Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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MAGIC FALL SHORT AGAINST PELICANS 100-92, SPORTS B1LIVING HEALTHY: Sesame Street, heart doctor launch childrens health project, C1 TEAMWORK: County ofcials form unique partnership, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 27 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.75 / 57Mostly cloudy 50 MICHAEL HILLAssociated PressALBANY, N.Y. Minimum-wage increase proposals are getting the maximum push from Democrats in statehouses in more than half of U.S. states, highlighting the politi cally potent income inequality issue this year. Lawmakers in at least 30 states are sponsoring or are expected to introduce wage hike measures, according to a national review by The Associated Press. They hope to notch state-level victories as President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats remain stymied in attempts to raise the federal minimum wage above $7.25 an hour. The president is expected to mention the minimum wage in his State of the Union address Tuesday. Even in Republican-dominated capi tals where the bills are longshots, the mea sures still give Demo crats a chance to ham mer home the popular theme of fair wages in what is an election year in most places. Its a no-brainer for any Democrat, said Neil Sroka, a strategist for progressive groups who is communications director at the Howard Dean-founded Democracy for America. Con gress is failing. They can take real action right in the states and have a demonstrable impact right here at home. For politics and policy, its a winning strategy. Minimum wage is a perennial issue that has taken on a higher prole amid the slowly RICK REEDSpecial to the Daily CommercialThe Tavares Pavilion that once stood watch over Lake Dora and was a reminder of simpler times is rising again along the shoreline. The two-story structure, which once served as a gath ering spot for some of the ar eas biggest events, will reign much longer than the origi nal meeting places 50 years, however. Its not going anywhere, said Tammy Rodgers, the community services director for Tavares and project man ager of the pavilion. It will stand the test of time. The new pavilion has the same footprint as the struc ture completed by L.G. Co ven in 1914 at the foot of St. Clair Abrams Avenue. It was one of many buildings he constructed in early Tavares. While the footprint might be the same, the materials ar ent. Instead of wood, builders are using more durable con crete and masonry products. Locals lamented the pass ing of the original pavilion in 1961, when the Tavares City Council deemed it unsafe and had it torn down. It had been the epicenter of Tavares social life for ve decades and also served as City Hall for a short time. The idea for a pavilion began small in 1908 when the Tavares Improvement As sociation proposed build ing a large dock. That plan was scrapped and a pavilion Tavares Pavilion rising over Lake Dora once again RICK REED / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Construction is under way to rebuild the Tavares Pavilion on Lake Dora. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comSpecial Olympics the worlds largest sports or ganization for children and adults with intellectual disabilities provides yearround training and competi tions to more than 4.2 million athletes in 170 countries. Nearly 200 of those athletes from all over Florida were in Clermont over the weekend preparing for the 2014 USA Special Olympics games next June in Princeton, N.J. Anticipation is high for Lake Countys Special Olympics program, which has never before had four athletes qualify for the national competition: David Icker in aquatics, Jonathan Robinson in bowling and Kyle Krekeler and running buddy Troy Clark in track and eld. Its so exciting to have some of our athletes going to the games this year, said Mary Adamson, a Special Olympics physical training instructor at Lake Hills School in Howey-inthe-Hills. I think a couple of athletes got to go to the inter national games once, but that was like 20 years ago. Because training was needed in a variety of sports, multiple venues were utilized, including the National Training Center in Clermont (aquatics); Montverde Academy in Montverde (soccer, track and eld, volley ball, basketball and cycling); Clermont Lanes in Clermont (bowling) and the Sanctuary Ridge Golf Course in Clermont (golf). Miami Dades Daniel Cartaya, the coach for Team Floridas track and eld team, said the camp provided him some insight as to just how strong the team is this year. I saw a tremendous amount of ability, he said. And its funny because Id never met most of these athletes before this weekend, but in less than 24 hours, its like they all have become mine. They are my athletes from now through the games and Im proud that this is our team. Ronna Smith from Clay County, one of Team Floridas bowling coaches, was moved by the camaraderie. Its been really cool for me and my athletes to get to know all the other athletes, she said. Were going to be friends from now on; its not like we will be competing with them in June and thats it. Its a life-changing Minimum wage bills pushed by at least 30 states Clermont hosts Special Olympics competitors Pro bowler Jim Carter, left, son of bowling legend Don Carter, chats with Special Olympics bowler Jonathan Robinson. PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Former Olympian Damu Cherry Mitchell talks shop with Special Olympics Athlete Kyle Krekeler, center, and his running partner Troy Clark, left, who will be represent Lake County in the Special Olympics 2014 USA Games in June. BEN NUCKOLSAssociated PressCOLUMBIA, Md. The gunman who killed two people at a Mary land mall was a teenage skateboarding enthu siast who had no crim inal record before he showed up at the shop ping center armed with a shotgun, plenty of am munition and a back pack lled with crude homemade explosives, authorities said Sunday. Darion Marcus Agu ilar, 19, took a taxi to the Mall in Columbia in suburban Baltimore on Saturday morning and entered the build ing near Zumiez, a shop that sells skateboarding gear. He went down stairs to a food court directly below the store, then returned less than an hour later, dumped the backpack in a dress ing room and started shooting, police said. Shoppers ed in a panic or barricaded themselves behind closed doors. When police arrived, they found three people dead two store employees and Aguilar, who had killed himself, authori ties said. The shooting bafed investigators and acquaintances of Aguilar, a quiet, skinny teenag er who graduated from high school less than a year ago and had no Mall gunman had no criminal pastSEE PAVILION | A2SEE OLYMPICS | A2SEE GUNMAN | A2SEE WAGE | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 27, 2014: This year you open up to a different way of thinking. As a result, your long-term goals become more possible than in the past. You communicate effectively, and others respond. A better relationship will develop between you and a sibling or neighbor in the next 12 months. If you are single, a trip you take in the next year could be signicant. You are likely to meet someone very different who opens you up to change. If you are attached, the two of you become much better friends. Traveling as a couple will bring you much closer. CAPRICORN understands you, perhaps too well. ARIES (March 21-April 19) A friend or associate expresses his or her high energy, which matches your enthusiasm. A meeting allows an even broader perspective to be gained. Express your appreciation to an older friend or relative who goes to bat for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The mix of drive, energy and endurance that you manifest will be hard to beat. As a result of your performance, you will establish a newfound rapport with a supervisor. A conversation lets you know how appreciated you are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Consider taking a new route or a different approach. You are so determined to get where you want to go that you barely can hear anyone else. Slow down, and youll get powerful feedback. Be grateful for others persistence. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to try to evolve to a new level of understanding, especially as you sense a roommates or close friends anxiety rising. Others will offer many suggestions, but one person demonstrates a better understanding of the dynamics. Listen well. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could be surprised by what comes down your path. You tend to work well with unexpected occurrences. Think before you leap, as returning to where you were could be close to impossible. Pace yourself. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be aware of your limits, especially regarding a difcult situation. Use your instincts with a domestic or personal matter involving your house. Your nances appear to be an issue. Dont worry you will nd a creative solution. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You have been more direct and far more feisty than usual. Notice how heated someone else becomes when he or she interacts with you. You might not realize how feisty you can be, but look at the reactions of those around you, and youll get it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Be aware of your nanc es. You could be swallowing some anger and choose to deal with it by spending money. Slow down, and make an assessment. Learn a more effective way of expressing your more difcult feelings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) If you feel pushed, you might be more than happy to go along with a change of pace. You might want to lighten up the moment. Return calls before settling on plans. Be aware of how possessive someone is before getting into a partnership with him or her. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Understand what is going on around you. Listen to your inner voice when dealing with a boss. Much that happens during the daytime might not be to your liking. Given space, you might recognize that it is all for the better. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Focus on friends and your objectives. You will see that your inner circle supports your long-term desires. Be more open in sharing what you desire. Communication will ourish, and youll feel unstoppable as a result. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Responsibilities drop on you, whether you like it or not. Let a friend or loved one help you. There is no reason for you to carry the weight of this situation alone. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US DATECASH 3 . ............................................... 9-1-5 Afternoon . .......................................... 3-2-0 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 5-6-4-4 Afternoon . ....................................... 0-9-3-8FLORIDALOTTERY JAN. 25FANTASY 5 . ......................... 10-16-20-25-35 FLORIDA LOTTO . ................... 2-3-7-21-36-43 POWERBALL ...................... 8-12-18-55-272 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. committee was formed. By the end of 1912, the committee adopt ed plans for a two-story, 40-foot by 40-foot structure that jutted 50 feet out into the lake. It was to be connected to the shore by a 6-foot-wide pier. The cost was $2,000 and the city voted to chip in $500 as the fundrais ing campaign started. The association held its rst meeting in the new pavilion on Nov. 12, 1914. It was also the meeting place for the Kiwanis Club, the Womens Club and The American Legion. Downstairs the pavilion was divided into four rooms by a pair of hallways running north and south and east and west. The upstairs was one big room for concerts, dances, plays and other events. Then city ofcials decided they would form a committee to remake their downtown and take advantage of the water front. Former Tavares Mayor Nancy Clutts fa cilitated the committee. The real cornerstone of the visioning, they wanted that pavilion rebuilt, said Clutts. They reminisced of their childhoods, the Womens Club, reunions and dances. Blaise Fiebach and As sociates, the architectur al rm that designed the citys two other historic replicas Woodlea, Cap tain Melton Haynes home and the train depot were hired for the pavilion. In addition to restroom facilities and two elevators, there will be two meeting rooms on the rst oor that open to a private deck overlook ing Lake Dora and a larger space in the middle of the rst oor. A sweeping staircase will rise to the second oor on the lake side of the building. The second oor will include a caterers kitch en, a large room for gath erings and a room for the bride for weddings. A re escape has been included in the front of the building, but it will look beautiful, Rodgers said. We also treated the pier like event space, Rodgers said. Its bigger than the original one and will have water, elec tric and sound available to use during events. City ofcials and builders hope for a May completion and events are al ready being booked. Citizens said they wanted us to honor our past, said Rodgers. We wanted to resurrect our past and honor our citi zenry. We saved the best for last. PAVILION FROM PAGE A1 experience for everyone involved. Krekeler, 25, from Tavares, who will be representing Lake County in track and eld, is looking for ward to the games, not only to demonstrate his sports abilities, but also his independence. He enjoys the program because it gives him the chance to be the best at something. Robinson, 33, from Mount Dora, who will be representing Lake County in bowling, said he was having fun at the camp but was keeping his focus on New Jersey. I want to go to nationals and get gold, he said. Thats my goal. At least two of the training sessions had surprise visitors who stopped by to meet the athletes and offer them some tips and expert advice. At Clermont Lanes, where the bowling session was held, bowling pro Jim Carter of Winter Garden, son of bowling legend Don Carter, stopped by to offer the bowlers some pointers. And at Montverde Academy, Nether lands sprinter Churanday Martina, Dominican Republic hurdler Lavonne Idlette, American sprinter and Olympic gold medalist Justin Gatlin and Tampa hurdler Damu Cherry Mitchell, along with her husband and three-time Olympian Dennis Mitchell, showed up to offer encouragement. All are working out at the National Training Center. For Gatlin, the visit was like a peer review. In my eyes, there is no difference between the Special Olympics athletes and any other athlete who participates in a sport, or Olympians like myself, he said. As far as I see it, being an athlete takes courage, it takes discipline and it takes athleticism, especially when it comes to competing against other people with the same talent as you. Im here today and what I see are fellow athletes. I look at them as my teammates. OLYMPICS FROM PAGE A1 previous run-ins with law enforcement. Police spent Sunday trying to piece to gether his motive, but it remained elusive. Aguilar, who had concealed the shot gun in a bag, red six to nine times. One victim, Brianna Benlolo, a 21-year-old single mother, lived half a mile away from Aguilar in the same College Park neighborhood, but police said they were still trying to determine what, if any, re lationship they had. Although they lived close to Mary lands largest university, neither was a student there. The other employee, Tyler Johnson, did not know Aguilar and did not social ize with Benlolo outside of work, a rela tive said. Aguilar purchased the 12-gauge shotgun legally last month at a store in neighboring Montgomery County. At his home, ofcers also recovered more ammunition, com puters and documents, police said. The home is in a middle-income neighborhood called Hollywood, near the Capital Beltway. No one answered the door Sunday morning. Aguilar graduated in 2013, school ofcials conrmed. GUNMAN FROM PAGE A1 recovering economy and growing public debate about income inequality. A Quinnipiac University poll this month found 71 percent of Americans in favor of raising the min imum wage including more than half of Republicans polled. Michael Sargeant, executive director of the Dem ocratic Legislative Campaign Committee, calls it an organic issue thats bubbling up from the grassroots. But its also being pressed by politi cians and labor unions. Democrats challenging Republican governors have taken up the issue, and there are ballot initiatives in several states. We are facing a huge income gap that only continues to widen, where the workers at the top see large wage increas es and the workers at the bottom are at a standstill. That needs to change, said Massachusetts Democratic Senate President Therese Murray. Five states passed mini mum wage measures last year, and advocates hope that number will grow as states from New Hamp shire to Washington consider proposals. Many would push families above the federal poverty line, which is $15,730 for a family of two. In Iowa, a bill would hike the minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10. A Rhode Island bill would raise it from $8 to $9. And a year after New York ap proved a multiyear minimum wage hike, Assembly Democrats in troduced another bill for 2014 sponsored by Labor Committee Chairman Carl Heastie of New York City that would acceler ate the increase. Labor unions and other advocates point to workers like Andrew Lloyd, who cleans the cabins, bathrooms and cockpits of airplanes between ights at John F. Kenne dy Airport in New York City for $8 an hour. With a wife and 1-year-old, he relies on food stamps to help stock the refrigerator and his paychecks bare ly cover diapers and other needs of his daughter. He said he cant afford a new pair of socks for himself. Its not enough. What were making is not enough to support, Lloyd said. Theres just no way they can justify what is going on is right. Opponents, many of them Republicans, ar gue that the higher wages translate into fewer jobs and higher consumer costs. So wage hike bills in Republican-controlled legislatures, like Florida and South Carolina, are not expected to pass. In Florida, Gov. Rick Scott said the claim that work ing families need the boost to make ends meet makes him cringe, because I know that state ment is a lie. Even if we did raise the minimum wage, working families will still not be able to make ends meet on those jobs, Scott said. We need good jobs that lead to good careers for our families, and thats what I am focused on. WAGE FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Partnership seeks entries for Mardi Gras paradeThe Leesburg Partnership is preparing for Mardi Gras Madness on Feb. 22. Festivities begin at 11 / a.m. as downtown Leesburg comes alive with the sights and sounds of Mardi Gras. A kids parade, pet parade, and oats will be on Main Street throughout the day, and winners will be judged in many categories. For information and parade applications, go to www.leesburgmardigras.com.TAVARES Author to speak at End of Life Care conferencesLocal author and retired hospice nurse Judy Flickinger will be one of the workshop leaders at the End of Life Care conference presented by Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, offering insightful information for local residents on making endof-life decisions. The conference will be offered from 8:30 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. Thursday, at the Church of the Nazarene, 32151 David Walker Dr. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 352-742-6783.TAVARES Hazardous waste to be collectedThe Lake County Solid Waste Division encourages Lake County residents to dispose of toxic materials at an upcoming Household Hazardous Waste Collection event, from 9 / a.m. to noon Thursday, at the Central Solid Waste Facility, 13130 County Landll Rd. Representatives will be on hand to collect small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products, such as lawn and gardening materials, photo and swimming pool chemicals, paint products, cleaning solutions, motor oil and used gas, batteries, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks, and will be offering convenient drive-thru disposal of the items. Materials such as infectious waste, solvents, chemical laboratory waste and radioactive waste are prohibited. To schedule a drop-off day for large quanities of items, call 352-343-3776.TAVARES Extension hosts landscaping seriesPruning Your Landscape is the topic of discussion as the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension hosts a Saturday in the Garden speaker series, at 10 / a.m., Saturday at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., Tavares. The class will give participants in sight on how and when to prune landscape trees, shrubs and palms, and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticulture agent. To register, go to saturdayinthegardenfebruary2014.eventbrite.com or call 352-343-4101 ext. 2714. The cost is $5 for adults, free for ages 16 and under.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWhen several days of rain saturated the roads on the boundaries of the Palisades Country Club properties in Clermont in May 2013, Fred Costello, a member of the Palisades Homeowner Association Advisory Committee, knew it was time to take action. Some of us were getting ready to build an ark, said Costello, remembering the damage that occurred. Ditches were 4 to 5 feet deep and 2 to 4 feet wide along Jalarmy Road, which is on the eastern border of the property. Large volumes of water cascaded downhill and dumped mud and debris onto nu merous patios and pools of the Palisades Country Club properties. Drainage water from heavy rain storms cascaded in torrents from the intersection of Cherry Lake and Jalarmy Roads, Costello said. Costello said he con tacted Lake County Com missioner Sean Parks concerning the situation. We met with county Public Works Director Jim Stivender and developed a repair plan, Parks said. The county came prepared and quickly re paired the damage. But what was unique about the project, County officials form unique partnership Staff ReportLake County reghters are shaving their heads and donning orange T-shirts and wristbands emblazoned with the words Team Jay to support their broth er, reghter Nick Ryon, whose son Jay has been diagnosed with cancer. The 6-year-old is aggressive ly ghting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or ALL, at Florida Hos pital in Orlando. A Facebook group called Team Jay, created to cheer up the child while he undergoes treatment, has gone viral. The page already has 6,000 members and climbing, and nearly 900 photos of ev erything orange: pumpkins, ip ops, silly socks, cats and even or ange-dyed dogs. Why orange? Leukemia awareness is represented by the color. Photos continue pouring in from across the world from U.S. Army bases, universities and re departments. Elisha Pappacoda, public information ofcer for Lake County, said in a press release.Tavares firefighters son battling leukemia PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY Jay Ryon, son of Lake County reghter Nick Ryon, is aggressively ghting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. BOB SELF / AP Jared Victory, an engineer with Aviation Systems Engineering Company, ies an X-8 quadcopter in the conference room of his companys ofces in Jacksonville. DREW DIXONThe Florida Times-UnionJACKSONVILLE The small, re mote-control helicopters hovering in a conference room took on the look of fun ight at a hobby store. But when mounted with video camer as and with further development by a Jacksonville company and others, the aircraft could mean hundreds of millions of dollars in new commerce for Florida. While the Aviation Systems Engineering Co. has provided military applications for unmanned drones since 2004, it is trying hard to use dif ferent terminology while developing a testing, observation, training and research site for commercial drones. Wary of associating the unmanned aircraft with their lethal military rep utation, ASEC ofcials speak of remote-control helicopters and xedwing planes for use in agriculture, public safety and real estate, among other potential applications. Most of the unmanned aircraft un der consideration for commercial use now weigh less than 55 pounds, similar to recreational model un manned aircraft. But the potential for development could broaden to aircraft that could be nearly as large as manned airplanes. The applications can range from crop dusting and monitoring of ag ricultural land, to observation of devastated areas after a disaster, to Firm explores market for unmanned aircraft LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comGov. Rick Scott has appointed Commissioner Leslie Campione to the Wekiva River Basin Commission. The 19-member board, which includes commissioners from Lake, Orange and Sem inole counties, was es tablished to ensure im plementation of the Wekiva Parkway and Protection Act. Established in 1988, the act also was meant to protect the resources of the Wekiva River system, according to the East Central Florida Regional Planning Council. Campione, who has attended the Wekiva River Basin Commis sion meetings for years, said she is glad to be on the board, as the Wekiva Parkway project continues to take shape. The project is a planned 25-mile state toll road running through Mount Dora, Campione appointed to Wekiva River Basin Commission Staff ReportThe Florida Bar will recog nize 21 lawyers including one serving Lake and Sumter counties for their work on behalf of poor and indigent clients. Florida Bar President Eugene K. Pettis of Fort Lau derdale will present the 2014 awards at a ceremony Thursday at the Supreme Court of Florida. Established in 1981, The Florida Bar Presidents Pro Bono Service Awards are intended to encourage lawyers to volunteer services to those who cannot afford legal fees. The awards recognize pro bono service in each of Floridas 20 judicial circuits. The Fifth Ju dicial Circuit serving Lake, Sumter, Citrus, Hernando and Marion counties will recognize attorney Joseph M. Mason Jr., who provides pro bono services through Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida Inc. and the Le gal Advocacy Center of Cen tral Florida. Since 1994, Mason has provided more than 1,000 hours of direct pro bono assis tance to low-income clients. In response to the foreclosure crisis, Mason partic ipated in Florida Attorneys Saving Homes, said Kenia Escobar of The Florida Bar. He provided legal advice, pro se assistance and full rep resentation to clients. His assistance has included homeownership issues, contractor fraud, denial of insur ance coverage and one case of complex real estate litigation that involved a fraudulent deed to a home that extended for more than six years. Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida Inc. has a Tavares ofce at 226 West Main St. TAVARESFlorida Bar recognizes pro bono lawyerSEE LAWYER | A5SEE FIREFIGHTER | A4SEE CAMPIONE | A5SEE PARTNERS | A5SEE AIRCRAFT | A5 MASON

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 OBITUARIESEdith D. GregorEdith D. Gregor age 84 passed away Fri day, January 24, 2014 in Leesburg, Florida. Mrs. Gregor was born in Un eeda, West Virginia and moved to the Leesburg area in 1992 from Ma ple Heights, Ohio. She had a 40 year career as a Bookkeeper before her retirement from the Standard Oil Company. She was a member of the New Life Presbyterian Church, Fruit land Park, Florida and The Eustis Elks Club. She was also a mem ber of the former Leesburg Business and Pro fessional Womens Club. She will be re membered by those close to her as a Joyful person who al ways carried a smile on her face. Anyone who knew her knew her as a truly nurturing caring spirit. She is survived by her loving husband of 14 years AL, A devoted son and daughterin-law Ed and Vickie Tyler of Bluewater Bay, Florida; 2 grandchil dren Stacia and Adam, and one great-grandchild Dylan. A funer al service will be held at Page-Theus Funer al Home 914 West Main St., Leesburg, FL Today (Monday) at 11:00 AM with Pastor Jim Kee gan serving as ofci ant. The family will re ceive friends one hour before the service from 10:00 11:00 AM. The family suggests that memorial contributions be made to the New Life Presbyterian Church 201 LaVista Street, Fruitland Park, Florida 34731. All ar rangements are under the careful direction of Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services.Jimmy ShautJimmy Shaut age 64 passed away Friday, January 24, 2014 in Ta vares, Florida. Jimmy was born in John son City, New York and moved to the Howey-inthe-Hills area in 1999 from Maryland. He was a Carpenter in the construction in dustry for over 40 years. Jimmy was a proud vet eran of the U. S. Army and the U. S. Marine Corps and served two tours of duty in Viet nam. He was a mem ber of American Le gion Post 108 for over 23 years, and a mem ber of the Veterans of Foreign Wars post 8087. He was also an ac tive member of Logos Christian Fellowship in Leesburg, Florida. Jimmy will be remem bered rst for his erce devotion and love to his God, Family, Country, and his church. He had a great sense of hu mor and he always saw the fun in things and when describing him the word hilarious has to be used. He loved bass shing and his 1962 Impala hot rod. He especially loved his walks with his wife Ter ri to watch the sunsets. Survivors include: His loving wife of 14 years Terri, His Mother Hel en Shaut Leesburg; Sons James (Gen) Shaut Jr. PA; Jeramy (Erica) Shaut Orlan do; Kyle (Tia) Shaut Howey-in-the-Hills; Willy Shaut Mt. Dora; Daughters Shelley (Wayne) Pope NC; Jennifer Shaut TX; Heather Shaut MD; and Cassandra (Bri an) Shaut MD; Broth ersRonnie Shaut Umatilla; David Shaut Leesburg; Fred Shaut Leesburg; Sisters Karen Kramer MD; Susan Goodson Mt. Dora; and 6 GrandchildrenJeramy II; Dane; Jack; Hailey; Serenity; and Natalia. Funeral Services will take place 6:00 PM Thursday Jan. 30, 2014 at Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services Lees burg, Florida. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the Service from 5:00 6:00 PM. After cremation his Graveside Services with full Military Honors will take place 12:00 PM Saturday Feb ruary 1, 2014 at Lakeside Memory Gardens, Eustis, Florida. All ar rangements are under the careful direction of Page-Theus Funeral Home Leesburg, Florida.IN MEMORY GREGOR Children from cheer leaders to Little Leaguers are ooding the page with photos of themselves holding signs and notes of support for Jay and his family. Thank you all for your comments and your videos, said Ryon in a video taken in Jays hospital room and posted to the group. Jay is loving it. Keep it coming in. Thats whats keeping us going. The Facebook group began with the sole purpose of making Jay smile. But the communitys support of the lit tle boy, affectionately known as J.J., is also a testament to the cama raderie within the Lake County Public Safety Department. Ryon shaved his head along with Jays mom Maggie Denk as a show of support. In turn, dozens of members of the Public Safety De partment are sporting completely bald heads, or Friar Tuck haircuts. Nick and Maggie are really incredible peo ple, said Lake County Fire Lt. Brian Gamble. They are always do nating their time on the opposite side of this. And J.J. he is a great little kid. For more information or to share a message with Jay, join the Team Jay group on Facebook. LEUKEMIA FROM PAGE A3

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties that serves Lake Coun ty and an Inverness of ce at 106 N. Osceola Ave. that serves Sum ter County. Legal Advocacy Center of Central Florida serves 12 Florida counties, including Lake and Sumter, and uses the ofces of Com munity Legal Services. Mason serves on the board of directors of Community Legal Ser vices and on the board of the Legal Advocacy Center. In 2012-13, Florida law yers provided more than 1.7 million hours of pro bono services to those in need and more than $4.8 million to legal aid organizations. LAWYER FROM PAGE A3 according to county ofcials and Costello, was how the project was completed. In a spirit of cooperation and partnership, the Palisades Home owner Association shared some of the expenses of the repairs with the county, Costello said. In our com munity, we stress partnership between residents, elected ofcials and the various county work groups. We have to try to make that more com mon in working in partnership. At a recent county commission meeting, Costello presented an award to Stivender, Roads Superin tendent Jeff Johnson and Parks for their work on remedying drainage issues in the Palisades Country Club community. This Lake County team worked in partnership with our residents with professionalism and achieved excellent results, the award citation reads. Stivender said he is appreciative when a HOA recognizes us for doing our job. Parks said the partnership is an ex ample of government performing its duty. Fred Costello and the Palisades could have come at us angrily, but they did not, he said. I appreciate them wanting to establish a part nership. So often it is said that government does not serve and isnt responsive to the people. But very clearly here we have a partnership that works. PARTNERS FROM PAGE A3 providing easy access to Orlando. Mount Dora is tak ing advantage of this by partnering with the Lake County Economic Development Depart ment to put together a regional commercial district on approxi mately 900 acres along the parkway extension into the city. Because we are at this critical stage of the road being built, (the commission) is an im portant forum to vet concerns that come up and impacts regarding the road being built, Campione said. The commissions purpose is to protect the water quality of the Wekiva River and all the natural attributes of Wekiva basin wildlife, including ora and fauna, Campione said. CAMPIONE FROM PAGE A3 helping police get a x on the area in hostage situations, to displays and observations of real estate properties, among other uses. ASEC Program Manager Brent Klavon said that while the company already generates about $30 million in annual revenue for developing operating systems for military aviation, main ly for the U.S. Navy, the company is prepar ing for a share of what many in the aeronau tics eld believe will be a vast commercial mar ket that could amount to a $632 million boost to the commercial mar ket for unmanned air craft systems in the Sunshine State, according to estimates from the Association for Un manned Vehicle Sys tems International. The same economic study suggested the unmanned aircraft systems industry could generate 3,251 jobs in Florida alone in three years. Estimates for the economic impact on the U.S. are much larger. The gures are kind of crazy big and they usually have a B with a billion behind them, Klavon said. Every where you see for a potential birds-eye view or the elimination of a ladder to go up on a roof, you could use one of these things. As the industry devel ops standards for creat ing the systems, the key to opening the commer cial market will be the regulations that the Fed eral Aviation Administration is formulating. Thats the sticking point: Flying unmanned remote-control aircraft beyond recreational use is illegal in the United States. But as the FAA and oth er regulators grapple with the legalities, companies such as ASEC continue to prepare for the new market that should come in 2015, according to the FAA Modernization and Reform Act. Two types of unmanned systems al ready have been approved for commercial use in the northern ar eas of Alaska. The FAA declined to respond to questions in a phone interview. But the FAA website shows that a road map on how to deal with un manned aircraft is under heavy consideration. Unmanned air craft offer new ways for commercial enter prises and public operators to increase op erational efciency, decrease costs and enhance safety; and this road map will allow us to safely and efciently integrate them into the (national air space), FAA Administrator Michael Huerta says on the website. ASEC ofcials hope to become a testing and research company, one that the aircraft manufacturers and de velopers will employ to rene the systems. In the meantime, ASEC is providing inkind services for Space Florida, which is devel oping space and aero nautical commercial interests in the state. Government-funded Space Florida is based at Cape Canaveral. Jax Chamber President Daniel Davis said many in the business community are following the unmanned-air craft developments closely. He acknowledged that many are unaware of the potential commercial impact, but the unknowns make the drone devel opment attractive. I want to be on the cutting edge. Whenever we have cutting-edge technology in our com munity, it would be hoove us to develop it, Davis said. Davis compared the potential unknown im pact of unmanned ve hicles to the iPhone and that few were aware of the potential commercial impact of that device. But Davis also said the pending legalities surrounding unmanned aircraft call for more information being passed along to the community before the technology can be embraced fully. I think we have to AIRCRAFTFROM PAGE A3prove that the community doesnt have anything to wor ry about in the safety and privacy issues that come along with unmanned aircraft, Davis said. Then, when it gets to the point, we need to be able to give budding creative entrepreneurs the opportu nity to succeed. A study by the un manned-vehicle trade association ranked Florida fourth in the nation for potential to achieve the most economic benet from industry developments. The study also noted that Floridas robust aviation and aerospace sector is inviting. BOB SELF / AP While Jared Victory, left, ies the X-8 quadcopter, a colleague monitors the aircrafts system in real time.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb Find brilliant lighting solutions for every room in your home. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressBETHESDA, Md. Forget being sneezed on: Government sci entists are deliber ately giving dozens of volunteers the u by squirting the live virus straight up their noses. It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of re search is a step in the quest for better u vac cines. It turns out that how the body fends off inuenza remains something of a mystery. Vaccines are working, but we could do better, said Dr. Mat thew Memoli of the National Institutes of Health, who is leading the study that aims to infect up to 100 adults over the next year. Wait a minute: Flu is sweeping the country, so why not just study the already sick? That wouldnt let scientists measure how the im mune system reacts through each step of infection, starting with that rst exposure to the virus. Its not an experiment to be taken lightly. After all, the u kills thou sands of Americans a year. For safety, Memo li chose a dose that produces mild to moder ate symptoms and accepts only volunteers who are healthy and no older than 50. And to avoid spreading the germs, partic ipants must spend at least nine days quar antined inside a spe cial isolation ward at the NIH hospital, their health closely moni tored. Theyre not released until nasal tests prove theyre no longer contagious. The incentive: About $3,000 to compensate for their time. I received a very scolding email from my mother about signing up, Daniel Bennett, 26, said with a grin. Their standards are so high, I dont believe Im in danger, add ed Bennett, a restaurant worker from Col lege Park, Md. I dont get sick that often. A masked and gloved Memoli had Bennett lie at for about a minute. It will taste salty. Some will drip down the back of your throat, Memoli said, before squeezing a syringe lled with millions of microscopic virus particles, oating in salt wa ter, into each nostril. Sure enough, a few days later Bennett had the runny nose and achiness of mild u. The best defense against inuenza is a yearly vaccine, but its far from perfect. In fact, the vaccine is least ef fective in people age 65 and older the group most susceptible to u probably because the immune system weakens with age. Understanding how younger adults bodies ght u may help sci entists determine what the more vulnerable el derly are missing, clues to help develop more protective vaccines for everyone, Memoli explained. Heres the issue: The vaccine is designed to raise peoples levels of a particular u-ghting antibody. It targets a protein that acts like the virus coat, called hemagglutinin the H in H1N1, the strain that caused the 2009 pan demic and that is causing the most illness so far this winter, too. But its not clear what antibody level is best to aim for or whether a certain amount means youre protect ed against getting sick at all, or that youd get a mild case instead of a severe one. As mind-boggling as it is, we dont know the answer to that, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief of NIHs National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. We made some assumptions that we knew ev erything about u. Just targeting hemagglutinin probably isnt enough, Memoli add ed. Already, some people in his study didnt get sick, despite remarkably low antibody levels, meaning some thing else must be pro tecting them. Could it be antibodies against the N in us name, the neuraminidase protein? Specic T cells that are activated to ght infection? Genes that switch on and off when a virus invades? To begin nding out, Memoli rst developed a laboratory-grown copy of the H1N1 u strain and sprayed different amounts into volunteers noses until he found the right dose to trigger mild u. He hopes eventually to test the harsher H3N2 strain, too. Now hes infecting two groups people with low antibody lev els and those with high levels. Some were re cently vaccinated, and some werent. Hell compare how sick they get, how long theyre contagious and how the immune system jumps into action. Called a human chal lenge study, this kind of research hasnt been performed with u vi ruses in the U.S. for more than a decade, before scientists had ways as sophisticated to measure what happens.Volunteers sneeze for science CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP Dr. Matthew Memoli, an infectious disease specialist, sprays live u virus into the nose of Daniel Bennett, 26, of College Park, Md., who is part of a study at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 O n a trip last month to the Turkish-Syrian border, I met an impressive young Syrian opposition journalist named Adnan Hadad, who had just ed Aleppo because he was being targeted by both the re gime and al-Qaida militants. When talks nally began in Switzerland on Wednesday between the Syrian regime and opposition, a testy exchange between Hadad and Syrian Information Minister Omran Zoubi caught my eye. At a news conference, Hadad asked Zoubi to comment on the deadly bar rel bombs being dropped by government planes on civilian neighborhoods in Aleppo. According to the New York Times, Zoubi snapped back: This is the kind of question you ask if you support the terrorist groups. This exchange illustrates why the Geneva II talks are headed for failure and why terror ist groups will grow stronger in Syria the longer Bashar al-Assad holds power. Zoubis remarks show the regimes determination to divert the talks away from any discussion of replacing Assad. Instead, Assads minions will push the narrative that the West needs him to ght jihadi terrorists. What Zoubi wont admit is that the regimes murder and torture of civilians fueled the jihadi threat. In the early months of the rebellion, the regime crushed hundreds of thousands of peaceful protesters who sought political reform, not revolution. Since then, its tactics have been grue some. An archive of 55,000 photographs, which recently emerged from Assads jails, shows 11,000 starved and tor tured corpses. Smuggled out by a police photographer who defected, the images have not yet been fully authenticated, but they rep licate endless reports of similar crimes against thousands of detainees in regime dungeons, related by survivors or documented by human rights groups. Assad has left no space for civic rebels such as Hadad, who seek neither dictatorship nor radical Islam. Far from being a terrorist supporter, Hadad represents Syr ias youthful best and brightest, whose future is being destroyed by the ghting. He left a safe and solid career as a nancial adviser in Dubai in 2012 to become an opposition media activist in Aleppo, where rebel journalists risk their lives to report war crimes against civilians by the regime or by Islamists. He ed Aleppo after the al-Qaida afliate Islamic State of Iraq and Syr ia (ISIS) declared war on media activists and started kidnapping and killing them. Over coffee last month at the Sirehan Hotel in the Turkish bor der city of Gaziantep, Hadad explained why Islamist militias and more radical jihadis such as ISIS have grown so strong. When the revolution started, Hadad told me, and hundreds of thousands came to the streets, people might have agreed on Assads leaving after 2014 (when elections are supposedly scheduled). But, he adds, after they saw the tanks, and the helicopters and massacres and the sectarian acts, people felt they must kill or be killed. Under siege, he said, Syrians tolerated various shades of Islamist militias more mainstream or even extreme hard-liners because they arrived with money, guns, and good organization. When the West failed to provide aid to non-Islamist militias, those defending their villages against regime soldiers had few choices. People needed guns and thats where the Islamists came in, said Hadad. When people have no hope, the thing you believe in, the only thing you have left, is faith. Indeed, the regime has largely refrained from going after ISIS, some of whose leaders have old ties to Syrian intelligence. As cynics point out, the regime welcomes the rise of radical groups in order to demonstrate to Syrians that Assad is the better choice. The regime releases the most dangerous Islamists from their prisons, says Hadad. Then you start a religious war. There you have it. The Assad regime will use the Islamist threat to reject compromise at Geneva, while jihadis grow stronger in Syria. Backed by Moscow and Tehran, the Syrian leader will stonewall peace talks and try to hold fake elections. With President Obama rmly committed to a passive position on Syria, Secretary of State John Kerrys calls for an Assad exit will be ignored. The ghting may continue for years, as the country sinks into de facto partition. Most tragic, the best and brightest of Syrias educated youth, such as Hadad, will ee out of physical or economic desperation. Or they will wind up dead or tortured. Many Syrians want to end this war by any means, even if the country is divided, Hadad told me sadly. But I dont think a majority would accept Assad staying. In a world where the international community tolerates a leader responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians, Hadad said, I dont think this global community is good for anything. When it comes to Syria, hes correct.Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorialboard member for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Readers may email her at trubin@phillynews.com.OTHERVOICES Trudy RubinTRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES Syria talks are headed for failure The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Forty years ago, when the Supreme Court expanded the right of police to search people they took into custody as well as the possessions they were car rying, the smartphone was the stuff of sci ence ction. But now that phones contain vast amounts of personal information, the court should rule that cellphone searches require a warrant. Last week, the justices agreed to review two lower court decisions that came to dif ferent conclusions about the privacy of cell phone data. In a California case, a state court upheld the conviction of David Leon Riley, who was initially pulled over because his car had expired tags. After police found guns in the car, they arrested Riley and searched through what one detective called lots of stuff on his smartphone, including a photo showing Riley and another man posing near a car that had been involved in a shooting. In the other case, the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston ruled that police may not conduct warrantless searches of data on cellphones seized from people who have been arrested. The case involved Brima Wurie, whose comparatively primitive ip phone displayed calls from a number identied as my house. When police went to the address associated with that number, they found a mailbox labeled with Wuries name. After obtaining a warrant, po lice searched the house and found crack cocaine, marijuana, cash and a rearm. Police long have been allowed to conduct warrantless searches of people they ar rest because of the possibility that a suspect might have a concealed weapon or try to destroy evidence. But in 1973, the Supreme Court unjustiably held that such searches were legal even when there was no probability that weapons or evidence would be found. The invasion of privacy permitted by that ruling multiplies exponentially when the object searched is a smartphone. Ideally the court would endorse the 1st Circuits holding that warrantless searches of cellphones are always unconstitutional. But the court also could draw a distinction between the search of Wuries phone, on which the call register was easily accessed, and the more intrusive search of Rileys smartphone. When the framers of the Constitution wrote of the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches, they couldnt have foreseen that papers and effects would be housed in a palm-sized device. But the court should rule that the principle of privacy is the same.From Los Angeles Times.AVOICENo warrant, no search of your mobile phone

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Heat top Spurs in Finals rematch / B3 STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterMIAMI In their tful, laborious search for a general manager, the Miami Dolphins nally found someone to say yes: Dennis Hickey. The longtime Tampa Bay Buccaneers executive accepted the job Sunday, ending a search that lasted nearly three weeks. Hickeys hiring came after the Dol phins were rejected by several can didates. New England Patriots direc tor of player personnel Nick Caserio and Tennessee Titans vice president of player personnel Lake Dawson turned down job offers, and Cleveland Browns assistant general man ager Ray Farmer withdrew from con sideration Thursday. Several others declined invitations to interview as a replacement for Jeff Ireland, whose six-year stint as gen eral manager ended Jan. 7 when he and owner Stephen Ross agreed to part ways. Hickey has been with the Buccaneers for 18 seasons, including the past three as director of player per sonnel. He was their director of col lege scouting for six years. He was not interviewed for Tampa Bays GM job when it became open after this season. The Bucs won four division titles and one Super Bowl championship during his time with them, but went 28-52 over the past ve years and had spotty draft re sults during that span. Hickey was among eight candidates interviewed, with Ross aide Matt Higgins and executive vice Dolphins name Bucs Hickey as new GMThree-week search ends after Miami rejected by several different candidates over concerns about roster control SEE HICKEY | B2 JOHN PYEAP Sports WriterMELBOURNE, Australia Stan Wawrinka added a win over Rafael Nadal to his list of rsts in a stunning run to his maiden Grand Slam title, extending his rivals in jury-cursed run at the Aus tralian Open with a 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 upset in Sundays nal. The 28-year-old Wawrinka had never taken a set off Nadal in 12 previous meetings, but attacked from the start against the 13-time major winner and regained his nerve after dropping the third set against the injured Spaniard. Nadal appeared to be on the verge of retiring in the second set, when he hurt his back and needed a medical time out, but he refused to quit. Its really not the way you want to win a tennis match, but in a Grand Slam nal Ill take it, said Wawrinka, the rst man in 21 years to beat the No. 1 and No. 2 ranked players en route to a Grand Slam title. Nadal was a hot favorite to win at Melbourne Park and become the rst man to win each of the four Grand Slam tournaments twice in the Open era instead, his injury curse struck again. It remains the only major hes hasnt won at least two times. Rafa, Im really sorry for you, I hope your back is go ing to be ne, youre a really great guy, good friend and really amazing cham pion, Wawrinka said as he accepted his rst major tro phy. Last year I had a crazy match, I lost it. I was crying a lot after the match. But in one year a lot happened I still dont know if Im dream ing or not but well see tomorrow morning. Wawrinka lost in ve sets to Novak Djokovic in the fourth round of the 2013 Australian Open, in the lon gest Grand Slam match of the season. Djokovic went Wawrinka wins Aussie Open final over injured Nadal AARON FAVILA / APStanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland kisses the trophy after defeating Rafael Nadal of Spain on Sunday after the mens singles nal at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia. SEE AUSSIE | B2 BILL HABER / APNew Orleans Pelicans shooting guard Eric Gordon (10) shoots over Orlando Magic power forward Glen Davis in the rst half on Sunday in New Orleans.PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALMemo Gidley is cut out of the Gainsco Corvette DP after he was involved in a crash with Risi Competizione Ferrari F458 (62) on Sunday during the IMSA Series Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. The RSR Racing Oreca passes in front of the ferris wheel. BRETT MARTELAP Sports WriterNEW ORLEANS Anthony Davis had 22 points, a career-high 19 rebounds and sev en blocked shots, and the New Orleans Pelicans won their sec ond straight game, 100-92 over the Or lando Magic on Sunday night. Davis statistical line marked the rst time since the franchise was founded as the Hornets in Char lotte in 1988 that a player on the club had that many points, rebounds and blocks in the same game. Tyreke Evans scored 13 of his 23 points in the fourth quarter to keep struggling Or lando at bay. Led by Arron Af alos 25 points, the Magic twice got as close as three points late in the fourth quarter, the last time on Tobias Harris runner with 4:26 to go. Brian Roberts had 15 points and Eric Gordon 14 for the Pelicans. Victor Oladipo 18 points and ve steals for Orlando, while Harris added 17 points and nine re bounds. Davis punctuated his latest memorable performance with a soaring windmill jam over Orlandos Glen Davis that made it 9890 with 1:24 left. JENNA FRYERAP Auto Racing WriterDAYTONA BEACH Action Express Racing led a Corvette podium sweep in the prestigious Rolex 24 at Daytona, where Joao Barbosa held off Max Angelelli on a restart with 8:23 remaining Sunday to preserve a second overall win in four years. Barbosa had driven the No. 5 Corvette to a 13.1-second lead when a full-course cau tion with 21 minutes remaining put the vic tory in jeopardy. The eld was bunched and Angelelli had one nal chance to give Wayne Taylor Racing the win. But Barbosa easily pulled away to get the win for teammates Christian Fittipaldi and Sebastien Bourdais. ts the second over all victory for Barbosa, third in class. Fittipal di was part of the win ning 2004 team, and its Bourdais rst victory. Barbosa was unhap py when IMSA race of cials called the fullcourse caution for a Porsche that had run off the track and into the chicane. I didnt want to see it. I had quite a good gap and cushion so I could manage trafc, said Barbosa, who lives outside Daytona in Or mond Beach. I was getting quite worried initially because I kept hitting trafc at the wrong moments. But we won the race. Wayne Taylor Racing nished second for the second consecutive year. I tried everything I had in the car, trust me, everything I had to use, Angelelli said. Co-owner Wayne Action Express leads podium sweep at Rolex 24 at Daytona SEE ROLEX | B2Davis powers Pelicans past Magic, 100-92SEE MAGIC | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 22 21 .512 Brooklyn 20 22 .476 1 New York 17 27 .386 5 Boston 15 31 .326 8 Philadelphia 14 30 .318 8 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 32 12 .727 Atlanta 23 20 .535 8 Washington 21 22 .488 10 Charlotte 19 27 .413 14 Orlando 12 33 .267 20 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 34 9 .791 Chicago 22 21 .512 12 Detroit 17 26 .395 17 Cleveland 16 28 .364 18 Milwaukee 8 35 .186 26 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 33 11 .750 Houston 29 17 .630 5 Dallas 25 20 .556 8 Memphis 22 20 .524 10 New Orleans 18 25 .419 14 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 35 10 .778 Portland 33 11 .750 1 Denver 21 21 .500 12 Minnesota 21 22 .488 13 Utah 15 29 .341 19 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 31 15 .674 Golden State 26 18 .591 4 Phoenix 25 18 .581 4 Sacramento 15 27 .357 14 L.A. Lakers 16 29 .356 14 Saturdays Games Chicago 89, Charlotte 87 L.A. Clippers 126, Toronto 118 Oklahoma City 103, Philadelphia 91 Memphis 99, Houston 81 Atlanta 112, Milwaukee 87 Denver 109, Indiana 96 Utah 104, Washington 101 Portland 115, Minnesota 104 Sundays Games Miami 113, San Antonio 101 New York 110, L.A. Lakers 103 New Orleans 100, Orlando 92 Phoenix 99, Cleveland 90 Brooklyn 85, Boston 79 Detroit at Dallas, late Portland at Golden State, late Denver at Sacramento, late Todays Games Phoenix at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games New Orleans at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m. Memphis at Portland, 10 p.m. Washington at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Sundays College Basketball Scores By The Associated Press EAST Canisius 78, Marist 65 Iona 71, St. Peters 63 NYU 78, Rochester 58 New Hampshire 61, Mass.-Lowell 32 Princeton 84, Kean 54 Quinnipiac 90, Manhattan 86, OT Siena 64, Faireld 56 Stony Brook 79, Maine 61 UMass 90, Fordham 52 SOUTH Memphis 80, South Florida 58 NC State 80, Georgia Tech 78, OT MIDWEST Evansville 66, Bradley 60 Green Bay 62, Detroit 52 Indiana 56, Illinois 46 Indiana-East 89, St. Louis Pharmacy 74 W. Michigan 62, Ball St. 53 SOUTHWEST SMU 75, Houston 68 National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 50 32 15 3 67 147 110 Tampa Bay 52 31 16 5 67 155 128 Toronto 54 27 21 6 60 155 168 Montreal 52 27 20 5 59 128 134 Detroit 52 23 18 11 57 135 144 Ottawa 52 22 20 10 54 147 165 Florida 52 21 24 7 49 127 158 Buffalo 50 14 29 7 35 97 144 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 52 36 14 2 74 168 128 N.Y. Rangers 54 28 23 3 59 139 138 Columbus 51 26 21 4 56 150 145 Philadelphia 53 25 22 6 56 142 158 Carolina 51 23 19 9 55 131 145 New Jersey 53 22 20 11 55 127 132 Washington 52 23 21 8 54 148 154 N.Y. Islanders 54 21 25 8 50 154 179 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 53 32 9 12 76 189 146 St. Louis 51 35 11 5 75 177 119 Colorado 51 32 14 5 69 149 134 Minnesota 54 28 20 6 62 129 133 Dallas 52 24 20 8 56 151 153 Nashville 53 23 22 8 54 131 158 Winnipeg 53 24 24 5 53 149 157 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 54 39 10 5 83 182 130 San Jose 52 34 12 6 74 165 125 Los Angeles 53 29 18 6 64 132 113 Vancouver 52 26 17 9 61 130 130 Phoenix 51 24 18 9 57 147 155 Calgary 52 18 27 7 43 119 165 Edmonton 53 15 32 6 36 135 187 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games St. Louis 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO Carolina 6, Ottawa 3 Boston 6, Philadelphia 1 Washington 5, Montreal 0 Tampa Bay 5, Colorado 2 Buffalo 5, Columbus 2 Winnipeg 5, Toronto 4, OT Dallas 3, Pittsburgh 0 Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 0 San Jose 3, Minnesota 2, OT Sundays Games Florida 5, Detroit 4, SO N.Y. Rangers 7, New Jersey 3 Winnipeg at Chicago, late Nashville at Edmonton, late Phoenix at Vancouver, late Todays Games Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Columbus at Carolina, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games Florida at Boston, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Columbus, 7 p.m. Washington at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Carolina at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 10 p.m. WINTER SPORTS Luge World Cup ResultsSunday At Sigulda, Latvia Men 1. Armin Zoeggeler, Italy, 1:35.913 (47.96947.944). 2. Johannes Ludwig, Germany, 1:36.019 (47.98848.031). 3. Dominik Fischnaller, Italy, 1:36.226 (48.07348.153). 4. Martins Rubenis, Latvia, 1:36.363 (48.22048.143). 5. Semen Pavlichenko, Russia, 1:36.482 (48.31248.170). 6. Alexandr Peretjagin, Russia, 1:36.543 (48.34848.195). 7. Chris Mazdzer, United States, 1:36.567 (48.39148.176). 8. Jozef Ninis, Slovakia, 1:36.597 (48.44848.149). 9. Thor Haug Norbech, Norway, 1:36.607 (48.36148.246). 10. Samuel Edney, Canada, 1:36.638 (48.38748.251). Final World Cup Standings 1. Felix Loch, Germany, 685 points. 2. Armin Zoeggeler, Italy, 595. 3. Dominik Fischnaller, Italy, 534. 4. David Moeller, Germany, 515. 5. Chris Mazdzer, United States, 412. 6. Andi Langenhan, Germany, 381. 7. Samuel Edney, Canada, 375. 8. Wolfgang Kindl, Austria, 339. 9. Gregory Carigiet, Switzerland, 323. 10. Reinhard Egger, Austria, 315. Also 24. Tucker West, United States, 162. 30. Aidan Kelly, United States, 110. 35. Taylor Morris, United States, 101. 45. Joe Mortensen, United States, 32. Mens World Cup Ski Jump Results Sunday At Sapporo, Japan Large Hill 1. Jernej Damjan, Slovenia, 255.0 (138-134 me ters). 2. Peter Prevc, Slovenia, 254.4 (124-137.5). 3. Robert Kranjec, Slovenia, 253.3 (126-137). 4. Michael Neumayer, Germany, 249.8 (133.5-134). 5. Andreas Koer, Austria, 246.9 (140-130). 6. Noriaki Kasai, Japan, 245.2 (123.5-133). 7. Jan Matura, Czech Republic, 243.0 (131.5-127). 8. Markus Eisenbichler, Germany, 241.3 (130132.5). 9. Nejc Dezman, Slovenia, 236.3 (131-129). 10. Daiki Ito, Japan, 230.1 (128.5-125). Also 51. Michael Glasder, United States, 82.5 (109.5), did not qualify for second jump. 62. Chris Lamb, United States, 67.6 (103), did not qualify for second jump. World Cup Standings (After 19 of 28 events) 1. Peter Prevc, Slovenia, 812 points. 2. Kamil Stoch, Poland, 721. 3. Gregor Schlierenzauer, Austria, 670. 4. Noriaki Kasai, Japan, 646. 5. Simon Ammann, Switzerland, 608. 6. Anders Bardal, Norway, 598. 7. Andreas Wellinger, Germany, 492. 8. Severin Freund, Germany, 467. 9. Thomas Diethart, Austria, 445. 10. Thomas Morgenstern, Austria, 438. Also 71. Nicholas Fairall, United States, 3. Womens Ski Jump World Cup Results Sunday At Planica, Slovenia 1. Daniela Iraschko-Stolz, Austria, 249.8 points (102.5-101.5 meters). 2. Sara Takanashi, Japan, 246.8 (101.5-98.5). 3. Carina Vogt, Germany, 241.3 (100-99). 4. Yuki Ito, Japan, 233.7 (96.5-97). 5. Maja Vtic, Slovenia, 233.3 (98.5-96.5). 6. Maren Lundby, Norway, 231.3 (97-96). 7. Coline Mattel, France, 228.3 (98-95). 8. Ursa Bogataj, Slovenia, 227.4 (99.5-95). 9. Katja Pozun, Slovenia, 219.4 (97-94). 10. Julia Clair, France, 218.8 (96-92.5). World Cup Standings (After 11 of 19 events) 1. Sara Takanashi, Japan, 1,020 points. 2. Carina Vogt, Germany, 666. 3. Daniela Iraschko-Stolz, Austria, 522. 4. Irina Avvakumova, Russia, 493. 5. Yuki Ito, Japan, 354. 6. Coline Mattel, France, 343. 7. Maren Lundby, Norway, 281. 8. Maja Vtic, Slovenia, 266. 9. Helena Olsson Smeby, Norway, 252. 10. Katharina Althaus, Germany, 228. Also 15. Jessica Jerome, United States, 175. 26. Lindsey Van, United States, 101. 34. Alissa Johnson, United States, 54. 47. Abby Hughes, United States, 13. S undays Sports TransactionsBASEBALL National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS Agreed to terms with 2B Joe Thurston and OF Jeremy Hermida on minor league contracts. FOOTBALL National Football League MIAMI DOLPHINS Named Dennis Hickey general manager. WASHINGTON REDSKINS Named Randy Jordan running backs coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS Reassigned RW Mikael Samuelsson to Grand Rapids (AHL). American Hockey League AHL Suspended Grand Rapids D Brennan Evans three games and Grand Rapids LW Triston Grant and Lake Erie RW Guillaume Desbiens one game for their actions during recent games. ECHL ECHL Suspended Wheeling F Chaz Johnson and Cincinnati D David MacDonald indenitely, Elmira F Corey Bellamy one game and Florida D Charles Landry and Toledo F Aaron Bogosian and ned them, along with Wheeling coach Clark Donatelli undisclosed amounts for their actions during re cent games. COLLEGE FLORIDA STATE Announced QB Jacob Coker will transfer to Alabama.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Duke at Pittsburgh ESPNU Norfolk St. at Savannah St.9 p.m.ESPN Oklahoma St. at Oklahoma ESPNU Ark.-Pine Bluff at Texas Southern FS1 Villanova at GeorgetownNHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m.NBCSN Buffalo at Pittsburgh10 p.m.NBCSN Los Angeles at San JoseWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 Notre Dame at Maryland9 p.m.ESPN2 Southern Cal at Stanfordpresident of football administration Dawn Aponte helping the owner with the screen ing process. The other nalist was Dolphins assistant general manager Brian Gaine, who worked under Ireland. Some candidates and potential candi dates expressed con cern about the Dol phins power structure, including the role of Aponte, who clashed with Ireland. Ross has said the new GM will report to him and will have autonomy in building the roster. Dawson turned down the job shortly before Hickey accepted. I felt Stephen is a great owner, passion ate and wants to win, but the details of the offer didnt align with my vision, Dawson said in a statement. I turned it down because it wasnt an ideal t for my family and me. So Ross turned to Hickey, who inter viewed for the rst time 10 days into the search. His task will be to upgrade the roster for coach Joe Philbin after Miami collapsed late in the season to blow a playoff berth and n ish 8-8. The Dolphins havent been above .500 since 2008, the longest such stretch in franchise history. Their tumultuous 2013 season in cluded a locker-room bullying scandal that drew national scru tiny, and a report on the NFL investigation into the case will be released after the Super Bowl. HICKEY FROM PAGE B1 on to win his third consecutive title at Melbourne Park, and then beat Wawrinka again in ve sets in the U.S. Open semi nals. But Wawrinka avenged those loss es this time, beating Djokovic in ve sets in the quarternals ending a run of 14 straight losses to the Serbian player. Now hell move from No. 8 to No. 3. In doing so, hell sur pass Federer, a 17time Grand Slam winner who lost to Nadal in the seminals to become the highest-ranked Swiss player for the rst time in his career. bWawrinka also broke up a sequence of wins for the Big Four with 34 of the previous 35 majors going to either Nadal, Djokovic, Roger Federer or Andy Murray. Stan, you really deserve it, Nadal said. Luck was against me today but you really deserve it. Last thing that I wanted to do was re tire. I hate to do that, especially in a nal. Same time, is tough to see yourself during the whole year you are working for a moment like this, and arrives the moment and you feel that you are not able to play at your best. Nadal has had a ter rible stretch with in juries at the Australian Open, and has described it as his unluckiest Grand Slam. He won the title in 2009, and lost an epic ve-set nal to Djokovic in 2012. But he missed the 2013 edition during a seven-month layoff with knee injuries and ill ness, and his quar ternal losses in 2010 and 2011 were affect ed by injuries. It has been a very emotional two weeks Im sorry to n ish this way, he told the Rod Laver Arena crowd. I tried very, very hard this year was one of the more emotional tournaments in my career. A possible retirement was loom ing when Nadal was serving at 0-2 in the second set. He bent over at the waist to stretch his back and then grabbed his lower back with his hand and grimaced in pain. His serve immediate ly dipped to 141 kph (87 mph). When Nadal took a medical timeout after falling behind a set and a break, and returned to a chorus of boos without a shirt after 7 minutes, it seemed that an ear ly nish was on the cards. Wawrinka was ag gravated during the time out, demanding that ofcials tell him why Nadal needed the break. And he came out aggressively to nish off the second set. Nadals serve speed dipped even further to 125 kph (77 mph) and then 114 kph (70 mph). The support in the stadium gradually shifted as the crowd saw the Spaniard battling to stay on the court. His service speed improved in the be ginning of the third set, prompting a fan to yell advice to Waw rinka: Cmon Stan, no sympathy! By the end of the set, Nadals serve was back up to 174 kph (108 mph) and Waw rinkas error count was escalating. Wawrinka composed himself af ter an exchange of breaks in the fourth set to serve it out in 2 hours, 21 minutes. Af ter a muted celebra tion, he consoled Nadal in the courtside chairs before getting a chance to hold up and kiss his rst big trophy. AUSSIE FROM PAGE B1 Taylor came out of re tirement to drive for the rst time since 2010 for the opportunity to drive with Angelelli and sons Ricky and Jordan. The 58-year-old drove one stint on Saturday then retreated to the pit stand to strategize for what he hoped would be a third and most memorable victory. It was a great result, and to have my fam ily and my kids drive with me and Max, its been an emotional roller-coaster, Wayne Tay lor said. Obviously, we wanted to be the rst winners for Chevro let in the Corvette, but we were second-best and they won fair and square. Action Express sec ond car, with drivers Brian Frisselle, Burt Frisselle, John Martin and Fabien Giroix, n ished third for a strong showing for the two-car team. Chevrolet was the top manufacturer standing at the end of the twice-around-theclock endurance race. Two Nissan teams took the next two places in the top-tier Prototype class as Ford was shut out in its debut of its new EcoBoost engine as the manufactur er stepped into the new unied Tudor United SportsCar Championship supporting teams for the rst time. But the No. 01 car from Chip Ganassi Racing team wasnt able to defend its win because of a series of prob lems that plagued the car starting very ear ly in the race. Then the No. 02 was taken out of contention when it de veloped a at rear tire while Scott Dixon was running second with roughly ve hours re maining. The No. 02 went to the garage with 48 minutes remaining when the oor of the Ford Riley began to un ravel and Dixon could see the pavement un der his feet. Michael Shank Racings entry, the 2012 race winning team, was plagued by a broken gearbox. But many in the Ford camp considered it a success considering the questions about re liability with the new engine package that plagued the manufacturer in preseason test ing. To see where we were, and where we are now, this is a great step moving forward with this program, said ve-time Rolex winner Scott Pruett. This is a whole new engine with technology that hasnt been in the sport before. We were here at (testing) and we left early because we had issues. So coming back here, everyone put this gallant effort ... to run like we did, when you think about where we were, its huge. ROLEX FROM PAGE B1 The play sent Glen Davis stumbling into the padding under the basket, while Anthony Davis took a triumphant stride over the baseline and glared intensely at the crazed crowd, his arms stiff at his side. The Magic were un able to recover after that. Orlando outshot New Orleans 46.8 per cent (36 of 77) to 45.7 percent (37 of 81), but New Orleans outscored Orlando at the foul line, 21-15, and outre bounded the Magic 4832. Orlando, which has lost 13 of 15 games, never led during the nal three quarters, but kept it close much of the second half. New Orleans led 6258 after a 6-0 Magic spurt in which Oladi po hit two free throws, converted a steal from Gordon into a fastbreak dunk, then stole the ball from Roberts to set up Afalos layup. Gordon halted the surge with a stepback jumper from 19 feet, and Anthony Davis two-handed jam capped an 11-2 run that put the Pelicans back up by 13. Orlando closed the third quarter with Afalos 3 and two layups by Jameer Nelson, and cut New Orleans lead to 75-71 on ETauwn Moores oater to open the fourth quarter. Evans responded with a reverse layup as he was fouled for a three-point play. He wound up scoring all 10 of the Pelicans points through the rst 6:33 of the nal period to help New Orleans main tain a slim lead. Evans also fed Davis for an alley-oop jam that made it 94-88. New Orleans started fast, erasing its nal decit of the game on Dari us Millers 3-pointer late in the rst period. When Miller hit his second from deep in the second quarter, it capped a 22-6 run that put New Orleans up 38-23. The lead grew to 16 points on Roberts 3 late in the period, but Orlando ran off eight straight points on Nel sons 3, Davis hook shot as he was fouled and Nelsons short oater. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterMIAMI Chris Bosh scored 24 points on 9 for 10 shooting, LeBron James added 18 points and the Miami Heat rolled past the San An tonio Spurs 113-101 on Sunday in an NBA Finals rematch from last season. Mario Chalmers scored 16 points for Mi ami, which used Dwyane Wade as a reserve for the rst time since Jan. 6, 2008. Wade an All-Star starter again this season had not played in any of Miamis most recent four games while dealing with ongoing knee rehabilitation, and n ished with eight points and ve assists in 24 minutes. Michael Beasley scored 12, Norris Cole scored 11 and Ray Al len added 10 for Miami. Bosh has made 17 of his last 18 shots from the oor. Tim Duncan led San Antonio with 23 points. Boris Diaw added 15, Marco Belinelli scored 12 and Tony Parker n ished with 11 for the Spurs, who went on a 13-0 run late in the fourth quarter and were still down by 13 when the spurt was over. Chalmers the last starter from either side who was in the game made a 3-pointer midway through the fourth to give Miami a 10680 lead. As the build ing slowly emptied, the Spurs slowly chipped away, with Nando De Colo getting six points and an assist during the run that was nowhere near enough to make any real differ ence. Roger Mason Jr. snapped the scoreless drought for Miami, making a 3-point er from nearly the same spot that Allen made his infamous game-ty ing one that saved the Heat with 5.2 seconds left in Game 6 of last seasons Finals, when the Spurs were one stop away from their fth championship. Miami won that one in over time, then prevailed in Game 7 for its second straight crown. Sundays game was the rst ofcial meet ing between the teams since that nale. San Antonio visited Mi ami in the preseason, a night where the Finals rematch was the only thing really worth talking about, but at least the Spurs didnt have to see Miamis third championship banner hanging from the rafters of Ameri canAirlines Arena that night. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich acknowledged that its still dif cult to think about. Coaches, he said, would understand. All the good stuff fades away and you remember the stuff that passed you by, Popo vich said. Thats the way we think, sad as it is. Unlike those Finals thrillers, this one wasnt a down-to-the-wire affair. With a minute to go in the rst half, Miamis lead was 53-50. It was 91-71 by the start of the fourth, a 38-21 blitz by the Heat over a span of 13 minutes eliminating any semblance of drama. The third quarter was all Miami, and elimi nated all doubt. Bosh was 4 for 4 from the eld, on the way to a 12-point quarter. Mi ami outrebounded San Antonio 14-3 in the quarter, with James and Cole each grabbing one more rebound in that period than the entire Spurs roster. And by the time the fourth started, the blowout was well un derway.NBA GOLF J PAT CARTER / AP Miami Heat players Michael Beasley (8) and Chris Andersen (11) block San Antonio Spurs Manu Ginbobil (20) during the rst half of a NBA basketball game on Sunday in Miami. DANTE CARRER / APJessica Korda of the U.S. kisses her trophy as she poses for photographers following her victory at the LPGA Pure Silk Bahamas Classic on Sunday at the Ocean Club Golf Course, Paradise Island, Bahamas. Associated PressPARADISE ISLAND, Bahamas Jessica Korda won the sea son-opening Bahamas LPGA Classic on Sunday for her second tour title, holing a 6-foot birdie putt on the nal hole to beat Stacy Lew is by a stroke. The 20-year-old Korda closed with a 7-under 66 for a 19-under 273 total on Atlantis Resorts Ocean Club course. Lewis parred the nal four holes two of them par 5s for a 66. Korda tied Lewis for the lead with a 12-foot birdie putt on the par3 17th, then got up and down for birdie on the par-5 18th. Kor das 4-iron approach on 18 scampered through the green to the fringe just short of the grandstand. With an ofcial and a TV announcer holding up cords that would have interfered with her stroke, she putted under the wires to set up the winning birdie. That was differ ent, Korda said. It was like jump rope. She admitted she was nervous on the winning putt. Incredible! Korda said. I could barely put the golf ball down and line up.Heat win Finals rematch with 113-101 victory over SpursJessica Korda wins Bahamas ClassicLPGA Pure Silk-Bahamas Classic Leading Par ScoresSunday At Ocean Club Golf Course Paradise Island, Bahamas Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,644; Par: 73 Final Jessica Korda, $195,000 69-66-72-66 -19 Stacy Lewis, $120,655 69-71-68-66 -18 Pornanong Phatlum, $63,581 71-69-69-67 -16 Paula Creamer, $63,581 71-65-71-69 -16 Lizette Salas, $63,581 72-67-66-71 -16 Na Yeon Choi, $63,581 70-68-66-72 -16 Christel Boeljon, $31,543 71-67-73-66 -15 Sandra Gal, $31,543 71-69-71-66 -15 Lydia Ko, $31,543 68-70-71-68 -15 P.K. Kongkraphan, $31,543 69-69-71-68 -15 Morgan Pressel, $23,945 70-73-69-66 -14 Thidapa Suwannapura, $23,945 70-71-68-69 -14 Brittany Lincicome, $19,289 70-71-71-68 -12 Chella Choi, $19,289 73-69-67-71 -12 Michelle Wie, $19,289 72-65-72-71 -12 Amelia Lewis, $19,289 69-73-66-72 -12 Jenny Suh, $19,289 71-66-71-72 -12 Alena Sharp, $15,220 75-69-70-68 -10 Kristy McPherson, $15,220 73-71-69-69 -10 Hee Young Park, $15,220 69-72-72-69 -10 Sandra Changkija, $15,220 71-72-68-71 -10 Azahara Munoz, $15,220 70-71-69-72 -10 Haru Nomura, $13,344 73-74-70-66 -9 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $13,344 75-68-71-69 -9 Angela Stanford, $12,386 73-73-69-69 -8 BRIAN MAHONEYAP Basketball WriterNEW YORK Car melo Anthony followed his 62-point game with 35 more, and the New York Knicks beat the Los Angeles Lakers 110-103 on Sunday. Anthony nished with two points fewer than he had at halftime of his record-setting night Friday, but he scored six straight New York points down the stretch after the Lakers had cut the Knicks lead to two with just over 5 minutes left. And he had plenty of help as the Knicks won their second straight following a ve-game losing streak. Raymond Felton scored 20 points, Tim Hardaway Jr. had 18 and J.R. Smith 16 for the Knicks. Tyson Chandler had 13 points and 14 rebounds. Jodie Meeks scored 24 points for the Lakers, but he was shut out in the fourth quarter after scoring 16 in the third. Pau Gasol had 20 points and 13 rebounds as the Lakers dropped their fourth straight to nish 2-5 on their Grammy Awards road trip. Anthonys 62 points were a career high, most at in the NBA this season and most at the current Madison Square Garden, one more than Kobe Bry ant scored ve years ago. Lakers coach Mike DAntoni, who coached Anthony in New York, said the key for the Lak ers was to contain ev eryone else, knowing Anthony would score. They didnt. Bryant is still unable to play as he recovers from a broken left knee. He said he called to congratulate Anthony after Fridays game, and though he stressed his appreciation for MSG, said having the building record wasnt particularly important to him. He also noted that Anthony, who will be come a free agent this summer, may have to tell the Knicks he wont settle for being on a non-contender, as Bry ant did with the Lak ers, and that the talent around him needed to be upgraded. It was good enough Sunday until Anthony took over. He followed his own missed shot with 4:52 left, made a jumper and then scored on a drive that pushed the Knicks lead to 105-98 with 2:33 to play. Manny Harris scored a season-high 18 points for the Lakers, who stayed in it until late by making 12 of 18 shots in the third quarter, in cluding 6 of 7 from behind the 3-point arc. The Lakers scored the nal nine points of the rst quarter, shooting 57 percent in the period to lead 25-22. It was tied at 45 late in the second before Anthony made a 3-pointer and a jumper, and the Knicks led 51-47 at the break. Notes: Bryant is due to have his knee examined after the Lakers return to Los Angeles. He said he was anxious to do some thing besides ride the stationary bike. ... The Knicks still face Boston on Tuesday and Cleveland on Thursday.Anthony sets season record for points in 2 games; Knicks top Lakers SETH WENIG / AP New York Knicks Tim Hardaway Jr. nishes off an alley-oop during the second half against the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday at Madison Square Garden in New York. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterSAN DIEGO In a tournament that was up for grabs, Scott Stallings hit a 4-iron worthy of a winner Sunday in the Farmers Insurance Open. Stallings was in a ve-way tie for the lead when he hit his second shot on the par-5 18th hole as hard as he could. It was enough to barely clear the water, and he took two putts from 40 feet for birdie and a 4-under 68 at Torrey Pines. That was enough for a one-shot victo ry when no one could catch him. It was the third career PGA Tour victory for Stallings, who earned a return trip to the Masters and should move high enough in the world ranking to qual ify for the Match Play Championship next month in Arizona. K.J. Choi had the best score of the week on the South Course with a 66 and was among those who tied for second. The pins were set up in favorable positions for birdies, making the course play the easi est it had all week. But that didnt make it easy not for Gary Woodland, Jordan Spieth, Pat Perez and so many others who squandered a good chance to win. Woodland appeared to have the best chance to catch Stallings. He was one shot behind with plenty of length to reach the 18th in two until he chose fair way metal off the tee on No. 17 and hooked it into the canyon. He felt he had to make his 45-foot par putt to have any chance, and three-putted for double bogey. Woodland, who had a one-shot lead going into the nal round, missed an easy birdie attempt on the 18th. Stallings rallies to win at Torrey

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 NHL COLLEGE BASKETBALL KEN POWTAKAssociated PressAMHERST, Mass. Fordham coach Tom Pecora isnt about to listen to excuses for his teams rough start in Atlantic-10 play. Chaz Williams had 18 points and eight as sists and No. 13 Massachusetts rebounded from a loss earlier this week with a 90-52 victory over the Rams on Sunday. Im tired of saying were inexperienced, Pecora said. No com plaining, no excuses, no regrets. Weve got to get better. This is a tremendous league, but we have an opportuni ty to get better by go ing to VCU Wednesday and you can see how thrilled I am about that. Raphiael Putney and Trey Davis both had 13 points and Maxie Esho had 10 points and six rebounds for the Minutemen (17-2, 4-1 A-10), who lost at Rich mond on Wednesday. The player that hurt Fordham the most, though, was Williams, who transferred from Hofstra after his freshman season when Pec ora was the coach of the Pride. I think hes just de veloped tremendously, Pecora said. As you all know I had him as a freshman. His abil ity to involve every one and basically to be a surgeon, with a great quarterback and the great length he has around him. Chris Whitehead led the Rams (8-11, 1-5) with 13 points and Branden Frazier had 12. It was Fordhams seventh loss in eight games coming off a win against George Mason. The Rams shot just 30.5 percent (18 of 59) from the eld and missed 21 of 27 on 3-point attempts. We werent able to, for whatever reason, get the ball consistent ly to the rim, Pecora said. In the rst ve minutes of the second half, they come out boom, game over. UMass broke the game open by scoring the rst 17 points of the second half. Fordham guard Jon Severe, who leads all Division I freshmen in scoring at 20.9 points per game, was held to seven points. UMass combined a swarming fullcourt press along with tough halfcourt man-to-man defense to take its largest lead of the season, 40-24 at halftime. The Minutemen turned it into a rout with its run to start the second half. Putney opened the run with a 3 and Williams nailed one in transition from the left wing as they went ahead 57-24 on Derrick Gordons short jumper 4 1-2 minutes into the second half. The Rams nally ended the run on Man dell Thomas 3-pointer 30 seconds later. The Minutemen cleared the bench for most of the nal 10 minutes and gave some reserves time to join in the fun with 3-pointers and crowd-pleasing fastbreak baskets. Coming off the loss in the nal game of a three-game road trip and in danger of drop ping low or possibly out of the AP Top 25, the Minutemen turned up the fullcourt pressure early after falling behind 7-0 in the open ing 3 minutes. Sporting new white T-shirts with red letter ing that read: UMa ss. Time for Pain, the Minutemen seemed focused to rebound with a convincing win in front of a sellout crowd. FRANK FRANKLIN II / AP New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist (30), of Sweden, stops a shot on goal during the second period of an outdoor NHL hockey game against the New Jersey Devils on Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York. IRA PODELLAP Sports WriterNEW YORK After sun reecting off the ice delayed the rst hockey game at Yankee Stadium, the New York Rangers and pin striped goalie Henr ik Lundqvist beat the New Jersey Devils 7-3 in snow and cold Sunday. Rick Nash scored for the fth straight game, and the New York Rangers used a four-goal second period to take the lead for good. The Devils led 1-0 and 3-1 in the rst, but New York got within one before in termission and then swarmed future Hall of Fame goalie Martin Brodeur. After Dominic Moore and Marc Sta al had goals in the rst for the Rang ers, Mats Zuccarello scored two straight to put New York ahead for the rst time. Carl Hagelin and Nash found the net, too, be hind the beleaguered Brodeur, who angrily swatted the puck away after one of the tallies. Nash has seven goals in his streak and 18 this season. A day after the Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks played in 60-degree weather at Dodger Stadium, the NHL returned to conditions more tting for hock ey. Lundqvist, who sported stylish pinstriped pads for the occasion, stumbled through a difcult rst but settled down and made 19 saves. He hadnt allowed more than two goals in his previous sev en outings. The Dev ils took care of that in the rst. Jaromir Jagr had two assists to excite the large number of New Jersey fans who made the trek to the Bronx for what was nominally a Devils home game. The teams played through the second period as the snow started and increased in intensity, not long after they were forced to wait around an ex tra hour to drop the pick because of bright sunshine that created a dangerous glare on the ice. The temperature was 24.9 degrees when the rst puck dropped at 1:41 / p .m. in front of a sellout Rangers score 6 straight, top NJ in cold and snowNo. 13 UMass routs Fordham JESSICA HILL / AP Massachusetts Chaz Williams, left, drives to the basket as Fordhams Bryan Smith defends during the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game on Sunday in Amherst, Mass. CLAY BAILEYAssociated PressMEMPHIS, Tenn. Chris Crawford scored 15 points, converting ve of Memphis season-high 10 3-pointers, and the 23rd-ranked Ti gers defeated South Florida 80-58 on Sunday. The Tigers, next-tolast in the American Athletic Conference in 3-point shooting per centage, ended the night at 10 of 22 from outside the arc. Craw ford was 5 of 10. Joe Jackson added 14 points and seven assists for Memphis (154, 5-2 AAC), while Shaq Goodwin nished with 13 points and 10 re bounds. Nick King had 10 points as Memphis won its third straight and fth of six. Martino Brock led South Florida (10-10, 1-6) with 17 points, the only Bull to score in double gures. Memphis broke the game open in the mid dle of the rst half, building the lead to 12 points at halftime. The Tigers were up 30 with about 9 minutes left. At that point, Memphis coach Josh Pastner be gan substituting freely. The Tigers, who entered the game shooting 30 percent from outside the arc, n ished at 46 percent against South Florida, including 58 percent in the second half. Meanwhile, South Florida shot 34 percent for the game and was 3 of 10 from 3-point range. South Florida en tered the game shooting 26 percent from outside the arc, the worst in the confer ence. Jacksons seven as sists were part of Memphis collecting 23 as sists on 25 eld goals. Memphis closed the half with a 10-0 run to go up 34-22. The Tigers might have taken a big ger lead but was sty mied by anemic free throw shooting, going 9 of 19. In the nal 7 min utes of the half, the Ti gers were 3 of 11 from the free throw line. Memphis ended the game 20 of 35. The 3-point shooting loosened up in the second half. Memphis hit seven of its rst 10 shots in the half, including missing only 2 of 8 from outside the arc. Meanwhile, the Bulls were 2 of 4, but that exchange of baskets didnt help South Flor ida keep pace. Memphis was up 56-33 after Crawford hit consecutive 3-pointers with just under 13 minutes left in the game.NO. 15 CINCINNATI 80, TEMPLE 76 PHILADELPHIA Sean Kilpatrick scored a season-high 29 points and No. 15 Cincinnati staved off a Temple comeback to remain undefeated in the American Athletic Conference with an 8076 victory Sunday. After the Bearcats (19-2, 8-0 AAC) had blown all of a 19-point lead and were tied at 76, Kilpatrick hit the game-winning free throws with 7.2 seconds to play. Temple attempted to tie the game again, but Josh Browns layup was blocked by Jer maine Sanders with a half-second to play. Kevin Johnson added two more free throws for the Bearcats, who had their nation-best streak of holding 27 consecutive opponents under 70 points ended. Dalton Pepper had a career-high 33 points, including the 3 that tied the game at 76 with 36.9 seconds left, for the Owls (5-13, 0-7), who have lost eight straight. Cincinnatis Justin Jackson played just 6 minutes after appear ing to injure his leg. The Bearcats are off to their best start since 2001-02 and their best start in league play since they went 8-0 in Conference USA that same season. Temples losing streak is its longest since the 1975-76 team lost 11 straight. The four straight home losses are its most since 200102. This was Cincinnatis second win over Temple in two weeks. The Bearcats won the rst meeting at home, 6958, on Jan. 14. The Owls second-half comeback was spear headed by Pepper, who made seven of his eight 3-pointers and scored 27 points in the second half. USF falls to No. 23 Memphis 80-58 LANE MURPHEY / AP Memphis forward Nick King (5) goes to the basket against South Floridas forward Chris Perry (23) in the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game on Sunday in Memphis, Tenn. MLB TOM WITHERSAP Sports WriterCLEVELAND When Jim Thome rst started pointing his bat toward the pitch er, he never imagined that subtle movement would one day be come immortalized. The Indians announced Saturday that they will unveil a statue of Thome at Progressive Field on Aug. 2. Clevelands career leader in home runs will be forever honored with the statue, which depicts him standing in the batters box and directing his bat to ward the mound. Hall of Fame pitcher Bob Feller is the only other Cleveland player to also be honored with a statue outside the ballpark. Thome never could have imagined such a tribute, and is humbled by the salute. As a player, I dont even want to say you dream of that, said Thome, who retired in 2012 with 612 career homers. When it happens, when the opportunity comes about, its humbling. Its just a wonderful thing. My family is just ecstatic about it. One of Clevelands most popular players, Thome hit 337 hom ers with the Indians. He broke in with the club as a slender third baseman in 1991 and developed into one of baseballs most feared hitters. Charlie Manu el once suggested to Thome that he should point his bat at the pitcher to loosen him up before hitting.Indians to unveil Jim Thome statue in Aug. THOME

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014WEIGHT LOSS: Jennifer Hudson aids citys program / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman goes red for heart month February is dedicated to the prevention and education of heart disease and in recognition of the m onth, Florida Hospital Waterman is Going Red by lighting the outside canopy at the hospital for the month, symbolizing ongoing efforts to improve the heart health of local residents. Kick-off event for the Going Red theme is the Womens Hot Topic Breakfast at 8 a.m., Fri., Jan. 31 with Gary Allen, MD, FAACP. There will also be two other presentations in February with a Health and Wellness Expo on Feb. 13 and educational presentation on Feb. 5 and Feb. 26. Space is limited for events and registration is required by calling 352-253-3635 or go to www.fhwater manheart.com. BUSHNELL Spice it up for Hospice chili cook-off is Feb. 8The 4th annual Spice it up for Hospice chili cook-off to benet the Lane Purcell Hospice House in Sumterville, will be held at the Bushnell Plaza, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Feb. 8 in downtown Bushnell. Guests can, for a $5 fee, be taste testers at the event sampling the different types of chili, and then vote for each of their favorite tasting chili and favorite booth. For information or to purchase a booth space, call Susan Bennett at 352-742-6807. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver classes scheduled The AARP Driver Safety Programs new Smart Driver Course helps par ticipants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, which includes workbooks and a completion certicate. Payment must be made by check to AARP, no cash or credit cards will be accepted. The two-day course will be offered at the following locations: %  %  Today and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon, at Royal Highlands, 5350 Monarch Blvd., Leesburg. Register by calling 352-365-2818. %  %  Feb. 3 and 5 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., in Leesburg. To register call 352-326-3540. %  %  Feb. 3 and 5 from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Call 352-735-7180 to register. MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterBert and Ernie jump rope and munch apples and car rots, and Cookie Mon ster has his namesake treat once a week, not ev ery day. Can a Muppets mini-makeover improve kids health, too? A three-year experiment in South America suggests it can. Now, the Sesame Street project is coming to the United States. Already, a test run in a New York City preschool has seen results: Four-year-old Jahmeice Strowder got her mom to make cauliower for the rst time in her life. A classmate, Bryson Payne, bugged his dad for a banana every morning and more salads. A parent brought home a loaf of bread instead of Doritos. What we created, I believe, is a culture of healthy eating to ght a toxic environment of junk food and too little exercise, said Dr. Valentin Fuster, a cardiologist at New Yorks Mount Sinai Hospital. Six years ago, he started working with Sesame Workshop, producers of televisions Sesame Street, on a project aimed at 3-to-5-year-olds. At that age they pay attention to every thing and habits can be changed, he said. The need is clear: A third of U.S. children and teens are obese or overweight. Many dont get enough exercise, and a recent study found that kids tness has declined worldwide. Theyre at high risk for heart and other problems later in life. The focus is younger and younger to try to prevent this, said Dr. Stephen Daniels, a Univer sity of Colorado pediatrician and a spokesman for the American Heart Association. The groups annual conference in November featured Fusters experiment as one of the years top achievements in heart disease prevention. For Sesame Street, the project offered a chance to improve the lives of young viewers and give a makeover to certain Muppets. While Cookie Monster is an engaging gure, we felt there was an opportunity there to really model healthy eating, said Jorge Baxter, regional director for Latin Amer ica for Sesame Workshop. The new message is that certain things like cookies are something you can eat sometimes, but there are some foods that you can eat all the time, like vegetables, he said. The healthy messages have been gradually incorporated into the television show, and its producers even made a doctor Muppet Dr. Ruster (pronounced Rooster) in Fusters image for the preschool project. It launched in Colombia because U.S. schools that Fuster approached years ago were reluctant, but a wealthy familys foundation was willing to sponsor the experiment in Bogota. It involved 1,216 Sesame Street, heart doctor launch project to boost childrens health SETH WENIG / AP Bryson Payne, 4, left, and his teacher Jacqualine Sanchez play with pretend food in a pre-kindergarten class at the Sheltering Arms Learning Center in New York. JOHN BARRETT / AP This photo provided by Sesame Workshop shows new Muppet Dr. Ruster, center, with, from left, Grover, Rosita, Elmo, Cookie Monster, Ernie and Bert.Its a mecca for fast food around here. Were trying to get them to walk past the Chinese food or pizza or McDonalds, to go home and make something.Rachael Lynch, director of educational servicesSEE HEALTH | C2

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 JULIE SCHARPERThe Baltimore SunBALTIMORE Jennifer Hudson urged women to chart their own path to better health as she spoke to a gathering of Weight Watchers participants at a West Baltimore se nior center this week. You cannot achieve somebody elses goals, the singer and Oscar-winning actress, who serves as Weight Watchers celebrity ambassador, told a crowd assembled at Park Heights Zeta Cen ter for Healthy and Ac tive Aging. If you didnt do it, theyre going to talk. If you do it, theyre still going to talk. Hudson, who had been in Washington over the weekend to at tend Michelle Obamas 50th birthday celebration, appeared in Balti more Tuesday morning to announce an expansion of a city program that allows low-income residents of some neighborhoods to join Weight Watchers for a reduced fee. A grant from the United States Conference of Mayors and Weight Watchers will allow the city to expand the health departments BMore Fit for Healthy Babies program. Both women and men will be able to participate at the Zeta Center and more women will be able to enroll in existing programs near Pat terson Park and Druid Hill Park. Residents who have a body mass index greater than 25 and who qualify for a government-subsidized program such as Medicare, WIC or federal student aid, are eligible for the program, which offers deep discounts on Weight Watchers meetings and tness classes. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said that 45 percent of the citys African-American residents are obese as is 36 percent of the citys total population. The mayor said that she was prompted to lose a signicant amount of weight her self several years ago af ter realizing that most of the health problems that aficted her family were tied to obesity. I had to be honest with myself, she said. I dont want to tell you what my (body mass index) was when I started. Hudson, wearing a sleek black dress, told the crowd she had never been this size in my life. In 2011, the year after she became a Weight Watchers ambassador, Hudson told Oprah she had lost 80 pounds. When Weight Watchers approached her, Hudson said, her rst reac tion was I cant lose no weight eating no popcorn. In time, she lost the diet mentality and began to manage her weight by making healthy choices, she said. Hudson said that between 75 and 100 members of her fam ily have lost a total of 2,000 pounds through the weight loss program. She urged the crowd, which included about a dozen participants in the city-spon sored Weight Watch ers group to take baby steps. One of my New Years resolutions this year was I want to help change lives, she said. Im starting that by be ing here. Hopefully, my testimony can help inspire someone elses journey and make a difference in someone elses life. The former Amer ican Idol nalist is also nding time to make music. Hudson, who received a Peo ples Choice Award this month for the charity she founded, said her third studio album, set to be released early this year, is a feel-good al bum, that is extremely different from every thing Ive done before. children and 928 par ents from 14 preschools. Some were given the program and others served as a comparison group. Kids had training on healthy habits and how the body works for an hour a day for ve months using Sesame Workshop-produced videos, a board game (the heart game), songs, posters and activities. Parents were involved through takehome assignments and workshops that focused on overcoming barriers to good food and exercise. For example, in areas with poor access to parks or play spaces, par ents were coached to encourage kids to use stairs instead of elevators and to walk instead of taking a bus. Childrens weight and exercise habits were measured at the start and 1 1/2 and 3 years later. Although many moved or dropped out by the time the study ended, researchers documented a signicant increase in knowledge, attitude and health habit scores among kids in the program versus the comparison group. The proportion of children at a healthy weight increased from 62 percent at the start to 75 percent at three years for those in the program. Ironically, in Colombia, that mostly meant that more under nourished kids grew to reach a healthy weight. In New York, where the program plans to launch in several ear ly childhood and Head Start programs this spring and fall, project leaders will have to tackle underand over weight kids. A lot of the kids are from low-income families, shelters, and many have poor access to healthy foods, said Rachael Lynch, director of educational services for an Episcopal Social Services preschool, The Learning Center, in Harlem. Its a mecca for fast food around here. Were try ing to get them to walk past the Chinese food or pizza or McDonalds, to go home and make something. Her preschool tested the Sesame Street project last summer and it really took off with kids and parents, she said. They love it. The kids relate, I cant stress it enough, to the Sesame Street characters, she said. The program had kids work in a near by community garden one day a week to learn about growing vegetables. They had a mystery food box to reach inside, feel and guess the contents, then use what they found to make a healthy snack such as smoothies, fruit salads, microwaved baked apples and apple dip. Children took home a weekend update to list and draw pictures of what they ate. Parents were asked to sign it to encourage an adult focus on healthy meals. Kateshia Strowder said the program had a big impact on her and her daughter, Jahmeice. Wed be in the grocery store and she would name every vegetable. Its amazing. Brussels sprouts she likes it. Cabbage she likes it, Strowder said. Im not a vegetable eater, to be honest. But I had to learn to do those things for her. Donte Payne said the same for his son, Bryson, a 4-year-old who also was in the Harlem program. It made him more interested in eating more healthy things, Payne said. He became very interested in salads. He loves salad now. In Colombia, the program is now expanding to about 20,000 children, and in Spain, a project is starting in Madrid. In New York, a foundation Fuster runs at Mount Sinai will sponsor the U.S. launch, aided by private donors. Dr. Jaime Cespedes, a pediatric and heart specialist who helped lead the project in Colombia believes it will succeed wherever it is tried. Sesame knows kids, knows media and how to communicate the messages, he said. When you get the kids to deliver the message to the family, change will come. www.Floridafoot.com Call Today for an appointment! CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) HEALTH FROM PAGE C1 Jennifer Hudson makes appearance to aid citys weight loss program WITH US. EVERYTHING www.dailycommercial.com 352-365-8200

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MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION The Helpful PlaceWe Sell & ServiceEquipment* APOPKA Apopka Ace Hardware & Lumber 530 South Park Avenue (407) 889-4111 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 LEESBURG South Leesburg Ace Hardware 27649 U.S. Highway 27 (352) 787-5446 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 EUSTIS Bronson Ace Hardware 26 East Orange Avenue (352) 357-2366 M-Sat 7-6:30, Sun 9-5 MOUNT DORA Mount Dora Ace Hardware 18691 U.S. Highway 441 (352) 383-2101 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 SORRENTO Sorrento Ace Hardware 24329 St. Rd. 46 (352) 383-2061 M-Sat 7-7:00, Sun 9-5 TAVARES Tavares Ace Hardware 509-South Highway 19 (352) 343-3361 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 UMATILLA Umatilla Ace Hardware 811 North Central Avenue (352) 669-3411 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5Come See Our Great Selection of Benjamin Moore Paint *At select stores only. MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON Those nutrition labels on the back of food packages may soon become easier to read. The Food and Drug Ad ministration says knowledge about nutrition has evolved over the last 20 years, and the labels need to reect that. As the agency considers revisions, nutritionists and other health experts have their own wish list of desired changes. The number of calories should be more prominent, they say, and the amount of added sugar and percentage of whole wheat in the food should be included. They also want more clarity on how serving sizes are dened. Theres a feeling that nu trition labels havent been as effective as they should be, says Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. When you look at the label, there are roughly two dozen num bers of substances that peo ple arent intuitively familiar with. For example, he says, most of the nutrients are listed in grams, the metric systems basic unit of mass. Jacobson says people dont really un derstand what a gram is. Michael Taylor, the FDAs deputy commissioner for foods, says 20 years ago there was a big focus on fat, and fat undifferentiated. Since then, health providers have focused more on calo ries and warned people away from saturated and trans fats more than all fats. Trans fats were separated out on the la bel in 2006. The nutrition facts label is now 20 years old, the food environment has changed and our dietary guidance has changed, says Taylor, who was at the agency in the ear ly 1990s when the FDA rst introduced the label at the behest of Congress. Its im portant to keep this updated so what is iconic doesnt become a relic. The FDA has sent guide lines for the new labels to the White House, but Tay lor would not estimate when they might be released. The FDA has been working on the issue for a decade, he said. Theres evidence that more people are reading the labels in recent years. According to an Agricul ture Department study re leased this month, a greater percentage of adults reported using the nutrition facts panel and other claims on food packages always or most of the time in 2009 and 2010 compared with two years earlier. The USDA study said 42 percent of working adults used the panel always or most of the time in 2009 and 2010, while older adults used it 57 percent of the time during that period. One expected change in the label is to make the cal orie listing more prominent, and Regina Hildwine of the Grocery Manufacturers Association said that could be useful to consumers. Her group represents the nations largest food companies. Hildwine said FDA also has suggested that it may be appropriate to remove the calories from fat declara tion on the label. Its not yet clear what other changes the FDA could de cide on. Nutrition advocates are hoping the agency adds a line for sugars and syrups that are not naturally oc curring in foods and drinks and are added when they are processed or prepared. Right now, some sugars are listed separately among the ingredients and some are not. It may be difcult for the FDA to gure out how to cal culate added sugars, however. Food manufacturers are adding naturally occurring sugars to their products so they can label them as natu ral but the nutrition con tent is no different. Other suggestions from health advocates: %  en Add the percentage of whole wheat to the label. Many manufacturers will label products whole wheat when there is really only a small percentage of it in the food. %  en Clearer measurements. Jacobson of CSPI and oth ers have suggested that the FDA use teaspoons instead of grams on the label, since consumers can envision a teaspoon. %  en Serving sizes that make sense. Theres no easy an swer, but health experts say that single-size servings that are clearly meant to be eaten in one sitting will often list two or three servings on the label, making the calorie and other nutrient information deceptive. FDA said last year that it may add another col umn to the labels, listing nu trition information per serv ing and per container. The agency may also adjust rec ommended serving sizes for some foods. %  en Package-front labeling. Beyond the panel on the back, nutrition experts have pushed for labels on the package front for certain nutrients so consumers can see them more easily. The FDA said several years ago it would issue guidelines for front of pack labeling, but later said it would hold off to see if the industry could cre ate its own labels. Tracy Fox, a Washing ton-based nutrition consultant, says clearer informa tion is needed to balance the billions of dollars a year that the food industry spends on food marketing.FDA to revise nutrition facts label J. DAVID AKE / AP The nutrition facts label on the side of a cereal box is photographed in Washington. Nutrition labels on the back of food packages may soon become easier to read. Associated PressNEW YORK Target Corp. says it will no longer be offering health care coverage for its part-time workers. The discounter is citing new options now available through health care exchanges under the Affordable Care Act. Target, based in Min neapolis, said the ma jority of its part-time workers who have been eligible for its health care insurance cover age dont enroll. In fact, less than 10 percent of its total employees of 361,000 take advantage of the part-time plan. It said it will stop cover ing the part-time work ers beginning April 1. Other large employ ers including UPS are scaling back health coverage by dropping spouses from their employee plans if they are able to get insurance through another employer. Health care reform is transforming the bene ts landscape and af fecting how all employ ers, including Target, administer health benets coverage, Jodee Kozlack, Targets executive vice president of human resources, said in a corporate blog post Tuesday. Our decision to discontinue this benet comes after careful consideration of the impact of our stores part-time team members and to Target, the new options available for our parttime team, and the historically low number of team members who elected to enroll in the part-time plan. Target said in the post that by offering its part-time workers in surance, it could actually disqualify many of them from new subsidies that could reduce their overall health insurance expenses. Target says part-time workers who are en rolled in the health care plan and are losing coverage will be given a $500 cash payment. The Affordable Care Act created insur ance exchanges that customers can vis it to shop for coverage and compare policies. Some people also qualify for income-based subsidies or tax credits to help buy a plan. The law requires that companies with 50 or more workers offer fulltime workers dened as those working 30 hours or more health coverage. Target said that em ployees who average be tween 20 and 31 hours per week will continue to be eligible for other benets, including vacation, dental, disabil ity and life insurance. Its part-time employees also will still qualify for store discounts and its 401(k) plan. Separately, Target said Wednesday that it was laying off 475 employees across the companys operations. It also said that over the past six months it has closed about 700 open positions across the entire chain. As an organization, Target continually assesses our oper ating model to ensure we are well positioned to adapt to changing business needs, said Molly Snyder, a Tar get spokeswoman, in a statement. We believe these decisions, while difcult, are the right actions as we continue to focus on transforming our business.Target to no longer offer health care coverage for part-time workers

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 315-8305 Is pain keeping you from what matters most? By covering up pain, swelling, or others, you may be making a deeper problem. Acupuncture is a time-tested, safe, natural and drug free treatment that can provide immediate relief and long lasting benefits.James N Georgiades AP Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: Im a 14-yearold girl going on 15. I am half-Mexican. In the Mexican culture, a girls 15th birthday is the year in which she becomes a woman. Most girls have a quinceanera party for this birthday. But these celebrations cost a lot of money almost as much as a wedding. I have been debating whether or not I should have one. My mom says she would rather put the money toward my college fund. I agree with her, but I also feel like I should acknowledge my Mexican background as much as I do the Caucasian part. I dont want to pressure my par ents, but I also dont want to be left out when my friends talk about their quinceaneras. What do you think? PARTY OR NOT IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DEAR PARTY OR NOT: A quinceanera may cost almost as much as a wedding, but there are weddings for every budget. We have all heard of families who have gone into debt to nance a wedding, but I never advise readers to go into debt for something like that. If your primary reason for wanting a quinceanera is so you wont feel left out of the conversation when friends talk about theirs, consider a small celebration with some of your girlfriends. That way your college fund wont be depleted, and youll spend fewer years paying off student loans. One of my friends, Fabiola, told me that some godmothers (madrinas) help to defray the cost of a quinceanera. There can be a godmother for the cake, another for the dress, etc. But she also told me that although her mother insisted she have a quinceanera, in thinking back about it, she wishes shed had that money for college. There are other ways to celebrate your Mexican heritage than spending a lot of money, so please give this some serious thought. DEAR ABBY: I just learned that my unborn child is a boy. Some people tell me that its harder to raise a baby boy, but others tell me differently. I dont know who to believe anymore. I am only ve months pregnant and already feeling stressed. 19 AND CONFUSED DEAR 19 AND CONFUSED: Your pregnancy and subsequent motherhood will be 100 per cent easier if you stop listening to people who relish putting negative thoughts in the heads of others. If you want RELIABLE information about raising your little boy, the per son to get it from is your pediatrician. DEAR ABBY: I saw your Christ mas column in which you included a note to all your Christian readers, and frankly I found it a little rude. Not only Christian people celebrate Christmas; many of us celebrate it as a secular holiday, a time to celebrate the love and joy in our lives and our family (both blood relatives and the people we make our family). I dont recall you wishing a Happy Hanukkah, a Blessed Ramadan or a Happy Yule to your Jewish, Muslim and Pagan readers (although I may have missed it). Im not usually one to care about such things, but since people from all walks of life come to you for advice, it would be nice to see you reach out to all of your readers. HAPPY PAGAN CHICK IN DENVER DEAR HAPPY PAGAN CHICK: You must not be a regular reader if you miss all of my holiday greetings. It has long been my practice to offer good wishes to my readers during the major holidays. This includes greetings to my Christian readers at Easter and Christmas, my Jewish readers at Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, and my Muslim readers when the fast of Ramadan is broken.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.comCelebrate girls big birthday without spending big bucks

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICESSAVE UP TO80%OFFPHARMACY PRICES YOUR COST!Cialis 20mg.24 count.......$89.95Flomax 4mg.90 count.......$68.00Viagra 100mg.20 count.......$65.95NO SHIPPING COST ON THESE PRODUCTS. ALL ADVERTISED MEDICATIONS ARE GENERIC. VALUECALL US FIRST OR CALL US LAST... Our prices on prescription medicines are competitive with other mail order or internet prices. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi north of Kmart)(352) 347-0403 or Fax (352) 347-2034 Fax: (352) 347-2034cdrx441@gmail.com Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. MOLLIE DURKINThe York DispatchYORK, Pa. For something as simple as a comic book, Do ver resident Dave Kots work has planted a lot of seeds. The organization he founded, Autism at Face Value, recently released the rst comic to feature an autistic superhero. When the comic hit store shelves around York on Dec. 24, it sold out in less than a week. Si nce then, he said, local middle schools have requested copies to use for social skills courses for students with special needs. Doctors want copies to put in their waiting rooms, he said. I am overwhelmed, in a good way, he said. I could not have dreamt this amount of positive outreach. Kot writes the script, and the scene he is proudest of comes when the main charac ter, Michael, goes to his middle school for the rst time. The experi ence turns his world and the comic panel upside down. It forces readers to literally look at somebody with autism differently than they may have expected, he said. There are four an ticipated issues of the comic, and Kot is now working on the script for Issue No. 2, he said. The organization, which legally changed its name from Face Val ue Comics to Autism at Face Value, looks to tackle more than just comics, Kot said. The nonrot will also continue research and community outreach, partnering with other businesses and organizations to reach a wider audience, he said. The Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders asked Kot to submit a copy of the comic for review, he said. Its kind of unique that a comic book would be reviewed by a journal of that profes sional caliber, he said. After some restocking, Issue No. 1 is avail able at three local comic book stores: Comix Connection in West Manchester Township, Planet X Comics in York Township and Com ic Store West in Sprin gettsbury Township. Managers said theyll continue to carry future issues. Jared Wolf, manager of Comix Connection, said his store sold about 60 copies. I think people re ally responded well to it, Wolf said. I think it achieved what they set out to achieve. And for Alex Levitsky, manager of Planet X, its a partnership that will continue. We want to do more with them down the road, he said. Theyre really nice people with good motivation.Autism comic book released in Pennsylvania stores I think people really responded well to it. I think it achieved what they set out to achieve.Jared Wolf, manager of Comix Connection

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f n n t f b n n f r b r n n b t t n r n r n r n n r n n b t r b n n n r n n n r r n n r t r r b b rnrr n nnrr n b rf b b b r r r n r r r r r r b b f r n n nftb f n r r r r r r n n n n n r n n r r r r r n r r r n r r n r n f n r r r r n n r r n r r n n r r n r n r n r n r r n r r n r n nftb nr tbnbr t b r r r b r r n r r r n r n r r r r f r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r n r b r b f t r r f r b t f t f t b b b b b f f t f f b f f b b t b f b t b t f b b f f f b b t b b t f t f t b b b b f f b b f f rf tr nrt fbtr rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 rfn tbntfb b tf rfnnfr rfnffnr frfntbrnfft n n r f n b t n r b ffrnf frfnrbnbb rfnnt tfbnfrf rfnrtbnbf t f t r f n b b b ttbr tntnbb tt brfnrn rt fnbr f rfnftntf rfnrtbnbf t rrfnrfnb b f n f f t n t b f t rfnfbntf f rfnrfntb frrnrnbb tt rffnr f r f r f n t n f f f nf rfnbnr rf rfnrtbnbf frfn nrr rrbrnrrrf t rtbtnt rfnrrn r frrntt r rfntnrbb rf rfnfbn rrfntrnrr frfn rnrf frfnrtnr rrtrnt rrfnrn rfntbn b bfrtnnfbbb tbftn t t r f n t n t b n n n n n btfrfnrfn fr frrnttbt f rf nfrfntbrnf ntrb b rfntnb rfnnr rf rfnr f r f n t b r n r b t bfrfntnt t frfntnt rf rfnfrnbrt b rfnffnrb t f b n r f n n f b r n t b t n r r f n n r f r t t b r f n t b n b r r f n b n f t t r f n r b r n t t ftr n r f t ftr r n t f b n t f n r r t r f n t b n t b f t n t n b f n n n tb r f n r b r n t b n t n t r f n t b n f b b b b t r f r f n t b n f f n t r f n r b r n r f n rn n t r t t r f n f n t n r n r t n t b n t b r r r r n t ttrttf rfrnbf rftfn n r f n n f f fbf f r f n f t n f r f n n f n n r b r f n f f n f b r f n r t n r f r r nffb b b n t n t b n f t t b b n

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfn tbfnbtf tbftf fbnf b t t b f f r f n t b t f b n f f f t f ffrft bfff t f b t t f b fff t t r b t n t f b t ffttn f b t t b b f t n b t b f t b ftbfbt tnft ffffn rfn tfb r b b t n f t t f b n f b t t b n b n t f f f r f t f b f f b f t b b b f t rfn fb f f t f n f t r f t f n b b f t t f b b b t f b f t n n f f f b t fbn fbn b b f b f ffrft bfff t f b t t f b fff t t r b t n t f b t ffttn rfn fb t f b n f f n t ftf ff bfbnf b f r b f f t f n b f t f b t f b f fb ffrft bfff t f b t t f b fff t t r b t n t f b t ffttn fb rr tf t b f b r f tbt f n b f t b t f b f b r f frfn bfbftf nf ffbtf t b f f f ftff f t tnf tt t t b bfbrff t t f rbf tf ftfft btt btbbf tf n t fftb btft bfbftf nfbt fff ft tf n tb f f f b f f f t trff bbfbt bftf ffbf fbffftf tt ff t bfbbff fbftf f frb tf bttbntfbf tf fbbn fbffnf tff t b tfbf b btf f btftfbt fb bbtbtb f btnfbf tff br fn rbbf f fff t ttft b ftbft bfbf tf fttbtf t frbfn b f b t f b t b f t f f ftffbtf ffbtbf tbf ttf bt bt ff fbnf ftnfbrf bf b ftf f ttfftfrff fttffbf f tffbfbtf t f f f f ffftfn t fb tfr tbftfrbf bnft tfftf bftf fb fbtft bbffff bbf b f ttf btbftfrf f b f t b f b f ftftbf bfb btbftf ft bf t bbf fbbftf ntb bfntbbt ffft bttffb f fft t tbffbftf fb tfr f t f f f n b r f b t r f f f n f t t n t f f b b fb r f b fbt b bt fft nf b ffntbfbf tf fffff ttf ffff fbftf bt tf brffftf bfft bbtb br b tfbt bftfft f tf ffn tft fbttftf t bbtbfbftfbt bfbf bttf btfbtbft ftf fff ttft t rfn t rf nf f bfbf b fbt b bbt f r f f tfff tf tftff brfff tbt t t rf tb tbt bftf f bb b rfbr b t f bftfb f fftff ft rfnt bf fnn f bf bn nbnf bb fb tf frf r f b fbf trf bft bb bbtr ft ff tbfft tnfbbf btfff ttf tnttfbt n tn t t b f tfbt bt fftf fb nnt ft f f f ntbftf n tfff t bfbffbf bt b tf ftft fnf ftfbt ftftfrfn t br

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 rfnttf bbnt tntff f fbttffb nbn f t f b n b bff ntfbntbb ttnf f nfntfft n fntt f fbnb bfff ffnttf nt ttf ffbtf nt ttf fnfbbnt f tf rrf ntnf ttfnfbn nrtnf tbt tt fnttfbbnbb ftbntb f nbtfbbb rrf nt f ffntt btnntt nb ffttt fn f f f t t b ntbf n ftt b nt f n t t f b ffbt ntfbbnnn n n t t f n f f n t t f b ttnbtt ttt bbbnt ff ffftt f ftfbbnt nrrf f nbbt t n t f f t t t n fbtttt bbnn f b n n n n nn tbt f f f b t n n n ftt b tbtn fttfbt t n n b t t f f f t t t t b t t f b t n b tnnn fnttf bt n f brnttf bbbt ttnf fnttfbtnn nbtf b bf tfntf fff ttfbbnnt n ftn ftt bbntbn nttff ff ttttfbbnnf n nn frfbt n f f b t t f t f n t t f b b t n b b t t n nt f fn tff fbtttf nt nn f t f f t t t t t t f b b t f b t n tnnfff f f fbfnttttf bn nnb fttf t ff ffnttf ff tttbnbn nnnbb ntnfff f fnttfb ntt f f f f b f f t t b t t f t t b n tt t f n b bb bf nbfttttf bbb nnf f nnntrf f f f f b b b t nttf b n t t f b f b f f n b t t t f t t nf f nbf f f f fbbtn fnttf nn fbn tttfbn f fbbbnn f f b b b f b t b b b b n f f f f n t t f b t n nf f nnff f f t t b n tt t f n b bb f n b f t f f b t n f f b t t f t f n t t f b b t n b b t t trf fft f fntttfttf bbf b n f n n t n t t f b t t f n t f n t b t t t f f f f b b b n t t f f frb f f ff bbbt t tf



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MAGIC FALL SHORT AGAINST PELICANS 100-92, SPORTS B1 LIVING HEALTHY: Sesame Street, heart doctor launch childrens health project C1 TEAMWORK: County ofcials form unique partnership A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 27 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C6 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 75 / 57 Mostly cloudy 50 MICHAEL HILL Associated Press ALBANY, N.Y. Min imum-wage increase proposals are getting the maximum push from Democrats in statehouses in more than half of U.S. states, highlighting the politi cally potent income in equality issue this year. Lawmakers in at least 30 states are spon soring or are expect ed to introduce wage hike measures, accord ing to a national re view by The Associat ed Press. They hope to notch state-level victo ries as President Barack Obama and congressio nal Democrats remain stymied in attempts to raise the federal mini mum wage above $7.25 an hour. The president is expected to mention the minimum wage in his State of the Union address Tuesday. Even in Republi can-dominated capi tals where the bills are longshots, the mea sures still give Demo crats a chance to ham mer home the popular theme of fair wages in what is an election year in most places. Its a no-brainer for any Democrat, said Neil Sroka, a strategist for progressive groups who is communications director at the Howard Dean-founded Democ racy for America. Con gress is failing. They can take real action right in the states and have a demonstrable impact right here at home. For politics and policy, its a winning strategy. Minimum wage is a perennial issue that has taken on a higher prole amid the slowly RICK REED Special to the Daily Commercial The Tavares Pavilion that once stood watch over Lake Dora and was a reminder of simpler times is rising again along the shoreline. The two-story structure, which once served as a gath ering spot for some of the ar eas biggest events, will reign much longer than the origi nal meeting places 50 years, however. Its not going anywhere, said Tammy Rodgers, the community services director for Tavares and project man ager of the pavilion. It will stand the test of time. The new pavilion has the same footprint as the struc ture completed by L.G. Co ven in 1914 at the foot of St. Clair Abrams Avenue. It was one of many buildings he constructed in early Tavares. While the footprint might be the same, the materials ar ent. Instead of wood, builders are using more durable con crete and masonry products. Locals lamented the pass ing of the original pavilion in 1961, when the Tavares City Council deemed it unsafe and had it torn down. It had been the epicenter of Tava res social life for ve decades and also served as City Hall for a short time. The idea for a pavilion be gan small in 1908 when the Tavares Improvement As sociation proposed build ing a large dock. That plan was scrapped and a pavilion Tavares Pavilion rising over Lake Dora once again RICK REED / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Construction is under way to rebuild the Tavares Pavilion on Lake Dora. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com S pecial Olympics the worlds largest sports or ganization for children and adults with intellectual disabilities provides yearround training and competi tions to more than 4.2 million athletes in 170 countries. Nearly 200 of those athletes from all over Florida were in Clermont over the weekend preparing for the 2014 USA Special Olympics games next June in Princeton, N.J. Anticipation is high for Lake Countys Special Olympics program, which has never be fore had four athletes quali fy for the national competi tion: David Icker in aquatics, Jonathan Robinson in bowl ing and Kyle Krekeler and run ning buddy Troy Clark in track and eld. Its so exciting to have some of our athletes going to the games this year, said Mary Adamson, a Special Olympics physical training instructor at Lake Hills School in Howey-inthe-Hills. I think a couple of athletes got to go to the inter national games once, but that was like 20 years ago. Because training was needed in a variety of sports, multiple venues were utilized, including the National Training Center in Clermont (aquatics); Mont verde Academy in Montverde (soccer, track and eld, volley ball, basketball and cycling); Clermont Lanes in Clermont (bowling) and the Sanctuary Ridge Golf Course in Clermont (golf). Miami Dades Daniel Carta ya, the coach for Team Flori das track and eld team, said the camp provided him some insight as to just how strong the team is this year. I saw a tremendous amount of ability, he said. And its funny because Id never met most of these athletes before this weekend, but in less than 24 hours, its like they all have become mine. They are my athletes from now through the games and Im proud that this is our team. Ronna Smith from Clay County, one of Team Floridas bowling coaches, was moved by the camaraderie. Its been really cool for me and my athletes to get to know all the other athletes, she said. Were going to be friends from now on; its not like we will be competing with them in June and thats it. Its a life-changing Minimum wage bills pushed by at least 30 states Clermont hosts Special Olympics competitors Pro bowler Jim Carter, left, son of bowling legend Don Carter, chats with Special Olympics bowler Jonathan Robinson. PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Former Olympian Damu Cherry Mitchell talks shop with Special Olympics Athlete Kyle Krekeler, center, and his running partner Troy Clark, left, who will be represent Lake County in the Special Olympics 2014 USA Games in June. BEN NUCKOLS Associated Press COLUMBIA, Md. The gunman who killed two people at a Mary land mall was a teenage skateboarding enthu siast who had no crim inal record before he showed up at the shop ping center armed with a shotgun, plenty of am munition and a back pack lled with crude homemade explosives, authorities said Sunday. Darion Marcus Agu ilar, 19, took a taxi to the Mall in Columbia in suburban Baltimore on Saturday morning and entered the build ing near Zumiez, a shop that sells skateboarding gear. He went down stairs to a food court di rectly below the store, then returned less than an hour later, dumped the backpack in a dress ing room and started shooting, police said. Shoppers ed in a panic or barricad ed themselves behind closed doors. When po lice arrived, they found three people dead two store employees and Aguilar, who had killed himself, authori ties said. The shooting bafed investigators and ac quaintances of Aguilar, a quiet, skinny teenag er who graduated from high school less than a year ago and had no Mall gunman had no criminal past SEE PAVILION | A2 SEE OLYMPICS | A2 SEE GUNMAN | A2 SEE WAGE | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 27, 2014: This year you open up to a different way of thinking. As a result, your long-term goals become more pos sible than in the past. You communicate effectively, and others respond. A bet ter relationship will devel op between you and a sib ling or neighbor in the next 12 months. If you are sin gle, a trip you take in the next year could be signi cant. You are likely to meet someone very different who opens you up to change. If you are attached, the two of you become much better friends. Traveling as a cou ple will bring you much clos er. CAPRICORN understands you, perhaps too well. ARIES (March 21-April 19) A friend or associate expresses his or her high energy, which matches your enthusiasm. A meeting al lows an even broader per spective to be gained. Ex press your appreciation to an older friend or relative who goes to bat for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The mix of drive, en ergy and endurance that you manifest will be hard to beat. As a result of your performance, you will es tablish a newfound rapport with a supervisor. A conver sation lets you know how appreciated you are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Consider taking a new route or a different ap proach. You are so deter mined to get where you want to go that you barely can hear anyone else. Slow down, and youll get power ful feedback. Be grateful for others persistence. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to try to evolve to a new level of un derstanding, especially as you sense a roommates or close friends anxiety rising. Others will offer many sug gestions, but one person demonstrates a better un derstanding of the dynam ics. Listen well. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could be surprised by what comes down your path. You tend to work well with unexpected occurrenc es. Think before you leap, as returning to where you were could be close to im possible. Pace yourself. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be aware of your lim its, especially regarding a difcult situation. Use your instincts with a domestic or personal matter involv ing your house. Your nanc es appear to be an issue. Dont worry you will nd a creative solution. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You have been more direct and far more feisty than usual. Notice how heat ed someone else becomes when he or she interacts with you. You might not re alize how feisty you can be, but look at the reactions of those around you, and youll get it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Be aware of your nanc es. You could be swallow ing some anger and choose to deal with it by spend ing money. Slow down, and make an assessment. Learn a more effective way of expressing your more dif cult feelings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) If you feel pushed, you might be more than happy to go along with a change of pace. You might want to lighten up the mo ment. Return calls before settling on plans. Be aware of how possessive some one is before getting into a partnership with him or her. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Understand what is going on around you. Listen to your inner voice when dealing with a boss. Much that happens during the daytime might not be to your liking. Given space, you might recognize that it is all for the better. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) Focus on friends and your objectives. You will see that your inner cir cle supports your long-term desires. Be more open in sharing what you desire. Communication will ourish, and youll feel unstoppable as a result. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Responsibilities drop on you, whether you like it or not. Let a friend or loved one help you. There is no reason for you to carry the weight of this situation alone. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US DATE CASH 3 ............................................... 9-1-5 Afternoon .......................................... 3-2-0 PLAY 4 ............................................. 5-6-4-4 Afternoon ....................................... 0-9-3-8 FLORIDA LOTTERY JAN. 25 FANTASY 5 ......................... 10-16-20-25-35 FLORIDA LOTTO ................... 2-3-7-21-36-43 POWERBALL ...................... 8-12-18-55-272 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. committee was formed. By the end of 1912, the committee adopt ed plans for a two-story, 40-foot by 40-foot struc ture that jutted 50 feet out into the lake. It was to be connected to the shore by a 6-foot-wide pier. The cost was $2,000 and the city voted to chip in $500 as the fundrais ing campaign started. The association held its rst meeting in the new pavilion on Nov. 12, 1914. It was also the meeting place for the Kiwanis Club, the Womens Club and The American Legion. Downstairs the pavil ion was divided into four rooms by a pair of hall ways running north and south and east and west. The upstairs was one big room for concerts, danc es, plays and other events. Then city ofcials de cided they would form a committee to remake their downtown and take advantage of the water front. Former Tavares Mayor Nancy Clutts fa cilitated the committee. The real cornerstone of the visioning, they wanted that pavilion re built, said Clutts. They reminisced of their child hoods, the Womens Club, reunions and dances. Blaise Fiebach and As sociates, the architectur al rm that designed the citys two other historic replicas Woodlea, Cap tain Melton Haynes home and the train depot were hired for the pavilion. In addition to restroom facilities and two eleva tors, there will be two meeting rooms on the rst oor that open to a private deck overlook ing Lake Dora and a larg er space in the middle of the rst oor. A sweeping staircase will rise to the second oor on the lake side of the building. The second oor will include a caterers kitch en, a large room for gath erings and a room for the bride for weddings. A re escape has been included in the front of the building, but it will look beautiful, Rodgers said. We also treated the pier like event space, Rodgers said. Its big ger than the original one and will have water, elec tric and sound available to use during events. City ofcials and build ers hope for a May com pletion and events are al ready being booked. Citizens said they wanted us to honor our past, said Rodgers. We wanted to resurrect our past and honor our citi zenry. We saved the best for last. PAVILION FROM PAGE A1 experience for everyone involved. Krekeler, 25, from Tava res, who will be represent ing Lake County in track and eld, is looking for ward to the games, not only to demonstrate his sports abilities, but also his independence. He en joys the program because it gives him the chance to be the best at something. Robinson, 33, from Mount Dora, who will be representing Lake County in bowling, said he was having fun at the camp but was keeping his focus on New Jersey. I want to go to nation als and get gold, he said. Thats my goal. At least two of the train ing sessions had surprise visitors who stopped by to meet the athletes and offer them some tips and expert advice. At Clermont Lanes, where the bowling ses sion was held, bowling pro Jim Carter of Win ter Garden, son of bowl ing legend Don Carter, stopped by to offer the bowlers some pointers. And at Montverde Academy, Nether lands sprinter Churan day Martina, Domin ican Republic hurdler Lavonne Idlette, Ameri can sprinter and Olym pic gold medalist Jus tin Gatlin and Tampa hurdler Damu Cherry Mitchell, along with her husband and three-time Olympian Dennis Mitch ell, showed up to offer encouragement. All are working out at the Na tional Training Center. For Gatlin, the visit was like a peer review. In my eyes, there is no difference between the Special Olympics ath letes and any other ath lete who participates in a sport, or Olympians like myself, he said. As far as I see it, being an athlete takes courage, it takes discipline and it takes athleticism, espe cially when it comes to competing against oth er people with the same talent as you. Im here today and what I see are fellow athletes. I look at them as my teammates. OLYMPICS FROM PAGE A1 previous run-ins with law enforcement. Police spent Sunday trying to piece to gether his motive, but it remained elusive. Aguilar, who had concealed the shot gun in a bag, red six to nine times. One victim, Brianna Benlolo, a 21-year-old single mother, lived half a mile away from Aguilar in the same College Park neighborhood, but police said they were still trying to determine what, if any, re lationship they had. Although they lived close to Mary lands largest university, neither was a student there. The other employee, Tyler Johnson, did not know Aguilar and did not social ize with Benlolo outside of work, a rela tive said. Aguilar purchased the 12-gauge shotgun legally last month at a store in neighboring Montgomery County. At his home, ofcers also recovered more ammunition, com puters and documents, police said. The home is in a middle-income neighborhood called Hollywood, near the Capital Beltway. No one answered the door Sunday morning. Aguilar graduated in 2013, school of cials conrmed. GUNMAN FROM PAGE A1 recovering economy and growing public debate about income inequality. A Quinnipiac University poll this month found 71 percent of Americans in favor of raising the min imum wage including more than half of Repub licans polled. Michael Sargeant, exec utive director of the Dem ocratic Legislative Cam paign Committee, calls it an organic issue thats bubbling up from the grassroots. But its also being pressed by politi cians and labor unions. Democrats challenging Republican governors have taken up the issue, and there are ballot initia tives in several states. We are facing a huge income gap that only con tinues to widen, where the workers at the top see large wage increas es and the workers at the bottom are at a standstill. That needs to change, said Massachusetts Dem ocratic Senate President Therese Murray. Five states passed mini mum wage measures last year, and advocates hope that number will grow as states from New Hamp shire to Washington con sider proposals. Many would push families above the federal poverty line, which is $15,730 for a family of two. In Iowa, a bill would hike the mini mum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10. A Rhode Island bill would raise it from $8 to $9. And a year after New York ap proved a multiyear minimum wage hike, Assembly Democrats in troduced another bill for 2014 sponsored by Labor Committee Chairman Carl Heastie of New York City that would acceler ate the increase. Labor unions and other advocates point to work ers like Andrew Lloyd, who cleans the cabins, bathrooms and cock pits of airplanes between ights at John F. Kenne dy Airport in New York City for $8 an hour. With a wife and 1-year-old, he relies on food stamps to help stock the refrigerator and his paychecks bare ly cover diapers and other needs of his daughter. He said he cant afford a new pair of socks for himself. Its not enough. What were making is not enough to support, Lloyd said. Theres just no way they can justify what is going on is right. Opponents, many of them Republicans, ar gue that the higher wages translate into fewer jobs and higher consumer costs. So wage hike bills in Republican-controlled legislatures, like Florida and South Carolina, are not expected to pass. In Florida, Gov. Rick Scott said the claim that work ing families need the boost to make ends meet makes him cringe, be cause I know that state ment is a lie. Even if we did raise the minimum wage, working families will still not be able to make ends meet on those jobs, Scott said. We need good jobs that lead to good careers for our families, and thats what I am focused on. WAGE FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Partnership seeks entries for Mardi Gras parade The Leesburg Partnership is pre paring for Mardi Gras Madness on Feb. 22. Festivities begin at 11 a.m. as downtown Leesburg comes alive with the sights and sounds of Mardi Gras. A kids parade, pet parade, and oats will be on Main Street throughout the day, and winners will be judged in many categories. For information and parade appli cations, go to www.leesburgmardi gras.com. TAVARES Author to speak at End of Life Care conferences Local author and retired hospice nurse Judy Flickinger will be one of the workshop leaders at the End of Life Care conference presented by Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, offering insightful information for local residents on making endof-life decisions. The conference will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, at the Church of the Nazarene, 32151 David Walker Dr. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 352-742-6783. TAVARES Hazardous waste to be collected The Lake County Solid Waste Division encourages Lake County residents to dispose of toxic ma terials at an upcoming Household Hazardous Waste Collection event, from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, at the Central Solid Waste Facility, 13130 County Landll Rd. Representatives will be on hand to collect small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products, such as lawn and gardening materials, photo and swimming pool chemi cals, paint products, cleaning solu tions, motor oil and used gas, bat teries, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks, and will be offering convenient drive-thru disposal of the items. Materials such as infectious waste, solvents, chemical laboratory waste and radioactive waste are prohibited. To schedule a drop-off day for large quanities of items, call 352-343-3776. TAVARES Extension hosts landscaping series Pruning Your Landscape is the topic of discussion as the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension hosts a Saturday in the Garden speaker series, at 10 a.m., Saturday at the Lake County Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Rd., Tavares. The class will give participants in sight on how and when to prune landscape trees, shrubs and palms, and will be presented by Brooke Mofs, residential horticulture agent. To register, go to saturdayinthe gardenfebruary2014.eventbrite.com or call 352-343-4101 ext. 2714. The cost is $5 for adults, free for ages 16 and under. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com When several days of rain saturated the roads on the boundaries of the Palisades Country Club properties in Clermont in May 2013, Fred Costello, a member of the Palisades Homeowner Association Advisory Committee, knew it was time to take action. Some of us were getting ready to build an ark, said Costello, remembering the damage that occurred. Ditches were 4 to 5 feet deep and 2 to 4 feet wide along Jalarmy Road, which is on the eastern border of the property. Large vol umes of water cascad ed downhill and dumped mud and debris onto nu merous patios and pools of the Palisades Country Club properties. Drainage water from heavy rain storms cas caded in torrents from the intersection of Cherry Lake and Jalarmy Roads, Costello said. Costello said he con tacted Lake County Com missioner Sean Parks concerning the situation. We met with coun ty Public Works Director Jim Stivender and devel oped a repair plan, Parks said. The county came prepared and quickly re paired the damage. But what was unique about the project, County officials form unique partnership Staff Report Lake County reghters are shaving their heads and donning orange T-shirts and wristbands emblazoned with the words Team Jay to support their broth er, reghter Nick Ryon, whose son Jay has been diagnosed with cancer. The 6-year-old is aggressive ly ghting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or ALL, at Florida Hos pital in Orlando. A Facebook group called Team Jay, created to cheer up the child while he undergoes treatment, has gone viral. The page already has 6,000 members and climb ing, and nearly 900 photos of ev erything orange: pumpkins, ip ops, silly socks, cats and even or ange-dyed dogs. Why orange? Leu kemia awareness is represented by the color. Photos continue pouring in from across the world from U.S. Army bases, universities and re departments. Elisha Pappacoda, public information ofcer for Lake County, said in a press release. Tavares firefighters son battling leukemia PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY Jay Ryon, son of Lake County reghter Nick Ryon, is aggressively ghting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. BOB SELF / AP Jared Victory, an engineer with Aviation Systems Engineering Company, ies an X-8 quadcopter in the conference room of his companys ofces in Jacksonville. DREW DIXON The Florida Times-Union JACKSONVILLE The small, re mote-control helicopters hovering in a conference room took on the look of fun ight at a hobby store. But when mounted with video camer as and with further development by a Jacksonville company and others, the aircraft could mean hundreds of millions of dollars in new commerce for Florida. While the Aviation Systems Engi neering Co. has provided military applications for unmanned drones since 2004, it is trying hard to use dif ferent terminology while developing a testing, observation, training and research site for commercial drones. Wary of associating the unmanned aircraft with their lethal military rep utation, ASEC ofcials speak of re mote-control helicopters and xedwing planes for use in agriculture, public safety and real estate, among other potential applications. Most of the unmanned aircraft un der consideration for commercial use now weigh less than 55 pounds, similar to recreational model un manned aircraft. But the potential for development could broaden to aircraft that could be nearly as large as manned airplanes. The applications can range from crop dusting and monitoring of ag ricultural land, to observation of devastated areas after a disaster, to Firm explores market for unmanned aircraft LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Gov. Rick Scott has appointed Commis sioner Leslie Campione to the Wekiva River Ba sin Commission. The 19-member board, which includes commissioners from Lake, Orange and Sem inole counties, was es tablished to ensure im plementation of the Wekiva Parkway and Protection Act. Established in 1988, the act also was meant to protect the resources of the Wekiva River sys tem, according to the East Central Florida Re gional Planning Council. Campione, who has attended the Wekiva River Basin Commis sion meetings for years, said she is glad to be on the board, as the Wekiva Parkway project contin ues to take shape. The project is a planned 25-mile state toll road running through Mount Dora, Campione appointed to Wekiva River Basin Commission Staff Report The Florida Bar will recog nize 21 lawyers including one serving Lake and Sumter counties for their work on behalf of poor and indigent clients. Florida Bar President Eu gene K. Pettis of Fort Lau derdale will present the 2014 awards at a ceremony Thurs day at the Supreme Court of Florida. Established in 1981, The Florida Bar Presidents Pro Bono Service Awards are intended to encourage law yers to volunteer services to those who cannot afford legal fees. The awards recognize pro bono service in each of Floridas 20 judicial circuits. The Fifth Ju dicial Circuit serving Lake, Sumter, Citrus, Hernando and Marion counties will recognize attorney Joseph M. Mason Jr., who provides pro bono services through Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida Inc. and the Le gal Advocacy Center of Cen tral Florida. Since 1994, Mason has provided more than 1,000 hours of direct pro bono assis tance to low-income clients. In response to the fore closure crisis, Mason partic ipated in Florida Attorneys Saving Homes, said Kenia Escobar of The Florida Bar. He provided legal advice, pro se assistance and full rep resentation to clients. His assistance has included homeownership issues, con tractor fraud, denial of insur ance coverage and one case of complex real estate litigation that involved a fraudulent deed to a home that extended for more than six years. Community Legal Services of Mid-Florida Inc. has a Tava res ofce at 226 West Main St. TAVARES Florida Bar recognizes pro bono lawyer SEE LAWYER | A5 SEE FIREFIGHTER | A4 SEE CAMPIONE | A5 SEE PARTNERS | A5 SEE AIRCRAFT | A5 MASON

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679 OBITUARIES Edith D. Gregor Edith D. Gregor age 84 passed away Fri day, January 24, 2014 in Leesburg, Florida. Mrs. Gregor was born in Un eeda, West Virginia and moved to the Leesburg area in 1992 from Ma ple Heights, Ohio. She had a 40 year career as a Bookkeeper before her retirement from the Standard Oil Compa ny. She was a member of the New Life Pres byterian Church, Fruit land Park, Florida and The Eustis Elks Club. She was also a mem ber of the former Lees burg Business and Pro fessional Womens Club. She will be re mem bered by those close to her as a Joyful person who al ways carried a smile on her face. Anyone who knew her knew her as a truly nurturing caring spirit. She is survived by her loving husband of 14 years AL, A devot ed son and daughterin-law Ed and Vickie Tyler of Bluewater Bay, Florida; 2 grandchil dren Stacia and Adam, and one great-grand child Dylan. A funer al service will be held at Page-Theus Funer al Home 914 West Main St., Leesburg, FL Today (Monday) at 11:00 AM with Pastor Jim Kee gan serving as ofci ant. The family will re ceive friends one hour before the service from 10:00 11:00 AM. The family suggests that memorial contribu tions be made to the New Life Presbyterian Church 201 LaVista Street, Fruitland Park, Florida 34731. All ar rangements are under the careful direction of Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services. Jimmy Shaut Jimmy Shaut age 64 passed away Friday, January 24, 2014 in Ta vares, Florida. Jim my was born in John son City, New York and moved to the Howey-inthe-Hills area in 1999 from Maryland. He was a Carpenter in the construction in dustry for over 40 years. Jimmy was a proud vet eran of the U. S. Army and the U. S. Marine Corps and served two tours of duty in Viet nam. He was a mem ber of American Le gion Post 108 for over 23 years, and a mem ber of the Veterans of Foreign Wars post 8087. He was also an ac tive member of Logos Christian Fellowship in Leesburg, Florida. Jimmy will be remem bered rst for his erce devotion and love to his God, Family, Coun try, and his church. He had a great sense of hu mor and he always saw the fun in things and when describing him the word hilarious has to be used. He loved bass shing and his 1962 Impala hot rod. He especially loved his walks with his wife Ter ri to watch the sunsets. Survivors include: His loving wife of 14 years Terri, His Mother Hel en Shaut Leesburg; Sons James (Gen) Shaut Jr. PA; Jeramy (Erica) Shaut Orlan do; Kyle (Tia) Shaut Howey-in-the-Hills; Willy Shaut Mt. Dora; Daughters Shelley (Wayne) Pope NC; Jennifer Shaut TX; Heather Shaut MD; and Cassandra (Bri an) Shaut MD; Broth ersRonnie Shaut Umatilla; David Shaut Leesburg; Fred Shaut Leesburg; Sisters Karen Kramer MD; Susan Goodson Mt. Dora; and 6 Grandchil drenJeramy II; Dane; Jack; Hailey; Serenity; and Natalia. Funeral Services will take place 6:00 PM Thursday Jan. 30, 2014 at Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cre mation Services Lees burg, Florida. The fam ily will receive friends an hour prior to the Service from 5:00 6:00 PM. After cremation his Graveside Services with full Military Hon ors will take place 12:00 PM Saturday Feb ruary 1, 2014 at Lake side Memory Gardens, Eustis, Florida. All ar rangements are under the careful direction of Page-Theus Funeral Home Leesburg, Flori da. IN MEMORY GREGOR Children from cheer leaders to Little Leaguers are ooding the page with photos of them selves holding signs and notes of support for Jay and his family. Thank you all for your comments and your videos, said Ryon in a video taken in Jays hospital room and post ed to the group. Jay is loving it. Keep it coming in. Thats whats keep ing us going. The Facebook group began with the sole purpose of making Jay smile. But the commu nitys support of the lit tle boy, affectionately known as J.J., is also a testament to the cama raderie within the Lake County Public Safety Department. Ryon shaved his head along with Jays mom Maggie Denk as a show of support. In turn, dozens of members of the Public Safety De partment are sporting completely bald heads, or Friar Tuck haircuts. Nick and Maggie are really incredible peo ple, said Lake County Fire Lt. Brian Gamble. They are always do nating their time on the opposite side of this. And J.J. he is a great little kid. For more information or to share a message with Jay, join the Team Jay group on Facebook. LEUKEMIA FROM PAGE A3

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties that serves Lake Coun ty and an Inverness of ce at 106 N. Osceola Ave. that serves Sum ter County. Legal Advo cacy Center of Central Florida serves 12 Flori da counties, including Lake and Sumter, and uses the ofces of Com munity Legal Services. Mason serves on the board of directors of Community Legal Ser vices and on the board of the Legal Advocacy Center. In 2012-13, Florida law yers provided more than 1.7 million hours of pro bono services to those in need and more than $4.8 million to legal aid organizations. LAWYER FROM PAGE A3 according to county ofcials and Costello, was how the project was completed. In a spirit of cooperation and partnership, the Palisades Home owner Association shared some of the expenses of the repairs with the county, Costello said. In our com munity, we stress partnership be tween residents, elected ofcials and the various county work groups. We have to try to make that more com mon in working in partnership. At a recent county commission meeting, Costello presented an award to Stivender, Roads Superin tendent Jeff Johnson and Parks for their work on remedying drainage issues in the Palisades Country Club community. This Lake County team worked in partnership with our residents with professionalism and achieved excel lent results, the award citation reads. Stivender said he is appreciative when a HOA recognizes us for doing our job. Parks said the partnership is an ex ample of government performing its duty. Fred Costello and the Palisades could have come at us angrily, but they did not, he said. I appreciate them wanting to establish a part nership. So often it is said that gov ernment does not serve and isnt responsive to the people. But very clearly here we have a partnership that works. PARTNERS FROM PAGE A3 providing easy access to Orlando. Mount Dora is tak ing advantage of this by partnering with the Lake County Economic Development Depart ment to put together a regional commercial district on approxi mately 900 acres along the parkway extension into the city. Because we are at this critical stage of the road being built, (the commission) is an im portant forum to vet concerns that come up and impacts regarding the road being built, Campione said. The commissions purpose is to protect the water quality of the Wekiva River and all the natural attributes of Wekiva basin wild life, including ora and fauna, Campione said. CAMPIONE FROM PAGE A3 helping police get a x on the area in hostage situations, to displays and observations of real estate properties, among other uses. ASEC Program Man ager Brent Klavon said that while the company already generates about $30 million in annual revenue for developing operating systems for military aviation, main ly for the U.S. Navy, the company is prepar ing for a share of what many in the aeronau tics eld believe will be a vast commercial mar ket that could amount to a $632 million boost to the commercial mar ket for unmanned air craft systems in the Sunshine State, accord ing to estimates from the Association for Un manned Vehicle Sys tems International. The same econom ic study suggested the unmanned aircraft sys tems industry could generate 3,251 jobs in Florida alone in three years. Estimates for the eco nomic impact on the U.S. are much larger. The gures are kind of crazy big and they usually have a B with a billion behind them, Klavon said. Every where you see for a po tential birds-eye view or the elimination of a ladder to go up on a roof, you could use one of these things. As the industry devel ops standards for creat ing the systems, the key to opening the commer cial market will be the regulations that the Fed eral Aviation Adminis tration is formulating. Thats the stick ing point: Flying un manned remote-con trol aircraft beyond recreational use is ille gal in the United States. But as the FAA and oth er regulators grapple with the legalities, com panies such as ASEC continue to prepare for the new market that should come in 2015, according to the FAA Modernization and Re form Act. Two types of unmanned systems al ready have been ap proved for commercial use in the northern ar eas of Alaska. The FAA declined to respond to questions in a phone interview. But the FAA website shows that a road map on how to deal with un manned aircraft is under heavy consideration. Unmanned air craft offer new ways for commercial enter prises and public op erators to increase op erational efciency, decrease costs and en hance safety; and this road map will allow us to safely and efciently integrate them into the (national air space), FAA Administrator Mi chael Huerta says on the website. ASEC ofcials hope to become a testing and research compa ny, one that the aircraft manufacturers and de velopers will employ to rene the systems. In the meantime, ASEC is providing inkind services for Space Florida, which is devel oping space and aero nautical commercial interests in the state. Government-funded Space Florida is based at Cape Canaveral. Jax Chamber Presi dent Daniel Davis said many in the business community are follow ing the unmanned-air craft developments closely. He acknowl edged that many are unaware of the poten tial commercial im pact, but the unknowns make the drone devel opment attractive. I want to be on the cutting edge. Whenever we have cutting-edge technology in our com munity, it would be hoove us to develop it, Davis said. Davis compared the potential unknown im pact of unmanned ve hicles to the iPhone and that few were aware of the potential commercial impact of that device. But Davis also said the pending legalities surrounding unmanned aircraft call for more information being passed along to the community before the technology can be embraced fully. I think we have to AIRCRAFT FROM PAGE A3 prove that the com munity doesnt have anything to wor ry about in the safe ty and privacy issues that come along with unmanned aircraft, Davis said. Then, when it gets to the point, we need to be able to give budding creative entrepre neurs the opportu nity to succeed. A study by the un manned-vehicle trade association ranked Florida fourth in the nation for po tential to achieve the most economic ben et from industry developments. The study also noted that Floridas robust aviation and aerospace sector is inviting. BOB SELF / AP While Jared Victory, left, ies the X-8 quadcopter, a colleague monitors the aircrafts system in real time.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb Find brilliant lighting solutions for every room in your home. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press BETHESDA, Md. Forget being sneezed on: Government sci entists are deliber ately giving dozens of volunteers the u by squirting the live virus straight up their noses. It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of re search is a step in the quest for better u vac cines. It turns out that how the body fends off inuenza remains something of a mystery. Vaccines are work ing, but we could do better, said Dr. Mat thew Memoli of the National Institutes of Health, who is leading the study that aims to infect up to 100 adults over the next year. Wait a minute: Flu is sweeping the country, so why not just study the already sick? That wouldnt let scientists measure how the im mune system reacts through each step of infection, starting with that rst exposure to the virus. Its not an experiment to be taken lightly. After all, the u kills thou sands of Americans a year. For safety, Memo li chose a dose that pro duces mild to moder ate symptoms and accepts only volunteers who are healthy and no older than 50. And to avoid spread ing the germs, partic ipants must spend at least nine days quar antined inside a spe cial isolation ward at the NIH hospital, their health closely moni tored. Theyre not re leased until nasal tests prove theyre no longer contagious. The incentive: About $3,000 to compensate for their time. I received a very scolding email from my mother about signing up, Daniel Bennett, 26, said with a grin. Their standards are so high, I dont believe Im in danger, add ed Bennett, a restau rant worker from Col lege Park, Md. I dont get sick that often. A masked and gloved Memoli had Bennett lie at for about a minute. It will taste salty. Some will drip down the back of your throat, Memoli said, before squeezing a syringe lled with millions of microscopic virus parti cles, oating in salt wa ter, into each nostril. Sure enough, a few days later Bennett had the runny nose and achiness of mild u. The best defense against inuenza is a yearly vaccine, but its far from perfect. In fact, the vaccine is least ef fective in people age 65 and older the group most susceptible to u probably because the immune system weakens with age. Understanding how younger adults bodies ght u may help sci entists determine what the more vulnerable el derly are missing, clues to help develop more protective vaccines for everyone, Memoli ex plained. Heres the issue: The vaccine is designed to raise peoples levels of a particular u-ght ing antibody. It targets a protein that acts like the virus coat, called hem agglutinin the H in H1N1, the strain that caused the 2009 pan demic and that is caus ing the most illness so far this winter, too. But its not clear what antibody level is best to aim for or wheth er a certain amount means youre protect ed against getting sick at all, or that youd get a mild case instead of a severe one. As mind-boggling as it is, we dont know the answer to that, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief of NIHs National Insti tute of Allergy and In fectious Diseases. We made some assump tions that we knew ev erything about u. Just targeting hemag glutinin probably isnt enough, Memoli add ed. Already, some peo ple in his study didnt get sick, despite re markably low antibody levels, meaning some thing else must be pro tecting them. Could it be antibodies against the N in us name, the neuramini dase protein? Specic T cells that are activated to ght infection? Genes that switch on and off when a virus invades? To begin nding out, Memoli rst developed a laboratory-grown copy of the H1N1 u strain and sprayed dif ferent amounts into volunteers noses un til he found the right dose to trigger mild u. He hopes eventually to test the harsher H3N2 strain, too. Now hes infecting two groups people with low antibody lev els and those with high levels. Some were re cently vaccinated, and some werent. Hell compare how sick they get, how long theyre contagious and how the immune system jumps into action. Called a human chal lenge study, this kind of research hasnt been performed with u vi ruses in the U.S. for more than a decade, before scientists had ways as sophisticated to measure what happens. Volunteers sneeze for science CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP Dr. Matthew Memoli, an infectious disease specialist, sprays live u virus into the nose of Daniel Bennett, 26, of College Park, Md., who is part of a study at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 O n a trip last month to the Turkish-Syrian border, I met an impressive young Syrian opposition journalist named Adnan Hadad, who had just ed Aleppo because he was being targeted by both the re gime and al-Qaida militants. When talks nally began in Switzerland on Wednesday be tween the Syrian regime and opposition, a testy exchange between Hadad and Syrian In formation Minister Omran Zou bi caught my eye. At a news con ference, Hadad asked Zoubi to comment on the deadly bar rel bombs being dropped by government planes on civilian neighborhoods in Aleppo. Ac cording to the New York Times Zoubi snapped back: This is the kind of question you ask if you support the terrorist groups. This exchange illustrates why the Geneva II talks are head ed for failure and why terror ist groups will grow stronger in Syria the longer Bashar al-Assad holds power. Zoubis remarks show the re gimes determination to divert the talks away from any discus sion of replacing Assad. Instead, Assads minions will push the narrative that the West needs him to ght jihadi terrorists. What Zoubi wont admit is that the re gimes murder and torture of ci vilians fueled the jihadi threat. In the early months of the re bellion, the regime crushed hun dreds of thousands of peaceful protesters who sought politi cal reform, not revolution. Since then, its tactics have been grue some. An archive of 55,000 photographs, which recent ly emerged from Assads jails, shows 11,000 starved and tor tured corpses. Smuggled out by a police photographer who defect ed, the images have not yet been fully authenticated, but they rep licate endless reports of similar crimes against thousands of de tainees in regime dungeons, re lated by survivors or document ed by human rights groups. Assad has left no space for civ ic rebels such as Hadad, who seek neither dictatorship nor radical Islam. Far from being a terrorist sup porter, Hadad represents Syr ias youthful best and brightest, whose future is being destroyed by the ghting. He left a safe and solid career as a nancial advis er in Dubai in 2012 to become an opposition media activist in Aleppo, where rebel journal ists risk their lives to report war crimes against civilians by the regime or by Islamists. He ed Aleppo after the al-Qaida afli ate Islamic State of Iraq and Syr ia (ISIS) declared war on media activists and started kidnapping and killing them. Over coffee last month at the Sirehan Hotel in the Turkish bor der city of Gaziantep, Hadad ex plained why Islamist militias and more radical jihadis such as ISIS have grown so strong. When the revolution started, Hadad told me, and hundreds of thousands came to the streets, people might have agreed on As sads leaving after 2014 (when elections are supposedly sched uled). But, he adds, after they saw the tanks, and the helicop ters and massacres and the sec tarian acts, people felt they must kill or be killed. Under siege, he said, Syrians tolerated various shades of Isla mist militias more mainstream or even extreme hard-liners because they arrived with mon ey, guns, and good organization. When the West failed to provide aid to non-Islamist militias, those defending their villages against regime soldiers had few choices. People needed guns and thats where the Islamists came in, said Hadad. When people have no hope, the thing you be lieve in, the only thing you have left, is faith. Indeed, the regime has large ly refrained from going after ISIS, some of whose leaders have old ties to Syrian intelligence. As cynics point out, the regime welcomes the rise of radical groups in order to demonstrate to Syrians that Assad is the bet ter choice. The regime releas es the most dangerous Islamists from their prisons, says Hadad. Then you start a religious war. There you have it. The As sad regime will use the Islamist threat to reject compromise at Geneva, while jihadis grow stronger in Syria. Backed by Moscow and Tehran, the Syrian leader will stonewall peace talks and try to hold fake elections. With President Obama rmly committed to a passive position on Syria, Secretary of State John Kerrys calls for an Assad exit will be ignored. The ghting may continue for years, as the coun try sinks into de facto partition. Most tragic, the best and brightest of Syrias educated youth, such as Hadad, will ee out of physical or economic des peration. Or they will wind up dead or tortured. Many Syrians want to end this war by any means, even if the country is divided, Hadad told me sadly. But I dont think a majority would accept Assad staying. In a world where the international community tol erates a leader responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians, Hadad said, I dont think this global community is good for anything. When it comes to Syria, hes correct. Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorialboard member for the Philadel phia Inquirer. Readers may email her at trubin@phillynews.com. OTHER VOICES Trudy Rubin TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES Syria talks are headed for failure The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. F orty years ago, when the Supreme Court expanded the right of police to search people they took into custody as well as the possessions they were car rying, the smartphone was the stuff of sci ence ction. But now that phones contain vast amounts of personal information, the court should rule that cellphone searches require a warrant. Last week, the justices agreed to review two lower court decisions that came to dif ferent conclusions about the privacy of cell phone data. In a California case, a state court upheld the conviction of David Leon Riley, who was initially pulled over because his car had expired tags. After police found guns in the car, they arrested Riley and searched through what one detective called lots of stuff on his smartphone, including a photo showing Riley and another man posing near a car that had been involved in a shooting. In the other case, the U.S. 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston ruled that po lice may not conduct warrantless search es of data on cellphones seized from people who have been arrested. The case involved Brima Wurie, whose comparatively primi tive ip phone displayed calls from a num ber identied as my house. When police went to the address associated with that number, they found a mailbox labeled with Wuries name. After obtaining a warrant, po lice searched the house and found crack co caine, marijuana, cash and a rearm. Police long have been allowed to con duct warrantless searches of people they ar rest because of the possibility that a suspect might have a concealed weapon or try to destroy evidence. But in 1973, the Supreme Court unjustiably held that such search es were legal even when there was no prob ability that weapons or evidence would be found. The invasion of privacy permitted by that ruling multiplies exponentially when the object searched is a smartphone. Ideally the court would endorse the 1st Circuits holding that warrantless search es of cellphones are always unconstitution al. But the court also could draw a distinc tion between the search of Wuries phone, on which the call register was easily ac cessed, and the more intrusive search of Ri leys smartphone. When the framers of the Constitution wrote of the right of the people to be se cure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches, they couldnt have foreseen that papers and ef fects would be housed in a palm-sized de vice. But the court should rule that the prin ciple of privacy is the same. From Los Angeles Times. A VOICE No warrant, no search of your mobile phone

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Heat top Spurs in Finals rematch / B3 STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI In their tful, laborious search for a general manager, the Miami Dolphins nally found some one to say yes: Dennis Hickey. The longtime Tampa Bay Bucca neers executive accepted the job Sunday, ending a search that lasted nearly three weeks. Hickeys hiring came after the Dol phins were rejected by several can didates. New England Patriots direc tor of player personnel Nick Caserio and Tennessee Titans vice president of player personnel Lake Dawson turned down job offers, and Cleve land Browns assistant general man ager Ray Farmer withdrew from con sideration Thursday. Several others declined invitations to interview as a replacement for Jeff Ireland, whose six-year stint as gen eral manager ended Jan. 7 when he and owner Stephen Ross agreed to part ways. Hickey has been with the Bucca neers for 18 seasons, including the past three as director of player per sonnel. He was their director of col lege scouting for six years. He was not interviewed for Tampa Bays GM job when it became open after this season. The Bucs won four division titles and one Super Bowl championship during his time with them, but went 28-52 over the past ve years and had spotty draft re sults during that span. Hickey was among eight candi dates interviewed, with Ross aide Matt Higgins and executive vice Dolphins name Bucs Hickey as new GM Three-week search ends after Miami rejected by several different candidates over concerns about roster control SEE HICKEY | B2 JOHN PYE AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Australia Stan Wawrinka added a win over Rafael Nadal to his list of rsts in a stunning run to his maiden Grand Slam title, extending his rivals in jury-cursed run at the Aus tralian Open with a 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 upset in Sundays nal. The 28-year-old Wawrin ka had never taken a set off Nadal in 12 previous meet ings, but attacked from the start against the 13-time major winner and regained his nerve after dropping the third set against the injured Spaniard. Nadal appeared to be on the verge of retiring in the second set, when he hurt his back and needed a medical time out, but he refused to quit. Its really not the way you want to win a tennis match, but in a Grand Slam nal Ill take it, said Wawrinka, the rst man in 21 years to beat the No. 1 and No. 2 ranked players en route to a Grand Slam title. Nadal was a hot favorite to win at Melbourne Park and become the rst man to win each of the four Grand Slam tournaments twice in the Open era instead, his injury curse struck again. It remains the only major hes hasnt won at least two times. Rafa, Im really sorry for you, I hope your back is go ing to be ne, youre a re ally great guy, good friend and really amazing cham pion, Wawrinka said as he accepted his rst major tro phy. Last year I had a crazy match, I lost it. I was crying a lot after the match. But in one year a lot happened I still dont know if Im dream ing or not but well see to morrow morning. Wawrinka lost in ve sets to Novak Djokovic in the fourth round of the 2013 Australian Open, in the lon gest Grand Slam match of the season. Djokovic went Wawrinka wins Aussie Open final over injured Nadal AARON FAVILA / AP Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland kisses the trophy after defeating Rafael Nadal of Spain on Sunday after the mens singles nal at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia. SEE AUSSIE | B2 BILL HABER / AP New Orleans Pelicans shooting guard Eric Gordon (10) shoots over Orlando Magic power forward Glen Davis in the rst half on Sunday in New Orleans. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Memo Gidley is cut out of the Gainsco Corvette DP after he was involved in a crash with Risi Competizione Ferrari F458 (62) on Sunday during the IMSA Series Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach. The RSR Racing Oreca passes in front of the ferris wheel. BRETT MARTEL AP Sports Writer NEW ORLEANS Anthony Davis had 22 points, a career-high 19 rebounds and sev en blocked shots, and the New Orleans Pel icans won their sec ond straight game, 100-92 over the Or lando Magic on Sun day night. Davis statistical line marked the rst time since the fran chise was founded as the Hornets in Char lotte in 1988 that a player on the club had that many points, rebounds and blocks in the same game. Tyreke Evans scored 13 of his 23 points in the fourth quarter to keep struggling Or lando at bay. Led by Arron Af alos 25 points, the Magic twice got as close as three points late in the fourth quarter, the last time on Tobias Harris run ner with 4:26 to go. Brian Roberts had 15 points and Eric Gordon 14 for the Pelicans. Victor Oladipo 18 points and ve steals for Orlando, while Harris added 17 points and nine re bounds. Davis punctuated his latest memorable performance with a soaring windmill jam over Orlandos Glen Davis that made it 9890 with 1:24 left. JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer DAYTONA BEACH Action Express Rac ing led a Corvette po dium sweep in the prestigious Rolex 24 at Daytona, where Joao Barbosa held off Max Angelelli on a restart with 8:23 remaining Sunday to preserve a second overall win in four years. Barbosa had driv en the No. 5 Corvette to a 13.1-second lead when a full-course cau tion with 21 minutes remaining put the vic tory in jeopardy. The eld was bunched and Angelelli had one nal chance to give Wayne Taylor Racing the win. But Barbosa easi ly pulled away to get the win for teammates Christian Fittipaldi and Sebastien Bourda is. ts the second over all victory for Barbosa, third in class. Fittipal di was part of the win ning 2004 team, and its Bourdais rst victory. Barbosa was unhap py when IMSA race of cials called the fullcourse caution for a Porsche that had run off the track and into the chicane. I didnt want to see it. I had quite a good gap and cushion so I could manage trafc, said Barbosa, who lives outside Daytona in Or mond Beach. I was getting quite worried initially because I kept hitting trafc at the wrong moments. But we won the race. Wayne Taylor Rac ing nished second for the second consecutive year. I tried everything I had in the car, trust me, everything I had to use, Angelelli said. Co-owner Wayne Action Express leads podium sweep at Rolex 24 at Daytona SEE ROLEX | B2 Davis powers Pelicans past Magic, 100-92 SEE MAGIC | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 22 21 .512 Brooklyn 20 22 .476 1 New York 17 27 .386 5 Boston 15 31 .326 8 Philadelphia 14 30 .318 8 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 32 12 .727 Atlanta 23 20 .535 8 Washington 21 22 .488 10 Charlotte 19 27 .413 14 Orlando 12 33 .267 20 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 34 9 .791 Chicago 22 21 .512 12 Detroit 17 26 .395 17 Cleveland 16 28 .364 18 Milwaukee 8 35 .186 26 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 33 11 .750 Houston 29 17 .630 5 Dallas 25 20 .556 8 Memphis 22 20 .524 10 New Orleans 18 25 .419 14 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 35 10 .778 Portland 33 11 .750 1 Denver 21 21 .500 12 Minnesota 21 22 .488 13 Utah 15 29 .341 19 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 31 15 .674 Golden State 26 18 .591 4 Phoenix 25 18 .581 4 Sacramento 15 27 .357 14 L.A. Lakers 16 29 .356 14 Saturdays Games Chicago 89, Charlotte 87 L.A. Clippers 126, Toronto 118 Oklahoma City 103, Philadelphia 91 Memphis 99, Houston 81 Atlanta 112, Milwaukee 87 Denver 109, Indiana 96 Utah 104, Washington 101 Portland 115, Minnesota 104 Sundays Games Miami 113, San Antonio 101 New York 110, L.A. Lakers 103 New Orleans 100, Orlando 92 Phoenix 99, Cleveland 90 Brooklyn 85, Boston 79 Detroit at Dallas, late Portland at Golden State, late Denver at Sacramento, late Todays Games Phoenix at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games New Orleans at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m. Memphis at Portland, 10 p.m. Washington at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Sundays College Basketball Scores By The Associated Press EAST Canisius 78, Marist 65 Iona 71, St. Peters 63 NYU 78, Rochester 58 New Hampshire 61, Mass.-Lowell 32 Princeton 84, Kean 54 Quinnipiac 90, Manhattan 86, OT Siena 64, Faireld 56 Stony Brook 79, Maine 61 UMass 90, Fordham 52 SOUTH Memphis 80, South Florida 58 NC State 80, Georgia Tech 78, OT MIDWEST Evansville 66, Bradley 60 Green Bay 62, Detroit 52 Indiana 56, Illinois 46 Indiana-East 89, St. Louis Pharmacy 74 W. Michigan 62, Ball St. 53 SOUTHWEST SMU 75, Houston 68 National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 50 32 15 3 67 147 110 Tampa Bay 52 31 16 5 67 155 128 Toronto 54 27 21 6 60 155 168 Montreal 52 27 20 5 59 128 134 Detroit 52 23 18 11 57 135 144 Ottawa 52 22 20 10 54 147 165 Florida 52 21 24 7 49 127 158 Buffalo 50 14 29 7 35 97 144 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 52 36 14 2 74 168 128 N.Y. Rangers 54 28 23 3 59 139 138 Columbus 51 26 21 4 56 150 145 Philadelphia 53 25 22 6 56 142 158 Carolina 51 23 19 9 55 131 145 New Jersey 53 22 20 11 55 127 132 Washington 52 23 21 8 54 148 154 N.Y. Islanders 54 21 25 8 50 154 179 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 53 32 9 12 76 189 146 St. Louis 51 35 11 5 75 177 119 Colorado 51 32 14 5 69 149 134 Minnesota 54 28 20 6 62 129 133 Dallas 52 24 20 8 56 151 153 Nashville 53 23 22 8 54 131 158 Winnipeg 53 24 24 5 53 149 157 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 54 39 10 5 83 182 130 San Jose 52 34 12 6 74 165 125 Los Angeles 53 29 18 6 64 132 113 Vancouver 52 26 17 9 61 130 130 Phoenix 51 24 18 9 57 147 155 Calgary 52 18 27 7 43 119 165 Edmonton 53 15 32 6 36 135 187 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games St. Louis 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO Carolina 6, Ottawa 3 Boston 6, Philadelphia 1 Washington 5, Montreal 0 Tampa Bay 5, Colorado 2 Buffalo 5, Columbus 2 Winnipeg 5, Toronto 4, OT Dallas 3, Pittsburgh 0 Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 0 San Jose 3, Minnesota 2, OT Sundays Games Florida 5, Detroit 4, SO N.Y. Rangers 7, New Jersey 3 Winnipeg at Chicago, late Nashville at Edmonton, late Phoenix at Vancouver, late Todays Games Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Columbus at Carolina, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games Florida at Boston, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Columbus, 7 p.m. Washington at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Carolina at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 10 p.m. WINTER SPORTS Luge World Cup Results Sunday At Sigulda, Latvia Men 1. Armin Zoeggeler, Italy, 1:35.913 (47.96947.944). 2. Johannes Ludwig, Germany, 1:36.019 (47.98848.031). 3. Dominik Fischnaller, Italy, 1:36.226 (48.07348.153). 4. Martins Rubenis, Latvia, 1:36.363 (48.22048.143). 5. Semen Pavlichenko, Russia, 1:36.482 (48.31248.170). 6. Alexandr Peretjagin, Russia, 1:36.543 (48.34848.195). 7. Chris Mazdzer, United States, 1:36.567 (48.39148.176). 8. Jozef Ninis, Slovakia, 1:36.597 (48.44848.149). 9. Thor Haug Norbech, Norway, 1:36.607 (48.36148.246). 10. Samuel Edney, Canada, 1:36.638 (48.38748.251). Final World Cup Standings 1. Felix Loch, Germany, 685 points. 2. Armin Zoeggeler, Italy, 595. 3. Dominik Fischnaller, Italy, 534. 4. David Moeller, Germany, 515. 5. Chris Mazdzer, United States, 412. 6. Andi Langenhan, Germany, 381. 7. Samuel Edney, Canada, 375. 8. Wolfgang Kindl, Austria, 339. 9. Gregory Carigiet, Switzerland, 323. 10. Reinhard Egger, Austria, 315. Also 24. Tucker West, United States, 162. 30. Aidan Kelly, United States, 110. 35. Taylor Morris, United States, 101. 45. Joe Mortensen, United States, 32. Mens World Cup Ski Jump Results Sunday At Sapporo, Japan Large Hill 1. Jernej Damjan, Slovenia, 255.0 (138-134 me ters). 2. Peter Prevc, Slovenia, 254.4 (124-137.5). 3. Robert Kranjec, Slovenia, 253.3 (126-137). 4. Michael Neumayer, Germany, 249.8 (133.5-134). 5. Andreas Koer, Austria, 246.9 (140-130). 6. Noriaki Kasai, Japan, 245.2 (123.5-133). 7. Jan Matura, Czech Republic, 243.0 (131.5-127). 8. Markus Eisenbichler, Germany, 241.3 (130132.5). 9. Nejc Dezman, Slovenia, 236.3 (131-129). 10. Daiki Ito, Japan, 230.1 (128.5-125). Also 51. Michael Glasder, United States, 82.5 (109.5), did not qualify for second jump. 62. Chris Lamb, United States, 67.6 (103), did not qualify for second jump. World Cup Standings (After 19 of 28 events) 1. Peter Prevc, Slovenia, 812 points. 2. Kamil Stoch, Poland, 721. 3. Gregor Schlierenzauer, Austria, 670. 4. Noriaki Kasai, Japan, 646. 5. Simon Ammann, Switzerland, 608. 6. Anders Bardal, Norway, 598. 7. Andreas Wellinger, Germany, 492. 8. Severin Freund, Germany, 467. 9. Thomas Diethart, Austria, 445. 10. Thomas Morgenstern, Austria, 438. Also 71. Nicholas Fairall, United States, 3. Womens Ski Jump World Cup Results Sunday At Planica, Slovenia 1. Daniela Iraschko-Stolz, Austria, 249.8 points (102.5-101.5 meters). 2. Sara Takanashi, Japan, 246.8 (101.5-98.5). 3. Carina Vogt, Germany, 241.3 (100-99). 4. Yuki Ito, Japan, 233.7 (96.5-97). 5. Maja Vtic, Slovenia, 233.3 (98.5-96.5). 6. Maren Lundby, Norway, 231.3 (97-96). 7. Coline Mattel, France, 228.3 (98-95). 8. Ursa Bogataj, Slovenia, 227.4 (99.5-95). 9. Katja Pozun, Slovenia, 219.4 (97-94). 10. Julia Clair, France, 218.8 (96-92.5). World Cup Standings (After 11 of 19 events) 1. Sara Takanashi, Japan, 1,020 points. 2. Carina Vogt, Germany, 666. 3. Daniela Iraschko-Stolz, Austria, 522. 4. Irina Avvakumova, Russia, 493. 5. Yuki Ito, Japan, 354. 6. Coline Mattel, France, 343. 7. Maren Lundby, Norway, 281. 8. Maja Vtic, Slovenia, 266. 9. Helena Olsson Smeby, Norway, 252. 10. Katharina Althaus, Germany, 228. Also 15. Jessica Jerome, United States, 175. 26. Lindsey Van, United States, 101. 34. Alissa Johnson, United States, 54. 47. Abby Hughes, United States, 13. S undays Sports Transactions BASEBALL National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS Agreed to terms with 2B Joe Thurston and OF Jeremy Hermida on minor league contracts. FOOTBALL National Football League MIAMI DOLPHINS Named Dennis Hickey gen eral manager. WASHINGTON REDSKINS Named Randy Jordan running backs coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS Reassigned RW Mikael Samuelsson to Grand Rapids (AHL). American Hockey League AHL Suspended Grand Rapids D Brennan Evans three games and Grand Rapids LW Triston Grant and Lake Erie RW Guillaume Desbiens one game for their actions during recent games. ECHL ECHL Suspended Wheeling F Chaz Johnson and Cincinnati D David MacDonald indenitely, Elmira F Corey Bellamy one game and Florida D Charles Landry and Toledo F Aaron Bogosian and ned them, along with Wheeling coach Clark Donatelli undisclosed amounts for their actions during re cent games. COLLEGE FLORIDA STATE Announc ed QB Jacob Coker will transfer to Alabama. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Duke at Pittsburgh ESPNU Norfolk St. at Savannah St. 9 p.m. ESPN Oklahoma St. at Oklahoma ESPNU Ark.-Pine Bluff at Texas Southern FS1 Villanova at Georgetown NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Buffalo at Pittsburgh 10 p.m. NBCSN Los Angeles at San Jose WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 Notre Dame at Maryland 9 p.m. ESPN2 Southern Cal at Stanford president of football administration Dawn Aponte helping the owner with the screen ing process. The other nalist was Dolphins assistant general man ager Brian Gaine, who worked under Ireland. Some candidates and potential candi dates expressed con cern about the Dol phins power structure, including the role of Aponte, who clashed with Ireland. Ross has said the new GM will report to him and will have autonomy in building the roster. Dawson turned down the job shortly before Hickey accepted. I felt Stephen is a great owner, passion ate and wants to win, but the details of the offer didnt align with my vision, Dawson said in a statement. I turned it down because it wasnt an ideal t for my family and me. So Ross turned to Hickey, who inter viewed for the rst time 10 days into the search. His task will be to up grade the roster for coach Joe Philbin after Miami collapsed late in the season to blow a playoff berth and n ish 8-8. The Dolphins havent been above .500 since 2008, the longest such stretch in franchise history. Their tumul tuous 2013 season in cluded a locker-room bullying scandal that drew national scru tiny, and a report on the NFL investigation into the case will be re leased after the Super Bowl. HICKEY FROM PAGE B1 on to win his third consecutive title at Melbourne Park, and then beat Wawrinka again in ve sets in the U.S. Open semi nals. But Wawrinka avenged those loss es this time, beating Djokovic in ve sets in the quarternals ending a run of 14 straight losses to the Serbian player. Now hell move from No. 8 to No. 3. In doing so, hell sur pass Federer, a 17time Grand Slam win ner who lost to Nadal in the seminals to become the high est-ranked Swiss player for the rst time in his career. bWawrinka also broke up a sequence of wins for the Big Four with 34 of the previous 35 majors going to either Nadal, Djokovic, Roger Fed erer or Andy Murray. Stan, you really de serve it, Nadal said. Luck was against me today but you really deserve it. Last thing that I wanted to do was re tire. I hate to do that, especially in a nal. Same time, is tough to see yourself during the whole year you are working for a mo ment like this, and arrives the moment and you feel that you are not able to play at your best. Nadal has had a ter rible stretch with in juries at the Austra lian Open, and has described it as his unluckiest Grand Slam. He won the ti tle in 2009, and lost an epic ve-set nal to Djokovic in 2012. But he missed the 2013 edition during a sev en-month layoff with knee injuries and ill ness, and his quar ternal losses in 2010 and 2011 were affect ed by injuries. It has been a very emotional two weeks Im sorry to n ish this way, he told the Rod Laver Arena crowd. I tried very, very hard this year was one of the more emotional tourna ments in my career. A possible retire ment was loom ing when Nadal was serving at 0-2 in the second set. He bent over at the waist to stretch his back and then grabbed his low er back with his hand and grimaced in pain. His serve immediate ly dipped to 141 kph (87 mph). When Nadal took a medical timeout af ter falling behind a set and a break, and returned to a cho rus of boos without a shirt after 7 minutes, it seemed that an ear ly nish was on the cards. Wawrinka was ag gravated during the time out, demand ing that ofcials tell him why Nadal need ed the break. And he came out aggressive ly to nish off the sec ond set. Nadals serve speed dipped even further to 125 kph (77 mph) and then 114 kph (70 mph). The support in the stadium gradually shifted as the crowd saw the Spaniard bat tling to stay on the court. His service speed improved in the be ginning of the third set, prompting a fan to yell advice to Waw rinka: Cmon Stan, no sympathy! By the end of the set, Nadals serve was back up to 174 kph (108 mph) and Waw rinkas error count was escalating. Wawrinka com posed himself af ter an exchange of breaks in the fourth set to serve it out in 2 hours, 21 minutes. Af ter a muted celebra tion, he consoled Na dal in the courtside chairs before getting a chance to hold up and kiss his rst big trophy. AUSSIE FROM PAGE B1 Taylor came out of re tirement to drive for the rst time since 2010 for the opportunity to drive with Angelelli and sons Ricky and Jordan. The 58-year-old drove one stint on Saturday then retreated to the pit stand to strategize for what he hoped would be a third and most memorable victory. It was a great result, and to have my fam ily and my kids drive with me and Max, its been an emotional roll er-coaster, Wayne Tay lor said. Obviously, we wanted to be the rst winners for Chevro let in the Corvette, but we were second-best and they won fair and square. Action Express sec ond car, with drivers Brian Frisselle, Burt Frisselle, John Martin and Fabien Giroix, n ished third for a strong showing for the two-car team. Chevrolet was the top manufacturer standing at the end of the twice-around-theclock endurance race. Two Nissan teams took the next two plac es in the top-tier Proto type class as Ford was shut out in its debut of its new EcoBoost en gine as the manufactur er stepped into the new unied Tudor United SportsCar Champion ship supporting teams for the rst time. But the No. 01 car from Chip Ganassi Rac ing team wasnt able to defend its win because of a series of prob lems that plagued the car starting very ear ly in the race. Then the No. 02 was taken out of contention when it de veloped a at rear tire while Scott Dixon was running second with roughly ve hours re maining. The No. 02 went to the garage with 48 minutes remaining when the oor of the Ford Riley began to un ravel and Dixon could see the pavement un der his feet. Michael Shank Rac ings entry, the 2012 race winning team, was plagued by a broken gearbox. But many in the Ford camp considered it a success considering the questions about re liability with the new engine package that plagued the manufac turer in preseason test ing. To see where we were, and where we are now, this is a great step moving forward with this program, said ve-time Rolex win ner Scott Pruett. This is a whole new engine with technology that hasnt been in the sport before. We were here at (testing) and we left early because we had issues. So coming back here, everyone put this gallant effort ... to run like we did, when you think about where we were, its huge. ROLEX FROM PAGE B1 The play sent Glen Davis stumbling into the padding under the basket, while Anthony Davis took a triumphant stride over the baseline and glared intensely at the crazed crowd, his arms stiff at his side. The Magic were un able to recover after that. Orlando outshot New Orleans 46.8 per cent (36 of 77) to 45.7 percent (37 of 81), but New Orleans outscored Orlando at the foul line, 21-15, and outre bounded the Magic 4832. Orlando, which has lost 13 of 15 games, never led during the nal three quarters, but kept it close much of the second half. New Orleans led 6258 after a 6-0 Magic spurt in which Oladi po hit two free throws, converted a steal from Gordon into a fastbreak dunk, then stole the ball from Roberts to set up Afalos layup. Gordon halted the surge with a stepback jumper from 19 feet, and Anthony Da vis two-handed jam capped an 11-2 run that put the Pelicans back up by 13. Orlando closed the third quarter with Af alos 3 and two layups by Jameer Nelson, and cut New Orleans lead to 75-71 on ETauwn Moores oater to open the fourth quarter. Evans responded with a reverse layup as he was fouled for a three-point play. He wound up scoring all 10 of the Pelicans points through the rst 6:33 of the nal period to help New Orleans main tain a slim lead. Evans also fed Davis for an al ley-oop jam that made it 94-88. New Orleans started fast, erasing its nal de cit of the game on Dari us Millers 3-pointer late in the rst period. When Miller hit his second from deep in the second quarter, it capped a 22-6 run that put New Orle ans up 38-23. The lead grew to 16 points on Roberts 3 late in the period, but Orlando ran off eight straight points on Nel sons 3, Davis hook shot as he was fouled and Nelsons short oater. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI Chris Bosh scored 24 points on 9 for 10 shooting, LeBron James added 18 points and the Miami Heat rolled past the San An tonio Spurs 113-101 on Sunday in an NBA Fi nals rematch from last season. Mario Chalmers scored 16 points for Mi ami, which used Dwya ne Wade as a reserve for the rst time since Jan. 6, 2008. Wade an All-Star starter again this season had not played in any of Mi amis most recent four games while dealing with ongoing knee re habilitation, and n ished with eight points and ve assists in 24 minutes. Michael Beasley scored 12, Norris Cole scored 11 and Ray Al len added 10 for Mi ami. Bosh has made 17 of his last 18 shots from the oor. Tim Duncan led San Antonio with 23 points. Boris Diaw added 15, Marco Belinelli scored 12 and Tony Parker n ished with 11 for the Spurs, who went on a 13-0 run late in the fourth quarter and were still down by 13 when the spurt was over. Chalmers the last starter from either side who was in the game made a 3-pointer mid way through the fourth to give Miami a 10680 lead. As the build ing slowly emptied, the Spurs slowly chipped away, with Nando De Colo getting six points and an assist during the run that was no where near enough to make any real differ ence. Roger Mason Jr. snapped the score less drought for Mi ami, making a 3-point er from nearly the same spot that Allen made his infamous game-ty ing one that saved the Heat with 5.2 seconds left in Game 6 of last seasons Finals, when the Spurs were one stop away from their fth championship. Miami won that one in over time, then prevailed in Game 7 for its second straight crown. Sundays game was the rst ofcial meet ing between the teams since that nale. San Antonio visited Mi ami in the preseason, a night where the Fi nals rematch was the only thing really worth talking about, but at least the Spurs didnt have to see Miamis third championship banner hanging from the rafters of Ameri canAirlines Arena that night. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich acknowl edged that its still dif cult to think about. Coaches, he said, would understand. All the good stuff fades away and you re member the stuff that passed you by, Popo vich said. Thats the way we think, sad as it is. Unlike those Finals thrillers, this one wasnt a down-to-the-wire af fair. With a minute to go in the rst half, Miamis lead was 53-50. It was 91-71 by the start of the fourth, a 38-21 blitz by the Heat over a span of 13 minutes eliminating any semblance of dra ma. The third quarter was all Miami, and elimi nated all doubt. Bosh was 4 for 4 from the eld, on the way to a 12-point quarter. Mi ami outrebounded San Antonio 14-3 in the quarter, with James and Cole each grabbing one more rebound in that period than the entire Spurs roster. And by the time the fourth started, the blowout was well un derway. NBA GOLF J PAT CARTER / AP Miami Heat players Michael Beasley (8) and Chris Andersen (11) block San Antonio Spurs Manu Ginbobil (20) during the rst half of a NBA basketball game on Sunday in Miami. DANTE CARRER / AP Jessica Korda of the U.S. kisses her trophy as she poses for photographers following her victory at the LPGA Pure Silk Bahamas Classic on Sunday at the Ocean Club Golf Course, Paradise Island, Bahamas. Associated Press PARADISE ISLAND, Bahamas Jessica Korda won the sea son-opening Bahamas LPGA Classic on Sun day for her second tour title, holing a 6-foot birdie putt on the nal hole to beat Stacy Lew is by a stroke. The 20-year-old Korda closed with a 7-under 66 for a 19-under 273 total on Atlantis Resorts Ocean Club course. Lewis parred the nal four holes two of them par 5s for a 66. Korda tied Lewis for the lead with a 12-foot birdie putt on the par3 17th, then got up and down for birdie on the par-5 18th. Kor das 4-iron approach on 18 scampered through the green to the fringe just short of the grandstand. With an ofcial and a TV announcer holding up cords that would have interfered with her stroke, she putted under the wires to set up the winning birdie. That was differ ent, Korda said. It was like jump rope. She admitted she was nervous on the winning putt. Incredible! Korda said. I could barely put the golf ball down and line up. Heat win Finals rematch with 113-101 victory over Spurs Jessica Korda wins Bahamas Classic LPGA Pure Silk-Bahamas Classic Leading Par Scores Sunday At Ocean Club Golf Course Paradise Island, Bahamas Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,644; Par: 73 Final Jessica Korda, $195,000 69-66-72-66 -19 Stacy Lewis, $120,655 69-71-68-66 -18 Pornanong Phatlum, $63,581 71-69-69-67 -16 Paula Creamer, $63,581 71-65-71-69 -16 Lizette Salas, $63,581 72-67-66-71 -16 Na Yeon Choi, $63,581 70-68-66-72 -16 Christel Boeljon, $31,543 71-67-73-66 -15 Sandra Gal, $31,543 71-69-71-66 -15 Lydia Ko, $31,543 68-70-71-68 -15 P.K. Kongkraphan, $31,543 69-69-71-68 -15 Morgan Pressel, $23,945 70-73-69-66 -14 Thidapa Suwannapura, $23,945 70-71-68-69 -14 Brittany Lincicome, $19,289 70-71-71-68 -12 Chella Choi, $19,289 73-69-67-71 -12 Michelle Wie, $19,289 72-65-72-71 -12 Amelia Lewis, $19,289 69-73-66-72 -12 Jenny Suh, $19,289 71-66-71-72 -12 Alena Sharp, $15,220 75-69-70-68 -10 Kristy McPherson, $15,220 73-71-69-69 -10 Hee Young Park, $15,220 69-72-72-69 -10 Sandra Changkija, $15,220 71-72-68-71 -10 Azahara Munoz, $15,220 70-71-69-72 -10 Haru Nomura, $13,344 73-74-70-66 -9 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $13,344 75-68-71-69 -9 Angela Stanford, $12,386 73-73-69-69 -8 BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW YORK Car melo Anthony followed his 62-point game with 35 more, and the New York Knicks beat the Los Angeles Lakers 110-103 on Sunday. Anthony nished with two points fewer than he had at halftime of his record-setting night Fri day, but he scored six straight New York points down the stretch after the Lakers had cut the Knicks lead to two with just over 5 minutes left. And he had plenty of help as the Knicks won their second straight following a ve-game losing streak. Raymond Felton scored 20 points, Tim Hardaway Jr. had 18 and J.R. Smith 16 for the Knicks. Tyson Chandler had 13 points and 14 rebounds. Jodie Meeks scored 24 points for the Lakers, but he was shut out in the fourth quarter after scoring 16 in the third. Pau Gasol had 20 points and 13 rebounds as the Lakers dropped their fourth straight to nish 2-5 on their Grammy Awards road trip. Anthonys 62 points were a career high, most at in the NBA this season and most at the current Madison Square Garden, one more than Kobe Bry ant scored ve years ago. Lakers coach Mike DAntoni, who coached Anthony in New York, said the key for the Lak ers was to contain ev eryone else, knowing Anthony would score. They didnt. Bryant is still unable to play as he recov ers from a broken left knee. He said he called to congratulate Antho ny after Fridays game, and though he stressed his appreciation for MSG, said having the building record wasnt particularly important to him. He also noted that Anthony, who will be come a free agent this summer, may have to tell the Knicks he wont settle for being on a non-contender, as Bry ant did with the Lak ers, and that the talent around him needed to be upgraded. It was good enough Sunday until Anthony took over. He followed his own missed shot with 4:52 left, made a jumper and then scored on a drive that pushed the Knicks lead to 105-98 with 2:33 to play. Manny Harris scored a season-high 18 points for the Lakers, who stayed in it until late by making 12 of 18 shots in the third quarter, in cluding 6 of 7 from be hind the 3-point arc. The Lakers scored the nal nine points of the rst quarter, shoot ing 57 percent in the period to lead 25-22. It was tied at 45 late in the second before Anthony made a 3-pointer and a jumper, and the Knicks led 51-47 at the break. Notes: Bryant is due to have his knee examined after the Lakers return to Los Angeles. He said he was anxious to do some thing besides ride the stationary bike. ... The Knicks still face Boston on Tuesday and Cleve land on Thursday. Anthony sets season record for points in 2 games; Knicks top Lakers SETH WENIG / AP New York Knicks Tim Hardaway Jr. nishes off an alley-oop during the second half against the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday at Madison Square Garden in New York. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer SAN DIEGO In a tournament that was up for grabs, Scott Stallings hit a 4-iron worthy of a winner Sunday in the Farm ers Insurance Open. Stallings was in a ve-way tie for the lead when he hit his second shot on the par-5 18th hole as hard as he could. It was enough to barely clear the water, and he took two putts from 40 feet for birdie and a 4-un der 68 at Torrey Pines. That was enough for a one-shot victo ry when no one could catch him. It was the third career PGA Tour victory for Stallings, who earned a return trip to the Mas ters and should move high enough in the world ranking to qual ify for the Match Play Championship next month in Arizona. K.J. Choi had the best score of the week on the South Course with a 66 and was among those who tied for second. The pins were set up in fa vorable positions for birdies, making the course play the easi est it had all week. But that didnt make it easy not for Gary Woodland, Jordan Spieth, Pat Perez and so many others who squandered a good chance to win. Woodland ap peared to have the best chance to catch Stallings. He was one shot behind with plenty of length to reach the 18th in two until he chose fair way metal off the tee on No. 17 and hooked it into the canyon. He felt he had to make his 45-foot par putt to have any chance, and three-putted for dou ble bogey. Woodland, who had a one-shot lead going into the nal round, missed an easy birdie attempt on the 18th. Stallings rallies to win at Torrey

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 NHL COLLEGE BASKETBALL KEN POWTAK Associated Press AMHERST, Mass. Fordham coach Tom Pecora isnt about to listen to excuses for his teams rough start in Atlantic-10 play. Chaz Williams had 18 points and eight as sists and No. 13 Mas sachusetts rebounded from a loss earlier this week with a 90-52 vic tory over the Rams on Sunday. Im tired of saying were inexperienced, Pecora said. No com plaining, no excuses, no regrets. Weve got to get better. This is a tre mendous league, but we have an opportuni ty to get better by go ing to VCU Wednes day and you can see how thrilled I am about that. Raphiael Putney and Trey Davis both had 13 points and Maxie Esho had 10 points and six rebounds for the Minutemen (17-2, 4-1 A-10), who lost at Rich mond on Wednesday. The player that hurt Fordham the most, though, was Williams, who transferred from Hofstra after his fresh man season when Pec ora was the coach of the Pride. I think hes just de veloped tremendous ly, Pecora said. As you all know I had him as a freshman. His abil ity to involve every one and basically to be a surgeon, with a great quarterback and the great length he has around him. Chris Whitehead led the Rams (8-11, 1-5) with 13 points and Branden Frazier had 12. It was Fordhams seventh loss in eight games coming off a win against George Mason. The Rams shot just 30.5 percent (18 of 59) from the eld and missed 21 of 27 on 3-point attempts. We werent able to, for whatever reason, get the ball consistent ly to the rim, Peco ra said. In the rst ve minutes of the second half, they come out boom, game over. UMass broke the game open by scoring the rst 17 points of the second half. Fordham guard Jon Severe, who leads all Division I freshmen in scoring at 20.9 points per game, was held to seven points. UMass combined a swarming fullcourt press along with tough halfcourt man-to-man defense to take its larg est lead of the season, 40-24 at halftime. The Minutemen turned it into a rout with its run to start the second half. Putney opened the run with a 3 and Williams nailed one in transition from the left wing as they went ahead 57-24 on Derrick Gordons short jumper 4 1-2 minutes into the second half. The Rams nally ended the run on Man dell Thomas 3-pointer 30 seconds later. The Minutemen cleared the bench for most of the nal 10 minutes and gave some reserves time to join in the fun with 3-point ers and crowd-pleasing fastbreak baskets. Coming off the loss in the nal game of a three-game road trip and in danger of drop ping low or possibly out of the AP Top 25, the Minutemen turned up the fullcourt pres sure early after falling behind 7-0 in the open ing 3 minutes. Sporting new white T-shirts with red letter ing that read: UMa ss. Time for Pain, the Minutemen seemed fo cused to rebound with a convincing win in front of a sellout crowd. FRANK FRANKLIN II / AP New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist (30), of Sweden, stops a shot on goal during the second period of an outdoor NHL hockey game against the New Jersey Devils on Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York. IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer NEW YORK After sun reecting off the ice delayed the rst hockey game at Yan kee Stadium, the New York Rangers and pin striped goalie Henr ik Lundqvist beat the New Jersey Devils 7-3 in snow and cold Sun day. Rick Nash scored for the fth straight game, and the New York Rangers used a four-goal second pe riod to take the lead for good. The Devils led 1-0 and 3-1 in the rst, but New York got within one before in termission and then swarmed future Hall of Fame goalie Martin Brodeur. After Dominic Moore and Marc Sta al had goals in the rst for the Rang ers, Mats Zuccarello scored two straight to put New York ahead for the rst time. Carl Hagelin and Nash found the net, too, be hind the beleaguered Brodeur, who angri ly swatted the puck away after one of the tallies. Nash has seven goals in his streak and 18 this season. A day after the Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks played in 60-degree weather at Dodger Stadium, the NHL re turned to conditions more tting for hock ey. Lundqvist, who sported stylish pin striped pads for the occasion, stumbled through a difcult rst but settled down and made 19 saves. He hadnt allowed more than two goals in his previous sev en outings. The Dev ils took care of that in the rst. Jaromir Jagr had two assists to excite the large number of New Jersey fans who made the trek to the Bronx for what was nominally a Devils home game. The teams played through the second period as the snow started and increased in intensity, not long after they were forced to wait around an ex tra hour to drop the pick because of bright sunshine that created a dangerous glare on the ice. The temperature was 24.9 degrees when the rst puck dropped at 1:41 p.m. in front of a sellout Rangers score 6 straight, top NJ in cold and snow No. 13 UMass routs Fordham JESSICA HILL / AP Massachusetts Chaz Williams, left, drives to the basket as Fordhams Bryan Smith defends during the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game on Sunday in Amherst, Mass. CLAY BAILEY Associated Press MEMPHIS, Tenn. Chris Crawford scored 15 points, converting ve of Memphis sea son-high 10 3-pointers, and the 23rd-ranked Ti gers defeated South Florida 80-58 on Sunday. The Tigers, next-tolast in the American Athletic Conference in 3-point shooting per centage, ended the night at 10 of 22 from outside the arc. Craw ford was 5 of 10. Joe Jackson added 14 points and seven as sists for Memphis (154, 5-2 AAC), while Shaq Goodwin nished with 13 points and 10 re bounds. Nick King had 10 points as Memphis won its third straight and fth of six. Martino Brock led South Florida (10-10, 1-6) with 17 points, the only Bull to score in double gures. Memphis broke the game open in the mid dle of the rst half, building the lead to 12 points at halftime. The Tigers were up 30 with about 9 minutes left. At that point, Memphis coach Josh Pastner be gan substituting freely. The Tigers, who en tered the game shoot ing 30 percent from outside the arc, n ished at 46 percent against South Florida, including 58 percent in the second half. Mean while, South Florida shot 34 percent for the game and was 3 of 10 from 3-point range. South Florida en tered the game shoot ing 26 percent from outside the arc, the worst in the confer ence. Jacksons seven as sists were part of Mem phis collecting 23 as sists on 25 eld goals. Memphis closed the half with a 10-0 run to go up 34-22. The Tigers might have taken a big ger lead but was sty mied by anemic free throw shooting, going 9 of 19. In the nal 7 min utes of the half, the Ti gers were 3 of 11 from the free throw line. Memphis ended the game 20 of 35. The 3-point shooting loosened up in the sec ond half. Memphis hit seven of its rst 10 shots in the half, including missing only 2 of 8 from outside the arc. Meanwhile, the Bulls were 2 of 4, but that exchange of baskets didnt help South Flor ida keep pace. Mem phis was up 56-33 after Crawford hit consec utive 3-pointers with just under 13 minutes left in the game. NO. 15 CINCINNATI 80, TEMPLE 76 PHILADELPHIA Sean Kilpatrick scored a season-high 29 points and No. 15 Cincinnati staved off a Temple comeback to remain undefeated in the American Athletic Conference with an 8076 victory Sunday. After the Bearcats (19-2, 8-0 AAC) had blown all of a 19-point lead and were tied at 76, Kilpatrick hit the game-winning free throws with 7.2 sec onds to play. Temple attempted to tie the game again, but Josh Browns layup was blocked by Jer maine Sanders with a half-second to play. Kevin Johnson added two more free throws for the Bearcats, who had their nation-best streak of holding 27 consecutive opponents under 70 points ended. Dalton Pepper had a career-high 33 points, including the 3 that tied the game at 76 with 36.9 seconds left, for the Owls (5-13, 0-7), who have lost eight straight. Cincinnatis Justin Jackson played just 6 minutes after appear ing to injure his leg. The Bearcats are off to their best start since 2001-02 and their best start in league play since they went 8-0 in Conference USA that same season. Temples losing streak is its longest since the 1975-76 team lost 11 straight. The four straight home losses are its most since 200102. This was Cincinnatis second win over Tem ple in two weeks. The Bearcats won the rst meeting at home, 6958, on Jan. 14. The Owls second-half comeback was spear headed by Pepper, who made seven of his eight 3-pointers and scored 27 points in the second half. USF falls to No. 23 Memphis 80-58 LANE MURPHEY / AP Memphis forward Nick King (5) goes to the basket against South Floridas forward Chris Perry (23) in the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game on Sunday in Memphis, Tenn. MLB TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer CLEVELAND When Jim Thome rst started pointing his bat toward the pitch er, he never imagined that subtle movement would one day be come immortalized. The Indians an nounced Saturday that they will unveil a statue of Thome at Pro gressive Field on Aug. 2. Cleve lands career leader in home runs will be forever honored with the statue, which de picts him standing in the batters box and directing his bat to ward the mound. Hall of Fame pitcher Bob Feller is the only oth er Cleveland player to also be honored with a statue outside the ballpark. Thome never could have imagined such a tribute, and is hum bled by the salute. As a player, I dont even want to say you dream of that, said Thome, who retired in 2012 with 612 ca reer homers. When it happens, when the opportunity comes about, its humbling. Its just a wonderful thing. My family is just ecstatic about it. One of Clevelands most popular players, Thome hit 337 hom ers with the Indians. He broke in with the club as a slender third baseman in 1991 and developed into one of baseballs most feared hitters. Charlie Man u el once suggested to Thome that he should point his bat at the pitcher to loosen him up before hitting. Indians to unveil Jim Thome statue in Aug. THOME

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 WEIGHT LOSS: Jennifer Hudson aids citys program / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman goes red for heart month February is dedicated to the pre vention and education of heart disease and in recognition of the m onth, Florida Hospital Waterman is Going Red by lighting the out side canopy at the hospital for the month, symbolizing ongoing efforts to improve the heart health of local residents. Kick-off event for the Going Red theme is the Womens Hot Topic Breakfast at 8 a.m., Fri., Jan. 31 with Gary Allen, MD, FAACP. There will also be two other presenta tions in February with a Health and Wellness Expo on Feb. 13 and edu cational presentation on Feb. 5 and Feb. 26. Space is limited for events and registration is required by calling 352-253-3635 or go to www.fhwater manheart.com. BUSHNELL Spice it up for Hospice chili cook-off is Feb. 8 The 4th annual Spice it up for Hospice chili cook-off to benet the Lane Purcell Hospice House in Sumterville, will be held at the Bushnell Plaza, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Feb. 8 in downtown Bushnell. Guests can, for a $5 fee, be taste testers at the event sampling the different types of chili, and then vote for each of their favorite tasting chili and favorite booth. For information or to purchase a booth space, call Susan Bennett at 352-742-6807. LAKE COUNTY AARP Smart Driver classes scheduled The AARP Driver Safety Programs new Smart Driver Course helps par ticipants rene their skills and de velop safer and smarter driving habits. Cost for the class is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-mem bers, which includes workbooks and a completion certicate. Payment must be made by check to AARP, no cash or credit cards will be accepted. The two-day course will be of fered at the following locations: Today and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon, at Royal Highlands, 5350 Monarch Blvd., Leesburg. Register by calling 352-365-2818. Feb. 3 and 5 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., in Leesburg. To register call 352-326-3540. Feb. 3 and 5 from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Call 352-735-7180 to register. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer B ert and Ernie jump rope and munch apples and car rots, and Cookie Mon ster has his namesake treat once a week, not ev ery day. Can a Muppets mini-makeover improve kids health, too? A three-year experi ment in South Ameri ca suggests it can. Now, the Sesame Street proj ect is coming to the Unit ed States. Already, a test run in a New York City pre school has seen results: Four-year-old Jahmeice Strowder got her mom to make cauliower for the rst time in her life. A classmate, Bryson Payne, bugged his dad for a ba nana every morning and more salads. A parent brought home a loaf of bread instead of Doritos. What we created, I believe, is a culture of healthy eating to ght a toxic environment of junk food and too little exercise, said Dr. Valen tin Fuster, a cardiologist at New Yorks Mount Sinai Hospital. Six years ago, he start ed working with Sesa me Workshop, produc ers of televisions Sesame Street, on a project aimed at 3-to-5-year-olds. At that age they pay attention to every thing and habits can be changed, he said. The need is clear: A third of U.S. children and teens are obese or overweight. Many dont get enough exercise, and a recent study found that kids t ness has declined world wide. Theyre at high risk for heart and other prob lems later in life. The focus is young er and younger to try to prevent this, said Dr. Ste phen Daniels, a Univer sity of Colorado pediatri cian and a spokesman for the American Heart Asso ciation. The groups an nual conference in No vember featured Fusters experiment as one of the years top achievements in heart disease preven tion. For Sesame Street, the project of fered a chance to improve the lives of young viewers and give a makeover to certain Muppets. While Cookie Mon ster is an engaging gure, we felt there was an op portunity there to real ly model healthy eating, said Jorge Baxter, regional director for Latin Amer ica for Sesame Workshop. The new mes sage is that certain things like cookies are some thing you can eat some times, but there are some foods that you can eat all the time, like vegetables, he said. The healthy mes sages have been grad ually incorporated into the television show, and its producers even made a doctor Muppet Dr. Ruster (pronounced Rooster) in Fusters image for the preschool project. It launched in Colom bia because U.S. schools that Fuster approached years ago were reluctant, but a wealthy familys foundation was willing to sponsor the experi ment in Bogota. It involved 1,216 Sesame Street, heart doctor launch project to boost childrens health SETH WENIG / AP Bryson Payne, 4, left, and his teacher Jacqualine Sanchez play with pretend food in a pre-kindergarten class at the Sheltering Arms Learning Center in New York. JOHN BARRETT / AP This photo provided by Sesame Workshop shows new Muppet Dr. Ruster, center, with, from left, Grover, Rosita, Elmo, Cookie Monster, Ernie and Bert. Its a mecca for fast food around here. Were trying to get them to walk past the Chinese food or pizza or McDonalds, to go home and make something. Rachael Lynch, director of educational services SEE HEALTH | C2

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 JULIE SCHARPER The Baltimore Sun BALTIMORE Jen nifer Hudson urged women to chart their own path to better health as she spoke to a gathering of Weight Watchers participants at a West Baltimore se nior center this week. You cannot achieve somebody elses goals, the singer and Os car-winning actress, who serves as Weight Watchers celebri ty ambassador, told a crowd assembled at Park Heights Zeta Cen ter for Healthy and Ac tive Aging. If you didnt do it, theyre going to talk. If you do it, theyre still going to talk. Hudson, who had been in Washington over the weekend to at tend Michelle Obamas 50th birthday celebra tion, appeared in Balti more Tuesday morning to announce an expan sion of a city program that allows low-in come residents of some neighborhoods to join Weight Watchers for a reduced fee. A grant from the Unit ed States Conference of Mayors and Weight Watchers will allow the city to expand the health departments BMore Fit for Healthy Babies program. Both women and men will be able to participate at the Zeta Center and more women will be able to enroll in exist ing programs near Pat terson Park and Druid Hill Park. Residents who have a body mass index great er than 25 and who qualify for a govern ment-subsidized pro gram such as Medicare, WIC or federal student aid, are eligible for the program, which of fers deep discounts on Weight Watchers meet ings and tness classes. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said that 45 percent of the citys African-Ameri can residents are obese as is 36 percent of the citys total population. The mayor said that she was prompt ed to lose a signicant amount of weight her self several years ago af ter realizing that most of the health problems that aficted her family were tied to obesity. I had to be hon est with myself, she said. I dont want to tell you what my (body mass index) was when I started. Hudson, wearing a sleek black dress, told the crowd she had never been this size in my life. In 2011, the year after she became a Weight Watchers ambassador, Hudson told Oprah she had lost 80 pounds. When Weight Watchers approached her, Hud son said, her rst reac tion was I cant lose no weight eating no pop corn. In time, she lost the diet mentality and began to manage her weight by making healthy choices, she said. Hudson said that between 75 and 100 members of her fam ily have lost a total of 2,000 pounds through the weight loss pro gram. She urged the crowd, which included about a dozen partici pants in the city-spon sored Weight Watch ers group to take baby steps. One of my New Years resolutions this year was I want to help change lives, she said. Im starting that by be ing here. Hopefully, my testimony can help in spire someone elses journey and make a difference in someone elses life. The former Amer ican Idol nalist is also nding time to make music. Hudson, who received a Peo ples Choice Award this month for the charity she founded, said her third studio album, set to be released early this year, is a feel-good al bum, that is extreme ly different from every thing Ive done before. children and 928 par ents from 14 pre schools. Some were given the program and others served as a comparison group. Kids had training on healthy habits and how the body works for an hour a day for ve months using Sesame Workshop-produced videos, a board game (the heart game), songs, posters and ac tivities. Parents were involved through takehome assignments and workshops that fo cused on overcoming barriers to good food and exercise. For ex ample, in areas with poor access to parks or play spaces, par ents were coached to encourage kids to use stairs instead of ele vators and to walk in stead of taking a bus. Childrens weight and exercise habits were measured at the start and 1 1/2 and 3 years later. Although many moved or dropped out by the time the study ended, research ers documented a sig nicant increase in knowledge, attitude and health habit scores among kids in the pro gram versus the com parison group. The proportion of children at a healthy weight increased from 62 percent at the start to 75 percent at three years for those in the program. Ironically, in Colombia, that mostly meant that more under nourished kids grew to reach a healthy weight. In New York, where the program plans to launch in several ear ly childhood and Head Start programs this spring and fall, proj ect leaders will have to tackle underand over weight kids. A lot of the kids are from low-income fam ilies, shelters, and many have poor ac cess to healthy foods, said Rachael Lynch, di rector of educational services for an Episco pal Social Services pre school, The Learning Center, in Harlem. Its a mecca for fast food around here. Were try ing to get them to walk past the Chinese food or pizza or McDon alds, to go home and make something. Her preschool tested the Sesame Street proj ect last summer and it really took off with kids and parents, she said. They love it. The kids relate, I cant stress it enough, to the Ses ame Street characters, she sai d. The program had kids work in a near by community garden one day a week to learn about growing vegeta bles. They had a mys tery food box to reach inside, feel and guess the contents, then use what they found to make a healthy snack such as smoothies, fruit salads, micro waved baked apples and apple dip. Children took home a weekend update to list and draw pic tures of what they ate. Parents were asked to sign it to encourage an adult focus on healthy meals. Kateshia Strowder said the program had a big impact on her and her daughter, Jahme ice. Wed be in the gro cery store and she would name every veg etable. Its amazing. Brussels sprouts she likes it. Cabbage she likes it, Strowder said. Im not a vegeta ble eater, to be honest. But I had to learn to do those things for her. Donte Payne said the same for his son, Bryson, a 4-year-old who also was in the Harlem program. It made him more interested in eating more healthy things, Payne said. He be came very interested in salads. He loves sal ad now. In Colombia, the program is now ex panding to about 20,000 children, and in Spain, a project is starting in Madrid. In New York, a foundation Fuster runs at Mount Sinai will sponsor the U.S. launch, aid ed by private donors. Dr. Jaime Cespedes, a pediatric and heart spe cialist who helped lead the project in Colombia believes it will succeed wherever it is tried. Sesame knows kids, knows media and how to communicate the messages, he said. When you get the kids to deliver the message to the family, change will come. www.Floridafoot.com Call Today for an appointment! CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) HEALTH FROM PAGE C1 Jennifer Hudson makes appearance to aid citys weight loss program WITH US. EVERYTHING www .dailycommer cial.com 352-365-8200

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MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION The Helpful PlaceWe Sell & ServiceEquipment* APOPKA Apopka Ace Hardware & Lumber 530 South Park Avenue (407) 889-4111 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 LEESBURG South Leesburg Ace Hardware 27649 U.S. Highway 27 (352) 787-5446 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 EUSTIS Bronson Ace Hardware 26 East Orange Avenue (352) 357-2366 M-Sat 7-6:30, Sun 9-5 MOUNT DORA Mount Dora Ace Hardware 18691 U.S. Highway 441 (352) 383-2101 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 SORRENTO Sorrento Ace Hardware 24329 St. Rd. 46 (352) 383-2061 M-Sat 7-7:00, Sun 9-5 TAVARES Tavares Ace Hardware 509-South Highway 19 (352) 343-3361 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 UMATILLA Umatilla Ace Hardware 811 North Central Avenue (352) 669-3411 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5Come See Our Great Selection of Benjamin Moore Paint *At select stores only. MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press WASHINGTON Those nutrition labels on the back of food packages may soon become easier to read. The Food and Drug Ad ministration says knowledge about nutrition has evolved over the last 20 years, and the labels need to reect that. As the agency considers revisions, nutritionists and other health experts have their own wish list of desired changes. The number of calories should be more prominent, they sa y, and the amount of added sugar and percentage of whole wheat in the food should be included. They also want more clarity on how serving sizes are dened. Theres a feeling that nu trition labels havent been as effective as they should be, says Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. When you look at the label, there are roughly two dozen num bers of substances that peo ple arent intuitively familiar with. For example, he says, most of the nutrients are listed in grams, the metric systems basic unit of mass. Jacobson says people dont really un derstand what a gram is. Michael Taylor, the FDAs deputy commissioner for foods, says 20 years ago there was a big focus on fat, and fat undifferentiated. Since then, health providers have focused more on calo ries and warned people away from saturated and trans fats more than all fats. Trans fats were separated out on the la bel in 2006. The nutrition facts label is now 20 years old, the food environment has changed and our dietary guidance has changed, says Taylor, who was at the agency in the ear ly 1990s when the FDA rst introduced the label at the behest of Congress. Its im portant to keep this updated so what is iconic doesnt be come a relic. The FDA has sent guide lines for the new labels to the White House, but Tay lor woul d not estimate when they might be released. The FDA has been working on the issue for a decade, he said. Theres evidence that more people are reading the labels in recent years. According to an Agricul ture Department study re leased this month, a greater percentage of adults report ed using the nutrition facts panel and other claims on food packages always or most of the time in 2009 and 2010 compared with two years earlier. The USDA study said 42 percent of working adults used the panel always or most of the time in 2009 and 2010, while older adults used it 57 percent of the time during that period. One expected change in the label is to make the cal orie listing more prominent, and Regina Hildwine of the Grocery Manufacturers As sociation said that could be useful to consumers. Her group represents the nations largest food companies. Hildwine said FDA also has suggested that it may be appropriate to remove the calories from fat declara tion on the label. Its not yet clear what other changes the FDA could de cide on. Nutrition advocates are hoping the agency adds a line for sugars and syrups that are not naturally oc curring in foods and drinks and are added when they are processed or prepared. Right now, some sugars are listed separately among the ingre dients and some are not. It may be difcult for the FDA to gure out how to cal culate added sugars, howev er. Food manufacturers are adding naturally occurring sugars to their products so they can label them as natu ral but the nutrition con tent is no different. Other suggestions from health advocates: Add the percentage of whole wheat to the label. Many manufacturers will la bel products whole wheat when there is really only a small percentage of it in the food. Clearer measurements. Jacobson of CSPI and oth ers have suggested that the FDA use teaspoons instead of grams on the label, since consumers can envision a teaspoon. Serving sizes that make sense. Theres no easy an swer, but health experts say that single-size servings that are clearly meant to be eaten in one sitting will often list two or three servings on the label, making the calorie and other nutrient information deceptive. FDA said last year that it may add another col umn to the labels, listing nu trition information per serv ing and per container. The agency may also adjust rec ommended serving sizes for some foods. Package-front label ing. Beyond the panel on the back, nutrition experts have pushed for labels on the package front for certain nutrients so consumers can see them more easily. The FDA said several years ago it would issue guidelines for front of pack labeling, but later said it would hold off to see if the industry could cre ate its own labels. Tracy Fox, a Washing ton-based nutrition consul tant, says clearer informa tion is needed to balance the billions of dollars a year that the food industry spends on food marketing. FDA to revise nutrition facts label J. DAVID AKE / AP The nutrition facts label on the side of a cereal box is photographed in Washington. Nutrition labels on the back of food packages may soon become easier to read. Associated Press NEW YORK Target Corp. says it will no lon ger be offering health care coverage for its part-time workers. The discounter is citing new options now available through health care exchang es under the Affordable Care Act. Target, based in Min neapolis, said the ma jority of its part-time workers who have been eligible for its health care insurance cover age dont enroll. In fact, less than 10 percent of its total employees of 361,000 take advantage of the part-time plan. It said it will stop cover ing the part-time work ers beginning April 1. Other large employ ers including UPS are scaling back health coverage by dropping spouses from their em ployee plans if they are able to get insurance through another em ployer. Health care reform is transforming the bene ts landscape and af fecting how all employ ers, including Target, administer health ben ets coverage, Jodee Kozlack, Targets exec utive vice president of human resources, said in a corporate blog post Tuesday. Our decision to dis continue this benet comes after careful con sideration of the impact of our stores part-time team members and to Target, the new options available for our parttime team, and the his torically low number of team members who elected to enroll in the part-time plan. Target said in the post that by offering its part-time workers in surance, it could actu ally disqualify many of them from new subsi dies that could reduce their overall health in surance expenses. Target says part-time workers who are en rolled in the health care plan and are losing coverage will be given a $500 cash payment. The Affordable Care Act created insur ance exchanges that customers can vis it to shop for coverage and compare policies. Some people also qual ify for income-based subsidies or tax credits to help buy a plan. The law requires that companies with 50 or more workers offer fulltime workers de ned as those working 30 hours or more health coverage. Target said that em ployees who average be tween 20 and 31 hours per week will continue to be eligible for other benets, including va cation, dental, disabil ity and life insurance. Its part-time employees also will still qualify for store discounts and its 401(k) plan. Separately, Target said Wednesday that it was laying off 475 employees across the companys operations. It also said that over the past six months it has closed about 700 open positions across the entire chain. As an organiza tion, Target continu ally assesses our oper ating model to ensure we are well positioned to adapt to changing business needs, said Molly Snyder, a Tar get spokeswoman, in a statement. We believe these decisions, while difcult, are the right actions as we continue to focus on transform ing our business. Target to no longer offer health care coverage for part-time workers

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 315-8305 Is pain keeping you from what matters most? By covering up pain, swelling, or others, you may be making a deeper problem. Acupuncture is a time-tested, safe, natural and drug free treatment that can provide immediate relief and long lasting benefits.James N Georgiades AP Working gallery of local artistsANTIQUEDEALERSWANTED (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: Im a 14-yearold girl going on 15. I am half-Mexican. In the Mexican culture, a girls 15th birthday is the year in which she becomes a woman. Most girls have a quinceanera party for this birthday. But these celebra tions cost a lot of money al most as much as a wedding. I have been debating whether or not I should have one. My mom says she would rather put the money to ward my college fund. I agree with her, but I also feel like I should acknowledge my Mex ican background as much as I do the Caucasian part. I dont want to pressure my par ents, but I also dont want to be left out when my friends talk about their quinceaneras. What do you think? PARTY OR NOT IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DEAR PARTY OR NOT: A quinceanera may cost almost as much as a wedding, but there are weddings for every budget. We have all heard of families who have gone into debt to nance a wedding, but I never advise readers to go into debt for something like that. If your primary reason for wanting a quinceanera is so you wont feel left out of the conversation when friends talk about theirs, consider a small celebration with some of your girlfriends. That way your college fund wont be de pleted, and youll spend few er years paying off student loans. One of my friends, Fabiola, told me that some godmoth ers (madrinas) help to de fray the cost of a quinceane ra. There can be a godmother for the cake, another for the dress, etc. But she also told me that although her mother insisted she have a quincean era, in thinking back about it, she wishes shed had that money for college. There are other ways to celebrate your Mexican heritage than spending a lot of money, so please give this some serious thought. DEAR ABBY: I just learned that my unborn child is a boy. Some people tell me that its harder to raise a baby boy, but others tell me different ly. I dont know who to be lieve anymore. I am only ve months pregnant and already feeling stressed. 19 AND CON FUSED DEAR 19 AND CONFUSED: Your pregnancy and subsequent motherhood will be 100 per cent easier if you stop listen ing to people who relish put ting negative thoughts in the heads of others. If you want RELIABLE information about raising your little boy, the per son to get it from is your pedi atrician. DEAR ABBY: I saw your Christ mas column in which you included a note to all your Christian readers, and frank ly I found it a little rude. Not only Christian people cele brate Christmas; many of us celebrate it as a secular hol iday, a time to celebrate the love and joy in our lives and our family (both blood rela tives and the people we make our family). I dont recall you wishing a Happy Hanukkah, a Blessed Ramadan or a Happy Yule to your Jewish, Muslim and Pa gan readers (although I may have missed it). Im not usu ally one to care about such things, but since people from all walks of life come to you for advice, it would be nice to see you reach out to all of your readers. HAPPY PAGAN CHICK IN DENVER DEAR HAPPY PAGAN CHICK: You must not be a regular reader if you miss all of my holiday greetings. It has long been my practice to offer good wish es to my readers during the major holidays. This includes greetings to my Christian readers at Easter and Christ mas, my Jewish readers at Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, and my Muslim readers when the fast of Ramadan is broken. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Celebrate girls big birthday without spending big bucks

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICESSAVE UP TO80%OFFPHARMACY PRICES YOUR COST!Cialis 20mg.24 count.......$89.95Flomax 4mg.90 count.......$68.00Viagra 100mg.20 count.......$65.95NO SHIPPING COST ON THESE PRODUCTS. ALL ADVERTISED MEDICATIONS ARE GENERIC. VALUECALL US FIRST OR CALL US LAST... Our prices on prescription medicines are competitive with other mail order or internet prices. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi north of Kmart)(352) 347-0403 or Fax (352) 347-2034 Fax: (352) 347-2034cdrx441@gmail.com Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. MOLLIE DURKIN The York Dispatch YORK, Pa. For something as simple as a comic book, Do ver resident Dave Kots work has planted a lot of seeds. The organization he founded, Autism at Face Value, recently re leased the rst comic to feature an autistic su perhero. When the comic hit store shelves around York on Dec. 24, it sold out in less than a week. Si nce then, he said, local middle schools have requested copies to use for social skills courses for students with special needs. Doctors want copies to put in their waiting rooms, he said. I am overwhelmed, in a good way, he said. I could not have dreamt this amount of positive outreach. Kot writes the script, and the scene he is proudest of comes when the main charac ter, Michael, goes to his middle school for the rst time. The experi ence turns his world and the comic panel upside down. It forces readers to literally look at some body with autism dif ferently than they may have expected, he said. There are four an ticipated issues of the comic, and Kot is now working on the script for Issue No. 2, he said. The organization, which legally changed its name from Face Val ue Comics to Autism at Face Value, looks to tackle more than just comics, Kot said. The nonrot will also continue research and community outreach, partnering with other businesses and organi zations to reach a wider audience, he said. The Journal of Autism and Devel opmental Dis orders asked Kot to sub mit a copy of the comic for review, he said. Its kind of unique that a comic book would be reviewed by a journal of that profes sional caliber, he said. After some restock ing, Issue No. 1 is avail able at three local com ic book stores: Comix Connection in West Manchester Township, Planet X Comics in York Township and Com ic Store West in Sprin gettsbury Township. Managers said theyll continue to carry fu ture issues. Jared Wolf, manag er of Comix Connec tion, said his store sold about 60 copies. I think people re ally responded well to it, Wolf said. I think it achieved what they set out to achieve. And for Alex Levitsky, manager of Planet X, its a partnership that will continue. We want to do more with them down the road, he said. Theyre really nice people with good motivation. Autism comic book released in Pennsylvania stores I think people really responded well to it. I think it achieved what they set out to achieve. Jared Wolf, manager of Comix Connection

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f n n t f b n n f r b r n n b t t n r n r n r n n r n n b t r b n n n r n n n r r n n r t r r b b rnrr n nnrr n b rf b b b r r r n r r r r r r b b f r n n nftb f n r r r r r r n n n n n r n n r r r r r n r r r n r r n r n f n r r r r n n r r n r r n n r r n r n r n r n r r n r r n r n nftb nr tbnbr t b r r r b r r n r r r n r n r r r r f r r r r n r r r r r r r r r r n r b r b f t r r f r b t f t f t b b b b b f f t f f b f f b b t b f b t b t f b b f f f b b t b b t f t f t b b b b f f b b f f rf tr nrt fbtr rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 rfn tbntfb b tf rfnnfr rfnffnr frfntbrnfft n n r f n b t n r b ffrnf frfnrbnbb rfnnt tfbnfrf rfnrtbnbf t f t r f n b b b ttbr tntnbb tt brfnrn rt fnbr f rfnftntf rfnrtbnbf t rrfnrfnb b f n f f t n t b f t rfnfbntf f rfnrfntb frrnrnbb tt rffnr f r f r f n t n f f f nf rfnbnr rf rfnrtbnbf frfn nrr rrbrnrrrf t rtbtnt rfnrrn r frrntt r rfntnrbb rf rfnfbn rrfntrnrr frfn rnrf frfnrtnr rrtrnt rrfnrn rfntbn b bfrtnnfbbb tbftn t t r f n t n t b n n n n n btfrfnrfn fr frrnttbt f rf nfrfntbrnf n trb b rfntnb rfnnr rf rfnr f r f n t b r n r b t bfrfntnt t frfntnt rf rfnfrnbrt b rfnffnrb t f b n r f n n f b r n t b t n r r f n n r f r t t b r f n t b n b r r f n b n f t t r f n r b r n t t ftr n r f t ftr r n t f b n t f n r r t r f n t b n t b f t n t n b f n n n tb r f n r b r n t b n t n t r f n t b n f b b b b t r f r f n t b n f f n t r f n r b r n r f n rn n t r t t r f n f n t n r n r t n t b n t b r r r r n t ttrttf rfrnbf rftfn n r f n n f f fbf f r f n f t n f r f n n f n n r b r f n f f n f b r f n r t n r f r r nffb b b n t n t b n f t t b b n

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Monday, January 27, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfn tbfnbtf tbftf fbnf b t t b f f r f n t b t f b n f f f t f ffrft bfff t f b t t f b fff t t r b t n t f b t ffttn f b t t b b f t n b t b f t b ftbfbt tnft ffffn rfn tfb r b b t n f t t f b n f b t t b n b n t f f f r f t f b f f b f t b b b f t rfn fb f f t f n f t r f t f n b b f t t f b b b t f b f t n n f f f b t fbn fbn b b f b f ffrft bfff t f b t t f b fff t t r b t n t f b t ffttn rfn fb t f b n f f n t ftf ff bfbnf b f r b f f t f n b f t f b t f b f fb ffrft bfff t f b t t f b fff t t r b t n t f b t ffttn fb rr tf t b f b r f tbt f n b f t b t f b f b r f frfn bfbftf nf ffbtf t b f f f ftff f t tnf tt t t b bfbrff t t f rbf tf ftfft btt btbbf tf n t fftb btft bfbftf nfbt fff ft tf n tb f f f b f f f t trff bbfbt bftf ffbf fbffftf tt ff t bfbbff fbftf f frb tf bttbntfbf tf fbbn fbffnf tff t b tfbf b btf f btftfbt fb bbtbtb f btnfbf tff br fn rbbf f fff t ttft b ftbft bfbf tf fttbtf t frbfn b f b t f b t b f t f f ftffbtf ffbtbf tbf ttf bt bt ff fbnf ftnfbrf bf b ftf f ttfftfrff fttffbf f tffbfbtf t f f f f ffftfn t fb tfr tbftfrbf bnft tfftf bftf fb fbtft bbffff bbf b f ttf btbftfrf f b f t b f b f ftftbf bfb btbftf ft bf t bbf fbbftf ntb bfntbbt ffft bttffb f fft t tbffbftf fb tfr f t f f f n b r f b t r f f f n f t t n t f f b b fb r f b fbt b bt fft nf b ffntbfbf tf fffff ttf ffff fbftf bt tf brffftf bfft bbtb br b tfbt bftfft f tf ffn tft fbttftf t bbtbfbftfbt bfbf bttf btfbtbft ftf fff ttft t rfn t rf nf f bfbf b fbt b bbt f r f f tfff tf tftff brfff tbt t t rf tb tbt bftf f bb b rfbr b t f bftfb f fftff ft rfnt bf fnn f bf bn nbnf bb fb tf frf r f b fbf trf bft bb bbtr ft ff tbfft tnfbbf btfff ttf tnttfbt n tn t t b f tfbt bt fftf fb nnt ft f f f ntbftf n tfff t bfbffbf bt b tf ftft fnf ftfbt ftftfrfn t br

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 27, 2014 rfnttf bbnt tntff f fbttffb nbn f t f b n b bff ntfbntbb ttnf f nfntfft n fntt f fbnb bfff ffnttf nt ttf ffbtf nt ttf fnfbbnt f tf rrf ntnf ttfnfbn nrtnf tbt tt fnttfbbnbb ftbntb f nbtfbbb rrf nt f ffntt btnntt nb ffttt fn f f f t t b ntbf n ftt b nt f n t t f b ffbt ntfbbnnn n n t t f n f f n t t f b ttnbtt ttt bbbnt ff ffftt f ftfbbnt nrrf f nbbt t n t f f t t t n fbtttt bbnn f b n n n n nn tbt f f f b t n n n ftt b tbtn fttfbt t n n b t t f f f t t t t b t t f b t n b tnnn fnttf bt n f brnttf bbbt ttnf fnttfbtnn nbtf b bf tfntf fff ttfbbnnt n ftn ftt bbntbn nttff ff ttttfbbnnf n nn frfbt n f f b t t f t f n t t f b b t n b b t t n nt f fn tff fbtttf nt nn f t f f t t t t t t f b b t f b t n tnnfff f f fbfnttttf bn nnb fttf t ff ffnttf ff tttbnbn nnnbb ntnfff f fnttfb ntt f f f f b f f t t b t t f t t b n tt t f n b bb bf nbfttttf bbb nnf f nnntrf f f f f b b b t nttf b n t t f b f b f f n b t t t f t t nf f nbf f f f fbbtn fnttf nn fbn tttfbn f fbbbnn f f b b b f b t b b b b n f f f f n t t f b t n nf f nnff f f t t b n tt t f n b bb f n b f t f f b t n f f b t t f t f n t t f b b t n b b t t trf fft f fntttfttf bbf b n f n n t n t t f b t t f n t f n t b t t t f f f f b b b n t t f f frb f f ff bbbt t tf