Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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FREE DELIVERYWith Any New Cart Purchase rffnntb HAWKS COOL DOWN HEAT 121-114, SPORTS B1 IMAGE ISSUES: Republicans still struggling as midterm election strategies coalesce A6 LOCAL: Martin Luther King Jr. remembered by residents A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Tuesday, January 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 21 2 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED B6 COMICS B4 CROSSWORDS B6 DIVERSIONS B5 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page XX. 72 / 33 Some sun, then showers 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A s the agenda for the 2014 Florida Legislative Session begins to take shape, the protection of wa ter resources, including springs and lakes, is a major issue taking cen ter stage, according to state senators and rep resentatives. There already are discussions about l ing legislation to pro tect the springs, such as Alexander Springs near Altoona, and sev eral state senators have united to make the is sue a priority this year, according to legislators. State Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, said protec tion of water resourc es is perhaps one of the most complex if not the most complex issue facing the Legislature in the next four to ve years. Hays said it is critical that nutrients current ly found in the springs and lakes be removed before they get into the water bodies. We are trying to nd ways to remove the nu trients from the storm water runoff before it gets into the aquifer, he said. Hays said the health of some of the lakes and rivers is another con cern. One of the things we have to consider is the current state of deg radation of the Indi an River Lagoon has not occurred over night and it is not go ing to be restored over night, he said. These systems take a signif icant amount of time to regain their ecologi cal balance. We are go ing to be called upon to fund part of the resto ration of that lagoon. I think it is our obligation to make sure we dont spend money for the exercise of spending. Finding alterna tive water supplies to groundwater is another issue affecting the com munity, particularly in South Lake. Water experts and Staff Report Umatilla is looking at a number of options ranging from $20,000 to $8 million to ad dress problems with its aging utility sys tem that caused a wa ter main break last Oc tober that left the entire city without water for several hours. This includes a tem porary x of repair ing or replacing about 360 water pipe cutoff valves, to installing all new water pipes across the city. The utility system is between 40 and 60 years old, and low quality pipe, by todays standards, is thought to have been the cul prit with the line that failed on Oct. 30th, City Manager Glenn Irby said in a memo that will be discussed by city council mem bers at their meeting tonight. The problem with the system was highlighted when that 10-inch wa ter main ruptured three months ago along Ken tucky Avenue. Crews immediate ly attempted to isolate the break by exercising valves designed to turn off the ow of water to this immediate area, Irby said. Unfortu nately, this attempt failed and, ultimately, the citys entire system had to be turned off at the main plant. ALI AKBAR DAREINI and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG Associated Press TEHRAN, Iran Iran unplugged banks of centrifuges involved in its most sensi tive uranium enrichment work on Monday, prompting the United States and European Union to partially lift economic sanctions as a landmark deal aimed at easing concerns over Irans nuclear program went into effect. The mutual actions curbing atomic work in exchange for some sanctions relief start a six-month clock for Tehran and the world powers to negotiate a nal accord that the Obama administration and its European allies say will be intended to ensure Iran can not build a nuclear weapon. In the meantime, the interim deal puts limits on Irans program though it contin ues low levels of uranium enrichment. Teh ran denies its nuclear program is intended to produce a bomb. The payoff to Iran is an injection of billions of dollars into its crippled economy over the next six months from the suspension of some sanctions though other sanctions remain in place. In part a reection of a thaw between Washington and Tehran, the moves coin cidentally occurred on the 33rd anniversa ry of the end of the Iran hostage crisis. The holding of 52 Americans for 444 days by rad ical Iranian students that ended Jan. 20, 1981 was followed by more than three decades of U.S.-Iranian enmity that only began to ease last year with signs that Iran was ready to meet U.S. demands and scale back its nucle ar activities. British Foreign Secretary William Hague called the deal an important milestone but not the ultimate goal. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Six Lake County Fire Rescue reghters, who have been work ing out of the Value Place Hotel in Clermont for more than ve years on rotating shifts, will move out at the end of the year to a new loca tion, according to county ofcials. At a recent county commis sion meeting, board members ap proved entering into a partner ship with the city of Clermont for a joint-use re station, serving both county and city needs. Even so, Commissioner Sean Parks expressed some reserva tions, emphasizing the need to CLERMONT Checkout time coming for firefighters In Umatilla, fears of another water line burst AP PHOTO An unidentied International Atomic Energy Agency inspector cuts the connections between the twin cascades for 20 percent uranium enrichment at the Natanz facility, some 200 miles south of the capital Tehran, Iran, on Monday. HALIFAX MEDIA SERVICES Joe Wallace and local residents explore Alexander Springs in Astor. ENDANGERED Lawmakers: We must protect springs and lakes HALIFAX MEDIA SERVICES Swimmer Cody Robertson comes up for air while looking for items under the water at Alexander Springs. Some sanctions removed as Iran takes action SEE STATION | A2 SEE IRAN | A2 SEE UMATILLA | A2 SEE SPRINGS | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014: This year opportunities stem from your ability to know what you want from a situation. Sharing some of your wilder schemes will be better received than you might think. Others nd your imagination fun and invigorating. If you are sin gle, you could meet some one very gentle and kind. You might want to pinch yourself, as this person will seem to be unbelievable. If you are attached, the two of you thrive off the unex pected. LIBRA admires your imagination, and entices your romantic side. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You will feel great, and a partner might appear to be in the same mood at least until a hot is sue is broached. Then, you could nd out otherwise. Your ability to draw out oth ers emerges. You know the right move to make. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your efforts make a dif ference, yet an associate could have a negative atti tude. Fortunately, this per son does not rule the world. A friend might share his or her thoughts. Listen careful ly, as he or she will be com ing from an intuitive level. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will nd a situation provocative. You might feel as if a boss is making as sumptions that may not be grounded. Know that you dont have to respond to this persons projections. Be willing to blaze a new trail, and youll feel better about your choices. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Opt to be with a close friend or associate. Get to the bottom of a problem that might be bothering you. You will know whether the information you are given is correct. How you feel could change dramatically. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll want to have a friend ly chat with a difcult room mate, close friend or loved one. You could nd that this person tends to disen gage when you start to talk. As a result, you might won der whether this discussion should be postponed. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will jump into a sit uation without hesitation. Sometimes it is best to al low others to nd out what works; they need to go through a similar process to what you did. A partner could be very distracted, which will make it difcult to communicate. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You are energized. A child or loved one adores you wild, creative imagina tion. This person would be delighted to see this facet of your personality emerge. Keep it light. Be aware of the costs of pursuing what appears to be a fun plan. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You could feel tense, as others seem to demand that rules be loosened up some. You might feel some what vulnerable and choose to withdraw within. You cant control others, nor should you try. A psychic thought will come your way. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You will be fo cused on a key matter re volving around a friend or a signicant meeting. How you handle it and the end results could color your thinking about the whole situation. Emphasize what you want, and speak your mind. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might want to get to know someone in power better. You both have very different approaches that are effective. A fami ly matter or a domestic is sue could trigger unexpect ed happenings. Go with the ow. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might feel more in harmony with someone at distance than you do with many other people. You cant deny what exists be tween you. You are intuitive with this person, as is he or she with you. An unexpect ed call makes you smile. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You succeed best when you work closely with some one else. You know what is workable and what needs to happen. Though you tend to come up with ideas from out of left eld, this person sees value in them. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US MONDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 1-3-4 Afternoon .......................................... 0-7-7 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-9-7-2 Afternoon ....................................... 1-1-6-4 FLORIDA LOTTERY SUNDAY FANTASY 5 ............................. 4-7-14-24-32 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9.50 4 of 5 wins $96 5 of 5 wins $63,617.78 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pam.fenni more@dailycommercial.com. BRIDGE get the reghters quick ly out of the hotel, located off State Road 50. Because we have been dealing with the issue for ve years, I remain skepti cal about it, he said. We have got to get those re ghters in a better facili ty. I remain skeptical, but I appreciate the effort to move forward with some thing that may be bene cial to the residents. There have been van dalism and thefts of prop erty at the hotel, and re ofcials said they lack the resources to secure equip ment there. One rst re sponders personal vehi cles tires and rims were stolen, leaving the car on cinder blocks. The Lake County Sher iffs Ofce has received 42 calls about the hotel since 2011, according to a call list obtained from the de partment. Kyle Rogg, president and chief executive of cer of Value Place Hotels, said previously in a state ment that hotel security and safety are top priori ties there. As part of the partner ship, the city will purchase some property and the county will erect a modu lar building on the site, ac cording to Clermont City Manager Darren Gray. As our city continues to expand and grow, we knew we would need a re station going east, Gray said. We knew three to ve years out, we were in need of a re station. Gray said operational costs would be shared be tween the city and county. This is a benet not only to the city of Cler mont and Lake Coun ty, but to the residents of Lake County, he said. It saves money and we dont have to build two stations within a mile of each other. Currently, Gray said city ofcials are exploring the area of County Road 455 and SR 50 to purchase a site. Once land is ac quired, Gray said a modu lar building could be up in six to eight months. But Parks still expressed some doubts. Thats assuming bu reaucracy doesnt get in the way, as it has over the last four to ve years over this issue, he said. Commissioner Welton Cadwell said at the Jan. 14 commission meeting that he echoed Parks con cerns about moving the reghters out as soon as possible. If this thing is going to drag out, I would rather you come back with some type of plan to go ahead and do something at the substation, understand ing we might move, he said. County Fire Chief John Jolliff said the partnership is the best thing to do. We want to stay east, he said. It makes a lot of sense and we have the sheriffs substation as a backup. Lt. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Profes sional Fireghters of Lake County, said the partner ship is a step in the right direction. Anytime we can work with the city, it is good for both the county and city, he said. STATION FROM PAGE A1 Its important that other sanctions are maintained and the pressure is maintained for a comprehensive and nal settlement on the Iranian nuclear is sue, Hague said. The Europeans are aiming to start nego tiations on a nal deal in February, though no date or venue has been agreed on yet. Iranian Foreign Minister Mo hammad Javad Zarif said Saturday that Teh ran is ready to enter talks as soon as the interim deal goes into force. In the rst step of the interim accord, Iranian state TV said authorities disconnected cascades of centrifuges produc ing 20-percent enriched uranium at the Natanz facility in central Iran. The broadcast said in ternational inspectors were on hand to witness the stoppage before leaving to monitor sus pension of enrichment at Fordo, another site in central Iran. Iran also started Mon day to convert part of its stockpile of 20-percent enriched uranium to ox ide, which can be used to produce nuclear fuel but is difcult to recon vert for weapons use, the ofcial IRNA news agency said. After receiving inde pendent conrmation of the steps from the United Nations watch dog, the Internation al Atomic Energy Agen cy, EU foreign ministers in Brussels approved the partial sanctions sus pension. The White House also announced the suspen sion of some American sanctions on Iran. These actions rep resent the rst time in nearly a decade that Iran has veriably en acted measures to halt progress on its nucle ar program, and roll it back in key respects, White House press sec retary Jay Carney said in a statement. He said Iran is also providing U.N. inspec tors with increased transparency, includ ing more frequent and intrusive inspections. Taken together, these concrete actions repre sent an important step forward, he said. Under the deal reached in November in Geneva, Iran agreed to halt its 20 percent en richment program but continue enrichment up to 5 percent. Iranian Vice President Ali Akbar Salehi said his country has a total of 432 pounds of 20 per cent enriched uranium and will convert half of it to oxide over a period of six months. The remain ing half will be diluted to a level below 5 per cent level within three months. Uranium enriched to a high degree above 90 percent can be used to build a nuclear war head. Enriched below 5 percent, it can pow er an electricity-gener ating reactor, and at 20 percent it can power re actors used to produce medical isotopes. The enrichment is done by spinning the uranium in a series of centrifuges. Iran will also refrain from commissioning its under-construction 40 megawatt heavy water reactor in Arak, central Iran. That reactor can produce plutonium, an other route to building a warhead. Under the deal, the number of IAEA inspec tors in Iran will rough ly double, said Tero Varjoranta, an agency deputy director gener al. That would increase the agencys presence on the ground to a maxi mum of eight inspectors in Iran at any time. IRAN FROM PAGE A1 To make matters worse, the ruptured pipe was in a low-lying area and wa ter from multiple direc tions drained back into the trench dug to neces sitate repairs, Irby said. This delayed the repair work for several hours and resulted in a boil-wa ter notice for three days once the water was turned back on. Utility Service Compa ny of Atlanta, which has a contract with the city to maintain its water plant, has said it can repair or replace all the existing cutoff valves for about $20,000, which Irby says is a must because its inevitable that anoth er water line is going to break at some point. Umatilla could buy new valves from a North Carolina company and city crews could install them at a total cost of about $1.01 million, or pay a Silver Springs com pany $1.04 million to do the work, Irby said. If the city decides to re place all water pipes with new valves, it will cost about $8 million, staff be lieves, with that price cut in half if city crews do the work with the help of some temporary work ers. However, Irby said this do-it-yourself op tion would be a relative ly slow process compared with contracting with a company to do the work. In fact, Irby estimates a four-man crew, work ing a 40-hour week, lay ing 1,000 feet of linear pipe per week, will take 13 years to retrot the system. This may seem like a lengthy time peri od, Irby said, but if the city grows in population during this time, the ex pense would be spread over more taxpayers than there currently are. Any major work on the system will require a wa ter rate hike, which the city can use to obtain nancing, the city manag er noted. The council meets at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 1 S. Central Ave. UMATILLA FROM PAGE A1

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT OCALA Pedestrian killed on highway identified The Florida Highway Patrol on Monday released the name of a pe destrian struck and killed by a car Sunday night in northwest Ocala. Willard H. Daniel, 85, of Wildwood was walking east in between the two westbound lanes of U.S. Highway 27 near Northwest 55th Avenue. At 7:45 p.m., a 1999 Ford Ranger, driven by Charles Pennington, 36, was head ed west on US 27 and hit Daniel, ac cording to FHP reports. Daniel was pronounced dead at the scene. Neither Pennington, of Ocala, nor his 14-year-old passenger were injured. No charges were immediately led, reports state. TAVARES Historical Museum hosts special meeting The Lake County Historical Society will host its quarterly lun cheon at noon on Friday at the Tavares Civic Center 100 E. Caroline St., with special guest speaker Groveland City Councilman John Grifn, who will share the history of the Black Seminole Indians and talk about his recent participation in a Dade Battleeld re-enactment. A potluck lunch will be served at a cost of $6, and an RSVP is needed to attend the meeting by calling, 352343-9890 by Wednesday. The Lake County Historical Museum will be closed Fri., Jan. 24 for this special presentation. EUSTIS LEMA features sculptors Helmets for Heroes The Lake Eustis Museum of Art opens the exhibit, Helmets for Heroes by Dean S. Warren with a re ception, from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday at the museum, Orange Avenue in downtown Eustis in Ferran Park. Admission is free for members and $5 for non-members. Guests can meet the artist at the reception. Two of Warrens decorated helmets are being auctioned to benet the museum. Warren, based in Orlando, creates sculpture from a vast array of mate rials, marrying mythological sources with contemporary forms. For information, call 352-483-2900 or go to www.lakeeustisart museum.org. TAVARES Author to speak at End of Life Care conferences Local author and retired hospice nurse Judy Flickinger will be one of the workshop leaders at the End of Life Care conferences offered by Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, offering information for resi dents on end of life decisions. Conferences will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday at Hope Lutheran Church, 250 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages and from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Jan. 30, at the Church of the Nazarene, 32151 David Walker Dr., in Tavares. Reservations are needed and can be made by calling 352-742-6783. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report Montverde Academy students recently collect ed funds to buy supplies for an Art Cart program at Arnold Palmer Childrens Hospital in Orlando. The academys middle school Student Govern ment Association (SGA) partnered with Jayci Brau man, a fourth-grade stu dent at nearby Cypress Ridge Elementary School, who has been collecting art supplies for the hospi tal for the past three years. The main goal and in tention of SGAs charita ble involvement with aid ing the hospital was to offer a form of art therapy to help ease the fears and anxiety young Central Florida patients might feel before facing major surgery, George Karos, the academys commu nication ofcer, said in a press release. Braumans mother, Kim, is a guidance coun selor at the academy and she helped oversee the SGAs efforts with Jordan Foley, the schools middle school writing teacher. ROXANNE BROWN and AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writers news@dailycommercial.com Scores of people gath ered in Eustis and Cler mont on Monday for cel ebrations to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy. Family was the focus at Carver Park in Eustis, said Pastor Harold J. Kel ly of the Temple of Power in Eustis, who chaired the event. Along with all the fun stuff...we want to make the focus back, put the focus back on the fami ly, because that was Dr. Kings dream, that all men be created equal, black as well as white, he said. Clermonts celebration sponsored by the city of Clermont in conjunc tion with Christian Men in Action, the Lake Coun ty Black Caucus and the South Lake Democratic Club was held at Wa terfront Park. Today we will honor him (King) through words and music, but perhaps the greatest way to honor Dr. MLK when we leave this ceremony is through our actions, City Man ager Darren Gray. He (King) once said, What are we doing to serve oth ers? Think of what a dif ference it would make if we all made that our mis sion. Mondays celebration in Eustis took place af ter two days of events, including a communi ty breakfast on Saturday and an Ecumenical ser vice on Sunday. Kelly said he was pleased with the turnout over the week end and thanked all who took part in Mondays event. One of these volun teers was John Quashie, 26, who said the MLK cel ebration motivates ev eryone else to get up and do something special... for the kids to know who he is, what its about and why we celebrate. The Eustis Middle School jazz ensemble performed in the park on Monday at noon. The bands direc tor, Gerry Ricke, said the band wanted to support the community and the event. I really think that as musicians we need...to be very diverse in our thinking...and, of course, every time we get out and play, we gain experience and that makes us better as musicians, Ricke said. In Clermont, resident Dwayne Allen said he wished the turnout was greater. Its very signicant to know what Martin Lu ther King has done for us, not just as a black man or as a black race of peo ple, but for every person of every race, for bringing the generations togeth er and for freedom, he said. Gathering together LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Family and friends of Greg Padgett said the longtime Lake Coun ty man worked hard to carve a successful future.. He worked and paid his way through college, said Ashley Hunt, a friend of the late civic leader and certied public ac countant, who died in a tractor ac cident in Lady Lake on Jan. 4. He went from being a guy that grew up in Okahumpka, to a guy who grew to have the whole respect of the en tire community. County, state and city leaders and members of the community recent ly expressed shock and sadness after learning of Padgetts sudden death. They described him as a seless leader who was dedicated to bettering the community. Now, his daughters, Cori MacDonald and Carsen Boliek, have es tablished The Greg Padgett Scholarship Foundation to contin ue the legacy of their fathers love and sup port of the greater Lees burg area community and to provide scholar ship opportunities for local students interest ed in pursuing a career in accounting, accord ing to the Leesburg Part nership. A native of Leesburg, Padgett began working in public accounting in 1985. He was a partner in the public account ing firm, Padgett, Wetz & Young PA; He also served as past president of the Leadership Lake County Alumni Association, vice chairman of the board of directors of United Southern Bank, chair man of the Audit Com mittee of the bank, past president and member of the board of directors of the Leesburg Partner ship and board member of Kids Central. Hunt, a lawyer, will help facilitate the foundation. He remembers com ing to Lake County and Padgett taking him under his wing. Montverde Academy collects art supplies for sick kids PHOTO COURTESY MONTVERDE ACADEMY Montverde Academy middle school Student Government Association members show off some of the art supplies to be given to Arnold Palmer Childrens Hospital in Orlando. LEESBURG Scholarship set up in civic leaders name PADGETT Residents honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King ABOVE: Young Jerriell Carter cushions her head on the thigh of her grandmother, Myra Isom, as they listen to the presentation. LEFT: Clermont Police Chief Charles Broadway, south Lake Countys rst black police chief, addresses the audience. PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE COMMERCIAL Inez Ellzey is caught up in the moment during the Martin Luther King Day presentation at Clermonts Waterfront Park on Monday. Today we will honor him through words and music, but perhaps the greatest way to honor Dr. MLK when we leave this ceremony is through our actions. He once said, What are we doing to serve others? Think of what a difference it would make if we all made that our mission. Darren Gray Clermont City Manager SEE KIDS | A4 SEE SCHOLARSHIP | A4 SEE KING | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) OBITUARIES Kerri F. Duncan Kerri F. Duncan, 52, of Homosassa, Fl. Passed away Jan. 17, 2014 at home while un der the care of her lov ing fami ly and Hospice of Cit rus County. A native of Lake Wales, Fl. she came to the area in 2009 from Umatilla, Fl. She worked for Pub lix Supermarket for 32 years and was a Pro duce Manager there. Kerri was preceded in passing by her parents Paul Wayne and Fran ces Marie Duncan. She is survived by 2 sons Austin Brooks and Colton Brooks both of Orlando, Fl.; broth er, Paul Wayne Corky Duncan, Jr. of Cler mont, Fl.; 2 sisters Ger ri Byers of Jacksonville, Fl. and Sherri Brown of Tallahassee, Fl.; sev eral nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of friends. In lieu of ow ers donations may be made to Moftt Can cer Center https:// eforms.moftt.org/do nation.aspx?typeid=3 in memory of Kerri. A celebration of her life will be held Tuesday 4 pm at the Wilder Fu neral Home. Please go to www.wilderfuneral. com to sign the on line register book and leave a condolence message for the family. Wilder Funeral Home, Homo sassa, Fl. Ben Rogers Ben Rogers, 81, of Leesburg, FL passed away Sunday, Janu ary 19, 2014. Born July 23, 1932 in Nashville, GA the son of Charles Olin & Doris Elizabeth (DeVane) Rogers, he spent most of his life in Macon, GA moving to Leesburg in 1968. Ben was the Owner and Op erator of Camelot Tours of Kissimmee. He was a member of the Bap tist Church in Macon, served in the US Navy during the Korean Conict, He married Ann (Smith) of Lees burg who survives. Ben was an avid sherman, enjoyed boating, cook ing, gardening, play ing cards and social izing with his friends. He was loved by his family and friends and will be dearly missed. Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Ann (Smith) Rogers of Lees burg, daughter, Eliz abeth Lisa (Greg) Brooks of Macon, GA, a son, Charles B. Rog ers, Jr of Forsyth, GA, 3 step-daughters, Eliza beth Jackson, of Lees burg, Patti Roe of Lees burg and Judy (Dan) Perreault of Lake Mary, 9 grandchil dren, Michael, Sam uel (Jenifer), Daniel, Aaron, Carter, Rhett, Anna, Dana and Re becca, 3 great-grand children, and 5 neph ews. Graveside Funeral Services will be Tues day, January 21st at 11 am in Hillcrest Mem ory Gardens in Lees burg with Rev. Gary Blanchard Ofciating. In lieu of owers, me morials may be direct ed to Alzheimers Asso ciation 988 Woodcock Rd. Suite 200, Orlan do, FL 32803-3715. On line condolences may be left at www.beyers funeralhome.com. Ar rangements entrust ed to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. Cora Stapleton Cora Stapleton passed away on Janu ary 10th at the age of 101. She will be missed by all that knew her. She is survived by her daughter Susan Staple ton & her partner Judy Jordan several nieces & nephews. Cremation is being handled by Zion Hill Mortuary Services, St. Petersburg. A Cele bration of Life Memo rial will be held at a lat er date. Visit our online guestbook at zionhill mortuary@aol.com. Cynthia Yvonne Wright Cynthia Yvonne Wright, 60, of Oka humpka, FL died Tues day, January 14, 2014. She worked for 30 years at Sprint as a Di rectory Assistant. She was married to Henry Wright Sr. in December of 1971. She is survived by her Husband, Henry Wright Sr. (Okahump ka, FL) Mother, Joyce Harmon (Fruitland Park, FL) 2 Children, Daughter, Tamishia Caldwell (Charles) Son, Henry Wright Jr. (Cic ily), 5 grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, dear cousins and friends. Services will be held at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 at the Kingdom Hall of Jeho vahs Witness, 533 Sun nyside Drive, Leesburg, FL 34748, Brother Rich ard Brown Ofciat ing. Online condolenc es may be left at www. beyersfuneralhome. com. Arrangements entrusted to Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg, FL. OBITUARIES Dorothy S. Chastain Dorothy Straughan Chastain, 63, of Temple Terrace, died Friday, January 17, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home. Lynn Jerry Dickens Lynn Jerry Dickens, 86, of Grand Island, died Friday, January 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Geneva Purcell Hamilton Geneva Purcell Ham ilton, 80, of Webster, died Friday, January 17, 2014. Purcell Funeral Home. IN MEMORY DUNCAN Im very proud of Jayci for being so young, and noticing that she can make a change and a difference, Kim said. To have our own SGA get on board was icing on the cake. The stu dents were very gener ous and I hope that we can continue to count on their support in the future. Jayci appreciated the help as well. I wanted to thank the SGA for helping with the Arnold Palm er Art Cart Donation Drive, she told the SGA members in an email. I know I would be scared if I were sick or having surgery and Im really glad you wanted to help. Arnold Palmer Hospi tal is a 158-bed pediat ric hospital facility and the areas only Level 1 Trauma Center. Its Art Cart program provides activities such as color ing, painting, braiding, sculpture, card games, origami, paper crafts and other crafts to chil dren. KIDS FROM PAGE A3 He would take me to various fundraisers and mentor me, he said. We worked to gether on projects. In speaking with Boliek, Hunt said he learned how important youth agricultural pro grams were to Padgett. Oftentimes, Padgett would bring his daugh ters to the 4-H agricul tural fairs, strength ening their bond, according to Hunt. We want to contin ue doing something for the greater good of the community, Hunt said of the foundations purpose. It is going to be about supporting the community pro grams and events that Greg supported and was passionate about. Donations to the foundation can be made at any United Southern Bank branch or mailed to 515 W. Main St., Leesburg, FL 34748. SCHOLARSHIP FROM PAGE A3 to remember that is important, and the more people we can get down here every year the better, be cause the message we received today is passionate. He (Mar tin Luther King) may be gone, but his leg acy is still present ev ery single day. New Jacob Chap els Rev. Tone Lundy, the programs emcee, asked people to lis ten carefully to Kings words before play ing a live recording of the entire I Have a Dream speech King delivered be fore 250,000 people in Washington, D.C. in 1969. The mornings key note/inspirational speaker was Charles Broadway, Clermonts own chief of police. Dr. King was not a separatist; he believed that people from all nations could work together for advance ments and improve ments for all people, Broadway said. At one time in history, when the world was torn apart by war, Dr. King had the great est following, both blacks and whites, of any person in the civil rights movement. Today is so rele vant to me because I stand before you to day as the rst black police chief in Cler mont and in all of south Lake County, due to the long-lived legacy of Dr. King. KING FROM PAGE A3

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 county ofcials recent ly sounded the alarm that the communi ty must nd an alter native to diminishing groundwater supplies in the next ve years to avoid a direct impact to lake levels and the quality of life in south Lake. There is a demand of 300 million gallons of water by 2035 and we only have 50 mil lion gallons that can be met by our tradition al source, said Alan Oyler, consultant for St. Johns River Water Management District, who is assisting the South Lake Regional Water Initiative. All of the utilities are going to have to nd 250 mil lion gallons of water. For us to meet project demands, we are going to have to import water from someplace else. At the rst annu al South Lake Water Summit in November 2013, a panel of experts from the Lake Coun ty Water Authority and the St. Johns River Wa ter Management Dis trict weighed in on the problem of dwindling reserves in the Flori dan aquifer. While the lack of rainfall is a major fac tor affecting low lake levels, groundwater withdrawals and hu man impacts, such as surface water diver sions and irrigation, are also contributors, the panelists said. The South Lake Re gional Water Initia tive consisting of the South Lake Cham ber of Commerce, the county and the munic ipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola, Mascotte and Mont verde is trying to ad dress regional solu tions in the critical areas of reclaimed wa ter distribution, min imum ows and lev els of the regions lakes and rivers, and alterna tive water supplies and conservation They are working parallel to the Central Florida Water Initiative to nd a cost effective and alternative water source. For us to take mil lions of gallons of wa ter out of the aquifer that is potable water, and use that to water plants or agricultural projects, is not always the most wise use of drinking water, Hays pointed out. If we can nd ways to purify the wastewater and storm water runoff, and use that recycled water for those purposes that are acceptable, it is go ing to be a much bet ter utilization of our re sources. While desalination of water is an alternative water source option, Hays said it is his last resort. It is too expensive, he said. I think the biggest concern is nd ing the proper balance of utilizing water and making sure it ts our budget. Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, chair of the Environmental Preservation and Con servation Commit tee, said it is essen tial we have not only water quality but wa ter quantity. The water quantity is directly re lated to storage or bet ter management sys tems. It is important to divert surface water back into the natural environment. Rep. Steve Crisaful li, R-Merritt Island, agreed. I think these two is sues truly go hand and hand, he said. Rec lamation is one strate gy that may work, but we have to look at all options and make sure we are using sound sci ence when making de cisions affecting our waterways. Hays, Crisafulli and Dean were in agree ment that protection of water resources is one of the top priorities this year. It goes without say ing that water is the most critical and pre cious resource we have, Crisafulli said. Its what we depend on to live, it sustains our rich agricultural history, and it is what makes Florida such an attractive tourist desti nation. Dean echoed similar sentiments. Our most precious natural resource is water, he said.That drives everything from tourism, economic de velopment and agri culture. Anything you can imagine is at risk. In developing a statewide approach to protecting Flori das ecosystems, Cri safulli said the plan is achieved by working with stakeholders from across the state, iden tifying issues and nd ing solutions to ad dress them. In 2013, for exam ple, the Legislature took historic action with regards to Ever glades restoration, he said. Theres been great attention drawn to the Indian Riv er Lagoon and Lake Okeechobee in Cen tral and South Florida, and then there are our springs and the Apala chicola River, among many other important water bodies. Also in 2013, the Florida Legislature earmarked $10 mil lion from general reve nue for protection and restoration of springs, according to Clean Wa ter Actions 2013 State Legislative Report. The long-term com mitment begins, Cris afulli said, with using existing revenues to fund projects that will clean up our water ways or address critical water quantity issues. In the short term, we need to identify trouble areas and work to fund projects that will address those is sues, he added. As we do that, we cant fo cus on only one area whether its the springs or other specic bodies of water but rather, we need to take actions across the state. Asked if major legis lation would pass this year on the issue, Dean adamantly said the is sue will be addressed. We contacted ev ery water manage ment district, he said. We dont need any more studies. We need to start making thing happen regardless of how small or insigni cant. SPRINGS FROM PAGE A1 HALIFAX MEDIA SERVICES Swimmers enjoy the clear, cool water of Alexander Springs. CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN Associated Press McALLEN, Texas Account information stolen during the Target security breach is now being divided up and sold off regionally, a South Texas police chief said Monday following the arrest of two Mexican citizens who authorities say arrived at the border with 96 fraudulent credit cards. McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez said Mary Carmen Garcia, 27, and Daniel Guardio la Dominguez, 28, both of Mon terrey, Mexico, used cards con taining the account information of South Texas residents. Ro driguez said they were used to buy tens of thousands of dol lars worth of merchandise at national retailers in the area in cluding Best Buy, Wal-Mart and Toys R Us. Theyre obviously selling the data sets by region, Rodriguez said. Garcia and Guardiola were both being held Monday on state fraud charges. It was not immediately known whether they had retained lawyers. Rodriguez said he did not know whether they were the rst arrests related to the Target breach. Target did not immedi ately return phone and email messages left Monday, which was Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday. The Minne apolis-based company said last week that it has stopped more than a dozen operations that sought to scam breach victims by way of email, phone calls and text messages. McAllen police began working with the U.S. Secret Service after a number of area retailers were hit with fraudulent purchas es on Jan. 12. The Secret Ser vice conrmed that the fraudu lent accounts traced back to the original Target data breach from late last year, Rodriguez said. Investigators fanned out to McAllen-area merchants and re viewed miles of video looking for the fraudsters, he said. From that, they were able to identify two people and a car with Mexi can license plates. A message left for the Secret Service on Monday was not im mediately returned. With the help of U.S. Immi gration and Customs Enforce ment, investigators conrmed the identities of their suspects from immigration records of when they had entered Texas in the same vehicle. Police pre pared arrest warrants last week and waited for them to return. 2 nabbed in Target credit fraud case AP PHOTO McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez points at dozens of fraudulent credit cards that were conscated by McAllen police after arresting a man and a woman on charges tied to the December Target credit card breach on Monday.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 THOMAS BEAUMONT Associated Press WASHINGTON The Republican Partys image has changed lit tle in the year since GOP Chairman Reince Prie bus published his pre scription for broaden ing the partys appeal despite its investment in outreach to the racial minorities, women and gay voters who backed Democrats decisively in 2012. The issue that re mains an open book for the Republicans is: What is the character of the party? said Ari Fleischer, a top aide to President George W. Bush, who helped au thor the report of the Growth and Opportu nity Project. Are we a more inclusive and wel coming party yet? As the Republican National Committee opens its winter meet ings here Wednesday, the party is counting on the political geogra phy and expected low er turnout of the 2014 midterm elections to give them control of the Senate. If that hap pens, Fleischer said, it would be a false nar cotic for the larger problems facing a party that has lost the nation al popular vote in ve of the last six presiden tial elections. Those will take years to x. In the past year, Prie bus has launched new efforts to reach out to racial and ethnic mi norities, hired about 170 state-level staff with more planned and invested in tech nology to better track potential voters, a tac tic Republicans pio neered and Democrats have perfected over the past eight years. He also renewed efforts to win over Hispanics nation ally with voter outreach staffers. But these structur al changes can end the GOPs White House los ing streak only if its messengers fulll the GOPs image still muddled AP FILE PHOTO Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks in Boston. reports larger goal: Change course, modernize the par ty and learn once again how to appeal to more people. Since losing the 2012 presidential election, Republi cans have continued to slip in public ap proval. According to a recent Gallup poll, 32 percent have a favor able opinion of the GOP now, compared with 43 percent im mediately after Presi dent Barack Obamas re-election. Demo crats were viewed fa vorably by 42 per cent, also down from a year ago. The commit tee has deployed 17 full-time operatives to New York, Flori da, California, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Texas, Georgia and Colora do with the prima ry mission of bring ing more Hispanics into the GOP fold. More are planned in states including Ne vada, North Caroli na, Arizona, Wiscon sin, Michigan, Ohio and Illinois. JOSH FUNK Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. Oma has re chief said Mon day that people have died in an explosion and partial building col lapse at an animal feed processing plant, but he would not give a specic number of deaths. Interim Omaha Fire Chief Bernie Kanger said crews have stopped res cue efforts and will start a slower recovery effort to retrieve victims. The International Nutrition plant is unstable, so res cuers must work delib erately to ensure their safety, he said. Thirty-eight people were inside when the ex plosion occurred Mon day morning. Ten were taken to hospitals and four are in critical con dition. Its unclear how many people got out without being hurt. The cause of the blast has not yet been deter mined, but Kanger said there were no hazardous chemicals at the plant. Plant worker Nate Lewis, 21, said he was on the rst oor when he heard the blast. The building went dark, so he used light from his cell phone to make his way across the production oor to safety outside. I was a production line worker, although I dont know if I want to be that anymore, said Lewis, whos worked at International Nutrition for about four months. There appears to be structural damage to the top of the building, which sits in an indus trial area visible from In terstate 80, which bisects Nebraskas largest city. There are no residenc es nearby and no other buildings were evacuat ed after the explosion. Jamar White said he heard a loud crack and then looked up to see the back wall of the building collapsing. I ran at least 150 feet, White said. I ran far enough to make sure nothing else would keep falling. Fatalities reported in Omaha plant explosion NATI HARNIK / AP Fireghters stage outside the International Nutrition plant in Omaha, Neb., where a re and explosion took place.

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties CANADIAN MEDSSave up to 80%on Your Meds Prices352-633-3301Call for a FREE quote today. WE MATCH LOCAL COMPETITIONWe ship anywhere in the USA. COUPON$10.00 OFFInitial Purchase of $100.00 or More RYAN LUCAS and ZEINA KARAM Associated Press GENEVA A last-minute U.N. in vitation for Iran to join this weeks Syria peace talks threw the long-awaited Geneva conference into doubt Monday, forcing U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon to rescind his offer under intense U.S. pressure after the opposition threatened to boycott. With the invitation withdrawn, the main Western-backed op position group said it would attend the talks aimed at ending Syrias ruinous three-year civ il war. The opposition said the conference should seek to estab lish a transitional gov ernment with full exec utive powers in which killers and criminals do not participate. The surprise invita tion, extended Sun day by the U.N. sec retary-general, set off a urry of diplomat ic activity to salvage the talks. The U.S. said the offer should be re scinded, and the op position threatened to skip the event entirely. The conference is set to begin Wednesday in the Swiss luxury re sort city of Montreux, with high-ranking del egations from the United States, Russia and close to 40 oth er countries attending. Face-to-face negotia tions between the Syr ian government and its opponents the rst of the uprising are to start Friday in Geneva. The uproar over Irans invitation put the entire event at risk of being scuttled. The Syrian Nation al Coalition, which had voted late Saturday to attend after months of rancorous debate, is sued an ultimatum, saying that Iran must commit publicly with in hours to withdraw its troops and militias from Syria and abide by a 2012 roadmap to establish a transition al government. Other wise, the group said, the U.N. should with draw its invitation for Tehran to take part. The confusion sur rounding the Iranian invitation underscored the tenuous nature of the diplomatic effort to end the bloody con ict, which has mor phed from peaceful protests into a vicious civil war with outside powers backing reb els who are ghting not only the government but rival insurgents as well. It is not clear what exactly motivated Ban to issue the invitation, but it came hours after he said he had received assurances from Teh ran that it accepted the premise of the talks. Syria has been ruled by President Bashar Assads family since 1970, and Iran is As sads strongest region al ally, supplying his government with ad visers, money and ma teriel since the upris ing began in 2011. The Islamic Republics al lies, most notably the Lebanese Shiite mili tant group Hezbollah, have also gone to Syria to help bolster Assads forces. The last-minute invi tation appeared to take the U.S. and its Euro pean allies by surprise. An Iranian statement said Iran had accepted the offer without any pre-conditions. a bus. Russias National An ti-Terrorism Commit tee said Monday it was studying the video and would have no immedi ate comment. The vid eo couldnt be viewed in Russia, where Inter net providers cut ac cess to it under a law that bans the dissemi nation of extremist ma terials. In Washington, a Pentagon spokesman Monday said the U.S. has offered support to the Russian govern ment as it conducts se curity preparations for the Winter Olympics. Rear Adm. John Kirby said the U.S. will offer air and naval support, including two Navy ships in the Black Sea, to be available if re quested for all manner of contingencies, in consultation with the Russian government. The video was re leased by the Vilayat Dagestan, one of the units that make up the so-called Caucasus Emirate, an umbrel la group for the rebels seeking to establish an independent Islamic state in the North Cau casus. Doku Umarov, a Chechen warlord who leads the Emirate, had ordered a halt to at tacks on civilian tar gets in 2012. But he re scinded that order in July, urging his follow ers to strike the Sochi Olympics, which he denounced as satan ic dances on the bones of our ancestors. The games run from Feb. 7-23. The Kremlin-backed leader of Chechnya claimed last week that Umarov was dead, but the claim couldnt be veried. The Vilayat Dagestan statement said the Volgograd at tacks were carried out in part because of Umarovs order, but it didnt specically say he had ordered them. Dagestan has be come the center of an Islamic insurgency that has engulfed Russias North Caucasus after two separatist wars in Chechnya. Militants seeking to create an in dependent state gov erned by Islamic Shari ah law in the Caucasus launch daily attacks on police and other au thorities there. One of the two ethnic Chech en brothers accused of staging the Boston Marathon bombings spent six months in Dagestan in 2012. Andrei Soldatov, an independent Mos cow-based security an alyst, said the video threat need to be taken seriously. They have capabil ities to strike beyond the North Caucasus, which they demon strated in Volgograd, he said. Its extremely difcult to stop a lone wolf suicide bombing attack. VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV Associated Press MOSCOW Rus sias counter-ter rorism agency says its studying a vid eo posted by an Is lamic militant group that asserted re sponsibility for sui cide bombings that killed 34 people last month and is threat ening to strike the Winter Olympics in Sochi. Security experts say the Russians are right in taking the threat seriously. The video was posted online Sun day by a militant group in Dages tan, a predomi nantly Muslim re public in Russias volatile North Cau casus. The Olym pic host city of Sochi lies only 500 kilome ters (300 miles) west of Dagestan. Two Rus sian-speaking men featured in the vid eo are identied as members of Ansar al-Sunna, the name of a Jihadist group operating in Iraq. It was unclear whether the men in the video had received fund ing or training from that group or only adopted its name. There was no con firmation the two men were the sui cide bombers who struck the southern Russian city of Vol gograd last month as the video claims. Scores of people were also injured by the bombings of a train station and Russians study Islamic video threatening Olympics AP PHOTO This image made from a video posted online by an Islamic militant group shows two men, identied as Suleiman and Abdurakhman. The group asserted responsibility for the suicide bombings that killed 34 people in Volgograd, Russia. UN rescinds invitation to Iran to attend talks AP PHOTO The United Nations Security Council meets at U.N. headquarters on Monday.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9

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The majority of victims have no symptons.ABDOMINAL ULTRASOUND..............$95Helps identify cancers/disease of the liver, pancreas, kidneys, gallbladder and spleen.THYROID ULTRASOUND...................$40Scan to rule out cysts, nodules, goiters & tumors.ALL RESULTS & FILMS MAILED TO YOU IN 2 WEEKS. BLOOD TESTS: CHOLESTEROL/GLUCOSE-$35; AIC-$35; H-PYLORI-$35 Schedule individual tests or GET ALL SIX and SAVE BIG:COMPLETE EVALUATIONAll Six Ultrasounds$179Call for appointment and directions 1-888-667-7587JANUARY 22NDJANUARY 27THJANUARY 29THFEBRUARY 3RDFEBRUARY 4THBushnell, Blueberry Hill RVTavares Civic CenterWildwood, Continental CCLk. Panasoffkee Community Ctr.Eustis Community Ctr. ILYA GRIDNEFF Associated Press BOR, South Sudan Bor is a ghost town. Every shop is looted and empty. Bodies lie on the ground, and En glish-language grafti curses the ethnic group of the South Sudanese president. Near the airport, the road is littered with trash. Shipping containers are pried open and their contents ransacked. Once held by the rebels at tempting to overthrow South Sudans government, the city was taken back by the mili tary over the weekend with the help of Ugandan troops. More cities are falling back under government control af ter a conict that began Dec. 15 saw rebels gain control of several key cities. The government said Mon day it has also regained con trol of Malakal, the capital of the oil-producing Upper Nile state, though the U.N. said its base there took re, wound ing nearly three dozen people and damaging the hospital. Thousands have been killed and an estimated half million people have ed the ghting, which pits the government of President Salva Kiir, an eth nic Dinka, against former Vice President Riek Machar, an ethnic Nuer. Negotiators for Kiir and Machar said over the week end that a cease-re was close at hand. But a Twitter feed believed to be controlled by Machar said Monday there wont be a cease-re until Ugandan troops supporting the government leave and po litical detainees are released. FRANK JORDANS Associated Press BERLIN Waking up after almost three years of hibernation, a com et-chasing spacecraft sent its rst signal back to Earth on Monday, prompting cheers from scientists who hope to use it to land the rst space lander onto a comet. The European Space Agency received the allclear message from its Rosetta spacecraft at 7:18 p.m. a message that had to travel some 500 million miles. In keeping with the agencys effort to turn the tense wait for a sig nal into a social media event, the probe trig gered a series of Hello World! tweets in differ ent languages. Dormant systems on the unmanned space craft were switched back on in prepara tion for the nal stage of its decade-long mis sion to rendezvous with the comet named 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasi menko. Systems had been powered down in 2011 to conserve en ergy, leaving scientists in the dark about the probes fate until now. Because of the time it took Rosetta to wake up, and the long distance between the space craft and Earth, the ear liest possible hour for a signal to arrive was 6:30 p.m. I think its been the longest hour of my life, said Andrea Ac comazzo, the space crafts operations man ager at ESAs mission control room in Darm stadt, Germany. Now we have it back. Scientists will now take control of Roset ta again, a procedure slowed by the 45 min utes it takes a signal to travel to or from the spacecraft, he said. The wake-up call is one of the nal mile stones for Rosetta be fore it makes its ren dezvous with comet 67P in the summer. The probe will then y a se ries of complicated ma neuvers to observe the comet a lump of rock and ice about four kilo meters (2.5 miles) in di ameter before drop ping a lander called Philae onto its icy sur face in November. The lander will dig up samples and analyze them with its instru ments. In S. Sudan, rebel-held town of Bor destroyed Comet-chasing probe wakes up, signals Earth AP PHOTO Technicians celebrate after receiving the Rosetta wake up signal in the control room of European Space Agency in Darmstadt, Germany.

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I ndividually, the concrete steps President Obama an nounced Friday toward re forming the National Security Agencys surveillance programs were modest. Taken together, though, they signal the end of an era of unfettered escalation in U.S. intelligence-gathering. Since its establishment in 1952, the NSAs history has been one of almost nonstop ex pansion. But for most of that time, the agency still faced lim its on what kind of information it could gather and in the legal strictures that governed its pro grams. That changed after the ter rorist attacks of 2001, which prompted then-President George W. Bush to demand an all-out effort to collect every scrap of information available. His order came at a time when the Internet, email, instant mes saging and low-cost voice com munications were pouring an unprecedented amount of pri vate information into a glob al electronic network, available for sophisticated eavesdroppers to tap. Bush brushed aside legal con straints and ordered the NSA to collect domestic telephone and email communications without court warrants. Later, Congress and the Foreign Intelligence Sur veillance Court legalized much of that program retroactively, in cluding the NSAs collection of domestic telephone call records, known as metadata. The princi ple driving intelligence-gather ing had become collect rst, ask questions later. Obamas proposals are step back from that rule. The president didnt cancel any existing surveillance pro grams; indeed, he reafrmed the governments argument that telephone metadata should still be collected though with new safeguards. To many civil liberties ad vocates, his cautious moves were disappointing. But while Obamas practical steps were small, the conceptual steps were large. Instead of accept ing the doctrine that a global war against terrorists justies al most any expansion of informa tion-gathering, he said the en tire U.S. intelligence enterprise should be subject to more pub lic scrutiny and more stringent cost-benet tests. The power of new technolo gies means that there are fewer and fewer technical constraints on what we can do, Obama said. That places a special obli gation on us to ask tough ques tions about what we should do. The immediate practical ef fects of asking those questions will be few. The telephone meta data will still be there and still, for the time being, held in one big database at the NSA. But analysts who want to check U.S. telephone records of anyone suspicious will now need per mission in each case from the federal surveillance court. A second Obama innova tion the idea that the NSA should treat foreigners the same way it treats Americans when it comes to privacy is a revolu tionary idea within the intelli gence community, which is used to drawing a clear line between us and them. But it wont shield foreigners from being subjects of U.S. surveillance, unless they are on the short list of a few doz en allied leaders whose phones wont be tapped. The larger impact, over the long term, may come from a less obvious part of Obamas re forms: his directives that intel ligence agencies, including the NSA, face more stringent over sight, and that the FISA court make public its decisions affect ing privacy rights. Finally, Obamas new positions may help change the debate in Congress over the NSAs powers. The president said that al though the government should collect telephone metadata, in the long run, it shouldnt be the one to hold it. That almost cer tainly means a vigorous debate in Congress as surveillance pro grams come up for reauthoriza tion during the next two years. Some advocates for NSA reform in Congress, including Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., praised Obamas speech for reinvigorating that debate, even though it fell short of their wish list in other re spects. A year ago, before NSA rene gade Edward Snowden revealed dozens of once-secret programs, these issues were almost en tirely unknown, even to mem bers of Congress. Even a month ago, momentum toward NSA re form appeared to have stalled. But with Obamas speech Friday, it seems certain the issues will have a full airing, and the pres ident has made clear where he stands. The era in which a president could order the NSA to expand surveillance programs with little oversight from Congress and no scrutiny from the public is over. Thats a big change, and a good one. Doyle McManus is a columnist for The Los Angeles Times. Readers may send him email at doyle.mcmanus@latimes. OTHER VOICES Doyle McManus MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE President Obama steps back from unfettered surveillance The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. F riday night at 9, millions of Americans sat in front of their televisions and watch the tropical police drama Hawaii Five-0 on their local CBS station. And over the next week, roughly 3 million more will watch the show on their own schedule. Thats an un remarkable statistic today, considering that half of American homes have a digital vid eo recorder. But until Jan. 17, 1984, it was an open question whether consumer electron ics companies would even be allowed to sell such devices. On that day, a divided Supreme Court over ruled the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and declared that Sony could continue to sell its Betamax videocassette recorder despite the objections of two large Hollywood stu dios, Universal and Disney. Its an anniversa ry worth celebrating because it helped clear the way for a multitude of new technologies that have increased the demand for creative works. Justice John Paul Stevens majority opin ion in Sony Corp. of America v. Universal laid down at least two important principles for fu ture innovators. First, even if people copied an entire show, it wasnt an infringement if they were doing so to watch the program lat er. And second, if a product had a substantial legitimate use (such as time-shifting shows that are broadcast free over the air), it could be sold even if some buyers put it to illegitimate use (such as making copies of shows to rent or sell). But just as important, Stevens declined to expand copyright law to restrict new capa bilities Congress hadnt contemplated when it wrote the copyright statute. Betamax eventually lost the format war to VHS recorders, but its courtroom triumph helped all such devices proliferate. Record ers soon became the foundation for the home video business, which turned into Holly woods largest cash cow. The ruling opened the door for TiVo and other digital gadgetry in the home, then helped defend an assortment of Web-based services with both infringing and non-infringing uses, such as YouTube and oth er user-generated content sites and Dropbox and other online storage services. As new technologies emerge, however, so do legal questions that Stevens opinion doesnt answer. Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case brought by the major broadcast networks against Aereo, a compa ny that erects an array of tiny TV antennas on its property that subscribers use to tune in broadcasts on their computers, tablets and smartphones. For now, its enough to note that it could prove as important to cloudbased services as the Betamax case was to new devices in the home. Provided by MCT. A VOICE 84 Betamax ruling set a big precedent Editors Note: Gary Trudeau is on vacation this week. Enjoy these strips from 2012.

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www.Leesburgdermatologyandmohssurgery.comEast Main StreetPine StreetEast Dixie AvenueLeesburg DERMATOLOGY & MOHS Surgery Leesburg Regional Medical Center S. Lake StreetJohnny Gurgen, DO FAOCDBoard Certified Dermatologist & Mohs SurgeonAward Winning Author & Lecturer of multiple World Renowned Dermatologic Publications. SPECIALIZING IN: rfnt bt t tt t NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSMost Insurance Plans Accepted Medicare Accepted ttt t tt ttt tttt ttt tttt SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com TENNIS: Federer storms into quarternals / B3 JEFF SCHWEERS The Gainesville Sun GAINESVILLE In a ground oor lab of the New Engineering Building at the Univer sity of Florida, radiol ogist Keith Peters and mechanical engineer Ghatu Subhash are building the football helmet of the future. Theyve spent sev eral months dropping weights onto differ ent types of foam pad ding material to test their impact absorp tion rates in the Center for Dynamic Response of Advanced Materi als and tinkering with a system of uid-lled reservoirs they say will absorb more blunt force than traditional materials. Still in the early stag es of development, they arent ready to test it on humans yet. But they are optimistic that their design will work and eventually replace the kind of padding used in todays football hel mets and other protec tive headgear.w The inspiration came from watching the ille gal street-racing ick Fast 2 Furious, Peters said. In one scene, a car crashes into a barrier of water-lled canisters. Helmet designers at UF aim to reduce head injuries Peters shows variations on a graph of the amount of impact absorbed by different helmet linings, on Jan. 10 at the College of Engineering at the University of Florida. Large signs advertising the Super Bowl are seen on 42nd Street by Times Square on Monday in New York. Preparations for fan venues and activities for the upcoming Super Bowl are starting to appear along several blocks of Broadway, part of which has been dubbed Super Bowl Boulevard. CRAIG RUTTLE / AP RICK FREEMAN Associated Press NEW YORK Workers hung in harnesses, putting the nishing touches on a sponsors billboard high above Broadway. A few blocks north, in Times Square, a three-sto ry stage festooned with Fox Sports logos towered over the crossroads of the world. Below, the pedestrian plazas stayed relatively calm and un crowded for now beneath blinking ads, most of which refer enced the Super Bowl as New York spent a mellow MLK Monday pre paring to host the biggest event in sports. The Feb. 2 championship game, between Seattle and Denver, is still almost two weeks away, and while there will be all sorts of events sur rounding the game throughout the NYC and NJ prep for Super Bowl on calm MLK Monday Cops advise fans to expect huge trafc jams and to use public transportation, if possible SEE SUPER | B2 NFL PHOTOS BY ERICA BROUGH / GAINESVILLE SUN Keith Peters, MD, of the Department of Radiology at the University of Floridas College of Medicine, and Ghatu Subhash, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering seek to patent a different kind of football helmet that uses inatable/deatable padding. SEE HELMET | B2 TODD KIRKLAND / AP Miami Heat power forward Chris Andersen (11) shoots as he is defended by Atlanta Hawks power forward Elton Brand (42) and power forward Mike Scott (32) on Sunday in Atlanta. CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer ATLANTA Paul Millsap scored 26 points and the Atlanta Hawks overcame LeB ron James 30 points to beat the Miami Heat 121-114 on Mon day night. DeMarre Carroll added 19 points and Pero Antic had 17 for the Hawks, who snapped a nine-game losing streak in their series with the Heat. Chris Bosh had 21 points for Miami, which was without Dwyane Wade for the second straight game. James sank back-toback 3-pointers mid way through the nal period to give Miami its rst lead of the second half at 107104. The Hawks re grouped to lead 112108 following two free throws by Millsap. The Hawks led 116111 when a missed layup by Atlantas Shelvin Mack set up James three-point play to cut the lead to two points. Kyle Korver, who had 12 points, answered with a 3-pointer. James had a turn over on a bad pass and a missed 3-pointer on Miamis next two pos sessions. Atlanta took its rst win over Miami since Jan 2, 2012 and its rst home win in the series since Nov. 18, 2009. The Hawks led the Millsap has 26, Hawks hold off Heat 121-114 SEE HEAT | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 20 .500 Brooklyn 17 22 .436 2 New York 15 26 .366 5 Boston 14 28 .333 7 Philadelphia 13 28 .317 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 29 12 .707 Atlanta 21 19 .525 7 Washington 20 20 .500 8 Charlotte 18 25 .419 12 Orlando 11 30 .268 18 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 32 7 .821 Chicago 19 20 .487 13 Detroit 17 24 .415 16 Cleveland 15 26 .366 18 Milwaukee 7 33 .175 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 32 9 .780 Houston 27 15 .643 5 Dallas 25 18 .581 8 Memphis 20 20 .500 11 New Orleans 16 24 .400 15 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 31 9 .775 Oklahoma City 31 10 .756 Denver 20 20 .500 11 Minnesota 19 21 .475 12 Utah 14 28 .333 18 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 29 14 .674 Golden State 26 16 .619 2 Phoenix 23 17 .575 4 L.A. Lakers 16 25 .390 12 Sacramento 14 25 .359 13 Sundays Games L.A. Lakers 112, Toronto 106 Orlando 93, Boston 91 Oklahoma City 108, Sacramento 93 San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 82 Phoenix 117, Denver 103 Mondays Games Dallas 102, Cleveland 97 L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103 Washington 107, Philadelphia 99 Charlotte 100, Toronto 95 Brooklyn 103, New York 80 New Orleans 95, Memphis 92 Atlanta 121, Miami 114 L.A. Lakers at Chicago, late Portland at Houston, late Indiana at Golden State, late Todays Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. Wednesdays Games Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m. Boston at Washington, 7 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Dallas at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 8 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 49 31 15 3 65 141 109 Tampa Bay 50 29 16 5 63 146 123 Montreal 49 27 17 5 59 126 120 Toronto 50 25 20 5 55 141 152 Detroit 48 21 17 10 52 121 130 Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51 139 155 Florida 48 18 23 7 43 111 147 Buffalo 47 13 27 7 33 86 133 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 48 34 12 2 70 156 115 N.Y. Rangers 51 27 21 3 57 128 128 Philadelphia 50 25 19 6 56 137 144 Columbus 48 24 20 4 52 138 135 Washington 49 22 19 8 52 142 150 New Jersey 50 20 19 11 51 115 123 Carolina 48 20 19 9 49 117 137 N.Y. Islanders 51 20 24 7 47 142 166 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 51 32 8 11 75 184 139 St. Louis 47 32 10 5 69 166 107 Colorado 48 31 12 5 67 142 122 Minnesota 51 27 19 5 59 125 125 Dallas 48 21 19 8 50 136 148 Nashville 50 21 22 7 49 121 151 Winnipeg 50 22 23 5 49 141 150 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79 175 126 San Jose 49 31 12 6 68 158 121 Los Angeles 50 29 15 6 64 128 103 Vancouver 50 25 16 9 59 127 127 Phoenix 48 23 16 9 55 139 145 Calgary 49 16 26 7 39 109 156 Edmonton 51 15 30 6 36 131 181 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Sundays Games Chicago 3, Boston 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 1 Mondays Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 3, SO Boston 3, Los Angeles 2 Florida at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Detroit, late Dallas at Nashville, late Toronto at Phoenix, late Calgary at San Jose, late Todays Games Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m. St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 8 p.m. Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Wednesdays Games Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Mondays Sports Transactions BASEBALL National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS Signed 1B Lyle Overbay to a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS Agreed to terms with RHP Dil lon Gee on a one-year contract. Signed LHP John Lannan to a minor league contract. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Signed RHP Dustin Crenshaw. LAREDO LEMURS Signed RHP Kenny McDowall. WICHITA WINGNUTS Signed INF Colt Loehrs. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS Signed INF Richard Arias. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS Re-signed F Cartier Martin to a second 10-day contract. HOUSTON ROCKETS Reassigned G Isaiah Ca naan to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). WASHINGTON WIZARDS Assigned G Glen Rice to Iowa (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League WASHINGTON REDSKINS Named Ike Hilliard re ceivers coach. Canadian Football League CALGARY STAMPEDERS Re-signed CB Fred Bennett. HOCKEY National Hockey League MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Jonathon Blum and G Johan Gustafsson from Iowa (AHL). ECHL READING ROYALS Announced F Josh Brittain was loaned to the team by Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE CHOWAN Named Lindsay Austin assistant trainer. ELON Named Damian Wroblewski offensive coor dinator and offensive line coach. INDIANA Named Brian Knorr defensive coor dinator. SOUTH DAKOTA TECH Announced it is joining the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Indiana at Michigan St. ESPN2 Kansas St. at Texas ESPNU Missouri at LSU 9 p.m. ESPN Texas A&M at Kentucky ESPNU Georgia Tech at Boston College FS1 Butler at Providence NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN Minnesota at Dallas TENNIS 9 p.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, quarternals, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, mens or womens quarternal, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. FS1 Oklahoma at Iowa St. metropolitan area of nearly 20 million, the anticipation hasnt quite started to spike yet. It takes more than a big ballgame to get New York City excit ed. New Jersey, too, where everyones still steamed up over alle gations that top aides to Gov. Chris Chris tie orchestrated traf c jams in a northern New Jersey town, Fort Lee, by blocking off lanes to the George Washington Bridge. Unintentional traf c jams are a con cern every day in the region, let alone with an inux of vis itors expected and a big game day crowd anticipated at the Meadowlands sports complex. Crowding in Times Square is always a given, too. To the point that New York ers make a point of avoiding the area at all costs. But on Monday with most people off from work for the Martin Luther King holiday and the Bron cos and Seahawks basking in their con ference champion ships back at home most of midtown was calm. One pocket of ener gy could be found in Macys, where a tem porary NFL store is set up to sell tiny Statues of Liberty splashed with Super Bowl lo gos, NFL shield hats in various colors, hel mets in every size from big enough to protect a golf ball to the real thing, and vir tually anything else NFL-related. Next week is when Broadway turns into a fan fest, concerts happen in all ve bor oughs as well as New Jersey, where the game will actually be played and LeBron James and the Heat take a rare undercard role when they visit Madison Square Gar den and the Knicks. Monday afternoon, though, workers and security guards out numbered customers. Imani Williamson tossed a miniature football in the air to herself and beamed at visitors as they en tered Macys. When it gets busier later, her job will be to greet fans, ask where theyre from, and make them feel welcome. Asked if she had seen any crowds yet, the 22-year old ringer on temporary Super Bowl duty said No, not yet. Deeper in the store, Julie Maner com manded a well traf cked corner where whimsical, cartoonish Super Bowl posters by pop artist Charles Fazzino were on sale. She has gone to every Super Bowl since the 2003 game in San Di ego representing the artist. Usually, she says, she has a booth at the NFL Experience, a fan expo that has been modied for the New York game. Most of that events activi ties will be relocated to Broadway as part of the leagues Su per Bowl Boulevard sending retailers in doors to Macys. Maner wasnt sure if that would help or hurt sales, but she will have more days to sell the posters, 3D dec orated helmets and other works by Fazz ino some of which cost almost as much as game tickets. On Monday, she had just sold a poster to a German couple who wanted a souvenir be fore returning home, but was expecting to do most of her busi ness next week. The out-of-town ers dont come un til next week, Man er said. I dont know if its going to be bus ier than usual or light er than usual. SUPER FROM PAGE B1 The water explodes out of the canisters, dissi pating the energy from the impact. Unfortunately, that kind of impact barrier is a one-shot deal, he said. Instead, Peters and Subhash devised a sys tem combining a u id-lled reservoir con nected to an empty reservoir. When some thing hits the u id-lled container, the uid shoots into the empty reservoir, then slowly oozes back into the container, thus softening the impact dramatically. The device is not re ally different in size to standard padding, Pe ters said. This is using simple technology that should be able to t to gether nicely (inside a helmet). The technology is based in part on the work that Subhash has done over the last 15 years in improving pro tective gear for soldiers, reghters and others in high-risk situations. Their tests have shown that their u id-lled pads absorb ve times the impact of traditional padding. They estimate one to two years before such a product is function al and ready to be pro duced to retrot hel mets. The padding de creases the direct im pact from a blow to the head. But it doesnt deal with the torquing, or rotational, impact from glancing blows. Once Subhash and Pe ters perfect their pad ding system, they will set their sights on de signing the outer shell. Preventing rotation al impact would re quire a redesign of the helmet itself, Subhash said. Subhash has been drawing schematics but has not gotten to developing a prototype helmet yet. Testing has been delayed and an infusion of investor dollars is needed to get them to the next level, Subhash said. But they are hop ing the NFL and oth er sports organizations will take an interest in their research. Peters and Subhash estimate their designs could re duce head injuries by 40 percent or more. That is a lot to consid er, given that 340,000 sports-related trau matic brain injuries oc cur each year, some of them permanent, ac cording to the Cen ters for Disease wCon trol and Prevention. And professional foot ball players are struck in the head or neck at least once a game, Pe ters said. Last year, the NFL agreed to pay out $765 million to settle a con cussion lawsuit by 4,500 former players. The time has come to revolutionize hel mets, they said. While helmets have evolved to protect heads from a deadly knee or el bow penetration to the skull, Peters said, there has been no advance in concussion protection since the early 20th century. And they believe their improvements can be made inexpensively, for any type of helmet bicycle, football, po lice and re protection. The whole point is to make it less expen sive, to put it into small strips that could go into a helmet, Subhash said. HELMET FROM PAGE B1 Heat by 12 points at 5745 late in the high-scor ing rst half and kept a 97-92 advantage enter ing the nal period. Miami appeared bound for its eighth comeback from dou ble-digit decits of the season. With a large portion of the Atlanta crowd chanting Lets go, Heat! James sank a 3-pointer with 7:06 re maining for a 104-all tie. James sank anoth er jumper on Miamis next possession to give the Heat the lead. Carrolls 3-pointer for Atlanta tied the game at 107. Miami took its last lead when Mario Chalmers, who had 17 points, made one of two free throws. Wade, who missed his second straight game, said before the game there is still a little soreness in his knees. Some players on each team wore purple shoes on Martin Lu ther King Day in Kings hometown. Both teams and the ofcials wore Dream Big logos on their warm-up shirts. Kings daughter, Ber nice King, delivered a brief message before the game. The Hawks led 71-70 at halftime, setting a season high for points in a half and points al lowed by a Miami op ponent in a half. The Heat matched their season high for points in a half. It was only the second time in Miamis franchise history both teams had at least 70 points in a half. Antic had 12 points in the half but was called for two fouls in the rst two minutes of the sec ond half. Antic went to the bench with ve fouls. Elton Brand replaced Antic and had six points in the third peri od, helping the Hawks take a 97-92 lead into the nal period. Korver hit a 3-pointer to open the second pe riod, extending to 109 his NBA record of con secutive games with a 3. James was slow to re turn to his feet after he was hit in the back of his head by Korver as Korver was attempt ing to block James shot with 3:18 remaining in the rst half. Korv er was called for a a grant foul, but the call was overturned follow ing a review. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 TODD KIRKLAND / AP Miami Heats Chris Andersen (11) dunks in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks on Monday in Atlanta. The Hawks won 121-114.

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 NBA NOAH TRISTER AP Sports Writer AUBURN HILLS, Mich. DeAndre Jordan had 16 points and 21 rebounds, and the Los Angeles Clippers breezed to a 112-103 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Monday. Jordan made his rst sev en shots almost all on dunks. Blake Grifn added 25 points and Jamal Craw ford scored 26 for the Clip pers, who are now 6-2 since losing star point guard Chris Paul to a shoulder injury. J.J. Redick added 20 points for Los Angeles, including two four-point plays when the Pistons fouled him be yond the arc. Rodney Stuckey scored 29 points for Detroit and Josh Smith added 24, but the Pistons got almost noth ing from their starting back court. Brandon Jennings went scoreless and Kenta vious Caldwell-Pope scored only six points. Jordan threw down a memorable dunk on De troits Brandon Knight last March. Knight is no lon ger on the Pistons, but Jor dan put on another high light show Monday, dunking four times in the rst quarter alone. The Clippers led 6453 at halftime after shooting 66 percent from the eld. Jordan has six dou ble-doubles in the last sev en games, and his most im pressive dunk of the day was probably a one-handed al ley-oop from Redick in the third quarter. Jordans eyes were around rim level on that one, which gave Los An geles an 82-67 lead. Redick bounced back after a 4-for-17 showing against Indiana on Saturday. His rst four-point play put the Clip pers up 38-33 in the second quarter. His second came in the third, after the Pistons had cut the lead to six and looked ready for a potential run. The last player with two four-point plays in one game was Crawford, who did it for Golden State against Denver on March 28, 2009, accord ing to STATS. Once the Clippers pulled away, about the only fun moment for most of the crowd came when a fan seat ed courtside was drenched by a drink after the ball went sailing out of bounds right at him. Detroit trailed by as many as 20 points in the fourth. The Pistons cut the decit to nine late in the game, but Jordan punctuated a terrif ic day with yet another al ley-oop dunk. MAVERICKS 102, CAVS 97 CLEVELAND Monta El lis scored 22 points, Shawn Marion added 18 and the Dallas Mavericks held off a late Cleveland rally to beat the Cavaliers 102-97 on Monday. Cleveland roared back from a 24-point decit in the rst half and trailed by three with 2.8 seconds remaining, but the Cavaliers were called for a ve-second violation when Jarrett Jack failed to get the ball inbounds. Ellis put the game away with two free throws with 1.1 seconds left. Kyrie Irving led Cleveland with 26 points. Luol Deng, acquired from Chicago on Jan. 7, scored 20 points in his rst home game with the Cavaliers while Anderson Varejao had 18 points with 21 rebounds. Dirk Nowitzki scored 17 points and DeJuan Blair added 13 for the Mavericks, who had six players in dou ble gures. WIZARDS 107, 76ERS 99 WASHINGTON Bradley Beal scored 22 points with nine rebounds and eight assists, Marcin Gortat had 19 points and 11 rebounds and the Washington Wizards reached .500 for the fourth time this season with a 10799 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Monday. Each of the previous three times Washington has made it to breakeven, it has lost the next game. On Wednes day against Boston, the Wiz ards try to get over .500 for the rst time since they were 2-1 on Oct. 31, 2009. Beal missed 12 of 14 shots in Saturdays loss to Detroit but snapped back to score 13 in the second quarter and help give Washington a 6151 lead at halftime. Michael Carter-Williams led Philadelphia, which has lost seven of eight, with 31. Thaddeus Young had 18. Spencer Hawes had 11 points and tied his season high with 14 rebounds. BOBCATS 100, RAPTORS 95 CHARLOTTE, N.C. Al Jefferson had 22 points and 19 rebounds Monday, and the Bobcats held on to win 100-95 and beat the Toron to Raptors for the seventh straight time in Charlotte. Jefferson became the rst Bobcats player to have a double-double in the rst quarter with 10 points and 10 rebounds, sending Char lotte to a 26-11 lead. The Bobcats stretched the lead to 30 in the third quarter but needed to withstand a furi ous rally by the Raptors. With point guard Kemba Walker out with a sprained ankle, Ramon Sessions and Jannero Pargo combined for 40 points on 10 of 17 shoot ing. Sessions had 23 points and was 10 of 11 from the foul line, including two free throws with 1.6 seconds left. NETS 103, KNICKS 80 NEW YORK Joe John son scored 25 points and the Brooklyn Nets sent the Knicks to a fourth straight loss with a 103-80 victory Monday, evening this sea sons New York rivalry at a game apiece. Making a triumphant re turn from London, the Nets improved to 7-1 in 2014 and avenged last months blow out loss with a romp of their own. Andray Blatche had 19 points and 12 rebounds, and Alan Anderson scored 15 points for the Nets. Carmelo Anthony had 26 points and 12 rebounds for the Knicks. PELICANS 95, GRIZZLIES 92 MEMPHIS, Tenn. An thony Davis scored 21 of his 27 points in the second half and grabbed 10 rebounds as the New Orleans Peli cans snapped their eightgame losing streak with a 9592 victory over the Memphis Grizzlies on Monday. Tyreke Evans added 15 points, 11 of them in the fourth quarter. He also had seven assists. Brian Roberts scored 13 points and Eric Gor don nished with 12 for the short-handed Pelicans, who won for only the second time in January. Alexis Ajin ca scored 10 points f or New Orleans. Zach Randolph led the Grizzlies with 23 points and a season-high 20 rebounds. CARLOS OSORIO / AP Detroit Pistons forward Kyle Singler (25) drives on Los Angeles Clippers guard J.J. Redick (4) on Monday during the second half in Auburn Hills, Mich. Jordan, Redick lead Clippers past Pistons TENNIS JOHN PYE AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Aus tralia When the draw for the Australian Open was made, it wasnt Rog er Federer who was be ing widely touted as the prime contender to claim an 18th major title. All that hype sur rounded Serena Wil liams, but she was knocked out in the fourth round. Federer is still three match wins away from that milestone, but after his 6-3, 7-5, 6-4 demolition of No. 10-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on Monday night, its clear hes up for the challenge. On a day when No. 3 Maria Sharapova was upset by No. 20 Dominika Cibulko va, following topranked Williams out of the tournament and opening up the wom ens draw for defend ing champion Victoria Azarenka, the leading male contenders on the heavily stacked top half advanced to the quarternals. Progressing along with Federer were topranked Rafael Nadal, who had a 7-6 (3), 7-5, 7-6 (3) win over Kei Ni shikori though he was broken twice and got a time violation in the third set and Wimbledon champion Andy Murray, who over came a racket-smash ing, frustrating nish to the third set to beat Stephane Robert 6-1, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Now for the harder part. Federer is back in the quarternals of a Grand Slam for the rst time since last years French Open equaling Jim my Connors Openera record with his 41st trip to the last eight in a major. He next plays Murray, a three-time Australian Open nal ist. A win could set up a seminal against Nad al, who next plays rsttime major quarter nalist Grigor Dimitrov. A win there for Federer would likely set up a nal against three-time de fending champion No vak Djokovic the only other man who has won four Australian titles in the Open era. Djokovic is playing his quarter nal Tuesday against No. 8 Stan Wawrinka. Its a tough thing to do. I dont know if its been done before, sixth-seeded Federer said of his tough road to the title. Then again, if you dont embrace that challenge, you might as well not enter the draw. You might as well stay at home and watch other guys battle it out. Thats what I like. I like playing the best ... and you need to take it to them. Federer certainly did that against Tson ga, barely dropping a point on serve in the rst set and putting the 2008 Australian Open nalist under pressure right away with an ear ly break. The 32-yearold Swiss star was so re lentless that Tsonga, aggravated at not being able to threaten Feder er at all, screamed and smacked a ball into the crowd after losing an ex change of close volleys. From Tsongas side, it looked like he was fac ing the Federer of old before the crisis of con dence, the new racket, and before his record streak of reaching the quarternals at 36 con secutive majors came to a halt with a shock ing second-round de feat at Wimbledon. No, I was not sur prised because, you know, when you play Roger, you expect him at this level, Tsonga said. Federer demolishes Tsonga in straight sets, readies for quarters AARON FAVILA / AP Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates after defeating JoWilfried Tsonga of France on Monday after their fourth-round match at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne. Associated Press Come Sunday, NFL fans might see coach es Bill Belichick or Jim Harbaugh hollering at the referee and throw ing a red ag on the eld to challenge a call. And this week at the Australian Open, play ers will contest rulings and then watch the results be revealed on the scoreboard. Major League Base ball made sweeping changes this week to expand its instant re play system, but the review process wont appear nearly so dra matic. THE CHALLENGE OF THE CHALLENGE: Two outs, none on, scoreless game in the bottom of the second. Batter hits a chopper in the hole, seems to beat the throw but is called out. Should his manager ask for a re view? If hes wrong, he wont have any op tions later when his center elder makes a diving catch with the bases loaded and the umps say the ball bounced. Or does the manager go on a sh ing expedition, talking to the ump to gauge if he has a case and giving someone in the clubhouse more time to examine replays. BYE-BYE BEEFS: Face it, the spectacle of a manager charging from the dugout, ap ping his arms and shouting nose-tonose at an umpire is part of baseball lore. Will replay make wild rhubarbs a thing of the past? Well, rulings that get reviewed cant be argued. HEAR AND THERE: To contest a call, a manager simply tells the crew chief in timely fashion he wants a review. CMON UMP, THAT PITCH WAS LOW!: MLB has been ad amant that no mat ter what, replay would never be used to call balls and strikes. Nev er. Too hard to tell on tape whether an 88 mph slider clipped the corner, many say. But with technology improving by the in stant, is it impossible to imagine someday? Stay tuned. MLB Instant replay: How it will work

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Simon Sez:Hardy Fruit TreesTime to Plant Purina Dealerrf787-4415 DEAR ABBY: I just read the let ter from Twice Bitten in Wash ington (Nov. 4), who had thanked veterans for their ser vice to our country and re ceived several negative re sponses. Im a retired vet, dying from Agent Orange poi soning. I served two tours in Vietnam, and when I returned from Nam, I was called a baby killer, spat upon and refused taxi service because I was in uniform. America has had a change in attitude since the Vietnam War. Today, many folks appreci ate what the military is doing. I have been thanked several times while wearing my Viet nam Veterans hat and it makes me feel great, to the point my eyes water. Tell Twice Bitten to contin ue thanking the military vets. It means a lot, especially to vets like me. Sure beats being called a baby killer. VIETNAM VET DEAR VIETNAM VET: I received many letters like yours from Vietnam vets who were also not thanked for their service when they returned home. Like you, they very much ap preciate hearing a delayed thanks for their service. I would like to thank you and all the readers who respond ed to that column with such emotional and sometimes gut-wrenching stories. Read on: DEAR ABBY: I would like to of fer Twice an explanation for the reaction she received. I served two tours in Iraq and lost some good friends. When vets return home from war, home is a scary place. The life we lived and breathed is no longer. After spending so much time fearing the unknown and protecting ourselves physically and emotionally, we cant stop. Many of us came home feel ing guilty that we lived while others died ashamed that we might not have done enough, that we should have been the one who was laid to rest, that maybe if we had looked harder, fought harder, we wouldnt have lost a soldier. When I returned home, I reacted the way Twice de scribed. I was resentful that someone would take the time to honor me, but not the friends I lost. It was a long time before I realized that by honoring me with their sin cere thanks, they were honor ing every soldier we have ever lost. Now when I am thanked, I shake hands, I hug, and I thank them for their respect. To Twice: Never stop! Do not be afraid. We are not hate ful or angry. We are scared and sad. Your expression of thanks means more than any parade, any medal or any award could ever mean. BRANDON IN INDI ANA DEAR ABBY: As a soon-to-beretired career Army ofcer, I am one of those who feel awk ward when people thank us for doing our jobs. The Army was a career I chose, knowing the hardships and what would be asked of me. The military is lled with all kinds of peo ple, and even though I may not always be in the mood for a stranger to approach me when Im out and about, deep down inside it is refreshing to know that what I do is appreciated. PHIL IN WASHINGTON STATE DEAR ABBY: One day while walking in a cemetery, we saw an elderly gentleman lean ing on the arm of his caregiver, and we realized he was look ing at a veterans memorial. My wife approached and asked if he was a veteran. He looked at her and said Yes, and she said, Thank you very much for your service and your bravery. He immediately teared up and croaked out a Thank you. His caregiver rolled her eyes. My wife got into her face and said, You have a hero on your arm, so show him some re spect! The veteran cried hard er, grabbed my wifes hand and said, No one has ever said that to me, ESPECIALLY my care giver. KIMIT IN THE MID WEST Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Vets deserve thanks even when it seems unwelcome

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 r r f ntb rf tnnn n ttttt tnnn ftnntttn tn nntnnb tnt ntttttn tttttt ntnttn nfnttntnttnttn tntn nntnnb tnt ntttttn tttttt ntnttn nfnttntnttnttn tn ttn f frn tttttttt ntt t ttttn nn ttttt tttnttt ntttntnt nf f rff tt tnttnnt nt f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r r f r f r f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f t t n n t t n t t n t t t t t n t n t n n n t t n t t t t t n t n f t t n t t n t t t n t t n t t t t t tt t tttt ft ff ttft f f tntttttnt ntnnttt ntttt tttt ftftttt ftft t ttnnntttt ttt ttntttntn tn nt ttnn ttnn ntnnttn ttntntn nnnttttt ntttftfttnttnt ftnntt ttntttt ntttt nn tntntt tntt nttttt t tnnnttnt nntt ntttnttn tttntnt ntnttnt ntt nnttt ttnt nt ffn ntt n t t t f t n t n t t t t n t t t n t t n t n f t n t t t t t t t t t n t t t n n f t n t t n t t t t t n t n t t t n n t t n n f t n t t n t t t t t f n t t t t f n t t t f t n t t n t t t f n n f t n t t n t n t t t t t t t n t t t t f t t t t n t t t t n n f t n t t t t t t n t t f t n t t n t n t t t t t t n t t t t t n t t t t ntnntnt tttttnttn tftntttt tntnnttt tttftnt ntnttttt tnttnn tnttftntt ttntttn tntntt tttnttt tntttttntnn ttttt ttftntt tnttntnn tnntttt tnnttttt ttntntnttt f t n t t t n t n n t t t f t n t t t n t t n n f t n f t n n t t n t t t n n t t t t f t n t t n t t t f t n t n t t t t n t t t n t t n t n f t n t t t t t t t t t n t t t n n f t n t t n t t t t f t n t t n t t t f n n f t n t t n t t t t t n t n n t t f n n f t n t t n t n t t t t t t t n t t t t f t t t t n t t t t n n t t t t t f t n t t t t t n n t t t t t n t t t t f f f f f t t n t t t n n t t n n t t t n t t t t t f t n t t t n t t n f t n f t n t n t t n t t t n n f t n t t t t f t n t t f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f t n n f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r r f f r f f f f r f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f t t f t f t n n f t t t f n t t t f t f t n n f t n t t t t t n t n f t f t n t t f n t t t f t f t n f t n f t n t n t t t t t t n t n n t t t t t f n n t t t t t n t t t f n t f t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t n f t f t n t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t n t t f t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t n t t f t n t f t n t n f t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t f t t f t n n f t t t t n n f t t f t n n t t t t t f f r f t t t t n t t n t f f n f

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B9 r f n t b n t n n t b n t n t f b n t n t b t b n t n n t r n t n t r f n t b n t f t b r n n n t n n t f n n t t n t t r n n t n n n n n t r t t n b t n n rfn n t b b t n t tb f f n r t b t b n n t b n t n n t t n r n n r n t b n t b n t n n t n n t t n t n t t t tnnt btnbntbr r tnnrrb r t n t r f n n r n t t n r n t t t n n b n n b t t r t n t n t n t t n t r r r n b n n t n n n t n b r t n n r r n n b r t b n n b n n n n t b n t n n t b n t t n t t n n r r n t t n t t b n b n t n fr f f f r f f nnntntn ntntnb ntnt bt nbtbrt bntnt nt nttn rbnrntntb ntttnttntrtb tt nnbntn rnntbtb trntt nbt ntbrnnntt rrtnrnntn bnbtbn bbnbrrbnntb nrnntb brbnttbtb tnbnb b n b t r f nnntn tntnb tbnntnb nnntftntnt bnnntnt trr nbttt rbnrntntb ntttnttntrtb tt nntnbb ttnttntnnttb tr rnnttnbn bntntb tr ntnbntnb t ntbrnnntt rrtnrnntn bnbtbn bbnbrrbnntb nrnntb brbnttbtb tnbnb b n b t f nnntn tntnb tbnntnt nrntnnt ftntntbnn ntnt trrt nbn t rbnrntntb ntttnttntrtb tt nntnbb ttnttntnnttb tr rnnttnbn bntntb tr ntnbntnb t ntbrnnntt rrtnrnntn bnbtbn bbnbrrbnntb nrnntb brbnttbtb tnbnb b n b t r tnt tnttnn nnntbrntn nnttntnttb rr rntrbnt ntntt nbrrnb rrnrbtb nnbn nbnb tb t nnnt f f f f f ntn f f tbt nnntrtnt btntntb ntntnt nntnb nrrnbntt nbbnb f f f f tbttt f ntbntnbntrrtttb nbntrn ntbnbb bntn tnt t trtnnttntnt rntt rrtbn rtbtnnnntb bnb nn r bbnb r b t r f f ntn f f f ff tbt nnntrt ntbtnt bbtbtbnt nn bnnnnnttb tnbnt f fn ntntbf f f f ftttrn nnttbnt tbtbtnntt tbnbtttrnn nbntntnt bnnttrn nnttbnt tbtbttbt nntbnbb tnt nb tb ntbnbrrnt nbbntbtn f f f b b trtnnttntnt rntt rrtbn rtbtnnnntn b tbtb nb r rtnbnnn tbtbntntb rnnrntrbnttnb trnntnt ntt bntnntnt bnrtnrr nt tn nb rnn bb b t r

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B10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 rfrntbbbb ntbb b ffrnb bb ntbb tt f f r n b fr frntbbt rrn f n b r t f nbb r rtntbbbt r f r n b rfb rntbbb brr frfnb f ntb fr frntb ffrnbb b tt ntbb rfr nb r r n b b r ffnbbt f ntb rfrnb ft f f n b bbtf rfnbt t b t n t b b b rnt bt n t r nb f bnbb f fnb rn tr frnbb f nbb f r n b rfrn b ntbb ffrn t r nbb r rntbbt r rfrnb tb rntbb b ff nb b rf b rrnb rf rn n trb f frn t ntbbb fntbb rnbb n b b nbb tr fnt n t trntbb t ttr rr t f t f r f f r r f r f b f f r r r r r f r r f r f r r r r f t b b f n t b n b b r r f r b f r f r f f r f t r t f r r r r f t f r f f f f r r r r r r f r f r r r f b t r r f r f f r r f t t r r t b t f r r r f r f t t b t rrfr rr r f t b t r f f r f r r f f f f b t r r t t t t f t r frfbtf rrfr f f t f f f t r r r r r b fff ffff r r f b r f b frr frff frf fr f r r f f f t t b f b t b t f f f f f r r r r f r f rrf r r r r b f f r f f r r f r r f r f f r r r r f t b f r t b r f n b b b b b f b t t t r f f f r f n r r r r f f r f r f f r f f f f f f r r f r f b t r f b b b r f f f nr rff rrr rfrr ffr r r rrfr rf r r t t r t b b b b b f

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B11 r fntbnnntt tnnf nttbbntf b fn bnbtff t nffntn tntttbbbnt ttnnf r ttnf btt b f n t n n b f nntnb tntt ntt r n n t t r fnt nntt tntnft ntt br bntnt n f ntt r ftrr b b b n n n f f n t t n f b n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt ntt r tntntt fttnf ft ntt r rt t n t n b b t t n t n t r r r rt r n n n t n n f n t t n t t n n n t b f t t t n n n n f t n f b b n t b n f n n n t t n f f f n t t b n r rt btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r rt r r n t n t bf tnfr nn nnbbf b bf t b b btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r f n t t rr rt r nnnb nb tntt n b n nbnn nt fr t tnntt n b n n n n fnt nbn f nttf t nff ntt nbnnn nntnn n f n f ntt nntt fr t tntf ntt tfff ntt n tnftf ntn nfttftt b r ff t ntt t t n n n ff f tntt tntt tntnf ff nnf fntt tnfnbf tt nr fn r f ntt r ntf ntt nr r nr n n rnn ntt rt r rr n nnttntt tftt fntt ntttnn tnfn nnff ntt nttntn btn tt nn f nnfnn ntt r n n nntt tnft t n ntt tnff ntt nt nbttbnf n br n rntt nbtt nt nntt r nbtbnttf tnt r f ntt nfbntt nntnf n t n f nf fntt rntt ntbnnt bntnbbt f nfntt fn nnnnfnt nntn ntt r r f n f t t b tn tfntt r ffntt tfnt ntt t ntt bttt ttnntt ntt r t t b b tft b tt tttntt b r n tnn ntt r f ff nntt fbtn ntt r fff ntt r tnnn nf tft ntt bbtf n nt tn nttn nt n f f n t n ttf f nftf ntnf ntt n r nt nfnf ftttnfftff ttftn n n r r r n n n n t f n n f n f f nttf r ffntt tnnfff n tnntbtf n n n t t ntt t n n t t f fntt tf t btnntt nfnntt b nr r n n b n t t nf ttb ffntt ntt fftn n btr r tbrtt tfnn t nntt n n nnn nntt nftn ntt ttnn tf ntt ntf ntt nbt r ft r r nf nf ntt n ntt n ntt tnn btnntt b r nntff f rtff tf ntt ffn f rftf tf rff nf fn b tft fntt tt t rff ntt tf ntt r

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B12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 rfr ntrfbb nrrr fnt bbnnr r n r r rbbbbr r rbnbn nbnr bbrrr bbnt bbbrr bntr rb tn rr nnr nbbn r rrf r bbtr nrbntr r t r r ntbf f b b t n b b t b b b t r r bf brttr nbrbnr nbrr r ntr r r r rbr nbtrnrr r nrrf f nbbt b b b b b b b t n t b f b n t t r r t r n nn tbt r r r r r r r r bnbr rr b rnbrtr r n f r nbtf b bf r r t n t n b t n b b n r r br nbntbr nnrfr rr rr b rbbnbbnb tbr n rb bnbntt brr n nn frfbt r r t r n t b r t r n n b b n t r t n r b r n t t n r b b b r b bnrn nbrbtf rnrnb tnrr tnn nn f t f fbt rfnb rnbb bbrnrbbt bntb nnrbbr b r nbbnr fnttn nfbr n t n n b b n b r n n n r n b b n b r nnn btbr bntt rbt r fnnbt nrntrnr nrn nbrbnnn rbnbrr t nnbrr r t r t b n r n r b r r bntr b n r n n n t r n b t f b b n t r n t b r b n b r n b b n t t r r nt n n n tt tn n b r n t n n b bnbn btrbn bnnnbt rtnr nnf f nnntrf f t n r n b n t t n b b n t n b b b b b b b n r n n t t n r t t n b b n n n n n b n n b b n n b r r r n b n ff n n b n b b t r b b r n n n n n r n t t n b r r r r r n b b b b r n b r r n t t r r nf f b t f t n n n r r b t r t b n b r b r f n r nftf f nnff f r nt n n n tt tn n b r n t n n b bnbn t n r n t f n n b n b r b b r r r r t r n t b r t r trf fft n t r b r b b b r r frb f



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FREE DELIVERYWith Any New Cart Purchase rffnntb HAWKS COOL DOWN HEAT 121-114, SPORTS B1IMAGE ISSUES: Republicans still struggling as midterm election strategies coalesce, A6 LOCAL: Martin Luther King Jr. remembered by residents, A3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Tuesday, January 21, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 21 2 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED B6 COMICS B4 CROSSWORDS B6 DIVERSIONS B5 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SCOREBOARD B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A11 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page XX.72 / 33Some sun, then showers50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAs the agenda for the 2014 Florida Legislative Session begins to take shape, the protection of wa ter resources, including springs and lakes, is a major issue taking cen ter stage, according to state senators and rep resentatives. There already are discussions about ling legislation to protect the springs, such as Alexander Springs near Altoona, and several state senators have united to make the issue a priority this year, according to legislators. State Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, said protection of water resources is perhaps one of the most complex if not the most complex issue facing the Legislature in the next four to ve years. Hays said it is critical that nutrients currently found in the springs and lakes be removed before they get into the water bodies. We are trying to nd ways to remove the nutrients from the stormwater runoff before it gets into the aquifer, he said. Hays said the health of some of the lakes and rivers is another concern. One of the things we have to consider is the current state of degradation of the Indian River Lagoon has not occurred over night and it is not going to be restored over night, he said. These systems take a significant amount of time to regain their ecological balance. We are going to be called upon to fund part of the restoration of that lagoon. I think it is our obligation to make sure we dont spend money for the exercise of spending. Finding alternative water supplies to groundwater is another issue affecting the community, particularly in South Lake. Water experts and Staff ReportUmatilla is looking at a number of options ranging from $20,000 to $8 million to ad dress problems with its aging utility sys tem that caused a wa ter main break last Oc tober that left the entire city without water for several hours. This includes a tem porary x of repair ing or replacing about 360 water pipe cutoff valves, to installing all new water pipes across the city. The utility system is between 40 and 60 years old, and low quality pipe, by todays standards, is thought to have been the cul prit with the line that failed on Oct. 30th, City Manager Glenn Irby said in a memo that will be discussed by city council mem bers at their meeting tonight. The problem with the system was highlighted when that 10-inch wa ter main ruptured three months ago along Kentucky Avenue. Crews immediately attempted to isolate the break by exercising valves designed to turn off the ow of water to this immediate area, Irby said. Unfortunately, this attempt failed and, ultimately, the citys entire system had to be turned off at the main plant. ALI AKBAR DAREINI and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURGAssociated PressTEHRAN, Iran Iran unplugged banks of centrifuges involved in its most sensi tive uranium enrichment work on Monday, prompting the United States and European Union to partially lift economic sanctions as a landmark deal aimed at easing concerns over Irans nuclear program went into effect. The mutual actions curbing atomic work in exchange for some sanctions relief start a six-month clock for Tehran and the world powers to negotiate a nal accord that the Obama administration and its European allies say will be intended to ensure Iran can not build a nuclear weapon. In the meantime, the interim deal puts limits on Irans program though it contin ues low levels of uranium enrichment. Teh ran denies its nuclear program is intended to produce a bomb. The payoff to Iran is an injection of billions of dollars into its crippled economy over the next six months from the suspension of some sanctions though other sanctions remain in place. In part a reection of a thaw between Washington and Tehran, the moves coin cidentally occurred on the 33rd anniversa ry of the end of the Iran hostage crisis. The holding of 52 Americans for 444 days by rad ical Iranian students that ended Jan. 20, 1981 was followed by more than three decades of U.S.-Iranian enmity that only began to ease last year with signs that Iran was ready to meet U.S. demands and scale back its nucle ar activities. British Foreign Secretary William Hague called the deal an important milestone but not the ultimate goal. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comSix Lake County Fire Rescue reghters, who have been work ing out of the Value Place Hotel in Clermont for more than ve years on rotating shifts, will move out at the end of the year to a new loca tion, according to county ofcials. At a recent county commis sion meeting, board members ap proved entering into a partner ship with the city of Clermont for a joint-use re station, serving both county and city needs. Even so, Commissioner Sean Parks expressed some reservations, emphasizing the need to CLERMONTCheckout time coming for firefightersIn Umatilla, fears of another water line burst AP PHOTOAn unidentied International Atomic Energy Agency inspector cuts the connections between the twin cascades for 20 percent uranium enrichment at the Natanz facility, some 200 miles south of the capital Tehran, Iran, on Monday. HALIFAX MEDIA SERVICES Joe Wallace and local residents explore Alexander Springs in Astor.ENDANGEREDLawmakers: We must protect springs and lakes HALIFAX MEDIA SERVICES Swimmer Cody Robertson comes up for air while looking for items under the water at Alexander Springs. Some sanctions removed as Iran takes action SEE STATION | A2SEE IRAN | A2SEE UMATILLA | A2SEE SPRINGS | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014: This year opportunities stem from your ability to know what you want from a situation. Sharing some of your wilder schemes will be better received than you might think. Others nd your imagination fun and invigorating. If you are single, you could meet someone very gentle and kind. You might want to pinch yourself, as this person will seem to be unbelievable. If you are attached, the two of you thrive off the unexpected. LIBRA admires your imagination, and entices your romantic side. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You will feel great, and a partner might appear to be in the same mood at least until a hot issue is broached. Then, you could nd out otherwise. Your ability to draw out others emerges. You know the right move to make. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your efforts make a difference, yet an associate could have a negative attitude. Fortunately, this person does not rule the world. A friend might share his or her thoughts. Listen carefully, as he or she will be com ing from an intuitive level. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will nd a situation provocative. You might feel as if a boss is making assumptions that may not be grounded. Know that you dont have to respond to this persons projections. Be willing to blaze a new trail, and youll feel better about your choices. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Opt to be with a close friend or associate. Get to the bottom of a problem that might be bothering you. You will know whether the information you are given is correct. How you feel could change dramatically. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Youll want to have a friendly chat with a difcult room mate, close friend or loved one. You could nd that this person tends to disengage when you start to talk. As a result, you might wonder whether this discussion should be postponed. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will jump into a situation without hesitation. Sometimes it is best to allow others to nd out what works; they need to go through a similar process to what you did. A partner could be very distracted, which will make it difcult to communicate. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You are energized. A child or loved one adores you wild, creative imagination. This person would be delighted to see this facet of your personality emerge. Keep it light. Be aware of the costs of pursuing what appears to be a fun plan. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You could feel tense, as others seem to demand that rules be loosened up some. You might feel somewhat vulnerable and choose to withdraw within. You cant control others, nor should you try. A psychic thought will come your way. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You will be focused on a key matter revolving around a friend or a signicant meeting. How you handle it and the end results could color your thinking about the whole situation. Emphasize what you want, and speak your mind. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might want to get to know someone in power better. You both have very different approaches that are effective. A family matter or a domestic issue could trigger unexpected happenings. Go with the ow. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You might feel more in harmony with someone at distance than you do with many other people. You cant deny what exists between you. You are intuitive with this person, as is he or she with you. An unexpected call makes you smile. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You succeed best when you work closely with someone else. You know what is workable and what needs to happen. Though you tend to come up with ideas from out of left eld, this person sees value in them. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US MONDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 1-3-4 Afternoon . .......................................... 0-7-7 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-9-7-2 Afternoon . ....................................... 1-1-6-4FLORIDALOTTERY SUNDAYFANTASY 5 . ............................. 4-7-14-24-32 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9.50 4 of 5 wins $96 5 of 5 wins $63,617.78 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pam.fenni more@dailycommercial.com. BRIDGE get the reghters quick ly out of the hotel, located off State Road 50. Because we have been dealing with the issue for ve years, I remain skepti cal about it, he said. We have got to get those reghters in a better facility. I remain skeptical, but I appreciate the effort to move forward with something that may be bene cial to the residents. There have been vandalism and thefts of prop erty at the hotel, and re ofcials said they lack the resources to secure equipment there. One rst re sponders personal vehi cles tires and rims were stolen, leaving the car on cinder blocks. The Lake County Sher iffs Ofce has received 42 calls about the hotel since 2011, according to a call list obtained from the department. Kyle Rogg, president and chief executive of cer of Value Place Hotels, said previously in a state ment that hotel security and safety are top priori ties there. As part of the partner ship, the city will purchase some property and the county will erect a modu lar building on the site, ac cording to Clermont City Manager Darren Gray. As our city continues to expand and grow, we knew we would need a re station going east, Gray said. We knew three to ve years out, we were in need of a re station. Gray said operational costs would be shared be tween the city and county. This is a benet not only to the city of Cler mont and Lake County, but to the residents of Lake County, he said. It saves money and we dont have to build two stations within a mile of each other. Currently, Gray said city ofcials are exploring the area of County Road 455 and SR 50 to purchase a site. Once land is ac quired, Gray said a modular building could be up in six to eight months. But Parks still expressed some doubts. Thats assuming bureaucracy doesnt get in the way, as it has over the last four to ve years over this issue, he said. Commissioner Welton Cadwell said at the Jan. 14 commission meeting that he echoed Parks con cerns about moving the reghters out as soon as possible. If this thing is going to drag out, I would rather you come back with some type of plan to go ahead and do something at the substation, understanding we might move, he said. County Fire Chief John Jolliff said the partnership is the best thing to do. We want to stay east, he said. It makes a lot of sense and we have the sheriffs substation as a backup. Lt. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Profes sional Fireghters of Lake County, said the partner ship is a step in the right direction. Anytime we can work with the city, it is good for both the county and city, he said. STATION FROM PAGE A1 Its important that other sanctions are maintained and the pressure is maintained for a comprehensive and nal settlement on the Iranian nuclear is sue, Hague said. The Europeans are aiming to start nego tiations on a nal deal in February, though no date or venue has been agreed on yet. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Saturday that Teh ran is ready to enter talks as soon as the interim deal goes into force. In the rst step of the interim accord, Iranian state TV said authorities disconnected cascades of centrifuges producing 20-percent enriched uranium at the Natanz facility in central Iran. The broadcast said in ternational inspectors were on hand to witness the stoppage before leaving to monitor sus pension of enrichment at Fordo, another site in central Iran. Iran also started Mon day to convert part of its stockpile of 20-percent enriched uranium to oxide, which can be used to produce nuclear fuel but is difcult to recon vert for weapons use, the ofcial IRNA news agency said. After receiving independent conrmation of the steps from the United Nations watch dog, the International Atomic Energy Agen cy, EU foreign ministers in Brussels approved the partial sanctions suspension. The White House also announced the suspension of some American sanctions on Iran. These actions represent the rst time in nearly a decade that Iran has veriably enacted measures to halt progress on its nucle ar program, and roll it back in key respects, White House press secretary Jay Carney said in a statement. He said Iran is also providing U.N. inspec tors with increased transparency, including more frequent and intrusive inspections. Taken together, these concrete actions repre sent an important step forward, he said. Under the deal reached in November in Geneva, Iran agreed to halt its 20 percent enrichment program but continue enrichment up to 5 percent. Iranian Vice President Ali Akbar Salehi said his country has a total of 432 pounds of 20 per cent enriched uranium and will convert half of it to oxide over a period of six months. The remaining half will be diluted to a level below 5 per cent level within three months. Uranium enriched to a high degree above 90 percent can be used to build a nuclear war head. Enriched below 5 percent, it can pow er an electricity-gener ating reactor, and at 20 percent it can power re actors used to produce medical isotopes. The enrichment is done by spinning the uranium in a series of centrifuges. Iran will also refrain from commissioning its under-construction 40 megawatt heavy water reactor in Arak, central Iran. That reactor can produce plutonium, an other route to building a warhead. Under the deal, the number of IAEA inspectors in Iran will roughly double, said Tero Varjoranta, an agency deputy director gener al. That would increase the agencys presence on the ground to a maxi mum of eight inspectors in Iran at any time. IRAN FROM PAGE A1 To make matters worse, the ruptured pipe was in a low-lying area and water from multiple directions drained back into the trench dug to necessitate repairs, Irby said. This delayed the repair work for several hours and resulted in a boil-wa ter notice for three days once the water was turned back on. Utility Service Compa ny of Atlanta, which has a contract with the city to maintain its water plant, has said it can repair or replace all the existing cutoff valves for about $20,000, which Irby says is a must because its inevitable that another water line is going to break at some point. Umatilla could buy new valves from a North Carolina company and city crews could install them at a total cost of about $1.01 million, or pay a Silver Springs company $1.04 million to do the work, Irby said. If the city decides to replace all water pipes with new valves, it will cost about $8 million, staff believes, with that price cut in half if city crews do the work with the help of some temporary work ers. However, Irby said this do-it-yourself option would be a relative ly slow process compared with contracting with a company to do the work. In fact, Irby estimates a four-man crew, work ing a 40-hour week, lay ing 1,000 feet of linear pipe per week, will take 13 years to retrot the system. This may seem like a lengthy time peri od, Irby said, but if the city grows in population during this time, the expense would be spread over more taxpayers than there currently are. Any major work on the system will require a wa ter rate hike, which the city can use to obtain nancing, the city manag er noted. The council meets at 7 / p.m. at City Hall, 1 S. Central Ave. UMATILLA FROM PAGE A1

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT OCALA Pedestrian killed on highway identifiedThe Florida Highway Patrol on Monday released the name of a pedestrian struck and killed by a car Sunday night in northwest Ocala. Willard H. Daniel, 85, of Wildwood was walking east in between the two westbound lanes of U.S. Highway 27 near Northwest 55th Avenue. At 7:45 p.m., a 1999 Ford Ranger, driven by Charles Pennington, 36, was headed west on US 27 and hit Daniel, according to FHP reports. Daniel was pronounced dead at the scene. Neither Pennington, of Ocala, nor his 14-year-old passenger were injured. No charges were immediately led, reports state.TAVARES Historical Museum hosts special meetingThe Lake County Historical Society will host its quarterly luncheon at noon on Friday at the Tavares Civic Center 100 E. Caroline St., with special guest speaker Groveland City Councilman John Grifn, who will share the history of the Black Seminole Indians and talk about his recent participation in a Dade Battleeld re-enactment. A potluck lunch will be served at a cost of $6, and an RSVP is needed to attend the meeting by calling, 352343-9890 by Wednesday. The Lake County Historical Museum will be closed Fri., Jan. 24 for this special presentation.EUSTIS LEMA features sculptors Helmets for HeroesThe Lake Eustis Museum of Art opens the exhibit, Helmets for Heroes by Dean S. Warren with a reception, from 6 to 8 / p.m., Friday at the museum, Orange Avenue in downtown Eustis in Ferran Park. Admission is free for members and $5 for non-members. Guests can meet the artist at the reception. Two of Warrens decorated helmets are being auctioned to benet the museum. Warren, based in Orlando, creates sculpture from a vast array of materials, marrying mythological sources with contemporary forms. For information, call 352-483-2900 or go to www.lakeeustisart museum.org.TAVARES Author to speak at End of Life Care conferencesLocal author and retired hospice nurse Judy Flickinger will be one of the workshop leaders at the End of Life Care conferences offered by Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, offering information for residents on end of life decisions. Conferences will be offered from 8:30 / a.m. to 1 / p.m., Thursday at Hope Lutheran Church, 250 Avenida Los Angelos, The Villages and from 8:30 / a.m. to 1 / p.m., Jan. 30, at the Church of the Nazarene, 32151 David Walker Dr., in Tavares. Reservations are needed and can be made by calling 352-742-6783.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportMontverde Academy students recently collected funds to buy supplies for an Art Cart program at Arnold Palmer Childrens Hospital in Orlando. The academys middle school Student Government Association (SGA) partnered with Jayci Brau man, a fourth-grade stu dent at nearby Cypress Ridge Elementary School, who has been collecting art supplies for the hospital for the past three years. The main goal and intention of SGAs charita ble involvement with aiding the hospital was to offer a form of art therapy to help ease the fears and anxiety young Central Florida patients might feel before facing major surgery, George Karos, the academys commu nication ofcer, said in a press release. Braumans mother, Kim, is a guidance counselor at the academy and she helped oversee the SGAs efforts with Jordan Foley, the schools middle school writing teacher. ROXANNE BROWN and AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writersnews@dailycommercial.comScores of people gath ered in Eustis and Cler mont on Monday for celebrations to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy. Family was the focus at Carver Park in Eustis, said Pastor Harold J. Kelly of the Temple of Power in Eustis, who chaired the event. Along with all the fun stuff...we want to make the focus back, put the focus back on the family, because that was Dr. Kings dream, that all men be created equal, black as well as white, he said. Clermonts celebration sponsored by the city of Clermont in conjunction with Christian Men in Action, the Lake Coun ty Black Caucus and the South Lake Democratic Club was held at Wa terfront Park. Today we will honor him (King) through words and music, but perhaps the greatest way to honor Dr. MLK when we leave this ceremony is through our actions, City Manager Darren Gray. He (King) once said, What are we doing to serve oth ers? Think of what a dif ference it would make if we all made that our mis sion. Mondays celebration in Eustis took place after two days of events, including a community breakfast on Saturday and an Ecumenical ser vice on Sunday. Kelly said he was pleased with the turnout over the week end and thanked all who took part in Mondays event. One of these volun teers was John Quashie, 26, who said the MLK cel ebration motivates everyone else to get up and do something special... for the kids to know who he is, what its about and why we celebrate. The Eustis Middle School jazz ensemble performed in the park on Monday at noon. The bands director, Gerry Ricke, said the band wanted to support the community and the event. I really think that as musicians we need...to be very diverse in our thinking...and, of course, every time we get out and play, we gain experience and that makes us better as musicians, Ricke said. In Clermont, resident Dwayne Allen said he wished the turnout was greater. Its very signicant to know what Martin Luther King has done for us, not just as a black man or as a black race of peo ple, but for every person of every race, for bringing the generations together and for freedom, he said. Gathering together LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comFamily and friends of Greg Padgett said the longtime Lake Coun ty man worked hard to carve a successful future.. He worked and paid his way through college, said Ashley Hunt, a friend of the late civic leader and certied public accountant, who died in a tractor accident in Lady Lake on Jan. 4. He went from being a guy that grew up in Okahumpka, to a guy who grew to have the whole respect of the entire community. County, state and city leaders and members of the community recently expressed shock and sadness after learning of Padgetts sudden death. They described him as a seless leader who was dedicated to bettering the community. Now, his daughters, Cori MacDonald and Carsen Boliek, have es tablished The Greg Padgett Scholarship Foundation to contin ue the legacy of their fathers love and support of the greater Lees burg area community and to provide scholar ship opportunities for local students interested in pursuing a career in accounting, according to the Leesburg Partnership. A native of Leesburg, Padgett began working in public accounting in 1985. He was a partner in the public account ing firm, Padgett, Wetz & Young PA; He also served as past president of the Leadership Lake County Alumni Association, vice chairman of the board of directors of United Southern Bank, chair man of the Audit Committee of the bank, past president and member of the board of directors of the Leesburg Partner ship and board member of Kids Central. Hunt, a lawyer, will help facilitate the foundation. He remembers com ing to Lake County and Padgett taking him under his wing. Montverde Academy collects art supplies for sick kids PHOTO COURTESY MONTVERDE ACADEMYMontverde Academy middle school Student Government Association members show off some of the art supplies to be given to Arnold Palmer Childrens Hospital in Orlando. LEESBURGScholarship set up in civic leaders name PADGETT Residents honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King ABOVE: Young Jerriell Carter cushions her head on the thigh of her grandmother, Myra Isom, as they listen to the presentation. LEFT: Clermont Police Chief Charles Broadway, south Lake Countys rst black police chief, addresses the audience. PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE COMMERCIAL Inez Ellzey is caught up in the moment during the Martin Luther King Day presentation at Clermonts Waterfront Park on Monday. Today we will honor him through words and music, but perhaps the greatest way to honor Dr. MLK when we leave this ceremony is through our actions. He once said, What are we doing to serve others? Think of what a difference it would make if we all made that our mission.Darren GrayClermont City ManagerSEE KIDS | A4SEE SCHOLARSHIP | A4SEE KING | A4

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) OBITUARIESKerri F. DuncanKerri F. Duncan, 52, of Homosassa, Fl. Passed away Jan. 17, 2014 at home while under the care of her loving family and Hospice of Cit rus County. A native of Lake Wales, Fl. she came to the area in 2009 from Umatilla, Fl. She worked for Publix Supermarket for 32 years and was a Pro duce Manager there. Kerri was preceded in passing by her parents Paul Wayne and Frances Marie Duncan. She is survived by 2 sons Austin Brooks and Colton Brooks both of Orlando, Fl.; broth er, Paul Wayne Corky Duncan, Jr. of Cler mont, Fl.; 2 sisters Ger ri Byers of Jacksonville, Fl. and Sherri Brown of Tallahassee, Fl.; sev eral nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of friends. In lieu of ow ers donations may be made to Moftt Can cer Center https:// eforms.moftt.org/donation.aspx?typeid=3 in memory of Kerri. A celebration of her life will be held Tuesday 4 pm at the Wilder Fu neral Home. Please go to www.wilderfuneral. com to sign the on line register book and leave a condolence message for the family. Wilder Funeral Home, Homo sassa, Fl.Ben RogersBen Rogers, 81, of Leesburg, FL passed away Sunday, January 19, 2014. Born July 23, 1932 in Nashville, GA the son of Charles Olin & Doris Elizabeth (DeVane) Rogers, he spent most of his life in Macon, GA moving to Leesburg in 1968. Ben was the Owner and Operator of Camelot Tours of Kissimmee. He was a member of the Bap tist Church in Macon, served in the US Navy during the Korean Conict, He married Ann (Smith) of Lees burg who survives. Ben was an avid sherman, enjoyed boating, cooking, gardening, play ing cards and social izing with his friends. He was loved by his family and friends and will be dearly missed. Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Ann (Smith) Rogers of Lees burg, daughter, Elizabeth Lisa (Greg) Brooks of Macon, GA, a son, Charles B. Rog ers, Jr of Forsyth, GA, 3 step-daughters, Elizabeth Jackson, of Lees burg, Patti Roe of Lees burg and Judy (Dan) Perreault of Lake Mary, 9 grandchildren, Michael, Samuel (Jenifer), Daniel, Aaron, Carter, Rhett, Anna, Dana and Rebecca, 3 great-grandchildren, and 5 neph ews. Graveside Funeral Services will be Tues day, January 21st at 11 am in Hillcrest Mem ory Gardens in Lees burg with Rev. Gary Blanchard Ofciating. In lieu of owers, memorials may be directed to Alzheimers Asso ciation 988 Woodcock Rd. Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32803-3715. Online condolences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.com. Ar rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Cora StapletonCora Stapleton passed away on Janu ary 10th at the age of 101. She will be missed by all that knew her. She is survived by her daughter Susan Stapleton & her partner Judy Jordan several nieces & nephews. Cremation is being handled by Zion Hill Mortuary Services, St. Petersburg. A Celebration of Life Memorial will be held at a later date. Visit our online guestbook at zionhillmortuary@aol.com.Cynthia Yvonne WrightCynthia Yvonne Wright, 60, of Oka humpka, FL died Tuesday, January 14, 2014. She worked for 30 years at Sprint as a Di rectory Assistant. She was married to Henry Wright Sr. in December of 1971. She is survived by her Husband, Henry Wright Sr. (Okahump ka, FL) Mother, Joyce Harmon (Fruitland Park, FL) 2 Children, Daughter, Tamishia Caldwell (Charles) Son, Henry Wright Jr. (Cic ily), 5 grandchildren, siblings, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, dear cousins and friends. Services will be held at 4:00 / p.m. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witness, 533 Sun nyside Drive, Leesburg, FL 34748, Brother Rich ard Brown Ofciat ing. Online condolences may be left at www. beyersfuneralhome. com. Arrangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg, FL.OBITUARIESDorothy S. ChastainDorothy Straughan Chastain, 63, of Temple Terrace, died Friday, January 17, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home.Lynn Jerry DickensLynn Jerry Dickens, 86, of Grand Island, died Friday, January 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Geneva Purcell HamiltonGeneva Purcell Ham ilton, 80, of Webster, died Friday, January 17, 2014. Purcell Funeral Home.IN MEMORY DUNCAN Im very proud of Jayci for being so young, and noticing that she can make a change and a difference, Kim said. To have our own SGA get on board was icing on the cake. The stu dents were very gener ous and I hope that we can continue to count on their support in the future. Jayci appreciated the help as well. I wanted to thank the SGA for helping with the Arnold Palmer Art Cart Donation Drive, she told the SGA members in an email. I know I would be scared if I were sick or having surgery and Im really glad you wanted to help. Arnold Palmer Hospi tal is a 158-bed pediat ric hospital facility and the areas only Level 1 Trauma Center. Its Art Cart program provides activities such as color ing, painting, braiding, sculpture, card games, origami, paper crafts and other crafts to chil dren. KIDS FROM PAGE A3 He would take me to various fundraisers and mentor me, he said. We worked together on projects. In speaking with Boliek, Hunt said he learned how important youth agricultural pro grams were to Padgett. Oftentimes, Padgett would bring his daugh ters to the 4-H agricul tural fairs, strengthening their bond, according to Hunt. We want to continue doing something for the greater good of the community, Hunt said of the foundations purpose. It is going to be about supporting the community pro grams and events that Greg supported and was passionate about. Donations to the foundation can be made at any United Southern Bank branch or mailed to 515 W. Main St., Leesburg, FL 34748. SCHOLARSHIP FROM PAGE A3 to remember that is important, and the more people we can get down here every year the better, be cause the message we received today is passionate. He (Mar tin Luther King) may be gone, but his legacy is still present ev ery single day. New Jacob Chapels Rev. Tone Lundy, the programs emcee, asked people to lis ten carefully to Kings words before play ing a live recording of the entire I Have a Dream speech King delivered be fore 250,000 people in Washington, D.C. in 1969. The mornings key note/inspirational speaker was Charles Broadway, Clermonts own chief of police. Dr. King was not a separatist; he believed that people from all nations could work together for advance ments and improvements for all people, Broadway said. At one time in history, when the world was torn apart by war, Dr. King had the great est following, both blacks and whites, of any person in the civil rights movement. Today is so rele vant to me because I stand before you to day as the rst black police chief in Cler mont and in all of south Lake County, due to the long-lived legacy of Dr. King. KING FROM PAGE A3

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 county ofcials recent ly sounded the alarm that the community must nd an alter native to diminishing groundwater supplies in the next ve years to avoid a direct impact to lake levels and the quality of life in south Lake. There is a demand of 300 million gallons of water by 2035 and we only have 50 million gallons that can be met by our traditional source, said Alan Oyler, consultant for St. Johns River Water Management District, who is assisting the South Lake Regional Water Initiative. All of the utilities are going to have to nd 250 million gallons of water. For us to meet project demands, we are going to have to import water from someplace else. At the rst annual South Lake Water Summit in November 2013, a panel of experts from the Lake County Water Authority and the St. Johns River Water Management District weighed in on the problem of dwindling reserves in the Floridan aquifer. While the lack of rainfall is a major factor affecting low lake levels, groundwater withdrawals and human impacts, such as surface water diver sions and irrigation, are also contributors, the panelists said. The South Lake Regional Water Initiative consisting of the South Lake Chamber of Commerce, the county and the municipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola, Mascotte and Montverde is trying to address regional solutions in the critical areas of reclaimed water distribution, minimum ows and levels of the regions lakes and rivers, and alternative water supplies and conservation They are working parallel to the Central Florida Water Initiative to nd a cost effective and alternative water source. For us to take millions of gallons of water out of the aquifer that is potable water, and use that to water plants or agricultural projects, is not always the most wise use of drinking water, Hays pointed out. If we can nd ways to purify the wastewater and stormwater runoff, and use that recycled water for those purposes that are acceptable, it is going to be a much better utilization of our resources. While desalination of water is an alternative water source option, Hays said it is his last resort. It is too expensive, he said. I think the biggest concern is nding the proper balance of utilizing water and making sure it ts our budget. Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, chair of the Environmental Preservation and Conservation Committee, said it is essential we have not only water quality but water quantity. The water quantity is directly related to storage or better management systems. It is important to divert surface water back into the natural environment. Rep. Steve Crisafulli, R-Merritt Island, agreed. I think these two issues truly go hand and hand, he said. Reclamation is one strategy that may work, but we have to look at all options and make sure we are using sound science when making decisions affecting our waterways. Hays, Crisafulli and Dean were in agreement that protection of water resources is one of the top priorities this year. It goes without say ing that water is the most critical and precious resource we have, Crisafulli said. Its what we depend on to live, it sustains our rich agricultural history, and it is what makes Florida such an attractive tourist destination. Dean echoed similar sentiments. Our most precious natural resource is water, he said.That drives everything from tourism, economic development and agriculture. Anything you can imagine is at risk. In developing a statewide approach to protecting Floridas ecosystems, Crisafulli said the plan is achieved by working with stakeholders from across the state, identifying issues and nding solutions to address them. In 2013, for example, the Legislature took historic action with regards to Ever glades restoration, he said. Theres been great attention drawn to the Indian River Lagoon and Lake Okeechobee in Central and South Florida, and then there are our springs and the Apalachicola River, among many other important water bodies. Also in 2013, the Florida Legislature earmarked $10 million from general revenue for protection and restoration of springs, according to Clean Water Actions 2013 State Legislative Report. The long-term commitment begins, Crisafulli said, with using existing revenues to fund projects that will clean up our water ways or address critical water quantity issues. In the short term, we need to identify trouble areas and work to fund projects that will address those issues, he added. As we do that, we cant focus on only one area whether its the springs or other specic bodies of water but rather, we need to take actions across the state. Asked if major legislation would pass this year on the issue, Dean adamantly said the issue will be addressed. We contacted every water management district, he said. We dont need any more studies. We need to start making thing happen regardless of how small or insignicant. SPRINGS FROM PAGE A1 HALIFAX MEDIA SERVICESSwimmers enjoy the clear, cool water of Alexander Springs. CHRISTOPHER SHERMANAssociated PressMcALLEN, Texas Account information stolen during the Target security breach is now being divided up and sold off regionally, a South Texas police chief said Monday following the arrest of two Mexican citizens who authorities say arrived at the border with 96 fraudulent credit cards. McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez said Mary Carmen Garcia, 27, and Daniel Guardio la Dominguez, 28, both of Mon terrey, Mexico, used cards con taining the account information of South Texas residents. Ro driguez said they were used to buy tens of thousands of dollars worth of merchandise at national retailers in the area in cluding Best Buy, Wal-Mart and Toys R Us. Theyre obviously selling the data sets by region, Rodriguez said. Garcia and Guardiola were both being held Monday on state fraud charges. It was not immediately known whether they had retained lawyers. Rodriguez said he did not know whether they were the rst arrests related to the Target breach. Target did not immediately return phone and email messages left Monday, which was Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday. The Minne apolis-based company said last week that it has stopped more than a dozen operations that sought to scam breach victims by way of email, phone calls and text messages. McAllen police began working with the U.S. Secret Service after a number of area retailers were hit with fraudulent purchases on Jan. 12. The Secret Ser vice conrmed that the fraudulent accounts traced back to the original Target data breach from late last year, Rodriguez said. Investigators fanned out to McAllen-area merchants and reviewed miles of video looking for the fraudsters, he said. From that, they were able to identify two people and a car with Mexi can license plates. A message left for the Secret Service on Monday was not im mediately returned. With the help of U.S. Immi gration and Customs Enforce ment, investigators conrmed the identities of their suspects from immigration records of when they had entered Texas in the same vehicle. Police prepared arrest warrants last week and waited for them to return.2 nabbed in Target credit fraud case AP PHOTO McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez points at dozens of fraudulent credit cards that were conscated by McAllen police after arresting a man and a woman on charges tied to the December Target credit card breach on Monday.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 THOMAS BEAUMONTAssociated PressWASHINGTON The Republican Partys image has changed little in the year since GOP Chairman Reince Priebus published his prescription for broadening the partys appeal despite its investment in outreach to the racial minorities, women and gay voters who backed Democrats decisively in 2012. The issue that re mains an open book for the Republicans is: What is the character of the party? said Ari Fleischer, a top aide to President George W. Bush, who helped author the report of the Growth and Opportu nity Project. Are we a more inclusive and wel coming party yet? As the Republican National Committee opens its winter meet ings here Wednesday, the party is counting on the political geogra phy and expected low er turnout of the 2014 midterm elections to give them control of the Senate. If that hap pens, Fleischer said, it would be a false nar cotic for the larger problems facing a party that has lost the nation al popular vote in ve of the last six presidential elections. Those will take years to x. In the past year, Prie bus has launched new efforts to reach out to racial and ethnic minorities, hired about 170 state-level staff with more planned and invested in tech nology to better track potential voters, a tactic Republicans pio neered and Democrats have perfected over the past eight years. He also renewed efforts to win over Hispanics nation ally with voter outreach staffers. But these structur al changes can end the GOPs White House losing streak only if its messengers fulll the GOPs image still muddled AP FILE PHOTO Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks in Boston. reports larger goal: Change course, modernize the par ty and learn once again how to appeal to more people. Since losing the 2012 presidential election, Republicans have continued to slip in public approval. According to a recent Gallup poll, 32 percent have a favor able opinion of the GOP now, compared with 43 percent immediately after President Barack Obamas re-election. Democrats were viewed fa vorably by 42 per cent, also down from a year ago. The committee has deployed 17 full-time operatives to New York, Florida, California, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Texas, Georgia and Colorado with the primary mission of bring ing more Hispanics into the GOP fold. More are planned in states including Ne vada, North Carolina, Arizona, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Illinois. JOSH FUNKAssociated PressOMAHA, Neb. Oma has re chief said Mon day that people have died in an explosion and partial building col lapse at an animal feed processing plant, but he would not give a specic number of deaths. Interim Omaha Fire Chief Bernie Kanger said crews have stopped rescue efforts and will start a slower recovery effort to retrieve victims. The International Nutrition plant is unstable, so res cuers must work deliberately to ensure their safety, he said. Thirty-eight people were inside when the ex plosion occurred Monday morning. Ten were taken to hospitals and four are in critical condition. Its unclear how many people got out without being hurt. The cause of the blast has not yet been deter mined, but Kanger said there were no hazardous chemicals at the plant. Plant worker Nate Lewis, 21, said he was on the rst oor when he heard the blast. The building went dark, so he used light from his cell phone to make his way across the production oor to safety outside. I was a production line worker, although I dont know if I want to be that anymore, said Lewis, whos worked at International Nutrition for about four months. There appears to be structural damage to the top of the building, which sits in an indus trial area visible from Interstate 80, which bisects Nebraskas largest city. There are no residences nearby and no other buildings were evacuat ed after the explosion. Jamar White said he heard a loud crack and then looked up to see the back wall of the building collapsing. I ran at least 150 feet, White said. I ran far enough to make sure nothing else would keep falling.Fatalities reported in Omaha plant explosion NATI HARNIK / AP Fireghters stage outside the International Nutrition plant in Omaha, Neb., where a re and explosion took place.

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties CANADIAN MEDSSave up to 80%on Your Meds Prices352-633-3301Call for a FREE quote today. WE MATCH LOCAL COMPETITIONWe ship anywhere in the USA. COUPON$10.00 OFFInitial Purchase of $100.00 or More RYAN LUCAS and ZEINA KARAMAssociated PressGENEVA A last-minute U.N. invitation for Iran to join this weeks Syria peace talks threw the long-awaited Geneva conference into doubt Monday, forcing U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon to rescind his offer under intense U.S. pressure after the opposition threatened to boycott. With the invitation withdrawn, the main Western-backed opposition group said it would attend the talks aimed at ending Syrias ruinous three-year civ il war. The opposition said the conference should seek to estab lish a transitional gov ernment with full executive powers in which killers and criminals do not participate. The surprise invitation, extended Sun day by the U.N. sec retary-general, set off a urry of diplomatic activity to salvage the talks. The U.S. said the offer should be re scinded, and the op position threatened to skip the event entirely. The conference is set to begin Wednesday in the Swiss luxury re sort city of Montreux, with high-ranking del egations from the United States, Russia and close to 40 oth er countries attending. Face-to-face negotiations between the Syr ian government and its opponents the rst of the uprising are to start Friday in Geneva. The uproar over Irans invitation put the entire event at risk of being scuttled. The Syrian Nation al Coalition, which had voted late Saturday to attend after months of rancorous debate, issued an ultimatum, saying that Iran must commit publicly with in hours to withdraw its troops and militias from Syria and abide by a 2012 roadmap to establish a transitional government. Other wise, the group said, the U.N. should with draw its invitation for Tehran to take part. The confusion sur rounding the Iranian invitation underscored the tenuous nature of the diplomatic effort to end the bloody conict, which has mor phed from peaceful protests into a vicious civil war with outside powers backing rebels who are ghting not only the government but rival insurgents as well. It is not clear what exactly motivated Ban to issue the invitation, but it came hours after he said he had received assurances from Tehran that it accepted the premise of the talks. Syria has been ruled by President Bashar Assads family since 1970, and Iran is As sads strongest regional ally, supplying his government with ad visers, money and ma teriel since the upris ing began in 2011. The Islamic Republics allies, most notably the Lebanese Shiite militant group Hezbollah, have also gone to Syria to help bolster Assads forces. The last-minute invi tation appeared to take the U.S. and its Euro pean allies by surprise. An Iranian statement said Iran had accepted the offer without any pre-conditions. a bus. Russias National An ti-Terrorism Committee said Monday it was studying the video and would have no immediate comment. The video couldnt be viewed in Russia, where Inter net providers cut ac cess to it under a law that bans the dissemi nation of extremist materials. In Washington, a Pentagon spokesman Monday said the U.S. has offered support to the Russian government as it conducts se curity preparations for the Winter Olympics. Rear Adm. John Kirby said the U.S. will offer air and naval support, including two Navy ships in the Black Sea, to be available if re quested for all manner of contingencies, in consultation with the Russian government. The video was released by the Vilayat Dagestan, one of the units that make up the so-called Caucasus Emirate, an umbrella group for the rebels seeking to establish an independent Islamic state in the North Cau casus. Doku Umarov, a Chechen warlord who leads the Emirate, had ordered a halt to at tacks on civilian tar gets in 2012. But he re scinded that order in July, urging his follow ers to strike the Sochi Olympics, which he denounced as satanic dances on the bones of our ancestors. The games run from Feb. 7-23. The Kremlin-backed leader of Chechnya claimed last week that Umarov was dead, but the claim couldnt be veried. The Vilayat Dagestan statement said the Volgograd at tacks were carried out in part because of Umarovs order, but it didnt specically say he had ordered them. Dagestan has become the center of an Islamic insurgency that has engulfed Russias North Caucasus after two separatist wars in Chechnya. Militants seeking to create an independent state gov erned by Islamic Shariah law in the Caucasus launch daily attacks on police and other authorities there. One of the two ethnic Chechen brothers accused of staging the Boston Marathon bombings spent six months in Dagestan in 2012. Andrei Soldatov, an independent Moscow-based security an alyst, said the video threat need to be taken seriously. They have capabilities to strike beyond the North Caucasus, which they demon strated in Volgograd, he said. Its extremely difcult to stop a lone wolf suicide bombing attack. VLADIMIR ISACHENKOVAssociated PressMOSCOW Russias counter-ter rorism agency says its studying a vid eo posted by an Is lamic militant group that asserted responsibility for sui cide bombings that killed 34 people last month and is threat ening to strike the Winter Olympics in Sochi. Security experts say the Russians are right in taking the threat seriously. The video was posted online Sunday by a militant group in Dages tan, a predomi nantly Muslim re public in Russias volatile North Cau casus. The Olympic host city of Sochi lies only 500 kilometers (300 miles) west of Dagestan. Two Russian-speaking men featured in the vid eo are identied as members of Ansar al-Sunna, the name of a Jihadist group operating in Iraq. It was unclear whether the men in the video had received funding or training from that group or only adopted its name. There was no con firmation the two men were the suicide bombers who struck the southern Russian city of Vol gograd last month as the video claims. Scores of people were also injured by the bombings of a train station and Russians study Islamic video threatening Olympics AP PHOTO This image made from a video posted online by an Islamic militant group shows two men, identied as Suleiman and Abdurakhman. The group asserted responsibility for the suicide bombings that killed 34 people in Volgograd, Russia.UN rescinds invitation to Iran to attend talks AP PHOTO The United Nations Security Council meets at U.N. headquarters on Monday.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9

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The majority of victims have no symptons.ABDOMINAL ULTRASOUND..............$95Helps identify cancers/disease of the liver, pancreas, kidneys, gallbladder and spleen.THYROID ULTRASOUND...................$40Scan to rule out cysts, nodules, goiters & tumors.ALL RESULTS & FILMS MAILED TO YOU IN 2 WEEKS. BLOOD TESTS: CHOLESTEROL/GLUCOSE-$35; AIC-$35; H-PYLORI-$35 Schedule individual tests or GET ALL SIX and SAVE BIG:COMPLETE EVALUATIONAll Six Ultrasounds$179Call for appointment and directions 1-888-667-7587JANUARY 22NDJANUARY 27THJANUARY 29THFEBRUARY 3RDFEBRUARY 4THBushnell, Blueberry Hill RVTavares Civic CenterWildwood, Continental CCLk. Panasoffkee Community Ctr.Eustis Community Ctr. ILYA GRIDNEFFAssociated PressBOR, South Sudan Bor is a ghost town. Every shop is looted and empty. Bodies lie on the ground, and En glish-language grafti curses the ethnic group of the South Sudanese president. Near the airport, the road is littered with trash. Shipping containers are pried open and their contents ransacked. Once held by the rebels at tempting to overthrow South Sudans government, the city was taken back by the mili tary over the weekend with the help of Ugandan troops. More cities are falling back under government control af ter a conict that began Dec. 15 saw rebels gain control of several key cities. The government said Mon day it has also regained control of Malakal, the capital of the oil-producing Upper Nile state, though the U.N. said its base there took re, wounding nearly three dozen people and damaging the hospital. Thousands have been killed and an estimated half million people have ed the ghting, which pits the government of President Salva Kiir, an eth nic Dinka, against former Vice President Riek Machar, an ethnic Nuer. Negotiators for Kiir and Machar said over the week end that a cease-re was close at hand. But a Twitter feed believed to be controlled by Machar said Monday there wont be a cease-re until Ugandan troops supporting the government leave and po litical detainees are released. FRANK JORDANSAssociated PressBERLIN Waking up after almost three years of hibernation, a com et-chasing spacecraft sent its rst signal back to Earth on Monday, prompting cheers from scientists who hope to use it to land the rst space lander onto a comet. The European Space Agency received the allclear message from its Rosetta spacecraft at 7:18 / p.m. a message that had to travel some 500 million miles. In keeping with the agencys effort to turn the tense wait for a sig nal into a social media event, the probe triggered a series of Hello World! tweets in differ ent languages. Dormant systems on the unmanned space craft were switched back on in preparation for the nal stage of its decade-long mis sion to rendezvous with the comet named 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Systems had been powered down in 2011 to conserve en ergy, leaving scientists in the dark about the probes fate until now. Because of the time it took Rosetta to wake up, and the long distance between the spacecraft and Earth, the ear liest possible hour for a signal to arrive was 6:30 / p.m. I think its been the longest hour of my life, said Andrea Accomazzo, the space crafts operations manager at ESAs mission control room in Darm stadt, Germany. Now we have it back. Scientists will now take control of Roset ta again, a procedure slowed by the 45 min utes it takes a signal to travel to or from the spacecraft, he said. The wake-up call is one of the nal mile stones for Rosetta before it makes its rendezvous with comet 67P in the summer. The probe will then y a series of complicated ma neuvers to observe the comet a lump of rock and ice about four kilo meters (2.5 miles) in di ameter before drop ping a lander called Philae onto its icy sur face in November. The lander will dig up samples and analyze them with its instru ments. In S. Sudan, rebel-held town of Bor destroyedComet-chasing probe wakes up, signals Earth AP PHOTO Technicians celebrate after receiving the Rosetta wake up signal in the control room of European Space Agency in Darmstadt, Germany.

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A11 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I ndividually, the concrete steps President Obama an nounced Friday toward re forming the National Security Agencys surveillance programs were modest. Taken together, though, they signal the end of an era of unfettered escalation in U.S. intelligence-gathering. Since its establishment in 1952, the NSAs history has been one of almost nonstop expansion. But for most of that time, the agency still faced limits on what kind of information it could gather and in the legal strictures that governed its programs. That changed after the ter rorist attacks of 2001, which prompted then-President George W. Bush to demand an all-out effort to collect every scrap of information available. His order came at a time when the Internet, email, instant messaging and low-cost voice communications were pouring an unprecedented amount of private information into a global electronic network, available for sophisticated eavesdroppers to tap. Bush brushed aside legal constraints and ordered the NSA to collect domestic telephone and email communications without court warrants. Later, Congress and the Foreign Intelligence Sur veillance Court legalized much of that program retroactively, including the NSAs collection of domestic telephone call records, known as metadata. The principle driving intelligence-gather ing had become collect rst, ask questions later. Obamas proposals are step back from that rule. The president didnt cancel any existing surveillance programs; indeed, he reafrmed the governments argument that telephone metadata should still be collected though with new safeguards. To many civil liberties advocates, his cautious moves were disappointing. But while Obamas practical steps were small, the conceptual steps were large. Instead of accepting the doctrine that a global war against terrorists justies almost any expansion of information-gathering, he said the entire U.S. intelligence enterprise should be subject to more public scrutiny and more stringent cost-benet tests. The power of new technologies means that there are fewer and fewer technical constraints on what we can do, Obama said. That places a special obligation on us to ask tough questions about what we should do. The immediate practical effects of asking those questions will be few. The telephone metadata will still be there and still, for the time being, held in one big database at the NSA. But analysts who want to check U.S. telephone records of anyone suspicious will now need per mission in each case from the federal surveillance court. A second Obama innovation the idea that the NSA should treat foreigners the same way it treats Americans when it comes to privacy is a revolutionary idea within the intelligence community, which is used to drawing a clear line between us and them. But it wont shield foreigners from being subjects of U.S. surveillance, unless they are on the short list of a few dozen allied leaders whose phones wont be tapped. The larger impact, over the long term, may come from a less obvious part of Obamas reforms: his directives that intelligence agencies, including the NSA, face more stringent over sight, and that the FISA court make public its decisions affecting privacy rights. Finally, Obamas new positions may help change the debate in Congress over the NSAs powers. The president said that although the government should collect telephone metadata, in the long run, it shouldnt be the one to hold it. That almost cer tainly means a vigorous debate in Congress as surveillance programs come up for reauthorization during the next two years. Some advocates for NSA reform in Congress, including Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., praised Obamas speech for reinvigorating that debate, even though it fell short of their wish list in other respects. A year ago, before NSA renegade Edward Snowden revealed dozens of once-secret programs, these issues were almost entirely unknown, even to members of Congress. Even a month ago, momentum toward NSA reform appeared to have stalled. But with Obamas speech Friday, it seems certain the issues will have a full airing, and the president has made clear where he stands. The era in which a president could order the NSA to expand surveillance programs with little oversight from Congress and no scrutiny from the public is over. Thats a big change, and a good one.Doyle McManus is a columnist for The Los Angeles Times. Readers may send him email at doyle.mcmanus@latimes.OTHERVOICES Doyle McManusMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE President Obama steps back from unfettered surveillance The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Friday night at 9, millions of Americans sat in front of their televisions and watch the tropical police drama Hawaii Five-0 on their local CBS station. And over the next week, roughly 3 million more will watch the show on their own schedule. Thats an un remarkable statistic today, considering that half of American homes have a digital vid eo recorder. But until Jan. 17, 1984, it was an open question whether consumer electron ics companies would even be allowed to sell such devices. On that day, a divided Supreme Court over ruled the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and declared that Sony could continue to sell its Betamax videocassette recorder despite the objections of two large Hollywood stu dios, Universal and Disney. Its an anniversary worth celebrating because it helped clear the way for a multitude of new technologies that have increased the demand for creative works. Justice John Paul Stevens majority opinion in Sony Corp. of America v. Universal laid down at least two important principles for future innovators. First, even if people copied an entire show, it wasnt an infringement if they were doing so to watch the program later. And second, if a product had a substantial legitimate use (such as time-shifting shows that are broadcast free over the air), it could be sold even if some buyers put it to illegitimate use (such as making copies of shows to rent or sell). But just as important, Stevens declined to expand copyright law to restrict new capabilities Congress hadnt contemplated when it wrote the copyright statute. Betamax eventually lost the format war to VHS recorders, but its courtroom triumph helped all such devices proliferate. Recorders soon became the foundation for the home video business, which turned into Holly woods largest cash cow. The ruling opened the door for TiVo and other digital gadgetry in the home, then helped defend an assortment of Web-based services with both infringing and non-infringing uses, such as YouTube and other user-generated content sites and Dropbox and other online storage services. As new technologies emerge, however, so do legal questions that Stevens opinion doesnt answer. Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case brought by the major broadcast networks against Aereo, a compa ny that erects an array of tiny TV antennas on its property that subscribers use to tune in broadcasts on their computers, tablets and smartphones. For now, its enough to note that it could prove as important to cloudbased services as the Betamax case was to new devices in the home.Provided by MCT.AVOICE84 Betamax ruling set a big precedent Editors Note: Gary Trudeau is on vacation this week. Enjoy these strips from 2012.

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www.Leesburgdermatologyandmohssurgery.comEast Main StreetPine StreetEast Dixie AvenueLeesburg DERMATOLOGY & MOHS Surgery Leesburg Regional Medical Center S. Lake StreetJohnny Gurgen, DO FAOCDBoard Certified Dermatologist & Mohs SurgeonAward Winning Author & Lecturer of multiple World Renowned Dermatologic Publications. SPECIALIZING IN: rfnt bt t tt t NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTSMost Insurance Plans Accepted Medicare Accepted ttt t tt ttt tttt ttt tttt SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014www.dailycommercial.com TENNIS: Federer storms into quarternals / B3 JEFF SCHWEERSThe Gainesville SunGAINESVILLE In a ground oor lab of the New Engineering Building at the Univer sity of Florida, radiol ogist Keith Peters and mechanical engineer Ghatu Subhash are building the football helmet of the future. Theyve spent sev eral months dropping weights onto differ ent types of foam pad ding material to test their impact absorption rates in the Center for Dynamic Response of Advanced Materials and tinkering with a system of uid-lled reservoirs they say will absorb more blunt force than traditional materials. Still in the early stag es of development, they arent ready to test it on humans yet. But they are optimistic that their design will work and eventually replace the kind of padding used in todays football helmets and other protective headgear.w The inspiration came from watching the ille gal street-racing ick Fast 2 Furious, Peters said. In one scene, a car crashes into a barrier of water-lled canisters. Helmet designers at UF aim to reduce head injuriesPeters shows variations on a graph of the amount of impact absorbed by different helmet linings, on Jan. 10 at the College of Engineering at the University of Florida. Large signs advertising the Super Bowl are seen on 42nd Street by Times Square on Monday in New York. Preparations for fan venues and activities for the upcoming Super Bowl are starting to appear along several blocks of Broadway, part of which has been dubbed Super Bowl Boulevard. CRAIG RUTTLE / AP RICK FREEMANAssociated PressNEW YORK Workers hung in harnesses, putting the nishing touches on a sponsors billboard high above Broadway. A few blocks north, in Times Square, a three-sto ry stage festooned with Fox Sports logos towered over the crossroads of the world. Below, the pedestrian plazas stayed relatively calm and uncrowded for now beneath blinking ads, most of which refer enced the Super Bowl as New York spent a mellow MLK Monday pre paring to host the biggest event in sports. The Feb. 2 championship game, between Seattle and Denver, is still almost two weeks away, and while there will be all sorts of events sur rounding the game throughout the NYC and NJ prep for Super Bowl on calm MLK MondayCops advise fans to expect huge trafc jams and to use public transportation, if possibleSEE SUPER | B2 NFL PHOTOS BY ERICA BROUGH / GAINESVILLE SUN Keith Peters, MD, of the Department of Radiology at the University of Floridas College of Medicine, and Ghatu Subhash, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering seek to patent a different kind of football helmet that uses inatable/deatable padding. SEE HELMET | B2 TODD KIRKLAND / AP Miami Heat power forward Chris Andersen (11) shoots as he is defended by Atlanta Hawks power forward Elton Brand (42) and power forward Mike Scott (32) on Sunday in Atlanta. CHARLES ODUMAP Sports WriterATLANTA Paul Millsap scored 26 points and the Atlanta Hawks overcame LeBron James 30 points to beat the Miami Heat 121-114 on Mon day night. DeMarre Carroll added 19 points and Pero Antic had 17 for the Hawks, who snapped a nine-game losing streak in their series with the Heat. Chris Bosh had 21 points for Miami, which was without Dwyane Wade for the second straight game. James sank back-toback 3-pointers mid way through the nal period to give Miami its rst lead of the second half at 107104. The Hawks regrouped to lead 112108 following two free throws by Millsap. The Hawks led 116111 when a missed layup by Atlantas Shelvin Mack set up James three-point play to cut the lead to two points. Kyle Korver, who had 12 points, answered with a 3-pointer. James had a turn over on a bad pass and a missed 3-pointer on Miamis next two pos sessions. Atlanta took its rst win over Miami since Jan 2, 2012 and its rst home win in the series since Nov. 18, 2009. The Hawks led the Millsap has 26, Hawks hold off Heat 121-114SEE HEAT | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 20 .500 Brooklyn 17 22 .436 2 New York 15 26 .366 5 Boston 14 28 .333 7 Philadelphia 13 28 .317 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 29 12 .707 Atlanta 21 19 .525 7 Washington 20 20 .500 8 Charlotte 18 25 .419 12 Orlando 11 30 .268 18 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 32 7 .821 Chicago 19 20 .487 13 Detroit 17 24 .415 16 Cleveland 15 26 .366 18 Milwaukee 7 33 .175 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 32 9 .780 Houston 27 15 .643 5 Dallas 25 18 .581 8 Memphis 20 20 .500 11 New Orleans 16 24 .400 15 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 31 9 .775 Oklahoma City 31 10 .756 Denver 20 20 .500 11 Minnesota 19 21 .475 12 Utah 14 28 .333 18 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 29 14 .674 Golden State 26 16 .619 2 Phoenix 23 17 .575 4 L.A. Lakers 16 25 .390 12 Sacramento 14 25 .359 13 Sundays Games L.A. Lakers 112, Toronto 106 Orlando 93, Boston 91 Oklahoma City 108, Sacramento 93 San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 82 Phoenix 117, Denver 103 Mondays Games Dallas 102, Cleveland 97 L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103 Washington 107, Philadelphia 99 Charlotte 100, Toronto 95 Brooklyn 103, New York 80 New Orleans 95, Memphis 92 Atlanta 121, Miami 114 L.A. Lakers at Chicago, late Portland at Houston, late Indiana at Golden State, late Todays Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. Wednesdays Games Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m. Boston at Washington, 7 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Dallas at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 8 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 49 31 15 3 65 141 109 Tampa Bay 50 29 16 5 63 146 123 Montreal 49 27 17 5 59 126 120 Toronto 50 25 20 5 55 141 152 Detroit 48 21 17 10 52 121 130 Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51 139 155 Florida 48 18 23 7 43 111 147 Buffalo 47 13 27 7 33 86 133 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 48 34 12 2 70 156 115 N.Y. Rangers 51 27 21 3 57 128 128 Philadelphia 50 25 19 6 56 137 144 Columbus 48 24 20 4 52 138 135 Washington 49 22 19 8 52 142 150 New Jersey 50 20 19 11 51 115 123 Carolina 48 20 19 9 49 117 137 N.Y. Islanders 51 20 24 7 47 142 166 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 51 32 8 11 75 184 139 St. Louis 47 32 10 5 69 166 107 Colorado 48 31 12 5 67 142 122 Minnesota 51 27 19 5 59 125 125 Dallas 48 21 19 8 50 136 148 Nashville 50 21 22 7 49 121 151 Winnipeg 50 22 23 5 49 141 150 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79 175 126 San Jose 49 31 12 6 68 158 121 Los Angeles 50 29 15 6 64 128 103 Vancouver 50 25 16 9 59 127 127 Phoenix 48 23 16 9 55 139 145 Calgary 49 16 26 7 39 109 156 Edmonton 51 15 30 6 36 131 181 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Sundays Games Chicago 3, Boston 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 1 Mondays Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 3, SO Boston 3, Los Angeles 2 Florida at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Detroit, late Dallas at Nashville, late Toronto at Phoenix, late Calgary at San Jose, late Todays Games Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m. St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 8 p.m. Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Wednesdays Games Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Mondays Sports Transactions BASEBALL National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS Signed 1B Lyle Overbay to a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS Agreed to terms with RHP Dillon Gee on a one-year contract. Signed LHP John Lannan to a minor league contract. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Signed RHP Dustin Crenshaw. LAREDO LEMURS Signed RHP Kenny McDowall. WICHITA WINGNUTS Signed INF Colt Loehrs. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS Signed INF Richard Arias. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS Re-signed F Cartier Martin to a second 10-day contract. HOUSTON ROCKETS Reassigned G Isaiah Canaan to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). WASHINGTON WIZARDS Assigned G Glen Rice to Iowa (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League WASHINGTON REDSKINS Named Ike Hilliard receivers coach. Canadian Football League CALGARY STAMPEDERS Re-signed CB Fred Bennett. HOCKEY National Hockey League MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Jonathon Blum and G Johan Gustafsson from Iowa (AHL). ECHL READING ROYALS Announced F Josh Brittain was loaned to the team by Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE CHOWAN Named Lindsay Austin assistant trainer. ELON Named Damian Wroblewski offensive coordinator and offensive line coach. INDIANA Named Brian Knorr defensive coordinator. SOUTH DAKOTA TECH Announced it is joining the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Indiana at Michigan St. ESPN2 Kansas St. at Texas ESPNU Missouri at LSU9 p.m.ESPN Texas A&M at Kentucky ESPNU Georgia Tech at Boston College FS1 Butler at ProvidenceNHL HOCKEY 8 p.m.NBCSN Minnesota at DallasTENNIS 9 p.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, quarternals, at Melbourne, Australia3:30 a.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, mens or womens quarternal, at Melbourne, AustraliaWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.FS1 Oklahoma at Iowa St. metropolitan area of nearly 20 million, the anticipation hasnt quite started to spike yet. It takes more than a big ballgame to get New York City excited. New Jersey, too, where everyones still steamed up over alle gations that top aides to Gov. Chris Christie orchestrated traf c jams in a northern New Jersey town, Fort Lee, by blocking off lanes to the George Washington Bridge. Unintentional trafc jams are a concern every day in the region, let alone with an inux of vis itors expected and a big game day crowd anticipated at the Meadowlands sports complex. Crowding in Times Square is always a given, too. To the point that New York ers make a point of avoiding the area at all costs. But on Monday with most people off from work for the Martin Luther King holiday and the Bron cos and Seahawks basking in their con ference championships back at home most of midtown was calm. One pocket of ener gy could be found in Macys, where a tem porary NFL store is set up to sell tiny Statues of Liberty splashed with Super Bowl lo gos, NFL shield hats in various colors, helmets in every size from big enough to protect a golf ball to the real thing, and vir tually anything else NFL-related. Next week is when Broadway turns into a fan fest, concerts happen in all ve bor oughs as well as New Jersey, where the game will actually be played and LeBron James and the Heat take a rare undercard role when they visit Madison Square Gar den and the Knicks. Monday afternoon, though, workers and security guards outnumbered customers. Imani Williamson tossed a miniature football in the air to herself and beamed at visitors as they entered Macys. When it gets busier later, her job will be to greet fans, ask where theyre from, and make them feel welcome. Asked if she had seen any crowds yet, the 22-year old ringer on temporary Super Bowl duty said No, not yet. Deeper in the store, Julie Maner commanded a well trafcked corner where whimsical, cartoonish Super Bowl posters by pop artist Charles Fazzino were on sale. She has gone to every Super Bowl since the 2003 game in San Diego representing the artist. Usually, she says, she has a booth at the NFL Experience, a fan expo that has been modied for the New York game. Most of that events activi ties will be relocated to Broadway as part of the leagues Super Bowl Boulevard sending retailers indoors to Macys. Maner wasnt sure if that would help or hurt sales, but she will have more days to sell the posters, 3D decorated helmets and other works by Fazz ino some of which cost almost as much as game tickets. On Monday, she had just sold a poster to a German couple who wanted a souvenir before returning home, but was expecting to do most of her busi ness next week. The out-of-towners dont come un til next week, Maner said. I dont know if its going to be bus ier than usual or light er than usual. SUPER FROM PAGE B1 The water explodes out of the canisters, dissi pating the energy from the impact. Unfortunately, that kind of impact barrier is a one-shot deal, he said. Instead, Peters and Subhash devised a system combining a uid-lled reservoir con nected to an empty reservoir. When something hits the uid-lled container, the uid shoots into the empty reservoir, then slowly oozes back into the container, thus softening the impact dramatically. The device is not re ally different in size to standard padding, Peters said. This is using simple technology that should be able to t to gether nicely (inside a helmet). The technology is based in part on the work that Subhash has done over the last 15 years in improving pro tective gear for soldiers, reghters and others in high-risk situations. Their tests have shown that their uid-lled pads absorb ve times the impact of traditional padding. They estimate one to two years before such a product is functional and ready to be pro duced to retrot helmets. The padding decreases the direct im pact from a blow to the head. But it doesnt deal with the torquing, or rotational, impact from glancing blows. Once Subhash and Peters perfect their pad ding system, they will set their sights on de signing the outer shell. Preventing rotational impact would require a redesign of the helmet itself, Subhash said. Subhash has been drawing schematics but has not gotten to developing a prototype helmet yet. Testing has been delayed and an infusion of investor dollars is needed to get them to the next level, Subhash said. But they are hop ing the NFL and oth er sports organizations will take an interest in their research. Peters and Subhash estimate their designs could reduce head injuries by 40 percent or more. That is a lot to consid er, given that 340,000 sports-related traumatic brain injuries oc cur each year, some of them permanent, according to the Cen ters for Disease wControl and Prevention. And professional football players are struck in the head or neck at least once a game, Pe ters said. Last year, the NFL agreed to pay out $765 million to settle a con cussion lawsuit by 4,500 former players. The time has come to revolutionize helmets, they said. While helmets have evolved to protect heads from a deadly knee or elbow penetration to the skull, Peters said, there has been no advance in concussion protection since the early 20th century. And they believe their improvements can be made inexpensively, for any type of helmet bicycle, football, po lice and re protection. The whole point is to make it less expensive, to put it into small strips that could go into a helmet, Subhash said. HELMET FROM PAGE B1 Heat by 12 points at 5745 late in the high-scor ing rst half and kept a 97-92 advantage enter ing the nal period. Miami appeared bound for its eighth comeback from dou ble-digit decits of the season. With a large portion of the Atlanta crowd chanting Lets go, Heat! James sank a 3-pointer with 7:06 re maining for a 104-all tie. James sank anoth er jumper on Miamis next possession to give the Heat the lead. Carrolls 3-pointer for Atlanta tied the game at 107. Miami took its last lead when Mario Chalmers, who had 17 points, made one of two free throws. Wade, who missed his second straight game, said before the game there is still a little soreness in his knees. Some players on each team wore purple shoes on Martin Luther King Day in Kings hometown. Both teams and the ofcials wore Dream Big logos on their warm-up shirts. Kings daughter, Ber nice King, delivered a brief message before the game. The Hawks led 71-70 at halftime, setting a season high for points in a half and points al lowed by a Miami opponent in a half. The Heat matched their season high for points in a half. It was only the second time in Miamis franchise history both teams had at least 70 points in a half. Antic had 12 points in the half but was called for two fouls in the rst two minutes of the sec ond half. Antic went to the bench with ve fouls. Elton Brand replaced Antic and had six points in the third period, helping the Hawks take a 97-92 lead into the nal period. Korver hit a 3-pointer to open the second period, extending to 109 his NBA record of con secutive games with a 3. James was slow to return to his feet after he was hit in the back of his head by Korver as Korver was attempt ing to block James shot with 3:18 remaining in the rst half. Korver was called for a a grant foul, but the call was overturned following a review. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 TODD KIRKLAND / AP Miami Heats Chris Andersen (11) dunks in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks on Monday in Atlanta. The Hawks won 121-114.

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 NBA NOAH TRISTERAP Sports WriterAUBURN HILLS, Mich. DeAndre Jordan had 16 points and 21 rebounds, and the Los Angeles Clippers breezed to a 112-103 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Monday. Jordan made his rst sev en shots almost all on dunks. Blake Grifn added 25 points and Jamal Crawford scored 26 for the Clip pers, who are now 6-2 since losing star point guard Chris Paul to a shoulder injury. J.J. Redick added 20 points for Los Angeles, including two four-point plays when the Pistons fouled him be yond the arc. Rodney Stuckey scored 29 points for Detroit and Josh Smith added 24, but the Pistons got almost noth ing from their starting backcourt. Brandon Jennings went scoreless and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope scored only six points. Jordan threw down a memorable dunk on Detroits Brandon Knight last March. Knight is no lon ger on the Pistons, but Jor dan put on another high light show Monday, dunking four times in the rst quarter alone. The Clippers led 6453 at halftime after shooting 66 percent from the eld. Jordan has six dou ble-doubles in the last sev en games, and his most impressive dunk of the day was probably a one-handed alley-oop from Redick in the third quarter. Jordans eyes were around rim level on that one, which gave Los An geles an 82-67 lead. Redick bounced back after a 4-for-17 showing against Indiana on Saturday. His rst four-point play put the Clippers up 38-33 in the second quarter. His second came in the third, after the Pistons had cut the lead to six and looked ready for a potential run. The last player with two four-point plays in one game was Crawford, who did it for Golden State against Denver on March 28, 2009, according to STATS. Once the Clippers pulled away, about the only fun moment for most of the crowd came when a fan seat ed courtside was drenched by a drink after the ball went sailing out of bounds right at him. Detroit trailed by as many as 20 points in the fourth. The Pistons cut the decit to nine late in the game, but Jordan punctuated a terrific day with yet another al ley-oop dunk.MAVERICKS 102, CAVS 97 CLEVELAND Monta El lis scored 22 points, Shawn Marion added 18 and the Dallas Mavericks held off a late Cleveland rally to beat the Cavaliers 102-97 on Monday. Cleveland roared back from a 24-point decit in the rst half and trailed by three with 2.8 seconds remaining, but the Cavaliers were called for a ve-second violation when Jarrett Jack failed to get the ball inbounds. Ellis put the game away with two free throws with 1.1 seconds left. Kyrie Irving led Cleveland with 26 points. Luol Deng, acquired from Chicago on Jan. 7, scored 20 points in his rst home game with the Cavaliers while Anderson Varejao had 18 points with 21 rebounds. Dirk Nowitzki scored 17 points and DeJuan Blair added 13 for the Mavericks, who had six players in double gures.WIZARDS 107, 76ERS 99WASHINGTON Bradley Beal scored 22 points with nine rebounds and eight assists, Marcin Gortat had 19 points and 11 rebounds and the Washington Wizards reached .500 for the fourth time this season with a 10799 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Monday. Each of the previous three times Washington has made it to breakeven, it has lost the next game. On Wednesday against Boston, the Wiz ards try to get over .500 for the rst time since they were 2-1 on Oct. 31, 2009. Beal missed 12 of 14 shots in Saturdays loss to Detroit but snapped back to score 13 in the second quarter and help give Washington a 6151 lead at halftime. Michael Carter-Williams led Philadelphia, which has lost seven of eight, with 31. Thaddeus Young had 18. Spencer Hawes had 11 points and tied his season high with 14 rebounds.BOBCATS 100, RAPTORS 95CHARLOTTE, N.C. Al Jefferson had 22 points and 19 rebounds Monday, and the Bobcats held on to win 100-95 and beat the Toron to Raptors for the seventh straight time in Charlotte. Jefferson became the rst Bobcats player to have a double-double in the rst quarter with 10 points and 10 rebounds, sending Char lotte to a 26-11 lead. The Bobcats stretched the lead to 30 in the third quarter but needed to withstand a furious rally by the Raptors. With point guard Kemba Walker out with a sprained ankle, Ramon Sessions and Jannero Pargo combined for 40 points on 10 of 17 shoot ing. Sessions had 23 points and was 10 of 11 from the foul line, including two free throws with 1.6 seconds left.NETS 103, KNICKS 80NEW YORK Joe Johnson scored 25 points and the Brooklyn Nets sent the Knicks to a fourth straight loss with a 103-80 victory Monday, evening this sea sons New York rivalry at a game apiece. Making a triumphant return from London, the Nets improved to 7-1 in 2014 and avenged last months blow out loss with a romp of their own. Andray Blatche had 19 points and 12 rebounds, and Alan Anderson scored 15 points for the Nets. Carmelo Anthony had 26 points and 12 rebounds for the Knicks.PELICANS 95, GRIZZLIES 92 MEMPHIS, Tenn. An thony Davis scored 21 of his 27 points in the second half and grabbed 10 rebounds as the New Orleans Peli cans snapped their eightgame losing streak with a 9592 victory over the Memphis Grizzlies on Monday. Tyreke Evans added 15 points, 11 of them in the fourth quarter. He also had seven assists. Brian Roberts scored 13 points and Eric Gor don nished with 12 for the short-handed Pelicans, who won for only the second time in January. Alexis Ajinca scored 10 points f or New Orleans. Zach Randolph led the Grizzlies with 23 points and a season-high 20 rebounds. CARLOS OSORIO / APDetroit Pistons forward Kyle Singler (25) drives on Los Angeles Clippers guard J.J. Redick (4) on Monday during the second half in Auburn Hills, Mich. Jordan, Redick lead Clippers past Pistons TENNIS JOHN PYEAP Sports WriterMELBOURNE, Australia When the draw for the Australian Open was made, it wasnt Rog er Federer who was be ing widely touted as the prime contender to claim an 18th major title. All that hype sur rounded Serena Williams, but she was knocked out in the fourth round. Federer is still three match wins away from that milestone, but after his 6-3, 7-5, 6-4 demolition of No. 10-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga on Monday night, its clear hes up for the challenge. On a day when No. 3 Maria Sharapova was upset by No. 20 Dominika Cibulkova, following topranked Williams out of the tournament and opening up the womens draw for defend ing champion Victoria Azarenka, the leading male contenders on the heavily stacked top half advanced to the quarternals. Progressing along with Federer were topranked Rafael Nadal, who had a 7-6 (3), 7-5, 7-6 (3) win over Kei Nishikori though he was broken twice and got a time violation in the third set and Wimbledon champion Andy Murray, who over came a racket-smashing, frustrating nish to the third set to beat Stephane Robert 6-1, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Now for the harder part. Federer is back in the quarternals of a Grand Slam for the rst time since last years French Open equaling Jimmy Connors Openera record with his 41st trip to the last eight in a major. He next plays Murray, a three-time Australian Open nalist. A win could set up a seminal against Nadal, who next plays rsttime major quarternalist Grigor Dimitrov. A win there for Federer would likely set up a nal against three-time defending champion No vak Djokovic the only other man who has won four Australian titles in the Open era. Djokovic is playing his quarternal Tuesday against No. 8 Stan Wawrinka. Its a tough thing to do. I dont know if its been done before, sixth-seeded Federer said of his tough road to the title. Then again, if you dont embrace that challenge, you might as well not enter the draw. You might as well stay at home and watch other guys battle it out. Thats what I like. I like playing the best ... and you need to take it to them. Federer certainly did that against Tson ga, barely dropping a point on serve in the rst set and putting the 2008 Australian Open nalist under pressure right away with an ear ly break. The 32-yearold Swiss star was so relentless that Tsonga, aggravated at not being able to threaten Feder er at all, screamed and smacked a ball into the crowd after losing an ex change of close volleys. From Tsongas side, it looked like he was fac ing the Federer of old before the crisis of con dence, the new racket, and before his record streak of reaching the quarternals at 36 consecutive majors came to a halt with a shock ing second-round defeat at Wimbledon. No, I was not sur prised because, you know, when you play Roger, you expect him at this level, Tsonga said.Federer demolishes Tsonga in straight sets, readies for quarters AARON FAVILA / AP Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates after defeating JoWilfried Tsonga of France on Monday after their fourth-round match at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne. Associated PressCome Sunday, NFL fans might see coaches Bill Belichick or Jim Harbaugh hollering at the referee and throwing a red ag on the eld to challenge a call. And this week at the Australian Open, play ers will contest rulings and then watch the results be revealed on the scoreboard. Major League Base ball made sweeping changes this week to expand its instant re play system, but the review process wont appear nearly so dramatic.THE CHALLENGE OF THE CHALLENGE: Two outs, none on, scoreless game in the bottom of the second. Batter hits a chopper in the hole, seems to beat the throw but is called out. Should his manager ask for a re view? If hes wrong, he wont have any options later when his center elder makes a diving catch with the bases loaded and the umps say the ball bounced. Or does the manager go on a sh ing expedition, talking to the ump to gauge if he has a case and giving someone in the clubhouse more time to examine replays.BYE-BYE BEEFS: Face it, the spectacle of a manager charging from the dugout, apping his arms and shouting nose-tonose at an umpire is part of baseball lore. Will replay make wild rhubarbs a thing of the past? Well, rulings that get reviewed cant be argued.HEAR AND THERE: To contest a call, a manager simply tells the crew chief in timely fashion he wants a review. CMON UMP, THAT PITCH WAS LOW!: MLB has been ad amant that no matter what, replay would never be used to call balls and strikes. Never. Too hard to tell on tape whether an 88 mph slider clipped the corner, many say. But with technology improving by the in stant, is it impossible to imagine someday? Stay tuned.MLBInstant replay: How it will work

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Simon Sez:Hardy Fruit TreesTime to Plant Purina Dealerrf787-4415 DEAR ABBY: I just read the letter from Twice Bitten in Washington (Nov. 4), who had thanked veterans for their ser vice to our country and received several negative responses. Im a retired vet, dying from Agent Orange poisoning. I served two tours in Vietnam, and when I returned from Nam, I was called a baby killer, spat upon and refused taxi service because I was in uniform. America has had a change in attitude since the Vietnam War. Today, many folks appreciate what the military is doing. I have been thanked several times while wearing my Vietnam Veterans hat and it makes me feel great, to the point my eyes water. Tell Twice Bitten to continue thanking the military vets. It means a lot, especially to vets like me. Sure beats being called a baby killer. VIETNAM VET DEAR VIETNAM VET: I received many letters like yours from Vietnam vets who were also not thanked for their service when they returned home. Like you, they very much appreciate hearing a delayed thanks for their service. I would like to thank you and all the readers who responded to that column with such emotional and sometimes gut-wrenching stories. Read on: DEAR ABBY: I would like to offer Twice an explanation for the reaction she received. I served two tours in Iraq and lost some good friends. When vets return home from war, home is a scary place. The life we lived and breathed is no longer. After spending so much time fearing the unknown and protecting ourselves physically and emotionally, we cant stop. Many of us came home feeling guilty that we lived while others died ashamed that we might not have done enough, that we should have been the one who was laid to rest, that maybe if we had looked harder, fought harder, we wouldnt have lost a soldier. When I returned home, I reacted the way Twice described. I was resentful that someone would take the time to honor me, but not the friends I lost. It was a long time before I realized that by honoring me with their sincere thanks, they were honor ing every soldier we have ever lost. Now when I am thanked, I shake hands, I hug, and I thank them for their respect. To Twice: Never stop! Do not be afraid. We are not hateful or angry. We are scared and sad. Your expression of thanks means more than any parade, any medal or any award could ever mean. BRANDON IN INDIANA DEAR ABBY: As a soon-to-beretired career Army ofcer, I am one of those who feel awkward when people thank us for doing our jobs. The Army was a career I chose, knowing the hardships and what would be asked of me. The military is lled with all kinds of people, and even though I may not always be in the mood for a stranger to approach me when Im out and about, deep down inside it is refreshing to know that what I do is appreciated. PHIL IN WASHINGTON STATE DEAR ABBY: One day while walking in a cemetery, we saw an elderly gentleman leaning on the arm of his caregiver, and we realized he was looking at a veterans memorial. My wife approached and asked if he was a veteran. He looked at her and said Yes, and she said, Thank you very much for your service and your bravery. He immediately teared up and croaked out a Thank you. His caregiver rolled her eyes. My wife got into her face and said, You have a hero on your arm, so show him some respect! The veteran cried harder, grabbed my wifes hand and said, No one has ever said that to me, ESPECIALLY my caregiver. KIMIT IN THE MIDWESTDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.comVets deserve thanks even when it seems unwelcome

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 r f ntbttfbbt bnbftbt tttfb bfbbbtttfb bbtttbt nttbbtbtt ntbntttttbt bbbtbt btttntn tt btttbbttttt tntbnttntt bb tbnbbbbtttbbt bbtbnttttb nntbttfb nbtnt nttttb ntbbnt bttbb ttbtttbbt ttrbntt tbttbttb nrntntbttt ntttbnnt ntntttttntb tntttbbtnbn tbtnttb tbttnbnnttbt t tttttbt bbb bttt tttb ntttttttnbb tbtt tbt b t b t ttb bttfbnttbt nttbtbtttt ttttttt ttbb t bn nttbttn tb nbttt tnt rf tt f r t t b n b b b n t t b b t b b t b n b t t b t t b t n t b b t b b t t t n t b n t b n b b t t b b t t b f f f frbbbbb b bb bbb tt frn btttf rtttbnttttb tnttbtbt bt nttnt tbtttb tbbbttbnt nttbntnnt ttnttntb ttbtbbnbb tnttntttbb ntttbbtbt tttnttnt nttbnb ntt bnttnt btbbt ttntr ntttbnnt nntb btttntt ntb nttbt btttnt tntntb nttntn ntbnt nttbtbt rbnttb rntt ntnt bbttt nttbt ttntt btttntt tnttnt tnttb ttbttb bnbbbbttttttb tbtbt bbttttbt tbtttttt tttntbt bbbttbtt nttbt tttnt b bttbt tttttt tbtbtnbb ttttbttbbtb bbttttbbt tttbttt tbttbbtttt bbbbbt ttntt btt bbttbt f f f bb rt tt btbnttbtn bttr tttbbbtt bntbbt bnttb ntbbrt tnttttt btnttbtbt btbt r f f f r f r btntnbntbtn bnbtntntt nttbttt nt rtbb bttbntnttb ntnntttntt ntbttbtbbnb tntt tr tt f r bttt tnbt r tbnnttbbn bbbbttbtttb bbbtbnb ttbnbnbttb ttbntbbbt btnttnt tbttt ttnt bb ttbt tbttbbnbbbbt bbbtt tbbbbt tt btt tbbbbtntb bttnt tbttttt t tb bttbt rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 rfntb fff f rf ffff fff fff rr frrrrrrr rrrrrfr frfrr rffrfrfrf ffrfrrrr frrrbfr frrffr rfrfrrfrfrr rffrfrfr fffrfrf rnbtr rfffr rrrrrrrf rrfrrfffr ffnnrrr rffrfr rffrrr rf rfrrr frrfrr frfrfrrfr rrr rrrrrrff rfrrfrrt b t r r f r f r f r f b f r f r b f r f f f r r f f r r f b r f r f r f f b f r f r b r f b n r r f r f r f r f r f r b f r f r b f r f f f r r f f r r f n r f r r f f r b f r f r b r f b b b b r r f r f r f r f f r b f r f r b r r f b b r f r f r f f r b f r f r b r f b b r r f r f r f r f f r b f r f r b r r f b r f r f r f r f b f r f r b f r f f f r r f f r f b r r f r f r f r f f b f r f r b r r f n n f r r r f r f r b f r f r b f r f r f b b n r r f r f r f r f f b f r f r b r r f f r r r f r f r b f r f r b f r f f f r r f f r f b n r r f r f r tnbbb nn rr frr rffrfrr rrrbbrfrr rrfrrr rfrfffr rffrrrf ffrnnrr frbbrff rrfrt b f r r t b b f r r f f r r f f f f r f r f r r f r r r f f f f f r f f f r r r r f f r r r f f f r r f r f f r f f f r f n n r r r f r r f r n n b r r f r f r r f r r f r r f r r f f r r r f r r r r r r r f r r f f r r b b fbfrrr b tfr rrff rf ff brrrrf rbn rr rtn nb ftbn bbb nn f r r r r f b r f r r r f f f f r f r r f f r r f r f f r r r f f r f r r r r f f f r r r f r n n b f b n n f r r r rrffrrrb b rf tfr rr ft rf frf bb frrb rrfrtnnbrrt rrff f bbb nbb tr rr n f rfrf frfrrrrrnb rrrrf nbbfr ffrff rrrrrfrff b r rrrfrrr rfrffff rrrfffrnn rrrfbbt frbfrbr ffrrfrrf rfrft b n b bb bb bnnb n n rfbb fr frrr rr rr rr ffffrr rfr f frfrrf rrr rr n frrfr rffrfrrfrr bbrfbbfr ffr ffr rfrfrrf rfrrnn rrfrf rbbtfrbbr ffrrfrrfr frfrffrfrt r b t f r f r f r f f r b f r f f b f r f f r f r f f r b f r f n b r r f r f r f r f r r f r f f n b r r f f f r r r f r f r f f r r r r r f n n b n r r f r r f f r b f f r b f r f r r f r f r r f f r b f f r b f r f r r r r f n r b n r r f r f f r r f f r t f r f r b f r f r b f r f f b f r r f f f r r r f f t f r f r f r f f r b f r f r b r r f f r f r f r f r b f r f r b r f n b r r f r r f r f f r f r r f r f f r b r r f r f f r f r f f r f f r r r f r f r r f r f f r f f r f r r r r f n b n r r f r f r f r r f r f r b f r f r b r r f r f r r f f r b f r f r b r f r r f f f n b b f r f f r r r f n b b r b r r f r f r f f f r r n n b f f f r f r bffrrb rff t rr f bbb f r r f f r r f f f f r f r f r r f r r r f f f f f r f f f r r r r f r f f f r r f r f f n n r r r f r f r f r r f r t n n b f f f f r r f f r f r r f f r r b n n b rr rff rtrrrbb rtt frrr fffb nb nb bn f bbb rtbb tb frfff rfrfrfb fr frrfrr rrfrfffrr frrrfr rrfrrrrr rrfrf rfrf frfr rfrrrr frfffrrfr rrfr rrfrrrrr rrfr rr f rrrrrbbbrrr rfbbfr ffrn frffrrf rfff rrrrrff rrrfrrr rfb nn bbtf rbbrffrr frrfr ft b b b b b b b r rfrrr r rrfrr rr ffrfrrrr rrrrfff rrrrrrrrrr frrrrrr rrrfrfrr frrff rfrrrr f fff rr n frrf rffrfrrr ffrrbrftb frffr frf f r rrfr rrr rr frrrr ffrf rrrrrr rrfffrrr rrrrrrrfr rrrrrrrrf rfrrfrrf frfr rrr ffff rfrrrrf rffrrfffr nnrrrrf fbbfrnb rffrrfrrf rrffrfrt bb b b n n bnb b bb frrrfrrff rrrrrrfrfr rrrrrrf frrrfrfr frrr rrfr rrrffff rfrrff rffffrfrt rfrrfrfnn rrrfrf rfrrfrt nnbfrrr ffrfrrrr bnnbffr bnnfrrr rfrrrb rfrf t rr f bbb rfrffrrf rrrf fffrrrfr ffrrb rrrrf frrrrrrr ffrrrrrrf bfb rr rrff t rr frr brrr rf frf ftb bb tbnb ffff fff rr t f r f r f r n f r f f r b b b f r r n f r f f r b b b ff rfrrrbnf frfrfrfrff frrfft b n n rrrffr rrfrrrrrr rfb bb rr rrrf rrrrfrrbb rrbr ffrff rrfrrrf frrt rrffrrf ft fnnnrbff rrffrrrf rfrffrb rffrff frrrrr frfrrrrfr frrrfrr rrrfrfrr rrrrf rrrr rfr frff frfrf rfrrfrf frfrfr r rrrfrr rrrfrfr rfrfrfr rrrrrffr r rfrrrr ffrfffrr ffrfrrf rrfrnnrrr rbbtfr bfrb rtfrrbnb rr rff rff r rr frrff rrffffrf rfrrfr rrfffffrfff rrrrfr fffrrfrf frfrr fnnrrr frrfrnnb rrfrfrrf rrfrrfrr ffrrrfrr rrrrr frrffrrbb fb bbb fr nnr bbtfrbfr brffrrfrr frft b b b f r r f f r r f f f f r f r f r r f r r r f f f f f r f f f r r r r f f f f r r f r f f n n r r r f r f r f r r f r t n n b f f f f r r f r r f r f r r f f r r b n n b rbfb rrf t rr rt frrf brr rb frrf rrfrnnn rtnbn frrtbb bn ftbb bbb n rftbbnb rr frfrr rbfrrrbrrr rfbbnbfr ffrnf rffrr r rrrrrf frfrrrr b n r rr f rffrfrrfrb brrrbf rffr frffrr nr n n brr rrrrrrfr frfrrr rfrrf ffrnnbr ffrrbb frbbrff rrfrrf rft b n n b rfrrr frrfrr frfrfrrfr rrr rrr rbfb rr rfrf t rr f r r f f r r f f f f r f r f r r f r r r f f f f r f f f r r r r f r f f f f r f r r f r f r r f r r f r r f r r f f r r r f r r r r r r r f r f r r t n n b rt frfr frf b r ffb rrfrtnbbb tnbbbb bbbn ftb bbb tbb fffffff rr tfr b bb ff rfrrrbnf frfrfrfrff frrfft b nnnf rrffrff rrrffr rrfrrrrrr rfrffrrf rrrf fffrrrfr ffrrb rrrrf frrrrrrr ffrrrrrrf bfb rr rrff t rr frr brrr rf frf ft bb nbbbn r rr n f rfrf frfrrrrrnb rrrrf nbbbnfr ffrff rr b rrr rfrrrrf rffffrrr fffrnnrr rfbbtfrb frbrff rrfrrfr frft bnb f r r r r f b r f r r r f f f f r f r r f f r r f r f f r r r f f r f r r r r f f f r r r f r n n b f b n n f r r r rrffb b rf t rr ft rf frf bb frrb rrfrtnnbrrt rrff fn bbb tbnb r rr frrrrf rrbb rrrrr bnbrffr ffrr rr rrrrrfrf frrfrrr ffrrt n n n rfrrrf rrfffrrf ffrnnrrrr bbtfrbf brf rrrfrr frrfrfrfrr frrrr rrr rtbb rfrff t ffrfrfr nnrffrn ffb frrr rrfrrfr ffffr frrrrf ffrrfrr rfrfrfffr nnrrrr rrfrnbb nnbfbnnf rrr rfrrr ffrr rffffffr frrf frfr frfrrf rfrfffrnn rrrrrfr nbfrbnn bfrbnn frrr frrfrr rrrfrrrf rfffrrf rrfrrfr rfrrrrrr rrrrfffr rrfrr fffrnnrr rrrfrnb bnnbfbnn frrr rrffrffrrfrf rffrrff rfrrrrrfr rrrfrrf rrfrrffrr rrfrrffrrr ffffr frrfffrnnr rrnb bnnfbnnb frrr ftn bbb rrrbbn rrrftrffb rrrfrr frrrrn rfrrfrr rrfrffr rrrrrfrrr frfrrf rrbt rrr rrf fbb bb

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B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 r r f ntb rf tnnn n ttttt tnnn ftnntttn tn nntnnb tnt ntttttn tttttt ntnttn nfnttntnttnttn tntn nntnnb tnt ntttttn tttttt ntnttn nfnttntnttnttn tn ttn f frn tttttttt ntt t ttttn nn ttttt tttnttt ntttntnt nf f rff tt tnttnnt nt f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r r f r f r f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f t t n n t t n t t n t t t t t n t n t n n n t t n t t t t t n t n f t t n t t n t t t n t t n t t t t t tt t tttt ft ff ttft f f tntttttnt ntnnttt ntttt tttt ftftttt ftft t ttnnntttt ttt ttntttntn tn nt ttnn ttnn ntnnttn ttntntn nnnttttt ntttftfttnttnt ftnntt ttntttt ntttt nn tntntt tntt nttttt t tnnnttnt nntt ntttnttn tttntnt ntnttnt ntt nnttt ttnt nt ffn ntt n t t t f t n t n t t t t n t t t n t t n t n f t n t t t t t t t t t n t t t n n f t n t t n t t t t t n t n t t t n n t t n n f t n t t n t t t t t f n t t t t f n t t t f t n t t n t t t f n n f t n t t n t n t t t t t t t n t t t t f t t t t n t t t t n n f t n t t t t t t n t t f t n t t n t n t t t t t t n t t t t t n t t t t ntnntnt tttttnttn tftntttt tntnnttt tttftnt ntnttttt tnttnn tnttftntt ttntttn tntntt tttnttt tntttttntnn ttttt ttftntt tnttntnn tnntttt tnnttttt ttntntnttt f t n t t t n t n n t t t f t n t t t n t t n n f t n f t n n t t n t t t n n t t t t f t n t t n t t t f t n t n t t t t n t t t n t t n t n f t n t t t t t t t t t n t t t n n f t n t t n t t t t f t n t t n t t t f n n f t n t t n t t t t t n t n n t t f n n f t n t t n t n t t t t t t t n t t t t f t t t t n t t t t n n t t t t t f t n t t t t t n n t t t t t n t t t t f f f f f t t n t t t n n t t n n t t t n t t t t t f t n t t t n t t n f t n f t n t n t t n t t t n n f t n t t t t f t n t t f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f t n n f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f r r f f r f f f f r f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f t t f t f t n n f t t t f n t t t f t f t n n f t n t t t t t n t n f t f t n t t f n t t t f t f t n f t n f t n t n t t t t t t n t n n t t t t t f n n t t t t t n t t t f n t f t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t n f t f t n t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t n t t f t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t n t t f t n t f t n t n f t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t t f n n t n t t n t t t t f t t f t n n f t t t t n n f t t f t n n t t t t t f f r f t t t t n t t n t f f n f

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B9 r f n t b n t n n t b n t n t f b n t n t b t b n t n n t r n t n t r f n t b n t f t b r n n n t n n t f n n t t n t t r n n t n n n n n t r t t n b t n n rfn n t b b t n t tb f f n r t b t b n n t b n t n n t t n r n n r n t b n t b n t n n t n n t t n t n t t t tnnt btnbntbr r tnnrrb r t n t r f n n r n t t n r n t t t n n b n n b t t r t n t n t n t t n t r r r n b n n t n n n t n b r t n n r r n n b r t b n n b n n n n t b n t n n t b n t t n t t n n r r n t t n t t b n b n t n fr f f f r f f nnntntn ntntnb ntnt bt nbtbrt bntnt nt nttn rbnrntntb ntttnttntrtb tt nnbntn rnntbtb trntt nbt ntbrnnntt rrtnrnntn bnbtbn bbnbrrbnntb nrnntb brbnttbtb tnbnb b n b t r f nnntn tntnb tbnntnb nnntftntnt bnnntnt trr nbttt rbnrntntb ntttnttntrtb tt nntnbb ttnttntnnttb tr rnnttnbn bntntb tr ntnbntnb t ntbrnnntt rrtnrnntn bnbtbn bbnbrrbnntb nrnntb brbnttbtb tnbnb b n b t f nnntn tntnb tbnntnt nrntnnt ftntntbnn ntnt trrt nbn t rbnrntntb ntttnttntrtb tt nntnbb ttnttntnnttb tr rnnttnbn bntntb tr ntnbntnb t ntbrnnntt rrtnrnntn bnbtbn bbnbrrbnntb nrnntb brbnttbtb tnbnb b n b t r tnt tnttnn nnntbrntn nnttntnttb rr rntrbnt ntntt nbrrnb rrnrbtb nnbn nbnb tb t nnnt f f f f f ntn f f tbt nnntrtnt btntntb ntntnt nntnb nrrnbntt nbbnb f f f f tbttt f ntbntnbntrrtttb nbntrn ntbnbb bntn tnt t trtnnttntnt rntt rrtbn rtbtnnnntb bnb nn r bbnb r b t r f f ntn f f f ff tbt nnntrt ntbtnt bbtbtbnt nn bnnnnnttb tnbnt f fn ntntbf f f f ftttrn nnttbnt tbtbtnntt tbnbtttrnn nbntntnt bnnttrn nnttbnt tbtbttbt nntbnbb tnt nb tb ntbnbrrnt nbbntbtn f f f b b trtnnttntnt rntt rrtbn rtbtnnnntn b tbtb nb r rtnbnnn tbtbntntb rnnrntrbnttnb trnntnt ntt bntnntnt bnrtnrr nt tn nb rnn bb b t r

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B10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 rfrntbbbb ntbb b ffrnb bb ntbb tt f f r n b fr frntbbt rrn f n b r t f nbb r rtntbbbt r f r n b rfb rntbbb brr frfnb f ntb fr frntb ffrnbb b tt ntbb rfr nb r r n b b r ffnbbt f ntb rfrnb ft f f n b bbtf rfnbt t b t n t b b b rnt bt n t r nb f bnbb f fnb rn tr frnbb f nbb f r n b rfrn b ntbb ffrn t r nbb r rntbbt r rfrnb tb rntbb b ff nb b rf b rrnb rf rn ntrb f frn t ntbbb fntbb rnbb n b b nbb tr fnt n t trntbb t ttr rr t f t f r f f r r f r f b f f r r r r r f r r f r f r r r r f t b b f n t b n b b r r f r b f r f r f f r f t r t f r r r r f t f r f f f f r r r r r r f r f r r r f b t r r f r f f r r f t t r r t b t f r r r f r f t t b t rrfr rr r f t b t r f f r f r r f f f f b t r r t t t t f t r frfbtf rrfr f f t f f f t r r r r r b fff ffff r r f b r f b frr frff frf fr f r r f f f t t b f b t b t f f f f f r r r r f r f rrf r r r r b f f r f f r r f r r f r f f r r r r f t b f r t b r f n b b b b b f b t t t r f f f r f n r r r r f f r f r f f r f f f f f f r r f r f b t r f b b b r f f f nr rff rrr rfrr ffr r r rrfr rf r r t t r t b b b b b f

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B11 r fntbnnntt tnnf nttbbntf b fn bnbtff t nffntn tntttbbbnt ttnnf r ttnf btt b f n t n n b f nntnb tntt ntt r n n t t r fnt nntt tntnft ntt br bntnt n f ntt r ftrr b b b n n n f f n t t n f b n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt ntt r tntntt fttnf ft ntt r rt t n t n b b t t n t n t r r r rt r n n n t n n f n t t n t t n n n t b f t t t n n n n f t n f b b n t b n f n n n t t n f f f n t t b n r rt btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r rt r r n t n t bf tnfr nn nnbbf b bf t b b btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r f n t t rr rt r nnnb nb tntt n b n nbnn nt fr t tnntt n b n n n n fnt nbn f nttf t nff ntt nbnnn nntnn n f n f ntt nntt fr t tntf ntt tfff ntt n tnftf ntn nfttftt b r ff t ntt t t n n n ff f tntt tntt tntnf ff nnf fntt tnfnbf tt nr fn r f ntt r ntf ntt nr r nr n n rnn ntt rt r rr n nnttntt tftt fntt ntttnn tnfn nnff ntt nttntn btn tt nn f nnfnn ntt r n n nntt tnft t n ntt tnff ntt nt nbttbnf n br n rntt nbtt nt nntt r nbtbnttf tnt r f ntt nfbntt nntnf n t n f nf fntt rntt ntbnnt bntnbbt f nfntt fn nnnnfnt nntn ntt r r f n f t t b tn tfntt r ffntt tfnt ntt t ntt bttt ttnntt ntt r t t b b tft b tt tttntt br n tnn ntt r f ff nntt fbtn ntt r fff ntt r tnnn nf tft ntt bbtf n nt tn nttn nt n f f n t n ttf f nftf ntnf ntt n r nt nfnf ftttnfftff ttftn n n r r r n n n n t f n n f n f f nttf r ffntt tnnfff n tnntbtf n n n t t ntt t n n t t f fntt tf t btnntt nfnntt b nr r n n b n t t nf ttb ffntt ntt fftn n btr r tbrtt tfnn t nntt n n nnn nntt nftn ntt ttnn tf ntt ntf ntt nbt r ft r r nf nf ntt n ntt n ntt tnn btnntt b r nntff f rtff tf ntt ffn f rftf tf rff nf fn b tft fntt tt t rff ntt tf ntt r

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B12 DAILY COMMERCIAL Tuesday, January 21, 2014 rfr ntrfbb nrrr fnt bbnnr r n r r rbbbbr r rbnbn nbnr bbrrr bbnt bbbrr bntr rb tn rr nnr nbbn r rrf r bbtr nrbntr r t r r ntbf f b b t n b b t b b b t r r bf brttr nbrbnr nbrr r ntr r r r rbr nbtrnrr r nrrf f nbbt b b b b b b b t n t b f b n t t r r t r n nn tbt r r r r r r r r bnbr rr b rnbrtr r n f r nbtf b bf r r t n t n b t n b b n r r br nbntbr nnrfr rr rr b rbbnbbnb tbr n rb bnbntt brr n nn frfbt r r t r n t b r t r n n b b n t r t n r b r n t t n r b b b r b bnrn nbrbtf rnrnb tnrr tnn nn f t f fbt rfnb rnbb bbrnrbbt bntb nnrbbr b r nbbnr fnttn nfbr n t n n b b n b r n n n r n b b n b r nnn btbr bntt rbt r fnnbt nrntrnr nrn nbrbnnn rbnbrr t nnbrr r t r t b n r n r b r r bntr b n r n n n t r n b t f b b n t r n t b r b n b r n b b n t t r r nt n n n tt tn n b r n t n n b bnbn btrbn bnnnbt rtnr nnf f nnntrf f t n r n b n t t n b b n t n b b b b b b b n r n n t t n r t t n b b n n n n n b n n b b n n b r r r n b n ff n n b n b b t r b b r n n n n n r n t t n b r r r r r n b b b b r n b r r n t t r r nf f b t f t n n n r r b t r t b n b r b r f n r nftf f nnff f r nt n n n tt tn n b r n t n n b bnbn t n r n t f n n b n b r b b r r r r t r n t b r t r trf fft n t r b r b b b r r frb f