Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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FLORIDAS DOWNFALL STARTED A YEAR AGO SPORTS B1 TRAINING: Special Olympians headed to south Lake A3 GET IN SHAPE: Fitness tips to help you start your New Years resolution C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 13, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 13 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS DX DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS DX LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 SCOREBOARD B2 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 76 / 61 Partly sunny. 50 NASSER KARIMI Associated Press TEHRAN, Iran Iran has agreed to open the Is lamic Republics nuclear program to daily inspec tion by international ex perts starting from Jan. 20, setting the clock running on a six-month deadline for a nal nuclear agree ment, ofcials said Sunday. In exchange, Iran will get a relaxation of the nancial sanctions that have been crippling its economy. The announcement that Iran and six world powers had agreed on the plan for implementing an interim agreement came rst from Iranian ofcials and was later conrmed elsewhere. Some U.S. lawmakers have been leery of the agree ment, calling for tough er sanctions against Iran, rather than any loosening of controls. Irans ofcial IRNA news agency quoted Irani an Deputy Foreign Min ister Abbas Araghchi say ing the deal, which sets the terms of a landmark agree ment reached in Novem ber, would take effect from Jan. 20. The agency said Iran will grant the Unit ed Nations atomic agency access to its nuclear facili ties and its centrifuge pro duction lines to conrm it is complying with terms of the deal. Araghchi later told state television some $4.2 bil lion in seized oil revenue would be released under the deal. Senior ofcials in U.S. President Barack Obamas administration put the total relief gure at $7 billion. Iran, world powers reach deal opening nuke program AP FILE PHOTO A worker rides a bicycle in front of the reactor building of the Bushehr nuclear power plant, just outside the southern city of Bushehr. Associated Press TAMPA Research ers at the University of South Florida have teamed up with the Or lando Police Depart ment for a long-term study on ofcers ac tions using footage from body cameras. Fifty ofcers will wear tiny cameras on places like their sun glasses, collars and caps to provide critical perspective about their daily interactions and decisions. Fifty other ofcers participating in the year-long study will not wear the cameras. Police departments across the country are increasingly using body cameras, which cost be tween $200 and $400 each, to provide valu able rst-hand accounts and investigate issues such as use of force. Researchers from USFs criminology de partment will exam ine the number of inci dents and complaints Orlando police wear body cameras for study THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com N eighbors in a quiet Lees burg retirement com munity were stunned Sunday when Lake County sheriffs investigators discov ered a body buried in the yard of a homeowner who report edly has been missing in re cent weeks. Sheriffs ofcials said the death is suspicious. Theres concern that it may be the body of the missing homeown er, Jesse Wachter, 63. At this point, we do have a body that has been located at the property, Lt. John Her rell, sheriffs spokesman, said Sunday afternoon as yellow crime-scene tape and vehicles of the medical examiner and LCSO authorities surround ed the cream-color home at 181 North Lake Drive, in the Mid-Florida Lakes community. The identity of the victim has not been identied, nor has the cause of death been determined, Herrell said. It is obviously suspicious. We are treating it as a suspi cious death investigation, Herrell said. With neighbors reporting that they havent seen this man in recent weeks, that would lead us to suspect that it could be him, but obvi ously we are not going to as sume or reach to any conclu sions. Herrell said crime-scene in vestigators were working to ex hume the body while detec tives had a warrant to search the home for evidence that might help determine what took place. The investigation initially be gan after 8 p.m. Saturday when the Sheriffs Ofce received a report from a neighbor, who told deputies that someone was at the house loading items on a trailer. This concerned the neighbor since Wachter hadnt been seen recently. Deputies responded and stopped the vehicle, which happened to be Wachters LEESBURG Human remains found at property of missing man PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL The North Lake Drive neighborhood of Leesburg was blocked off Sunday as LSCO crime-scene personnel and the medical examiner were on site for the excavation of property owned by Jesse Wachter. Deputies became concerned after a cadaver dog alerted on the area; Neighbors say they had not seen Wachter in recent weeks. Lake County Sheriff Gary Borders, center, receives an update on Sunday at the crime scene from Lt. John Herrell, LCSO spokesman, left, and Capt. Chuck Theobald, right, of criminal investigations. N 181 North Lake Drive, Leesburg WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICHUMAN REMAINS FOUND Sheriffs investigators discovered human remains late Saturday on the property of a man who neighbors say they havent seen in weeks. 44 44Radio Rd. Emeralda Ave.Poe St.Creek Rd. 437 JOSH BOAK and SAM HANANEL Associated Press WASHINGTON A cutoff of benets for the long-term unem ployed has left more than 1.3 million Amer icans with a stressful decision: What now? Without their unem ployment checks, many will abandon what had been a futile search and will no longer look for a job an exo dus that could dwarf the 347,000 Americans who stopped seek ing work in Decem ber. Beneciaries have been required to look for work to receive un employment checks. Some who lost their benets say theyll be gin an early and un planned retirement. Others will pile on debt to pay for school and an eventual second ca reer. Many will likely lean on family, friends and other government programs to get by. Theyre people like Stan Osnowitz, a 67-year-old electrician in Baltimore who lost his state unemploy ment benets of $430 a week. The money put gasoline in his car to Loss of jobless aid leaves many with bleak options PATRICK SEMANSKY / AP Stan Osnowitz poses in his living room in Baltimore. SEE CAMERAS | A2 SEE NUKE | A2 SEE JOBLESS | A2 SEE BODY | A4

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 13, 2014: This year your focus re mains on your daily life and on your relationships. Youll have a goal in mind and, with endurance, you can make it happen. Dont fo cus on the obstacles; in stead, focus on the end re sults. If you are single, in the next six months, you could meet someone of signicance. Do not settle right now. Go for what you want. If you are attached, the two of you might dis agree about who should take out the garbage, but your relationship will evolve to a much closer and inti mate level. CANCER chal lenges you in many ways. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could be set on having certain results, most likely involving your nanc es. You will communicate your determination, but there are others involved who might be less enthu siastic. This conversation could continue for sever al days. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Others will want to have a discussion with you involving your funds. You might need to distance yourself a bit, but still be aware of where they are coming from. Try not to cut off the parties involved; in stead, just change the top ic. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will turn whatev er is going on into a so cial happening. Be aware of what you are doing and why. In this case, you might want to help someone lighten up. However, keep in mind that sometimes your actions could backre. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Take a back seat until you gain a greater perspec tive and a better sense of direction. You might not be as tuned in to a situation as you think you are. Do some research, and keep your judgments to yourself for now. T LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Use the daylight hours to the max. You could feel as if a family member is hold ing you back. Listen to your inner voice in this situa tion. Your ability to go for what you want will be unfet tered by this person. That strength comes from within. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Others will follow, once they understand why youre doing what youre doing. You might feel as if you have taken on too much. You need to emphasize what you want from others. Understand that they will be more responsive later in the evening. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Reach out for new in formation. If you dont, you wont be able to make a solid decision. There will be a lot going on around you; sort through as much of it as you can. You might note that a common thread runs through these different is sues. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your instincts will kick in when dealing with a part ner and/or a nancial mat ter. Your sixth sense could go against your logic, but it likely is right-on. Detach some, and revisit this issue later. You will understand a lot more at that time. Let go for now. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Others really want you to hear what they think. Your knee-jerk response might not be positive. Stop, and get to the bottom of what is happening with you rst. Try not to give feed back until you clear up your feelings. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Pace yourself. Stop and visit with some one in your daily life who could seem off. You have the capacity and organiza tion to make time for this person. You might decide to return calls and schedule a meeting toward the end of the day. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your playfulness might be endearing to some, but it wont be to a boss, who might be quite stern and difcult to deal with. Stop, take a deep breath and ad just to the moment. How you see a situation could change radically as a result. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Realize that it is OK if you have a difcult time starting the day. If you can take a personal day, you could enjoy some extra time at home. Know that you will lighten up in either case; you just have a case of the Monday blues. This, too, will pass. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 0-9-0 Afternoon .......................................... 3-9-1 PLAY 4 ............................................. 7-7-0-0 Afternoon ....................................... 9-1-4-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY SATURDAY FANTASY 5 ........................... 1-14-25-27-33 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $24 4 of 5 wins $555 Rolldown THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. involving force and whether injuries go up or down. Theyll also look at wheth er civilian s treat ofcers wearing cam eras differently and whether theyre less likely to approach them. The footage can also be useful when a complaint is lodged against an ofcer. If you really want to make camer as a strong accountability mechanism, you want the supervisors to review ran dom lm and let the ofcers know, said Lorie Fridell, associate professor and graduate director in criminology at USF. That makes the lm more power ful in terms of promotion and good be havior. The Institute of Criminology at the University of Cambridge led a body camera study in 2012 with Californias Rialto Police Department, using a small er sample size of ofcers than the USF study. Complaints against Rialto police ofcers dropped by 88 percent. And of cers wearing cameras used force al most 60 percent less. CAMERAS FROM PAGE A1 Under the November agreement, Iran agreed to limit its uranium en richment to 5 percent the grade commonly used to power reactors. The deal also commits Iran to stop producing 20 percent enriched ura nium which is only a technical step away from weapons-grade materi al and to neutralize its 20 percent stockpile over the six months. In exchange, econom ic sanctions Iran fac es would be eased for six months. During that time, the so-called P5+1 world powers Britain, China, France, Germa ny, Russia and the United States would continue negotiations with Iran on a permanent deal. The West fears Irans nuclear program could allow it to build a nuclear bomb. Iran says its pro gram is for peaceful pur poses, such as medical research and power gen eration. Irans semi-of cial ISNA news agency reported Sunday that un der the terms of the deal, Iran will guarantee that it wont try to attain nuclear arms under any circum stance. However, Aragh chi stressed Iran could resume production of 20 percent uranium in one day if it chose. The senior U.S. of cials said U.N. inspectors would have daily access to Iranian nuclear sites and would make month ly reports. Iran will dilute half of its nuclear mate rial during the rst three months of the agree ment, the ofcials said, and all of it by the end of the agreement. In exchange, Iran would have access to parts for its civilian avia tion, petrochemical and automotive industries, as well as be allowed to im port and export gold, the ofcials said. The deal also gives Iran access to international humanitar ian and medical supplies, though Iran still could not use U.S. banks and the majority of sanctions would remain in place, they said. The senior U.S. ofcials spoke on the condition of anonymity because the specic terms of the agreement were not re leased publicly. European Union nego tiator Catherine Ashton praised the deal in a state ment, saying the founda tions for a coherent, robust and smooth implemen tation ... have been laid. German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier called the deal a decisive step forward which we can build on. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry welcomed the deal in a statement as well, saying further negotiations represent the best chance we have to resolve this critical national security issue peacefully, and durably. NUKE FROM PAGE A1 hel p him look for work. Osnowitz says a con tinuation of his benets would have enabled his job search to continue into spring, when construction activity usually increases and more electrical jobs become available. He says hes sought low-paid work at stores like Lowes or Home De pot. But he acknowledges that at his age, the pros pect of a minimum-wage job is depressing. I have two choices, Osnowitz says. I can take a job at McDonalds or something and give up everything Ive stud ied and everything Ive worked for and all the ex perience that I have. Or I can go to retirement. Unemployment ben ets were extended as a federal emergency move during the 2008 nan cial crisis at a time of rising unemployment. The benets have gone to millions who had ex hausted their regular state unemployment checks, typically after six months. Last month, the extended-benets pro gram was allowed to ex pire, a casualty of de cit-minded lawmakers who argue that the gov ernment cant afford to fund it indenitely and that unemployment ben ets do little to put peo ple back to work. The duration of the fed eral benets has varied from state to state up to 47 weeks. As a result, the long-term unemployed in Rhode Island, for exam ple, could receive a total of 73 weeks 26 weeks of regular benets, plus 47 weeks from the now-ex pired federal program. Outside Cincinnati, Tammy Blevins, 57, fears that welfare is her next step. She was let go as a machine operator at a printing plant in May. Her unemployment check and a small inheritance from her father helped cover her $1,000-a-month mortgage and $650 health insurance premi um. Now, with her bene ts cut off and few open ings in manufacturing, she dreads what could be next. Im going to have to try the welfare thing, I guess, Blevins says. I dont know. Im lost. Others plan to switch careers. After being laid off last summer as a high school history teacher, Jada Urquhart enrolled at Ohio State University to become a social worker. Urquhart, 58, has al ready borrowed against her house, canceled ca ble TV and turned down the thermostat despite the winter chill. Without an unemployment check, she plans to max out her credit cards and take on student loans to com plete her degree by 2015. Ill be 60 when I grad uate, she says. If I do one-on-one or family counseling, I can work forever. Urquhart nds herself in sympathy with mem bers of Congress who want to limit government spending. At least in the ory she does. Its just hard when youre the one getting shrunk, she says. Jesse Rothstein, an economist at the Univer sity of California, Berke ley, who has studied the long-term unemployed, has found that extend ed benets help both the recipients and the econ omy by fueling con sumer spending. A Band-Aid doesnt heal a serious wound, but that isnt much of a reason not to use one, Rothstein says. The trend of people end ing their job hunts once their benets expire has already emerged in North Carolina, which started cutting off aid in July. North Carolinas unemployment rate sank from 8.8 percent in June to 7.4 percent in November, but mainly be cause people stopped their job searches. JOBLESS FROM PAGE A1

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program seeks volunteers Lake and Sumter County residents ages 55 and older who have a life time of experience to share and the desire to make a real difference in the community are needed as vol unteers for the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) program. Those interested can get informa tion by calling 352-365-1995. WILDWOOD Area 13 Family Care Council meeting set for today The Area 13 Family Care Council will meet from 10 a.m. to noon today at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities ofce, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood, for those with developmental disabilities and their families. Developmental disabilities are dened as autism, cerebral palsy, Downs Syndrome, Prader-Willi Syndrome, spina bida and intellec tual disabilities. For information, call Betty Kay Clements at 352-753-1163 or send an email to isabelfcc13@yahoo.com. TAVARES Religious leaders sought for invocation at meetings The Lake County Commission is seeking local pastors, preachers, fa thers, rabbis and other heads of re ligious organizations to participate in county commission meetings by opening with an invocation. Meetings are held at 9 a.m., on Tuesdays, twice each month in Commission Chambers at the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St., Tavares. To participate in the invocation portion of a commission meeting, call Kathy Hartenstein at 352-3235733, or send an email to kharten stein@lakecounty.gov. MOUNT DORA January Ladies Tea Adventure at Museum of Art Ladies Tea Adventures January tea will take place at 2 p.m., Wednesday, at the Lake Eustis Museum of Art, 1 W. Orange Avenue, Eustis. Liz Wincup, a well-known Central Florida artist, will be paint ing while the group takes tea, and will talk about her work and art observations. Reservations are required by call ing 352-360-9497. Cost is $22 for members and $24 for non-members. TAVARES Guardian ad Litem program seeks volunteers Local training will begin Jan. 28 at the UF Extension Service Agriculture Center, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares for qualied volunteers to serve as advocates for children who have been removed from their homes for alleged abuse, neglect or abandonment, and who are part of the dependency court proceedings. For information, call Lynn Sennett at 352-274-5231, send an email to Lynn.Sennett@gal..gov or go to www.guardianadlitem.org. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff Report The cast for the new Lazarus Filmworks lm The Diner was nalized this week with the addi tion of a Major League Baseball Cy Young winner. The movie by the Mount Dora-based Christian lm company tells the story of a former boxing cham pion who believes all his problems can be blamed on God. John Denny, who won the 1983 Cy Young Award while pitching for the Philadelphia Phil lies, was added to the staff playing the role of chairman of the Florida Boxing Commission. We will begin lming on the 19th of this month with the boxing commis sion scene and then the ght scenes the next day, Director De Miller said. We will then lm a few scenes at the Lakeside Inn in Mount Dora on the 21st and take about a 10-day break be fore completing the lm ing with two weeks in Feb ruary at various locations throughout Lake County. The lm stars Wade Wil liams, who starred in last falls theatrical hit movie, The Investigator, as the lead character. The cast also includes Kibwe Dorsey, an other of the fea tured actors in The Investigator, and Michael Santi, who won the Best Actor award at the Orlando 48 Hour Film festival last fall. Miller said the pro duction is still looking for volunteers to help on the crew and urged those interested to com plete a short information form on the movie web site, www.TheDinerMov ie.com. He also said there will be a number of op portunities for interested persons to appear as ex tras, especially in the ght scene audience. We will be lming the ght sequences at the Teknique Boxing arena in Minneola, Miller said. James J.T. Taylor, op erator of the boxing fa cility, and Denise Crim, owner of the Fighting Arts Emporium, are hosting the lm company during their shoot in Minneola on Jan. 20. Besides having two for mer boxers in the cast, Rick Gaetano and Moses Cantu, who will appear as DENNY MOUNT DORA Cast for The Diner firmed up SEE MOVIE | A4 Staff Report The University of Flori das Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/ IFAS) Extension ofce in Lake County is hosting two free classes designed to help older Lake County residents better organize and simplify their lives. The rst class, Aging in Place, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon, Wednes day, and aims to help old er residents maintain in dependence and safety inside the home. This class will teach ways to modify the home, provide tools to simplify life and offer tips regarding hiring assistance for both personal and healthcare needs, said Elisha Pap pacoda, public information ofcer for Lake County. Those interested in at tending this class should register at janagingwell. eventbrite.com. From everyday house hold items to nancial papers, participants will learn what to keep and what to throw out by de veloping a clear the clut ter strategy in the sec ond class, Organize Your Home and Important Pa pers. The program takes place from 10 a.m. to noon on Feb. 19. Those interested in attending should register at febag ingwell.eventbrite.com. Both classes are free, and will be held at the Lake County Exten sion ofce, 1951 Wood lea Road, Tavares. Regis tration is required online, or by calling 352-343-4101 ext. 2719 or 2721. For information, send an email to Julie England at julieeng@u.edu. TAVARES Extension office plans classes to help seniors MARISA KENDALL The News-Press FORT MYERS Fewer Florida families are entombing their loved ones bodies un derground opting instead to send the re mains into the Gulf of Mexico, shoot them into the sky or wear them in a locket. The traditional buri al, once so important in the grieving process, is becoming a thing of the past. More than half of Floridians who die are cremated instead of buried. The practice is even more common in southwest Florida, where nancial, prac tical, religious and sen timental reasons are causing more people to choose cremation. Whats interesting is cremation seems to be becoming the new tra dition for many fam ilies, said Barbara Kemmis, executive di rector of the Cremation Association of North America. Florida cremated 59 percent of its dead in 2011 the sec ond highest percent age in the U.S., accord ing to the most recent Cremation Associa tion statistics. Florida ranked third for growth in cremations that year, behind California and Texas. In 2012, 74 percent of Lee and 73 percent of Collier county res idents who died were cremated, according to the most recent Florida Department of Health statistics. Thats com pared to 69 percent in Lee and 68 percent in Collier in 2008. At Mullins Memori al Funeral Home & Cre mation Service in Cape Coral, about 85 percent of clients choose crema tion, according to owner Shannon Mullins. A major reason is cost. A basic crema tion costs an average of about $2,250, according to the Cremation Asso ciation. Thats com pared to about $8,350 for the average burial. Another reason was demonstrated last month, when a south west Florida father ex humed his deceased sons body and was ap palled at what he saw. Jesse Watlington, 11, died in October 2012 after he was struck by lightning. His family buried him at Fort My ers Memorial Gardens, but later moved to Or lando and decided to re-bury Jesse close by. When workers Cremation becoming more popular in Florida JACK HARDMAN / AP Shannon Mullins of Mullins Memorial Funeral Home & Cremation Services waits for the cremator to heat up to 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit in preparation for a cremation in Cape Coral. SEE CREMATION | A4 Staff Report More than 180 Special Olym pics Florida athletes will travel to Clermont on Jan. 24-25 to train and prepare for the 2014 Special Olympics USA Games in June. This two-day training will build on each teams and indi viduals competitive strength before they join more than 3,500 Special Olympics ath letes from throughout the Unit ed States in New Jersey to com pete in 16 sports, before tens of thousands of spectators and volunteers. For some athletes, traveling to compete in the 2014 USA Games in New Jersey is the rst time they will leave their hometowns, ofcials say. A specic combination of training and conditioning has been designed to provide each athlete with a competitive edge. Athletes will also take part in a general orientation as well as be tted for uniforms while at the training camp. Because individuals and teams encompass a variety of sports, multiple venues will be utilized, including the Nation al Training Center in Clermont (aquatics); Montverde Acade my in Montverde (soccer, track and eld, volleyball, basketball and cycling); Clermont Lanes in Clermont (bowling) and the Sanctuary Ridge Golf Course in Clermont (golf). The 2014 Special Olympics USA Games will celebrate the Special Olympics movement while promoting the ideals of ac ceptance and inclusion through sports and highlighting the abil ities of athletes with intellectual disabilities, ofcials say. CLERMONT Special Olympians headed to south Lake

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com DEATH NOTICES Anne Price Saunders Anne Price Saunders, 73, of Mount Dora, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Harden/Pauli Fu neral Home, Eustis. Dorothy Jane Smaltino Dorothy Jane Smalti no, 74, of Wildwood, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg. IN MEMORY corner men for the ac tor-ghters, Miller said boxing enthusiasts will also be interested in the boxing scenes for another reason. Those who follow boxing will want to take special note of the box ing gloves that will be worn by Michael Santi, Miller said. The gloves were last worn by a re al-life boxing champion, the late Arturo Gatti. Miller explained that Cantu, who was trained by Gattis trainer, former champ Buddy McGirt, was able to obtain the famous gloves from a contact at a Florida box ing gym. Gatti, who won two world champion ship titles, retired from boxing in 2007 and died in 2009 while vacation ing in Brazil. The cause of his death is still under investigation. While this is a faiththemed movie, Miller pointed out, there has been a lot of interest be cause of its professional boxing backstory. Miller said the com pany is once again be ing aided by a coalition of Lake County church es, including Adventure Christian Church in Ta vares, the First Unit ed Methodist Church of Mount Dora and the First Baptist Churches of Umatilla and Eustis. We are very proud of our association with these churches and, in fact, would have a dif cult time doing what we do without the help of church members and use of their facili ties, he said. MOVIE FROM PAGE A3 Staff report The Sumter County Cham ber of Commerce will present its annual Business and In dustry Awards at its Plaid and Pearls Awards Gala and An nual Dinner on January 24 at the Savannah Center in The Villages. The following winners were chosen from nominations re ceived from business and community members: Sean Williams of PSL Construction was selected as Outstanding Business Man of the Year. Connie Mahan of Con nie Mahan Real Estate Group was selected as Outstanding Business Woman of the Year. Mike Scott Plumbing has been chosen as Outstand ing Large Business of the Year, representing businesses with 80 or more employees. High Five Your Life Fro zen Yogurt of Buffalo Ridge was selected as Outstanding Small Business of the Year. The Scenic Sumter Her itage Byway Advocacy Group was selected as Outstanding Non Prot. Marc and Cheryl Kozak of Blue Monster Promotions will be honored as Outstand ing Chamber Volunteers of the Year. In addition to recognizing the top businesses, the din ner and awards ceremony will feature the installation of the chambers 2014 board of directors. Emily Rose and Emily Gra ham will perform at the 6:30 p.m. event. A silent auction where individuals and businesses have donated items, gift cer ticates, gift baskets or ser vices valued at $50 or more will help support the chambers mission to edu cate, support and promote businesses in Sumter Coun ty. Donors will be listed on the chambers website, in the event program, on the auc tion tables and in a special feature in our newsletter. Donors of items worth more than $500 will be recog nized on the PowerPoint pri or to the live program. Tickets and tables are avail able for the event. For pricing and reservations, or to do nate an item, call the cham ber ofce at 352-793-3099. LAKE PANASOFFKEE Sumter chamber to hand out awards opened the grave, the burial vault lid was cracked, and the casket inside was full of water. Certain caskets and burial vaults can keep water out, but only for so long, Mullins said. Especially after a rainy season in southwest Florida, where the water level is so high. Cremation is also a practical option for southwest Floridas seasonal and transplant resi dents, as cremated remains are cheaper and easier to transport, Mullins said. Cremation ts peoples mod ern lifestyles and gives fami lies more options, Kemmis said. There are a handful of cemeter ies in southwest Florida, but un limited ways to lay cremated re mains to rest. Mullins dedicates one wall of his funeral home showroom to casket options, and three to urns. There are urns that display pictures, are disguised as lamps, worn as lockets or are biode gradable. Mullins sells a Florida Gators urn and a $695 urn handmade by an artist from Sarasota. Families can encase their loved ones remains in concrete and send them to the bottom of the ocean to create a reef. They can put the remains into a blownglass work of art, or extract the carbon from the remains to cre ate a diamond. Cremated remains also can be interred at traditional cemeter ies, such as Fort Myers Memori al Gardens. Probably our most beauti ful area is our cremation area, General Manager Donnell Sulli van said. The cremation area has been open four years, and its so pop ular Memorial Gardens is look ing into an expansion. Perhaps the most unusual way to lay a loved one to rest shoot the remains up in a rock et over the Gulf of Mexico. At 3,000 feet a parachute deploys and oats the remains down to the water. Mullins has conducted the rocket launch twice in his career once was for a deceased re works fanatic. No two people grieve the same way, Kemmis said, so I think this personalization is just so important. Bill Krumrey, 69, of Cape Coral, had his mother buried in August. Its what she wanted to be next to her husband in the familys Chicago cemetery, he said. But Krumrey plans to be cremated. (It) makes life simpler, he said. Members of Bob Bastubas family have always been buried, but the 68-year-old Fort Myers resident thinks he will break tra dition and choose cremation. His wife likes the idea because its cheaper. Theyre considering internment in a veterans cem etery in Michigan, where hes originally from. Anthony Loehle, 21, of Fort Myers, wants to be cremated and have his ashes planted with a tree. That would be kind of awe some because it would help the environment a lot, he said. But cremation isnt for every one. Some people because of reli gious beliefs, or because of nat ural fears of ame or re, want nothing to do with that, Mull ins said. At Friendship Missionary Bap tist Church in Fort Myers, about 2 percent of members choose cremation, according to Pastor James Bing. Five years ago, no one did. But the church doesnt dictate how its members lay their loved ones to rest, Bing said. While hes not sure he would want to be cremated, the practice doesnt bother him. In the Old Testament, Bing said, bodies were often burned. So cremation really is not a new phenomenon. The Catholic Church once banned cremation, but now al lows the practice as long as the remains are interred instead of scattered. CREMATION FROM PAGE A3 truck, and found that the trailer it was pulling contained Wachters motorcycle, golf cart and applianc es. The truck was being driven by Wachters son, Jesse Jordan, 28. Jordans girlfriend, Jessica Thig pen, also 28, was a passenger in the truck. Herrell said both Jordan and Thig pen admitted to being drug addicts, and deputies found the pair in pos session of drugs. They were both ar rested and taken to the Lake Coun ty Jail. Herrell said a cadaver dog was brought to the home Saturday night and alerted on the property, signi fying that there was a body buried there. Crime-scene personnel then began excavating the site. Neighbor Andrew ONeil came home Sunday to nd deputies had used the carport of his home as the starting point for blocking off the crime-scene area. Ive never seen police here, espe cially right here in my carport, he said. This is just shocking. Other neighbors in the commu nity of 1,000-plus homes gathered in clusters and admitted they were stunned. Mercy, mercy, said Eliza beth Sattereld, who has lived at Mid-Florida Lakes for nearly 10 years. Nothing liked this has ever happened that I know of. Sattereld said Wachter lived by himself but that others might have moved in, while ONeal said he had seen Wachter and his son together in what appeared to be happy times. I always thought they were a close-knit family and Id seen them shing like a father and son thing. Id see Jesse and his son always out there with their shing poles, ONeal said. They would always wave and Id wave back. BODY FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Andrew ONeal came home Sunday to nd deputies blocked off the crime scene area by starting at his property, just a few houses down from an excavation site where a body was found buried. MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVER AL The six space station astronauts nally got their Christmas presents Sunday with the ar rival of a private ly launched supply ship that took an ex tra month to soar. The spacemen opened the capsule a day early and start ed removing items, as soon as the Or bital Sciences Corp. vessel was moored safely at the Interna tional Space Station. Packed inside were 3,000 pounds of gro ceries, equipment and experiments, as well as eager ly awaited Christ mas gifts from their families back home and some fresh fruit courtesy of NASA. Among the rst things out: ants that are part of an educa tional project. NASA is relying on private industry to keep the orbiting lab well stocked in this post-shuttle era and, in three or four more years, possibly supply rides for U.S. astronauts as well. This was Orbital Sci ences second ship ment. The Virginia com pany was supposed to make the latest delivery last month, well before Christ mas, but had to wait for reasons beyond its control. A space station breakdown in mid-December took priority, and NASA bumped the ight to January in order to repair the disabled cooling sys tem at the orbiting outpost. Christmas delivery, finally, for space station AP PHOTO In this image from video provided by NASA, the Cygnus resupply spacecraft approaches the International Space Station early Sunday.

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 I ve made a list of 20 rules to live by. 1) Bring your sense of hu mor with you at all times. Bring your friends with a sense of hu mor. If their friends have a sense of humor, invite them, too. Re member this when going to hos pitals, weight-loss centers and funerals, as well as when going to work, coming home, waking up and going to sleep. 2) If its worth crying over, its probably worth laughing at. Cul tivate a sense of perspective that permits you to see the wider and longer view of the situation; this will help you realize that al though your situation is upset ting, it might also one day be come a terric story. 3) Other people dont care what youre wearing. 4) Dont be a sissy. This is es pecially important if you are a woman. Girls can be sissies, but behaving like a simpering, whin ing, fretful coward as an adult is unacceptable no matter what your gender happens to be. If you are anxious, scared and feel ing powerless, you dont need to change your behavior; you need to change your life. 5) Dont lie. Cheat the devil and tell the truth. 6) There is one exception to the rule above: Never say a baby looks like a sausage wearing a hat. The parents will not forgive you. This is a situation in which telling the truth is not whol ly necessary. If its not possible to tell the whole truth for fear of causing undue pain, just say the baby looks happy. 7) Never use the passive voice. Do not say, It will get done. Say, Ill do it and then offer a solid, unwavering dead line. Always make your deadline. 8) The pinnacle is always slip pery; no peak is safe. Only pla teaus offers a place to rest. Are you ready to stay on a plateau or are you climbing? Decide, and pack your bags accordingly. 9) As we age, love changes. As a youth, you fall for an unat tainable ideal. When youre more mature, you fall in love with a person: Sure, he has only one eye in the middle of his fore head, youll rationalize, but he never forgets my birthday. 10) Power is the ability to per suade stupid people to do intel ligent things and intelligent peo ple to do stupid things. This is why power is dangerous. 11) Sherlock Holmes said, Work is the best antidote to sor row, my dear Watson. Listen to Mr. Holmes. 12) Everybody wants a short cut to love, prosperity and weight loss, although not neces sarily in that order. Apart from being born into an adoring fam ily, getting good genes and in heriting the mineral rights, how ever, there are no shortcuts. The rest of us have to work at it. 13) Help the dramatically self-pitying to understand that they are not, by denition, sym pathetic or interesting. Encour age them to address topics other than themselves. 14) Be kind, not nice. Kindness is both intentional and mean ingful. Acts of kindness require generosity, emotional and other wise. Perfunctory and supercial niceness is, too often, mere win dow dressing. 15) Only poor workers blame their tools. Its not the fault of the computer, the school, the train, the government or poor cell phone reception. Take re sponsibility. 16) You know how sometimes you dont think youre asleep youre half listening to a conver sation or the television only to discover you were unconscious? One part of your head would swear its awake, but when you actually snap out of it, you real ize you were wholly elsewhere? Sometimes that happens in life. Sometimes the only way you know youre truly in love, in the entirely wrong profession, be ing a moron at parties or a great poet is when you snap out of it. 17) You can always stop what youre doing. 18) You should either be doing something useful or you should be playing. You should not be thinking about playing while at work or thinking about work when youre out having fun. Compartmentalizing your life is not inevitably a bad thing. Its easy to waste pleasure by feeling guilty and waste potentially ef fective time by feeling resentful. 19) Be aware that a safety net, if pulled too tight, easily turns into a noose. Dont trade independence for security with out being aware of the conse quences. 20) Someday you will die. Until then, you should do everything possible to enjoy life. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a femi nist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Cou rant. She can be reached through her website at www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE 20 important rules to live by The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. A Tallahassee lobbyist wants to know what part of a constitutional require ment in Florida there shall be a lieutenant governor Gov. Rick Scott doesnt understand. Its a good question. Despite the mandate for a lieutenant gov ernor clearly stated in Article IV, Section 2, of the Florida Constitution the state has been without a No. 2 executive since Jennifer Carroll quit the position in March 2013. Carroll resigned after it was publicly re ported that she had previously done pub lic relations consulting for Allied Veterans of the World, accused of illegally operating socalled Internet gambling parlors while act ing as a veterans charity. The post has been vacant since, saving the state about three-quarters of the $500,000 annual budget. Whats more, there is no apparent evi dence that Floridas government has suf fered for the lack of a lieutenant governor. Yet, on Jan. 6, Barbara DeVane sued Scott, asking the state Supreme Court to require him to appoint a lieutenant governor with in 30 days. DeVane, a registered lobbyist for the Flor ida National Organization for Women, is linked to causes embraced by Democrats; the lawyer who led the suit has contribut ed to the campaign for Charlie Crist, a Dem ocrat running against Scott. So, the lawsuit has political overtones. Yet Scott brought the legal challenge on him self. The constitution leaves no doubt that there shall be a lieutenant governor, a mandate that Scott has outed without explanation. State law directs the governor to appoint a lieu tenant governor in the event of a vacancy. Whether the Supreme Court will agree to the plaintiffs demand is a matter of debate because neither the state constitution nor law species when a vacancy must be lled. DeVanes lawsuit cites concerns about suc cession, in the event that Scott became inca pacitated. Those worries seem overstated. Florida Statute 14.055 creates a succes sion plan involving members of the Cab inet. The state attorney general would be rst in line if there is no lieutenant, followed by the chief nancial ofcer and then the commissioner of agriculture. If, for some reason, that process didnt produce a gover nor, the Legislature would choose in a joint session someone to ll the remainder of the chief executives term. Florida certainly has more pressing prob lems than whether it has a lieutenant gover nor. But there is an important principle in volved respect for the state constitution and the law. Months ago, Scott said, Florida laws make it clear that our state has a lieutenant governor. Yet, Scott has acted as though he can comply with constitutional and statuto ry mandates when he feels like it. From Ocala.com. A VOICE Scott is ignoring a state mandate Only poor workers blame their tools. Its not the fault of the computer, the school, the train, the government or poor cell phone reception. Take responsibility.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741 Check out on the Opinion Page

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com SUPER BOWL TICKETS: You pay, they play / B3 STEVE REED Associated Press CHARLOTTE, N.C. Colin Kaepernick raced into the end zone, then pretended to rip open his shirt with both hands imitating Cam Newtons Superman touchdown celebration. Three years of frustra tion had come to a head. Just a little shoutout, Kaepernick said. To whom? I think you know the answer, Kaepernick said with a grin. Kaepernick said he will never f orget that he was selected in the second round of the 2011 NFL draft, 35 spots behind Newton, the Heisman Trophy winner and the top pick that sea son. On Sunday, he out played his quarterback counterpart, throwing one touchdown pass and running for anoth er score as the San Fran cisco 49ers defeated the Carolina Panthers 23-10 to advance to the NFC title game for the third straight season. Kaepernick completed 15 of 28 passes for 196 yards in the division al playoff win, avenging his worst statistical per formance of the season two months ago against the Panthers. Thats not the rst, nor will it be the last time somebody does that, Newton said of Kaepernicks copycat display before leav ing the postgame podium. Anquan Boldin had eight catches for 136 yards and Frank Gore ran for 84 yards on 17 Kaepernick lifts 49ers over Panthers, 23-10 San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) runs against the Carolina Panthers during the second half of a divisional playoff NFL football game on Sunday in Charlotte, N.C. GERRY BROOME / AP PAT DOOLEY Halifax Media Group Quarterback Jeff Driskel is sacked during the rst half of the Florida Gators 33-23 loss against the Louisville Cardi nals in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 2, 2013, at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, La. One play said it all about Floridas 2013 football season, a play so comical and mind-bog gling it was ESPNs No. 1 choice for the Not Top 10 for the year. Forget the result, a 7-yard gain by Solomon Patton for a rst down that set up a touch down. It got in the way of the il lustration of incompetence. Quinton Dunbar and Jon Harrison were blocking each other. Thats all you need to know. That it happened during the low point of Floridas season a 26-20 loss to FCS school Georgia Southern brought the point home with all of the subtlety of a hammer to the teeth. Every time it seemed that the 2013 football team had bot tomed out, it found a way to dig deeper. When the calendar ipped over to 2014, the giant whoosh ing sound you heard was the Gator Nation letting out a sigh of relief. You didnt have to be superstitious to understand that was an unlucky num ber for UF. It started right away, just two days into the year (and a year ago today) when the Gators should have been celebrating a 2012 season that saw them come this close to playing for the national championship. In New Orleans, a place that had been good to Florida fans over the years, a veritable whos who of Gator greats were on hand for the Sugar Bowl. Among the former players in attendance were three of the ve members of the Ring of Honor Emmitt Smith, Dan ny Wuerffel and Tim Tebow. If that wasnt enough royalty, Mu hammad Ali was there to repre sent Louisville. Not there? Florida fans. It was an embarrassing night for the Gator Nation before the game ever kicked off. UF end ed up eating $840,000 worth of tickets and the Sugar Bowl was almost a home game for Louis ville. It wasnt any better on the eld where Florida fell behind 14-0 and 24-3. The second half began with an onside kick by UF downfall started a year ago DOUG FINGER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Florida Gators running back Matt Jones (24) fumbles the football against Tennessee on Sept. 21 in Gainesville. SEE 49ERS | B2 When the calendar flipped over to 2014, the giant whooshing sound you heard was the Gator Nation letting out a sigh of relief. You didnt have to be superstitious to understand that 13 was an unlucky number for UF. SEE GATORS | B2 ARNIE STAPLETON AP Pro Football Writer DENVER Peyton Manning welcomed Wes Welker back into the lineup with a touchdown toss and the Denver Broncos narrowly avoided a re peat of their playoff slip from last year, advanc ing to the AFC cham pionship game with a 24-17 win over the San Diego Chargers on Sunday. The Broncos (14-3) took a 17-0 lead into the fourth quarter. Char gers quarterback Philip Rivers then capitalized on an injury to corner back Chris Harris Jr. to stage a comeback rem iniscent of Baltimores shocking win at Denver exactly a year earlier. This time, however, Manning rescued the Broncos from the brink of another crushing collapse and sent them into the title game for the rst time in eight seasons. Theyll host the New England Patriots (13-4) on Sunday. Get ready for Brady vs. Manning once more. Broncos top Chargers, make AFC title game JACK DEMPSEY / AP Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning hands the ball off to running back Knowshon Moreno (27) in the second quarter of an NFL AFC division playoff football game in Denver. SEE BRONCOS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 18 17 .514 Brooklyn 15 22 .405 4 New York 14 22 .389 4 Boston 13 25 .342 6 Philadelphia 12 25 .324 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 27 10 .730 Atlanta 20 17 .541 7 Washington 16 19 .457 10 Charlotte 15 23 .395 12 Orlando 10 27 .270 17 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 29 7 .806 Chicago 17 18 .486 11 Detroit 16 22 .421 14 Cleveland 13 23 .361 16 Milwaukee 7 29 .194 22 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 28 8 .778 Houston 24 14 .632 5 Dallas 22 16 .579 7 Memphis 16 19 .457 11 New Orleans 15 21 .417 13 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 28 9 .757 Portland 28 9 .757 Denver 19 17 .528 8 Minnesota 18 18 .500 9 Utah 12 26 .316 16 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 Golden State 25 14 .641 1 Phoenix 21 15 .583 3 L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 11 Sacramento 12 22 .353 11 Saturdays Games Houston 114, Washington 107 Toronto 96, Brooklyn 80 New York 102, Philadelphia 92 Detroit 110, Phoenix 108 Chicago 103, Charlotte 97 Oklahoma City 101, Milwaukee 85 Dallas 110, New Orleans 107 Denver 120, Orlando 94 Portland 112, Boston 104 Sundays Games Cleveland at Sacramento, late Atlanta at Memphis, late Minnesota at San Antonio, late Todays Games Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at New York, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Orlando at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Denver at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games Sacramento at Indiana, 7 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 45 29 14 2 60 129 98 Tampa Bay 45 27 14 4 58 132 109 Montreal 46 26 15 5 57 117 107 Detroit 45 20 15 10 50 118 126 Ottawa 46 20 18 8 48 131 146 Toronto 46 21 20 5 47 125 141 Florida 45 17 21 7 41 105 139 Buffalo 43 12 26 5 29 75 120 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 47 33 12 2 68 152 112 Washington 44 22 16 6 50 135 133 Philadelphia 45 23 18 4 50 120 125 N.Y. Rangers 46 23 20 3 49 114 123 Carolina 45 19 17 9 47 111 128 New Jersey 46 19 18 9 47 106 114 Columbus 45 21 20 4 46 126 129 N.Y. Islanders 46 17 22 7 41 126 150 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 47 29 8 10 68 170 129 St. Louis 44 31 8 5 67 161 99 Colorado 45 28 12 5 61 132 115 Minnesota 47 24 18 5 53 114 119 Dallas 44 20 17 7 47 125 135 Nashville 46 19 20 7 45 109 137 Winnipeg 47 19 23 5 43 128 145 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 47 34 8 5 73 160 119 San Jose 46 28 12 6 62 148 116 Los Angeles 46 27 14 5 59 119 96 Vancouver 46 24 13 9 57 123 114 Phoenix 44 21 14 9 51 133 136 Calgary 45 15 24 6 36 101 144 Edmonton 47 15 27 5 35 123 164 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Ottawa 2, Nashville 1, SO Tampa Bay 6, Philadelphia 3 Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT New Jersey 2, Florida 1, OT Columbus 6, Winnipeg 3 Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Anaheim 5, Phoenix 3 Pittsburgh 2, Calgary 1 Detroit 3, Los Angeles 1 Boston 1, San Jose 0 Sundays Games Buffalo at Washington, late N.Y. Islanders at Dallas, late New Jersey at Toronto, late Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, late Edmonton at Chicago, late Minnesota at Nashville, late Detroit at Anaheim, late Todays Games Calgary at Carolina, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. San Jose at Washington, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 8 p.m. Phoenix at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 8 p.m. Ottawa at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. COLLEGE BASKETBALL Men EAST Canisius 87, Monmouth (NJ) 67 Iona 87, Siena 78 La Salle 75, Duquesne 56 Manhattan 86, Marist 79, OT Rider 90, Niagara 78 St. Peters 74, Quinnipiac 67 Stony Brook 73, Hartford 50 SOUTH Louisville 71, SMU 63 MIDWEST Brescia 84, Indiana-East 82 Creighton 95, Xavier 89 Green Bay 93, Milwaukee 86, OT Iowa 84, Ohio St. 74 N. Illinois 45, Bowling Green 36 Purdue 70, Nebraska 64 SOUTHWEST Tulsa 75, Southern Miss. 71 FAR WEST San Diego St. 79, Air Force 72 Stanford 82, Oregon 80 Washington 71, Colorado 54 Women EAST Albany (NY) 69, Hartford 52 Canisius 76, Rider 72 Cent. Michigan 82, Buffalo 68 Purdue 84, Penn St. 74 Quinnipiac 77, Manhattan 74 St. Peters 67, Niagara 55 Syracuse 76, Georgia Tech 70 Towson 66, Northeastern 65 West Virginia 56, Texas 49, OT SOUTH Alabama 93, Mississippi 79 Clemson 77, Pittsburgh 67 Coll. of Charleston 101, William & Mary 65 Duke 78, Boston College 57 Hofstra 64, UNC Wilmington 55 James Madison 87, Delaware 51 Kentucky 80, Missouri 69 LSU 82, Florida 68 Louisville 62, South Florida 54 Miami 64, Virginia Tech 62 NC State 62, Wake Forest 54 North Carolina 65, Florida St. 61 Notre Dame 79, Virginia 72 South Carolina 72, Auburn 66 Texas A&M 58, Georgia 44 VCU 73, Saint Josephs 69 Vanderbilt 74, Tennessee 63 MIDWEST Ball St. 55, Kent St. 31 Bowling Green 81, Akron 65 Cleveland St. 98, Wright St. 82 Evansville 71, Drake 67 Indiana St. 47, Illinois St. 44 Iowa 82, Wisconsin 65 Loyola of Chicago 63, Missouri St. 61 Michigan St. 79, Michigan 72 Minnesota 94, Northwestern 59 N. Illinois 77, E. Michigan 54 N. Iowa 87, S. Illinois 53 Nebraska 75, Illinois 56 Ohio 70, W. Michigan 53 Toledo 68, Miami (Ohio) 52 Wichita St. 74, Bradley 72 SOUTHWEST Mississippi St. 54, Arkansas 50 FAR WEST Arizona St. 59, UCLA 57 California 68, Utah 59 Denver 91, South Dakota 84 Southern Cal 54, Arizona 45 Stanford 87, Colorado 77 TV 2 DAY MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN Virginia at Duke NBCSN Charleston at Northeastern ESPNU Texas at West Virginia CSS Texas State at La.-Lafayette 7:30 p.m. CBSSN Lafayette at Loyola-Md. 9 p.m. ESPN Kansas at Iowa St. ESPNU Syracuse at Boston College NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 8 p.m. NBA Washington at Chicago 8:30 p.m. FS-Florida Orlando at Dallas NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Columbus SOCCER 3 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Arsenal at Aston Villa TENNIS 9 p.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 UConn at Baylor SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED carries for the 49ers (14-4), who will vis it Seattle next Sunday looking for a return trip to the Super Bowl. I think were the two teams that every body was looking at from the beginning, Kaepernick said. Its going to be a knock down, drag-out game. The 49ers will have their hands full. San Francisco (14-4) split two games with the Seahawks this sea son, but lost 29-3 at CenturyLink Field in September. The 49ers were missing receiver Mi chael Crabtree in that lopsided loss. Crab tree only had three catches for 26 yards against Carolina, but Boldin said he drew plenty of double teams that allowed him to get open. Thats the great thing about our team we have weapons all around, Boldin said. You try to take one guy out and you still have two or three guys left who can make big plays. The 49ers held New ton in check, inter cepting him twice and sacking him ve times while stopping the Panthers (12-5) twice on the 1-yard line in the rst half. Newton nished with 267 yards pass ing and had 54 yards on 10 carries, but the Panthers only found the end zone once on a 31-yard TD strike to Steve Smith. It was a rough play off debut for Newton. Linebacker Ahmad Brooks stopped New ton on a fourth-down sneak early in the sec ond. Later, Brooks vaulted over the line and past Newton he was called for off sides, but the 49ers showed the Panthers it wouldnt be easy. Terrible ending to a great season, New ton said. Almost ttingly, he misred into the end zone on the nal play of the game. 49ERS FROM PAGE B1 Florida. Not only did Louisville recover it, but Florida was as sessed a pair of personal foul penalties to set the Cardinals up at the UF 19-yard line. Florida had 98 yards of penal ties in the game and Jeff Driskel had three turnovers. After tell ing the media all week how they wanted to end the season on a high note, the Gator players laid an egg instead. Tight end Jordan Reed was basically benched af ter he lined up wrong on the rst play of the game. After the game, Louisville coach Charlie Strong, a longtime UF assistant, hugged a member of the nation al media and said, Thatll teach them for not hiring me. It was hardly the right way to start the year. It would get worse. Summer brought little relief for Gator fans. They watched two major stories unravel na tionally that put two heroes of the 2008 national champion ship team in the news for the wrong reasons. The most serious came on June 26 when former UF tight end Aaron Hernandez, proba bly the best to ever play the po sition for the Gators, was arrest ed for the murder of Odin Lloyd. Nine days earlier, Lloyds body was found in an industrial park a mile from Hernandezs house. Ninety minutes after he was ar rested, Hernandez was released by the New England Patriots. Hernandez is still awaiting tri al on multiple charges. August meant the start of practice and Florida had high expectations for a team that was loaded with talent. Except Driskel had to have an emergency appendectomy and would miss the rst few weeks of practice. And starting tailback Matt Jones had a viral infec tion that would keep him out of camp and cause him to miss the opener. And starting right tack le Chaz Green suffered a torn la brum and was out for the sea son. And starting wide receiver Andre Debose suffered a torn ACL and was out for the season. And all of this happened be fore the rst practice of the summer. It was almost as if Florida had angered a voodoo queen during their trip to New Orleans. In all, Florida lost 72 start ers to injuries. Every time you thought they had reached some new record for injured players, another one popped up. It al most became a Monday ritual to nd out who would be lost for the season. Driskel suffered a broken leg early in the third game of the season and Dominique Easley, the leader of the defense, suf fered a torn ACL a few days later in practice. Driskels replacement, Tyler Murphy, played well as Florida went through the lightest part of its schedule, but when the op position toughened and Mur phy suffered a shoulder injury, the losses mounted and eventu ally Murphy was sidelined. Before the season was over, Florida lost two quarterbacks, three offensive tackles, two line backers and its top tailback to injuries. UF started the season ranked No. 10 despite losing six defen sive starters to the NFL. On the day of the opener, the bad news kept coming Tebow was cut by the New England Patriots. Florida won its opener but turnovers killed the Gators the next week at Miami in a loss that was made that much more de ating because it was the last time the two teams would play for a long time. Murphy led the Gators to wins over Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas three teams who would combine to win two con ference games. The Gators then ran into a stretch where they would play one home game in 47 days. Losses at LSU and Missou ri virtually eliminated the team from playing for an SEC title and a loss to Georgia in Jacksonville cemented it. OK, beat Vanderbilt and Geor gia Southern and at least you go to a bowl game. But Murphy had his worst game against the Commodores, throwing three picks. Vandy won by 17 points despite only gaining 183 yards of offense. Muschamps team nally came to play in Columbia, S.C., the fol lowing week and led through out much of the game before the Gamecocks pulled it out. Then came Georgia Southern. Florida had never lost to an FCS team, but the Gators al lowed 429 rushing yards in the 26-20 loss. Again, Florida made national news for the wrong rea son. And days later, when the video surfaced of the two Flori da players blocking each other, well, the once-proud program had become a laughing stock. For the rst time since 1990, Florida had no bowl to prepare for in December. In a way, it was a relief for Florida fans, who had grown so tired of watching their team play that thousands sold their tickets to FSU fans for the nale at The Swamp. The only question when it was over was it the worst year ever for Florida football? Even for those Florida fans who lived through 0-10-1 in 1979, it would be hard to argue any differently. GATORS FROM PAGE B1 In the most recent matchup of QBs with Hall of Fame creden tials, Tom Brady and the Patriots rallied past Manning and the vis iting Broncos 34-31 in overtime on Nov. 24. Its the Broncos ver sus the Patriots and certainly Tom and I have played against each other a lot, Man ning said after beat ing San Diego. But when you get to the AFC championship, its about two good teams that have been through a lot to get there. Manning ended a personal three-game postseason skid in win ning for the rst time since leading India napolis over the Jets 30-17 in the AFC cham pionship game on Jan. 24, 2010. Manning complet ed 25 of 36 passes for 230 yards and two TDs, numbers that werent quite up to the stan dards he set during a record-breaking regu lar season when he es tablished new bench marks with 55 TD throws and 5,447 yards through the air. But it was windy and the Broncos were in tent on establishing the run and controlling the clock. San Diego had Manning and his high-octane offense cooling their cleats on the sideline for more than 38 minutes in both of their meetings during the regular sea son, when both teams won on the road. Denver had the ball for 35 minutes, 27 sec onds in this game, to San Diegos 24:33. After gaining just 18 yards on the ground against San Diego last month, the Broncos ran for 133 yards, including 82 by Knowshon More no, whose 3-yard TD run put them ahead 24-7 with 8:12 left. After that, things got interesting. Quentin Jammer, who gave up San Di egos rst TD, a 16-yard er to Keenen Allen ear ly in the fourth quarter, surrendered a 49yard catch by Allen on fourth-and-5 from the San Diego 25 with sev en minutes left. That led to Allens second TD, also from 16 yards out, that pulled the Chargers to 24-14 with 5:43 left. Eric Decker then made his third big blun der of the day, ubbing the onside kick, which San Diego recovered. Nick Novaks 30yard eld goal with 3:53 pulled the Char gers (10-8) to within a touchdown. Novak followed with a pooch kick, and Trin don Holliday secured the ball at the Denver 27 with 3:51 left. Man ning converted two third-down throws to tight end Julius Thom as, the rst one a nif ty 21-yarder on thirdand-17 from his 20 and then a third-and-6 from his 45-yard line. Then, on third-and-1, Moreno burst up the middle for 5 yards with a minute left and the offensive linemen high-ved each other. All Manning had to do at that point was take a knee just like he did last year at the end of regulation af ter Jacoby Jones had hauled in Joe Flaccos 70-yard desperation throw with 31 seconds left to tie the game. In that game, coach John Fox ordered Man ning to take a knee even though he had three timeouts left so he could take his chanc es in overtime. And the Broncos lost 38-35 in double overtime. Those boos were re placed by cheers in this game, the scowls by smiles. Allen nished with six catches for 142 yards as the Chargers lost for the rst time in six weeks. The Broncos took a 14-0 halftime lead that could have easily been 21-0 if not for blunders by Decker, who tripped with no defender near him at the San Diego 30-yard line after a 47yard punt return. This was the 109th meeting between the original AFL rivals but the rst in the postsea son. BRONCOS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 TIM BOOTH Associated Press SEATTLE In the after glow of advancing to the NFC championship game, Russell Wilson patrolled the Seattle Seahawks locker room mak ing sure the message was still clear to his teammates. We havent done anything yet, Wilson said. Thats our goal, we have 60 minutes of football left. I was talking to some of the guys in the locker room, I was talking to Coach Carroll, I was just kind of sitting there. You have 60 minutes left of foot ball, 60 minutes of your life, the best 60 minutes that you can possibly play, and then you play in the Super Bowl. The Seahawks are one step from the Super Bowl because in the NFC divisional play off game against New Orle ans on Saturday they leaned on the principles Pete Car roll put in place in the in fancy of his arrival in Seat tle. The Seahawks have been about running the football and playing defense rst and foremost, well before Wilson arrived or Percy Harvin was acquired. It was of little surprise that Marshawn Lynch kept get ting fed carries and Seattle used another swarming de fensive effort against Drew Brees and New Orleans po tent offense in Saturdays 2315 victory. It was a blustery, nasty day where those traits Carroll values so deeply were brought to the forefront. Lynch nished with a fran chise playoff record 140 yards rushing and both of Seattles touchdowns. Seattle will host San Fran cisco next Sunday in the NFC championship game with the possibility of ad vancing to the Super Bowl for the second time in fran chise history. Seattles only Super Bowl trip came in the 2005 playoffs when it routed Carolina in the NFC champi onship game at home. It feels awesome, but this doesnt mean anything if we dont win next week, Seat tle fullback Michael Robin son said. Even though he again was one of the top running backs in the league, Lynchs regu lar season lacked consisten cy. Much of that was due to blocking struggles by Seat tles offensive line, but some thing clicked against the Saints and the Seahawks kept turning to their bruis ing back. Lynch had 69 yards in the rst half, including his 15-yard touchdown run that gave Seattle a 13-0 lead early in the second quarter. But it was his 31-yard touchdown run with 2:40 left that provided the capper for Seattle. The 1and 2-yard runs from earlier in the game nally popped with Lynchs TD run that left CenturyLink Field shaking again. I just stayed with what we were calling and just believed in my team, Lynch said. Seattle avoids being bit by lower seed JOHN FROSCHAUER / AP Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch (24) arrives in the end zone with a 31-yard touchdown during the fourth quarter of an NFC divisional playoff NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints in Seattle on Saturday. DENNIS WASZAK JR. Associated Press FOXBOROUGH, Mass. This time, there was no stunning comeback for Andrew Luck and the Indianap olis Colts. Just a handful of frus trating mistakes, some missed opportunities and now a long offsea son to imagine what could have been. Luck threw four in terceptions and the Colts gave up four touchdown runs by Le Garrette Blount and two by Stevan Ridley as the New England Pa triots advanced to the AFC championship game with a 43-22 vic tory Saturday night. Im just disappoint ed in myself, Luck said. I cant commit that many turnovers and have a chance to win against a great team like this. The Colts (12-6) were coming off a stunning 45-44 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in which they overcame a 38-10 third-quar ter decit in the wildcard game for the sec ond-biggest comeback victory in NFL playoffs history. They fell behind 14-0 early in this one, but were within a touch down down 29-22 entering the fourth quarter. But Blount, Tom Brady and the rest of the Patriots offense pulled away. We never stopped ghting and we had our chances and just couldnt get over that hump, said Luck, who threw two touchdown passes to LaVon Brazill. The Patriots deserved to win. Billed as a match up between marquee quarterbacks longtime great Brady and second-year star Luck the Patriots lead er was content to hand off while Luck threw an interception on his second pass and never found consistency. Luck had three in terceptions a week earlier, but led the Colts to their impres sive comeback against the Chiefs. The Colts trailed 21-12 at half time against the Patri ots and cut it to 29-22 on a 35-yard pass to Brazill with 5:01 left in the third. The Patriots (13-4) dominated the rest of the way and advanced to play Denver in the AFC championship. Luck struggles as Colts lose to Patriots, 43-22 AP PHOTO New England Patriots defensive end Rob Ninkovich (50) helps Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck (12) up from the turf on Saturday. RICK FREEMAN Associated Press NEW YORK Welcome to the Super Bowl, where demand always beats supply and the teams dont really matter. The NFLs championship game is one of the largest sports and entertainment spectacles in the world. The teams arent exactly afterthoughts, but tick ets are going to move quickly no matter how popular the two contenders are. In fact, the number print ed after the dollar sign on the front of a Super Bowl ticket has about as much in common with the price paid by its hold er as the point spread does with the nal. Less, actually the point spread is at least an informed prediction that comes from the bookmakers observations of previous events and the price the public will pay to bet its teams. So, as we near the big game on Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., lets take an inside look at the tick et trade. HOW MUCH? Even on NFL. com, users in search of tickets are directed to a resellers web site, operated by Ticketmas ter. On Thursday evening, the cheapest ticket available was over $3,000. (The league also conducts a lottery to purchase tickets for $500. These cannot be resold.) On Stubhub, people were willing to part with seats for a little more than $2,500, 24 days and an hour before kickoff. Needless to say, these were all in the nosebleed sections. But fans eager to lock down seats now would probably be ad vised to wait. What were probably going to see is over time, the closer we get to the game, the more the prices will drop, said Smita Sa ran, Stubhubs senior spokes woman. Saran said that before last years game, Stubhub was re ceiving searches for tickets up to an hour before kickoff. She also pointed out that fans who purchase on Stubhub have access to a tailgate party where they can pick up their tickets in the parking lot theyll even give fans a lift there from New Jersey or Manhattan. But that all depends on some one pulling the trigger on a ma jor purchase. WHOS PLAYING? The teams in the game should have some bearing on the price. Large fan bases close to the New York City area think New En gland could cause demand and prices to rise. Three West Coast teams are still alive in the playoffs, and no matter how ar dently supported the San Di ego Chargers, San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks are, being a continent away from seeing the game in person will probably thin the hordes ranks. The remaining teams in or der of proximity to Newark Air port, just down the turnpike from the Meadowlands, are the Carolina Panthers (from Char lotte, N.C.), Indianapolis Colts, New Orleans Saints and Den ver Broncos. The halftime show is set. Thatll be Grammy-winner Bruno Mars. The 28-year-old pop star isnt as venerable as some of the heavy hitters to grace the halftime stage in the past Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, the Rolling Stones and Paul McCartney have albums older than he is but he should be a bigger draw than Up With People. WHATS THE WEATHER LIKE? Re gardless of what team is in the game, one more major fac tor could affect prices the weather forecast. If the prospect of playing outside in 40-degree weather (the average for East Rutherford, N.J.), doesnt seem so bad, that could be because most of the United States just experienced a polar vortex with nighttime temperatures getting down into the single digits. As this is the rst Super Bowl in a cold-weather city, theres no data on how a cold snap affects interest in tickets, but after the polar vortex, its probably safe to assume demand would not be strong to sit outside for four hours or longer on a cold night in northern New Jersey. WHAT ABOUT TRAFFIC? New Jer sey is not known as the easi est place to drive. And that was before members of Gov. Chris Christies administration were found to have arranged for in tentional trafc jams for polit ical retribution. After previously assuring the public that his staff had noth ing to do with the lane clos ings in September that caused major backups at the George Washington Bridge, Chris tie said had to re an aide. His news conference to address the scandal made national news three weeks before his state is on display for the world as host of the Super Bowl. That said, no governor can control New York City area traf c, but the states transporta tion authority will be running trains on a new line complet ed ahead of the stadiums 2010 opening. An armada of buses will also be available, and orga nizers are discouraging drivers the host committee website even refers to parking as th and Long. X-FACTOR: If after all of that, fans dont feel like shelling out a paycheck (or two) for the chance to brave trafc and weather to watch the Su per Bowl from the upper deck, theres one more consideration you cant watch the Puppy Bowl at the stadium. Looking for Super Bowl tickets? You pay, they play AP PHOTO Some NFL football Super Bowl XLV tickets are held outside Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 GOLF DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer HONOLULU A birdie on the nal hole gave Chris Kirk a 5-un der 65 and the outright lead in the Sony Open, and thats about it. Cloudy conditions and only a gentle, Pacic breeze meant just about everyone was in the mix at Waialae Country Club even John Daly. At one point, there was a six-way tie for the lead Saturday in the third round. An hour later, 14 players were separated by a single shot. Kirk got up-and-down from a bunker on the par-5 18th hole, making a 10-foot birdie putt that gave him the lead over Harris English (67) and PGA Tour rookie Will Wilcox (64), who is play ing only the third PGA Tour event of his career. Kirk was at 12-under 198. Daly matched the low score of the third round with a 64 and was ve shots behind. Masters champion Adam Scott wasnt making up any ground, dropped two shots late in his round and nished with a twoputt birdie for a 71 and was two shots behind. A dozen players were separated by three shots going into Sun day, a group that in cludes Kapalua win ner Zach Johnson as he tries to become the rst player since Ernie Els in 2003 to sweep the Hawaii swing. Kirk and English both are going for their sec ond win of this wrap around season that be gan in October. Kirk won the McGladrey Classic in November, his nal tournament of the year before taking time off for the birth of his second child. English nished the year with a win in the OHL Classic at Mayakoba in Mexico. The plan for both of them is to not worry about anyone else be cause there would be too many players to worry about. When its so close like that, everybody is go ing to be making some birdies here and there, Kirk said. So I proba bly wont look at lead erboards as much as I normally would. A lot of courses I think lend themselves to you need to know what your po sition is going into any given hole, but out here, I dont think thats really the case. Theyre just so volatile with guys mak ing birdies and bogeys. Ill just probably try to keep my head down and make as many birdies as I can. Former Sony Open champion Jerry Kelly (66) and Jimmy Walker (67) were at 10-under 200, while the group at 201 included Rob ert Allenby (65), Pat Pe rez (66), Retief Goos en (66) and Johnson, who had a 66. Brian Stuard, who had a oneshot lead going into the third round, had a 71 and also was still only three shots behind. Chris Kirk moves into the lead at Sony Open AP PHOTO Chris Kirk watches his drive off the 12th tee during the third round of the Sony Open golf tournament at Waialae Country Club, Saturday in Honolulu.

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RUSTY MILLER Associated Press COLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State started the week with 15 consecu tive wins and ended it with consecutive loss es. Now the third-ranked Buckeyes think it might be time to circle the wagons. LaQuinton Ross scored 22 points, Amir Williams had 11 and Lenzelle Smith Jr. 10 but the Buckeyes watched No. 20 Iowa make all the big plays down the stretch of an 84-74 victory Sunday. The loss followed the Buckeyes 72-68 defeat at No. 5 Michigan State on Tuesday night. For players not accus tomed to losing very of ten, this is a mini-crisis. The worst thing we can do is feel sorry for ourselves, point guard Aaron Craft said. We cant keep this going. We have to nd a way to pick ourselves up. No ones going to do it for us. Its the 12 play ers on the team and the coaches and thats about it. The Buckeyes (15-2, 2-2 Big Ten) dont have to look too far to see what went wrong. After averaging 10.3 turnovers a game head ing into the Michigan State game, they to taled 38 in those two painful losses. During one span in the nal minutes against Iowa, where they had 17 turnovers, they hand ed the ball over without a shot ve times on 11 possessions. Coach Thad Matta is mystied by the turn around on turnovers. Ive got to gure that out, he said, shaking his head. The big gest thing is getting our guys to understand you cant let one mistake compound into anoth er mistake. Thats kind of what happened to us today. We played some really good bas ketball so did Iowa. Theyre a great team. But its that consisten cy and understand ing of what needs to be done, when it needs to be done, how it needs to be done. Roy Devin Marble scored 22 points and Aaron White added 19 for the Hawkeyes, who ended the game on a 22-9 run. The Buckeyes had a nine-point lead at one point in the second half. After that evaporat ed, they led by three with under 6 minutes to play. For a team that was down by eight in the nal minute and beat Notre Dame in regulation, and which scored 20 of the nal 23 points of regulation to force overtime against Michigan State, it ap peared the Buckeyes were right where they wanted to be. But the Hawkeyes (14-3, 3-1) had other thoughts. A free throw by Jar rod Uthoff and anoth er by Marble cut the lead to a point before Uthoff scored consec utive baskets, both on layups. The second, at the 4:25 mark, put the Hawkeyes up 68-65. Marble was fouled in the backcourt and hit both shots for a 70-65 Iowa lead with 3 min utes remaining. The Hawkeyes led by four when White with 40 friends and family members mak ing the two-hour drive from suburban Cleve land to root him on had the ball tipped away. He recovered it beyond midcourt, and then drove to hit a 12foot fallaway as the shot clock was running down with 2:06 left. That made it 74-68 and Ohio State never made a serious threat again. It was Iowas rst win over a top 5 team since an 83-65 victory at No. 2 Missouri on Dec. 15, 2001. Iowa was 0-2 on op ponents home courts this season coming in. Their three losses have come against teams with a combined 45-2 record (Villanova, Iowa State and Wisconsin) with each loss coming by ve or fewer points. The Hawkeyes had not beaten Ohio State one of the Big Tens bullies since Mat ta came aboard a de cade ago since 2008. They hadnt beaten the Buckeyes in Columbus since 2004, making a long, quiet ight home on the last seven trips. Craft said this weeks losses were not con nected in any way, oth er than the Buckeyes didnt play well enough in either one. This is just not us, he said. OSUs mistakes down stretch end in loss AP PHOTO Iowas Gabriel Olaseni, right, fouls Ohio States Sam Thompson during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday in Columbus, Ohio. Iowa beat Ohio State 84-74. COLLEGE BASKETBALL STEPHEN HAWKINS AP Basketball Writer That current nations best streak gets a sig nicant test when the No. 7 Lady Bears (141) host top-ranked Connecticut (17-0) on Monday night. It will be a good game. Theyre pretty big in size. Were a little undersized this year. But well gure it out, said Sims, the nation al scoring leader at 31.8 points a game. And Ill just tell you, it wont be a blowout. It will be a tough game for them and us, so just be ready for it. UConn coach Geno Auriemmas teams have been involved in many home-court win ning streaks, main taining their own and breaking others. Baylor is the third team to reach 69 straight home wins. Tennessee had its streak broken by UConn in 1996; the Huskies had their string snapped by Duke in 2004. UConn holds the NCAA record with 99 wins in a row at home, a streak ended near ly two years ago by St. Johns. The closest any team has gotten to that was Stanford, with 82 straight until UConn won at Maples Pavilion last season. Games like this al ways kind of test you and test how much your team has grown, said Breanna Stew art, UConns top scor er at 18.1 points per game. Everyone is go ing to have to show up and prove how much theyve gotten better. This will be the fth meeting between the powerhouse wom ens programs with the two active coaches who have won the larg est percentage of their games. Auriemma has an 856-133 record (.866 winning percentage) in his 29th season, and Kim Mulkey is 386-82 (.825) in her 14th sea son at Baylor. They are 2-2 against each other. I like getting away from whatever league games you are playing. I like the bigness of it. I like the challenge of it, Auriemma said. Both teams are com ing off lopsided home wins Saturday to stay undefeated in their re spective conferences. American Athletic Con ference-leading UCo nn beat Temple 80-36. Baylor won 80-46 over TCU and is the only Big 12 team without a league loss. Its not like Mon day is going to take all the focus and all the at tention away from win ning your conference championship, Au riemma said. When was the last time a con ference championship was important? Baylor is playing for a nation al championship. Con necticut is playing for a national champion ship. Mulkey, the only womens coach to win a national title as a play er and a coach, takes a different approach. I just prioritize. I think your confer ence is more import ant, Mulkey said. I said that when we were No. 1 in the con ference. Your confer ence comes rst, then the NCAA tournament. I guess he just has a difference of opinion. Hes certainly entitled to his opinion, hes won eight champion ships. But for our team, were not over-empha sizing it. UConn and the Lady Bears rst met in the 2010 Final Four, a 70-50 win by the Huskies that ended Brittney Griners freshman season. This will be the rst meet ing without the 6-foot8 center and two-time AP player of the year. No. 2 Baylor lost 6564 at the No. 1 Huskies early the next season. The Lady Bears were the No. 1 team and won the last two meetings a 1-2 matchup in Waco two seasons ago and at then-No. 3 UCo nn last year. Baylor womens 69-game home streak on line against Connecticut When was the last time a conference championship was important? Baylor is playing for a national championship. Connecticut is playing for a national championship. UConn coach Geno Auriemma

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties GARY B. GRAVES Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. Luke Hancocks ca reer-high 23 points, in cluding two free throws with 46 seconds re maining, helped No. 12 Louisville hold off SMU for a 71-63 victory Sun day in a meeting of Hall of Fame coaches. Hancocks second straight 20-point game helped Rick Pitinos Cardinals (14-3, 3-1 American Athletic Con ference) get the nal word in his rst colle giate matchup against Larry Brown and his Mustangs (11-4, 1-2). Making his rst start despite dealing with a left Achilles issue, the senior guard made 8 of 15 from the eld 4 of 9 from 3-point range to help keep Louisville ahead in a tense game that Montrezl Harrell nally settled with a dunk and a block after Hancocks free throws. Russ Smith scored 23 points and Harrell add ed 12 points and 13 re bounds as Louisville bounced back from Thursdays loss to No. 24 Memphis with 47 per cent shooting, despite being outrebounded 4835 including 20-6 on the offensive end. Markus Kennedy had 12 points and eight re bounds in his rst start of the season for SMU while Shawn Williams added 10 points. Al though the Mustangs controlled the boards, they managed to hit just 24 of 65 from the eld (a season-low 37 percent), well below their leaguebest 50 percent mark coming in. SMU made just 13 of 25 free throws and were only 2 of 11 from be yond the arc. Hancock, Smith and Terry Rozier combined for nine of Louisvilles 10 3-pointers on 23 at tempts. The biggest attrac tion was the rst-ev er collegiate meeting between Hall of Fam ers Pitino and Brown, who brought 2,554 com bined victories and three NCAA titles into the contest. Sunday marked the third of eight sched uled matchups nation wide between Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame members, and these two will meet again on March 5 when the Car dinals face the Mus tangs in Dallas. Pitino, who just en tered the Hall in Sep tember, made a point of heading down the sideline to greet Brown, 73, as the two ex changed pleasantries. From there it was all business between two schools ghting to con tend in the AAC. SMU was playing for the rst time since up setting then-No. 17 Connecticut on Jan. 4 and seeking its second straight win against a ranked opponent. Be sides having the AACs best shooting outt, the Mustangs also had the No. 2 eld goal de fense (36 percent), both of which presented challenges for a Cardi nals team that was out of sync on both ends of the court in Thursdays loss to No. 24 Memphis. No. 12 Louisville survives SMU, 71-63 AP PHOTO SMUs Sterling Brown, left, attempts to steal the ball away from Louisvilles Chris Jones during the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game on Sunday in Louisville, Ky.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 MINDFUL EATING: Skip the diets, focus on yourself / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com EUSTIS LIFE to host two January luncheons LIFE, a social support group for the widowed, hosts two luncheons every month at two locations. The Eustis luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m., Wednesday at Lake Tech (vocational school), 2100 Kurt St., in the faculty dining room on the north side of the building. The lunch will be prepared by Lake Techs Culinary Arts Pro gram. The program will be presented by Frank Staneld, a retired newspa per reporter and writer of Unbroken The Dorothy Lewis Story. The Leesburg LIFE luncheon will be held at 11:30 a.m., Thursday at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Avenue, in Venetian Gardens in Leesburg. Moved to the third Thursday of the month, the LIFE luncheon in Leesburg will fea ture a very special program after a buffet-style lunch. Entertainment will be provided by Samantha Jack son, educator for the Audubon Cen ter for Birds of Prey, who will bring four birds of prey, including a bald eagle. She will speak about the birds and conservation issues they face. The luncheon costs $10, and RSVP is required. For information, call 352-787-0403. LEESBURG Lake County Parkinsons support group to meet Kristin Grunell with Visiting An gels, Deborah Snow with Phoe nix Home Care and Linda Grifn with TLC Family Care Home are the guests for this meeting from 1 to 3 p.m., Tuesday at the Lake Square Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morn ingside Drive in Leesburg. The trio will discuss ways to get help dealing with Parkinsons and to plan for emergencies. For information, call Dave or Pat Tribbey at 352-343-0376, or Marion or Jim Papson at 352-315-9359. THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer support group to meet Wednesday The Villages Prostate Cancer Edu cation and Support Group will hold a special for men only meeting at 7 p.m., on Wednesday in the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Lau rel Manor Drive, The Villages. The meeting will consist of a frank, round-table discussion led by prostate cancer survivors for both newly diagnosed and long-term pa tients. Topics to be discussed in clude types of treatment, what hap pens if the cancer reoccurs and side effects of various treatments, such as urinary incontinence. Meetings are free and are open to all men. For information, call Dan Bard at 352-259-9433, Tom Vajda at 352-4464194 or Fred Neilson at 352-365-1483. BY EDDIE ALVAREZ The Miami Herald MIAMI Want to get into shape but dont know how to begin? Certied tness instructor and trainer Myriam Charleston and partner Jeff Pierre are here to help. We asked Charleston to start us off with 10 tips for people looking to start a tness routine: 1) Whats the rst thing you tell a client who is starting a tness regi men? No. 1: Make sure they get clear ance from their physician. The next thing is to get a tness assessment/ evaluation in order to know where youre starting from and to set real istic tness goals. 2) How often should a beginner work out? A beginner should aim to work out three times a week and have a program that includes at least 30 minutes of cardiovascular exer cise (walking, jogging, cycling), 30 minutes of strength training (free weights or machines), and 10 min utes of stretching (hold each stretch for 10 seconds). 3) What are the critical areas to work out? I like to start with legs, because they are your bodys foundation, and your stomach muscles, also known as your core muscles. But re member, your body will burn more fat if you develop muscles through out your entire body. My recom mendation is to work major mus cle groups (legs, back, chest) with minor ones (biceps, triceps, calves) and incorporate push/pull move ments to create muscle balance. For instance, if you work chest (push) in one session, work your biceps (pull) in the same session. 4) Im overweight. What can I do? Have an assessment done by a t ness instructor. The assessment will give you information about your body composition and help you set realistic goals. Many people want to lose weight but what they really want to do is lose fat. Focus on body composition (your body fat per centage); the right percentage for you depends on your overall health, age and sex. A tness instructor can personalize a body fat goal for you. And remember, the more mus cle you build, the easier it will be to burn fat. Thats why an effective weight-loss program incorporates a good strength training routine. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Talk about mind over matter: A quirky new study suggests patients expectations can make a big difference in how they feel after treat ment for a migraine. Boston researchers re cruited 66 migraine pa tients in an attempt to quantify how much of their pain relief came from a medication and how much was due to whats called the placebo effect, the healing power of positive belief. More than 450 head aches later, they report ed Wednesday that its important for doctors to carefully choose what they tell patients about a powerful medicine be cause the message could help enhance its benets, or blunt them. Every word you say counts, not only ev ery gram of the medica tion, said Harvard pro fessor Ted Kaptchuk, who led the new study with a team at Bostons Beth Is rael Deaconess Hospital. Heres how it worked. First, the patients who suffer regular migraines agreed to forgo pain re lievers for several hours during one attack, re cording their symptoms for comparison with later headaches. Then for each of their next six migraines, the pa tients were given a differ ent pill inside an envelope with a different message. Sometimes they were told it was an effective mi graine drug named riza triptan, a positive mes sage. Other times they were told it was a place bo, a dummy pill, suggest ing no benet. Still other times they were told the pill could be either one, a neutral message. Positive thinking helps migraine drug work Fitness tips to help you start your New Years resolution MARSHA HALPER / MCT Andrea Benedetti, right, gets advice on proper free weights form from tness instructor Myriam Charleston in the Miami Heralds tness center. NANCY CHURNIN The Dallas Morning News DALLAS The good news is Amer icans are living longer. The bad is that were not living as long as people in oth er countries. American longevity has dropped sig nicantly since 1979 compared with lon gevity elsewhere, according to a 2006 report from the National Academy of Sci ences. American men live to an average age of 75, about four years less than Australians and Japanese, who live to an average of 79. American women have made the biggest comparative drop, going from being the longest-lived in the 1960s to the 28th today. Japanese women pulled ahead between 1980 and 2006 to an average 86 years, with Italian and French women living to an average of 84 years. During this same time period, American women edged up to an average of 80. Theres no agreed-upon reason for this, according to a 2011 report from the Na tional Institutes for Health. But research ers do cite a tantalizing clue: Americans seem to have their highest vulnerabili ty between the ages of 55 and 75. These are the years when we die from heart dis ease, diabetes and lung disease more of ten than those in other countries. If Americans make it past 75, they not only have the same chance to live a long life, but they have shot at joining the ranks of the increasing numbers extending their lives into their 90s and even 100s. Americans are living longer, but not as long as other countries NATHAN HUNSINGER / MCT Louise Yoss exercises in the Silver Sneakers Zumba class at the Aaron Family JCC in Dallas. SEE FITNESS | C4 SEE POSITIVE | C3 SEE LONGEVITY | C5

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION BY ADDIE BROYLES Austin American-Statesman AUSTIN, Texas Mi chelle May never saw her mom eat a baked potato. When she was a kid, everyone else at the ta ble got one, but not her mom, a slender wom an who was always on a diet to stay that way. I believed that when I grew up, I wouldnt get to eat potatoes any more, either. Its a story she tells in Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat (Am I Hungry? Publish ing, $19.95), a 2011 book I discovered last summer at a nutrition conference hosted by the Univer sity of Texas that really helped put our modern American dieting culture into perspective. In her keynote speech at the event, May, a family-phy sician-turned-well ness-coach, explained that there are three types of eaters: restric tive eaters, like her mom, overeaters and instinctive eaters. Most of us who have struggled with our weight (and feelings about food and eating) oscillate between the rst two, either consum ing every chance we get (and feeling bad about it) or eating by strict sets of pre-determined rules (and feeling bad when we break them). But it is that third cat egory instinctive eat ing that May wants us to strive for, no matter if its New Years Day or any other day of the year when we feel trapped by what she calls the eat-re pent-repeat cycle. During the Austin conference, May asked the audience to think of someone we know who seems to have a healthy relationship with food. I immediately thought about my mom, who struggled with compul sive overeating in her 20s and 30s and nally broke her yo-yo dieting habits by the time I was in elementary school. I always thought of her as a mindful eat er, whose key to success was reasonable portion sizes and a regular, con sistent exercise regimen. I rarely saw her eat seconds, but I never saw her miss a meal. She was the kind of mom who could eat one, maybe two cook ies, and feel satised. She enjoyed cooking, but food was only one of the ways she showed us her love. And most admira bly, when I came home from college weigh ing 30 pounds more than when I left, she didnt lecture me for not practicing what she preached. She simply continued her practice. Instinctive eating helps us refocus on what food really is: fuel for our bodies. Starting in our teen years, and increasing ly earlier, unfortunately, we learn the latest (and ever-changing research) on good and bad food, drinks, eating hab its and exercise. We ob sess about calories con sumed. We learn how to calculate a small bag of fries into minutes on a Stairmaster. But from birth, we learn something even harder to unlearn: eat ing habits and triggers. Parents tell children to clean their plates without realizing that they are also teaching children to ignore the natural signals in their bodies that tell them they are full. We eat because the clock says its time to eat. We ll our plates with too much food because the plates are large and thats what everybody else is doing. We confuse thirst for hunger and food for love, May says. Mindful eating means you eat with intention and attention, she says. It means setting a pur pose for your meal and becoming aware of how you feel while youre eat ing, she says. It starts not with de ciding what you should or shouldnt eat, but with when, how and why. The key to guring out what to eat is balancing what you want (men tal) with what you need (physical) and what you have (environmental). Re-learning how to listen to your body so you can determine whether its telling you to eat more protein, greens, grains, dairy, vegetables, ber, vita mins and even specif ic minerals can take years, but you have to be paying attention to how you feel before, during and after eating to start that process. And beware, May says: Your learned needs might not re ally be needs at all. The chemicals in, say, diet soda, have trained your body to want them, but those false needs are triggers you have to break, just like the emotional ones. Once youve gured out how to know when its actually time to eat and what kind of fuel your body is telling you it needs, then comes what can be the hard est part: Knowing when to stop. Weve been hearing for years that it takes more time than we re alize for our stomachs to send the message to our brains that were full. But its not just about eating slowly to allow that memo to be delivered; we have to be focusing on the food and not something else, like the television or computer or a book or magazine. Not paying atten tion to the act of eat ing is one of the biggest culprits in overeating, which then throws off your internal gauge. The goal isnt to eat perfectly or never mess up, May says. If you fall off, dont judge, she says. Just think, Oh, isnt that in teresting, and pay at tention to what went wrong and why. The whole point of all of this, May says, is to free yourself from feelings of deprivation and guilt so you can better be in charge of so many as pects of your life, not just whats for dinner. Mindful eating: Skip diets, focus on yourself RALPH BARRERA / MCT We all hear that were supposed to be more mindful when we eat, for our health, for our mind, for our families, but what does that really mean and how does it relate to how food actually tastes? BILL WARD Star Tribune MINNEAPOLIS Gabby Helmin-Clazmer is an unabashed binge viewer. She has de voured full TV seasons at a time of everything from Keeping Up With the Kardashians to Breaking Bad. But as with other major indul gences, the aftermath can be a downer. One way or another. If I binge-watch a re ality show, I feel like I have wasted a ton of my time, said HelminClazmer of Minneapolis. But when she nishes an intense drama, the depression and feeling of emptiness is much stronger than with a re ality show. A world that I was once living in no longer exists. As binge viewing continues to radically change the way Amer icans watch television 62 percent of us do it, according to a recent Harris Interactive sur vey the aftereffects are just beginning to be understood. The good news: Its probably not the worst way to while away a win ter weekend. The bad news: Its not the health iest of habits, and might even inuence our worl dview if the shows are dark and depressing. Michael Erdman of Little Canada, Minn., just watched the sec ond season of Ameri can Horror Story, and Ive got to tell you, that was one sick and twist ed show. Loved every minute of it, but it was giving me nightmares. The concerns can go beyond the psyche, said Dr. James Mitchell, president of the Neu ropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D. It doesnt sound like a particularly desirable behavior, both for ones mood and ones phys ical health, he said. The inactivity is bad, the food that accompa nies it probably is bad, your mood is bad. TV scholars have long worried about the ad verse effects of watch ing too much TV. They even have a name for it. The cultivation theo ry says that people who watch signicantly more TV have a darker view of the world, they see it as a mean and scary place, said Kevin Sauter, a com munications professor at the University of St. Thomas. This is a more focused experience the binge. And yes, someone might be more concerned about going out into the community after three days of may hem. But I dont think its a permanent condition. But then many of us simply move on to the next series, via Netix, Amazon, Hulu, On De mand services or myr iad other outlets. In the beginning was the DVD box set, and it was good. The shift to ward binge viewing was prompted by serialized dramas like The West Wing and The So pranos. Their ongoing story lines compelled viewers to follow the sagas of these heroes (and anti-heroes) in short order. The trend gained steam even with short-lived series such as Firey and Freaks and Geeks, which be came naturals for binge viewing on DVD. Nowadays, Sauter said, the narrative in these types of shows can span an entire sea son, pushing viewers to keep watching: So you get to the end of an epi sode, and its Well, lets watch one more. Sauter, who teach es courses in TV criti cism, likens the experi ence to eating a whole bag of potato chips. The rst couple are good, but once you get to the mid dle of the pack, you can lose all the savoring of it. Still, he said, TV has always been accused of being a time-waster, and now were talking about big, big chunks of time. And time spent (binge viewing) means time taken away from other things, family, friends, activities. Binge TV viewing is a popular indulgence, for better or worse

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Sometimes the doc tors message was true they were told they got rizatriptan and they really did. Sometimes it was false because re searchers had secretly switched the pills. Mixing up the pos sibilities allowed re searchers to tease out how the same persons pain relief differed from migraine to migraine as his or her expectations changed. Of course the real mi graine drug worked far better than the dum my pill. But remark ably, people who knew they were taking a pla cebo still reported less pain than when theyd left their migraine un treated, the researchers found. The surprise: Pa tients reports of pain relief more than dou bled when they were told the migraine drug was real than when they were told, falsely, that it was a fake, the team reported Wednes day in the journal Sci ence Translational Medicine. In fact, people re ported nearly as much pain relief when they took a placebo that they thought was the real drug as they did when they took the mi graine drug while be lieving it was a fake. The more we gave a positive message to the patient, the bigger the placebo effect was, Kaptchuk said. He said that effect probably isnt pure ly psychological, say ing the ritual of tak ing a medication may trigger some subcon scious memory that could leave people feel ing better even if they knew theyd taken a fake drug. Scientists have long known that some peo ple report notice able improvements in pain and certain oth er symptoms when theyre given a placebo, which can be a sugar pill or sham surgery or some other benign in tervention. Some stud ies even have docu mented that a placebo actually can spark a bi ological effect. But scientists dont know why the place bo effect works or how to harness its potential benet. The new research is an interesting at tempt to answer some of those questions, at least for one kind of pain, said Dr. Mark Sta cy, vice dean for clinical research at Duke Uni versity Medical Cen ter, who wasnt involved with the work. And learning how much of an impact it makes could help design bet ter studies of new drugs, to ensure the phenom enon doesnt skew the results, he added. For now, it shows the power of positive think ing may be helpful in taking care of your mi graine, he said. POSITIVE FROM PAGE C1

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 www.Floridafoot.com Call Today for an appointment! CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com An effective way to lose fat is to incorporate healthy eating habits with frequent, small meals (ve to six per day), cardio, strength training and consis tency. 5) What about diet? What kinds of food should I be eating? Can I still eat my favorite desserts? Dont use the word diet. Instead, focus on healthy eating, which means consuming healthy carbohydrates (whole wheat bread and pasta), fruits, veg etables and lean pro teins (chicken or tur key breast, sh, lightly marbled red meats). Eat ve or six times a day but eat small por tions during each meal. Use unhealthy items in moderation, like des serts and other sim ple sugar /white our items. Follow the 80/20 rule: Eat healthy meals 80 percent of the time and indulge 20 percent. 6) Im older. Can I still work out safely? Absolutely! As we get older, overall mus cle mass tends to de crease and there is an increasing risk of bone diseases. But you can minimize those effects of aging with a con sistent tness routine. Prior to each workout, make sure you warm up with a brisk walk or light jog for 10 to 15 minutes to get the body moving and warm. And dont forget to stretch. Incorporating exibil ity, core and strength training will maintain overall body health and minimize the chance of injury. 7) Im a woman and I dont want build big muscles. This is a misconcep tion I hear all the time. It is usually difcult for women to build mus cle, and it usually takes a long time. Women dont have the same amount of muscle cells that men have, on av erage. But for women, strength training is very important because it helps burn fat and build bone density to com bat osteoporosis. Mus cles also help us shape and tone our bodies, so ladies, dont be afraid of building muscles. 8) How long will it take before I see re sults? It depends on the in dividual. Usually, people will start to notice chang es after two or three months. Remember your results will depend on how consistent you are with your strength training, your cardio and your eating habits. Con sistency in those three areas is the key. 9) I dont like going to the gym. What can I do at home? You can purchase a few items to create a home gym: a stability ball, a mat, a few dumb bells, and resistance bands. There are also body-weight exercis es you can do: squats, lunges, biceps curls, dips, crunches, pull-ups and push-ups. Howev er, the benet of going to a gym lies in the vari ety of exercises you can do. Consistency is the key to success, so keep yourself interested and change up the exercises you perform. 10) Ive started work out routines before and lost interest. What can I do to stay motivated? Many people com plain of losing inter est with their workouts One of the most im portant things is nd something you enjoy doing. Start with any physical activity that you enjoy doing to keep yourself motivated. Is it a sport? Is it working out with a friend? Another option is to hire a personal trainer who can keep you mo tivated and can cus tomize a work-out pro gram to meet your goals. It is important to set realistic goals and track your progress so you dont become dis couraged. And if you miss some workouts or have a weekend where you overindulged, dont despair! Just rededicate yourself and get back to your routine. FITNESS FROM PAGE C1 MARSHA HALPER / MCT Fitness instructor Jeff Pierre watches as Eddie Alvarez performs a rowing workout in the Miami Heralds on-site tness center.

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Experts say people are particularly vulner able from 55 to 75 be cause this is when the cumulative effects of poor nutrition, lack of exercise and lack of screenings can con verge. Poor lifestyle choices can lead to clogged arteries, high blood pressure, insulin resistance and cancers spotted too late for ef fective treatment. Obesity is the No. 1 driver of ill health, as far as Dr. Diana Ker win is concerned. Ker win, chief of geriatrics at Texas Health Dallas, also blames Americans sedentary lifestyle for driving up the increase in fatal diseases. She points with pride to her patient Louise Yoss, 78, of Dallas, a reg ular at the Silver Sneak ers exercise class at the Aaron Family Jew ish Community Center in Dallas. Yoss started working out at 74. Ker win says Yoss is improv ing her odds of a healthy future with exercise and healthy food choices. Heart disease re mains the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, killing 1 of 4 of both genders, accord ing to a 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A contributing factor to womens deaths in par ticular is a lack of aware ness of the symptoms of heart attacks in females, which can lead to criti cal time elapsing before seeking lifesaving care. While both men and women can experience the telltale shortness of breath, pressure or pain in the lower chest or upper abdomen or extreme fatigue or diz ziness, women are more likely to dismiss the symptoms as acid reux, the u or aging. Smoking can aggra vate diseases or make health problems worse. Experts are encour aged that the percent age of American smok ers dropped from 18.9 percent to 18 percent in 2012, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. However, thats still too many, says Dr. Mitchell Magee, medical direc tor of the CLEAR (Chest Lung Evaluation & Re source) Clinic and sur gical director of thorac ic oncology at Medical City Dallas. Plus, many dont re alize theyre at risk for lung cancer even if they dont smoke, Ma gee says. Women seem to be at particular risk for this disease. While the rate of new lung cancer cas es has dropped 22 per cent for men over the past 33 years, it has risen for women by 106 per cent, according to the American Cancer So ciety. Lung cancer has a greater mortality rate than any other cancer, causing more deaths in women than breast, uterine and ovarian cancer combined. The median age for a person to receive a di agnosis of lung can cer is 65, and 20 per cent of women with the disease have never smoked or had any ex posure to smoke. Magee attributes that to a lack of research and screenings for lung cancer. By the time symptoms occur, its usually too late to save the patient. Women who have had other cancers, have had their ovaries removed surgically before meno pause or who have hor mone replacement after menopause are at high er risk and would benet from screenings, he says. HOW TO OVERCOME Does all this render Americans relative de cline in longevity inev itable or unsolvable? Not according to Dan Buettners 2008 book The Blue Zones: Les sons for Living Longer From the People Whove Lived the Longest. Buettners book has inspired a program called the Blue Zones Project by Healthways, a company based in Franklin, Tenn. Emotional and psy chological needs are also part of the health and longevity picture, says Joel Spoonheim, executive director for community programs with Healthways. People whose lives have a sense of purpose live about seven years longer than those with out that. When people hit retirement, they ask, Why am I here? Why am I getting up in the morn ing? Spoonheim notes. For Yoss, her Silver Sneakers class, where she moves to music alongside women who have become like fam ily, answers that ques tion and more. Cindy is fabulous, she says of Cindy Dod son, the teacher who stops to check on and praise Yoss as she rests after class. Its joyful. I hate to miss it. LONGEVITY FROM PAGE C1 NATHAN HUNSINGER / MCT Louise Yoss works out with the Silver Sneakers class at the Aaron Family JCC.

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 315-8305 Is pain keeping you from what matters most? By covering up pain, swelling, or others, you may be making a deeper problem. Acupuncture is a time-tested, safe, natural and drug free treatment that can provide immediate relief and long lasting benefits.James N Georgiades AP Working gallery of local artists (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: You said in your Nov. 14 column on bully ing that you hadnt received a single letter from anyone who had bullied others. Well, I was a bully. As a young girl Id tease and taunt, and when I was older I used sarcasm as a way to bul ly. I was involved in an abu sive relationship in my 20s. With support and counsel ing, I was able to stop being abused and being abusive. I learned the feelings I had repressed shame, fear and low self-worth from a child hood of sexual and physi cal abuse were misdirect ed at the people around me instead of at my abuser, my father, as they should have been. Im not saying this is an excuse for the hurt I inicted on others, but for me there was a correlation. Im now in a loving and supportive relationship. We have raised our children to be kind, thoughtful and con dent individuals. Im involved with an organization sup porting nonprot programs in our community that em power abused children, reach out to the sexually exploited and help women experienc ing domestic violence. Because of the life I lead now, I have been able to let go of the negativity and shame of being abused, but the shame of being abusive stays with me. I hope the people I hurt have forgiv en me and have been able to move forward. But I will nev er know for sure. Thank you for allowing me to share my story. Even if it doesnt get printed, writing it has lifted a little bit of the weight that I still carry from my bullying days. REDEEM ING MYSELF OUT WEST DEAR REDEEMING: Confes sion is good for the soul, and if getting this off your chest has been helpful, Im glad. Obviously, you have grown since the days when you were an abuser, and your focus on helping vulnerable people in your community is laud able. I hope you will contin ue the work that youre doing because there is great need for it. If your letter makes just one person stop and think twice about WHY he or she would deliberately hurt or dimin ish someone else, it will have been worth the space in my column because sometimes those scars can last a lifetime. DEAR ABBY: I recently lost a niece. She had struggled with substance abuse and was away at college when she died. I believed in what a wonderful person she was and could be, and often sent her cards of encouragement. When my sister and her husband went to retrieve her belongings, they mentioned that she had my cards around her room. I had hoped that her parents would give them to me, but three months lat er, they have not. Would it be wrong for me to ask for them? LOVING AUNT IN THE SOUTH DEAR LOVING AUNT: Please ac cept my sympathy for your familys loss. The cards may not have been offered be cause your sister and her husband are experiencing the depths of grief. While it would not be wrong to ask if you can have them, dont be surprised if they refuse to let them go at least for the time being. Having the pos sessions their daughter sur rounded herself with may be important to them right now as a way of feeling closer to her. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Reformed bully still regrets the pain she caused others

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 r f n t b t f b t r t t b t t t f b b r b t t r t f t f f t r f r b b f r r t r t t r t r r r b r t b r b b r b r b r b t f t b t f b b f r r t r b r t f t t t t r f t b b r f r t r f t r t r r r b n n n n n n n n n n n n rf trttftt t f ntbf r t r t f t rfrfttb brtfrbr rtttt rtrbttt tfffrfftf rbtr ttr rbttftrr rbtrrrbtt rbttr btfrrbrr trfttbrr tt tbt ttr tr f tt n ttr rr rfntbrft t b t r r t r r t r t t t f t r f r t b t r r r f t t t f tt rf nttrt fbftf tffrt rbrr frbrtrbrrtf rftn n nn t trrrtrrtf nn tfftr rtfrffbtt t trtttt ft t r fbrftrtrfrt fr n n n n t t r t f r t r r f t t b b f t r r f t r b r t r t b f r t r f t b r r b t r t r t b t b t b f r t r r r f t b r r b t t r t t r b n tfr ft b rf n n n n trr ft r f t t r f r f t t t f f f r t t f t f r f t f b f f r f n t r r b r b r t r f t t btrrtrr trtt tftr frtbtrrrr fttt rbr rrrtfftf trr ftt rtb tbr tt f tt rf nttrt fbftfb tffrt rrbr frbrtrbrrtft rftr ttrrtf ftr rtfrffbtrr tttrt frbrttr tft trfbrf trtrfrtf n n n rf rf rfntb f rr

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 r f n t b n f r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r f b n f f f f b f f f f n f f r r f r r r r r f r r f n r r f r r r b t f f r n f r f f f r r r r n r n f r r r r f r r f r r f r f rrr b r r r f f f t n r r f n r r r f r r r r r f r r r f r r r t f f b t f r r r r r f r r r r r r r t r r r n f r n r r r f r b r b r r r t r t t t f ff b r n r r f b r ntb f t f f r r r n n f r r r b r f n f f f f r r f r f f f f r r r r r r r r r r f n ffrrrr b r r r nb f frtrr r rtr r rrr r r r r bb f n rrr rr rr rr rr r t r b r r b r f t n f n n r r r r r f r f b f r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r f r r n bb f b t r r r b b t r f b r f b f r r r b b t r r f f b f t r b f b t b r f r f r f b f b r f r r r r n r r r f rb r r r f b r f b tbf t n t f r r f r r r r r r r r r r f n f r r rrr rr r f r bb f f f t r r r r r r f f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 rfn tbtt nrnn tf nnt ftn nrt n r t bn trbrtr t fnr tt rf nr t rtnnnr tb btnf f t r tn ntnt tffn tt trttbtb t f brnnf r tb bttn b rf t t nnntrt f t n r n n r f b ttb tnf nttrf nntb t nf trf t n b b t r tnrffr tb btbn nbfr n t tn n rf n n tb rt bntfrbt n rbtn r f rnnr b n nntb frt rtntb t b fft t r f t b n t r n t t b rf ttbt tbtfnt bnr trf tnnttttbtb r rtb rbt nrnnt nnn ntfntb tt n ftfb rtt r tffttb tb b ttbrnb bttrtt rn b rnrb nb b ttb t rn rntbbftnn n b nr fn ff tt n trn fn nn trr ntrbf ft tbt rtb trnfn ttrn b tbt tt tn t r ffttbtb tttbtt r t b r fttr r tfnttb f n b r t b f t t f n t b n tn f t n f n r r t n t n n t r b t nttb btt tbbrntfr n tbbtfr tb nr r tn n t f n b r tntfrtn nn fttbf t trttbtb n tbt nt ttb ttbtb b ntt tn nnb n trttb r ftnnrtnt btt rbr trntb nrttbtb nn r ttbtb tbttb tb nnntb tt frfnt bbtb tnnrnttbrnr b nnrtf tb r nrnrbt ttnr bb r nr brn n b r tbt rrtnb ftr tt ftr tt t t b t t n rf nbnfnt tnnb nnffnn ttbftt nnt ntb t n n f t n t f n n fn b f n n bb f ffft nnt b t n f f n b n t n t t b t t t t t b t t n b n n n n n f t n n t n b n t n f f t f t b t b n t n n n f r t t r n t r n t t b n t f t f f f n b f n t t t t r t t n b ffrnb ntnntn nn t n n r n n t t t

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rfnt b r fnt bnt b t r r t r t f f r f r r r r t f b f t f t b rfb brbbbbbt bb nr btrr bftrtbb b brbb rtbf rtftrbbb tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb nr bnt r t b t t t f t r r t b f f r b t b r f t f f r b t f f r t r t b r b f b f r b r t r r r t b t b r b t t t f t b f r b r t b t f b b r t r t b f f r b t t r t b f b r t b f r tfrtbfrbr btbrftt tfrrr ttttbrrtt rfbbrt t r t f f t rr tn bfbtb bftttfb bnt b n b f f t t f b b t b b r r t t b t t f t t b b t r b tbrr rttt trfrt b r t r t r bnt r b t f f b f t r t b f t b t b t t f b b f b t f f t t t t r bnt tn bnt tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb t t r t r t n r r t r t f r f r b f r r f r t b rnt t b t r t r r f b f f f b r t b b b b b b r t rrt r f t b r n t rtfbfrt rftbftfbbb btrf r b f f t r f b b t t t t tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb t tbbtfbt brtbtrftf rr f b b t f b f r b r r t r f r t b f b b f r t b r b f r f f r t f b t r f t b r b f r f f r f t t b t f b t t r t t r f t b b r f f b b b f r b tbrftt r t f b n f t t t t b f t t r r t f b t r r f r b t r f t f f nr t b b t b b t b r b f b b t r f t f t f b tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb nr t rfttrbf trft b t f b r b t t f b t t r b t f b rtft ttrrbt b b rftrft b r t r t b tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb tn bn b bfb ffrb nfft bbb fftrt t r b b t f r r r t r b f bb bbb ttf t bbb f t b tnf t ttntb brbbb r b b t bbfb bbb trb tb bb bbb r t t t r f t t f t f bbb bftt tfrftt rttt rrtbr rtt ttrf t bfttbb b frtbftt

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 rff ntbnt f f n t b n bfrf rrfbftn nbnfrr rffb rrr rrbfff bfn rf nftnnt n tt nbfbnf ntt bnnbrf tn nnrfrf ntnn rrr rftb n n rrf nbfnn ntf n b b f f b t t bnr tn f f n t n f b b nf nn f b f n t brrf f btt f n b b t b b n b b t n b n n n b b b b n b b n b b n n b n b t r r t t f f b r n n b bb nt b n brfbf ntt b f f b f n t n bttfn fr rrrf bff nbtn n f rfffnrn rf nbfnn b f bf n bf n rrf rnfnbt btf t tf b b bn rff btb bb fff nb b



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FLORIDAS DOWNFALL STARTED A YEAR AGO SPORTS B1TRAINING: Special Olympians headed to south Lake, A3 GET IN SHAPE: Fitness tips to help you start your New Years resolution, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 13, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 13 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS DX DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS DX LIVING HEALTHY C1 STATE/REGION A3 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 SCOREBOARD B2 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.76 / 61Partly sunny.50 NASSER KARIMIAssociated PressTEHRAN, Iran Iran has agreed to open the Islamic Republics nuclear program to daily inspec tion by international experts starting from Jan. 20, setting the clock running on a six-month deadline for a nal nuclear agree ment, ofcials said Sunday. In exchange, Iran will get a relaxation of the nancial sanctions that have been crippling its economy. The announcement that Iran and six world powers had agreed on the plan for implementing an interim agreement came rst from Iranian ofcials and was later conrmed elsewhere. Some U.S. lawmakers have been leery of the agree ment, calling for tough er sanctions against Iran, rather than any loosening of controls. Irans ofcial IRNA news agency quoted Iranian Deputy Foreign Min ister Abbas Araghchi say ing the deal, which sets the terms of a landmark agreement reached in November, would take effect from Jan. 20. The agency said Iran will grant the Unit ed Nations atomic agency access to its nuclear facili ties and its centrifuge pro duction lines to conrm it is complying with terms of the deal. Araghchi later told state television some $4.2 billion in seized oil revenue would be released under the deal. Senior ofcials in U.S. President Barack Obamas administration put the total relief gure at $7 billion.Iran, world powers reach deal opening nuke program AP FILE PHOTO A worker rides a bicycle in front of the reactor building of the Bushehr nuclear power plant, just outside the southern city of Bushehr. Associated PressTAMPA Research ers at the University of South Florida have teamed up with the Or lando Police Depart ment for a long-term study on ofcers ac tions using footage from body cameras. Fifty ofcers will wear tiny cameras on places like their sunglasses, collars and caps to provide critical perspective about their daily interactions and decisions. Fifty other ofcers participating in the year-long study will not wear the cameras. Police departments across the country are increasingly using body cameras, which cost between $200 and $400 each, to provide valuable rst-hand accounts and investigate issues such as use of force. Researchers from USFs criminology de partment will examine the number of inci dents and complaints Orlando police wear body cameras for study THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comNeighbors in a quiet Lees burg retirement com munity were stunned Sunday when Lake County sheriffs investigators discov ered a body buried in the yard of a homeowner who report edly has been missing in re cent weeks. Sheriffs ofcials said the death is suspicious. Theres concern that it may be the body of the missing homeowner, Jesse Wachter, 63. At this point, we do have a body that has been located at the property, Lt. John Her rell, sheriffs spokesman, said Sunday afternoon as yellow crime-scene tape and vehicles of the medical examiner and LCSO authorities surrounded the cream-color home at 181 North Lake Drive, in the Mid-Florida Lakes community. The identity of the victim has not been identied, nor has the cause of death been determined, Herrell said. It is obviously suspicious. We are treating it as a suspicious death investigation, Herrell said. With neighbors reporting that they havent seen this man in recent weeks, that would lead us to suspect that it could be him, but obviously we are not going to assume or reach to any conclusions. Herrell said crime-scene investigators were working to exhume the body while detectives had a warrant to search the home for evidence that might help determine what took place. The investigation initially be gan after 8 / p.m. Saturday when the Sheriffs Ofce received a report from a neighbor, who told deputies that someone was at the house loading items on a trailer. This concerned the neighbor since Wachter hadnt been seen recently. Deputies responded and stopped the vehicle, which happened to be Wachters LEESBURGHuman remains found at property of missing man PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL The North Lake Drive neighborhood of Leesburg was blocked off Sunday as LSCO crime-scene personnel and the medical examiner were on site for the excavation of property owned by Jesse Wachter. Deputies became concerned after a cadaver dog alerted on the area; Neighbors say they had not seen Wachter in recent weeks. Lake County Sheriff Gary Borders, center, receives an update on Sunday at the crime scene from Lt. John Herrell, LCSO spokesman, left, and Capt. Chuck Theobald, right, of criminal investigations. N 181 North Lake Drive, Leesburg WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICHUMAN REMAINS FOUND Sheriffs investigators discovered human remains late Saturday on the property of a man who neighbors say they havent seen in weeks. 44 44Radio Rd. Emeralda Ave.Poe St.Creek Rd. 437 JOSH BOAK and SAM HANANELAssociated PressWASHINGTON A cutoff of benets for the long-term unem ployed has left more than 1.3 million Amer icans with a stressful decision: What now? Without their unem ployment checks, many will abandon what had been a futile search and will no longer look for a job an exo dus that could dwarf the 347,000 Americans who stopped seek ing work in December. Beneciaries have been required to look for work to receive un employment checks. Some who lost their benets say theyll begin an early and un planned retirement. Others will pile on debt to pay for school and an eventual second ca reer. Many will likely lean on family, friends and other government programs to get by. Theyre people like Stan Osnowitz, a 67-year-old electrician in Baltimore who lost his state unemploy ment benets of $430 a week. The money put gasoline in his car to Loss of jobless aid leaves many with bleak options PATRICK SEMANSKY / AP Stan Osnowitz poses in his living room in Baltimore. SEE CAMERAS | A2SEE NUKE | A2SEE JOBLESS | A2 SEE BODY | A4

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 13, 2014: This year your focus remains on your daily life and on your relationships. Youll have a goal in mind and, with endurance, you can make it happen. Dont focus on the obstacles; instead, focus on the end results. If you are single, in the next six months, you could meet someone of signicance. Do not settle right now. Go for what you want. If you are attached, the two of you might disagree about who should take out the garbage, but your relationship will evolve to a much closer and intimate level. CANCER challenges you in many ways. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could be set on having certain results, most likely involving your nances. You will communicate your determination, but there are others involved who might be less enthusiastic. This conversation could continue for several days. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Others will want to have a discussion with you involving your funds. You might need to distance yourself a bit, but still be aware of where they are coming from. Try not to cut off the parties involved; instead, just change the topic. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You will turn whatever is going on into a social happening. Be aware of what you are doing and why. In this case, you might want to help someone lighten up. However, keep in mind that sometimes your actions could backre. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Take a back seat until you gain a greater perspective and a better sense of direction. You might not be as tuned in to a situation as you think you are. Do some research, and keep your judgments to yourself for now. T LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Use the daylight hours to the max. You could feel as if a family member is holding you back. Listen to your inner voice in this situation. Your ability to go for what you want will be unfettered by this person. That strength comes from within. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Others will follow, once they understand why youre doing what youre doing. You might feel as if you have taken on too much. You need to emphasize what you want from others. Understand that they will be more responsive later in the evening. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Reach out for new information. If you dont, you wont be able to make a solid decision. There will be a lot going on around you; sort through as much of it as you can. You might note that a common thread runs through these different issues. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your instincts will kick in when dealing with a partner and/or a nancial matter. Your sixth sense could go against your logic, but it likely is right-on. Detach some, and revisit this issue later. You will understand a lot more at that time. Let go for now. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Others really want you to hear what they think. Your knee-jerk response might not be positive. Stop, and get to the bottom of what is happening with you rst. Try not to give feedback until you clear up your feelings. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Pace yourself. Stop and visit with someone in your daily life who could seem off. You have the capacity and organization to make time for this person. You might decide to return calls and schedule a meeting toward the end of the day. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Your playfulness might be endearing to some, but it wont be to a boss, who might be quite stern and difcult to deal with. Stop, take a deep breath and adjust to the moment. How you see a situation could change radically as a result. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Realize that it is OK if you have a difcult time starting the day. If you can take a personal day, you could enjoy some extra time at home. Know that you will lighten up in either case; you just have a case of the Monday blues. This, too, will pass. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 0-9-0 Afternoon . .......................................... 3-9-1 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 7-7-0-0 Afternoon . ....................................... 9-1-4-6FLORIDALOTTERY SATURDAYFANTASY 5 . ........................... 1-14-25-27-33 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $24 4 of 5 wins $555 Rolldown THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. involving force and whether injuries go up or down. Theyll also look at wheth er civilians treat ofcers wearing cam eras differently and whether theyre less likely to approach them. The footage can also be useful when a complaint is lodged against an ofcer. If you really want to make camer as a strong accountability mechanism, you want the supervisors to review ran dom lm and let the ofcers know, said Lorie Fridell, associate professor and graduate director in criminology at USF. That makes the lm more power ful in terms of promotion and good behavior. The Institute of Criminology at the University of Cambridge led a body camera study in 2012 with Californias Rialto Police Department, using a small er sample size of ofcers than the USF study. Complaints against Rialto police ofcers dropped by 88 percent. And ofcers wearing cameras used force al most 60 percent less. CAMERAS FROM PAGE A1 Under the November agreement, Iran agreed to limit its uranium en richment to 5 percent the grade commonly used to power reactors. The deal also commits Iran to stop producing 20 percent enriched ura nium which is only a technical step away from weapons-grade material and to neutralize its 20 percent stockpile over the six months. In exchange, economic sanctions Iran fac es would be eased for six months. During that time, the so-called P5+1 world powers Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States would continue negotiations with Iran on a permanent deal. The West fears Irans nuclear program could allow it to build a nuclear bomb. Iran says its program is for peaceful pur poses, such as medical research and power gen eration. Irans semi-ofcial ISNA news agency reported Sunday that un der the terms of the deal, Iran will guarantee that it wont try to attain nuclear arms under any circum stance. However, Aragh chi stressed Iran could resume production of 20 percent uranium in one day if it chose. The senior U.S. ofcials said U.N. inspectors would have daily access to Iranian nuclear sites and would make month ly reports. Iran will dilute half of its nuclear mate rial during the rst three months of the agree ment, the ofcials said, and all of it by the end of the agreement. In exchange, Iran would have access to parts for its civilian aviation, petrochemical and automotive industries, as well as be allowed to im port and export gold, the ofcials said. The deal also gives Iran access to international humanitar ian and medical supplies, though Iran still could not use U.S. banks and the majority of sanctions would remain in place, they said. The senior U.S. ofcials spoke on the condition of anonymity because the specic terms of the agreement were not re leased publicly. European Union negotiator Catherine Ashton praised the deal in a state ment, saying the founda tions for a coherent, robust and smooth implemen tation ... have been laid. German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier called the deal a decisive step forward which we can build on. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry welcomed the deal in a statement as well, saying further negotiations represent the best chance we have to resolve this critical national security issue peacefully, and durably. NUKE FROM PAGE A1 help him look for work. Osnowitz says a con tinuation of his benets would have enabled his job search to continue into spring, when construction activity usually increases and more electrical jobs become available. He says hes sought low-paid work at stores like Lowes or Home De pot. But he acknowledges that at his age, the pros pect of a minimum-wage job is depressing. I have two choices, Osnowitz says. I can take a job at McDonalds or something and give up everything Ive stud ied and everything Ive worked for and all the ex perience that I have. Or I can go to retirement. Unemployment benets were extended as a federal emergency move during the 2008 nancial crisis at a time of rising unemployment. The benets have gone to millions who had ex hausted their regular state unemployment checks, typically after six months. Last month, the extended-benets program was allowed to ex pire, a casualty of decit-minded lawmakers who argue that the government cant afford to fund it indenitely and that unemployment benets do little to put peo ple back to work. The duration of the federal benets has varied from state to state up to 47 weeks. As a result, the long-term unemployed in Rhode Island, for exam ple, could receive a total of 73 weeks 26 weeks of regular benets, plus 47 weeks from the now-ex pired federal program. Outside Cincinnati, Tammy Blevins, 57, fears that welfare is her next step. She was let go as a machine operator at a printing plant in May. Her unemployment check and a small inheritance from her father helped cover her $1,000-a-month mortgage and $650 health insurance premium. Now, with her benets cut off and few open ings in manufacturing, she dreads what could be next. Im going to have to try the welfare thing, I guess, Blevins says. I dont know. Im lost. Others plan to switch careers. After being laid off last summer as a high school history teacher, Jada Urquhart enrolled at Ohio State University to become a social worker. Urquhart, 58, has al ready borrowed against her house, canceled cable TV and turned down the thermostat despite the winter chill. Without an unemployment check, she plans to max out her credit cards and take on student loans to com plete her degree by 2015. Ill be 60 when I grad uate, she says. If I do one-on-one or family counseling, I can work forever. Urquhart nds herself in sympathy with mem bers of Congress who want to limit government spending. At least in the ory she does. Its just hard when youre the one getting shrunk, she says. Jesse Rothstein, an economist at the Univer sity of California, Berke ley, who has studied the long-term unemployed, has found that extend ed benets help both the recipients and the economy by fueling con sumer spending. A Band-Aid doesnt heal a serious wound, but that isnt much of a reason not to use one, Rothstein says. The trend of people ending their job hunts once their benets expire has already emerged in North Carolina, which started cutting off aid in July. North Carolinas unemployment rate sank from 8.8 percent in June to 7.4 percent in November, but mainly be cause people stopped their job searches. JOBLESSFROM PAGE A1

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT LEESBURG Retired and Senior Volunteer Program seeks volunteersLake and Sumter County residents ages 55 and older who have a lifetime of experience to share and the desire to make a real difference in the community are needed as volunteers for the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) program. Those interested can get information by calling 352-365-1995.WILDWOOD Area 13 Family Care Council meeting set for todayThe Area 13 Family Care Council will meet from 10 / a.m. to noon today at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities ofce, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44) in Wildwood, for those with developmental disabilities and their families. Developmental disabilities are dened as autism, cerebral palsy, Downs Syndrome, Prader-Willi Syndrome, spina bida and intellectual disabilities. For information, call Betty Kay Clements at 352-753-1163 or send an email to isabelfcc13@yahoo.com.TAVARES Religious leaders sought for invocation at meetingsThe Lake County Commission is seeking local pastors, preachers, fathers, rabbis and other heads of religious organizations to participate in county commission meetings by opening with an invocation. Meetings are held at 9 / a.m., on Tuesdays, twice each month in Commission Chambers at the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St., Tavares. To participate in the invocation portion of a commission meeting, call Kathy Hartenstein at 352-3235733, or send an email to khartenstein@lakecounty.gov.MOUNT DORA January Ladies Tea Adventure at Museum of ArtLadies Tea Adventures January tea will take place at 2 / p.m., Wednesday, at the Lake Eustis Museum of Art, 1 W. Orange Avenue, Eustis. Liz Wincup, a well-known Central Florida artist, will be painting while the group takes tea, and will talk about her work and art observations. Reservations are required by calling 352-360-9497. Cost is $22 for members and $24 for non-members.TAVARES Guardian ad Litem program seeks volunteersLocal training will begin Jan. 28 at the UF Extension Service Agriculture Center, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares for qualied volunteers to serve as advocates for children who have been removed from their homes for alleged abuse, neglect or abandonment, and who are part of the dependency court proceedings. For information, call Lynn Sennett at 352-274-5231, send an email to Lynn.Sennett@gal..gov or go to www.guardianadlitem.org.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 Staff ReportThe cast for the new Lazarus Filmworks lm The Diner was nalized this week with the addi tion of a Major League Baseball Cy Young winner. The movie by the Mount Dora-based Christian lm company tells the story of a former boxing champion who believes all his problems can be blamed on God. John Denny, who won the 1983 Cy Young Award while pitching for the Philadelphia Phillies, was added to the staff playing the role of chairman of the Florida Boxing Commission. We will begin lming on the 19th of this month with the boxing commission scene and then the ght scenes the next day, Director De Miller said. We will then lm a few scenes at the Lakeside Inn in Mount Dora on the 21st and take about a 10-day break be fore completing the lm ing with two weeks in Feb ruary at various locations throughout Lake County. The lm stars Wade Williams, who starred in last falls theatrical hit movie, The Investigator, as the lead character. The cast also includes Kibwe Dorsey, another of the featured actors in The Investigator, and Michael Santi, who won the Best Actor award at the Orlando 48 Hour Film festival last fall. Miller said the pro duction is still looking for volunteers to help on the crew and urged those interested to com plete a short information form on the movie web site, www.TheDinerMovie.com. He also said there will be a number of opportunities for interested persons to appear as ex tras, especially in the ght scene audience. We will be lming the ght sequences at the Teknique Boxing arena in Minneola, Miller said. James J.T. Taylor, operator of the boxing facility, and Denise Crim, owner of the Fighting Arts Emporium, are hosting the lm company during their shoot in Minneola on Jan. 20. Besides having two for mer boxers in the cast, Rick Gaetano and Moses Cantu, who will appear as DENNYMOUNT DORACast for The Diner firmed up SEE MOVIE | A4 Staff ReportThe University of Flori das Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/ IFAS) Extension ofce in Lake County is hosting two free classes designed to help older Lake County residents better organize and simplify their lives. The rst class, Aging in Place, will be held from 10 / a.m. to noon, Wednes day, and aims to help old er residents maintain independence and safety inside the home. This class will teach ways to modify the home, provide tools to simplify life and offer tips regarding hiring assistance for both personal and healthcare needs, said Elisha Pap pacoda, public information ofcer for Lake County. Those interested in attending this class should register at janagingwell. eventbrite.com. From everyday house hold items to nancial papers, participants will learn what to keep and what to throw out by developing a clear the clutter strategy in the sec ond class, Organize Your Home and Important Pa pers. The program takes place from 10 / a.m. to noon on Feb. 19. Those interested in attending should register at febagingwell.eventbrite.com. Both classes are free, and will be held at the Lake County Extension ofce, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares. Regis tration is required online, or by calling 352-343-4101 ext. 2719 or 2721. For information, send an email to Julie England at julieeng@u.edu.TAVARESExtension office plans classes to help seniors MARISA KENDALLThe News-PressFORT MYERS Fewer Florida families are entombing their loved ones bodies underground opting instead to send the re mains into the Gulf of Mexico, shoot them into the sky or wear them in a locket. The traditional buri al, once so important in the grieving process, is becoming a thing of the past. More than half of Floridians who die are cremated instead of buried. The practice is even more common in southwest Florida, where nancial, practical, religious and sen timental reasons are causing more people to choose cremation. Whats interesting is cremation seems to be becoming the new tra dition for many fam ilies, said Barbara Kemmis, executive director of the Cremation Association of North America. Florida cremated 59 percent of its dead in 2011 the second highest percentage in the U.S., accord ing to the most recent Cremation Association statistics. Florida ranked third for growth in cremations that year, behind California and Texas. In 2012, 74 percent of Lee and 73 percent of Collier county residents who died were cremated, according to the most recent Florida Department of Health statistics. Thats compared to 69 percent in Lee and 68 percent in Collier in 2008. At Mullins Memori al Funeral Home & Cremation Service in Cape Coral, about 85 percent of clients choose crema tion, according to owner Shannon Mullins. A major reason is cost. A basic cremation costs an average of about $2,250, according to the Cremation Asso ciation. Thats compared to about $8,350 for the average burial. Another reason was demonstrated last month, when a south west Florida father exhumed his deceased sons body and was ap palled at what he saw. Jesse Watlington, 11, died in October 2012 after he was struck by lightning. His family buried him at Fort My ers Memorial Gardens, but later moved to Or lando and decided to re-bury Jesse close by. When workers Cremation becoming more popular in Florida JACK HARDMAN / AP Shannon Mullins of Mullins Memorial Funeral Home & Cremation Services waits for the cremator to heat up to 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit in preparation for a cremation in Cape Coral.SEE CREMATION | A4 Staff ReportMore than 180 Special Olym pics Florida athletes will travel to Clermont on Jan. 24-25 to train and prepare for the 2014 Special Olympics USA Games in June. This two-day training will build on each teams and individuals competitive strength before they join more than 3,500 Special Olympics athletes from throughout the Unit ed States in New Jersey to compete in 16 sports, before tens of thousands of spectators and volunteers. For some athletes, traveling to compete in the 2014 USA Games in New Jersey is the rst time they will leave their hometowns, ofcials say. A specic combination of training and conditioning has been designed to provide each athlete with a competitive edge. Athletes will also take part in a general orientation as well as be tted for uniforms while at the training camp. Because individuals and teams encompass a variety of sports, multiple venues will be utilized, including the National Training Center in Clermont (aquatics); Montverde Acade my in Montverde (soccer, track and eld, volleyball, basketball and cycling); Clermont Lanes in Clermont (bowling) and the Sanctuary Ridge Golf Course in Clermont (golf). The 2014 Special Olympics USA Games will celebrate the Special Olympics movement while promoting the ideals of ac ceptance and inclusion through sports and highlighting the abilities of athletes with intellectual disabilities, ofcials say.CLERMONTSpecial Olympians headed to south Lake

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Steverson-Hamlin and Hilbish Funerals and Cremations226 East Burleigh Blvd, Tavares, FL 32778 352-343-4444 www.steversonhamlinhilbish.com DEATH NOTICESAnne Price SaundersAnne Price Saunders, 73, of Mount Dora, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis.Dorothy Jane SmaltinoDorothy Jane Smalti no, 74, of Wildwood, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home and Crematory, Leesburg.IN MEMORY corner men for the ac tor-ghters, Miller said boxing enthusiasts will also be interested in the boxing scenes for another reason. Those who follow boxing will want to take special note of the box ing gloves that will be worn by Michael Santi, Miller said. The gloves were last worn by a real-life boxing champion, the late Arturo Gatti. Miller explained that Cantu, who was trained by Gattis trainer, former champ Buddy McGirt, was able to obtain the famous gloves from a contact at a Florida box ing gym. Gatti, who won two world championship titles, retired from boxing in 2007 and died in 2009 while vacationing in Brazil. The cause of his death is still under investigation. While this is a faiththemed movie, Miller pointed out, there has been a lot of interest because of its professional boxing backstory. Miller said the com pany is once again be ing aided by a coalition of Lake County church es, including Adventure Christian Church in Tavares, the First Unit ed Methodist Church of Mount Dora and the First Baptist Churches of Umatilla and Eustis. We are very proud of our association with these churches and, in fact, would have a dif cult time doing what we do without the help of church members and use of their facili ties, he said. MOVIE FROM PAGE A3 Staff reportThe Sumter County Cham ber of Commerce will present its annual Business and Industry Awards at its Plaid and Pearls Awards Gala and An nual Dinner on January 24 at the Savannah Center in The Villages. The following winners were chosen from nominations re ceived from business and community members: %  en Sean Williams of PSL Construction was selected as Outstanding Business Man of the Year. %  en Connie Mahan of Con nie Mahan Real Estate Group was selected as Outstanding Business Woman of the Year. %  en Mike Scott Plumbing has been chosen as Outstand ing Large Business of the Year, representing businesses with 80 or more employees. %  en High Five Your Life Fro zen Yogurt of Buffalo Ridge was selected as Outstanding Small Business of the Year. %  en The Scenic Sumter Her itage Byway Advocacy Group was selected as Outstanding Non Prot. %  en Marc and Cheryl Kozak of Blue Monster Promotions will be honored as Outstanding Chamber Volunteers of the Year. In addition to recognizing the top businesses, the din ner and awards ceremony will feature the installation of the chambers 2014 board of directors. Emily Rose and Emily Gra ham will perform at the 6:30 / p.m. event. A silent auction where individuals and businesses have donated items, gift cer ticates, gift baskets or ser vices valued at $50 or more will help support the chambers mission to edu cate, support and promote businesses in Sumter Coun ty. Donors will be listed on the chambers website, in the event program, on the auc tion tables and in a special feature in our newsletter. Donors of items worth more than $500 will be recog nized on the PowerPoint pri or to the live program. Tickets and tables are available for the event. For pricing and reservations, or to do nate an item, call the cham ber ofce at 352-793-3099.LAKE PANASOFFKEESumter chamber to hand out awardsopened the grave, the burial vault lid was cracked, and the casket inside was full of water. Certain caskets and burial vaults can keep water out, but only for so long, Mullins said. Especially after a rainy season in southwest Florida, where the water level is so high. Cremation is also a practical option for southwest Floridas seasonal and transplant residents, as cremated remains are cheaper and easier to transport, Mullins said. Cremation ts peoples modern lifestyles and gives fami lies more options, Kemmis said. There are a handful of cemeter ies in southwest Florida, but un limited ways to lay cremated re mains to rest. Mullins dedicates one wall of his funeral home showroom to casket options, and three to urns. There are urns that display pictures, are disguised as lamps, worn as lockets or are biodegradable. Mullins sells a Florida Gators urn and a $695 urn handmade by an artist from Sarasota. Families can encase their loved ones remains in concrete and send them to the bottom of the ocean to create a reef. They can put the remains into a blownglass work of art, or extract the carbon from the remains to create a diamond. Cremated remains also can be interred at traditional cemeter ies, such as Fort Myers Memori al Gardens. Probably our most beautiful area is our cremation area, General Manager Donnell Sullivan said. The cremation area has been open four years, and its so pop ular Memorial Gardens is look ing into an expansion. Perhaps the most unusual way to lay a loved one to rest shoot the remains up in a rocket over the Gulf of Mexico. At 3,000 feet a parachute deploys and oats the remains down to the water. Mullins has conducted the rocket launch twice in his career once was for a deceased reworks fanatic. No two people grieve the same way, Kemmis said, so I think this personalization is just so important. Bill Krumrey, 69, of Cape Coral, had his mother buried in August. Its what she wanted to be next to her husband in the familys Chicago cemetery, he said. But Krumrey plans to be cremated. (It) makes life simpler, he said. Members of Bob Bastubas family have always been buried, but the 68-year-old Fort Myers resident thinks he will break tra dition and choose cremation. His wife likes the idea because its cheaper. Theyre considering internment in a veterans cem etery in Michigan, where hes originally from. Anthony Loehle, 21, of Fort Myers, wants to be cremated and have his ashes planted with a tree. That would be kind of awe some because it would help the environment a lot, he said. But cremation isnt for every one. Some people because of reli gious beliefs, or because of natural fears of ame or re, want nothing to do with that, Mull ins said. At Friendship Missionary Bap tist Church in Fort Myers, about 2 percent of members choose cremation, according to Pastor James Bing. Five years ago, no one did. But the church doesnt dictate how its members lay their loved ones to rest, Bing said. While hes not sure he would want to be cremated, the practice doesnt bother him. In the Old Testament, Bing said, bodies were often burned. So cremation really is not a new phenomenon. The Catholic Church once banned cremation, but now allows the practice as long as the remains are interred instead of scattered. CREMATION FROM PAGE A3 truck, and found that the trailer it was pulling contained Wachters motorcycle, golf cart and appliances. The truck was being driven by Wachters son, Jesse Jordan, 28. Jordans girlfriend, Jessica Thigpen, also 28, was a passenger in the truck. Herrell said both Jordan and Thigpen admitted to being drug addicts, and deputies found the pair in possession of drugs. They were both ar rested and taken to the Lake County Jail. Herrell said a cadaver dog was brought to the home Saturday night and alerted on the property, signifying that there was a body buried there. Crime-scene personnel then began excavating the site. Neighbor Andrew ONeil came home Sunday to nd deputies had used the carport of his home as the starting point for blocking off the crime-scene area. Ive never seen police here, especially right here in my carport, he said. This is just shocking. Other neighbors in the community of 1,000-plus homes gathered in clusters and admitted they were stunned. Mercy, mercy, said Elizabeth Sattereld, who has lived at Mid-Florida Lakes for nearly 10 years. Nothing liked this has ever happened that I know of. Sattereld said Wachter lived by himself but that others might have moved in, while ONeal said he had seen Wachter and his son together in what appeared to be happy times. I always thought they were a close-knit family and Id seen them shing like a father and son thing. Id see Jesse and his son always out there with their shing poles, ONeal said. They would always wave and Id wave back. BODY FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Andrew ONeal came home Sunday to nd deputies blocked off the crime scene area by starting at his property, just a few houses down from an excavation site where a body was found buried. MARCIA DUNNAP Aerospace WriterCAPE CANAVER AL The six space station astronauts nally got their Christmas presents Sunday with the ar rival of a private ly launched supply ship that took an ex tra month to soar. The spacemen opened the capsule a day early and start ed removing items, as soon as the Or bital Sciences Corp. vessel was moored safely at the Interna tional Space Station. Packed inside were 3,000 pounds of gro ceries, equipment and experiments, as well as eager ly awaited Christ mas gifts from their families back home and some fresh fruit courtesy of NASA. Among the rst things out: ants that are part of an educa tional project. NASA is relying on private industry to keep the orbiting lab well stocked in this post-shuttle era and, in three or four more years, possibly supply rides for U.S. astronauts as well. This was Orbital Sciences second shipment. The Virginia company was supposed to make the latest delivery last month, well before Christmas, but had to wait for reasons beyond its control. A space station breakdown in mid-December took priority, and NASA bumped the ight to January in order to repair the disabled cooling sys tem at the orbiting outpost.Christmas delivery, finally, for space station AP PHOTO In this image from video provided by NASA, the Cygnus resupply spacecraft approaches the International Space Station early Sunday.

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 I ve made a list of 20 rules to live by. 1) Bring your sense of humor with you at all times. Bring your friends with a sense of humor. If their friends have a sense of humor, invite them, too. Remember this when going to hospitals, weight-loss centers and funerals, as well as when going to work, coming home, waking up and going to sleep. 2) If its worth crying over, its probably worth laughing at. Cultivate a sense of perspective that permits you to see the wider and longer view of the situation; this will help you realize that although your situation is upsetting, it might also one day become a terric story. 3) Other people dont care what youre wearing. 4) Dont be a sissy. This is especially important if you are a woman. Girls can be sissies, but behaving like a simpering, whining, fretful coward as an adult is unacceptable no matter what your gender happens to be. If you are anxious, scared and feeling powerless, you dont need to change your behavior; you need to change your life. 5) Dont lie. Cheat the devil and tell the truth. 6) There is one exception to the rule above: Never say a baby looks like a sausage wearing a hat. The parents will not forgive you. This is a situation in which telling the truth is not wholly necessary. If its not possible to tell the whole truth for fear of causing undue pain, just say the baby looks happy. 7) Never use the passive voice. Do not say, It will get done. Say, Ill do it and then offer a solid, unwavering deadline. Always make your deadline. 8) The pinnacle is always slippery; no peak is safe. Only plateaus offers a place to rest. Are you ready to stay on a plateau or are you climbing? Decide, and pack your bags accordingly. 9) As we age, love changes. As a youth, you fall for an unattainable ideal. When youre more mature, you fall in love with a person: Sure, he has only one eye in the middle of his forehead, youll rationalize, but he never forgets my birthday. 10) Power is the ability to per suade stupid people to do intelligent things and intelligent people to do stupid things. This is why power is dangerous. 11) Sherlock Holmes said, Work is the best antidote to sor row, my dear Watson. Listen to Mr. Holmes. 12) Everybody wants a shortcut to love, prosperity and weight loss, although not necessarily in that order. Apart from being born into an adoring family, getting good genes and inheriting the mineral rights, however, there are no shortcuts. The rest of us have to work at it. 13) Help the dramatically self-pitying to understand that they are not, by denition, sympathetic or interesting. Encour age them to address topics other than themselves. 14) Be kind, not nice. Kindness is both intentional and meaningful. Acts of kindness require generosity, emotional and other wise. Perfunctory and supercial niceness is, too often, mere window dressing. 15) Only poor workers blame their tools. Its not the fault of the computer, the school, the train, the government or poor cell phone reception. Take responsibility. 16) You know how sometimes you dont think youre asleep youre half listening to a conver sation or the television only to discover you were unconscious? One part of your head would swear its awake, but when you actually snap out of it, you realize you were wholly elsewhere? Sometimes that happens in life. Sometimes the only way you know youre truly in love, in the entirely wrong profession, being a moron at parties or a great poet is when you snap out of it. 17) You can always stop what youre doing. 18) You should either be doing something useful or you should be playing. You should not be thinking about playing while at work or thinking about work when youre out having fun. Compartmentalizing your life is not inevitably a bad thing. Its easy to waste pleasure by feeling guilty and waste potentially effective time by feeling resentful. 19) Be aware that a safety net, if pulled too tight, easily turns into a noose. Dont trade independence for security without being aware of the consequences. 20) Someday you will die. Until then, you should do everything possible to enjoy life.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her website at www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE 20 important rules to live by The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. A Tallahassee lobbyist wants to know what part of a constitutional require ment in Florida there shall be a lieutenant governor Gov. Rick Scott doesnt understand. Its a good question. Despite the mandate for a lieutenant gov ernor clearly stated in Article IV, Section 2, of the Florida Constitution the state has been without a No. 2 executive since Jennifer Carroll quit the position in March 2013. Carroll resigned after it was publicly reported that she had previously done public relations consulting for Allied Veterans of the World, accused of illegally operating socalled Internet gambling parlors while acting as a veterans charity. The post has been vacant since, saving the state about three-quarters of the $500,000 annual budget. Whats more, there is no apparent evidence that Floridas government has suffered for the lack of a lieutenant governor. Yet, on Jan. 6, Barbara DeVane sued Scott, asking the state Supreme Court to require him to appoint a lieutenant governor within 30 days. DeVane, a registered lobbyist for the Flor ida National Organization for Women, is linked to causes embraced by Democrats; the lawyer who led the suit has contributed to the campaign for Charlie Crist, a Democrat running against Scott. So, the lawsuit has political overtones. Yet Scott brought the legal challenge on himself. The constitution leaves no doubt that there shall be a lieutenant governor, a mandate that Scott has outed without explanation. State law directs the governor to appoint a lieu tenant governor in the event of a vacancy. Whether the Supreme Court will agree to the plaintiffs demand is a matter of debate because neither the state constitution nor law species when a vacancy must be lled. DeVanes lawsuit cites concerns about suc cession, in the event that Scott became inca pacitated. Those worries seem overstated. Florida Statute 14.055 creates a succession plan involving members of the Cabinet. The state attorney general would be rst in line if there is no lieutenant, followed by the chief nancial ofcer and then the commissioner of agriculture. If, for some reason, that process didnt produce a gover nor, the Legislature would choose in a joint session someone to ll the remainder of the chief executives term. Florida certainly has more pressing problems than whether it has a lieutenant gover nor. But there is an important principle involved respect for the state constitution and the law. Months ago, Scott said, Florida laws make it clear that our state has a lieutenant governor. Yet, Scott has acted as though he can comply with constitutional and statutory mandates when he feels like it.From Ocala.com.AVOICEScott is ignoring a state mandate Only poor workers blame their tools. Its not the fault of the computer, the school, the train, the government or poor cell phone reception. Take responsibility.

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 You dont have to pay extra for an evening service call. Munns is the home of 8 to 8 Same Great Rate. Emergency services are also available. Were there when you need us!Carl Munn www.munnair.com2135 US Hwy 441/27Fruitland Park, FL24/7/365 (352)-787-7741 Check out on the Opinion Page

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014www.dailycommercial.comSUPER BOWL TICKETS: You pay, they play / B3 STEVE REEDAssociated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. Colin Kaepernick raced into the end zone, then pretended to rip open his shirt with both hands imitating Cam Newtons Superman touchdown celebration. Three years of frustration had come to a head. Just a little shoutout, Kaepernick said. To whom? I think you know the answer, Kaepernick said with a grin. Kaepernick said he will never forget that he was selected in the second round of the 2011 NFL draft, 35 spots behind Newton, the Heisman Trophy winner and the top pick that sea son. On Sunday, he outplayed his quarterback counterpart, throwing one touchdown pass and running for anoth er score as the San Francisco 49ers defeated the Carolina Panthers 23-10 to advance to the NFC title game for the third straight season. Kaepernick completed 15 of 28 passes for 196 yards in the divisional playoff win, avenging his worst statistical per formance of the season two months ago against the Panthers. Thats not the rst, nor will it be the last time somebody does that, Newton said of Kaepernicks copycat display before leav ing the postgame podium. Anquan Boldin had eight catches for 136 yards and Frank Gore ran for 84 yards on 17 Kaepernick lifts 49ers over Panthers, 23-10 San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) runs against the Carolina Panthers during the second half of a divisional playoff NFL football game on Sunday in Charlotte, N.C.GERRY BROOME / AP PAT DOOLEYHalifax Media GroupQuarterback Jeff Driskel is sacked during the rst half of the Florida Gators 33-23 loss against the Louisville Cardi nals in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 2, 2013, at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, La. One play said it all about Floridas 2013 football season, a play so comical and mind-bog gling it was ESPNs No. 1 choice for the Not Top 10 for the year. Forget the result, a 7-yard gain by Solomon Patton for a rst down that set up a touch down. It got in the way of the illustration of incompetence. Quinton Dunbar and Jon Harrison were blocking each other. Thats all you need to know. That it happened during the low point of Floridas season a 26-20 loss to FCS school Georgia Southern brought the point home with all of the subtlety of a hammer to the teeth. Every time it seemed that the 2013 football team had bot tomed out, it found a way to dig deeper. When the calendar ipped over to 2014, the giant whooshing sound you heard was the Gator Nation letting out a sigh of relief. You didnt have to be superstitious to understand that was an unlucky num ber for UF. It started right away, just two days into the year (and a year ago today) when the Gators should have been celebrating a 2012 season that saw them come this close to playing for the national championship. In New Orleans, a place that had been good to Florida fans over the years, a veritable whos who of Gator greats were on hand for the Sugar Bowl. Among the former players in attendance were three of the ve members of the Ring of Honor Emmitt Smith, Dan ny Wuerffel and Tim Tebow. If that wasnt enough royalty, Mu hammad Ali was there to represent Louisville. Not there? Florida fans. It was an embarrassing night for the Gator Nation before the game ever kicked off. UF end ed up eating $840,000 worth of tickets and the Sugar Bowl was almost a home game for Louis ville. It wasnt any better on the eld where Florida fell behind 14-0 and 24-3. The second half began with an onside kick by UF downfall started a year ago DOUG FINGER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Florida Gators running back Matt Jones (24) fumbles the football against Tennessee on Sept. 21 in Gainesville.SEE 49ERS | B2When the calendar flipped over to 2014, the giant whooshing sound you heard was the Gator Nation letting out a sigh of relief. You didnt have to be superstitious to understand that 13 was an unlucky number for UF.SEE GATORS | B2 ARNIE STAPLETONAP Pro Football WriterDENVER Peyton Manning welcomed Wes Welker back into the lineup with a touchdown toss and the Denver Broncos narrowly avoided a re peat of their playoff slip from last year, advanc ing to the AFC championship game with a 24-17 win over the San Diego Chargers on Sunday. The Broncos (14-3) took a 17-0 lead into the fourth quarter. Char gers quarterback Philip Rivers then capitalized on an injury to corner back Chris Harris Jr. to stage a comeback reminiscent of Baltimores shocking win at Denver exactly a year earlier. This time, however, Manning rescued the Broncos from the brink of another crushing collapse and sent them into the title game for the rst time in eight seasons. Theyll host the New England Patriots (13-4) on Sunday. Get ready for Brady vs. Manning once more.Broncos top Chargers, make AFC title game JACK DEMPSEY / AP Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning hands the ball off to running back Knowshon Moreno (27) in the second quarter of an NFL AFC division playoff football game in Denver.SEE BRONCOS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 18 17 .514 Brooklyn 15 22 .405 4 New York 14 22 .389 4 Boston 13 25 .342 6 Philadelphia 12 25 .324 7 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 27 10 .730 Atlanta 20 17 .541 7 Washington 16 19 .457 10 Charlotte 15 23 .395 12 Orlando 10 27 .270 17 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 29 7 .806 Chicago 17 18 .486 11 Detroit 16 22 .421 14 Cleveland 13 23 .361 16 Milwaukee 7 29 .194 22 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 28 8 .778 Houston 24 14 .632 5 Dallas 22 16 .579 7 Memphis 16 19 .457 11 New Orleans 15 21 .417 13 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 28 9 .757 Portland 28 9 .757 Denver 19 17 .528 8 Minnesota 18 18 .500 9 Utah 12 26 .316 16 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 Golden State 25 14 .641 1 Phoenix 21 15 .583 3 L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 11 Sacramento 12 22 .353 11 Saturdays Games Houston 114, Washington 107 Toronto 96, Brooklyn 80 New York 102, Philadelphia 92 Detroit 110, Phoenix 108 Chicago 103, Charlotte 97 Oklahoma City 101, Milwaukee 85 Dallas 110, New Orleans 107 Denver 120, Orlando 94 Portland 112, Boston 104 Sundays Games Cleveland at Sacramento, late Atlanta at Memphis, late Minnesota at San Antonio, late Todays Games Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at New York, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Orlando at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Denver at Utah, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games Sacramento at Indiana, 7 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 45 29 14 2 60 129 98 Tampa Bay 45 27 14 4 58 132 109 Montreal 46 26 15 5 57 117 107 Detroit 45 20 15 10 50 118 126 Ottawa 46 20 18 8 48 131 146 Toronto 46 21 20 5 47 125 141 Florida 45 17 21 7 41 105 139 Buffalo 43 12 26 5 29 75 120 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 47 33 12 2 68 152 112 Washington 44 22 16 6 50 135 133 Philadelphia 45 23 18 4 50 120 125 N.Y. Rangers 46 23 20 3 49 114 123 Carolina 45 19 17 9 47 111 128 New Jersey 46 19 18 9 47 106 114 Columbus 45 21 20 4 46 126 129 N.Y. Islanders 46 17 22 7 41 126 150 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 47 29 8 10 68 170 129 St. Louis 44 31 8 5 67 161 99 Colorado 45 28 12 5 61 132 115 Minnesota 47 24 18 5 53 114 119 Dallas 44 20 17 7 47 125 135 Nashville 46 19 20 7 45 109 137 Winnipeg 47 19 23 5 43 128 145 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 47 34 8 5 73 160 119 San Jose 46 28 12 6 62 148 116 Los Angeles 46 27 14 5 59 119 96 Vancouver 46 24 13 9 57 123 114 Phoenix 44 21 14 9 51 133 136 Calgary 45 15 24 6 36 101 144 Edmonton 47 15 27 5 35 123 164 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Ottawa 2, Nashville 1, SO Tampa Bay 6, Philadelphia 3 Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT New Jersey 2, Florida 1, OT Columbus 6, Winnipeg 3 Colorado 4, Minnesota 2 Anaheim 5, Phoenix 3 Pittsburgh 2, Calgary 1 Detroit 3, Los Angeles 1 Boston 1, San Jose 0 Sundays Games Buffalo at Washington, late N.Y. Islanders at Dallas, late New Jersey at Toronto, late Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, late Edmonton at Chicago, late Minnesota at Nashville, late Detroit at Anaheim, late Todays Games Calgary at Carolina, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. San Jose at Washington, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 8 p.m. Phoenix at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Calgary at Nashville, 8 p.m. Ottawa at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.COLLEGE BASKETBALLMen EAST Canisius 87, Monmouth (NJ) 67 Iona 87, Siena 78 La Salle 75, Duquesne 56 Manhattan 86, Marist 79, OT Rider 90, Niagara 78 St. Peters 74, Quinnipiac 67 Stony Brook 73, Hartford 50 SOUTH Louisville 71, SMU 63 MIDWEST Brescia 84, Indiana-East 82 Creighton 95, Xavier 89 Green Bay 93, Milwaukee 86, OT Iowa 84, Ohio St. 74 N. Illinois 45, Bowling Green 36 Purdue 70, Nebraska 64 SOUTHWEST Tulsa 75, Southern Miss. 71 FAR WEST San Diego St. 79, Air Force 72 Stanford 82, Oregon 80 Washington 71, Colorado 54 Women EAST Albany (NY) 69, Hartford 52 Canisius 76, Rider 72 Cent. Michigan 82, Buffalo 68 Purdue 84, Penn St. 74 Quinnipiac 77, Manhattan 74 St. Peters 67, Niagara 55 Syracuse 76, Georgia Tech 70 Towson 66, Northeastern 65 West Virginia 56, Texas 49, OT SOUTH Alabama 93, Mississippi 79 Clemson 77, Pittsburgh 67 Coll. of Charleston 101, William & Mary 65 Duke 78, Boston College 57 Hofstra 64, UNC Wilmington 55 James Madison 87, Delaware 51 Kentucky 80, Missouri 69 LSU 82, Florida 68 Louisville 62, South Florida 54 Miami 64, Virginia Tech 62 NC State 62, Wake Forest 54 North Carolina 65, Florida St. 61 Notre Dame 79, Virginia 72 South Carolina 72, Auburn 66 Texas A&M 58, Georgia 44 VCU 73, Saint Josephs 69 Vanderbilt 74, Tennessee 63 MIDWEST Ball St. 55, Kent St. 31 Bowling Green 81, Akron 65 Cleveland St. 98, Wright St. 82 Evansville 71, Drake 67 Indiana St. 47, Illinois St. 44 Iowa 82, Wisconsin 65 Loyola of Chicago 63, Missouri St. 61 Michigan St. 79, Michigan 72 Minnesota 94, Northwestern 59 N. Illinois 77, E. Michigan 54 N. Iowa 87, S. Illinois 53 Nebraska 75, Illinois 56 Ohio 70, W. Michigan 53 Toledo 68, Miami (Ohio) 52 Wichita St. 74, Bradley 72 SOUTHWEST Mississippi St. 54, Arkansas 50 FAR WEST Arizona St. 59, UCLA 57 California 68, Utah 59 Denver 91, South Dakota 84 Southern Cal 54, Arizona 45 Stanford 87, Colorado 77TV2DAY MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN Virginia at Duke NBCSN Charleston at Northeastern ESPNU Texas at West Virginia CSS Texas State at La.-Lafayette7:30 p.m.CBSSN Lafayette at Loyola-Md.9 p.m.ESPN Kansas at Iowa St. ESPNU Syracuse at Boston CollegeNATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 8 p.m.NBA Washington at Chicago8:30 p.m.FS-Florida Orlando at DallasNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at ColumbusSOCCER 3 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Arsenal at Aston VillaTENNIS 9 p.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, Australia3 a.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, AustraliaWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m.ESPN2 UConn at BaylorSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED carries for the 49ers (14-4), who will vis it Seattle next Sunday looking for a return trip to the Super Bowl. I think were the two teams that every body was looking at from the beginning, Kaepernick said. Its going to be a knockdown, drag-out game. The 49ers will have their hands full. San Francisco (14-4) split two games with the Seahawks this sea son, but lost 29-3 at CenturyLink Field in September. The 49ers were missing receiver Mi chael Crabtree in that lopsided loss. Crab tree only had three catches for 26 yards against Carolina, but Boldin said he drew plenty of double teams that allowed him to get open. Thats the great thing about our team we have weapons all around, Boldin said. You try to take one guy out and you still have two or three guys left who can make big plays. The 49ers held Newton in check, inter cepting him twice and sacking him ve times while stopping the Panthers (12-5) twice on the 1-yard line in the rst half. Newton nished with 267 yards passing and had 54 yards on 10 carries, but the Panthers only found the end zone once on a 31-yard TD strike to Steve Smith. It was a rough play off debut for Newton. Linebacker Ahmad Brooks stopped Newton on a fourth-down sneak early in the sec ond. Later, Brooks vaulted over the line and past Newton he was called for off sides, but the 49ers showed the Panthers it wouldnt be easy. Terrible ending to a great season, New ton said. Almost ttingly, he misred into the end zone on the nal play of the game. 49ERS FROM PAGE B1 Florida. Not only did Louisville recover it, but Florida was as sessed a pair of personal foul penalties to set the Cardinals up at the UF 19-yard line. Florida had 98 yards of penalties in the game and Jeff Driskel had three turnovers. After tell ing the media all week how they wanted to end the season on a high note, the Gator players laid an egg instead. Tight end Jordan Reed was basically benched af ter he lined up wrong on the rst play of the game. After the game, Louisville coach Charlie Strong, a longtime UF assistant, hugged a member of the national media and said, Thatll teach them for not hiring me. It was hardly the right way to start the year. It would get worse. Summer brought little relief for Gator fans. They watched two major stories unravel na tionally that put two heroes of the 2008 national championship team in the news for the wrong reasons. The most serious came on June 26 when former UF tight end Aaron Hernandez, proba bly the best to ever play the po sition for the Gators, was arrest ed for the murder of Odin Lloyd. Nine days earlier, Lloyds body was found in an industrial park a mile from Hernandezs house. Ninety minutes after he was ar rested, Hernandez was released by the New England Patriots. Hernandez is still awaiting tri al on multiple charges. August meant the start of practice and Florida had high expectations for a team that was loaded with talent. Except Driskel had to have an emergency appendectomy and would miss the rst few weeks of practice. And starting tailback Matt Jones had a viral infec tion that would keep him out of camp and cause him to miss the opener. And starting right tack le Chaz Green suffered a torn labrum and was out for the sea son. And starting wide receiver Andre Debose suffered a torn ACL and was out for the season. And all of this happened before the rst practice of the summer. It was almost as if Florida had angered a voodoo queen during their trip to New Orleans. In all, Florida lost 72 start ers to injuries. Every time you thought they had reached some new record for injured players, another one popped up. It al most became a Monday ritual to nd out who would be lost for the season. Driskel suffered a broken leg early in the third game of the season and Dominique Easley, the leader of the defense, suf fered a torn ACL a few days later in practice. Driskels replacement, Tyler Murphy, played well as Florida went through the lightest part of its schedule, but when the op position toughened and Mur phy suffered a shoulder injury, the losses mounted and eventu ally Murphy was sidelined. Before the season was over, Florida lost two quarterbacks, three offensive tackles, two linebackers and its top tailback to injuries. UF started the season ranked No. 10 despite losing six defen sive starters to the NFL. On the day of the opener, the bad news kept coming Tebow was cut by the New England Patriots. Florida won its opener but turnovers killed the Gators the next week at Miami in a loss that was made that much more deating because it was the last time the two teams would play for a long time. Murphy led the Gators to wins over Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas three teams who would combine to win two con ference games. The Gators then ran into a stretch where they would play one home game in 47 days. Losses at LSU and Missou ri virtually eliminated the team from playing for an SEC title and a loss to Georgia in Jacksonville cemented it. OK, beat Vanderbilt and Geor gia Southern and at least you go to a bowl game. But Murphy had his worst game against the Commodores, throwing three picks. Vandy won by 17 points despite only gaining 183 yards of offense. Muschamps team nally came to play in Columbia, S.C., the fol lowing week and led throughout much of the game before the Gamecocks pulled it out. Then came Georgia Southern. Florida had never lost to an FCS team, but the Gators al lowed 429 rushing yards in the 26-20 loss. Again, Florida made national news for the wrong reason. And days later, when the video surfaced of the two Flori da players blocking each other, well, the once-proud program had become a laughing stock. For the rst time since 1990, Florida had no bowl to prepare for in December. In a way, it was a relief for Florida fans, who had grown so tired of watching their team play that thousands sold their tickets to FSU fans for the nale at The Swamp. The only question when it was over was it the worst year ever for Florida football? Even for those Florida fans who lived through 0-10-1 in 1979, it would be hard to argue any differently. GATORS FROM PAGE B1 In the most recent matchup of QBs with Hall of Fame creden tials, Tom Brady and the Patriots rallied past Manning and the vis iting Broncos 34-31 in overtime on Nov. 24. Its the Broncos ver sus the Patriots and certainly Tom and I have played against each other a lot, Man ning said after beat ing San Diego. But when you get to the AFC championship, its about two good teams that have been through a lot to get there. Manning ended a personal three-game postseason skid in winning for the rst time since leading India napolis over the Jets 30-17 in the AFC cham pionship game on Jan. 24, 2010. Manning completed 25 of 36 passes for 230 yards and two TDs, numbers that werent quite up to the stan dards he set during a record-breaking regu lar season when he es tablished new benchmarks with 55 TD throws and 5,447 yards through the air. But it was windy and the Broncos were in tent on establishing the run and controlling the clock. San Diego had Manning and his high-octane offense cooling their cleats on the sideline for more than 38 minutes in both of their meetings during the regular sea son, when both teams won on the road. Denver had the ball for 35 minutes, 27 sec onds in this game, to San Diegos 24:33. After gaining just 18 yards on the ground against San Diego last month, the Broncos ran for 133 yards, including 82 by Knowshon Moreno, whose 3-yard TD run put them ahead 24-7 with 8:12 left. After that, things got interesting. Quentin Jammer, who gave up San Di egos rst TD, a 16-yard er to Keenen Allen ear ly in the fourth quarter, surrendered a 49yard catch by Allen on fourth-and-5 from the San Diego 25 with sev en minutes left. That led to Allens second TD, also from 16 yards out, that pulled the Chargers to 24-14 with 5:43 left. Eric Decker then made his third big blun der of the day, ubbing the onside kick, which San Diego recovered. Nick Novaks 30yard eld goal with 3:53 pulled the Char gers (10-8) to within a touchdown. Novak followed with a pooch kick, and Trindon Holliday secured the ball at the Denver 27 with 3:51 left. Man ning converted two third-down throws to tight end Julius Thomas, the rst one a nif ty 21-yarder on thirdand-17 from his 20 and then a third-and-6 from his 45-yard line. Then, on third-and-1, Moreno burst up the middle for 5 yards with a minute left and the offensive linemen high-ved each other. All Manning had to do at that point was take a knee just like he did last year at the end of regulation after Jacoby Jones had hauled in Joe Flaccos 70-yard desperation throw with 31 seconds left to tie the game. In that game, coach John Fox ordered Man ning to take a knee even though he had three timeouts left so he could take his chances in overtime. And the Broncos lost 38-35 in double overtime. Those boos were re placed by cheers in this game, the scowls by smiles. Allen nished with six catches for 142 yards as the Chargers lost for the rst time in six weeks. The Broncos took a 14-0 halftime lead that could have easily been 21-0 if not for blunders by Decker, who tripped with no defender near him at the San Diego 30-yard line after a 47yard punt return. This was the 109th meeting between the original AFL rivals but the rst in the postsea son. BRONCOS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 TIM BOOTHAssociated PressSEATTLE In the after glow of advancing to the NFC championship game, Russell Wilson patrolled the Seattle Seahawks locker room making sure the message was still clear to his teammates. We havent done anything yet, Wilson said. Thats our goal, we have 60 minutes of football left. I was talking to some of the guys in the locker room, I was talking to Coach Carroll, I was just kind of sitting there. You have 60 minutes left of football, 60 minutes of your life, the best 60 minutes that you can possibly play, and then you play in the Super Bowl. The Seahawks are one step from the Super Bowl because in the NFC divisional play off game against New Orle ans on Saturday they leaned on the principles Pete Car roll put in place in the in fancy of his arrival in Seat tle. The Seahawks have been about running the football and playing defense rst and foremost, well before Wilson arrived or Percy Harvin was acquired. It was of little surprise that Marshawn Lynch kept getting fed carries and Seattle used another swarming defensive effort against Drew Brees and New Orleans potent offense in Saturdays 2315 victory. It was a blustery, nasty day where those traits Carroll values so deeply were brought to the forefront. Lynch nished with a fran chise playoff record 140 yards rushing and both of Seattles touchdowns. Seattle will host San Fran cisco next Sunday in the NFC championship game with the possibility of ad vancing to the Super Bowl for the second time in franchise history. Seattles only Super Bowl trip came in the 2005 playoffs when it routed Carolina in the NFC champi onship game at home. It feels awesome, but this doesnt mean anything if we dont win next week, Seat tle fullback Michael Robinson said. Even though he again was one of the top running backs in the league, Lynchs regu lar season lacked consistency. Much of that was due to blocking struggles by Seat tles offensive line, but some thing clicked against the Saints and the Seahawks kept turning to their bruis ing back. Lynch had 69 yards in the rst half, including his 15-yard touchdown run that gave Seattle a 13-0 lead early in the second quarter. But it was his 31-yard touchdown run with 2:40 left that provided the capper for Seattle. The 1and 2-yard runs from earlier in the game nally popped with Lynchs TD run that left CenturyLink Field shaking again. I just stayed with what we were calling and just believed in my team, Lynch said. Seattle avoids being bit by lower seed JOHN FROSCHAUER / AP Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch (24) arrives in the end zone with a 31-yard touchdown during the fourth quarter of an NFC divisional playoff NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints in Seattle on Saturday. DENNIS WASZAK JR.Associated PressFOXBOROUGH, Mass. This time, there was no stunning comeback for Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts. Just a handful of frus trating mistakes, some missed opportunities and now a long offsea son to imagine what could have been. Luck threw four interceptions and the Colts gave up four touchdown runs by LeGarrette Blount and two by Stevan Ridley as the New England Patriots advanced to the AFC championship game with a 43-22 vic tory Saturday night. Im just disappointed in myself, Luck said. I cant commit that many turnovers and have a chance to win against a great team like this. The Colts (12-6) were coming off a stunning 45-44 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in which they overcame a 38-10 third-quar ter decit in the wildcard game for the sec ond-biggest comeback victory in NFL playoffs history. They fell behind 14-0 early in this one, but were within a touch down down 29-22 entering the fourth quarter. But Blount, Tom Brady and the rest of the Patriots offense pulled away. We never stopped ghting and we had our chances and just couldnt get over that hump, said Luck, who threw two touchdown passes to LaVon Brazill. The Patriots deserved to win. Billed as a match up between marquee quarterbacks longtime great Brady and second-year star Luck the Patriots leader was content to hand off while Luck threw an interception on his second pass and never found consistency. Luck had three in terceptions a week earlier, but led the Colts to their impressive comeback against the Chiefs. The Colts trailed 21-12 at halftime against the Patriots and cut it to 29-22 on a 35-yard pass to Brazill with 5:01 left in the third. The Patriots (13-4) dominated the rest of the way and advanced to play Denver in the AFC championship.Luck struggles as Colts lose to Patriots, 43-22 AP PHOTO New England Patriots defensive end Rob Ninkovich (50) helps Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck (12) up from the turf on Saturday. RICK FREEMANAssociated PressNEW YORK Welcome to the Super Bowl, where demand always beats supply and the teams dont really matter. The NFLs championship game is one of the largest sports and entertainment spectacles in the world. The teams arent exactly afterthoughts, but tickets are going to move quickly no matter how popular the two contenders are. In fact, the number print ed after the dollar sign on the front of a Super Bowl ticket has about as much in common with the price paid by its hold er as the point spread does with the nal. Less, actually the point spread is at least an informed prediction that comes from the bookmakers observations of previous events and the price the public will pay to bet its teams. So, as we near the big game on Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., lets take an inside look at the tick et trade. HOW MUCH? Even on NFL. com, users in search of tickets are directed to a resellers website, operated by Ticketmas ter. On Thursday evening, the cheapest ticket available was over $3,000. (The league also conducts a lottery to purchase tickets for $500. These cannot be resold.) On Stubhub, people were willing to part with seats for a little more than $2,500, 24 days and an hour before kickoff. Needless to say, these were all in the nosebleed sections. But fans eager to lock down seats now would probably be advised to wait. What were probably going to see is over time, the closer we get to the game, the more the prices will drop, said Smita Saran, Stubhubs senior spokes woman. Saran said that before last years game, Stubhub was re ceiving searches for tickets up to an hour before kickoff. She also pointed out that fans who purchase on Stubhub have access to a tailgate party where they can pick up their tickets in the parking lot theyll even give fans a lift there from New Jersey or Manhattan. But that all depends on some one pulling the trigger on a major purchase. WHOS PLAYING? The teams in the game should have some bearing on the price. Large fan bases close to the New York City area think New En gland could cause demand and prices to rise. Three West Coast teams are still alive in the playoffs, and no matter how ar dently supported the San Di ego Chargers, San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks are, being a continent away from seeing the game in person will probably thin the hordes ranks. The remaining teams in or der of proximity to Newark Air port, just down the turnpike from the Meadowlands, are the Carolina Panthers (from Char lotte, N.C.), Indianapolis Colts, New Orleans Saints and Den ver Broncos. The halftime show is set. Thatll be Grammy-winner Bruno Mars. The 28-year-old pop star isnt as venerable as some of the heavy hitters to grace the halftime stage in the past Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, the Rolling Stones and Paul McCartney have albums older than he is but he should be a bigger draw than Up With People. WHATS THE WEATHER LIKE? Re gardless of what team is in the game, one more major fac tor could affect prices the weather forecast. If the prospect of playing outside in 40-degree weather (the average for East Rutherford, N.J.), doesnt seem so bad, that could be because most of the United States just experienced a polar vortex with nighttime temperatures getting down into the single digits. As this is the rst Super Bowl in a cold-weather city, theres no data on how a cold snap affects interest in tickets, but after the polar vortex, its probably safe to assume demand would not be strong to sit outside for four hours or longer on a cold night in northern New Jersey. WHAT ABOUT TRAFFIC? New Jer sey is not known as the easi est place to drive. And that was before members of Gov. Chris Christies administration were found to have arranged for in tentional trafc jams for polit ical retribution. After previously assuring the public that his staff had noth ing to do with the lane clos ings in September that caused major backups at the George Washington Bridge, Chris tie said had to re an aide. His news conference to address the scandal made national news three weeks before his state is on display for the world as host of the Super Bowl. That said, no governor can control New York City area traf c, but the states transportation authority will be running trains on a new line completed ahead of the stadiums 2010 opening. An armada of buses will also be available, and orga nizers are discouraging drivers the host committee website even refers to parking as th and Long. X-FACTOR: If after all of that, fans dont feel like shelling out a paycheck (or two) for the chance to brave trafc and weather to watch the Super Bowl from the upper deck, theres one more consideration you cant watch the Puppy Bowl at the stadium.Looking for Super Bowl tickets? You pay, they play AP PHOTO Some NFL football Super Bowl XLV tickets are held outside Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas.NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterHONOLULU A birdie on the nal hole gave Chris Kirk a 5-under 65 and the outright lead in the Sony Open, and thats about it. Cloudy conditions and only a gentle, Pacic breeze meant just about everyone was in the mix at Waialae Country Club even John Daly. At one point, there was a six-way tie for the lead Saturday in the third round. An hour later, 14 players were separated by a single shot. Kirk got up-and-down from a bunker on the par-5 18th hole, making a 10-foot birdie putt that gave him the lead over Harris English (67) and PGA Tour rookie Will Wilcox (64), who is play ing only the third PGA Tour event of his career. Kirk was at 12-under 198. Daly matched the low score of the third round with a 64 and was ve shots behind. Masters champion Adam Scott wasnt making up any ground, dropped two shots late in his round and nished with a twoputt birdie for a 71 and was two shots behind. A dozen players were separated by three shots going into Sun day, a group that includes Kapalua win ner Zach Johnson as he tries to become the rst player since Ernie Els in 2003 to sweep the Hawaii swing. Kirk and English both are going for their sec ond win of this wraparound season that be gan in October. Kirk won the McGladrey Classic in November, his nal tournament of the year before taking time off for the birth of his second child. English nished the year with a win in the OHL Classic at Mayakoba in Mexico. The plan for both of them is to not worry about anyone else because there would be too many players to worry about. When its so close like that, everybody is going to be making some birdies here and there, Kirk said. So I proba bly wont look at leaderboards as much as I normally would. A lot of courses I think lend themselves to you need to know what your po sition is going into any given hole, but out here, I dont think thats really the case. Theyre just so volatile with guys mak ing birdies and bogeys. Ill just probably try to keep my head down and make as many birdies as I can. Former Sony Open champion Jerry Kelly (66) and Jimmy Walker (67) were at 10-under 200, while the group at 201 included Rob ert Allenby (65), Pat Perez (66), Retief Goos en (66) and Johnson, who had a 66. Brian Stuard, who had a oneshot lead going into the third round, had a 71 and also was still only three shots behind.Chris Kirk moves into the lead at Sony Open AP PHOTOChris Kirk watches his drive off the 12th tee during the third round of the Sony Open golf tournament at Waialae Country Club, Saturday in Honolulu.

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RUSTY MILLERAssociated PressCOLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State started the week with 15 consecutive wins and ended it with consecutive loss es. Now the third-ranked Buckeyes think it might be time to circle the wagons. LaQuinton Ross scored 22 points, Amir Williams had 11 and Lenzelle Smith Jr. 10 but the Buckeyes watched No. 20 Iowa make all the big plays down the stretch of an 84-74 victory Sunday. The loss followed the Buckeyes 72-68 defeat at No. 5 Michigan State on Tuesday night. For players not accus tomed to losing very of ten, this is a mini-crisis. The worst thing we can do is feel sorry for ourselves, point guard Aaron Craft said. We cant keep this going. We have to nd a way to pick ourselves up. No ones going to do it for us. Its the 12 play ers on the team and the coaches and thats about it. The Buckeyes (15-2, 2-2 Big Ten) dont have to look too far to see what went wrong. After averaging 10.3 turnovers a game head ing into the Michigan State game, they totaled 38 in those two painful losses. During one span in the nal minutes against Iowa, where they had 17 turnovers, they handed the ball over without a shot ve times on 11 possessions. Coach Thad Matta is mystied by the turn around on turnovers. Ive got to gure that out, he said, shaking his head. The big gest thing is getting our guys to understand you cant let one mistake compound into another mistake. Thats kind of what happened to us today. We played some really good bas ketball so did Iowa. Theyre a great team. But its that consistency and understand ing of what needs to be done, when it needs to be done, how it needs to be done. Roy Devin Marble scored 22 points and Aaron White added 19 for the Hawkeyes, who ended the game on a 22-9 run. The Buckeyes had a nine-point lead at one point in the second half. After that evaporated, they led by three with under 6 minutes to play. For a team that was down by eight in the nal minute and beat Notre Dame in regulation, and which scored 20 of the nal 23 points of regulation to force overtime against Michigan State, it ap peared the Buckeyes were right where they wanted to be. But the Hawkeyes (14-3, 3-1) had other thoughts. A free throw by Jar rod Uthoff and another by Marble cut the lead to a point before Uthoff scored consec utive baskets, both on layups. The second, at the 4:25 mark, put the Hawkeyes up 68-65. Marble was fouled in the backcourt and hit both shots for a 70-65 Iowa lead with 3 min utes remaining. The Hawkeyes led by four when White with 40 friends and family members making the two-hour drive from suburban Cleveland to root him on had the ball tipped away. He recovered it beyond midcourt, and then drove to hit a 12foot fallaway as the shot clock was running down with 2:06 left. That made it 74-68 and Ohio State never made a serious threat again. It was Iowas rst win over a top 5 team since an 83-65 victory at No. 2 Missouri on Dec. 15, 2001. Iowa was 0-2 on opponents home courts this season coming in. Their three losses have come against teams with a combined 45-2 record (Villanova, Iowa State and Wisconsin) with each loss coming by ve or fewer points. The Hawkeyes had not beaten Ohio State one of the Big Tens bullies since Mat ta came aboard a de cade ago since 2008. They hadnt beaten the Buckeyes in Columbus since 2004, making a long, quiet ight home on the last seven trips. Craft said this weeks losses were not connected in any way, oth er than the Buckeyes didnt play well enough in either one. This is just not us, he said.OSUs mistakes down stretch end in loss AP PHOTO Iowas Gabriel Olaseni, right, fouls Ohio States Sam Thompson during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday in Columbus, Ohio. Iowa beat Ohio State 84-74.COLLEGE BASKETBALL STEPHEN HAWKINSAP Basketball WriterThat current nations best streak gets a signicant test when the No. 7 Lady Bears (141) host top-ranked Connecticut (17-0) on Monday night. It will be a good game. Theyre pretty big in size. Were a little undersized this year. But well gure it out, said Sims, the nation al scoring leader at 31.8 points a game. And Ill just tell you, it wont be a blowout. It will be a tough game for them and us, so just be ready for it. UConn coach Geno Auriemmas teams have been involved in many home-court winning streaks, maintaining their own and breaking others. Baylor is the third team to reach 69 straight home wins. Tennessee had its streak broken by UConn in 1996; the Huskies had their string snapped by Duke in 2004. UConn holds the NCAA record with 99 wins in a row at home, a streak ended near ly two years ago by St. Johns. The closest any team has gotten to that was Stanford, with 82 straight until UConn won at Maples Pavilion last season. Games like this always kind of test you and test how much your team has grown, said Breanna Stew art, UConns top scor er at 18.1 points per game. Everyone is going to have to show up and prove how much theyve gotten better. This will be the fth meeting between the powerhouse womens programs with the two active coaches who have won the largest percentage of their games. Auriemma has an 856-133 record (.866 winning percentage) in his 29th season, and Kim Mulkey is 386-82 (.825) in her 14th sea son at Baylor. They are 2-2 against each other. I like getting away from whatever league games you are playing. I like the bigness of it. I like the challenge of it, Auriemma said. Both teams are com ing off lopsided home wins Saturday to stay undefeated in their re spective conferences. American Athletic Conference-leading UConn beat Temple 80-36. Baylor won 80-46 over TCU and is the only Big 12 team without a league loss. Its not like Monday is going to take all the focus and all the attention away from winning your conference championship, Auriemma said. When was the last time a conference championship was important? Baylor is playing for a nation al championship. Con necticut is playing for a national champion ship. Mulkey, the only womens coach to win a national title as a play er and a coach, takes a different approach. I just prioritize. I think your confer ence is more important, Mulkey said. I said that when we were No. 1 in the con ference. Your confer ence comes rst, then the NCAA tournament. I guess he just has a difference of opinion. Hes certainly entitled to his opinion, hes won eight championships. But for our team, were not over-emphasizing it. UConn and the Lady Bears rst met in the 2010 Final Four, a 70-50 win by the Huskies that ended Brittney Griners freshman season. This will be the rst meet ing without the 6-foot8 center and two-time AP player of the year. No. 2 Baylor lost 6564 at the No. 1 Huskies early the next season. The Lady Bears were the No. 1 team and won the last two meetings a 1-2 matchup in Waco two seasons ago and at then-No. 3 UConn last year.Baylor womens 69-game home streak on line against ConnecticutWhen was the last time a conference championship was important? Baylor is playing for a national championship. Connecticut is playing for a national championship.UConn coach Geno Auriemma

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties GARY B. GRAVESAssociated PressLOUISVILLE, Ky. Luke Hancocks ca reer-high 23 points, in cluding two free throws with 46 seconds re maining, helped No. 12 Louisville hold off SMU for a 71-63 victory Sun day in a meeting of Hall of Fame coaches. Hancocks second straight 20-point game helped Rick Pitinos Cardinals (14-3, 3-1 American Athletic Conference) get the nal word in his rst colle giate matchup against Larry Brown and his Mustangs (11-4, 1-2). Making his rst start despite dealing with a left Achilles issue, the senior guard made 8 of 15 from the eld 4 of 9 from 3-point range to help keep Louisville ahead in a tense game that Montrezl Harrell nally settled with a dunk and a block after Hancocks free throws. Russ Smith scored 23 points and Harrell add ed 12 points and 13 rebounds as Louisville bounced back from Thursdays loss to No. 24 Memphis with 47 per cent shooting, despite being outrebounded 4835 including 20-6 on the offensive end. Markus Kennedy had 12 points and eight rebounds in his rst start of the season for SMU while Shawn Williams added 10 points. Although the Mustangs controlled the boards, they managed to hit just 24 of 65 from the eld (a season-low 37 percent), well below their leaguebest 50 percent mark coming in. SMU made just 13 of 25 free throws and were only 2 of 11 from be yond the arc. Hancock, Smith and Terry Rozier combined for nine of Louisvilles 10 3-pointers on 23 at tempts. The biggest attrac tion was the rst-ever collegiate meeting between Hall of Fam ers Pitino and Brown, who brought 2,554 com bined victories and three NCAA titles into the contest. Sunday marked the third of eight sched uled matchups nation wide between Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame members, and these two will meet again on March 5 when the Car dinals face the Mustangs in Dallas. Pitino, who just en tered the Hall in Sep tember, made a point of heading down the sideline to greet Brown, 73, as the two ex changed pleasantries. From there it was all business between two schools ghting to contend in the AAC. SMU was playing for the rst time since upsetting then-No. 17 Connecticut on Jan. 4 and seeking its second straight win against a ranked opponent. Besides having the AACs best shooting outt, the Mustangs also had the No. 2 eld goal defense (36 percent), both of which presented challenges for a Cardi nals team that was out of sync on both ends of the court in Thursdays loss to No. 24 Memphis.No. 12 Louisville survives SMU, 71-63 AP PHOTO SMUs Sterling Brown, left, attempts to steal the ball away from Louisvilles Chris Jones during the rst half of an NCAA college basketball game on Sunday in Louisville, Ky.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014MINDFUL EATING: Skip the diets, focus on yourself / C2 Health check www.dailycommercial.com EUSTIS LIFE to host two January luncheonsLIFE, a social support group for the widowed, hosts two luncheons every month at two locations. The Eustis luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m., Wednesday at Lake Tech (vocational school), 2100 Kurt St., in the faculty dining room on the north side of the building. The lunch will be prepared by Lake Techs Culinary Arts Program. The program will be presented by Frank Staneld, a retired newspa per reporter and writer of Unbroken The Dorothy Lewis Story. The Leesburg LIFE luncheon will be held at 11:30 a.m., Thursday at the Leesburg Community Center, 109 E. Dixie Avenue, in Venetian Gardens in Leesburg. Moved to the third Thursday of the month, the LIFE luncheon in Leesburg will feature a very special program after a buffet-style lunch. Entertainment will be provided by Samantha Jackson, educator for the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey, who will bring four birds of prey, including a bald eagle. She will speak about the birds and conservation issues they face. The luncheon costs $10, and RSVP is required. For information, call 352-787-0403.LEESBURG Lake County Parkinsons support group to meet Kristin Grunell with Visiting Angels, Deborah Snow with Phoenix Home Care and Linda Grifn with TLC Family Care Home are the guests for this meeting from 1 to 3 p.m., Tuesday at the Lake Square Presbyterian Church, 10200 Morningside Drive in Leesburg. The trio will discuss ways to get help dealing with Parkinsons and to plan for emergencies. For information, call Dave or Pat Tribbey at 352-343-0376, or Marion or Jim Papson at 352-315-9359. THE VILLAGES Prostate cancer support group to meet WednesdayThe Villages Prostate Cancer Education and Support Group will hold a special for men only meeting at 7 p.m., on Wednesday in the Laurel Manor Recreation Center, 1985 Laurel Manor Drive, The Villages. The meeting will consist of a frank, round-table discussion led by prostate cancer survivors for both newly diagnosed and long-term patients. Topics to be discussed include types of treatment, what happens if the cancer reoccurs and side effects of various treatments, such as urinary incontinence. Meetings are free and are open to all men. For information, call Dan Bard at 352-259-9433, Tom Vajda at 352-4464194 or Fred Neilson at 352-365-1483. BY EDDIE ALVAREZThe Miami HeraldMIAMI Want to get into shape but dont know how to begin? Certied tness instructor and trainer Myriam Charleston and partner Jeff Pierre are here to help. We asked Charleston to start us off with 10 tips for people looking to start a tness routine: 1) Whats the rst thing you tell a client who is starting a tness regimen? No. 1: Make sure they get clear ance from their physician. The next thing is to get a tness assessment/ evaluation in order to know where youre starting from and to set realistic tness goals. 2) How often should a beginner work out? A beginner should aim to work out three times a week and have a program that includes at least 30 minutes of cardiovascular exer cise (walking, jogging, cycling), 30 minutes of strength training (free weights or machines), and 10 minutes of stretching (hold each stretch for 10 seconds). 3) What are the critical areas to work out? I like to start with legs, because they are your bodys foundation, and your stomach muscles, also known as your core muscles. But re member, your body will burn more fat if you develop muscles through out your entire body. My recom mendation is to work major muscle groups (legs, back, chest) with minor ones (biceps, triceps, calves) and incorporate push/pull move ments to create muscle balance. For instance, if you work chest (push) in one session, work your biceps (pull) in the same session. 4) Im overweight. What can I do? Have an assessment done by a tness instructor. The assessment will give you information about your body composition and help you set realistic goals. Many people want to lose weight but what they really want to do is lose fat. Focus on body composition (your body fat per centage); the right percentage for you depends on your overall health, age and sex. A tness instructor can personalize a body fat goal for you. And remember, the more mus cle you build, the easier it will be to burn fat. Thats why an effective weight-loss program incorporates a good strength training routine. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Talk about mind over matter: A quirky new study suggests patients expectations can make a big difference in how they feel after treatment for a migraine. Boston researchers recruited 66 migraine patients in an attempt to quantify how much of their pain relief came from a medication and how much was due to whats called the placebo effect, the healing power of positive belief. More than 450 head aches later, they reported Wednesday that its important for doctors to carefully choose what they tell patients about a powerful medicine be cause the message could help enhance its benets, or blunt them. Every word you say counts, not only ev ery gram of the medica tion, said Harvard pro fessor Ted Kaptchuk, who led the new study with a team at Bostons Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital. Heres how it worked. First, the patients who suffer regular migraines agreed to forgo pain relievers for several hours during one attack, re cording their symptoms for comparison with later headaches. Then for each of their next six migraines, the patients were given a differ ent pill inside an envelope with a different message. Sometimes they were told it was an effective mi graine drug named riza triptan, a positive mes sage. Other times they were told it was a place bo, a dummy pill, suggest ing no benet. Still other times they were told the pill could be either one, a neutral message.Positive thinking helps migraine drug workFitness tips to help you start your New Years resolution MARSHA HALPER / MCT Andrea Benedetti, right, gets advice on proper free weights form from tness instructor Myriam Charleston in the Miami Heralds tness center. NANCY CHURNINThe Dallas Morning NewsDALLAS The good news is Amer icans are living longer. The bad is that were not living as long as people in other countries. American longevity has dropped signicantly since 1979 compared with lon gevity elsewhere, according to a 2006 report from the National Academy of Sci ences. American men live to an average age of 75, about four years less than Australians and Japanese, who live to an average of 79. American women have made the biggest comparative drop, going from being the longest-lived in the 1960s to the 28th today. Japanese women pulled ahead between 1980 and 2006 to an average 86 years, with Italian and French women living to an average of 84 years. During this same time period, American women edged up to an average of 80. Theres no agreed-upon reason for this, according to a 2011 report from the Na tional Institutes for Health. But researchers do cite a tantalizing clue: Americans seem to have their highest vulnerabili ty between the ages of 55 and 75. These are the years when we die from heart dis ease, diabetes and lung disease more of ten than those in other countries. If Americans make it past 75, they not only have the same chance to live a long life, but they have shot at joining the ranks of the increasing numbers extending their lives into their 90s and even 100s.Americans are living longer, but not as long as other countries NATHAN HUNSINGER / MCT Louise Yoss exercises in the Silver Sneakers Zumba class at the Aaron Family JCC in Dallas.SEE FITNESS | C4SEE POSITIVE | C3SEE LONGEVITY | C5

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION BY ADDIE BROYLESAustin American-StatesmanAUSTIN, Texas Michelle May never saw her mom eat a baked potato. When she was a kid, everyone else at the ta ble got one, but not her mom, a slender wom an who was always on a diet to stay that way. I believed that when I grew up, I wouldnt get to eat potatoes any more, either. Its a story she tells in Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat (Am I Hungry? Publishing, $19.95), a 2011 book I discovered last summer at a nutrition conference hosted by the Univer sity of Texas that really helped put our modern American dieting culture into perspective. In her keynote speech at the event, May, a family-phy sician-turned-wellness-coach, explained that there are three types of eaters: restrictive eaters, like her mom, overeaters and instinctive eaters. Most of us who have struggled with our weight (and feelings about food and eating) oscillate between the rst two, either consuming every chance we get (and feeling bad about it) or eating by strict sets of pre-determined rules (and feeling bad when we break them). But it is that third category instinctive eat ing that May wants us to strive for, no matter if its New Years Day or any other day of the year when we feel trapped by what she calls the eat-re pent-repeat cycle. During the Austin conference, May asked the audience to think of someone we know who seems to have a healthy relationship with food. I immediately thought about my mom, who struggled with compul sive overeating in her 20s and 30s and nally broke her yo-yo dieting habits by the time I was in elementary school. I always thought of her as a mindful eater, whose key to success was reasonable portion sizes and a regular, con sistent exercise regimen. I rarely saw her eat seconds, but I never saw her miss a meal. She was the kind of mom who could eat one, maybe two cookies, and feel satised. She enjoyed cooking, but food was only one of the ways she showed us her love. And most admirably, when I came home from college weigh ing 30 pounds more than when I left, she didnt lecture me for not practicing what she preached. She simply continued her practice. Instinctive eating helps us refocus on what food really is: fuel for our bodies. Starting in our teen years, and increasingly earlier, unfortunately, we learn the latest (and ever-changing research) on good and bad food, drinks, eating hab its and exercise. We obsess about calories consumed. We learn how to calculate a small bag of fries into minutes on a Stairmaster. But from birth, we learn something even harder to unlearn: eating habits and triggers. Parents tell children to clean their plates without realizing that they are also teaching children to ignore the natural signals in their bodies that tell them they are full. We eat because the clock says its time to eat. We ll our plates with too much food because the plates are large and thats what everybody else is doing. We confuse thirst for hunger and food for love, May says. Mindful eating means you eat with intention and attention, she says. It means setting a pur pose for your meal and becoming aware of how you feel while youre eating, she says. It starts not with deciding what you should or shouldnt eat, but with when, how and why. The key to guring out what to eat is balancing what you want (men tal) with what you need (physical) and what you have (environmental). Re-learning how to listen to your body so you can determine whether its telling you to eat more protein, greens, grains, dairy, vegetables, ber, vitamins and even specific minerals can take years, but you have to be paying attention to how you feel before, during and after eating to start that process. And beware, May says: Your learned needs might not re ally be needs at all. The chemicals in, say, diet soda, have trained your body to want them, but those false needs are triggers you have to break, just like the emotional ones. Once youve gured out how to know when its actually time to eat and what kind of fuel your body is telling you it needs, then comes what can be the hard est part: Knowing when to stop. Weve been hearing for years that it takes more time than we re alize for our stomachs to send the message to our brains that were full. But its not just about eating slowly to allow that memo to be delivered; we have to be focusing on the food and not something else, like the television or computer or a book or magazine. Not paying attention to the act of eating is one of the biggest culprits in overeating, which then throws off your internal gauge. The goal isnt to eat perfectly or never mess up, May says. If you fall off, dont judge, she says. Just think, Oh, isnt that interesting, and pay at tention to what went wrong and why. The whole point of all of this, May says, is to free yourself from feelings of deprivation and guilt so you can better be in charge of so many as pects of your life, not just whats for dinner.Mindful eating: Skip diets, focus on yourself RALPH BARRERA / MCT We all hear that were supposed to be more mindful when we eat, for our health, for our mind, for our families, but what does that really mean and how does it relate to how food actually tastes? BILL WARDStar TribuneMINNEAPOLIS Gabby Helmin-Clazmer is an unabashed binge viewer. She has devoured full TV seasons at a time of everything from Keeping Up With the Kardashians to Breaking Bad. But as with other major indulgences, the aftermath can be a downer. One way or another. If I binge-watch a reality show, I feel like I have wasted a ton of my time, said HelminClazmer of Minneapolis. But when she nishes an intense drama, the depression and feeling of emptiness is much stronger than with a re ality show. A world that I was once living in no longer exists. As binge viewing continues to radically change the way Amer icans watch television 62 percent of us do it, according to a recent Harris Interactive sur vey the aftereffects are just beginning to be understood. The good news: Its probably not the worst way to while away a win ter weekend. The bad news: Its not the healthiest of habits, and might even inuence our worl dview if the shows are dark and depressing. Michael Erdman of Little Canada, Minn., just watched the second season of American Horror Story, and Ive got to tell you, that was one sick and twisted show. Loved every minute of it, but it was giving me nightmares. The concerns can go beyond the psyche, said Dr. James Mitchell, president of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, N.D. It doesnt sound like a particularly desirable behavior, both for ones mood and ones phys ical health, he said. The inactivity is bad, the food that accompa nies it probably is bad, your mood is bad. TV scholars have long worried about the ad verse effects of watch ing too much TV. They even have a name for it. The cultivation theo ry says that people who watch signicantly more TV have a darker view of the world, they see it as a mean and scary place, said Kevin Sauter, a com munications professor at the University of St. Thomas. This is a more focused experience the binge. And yes, someone might be more concerned about going out into the community after three days of may hem. But I dont think its a permanent condition. But then many of us simply move on to the next series, via Netix, Amazon, Hulu, On Demand services or myr iad other outlets. In the beginning was the DVD box set, and it was good. The shift to ward binge viewing was prompted by serialized dramas like The West Wing and The Sopranos. Their ongoing story lines compelled viewers to follow the sagas of these heroes (and anti-heroes) in short order. The trend gained steam even with short-lived series such as Firey and Freaks and Geeks, which be came naturals for binge viewing on DVD. Nowadays, Sauter said, the narrative in these types of shows can span an entire season, pushing viewers to keep watching: So you get to the end of an epi sode, and its Well, lets watch one more. Sauter, who teaches courses in TV criti cism, likens the experi ence to eating a whole bag of potato chips. The rst couple are good, but once you get to the middle of the pack, you can lose all the savoring of it. Still, he said, TV has always been accused of being a time-waster, and now were talking about big, big chunks of time. And time spent (binge viewing) means time taken away from other things, family, friends, activities.Binge TV viewing is a popular indulgence, for better or worse

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 Sometimes the doc tors message was true they were told they got rizatriptan and they really did. Sometimes it was false because researchers had secretly switched the pills. Mixing up the pos sibilities allowed re searchers to tease out how the same persons pain relief differed from migraine to migraine as his or her expectations changed. Of course the real mi graine drug worked far better than the dum my pill. But remark ably, people who knew they were taking a pla cebo still reported less pain than when theyd left their migraine un treated, the researchers found. The surprise: Patients reports of pain relief more than dou bled when they were told the migraine drug was real than when they were told, falsely, that it was a fake, the team reported Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine. In fact, people reported nearly as much pain relief when they took a placebo that they thought was the real drug as they did when they took the mi graine drug while believing it was a fake. The more we gave a positive message to the patient, the bigger the placebo effect was, Kaptchuk said. He said that effect probably isnt purely psychological, say ing the ritual of taking a medication may trigger some subcon scious memory that could leave people feeling better even if they knew theyd taken a fake drug. Scientists have long known that some people report noticeable improvements in pain and certain oth er symptoms when theyre given a placebo, which can be a sugar pill or sham surgery or some other benign intervention. Some studies even have documented that a placebo actually can spark a bi ological effect. But scientists dont know why the placebo effect works or how to harness its potential benet. The new research is an interesting at tempt to answer some of those questions, at least for one kind of pain, said Dr. Mark Sta cy, vice dean for clinical research at Duke Uni versity Medical Cen ter, who wasnt involved with the work. And learning how much of an impact it makes could help design better studies of new drugs, to ensure the phenom enon doesnt skew the results, he added. For now, it shows the power of positive think ing may be helpful in taking care of your mi graine, he said. POSITIVE FROM PAGE C1

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 www.Floridafoot.com Call Today for an appointment! CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com An effective way to lose fat is to incorporate healthy eating habits with frequent, small meals (ve to six per day), cardio, strength training and consistency. 5) What about diet? What kinds of food should I be eating? Can I still eat my favorite desserts? Dont use the word diet. Instead, focus on healthy eating, which means consuming healthy carbohydrates (whole wheat bread and pasta), fruits, vegetables and lean proteins (chicken or tur key breast, sh, lightly marbled red meats). Eat ve or six times a day but eat small por tions during each meal. Use unhealthy items in moderation, like desserts and other sim ple sugar /white our items. Follow the 80/20 rule: Eat healthy meals 80 percent of the time and indulge 20 percent. 6) Im older. Can I still work out safely? Absolutely! As we get older, overall mus cle mass tends to de crease and there is an increasing risk of bone diseases. But you can minimize those effects of aging with a con sistent tness routine. Prior to each workout, make sure you warm up with a brisk walk or light jog for 10 to 15 minutes to get the body moving and warm. And dont forget to stretch. Incorporating exibility, core and strength training will maintain overall body health and minimize the chance of injury. 7) Im a woman and I dont want build big muscles. This is a misconception I hear all the time. It is usually difcult for women to build muscle, and it usually takes a long time. Women dont have the same amount of muscle cells that men have, on av erage. But for women, strength training is very important because it helps burn fat and build bone density to combat osteoporosis. Muscles also help us shape and tone our bodies, so ladies, dont be afraid of building muscles. 8) How long will it take before I see results? It depends on the individual. Usually, people will start to notice chang es after two or three months. Remember your results will depend on how consistent you are with your strength training, your cardio and your eating habits. Consistency in those three areas is the key. 9) I dont like going to the gym. What can I do at home? You can purchase a few items to create a home gym: a stability ball, a mat, a few dumb bells, and resistance bands. There are also body-weight exercises you can do: squats, lunges, biceps curls, dips, crunches, pull-ups and push-ups. However, the benet of going to a gym lies in the vari ety of exercises you can do. Consistency is the key to success, so keep yourself interested and change up the exercises you perform. 10) Ive started work out routines before and lost interest. What can I do to stay motivated? Many people complain of losing inter est with their workouts One of the most im portant things is nd something you enjoy doing. Start with any physical activity that you enjoy doing to keep yourself motivated. Is it a sport? Is it working out with a friend? Another option is to hire a personal trainer who can keep you mo tivated and can cus tomize a work-out program to meet your goals. It is important to set realistic goals and track your progress so you dont become dis couraged. And if you miss some workouts or have a weekend where you overindulged, dont despair! Just rededicate yourself and get back to your routine. FITNESS FROM PAGE C1 MARSHA HALPER / MCT Fitness instructor Jeff Pierre watches as Eddie Alvarez performs a rowing workout in the Miami Heralds on-site tness center.

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) Experts say people are particularly vulner able from 55 to 75 be cause this is when the cumulative effects of poor nutrition, lack of exercise and lack of screenings can converge. Poor lifestyle choices can lead to clogged arteries, high blood pressure, insulin resistance and cancers spotted too late for ef fective treatment. Obesity is the No. 1 driver of ill health, as far as Dr. Diana Ker win is concerned. Ker win, chief of geriatrics at Texas Health Dallas, also blames Americans sedentary lifestyle for driving up the increase in fatal diseases. She points with pride to her patient Louise Yoss, 78, of Dallas, a reg ular at the Silver Sneak ers exercise class at the Aaron Family Jewish Community Center in Dallas. Yoss started working out at 74. Ker win says Yoss is improv ing her odds of a healthy future with exercise and healthy food choices. Heart disease remains the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, killing 1 of 4 of both genders, according to a 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A contributing factor to womens deaths in par ticular is a lack of aware ness of the symptoms of heart attacks in females, which can lead to critical time elapsing before seeking lifesaving care. While both men and women can experience the telltale shortness of breath, pressure or pain in the lower chest or upper abdomen or extreme fatigue or dizziness, women are more likely to dismiss the symptoms as acid reux, the u or aging. Smoking can aggravate diseases or make health problems worse. Experts are encour aged that the percentage of American smok ers dropped from 18.9 percent to 18 percent in 2012, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. However, thats still too many, says Dr. Mitchell Magee, medical director of the CLEAR (Chest Lung Evaluation & Re source) Clinic and sur gical director of thorac ic oncology at Medical City Dallas. Plus, many dont realize theyre at risk for lung cancer even if they dont smoke, Ma gee says. Women seem to be at particular risk for this disease. While the rate of new lung cancer cas es has dropped 22 per cent for men over the past 33 years, it has risen for women by 106 per cent, according to the American Cancer Society. Lung cancer has a greater mortality rate than any other cancer, causing more deaths in women than breast, uterine and ovarian cancer combined. The median age for a person to receive a di agnosis of lung can cer is 65, and 20 per cent of women with the disease have never smoked or had any ex posure to smoke. Magee attributes that to a lack of research and screenings for lung cancer. By the time symptoms occur, its usually too late to save the patient. Women who have had other cancers, have had their ovaries removed surgically before meno pause or who have hor mone replacement after menopause are at high er risk and would benet from screenings, he says.HOW TO OVERCOMEDoes all this render Americans relative de cline in longevity inevitable or unsolvable? Not according to Dan Buettners 2008 book The Blue Zones: Les sons for Living Longer From the People Whove Lived the Longest. Buettners book has inspired a program called the Blue Zones Project by Healthways, a company based in Franklin, Tenn. Emotional and psy chological needs are also part of the health and longevity picture, says Joel Spoonheim, executive director for community programs with Healthways. People whose lives have a sense of purpose live about seven years longer than those without that. When people hit retirement, they ask, Why am I here? Why am I getting up in the morn ing? Spoonheim notes. For Yoss, her Silver Sneakers class, where she moves to music alongside women who have become like family, answers that question and more. Cindy is fabulous, she says of Cindy Dodson, the teacher who stops to check on and praise Yoss as she rests after class. Its joyful. I hate to miss it. LONGEVITY FROM PAGE C1 NATHAN HUNSINGER / MCT Louise Yoss works out with the Silver Sneakers class at the Aaron Family JCC.

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 315-8305 Is pain keeping you from what matters most? By covering up pain, swelling, or others, you may be making a deeper problem. Acupuncture is a time-tested, safe, natural and drug free treatment that can provide immediate relief and long lasting benefits.James N Georgiades AP Working gallery of local artists (352) 460-4806facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburg DEAR ABBY: You said in your Nov. 14 column on bully ing that you hadnt received a single letter from anyone who had bullied others. Well, I was a bully. As a young girl Id tease and taunt, and when I was older I used sarcasm as a way to bully. I was involved in an abusive relationship in my 20s. With support and counseling, I was able to stop being abused and being abusive. I learned the feelings I had repressed shame, fear and low self-worth from a childhood of sexual and physical abuse were misdirected at the people around me instead of at my abuser, my father, as they should have been. Im not saying this is an excuse for the hurt I inicted on others, but for me there was a correlation. Im now in a loving and supportive relationship. We have raised our children to be kind, thoughtful and condent individuals. Im involved with an organization supporting nonprot programs in our community that empower abused children, reach out to the sexually exploited and help women experiencing domestic violence. Because of the life I lead now, I have been able to let go of the negativity and shame of being abused, but the shame of being abusive stays with me. I hope the people I hurt have forgiven me and have been able to move forward. But I will never know for sure. Thank you for allowing me to share my story. Even if it doesnt get printed, writing it has lifted a little bit of the weight that I still carry from my bullying days. REDEEMING MYSELF OUT WEST DEAR REDEEMING: Confession is good for the soul, and if getting this off your chest has been helpful, Im glad. Obviously, you have grown since the days when you were an abuser, and your focus on helping vulnerable people in your community is laudable. I hope you will continue the work that youre doing because there is great need for it. If your letter makes just one person stop and think twice about WHY he or she would deliberately hurt or diminish someone else, it will have been worth the space in my column because sometimes those scars can last a lifetime. DEAR ABBY: I recently lost a niece. She had struggled with substance abuse and was away at college when she died. I believed in what a wonderful person she was and could be, and often sent her cards of encouragement. When my sister and her husband went to retrieve her belongings, they mentioned that she had my cards around her room. I had hoped that her parents would give them to me, but three months later, they have not. Would it be wrong for me to ask for them? LOVING AUNT IN THE SOUTH DEAR LOVING AUNT: Please accept my sympathy for your familys loss. The cards may not have been offered because your sister and her husband are experiencing the depths of grief. While it would not be wrong to ask if you can have them, dont be surprised if they refuse to let them go at least for the time being. Having the possessions their daughter sur rounded herself with may be important to them right now as a way of feeling closer to her.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Reformed bully still regrets the pain she caused others

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 r f n t b t f b t r t t b t t t f b b r b t t r t f t f f t r f r b b f r r t r t t r t r r r b r t b r b b r b r b r b t f t b t f b b f r r t r b r t f t t t t r f t b b r f r t r f t r t r r r b n n n n n n n n n n n n rf trttftt t f ntbf r t r t f t rfrfttb brtfrbr rtttt rtrbttt tfffrfftf rbtr ttr rbttftrr rbtrrrbtt rbttr btfrrbrr trfttbrr tt tbt ttr tr f tt n ttr rr rfntbrft t b t r r t r r t r t t t f t r f r t b t r r r f t t t f tt rf nttrt fbftf tffrt rbrr frbrtrbrrtf rftn n nn t trrrtrrtf nn tfftr rtfrffbtt t trtttt ft t r fbrftrtrfrt fr n n n n t t r t f r t r r f t t b b f t r r f t r b r t r t b f r t r f t b r r b t r t r t b t b t b f r t r r r f t b r r b t t r t t r b n tfr ft b rf n n n n trr ft r f t t r f r f t t t f f f r t t f t f r f t f b f f r f n t r r b r b r t r f t t btrrtrr trtt tftr frtbtrrrr fttt rbr rrrtfftf trr ftt rtb tbr tt f tt rf nttrt fbftfb tffrt rrbr frbrtrbrrtft rftr ttrrtf ftr rtfrffbtrr tttrt frbrttr tft trfbrf trtrfrtf n n n rf rf rfntb f rr

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 r f n t b n f r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r f b n f f f f b f f f f n f f r r f r r r r r f r r f n r r f r r r b t f f r n f r f f f r r r r n r n f r r r r f r r f r r f r f rrr b r r r f f f t n r r f n r r r f r r r r r f r r r f r r r t f f b t f r r r r r f r r r r r r r t r r r n f r n r r r f r b r b r r r t r t t t f ff b r n r r f b r ntb f t f f r r r n n f r r r b r f n f f f f r r f r f f f f r r r r r r r r r r f n ffrrrr b r r r nb f frtrr r rtr r rrr r r r r bb f n rrr rr rr rr rr r t r b r r b r f t n f n n r r r r r f r f b f r r r f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r f r f r r n bb f b t r r r b b t r f b r f b f r r r b b t r r f f b f t r b f b t b r f r f r f b f b r f r r r r n r r r f rb r r r f b r f b tbf t n t f r r f r r r r r r r r r r f n f r r rrr rr r f r bb f f f t r r r r r r f f r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 rfn tbtt nrnn tf nnt ftn nrt n r t bn trbrtr t fnr tt rf nr t rtnnnr tb btnf f t r tn ntnt tffn tt trttbtb t f brnnf r tb bttn b rf t t nnntrt f t n r n n r f b ttb tnf nttrf nntb t nf trf t n b b t r tnrffr tb btbn nbfr n t tn n rf n n tb rt bntfrbt n rbtn r f rnnr b n nntb frt rtntb t b fft t r f t b n t r n t t b rf ttbt tbtfnt bnr trf tnnttttbtb r rtb rbt nrnnt nnn ntfntb tt n ftfb rtt r tffttb tb b ttbrnb bttrtt rn b rnrb nb b ttb t rn rntbbftnn n b nr fn ff tt n trn fn nn trr ntrbf ft tbt rtb trnfn ttrn b tbt tt tn t r ffttbtb tttbtt r t b r fttr r tfnttb f n b r t b f t t f n t b n tn f t n f n r r t n t n n t r b t nttb btt tbbrntfr n tbbtfr tb nr r tn n t f n b r tntfrtn nn fttbf t trttbtb n tbt nt ttb ttbtb b ntt tn nnb n trttb r ftnnrtnt btt rbr trntb nrttbtb nn r ttbtb tbttb tb nnntb tt frfnt bbtb tnnrnttbrnr b nnrtf tb r nrnrbt ttnr bb r nr brn n b r tbt rrtnb ftr tt ftr tt t t b t t n rf nbnfnt tnnb nnffnn ttbftt nnt ntb t n n f t n t f n n fn b f n n bb f ffft nnt b t n f f n b n t n t t b t t t t t b t t n b n n n n n f t n n t n b n t n f f t f t b t b n t n n n f r t t r n t r n t t b n t f t f f f n b f n t t t t r t t n b ffrnb ntnntn nn t n n r n n t t t

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Monday, January 13, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rfnt b r fnt bnt b t r r t r t f f r f r r r r t f b f t f t b rfb brbbbbbt bb nr btrr bftrtbb b brbb rtbf rtftrbbb tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb nr bnt r t b t t t f t r r t b f f r b t b r f t f f r b t f f r t r t b r b f b f r b r t r r r t b t b r b t t t f t b f r b r t b t f b b r t r t b f f r b t t r t b f b r t b f r tfrtbfrbr btbrftt tfrrr ttttbrrtt rfbbrt t r t f f t rr tn bfbtb bftttfb bnt b n b f f t t f b b t b b r r t t b t t f t t b b t r b tbrr rttt trfrt b r t r t r bnt r b t f f b f t r t b f t b t b t t f b b f b t f f t t t t r bnt tn bnt tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb t t r t r t n r r t r t f r f r b f r r f r t b rnt t b t r t r r f b f f f b r t b b b b b b r t rrt r f t b r n t rtfbfrt rftbftfbbb btrf r b f f t r f b b t t t t tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb t tbbtfbt brtbtrftf rr f b b t f b f r b r r t r f r t b f b b f r t b r b f r f f r t f b t r f t b r b f r f f r f t t b t f b t t r t t r f t b b r f f b b b f r b tbrftt r t f b n f t t t t b f t t r r t f b t r r f r b t r f t f f nr t b b t b b t b r b f b b t r f t f t f b tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb nr t rfttrbf trft b t f b r b t t f b t t r b t f b rtft ttrrbt b b rftrft b r t r t b tbtbt brtbtbt t r t r tbtt bb b f b r t r b b f bbfttfb tn bn b bfb ffrb nfft bbb fftrt t r b b t f r r r t r b f bb bbb ttf t bbb f t b tnf t ttntb brbbb r b b t bbfb bbb trb tb bb bbb r t t t r f t t f t f bbb bftt tfrftt rttt rrtbr rtt ttrf t bfttbb b frtbftt

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 13, 2014 rff ntbnt f f n t b n bfrf rrfbftn nbnfrr rffb rrr rrbfff bfn rf nftnnt n tt nbfbnf ntt bnnbrf tn nnrfrf ntnn rrr rftb n n rrf nbfnn ntf n b b f f b t t bnr tn f f n t n f b b nf nn f b f n t brrf f btt f n b b t b b n b b t n b n n n b b b b n b b n b b n n b n b t r r t t f f b r n n b bb nt b n brfbf ntt b f f b f n t n bttfn fr rrrf bff nbtn n f rfffnrn rf nbfnn b f bf n bf n rrf rnfnbt btf t tf b b bn rff btb bb fff nb b