Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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MANNING TO SUPER BOWL, BRONCOS BEAT PATRIOTS 26-16, B1EUSTIS: Fire department to get second station, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Googles contact lens prototype could be option for diabetics, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 20, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 20 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.68 / 49Mostly sunny.50 JENNIFER KAYAssociated PressMIAMI BEACH Flipping through a stack of color im ages he shot during a 1965 march from Sel ma to Montgomery, Ala., photographer Bob Adel man is casual about the history they represent. He pauses at the image of a group of people with clasped hands raised in victory at a Montgomery cab stand, where people had gathered during the citys long bus boy cott a decade earlier, and calls them real King fans. Pointing to the second oor of the Alabama Capitol, behind a line of green-helmeted troops, he chuckles as he remembers, Gov. Wallace was hiding behind the curtains up there. Then theres the man with his st raised in mid-speech, whom he calls Doc better known as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Now they seem like momentous events. At the time, they were covered in the back pages of newspapers, for the most part. The only time blacks appeared in newspapers at that time was when there was violence, ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.bown@dailycommercial.comGroveland population 8,729 has been ranked one of the Top 10 Safest Places in Florida by Movoto Blog, a California-based online real estate brokerage. We are ranked 10th out of 411 cit ies across the state of Florida, City Clerk Teresa Begely announced in an email to city employees. The rank ings were based on statistical data of reported crimes from 2012. ...Your hard work and dedication help Grov eland become a greater place to live and work. Movotos list ranks Groveland num ber 10 following Parkland, Weston, Marco Island, Sanibel, Punta Gorda, Longboat Key, Bay Harbor Islands, Niceville and Valparaiso. With just 144 reported crimes in 2012, Groveland comes in as the nal city (number 10 of 10) on our list, the blog stated. This city of nearly 9,000 people had only 11 reported vi olent crimes in 2012 two robberies and nine aggravated assaults. Of their property crimes, 80 were theft, 46 were burglaries and sev en were motor vehicle theft. All told, residents have just a 1 in 62 chance of being involved in crime in Grov eland, making it signicantly safer than our least safe city, Florida City, where your chances are just 1 in 8. So good job, Groveland! According to the rm, the information gathered to nalize the rankings was based on the FBIs 2012 report of crime statistics. We selected the Florida cities and towns with a population of 5,000 or more, which left us with 202 loca tions in total, the companys web site states. Then, we looked at each of these locations in terms of these three criteria: property crime (theft, burglary, motor vehicle thefts), vi olent crime (rape, murder, assault) and the chance a resident will be a victim of crime. John Flinn, a Groveland police commander and assistant to Police Chief Melvin Tennyson, said he thinks the ranking speaks volumes about Groveland and should help Groveland relishes safe city designationSEE SAFE | A2 NASSER KARIMIAssociated PressTEHRAN, Iran Ahead of the start of a nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, an ofcial in the Is lamic Republic called lim iting uranium enrichment and diluting its stockpile the countrys most import ant commitments, state radio reported Sunday. The comments by Behrouz Kamalvandi, a spokesman of Irans atomic department, show how the government of moderate President Hassan Rouhani welcomes the deal, which begins Mon day. International inspec tors also already have ar rived in Tehran, preparing for the government opening its facilities to them. Implementation of mutual commitments in the framework of the Gene va deal will begin from to morrow, Kamalvandi said. Under the agreement, suspension of 20-percent en richment of uranium and the diluting of the current stockpile of enriched urani um are the most important commitments of our country. Iran struck the deal in No vember with the so-called P5+1 countries Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States. Negotiators agreed to nal terms of the deal Jan. 13. Under the agreement, Iran will limit its uranium enrichment to 5 percent the grade commonly used to power reactors. The deal also commits Iran to stop producing 20-percent enriched uranium which is only a technical step away from weapons-grade material and to neutralize its 20-percent stockpile over Iran prepares for start of landmark nuclear deal Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif adjusts his glasses as he speaks during a joint press conference in Tehran, Iran on Dec. 22.VAHID SALEMI / APSEE DEAL | A2 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comAs the nation spends today honoring slain civil rights leader Martin Lu ther King Jr., area and na tional ofcials are hoping residents will keep his dream alive through the rest of the year. The long-time Eustis native and 70-yearold Carla Mitchell, an ofcial with the Eustis African-American Heritage Committee, recalls growing up in a segregated so ciety of white and colored-only signs. Recognizing King only one day a year is a disser vice to him, said Mitch ell. It is up to the elder ly to make sure our youth are always mindful of all he did for us. King spent his life ghting for the nation to honor all races by giving them equality. As a young minister in Montgomery, Ala., in 1955, King led a bus boycott that was sparked by NAACP mem ber Rosa Parks, a black woman, getting arrest ed after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger, as well as the March on Washington in 1963, where he delivered Many local events scheduled to honor MLKExhibit features photographs from civil rights movement J. PAT CARTER / AP Bob Adelman talks about the photos he took during the civil rights movement at his Miami Beach home.Now they seem like momentous events. At the time, they were covered in the back pages of newspapers, for the most part. The only time blacks appeared in newspapers at that time was when there was violence.Bob AdelmanSEE MLK | A2SEE PHOTOS | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 20, 2014: This year you emphasize the importance of seeing the big picture. Sometimes, if you are not careful or overthink, you will lose your strong will to act. Watch out for this trait. If you are single, you are unusually attractive. You will have many dating possibilities, but you might attract emotionally unavailable individuals. Be careful. If you are attached, the two of you can work through nearly anything because of your commitment to each other. Be aware of your differences, and respect them. VIRGO sometimes annoys you with his or her penchant for detail. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Listen to what is being shared while you go through your day. You will note that seriousness seems to mark your interactions. A discussion is a must in order for you to understand where others are coming from. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your creativity will help provide a solution; it might not be considered perfect by all parties, but it will work. A partner could try to resist your attempts to bring him or her out of his or her shell. Your caring will be evident, but it still might not work. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Work from home, or handle a domestic matter before you go to work. A partner will come through for you in a big way. Let this person know how much you appreciate his or her efforts. You can balance different concerns with ease. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Ask more questions, and expect to receive clear responses. Everyone needs to be on the same page in order to be most effective. Your depth and interest in handling a personal matter efciently and with sensitivity will impress a loved one. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Be aware of the cost of handling a matter as you are. Play it easy and relaxed in the company of a loved one who can give you feedback that you will accept. A personal or domestic matter lingers in your mind. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep conversations moving, especially if they turn the focus to others. You might notice that someone seems closed down. Trust that this person has a good reason, and refuse to personalize the matter. That attitude will mean the world to him or her. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Listen to news and consider what is really being said. Much is going on behind the scenes that you might not understand. Be aware of your options before you launch into action. Someone might not care how a certain idea will affect you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You could be making an error if you choose not to absorb what is said in a meeting with others. Approach a situation with care, yet also be aware of your limits. Be more open, and express your gentle side. Someone cant help but respond. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You like to perform and achieve the highest level of excellence possible. At the moment, you might feel challenged, but you have the assets to make an impression and to excel. Holding back a certain feeling will take a toll on you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Make a point of seeing the whole picture, and refuse to sell yourself short. Your way of dealing with a problem could change once you do. With that alteration will come a different outcome that might be more benecial to everyone involved. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Dont allow someone else to do your dirty work. Reach out and communicate with others directly. Follow this suggestion, and keep all interpersonal matters on a one-on-one level. The results will please you, and others will be more open as well. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You have a strong mind, but a partner will need to think a situation through and come up with his or her own conclusion. Develop the ability to let go, and give others the space to get to where you are. Be patient. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 7-2-3 Afternoon . .......................................... 9-2-5 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 7-6-8-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 6-4-1-1FLORIDALOTTERY SATURDAYFANTASY 5 . ............................. 4-8-13-22-23 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9 4 of 5 wins $102 5 of 5 wins $135,340.73 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com attract people to the town. Flinn said also that even though the crime statistics used for the rankings on the top-10 list Movoto devised are based on 2012 statistics, the same holds true today because of the day-to-day mental ity the department strives to maintain. I attribute our success in keep ing crime in Groveland down to a lot of proactive patrols on behalf of our duty shifts, Flinn said. And with the benet of our ofcers, the residents in our community and the intel systems we use within the police department, we can identify what areas we need to focus on. When we identify problem areas, we do a needs assessment and focus our ef forts there. Flinn said the department has two Di rective Patrol positions, which focus on trafc enforcement and problem areas. In an email to Tennyson and Fire Chief Willie Morgan, Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks praised both departments efforts. I wanted to take this opportunity to personally thank you both, and all in the Groveland police and re departments, for a job well done, Loucks said. SAFE FROM PAGE A1 the six months. In exchange, economic sanctions Iran fac es would be eased for six months. Senior of cials in President Barack Obamas administration have put the total relief gure at some $7 billion. During the six months, negotiations between Iran and the world pow ers would continue in hopes of reaching a per manent deal. The West fears Irans nuclear program could allow it to build an atom ic weapon. Iran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes, like power generation and medical research. On Saturday a team of international inspec tors arrived in Tehran in preparation of beginning their inspections. They will visit Fordo, where Iran enriches its 20-per cent uranium, as well as its Natanz facility, which produces 5-percent enriched uranium, to en sure the country com plies with the deal. Kamalvandi said Sun day that Iran will use centrifuges now producing 20-percent enriched uranium to instead pro duce 5-percent enriched uranium to comply with the agreement. But suspicions remain high in both Tehran and Washington after decades of hostility dating back to the 1979 Islamic Revolu tion in Iran that ousted the U.S.-backed shah dy nasty. Rouhani, Irans new reformist president, has reached out to the West, but must depend on sup port from Irans top de cision-maker, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, for his initia tives amid criticism from hard-line factions. Writing a post on his Facebook page Sunday, Irans Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif reassured the world that the deal will begin on time. I am hopeful that im plementation of the rst phase will have positive results for the coun try and peace and stabil ity in the region and the world while preparing the ground for essential talks on a nal solution, Zarif wrote. DEAL FROM PAGE A1 his I Have a Dream speech. Several activities dedicated to King have been celebrated within the several days in Lake and Sumter Counties. Today, a Commemoration Celebration will take place from 11 / a.m. to 6 / p .m. at Eustis Parks and Rec reation Center/Carver Park, 2214 E. Bates Ave. Sumter County will have three MLK events today: a parade in city of Royal at 10 / a.m., a pa rade in Wildwood at 11 / a.m. and a K ing ban quet to recognize and honor outstanding residents will occur 5 / p .m. at the Royal Community Center, 9569 County Road 235. Louis Ward is an ofcial with the Dr. Martin Lu ther King Jr. Commem oration Committee of Lake and Sumter Coun ties, which put on most of the annual area ac tivities this month and whose theme is Advancing the Dream, the same one used in last years na tionwide 50th anniversa ry celebration of Kings civil rights March on Washington. Ward said despite Kings effort to bring the races together in harmony, the area and nation still remains somewhat divisive. People need to under stand that King wasnt about just fairness to blacks, he was about equality for all people, said Ward. We need to make sure people know that every day of the year. Kings daughter, Ber nice, is calling for a no shots red day today in honor of her fathers support of non-violence. According to a Reuters article, in a time of school shootings and increasingly violent movies, tele vision shows and video games, Bernice King said she believes her fathers philosophy of non-vio lence is more relevant than it was 10 years ago. America has an enor mous appetite for violence. I dont know why we have such an afnity for that, but I do know it has to stop, said Bernice King, chief executive ofcer of the Atlanta-based Martin Luther King Center. Capt. Rob Hicks, spokesman for the Leesburg Police Department, said he supported the ef forts of Bernice King. I hope that her call for non-violence is respected, said Hicks. It is a great way to honor the memory of such an inu ential leader and a man who advocated non-violence. Kings birthday is on Jan. 15, but recognized nationally the third Monday of January. Various area city and county of ces are closed today to honor King and many residents have the day off from work. Leesburg Mayor John Christian said residents should not just hon or King by taking the day off and relaxing but should pay tribute to him throughout the year. Get involved in a com munity effort that brings people together, he said. MLK FROM PAGE A1 LIBBY QUAIDAssociated PressWASHINGTON A chief ele ment of President Barack Obamas attempt to overhaul U.S. surveil lance will not work, leaders of Congress intelligence committees said Sunday, pushing back against the idea that the government should cede control of how Amer icans phone records are stored. Obama, under pressure to calm the controversy over government spying, said Friday he wants bulk phone data stored outside the gov ernment to reduce the risk that the records will be abused. The president said he will require a special judges advance approval before intelligence agencies can examine someones data and will force ana lysts to keep their searches closer to suspected terrorists. And I think thats a very dif cult thing, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, said Sunday. Because the whole purpose of this program is to provide instantaneous infor mation to be able to disrupt any plot that may be taking place. Under the surveillance program, the NSA gathers phone numbers called and the length of conver sations, but not the content of the calls. Obama said the NSA some times needs to tap those records to nd people linked to suspected ter rorists. But he said eventually the bulk data should be stored some where out of the governments hands. That could mean nding a way for phone companies to store the records, though some compa nies have balked at the idea, or it could mean creating a third-party entity to hold the records. Feinstein, D-Calif., said many Americans dont understand that threats persist a dozen years af ter the 9/11 terrorist attacks. New bombs are being devised. New ter rorists are emerging, new groups. Actually, a new level of vicious ness. And I think we need to be prepared, Feinstein said.Lawmakers say Obama surveillance idea wont work

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Rep. Webster makes budget savings announcementU.S. Representative Daniel Webster (FL10) will announce a milestone achievement as he works to reduce our governments debt at separate meetings Tuesday: at 8:30 / a.m., Beacon College Chopping Block Dining Hall, 117 W. Main St.; at 10 / a.m., Clermont City Hall, 685 W. Montrose St. and at 2 / p.m., Winter Garden City Hall, 300 W. Plant St. Call 407-654-5705 for information.TAVARES Department of Health offices are closed todayAll Florida Department of Health ofces in Lake County will be closed today in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. All ofces will reopen Tuesday with regularly scheduled hours. As in all medical emergencies, residents needing immediate assistance should dial 911.TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension to host classes on arthritisThe University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County will host free classes on arthritis pain management. The free program, Put Pain in Its Place: How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control, will provide older adults knowledge about osteoarthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3 / p.m. on Thursday, Lake County Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Rd. Registration is required, and can be completed online at lakepaininplace.eventbrite.com. The Umatilla class is from 11 / a.m. to 12:30 / p.m. on Feb. 7 at the Umatilla Public Library, 412 Hateld Dr. Registration is recommended, and can be completed online at umatillapain2014.eventbrite.com. To register for either program by phone, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721.TAVARES Lake County offices are closed todayAll ofces of the Lake County Board of County Commissioners, Clerk of Courts, Property Appraiser, Supervisor of Elections and Tax Collector are closed today for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Ofces will reopen with regularly scheduled hours on Tuesday. Lake County Solid Waste residential collection services will continue as normal today, but residential convenience centers will be closed. Lake Countys public transportation service, LakeXpress, will not op erate today. The Lake County Welcome Center, located at 20763 U.S. Highway 27 in Groveland, is closed, as well as the Lake County Library System. For information or to view a bus schedule, call 352-323-5733 or visit www.RideLakeXpress.com.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comAfter almost three decades of serving residents with only one re station, the Eustis Fire Department will add another one. City commissioners recently voted to build a $350,000 station on 2.5 acres of city-owned land on Hicks Ditch Road, just south of the inter section with County Road 44. Eustis Fire Chief Rex Winn, who has been with the department since 1993, said they have wanted a second sta tion for at least 20 years but didnt have the money. Fire impact fees helped to gener ate funds for the building. It will allow us to make a lot of difference in the north part of the city, said Winn, of a department that typically responds to more than 3,270 calls every year. It de nitely will mean quicker response times. A pre-bid construction meeting for the new station is planned Jan. 28 and bids will be opened Feb. 18. Ground breaking for the project is expected in February and the build ing should be completed by the end of 2014. Winn said the 24-hour Station No. 23 will include sleeping quarters and ofce space as well as other mod ern conveniences lacking in the cur rent station that was built in 1984 at 100 W. Norton Ave. But he was quick to point out the department wont overspend on amenities.EUSTISEustis to get second fire station MATT SOERGELThe Florida Times-UnionJACKSONVILLE The search for great white sharks off the coast of Jacksonville just off the beach, in fact is about to get a lot more serious. By the end of this month, the University of North Floridas shark-re search program expects to place as many as 10 sensors in the Atlantic. If a great white thats been tagged by a tracking de vice swims within a few hundred yards of a sensor, scientists will know. The devices will be near the beach, per haps a half-mile or mile from the sand. The great whites, after all, do come in close. The nonprot shark research group, Ocearch, last January tracked a 16 1/2-foot great white named Mary Lee in the surf zone in Jacksonville Beach. They then brought their research vessel on an expedition to Jack sonville and caught and tagged 14-foot Lydia within eyesight of Hanna Park. Meanwhile, the satellite tag on Katharine was showing that shark hanging around near Cape Canaveral. The Ocearch sharks are tracked by GPS devices, which are caught by sat ellite every time they rise to the surface. Dont think of UNFs nearshore devices as early-warning signals, though. The sensors store information but cant transmit it instantly; it will have to wait un til researchers travel to them and download the data. Jim Gelsleichter, a shark expert at UNF, is still making nal plans on where to place his schools sensors, which will be able to spot the sharks underwater. He said theyll most likely be attached to buoys in Nassau Sound, Fort George Inlet, the Mayport area, Jackson ville Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach and St. Augustine. Chris Fischer, founder of Ocearch, is on an expedition in the Gala pagos Islands. He said he was thrilled by the new sensors off Jackson ville, calling them a crucial link in researchers Researchers serious about tracking great white sharks BRUCE LIPSKY / AP Jim Gelsleichter, an assistant professor in the biology department at the University of North Florida, holds one of the receivers that will be used to track shark movements in Jacksonville. Staff ReportBrian Blanchard, assis tant secretary of the Flor ida Department of Trans portation, will be among the ofcials taking part in a ribbon-cutting in Bushnell on Saturday for a Sumter County scenic roadway designation. The Scenic Sumter Her itage Byway becomes the 24th Florida Scenic Highway to be designated by the FDOT. It includes 62 miles of roadway from State Road 50 to State Road 44. According to Samantha Merritt of the Sumter County Chamber of Commerce, the Florida Scenic Byway Program is a grass roots effort to heighten awareness of Floridas his torical and intrinsic resources cultural, rec reational, natural and scenic which collec tively enhance the overall traveling experience. The roads that comprise the byway traverse pastoral farmlands, cattle ranches, horse farms and interesting small towns. Attractions along the way include the General James Van Fleet Trail State Park, Richloam Wildlife Area, Dade Bat tleeld Historic State Park, Florida National Cemetery and Lake Panasoffkee. The ceremony begins at 9 / a.m. Saturday at the Dade Battleeld Historic State Park, 7200 County Road 603. There will be free ad mission to the park for this event from 9 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. The Dade Battleeld His toric Society will provide a history lesson featuring time period re-enactors and musket ring demon strations. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLeesburg native San di Moore is at the helm as the new executive di rector of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Com merce, and she comes to the Chamber following 7 years with the Lees burg Partnership, where she was involved in coor dinating Saturday Morning Market, Mardi Gras and other events geared to bring folks downtown. I have a deep love for our community, and one of the things that ap pealed to me about the job is that I didnt feel like I had changed teams. Im still on Team Lees burg, Moore said Sunday during a telephone inter view. Moores new executive position allows her to expand from the downtown area to provide support and Chamber services to the business community through the Leesburg area. There is a lot of poten tial, she said. We have a lot of great businesses and we want to really sup port them and help them to grow within their busi ness to become stron ger, whether its through training, whether its cre ating opportunities for businesses to do exchanges with each other in business-to-business networking opportunities. The Chamber director embraces the idea of LEESBURGSandi Moore tapped as new Chamber director MOORE Heritage trail to be official FridayIf a great white thats been tagged by a tracking device swims within a few hundred yards of a sensor, scientists will know.SEE FIRE | A4SEE MOORE | A4SEE SHARKS | A4BUSHNELL

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb Find brilliant lighting solutions for every room in your home. Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services914 West Main St., Leesburg, FL 34748 352-787-5511 www.pagetheus.com THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLake County sher iffs detectives are looking for a missing Mascotte man and are asking for the publics help in nding him, ofcials said Sunday. Xavier Tarrand, 20, of Douglas Road in Mascotte, was last seen the night of Jan 15 at the Race Trac gas station at the intersection of State Road 50 and State Road 33 in Groveland. A family member dropped Tarrand off at the gas station to meet with someone, at which time Tarrand left with an unknown person in a black vehicle, Lt. John Herrell, LCSO spokesman, said in a statement. Tarrand has not returned home and has not been seen since; therefore, the circum stances surrounding his disappearance are considered suspicious. Herell said Groveland Police Department be gan the initial investigation before turning it over to the Sheriffs Ofce on Saturday. Lake County sher iffs detectives are asking for anyone with in formation to call the Sheriffs Ofce at 352343-2101 or Central Florida CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS.MASCOTTEMan reported missing Staff reportThe Lake-Sumter State College Foundation Inc. recently installed new ofcers and welcomed 11 new board members. As the principal fundraising organization for Lake-Sumter State College, the board of di rectors play a crucial role in the success of the college with their assistance to the foun dation in generating private gifts to the college that in clude support for students, faculty, staff and instruction, Erin OSteen Lewin, founda tion development manager, said in a press release. The new executive com mittee includes: President Tim McRae with Akers Me dia Group; President-Elect George Davis with Insight Credit Union; Vice-President Lori Farfaglia with Unit ed Southern Bank; Treasurer Mac Andrews with Andrews & Miller, PA; Secretary/Exec utive Director Rosanne Bran deburg; Past-President Harry Hackney with Campione and Hackney, PA; board of trust ees liaison Margo Odom; LSSC President Dr. Chuck Mojock and faculty liaison Dr. Gary Sligh. We are extremely pleased to welcome our new ofcers and board members, said Brandeburg, the foundations executive director. Through their leadership, LSSC will continue to provide the opportunities for higher education to our students, community partners, as well as to provide the insight and guidance our community has come to expect. Eleven new board mem bers also were installed: Bob Bone, Mike DeGraw, LeLay na France, Josh Gonzales, Lindsay Holt, David Jor dan, Kathy Nail, Jacqueline Perry, Kim Varnadore, Linda Weekley and Joe Ziler, all of whom have been working with the foundation. I am very honored and humbled to serve as president of the Lake-Sumter State College Foundation Board for 2014, McRae said. Being a part of a board that positively affects the lives of so many students has been very exciting for me and as an alumnus it makes serving even more special. The foundations mission is to help provide excellence in education, service to the community and nancial assistance to qualied stu dents. For information, call 352-365-3518.LEESBURGLSSC has new officers, board members It will look more like a house, Winn said. He added city em ployees will conduct much of the site work. A re truck from the downtown station will be moved to the new facilitys 1,584 squareFIRE FROM PAGE A3 the Chamber and Partnership collaborating on some projects and showing support for each others work. The Chamber is not the Partnership and there is no reason why we should look to each other like competition at all, she said. We should be able to work together for the good of the community while maintaining our own identity because we each essentially have different focuses, but some of our focuses do overlap and in those cases, we can work to gether and not against each other. Moore praised Joe Shipes, her former boss at the Leesburg Part nership, for being in strumental in prepar ing her for her new role. I really enjoyed all of my time at the Leesburg Partnership and I be lieved in the organization and what they are doing for the commu nity, she said. I have always loved working with Joe. He was a very generous boss in what he taught. Moore said her new position comes at the perfect time. This is an opportu nity in a time when we have a new city man ager, and we are go ing to be having a new economic development person, she said. There are lots of things happening within the city, and so Im looking at the Chamber as an other piece of that, and seeing where we can all work together so much more cohesively. Moore began Jan. 6, and has been touched by the overwhelming support she has re ceived. One of the things that I am really looking for ward to is really listening to and hearing from the businesses, she said. I think that I have a good idea of what would be good, but at the same time, Im really trying to keep my mind open to hearing what people want and what they are looking for. The new director also aspires to increase the Chambers member ship from its current 350-plus businesses. My goal is to make it relevant; I want people to see the benet of be ing a Chamber mem ber, and maybe bring some of the people who were a little dis gruntled back into the fold, she said of for mer members. I hope that they will really see its value and relevance to being a member of the Chamber. Moore replaces Jan Zacharchuk, the for mer director, who was cut Sept. 26, 2013, after the board of directors eliminated the top job and said it planned to reorganize and restructure the position. MOORE FROM PAGE A3 understanding of great whites. Placing the sensors close to shore is a big plus, too, Fischer said. The tracking devices are showing that some great whites spend much more of their time poking their nos es into inlets and cruis ing along beaches than what was once believed. Whats really sur prised us is the coast al portion of their life, which particularly seems signicant in the Southeast, he said. Ocearchs high-pro le spottings of great whites in the area cre ated a buzz in tradi tional media outlets and social-media sites. Mary Lee, a celebrity shark, even has a Facebook page. So are there more great whites in the ocean off Jacksonville? Experts arent sure. Finding white sharks is tough, said Greg Skomal, a shark ex pert at the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries who accom panies the Ocearch ves sel on its expedition to Jacksonville. Counting them is even tougher. But Skomal said there has denitely been a big rebound in the great-white population off Cape Cod the last couple of decades. Thats due to efforts to protect the seals there, which sharks nd tasty. Thanks to tracking devices implanted in those Cape Cod sharks, scientists know they frequently range as far south as Florida. So it seems likely that more Cape Cod sharks equals more Florida sharks. I dont think its any reason to run up and down the beach screaming, Gelsleichter said. But the scientist in me is curious about it. Gelsleichter, an assistant professor of biology, has been fascinated by sharks ever since he saw Jaws at age 6. Yes, he knows it wasnt an age-appropriate movie, but there you have it. Hes now directing the universitys Shark Biolo gy Program, which stud ies the many species of sharks in the area. Great whites, the apex predator of the ocean, attract the most media attention, however even if theyre not much of a threat to humans on the East Coast. In July 2012 a swimmer was bitten off Cape Cod and sur vived; that was the rst great-white-shark injury there in 75 years, Gelsleichter said. Meanwhile, the In ternational Shark Attack File at the Flori da Museum of Natural History said there has not been a single doc umented instance in Floridas recorded history of a great white attacking a human. Scientists once thought the animals summered off Cape Cod and wintered in the Southeast a pret ty simple pattern. SHARKS FROM PAGE A3 foot engine bay. The station will also have a brush truck. Winn said some of the departments 21 reghters will start using the new build ing and they also will hire another person. A history of the Eu stis Fire Department, written in 2012, stated that of all that has happened over the past 100 years, The one bad thing is that they only have one re station that is on West Norton Avenue, but Chief Winn says they are trying to work on getting another re station soon. But it looks now that theyre off the Southeast coast, some of them any way, even during warmer months. Were seeing good evidence to show that the animals are not just winter residents, Gelsleichter said. UNFs devices will be able to pick up any of the Ocearchtagged sharks, along with about 20 others tagged by harpooners off Cape Cod. Each shark emits a distinct signal, so scientists will be able to identify and track each one. UNF already has three devices work ing, but theyre at popular diving spots far offshore. They picked up the presence of two great whites last winter. The Ocean Tracking Network of Canada provided some of the funding, and a UNF grant kicked in $4,000. The UNF sensors will tie in with a network of such devic es to the north and south, lling a crucial gap in knowl edge, Gelsleichter said. Much remains to be learned about the travel patterns and life cycles of the great white. I think denite ly that were an important part of the puzzle, he said. TARRAND

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 JOIN US FOR A FREE SEMINAR SERIES LEARN ABOUT Non-surgical arthritis treatment Latest advancements in joint replacement Surgical approaches designed to speed recoveryKNEE & SHOULDER January 17 @ 3:00pm | John Cowin, MDHIP & KNEE January 22 @ 3:00pm | Carl Ollivierre, MD EVENT LOCATIONWaterfront Inn 1105 Lake Shore Dr. The Villages Refreshments will be provided.Call (352) 327-4713 to reserve your seat today! PAIN?JOINTIndividual results vary. With any surgery, there are potential risks and recovery times may differ depending on the patient. Last Chance to RegisterCALL TODAY! Need Tax Help?Call352-787-1040Open Year Round. Adelman said. The images are among roughly 150 assembled at Nova Southeastern Universitys Museum of Art-Fort Lauderdale for an exhibit marking the half-century since the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964. Adelman volunteered his services as a photographer to the Congress of Racial Equality and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He went on to shoot the covers of national magazines and the front pages of national newspapers, but he always considered himself an activist. Unlike photojournalists trying to get the shot, this is somebody that is part of the circle really recognizing the role he can play in bringing about change through his images, museum director Bonnie Clearwater said. The exhibit is titled The Movement, referring to both the efforts to end segregation in America and Adelmans aesthetic as a photographer, Clearwater said. Adelman wanted to capture the spir it of the demonstrations on lm, but frame after frame focuses on bodies how the people in the movement physically moved. Another image from the march to Montgomery shows King and his wife at the front of a crowd that seems endless behind them, in spite of the rain that has dampened their clothes. The descendants of enslaved people who had no rights to their own PHOTOS FROM PAGE A1 bodies were marching en masse across a landscape in which signs and white people told black people where they could and could not go. I told my friends, This is history, even though it was not apparent to many people, Adelman said. I thought this using your body to try to change things, whether you tried to vote or went to the bathroom or you were trying to go into a movie theater or whatever that was inescapable and it was I guess very, very provocative and confrontational. In his Miami Beach home, above a replace lled with dozens of the books he has published, hangs Adelmans iconic image of King delivering his I Have a Dream speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, raising his right hand over his head as he crescendos with the words of an old spiritual, Free at last! Free at Last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! The contact sheet with that image has been enlarged for the exhibit. The frame is in the center of a row of negatives and has a crack through its center. It was reprinted so many times that the negative tore. Ive spent 50 years wondering, with all these photographers there, why I took the denitive picture, said Adelman, 83. I only came there because I knew that Doc was the most extraordinary speaker I ever heard and he would speak in an unforgettable way. SAM HANANELAssociated PressWASHINGTON The opening of Postal Service retail centers in dozens of Staples stores around the country is being met with threats of protests and boycotts by the agencys unions. The new outlets are staffed by Staples employees, not postal work ers, and labor ofcials say that move replaces good-paying union jobs with low-wage, nonunion workers. Its a direct assault on our jobs and on public postal ser vices, said Mark Di mondstein, president of the 200,000-member American Postal Workers Union. The dispute comes as the nancially struggling Postal Service continues to form part nerships with private companies, and looks to cut costs and boost revenue. The deal with Staples began as a pilot program in November at 84 stores in Califor nia, Georgia, Massa chusetts and Pennsylvania as a way make it easier for customers to buy stamps, send packages or use Priority and certied mail. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said the program has noth ing to do with privat ization and everything to do with customer service and driving up demand for the agencys products. The privatization discussion is a ruse, Donahoe said in an interview. We have no interest in privatiz ing the Postal Service. We are looking to grow our business to provide customer convenience to postal products. Staples spokeswoman Carrie McElwee re ferred questions about union concerns to the Postal Service. She said the company continually tests new products and services to better meet the needs of our customers. Union leaders fear that if the Staples pro gram is successful, the Postal Service will want to expand it to more than 1,500 of the com panys other stores. That could siphon work and customers away from nearby brick-andmortar post ofces, taking jobs from postal workers and even leading traditional post ofces to close. Union leaders have been visiting Staples stores to meet with managers, asking them to share the unions displeasure with upper management. Dimondstein asked to meet with the Sta ples CEO Ronald Sar gent, who has declined. The union plans to hold sustained protests this month at Sta ples stores in the San Francisco and San Jose, Calif., area that would be expanded elsewhere. Union ofcials also are considering how they can exert pressure on Staples shareholders. If Staples insists on continuing to refuse to staff those stores with postal workers, were going to urge people to take their business elsewhere, Dimond stein said. The union wants the counters to be run by postal employees, not workers hired by Staples. The average postal clerk earns about $25 an hour, according to the union. The Staples post ofce counters are run by nonunion workers often making little more than the minimum wage.Postal Service, union wrangle over retail centers in Staples LYNNE SLADKY / AP This le photo shows a Staples ofce supply store Miami. The opening of Postal Service retail centers in dozens of Staples stores around the country is being met with threats of protests and boycotts by the agencys unions. Associated PressSANFORD A central Florida airport wants to install articial turf to deter birds from hanging around the planes. Sanford International Airport ofcials say birds cause problems for dozens of planes a year. One jet had to make an emer gency landing after a bird ew into one of its engines. In 2012, the Federal Aviation Administration spent more than $100,000 on air cannons to scare away birds. Airport ofcials tell WFTV that they now want to take a quieter approach. Ofcials say articial turf doesnt retain water or food, so the birds wont want to hang around the airport. Three acres of the fake grass has been proposed for the north side of the airport at a cost of more than $500,000. Airport of cials plan to nalize the proj ect next month.Central Florida airport hopes fake grass will keep birds away

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 AGRItunity 2014Conference and Trade Show 3 Concurrent Workshop Sessions! http://sumter.ifas.ufl.edu (352) 793-2728 Friday Pre-Conference January 24, 2014 West Central Florida Agricultural Education Center 7620 SR 471, Bushnell, FL 33513 Sumter County Fairgrounds MARIA DANILOVAAssociated PressKIEV, Ukraine Anti-government protests in Ukraines capital escalated into ery street battles with police Sun day as thousands of demon strators hurled rocks and rebombs to set police vehicles ablaze. Dozens of ofcers and protesters were injured. Police responded with stun grenades, tear gas and water cannons, but were outnum bered by the protesters. Many of the riot police held their shields over their heads to protect themselves from the projectiles thrown by demonstrators on the other side of a cordon of buses. The violence was a sharp escalation of Ukraines twomonth political crisis, which has brought round-the-clock protest gatherings, but had been largely peaceful. Opposition leader Vitali Klitschko tried to persuade demonstrators to stop their unrest, but failed and was sprayed by a re extinguisher in the process. Klitschko later traveled to Presi dent Viktor Yanukovychs subur ban residence and said the president has agreed to negotiate. There are only two ways for events to develop. The rst one is not to negotiate, Klitschko was quoted as saying by the Interfax news agency. A scenario of force can be unpredictable and I dont rule out the possi bility of a civil war. ... And here we are using all possibilities in order to prevent bloodshed. Yanukovych said later on his website that he has tasked a working group, headed by national security council head Andriy Klyuev, to meet with opposition representatives to work out a solution to the crisis. However, it was unclear if either side was prepared for real compromise; throughout the crisis, the opposition has insisted on the governments resignation and calling early presidential elections. The crisis erupted in November after Yanukovychs decision to freeze ties with the Europe an Union and seek a huge bail out from Russia. The decision sparked protests, which in creased in size and determina tion after police twice violently dispersed demonstrators. But anger rose substantially af ter Yanukovych last week signed an array of laws severely limiting protests and banning the wear ing of helmets and gas masks. Many of Sundays demonstrators wore hardhats and masks in deance of the new laws. They set several police buses on re and some chased and beat ofcers. Police responded with tear gas and stun grenades. Water cannons were also red at the protesters in temperatures of 18 F, but the clashes continued. The harsh new laws brought a crowd of tens of thousands to the protest at Kievs central square on Sunday. While most remained on the square, a group of radicals marched toward a police cordon several hundred meters away blocking an area housing gov ernment ofces and began at tacking riot police with sticks to push their way toward Ukraines parliament building. The crowd then swelled to thousands. The blasts of stun grenades echoed and plumes of smoke rose above the crowd. Activists chanted Shame! and Revolution. The Interior Ministry said more than 70 police were in jured, four of them seriously; there were no immediate gures for protester injuries. ANGELA DELLI SANTIAssociated PressTRENTON, N.J. The Democratic may or of a town severely ooded by Superstorm Sandy said Sunday that she was told an ulti matum tying recovery funds to her support for a prime real estate project came directly from Republican Gov. Chris Christie. Hoboken May or Dawn Zimmer told CNNs State of the Union with Candy Crowley that the message pushing a Rocke feller Group commer cial development was delivered by Christies lieutenant governor, Kim Guadagno, when the two were at an event in Hoboken in May to celebrate the opening of a new supermarket. The lieutenant gov ernor pulled me aside and said, essentially, Youve got to move for ward with the Rockefel ler project. This project is really important to the governor. And she said that she had been with him on Friday night and that this was a direct message from the governor, Zimmer recalled Guadagno saying. Christie spokesman Colin Reed issued a statement Sunday say ing, Mayor Zimmers categorization about her conversation in Hoboken is categorically false.Ukraine protests escalate into fiery street battles EVGENY FELDMAN / AP A protester throws a stone towards a burning police bus during clashes with police, Sunday in central Kiev, Ukraine.NJ mayor: Sandy aid ultimatum came from Christie MEL EVANS / AP FILE PHOTO Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer speaks to the media as she stands near the Hudson River in Hoboken, N.J. IJAZ MOHAMMED REBECCA SANTANAAssociated PressBANNU, Pakistan A Taliban bombing in side an army compound in northwest Pakistan killed at least 20 troops Sunday, ofcials and militants said, in one of the deadliest attacks to target the countrys forces as they battle insurgents in its volatile frontier. The blast targeted a vehicle in a convoy about to leave a military base in the town of Ban nu and drive west to the North Waziristan tribal area, police ofcial Inyat Ali Khan said. Pakistans military said the blast wounded 30 troops. The Taliban claimed the attack and called it a suicide bombing. Mil itary ofcials said the blast came from an ex plosive planted in the vehicle, hired by the paramilitary Frontier Corps. While the army has its own transport ve hicles, the paramilitary forces often hire vehicles when they need to move troops in large numbers. A spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban, Shahidullah Shahid, told The Associated Press by telephone that the attack had been carried out to avenge the death of Waliur Rehman, the groups former second in command. He was killed last year in a U.S. drone strike. We will avenge the killing of every one of our fellows through such attacks, the spokesman warned. The explosion was heard and felt across the town of Bannu. I rushed out of my home and saw black, thick smoke billowing out of the cantonments Razmak gate area, res ident Sajjad Khan said. He said troops quick ly cordoned off the area and ordered residents to go back inside. North Waziristan is considered a safe haven for al-Qaida-linked militants. Pakistani troop convoys often are hit by roadside bombs, but blasts inside military compounds are rare. Last December, a sui cide bomber killed four Pakistani soldiers when he rammed an explosive-laden car into a checkpoint outside an army camp in North Waziristan. Thirty Pakistani troops died over a four-day period last April in another part of the northwest called the Tirah Valley as part of an operation to oust militants hiding there. The Pakistani military has been ghting for years in the tribal areas against militants who want to overthrow the government and estab lish a hard-line Islamic state. The tribal region is also a refuge for insurgents ghting NATO and U.S. forces in neigh boring Afghanistan.Taliban bombing kills 20 troops in Pakistan compound

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 T he case of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old Oakland, Calif., girl who was declared brain dead Dec. 12 following compli cations from tonsil and sinus surgery, hasnt ended yet. In sisting Jahi was still alive and should remain on the ventilator that was keeping her heart beat ing, the girls family fought Chil drens Hospital Oakland and was nally allowed by a judge to take her body into their custody. On Jan. 5, the body was moved to an undisclosed facility where, according to the familys attor ney, Christopher Dolan, her health is improving. Jahis saga gives rise to several conicting strains of accusation. The family and its supporters vilied the hospital for stopping treatment. The public, while sympathetic to the family, saw Dolan as a shameless opportunist whod stirred up a media circus. Ive already made the somewhat subtle point that beneath the welter of conicting views lurked the desire to locate some source of blame including the family in an effort to cope with the terrifying randomness of a child dying under such circumstances. But the truth is that Jahi has been dead for more than a month now, and the time for subtlety is over. The situation, to put it bluntly, is a disgrace. Dolan, who has argued that it shouldnt be up to doctors but rather families to determine when death has occurred, has done a grave disservice to the McMath family by enabling their delusions. In turn, they have done a disservice to their community by maligning a worldclass hospital, which serves some of the areas poorest children, with as-yet-unsubstantiated implications of poor treatment. The most disgraceful party in all of this, however, may be the media, which have done a disser vice to a public that, despite the endless coverage of the case, remains widely confused about the difference between brain death, from which there is no recovery, and comas or vegetative states, in which the brain continues to function to some degree. Its hard to say whats worse, the countless and continued uses of the misnomer life sup port or the remarkable amount of exposure granted to experts, many afliated with radical religious groups, determined to cite a handful of recovery from brain death cases that are really misdiagnoses of brain death. And dont get me started on a local TV news report about Jahis eighth-grade classmates, who were told by at least one administrator and even some parents that their friend might return someday. This is all, of course, done in the guise of balance, and to gen erate the kind of page views Ill call rage views. But this is no longer a story that requires balance. A teenager, tragically, has died. Her family deserves sensitivity and compassion, but do they deserve authority over doctors and the coroner in declaring someone dead? Do they get to do whatever they want with a body? Do they deserve to collect nearly $60,000 in GoFundMe contributions theyve solicited under the pretense that six separate doctors have made a wrong diagnosis and a resurrection will happen? Figures from the National Center for Health Statistics tell us that every day, roughly 7,000 people die in this country. Many are declared dead after being taken off ventilators, and many though we dont like to think about it are children who, like Jahi, have died suddenly and seemingly inexplicably. For whatever reasons coer cion, denial, distrust, greed, grief Jahis family got the idea that they were somehow different. As harmful as that is to their healing process, its also harmful to societys well-being, a harm that too many, whatever their intentions, have perpetuated. The hospital, even before the court order, gave the family many more days to say goodbye than most loved ones get in such cir cumstances. The judge, seemingly against all logic, gave the family a power, and a burden, that no family should have to wield or shoulder. The media (including me) gave them attention that, like the donations, would have been better spent elsewhere. In that sense, Jahis family is right: They were mistreated. They were treated as special. And death, though it is singular and especially horrifying when it befalls a young person, is about as unspecial as it gets. Believing otherwise will only prolong their suffering and draw out a story that should have ended long ago.From Los Angeles Times.OTHERVOICES Meghan DaumTRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES For Jahi, its past time for a reality check The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Lying by and about politicians is a re grettable and probably permanent feature of American democracy. But should it also be a criminal offense? The Supreme Court has agreed to hear an ar gument by an antiabortion group chal lenging an Ohio law that criminalizes false statements about candidates for public of ce. The justices should allow the groups claim to proceed. Using criminal law to po lice truth in political debate is unnecessary and invites abuse. The Ohio law prohibits false statements about a candidate if they are made knowingly or with reckless disregard of whether they might be false. If the Ohio Elections Commission decides the law was violated, it shall refer the matter to prosecutors. During the 2010 election campaign, the Susan B. Anthony List, an antiabortion political action committee, planned to post an ad on billboards accusing then-Rep. Steven Driehaus, D-Ohio, of voting for taxpay er-funded abortion when he supported the Affordable Care Act. Driehaus led a complaint with the commission under the false statement law, and fearing legal reprisals, the advertising company that owned the billboard space refused to post the ad. The Susan B. Anthony List tried to chal lenge the constitutionality of the law, but the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals said that no case or controversy existed because the elections commission hadnt made a nal decision on Driehaus complaint and because the group couldnt establish that it faced an imminent threat of prosecution. Citizens who believe a law violates their First Amendment rights ought to be able to make that case even if they arent in immediate danger of being prosecuted. And the Ohio law is constitutionally suspect, especially after a 2012 decision in which the Supreme Court struck down a law making it a crime to falsely claim to have received military honors. However well intended, laws criminalizing false statements about candidates could have the unintended effect of stiing truthful political speech. As the Supreme Court has observed: Erroneous statement is inevitable in free debate, and ... it must be protected if the freedoms of expression are to have the breathing space that they need ... to survive. Claims by and about candidates are best tested in the back-and-forth of a political campaign, in journalistic fact-checking and, if worse comes to worst, in a civil libel trial, not in a criminal trial.From Los Angeles Times.AVOICEThe truth about lying in politics The hospital, even before the court order, gave the family many more days to say goodbye than most loved ones get in such circumstances. The judge, seemingly against all logic, gave the family a power, and a burden, that no family should have to wield or shoulder. The media (including me) gave them attention that, like the donations, would have been better spent elsewhere.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014www.dailycommercial.comTENNIS: Serena ousted at Aussie Open / B6 JOHN RAOUX / AP Orlando Magics Arron Afalo (4) and Boston Celtics Jerryd Bayless go after a loose ball on Sunday during the rst half in Orlando. KYLE HIGHTOWERAssociated PressORLANDO Arron Afalo had 20 points and 13 rebounds, Tobias Harris added 18 points and the Or lando Magic snapped a season-high 10game losing streak with a 93-91 win over the Boston Celtics on Sunday night. After several ties in the fourth quar ter, Harris hit a pair of free throws with 10.1 seconds remaining to give Orlando the vic tory. The win also ends a 10-game regular-season losing streak to the Celtics. Glen Davis added 17 points and Jameer Nelson 16 for Orlando. Boston has lost nine straight on the road and 11 of 12 overall. Jeff Green led the Celtics with 22 points, and Avery Bradley and Kris Humphries added 18 apiece. Rajon Rondo had six points and four assists in his second game back from a torn ACL. Orlando scored the rst basket of the third quarter to build a nine-point lead, but went cold and allowed Boston to reel off a 13-2 run and re take the lead, 61-57. The Magic were able to steady themselves, and after three differ ent ties in the rst six minutes of the fourth, nudged back in front PEYTONS PLACE CHARLIE RIEDEL / APDenver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning is engulfed in confetti during the trophy ceremony after the AFC Championship game on Sunday in Denver. The Broncos defeated the Patriots 26-16 to advance to the Super Bowl. Manning, Broncos dominate Patriots to earn trip to Super Bowl EDDIE PELLSAP National WriterDENVER Pey ton Manning had an answer for everyone. Whats new? For Tom Brady. For the New England de fense. For anyone who thought he couldnt win the big one. Manning is taking the Denver Broncos on a trip to New York for the Super Bowl after another of his impeccably crafted victories this time, a 26-16 win over the Patriots on Sunday in the AFC title game. Less than three years after being unable to throw a football be cause of his surgical ly ravaged neck and nerve endings, Manning will get a chance for his second ring. Hell try to become the rst quarterback to win one with two different teams, at the Meadow lands on Feb. 2 against Seattle, who defeated San Francisco. Its very rewarding when you put a lot of hard work into the off season and the regu lar season and it pays dividends with a huge win, Manning said. After taking the nal knee, Manning stuffed the football in his hel met and ran to the 30-yard line to shake hands with Brady. The Indy-turned-Denver quarterback improved to 5-10 lifetime against New Englands QB but 2-1 in AFC title games. Hes been remarkable. Its unprecedented what he did, Broncos coach John Fox said. Though Manning threw for 400 yards, it was more dink-anddunk than a reworks show in this, the 15th installment of the NFLs two best quarterbacks of a generation. Manning set up four eld goals by Matt Prater and put his stamp on this one with a pair of long, meticulous and mistake-free touchdown drives in which nothing came cheap. He geared down the no-huddle, hurry-up offense that helped him set records for touch down passes and yard age this season and made the Broncos the highest-scoring team in history. The result: 93and 80-yard touch down drives that each lasted a few seconds over seven minutes; they were the two lon gest, time-wise, of the season for the Broncos (15-3). Manning capped the second with a 3-yard JOE MAHONEY / AP New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) is sacked by Denver Broncos defensive tackle Terrance Knighton during the second half on Sunday in Denver.SEE AFC | B2Magic end their 10-game skid with win over CelticsSEE MAGIC | B2 Seattle Seahawks Russell Wilson throws during the second half of the NFC Championship game against the San Francisco 49ers, on Sunday in Seattle. TED S. WARREN / APSeahawks edge Niners, earn date with Denver in Super Bowl BARRY WILNERAP Pro Football WriterSEATTLE The Seat tle Seahawks are bringing their game-changing defense and the 12th Man to the Big Apple for the Super Bowl. Seattles top-ranked defense forced three fourth-quarter turnovers, and Russell Wilson threw a 35-yard touch down pass on fourth down for the winning points in a 23-17 victo ry over the San Francisco 49ers for the NFC title Sunday. Seattle will meet Den ver (15-3) for the NFL title in two weeks in the New Jersey Meadow lands. Its the rst trip to the big game for the Se ahawks (15-3) since they lost to Pittsburgh after the 2005 season. The conference champs had the best records in the league this year, the rst time the top seeds have gotten to the Super Bowl since the 2010 game. Moments after Richard Sherman tipped Colin Kaepernicks pass to teammate Malcolm Smith for the clinching interception, the All-Pro cornerback jumped into the stands behind the end zone, saluting the Seahawks raucous fans. With 12th Man ags waving everywhere, and SEE SEATTLE | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 19 .513 Brooklyn 16 22 .421 3 New York 15 25 .375 5 Boston 14 28 .333 7 Philadelphia 13 27 .325 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 29 11 .725 Atlanta 20 19 .513 8 Washington 19 20 .487 9 Charlotte 17 25 .405 13 Orlando 11 30 .268 18 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 32 7 .821 Chicago 19 20 .487 13 Detroit 17 23 .425 15 Cleveland 15 25 .375 17 Milwaukee 7 33 .175 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 32 9 .780 Houston 27 15 .643 5 Dallas 24 18 .571 8 Memphis 20 19 .513 11 New Orleans 15 24 .385 16 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 31 9 .775 Oklahoma City 30 10 .750 1 Denver 20 19 .513 10 Minnesota 19 21 .475 12 Utah 14 28 .333 18 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 28 14 .667 Golden State 26 16 .619 2 Phoenix 22 17 .564 4 L.A. Lakers 16 25 .390 11 Sacramento 14 24 .368 12 Saturdays Games Indiana 106, L.A. Clippers 92 Detroit 104, Washington 98 Miami 104, Charlotte 96, OT Chicago 103, Philadelphia 78 Minnesota 98, Utah 72 Houston 114, Milwaukee 104 Golden State 97, New Orleans 87 Portland 127, Dallas 111 Sundays Games L.A. Lakers 112, Toronto 106 Orlando 93, Boston 91 San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 82 Sacramento at Oklahoma City, late Denver at Phoenix, late Todays Games Dallas at Cleveland, 1 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Detroit, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 2 p.m. Toronto at Charlotte, 2 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 2:30 p.m. New Orleans at Memphis, 5 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Chicago, 8 p.m. Portland at Houston, 8 p.m. Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. Sundays Mens College Basketball Scores EAST Army 74, Bucknell 67 Baruch 78, Wesleyan (Conn.) 64 Monmouth (NJ) 83, Canisius 82 SOUTH Southern Miss. 80, Louisiana Tech 71 MIDWEST Bowling Green 69, W. Michigan 64 Green Bay 69, Ill.-Chicago 64 Iowa 94, Minnesota 73 Wright St. 49, Cleveland St. 46 SOUTHWEST Houston 77, Rutgers 55 Sundays Womens Basketball Major Scores EAST Boston U. 70, Loyola (Md.) 60 Coll. of Charleston 90, Northeastern 74 Drexel 61, Delaware 52 James Madison 77, Hofstra 50 Marist 73, Canisius 47 Niagara 48, Monmouth (NJ) 45 North Carolina 73, Boston College 56 Syracuse 58, Pittsburgh 47 UConn 94, Rutgers 64 UNC Wilmington 54, Towson 53 SOUTH Appalachian St. 75, UNC-Greensboro 56 Duke 74, Virginia Tech 70 Elon 67, W. Carolina 52 Georgia 68, Florida 62 Kentucky 73, Auburn 71 Maryland 92, Georgia Tech 81 Miami 80, NC State 71 South Carolina 77, Alabama 51 Vanderbilt 79, LSU 70 Virginia 85, Florida St. 68 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 68, Mississippi 65 Louisville 81, SMU 66 TCU 54, Texas 48 Texas A&M 73, Mississippi St. 35 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 68, Mississippi 65 Louisville 81, SMU 66 TCU 54, Texas 48 Texas A&M 73, Mississippi St. 35 FAR WEST Utah 59, Washington St. 57 tx $vmajorscores3 MIDWEST Dayton 73, Fordham 64 DePaul 91, Villanova 65 Illinois St. 78, Evansville 54 Indiana 83, Minnesota 78, OT Indiana St. 63, S. Illinois 44 Iowa 81, Ohio St. 74 Kansas 76, Baylor 60 Loyola of Chicago 73, Bradley 63 National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 48 30 15 3 63 138 107 Tampa Bay 50 29 16 5 63 146 123 Montreal 49 27 17 5 59 126 120 Toronto 50 25 20 5 55 141 152 Detroit 48 21 17 10 52 121 130 Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51 139 155 Florida 48 18 23 7 43 111 147 Buffalo 47 13 27 7 33 86 133 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 48 34 12 2 70 156 115 Philadelphia 49 25 19 5 55 134 140 N.Y. Rangers 50 26 21 3 55 124 127 Columbus 48 24 20 4 52 138 135 Washington 48 22 18 8 52 141 146 New Jersey 50 20 19 11 51 115 123 Carolina 48 20 19 9 49 117 137 N.Y. Islanders 50 19 24 7 45 138 163 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 51 32 8 11 75 184 139 St. Louis 47 32 10 5 69 166 107 Colorado 48 31 12 5 67 142 122 Minnesota 51 27 19 5 59 125 125 Dallas 48 21 19 8 50 136 148 Nashville 50 21 22 7 49 121 151 Winnipeg 50 22 23 5 49 141 150 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79 175 126 San Jose 49 31 12 6 68 158 121 Los Angeles 49 29 14 6 64 126 100 Vancouver 50 25 16 9 59 127 127 Phoenix 48 23 16 9 55 139 145 Calgary 49 16 26 7 39 109 156 Edmonton 51 15 30 6 36 131 181 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Columbus 4, Buffalo 3, SO Detroit 3, Los Angeles 2, SO Vancouver 3, Calgary 2, SO N.Y. Rangers 4, Ottawa 1 San Jose 5, Tampa Bay 4 Winnipeg 3, Edmonton 2, OT Toronto 5, Montreal 3 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Islanders 4 Carolina 3, Florida 2 Anaheim 3, St. Louis 2 Colorado 5, Nashville 4 Phoenix 3, New Jersey 2 Minnesota 3, Dallas 2, OT Sundays Games Chicago 3, Boston 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 3 Washington at N.Y. Rangers, late Todays Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. Los Angeles at Boston, 3 p.m. Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m. Toronto at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Calgary at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m. St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 8 p.m. Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m.Australian Open ResultsSunday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $29.72 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Fabio Fognini (15), Italy, 6-3, 6-0, 6-2. David Ferrer (3), Spain, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-2, 6-1. Women Fourth Round Flavia Pennetta (28), Italy, def. Angelique Kerber (9), Germany, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5. Li Na (4), China, def. Ekaterina Makarova (22), Rus sia, 6-2, 6-0. Ana Ivanovic (14), Serbia, def. Serena Williams (1), United States, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Doubles Men Third Round Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (5), Czech Republic, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, and Michael Venus, New Zealand, 6-3, 6-2. Treat Huey, Philippines, and Dominic Inglot (12), Britain, def. Rohan Bopanna, India, and Aisam-ulHaq Qureshi (7), Pakistan, 6-4, 7-6 (1). Alex Bolt and Andrew Whittington, Australia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta and Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (5), 7-5. Michael Llodra and Nicolas Mahut (13), France, def. Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (2), Bra zil, 7-6 (4), 6-4. Women Third Round Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, and Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-2, 7-5. Shahar Peer, Israel, and Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (4), Slovenia, def. Chan Hao-ching, Taiwan, and Liezel Huber (13), United States, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-4. Mixed First Round Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, and Colin Flem ing, Britain, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, and Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4. Legends Doubles Round Robin Men Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Cedric Pioline, France, def. Pat Cash, Australia, and Mats Wilander, Sweden, 6-7 (2), 6-1, 10-8. Guy Forget and Henri Leconte, France, def. Joshua Eagle and Andrew Florent, Australia, 6-3, 4-6, 10-7. Women Nicole Bradtke and Rennae Stubbs, Australia, def. Martina Hingis, Switzerland, and Martina Navratilova, United States, 7-6 (3), 1-6, 10-6. Junior Singles Boys First Round Jumpei Yamasaki (14), Japan, def. Gabriel Vellinho Hocevar, Brazil, 6-1, 6-3. Lucas Miedler (13), Austria, def. Makoto Ochi, Ja pan, 6-2, 6-2. Lee Duckhee (12), South Korea, def. Mitchell Harper, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Simon Friis Soendergaard, Denmark, def. Alexander Klintcharov, New Zealand, 6-4, 6-3. Oliver Anderson, Australia, def. Rafael Matos, Bra zil, 6-4, 6-3. Petros Chrysochos, Cyprus, def. Oh Chan-yeong, South Korea, 7-5, 7-6 (3). Andrea Pellegrino, Italy, def. Sora Fukuda, Japan, 5-7, 6-1, 6-3. Ilya Vasilyev, Russia, def. Brian Tran, Australia, 6-7 (2), 6-2, 6-4. Marcelo Zormann da Silva (15), Brazil, def. Chung Yunseong, South Korea, 6-3, 6-3. Omar Jasika, Australia, def. Zheng Wei Qiang, China, 6-3, 6-2. Stefan Kozlov (2), United States, def. Blake Mott, Australia, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-5, retired. Quentin Halys (7), France, def. Johannes Haerteis, Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Alexander Zverev (1), Germany, def. Nino Serdarusic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-4. Boris Pokotilov, Russia, def. Max Purcell, Australia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Ryotero Matsumura, Japan, def. Jacopo Stefanini, Italy, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3. Alex Molcan, Slovakia, def. Roman Saullin (4), Russia, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Girls First Round Emilie Francati, Denmark, def. Sasha Bollweg, Australia, 6-1, 6-2. Fiona Ferro (15), France, def. Georgia Brescia, Italy, 7-5, 0-6, 6-2. Naiktha Bains, Australia, def. Shiori Fukuda, Japan, 6-2, 6-1. Natalie Novotna, Czech Republic, def. Beatrice Lombardo, Italy, 6-4, 6-3. Olivia Tjandramulia, Australia, def. Nozomi Ohya, Japan, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. Olivia Hauger, United States, def. Chloe Hule, Australia, 6-2, 7-5. Jelena Ostapenko (6), Latvia, def. Kaylah McPhee, Australia, 6-1, 7-5. Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Andrea Dikosavljevic, Australia, 6-2, 6-0. Anastasia Shaulskaya, Russia, def. You Xiao-Di (11), China, 6-2, 6-4. Isabelle Wallace, Britain, def. Priscilla Hon (12), Australia, 6-3, 5-7, 12-10. Margot Yerolymos, France, def. Julia Grabher, Austria, 6-0, 7-5. Rosie Cheng, New Zealand, def. Fanny Stollar (16), Hungary, 6-4, 6-4. Sun Ziyue (7), China, def. Linda Huang, Australia, 6-3, 6-0. Katie Boulter (9), Britain, def. Dhruthi Tatachar Venugopal, India, 6-3, 6-3. Tereza Mihalikova, Slovakia, def. Petra Hule, Aus tralia, 7-6 (6), 6-1. Jana Fett, Croatia, def. Nicole Kraemer, Austra lia, 6-2, 6-1. Varvara Flink (1), Russia, def. Ye Qiu Yu, China, 7-5, 6-4. Xu Shilin (5), China, def. Seone Mendez, Australia, 6-2, 6-1. Junior Doubles Boys First Round Pedro Martinez Portero and Jaume Antoni Munar Clar, Spain, def. Chung Hyeon, South Korea, and Sumit Nagal (8), India, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Martin Blasko and Alex Molcan, Slovakia, def. Lee Duckhee, South Korea, and Simon Friis Soendergaard, Denmark, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Filippo Baldi, Italy, and Johannes Haerteis (6), Ger many, def. Harry Bourchier and Daniel Nolan, Australia, 6-3, 2-6, 10-1. Hong Seong-chan and Oh Chan-yeong, South Korea, def. Mitchell Harper and Jack Jaeda, Australia, 7-5, 6-3. Daniel Guccione and Marc Polmans, Australia, def. William Matheson, New Zealand, and Marko Osmakcic, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-4. Yusuke Takahashi and Jumpei Yamasaki, Japan, def. Petros Chrysochos, Cyprus, and Nino Serdarusic, Croatia, 3-6, 6-4, 12-10. Girls First Round Naiktha Bains and Olivia Tjandramulia, Australia, def. Verena Hofer and Beatrice Lombardo, Italy, 6-3, 6-2. Anhelina Kalinina, Ukraine, and Elizaveta Kulichkova (1), Russia, def. Kimberly Birrell and Anja Do kic, Australia, 6-1, 6-4. Kamonwan Buayam, Thailand, and Sara Tomic (6), Australia, def. Georgia Brescia, Italy, and Julia Grab her, Austria, 6-0, 6-1. Lizette Cabrera and Zoe Hives, Australia, def. Em ily Arbuthnott, Britain, and Olivia Hauger, United States, 6-3, 6-2. Sundays Sports Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Indiana F David West $15,000 for elbowing Los Angeles Clippers F Blake Grifn in the jaw during a Jan. 18 game. Fined Sacramento coach Michael Malone $25,000 for verbal abuse of a game ofcial and not proceeding directly to his locker room following the completion of the Jan. 17 game at Memphis. HOCKEY American Hockey League AHL Suspended Norfolk LW Max Friberg one game for a boarding incident in a Jan. 17 game against Worcester. COLLEGE AUBURN Named Adrian Ghioroaie assistant track and eld coach.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN North Carolina at Virginia ESPNU Delaware St. at North Carolina A&T FS1 Creighton at Villanova NBCSN Delaware at Drexel9 p.m.ESPN Baylor at Kansas ESPNU Maryland at NC State FS1 Marquette at GeorgetownNBA BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m.ESPN Brooklyn at N.Y.8 p.m.TNT L.A. Lakers at Chicago10:30 p.m.TNT Indiana at Golden State5:30 p.m.SUN Miami at AtlantaSOCCER 2:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Everton at West BromwichTENNIS 9 p.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, quarternals, at Melbourne, Australia3 a.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, mens or womens quarternal, at Melbourne, AustraliaWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 Notre Dame at Tennessee pass to Demary ius Thomas who got inside the over matched Alfonzo Dennard and left his feet to make the catch for a 20-3 lead mid way through the third quarter. From there, it was catch-up time for Brady and the Pats (13-5), and they are not built for that, at least not this year. A team that aver aged more than 200 yards on the ground the last three games didnt have much quick-strike capability. Brady, who threw for most of his 277 yards in comeback mode, actually led the Patriots to a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns. But they were a pair of time-consuming, 80-yard drives. The second cut the decit to 2616 with 3:07 left, but the Broncos stopped Shane Vereen on the 2-point conversion and the celebration was on in Denver. Losing is nev er easy, Patriots defensive lineman Rob Ninkovich said. But when you have somebody as talented as (Manning), who puts in as much work and effort, and has done it for so long, its a little bit easier to swallow. The Broncos have had one close call since when they lost at home to Pittsburgh in the 2005 seasons AFC title game but what it really took was Elways re turn to the franchise in 2011. He slammed the door on the Tim Tebow experiment and signed Manning to a contract, knowing there were risks involved in bringing to town a thirty-something quarterback coming off multiple operations to resur rect his career. Even without Von Miller on the eld, Elway put enough pieces in place around Manning to contend for a championship. Its been a terrif ic group, Elway said as he hoisted the AFC championship trophy. They worked their tail off all year. Manning knows how to make the most of all those options. This game started getting out of hand at about the same time Patriots corner back Aqib Talib went out with a knee injury. Nobody else could cover Thomas, and Manning, who nds mismatches even under the toughest of circumstances, found this one quickly. Peyton Manning is Peyton Manning, Carter said. AFC FROM PAGE B1 82-79 on a pair of free throws by Afalo. Green tied it back up at 87 with two free throws of his own with 1:48 remaining. Then following a Magic miss, Rondo got free off of a screen and connected on 16-foot jumper to give the Celtics the lead again. Afalo tied it again at 89 with a layup. Then a Celtics miss even tually led to Nelson being fouled on the other end and hitting two free throws that put the Magic up a basket at 91-89. Coming out of a timeout, Green was fouled by Afalo on a layup, but failed to hit the free throw to complete the threepoint play. Orlando snared the rebound and called a timeout with 30.7 seconds to play. Humphries fouled Harris during a scramble for a rebound and Harris calmly sank his two free throws with 10.1 seconds showing on the clock. The Celtics had a nal posses sion, but failed to get up a shot before time expired. The Magic dominated the ac tion underneath early on and took at 53-46 lead into halftime. Orlando outscored Boston 3520 in the second quarter and got 10 points apiece in the half from Afalo and Harris. Kyle OQuinn came off the bench to grab nine points and seven rebounds, which led to some easy putbacks. The Celtics got 10 each from Bradley and Humphries, but had a scary moment late in the rst quarter when Green slipped while attempting to contest a jumper by Afalo. Green landed hard and awkwardly on his right knee, but was able to walk off on his own power after lying on the court for a few minutes. The incident didnt seem to have any lingering effects as he explodedfor a dunk late in the half. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1 New England 0 3 0 13 16 Denver 3 10 7 6 26 First Quarter DenFG Prater 27, 3:43. Second Quarter DenTamme 1 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 7:50. NEFG Gostkowski 47, 2:54. DenFG Prater 35, :25. Third Quarter DenD.Thomas 3 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 7:52. Fourth Quarter DenFG Prater 19, 12:02. NEEdelman 7 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 9:26. DenFG Prater 54, 7:00. NEBrady 5 run (run failed), 3:07. A,110. NE Den First downs 19 27 Total Net Yards 320 507 Rushes-yards 16-64 28-107 Passing 256 400 Punt Returns 0-0 0-0 Kickoff Returns 0-0 1-4 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 24-38-0 32-43-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-21 0-0 Punts 3-49.0 1-48.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 2-15 4-34 Time of Possession 24:16 35:44 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNew England, Vereen 4-34, Ridley 5-17, Brady 2-7, Blount 5-6. Denver, Moreno 14-59, Ball 1243, Green 1-6, Manning 1-(minus 1). PASSINGNew England, Brady 24-38-0-277. Denver, Manning 32-43-0-400. RECEIVINGNew England, Edelman 10-89, Vereen 5-59, Collie 4-57, Dobson 2-33, Hoomanawanui 2-33, Mulligan 1-6. Denver, J.Thomas 8-85, D.Thomas 7-134, Decker 5-73, Welker 4-38, Ball 3-13, Tamme 2-24, Moreno 2-22, Caldwell 1-11. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. New York, New York blaring over the loudspeakers, CenturyLink Field rocked like never before. Thats as sweet as it gets, Sherman said. San Francisco (14-5) led 17-13 when Wilson, given a free play as Al don Smith jumped offside, hurled the ball to Jermaine Kearse, who made a leaping catch in the end zone over Car los Rogers. Steven Hauschka then kicked his third eld goal, and Smith intercepted in the end zone on the 49ers nal possession. This feels even sweeter, with the amazing support we have had from the 12th Man, team owner Paul Allen said, comparing this Super Bowl trip to the previous one. SEATTLE FROM PAGE B1 49ers-Seahawks Stats San Francisco 3 7 7 0 17 Seattle 0 3 10 10 23 First Quarter SFFG Dawson 25, 12:45. Second Quarter SFDixon 1 run (Dawson kick), 10:03. SeaFG Hauschka 32, 5:47. Third Quarter SeaLynch 40 run (Hauschka kick), 9:51. SFBoldin 26 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 6:29. SeaFG Hauschka 40, 3:55. Fourth Quarter SeaKearse 35 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 13:44. SeaFG Hauschka 47, 3:37. A,454. SF Sea First downs 16 14 Total Net Yards 308 308 Rushes-yards 28-161 29-115 Passing 147 193 Punt Returns 1-0 3-10 Kickoff Returns 4-92 3-109 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-24-2 16-25-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-6 4-22 Punts 4-42.0 2-45.5 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 3-1 Penalties-Yards 7-65 8-66 Time of Possession 28:32 31:28 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 11-130, Hunter 3-16, Gore 11-14, Dixon 2-1, James 1-0. Seattle, Lynch 22-109, Turbin 2-6, Wilson 5-0. PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 14-24-2153. Seattle, Wilson 16-25-0-215. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Boldin 5-53, Crabtree 4-52, V.Davis 2-16, Gore 1-17, V.McDonald 1-13, Patton 1-2. Seattle, Baldwin 6-106, Tate 4-31,

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Associated Press CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Faith Randolph scored a career-high 26 points and Virginia rolled by No. 17 Florida State 85-68 Sunday. Virginia (9-9, 2-3 ACC) tied its second-highest scoring performance of the season, and jumped to a 47-31 halftime lead behind 20 rsthalf points from Randolph. Florida State (144, 2-3) never cut the decit to fewer than 11 points in the second half. The Semi noles committed 27 turnovers compared with 10 for Virginia. Ataira Franklin had 18 points and 10 re bounds for the Cav aliers while Sarah Imovbioh added 15. Emiah Bingley scored 21 points to lead the Seminoles. Natasha Howard added 15 points and Kai James had 11. Virginia played its third straight ranked opponent after falling to No. 2 Notre Dame and No. 3 Duke. Florida State won 14 of its rst 15 games but has dropped its last three, including losses to No. 9 North Carolina and No. 20 North Carolina State.NO. 24 VANDY 79, LSU 70NASHVILLE, Tenn. Jasmine List er scored 25 points, including a trio of 3-pointers and 10-for10 shooting from the foul line, to lift No. 24 Vanderbilt to a 79-70 upset win over No. 14 LSU on Sunday. Christina Foggie contributed 19 points and Morgan Batey had 11 for Vanderbilt (16-3, 5-1 SEC), which shot 52 percent from the eld in toppling its second ranked team in as many weeks. The Commodores broke open the game in the second half, carving out its rst double-digit lead with an 11-4 run fueled by a layup and four free throws from Kylee Smith that made it 48-35 with 12:08 to go. Vandy scored 12 of the next 18 points over the next 4 min utes to build a lead it would protect against an LSU rally down the stretch.NO. 10 KENTUCKY 73, AUBURN 71AUBURN, Ala. Jennifer ONeill scored 16 points, Samarie Walker had 13 points and 10 rebounds and No. 10 Kentucky over came a 13-point rsthalf decit to beat Au burn 73-71 on Sunday. The Wildcats (153, 3-2 Southeastern Conference) survived 13-of-29 shooting from the foul line to hold off the Tigers (116, 2-2). Meagan Tucker hit a jumper with 1:07 left to bring Auburn within two points. The Wildcats worked 20 seconds off the clock and then called timeout. ONeill missed two long jumpers in the nal seconds, but Linnae Harper and Walker grabbed the offensive rebounds. Walker missed two free throws with 6 seconds remaining. Tyrese Tanner, who scored 28 points, re bounded and threw it to Katie Frerking. ONeill smothered her in the corner and Au burn couldnt get a nal shot off. Harper also had 13 points for the Wildcats. Auburn starter Ha sina Muhammad missed the game with an unspecied injury. MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL LUKE MEREDITHAP Sports WriterIOWA CITY, Iowa Aaron White scored all of his 18 points in the second half and Josh Oglesby added a sea son-high 17 points as 14th-ranked Iowa blew past Minnesota 94-73 on Sunday. Devyn Marble had 15 of his 16 points after halftime for the surging Hawkeyes, who moved into third place in the Big Ten behind Michigan State and Michigan. Iowa (15-3, 4-1 Big Ten) overcame a 10-point decit with a 29-10 run and out scored the Gophers 53-30 in the second half. Andre Hollins had a game-high 20 points for Minnesota (145, 3-3). But Iowa held Hollins without a eld goal in the second half in handing the Gophers their most lopsided loss of the sea son. Last season, Iowa used a 37-10 run to erase a 16-point decit and blow past the Gophers in Iowa City. On Sunday, the Hawkeyes outscored the Gophers by 19 points in just 6 minutes to notch its 20th straight home win one shy of the Carver-Hawkeye Arena record. An 11-0 run helped put Minnesota ahead 43-33 late in the rst half, but Oglesby hit back-to-back 3s as the Hawkeyes got the decit down to 2 by half time. Marble then caught re, scoring 14 points in the opening 8:41 of the second half to help Iowa take a 71-59 lead with 11:19 left. Whites 3-point play with 4:35 left was a back-breaker for the Gophers, who missed all eight of their 3-point tries in the second half. Austin Hollins had 13 for the Gophers, who came to Iowa City on a roll. After pushing league leaders Michigan State to overtime in East Lan sing, Minnesota beat No. 11 Ohio State 63-53 on Thursday for its third win in four games. The Gophers started strong in this one too, keeping Mar ble and White scoreless for nearly 18 min utes in the rst half. But Oglesby capped a brilliant half with an off-balance 25-footer that pulled the Hawkeyes within 4341. Oglesby, who missed the rst 12 games with a foot injury, had 14 rst-half points to keep the Hawkeyes in the game. Iowa had a week off after a program-dening upset at Ohio State, which was likely a big reason why it looked so sluggish in the rst 20 minutes. But Mar ble opened the second half with his rst bas ket of the day and fol lowed with a pair of 3s, waking up a sellout crowd and putting the Hawkeyes ahead 5246. Iowa is now a game back of Michigan for sec ond place in the league but it wont have to wait long for a shot at the Wolverines. Michigan hosts the Hawkeyes on Wednesday. WRIGHT ST. 49, CLEVELAND ST. 46CLEVELAND Jer ran Young scored 10 points and Wright State held off a late rally from Cleveland State for a 49-46 win on Sunday. Wright State (12-9, 4-2 Horizon League) led 49-40 with 3:15 left after Matt Vests dunk before Cleveland State (11-9, 3-3) scored the last six points of the game. Cleveland States Trey Lewis scored with 44 seconds left to bring the Vikings within 49-46. Follow ing a shot-clock viola tion from Wright State, Lewis had a 3-point at tempt at the buzzer but the shot bounced off the rim as the Raid ers held on. Young was the lone Wright State scorer in double digits as the Raiders shot just 33.3 percent from the eld. Vest had nine points. Jon Harris scored 17 points to go along with 11 rebounds for the Vikings.White helps No. 14 Iowa blow past Minnesota 94-73 CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Iowa guard Mike Gesell, bottom, ghts for a loose ball with Minnesota center Elliott Eliason, top right, during the rst half on Sunday in Iowa City, Iowa. WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL OLYMPICS FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS In a Feb. 28, 2010, le photo Canadas Sidney Crosby leaps in the air after making the game-winning goal in the overtime period of a mens gold medal ice hockey game against USA at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Associated Press OTTAWA, Ontario Sid the Kid is now Captain Canada. Pittsburgh Penguins star Sidney Crosby, who lifted his home country to gold in Vancouver four years ago, will captain the Canadian hockey team in Sochi. You hear names being kind of thrown around, Crosby said. Theres so many leaders and so many guys capable of leading by example. Its just an honor. The 26-year-old cur rently leads the NHL in scoring and has become the face of both the NHL and hockey in Canada. The Chicago Blackhawks Jonathan Toews and the Nashville Pred ators Shea Weber will be alternate captains, Hockey Canada an nounced Sunday. Sidney, Jonathan and Shea have been leaders on the interna tional stage in the past, as well as with their NHL teams, coach Mike Babcock said in a statement. These three players will be at the forefront of our efforts in Sochi, but we are condent we have 25 players on our roster that will lead in their own way and allow our team to be successful. Crosby was made the youngest captain in NHL history when he got the C for the Penguins 6 years ago. Sid the Kid now known as Captain Canada Associated PressST. LOUIS Shelby Miller pitched just one inning in the playoffs last season for the Car dinals and is puzzled why he wasnt used more. Now he simply wants to get on with next season. Its tough to not get to pitch in the post season and stuff, but at the same time, we had a good thing going and its hard to change it up, Miller said Sun day during the annual Cardinals Winter Warmup. I dont really have a good answer for it to be honest. We were winning games, so you cant really complain. Miller had a 15-9 re cord last year with a 3.06 ERA, 10th best in the league. In the post season, the 23-yearold rookie right-hander pitched one inning of relief against Pittsburgh in the NL divi sion series. He gave up a home run. And that was it. He says there were no injury concerns with this shoulder and he wasnt tired. Physically, I felt amazing, he said. I felt good. I didnt feel any better or worse than I did during the season. No one in the organization told him why he was put on the shelf. Nor did he ask for a rea son, either. The season just kind of ended and I just kind of put it in the past really, Miller said. I was a little upset I didnt pitch but I just put it away. After the season end ed, I just wanted to be ready for a big offsea son. I didnt want to dwell on the past and why I didnt pitch in October. Im not worried about it anymore. Im just going to let it be a mystery. A mystery unsolved.BASEBALLCardinals Shelby Miller armed for coming season ASSOCIATED PRESS Cardinals rookie right-hander Shelby Miller doesnt know why he wasnt used in the postseason. Now, he simply wants to get on with the game. BUTCH DILL / AP Auburns Tyrese Tanner (32), Kentuckys Kastine Evans (32), Linnae Harper (15) and Auburns Peyton Davis (34) ght for a rebound on Sunday in Auburn, Ala. Kentucky defeated Auburn 73-71. Randolph scores career-high 26 as Virginia rolls by No. 17 Florida State

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 NHL NBA JAY COHENAP Sports WriterCHICAGO Patrick Kane scored in a shootout to lift the Chicago Blackhawks to a 3-2 victory over the Boston Bruins on Sunday in a rematch of last seasons Stanley Cup nals. Jonathan Toews beat Tuukka Rask on the stick side to give the Blackhawks the lead in the tiebreaker, but Brad Marchands quick wrist shot got by Corey Crawford, tying it up for the Bruins. Kane, who won the Conn Smythe Trophy last year as playoff MVP, then skated toward the net, slowed up for a second and sent a shot past Rask on the stick side to give Chicago the win. The Blackhawks had lost their past seven games that had gone past regulation. Marian Hossa and Brandon Bollig had the regulation goals for Chicago, which beat Boston in six games in June for the title. Coach Joel Quenneville picked up win No. 692, matching Dick Irvin Sr., for third on the NHLs career list. Marchand scored in each of the rst two periods for the Bruins, who had won two of three. Rask had 35 stops. It was Bostons rst visit to Chicago since June 22, when the Blackhawks used two goals by Kane to win 3-1 and take a 3-2 lead in the NHL nals. The Blackhawks then had a memorable ral ly in Game 6 in Bos ton, scoring twice in 17 seconds late in the third period to secure their second title in four seasons. The series included ve overtime peri ods, including three in Chicagos 4-3 victory in Game 1. Together again for the anticipated rematch, the Bruins and Blackhawks once again were unable to decide the game in three periods. Defenseman Gregory Campbell had a chance to win it for Boston in overtime, but whiffed on a deected puck. Chicago controlled much of the rst period and had a 1-0 lead before Marchand made the most of two open opportunities in a 69-second span overlapping the rst two periods. First, Marchand got a slick pass from Patrice Bergeron and sent a wrist shot over Crawfords right shoulder at 19:41 of the rst. The Blackhawks lost the sneaky forward again at the start of the second, and he used a clever fake to set up a shot through Crawfords legs for his 14th goal. It was Marchands second multigoal game of the season. He has four goals and an assist in his past three games. Bostons 2-1 lead lasted about 10 minutes. The Blackhawks caught a break when Bolligs bad-angle shot from the right side went off Rasks left foot and into the net for his fth goal of the season. Associated PressNEW YORK A re cord 98 underclassmen, including Johnny Manziel and Jadeveon Clowney, have made themselves eligible for the NFL draft in May. The league released the list of early entrants Sunday and said the number has risen six straight seasons. The deadline for under classmen to apply was Jan. 15. Last year, 73 under classmen entered the draft. The year before it was 65 and in 2011 it was 56. Also, four players who recently graduated and still have el igibility left are joining the draft class but arent included in the number. Most notable among those is Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. Southern California defensive back Dion Bailey, Ari zona State linebacker Carl Bradford and Alabama linebacker Adrian Hubbard are also juniors who have informed the league they have graduated. Among the early entrants expected to be se lected near the top of the draft are Manziel, the Texas A&M quarterback, Clowney, the defensive end from South Caroli na, and Clemson receiver Sammy Watkins. The draft is May 8-10 in New York. LSU for the second straight season had the most players of any school to leave early. The Tigers had seven early entrants this season, including wide re ceivers Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham Jr., after 11 LSU players left early last year. Alabama and South ern California each had ve leave early, along with California. Cal, which went 1-11, has six players listed among the early entrants, but that includes defensive end Chris McCain, who was dismissed from the team in September. National champion Florida State lost four players early, including All-America defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan and receiver Kelvin Benjamin, who caught the winning touch down in the BCS cham pionship game against Auburn. Notre Dame, Florida and South Car olina also had four ear ly entrants.Record 98 underclassmen eligible for NFL draftNFL JOHN RAOUX / AP Wisconsin running back James White (20) is tackled by South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney (7) during the rst half of the Capital One Bowl NCAA college football game on Jan. 1 in Orlando. IAN HARRISONAssociated PressTORONTO Nick Young says the Los Angeles Lakers have woken up since air ing some grievances at a team meeting last week. Young returned from suspension to score 29 points, Pau Gasol had 22 and the Lakers beat the Toronto Raptors 112-106 on Sun day, just their third win in 15 games. Nicks been doing it all year and he just keeps going, Lakers coach Mike DAntoni said. Young was suspend ed for Fridays victory at Boston after he was ejected for throwing a punch at Phoenixs Go ran Dragic in a loss last Wednesday. Rested and refreshed, Young scored 15 points in the fourth quarter as the Lakers overcame a 19-point rst-half decit. They won back-to-back games for the rst time since beating Memphis on Dec. 17 and Minne sota on Dec. 20. Los Angeles held a team meeting before Fridays game to ad dress Youngs ejection, and suggestions that his teammates had not done enough to stand up for him after a hard foul by Suns center Alex Len. Young called the meeting a turning point in whats been a dismal season so far. We had an altercation that woke us all up and were out there battling with each other now, Young said. Now were just laying it out there. Ryan Kelly scored 17 in his rst career start and Kendall Marshall had 10 points and 11 assists. Kelly said Fridays meeting underscored a lack of urgency in both the teams re sponse to Lens foul on Young, and the Lakers play in general. That was carrying over into the game, a lack of urgency to get back on defense, a lack of urgency to rebound and things like that, Kelly said. When we saw that on tape, thats the one thing it did for us is to make us realize that on every play, every possession, we have to have that sense of urgency. The Lakers reached the midway point of the season with a re cord of 16-25. Its really gratifying to win back-to-back games on the road, especially with the way weve been struggling, Gasol said. Im just really proud of the guys. Theyre stepping up, theyre bring ing the effort, bringing the intensity, bringing the focus and not want ing to give up. Long-term injuries to Steve Nash and Kobe Bryant have made life rough on the Lakers, but they havent given up on a playoff push. If we keep plugging along, maybe well get some luck here and get some guys back, DAn toni said. With Bryant sidelined by a sore left knee, Kelly said Young has become the player the Lakers turn to when the shot clock is winding down. If weve got seven seconds on the clock, you give Nick the ball hell nd a way to get a shot or get to the line. FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS Los Angeles Lakers forward Wesley Johnson (11) picks up an offensive fouls as he drives through Toronto Raptors forward Amir Johnson (15) during rst-half NBA basketball game action on Sunday in Toronto.Kane scores in SO as Blackhawks top Bruins NAM Y. HUH / AP Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford (50), left, blocks a shot by Boston Bruins Brad Marchand (63). Young scores 29 as Lakers beat Raptors

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Abu Dhabi Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Abu Dhabi Golf Club Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Purse: $2.7 million Yardage: 7,583; Par: 72 Final Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-70-68-67 274 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 70-67-70-68 275 Phil Mickelson, United States 73-70-63-69 275 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 67-68-73-68 276 George Coetzee, South Africa 68-70-72-66 276 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-72-68 278 Johan Carlsson, Sweden 73-70-71-65 279 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 70-73-68-69 280 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 73-67-72-68 280 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 72-68-66-75 281 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 70-67-72-72 281 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 70-70-75-66 281 Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-70-69-72 281 Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-70-71 281 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-71-68-73 281 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-70-68-73 281 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-68-67-73 281 Craig Lee, Scotland 68-67-69-77 281 Also Sergio Garcia, Spain 76-68-70-68 282 Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-71-69-74 284 Matteo Manassero, Italy 71-73-70-70 284 Luke Donald, England 70-73-71-71 285 Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 73-68-74-71 286 Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 74-69-72-73 288 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-70-73-73 289 KAMRAN JEBREILI / AP Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland, second right, taps on the shoulder of the winner of the tournament, Pablo Larrazabal of Spain, second left, as Phil Mickelson of the U.S., rst right, looks at them after the nal round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship on Sunday in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates Spains Pablo Larrazabal shot a nal round 67 to end a near threeyear winless drought to capture the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship on Sunday. Larrazabal, 30, won by a stroke with a 14-under par 274 on the National Course in the UAE capital. Rory McIlroy (68), who had incurred a two-stroke penalty a day earlier, nished with a share of second place with Phil Micklelson (69) on 13 under. It means a lot to win my third victory on Tour and playing against who I played today, said Larrazabal. Of course, I play against myself but I knew who I also had behind me in Mickel son. I have just beaten two of the three most talented guys in my era, and in the last era, as well in Phil Mickelson and Rory. Mickelson was left counting the cost of incurring a shot penalty after a double hit while playing from brush on the 13th hole of the National course. The British Open champion, who was leading at the time, nished the hole with a triple-bogey seven. I was sitting at the presentation ceremony I said to myself: Pablo? What are you doing here? Ive got Rory McIlroy on my left and I am shaking the hand of Phil Mickelson on my right. Its very special for me, added Larrazabal after collecting the trophy. But its been a long journey and a lot of work since my last win in Munich, and only my team and my family know how hard I have worked for this victory with no hol idays, and not too many days off this winter, just working hard to arrive here properly and in form to Abu Dhabi. So, yes happy days. While Mickelson was returning home for his rst PGA event of the New Year, at this coming weeks Farm ers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines, McIlroy is returning to near by Dubai to continue working on his game. It is the second occasion in three years he has let slip victory in Abu Dhabi because of a rules violation. It happens, it happens but it never crossed my mind I might double hit it, Mickelson said. I was just trying to dribble it out of the bush because I couldnt get the unplayable penalty lie to give me a shot without stroke and distance and I felt it was worth the risk. It not only cost a pen alty shot, but it also stopped the ball from going to a spot where I could hit again. So after that I got refocused and got aggressive and made some birdies and gave myself a chance. If Pablo had not birdied the last hole to win, I would have gotten into a play-off, and so I give him a lot of credit for nishing the tournament off the right way. McIlroy had been penalized for illegally brushing sand off his line on the nal day of the 2012 event before losing by a stroke to Englands Robert Rock. On Saturday, the double Major winner was slapped with a two-shot penalty after being reported by the caddy of another player in not taking full relief from a spectator cross walk.Larrazabal wins Abu Dhabi ChampionshipSpaniard shoots nal-round 67 to win Abu Dhabi Championship from McIlroy, Mickelson JOHN NICHOLSONAP Sports WriterLA QUINTA, Calif. Patrick Reed lost his putting touch for a few hours in the nal round of the Humana Challenge. He found it when things were getting interesting. After shooting three straight 9-under 63s to open a seven-stroke lead, Reed had a 1-un der 71 on Sunday at PGA Wests Arnold Palmer Private Course to beat Ryan Palmer by two strokes. It was tough out there, Reed said. Finally resembling the guy who talked Sat urday about being in a putting coma, Reed ran in an 18-footer for birdie on the par-3 15th to push his advantage to three strokes and parred the nal three holes. He completed the wire-to-wire victory at 28-under 260. I started toward the end playing for par, just because I knew pars werent going to hurt me, Reed said. I knew someone was going to have to do something spectacular to catch me. The 23-year-old Reed has two victories in his rst 46 PGA Tour starts, winning the Wyndham Championship in August. He was projected to jump from 73rd to 42nd in the world rank ing, enough to lock up a spot next month in the 64-man Match Play Championship eld. Palmer made a 15foot eagle putt on the nal hole for a 63. What can you do with what Patrick did this week? Palmer said. Its ridiculous what he did. Amazing how good he played. Well come up a couple short, but it was a win in my game because I was playing for second today. Zach Johnson and Justin Leonard tied for third at 25 under. John son birdied the nal ve holes for a 62, the best round of the week. I got red hot at the end, Johnson said. I played really good early, missed a couple putts, but I made a bunch at the end. The Kapalua winner is taking a four-week break. Hell return for the Match Play event in Arizona. I know its a neces sity, I know its good for me, its good for my family, but Im also hes itant because Im play ing well, Johnson said. Hopefully, I can main tain where Im at. Main tain my posture and my fundamentals, and that sort of thing, and come back out here in Tuc son ready to go. Leonard parred his last two for a 65. Its a great week, Leonard said. Would love to have made a few more putts today, but its such a fun journey. Im cutting my schedule back this year and all this does is kind of free me up to do that. Other than a key 18-footer on No. 15, the longest putt Reed holed was a 5-footer for a par save on the par-4 13th. That also was a crucial putt after he played the previous eight holes in 1 over with four bogeys, three birdies and a par. In that eight-hole stretch, Todd missed two 6-foot par putts and an 8-footer and dropped another stroke with a poor bun ker shot on the par3 12th. He two-putted for birdie on two par 5s and made a 4-footer on the par-4 eighth for the other birdie. Reed also two-putted from 12 feet for a bird ie on the par-5 second hole, but his eagle putt near had a chance signaling that his putter had cooled off over night. PGA-Humana Challenge Scores Sunday p-PGA West, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par 72 n-PGA West, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards, par 72 q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards, par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5.7 million Final Patrick Reed (500), $1,026,000 63p-63q-63n-71 260 Ryan Palmer (300), $615,600 64p-65q-70n-63 262 Zach Johnson (163), $330,600 65q-68n-68p-62 263 Justin Leonard (163), $330,600 66n-67p-65q-65 263 Brian Stuard (110), $228,000 67q-66n-66p-65 264 Bill Haas (95), $198,075 65q-66n-67p-67 265 Brendon Todd (95), $198,075 65n-63p-68q-69 265 Chad Collins (85), $176,700 68n-68p-65q-65 266 Stuart Appleby (73), $148,200 66p-69q-67n-65 267 Charlie Beljan (73), $148,200 68q-64n-68p-67 267 Ben Crane (73), $148,200 70q-64n-65p-68 267 Charley Hoffman (73), $148,200 64q-66n-66p-71 267 Russell Knox (56), $103,740 65p-70q-67n-66 268 Matt Every (56), $103,740 65n-68p-69q-66 268 Jerry Kelly (56), $103,740 69q-65n-68p-66 268 Will MacKenzie (56), $103,740 67n-66p-66q-69 268 Matt Jones (56), $103,740 66n-67p-66q-69 268 Brendon de Jonge (51), $74,328 69q-68n-66p-66 269 Luke Guthrie (51), $74,328 69p-67q-67n-66 269 Scott Langley (51), $74,328 69q-68n-65p-67 269 Keegan Bradley (51), $74,328 69q-66n-65p-69 269 James Driscoll (51), $74,328 68p-63q-66n-72 269 Webb Simpson (48), $57,000 69p-70q-67n-64 270 Charlie Wi (48), $57,000 65p-69q-69n-67 270 Ryo Ishikawa (43), $41,681 66p-69q-69n-67 271 Tyrone Van Aswegen (43), $41,681 69n-67p-67q-68 271 Martin Flores (43), $41,681 69p-65q-69n-68 271 Johnson Wagner (43), $41,681 72p-66q-68n-65 271 Martin Laird (43), $41,681 69n-66p-68q-68 271 Hudson Swafford (43), $41,681 65n-71p-70q-65 271 Billy Horschel (43), $41,681 72p-65q-70n-64 271 Roberto Castro (43), $41,681 68p-73q-66n-64 271 Camilo Villegas (36), $30,780 70n-66p-68q-68 272 Harris English (36), $30,780 67q-66n-71p-68 272 Josh Teater (36), $30,780 68n-68p-70q-66 272 Rickie Fowler (36), $30,780 68q-71n-67p-66 272 Jason Bohn (36), $30,780 70q-65n-66p-71 272 Bryce Molder (29), $21,660 69p-72q-63n-69 273 Gary Woodland (29), $21,660 69p-71q-65n-68 273 Andrew Svoboda (29), $21,660 69n-69p-66q-69 273 Cameron Tringale (29), $21,660 68q-66n-70p-69 273 Jeff Overton (29), $21,660 70q-67n-67p-69 273 Brian Davis (29), $21,660 69p-71q-66n-67 273 Spencer Levin (29), $21,660 69p-68q-66n-70 273 Rory Sabbatini (29), $21,660 68p-67q-67n-71 273 Seung-Yul Noh (29), $21,660 68p-66q-66n-73 273 James Hahn (29), $21,660 70p-68q-69n-66 273 Justin Hicks (19), $13,817 64n-71p-70q-69 274 John Merrick (19), $13,817 66q-70n-69p-69 274 Kevin Kisner (19), $13,817 66n-70p-69q-69 274 Brad Fritsch (19), $13,817 67p-70q-67n-70 274 Scott Brown (19), $13,817 67p-68q-70n-69 274 Bo Van Pelt (19), $13,817 70q-68n-67p-69 274 Kevin Na (19), $13,817 68n-68p-68q-70 274 Brice Garnett (19), $13,817 67p-69q-68n-70 274 Steven Bowditch (19), $13,817 71n-67p-68q-68 274 Michael Putnam (19), $13,817 68q-69n-70p-67 274 Harrison Frazar (8), $12,198 69n-68p-68q-70 275 Pat Perez (8), $12,198 69q-70n-66p-70 275 Brandt Snedeker (8), $12,198 72q-64n-69p-70 275 Davis Love III (8), $12,198 69p-68q-69n-69 275 Daniel Summerhays (8), $12,198 64n-69p-73q-69 275 Kevin Chappell (8), $12,198 70q-70n-63p-72 275 Charles Howell III (8), $12,198 73n-68p-65q-69 275 Scott Stallings (8), $12,198 68n-69p-69q-69 275 Jonathan Byrd (8), $12,198 68p-69q-65n-73 275 Stewart Cink (8), $12,198 73q-63n-71p-68 275 Lee Williams (8), $12,198 70n-68p-69q-68 275 Erik Compton (1), $11,172 70q-66n-70p-70 276 Jim Herman (1), $11,172 67n-68p-68q-73 276 Blake Adams (1), $11,172 70p-70q-66n-70 276 Ken Duke (1), $11,172 71p-70q-65n-70 276 Nicholas Thompson (1), $11,172 71p-69q-67n-69 276 Chad Campbell (1), $11,172 71p-68q-68n-69 276 John Senden (1), $11,172 71n-70p-66q-69 276 William McGirt (1), $10,659 70n-70p-64q-73 277 Freddie Jacobson (1), $10,659 71p-68q-68n-70 277 David Lingmerth (1), $10,431 69q-68n-69p-72 278 Kevin Stadler (1), $10,431 69n-66p-72q-71 278 Brett Quigley (1), $10,260 66q-73n-68p-72 279 Scott McCarron (1), $10,146 72q-69n-66p-73 280 J.J. Henry (1), $9,975 71n-70p-65q-75 281 Brian Harman (1), $9,975 69n-66p-72q-74 281 Patrick Reed holds on to win Humana Challenge MATT YORK Patrick Reed kisses the trophy on Sunday after the nal round of the Humana Challenge PGA golf tournament on the Palmer Private course at PGA West in La Quinta, Calif. CHRIS CARLSON / AP Zach Johnson watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during the nal round of the Humana Challenge golf tournament on Sunday on the Palmer Private course at PGA West in La Quinta, Calif.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 Arts/CulturalAn individual whose personal or professional talents/activities in the cultural arts have contributed to the enrichment of Lake County.Hall of Fame Business AwardFor career business achievement of 20 years or more.Business AchievementA business leader whose achievements within his or her field have aided the economic business climate of Lake County. Categories: Small Medium (12-39 employees) Large EntrepreneurEducationAn employed, elected or volunteer educator who has shown innovation and dedication to public or private schools in Lake County.HumanitarianAn individual whose volunteer activities have improved the quality of life in Lake County..Public ServiceAn outstanding elected or employed official of state, county or city government; or a volunteer who has made contributions toward improving Lake Countys quality of life.Sports/AthleticsA person who has achieved in sports through performance or in promotion of athletic events in Lake County.Chris Daniels Memorial Public Safety AwardTo recognize an individual in the area of Public Safety who has demonstrated superior performance in their career, and has shown a commitment to better the Lake County through community involvement. This would include those persons in Lake County in the careers of law enforcement, fire, emergency medical services and emergency management.Special Judges AwardAwarded at the discretion of the judges for particularly outstanding contributions to Lake CountyLake County Leadership AwardAn individual whose guidance & leadership has impacted Lake CoNominations must be postmarked by February 21, 2014 Mail to:LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS Lake County League of Cities or email to myersj@ci.eustis.fl.us CommunityService Awards NOMINATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED!Applications will be Printed in the THURSDAY EDITION of the Daily Commercial Were sure you know a person whose dedication and selflessness have made Lake County a better place. Now its time to give them the recognition they deserve.Nominating someone is easy. Nomination forms will be printed in the Thursday editions of the Daily Commercial, can be picked up at the Chamber of Commerce offices and City Halls throughout Lake County or you can contact Janice Jones (phone: 352-483-5440 or email: JonesJ@ci.eustis.fl.us.com) and have one sent to you. You can also access and submit the nomination form on-line at www.dailycommercial.comIf selected, your nominee will be honored at the 2014 Lake County Community Service Awards Dinner on April 30, 2014.SO SHOW YOUR APPRECIATION. MAKE YOUR NOMINATIONS TODAY! Your First Choice In-Print & On-Line JOHN PYEAP Sports WriterMELBOURNE, Australia The powerful serve that carried Ser ena Williams to 25 con secutive wins sudden ly became the target of Ana Ivanovics attack in a major fourth-round upset at the Australian Open. Williams had a back complaint shed tried to keep secret before Sunday but Ivanovic noticed almost immediately that her serve wasnt as fast as shed expected, and she started taking big swipes at it. The No. 14-seeded Ivanovic ended Williams bid for a sixth Australian and 18th Grand Slam title with a 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 victory that took the hottest of favorites out of con tention at Melbourne Park and opened up one side of the wom ens draw. Its not easy play ing such a champion ... but she is also just a human, said Iva novic, who beat Venus Williams in the nal at Auckland, New Zealand earlier this month. I just went out there swinging. Williams hadnt lost a match since August, and went 78-4 in 2013. She came into the fourth round with those 25 straight wins, the second-longest streak of her career, and it was her 70th match at Melbourne Park, a record in the Open era. Williams had just set the mark for most match wins (61) ever at the Australian Open with her third-round victory. The No. 1-ranked Williams didnt move her feet well, and was lung ing for balls. When she tried to step up the intensity in the third set, her grunts becoming louder and more frequent until she toned it down after spraying a wild backhand wide in the next-to-last game, Ivanovic matched her stroke for stroke. It wasnt the best, Williams told a news conference, after being told that her coach had leaked news of a back problem. Again, I dont want to blame anything. I feel like Ana deserves all the credit, Williams added. I feel she played unbelievable today. I think she went for her shots. Its not like I gave her the match. Ivanovic advanced to the quarternals here for the rst time since her run to the 2008 nal and will next play the winner of Sundays later match between Aus tralian wild-card entry Casey Dellacqua and No. 30-seeded Eugenie Bouchard. The other quarternal on this half will fea ture two women wholl turn 32 next month, af ter two-time nalist Li Na beat No. 22 Ekater ina Makarova 6-2, 6-0 and No. 28 Flavia Pen netta upset No. 9 Angelique Kerber 6-1, 4-6, 7-5. Novak Djokovic continued his bid for a fourth straight title here with a 6-3, 6-0, 6-2 win over Fabio Fognini in 1 hours, while No. 3-seeded David Ferrer advanced to the quar ternals by beating Florian Mayer 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-2, 6-1. In the 52 previous matches here where shed won the rst set, Williams had only ever lost one match against fellow American Sloane Stephens in last years quarternals. The crowd was evenly divided at rst but, sensing an upset, started backing Ivanovic, the former girlfriend of Australian golfer Adam Scott, as the match progressed. After dropping serve twice in the rst set, Ivanovic didnt face an other break point in the second or third sets. She broke Williams three times, frequently standing well inside the baseline to receive. She had 33 winners, including 20 on her forehand side. She also had a little bit of luck, when she drove a back hand into the top of the net, and it looped over and caught the line at an important stage of the third set. I had to remind my self all the time just to stay in the moment, because there were moments in the match where it could have gone either way, Ivanovic said. But I really just believed in my game and stepped up when I needed to. Ivanovic won her only major at the French Open in 2008, giving her the No. 1 ranking for a total of 12 weeks. But then she only advanced past the fourth round once at 22 Grand Slams. I had to break a spell, fourth round, Ivanovic said, and whats the better place to do it than here against such a champion? Williams hit 22 win ners but made 31 un forced errors, mostly on her backhand. I made a tremendous amount of er rors, shots ... I havent missed since the s, Williams said. Williams, pausing to concentrate, was given a warning for a time vio lation in her last service game, and fended off a match point when Ivanovic netted a return. In the next game, though, Ivanovic set up triple match point when Williams hit a service return too long, and then clinched it just under two hours. Williams didnt say exactly what the back injury was, but thought shed get over it in a few days with some rest. Shed thought about pulling out of the tour nament, but it wasnt in her nature to concede defeat. Maybe I wasnt the best physically, but that had nothing to do with it, Williams said. I think Ana just played a really good match. She did what it takes to win.Ivanovic ousts Serena in historic upset AARON FAVIA / AP Serena Williams of the U.S. rests on her racket during her fourth round loss to Ana Ivanovic of Serbia on Sunday at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014SMOKING: Surgeon general adds to list of harms / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Line dance classes to be offered every TuesdayRay Johnston is the instructor for line dance classes taking place from 1 to 2:30 p.m., every Tuesday, at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St. For information, call 352-7878044, or 352-324-2327. LADY LAKE Essential tremor support group meeting is WednesdayShare with others who have this disease at 2 p.m., Wednesday, St. Timothy Ministry Building, 1351 Paige Place in Lady Lake. Participants will learn about methods of coping, using medications, helpful hints, support and understanding for you and your caregiver. Heather Simpson, occupational therapist from Shands Hospital in Gainesville, is the guest speaker for this meeting. For information, call 352-787-3866, or email kstaylor62@usa2net.net.TAVARES Support groups, classes at Florida Hospital WatermanOvereaters Anonymous group meets at 5:30 p.m., every Thursday, in Mattison Conference Room E, Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way, Tavares. Call 352223-9769. Childbirth classes are held on an ongoing basis. For details and registration, call 352-253-3367 or email Cheryl.Finotti@ahss.org. Look Good Feel Better Amer ican Cancer Society program meets from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., on the second Monday of every other month, at the hospitals Cancer Institute Waterman Conference Room, Tavares. Call Latanya Ruiz at 352-253-3605. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meetings are held at 10 a.m., the rst Friday of every month, in Mattison Conference Room F, at the hospital in Tavares. Call 352-638-0663, or email pityusnot@hotmail.com.TAVARES Osteoarthritis pain classes to be offered Put Pain in its Place-How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control is the topic to be discussed at two free classes. Get the facts about osteoarthritis and lean strategies for controlling and preventing pain, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., Thursday, at the Lake County Extension ofce, 1951 Woodlea Rd., in Tavares. For registration, go to lakepaininplace.eventbrite.com. The second class will be from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., on Feb. 7 at the Umatilla Public Library in Umatilla. For registration, go to umatillapain2014.eventbrite.com. MARTHA MENDOZAAP National WriterMOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. Brian Otis ginger ly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index nger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glit ter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of min iaturized transistors. Its ringed with a hair-thin antenna. Together these remarkable miniature electronics can monitor glucose levels in tears of diabetics and then wire lessly transmit them to a handheld device. It doesnt look like much, but it was a cra zy amount of work to get everything so very small, he said before the project was unveiled Thursday. During years of sol dering hair-thin wires to miniaturize electronics, Otis burned his ngertips so often that he can no longer feel the tiny chips he made from scratch in Googles Silicon Valley headquarters, a small price to pay for what he says is the smallest wire less glucose sensor ever made. Just 35 miles away in the beach town of Santa Cruz, high school soccer coach and university se nior Michael Vahradian, 21, has his own set of ngertip callouses, his from pricking himself up to 10 times a day for the past 17 years to draw blood for his glucose meter. A cellphone-sized pump on his hip that attaches to a exible tube implanted in his stomach shoots rap id-acting insulin into his body around the clock. I remember at rst it was really hard to make the needle sticks a habit because it hurt so much, he said. And there are still times I dont want to do it it hurts and its incon venient. When Im hanging out with friends, head ing down to the beach to body-surf or going to lunch, I have to hold ev eryone up to take my Googles contact lens prototype could be option for diabetics AP FILE PHOTO This undated photo released by Google shows a contact lens Google is testing to explore tear glucose. ARNIE STAPLETONAP Pro Football WriterENGLEWOOD, Colo. Of all the decisions coach John Fox made that kept the Den ver Broncos rolling through a drama-lled season, one was an absolute life-saver. Instead of going out on his shing boat for some solitude during his teams bye week, Fox decided to play 18 holes with some buddies some 200 yards from his offseason home in Charlotte, N.C. Id have been 60 miles out in the woods, Fox said. They might never have found me. Fox had just seen his cardiologist in Raleigh, who told him hed still be able to de lay his heart operation until after the Super Bowl so long as he didnt feel faint or short of breath in the meantime. Fox was born with a genetic de fect in his aortic valve, which regu lates blood ow from the heart into the aorta, the major blood vessel that brings blood into the body. He said it was discovered in 1997 when a murmur showed up in a physical while he was the Giants defensive coordinator. Feeling dizzy, he chipped with in 2 feet for par, then lay down on the 14th green and, hardly able to breathe, said a short prayer: God John Foxs biggest decision was a life-saver ED ANDRIESKI / AP SEE GOOGLE | C2SEE FOX | C3

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The prototype, which Google says will take at least ve years to reach consumers, is one of several medical devices being designed by companies to make glucose monitoring for diabetic patients more convenient and less invasive than traditional nger pricks. The contact lenses were developed during the past 18 months in the clandestine Goo gle X lab that also came up with a driverless car, Googles Web-surng eyeglasses and Proj ect Loon, a network of large balloons designed to beam the Internet to unwired places. But research on the contact lenses began several years ear lier at the University of Washington, where sci entists worked under National Science Foundation funding. Until Thursday, when Google shared information about the project with The Associated Press, the work had been kept under wraps. You can take it to a certain level in an ac ademic setting, but at Google we were given the latitude to invest in this project, Otis said. The beautiful thing is were leveraging all of the innovation in the semiconductor industry that was aimed at mak ing cellphones smaller and more powerful. American Diabetes Association board chair Dwight Holing said hes gratied that creative scientists are searching for solutions for people with diabetes but warned that the device must provide accurate and timely information. People with diabe tes base very important health care decisions on the data we get from our monitors, he said. Other non-needle glucose monitor ing systems are also in the works, including a similar contact lens by Netherlands-based NovioSense, a minus cule, exible spring that is tucked under an eyelid. Israel-based OrSense has already tested a thumb cuff, and there have been early designs for tattoos and saliva sensors. A wristwatch mon itor was approved by the FDA in 2001, but patients said the low level electric currents pulling uid from their skin was painful, and it was buggy. There are a lot of people who have big promises, said Dr. Christopher Wilson, CEO of NovioSense. Its just a question of who gets to market with something that really works rst. Palo Alto Medical Foundation endocrinologist Dr. Larry Levin said it was remarkable and important that a tech rm like Google is getting into the medical eld and that hed like to be able to offer his patients a pain-free alternative from either pricking their ngers or living with a thick nee dle embedded in their stomach for constant monitoring. Worldwide, the glucose-monitoring devices market is expect ed to be more than $16 billion by the end of this year, according to analysts at Renub Re search. The Google team built the wireless chips in clean rooms and used advanced engi neering to get integrat ed circuits and a glucose sensor into such a small space. Researchers also had to build in a system to pull energy from incoming radio frequency waves to power the device enough to collect and transmit one glucose reading per second. The embedded electronics in the lens dont obscure vision because they lie outside the eyes pupil and iris. Google is now look ing for partners with experience bringing similar products to market. Google ofcials declined to say how many people worked on the project or how much the rm has invested in it. Dr. David Klonoff, medical director of the diabetes research institute at Mills-Peninsula Health Services in San Mateo, worked with Google to see wheth er glucose is present in tears and whether the amount of glu cose is proportional to the amount of glucose in blood. Hes still analyzing but optimistic about his ndings and warns there are many potential pitfalls. Already this has some breakthrough technologies, but this is a moonshot, there are so many challeng es, he said. One is guring out how to correlate glucose levels in tears as compared with blood. And what happens on windy days, while chopping onions or during very sad movies? As with any med ical device, it would need to be tested and proved accurate, safe, and at least as good as other types of glucose sensors available now to win FDA approval. GOOGLE FROM PAGE C1 LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Its no secret that smoking causes lung cancer. But what about diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction? Fifty years into the war on smoking, scientists still are adding diseases to the long list of cigarettes harms even as the government struggles to get more people to kick the habit. A new report from the U.S. Surgeon Generals ofce says the nation is at a crossroads, celebrating decades of prog ress against the chief pre ventable killer but not yet poised to nish the job. The real emphasis needs to be put on the fact that we still have a major and tragic catastrophe going on, said acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak. The report, being released Friday, is a dash of cold wa ter after last weeks head lines marking the 50th anniversary of the landmark 1964 surgeon generals report that launched the anti-smoking movement. Yes, far fewer Americans smoke today about 18 percent of adults, down from more than 42 percent in 1964. But the government may not meet its goal of dropping that rate to 12 percent by 2020, the new report cautioned. Nearly half a million peo ple will die from smoking-re lated diseases this year. Each day, more than 3,200 youths smoke their rst cigarette. New products such as e-cigarettes, with effects that ar ent yet understood, compli cate public health messages. And if current trends contin ue unabated, 5.6 million of todays children and teens will go on to die prematurely during adulthood because of smoking, the report found. Remarkably, the report adds more entries to the ofcial list of smoking-caused diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, the macular degeneration that can blind older adults, two additional cancers liver and colorectal and cleft palate birth defects. Enough is enough, said Lushniak. He urged new re solve to end smoking by in creasing use of proven tobacco-control measures, including price hikes for cigarettes and expanding compre hensive indoor-smoking bans that he said currently cover about half the population. The report also encourag es research into newer ideas, such as whether lowering the amount of addictive nic otine in cigarettes would help people quit. Here are some ways the smoking landscape has changed between the 1964 surgeon generals report and Fridays: 1964: The surgeon general declares that cigarette smoking increases deaths. 2014: About 20.8 million people in the U.S. have died from smoking-related dis eases since then, a toll the report puts at 10 times the number of Americans who have died in all of the na tions wars combined. Most were smokers or former smokers, but nearly 2.5 million died from heart disease or lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke. 1964: Heavy smoking is declared the main cause of lung cancer, at least in men. The data for women, though less extensive, point in the same direction. 2014: Today, lung cancer is the top cancer killer, and women who smoke have about the same risk of dying from it as men. As smoking has declined, rates of new lung cancer diagnoses are declining nearly 3 percent a year among men and about 1 percent a year among women. 1964: Male smokers were dying of heart disease more than nonsmokers, but the surgeon general stopped short of declaring cigarettes a cause of heart disease. 2014: Today, heart disease actually claims more lives of smokers 35 and older than lung cancer does. Likewise, secondhand smoke is riskier for your heart. Smoke-free laws have been linked to re ductions in heart attacks. Fridays surgeon general re port also found that second hand smoke increases the risk of a stroke. 1964: Smoking in pregnancy results in low-birthweight babies. 2014: Fridays report said 100,000 of the smok ing-caused deaths over the past 20 years were babies who died of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, or complications from pre maturity, low birth weight or other conditions related to parents smoking. And it adds cleft palate birth defects to that list of smoking risks to babies. 1964: The more you smoke, the bigger the risk of death. 2014: Smokers are esti mated to shorten their life by more than a decade. But stopping can lower that risk; sooner is better. 1964: That rst report fo cused mostly on lung effects and couldnt prove whether certain other illnesses were caused by smoking. 2014: Doctors now know that smoking impacts nearly every organ of the body, and Fridays report said medical care for smoking-caused illnesses is costing the coun try more than $130 billion a year. Add to that lost produc tivity of more than $150 billion a year. 1964: Cigarettes were the major concern. The habit ual use of tobacco is related primarily to psychological and social drives, reinforced and perpetuated by phar macological (drug) actions of nicotine. 2014: The tobacco industry continues to introduce and market new products that establish and maintain nicotine addiction, Fridays report says. The percentage of middle and high school students who use electron ic or e-cigarettes more than doubled between 2011 and 2012.Surgeon general adds to list of smokings harms PAT WELLENBACH / AP This le photo shows packs of cigarettes in a store in Brunswick, Maine.

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION you get me out of this and Ill get it xed now. Less than 48 hours later, on Nov. 4, he underwent openheart surgery. Four days after that, he was released from the hospital and his wife helped him set up a command center at his home in Charlotte to keep tabs on his team back in Denver. Not only was he in daily con tact with defensive coordi nator Jack Del Rio, who guid ed the Broncos to three wins in four games during in his ab sence, but Fox was also in con stant communication with his captains, including quarterback Peyton Manning. Fox watched cut-ups of practices on his iPad playbook to help formulate game plans and he watched games on his bigscreen TV. The lone loss during his hia tus was a 34-31 overtime heartbreaker at New England on Nov. 24 when the Broncos blew a 24-0 halftime lead after cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie separated a shoulder trying to pick off Tom Bradys despera tion pass that died in the wind at the end of the rst half. Brady took advantage of D.R.C.s absence to stage the biggest comeback of his career, just as hes going to try to capi talize on the loss of cornerback Chris Harris Jr. (knee) when the Patriots (13-4) visit the Broncos (14-3) on Sunday with a trip to the Super Bowl on the line. Probably the hardest thing for the team was that we didnt know when Foxie was going to be back, Broncos executive vice president John Elway said. And in Foxies mind, he would have been back three days after the surgery. Fox and his wife, Robin, ew home on team owner Pat Bowlens jet in late November and at Del Rios suggestion he visited with the team on Thanks giving morning, then watched from his home in Denver as the Broncos beat the Chiefs 35-28 in Kansas City that weekend to take charge of the AFC West. He returned to work the fol lowing day, his newfound ener gy matching his renewed enthusiasm, saying his surgeon told him the aortic valve was now the size of a 50-cent piece instead of a pinhead. What a difference. He exuded vitality while cap turing his third division title in his three seasons since replacing Josh McDaniels in Denver, then dispatched the demons of last years playoff loss with an exhaling win over San Diego last weekend. Hes got more energy than anybody Ive ever seen, Elway said. That, to me, is the denition of John Fox: the energy lev el that he brings. He brings it to the practice eld, and its contagious. I think thats why he was a perfect t for us after what hap pened with Josh. That positive attitude that he brings turned the culture around because of the type of guy that he is. We missed his energy. Since his return on Dec. 2, Fox has more pep in his step, more boom in his voice and even more gumption in his calls. Like sending in Matt Prater for a 64-yard eld goal attempt on an icy afternoon in Denver or or dering his high-powered offense not to milk the clock with a big lead at Houston, where Man ning broke Bradys single-sea son touchdown record with a late score. Could this be the same man who had Manning take a knee with three timeouts and 31 seconds remaining in regulation in the playoff game last year af ter Baltimores Jacoby Jones 70yard game-tying TD catch? Has Fox turned in his conser vative credentials? While Fox said his health scare did cause him to re-evaluate some things, he insists it didnt have a profound effect on his approach to the job. Its like an injury to a player, Fox said. When you come back, you hope youre the same play er again. FOX FROM PAGE C1 MATTHEW PERRONEAssociated PressWASHINGTON The Food and Drug Administration on Friday cleared a rst-ofa-kind blood test that can help diagnose mental disabilities in babies by analyzing their genetic code. The laboratory test from Affymetrix detects variations in patients chromosomes that are linked to Down syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome and other developmental disor ders. About 2 to 3 per cent of U.S. children have some sort of in tellectual disability, according to the National Institutes of Health. The test, known as the CytoScan Dx Assay, is designed to help doctors diagnose childrens disabilities earlier and get them appropriate care and support. It is not intended for prenatal screening or for predicting other genetically acquired diseases and conditions, such as cancer. While there are al ready genetic tests used to detect condi tions like Downs syndrome, doctors usually have to order them individually and they can take sever al days to develop. Pe diatricians said Friday that Affymetrixs test should offer a faster, more comprehensive screening approach. Dr. Annemarie Stroustrup stressed that such tests are generally only used after children ex hibit certain physi cal or behavioral signs that suggest a disorder. When theres something about the child that strikes us as unusual or pointing to a potential genetic disease, thats when we would use this testing, said Stroustrup, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Currently hospitals in all 50 states are required to screen new borns for at least 29 disorders that can be detected though laboratory testing, including sickle cell anemia and cystic brosis. Generally those tests pickup irregularities in metabolism, not genetic varia tions. The mandatory screening program, begun a half-centu ry ago, is considered one of the nations most successful pub lic health programs. The FDA said it ap proved the new test based on studies showing it accurate ly analyzes a patients entire genome and can accurately spot variations associated with intellectual disabilities. REBECCA SANTANAAssociated PressKARACHI, Pakistan Pakistans city of Peshawar is the worlds largest pool of the po lio virus, with the vast majority of cases in the country and neighbor ing Afghanistan trac ing back to the restive northwestern city, the World Health Organization announced Friday. Some 90 percent of polio cases found around Pakistan can be genetically linked to the city, the U.N. orga nization said. Even 12 of the 13 cases reported in 2013 in neighboring Afghanistan can also be traced back to Pe shawar, ofcials said, showing the challenge of combating the dis ease in a country where militants target vacci nators. If you do not take care of this reservoir it will keep threatening other parts of the country as well. Then the nal eradication would be much more difcult, said Elias Durry, who heads the WHOs eradication efforts in Pakistan. Pakistan, along with Afghanistan and Nigeria, are the only coun tries in the world where polio remains endemic. Pakistan has struggled for years to eradicate the disease through a series of repeated vaccination campaigns of children. But that effort has been hampered in re cent years by militant attacks that have left more than 30 vaccinators and police of cers who protect them dead. Two powerful Pa kistani Taliban militants also have banned vaccinators from North and South Waziristan, two tribal regions that border Afghanistan to the west. The number of po lio cases in Pakistan jumped from 58 in 2012 to 91 in 2013. Of the polio cases recorded last year, 65 were located in the re mote tribal regions. Hundreds of thou sands of Pakistanis seeking refuge from ghting in the tribal regions in recent years have ooded into Pe shawar, which is also the capital of Khyber Paktunkhwa province. Those infected bring the disease back with them when they leave. Hundreds of thousands of Afghans also travel to and from the city daily. The WHO and the government regularly test samples of the sewage water in Peshawar as well as other major cities across the coun try. During the last six months, they detected the highly contagious polio virus in all the samples collected in Peshawar, Durry said. The organization is calling for repeated vaccination campaigns to help get rid of the disease in Peshawar. Pakistan has been under pressure inter nationally to eradicate the disease, which usually infects children liv ing in unsanitary conditions. The disease attacks the nerves and can kill or paralyze. But vaccination teams have had a hard time reaching all chil dren in parts of the troubled northwest. Durry said rough ly 260,000 children are believed to have missed vaccinations last year in North and South Waziristan. Militants claim the vaccine is meant to ster ilize Muslim children and accused health workers of being U.S. spies. The allegation gained traction after the CIA used a Pakistani doctor to try to conrm the presence of Osama bin Laden in 2011 under the guise of an immunization program. Meanwhile Friday, gunmen killed a driver, a technician and a security staffer for the private Express News television channel in the southern city of Karachi, police ofcial Javed Odho said. A spokesman for the Pa kistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement, saying that channel and other media outlets had supported the government in its war against the militants. The media outlet was attacked twice last year, with the Pakistani Taliban claiming respon sibility for one of the incidents. Five journal ists were killed last year in Pakistan, making it the fourth-deadliest country in the world for journalists, accord ing to the Committee to Protect Journalists.World Health Organization calls Pakistan city worlds largest pool of polio MUHAMMED MUHEISEN / AP Pakistani health worker Nooman Mehboob, 21, center, gives Ameeq Andriaz, 4, a polio vaccine while other women holding their children wait to have them vaccinated in a neighborhood in Islamabad, Pakistan.FDA OKs mental disability blood test for infants

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 rfntbbbnn fnb Digital Hearing Aids $249 ALL MAJOR BRANDS ARE AVAILABLE starting at$199 Digital Custom Aids $259 Don Smith, HAS, owner of Corrective Hearing Centers 9am 4pmBetter Living Through Better HearingCome Join Our GRAND OPENING of Our Golf Cart Accessible at The Villages Location at 11974 County Road 101, Suite 102, The Villages Fl. 32162. 787-HEAR (4327) Conveniently located in Park Central Plaza 2468 Hwy 441/Suite 104 Fruitland Park, FL 34731 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties NANCY TANKERTimes-News of HendersonvilleHENDERSONVILLE, N.C. This year, Mills River Elementary third-grader Dan ny Castro, 9, got a very special present from his school. School ofcials pur chased an FM-based wireless system that allows the hearing-im paired youngster to hear his teacher, Julie Ann Mitchell, through his hearing aids. Every day the gregar ious boy enters school, hooks up his hear ing system and pre pares to learn. Mitchell uses a microphone and a palm-sized wire less transmitter that hangs around her neck to reach the receivers in Dannys hearing aids, allowing him to listen to her lessons at a high er decibel level than he otherwise could. Whenever she speaks on the microphone, it connects to my boots (receivers in his hearing aids), and its cool because you can hear what she is saying, Danny said on a rainy Friday morning after he nished reading a book passage to a classmate. I use it to help me hear better. Until this year, Danny had been using a simi lar system his parents had purchased and sent him to school with every day since kinder garten. The new technology, however, can be left at school. Mitchell said Danny is excelling this year. With his hearing loss, he works with a speech therapist and he has come a long way. Learning vocabulary, math or any other third-grade subject would be difcult for him without the sound-amplifying ap paratus, Mitchell said. He would miss about 80 percent of instruction without the hear ing aid and the FM system. Without the system, it would be a struggle for him and his vocabulary would suffer. She added that Dan nys parents have been very conscientious about making sure he has the proper technol ogy to aide his learning. They have been working with his doctors and audiologists to make sure he is re ceiving the help that he needs, Mitchell said. He has become used to it over the years, so its very much second nature to him. Its part of his everyday life. Mitchell said Danny will often take the initiative to charge the system or initiate it in the morning before class starts. He is a very outgoing, very sweet and ea ger student, she said. He wants to get his work correct, so he works very hard. Fellow students think the system is cool, she added. They see that it is helping one of my students and because they have been in class with him for years, they have been very accepting. Mitchell said sever al other hearing-impaired students at the school use systems to help them hear their teachers. One student has a tower speaker that sits on the oor and amplies the teachers voice, while another has a desktop speaker that accomplishes the same mission. With this system Danny, has really grown over the years, Mitch ell said. She would like other school administrators to know that it is easy for students who have hearing loss to re ceive help with some sort of FM system in order to grow academically. Without it, theres a lack of vocab ulary and compensation with anything being taught. Our school has been working hard in the past year, and we were fortunate to get the system this year. Danny said he likes the system because wherever Mrs. Mitchell goes, the speaker follows her and moves with her so I can hear her. I also like it because it connects to the com puter speaker so I can hear it better. Without it, I would not be able to hear Mrs. Mitchell and if I cant hear her, then what kind of les sons can I use?Third-grader gets help with hearing aid PATRICK SULLIVAN / AP Mills River Elementary School third grade teacher Julie Ann Mitchell uses a microphone connected to an FM wireless signal that connects to a receiver in the hearing aid of her third-grade student Danny Castro to help him hear what she is teaching.

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 255 Waterman Avenue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www.WatermanVillage.com Now is the time to make a Make a fresh start in 2014 and ease your worries about the day-to-day stresses that can keep you from living your best life. At Waterman Village youll enjoy: Maintenance-free living Spacious, single-story villa, manor or cottage Delectable dining in three distinct on-campus venues Fun activities, events and golf Wellness center with heated pool and golf simulator Access to home care, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehab if neededCall (352) 385-1126. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. JOHN MONKThe (Columbia) StateBLYTHEWOOD, S.C. Sara Duncan is 5 years old, loves horses, cheerleaders, music and the color purple. She also has neuro blastoma, a rare and potentially fatal child hood cancer. In the United States, there are only 400 to 600 cases a year. Recently, sever al hundred people showed up at a spa ghetti dinner fundrais er at Saras church, the 1,100-member Trinity United Methodist, in Blythewood to offer prayers and well wishes. The event raised some $4,000. One supporter was Trinity member Jackson Davis, 11, who wrote these words with a purple felt-tipped pen on a board crowd ed with prayers and good wishes: Love you, get well soon. Many people wore lo gos with a purple danc ing lion, a logo church member Kathy Rhodes designed in tribute to Saras favorite song, Roar, an anthem to courage by pop sing er Katy Perry. Its about a fearful young woman who became brave. I got the eye of a ti ger / Dancing through a re. ... Youre going to hear me roar, the song goes. Saras mom, Michelle Duncan, 37, a church member, said in an in terview that so far, Sara is making progress. Were thankful we live in a community with such great support be tween the church, the neighborhood and the Blythewood communi ty coming together to help us out. The money will come in handy for expenses insurance doesnt cover, she said. Already, Sara the youngest of three chil dren has endured a medical odyssey most adults will never see. It has included a major operation to remove an abdominal solid-mass tumor, rounds of che motherapy, stem-cell extractions and im plants from and into her body. Radiation therapy, and weeks more in the hospital, are most likely in the future. Shes been a regular both at Pal metto Health Richland Childrens Hospital and the Medical University of South Carolina. The Duncans Mi chelle and her husband, David, of 17 years are thankful the neuroblastoma was discovered early. In September, she had a little bellyache, said Michelle Duncan, explaining that Saras reg ular pediatrician at Pal metto Pediatrics made the diagnosis on the rst visit. We feel that God has a path for us, for healing, and Hes been really good to us so far. Hes put the right doctors in place, the right medical team in place, Duncan said, wiping away tears as she spoke outside the fundraiser. Sara knows what is happening, Duncan said. Her faith is great. She has prayed for healing, and she knows that God is going to heal her. Shes a ghter. She doesnt complain. She doesnt like nee dles, but I dont know who does. Trinity pastor the Rev. Cathy Jamieson-Ogg de scribed Sara this way: She is happy and brave. Also at the event were seven cheerleaders from the Universi ty of South Carolina. Last summer, before her cancer was discov ered, Sara a Gamecocks fan attended a three-day cheerleader kid camp at USC. Clearly, we made an impact on Sara, which is awesome, said cheerleader Greg Francendese, 22, a senior advertising major from Atlanta.Church rallies around girl, 5, with rare cancer

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 315-8305 Allergies? Colds & Flu? Headaches? Respiratory Disease? Call today to schedule your appointment Support your bodys Immune system to prevent and eliminate Acute and Chronic Respiratory Disease. Acupuncture is a time-tested, safe, natural and drug free treatment that provides relief with long lasting benefits. Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DEAR ABBY: Im a high school senior. At the beginning of the school year, I agreed to drive my best friend to school in the mornings, and for a while it was nice. Last month she started to refuse to talk while I was driving. If I tried talking to her, she wouldnt respond. She recently told her boyfriend (who she texts constantly while riding with me) that she didnt like my driving. I found out because of a post he made on Facebook. When I asked her about it, she said that morning I had slammed on the brakes and it scared her. This has made me tense and stressed out in the mornings, and I want to stop driving her. My grandmother says I should stick it out instead of causing friction. My mom thinks I should stop driving her, but only if she can nd another ride. I tried to explain this to her, but she wont listen and Im still stuck with her. This has ruined our relationship. I feel like she hates me, but I dont know what to do about any of it. Help! DRIVEN CRAZY IN FLORIDA DEAR DRIVEN CRAZY: Your for mer best friend may have stopped talking to you on the way to school because she was too busy texting her boyfriend. She is ignoring the fact that you have been doing her the favor of transporting her and is using you as a private taxi service. If she was frightened because you braked suddenly, the per son she should have said it to was YOU. So stop explaining to her and TELL her that if she wants to continue getting a free ride, she had better adjust her attitude or make other arrangements for transportation. DEAR ABBY: My daughter, the mother of a toddler, just had twins. We live four hours away, so I stayed with them for a few weeks to help her and her husband adjust to their larger family. It taught me a lot about how to help new mothers who are feeling overwhelmed. Its not about holding the babies; everyone wants to do that. Instead, if you really want to help tired parents, do one of the following: Take the older children to the park, the library, the zoo, to a diner for breakfast. Keep them happy and safe, and bring them home worn out. Bring dinner or takeout when visiting. Wash, dry and fold the laundry. Get the kids ready for bed, give them their baths, read books to them and wait until they are asleep to leave. Clean the house, run the vacuum, empty the garbage and change the beds. Buy grocer ies (the basics), including paper goods, and grab a box of gallon plastic bags, masking tape and Sharpies (to date frozen foods). The gift of your time is ever so much more helpful than cute baby outts that are quickly outgrown. Thanks, Abby! PROUD GRANDMA IN NEW YORK DEAR PROUD GRANDMA: My warm congratulations on the new additions to your family. Your daughter is a lucky woman. Your letter should be clipped and saved by anyone who is looking forward to grandparent hood because it is a classic. D EAR READERS: Today we celebrate the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the visionary civil rights leader who was assassinated in 1968. Many of his words ring as true today as when they were rst spoken. The quote I have in mind as I write this is, All progress is precarious, and the solution of one problem brings us face-to-face with another problem. It applies to many aspects of life.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Teenagers taxi service has a disgruntled rider

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center rrfnt fb r fftfr bn ftt bbn f bb b nfr t t MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg.

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f n f t b b b r n ntntnttnt nbnbtrn tnbnnttnbnt nnf nfbnrbfntt ttntnnnbt nttttbtbnf tttntbnffn ttbbtbtttt rnnnrtnttt bft n b r n r b n n f n n f r n f t f f n f n f n t n f r n n f n f n f b n n f t b fnt tbr t n t n b n f t b t n t t n t n f t n f t b b n n t n f t b n b n b t t b n f r n n f b b n f r n n f b t r n f t f t t t n t fb n t n b n t n f n t n t t t t b n r n n b b t n n f n f n n f n n f b t r n b b t n b f bbtnnt nn rtttbt ttnntr t b n f b b t f fr n r b r n b n f b n n b t t b b n ft n b b b t b b t b n t n t t n n f n b b n b b b b b b b n n b b n t n b b f n t b n f n b b b b n r n t n n b b b t b b t t t r b n t n n n b n b b n n f n b n t r b n t b b t b b f n t t n n b t b b b n t b n b b b n n b n ft ftr f ttbr r r bbntb b r nbntnbtb nbtbnfn bb bbtf r f r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtf rfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rf nrtbt rfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 r f n f r t b n r n n r n n n r n n n r n r r n n t n n f f b rnrf rf t r b f rr bnbrnff b nf brrr bff bbn ff r tff rrb ff r n n n f f rnnn btrbff nrbr rb bff r b r r b f f b rbrrnf r b f f fr ff r f brn f b brnff fnrnrn rrn rrn rrbf nrbrr n r r b r n t r n f f b ff nn r bbf f f f rr rrnf nrnn rnrb n nnr ff bnnbtrn rrr ff rr rnf rf nnr rfnff ntrb brr b rb ff rnf f f r ff rrr bff nn ff n ff rn nnrtrr ff f t n r b n b r r b n r n b r n b r f f b n b n n n r n n n n r n r r r n r r n r n b n r n n n n b n r n n b n n b n n r n f n f b n r r r r t b n r n r f f r n f r n r n r b n r t r r f r n r n b n n r b n n r r n r r r n n b b r n r b n n f f r f f r r r n r b n r r b r r r n b r b b b r r n n n n t r r n r r t r n b n n n b t n b r r f b r r r r r n r n r t r n n r r r n r b n b r r r r r n f f f r n r r f f r r n r r r t r b n r t r n b n f r r n r rnn rbn ntb r r n f f b rnn r nr b f f f rnrtbnr rbrrr bnnr nntrt br r n f f f r n n r r t b n n n b r b n r r r r n r t b r n n t b b b r b r n r f f r b r n r r n r f f n b r r b b b n r r b b b n r n r b n r n r r r b n b b n r r n r r r n b t n n n rnn tbbnb ntrtrbr rrrb n b r f f r r n r r b r b b r n n f r f n b t b f f f f bnn rbnnnrbb nbbn rfbnr tnnrrb n r n n r b r b r b r f f r n b n r n n f f r f f f r n r b b b n r r r b r b r n f f r n r r b b rbrrr rnn rntr n n r n b r n b b r b r r b r r r n r n r b n n b n r b r n r b b t n n n f r b r n n f f r b r r r n r n b n n b b n n b n r n t r r n r r b r n b r r n n n n b r b b n b t n b b n r n r r t b r n n b b b n r b r b n r r r b r b b nr

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 r fntbnnntt tnnf nttbbntf b fn bnbtff t nffntn tntttbbbnt ttnnf r ttnf btt b f n t n n b f nntnb tntt ntt r n n t t r fnt nntt tntnft ntt br nttn tntnnttntt bntnt n f ntt r ftrr b b b n n n f f n t t n f b n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt ntt r t n t n b b t t n t n t r r r rt r n n n t n n f n t t n t t n n n t b f t t t n n n n f t n f b b n t b n f n n n t t n f f f n t t b n r rt btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r rt r r n t n t bf tnfr nn nnbbf b bf t b b btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r f n t t rr rt r nnnb nb tntt nbnn nt ff fr t f n fnt nbn ff nff ntt nbnnn nntnn ntt nntt fr t tntf ntt tfff ntt t f n tnftf ntn nfttftt b r ff t ntt t t n n n ff f tntt tntt tntnf ff nnf fntt tnfnbf tt nr fn r f ntt r ntf ntt nr r nr n n rnn ntt rt r rr ntttnn tnfn nttntn btn tt nn f nnfnn ntt r n n nntt n ntt tnff ntt nt nbttbnf n rntt nbtt nt nntt r nbtbnttf tnt r f ntt nfbntt br n nntnf n t n f nf fntt rntt ntbnnt ft n bntnbbt f fn nnnnfnt nntn ntt r r f n f t t b tn tfntt r ffntt tfnt ntt t ntt bttt r t t b b tttt ntt br n tnn ntt r f ff nntt fbtn ntt r fff ntt r tnnn nf tft ntt bbtf n nt tn nttn nt n f f n t n ttf f nftf ntnf ntt n r nt nfnf ftttnfftff ttftn n nf n r r n n n n t f n n f n f f nttf r tfntt ffntt tnntbtf n n n t t ntt t n n t t f fntt r n t n t f b b b t t n n b f t n f t n n t f n n n t t n t t t t f f n t t b b n t n b t f n n t nr bnt bntt btnntt nfnntt b nr r n n b n t t nf ttb ffntt ntt fftn n btr r tbrtt tfnn t nntt n n nntt nftn ntt ttnn tf ntf ntt nbt r ft r r nf nf ntt n ntt tnn btnntt b r rtff nbffn nf ntfbntt tf ntt rftf tf rff nf fn b tft fntt tt t rff ntt tf rnn ff nntt tf ttntt t t b f rft fntt ttt tff r

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 rfntr brttnftnb nnbrbbr b nfntb nnnnttr r b n r r bb nnnrr nr rttn bbntn rr bbnntr tt ttnbnb bnrtt rrf bbr ttttnnr tt btrnbrbb ttnr ntbf r r t t ntbf f b t n b t n n t b b n r r fbbbr ntnrnr bf nrbnr rnnbbr nnrrtt r tnnr rtt n n r r r tt rtt nrrf f nbbt b b b b b b n n t f n t n n n r r n n t b r t t n nn tbt r r r r r bnr rr b b nntrttnnrtnr rtt n f rtt nbtf b bf r t r n n b n b b t n b t n n r r bbrfntr tbrrnbn rttr tn bttbbbrrtt nbb trbbttbb bbtnr tttrntn bttbbnbb tnrrtt n nn frfbt r b r n r b b r n r b n n b b t r n b t r t b r n t n b n t n n t r b t n r bbbn bnttrnnn bnrbbbn ftrrnbt bbbnbrr ttnbtnttn nn f t f nfbnt rfnnnt rbtbb nrrnbt nnnb bnbrttnbnr bbttnnnt bnr bntbr fttnn bnnfrtt b n n n r t r t t n b n n b r t t bn nnbbtnr btnntnnbnt brbn tbbtbnr bbtt ttbbb tnbrr r t r n b t n n t r t r t b r b b r b nnbbbr tt r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt nnf f nnntrf f n r b n n n n t n b b n t b n b n n n b b b b r t n t t n r b n t b b n n n n b b n t t b t n b b t t n n b b n n n b r b r r n b n ff tbtnnbbr bbttnntttrtr b nttf n t t b r t n n n t t n n r r r n b b n b t b r b b n n b n r t t r r b n n r b n b t n n b n b n r b n n r t r n n r r t t nf f n f b t t n n n r b r r b r b n n n n n b b b t t b n t t n b b n n b t t b b n n t r n t r n n b t n r r f r nftf f nnff f r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt n n t n r n f n n r b t n r b r t t r b r n r b b r n r b trf fft n b n n r b r b r n b b b r b t t b b n frb f



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MANNING TO SUPER BOWL, BRONCOS BEAT PATRIOTS 26-16, B1 EUSTIS: Fire department to get second station A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Googles contact lens prototype could be option for diabetics C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 20, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 20 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C7 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 68 / 49 Mostly sunny. 50 JENNIFER KAY Associated Press M IAMI BEACH Flipping through a stack of color im ages he shot during a 1965 march from Sel ma to Montgomery, Ala., photographer Bob Adel man is casual about the history they represent. He pauses at the image of a group of people with clasped hands raised in victory at a Montgom ery cab stand, where peo ple had gathered during the citys long bus boy cott a decade earlier, and calls them real King fans. Pointing to the sec ond oor of the Alabama Capitol, behind a line of green-helmeted troops, he chuckles as he re members, Gov. Wallace was hiding behind the curtains up there. Then theres the man with his st raised in mid-speech, whom he calls Doc better known as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Now they seem like momentous events. At the time, they were cov ered in the back pages of newspapers, for the most part. The only time blacks appeared in newspapers at that time was when there was violence, ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.bown@dailycommercial.com Groveland population 8,729 has been ranked one of the Top 10 Safest Places in Florida by Movoto Blog, a California-based online real estate brokerage. We are ranked 10th out of 411 cit ies across the state of Florida, City Clerk Teresa Begely announced in an email to city employees. The rank ings were based on statistical data of reported crimes from 2012. ...Your hard work and dedication help Grov eland become a greater place to live and work. Movotos list ranks Groveland num ber 10 following Parkland, Weston, Marco Island, Sanibel, Punta Gorda, Longboat Key, Bay Harbor Islands, Niceville and Valparaiso. With just 144 reported crimes in 2012, Groveland comes in as the nal city (number 10 of 10) on our list, the blog stated. This city of nearly 9,000 people had only 11 reported vi olent crimes in 2012 two robberies and nine aggravated assaults. Of their property crimes, 80 were theft, 46 were burglaries and sev en were motor vehicle theft. All told, residents have just a 1 in 62 chance of being involved in crime in Grov eland, making it signicantly safer than our least safe city, Florida City, where your chances are just 1 in 8. So good job, Groveland! According to the rm, the informa tion gathered to nalize the rankings was based on the FBIs 2012 report of crime statistics. We selected the Florida cities and towns with a population of 5,000 or more, which left us with 202 loca tions in total, the companys web site states. Then, we looked at each of these locations in terms of these three criteria: property crime (theft, burglary, motor vehicle thefts), vi olent crime (rape, murder, assault) and the chance a resident will be a victim of crime. John Flinn, a Groveland police commander and assistant to Po lice Chief Melvin Tennyson, said he thinks the ranking speaks volumes about Groveland and should help Groveland relishes safe city designation SEE SAFE | A2 NASSER KARIMI Associated Press TEHRAN, Iran Ahead of the start of a nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, an ofcial in the Is lamic Republic called lim iting uranium enrichment and diluting its stockpile the countrys most import ant commitments, state radio reported Sunday. The comments by Behrouz Kamalvan di, a spokesman of Irans atomic department, show how the gov ern ment of moderate President Hassan Rouhani welcomes the deal, which begins Mon day. International inspec tors also already have ar rived in Tehran, preparing for the government opening its facilities to them. Implementation of mu tual commitments in the framework of the Gene va deal will begin from to morrow, Kamalvandi said. Under the agreement, sus pension of 20-percent en richment of uranium and the diluting of the current stockpile of enriched urani um are the most import ant commitments of our country. Iran struck the deal in No vember with the so-called P5+1 countries Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States. Negotiators agreed to nal terms of the deal Jan. 13. Under the agreement, Iran will limit its uranium enrichment to 5 percent the grade commonly used to power reactors. The deal also commits Iran to stop producing 20-percent en riched uranium which is only a technical step away from weapons-grade mate rial and to neutralize its 20-percent stockpile over Iran prepares for start of landmark nuclear deal Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif adjusts his glasses as he speaks during a joint press conference in Tehran, Iran on Dec. 22. VAHID SALEMI / AP SEE DEAL | A2 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com As the nation spends today honoring slain civ il rights leader Martin Lu ther King Jr., area and na tional ofcials are hoping residents will keep his dream alive through the rest of the year. The long-time Eus tis native and 70-yearold Carla Mitchell, an ofcial with the Eustis Af rican-American Heritage Committee, recalls grow ing up in a segregated so ciety of white and col ored-only signs. Recognizing King only one day a year is a disser vice to him, said Mitch ell. It is up to the elder ly to make sure our youth are always mindful of all he did for us. King spent his life ghting for the nation to honor all races by giving them equality. As a young minister in Montgom ery, Ala., in 1955, King led a bus boycott that was sparked by NAACP mem ber Rosa Parks, a black woman, getting arrest ed after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger, as well as the March on Washington in 1963, where he delivered Many local events scheduled to honor MLK Exhibit features photographs from civil rights movement J. PAT CARTER / AP Bob Adelman talks about the photos he took during the civil rights movement at his Miami Beach home. Now they seem like momentous events. At the time, they were covered in the back pages of newspapers, for the most part. The only time blacks appeared in newspapers at that time was when there was violence. Bob Adelman SEE MLK | A2 SEE PHOTOS | A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 20, 2014: This year you emphasize the importance of seeing the big picture. Sometimes, if you are not careful or overthink, you will lose your strong will to act. Watch out for this trait. If you are sin gle, you are unusually at tractive. You will have many dating possibilities, but you might attract emotionally unavailable individuals. Be careful. If you are attached, the two of you can work through nearly anything be cause of your commitment to each other. Be aware of your differences, and re spect them. VIRGO some times annoys you with his or her penchant for detail. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Listen to what is being shared while you go through your day. You will note that seriousness seems to mark your interactions. A discus sion is a must in order for you to understand where others are coming from. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your creativity will help provide a solution; it might not be considered perfect by all parties, but it will work. A partner could try to resist your attempts to bring him or her out of his or her shell. Your caring will be evident, but it still might not work. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Work from home, or handle a domestic matter before you go to work. A partner will come through for you in a big way. Let this person know how much you appreciate his or her ef forts. You can balance dif ferent concerns with ease. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Ask more questions, and expect to receive clear responses. Everyone needs to be on the same page in order to be most effective. Your depth and interest in handling a personal matter efciently and with sensitivi ty will impress a loved one. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Be aware of the cost of han dling a matter as you are. Play it easy and relaxed in the company of a loved one who can give you feedback that you will accept. A per sonal or domestic matter lingers in your mind. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep conversations moving, especially if they turn the focus to others. You might notice that some one seems closed down. Trust that this person has a good reason, and refuse to personalize the matter. That attitude will mean the world to him or her. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Listen to news and consid er what is really being said. Much is going on behind the scenes that you might not understand. Be aware of your options before you launch into action. Some one might not care how a certain idea will affect you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You could be making an error if you choose not to absorb what is said in a meeting with others. Ap proach a situation with care, yet also be aware of your limits. Be more open, and express your gentle side. Someone cant help but respond. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) You like to per form and achieve the high est level of excellence possible. At the moment, you might feel challenged, but you have the assets to make an impression and to excel. Holding back a cer tain feeling will take a toll on you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Make a point of seeing the whole picture, and refuse to sell yourself short. Your way of deal ing with a problem could change once you do. With that alteration will come a different outcome that might be more benecial to everyone involved. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Dont allow someone else to do your dirty work. Reach out and communi cate with others directly. Follow this suggestion, and keep all interpersonal mat ters on a one-on-one lev el. The results will please you, and others will be more open as well. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You have a strong mind, but a partner will need to think a situation through and come up with his or her own conclusion. Develop the ability to let go, and give others the space to get to where you are. Be patient. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 7-2-3 Afternoon .......................................... 9-2-5 PLAY 4 ............................................. 7-6-8-9 Afternoon ....................................... 6-4-1-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY SATURDAY FANTASY 5 ............................. 4-8-13-22-23 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $9 4 of 5 wins $102 5 of 5 wins $135,340.73 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com attract people to the town. Flinn said also that even though the crime statistics used for the rankings on the top-10 list Movoto devised are based on 2012 statistics, the same holds true today because of the day-to-day mental ity the department strives to maintain. I attribute our success in keep ing crime in Groveland down to a lot of proactive patrols on behalf of our duty shifts, Flinn said. And with the ben et of our ofcers, the residents in our community and the intel systems we use within the police department, we can identify what areas we need to focus on. When we identify problem areas, we do a needs assessment and focus our ef forts there. Flinn said the department has two Di rective Patrol positions, which focus on trafc enforcement and problem areas. In an email to Tennyson and Fire Chief Willie Morgan, Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks praised both departments efforts. I wanted to take this opportunity to personally thank you both, and all in the Groveland police and re departments, for a job well done, Loucks said. SAFE FROM PAGE A1 the six months. In exchange, econom ic sanctions Iran fac es would be eased for six months. Senior of cials in President Barack Obamas administration have put the total relief gure at some $7 billion. During the six months, negotiations between Iran and the world pow ers would continue in hopes of reaching a per manent deal. The West fears Irans nuclear program could allow it to build an atom ic weapon. Iran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes, like power generation and medical research. On Saturday a team of international inspec tors arrived in Tehran in preparation of beginning their inspections. They will visit Fordo, where Iran enriches its 20-per cent uranium, as well as its Natanz facility, which produces 5-percent en riched uranium, to en sure the country com plies with the deal. Kamalvandi said Sun day that Iran will use centrifuges now produc ing 20-percent enriched uranium to instead pro duce 5-percent enriched uranium to comply with the agreement. But suspicions remain high in both Tehran and Washington after decades of hostility dating back to the 1979 Islamic Revolu tion in Iran that ousted the U.S.-backed shah dy nasty. Rouhani, Irans new reformist president, has reached out to the West, but must depend on sup port from Irans top de cision-maker, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, for his initia tives amid criticism from hard-line factions. Writing a post on his Facebook page Sunday, Irans Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif reassured the world that the deal will begin on time. I am hopeful that im plementation of the rst phase will have posi tive results for the coun try and peace and stabil ity in the region and the world while preparing the ground for essential talks on a nal solution, Zarif wrote. DEAL FROM PAGE A1 his I Have a Dream speech. Several activities dedi cated to King have been celebrated within the several days in Lake and Sumter Counties. Today, a Commemoration Cel ebration will take place from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Eustis Parks and Rec reation Center/Carver Park, 2214 E. Bates Ave. Sumter County will have three MLK events today: a parade in city of Royal at 10 a.m., a pa rade in Wildwood at 11 a.m. and a King ban quet to recognize and honor outstanding res idents will occur 5 p.m. at the Royal Communi ty Center, 9569 County Road 235. Louis Ward is an ofcial with the Dr. Martin Lu ther King Jr. Commem oration Committee of Lake and Sumter Coun ties, which put on most of the annual area ac tivities this month and whose theme is Advanc ing the Dream, the same one used in last years na tionwide 50th anniversa ry celebration of Kings civil rights March on Washington. Ward said despite Kings effort to bring the races together in harmo ny, the area and nation still remains somewhat divisive. People need to under stand that King wasnt about just fairness to blacks, he was about equality for all people, said Ward. We need to make sure people know that every day of the year. Kings daughter, Ber nice, is calling for a no shots red day today in honor of her fathers sup port of non-violence. According to a Reuters article, in a time of school shootings and increas ingly violent movies, tele vision shows and video games, Bernice King said she believes her fathers philosophy of non-vio lence is more relevant than it was 10 years ago. America has an enor mous appetite for vio lence. I dont know why we have such an afnity for that, but I do know it has to stop, said Bernice King, chief executive ofcer of the Atlanta-based Martin Luther King Center. Capt. Rob Hicks, spokesman for the Lees burg Police Department, said he supported the ef forts of Bernice King. I hope that her call for non-violence is respect ed, said Hicks. It is a great way to honor the memory of such an inu ential leader and a man who advocated non-vio lence. Kings birthday is on Jan. 15, but recognized nationally the third Mon day of January. Various area city and county of ces are closed today to honor King and many residents have the day off from work. Leesburg Mayor John Christian said residents should not just hon or King by taking the day off and relaxing but should pay tribute to him throughout the year. Get involved in a com munity effort that brings people together, he said. MLK FROM PAGE A1 LIBBY QUAID Associated Press WASHINGTON A chief ele ment of President Barack Obamas attempt to overhaul U.S. surveil lance will not work, leaders of Congress intelligence committees said Sunday, pushing back against the idea that the government should cede control of how Amer icans phone records are stored. Obama, under pressure to calm the controversy over government spying, said Friday he wants bulk phone data stored outside the gov ernment to reduce the risk that the records will be abused. The presi dent said he will require a special judges advance approval before intelligence agencies can examine someones data and will force ana lysts to keep their searches closer to suspected terrorists. And I think thats a very dif cult thing, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, said Sunday. Because the whole purpose of this program is to provide instantaneous infor mation to be able to disrupt any plot that may be taking place. Under the surveillance program, the NSA gathers phone numbers called and the length of conver sations, but not the content of the calls. Obama said the NSA some times needs to tap those records to nd people linked to suspected ter rorists. But he said eventually the bulk data should be stored some where out of the governments hands. That could mean nding a way for phone companies to store the records, though some compa nies have balked at the idea, or it could mean creating a third-party entity to hold the records. Feinstein, D-Calif., said many Americans dont understand that threats persist a dozen years af ter the 9/11 terrorist attacks. New bombs are being devised. New ter rorists are emerging, new groups. Actually, a new level of vicious ness. And I think we need to be prepared, Feinstein said. Lawmakers say Obama surveillance idea wont work

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Rep. Webster makes budget savings announcement U.S. Representative Daniel Webster (FL10) will announce a milestone achievement as he works to reduce our governments debt at separate meetings Tuesday: at 8:30 a.m., Beacon College Chopping Block Dining Hall, 117 W. Main St.; at 10 a.m., Clermont City Hall, 685 W. Montrose St. and at 2 p.m., Winter Garden City Hall, 300 W. Plant St. Call 407-654-5705 for information. TAVARES Department of Health offices are closed today All Florida Department of Health ofces in Lake County will be closed today in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. All ofces will reopen Tuesday with regularly scheduled hours. As in all medical emergencies, res idents needing immediate assis tance should dial 911. TAVARES UF/IFAS Extension to host classes on arthritis The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County will host free classes on arthritis pain management. The free program, Put Pain in Its Place: How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control, will provide older adults knowledge about osteo arthritis pain and offer strategies to relieve it. The Tavares class is from 2 to 3 p.m. on Thursday, Lake County Extension Ofce, 1951 Woodlea Rd. Registration is required, and can be completed online at lakepainin place.eventbrite.com. The Umatilla class is from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Feb. 7 at the Umatilla Public Library, 412 Hateld Dr. Registration is recom mended, and can be completed online at umatillapain2014.eventbrite.com. To register for either program by phone, call 352-343-4101, ext. 2719 or 2721. TAVARES Lake County offices are closed today All ofces of the Lake County Board of County Commissioners, Clerk of Courts, Property Appraiser, Supervisor of Elections and Tax Collector are closed today for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Ofces will reopen with regularly scheduled hours on Tuesday. Lake County Solid Waste residen tial collection services will contin ue as normal today, but residential convenience centers will be closed. Lake Countys public transporta tion service, LakeXpress, will not op erate today. The Lake County Welcome Center, located at 20763 U.S. Highway 27 in Groveland, is closed, as well as the Lake County Library System. For information or to view a bus schedule, call 352-323-5733 or visit www.RideLakeXpress.com. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com After almost three decades of serving residents with only one re station, the Eustis Fire Department will add another one. City commissioners recently vot ed to build a $350,000 station on 2.5 acres of city-owned land on Hicks Ditch Road, just south of the inter section with County Road 44. Eustis Fire Chief Rex Winn, who has been with the department since 1993, said they have wanted a second sta tion for at least 20 years but didnt have the money. Fire impact fees helped to gener ate funds for the building. It will allow us to make a lot of difference in the north part of the city, said Winn, of a department that typically responds to more than 3,270 calls every year. It de nitely will mean quicker response times. A pre-bid construction meeting for the new station is planned Jan. 28 and bids will be opened Feb. 18. Ground breaking for the project is expected in February and the build ing should be completed by the end of 2014. Winn said the 24-hour Station No. 23 will include sleeping quarters and ofce space as well as other mod ern conveniences lacking in the cur rent station that was built in 1984 at 100 W. Norton Ave. But he was quick to point out the department wont overspend on amenities. EUSTIS Eustis to get second fire station MATT SOERGEL The Florida Times-Union JACKSONVILLE The search for great white sharks off the coast of Jacksonville just off the beach, in fact is about to get a lot more serious. By the end of this month, the University of North Floridas shark-re search program expects to place as many as 10 sensors in the Atlantic. If a great white thats been tagged by a tracking de vice swims within a few hundred yards of a sen sor, scientists will know. The devices will be near the beach, per haps a half-mile or mile from the sand. The great whites, after all, do come in close. The nonprot shark re search group, Ocearch, last January tracked a 16 1/2-foot great white named Mary Lee in the surf zone in Jacksonville Beach. They then brought their research vessel on an expedition to Jack sonville and caught and tagged 14-foot Lydia within eyesight of Han na Park. Meanwhile, the satellite tag on Katharine was showing that shark hanging around near Cape Canaveral. The Ocearch sharks are tracked by GPS devices, which are caught by sat ellite every time they rise to the surface. Dont think of UNFs nearshore devices as early-warning signals, though. The sensors store information but cant transmit it instant ly; it will have to wait un til researchers travel to them and download the data. Jim Gelsleichter, a shark expert at UNF, is still making nal plans on where to place his schools sensors, which will be able to spot the sharks underwater. He said theyll most likely be attached to buoys in Nassau Sound, Fort George Inlet, the Mayport area, Jackson ville Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach and St. Augustine. Chris Fischer, found er of Ocearch, is on an expedition in the Gala pagos Islands. He said he was thrilled by the new sensors off Jackson ville, calling them a cru cial link in researchers Researchers serious about tracking great white sharks BRUCE LIPSKY / AP Jim Gelsleichter, an assistant professor in the biology department at the University of North Florida, holds one of the receivers that will be used to track shark movements in Jacksonville. Staff Report Brian Blanchard, assis tant secretary of the Flor ida Department of Trans portation, will be among the ofcials taking part in a ribbon-cutting in Bushnell on Saturday for a Sumter County scenic roadway designation. The Scenic Sumter Her itage Byway becomes the 24th Florida Scenic High way to be designated by the FDOT. It includes 62 miles of roadway from State Road 50 to State Road 44. According to Saman tha Merritt of the Sumter County Chamber of Com merce, the Florida Scenic Byway Program is a grass roots effort to heighten awareness of Floridas his torical and intrinsic re sources cultural, rec reational, natural and scenic which collec tively enhance the overall traveling experience. The roads that comprise the byway traverse pastoral farmlands, cattle ranches, horse farms and interesting small towns. Attractions along the way include the General James Van Fleet Trail State Park, Richloam Wildlife Area, Dade Bat tleeld Historic State Park, Florida National Cemetery and Lake Panasoffkee. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Dade Battleeld Historic State Park, 7200 County Road 603. There will be free ad mission to the park for this event from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Dade Battleeld His toric Society will provide a history lesson featuring time period re-enactors and musket ring demon strations. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Leesburg native San di Moore is at the helm as the new executive di rector of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Com merce, and she comes to the Chamber following 7 years with the Lees burg Partnership, where she was involved in coor dinating Saturday Morn ing Market, Mardi Gras and other events geared to bring folks downtown. I have a deep love for our community, and one of the things that ap pealed to me about the job is that I didnt feel like I had changed teams. Im still on Team Lees burg, Moore said Sunday during a telephone inter view. Moores new executive position allows her to ex pand from the down town area to provide support and Chamber services to the business community through the Leesburg area. There is a lot of poten tial, she said. We have a lot of great businesses and we want to really sup port them and help them to grow within their busi ness to become stron ger, whether its through training, whether its cre ating opportunities for businesses to do ex changes with each other in business-to-business networking opportuni ties. The Chamber direc tor embraces the idea of LEESBURG Sandi Moore tapped as new Chamber director MOORE Heritage trail to be official Friday If a great white thats been tagged by a tracking device swims within a few hundred yards of a sensor, scientists will know. SEE FIRE | A4 SEE MOORE | A4 SEE SHARKS | A4 BUSHNELL

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 Family Owned Lighting Centerwww.bescolights.comVISIT OUR SHOWROOM352-787-4542 20% OFF rfntbrtbrt brftbtrt brfb Find brilliant lighting solutions for every room in your home. Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services914 West Main St., Leesburg, FL 34748 352-787-5511 www.pagetheus.com THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Lake County sher iffs detectives are looking for a missing Mascotte man and are asking for the publics help in nding him, ofcials said Sunday. Xavier Tarrand, 20, of Douglas Road in Mas cotte, was last seen the night of Jan 15 at the Race Trac gas station at the intersection of State Road 50 and State Road 33 in Groveland. A fam ily mem ber dropped Tarrand off at the gas sta tion to meet with someone, at which time Tarrand left with an unknown person in a black ve hicle, Lt. John Herrell, LCSO spokesman, said in a statement. Tarrand has not re turned home and has not been seen since; therefore, the circum stances surrounding his disappearance are considered suspicious. Herell said Groveland Police Department be gan the initial investi gation before turning it over to the Sheriffs Of ce on Saturday. Lake County sher iffs detectives are ask ing for anyone with in formation to call the Sheriffs Ofce at 352343-2101 or Central Florida CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS. MASCOTTE Man reported missing Staff report The Lake-Sumter State College Foundation Inc. re cently installed new ofcers and welcomed 11 new board members. As the principal fundraising organization for Lake-Sumter State College, the board of di rectors play a crucial role in the success of the college with their assistance to the foun dation in generating private gifts to the college that in clude support for students, faculty, staff and instruction, Erin OSteen Lewin, founda tion development manager, said in a press release. The new executive com mittee includes: President Tim McRae with Akers Me dia Group; President-Elect George Davis with Insight Credit Union; Vice-Presi dent Lori Farfaglia with Unit ed Southern Bank; Treasurer Mac Andrews with Andrews & Miller, PA; Secretary/Exec utive Director Rosanne Bran deburg; Past-President Harry Hackney with Campione and Hackney, PA; board of trust ees liaison Margo Odom; LSSC President Dr. Chuck Mojock and faculty liaison Dr. Gary Sligh. We are extremely pleased to welcome our new ofcers and board members, said Brandeburg, the foundations executive director. Through their leadership, LSSC will continue to provide the opportunities for high er education to our students, community partners, as well as to provide the insight and guidance our community has come to expect. Eleven new board mem bers also were installed: Bob Bone, Mike DeGraw, LeLay na France, Josh Gonzales, Lindsay Holt, David Jor dan, Kathy Nail, Jacqueline Perry, Kim Varnadore, Lin da Weekley and Joe Ziler, all of whom have been working with the foundation. I am very honored and humbled to serve as pres ident of the Lake-Sumter State College Foundation Board for 2014, McRae said. Being a part of a board that positively affects the lives of so many students has been very exciting for me and as an alumnus it makes serv ing even more special. The foundations mission is to help provide excellence in education, service to the community and nancial assistance to qualied stu dents. For information, call 352-365-3518. LEESBURG LSSC has new officers, board members It will look more like a house, Winn said. He added city em ployees will conduct much of the site work. A re truck from the downtown station will be moved to the new facilitys 1,584 squareFIRE FROM PAGE A3 the Chamber and Part nership collaborating on some projects and showing support for each others work. The Chamber is not the Partnership and there is no reason why we should look to each other like competition at all, she said. We should be able to work together for the good of the community while maintaining our own identity because we each essentially have different focuses, but some of our focuses do overlap and in those cases, we can work to gether and not against each other. Moore praised Joe Shipes, her former boss at the Leesburg Part nership, for being in strumental in prepar ing her for her new role. I really enjoyed all of my time at the Leesburg Partnership and I be lieved in the organiza tion and what they are doing for the commu nity, she said. I have always loved working with Joe. He was a very generous boss in what he taught. Moore said her new position comes at the perfect time. This is an opportu nity in a time when we have a new city man ager, and we are go ing to be having a new economic develop ment person, she said. There are lots of things happening within the city, and so Im looking at the Chamber as an other piece of that, and seeing where we can all work together so much more cohesively. Moore began Jan. 6, and has been touched by the overwhelming support she has re ceived. One of the things that I am really looking for ward to is really listening to and hearing from the businesses, she said. I think that I have a good idea of what would be good, but at the same time, Im really trying to keep my mind open to hearing what people want and what they are looking for. The new director also aspires to increase the Chambers member ship from its current 350-plus businesses. My goal is to make it relevant; I want people to see the benet of be ing a Chamber mem ber, and maybe bring some of the people who were a little dis gruntled back into the fold, she said of for mer members. I hope that they will really see its value and relevance to being a member of the Chamber. Moore replaces Jan Zacharchuk, the for mer director, who was cut Sept. 26, 2013, after the board of directors eliminated the top job and said it planned to reorganize and restruc ture the position. MOORE FROM PAGE A3 understanding of great whites. Placing the sensors close to shore is a big plus, too, Fischer said. The tracking devices are showing that some great whites spend much more of their time poking their nos es into inlets and cruis ing along beaches than what was once believed. Whats really sur prised us is the coast al portion of their life, which particularly seems signicant in the Southeast, he said. Ocearchs high-pro le spottings of great whites in the area cre ated a buzz in tradi tional media outlets and social-media sites. Mary Lee, a celebrity shark, even has a Face book page. So are there more great whites in the ocean off Jacksonville? Experts arent sure. Finding white sharks is tough, said Greg Skomal, a shark ex pert at the Massachu setts Division of Marine Fisheries who accom panies the Ocearch ves sel on its expedition to Jacksonville. Counting them is even tougher. But Skomal said there has denitely been a big rebound in the great-white popula tion off Cape Cod the last couple of decades. Thats due to efforts to protect the seals there, which sharks nd tasty. Thanks to tracking devices implanted in those Cape Cod sharks, scientists know they frequently range as far south as Florida. So it seems likely that more Cape Cod sharks equals more Florida sharks. I dont think its any reason to run up and down the beach screaming, Gelsleich ter said. But the sci entist in me is curious about it. Gelsleichter, an assis tant professor of biolo gy, has been fascinated by sharks ever since he saw Jaws at age 6. Yes, he knows it wasnt an age-appropriate movie, but there you have it. Hes now directing the universitys Shark Biolo gy Program, which stud ies the many species of sharks in the area. Great whites, the apex preda tor of the ocean, attract the most media atten tion, however even if theyre not much of a threat to humans on the East Coast. In July 2012 a swim mer was bitten off Cape Cod and sur vived; that was the rst great-white-shark in jury there in 75 years, Gelsleichter said. Meanwhile, the In ternational Shark At tack File at the Flori da Museum of Natural History said there has not been a single doc umented instance in Floridas recorded his tory of a great white at tacking a human. Scientists once thought the animals summered off Cape Cod and wintered in the Southeast a pret ty simple pattern. SHARKS FROM PAGE A3 foot engine bay. The station will also have a brush truck. Winn said some of the departments 21 reghters will start using the new build ing and they also will hire another person. A history of the Eu stis Fire Department, written in 2012, stat ed that of all that has happened over the past 100 years, The one bad thing is that they only have one re station that is on West Norton Ave nue, but Chief Winn says they are trying to work on getting another re station soon. But it looks now that theyre off the Southeast coast, some of them any way, even during warmer months. Were seeing good evidence to show that the animals are not just winter residents, Gelsleichter said. UNFs devices will be able to pick up any of the Ocearchtagged sharks, along with about 20 others tagged by harpoon ers off Cape Cod. Each shark emits a distinct signal, so scientists will be able to identify and track each one. UNF already has three devices work ing, but theyre at popular diving spots far offshore. They picked up the pres ence of two great whites last winter. The Ocean Track ing Network of Can ada provided some of the funding, and a UNF grant kicked in $4,000. The UNF sensors will tie in with a net work of such devic es to the north and south, lling a cru cial gap in knowl edge, Gelsleichter said. Much remains to be learned about the travel patterns and life cycles of the great white. I think denite ly that were an im portant part of the puzzle, he said. TARRAND

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 JOIN US FOR A FREE SEMINAR SERIES LEARN ABOUT Non-surgical arthritis treatment Latest advancements in joint replacement Surgical approaches designed to speed recoveryKNEE & SHOULDER January 17 @ 3:00pm | John Cowin, MDHIP & KNEE January 22 @ 3:00pm | Carl Ollivierre, MD EVENT LOCATIONWaterfront Inn 1105 Lake Shore Dr. The Villages Refreshments will be provided.Call (352) 327-4713 to reserve your seat today! PAIN?JOINTIndividual results vary. With any surgery, there are potential risks and recovery times may differ depending on the patient. Last Chance to RegisterCALL TODAY! Need Tax Help?Call352-787-1040Open Year Round. Adelman said. The images are among roughly 150 assembled at Nova Southeastern Uni versitys Museum of Art-Fort Lauderdale for an exhibit mark ing the half-century since the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964. Adelman volun teered his services as a photographer to the Congress of Ra cial Equality and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Com mittee. He went on to shoot the covers of national maga zines and the front pages of national newspapers, but he always considered himself an activist. Unlike photo journalists trying to get the shot, this is somebody that is part of the circle really recognizing the role he can play in bringing about change through his images, muse um director Bonnie Clearwater said. The exhibit is ti tled The Move ment, referring to both the efforts to end segregation in America and Adel mans aesthetic as a photographer, Clearwater said. Adelman wanted to capture the spir it of the demonstra tions on lm, but frame after frame fo cuses on bodies how the people in the movement phys ically moved. Another image from the march to Montgomery shows King and his wife at the front of a crowd that seems end less behind them, in spite of the rain that has dampened their clothes. The descen dants of enslaved people who had no rights to their own PHOTOS FROM PAGE A1 bodies were march ing en masse across a landscape in which signs and white peo ple told black people where they could and could not go. I told my friends, This is history, even though it was not ap parent to many peo ple, Adelman said. I thought this us ing your body to try to chan ge things, wheth er you tried to vote or went to the bathroom or you were trying to go into a movie theater or whatever that was inescapable and it was I guess very, very provocative and con frontational. In his Miami Beach home, above a re place lled with doz ens of the books he has published, hangs Adel mans iconic image of King delivering his I Have a Dream speech at the Lincoln Memori al in Washington, rais ing his right hand over his head as he crescen dos with the words of an old spiritual, Free at last! Free at Last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! The contact sheet with that image has been enlarged for the exhibit. The frame is in the center of a row of negatives and has a crack through its cen ter. It was reprinted so many times that the negative tore. Ive spent 50 years wondering, with all these photographers there, why I took the denitive picture, said Adelman, 83. I only came there because I knew that Doc was the most extraordinary speaker I ever heard and he would speak in an unforgettable way. SAM HANANEL Associated Press WASHINGTON The opening of Postal Service retail centers in dozens of Staples stores around the country is being met with threats of protests and boycotts by the agencys unions. The new outlets are staffed by Staples em ployees, not postal work ers, and labor ofcials say that move replaces good-paying union jobs with low-wage, non union workers. Its a direct as sault on our jobs and on public postal ser vices, said Mark Di mondstein, president of the 200,000-member American Postal Work ers Union. The dispute comes as the nancially strug gling Postal Service continues to form part nerships with private companies, and looks to cut costs and boost revenue. The deal with Staples began as a pilot program in November at 84 stores in Califor nia, Georgia, Massa chusetts and Pennsyl vania as a way make it easier for customers to buy stamps, send pack ages or use Priority and certied mail. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said the program has noth ing to do with privat ization and everything to do with customer service and driving up demand for the agen cys products. The privatization discussion is a ruse, Donahoe said in an in terview. We have no interest in privatiz ing the Postal Service. We are looking to grow our business to provide customer convenience to postal products. Staples spokeswom an Carrie McElwee re ferred questions about union concerns to the Postal Service. She said the company continu ally tests new products and services to better meet the needs of our customers. Union leaders fear that if the Staples pro gram is successful, the Postal Service will want to expand it to more than 1,500 of the com panys other stores. That could siphon work and customers away from nearby brick-andmortar post ofces, taking jobs from postal workers and even lead ing traditional post of ces to close. Union leaders have been visiting Staples stores to meet with managers, asking them to share the unions displeasure with upper management. Dimondstein asked to meet with the Sta ples CEO Ronald Sar gent, who has declined. The union plans to hold sustained pro tests this month at Sta ples stores in the San Francisco and San Jose, Calif., area that would be expanded elsewhere. Union ofcials also are considering how they can exert pressure on Staples shareholders. If Staples insists on continuing to refuse to staff those stores with postal workers, were going to urge people to take their business elsewhere, Dimond stein said. The union wants the counters to be run by postal employees, not workers hired by Staples. The average postal clerk earns about $25 an hour, according to the union. The Staples post ofce counters are run by nonun ion workers often making little more than the minimum wage. Postal Service, union wrangle over retail centers in Staples LYNNE SLADKY / AP This le photo shows a Staples ofce supply store Miami. The opening of Postal Service retail centers in dozens of Staples stores around the country is being met with threats of protests and boycotts by the agencys unions. Associated Press SANFORD A central Florida airport wants to install articial turf to deter birds from hanging around the planes. Sanford International Airport ofcials say birds cause prob lems for dozens of planes a year. One jet had to make an emer gency landing after a bird ew into one of its engines. In 2012, the Federal Aviation Administration spent more than $100,000 on air cannons to scare away birds. Airport ofcials tell WFTV that they now want to take a quieter approach. Ofcials say articial turf doesnt retain water or food, so the birds wont want to hang around the airport. Three acres of the fake grass has been proposed for the north side of the airport at a cost of more than $500,000. Airport of cials plan to nalize the proj ect next month. Central Florida airport hopes fake grass will keep birds away

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 AGRItunity 2014Conference and Trade Show 3 Concurrent Workshop Sessions! http://sumter.ifas.ufl.edu (352) 793-2728 Friday Pre-Conference January 24, 2014 West Central Florida Agricultural Education Center 7620 SR 471, Bushnell, FL 33513 Sumter County Fairgrounds MARIA DANILOVA Associated Press KIEV, Ukraine Anti-gov ernment protests in Ukraines capital escalated into ery street battles with police Sun day as thousands of demon strators hurled rocks and re bombs to set police vehicles ablaze. Dozens of ofcers and protesters were injured. Police responded with stun grenades, tear gas and water cannons, but were outnum bered by the protesters. Many of the riot police held their shields over their heads to protect themselves from the projectiles thrown by demonstrators on the other side of a cordon of buses. The violence was a sharp escalation of Ukraines twomonth political crisis, which has brought round-the-clock protest gatherings, but had been largely peaceful. Opposition leader Vitali Klitsc hko tried to persuade demon strators to stop their unrest, but failed and was sprayed by a re extinguisher in the process. Klitschko later traveled to Presi dent Viktor Yanukovychs subur ban residence and said the pres ident has agreed to negotiate. There are only two ways for events to develop. The rst one is not to negotiate, Klitschko was quoted as saying by the In terfax news agency. A scenario of force can be unpredictable and I dont rule out the possi bility of a civil war. ... And here we are using all possibilities in order to prevent bloodshed. Yanukovych said later on his website that he has tasked a working group, headed by na tional security council head Andriy Klyuev, to meet with opposition representatives to work out a solution to the cri sis. However, it was unclear if either side was prepared for real compromise; throughout the crisis, the opposition has insisted on the governments resignation and calling early presidential elections. The crisis erupted in Novem ber after Yanukovychs decision to freeze ties with the Europe an Union and seek a huge bail out from Russia. The decision sparked protests, which in creased in size and determina tion after police twice violently dispersed demonstrators. But anger rose substantially af ter Yanukovych last week signed an array of laws severely limiting protests and banning the wear ing of helmets and gas masks. Many of Sundays demon strators wore hardhats and masks in deance of the new laws. They set several police buses on re and some chased and beat ofcers. Police responded with tear gas and stun grenades. Water cannons were also red at the protesters in temperatures of 18 F, but the clashes continued. The harsh new laws brought a crowd of tens of thousands to the protest at Kievs central square on Sunday. While most remained on the square, a group of radicals marched toward a police cordon several hundred meters away blocking an area housing gov ernment ofces and began at tacking riot police with sticks to push their way toward Ukraines parliament building. The crowd then swelled to thousands. The blasts of stun grenades echoed and plumes of smoke rose above the crowd. Activists chanted Shame! and Revolu tion. The Interior Ministry said more than 70 police were in jured, four of them seriously; there were no immediate gures for protester injuries. ANGELA DELLI SANTI Associated Press TRENTON, N.J. The Democratic may or of a town severely ooded by Superstorm Sandy said Sunday that she was told an ulti matum tying recovery funds to her support for a prime real estate project came directly from Republican Gov. Chris Christie. Hoboken May or Dawn Zimmer told CNNs State of the Union with Candy Crowley that the mes sage pushing a Rocke feller Group commer cial development was delivered by Christies lieutenant governor, Kim Guadagno, when the two were at an event in Hoboken in May to celebrate the opening of a new supermarket. The lieutenant gov ernor pulled me aside and said, essentially, Youve got to move for ward with the Rockefel ler project. This project is really important to the governor. And she said that she had been with him on Friday night and that this was a direct message from the gov ernor, Zimmer recalled Guadagno saying. Christie spokesman Colin Reed issued a statement Sunday say ing, Mayor Zimmers categorization about her conversation in Hoboken is categori cally false. Ukraine protests escalate into fiery street battles EVGENY FELDMAN / AP A protester throws a stone towards a burning police bus during clashes with police, Sunday in central Kiev, Ukraine. NJ mayor: Sandy aid ultimatum came from Christie MEL EVANS / AP FILE PHOTO Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer speaks to the media as she stands near the Hudson River in Hoboken, N.J. IJAZ MOHAMMED REBECCA SANTANA Associated Press BANNU, Pakistan A Taliban bombing in side an army com pound in northwest Pakistan killed at least 20 troops Sunday, of cials and militants said, in one of the deadli est attacks to target the countrys forces as they battle insurgents in its volatile frontier. The blast targeted a vehicle in a convoy about to leave a military base in the town of Ban nu and drive west to the North Waziristan tribal area, police ofcial Inyat Ali Khan said. Pakistans military said the blast wounded 30 troops. The Taliban claimed the attack and called it a suicide bombing. Mil itary ofcials said the blast came from an ex plosive planted in the vehicle, hired by the paramilitary Frontier Corps. While the army has its own transport ve hicles, the paramilitary forces often hire vehicles when they need to move troops in large numbers. A spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban, Sha hidullah Shahid, told The Associated Press by telephone that the attack had been carried out to avenge the death of Waliur Rehman, the groups former second in command. He was killed last year in a U.S. drone strike. We will avenge the killing of every one of our fellows through such attacks, the spokesman warned. The explosion was heard and felt across the town of Bannu. I rushed out of my home and saw black, thick smoke billowing out of the cantonments Razmak gate area, res ident Sajjad Khan said. He said troops quick ly cordoned off the area and ordered residents to go back inside. North Waziristan is considered a safe haven for al-Qaida-linked mil itants. Pakistani troop convoys often are hit by roadside bombs, but blasts inside military compounds are rare. Last December, a sui cide bomber killed four Pakistani soldiers when he rammed an explo sive-laden car into a checkpoint outside an army camp in North Waziristan. Thirty Pa kistani troops died over a four-day period last April in another part of the northwest called the Tirah Valley as part of an operation to oust militants hiding there. The Pakistani military has been ghting for years in the tribal areas against militants who want to overthrow the government and estab lish a hard-line Islamic state. The tribal region is also a refuge for in surgents ghting NATO and U.S. forces in neigh boring Afghanistan. Taliban bombing kills 20 troops in Pakistan compound

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 T he case of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old Oakland, Calif., girl who was declared brain dead Dec. 12 following compli cations from tonsil and sinus surgery, hasnt ended yet. In sisting Jahi was still alive and should remain on the ventilator that was keeping her heart beat ing, the girls family fought Chil drens Hospital Oakland and was nally allowed by a judge to take her body into their custody. On Jan. 5, the body was moved to an undisclosed facility where, according to the familys attor ney, Christopher Dolan, her health is improving. Jahis saga gives rise to several conicting strains of accusation. The family and its supporters vil ied the hospital for stopping treatment. The public, while sym pathetic to the family, saw Dolan as a shameless opportunist whod stirred up a media circus. Ive already made the somewhat subtle point that beneath the wel ter of conicting views lurked the desire to locate some source of blame including the family in an effort to cope with the terri fying randomness of a child dying under such circumstances. But the truth is that Jahi has been dead for more than a month now, and the time for subtlety is over. The situation, to put it bluntly, is a disgrace. Dolan, who has argued that it shouldnt be up to doctors but rather families to determine when death has occurred, has done a grave disservice to the McMath family by enabling their delusions. In turn, they have done a disservice to their com munity by maligning a worldclass hospital, which serves some of the areas poorest children, with as-yet-unsubstantiated im plications of poor treatment. The most disgraceful party in all of this, however, may be the media, which have done a disser vice to a public that, despite the endless coverage of the case, re mains widely confused about the difference between brain death, from which there is no recovery, and comas or vegetative states, in which the brain continues to function to some degree. Its hard to say whats worse, the countless and continued uses of the misnomer life sup port or the remarkable amount of exposure granted to experts, many afliated with radical reli gious groups, determined to cite a handful of recovery from brain death cases that are really misdi agnoses of brain death. And dont get me started on a local TV news report about Jahis eighth-grade classmates, who were told by at least one administrator and even some parents that their friend might return someday. This is all, of course, done in the guise of balance, and to gen erate the kind of page views Ill call rage views. But this is no longer a story that requires bal ance. A teenager, tragically, has died. Her family deserves sen sitivity and compassion, but do they deserve authority over doc tors and the coroner in declaring someone dead? Do they get to do whatever they want with a body? Do they deserve to collect nearly $60,000 in GoFundMe contribu tions theyve solicited under the pretense that six separate doctors have made a wrong diagnosis and a resurrection will happen? Figures from the National Center for Health Statistics tell us that every day, roughly 7,000 people die in this country. Many are declared dead after being taken off ventilators, and many though we dont like to think about it are children who, like Jahi, have died suddenly and seemingly inexplicably. For whatever reasons coer cion, denial, distrust, greed, grief Jahis family got the idea that they were somehow different. As harmful as that is to their heal ing process, its also harmful to societys well-being, a harm that too many, whatever their inten tions, have perpetuated. The hospital, even before the court order, gave the family many more days to say goodbye than most loved ones get in such cir cumstances. The judge, seeming ly against all logic, gave the fam ily a power, and a burden, that no family should have to wield or shoulder. The media (includ ing me) gave them attention that, like the donations, would have been better spent elsewhere. In that sense, Jahis fami ly is right: They were mistreat ed. They were treated as special. And death, though it is singular and especially horrifying when it befalls a young person, is about as unspecial as it gets. Believing otherwise will only prolong their suffering and draw out a story that should have ended long ago. From Los Angeles Times. OTHER VOICES Meghan Daum TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES For Jahi, its past time for a reality check The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. L ying by and about politicians is a re grettable and probably permanent feature of American democracy. But should it also be a criminal offense? The Supreme Court has agreed to hear an ar gument by an antiabortion group chal lenging an Ohio law that criminalizes false statements about candidates for public of ce. The justices should allow the groups claim to proceed. Using criminal law to po lice truth in political debate is unnecessary and invites abuse. The Ohio law prohibits false statements about a candidate if they are made know ingly or with reckless disregard of wheth er they might be false. If the Ohio Elections Commission decides the law was violated, it shall refer the matter to prosecutors. During the 2010 election campaign, the Susan B. Anthony List, an antiabortion po litical action committee, planned to post an ad on billboards accusing then-Rep. Ste ven Driehaus, D-Ohio, of voting for taxpay er-funded abortion when he supported the Affordable Care Act. Driehaus led a com plaint with the commission under the false statement law, and fearing legal reprisals, the advertising company that owned the billboard space refused to post the ad. The Susan B. Anthony List tried to chal lenge the constitutionality of the law, but the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals said that no case or controversy existed because the elections commission hadnt made a nal decision on Driehaus complaint and because the group couldnt establish that it faced an imminent threat of prosecution. Citizens who believe a law violates their First Amendment rights ought to be able to make that case even if they arent in immedi ate danger of being prosecuted. And the Ohio law is constitutionally suspect, especially after a 2012 decision in which the Supreme Court struck down a law making it a crime to falsely claim to have received military honors. However well intended, laws criminaliz ing false statements about candidates could have the unintended effect of stiing truthful political speech. As the Supreme Court has observed: Erroneous statement is inevitable in free debate, and ... it must be protected if the freedoms of expression are to have the breathing space that they need ... to survive. Claims by and about candidates are best tested in the back-and-forth of a political campaign, in journalistic fact-checking and, if worse comes to worst, in a civil libel trial, not in a criminal trial. From Los Angeles Times. A VOICE The truth about lying in politics The hospital, even before the court order, gave the family many more days to say goodbye than most loved ones get in such circumstances. The judge, seemingly against all logic, gave the family a power, and a burden, that no family should have to wield or shoulder. The media (including me) gave them attention that, like the donations, would have been better spent elsewhere.

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com TENNIS: Serena ousted at Aussie Open / B6 JOHN RAOUX / AP Orlando Magics Arron Afalo (4) and Boston Celtics Jerryd Bayless go after a loose ball on Sunday during the rst half in Orlando. KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated Press ORLANDO Arron Afalo had 20 points and 13 rebounds, To bias Harris added 18 points and the Or lando Magic snapped a season-high 10game losing streak with a 93-91 win over the Boston Celtics on Sunday night. After several ties in the fourth quar ter, Harris hit a pair of free throws with 10.1 seconds remaining to give Orlando the vic tory. The win also ends a 10-game regular-sea son losing streak to the Celtics. Glen Davis added 17 points and Jameer Nelson 16 for Orlando. Boston has lost nine straight on the road and 11 of 12 overall. Jeff Green led the Celtics with 22 points, and Avery Bradley and Kris Humphries add ed 18 apiece. Rajon Rondo had six points and four assists in his second game back from a torn ACL. Orlando scored the rst basket of the third quarter to build a nine-point lead, but went cold and al lowed Boston to reel off a 13-2 run and re take the lead, 61-57. The Magic were able to steady themselves, and after three differ ent ties in the rst six minutes of the fourth, nudged back in front PEYTONS PLACE CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning is engulfed in confetti during the trophy ceremony after the AFC Championship game on Sunday in Denver. The Broncos defeated the Patriots 26-16 to advance to the Super Bowl. Manning, Broncos dominate Patriots to earn trip to Super Bowl EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer DENVER Pey ton Manning had an answer for everyone. Whats new? For Tom Brady. For the New England de fense. For anyone who thought he couldnt win the big one. Manning is taking the Denver Broncos on a trip to New York for the Super Bowl after an other of his impeccably crafted victories this time, a 26-16 win over the Patriots on Sunday in the AFC title game. Less than three years after being unable to throw a football be cause of his surgical ly ravaged neck and nerve endings, Man ning will get a chance for his second ring. Hell try to become the rst quarterback to win one with two different teams, at the Meadow lands on Feb. 2 against Seattle, who defeated San Francisco. Its very rewarding when you put a lot of hard work into the off season and the regu lar season and it pays dividends with a huge win, Manning said. After taking the nal knee, Manning stuffed the football in his hel met and ran to the 30-yard line to shake hands with Brady. The Indy-turned-Denver quarterback improved to 5-10 lifetime against New Englands QB but 2-1 in AFC title games. Hes been remark able. Its unprecedent ed what he did, Bron cos coach John Fox said. Though Manning threw for 400 yards, it was more dink-anddunk than a reworks show in this, the 15th installment of the NFLs two best quarterbacks of a generation. Man ning set up four eld goals by Matt Prater and put his stamp on this one with a pair of long, meticulous and mistake-free touch down drives in which nothing came cheap. He geared down the no-huddle, hurry-up offense that helped him set records for touch down passes and yard age this season and made the Broncos the highest-scoring team in history. The result: 93and 80-yard touch down drives that each lasted a few seconds over seven minutes; they were the two lon gest, time-wise, of the season for the Broncos (15-3). Manning capped the second with a 3-yard JOE MAHONEY / AP New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) is sacked by Denver Broncos defensive tackle Terrance Knighton during the second half on Sunday in Denver. SEE AFC | B2 Magic end their 10-game skid with win over Celtics SEE MAGIC | B2 Seattle Seahawks Russell Wilson throws during the second half of the NFC Championship game against the San Francisco 49ers, on Sunday in Seattle. TED S. WARREN / AP Seahawks edge Niners, earn date with Denver in Super Bowl BARRY WILNER AP Pro Football Writer SEATTLE The Seat tle Seahawks are bring ing their game-changing defense and the 12th Man to the Big Apple for the Super Bowl. Seattles top-ranked defense forced three fourth-quarter turn overs, and Russell Wilson threw a 35-yard touch down pass on fourth down for the winning points in a 23-17 victo ry over the San Francis co 49ers for the NFC title Sunday. Seattle will meet Den ver (15-3) for the NFL ti tle in two weeks in the New Jersey Meadow lands. Its the rst trip to the big game for the Se ahawks (15-3) since they lost to Pittsburgh after the 2005 season. The conference champs had the best re cords in the league this year, the rst time the top seeds have gotten to the Super Bowl since the 2010 game. Moments after Rich ard Sherman tipped Colin Kaepernicks pass to teammate Malcolm Smith for the clinching interception, the All-Pro cornerback jumped into the stands behind the end zone, saluting the Seahawks raucous fans. With 12th Man ags waving everywhere, and SEE SEATTLE | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 19 .513 Brooklyn 16 22 .421 3 New York 15 25 .375 5 Boston 14 28 .333 7 Philadelphia 13 27 .325 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 29 11 .725 Atlanta 20 19 .513 8 Washington 19 20 .487 9 Charlotte 17 25 .405 13 Orlando 11 30 .268 18 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 32 7 .821 Chicago 19 20 .487 13 Detroit 17 23 .425 15 Cleveland 15 25 .375 17 Milwaukee 7 33 .175 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 32 9 .780 Houston 27 15 .643 5 Dallas 24 18 .571 8 Memphis 20 19 .513 11 New Orleans 15 24 .385 16 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 31 9 .775 Oklahoma City 30 10 .750 1 Denver 20 19 .513 10 Minnesota 19 21 .475 12 Utah 14 28 .333 18 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 28 14 .667 Golden State 26 16 .619 2 Phoenix 22 17 .564 4 L.A. Lakers 16 25 .390 11 Sacramento 14 24 .368 12 Saturdays Games Indiana 106, L.A. Clippers 92 Detroit 104, Washington 98 Miami 104, Charlotte 96, OT Chicago 103, Philadelphia 78 Minnesota 98, Utah 72 Houston 114, Milwaukee 104 Golden State 97, New Orleans 87 Portland 127, Dallas 111 Sundays Games L.A. Lakers 112, Toronto 106 Orlando 93, Boston 91 San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 82 Sacramento at Oklahoma City, late Denver at Phoenix, late Todays Games Dallas at Cleveland, 1 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Detroit, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 2 p.m. Toronto at Charlotte, 2 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 2:30 p.m. New Orleans at Memphis, 5 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Chicago, 8 p.m. Portland at Houston, 8 p.m. Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. Sundays Mens College Basketball Scores EAST Army 74, Bucknell 67 Baruch 78, Wesleyan (Conn.) 64 Monmouth (NJ) 83, Canisius 82 SOUTH Southern Miss. 80, Louisiana Tech 71 MIDWEST Bowling Green 69, W. Michigan 64 Green Bay 69, Ill.-Chicago 64 Iowa 94, Minnesota 73 Wright St. 49, Cleveland St. 46 SOUTHWEST Houston 77, Rutgers 55 Sundays Womens Basketball Major Scores EAST Boston U. 70, Loyola (Md.) 60 Coll. of Charleston 90, Northeastern 74 Drexel 61, Delaware 52 James Madison 77, Hofstra 50 Marist 73, Canisius 47 Niagara 48, Monmouth (NJ) 45 North Carolina 73, Boston College 56 Syracuse 58, Pittsburgh 47 UConn 94, Rutgers 64 UNC Wilmington 54, Towson 53 SOUTH Appalachian St. 75, UNC-Greensboro 56 Duke 74, Virginia Tech 70 Elon 67, W. Carolina 52 Georgia 68, Florida 62 Kentucky 73, Auburn 71 Maryland 92, Georgia Tech 81 Miami 80, NC State 71 South Carolina 77, Alabama 51 Vanderbilt 79, LSU 70 Virginia 85, Florida St. 68 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 68, Mississippi 65 Louisville 81, SMU 66 TCU 54, Texas 48 Texas A&M 73, Mississippi St. 35 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 68, Mississippi 65 Louisville 81, SMU 66 TCU 54, Texas 48 Texas A&M 73, Mississippi St. 35 FAR WEST Utah 59, Washington St. 57 tx $vmajorscores3 MIDWEST Dayton 73, Fordham 64 DePaul 91, Villanova 65 Illinois St. 78, Evansville 54 Indiana 83, Minnesota 78, OT Indiana St. 63, S. Illinois 44 Iowa 81, Ohio St. 74 Kansas 76, Baylor 60 Loyola of Chicago 73, Bradley 63 National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 48 30 15 3 63 138 107 Tampa Bay 50 29 16 5 63 146 123 Montreal 49 27 17 5 59 126 120 Toronto 50 25 20 5 55 141 152 Detroit 48 21 17 10 52 121 130 Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51 139 155 Florida 48 18 23 7 43 111 147 Buffalo 47 13 27 7 33 86 133 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 48 34 12 2 70 156 115 Philadelphia 49 25 19 5 55 134 140 N.Y. Rangers 50 26 21 3 55 124 127 Columbus 48 24 20 4 52 138 135 Washington 48 22 18 8 52 141 146 New Jersey 50 20 19 11 51 115 123 Carolina 48 20 19 9 49 117 137 N.Y. Islanders 50 19 24 7 45 138 163 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 51 32 8 11 75 184 139 St. Louis 47 32 10 5 69 166 107 Colorado 48 31 12 5 67 142 122 Minnesota 51 27 19 5 59 125 125 Dallas 48 21 19 8 50 136 148 Nashville 50 21 22 7 49 121 151 Winnipeg 50 22 23 5 49 141 150 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79 175 126 San Jose 49 31 12 6 68 158 121 Los Angeles 49 29 14 6 64 126 100 Vancouver 50 25 16 9 59 127 127 Phoenix 48 23 16 9 55 139 145 Calgary 49 16 26 7 39 109 156 Edmonton 51 15 30 6 36 131 181 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Columbus 4, Buffalo 3, SO Detroit 3, Los Angeles 2, SO Vancouver 3, Calgary 2, SO N.Y. Rangers 4, Ottawa 1 San Jose 5, Tampa Bay 4 Winnipeg 3, Edmonton 2, OT Toronto 5, Montreal 3 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Islanders 4 Carolina 3, Florida 2 Anaheim 3, St. Louis 2 Colorado 5, Nashville 4 Phoenix 3, New Jersey 2 Minnesota 3, Dallas 2, OT Sundays Games Chicago 3, Boston 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 3 Washington at N.Y. Rangers, late Todays Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. Los Angeles at Boston, 3 p.m. Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m. Toronto at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Calgary at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m. St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 8 p.m. Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Australian Open Results Sunday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $29.72 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Fabio Fognini (15), Italy, 6-3, 6-0, 6-2. David Ferrer (3), Spain, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-2, 6-1. Women Fourth Round Flavia Pennetta (28), Italy, def. Angelique Kerber (9), Germany, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5. Li Na (4), China, def. Ekaterina Makarova (22), Rus sia, 6-2, 6-0. Ana Ivanovic (14), Serbia, def. Serena Williams (1), United States, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Doubles Men Third Round Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (5), Czech Republic, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, and Mi chael Venus, New Zealand, 6-3, 6-2. Treat Huey, Philippines, and Dominic Inglot (12), Britain, def. Rohan Bopanna, India, and Aisam-ulHaq Qureshi (7), Pakistan, 6-4, 7-6 (1). Alex Bolt and Andrew Whittington, Australia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta and Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (5), 7-5. Michael Llodra and Nicolas Mahut (13), France, def. Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (2), Bra zil, 7-6 (4), 6-4. Women Third Round Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, and Petra Mar tic, Croatia, 6-2, 7-5. Shahar Peer, Israel, and Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, and Mi chaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (4), Slovenia, def. Chan Hao-ching, Tai wan, and Liezel Huber (13), United States, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-4. Mixed First Round Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, and Colin Flem ing, Britain, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, and Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4. Legends Doubles Round Robin Men Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Cedric Pioline, France, def. Pat Cash, Australia, and Mats Wilander, Swe den, 6-7 (2), 6-1, 10-8. Guy Forget and Henri Leconte, France, def. Joshua Eagle and Andrew Florent, Australia, 6-3, 4-6, 10-7. Women Nicole Bradtke and Rennae Stubbs, Australia, def. Martina Hingis, Switzerland, and Martina Navrati lova, United States, 7-6 (3), 1-6, 10-6. Junior Singles Boys First Round Jumpei Yamasaki (14), Japan, def. Gabriel Vellinho Hocevar, Brazil, 6-1, 6-3. Lucas Miedler (13), Austria, def. Makoto Ochi, Ja pan, 6-2, 6-2. Lee Duckhee (12), South Korea, def. Mitchell Harper, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Simon Friis Soendergaard, Denmark, def. Alexander Klintcharov, New Zealand, 6-4, 6-3. Oliver Anderson, Australia, def. Rafael Matos, Bra zil, 6-4, 6-3. Petros Chrysochos, Cyprus, def. Oh Chan-yeong, South Korea, 7-5, 7-6 (3). Andrea Pellegrino, Italy, def. Sora Fukuda, Japan, 5-7, 6-1, 6-3. Ilya Vasilyev, Russia, def. Brian Tran, Australia, 6-7 (2), 6-2, 6-4. Marcelo Zormann da Silva (15), Brazil, def. Chung Yunseong, South Korea, 6-3, 6-3. Omar Jasika, Australia, def. Zheng Wei Qiang, China, 6-3, 6-2. Stefan Kozlov (2), United States, def. Blake Mott, Australia, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-5, retired. Quentin Halys (7), France, def. Johannes Haerteis, Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Alexander Zverev (1), Germany, def. Nino Serdaru sic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-4. Boris Pokotilov, Russia, def. Max Purcell, Australia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Ryotero Matsumura, Japan, def. Jacopo Stefanini, Italy, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3. Alex Molcan, Slovakia, def. Roman Saullin (4), Russia, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Girls First Round Emilie Francati, Denmark, def. Sasha Bollweg, Aus tralia, 6-1, 6-2. Fiona Ferro (15), France, def. Georgia Brescia, Italy, 7-5, 0-6, 6-2. Naiktha Bains, Australia, def. Shiori Fukuda, Ja pan, 6-2, 6-1. Natalie Novotna, Czech Republic, def. Beatrice Lombardo, Italy, 6-4, 6-3. Olivia Tjandramulia, Australia, def. Nozomi Ohya, Japan, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. Olivia Hauger, United States, def. Chloe Hule, Aus tralia, 6-2, 7-5. Jelena Ostapenko (6), Latvia, def. Kaylah McPhee, Australia, 6-1, 7-5. Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Andrea Dikosavl jevic, Australia, 6-2, 6-0. Anastasia Shaulskaya, Russia, def. You Xiao-Di (11), China, 6-2, 6-4. Isabelle Wallace, Britain, def. Priscilla Hon (12), Australia, 6-3, 5-7, 12-10. Margot Yerolymos, France, def. Julia Grabher, Austria, 6-0, 7-5. Rosie Cheng, New Zealand, def. Fanny Stollar (16), Hungary, 6-4, 6-4. Sun Ziyue (7), China, def. Linda Huang, Austra lia, 6-3, 6-0. Katie Boulter (9), Britain, def. Dhruthi Tatachar Venugopal, India, 6-3, 6-3. Tereza Mihalikova, Slovakia, def. Petra Hule, Aus tralia, 7-6 (6), 6-1. Jana Fett, Croatia, def. Nicole Kraemer, Austra lia, 6-2, 6-1. Varvara Flink (1), Russia, def. Ye Qiu Yu, China, 7-5, 6-4. Xu Shilin (5), China, def. Seone Mendez, Austra lia, 6-2, 6-1. Junior Doubles Boys First Round Pedro Martinez Portero and Jaume Antoni Munar Clar, Spain, def. Chung Hyeon, South Korea, and Sumit Nagal (8), India, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Martin Blasko and Alex Molcan, Slovakia, def. Lee Duckhee, South Korea, and Simon Friis Soender gaard, Denmark, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Filippo Baldi, Italy, and Johannes Haerteis (6), Ger many, def. Harry Bourchier and Daniel Nolan, Aus tralia, 6-3, 2-6, 10-1. Hong Seong-chan and Oh Chan-yeong, South Ko rea, def. Mitchell Harper and Jack Jaeda, Austra lia, 7-5, 6-3. Daniel Guccione and Marc Polmans, Australia, def. William Matheson, New Zealand, and Marko Os makcic, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-4. Yusuke Takahashi and Jumpei Yamasaki, Japan, def. Petros Chrysochos, Cyprus, and Nino Serdaru sic, Croatia, 3-6, 6-4, 12-10. Girls First Round Naiktha Bains and Olivia Tjandramulia, Australia, def. Verena Hofer and Beatrice Lombardo, Italy, 6-3, 6-2. Anhelina Kalinina, Ukraine, and Elizaveta Kulic hkova (1), Russia, def. Kimberly Birrell and Anja Do kic, Australia, 6-1, 6-4. Kamonwan Buayam, Thailand, and Sara Tomic (6), Australia, def. Georgia Brescia, Italy, and Julia Grab her, Austria, 6-0, 6-1. Lizette Cabrera and Zoe Hives, Australia, def. Em ily Arbuthnott, Britain, and Olivia Hauger, United States, 6-3, 6-2. Sundays Sports Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Indiana F David West $15,000 for elbowing Los Angeles Clippers F Blake Grifn in the jaw during a Jan. 18 game. Fined Sacramento coach Michael Malone $25,000 for verbal abuse of a game ofcial and not proceeding directly to his locker room following the completion of the Jan. 17 game at Memphis. HOCKEY American Hockey League AHL Suspended Norfolk LW Max Friberg one game for a boarding incident in a Jan. 17 game against Worcester. COLLEGE AUBURN Named Adrian Ghioroaie assistant track and eld coach. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN North Carolina at Virginia ESPNU Delaware St. at North Carolina A&T FS1 Creighton at Villanova NBCSN Delaware at Drexel 9 p.m. ESPN Baylor at Kansas ESPNU Maryland at NC State FS1 Marquette at Georgetown NBA BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. ESPN Brooklyn at N.Y. 8 p.m. TNT L.A. Lakers at Chicago 10:30 p.m. TNT Indiana at Golden State 5:30 p.m. SUN Miami at Atlanta SOCCER 2:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Everton at West Bromwich TENNIS 9 p.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, quarternals, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, mens or womens quarternal, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 Notre Dame at Tennessee pass to Demary ius Thomas who got inside the over matched Alfonzo Dennard and left his feet to make the catch for a 20-3 lead mid way through the third quarter. From there, it was catch-up time for Brady and the Pats (13-5), and they are not built for that, at least not this year. A team that aver aged more than 200 yards on the ground the last three games didnt have much quick-strike capabil ity. Brady, who threw for most of his 277 yards in comeback mode, actually led the Patriots to a pair of fourth-quarter touch downs. But they were a pair of time-con suming, 80-yard drives. The second cut the decit to 2616 with 3:07 left, but the Broncos stopped Shane Vereen on the 2-point conversion and the celebration was on in Denver. Losing is nev er easy, Patriots de fensive lineman Rob Ninkovich said. But when you have some body as talented as (Manning), who puts in as much work and effort, and has done it for so long, its a little bit easier to swallow. The Broncos have had one close call since when they lost at home to Pitts burgh in the 2005 sea sons AFC title game but what it really took was Elways re turn to the franchise in 2011. He slammed the door on the Tim Tebow experiment and signed Manning to a contract, knowing there were risks in volved in bringing to town a thirty-some thing quarterback coming off multiple operations to resur rect his career. Even without Von Miller on the eld, El way put enough piec es in place around Manning to contend for a championship. Its been a terrif ic group, Elway said as he hoisted the AFC championship tro phy. They worked their tail off all year. Manning knows how to make the most of all those options. This game started getting out of hand at about the same time Patriots corner back Aqib Talib went out with a knee inju ry. Nobody else could cover Thomas, and Manning, who nds mismatches even un der the toughest of circumstances, found this one quickly. Peyton Manning is Peyton Manning, Carter said. AFC FROM PAGE B1 82-79 on a pair of free throws by Afalo. Green tied it back up at 87 with two free throws of his own with 1:48 remaining. Then fol lowing a Magic miss, Rondo got free off of a screen and connect ed on 16-foot jumper to give the Celtics the lead again. Afalo tied it again at 89 with a layup. Then a Celtics miss even tually led to Nelson being fouled on the other end and hitting two free throws that put the Magic up a basket at 91-89. Coming out of a timeout, Green was fouled by Afalo on a layup, but failed to hit the free throw to complete the threepoint play. Orlando snared the rebound and called a timeout with 30.7 seconds to play. Humphries fouled Harris during a scramble for a rebound and Harris calmly sank his two free throws with 10.1 seconds showing on the clock. The Celtics had a nal posses sion, but failed to get up a shot before time expired. The Magic dominated the ac tion underneath early on and took at 53-46 lead into halftime. Orlando outscored Boston 3520 in the second quarter and got 10 points apiece in the half from Afalo and Harris. Kyle OQuinn came off the bench to grab nine points and seven re bounds, which led to some easy putbacks. The Celtics got 10 each from Bradley and Humphries, but had a scary moment late in the rst quarter when Green slipped while attempting to contest a jumper by Afalo. Green landed hard and awkwardly on his right knee, but was able to walk off on his own power after lying on the court for a few minutes. The incident didnt seem to have any lingering effects as he explodedfor a dunk late in the half. MAGIC FROM PAGE B1 New England 0 3 0 13 16 Denver 3 10 7 6 26 First Quarter DenFG Prater 27, 3:43. Second Quarter DenTamme 1 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 7:50. NEFG Gostkowski 47, 2:54. DenFG Prater 35, :25. Third Quarter DenD.Thomas 3 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 7:52. Fourth Quarter DenFG Prater 19, 12:02. NEEdelman 7 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 9:26. DenFG Prater 54, 7:00. NEBrady 5 run (run failed), 3:07. A,110. NE Den First downs 19 27 Total Net Yards 320 507 Rushes-yards 16-64 28-107 Passing 256 400 Punt Returns 0-0 0-0 Kickoff Returns 0-0 1-4 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 24-38-0 32-43-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-21 0-0 Punts 3-49.0 1-48.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 2-15 4-34 Time of Possession 24:16 35:44 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNew England, Vereen 4-34, Ridley 5-17, Brady 2-7, Blount 5-6. Denver, Moreno 14-59, Ball 1243, Green 1-6, Manning 1-(minus 1). PASSINGNew England, Brady 24-38-0-277. Denver, Manning 32-43-0-400. RECEIVINGNew England, Edelman 10-89, Vereen 5-59, Collie 4-57, Dobson 2-33, Hoomanawanui 2-33, Mulligan 1-6. Denver, J.Thomas 8-85, D.Thomas 7-134, Decker 5-73, Welker 4-38, Ball 3-13, Tamme 2-24, Moreno 2-22, Caldwell 1-11. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. New York, New York blaring over the loud speakers, CenturyLink Field rocked like never before. Thats as sweet as it gets, Sherman said. San Francisco (14-5) led 17-13 when Wilson, given a free play as Al don Smith jumped off side, hurled the ball to Jermaine Kearse, who made a leaping catch in the end zone over Car los Rogers. Steven Hauschka then kicked his third eld goal, and Smith intercepted in the end zone on the 49ers nal possession. This feels even sweeter, with the amaz ing support we have had from the 12th Man, team owner Paul Allen said, comparing this Super Bowl trip to the previous one. SEATTLE FROM PAGE B1 49ers-Seahawks Stats San Francisco 3 7 7 0 17 Seattle 0 3 10 10 23 First Quarter SFFG Dawson 25, 12:45. Second Quarter SFDixon 1 run (Dawson kick), 10:03. SeaFG Hauschka 32, 5:47. Third Quarter SeaLynch 40 run (Hauschka kick), 9:51. SFBoldin 26 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 6:29. SeaFG Hauschka 40, 3:55. Fourth Quarter SeaKearse 35 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 13:44. SeaFG Hauschka 47, 3:37. A,454. SF Sea First downs 16 14 Total Net Yards 308 308 Rushes-yards 28-161 29-115 Passing 147 193 Punt Returns 1-0 3-10 Kickoff Returns 4-92 3-109 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-24-2 16-25-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-6 4-22 Punts 4-42.0 2-45.5 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 3-1 Penalties-Yards 7-65 8-66 Time of Possession 28:32 31:28 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 11-130, Hunter 3-16, Gore 11-14, Dixon 2-1, James 1-0. Seattle, Lynch 22-109, Turbin 2-6, Wilson 5-0. PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 14-24-2153. Seattle, Wilson 16-25-0-215. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Boldin 5-53, Crabtree 4-52, V.Davis 2-16, Gore 1-17, V.McDonald 1-13, Patton 1-2. Seattle, Baldwin 6-106, Tate 4-31,

PAGE 11

Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Associated Press CHARLOTTES VILLE, Va. Faith Randolph scored a ca reer-high 26 points and Virginia rolled by No. 17 Florida State 85-68 Sunday. Virginia (9-9, 2-3 ACC) tied its sec ond-highest scoring performance of the season, and jumped to a 47-31 halftime lead behind 20 rsthalf points from Ran dolph. Florida State (144, 2-3) never cut the decit to fewer than 11 points in the sec ond half. The Semi noles committed 27 turnovers compared with 10 for Virginia. Ataira Franklin had 18 points and 10 re bounds for the Cav aliers while Sarah Imovbioh added 15. Emiah Bingley scored 21 points to lead the Seminoles. Natasha Howard add ed 15 points and Kai James had 11. Virginia played its third straight ranked opponent after falling to No. 2 Notre Dame and No. 3 Duke. Florida State won 14 of its rst 15 games but has dropped its last three, including losses to No. 9 North Carolina and No. 20 North Carolina State. NO. 24 VANDY 79, LSU 70 NASHVILLE, Tenn. Jasmine List er scored 25 points, including a trio of 3-pointers and 10-for10 shooting from the foul line, to lift No. 24 Vanderbilt to a 79-70 upset win over No. 14 LSU on Sunday. Christina Foggie contributed 19 points and Morgan Batey had 11 for Vanderbilt (16-3, 5-1 SEC), which shot 52 percent from the eld in toppling its second ranked team in as many weeks. The Commodores broke open the game in the second half, carving out its rst double-digit lead with an 11-4 run fueled by a layup and four free throws from Kylee Smith that made it 48-35 with 12:08 to go. Vandy scored 12 of the next 18 points over the next 4 min utes to build a lead it would protect against an LSU rally down the stretch. NO. 10 KENTUCKY 73, AUBURN 71 AUBURN, Ala. Jennifer ONeill scored 16 points, Samarie Walker had 13 points and 10 rebounds and No. 10 Kentucky over came a 13-point rsthalf decit to beat Au burn 73-71 on Sunday. The Wildcats (153, 3-2 Southeastern Conference) survived 13-of-29 shooting from the foul line to hold off the Tigers (116, 2-2). Meagan Tucker hit a jumper with 1:07 left to bring Auburn within two points. The Wildcats worked 20 seconds off the clock and then called tim eout. ONeill missed two long jumpers in the nal seconds, but Linnae Harper and Walker grabbed the offensive rebounds. Walker missed two free throws with 6 seconds remaining. Tyrese Tanner, who scored 28 points, re bounded and threw it to Katie Frerking. ONeill smothered her in the corner and Au burn couldnt get a nal shot off. Harper also had 13 points for the Wild cats. Auburn starter Ha sina Muhammad missed the game with an unspecied injury. MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL LUKE MEREDITH AP Sports Writer IOWA CITY, Iowa Aaron White scored all of his 18 points in the second half and Josh Oglesby added a sea son-high 17 points as 14th-ranked Iowa blew past Minnesota 94-73 on Sunday. Devyn Marble had 15 of his 16 points after halftime for the surg ing Hawkeyes, who moved into third place in the Big Ten behind Michigan State and Michigan. Iowa (15-3, 4-1 Big Ten) overcame a 10-point decit with a 29-10 run and out scored the Gophers 53-30 in the second half. Andre Hollins had a game-high 20 points for Minnesota (145, 3-3). But Iowa held Hollins without a eld goal in the second half in handing the Go phers their most lop sided loss of the sea son. Last season, Iowa used a 37-10 run to erase a 16-point decit and blow past the Go phers in Iowa City. On Sunday, the Hawkeyes outscored the Gophers by 19 points in just 6 minutes to notch its 20th straight home win one shy of the Carver-Hawkeye Arena record. An 11-0 run helped put Minnesota ahead 43-33 late in the rst half, but Oglesby hit back-to-back 3s as the Hawkeyes got the de cit down to 2 by half time. Marble then caught re, scoring 14 points in the opening 8:41 of the second half to help Iowa take a 71-59 lead with 11:19 left. Whites 3-point play with 4:35 left was a back-breaker for the Gophers, who missed all eight of their 3-point tries in the second half. Austin Hollins had 13 for the Gophers, who came to Iowa City on a roll. After pushing league leaders Michigan State to overtime in East Lan sing, Minnesota beat No. 11 Ohio State 63-53 on Thursday for its third win in four games. The Gophers start ed strong in this one too, keeping Mar ble and White score less for nearly 18 min utes in the rst half. But Oglesby capped a brilliant half with an off-balance 25-foot er that pulled the Hawkeyes within 4341. Oglesby, who missed the rst 12 games with a foot injury, had 14 rst-half points to keep the Hawkeyes in the game. Iowa had a week off after a program-den ing upset at Ohio State, which was likely a big reason why it looked so sluggish in the rst 20 minutes. But Mar ble opened the second half with his rst bas ket of the day and fol lowed with a pair of 3s, waking up a sellout crowd and putting the Hawkeyes ahead 5246. Iowa is now a game back of Michigan for sec ond place in the league but it wont have to wait long for a shot at the Wolverines. Michi gan hosts the Hawkeyes on Wednesday. WRIGHT ST. 49, CLEVELAND ST. 46 CLEVELAND Jer ran Young scored 10 points and Wright State held off a late rally from Cleveland State for a 49-46 win on Sunday. Wright State (12-9, 4-2 Horizon League) led 49-40 with 3:15 left after Matt Vests dunk before Cleveland State (11-9, 3-3) scored the last six points of the game. Cleveland States Trey Lewis scored with 44 seconds left to bring the Vikings within 49-46. Follow ing a shot-clock viola tion from Wright State, Lewis had a 3-point at tempt at the buzzer but the shot bounced off the rim as the Raid ers held on. Young was the lone Wright State scorer in double digits as the Raiders shot just 33.3 percent from the eld. Vest had nine points. Jon Harris scored 17 points to go along with 11 rebounds for the Vi kings. White helps No. 14 Iowa blow past Minnesota 94-73 CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Iowa guard Mike Gesell, bottom, ghts for a loose ball with Minnesota center Elliott Eliason, top right, during the rst half on Sunday in Iowa City, Iowa. WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL OLYMPICS FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS In a Feb. 28, 2010, le photo Canadas Sidney Crosby leaps in the air after making the game-winning goal in the overtime period of a mens gold medal ice hockey game against USA at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. Associated Press OTTAWA, Ontario Sid the Kid is now Captain Canada. Pittsburgh Penguins star Sidney Crosby, who lifted his home coun try to gold in Vancou ver four years ago, will captain the Canadian hockey team in Sochi. You hear names be ing kind of thrown around, Crosby said. Theres so many leaders and so many guys capa ble of leading by exam ple. Its just an honor. The 26-year-old cur rently leads the NHL in scoring and has be come the face of both the NHL and hockey in Canada. The Chicago Black hawks Jonathan Toews and the Nashville Pred ators Shea Weber will be alternate captains, Hockey Canada an nounced Sunday. Sidney, Jonathan and Shea have been leaders on the interna tional stage in the past, as well as with their NHL teams, coach Mike Babcock said in a statement. These three players will be at the forefront of our ef forts in Sochi, but we are condent we have 25 players on our roster that will lead in their own way and allow our team to be successful. Crosby was made the youngest captain in NHL history when he got the C for the Penguins 6 years ago. Sid the Kid now known as Captain Canada Associated Press ST. LOUIS Shelby Miller pitched just one inning in the playoffs last season for the Car dinals and is puzzled why he wasnt used more. Now he simply wants to get on with next season. Its tough to not get to pitch in the post season and stuff, but at the same time, we had a good thing going and its hard to change it up, Miller said Sun day during the annu al Cardinals Winter Warmup. I dont really have a good answer for it to be honest. We were winning games, so you cant really complain. Miller had a 15-9 re cord last year with a 3.06 ERA, 10th best in the league. In the post season, the 23-yearold rookie right-hander pitched one inning of relief against Pitts burgh in the NL divi sion series. He gave up a home run. And that was it. He says there were no injury concerns with this shoulder and he wasnt tired. Physically, I felt amazing, he said. I felt good. I didnt feel any better or worse than I did during the season. No one in the orga nization told him why he was put on the shelf. Nor did he ask for a rea son, either. The season just kind of ended and I just kind of put it in the past real ly, Miller said. I was a little upset I didnt pitch but I just put it away. After the season end ed, I just wanted to be ready for a big offsea son. I didnt want to dwell on the past and why I didnt pitch in October. Im not worried about it anymore. Im just going to let it be a mystery. A mystery unsolved. BASEBALL Cardinals Shelby Miller armed for coming season ASSOCIATED PRESS Cardinals rookie right-hander Shelby Miller doesnt know why he wasnt used in the postseason. Now, he simply wants to get on with the game. BUTCH DILL / AP Auburns Tyrese Tanner (32), Kentuckys Kastine Evans (32), Linnae Harper (15) and Auburns Peyton Davis (34) ght for a rebound on Sunday in Auburn, Ala. Kentucky defeated Auburn 73-71. Randolph scores career-high 26 as Virginia rolls by No. 17 Florida State

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 NHL NBA JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer CHICAGO Pat rick Kane scored in a shootout to lift the Chicago Blackhawks to a 3-2 victory over the Boston Bruins on Sunday in a rematch of last seasons Stanley Cup nals. Jonathan Toews beat Tuukka Rask on the stick side to give the Blackhawks the lead in the tiebreaker, but Brad Marchands quick wrist shot got by Corey Crawford, tying it up for the Bruins. Kane, who won the Conn Smythe Trophy last year as playoff MVP, then skated to ward the net, slowed up for a second and sent a shot past Rask on the stick side to give Chicago the win. The Blackhawks had lost their past seven games that had gone past regulation. Marian Hossa and Brandon Bollig had the regulation goals for Chicago, which beat Boston in six games in June for the title. Coach Joel Quenneville picked up win No. 692, matching Dick Irvin Sr., for third on the NHLs career list. Marchand scored in each of the rst two pe riods for the Bruins, who had won two of three. Rask had 35 stops. It was Bostons rst visit to Chicago since June 22, when the Blackhawks used two goals by Kane to win 3-1 and take a 3-2 lead in the NHL nals. The Blackhawks then had a memorable ral ly in Game 6 in Bos ton, scoring twice in 17 seconds late in the third period to secure their second title in four seasons. The series includ ed ve overtime peri ods, including three in Chicagos 4-3 victory in Game 1. Together again for the anticipated re match, the Bruins and Blackhawks once again were unable to decide the game in three periods. Defen seman Gregory Camp bell had a chance to win it for Boston in overtime, but whiffed on a deected puck. Chicago controlled much of the rst pe riod and had a 1-0 lead before Marchand made the most of two open opportunities in a 69-second span overlapping the rst two periods. First, Marchand got a slick pass from Patrice Bergeron and sent a wrist shot over Crawfords right shoulder at 19:41 of the rst. The Black hawks lost the sneaky forward again at the start of the second, and he used a clever fake to set up a shot through Crawfords legs for his 14th goal. It was Marchands second multigoal game of the season. He has four goals and an assist in his past three games. Bostons 2-1 lead lasted about 10 min utes. The Blackhawks caught a break when Bolligs bad-angle shot from the right side went off Rasks left foot and into the net for his fth goal of the season. Associated Press NEW YORK A re cord 98 underclass men, including Johnny Manziel and Jadeveon Clowney, have made themselves eligible for the NFL draft in May. The league released the list of early entrants Sunday and said the number has risen six straight seasons. The deadline for under classmen to apply was Jan. 15. Last year, 73 under classmen entered the draft. The year before it was 65 and in 2011 it was 56. Also, four players who recently gradu ated and still have el igibility left are join ing the draft class but arent included in the number. Most notable among those is Louis ville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. Southern California defensive back Dion Bailey, Ari zona State linebacker Carl Bradford and Ala bama linebacker Adri an Hubbard are also juniors who have in formed the league they have graduated. Among the early en trants expected to be se lected near the top of the draft are Manziel, the Texas A&M quarterback, Clowney, the defensive end from South Caroli na, and Clemson receiv er Sammy Watkins. The draft is May 8-10 in New York. LSU for the second straight season had the most players of any school to leave early. The Tigers had seven early entrants this sea son, including wide re ceivers Jarvis Landry and Odell Beckham Jr., after 11 LSU players left early last year. Alabama and South ern California each had ve leave early, along with California. Cal, which went 1-11, has six players listed among the early entrants, but that includes defensive end Chris McCain, who was dismissed from the team in September. National champion Florida State lost four players early, including All-America defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan and receiver Kelvin Benjamin, who caught the winning touch down in the BCS cham pionship game against Auburn. Notre Dame, Florida and South Car olina also had four ear ly entrants. Record 98 underclassmen eligible for NFL draft NFL JOHN RAOUX / AP Wisconsin running back James White (20) is tackled by South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney (7) during the rst half of the Capital One Bowl NCAA college football game on Jan. 1 in Orlando. IAN HARRISON Associated Press TORONTO Nick Young says the Los Angeles Lakers have woken up since air ing some grievances at a team meeting last week. Young returned from suspension to score 29 points, Pau Gasol had 22 and the Lakers beat the Toronto Rap tors 112-106 on Sun day, just their third win in 15 games. Nicks been doing it all year and he just keeps going, Lakers coach Mike DAntoni said. Young was suspend ed for Fridays victory at Boston after he was ejected for throwing a punch at Phoenixs Go ran Dragic in a loss last Wednesday. Rested and refreshed, Young scored 15 points in the fourth quarter as the Lakers overcame a 19-point rst-half decit. They won back-to-back games for the rst time since beating Memphis on Dec. 17 and Minne sota on Dec. 20. Los Angeles held a team meeting before Fridays game to ad dress Youngs ejection, and suggestions that his teammates had not done enough to stand up for him after a hard foul by Suns center Alex Len. Young called the meeting a turning point in whats been a dismal season so far. We had an altercation that woke us all up and were out there battling with each other now, Young said. Now were just laying it out there. Ryan Kelly scored 17 in his rst career start and Kendall Marshall had 10 points and 11 assists. Kelly said Fridays meeting underscored a lack of urgency in both the teams re sponse to Lens foul on Young, and the Lakers play in general. That was carrying over into the game, a lack of urgency to get back on defense, a lack of urgency to rebound and things like that, Kelly said. When we saw that on tape, thats the one thing it did for us is to make us real ize that on every play, every possession, we have to have that sense of urgency. The Lakers reached the midway point of the season with a re cord of 16-25. Its really gratifying to win back-to-back games on the road, especially with the way weve been struggling, Gasol said. Im just really proud of the guys. Theyre step ping up, theyre bring ing the effort, bringing the intensity, bringing the focus and not want ing to give up. Long-term injuries to Steve Nash and Kobe Bryant have made life rough on the Lakers, but they havent given up on a playoff push. If we keep plugging along, maybe well get some luck here and get some guys back, DAn toni said. With Bryant sidelined by a sore left knee, Kelly said Young has become the player the Lakers turn to when the shot clock is winding down. If weve got seven seconds on the clock, you give Nick the ball hell nd a way to get a shot or get to the line. FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS Los Angeles Lakers forward Wesley Johnson (11) picks up an offensive fouls as he drives through Toronto Raptors forward Amir Johnson (15) during rst-half NBA basketball game action on Sunday in Toronto. Kane scores in SO as Blackhawks top Bruins NAM Y. HUH / AP Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford (50), left, blocks a shot by Boston Bruins Brad Marchand (63). Young scores 29 as Lakers beat Raptors

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 The Helpful PlaceWe Sell & ServiceEquipment* APOPKA Apopka Ace Hardware & Lumber 530 South Park Avenue (407) 889-4111 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 LEESBURG South Leesburg Ace Hardware 27649 U.S. Highway 27 (352) 787-5446 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 EUSTIS Bronson Ace Hardware 26 East Orange Avenue (352) 357-2366 M-Sat 7-6:30, Sun 9-5 MOUNT DORA Mount Dora Ace Hardware 18691 U.S. Highway 441 (352) 383-2101 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 SORRENTO Sorrento Ace Hardware 24329 St. Rd. 46 (352) 383-2061 M-Sat 7-7:00, Sun 9-5 TAVARES Tavares Ace Hardware 509-South Highway 19 (352) 343-3361 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 UMATILLA Umatilla Ace Hardware 811 North Central Avenue (352) 669-3411 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5Come See Our Great Selection of Benjamin Moore Paint *At select stores only. Abu Dhabi Championship Leading Scores Sunday At Abu Dhabi Golf Club Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Purse: $2.7 million Yardage: 7,583; Par: 72 Final Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-70-68-67 274 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 70-67-70-68 275 Phil Mickelson, United States 73-70-63-69 275 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 67-68-73-68 276 George Coetzee, South Africa 68-70-72-66 276 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-72-68 278 Johan Carlsson, Sweden 73-70-71-65 279 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 70-73-68-69 280 Robert Karlsson, Sweden 73-67-72-68 280 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 72-68-66-75 281 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 70-67-72-72 281 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 70-70-75-66 281 Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-70-69-72 281 Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-70-71 281 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-71-68-73 281 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-70-68-73 281 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-68-67-73 281 Craig Lee, Scotland 68-67-69-77 281 Also Sergio Garcia, Spain 76-68-70-68 282 Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-71-69-74 284 Matteo Manassero, Italy 71-73-70-70 284 Luke Donald, England 70-73-71-71 285 Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 73-68-74-71 286 Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 74-69-72-73 288 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-70-73-73 289 KAMRAN JEBREILI / AP Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland, second right, taps on the shoulder of the winner of the tournament, Pablo Larrazabal of Spain, second left, as Phil Mickelson of the U.S., rst right, looks at them after the nal round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship on Sunday in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. ABU DHABI, Unit ed Arab Emirates Spains Pablo Larraza bal shot a nal round 67 to end a near threeyear winless drought to capture the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Champion ship on Sunday. Larrazabal, 30, won by a stroke with a 14-under par 274 on the National Course in the UAE capital. Rory McIlroy (68), who had incurred a two-stroke penalty a day earlier, nished with a share of second place with Phil Micklel son (69) on 13 under. It means a lot to win my third victo ry on Tour and playing against who I played today, said Larrazabal. Of course, I play against myself but I knew who I also had behind me in Mickel son. I have just beaten two of the three most talented guys in my era, and in the last era, as well in Phil Mickel son and Rory. Mickelson was left counting the cost of incurring a shot pen alty after a double hit while playing from brush on the 13th hole of the National course. The British Open champion, who was leading at the time, nished the hole with a triple-bogey seven. I was sitting at the presentation ceremo ny I said to myself: Pablo? What are you doing here? Ive got Rory McIlroy on my left and I am shaking the hand of Phil Mick elson on my right. Its very special for me, added Larrazabal after collecting the trophy. But its been a long journey and a lot of work since my last win in Munich, and only my team and my fam ily know how hard I have worked for this victory with no hol idays, and not too many days off this winter, just working hard to arrive here properly and in form to Abu Dhabi. So, yes happy days. While Mickelson was returning home for his rst PGA event of the New Year, at this coming weeks Farm ers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines, McIlroy is returning to near by Dubai to continue working on his game. It is the second oc casion in three years he has let slip victory in Abu Dhabi because of a rules violation. It happens, it hap pens but it never crossed my mind I might double hit it, Mickelson said. I was just trying to dribble it out of the bush because I couldnt get the unplayable penalty lie to give me a shot without stroke and distance and I felt it was worth the risk. It not only cost a pen alty shot, but it also stopped the ball from going to a spot where I could hit again. So after that I got refocused and got ag gressive and made some birdies and gave myself a chance. If Pablo had not birdied the last hole to win, I would have gotten into a play-off, and so I give him a lot of credit for nishing the tourna ment off the right way. McIlroy had been penalized for illegally brushing sand off his line on the nal day of the 2012 event before losing by a stroke to Englands Robert Rock. On Saturday, the dou ble Major winner was slapped with a two-shot penalty after being re ported by the caddy of another player in not taking full relief from a spectator cross walk. Larrazabal wins Abu Dhabi Championship Spaniard shoots nal-round 67 to win Abu Dhabi Championship from McIlroy, Mickelson JOHN NICHOLSON AP Sports Writer LA QUINTA, Ca lif. Patrick Reed lost his putting touch for a few hours in the nal round of the Humana Challenge. He found it when things were get ting interesting. After shooting three straight 9-under 63s to open a seven-stroke lead, Reed had a 1-un der 71 on Sunday at PGA Wests Arnold Palmer Private Course to beat Ryan Palmer by two strokes. It was tough out there, Reed said. Finally resembling the guy who talked Sat urday about being in a putting coma, Reed ran in an 18-footer for birdie on the par-3 15th to push his advantage to three strokes and parred the nal three holes. He completed the wire-to-wire victo ry at 28-under 260. I started toward the end playing for par, just because I knew pars werent going to hurt me, Reed said. I knew someone was going to have to do something spectacular to catch me. The 23-year-old Reed has two victories in his rst 46 PGA Tour starts, winning the Wyndham Championship in Au gust. He was projected to jump from 73rd to 42nd in the world rank ing, enough to lock up a spot next month in the 64-man Match Play Championship eld. Palmer made a 15foot eagle putt on the nal hole for a 63. What can you do with what Patrick did this week? Palm er said. Its ridiculous what he did. Amazing how good he played. Well come up a couple short, but it was a win in my game because I was playing for second today. Zach Johnson and Justin Leonard tied for third at 25 under. John son birdied the nal ve holes for a 62, the best round of the week. I got red hot at the end, Johnson said. I played really good early, missed a cou ple putts, but I made a bunch at the end. The Kapalua winner is taking a four-week break. Hell return for the Match Play event in Arizona. I know its a neces sity, I know its good for me, its good for my family, but Im also hes itant because Im play ing well, Johnson said. Hopefully, I can main tain where Im at. Main tain my posture and my fundamentals, and that sort of thing, and come back out here in Tuc son ready to go. Leonard parred his last two for a 65. Its a great week, Leonard said. Would love to have made a few more putts today, but its such a fun journey. Im cutting my sched ule back this year and all this does is kind of free me up to do that. Other than a key 18-footer on No. 15, the longest putt Reed holed was a 5-footer for a par save on the par-4 13th. That also was a crucial putt after he played the previous eight holes in 1 over with four bogeys, three birdies and a par. In that eight-hole stretch, Todd missed two 6-foot par putts and an 8-footer and dropped another stroke with a poor bun ker shot on the par3 12th. He two-putted for birdie on two par 5s and made a 4-footer on the par-4 eighth for the other birdie. Reed also two-putted from 12 feet for a bird ie on the par-5 second hole, but his eagle putt near had a chance signaling that his put ter had cooled off over night. PGA-Humana Challenge Scores Sunday p-PGA West, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par 72 n-PGA West, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards, par 72 q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards, par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5.7 million Final Patrick Reed (500), $1,026,000 63p-63q-63n-71 260 Ryan Palmer (300), $615,600 64p-65q-70n-63 262 Zach Johnson (163), $330,600 65q-68n-68p-62 263 Justin Leonard (163), $330,600 66n-67p-65q-65 263 Brian Stuard (110), $228,000 67q-66n-66p-65 264 Bill Haas (95), $198,075 65q-66n-67p-67 265 Brendon Todd (95), $198,075 65n-63p-68q-69 265 Chad Collins (85), $176,700 68n-68p-65q-65 266 Stuart Appleby (73), $148,200 66p-69q-67n-65 267 Charlie Beljan (73), $148,200 68q-64n-68p-67 267 Ben Crane (73), $148,200 70q-64n-65p-68 267 Charley Hoffman (73), $148,200 64q-66n-66p-71 267 Russell Knox (56), $103,740 65p-70q-67n-66 268 Matt Every (56), $103,740 65n-68p-69q-66 268 Jerry Kelly (56), $103,740 69q-65n-68p-66 268 Will MacKenzie (56), $103,740 67n-66p-66q-69 268 Matt Jones (56), $103,740 66n-67p-66q-69 268 Brendon de Jonge (51), $74,328 69q-68n-66p-66 269 Luke Guthrie (51), $74,328 69p-67q-67n-66 269 Scott Langley (51), $74,328 69q-68n-65p-67 269 Keegan Bradley (51), $74,328 69q-66n-65p-69 269 James Driscoll (51), $74,328 68p-63q-66n-72 269 Webb Simpson (48), $57,000 69p-70q-67n-64 270 Charlie Wi (48), $57,000 65p-69q-69n-67 270 Ryo Ishikawa (43), $41,681 66p-69q-69n-67 271 Tyrone Van Aswegen (43), $41,681 69n-67p-67q-68 271 Martin Flores (43), $41,681 69p-65q-69n-68 271 Johnson Wagner (43), $41,681 72p-66q-68n-65 271 Martin Laird (43), $41,681 69n-66p-68q-68 271 Hudson Swafford (43), $41,681 65n-71p-70q-65 271 Billy Horschel (43), $41,681 72p-65q-70n-64 271 Roberto Castro (43), $41,681 68p-73q-66n-64 271 Camilo Villegas (36), $30,780 70n-66p-68q-68 272 Harris English (36), $30,780 67q-66n-71p-68 272 Josh Teater (36), $30,780 68n-68p-70q-66 272 Rickie Fowler (36), $30,780 68q-71n-67p-66 272 Jason Bohn (36), $30,780 70q-65n-66p-71 272 Bryce Molder (29), $21,660 69p-72q-63n-69 273 Gary Woodland (29), $21,660 69p-71q-65n-68 273 Andrew Svoboda (29), $21,660 69n-69p-66q-69 273 Cameron Tringale (29), $21,660 68q-66n-70p-69 273 Jeff Overton (29), $21,660 70q-67n-67p-69 273 Brian Davis (29), $21,660 69p-71q-66n-67 273 Spencer Levin (29), $21,660 69p-68q-66n-70 273 Rory Sabbatini (29), $21,660 68p-67q-67n-71 273 Seung-Yul Noh (29), $21,660 68p-66q-66n-73 273 James Hahn (29), $21,660 70p-68q-69n-66 273 Justin Hicks (19), $13,817 64n-71p-70q-69 274 John Merrick (19), $13,817 66q-70n-69p-69 274 Kevin Kisner (19), $13,817 66n-70p-69q-69 274 Brad Fritsch (19), $13,817 67p-70q-67n-70 274 Scott Brown (19), $13,817 67p-68q-70n-69 274 Bo Van Pelt (19), $13,817 70q-68n-67p-69 274 Kevin Na (19), $13,817 68n-68p-68q-70 274 Brice Garnett (19), $13,817 67p-69q-68n-70 274 Steven Bowditch (19), $13,817 71n-67p-68q-68 274 Michael Putnam (19), $13,817 68q-69n-70p-67 274 Harrison Frazar (8), $12,198 69n-68p-68q-70 275 Pat Perez (8), $12,198 69q-70n-66p-70 275 Brandt Snedeker (8), $12,198 72q-64n-69p-70 275 Davis Love III (8), $12,198 69p-68q-69n-69 275 Daniel Summerhays (8), $12,198 64n-69p-73q-69 275 Kevin Chappell (8), $12,198 70q-70n-63p-72 275 Charles Howell III (8), $12,198 73n-68p-65q-69 275 Scott Stallings (8), $12,198 68n-69p-69q-69 275 Jonathan Byrd (8), $12,198 68p-69q-65n-73 275 Stewart Cink (8), $12,198 73q-63n-71p-68 275 Lee Williams (8), $12,198 70n-68p-69q-68 275 Erik Compton (1), $11,172 70q-66n-70p-70 276 Jim Herman (1), $11,172 67n-68p-68q-73 276 Blake Adams (1), $11,172 70p-70q-66n-70 276 Ken Duke (1), $11,172 71p-70q-65n-70 276 Nicholas Thompson (1), $11,172 71p-69q-67n-69 276 Chad Campbell (1), $11,172 71p-68q-68n-69 276 John Senden (1), $11,172 71n-70p-66q-69 276 William McGirt (1), $10,659 70n-70p-64q-73 277 Freddie Jacobson (1), $10,659 71p-68q-68n-70 277 David Lingmerth (1), $10,431 69q-68n-69p-72 278 Kevin Stadler (1), $10,431 69n-66p-72q-71 278 Brett Quigley (1), $10,260 66q-73n-68p-72 279 Scott McCarron (1), $10,146 72q-69n-66p-73 280 J.J. Henry (1), $9,975 71n-70p-65q-75 281 Brian Harman (1), $9,975 69n-66p-72q-74 281 Patrick Reed holds on to win Humana Challenge MATT YORK Patrick Reed kisses the trophy on Sunday after the nal round of the Humana Challenge PGA golf tournament on the Palmer Private course at PGA West in La Quinta, Calif. CHRIS CARLSON / AP Zach Johnson watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during the nal round of the Humana Challenge golf tournament on Sunday on the Palmer Private course at PGA West in La Quinta, Calif.

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 Arts/CulturalAn individual whose personal or professional talents/activities in the cultural arts have contributed to the enrichment of Lake County.Hall of Fame Business AwardFor career business achievement of 20 years or more.Business AchievementA business leader whose achievements within his or her field have aided the economic business climate of Lake County. Categories: Small Medium (12-39 employees) Large EntrepreneurEducationAn employed, elected or volunteer educator who has shown innovation and dedication to public or private schools in Lake County.HumanitarianAn individual whose volunteer activities have improved the quality of life in Lake County..Public ServiceAn outstanding elected or employed official of state, county or city government; or a volunteer who has made contributions toward improving Lake Countys quality of life.Sports/AthleticsA person who has achieved in sports through performance or in promotion of athletic events in Lake County.Chris Daniels Memorial Public Safety AwardTo recognize an individual in the area of Public Safety who has demonstrated superior performance in their career, and has shown a commitment to better the Lake County through community involvement. This would include those persons in Lake County in the careers of law enforcement, fire, emergency medical services and emergency management.Special Judges AwardAwarded at the discretion of the judges for particularly outstanding contributions to Lake CountyLake County Leadership AwardAn individual whose guidance & leadership has impacted Lake CoNominations must be postmarked by February 21, 2014 Mail to:LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS Lake County League of Cities or email to myersj@ci.eustis.fl.us CommunityService Awards NOMINATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED!Applications will be Printed in the THURSDAY EDITION of the Daily Commercial Were sure you know a person whose dedication and selflessness have made Lake County a better place. Now its time to give them the recognition they deserve.Nominating someone is easy. Nomination forms will be printed in the Thursday editions of the Daily Commercial, can be picked up at the Chamber of Commerce offices and City Halls throughout Lake County or you can contact Janice Jones (phone: 352-483-5440 or email: JonesJ@ci.eustis.fl.us.com) and have one sent to you. You can also access and submit the nomination form on-line at www.dailycommercial.comIf selected, your nominee will be honored at the 2014 Lake County Community Service Awards Dinner on April 30, 2014.SO SHOW YOUR APPRECIATION. MAKE YOUR NOMINATIONS TODAY! Your First Choice In-Print & On-Line JOHN PYE AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Aus tralia The powerful serve that carried Ser ena Williams to 25 con secutive wins sudden ly became the target of Ana Ivanovics attack in a major fourth-round upset at the Australian Open. Williams had a back complaint shed tried to keep secret be fore Sunday but Iva novic noticed almost immediately that her serve wasnt as fast as shed expected, and she started taking big swipes at it. The No. 14-seed ed Ivanovic ended Wil liams bid for a sixth Australian and 18th Grand Slam title with a 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 victo ry that took the hottest of favorites out of con tention at Melbourne Park and opened up one side of the wom ens draw. Its not easy play ing such a champion ... but she is also just a human, said Iva novic, who beat Venus Williams in the nal at Auckland, New Zea land earlier this month. I just went out there swinging. Williams hadnt lost a match since Au gust, and went 78-4 in 2013. She came into the fourth round with those 25 straight wins, the second-longest streak of her career, and it was her 70th match at Melbourne Park, a record in the Open era. Williams had just set the mark for most match wins (61) ever at the Australian Open with her third-round victory. The No. 1-ranked Wil liams didnt move her feet well, and was lung ing for balls. When she tried to step up the in tensity in the third set, her grunts becoming louder and more fre quent until she toned it down after spraying a wild backhand wide in the next-to-last game, Ivanovic matched her stroke for stroke. It wasnt the best, Williams told a news conference, after being told that her coach had leaked news of a back problem. Again, I dont want to blame anything. I feel like Ana deserves all the credit, Wil liams added. I feel she played unbelievable to day. I think she went for her shots. Its not like I gave her the match. Ivanovic advanced to the quarternals here for the rst time since her run to the 2008 nal and will next play the winner of Sundays lat er match between Aus tralian wild-card entry Casey Dellacqua and No. 30-seeded Eugenie Bouchard. The other quarter nal on this half will fea ture two women wholl turn 32 next month, af ter two-time nalist Li Na beat No. 22 Ekater ina Makarova 6-2, 6-0 and No. 28 Flavia Pen netta upset No. 9 An gelique Kerber 6-1, 4-6, 7-5. Novak Djokovic con tinued his bid for a fourth straight title here with a 6-3, 6-0, 6-2 win over Fabio Fognini in 1 hours, while No. 3-seeded David Ferrer advanced to the quar ternals by beating Florian Mayer 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-2, 6-1. In the 52 previous matches here where shed won the rst set, Williams had only ever lost one match against fellow Ameri can Sloane Stephens in last years quarternals. The crowd was even ly divided at rst but, sensing an upset, start ed backing Ivanovic, the former girlfriend of Australian golfer Adam Scott, as the match progressed. After dropping serve twice in the rst set, Ivanovic didnt face an other break point in the second or third sets. She broke Williams three times, frequent ly standing well inside the baseline to receive. She had 33 winners, including 20 on her forehand side. She also had a little bit of luck, when she drove a back hand into the top of the net, and it looped over and caught the line at an important stage of the third set. I had to remind my self all the time just to stay in the moment, because there were moments in the match where it could have gone either way, Iva novic said. But I real ly just believed in my game and stepped up when I needed to. Ivanovic won her only major at the French Open in 2008, giving her the No. 1 ranking for a total of 12 weeks. But then she only advanced past the fourth round once at 22 Grand Slams. I had to break a spell, fourth round, Ivanovic said, and whats the better place to do it than here against such a champion? Williams hit 22 win ners but made 31 un forced errors, mostly on her backhand. I made a tremen dous amount of er rors, shots ... I havent missed since the s, Williams said. Williams, pausing to concentrate, was given a warning for a time vio lation in her last service game, and fended off a match point when Iva novic netted a return. In the next game, though, Ivanovic set up triple match point when Williams hit a service return too long, and then clinched it just under two hours. Williams didnt say exactly what the back injury was, but thought shed get over it in a few days with some rest. Shed thought about pulling out of the tour nament, but it wasnt in her nature to concede defeat. Maybe I wasnt the best physically, but that had nothing to do with it, Williams said. I think Ana just played a really good match. She did what it takes to win. Ivanovic ousts Serena in historic upset AARON FAVIA / AP Serena Williams of the U.S. rests on her racket during her fourth round loss to Ana Ivanovic of Serbia on Sunday at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 SMOKING: Surgeon general adds to list of harms / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Line dance classes to be offered every Tuesday Ray Johnston is the instructor for line dance classes taking place from 1 to 2:30 p.m., every Tuesday, at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St. For information, call 352-7878044, or 352-324-2327. LADY LAKE Essential tremor support group meeting is Wednesday Share with others who have this disease at 2 p.m., Wednesday, St. Timothy Ministry Building, 1351 Paige Place in Lady Lake. Participants will learn about methods of coping, using medica tions, helpful hints, support and understanding for you and your caregiver. Heather Simpson, oc cupational therapist from Shands Hospital in Gainesville, is the guest speaker for this meeting. For information, call 352-787-3866, or email kstaylor62@usa2net.net. TAVARES Support groups, classes at Florida Hospital Waterman Overeaters Anonymous group meets at 5:30 p.m., every Thurs day, in Mattison Conference Room E, Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way, Tavares. Call 352223-9769. Childbirth classes are held on an ongoing basis. For details and reg istration, call 352-253-3367 or email Cheryl.Finotti@ahss.org. Look Good Feel Better Amer ican Cancer Society program meets from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., on the second Monday of every other month, at the hospitals Cancer Institute Waterman Conference Room, Tavares. Call La tanya Ruiz at 352-253-3605. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meetings are held at 10 a.m., the rst Friday of every month, in Mattison Conference Room F, at the hospi tal in Tavares. Call 352-638-0663, or email pityusnot@hotmail.com. TAVARES Osteoarthritis pain classes to be offered Put Pain in its Place-How to Get Osteoarthritis Pain Under Control is the topic to be discussed at two free classes. Get the facts about osteoarthritis and lean strategies for controlling and preventing pain, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., Thursday, at the Lake County Extension ofce, 1951 Woodlea Rd., in Tavares. For registration, go to lakepaininplace.eventbrite.com. The second class will be from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., on Feb. 7 at the Umatilla Public Library in Umatilla. For registration, go to umatillapa in2014.eventbrite.com. MARTHA MENDOZA AP National Writer MOUNTAIN VIEW, Ca lif. Brian Otis ginger ly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index nger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glit ter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of min iaturized transistors. Its ringed with a hair-thin antenna. Together these remarkable miniature electronics can monitor glucose levels in tears of diabetics and then wire lessly transmit them to a handheld device. It doesnt look like much, but it was a cra zy amount of work to get everything so very small, he said before the project was unveiled Thursday. During years of sol dering hair-thin wires to miniaturize electronics, Otis burned his ngertips so often that he can no longer feel the tiny chips he made from scratch in Googles Silicon Val ley headquarters, a small price to pay for what he says is the smallest wire less glucose sensor ever made. Just 35 miles away in the beach town of Santa Cruz, high school soccer coach and university se nior Michael Vahradian, 21, has his own set of n gertip callouses, his from pricking himself up to 10 times a day for the past 17 years to draw blood for his glucose meter. A cell phone-sized pump on his hip that attaches to a ex ible tube implanted in his stomach shoots rap id-acting insulin into his body around the clock. I remember at rst it was really hard to make the needle sticks a habit because it hurt so much, he said. And there are still times I dont want to do it it hurts and its incon venient. When Im hang ing out with friends, head ing down to the beach to body-surf or going to lunch, I have to hold ev eryone up to take my Googles contact lens prototype could be option for diabetics AP FILE PHOTO This undated photo released by Google shows a contact lens Google is testing to explore tear glucose. ARNIE STAPLETON AP Pro Football Writer ENGLEWOOD, Colo. Of all the decisions coach John Fox made that kept the Den ver Broncos rolling through a drama-lled season, one was an absolute life-saver. Instead of going out on his sh ing boat for some solitude during his teams bye week, Fox decided to play 18 holes with some buddies some 200 yards from his offseason home in Charlotte, N.C. Id have been 60 miles out in the woods, Fox said. They might never have found me. Fox had just seen his cardiologist in Raleigh, who told him hed still be able to de lay his heart operation until after the Super Bowl so long as he didnt feel faint or short of breath in the meantime. Fox was born with a genetic de fect in his aortic valve, which regu lates blood ow from the heart into the aorta, the major blood vessel that brings blood into the body. He said it was discovered in 1997 when a murmur showed up in a physical while he was the Giants defensive coordinator. Feeling dizzy, he chipped with in 2 feet for par, then lay down on the 14th green and, hardly able to breathe, said a short prayer: God John Foxs biggest decision was a life-saver ED ANDRIESKI / AP SEE GOOGLE | C2 SEE FOX | C3

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The prototype, which Google says will take at least ve years to reach consumers, is one of several medical devic es being designed by companies to make glucose monitoring for diabetic patients more convenient and less in vasive than traditional nger pricks. The contact lenses were developed during the past 18 months in the clandestine Goo gle X lab that also came up with a driverless car, Googles Web-surng eyeglasses and Proj ect Loon, a network of large balloons designed to beam the Internet to unwired places. But research on the contact lenses be gan several years ear lier at the University of Washington, where sci entists worked under National Science Foun dation funding. Until Thursday, when Goo gle shared information about the project with The Associated Press, the work had been kept under wraps. You can take it to a certain level in an ac ademic setting, but at Google we were given the latitude to invest in this project, Otis said. The beautiful thing is were leveraging all of the innovation in the semiconductor industry that was aimed at mak ing cellphones smaller and more powerful. American Diabetes Association board chair Dwight Holing said hes gratied that creative scientists are searching for solutions for peo ple with diabetes but warned that the device must provide accurate and timely information. People with diabe tes base very important health care decisions on the data we get from our monitors, he said. Other non-nee dle glucose monitor ing systems are also in the works, including a similar contact lens by Netherlands-based NovioSense, a minus cule, exible spring that is tucked under an eyelid. Israel-based OrSense has already tested a thumb cuff, and there have been early designs for tat toos and saliva sensors. A wristwatch mon itor was approved by the FDA in 2001, but patients said the low level electric currents pulling uid from their skin was painful, and it was buggy. There are a lot of people who have big promises, said Dr. Christopher Wilson, CEO of NovioSense. Its just a question of who gets to market with something that re ally works rst. Palo Alto Medical Foundation endocri nologist Dr. Larry Levin said it was remarkable and important that a tech rm like Google is getting into the medi cal eld and that hed like to be able to offer his patients a pain-free alternative from either pricking their ngers or living with a thick nee dle embedded in their stomach for constant monitoring. Worldwide, the glu cose-monitoring de vices market is expect ed to be more than $16 billion by the end of this year, according to analysts at Renub Re search. The Google team built the wireless chips in clean rooms and used advanced engi neering to get integrat ed circuits and a glu cose sensor into such a small space. Researchers also had to build in a system to pull energy from in coming radio frequency waves to power the de vice enough to collect and transmit one glu cose reading per sec ond. The embedded electronics in the lens dont obscure vision be cause they lie outside the eyes pupil and iris. Google is now look ing for partners with ex perience bringing sim ilar products to market. Google ofcials declined to say how many people worked on the project or how much the rm has invested in it. Dr. David Klonoff, medical director of the diabetes research insti tute at Mills-Peninsula Health Services in San Mateo, worked with Google to see wheth er glucose is present in tears and wheth er the amount of glu cose is proportional to the amount of glucose in blood. Hes still an alyzing but optimistic about his ndings and warns there are many potential pitfalls. Already this has some breakthrough technologies, but this is a moonshot, there are so many challeng es, he said. One is guring out how to correlate glu cose levels in tears as compared with blood. And what happens on windy days, while chopping onions or during very sad mov ies? As with any med ical device, it would need to be tested and proved accurate, safe, and at least as good as other types of glucose sensors available now to win FDA approval. GOOGLE FROM PAGE C1 LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Its no secret that smoking caus es lung cancer. But what about diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunc tion? Fifty years into the war on smoking, scientists still are adding diseases to the long list of cigarettes harms even as the government struggles to get more people to kick the habit. A new report from the U.S. Surgeon Generals ofce says the nation is at a crossroads, celebrating decades of prog ress against the chief pre ventable killer but not yet poised to nish the job. The real emphasis needs to be put on the fact that we still have a major and tragic catastrophe going on, said acting Surgeon General Bo ris Lushniak. The report, being released Friday, is a dash of cold wa ter after last weeks head lines marking the 50th anni versary of the landmark 1964 surgeon generals report that launched the anti-smok ing movement. Yes, far fewer Americans smoke today about 18 percent of adults, down from more than 42 percent in 1964. But the government may not meet its goal of drop ping that rate to 12 percent by 2020, the new report cau tioned. Nearly half a million peo ple will die from smoking-re lated diseases this year. Each day, more than 3,200 youths smoke their rst cigarette. New products such as e-cig arettes, with effects that ar ent yet understood, compli cate public health messages. And if current trends contin ue unabated, 5.6 million of todays children and teens will go on to die prematurely during adulthood because of smoking, the report found. Remarkably, the report adds more entries to the of cial list of smoking-caused diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthri tis, erectile dysfunction, the macular degeneration that can blind older adults, two additional cancers liver and colorectal and cleft palate birth defects. Enough is enough, said Lushniak. He urged new re solve to end smoking by in creasing use of proven to bacco-control measures, including price hikes for ciga rettes and expanding compre hensive indoor-smoking bans that he said currently cover about half the population. The report also encourag es research into newer ideas, such as whether lowering the amount of addictive nic otine in cigarettes would help people quit. Here are some ways the smoking landscape has changed between the 1964 surgeon generals report and Fridays: 1964: The surgeon general declares that cigarette smok ing increases deaths. 2014: About 20.8 million people in the U.S. have died from smoking-related dis eases since then, a toll the report puts at 10 times the number of Americans who have died in all of the na tions wars combined. Most were smokers or former smokers, but nearly 2.5 mil lion died from heart disease or lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke. 1964: Heavy smoking is de clared the main cause of lung cancer, at least in men. The data for women, though less extensive, point in the same direction. 2014: Today, lung cancer is the top cancer killer, and women who smoke have about the same risk of dying from it as men. As smoking has declined, rates of new lung cancer diagnoses are declining nearly 3 percent a year among men and about 1 percent a year among women. 1964: Male smokers were dying of heart disease more than nonsmokers, but the surgeon general stopped short of declaring cigarettes a cause of heart disease. 2014: Today, heart disease actually claims more lives of smokers 35 and older than lung cancer does. Likewise, secondhand smoke is riski er for your heart. Smoke-free laws have been linked to re ductions in heart attacks. Fridays surgeon general re port also found that second hand smoke increases the risk of a stroke. 1964: Smoking in preg nancy results in low-birthweight babies. 2014: Fridays report said 100,000 of the smok ing-caused deaths over the past 20 years were babies who died of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, or complications from pre maturity, low birth weight or other conditions relat ed to parents smoking. And it adds cleft palate birth de fects to that list of smoking risks to babies. 1964: The more you smoke, the bigger the risk of death. 2014: Smokers are esti mated to shorten their life by more than a decade. But stopping can lower that risk; sooner is better. 1964: That rst report fo cused mostly on lung effects and couldnt prove whether certain other illnesses were caused by smoking. 2014: Doctors now know that smoking impacts nearly every organ of the body, and Fridays report said medical care for smoking-caused ill nesses is costing the coun try more than $130 billion a year. Add to that lost produc tivity of more than $150 bil lion a year. 1964: Cigarettes were the major concern. The habit ual use of tobacco is related primarily to psychological and social drives, reinforced and perpetuated by phar macological (drug) actions of nicotine. 2014: The tobacco indus try continues to introduce and market new products that establish and maintain nicotine addiction, Fridays report says. The percentage of middle and high school students who use electron ic or e-cigarettes more than doubled between 2011 and 2012. Surgeon general adds to list of smokings harms PAT WELLENBACH / AP This le photo shows packs of cigarettes in a store in Brunswick, Maine.

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION you get me out of this and Ill get it xed now. Less than 48 hours later, on Nov. 4, he underwent openheart surgery. Four days after that, he was released from the hospital and his wife helped him set up a command center at his home in Charlotte to keep tabs on his team back in Denver. Not only was he in daily con tact with defensive coordi nator Jack Del Rio, who guid ed the Broncos to three wins in four games during in his ab sence, but Fox was also in con stant communication with his captains, including quarterback Peyton Manning. Fox watched cut-ups of prac tices on his iPad playbook to help formulate game plans and he watched games on his bigscreen TV. The lone loss during his hia tus was a 34-31 overtime heart breaker at New England on Nov. 24 when the Broncos blew a 24-0 halftime lead after cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromart ie separated a shoulder trying to pick off Tom Bradys despera tion pass that died in the wind at the end of the rst half. Brady took advantage of D.R.C.s absence to stage the biggest comeback of his career, just as hes going to try to capi talize on the loss of cornerback Chris Harris Jr. (knee) when the Patriots (13-4) visit the Broncos (14-3) on Sunday with a trip to the Super Bowl on the line. Probably the hardest thing for the team was that we didnt know when Foxie was going to be back, Broncos executive vice president John Elway said. And in Foxies mind, he would have been back three days after the surgery. Fox and his wife, Robin, ew home on team owner Pat Bowlens jet in late November and at Del Rios suggestion he visited with the team on Thanks giving morning, then watched from his home in Denver as the Broncos beat the Chiefs 35-28 in Kansas City that weekend to take charge of the AFC West. He returned to work the fol lowing day, his newfound ener gy matching his renewed enthu siasm, saying his surgeon told him the aortic valve was now the size of a 50-cent piece instead of a pinhead. What a difference. He exuded vitality while cap turing his third division title in his three seasons since replac ing Josh McDaniels in Denver, then dispatched the demons of last years playoff loss with an exhaling win over San Diego last weekend. Hes got more energy than anybody Ive ever seen, Elway said. That, to me, is the deni tion of John Fox: the energy lev el that he brings. He brings it to the practice eld, and its conta gious. I think thats why he was a perfect t for us after what hap pened with Josh. That positive attitude that he brings turned the culture around because of the type of guy that he is. We missed his energy. Since his return on Dec. 2, Fox has more pep in his step, more boom in his voice and even more gumption in his calls. Like sending in Matt Prater for a 64-yard eld goal attempt on an icy afternoon in Denver or or dering his high-powered offense not to milk the clock with a big lead at Houston, where Man ning broke Bradys single-sea son touchdown record with a late score. Could this be the same man who had Manning take a knee with three timeouts and 31 sec onds remaining in regulation in the playoff game last year af ter Baltimores Jacoby Jones 70yard game-tying TD catch? Has Fox turned in his conser vative credentials? While Fox said his health scare did cause him to re-evaluate some things, he insists it didnt have a profound effect on his approach to the job. Its like an injury to a player, Fox said. When you come back, you hope youre the same play er again. FOX FROM PAGE C1 MATTHEW PERRONE Associated Press WASHINGTON The Food and Drug Administration on Fri day cleared a rst-ofa-kind blood test that can help diagnose mental disabilities in babies by analyzing their genetic code. The laboratory test from Affymetrix de tects variations in pa tients chromosomes that are linked to Down syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome and other developmental disor ders. About 2 to 3 per cent of U.S. children have some sort of in tellectual disability, ac cording to the National Institutes of Health. The test, known as the CytoScan Dx As say, is designed to help doctors diagnose childrens disabilities earlier and get them appropriate care and support. It is not in tended for prenatal screening or for pre dicting other genet ically acquired dis eases and conditions, such as cancer. While there are al ready genetic tests used to detect condi tions like Downs syn drome, doctors usu ally have to order them individually and they can take sever al days to develop. Pe diatricians said Friday that Affymetrixs test should offer a faster, more comprehensive screening approach. Dr. Annemarie Strous trup stressed that such tests are generally only used after children ex hibit certain physi cal or behavioral signs that suggest a disorder. When theres something about the child that strikes us as unusual or pointing to a potential genet ic disease, thats when we would use this testing, said Strous trup, an assistant pro fessor of pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Currently hospitals in all 50 states are re quired to screen new borns for at least 29 disorders that can be detected though labo ratory testing, includ ing sickle cell anemia and cystic brosis. Generally those tests pickup irregulari ties in metabolism, not genetic varia tions. The mandato ry screening program, begun a half-centu ry ago, is considered one of the nations most successful pub lic health programs. The FDA said it ap proved the new test based on studies showing it accurate ly analyzes a patients entire genome and can accurately spot variations associated with intellectual dis abilities. REBECCA SANTANA Associated Press KARACHI, Pakistan Pakistans city of Pe shawar is the worlds largest pool of the po lio virus, with the vast majority of cases in the country and neighbor ing Afghanistan trac ing back to the restive northwestern city, the World Health Organi zation announced Fri day. Some 90 percent of polio cases found around Pakistan can be genetically linked to the city, the U.N. orga nization said. Even 12 of the 13 cases reported in 2013 in neighboring Afghanistan can also be traced back to Pe shawar, ofcials said, showing the challenge of combating the dis ease in a country where militants target vacci nators. If you do not take care of this reservoir it will keep threatening other parts of the coun try as well. Then the nal eradication would be much more dif cult, said Elias Durry, who heads the WHOs eradication efforts in Pakistan. Pakistan, along with Afghanistan and Nige ria, are the only coun tries in the world where polio remains endemic. Pakis tan has struggled for years to eradicate the disease through a series of repeated vac cination campaigns of children. But that effort has been hampered in re cent years by militant attacks that have left more than 30 vacci nators and police of cers who protect them dead. Two powerful Pa kistani Taliban mili tants also have banned vaccinators from North and South Waziristan, two tribal regions that border Afghanistan to the west. The number of po lio cases in Pakistan jumped from 58 in 2012 to 91 in 2013. Of the polio cases recorded last year, 65 were located in the re mote tribal regions. Hundreds of thou sands of Pakistanis seeking refuge from ghting in the tribal re gions in recent years have ooded into Pe shawar, which is also the capital of Khyber Paktunkhwa province. Those infected bring the disease back with them when they leave. Hundreds of thousands of Afghans also travel to and from the city daily. The WHO and the government regularly test samples of the sew age water in Peshawar as well as other major cities across the coun try. During the last six months, they detected the highly contagious polio virus in all the samples collected in Peshawar, Durry said. The organization is calling for repeated vaccination campaigns to help get rid of the disease in Peshawar. Pakistan has been under pressure inter nationally to eradicate the disease, which usu ally infects children liv ing in unsanitary con ditions. The disease attacks the nerves and can kill or paralyze. But vaccination teams have had a hard time reaching all chil dren in parts of the troubled northwest. Durry said rough ly 260,000 children are believed to have missed vaccinations last year in North and South Waziristan. Militants claim the vaccine is meant to ster ilize Muslim children and accused health workers of being U.S. spies. The allegation gained traction after the CIA used a Pakistani doctor to try to conrm the presence of Osama bin Laden in 2011 under the guise of an immuni zation program. Meanwhile Friday, gunmen killed a driv er, a technician and a security staffer for the private Express News television channel in the southern city of Karachi, police of cial Javed Odho said. A spokesman for the Pa kistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement, saying that channel and other media out lets had supported the government in its war against the militants. The media outlet was attacked twice last year, with the Pakistani Tali ban claiming respon sibility for one of the incidents. Five journal ists were killed last year in Pakistan, making it the fourth-deadliest country in the world for journalists, accord ing to the Committee to Protect Journalists. World Health Organization calls Pakistan city worlds largest pool of polio MUHAMMED MUHEISEN / AP Pakistani health worker Nooman Mehboob, 21, center, gives Ameeq Andriaz, 4, a polio vaccine while other women holding their children wait to have them vaccinated in a neighborhood in Islamabad, Pakistan. FDA OKs mental disability blood test for infants

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 rfntbbbnn fnb Digital Hearing Aids $249 ALL MAJOR BRANDS ARE AVAILABLE starting at$199 Digital Custom Aids $259 Don Smith, HAS, owner of Corrective Hearing Centers 9am 4pmBetter Living Through Better HearingCome Join Our GRAND OPENING of Our Golf Cart Accessible at The Villages Location at 11974 County Road 101, Suite 102, The Villages Fl. 32162. 787-HEAR (4327) Conveniently located in Park Central Plaza 2468 Hwy 441/Suite 104 Fruitland Park, FL 34731 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties NANCY TANKER Times-News of Hendersonville HENDERSONVILLE, N.C. This year, Mills River Elementa ry third-grader Dan ny Cast ro, 9, got a very special present from his school. School ofcials pur chased an FM-based wireless system that al lows the hearing-im paired youngster to hear his teacher, Julie Ann Mitchell, through his hearing aids. Every day the gregar ious boy enters school, hooks up his hear ing system and pre pares to learn. Mitch ell uses a microphone and a palm-sized wire less transmitter that hangs around her neck to reach the receivers in Dannys hearing aids, allowing him to listen to her lessons at a high er decibel level than he otherwise could. Whenever she speaks on the micro phone, it connects to my boots (receivers in his hearing aids), and its cool because you can hear what she is saying, Danny said on a rainy Friday morning after he nished read ing a book passage to a classmate. I use it to help me hear better. Until this year, Danny had been using a simi lar system his parents had purchased and sent him to school with every day since kinder garten. The new tech nology, however, can be left at school. Mitchell said Dan ny is excelling this year. With his hearing loss, he works with a speech therapist and he has come a long way. Learning vocabu lary, math or any oth er third-grade sub ject would be difcult for him without the sound-amplifying ap paratus, Mitchell said. He would miss about 80 percent of instruc tion without the hear ing aid and the FM system. Without the system, it would be a struggle for him and his vocabulary would suffer. She added that Dan nys parents have been very conscientious about making sure he has the proper technol ogy to aide his learn ing. They have been working with his doc tors and audiologists to make sure he is re ceiving the help that he needs, Mitchell said. He has become used to it over the years, so its very much second nature to him. Its part of his everyday life. Mitchell said Dan ny will often take the initiative to charge the system or initiate it in the morning before class starts. He is a very outgo ing, very sweet and ea ger student, she said. He wants to get his work correct, so he works very hard. Fellow students think the system is cool, she added. They see that it is helping one of my students and because they have been in class with him for years, they have been very accept ing. Mitchell said sever al other hearing-im paired students at the school use systems to help them hear their teachers. One student has a tower speaker that sits on the oor and amplies the teachers voice, while another has a desktop speaker that accomplishes the same mission. With this system Danny, has really grown over the years, Mitch ell said. She would like other school adminis trators to know that it is easy for students who have hearing loss to re ceive help with some sort of FM system in order to grow aca demically. Without it, theres a lack of vocab ulary and compensa tion with anything be ing taught. Our school has been working hard in the past year, and we were fortunate to get the system this year. Danny said he likes the system because wherever Mrs. Mitch ell goes, the speaker follows her and moves with her so I can hear her. I also like it because it connects to the com puter speaker so I can hear it better. Without it, I would not be able to hear Mrs. Mitchell and if I cant hear her, then what kind of les sons can I use? Third-grader gets help with hearing aid PATRICK SULLIVAN / AP Mills River Elementary School third grade teacher Julie Ann Mitchell uses a microphone connected to an FM wireless signal that connects to a receiver in the hearing aid of her third-grade student Danny Castro to help him hear what she is teaching.

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 255 Waterman Avenue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www.WatermanVillage.com Now is the time to make a Make a fresh start in 2014 and ease your worries about the day-to-day stresses that can keep you from living your best life. At Waterman Village youll enjoy: Maintenance-free living Spacious, single-story villa, manor or cottage Delectable dining in three distinct on-campus venues Fun activities, events and golf Wellness center with heated pool and golf simulator Access to home care, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehab if neededCall (352) 385-1126. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. JOHN MONK The (Columbia) State BLYTHEWOOD, S.C. Sara Duncan is 5 years old, loves hors es, cheerleaders, music and the color purple. She also has neuro blastoma, a rare and potentially fatal child hood cancer. In the United States, there are only 400 to 600 cases a year. Recently, sever al hundred people showed up at a spa ghetti dinner fundrais er at Saras church, the 1,100-member Trini ty United Methodist, in Blythewood to offer prayers and well wish es. The event raised some $4,000. One supporter was Trinity member Jack son Davis, 11, who wrote these words with a purple felt-tipped pen on a board crowd ed with prayers and good wishes: Love you, get well soon. Many people wore lo gos with a purple danc ing lion, a logo church member Kathy Rhodes designed in tribute to Saras favorite song, Roar, an anthem to courage by pop sing er Katy Perry. Its about a fearful young woman who became brave. I got the eye of a ti ger / Dancing through a re. ... Youre going to hear me roar, the song goes. Saras mom, Michelle Duncan, 37, a church member, said in an in terview that so far, Sara is making progress. Were thankful we live in a community with such great support be tween the church, the neighborhood and the Blythewood communi ty coming together to help us out. The money will come in handy for expenses insurance doesnt cov er, she said. Already, Sara the youngest of three chil dren has endured a medical odyssey most adults will never see. It has included a major operation to remove an abdominal solid-mass tumor, rounds of che motherapy, stem-cell extractions and im plants from and into her body. Radiation therapy, and weeks more in the hospital, are most likely in the future. Shes been a regular both at Pal metto Health Richland Childrens Hospital and the Medical University of South Carolina. The Duncans Mi chelle and her hus band, David, of 17 years are thankful the neuroblastoma was discovered early. In September, she had a little bellyache, said Michelle Duncan, ex plaining that Saras reg ular pediatrician at Pal metto Pediatrics made the diagnosis on the rst visit. We feel that God has a path for us, for healing, and Hes been really good to us so far. Hes put the right doctors in place, the right medical team in place, Duncan said, wiping away tears as she spoke outside the fundraiser. Sara knows what is happening, Duncan said. Her faith is great. She has prayed for healing, and she knows that God is going to heal her. Shes a ghter. She doesnt complain. She doesnt like nee dles, but I dont know who does. Trinity pastor the Rev. Cathy Jamieson-Ogg de scribed Sara this way: She is happy and brave. Also at the event were seven cheerlead ers from the Universi ty of South Carolina. Last summer, before her cancer was discov ered, Sara a Game cocks fan attended a three-day cheerleader kid camp at USC. Clearly, we made an impact on Sara, which is awesome, said cheerleader Greg Fran cendese, 22, a senior advertising major from Atlanta. Church rallies around girl, 5, with rare cancer

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 315-8305 Allergies? Colds & Flu? Headaches? Respiratory Disease? Call today to schedule your appointment Support your bodys Immune system to prevent and eliminate Acute and Chronic Respiratory Disease. Acupuncture is a time-tested, safe, natural and drug free treatment that provides relief with long lasting benefits. Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DEAR ABBY: Im a high school senior. At the beginning of the school year, I agreed to drive my best friend to school in the mornings, and for a while it was nice. Last month she started to re fuse to talk while I was driv ing. If I tried talking to her, she wouldnt respond. She recent ly told her boyfriend (who she texts constantly while riding with me) that she didnt like my driving. I found out because of a post he made on Face book. When I asked her about it, she said that morning I had slammed on the brakes and it scared her. This has made me tense and stressed out in the morn ings, and I want to stop driv ing her. My grandmother says I should stick it out instead of causing friction. My mom thinks I should stop driving her, but only if she can nd anoth er ride. I tried to explain this to her, but she wont listen and Im still stuck with her. This has ruined our relationship. I feel like she hates me, but I dont know what to do about any of it. Help! DRIVEN CRAZY IN FLORIDA DEAR DRIVEN CRAZY: Your for mer best friend may have stopped talking to you on the way to school because she was too busy texting her boyfriend. She is ignoring the fact that you have been doing her the favor of transporting her and is using you as a private taxi service. If she was frightened because you braked suddenly, the per son she should have said it to was YOU. So stop explaining to her and TELL her that if she wants to continue getting a free ride, she had better adjust her attitude or make other arrange ments for transportation. DEAR ABBY: My daughter, the mother of a toddler, just had twins. We live four hours away, so I stayed with them for a few weeks to help her and her hus band adjust to their larger fam ily. It taught me a lot about how to help new mothers who are feeling overwhelmed. Its not about holding the ba bies; everyone wants to do that. Instead, if you really want to help tired parents, do one of the following: Take the older children to the park, the library, the zoo, to a diner for breakfast. Keep them happy and safe, and bring them home worn out. Bring dinner or takeout when visiting. Wash, dry and fold the laundry. Get the kids ready for bed, give them their baths, read books to them and wait until they are asleep to leave. Clean the house, run the vac uum, empty the garbage and change the beds. Buy grocer ies (the basics), including paper goods, and grab a box of gallon plastic bags, masking tape and Sharpies (to date frozen foods). The gift of your time is ever so much more helpful than cute baby outts that are quick ly outgrown. Thanks, Abby! PROUD GRANDMA IN NEW YORK DEAR PROUD GRANDMA: My warm congratulations on the new additions to your family. Your daughter is a lucky wom an. Your letter should be clipped and saved by anyone who is looking forward to grandparent hood because it is a classic. D EAR READERS : Today we cele brate the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the vi sionary civil rights leader who was assassinated in 1968. Many of his words ring as true today as when they were rst spoken. The quote I have in mind as I write this is, All progress is pre carious, and the solution of one problem brings us face-to-face with another problem. It ap plies to many aspects of life. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Teenagers taxi service has a disgruntled rider

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 365-6442Shoppes of Lake Village (next to Lake Square Mall) Publix Shopping Center rrfnt fb r fftfr bn ftt bbn f bb b nfr t t MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTEDFINANCING AVAILABLE*X-rays not included.License# DN14389FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 ValueDr. Vaziri & Staff www.LeadingDental.com *X-Rays not included. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg.

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r f n f t b b b r n ntntnttnt nbnbtrn tnbnnttnbnt nnf nfbnrbfntt ttntnnnbt nttttbtbnf tttntbnffn ttbbtbtttt rnnnrtnttt bft n b r n r b n n f n n f r n f t f f n f n f n t n f r n n f n f n f b n n f t b f nt tbr t n t n b n f t b t n t t n t n f t n f t b b n n t n f t b n b n b t t b n f r n n f b b n f r n n f b t r n f t f t t t n t f b n t n b n t n f n t n t t t t b n r n n b b t n n f n f n n f n n f b t r n b b t n b f bbtnnt nn rtttbt ttnntr t b n f b b t f f r n r b r n b n f b n n b t t b b n ft n b b b t b b t b n t n t t n n f n b b n b b b b b b b n n b b n t n b b f n t b n f n b b b b n r n t n n b b b t b b t t t r b n t n n n b n b b n n f n b n t r b n t b b t b b f n t t n n b t b b b n t b n b b b n n b n ft f tr f ttbr r r bbntb b r nbntnbtb nbtbnfn bb bbtf r f r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtf rfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rf nrtbt rfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 r f n f r t b n r n n r n n n r n n n r n r r n n t n n f f b rnrf rf t r b f rr bnbrnff b nf brrr bff bbn ff r tff rrb ff r n n n f f rnnn btrbff nrbr rb bff r b r r b f f b rbrrnf r b f f fr ff r f brn f b brnff fnrnrn rrn rrn rrbf nrbrr n r r b r n t r n f f b ff nn r bbf f f f rr rrnf nrnn rnrb n nnr ff bnnbtrn rrr ff rr rnf rf nnr rfnff ntrb brr b rb ff rnf f f r ff rrr bff nn ff n ff rn nnrtrr ff f t n r b n b r r b n r n b r n b r f f b n b n n n r n n n n r n r r r n r r n r n b n r n n n n b n r n n b n n b n n r n f n f b n r r r r t b n r n r f f r n f r n r n r b n r t r r f r n r n b n n r b n n r r n r r r n n b b r n r b n n f f r f f r r r n r b n r r b r r r n b r b b b r r n n n n t r r n r r t r n b n n n b t n b r r f b r r r r r n r n r t r n n r r r n r b n b r r r r r n f f f r n r r f f r r n r r r t r b n r t r n b n f r r n r rnn rbn ntb r r n f f b rnn r nr b f f f rnrtbnr rbrrr bnnr nntrt br r n f f f r n n r r t b n n n b r b n r r r r n r t b r n n t b b b r b r n r f f r b r n r r n r f f n b r r b b b n r r b b b n r n r b n r n r r r b n b b n r r n r r r n b t n n n rnn tbbnb ntrtrbr rrrb n b r f f r r n r r b r b b r n n f r f n b t b f f f f bnn rbnnnrbb nbbn rfbnr tnnrrb n r n n r b r b r b r f f r n b n r n n f f r f f f r n r b b b n r r r b r b r n f f r n r r b b rbrrr rnn rntr n n r n b r n b b r b r r b r r r n r n r b n n b n r b r n r b b t n n n f r b r n n f f r b r r r n r n b n n b b n n b n r n t r r n r r b r n b r r n n n n b r b b n b t n b b n r n r r t b r n n b b b n r b r b n r r r b r b b nr

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Monday, January 20, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 r fntbnnntt tnnf nttbbntf b fn bnbtff t nffntn tntttbbbnt ttnnf r ttnf btt b f n t n n b f nntnb tntt ntt r n n t t r fnt nntt tntnft ntt br nttn tntnnttntt bntnt n f ntt r ftrr b b b n n n f f n t t n f b n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt ntt r t n t n b b t t n t n t r r r rt r n n n t n n f n t t n t t n n n t b f t t t n n n n f t n f b b n t b n f n n n t t n f f f n t t b n r rt btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r rt r r n t n t bf tnfr nn nnbbf b bf t b b btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r f n t t rr rt r nnnb nb tntt nbnn nt ff fr t f n fnt nbn ff nff ntt nbnnn nntnn ntt nntt fr t tntf ntt tfff ntt t f n tnftf ntn nfttftt b r ff t ntt t t n n n ff f tntt tntt tntnf ff nnf fntt tnfnbf tt nr fn r f ntt r ntf ntt nr r nr n n rnn ntt rt r rr ntttnn tnfn nttntn btn tt nn f nnfnn ntt r n n nntt n ntt tnff ntt nt nbttbnf n rntt nbtt nt nntt r nbtbnttf tnt r f ntt nfbntt br n nntnf n t n f nf fntt rntt ntbnnt ft n bntnbbt f fn nnnnfnt nntn ntt r r f n f t t b tn tfntt r ffntt tfnt ntt t ntt bttt r t t b b tttt ntt br n tnn ntt r f ff nntt fbtn ntt r fff ntt r tnnn nf tft ntt bbtf n nt tn nttn nt n f f n t n ttf f nftf ntnf ntt n r nt nfnf ftttnfftff ttftn n nf n r r n n n n t f n n f n f f nttf r tfntt ffntt tnntbtf n n n t t ntt t n n t t f fntt r n t n t f b b b t t n n b f t n f t n n t f n n n t t n t t t t f f n t t b b n t n b t f n n t nr bnt bntt btnntt nfnntt b nr r n n b n t t nf ttb ffntt ntt fftn n btr r tbrtt tfnn t nntt n n nntt nftn ntt ttnn tf ntf ntt nbt r ft r r nf nf ntt n ntt tnn btnntt b r rtff nbffn nf ntfbntt tf ntt rftf tf rff nf fn b tft fntt tt t rff ntt tf rnn ff nntt tf ttntt t t b f rft fntt ttt tff r

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 20, 2014 rfntr brttnftnb nnbrbbr b nfntb nnnnttr r b n r r bb nnnrr nr rttn bbntn rr bbnntr tt ttnbnb bnrtt rrf bbr ttttnnr tt btrnbrbb ttnr ntbf r r t t n tbf f b t n b t n n t b b n r r fbbbr ntnrnr bf nrbnr rnnbbr nnrrtt r tnnr rtt n n r r r tt rtt nrrf f nbbt b b b b b b n n t f n t n n n r r n n t b r t t n nn tbt r r r r r bnr rr b b nntrttnnrtnr rtt n f rtt nbtf b bf r t r n n b n b b t n b t n n r r bbrfntr tbrrnbn rttr tn bttbbbrrtt nbb trbbttbb bbtnr tttrntn bttbbnbb tnrrtt n nn frfbt r b r n r b b r n r b n n b b t r n b t r t b r n t n b n t n n t r b t n r bbbn bnttrnnn bnrbbbn ftrrnbt bbbnbrr ttnbtnttn nn f t f nfbnt rfnnnt rbtbb nrrnbt nnnb bnbrttnbnr bbttnnnt bnr bntbr fttnn bnnfrtt b n n n r t r t t n b n n b r t t bn nnbbtnr btnntnnbnt brbn tbbtbnr bbtt ttbbb tnbrr r t r n b t n n t r t r t b r b b r b nnbbbr tt r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt nnf f nnntrf f n r b n n n n t n b b n t b n b n n n b b b b r t n t t n r b n t b b n n n n b b n t t b t n b b t t n n b b n n n b r b r r n b n ff tbtnnbbr bbttnntttrtr b nttf n t t b r t n n n t t n n r r r n b b n b t b r b b n n b n r t t r r b n n r b n b t n n b n b n r b n n r t r n n r r t t nf f n f b t t n n n r b r r b r b n n n n n b b b t t b n t t n b b n n b t t b b n n t r n t r n n b t n r r f r nftf f nnff f r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt n n t n r n f n n r b t n r b r t t r b r n r b b r n r b trf fft n b n n r b r b r n b b b r b t t b b n frb f