters worse, SMU went 14 of 26 from the foul line. It wasnt the free throws, said Brown, the former 76ers coach who was coaching his rst game in Philadel phia since 2009. We got outcoached. Fran did a great job of creat ing matchup problems for us. They controlled the tempo, they made all the effort plays. ... We didnt have an of fensive rebound in the rst half, and we got four for the game. I think that was the most signicant thing. Wisconsin beats No. 15 Michigan CARLOS OSORIO / AP Wisconsin forward Frank Kaminsky (44) pulls down a rebound next to teammate guard Josh Gasser (21) during the rst half against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. NOAH TRISTER AP Sports Writer ANN ARBOR, Mich. Wisconsin was on the verge of wasting a tremendous rst half, so with Michigan ral lying and the crowd roaring, the Badgers calmly went inside to Frank Kaminsky. I wanted the ball in my hands, the 7-footer said. I was able to make some things happen. Kaminsky had 25 points and 11 re bounds, and No. 21 Wisconsin smothered No. 15 Michigan in the rst half before hold ing on for a 75-62 vic tory Sunday. The Wol verines cut an 18-point decit to three in the second half, but Ka minsky personally went on a 7-2 run after that, helping Wiscon sin regain control. We were talking about touching the post, yes, Badgers coach Bo Ryan said. They were playing him tough. Once he got it 12 feet away, 12 to maybe 15, thats when he made his moves, and actually used his body as well as Ive ever seen him on a consistent basis. The Badgers (21-5, 8-5 Big Ten) commit ted only two turnovers en route to their fourth straight win. The Badgers led 3419 at halftime after holding Michigan (187, 10-3) without an as sist in the rst half. Theyre a difcult matchup for anybody they play, Michi gan coach John Beile in said. Once we get down like we got down, its tough to come back because of their ball-control offense. They make timely shots, theyve got a great plan and really played a high-IQ game today. NO. 4 WICHITA ST. 84, EVANSVILLE 68 EVANSVILLE, Ind. Ron Baker scored 26 points and Fred Van Vleet nished with 18 points, eight assists and ve steals, leading No. 4 Wichita State to an 84-68 victory Sun day at Evansville. The Shockers (27-0, 14-0 Missouri Valley Conference) remained one of two perfect teams in major college basketball and extend ed their school-record winning streak. They are the 21st team in Division I history to go 27-0, a list No. 1 Syra cuse could join later this week. But getting No. 27 sure wasnt easy. D.J. Balentine and Egidiju Mockevicius each scored 19 points, not quite enough to prevent Evansville (1116, 4-10) from losing for the fourth time in ve games. Evansville spent most of the second half trying to dig out of a double-digit decit and got as close as 6560 with about 6 min utes to play. But Wichi ta State sealed it with a late 13-4 spurt. NO. 18 CREIGHTON 101, VILLANOVA 80 OMAHA, Neb. Doug McDermott matched his season high with 39 points and passed Larry Bird for 13th place on the Division I career scor ing chart, and No. 18 Creighton defeated sixth-ranked Villanova 101-80 on Sunday. Creightons sec ond win over Villano va in a month moved the Bluejays (21-4, 112) into a rst-place tie with the Wildcats (223, 11-2) in the Big East. The Bluejays beat the same ranked oppo nent twice in the same season for the rst time in program histo ry. They also won their 16th straight at home. McDermott, a two-time rst-team All-America and lead ing candidate for na tional player of the year, went over 30 points for ninth time this season and 23rd time in his career. James Bell scored 18 points for the Wildcats. Nebraska tops No. 9 Michigan State 60-51 Pepper leads Temple past No. 23 SMU

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 STUDY: Mammograms dont lower risk of dying from breast cancer / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver classes to be offered The AARP Driver Safety Programs new Smart Driver Course helps participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driv ing habits. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP, no cash or credit cards will be accepted. Two-day classes will be offered: From 1 to 4 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday at the HardenPauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St. Eustis. To register, call 352-394-0250. From 9 a.m. to noon, Tuesday and Thursday at South Lake Hospital (Live Well Campus) 1935 Don Wickham Road, in Clermont. Register at 352-394-0250. EUSTIS February LIFE Luncheon scheduled for Wednesday The Eustis LIFE Luncheon will be held at 11:30 a.m., Wednesday at Lake Tech (Vocational School) at 2100 Kurt St., in Eustis in the faculty dining room, follow the LIFE signs. Lunch items will be prepared by Lake Techs Culinary Arts program, and the Honey Belles will entertain. Cost is $10, and an RSVP is needed by calling, 352-787-0403, or email ing rreed@beyersfhc.com. LAKE COUNTY Free quit smoking classes to be offered The Florida Department of Health in Lake County in collaboration with the Central Florida Area Health Education Center will offer the free classes at the following locations: From 6 to 8 p.m., Tuesday for a twohour class, at the Department of Health Van Dee Medical Building, 14 N. Eustis St., in Eustis; and Feb. 24, offering weekly classes for six weeks (participants must attend all six classes) from 6:30 to 8 p.m., at the National Training Center, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. Registration is required for the classes by calling 877-252-6094. SUMTER COUNTY New hours at WIC offices in Wildwood, Bushnell New hours for the WIC ofce in Wildwood and Bushnell are in effect. The WIC program provides services at no cost to eligible women and children participating in the pro gram to receive food checks for spe cic nutrition items to be redeemed at most local grocery stores. For information and ofce hours, call the Bushnell ofce at 352569-3140, or Wildwood ofce at 352-689-6540. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer There may be a link be tween weather and the risk of suffering a stroke, say researchers who ana lyzed climate trends and hospital records on mil lions of Americans. Cold weather, high hu midity and big daily tem perature swings seem to land more people in the hospital with strokes. As it got warmer, risk fell 3 percent for every 5 de grees, the study found. Maybe some of these meteorological factors serve as a trigger, said Ju dith Lichtman, a Yale Uni versity stroke research er who led the study. With global climate change and extreme weather like this weeks freak storm in the South, this could be increasingly important, she said. Lichtman and col leagues from Harvard and Duke universities gave results of their study Wednesday at the Ameri can Heart Associations In ternational Stroke Confer ence in San Diego. It is the largest and most detailed research on this issue. Each year, about 800,000 Americans have a stroke. Most are due to clots that block a v ves sel to the brain, and high blood pressure is a major risk factor. Some earlier studies found a seasonal trend to stroke rates, and there are biological reasons to think they are related, said one independent expert, Dr. Andrew Stemer, a neurol ogist at Georgetown Uni versity. Blood vessels constrict in cold weather, which can raise blood pressure, he said. Extreme weather can WEATHER AND STROKES A link between the weather and strokes? New research suggests there is. Higher rates of hospital stays for stroke were tied to certain kinds of weather conditions: COLD WEATHER: The risk fell as the temperatures went up. The chances of being hospitalized for a stroke fell 3 percent for every 5-degree rise in temperature. HUMIDITY: Each 5-degree rise in the dew point (humidity) raised the risk by 2 percent. TEMPERATURE CHANGES: Big changes over one day made a dif ference. Each 5-degree increase in daily temperature uctua tion raised the chance of stroke hospitalization by 6 percent. Study ties weather to stroke rates HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Sue Seiter, right, observes as her husband, Bob, center, works with physical therapist Roger Scherwin, left, during a session at their Lakewood Ranch home on Nov. 27, 2013. Bob suffered a hemorrhagic stroke in the right half of his brain. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer Wo men have a high er risk of blood clots that can cause strokes, heart attacks and other problems for 12 weeks after childbirth twice as long as doctors have thought, new research nds. Strokes are still fair ly rare right after preg nancy but devastating when they do occur and fatal about 10 percent of the time, according to Dr. Hooman Kamel, a neurology specialist at New Yorks Weill Cornell Medical College. Blood clots in the legs us ually just cause pain but can be fatal if they travel to the lungs. Kamel led the new study, which was pub lished online in the New England Journal of Medicine and present ed at an American Heart Association stroke con ference on Thursday. Pregnant women are more prone to blood clots because blood components to pre vent excessive bleeding during labor natural ly increase, and blood from the legs has more trouble traveling to the heart. Blood clot risk lasts for 12 weeks after pregnancy AP FILE PHOTO An expecting mother is examined by a midwife during a home visit in Free Union, Va. SEE STROKE | C2 SEE CLOTS | C2

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Sometimes theres the notion that once they deliver they dont have to worry about these things, but risk persists for some time after the birth, said Dr. Andrew Stemer, a Georgetown Universi ty neurologist. Doctors now some times give low-dose blood thinners to cer tain women at high er risk of blood clots for six weeks after de livery. The new study suggests risk lasts lon ger than that. It involved near ly 1.7 million Califor nia women giving birth to their rst child. Over the next year and a half, 1,015 of them devel oped clots 248 had strokes, 47 had heart at tacks and 720 had clots in the legs or lungs. The risk of one of these problems was about 11 times great er during the rst six weeks after delivery and more than two times greater during weeks seven to 12. Af ter that, it fell to level seen in women who had not had a baby. A federal grant paid for the research. Kamel advises wom en who recently had a baby to seek med ical help right away if they develop chest pain or pressure, trou ble breathing, swell ing or pain in one leg, a sudden severe head ache or sudden loss of speech, vision, bal ance, or strength on one side of the body. High blood pressure and smoking add to the risk of blood clots. CLOTS FROM PAGE C1 trigger a stress reaction by the body, causing it to release substances that not only increase the work of the heart but make blood stickier and more likely to clot, Stemer said. In cold weather your body clamps down, theres cardiovascu lar stress, said Dr. Lar ry Goldstein, a Duke stroke specialist who worked on the study. Conversely, high hu midity may cause de hydration, which also can raise the risk for clots and raise stress on the body, he said. You know how you feel when youre out in hot, humid weather you dont feel so hot. Several of these same researchers published another study earli er this year that looked at stroke deaths from 1999 to 2006 among Medicare patients and found a pattern higher rates in the win ter, lower in summer and a small peak in July. The new study looked at stroke hospitaliza tions, not just deaths, in a wider population of adults using a fed eral database covering all states except Ida ho, North Dakota, Del aware and New Hamp shire. Researchers also had daily climate data down to the county lev el from the National Climatic Data Center for 2010 and 2011. Researchers tracked only strokes caused by clots, not the less com mon kind caused by a burst or bleeding blood vessel. Lower temperatures, larger daily tempera ture changes and high er dew points (humid ity) were tied to higher stroke hospitalization rates. Each 5-degree in crease in daily tem perature uctuation (the highest reading minus the lowest one) raised the chance of stroke hospitaliza tion by 6 percent. Each 5-degree rise in the dew point (humidity) raised the risk by 2 percent. The researchers did not establish a thresh old when things were too hot the point of the study was track ing the general trend, Lichtman said. The results mean that during extreme weath er, friends and relatives should keep an eye on people that are at high risk, those who are old er, she said. During stressful weather conditions, you want to watch your diet, watch your salt intake, regard less of what the tem peratures are, and get enough uids, said Daniel Lackland, a sci entist at Medical Uni versity of South Caroli na in Charleston. Goldstein added this advice for people al ready at cardiovascular risk: Stay in air condi tioning in the summ e r and stay heated in the winter, so the weather outside affects you less. STROKE FROM PAGE C1 MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer A Canadian study that many experts say has major aws has revived debate about the value of mammograms. The research suggests that these screening X-rays do not lower the risk of dying of breast cancer while nding many tumors that do not need treatment. The study gives longer fol low-up on nearly 90,000 women who had annual breast exams by a nurse to check for lumps plus a mammogram, or the nurses breast exam alone. After more than two decades, breast can cer death rates were similar in the two groups, suggesting little benet from mammograms. Its important to note that this study did not compare mam mograms to no screening at all, as most other research on this topic has. Many groups have not endorsed breast exams for screening because of limited ev idence that they save lives. Critics of the Canadian study also say it used outdated equip ment and poor methods that made mammograms look un fairly ineffective. The study was published Wednesday in the British jour nal BMJ. Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer and cause of can cer deaths in women worldwide. Nearly 1.4 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Many studies have found that mam mography saves lives, but how many and for what age groups is debatable. It also causes many false alarms and overtreatment of cancers never destined to be come life-threatening. In the U.S., a government-ap pointed task force that gives screening advice does not back mammograms until age 50, and then only every other year. The American Cancer Society recommends them every year starting at age 40. Other coun tries screen less aggressively. In Britain, for example, mammo grams are usually offered only every three years. The Canadian study has long been the most pessimistic on the value of mammograms. It initially reported that after ve years of screening, 666 can cers were found among wom en given mammograms plus breast exams versus 524 can cers among those given the ex ams alone. After 25 years of follow-up, about 500 in each group died, suggesting mammograms were not saving lives. The similarity in the death rates suggests that the 142 extra cancers caught by mammograms represent overdiagnosis tumors not destined to prove fatal, study leaders concluded. The work was immediate ly criticized. The American Col lege of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging called it an in credibly misleading analysis based on the deeply awed and widely discredited study. Mam mograms typically nd far more cancers than this study did, sug gesting the quality was poor, the groups contend. In a letter posted by the med ical journal, Dr. Daniel Kopans, a radiologist at Harvard Med ical School, described outdat ed machines and methods he saw in 1990, when he was one of the experts asked to review the quality of mammograms used in the study. I can personally attest to the fact that the quality was poor, he wrote. To save money they used secondhand mammogra phy machines that gave poor images, failed to properly posi tion breasts for imaging, and did not train radiologists on how to interpret the scans, he wrote. The study leader, Dr. Antho ny Miller of the University of To ronto, said it was completely untrue that inferior equipment or methods were used. Still, the study highlights the fact that mammograms are an imperfect tool that lead to many false alarms, needless biop sies and treatment of many tu mors that would never threaten a womans life. Overdiagnosis is not an anomaly in the study from Can ada. This has been compellingly demonstrated in research from the U.S. and Europe, said an other study leader, Dr. Cornelia Baines of the University of To ronto. Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a pro fessor of medicine at the Dart mouth Institute for Health Pol icy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire, spoke on the issue at the San Antonio Breast Can cer Symposium in December. Screening is a choice, not a public health imperative. There are trade-offs here, he said. Study disputes value of routine mammograms for breast cancer AP FILE PHOTO A radiologist uses a magnifying glass to check mammograms for breast cancer in Los Angeles. Overdiagnosis is not an anomaly in the study from Canada. This has been compellingly demonstrated in research from the U.S. and Europe. Dr. Cornelia Baines, the University of Toronto

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON The sooner you start explaining the world to your baby, the better. That doesnt mean ash cards for tots, or merely pointing out objects: Heres an or ange. Thats a bowl. New research shows that both how much and how well parents talk with babies and toddlers help to tune the youngsters brains in ways that build cru cial language and vo cabulary skills a key to ghting the infa mous word gap that puts poor children at a disadvantage at an even younger age than once thought. The idea is to connect words and meaning, so the brain becomes primed to learn through context: Lets put the orange in this bowl with the banana and the ap ple and the grapes. Youre building in telligence through lan guage, is how Stanford University psychology professor Anne Fernald explains it. And forget dumb ed-down baby talk: Longer, more complex sentences are better. The advice I give mothers is to have con versations with your babies, said Erika Hoff, a psychology pro fessor at Florida Atlan tic University. Chil dren can hear lots of talk that goes over their head in terms of the meaning, and they still benet from it. The research, pre sented Thursday and Friday at a meeting of the American Associ ation for the Advance ment of Science, comes amid a growing push for universal preschool, to help disadvantaged youngsters catch up. But it also begs the question of whether children from low-in come, less educated families need earlier in tervention, such as pre school that starts at age 3 instead of 4, or higher quality day care or even some sort of Lets talk campaign aimed at new parents to stress talking, singing and reading with tots even before they can respond. That can be difcult for par ents working multiple jobs, or who may not read well or who simply dont know why its im portant. Scientists have long known that be fore they start kinder garten, children from middle-class or af uent families have heard millions more words than youngsters from low-income fam ilies, leaving the poor er children with small er vocabularies and less ready to succeed academically. Fernald said by some mea sures, 5-year-olds from low-income families can lag two years be hind their peers in tests of language develop ment, an achievement gap thats difcult to overcome. Brain scans sup port the link, said Dr. Kimberly Noble of Co lumbia University Medical Center. Ear ly experiences shape the connections that childrens brains form, and kids from higher socioeconomic back grounds devote more neural real estate to brain regions involved in language develop ment, she found. How early does the word gap appear? Around age 18 months, Stanfords Fernald dis covered when she compared how chil dren mentally process the language they hear. Lower-income kids in her study achieved at age 2 the level of pro ciency that more afu ent kids had reached six months earlier. To understand why language processing is so important, consid er this sentence: The kittys on the bench. If the youngster knows the word kitty, and his brain recognizes it quickly enough, then he has can gure out bench means by the context. But if hes slow to recognize kitty, then bench ies by before he has a chance to learn it. Next, Fernald tucked recorders into T-shirts of low-income tod dlers in Spanish-speak ing households to deter mine what they heard all day and found re markable differences in whats called child-di rected speech. Thats when children are spo ken to directly, in con trast to television or con versations they overhear. One child heard more than 12,000 words of child-directed speech in a day, while anoth er heard a mere 670 words, she found. The youngsters who re ceived more child-di rected speech pro cessed language more efciently and learned words more quickly, she reported. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. More talking, longer sentences help babies brains TIPS FOR TALKING TO BABIES, TODDLERS Research shows that both how much and how well parents talk to babies and toddlers inuences development of language and vocabulary skills crucial to later school achievement. Here are some tips: The sooner you start talking with ba bies, the better. Their brains are absorb ing vital information well before theyre able to respond. The high-pitched, sing-song tone that many people take with babies does get their attention. But dont dumb it down: Use rich, varied language and longer sentences, said Erika Hoff of Florida At lantic University. Dont just label things, make connec tions. The dog is wagging his tail isnt as effective as, Look how uffy that dogs tail is. Its much fatter than the cats skinny tail. What matters most is speech direct ed to babies and toddlers, not what they overhear, said Anne Fernald of Stanford University. Turn off the TV. Television does not help the brain learn language, said Dr. Kimberly Noble of Columbia University Medical Center. Babies and toddlers es pecially require personal interaction to learn. Reading a book for 10 minutes a day adds up fast, Fernald noted. If mom or dad isnt a good reader, just talk about the pictures.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Basketball Writer WACO, Texas Isa iah Austin came to the stark realization as a teenager that hed nev er again see out of his right eye. Multiple operations couldnt x the de tached retina and save his vision after a previ ous injury was aggra vated doing a routine dunk before a middle school game. It was real hard. ... Im losing sight, like Im half-blind now, recalled Austin. Back then, he was already towering over oth er players and had big basketball dreams. That is when Austins mother told him some thing that he didnt ful ly understand at the time, but now means so much to the 7-foot-1 Baylor sophomore and NBA prospect. You can make it your excuse, or you can make it your story, his mother told him. You can touch lives or you can be a quitter. While he didnt take into consideration then what that actual ly meant, and gured his mother was just trying to help him get through a tough time, Austin started working on his game again. He became a top national recruit in high school. Austin didnt tell Bay lor coach Scott Drew about being blind in one eye until af ter committing to the school, and then prac ticed a few weeks with his new teammates for his 2012-13 season be fore telling them. Then last month, in a piece aired as part of an ESPN broadcast of a Bears game, Austin revealed publicly the secret of his prosthetic eye. There were some people that questioned his toughness. After the story, nobodys ques tioning his toughness, Drew said. It allows him to be a role mod el now for anyone that has poor eyesight, or any other issue. Austin said the reve lation has allowed him to be himself all the time and show people hes more than a bas ketball player. He is now willing to share his story with anyone. I want to be some body that some kid looks up to saying if he can do it, then I can do it. I just want to push the youth and help peo ple grow, he said. I re ally can tell people that even with a disability you can make it. The amount of sup port and positive feed back has come as a bit of a surprise to Aus tin. Drew told of a fami ly from Houston with no connection to Baylor at a game to support Austin. Several NBA scouts who watch Baylor games said they al ready knew about the eye, and their percep tion of Austin hasnt changed. As one of them said, You cant teach 7 foot 1. Austin might have been a rst-round NBA pick last summer after his freshman season, but wasnt going to be able to go to the com bine or pre-draft work outs because of a torn labrum in his shoulder. He didnt mind more time at Baylor. I just felt like this year is just another step for me growing closer to God and becoming a better man on and off the court, he said. When he was about 12, Austin was play ing rst base during a camp when he was struck in the eye by a baseball thrown his way when he wasnt looking. There were no vision problems then, but doctors told him his retina was loose. They said that it did have a chance of tear ing or ripping, he said. And it happened to me in the eighth grade. Already about 6-7 at the time, Austin sud denly could only see red from his right eye after a pregame dunk. When taking out his contact lens didnt solve the issue, he was taken to an eye doctor who almost immedi ately did surgery. Three more opera tions followed over sev eral months. He would have blurry vision for brief times, but even tually saw nothing out of his right eye, even when a light was shined directly into it. Because of limit ed peripheral vision, Austin has to keep his head on a swivel, looking both ways in the paint and constant ly rotating his body to see as much of the court as possible. That is a constant emphasis, especially in practice. But he said the hard est part is depth per ception on shots, espe cially in different gyms like Kansas where the wall is far behind the baskets. He was 4-of-8 on 3-pointers at Allen Fieldhouse last month, but quickly points out that he missed all three of his free throw at tempts. Regional Urgent Care LAKE We at LRUC have made it affordable for you to receive the care you want and need For REAL medicine by REAL DOCTORS with CBC$25 Urine$15 Analysis HCG$208404 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 352.315.8881O.V.$95 X-Rays$50 Cardiac$100 Testing CMP$35 EKG$25 Strep$15 Test Pricing PricingSTRAIGHT STRAIGHT 352.259.4322 Blind eye no excuse for Baylors Isaiah Austin AP FILE PHOTO Baylor center Isaiah Austin (21) adjusts his glasses during the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game against TCU in Fort Worth, Texas.

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LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON The U.S. and 26 oth er countries began a new effort Thursday to prevent and ght out breaks of dangerous in fectious diseases before they spread around the globe. U.S. health of cials called the Global Health Security Agenda a priority because too many countries lack the health infrastruc ture necessary to spot a new infection rapid ly and sound the alarm before it has time to gain a foothold and even spread into other countries. Germs do not recog nize or stop at nation al borders, Health and Human Services Secre tary Kathleen Sebelius said Thursday as rep resentatives from par ticipating countries, the World Health Or ganization and oth er groups met to dis cuss plans. A threat anywhere is indeed a threat everywhere. Yet fewer than 20 per cent of countries are adequately prepared to respond to emerging infections, she said. Infectious diseases are a growing concern. Just in the past year, China alerted the world that a new type of bird u was sickening peo ple; a mysterious and deadly new respirato ry virus emerged in the Middle East; and sci entists detected the spread of some old er diseases to new lo cales including the rst appearance of mosqui to-borne chikungunya virus in the Caribbean. New diseases are but a plane ride away, warned Dr. Tom Frie den, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Preven tion. There are too many blind spots around the world, he told report ers in preparation for Thursdays meeting. The goal of the new effort: Over ve years, the U.S. will partner with other countries to bolster local dis ease monitoring, de velop tests for differ ent pathogens and help regions create and strengthen systems to report and respond to public health emergen cies. Last year, the CDC began a pilot project in Uganda to improve de tection of such diseas es as cholera, drug-re sistant tuberculosis and hemorrhagic fe vers. Motorcycles raced samples from sick pa tients in remote parts of the country to pro vincial capitals, where they could be shipped overnight to a labora tory that could rapidly report the results back. It showed that very rapid progress was pos sible, Frieden said. This year, the CDC and Defense Depart ment together will spend $40 million for similar projects in 10 other countries, which are yet to be named. In 2015, the Obama ad ministration is seek ing $45 million in new funding to further ex pand the work. Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 La Plaza Grande South 1008 Bichara Blvd. The Villages352-259-7800$1500OFF ALL SHOES IN STOCKMust present coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person. Good 2-18-2014 thru 3-3-2014. www.shopshoebiz.com rfntbbbnn fnb Digital Hearing Aids $249 ALL MAJOR BRANDS ARE AVAILABLE starting at$199 Digital Custom Aids $259 Don Smith, HAS, owner of Corrective Hearing Centers 9am 4pmBetter Living Through Better HearingCome Join Our GRAND OPENING of Our Golf Cart Accessible at The Villages Location at 11974 County Road 101, Suite 102, The Villages Fl. 32162. 787-HEAR (4327) Conveniently located in Park Central Plaza 2468 Hwy 441/Suite 104 Fruitland Park, FL 34731 US, 26 countries launch global effort to fight infectious diseases

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 DEAR ABBY: My youngest grown son discovered that his girlfriend his possible fu ture wife was texting pic tures of herself to his stepfa ther. Needless to say, he told her the relationship is over. Now, for obvious reasons, he no longer wants to be around his stepfather, and is deeply concerned about how it will affect his relationship with his mother, my ex-wife. They are close, which I en couraged, but she seems to be in denial about the situation. Have you any suggestions on how to be supportive of my son and all the dynamics? TOO MUCH DRAMA IN MISSOURI DEAR TOO MUCH DRAMA: You say your ex-wife seems to be in denial. Was the reason for the breakup ever explained to her? If it wasnt, then your son should talk to his mother about it, and from then on ar range to see her alone. DEAR ABBY: I just dropped off my 13-year-old son at a party. Hes a seventh-grad er, and when I take him to a friends house, if I havent met the parents, I walk him to the door and introduce him and myself to them. I do this to try and make sure the parents are at home and responsible. (Honestly, if they werent, Id take my son and leave.) I know it embar rasses him, but most parents thank me because they want to meet the parents of the kids who are in their homes. Times are different for our kids today. I just cant believe that someone would sim ply drop off a child and speed away when he/she has abso lutely no clue who these peo ple are. Im not a helicopter parent; Im just a mother who loves my children enough to make sure theyre in good hands. Recently, a ninth-grad er in our school district had a house party where 30 kids re ceived underage drinking ci tations! Sorry but Im tak ing no chances. Parenting is not being your childs best friend. Please encourage par ents not to be afraid to reach out to other parents. It really does take a village. VIGILANT IN BUCKS COUNTY, PA. DEAR VIGILANT: Your children are fortunate to have a moth er who is as involved in their lives as you are. Not all young people are so lucky. Your son may nd your vigilance em barrassing, but take comfort in knowing that all kids your sons age nd their parents embarrassing. Orchids to you for pointing out the importance of parents networking with each other to ensure that their children are safe and supervised. When an entire village is watching, there is less chance of a lamb straying. DEAR ABBY: I have been mar ried to my wife for 33 years. I recently found a pair of her panties with Booty Call printed across the back. I cant help but wonder. She has nev er had underwear like that in 33 years. What gives? SUR PRISED TEXAN DEAR SURPRISED: Was your wife wearing the lingerie at the time? If not, how did you discover the panties? The surest way to get to the bottom of this would be to ask your wife this question. She may have thought they were cute and bought them on impulse or they may have been a gift. Please let me know, because not only am I interested in her answer, but Im sure millions of readers are curious, too. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Girlfriends texts to stepfather throw family out of whack

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS Immediate Appointments AvailableBassin Center 1004 N. 14th St., Leesburg, FL 1580 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages, FL(Next to Wolfys & McDonalds)Podiatry Institute of Central FloridaDr. Chan PodiatristDouble Board Certified Orthopedics & Podiatric MedicineTwenty-eight foot bones held together by ligaments and muscles and nourished by an intricate system of neurovasculature, are a fascinating wonder to the uninitiated as well as to the most experienced of doctors. Every patient who walks in affirms the intricacy and vulnerability of this magnificent design.Delivering competent and premier podiatric care with compassion. Welcome Dr. Chanrfrntrbrtrfnr rbrrbrnDiabetic Foot Care, Arthritic Disorders, Common Foot & Ankle Problems, Broken Foot, Ankle and Leg, Orthotics, Arch Disorders, Heel Pain, Laceration Trauma, Bone Spurs, Plantar Fascitis, Warts, Ingrown Nails, Hammertoes, Bunions, Corns, Callouses, Fungal Infection.rfffntbt rffrrfrf rYale University rffff rb frfffrffrrfffrr ffrff nttfRosalyn Franklin University fffrffff ffr ffWheaton College ffr Your feet are in good hands with Dr. Chan!Traumatology, Sports Medicine, Deformity Correction are his passion. Helping patients compassionately and completely is his goal. 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center rrfnt fb r fftfr bn ftt bbn f bb b nfr t t MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg.

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f ntbb bbb bnnnbbb bbbbbb rnbnnb nnbtn bnnnntbb bbnn nbbtbtn bbbbb btbbbnbbbt bbbnbbbbbt ttbnbbbbb bbtnb nbbbbb nnbntbbntnnn r f ttbbnbbbbb bbtnb nbbbbbbntbbn tnnn r r fr rf r bbntnnnnbn r bbtbbbnb ff ff tnr btntnb nb ttn btbb ntbtnbttb btbbbnb bb nntn b bbnnnnnnbnbbb bbtbbbntb nbbnnbnnb tt bbtn n bntbtt tbb r btb nb nn bbbnb btb btbb btbnntb ntb b b r r r fr tnn rrr rrr r f r f f bb bttnbb r r r b r r r b n btbbbttn bnbb r r bbntbnb bnbbbnb bbbnnnn btnnb bnbbb nbbtbtn bbbnnnnn bbntnnnnb nbntbbnnt nbtbnbnbbb bnbtnnbnbnbt bbbbnbbtnttbbbb nbbtnbbnb tn nnbnnb nnnbb bbnnntn bbnnb nnbnnbbnb bntbbnn bnnb tbbntbrbb nbnbbnt nnbnntbb rnbbb tnbtbb btbbb btbbbnbnbt f f f rbbnn nbbbnn btbnnnb nbbbbnfttb bbnn bb rf bbrbbbn nntbb nnbnntnnn btnbbnrb bnnnb bbnntnn btbnnnb nbbbbb bbtbbntbttntt bttbnbbnb bttnbnbb bnnntbn f r r r b b n n n t n b b n n b n n b n n b b n b b n t b b n n b n n b t b b b n b n b b n t n n b n b b n b r b t n b t b b n n n b b n n n b b b n n b n n b t t bntbtt btn btb nb bbtnnb rtn r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 rfrn tbf r f n t b f t n t n t t n t n f rntt rtrttnn rtttf rnbbrtt bnt nntnnf r r b f f t r t f n n r f n r rf r t t t n n t n f t f n n n t t n t n r n r t t f nntb b n r n t n n f f n n t f n r n t n f n f t f f f n f t r n b f n t t n t n t f f t f t b t t t t n f f t n f f n n n r n n n f n t t f t r t b t f b r t t t t t b n f t n n f t n n n f nbtnn tbrf tbtfrft btnnrrtf r t f t n t n t n f n b t n n n f f n n t b r n b t n n t r b t t n f n t n n n n n t t n b r t b b t n b r t n t n r r t n n n b n b n t n t t t r n t t n r r n f t n n n r t n n t n n t n b n t n t n n b t n b f n n r r n b t n t n t f b b bb t n b b t t t n r r n r f n b f b n b t n t t n r f f b f f f f r bttrtrn tntt tnnnnn ftr trttrtnbnt ftnnbnt bn fbtf f tntb nnnbfnbf f nnntnff f tntb tbn btn nntntnt nbntnrt nntntnrt nrrtr tnfn nnbf tnnbr tbnnttnt tftrntnbnrrntn nntf f f nrtnrrnnb nbtr nbnttnn btnntntt rtntt bnr nrrnnfb tntntntrbnn trbntnttn ttntrfntn tnnntn nfrt nnrntrnrt nbntn nnt rttrtt nnf tntnt t f tntb nntnttf nttt tntbnrffnf ttf f tntb b t n f f ttnnnt tnnb fnrffbn bntnf tnnnttn nbntf nrffbnf bntnf brtttn nbnrrntnrntn nttrtnf rtnrrnnb nbnbntnbt trnbnttn tntntt rtftrtrnb rtnbtnntn ttrtn bnr nrrnntnn ff rtrtnnbn ttnnbtnff rffnbnfb ntnfttttn nf bnnnnt rnbnnnf bntnttn nbtnffrff f f tntb

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 r f n t b f r r b f b n r b n f f n t r r n t n n f n n n n b t f b b b r f b b n f t b r f t b f n b r r b n b r r f r t r n n n f b r f n f f f b t b r b f n f r b n r n f n f r n r r f b t n r r r n r n f t n f f t r f r f r f r f r b t b r r b r f n b r b n f f f f n f n b f f t b r r t b r n f b r f n b r b n f f n f r b r f t b r b t b r bnfbrbbnr tbnnrbfnbr bfbb tnbrnrftf tbnfbfnrf ntbnnrtft nrrbfb rftffb f t r f f b n n t r b n t fnt n t f n f f r f f n f r f t b r r r n r t b n n n f r bn nbtrfb nrfrrb t r b n f r b t r r n t b t r b n f b f b t n n r b f t b n t b n t r f f t b n t b n b r t b r r f r f r r n t f n n f r r f n f r t r b f r r r n n b r r n r b n f r f n r b n f nrbr bbnbnfrrr tnrt fbtbnn brfnbrbnfnrf tbbrnfbnrf rfnnfr nnbbfr ntfrbnf f b f t b n n f r f t f n f f b n f b n f n r f b b f n n r r bn rbb ffr r n r t b n r r r r f b rbnfrfrnfn rnrbnfbrtf trbnnrfft rbrbnftbrr nrrfrfb fbnfrbbf nfnnf rrntf ftrffbrb nn r b n r n r n n tbbrbrfbf brnnbfbnfb rfrnfrtrbnn nfbnfnfbnf r r t b n n t f b r r b n r f b n r r n n n n t f b r n t b n f b b f r t b n n f r r r r f n n r t b n r f t r n n n r f b t b r f n f n f r b r b r b t b t b r b n r r r n t f f f fnt trtnf tfbrfb fbrftnr tfrt r t b n f n t n t b r r f t b r n n b n n f n n t b n f f r n n f r n f t b r b n t b b r r r r f n t r r r t b r f n n r t b n r b r r b n f f r r t rnfbfrfr brbfbntfrfbrfrtb tnnfbrf nfrbnfrnrntfb rrrntfbr tfbnf n b n b n f r r b n f r r r r b n n t f n b r b b n t b r n b n f b r r b n f t b b n b n f r f n f t f b frrnnnfnfbrbn tbrtnn bnfrbbfbnfbnbr f t b n b n t f r n n f n ft rf nrtbt rfnt

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 rffr nfrrtrb rbnr rr n r r r r nrnr f brnr rfrf fbbr bbrbntrb br fbbfrn brbrrt bbrr brfbr fbrr b b b nnb fb nrfrfr f fbbrr t brrr r b r b r f r fb nfbfbr rbbrr rrb b rfrbbbnr brr frfbbfb rf rrr ftnfb ntb b r nbbrb nbrrrr r rrrnrbrfbbfr b r r brr rbbr rbbrbr b rbrr frrf f r r rbr t rt nr br nr r r f b r n r n t r r r fbnrbbr rrr r r r n t r n r b b t f f r r r t r b r r r r r rrrrbr fnr rnf r r fbnrrb ff nfrf fbfr nrr brffbbrr r rrr nfr fb r rrr r rrr bf brr rrfft rfr nr frbrr brb br r rbfr f f fr rr r t btr rbf t fr bb brf rr rn br br fr bb rf fb fbrrb r nrrt nrr n brrf r nfr t bb nfrb nbbb n nbn rbfr rr nf rbbrr r rbrrf rfrt fr r frn r t rrffnr rbrr brfr f br bbr rrbrbr bfrrbrrrbfrr r b r r b f r r b b r b r r t r r b t r r r bbr ffb bf t n t f b r bf frrtrnr rtfrfrf nrrr rrnr t rb nbf n fr b f b t br f rfbrrfrf f rrrr bfr b r bfr fb fbtr frf t br bfb nrn rbrr fn nr f t r rfb n t rr rrb brnrbr frrr rrfrrrfrf fbr brn nfnf fbrr r r r r n r n f r r f r b r t r r b r r r f f r b f r f r b r b n r r brrr nf rrtr r f ftbrbrt rr rrr br bfrbrb f b rbr n nr bbr n rrr bfnftbn r rf frfbr b bb r rrfr rbbrrr rt r b r b r b b rbrfrrrrn rfrfrrb fbbnrrbbfb frbbr r f f b f f b b b r r f b b r r r

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 r f r f r n t t b f b r r r r fntn fnff tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn rr b b r f b b b b b f n b b b n r r fntbn n f t t b r b t t b n t r f n t t b f n n n f n r rb b n b b b t b r f n n n n r r r ff brntb bnnfnn fnb b n b rr n tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn rr rn bn btb nb n n n n b n t t b b b b f n f f n f n b r r nb bbnnn nbbbrr n b n b b n f f n r r r nnbb r tn b r r r r n n b b t n n b n n n b n t t b b n b t b b n b r r f f f f f n n f f f f n n f r t n b r n n n b b r r r tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn r r tn r r r n n b n n rftfn rr bf bttbfn nr n tn rfbnb nbfn nb r f r f r n t t b f b f n r r r nbnbnf fnr tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn r r n tn rfffn br n n bf nbrr frrr fn rrr f rr tb br nbrr ftb rn t t n t n n b n n n r fb bnb nbrr r bnt tnnnr fb n r n rbnn nnnn bn n nnrr r br rrr r b r r r b r ttnnn fnrrr nnnn rr b bbb rr nb b r bn r frr f b r r fbr ftrrrr ttb nn n bfbb rrr nbnnnr rr fnb n nnn ttr bbt nnr nn bnnr b t n r r fnbrrr ntt brrrr tn nnrr bnbb rr r n b b b r r r bn nbbbr bn nbbbr f rrr b b n r r r r fb rrrr nnt brr b b b t n r nnbbnb rr r rrr f brrr f n n n r n brrr b

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 rf rntbftfbbftn rbntftb f n f rtrtbfb n fbtftbftnbtf ffftb fbfr f b rrb trr ffrtr trnb ntbf ft rrftbrft tbff rrf brtfr ntbf rtntft f nffb frbrf tfbf bf rrf r btrftb f tffbb tfbf nrrf f nbbt nbtf rrfrfbnb bt rrb rrfrrtnrr b f n nn tbt fr b f bfftnftfb f nb bnrnbrn ftfrbt f fttfbb tftrfrr rf n f f rt nbtf b bf tn rrr rrfftbf rbrrrt tftrrf rft tfttnttr rrtrr n nn frfbt ff frbbbbrf nn f t f tfftr nntbrtfbr brr nnf f rrtfff trftrrt frrftfntf tf f r b f n f t n b b f f f r t t r f nntb fttrtftrtb fttbr trrtf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f tf ffrrtb frr nnf f nnntrf f bnrfrb rnfttrft ttb ftrtnfntb rbrff fb f b f n ff f f t r f t t r f f f t f f r tfr fftbrttb tfrrf nfftrnf rbrrb r f b f b r f nf f



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BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties KESSELS HAT TRICK LIFTS US HOCKEY, SPORTS B1PRISONS: Use of smuggled cellphones on the rise, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Study ties weather to stroke rates, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, February 17, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 47 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C8 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.75 / 52Partly sunny and pleasant. 50 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMike Evans Machinery Company (MEMCO), a 20-year-old fuel-tank manufacturer in Clermont, has grown to the point where it plans to move to Bushnell and create a facility with more than ve times the square footage it has in south Lake. Weve outgrown the place were in, Service and Administration Manager Curtis Evans said. Our production line is jammed up here (in Cler mont) because we are getting so much interest. The building were moving into (in Bushnell) is much larger and will allow us to produce the tanks faster and more efciently. Theres also more room for us to grow out there. Doing business under the name Envirosafe, the company has a 15,000-square-foot manufacturing facility at 901 12th St. in Clermont. It has become the No. 1 manufacturer of above-ground fuel systems in the U.S., thanks in part to the worldwide attention it has received on the Web since 2008. The fuel systems store gasoline, diesel fuel or liquid chemicals. The company has been leasing its Clermont site since 2004, but recently bought a 50,000-square-foot building off of County Road 747 in Bushnell, where it plans to build CLERMONTFuel-tank manufacturer plans large-scale expansion SUBMITTED PHOTO From left, MEMCO Production Manager Skeeter Glover, President Michael Evans, and Sales and Administration Manager Curtis Evans, oversee a workers progress on one of the companys above-ground fuel storage tanks being built in Clermont. TOM HAYSAssociated PressNEW YORK The account information given by a new customer at Liberty Reserve read like a not-so-clever prank: Joe Bogus, 123 Fake Main Street, Completely Made Up City, N.Y. But at the multi billion-dollar virtual banking operation, it didnt matter. Mr. Bo gus in reality, an undercover federal agent was free to begin transferring funds, no questions asked. Authorities say the re cent investigations of Liberty Reserve and the hidden website Silk MATTHEW LEEAP Diplomatic WriterJAKARTA, Indonesia Cli mate change may be the worlds most fearsome weapon of mass destruction and ur gent global action is needed to combat it, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Sun day, comparing those who deny its existence or question its causes to people who insist the Earth is at. In a speech to Indonesian stu dents, civic leaders and government ofcials in Jakarta, Kerry laid into climate change skeptics, accusing them of using shoddy science and scientists to delay measures needed to re duce emissions of greenhouse gases at the risk of imperiling the planet. He also went after those who dispute who is responsible for such emissions, arguing that everyone and ev ery country must take responsibility and act immediately. We simply dont have time to let a few loud interest groups hijack the climate conversation, he said, referring to what he called big companies that dont want to change and spend a lot of money to act to reduce the risks. He later sin gled out big oil and coal con cerns as the primary offenders. We should not allow a tiny minority of shoddy scientists and science and extreme ideo logues to compete with scientic facts, Kerry told the audience gathered at a U.S. Embassy-run American Cen ter in a Jakarta shopping mall. Nor should we allow any room for those who think that the costs associated with doing the right thing outweigh the benets. The science is unequivo cal, and those who refuse to Kerry: Climate change is worlds most fearsome WMD EVAN VUCCI / AP U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, tours the Istiqlal Mosque with Grand Imam K.H. Ali Mustafa Yaqub on Sunday in Jakarta. DONNA CASSATAAssociated PressWASHINGTON House Democrats are determined to cast an election-year spotlight on Republican opposition to raising the min imum wage and over hauling immigration laws. To try to accomplish that in the GOP-con trolled House, Democrats are planning to rely on an infrequently used, rarely successful tactic known as a dis charge petition. It requires the mi nority party in this case, Democrats, who are unable to dictate the House agenda to persuade some two dozen Republicans to defy their leadership, AP FILE PHOTO House Minority Leader, Democrat Nancy Pelosi of California, calls for action on immigration reform on Capitol Hill in Washington with other lawmakers and activists. House Dems will use discharge petition, force voteNY officials: Virtual currency invites real crime Weve outgrown the place were in. Our production line is jammed up here because we are getting so much interest. The building were moving into is much larger and will allow us to produce the tanks faster and more efficiently. Theres also more room for us to grow out there.Curtis EvansService and Administration ManagerSEE CLIMATE | A2SEE FUEL | A2SEE VOTE | A2SEE CURRENCY | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 17, 2014: This year you evolve and grow in a new way. At times you might feel as if you do not have a choice. If you feel that way, stop and rethink your alternatives. Brainstorm more often with people who do not think like you. Seek to achieve your goals. If you are single, you will meet many people. Come summer, the possibility of meeting someone of signicance is likely. Do not commit unless you are sure of your choice. If you are attached, your relationship could become even more signicant as your sweetie teams up with you to make a dream come true. You will enter a very romantic period during the summer. LIBRA likes the way you think. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You will accomplish more in the morning. In the evening, random calls and perhaps a visit with a loved one could take priority. Your instincts about a situation could be off. Someone might point you in the wrong direction. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Dive into a dynamic problem. You will enjoy the brainstorming involved with heading in a new direction. You could nd that someone is dealing with a level of discomfort during this process. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will clear up a problem only after you detach and look at the big picture. At that point, the solution will permit resolution in an amiable manner. Once the air is cleared, you can direct your energy in a different direction. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Listen to your sixth sense when speaking with a close loved one. There might be a lot more going on than meets the eye. This person might not be able to share what the issue is. Give him or her space to work it out. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might be concerned with a nancial matter that needs to be handled immediately. Your domestic life could point to a different direction and a new possibility. Listen to feedback, and make a decision accordingly. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might feel strongly about a certain matter, so dont hesitate to let others know where you are coming from. Keep a personal matter quiet, and be willing to have a long-overdue conversation. Focus on your nances and effectiveness. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might feel out of sync in the morning, but by the afternoon you will draw others to you. Use care with your nances; make smart choices. Your personality and energy are likely to dominate the afternoon. You will be all smiles. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Decisions made in the afternoon might not be as sound as you would like them to be. Listen to news and respond accordingly. Recognize that you need to think carefully about the implications involved, especially after you look at the big picture. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You could be full of energy. In the morning, maintain your focus on an important matter involving your career or an older relative. Your sense of humor emerges when dealing with a friend in the afternoon. A meeting will be instrumental. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19)Detaching will help you deal with a volatile situation. Recognize what is happening with a relationship in which information might not be properly communicated between the parties involved. Know that you can change this situation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could discover the benets of having a conversation in the morning. Oneon-one relating resolves a problem better than any other method can. Use this opportunity. With new information, youll gain a new perspective. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Rethink your interactions with a key person. It can be great to act spontaneously, but sometimes you need to think more carefully about the actions you take. Make a point of having an important conversation later in the day. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US FEB. 16CASH 3 . ............................................... 1-1-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 5-9-0 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 5-7-1-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 2-0-1-5FLORIDALOTTERY FEB. 15FANTASY 5 . ............................. 4-6-17-18-33 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................... 1-3-5-10-38-49 POWERBALL ........................ 2-9-14-21-233 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. believe it are simply burying their heads in the sand, Kerry said. We dont have time for a meeting anywhere of the Flat Earth Society. Kerry, saying that 97 percent of scien tists who have weighed in on the issue agree that the phenomenon is real, ar gued that the cost of inaction to environ ments and economies will far outweigh the signicant expense of reducing greenhouse gas emissions that trap solar heat in the atmosphere and contribute to the Earths rising temperatures. He outlined a litany of recent weather disasters, particularly ooding and typhoons in Asia, and their impact on commerce, agriculture, shing and dai ly living conditions for billions of people. This city, this country, this region, is really on the front lines of climate change, Kerry said. Its not an exagger ation to say that your entire way of life here is at risk. He added: In a sense, climate change can now be considered the worlds larg est weapon of mass destruction, perhaps even, the worlds most fearsome weapon of mass destruction. The solution, Kerry said, is a new glob al energy policy that shifts reliance from fossil fuels to cleaner technologies. CLIMATE FROM PAGE A1 another 30,000-squarefoot building. MEMCOs investment in the new building, which included the pur chase price, renovations and new equipment, is estimated at nearly $2 million. According to Evans, the building should be completed around April and will bring 22 to 35 new jobs to the area. Evans, along with company President Mike Evans and Production Manager Skeeter Glover, are unsure at this time if theyll keep the Clermont location open as well, but most of the workers there will be relocating. We have so much steel, big equipment and a lot of tanks. Its going to be a big move, Evans said. Were thinking about keeping our Clermont location, too, but well have to wait and see whether we need it or not. When the company rst began, Evans said the tanks were going to big ready-mix and waste companies, along with municipalities. Since appearing on the Web, the company has added contractors, farming operations, hospitals, trucking, aviation and marine companies and even governmental agencies and the U.S. military to its customer list. Many are located outside the United States. Although the tanks MEMCO manufactures are for storing regular gasoline and diesel fuel, it also produces bio-diesel, oil, ethanol and different chemical tanks, Evans said, adding that the custom-built tanks are all manufactured using a double wall system and comply with all local, state and federal regulations. Tank sizes vary from 300 to 35,000 gallons. Were excited, Evans said of the move. Its a big step forward from where we started in 1992. We went from a little place in Oakland to the facility in Clermont where weve been for 10 years, and now were looking forward to the new facility in Bushnell. For information, call 352-241-2302, 800555-4754 or visit abovegroundfuelstoragetanks.com. FUEL FROM PAGE A1 join Democrats and force a vote on setting the fed eral minimum wage at $10.10 an hour. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California said Democrats will push the wage issue when Congress returns from its break Feb. 24. Forcing a vote on a com prehensive overhaul of immigration laws could occur in a few months. Democratic leaders ar gue that a majority of Americans favor both steps, which are priorities for President Barack Obama, and say the House GOP is the ob stacle. Republicans say Democrats are embarking on an approach that they know has little chance of success in an attempt to circumvent the will of the GOP-led House. The odds are daunting for Democrats in what clearly is political ma neuvering ahead of the elections this fall. Some questions and answers on how it works.Q What does a dis charge petition do?A It allows the minority or opposition party to bypass the House speak er and get a vote. First, 217 members one more than half the Houses current member ship of 432 have to sign a petition. A motion to consider the wage issue would then be placed on the legislative calendar, but it cant be acted on for at least seven days. Any lawmaker can then call it up but only on the sec ond or fourth Monday of the month. The motion is debated and if the House passes it, then lawmakers would consider and vote on the bill. Currently there are 232 Republicans, 200 Dem ocrats and three vacancies in the House. All 200 Democrats would have to sign the petition, but Democrats would have a tough time getting 17 Republicans to join them. Signing a discharge petition would be a breach of loyalty for Republi cans, certain to draw the wrath of the caucus, and a rebuke of Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Republicans largely oppose any increase in the minimum wage. They say its an issue left to the states and that it could slow hiring in a struggling economy.Q What about immi gration? A number of House Republicans back a comprehensive ap proach. Would they sign a discharge petition?A Highly unlikely. Re publicans still are un willing to break ranks with the party and Boeh ner, despite the distinct ly different political forc es on the issue. Immigration overhaul has the support of an unusual coalition that includes some traditional backers of the GOP. They include the U.S. Cham ber of Commerce and business groups, reli gious organizations such as the U.S. Catholic Bish ops, evangelicals and la bor unions. VOTE FROM PAGE A1 Road, a vast black-mar ket bazaar for narcotics and other contraband, demonstrate how the an onymity inherent in the use of virtual currency is attracting a legion of eshand-blood criminals. The perpetrators feel they can more easi ly conceal their activity, their identities and their proceeds, Deputy U.S. Attorney Richard Zabel said at a hearing last month held by the New York State Department for Financial Services. Hard cash carries the burden of needing to be physically smuggled and hand-delivered, Zabel said. By contrast, in the Silk Road case, users were able to purchase drugs from drug dealers located anywhere in the world, essentially with a push of a button, he said. At the same hearing, Manhattan District At torney Cyrus Vance Jr. urged state regulators to put tighter controls on digital currency ex changes to tame a digi tal Wild West. New Yorks chief nan cial regulator, Benjamin Lawsky, said in a speech last week that hes con sidering new rules requir ing businesses to obtain a Bitlicense if they use the new currencies and com ply with know-your-cus tomer guidelines to pre vent money laundering activities. The dialogue comes at a time when Bitcoins and other virtual currencies have been gaining the backing of legitimate investors and mainstream businesses. Users exchange cash for digital money using online exchanges, then store it in a wallet pro gram in their computer. The program can trans fer payments directly to a merchant who accepts the currency or to private parties anywhere in the world, eliminating transaction fees and the need to provide bank or credit card information. In the past year, there are signs that the virtual currency phenomenon has moved beyond the early days when it was an oddity embraced by a small cadre of libertar ians and computer geeks and later by criminals during its vice phase, said Fred Wilson, a partner in a Manhattan venture capital rm. Are people still doing bad things with Bitcoin? Wilson said. Sure. Is the majority of the Bitcoin activity vice? Not a chance. CURRENCY FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Community Center to host Black Is Beautiful programA program focusing on the various shades of the black race will be held at 7 p.m. tonight at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Ave. Titled   Black Is Beautiful and pre sented by McCalls Beauty Salon and LaShay Inc., the program will focus on eight black women who vary in shades of color. The NAACP will also be part of the program. For information, call 352-787-0119.LEESBURG Party in the Street will host 12 hours of Mardi GrasDowntown Leesburg will come alive with the sights and sounds of Mardi Gras on Saturday with a variety of street entertainment, including stilt walkers, jugglers and games for kids. Radio Disney will also be a part of the festivities, bringing teen music artists The Vamps and Becky G to perform live at the Mardi Gras party on their way to the Radio Disney Music Awards in Los Angeles, Calif. For information, go to www.leesburgevent.com.MOUNT DORA Food trucks will return to downtown on ThursdayBeginning Thursday, food trucks will visit downtown Mount Dora on the third Thursday of every month. Hosted by the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Commerce, the trucks will be located in the Chamber parking lot and on Sunset Park at the cor ner of 4th and Alexander Streets, with tables and chairs set up to offer par ticipants a gathering and seating area. Ten to 15 unique food trucks offer ing a wide variety of different food styles will participate in the event, opening for service from 5:30 to 8:30 / p.m. For information, call the Chamber ofce at 352-383-2165.NATIONWIDE Bob Evans offers free pancakes to veteransVeterans with proof of service and identication, or in uniform, can get free all-you-can-eat pancakes at Bob Evans restaurants today in a nationwide event honoring the men and women who serve our country. For details, go to www.bobevans.com.LEESBURG Rep. Metz sponsors bill for Korean War veteransState Representative Larry Metz (R-Yalaha) will speak at 2 / p.m., Feb. 26, at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., to local Korean War Veterans about his Florida House Bill 559, entitled Military Veterans, which Metz says changes the term Korean Conict to Korean War in the statutes and on the authorized Florida license plate. HB 559 also addresses cer tain issues relating to the Vietnam War, the Combat Medical Badge, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal and Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal. For information, call 800-400-5959 or 352-408-6612.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressTheyre hidden in babies diapers, ramen noodle soup packages, foot balls, soda cans and even body cavities. Not drugs or weapons, but cellphones. Theyre becoming a growing problem in prisons across the country as they are used to make threats, plan escapes and for inmates to continue to make money from illegal activity even while behind bars. You can pick states all across the country and youll see every thing from hits being ordered on individuals to criminal enter prises being run from inside institutions with cellphones, said Michael Crews, head of Floridas Department of Corrections. When two murder ers serving life sentences escaped from Florida Panhandle prison last fall, a search of their cells turned up a cellphone used to help plan the getaway, drawing attention to the bur geoning problem. It was just one of 4,200 cellphones conscated by prison ofcials last year, or 11 per day.Smuggled cellphone use on the rise in prisons FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS / AP A cellphone and cigarettes were found inside a camouage package on Jan. 25 near an undisclosed Florida state prison. Staff ReportThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has ap proved staff recommendations for revisions to boating safety zones on the St. Johns River in Lake, Semi nole and Volusia counties. The rst proposal will change descriptions of some zones to match the physical locations of reg ulatory markers, some of which have been in place since 1995. These are technical changes to rule language and will include updating rule maps, said Capt. Gary Klein of the FWCs Boating and Waterways Section. The changes will also relieve these county governments from the re sponsibility of maintaining markers for state-ad opted boating safety zones, as the FWC will take over maintenance. On the river, three affected zones will remain as they have been physi cally marked since at least 2007. The rule language will be updated to match current marker locations by extending: %  %  The northern bound ary of the State Road 40 (As tor) Bridge zone by 350 feet. %  %  The northern bound ary of the SR 44 (Whitehair) Bridge zone by 100 feet. %  %  The eastern bound ary of the Interstate 4 (Lake Monroe) Bridge zone by 125 feet. The current rule lan guage is inconsistent with the markers and is not clear to the public, Klein said. These changes revise the rule language to create safe boating conditions and areas that can be con sistently marked, under stood and enforced.St. Johns boat safety rules changed in Lake Staff ReportA student-led effort in one of Lake Minneola High Schools Game, Simulation and Animation courses continues to dene the techno logical ingenuity of the one-to-one iPad campus. James Martin, who teaches this Career-Technical Education course, challenged students to cre ate an informational mobile application that would represent the high school. By Dec. 20, 2013, the students had accomplished their goal when the Lake Minneola High School App was approved by Google and available for download on the Android Market. The informational app features Lake Minneola students create school app Staff ReportThe Sumter County Master Gardener Plant and Garden Festival, slat ed March 15 from 8 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. at the Wildwood Community Center, has been expanded this year. New this year is our Gardeners Boutique, with stained glass, garden art, outdoor dcor, nature-inspired jewelry, miniature gardens and gifts for gardeners, located in the Community Center building, said Kathy Porter, in charge of publicity for the event. Also, at the Community Center building, will be our extremely popular Ask the Master Gar dener booth to answer all your gardening questions. Festival vendors will fea ture a large selection of nursery plants, includ ing owers, herbs, shrubs, palms, citrus trees, bonsai and succulents. There also will be landscape design services, along with verti cal, hydroponic and moveable gardens beds, Porter said in a press release. In addition, numerous choices of outdoor structures and garden pottery will be available. Master gardeners will be selling copies of the second edition of Gar dening in Sumter County Month-by-Month. They also will be selling rafe tickets for baskets loaded with garden items, gift certicates and one-of-akind articles. The 4-H Caf will be selling coffee, doughnuts and cold drinks. Admission is $1 per per son and children under 12 are admitted free. Free parking will be available. All proceeds will go to support University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Sumter County Master Gardener events and outreach programs. The Community Cen ter is at 6500 Powell Rd., a mile south of Route 466A. For information, call the Sumter County Extension Ofce at 352-793-2728 x 223, or email plantclinic@ aol.com.Plant and garden fest coming to Wildwood Staff ReportThe Lake County Public Works Department is announcing that Al fred Street from State Road 19 to Sin clair Avenue in downtown Tavares will re-open to trafc on Tuesday. Storm-pipe installation will continue down Caroline Street. Sin clair Avenue will be closed at the intersection of Caroline Street for a twoto three-day period in the coming weeks. Detour signs will be placed accordingly to direct trafc through the area. The Alfred Street project, once complete, will establish one-way directional trafc between State Road 19 and Disston Avenue. The city of Tavares is also currently overseeing a utility project to re place water and sewer lines in the downtown area. For more information about the project, contact the Lake County Department of Public Works Road Operations Division at 352-4839007.EUSTISAlfred Street to reopen Tuesday Staff ReportLake-Sumter State College will be one of the host sites on Sunday for a statewide program called College Goal Sunday, which will provide information to college-bound students and their families applying for nancial aid. The event will be held from 1-4 / p.m. in the Health Sciences Building at LSSCs Leesburg Cam pus. The schools nancial aid staff will be on hand to help college hopefuls complete nancial aid applications. College Goal Sunday is a free event for all and is not limited to students interested in attending LSSC, located at 9501 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg. Audrey Williams, director of nancial aid, said completing the Free Application for Federal Stu dent Aid (FAFSA) is the rst step in applying for federal, state and LEESBURGLSSC plans college aid event Feb. 23 SEE APP | A4SEE AID | A4SEE RULES | A4SEE PRISONS | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com DEATH NOTICESTammy D. TiqueTammy D. Tique, 44, of Leesburg, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.IN MEMORY up-to-date news from the school, calendar of events, bell schedule, course descriptions and more. Anything a student would need to learn about the school, Martin said, this app gives them the information right at their ngertips. Finding its way onto Apples App Store proved to be a greater challenge than the An droid Market. The rst time we submitted to Apple we got rejected, Martin said. Students stayed on task and nearly a month later, on Jan. 22, the Lake Minneola High School Mobile Application was cleared for the Apple App Store. The Android version (Android 2.3 or later), Apple iPad version (iOS 5.1 or later) and Apple iPhone version (iOS 5.1 or later) of the app are all currently available to download. They did an amazing job by remaining fo cused and professional throughout the entire effort, Martin said of the students. APP FROM PAGE A3 some institutional assistance. Filling out the FAFSA form can be a daunting task for many, but hav ing one-on-one help simplies the process, she said. Most colleges and universities begin to award nancial aid as early as March 1, so the FAFSA should be completed as soon as possible. In addition to door prizes and refreshments, event attendees will be entered in a drawing for a $500 scholarship to be used at the school of your choice. The College Goal Sunday program was established in 1989 and has evolved from a one-time event offered in Indiana to a nation al effort including 40 states and the District of Columbia and more than 10,000 volunteers dedicated to assisting students and families in accessing nancial aid for college. Those interested in attending College Goal Sunday and getting assistance with complet ing the FAFSA are asked to bring the following: %  en Drivers license %  en Social Security card (not necessary if you know the number) %  en Alien registration number or permanent residence card %  en 2013 W-2 Forms and other records of money earned %  en 2013 Federal In come Tax Return IRS Form1040, 1040A, 1040EZ or foreign tax return %  en If 2013 Tax Returns are not yet led, the FAFSA may be com pleted based on estimates from W-2s %  en 2013 untaxed in come records Social Security, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, TANF/SNAP or veterans benets records AID FROM PAGE A3 Another change modies the regulated speed in the yearround boating safety zones currently in place from idle-speed, nowake to slow-speed, minimum-wake. This change will al low boaters to oper ate at a slightly fast er speed through the zones, but still requires them to create little or no wake, Klein said. The amendments will also repeal dupli cative regulations and make minor techni cal changes like clar ifying the denitions of shoreline-to-shoreline zones, changing the measurement of some zones and changing the descriptions of some zones. The need for the revisions originated from an FWC review of current state regulations, includ ing boating safety zone boundaries and water way marker locations. FWC staff received support for its proposed changes during previous public meetings. Those providing public comment included local law enforcement personnel and boaters. The proposals amend Florida Administrative Code rule 68D-24.018. Staff will nalize the rules for adoption un less a meeting is re quested within 21 days of the notice of the pro posed rule appearing in the Florida Administrative Register. For ad ditional information, visit MyFWC.com/ Boating or call 850488-5600. RULES FROM PAGE A3 The scary part is, if we found 4,200, we know thats not all of them, Crews said. And while prison ofcials are try ing their best to keep cellphones out, its not such an easy task. Jamming cellphone signals is prohibited by federal law, and it costs more than $1 million each for authorized towers that control what cellphone calls can come in and out of prisons. Some prisons even have to police their own corrections ofcers who sometimes help inmates receive contraband. In Texas, a death row inmate made several calls with a cellphone to state Sen. John Whitmire, who chairs the Criminal Justice Committee. Whitmire didnt believe it when he started receiving calls from death row inmate Richard Tabler. He held his phone out, I guess outside his cell and there was a very distinct prison noise. He said, Did you hear that? and I said, Yup. Thats a prison, Whitmire said. I said, Howd you get that phone? He said, I paid $2,100 for it. I said, How do you keep it charged? He said, I have a charger. The calls continued, and Whitmire had the phone investigated. The month before, Tabler used 2,800 minutes and was sharing the phone with other prisoners, Whitmire said. Tablers mother, in Geor gia, was paying the bill and collecting payments from the other prisoners families. Tabler asked Whitmire if he could help arrange a visit with his mother. When she arrived in Texas she was arrested for her part in the prison cellphone scheme. Tabler wasnt happy about that and made another call to Whitmire. He said he was going to have me killed, Whitmire said. In other cases around the country, infamous murderer Charles Manson, imprisoned in California, was found with a cellphone under his mattress, twice. Two Indiana prisoners were convicted of using cellphones smuggled in by guards to run an operation that distributed methamphetamine, heroin and other drugs. A prisoner in Georgia was accused this year of using two cell phones to impersonate a sheriffs lieutenant and scam elderly drivers who had received red light camera tickets, getting them each to pay about $500. In Oklahoma, a newspaper investigation found dozens of prisoners using cellphones to maintain Facebook pages. The Oklahoman found about three dozen inmates who were disciplined by prison ofcials and its reporters found about as many who hadnt been caught. Florida prisoners have also been using social media with cellphones. Those helping inmates smuggle phones into Florida prisons can be charged with a third-degree felony punishable by up to ve years in prison. In Mississippi, the penalty can be 15 years for having a cellphone in prisons. As corrections departments keep looking for new ways to stop cellphone smuggling, prisoners are nding creative, new ways to get them in. You may get a prepackaged, sealed ramen noodle soup and its completely sealed the weight seems to be right, but when you open it, theres a cellphone inside, said Timothy Cannon, Floridas deputy corrections secretary. Theyre very, very, very creative in the way they do some of these things. Phones have been hidden in the hollowed out centers of large stacks of legal documents. One corrections ofcer found two liter soda bottles that were used as oats out side a prison. When he pulled them out of a pond, bags containing more than a dozen cellphones each were found tied to them. Weve found cellphones and drugs in babies diapers during visitations, Cannon said. If they think youd never search an infant child, that will be the next place they go to try to get it in. Phones hidden in body cavities cant always be picked up by traditional metal detectors, and many are wrapped in electrical tape to further avoid detection. We have found cellphones in the private area of visitors Im talking females and males, said Christopher Epps, head of the Mississippi prison system and president of the American Corrections Association. He said its not unusual to nd three phones in a body cavity. States are looking for new ways to nd cellphones or to prevent their use. Epps said that includes recently installed netting held up by 50-foot poles to keep people from throwing bags over prison fences for prisoners to retrieve. Federal law prohibits jamming cellphone signals, but Texas, Mary land, California and Mississippi installed towers at some prisons that control what cellphone trafc is allowed. Phone signals reach the tower, but only authorized numbers are then passed through. Its not something Florida is considering because of the hefty price tag. Each system costs about $1.5 million, and with 49 major prisons, the state doesnt have the money to cover them all. Instead, its testing machines that detect a cellphones magnetic elds. And like Indiana and other states, Florida is also using dogs trained to sniff out cellphones. Still, with 100,000 prisoners in Florida, Crews knows the problem will never be completely solved, especially with the prot that can be made. When youre talking about that kind of money, youre going to have a lot of people who are willing to do just about anything to get them in, Crews said. For a large portion of these inmates, it is about making a dollar. PRISONS FROM PAGE A3 DAVE BREITENSTEINThe News-PressFORT MYERS The days of college librar ies featuring row upon row of dusty, tattered books are history. University libraries, including Florida Gulf Coast University, have been trading shelf space for study space, digitizing materials to free up square footage for other purposes. Another space-saving measure is on the horizon. Floridas public universities have designed a $26 million high-density storage facility, which would house 5.2 million volumes that ar ent used on a regu lar basis. All books and reference materi als will be stored at 50 degrees with 35 per cent relative humidi ty, ideal conditions for preserving materials. The facility will be in Gainesville. FGCU has the new est library in the state university system, so its shelves arent loaded with dusty novels from the 19th century. However, there are materials and spe cial collections that students and faculty rarely, if ever, retrieve from the shelves. FG CUs library features 22 study rooms, a writing center, com puter lab, Starbucks, tutoring lab, ofces ... and books. We have 250,000 physical items on shelves in this build ing, so we do still have a lot of stuff, said uni versity librarian Kathleen Miller. Library staff will be monitoring material usage to see how often patrons check out cer tain items. Those that rarely leave the shelves will be boxed up and shipped to Gaines ville, where items will be cataloged and pos sibly digitized before they are placed in the warehouse. The Dewey Decimal System of grouping books wont be used in the warehouse. In stead, book height will determine where an item is stored, maxi mizing the number of volumes that will t under a 35-foot ceiling. A computerized retrieval device sim ilar to those in new er vending machines will remove items upon request. Every book has a bar code, every tray has a bar code, every shelf has a bar code, said Judith Russell, dean of libraries for the University of Flor ida. Its an efcient way to store low-use materials but still be able to retrieve them if necessary. Although the Flor ida Board of Gover nors, which oversees the university sys tem, approved the warehouse concept, legislators still must approve the bulk of funding. Russell hopes that happens this spring. The university sys tem, like local public libraries, has agreements that allow patrons to check out books on loan from other campuses. Its usually a two-day turnaround to ship items between the colleges, Russell said. Items that have been scanned and digitized can be transferred electronically. FGCU students and faculty wont see changes with highuse items, but the library is digitizing materials that arent retrieved as often. The university also maintains digital subscriptions to dozens of newspapers, mag azines and journals, and provides access to electronic referenc es of all sorts. Thats allowed the universi ty to expand seating to turn the library into more of a study space than book place. Once Florida uni versities start send ing items to the warehouse, only one copy will make it on the shelves. College libraries receive makeover

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 S ecretary of State John Kerry has done Israelis and Pal estinians a huge favor by pushing them to make one last try at negotiating a two-state solution. After months of effort, Kerry will soon present a draft framework meant to serve as a basis for a nal agreement. Critics such as Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon have called Kerrys project obsessive and messianic. Although those remarks were quickly refuted by Prime Minisiter Benjamin Netanyahu, Yaalon was correct: You really do have to be mad to try to close the current gap between Israelis and Palestinians. Yet Kerry has managed, by his obsession, to force both sides to face the consequences if his efforts end in failure. The impor tance of Kerrys crusade was laid out to me by Amram Mitzna, a member of parliament from the centrist Hatnuah Party, whose leader, Tzipi Livni, represents Israel at the talks. Never before has a secretary of state been so involved or such a believer, said Mitzna, who was visiting Philadelphia on a tour arranged by the liberal Jewish group J Street. This is the last opportunity for the United States to be as involved as it is now. If these talks fail, I dont see when we will be able to get an agreement, because we need an outside force to push us ahead. Mitzna has had long experience with failed peace efforts. A retired general who became may or of the mixed Jewish-Arab city of Haifa, he later led the Labor Party when it lost badly to Ariel Sharon in the 2003 elections. Israeli voters were skeptical about the prospects for peace then, and are even more so now. But Mitzna believes there are pressing reasons that Israel cant afford to keep control of the West Bank and, indirectly, of Gaza. He thinks the relative quiet in those areas wont last. We are about to face a third Palestinian intifada, he says. The rst uprising was fought with stones, and the second with guns and suicide bombers. But this time, says Mitzna, the tactics will be different, using media and world opinion against Israel. The atmosphere is more ready than ever to isolate Israel. Kerry recently raised this danger and was falsely accused by some Israeli hawks of promoting a boy cott. But, like Mitzna, he was only describing the real prospect if Israel continues to occupy and settle the West Bank, with no further talks on two states and no political rights for Palestinians. To the world, this will look like South African apartheid redux. Id add something Mitzna didnt mention: The Palestinian Authority on the West Bank is nanced largely by foreign aid, much of it from European sources. If the occupa tion continues indenitely, that aid will dry up, and Israel will become legally responsible for keeping the West Bank aoat. A framework accord, says Mitzna, would keep such prospects at bay, and keep negotiations going. He sees the current instability in the Arab world as a plus for a deal, because no Arab army is likely to threaten Israel for the next 15 years. He also thinks a new Palestinian government, along with neighboring Jordan, would, for reasons of self-interest, keep any terrorist threat and the Jordan border under control. Mitzna doesnt believe Israel needs formal recognition as a Jewish state, although he would like it. More important, he says, is a deal that formally declares the conict to be over, and species that Palestinian refugees must return to the new state of Palestine. If 1948 Palestinians and their descendants ooded Israel, there really would be no more Jewish state. However, the leaked version of Kerrys framework doesnt look likely to meet either sides red line. Both might accept a demilitarized Palestinian state along pre-1967 borders, with territorial swaps so Israel can keep large West Bank settlements. But Palestinians wont agree to recognize Israel as a Jewish state, a provision reportedly included in the framework; the Palestinians say this marginalizes the 20 percent of Israeli citizens who are Arabs. Nor will they give up on a division of the city of Jerusalem. And they still insist on the absolute right of refugees to return to Israel, which is denitely not included. The best the secretary of state is likely to achieve is a Kerry Plan with loopholes, which each side can endorse with reserva tions. This would provide a cov er to keep talks going for six more months, but isnt likely to lead to a nal agreement. Still, as Mitzna made clear, the prospect of failed talks is hugely risky to both sides (the Palestinian option of taking their case to the United Nations will not gain them statehood). In the end, Israelis and Palestinians need the obsessive Ker ry so badly they may agree to keep trying.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorialboard member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may email her at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Kerrys obsession with Israel, Palestine is beneficial to both The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Lending the authority of his ofce to an important and increasingly biparti san cause, U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. this week called for states to do away with laws that prevent convicted fel ons from voting even after they have served their time. In a speech at Georgetown University, Holder noted that an estimated 5.8 million Americans are prohibited from voting because of felony convictions, and said that the impact of such exclusion on racial minorities was disproportionate and unacceptable. As a result of such laws, 2.2 million black citizens nearly one in 13 adults are unable to vote. In Florida, Kentucky and Virginia, the ratio is one in ve. It isnt just that black Americans are incar cerated at rates higher than the rest of the population. Holder also noted that felony dis enfranchisement laws in some states have his torical roots in efforts during Reconstruction to target AfricaAmericans and diminish the electoral strength of newly freed populations. Holders emphasis on the racial implications of these laws is entirely appropriate. It is consistent with other initiatives he has taken to ameliorate disparities in law enforcement, including his directive to federal prosecutors to refrain from charging low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with crimes that would lead to draconian mandatory minimum sentences. Black defendants have disproportionately been harmed by excesses in the war on drugs. But redressing racial inequity isnt the only reason for allowing men and women who have paid their debt to society to rejoin their fellow citizens at the ballot box. As Holder pointed out, research suggests former pris oners who had their voting rights restored were less likely to offend again. And, empiri cal evidence aside, re-enfranchising citizens who have been returned to their communi ties is a matter of simple justice. In California, voting rights are restored to felons automatically after their release from prison and discharge from parole. That system is a model for the entire nation. But, according to the Brennan Center for Justice, 11 states permanently bar some or all convicted felons from voting (though most released prisoners can apply for a restoration of voting rights on an individual basis). As a federal ofcial, Holder has no direct inuence over state election laws. And in his speech, he didnt endorse periodic proposals in Congress to allow offenders who have served their time to vote in federal elections even if they were ineligible to participate in elections for state and local ofces. Still, the attorney general delivered a mes sage that state government should heed: that felon disenfranchisement laws undermine the reentry process and defy the principles of accountability and rehabilitation that guide our criminal justice policies.From the Los Angeles Times.AVOICERestore the vote to felons DOONESBURY FlashbackEditors Note: Gary Trudeau is on vacation this week. Enjoy these strips from 2013.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014www.dailycommercial.comGOLF: Bubba Watson wins at Riviera / B3 PETR DAVID JOSEK / AP USA goaltender Ryan Miller stops a shot on the goal during the 2014 Winter Olympics mens ice hockey game against Slovenia at Shayba Arena on Sunday in Sochi, Russia. LARRY LAGEAP Hockey WriterSOCHI, Russia Phil Kessel is the rst Amer ican in more than a de cade to score a hat trick in an Olympic hockey tournament. Hes more interested in something no Amer ican has accomplished on Olympic ice since 1980 winning a gold medal. Kessel scored two of his three goals within the opening ve min utes to lead the U.S. to a 5-1 win against Slove nia on Sunday. The U.S. is undefeated through three games and if it can win three more, the nation will celebrate its rst Olympic championship in hockey since the Miracle on Ice at the Lake Placid Games. Its about the wins, right? Kessel asked, rhetorically. We just want to win games. No members of Team USA was alive when the U.S. beat the Soviet Union in 1980 in one of the biggest upsets in sports history. But if they end up with gold around their neck on Sunday, this title wont be regarded as a mira cle. Kessel and his team mates earned an automatic spot in the quar ternals of the 12-team tournament by routing Slovenia and Slo vakia, and outlasting Russia in a shootout, to nish atop their group. Theyve scored 15 and allowed only four goals so far. Kessel scored 1:04 af ter the puck dropped, removing any thought the Americans would have a hangover after their much hyped vic tory against the host Russians on Saturday. I was certainly con cerned after the emo tional game, said coach Dan Bylsma. We were fortunate that we got right out of the gate with a couple great plays. Kessels third goal midway through the second period made him the rst U.S. play er to score a hat trick at the Olympics since John LeClair did it on Feb. 15, 2002, against Finland. I was saying right before the game, I hope somebody does something pretty cool, so that some of the focus gets off of me and onto someone else, said T.J. Phil Kessels hat trick helps US rout Slovenia 5-1Lakehawks edge Broward CC in 15 Staff ReportThe game was so close for so long that it wasnt suprising to see it decided by a pair of throwing er rors in the 15th inning that gave Lake-Sum ter State College a 6-5 win over visiting Broward College. Kris Hodges and Sam Thomas led the Lakehaws with three hits apiece, but it was Tanner Barnhards fth-inning threerun homer that gave LSSC the early 4-2 advantage. Hodges began the inning the with a single to shallow right-center, then quickly stole second. With one out, Dakota Higdon reached base on a elders choice with Hodges advancing to third, setting the stage for Barnhard, who deposited Broward hurler Jamie Pozos rst pitch over the left eld fence. Broward tied the game in the top of the ninth on Austin Lang hams run-scoring single, and the teams remained deadlocked until the nal frame. Michael Howe picked up the win in relief for the Lakehawks while Ryan Gurerra was tagged with the loss. The Lakehawks (52) are back in action at 4 p.m. today when they travel to Babson Park to take on Webber International University. RACHEL COHENAP Sports WriterSOCHI, Russia Charlie White threw his arms in the air in celebration to try to describe how hed felt Sunday morning. After four years, the moment had nally ar rived for White and Meryl Davis, seeking to win the United States rst Olympic gold medal in ice dancing. I denitely woke up today ready, Davis said. And yes, its great to wake up with a smile on your face. They were grinning even more broadly after their short dance, when they set an international personal best with 78.89 points to lead training partners Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada by 2.56. Davis and White won silver at the 2010 Games when Virtue and Moir became the rst Olympic ice dance champions from North America. The free dance is Monday, and Davis and White, both from Michigan, are one performance Davis, White of US closing in on goldSEE DANCE | B2SEE USA | B2 Austin Dillon puts No. 3 car back on the track at Daytona Austin Dillon (3) drives through Turn 4 during qualifying for the Daytona 500 on Sunday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. PHELAN EBANHACK / AP JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing Writer DAYTONA BEACH With the No. 3 on his door and memories of the late Dale Earnhardt fresh in his mind, Austin Dillon took the fabled number out of hibernation and straight to the top at Daytona. Dillon won the pole for the sea son-opening Daytona 500 driving the No. 3 Chevrolet a car Rich ard Childress had refused to eld at NASCARs top level since Earn hardts fatal accident on the last lap of the 2001 race. But now that his 23-year-old grandson is ready to race in the Sprint Cup Series, Childress al lowed Dillon to use the number widely associated with the sev en-time champion. Earnhardt won 67 races, six championships and the 1998 Daytona 500 driving the No. 3.SEE DAYTONA | B2 MATT SLOCUM / AP USA forward Phil Kessel, right, watches as his third goal sails past Slovenia goaltender Luka Gracnar.

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 NASCAR-Sprint Cup-Daytona 500 LineupAfter Sunday qualifying; race Feb. 23 At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.019 mph. 2. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 195.852. Failed to Qualify 3. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 195.818. 4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.712. 5. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.707. 6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 195.296. 7. (88) Dale Earnhardt. Jr., Chevrolet, 195.211. 8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.042. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse. Jr., Ford, 195.004. 10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194.919. 11. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.894. 12. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 194.776. 13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.658. 14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.637. 15. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.582. 16. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 194.582. 17. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 194.574. 18. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.574. 19. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.544. 20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.523. 21. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194.502. 22. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.477. 23. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.422. 24. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 194.410. 25. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.380. 26. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 194.334. 27. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 194.108. 28. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 194.078. 29. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.066. 30. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 193.815. 31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 193.736. 32. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193.732. 33. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.594. 34. (66) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 193.428. 35. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.365. 36. (35) Eric McClure, Ford, 192.905. 37. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.798. 38. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.695. 39. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 192.538. 40. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 192.328. 41. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 192.291. 42. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 192.135. 43. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 192.061. 44. (52) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 191.493. 45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.480. 46. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 190.347. 47. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.685. 48. (93) Morgan Shepherd, Toyota, 189.542.National Basketball AssociationEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 Brooklyn 24 27 .471 3 New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 37 14 .725 Atlanta 25 26 .490 12 Washington 25 27 .481 12 Charlotte 23 30 .434 15 Orlando 16 38 .296 22 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 Chicago 27 25 .519 13 Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20 Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 15 .717 Houston 36 17 .679 2 Dallas 32 22 .593 6 Memphis 29 23 .558 8 New Orleans 23 29 .442 14 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 12 .782 Portland 36 17 .679 6 Minnesota 25 28 .472 17 Denver 24 27 .471 17 Utah 19 33 .365 22 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 Phoenix 30 21 .588 5 Golden State 31 22 .585 5 L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18 Sacramento 18 35 .340 18 Saturdays Games No games scheduled Sundays Games East vs. West, 8 p.m. Todays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. New York at Memphis, 8 p.m. Miami at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Winter Olympic Medals Table At Sochi, Russia Through Sunday (55 of 98 events) Nation G S B T ot Netherlands 5 5 7 17 Russia 4 7 5 16 United States 4 4 8 16 Norway 5 3 6 14 Canada 4 6 4 14 Germany 7 3 2 12 Sweden 2 5 2 9 Switzerland 5 1 1 7 Austria 2 4 1 7 France 2 0 4 6 China 3 2 0 5 Japan 1 3 1 5 Slovenia 1 1 3 5 Italy 0 2 3 5 Poland 4 0 0 4 Belarus 3 0 1 4 Czech Republic 1 2 1 4 South Korea 1 1 1 3 Latvia 0 1 2 3 Britain 1 0 1 2 Finland 0 2 0 2 Australia 0 1 1 2 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Croatia 0 1 0 1 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1 Ukraine 0 0 1 1 Sundays U.S. Olympians Fared ALPINE SKIING Mens Super-G (Start position in parentheses) 2. (29) Andrew Weibrecht, Lake Placid, N.Y., 1:18.44. 3. (13) Bode Miller, Easton, N.H., 1:18.67. 14. (9) Ted Ligety, Park City, Utah, 1:19.48. 23. (25) Travis Ganong, Squaw Valley, Calif., 1:20.02. BOBSLEIGH Mens Two-Man Through Two runs 3. United States 1 (Steven Holcomb, Park City, Utah, Steve Langton, Melrose, Mass.), 1:53.18. 11. United States 2 (Cory Butner, Yucaipa, Calif., Chris Fogt, Alpine, Utah), 1:53.56. 13. United States 3 (Nick Cunningham, Monterey, Calif., Dallas Robinson, Georgetown, Ky.), 1:53.80. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING Mens 4x10km Relay 11. United States (Andy Newell, Shaftsbury, Vt., Erik Bjornsen, Winthrop, Wash., Noah Hoffman, Aspen, Colo., Simi Hamilton, Aspen, Colo.), 1:33:15.1. FIGURE SKATING Ice Dancing Short Dance 1. Meryl Davis, West Bloomeld, Mich., and Charlie White, Bloomeld Hills, Mich., 78.89 (Q). 8. Madison Chock, Redondo Beach, Calif., and Evan Bates, Ann Arbor, Mich., 65.46 (Q). 9. Maia and Alex Shibutani, Ann Arbor and Mich., 64.47 (Q). SNOWBOARD Womens Cross Qualifying (First and second runs followed by best time) 2. (15) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn., (2, 1:21.40) 1:21.40, +0.79. 9. (2) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City, (9, 1:23.96) 1:23.96, +3.35. NR. (6) Jackie Hernandez, Londonderry, Vt., DNF. Quarternals Heat 1 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (Q). NR. (24) Jackie Hernandez, Londonderry, Vt., DNS. Heat 4 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (Q). Seminals Heat 1 3. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City (A). Heat 2 6. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. (B). Small Final 1. (2) Lindsey Jacobellis, Roxbury, Conn. Medal Final 4. (9) Faye Gulini, Salt Lake City. SPEEDSKATING Womens 1500 7. Heather Richardson, High Point, N.C., 1:57.60. 14. Brittany Bowe, Ocala, 1:58.31. 18. Jilleanne Rookard, Woodhaven, Mich., 1:59.15. Sundays Winter Olympic ScoresCURLING Men Canada 8, United States 6 Norway 7, Britain 6 Sweden 8, Russia 4 Norway 5, Switzerland 3 Canada 9, China 8 Denmark 6, Germany 3 Sweden 6, United States 4 Women Denmark 7, South Korea 4 Japan 9, Switzerland 7 Sweden 5, Russia 4 Canada 7, United States 6 ICE HOCKEY Men Austria 3, Norway 1 United States 5, Slovenia 1 Russia 1, Slovakia 0, SO Sundays Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX Agreed to terms with RHP Francisco Cordero on a minor league contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Agreed to terms with OF Josh Reddick on a one-year contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Agreed to terms with RHP Craig Kimbrel on a four-year contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms with RHP A.J. Burnett to a one-year contract. Designated LHP Joe Savery for assignment.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED BOXING 10 p.m.FS1 Champion Paul Mendez (14-2-2) vs. Raul Casarez (20-4-0), for IBA Conti nental middleweight title; featherweights, Manuel Avila (13-0-0) vs. Enrique Quevedo (15-6-1), at Salinas, Calif.MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN North Carolina at Florida St. NBCSN Delaware at Towson9 p.m.ESPN Oklahoma St. at Baylor ESPNU MVSU at SouthernWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 Maryland at DukeWINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live NBC 3 p.m.Womens Biathlon 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final; Mens Snowboarding Cross Competition; Mens Freestyle Skiing Aerials Competition8 p.m.Figure Skating Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final; Mens Snowboarding Cross Gold Medal Final; Mens Freestyle Skiing Aerials Gold Medal Final; Mens Ski Jumping Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final1:01 a.m.Two-Man Bobsled Gold Medal Final RunsNBCSN 7 a.m.Womens Hockey Seminal, United States vs. Sweden (LIVE)10 a.m.Figure Skating Ice Dancing Gold Medal Final (LIVE)1:30 p.m.Mens Ski Jumping Team K-125 Large Hill Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Womens Biathlon 12.5km Mass Start Gold Medal Final5 p.m.Game of the Day: Hockey3 a.m.Mens Hockey Elimination Round (LIVE)5:30 a.m.Mens Nordic Combined Individual K-125 Large Hill, Ski JumpingMSNBC NoonWomens Hockey Seminal, Canada vs. Switzerland (LIVE)CNBC 5 p.m.Womens Curling Denmark vs. Britain away from gold. I told Charlie in the middle of the pro gram I felt like I was in a dream, Davis said. It is such a surreal experience. Virtue and Moir re bounded from a shaky performance in the team event, but the Americans, skating last, have overtaken their ri vals over the last four years, and it was no dif ferent Sunday. A Russian team was in third, though it wasnt world bronze medal ists Ekaterina Bobro va and Dmitri Soloviev. Elena Ilinykh and Nikita Katsalapov were 3.29 points behind Virtue and Moir. Frances Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat were fourth, just 0.26 out of the bronze position, with Bobrova and Soloviev fth. Davis and White will again skate on Monday. Their twizzles are at another speed from the rest of the eld, and yet they spin across the ice in perfect unison. Skat ing to My Fair Lady, they gaze at each other and into the crowd with an exuberant bliss. They y, said their coach, Marina Zoue va, who also works with Virtue and Moir. And you can see at the same time where they are strong. And they are so light at the same time and so owing. With Whites tuxedo and tails and Davis gauzy pink dress, they were decked out for a coronation. They really did the best this program can be done, with joy, Zoueva said. Total joy. When it was over, they held their embrace for a few extra seconds. We kept in the mo ment and neither of us was pushing it, White said. We were out there enjoying each others company. This was special for us. The other American teams, Madison Chock and Evan Bates and siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani, were eighth and ninth. Virtue had a bob ble on a twizzle during the team short dance, but on Sunday, she and Moir looked much more like the cou ple that charmed the home crowd in Vancouver four years ago. Their footwork again crisp, they seemed to bounce over the ice as they performed to jazz standards from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. In his black bowtie and suspenders, Moir, ever the show man, smiled coyly from start to nish, eyebrow arched. Virtues face beamed brighter than the sparkles on her apper-style dress. With the two still posed cheek to cheek just like the lyrics to the nal song in their med ley, Moir shouted out Yes! and pumped a st. He whirled across the ice in celebration, then lifted Virtue into the air, burying his face in her shoulder. That was more like it, Moir said afterward. The week between their programs seemed to drag on forever Moir called the waiting miserable. I just wanted my chance to be on the stage and do that, he said. So when the music ended, he let out all that tension, though Virtue teased him: You left me. I didnt get the memo on that, she joked later of his extra little dance. I get a little emo tional after we skate like that, he explained. Both couples have been together since they were little kids, and each talked about wanting to revel in the moment of these Olympics. That was ac complished Sunday. Weve been togeth er 17 years and that plays a huge part in just how comfortable you are on the ice in big moments, White said. We have been through so much to gether in competitions and in life. Its just hav ing that consistency in our training and our approach, and when it comes to big competitions, being a little bit nervous. You want to be able to count on that. Oshie, who scored on four of six attempts in an eight-round shootout against Russia. He didnt need six shots in the shootout to do it. He did it in regular time. Slovenias Marcel Rodman scored with 17.6 seconds left in the game, denying U.S. goalie Ryan Miller a shutout. Miller made 17 saves in his Sochi debut. Yeah, I denitely had some nerves, Miller said. It was an important game to ensure that were at the top of our pool. With plenty of support at the other end of the rink, the 2010 silver medal winner didnt need to worry. They were stronger on the puck, Slove nia coach Matjaz Kopitar said. Theyre strong. Theyre fast. Ryan McDonagh scored about a minute af ter Kessels third goal to put the Americans up 4-0. David Backes gave them a ve-goal cush ion early in the third. Kessel is the rst American to score four goals in the three-game preliminary round of the Olympic tournament since Bill Cleary and Roger Christian in 1960. Fittingly, the native of Madison, Wis., and his teammates were sport ing throwback jerseys in the style Cleary and Christian wore at the games in Squaw Valley USA from right shoulder to left hip. Weve got grit and determination through out the lineup, but thats the type of speed and skill we need, Bylsma said. The U.S. also has two goalies, Quick and Mill er, who are potentially great, and a good one in Jimmy Howard. Who will be in net for the quar ternals, when its win-or-go-home? Im not going to tell you that now, Bylsma said after Sundays game. Luka Gracnar made 23 saves for Slovenia, who play in the qualication-playoff round Tuesday after beating Slovakia and losing to the U.S. and Russia. USA FROM PAGE B1 DANCE FROM PAGE B1 Childress has long been elding cars with the No. 3 for Dillon in other series, and he al ways knew if his grand son made it to the top, he could use Earnhardts number. He said it was something Earnhardt had given his blessing to long be fore his death. Dillon doesnt take the responsibility lightly. Everybody wants to see this number per form well, and thats what my goals are, Dil lon said. Dillon turned a lap at 196.019 mph to win the pole in Sundays session, which is only used to set the front row for the kickoff to the 2014 season. Martin Truex Jr., driving a Chevrolet for Fur niture Row Racing, qualied second with a lap at 195.852 mph. Truexs engine is built by Earnhardt-Childress Racing, giving the company a sweep of the Daytona 500 front row. The rest of the eld is set Thursday through a pair of qualifying races. Childress knew he had a shot at the pole, if not with Dillon then from another one of his four Richard Childress Racing entries. All were fast in January testing, and again in two Satur day practice sessions. But it was Hendrick Motorsports driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., the rst driver to make his qualifying attempt, who set the pace early and held down the pro visional pole for most of the session. RCR drivers Brian Scott and Paul Menard failed to bump Earnhardt, and it was surprisingly Ford driver Greg Bife who nally did it as the 33rd driver to take his turn. Ryan Newman then took his shot for RCR and missed, and Dillon was the next driver out. He shot to the top of the board and his grandfather pumped his fist in celebration. He then nervously watched as the final 10 drivers made their runs, and gave anoth er fist-pump in cele bration. We wanted to come down here and put on a good show with the 3, and to have another ECR engine with Fur niture Row on the front row, we couldnt be more proud, Childress said. So could he nally re lax? The pressure is al ways on when youve got grandsons racing for you, said Chil dress, who thanked all the sponsors who be lieved in this young kid, who took a chance on him. DAYTONA FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 WINTER OLYMPICS Associated Press A day after a tough shootout loss to the United States, Russia bounced back against Slovakia, thanks to Alexander Radulov and Ilya Kovalchuk. Another boister ous sellout crowd at Bolshoy Ice Dome grew increasing ly nervous throughout the scoreless game, but the Rus sian stars delivered in the shootout. The United States, meanwhile, easily handled Slovenia, winning 5-1 be hind Phil Kessels hat trick. DUTCH SWEEP 16The Dutch got their third sweep in speedskating albeit a gold by Jorien ter Mors over favorite Ireen Wust in the womens 1,500. Lottevan Beek got the bronze. The Dutch have now won 16 speedskating medals in So chi, breaking the record haul of 13 by East Germany at the 1988 Calgary Olympics. The win by ter Mors sets her up for a shot at becoming the rst skater to win medials in both long and short track.NORWAY IS SUPER-GKjetil Jansrud won the fourth straight Olympic super-G gold medal for Nor way, nishing the chop py course in 1 minute, 18.14 seconds, with American ski er Andrew Weibrecht 0.30 seconds behind. Bode Miller, at age 36, became the old est Alpine skier to win a med al when he and Jan Hudec of Canada tied for bronze. It was Millers sixth Olympic medal, moving the American two behind all-time Alpine leader Kjetil Andre Aamodt.SWEDEN GOLDEN AGAINSweden successfully defended its Olympic title in the mens 4x10-kilometer cross-country relay to become the rst country in 42 years to win both mens and womens team events in the same Winter Games. Russia took silver as President Vladimir Putin looked on, and France was third. But it was another disappointment for Norway, which nished fourth a day after its heavily favored women failed to get a medal.BEST CZECH FINISH IN SNOWBOARDCROSSEva Samkova won the gold medal in womens snow boardcross for the rst po dium nish in the Olympics by a Czech snowboarder. Dominique Maltais of Can ada became the rst multi ple-medal winner in wom ens snowboardcross when she nished a distant sec ond. Chloe Trespeuch of France earned bronze. Pe rennial gold medal contend er Lindsey Jacobellis again failed to win the title that has eluded the American at three straight Olympics.COURSE DANGERBarely 24 hours after Russian skicross racer Maria Komissarova severely in jured her spine while train ing on the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park, Jackie Her nandez sustained a concussion when she smacked her head after catching an edge during qualifying for snowboardcross. The 21-year-old American was treated and released, but barred from competing in the elimination rounds.HOT. COOL. PEA SOUP More weather woes for the Sochi Games. The mens 15-kilometer mass-start biathlon race was postponed until Monday because of fog. The race was initially delayed for an hour, but the visibility remained too poor to run the race. Martin Four cade of France will be aim ing for his third gold medal of the Sochi Olympics, while Ole Einar Bjoerndalen of Norway could win a record 13th Winter Olympic medal.MEDALSAnother speedskating sweep boosted the Netherlands, which now has 17 medals overall, ve of them gold. Russia and the United States both have 16 total and four gold. Norway and Can ada both have 14 in all, but the Scandinavians have the edge on golds, 5-4. Germa ny still has the most golds in Sochi with seven, but only 12 medals overall.TODAYS HIGHLIGHTSeven medals events are on tap, including the ice dance competition featuring favorites Meryl Davis and Charlie White of the U.S., taking on Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, the Canadian de fending champions.Russia bounces back after loss to US squad MARK HUMPHREY / AP Russia forward Ilya Kovalchuk scores the winning shot in a shootout against Slovakia goaltender Jan Laco in overtime on Sunday in Sochi, Russia. Russia won 1-0. Womens Australian Open Leading Scores Karrie Webb, $180,000 71-69-68-68 Chella Choi, $110,822 70-71-62-74 Paula Creamer, $64,213 68-69-73-68 Karine Icher, $64,213 69-68-70-71 Lydia Ko, $64,213 68-68-69-73 Stacy Lewis, $33,068 71-69-70-69 Amelia Lewis, $33,068 71-67-69-72 Morgan Pressel, $33,068 69-68-70-72 Jenny Shin, $33,068 74-67-66-72 Gerina Piller, $24,573 75-69-68-68 Azahara Munoz, $21,296 68-70-73-70 Jessica Speechley, $21,296 71-67-70-73 Mi Hyang Lee, $21,296 72-67-68-74 a-Minjee Lee, 68-67-68-78 Trish Johnson, $17,171 70-73-68-71 Sarah Kemp, $17,171 71-68-71-72 Perrine Delacour, $17,171 70-73-65-74 Caroline Hedwall, $17,171 68-65-74-75 Sandra Gal, $14,228 73-69-72-69 Giulia Sergas, $14,228 68-71-72-72 Jessica Korda, $14,228 67-70-72-74 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $14,228 70-68-71-74 Cheyenne Woods, $12,742 74-65-71-74 Africa Open Leading Scores Aiken won on rst playoff hole Thomas Aiken, South Africa 66-65-66-67 264 Oliver Fisher, England 66-63-66-69 264 John Hahn, United States 65-61-71-68 265 David Horsey, England 66-64-70-65 265 Richard Bland, England 64-69-64-69 266 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 66-67-67-66 266 Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 68-63-62-73 266 Jaco van Zyl, South Africa 69-65-67-65 266 Lucas Bjerregaard, Denmark 64-67-69-68 268 Keith Horne, South Africa 68-69-66-65 268 Damien McGrane, Ireland 67-69-67-65 268 Ulrich Van den Berg, South Africa 66-68-65-69 268 Stuart Manley, Wales 68-69-65-67 269 Adrian Otaegui, Spain 69-65-68-67 269 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 65-66-68-70 269 Jens Dantorp, Sweden 69-63-68-70 270 Jean Hugo, South Africa 68-66-67-69 270 Wade Ormsby, Australia 70-64-69-67 270 JJ Senekal, South Africa 66-71-69-64 270 Also Daniel Im, United States 69-67-66-69 271 Jason Knutzon, United States 71-66-72-70 279 ACE Group Classic Leading Scores Kirk Triplett (240), $240,000 67-67-66 200 Olin Browne (117), $117,067 66-69-66 201 Bernhard Langer (117), $117,067 64-70-67 201 Duffy Waldorf (117), $117,067 67-68-66 201 Jay Haas (76), $76,000 68-72-64 204 Michael Allen (61), $60,800 68-71-67 206 Colin Montgomerie (61), $60,800 70-67-69 206 Mark Calcavecchia (46), $45,867 73-69-66 208 Mike Goodes (46), $45,867 68-72-68 208 Billy Andrade (46), $45,867 71-69-68 208 Peter Senior, $32,000 75-69-65 209 Jim Rutledge, $32,000 72-73-64 209 Wes Short, Jr., $32,000 69-73-67 209 Tommy Armour III, $32,000 68-72-69 209 Rod Spittle, $32,000 70-70-69 209 Bob Tway, $32,000 65-72-72 209 Tom Pernice Jr., $25,600 69-71-70 210 Mark OMeara, $21,120 70-72-69 211 Rocco Mediate, $21,120 70-70-71 211 Tom Lehman, $21,120 70-70-71 211 Bill Glasson, $21,120 69-69-73 211 Dana Quigley, $3,440 74-75-70 219 Northern Trust Open Leading Scores Bubba Watson (500), $1,206,000 70-71-64-64 269 Dustin Johnson (300), $723,600 66-70-69-66 271 Jason Allred (0), $388,600 73-64-67-68 272 Brian Harman (163), $388,600 67-69-68-68 272 Charl Schwartzel (110), $268,000 69-68-68-68 273 Bryce Molder (89), $216,913 69-69-69-67 274 Matt Every (89), $216,913 69-69-69-67 274 William McGirt (89), $216,913 69-67-65-73 274 George McNeill (89), $216,913 69-68-66-71 274 Harris English (73), $174,200 70-69-69-67 275 Brendan Steele (73), $174,200 68-71-67-69 275 K.J. Choi (58), $127,300 69-72-67-68 276 Charley Hoffman (58), $127,300 67-71-68-70 276 Sang-Moon Bae (58), $127,300 67-66-72-71 276 Cameron Tringale (58), $127,300 68-70-67-71 276 Jordan Spieth (58), $127,300 72-66-67-71 276 Charlie Beljan (58), $127,300 67-68-68-73 276 Aaron Baddeley (53), $97,150 69-65-72-71 277 John Senden (53), $97,150 71-70-66-70 277 Keegan Bradley (50), $80,847 68-70-72-68 278 Lee Westwood (50), $80,847 69-70-68-71 278 Jimmy Walker (50), $80,847 67-71-67-73 278 Kevin Chappell (46), $57,955 71-70-69-69 279 Kevin Stadler (46), $57,955 69-69-74-67 279 Jim Furyk (46), $57,955 68-68-71-72 279 Robert Garrigus (46), $57,955 67-67-73-72 279 Hideki Matsuyama (46), $57,955 70-69-69-71 279 Bill Haas (46), $57,955 72-67-67-73 279 Robert Allenby (40), $42,601 71-69-71-69 280 Daniel Summerhays (40), $42,601 71-72-66-71 280 Geoff Ogilvy (40), $42,601 74-68-69-69 280 Blake Adams (40), $42,601 67-70-71-72 280 David Lingmerth (40), $42,601 70-69-70-71 280 James Hahn (40), $42,601 71-72-65-72 280 Brendon Todd (34), $33,031 71-70-69-71 281 Ernie Els (34), $33,031 71-70-68-72 281 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (34), $33,031 71-70-71-69 281 Kevin Streelman (34), $33,031 72-69-73-67 281 John Huh (34), $33,031 71-71-72-67 281 J.J. Henry (29), $26,130 70-69-71-72 282 Victor Dubuisson (0), $26,130 70-72-68-72 282 Jhonattan Vegas (29), $26,130 70-69-71-72 282 GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterLOS ANGELES Bubba Watson wasnt about to let another chance get away. Two weeks after Watson made a pair of late bogeys in the Phoenix Open, he delivered the best closing round at Riviera in some three decades. Watson played the nal 39 holes without a bogey and shot a 7-under 64 on Sunday to win the Northern Trust Open. It was his rst victory in 22 months and 41 tournaments worldwide dating to the 2012 Masters. Watson wound up with a two-shot victory over Dustin Johnson, who closed with a 66 for the second straight week and got the same result. This wasnt Bubba golf as much as it was simply great golf. Watson, who also shot 64 on Saturday to start the nal round four shots behind William McGirt, made up ground so quick ly that he broke out of a four-way tie for the lead with a birdie on the eighth hole and made the turn in 30. Equally critical were a pair of par saves with 7-foot putts on the 12th and 13th holes. Johnson, who was sec ond at the AT&T Pebble Beach National ProAm last week after a nal-round 66, made birdie on the 15th hole to get within one shot. He didnt give himself good birdie chances on the last three holes. Watson made a 15-foot birdie putt on the 18th to cap off the best closing round in this tournament since Doug Tewell shot a 63 in 1986. Even sweet er was going up the steps toward the famous club house to see his 2-yearold son, Caleb, whom Watson adopted just before his Masters victory. Watson nished at 15-under 269, and he wasnt the only big winner. Jason Allred, who went to college up the coast at Pepperdine, played bogey-free for a 68 and tied for third with Brian Har man, who also had a 68. Allred was a Monday qual ier, and this was his rst regular PGA Tour event since he last had his card in 2008. The tie for third was a career-best for the 33-year-old Allred. He earned $388,600, which is more than he had made in his entire career, which included two full seasons on the PGA Tour. He now is exempt into the Honda Classic, which starts in two weeks about the time his wife is due with their third child. Well have fun guring out what that looks like, Allred said. Watson won for the fth time in his career, and he had to earn it. With no margin for error over the closing holes, he managed to get out of a deep fairway bunker on the 15th hole to the front edge of the green. He smartly played to the middle of the green on the par-3 16th hole for a par. Facing the uphill tee shot on the 18th, he blasted his drive down the middle of the fairway and hit wedge into 15 feet to the right of the pin. And when it was over, he felt a lot better than he did two weeks ago in Phoe nix, where he missed a short par putt on the last hole to lose by one to Kev in Stadler. Johnson, meanwhile, now has nished among the top six in all four tournaments this season including a win in Shanghai and consecutive runner-up nishes. His other start was at Kapalua, where he tied for sixth. I had a chance there on the back nine, I just didnt have good looks on 16, 17 and 18 to give myself a chance, Johnson said. I was still right there. Thats all you can ask for. McGirt, who had a twoshot lead to start the nal round as he tried to win for the rst time, opened with a birdie and stalled after that. And on yet another gorgeous day at Riv iera, this was not a day to stall. Watson hit a perfect tee shot on the par-3 fourth that rode the slope to 15 feet for birdie. He holed a bunker shot from left of the sixth green for birdie. And a 15-footer on the eighth gave Watson his fth birdie of the round, and the outright lead.WOMENS AUSTRALIAN OPENMELBOURNE, Australia Karrie Webb won the Womens Australian Open for the fth time Sunday, shooting a 4-under 68 in the nal round to beat Chella Choi by one stroke. Webb birdied the 18th hole to take the outright lead, then watched as Choi, who shot a course-record 62 on Sat urday to take a share of the third-round lead, pushed a 10-foot putt wide of the hole at 18 to miss the chance for a playoff. Webb, who clinched her 40th LPGA title, nished at 12-under 276 overall. She previously won the Australian Open in 2000, 2002, 2007 and 2008.CHAMPIONS TOURNAPLES Kirk Triplett won the ACE Group Clas sic on Sunday for his third Champions Tour title, hol ing a 6-foot par putt on the nal hole for a onestroke victory. The 51-year-old Triplett shot a 6-under 66 to n ish at 16-under 200 on TwinEagles Talon Course. He won the 50-and-over tours Pebble Beach event the last two years after winning three times on the PGA Tour. Defending champion Bernhard Langer, Duffy Waldorf and Olin Browne tied for second. Playing in the nal threesome, Triplett, Langer and Waldorf were tied for the lead with a hole to play. On the par-4 18th, Wal dorf drove into a bunker and wound up with a bo gey for a 66. REED SAXON / AP Bubba Watson watches his birdie putt roll in on the 18th green, which gave him the victory in the Northern Trust Open golf tournament on Sunday at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles. Bubba ends two-year winless drought

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 AP FILE PHOTOMiami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito (68) and tackle Jonathan Martin (71) look over plays during an NFL preseason football game on Aug. 24 in Miami Gardens.NFL ARNIE STAPLETONAP Pro Football WriterNow that the NFL knows the scope of the racially charged Miami Dolphins bullying scandal, the league has been left to grapple with what its next steps should be. A report released Friday on the Miami case concluded with a one-paragraph call to action: As all must surely recognize, the NFL is not an ordinary work place. Professional football is a rough, contact sport played by men of exceptional size, speed, strength and athleticism. But even the largest, strongest and eetest per son may be driven to despair by bullying, taunting and constant insults. We encour age the creation of new workplace conduct rules and guidelines that will help ensure that players respect each other as professionals and people. League executives agree steps need to be taken, and have vowed to take action. But it may be difcult to reg ulate locker room be havior by determining when something a player considers to be harmless locker room nonsense crosses the line. Players are part of a team, but they are also individuals with differ ent levels of sensitivity. And as the reports call to action points out, the NFL is not an ordinary workplace and locker rooms are sanctuaries within those workplaces where even without the kinds of vicious taunts and racist insults cited in the report, behavior that would not be accepted in society is tol erated, and even condoned or encouraged. Still, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross wants his organization to lead the way to change the culture. I have made it clear to everyone within our organization that this situation must nev er happen again, Ross said in a statement re leased through the team after the report was released. We are committed to address this issue forcefully and to take a leader ship role in establishing a standard that will be a benchmark in all of sports. Before the Super Bowl, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell had said hed be out in front on the issue of hazing. Our No. 1 priority has to make sure that we have a workplace environment thats professional, recognizing that we have some unique circumstances. But we have to make sure that our players, (and) other employ ees, have that kind of professional workplace environment, Goodell said then. After the report was released, the NFL did not mention any possi ble punishment stemming from the case in a statement emailed by a league spokesman. The NFL Players As sociation said it will review the ndings closely, confer with players and all relevant parties involved. The report by lawyer Ted Wells said the be havior that occurred here was harmful to the players, the team and the league, but he noted the investigators werent asked to rec ommend discipline or determine legal liabili ty for the bullying. Wells concluded that offensive linemen John Jerry and Mike Pounc ey joined Richie Incog nito in harassing Jona than Martin, who left the team in October, and position coach Jim Turner participated in the taunting of a sec ond player. That player is Andrew McDonald, now with the Carolina Panthers. The report found no evidence that the Dolphins front ofce or head coach Joe Philbin were aware of the conduct Martin found abusive. There are lines even in a football locker room that should not be crossed, as they were here, the report said. We leave the de termination of pre cisely where to draw those lines to those who spend their lives playing, coaching and managing the game of professional football. Players would like to police themselves. It is, after all, their locker room. Teams want a big say in setting those parameters. Like any other employer, they are re sponsible for maintain ing a safe and respectful work environment that adheres to both the leagues policies and federal law. The league is taking a hard look at the re port, which details homophobic invective directed at McDonald. That element in par ticular is a hot button issue in light of SEC co-defensive player of the year Michael Sams recent revelation that hes homosexual, putting him in line to be come the leagues rst openly gay player. Being at the center of this scandal puts the Dolphins at the forefront of any bolstering of policies protecting players from bullying. The report said that in 2013, Dolphins players acknowledged receiving and understanding the personal conduct code and the workplace harassment and dis crimination policies, both taken from the NFL handbook. The latter policy states that harassment can include, but is not limited to: unwelcome contact; jokes, com ments and antics; generalizations and putdowns; pornographic or suggestive literature and language. In addition, harassment and discrimination are not limited to the workplace: they example (sic), through calls, texts or emails, on a plane or team bus; at a team event; or at the team hotel. The policy encourages reporting discrimination or harassment to the players union, a coach, human resources or NFL security. The report touches on a code against snitching that exists in NFL locker rooms, however, and Martin never did report the abuse be fore walking away from the team when hed had enough. The Dolphins have already pledged to improve the teams workplace conduct policies, which Wells called commendable. The team has formed an inde pendent advisory group that includes Don Shula and Tony Dungy, along with several prominent retired players, to re view the organizations conduct policies and suggest improvements.Many questions facing NFL after bullying report

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 EleganceandValueWe are a decor store! Celebrating 59 Years In Business20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb & Tax Preparation CustomersIIts not too late to file for 10, 11 and 12!2468 Hwy. 441/27, Suite 403 (Near Boot Barn) Fruitland Park, FL 34731Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday-Saturday 9am to 9pmToms Tax ServiceFruitland Park787-1040The Villages753-1040 $4000OFFReceive refund as soon as 8 days Coupon required. Limited time offer. Some restrictions apply. See preparer for details. BASEBALLRays add Bedard to highestpaid team in franchise history AP FILE PHOTO Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price delivers against the Boston Red Sox during Game 2 of baseballs American League division series in Boston. The three-time AL All-Star and the Rays have agreed to a $14 million, one-year contract Associated PressPORT CHARLOTTE When the Tampa Bay Rays open the season in late March, theyll take the eld as the highest-paid team in franchise history. A smooth offseason for the AL wild-card winners saw them retain star pitcher David Price for at least one more season, contributing to a payroll expected to be around $80 million. Rays executive vice president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman says the players wont feel the pressure of living up to their salaries. I think thats something that guys dont really lock in all that much, Friedman said. They care much more about whos in the clubhouse and who the tal ent is in there. Ever since 2008, weve all come to camp with the expectation to win. Irrespec tive of what our payroll number is, I think the focus is on the talent. In addition to keeping Price, Tampa Bay added veteran pitchers Heath Bell, Erik Be dard and Grant Balfour, as well as catcher Ryan Hanigan. The Rays signed Be dard on Friday morning. The 34-year-old lefty is expected to report to spring training in the next couple of days. Bedard went 4-12 with a 4.59 ERA for Houston last year. He is 67-76 overall in 10 seasons with Baltimore, Seattle, Boston, Pittsburgh and the Astros. Hes a guy that weve liked in the past and were anxious to get him in here and be around him more, Friedman said. Hell come in to compete for the fth starter job. I dont know how that will transpire, but hes also a candi date to pitch out of the bullpen. Manager Joe Maddon said the Rays, as currently assembled, have every chance to be better than last years team, which lost in the division series to the eventual champion Boston Red Sox. The drive is to not have to go through the angst of the end of last season, to not have to go through (a high-pres sure series in) Toronto, then go to (one-game playoffs against) Texas and Cleveland to nal ly get to play Boston, Maddon said. That personies that you re ally want to win your division. Maddon said he wont rush into making lineups, but noted that the continuity of the Rays roster, which returns an entire starting ineld and nearly every key gure from last year, is a major boost to his planning process. To bring the same ineld back is unusual and its kind of ex citing, Maddon said. Those four guys, all four were Gold Glove candidates. Thats really an exciting group to have. (First baseman) James (Loney) kind of anchors it in the sense that he provides so much condence for the other guys.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 Do it for yourself andFree yourself from home ownership worries and spend more quality time with those you love. Enjoy delightful dining companions in three distinct on-campus venues join your neighbors for a game of golf or bocce ball venture into Mount Dora with friends or take a dance class with the one you love. Choosing a secure, maintenance-free lifestyle at Waterman Village allows you stay connected with those who matter most. Contact us today!Call (352) 385-1126. 255 Waterman Avenue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www.WatermanVillage.com COLLEGE BASKETBALL Associated PressEAST LANSING, Mich. Terran Pette way scored 23 points and Walter Pitchford added 18 and Nebraska topped No. 9 Michigan State 60-51 on Sunday. Petteway had 16 points in the last 20 minutes after Pitchford had scored 12 before the break for the Cornhusk ers (14-10, 6-6 Big Ten). Gary Harris had 18 points and Adreian Payne 11 for the Spar tans (21-5, 10-3), who remain in a rst-place tie with Michigan. Har ris was 5 for 15 from the eld. Michigan State shot 34 percent from the eld and 20.8 per cent on 3-pointers. The Cornhuskers led 32-25 at the half and held off a second-half surge with a 9-2 clos ing run. The Spartans got a lift when point guard Keith Appling returned from a three-game absence with a sore right wrist. He played 19 minutes, but had just two points and one assist after not practicing for two weeks. Nebraska outhustled the Spartans for most of the game and won despite a poor shooting day. The Cornhuskers shot 35.8 percent from the eld, 30 percent from 3-point range and 61.9 percent at the foul line. After Paynes layup cut Michigan States decit to 51-49, the Spartans grabbed a defensive rebound and called timeout. After Kenny Ka minski airballed a 3 from the left wing, the Cornhuskers built the lead back to ve on a 3-pointer by Petteway. The Spartans never got closer than three the rest of the way. Nebraska scored the rst six points on 3s from Pitchford, a native of nearby Grand Rap ids, and David Rivers. Petteways rst 3 made it 11-4 and two free throws made it 13-4. Associated PressPHILADELPHIA Larry Brown has had a lot of success in Philadelphia. But on Sunday, his No. 23 SMU Mustangs took a clear step back, one that could drop them from the national polls just as quickly as they arrived. Despite 18 points from Markus Kennedy, SMU was upset, 71-64, by Temple. The Mustangs had a four-game winning streak snapped at the end of what has been an eventful week for Browns team. It started with SMU entering the poll for the rst time in 29 years. The Mustangs had their game at Rutgers pushed back from Thursday to Friday because of a winter storm in the northeast. They then made a short trip from Piscataway, N.J., to Philadelphia. All six of SMUs losses this season have come on the road. We didnt stay at the Ritz on the Four Sea sons. Weve been on the road six days, and I think we have $41, Brown joked. But I dont want to use that as an excuse. SMU came into the game with the best rebounding margin in the conference, while Temple came in with the worst. But on Sunday, Temple managed to beat SMU, 38-25, on the glass, scoring 15 second-chance points off 12 offensive boards. Making matters worse, SMU went 14 of 26 from the foul line. It wasnt the free throws, said Brown, the former 76ers coach who was coaching his rst game in Philadel phia since 2009. We got outcoached. Fran did a great job of creat ing matchup problems for us. They controlled the tempo, they made all the effort plays. ... We didnt have an of fensive rebound in the rst half, and we got four for the game. I think that was the most signicant thing.Wisconsin beats No. 15 Michigan CARLOS OSORIO / AP Wisconsin forward Frank Kaminsky (44) pulls down a rebound next to teammate guard Josh Gasser (21) during the rst half against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. NOAH TRISTERAP Sports WriterANN ARBOR, Mich. Wisconsin was on the verge of wasting a tremendous rst half, so with Michigan ral lying and the crowd roaring, the Badgers calmly went inside to Frank Kaminsky. I wanted the ball in my hands, the 7-footer said. I was able to make some things happen. Kaminsky had 25 points and 11 rebounds, and No. 21 Wisconsin smothered No. 15 Michigan in the rst half before holding on for a 75-62 vic tory Sunday. The Wolverines cut an 18-point decit to three in the second half, but Kaminsky personally went on a 7-2 run after that, helping Wisconsin regain control. We were talking about touching the post, yes, Badgers coach Bo Ryan said. They were playing him tough. Once he got it 12 feet away, 12 to maybe 15, thats when he made his moves, and actually used his body as well as Ive ever seen him on a consistent basis. The Badgers (21-5, 8-5 Big Ten) commit ted only two turnovers en route to their fourth straight win. The Badgers led 3419 at halftime after holding Michigan (187, 10-3) without an as sist in the rst half. Theyre a difcult matchup for anybody they play, Michigan coach John Beilein said. Once we get down like we got down, its tough to come back because of their ball-control offense. They make timely shots, theyve got a great plan and really played a high-IQ game today.NO. 4 WICHITA ST. 84, EVANSVILLE 68EVANSVILLE, Ind. Ron Baker scored 26 points and Fred VanVleet nished with 18 points, eight assists and ve steals, leading No. 4 Wichita State to an 84-68 victory Sun day at Evansville. The Shockers (27-0, 14-0 Missouri Valley Conference) remained one of two perfect teams in major college basketball and extend ed their school-record winning streak. They are the 21st team in Division I history to go 27-0, a list No. 1 Syracuse could join later this week. But getting No. 27 sure wasnt easy. D.J. Balentine and Egidiju Mockevicius each scored 19 points, not quite enough to prevent Evansville (1116, 4-10) from losing for the fourth time in ve games. Evansville spent most of the second half trying to dig out of a double-digit decit and got as close as 6560 with about 6 min utes to play. But Wichita State sealed it with a late 13-4 spurt.NO. 18 CREIGHTON 101, VILLANOVA 80OMAHA, Neb. Doug McDermott matched his season high with 39 points and passed Larry Bird for 13th place on the Division I career scor ing chart, and No. 18 Creighton defeated sixth-ranked Villanova 101-80 on Sunday. Creightons second win over Villanova in a month moved the Bluejays (21-4, 112) into a rst-place tie with the Wildcats (223, 11-2) in the Big East. The Bluejays beat the same ranked opponent twice in the same season for the rst time in program histo ry. They also won their 16th straight at home. McDermott, a two-time rst-team All-America and leading candidate for na tional player of the year, went over 30 points for ninth time this season and 23rd time in his career. James Bell scored 18 points for the Wildcats.Nebraska tops No. 9 Michigan State 60-51Pepper leads Temple past No. 23 SMU

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014STUDY: Mammograms dont lower risk of dying from breast cancer / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver classes to be offeredThe AARP Driver Safety Programs new Smart Driver Course helps participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Payment must be made by check to AARP, no cash or credit cards will be accepted. Two-day classes will be offered: %  %  From 1 to 4 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday at the HardenPauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St. Eustis. To register, call 352-394-0250. %  %  From 9 a.m. to noon, Tuesday and Thursday at South Lake Hospital (Live Well Campus) 1935 Don Wickham Road, in Clermont. Register at 352-394-0250.EUSTIS February LIFE Luncheon scheduled for WednesdayThe Eustis LIFE Luncheon will be held at 11:30 a.m., Wednesday at Lake Tech (Vocational School) at 2100 Kurt St., in Eustis in the faculty dining room, follow the LIFE signs. Lunch items will be prepared by Lake Techs Culinary Arts program, and the Honey Belles will entertain. Cost is $10, and an RSVP is needed by calling, 352-787-0403, or emailing rreed@beyersfhc.com.LAKE COUNTY Free quit smoking classes to be offeredThe Florida Department of Health in Lake County in collaboration with the Central Florida Area Health Education Center will offer the free classes at the following locations: From 6 to 8 p.m., Tuesday for a twohour class, at the Department of Health Van Dee Medical Building, 14 N. Eustis St., in Eustis; and Feb. 24, offering weekly classes for six weeks (participants must attend all six classes) from 6:30 to 8 p.m., at the National Training Center, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. Registration is required for the classes by calling 877-252-6094.SUMTER COUNTY New hours at WIC offices in Wildwood, Bushnell New hours for the WIC ofce in Wildwood and Bushnell are in effect. The WIC program provides services at no cost to eligible women and children participating in the program to receive food checks for specic nutrition items to be redeemed at most local grocery stores. For information and ofce hours, call the Bushnell ofce at 352569-3140, or Wildwood ofce at 352-689-6540. MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterThere may be a link be tween weather and the risk of suffering a stroke, say researchers who analyzed climate trends and hospital records on mil lions of Americans. Cold weather, high humidity and big daily tem perature swings seem to land more people in the hospital with strokes. As it got warmer, risk fell 3 percent for every 5 de grees, the study found. Maybe some of these meteorological factors serve as a trigger, said Judith Lichtman, a Yale Uni versity stroke researcher who led the study. With global climate change and extreme weather like this weeks freak storm in the South, this could be increasingly important, she said. Lichtman and colleagues from Harvard and Duke universities gave results of their study Wednesday at the Ameri can Heart Associations International Stroke Confer ence in San Diego. It is the largest and most detailed research on this issue. Each year, about 800,000 Americans have a stroke. Most are due to clots that block a v vessel to the brain, and high blood pressure is a major risk factor. Some earlier studies found a seasonal trend to stroke rates, and there are biological reasons to think they are related, said one independent expert, Dr. Andrew Stemer, a neurol ogist at Georgetown Uni versity. Blood vessels constrict in cold weather, which can raise blood pressure, he said. Extreme weather can WEATHER AND STROKESA link between the weather and strokes? New research suggests there is. Higher rates of hospital stays for stroke were tied to certain kinds of weather conditions: COLD WEATHER: The risk fell as the temperatures went up. The chances of being hospitalized for a stroke fell 3 percent for every 5-degree rise in temperature. HUMIDITY: Each 5-degree rise in the dew point (humidity) raised the risk by 2 percent. TEMPERATURE CHANGES: Big changes over one day made a dif ference. Each 5-degree increase in daily temperature uctua tion raised the chance of stroke hospitalization by 6 percent.Study ties weather to stroke rates HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Sue Seiter, right, observes as her husband, Bob, center, works with physical therapist Roger Scherwin, left, during a session at their Lakewood Ranch home on Nov. 27, 2013. Bob suffered a hemorrhagic stroke in the right half of his brain. MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterWo men have a higher risk of blood clots that can cause strokes, heart attacks and other problems for 12 weeks after childbirth twice as long as doctors have thought, new research nds. Strokes are still fair ly rare right after preg nancy but devastating when they do occur and fatal about 10 percent of the time, according to Dr. Hooman Kamel, a neurology specialist at New Yorks Weill Cornell Medical College. Blood clots in the legs us ually just cause pain but can be fatal if they travel to the lungs. Kamel led the new study, which was published online in the New England Journal of Medicine and present ed at an American Heart Association stroke con ference on Thursday. Pregnant women are more prone to blood clots because blood components to prevent excessive bleeding during labor naturally increase, and blood from the legs has more trouble traveling to the heart.Blood clot risk lasts for 12 weeks after pregnancy AP FILE PHOTO An expecting mother is examined by a midwife during a home visit in Free Union, Va.SEE STROKE | C2SEE CLOTS | C2

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Sometimes theres the notion that once they deliver they dont have to worry about these things, but risk persists for some time after the birth, said Dr. Andrew Stemer, a Georgetown University neurologist. Doctors now some times give low-dose blood thinners to cer tain women at high er risk of blood clots for six weeks after de livery. The new study suggests risk lasts lon ger than that. It involved near ly 1.7 million Califor nia women giving birth to their rst child. Over the next year and a half, 1,015 of them devel oped clots 248 had strokes, 47 had heart at tacks and 720 had clots in the legs or lungs. The risk of one of these problems was about 11 times great er during the rst six weeks after delivery and more than two times greater during weeks seven to 12. Af ter that, it fell to level seen in women who had not had a baby. A federal grant paid for the research. Kamel advises women who recently had a baby to seek med ical help right away if they develop chest pain or pressure, trou ble breathing, swelling or pain in one leg, a sudden severe headache or sudden loss of speech, vision, balance, or strength on one side of the body. High blood pressure and smoking add to the risk of blood clots. CLOTS FROM PAGE C1 trigger a stress reaction by the body, causing it to release substances that not only increase the work of the heart but make blood stickier and more likely to clot, Stemer said. In cold weather your body clamps down, theres cardiovascular stress, said Dr. Lar ry Goldstein, a Duke stroke specialist who worked on the study. Conversely, high humidity may cause de hydration, which also can raise the risk for clots and raise stress on the body, he said. You know how you feel when youre out in hot, humid weather you dont feel so hot. Several of these same researchers published another study earli er this year that looked at stroke deaths from 1999 to 2006 among Medicare patients and found a pattern higher rates in the win ter, lower in summer and a small peak in July. The new study looked at stroke hospitalizations, not just deaths, in a wider population of adults using a federal database covering all states except Idaho, North Dakota, Del aware and New Hamp shire. Researchers also had daily climate data down to the county lev el from the National Climatic Data Center for 2010 and 2011. Researchers tracked only strokes caused by clots, not the less com mon kind caused by a burst or bleeding blood vessel. Lower temperatures, larger daily tempera ture changes and higher dew points (humidity) were tied to higher stroke hospitalization rates. Each 5-degree increase in daily tem perature uctuation (the highest reading minus the lowest one) raised the chance of stroke hospitalization by 6 percent. Each 5-degree rise in the dew point (humidity) raised the risk by 2 percent. The researchers did not establish a thresh old when things were too hot the point of the study was tracking the general trend, Lichtman said. The results mean that during extreme weather, friends and relatives should keep an eye on people that are at high risk, those who are old er, she said. During stressful weather conditions, you want to watch your diet, watch your salt intake, regardless of what the tem peratures are, and get enough uids, said Daniel Lackland, a scientist at Medical Uni versity of South Caroli na in Charleston. Goldstein added this advice for people al ready at cardiovascular risk: Stay in air condi tioning in the summ e r and stay heated in the winter, so the weather outside affects you less. STROKE FROM PAGE C1 MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterA Canadian study that many experts say has major aws has revived debate about the value of mammograms. The research suggests that these screening X-rays do not lower the risk of dying of breast cancer while nding many tumors that do not need treatment. The study gives longer follow-up on nearly 90,000 women who had annual breast exams by a nurse to check for lumps plus a mammogram, or the nurses breast exam alone. After more than two decades, breast cancer death rates were similar in the two groups, suggesting little benet from mammograms. Its important to note that this study did not compare mam mograms to no screening at all, as most other research on this topic has. Many groups have not endorsed breast exams for screening because of limited evidence that they save lives. Critics of the Canadian study also say it used outdated equipment and poor methods that made mammograms look un fairly ineffective. The study was published Wednesday in the British jour nal BMJ. Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer and cause of can cer deaths in women worldwide. Nearly 1.4 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Many studies have found that mam mography saves lives, but how many and for what age groups is debatable. It also causes many false alarms and overtreatment of cancers never destined to be come life-threatening. In the U.S., a government-ap pointed task force that gives screening advice does not back mammograms until age 50, and then only every other year. The American Cancer Society recommends them every year starting at age 40. Other coun tries screen less aggressively. In Britain, for example, mammograms are usually offered only every three years. The Canadian study has long been the most pessimistic on the value of mammograms. It initially reported that after ve years of screening, 666 can cers were found among women given mammograms plus breast exams versus 524 can cers among those given the exams alone. After 25 years of follow-up, about 500 in each group died, suggesting mammograms were not saving lives. The similarity in the death rates suggests that the 142 extra cancers caught by mammograms represent overdiagnosis tumors not destined to prove fatal, study leaders concluded. The work was immediate ly criticized. The American Col lege of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging called it an in credibly misleading analysis based on the deeply awed and widely discredited study. Mam mograms typically nd far more cancers than this study did, sug gesting the quality was poor, the groups contend. In a letter posted by the med ical journal, Dr. Daniel Kopans, a radiologist at Harvard Med ical School, described outdated machines and methods he saw in 1990, when he was one of the experts asked to review the quality of mammograms used in the study. I can personally attest to the fact that the quality was poor, he wrote. To save money they used secondhand mammography machines that gave poor images, failed to properly position breasts for imaging, and did not train radiologists on how to interpret the scans, he wrote. The study leader, Dr. Antho ny Miller of the University of To ronto, said it was completely untrue that inferior equipment or methods were used. Still, the study highlights the fact that mammograms are an imperfect tool that lead to many false alarms, needless biop sies and treatment of many tumors that would never threaten a womans life. Overdiagnosis is not an anomaly in the study from Canada. This has been compellingly demonstrated in research from the U.S. and Europe, said an other study leader, Dr. Cornelia Baines of the University of To ronto. Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a pro fessor of medicine at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire, spoke on the issue at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December. Screening is a choice, not a public health imperative. There are trade-offs here, he said.Study disputes value of routine mammograms for breast cancer AP FILE PHOTO A radiologist uses a magnifying glass to check mammograms for breast cancer in Los Angeles.Overdiagnosis is not an anomaly in the study from Canada. This has been compellingly demonstrated in research from the U.S. and Europe.Dr. Cornelia Baines,the University of Toronto

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 LAURAN NEERGAARDAP Medical WriterWASHINGTON The sooner you start explaining the world to your baby, the better. That doesnt mean ash cards for tots, or merely pointing out objects: Heres an or ange. Thats a bowl. New research shows that both how much and how well parents talk with babies and toddlers help to tune the youngsters brains in ways that build cru cial language and vo cabulary skills a key to ghting the infa mous word gap that puts poor children at a disadvantage at an even younger age than once thought. The idea is to connect words and meaning, so the brain becomes primed to learn through context: Lets put the orange in this bowl with the banana and the ap ple and the grapes. Youre building intelligence through lan guage, is how Stanford University psychology professor Anne Fernald explains it. And forget dumbed-down baby talk: Longer, more complex sentences are better. The advice I give mothers is to have con versations with your babies, said Erika Hoff, a psychology pro fessor at Florida Atlan tic University. Children can hear lots of talk that goes over their head in terms of the meaning, and they still benet from it. The research, presented Thursday and Friday at a meeting of the American Association for the Advance ment of Science, comes amid a growing push for universal preschool, to help disadvantaged youngsters catch up. But it also begs the question of whether children from low-income, less educated families need earlier in tervention, such as preschool that starts at age 3 instead of 4, or higher quality day care or even some sort of Lets talk campaign aimed at new parents to stress talking, singing and reading with tots even before they can respond. That can be difcult for par ents working multiple jobs, or who may not read well or who simply dont know why its im portant. Scientists have long known that before they start kinder garten, children from middle-class or af uent families have heard millions more words than youngsters from low-income families, leaving the poor er children with small er vocabularies and less ready to succeed academically. Fernald said by some measures, 5-year-olds from low-income families can lag two years be hind their peers in tests of language development, an achievement gap thats difcult to overcome. Brain scans support the link, said Dr. Kimberly Noble of Columbia University Medical Center. Ear ly experiences shape the connections that childrens brains form, and kids from higher socioeconomic back grounds devote more neural real estate to brain regions involved in language development, she found. How early does the word gap appear? Around age 18 months, Stanfords Fernald dis covered when she compared how children mentally process the language they hear. Lower-income kids in her study achieved at age 2 the level of pro ciency that more afuent kids had reached six months earlier. To understand why language processing is so important, consider this sentence: The kittys on the bench. If the youngster knows the word kitty, and his brain recognizes it quickly enough, then he has can gure out bench means by the context. But if hes slow to recognize kitty, then bench ies by before he has a chance to learn it. Next, Fernald tucked recorders into T-shirts of low-income tod dlers in Spanish-speaking households to deter mine what they heard all day and found remarkable differences in whats called child-di rected speech. Thats when children are spo ken to directly, in con trast to television or con versations they overhear. One child heard more than 12,000 words of child-directed speech in a day, while anoth er heard a mere 670 words, she found. The youngsters who re ceived more child-di rected speech pro cessed language more efciently and learned words more quickly, she reported. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. More talking, longer sentences help babies brains TIPS FOR TALKING TO BABIES, TODDLERS Research shows that both how much and how well parents talk to babies and toddlers inuences development of language and vocabulary skills crucial to later school achievement. Here are some tips: %  enThe sooner you start talking with babies, the better. Their brains are absorbing vital information well before theyre able to respond. %  enThe high-pitched, sing-song tone that many people take with babies does get their attention. But dont dumb it down: Use rich, varied language and longer sentences, said Erika Hoff of Florida Atlantic University. %  enDont just label things, make connections. The dog is wagging his tail isnt as effective as, Look how uffy that dogs tail is. Its much fatter than the cats skinny tail. %  enWhat matters most is speech directed to babies and toddlers, not what they overhear, said Anne Fernald of Stanford University. %  enTurn off the TV. Television does not help the brain learn language, said Dr. Kimberly Noble of Columbia University Medical Center. Babies and toddlers especially require personal interaction to learn. %  enReading a book for 10 minutes a day adds up fast, Fernald noted. If mom or dad isnt a good reader, just talk about the pictures.

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 STEPHEN HAWKINSAP Basketball WriterWACO, Texas Isaiah Austin came to the stark realization as a teenager that hed never again see out of his right eye. Multiple operations couldnt x the detached retina and save his vision after a previ ous injury was aggravated doing a routine dunk before a middle school game. It was real hard. ... Im losing sight, like Im half-blind now, recalled Austin. Back then, he was already towering over other players and had big basketball dreams. That is when Austins mother told him something that he didnt ful ly understand at the time, but now means so much to the 7-foot-1 Baylor sophomore and NBA prospect. You can make it your excuse, or you can make it your story, his mother told him. You can touch lives or you can be a quitter. While he didnt take into consideration then what that actual ly meant, and gured his mother was just trying to help him get through a tough time, Austin started working on his game again. He became a top national recruit in high school. Austin didnt tell Bay lor coach Scott Drew about being blind in one eye until af ter committing to the school, and then practiced a few weeks with his new teammates for his 2012-13 season be fore telling them. Then last month, in a piece aired as part of an ESPN broadcast of a Bears game, Austin revealed publicly the secret of his prosthetic eye. There were some people that questioned his toughness. After the story, nobodys questioning his toughness, Drew said. It allows him to be a role mod el now for anyone that has poor eyesight, or any other issue. Austin said the revelation has allowed him to be himself all the time and show people hes more than a bas ketball player. He is now willing to share his story with anyone. I want to be some body that some kid looks up to saying if he can do it, then I can do it. I just want to push the youth and help peo ple grow, he said. I really can tell people that even with a disability you can make it. The amount of sup port and positive feed back has come as a bit of a surprise to Aus tin. Drew told of a family from Houston with no connection to Baylor at a game to support Austin. Several NBA scouts who watch Baylor games said they already knew about the eye, and their perception of Austin hasnt changed. As one of them said, You cant teach 7 foot 1. Austin might have been a rst-round NBA pick last summer after his freshman season, but wasnt going to be able to go to the com bine or pre-draft work outs because of a torn labrum in his shoulder. He didnt mind more time at Baylor. I just felt like this year is just another step for me growing closer to God and becoming a better man on and off the court, he said. When he was about 12, Austin was play ing rst base during a camp when he was struck in the eye by a baseball thrown his way when he wasnt looking. There were no vision problems then, but doctors told him his retina was loose. They said that it did have a chance of tear ing or ripping, he said. And it happened to me in the eighth grade. Already about 6-7 at the time, Austin suddenly could only see red from his right eye after a pregame dunk. When taking out his contact lens didnt solve the issue, he was taken to an eye doctor who almost immedi ately did surgery. Three more operations followed over sev eral months. He would have blurry vision for brief times, but even tually saw nothing out of his right eye, even when a light was shined directly into it. Because of limited peripheral vision, Austin has to keep his head on a swivel, looking both ways in the paint and constantly rotating his body to see as much of the court as possible. That is a constant emphasis, especially in practice. But he said the hardest part is depth per ception on shots, espe cially in different gyms like Kansas where the wall is far behind the baskets. He was 4-of-8 on 3-pointers at Allen Fieldhouse last month, but quickly points out that he missed all three of his free throw attempts. Regional Urgent Care LAKE We at LRUC have made it affordable for you to receive the care you want and need For REAL medicine by REAL DOCTORS with CBC$25 Urine$15 Analysis HCG$208404 US HWY 441 Leesburg, FL 34788 352.315.8881O.V.$95 X-Rays$50 Cardiac$100 Testing CMP$35 EKG$25 Strep$15 Test Pricing PricingSTRAIGHT STRAIGHT 352.259.4322 Blind eye no excuse for Baylors Isaiah Austin AP FILE PHOTO Baylor center Isaiah Austin (21) adjusts his glasses during the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game against TCU in Fort Worth, Texas.

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LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON The U.S. and 26 oth er countries began a new effort Thursday to prevent and ght out breaks of dangerous in fectious diseases before they spread around the globe. U.S. health of cials called the Global Health Security Agenda a priority because too many countries lack the health infrastruc ture necessary to spot a new infection rapidly and sound the alarm before it has time to gain a foothold and even spread into other countries. Germs do not recognize or stop at national borders, Health and Human Services Secre tary Kathleen Sebelius said Thursday as representatives from par ticipating countries, the World Health Or ganization and other groups met to dis cuss plans. A threat anywhere is indeed a threat everywhere. Yet fewer than 20 per cent of countries are adequately prepared to respond to emerging infections, she said. Infectious diseases are a growing concern. Just in the past year, China alerted the world that a new type of bird u was sickening people; a mysterious and deadly new respiratory virus emerged in the Middle East; and scientists detected the spread of some older diseases to new locales including the rst appearance of mosquito-borne chikungunya virus in the Caribbean. New diseases are but a plane ride away, warned Dr. Tom Frie den, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are too many blind spots around the world, he told report ers in preparation for Thursdays meeting. The goal of the new effort: Over ve years, the U.S. will partner with other countries to bolster local disease monitoring, de velop tests for differ ent pathogens and help regions create and strengthen systems to report and respond to public health emergen cies. Last year, the CDC began a pilot project in Uganda to improve de tection of such diseases as cholera, drug-resistant tuberculosis and hemorrhagic fe vers. Motorcycles raced samples from sick patients in remote parts of the country to provincial capitals, where they could be shipped overnight to a labora tory that could rapidly report the results back. It showed that very rapid progress was pos sible, Frieden said. This year, the CDC and Defense Department together will spend $40 million for similar projects in 10 other countries, which are yet to be named. In 2015, the Obama ad ministration is seeking $45 million in new funding to further ex pand the work. Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 La Plaza Grande South 1008 Bichara Blvd. The Villages352-259-7800$1500OFF ALL SHOES IN STOCKMust present coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person. Good 2-18-2014 thru 3-3-2014. www.shopshoebiz.com rfntbbbnn fnb Digital Hearing Aids $249 ALL MAJOR BRANDS ARE AVAILABLE starting at$199 Digital Custom Aids $259 Don Smith, HAS, owner of Corrective Hearing Centers 9am 4pmBetter Living Through Better HearingCome Join Our GRAND OPENING of Our Golf Cart Accessible at The Villages Location at 11974 County Road 101, Suite 102, The Villages Fl. 32162. 787-HEAR (4327) Conveniently located in Park Central Plaza 2468 Hwy 441/Suite 104 Fruitland Park, FL 34731 US, 26 countries launch global effort to fight infectious diseases

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 DEAR ABBY: My youngest grown son discovered that his girlfriend his possible future wife was texting pictures of herself to his stepfather. Needless to say, he told her the relationship is over. Now, for obvious reasons, he no longer wants to be around his stepfather, and is deeply concerned about how it will affect his relationship with his mother, my ex-wife. They are close, which I encouraged, but she seems to be in denial about the situation. Have you any suggestions on how to be supportive of my son and all the dynamics? TOO MUCH DRAMA IN MISSOURI DEAR TOO MUCH DRAMA: You say your ex-wife seems to be in denial. Was the reason for the breakup ever explained to her? If it wasnt, then your son should talk to his mother about it, and from then on ar range to see her alone. DEAR ABBY: I just dropped off my 13-year-old son at a party. Hes a seventh-grader, and when I take him to a friends house, if I havent met the parents, I walk him to the door and introduce him and myself to them. I do this to try and make sure the parents are at home and responsible. (Honestly, if they werent, Id take my son and leave.) I know it embar rasses him, but most parents thank me because they want to meet the parents of the kids who are in their homes. Times are different for our kids today. I just cant believe that someone would simply drop off a child and speed away when he/she has absolutely no clue who these people are. Im not a helicopter parent; Im just a mother who loves my children enough to make sure theyre in good hands. Recently, a ninth-grader in our school district had a house party where 30 kids received underage drinking citations! Sorry but Im taking no chances. Parenting is not being your childs best friend. Please encourage par ents not to be afraid to reach out to other parents. It really does take a village. VIGILANT IN BUCKS COUNTY, PA. DEAR VIGILANT: Your children are fortunate to have a mother who is as involved in their lives as you are. Not all young people are so lucky. Your son may nd your vigilance embarrassing, but take comfort in knowing that all kids your sons age nd their parents embarrassing. Orchids to you for pointing out the importance of parents networking with each other to ensure that their children are safe and supervised. When an entire village is watching, there is less chance of a lamb straying. DEAR ABBY: I have been mar ried to my wife for 33 years. I recently found a pair of her panties with Booty Call printed across the back. I cant help but wonder. She has never had underwear like that in 33 years. What gives? SURPRISED TEXAN DEAR SURPRISED: Was your wife wearing the lingerie at the time? If not, how did you discover the panties? The surest way to get to the bottom of this would be to ask your wife this question. She may have thought they were cute and bought them on impulse or they may have been a gift. Please let me know, because not only am I interested in her answer, but Im sure millions of readers are curious, too.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Girlfriends texts to stepfather throw family out of whack

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS Immediate Appointments AvailableBassin Center 1004 N. 14th St., Leesburg, FL 1580 Santa Barbara Blvd., The Villages, FL(Next to Wolfys & McDonalds)Podiatry Institute of Central FloridaDr. Chan PodiatristDouble Board Certified Orthopedics & Podiatric MedicineTwenty-eight foot bones held together by ligaments and muscles and nourished by an intricate system of neurovasculature, are a fascinating wonder to the uninitiated as well as to the most experienced of doctors. Every patient who walks in affirms the intricacy and vulnerability of this magnificent design.Delivering competent and premier podiatric care with compassion. Welcome Dr. Chanrfrntrbrtrfnr rbrrbrnDiabetic Foot Care, Arthritic Disorders, Common Foot & Ankle Problems, Broken Foot, Ankle and Leg, Orthotics, Arch Disorders, Heel Pain, Laceration Trauma, Bone Spurs, Plantar Fascitis, Warts, Ingrown Nails, Hammertoes, Bunions, Corns, Callouses, Fungal Infection.rfffntbt rffrrfrf rYale University rffff rb frfffrffrrfffrr ffrff nttfRosalyn Franklin University fffrffff ffr ffWheaton College ffr Your feet are in good hands with Dr. Chan!Traumatology, Sports Medicine, Deformity Correction are his passion. Helping patients compassionately and completely is his goal. 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center rrfnt fb r fftfr bn ftt bbn f bb b nfr t t MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg.

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f ntbb bbb bnnnbbb bbbbbb rnbnnb nnbtn bnnnntbb bbnn nbbtbtn bbbbb btbbbnbbbt bbbnbbbbbt ttbnbbbbb bbtnb nbbbbb nnbntbbntnnn r f ttbbnbbbbb bbtnb nbbbbbbntbbn tnnn r r fr rf r bbntnnnnbn r bbtbbbnb ff ff tnr btntnb nb ttn btbb ntbtnbttb btbbbnb bb nntn b bbnnnnnnbnbbb bbtbbbntb nbbnnbnnb tt bbtn n bntbtt tbb r btb nb nn bbbnb btb btbb btbnntb ntb b b r r r fr tnn rrr rrr r f r f f bb bttnbb r r r b r r r b n btbbbttn bnbb r r bbntbnb bnbbbnb bbbnnnn btnnb bnbbb nbbtbtn bbbnnnnn bbntnnnnb nbntbbnnt nbtbnbnbbb bnbtnnbnbnbt bbbbnbbtnttbbbb nbbtnbbnb tn nnbnnb nnnbb bbnnntn bbnnb nnbnnbbnb bntbbnn bnnb tbbntbrbb nbnbbnt nnbnntbb rnbbb tnbtbb btbbb btbbbnbnbt f f f rbbnn nbbbnn btbnnnb nbbbbnfttb bbnn bb rf bbrbbbn nntbb nnbnntnnn btnbbnrb bnnnb bbnntnn btbnnnb nbbbbb bbtbbntbttntt bttbnbbnb bttnbnbb bnnntbn f r r r b b n n n t n b b n n b n n b n n b b n b b n t b b n n b n n b t b b b n b n b b n t n n b n b b n b r b t n b t b b n n n b b n n n b b b n n b n n b t t bntbtt btn btb nb bbtnnb rtn r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 rfrn tbf r f n t b f t n t n t t n t n f rntt rtrttnn rtttf rnbbrtt bnt nntnnf r r b f f t r t f n n r f n r rf r t t t n n t n f t f n n n t t n t n r n r t t f nntb b n r n t n n f f n n t f n r n t n f n f t f f f n f t r n b f n t t n t n t f f t f t b t t t t n f f t n f f n n n r n n n f n t t f t r t b t f b r t t t t t b n f t n n f t n n n f nbtnn tbrf tbtfrft btnnrrtf r t f t n t n t n f n b t n n n f f n n t b r n b t n n t r b t t n f n t n n n n n t t n b r t b b t n b r t n t n r r t n n n b n b n t n t t t r n t t n r r n f t n n n r t n n t n n t n b n t n t n n b t n b f n n r r n b t n t n t f b b bb t n b b t t t n r r n r f n b f b n b t n t t n r f f b f f f f r bttrtrn tntt tnnnnn ftr trttrtnbnt ftnnbnt bn fbtf f tntb nnnbfnbf f nnntnff f tntb tbn btn nntntnt nbntnrt nntntnrt nrrtr tnfn nnbf tnnbr tbnnttnt tftrntnbnrrntn nntf f f nrtnrrnnb nbtr nbnttnn btnntntt rtntt bnr nrrnnfb tntntntrbnn trbntnttn ttntrfntn tnnntn nfrt nnrntrnrt nbntn nnt rttrtt nnf tntnt t f tntb nntnttf nttt tntbnrffnf ttf f tntb b t n f f ttnnnt tnnb fnrffbn bntnf tnnnttn nbntf nrffbnf bntnf brtttn nbnrrntnrntn nttrtnf rtnrrnnb nbnbntnbt trnbnttn tntntt rtftrtrnb rtnbtnntn ttrtn bnr nrrnntnn ff rtrtnnbn ttnnbtnff rffnbnfb ntnfttttn nf bnnnnt rnbnnnf bntnttn nbtnffrff f f tntb

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 r f n t b f r r b f b n r b n f f n t r r n t n n f n n n n b t f b b b r f b b n f t b r f t b f n b r r b n b r r f r t r n n n f b r f n f f f b t b r b f n f r b n r n f n f r n r r f b t n r r r n r n f t n f f t r f r f r f r f r b t b r r b r f n b r b n f f f f n f n b f f t b r r t b r n f b r f n b r b n f f n f r b r f t b r b t b r bnfbrbbnr tbnnrbfnbr bfbb tnbrnrftf tbnfbfnrf ntbnnrtft nrrbfb rftffb f t r f f b n n t r b n t fnt n t f n f f r f f n f r f t b r r r n r t b n n n f r bn nbtrfb nrfrrb t r b n f r b t r r n t b t r b n f b f b t n n r b f t b n t b n t r f f t b n t b n b r t b r r f r f r r n t f n n f r r f n f r t r b f r r r n n b r r n r b n f r f n r b n f nrbr bbnbnfrrr tnrt fbtbnn brfnbrbnfnrf tbbrnfbnrf rfnnfr nnbbfr ntfrbnf f b f t b n n f r f t f n f f b n f b n f n r f b b f n n r r bn rbb ffr r n r t b n r r r r f b rbnfrfrnfn rnrbnfbrtf trbnnrfft rbrbnftbrr nrrfrfb fbnfrbbf nfnnf rrntf ftrffbrb nn r b n r n r n n tbbrbrfbf brnnbfbnfb rfrnfrtrbnn nfbnfnfbnf r r t b n n t f b r r b n r f b n r r n n n n t f b r n t b n f b b f r t b n n f r r r r f n n r t b n r f t r n n n r f b t b r f n f n f r b r b r b t b t b r b n r r r n t f f f fnt trtnf tfbrfb fbrftnr tfrt r t b n f n t n t b r r f t b r n n b n n f n n t b n f f r n n f r n f t b r b n t b b r r r r f n t r r r t b r f n n r t b n r b r r b n f f r r t rnfbfrfr brbfbntfrfbrfrtb tnnfbrf nfrbnfrnrntfb rrrntfbr tfbnf n b n b n f r r b n f r r r r b n n t f n b r b b n t b r n b n f b r r b n f t b b n b n f r f n f t f b frrnnnfnfbrbn tbrtnn bnfrbbfbnfbnbr f t b n b n t f r n n f n ft rf nrtbt rfnt

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 rffr nfrrtrb rbnr rr n r r r r nrnr f brnr rfrf fbbr bbrbntrb br fbbfrn brbrrt bbrr brfbr fbrr b b b nnb fb nrfrfr f fbbrr t brrr r b r b r f r fb nfbfbr rbbrr rrb b rfrbbbnr brr frfbbfb rf rrr ftnfb ntb b r nbbrb nbrrrr r rrrnrbrfbbfr b r r brr rbbr rbbrbr b rbrr frrf f r r rbr t rt nr br nr r r f b r n r n t r r r fbnrbbr rrr r r r n t r n r b b t f f r r r t r b r r r r r rrrrbr fnr rnf r r fbnrrb ff nfrf fbfr nrr brffbbrr r rrr nfr fb r rrr r rrr bf brr rrfft rfr nr frbrr brb br r rbfr f f fr rr r t btr rbf t fr bb brf rr rn br br fr bb rf fb fbrrb r nrrt nrr n brrf r nfr t bb nfrb nbbb n nbn rbfr rr nf rbbrr r rbrrf rfrt fr r frn r t rrffnr rbrr brfr f br bbr rrbrbr bfrrbrrrbfrr r b r r b f r r b b r b r r t r r b t r r r bbr ffb bf t n t f b r bf frrtrnr rtfrfrf nrrr rrnr t rb nbf n fr b f b t br f rfbrrfrf f rrrr bfr b r bfr fb fbtr frf t br bfb nrn rbrr fn nr f t r rfb n t rr rrb brnrbr frrr rrfrrrfrf fbr brn nfnf fbrr r r r r n r n f r r f r b r t r r b r r r f f r b f r f r b r b n r r brrr nf rrtr r f ftbrbrt rr rrr br bfrbrb f b rbr n nr bbr n rrr bfnftbn r rf frfbr b bb r rrfr rbbrrr rt r b r b r b b rbrfrrrrn rfrfrrb fbbnrrbbfb frbbr r f f b f f b b b r r f b b r r r

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Monday, February 17, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 r f r f r n t t b f b r r r r fntn fnff tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn rr b b r f b b b b b f n b b b n r r fntbn n f t t b r b t t b n t r f n t t b f n n n f n r rb b n b b b t b r f n n n n r r r ff brntb bnnfnn fnb b n b rr n tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn rr rn bn btb nb n n n n b n t t b b b b f n f f n f n b r r nb bbnnn nbbbrr n b n b b n f f n r r r nnbb r tn b r r r r n n b b t n n b n n n b n t t b b n b t b b n b r r f f f f f n n f f f f n n f r t n b r n n n b b r r r tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn r r tn r r r n n b n n rftfn rr bf bttbfn nr n tn rfbnb nbfn nb r f r f r n t t b f b f n r r r nbnbnf fnr tnn nbnn f b b r nf nn f n n b b tn r f n nnn r r n tn rfffn br n n bf nbrr frrr fn rrr f rr tb br nbrr ftb rn t t n t n n b n n n r fb bnb nbrr r bnt tnnnr fb n r n rbnn nnnn bn n nnrr r br rrr r b r r r b r ttnnn fnrrr nnnn rr b bbb rr nb b r bn r frr f b r r fbr ftrrrr ttb nn n bfbb rrr nbnnnr rr fnb n nnn ttr bbt nnr nn bnnr b t n r r fnbrrr ntt brrrr tn nnrr bnbb rr r n b b b r r r bn nbbbr bn nbbbr f rrr b b n r r r r fb rrrr nnt brr b b b t n r nnbbnb rr r rrr f brrr f n n n r n brrr b

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, February 17, 2014 rf rntbftfbbftn rbntftb f n f rtrtbfb n fbtftbftnbtf ffftb fbfr f b rrb trr ffrtr trnb ntbf ft rrftbrft tbff rrf brtfr ntbf rtntft f nffb frbrf tfbf bf rrf r btrftb f tffbb tfbf nrrf f nbbt nbtf rrfrfbnb bt rrb rrfrrtnrr b f n nn tbt fr b f bfftnftfb f nb bnrnbrn ftfrbt f fttfbb tftrfrr rf n f f rt nbtf b bf tn rrr rrfftbf rbrrrt tftrrf rft tfttnttr rrtrr n nn frfbt ff frbbbbrf nn f t f tfftr nntbrtfbr brr nnf f rrtfff trftrrt frrftfntf tf f r b f n f t n b b f f f r t t r f nntb fttrtftrtb fttbr trrtf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f tf ffrrtb frr nnf f nnntrf f bnrfrb rnfttrft ttb ftrtnfntb rbrff fb f b f n ff f f t r f t t r f f f t f f r tfr fftbrttb tfrrf nfftrnf rbrrb r f b f b r f nf f