Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Careand Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson BRADY VS. MANNING, CHAPTER 15, SPORTS, B1ONE OF A KIND: Montverde Academy dedicates its Cruyff Court, A3 W. VA. WATER: Residents still wary of drinking it, A5 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, January 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 19 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C3 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C4 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C4 MONEY E1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.67 / 42Warmer with sunshine $1 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Roger LaPierre works on his vintage hydroplane Miss Dinomytes during the Winter Thunder Regatta on Saturday in Tavares. Joshua McMiller, a 4th-grade student at Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School in Leesburg, performs Lift Every Voice and Sing as his oat stops at the parade stand at the Martin Luther King Jr. parade on Saturday in downtown Leesburg.MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL AUSTIN FULLER Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comWhen 70-year-old Miami resident Skip Gillam got his rst boat at age 18, he named it Last Blast because he was expecting to join the military and thought it could be his last one. His eighth boat, and seventh he named Last Blast, has been running demonstration laps this week end at the Tavares Winter Thunder Regatta, with his stepson Paul Mezyk in the drivers seat. The boat features the words and I mean it! beneath its name. One of Gillams previous boats held the straightaway world record for a 280 hydro plane from 1982 to 2008 with a speed of 124.123 mph. Gillam said the record was improved by 11 mph when his boat set it. Gillam said that while he built the boat, the driver for the world-record run was Andy Coker. Gillam said the boat being demonstrated this weekend is a 2009 replica of a 1953 Jersey Speed Skiff, complete with modern day rac ing trim. The Tavares Winter Thunder Regatta, which had practice runs open to the public on Friday and demon strations on Saturday, will continue today from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p .m. in Wooton Park. Registrar Gerri Prusko, who is treasurer of the Classic Race Boat Association, estimated between 200 to 250 people came through the gate before 2:30 / p .m. on Saturday and she ex pected the event would nish Saturday with an attendance of 300 spec tators. Theres a steady stream, theyre coming and going and people who are coming are en joying the event, Prus ko said.WINTER THUNDER REGATTA ON DISPLAYTAVARES LaPierre takes Miss Dinomytes out for a spin. The boat peaked at approximately 140 mph, but LaPierre said it could race at 170 mph.SEE BOATS | A2 Parade attendees undaunted by cold weather MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comSnuggled up in coats, wool caps and gloves, hundreds of onlookers braved the chilly temperatures Saturday morning for the citys annual Martin Luther King Jr. parade. The 60-plus entries featured church groups, elected ofcials, civic organizations, school leaders and law enforce ment, as well as pageant win ners many of whom, despite the weather, rode in shiny con vertibles. Wrapped in a heavy coat and scarf and trying to shield her self from the wind, onlooker Marlene Nelson said the cold weather was not going to keep her away. Its a small price to pay to honor a man who did so much for us, Nelson said.LEESBURGSEE PARADE | A2 More online For more on this story, see www.dailycommercial.com. MICHAEL J. MISHAKAssociated PressPALM BEACH New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie left a political scandal back home as he raised money Sat urday for fellow Re publicans in Florida. As chairman of the Republican Governors Association, Christie was headlin ing a series of events over the weekend to help Floridas gover nor, Rick Scott, and the state party. The private events were giving Christie his rst chance to test his political viability out side New Jersey since a scandal erupted over an apparent political payback scheme led to massive trafc jams last fall when lo cal access lanes to the George Washington Bridge were closed. Christie was re-elected governor last November and is considered a po tential contender for the Republican nomination for president in 2016. Two promi nent Florida Repub licans former Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Christie circus pulls into Fla. CHRISTIE NJ governor in Palm Beach to help Scott, state GOP LARA JAKESAP National Security WriterWASHINGTON President Barack Obamas orders to change some U.S. surveillance prac tices put the burden on Congress to deal with a national security controversy that has alarmed Americans and outraged foreign allies. Yet he avoided major action on the practice of sweep ing up billions of phone, email and text messages from across the globe. In a speech at the Justice Department on Fri day, Obama said he was placing new limits on the way intelligence ofcials access phone re cords from hundreds of millions of Americans Obama calls on Congress to deal with surveillanceSEE NSA | A2SEE CIRCUS | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 HOW TO REACH US SATURDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 3-2-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 1-3-1 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-4-6-9 Afternoon . ....................................... 0-7-3-1FLORIDALOTTERY FRIDAYFANTASY 5 . ............................. 2-4-11-17-24 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $7.50 4 of 5 wins $70 5 of 5 wins $47,327.94 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pam.fenni more@dailycommercial.com. Most participants were wearing shirts, carrying posters or sitting atop oats adorned with pic tures of the slain civ il rights leader, as well as other black icons such as President Obama and Nelson Mandela. All the while, Kings speeches could be heard as his voice boomed from speakers set up for the occasion. A Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School oat stopped in front of the parade stand, where 4th-grade student Joshua McMiller belted out the Lift Every Voice and Sing often referred to as The Negro National Anthem. The Golden Triangle Democratic Club, one of a number of Democratic organizations in the parade, had mem bers dressed in caps and gowns with a sign ask ing people to Advance the Dream through edu cation They stopped several times on the pa rade route to dance in or der to attract onlookers. Its a good way to live his dream, said club member Sandy Martin of the education theme. There were plenty of slogans associated with King, unity and human rights that were plastered on posters, including Together we stand, divided we fall, Make the dream a reality, We are endowed by our Creator with cer tain unalienable rights, Dreams do come true, and I Have a Dream. Law enforcement of cers on circling motorcy cles and others on horse back performed a short drill exercise in front of the reviewing stand. A re truck carried a couple representing King and his wife, Coretta. Parade marchers threw candy to the children, who were thrilled by the attention. With temperatures hovering in the high 40s at the 11a.m. start time, Chris Hamilton, one of the event organizers, said the weather had lit tle effect on the participation. We still had a few walk-ups, said Hamilton, referring to groups who decided Saturday morning to join the pa rade. The grand marshal of this years commemoration parade was longtime Leesburg area res ident Maggie Brown. Honorary marshals included Leesburg City Commissioner David Knowles, Pastor Ken Scrubbs and Sumter County Commissioner Douglas Gilpin. PARADE FROM PAGE A1 There were concerns Saturday morning that winds would force some boats not to demonstrate because of safety concerns, but Bill John, the president of the Classic Race Boat Associa tion, said conditions had improved enough as the day went on for all boats to perform. Theyre all running to day. We had some cancellations and we did cancel two heats, John said. John said on Friday Ta vares is the best location in the country for a vin tage race boat event. Bill Neron (has) done a great job developing this, John said. According to Prusko, approximately 18 boats would be participating at the regatta, but John added the number could grow with two more boats on the way. He said some participants cancelled because of sick ness. Roger LaPierre, a sea sonal resident who lives in Tavares six months each year, has demonstrated Miss Dinomytes, a 1985 Hydroplane that won a 1988 world championship. LaPierre bought the boat in 2007 and said the championship was won by Howie Benns. He said his boat can reach about 170 mph, but he would only be driving it around 140 mph. A boat that was a member of the event was in volved in an accident Friday evening, but the accident did not take place during the regat ta and the boat was not participating in activities authorized by the event, according to John and Bill Neron, the direc tor of economic develop ment and grants for the city of Tavares. The two people on the boat airlifted to Orlando Regional Medical Center and remained conscious as of Saturday morning, according to Prusko. She did not know the extent of their injuries. The Orlando Sentinel previously reported three drivers died in ac cidents in 2012. According to John, the group reformed after those accidents, but speeds were lowered and now run under the rules and regulations of the American Power Boat As sociation. BOATS FROM PAGE A1 and was moving toward eventually strip ping the massive data collection from the governments hands. His promises to end government storage of its collection of data on Americans telephone calls and require ju dicial review to exam ine the data were met with skepticism from pri vacy advocates and some lawmakers. But Obama has made it nearly impossible for re luctant leaders in Congress to avoid making some changes in the U.S. phone surveillance they have supported for years. Obama admitted that he has been torn be tween how to protect privacy rights and how to protect the U.S. from terror attacks what ofcials have called the main purpose of the spy programs. The challenge is get ting the details right, and that is not simple, he said. His speech had been anticipated since former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden made off with an estimat ed 1.7 million documents related to surveillance and other NSA operations and gave them to sever al journalists around the world. The revelations in the documents touched off a public debate about whether Americans wanted to give up some priva cy in exchange for intelligence-gathering on terror suspects. The president said his proposals should give the American peo ple greater condence that their rights are be ing protected, even as our intelligence and law enforcement agencies maintain the tools they need to keep us safe. The NSA says it does not listen in on the phone calls or read the Internet messages without specic court orders on a case-by-case basis. But intelligence ofcials do collect specic infor mation about the calls and messages, such as how long they lasted, to try to track communica tions of suspected terror ists. Plans to end the sweep of phone records have been building momen tum in Congress among both liberal Democrats and conservative Repub licans. Congressional leadership and the chair men of the intelligence committees who for years have signed off on the programs have opposed dramatic changes. Obamas order signals that the phone program must be overhauled, and lawmakers called his speech a welcome rst step. It is now time for Con gress to take the next step by enacting legislation to appropriately limit these programs, said Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., a member of the House Judiciary Committee. The leaders of the Senate and House intelligence committees, which have proposed far less sweeping legislation, threw the responsibility back to Obama. We encourage the White House to send legislation with the pro posed changes so they can be fully debated, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., said in a coolly worded statement. NSA FROM PAGE A1 Marco Rubio also are viewed as potential candidates. In Orlando on Satur day, hundreds of donors attended the fund raiser where Christie presented Scott with a $2.5 million check from the RGA for a political committee thats help ing Scotts campaign, according to the asso ciation. Then Christie joined about two dozen guests at the Palm Beach home of Jose Pepe Fanjul Jr., executive vice president of Florida Crystals, one of the nations largest sugar producers. Christie didnt ad dress the bridge scan dal during his visit to Fanjuls home, according to guests who spoke to The Associated Press We know hes going to get through it and hes going to come out stronger, said William J. Diamond, who at tended the event. The question wasnt raised because, quite frankly, none of us are really interested, said Geoffrey Leigh, another guest. The main thing is: Has he got the abili ty? Has he got the com prehension? These are the things which are important. These are the things which people vote for. Do they have condence in the man? Anita Mitchell, chair woman of the Palm Beach County Republican Party and among those at Fanjuls home, said Christie has moved on. Hes doing what hes supposed to be doing, she said. I think most people are saying unless we nd out any thing else, we take him at his word. In response to the scandal, Christie has apologized and red a top aide, and told reporters he had no knowledge or involvement in the matter. Still, with investigations moving ahead, the issue could follow him for some time and cause consternation for his nancial backers. Many Republicans have come to Chris ties defense and credited him with taking responsibility for the scandal, although some GOP leaders say his future will depend on whether his account of what happened proves accurate. Rick Wilson, a Flori da-based GOP consultant, said donors hes spoken with feel Christies rising star was tainted by the controversies. The jury is denitely now out, he said. Hes gone from an A-plus to a B. Hes not going to be the presidential nominee in waiting. Were in a watch-and-see phase. Democrats have tried to use the bridge scandal to tarnish Christie. Backed by local elect ed ofcials, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., who leads the Democratic National Committee, held a news conference near Christies Orlando fundraiser to tie the New Jersey governor to Scott, one of the most vulnerable incumbents in the country. Republican governors have been touting themselves as the grown-ups and the ones that have the ability to lead us for ward, she said in an interview. The guy they chose as their leader is Chris Christie, who has been characterized as a maniacal bully by Republicans and who was will ing to take out retribution against not the elected of cials who wouldnt en dorse him but ... his own constituents. Another fundraiser was set to take place Saturday at the Fort Lauderdale home of Bill Rubin, the presi dent of a lobbying rm and a longtime friend of Scotts. On Sunday, Christie was scheduled to attend fund raisers in Palm Beach and meet with major nancial supporters at a gathering organized by Ken Langone, the bil lionaire co-founder of Home Depot. He had urged the governor to consider a late entry into the 2012 presidential race. Christie faced a new political problem back home. Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer alleged Saturday that his administration withheld millions of dollars in Superstorm Sandy recovery grants from her city. CIRCUS FROM PAGE A1 CAROLYN KASTER / AP President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks about National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance on Friday at the Justice Department in Washington. The president called for ending the governments control of phone data from millions of Americans.

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Ron Seggis Greatest Hits Live set for todayThe Ron Seggi show, Greatest Hits Live will be in Mount Dora this weekend for a matinee performance at 3 / p.m.today at the Mount Dora Community Theatre Tunes from the 50s, 60s and 70s, from the greats including Frank Sinatra, Elvis, Ray Charles and others, will be featured. Tickets are $15 in advance, at www.mountdoraevents.com, or at the door for $20.MOUNT DORA Friends of the Library 28th annual Used Book Sale setFriends of the Library 28th annual Used Book Sale will take place on Friday and Saturday from 8 / a.m. to 4 / p.m., at the W.T. Bland Public Library, at 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Members of the Friends of the Library can attend a special preview sale from 5 to 7 / p.m., on Thursday. Numerous books, both hardback and paperback, CDs, videos, records and more will be available at the sale. Funds raised support the childrens programs. For information, call the library at 352-735-7180, option 5.TAVARES Lake County Department of Health to close on MondayAll Florida Department of Health in Lake County ofces will be closed Monday in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. All ofces will reopen on Tuesday Tuesday with regularly scheduled hours. As in all medical emergencies, residents needing immediate assistance should dial 911.EUSTIS Governmental offices to close on Monday All ofces at Eustis City Hall and Parks and Recreation will be closed on Monday in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Scheduled rentals of Parks & Recreation facilities are not affected by this holiday closure. The Eustis Memorial Library will be closed today and Monday. Garbage, yard trash and recy cling services provided by Waste Management will not be affected by this closure.CLERMONT Animal Rescue Dice Run scheduled for Feb. 1The Animal Rescue Dice Run will take place Feb. 1 to help raise awareness and funds for the South Lake Animal League, a no kill shelter. The event begins and ends at Stormy Hill Harley-Davidson, 2480 U.S. Highway 27, in Clermont. Participants will register at the dealership at 10 / a.m. Food and beverages by Beef O Bradys, vendors, music by LostNfound, games for prizes by emcee, Radical Randy. For information, call 352-243-7111.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff reportLake Countys Animal Services Division has temporarily suspended the use of the night-drop kennels because of a ra bies alert issued last week in the Leesburg area. Residents sometimes use the kennels to drop off strays or give up pets for adoption after regular business hours, Cyndi Nason, division manager, Lake County Animal Ser vices, said in a press re lease. Because of the public safety threat, stray ani mals left in the night-drop that are not reclaimed will be euthanized in accor dance with Health Department Rabies Alert guidelines, she said. Animal Services asks that the public drop off animals only during regular hours, which are Monday through Friday, 10 / a.m. 6 / p .m., and on Saturdays from 10 / a.m. 4 / p.m., so they can identi fy where the animal originated and its vaccination status. All animals in the shelter must be current on their rabies vaccine to be adopted. Residents and visitors in Lake County should be aware that rabies is present in the wild animal population and domes tic animals are at risk if not vaccinated, said Eli sha Pappacoda, public information ofcer for the county.TAVARESRabies alert closes night-drop kennels RABIES ALERT BOUNDARIESAlert issued for 60 days after rabid raccoon was found. North Lake Grifn South Lake Harris East Lake Grifn-Lake Harris 441 connector West Canal StreetSEE ALERT | A6 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comOne brother was taken to the hospital with a critical gunshot wound to the head and another was detained by po lice and later released on Saturday after an early morning shooting at a Leesburg con venience store. Leesburg police so far have not determined a motive in the shoot ing of 24-year-old Josh ua Faile but said they believe the Leesburg brothers were the only people involved.LEESBURGMan shot, cops have no motive Halifax MediaThe ght over which hospitals will in Florida treat the most seriously ill patients saw a new player emerge this month. A national conservative group has started a media blitz that is hitting area airwaves and the Internet in support of new trauma centers. The 60 Plus Association Inc. warns in its $250,000 ad campaign that out-oftown hospitals, including UF Health Shands Hospital, are suing to shut down badly needed Flori da trauma centers that of fer specialized care to the most medically needy. The list of targeted Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) trauma centers includes the one at Ocala Regional Med ical Center that opened just over a year ago, and serves Lake and Sumter residents. They want to pull the plug on life-saving trauma care, says one Inter net and radio ad. Dont let them put their bottom line ahead of our lives. 60 Plus, based in Alexan dria, Va., touts itself as a non-partisan seniors advocacy group with a free enterprise, less government, less taxes approach OCALATrauma center conflict heats upSEE TRAUMA | A5SEE MOTIVE | A6 Staff reportChildren of parents receiving life and job skills training in Cler mont will soon have a safe place to play at the New Beginnings Learning and Development Center. The Leadership Lake Class of 2013, which graduated last May, has donated nearly $7,500 so that New Beginnings can build a commer cial-grade playground at its facility at 792 East Montrose St. An additional $1,000 was donated to install the telephone system in the center. The new playground will feature a rock wall, slide and swings and will be built in the area adjacent to the center. The Leadership Training center gets playgroundSEE PLAY | A6 AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, US Rep. Daniel Webster, Florida Sen. Alan Hays, Jeanne Hays, Florida Rep. Larry Metz attend the dedication ceremony of the Montverde Academy Cruyff Court, the rst of its kind in the United States. AUSTIN FULLER Staff Writeraustinfuller@dailycommercial.comA Cruyff Court was dedicated on Saturday at Montverde Academy and local dignitaries were on hand to witness the ceremony. U.S. Rep. Daniel Webster, Florida Sen. Alan Hays, and Florida Rep. Larry Metz were among those attending the cer emony of new facility a small soccer eld which is the only one of its kind in the United States. I think a lot of things that are done here at Montverde Academy are unique and Im not sur prised, said Webster, who represents congressional District 10. They kind of push the bubble...I appreciate it. Hays, who represents Florida District 11, said he came to learn more about the new facility and to show support for the school. This is truly a hidden gem, Hays said. Hays believes athletics are part of getting a well-rounded education. Im interested in todays young people and the vehicle, the best vehi cle to prosperity, is a good education, he said. Metz, who represents District 32 in the Florida House of Representatives, which includes Leesburg and south Lake County, said he thought it would be a unique experience to see the rst Cruyff Court in the country. I was intrigued by it, frankly. Im all for having facilities for kids to use after school, where they can learn teamwork and character development, Metz said. Montverde Academy has taken the lead here to partner with the Cruyff Foundation to have the rst Cruyff Court in America and I didnt want to miss that. Dr. Kasey Kesselring, Montverde Academys headmaster, said construction of the court was funded in co-opera tion between the Cruyff Foundation and the school itself. It cost about $150,000. Its obviously very unique because its the only one in the United States. It ts very well with our mission as a school as far as our commitment to the community, Kes selring said. This whole project is designed to be a community service-driven project. Mike Potempa, the schools athletic director and soccer coach, said the court will be open to the public.Cruyff Court first of its kind in USMONTVERDEMiniature soccer field designed for youths of all ages, funded by Montverde Academy, Cruyff FoundationSEE CRUYFF | A7

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 OBITUARIESWilliam (Bill) EntwistleWilliam (Bill) En twistle of Leesburg sud denly passed away Jan uary 14th at the age of 84. Born in Syracuse, New York on August 19, 1929, Pops the Great (PTG), as he was af fectionately known by his immediate family, was a devoted husband and loving father. He is sur vived by his wife Janet of 55 years, his son Bill, Jr. (Chantal) of Pembroke Pines, FL, and daughters Kit ty (Fred) of Pensacola, FL, Amy (Derek) of West Palm Beach, FL, Julie (Jeff) of Bear, DE and his grandchildren: Jennifer, Jackie, Matt, Ryne, Kait lyn, Derek, Brad, Kel ly, Riley, Jordan, Jarrod and great-grandchildren Jackson, Hailee, and Brody. Bill grew up in Syracuse, graduating from Christian Broth ers Academy. Right out of school, he followed in his fathers footsteps and began his long ca reer in the golf busi ness. He also served in the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1954. In 1958, he married Janet Billy of Syracuse. Bill spent a lifetime in the golf industry making friends all over the world through the game he loved. He passed the love of the game to his children and grandchildren. With his dry sense of humor, Bill was a practical jokester, loved sharing stories of his life and nicknaming his family and close friends. A view ing will be held for family and friends on Mon day, January 20th from 3:30-5:00 p.m. at the Al len J. Harden Funeral Home, 1800 N. Donnelly Street, Mount Dora, FL. A Funeral Mass will be said on Tuesday, January 21st at 9:00 A.M. at St. Patrick Catho lic Church, 6803 Old Hwy 441 South, Mount Dora, FL. The family is requesting that in lieu of owers or other gifts, that donations be made on his behalf to the Florida Golf Course Superintendents Association Scholarship Fund. Donations may be sent to Bill Entwistle Jr., 2211 NW 101 Terrace, Pembroke Pines, FL 33026.Arthur LaneauArthur Laneau Born Sept. 18th 1925 in Bos ton, Mass. Died Jan 14th 2014 at home in Leesburg, Fl. Survived by: WifePauline SonsKenneth (Sandy), Stephen, & Douglas (Lin da), DaughtersSusan Morgan, & Bonnie Kel ly (Billy) BrothersRichard, Robert SisterMimi Nickerson 13 grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren Worked as National Sales Manager in New England, Retired from Halifax Country Club (President) in Halifax, Mass. Memorial Service Sat Jan 25th at 3PM in Lake Yale Estates ClubhouseJoe P. JP Wilds, Jr.Joe P. JP Wilds, Jr., 68 of Leesburg was born February 4, 1945 and died January 17, 2014. He was born in Leesburg, FL and lat er moved to Vero Beach where he lived and worked before re turning to Leesburg in 1991. He was a protes tant and attended the Christian Worship Center in Center Hill, FL. Mr. Wilds is survived by his sons: Randy (Cathy) Wilds of Orlan do, FL and Gary (Debbie) Wilds of North Car olina; 6 grandchildren; sisters: Betty (David) Scott of Webster, FL, Maggie West of Leesburg, FL and Louise (Julian) Penn of Lady Lake, FL; and a broth er Danny (Margaret) Wilds of Leesburg, FL. A visitation will be held in the Chapel of Beyers Funeral Home in Leesburg from 11 a.m 1 p.m. on Tuesday January 21, 2014 with a Funeral Service to follow the visitation be ginning at 1 PM. A com mittal service will follow and interment will be at Lone Oak Cemetery, Leesburg, FL. Condolences may be left at www.beyersfuneralhome.com, Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory in charge of all arrangements.George E. KuhnGeorge E. Kuhn, 87, of Leesburg, died Thursday, January 16, 2014. Born in Louisville, KY, he graduated from University of Louisville, he married Helen Rose (Avery) of New Albany, IN January 16, 1954, George passed on their 60th anniversary. They have 4 children, Lisa, Christopher, Eric Kuhn and Helene Kuhn Nick ey. George served in the US Army in WWII and the Air Force in Korea. He worked for A&P Tea Co, KY Dept. of Mental Health, Schenley In dustries, the Social Se curity Administration. His other activities include U of L Chess Club, PISHA, Germany Philatelic Society, Happy Hoe downers Square dance Club, Charter member and author of the by-laws of the Lake County Cultural Affairs Council, 1995-96. Selected as one of the original Commentators for Catholic Church in Kentucky, a Lector at St. Pauls Catholic Church from 1969-85, also served as train er for new Lectors and scheduler for week end services, Commis sioned Special Minister of the Eucharist since 1985, was awarded the Father William Killion Volunteer Award in 2011 along with Helen. Joined the Rotary Club of Leesburg in 1970, serving as Presi dent 1977-79, Charter President of Leesburg Sunrise Rotary 198183, Charter President of Leesburg Sunset Rota ry 1984-85, Governor of Rotary District 6980 in 1997-98, District Delegate to Rotary Council on Legislation in 2004, Served on district committee to organize Rotary Clubs in Wildwood 1975, Lady Lake 1996 and Lady Lake Area 2003. Friends may call Monday, January 20th from 5 to 7 pm at the Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg, where Parish Prayers will be at 7 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be Tuesday, January 21st at 8:30 am at St. Pauls Catholic Church with Fr. Mark Wajda ofciating. Burial follow in Florida National Cem etery, Bushnell. In lieu of owers, you may direct your memorials to Cornerstone Hospice, 2445 Lane Park Road, Tavares, FL 32778 of St. Pauls Catholic School, 1330 Sunshine Ave. Leesburg, FL 34748. Online condolences and complete obituary information may be left or read at www.beyersfuneralhome.com .Lois Jean Hoke BitnerLois Jean Hoke Bit ner of Yalaha, FL died on Dec. 25, 2013 at the age of 89. She was born on August 31, 1924 in Acme, PA to the late Wade S. Hoke and Emma Shyeiger Hoke. Lois was the last sur viving member of her family. She was educat ed in the Mount Pleasant Township Schools and graduated from Hurst High School in 1942 where, blessed with a lovely soprano voice, sang in various musi cals. Lois also sang for years as a soloist and in the church choir at the Acme Methodist Church. In addition to her parents, Lois was preceded in death by her beloved husband: Clyde J. Bitner in May of 2013, brothers; Milton Wade, Harold, Vernon, Clair, Leon, Donald and her foster brother Jack. She was also pre ceded by sister; Arta Gale, and Ruby. She is survived by a number of nieces and nephews. A memorial Service will be held in Florida at the Gloria Dei Luther an Church in Leesburg on Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 11:00 / a.m.. I nurn ment will take place in the Gloria Dei cremation garden. There will also be a memorial ser vice held back home at the Acme Methodist Church on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014 at 11:00 / a.m. Page-Theus Funeral Home And Cremation Services www.pagetheus.comDEATH NOTICESDonna M. ColwellDonna M. Colwell, 68, of Tavares died on Friday, Jan. 17, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations.Walter HixenbaughWalter Hixenbaugh, 89, of Leesburg died Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Protect and Serve Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com Shoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLEESBURG 365-6442Sleep through your Dental Appointment The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.License# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hrIV SEDATION: FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 Value*x-rays not includedFinancing Available Dr. Vaziri & Staff IN MEMORY ENTWISTLE BITNER

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Lake & Marion CountiesLake County (321) 806-2074 Marion County (352) 610-3018 The Quilting Guild of The Villages FLpresentsMARKETPLACE 2014Friday, January 24 & Saturday, January 25 from 9am to 4pm 30 vendors. Shops from six states in one location. Supplies & Equipment: Quilting, Sewing, Fiber Arts, Yarn, Needlework, plus Make & Takes and Basket Mania Raffle. Food Vendors AvailableWildwood Community Center600 County Road 139 Wildwood, FL 34785More at www.QGOTV.org (352) 787-3013CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT TODAY!Box Office HoursMonday-Friday 9:00am-1:00pm(also 1 hour before show time)$18 Adult/$9 StudentShow TimesAll Fridays @ 8pm Sat. Jan. 18 & 25 @ 8pm Sat. Feb 1 @ 2pm All Sundays @ 2pmMELONPATCHTHEATREpresentsSix Dance Lessons In Six Weeksby Richard Alfieri January 17, 18, 19; 24, 25, 26; 31, February 1, 2, 2014Show contains adult language and themes. to seniors issues. As a 501(4) organization, 60 Plus is not required to disclose its donors. When Ocala Regional was asked if the hospital or HCA played a role in the 60 Plus media cam paign, Ocala Regional spokeswoman Suzanne Santangelo emailed this response: Ocala Regional Medi cal Center does not have a role with 60 Plus. At a national and local lev el, the Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) supports organizations from across the political and ideological spec trum, and will continue to do so as we feel partnerships with stakeholder organizations are benecial to our com munity commitment. This ad campaign is the latest volley in a contentious legal battle dating back years as opponents of new trauma centers want the facilities shuttered and supporters ght to keep them open. The oppenents include Shands Jacksonville and Shands at UF, Tampa General Hospital, St. Josephs Hospi tal in Tampa and Bay front Medical Center in St. Petersburg. The legal battle began in 2004 when the Florida Legislature told the Florida Department of Health to up date its rules concerning trauma centers. The rules had not changed since 1992. But the department did not act. In Septem ber 2011, an adminis trative law judge found that the department rules for determining the location and need for trauma centers were invalid. In November 2011, the 1st District Court of Appeal upheld the judges ruling, but not before the Florida De partment of Health granted Ocala Regional and other trauma cen ters approval to start operating. Shands contends it did not have an oppor tunity to participate in the process and to ob ject to the Ocala trau ma center, nor did the Department of Health have the authority to allow the new trauma centers to open. Recent appeals court decisions have sided with Shands that the hospital had standing and should have been allowed to participate in the process and be heard. Shands cites studies that show smaller trauma centers do not en joy the same life-saving success rate as do larger, more experienced trauma centers such as the one at Shands. It also estimated that the Ocala trauma center would siphon about a third of its trauma business. Dr. Darwin Noel Ang, the trauma medical di rector at Ocala Regional Medical Center, said the Marion County area saw more trauma patients transferred out of town for care than any other community in Florida before his hospital opened its trauma center. TRAUMA FROM PAGE A3 BEN NUCKOLSAssociated PressCHARLESTON, W.Va. The smell lingers the slightly sweet, slightly bitter odor of a chemical that contaminated the water supply of West Virginias capital more than a week ago. It creeps out of faucets and shower heads. It wafts from the Elk Riv er, the site of the spill. Sometimes it hangs in the cold nighttime air. For several days, a majority of Charles ton-area residents have been told their water is safe to drink, that the concentration of a chemical used to wash coal is so low that it wont be harmful. Restaurants have reopened using tap water to wash dishes and produce, clean out their soda fountains and make ice. But as long as peo ple can still smell it, theyre wary and giv en the lack of knowl edge about the chem ical known as MCHM, some experts say their caution is justied. I would certainly be waiting until I couldnt smell it anymore, cer tainly to be drinking it, said Richard Denison, a scientist with the En vironmental Defense Fund who has followed the spill closely. I dont blame people at all for raising questions and wondering whether they can trust whats being told to them. The Jan. 9 spill from a Freedom Industries facility on the banks of the Elk River, less than 2 miles upstream from Charlestons water treatment plant, led to a ban on water use that affected 300,000 peo ple. Four days later, of cials started to lift the ban in one area after another, saying tap water was safe for drinking because the concen tration of the chemi cal dipped below one part per million, even though the smell was still strong at that lev el. By Friday afternoon, nearly all of the 300,000 people impacted had been told the water was safe. Late Wednesday, however, health ofcials issued different guidance for pregnant women, urging them not to drink tap water until the chemical is entirely undetectable. The Centers for Disease Control said it made that recommendation out of an abundance of caution because existing studies dont pro vide a complete picture of how the chemical affects humans. For Sarah Bergstrom, a 29-year-old nurse who is four months pregnant with her second child, the news was devastating. She hasnt drunk the water since the spill, but she has taken showers. I cried myself to sleep (Wednesday) night. I was both angry and scared, she said. This baby that weve wanted for so long, Im now questioning have I done something that could have harmed her? Bergstrom said shes fortunate that she can afford bottled water, which she intends to use for the foreseeable future. My biggest fear is for those mothers, those pregnant women out there who arent able to go get enough bottled water for their family, who dont have the re sources and dont have the knowledge base to know that this is not safe, she said. Karen Bowling, West Virginias secretary of Health and Human Resources, said pregnant women who drank the water before being told to avoid it should con tact their doctors.Many remain wary of W.Va. water as smell lingers MICHAEL SWITZER Local residents now have a way to pick up bottled water and ll containers after a chemical spill on the Elk River contaminated the public water supply in nine counties. I would certainly be waiting until I couldnt smell (the water) anymore, certainly to be drinking it, Richard Denison a scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 CITY OF TAVARES CITIZEN BOARDS/COMMITTEESThe City of Tavares is presently accepting applications for the following Board: Planning and Zoning Board This position is voluntary and appointed by the Mayor of the City of Tavares. The position is for the remainder of a three year term which expires June 2016. Applicants must be a resident of Tavares. Applications may be obtained by calling (352) 253-4546, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 pm Monday through Friday or by downloading the application from the citys web site at www.tavares.org Applications should be submitted by February 7, 2014. For additional information please call Nancy Barnett, City Clerk, at 352-253-4546. 238931-January 19, 2014 The public is asked to maintain a heightened awareness that rabies is active in Lake County. People who have been bitten or scratched by wild or domestic animals should seek medical attention and re port the injury to the Florida Department of Health in Lake County at 352-253-6130. Keep your pets un der direct supervision to prevent them from coming in contact with wild animals. If your pet is bitten, seek vet erinary assistance immediately and contact Lake County Animal Services at 352-3439688. For more informa tion, visit www.or idahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/ rabies/index.html, contact the Florida De partment of Health in Lake County at 352253-6130. ALERT FROM PAGE A3 According to Capt. Rob Hicks, police re sponded to the 24hour Circle K at 900 S. 14th Street about 2:05 / a.m., wher e Faile was slumped over in a Ford pickup truck, having been shot in the head. His brother, David Faile, 25, was standing outside the passenger door. The brother was very distraught, Hicks said. The victim was air lifted to Ocala Region al Medical Center. A hospital spokeswoman refused to com ment on his condition, citing the police investigation. MOTIVE FROM PAGE A3 Lake Class of 2013 has been incredibly gener ous about helping us complete the last piece of our dream to provide an essential community facility that helps strug gling families get back on their feet, Steve Smith, executive direc tor of New Beginnings, said in a press release. The class conducted various fundraising activities, including rafing off an iPad, hold ing a silent auction and participating in the an nual Leadership Lake County Reverse Draw. Our class was ex tremely enthusiastic and motivated to raise the money for this or ganization, which truly benets the entire Lake County community, said Rebecca Sargent, nancial adviser with Edward Jones and president of the Leadership Lake Class of 2013. Construction on the playground is scheduled for next week and a ribbon-cutting cer emony is planned for Saturday. Members of the Leadership Lake Class will assist in in stalling mulch and landscaping. PLAY FROM PAGE A3 SUBMITTED PHOTOThis $8,500 check will enable New Beginnings to expand its programs. ROXANA HEGEMANAssociated PressWICHITA, Kan. The U.S. Election Assistance Com mission found Friday that heightened proof-of-citizenship requirements likely would hinder eligible citizens from voting in federal elections, handing down a ruling that denied requests from Kansas, Arizona and Georgia to modify the registration form for their residents. The decision came just hours before a court-imposed deadline in a lawsuit led in federal court by Kansas and Arizona that seeks to force the com mission to modify state-specic requirements for registering to vote in those states. Georgia, which has a similar voter registration law, is not part of the litigation but was included in the commissions decision. Those states have enacted laws requir ing new voters to pro vide a birth certi cate, passport or other proof of U.S. citizen ship when registering to vote. People who register using the federal form only need to sign a statement, under penalty of perjury, that he or she is a U.S. citizen. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has championed his states proof-of-citizenship law to keep non-citizens from voting, par ticularly those in the U.S. illegally. But crit ics say voter fraud is extremely rare and contend such laws suppress the vote and threaten to keep thou sands of citizens from casting ballots. Kobach said in an email that he had an ticipated the adverse ruling from the commission and the states will now press their constitutional claims before the U.S. District Court in Kansas. He ar gues the decision is unconstitutional because it prevents Kansas and Arizona from securing their voter rolls. The EACs reasoning reects the partisan view of the Obama Justice Department that requiring voters to provide documentary proof of citizen ship at the time of reg istration is undesirable as a policy matter, Ko bach said. However, the EAC has no author ity to second-guess the policy decisions of the sovereign states of Kan sas and Arizona. In its decision, the EAC found that add ed documentation bur dens do not enhance voter participation and result in an overall de crease in registration of eligible citizens undermining the core purpose of the National Voter Registration Act. It cited as evidence the problems Kansas already has experienced with its own enhanced voter registration re quirements. The voter registrations of 20,127 Kansans remained on hold Friday because theyve not yet provided proof of their citizen ship to election ofcials.Feds deny state decisions to tighten voter registration AP FILE PHOTO In this Oct. 31, 2013, photo, former Kansas state Sen. Jean Schodorf answers questions during a news conference at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan., to kick off her campaign for secretary of state. Schodorf lost her Senate seat in 2012. The U.S. Election Assistance Commission found Friday that proof-of-citizenship requirements for Kansas voters would hinder eligible citizens from voting in federal elections.

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 CITY OF TAVARES The City of Tavares welcomes participation from ministers, lay ministers, priests, rabbis, reverends, and other heads of religious organizations to participate in City Council meetings by volunteering to open the meeting with an invocation. The meetings are held the rst and third Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. at 201 E. Main Street, Tavares, FL, City Council Chambers.If you are interested in participating please contact Nancy Barnett, City Clerk, at (352) 253-4546 or nbarnett@Tavares.org. 238930-January 19, 2014 235457 January 19, 2014 FREE SMALL NUGGET TRAYrfnt bt bbb tbt tb tb ntnt bfnbCATERING Its an outreach ef fort for us to connect Montverde Academy to the local community and provide an oppor tunity for children to ex ercise and have fun, Po tempa said. Potempa said the schools physical edu cation classes will use the eld. He added the court can be used for activities other than soccer, including basketball. He said the attendance of Florida politi cians was great. It just shows the type of support we have at Montverde Academy, Potempa said. Dignitaries from the Netherlands and Haiti as well as 2011 Ma jor League Soccer MVP Dwayne De Rosario and Francisco Lindor, a graduate of Montverde Academy who was a Major League Baseball rst round draft pick in 2011, were also in at tendance. CRUYFF FROM PAGE A3 MARIAM RIZKAssociated PressCAIRO Almost everyone who cast ballots supported Egypts new constitution in this weeks referendum, re sults announced Satur day show, but a boycott by Islamists and low youth turnout suggest the country is still dan gerously divided. Nearly 20 million vot ers backed the new constitution, almost double the number of those who voted for one drafted in 2012 un der the government of toppled Islamist Presi dent Mohammed Mor si. Only a narrow sliver of voters 1.9 percent voted against the charter, after a mas sive government-sponsored campaign sup porting it and the arrest of activists campaign ing against it. Despite a milieu of intense social up heaval and acts of ter rorism and sabotage that sought to derail the process, Egyptians have now marked yet another dening moment in our roadmap to democracy, presidential spokesman Ehab Badawy said. The outcome represents nothing less than the dawn ing of a new Egypt. The expected over whelming support for the charter is seen as key to legitimizing Egypts military-backed interim government, and the political plan put in place since Mor sis ouster in July. Ana lysts say it also suggests military chief Gen. Ab del-Fattah el-Sissi, who led the coup against Morsi, has enough pop ular support to make a rumored run for the presidency himself. It was the rst vote since the military removed Morsi follow ing massive protests in July. Hundreds cele brated in the streets af ter ofcials announced the results, including Hoda Hamza, a house wife who waved an Egyptian ag in Cairos Tahrir Square and car ried a picture of el-Sissi with an inscription reading: By the order of the people, el-Sissi is president. Now, I wish el-Sissi will be president, Hamza said. We have no better man. ... If it werent for the army, we wouldnt have food on the table. Morsi supporters, who boycotted the vote, immediately challenged the results. De spite being outlawed and labeled a terrorist group, Morsis Muslim Brotherhood and its al lies continue to hold near-daily protests that often devolve into clashes with police. Even if 38 percent of the voters took part, that still means that 62 percent of the public re jects the interim government, said Imam Youssef, a member of the Brotherhoods co alition against the July coup and an ultracon servative Islamist party. They are trying to legitimize their coup. Egypts High Election Commission said 38.6 percent of the countrys more than 53 million eligible voters took part in the two-day poll Tuesday and Wednesday. Judge Nabil Salib, who heads the commission, called the participation of 20.6 million voters an unri valled success.Voters overwhelmingly back new Egypt constitution ALY HAZZAA / AP A man carrying his child runs away from tear gas during clashes between Egypts security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi on Friday in Cairo. AYSE WIETING Associated PressISTANBUL The main, Western-backed Syrian opposition group voted Saturday in favor of attending a coming peace confer ence aimed at ending the countrys bloody civil war, paving the way for the rst direct talks between the ri val sides in the nearly three-year conict. The vote in Istanbul came as food supplies began entering a be sieged rebel-held Palestinian refugee camp in Syrias capital for the rst time in months, an apparent goodwill gesture by President Bashar Assads government ahead of the peace conference, Palestinian and United Nations ofcials said. The Syrian Nation al Coalition was under huge pressure from its Western and Arab sponsors to attend the peace talks, scheduled to open Wednesday in the Swiss city of Montreux. The Syrian government has already said it will attend the U.N.-sponsored talks. The Coalitions leader, Ahmad al-Jarba, said in a speech late Saturday that they are heading to the conference without any bargain regarding the principles of the revo lution and we will not be cheated. The negotiating ta ble for us is a track to ward achieving the demands of the rev olution at the top of them removing the butcher from power, Jarba said. But many Coalition members are hesitant to attend a conference that has little chance of success and will burn the last shred of credibility the group has with powerful rebels on the ground, who reject the talks. Many members boycotted the Is tanbul meetings that began on Friday, forc ing the Coalitions legal committee to approve the decision in a simple majority vote. Although Islamic rebel groups reject any talks with the government, the head of the Western-backed Supreme Military Council, Gen. Salim Idris, said in a statement that he backs a solution that guarantees a polit ical transition of power. He called upon Coali tion ofcials heading to Geneva to demand that Assad and his top of cials leave power, have no role in Syrias future and set up a transition al government with full powers that in clude control of security agencies and open corridors to allow food into besieged areas. Maj. Issam el-Rayyes, a spokesman for the Syrian Revolutionary Front, also said they back a political solu tion that would include Assad leaving power. The Coalitions media ofce said there were 58 votes in favor of attending the conference and 14 votes against. It added that there were two abstentions and one blank ballot. The aim of the con ference, dubbed Ge neva 2, is to agree on a roadmap for Syria based on one adopted by the U.S., Russia and other major powers in June 2012. Syrian opposition says it plans to attend Mideast peace conference ASSOCIATED PRESS Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, and his Syrian counterpart Walid al-Moallem arrive for talks in Moscow. The opposition have voted to attend a peace conference opening next week in Switzerland.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014www.dailycommercial.comCOLLEGE HOOPS: FSU falls at Virginia / B4 MARK FISHERSpecial to the Daily CommercialMontverde Academy cruised through its opening two games at the third annual Montverde Academy Invitational Soccer Tournament (MAST). The Eagles raced past two overmatched oppo nents by the combined score of 13-0 on Thurs day and Friday, but they expected a more com petitive game in Saturdays championship game against Coppell (Texas). They werent disappointed. Diego Campos scored in 46th minute to break a scoreless tie and lead Montverde Academy to a 1-0 win for the Eagles third-straight MAST title. In other games on the nal day of action, San Clemente (Calif.) out scored Delray Beach American Heritage 4-2 in the third-place game. Phoenix Brophy beat Winter Garden West Orange 8-7 in penal ty kicks, after playing to a 1-1 tie in regulation, in the fth-place game. North Broward picked up its only win in the three-day tournament with a 4-1 victo ry against Auburndale in the seventh-place game. EDDIE PELLSAssociated PressDENVER Only one of them can be the greatest. Peyton Manning could be the one owner of a record four, working on ve, Most Valuable Player awards, current holder of NFL single-season records for passing yardage and touchdowns and architect of a career-reviving second act, the likes of which has rarely been seen in any sport. Tom Brady could also be that man leader of ve Super Bowl teams and winner of three titles, one-time holder of some of the records Manning holds now and author of an undefeated regu lar season. He also has that 10-4 record against Manning despite constant turnover on his roster and a lack of a star-studded re ceiving corps. Manning and Brady will meet today for the 15th time, and the fourth time in the postseason, when the Broncos (14-3) face the Patriots (13-4) in the AFC title game. The winner between the top two quarterbacks over an era in which quarterbacks have never been so good will get what could be the last say in the debate over who goes down as the greatest STEVEN SENNE / AP Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, left, and New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, right, speak in the middle of the eld after the Patriots beat the Broncos 31-21 in a 2012 game in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots are scheduled to play the Broncos in the AFC championship game today in Denver. PHOTO COURTESY / ISRAEL RAMOSThe Leesburg High School girls soccer team (pictured) won the Class 3A-District 5 championship Friday with a 2-0 win against Eustis. The Yellow Jackets will host Daytona Beach Seabreeze, while Eustis will play at Palm Coast Matanzas. In Class 2A, Umatilla will play at Alachua Santa Fe. All games are at 7 p.m. Thursday. JOHN ZENORAssociated PressAUBURN, Ala. Casey Prather scored 21 points in his return from a knee injury and helped No. 7 Florida survive a scare from Au burn in a 68-61 victory on Saturday. Prather had 16 points in the rst half af ter missing the past two games with a bad ly bruised right knee. He made 8 of 10 shots for the Gators (15-2, 4-0 Southeastern Con ference), who have won nine straight games and eight in a row at Auburn (8-7, 0-4). Tahj Shamsid-Deen hit a jump shot with 1:59 left to cut Floridas lead to 62-61, but Scottie Wilbekin answered with a fadeaway jumper. Wilbekin made 2 of 4 free throws over the nal 48 seconds. Patric Young blocked KT Harrells attempt to bring Auburn to within two points in be tween those trips to the line. Kasey Hill made two late free throws for the nal margin. Wilbekin nished with 16 points and Young scored 13 for Florida, which outre bounded Auburn 31-23. The SECs leading scorer Chris Denson scored 15 of his 21 points in the second half to help keep the Tigers close. KT Harrell add ed 18 points and made 4 of 7 3-pointers. JAY SAILORS / AP Florida guard Michael Frazier II (20) drives past Auburn guard Chris Densen during Saturdays game in Auburn, Ala. BARRY WILNERAssociated PressSEATTLE From the rst kickoff back in Sep tember, the 49ers and Seahawks seemed destined to meet for the NFC title. Time to get it on. With the conferences most physical, relentless defenses, adept at forcing turnovers and making opponents think twice about, well, just about anything, Seattle (now 14-3) won the NFC West by one game over San Francis co (now 14-4). The of fenses, while not near ly as imposing, have the right elements for a champion: strong running games, efcient and sometimes dynamic quarterbacks, and staunch lines. Their coaches have the proper pedigree, as well. Jim Harbaugh has led the 49ers to the NFC championship game in all three sea sons in charge, making the Super Bowl last year. Pete Carroll had a 28-23 MONTVERDE LEESBURG GIRLS TAKE DISTRICTBrady-Manning, Chapter 15Seahawks, 49ers just belong in this gameUF survives scare against AuburnSEE AFC | B2SEE NFC | B2SEE UF | B2 Eagles take MAST title

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 18 .526 Brooklyn 16 22 .421 4 New York 15 25 .375 6 Boston 14 27 .341 7 Philadelphia 13 26 .333 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 28 11 .718 Atlanta 20 19 .513 8 Washington 19 19 .500 8 Charlotte 17 24 .415 12 Orlando 10 30 .250 18 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 31 7 .816 Chicago 18 20 .474 13 Detroit 16 23 .410 15 Cleveland 15 25 .375 17 Milwaukee 7 31 .184 24 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 31 9 .775 Houston 26 15 .634 5 Dallas 24 17 .585 7 Memphis 20 19 .513 10 New Orleans 15 23 .395 15 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 30 9 .769 Oklahoma City 30 10 .750 Denver 20 19 .513 10 Minnesota 18 21 .462 12 Utah 14 27 .341 17 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 28 13 .683 Golden State 25 16 .610 3 Phoenix 22 17 .564 5 L.A. Lakers 15 25 .375 12 Sacramento 14 24 .368 12 Fridays Games Charlotte 111, Orlando 101 Miami 101, Philadelphia 86 Washington 96, Chicago 93 L.A. Clippers 109, New York 95 Toronto 94, Minnesota 89 L.A. Lakers 107, Boston 104 Utah 110, Detroit 89 Memphis 91, Sacramento 90 Portland 109, San Antonio 100 Dallas 110, Phoenix 107 Cleveland 117, Denver 109 Oklahoma City 127, Golden State 121 Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers at Indiana, late Detroit at Washington, late Miami at Charlotte, late Philadelphia at Chicago, late Utah at Minnesota, late Milwaukee at Houston, late Golden State at New Orleans, late Portland at Dallas, late Todays Games L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 1 p.m. Boston at Orlando, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Denver at Phoenix, 8 p.m. College Saturdays scores Men EAST Albany (NY) 85, Maine 78 American U. 66, Lafayette 61 Bryant 95, Fairleigh Dickinson 68 Colgate 63, Navy 41 Delaware 74, Northeastern 70 Faireld 71, Manhattan 67 Hartford 60, New Hampshire 43 Holy Cross 61, Lehigh 42 LIU Brooklyn 62, CCSU 61 La Salle 74, Temple 68 Quinnipiac 85, Niagara 71 Rhode Island 71, George Mason 69, OT Robert Morris 77, Mount St. Marys 69 Seton Hall 67, Georgetown 57 Syracuse 59, Pittsburgh 54 Vermont 73, UMBC 47 Villanova 88, DePaul 62 Wagner 56, St. Francis (Pa.) 50 Yale 74, Brown 67 SOUTH Appalachian St. 81, Georgia Southern 68 Campbell 97, VMI 93, OT Clemson 61, Wake Forest 53 Drexel 79, UNC Wilmington 63 Duke 95, NC State 60 Florida 68, Auburn 61 Gardner-Webb 67, Presbyterian 58 Georgia 66, Arkansas 61, OT Georgia St. 99, UALR 73 Howard 88, Md.-Eastern Shore 55 Kentucky 74, Tennessee 66 McNeese St. 70, Houston Baptist 68 Memphis 101, LeMoyne-Owen 78 Miami 56, Georgia Tech 42 Mississippi 75, South Carolina 74 Mississippi St. 81, Texas A&M 72, OT Morehead St. 82, UT-Martin 75 NC Central 62, Delaware St. 52 North Carolina 82, Boston College 71 Radford 93, Longwood 76 Richmond 73, Dayton 64 SMU 58, UCF 46 Stetson 77, SC-Upstate 73, OT Texas A&M-CC 70, Nicholls St. 67 Tulsa 69, Marshall 52 VCU 80, Duquesne 65 Virginia 78, Florida St. 66 W. Carolina 67, Samford 64 William & Mary 78, James Madison 56 MIDWEST Butler 69, Marquette 57, OT E. Illinois 67, Austin Peay 64 Evansville 53, Loyola of Chicago 48 Kansas 80, Oklahoma St. 78 Kansas St. 78, West Virginia 56 Miami (Ohio) 64, Ball St. 52 Missouri 68, Alabama 47 N. Dakota St. 65, W. Illinois 52 N. Iowa 94, Missouri St. 89 Northwestern 54, Indiana 47 SIU-Edwardsville 67, Murray St. 60 Saint Louis 70, Fordham 48 South Dakota 75, IPFW 61 Texas-Pan American 84, Chicago St. 61 Toledo 75, Akron 61 Valparaiso 75, Milwaukee 62 Wichita St. 68, Indiana St. 48 SOUTHWEST Abilene Christian 73, Cent. Arkansas 72 Oklahoma 66, Baylor 64 Texas 86, Iowa St. 76 FAR WEST California 76, Washington St. 55 Colorado 83, Southern Cal 62 Gonzaga 82, Loyola Marymount 72 N. Arizona 77, Portland St. 56 Utah 74, UCLA 69 Wyoming 67, San Jose St. 56 Women EAST Albany (NY) 84, Maine 56 American U. 72, Lafayette 57 Bryant 72, LIU Brooklyn 66 Buffalo 84, E. Michigan 83, OT CCSU 72, Fairleigh Dickinson 67 Columbia 71, Cornell 64 Dartmouth 48, NJIT 45 Duquesne 62, Rhode Island 47 Iona 64, Faireld 59 Lehigh 87, Holy Cross 82 Mount St. Marys 89, Wagner 78 New Hampshire 61, Hartford 56 Quinnipiac 70, Siena 49 Rider 56, St. Peters 55 Robert Morris 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 69 Seton Hall 73, Georgetown 62 St. Bonaventure 62, Saint Louis 60 St. Francis (NY) 69, Sacred Heart 49 VCU 81, UMass 51 Vermont 63, UMBC 59 West Virginia 77, Oklahoma 63 SOUTH Alabama St. 92, Alabama A&M 45 Campbell 46, Presbyterian 43 Coastal Carolina 77, Charleston Southern 63 Davidson 79, Georgia Southern 66 E. Kentucky 68, Jacksonville St. 61 East Carolina 86, Louisiana Tech 55 Florida Gulf Coast 69, Mercer 57 Georgia St. 61, UALR 59 Hampton 80, Coppin St. 52 High Point 81, Gardner-Webb 77 Howard 77, Md.-Eastern Shore 75, OT Jackson St. 83, Prairie View 82, 2OT Jacksonville 67, N. Kentucky 56 MVSU 70, Alcorn St. 55 McNeese St. 66, Houston Baptist 62 Memphis 48, Houston 40 Middle Tennessee 61, UAB 55 NC Central 75, Delaware St. 61 Nicholls St. 67, Texas A&M-CC 60 Norfolk St. 61, Morgan St. 52 North Florida 78, Lipscomb 66 SC State 68, Florida A&M 57 SE Louisiana 67, Lamar 62 Sam Houston St. 78, New Orleans 47 Samford 59, Furman 58 Savannah St. 58, Bethune-Cookman 54 Stetson 98, Kennesaw St. 75 Texas Southern 77, Grambling St. 63 Tulane 73, Southern Miss. 71, OT UNC Asheville 83, Liberty 80, OT UT-Martin 74, Morehead St. 52 Winthrop 70, Longwood 49 MIDWEST Akron 77, Kent St. 51 Austin Peay 64, E. Illinois 56 Ball St. 79, Ohio 63 Cent. Michigan 82, Bowling Green 79, OT Green Bay 90, Cleveland St. 72 IPFW 96, South Dakota 78 IUPUI 82, Denver 66 Ill.-Chicago 78, Oakland 65 Michigan 69, Illinois 60 Missouri St. 89, Drake 66 Montana St. 76, North Dakota 65 N. Dakota St. 83, W. Illinois 78 N. Illinois 69, Miami (Ohio) 66 Northwestern 74, Wisconsin 58 S. Dakota St. 80, Nebraska-Omaha 66 SIU-Edwardsville 71, Murray St. 67 St. Johns 49, Marquette 47 Temple 58, Cincinnati 47 W. Michigan 78, Toledo 72 Wright St. 79, Valparaiso 65 Xavier 75, Providence 52 Youngstown St. 87, Milwaukee 71 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 67, Abilene Christian 54 Incarnate Word 67, Oral Roberts 64 Oklahoma St. 82, Texas Tech 56 Rice 74, Marshall 68, OT Tulsa 78, FIU 73 UTSA 58, North Texas 56 FAR WEST CS Northridge 64, UC Santa Barbara 46 Colorado St. 87, Air Force 49 E. Washington 78, Sacramento St. 65 Fresno St. 75, New Mexico 73 Idaho St. 69, S. Utah 65 N. Arizona 88, Portland St. 67 N. Colorado 57, Montana 54 Pacic 75, Pepperdine 64 Saint Marys (Cal) 78, Loyola Marymount 74 San Diego 60, BYU 45 San Jose St. 74, Wyoming 68 Seattle 75, Utah Valley 67 HOCKEY NHL Fridays Games Columbus 5, Washington 1 Chicago 4, Anaheim 2 Saturdays Games N.Y. Rangers 4, Ottawa 1 San Jose 5, Tampa Bay 4 Winnipeg 3, Edmonton 2, OT Columbus at Buffalo, late Montreal at Toronto, late Los Angeles at Detroit, late N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, late Florida at Carolina, late Anaheim at St. Louis, late Colorado at Nashville, late New Jersey at Phoenix, late Dallas at Minnesota, late Calgary at Vancouver, late Todays Games Boston at Chicago, 12:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 5 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour Humana Challenge Saturday p-PGA West, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par 72 n-PGA West, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards, par 72 q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards, par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5.7 million Third Round Patrick Reed 63p-63q-63n 189 Charley Hoffman 64q-66n-66p 196 Brendon Todd 65n-63p-68q 196 James Driscoll 68p-63q-66n 197 Bill Haas 65q-66n-67p 198 Justin Leonard 66n-67p-65q 198 Ryan Palmer 64p-65q-70n 199 Matt Jones 66n-67p-66q 199 Brian Stuard 67q-66n-66p 199 Will MacKenzie 67n-66p-66q 199 Ben Crane 70q-64n-65p 199 Keegan Bradley 69q-66n-65p 200 Charlie Beljan 68q-64n-68p 200 Seung-Yul Noh 68p-66q-66n 200 Jason Bohn 70q-65n-66p 201 Zach Johnson 65q-68n-68p 201 Chad Collins 68n-68p-65q 201 Jerry Kelly 69q-65n-68p 202 Jonathan Byrd 68p-69q-65n 202 Stuart Appleby 66p-69q-67n 202 Matt Every 65n-68p-69q 202 Rory Sabbatini 68p-67q-67n 202 Scott Langley 69q-68n-65p 202 Russell Knox 65p-70q-67n 202 Spencer Levin 69p-68q-66n 203 Luke Guthrie 69p-67q-67n 203 Martin Laird 69n-66p-68q 203 Kevin Chappell 70q-70n-63p 203 Charlie Wi 65p-69q-69n 203 Martin Flores 69p-65q-69n 203 Jim Herman 67n-68p-68q 203 Brendon de Jonge 69q-68n-66p 203 Tyrone Van Aswegen 69n-67p-67q 203 Abu Dhabi Championship Saturday At Abu Dhabi Golf Club Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Purse: $2.7 million Yardage: 7,583; Par: 72 Third Round Craig Lee, Scotland 68-67-69 204 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 72-68-66 206 Phil Mickelson, United States 73-70-63 206 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-70-68 207 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 70-67-70 207 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-70-68 208 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-68-67 208 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-71-68 208 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 67-68-73 208 Matthew Baldwin, England 67-72-69 208 Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-70-69 209 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 70-67-72 209 Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-71-69 210 Hennie Otto, South Africa 70-71-69 210 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-72 210 George Coetzee, South Africa 68-70-72 210 Tommy Fleetwood, England 73-65-72 210 Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-70 210 Jose-Filipe Lima, Portugal 68-75-67 210 Also Luke Donald, England 70-73-71 214 Sergio Garcia, Spain 76-68-70 214 Darren Clarke, Northern Ireland 74-69-72 215 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-70-73 216 TV2DAY FIGURE SKATING 4 p.m.NBC European Championships, at Budapest, HungaryGOLF 3 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, Humana Challenge, nal round, at La Quinta, Calif.7 p.m.TGC Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, nal round, at Kaupule hu-Kona, HawaiiMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m.FS1 Louisiana Tech at Southern Miss. CBSSN Rutgers at Houston3 p.m.CBSSN Bucknell at Army3:30 p.m.NBCSN Towson at Charleston6 p.m.ESPNU Virginia Tech at Notre Dame8 p.m.ESPNU Oregon at Oregon StateNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 6 p.m.FS-Florida Boston at OrlandoNATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 3 p.m.CBS Playoffs, AFC Championship, New England at Denver6:30 p.m.FOX Playoffs, NFC Championship, S.F at SeattleNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 12:30 p.m.NBC Boston at Chicago5 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Carolina7:30 p.m.NBCSN Washington at N.Y. RangersSOCCER 8:25 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Tottenham at Swansea City10:55 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Manchester United at ChelseaTENNIS 9 p.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia3 a.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, AustraliaWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m.ESPN2 UConn at Rutgers FS1 Villanova at DePaul5 p.m.ESPN2 Penn St. at Michigan St.SCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED FA-Leesburg boys hoops team falls for first timeSTAFF REPORTOjay Cummings scored 12 points on Satur day, but Ocala Trinity Catholic had more at the nish to hold off First Academy of Leesburg 5847 in a boys basketball tournament at Wildwood High School. First Academy of Leesburg fell to 14-1 overall, while Ocala Trinity Catholic improved t0 11-9. not so much be cause of what the winloss numbers will say but because this could be the last time they meet with the stakes so high. I dont know that there will ever be an other rivalry like it, or has been a rivalry like it, said John Elway, whose own rivalry with Dan Marino was held to only three meetings because of scheduling quirks over their decade-plus careers. The game will either give Brady a chance to match Joe Montana and Terry Bradshaw for a fourth title or afford Manning the oppor tunity to win a second ring, which would put him one behind Brady, and in the same company with his brother, Eli, Roger Staubach and Elway, among others. It would also make Manning the rst QB to win championships with two different teams. While paying ultimate respect to each other I feel like hes been a better player each year than he was the year before, Man ning said neither quarterback profess es to care much about how their own head-tohead showdowns will dene their legacy. Dont believe it, says Phil Simms, who ad mits in retirement that the smile was a little wider after he walked off the eld with a win over a Staubach or Joe Theismann. Its always person al, no matter what, Simms said. Its part of being a competitor and doing what you do. One reason Brady has a .714 win per centage in the headto-head meetings and also holds a 2-1 advan tage in the playoffs is because, more often than not, hes been sur rounded by the more complete team. He has been any thing but a one-man show in New England this season, illustrat ed best by the fact that the Patriots are in the AFC title game even though Brady threw for 25 touchdowns less than half of Mannings record-setting 55. Without Rob Gron kowski, Aaron Hernandez or Wes Welker to throw to, Brady made it work, with a big assist from head coach Bill Belichick and offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, who used to coach the Broncos. New Englands running game, led by Le Garrette Blount and Shane Vereen, has aver aged 214 yards the last three games. Bradys 75 passes over the last three games are the fewest of any threegame stretch in his ca reer. Manning has thrown for 92 touchdowns since arriving in Den ver at the start of the 2012 season, his neck rebuilt from multiple surgeries, his future uncertain because of his weakened throwing arm. Hed be the rst to ad mit hes not the same as he once was, physically. But nobody prepares better. His record-setting 5,477 yards and all those touchdown throws came with a gifted group of offensive stars surround ing him Welker, Eric Decker, Demaryius Thomas and this seasons difference maker, 6-foot-5 tight end Julius Thomas. But Man ning had great players around him in Indianapolis, as well, and never put up these sort of numbers. Today, Brady, who missed parts of practice early in the week with the u, will be go ing against a depleted secondary that just lost cornerback Chris Har ris Jr., which will make Champ Bailey in jured most of the season a bigger cog for the Denver D. And the Patriots will likely invite the Bron cos to run much the way they did in their 34-31 overtime loss in Week 12 knowing the best chance of beating them is by taking the ball out of Man nings hands. AFC FROM PAGE B1 record in three seasons as Patriots coach, then went to the col lege ranks and built a powerhouse at Southern California, with two national titles. That theres no love lost between Harbaugh and Carroll dating back to when they both were working in college Harbaugh at Stanford, where he ran up the score on Carrolls Trojans adds plenty of spice. The sum total on both sides should be a worthy conference champion to meet either Denver or New En gland in two weeks in the New Jersey Meadowlands for the NFL crown. Even if both teams are playing down the drama they gure to provide before an ear-shattering wall of noise at CenturyLink Field today. The schedule brought these teams together in September and December. Seattle won 29-3 at home in Week 2, then lost 1917 at San Francisco on Dec. 8. CenturyLink Field might be the tough est venue in the NFL for visitors, with archi tecture that not only keeps the noise inside the stadium, but fun nels it toward the eld itself. Wilson became a starter as a rookie in 2012 and went undefeated. He won his rst six home starts this season before a stum ble against Arizona, but then Seattle defeat ed St. Louis to nish off the regular season, and New Orleans in a divi sional-round playoff last weekend. Thats pretty spectacular and it just shows how amazing our fans are, how much energy the city has for our football team, Wil son said of the super sonic sound levels the 49ers can expect to deal with when they have the ball. Thats what were looking for ward to, and we want to bring something spe cial to this city, and to do it we have to play one play at a time and see what happens at the end of the game. N ot that the 49ers are likely to be intimidated by the surroundings. They went 6-2 away from home in the reg ular season, and their two road wins have come at venerable Lambeau Field in frigid conditions, and at Car olina, which had won its last seven home games. NFC FROM PAGE B1 Allen Payne nished with 11 points. A uburn has lost its rst four SEC games this season by a combined 23 point. The Tigers have dropped their last 14 against league teams over all. The Gators, who lost a 13-point lead in the rst half, made 21 of 39 shots (53.8 percent). Florida made 23 of 33 free throws while Auburn was 14 of 22. The Tigers point guards, Sham sid-Deen and Malcolm Canada, both fouled out. Prather got right into his offensive rhythm after the layoff. He came into the game with 16:58 remaining, hit two quick jump shots and made his rst ve attempts, including a fast-break dunk off a nice bounce pass from Hill. The Gators reeled off a 14-1 run for a 23-10 lead while the Tigers missed their rst 10 at tempts from inside the 3-point line. Walk-on Alex Thompson nally scored on a putback 13 minutes into the game for Auburns rst basket since making a third consecutive 3-pointer with 14:28 left in the half. Auburn hit all ve of its 3-point attempts in the rst half and nished 7 of 13. Despite Prathers explosion, the Gators bare ly led at halftime. Wilbekin made two free throws with 3 seconds left to give Florida a 33-32 half time lead. UF FROM PAGE B1

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available Tee time 5 days in advance. Expires 1/31/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$34 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents NEW YEARS TUNE-UP SPECIALCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen WreshSeries of 4 Full SwingorShort Game Tune-Up Series(reg. $200)$150(Chipping, Pitching, Putting & Bunkers) GOLF Associated PressABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates Phil Mickelson surged up the leaderboard with a 9-under 63 to put him self in second place af ter the third round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, while Rory McIlroy was hit with a two-shot pen alty for a rules infraction that dropped him into a tie for fourth. Mickelson barely made the cut but had the best round of the day with nine birdies and an eagle coupled with two bogeys to sit two shots behind leader Craig Lee of Scotland. Lee shot a 69 for a 12-under 204 total. I just love the fact I am in contention and have an opportuni ty in my rst tourna ment of the year here in Abu Dhabi, Mickelson said. The biggest thing for me is that each day as the tournament has progressed I have felt a lot sharper and sharper. McIlroy thought he was alone in second place a stroke behind Lee after nishing his round, but tournament ofcials then ruled that he had taken a drop incorrectly on the second hole and adjusted his score to a double-bo gey 7. That gave him a 70 for the round to sit one stroke behind Mickelson and Gaganjeet Bhullar of India (66). McIlroy had to take relief on the second hole when his ball ended up on a gallery crosswalk and went on to par the hole, but was later told by the caddy of playing partner Ri cardo Gonzalez that he had his left foot on the white line marking the drop area, meaning he had not taken full relief according to the rules. Tournament ofcials reviewed the situation after McIlroy complet ed his round, with the golfer going back to the spot to show where he stood when he took the shot. I didnt even know my foot was on the line, McIlroy said. We went back to see it again there and see where my divot was, and it was clear that I couldnt have played the shot with my feet anywhere else. I guess I was so much into the shot I didnt even realize. ... Theres a lot of stupid rules and this is one of them. To make matters worse, McIlroy said his drop had actually given him a bad lie and that he would have beneted from dropping again. If anything, it was a disadvantage, McIlroy said. McIlroy had nished the round with out a bogey, making his fourth birdie of the day on the 18th. To a spectator it may feel like I have been unduly punished, and thats what it feels like to me, but its a rule of the game. I do feel like I have been hard done by but its nothing that a fast start tomorrow cant x. Mickelson shot his lowest score since a 63 on the opening day of the Deutsche Bank Championship in September, falling one shot short of the Abu Dhabi course record. The American birdied four of his open ing six holes, eagled the eighth and then also birdied ve of his in ward holes, including sinking a 50-foot birdie putt at the par-5 last. That came after he tried to reach the green in two shots but ended up beneath some trees to the left and needed a pitching wedge on his third shot. (I) gave myself a 45 to 50 footer that you dont really expect to make too often but I had a good kind of feel on that one and it just rolled right I, Mick elson said. But then I was getting a little tired mentally those last few holes and I could tell it was early in the season so I just wasnt as sharp mentally.Mickelson surges; McIlroy gets 2 shot penalty KAMRAN JEBREILI / AP Rory McIlroy tees off on the 11th hole during Saturdays third round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. AUTO RACING Associated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. A 16-driver champion ship eld that would be whittled down to create a winner-take-all season nale is among radical changes report edly being considered by NASCAR. NASCAR chairman Brian France has re peatedly said he wants to place a greater em phasis on winning, and hes never ruled out tin kering with the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship format in an effort to create the Game 7 moments he covets. The Charlotte Observer rst reported Friday night a possible over haul to the Chase for mat that France rst introduced in 2004 and has made period ic changes to several times since. Citing anonymous sources, The Observer outlined three major changes beginning with expanding the eld from 12 drivers to 16 meaning a win during the regular season would virtual ly guarantee a driver a spot in the eld. Once the eld is set, The Observer said NASCAR is considering eliminations during the 10-race Chase. The eld would be cut after the third, sixth and ninth races. The proposed eliminations would drop the lowest four drivers from ti tle contention after the third, sixth and ninth races, leaving four drivers eligible for a win ner-take-all race in the season nale at Homestead-Miami Speedway. The four remain ing drivers would go into Homestead with their points reset and tied in the standings, The Observer said. A statement from NASCAR chief commu nications ofcer Brett Jewkes was non-committal on The Observer report. NASCAR has begun the process of brieng key industry stakeholders on potential con cepts to evolve its NA SCAR Sprint Cup Series championship format, Jewkes said. This dialogue is the nal phase of a multi-year process that has included the review of extensive fan research, partner and industry feedback and other data-driven insights. NASCAR has no plans to comment fur ther until the stakeholder discussions are complete. But driver Denny Hamlin posted a se ries of Tweets on Saturday afternoon that supported the format if NASCAR ultimately moves forward with the changes. NASCAR is expected to ofcially out line any changes later this month. This points system change is going to be a really good thing. Trust in it and watch how ex citing each chase race is going to be, Hamlin posted. Hamlin also Tweeted that every Chase race will now be as exciting as the September race at Richmond, which is the nal race to set the Chase eld. He also responded to two fans who criticized the format. One argued it was articially construed excitement instead of the traditional consistency that NASCAR used for decades in crowning its cham pion. Consistency will keep you up top, Hamlin replied. Hamlin received support from 2012 Cup champion Brad Keselowski, who replied on Twitter to him that he also liked the reported new format. Guess we may be in the minority here, Keselowski said. NASCAR has been working feverishly be hind the scenes to improve its on-track product, particularly at 1.5-mile tracks, and at least some changes are expected to the points system to meet Frances desire to put a greater emphasis on winning. France was thrilled with the nish of the March race at California, where feuding drivers Hamlin and Joey Logano relent lessly raced for the win.NASCAR considers radical changes to Chase points format TENNIS JOHN PYEAssociated PressMELBOURNE, Australia Rafael Nadal made it abundantly clear how much he missed the last Australian Open with the manner of his thirdround demolition of Gael Monls. Top-seeded Nadal trounced No. 25-seeded Monls 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 in two ho urs to nish off Saturdays program on the Rod Laver Are na, then told the crowd it was very emotional to have the chance to play that well here in Aus tralia after missing last year. He skipped it in 2013 during a seven-month layoff for illness and in juries, depriving him a chance to pick up two full sets of the Grand Slam titles. Nadal returned to w in the French and U.S. Open crowns among his 10 titles last season and regained the year-end No. 1-ranking. The Australian Open is the only major Nadal has not won at least twice, with his sole triumph at Mel bourne Park in 2009. The Spaniard lost an epic ve-set nal to Novak Djokovic two years ago. The 27-year-old broke Monls serve in the rst game and then fend ed off three break points before holding in the next. He conceded just one point on serve in the second set and, apart from a slight stumble that caused him to hob ble around momentar ily, he didnt have any trouble advancing. Na dal next plays No. 16 Kei Nishikori of Japan, who ended the U.S. run in the mens draw with a comfortable win over Donald Young.Nadal puts on a grand show in Australia

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL JOSEPH WHITEAssociated PressWASHINGTON Fuquan Edwin scored 19 of his 24 points in the second half, and Seton Hall rallied from a 10-point, second-half decit Saturday and broke a three-game losing streak with a 6757 win over George town. Back in the starting lineup after battling a knee injury, Ed win went 4 for 4 from 3-point range after halftime for the Pirates (11-7, 2-3 Big East), who had been 0-4 on the road against their conference rivals since an overtime victory on Jan. 29, 2003. Seton Hall hadnt won in regulation at Georgetown since Jan. 8, 2000. Edwin also had ve steals to set the school record with 263. He passed Dan Callandrillo, who had 260 from 1978-82. DVauntes Smith-Rivera scored 14 points to lead the Hoyas (11-6, 3-3), who didnt score a eld goal over the nal 9:44 and blew a dou ble-digit, second-half lead for the second straight game, having lost to Xavier after lead ing by 17 on Wednes day. Georgetown also lost at home for the rst time this season after winning its rst eight at the Verizon Center. Edwin has missed four games due to injury this season, and he came off the bench in Seton Halls previous game, a one-point loss at Marquette. Against Georgetown, he led the decisive 15-3 run, highlighted by a sequence in which he hit a 3-point er that he celebrated by running backward with both arms in the air, then made a steal at the other end of the oor. Edwin fouled out with 1:51 to play and his team leading by 11, and his teammates had to hang on. Sterling Gibbs made only 4 of 8 free throws over the nal 2:50, allowing the Hoyas to cut the decit to seven with several chances to make it the score closer. Eugene Teague returned for the Pirates after missing four games with a concus sion, but committed two offensive fouls in the rst 2:18 and head ed for the bench. He nished with 10 points in 23 minutes. Georgetown remains without Jabril Trawick and Joshua Smith, both regulars in the starting lineup until recently. Trawick missed his third game with a broken jaw, and Smith sat out for the fourth consecutive game for academic reasons. Nate Lubick continues to play with a mask after breaking his nose last weekend against Butler. Both teams came out sluggish, looking more like football teams content to trade punts rather than score. Both started 3 for 12 from the field, and Seton Hall had five turnovers in the first five minutes. The Hoyas closed out the first half with a 10-0 run, includ ing 3-pointers from Markel Starks and Reggie Cameron, to take a 35-26 lead at the break. Georgetown took the first double-dig it lead of the game on Camerons 3-pointer early in the second half, but turnovers began hurting the Hoyas as Seton Hall pulled off a 20-9 run and took a 48-47 lead on Ed wins three-point play with 10:06 remaining. Aaron Bowen then made a layup to put Georgetown back ahead, but that was the last Hoyas field goal. Teague made a bucket to give Seton Hall the lead for good, and Edwin followed with a 3-pointer as the Pirates pulled away. SETON HALL 67, GEORGETOWN 57SETON HALL (11-7) Oliver 2-7 1-2 7, Auda 1-4 2-3 4, Teague 3-6 4-6 10, Gibbs 2-6 6-15 11, Edwin 8-17 3-3 24, Mobley 1-6 0-0 3, Sina 3-4 0-1 8, Geramipoor 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 20-51 16-30 67. GEORGETOWN (11-6) Cameron 2-7 0-0 6, Lubick 0-3 2-2 2, Hopkins 4-7 3-6 11, Smith-Rivera 4-12 6-7 14, Starks 3-12 2-2 9, Bowen 4-9 4-4 13, Caprio 1-1 0-0 2, Ayegba 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 18-53 17-21 57. HalftimeGeorgetown 35-26. 3-Point GoalsSeton Hall 11-20 (Edwin 5-8, Sina 2-3, Oliver 2-4, Mo bley 1-2, Gibbs 1-2, Auda 0-1), Georgetown 4-18 (Cameron 2-5, Bowen 1-3, Starks 1-5, Smith-Rivera 0-5). Fouled OutEdwin. ReboundsSeton Hall 39 (Teague 9), Georgetown 39 (Hopkins 15). Assists Seton Hall 14 (Gibbs 9), Georgetown 14 (Smith-Ri vera 5). Total FoulsSeton Hall 17, Georgetown 20. A,786.Seton Hall ends DC skid, tops Georgetown 67-57 ALEX BRANDON / AP Seton Hall guard Jaren Sina (30) drives past Georgetown guard Markel Starks (5) during Saturdays game in Washington. GARY B. GRAVESAssociated PressLEXINGTON, Ky. Freshman Andrew Harrison scored a sea son-high 26 points and No. 13 Kentucky used near-perfect free throw shooting to pull away from Tennessee for a 74-66 victory Saturday. The Wildcats (13-4, 3-1 Southeastern Conference) made 23 of 24 from the line including their rst 17 before Aar on Harrison, Andrews twin, missed the front end of a 1-and-1 with 32 seconds remaining. The Wildcats had en tered the game making 66 percent of their free throws, 63 percent in SEC games. Andrew Harrison made all 10 of his free throw attempts along with a couple of 3-pointers and freshman Julius Randle was 5 of 5 from the free throw line and 6 of 9 from the eld for 18 points. Kentucky overcame a nine-point rst-half decit to beat the Volunteers (11-6, 2-2) in this seasons lone scheduled meeting between the schools. Trailing 18-9 with 12:16 left in the half, the Wild cats closed with a 25-14 run over the nal 11:06 and led by as many as 11 points in the second half. Kentucky was outre bounded 39-24 by the Vols, who made just 16 of 23 from the free throw line. Aaron Harrison n ished with 14 points in cluding two from beyond the arc to help the Wildcats nish 7 of 16 from 3-point range. He was 6 of 7 from the free throw line. Jarnell Stokes had 20 points and 15 rebounds for Tennessee, which lost to Kentucky for the 150th time in the se ries that dates to 1910. Jordan McRae added 17 points and Jeronne Maymon had 12 for the Volunteers. Tennessee shot well from the eld and the free throw line in Wednesday nights victory over Auburn. The Volunteers committed just 12 turnovers after coming in last in the SEC with a minus-7.5 margin in league play, but that was still four fewer than Kentucky. The Wildcats succeeded in making Tuesday nights heart breaking 87-85 over time loss at Arkansas a distant memory. While the Wildcats insisted there were no lingering mental effects from Mi chael Qualls last-sec ond rebound dunk that snatched away anoth er winnable game, they also stressed the need not to let it happen again. Payback was also on Kentucky players minds after last years 30-point loss in Knox ville just days after Ner lens Noels season-ending knee injury. It was Tennessees most lop sided win in the series and the Wildcats were determined to make amends. Kentuckys quest ap peared difcult early as Stokes seemed primed to beat the Wildcats by himself. He scored the games rst six points en route to a 12-point, 11-rebound rst half that symbolized the Vols energetic effort: they outrebounded the Wildcats 23-10 in the rst 20 minutes and built a lead that stood for most of the half. And yet, Stokes per formance and Tennessees statistical edge mattered little at half time as Kentucky emerged with a 34-32 lead thanks to its run that included a 16-6 spurt over the nal 7:06. James Youngs 3-pointer with 54 seconds re maining capped the surge, but 26 combined points by Randle and Andrew Harrison car ried the Wildcats. Randle scored 16 points in the rst half and got things going by scoring Kentuckys rst ve points includ ing his rst 3-pointer this season after seven misses. The second half be longed to the Wildcats, who shot 46 percent from the eld and nished 22 of 50 overall (44 percent). Tennessee nished 24 of 58 (41 percent). No. 13 KENTUCKY 74, TENNESSEE 66 TENNESSEE (11-6) Richardson 2-7 0-0 4, Barton 0-4 2-2 2, Stokes 8-12 4-6 20, Maymon 4-11 4-7 12, McRae 5-14 6-8 17, Moore 2-4 0-0 4, Ndiaye 1-3 0-0 2, Thompson 2-2 0-0 5, Reese 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 24-58 16-23 66. KENTUCKY (13-4) Young 3-9 0-0 8, Aa. Harrison 3-7 6-7 14, An. Harri son 7-13 10-10 26, Cauley-Stein 0-5 0-0 0, Randle 6-9 5-5 18, Polson 0-0 0-0 0, Poythress 1-4 2-2 4, Hawkins 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 2250 23-24 74. HalftimeKentucky 34-32. 3-Point GoalsTennes see 2-13 (Thompson 1-1, McRae 1-7, Richardson 0-1, Moore 0-1, Reese 0-1, Barton 0-2), Kentucky 7-16 (An. Harrison 2-3, Aa. Harrison 2-4, Young 2-5, Randle 1-2, Poythress 0-2). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsTennessee 39 (Stokes 15), Kentucky 24 (Aa. Harrison, Johnson 4). AssistsTennessee 10 (Barton 3), Kentucky 11 (Randle 4). Total FoulsTennessee 20, Kentucky 17. A,246.No. 13 Kentucky beats Tennessee at charity stripe JAMES CRISP / AP Kentuckys Julius Randle, left, shoots under pressure from Tennessees Jarnell Stokes (5) during the rst half of Saturdays game in Lexington, Ky. HANK KURZ JR.Associated PressCHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Joe Harris scored 18 points and Virginia used an early 22-5 run to take command on its way to a 78-66 victory against Florida State on Saturday and a sweep of its season series against the Seminoles. Malcolm Brogdon added 16 points for the Cavaliers (13-5, 4-1 At lantic Coast Confer ence), who won 62-50 at Florida State on Jan. 4. The sweep is the rst for the Cavaliers since the 2000-01 season. Okaro White and Aar on Thomas scored 15 each for Florida State (12-5, 3-2). The Seminoles arrived second in the ACC defensively, allowing teams to make just 36.3 percent of their eld goal attempts, but the Cavaliers shot better than 55 percent in the rst half in bolting to 4526 lead by halftime. The Cavaliers also closed the half with an 11-3 burst that featured ve points from Akil Mitchell. The Seminoles trailed by as many as 21 in the second half, and got no closer than 12, including in the nal minute when Virginias Justin Ander son was assessed a tech nical foul for hanging on the rim after a dunk. During some brief confusion on the court, words were exchanged, and the Cavaliers Dar ion Atkins and Teven Jones were ejected for leaving the bench. After the game, as the Seminoles lined up to head for their locker room, words were ex changed again and the teams came togeth er again, but coaches seemed to control the situation and the teams went to their locker rooms without incident. Virginia used the same blueprint in the rematch as it had in Tallahassee, but this time had the benet of having Harris in the lineup. In Florida, Harris sustained a con cussion after just two minutes on the court and watched the rest of the game as Justin An derson and London Per rantes took charge. This time, he had 10 points by halftime and nished the game 6-for8 with four 3-pointers in ve attempts. After an opening 3-pointer by Devon Bookert for the Seminoles, Virginia scored 22 of the next 27 points. Brogdon had eight and he and Justin Ander son both hit 3-pointers, while the Seminoles turned the ball over at least three times and went more than six min utes between their rst eld goal and second. The Seminoles also turned the ball over 18 times, leading to 26 points for the Cavaliers. No. 20 NC STATE 80, No. 17 FLORIDA ST. 57FLORIDA ST. (14-3) Jones 5-18 0-1 11, Delgado 2-9 0-0 4, Brown 2-7 2-3 6, Slaughter 5-9 2-2 12, Howard 6-12 2-4 14, James 2-5 1-2 5, Bingley 1-3 0-0 2, Coleman 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 24-65 7-12 57. NC STATE (16-2) Goodwin-Coleman 4-9 0-0 12, Brown 3-11 0-2 8, Barrett 2-6 2-2 8, Gatling 8-8 4-5 20, Burke 5-15 5-6 16, Spencer 1-2 1-1 3, Eli 0-0 0-0 0, Mathurin 0-0 0-0 0, Daniel 5-9 3-4 13. Totals 28-60 1520 80. HalftimeNC State 37-26. 3-Point GoalsFlorida St. 2-12 (Coleman 1-2, Jones 1-7, Brown 0-1, Bingley 0-1, Delgado 0-1), NC State 9-22 (Goodwin-Coleman 4-9, Brown 2-4, Barrett 2-6, Burke 1-2, Spencer 0-1). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsFlorida St. 38 (Slaughter 11), NC State 42 (Burke 10). Assists Florida St. 12 (Delgado 7), NC State 23 (Barrett, Burke, Spencer 5). Total FoulsFlorida St. 18, NC State 13. A,786.Harris 18 lead UVa past Florida State, 78-66 ANDREW SHURTLEFF / AP Florida State guard Aaron Thomas (25) drives past Virginia guard Malcolm Brogdon (15) during the rst half of Saturdays game in Charlottesville, Va.

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Shall We Rename Bloxam Avenue Trash Trail?I just lled my third bag with garbage picked up on Bloxam Avenue in Clermont. Hundreds of cigarette lters lining the curbs, brown bottles of beer still dripping with the last sip of liquid, fast-food restaurant cups with lids and straws still attached, smashed fast food bags once housing hamburgers still stained with cheese and ketchup, tin beer and soda cans attened and shredded by the city workers lawnmowers, insulation and foam dropped from construction trucks, smashed cigarette cartons, and yes, I cant for get an empty prescription bottle of oxycodone. Why, on a beautiful Sunday afternoon do I nd myself wearing stained gardening gloves, carrying a stinky garbage bag lled with litter and bending over to retrieve these disgusting items every few seconds from Mother Earth? You see, I recently moved from the other side of Clermont, a gated community with residents who walked every day to stay healthy and strong. I loved walking there and never had to be concerned about stepping in dog poop or on a broken beer bottle. After relocating, I knew I wanted to nd a walking trail and, voila, there was Bloxam Avenue waiting for me with all of its sidewalks, yards, and roads lled with stagnant and mounting trash. Bloxam Avenue, I imagine, was once a scenic Florida road with its new homes lining one side of the street and sweet-smelling citrus groves on the other. Now, in just one night, I can see the additional garbage accumulating. I dont know the culture, religion, or skin color of the driver who rolls down his or her car/truck window and with sheer abandonment pitches lth out the window, but I do know her or his habits -smokers, fast-food patrons, alcohol enthusiasts, and lets not forget the drug users. How can we teach others to respect the land, the roads, personal property and our proud City of Clermont? Perhaps some civic group should/could adopt a highway. Why not Bloxam Avenue? DEANNA M. CREE | Clermont Democrat misstepsWhile Mary OHanlons heartwarming story of immigration, hard work and the American Dream casts a Norman Rockwell portrait of the Democratic Par ty, its time to fast forward from F.D.R.s New Deal into the 21st Century. As you are one to spot inaccuracies in data, lets examine yours. If you are correct in assuming the rich pay little taxes and the poor certainly pay little also, then raising taxes, as you propose, would come from where? Exactly, the middle class. This whole administration has been about spending and raising taxes. This is not a social media phenomenon, it is fact. Every time Congress tries to control spending, the Democrats throw a t. They are not willing to cooperate. The president and Harry Reid threaten to veto or vote down bills without even reading them. As far as government is concerned the Democrats want a hand in it all. Bigger is better. The more we can get on the pay roll the better. Im not sure if this is because of campaign promises that have not been fullled or ar rogance. And lets talk about the white elephant in the middle of the room that most Democrats (especially ones up for re-election) are running away from, Obamacare. This debacle and the nightmare it has presented is a testament to the snake oil salesman approach to the Democratic philosophy. Word it so no one will under stand it and wrap it up in a pretty package. So Mary OHanlon, while your picture-perfect postcard version of the Democratic Party looks good on paper, in reality it is the root of many of this countrys problems. I feel a little bad that I have to be the one to wake you up from your American Dream. DAVID J. MERRILL | EustisBring more focus on the possibilities of desalination of seawaterI agree with the Daily Commercial editorial from Jan. 1, CFWI plan will drain our water supply, about vanishing surface water, and I request you bring more focus on the possibilities of desalination of seawater. While efforts to conserve sur face water are controversial and many see those efforts as unfair when commercial interests are withdrawing the precious liquid, desalination, while also controversial due to cost and environmental impact, is the only controllable way to assure future water consumption needs. Desalination, unlike surface water, is not dependent upon unpredictable rainfall. Many states are experiencing record drought. Many states are at war over other states taking their water. There are an estimated 15,000 desalination efforts worldwide and fewer than 400 desalination plants in the USA. As you know, the Sabal Trail Transmission wants to build a 474-mile natural gas pipeline from Alabama to Florida at a cost of $3 billion dollars. The Tampa Bay desalination plant cost a mere $158 million. Just think of the economic impact of one or more desalination plants in construction, maintenance and supply jobs alone. The best practices and the best expert minds on the effort ought to be incentivized to come up with the most effective, efcient and environmentally safe methods to provide desalinated water for our future needs. This has to be done now before we are at one anothers throats over the most precious commodity we have next to oxygen. Please provide more focus on this subject while you are calling attention to the dilemma and other efforts to distribute vanishing surface water. CHOICE EDWARDS | Clermont Voiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third par ties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to ar chive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to let ters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEKIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANSC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORLake County has had a long and fruit ful relationship with the citrus in dustry hence, communities with names like Groveland. The citrus busi ness isnt what it once was hereabouts, having been diminished by big freez es and disease, but now what remains is being threatened here and elsewhere around the Sunshine State by citrus greening. In fact, citrus greening has the potential to wipe out what is arguably one of Floridas signature industries. The bacterium that causes the disease has already decimated the states $9 billion citrus industry. It has cost the state as many as 8,000 jobs and caused $4.5 billion in crop damage since 2006. While conventional solutions have proven elusive, there is still hope that the industry can be saved. There is an emerging scientic consensus that genetic engineering can defeat citrus greening, The New York Times reported in a story last summer. People are either going to drink transgenic orange juice or theyre going to drink apple juice, the Times reported one University of Florida scientist as saying. The citrus industry has avoided the solution due to consumer fears over genetically modied organisms, or GMOs. As the Times story and its more recent piece on genetically modied crops in Hawaii described, a lot of false infor mation in the guise of science has been spread about the health risks of consuming genetically modied foods. In Hawaii, a genetically engineered variety of papaya saved the fruit from a devastating disease. Yet, opponents of GMOs have pushed to ban genetically engineered crops on the island of Kona, citing erroneous claims such as a thor oughly debunked study that a diet of GMO corn caused tumors in rats. There are certainly legitimate concerns about the environmental impact of GMOs and companies that develop them. Pesticide-resistant crops, for example, can lead to increased pesticide spraying and associated problems. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last year that farmers couldnt use biotech company Monsantos genetically altered soy beans without paying a fee. The decision set a frightening precedent in cementing corporate control over the food supply. But biotechnology offers hope in feeding a growing population grappling with climate change. Yet some liberal groups working to address climate change are opposed to GMOs, spreading the same kind of misinformation employed by climate-change deniers. The citrus industry and others in agriculture must do a better job educating the public about genetically engineered crops, while addressing legitimate concerns. Failing to do so could spell the end of Florida citrus, and that would mean the end to an important slice of the states economy and history. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM McNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF ALAN YOUNGBLOOD / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP A diver explores Alexander Springs in Astor.The search to save citrus

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 OTHERVOICESVoices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHERVOICESOTHERVOICES I nd considerable irony that Hillary Clinton is a symbol of feminism while Sar ah Palin is despised by todays feminists. Sarah Palins parents were teachers in Alaska and her entire life and political career was achieved largely through her personal grit, determination and fundamental beliefs in less taxes and open and ethical government. Hillary Clintons par ents were far better off nancially. She attended Wellesly and Yale Law School, but her political success has largely come as a result of who she married. I really doubt that had Hillary not married Bill Clinton that she would have become a senator from New York or secretary of state. Had a Republican president had sex with an intern in the White House, the feminists in America would have become unglued, and rightfully so. You would think that nding out that the most powerful man in the world was taking sexual advantage of a young female White House intern would rightfully draw the outrage of feminists. Funny, I dont remember that occur ring with Bill Clinton. I am pretty sure that had any college president or the CEO of any For tune 500 company who did what Bill Clinton did would have been immediately red. But the feminists, Hillary and the Democrat leadership stood by their man as the fate of their party and Hillarys future political fortunes superseded the lies and embar rassment the Lewinski affair brought to our nations highest ofce. Feminism showed its true colors when it gave a pass to Bill Clinton. Sarah Palin did not become governor of Alaska because of who she married. She also did not become the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee because she did a poor job as governor. In fact, The Anchorage Daily News called her The Joan of Arc of Alaska politics. Her political career began as a city council member, then mayor of Wasilla City. Later, as the governors appointee to chair the states Oil & Gas Conservation Committee, she took on her own Republican leaders for the lack of ethics she saw taking place. This act of political courage thrust her into the race for gover nor which she won impressively 49 percent to 41 percent. I contrast her gutsy rise to become the rst woman governor of Alaska (also the youngest) with that of Hillary Clinton, whose political fortunes came as a direct result of being the wife of the president for eight years. You would think that a true feminist would greatly admire a selfmade woman who took on her own partys leadership over ethics, became the rst woman governor of Alaska, excelled as governor, raised ve children with her supportive husband and was then selected to become the rst Republican woman vice presidential nominee in 2008. But Sarah Palin had one over riding fatal aw: She is Pro Life. Hillary Clinton stood by her man even though he deliberately lied to Americans regarding his sexual relationship with a young White House Intern because she realized that her own political aspirations were tied to his fate. Although Impeachment passed the House it fell sort in the Senate and Hillarys future was saved. She then chose to run for the Senate, but not in Arkansas. She chose the very blue state of New York and the benets of eight years of being in the national spotlight paid off. Her next political step was the presidency. But she underestimated Barack Obama and lost her bid in 2008. Once elected, President Obama, wanting to help heal the rift of primary competition, appointed Hillary as secretary of state. Hillary became our most traveled secretary of state, but upon leaving ofce, in the aftermath of the Benghazi debacle, there is not one single notable achievement she can claim during her tenure. In fact our for eign policy status around the world is in worse shape now than when she and President Obama took over. But to the feminists of America, her lack of diplomatic success is immaterial because she is pro abortion. Finally I well remember that TV ad of Hillarys 2008 campaign asking voters who they wanted to answer that 3 / a.m. crisis call ... her or Barrack Obama. Well that answer came from the 911 call placed by our embassy personnel who were under attack in Benghazi. We now know that the answer to that question is: We dont want either Hillary or President Obama taking that call. It was too big of a political hot potato in the home stretch of a presidential campaign. Im pretty sure that had Sarah Palin been our secretary of state, that she would not have ignored the multiple pleas from our ambassador for more protection and when that desperate call for assistance came from Benghazi, she would have marshaled all of our resources to go to their aid. Courage over politics would have prevailed.Palin, Clinton and a paradox in feminism RUSS SLOANGUEST COLUMNIST No, not that affair. We dont know if French President Francois Hollande has been carrying on with the actress Julie Gayet, which is all the talk over there. We mean Hollandes affair with the notion that he could revive the French economy by punishing employers and soaking the rich. That affair appears to be over. Regrets? We imagine Hollande has a few. He was elected in 2012 on a promise to protect government social spending and the nations workers by punishing businesses that closed plants and taxing the most successful citizens. A member of Hollandes Cabinet told steelmaker ArcelorMittal that if it didnt protect jobs, its plant in northern France would be nationalized. Hollandes persistent push for a 75 percent tax on incomes above 1 million euros won court approval last month. He made scant efforts to deal with Frances soaring public debt and notoriously uncompetitive business environment. And what has happened in France? Foreign investment has dried up. Unemployment has hit a 16-year high, more than twice the rate of Germany. Consumer spending and economic growth have stalled. Hollandes approval ratings are the worst of any postwar French president. On Tuesday, Hollande launched a crusade to make his country competitive again. He announced a 30-billion-euro payroll-tax cut for French companies. He pledged to reduce government red tape and labor rules that scare away investors. He promised to cut government social spending by at least 50 billion euros by the end of 2017. Frances leader might nally be recognizing that the nations failure to be competitive with its neighbors starts at the top. He also called on business, though, to increase employment in return for the better operating environment and said he would establish a commission to monitor job creation. There is no time to lose, Hollande said Tuesday, 20 months into his disastrous term. Chalk it up to a bad romance. It was just one of those things.Distributed by MCT Information Services.Responding to Russ Sloans version of history in his guest column on Dec. 22, Is recent world history re peating Itself? The 1908 discovery of oil in Iran by a British geologist energized a cir cling of the wagons to insure British control and royalty rights that left Iranians with as little as 16 percent of the prots. Conditions amounting to plunder were struggled with for more than 40 years until the democratically elected Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh brought about the nationalization of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC) in March, 1951. U.S. interests recently allied with the British joined the furor and sent the CIA (Operation Ajax) to overthrow Mossadegh in 1953 and install the west-leaning Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. AIOC became British Petroleum in 1954. Their National Intelligence and Security Or ganization (SAVAK) was designed by the U.S. and Israel in 1957 promoting their own interests. The horrors of the Shahs despotic regime through 1979 are too many for this review. All this provocation to revolt is totally ignored by Russ Sloan. For Zionist sympathizers pulling for a U.S. war with Iran, history begins on Nov. 4, 1979, when youthful Islamists invaded the U.S. embassy compound and held its staff hostage for 444 days. Before that, it is unlikely that most Americans could locate Iran on a map. After that, cranking up hatred for Iran became a national policy. Its what we do when we want the oil at any price. JOHN WHITAKER | TavaresIn France, the end of the affairOil grab is behind anti-Iran sentiment

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rfrfnt rrfntnbrfbfftntnntbtttttfttfbttntnttbtfrnfrftfftbffftfbbtttbnnffbnrfbtfffffffttbtbntbtfbftntnrfttttfttttfbtntttfbbftffffffnrfrfrfbnrfrftttbftrffffftntfbfttffftbtttbftf rfn tb rnn r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 r f f f f fn nt nb rf r fnttbb rfn ff ff ffb f f fr t ttbb f fff ffb ff f fff rfttn tt n n f t f f t f f f f f n f t f f f f f f f f b f b f t f f b t f f f f f f f f f b t t f f f f t f f f t t r r f r f f t f f f f f r f f t f f f r f f t f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f f f f t f f f b f f f b f f f f f f f t f f f f f t t f ff t nff t bt tttffbrbb tttt f f f f f f b n b t t b b b t t b b b t ttt r fnt rfn ffr ffr fff f f f fr f tt t f fr ffr fffff fff fff f fff rfttn tt n f f f f t f f t f t f ff t n t bt ttbbb tt f f f f f b t b f f f t b ttn f t f t r f f f r ftt tt fttt f ff ff nff ffff ff n r rf trt tttf bn r r f f t f f tfff t f ff t nf f f f f f r f f f f f f f b t t b b b t r t b b b n ttt t f t f t f r f t nff f ttfff t t b tb ttb n b b t nt ttt fnt f f f fr tt nt f f fttnf t fbn t f fntbb f rf fr n n ft n t f t f f f ntb t t nf ttt f f f f f f n b t t b b b t tt nff fn tf ft b ntb ntbbtb ttb nt ttt r r f n nttt fff fff ff fff fffff f f fr tt nttt f ff fff ffff fffff f f ff ttnt t n t t r f f f f f f f f f f f fff fff ffff ffbb n ffbf fb f t tb f ff fff ff fff rfff ffr f fff tt rf ffbf tt f bbtt tt n b t t b b b t tt nff fn tf ft b ntb ntbbtb b nt ttt r r f n nbb ffff ff ffffff ffbff b ff rffffff fff f ff ffff ff ff fff ff ff fffff f f f fr ttt bb f ffff ffff fff ffff ffff ff ffffff ffbff b ffrff fffff ff ff ff fff fff ff fffff f f ff ttnt t n f t f t t t t t f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f rf nrtbt rfnt

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 rf r f fn t b f f f b r f fn t b f f f f t f f b r f b f ft b f t fb f b r f r n f t ft b r f b t b b f b r f t t b f n b r fr t b f f b r f b b r f r f f f f b f f ft b f b f n f f f f f f ft b f f f f f n f f f f f f b r f fb f fr t b t b ft b f fr t f f f f f n n t t b f r f f r b f f t f t t b f f t f b f f f b f fb f t r f f f t b f f f f f f r f f r t b f f t t b f f t b f t b f r f b fn b r f f f f f t f b t r f r t f b fn ft b n t b f f f n t f b n n r ft n n r t f f f f f f f n t f f b f b t f n n t f f t b f f f n t f t r t n n t n b r f b fb n f b r f r r b f n t t b b r t r fn f t f b t b t f t b f f b f f f f b t f t r f t b t f t r f t r f f r t f f f f f f f f f t b r f f f f f f f r t b f r t b n f n t f f f t f t t b f f f t n n t f n f f f t b t b f t r r f b f f b t b f f b t b f f f f r f n f f r f t f f f n f t f r t f f ft b f b f f f f r f rf f f f f f f f f f f f fftbff nfbtbft ffbrfbrfrtfbtb tffbrfbrfbrft tfntbbb tfbtbft ffbrfbr brbrtbffrtfn tftftbrfntbbb ffnftf b r f n f n t t b t b b n b r f t t b f b r f b n t t b t b b n f n f f f n n b f t r f f f f f f t r f t r r f f b t r f b f f t f t b f t t b f n f b f f f f f f f fffftbr tnbrfnftn ffrtfrftb trftrfftb f fn fr t ff f f f f f bffrtffbfb ff frtfbfb ffffbt tff ftbrffrf nf brfrtr bfbfffftf rrffnfff ffbfbffrt f f f f ffftffb nbftbfrf fbfftnft btffffrfttb r ft b f b f f f f f b f f f n t f f f b f f t r b t f t t b f f r f f t n f f t b f f t n f t r f b t f t r f f t b f f f t b f t f f f t r r f f f ft b f b f f f f f f f f f f f f b f f ft b f b f f f f f f f t f b f t b f t t b f t b r f f r f b t t b f f f t b f t f f ft b f b f f b t b f t t b n n n b f f b t r r f f f t t b f f n t t f f b r b t f f f n f f f f t r r f nt f tbffffbtftr tbfnrtftbffn fffrfrttbfr fff f f f f f n t f n f b t n f f r f f t r r f b f f t ft b f b f f f t r f t r t b f f f f nt f f f b f f f f t f f b f f t f b f f t f f b f f f f t f t b fn f f t b f n f f f b f f t t t b f f t b f f n t t f b r f n f f ft b f b f f f t t f n t f n f n f f t t f f f t f t b f t b r n t t f f r n ft b f f ft b f b f n t f n f f n f f t t f f f f r r f b fr f b r t f n f n n t b fn f f f f f b f n f f t b f b r f b f f f t b f f n t t f f b t f b r f n f f t t f f t t f f f n t f f n f n f f n f f f f t f b f t b f f f b f f f f f t f b f f t f t b fn f b f n f f t b f b f f t b f f f t f f n f b r n ft b f f t f f b f t t b f f f b t t f t t b f n f b f f b f n f f f r f f f f f r r f f f b f n t f n r t t t b r f n bt nftfffrr tbrftbffbttb tftbrffnbbf tbfftbrtbft ttbftbfftbfft bt b r f n f r b n f f f f f t ft b f f t n f f fn f n f f f f f f f f f f n t f t f t t t b f t f f t n t f b f t t b f b fb r f f n f f f f f f n b t b b f ft b f r f f b f f t f n b f ft b f f f f t b f n f f ft b f rffftrff nffftfrttttftb ffbff f b r f n fr r n bt f f f r f t f t f b r r b f t b f r n n r t f f f t r n f f f f f t b r b r f n f t r r b n n t n f f f b f f f t f fb r f f f f f f r f t t b f ff n b f b f f b f f f f f f f f f f f f f n f f f b f b t f t f f n f f n r n t f f f n n t t b f b r f f t f b f f t b f f t t r ft b r t t r f t b f f n t n b n f t f t b r t n f b n b f b t t b f t b t t t t f t ft b r t r t f b t f f t n f t t b f t f f b t ft b r t b fn r t r b t ft b b f f f f b r f f f t f n n t f f f f f n t f r t n n t n f f t b f f t t r ft b r t t r f t b f f n t n b n f b f b r f t f t t f t b r t n f b n b f b t t b f t b t t t t f t ft b r f b f f f b r f t t f b t t t b t t b f n f t f f t n f t t b f t f f b t ft b r t b fn r t r b t ft b b f f f f b r f f f t f n n t f f f f f n t f r t n n t n f fftftfff tfffffbt btfrtbfntbtfbr ttbftrfbtbf brftfntbftfbfn ftrftbftfrtfnttbfbf rttfbrfr f f t f f t f b n n b f f f n f t t b r t t b f f t t b ft b t b n f f f f f f f f f f f tbfnfff ftbfnftbfft rtbftbffbfrrttbf brtrfnffbrf fffr nfffttrftbft ftbtbfftftftbtb ffbrrf bnbftbf tbfbrfff tbrftffn fn t f f n f f t f t f n b f f f b f n f f f b f f t b f b f n b f n t tftffffnnttb tfbtfbrffnbft ttbftfttbff ffffttb tfntrfbrfbtrf tbfttrfbrtr tffbftbfbr ftfnfftfbtr brfffffnff trftrftftbfbrf ffnnbfrfb f f f b r f f t r n f f n f b r f n f f n f f f f n t f f f f f f f brfbrftffb tfffbrbf fbrrfftftbffnt rfftftbfntbt fr t f f t b r t b r t n n f r f b t f b f b f f n f t b r t b f f t n n t b f n f f r t b f t b f f r t b f t f f b r f b r f t b f f n t n n t b f f t b f t b f f n ff t b r t b f f n f f b r f t f t f t b f f f f t f n f f t f f b f f f f t f t b f f b t b f b f f t f t b f f t t n f f f f f f t f f f f t f n t b f n b f f f n f b t r n n f f f f f n b f t t f f f t b f n f f f f f f f f f r r f b t f f b f f f t f b r f b f fr ft f t b f r f t b f t f t b f b f ft n f f n t t f f n f ft b r t b n r t b f f t n n t b f f f f t t b f f b f t f f b f n f t b b b f t bfftfftnffb rbtrfftffbrf ffffff bfftnftfr f b t b f f f f f t f n f t f n f f f t b f f n b t f f t b f n f b b f f t f f t r f f f ft f n t r n b f f b f b f t b t b f ft b b t b f f f n f f f f n t fr f n f t f f t b f t f t t b f t f r n b f t ft f t t r f f f f b f r t f f t r f f t t t ft b r t b f t t b f r t n b f f f f b f t b fb n f f t t f f f t f f b b t fn f b f f b r f t r t b f t f n tf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nfffft ff bft f f f f f f f f f f fnnttbffftfftbrf tfrftftftfnnttbfntb bfbffffnftbf nnttbfnfftfff nbfftbrfftr ftfntbftfbffftff bbfttbftfnnrtbf tfntbfffrtttfft tntnbfrfbfftf tfftfffff fftbfrftff rrfntbfftrf ffbfrtrfffbfrttb nrffftfftbrfft ffbfnfbtrrff ntbfftbfffftfbrf rfffrtbfbrfbff tnfrfffrtbftfnr tfrftbrfftnbfbr trbfbftffftff rffftfrfbftrftn rfftrff rf bff b t t b f f t r f t f f f t r ftffftrftbt tbrfbrffntffrftrf tbfftbrftrbfr ffffrftrftf trfbtfffbfff fftffftbfbf fffftrf tftrfbtbftffrff ftnfffnftb trfbrfnftbffff fbtbfftnf fnffftbrffnttbf fftrff tbf rf bff f f fffbftftf fffnff fbrtffrfnf fbfftbf fftrffff ffftfffffbr brfftr f rf ff f ft b n t b f f f f f f f f b f t f fr t t t f b r f b f n n r t b ft b f r f t t ft b f t f r t b f f b t r f fb f f f f f f t t b f t b f t b ff f b f f r t b f f f t f f f f f f f t b f f f t f f f t r f b f f f t t b f f t b fr f f f t f f t f r t b f f f t b ft n t r f f ft f f f t ft n t r f f f bffff b rf ntb n

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rf r f n t b f t n t n t rf rff fftt f t n t b f t n t n t bf ntf tbb fntftt f f f t n rnfb fnt f trft bftnn t b bftf rf fftnn f t r t f r r f f f t n t f fttnt f tn fttn rrb fntbfnt r f t n f tnt r f t f t n f ftnttn rffnf fr rb r r rrf rr rfrff fnfr r r rr rr rf rf f f t f f f b r r r r r r r r r b r f r b r r r r b r r b r f tfrf tf r fftntn rff fn tbf r r r f f t t fftt fn f f t t n n ft tn brfft tt rrr rftftttnttnf f fb rf brffnn nb nf ntrft bfb rrfftt rrff ttnt tt fftnt bf tn rf tnntt nf tftt brrf tftn tfftttf f f t t bf t bbf bfttt r r f f t t n bf ttn trb ftftt rff tftt bf f tf f ttftn bff ntfttnt r ffftf tn rftn t r fftttn fff ftfttt fnnt ftft tnn f nft rrffntf tn fftntn f ffft t rfff ttn f tttn r f f r fnt brf fntftn r r r r r t n frf rftfntnnt f r fnffttt f n t f t ft f rtfn f ftt f fr ftn f fbrft brff ftn b f f t t t t ffnfttt fb rf ft ftf fbfttn b b f t f t n r fftt f ftf f t f t f f t t t t n fftf tnn b nftt rf fn rr fftnntn frrr ftb n brftf rr fff r f f n t t ft ttn f rfff ffntbft t b f t n rrrr fff rrr bfrff fb rrf tt nt rrftrf rrfntf t rtf ftf bf frr fntftt bnb rf fttf r btn rft rftnn f f t f t n bf tf tb nf ftftn ff tftn f tff tnt rf tttn b f f rrrf tttn b bnf r r r f r b r f r b f r t f f

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb r fntbnnntt tnnf nttbbntf b fn bnbtff t nffntn tntttbbbnt ttnnf r ttnf btt b f n t n n b f nntnb tntt ntt r n n t t r fnt nntt tntnft ntt br nttn tntnnttntt bntnt n f ntt r ftrr b b b n n n f f r n t t n f b n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt ntt r t n t n b b t t n t n t r r r rt r n n n t n n f n t t n t r rt t n n n t b f t t t n n n n f t n f b b n t b n f n n n t t n f f f n t t b n n n t n n n t n b n t t f n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r rt r r n t n t bf tnfr nn nnbbf rr rt b bf t b b btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r f n t t rr rt r nnnb nb tntt nbnn nt ff f n fnt nbn ff nff ntt nbnnn nntnn ntt nntt fr t tntf ntt tfff ntt t f n tnftf ntn nfttftt b r ff t ntt t t n n n ff f tntt tntt tntnf ff nnf fntt tnfnbf tt nr fn r f ntt r ntf ntt nr r nr n n rnn ntt rt r rr ntttnn tnfn nttntn btn tt nn f nnfnn ntt r n n nntt n ntt tnff ntt nt nbttbnf n rntt nbtt nt nntt r nbtbnttf tnt r f ntt nfbntt nntnf n t n f nf fntt rntt ntbnnt ft n bntnbbt f fn nnnnfnt nntn ntt r r f n f t t b tn tfntt r ffntt tfnt ntt t ntt bttt r t t b b tttt ntt br n tnn ntt r f ff nntt fbtn ntt r fff ntt r tnnn nf tft ntt bbtf n nt tn nttn nt n f f r

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntr brttnftnb nnbrbbr b nfntb nnnnttr r b n r r bb nnnrr nr rttn bbntn rr bbnntr tt ttnbnb bnrtt rrf bbr ttttnnr tt btrnbrbb ttnr ntbf r r t t ntbf f b t n b t n n t b b n r r fbbbr ntnrnr bf nrbnr rnnbbr nnrrtt r tnnr rtt n n r r r tt rtt nrrf f nbbt b b b b b b n n t f n t n n n r r n n t b r t t n nn tbt r r r r r bnr rr b b nntrttnnrtnr rtt n f rtt nbtf b bf r t r n n b n b b t n b t n n r r bbrfntr tbrrnbn rttr tn bttbbbrrtt nbb trbbttbb bbtnr tttrntn bttbbnbb tnrrtt n nn frfbt r b r n r b b r n r b n n b b t r n b t r t b r n t n b n t n n t r b t n r bbbn bnttrnnn bnrbbbn ftrrnbt bbbnbrr ttnbtnttn nn f t f nfbnt rfnnnt rbtbb nrrnbt nnnb bnbrttnbnr bbttnnnt bnr bntbr fttnn bnnfrtt b n n n r t r t t n b n n b r t t bn nnbbtnr btnntnnbnt brbn tbbtbnr bbtt ttbbb tnbrr r t r n b t n n t r t r t b r b b r b nnbbbr tt r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt nnf f nnntrf f n r b n n n n t n b b n t b n b n n n b b b b r t n t t n r b n t b b n n n n b b n t t b t n b b t t n n b b n n n b r b r r n b n ff tbtnnbbr bbttnntttrtr b nttf n t t b r t n n n t t n n r r r n b b n b t b r b b n n b n r t t r r b n n r b n b t n n b n b n r b n n r t r n n r r t t nf f n f b t t n n n r b r r b r b n n n n n b b b t t b n t t n b b n n b t t b b n n t r nftf f nnff f r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt n n t n r n f n n r b t n r b r t t r b r n r b b r n r b trf fft bnbtnt bnrntbbrb tt n b n n r b r b r n b b b r b t t b b n frb f

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E1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014Moneyscott.callahan@dailycommercial.com ENTREPRENEURS: Boomers attempt to stage rebound / E3 www.dailycommercial.com RICK REEDSpecial to the Daily CommercialWake up and smell Frank Garofalos coffee his fresh roasted coffee. Once you do, you may never go back to your regular brand. Garofalo and his wife, Tammi, own and operate Golden Hills Coffee Roasters, a micro coffee roaster on Max Hooks Road in Groveland. If you compare ours to Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks, you wont go back, Garofalo said of two of the nations heavyweight roasters. This is what coffee is supposed to taste like. Garofalo was an average coffee drinker, two cups daily. And he enjoyed both cups. I thought I was buying the best coffee, Starbucks, he said. I thought it was the best. But when I compared my cup to what I was drinking I thought, Wow, Ive been drink ing burnt coffee this whole time. Why the conversion? Garofalo owned a Feder al Express ground route in the Gainesville area and many of his deliveries were at the University of Florida. It was curiosity, he said. I wanted to see why all the kids in Gainesville were drinking all this handcrafted roasted coffee. So he bought a little halfpound roaster, put it on his back porch and started learning about roasting. He still remembers that rst cup. The smell and aroma of the coffee, wed never experienced before, he said. The caramel, chocolate and vanilla of the Costa Rican coffee beans is what we really fell in love with. It was the best cup of coffee I ever had in my life. So he began his coffee and roasting education, and read everything he could get his hands on while learning the ins and outs of roasting. Hed roast the beans at night, put them in bags with their name on them and then sell them to family, friends and customers along his FedEx route. Each coffee has to be roasted in a unique way, Garofalo said. The avors are in the beans. Its my job to get the avors out. His condence grew. I told my wife we could do this, he said. So he purchased a 20-pound drum roaster and put his route up for sale. It took two-and-a-half years to sell it, Garofalo said of his FedEx route. During that time I was perfecting our roasting. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Frank Garofalo, 45, roasts coffee at his company Golden Hills Coffee in Groveland on Wednesday. TOP: Garofalo holds green coffee beans. Bags of coffee beans sit near a wall waiting to be roasted. Groveland man knows beans about coffeeI thought I was buying the best coffee, Starbucks. I thought it was the best. But when I compared my cup to what I was drinking I thought, Wow, Ive been drinking burnt coffee this whole time.Frank Garofalo DAVID PIERSONLos Angeles TimesLOS ANGELES One of Californias top ambas sadors often comes lightly salted and travels in a vac uum-sealed can. Eat an al mond anywhere in the world and chances are that it was grown in the Golden State. California produces 82 percent of the globes al monds, harvesting about 800,000 acres of the tree nut across a 400-mile stretch from northern Tehama County to southern Kern County. Fueling the boom is robust foreign demand, par ticularly from emerging consumer markets like China and India, where the industry has been promot ing almonds as a healthful snack. About 70 percent of Cal ifornias almonds are sold overseas. That made the crunchy nut the No. 1 state agricultural export in 2012 at $2.5 billion. Thats 2 1/2 times more than wine, the second-most-valuable California agricultural export, according to the U.S. Cen sus Bureau. The U.S. is the 800-pound gorilla of the global almond industry, said Karen Halliburton Barber, assistant vice president and senior analyst for produce at Ra bobank, a leading agricultural lender. Theyre the dominant producer. The Almond Board of California forecasts that the state will harvest its third-largest crop this year at 1.85 billion pounds slightly less than last years 1.88 billion pounds. Thats more than three times what the state was BRIAN VAN DER BRUG / MCT Joe MacIlvaine, president of Paramount Farming Company, shows off buds on almond tree branches in Lost Hills, Calif., on September 9, 2013. MacIlvaine has been president of Paramount Farming Company since 1986. Global demand drives growth in almond production SEE ALMOND | E4 ALEX VEIGAAssociated PressU.S. homebuilders lost a little condence in the housing market this month but remain generally upbeat ahead of the spring home-selling next season. The National Associa tion of Home Builders/ Wells Fargo builder sentiment index released Thursday dipped to 56. Thats down from Decembers reading of 57, which was revised one point lower from its initial estimate. Readings above 50 indicate more builders view sales conditions as good, rather than poor. Builders view of current sales condi tions for single-family homes, their outlook for sales over the next six months and trafc by prospective buy ers each declined since December. Even so, the over all index is nine points higher than a year ago, reecting a stronger U.S. housing market. Rising home prices, historically low mort gage rates and signi cant pent-up demand will drive a continuing, gradual recovery in the year ahead, said David Crowe, the NAHBs chief economist. The spring buy ing and selling season kicks off next month, traditionally the time of the year that sets the tone for residential hiring and construction. Many builders, US homebuilder confidence dips in January GENE J. PUSKAR / AP A carpenter works on the roof of a town home in Robinson Township, Pa. The National Association of Home Builders releases the housing market index for January on Thursday.I been doin ne on Houston time When the sun sets on Copano Bay. I Like Texas by Pat GreenI recently heard a well-educated Texan talk about his home state seceding from the un ion. Floridians never talk about se ceding. Im not sure we ever joined. An drew Jackson prob ably took one look at Floridas impenetrable swamps, our alligators and mosquitoes and at the deant Semi noles ensconced in the muck and said, Lets push on to greener pastures. Florida and Texas share a remarkable size and breathtaking beauty. Driving the length of Florida, from Pensacola to Key West, or the width of Texas, from El Paso to Tyler, is a MARGARET McDOWELLGUEST COLUMNIST SEE BEANS | E2SEE CONFIDENCE | E2Texas and Florida keep taxes low, growth highSEE MCDOWELL | E2

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 Quality Inn rrfntbn nntnb nft bfnfnb frn $19900$16900tb rfSCHEDULED DEPARTURES EVERY SUNDAY. tb rfIP CASINO RESORT4 DAYS/3 NIGHTSwww.goclassictours.comBILOXI BOUND4 DAYS 3 NIGHTSBEAU RIVAGErffntb fnBest Western Historic rrfnTHE BIG EASYNEW ORLEANS5 DAYS, 4 NIGHTS7 MEALS/$15 FREE PLAYnttb ttft tt tt t ttbtt$49595$599 Singlebnnfbbfbrrn t tt CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Toward the tail end of that period, he was becoming depressed because he couldnt sell the route. But on his way home from Gainesville one day, he had a vision. I looked up to the sky and took a photo of clouds; they were almost like contrails, he said. It was shaped like my logo. The logo had been developed two years earlier after they asked their son Frank, then 9 years old, to come up with a name. He suggested Golden Valley Coffee and his parents loved the idea. But, that name was already taken. So Garofalo sketched something representative of where they lived hills, three to be exact. He suggested to Frank they call it Golden Hills Coffee. Those three hills represent my wife, my self and my son. He said. Fast forward to two years later, and the clouds looked like the three hills I sketched. I came home and showed my wife the photo and she could not believe it. She was blown away by it. Within a couple of weeks, Garofalo had a buyer for his FedEx route and the rest is history. The back porch of their Clermont home became too small and they found space at an industrial park off of State Road 50 at 1510 Max Hooks Rd., Ste. C, where they are still committed to roasting the nest coffees. All of their coffee is roasted there, usually twice a week. There is also a retail space, but most of their coffee is sold at coffee shops and bakeries in Central Florida, Gainesville or online. Roasting the beans is a complex process involving the right beans, bean origin, temperature and blends. Trade secrets, he said of his process. The origins we use and temperatures and controls, all thats kept secret. Its also very hands on. A lot of roasters use computers, he added. We use a hands-on approach. Things like humidity and tempera ture are always differ ent so it has to be adjusted each time we roast. I learned a lot by reading and practicing at home. His wife Tammi handles the website, billing and accounts receivable. On the days hes not roasting, Frank delivers his beans and seeks new accounts. We started with zero wholesale accounts, he said. I had to go out on the streets with my kit. The key was developing his own espresso blend. You wont get accounts without it, he said. Now I bring a shot of espresso and they see the difference and taste the differ ence. Garofalo also spent time perfecting the companys signature house blend. The website describes it as a unique blend of coffee avors that represent what Florida has to offer: Expect a bright cup with hints of grapefruit, lemon, lime and or ange on the nish. This was the most important blend, he said. I wanted the coffee to represent what Florida has to offer without adding any avors. He did it by blending different beans and picking different origins, and then blending it the right way. I had a goal in mind that was very unique, he said. It took six weeks. Finding the right espresso blend took longer. The espresso was more complex, he added. There was a lot going on. They offer 14 differ ent single origins and blends that they roast, though not always at the same time. And youll nd different beans and blends at different retail shops, depending on the clientele. Not everyone wants organic or fair trade coffee. Golden Hills Coffee Roasters purchases their green coffee beans from around the world in 132to 150-pound burlap sacks. It takes 15 to 17 minutes to roast about 12 pounds of coffee. Garofalo roasts less than the 20-pound capacity because it gives him greater control. The roaster gets to about 430 degrees and the beans are heated to about 350. They offer private or customized labels with customers logos on the bag. That has been good for business, he said. Garofalo continues looking for wholesale customers and also offers a fundraiser program, which is a presale program, meaning nothing is purchased in advance. Their shop is open from 8 / a.m. un til 4 / p.m., Monday through Friday. For information or to order coffee, go to www. goldenhillscoffee.com, call 352-217-2831 or go to their Facebook page. BEANS FROM PAGE E1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Garofalo checks on coffee beans while they are being roasted. particularly smaller rms, sell homes that will take months to build. While average U.S. mortgage rates for xed mortgages remain near historically low levels, they have risen more than a full percentage point since hitting record lows a year ago. That slowed sales during the summer and through much of the fall. Sales of new homes dipped 2.1 percent in November to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 464,000, according to the Commerce Depart ment. Still, the government revised sales g ures higher for the previous three months, an encouraging sign heading into the spring. The annual pace of new-home sales remains well below the 700,000 generally consistent with a healthy market. But overall, 2013 represented the best year for the housing market since the nancial crisis, and most economists expect sales and prices to keep rising this year. Builders broke ground on homes at a season ally adjusted annual rate of 1.09 million homes and apartments in November. That was the fastest pace since February 2008 and was 23 percent higher than in October. Crowe noted that many homebuilders face rising construction costs and the fallout from inaccurate home appraisals, which have sty mied some sales. That may be dimming the outlook for some of the respondents polled in the latest NAHB survey, which included responses from 349 builders. A measure of current sales conditions for single-family homes dipped one point to 62. Builders outlook for single-family home sales over the next six months slipped two points to 60, while a gauge of trafc by pr ospective buy ers fell three points from last month to 40. CONFIDENCE FROM PAGE E1 signicant excursion. The exquisite blue-white swirls in the late summer sky over Odessa and the west Texas plains are virtu ally indescribable, just as the painted colors of a winter sun set over the Gulf in Destin defy verbal denition. Texas is Sam Houston, Jim Bowie, the Alamo and the hill country. Florida is Disney World, The Everglades, A1A and white sand beaches. Texas, which currently enjoys a bustling economy, is electronics, airlines, cattle, cotton, lumber and big oil. Many Floridians are more interested in preventing oil from washing up on our shores than in drilling for it. Our economy is fueled by international trade, tourism, the space industry, agriculture and the military. The states also share a couple of similarities: One no state income tax. Two growing populations. Texas gener ates almost 9 percent of the U.S. GDP; Florida produces just under 6 percent. But Florida may pass New York in population this year (according to the Associated Press), and with 20 million residents will then trail only California and yes, Texas, in population. Seven states operate without a state income tax: Alaska, Flor ida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. Is it a coincidence that the economies in several of these states are booming? Maybe. The relationship between state taxes and overall economic health is a complex issue. Some Texans, for instance, complain that while Texas has no state income tax, residents are saddled with high property taxes instead. The Tax Foundation compiles a list of the states that pay the lowest total per capita income in state taxes. Alaska, at 6.4 per cent of income, is the lowest. Florida is fourth at only 7.4 per cent of income. As Elizabeth Malm, an economist at The Tax Foundation writes, a states ability to export its tax burden, or collect revenues from non-residents, is a key component in meeting state revenue requirements. Few states perform this function better than Florida. It also appears that states with low taxation are attracting new growth and new residents, as they must, to compete with other states in the new state taxation and growth paradigm.Margaret R. McDowell, a syndicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 Seven states operate without a state income tax: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming.

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties LILY LEUNGThe Orange County RegisterIn the depths of the Great Recession, Kathleen Schneider saw a nest egg she had built over decades shrink by more than 20 percent. The Fullerton, Calif., residents investment portfolio began to rebound last year, but the sharp decline taught her the need to diversify. So Schneider, 57, recently took out a portion of her re tirement savings and bought an Instant Imprints fran chise, which makes promotional items for businesses. Her shop opened in late November. The chains franchisees typically invest a total of $160,982 to $297,898 and pay an ongoing royalty fee of 6 percent, according to franchising data from Entrepre neur Media. So now Ive got control of whether I succeed or not, said Schneider, who also owns a separate IT business consulting rm. Her nan cial future is more tied to my being successful in the business than just the nancial markets. It is increasingly more common to see baby boom ers jump into self-employ ment. More than 23 percent of entrepreneurs who started companies in 2012, the latest year for which data is available, are ages 55 to 64. Thats a jump from 14 per cent in 1996, according to an analysis by the Ewing Mari on Kauffman Foundation, a Kansas City, Mo.-based nonprot that tracks startup activity. Motivations to kick off a business instead of nding a retirement getaway include replenishing retirement accounts, starting second careers or working for oneself. But those with dreams of starting new ventures in their 50s and 60s face chal lenges that go beyond the usual ones facing entrepre neurs. Theres about a 50/50 chance that a U.S. business will make it past the ve-year mark, based on 2013 Cen sus Bureau data. Its unclear whether the odds of success are better or worse for boom er-led startups. What is clear is that recovery from a failure could be more difcult. The business entry and exit are much closer together, said Michele Markey, vice president of the Kauffman Foundations FastTrac program, which trains entrepreneurs around the country. If you take a boomer thats 55, they dont have 20 to 30 years to recover (from) an up-and-down business or business mistakes. Acknowledging that, the Kauffman Foundation and AARP last year launched a program for baby boomers who want to explore entrepreneurship. Irvine, Calif., is among three cities piloting a 10week course, Kauffman Fast Trac New Venture for the Boomer Entrepreneur. Miami and New York City are the other locations. Organiz ers chose Irvine partly be cause of its proximity to oth er big population centers in Southern California, including San Diego and the Inland Empire, said Larry Kutch er, an Orange County, Calif., business owner leading the local course. Set to start Feb. 24, the lo cal program will cover topics such as coming up with business plans, rening elevator pitches and learn ing the value of networking. One likely discussion top ic is franchising, which is a popular model for older en trepreneurs because it of fers a companys established brand and support system. Thats what appealed to Schneider, who opened the promotional items store in Fullerton. Youre having a business with the support of suppliers and contacts but youre still running your own busi ness, she said. Lori Kewalram and her husband, Biju, both in their 50s and from the corporate world, also went the fran chise route. They recently bought the Huntington Beach, Calif., location of BrightStar Care, a nation al business that mainly pro vides medical and non-med ical help to the elderly. Kewalram, 53, used part of the couples retirement savings to nance the business, which she said reects her condence in the franchises reputation. BrightStar Care franchi sees typically invest $90,378 to $165,676 for a location and must pay 5 percent to 6 percent in ongoing royalties, franchising data from Entre preneur Media shows. A former IT professional, Kewalram said she launched the business to help the el derly while having the ability to do my own thing and be in control. And, like Schnei der, she saw her retirement savings take a hit during the last nancial downturn. But franchising isnt for everyone. Boomers have to think about how much mon ey they can afford to risk and how many years they plan to work. Markey, of Kauffman FastTrac, presents this hypothetical: Someone who is 55 and wants to retire in ve years is thinking about investing in a McDonalds franchise that will cost $1 million to $2 mil lion. Can you invest in that, get it up and running, be prot able and receive an invest ment back, plus whatever additional nancial benet that might be? Markey said. Time frame is a big consideration for their goals. Would-be franchisees generally have to sign multiyear agreements. If a franchiser goes under during that time, franchisees could lose all or most of their investments, said Don Sniegowski, who runs franchisee-advice web site Blue MauMau. Franchisees also could be on the hook for any future royalties. You can lose quite a bit, Sniegowski said. If youre 56, go into (a franchise) busi ness and lose all your life savings then youre in big trouble.Boomer entrepreneurs attempt to stage rebound JEBB HARRIS / MCT Owners Kathy Schneider and son, Steve Schneider, watch a banner roll off a large format printer at Instant Imprints in Fullerton, Calif. Associated PressWASHINGTON The Treasury Depart ment announced Thursday it plans to sell 410,000 shares of Ally Financial for $3 bil lion as part of its ongo ing effort to recoup the costs of the $700 billion nancial bailout. The shares will be offered in a private offer ing at $7,375 each. After the completion of the stock sale, the department said the U.S. government will have recovered about $15.3 billion, or 89 per cent, of the $17.2 bil lion it provided to Ally during the nancial crisis. The government will still hold about 37 percent of the bank holding companys stock. Ally Financial received a total of $17.2 billion in govern ment support during the nancial crisis. Ally, based in Detroit, makes loans to GM customers and nances dealer inventories. The government rst bailed out the com pany, then known as GMAC Inc., in late 2008 as part of the Bush ad ministrations aid to the auto industry. The Obama administration provided additional funding in May and December 2009. The company said in a statement the sale is a key step in the com panys plan to repay U.S. taxpayers in full for the money it received from the government bailout fund, the Troubled Asset Re lief Program. These actions, coupled with the strength of our ongoing busi ness, position Ally to complete its plans to exit TARP and to con tinue to build upon our thriving franchis es, Ally said in a state ment.Treasury sells $3 billion in Ally Financial stock

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Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Internal Medicine Practices BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! producing in the late 1990s. Experts are op timistic that the industry can maintain that sort of volume in the coming years. For eign demand is expect ed to increase. Competition should remain light. The main barriers to continued growth are access to land and tightening water supplies. Well run out of dirt and water before we run out of almond markets, said Daniel Sumner, director of the Agricultural Issues Center at University of California-Davis. The biggest of those worries is water. Almonds are a relatively thirsty crop, and farmers need to water them even during dry spells. California suffered its worst drought conditions in 90 years be tween January and May, leaving reservoirs dangerously low and state water allocations to farmers well below historical averages, according to the Bureau of Reclamation. The stingy water supplies resulted in smaller almonds this year. Water is a huge challenge, said Richard Waycott, chief executive of the state almond board. The group has partnered with the University of Califor nia-Davis to promote a variety of water conser vation plans using mi cro sprinklers and soil moisture monitoring systems. Growers are harvesting more almonds and using less water per acre than in years past. But the sheer acreage of Californias almond industry means water will remain a concern. Still, with almond prices nearly doubling in the last ve years to $2.58 a pound, its lit tle wonder that growers have been abandoning crops such as cotton and furiously planting almond trees. Theres twice as much almond acreage in California as there was two decades ago. Meanwhile, cotton acreage has dwindled to about 400,000 acres from 1.3 million acres over the same period. It feels like almonds became rock stars overnight, said Kar en Ross, secretary of the California Depart ment of Food and Ag riculture. But theyve been building in bits and pieces for years. I look at almonds as a great case study be cause they were very strategic and willing to make long-term investments. Central to that plan are nutritional research and clever marketing. The Almond Board of California has funded a number of studies, in cluding an October report in the European Journal of Clinical Nu trition showing that eating dry-roasted, lightly salted al monds could sate hunger without increasing body weight. Almonds are a major part of the farming portfolio of Beverly Hills, Calif., billionaires Stewart and Lynda Resnick, who own brands such as Wonderful Pistachios, Pom Wonder ful pomegranate juice and Halos mandarin. The couples Para mount Farming Co. has been expanding its al mond acreage in Kern and Madera counties to meet growing global demand for the tree nut. It farms 46,000 acres of almond or chards, a space the size of 13 Los Angeles Inter national airports that produces 6 percent of the states almonds. This is a natural place to grow al monds, said Joe MacIlvaine, president of Paramount Farming, surveying the com panys vast acreage in Lost Hills, a dusty at 50 miles northwest of Bakerseld, Calif. You need that Mediterranean-type climate or it wont work. That means warm and dry weather almost year round, and no frost during the crucial spring. Thats when the $4.8 billion indus try puts its faith in hon eybees to pollinate the pink-and-white owers blooming on the al mond trees. For Paramount, that requires hiring bee keepers to deploy near ly 3 billion buzzing insects. That has become increasingly dif cult and more expensive with the sudden and mysterious death of billions of bees since 2006, a phenomenon known as bee colony collapse disorder. Our crop is entirely dependent on them, MacIlvaine said. Harvesting isnt near ly as precarious, thanks to modern machinery. In the late summer, the orchards rumble with the sound of tree shak ers low-slung vehicles equipped with padded arms that rattle the tree trunks until they rain clouds of al monds and dust. The almonds are sent to a state-of-theart processing facility, which shells the nuts, checks them for de fects and then hand sorts them for different grades. The company is building a packaging and roasting plant part of its plan to sell more of its almonds directly to consumers as a packaged snack. About 40 percent of the companys almonds are sold to major food companies such as Kelloggs for use in prod ucts including cereal. Some of the nuts are also sold to Chi na, where annual consumption of Califor nia almonds has more than doubled in the last ve years to 208 million pounds, making it the top foreign destination for the California crop. The state almond board has an ofce in China, where it has in vested heavily, promoting the nut on billboards and in print and digital advertising as part of a youthful and healthy lifestyle. What bodes well for the industry is that al mond demand is also expanding in Europe and the U.S., shield ing it from dips in con sumption in any one place, said Halliburton Barber of Rabobank. They have a balance. Its more than just China, she said. Theres still great potential to keep growing. ALMONDFROM PAGE E1 BRIAN VAN DER BRUG / MCT Workers hand-sort almonds for defects after the nuts have passed through laser sorters at Paramount Farms in Los Hills, Calif. California produces 82 percent of the globes almonds. VIRGINIA BRIDGESThe News & ObserverDr. Isaac Porter is using his Google Plus prole page to build his brand, one post at a time. The whole key of it is just building my personal brand, our reputation, putting it out there when people are looking. If they see some of these signals, proles online, it can help them trust us more, said Porter, 35, owner and practicing physician at Lowry Porter Ophthalmology in Raleigh, N.C. A Google Plus user since early 2012, Porter also has Facebook and Twitter pages, but Google Plus is his busi ness and brand develop ment headquarters. Porter uses Google Plus Communities to discuss chal lenges and new procedures with other eye doctors and to learn about health care mar keting. He turns to Author ship to link his face and blue shirt and tie with his business results on a Google Search. And he uses Hangouts to make videos, interview a pa tient in England and talk to other experts across the U.S. One of the things that is good about Google Plus is every time you make a new post, it creates a new Web page just for that post, he said. And theres a possibility that that page itself will show up in Google Search results. Google Plus is a social lay er of Google that the company is weaving into all of its services, said Jesse Wojdy lo, a copywriter, Google Plus expert and owner of Wojdy lo Social Media and Content Writing in Chapel Hill, N.C. In essence, it is a way for people to share their thoughts, feelings and content across all Google prod ucts, Wojdylo said, which range from YouTube and an alytics to Gmail and paid ad vertising options. Launched in 2011, Google Plus has more than 300 million active monthly users, compared to 540 mil lion active monthly users of Google services, accord ing to statistics released last fall. Over the years, Google Plus users have evolved from tech geeks and social media marketers to brands build ing their own Google Plus empires, according to Mark Traphagen, senior director Small business owners turn to Google Plus to build brandSEE GOOGLE | E6

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, Jan. 19, the 19th day of 2014. There are 346 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Jan. 19, 1807, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Va. On this date: In 1764, John Wilkes was expelled from the British Parliament for seditious libel and obscenity (the former charge was for criticizing a speech delivered by King George III; the latter, for penning a pornographic parody of Alexander Popes Essay on Man). In 1853, Giuseppe Verdis opera Il Trovatore premiered in Rome. In 1861, Georgia became the fth state to secede from the Union. In 1937, millionaire Howard Hughes set a transcontinental air record by ying his monoplane from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J., in 7 hours, 28 minutes and 25 seconds. In 1942, during World War II, Japan invaded Burma (Myanmar). In 1944, the federal government relinquished control of the nations railroads to their owners following settlement of a wage dispute. In 1955, a presidential news conference was lmed for television for the rst time, with the permission of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. In 1966, Indira Gandhi was elected prime minister of India. In 1970, President Richard M. Nixon nominated G. Harrold Carswell to the Supreme Court; however, the nomination was defeated because of controversy over Carswells past racial views. In 1977, in one of his last acts of ofce, President Gerald R. Ford pardoned Iva Toguri DAquino, an American convicted of treason for making wartime broadcasts for Japan. In 1981, the United States and Iran signed an accord paving the way for the release of 52 Americans held hostage for more than 14 months. In 1992, German government and Jewish ofcials dedicated a Holocaust memorial at the villa on the outskirts of Berlin where the notorious Wannsee Conference had taken place.DEAR ABBY: My husband, George, and I have been married for 13 years. Last night he dropped a bombshell. He told me that while he loves me, he isnt happy. He assured me he has no inclination to divorce me, but he pretty much laid the entire reason for his unhappiness at my feet. I dont handle people well. I love George and our son, but I am most relaxed and comfortable when Im by myself. I dont neglect them. We do lots of stuff outside the house as a family. I have no close friends, and thats how I prefer it. Georges complaint is that I keep him from having friends. I have never tried to stop him. In fact, I have encour aged him to cultivate friendships and hang out with the guys, join groups, etc. He says he cant do that and leave me at home. I wouldnt mind his going out, but its nerve-racking for me to go. Abby, in 13 years I dont think I have ever looked George or my son in the eye. Its not something Im comfortable with. My husband knew how I was when he married me. What can I do? OKLAHOMA LONER DEAR LONER: You need to nd out why you are unable to look even the people closest to you in the eye. Eye contact is an important part of communication, and that you are unable to do it even with your child is of concern to me. There may be a psychological or neurological reason for it. While its ne for you to encourage your husband to socialize without you, its understandable that he would feel uncomfortable doing it all the time. He isnt a bachelor. Couples usually socialize together, and the women often initiate the arranging. If the root of your problem is a social anxiety disorder, there is help available for it. Your doctor may be able to refer you to a specialist. For the sake of your marriage and your family, please dont put it off. DEAR ABBY: Im thinking about marrying my longtime boyfriend, but Im hesitant because he wants me to change my last name. I want to keep my maiden name as my mother did. Most of the women I look up to in my life kept their names. My boyfriend says my wanting to keep my name tells him I am not committed. He says hed be really hurt if I did it. I feel that retaining my name is the ulti mate in female empowerment. The tradition of women changing their last name goes back to when we were treated as property and not educated. What do you think I should do? FEMALE FIRST, WIFE SECOND DEAR FEMALE FIRST: Women retain their maiden names for a variety of reasons: Many do it because they are established in their careers when they marry and feel a name change would be confusing. Others prefer to keep their personal and professional lives separate. This shouldnt be a contest of wills, and you should not change your name to prove the depth of your commitment. Your boyfriend appears to be very traditional in his thinking. Stop for a moment and ask yourself what that would mean for your future if you mar ry him. Would he be willing to compromise if you offer to hyphenate your name with his? If he isnt, and you feel giving up your name would make you feel like chattel, then per haps you should look for a man whose beliefs are closer to your own.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014: This year you often go back and forth from being serious to whimsical. People act as if they dont know which facet of your personality they will encounter. Try to explain more of what you are thinking about. A partner and/or friends would appreciate the insight. If you are single, you will need a full year to determine whether the person you have met is the right one for you. If you are attached, the two of you have a more dynamic interaction than you have had in a while. Enjoy the excitement! AQUARIUS has interesting ideas about money and how to use it. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could have an errand or two to complete before getting together with others for brunch. Note that you will have a tendency to go overboard, so a little self-discipline will go far. You might feel slightly off-kil ter part of the afternoon. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your creativity will come up with a solution to an issue that has been caused by sudden change. You might be gaining new insight about a loved one. Let this person be who he or she is. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you feel the need to stay close to home, do. Others might express their concern at your unusually low prole. You simply might need a break from the hectic pace. Indulge yourself. You will get a little time off before the pace picks back up. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You will want to become more aware of a special person in your life. You might assume that you already know this person, but he or she seems to be changing right in front of you. You could be quite sur prised by what you see. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Choose relaxing plans, as you are entering a very busy few weeks. You will want to have the energy to be receptive to others. You already might be getting a sense of what is about to happen. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Share more of what is happening with someone you care about. This person might not be sure of his or her role in this situation, and you might not know, either. A discussion will help both of you gure out what to do. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You are likely to become even more serious than you have been as of late. A friend or new associate will be a breath of fresh air, as his or her presence will give you a break from your tasks. Use the morning to get some R and R. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You have a lot on your mind, and youll be determined to discuss what you are considering with several friends. They might not be as comfortable with your ideas as you are, so realize that their feedback could reect that discomfort. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Dont allow a parent or older friend to push you too hard to join him or her today. You might have some very special plans with a loved one. Refuse to take away from this scheduled time together. A child could surprise you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Reach out to someone whom you care about but often dont visit. Arrange to Skype with each other, or make plans to visit soon. Even established friendships need nurturing. Be smart. Make time for this person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Enjoy going to brunch with a loved one. You might be startled by what someone around you does. Later, you will laugh about the incident. Communication needs to be spontaneous, no matter who you are speaking with. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)Call a friend you have not spoken with in some time. Your sense of humor will take the edge off if he or she makes a startling statement or judgment. You are more creative than you might believe. Listen to news that comes forward. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR Woman prefers solitary life, despite husbands protests TODAY IN HISTORY

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 of online marketing at Internet market ing rm Stone Temple Consulting. While networks like Facebook work better for keeping in touch with your existing customers, Google Plus provides unique opportunities to reach out to prospects who never would nd you there, Traphagen wrote in an email. And businesses should not ignore the power of Google Plus to inuence Google Search, where their po tential customers are looking for what they have to offer. Google Plus is par ticularly benecial for businesses, such as dentists, doctors and landscapers, who are on a constant quest to elevate their brand and search ranking in a competitive environ ment, Wojdylo said. While most small businesses can benet from using Google products, Traphagen wrote, they should not put all their hopes into one Goo gle basket. Unexpected changes to a service or algorithm could devas tate companies that are too dependent. They should always be developing other ways of reaching new customers, such as paid advertising, email campaigns, Traphagen wrote. Many small business owners are using Googles products. Heres a breakdown. COMMUNITIES: Wojdy lo likened Google Communities to a message board in which various parties contribute to a conversation on one specic topic. Researching, connecting and commenting in meaningful Communities will help brands and owners increase their presence in oth er peoples circles, Goo gles version of following someone, Wojdylo said. Communities can be an extension of a busi ness page, Wojdylo said. For example, a lawn care business could cre ate a community on lawn care in its region and invite people to par ticipate and comment. So its not just you blasting out, Hey, I of fer this service, he said. Its your customers and potential clients, or anybody, coming in there saying, Hey, I have an issue with my grass dying in April. What do I do? Every Google Plus post has its own URL, which means useful question and answer sessions can be posted elsewhere online. HANGOUTS: Hangouts enable conversations via text and video. Hangouts allow users to schedule Hangouts on Air and have vid eo conversations over the Internet with up to nine people. The live video can be promoted on a dedicated page and will become a shareable YouTube video. Think of it as a Skype within Facebook, Wojdylo said. Small businesses can use Hangouts to answer questions, spread the word about a new product or procedure or create commercials. Best Buy created a Hangout for a Black Friday buy-a-thon, where the company announced a new sale item every ve minutes. HELPOUTS: In Novem ber, Google rolled out Helpouts, which allows users to get and give help over live video. Owners can use Hel pouts for a quick an swer to a question on topics like xing a ga rage or removing a computer virus. Users can choose ser vices based on the providers qualications, prices and reviews, and can connect instantly or set up an appointment. GOOGLEFROM PAGE E4 TRAVIS LONG / MCT Dr. Isaac Porter does an eye examination on Neville Wood at his clinic in Raleigh, N.C.

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r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Careand Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson BRADY VS. MANNING, CHAPTER 15, SPORTS, B1 ONE OF A KIND: Montverde Academy dedicates its Cruyff Court A3 W. VA. WATER: Residents still wary of drinking it A5 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, January 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 19 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C3 COMICS INSIDE CROSSWORDS C4 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C4 MONEY E1 NATION A5 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES C1 WORLD A7 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 67 / 42 Warmer with sunshine $1 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Roger LaPierre works on his vintage hydroplane Miss Dinomytes during the Winter Thunder Regatta on Saturday in Tavares. Joshua McMiller, a 4th-grade student at Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School in Leesburg, performs Lift Every Voice and Sing as his oat stops at the parade stand at the Martin Luther King Jr. parade on Saturday in downtown Leesburg. MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL AUSTIN FULLER Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com When 70-year-old Miami resident Skip Gillam got his rst boat at age 18, he named it Last Blast because he was expecting to join the military and thought it could be his last one. His eighth boat, and seventh he named Last Blast, has been running demon stration laps this week end at the Tavares Win ter Thunder Regatta, with his stepson Paul Mezyk in the drivers seat. The boat features the words and I mean it! beneath its name. One of Gillams pre vious boats held the straightaway world re cord for a 280 hydro plane from 1982 to 2008 with a speed of 124.123 mph. Gillam said the record was improved by 11 mph when his boat set it. Gillam said that while he built the boat, the driver for the world-record run was Andy Coker. Gillam said the boat being demonstrated this weekend is a 2009 replica of a 1953 Jersey Speed Skiff, complete with modern day rac ing trim. The Tavares Win ter Thunder Regat ta, which had practice runs open to the public on Friday and demon strations on Saturday, will continue today from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Wooton Park. Registrar Gerri Prus ko, who is treasurer of the Classic Race Boat Association, estimated between 200 to 250 peo ple came through the gate before 2:30 p.m. on Saturday and she ex pected the event would nish Saturday with an attendance of 300 spec tators. Theres a steady stream, theyre coming and going and people who are coming are en joying the event, Prus ko said. WINTER THUNDER REGATTA ON DISPLAY TAVARES LaPierre takes Miss Dinomytes out for a spin. The boat peaked at approximately 140 mph, but LaPierre said it could race at 170 mph. SEE BOATS | A2 Parade attendees undaunted by cold weather MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Snuggled up in coats, wool caps and gloves, hundreds of onlookers braved the chilly temperatures Saturday morn ing for the citys annual Martin Luther King Jr. parade. The 60-plus entries fea tured church groups, elected ofcials, civic organizations, school leaders and law enforce ment, as well as pageant win ners many of whom, despite the weather, rode in shiny con vertibles. Wrapped in a heavy coat and scarf and trying to shield her self from the wind, onlooker Marlene Nelson said the cold weather was not going to keep her away. Its a small price to pay to honor a man who did so much for us, Nelson said. LEESBURG SEE PARADE | A2 More online For more on this story, see www.dailycommercial.com. MICHAEL J. MISHAK Associated Press PALM BEACH New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie left a political scandal back home as he raised money Sat urday for fellow Re publicans in Florida. As chairman of the Republican Gov ernors Association, Christie was headlin ing a series of events over the weekend to help Floridas gover nor, Rick Scott, and the state party. The private events were giving Christie his rst chance to test his political viability out side New Jersey since a scandal erupted over an apparent political payback scheme led to massive trafc jams last fall when lo cal access lanes to the George Washington Bridge were closed. Christie was re-elected governor last November and is considered a po tential contender for the Republican nom ination for president in 2016. Two promi nent Florida Repub licans former Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Christie circus pulls into Fla. CHRISTIE NJ governor in Palm Beach to help Scott, state GOP LARA JAKES AP National Security Writer WASHINGTON President Barack Obamas orders to change some U.S. surveillance prac tices put the burden on Congress to deal with a national security controversy that has alarmed Americans and outraged foreign allies. Yet he avoided major action on the practice of sweep ing up billions of phone, email and text mes sages from across the globe. In a speech at the Justice Department on Fri day, Obama said he was placing new limits on the way intelligence ofcials access phone re cords from hundreds of millions of Americans Obama calls on Congress to deal with surveillance SEE NSA | A2 SEE CIRCUS | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 HOW TO REACH US SATURDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 3-2-7 Afternoon .......................................... 1-3-1 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-4-6-9 Afternoon ....................................... 0-7-3-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY FRIDAY FANTASY 5 ............................. 2-4-11-17-24 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $7.50 4 of 5 wins $70 5 of 5 wins $47,327.94 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pam.fenni more@dailycommercial.com. Most participants were wearing shirts, carrying posters or sitting atop oats adorned with pic tures of the slain civ il rights leader, as well as other black icons such as President Obama and Nelson Mandela. All the while, Kings speeches could be heard as his voice boomed from speakers set up for the occasion. A Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School oat stopped in front of the parade stand, where 4th-grade student Josh ua McMiller belted out the Lift Every Voice and Sing often referred to as The Negro National Anthem. The Golden Triangle Democratic Club, one of a number of Demo cratic organizations in the parade, had mem bers dressed in caps and gowns with a sign ask ing people to Advance the Dream through edu cation They stopped several times on the pa rade route to dance in or der to attract onlookers. Its a good way to live his dream, said club member Sandy Martin of the education theme. There were plenty of slogans associated with King, unity and human rights that were plastered on posters, including To gether we stand, divided we fall, Make the dream a reality, We are endowed by our Creator with cer tain unalienable rights, Dreams do come true, and I Have a Dream. Law enforcement of cers on circling motorcy cles and others on horse back performed a short drill exercise in front of the reviewing stand. A re truck carried a cou ple representing King and his wife, Coretta. Parade marchers threw candy to the children, who were thrilled by the attention. With temperatures hovering in the high 40s at the 11a.m. start time, Chris Hamilton, one of the event organizers, said the weather had lit tle effect on the partici pation. We still had a few walk-ups, said Hamil ton, referring to groups who decided Saturday morning to join the pa rade. The grand marshal of this years commemo ration parade was longtime Leesburg area res ident Maggie Brown. Honorary marshals in cluded Leesburg City Commissioner David Knowles, Pastor Ken Scrubbs and Sumter County Commissioner Douglas Gilpin. PARADE FROM PAGE A1 There were concerns Saturday morning that winds would force some boats not to demon strate because of safety concerns, but Bill John, the president of the Clas sic Race Boat Associa tion, said conditions had improved enough as the day went on for all boats to perform. Theyre all running to day. We had some cancel lations and we did cancel two heats, John said. John said on Friday Ta vares is the best location in the country for a vin tage race boat event. Bill Neron (has) done a great job developing this, John said. According to Prusko, approximately 18 boats would be participating at the regatta, but John added the number could grow with two more boats on the way. He said some participants can celled because of sick ness. Roger LaPierre, a sea sonal resident who lives in Tavares six months each year, has demon strated Miss Dino mytes, a 1985 Hydro plane that won a 1988 world championship. LaPierre bought the boat in 2007 and said the championship was won by Howie Benns. He said his boat can reach about 170 mph, but he would only be driving it around 140 mph. A boat that was a mem ber of the event was in volved in an accident Friday evening, but the accident did not take place during the regat ta and the boat was not participating in activ ities authorized by the event, according to John and Bill Neron, the direc tor of economic develop ment and grants for the city of Tavares. The two people on the boat airlifted to Orlando Regional Medical Center and remained conscious as of Saturday morning, according to Prusko. She did not know the extent of their injuries. The Orlando Senti ne l previously reported three drivers died in ac cidents in 2012. According to John, the group reformed af ter those accidents, but speeds were lowered and now run under the rules and regulations of the American Power Boat As sociation. BOATS FROM PAGE A1 and was moving to ward eventually strip ping the massive data collection from the gov ernments hands. His promises to end government storage of its collection of data on Americans telephone calls and require ju dicial review to exam ine the data were met with skepticism from pri vacy advocates and some lawmakers. But Obama has made it nearly impossible for re luctant leaders in Con gress to avoid making some changes in the U.S. phone surveillance they have supported for years. Obama admitted that he has been torn be tween how to protect privacy rights and how to protect the U.S. from terror attacks what ofcials have called the main purpose of the spy programs. The challenge is get ting the details right, and that is not simple, he said. His speech had been an ticipated since former Na tional Security Agency an alyst Edward Snowden made off with an estimat ed 1.7 million documents related to surveillance and other NSA operations and gave them to sever al journalists around the world. The revelations in the documents touched off a public debate about whether Americans want ed to give up some priva cy in exchange for intelli gence-gathering on terror suspects. The president said his proposals should give the American peo ple greater condence that their rights are be ing protected, even as our intelligence and law enforcement agencies maintain the tools they need to keep us safe. The NSA says it does not listen in on the phone calls or read the Internet messages with out specic court orders on a case-by-case basis. But intelligence ofcials do collect specic infor mation about the calls and messages, such as how long they lasted, to try to track communica tions of suspected terror ists. Plans to end the sweep of phone records have been building momen tum in Congress among both liberal Democrats and conservative Repub licans. Congressional leadership and the chair men of the intelligence committees who for years have signed off on the programs have op posed dramatic changes. Obamas order signals that the phone program must be overhauled, and lawmakers called his speech a welcome rst step. It is now time for Con gress to take the next step by enacting legislation to appropriately lim it these programs, said Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., a member of the House Judiciary Committee. The leaders of the Senate and House in telligence committees, which have proposed far less sweeping legislation, threw the responsibility back to Obama. We encourage the White House to send leg islation with the pro posed changes so they can be fully debated, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., said in a coolly worded statement. NSA FROM PAGE A1 Marco Rubio also are viewed as potential candidates. In Orlando on Satur day, hundreds of do nors attended the fund raiser where Christie presented Scott with a $2.5 million check from the RGA for a political committee thats help ing Scotts campaign, according to the asso ciation. Then Christie joined about two doz en guests at the Palm Beach home of Jose Pepe Fanjul Jr., exec utive vice president of Florida Crystals, one of the nations largest sug ar producers. Christie didnt ad dress the bridge scan dal during his visit to Fanjuls home, accord ing to guests who spoke to The Associated Press We know hes going to get through it and hes going to come out stronger, said William J. Diamond, who at tended the event. The question wasnt raised because, quite frankly, none of us are really interested, said Geoffrey Leigh, another guest. The main thing is: Has he got the abili ty? Has he got the com prehension? These are the things which are im portant. These are the things which people vote for. Do they have condence in the man? Anita Mitchell, chair woman of the Palm Beach County Repub lican Party and among those at Fanjuls home, said Christie has moved on. Hes doing what hes supposed to be do ing, she said. I think most people are saying unless we nd out any thing else, we take him at his word. In response to the scandal, Christie has apologized and red a top aide, and told re porters he had no knowledge or involve ment in the matter. Still, with investiga tions moving ahead, the issue could follow him for some time and cause consternation for his nancial backers. Many Republicans have come to Chris ties defense and cred ited him with tak ing responsibility for the scandal, although some GOP leaders say his future will depend on whether his account of what happened proves accurate. Rick Wilson, a Flori da-based GOP consul tant, said donors hes spoken with feel Chris ties rising star was tainted by the contro versies. The jury is denitely now out, he said. Hes gone from an A-plus to a B. Hes not going to be the presidential nom inee in waiting. Were in a watch-and-see phase. Democrats have tried to use the bridge scan dal to tarnish Christie. Backed by local elect ed ofcials, Rep. Deb bie Wasserman Schul tz, D-Fla., who leads the Democratic Na tional Committee, held a news conference near Christies Orlan do fundraiser to tie the New Jersey governor to Scott, one of the most vulnerable incumbents in the country. Republican governors have been touting them selves as the grown-ups and the ones that have the ability to lead us for ward, she said in an in terview. The guy they chose as their leader is Chris Christie, who has been characterized as a maniacal bully by Repub licans and who was will ing to take out retribution against not the elected of cials who wouldnt en dorse him but ... his own constituents. Another fundrais er was set to take place Saturday at the Fort Lauderdale home of Bill Rubin, the presi dent of a lobbying rm and a longtime friend of Scotts. On Sunday, Christie was sched uled to attend fund raisers in Palm Beach and meet with major nancial supporters at a gathering organized by Ken Langone, the bil lionaire co-founder of Home Depot. He had urged the governor to consider a late entry into the 2012 presiden tial race. Christie faced a new political problem back home. Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer alleged Saturday that his ad ministration withheld millions of dollars in Superstorm Sandy re covery grants from her city. CIRCUS FROM PAGE A1 CAROLYN KASTER / AP President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks about National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance on Friday at the Justice Department in Washington. The president called for ending the governments control of phone data from millions of Americans.

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT MOUNT DORA Ron Seggis Greatest Hits Live set for today The Ron Seggi show, Greatest Hits Live will be in Mount Dora this weekend for a matinee performance at 3 p.m.today at the Mount Dora Community Theatre Tunes from the 50s, 60s and 70s, from the greats including Frank Sinatra, Elvis, Ray Charles and oth ers, will be featured. Tickets are $15 in advance, at www.mountdoraevents.com, or at the door for $20. MOUNT DORA Friends of the Library 28th annual Used Book Sale set Friends of the Library 28th an nual Used Book Sale will take place on Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the W.T. Bland Public Library, at 1995 N. Donnelly St., in Mount Dora. Members of the Friends of the Library can attend a special preview sale from 5 to 7 p.m., on Thursday. Numerous books, both hardback and paperback, CDs, videos, re cords and more will be available at the sale. Funds raised support the chil drens programs. For information, call the library at 352-735-7180, option 5. TAVARES Lake County Department of Health to close on Monday All Florida Department of Health in Lake County ofces will be closed Monday in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. All ofces will reopen on Tuesday Tuesday with regularly scheduled hours. As in all medical emergencies, res idents needing immediate assis tance should dial 911. EUSTIS Governmental offices to close on Monday All ofces at Eustis City Hall and Parks and Recreation will be closed on Monday in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Scheduled rent als of Parks & Recreation facilities are not affected by this holiday closure. The Eustis Memorial Library will be closed today and Monday. Garbage, yard trash and recy cling services provided by Waste Management will not be affected by this closure. CLERMONT Animal Rescue Dice Run scheduled for Feb. 1 The Animal Rescue Dice Run will take place Feb. 1 to help raise aware ness and funds for the South Lake Animal League, a no kill shelter. The event begins and ends at Stormy Hill Harley-Davidson, 2480 U.S. Highway 27, in Clermont. Participants will register at the dealership at 10 a.m. Food and beverages by Beef O Bradys, vendors, music by LostNfound, games for prizes by emcee, Radical Randy. For information, call 352-243-7111. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff report Lake Countys Ani mal Services Division has temporarily suspended the use of the night-drop kennels because of a ra bies alert issued last week in the Leesburg area. Residents sometimes use the kennels to drop off strays or give up pets for adoption after regu lar business hours, Cyndi Nason, division manager, Lake County Animal Ser vices, said in a press re lease. Because of the public safety threat, stray ani mals left in the night-drop that are not reclaimed will be euthanized in accor dance with Health De partment Rabies Alert guidelines, she said. Animal Services asks that the public drop off animals only during reg ular hours, which are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. 6 p.m., and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. 4 p.m., so they can identi fy where the animal origi nated and its vaccination status. All animals in the shelter must be current on their rabies vaccine to be adopted. Residents and visitors in Lake County should be aware that rabies is pres ent in the wild animal population and domes tic animals are at risk if not vaccinated, said Eli sha Pappacoda, public in formation ofcer for the county. TAVARES Rabies alert closes night-drop kennels RABIES ALERT BOUNDARIES Alert issued for 60 days after rabid raccoon was found. North Lake Grifn South Lake Harris East Lake Grifn-Lake Harris 441 connector West Canal Street SEE ALERT | A6 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com One brother was tak en to the hospital with a critical gunshot wound to the head and anoth er was detained by po lice and later released on Saturday after an early morning shoot ing at a Leesburg con venience store. Leesburg police so far have not determined a motive in the shoot ing of 24-year-old Josh ua Faile but said they believe the Leesburg brothers were the only people involved. LEESBURG Man shot, cops have no motive Halifax Media The ght over which hospitals will in Florida treat the most seriously ill patients saw a new player emerge this month. A national conservative group has started a media blitz that is hitting area airwaves and the Internet in support of new trauma centers. The 60 Plus Association Inc. warns in its $250,000 ad campaign that out-oftown hospitals, including UF Health Shands Hos pital, are suing to shut down badly needed Flori da trauma centers that of fer specialized care to the most medically needy. The list of targeted Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) trauma centers includes the one at Ocala Regional Med ical Center that opened just over a year ago, and serves Lake and Sumter residents. They want to pull the plug on life-saving trau ma care, says one Inter net and radio ad. Dont let them put their bottom line ahead of our lives. 60 Plus, based in Alexan dria, Va., touts itself as a non-partisan seniors ad vocacy group with a free enterprise, less govern ment, less taxes approach OCALA Trauma center conflict heats up SEE TRAUMA | A5 SEE MOTIVE | A6 Staff report Children of parents receiving life and job skills training in Cler mont will soon have a safe place to play at the New Beginnings Learn ing and Development Center. The Leadership Lake Class of 2013, which graduated last May, has donated nearly $7,500 so that New Beginnings can build a commer cial-grade playground at its facility at 792 East Montrose St. An addi tional $1,000 was do nated to install the tele phone system in the center. The new playground will feature a rock wall, slide and swings and will be built in the area adjacent to the center. The Leadership Training center gets playground SEE PLAY | A6 AUSTIN FULLER / DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, US Rep. Daniel Webster, Florida Sen. Alan Hays, Jeanne Hays, Florida Rep. Larry Metz attend the dedication ceremony of the Montverde Academy Cruyff Court, the rst of its kind in the United States. AUSTIN FULLER Staff Writer austinfuller@dailycommercial.com A Cruyff Court was ded icated on Saturday at Montverde Academy and local dignitaries were on hand to witness the cere mony. U.S. Rep. Daniel Web ster, Florida Sen. Alan Hays, and Florida Rep. Larry Metz were among those attending the cer emony of new facility a small soccer eld which is the only one of its kind in the United States. I think a lot of things that are done here at Montverde Academy are unique and Im not sur prised, said Webster, who represents congressional District 10. They kind of push the bubble...I appre ciate it. Hays, who represents Florida District 11, said he came to learn more about the new facility and to show support for the school. This is truly a hidden gem, Hays said. Hays believes athlet ics are part of getting a well-rounded education. Im interested in to days young people and the vehicle, the best vehi cle to prosperity, is a good education, he said. Metz, who represents District 32 in the Florida House of Representatives, which includes Leesburg and south Lake County, said he thought it would be a unique experience to see the rst Cruyff Court in the country. I was intrigued by it, frankly. Im all for having facilities for kids to use after school, where they can learn teamwork and character development, Metz said. Montverde Academy has taken the lead here to partner with the Cruyff Foundation to have the rst Cruyff Court in America and I didnt want to miss that. Dr. Kasey Kesselring, Montverde Academys headmaster, said con struction of the court was funded in co-opera tion between the Cruyff Foundation and the school itself. It cost about $150,000. Its obviously very unique because its the only one in the United States. It ts very well with our mission as a school as far as our commitment to the community, Kes selring said. This whole project is designed to be a community service-driv en project. Mike Potempa, the schools athletic direc tor and soccer coach, said the court will be open to the public. Cruyff Court first of its kind in US MONTVERDE Miniature soccer field designed for youths of all ages, funded by Montverde Academy, Cruyff Foundation SEE CRUYFF | A7

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 OBITUARIES William (Bill) Entwistle William (Bill) En twistle of Leesburg sud denly passed away Jan uary 14th at the age of 84. Born in Syracuse, New York on August 19, 1929, Pops the Great (PTG), as he was af fectionately known by his immediate family, was a devoted husband and lov ing father. He is sur vived by his wife Janet of 55 years, his son Bill, Jr. (Chan tal) of Pembroke Pines, FL, and daughters Kit ty (Fred) of Pensacola, FL, Amy (Derek) of West Palm Beach, FL, Julie (Jeff) of Bear, DE and his grandchildren: Jennifer, Jackie, Matt, Ryne, Kait lyn, Derek, Brad, Kel ly, Riley, Jordan, Jarrod and great-grandchil dren Jackson, Hailee, and Brody. Bill grew up in Syracuse, graduating from Christian Broth ers Academy. Right out of school, he followed in his fathers footsteps and began his long ca reer in the golf busi ness. He also served in the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1954. In 1958, he married Janet Billy of Syracuse. Bill spent a lifetime in the golf in dustry making friends all over the world through the game he loved. He passed the love of the game to his children and grand children. With his dry sense of humor, Bill was a practical jokester, loved sharing stories of his life and nick naming his family and close friends. A view ing will be held for fam ily and friends on Mon day, January 20th from 3:30-5:00 p.m. at the Al len J. Harden Funeral Home, 1800 N. Donnel ly Street, Mount Dora, FL. A Funeral Mass will be said on Tuesday, Jan uary 21st at 9:00 A.M. at St. Patrick Catho lic Church, 6803 Old Hwy 441 South, Mount Dora, FL. The family is requesting that in lieu of owers or other gifts, that donations be made on his behalf to the Florida Golf Course Su perintendents Associa tion Scholarship Fund. Donations may be sent to Bill Entwistle Jr., 2211 NW 101 Terrace, Pem broke Pines, FL 33026. Arthur Laneau Arthur Laneau Born Sept. 18th 1925 in Bos ton, Mass. Died Jan 14th 2014 at home in Leesburg, Fl. Survived by: WifePauline SonsKenneth (Sandy), Ste phen, & Douglas (Lin da), DaughtersSusan Morgan, & Bonnie Kel ly (Billy) BrothersRichard, Robert Sis terMimi Nickerson 13 grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren Worked as National Sales Man ager in New England, Retired from Halifax Country Club (Presi dent) in Halifax, Mass. Memorial Service Sat Jan 25th at 3PM in Lake Yale Estates Clubhouse Joe P. JP Wilds, Jr. Joe P. JP Wilds, Jr., 68 of Leesburg was born February 4, 1945 and died January 17, 2014. He was born in Leesburg, FL and lat er moved to Vero Beach where he lived and worked before re turning to Leesburg in 1991. He was a protes tant and attended the Christian Worship Cen ter in Center Hill, FL. Mr. Wilds is survived by his sons: Randy (Cathy) Wilds of Orlan do, FL and Gary (Deb bie) Wilds of North Car olina; 6 grandchildren; sisters: Betty (David) Scott of Webster, FL, Maggie West of Lees burg, FL and Louise (Julian) Penn of Lady Lake, FL; and a broth er Danny (Margaret) Wilds of Leesburg, FL. A visitation will be held in the Chapel of Beyers Funeral Home in Leesburg from 11 a.m 1 p.m. on Tuesday January 21, 2014 with a Funeral Service to fol low the visitation be ginning at 1 PM. A com mittal service will follow and interment will be at Lone Oak Cemetery, Leesburg, FL. Condo lences may be left at www.beyersfuneral home.com, Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory in charge of all arrangements. George E. Kuhn George E. Kuhn, 87, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, January 16, 2014. Born in Louisville, KY, he graduated from Uni versity of Louisville, he married Helen Rose (Avery) of New Alba ny, IN January 16, 1954, George passed on their 60th anniversary. They have 4 children, Lisa, Christopher, Eric Kuhn and Helene Kuhn Nick ey. George served in the US Army in WWII and the Air Force in Korea. He worked for A&P Tea Co, KY Dept. of Men tal Health, Schenley In dustries, the Social Se curity Administration. His other activities in clude U of L Chess Club, PISHA, Germany Philatelic Society, Hap py Hoe downers Square dance Club, Charter member and author of the by-laws of the Lake County Cultural Af fairs Council, 1995-96. Selected as one of the original Commentators for Catholic Church in Kentucky, a Lector at St. Pauls Catholic Church from 1969-85, also served as train er for new Lectors and scheduler for week end services, Commis sioned Special Minister of the Eucharist since 1985, was awarded the Father William Kil lion Volunteer Award in 2011 along with Hel en. Joined the Rota ry Club of Leesburg in 1970, serving as Presi dent 1977-79, Charter President of Leesburg Sunrise Rotary 198183, Charter President of Leesburg Sunset Rota ry 1984-85, Governor of Rotary District 6980 in 1997-98, District Dele gate to Rotary Council on Legislation in 2004, Served on district com mittee to organize Ro tary Clubs in Wildwood 1975, Lady Lake 1996 and Lady Lake Area 2003. Friends may call Monday, January 20th from 5 to 7 pm at the Beyers Funeral Home Chapel, Leesburg, where Parish Prayers will be at 7 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be Tuesday, January 21st at 8:30 am at St. Pauls Catholic Church with Fr. Mark Wajda ofci ating. Burial follow in Florida National Cem etery, Bushnell. In lieu of owers, you may di rect your memorials to Cornerstone Hospice, 2445 Lane Park Road, Tavares, FL 32778 of St. Pauls Catholic School, 1330 Sunshine Ave. Leesburg, FL 34748. Online condolences and complete obituary information may be left or read at www.beyers funeralhome.com Lois Jean Hoke Bitner Lois Jean Hoke Bit ner of Yalaha, FL died on Dec. 25, 2013 at the age of 89. She was born on August 31, 1924 in Acme, PA to the late Wade S. Hoke and Emma Shyeiger Hoke. Lois was the last sur viving member of her family. She was educat ed in the Mount Pleas ant Township Schools and graduated from Hurst High School in 1942 where, bless ed with a lovely soprano voice, sang in various musi cals. Lois also sang for years as a soloist and in the church choir at the Acme Methodist Church. In addition to her parents, Lois was preceded in death by her beloved husband: Clyde J. Bitner in May of 2013, brothers; Milton Wade, Harold, Vernon, Clair, Leon, Donald and her foster brother Jack. She was also pre ceded by sister; Arta Gale, and Ruby. She is survived by a number of nieces and nephews. A memorial Service will be held in Florida at the Gloria Dei Luther an Church in Leesburg on Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 11:00 a.m.. Inurn ment will take place in the Gloria Dei crema tion garden. There will also be a memorial ser vice held back home at the Acme Meth odist Church on Sat urday, Feb. 1, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Page-Theus Funeral Home And Cremation Services www.pagetheus.com DEATH NOTICES Donna M. Colwell Donna M. Colwell, 68, of Tavares died on Friday, Jan. 17, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations. Walter Hixenbaugh Walter Hixenbaugh, 89, of Leesburg died Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Protect and Serve Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com Shoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLEESBURG 365-6442Sleep through your Dental Appointment The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for paym ent for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the a dvertisement for treatment.License# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hrIV SEDATION: FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 Value*x-rays not includedFinancing Available Dr. Vaziri & Staff IN MEMORY ENTWISTLE BITNER

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 Lake & Marion CountiesLake County (321) 806-2074 Marion County (352) 610-3018 The Quilting Guild of The Villages FLpresentsMARKETPLACE 2014Friday, January 24 & Saturday, January 25 from 9am to 4pm 30 vendors. Shops from six states in one location. Supplies & Equipment: Quilting, Sewing, Fiber Arts, Yarn, Needlework, plus Make & Takes and Basket Mania Raffle. Food Vendors AvailableWildwood Community Center600 County Road 139 Wildwood, FL 34785More at www.QGOTV.org (352) 787-3013CALL TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT TODAY!Box Office HoursMonday-Friday 9:00am-1:00pm(also 1 hour before show time)$18 Adult/$9 StudentShow TimesAll Fridays @ 8pm Sat. Jan. 18 & 25 @ 8pm Sat. Feb 1 @ 2pm All Sundays @ 2pmMELONPATCHTHEATREpresentsSix Dance Lessons In Six Weeksby Richard Alfieri January 17, 18, 19; 24, 25, 26; 31, February 1, 2, 2014Show contains adult language and themes. to seniors issues. As a 501(4) organization, 60 Plus is not required to disclose its donors. When Ocala Regional was asked if the hospital or HCA played a role in the 60 Plus media cam paign, Ocala Regional spokeswoman Suzanne Santangelo emailed this response: Ocala Regional Medi cal Center does not have a role with 60 Plus. At a national and local lev el, the Hospital Corpo ration of America (HCA) supports organizations from across the politi cal and ideological spec trum, and will continue to do so as we feel part nerships with stake holder organizations are benecial to our com munity commitment. This ad campaign is the latest volley in a contentious legal bat tle dating back years as opponents of new trauma centers want the facilities shuttered and supporters ght to keep them open. The oppenents in clude Shands Jackson ville and Shands at UF, Tampa General Hospi tal, St. Josephs Hospi tal in Tampa and Bay front Medical Center in St. Petersburg. The legal battle be gan in 2004 when the Florida Legislature told the Florida Depart ment of Health to up date its rules concern ing trauma centers. The rules had not changed since 1992. But the department did not act. In Septem ber 2011, an adminis trative law judge found that the department rules for determining the location and need for trauma centers were invalid. In November 2011, the 1st District Court of Appeal upheld the judges ruling, but not before the Florida De partment of Health granted Ocala Regional and other trauma cen ters approval to start operating. Shands contends it did not have an oppor tunity to participate in the process and to ob ject to the Ocala trau ma center, nor did the Department of Health have the authority to allow the new trauma centers to open. Recent appeals court decisions have sided with Shands that the hospital had standing and should have been allowed to participate in the process and be heard. Shands cites studies that show smaller trau ma centers do not en joy the same life-saving success rate as do larger, more experienced trau ma centers such as the one at Shands. It also estimated that the Oca la trauma center would siphon about a third of its trauma business. Dr. Darwin Noel Ang, the trauma medical di rector at Ocala Region al Medical Center, said the Marion County area saw more trauma pa tients transferred out of town for care than any other community in Florida before his hos pital opened its trauma center. TRAUMA FROM PAGE A3 BEN NUCKOLS Associated Press CHARLESTON, W.Va. The smell lingers the slightly sweet, slightly bitter odor of a chemical that contami nated the water supply of West Virginias capital more than a week ago. It creeps out of faucets and shower heads. It wafts from the Elk Riv er, the site of the spill. Sometimes it hangs in the cold nighttime air. For several days, a majority of Charles ton-area residents have been told their water is safe to drink, that the concentra tion of a chemical used to wash coal is so low that it wont be harm ful. Restaurants have reopened using tap water to wash dishes and produce, clean out their soda fountains and make ice. But as long as peo ple can still smell it, theyre wary and giv en the lack of knowl edge about the chem ical known as MCHM, some experts say their caution is justied. I would certainly be waiting until I couldnt smell it anymore, cer tainly to be drinking it, said Richard Denison, a scientist with the En vironmental Defense Fund who has followed the spill closely. I dont blame people at all for raising questions and wondering whether they can trust whats being told to them. The Jan. 9 spill from a Freedom Industries facility on the banks of the Elk River, less than 2 miles upstream from Charlestons water treatment plant, led to a ban on water use that affected 300,000 peo ple. Four days later, of cials started to lift the ban in one area after another, saying tap wa ter was safe for drinking because the concen tration of the chemi cal dipped below one part per million, even though the smell was still strong at that lev el. By Friday afternoon, nearly all of the 300,000 people impacted had been told the water was safe. Late Wednesday, however, health of cials issued different guidance for pregnant women, urging them not to drink tap water until the chemical is entirely undetectable. The Centers for Disease Control said it made that recommendation out of an abundance of caution because exist ing studies dont pro vide a complete picture of how the chemical af fects humans. For Sarah Bergstrom, a 29-year-old nurse who is four months pregnant with her sec ond child, the news was devastating. She hasnt drunk the water since the spill, but she has taken showers. I cried myself to sleep (Wednesday) night. I was both angry and scared, she said. This baby that weve wanted for so long, Im now questioning have I done some thing that could have harmed her? Bergstrom said shes fortunate that she can afford bottled water, which she intends to use for the foreseeable future. My biggest fear is for those mothers, those pregnant women out there who arent able to go get enough bottled water for their family, who dont have the re sources and dont have the knowledge base to know that this is not safe, she said. Karen Bowling, West Virginias secretary of Health and Human Re sources, said pregnant women who drank the water before being told to avoid it should con tact their doctors. Many remain wary of W.Va. water as smell lingers MICHAEL SWITZER Local residents now have a way to pick up bottled water and ll containers after a chemical spill on the Elk River contaminated the public water supply in nine counties. I would certainly be waiting until I couldnt smell (the water) anymore, certainly to be drinking it, Richard Denison a scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 CITY OF TAVARES CITIZEN BOARDS/COMMITTEESThe City of Tavares is presently accepting applications for the following Board: Planning and Zoning Board This position is voluntary and appointed by the Mayor of the City of Tavares. The position is for the remainder of a three year term which expires June 2016. Applicants must be a resident of Tavares. Applications may be obtained by calling (352) 253-4546, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 pm Monday through Friday or by downloading the application from the citys web site at www.tavares.org Applications should be submitted by February 7, 2014. For additional information please call Nancy Barnett, City Clerk, at 352-253-4546. 238931-January 19, 2014 The public is asked to maintain a heightened awareness that rabies is active in Lake County. People who have been bitten or scratched by wild or domestic ani mals should seek med ical attention and re port the injury to the Florida Department of Health in Lake County at 352-253-6130. Keep your pets un der direct supervision to prevent them from coming in contact with wild animals. If your pet is bitten, seek vet erinary assistance im mediately and contact Lake County Animal Services at 352-3439688. For more informa tion, visit www.or idahealth.gov/diseas es-and-conditions/ rabies/index.html, contact the Florida De partment of Health in Lake County at 352253-6130. ALERT FROM PAGE A3 According to Capt. Rob Hicks, police re sponded to the 24hour Circle K at 900 S. 14th Street about 2:05 a.m., where Faile was slumped over in a Ford pickup truck, having been shot in the head. His brother, David Faile, 25, was standing outside the passenger door. The brother was very distraught, Hicks said. The victim was air lifted to Ocala Region al Medical Center. A hospital spokeswom an refused to com ment on his condition, citing the police inves tigation. MOTIVE FROM PAGE A3 Lake Class of 2013 has been incredibly gener ous about helping us complete the last piece of our dream to provide an essential community facility that helps strug gling families get back on their feet, Steve Smith, executive direc tor of New Beginnings, said in a press release. The class conducted various fundraising ac tivities, including raf ing off an iPad, hold ing a silent auction and participating in the an nual Leadership Lake County Reverse Draw. Our class was ex tremely enthusiastic and motivated to raise the money for this or ganization, which truly benets the entire Lake County community, said Rebecca Sargent, nancial adviser with Edward Jones and pres ident of the Leadership Lake Class of 2013. Construction on the playground is sched uled for next week and a ribbon-cutting cer emony is planned for Saturday. Members of the Leadership Lake Class will assist in in stalling mulch and landscaping. PLAY FROM PAGE A3 SUBMITTED PHOTO This $8,500 check will enable New Beginnings to expand its programs. ROXANA HEGEMAN Associated Press WICHITA, Kan. The U.S. Elec tion Assistance Com mission found Fri day that heightened proof-of-citizenship requirements likely would hinder eligible citizens from voting in federal elections, handing down a ruling that denied requests from Kansas, Arizona and Georgia to modify the registration form for their residents. The decision came just hours before a court-imposed dead line in a lawsuit led in federal court by Kan sas and Arizona that seeks to force the com mission to modify state-specic require ments for registering to vote in those states. Georgia, which has a similar voter registra tion law, is not part of the litigation but was included in the com missions decision. Those states have enacted laws requir ing new voters to pro vide a birth certi cate, passport or other proof of U.S. citizen ship when registering to vote. People who register using the fed eral form only need to sign a statement, un der penalty of perjury, that he or she is a U.S. citizen. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has championed his states proof-of-citizenship law to keep non-citi zens from voting, par ticularly those in the U.S. illegally. But crit ics say voter fraud is extremely rare and contend such laws suppress the vote and threaten to keep thou sands of citizens from casting ballots. Kobach said in an email that he had an ticipated the adverse ruling from the com mission and the states will now press their constitutional claims before the U.S. District Court in Kansas. He ar gues the decision is un constitutional because it prevents Kansas and Arizona from securing their voter rolls. The EACs reason ing reects the parti san view of the Obama Justice Department that requiring voters to provide documen tary proof of citizen ship at the time of reg istration is undesirable as a policy matter, Ko bach said. However, the EAC has no author ity to second-guess the policy decisions of the sovereign states of Kan sas and Arizona. In its decision, the EAC found that add ed documentation bur dens do not enhance voter participation and result in an overall de crease in registration of eligible citizens undermining the core purpose of the National Voter Registration Act. It cited as evidence the problems Kansas al ready has experienced with its own enhanced voter registration re quirements. The voter registrations of 20,127 Kansans remained on hold Friday because theyve not yet provid ed proof of their citizen ship to election ofcials. Feds deny state decisions to tighten voter registration AP FILE PHOTO In this Oct. 31, 2013, photo, former Kansas state Sen. Jean Schodorf answers questions during a news conference at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan., to kick off her campaign for secretary of state. Schodorf lost her Senate seat in 2012. The U.S. Election Assistance Commission found Friday that proof-of-citizenship requirements for Kansas voters would hinder eligible citizens from voting in federal elections.

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 CITY OF TAVARES The City of Tavares welcomes participation from ministers, lay ministers, priests, rabbis, reverends, and other heads of religious organizations to participate in City Council meetings by volunteering to open the meeting with an invocation. The meetings are held the rst and third Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. at 201 E. Main Street, Tavares, FL, City Council Chambers.If you are interested in participating please contact Nancy Barnett, City Clerk, at (352) 253-4546 or nbarnett@Tavares.org. 238930-January 19, 2014 235457 January 19, 2014 FREE SMALL NUGGET TRAYrfnt bt bbb tbt tb tb ntnt bfnbCATERING Its an outreach ef fort for us to connect Montverde Academy to the local community and provide an oppor tunity for children to ex ercise and have fun, Po tempa said. Potempa said the schools physical edu cation classes will use the eld. He added the court can be used for activi ties other than soccer, including basketball. He said the atten dance of Florida politi cians was great. It just shows the type of support we have at Montverde Academy, Potempa said. Dignitaries from the Netherlands and Hai ti as well as 2011 Ma jor League Soccer MVP Dwayne De Rosario and Francisco Lindor, a graduate of Montverde Academy who was a Major League Baseball rst round draft pick in 2011, were also in at tendance. CRUYFF FROM PAGE A3 MARIAM RIZK Associated Press CAIRO Almost ev eryone who cast ballots supported Egypts new constitution in this weeks referendum, re sults announced Satur day show, but a boycott by Islamists and low youth turnout suggest the country is still dan gerously divided. Nearly 20 million vot ers backed the new constitution, almost double the number of those who voted for one drafted in 2012 un der the government of toppled Islamist Presi dent Mohammed Mor si. Only a narrow sliver of voters 1.9 percent voted against the charter, after a mas sive government-spon sored campaign sup porting it and the arrest of activists campaign ing against it. Despite a milieu of intense social up heaval and acts of ter rorism and sabotage that sought to derail the process, Egyptians have now marked yet another dening mo ment in our roadmap to democracy, presiden tial spokesman Ehab Badawy said. The out come represents noth ing less than the dawn ing of a new Egypt. The expected over whelming support for the charter is seen as key to legitimizing Egypts military-backed interim government, and the political plan put in place since Mor sis ouster in July. Ana lysts say it also suggests military chief Gen. Ab del-Fattah el-Sissi, who led the coup against Morsi, has enough pop ular support to make a rumored run for the presidency himself. It was the rst vote since the military re moved Morsi follow ing massive protests in July. Hundreds cele brated in the streets af ter ofcials announced the results, including Hoda Hamza, a house wife who waved an Egyptian ag in Cairos Tahrir Square and car ried a picture of el-Sis si with an inscription reading: By the order of the people, el-Sissi is president. Now, I wish el-Sis si will be president, Hamza said. We have no better man. ... If it werent for the army, we wouldnt have food on the table. Morsi supporters, who boycotted the vote, immediately chal lenged the results. De spite being outlawed and labeled a terrorist group, Morsis Muslim Brotherhood and its al lies continue to hold near-daily protests that often devolve into clashes with police. Even if 38 percent of the voters took part, that still means that 62 percent of the public re jects the interim gov ernment, said Imam Youssef, a member of the Brotherhoods co alition against the July coup and an ultracon servative Islamist party. They are trying to le gitimize their coup. Egypts High Election Commission said 38.6 percent of the coun trys more than 53 mil lion eligible voters took part in the two-day poll Tuesday and Wednes day. Judge Nabil Sal ib, who heads the com mission, called the participation of 20.6 million voters an unri valled success. Voters overwhelmingly back new Egypt constitution ALY HAZZAA / AP A man carrying his child runs away from tear gas during clashes between Egypts security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi on Friday in Cairo. AYSE WIETING Associated Press ISTANBUL The main, Western-backed Syrian opposition group voted Saturday in favor of attending a coming peace confer ence aimed at ending the countrys bloody civil war, paving the way for the rst direct talks between the ri val sides in the nearly three-year conict. The vote in Istanbul came as food supplies began entering a be sieged rebel-held Pal estinian refugee camp in Syrias capital for the rst time in months, an apparent goodwill gesture by President Bashar Assads gov ernment ahead of the peace conference, Pal estinian and United Nations ofcials said. The Syrian Nation al Coalition was under huge pressure from its Western and Arab spon sors to attend the peace talks, scheduled to open Wednesday in the Swiss city of Montreux. The Syrian government has already said it will attend the U.N.-spon sored talks. The Coalitions lead er, Ahmad al-Jarba, said in a speech late Saturday that they are heading to the con ference without any bargain regarding the principles of the revo lution and we will not be cheated. The negotiating ta ble for us is a track to ward achieving the demands of the rev olution at the top of them removing the butcher from power, Jarba said. But many Coalition members are hesitant to attend a conference that has little chance of success and will burn the last shred of cred ibility the group has with powerful rebels on the ground, who reject the talks. Many mem bers boycotted the Is tanbul meetings that began on Friday, forc ing the Coalitions legal committee to approve the decision in a simple majority vote. Although Islamic rebel groups reject any talks with the govern ment, the head of the Western-backed Su preme Military Coun cil, Gen. Salim Idris, said in a statement that he backs a solution that guarantees a polit ical transition of pow er. He called upon Coali tion ofcials heading to Geneva to demand that Assad and his top of cials leave power, have no role in Syrias future and set up a transition al government with full powers that in clude control of secu rity agencies and open corridors to allow food into besieged areas. Maj. Issam el-Rayyes, a spokesman for the Syrian Revolutionary Front, also said they back a political solu tion that would include Assad leaving power. The Coalitions media ofce said there were 58 votes in favor of at tending the conference and 14 votes against. It added that there were two abstentions and one blank ballot. The aim of the con ference, dubbed Ge neva 2, is to agree on a roadmap for Syria based on one adopted by the U.S., Russia and other major powers in June 2012. Syrian opposition says it plans to attend Mideast peace conference ASSOCIATED PRESS Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, and his Syrian counterpart Walid al-Moallem arrive for talks in Moscow. The opposition have voted to attend a peace conference opening next week in Switzerland.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com COLLEGE HOOPS: FSU falls at Virginia / B4 MARK FISHER Special to the Daily Commercial Montverde Acade my cruised through its opening two games at the third annual Mont verde Academy Invita tional Soccer Tourna ment (MAST). The Eagles raced past two overmatched oppo nents by the combined score of 13-0 on Thurs day and Friday, but they expected a more com petitive game in Sat urdays championship game against Coppell (Texas). They werent disap pointed. Diego Campos scored in 46th minute to break a scoreless tie and lead Montverde Academy to a 1-0 win for the Eagles third-straight MAST ti tle. In other games on the nal day of action, San Clemente (Calif.) out scored Delray Beach American Heritage 4-2 in the third-place game. Phoenix Brophy beat Winter Garden West Orange 8-7 in penal ty kicks, after playing to a 1-1 tie in regula tion, in the fth-place game. North Broward picked up its only win in the three-day tourna ment with a 4-1 victo ry against Auburndale in the seventh-place game. EDDIE PELLS Associated Press DENVER Only one of them can be the greatest. Peyton Manning could be the one owner of a record four, working on ve, Most Valuable Player awards, current holder of NFL single-season records for passing yardage and touchdowns and architect of a career-reviving second act, the likes of which has rarely been seen in any sport. Tom Brady could also be that man leader of ve Super Bowl teams and winner of three titles, one-time holder of some of the records Manning holds now and author of an undefeated regu lar season. He also has that 10-4 record against Manning despite constant turnover on his roster and a lack of a star-studded re ceiving corps. Manning and Brady will meet today for the 15th time, and the fourth time in the postseason, when the Broncos (14-3) face the Patriots (13-4) in the AFC ti tle game. The winner between the top two quarterbacks over an era in which quarterbacks have never been so good will get what could be the last say in the debate over who goes down as the greatest STEVEN SENNE / AP Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, left, and New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, right, speak in the middle of the eld after the Patriots beat the Broncos 31-21 in a 2012 game in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots are scheduled to play the Broncos in the AFC championship game today in Denver. PHOTO COURTESY / ISRAEL RAMOS The Leesburg High School girls soccer team (pictured) won the Class 3A-District 5 championship Friday with a 2-0 win against Eustis. The Yellow Jackets will host Daytona Beach Seabreeze, while Eustis will play at Palm Coast Matanzas. In Class 2A, Umatilla will play at Alachua Santa Fe. All games are at 7 p.m. Thursday. JOHN ZENOR Associated Press AUBURN, Ala. Casey Prather scored 21 points in his return from a knee injury and helped No. 7 Florida survive a scare from Au burn in a 68-61 victory on Saturday. Prather had 16 points in the rst half af ter missing the past two games with a bad ly bruised right knee. He made 8 of 10 shots for the Gators (15-2, 4-0 Southeastern Con ference), who have won nine straight games and eight in a row at Auburn (8-7, 0-4). Tahj Shamsid-Deen hit a jump shot with 1:59 left to cut Floridas lead to 62-61, but Scottie Wilbekin answered with a fadeaway jumper. Wilbekin made 2 of 4 free throws over the nal 48 seconds. Patric Young blocked KT Harrells attempt to bring Auburn to within two points in be tween those trips to the line. Kasey Hill made two late free throws for the nal margin. Wilbekin nished with 16 points and Young scored 13 for Florida, which outre bounded Auburn 31-23. The SECs leading scorer Chris Denson scored 15 of his 21 points in the second half to help keep the Tigers close. KT Harrell add ed 18 points and made 4 of 7 3-pointers. JAY SAILORS / AP Florida guard Michael Frazier II (20) drives past Auburn guard Chris Densen during Saturdays game in Auburn, Ala. BARRY WILNER Associated Press SEATTLE From the rst kickoff back in Sep tember, the 49ers and Seahawks seemed des tined to meet for the NFC title. Time to get it on. With the conferences most physical, relent less defenses, adept at forcing turnovers and making opponents think twice about, well, just about anything, Se attle (now 14-3) won the NFC West by one game over San Francis co (now 14-4). The of fenses, while not near ly as imposing, have the right elements for a champion: strong run ning games, efcient and sometimes dynam ic quarterbacks, and staunch lines. Their coaches have the proper pedigree, as well. Jim Harbaugh has led the 49ers to the NFC championship game in all three sea sons in charge, making the Super Bowl last year. Pete Carroll had a 28-23 MONTVERDE LEESBURG GIRLS TAKE DISTRICT Brady-Manning, Chapter 15 Seahawks, 49ers just belong in this game UF survives scare against Auburn SEE AFC | B2 SEE NFC | B2 SEE UF | B2 Eagles take MAST title

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 20 18 .526 Brooklyn 16 22 .421 4 New York 15 25 .375 6 Boston 14 27 .341 7 Philadelphia 13 26 .333 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 28 11 .718 Atlanta 20 19 .513 8 Washington 19 19 .500 8 Charlotte 17 24 .415 12 Orlando 10 30 .250 18 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 31 7 .816 Chicago 18 20 .474 13 Detroit 16 23 .410 15 Cleveland 15 25 .375 17 Milwaukee 7 31 .184 24 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 31 9 .775 Houston 26 15 .634 5 Dallas 24 17 .585 7 Memphis 20 19 .513 10 New Orleans 15 23 .395 15 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 30 9 .769 Oklahoma City 30 10 .750 Denver 20 19 .513 10 Minnesota 18 21 .462 12 Utah 14 27 .341 17 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 28 13 .683 Golden State 25 16 .610 3 Phoenix 22 17 .564 5 L.A. Lakers 15 25 .375 12 Sacramento 14 24 .368 12 Fridays Games Charlotte 111, Orlando 101 Miami 101, Philadelphia 86 Washington 96, Chicago 93 L.A. Clippers 109, New York 95 Toronto 94, Minnesota 89 L.A. Lakers 107, Boston 104 Utah 110, Detroit 89 Memphis 91, Sacramento 90 Portland 109, San Antonio 100 Dallas 110, Phoenix 107 Cleveland 117, Denver 109 Oklahoma City 127, Golden State 121 Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers at Indiana, late Detroit at Washington, late Miami at Charlotte, late Philadelphia at Chicago, late Utah at Minnesota, late Milwaukee at Houston, late Golden State at New Orleans, late Portland at Dallas, late Todays Games L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 1 p.m. Boston at Orlando, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Denver at Phoenix, 8 p.m. College Saturdays scores Men EAST Albany (NY) 85, Maine 78 American U. 66, Lafayette 61 Bryant 95, Fairleigh Dickinson 68 Colgate 63, Navy 41 Delaware 74, Northeastern 70 Faireld 71, Manhattan 67 Hartford 60, New Hampshire 43 Holy Cross 61, Lehigh 42 LIU Brooklyn 62, CCSU 61 La Salle 74, Temple 68 Quinnipiac 85, Niagara 71 Rhode Island 71, George Mason 69, OT Robert Morris 77, Mount St. Marys 69 Seton Hall 67, Georgetown 57 Syracuse 59, Pittsburgh 54 Vermont 73, UMBC 47 Villanova 88, DePaul 62 Wagner 56, St. Francis (Pa.) 50 Yale 74, Brown 67 SOUTH Appalachian St. 81, Georgia Southern 68 Campbell 97, VMI 93, OT Clemson 61, Wake Forest 53 Drexel 79, UNC Wilmington 63 Duke 95, NC State 60 Florida 68, Auburn 61 Gardner-Webb 67, Presbyterian 58 Georgia 66, Arkansas 61, OT Georgia St. 99, UALR 73 Howard 88, Md.-Eastern Shore 55 Kentucky 74, Tennessee 66 McNeese St. 70, Houston Baptist 68 Memphis 101, LeMoyne-Owen 78 Miami 56, Georgia Tech 42 Mississippi 75, South Carolina 74 Mississippi St. 81, Texas A&M 72, OT Morehead St. 82, UT-Martin 75 NC Central 62, Delaware St. 52 North Carolina 82, Boston College 71 Radford 93, Longwood 76 Richmond 73, Dayton 64 SMU 58, UCF 46 Stetson 77, SC-Upstate 73, OT Texas A&M-CC 70, Nicholls St. 67 Tulsa 69, Marshall 52 VCU 80, Duquesne 65 Virginia 78, Florida St. 66 W. Carolina 67, Samford 64 William & Mary 78, James Madison 56 MIDWEST Butler 69, Marquette 57, OT E. Illinois 67, Austin Peay 64 Evansville 53, Loyola of Chicago 48 Kansas 80, Oklahoma St. 78 Kansas St. 78, West Virginia 56 Miami (Ohio) 64, Ball St. 52 Missouri 68, Alabama 47 N. Dakota St. 65, W. Illinois 52 N. Iowa 94, Missouri St. 89 Northwestern 54, Indiana 47 SIU-Edwardsville 67, Murray St. 60 Saint Louis 70, Fordham 48 South Dakota 75, IPFW 61 Texas-Pan American 84, Chicago St. 61 Toledo 75, Akron 61 Valparaiso 75, Milwaukee 62 Wichita St. 68, Indiana St. 48 SOUTHWEST Abilene Christian 73, Cent. Arkansas 72 Oklahoma 66, Baylor 64 Texas 86, Iowa St. 76 FAR WEST California 76, Washington St. 55 Colorado 83, Southern Cal 62 Gonzaga 82, Loyola Marymount 72 N. Arizona 77, Portland St. 56 Utah 74, UCLA 69 Wyoming 67, San Jose St. 56 Women EAST Albany (NY) 84, Maine 56 American U. 72, Lafayette 57 Bryant 72, LIU Brooklyn 66 Buffalo 84, E. Michigan 83, OT CCSU 72, Fairleigh Dickinson 67 Columbia 71, Cornell 64 Dartmouth 48, NJIT 45 Duquesne 62, Rhode Island 47 Iona 64, Faireld 59 Lehigh 87, Holy Cross 82 Mount St. Marys 89, Wagner 78 New Hampshire 61, Hartford 56 Quinnipiac 70, Siena 49 Rider 56, St. Peters 55 Robert Morris 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 69 Seton Hall 73, Georgetown 62 St. Bonaventure 62, Saint Louis 60 St. Francis (NY) 69, Sacred Heart 49 VCU 81, UMass 51 Vermont 63, UMBC 59 West Virginia 77, Oklahoma 63 SOUTH Alabama St. 92, Alabama A&M 45 Campbell 46, Presbyterian 43 Coastal Carolina 77, Charleston Southern 63 Davidson 79, Georgia Southern 66 E. Kentucky 68, Jacksonville St. 61 East Carolina 86, Louisiana Tech 55 Florida Gulf Coast 69, Mercer 57 Georgia St. 61, UALR 59 Hampton 80, Coppin St. 52 High Point 81, Gardner-Webb 77 Howard 77, Md.-Eastern Shore 75, OT Jackson St. 83, Prairie View 82, 2OT Jacksonville 67, N. Kentucky 56 MVSU 70, Alcorn St. 55 McNeese St. 66, Houston Baptist 62 Memphis 48, Houston 40 Middle Tennessee 61, UAB 55 NC Central 75, Delaware St. 61 Nicholls St. 67, Texas A&M-CC 60 Norfolk St. 61, Morgan St. 52 North Florida 78, Lipscomb 66 SC State 68, Florida A&M 57 SE Louisiana 67, Lamar 62 Sam Houston St. 78, New Orleans 47 Samford 59, Furman 58 Savannah St. 58, Bethune-Cookman 54 Stetson 98, Kennesaw St. 75 Texas Southern 77, Grambling St. 63 Tulane 73, Southern Miss. 71, OT UNC Asheville 83, Liberty 80, OT UT-Martin 74, Morehead St. 52 Winthrop 70, Longwood 49 MIDWEST Akron 77, Kent St. 51 Austin Peay 64, E. Illinois 56 Ball St. 79, Ohio 63 Cent. Michigan 82, Bowling Green 79, OT Green Bay 90, Cleveland St. 72 IPFW 96, South Dakota 78 IUPUI 82, Denver 66 Ill.-Chicago 78, Oakland 65 Michigan 69, Illinois 60 Missouri St. 89, Drake 66 Montana St. 76, North Dakota 65 N. Dakota St. 83, W. Illinois 78 N. Illinois 69, Miami (Ohio) 66 Northwestern 74, Wisconsin 58 S. Dakota St. 80, Nebraska-Omaha 66 SIU-Edwardsville 71, Murray St. 67 St. Johns 49, Marquette 47 Temple 58, Cincinnati 47 W. Michigan 78, Toledo 72 Wright St. 79, Valparaiso 65 Xavier 75, Providence 52 Youngstown St. 87, Milwaukee 71 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 67, Abilene Christian 54 Incarnate Word 67, Oral Roberts 64 Oklahoma St. 82, Texas Tech 56 Rice 74, Marshall 68, OT Tulsa 78, FIU 73 UTSA 58, North Texas 56 FAR WEST CS Northridge 64, UC Santa Barbara 46 Colorado St. 87, Air Force 49 E. Washington 78, Sacramento St. 65 Fresno St. 75, New Mexico 73 Idaho St. 69, S. Utah 65 N. Arizona 88, Portland St. 67 N. Colorado 57, Montana 54 Pacic 75, Pepperdine 64 Saint Marys (Cal) 78, Loyola Marymount 74 San Diego 60, BYU 45 San Jose St. 74, Wyoming 68 Seattle 75, Utah Valley 67 HOCKEY NHL Fridays Games Columbus 5, Washington 1 Chicago 4, Anaheim 2 Saturdays Games N.Y. Rangers 4, Ottawa 1 San Jose 5, Tampa Bay 4 Winnipeg 3, Edmonton 2, OT Columbus at Buffalo, late Montreal at Toronto, late Los Angeles at Detroit, late N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, late Florida at Carolina, late Anaheim at St. Louis, late Colorado at Nashville, late New Jersey at Phoenix, late Dallas at Minnesota, late Calgary at Vancouver, late Todays Games Boston at Chicago, 12:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 5 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Tour Humana Challenge Saturday p-PGA West, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par 72 n-PGA West, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards, par 72 q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards, par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5.7 million Third Round Patrick Reed 63p-63q-63n 189 Charley Hoffman 64q-66n-66p 196 Brendon Todd 65n-63p-68q 196 James Driscoll 68p-63q-66n 197 Bill Haas 65q-66n-67p 198 Justin Leonard 66n-67p-65q 198 Ryan Palmer 64p-65q-70n 199 Matt Jones 66n-67p-66q 199 Brian Stuard 67q-66n-66p 199 Will MacKenzie 67n-66p-66q 199 Ben Crane 70q-64n-65p 199 Keegan Bradley 69q-66n-65p 200 Charlie Beljan 68q-64n-68p 200 Seung-Yul Noh 68p-66q-66n 200 Jason Bohn 70q-65n-66p 201 Zach Johnson 65q-68n-68p 201 Chad Collins 68n-68p-65q 201 Jerry Kelly 69q-65n-68p 202 Jonathan Byrd 68p-69q-65n 202 Stuart Appleby 66p-69q-67n 202 Matt Every 65n-68p-69q 202 Rory Sabbatini 68p-67q-67n 202 Scott Langley 69q-68n-65p 202 Russell Knox 65p-70q-67n 202 Spencer Levin 69p-68q-66n 203 Luke Guthrie 69p-67q-67n 203 Martin Laird 69n-66p-68q 203 Kevin Chappell 70q-70n-63p 203 Charlie Wi 65p-69q-69n 203 Martin Flores 69p-65q-69n 203 Jim Herman 67n-68p-68q 203 Brendon de Jonge 69q-68n-66p 203 Tyrone Van Aswegen 69n-67p-67q 203 Abu Dhabi Championship Saturday At Abu Dhabi Golf Club Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Purse: $2.7 million Yardage: 7,583; Par: 72 Third Round Craig Lee, Scotland 68-67-69 204 Gaganjeet Bhullar, India 72-68-66 206 Phil Mickelson, United States 73-70-63 206 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 69-70-68 207 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland 70-67-70 207 Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-70-68 208 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-68-67 208 Michael Hoey, Northern Ireland 69-71-68 208 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 67-68-73 208 Matthew Baldwin, England 67-72-69 208 Peter Hanson, Sweden 70-70-69 209 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 70-67-72 209 Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-71-69 210 Hennie Otto, South Africa 70-71-69 210 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-70-72 210 George Coetzee, South Africa 68-70-72 210 Tommy Fleetwood, England 73-65-72 210 Tyrrell Hatton, England 69-71-70 210 Jose-Filipe Lima, Portugal 68-75-67 210 Also Luke Donald, England 70-73-71 214 Sergio Garcia, Spain 76-68-70 214 Darren Clarke, Northern Ireland 74-69-72 215 Jamie Donaldson, Wales 73-70-73 216 TV 2 DAY FIGURE SKATING 4 p.m. NBC European Championships, at Budapest, Hungary GOLF 3 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, Humana Challenge, nal round, at La Quinta, Calif. 7 p.m. TGC Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, nal round, at Kaupule hu-Kona, Hawaii MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FS1 Louisiana Tech at Southern Miss. CBSSN Rutgers at Houston 3 p.m. CBSSN Bucknell at Army 3:30 p.m. NBCSN Towson at Charleston 6 p.m. ESPNU Virginia Tech at Notre Dame 8 p.m. ESPNU Oregon at Oregon State NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 6 p.m. FS-Florida Boston at Orlando NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 3 p.m. CBS Playoffs, AFC Championship, New England at Denver 6:30 p.m. FOX Playoffs, NFC Championship, S.F at Seattle NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 12:30 p.m. NBC Boston at Chicago 5 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Carolina 7:30 p.m. NBCSN Washington at N.Y. Rangers SOCCER 8:25 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Tottenham at Swansea City 10:55 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Manchester United at Chelsea TENNIS 9 p.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 UConn at Rutgers FS1 Villanova at DePaul 5 p.m. ESPN2 Penn St. at Michigan St. SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED FA-Leesburg boys hoops team falls for first time STAFF REPORT Ojay Cummings scored 12 points on Satur day, but Ocala Trinity Catholic had more at the nish to hold off First Academy of Leesburg 5847 in a boys basketball tournament at Wild wood High School. First Academy of Leesburg fell to 14-1 overall, while Ocala Trinity Catholic improved t0 11-9. not so much be cause of what the winloss numbers will say but because this could be the last time they meet with the stakes so high. I dont know that there will ever be an other rivalry like it, or has been a rivalry like it, said John Elway, whose own rivalry with Dan Marino was held to only three meetings because of scheduling quirks over their de cade-plus careers. The game will either give Brady a chance to match Joe Montana and Terry Bradshaw for a fourth title or afford Manning the oppor tunity to win a second ring, which would put him one behind Brady, and in the same com pany with his brother, Eli, Roger Staubach and Elway, among others. It would also make Man ning the rst QB to win championships with two different teams. While paying ulti mate respect to each other I feel like hes been a better player each year than he was the year before, Man ning said neither quarterback profess es to care much about how their own head-tohead showdowns will dene their legacy. Dont believe it, says Phil Simms, who ad mits in retirement that the smile was a little wider after he walked off the eld with a win over a Staubach or Joe Theismann. Its always person al, no matter what, Simms said. Its part of being a competitor and doing what you do. One reason Brady has a .714 win per centage in the headto-head meetings and also holds a 2-1 advan tage in the playoffs is because, more often than not, hes been sur rounded by the more complete team. He has been any thing but a one-man show in New England this season, illustrat ed best by the fact that the Patriots are in the AFC title game even though Brady threw for 25 touchdowns less than half of Mannings record-setting 55. Without Rob Gron kowski, Aaron Hernan dez or Wes Welker to throw to, Brady made it work, with a big assist from head coach Bill Belichick and offensive coordinator Josh Mc Daniels, who used to coach the Broncos. New Englands run ning game, led by Le Garrette Blount and Shane Vereen, has aver aged 214 yards the last three games. Bradys 75 passes over the last three games are the fewest of any threegame stretch in his ca reer. Manning has thrown for 92 touchdowns since arriving in Den ver at the start of the 2012 season, his neck rebuilt from multiple surgeries, his future uncertain because of his weakened throwing arm. Hed be the rst to ad mit hes not the same as he once was, physical ly. But nobody prepares better. His record-set ting 5,477 yards and all those touchdown throws came with a gifted group of offen sive stars surround ing him Welker, Eric Decker, Demaryius Thomas and this sea sons difference maker, 6-foot-5 tight end Ju lius Thomas. But Man ning had great players around him in India napolis, as well, and never put up these sort of numbers. Today, Brady, who missed parts of prac tice early in the week with the u, will be go ing against a depleted secondary that just lost cornerback Chris Har ris Jr., which will make Champ Bailey in jured most of the sea son a bigger cog for the Denver D. And the Patriots will likely invite the Bron cos to run much the way they did in their 34-31 overtime loss in Week 12 know ing the best chance of beating them is by tak ing the ball out of Man nings hands. AFC FROM PAGE B1 record in three sea sons as Patriots coach, then went to the col lege ranks and built a powerhouse at South ern California, with two national titles. That theres no love lost between Harbaugh and Carroll dating back to when they both were working in college Harbaugh at Stanford, where he ran up the score on Carrolls Tro jans adds plenty of spice. The sum total on both sides should be a worthy conference champion to meet ei ther Denver or New En gland in two weeks in the New Jersey Mead owlands for the NFL crown. Even if both teams are playing down the drama they gure to provide before an ear-shattering wall of noise at CenturyLink Field today. The schedule brought these teams together in September and December. Seat tle won 29-3 at home in Week 2, then lost 1917 at San Francisco on Dec. 8. CenturyLink Field might be the tough est venue in the NFL for visitors, with archi tecture that not only keeps the noise inside the stadium, but fun nels it toward the eld itse lf. Wilson became a starter as a rookie in 2012 and went unde feated. He won his rst six home starts this season before a stum ble against Arizona, but then Seattle defeat ed St. Louis to nish off the regular season, and New Orlea ns in a divi sional-round playoff last weekend. Thats pretty spec tacular and it just shows how amazing our fans are, how much energy the city has for our football team, Wil son said of the super sonic sound levels the 49ers can expect to deal with when they have the ball. Thats what were looking for ward to, and we want to bring something spe cial to this city, and to do it we have to play one play at a time and see what happens at the end of the game. N ot that the 49ers are likely to be intimidated by the surroundings. They went 6-2 away from home in the reg ular season, and their two road wins have come at venerable Lambeau Field in frigid conditions, and at Car olina, which had won its last seven home games. NFC FROM PAGE B1 Allen Payne nished with 11 points. A uburn has lost its rst four SEC games this season by a combined 23 point. The Tigers have dropped their last 14 against league teams over all. The Gators, who lost a 13-point lead in the rst half, made 21 of 39 shots (53.8 percent). Florida made 23 of 33 free throws while Auburn was 14 of 22. The Tigers point guards, Sham sid-Deen and Malcolm Canada, both fouled out. Prather got right into his offensive rhythm after the layoff. He came into the game with 16:58 re maining, hit two quick jump shots and made his rst ve attempts, including a fast-break dunk off a nice bounce pass from Hill. The Gators reeled off a 14-1 run for a 23-10 lead while the Tigers missed their rst 10 at tempts from inside the 3-point line. Walk-on Alex Thompson nally scored on a putback 13 min utes into the game for Auburns rst basket since making a third consecutive 3-pointer with 14:28 left in the half. Auburn hit all ve of its 3-point attempts in the rst half and nished 7 of 13. Despite Prathers explosion, the Gators bare ly led at halftime. Wilbekin made two free throws with 3 seconds left to give Florida a 33-32 half time lead. UF FROM PAGE B1

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Expires 1/31/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$34 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents NEW YEARS TUNE-UP SPECIALCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesTaught by PGA ProfessionalStephen WreshSeries of 4 Full SwingorShort Game Tune-Up Series(reg. $200)$150(Chipping, Pitching, Putting & Bunkers) GOLF Associated Press ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates Phil Mickelson surged up the leaderboard with a 9-under 63 to put him self in second place af ter the third round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, while Rory McIlroy was hit with a two-shot pen alty for a rules infrac tion that dropped him into a tie for fourth. Mickelson barely made the cut but had the best round of the day with nine birdies and an eagle coupled with two bogeys to sit two shots behind lead er Craig Lee of Scot land. Lee shot a 69 for a 12-under 204 total. I just love the fact I am in contention and have an opportuni ty in my rst tourna ment of the year here in Abu Dhabi, Mickelson said. The biggest thing for me is that each day as the tournament has progressed I have felt a lot sharper and sharp er. McIlroy thought he was alone in second place a stroke behind Lee after nishing his round, but tournament ofcials then ruled that he had taken a drop in correctly on the second hole and adjusted his score to a double-bo gey 7. That gave him a 70 for the round to sit one stroke behind Mickelson and Gagan jeet Bhullar of India (66). McIlroy had to take relief on the second hole when his ball ended up on a gallery crosswalk and went on to par the hole, but was later told by the caddy of playing partner Ri cardo Gonzalez that he had his left foot on the white line marking the drop area, meaning he had not taken full re lief according to the rules. Tournament ofcials reviewed the situation after McIlroy complet ed his round, with the golfer going back to the spot to show where he stood when he took the shot. I didnt even know my foot was on the line, McIlroy said. We went back to see it again there and see where my divot was, and it was clear that I couldnt have played the shot with my feet anywhere else. I guess I was so much into the shot I didnt even re alize. ... Theres a lot of stupid rules and this is one of them. To make matters worse, McIlroy said his drop had actually given him a bad lie and that he would have bene ted from dropping again. If anything, it was a disadvantage, McIlroy said. McIlroy had n ished the round with out a bogey, making his fourth birdie of the day on the 18th. To a spectator it may feel like I have been unduly punished, and thats what it feels like to me, but its a rule of the game. I do feel like I have been hard done by but its nothing that a fast start tomorrow cant x. Mickelson shot his lowest score since a 63 on the opening day of the Deutsche Bank Championship in Sep tember, falling one shot short of the Abu Dhabi course record. The American bird ied four of his open ing six holes, eagled the eighth and then also birdied ve of his in ward holes, including sinking a 50-foot bird ie putt at the par-5 last. That came after he tried to reach the green in two shots but ended up beneath some trees to the left and needed a pitching wedge on his third shot. (I) gave myself a 45 to 50 footer that you dont really expect to make too often but I had a good kind of feel on that one and it just rolled right I, Mick elson said. But then I was getting a little tired mentally those last few holes and I could tell it was early in the season so I just wasnt as sharp mentally. Mickelson surges; McIlroy gets 2 shot penalty KAMRAN JEBREILI / AP Rory McIlroy tees off on the 11th hole during Saturdays third round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. AUTO RACING Associated Press CHARLOTTE, N.C. A 16-driver champion ship eld that would be whittled down to cre ate a winner-take-all season nale is among radical changes report edly being considered by NASCAR. NASCAR chairman Brian France has re peatedly said he wants to place a greater em phasis on winning, and hes never ruled out tin kering with the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship format in an effort to create the Game 7 moments he covets. The Charlotte Observ er rst reported Friday night a possible over haul to the Chase for mat that France rst introduced in 2004 and has made period ic changes to several times since. Citing anonymous sources, The Observ er outlined three ma jor changes begin ning with expanding the eld from 12 driv ers to 16 meaning a win during the regular season would virtual ly guarantee a driver a spot in the eld. Once the eld is set, The Observer said NA SCAR is considering eliminations during the 10-race Chase. The eld would be cut after the third, sixth and ninth races. The proposed eliminations would drop the low est four drivers from ti tle contention after the third, sixth and ninth races, leaving four driv ers eligible for a win ner-take-all race in the season nale at Home stead-Miami Speed way. The four remain ing drivers would go into Homestead with their points reset and tied in the standings, The Observer said. A statement from NASCAR chief commu nications ofcer Brett Jewkes was non-com mittal on The Observ er report. NASCAR has begun the process of brieng key industry stakehold ers on potential con cepts to evolve its NA SCAR Sprint Cup Series championship format, Jewkes said. This dia logue is the nal phase of a multi-year process that has included the review of extensive fan research, partner and industry feedback and other data-driven in sights. NASCAR has no plans to comment fur ther until the stake holder discussions are complete. But driver Denny Hamlin posted a se ries of Tweets on Sat urday afternoon that supported the format if NASCAR ultimately moves forward with the changes. NASCAR is ex pected to ofcially out line any changes later this month. This points system change is going to be a really good thing. Trust in it and watch how ex citing each chase race is going to be, Hamlin posted. Hamlin also Tweet ed that every Chase race will now be as ex citing as the Septem ber race at Richmond, which is the nal race to set the Chase eld. He also responded to two fans who criticized the format. One argued it was articially con strued excitement in stead of the traditional consistency that NA SCAR used for decades in crowning its cham pion. Consistency will keep you up top, Ham lin replied. Hamlin received sup port from 2012 Cup champion Brad Kesel owski, who replied on Twitter to him that he also liked the reported new format. Guess we may be in the minority here, Ke selowski said. NASCAR has been working feverishly be hind the scenes to im prove its on-track product, particularly at 1.5-mile tracks, and at least some changes are expected to the points system to meet Frances desire to put a greater emphasis on winning. France was thrilled with the nish of the March race at California, where feuding drivers Hamlin and Joey Logano relent lessly raced for the win. NASCAR considers radical changes to Chase points format TENNIS JOHN PYE Associated Press MELBOURNE, Austra lia Rafael Nadal made it abundantly clear how much he missed the last Australia n Open with the manner of his thirdround demolition of Gael Monls. Top-seeded Nadal trounced No. 25-seed ed Monls 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 in two ho urs to nish off Saturdays program on the Rod Laver Are na, then told the crowd it was very emotional to have the chance to play that well here in Aus tralia after missing last year. He skipped it in 2013 during a seven-month layoff for illness and in juries, depriving him a chance to pick up two full sets of the Grand Slam titles. Nadal returned to w in the French and U.S. Open crowns among his 10 titles last season and regained the year-end No. 1-ranking. The Aus tralian Open is the only major Nadal has not won at least twice, with his sole triumph at Mel bourne Park in 2009. The Spaniard lost an epic ve-set nal to Novak Djokovic two years ago. The 27-year-old broke Monls serve in the rst game and then fend ed off three break points before holding in the next. He conceded just one point on serve in the second set and, apart from a slight stumble that caused him to hob ble around momentar ily, he didnt have any trouble advancing. Na dal next plays No. 16 Kei Nishikori of Japan, who ended the U.S. run in the mens draw with a com fortable win over Don ald Young. Nadal puts on a grand show in Australia

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 COLLEGE BASKETBALL JOSEPH WHITE Associated Press WASHINGTON Fuquan Edwin scored 19 of his 24 points in the second half, and Seton Hall rallied from a 10-point, second-half decit Saturday and broke a three-game losing streak with a 6757 win over George town. Back in the start ing lineup after bat tling a knee injury, Ed win went 4 for 4 from 3-point range after halftime for the Pirates (11-7, 2-3 Big East), who had been 0-4 on the road against their conference rivals since an overtime victory on Jan. 29, 2003. Seton Hall hadnt won in reg ulation at Georgetown since Jan. 8, 2000. Edwin also had ve steals to set the school record with 263. He passed Dan Callandril lo, who had 260 from 1978-82. DVauntes Smith-Ri vera scored 14 points to lead the Hoyas (11-6, 3-3), who didnt score a eld goal over the nal 9:44 and blew a dou ble-digit, second-half lead for the second straight game, having lost to Xavier after lead ing by 17 on Wednes day. Georgetown also lost at home for the rst time this season after winning its rst eight at the Verizon Center. Edwin has missed four games due to inju ry this season, and he came off the bench in Seton Halls previous game, a one-point loss at Marquette. Against Georgetown, he led the decisive 15-3 run, high lighted by a sequence in which he hit a 3-point er that he celebrated by running backward with both arms in the air, then made a steal at the other end of the oor. Edwin fouled out with 1:51 to play and his team leading by 11, and his teammates had to hang on. Sterling Gibbs made only 4 of 8 free throws over the nal 2:50, allowing the Hoyas to cut the decit to seven with several chances to make it the score closer. Eugene Teague re turned for the Pirates after missing four games with a concus sion, but committed two offensive fouls in the rst 2:18 and head ed for the bench. He nished with 10 points in 23 minutes. Georgetown re mains without Jabril Trawick and Joshua Smith, both regulars in the starting lineup until recently. Trawick missed his third game with a broken jaw, and Smith sat out for the fourth consecutive game for academic reasons. Nate Lubick continues to play with a mask after breaking his nose last weekend against Butler. Both teams came out sluggish, look ing more like football teams content to trade punts rather than score. Both started 3 for 12 from the field, and Seton Hall had five turnovers in the first five minutes. The Hoyas closed out the first half with a 10-0 run, includ ing 3-pointers from Markel Starks and Reggie Cameron, to take a 35-26 lead at the break. Georgetown took the first double-dig it lead of the game on Camerons 3-point er early in the second half, but turnovers be gan hurting the Hoyas as Seton Hall pulled off a 20-9 run and took a 48-47 lead on Ed wins three-point play with 10:06 remaining. Aaron Bowen then made a layup to put Georgetown back ahead, but that was the last Hoyas field goal. Teague made a bucket to give Seton Hall the lead for good, and Edwin followed with a 3-pointer as the Pirates pulled awa y. SETON HALL 67, GEORGETOWN 57 SETON HALL (11-7) Oliver 2-7 1-2 7, Auda 1-4 2-3 4, Teague 3-6 4-6 10, Gibbs 2-6 6-15 11, Edwin 8-17 3-3 24, Mobley 1-6 0-0 3, Sina 3-4 0-1 8, Geramipoor 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 20-51 16-30 67. GEORGETOWN (11-6) Cameron 2-7 0-0 6, Lubick 0-3 2-2 2, Hopkins 4-7 3-6 11, Smith-Rivera 4-12 6-7 14, Starks 3-12 2-2 9, Bowen 4-9 4-4 13, Caprio 1-1 0-0 2, Ayegba 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 18-53 17-21 57. HalftimeGeorgetown 35-26. 3-Point GoalsSeton Hall 11-20 (Edwin 5-8, Sina 2-3, Oliver 2-4, Mo bley 1-2, Gibbs 1-2, Auda 0-1), Georgetown 4-18 (Cameron 2-5, Bowen 1-3, Starks 1-5, Smith-Rivera 0-5). Fouled OutEdwin. ReboundsSeton Hall 39 (Teague 9), Georgetown 39 (Hopkins 15). Assists Seton Hall 14 (Gibbs 9), Georgetown 14 (Smith-Ri vera 5). Total FoulsSeton Hall 17, Georgetown 20. A,786. Seton Hall ends DC skid, tops Georgetown 67-57 ALEX BRANDON / AP Seton Hall guard Jaren Sina (30) drives past Georgetown guard Markel Starks (5) during Saturdays game in Washington. GARY B. GRAVES Associated Press LEXINGTON, Ky. Freshman Andrew Harrison scored a sea son-high 26 points and No. 13 Kentucky used near-perfect free throw shooting to pull away from Tennessee for a 74-66 victory Saturday. The Wildcats (13-4, 3-1 Southeastern Con ference) made 23 of 24 from the line including their rst 17 before Aar on Harrison, Andrews twin, missed the front end of a 1-and-1 with 32 seconds remaining. The Wildcats had en tered the game making 66 percent of their free throws, 63 percent in SEC games. Andrew Harri son made all 10 of his free throw attempts along with a couple of 3-pointers and fresh man Julius Randle was 5 of 5 from the free throw line and 6 of 9 from the eld for 18 points. Kentucky overcame a nine-point rst-half decit to beat the Vol unteers (11-6, 2-2) in this seasons lone scheduled meeting between the schools. Trailing 18-9 with 12:16 left in the half, the Wild cats closed with a 25-14 run over the nal 11:06 and led by as many as 11 points in the second half. Kentucky was outre bounded 39-24 by the Vols, who made just 16 of 23 from the free throw line. Aaron Harrison n ished with 14 points in cluding two from be yond the arc to help the Wildcats nish 7 of 16 from 3-point range. He was 6 of 7 from the free throw line. Jarnell Stokes had 20 points and 15 rebounds for Tennessee, which lost to Kentucky for the 150th time in the se ries that dates to 1910. Jordan McRae added 17 points and Jeronne Maymon had 12 for the Volunteers. Tennessee shot well from the eld and the free throw line in Wednesday nights vic tory over Auburn. The Volunteers committed just 12 turnovers after coming in last in the SEC with a minus-7.5 margin in league play, but that was still four fewer than Kentucky. The Wildcats suc ceeded in making Tuesday nights heart breaking 87-85 over time loss at Arkansas a distant memory. While the Wildcats insisted there were no lingering mental effects from Mi chael Qualls last-sec ond rebound dunk that snatched away anoth er winnable game, they also stressed the need not to let it happen again. Payback was also on Kentucky players minds after last years 30-point loss in Knox ville just days after Ner lens Noels season-end ing knee injury. It was Tennessees most lop sided win in the series and the Wildcats were determined to make amends. Kentuckys quest ap peared difcult early as Stokes seemed primed to beat the Wildcats by himself. He scored the games rst six points en route to a 12-point, 11-rebound rst half that symbolized the Vols energetic effort: they outrebounded the Wildcats 23-10 in the rst 20 minutes and built a lead that stood for most of the half. And yet, Stokes per formance and Tennes sees statistical edge mattered little at half time as Kentucky emerged with a 34-32 lead thanks to its run that included a 16-6 spurt over the nal 7:06. James Youngs 3-point er with 54 seconds re maining capped the surge, but 26 combined points by Randle and Andrew Harrison car ried the Wildcats. Randle scored 16 po ints in the rst half and got things going by scoring Kentuckys rst ve points includ ing his rst 3-pointer this season after seven misses. The second half be longed to the Wildcats, who shot 46 percent from the eld and n ished 22 of 50 overall (44 percent). Tennes see nished 24 of 58 (41 percent). No. 13 KENTUCKY 74, TENNESSEE 66 TENNESSEE (11-6) Richardson 2-7 0-0 4, Barton 0-4 2-2 2, Stokes 8-12 4-6 20, Maymon 4-11 4-7 12, McRae 5-14 6-8 17, Moore 2-4 0-0 4, Ndiaye 1-3 0-0 2, Thompson 2-2 0-0 5, Reese 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 24-58 16-23 66. KENTUCKY (13-4) Young 3-9 0-0 8, Aa. Harrison 3-7 6-7 14, An. Harri son 7-13 10-10 26, Cauley-Stein 0-5 0-0 0, Randle 6-9 5-5 18, Polson 0-0 0-0 0, Poythress 1-4 2-2 4, Hawkins 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 2250 23-24 74. HalftimeKentucky 34-32. 3-Point GoalsTennes see 2-13 (Thompson 1-1, McRae 1-7, Richardson 0-1, Moore 0-1, Reese 0-1, Barton 0-2), Kentucky 7-16 (An. Harrison 2-3, Aa. Harrison 2-4, Young 2-5, Randle 1-2, Poythress 0-2). Fouled OutNone. Re boundsTennessee 39 (Stokes 15), Kentucky 24 (Aa. Harrison, Johnson 4). AssistsTennessee 10 (Barton 3), Kentucky 11 (Randle 4). Total FoulsTen nessee 20, Kentucky 17. A,246. No. 13 Kentucky beats Tennessee at charity stripe JAMES CRISP / AP Kentuckys Julius Randle, left, shoots under pressure from Tennessees Jarnell Stokes (5) during the rst half of Saturdays game in Lexington, Ky. HANK KURZ JR. Associated Press CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Joe Harris scored 18 points and Virginia used an early 22-5 run to take command on its way to a 78-66 victory against Florida State on Saturday and a sweep of its season series against the Seminoles. Malcolm Brogdon added 16 points for the Cavaliers (13-5, 4-1 At lantic Coast Confer ence), who won 62-50 at Florida State on Jan. 4. The sweep is the rst for the Cavaliers since the 2000-01 season. Okaro White and Aar on Thomas scored 15 each for Florida State (12-5, 3-2). The Semi noles arrived second in the ACC defensively, al lowing teams to make just 36.3 percent of their eld goal attempts, but the Cavaliers shot better than 55 percent in the rst half in bolting to 4526 lead by halftime. The Cavaliers also closed the half with an 11-3 burst that featured ve points from Akil Mitchell. The Seminoles trailed by as many as 21 in the second half, and got no closer than 12, including in the nal minute when Virginias Justin Ander son was assessed a tech nical foul for hanging on the rim after a dunk. During some brief con fusion on the court, words were exchanged, and the Cavaliers Dar ion Atkins and Teven Jones were ejected for leaving the bench. After the game, as the Seminoles lined up to head for their lock er room, words were ex changed again and the teams came togeth er again, but coaches seemed to control the situation and the teams went to their locker rooms without incident. Virginia used the same blueprint in the rematch as it had in Tallahassee, but this time had the benet of having Harris in the lineup. In Florida, Harris sustained a con cussion after just two minutes on the court and watched the rest of the game as Justin An derson and London Per rantes took charge. This time, he had 10 points by halftime and nished the game 6-for8 with four 3-pointers in ve attempts. After an opening 3-pointer by Devon Bookert for the Semi noles, Virginia scored 22 of the next 27 points. Brogdon had eight and he and Justin Ander son both hit 3-point ers, while the Seminoles turn ed the ball over at least three times and went more than six min utes between their rst eld goal and second. The Seminoles also turned the ball over 18 times, leading to 26 points for the Cavaliers. No. 20 NC STATE 80, No. 17 FLORIDA ST. 57 FLORIDA ST. (14-3) Jones 5-18 0-1 11, Delgado 2-9 0-0 4, Brown 2-7 2-3 6, Slaughter 5-9 2-2 12, Howard 6-12 2-4 14, James 2-5 1-2 5, Bingley 1-3 0-0 2, Coleman 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 24-65 7-12 57. NC STATE (16-2) Goodwin-Coleman 4-9 0-0 12, Brown 3-11 0-2 8, Barrett 2-6 2-2 8, Gatling 8-8 4-5 20, Burke 5-15 5-6 16, Spencer 1-2 1-1 3, Eli 0-0 0-0 0, Mathurin 0-0 0-0 0, Daniel 5-9 3-4 13. Totals 28-60 1520 80. HalftimeNC State 37-26. 3-Point GoalsFlorida St. 2-12 (Coleman 1-2, Jones 1-7, Brown 0-1, Bingley 0-1, Delgado 0-1), NC State 9-22 (Goodwin-Coleman 4-9, Brown 2-4, Barrett 2-6, Burke 1-2, Spencer 0-1). Fouled OutNone. ReboundsFlorida St. 38 (Slaughter 11), NC State 42 (Burke 10). Assists Florida St. 12 (Delgado 7), NC State 23 (Barrett, Burke, Spencer 5). Total FoulsFlorida St. 18, NC State 13. A,786. Harris 18 lead UVa past Florida State, 78-66 ANDREW SHURTLEFF / AP Florida State guard Aaron Thomas (25) drives past Virginia guard Malcolm Brogdon (15) during the rst half of Saturdays game in Charlottesville, Va.

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Shall We Rename Bloxam Avenue Trash Trail? I just lled my third bag with garbage picked up on Bloxam Av enue in Clermont. Hundreds of cigarette lters lining the curbs, brown bottles of beer still drip ping with the last sip of liquid, fast-food restaurant cups with lids and straws still attached, smashed fast food bags once housing ham burgers still stained with cheese and ketchup, tin beer and soda cans attened and shredded by the city workers lawnmowers, in sulation and foam dropped from construction trucks, smashed cig arette cartons, and yes, I cant for get an empty prescription bottle of oxycodone. Why, on a beautiful Sunday af ternoon do I nd myself wearing stained gardening gloves, carrying a stinky garbage bag lled with litter and bending over to retrieve these disgusting items every few seconds from Mother Earth? You see, I recently moved from the other side of Clermont, a gat ed community with residents who walked every day to stay healthy and strong. I loved walking there and never had to be concerned about stepping in dog poop or on a broken beer bottle. After relocating, I knew I want ed to nd a walking trail and, voila, there was Bloxam Avenue waiting for me with all of its side walks, yards, and roads lled with stagnant and mounting trash. Bloxam Avenue, I imagine, was once a scenic Florida road with its new homes lining one side of the street and sweet-smelling citrus groves on the other. Now, in just one night, I can see the addition al garbage accumulating. I dont know the culture, religion, or skin color of the driver who rolls down his or her car/truck window and with sheer abandonment pitch es lth out the window, but I do know her or his habits -smokers, fast-food patrons, alcohol enthu siasts, and lets not forget the drug users. How can we teach others to re spect the land, the roads, person al property and our proud City of Clermont? Perhaps some civ ic group should/could adopt a highway. Why not Bloxam Ave nue? DEANNA M. CREE | Clermont Democrat missteps While Mary OHanlons heart warming story of immigration, hard work and the American Dream casts a Norman Rockwell portrait of the Democratic Par ty, its time to fast forward from F.D.R.s New Deal into the 21st Century. As you are one to spot inaccura cies in data, lets examine yours. If you are correct in assuming the rich pay little taxes and the poor certainly pay little also, then raising taxes, as you propose, would come from where? Exact ly, the middle class. This whole administration has been about spending and raising taxes. This is not a social media phenomenon, it is fact. Every time Congress tries to control spending, the Demo crats throw a t. They are not will ing to cooperate. The president and Harry Reid threaten to veto or vote down bills without even reading them. As far as government is con cerned the Democrats want a hand in it all. Bigger is better. The more we can get on the pay roll the better. Im not sure if this is because of campaign promises that have not been fullled or ar rogance. And lets talk about the white el ephant in the middle of the room that most Democrats (especial ly ones up for re-election) are running away from, Obamacare. This debacle and the nightmare it has presented is a testament to the snake oil salesman approach to the Democratic philosophy. Word it so no one will under stand it and wrap it up in a pretty package. So Mary OHanlon, while your picture-perfect postcard version of the Democratic Party looks good on paper, in reality it is the root of many of this countrys problems. I feel a little bad that I have to be the one to wake you up from your American Dream. DAVID J. MERRILL | Eustis Bring more focus on the possibilities of desalination of seawater I agree with the Daily Com mercial editorial from Jan. 1, CFWI plan will drain our water supply, about vanishing surface water, and I request you bring more focus on the possibilities of desalination of seawater. While efforts to conserve sur face water are controversial and many see those efforts as unfair when commercial interests are withdrawing the precious liquid, desalination, while also contro versial due to cost and environ mental impact, is the only con trollable way to assure future water consumption needs. Desalination, unlike surface water, is not dependent upon unpredictable rainfall. Many states are experiencing record drought. Many states are at war over other states taking their water. There are an estimated 15,000 desalination efforts worldwide and fewer than 400 desalination plants in the USA. As you know, the Sabal Trail Transmission wants to build a 474-mile nat ural gas pipeline from Alabama to Florida at a cost of $3 billion dollars. The Tampa Bay desalination plant cost a mere $158 million. Just think of the economic im pact of one or more desalination plants in construction, mainte nance and supply jobs alone. The best practices and the best expert minds on the ef fort ought to be incentivized to come up with the most effec tive, efcient and environmen tally safe methods to provide de salinated water for our future needs. This has to be done now before we are at one anothers throats over the most precious commodity we have next to ox ygen. Please provide more focus on this subject while you are calling attention to the dilemma and other efforts to distribute van ishing surface water. CHOICE EDWARDS | Clermont Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third par ties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to ar chive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to let ters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR L ake County has had a long and fruit ful relationship with the citrus in dustry hence, communities with names like Groveland. The citrus busi ness isnt what it once was hereabouts, having been diminished by big freez es and disease, but now what remains is being threatened here and elsewhere around the Sunshine State by citrus greening. In fact, citrus greening has the poten tial to wipe out what is arguably one of Floridas signature industries. The bacterium that causes the disease has already decimated the states $9 bil lion citrus industry. It has cost the state as many as 8,000 jobs and caused $4.5 billion in crop damage since 2006. While conventional solutions have proven elusive, there is still hope that the industry can be saved. There is an emerging scientic consensus that ge netic engineering can defeat citrus greening, The New York Times reported in a story last summer. People are either going to drink transgenic orange juice or theyre going to drink apple juice, the Times report ed one University of Florida scientist as saying. The citrus industry has avoided the solution due to consumer fears over ge netically modied organisms, or GMOs. As the Times story and its more recent piece on genetically modied crops in Hawaii described, a lot of false infor mation in the guise of science has been spread about the health risks of con suming genetically modied foods. In Hawaii, a genetically engineered variety of papaya saved the fruit from a devastating disease. Yet, opponents of GMOs have pushed to ban genetically engineered crops on the island of Kona, citing erroneous claims such as a thor oughly debunked study that a diet of GMO corn caused tumors in rats. There are certainly legitimate con cerns about the environmental impact of GMOs and companies that develop them. Pesticide-resistant crops, for ex ample, can lead to increased pesticide spraying and associated problems. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled last year that farmers couldnt use biotech com pany Monsantos genetically altered soy beans without paying a fee. The decision set a frightening precedent in cementing corporate control over the food supply. But biotechnology offers hope in feed ing a growing population grappling with climate change. Yet some liberal groups working to address climate change are opposed to GMOs, spreading the same kind of misinformation employed by cli mate-change deniers. The citrus industry and others in ag riculture must do a better job educating the public about genetically engineered crops, while addressing legitimate con cerns. Failing to do so could spell the end of Florida citrus, and that would mean the end to an important slice of the states economy and history. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM McNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF ALAN YOUNGBLOOD / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP A diver explores Alexander Springs in Astor. The search to save citrus

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 OTHER VOICES Voices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHER VOICES OTHER VOICES I nd considerable irony that Hillary Clinton is a symbol of feminism while Sar ah Palin is despised by todays feminists. Sarah Palins parents were teachers in Alas ka and her entire life and political career was achieved large ly through her person al grit, determination and fundamental be liefs in less taxes and open and ethical gov ernment. Hillary Clintons par ents were far better off nancially. She attend ed Wellesly and Yale Law School, but her political success has largely come as a result of who she married. I really doubt that had Hillary not married Bill Clinton that she would have become a senator from New York or sec retary of state. Had a Republican president had sex with an intern in the White House, the feminists in America would have become unglued, and rightfully so. You would think that nding out that the most powerful man in the world was taking sexual advan tage of a young female White House intern would rightfully draw the outrage of femi nists. Funny, I dont re member that occur ring with Bill Clinton. I am pretty sure that had any college president or the CEO of any For tune 500 company who did what Bill Clinton did would have been immediately red. But the feminists, Hillary and the Dem ocrat leadership stood by their man as the fate of their party and Hillarys future politi cal fortunes supersed ed the lies and embar rassment the Lewinski affair brought to our nations highest of ce. Feminism showed its true colors when it gave a pass to Bill Clin ton. Sarah Palin did not become governor of Alaska because of who she married. She also did not become the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee because she did a poor job as governor. In fact, The Anchorage Dai ly News called her The Joan of Arc of Alaska politics. Her political career began as a city council member, then mayor of Wasilla City. Later, as the governors appoin tee to chair the states Oil & Gas Conservation Committee, she took on her own Republican leaders for the lack of ethics she saw taking place. This act of polit ical courage thrust her into the race for gover nor which she won im pressively 49 percent to 41 percent. I contrast her gutsy rise to become the rst woman governor of Alaska (also the young est) with that of Hillary Clinton, whose polit ical fortunes came as a direct result of being the wife of the presi dent for eight years. You would think that a true feminist would greatly admire a selfmade woman who took on her own partys leadership over ethics, became the rst wom an governor of Alaska, excelled as governor, raised ve children with her supportive husband and was then selected to become the rst Republican wom an vice presidential nominee in 2008. But Sarah Palin had one over riding fatal aw: She is Pro Life. Hillary Clinton stood by her man even though he deliberate ly lied to Americans re garding his sexual rela tionship with a young White House Intern because she realized that her own political aspirations were tied to his fate. Although Impeachment passed the House it fell sort in the Senate and Hil larys future was saved. She then chose to run for the Senate, but not in Arkansas. She chose the very blue state of New York and the ben ets of eight years of being in the nation al spotlight paid off. Her next political step was the presidency. But she underestimat ed Barack Obama and lost her bid in 2008. Once elected, Presi dent Obama, wanting to help heal the rift of primary competition, appointed Hillary as secretary of state. Hillary became our most traveled secre tary of state, but upon leaving ofce, in the af termath of the Beng hazi debacle, there is not one single nota ble achievement she can claim during her tenure. In fact our for eign policy status around the world is in worse shape now than when she and Presi dent Obama took over. But to the feminists of America, her lack of diplomatic success is immaterial because she is pro abortion. Finally I well remem ber that TV ad of Hil larys 2008 campaign asking voters who they wanted to answer that 3 a.m. crisis call ... her or Barrack Obama. Well that answer came from the 911 call placed by our embas sy personnel who were under attack in Beng hazi. We now know that the answer to that question is: We dont want either Hillary or President Obama tak ing that call. It was too big of a political hot potato in the home stretch of a presiden tial campaign. Im pretty sure that had Sarah Palin been our secretary of state, that she would not have ignored the mul tiple pleas from our ambassador for more protection and when that desperate call for assistance came from Benghazi, she would have marshaled all of our resources to go to their aid. Courage over politics would have prevailed. Palin, Clinton and a paradox in feminism RUSS SLOAN GUEST COLUMNIST N o, not that affair. We dont know if French Pres ident Francois Hollande has been carrying on with the actress Ju lie Gayet, which is all the talk over there. We mean Hollandes affair with the no tion that he could revive the French economy by punishing em ployers and soaking the rich. That affair appears to be over. Regrets? We imagine Hollande has a few. He was elected in 2012 on a prom ise to protect government social spending and the nations workers by punishing businesses that closed plants and taxing the most success ful citizens. A member of Hollandes Cabinet told steelmaker ArcelorMit tal that if it didnt protect jobs, its plant in northern France would be nationalized. Hollandes persistent push for a 75 percent tax on incomes above 1 million euros won court ap proval last month. He made scant ef forts to deal with Frances soaring public debt and notoriously uncom petitive business environment. And what has happened in France? Foreign investment has dried up. Unemployment has hit a 16-year high, more than twice the rate of Germany. Consumer spending and economic growth have stalled. Hollandes approval ratings are the worst of any postwar French presi dent. On Tuesday, Hollande launched a crusade to make his country com petitive again. He announced a 30-billion-euro payroll-tax cut for French companies. He pledged to re duce government red tape and labor rules that scare away investors. He promised to cut government social spending by at least 50 billion euros by the end of 2017. Frances leader might nally be recognizing that the nations fail ure to be competitive with its neigh bors starts at the top. He also called on business, though, to increase employment in return for the bet ter operating environment and said he would establish a commissio n to monitor job creation. There is no time to lose, Hol lande said Tuesday, 20 months into his disastrous term. Chalk it up to a bad romance. It was just one of those things. Distributed by MCT Information Services. R esponding to Russ Sloans version of history in his guest column on Dec. 22, Is recent world history re peating Itself? The 1908 discovery of oil in Iran by a British ge ologist energized a cir cling of the wagons to in sure British control and royalty rights that left Ira nians with as little as 16 percent of the prots. Conditions amounting to plunder were struggled with for more than 40 years until the democrat ically elected Prime Min ister Mohammad Mossa degh brought about the nationalization of the An glo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC) in March, 1951. U.S. interests recent ly allied with the British joined the furor and sent the CIA (Operation Ajax) to overthrow Mossade gh in 1953 and install the west-leaning Shah Mo hammad Reza Pahlavi. AIOC became British Pe troleum in 1954. Their National Intelli gence and Security Or ganization (SAVAK) was designed by the U.S. and Israel in 1957 promot ing their own interests. The horrors of the Shahs despotic regime through 1979 are too many for this review. All this provocation to revolt is totally ignored by Russ Sloan. For Zion ist sympathizers pulling for a U.S. war with Iran, history begins on Nov. 4, 1979, when youthful Is lamists invaded the U.S. embassy compound and held its staff hostage for 444 days. Before that, it is un likely that most Ameri cans could locate Iran on a map. After that, crank ing up hatred for Iran be came a national policy. Its what we do when we want the oil at any price. JOHN WHITAKER | Tavares In France, the end of the affair Oil grab is behind anti-Iran sentiment

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rfrfnt rrfntnbrfbfftntnn tbtttttfttfbttntnttbtfrnfrftfftbffftfbbtttbnnffbnrfbtfffffffttbtbntbtfbftntnrft tttfttttfbtntttfbbftffffffnrfrfrfbnrfrftttbftrffffftntfbfttffft btttbftf rfn tb rnn r rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 r f f f f fn nt nb rf r fnttbb rfn ff ff ffb f f fr t ttbb f fff ffb ff f fff rfttn tt n n f t f f t f f f f f n f t f f f f f f f f b f b f t f f b t f f f f f f f f f b t t f f f f t f f f t t r r f r f f t f f f f f r f f t f f f r f f t f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f f f f t f f f b f f f b f f f f f f f t f f f f f t t f ff t nff t bt tttffbrbb tttt f f f f f f b n b t t b b b t t b b b t ttt r fnt rfn ffr ffr fff f f f fr f tt t f fr ffr fffff fff fff f fff rfttn tt n f f f f t f f t f t f ff t n t bt ttbbb tt f f f f f b t b f f f t b ttn f t f t r f f f r ftt tt fttt f ff ff nff ffff ff n r rf trt tttf bn r r f f t f f tfff t f ff t nf f f f f f r f f f f f f f b t t b b b t r t b b b n ttt t f t f t f r f t nff f ttfff t t b tb ttb n b b t nt ttt fnt f f f fr tt nt f f fttnf t fbn t f fntbb f rf fr n n ft n t f t f f f ntb t t nf ttt f f f f f f n b t t b b b t tt nff fn tf ft b ntb ntbbtb ttb nt ttt r r f n nttt fff fff ff fff fffff f f fr tt nttt f ff fff ffff fffff f f ff ttnt t n t t r f f f f f f f f f f f fff fff ffff ffbb n ffbf fb f t tb f ff fff ff fff rfff ffr f fff tt rf ffbf tt f bbtt tt n b t t b b b t tt nff fn tf ft b ntb ntbbtb b nt ttt r r f n nbb ffff ff ffffff ffbff b ff rffffff fff f ff ffff ff ff fff ff ff fffff f f f fr ttt bb f ffff ffff fff ffff ffff ff ffffff ffbff b ffrff fffff ff ff ff fff fff ff fffff f f ff ttnt t n f t f t t t t t f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f rf nrtbt rfnt

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 rf r f f n t b f f f b r f f n t b f f f f t f f b r f b f f t b f t f b f b r f r n f t f t b r f b t b b f b r f t t b f n b r f r t b f f b r f b b r f r f f f f b f f ft b f b f n f f f f f f f t b f f f f f n f f f f f f b r f f b f f r t b t b f t b f f r t f f f f f n n t t b f r f f r b f f t f t t b f f t f b f f f b f f b f t r f f f t b f f f f f f r f f r t b f f t t b f f t b f t b f r f b f n b r f f f f f t f b t r f r t f b f n f t b n t b f f f n t f b n n r ft n n r t f f f f f f f n t f f b f b t f n n t f f t b f f f n t f t r t n n t n b r f b fb n f b r f r r b f n t t b b r t r fn f t f b t b t f t b f f b f f f f b t f t r f t b t f t r f t r f f r t f f f f f f f f f t b r f f f f f f f r t b f r t b n f n t f f f t f t t b f f f t n n t f n f f f t b t b f t r r f b f f b t b f f b t b f f f f r f n f f r f t f f f n f t f r t f f ft b f b f f f f r f rf f f f f f f f f f f f fftbff nfbtbft ffbrfbrfrtfbtb tffbrfbrfbrft tfntbbb tfbtbft ffbrfbr brbrtbffrtfn tftftbrfntbbb ffnftf b r f n f n t t b t b b n b r f t t b f b r f b n t t b t b b n f n f f f n n b f t r f f f f f f t r f t r r f f b t r f b f f t f t b f t t b f n f b f f f f f f f fffftbr tnbrfnftn ffrtfrftb trftrfftb f fn fr t f f f f f f f bffrtffbfb ff frtfbfb ffffbt tff ftbrffrf nf brfrtr bfbfffftf rrffnfff ffbfbffrt f f f f ffftffb nbftbfrf fbfftnft btffffrfttb r f t b f b f f f f f b f f f n t f f f b f f t r b t f t t b f f r f f t n f f t b f f t n f t r f b t f t r f f t b f f f t b f t f f f t r r f f f ft b f b f f f f f f f f f f f f b f f ft b f b f f f f f f f t f b f t b f t t b f t b r f f r f b t t b f f f t b f t f f f t b f b f f b t b f t t b n n n b f f b t r r f f f t t b f f n t t f f b r b t f f f n f f f f t r r f nt f tbffffbtftr tbfnrtftbffn fffrfrttbfr fff f f f f f n t f n f b t n f f r f f t r r f b f f t f t b f b f f f t r f t r t b f f f f nt f f f b f f f f t f f b f f t f b f f t f f b f f f f t f t b fn f f t b f n f f f b f f t t t b f f t b f f n t t f b r f n f f ft b f b f f f t t f n t f n f n f f t t f f f t f t b f t b r n t t f f r n ft b f f ft b f b f n t f n f f n f f t t f f f f r r f b fr f b r t f n f n n t b fn f f f f f b f n f f t b f b r f b f f f t b f f n t t f f b t f b r f n f f t t f f t t f f f n t f f n f n f f n f f f f t f b f t b f f f b f f f f f t f b f f t f t b f n f b f n f f t b f b f f t b f f f t f f n f b r n ft b f f t f f b f t t b f f f b t t f t t b f n f b f f b f n f f f r f f f f f r r f f f b f n t f n r t t t b r f n bt nftfffrr tbrftbffbttb tftbrffnbbf tbfftbrtbft ttbftbfftbfft bt b r f n f r b n f f f f f t ft b f f t n f f f n f n f f f f f f f f f f n t f t f t t t b f t f f t n t f b f t t b f b fb r f f n f f f f f f n b t b b f ft b f r f f b f f t f n b f ft b f f f f t b f n f f ft b f rffftrff nffftfrttttftb ffbff f b r f n fr r n bt f f f r f t f t f b r r b f t b f r n n r t f f f t r n f f f f f t b r b r f n f t r 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t b f n f b b f f t f f t r f f f ft f n t r n b f f b f b f t b t b f ft b b t b f f f n f f f f n t fr f n f t f f t b f t f t t b f t f r n b f t ft f t t r f f f f b f r t f f t r f f t t t f t b r t b f t t b f r t n b f f f f b f t b f b n f f t t f f f t f f b b t f n f b f f b r f t r t b f t f n tf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f nfffft ff bft f f f f f f f f f f fnnttbffftfftbrf tfrftftftfnnttbfntb bfbffffnftbf nnttbfnfftfff nbfftbrfftr ftfntbftfbffftff bbfttbftfnnrtbf tfntbfffrtttfft tntnbfrfbfftf tfftfffff fftbfrftff rrfntbfftrf ffbfrtrfffbfrttb nrffftfftbrfft ffbfnfbtrrff ntbfftbfffftfbrf rfffrtbfbrfbff tnfrfffrtbftfnr tfrftbrfftnbfbr trbfbftffftff rffftfrfbftrftn rfftrff rf bff b t t b f f t r f t f f f t r ftffftrftbt tbrfbrffntffrftrf tbfftbrftrbfr ffffrftrftf trfbtfffbfff fftffftbfbf fffftrf tftrfbtbftffrff ftnfffnftb trfbrfnftbffff fbtbfftnf fnffftbrffnttbf fftrff tbf rf bff f f fffbftftf fffnff fbrtffrfnf fbfftbf fftrffff ffftfffffbr brfftr f rf ff f f t b n t b f f f f f f f f b f t f f r t t t f b r f b f n n r t b f t b f r f t t f t b f t f r t b f f b t r f f b f f f f f f t t b f t b f t b f f f b f f r t b f f f t f f f f f f f t b f f f t f f f t r f b f f f t t b f f t b f r f f f t f f t f r t b f f f t b f t n t r f f f t f f f t f t n t r f f f bffff b rf ntb n

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rf r f n t b f t n t n t rf rff fftt f t n t b f t n t n t bf ntf tbb fntftt f f f t n rnfb fnt f trft bftnn t b bftf rf fftnn f t r t f r r f f f t n t f fttnt f tn fttn rrb fntbfnt r f t n f tnt r f t f t n f ftnttn rffnf fr rb r r rrf rr rfrff fnfr r r rr rr rf rf f f t f f f b r r r r r r r r r b r f r b r r r r b r r b r f tfrf tf r fftntn rff fn tbf r r r f f t t fftt fn f f t t n n ft tn brfft tt rrr rftftttnttnf f fb rf brffnn nb nf ntrft bfb rrfftt rrff ttnt tt fftnt bf tn rf tnntt nf tftt brrf tftn tfftttf f f t t bf t bbf bfttt r r f f t t n bf ttn trb ftftt rff tftt bf f tf f ttftn bff ntfttnt r ffftf tn rftn t r fftttn fff ftfttt fnnt ftft tnn f nft rrffntf tn fftntn f ffft t rfff ttn f tttn r f f r fnt brf fntftn r r r r r t n frf rftfntnnt f r fnffttt f n t f t ft f rtfn f ftt f fr ftn f fbrft brff ftn b f f t t t t ffnfttt fb rf ft ftf fbfttn b b f t f t n r fftt f ftf f t f t f f t t t t n fftf tnn b nftt rf fn rr fftnntn frrr ftb n brftf rr fff r f f n t t ft ttn f rfff ffntbft t b f t n rrrr fff rrr bfrff fb rrf tt nt rrftrf rrfntf t rtf ftf bf frr fntftt bnb rf fttf r btn rft rftnn f f t f t n bf tf tb nf ftftn ff tftn f tff tnt rf tttn b f f rrrf tttn b bnf r r r f r b r f r b f r t f f

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb r fntbnnntt tnnf nttbbntf b fn bnbtff t nffntn tntttbbbnt ttnnf r ttnf btt b f n t n n b f nntnb tntt ntt r n n t t r fnt nntt tntnft ntt br nttn tntnnttntt bntnt n f ntt r ftrr b b b n n n f f r n t t n f b n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt ntt r t n t n b b t t n t n t r r r rt r n n n t n n f n t t n t r rt t n n n t b f t t t n n n n f t n f b b n t b n f n n n t t n f f f n t t b n n n t n n n t n b n t t f n t t btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r rt r r n t n t bf tnfr nn nnbbf rr rt b bf t b b btnf tnt n n t t ftfn f t n t n f n n t b ntt n t t r f n t t rr rt r nnnb nb tntt nbnn nt ff f n fnt nbn ff nff ntt nbnnn nntnn ntt nntt fr t tntf ntt tfff ntt t f n tnftf ntn nfttftt b r ff t ntt t t n n n ff f tntt tntt tntnf ff nnf fntt tnfnbf tt nr fn r f ntt r ntf ntt nr r nr n n rnn ntt rt r rr ntttnn tnfn nttntn btn tt nn f nnfnn ntt r n n nntt n ntt tnff ntt nt nbttbnf n rntt nbtt nt nntt r nbtbnttf tnt r f ntt nfbntt nntnf n t n f nf fntt rntt ntbnnt ft n bntnbbt f fn nnnnfnt nntn ntt r r f n f t t b tn tfntt r ffntt tfnt ntt t ntt bttt r t t b b tttt ntt br n tnn ntt r f ff nntt fbtn ntt r fff ntt r tnnn nf tft ntt bbtf n nt tn nttn nt n f f r

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfntr brttnftnb nnbrbbr b nfntb nnnnttr r b n r r bb nnnrr nr rttn bbntn rr bbnntr tt ttnbnb bnrtt rrf bbr ttttnnr tt btrnbrbb ttnr ntbf r r t t n tbf f b t n b t n n t b b n r r fbbbr ntnrnr bf nrbnr rnnbbr nnrrtt r tnnr rtt n n r r r tt rtt nrrf f nbbt b b b b b b n n t f n t n n n r r n n t b r t t n nn tbt r r r r r bnr rr b b nntrttnnrtnr rtt n f rtt nbtf b bf r t r n n b n b b t n b t n n r r bbrfntr tbrrnbn rttr tn bttbbbrrtt nbb trbbttbb bbtnr tttrntn bttbbnbb tnrrtt n nn frfbt r b r n r b b r n r b n n b b t r n b t r t b r n t n b n t n n t r b t n r bbbn bnttrnnn bnrbbbn ftrrnbt bbbnbrr ttnbtnttn nn f t f nfbnt rfnnnt rbtbb nrrnbt nnnb bnbrttnbnr bbttnnnt bnr bntbr fttnn bnnfrtt b n n n r t r t t n b n n b r t t bn nnbbtnr btnntnnbnt brbn tbbtbnr bbtt ttbbb tnbrr r t r n b t n n t r t r t b r b b r b nnbbbr tt r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt nnf f nnntrf f n r b n n n n t n b b n t b n b n n n b b b b r t n t t n r b n t b b n n n n b b n t t b t n b b t t n n b b n n n b r b r r n b n ff tbtnnbbr bbttnntttrtr b nttf n t t b r t n n n t t n n r r r n b b n b t b r b b n n b n r t t r r b n n r b n b t n n b n b n r b n n r t r n n r r t t nf f n f b t t n n n r b r r b r b n n n n n b b b t t b n t t n b b n n b t t b b n n t r nftf f nnff f r nbnbnt btnbnbtn n n t t nbntn bb b t b t r n t b b bbnntbt tt n n t n r n f n n r b t n r b r t t r b r n r b b r n r b trf fft bnbtnt bnrntbbrb tt n b n n r b r b r n b b b r b t t b b n frb f

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014

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E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 Money scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com ENTREPRENEURS: Boomers attempt to stage rebound / E3 www.dailycommercial.com RICK REED Special to the Daily Commercial W ake up and smell Frank Garofalos coffee his fresh roasted coffee. Once you do, you may never go back to your regular brand. Garofalo and his wife, Tam mi, own and operate Golden Hills Coffee Roasters, a micro coffee roaster on Max Hooks Road in Groveland. If you compare ours to Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks, you wont go back, Garofa lo said of two of the nations heavyweight roasters. This is what coffee is supposed to taste like. Garofalo was an average cof fee drinker, two cups daily. And he enjoyed both cups. I thought I was buying the best coffee, Starbucks, he said. I thought it was the best. But when I compared my cup to what I was drinking I thought, Wow, Ive been drink ing burnt coffee this whole time. Why the conversion? Garofalo owned a Feder al Express ground route in the Gainesville area and many of his deliveries were at the Uni versity of Florida. It was curiosity, he said. I wanted to see why all the kids in Gainesville were drinking all this handcrafted roasted cof fee. So he bought a little halfpound roaster, put it on his back porch and started learn ing about roasting. He still re members that rst cup. The smell and aroma of the coffee, wed never experienced before, he said. The cara mel, chocolate and vanilla of the Costa Rican coffee beans is what we really fell in love with. It was the best cup of coffee I ever had in my life. So he began his coffee and roasting education, and read everything he could get his hands on while learning the ins and outs of roasting. Hed roast the beans at night, put them in bags with their name on them and then sell them to family, friends and customers along his FedEx route. Each coffee has to be roast ed in a unique way, Garofa lo said. The avors are in the beans. Its my job to get the a vors out. His condence grew. I told my wife we could do this, he said. So he purchased a 20-pound drum roaster and put his route up for sale. It took two-and-a-half years to sell it, Garofalo said of his FedEx route. During that time I was perfecting our roasting. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Frank Garofalo, 45, roasts coffee at his company Golden Hills Coffee in Groveland on Wednesday. TOP: Garofalo holds green coffee beans. Bags of coffee beans sit near a wall waiting to be roasted. Groveland man knows beans about coffee I thought I was buying the best coffee, Starbucks. I thought it was the best. But when I compared my cup to what I was drinking I thought, Wow, Ive been drinking burnt coffee this whole time. Frank Garofalo DAVID PIERSON Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES One of Californias top ambas sadors often comes lightly salted and travels in a vac uum-sealed can. Eat an al mond anywhere in the world and chances are that it was grown in the Golden State. California produces 82 percent of the globes al monds, harvesting about 800,000 acres of the tree nut across a 400-mile stretch from northern Tehama County to southern Kern County. Fueling the boom is ro bust foreign demand, par ticularly from emerging consumer markets like Chi na and India, where the in dustry has been promot ing almonds as a healthful snack. About 70 percent of Cal ifornias almonds are sold overseas. That made the crunchy nut the No. 1 state agricultural export in 2012 at $2.5 billion. Thats 2 1/2 times more than wine, the second-most-valuable Cal ifornia agricultural export, according to the U.S. Cen sus Bureau. The U.S. is the 800-pound gorilla of the global almond industry, said Karen Hal liburton Barber, assistant vice president and senior analyst for produce at Ra bobank, a leading agricul tural lender. Theyre the dominant producer. The Almond Board of California forecasts that the state will harvest its third-largest crop this year at 1.85 billion pounds slightly less than last years 1.88 billion pounds. Thats more than three times what the state was BRIAN VAN DER BRUG / MCT Joe MacIlvaine, president of Paramount Farming Company, shows off buds on almond tree branches in Lost Hills, Calif., on September 9, 2013. MacIlvaine has been president of Paramount Farming Company since 1986. Global demand drives growth in almond production SEE ALMOND | E4 ALEX VEIGA Associated Press U.S. homebuilders lost a little condence in the housing market this month but remain generally upbeat ahead of the spring home-sell ing next season. The National Associa tion of Home Builders/ Wells Fargo builder sen timent index released Thursday dipped to 56. Thats down from De cembers reading of 57, which was revised one point lower from its ini tial estimate. Readings above 50 indicate more builders view sales conditions as good, rather than poor. Builders view of current sales condi tions for single-fami ly homes, their outlook for sales over the next six months and traf c by prospective buy ers each declined since December. Even so, the over all index is nine points higher than a year ago, reecting a stronger U.S. housing market. Rising home prices, historically low mort gage rates and signi cant pent-up demand will drive a continuing, gradual recovery in the year ahead, said Da vid Crowe, the NAHBs chief economist. The spring buy ing and selling season kicks off next month, traditionally the time of the year that sets the tone for residential hiring and construc tion. Many builders, US homebuilder confidence dips in January GENE J. PUSKAR / AP A carpenter works on the roof of a town home in Robinson Township, Pa. The National Association of Home Builders releases the housing market index for January on Thursday. I been doin ne on Houston time When the sun sets on Copano Bay. I Like Texas by Pat Green I recently heard a well-educated Texan talk about his home state seceding from the un ion. Floridians never talk about se ceding. Im not sure we ever joined. An drew Jackson prob ably took one look at Floridas impenetrable swamps, our alligators and mosquitoes and at the deant Semi noles ensconced in the muck and said, Lets push on to greener pastures. Florida and Texas share a remarkable size and breathtaking beau ty. Driving the length of Florida, from Pensac ola to Key We st, or the width of Texas, from El Paso to Tyler, is a MARGARET McDOWELL GUEST COLUMNIST SEE BEANS | E2 SEE CONFIDENCE | E2 Texas and Florida keep taxes low, growth high SEE MCDOWELL | E2

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LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Toward the tail end of that period, he was becoming depressed because he couldnt sell the route. But on his way home from Gainesville one day, he had a vision. I looked up to the sky and took a pho to of clouds; they were almost like contrails, he said. It was shaped like my logo. The logo had been developed two years earlier after they asked their son Frank, then 9 years old, to come up with a name. He sug gested Golden Valley Coffee and his parents loved the idea. But, that name was already taken. So Ga rofalo sketched some thing representative of where they lived hills, three to be exact. He suggested to Frank they call it Golden Hills Coffee. Those three hills represent my wife, my self and my son. He said. Fast forward to two years later, and the clouds looked like the three hills I sketched. I came home and showed my wife the photo and she could not believe it. She was blown away by it. Within a couple of weeks, Garofalo had a buyer for his FedEx route and the rest is history. The back porch of their Clermont home became too small and they found space at an industrial park off of State Road 50 at 1510 Max Hooks Rd., Ste. C, where they are still committed to roasting the nest coffees. All of their coffee is roasted there, usual ly twice a week. There is also a retail space, but most of their coffee is sold at coffee shops and bakeries in Central Florida, Gainesville or online. Roasting the beans is a complex process in volving the right beans, bean origin, tempera ture and blends. Trade secrets, he said of his process. The origins we use and temperatures and controls, all thats kept secret. Its also very hands on. A lot of roasters use computers, he add ed. We use a hands-on approach. Things like humidity and tempera ture are always differ ent so it has to be ad justed each time we roast. I learned a lot by reading and practicing at home. His wife Tammi han dles the website, billing and accounts receiv able. On the days hes not roasting, Frank deliv ers his beans and seeks new accounts. We started with zero wholesale accounts, he said. I had to go out on the streets with my kit. The key was devel oping his own espres so blend. You wont get ac counts without it, he said. Now I bring a shot of espresso and they see the difference and taste the differ ence. Garofalo also spent time perfecting the companys signature house blend. The website de scribes it as a unique blend of coffee avors that represent what Florida has to offer: Ex pect a bright cup with hints of grapefruit, lemon, lime and or ange on the nish. This was the most important blend, he said. I wanted the cof fee to represent what Florida has to offer with out adding any avors. He did it by blend ing different beans and picking different ori gins, and then blend ing it the right way. I had a goal in mind that was very unique, he said. It took six weeks. Finding the right espresso blend took longer. The espresso was more complex, he added. There was a lot going on. They offer 14 differ ent single origins and blends that they roast, though not always at the same time. And youll nd different beans and blends at different retail shops, depending on the cli entele. Not everyone wants organic or fair trade coffee. Golden Hills Cof fee Roasters purchas es their green coffee beans from around the world in 132to 150-pound burlap sacks. It takes 15 to 17 minutes to roast about 12 pounds of coffee. Garofalo roasts less than the 20-pound ca pacity because it gives him greater control. The roaster gets to about 430 degrees and the beans are heated to about 350. They offer private or customized labels with customers logos on the bag. That has been good for business, he said. Garofalo continues looking for wholesale customers and also of fers a fundraiser pro gram, which is a presale program, meaning nothing is purchased in advance. Their shop is open from 8 a.m. un til 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. For information or to order coffee, go to www. goldenhillscoffee.com, call 352-217-2831 or go to their Facebook page. BEANS FROM PAGE E1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Garofalo checks on coffee beans while they are being roasted. particularly smaller rms, sell homes that will take months to build. While average U.S. mortgage rates for xed mortgages remain near historically low lev els, they have risen more than a full percentage point since hitting record lows a year ago. That slowed sales during the summer and through much of the fall. Sales of new homes dipped 2.1 percent in No vember to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 464,000, according to the Commerce Depart ment. Still, the government revised sales g ures higher for the previous three months, an encouraging sign heading into the spring. The annual pace of new-home sales remains well below the 700,000 generally consistent with a healthy market. But overall, 2013 rep resented the b est year for the housing market since the nancial crisis, and most economists expect sales and prices to keep rising this year. Builders broke ground on homes at a season ally adjusted annual rate of 1.09 million homes and apartments in November. That was the fastest pace since February 2008 and was 23 percent higher than in October. Crowe noted that many homebuilders face rising construction costs and the fallout from inaccurate home appraisals, which have sty mied some sales. That may be dimming the outlook for some of the respondents polled in the latest NAHB survey, which included responses from 349 builders. A measure of current sales conditions for single-family homes dipped one point to 62. Builders outlook for single-family home sales over the next six months slipped two points to 60, while a gauge of trafc by pr ospective buy ers fell three points from last month to 40. CONFIDENCE FROM PAGE E1 signicant excursion. The exqui site blue-white swirls in the late summer sky over Odessa and the west Texas plains are virtu ally indescribable, just as the painted colors of a winter sun set over the Gulf in Destin defy verbal denition. Texas is Sam Houston, Jim Bowie, the Alamo and the hill country. Florida is Disney World, The Everglades, A1A and white sand beaches. Texas, which currently enjoys a bustling economy, is electronics, airlines, cattle, cotton, lumber and big oil. Many Floridians are more interested in preventing oil from washing up on our shores than in drilling for it. Our econ omy is fueled by international trade, tourism, the space indus try, agriculture and the military. The states also share a cou ple of similarities: One no state income tax. Two grow ing populations. Texas gener ates almost 9 percent of the U.S. GDP; Florida produces just under 6 percent. But Florida may pass New York in popula tion this year (according to the Associated Press), and with 20 million residents will then trail only California and yes, Texas, in population. Seven states operate without a state income tax: Alaska, Flor ida, Nevada, South Dakota, Tex as, Washington and Wyoming. Is it a coincidence that the economies in several of these states are booming? Maybe. The relationship between state tax es and overall economic health is a complex issue. Some Tex ans, for instance, complain that while Texas has no state income tax, residents are saddled with high property taxes instead. The Tax Foundation compiles a list of the states that pay the lowest total per capita income in state taxes. Alaska, at 6.4 per cent of income, is the lowest. Florida is fourth at only 7.4 per cent of income. As Elizabeth Malm, an econ omist at The Tax Foundation writes, a states ability to ex port its tax burden, or col lect revenues from non-resi dents, is a key component in meeting state revenue require ments. Few states perform this function better than Florida. It also appears that state s with low taxation are attracting new growth and new residents, as they must, to compete with other states in the new state taxation and growth paradigm. Margaret R. McDowell, a syndicated economic columnist, chartered nancial consultant and accredited investment duciary, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. MCDOWELL FROM PAGE E1 Seven states operate without a state income tax: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming.

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties LILY LEUNG The Orange County Register In the depths of the Great Recession, Kathleen Schnei der saw a nest egg she had built over decades shrink by more than 20 percent. The Fullerton, Calif., residents investment portfolio began to rebound last year, but the sharp decline taught her the need to diversify. So Schneider, 57, recently took out a portion of her re tirement savings and bought an Instant Imprints fran chise, which makes promo tional items for businesses. Her shop opened in late No vember. The chains franchi sees typically invest a total of $160,982 to $297,898 and pay an ongoing royalty fee of 6 percent, according to fran chising data from Entrepre neur Media. So now Ive got control of whether I succeed or not, said Schneider, who also owns a separate IT business consulting rm. Her nan cial future is more tied to my being successful in the business than just the nancial markets. It is increasingly more common to see baby boom ers jump into self-employ ment. More than 23 percent of entrepreneurs who start ed companies in 2012, the latest year for which data is available, are ages 55 to 64. Thats a jump from 14 per cent in 1996, according to an analysis by the Ewing Mari on Kauffman Foundation, a Kansas City, Mo.-based non prot that tracks startup ac tivity. Motivations to kick off a business instead of nding a retirement getaway include replenishing retirement ac counts, starting second ca reers or working for one self. But those with dreams of starting new ventures in their 50s and 60s face chal lenges that go beyond the usual ones facing entrepre neurs. Theres about a 50/50 chance that a U.S. business will make it past the ve-year mark, based on 2013 Cen sus Bureau data. Its unclear whether the odds of success are better or worse for boom er-led startups. What is clear is that recovery from a failure could be more difcult. The business entry and exit are much closer togeth er, said Michele Markey, vice president of the Kauff man Foundations FastTrac program, which trains entre preneurs around the coun try. If you take a boomer thats 55, they dont have 20 to 30 years to recover (from) an up-and-down business or business mistakes. Acknowledging that, the Kauffman Foundation and AARP last year launched a program for baby boomers who want to explore entre preneurship. Irvine, Calif., is among three cities piloting a 10week course, Kauffman Fast Trac New Venture for the Boomer Entrepreneur. Mi ami and New York City are the other locations. Organiz ers chose Irvine partly be cause of its proximity to oth er big population centers in Southern California, includ ing San Diego and the Inland Empire, said Larry Kutch er, an Orange County, Calif., business owner leading the local course. Set to start Feb. 24, the lo cal program will cover top ics such as coming up with business plans, rening el evator pitches and learn ing the value of networking. One likely discussion top ic is franchising, which is a popular model for older en trepreneurs because it of fers a companys established brand and support system. Thats what appealed to Schneider, who opened the promotional items store in Fullerton. Youre having a business with the support of suppliers and contacts but youre still running your own busi ness, she said. Lori Kewalram and her husband, Biju, both in their 50s and from the corporate world, also went the fran chise route. They recent ly bought the Huntington Beach, Calif., location of BrightStar Care, a nation al business that mainly pro vides medical and non-med ical help to the elderly. Kewalram, 53, used part of the couples retirement sav ings to nance the business, which she said reects her condence in the franchises reputation. BrightStar Care franchi sees typically invest $90,378 to $165,676 for a location and must pay 5 percent to 6 percent in ongoing royalties, franchising data from Entre preneur Media shows. A former IT professional, Kewalram said she launched the business to help the el derly while having the abili ty to do my own thing and be in control. And, like Schnei der, she saw her retirement savings take a hit during the last nancial downturn. But franchising isnt for everyone. Boomers have to think about how much mon ey they can afford to risk and how many years they plan to work. Markey, of Kauffman Fast Trac, presents this hypothet ical: Someone who is 55 and wants to retire in ve years is thinking about investing in a McDonalds franchise that will cost $1 million to $2 mil lion. Can you invest in that, get it up and running, be prot able and receive an invest ment back, plus whatever additional nancial benet that might be? Markey said. Time frame is a big consid eration for their goals. Would-be franchisees gen erally have to sign multiyear agreements. If a franchiser goes under during that time, franchisees could lose all or most of their investments, said Don Sniegowski, who runs franchisee-advice web site Blue MauMau. Franchisees also could be on the hook for any future royalties. You can lose quite a bit, Sniegowski said. If youre 56, go into (a franchise) busi ness and lose all your life savings then youre in big trouble. Boomer entrepreneurs attempt to stage rebound JEBB HARRIS / MCT Owners Kathy Schneider and son, Steve Schneider, watch a banner roll off a large format printer at Instant Imprints in Fullerton, Calif. Associated Press WASHINGTON The Treasury Depart ment announced Thursday it plans to sell 410,000 shares of Ally Financial for $3 bil lion as part of its ongo ing effort to recoup the costs of the $700 billion nancial bailout. The shares will be of fered in a private offer ing at $7,375 each. After the completion of the stock sale, the department said the U.S. government will have recovered about $15.3 billion, or 89 per cent, of the $17.2 bil lion it provided to Ally during the nancial crisis. The government will still hold about 37 percent of the bank holding companys stock. Ally Financial re ceived a total of $17.2 billion in govern ment support during the nancial crisis. Ally, based in Detroit, makes loans to GM customers and nanc es dealer inventories. The government rst bailed out the com pany, then known as GMAC Inc., in late 2008 as part of the Bush ad ministrations aid to the auto industry. The Obama administration provided addition al funding in May and December 2009. The company said in a statement the sale is a key step in the com panys plan to repay U.S. taxpayers in full for the money it re ceived from the gov ernment bailout fund, the Troubled Asset Re lief Program. These actions, cou pled with the strength of our ongoing busi ness, position Ally to complete its plans to exit TARP and to con tinue to build upon our thriving franchis es, Ally said in a state ment. Treasury sells $3 billion in Ally Financial stock

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Crystal, M.D. Board Certified Internal Medicine Joan De Riggs P.A.-C.(Three Locations To Serve You )TAVARES 2736 Dora Ave., Tavares, FL 32778 LEESBURG 26218 US Hwy 27, Suite 103 LADY LAKE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT.Internal Medicine Practices BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! producing in the late 1990s. Experts are op timistic that the in dustry can maintain that sort of volume in the coming years. For eign demand is expect ed to increase. Compe tition should remain light. The main barriers to continued growth are access to land and tightening water sup plies. Well run out of dirt and water before we run out of almond markets, said Dan iel Sumner, director of the Agricultural Issues Center at University of California-Davis. The biggest of those worries is water. Al monds are a relatively thirsty crop, and farm ers need to water them even during dry spells. California suffered its worst drought con ditions in 90 years be tween January and May, leaving reservoirs dangerously low and state water allocations to farmers well below historical averages, ac cording to the Bureau of Reclamation. The stingy water supplies resulted in smaller al monds this year. Water is a huge chal lenge, said Richard Waycott, chief execu tive of the state almond board. The group has partnered with the University of Califor nia-Davis to promote a variety of water conser vation plans using mi cro sprinklers and soil moisture monitoring systems. Growers are harvest ing more almonds and using less water per acre than in years past. But the sheer acreage of Californias almond industry means water will remain a concern. Still, with almond prices nearly doubling in the last ve years to $2.58 a pound, its lit tle wonder that growers have been abandoning crops such as cotton and furiously planting almond trees. Theres twice as much almond acreage in California as there was two decades ago. Meanwhile, cotton acreage has dwindled to about 400,000 acres from 1.3 million acres over the same period. It feels like almonds became rock stars overnight, said Kar en Ross, secretary of the California Depart ment of Food and Ag riculture. But theyve been building in bits and pieces for years. I look at almonds as a great case study be cause they were very strategic and willing to make long-term invest ments. Central to that plan are nutritional research and clever marketing. The Almond Board of California has funded a number of studies, in cluding an October re port in the European Journal of Clinical Nu trition showing that eating dry-roast ed, lightly salted al monds could sate hun ger without increasing body weight. Almonds are a ma jor part of the farm ing portfolio of Beverly Hills, Calif., billionaires Stewart and Lynda Res nick, who own brands such as Wonderful Pis tachios, Pom Wonder ful pomegranate juice and Halos mandarin. The couples Para mount Farming Co. has been expanding its al mond acreage in Kern and Madera counties to meet growing glob al demand for the tree nut. It farms 46,000 acres of almond or chards, a space the size of 13 Los Angeles Inter national airports that produces 6 percent of the states almonds. This is a natu ral place to grow al monds, said Joe MacIlvaine, president of Paramount Farm ing, surveying the com panys vast acreage in Lost Hills, a dusty at 50 miles northwest of Bakerseld, Calif. You need that Mediterra nean-type climate or it wont work. That means warm and dry weather al most year round, and no frost during the cru cial spring. Thats when the $4.8 billion indus try puts its faith in hon eybees to pollinate the pink-and-white ow ers blooming on the al mond trees. For Paramount, that requires hiring bee keepers to deploy near ly 3 billion buzzing insects. That has be come increasingly dif cult and more expen sive with the sudden and mysterious death of billions of bees since 2006, a phenomenon known as bee colony collapse disorder. Our crop is entirely dependent on them, MacIlvaine said. Harvesting isnt near ly as precarious, thanks to modern machinery. In the late summer, the orchards rumble with the sound of tree shak ers low-slung ve hicles equipped with padded arms that rat tle the tree trunks until they rain clouds of al monds and dust. The almonds are sent to a state-of-theart processing facility, which shells the nuts, checks them for de fects and then hand sorts them for different grades. The company is building a packaging and roasting plant part of its plan to sell more of its almonds directly to consumers as a packaged snack. About 40 percent of the companys almonds are sold to major food companies such as Kel loggs for use in prod ucts including cereal. Some of the nuts are also sold to Chi na, where annual con sumption of Califor nia almonds has more than doubled in the last ve years to 208 million pounds, making it the top foreign destination for the California crop. The state almond board has an ofce in China, where it has in vested heavily, pro moting the nut on bill boards and in print and digital advertising as part of a youthful and healthy lifestyle. What bodes well for the industry is that al mond demand is also expanding in Europe and the U.S., shield ing it from dips in con sumption in any one place, said Halliburton Barber of Rabobank. They have a balance. Its more than just Chi na, she said. Theres still great potential to keep growing. ALMOND FROM PAGE E1 BRIAN VAN DER BRUG / MCT Workers hand-sort almonds for defects after the nuts have passed through laser sorters at Paramount Farms in Los Hills, Calif. California produces 82 percent of the globes almonds. VIRGINIA BRIDGES The News & Observer Dr. Isaac Porter is using his Google Plus prole page to build his brand, one post at a time. The whole key of it is just building my personal brand, our reputation, putting it out there when people are looking. If they see some of these signals, proles on line, it can help them trust us more, said Porter, 35, owner and practicing physician at Lowry Porter Ophthalmolo gy in Raleigh, N.C. A Google Plus user since early 2012, Porter also has Facebook and Twitter pages, but Google Plus is his busi ness and brand develop ment headquarters. Porter uses Google Plus Communities to discuss chal lenges and new procedures with other eye doctors and to learn about health care mar keting. He turns to Author ship to link his face and blue shirt and tie with his business results on a Google Search. And he uses Hangouts to make videos, interview a pa tient in England and talk to other experts across the U.S. One of the things that is good about Google Plus is every time you make a new post, it creates a new Web page just for that post, he said. And theres a possibility that that page itself will show up in Google Search results. Google Plus is a social lay er of Google that the compa ny is weaving into all of its services, said Jesse Wojdy lo, a copywriter, Google Plus expert and owner of Wojdy lo Social Media and Content Writing in Chapel Hill, N.C. In essence, it is a way for people to share their thoughts, feelings and con tent across all Google prod ucts, Wojdylo said, which range from YouTube and an alytics to Gmail and paid ad vertising options. Launched in 2011, Goo gle Plus has more than 300 million active monthly us ers, compared to 540 mil lion active monthly users of Google services, accord ing to statistics released last fall. Over the years, Google Plus users have evolved from tech geeks and social media marketers to brands build ing their own Google Plus empires, according to Mark Traphagen, senior director Small business owners turn to Google Plus to build brand SEE GOOGLE | E6

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Sunday, January 19, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeat ed numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, Jan. 19 the 19th day of 2014. There are 346 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory: On Jan. 19, 1807, Con federate Gen. Robert E. Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Va. On this date: In 1764 John Wilkes was expelled from the British Parliament for seditious li bel and obscenity (the for mer charge was for criticiz ing a speech delivered by King George III; the latter, for penning a pornographic parody of Alexander Popes Essay on Man). In 1853 Giuseppe Ver dis opera Il Trovatore pre miered in Rome. In 1861 Georgia became the fth state to secede from the Union. In 1937 millionaire How ard Hughes set a transcon tinental air record by ying his monoplane from Los An geles to Newark, N.J., in 7 hours, 28 minutes and 25 seconds. In 1942 during World War II, Japan invaded Bur ma (Myanmar). In 1944 the federal gov ernment relinquished con trol of the nations railroads to their owners following settlement of a wage dis pute. In 1955 a presidential news conference was lmed for television for the rst time, with the permission of President Dwight D. Eisen hower. In 1966 Indira Gandhi was elected prime minister of India. In 1970 President Rich ard M. Nixon nominated G. Harrold Carswell to the Su preme Court; however, the nomination was defeated because of controversy over Carswells past racial views. In 1977 in one of his last acts of ofce, President Gerald R. Ford pardoned Iva Toguri DAquino, an Ameri can convicted of treason for making wartime broadcasts for Japan. In 1981 the United States and Iran signed an accord paving the way for the release of 52 Ameri cans held hostage for more than 14 months. In 1992 German govern ment and Jewish ofcials dedicated a Holocaust me morial at the villa on the outskirts of Berlin where the notorious Wannsee Con ference had taken place. DEAR ABBY: My hus band, George, and I have been married for 13 years. Last night he dropped a bombshell. He told me that while he loves me, he isnt happy. He assured me he has no inclination to divorce me, but he pret ty much laid the entire reason for his unhappi ness at my feet. I dont handle peo ple well. I love George and our son, but I am most relaxed and com fortable when Im by myself. I dont neglect them. We do lots of stuff outside the house as a family. I have no close friends, and thats how I prefer it. Georges complaint is that I keep him from having friends. I have never tried to stop him. In fact, I have encour aged him to cultivate friendships and hang out with the guys, join groups, etc. He says he cant do that and leave me at home. I wouldnt mind his going out, but its nerve-racking for me to go. Abby, in 13 years I dont think I have ever looked George or my son in the eye. Its not something Im com fortable with. My hus band knew how I was when he married me. What can I do? OKLA HOMA LONER DEAR LONER: You need to nd out why you are unable to look even the people closest to you in the eye. Eye contact is an important part of communication, and that you are un able to do it even with your child is of concern to me. There may be a psychological or neuro logical reason for it. While its ne for you to encourage your husband to socialize without you, its un derstandable that he would feel uncomfort able doing it all the time. He isnt a bache lor. Couples usually so cialize together, and the women often initi ate the arranging. If the root of your problem is a social anx iety disorder, there is help available for it. Your doctor may be able to refer you to a specialist. For the sake of your marriage and your family, please dont put it off. DEAR ABBY: Im think ing about marrying my longtime boyfriend, but Im hesitant because he wants me to change my last name. I want to keep my maiden name as my mother did. Most of the women I look up to in my life kept their names. My boyfriend says my wanting to keep my name tells him I am not committed. He says hed be really hurt if I did it. I feel that retain ing my name is the ulti mate in female empow erment. The tradition of women changing their last name goes back to when we were treated as property and not educated. What do you think I should do? FEMALE FIRST, WIFE SECOND DEAR FEMALE FIRST: Women retain their maiden names for a va riety of reasons: Many do it because they are established in their ca reers when they marry and feel a name change would be confusing. Others prefer to keep their personal and pro fessional lives separate. This shouldnt be a con test of wills, and you should not change your name to prove the depth of your commitment. Your boyfriend ap pears to be very tra ditional in his think ing. Stop for a moment and ask yourself what that would mean for your future if you mar ry him. Would he be willing to compromise if you offer to hyphen ate your name with his? If he isnt, and you feel giving up your name would make you feel like chattel, then per haps you should look for a man whose beliefs are closer to your own. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014: This year you often go back and forth from being serious to whimsical. Peo ple act as if they dont know which facet of your person ality they will encounter. Try to explain more of what you are thinking about. A part ner and/or friends would appreciate the insight. If you are single, you will need a full year to determine whether the person you have met is the right one for you. If you are attached, the two of you have a more dy namic interaction than you have had in a while. Enjoy the excitement! AQUARIUS has interesting ideas about money and how to use it. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could have an er rand or two to complete be fore getting together with others for brunch. Note that you will have a tenden cy to go overboard, so a lit tle self-discipline will go far. You might feel slightly off-kil ter part of the afternoon. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your creativity will come up with a solution to an is sue that has been caused by sudden change. You might be gaining new in sight about a loved one. Let this person be who he or she is. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you feel the need to stay close to home, do. Oth ers might express their con cern at your unusually low prole. You simply might need a break from the hec tic pace. Indulge yourself. You will get a little time off before the pace picks back up. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You will want to be come more aware of a spe cial person in your life. You might assume that you al ready know this person, but he or she seems to be changing right in front of you. You could be quite sur prised by what you see. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Choose relaxing plans, as you are entering a very busy few weeks. You will want to have the energy to be re ceptive to others. You al ready might be getting a sense of what is about to happen. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Share more of what is happening with someone you care about. This person might not be sure of his or her role in this situation, and you might not know, ei ther. A discussion will help both of you gure out what to do. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You are likely to become even more serious than you have been as of late. A friend or new associate will be a breath of fresh air, as his or her presence will give you a break from your tasks. Use the morning to get some R and R. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You have a lot on your mind, and youll be deter mined to discuss what you are considering with sever al friends. They might not be as comfortable with your ideas as you are, so realize that their feedback could re ect that discomfort. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Dont allow a par ent or older friend to push you too hard to join him or her today. You might have some very special plans with a loved one. Refuse to take away from this sched uled time together. A child could surprise you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Reach out to someone whom you care about but often dont visit. Arrange to Skype with each other, or make plans to vis it soon. Even established friendships need nurturing. Be smart. Make time for this person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Enjoy going to brunch with a loved one. You might be startled by what some one around you does. Later, you will laugh about the inci dent. Communication needs to be spontaneous, no mat ter who you are speaking with. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Call a friend you have not spoken with in some time. Your sense of humor will take the edge off if he or she makes a startling statement or judgment. You are more creative than you might believe. Listen to news that comes forward. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR Woman prefers solitary life, despite husbands protests TODAY IN HISTORY

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 19, 2014 of online marketing at Internet market ing rm Stone Temple Consulting. While networks like Facebook work better for keeping in touch with your existing cus tomers, Google Plus provides unique op portunities to reach out to prospects who never would nd you there, Traphagen wrote in an email. And businesses should not ignore the power of Google Plus to inuence Google Search, where their po tential customers are looking for what they have to offer. Google Plus is par ticularly benecial for businesses, such as dentists, doctors and landscapers, who are on a constant quest to elevate their brand and search ranking in a competitive environ ment, Wojdylo said. While most small busi nesses can benet from using Google products, Traphagen wrote, they should not put all their hopes into one Goo gle basket. Unexpected changes to a service or algorithm could devas tate companies that are too dependent. They should always be developing other ways of reaching new customers, such as paid advertising, email campaigns, Trapha gen wrote. Many small business owners are using Goo gles products. Heres a breakdown. COMMUNITIES: Wojdy lo likened Google Com munities to a message board in which various parties contribute to a conversation on one specic topic. Researching, connect ing and commenting in meaningful Commu nities will help brands and owners increase their presence in oth er peoples circles, Goo gles version of following someone, Wojdylo said. Communities can be an extension of a busi ness page, Wojdylo said. For example, a lawn care business could cre ate a community on lawn care in its region and invite people to par ticipate and comment. So its not just you blasting out, Hey, I of fer this service, he said. Its your custom ers and potential cli ents, or anybody, com ing in there saying, Hey, I have an issue with my grass dying in April. What do I do? Every Google Plus post has its own URL, which means useful question and answer sessions can be posted elsewhere online. HANGOUTS: Hangouts enable conversations via text and video. Hangouts allow users to schedule Hangouts on Air and have vid eo conversations over the Internet with up to nine people. The live video can be promoted on a dedi cated page and will be come a shareable You Tube video. Think of it as a Skype within Facebook, Woj dylo said. Small businesses can use Hangouts to an swer questions, spread the word about a new product or procedure or create commercials. Best Buy created a Hangout for a Black Friday buy-a-thon, where the company announced a new sale item every ve minutes. HELPOUTS: In Novem ber, Google rolled out Helpouts, which allows users to get and give help over live video. Owners can use Hel pouts for a quick an swer to a question on topics like xing a ga rage or removing a computer virus. Users can choose ser vices based on the pro viders qualications, prices and reviews, and can connect instantly or set up an appointment. GOOGLE FROM PAGE E4 TRAVIS LONG / MCT Dr. Isaac Porter does an eye examination on Neville Wood at his clinic in Raleigh, N.C.

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