Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com There was no time to spare. Learning her ex-boyfriend had been released from jail after serving time for assault and bat tery, Azalay, who asked that her real name not be used, feared he would kill her this time. He beat me all over, she said. He held me hostage for four days. What he did, he should have gotten more than three years. Remembering the incident vividly when he tried to choke her after she said she wanted to leave him, her voice began to crack. I still fear for my life, she said, lowering her eyes. I am al ways looking over my shoulder. Azalay entered the Haven do mestic violence shelter, which provides emergency, long-term shelter and counseling for vic tims of domestic violence. Since then, she said she has found hope and support, and as pires to nish school and begin a career as a medical assistant. It has made me stronger, she said. I should not let one person stop me from living. Domestic violence has become a part of all societies: it is every where and does not discriminate by culture, age or class. In the city of Mascotte, the community learned of the chill ing death of Kristi Lynne Del aney, 26, last November. In what has become a familiar story around the country, Del aneys on-again, off-again boy friend, Johnny Lashawn Ship man has been charged with homicide. Investigators would not say how she was killed, but family members who found the wom an said it was apparent she was beaten to death with a baseball bat and the couples 3-year-old daughter witnessed the attack. Three women are killed by a current or former intimate part ner each day in America, on av erage, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Vio lence (NCADV). Statistics from the NCADV fur ther highlight that a woman is battered every 15 seconds in the United States. The Lake County Sheriffs Of ce responded to 414 domes tic disturbance calls in 2013 and Sumter County Sheriffs Ofce reported 318 calls. According to Walter Forgie, a supervisor with the State At torneys Ofce in Lake Coun ty, there were 105.6 domestic vi olence cases per month in 2013 compared with 102 in 2012. Advocates against domestic vi olence said it is the most under reported crime and is an issue people in many communities do not like to talk about. Research from the National Institute of Justice supports that assertion. According to the justice report, which highlighted ndings from A problem in the shadows r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Careand Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson SEAHAWKS ROLL PAST THE SAINTS, SPORTS B1 MONEY: Former Idol singer whistles while he works at his Mount Dora bistro E1 SUPREME COURT: Protest-free zones could be coming A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, January 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 137 No. 12 5 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED C4 CROSSWORDS C3 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C4 MONEY E1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 STATE A3 VOICES C1 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8. 70 / 51 Sunshine and patchy clouds $1 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BY THE NUMBERS 125,631: Hotline calls received 90,139: Safety plans provided 36,389: Outreach services 15,997: People given shelter 3,471: Shelter requests denied due to lack of space 192: People killed in domestic violence cases, or 19.5 percent of all homicide cases Stats are from the scal year 2011-12 in Florida. BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Angela Wilder poses for a photo in Umatilla on Thursday. I am in the age group where women stayed home. They are convinced they have no choice. They think, If my husband starts hitting me, what am I going to do? They dont understand that Haven is here to help. There is shame and embarrassment. Ann Eggleston Vice chairwoman of the board of directors of Haven GARY FINEOUT Associated Press ORLANDO Head ing into a crucial elec tion year, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Satur day that the states Re publicans will win big and keep their lock on state government and maintain their majori ty among Floridas mem bers in Congress. Scotts remarks at the annual gathering of the Republican Party of Flor ida were his rst major campaign speech during a year in which he will be the main target for the states Democrats. Scott and other top Republicans gearing up for this years elec tions sounded condent as they repeatedly cit ed the states improving Scott vows GOP will win big in 2014 election Advocates: Domestic violence the most underreported crime For more on the Florida Republican party meeting, see Page A3 MATTHEW LEE AP Diplomatic Writer WASHINGTON Five years after pledg ing to remake the U.S. relationship with the broader Middle East and improve Ameri cas image in the Mus lim world, the Obama administrations re gional strategy ap pears to have come unhinged. President Barack Obama has been con fronted by fast-mov ing and ominous de velopments from Afghanistan to Tuni sia, amid a bitter pub lic power struggle be tween Iran and Saudi Arabia, and has ad justed his rst terms grand plan to restore Washingtons stand ing and inuence. Now, its a small er vision that seems to rely on ad hoc re sponses aimed at merely keeping the United States relevant in an increasingly vol atile and hostile at mosphere. His administration has been forced to deal with three years of civil war in Syria. A Western-backed op position is struggling to topple an autocrat ic government and repel Islamic ght ers who also are de stabilizing neigh boring Lebanon and Iraq, where al-Qa ida has resurged less than three years after Obama withdrew U.S. forces. The U.S. is strug gling to identify a co herent position in Egypt after the mil itary ouster of the countrys rst dem ocratically elected president. The ad ministration tried its best to avoid calling the power transfer a coup. It is losing patience with Afghan Presi dent Hamid Karzai, who is refusing to sign a security agreement with the U.S. The pact would allow the U.S. to leave some troops in the country to help train and assist Kar zais army in keeping the Taliban at bay af ter Americas longest conict ends Dec. 31. Secretary of State John Kerry is trying to forge an Israeli-Pal estinian peace deal against resistance Obamas grand plan for Mideast diminished AP FILE PHOTO President Barack Obama looks on as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, left, and President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority shake hands prior to their 2009 meeting in New York. Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon dies. See Page A7. SEE SCOTT | A2 SEE VIOLENCE | A2 SEE OBAMA| A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 HOW TO REACH US SATURDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 6-2-8 Afternoon .......................................... 1-6-8 PLAY 4 .............................................. 20-7-5 Afternoon ....................................... 7-4-1-8 FLORIDA LOTTERY FRIDAY FANTASY 5 ........................... 6-12-18-19-33 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $10 4 of 5 wins $113.50 5 of 5 wins $238,631.18 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. economy and jobs pic ture as a key reason why they expect to win in No vember. We have every right to win every election be cause we are doing the right thing, Scott told roughly 200 party activ ists and party ofcials. Republicans have con trolled the Florida Leg islature and governors mansion for much of the last two decades. But Democrats consid er Scott vulnerable, since he has had lackluster poll numbers during his en tire three years in ofce. Several Republicans em phasized the importance of the 2014 election say ing that it will help the GOP during the next presidential election. President Barack Obama won Florida in both 2008 and 2012, while President George W. Bush won the state four years earlier. The road to the White House in 2016 runs right through Tallahassee, said Peter Feaman, Flor idas national committee man. Even though there are other Democrats in the race, Florida Republicans consider former Gov. Charlie Crist the like ly candidate to challenge Scott in the fall. Crist for mally jumped into the race last November and has raised more than $4 million for his campaign effort in just two months. Crist has wasted little time in criticizing Scott as a terrible governor and faulting him every thing from pushing for budget cuts to education in rst year to rejecting billions in federal aid for high speed rail. Scott did not mention Crist directly during his remarks, but that didnt stop other Republicans from branding Crist as a political opportunist who changed his politi cal philosophy and par ties. Crist was elected while he was Republican, ran as an independent in the U.S. Senate race he lost to Marco Rubio, and became a Democrat in 2012. Charlie Crist will say and do anything to get elected and we cant let our fellow citizens in Florida not remember that, said Sharon Day, co-chair of the Republi can National Committee. Republican Party of Florida Chairman Len ny Curry told party mem bers that they have to continue to remind Flo ridians that that states unemployment rate has dropped since Scott took ofce. Curry insisted that Scott deserves the cred it for improvement in the states economy and that the GOP should push back if the media or Dem ocrats say otherwise. The Democratic es tablishment will go out of its way to poke holes in our triumphs, Curry said. Floridas unemploy ment rate in December was 6.4 percent. Thats the lowest it has been since July 2008, but state economists say one of the big reasons for the decline is people are leav ing the labor force or had delayed their job search. The state Ofce of Eco nomic and Demographic Research said in a report last month that Floridas real unemployment rate would be 8.3 percent if the amount of people in the labor force had held steady since December 2011. Republicans expect to have a signicant cash advantage over Crist and the Democrats during the next 10 months that should allow them to spend millions on tele vision advertising to tout Scotts handling of the economy. But Curry and others made it clear that they also plan to use Crists support of Obama and the presidents health care overhaul in the cam paign. Scott, who has been a harsh critic of the overhaul in the past and used it during his rst campaign, lashed into it again on Saturday, and said we dont need the federal government tell ing us what to do every day. We are going to ab solutely point out where Charlie Crist failed and his connection and his tie to this atrocious act, Curry said. SCOTT FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Gov. Rick Scott smiles as he speaks in Fort Lauderdale. the National Violence Against Women Survey, only 27 percent of wom en and 13.5 percent of men who were physically assaulted by an intimate partner reported their as sault to law enforcement. Less than 20 percent of women victims reported intimate partner rapes to police. LIVING IN SHAME In the past ve years in The Villages, 3,000 wom en have sought services from Haven of Lake and Sumter Counties, which serves victims of domes tic violence and sexual assault, according to Kel ly Smallridge, executive director. With the popu lation growing in The Vil lages, Smallridge said the problem is expected to increase. But Smallridge said many seniors dont tell anyone or report it. They live with it, she said. That is the value system of that generation. With that particular gen eration, if you marry him, you stay married. They dont tell their families. They dont tell their best friend. Smallridge remembers one of her rst clients from The Villages, who showed up at the shelter 10 years ago. My very rst client had a broken jaw and two black eyes, she said. She had lived with domes tic violence for 60 years of her life. Many residents of The Villages do not go into shelter, Smallridge said. They are calling to al leviate their fears, she said. They want us to tell them if they have legal re course. Ann Eggleston, vice chairwoman of the board of directors of Haven, lives in The Villages and said she knows domes tic violence is occurring there. I am in the age group where women stayed home, she said. They are convinced they have no choice. They think, if my husband starts hit ting me, what am I going to do? They dont under stand the Haven is here to help. There is shame and embarrassment. According to statistics compiled by Haven, 331 clients in Lake and Sum ter counties entered the shelter in scal year 201213. There were seven pro tective injunctions in both counties during that time. For many senior wom en, they dont know what options they have, Eggleston said. I think by the time you are my age, you just dont know what to do, she said. You are no lon ger wanted by the work force. But, there is a way out, Eggleston said, remind ing women that they can apply for Social Security benets and do have re course. Any contact they have with Haven is strictly con dential, Eggleston said. Eggleston said she has seen women she suspect ed were abused around The Villages. They are quiet and meek, she said. He does all the talking. I some times see nger bruises around the arms. Like many communi ties, Eggleston said there is a stigma about calling for help. No one wants the po lice car in the driveway, she said. There is a stig ma with domestic vio lence. Why are the po lice at your house? This is a utopia for old people and nothing bad hap pens. I know it does. Egglestons husband, Glenn, a former homi cide sergeant, chose to support Haven as the charity of choice for their group, the Tri-County Browns Backers. Glenn said he loves liv ing in The Villages, but he believes domestic vi olence happens there. He remembers going to domestic disturbanc es as a police ofcer and, in particular, how the circumstances affected children. When you got to a house with domestic vi olence and there are kids shivering because of it, it has a profound effect on you period, he said. It is not a manly thing: women getting beat up by men. Smallridge said she re ceived a call from a doc tors ofce in The Villag es, asking her to come in and train his staff about domestic violence be cause of elderly wom en coming in with suspi cious bruises. HEALING ONE DAY AT A TIME Severely beaten at the hands of her ex-boy friend, Angela Wilder is slowly putting the pieces of her life back together. He was a very aggres sive man and we were together for three years, she said in a phone in terview in Umatilla, where she has sought help for addiction at the Ruth House, a transition al shelter for women and children in crisis. What started out as a verbally abusive rela tionship turned physi cally violent at the end, Wilder said. We had gotten into an argument and I asked to talk, she said. That is when things got physical, she said. When I did not leave, he grabbed me and dragged me through the house, she said. He punched me in the ribs. Then, when she tried to get the spare key to her car outside the home, her ex-boyfriend threw her across the yard, Wilder said. Wilder said she left Os ceola County and moved to Lake County to be near her daughters while she slowly gets her life back on track. Starting over is hard but it is worth it, she said. I am learning my self value and how to be an independent wom an: a single woman in recovery who has three daughters. Rebecca Randall, exec utive director of the Ruth House, said percent of women that have lived here all have domestic violence issues in their past. We provide a safe, structured environment and teach them about the love of God. Smallridge said the biggest misconception about domestic violence is that if somebody is not holding you down or hitting you, it is not do mestic violence. The violent crimes leave emotional scars, according to advocates. Domestic violence and rape are the only two violent crimes where the victim feels shame and guilt, Eggleston said. Love does not hurt. When clients enter the shelter, Smallridge said a safety plan is developed. All those things that happened equals possi ble death for you, she said of the urgency to keep victims safe. Azalay said while she has moved on from the relationship many years ago, it is hard to forget. She remembers her ex-boyfriends haunting words: If I see you, I am going to kill you. I have had two kids with him, she said. My son looks like him. How am I supposed to forget what he did to me? Even during tough times, she said she refus es to go back to a life she described as lled with fear. It is not worth it, she said. My mom and my sister were in abusive sit uations. They stuck with it. I got away from it. VIOLENCE FROM PAGE A1 We had gotten into an argument and I asked to talk. When I did not leave, he grabbed me and dragged me through the house. He punched me in the ribs. Angela Wilder

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A man was killed and his fe male passenger is in critical condition after their motor cycle was struck head-on by a car in Howey-in-the-Hills on Saturday. The crash occurred about 2:30 p.m. According to Howey-in-theHills police, a woman driv ing a Toyota Avalon south on State Road 19 crossed the yel low line near Savage Circle in front of three motorcycles rid ing in tandem. The rst rider was able to avoid the car, while the second bike was clipped Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT ASTOR Area man killed in late-night wreck A 33-year-old Astor man died Friday night when he crashed his car in Volusia County, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. Cesar Nevarez was driving his 2002 Kia southbound on Grand Avenue when the accident occurred at about 10:30 p.m. For reasons un known, he lost control of the car, left the road and hit a tree, the FHP reported. Nevarez died at the scene. An investigation continues. TAVARES Religious leaders sought for invocation at meetings The Lake County Commission is seeking local pastors, preachers, fa thers, rabbis and other heads of re ligious organizations to participate in County Commission meetings by opening with an invocation. Meetings are held at 9 a.m., on Tuesdays, twice each month in Commission Chambers at the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St. To participate in the invocation portion of a County Commission meeting, call Kathy Hartenstein at 352-323-5733 or email kharten stein@lakecounty.gov. LEESBURG RSVP program seeking older volunteers Lake and Sumter County resi dents age 55-plus who have a life time of experience to share and the desire to make a real difference in the community are needed as vol unteers for the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) program. RSVP volunteers tutor elementary grade students, mentor low-income high school students who are college bound, participate in after-school ed ucational and enrichment programs, deliver meals, make telephone reas surance calls to homebound seniors, provide transportation for cancer pa tients, sort and distribute food to the needy, and support veterans and mil itary families. Interested parties can get infor mation by calling 352-365-1995. SUMTERVILLE SECO announces 2014 scholarship program The Sumter Electric Cooperative (SECO) has announced the continu ation of its scholarship program that will benet up to 12 deserving high school seniors from the coopera tives service territory. Each recipient will receive a $3,000 scholarship to assist them in going on to a college or technical school following graduation. Graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be en rolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/tech nical school by the end of 2014. Applications are available at area high school guidance ofces and at any of SECO customer service center in Lake, Sumter, Marion and Citrus counties, and must be returned to SECO no later than April 4. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 GARY FINEOUT Associated Press ORLANDO Florida Gov. Rick Scott, acknowledging the backlash among some Republicans against new state school standards, said Sat urday that steps will be taken to ad dress the criticism that has built up over the last few months. Scott, who was speaking at the an nual meeting of the Republican Par ty of Florida, said he understood there was a little bit of passion surrounding the standards that are known ofcially as the Common Core State Standards. His remarks came a day after a state party caucus passed a resolution opposing them. The governor said Education Commissioner Pam Stewart will unveil a list next week of proposed changes to the standards. He also said that the Florida Legislature during its spring session would pass a data security bill to respond to concerns about what type of infor mation will be collected from stu dents that could be passed on to others. These are Florida standards, they are not some national standards, Scott said. This is our state. Were not going to have the federal gov ernment telling us how to do our ed ucation system. Scotts response still falls short of an outright repeal of the standards that some opponents want. Flor ida also had no plans to give de tailed student data to the federal Scott: Changes coming to Common Core Staff Report An annexation incen tive program in Eustis apparently is paying off because the city plans to expand its boundaries by about 90 additional acres. Five separate public hearings are scheduled Thursday for the rst readings of ordinanc es to annex 28 parcels of land. This is still a far cry from another 422 tracts the city has identied as eligible for annexation. The city identied the 450 tracts last year and announced an annex ation incentive program which will waive all ap plication fees associat ed with voluntary an nexation requests. This is saving property own ers between $1,225 and $2,275 in application fees per annexation re quest. This is an excellent opportunity for enclave property owners to be come part of the city of Eustis and benet from EUSTIS City poised to annex 90 acres MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com To the sounds of laugh ter from the crowd of mostly adults and seniors, ofcials at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast in The Villages on Saturday pointed out that their keynote speak er was only 6 years old when the group rst held the event 11 years ago. Javan Latson, a 17-yearold Belleview High School honor student and the events youngest key note speaker, admitted to the audience of about 650 people that although he was familiar with Dr. King, he had to con sult with his 84-year-old grandfather and a wellknown 73-year-old con gressman and civil rights leader who were present at the March on Washing ton in 1963 to get a better idea of Kings dream. Then he gave a lesson to the adults on King. He said he learned a young person should speak up and stand up whenever they see some one getting mistreated, abused or bullied. Stand up for righ teousness. Sometimes that means you have to turn something upside down to make it right side up, said Latson, quot ing words he was given by U.S. Representative John Lewis of Georgia. Held at the Savannah Center in The Villages by the MLK Commemora tive Committee, the event also included a video trib ute to King, a slide fea turing various civil right leaders, revolutionaries and images such as for whites only signs. There were various speakers, as well as scholarship and community leader award THE VILLAGES Student schools audience on Dr. King MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Javan Latson, a 17-year-old Belleview High School student, greets visitors after speaking at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast in The Villages. Even though the civil rights activists of the 1960s are now famous American heroes and icons in the present, Dr. King and his colleagues were then just ordinary folks hoping to do extraordinary things. Javan Latson Keynote speaker at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Police sift through the wreckage after a fatal crash in Howey-in-the-Hills. Staff report The Florida Depart ment of Transporta tion is holding a pub lic meeting on Jan. 21 regarding proposed improvements to the north-south portion of State Road 44 in the Eu stis and Mount Dora ar eas. The project limits are from US 441 to the eastwest section of SR 44 in Lake County, Florida. This project widens EUSTIS SR 44 roadwork on agena SEE EDUCATION | A4 SEE ANNEX | A4 SEE ROADS | A4 1 dead, another hurt in crash HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS SEE CRASH | A4 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Prosecutors report ed Friday they are almost nished closing a case against a former deputy re chief who died in De cember amid charges of lascivious child moles tation in Sumter Coun ty and similar accusations in Hernando County. Cecil Brad Burris, 55, had been with Sumter County Fire Rescue since 2003 and also served as a re marshall there, before he was terminated in 2012 after he was arrested on charges of molesting and touching a 16-year-old girl. He had been released from the Sumter County jail in lieu of $75,000 bail and was awaiting a Feb ruary pre-trial hearing on the lewd and lascivious charges. WILDWOOD Officials wrapping molestation case BURRIS SEE CASE | A4 SEE KING | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 365-255024 Hour Answering Service 1501 N. US Hwy 441 Suite 1836, Bldg 1800 The VillagesPunya Clinic 1070 Flagler Avenue Leesburg PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE TROUBLE SLEEPING?Shakti Narain, M.D. FCCP Accepting New Patients LRDA SLP DSRDRSCenterLRDA SLP DSRDRSCenter Protect and Serve Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! OBITUARIES Barbara E. Devendorf Barbara E. Deven dorf passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 at the age of 85. She was born on January 22, 1928 in East Syracuse, NY to the late Mar tin and Lucy Law ler. She was em ployed for many years as an ofce manag er in the medical eld in New York, but has made her home here in The Plantation since 1992. Barbara en joyed golng, but her true passion was play ing bridge. She is sur vived by her loving hus band of 62 years, Paul Devendorf, of Lees burg, one son; Doug las (Jean) Devendorf of Fulton, NY, two daugh ters-in-law Sandra and Vicki Devendorf, ve grandchildren, Wayne, Neil and Ian Deven dorf, Jimmy and Justin Keller and one greatgrand daughter, Katie Ann Devendorf. Barba ra is also survived by a brother; Richard (Joy) Lawler of Zephyrhills, FL, and four sisters; Jeanne (Herbert) Bills of Port Orange, FL, Viv ian (Glenn) Cooper of Pennellville, NY, Mary Lou (Edward) Brown of Phoenix, NY, and Jac queline (Carl) Calta biano of New Smyrna Beach, FL. a sister-inlaw Jean Lawler, and many nieces and neph ews. She was preceded in death by two sons; Wayne and Richard De vendorf, and a brother; Martin Lawler Jr. A me morial service for Bar bara will be held in the Page-Theus Funeral Home on Tuesday, Jan 14th at 1:30 p.m. Visi tation will be at the fu neral home on Tuesday from 12:30 until the time of services. Buri al will take place at a later date in Mt. Ad nah Cemetery in Ful ton, NY. Memorials in Barbaras honor may be directed to the Corner stone Hospice, Tavares, FL. Page-Theus Funer al Home And Crema tion Services www.pag etheus.com Harold Richard Johnston Harold Richard John ston, 71, of Lisbon died unexpectedly Wednes day, January 8, 2014. He was born January 18, 1942 in Dawson, GA to the late Grover R and Julia C Johnston. He was a member of the Lisbon Church of God and loved the Geor gia Bulldogs and NA SCAR. He leaves be hind a grieving family of a daughter, Denise Johnston of Ellijay, GA; 2 granddaughters, Car ly of Seattle, WA and Marsha Taylor of El lijay, GA; grandson, Chase Radcliff of CA; 3 great-grandchildren; 3 stepchildren, Dar rel, Debbie and Shir ley; 2 sisters, Sar ah Sullivan and Yvette Shuttlesworth both of Lisbon; 2 neph ews, Trent and Vance (Jodie) Sullivan; niece, Michelle (Paul) White; 3 great-nieces and a great nephew along with his beloved dogs, Pepper and Heidi. He Will Be Missed! Visita tion for Harold will be held 6:00pm 8:00pm, Monday, January 13, 2014 in the funeral home. Funeral services will be 10:00am, Tues day, January 14, 2014 in the Page-Theus Fu neral Chapel with in terment following the service in Lakeside Memory Gardens, Eu stis. On-line condo lences may be shared by visiting www.pag etheus.com. Arrange ments are entrusted to Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Leesburg. DEATH NOTICES Robert L. Williams Robert L. Williams, 67, of Mascotte, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc. Ruth Rucker Odor Saxon Ruth Rucker Odor Saxon, 96, of Tavares, died Saturday, Janu ary 11, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Fu nerals & Cremation. DEVENDORF government, but State Board of Education member John Colon said passing a bill will ensure that theres no wiggle room. The changes that Stewart plans to the standards are relative ly minor. She told state legislators earlier this week that one of them would to be include the teaching of cursive writing in schools. Scott initially backed Common Core stan dards, which set uni form benchmarks for reading, writing and math. But in the last few months he refused to take a rm position on Floridas transition to the new standards, which have been ad opted by 45 states and the District of Colum bia. In September, Scott called for public hearings and set the groundwork for the state to pull out of a consortium develop ing a national test to see if school children are meeting the new standards. The hear ings generated harsh criticism of the stan dards from some par ents who called them a plan by federal bu reaucrats to assert more control over schools. Common Core State Standards are a result of an initiative sponsored by the National Gover nors Association and the Council of Chief State School Ofcers. Opponents see them as the nationalization of education policy and standards, something they say should be left to the states. The new standards are backed by former Gov. Jeb Bush, who helped cre ate the states current A-to-F grading system. Supporters contend that having a shared set of standards will al low for a more accurate state-by-state compar ison of student perfor mance. Rep. Debbie Mayeld, R-Vero Beach, is spon soring a bill that would halt the states imple mentation of the stan dards for now. Mayeld praised the governors actions, but said he hoped he would even tually agree to opt out of Common Core com pletely. EDUCATION FROM PAGE A3 IN MEMORY city services, now-interim City Manager Dianne Kramer said at the time. The program will also bene t the city by providing more cost ef fective services to a compact area. An enclave is unincorporated Lake County land surrounded onsever al sides by city land. The city already provides water and sewer service to many of these sites. It was during multiple budget workshops and strategic planning sessions that commissioners em phasized the need to expand the citys tax base with increased land valuation and to increase the resi dent population, Kramer said. Homeowners with an assessed value of approximately $30,000 would see no increase in their annu al tax assessment, while water cus tomers would also get a 25 percent reduction in user fees with annex ation, she previously told the board. If all of the identied properties participated in the voluntary an nexation program, the citys land valuation would increase by ap proximately $28 million and the tax revenue would increase by approxi mately $187,000, she reported. To be considered for annexation on Thursday are 45.6 acres on the south side of County Road 44, west of East CR 44 and Gatch Road; 25.5 acres on the northeast corner of Da vid Walker Drive and Mt. Homer Road; 11 acres on the north side of CR 44, west of Gatch Road and east of Hicks Ditch Road; and 25 smaller parcels ranging in size from .14 to .77 acres. For more information, about an nexing into the city, call the Devel opment Services department at 352483-5460. ANNEX FROM PAGE A3 the existing two lane conguration on the north-south portion of SR 44 into a divided, four-lane highway. It includes bicycle lanes and sidewalks along both sides, as well as curb and gutters. The meeting will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the City of Mount Dora Community Building. It begins with an open house and includes a brief presentation at 6 p.m. Project repre sentatives are available to answer questions. Other fast facts: Planned travel lanes are 11 feet wide Planned medians are 19.5 feet wide Bike lanes are four feet wideboth sides of the roadway Sidewalks are ve feet wideboth sides of the roadway Design is antic ipated complete by spring 2015 Construction is anticipated to begin the fall 2015 Estimated con struction duration is 12 months. ROADS FROM PAGE A3 but no one was injured. The car struck the third bike, a Harley-David son, head-on. Cpl. Rich Roman, the crash investigator, said the male driver of the Harley-Davidson was taken to Florida Hospi tal Waterman where he was pronounced dead. The female passenger was airlifted to Orlando Regional Medical Cen ter with critical injuries. The driver of the car was taken to Leesburg Re gional Medical Center with unknown injuries. As of press time, po lice said they were still trying to reach fami ly members and had not released the victims names. The crash occurred about a mile from Mis sion Inn on Coun ty Road 48 and caused law enforcement to shut down the stretch of SR 19 between Howeyin-the-Hills and Tava res and reroute trafc to allow investigators to sift through the scene and workers to clean up clothing, personal items, a helmet and oth er debris left scattered across the highway. CRASH FROM PAGE A3 The Sumter County Sheriffs Ofce apparently started its investigation after the Department of Children and Families received a complaint against Burris. The arrest afdavit added the sheriffs ofce responded to South Sumter High in Bushnell, where the girl told detectives about the inappropriate touching. Burris later admitted touching the girls breast, genital area and but tocks, the arrest afdavit added. Burris died of natural causes, ac cording to the Assistant State Attor ney Angelina Rodeo, who was pros ecuting the case. Rodeo said Burris could have faced 60 years in prison but turned down a plea offer for 30 years. Rodeo said a woman contended as a 9 year old that Burris had mo lested her in Hernando County but the case was dropped. It reopened after Burris was arrested in the Sum ter County case. Hernando County ofcials couldnt be reached Friday. CASE FROM PAGE A3

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 presentations. Its a great way to get the community togeth er, of all races, to hon or King said Lew Jones, committee president. Barbara Jones, a com mittee member and Lews wife, said they de cided to ask Latson to be their rst student keynote speaker after hearing him speak else where. Standing at the podium in a white dress shirt and black bow tie, Latson said he admired the slain civil rights leader and others like him and added noth ing but death could stop him from pursing his dream of living in a colorblind society. Even though the civ il rights activists of the 1960s are now famous American heroes and icons in the present, Dr. King and his colleagues were then just ordinary folks hoping to do ex traordinary things, said Latson. Those valiant men and women recog nized that the brutali ty they endured would lead to a greater good for all citizens black and white. Latsons grandfather, Leonard Reynolds, a Vil lager also at the break fast, was a metropolitan policeman in Washing ton, D.C. on Aug. 28, 1963 when he was as signed to the march. In a light moment during the breakfast, Latson joked that his grandfa ther didnt hear much of Kings speech be cause at the march he was talking with Lena Horne, a popular ac tress, singer and civil rights activist. Latson said his grand father thought at the time it was just anoth er good speech by a well-spoken preacher. But years later, he would realize the importance of the speech. Reynolds eventually would ght for equality in his own department, which in 1963 didnt allow black ofcers to drive patrol cars. Although he didnt march the dream of freedom and equali ty was deeply embed ded in him and in oth ers like him who stood up for their rights, Lat son said. Latson said adults needed to ensure they played a positive role in the lives of young peo ple and added the na tion still had a way to go on the road to equality. Although great im provements have been made since the 1960s, we still have a long way to go. America still has not resolved the mat ter of racism because it is deeply embedded in the fabric of society and in the hearts of many in dividuals, said Latson, again quoting Lewis. A record number of eight high school stu dents received scholar ships at the event thanks to a $25,000 donation, Barbara Jones said. Ron Lottes donated $7,500 on behalf of himself and his late wife. KING FROM PAGE A3 from both sides, in a quest dis missed by some as quixotic. Yet apart from Kerrys efforts, Obamas national security team seems to have settled on a large ly hands-off, do-no-harm ap proach to developments in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya and Egypt. This has attracted criticism and concern, not least from tra ditional U.S. allies such as the Saudis, who like the Israelis and many members of Congress are wary, if not outright opposed to the administrations engagement with Iran over its nuclear pro gram. Administration ofcials, of course, are quick to deny sugges tions of indecision, weakness or, worse, political expedience. They say the president is adopting carefully crafted, prag matic and diplomatic initiatives for each hot spot initiatives de signed to reduce what current ofcials believe was President George W. Bushs reliance on mil itary might and pressure tactics. While the crises engulng the Middle East cannot be blamed on Obama, there are growing fears that the U.S.s Mideast pol icy has become rudderless and reactive, and may be contribut ing to worsening conditions and a rise of Islamic extremism, nota bly in Syria and Iraq. OBAMA FROM PAGE A1

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) MARK SHERMAN Associated Press BOSTON Eleanor McCullen clutches a ba bys hat knit in pink and blue as she patrols a yel low semicircle painted on the sidewalk outside a Planned Parenthood health clinic on a frigid December morning with snow in the forecast. The painted line marks 35 feet from the clinics entrance and thats where the 77-year-old McCullen and all other abortion protesters and support ers must stay under a Massachusetts law that is being challenged at the U.S. Supreme Court as an unconstitution al infringement on free speech. Arguments are set for Wednesday. Outside the line, Mc Cullen and others are free to approach any one with any message they wish. They risk ar rest if they get closer to the door. With her pleasant de meanor and grandmo therly mien, McCullen has become the new face of a decades-old ght between abor tion opponents assert ing their right to try to change the minds of women seeking abor tions and abortion providers claiming that patients should be able to enter their facilities without being impeded or harassed. In 2000, the Su preme Court upheld a different buffer zone in Colorado in a de cision that some free speech advocates, who also support abortion rights, heav ily criticized. Noted First Amendment law yer Floyd Abrams re cently called the deci sion in Hill v. Colorado what may well be the most indefensible First Amendment rul ing so far this century. The three dissent ers in that case Jus tices Anthony Ken nedy, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thom as remain on the court. They have been joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Jus tice Samuel Alito, who may be willing to pro vide the two addition al votes in support of the protesters. McCullen and oth er abortion opponents sued over the limits on their activities at Planned Parenthood health centers in Bos ton, Springeld and Worcester. At the lat ter two sites, the pro testers say they have little chance of reach ing patients arriving by car because they must stay 35 feet from the entrance to those buildings parking lots. Planned Parenthood provides health exams for women, cancer screenings, tests for sexually transmitted diseases, birth control and abortions at the clinic, although clin ic employees said no abortions were per formed. High court to consider notion of abortion clinic protest-free zones JASON STRAZIUSO Associated Press NAIROBI, Kenya The death tolls are huge and the individual in cidents gruesome. One estimate says nearly 10,000 people have been killed in South Sudan in a month of warfare, while in neighboring Central African Repub lic combatants in Mus lim-vs.-Christian battles have beheaded children. Sub-Saharan Africa has seen a very violent start to 2014, with rag ing conicts in South Sudan and Central Afri can Republic, as well as continued violence in Congo, and attacks in Somalia and Kenya. Compared to decades past, Africa and its peo ple are suffering from fewer conicts today, but several recent out breaks of violence are cause for concern, said J. Peter Pham, director of the Washington-based think tank Africa Center at the Atlantic Council. The conicts also lack strong international peacekeeping, he said. Peacekeeping in Af rica, whether under the formal auspices of the United Nations or those of the African Union, suf fers today from the same two limitations which they have been bur dened with since the very rst U.N. peacekeeping mission, the 1960-1964 operation in the Con go (ONUC), namely lack of political will resulting in a weak mandate and lack of adequate forces, he wrote by email. The conict that broke out in South Sudan on Dec. 15 saw violence ra diate across the country as ethnic groups target ed each other. Short ly afterward Uganda dispatched troops and military equipment to aid South Sudans cen tral government from breakaway units of that countrys military. Casie Copeland, South Sudan analyst for the International Crisis Group, said violence in Africa tends to involve other countries and noted a long history of regional involvement in African conicts. The U.N. Securi ty Council on Friday, however, strongly dis couraged external in tervention that would exacerbate the military and political tensions. The U.N. has said more than 1,000 people have died in the South Sudan conict. But Copeland, after speaking to U.N. workers, aid actors, gov ernment ofcials and combatants, estimates nearly 10,000 have died. Civilians in the Cen tral African Republic a country where vi olence pits Muslims against Christians have suffered terri bly since armed rebels overthrew the president in March 2013. The mostly Muslim ghters were blamed for scores of atrocities after taking power. Africa sees violent, deadly start to 2014 AP FILE PHOTO Muslim men organized in militias with machetes rough up a Christian man while checking him for weapons in the Miskine neighbourhood of Bangui, Central African Republic.

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AYA BATRAWY Associated Press JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia is quiet ly planning to raze slums in one of its largest cities to make way for newer, restored neighborhoods as part of a wider plan to keep up with soaring demand for affordable housing. A gap between what is available on the market and what many Saudis can afford has left peo ple frustrated and ac cusing the government of corruption. A short age of lowand mid dle-income housing means millions of Sau dis cannot afford to buy a home. Young Saudis are es pecially affected since it takes years of saving be fore many can afford to buy a home, often a pre cursor to marriage. To address the hous ing shortage and public grumbling, the Red Sea city of Jiddah is a test ing ground for a plan that includes getting rid of most of its roughly 50 unplanned settlements, which comprise a third of its built-up area, ac cording to municipality gures. In their place, th e city plans to build subsi dized housing complex es for Saudis. If this new model for revamping the king doms second-largest city succeeds, it would be replicated through out Saudi Arabia in areas where aging infrastruc ture needs overhaul. The project is new, and even revolution ary, for a country where speaking openly about poverty is taboo and can lead to arrest. There are no ofcial govern ment gures on pover ty levels in Saudi Arabia and several Saudi-based research analysts say there are no mecha nisms in place to permit studies on it. In 2011, Saudi blogger Feras Bugnah was de tained for several days with his crew for mak ing a video on poverty that showed slum hous ing in Riyadh. Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 Mission Inn Resort & Club Make a difference in the life of an abused child . become a Guardian ad Litem Volunteer and experience the rewards of helping Lake Countys most vulnerable children. Stand up and speak for a child who has been abused, neglected and abandoned. Our next training begins January 28, 2014 at the UF Extension Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares. For further information contact Lynn Sennett, Recruiter/Training Guardian ad Litem Program at 352-274-5231 or email Lynn.Sennett@gal.fl.gov .Visit our website at www.guardianadlitem.org JOSEF FEDERMAN Associated Press JERUSALEM It was vintage Ariel Sharon: His hefty body bobbing be hind a wall of security men, the ex-general led a march onto a Jerusa lem holy site, staking a bold claim to a shrine that has been in conten tion from the dawn of the Arab-Israeli conict. What followed was a Palestinian uprising that put Mideast peace ef forts into deep-freeze. Five years later, Sha ron, who died Satur day at 85, was again bar reling headlong into controversy, bulldoz ing ahead with his plan to pull Israel out of the Gaza Strip and uproot all 8,500 Jewish settlers living there without re gard to threats to his life from Jewish extremists. The withdrawal and the barrier he was build ing between Israel and the West Bank perma nently changed the face of the conict and marked the nal lega cy of a man who shaped Israel as much as any other leader. He was a farmer-turned-soldier, a soldier-turned-pol itician, a politi cian-turned-statesman a hard-charging Is raeli who built Jewish settlements on war-won land, but didnt shy away from destroying them when he deemed them no longer useful. Sharon died eight years after a debilitat ing stroke put him into a coma. His body was to lie in state at the parlia ment on Sunday before he is laid to rest at his ranch in southern Israel on Monday, Israeli me dia reported. Vice Presi dent Joe Biden will lead the U.S. delegation. Sharon suffered his stroke in January 2006 and fell into a coma. Over the past week and a half, doctors report ed a sharp decline in his condition as various bodily organs, includ ing his kidneys, failed. On Saturday, Dr. Shlomo Noy of the Sheba Medi cal Center near Tel Aviv said his heart weak ened and he peacefully departed with relatives by his bedside. His death was greet ed with the same strong feelings he evoked in life. Israelis called him a war hero. His enemies called him a war criminal. President Barack Obama remembered Sharon as a leader who dedicated his life to the state of Israel. For mer President George W. Bush, who was in the White House during Sharons tenure, called him a warrior for the ages and a partner in seeking security for the Holy Land and a better, peaceful Middle East. Israeli Prime Minis ter Benjamin Netanya hu, a rival and harsh critic of Sharon, said: His memory will be en shrined forever in the heart of the nation. President Shimon Peres, a longtime friend and ri val, said he was an out standing man and an exceptional command er who moved his peo ple and loved them and the people loved him. Sharon, Israels bulldozer in politics, dies at 85 AP FILE PHOTO Ariel Sharon, then Israels Prime Minister-elect, looks up as he touches Judaism holiest site, the Western Wall, in Jerusalem. Poor Saudi slums highlight wider housing problems AP FILE PHOTO Architect Usamah Shehatah points at a map in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NFL: Carolina gearing up for San Francisco / B4 KURT VOIGT Associated Press FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Dorian Finney-Smith scored a ca reer-high 22 points as No. 10 Flor ida overcame the absence of lead ing scorer Casey Prather to snap Arkansas 23-game home win ning streak with an 84-82 over time win on Saturday. Finney-Smith, starting in place of Prather, also added a sea son-high 15 rebounds as the Ga tors (13-2, 2-0 Southeastern Con ference) won their seventh in row. Florida trailed 66-57 in the clos ing minutes of regulation, but Scotie Wilbekin sent it into over time with a jumper with two sec onds left that tied the game. Wilbekin nished with 18 points, while Michael Frazier had 15 and Patric Young 10. Ky Madden led the Razorbacks (11-4, 0-2) who had ve players nish in double gures, with 23 points. Arkansas had a chance to all but seal the win with 17.1 seconds re maining in regulation, but Alan dise Harris missed the front end of a 1-and-1 to give Florida the ball back while down 66-64. Wilbekin answered with the game-tying jumper with two sec onds left on the other end for the Gators, who then took control quickly in overtime. Florida played without Prather because of a bone bruise on the senior forwards right knee. Finney-Smith started in the place of Prather, who is averag ing 17 points per game this sea son, and had nine points at half time. He continued to have the hot hand in the second half and overtime where he scored vestraight points to put the Gators up 77-69. Following a pair of baskets from Harris, who nished with 11 points, the Razorbacks closed the Florida lead to 82-79 with 21.9 seconds remaining in overtime. However, Harris missed an inside attempt and Wilbekin who had nine points in overtime sealed with win with free throws with 5.4 seconds remaining. DAVID QUINN / AP Florida guard DeVon Walker (25) drives to the basket against Arkansas forwards Jacorey Williams (22) and Coty Clarke, right, during Saturdays game in Fayetteville, Ark. Florida, which entered the game as the 10th-ranked team in the nation, won 84-82 in overtime. RONALD BLUM Associated Press NEW YORK Alex Rodriguez was dealt the most severe punishment in the history of baseballs drug agreement when an arbitra tor ruled the New York Yankees third base man is suspended for the entire 2014 season as a result of a drug investigation by Major League Baseball. The decision by arbitrator Fredric Horow itz, announced Saturday, cut the suspension issued Aug. 5 by baseball Commissioner Bud Selig from 211 games to this years entire 162-game regular-season schedule plus any postseason games. The three-time Ameri can League Most Valuable Player will lose just over $22 million of his $25 million salary. Rodriguez vowed to continue his ght in federal court. I dont think he has very much of a chance, said Stanford Law School profes sor emeritus William B. Gould IV, the former chairman of the National Labor Relations Board. There are many cases that are ap pealed from arbitration awards, but the case law at the Supreme Court level makes suc cess very much a long shot. Rodriguez is the most high-prole play er ensnared by baseballs drug rules, which were rst agreed to in 2002 as management and union attempted to combat the use of TIM BOOTH Associated Press SEATTLE Marshawn Lynch overpowered the New Orleans Saints in the postsea son again. Lynch ran for 140 yards and two touchdowns, Steven Hauschka kicked three eld goals in blustery conditions and Seattles defense us tered Drew Brees and New Orleans in a 23-15 victory Saturday in the NFC division al playoff game. The top-seeded Seahawks advanced to the NFC cham pionship game for the sec ond time in franchise histo ry and will host San Francisco or Carolina next Sunday. Se attle last reached the confer ence title game in the 2005 playoffs. Seattle shut out the Saints in the rst half, got Lynchs rst 100-yard game since Week 10 of the regular season and received a spark from the brief return of Percy Harvin before he left with a concus sion. Lynch scored on a 15yard run in the rst half and capped the victory with a 31yard scoring run with 2:40 left that coach Pete Carroll cel ebrated by jumping into of fensive line coach Tom Ca bles arms. Lynch stiff-armed Keenan Lewis on his way to the end zone for the clinch ing score that left Centu ryLink Field swaying. Lynch nished with 28 car ries and made up for another shaky day passing by Russell Wilson. Seattles offense was a concern heading into the postseason and, outside of Lynch, did little to quell those worries. Wilson missed on ve of his rst six pass attempts to start the second half but came through with a vital 31-yard completion to Doug Baldwin with 2:57 remaining. ELAINE THOMPSON / AP Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch, top, scores on a 15-yard run while New Orleans cornerback Corey White (24) tries to make the stop in Saturdays NFC divisional playoff game in Seattle. ELISE AMENDOLA / AP New York Yankees Alex Rodriguez sits in the dugout during a game against Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park in Boston. A-Rod banned for 14 season SEE A-ROD | B2 No. 10 Gators stop Hogs in OT Seahawks rumble past Saints

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 17 17 .500 Brooklyn 15 21 .417 3 New York 13 22 .371 4 Boston 13 24 .351 5 Philadelphia 12 24 .333 6 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 27 10 .730 Atlanta 20 17 .541 7 Washington 16 18 .471 9 Charlotte 15 22 .405 12 Orlando 10 26 .278 16 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 29 7 .806 Chicago 16 18 .471 12 Detroit 15 22 .405 14 Cleveland 13 23 .361 16 Milwaukee 7 28 .200 21 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 28 8 .778 Houston 23 14 .622 5 Dallas 21 16 .568 7 Memphis 16 19 .457 11 New Orleans 15 20 .429 12 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 27 9 .750 Portland 27 9 .750 Denver 18 17 .514 8 Minnesota 18 18 .500 9 Utah 12 26 .316 16 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 Golden State 25 14 .641 1 Phoenix 21 14 .600 3 L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 11 Sacramento 12 22 .353 11 Fridays Games Indiana 93, Washington 66 Detroit 114, Philadelphia 104 Atlanta 83, Houston 80 Minnesota 119, Charlotte 92 Memphis 104, Phoenix 99 Dallas 107, New Orleans 90 Brooklyn 104, Miami 95,2OT Chicago 81, Milwaukee 72 Cleveland 113, Utah 102 Sacramento 103, Orlando 83 Golden State 99, Boston 97 L.A. Clippers 123, L.A. Lakers 87 Saturdays Games Houston at Washington, late Brooklyn at Toronto, late New York at Philadelphia, late Phoenix at Detroit, late Charlotte at Chicago, late Milwaukee at Oklahoma City, late New Orleans at Dallas, late Orlando at Denver, late Boston at Portland, late Todays Games Cleveland at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Memphis, 6 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Mondays Games Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at New York, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Orlando at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Denver at Utah, 9 p.m. College Saturdays scores Men EAST American U. 69, Colgate 62 Boston U. 89, Lafayette 78 Brown 91, Daniel Webster 50 Bucknell 61, Holy Cross 57 Buffalo 76, E. Michigan 66 Columbia 104, Cent. Pennsylvania 78 Cornell 77, Oberlin 55 Drexel 93, Northeastern 88, 2OT George Washington 69, Rhode Island 56 Harvard 61, Dartmouth 45 Indiana 79, Penn St. 76 Memphis 79, Temple 69 Mount St. Marys 88, St. Francis (NY) 82 Pittsburgh 80, Wake Forest 65 Robert Morris 71, Bryant 67 Sacred Heart 71, Fairleigh Dickinson 67 St. Francis (Pa.) 75, CCSU 67 Syracuse 57, North Carolina 45 Towson 60, UNC Wilmington 53 UMBC 79, Maine 76 UMass 73, St. Bonaventure 68 Villanova 74, St. Johns 67 Wagner 84, LIU Brooklyn 70 Yale 88, Baruch 49 SOUTH Boston College 62, Virginia Tech 59 Clemson 72, Duke 59 Georgia Tech 74, Notre Dame 69 Incarnate Word 78, New Orleans 55 Jacksonville 76, Florida Gulf Coast 69 Kentucky 71, Vanderbilt 62 LSU 71, South Carolina 68 Liberty 85, VMI 80 Louisiana-Lafayette 90, Texas-Arlington 70 Missouri 70, Auburn 68 SC-Upstate 84, Lipscomb 70 SE Louisiana 85, Abilene Christian 77, 2OT UNC Asheville 84, Presbyterian 70 W. Carolina 68, Georgia Southern 67 Winthrop 85, Charleston Southern 68 MIDWEST Indiana St. 62, Bradley 59 Kansas 86, Kansas St. 60 Marquette 67, Seton Hall 66 Michigan St. 87, Minnesota 75, OT N. Dakota St. 87, IUPUI 64 Saint Louis 67, Dayton 59 W. Michigan 78, Miami (Ohio) 77, OT Weber St. 72, North Dakota 60 SOUTHWEST Baylor 88, TCU 62 Florida 84, Arkansas 82, OT Oklahoma 87, Iowa St. 82 Tulane 73, North Texas 62 No. 10 FLORIDA 84, ARKANSAS 82, OT FLORIDA (13-2) Finney-Smith 7-15 5-8 22, Yeguete 1-3 5-8 7, Hill 3-7 0-0 6, Frazier II 4-7 3-4 15, D. Walker 0-4 2-2 2, Young 4-9 2-2 10, Wilbekin 4-12 8-10 18, Kurtz 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 25-59 25-34 84. ARKANSAS (11-4) Clarke 5-12 3-4 16, Portis 6-16 2-4 14, Madden 9-16 0-0 23, Gulley III 0-2 1-4 1, Qualls 2-10 5-6 10, Harris 4-8 3-5 11, Scott Jr. 0-1 2-2 2, Bell 1-5 2-2 5, Haydar 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 0-0 0-0 0, Kings ley 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 27-72 18-27 82. HalftimeArkansas 36-35. End Of RegulationTied 66. 3-Point GoalsFlorida 9-25 (Frazier II 4-7, Fin ney-Smith 3-7, Wilbekin 2-5, Hill 0-1, Yeguete 0-1, D. Walker 0-4), Arkansas 10-24 (Madden 5-10, Clarke 3-5, Bell 1-3, Qualls 1-4, Haydar 0-1, Gulley III 0-1). Fouled OutHarris, Young. ReboundsFlor ida 44 (Finney-Smith 15), Arkansas 45 (Clarke 14). AssistsFlorida 13 (Hill 5), Arkansas 12 (Clarke, Madden, Qualls 3). Total FoulsFlorida 20, Arkansas 24. A,040. No. 18 FLORIDA ST. 68, MIAMI 63 FLORIDA ST. (14-1) Jones 6-21 1-2 17, Delgado 4-9 2-4 10, Brown 2-12 0-1 4, Slaughter 2-4 3-5 7, Howard 11-17 5-8 27, James 0-0 0-0 0, Bingley 0-3 1-2 1, Coleman 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 26-68 12-22 68. MIAMI (9-6) Saunders 5-12 2-2 16, Williams 6-12 0-1 12, Mot ley 4-12 0-1 8, McGuire 1-7 2-5 4, Brown 2-8 0-0 4, Dennis 5-13 4-6 15, Thomas 0-2 0-0 0, Sterling 0-0 2-2 2, Hayes 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 24-68 10-17 63. HalftimeMiami 33-31. 3-Point GoalsFlorida St. 4-13 (Jones 4-9, Coleman 0-1, Brown 0-3), Miami 5-21 (Saunders 4-10, Dennis 1-4, McGuire 0-1, Hayes 0-1, Brown 0-1, Motley 0-2, Thomas 0-2). Fouled OutHayes. ReboundsFlorida St. 49 (How ard 18), Miami 47 (Williams 11). AssistsFlorida St. 14 (Delgado 10), Miami 12 (Motley 5). Total Fouls Florida St. 17, Miami 22. A,227. Women EAST American U. 72, Colgate 55 Bucknell 83, Holy Cross 79, OT CCSU 80, Wagner 71 Creighton 97, Providence 65 Fordham 70, Richmond 59 Georgetown 85, Butler 79 Harvard 73, Dartmouth 63 La Salle 78, UMass 41 Lafayette 68, Boston U. 63 Loyola (Md.) 70, Lehigh 64 Maine 64, Binghamton 51 NJIT 48, Brown 43 Navy 74, Army 64 New Hampshire 71, Stony Brook 68, OT Princeton 84, Penn 53 Rhode Island 59, George Mason 40 Robert Morris 84, Bryant 73 Rutgers 64, SMU 54 St. Francis (NY) 69, LIU Brooklyn 48 St. Francis (Pa.) 111, Fairleigh Dickinson 89 UConn 80, Temple 36 SOUTH Appalachian St. 61, Samford 47 Bellarmine 85, Missouri St. 65 Campbell 75, Coastal Carolina 68 Chattanooga 77, W. Carolina 57 Coppin St. 68, Savannah St. 53 Davidson 67, Elon 62 Furman 82, Wofford 58 Hampton 79, Delaware St. 39 Incarnate Word 67, New Orleans 38 Jacksonville 74, North Florida 42 Jacksonville St. 61, E. Illinois 46 Longwood 59, Gardner-Webb 57 Louisiana-Monroe 78, Texas St. 52 NC A&T 69, Bethune-Cookman 55 Norfolk St. 73, Md.-Eastern Shore 66 SC State 80, Morgan St. 53 Stetson 91, ETSU 62 Tulane 92, Old Dominion 62 UAB 63, Marshall 57 UNC Asheville 68, Radford 61 UT-Martin 82, Belmont 53 MIDWEST Duquesne 59, Saint Louis 47 IUPUI 71, N. Dakota St. 46 Marquette 73, Xavier 67 Milwaukee 75, Green Bay 64 Oakland 78, Detroit 63 UMKC 83, Chicago St. 60 W. Illinois 84, Nebraska-Omaha 62 SOUTHWEST Cincinnati 59, Houston 50 Sam Houston St. 51, Nicholls St. 50 UTEP 97, Tulsa 66 HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 44 28 14 2 58 128 98 Tampa Bay 45 27 14 4 58 132 109 Montreal 45 25 15 5 55 115 106 Detroit 44 19 15 10 48 115 125 Toronto 46 21 20 5 47 125 141 Ottawa 45 19 18 8 46 129 145 Florida 44 17 21 6 40 104 137 Buffalo 43 12 26 5 29 75 120 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 46 32 12 2 66 150 111 Washington 44 22 16 6 50 135 133 Philadelphia 45 23 18 4 50 120 125 N.Y. Rangers 46 23 20 3 49 114 123 Carolina 45 19 17 9 47 111 128 New Jersey 45 18 18 9 45 104 113 Columbus 44 20 20 4 44 120 126 N.Y. Islanders 46 17 22 7 41 126 150 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 44 31 8 5 67 161 99 Chicago 46 29 8 9 67 169 127 Colorado 44 27 12 5 59 128 113 Minnesota 46 24 17 5 53 112 115 Dallas 44 20 17 7 47 125 135 Nashville 45 19 20 6 44 108 135 Winnipeg 46 19 22 5 43 125 139 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 46 33 8 5 71 155 116 San Jose 45 28 11 6 62 148 115 Los Angeles 45 27 13 5 59 118 93 Vancouver 46 24 13 9 57 123 114 Phoenix 43 21 13 9 51 130 131 Calgary 44 15 23 6 36 100 142 Edmonton 47 15 27 5 35 123 164 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Fridays Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Dallas 2 Washington 3, Toronto 2 Columbus 3, Carolina 0 N.Y. Islanders 2, Colorado 1, OT Edmonton 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Vancouver 2, St. Louis 1 Saturdays Games Tampa Bay 6, Philadelphia 3 Chicago at Montreal, late Florida at New Jersey, late Ottawa at Nashville, late Columbus at Winnipeg, late Colorado at Minnesota, late Anaheim at Phoenix, late Pittsburgh at Calgary, late Detroit at Los Angeles, late Boston at San Jose, late Todays Games Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Dallas, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Nashville, 7 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Mondays Games Calgary at Carolina, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL MLB ARBITRATION PANEL Reduced the suspen sion of N.Y. Yankees 3B Alex Rodriguez from 211 games to 162. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS Signed F James Nunnally to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS Named Bryan Cox defensive line coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES Activated F Cody Hodgson from injured reserve. Recalled D Brayden McNabb from Rochester (AHL). Sent D Rasmus Ristolainen and LW Johan Larsson to Rochester. Loaned C Mikhail Grigorenko to Quebec (QMJHL). NEW YORK RANGERS Assigned F J.T. Miller to Hartford (AHL). Reassigned G Scott Stajcer from Greenville (ECHL) to Hartford. ST. LOUIS BLUES Signed F Ryan Reaves to a four-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS Reassigned C Michael Latta to Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League HARTFORD WOLF PACK Claimed F T.J. Hensick off waivers from Abbotsford. ECHL SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Loaned D Ryan Grimshaw to Rochester (AHL). COLLEGE PENN STATE Named James Franklin football coach. TV 2 DAY FIGURE SKATING 3 p.m. NBC U.S. Championships, at Boston GOLF 7 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, Sony Open, nal round, at Honolulu MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FS1 Southern Miss. at Tulsa 1:30 p.m. CBS Iowa at Ohio St. 2 p.m. CBSSN SMU at Louisville 2:30 p.m. NBCSN La Salle at Duquesne 3 p.m. FS1 Colorado at Washington 5 p.m. FS1 Stanford at Oregon 8 p.m. ESPNU Maryland at Florida State 10 p.m. ESPNU Arizona State at UCLA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 6 p.m. NBA Cleveland at Sacramento NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 1 p.m. FOX NFC Divisional Playoff, San Francisco at Carolina 4:30 p.m. CBS AFC Divisional Playoff, San Diego at Denver NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7 p.m. NBCSN Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers SOCCER 9:05 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Newcastle at Manchester City 11:10 a.m. NBCSN Premier League, Liverpool at Stoke City TENNIS 7 p.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, Australia 3 a.m. ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon FSN Texas at West Virginia 2:30 p.m. SUN South Carolina at Auburn 3 p.m. ESPN Purdue at Penn St. 5 p.m. ESPN Tennessee at Vanderbilt SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED steroids and other per formance-enhancing drugs. In sustaining more than three-quar ters of Seligs initial penalty, Horowitzs de cision will be widely viewed as a victory for the 79-year-old Selig, who has ruled baseball since 1992 and says he intends to retire in Jan uary 2015. A 14-time All-Star, Rodriguez has been baseballs highest-paid player under a $275 million, 10-year con tract. He has spent parts of the last six sea sons on the disabled list and will be 39 years old when he is eligible to return to the eld in 2015. He is signed with the Yankees through the 2017 season. Rodriguez admitted ve years ago he used performance-enhanc ing drugs while with Texas from 2001-03 but has denied using them since. He already sued MLB and Selig in Oc tober, claiming they are engaged in a witch hunt against him. The number of games sadly comes as no surprise, as the deck has been stacked against me from day one, Rodriguez said in a statement. This is one mans decision, that was not put be fore a fair and impar tial jury, does not in volve me having failed a single drug test, is at odds with the facts and is inconsistent with the terms of the Joint Drug Agreement and the Ba sic Agreement, and re lies on testimony and documents that would never have been al lowed in any court in the United States be cause they are false and wholly unreliable. The Major League Baseball Players As sociation had led a grievance last sum mer saying the disci pline was without just cause. The 65-year-old Horowitz, a Califor nia-based lawyer who became the sports in dependent arbitrator in 2012, heard the case over 12 sessions from Sept. 30 until Nov. 21. Technically, he chaired a three-man arbitra tion panel that in cluded MLB Chief Op erating Ofcer Rob Manfred and union General Counsel Dave Prouty. The written opinion was not made public. In Rodriguezs only partial victory, Horow itz ruled he is entitled to 21-183rds, or about 11.5 percent, of his sal ary this year, a person familiar with the de cision said, speaking on condition of ano nymity because the de cision was not made public. That comes to $2,868,852.46. Bas eballs drug agree ment says the amount of lost pay shall match the number of regu lar-season games sus pended, regardless of days over the season, which is 183 days this year. Despite the ban, baseballs drug rules allow Rodriguez to participate in spring training and play in exhibition games, al though the Yankees may try to tell him not to report. New York gures to be happy with the deci sion, which eliminates uncertainty and gives the Yankees additional money to sign Japanese pitcher Masahiro Tana ka or other free agents while remaining under the $189 million luxury tax threshold. MLB was largely pleased. While we believe the original 211-game sus pension was appropri ate, we respect the de cision rendered by the panel and will focus on our continuing efforts on eliminating per formance-enhancing substances from our game, MLB said in a statement. The union said it strongly disagrees with the ruling but added we recognize that a nal and bind ing decision has been reached. We respect the col lectively-bargained ar bitration process which led to the decision, the unions statement add ed. Picked rst in the 1993 amateur draft, Ro driguez reached the majors at age 18 with Seattle and was an AllStar by 20. He seemed destined to become one of the greatest play ers in the history of the game, and appeared in line to break the career home run record he ranks fth with 654. This injustice is MLBs rst step toward abolishing guaranteed contracts in the 2016 bargaining round, in stituting lifetime bans for single violations of drug policy, and fur ther insulating its cor rupt investigative pro gram from any variety of defense by accused players, or any variety of objective review, Rodriguez said. I have been clear that I did not use per formance-enhancing substances as alleged in the notice of disci pline, or violate the Ba sic Agreement or the Joint Drug Agreement in any manner, and in order to prove it I will take this ght to feder al court. I am condent that when a federal judge reviews the en tirety of the record, the hearsay testimony of a criminal whose own re cords demonstrate that he dealt drugs to mi nors, and the lack of credible evidence put forth by MLB, that the judge will nd that the panel blatantly dis regarded the law and facts, and will overturn the suspension. Rodriguez has claimed Selig was on a vendetta to smear him as a way of burnishing the commissioners im age following the Ste roids Era. Both sides have admitted paying for evidence as they prepared for the hear ing. Fourteen players were penalized fol lowing the Biogenesis probe, and they all ac cepted penalties. Mil waukee outelder Ryan Braun sat out the nal 65 games of the season, the other players were given 50-game suspen sions. A-Rods drug penal ty was for his use and possession of numer ous forms of prohibited performance-enhanc ing substances, includ ing testosterone and human growth hor mone over the course of multiple years, MLB said last summer. His punishment under the labor contract was for attempting to cover up his violations of the program by engaging in a course of conduct intended to obstruct and frustrate the ofce of the commissioners investigation. Rodriguezs penal ty was more than dou ble the previous high for a PED suspension, a 100-game ban given last year to San Fran cisco pitcher Guiller mo Mota for a second offense. Kansas City in elder Miguel Tejada was given a 105-game ban last summer fol lowing a third positive test for amphetamines. A-ROD FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lamar Smith and Zach Brock recorded double-doubles Friday to lead Mount Dora Bi ble to a 67-44 win at home against Ocoee Legacy Charter. Smith had 23 points and 10 rebounds, while Brock dropped in 11 points and dished out 10 assists, along with ve rebounds in the win. Zac Ward added 20 points and four assists, and Daniel Johnson had 10 points and ve re bounds. Mount Dora Bible im proved to 14-4 with the win. In other late action on Friday, First Acade my of Leesburgs boys basketball team raised its record to 12-0 with a 64-51 road win against Gainesville Cornerstone Charter. Byron Masoline led the way for the Eagles with 19 points, while Luke Lea added 18. In girls basketball, East Ridge got a 4924 win against Winter Springs. Katie Roche led the Knights with 17 points and Charisa Broadway added 12 points. MDB improves to 14-4 with win at home

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available Tee time 5 days in advance. Expires 1/31/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$34 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents Tour Technique Short Game ClinicsCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesPresented by: PGA ProfessionalsStephen Wresh and Randy JoynerJan. 20th, 10:00-12:00 Chipping & Putting $55 Jan. 20th, 2:00-4:00 Pitching & Bunkers $55 Including COLLEGE BASKETBALL JOHN KEKIS Associated Press SYRACUSE, N.Y. C.J. Fair scored 20 points, Jerami Grant had 12 points and a ca reer-high 12 rebounds, and No. 2 Syracuse beat North Carolina 57-45 Saturday in an Atlantic Coast Confer ence marquee match up. Syracuse (16-0, 3-0) evened its all-time re cord against the North Carolina (10-6, 0-3) to 4-4. UNC started 0-2 in ACC play three times in the past ve years and ve times overall, and the loss to Syra cuse equaled the worst conference start in school history in 199697, Dean Smiths nal year as head coach. The last time North Carolina scored fewer than 45 points was in a 56-44 loss to eventu al national champion Villanova in the South east Regional nal of the 1985 NCAA tour nament. The Tar Heels also beat North Caroli na State 45-44 in Feb ruary 1997. UNC coach Roy Wil liams dropped to 1-4 against Syracuse, the most notable setback an 81-78 loss to the Or ange for the 2003 na tional championship in New Orleans when he was coach at Kan sas. Syracuse also beat Kansas in the 1996 NCAA tournament by three points (60-57) to reach the Final Four. North Carolina was coming off a home 63-57 loss to Miami in which the Tar Heels shot just 31 percent (20 for 65) and nished with a season-low scoring output against Miamis zone. This game, which featured teams with a combined 3,989 wins (UNC is third with 2,100 and Syracuse fth with 1,890) was decided by a dominant rst half and strong defense by the Orange. Tyler Ennis n ished with 10 points and seven assists to go with a season-high four turnovers, and Trevor Cooney had 10 points despite a woe ful shooting game. He was 4 of 17 and 2 of 12 from long range. Marcus Paige led North Carolina with 17 points and James Michael McAdoo had 15 points and nine re bounds. Center Joel James, who returned to the North Carolina line up Wednesday night against Miami after missing four straight games and most of a loss to Texas on Dec. 18 with a right-knee injury, played only 10 minutes and did not score. J.P Tokoto n ished with three points on 1-of-6 shooting. UNC shot 2 of 12 from behind the arc and 20 of 51 (39.2 per cent) overall and was outrebounded 41-35, 17-10 on the offensive glass, netting just two second-chance points. Syracuse led by 12 at halftime and extend ed the lead to 42-24 on Fairs three-point play with 16:18 to go. Paige answered with a 3, McAdoo convert ed a wide-open layup and Brice Johnson fol lowed with an open slam dunk to keep the Tar Heels in the game. Any chance at a comeback seemed to disappear when En nis fed Cooney for a 3 from the left wing at the shot clock buzzer to boost the Syracuse lead to 47-31 midway through the half and the Orange cruised to the win. The Tar Heels have been inconsistent, beating highly ranked Michigan State, Ken tucky and Louisville but losing to ve un ranked opponents. They were 12th in the preseason poll but dropped out of the rankings in the fourth regular-season vot ing following losses to Belmont and UAB, re turned after a oneweek absence with a win over then-No. 1 Michigan State, then dropped out from No. 19 after opening ACC play with a loss at Wake Forest. North Carolina was intent on knocking off another ranked team and attacked the mid dle of the Syracuse zone with great suc cess at the outset, with McAdoo hitting a pair of jumpers and Tokoto another from the foul line as the Tar Heels gained an 8-4 lead in the rst 4 minutes. The Orange re grouped after a tim eout and went on a 17-5 run keyed by Fair and Grant, who did all the scoring. Fair hit a 3 from the wing and converted three free throws to give Syracuse a 19-15 lead and two free throws by Grant completed a 10-0 spurt and put the Orange on top 21-15 at 8:53. The Tar Heels cooled off in a big way after the solid start, unable to penetrate inside. After Paige convert ed a three-point play with 13:04 left, UNC got only a fast-break slam dunk by McA doo, a layup by Nate Britt and a jumper in the lane by Leslie Mc Donald in the ensuing 11 minutes and went into the locker room at halftime trailing 34-22. North Carolina was 0 for 8 from beyond the arc in the opening half and pounded on the boards 34-22, failing to get any second-chance points, as Grant pulled down eight rebounds. The Orange werent much better from long range, and Cooney missed all six of his at tempts. But they out scored the Tar Heels 10-2 from the foul line. No. 2 Syracuse beats North Carolina 57-45 NICK LISI / AP North Carolinas Marcus Paige, right, drives past Syracuses Trevor Cooney, left, in the rst half of Saturdays game in Syracuse, N.Y. COLLEGE FOOTBALL WILL GRAVES Associated Press STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Penn State has hired James Franklin as its next head coach. Franklin, 41, who led Vanderbilt to bowls in all three of his seasons there, replaces Bill OBrien, who left the Nittany Lions after two years to coach the NFLs Houston Texans. Penn State made the announcement Sat urday, after the schools compensation commit tee met to nalize the contract. That committee ap proved the hiring by a 6-0 vote Saturday morn ing. Franklin won 24 games with the Com modores and is a Pennsylva nia native with strong ties instate. Penn State ofcials met with him this week in Florida. He will be asked to build off a foundation that OBrien set amid scandal. Despite a lack of scholarships, a bowl ban and player defec tions from the late Joe Paternos roster, OBrien le d the Nittany Lions to two winning seasons (84, 7-5) while restoring some tempered enthu siasm in Happy Valley. That torch has now been passed to Frank lin, who played at Di vision III East Strouds burg (Pa.). He set seven school records as a se nior, and also has coached at Washington State, Idaho State, Kan sas State and Maryland. With the Terrapins, he was offensive coordina tor and assistant head coach. Members of Penn States trustee commit tee on compensation met with Athletic Direc tor Dave Joyner and oth ers Saturday morning to discuss the contract, which the group called excellent for both Franklin and the Nitta ny Lions. Much of Saturdays meeting, at which spe cic terms of the con tract were laid out for trustees, was done pri vately. The actual vote was public, lasting roughly a minute, and Penn State made the formal announcement of the hiring moments later. Vandys Franklin introduced as next coach at Penn State FRANKLIN JOHN ZENOR Associated Press Alabama ofcial ly welcomed former Southern California coach Lane Kifn as its offensive coordi nator and quar terbacks coach. Kifn returns to the Southeast ern Conference after head coach ing stints with the NFLs Oak land Raiders, Al abama rival Tennessee and the Trojans. He re places Doug Nussmei er, who left Alabama for Michigan. He is an outstand ing and creative of fensive coach who has great experience both at the college and NFL level, coach Nick Sa ban said in a statement. He has a very good un derstanding of the game and I have always been impressed with what I saw in the games he called. He coaches with a great deal of pas sion and enthu siasm, and also does an excellent job as a teacher. Kifn spent a week in Tuscaloo sa, Ala., last month ex changing ideas with Sa ban and his staff and observing Alabamas offense. Now, hes the splashiest hire of Sa bans tenure at Alabama, which has won three na tional titles in the past ve seasons. The 38-year-old Kif n w as 28-15 in threeplus seasons with USC. He was red ve games into last season from one of college footballs marquee jobs. Kifn spent six sea sons (2001-06) at USC under Pete Carroll as an assistant, including the nal two as offensive co ordinator. He also called plays during his time as a head coach. He spent the 2009 season at Ten nessee, going 7-6 before leaving to replace Car roll. We want to thank the University of Alabama and Coach Saban for this tremendous oppor tunity, and we feel hum bled and honored to be a part of the Crimson Tide family, Kifn said in a statement. Ive al ways had the utmost re spect for what Coach Sa ban has done with his programs. Having the unique opportunity to be here last month, I was able to meet some of the great players and the great people in the or ganization, and Im very excited to start working with them. Now, Kifn is tasked with nding a replace ment for quarterback AJ McCarron, the Heisman Trophy runner-up. One potential contender, Alec Morris, posted on his Twitter page Love it after the hiring. Kiffin joins Alabama as coordinator KIFFIN Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE STEVE REED Associated Press CHARLOTTE, N.C. It doesnt surprise safe ty Mike Mitchell that the Carolina Panthers are only the third home underdog in the NFL divisional playoffs in the past 20 years. We havent gotten much respect all year, he said. It looks like we still have people to prove wrong. The Panthers (124) are playing the no-respect card af ter opening the week as a 1-point underdog against San Francis co (13-4), despite de feating the 49ers 10-9 at Candlestick Park on Nov. 10. Panthers wide receiv er Steve Smith said the 49ers are likely favored because of their playoff experience. This is the third straight season San Francisco has been to the playoffs under coach Jim Harbaugh, and most of the play ers have returned from last years NFC champi onship team. The Pan thers will make their rst playoff appear ance since 2008 under third-year coach Ron Rivera. That doesnt seem to bother Rivera. No, because two years ago (the 49ers) didnt have any play off experience and they did pretty well, Rivera said. Harbaugh, who was teammates with Rivera with the Chicago Bears, also downplayed the experience factor. Ive always really felt that where youre going is a heck of a lot more important than where youve come from, Harbaugh said. Rivera said the Pan thers got some play off-type experience by winning a number of big games during the season they beat New England and New Orleans along with San Francisco to battle back from a 1-3 start to win the NFC South and secure a rst-round bye. The Panthers sacked Colin Kaepernick six time s and limited him to 91 yards passing and 16 yards rushing in the rst meeting in a win that defensive end Greg Hardy said proved we were a contender. Kaepernick said hes eager to bounce back from perhaps the most disappointing game of his career against Carolina. When asked what the Panthers did that was so effective, he said I think it was more of what we did to ourselves. I didnt play well. Being the home un derdogs might not be a bad thing for the Pan thers. According to the Glantz-Culver Line, one of the two home divisional playoff un derdogs since the 1994 season was the Pan thers, who upended the Dallas Cowboys in the very same stadium theyll face the 49ers in today. Three things to watch between the 49ers and Panthers: CRABTREE, DAVIS IMPACT The 49ers lost tight end Vernon Davis to a concussion early in the last meeting with Car olina, while top 2012 wide receiver Michael Crabtree had yet to re turn from a torn right Achilles tendon that re quired surgery in May. In ve regular-season games since his return, Crabtree had 19 recep tions for 284 yards and a touchdown and he caught eight passes for 125 yards in a 23-20 wild-card win at Green Bay last week. SMITHS LEFT KNEE Panthers wide re ceiver Steve Smith said he will play despite a sprained left knee. Smith returned to prac tice this week, but isnt sure what to expect when he steps on the eld Sunday. Its not about can I go, its about how con dent do I feel when I am going? I will play Sunday, Smith said. But its how much of that I dont worry about the knee. Thats when the condence increas es. NEWTONS FIRST Panthers quarter back Cam Newton has thrived in the nation al spotlight in college and on big stages like Monday night this sea son. But this will be the third-year quarter backs rst foray into the NFL postseason, so it will be interesting to see how he responds to the pressure. Its simply about seizing the moment, Newton said. Underdog Panthers look to upend 49ers again BOB LEVERONE / AP Carolina quarterback Cam Newton (1) hurdles New Orleans David Hawthorne (57) during a game earlier this season in Charlotte, N.C. Newton will lead the underdog Panthers into todays NFC playoff game against San Francisco. ARNIE STAPLETON Associated Press DENVER No quar terback has been to the playoffs more than Peyton Manning or ex perienced more heart ache there, either. Only once in his pre vious dozen trips to the postseason party has Manning put his n gerprints on the Lom bardi Trophy. His 9-11 postseason record stands in stark contrast to his 167-73 regular season mark and includes eight rstround exits, none more scarring than last years AFC Divisional roundhome loss to Baltimore as the AFCs top seed. He also lost his rst playoff game in In dianapolis as the No. 1 seed after the 2005 season, then bounced back to win it all the next year. Since then, hes won just two of seven playoff games and lost his last three. The meticulous quarterback renowned for his unrivaled work ethic and painstaking preparation doesnt be lieve thats because he grinds too much in Jan uary. I really dont believe so, Manning said as he prepared for todays showdown between his Denver Broncos (13-3) and the San Di ego Chargers (10-7). I know people its easy to summarize, to take a whole bunch of foot ball seasons and lump them together. I per sonally dont believe in that theory. Manning set a slew of records this sea son, including 55 TD passes and 5,447 yards through the air as the Broncos became the highest-scoring team of the Super Bowl era. Five players scored 10 or more touchdowns. No team in history had ever had more than three players accom plish that feat. Yet for all his records and all his greatness, Mannings fault-nd ers point to his cold-weather record its 4-7 in sub-freezing temperatures at kickoff and his playoff prat falls his 11 losses are tied with Brett Favre for most in NFL history to suggest he wont cap it all off with a champi onship in the rst out door Super Bowl in a cold-weather city next month. Heres the thing about the cold: In many of those games, Manning had the lesser team. Thats why he was on the road. And some times, he only played a series or two because his team had already clinched its playoff slot, but the loss went next to his name nonethe less. And in the playoffs, you could point the nger at his support ing cast as much as you could at him, if not more. If Rahim Moore doesnt make one of the biggest blun ders in playoff histo ry last year, Manning would be hailed for his fourth-quarter touch down toss to beat the Ravens and not lam basted for his intercep tion in overtime. And maybe now hed be try ing to defend a Super Bowl title instead of seeking atonement. That scarring defeat has driven Manning for 365 days. So doggedly deter mined to rectify that disappointment, Man ning at times this sea son seemed in a hur ry just to get back here. The regular season took on an air of being 20 preseason games with the real opener coming today. Yet, all week, he was relaxed, embracing the pressure of this time of year. Manning is com ing off his best statis tical season at age 37, just two years removed from the neck sur geries that weakened his throwing arm but strengthened his re solve. Yet, no matter how many more years he has left, he knows he wont get many more chances. And so, hes embracing this latest trip to the playoffs and enjoying the journey, relishing his chance to chase redemption and another ring. No QB has Mannings experience, heartbreak ED ANDRIESKI / AP Denver quarterback Peyton Manning (18) throws during practice on Friday at the Broncos training facility in Englewood, Colo. The Broncos host San Diego today in an AFC playoff game. TOM WITHERS Associated Press CLEVELAND Jim Tressel has not been contacted by the Browns about their coaching va cancy. On Thursday, he found a way to reach out to them. Ohio States for mer coach, who re mains wildly popular in his home state, told a Columbus radio sta tion that while he has not had any discus sions with the Browns it doesnt mean that I dont have any interest in the NFL. Appearing on 97.1 FM, Tressel didnt rule out the possibility that he could be a coach ing candidate sometime soon. The 61-year-old spent 10 seasons at Ohio State, where he led the Buckeyes to a national title before he was red for failing to report vio lations by some players. Tressel is currently a vice president at Akron, but sounded as if hes itch ing to return to coach ing. Hes been watch ing bowl games and the NFL playoffs with keen interest. Tressel grew up in Berea, where the Browns train and have their headquarters. A report last week that he would be interviewed by the Browns, who are look ing to hire their fourth coach in six years, was quickly shot down. But as long as the Browns search con tinues, Tressels name will be oated as some Cleveland fans fantasize about the sweater-vest ed coach taking over their perennial loser. Tressel spent one sea son as a consultant on Indianapolis coaching staff under Jim Cald well. He enjoyed and learned from the expe rience. The Browns are near ing the end of the sec ond week of their coach ing search. Theyve interviewed at least four known candidates: New England offensive coor dinator Josh McDaniels, Seattle defensive coor dinator Dan Quinn, Ar izona defensive coordi nator Todd Bowles and Green Bay quarterbacks coach Ben McAdoo. McDaniels removed himself from consid eration on Wednes day, and a person fa miliar with the decision told the AP he did so be cause he wasnt guaran teed he was the favorite. Tressel says he has not been contacted by Cleveland

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Democrats understand that we have choices Democrats are free from the control of the minority tea par ty and the top one percent of the wealthy when working to help their fellow citizens. They dont blindly follow the directives of their most radical members. They understand that interna tional diplomacy and sanctions can be successful in changing the behavior of our enemies in stead of borrowing billions of dol lars from the Chinese and send ing our fellow citizens into a war of choice resulting in a huge cost of lives, limbs, mental health and treasury which will be a drain on our society for decades as we rightly spend to provide our veterans with the assistance they deserve over the decades ahead. Democrats understand that we as a nation have choices regard ing how well we compete against rising economic powers like Chi na. We can choose to invest in ed ucation or not. We can choose to regulate business or to allow greed and unpatriotic behavior to turn our economy into sham bles which thrust us into the last recession from which we are con tinually recovering. Democrats understand that neither big government nor small government should be pursued as an end unto itself, but is the re sult of the programs the country needs and wants to provide for all its citizens so they can pursue health, wealth and happiness. So we have regulations on food imports, food production and controls on drugs. We have fed eral agencies that work to ensure safeguards for us. We have a de partment of defense that protects us. We provide minimum safety nets to our citizens in education, social security and medicare, yet we trail other countries on all of these measures. Cutting taxes and decreasing regulations will not help us im prove the quality of life and fu ture security of our children and the Democrats understand this. Democrats work to improves citi zens lives not just to reduce taxes for the wealthy while allowing the neediest among us to suffer. Just look at how our Republican gov ernor has refused federal medic aid funds which has lost Florid ians billions of dollars. Twenty percent of Floridians have no health insurance, while less than 5 percent of Massachusetts resi dents have no health insurance. Is this a fundamental of Republican conservatism of which we should be proud? Another great reason to vote Democrat is to wake up the good Republicans and to rid our Re publican party of the fanatic fringe element that has become so powerful. Many of us Republicans are em barrassed by the behavior of our elected Republicans and want to return to Eisenhower Republican ism. ELTON FOWLER | Tavares Why do we have a Federal Reserve? Why do we have a Federal Re serve? Answer: So those politi cians who want to run this coun try as a dictatorship can do so. If we the people stopped paying taxes and the curren cy was backed by gold and sil ver, we could bring the country to a standstill until the laws were changed to our satisfaction. This would be a democracy of the people that pays this coun trys debts. Instead we have paper federal reserve. The politicians can print more to replace those the taxpaying citizens hoard in an attempt to control the indepen dent and dictatorial government. The only reason to collect taxes today is to keep the citizens weak, since wealth is power. Through taxes, the government has the power to audit your nances and make sure you are not spending money building an army of insur rection to deprive them of their dictatorial powers over you. The Treasury Department has trillions of dollars printed and warehoused. These are held ready to turn loose instantly. Until we get currency backed by gold we are at the mercy of dictators. The feuding between parties is an act following a script. Why else do you think we dont have new par ties starting up? The tea party is run by the Republicans following their script. The old good guy, bad guy game. VERNON HALL | Umatilla Niagara Bottling contract doesnt make sense You had an article about de pletion of Floridas underground aquifers not too long ago and how we should try to have drought-resistant yards and plants. Then I saw in the Dec. 18 pa per that the governing board of the St. Johns River Water Man agement District wants to ap prove a 20-year contract for Ni agara Bottling Co. to take even more water from our aquifer. This just does not make sense to me. How can a few people make that decision that affects all Flo ridians? Are they getting paid off to approve a foolish request such as this? I say no decision that important should be de cided by a few people. It should go to the people of Florida for a vote so we know that not one person is proting by this re quest. Bottled water should be banned. Tap water should be pure enough for every person in the U.S. to drink and tote with them. CAROLE RIETZEL | Leesburg Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third par ties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to ar chive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to let ters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VOICE LETTER of the WEEK C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR T he latest word on our water sup ply is hardly news but worth not ing nonetheless. The St. Johns River Water Management District is project ing the 18 counties that make up the district including Lake will tap out their groundwater supply by 2035. When that happens, other means will have to be found to meet the shortfall that is forecast to be somewhere around 256 million gallons a day. What is welcome in the districts latest water-supply report is that for the rst time ofcials are talking seriously about the need for conservation measures. Many have long advocated strict conser vation measures and widespread water reuse programs similar to those imple mented in the Tampa Bay region, where daily per capita water use is about half what it is in the St. Johns district. Conservation, however, will not be enough, according to the water manag ers. No, even the best conservation sce nario will leave the district, which in cludes big water users Orlando and Jacksonville, about 40 million gallons short, and probably much more. So the district is looking at greater use of underground storage facilities, aqui fer recharge, brackish groundwater from coastal areas and, of course, surface wa ter, notably the Ocklawaha and St. Johns rivers. Desalination is also mentioned, but it is not an option the district has ever been warm to because of its cost. Yet, while the district will seek pub lic input on the water supply plan in the coming weeks, we would encour age water managers to strive to imple ment a serious, long-term conservation program. Water storage and aquifer re charge are also methods that are envi ronmentally and consumer friendly. Tapping into our surface waters, though, should be a last resort. Because it is easy and relatively cheap, however, it tends to be the rst resort. And make no mistake, with 1,000 lakes in Lake County and a rst-magnitude spring, desperate coastal counties will look in land toward us to slake their thirst. We are pleased the St. Johns district is addressing this problem. As we said at the outset, this is hardly a new reality water experts and environmentalists, indeed everyday Floridians, have been warning about our growing population draining our water supply for more than a generation. We urge St. Johns ofcials to keep their eye on the ball and start address ing the problem by implementing a con servation program that all citizens can contribute to. That is the place to start. We also urge citizens to attend a meet ing of the areas legislative delegation Jan. 30 in Tavares, where our lawmak ers will begin to hatch plans for dealing with the states looming water crisis. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST District should get serious about water conservation MALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Canoers enjoy the clear water of Alexander Springs in the Ocala National Forest.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 OTHER VOICES Voices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHER VOICES OTHER VOICES RUSS SLOAN GUEST COLUMNIST I n 2013, we learned for the rst time about the massive accumulation of tele phone data gathered by our National Secu rity Agency (NSA) on U.S. citizens. Recent ly, Federal Judge Rich ard J. Leon ruled the NSA had overstepped its authority under our Constitution. Im sure that this ruling will wind up before the Supreme Court. In the meantime, I have some suggestions for new NSA assignments that could save and protect billions of U.S. tax dollars. ASSIGNMENT 1: Find out why the IRS sent 655 refund checks to one single address in Kaunas, Lithuania and 343 more checks to a single address in Shanghai, China. Thousands more po tentially fraudulent checks went to plac es in Bulgaria, Ireland and Canada. ASSIGNMENT 2: The U.S. Treasury Inspector General for Taxation said there were proba bly 1.5 million fraudu lent refund checks sent out worth $3.2 million. Go get em NSA. ASSIGNMENT 3: Medi care paid out $23 mil lion to dead people, and Social Security paid out $31 million more to dead people. Gives a new meaning to the term death ben ets. ASSIGNMENT 4: Over a recent ve year period, federal worker benets were paid out to the tune of $600 million to undeserving recipi ents. A son received his fathers benet checks for 37 years after his dads death, totaling $515,000. Yes, 37 years. ASSIGNMENT 5: There were 89,000 stimulus checks sent to people who were either dead or in prison. Question for NSA: Who got them and what was done about it? ASSIGNMENT 6: Food stamp fraud, which is a multi-million dol lar problem, needs to be corrected. Just one small mom-and-pop convenience store in Palm Beach County ripped off the taxpay ers $2.8 million over four years. The list could go on and on and on. Between the IRS and the NSA, we have bil lions of dollars invest ed. Do you think that within the IRS there would be some basic screening program that might catch 655 refund checks going to one address in Lithuania and 343 more to Chi na? With all the com puter and monitoring power within the NSA, surely they could de termine who is deserv ing, fraudulent, dead, alive or in prison and collecting unemploy ment checks. Im all for using our technical capabilities to ensure national se curity under our con stitutional authority. But history has shown us that sometimes we cannot even recognize basic questionable be havior. Lee Harvey Os wald, President Ken nedys assassin, was known by our FBI to be an avowed com munist, who had gone to the Soviet Union, married a Russian girl and returned to the U.S., where he openly championed Castro in Cuba. Yet on November 22, 1963 Oswald was not under the watch ful eye of the FBI or anyone else in Dal las and murdered the president. The 9/11 terrorists who took ying lessons in the U.S. seemed only interested in ying the plane but not in landing. Yet no bells went off. More recently, Army Major Nidal Hasan murdered 30 fellow soldiers after clearly showing a history of his disdain for America and our mil itary efforts. Not only was his behavior ig nored, he was tolerated and promoted. We have created such a gigantic feder al bureaucratic mon ster that we waste bil lions of tax dollars sending money to peo ple who are dead, in eligible and/or unde serving. Yes, NSA may need to redirect some of its snooping ef forts. Instead of track ing our citizens phone calls, maybe they could use some of their bil lion-dollar techni cal capability to help prevent the fraud and abuse in the IRS, Social Security, food stamps, Medicare, Medicaid, unemployment bene ts and disability pay ments under Social Se curity. Surely, if we can track the calls of 300 million phones, we can deter mine who is dead, alive or in prison. A possible new assignment for the NSA in 2014 M y wish for the American people is that we take back our government, not from our centrist pres ident who has accom plish much expanding health care for millions; 7.8 million private sec tor jobs (in 44 months); real GDP growth and a decit that is growing at half (4.1 percent) what it was when he took ofce in 2009. Instead, we need to take our government back from the obstruc tionism of the Republi can-controlled House and the libustering Senate. This country needs Congress to get to work. Stop trying to run our government based on austerity measures that have never worked. Start working to raise peo ple out of poverty. We need job growth which cuts unemployment and its costs, food stamps (SNAP) and nancial as sistance (TANF). Raise the minimum wage. This puts more money into the economy (employers paying a fair wage, means less government assis tance). Improve and up date our infrastructure and transportation (high speed Internet and rail) this will bring econom ic growth to small and large businesses. Expand grants and energy cred its for renewable ener gy, which stops the dam age to our environment (climate change is a fact and humans are almost entirely the cause). Stop draining billions of dol lars from our economy for foreign oil. Stop welfare for the richest corporations and close loopholes in the tax code that allow them to avoid taxes with offshore accounts. Cut unneces sary and excessive de fense spending. Expand, dont cut, Social Securi ty and Medicare retire ment programs paid for by workers that keep mil lions of seniors out of poverty. Work to improve the Affordable Healthcare Act. Stop voting to repeal; its a waste of time. Respect womens rights to abortion and birth control. These are per sonal decisions not to be made by politicians. Stop trying to turn our country into a theocra cy, we are a democracy that respects all beliefs or none and does not advo cate for any religion. Improve our public ed ucation system by us ing the input of teach ers, paying them a living wage and showing them the respect they deserve. Stop draining dollars from public education for unnecessary expen sive testing, vouchers and private, for-prot char ter schools. These pro grams have proven to be ineffective. They do not benet students of low er income or improve test scores. Protect consumers from Wall Streets abus es. Strengthen and fund the EPA and FDA. We need clean air, water, safe food and drugs. Strength en the voters rights laws. We should not be making it more difcult for peo ple to vote. We have no measurable voter fraud, so why would we make people furnish a govern ment ID, often at great expense? It makes us look like a communist coun try. We need comprehen sive immigration reform and common sense gun control laws. This is just a partial list of work that the House Republicans should be doing instead of shutting down the government at the cost of $24 billion to our economy. So, in stead of taking another vacation on the taxpay ers dollar, lets see Con gress get to work. If not, lets send them home for good in 2014. Kathy Weaver lives in Clermont. Quit the obstructionism in Congress H ealth ofcials say it appears similar to the one that ran ram pant in 2009. In the 2009-10 u season, 284,000 people died from swine u worldwide. The U.S. Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention report that the u is in full swing in many parts of the country. The latest CDC g ures from the nal week of 2013 show signicant u activity in 25 states, espe cially in the big ger ones such as New York, Texas and Illinois. Classic u symptoms in clude ach ing body, fe ver, headache, sore throat, nasal congestion, runny nose and extreme sneezing. But any one who has been aficted with this particular strain of u knows that each o f those symptoms, which may sound like a common cold, manifest in exceptionally aggressive and un com fortable ways. And did we men tion they can kill? During the 2009 outbreak, many people did not get a u shot because of a shortage of vaccine. But vaccine is plentiful this year, and its avail able not only at hospitals and clinics but at many pharmacies and even grocery stores. There is no good rea son not to get a shot. At particular risk are older adults, children under 5 and anyone who has heart or lung disease, diabetes, asthma or who may be pregnant. The CDC advises everyone to get a u shot each year and take addi tional preventive action by wash ing hands and avoiding contact with sick people. But its important to know the signs of the u and treat them immediately. See a doctor and take all the medication prescribed. And dont even think about treat ing this u as something to power through. It is neither heroic nor ad mirable to show up at work or school with it. It is stupid for you and incon siderate of others. This is all common sense, but its amazing how widely its ignored from year to year. So were trying again. Get a shot. Distributed by MCT Information Services. Flu is no joke get a shot At particular risk are older adults, children under 5 and anyone who has heart or lung disease, diabetes, asthma or who may be pregnant.

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fnnrtrnrnrrtnrrnn nrrrtrnrfrnnb trnrrtfrnrr nrbfrtrrntrrnr nrrnn rrrr r rrtrrf b rfbr r fbrrrr r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r fbrrrr t r r r r r r r r r r r r r rr rrr nntt rrrr rrr t r r rrrrr rrrrr rrrfrnrnn brfrfrrnrr rtrrrrrr rrnrrnrfrn nrrnrnr nrnrnrf frrrn frnrfrfrr rrr rr rr rrrr rr rrr rr rrrrrnr trrrrrtn brnrrfbrnrn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rrtnrnrbfrrbfr fnrrrrbrtrbfrn trntrbrrnrrrr rnnttrbrrrn rrrrfnrr frrrrrtrrnn nbrrbrtrrtnrfnnrt nrnrtrnrrtnrrnnrn rrtrnrfrrrrrn rrrrrr nrtrnrrnnttrbr nnbrtrnrrtf nrrrnrbfrtrrnt rnrrnrnn rbrrrrtrrfr nrrbrtrr nrb rtrrnfnrf br fbr r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rrr rrr nntt rrrr t r r r rrrrffrr nrfrtrfr rrrrnrnnr rrrrtrrrfnn nfnrnrrrfbrnrn brrtrnfnrfrnrrr nrrrnrtrrr fbrffrrrnr rrrr rrrrrrr rrrbrtrrrtn nrbrrrtrnrn fbrnrfrn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r brrnnrrnrnr ffrtrrrntrbrrr brrrtrrrtrrn rfrtnrrnrnnrrb trr rnrrbrtrr nrb rtrrnfnrf b fbr rr brtrnntt rrnrr r rfrr rr nnrr nr t r b f r r r n r r n n n b r r r n r n r r r n n r n r n r b f r r n r r r r b f r r n n r t r n r n r r r r n r t r f r n n r r n r b r t r b f r n t r b f r n r r r n r f r r n r f b r r n r r r r r fbrrrr t r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rrr rrrr nntt rrrr rrrr rrrr rrrr t r r r rrrrfr rrbrtrrrr nrrrrrrtrrnfn frtrrrfnnrnfnrnrrt rfbrnrnrr rrrrrn rnnttrrrrr rrr rrrrr rrrr rrrtr rtrnrfrrrrrn rrnrtrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrrb trfbrrrtnrn brrrtrnrnrnrf rn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r t r b f r r r r n r r n n n b r r b r n r n r r n n r n r n r n r b f r n r r r r r b f r r r n n r t n r n r r r r r n r r t t n r t r r n r f r n n r r n r r r t t n r r r n r r r r n n r r r n r b r t b f r n r t r n r n r n r t r b f r n r r n rn n r r rnrrbrtrr r rtrrnfnrf b fbr fnrb nrrfr rrrr fnr rfrnr rr nnrr rr rr fbrrrr r rntbrrnrtrrfrn rnrnrfrrt rnnbrrrnr rrtrrrrfn rrrrfnrrnnnf nntnrrnfnrr brnnrtrnf frnrtfnfrnr rnrrnrr nrnrrrrfnrfnrr nrnrrnrnrtr rtnrnrrn n r n f r t r r r r r r r r f b r r n r r rfnrrrrnrrfrrn trnrrnnbrtnr fnrrfnrnrbrr nrrrnrtrrfnrnr rtrrrr nrb nr nrnn nr br rr fbrrrr r rtrrnfnrf b fbr fnrb nrrfr rrrr fnr rfrnr rr nnrr rr rr fbrrrr t r r r r r r r rr r r r r r r r r rrrr rrr rrrr rrrr nntt rr rr rrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrr rrrrr rrrr rrr rrrrr rrrrr rrrr rr t r r r rrrrfr rrbrtrrrr nrrrrtrrnfn frtrrrfnnrnfnrnrrt rfbrnrnrr rrr rrrrr rrr rrrr rrrr rrr rrrr rrrr rnrrnnttrr rr rr rrrrr rrrrrr rrrrr rrr rrrrr rrrr rrrr rrrtr rtrnrfrrrrrn rrnrtrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrr rrrrrrrrb trfbrrrtnrn brrrtrnrnrnrf rn r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r t r b f r r r r n r r n n n b r r b r n r n r r n n r n r n r n r b f r n r r r r r b f r r r n n r t n r n r r r r n r r r t t n r t r r n r f n n r r r n r r t t n r r r r n r r r r n n r r n r b r t r b f r n r t r n r n n r t r b f r r n r r n r n n r rnrrbrtrr r rntbrrnrtrrfrn rnrnrfrrt rnnbrrrnr rrtrrrrfn rrrrfnrr nnnfrnntnrrnfnr rbrnnrtrnf frnrtfnfrnr rnrnrrrnrn rrrfnrfnrrrn nrrnrnrtrr tnrnrrn r r r r r r r r r r f b r r n r r rfnrrrrnrrfrrn trnrrnnbrtnr fnrrfnrnrbrr nrrrnrtrrfnrnr rtrrrr nrb r r r n r nrnr nrnr r fbrrrr t t

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rf rfnftbffff ffff rnfbn ff b b f ftr fff n r fff n nrf ff nf fft f frrf b b f t f f t r rf ntb t nnr tfr n fr f frftf nt ffrt ftf t ftf b f t r f t f f r t t t rt b b t b f f t rrt rr frt frtrff b b b n t f t f r f r f f r t t f f f t f t t n f n r f r f f f b f r r n n f r t t b r r f tt b t f t f t tt b nb b n f b t r r f n f f f t r t t f f t f r f r b n r r t n f b f f t f f n n f f f b b b n n f r n f r f n r t r r b f tb b r f f f r n b r n n n f r f bt t f b b f f r f n n t f f b b n f f r t r b b n n t f f b b b f r t f f r f r r t bt b n f r r t t f f f f n n r f f r t bn n b f r t n f r t f b nn r n nn nn tt n n n n b n n r f r t f t tt n f r f r r n f t r f r t f f f f f t r r t r r t b t t f f r f t f f t f f tbt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t r bttbttb bbtr fbtt r f b r f t r f b t r f r f r bfb bfbfr rf r ff t r n r rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t fn r tb nt ttr frr fbbbfr bt fnnb rrrbtt fbbbt t t r r t b t b f f b t t r fbb rr rrrbtt bffb b rrrbtt btb bttr fbbtt fnnb tbftr btt rtrrr btt t r r t f rrr bffrrr tr btt bttttfr rrf rrr ft btt t f t b f b b rrr rnf ftfb b btt ftbfrtt tbtt fn tn tbt fbbtt rbffbrr rbtt brbffb fn tn tbfbbff rrr ff rb bffr bfbrbtt fbbrf btt fb b r b b t rfntbbttrf rfbttbtt fbft rrnf bttbtb tffb ttfr rbbf r bfbnrbfffb btt b f r b f n rffbbtt rr btt rb rfr rtbfrrr btt b t t r b tbfftb btftbbt fb nb btt r btt brfrbtt bbtbnf r r frtbfr r f b t b t nfbrbrf btt frbtfbbt btfbftrr r r fr r b t t r f frtbf trbtt frbtt tfbt btt b rfbtt rf f fb nb b b t t fb r r btt rr bbtt rtb fbtt fn tbfbb fb bfbb bftrf fttttrfbtt rffbtr rf f rb brf f r f f r r b r t r f t f bfbt rrrbtbff frrbtbr btt bnf frt rtfrrtrrr bttfr f b ftrbtt btnbrf bb tbrbtrt bfrr fbbt frtt rr btt rrr rbtt fr b b b t f r r t r f ffb fbfbfbtfrf fb rrtbbf rrfrr fbr b b tbbtt bfbfbtt btt tbtb fbr b b rrb ttrf fbtt rtfrb b fbr bb f f rtrf bbtt rbfb fbtt fbbtt r brtbf btt ttbbnr rtfr btr btt rbtf rtrftbf fb rfbr rrbtt fr rt ffbn tbrrr rfrrrr b b t r t ftrrtt rffrr f f b f r f b t f b f t r r t f f r b f b t f n r b f t b f r r r f t b b f f f b n b t t r rffb fb trr rrf rttbr ff frfrtb rbf b bb f bnr t r f t ttrrtr btb frrbttbt rnft trfbtrrr tbtt bfrrff brf bfbtt bfrr rrr tbfbtt btttrrf rbtt b f f

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb rff ntbnt f f n t b n bfrf rrfbftn nbnfrr rffb rrr rrbfff bfn rf nftnnt n tt nbfbnf ntt rrf bnnbrf tn nnrfrf ntnn rrr rftb n n rrf nbfnn ntf n b b f f b t t bnr tn f f n t n f b b nf nn f b f n t brrf f btt n b b t n b n n n b b b b n b b n b b n n b n b t r r t t f f b r n n f n b b t b b bb nt b n brfbf ntt f b f n t n bttfn fr rrrf bff nbtn b f n f rfffnrn rf nbfnn b f bf n bf n rrf rnfnbt btf t tf b b bn rff btb bb fff nb ff fbn b bb frft bb f f r r r f n f f n t nf rfr fbtb nbbn ff frrf fnn bbt ff nn nbf nntn f r t t nb r f r bn n r n bb f f bbbrf f r f n b b t n b n r r n r t r r r r n n b f f r r r n b b f f f b f nrrf ff frbftf r bfrbb br r t t n t t b ff r rff fnrfft bnbtbnt f rff r f n f r r n n n f bf f nnf rfbfnt n f f f n t r n b r f f r r f n f f n b n t b f f n b b ff f bbff f f r t t nb r f r bn n r n f b n r r f r f f n t rf ff r r r n b n f b b b n r f r f b f b n frt f f f n n n n f nf nfb rnnrfrrf rf brft t nf n n f f b r r r f n bff f r t t nb r f r bn n r n bff rr ff ntnt bf f b f f f f f f n b f f f f n n b b f n t b b n n b f f f f n b bf tf f f r b r f f r r r f b t b n n t r b r r n n f f r r b n r b r r bf rfrnnbb n b n f f n f n n b n f n b n b f f f r f n b t t n b f n b f n n f n b b n r f f r b b r f f n n n t t n b r f n f b n n n b t bf tf

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E1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 Money scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com OLD GADGETS: Contributing to pollution? / E4 www.dailycommercial.com VIRGINIA BRIDGES The News & Observer In the beginning, the partners of Chubbys Tacos made long lists of potential business names. They thought about a casual Mexican restau rant mixed with some thing tropical, like Tiki Ta cos. Then they did a Web search, only to nd the do main name already in use. We werent getting any where with it, said own er Jody Lytton, who went on to open Chubbys with then-partner Tony Sustaita. Then one night, the two went out drinking and played a game that gener ated potential adult lm star names by combining the name of their rst pet with the name of the street where they grew up. In the game, Sustaitas name was Chubby Herrera. So he said they should name their Mexican eatery Chub by Herreras Taqueria. But Lytton said he could barely get that out of his mouth. I was, like, What about Chubbys Tacos? Lytton said. With that name, a restau rant chain was born in Durham, N.C., on Cinco de Mayo 2008. But unfor tunately for Lytton, now the sole owner, the compa ny was built on a borrowed brand. Six years later, Lytton is paying the price for using a name legally claimed by an other business. His out-ofstate expansion aspirations are now limited, and hes at risk of a lawsuit. So Lyt tons 2014 plans include re naming and rebranding the business, which has four locations in North Carolina and a fth in the works. Todd Coats, chief creative ofcer for Capstrat, a mar keting and public relations agency in Raleigh, N.C., said small-business owners Skimping on name can land small businesses in trouble COREY LOWENSTEIN / RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER A sign on the salsa bar promotes the new naming contest for the Chubbys Tacos Mexican restaurants at one of the locations in Raleigh, N.C. The restaurants owner wants to franchise his business but must look at changing the name as a different business has the name licensed in another state. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL David Willis makes a cup of coffee at his business Mount Dora Coffee House and Bistro in Mount Dora on Thursday. RICK REED Special to The Daily Commercial W hat will David Willis do for an encore after this seasons run on TVs American Idol? Last year, he and his wife Olivia opened the Mount Dora Coffee House & Bistro after buying and renovating a down town coffee shop at 342 Dora Drawdy Way. This year, while the talented performer still pursues a music career he now has a successful, growing business. Mount Dora Coffee House & Bistro is a popular place to hang out, drink some good coffee or other beverage, eat a meal or sweet and often listen to live entertainment. Thing is, this is going better than I had hoped, but harder than I had planned, said Wil lis. We provide a cool, groovy place that provides a sense thats warm and cozy. If cus tomers walk out of here with that feeling, its worth every day, every dollar, every minute of sleep lost. After last years remarkable run on the singing competition series, where Willis made it to the lightning round, David and Olivia were trying to decide their next step. They were con sidering moving to California to follow a music career. But they happened upon the closed coffee shop while look ing for an apartment in down town Mount Dora. Apparently music isnt the only thing they have coursing through their veins. Both had worked as baristas in local cof fee shops during high school. MOUNT DORA Former Idol contestant enjoys running local bistro ANNE DINNOCENZIO AP Retail writer NEW YORK Macys Inc. is cutting 2,500 jobs as part of a reorganization to sustain its protability. Shares rose 5.5 percent in af ter-hours trading Wednesday. The announcement comes on the heels of a strong hol iday shopping season for the department store chain, which also runs the higher-end Bloomingdales chain. Macys said the moves will save it $100 million per year and forecast a 2014 prot above Wall Streets forecasts. Macys has been a standout among its peers throughout the economic recovery and has reaped the benets of its strat egy of tailoring merchandise to local markets. But like oth er merchants, Macys is grap pling with a still cautious shop per. Its also trying to respond to shoppers shift toward buy ing and research on their PCs and mobile devices like smart phones. While Macys will cut jobs, it is also planning to reassign or transfer some workers. Its also adding positions related to on line shopping, a growing area for the company, and ware houses. That will leave its work force level at about 175,000. The Cincinnati-based com pany plans to close ve stores and open eight others, leaving it with 844 stores nationwide once the changes are complete. Its also shifting merchan dising responsibilities for soft home categories like sheets Macys cutting 2,500 jobs in reorganization We provide a cool, groovy place that provides a sense thats warm and cozy. If customers walk out of here with that feeling, its worth every day, every dollar, every minute of sleep lost. David Willis PETER SVENSSON AP Technology Writer LAS VEGAS Gadget lovers are slipping on tness bands that track movement and buck ling on smartwatch es that let them check phone messages. Some brave souls are even donning Googles geeky-looking Glass eyewear. For the technolo gy industry, this is ex citing time, but also a risky one. No one really knows whether the av erage consumer can be enticed to make gad gets part of their every day attire. The question is: Can tech companies cre ate wearables with the right mix of function and fashion? Wearable comput ing devices are ignit ing an explosion of hope and creativity Few wearables balance fashion and function AP PHOTO Fitbug Orb activity trackers are worn by an exhibit representative during the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. TALI ARBEL Associated Press NEW YORK Hey twentysomethings, dreaming of trad ing in the safety of a regular paycheck to start your own busi ness? Theres no secret sauce. Instead, found ers of three companies have obvious tips: Work hard, network and ask for help. Chicago venture capitalist Bruce Bar ron, who has invested in companies includ ing food ordering ser vice GrubHub and pet products website dog gyloot seconds that. He counsels young entrepreneurs to be open to advice. Some young company own ers wanted us to write a check and just get out of the way. Those How to get ahead with a short resume AP PHOTO In this undated photo provided by Homejoy, Adora Cheung and Aaron Cheung, siblings and founders of cleaning service Homejoy pose for a photo. SEE YOUNG | E6 SEE SMALL | E2 SEE GADGETS | E3 SEE MACYS | E4 SEE BISTRO | E2

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 rfn ttbt f bftJANUARY 13, 2014 11:00 AM 2:00 PMLEESBURG COMMUNITY CENTER 109 E. DIXIE AVE. VENETIAN GARDENSLooking for a Cruise Bargain? Whats new for 2014? Find your next vacation!Join us for our 25th Annual Travel Showcase featuring representatives from these Cruise Lines, Tour Companies, and Area AttractionsGlobus Tours A-Rosa Cruises Carnival Cruises Norwegian Cruises Celebrity Cruises Azamara Cruises Hurst Transportation Pacific Delight Tours Princess Cruises Viking River Cruises Disney Cruises Florida Tour Connection Travel Insured International Oceania Cruises Victory Casino Cruises Monograms Independent Travel Yankee Holidays Cunard Cruises Holland American Cruises MSC Italian Cruises Royal Caribbean Cruises Avalon River Cruises Cosmos Tours Disney Resorts Amtrak VactionsLANDSEAIR TRAVELYour Vacation Specialist Since 1964 PRESENTED BY: Landseair Travel Celebrating 50 Years 1964 2014 secret santasTAKE NOTE FREE SMALL NUGGET TRAYrfnt bt bbb Need Tax Help?Call352-787-1040Open Year Round. should not short change the process of coming up with an ef fective and appropriate moniker. There are billions of business names al ready in existence, Coats said, so owners should start by listing hundreds of options. This is a quantity game, more than any thing else in the begin ning, Coats said. Coats will generate names by mashing up words, try ing different variations, prexes and sufxes. Owners should con sider their intended au dience, Coats said, and what they will tolerate. Knowing the toler ance of how descrip tive it needs to be, and how much leeway you have in the presenta tion of that will help to determine the vastness of the long list that you are creating, he said. A younger audience may be more willing to accept irreverent names, Coats said. But with some products or services, such as hotels, descriptive titles or es tablished brands might be more effective. Marketing budget is also a consideration, as obscure or made-up names might require a campaign to give it meaning, Coats said. Small-business own ers can narrow their list by asking themselves which names are the most memorable and tell the story of their brand. If you sing them out, do they roll off of your tongue, or do they clang around in your mouth? Coats said. Owners should search the Internet for similar names and neg ative connotations, and explore registered names on the U.S. Pat ent and Trademark Of ce website. Once small-business owners identify a via ble name, they should consider ling an ap plication for a trade mark with the U.S. Pat ent and Trademark Ofce, said Justin Ni fong, a patent and in tellectual property at torney and managing partner with NK Patent Law in Durham, N.C. A trademark includes names or symbols used to distinguish the source of goods and services. Typically, a trademark is the name of a business, but logos and slogans also qual ify. For example, Nike registered its swoosh, and Chick-l-A regis tered Eat mor chikin. Federal registration isnt mandatory and re quires a current or fu ture intention for inter state commerce, but has several advantages over common law trademark registration or registra tion with the state, Ni fong said. Benets of federal registration in clude an owners claim to a mark in a national database, which could deter other businesses from using it, and a legal presumption of own ership in all U.S. states and territories. Common law trade mark rights can be at tached to an in-use business name, but the protection is limited to geographic areas in which the company is operating, Nifong said. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Ofce will allow companies to reg ister similar marks if their services are clear ly different, Nifong said. Delta, for example, is a brand associated with both an airline and bath and kitchen faucets. But the federal application process seeks to pre vent similar products or services from hav ing brands with similar names that could con fuse the consumer. Early on, Lytton did some Internet research on the name Chubbys. He found restaurants with the name El Chub bys and The Original Chubbys in Colorado. Lytton told himself that no one would con fuse those with Chub bys Tacos in North Car olina. Now, Lytton is plan ning to open anoth er restaurant in Cary, N.C., while establishing consistent systems for franchising. Last year, Lytton reached out to Nifong to see whether he could move forward under Chubbys. He couldnt, howev er, because El Chubbys had claimed the federal trademark registration. In this case, Nifong said, Chubbys is the dominant word and consideration. Words such as original and tacos are descriptive and generally have less weight in the trademark consideration process. If Lytton wants to move forward with any out-of-state expansion, he has to change his name and his brand. We are probably OK as long as we stay in North Carolina, but if we start expanding, the (Colorado restau rant) with the rights to Chubbys would prob ably come smack us around, Lytton said. SMALL FROM PAGE E1 And opening a coffee shop has also been a dream. We purchased it on May 1 and opened on June 1, said Willis. We did 75 percent of the renovation. Literally, we began working the night we bought it and, for the next 30 days, weve been here ever since. Mount Dora Cof fee House & Bistro is open from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. every day but Sunday, serving break fast, lunch and dinner, along with their cof fee house drinks and sweets. We really enjoy what we do here, said Wil lis. We have a sense of community and share it with everyone not just our cuisine and drinks, but we share in the community. Entertainment is a big part of their suc cess. We have live mu sic most nights, Wil lis said. The best way to put it, on any giv en night you can nd live entertainment at the Bistro, either open mike, poetry, or acous tical musicians. We keep a strong empha sis on entertainment. Of course the com munity also loves the edible items on the menu. Barretts Carrot Cake ies out of here, said Willis. The carrot cake is named after his fatherin-law, Barrett Hand, and it comes from a tried-and-true fami ly recipe. In fact, the carrot cake is baked by Priscilla Hand, his mother-in-law, and her sister, Maggie Hayes. David also lends a hand in the kitchen, along with Olivia, do ing whatever is neces sary. But our morn ing crew is really good and we usually dont have to come in before noon, he said. His favorite item on the menu is Pappa Wil liss Southern Break fast Bowl, which is home-style grits, Ver mont cheddar cheese, scrambled eggs and crumbled hickory smoked bacon. Its a warm comfort ing breakfast meal, Willis said. When I was growing up, we had a 10-bedroom inn for single mothers, fos ter kids, you name it. So from a very ear ly age I was cooking. And I never knew how many people were in each room, at least 15 a night for dinner. And I was trying to please ev eryones tastes. Their coffee beans are ordered fresh every week from Grovelands Golden Hills Coffee Roasters. Other breakfast hits include pancakes with berries, hash brown-crusted quiche Lorraine and an old favorite, cinnamon French toast. Lunch includes homemade soup, sandwiches, paninis and salads. And there is a dinner menu as well. We have a num ber of sandwiches we rotate and some set items, Willis said. We consider ourselves foodies. And we like to share with friends and family. One of the things he cant share is whats happening with this seasons show. Ameri can Idol has been popu lar and topping viewer ship consistently since its inception in 2002. Ill be working and they come by and ask about the previous sea son and to get clues about this season, Willis said. Im lim ited about what I can share, what Im legally allo wed to say. The new season be gins airing Jan. 1516. Willis auditioned in Detroit because he wasnt able to get to At lanta and his audition will air the following week. The only thing I can say is tune in Jan. 15 and 16, he said. I say that with a smile. There are plenty of smiles to go around, before or after you sample the menu. Mount Dora Cof fee House & Bistro is at 342 Dora Drawdy Way and is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., Mon day through Saturday. For information, call 352-385-1781 or visit them on Facebook. BISTRO FROM PAGE E1 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: The interior of the Mount Dora Coffee House and Bistro is shown. RIGHT: A cup of coffee sits on a table at the shop.

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 Call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Wednesday January 15, at 11:00 amComfort Suites CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties thats engaged both startups and big companies including Samsung, Sony, LG and others. At the Interna tional Consumer Electronics Show this week, companies are showing off hundreds of new watches, wrist bands and eyeglasses with built-in video screens or cameras. The industry is encouraged by the attention Googles Glass is get ting. The device is worn like a pair of glasses and projects a small vid eo screen into the wearers eld of vision. Companies are also encour aged by the success albeit on a small scale of the Pebble and Sam sung Galaxy Gear smartwatches. Intel Corp., the worlds largest maker of computer processors, is on the wearable computing band wagon, too. Its CEO, Brian Krzan ich, demonstrated a onesie that can measure a babys temperature, pulse and breathing rate. It sends a wire less signal to a parents smart cof fee cup, which shows a smiley face in lights if the baby is sleeping well and a worried face if the child is too hot or close to waking up. The outt can also send a signal to a smart bot tle warmer, so it can be ready with warm formula when the baby wakes. We want to make everything smart, Krzanich said, showing off the brains of the onesie a comput er the size of a stamp. The smart onesie is one example of the many gadgets at the show that are designed to demonstrate what technology can do. Whats less clear is whether they tackle real problems, and improve life so much that peo ple will care to buy them. The wearables industry is haunt ed by an earlier false start: Bluetooth headsets, which were commonplace a few years ago, fell out of favor. The shift away from phone calls and to wards texting was one factor, but many say it simply became uncool to walk around in public with a listen ing device protruding from ones ear. Its easier to convince consumers to wear gadgets on their wrists, and thats where most of the industrys energy is focused. The wrist is one of the few plac es where its socially acceptable and technologically feasible to wear a gadget, says David Rosales, the chief technology ofcer of Meta Watch Ltd., a spin-off of watchmaker Fos sil. Rosales has been making smart watches for years, but only now does he believe they can break into the mainstream. Its not so much a mat ter of technology smartwatches worked ne in 2006, as one of social acceptance, he says. Smartwatches are still a small mar ket: the Consumer Electronics Asso ciation estimates that just under a million of them will be sold in the U.S. this year, up from 600,000 in 2013. I dont think consumers get the idea of smartwatches, says Russ Crupnick, senior vice president of industry analysis at research rm NPD Group. In a survey, the group found that the feature U.S. consum ers most desire in a smartwatch is the ability to make and receive calls something the watches gener ally dont do. He thinks the image a smartwatch projects of the owner is a more important driver. I think this is about jewelry ... I think at least in the near term, its about what having one of these things says about me and my per sonal brand, Crupnick says. Its hu man nature to brand ourselves. Fitness bands are also an effective way to brand oneself, and theyve seen a big surge in interest recently. The CEA says that last year, 13 per cent of U.S. consumers said they in tend to buy a wearable tness prod uct in the next 12 months, up from 3 percent the year before. But the staying power of these products is questionable much of their mo tion tracking can be done by smart phones, which already contain the motion sensors that let the tness bands act as advanced pedome ters. At CES, some bands are being revealed that do more than phones can; Epsons Pulsense, for instance, measures a wearers heart rate by shining a light through the skin. Glucovation, a startup from Carls bad, Calif., is among the companies that want to take wearables one step further: into the skin. Its developing a patch with a tiny needle that mea sures the wearers blood glucose lev el and relays it wirelessly to a smart phone. That could be useful not just for diabetics, but for anyone trying to control their eating habits. The patch, which is at least two years away from being sold, would be worn discretely under clothing. Goo gle Glass is the opposite: its blatant and in your face, literally. Many peo ple balk at the image of the man-ma chine integration it conveys, and since it contains a forward-facing camera, the gadget has given rise to privacy concerns. In theory, Glass wearers could be recording or taking pictures of anything they see, unbe knownst to others. GADGETS FROM PAGE E1 AP PHOTO The Panasonic HX-A100 wearable wicamera sits on display at the International Consumer Electronics Show. JIM PUZZANGHERA Los Angeles Times WASHINGTON The new regulator for Fannie Mae and Fred die Mac said Wednes day he was delaying planned fee increas es by the seized mort gage nance giants because he wanted to assess the impact on the housing market. Melvin L. Watt, who was sworn in as di rector of the Feder al Housing Finance Agency on Monday, quickly showed there would be a change in the direction of gov ernment oversight of Fannie and Freddie. He said he intend ed to conduct a thor ough evaluation of an increase in fees the rms charge lend ers to guarantee mort gages. Those increas es, which would make mortgages more ex pensive, were set to take effect in March and April. The FHFA, under former acting director Edward J. DeMarco, announced in Decem ber that it had direct ed Fannie and Fred die to increase their base guarantee fee, or g-fee, by 0.1 percent age points and make changes to other fees. The agency esti mated that the fees for a 30-year xedrate mortgage would increase by 0.14 per centage points as part of an effort to reduce Fannies and Freddies over-sized presence in the housin g market. The new fees bet ter reect the risk of guaranteeing mort gages and would allow private rms to better compete to guarantee mortgages, DeMarco said. Fannie and Fred die guarantee or pur chase more than six in 10 new mortgages. The fees usually are passed on by lenders to borrowers, inc reas ing the cost of mort gages. New regulator delays Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac mortgage fee increases

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAVID FERRELL The Orange County Register Christmas gifts of yes teryear meet an inglo rious end at Absolute Green Electronics Re cycling in Lake Forest, Calif. Computers are dismantled, the parts sorted into cardboard bins. One holds noth ing but hard drives, an other AC adapters. Bins stretch in rows across a mammoth warehouse a bin for graphic cards, a bin for cooling fans, also cellphones, VHS camcorders, dig ital cameras, cables, network switches. Stacked-up print ers form a miniature mountain. Old-fash ioned picture tubes sit face-down on pallets. Flat-screen monitors cluster along a wall like tombstones. There are differ ent grades of boards, said owner and Presi dent Victor Kianipay, stepping past hulk ing, dust-covered pro jection TVs to poke into apple boxes lled with circuit boards. Some are etched main ly in copper; others are heavily embedded with silicon chips. Every thing gets separated, Kianipay said. There are so many layers and layers of product. This is electronic waste, or e-waste a revenue stream for Ki anipay, who moved 25,000 pounds of dis carded items in last Jan uarys post-Christmas frenzy. E-waste also, de spite the work of Kian ipay and other entre preneurial recyclers, is an environmental problem of global pro portion. The ever-ris ing tide of electronic junk now totals near ly 50 million tons a year worldwide, according to the Solving the E-Waste Problem Initiative, a co alition of governments, scientists and industry groups based in Bonn, Germany. Within ve years, the annual gure may reach 65 million tons enough to ll trucks parked bumper to bumper encircling three-quarters of the Earth, the coalition es timates. The waste is a particular concern in part because much of it contains lead, mer cury and other hazard ous substances, which are released when the waste is melted down to recover gold, silver and copper. The widespread practice, by some recy clers and waste dealers, of exporting electron ic waste to developing countries has created bustling scrap econo mies in poor parts of China and Africa while exposing large num bers of people to toxins and carcinogens. You see all these thousands literally thousands of wom en and young kids whose job is to cook circuit boards, said Jim Puckett, found er and executive direc tor of the Seattle-based Basel Action Network. The group is named af ter the Swiss city where international agree ments were drafted in the late 1980s and early 1990s to stop the digi tal dumping. Although 35 nations have adopted the te nets of the Basel Con vention, Puckett said, the United States by far the largest producer of e-waste has not. The U.S. Environ mental Protection Agency, in a report posted on its web site, said most dis carded consumer elec tronics end up in our landlls a whol ly separate environ mental problem. No one is sure how much e-waste ends up being exported from the U.S., the EPA says, but the United States govern ment is concerned that these exports are being mismanaged abroad, causing serious pub lic health and environ mental hazards. Puckett, who has spent years investi gating the issue, esti mates that about 50 to 80 percent of what is handed over to recy clers is exported. Spurred by environ mental activists, Con gress and state gov ernments are trying to ensure that e-waste gets properly recycled here. The federal Re sponsible Electron ics Recycling Act, in troduced in July and co-sponsored by Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Ca lif., would prohibit the export of toxics-con taining electronic junk to nations that cannot process them safely. The bill has gained bipartisan support and now sits in the House Committee on Ener gy and Commerce, said Austin Vevurka, Thompsons press aide. It addresses a grow ing environmental and health problem and it helps create good-pay ing recycling jobs in the U.S., Vevurka said. Its a win-win. In addition, President Barack Obama estab lished the Interagen cy Task Force on Elec tronics Stewardship in 2010 to encourage de velopment of greener electronic devices and to boost domestic recy cling. California became a national pioneer by en acting the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003, which created a system of incentives to prevent the disposal of most video-display de vices and certain oth er types of electronic equipment in landlls. The law applies to lap tops and televisions that use liquid-crys tal display or plasma screens and especially targets outmoded TVs and computer mon itors that have cath ode-ray tubes. The old TVs are par ticularly bad because they contain both lead and mercury, said Mark Oldeld, a spokesman for the states Depart ment of Resources Re cycling and Recovery. Since 2005, when the state began keep ing track of e-waste re cycling statistics, more than 1.5 billion pounds of video-display equip ment has been collect ed directly because of the law, Oldeld said. rrfntbn nntnb nft bfnfnb frn $19900$16900tb rfSCHEDULED DEPARTURES EVERY SUNDAY. tb rfIP CASINO RESORT4 DAYS/3 NIGHTSwww.goclassictours.comBILOXI BOUND4 DAYS 3 NIGHTSBEAU RIVAGErffntb fnBest Western Historic rrfnTHE BIG EASYNEW ORLEANS5 DAYS, 4 NIGHTS7 MEALS/$15 FREE PLAYnttb ttft tt tt t ttbtt$49595$599 Singlebnnfbbfbrrn t tt Shoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLEESBURG 365-6442Sleep through your Dental Appointment The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for paym ent for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the a dvertisement for treatment.License# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hrIV SEDATION: FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 Value*x-rays not includedFinancing Available Dr. Vaziri & Staff and towels from the district level to the regional and national level. Ma cys says that such goods change less often than clothing and accessories and are less subject to local tastes. The moves come after a solid hol iday shopping season for the chain. Revenue at stores opened at least a year, a key indicator of a retailers health, rose 4.3 percent in November and December. The company is optimistic about this year. It expects earnings per share of $4.40 to $4.50 in 2014, best ing analysts prediction of $4.36 per share, according to FactSet. Our company has signicantly increased sales and protability over the past four years, and we have cre ated a culture of growth at Macys Inc., said Terry J. Lundgren, Macys chairman, president and CEO in a statement. As the success of these strategies has unfolded, we have identied some specic areas where we can improve our efciency with out compromising our effectiveness in serving the evolving needs of our customers. Shares rose 5.5 percent to $54.70 in after-hours trading after closing down 34 cents to $51.84. MACYS FROM PAGE E1 Obsolete gadgetry can pile up, contributing to pollution MINDY SCHAUER / ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER Old computer keyboards ll a box and EXPC employee Diego Cuellar walks through the business warehouse in Santa Ana, Calif. In California e-waste is recycled with funds paid by consumers as a fee when they purchase electronics.

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeat ed numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, Jan. 12 the 12th day of 2014. There are 353 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On Jan. 12, 1959, Berry Gordy Jr. founded Motown Records (originally Tamla Records) in Detroit. On this date : In 1519 Holy Roman Em peror Maximilian I died. In 1773 the rst public museum in America was or ganized in Charleston, S.C. In 1828 the United States and Mexico signed a Treaty of Limits dening the boundary between the two countries to be the same as the one established by an 1819 treaty between the U.S. and Spain. In 1912 textile workers at the Everett Mill in Law rence, Mass., most of them immigrant women, walked off the job to protest wage cuts. In 1915 the House of Representatives rejected, 204-174, a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. In 1932, Hattie W. Cara way became the rst wom an elected to the U.S. Sen ate after initially being appointed to serve out the remainder of the term of her late husband, Thadde us. In 1948 the U.S. Su preme Court, in Sipuel v. Board of Regents of Univer sity of Oklahoma, ruled that state law schools could not discriminate against appli cants on the basis of race. In 1964 leftist rebels in Zanzibar began their suc cessful revolt against the government. In 1969 the New York Jets of the American Foot ball League upset the Bal timore Colts of the Nation al Football League 16-7 in Super Bowl III, played at the Orange Bowl in Miami. In 1971 the ground breaking situation comedy All in the Family premiered on CBS television. In 1986 the shuttle Co lumbia blasted off with a crew that included the rst Hispanic-American in space, Dr. Franklin R. Chang-Diaz. In 2010 Haiti was struck by a magnitude-7 earth quake, killing as many as 300,000 residents and leaving over 1.5 million peo ple homeless. DEAR ABBY: We rent ed a car while we were on vacation. Most of the newer cars have all kinds of high-tech equipment and devic es different kinds for different models of ve hicles. The problem is the instruction book lets that describe how the equipment oper ates are never provided with the cars. Its dangerous to try and gure out how the equipment oper ates by trial and error while starting to drive an unfamiliar vehi cle. Why dont the rent al agencies provide the instruction manu als, or at least a pam phlet summarizing the procedures? Surely not many people would steal them, since theyre just using the cars for a short time. Also, it would be helpful if the rental agencies would include an inexpensive ice scraper with every car in appropriate areas of the country, so custom ers could clean their windshields and avoid the hazard of obstruct ed vision. CAR RENTER IN CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. DEAR CAR RENTER: What youre describing is also true with loaner cars that are offered when a vehicle is being serviced. I am pretty sure the rea son those items are not provided is fear that they would be stolen. However, I agree that knowing how to oper ate the radio, heating, air-conditioning and street map functions on the newer cars can be confusing which is why you should ask to have the pertinent pages of the manu al photocopied so you can refer to them as needed. (The techno logically inclined can Google the make of car and ask How to turn on the radio, etc. be cause the information is available online.) DEAR ABBY: My best friend died from the u in November. She was only 63 and had been my friend for 23 years. She died because she was stubborn and in sisted to all her friends myself included that she was ne and didnt need to see a doctor or go to the emergency room. We had all threatened to come and drag her to the doctor or the ER or call 911, but because she insisted she was getting better, we took her word for it. Now were kicking ourselves for not getting her the help she obvi ously needed. Abby, please tell your readers that when a friend or family member is sick enough to cause this kind of concern, to ignore the person and get her (or him) to a doc tor! I will miss my friend every day for the rest of my life because I can no longer call to say good morning. Her name was Abby, too, and she was the best friend Ive ever had. DEVASTATED IN TAR ZANA, CALIF. DEAR DEVASTATED: Im sorry for the loss of your friend. But none of you should blame your selves for what hap pened to her. She made an unwise choice. It is not unusual for people who experience serious symptoms to go into a state of deni al (Lets wait, It will pass, etc.). But unless your friend was expe riencing extreme re spiratory distress or an unusually high fe ver, she might have re covered from that virus without intervention. P.S. I cant help but wonder if your friend got her u vaccina tion last fall when they started being offered. While its not 100 per cent effective for ev eryone, it is effective in many people. I get one every year, and its worth discussing with your doctor. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her moth er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAb by.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014: This year you open up to a lot of new ideas and hob bies. Though others might not understand your excite ment, youll feel as if your mind is expanding. A new job or career path becomes a possibility. If you are sin gle, you might not be set tled enough to pursue an important relationship. If you are attached, the two of you will develop a new pas time that you both enjoy. It could be taking a massage class together or pursuing a new hobby. GEMINI can be very supercial ARIES (March 21-April 19) You tend to express yourself in a highly charged manner. You could draw quite a response from a partner who has been noth ing less than grumpy as of late. Expressing your feel ings will just retrigger the situation. Say less if you can. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Check out a recent pur chase with greater care, as the quality of the item could make a big difference in how you enjoy it. A partner might seem stiff or remote. Know that recent events have propelled his or her thinking in a new direction. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You cant help but keep smiling and enjoying your self. Even if someone is be ing difcult, it makes little difference to you, as you ac cept this person for all of his or her different moods. A loved one will be full of surprises. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Continue the low-key theme of the past few days. You have pushed yourself very hard to accomplish cer tain tasks. Indulge in some you time, which could in volve a friend or loved one. Try not to make plans. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Accept an invitation in volving friends and a fun event. Your lively spirit is al ways considered an asset at parties. Still, you could be thinking through an im portant decision. You need some time to think before heading out. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might want to stop a conversation before it be comes too public. You have every reason to want to pur sue this matter. Note that someone is liable to spill the beans. You might want to be more discerning as to whom you share news with. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Hopefully you have man aged to get away from your routine. The relaxation of being in a different setting might have opened your mind to a new realm of pos sibilities. When you get set tled back into your routine, you will see the difference. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might need to be more direct with a partner than you have been in a while. You could be uncom fortable changing the way you treat this person, but be open and allow the free exchange of ideas and opin ions. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your popularity is high, and you have a pletho ra of options in various seg ments of your life. At this moment in time, you dont need to make any life de cisions. Wait until the be ginning of February to set goals for yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might not have the most exciting day, but you will enjoy getting some extra R and R. A dear friend will want to discuss a nancial matter, but he or she might not be sure how to approach this topic with you. Keep an open mind. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You cant seem to be serious, unless it is a dis cussion about a new love. Your grace combined with your innate mischievous ness attracts many people, especially friends who rare ly see you like this. One of them could be magnetized by this side of you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might feel as if you should stay at home in or der to accomplish a partic ular goal. How reasonable you are could play into the outcome. Someone who cares about you a lot and understands where you are coming from will have your back. HOROSCOPES Bigars Stars JACQUELINE BIGAR High-tech rental cars should come with instruction manuals TODAY IN HISTORY

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 qualities dont bode well for us. We want to see people who are col laborative, he says. Three entrepreneurs who successfully raised money for their com panies underscore the importance of hard work, of course and making friends and playing nice. HOMEJOY FOUNDERS: Adora Cheung, 30, and her brother Aaron Cheung, 25 STARTED IN: Mountain View, Calif., July 2012 THE BUSINESS: Now based in San Francis co, Homejoys website connects more than 100,000 house clean ers with customers in about 30 cities in the U.S. and Canada MONEY RAISED: $40 million BIG BACKER: Max Levchin, co-founder of PayPal Coming out of the University of Roches ter, which had no en trepreneurial commu nity that she was aware of, Adora Cheung want ed to learn how start ups work. She joined a Bay Area company, Slide, which was start ed by PayPal co-found er Max Levchin. IMPRESS THEM: Slide didnt have many em ployees when Cheung came on board. I got to work closely with Max, and he came to know a lot of how I work. He and I work on a very similar sleep schedule, she says. They would nd themselves talking shop at 4 a.m. FOLLOWING FRIENDS: After Cheung left Slide, she and her brother spent three-and-a-half years trying to come up with a business. They participated in the Y Combinator acceler ator program, which helps startups launch. Friends who had been through the program recommended it. KEEP IN TOUCH: The Cheungs were in debt and needed money for Homejoy. Levchin was the rst investor. It was very helpful that Max knows me and I think he trusts me. He saw numbers that were going up and to the right. He gave us a bit of money, Cheung says. After that, other inves tors wanted in. SWEETGREEN FOUNDERS: Former Georgetown Universi ty schoolmates Nicolas Jammet, 28; Jonathan Neman, 29; and Na thaniel Ru, 28 STARTED IN: Washing ton, D.C., August 2007 THE BUSINESS: Twen ty-two shops and 600 employees selling sal ads, wraps, soups and juices, in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Maryland and Virginia MONEY RAISED: $40 million BIG BACKER: Steve Case, co-founder of AOL The trio launched Sweetgreen the sum mer after their senior year of college. Over the years, they raised $17 million from about 100 people before land ing their rst invest ment from a nancial institution in Decem ber: $22 million from AOL co-founder Steve Cases Revolution fund. OLD FRIENDS: When the three had noth ing but a business plan and a possible loca tion, they raised their rst chunk of money $375,000 from 25 friends, friends of fam liy, former bosses and classmates. BLUE APRON FOUNDERS: Matt Salz berg, 30; Ilia Papas, 32; and Matthew Wadiak, 35. STARTED IN: New York, August 2012 THE BUSINESS: Deliv ers about 300,000 boxes of ingredients and reci pes for home cooks ev ery month. Blue Apron has 130 employees. MONEY RAISED: $8 mil lion BIG BACKERS: Jason Finger, co-founder of restaurant delivery website Seamless, then known as SeamlessWeb and Bob Goodman, partner at venture cap ital rm Bessemer Ven ture Partners. Matt Salzberg knew in college that he want ed to run his own busi ness. So he deliberate ly went to work rst for a venture capital rm, Bessemer Venture Part ners. He met key advis ers there. PERSONAL CONNECTION: Salzberg had conver sations with Jason Fin ger, then an entrepre neur-in-residence at Bessemer, that went beyond the invest ment opportunities they worked on togeth er in the ofce. Fin ger was the rst person who said he would in vest in Salzbergs ven ture. With Fingers en couragement, Salzberg left Bessemer before he came up with Blue Apron. A former boss of his from Bessemer, Bob Goodman, was also one of the rst inves tors in Blue Apron. KNOW YOUR WEAKNESS ES: Salzberg had worked in nance, and needed people with technology and food expertise. He brought on Papas, who had e-commerce expe rience, and Wadiak, a chef. IN PERSON: Its re ally important when youre raising capital to have people who be lieve in you, Salzberg says. And its easier to sway them with your passion face-to-face. Its hard to convey that through PowerPoint or on the phone. Often its through body lan guage. YOUNG FROM PAGE E1 AP PHOTO This photo provided by Blue Apron shows Blue Apron founder Matt Salzberg and Bob Goodman of Bessemer, a former boss of Salzbergs in New York.



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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThere was no time to spare. Learning her ex-boyfriend had been released from jail after serving time for assault and battery, Azalay, who asked that her real name not be used, feared he would kill her this time. He beat me all over, she said. He held me hostage for four days. What he did, he should have gotten more than three years. Remembering the incident vividly when he tried to choke her after she said she wanted to leave him, her voice began to crack. I still fear for my life, she said, lowering her eyes. I am always looking over my shoulder. Azalay entered the Haven domestic violence shelter, which provides emergency, long-term shelter and counseling for victims of domestic violence. Since then, she said she has found hope and support, and aspires to nish school and begin a career as a medical assistant. It has made me stronger, she said. I should not let one person stop me from living. Domestic violence has become a part of all societies: it is every where and does not discriminate by culture, age or class. In the city of Mascotte, the community learned of the chilling death of Kristi Lynne Delaney, 26, last November. In what has become a familiar story around the country, Delaneys on-again, off-again boy friend, Johnny Lashawn Shipman has been charged with homicide. Investigators would not say how she was killed, but family members who found the woman said it was apparent she was beaten to death with a baseball bat and the couples 3-year-old daughter witnessed the attack. Three women are killed by a current or former intimate partner each day in America, on average, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV). Statistics from the NCADV fur ther highlight that a woman is battered every 15 seconds in the United States. The Lake County Sheriffs Ofce responded to 414 domestic disturbance calls in 2013 and Sumter County Sheriffs Ofce reported 318 calls. According to Walter Forgie, a supervisor with the State Attorneys Ofce in Lake County, there were 105.6 domestic violence cases per month in 2013 compared with 102 in 2012. Advocates against domestic violence said it is the most under reported crime and is an issue people in many communities do not like to talk about. Research from the National Institute of Justice supports that assertion. According to the justice report, which highlighted ndings from A problem in the shadows r fntrbrn r rtr nrnt frtr rrt frtr rrrnrt frtr rnr Call Our Experienced Physicians For Family Medicine Podiatric/Foot Careand Chiropractic Treatment 357-8615 ~ www.lakehealthcarecenter.com 910 Mt. Homer Rd. ~ Eustis Most Insurance AcceptedServing Lake County Since 1963 ~ Founded by Dr. Jim Glisson SEAHAWKS ROLL PAST THE SAINTS, SPORTS B1MONEY: Former Idol singer whistles while he works at his Mount Dora bistro, E1 SUPREME COURT: Protest-free zones could be coming, A6 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Sunday, January 12, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 137 No. 12 5 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED C4 CROSSWORDS C3 DIVERSIONS E5 LEGALS C4 MONEY E1 NATION A6 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 STATE A3 VOICES C1 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A8.70 / 51Sunshine and patchy clouds$1 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BY THE NUMBERS %  en 125,631: Hotline calls received %  en 90,139: Safety plans provided %  en 36,389: Outreach services %  en 15,997: People given shelter %  en 3,471: Shelter requests denied due to lack of space %  en 192: People killed in domestic violence cases, or 19.5 percent of all homicide casesStats are from the scal year 2011-12 in Florida. BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Angela Wilder poses for a photo in Umatilla on Thursday.I am in the age group where women stayed home. They are convinced they have no choice. They think, If my husband starts hitting me, what am I going to do? They dont understand that Haven is here to help. There is shame and embarrassment.Ann EgglestonVice chairwoman of the board of directors of Haven GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressORLANDO Heading into a crucial election year, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Satur day that the states Republicans will win big and keep their lock on state government and maintain their majority among Floridas mem bers in Congress. Scotts remarks at the annual gathering of the Republican Party of Flor ida were his rst major campaign speech during a year in which he will be the main target for the states Democrats. Scott and other top Republicans gearing up for this years elections sounded condent as they repeatedly cit ed the states improving Scott vows GOP will win big in 2014 electionAdvocates: Domestic violence the most underreported crime For more on the Florida Republican party meeting, see Page A3 MATTHEW LEE AP Diplomatic WriterWASHINGTON Five years after pledg ing to remake the U.S. relationship with the broader Middle East and improve Ameri cas image in the Mus lim world, the Obama administrations regional strategy ap pears to have come unhinged. President Barack Obama has been confronted by fast-moving and ominous developments from Afghanistan to Tunisia, amid a bitter pub lic power struggle between Iran and Saudi Arabia, and has ad justed his rst terms grand plan to restore Washingtons standing and inuence. Now, its a smaller vision that seems to rely on ad hoc re sponses aimed at merely keeping the United States relevant in an increasingly volatile and hostile at mosphere. His administration has been forced to deal with three years of civil war in Syria. A Western-backed opposition is struggling to topple an autocratic government and repel Islamic ghters who also are destabilizing neighboring Lebanon and Iraq, where al-Qaida has resurged less than three years after Obama withdrew U.S. forces. The U.S. is strug gling to identify a co herent position in Egypt after the military ouster of the countrys rst democratically elected president. The administration tried its best to avoid calling the power transfer a coup. It is losing patience with Afghan Presi dent Hamid Karzai, who is refusing to sign a security agreement with the U.S. The pact would allow the U.S. to leave some troops in the country to help train and assist Kar zais army in keeping the Taliban at bay af ter Americas longest conict ends Dec. 31. Secretary of State John Kerry is trying to forge an Israeli-Pal estinian peace deal against resistance Obamas grand plan for Mideast diminished AP FILE PHOTO President Barack Obama looks on as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, left, and President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority shake hands prior to their 2009 meeting in New York.Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon dies. See Page A7. SEE SCOTT | A2SEE VIOLENCE | A2SEE OBAMA| A5

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 HOW TO REACH US SATURDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 6-2-8 Afternoon . .......................................... 1-6-8 PLAY 4 . .............................................. 20-7-5 Afternoon . ....................................... 7-4-1-8FLORIDALOTTERY FRIDAYFANTASY 5 . ........................... 6-12-18-19-33 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $10 4 of 5 wins $113.50 5 of 5 wins $238,631.18 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. economy and jobs pic ture as a key reason why they expect to win in No vember. We have every right to win every election be cause we are doing the right thing, Scott told roughly 200 party activ ists and party ofcials. Republicans have controlled the Florida Leg islature and governors mansion for much of the last two decades. But Democrats consid er Scott vulnerable, since he has had lackluster poll numbers during his en tire three years in ofce. Several Republicans em phasized the importance of the 2014 election say ing that it will help the GOP during the next presidential election. President Barack Obama won Florida in both 2008 and 2012, while President George W. Bush won the state four years earlier. The road to the White House in 2016 runs right through Tallahassee, said Peter Feaman, Flor idas national committeeman. Even though there are other Democrats in the race, Florida Republicans consider former Gov. Charlie Crist the like ly candidate to challenge Scott in the fall. Crist for mally jumped into the race last November and has raised more than $4 million for his campaign effort in just two months. Crist has wasted little time in criticizing Scott as a terrible governor and faulting him every thing from pushing for budget cuts to education in rst year to rejecting billions in federal aid for high speed rail. Scott did not mention Crist directly during his remarks, but that didnt stop other Republicans from branding Crist as a political opportunist who changed his politi cal philosophy and par ties. Crist was elected while he was Republican, ran as an independent in the U.S. Senate race he lost to Marco Rubio, and became a Democrat in 2012. Charlie Crist will say and do anything to get elected and we cant let our fellow citizens in Florida not remember that, said Sharon Day, co-chair of the Republican National Committee. Republican Party of Florida Chairman Lenny Curry told party mem bers that they have to continue to remind Floridians that that states unemployment rate has dropped since Scott took ofce. Curry insisted that Scott deserves the credit for improvement in the states economy and that the GOP should push back if the media or Dem ocrats say otherwise. The Democratic establishment will go out of its way to poke holes in our triumphs, Curry said. Floridas unemploy ment rate in December was 6.4 percent. Thats the lowest it has been since July 2008, but state economists say one of the big reasons for the decline is people are leav ing the labor force or had delayed their job search. The state Ofce of Eco nomic and Demographic Research said in a report last month that Floridas real unemployment rate would be 8.3 percent if the amount of people in the labor force had held steady since December 2011. Republicans expect to have a signicant cash advantage over Crist and the Democrats during the next 10 months that should allow them to spend millions on television advertising to tout Scotts handling of the economy. But Curry and others made it clear that they also plan to use Crists support of Obama and the presidents health care overhaul in the cam paign. Scott, who has been a harsh critic of the overhaul in the past and used it during his rst campaign, lashed into it again on Saturday, and said we dont need the federal government tell ing us what to do every day. We are going to absolutely point out where Charlie Crist failed and his connection and his tie to this atrocious act, Curry said. SCOTT FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO Gov. Rick Scott smiles as he speaks in Fort Lauderdale.the National Violence Against Women Survey, only 27 percent of women and 13.5 percent of men who were physically assaulted by an intimate partner reported their assault to law enforcement. Less than 20 percent of women victims reported intimate partner rapes to police.LIVING IN SHAMEIn the past ve years in The Villages, 3,000 women have sought services from Haven of Lake and Sumter Counties, which serves victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, according to Kelly Smallridge, executive director. With the population growing in The Villages, Smallridge said the problem is expected to increase. But Smallridge said many seniors dont tell anyone or report it. They live with it, she said. That is the value system of that generation. With that particular generation, if you marry him, you stay married. They dont tell their families. They dont tell their best friend. Smallridge remembers one of her rst clients from The Villages, who showed up at the shelter 10 years ago. My very rst client had a broken jaw and two black eyes, she said. She had lived with domestic violence for 60 years of her life. Many residents of The Villages do not go into shelter, Smallridge said. They are calling to alleviate their fears, she said. They want us to tell them if they have legal recourse. Ann Eggleston, vice chairwoman of the board of directors of Haven, lives in The Villages and said she knows domestic violence is occurring there. I am in the age group where women stayed home, she said. They are convinced they have no choice. They think, if my husband starts hitting me, what am I going to do? They dont under stand the Haven is here to help. There is shame and embarrassment. According to statistics compiled by Haven, 331 clients in Lake and Sumter counties entered the shelter in scal year 201213. There were seven protective injunctions in both counties during that time. For many senior women, they dont know what options they have, Eggleston said. I think by the time you are my age, you just dont know what to do, she said. You are no longer wanted by the work force. But, there is a way out, Eggleston said, reminding women that they can apply for Social Security benets and do have recourse. Any contact they have with Haven is strictly con dential, Eggleston said. Eggleston said she has seen women she suspected were abused around The Villages. They are quiet and meek, she said. He does all the talking. I some times see nger bruises around the arms. Like many communities, Eggleston said there is a stigma about calling for help. No one wants the po lice car in the driveway, she said. There is a stigma with domestic violence. Why are the police at your house? This is a utopia for old people and nothing bad happens. I know it does. Egglestons husband, Glenn, a former homicide sergeant, chose to support Haven as the charity of choice for their group, the Tri-County Browns Backers. Glenn said he loves living in The Villages, but he believes domestic violence happens there. He remembers going to domestic disturbances as a police ofcer and, in particular, how the circumstances affected children. When you got to a house with domestic violence and there are kids shivering because of it, it has a profound effect on you period, he said. It is not a manly thing: women getting beat up by men. Smallridge said she received a call from a doctors ofce in The Villages, asking her to come in and train his staff about domestic violence because of elderly women coming in with suspicious bruises.HEALING ONE DAY AT A TIMESeverely beaten at the hands of her ex-boy friend, Angela Wilder is slowly putting the pieces of her life back together. He was a very aggressive man and we were together for three years, she said in a phone interview in Umatilla, where she has sought help for addiction at the Ruth House, a transition al shelter for women and children in crisis. What started out as a verbally abusive relationship turned physically violent at the end, Wilder said. We had gotten into an argument and I asked to talk, she said. That is when things got physical, she said. When I did not leave, he grabbed me and dragged me through the house, she said. He punched me in the ribs. Then, when she tried to get the spare key to her car outside the home, her ex-boyfriend threw her across the yard, Wilder said. Wilder said she left Osceola County and moved to Lake County to be near her daughters while she slowly gets her life back on track. Starting over is hard but it is worth it, she said. I am learning my self value and how to be an independent woman: a single woman in recovery who has three daughters. Rebecca Randall, executive director of the Ruth House, said percent of women that have lived here all have domestic violence issues in their past. We provide a safe, structured environment and teach them about the love of God. Smallridge said the biggest misconception about domestic violence is that if somebody is not holding you down or hitting you, it is not domestic violence. The violent crimes leave emotional scars, according to advocates. Domestic violence and rape are the only two violent crimes where the victim feels shame and guilt, Eggleston said. Love does not hurt. When clients enter the shelter, Smallridge said a safety plan is developed. All those things that happened equals possible death for you, she said of the urgency to keep victims safe. Azalay said while she has moved on from the relationship many years ago, it is hard to forget. She remembers her ex-boyfriends haunting words: If I see you, I am going to kill you. I have had two kids with him, she said. My son looks like him. How am I supposed to forget what he did to me? Even during tough times, she said she refuses to go back to a life she described as lled with fear. It is not worth it, she said. My mom and my sister were in abusive situations. They stuck with it. I got away from it. VIOLENCE FROM PAGE A1 We had gotten into an argument and I asked to talk. When I did not leave, he grabbed me and dragged me through the house. He punched me in the ribs.Angela Wilder

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comA man was killed and his fe male passenger is in critical condition after their motor cycle was struck head-on by a car in Howey-in-the-Hills on Saturday. The crash occurred about 2:30 / p.m. According to Howey-in-theHills police, a woman driv ing a Toyota Avalon south on State Road 19 crossed the yel low line near Savage Circle in front of three motorcycles riding in tandem. The rst rider was able to avoid the car, while the second bike was clipped Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT ASTOR Area man killed in late-night wreckA 33-year-old Astor man died Friday night when he crashed his car in Volusia County, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. Cesar Nevarez was driving his 2002 Kia southbound on Grand Avenue when the accident occurred at about 10:30 p.m. For reasons unknown, he lost control of the car, left the road and hit a tree, the FHP reported. Nevarez died at the scene. An investigation continues. TAVARES Religious leaders sought for invocation at meetingsThe Lake County Commission is seeking local pastors, preachers, fathers, rabbis and other heads of religious organizations to participate in County Commission meetings by opening with an invocation. Meetings are held at 9 / a.m., on Tuesdays, twice each month in Commission Chambers at the Lake County Administration Building, 315 W. Main St. To participate in the invocation portion of a County Commission meeting, call Kathy Hartenstein at 352-323-5733 or email khartenstein@lakecounty.gov.LEESBURG RSVP program seeking older volunteersLake and Sumter County residents age 55-plus who have a lifetime of experience to share and the desire to make a real difference in the community are needed as volunteers for the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) program. RSVP volunteers tutor elementary grade students, mentor low-income high school students who are college bound, participate in after-school educational and enrichment programs, deliver meals, make telephone reassurance calls to homebound seniors, provide transportation for cancer patients, sort and distribute food to the needy, and support veterans and military families. Interested parties can get infor mation by calling 352-365-1995.SUMTERVILLE SECO announces 2014 scholarship programThe Sumter Electric Cooperative (SECO) has announced the continuation of its scholarship program that will benet up to 12 deserving high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory. Each recipient will receive a $3,000 scholarship to assist them in going on to a college or technical school following graduation. Graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2014. Applications are available at area high school guidance ofces and at any of SECO customer service center in Lake, Sumter, Marion and Citrus counties, and must be returned to SECO no later than April 4.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressORLANDO Florida Gov. Rick Scott, acknowledging the backlash among some Republicans against new state school standards, said Saturday that steps will be taken to ad dress the criticism that has built up over the last few months. Scott, who was speaking at the an nual meeting of the Republican Par ty of Florida, said he understood there was a little bit of passion surrounding the standards that are known ofcially as the Common Core State Standards. His remarks came a day after a state party caucus passed a resolution opposing them. The governor said Education Commissioner Pam Stewart will unveil a list next week of proposed changes to the standards. He also said that the Florida Legislature during its spring session would pass a data security bill to respond to concerns about what type of infor mation will be collected from stu dents that could be passed on to others. These are Florida standards, they are not some national standards, Scott said. This is our state. Were not going to have the federal gov ernment telling us how to do our ed ucation system. Scotts response still falls short of an outright repeal of the standards that some opponents want. Flor ida also had no plans to give de tailed student data to the federal Scott: Changes coming to Common Core Staff ReportAn annexation incen tive program in Eustis apparently is paying off because the city plans to expand its boundaries by about 90 additional acres. Five separate public hearings are scheduled Thursday for the rst readings of ordinances to annex 28 parcels of land. This is still a far cry from another 422 tracts the city has identied as eligible for annexation. The city identied the 450 tracts last year and announced an annexation incentive program which will waive all ap plication fees associat ed with voluntary an nexation requests. This is saving property owners between $1,225 and $2,275 in application fees per annexation request. This is an excellent opportunity for enclave property owners to become part of the city of Eustis and benet from EUSTISCity poised to annex 90 acres MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comTo the sounds of laugh ter from the crowd of mostly adults and seniors, ofcials at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast in The Villages on Saturday pointed out that their keynote speaker was only 6 years old when the group rst held the event 11 years ago. Javan Latson, a 17-yearold Belleview High School honor student and the events youngest key note speaker, admitted to the audience of about 650 people that although he was familiar with Dr. King, he had to consult with his 84-year-old grandfather and a wellknown 73-year-old congressman and civil rights leader who were present at the March on Washing ton in 1963 to get a better idea of Kings dream. Then he gave a lesson to the adults on King. He said he learned a young person should speak up and stand up whenever they see some one getting mistreated, abused or bullied. Stand up for righ teousness. Sometimes that means you have to turn something upside down to make it right side up, said Latson, quot ing words he was given by U.S. Representative John Lewis of Georgia. Held at the Savannah Center in The Villages by the MLK Commemora tive Committee, the event also included a video trib ute to King, a slide featuring various civil right leaders, revolutionaries and images such as for whites only signs. There were various speakers, as well as scholarship and community leader award THE VILLAGESStudent schools audience on Dr. King MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIALJavan Latson, a 17-year-old Belleview High School student, greets visitors after speaking at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast in The Villages.Even though the civil rights activists of the 1960s are now famous American heroes and icons in the present, Dr. King and his colleagues were then just ordinary folks hoping to do extraordinary things.Javan LatsonKeynote speaker at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Police sift through the wreckage after a fatal crash in Howey-in-the-Hills. Staff reportThe Florida Depart ment of Transportation is holding a public meeting on Jan. 21 regarding proposed improvements to the north-south portion of State Road 44 in the Eu stis and Mount Dora ar eas. The project limits are from US 441 to the eastwest section of SR 44 in Lake County, Florida. This project widens EUSTISSR 44 roadwork on agena SEE EDUCATION | A4SEE ANNEX | A4SEE ROADS | A41 dead, another hurt in crashHOWEY-IN-THE-HILLSSEE CRASH | A4 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comProsecutors reported Friday they are almost nished closing a case against a former deputy re chief who died in De cember amid charges of lascivious child moles tation in Sumter Coun ty and similar accusations in Hernando County. Cecil Brad Burris, 55, had been with Sumter County Fire Rescue since 2003 and also served as a re marshall there, before he was terminated in 2012 after he was arrested on charges of molesting and touching a 16-year-old girl. He had been released from the Sumter County jail in lieu of $75,000 bail and was awaiting a Feb ruary pre-trial hearing on the lewd and lascivious charges. WILDWOODOfficials wrapping molestation case BURRIS SEE CASE | A4SEE KING | A5

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 365-255024 Hour Answering Service 1501 N. US Hwy 441 Suite 1836, Bldg 1800 The VillagesPunya Clinic 1070 Flagler Avenue Leesburg PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE TROUBLE SLEEPING?Shakti Narain, M.D. FCCP Accepting New Patients LRDA SLP DSRDRSCenterLRDA SLP DSRDRSCenter Protect and Serve Thank a law enforcement professional today for their service.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com BEST TRAVEL SCOOTER only$699 1323 S. 14th Street (US Hwy 27) Leesburg Easy to break down only 5 pieces!Lightweight the heaviest part is only 29 lbs! OBITUARIESBarbara E. DevendorfBarbara E. Devendorf passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 at the age of 85. She was born on January 22, 1928 in East Syracuse, NY to the late Mar tin and Lucy Lawler. She was employed for many years as an ofce manager in the medical eld in New York, but has made her home here in The Plantation since 1992. Barbara en joyed golng, but her true passion was play ing bridge. She is sur vived by her loving hus band of 62 years, Paul Devendorf, of Lees burg, one son; Doug las (Jean) Devendorf of Fulton, NY, two daugh ters-in-law Sandra and Vicki Devendorf, ve grandchildren, Wayne, Neil and Ian Devendorf, Jimmy and Justin Keller and one greatgrand daughter, Katie Ann Devendorf. Barba ra is also survived by a brother; Richard (Joy) Lawler of Zephyrhills, FL, and four sisters; Jeanne (Herbert) Bills of Port Orange, FL, Viv ian (Glenn) Cooper of Pennellville, NY, Mary Lou (Edward) Brown of Phoenix, NY, and Jac queline (Carl) Caltabiano of New Smyrna Beach, FL. a sister-inlaw Jean Lawler, and many nieces and neph ews. She was preceded in death by two sons; Wayne and Richard Devendorf, and a brother; Martin Lawler Jr. A me morial service for Bar bara will be held in the Page-Theus Funeral Home on Tuesday, Jan 14th at 1:30 / p .m. Visi tation will be at the funeral home on Tuesday from 12:30 until the time of services. Burial will take place at a later date in Mt. Adnah Cemetery in Ful ton, NY. Memorials in Barbaras honor may be directed to the Corner stone Hospice, Tavares, FL. Page-Theus Funer al Home And Crema tion Services www.pag etheus.comHarold Richard JohnstonHarold Richard John ston, 71, of Lisbon died unexpectedly Wednesday, January 8, 2014. He was born January 18, 1942 in Dawson, GA to the late Grover R and Julia C Johnston. He was a member of the Lisbon Church of God and loved the Geor gia Bulldogs and NA SCAR. He leaves be hind a grieving family of a daughter, Denise Johnston of Ellijay, GA; 2 granddaughters, Car ly of Seattle, WA and Marsha Taylor of Ellijay, GA; grandson, Chase Radcliff of CA; 3 great-grandchildren; 3 stepchildren, Dar rel, Debbie and Shir ley; 2 sisters, Sar ah Sullivan and Yvette Shuttlesworth both of Lisbon; 2 nephews, Trent and Vance (Jodie) Sullivan; niece, Michelle (Paul) White; 3 great-nieces and a great nephew along with his beloved dogs, Pepper and Heidi. He Will Be Missed! Visita tion for Harold will be held 6:00pm 8:00pm, Monday, January 13, 2014 in the funeral home. Funeral services will be 10:00am, Tuesday, January 14, 2014 in the Page-Theus Fu neral Chapel with in terment following the service in Lakeside Memory Gardens, Eu stis. On-line condolences may be shared by visiting www.pagetheus.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Leesburg.DEATH NOTICESRobert L. WilliamsRobert L. Williams, 67, of Mascotte, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.Ruth Rucker Odor SaxonRuth Rucker Odor Saxon, 96, of Tavares, died Saturday, January 11, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Fu nerals & Cremation. DEVENDORF government, but State Board of Education member John Colon said passing a bill will ensure that theres no wiggle room. The changes that Stewart plans to the standards are relative ly minor. She told state legislators earlier this week that one of them would to be include the teaching of cursive writing in schools. Scott initially backed Common Core standards, which set uniform benchmarks for reading, writing and math. But in the last few months he refused to take a rm position on Floridas transition to the new standards, which have been adopted by 45 states and the District of Colum bia. In September, Scott called for public hearings and set the groundwork for the state to pull out of a consortium developing a national test to see if school children are meeting the new standards. The hear ings generated harsh criticism of the stan dards from some par ents who called them a plan by federal bu reaucrats to assert more control over schools. Common Core State Standards are a result of an initiative sponsored by the National Gover nors Association and the Council of Chief State School Ofcers. Opponents see them as the nationalization of education policy and standards, something they say should be left to the states. The new standards are backed by former Gov. Jeb Bush, who helped cre ate the states current A-to-F grading system. Supporters contend that having a shared set of standards will al low for a more accurate state-by-state compar ison of student perfor mance. Rep. Debbie Mayeld, R-Vero Beach, is spon soring a bill that would halt the states implementation of the standards for now. Mayeld praised the governors actions, but said he hoped he would eventually agree to opt out of Common Core com pletely. EDUCATION FROM PAGE A3 IN MEMORY city services, now-interim City Manager Dianne Kramer said at the time. The program will also bene t the city by providing more cost ef fective services to a compact area. An enclave is unincorporated Lake County land surrounded onsever al sides by city land. The city already provides water and sewer service to many of these sites. It was during multiple budget workshops and strategic planning sessions that commissioners emphasized the need to expand the citys tax base with increased land valuation and to increase the resi dent population, Kramer said. Homeowners with an assessed value of approximately $30,000 would see no increase in their annual tax assessment, while water cus tomers would also get a 25 percent reduction in user fees with annex ation, she previously told the board. If all of the identied properties participated in the voluntary an nexation program, the citys land valuation would increase by approximately $28 million and the tax revenue would increase by approxi mately $187,000, she reported. To be considered for annexation on Thursday are 45.6 acres on the south side of County Road 44, west of East CR 44 and Gatch Road; 25.5 acres on the northeast corner of Da vid Walker Drive and Mt. Homer Road; 11 acres on the north side of CR 44, west of Gatch Road and east of Hicks Ditch Road; and 25 smaller parcels ranging in size from .14 to .77 acres. For more information, about an nexing into the city, call the Devel opment Services department at 352483-5460. ANNEX FROM PAGE A3 the existing two lane conguration on the north-south portion of SR 44 into a divided, four-lane highway. It includes bicycle lanes and sidewalks along both sides, as well as curb and gutters. The meeting will be from 5 / p.m. to 7 / p .m., at the City of Mount Dora Community Building. It begins with an open house and includes a brief presentation at 6 / p.m. Project repre sentatives are available to answer questions. Other fast facts: %  en Planned travel lanes are 11 feet wide %  en Planned medians are 19.5 feet wide %  en Bike lanes are four feet wideboth sides of the roadway %  en Sidewalks are ve feet wideboth sides of the roadway %  en Design is anticipated complete by spring 2015 %  en Construction is anticipated to begin the fall 2015 %  en Estimated construction duration is 12 months. ROADS FROM PAGE A3 but no one was injured. The car struck the third bike, a Harley-Davidson, head-on. Cpl. Rich Roman, the crash investigator, said the male driver of the Harley-Davidson was taken to Florida Hospi tal Waterman where he was pronounced dead. The female passenger was airlifted to Orlando Regional Medical Cen ter with critical injuries. The driver of the car was taken to Leesburg Re gional Medical Center with unknown injuries. As of press time, police said they were still trying to reach fami ly members and had not released the victims names. The crash occurred about a mile from Mis sion Inn on Coun ty Road 48 and caused law enforcement to shut down the stretch of SR 19 between Howeyin-the-Hills and Tavares and reroute trafc to allow investigators to sift through the scene and workers to clean up clothing, personal items, a helmet and oth er debris left scattered across the highway. CRASH FROM PAGE A3 The Sumter County Sheriffs Ofce apparently started its investigation after the Department of Children and Families received a complaint against Burris. The arrest afdavit added the sheriffs ofce responded to South Sumter High in Bushnell, where the girl told detectives about the inappropriate touching. Burris later admitted touching the girls breast, genital area and but tocks, the arrest afdavit added. Burris died of natural causes, according to the Assistant State Attor ney Angelina Rodeo, who was pros ecuting the case. Rodeo said Burris could have faced 60 years in prison but turned down a plea offer for 30 years. Rodeo said a woman contended as a 9 year old that Burris had mo lested her in Hernando County but the case was dropped. It reopened after Burris was arrested in the Sum ter County case. Hernando County ofcials couldnt be reached Friday. CASE FROM PAGE A3

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5 presentations. Its a great way to get the community together, of all races, to hon or King said Lew Jones, committee president. Barbara Jones, a committee member and Lews wife, said they de cided to ask Latson to be their rst student keynote speaker after hearing him speak else where. Standing at the podium in a white dress shirt and black bow tie, Latson said he admired the slain civil rights leader and others like him and added noth ing but death could stop him from pursing his dream of living in a colorblind society. Even though the civ il rights activists of the 1960s are now famous American heroes and icons in the present, Dr. King and his colleagues were then just ordinary folks hoping to do ex traordinary things, said Latson. Those valiant men and women recognized that the brutality they endured would lead to a greater good for all citizens black and white. Latsons grandfather, Leonard Reynolds, a Villager also at the breakfast, was a metropolitan policeman in Washington, D.C. on Aug. 28, 1963 when he was as signed to the march. In a light moment during the breakfast, Latson joked that his grandfa ther didnt hear much of Kings speech be cause at the march he was talking with Lena Horne, a popular actress, singer and civil rights activist. Latson said his grandfather thought at the time it was just anoth er good speech by a well-spoken preacher. But years later, he would realize the importance of the speech. Reynolds eventually would ght for equality in his own department, which in 1963 didnt allow black ofcers to drive patrol cars. Although he didnt march the dream of freedom and equali ty was deeply embed ded in him and in others like him who stood up for their rights, Lat son said. Latson said adults needed to ensure they played a positive role in the lives of young peo ple and added the na tion still had a way to go on the road to equality. Although great improvements have been made since the 1960s, we still have a long way to go. America still has not resolved the mat ter of racism because it is deeply embedded in the fabric of society and in the hearts of many in dividuals, said Latson, again quoting Lewis. A record number of eight high school students received scholar ships at the event thanks to a $25,000 donation, Barbara Jones said. Ron Lottes donated $7,500 on behalf of himself and his late wife. KING FROM PAGE A3 from both sides, in a quest dis missed by some as quixotic. Yet apart from Kerrys efforts, Obamas national security team seems to have settled on a largely hands-off, do-no-harm ap proach to developments in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya and Egypt. This has attracted criticism and concern, not least from tra ditional U.S. allies such as the Saudis, who like the Israelis and many members of Congress are wary, if not outright opposed to the administrations engagement with Iran over its nuclear pro gram. Administration ofcials, of course, are quick to deny suggestions of indecision, weakness or, worse, political expedience. They say the president is adopting carefully crafted, prag matic and diplomatic initiatives for each hot spot initiatives de signed to reduce what current ofcials believe was President George W. Bushs reliance on mil itary might and pressure tactics. While the crises engulng the Middle East cannot be blamed on Obama, there are growing fears that the U.S.s Mideast pol icy has become rudderless and reactive, and may be contribut ing to worsening conditions and a rise of Islamic extremism, nota bly in Syria and Iraq. OBAMA FROM PAGE A1

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) MARK SHERMANAssociated PressBOSTON Eleanor McCullen clutches a babys hat knit in pink and blue as she patrols a yel low semicircle painted on the sidewalk outside a Planned Parenthood health clinic on a frigid December morning with snow in the forecast. The painted line marks 35 feet from the clinics entrance and thats where the 77-year-old McCullen and all other abortion protesters and support ers must stay under a Massachusetts law that is being challenged at the U.S. Supreme Court as an unconstitutional infringement on free speech. Arguments are set for Wednesday. Outside the line, McCullen and others are free to approach any one with any message they wish. They risk ar rest if they get closer to the door. With her pleasant demeanor and grandmotherly mien, McCullen has become the new face of a decades-old ght between abor tion opponents assert ing their right to try to change the minds of women seeking abor tions and abortion providers claiming that patients should be able to enter their facilities without being impeded or harassed. In 2000, the Su preme Court upheld a different buffer zone in Colorado in a de cision that some free speech advocates, who also support abortion rights, heavily criticized. Noted First Amendment law yer Floyd Abrams recently called the deci sion in Hill v. Colorado what may well be the most indefensible First Amendment rul ing so far this century. The three dissenters in that case Jus tices Anthony Ken nedy, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas remain on the court. They have been joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Jus tice Samuel Alito, who may be willing to pro vide the two addition al votes in support of the protesters. McCullen and oth er abortion opponents sued over the limits on their activities at Planned Parenthood health centers in Bos ton, Springeld and Worcester. At the lat ter two sites, the protesters say they have little chance of reaching patients arriving by car because they must stay 35 feet from the entrance to those buildings parking lots. Planned Parenthood provides health exams for women, cancer screenings, tests for sexually transmitted diseases, birth control and abortions at the clinic, although clin ic employees said no abortions were per formed.High court to consider notion of abortion clinic protest-free zones JASON STRAZIUSOAssociated PressNAIROBI, Kenya The death tolls are huge and the individual in cidents gruesome. One estimate says nearly 10,000 people have been killed in South Sudan in a month of warfare, while in neighboring Central African Republic combatants in Muslim-vs.-Christian battles have beheaded children. Sub-Saharan Africa has seen a very violent start to 2014, with rag ing conicts in South Sudan and Central African Republic, as well as continued violence in Congo, and attacks in Somalia and Kenya. Compared to decades past, Africa and its people are suffering from fewer conicts today, but several recent out breaks of violence are cause for concern, said J. Peter Pham, director of the Washington-based think tank Africa Center at the Atlantic Council. The conicts also lack strong international peacekeeping, he said. Peacekeeping in Africa, whether under the formal auspices of the United Nations or those of the African Union, suffers today from the same two limitations which they have been bur dened with since the very rst U.N. peacekeeping mission, the 1960-1964 operation in the Con go (ONUC), namely lack of political will resulting in a weak mandate and lack of adequate forces, he wrote by email. The conict that broke out in South Sudan on Dec. 15 saw violence ra diate across the country as ethnic groups targeted each other. Shortly afterward Uganda dispatched troops and military equipment to aid South Sudans central government from breakaway units of that countrys military. Casie Copeland, South Sudan analyst for the International Crisis Group, said violence in Africa tends to involve other countries and noted a long history of regional involvement in African conicts. The U.N. Securi ty Council on Friday, however, strongly discouraged external in tervention that would exacerbate the military and political tensions. The U.N. has said more than 1,000 people have died in the South Sudan conict. But Copeland, after speaking to U.N. workers, aid actors, gov ernment ofcials and combatants, estimates nearly 10,000 have died. Civilians in the Cen tral African Republic a country where vi olence pits Muslims against Christians have suffered terri bly since armed rebels overthrew the president in March 2013. The mostly Muslim ghters were blamed for scores of atrocities after taking power.Africa sees violent, deadly start to 2014 AP FILE PHOTO Muslim men organized in militias with machetes rough up a Christian man while checking him for weapons in the Miskine neighbourhood of Bangui, Central African Republic.

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AYA BATRAWYAssociated PressJIDDAH, Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia is quiet ly planning to raze slums in one of its largest cities to make way for newer, restored neighborhoods as part of a wider plan to keep up with soaring demand for affordable housing. A gap between what is available on the market and what many Saudis can afford has left people frustrated and accusing the government of corruption. A short age of lowand mid dle-income housing means millions of Saudis cannot afford to buy a home. Young Saudis are especially affected since it takes years of saving before many can afford to buy a home, often a pre cursor to marriage. To address the hous ing shortage and public grumbling, the Red Sea city of Jiddah is a test ing ground for a plan that includes getting rid of most of its roughly 50 unplanned settlements, which comprise a third of its built-up area, according to municipality gures. In their place, th e city plans to build subsi dized housing complex es for Saudis. If this new model for revamping the kingdoms second-largest city succeeds, it would be replicated throughout Saudi Arabia in areas where aging infrastruc ture needs overhaul. The project is new, and even revolutionary, for a country where speaking openly about poverty is taboo and can lead to arrest. There are no ofcial govern ment gures on pover ty levels in Saudi Arabia and several Saudi-based research analysts say there are no mecha nisms in place to permit studies on it. In 2011, Saudi blogger Feras Bugnah was detained for several days with his crew for mak ing a video on poverty that showed slum hous ing in Riyadh. Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 Mission Inn Resort & Club Make a difference in the life of an abused child . become a Guardian ad Litem Volunteer and experience the rewards of helping Lake Countys most vulnerable children. Stand up and speak for a child who has been abused, neglected and abandoned. Our next training begins January 28, 2014 at the UF Extension Agricultural Center, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares. For further information contact Lynn Sennett, Recruiter/Training Guardian ad Litem Program at 352-274-5231 or email Lynn.Sennett@gal.fl.gov .Visit our website at www.guardianadlitem.org JOSEF FEDERMANAssociated PressJERUSALEM It was vintage Ariel Sharon: His hefty body bobbing be hind a wall of security men, the ex-general led a march onto a Jerusalem holy site, staking a bold claim to a shrine that has been in conten tion from the dawn of the Arab-Israeli conict. What followed was a Palestinian uprising that put Mideast peace efforts into deep-freeze. Five years later, Sharon, who died Satur day at 85, was again bar reling headlong into controversy, bulldozing ahead with his plan to pull Israel out of the Gaza Strip and uproot all 8,500 Jewish settlers living there without re gard to threats to his life from Jewish extremists. The withdrawal and the barrier he was build ing between Israel and the West Bank permanently changed the face of the conict and marked the nal lega cy of a man who shaped Israel as much as any other leader. He was a farmer-turned-soldier, a soldier-turned-politician, a politician-turned-statesman a hard-charging Is raeli who built Jewish settlements on war-won land, but didnt shy away from destroying them when he deemed them no longer useful. Sharon died eight years after a debilitating stroke put him into a coma. His body was to lie in state at the parlia ment on Sunday before he is laid to rest at his ranch in southern Israel on Monday, Israeli media reported. Vice Presi dent Joe Biden will lead the U.S. delegation. Sharon suffered his stroke in January 2006 and fell into a coma. Over the past week and a half, doctors reported a sharp decline in his condition as various bodily organs, including his kidneys, failed. On Saturday, Dr. Shlomo Noy of the Sheba Medi cal Center near Tel Aviv said his heart weak ened and he peacefully departed with relatives by his bedside. His death was greeted with the same strong feelings he evoked in life. Israelis called him a war hero. His enemies called him a war criminal. President Barack Obama remembered Sharon as a leader who dedicated his life to the state of Israel. For mer President George W. Bush, who was in the White House during Sharons tenure, called him a warrior for the ages and a partner in seeking security for the Holy Land and a better, peaceful Middle East. Israeli Prime Minis ter Benjamin Netanya hu, a rival and harsh critic of Sharon, said: His memory will be en shrined forever in the heart of the nation. President Shimon Peres, a longtime friend and ri val, said he was an out standing man and an exceptional commander who moved his peo ple and loved them and the people loved him. Sharon, Israels bulldozer in politics, dies at 85 AP FILE PHOTO Ariel Sharon, then Israels Prime Minister-elect, looks up as he touches Judaism holiest site, the Western Wall, in Jerusalem.Poor Saudi slums highlight wider housing problems AP FILE PHOTO Architect Usamah Shehatah points at a map in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNFL: Carolina gearing up for San Francisco / B4 KURT VOIGTAssociated PressFAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Dorian Finney-Smith scored a career-high 22 points as No. 10 Flor ida overcame the absence of leading scorer Casey Prather to snap Arkansas 23-game home winning streak with an 84-82 over time win on Saturday. Finney-Smith, starting in place of Prather, also added a season-high 15 rebounds as the Gators (13-2, 2-0 Southeastern Con ference) won their seventh in row. Florida trailed 66-57 in the closing minutes of regulation, but Scotie Wilbekin sent it into over time with a jumper with two sec onds left that tied the game. Wilbekin nished with 18 points, while Michael Frazier had 15 and Patric Young 10. Ky Madden led the Razorbacks (11-4, 0-2) who had ve players nish in double gures, with 23 points. Arkansas had a chance to all but seal the win with 17.1 seconds re maining in regulation, but Alan dise Harris missed the front end of a 1-and-1 to give Florida the ball back while down 66-64. Wilbekin answered with the game-tying jumper with two sec onds left on the other end for the Gators, who then took control quickly in overtime. Florida played without Prather because of a bone bruise on the senior forwards right knee. Finney-Smith started in the place of Prather, who is averaging 17 points per game this sea son, and had nine points at half time. He continued to have the hot hand in the second half and overtime where he scored vestraight points to put the Gators up 77-69. Following a pair of baskets from Harris, who nished with 11 points, the Razorbacks closed the Florida lead to 82-79 with 21.9 seconds remaining in overtime. However, Harris missed an inside attempt and Wilbekin who had nine points in overtime sealed with win with free throws with 5.4 seconds remaining. DAVID QUINN / AP Florida guard DeVon Walker (25) drives to the basket against Arkansas forwards Jacorey Williams (22) and Coty Clarke, right, during Saturdays game in Fayetteville, Ark. Florida, which entered the game as the 10th-ranked team in the nation, won 84-82 in overtime. RONALD BLUMAssociated PressNEW YORK Alex Rodriguez was dealt the most severe punishment in the history of baseballs drug agreement when an arbitra tor ruled the New York Yankees third base man is suspended for the entire 2014 season as a result of a drug investigation by Major League Baseball. The decision by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz, announced Saturday, cut the suspension issued Aug. 5 by baseball Commissioner Bud Selig from 211 games to this years entire 162-game regular-season schedule plus any postseason games. The three-time Ameri can League Most Valuable Player will lose just over $22 million of his $25 million salary. Rodriguez vowed to continue his ght in federal court. I dont think he has very much of a chance, said Stanford Law School professor emeritus William B. Gould IV, the former chairman of the National Labor Relations Board. There are many cases that are appealed from arbitration awards, but the case law at the Supreme Court level makes success very much a long shot. Rodriguez is the most high-prole play er ensnared by baseballs drug rules, which were rst agreed to in 2002 as management and union attempted to combat the use of TIM BOOTHAssociated PressSEATTLE Marshawn Lynch overpowered the New Orleans Saints in the postsea son again. Lynch ran for 140 yards and two touchdowns, Steven Hauschka kicked three eld goals in blustery conditions and Seattles defense us tered Drew Brees and New Orleans in a 23-15 victory Saturday in the NFC divisional playoff game. The top-seeded Seahawks advanced to the NFC championship game for the sec ond time in franchise histo ry and will host San Francisco or Carolina next Sunday. Seattle last reached the confer ence title game in the 2005 playoffs. Seattle shut out the Saints in the rst half, got Lynchs rst 100-yard game since Week 10 of the regular season and received a spark from the brief return of Percy Harvin before he left with a concus sion. Lynch scored on a 15yard run in the rst half and capped the victory with a 31yard scoring run with 2:40 left that coach Pete Carroll celebrated by jumping into of fensive line coach Tom Cables arms. Lynch stiff-armed Keenan Lewis on his way to the end zone for the clinch ing score that left Centu ryLink Field swaying. Lynch nished with 28 car ries and made up for another shaky day passing by Russell Wilson. Seattles offense was a concern heading into the postseason and, outside of Lynch, did little to quell those worries. Wilson missed on ve of his rst six pass attempts to start the second half but came through with a vital 31-yard completion to Doug Baldwin with 2:57 remaining. ELAINE THOMPSON / AP Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch, top, scores on a 15-yard run while New Orleans cornerback Corey White (24) tries to make the stop in Saturdays NFC divisional playoff game in Seattle. ELISE AMENDOLA / AP New York Yankees Alex Rodriguez sits in the dugout during a game against Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park in Boston. A-Rod banned for 14 seasonSEE A-ROD | B2No. 10 Gators stop Hogs in OT Seahawks rumble past Saints

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 17 17 .500 Brooklyn 15 21 .417 3 New York 13 22 .371 4 Boston 13 24 .351 5 Philadelphia 12 24 .333 6 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 27 10 .730 Atlanta 20 17 .541 7 Washington 16 18 .471 9 Charlotte 15 22 .405 12 Orlando 10 26 .278 16 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 29 7 .806 Chicago 16 18 .471 12 Detroit 15 22 .405 14 Cleveland 13 23 .361 16 Milwaukee 7 28 .200 21 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 28 8 .778 Houston 23 14 .622 5 Dallas 21 16 .568 7 Memphis 16 19 .457 11 New Orleans 15 20 .429 12 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 27 9 .750 Portland 27 9 .750 Denver 18 17 .514 8 Minnesota 18 18 .500 9 Utah 12 26 .316 16 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 Golden State 25 14 .641 1 Phoenix 21 14 .600 3 L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 11 Sacramento 12 22 .353 11 Fridays Games Indiana 93, Washington 66 Detroit 114, Philadelphia 104 Atlanta 83, Houston 80 Minnesota 119, Charlotte 92 Memphis 104, Phoenix 99 Dallas 107, New Orleans 90 Brooklyn 104, Miami 95,2OT Chicago 81, Milwaukee 72 Cleveland 113, Utah 102 Sacramento 103, Orlando 83 Golden State 99, Boston 97 L.A. Clippers 123, L.A. Lakers 87 Saturdays Games Houston at Washington, late Brooklyn at Toronto, late New York at Philadelphia, late Phoenix at Detroit, late Charlotte at Chicago, late Milwaukee at Oklahoma City, late New Orleans at Dallas, late Orlando at Denver, late Boston at Portland, late Todays Games Cleveland at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Memphis, 6 p.m. Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Mondays Games Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m. Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at New York, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Orlando at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Denver at Utah, 9 p.m. College Saturdays scores Men EAST American U. 69, Colgate 62 Boston U. 89, Lafayette 78 Brown 91, Daniel Webster 50 Bucknell 61, Holy Cross 57 Buffalo 76, E. Michigan 66 Columbia 104, Cent. Pennsylvania 78 Cornell 77, Oberlin 55 Drexel 93, Northeastern 88, 2OT George Washington 69, Rhode Island 56 Harvard 61, Dartmouth 45 Indiana 79, Penn St. 76 Memphis 79, Temple 69 Mount St. Marys 88, St. Francis (NY) 82 Pittsburgh 80, Wake Forest 65 Robert Morris 71, Bryant 67 Sacred Heart 71, Fairleigh Dickinson 67 St. Francis (Pa.) 75, CCSU 67 Syracuse 57, North Carolina 45 Towson 60, UNC Wilmington 53 UMBC 79, Maine 76 UMass 73, St. Bonaventure 68 Villanova 74, St. Johns 67 Wagner 84, LIU Brooklyn 70 Yale 88, Baruch 49 SOUTH Boston College 62, Virginia Tech 59 Clemson 72, Duke 59 Georgia Tech 74, Notre Dame 69 Incarnate Word 78, New Orleans 55 Jacksonville 76, Florida Gulf Coast 69 Kentucky 71, Vanderbilt 62 LSU 71, South Carolina 68 Liberty 85, VMI 80 Louisiana-Lafayette 90, Texas-Arlington 70 Missouri 70, Auburn 68 SC-Upstate 84, Lipscomb 70 SE Louisiana 85, Abilene Christian 77, 2OT UNC Asheville 84, Presbyterian 70 W. Carolina 68, Georgia Southern 67 Winthrop 85, Charleston Southern 68 MIDWEST Indiana St. 62, Bradley 59 Kansas 86, Kansas St. 60 Marquette 67, Seton Hall 66 Michigan St. 87, Minnesota 75, OT N. Dakota St. 87, IUPUI 64 Saint Louis 67, Dayton 59 W. Michigan 78, Miami (Ohio) 77, OT Weber St. 72, North Dakota 60 SOUTHWEST Baylor 88, TCU 62 Florida 84, Arkansas 82, OT Oklahoma 87, Iowa St. 82 Tulane 73, North Texas 62 No. 10 FLORIDA 84, ARKANSAS 82, OT FLORIDA (13-2) Finney-Smith 7-15 5-8 22, Yeguete 1-3 5-8 7, Hill 3-7 0-0 6, Frazier II 4-7 3-4 15, D. Walker 0-4 2-2 2, Young 4-9 2-2 10, Wilbekin 4-12 8-10 18, Kurtz 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 25-59 25-34 84. ARKANSAS (11-4) Clarke 5-12 3-4 16, Portis 6-16 2-4 14, Madden 9-16 0-0 23, Gulley III 0-2 1-4 1, Qualls 2-10 5-6 10, Harris 4-8 3-5 11, Scott Jr. 0-1 2-2 2, Bell 1-5 2-2 5, Haydar 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 0-0 0-0 0, Kings ley 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 27-72 18-27 82. HalftimeArkansas 36-35. End Of RegulationTied 66. 3-Point GoalsFlorida 9-25 (Frazier II 4-7, Fin ney-Smith 3-7, Wilbekin 2-5, Hill 0-1, Yeguete 0-1, D. Walker 0-4), Arkansas 10-24 (Madden 5-10, Clarke 3-5, Bell 1-3, Qualls 1-4, Haydar 0-1, Gulley III 0-1). Fouled OutHarris, Young. ReboundsFlor ida 44 (Finney-Smith 15), Arkansas 45 (Clarke 14). AssistsFlorida 13 (Hill 5), Arkansas 12 (Clarke, Madden, Qualls 3). Total FoulsFlorida 20, Arkansas 24. A,040. No. 18 FLORIDA ST. 68, MIAMI 63 FLORIDA ST. (14-1) Jones 6-21 1-2 17, Delgado 4-9 2-4 10, Brown 2-12 0-1 4, Slaughter 2-4 3-5 7, Howard 11-17 5-8 27, James 0-0 0-0 0, Bingley 0-3 1-2 1, Coleman 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 26-68 12-22 68. MIAMI (9-6) Saunders 5-12 2-2 16, Williams 6-12 0-1 12, Mot ley 4-12 0-1 8, McGuire 1-7 2-5 4, Brown 2-8 0-0 4, Dennis 5-13 4-6 15, Thomas 0-2 0-0 0, Sterling 0-0 2-2 2, Hayes 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 24-68 10-17 63. HalftimeMiami 33-31. 3-Point GoalsFlorida St. 4-13 (Jones 4-9, Coleman 0-1, Brown 0-3), Miami 5-21 (Saunders 4-10, Dennis 1-4, McGuire 0-1, Hayes 0-1, Brown 0-1, Motley 0-2, Thomas 0-2). Fouled OutHayes. ReboundsFlorida St. 49 (Howard 18), Miami 47 (Williams 11). AssistsFlorida St. 14 (Delgado 10), Miami 12 (Motley 5). Total Fouls Florida St. 17, Miami 22. A,227. Women EAST American U. 72, Colgate 55 Bucknell 83, Holy Cross 79, OT CCSU 80, Wagner 71 Creighton 97, Providence 65 Fordham 70, Richmond 59 Georgetown 85, Butler 79 Harvard 73, Dartmouth 63 La Salle 78, UMass 41 Lafayette 68, Boston U. 63 Loyola (Md.) 70, Lehigh 64 Maine 64, Binghamton 51 NJIT 48, Brown 43 Navy 74, Army 64 New Hampshire 71, Stony Brook 68, OT Princeton 84, Penn 53 Rhode Island 59, George Mason 40 Robert Morris 84, Bryant 73 Rutgers 64, SMU 54 St. Francis (NY) 69, LIU Brooklyn 48 St. Francis (Pa.) 111, Fairleigh Dickinson 89 UConn 80, Temple 36 SOUTH Appalachian St. 61, Samford 47 Bellarmine 85, Missouri St. 65 Campbell 75, Coastal Carolina 68 Chattanooga 77, W. Carolina 57 Coppin St. 68, Savannah St. 53 Davidson 67, Elon 62 Furman 82, Wofford 58 Hampton 79, Delaware St. 39 Incarnate Word 67, New Orleans 38 Jacksonville 74, North Florida 42 Jacksonville St. 61, E. Illinois 46 Longwood 59, Gardner-Webb 57 Louisiana-Monroe 78, Texas St. 52 NC A&T 69, Bethune-Cookman 55 Norfolk St. 73, Md.-Eastern Shore 66 SC State 80, Morgan St. 53 Stetson 91, ETSU 62 Tulane 92, Old Dominion 62 UAB 63, Marshall 57 UNC Asheville 68, Radford 61 UT-Martin 82, Belmont 53 MIDWEST Duquesne 59, Saint Louis 47 IUPUI 71, N. Dakota St. 46 Marquette 73, Xavier 67 Milwaukee 75, Green Bay 64 Oakland 78, Detroit 63 UMKC 83, Chicago St. 60 W. Illinois 84, Nebraska-Omaha 62 SOUTHWEST Cincinnati 59, Houston 50 Sam Houston St. 51, Nicholls St. 50 UTEP 97, Tulsa 66 HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 44 28 14 2 58 128 98 Tampa Bay 45 27 14 4 58 132 109 Montreal 45 25 15 5 55 115 106 Detroit 44 19 15 10 48 115 125 Toronto 46 21 20 5 47 125 141 Ottawa 45 19 18 8 46 129 145 Florida 44 17 21 6 40 104 137 Buffalo 43 12 26 5 29 75 120 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 46 32 12 2 66 150 111 Washington 44 22 16 6 50 135 133 Philadelphia 45 23 18 4 50 120 125 N.Y. Rangers 46 23 20 3 49 114 123 Carolina 45 19 17 9 47 111 128 New Jersey 45 18 18 9 45 104 113 Columbus 44 20 20 4 44 120 126 N.Y. Islanders 46 17 22 7 41 126 150 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 44 31 8 5 67 161 99 Chicago 46 29 8 9 67 169 127 Colorado 44 27 12 5 59 128 113 Minnesota 46 24 17 5 53 112 115 Dallas 44 20 17 7 47 125 135 Nashville 45 19 20 6 44 108 135 Winnipeg 46 19 22 5 43 125 139 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 46 33 8 5 71 155 116 San Jose 45 28 11 6 62 148 115 Los Angeles 45 27 13 5 59 118 93 Vancouver 46 24 13 9 57 123 114 Phoenix 43 21 13 9 51 130 131 Calgary 44 15 23 6 36 100 142 Edmonton 47 15 27 5 35 123 164 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Fridays Games N.Y. Rangers 3, Dallas 2 Washington 3, Toronto 2 Columbus 3, Carolina 0 N.Y. Islanders 2, Colorado 1, OT Edmonton 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Vancouver 2, St. Louis 1 Saturdays Games Tampa Bay 6, Philadelphia 3 Chicago at Montreal, late Florida at New Jersey, late Ottawa at Nashville, late Columbus at Winnipeg, late Colorado at Minnesota, late Anaheim at Phoenix, late Pittsburgh at Calgary, late Detroit at Los Angeles, late Boston at San Jose, late Todays Games Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Dallas, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Nashville, 7 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Mondays Games Calgary at Carolina, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.TRANSACTIONSBASEBALL MLB ARBITRATION PANEL Reduced the suspension of N.Y. Yankees 3B Alex Rodriguez from 211 games to 162. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS Signed F James Nunnally to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS Named Bryan Cox defensive line coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES Activated F Cody Hodgson from injured reserve. Recalled D Brayden McNabb from Rochester (AHL). Sent D Rasmus Ristolainen and LW Johan Larsson to Rochester. Loaned C Mikhail Grigorenko to Quebec (QMJHL). NEW YORK RANGERS Assigned F J.T. Miller to Hartford (AHL). Reassigned G Scott Stajcer from Greenville (ECHL) to Hartford. ST. LOUIS BLUES Signed F Ryan Reaves to a four-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS Reassigned C Michael Latta to Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League HARTFORD WOLF PACK Claimed F T.J. Hensick off waivers from Abbotsford. ECHL SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS Loaned D Ryan Grimshaw to Rochester (AHL). COLLEGE PENN STATE Named James Franklin football coach.TV2DAY FIGURE SKATING 3 p.m.NBC U.S. Championships, at BostonGOLF 7 p.m.TGC PGA Tour, Sony Open, nal round, at HonoluluMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m.FS1 Southern Miss. at Tulsa1:30 p.m.CBS Iowa at Ohio St.2 p.m.CBSSN SMU at Louisville2:30 p.m.NBCSN La Salle at Duquesne3 p.m.FS1 Colorado at Washington5 p.m.FS1 Stanford at Oregon8 p.m.ESPNU Maryland at Florida State10 p.m.ESPNU Arizona State at UCLANATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 6 p.m.NBA Cleveland at SacramentoNATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 1 p.m.FOX NFC Divisional Playoff, San Francisco at Carolina4:30 p.m.CBS AFC Divisional Playoff, San Diego at DenverNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 7 p.m.NBCSN Philadelphia at N.Y. RangersSOCCER 9:05 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Newcastle at Manchester City11:10 a.m.NBCSN Premier League, Liverpool at Stoke CityTENNIS 7 p.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, Australia3 a.m.ESPN2 Australian Open, rst round, at Melbourne, AustraliaWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NoonFSN Texas at West Virginia2:30 p.m.SUN South Carolina at Auburn3 p.m.ESPN Purdue at Penn St.5 p.m.ESPN Tennessee at VanderbiltSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED steroids and other per formance-enhancing drugs. In sustaining more than three-quar ters of Seligs initial penalty, Horowitzs de cision will be widely viewed as a victory for the 79-year-old Selig, who has ruled baseball since 1992 and says he intends to retire in Jan uary 2015. A 14-time All-Star, Rodriguez has been baseballs highest-paid player under a $275 million, 10-year contract. He has spent parts of the last six sea sons on the disabled list and will be 39 years old when he is eligible to return to the eld in 2015. He is signed with the Yankees through the 2017 season. Rodriguez admitted ve years ago he used performance-enhancing drugs while with Texas from 2001-03 but has denied using them since. He already sued MLB and Selig in Oc tober, claiming they are engaged in a witch hunt against him. The number of games sadly comes as no surprise, as the deck has been stacked against me from day one, Rodriguez said in a statement. This is one mans decision, that was not put be fore a fair and impar tial jury, does not involve me having failed a single drug test, is at odds with the facts and is inconsistent with the terms of the Joint Drug Agreement and the Ba sic Agreement, and re lies on testimony and documents that would never have been al lowed in any court in the United States be cause they are false and wholly unreliable. The Major League Baseball Players As sociation had led a grievance last summer saying the discipline was without just cause. The 65-year-old Horowitz, a Califor nia-based lawyer who became the sports in dependent arbitrator in 2012, heard the case over 12 sessions from Sept. 30 until Nov. 21. Technically, he chaired a three-man arbitration panel that included MLB Chief Operating Ofcer Rob Manfred and union General Counsel Dave Prouty. The written opinion was not made public. In Rodriguezs only partial victory, Horow itz ruled he is entitled to 21-183rds, or about 11.5 percent, of his salary this year, a person familiar with the de cision said, speaking on condition of ano nymity because the de cision was not made public. That comes to $2,868,852.46. Bas eballs drug agreement says the amount of lost pay shall match the number of regular-season games suspended, regardless of days over the season, which is 183 days this year. Despite the ban, baseballs drug rules allow Rodriguez to participate in spring training and play in exhibition games, al though the Yankees may try to tell him not to report. New York gures to be happy with the deci sion, which eliminates uncertainty and gives the Yankees additional money to sign Japanese pitcher Masahiro Tanaka or other free agents while remaining under the $189 million luxury tax threshold. MLB was largely pleased. While we believe the original 211-game sus pension was appropriate, we respect the decision rendered by the panel and will focus on our continuing efforts on eliminating per formance-enhancing substances from our game, MLB said in a statement. The union said it strongly disagrees with the ruling but added we recognize that a nal and bind ing decision has been reached. We respect the col lectively-bargained ar bitration process which led to the decision, the unions statement add ed. Picked rst in the 1993 amateur draft, Ro driguez reached the majors at age 18 with Seattle and was an AllStar by 20. He seemed destined to become one of the greatest play ers in the history of the game, and appeared in line to break the career home run record he ranks fth with 654. This injustice is MLBs rst step toward abolishing guaranteed contracts in the 2016 bargaining round, in stituting lifetime bans for single violations of drug policy, and fur ther insulating its cor rupt investigative program from any variety of defense by accused players, or any variety of objective review, Rodriguez said. I have been clear that I did not use per formance-enhancing substances as alleged in the notice of disci pline, or violate the Basic Agreement or the Joint Drug Agreement in any manner, and in order to prove it I will take this ght to feder al court. I am condent that when a federal judge reviews the en tirety of the record, the hearsay testimony of a criminal whose own records demonstrate that he dealt drugs to mi nors, and the lack of credible evidence put forth by MLB, that the judge will nd that the panel blatantly disregarded the law and facts, and will overturn the suspension. Rodriguez has claimed Selig was on a vendetta to smear him as a way of burnishing the commissioners image following the Steroids Era. Both sides have admitted paying for evidence as they prepared for the hear ing. Fourteen players were penalized following the Biogenesis probe, and they all accepted penalties. Milwaukee outelder Ryan Braun sat out the nal 65 games of the season, the other players were given 50-game suspensions. A-Rods drug penalty was for his use and possession of numer ous forms of prohibited performance-enhancing substances, including testosterone and human growth hor mone over the course of multiple years, MLB said last summer. His punishment under the labor contract was for attempting to cover up his violations of the program by engaging in a course of conduct intended to obstruct and frustrate the ofce of the commissioners investigation. Rodriguezs penalty was more than dou ble the previous high for a PED suspension, a 100-game ban given last year to San Francisco pitcher Guiller mo Mota for a second offense. Kansas City inelder Miguel Tejada was given a 105-game ban last summer fol lowing a third positive test for amphetamines. A-ROD FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLamar Smith and Zach Brock recorded double-doubles Friday to lead Mount Dora Bible to a 67-44 win at home against Ocoee Legacy Charter. Smith had 23 points and 10 rebounds, while Brock dropped in 11 points and dished out 10 assists, along with ve rebounds in the win. Zac Ward added 20 points and four assists, and Daniel Johnson had 10 points and ve re bounds. Mount Dora Bible im proved to 14-4 with the win. In other late action on Friday, First Acade my of Leesburgs boys basketball team raised its record to 12-0 with a 64-51 road win against Gainesville Cornerstone Charter. Byron Masoline led the way for the Eagles with 19 points, while Luke Lea added 18. In girls basketball, East Ridge got a 4924 win against Winter Springs. Katie Roche led the Knights with 17 points and Charisa Broadway added 12 points.MDB improves to 14-4 with win at home

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 Pro Shop: 352-748-3293352-748-010050 Continental Blvd Hwy 44 East Wildwood, FL 34785www.continentalcountryclub.comRestaurant 352-748-0050 Real Estate 352-748-9225Affordable 55+ Resort Living in a Resident-Owned Community Stephen Wresh Golf AcademyHome of 40 Days to Better GolfPrivate, Couple & Group Lessons by Appointment352-267-4707Please call our Pro-Shop for availability, memberships and reservations.352-748-3293Group Rates Available Tee time 5 days in advance. Expires 1/31/2014.ACTIVE MILITARY OR SPECIAL SERVICES(Police, Fire Rescue, etc.)All rates subject to change without notice. 18 Holes for$34 Plus TaxCome Play Continental Country Club For the First Time Again...$1000+tax RESTAURANT OPEN TO PUBLIC Stephen Wresh Golf Academypresents Tour Technique Short Game ClinicsCall(352)267-4707to registerLocated at Continental Country Club, 15 minutes from The VillagesPresented by: PGA ProfessionalsStephen Wresh and Randy JoynerJan. 20th, 10:00-12:00 Chipping & Putting $55 Jan. 20th, 2:00-4:00 Pitching & Bunkers $55 Including COLLEGE BASKETBALL JOHN KEKISAssociated PressSYRACUSE, N.Y. C.J. Fair scored 20 points, Jerami Grant had 12 points and a career-high 12 rebounds, and No. 2 Syracuse beat North Carolina 57-45 Saturday in an Atlantic Coast Confer ence marquee matchup. Syracuse (16-0, 3-0) evened its all-time record against the North Carolina (10-6, 0-3) to 4-4. UNC started 0-2 in ACC play three times in the past ve years and ve times overall, and the loss to Syra cuse equaled the worst conference start in school history in 199697, Dean Smiths nal year as head coach. The last time North Carolina scored fewer than 45 points was in a 56-44 loss to eventual national champion Villanova in the Southeast Regional nal of the 1985 NCAA tour nament. The Tar Heels also beat North Carolina State 45-44 in February 1997. UNC coach Roy Williams dropped to 1-4 against Syracuse, the most notable setback an 81-78 loss to the Or ange for the 2003 national championship in New Orleans when he was coach at Kansas. Syracuse also beat Kansas in the 1996 NCAA tournament by three points (60-57) to reach the Final Four. North Carolina was coming off a home 63-57 loss to Miami in which the Tar Heels shot just 31 percent (20 for 65) and nished with a season-low scoring output against Miamis zone. This game, which featured teams with a combined 3,989 wins (UNC is third with 2,100 and Syracuse fth with 1,890) was decided by a dominant rst half and strong defense by the Orange. Tyler Ennis nished with 10 points and seven assists to go with a season-high four turnovers, and Trevor Cooney had 10 points despite a woe ful shooting game. He was 4 of 17 and 2 of 12 from long range. Marcus Paige led North Carolina with 17 points and James Michael McAdoo had 15 points and nine re bounds. Center Joel James, who returned to the North Carolina line up Wednesday night against Miami after missing four straight games and most of a loss to Texas on Dec. 18 with a right-knee injury, played only 10 minutes and did not score. J.P Tokoto nished with three points on 1-of-6 shooting. UNC shot 2 of 12 from behind the arc and 20 of 51 (39.2 per cent) overall and was outrebounded 41-35, 17-10 on the offensive glass, netting just two second-chance points. Syracuse led by 12 at halftime and extend ed the lead to 42-24 on Fairs three-point play with 16:18 to go. Paige answered with a 3, McAdoo converted a wide-open layup and Brice Johnson fol lowed with an open slam dunk to keep the Tar Heels in the game. Any chance at a comeback seemed to disappear when En nis fed Cooney for a 3 from the left wing at the shot clock buzzer to boost the Syracuse lead to 47-31 midway through the half and the Orange cruised to the win. The Tar Heels have been inconsistent, beating highly ranked Michigan State, Ken tucky and Louisville but losing to ve un ranked opponents. They were 12th in the preseason poll but dropped out of the rankings in the fourth regular-season voting following losses to Belmont and UAB, returned after a oneweek absence with a win over then-No. 1 Michigan State, then dropped out from No. 19 after opening ACC play with a loss at Wake Forest. North Carolina was intent on knocking off another ranked team and attacked the mid dle of the Syracuse zone with great suc cess at the outset, with McAdoo hitting a pair of jumpers and Tokoto another from the foul line as the Tar Heels gained an 8-4 lead in the rst 4 minutes. The Orange re grouped after a timeout and went on a 17-5 run keyed by Fair and Grant, who did all the scoring. Fair hit a 3 from the wing and converted three free throws to give Syracuse a 19-15 lead and two free throws by Grant completed a 10-0 spurt and put the Orange on top 21-15 at 8:53. The Tar Heels cooled off in a big way after the solid start, unable to penetrate inside. After Paige converted a three-point play with 13:04 left, UNC got only a fast-break slam dunk by McAdoo, a layup by Nate Britt and a jumper in the lane by Leslie Mc Donald in the ensuing 11 minutes and went into the locker room at halftime trailing 34-22. North Carolina was 0 for 8 from beyond the arc in the opening half and pounded on the boards 34-22, failing to get any second-chance points, as Grant pulled down eight rebounds. The Orange werent much better from long range, and Cooney missed all six of his at tempts. But they out scored the Tar Heels 10-2 from the foul line.No. 2 Syracuse beats North Carolina 57-45 NICK LISI / AP North Carolinas Marcus Paige, right, drives past Syracuses Trevor Cooney, left, in the rst half of Saturdays game in Syracuse, N.Y. COLLEGE FOOTBALL WILL GRAVESAssociated PressSTATE COLLEGE, Pa. Penn State has hired James Franklin as its next head coach. Franklin, 41, who led Vanderbilt to bowls in all three of his seasons there, replaces Bill OBrien, who left the Nittany Lions after two years to coach the NFLs Houston Texans. Penn State made the announcement Saturday, after the schools compensation commit tee met to nalize the contract. That committee ap proved the hiring by a 6-0 vote Saturday morning. Franklin won 24 games with the Commodores and is a Pennsylvania native with strong ties instate. Penn State ofcials met with him this week in Florida. He will be asked to build off a foundation that OBrien set amid scandal. Despite a lack of scholarships, a bowl ban and player defections from the late Joe Paternos roster, OBrien led the Nittany Lions to two winning seasons (84, 7-5) while restoring some tempered enthusiasm in Happy Valley. That torch has now been passed to Frank lin, who played at Di vision III East Strouds burg (Pa.). He set seven school records as a se nior, and also has coached at Washington State, Idaho State, Kansas State and Maryland. With the Terrapins, he was offensive coordina tor and assistant head coach. Members of Penn States trustee commit tee on compensation met with Athletic Direc tor Dave Joyner and others Saturday morning to discuss the contract, which the group called excellent for both Franklin and the Nitta ny Lions. Much of Saturdays meeting, at which specic terms of the con tract were laid out for trustees, was done pri vately. The actual vote was public, lasting roughly a minute, and Penn State made the formal announcement of the hiring moments later. Vandys Franklin introduced as next coach at Penn State FRANKLIN JOHN ZENORAssociated PressAlabama ofcially welcomed former Southern California coach Lane Kifn as its offensive coordinator and quar terbacks coach. Kifn returns to the Southeastern Conference after head coaching stints with the NFLs Oakland Raiders, Alabama rival Tennessee and the Trojans. He replaces Doug Nussmeier, who left Alabama for Michigan. He is an outstanding and creative of fensive coach who has great experience both at the college and NFL level, coach Nick Sa ban said in a statement. He has a very good understanding of the game and I have always been impressed with what I saw in the games he called. He coaches with a great deal of passion and enthusiasm, and also does an excellent job as a teacher. Kifn spent a week in Tuscaloosa, Ala., last month ex changing ideas with Sa ban and his staff and observing Alabamas offense. Now, hes the splashiest hire of Sabans tenure at Alabama, which has won three na tional titles in the past ve seasons. The 38-year-old Kifn was 28-15 in threeplus seasons with USC. He was red ve games into last season from one of college footballs marquee jobs. Kifn spent six seasons (2001-06) at USC under Pete Carroll as an assistant, including the nal two as offensive coordinator. He also called plays during his time as a head coach. He spent the 2009 season at Ten nessee, going 7-6 before leaving to replace Car roll. We want to thank the University of Alabama and Coach Saban for this tremendous oppor tunity, and we feel humbled and honored to be a part of the Crimson Tide family, Kifn said in a statement. Ive al ways had the utmost re spect for what Coach Sa ban has done with his programs. Having the unique opportunity to be here last month, I was able to meet some of the great players and the great people in the or ganization, and Im very excited to start working with them. Now, Kifn is tasked with nding a replacement for quarterback AJ McCarron, the Heisman Trophy runner-up. One potential contender, Alec Morris, posted on his Twitter page Love it after the hiring. Kiffin joins Alabama as coordinator KIFFIN Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE STEVE REEDAssociated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. It doesnt surprise safety Mike Mitchell that the Carolina Panthers are only the third home underdog in the NFL divisional playoffs in the past 20 years. We havent gotten much respect all year, he said. It looks like we still have people to prove wrong. The Panthers (124) are playing the no-respect card after opening the week as a 1-point underdog against San Francisco (13-4), despite de feating the 49ers 10-9 at Candlestick Park on Nov. 10. Panthers wide receiver Steve Smith said the 49ers are likely favored because of their playoff experience. This is the third straight season San Francisco has been to the playoffs under coach Jim Harbaugh, and most of the play ers have returned from last years NFC championship team. The Panthers will make their rst playoff appear ance since 2008 under third-year coach Ron Rivera. That doesnt seem to bother Rivera. No, because two years ago (the 49ers) didnt have any play off experience and they did pretty well, Rivera said. Harbaugh, who was teammates with Rivera with the Chicago Bears, also downplayed the experience factor. Ive always really felt that where youre going is a heck of a lot more important than where youve come from, Harbaugh said. Rivera said the Pan thers got some play off-type experience by winning a number of big games during the season they beat New England and New Orleans along with San Francisco to battle back from a 1-3 start to win the NFC South and secure a rst-round bye. The Panthers sacked Colin Kaepernick six times and limited him to 91 yards passing and 16 yards rushing in the rst meeting in a win that defensive end Greg Hardy said proved we were a contender. Kaepernick said hes eager to bounce back from perhaps the most disappointing game of his career against Carolina. When asked what the Panthers did that was so effective, he said I think it was more of what we did to ourselves. I didnt play well. Being the home un derdogs might not be a bad thing for the Pan thers. According to the Glantz-Culver Line, one of the two home divisional playoff underdogs since the 1994 season was the Pan thers, who upended the Dallas Cowboys in the very same stadium theyll face the 49ers in today. Three things to watch between the 49ers and Panthers:CRABTREE, DAVIS IMPACT The 49ers lost tight end Vernon Davis to a concussion early in the last meeting with Car olina, while top 2012 wide receiver Michael Crabtree had yet to re turn from a torn right Achilles tendon that required surgery in May. In ve regular-season games since his return, Crabtree had 19 receptions for 284 yards and a touchdown and he caught eight passes for 125 yards in a 23-20 wild-card win at Green Bay last week.SMITHS LEFT KNEEPanthers wide receiver Steve Smith said he will play despite a sprained left knee. Smith returned to prac tice this week, but isnt sure what to expect when he steps on the eld Sunday. Its not about can I go, its about how con dent do I feel when I am going? I will play Sunday, Smith said. But its how much of that I dont worry about the knee. Thats when the condence increas es.NEWTONS FIRSTPanthers quarter back Cam Newton has thrived in the nation al spotlight in college and on big stages like Monday night this sea son. But this will be the third-year quarter backs rst foray into the NFL postseason, so it will be interesting to see how he responds to the pressure. Its simply about seizing the moment, Newton said.Underdog Panthers look to upend 49ers again BOB LEVERONE / AP Carolina quarterback Cam Newton (1) hurdles New Orleans David Hawthorne (57) during a game earlier this season in Charlotte, N.C. Newton will lead the underdog Panthers into todays NFC playoff game against San Francisco. ARNIE STAPLETONAssociated PressDENVER No quar terback has been to the playoffs more than Peyton Manning or experienced more heartache there, either. Only once in his pre vious dozen trips to the postseason party has Manning put his n gerprints on the Lom bardi Trophy. His 9-11 postseason record stands in stark contrast to his 167-73 regular season mark and includes eight rstround exits, none more scarring than last years AFC Divisional roundhome loss to Baltimore as the AFCs top seed. He also lost his rst playoff game in Indianapolis as the No. 1 seed after the 2005 season, then bounced back to win it all the next year. Since then, hes won just two of seven playoff games and lost his last three. The meticulous quarterback renowned for his unrivaled work ethic and painstaking preparation doesnt believe thats because he grinds too much in Jan uary. I really dont believe so, Manning said as he prepared for todays showdown between his Denver Broncos (13-3) and the San Di ego Chargers (10-7). I know people its easy to summarize, to take a whole bunch of foot ball seasons and lump them together. I per sonally dont believe in that theory. Manning set a slew of records this season, including 55 TD passes and 5,447 yards through the air as the Broncos became the highest-scoring team of the Super Bowl era. Five players scored 10 or more touchdowns. No team in history had ever had more than three players accom plish that feat. Yet for all his records and all his greatness, Mannings fault-nders point to his cold-weather record its 4-7 in sub-freezing temperatures at kickoff and his playoff prat falls his 11 losses are tied with Brett Favre for most in NFL history to suggest he wont cap it all off with a championship in the rst outdoor Super Bowl in a cold-weather city next month. Heres the thing about the cold: In many of those games, Manning had the lesser team. Thats why he was on the road. And sometimes, he only played a series or two because his team had already clinched its playoff slot, but the loss went next to his name nonethe less. And in the playoffs, you could point the nger at his support ing cast as much as you could at him, if not more. If Rahim Moore doesnt make one of the biggest blun ders in playoff history last year, Manning would be hailed for his fourth-quarter touchdown toss to beat the Ravens and not lam basted for his interception in overtime. And maybe now hed be try ing to defend a Super Bowl title instead of seeking atonement. That scarring defeat has driven Manning for 365 days. So doggedly deter mined to rectify that disappointment, Manning at times this season seemed in a hur ry just to get back here. The regular season took on an air of being 20 preseason games with the real opener coming today. Yet, all week, he was relaxed, embracing the pressure of this time of year. Manning is com ing off his best statis tical season at age 37, just two years removed from the neck sur geries that weakened his throwing arm but strengthened his resolve. Yet, no matter how many more years he has left, he knows he wont get many more chances. And so, hes embracing this latest trip to the playoffs and enjoying the journey, relishing his chance to chase redemption and another ring.No QB has Mannings experience, heartbreak ED ANDRIESKI / AP Denver quarterback Peyton Manning (18) throws during practice on Friday at the Broncos training facility in Englewood, Colo. The Broncos host San Diego today in an AFC playoff game. TOM WITHERSAssociated PressCLEVELAND Jim Tressel has not been contacted by the Browns about their coaching va cancy. On Thursday, he found a way to reach out to them. Ohio States for mer coach, who re mains wildly popular in his home state, told a Columbus radio sta tion that while he has not had any discussions with the Browns it doesnt mean that I dont have any interest in the NFL. Appearing on 97.1 FM, Tressel didnt rule out the possibility that he could be a coach ing candidate sometime soon. The 61-year-old spent 10 seasons at Ohio State, where he led the Buckeyes to a national title before he was red for failing to report vio lations by some players. Tressel is currently a vice president at Akron, but sounded as if hes itching to return to coach ing. Hes been watch ing bowl games and the NFL playoffs with keen interest. Tressel grew up in Berea, where the Browns train and have their headquarters. A report last week that he would be interviewed by the Browns, who are look ing to hire their fourth coach in six years, was quickly shot down. But as long as the Browns search continues, Tressels name will be oated as some Cleveland fans fantasize about the sweater-vested coach taking over their perennial loser. Tressel spent one season as a consultant on Indianapolis coaching staff under Jim Caldwell. He enjoyed and learned from the experience. The Browns are near ing the end of the sec ond week of their coaching search. Theyve interviewed at least four known candidates: New England offensive coor dinator Josh McDaniels, Seattle defensive coor dinator Dan Quinn, Ar izona defensive coordinator Todd Bowles and Green Bay quarterbacks coach Ben McAdoo. McDaniels removed himself from consideration on Wednesday, and a person fa miliar with the decision told the AP he did so be cause he wasnt guaran teed he was the favorite. Tressel says he has not been contacted by Cleveland

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Democrats understand that we have choicesDemocrats are free from the control of the minority tea par ty and the top one percent of the wealthy when working to help their fellow citizens. They dont blindly follow the directives of their most radical members. They understand that international diplomacy and sanctions can be successful in changing the behavior of our enemies instead of borrowing billions of dollars from the Chinese and sending our fellow citizens into a war of choice resulting in a huge cost of lives, limbs, mental health and treasury which will be a drain on our society for decades as we rightly spend to provide our veterans with the assistance they deserve over the decades ahead. Democrats understand that we as a nation have choices regarding how well we compete against rising economic powers like China. We can choose to invest in education or not. We can choose to regulate business or to allow greed and unpatriotic behavior to turn our economy into shambles which thrust us into the last recession from which we are continually recovering. Democrats understand that neither big government nor small government should be pursued as an end unto itself, but is the result of the programs the country needs and wants to provide for all its citizens so they can pursue health, wealth and happiness. So we have regulations on food imports, food production and controls on drugs. We have federal agencies that work to ensure safeguards for us. We have a department of defense that protects us. We provide minimum safety nets to our citizens in education, social security and medicare, yet we trail other countries on all of these measures. Cutting taxes and decreasing regulations will not help us improve the quality of life and future security of our children and the Democrats understand this. Democrats work to improves citizens lives not just to reduce taxes for the wealthy while allowing the neediest among us to suffer. Just look at how our Republican governor has refused federal medicaid funds which has lost Floridians billions of dollars. Twenty percent of Floridians have no health insurance, while less than 5 percent of Massachusetts residents have no health insurance. Is this a fundamental of Republican conservatism of which we should be proud? Another great reason to vote Democrat is to wake up the good Republicans and to rid our Republican party of the fanatic fringe element that has become so powerful. Many of us Republicans are embarrassed by the behavior of our elected Republicans and want to return to Eisenhower Republicanism. ELTON FOWLER | TavaresWhy do we have a Federal Reserve?Why do we have a Federal Reserve? Answer: So those politicians who want to run this country as a dictatorship can do so. If we the people stopped paying taxes and the currency was backed by gold and silver, we could bring the country to a standstill until the laws were changed to our satisfaction. This would be a democracy of the people that pays this coun trys debts. Instead we have paper federal reserve. The politicians can print more to replace those the taxpaying citizens hoard in an attempt to control the independent and dictatorial government. The only reason to collect taxes today is to keep the citizens weak, since wealth is power. Through taxes, the government has the power to audit your nances and make sure you are not spending money building an army of insur rection to deprive them of their dictatorial powers over you. The Treasury Department has trillions of dollars printed and warehoused. These are held ready to turn loose instantly. Until we get currency backed by gold we are at the mercy of dictators. The feuding between parties is an act following a script. Why else do you think we dont have new par ties starting up? The tea party is run by the Republicans following their script. The old good guy, bad guy game. VERNON HALL | UmatillaNiagara Bottling contract doesnt make senseYou had an article about depletion of Floridas underground aquifers not too long ago and how we should try to have drought-resistant yards and plants. Then I saw in the Dec. 18 paper that the governing board of the St. Johns River Water Management District wants to approve a 20-year contract for Niagara Bottling Co. to take even more water from our aquifer. This just does not make sense to me. How can a few people make that decision that affects all Floridians? Are they getting paid off to approve a foolish request such as this? I say no decision that important should be decided by a few people. It should go to the people of Florida for a vote so we know that not one person is proting by this request. Bottled water should be banned. Tap water should be pure enough for every person in the U.S. to drink and tote with them. CAROLE RIETZEL | Leesburg Voiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third par ties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to ar chive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to let ters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.OURVOICE LETTER of the WEEKC1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORThe latest word on our water sup ply is hardly news but worth not ing nonetheless. The St. Johns River Water Management District is project ing the 18 counties that make up the district including Lake will tap out their groundwater supply by 2035. When that happens, other means will have to be found to meet the shortfall that is forecast to be somewhere around 256 million gallons a day. What is welcome in the districts latest water-supply report is that for the rst time ofcials are talking seriously about the need for conservation measures. Many have long advocated strict conser vation measures and widespread water reuse programs similar to those implemented in the Tampa Bay region, where daily per capita water use is about half what it is in the St. Johns district. Conservation, however, will not be enough, according to the water managers. No, even the best conservation scenario will leave the district, which includes big water users Orlando and Jacksonville, about 40 million gallons short, and probably much more. So the district is looking at greater use of underground storage facilities, aquifer recharge, brackish groundwater from coastal areas and, of course, surface water, notably the Ocklawaha and St. Johns rivers. Desalination is also mentioned, but it is not an option the district has ever been warm to because of its cost. Yet, while the district will seek public input on the water supply plan in the coming weeks, we would encour age water managers to strive to implement a serious, long-term conservation program. Water storage and aquifer recharge are also methods that are environmentally and consumer friendly. Tapping into our surface waters, though, should be a last resort. Because it is easy and relatively cheap, however, it tends to be the rst resort. And make no mistake, with 1,000 lakes in Lake County and a rst-magnitude spring, desperate coastal counties will look inland toward us to slake their thirst. We are pleased the St. Johns district is addressing this problem. As we said at the outset, this is hardly a new reality water experts and environmentalists, indeed everyday Floridians, have been warning about our growing population draining our water supply for more than a generation. We urge St. Johns ofcials to keep their eye on the ball and start addressing the problem by implementing a con servation program that all citizens can contribute to. That is the place to start. We also urge citizens to attend a meeting of the areas legislative delegation Jan. 30 in Tavares, where our lawmakers will begin to hatch plans for dealing with the states looming water crisis. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTDistrict should get serious about water conservation MALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Canoers enjoy the clear water of Alexander Springs in the Ocala National Forest.

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 OTHERVOICESVoices | SUBMIT YOUR OWN GUEST COLUMN: If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OTHERVOICESOTHERVOICES RUSS SLOANGUEST COLUMNIST In 2013, we learned for the rst time about the massive accumulation of tele phone data gathered by our National Secu rity Agency (NSA) on U.S. citizens. Recent ly, Federal Judge Rich ard J. Leon ruled the NSA had overstepped its authority under our Constitution. Im sure that this ruling will wind up before the Supreme Court. In the meantime, I have some suggestions for new NSA assignments that could save and protect billions of U.S. tax dollars. ASSIGNMENT 1: Find out why the IRS sent 655 refund checks to one single address in Kaunas, Lithuania and 343 more checks to a single address in Shanghai, China. Thousands more potentially fraudulent checks went to places in Bulgaria, Ireland and Canada. ASSIGNMENT 2: The U.S. Treasury Inspector General for Taxation said there were probably 1.5 million fraudulent refund checks sent out worth $3.2 million. Go get em NSA. ASSIGNMENT 3: Medicare paid out $23 million to dead people, and Social Security paid out $31 million more to dead people. Gives a new meaning to the term death benets. ASSIGNMENT 4: Over a recent ve year period, federal worker benets were paid out to the tune of $600 million to undeserving recipients. A son received his fathers benet checks for 37 years after his dads death, totaling $515,000. Yes, 37 years. ASSIGNMENT 5: There were 89,000 stimulus checks sent to people who were either dead or in prison. Question for NSA: Who got them and what was done about it? ASSIGNMENT 6: Food stamp fraud, which is a multi-million dollar problem, needs to be corrected. Just one small mom-and-pop convenience store in Palm Beach County ripped off the taxpay ers $2.8 million over four years. The list could go on and on and on. Between the IRS and the NSA, we have billions of dollars invested. Do you think that within the IRS there would be some basic screening program that might catch 655 refund checks going to one address in Lithuania and 343 more to China? With all the computer and monitoring power within the NSA, surely they could determine who is deserving, fraudulent, dead, alive or in prison and collecting unemploy ment checks. Im all for using our technical capabilities to ensure national security under our constitutional authority. But history has shown us that sometimes we cannot even recognize basic questionable behavior. Lee Harvey Oswald, President Kennedys assassin, was known by our FBI to be an avowed communist, who had gone to the Soviet Union, married a Russian girl and returned to the U.S., where he openly championed Castro in Cuba. Yet on November 22, 1963 Oswald was not under the watchful eye of the FBI or anyone else in Dallas and murdered the president. The 9/11 terrorists who took ying lessons in the U.S. seemed only interested in ying the plane but not in landing. Yet no bells went off. More recently, Army Major Nidal Hasan murdered 30 fellow soldiers after clearly showing a history of his disdain for America and our military efforts. Not only was his behavior ignored, he was tolerated and promoted. We have created such a gigantic feder al bureaucratic monster that we waste billions of tax dollars sending money to people who are dead, ineligible and/or undeserving. Yes, NSA may need to redirect some of its snooping efforts. Instead of tracking our citizens phone calls, maybe they could use some of their billion-dollar technical capability to help prevent the fraud and abuse in the IRS, Social Security, food stamps, Medicare, Medicaid, unemployment benets and disability pay ments under Social Security. Surely, if we can track the calls of 300 million phones, we can deter mine who is dead, alive or in prison.A possible new assignment for the NSA in 2014 My wish for the American people is that we take back our government, not from our centrist pres ident who has accom plish much expanding health care for millions; 7.8 million private sec tor jobs (in 44 months); real GDP growth and a decit that is growing at half (4.1 percent) what it was when he took ofce in 2009. Instead, we need to take our government back from the obstruc tionism of the Republi can-controlled House and the libustering Senate. This country needs Congress to get to work. Stop trying to run our government based on austerity measures that have never worked. Start working to raise people out of poverty. We need job growth which cuts unemployment and its costs, food stamps (SNAP) and nancial assistance (TANF). Raise the minimum wage. This puts more money into the economy (employers paying a fair wage, means less government assistance). Improve and update our infrastructure and transportation (high speed Internet and rail) this will bring economic growth to small and large businesses. Expand grants and energy credits for renewable ener gy, which stops the damage to our environment (climate change is a fact and humans are almost entirely the cause). Stop draining billions of dollars from our economy for foreign oil. Stop welfare for the richest corporations and close loopholes in the tax code that allow them to avoid taxes with offshore accounts. Cut unnecessary and excessive defense spending. Expand, dont cut, Social Security and Medicare retirement programs paid for by workers that keep millions of seniors out of poverty. Work to improve the Affordable Healthcare Act. Stop voting to repeal; its a waste of time. Respect womens rights to abortion and birth control. These are per sonal decisions not to be made by politicians. Stop trying to turn our country into a theocracy, we are a democracy that respects all beliefs or none and does not advocate for any religion. Improve our public education system by using the input of teachers, paying them a living wage and showing them the respect they deserve. Stop draining dollars from public education for unnecessary expensive testing, vouchers and private, for-prot char ter schools. These programs have proven to be ineffective. They do not benet students of lower income or improve test scores. Protect consumers from Wall Streets abuses. Strengthen and fund the EPA and FDA. We need clean air, water, safe food and drugs. Strengthen the voters rights laws. We should not be making it more difcult for people to vote. We have no measurable voter fraud, so why would we make people furnish a government ID, often at great expense? It makes us look like a communist country. We need comprehensive immigration reform and common sense gun control laws. This is just a partial list of work that the House Republicans should be doing instead of shutting down the government at the cost of $24 billion to our economy. So, instead of taking another vacation on the taxpay ers dollar, lets see Congress get to work. If not, lets send them home for good in 2014.Kathy Weaver lives in Clermont.Quit the obstructionism in Congress Health ofcials say it appears similar to the one that ran ram pant in 2009. In the 2009-10 u season, 284,000 people died from swine u worldwide. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that the u is in full swing in many parts of the country. The latest CDC gures from the nal week of 2013 show signicant u activity in 25 states, especially in the bigger ones such as New York, Texas and Illinois. Classic u symptoms include aching body, fever, headache, sore throat, nasal congestion, runny nose and extreme sneezing. But any one who has been aficted with this particular strain of u knows that each of those symptoms, which may sound like a common cold, manifest in exceptionally aggressive and uncomfortable ways. And did we mention they can kill? During the 2009 outbreak, many people did not get a u shot because of a shortage of vaccine. But vaccine is plentiful this year, and its available not only at hospitals and clinics but at many pharmacies and even grocery stores. There is no good reason not to get a shot. At particular risk are older adults, children under 5 and anyone who has heart or lung disease, diabetes, asthma or who may be pregnant. The CDC advises everyone to get a u shot each year and take additional preventive action by washing hands and avoiding contact with sick people. But its important to know the signs of the u and treat them immediately. See a doctor and take all the medication prescribed. And dont even think about treating this u as something to power through. It is neither heroic nor admirable to show up at work or school with it. It is stupid for you and inconsiderate of others. This is all common sense, but its amazing how widely its ignored from year to year. So were trying again. Get a shot.Distributed by MCT Information Services.Flu is no joke get a shotAt particular risk are older adults, children under 5 and anyone who has heart or lung disease, diabetes, asthma or who may be pregnant.

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 rfnntb ttrffntfftbfttttrffntfftbftfntrtnnnttfttffttnttfrbftttttfttftffrnftnntntftttttrfnttntffrffntfftbfttfnftttftftfttftttnnttntnnffttnnftntntffnnttfttftftnfftttttftftttffttttttftntfttfttfttnftttfttrnfrttttttftfnttfftttttrtttttnntttftftntftftttnrfttffttnntftttntfttrtfnrnntftntfrttftrttttttftfttntffttfttftttftttt rf nrtbbrrnt nrbbrnr rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtb ntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 r fr n t btn t nn tt t nt t b n rf rf rfrntrbfrnrr nrrntrbfrr rrbrrtrr frbfrnrnr r f n r f r r f r r n r r n r r rb f r b n rt r n r r n r b r rt r n r r n r f r r rn r n rt r b r r n t f b n b r rn n b r r r r r r rt n b r b r r n f r r n r n f r n n r n r r n rn r n n r f r r r r n r r n r rt n n b n f rn f n r n n r f n r r r r b r n r f r t r f t n n b r r f r n r r b n r r r rf r n n r n r rf ntb r r r n r r r r n r f b r f r r r f r r f t f f n r rt n r r n n r n n f n r r r r n n r n n r t r n n r n f n r t r n r r r r r n n r n r n r rt rt n r r r r f b r r r n n r t n r t r f r r r r r n r r n n n f rtt b r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rb t r r r rfnrrfbrr rr rt r t r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rr rrr rrrr rrrr nntt rrrrrr r t r r r rrrrffrrrn frtrrfr fbrrrrrnrr rtrrnfnrfrtr rfnnrnfnrnrrtrrfb nrnrrr rrrrr rrrr 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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rf rfnftbffff ffff rnfbn ff b b f ftr fff n r fff n nrf ff nf fft f frrf b b f t f f t r rf ntb t nnr tfr n fr f frftf nt ffrt ftf t ftf b f t r f t f f r t t t rt b b t b f f t rrt rr frt frtrff b b b n t f t f r f r f f r t t f f f t f t t n f n r f r f f f b f r r n n f r t t b r r f tt b t f t f t tt b nb b n f b t r r f n f f f t r t t f f t f r f r b n r r t n f b f f t f f n n f f f b b b n n f r n f r f n r t r r b f tb b r f f f r n b r n n n f r f bt t f b b f f r f n n t f f b b n f f r t r b b n n t f f b b b f r t f f r f r r t bt b n f r r t t f f f f n n r f f r t bn n b f r t n f r t f b nn r n nn nn tt n n n n b n n r f r t f t tt n f r f r r n f t r f r t f f f f f t r r t r r t b t t f f r f t f f t f f tbt

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t r bttbttb bbtr fbtt r f b r f t r f b t r f r f r bfb bfbfr rf r ff t r n r rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t fn r tb nt ttr frr fbbbfr bt fnnb rrrbtt fbbbt t t r r t b t b f f b t t r fbb rr rrrbtt bffb b rrrbtt btb bttr fbbtt fnnb tbftr btt rtrrr btt t r r t f rrr bffrrr tr btt bttttfr rrf rrr ft btt t f t b f b b rrr rnf ftfb b btt ftbfrtt tbtt fn tn tbt fbbtt rbffbrr rbtt brbffb fn tn tbfbbff rrr ff rb bffr bfbrbtt fbbrf btt fb b r b b t rfntbbttrf rfbttbtt fbft rrnf bttbtb tffb ttfr rbbf r bfbnrbfffb btt b f r b f n rffbbtt rr btt rb rfr rtbfrrr btt b t t r b tbfftb btftbbt fb nb btt r btt brfrbtt bbtbnf r r frtbfr r f b t b t nfbrbrf btt frbtfbbt btfbftrr r r fr r b t t r f frtbf trbtt frbtt tfbt btt b rfbtt rf f fb nb b b t t fb r r btt rr bbtt rtb fbtt fn tbfbb fb bfbb bftrf fttttrfbtt rffbtr rf frb brf f r f f r r b r t r f t f bfbt rrrbtbff frrbtbr btt bnf frt rtfrrtrrr bttfr f b ftrbtt btnbrf bb tbrbtrt bfrr fbbt frtt rr btt rrr rbtt fr b b b t f r r t r f ffb fbfbfbtfrf fb rrtbbf rrfrr fbr b b tbbtt bfbfbtt btt tbtb fbr b b rrb ttrf fbtt rtfrb b fbr bb f f rtrf bbtt rbfb fbtt fbbtt r brtbf btt ttbbnr rtfr btr btt rbtf rtrftbf fb rfbr rrbtt fr rt ffbn tbrrr rfrrrr b b t r t ftrrtt rffrr f f b f r f b t f b f t r r t f f r b f b t f n r b f t b f r r r f t b b f f f b n b t t r rffb fb trr rrf rttbr ff frfrtb rbf b bb f bnr t r f t ttrrtr btb frrbttbt rnft trfbtrrr tbtt bfrrff brf bfbtt bfrr rrr tbfbtt btttrrf rbtt b f f

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 rfnr fnntbb bb rfrntbb rff ntbnt f f n t b n bfrf rrfbftn nbnfrr rffb rrr rrbfff bfn rf nftnnt n tt nbfbnf ntt rrf bnnbrf tn nnrfrf ntnn rrr rftb n n rrf nbfnn ntf n b b f f b t t bnr tn f f n t n f b b nf nn f b f n t brrf f btt n b b t n b n n n b b b b n b b n b b n n b n b t r r t t f f b r n n f n b b t b b bb nt b n brfbf ntt f b f n t n bttfn fr rrrf bff nbtn b f n f rfffnrn rf nbfnn b f bf n bf n rrf rnfnbt btf t tf b b bn rff btb bb fff nb ff fbn b bb frft bb f f r r r f n f f n t nf rfr fbtb nbbn ff frrf fnn bbt ff nn nbf nntn f r t t nb r f r bn n r n bbf f bbbrf f r f n b b t n b n r r n r t r r r r n n b f f r r r n b b f f f b f nrrf ff frbftf r bfrbb br r t t n t t b ff r rff fnrfft bnbtbnt f rff r f n f r r n n n f bf f nnf rfbfnt n f f f n t r n b r f f r r f n f f n b n t bf f n b bff f bbff f f r t t nb r f r bn n r n f b n r r f r f f n t rf ff r r r n b n f b b b n r f r f b f b n frt f f f n n n n f nf nfb rnnrfrrf rf brft t nf n n f f b r r r f n bff f r t t nb r f r bn n r n bff rr ff ntnt bf f b f f f f f f n b f f f f n n b b f n t b b n n b f f f f n b bf tf f f r b r f f r r r f b t b n n t r b r r n n f f r r b n r b r r bf rfrnnbb n b n f f n f n n b n f n b n b f f f r f n b t t n b f n b f n n f n b b n r f f r b b r f f n n n t t n b r f n f b n n n b t bf tf

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014

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E1DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014Moneyscott.callahan@dailycommercial.com OLD GADGETS: Contributing to pollution? / E4 www.dailycommercial.com VIRGINIA BRIDGESThe News & Observer In the beginning, the partners of Chubbys Tacos made long lists of potential business names. They thought about a casual Mexican restaurant mixed with some thing tropical, like Tiki Tacos. Then they did a Web search, only to nd the domain name already in use. We werent getting any where with it, said own er Jody Lytton, who went on to open Chubbys with then-partner Tony Sustaita. Then one night, the two went out drinking and played a game that gener ated potential adult lm star names by combining the name of their rst pet with the name of the street where they grew up. In the game, Sustaitas name was Chubby Herrera. So he said they should name their Mexican eatery Chub by Herreras Taqueria. But Lytton said he could barely get that out of his mouth. I was, like, What about Chubbys Tacos? Lytton said. With that name, a restau rant chain was born in Durham, N.C., on Cinco de Mayo 2008. But unfor tunately for Lytton, now the sole owner, the compa ny was built on a borrowed brand. Six years later, Lytton is paying the price for using a name legally claimed by another business. His out-ofstate expansion aspirations are now limited, and hes at risk of a lawsuit. So Lyttons 2014 plans include re naming and rebranding the business, which has four locations in North Carolina and a fth in the works. Todd Coats, chief creative ofcer for Capstrat, a mar keting and public relations agency in Raleigh, N.C., said small-business owners Skimping on name can land small businesses in trouble COREY LOWENSTEIN / RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER A sign on the salsa bar promotes the new naming contest for the Chubbys Tacos Mexican restaurants at one of the locations in Raleigh, N.C. The restaurants owner wants to franchise his business but must look at changing the name as a different business has the name licensed in another state. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL David Willis makes a cup of coffee at his business Mount Dora Coffee House and Bistro in Mount Dora on Thursday. RICK REEDSpecial to The Daily CommercialWhat will David Willis do for an encore after this seasons run on TVs American Idol? Last year, he and his wife Olivia opened the Mount Dora Coffee House & Bistro after buying and renovating a down town coffee shop at 342 Dora Drawdy Way. This year, while the talented performer still pursues a music career he now has a successful, growing business. Mount Dora Coffee House & Bistro is a popular place to hang out, drink some good coffee or other beverage, eat a meal or sweet and often listen to live entertainment. Thing is, this is going better than I had hoped, but harder than I had planned, said Willis. We provide a cool, groovy place that provides a sense thats warm and cozy. If customers walk out of here with that feeling, its worth every day, every dollar, every minute of sleep lost. After last years remarkable run on the singing competition series, where Willis made it to the lightning round, David and Olivia were trying to decide their next step. They were considering moving to California to follow a music career. But they happened upon the closed coffee shop while looking for an apartment in downtown Mount Dora. Apparently music isnt the only thing they have coursing through their veins. Both had worked as baristas in local coffee shops during high school. MOUNT DORAFormer Idol contestant enjoys running local bistro ANNE DINNOCENZIOAP Retail writerNEW YORK Macys Inc. is cutting 2,500 jobs as part of a reorganization to sustain its protability. Shares rose 5.5 percent in af ter-hours trading Wednesday. The announcement comes on the heels of a strong hol iday shopping season for the department store chain, which also runs the higher-end Bloomingdales chain. Macys said the moves will save it $100 million per year and forecast a 2014 prot above Wall Streets forecasts. Macys has been a standout among its peers throughout the economic recovery and has reaped the benets of its strat egy of tailoring merchandise to local markets. But like oth er merchants, Macys is grap pling with a still cautious shopper. Its also trying to respond to shoppers shift toward buy ing and research on their PCs and mobile devices like smart phones. While Macys will cut jobs, it is also planning to reassign or transfer some workers. Its also adding positions related to on line shopping, a growing area for the company, and warehouses. That will leave its work force level at about 175,000. The Cincinnati-based company plans to close ve stores and open eight others, leaving it with 844 stores nationwide once the changes are complete. Its also shifting merchandising responsibilities for soft home categories like sheets Macys cutting 2,500 jobs in reorganizationWe provide a cool, groovy place that provides a sense thats warm and cozy. If customers walk out of here with that feeling, its worth every day, every dollar, every minute of sleep lost.David Willis PETER SVENSSONAP Technology WriterLAS VEGAS Gadget lovers are slipping on tness bands that track movement and buck ling on smartwatch es that let them check phone messages. Some brave souls are even donning Googles geeky-looking Glass eyewear. For the technology industry, this is ex citing time, but also a risky one. No one really knows whether the av erage consumer can be enticed to make gad gets part of their every day attire. The question is: Can tech companies create wearables with the right mix of function and fashion? Wearable computing devices are ignit ing an explosion of hope and creativity Few wearables balance fashion and function AP PHOTO Fitbug Orb activity trackers are worn by an exhibit representative during the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. TALI ARBELAssociated PressNEW YORK Hey twentysomethings, dreaming of trading in the safety of a regular paycheck to start your own business? Theres no secret sauce. Instead, founders of three companies have obvious tips: Work hard, network and ask for help. Chicago venture capitalist Bruce Bar ron, who has invested in companies includ ing food ordering ser vice GrubHub and pet products website dog gyloot seconds that. He counsels young entrepreneurs to be open to advice. Some young company owners wanted us to write a check and just get out of the way. Those How to get ahead with a short resume AP PHOTO In this undated photo provided by Homejoy, Adora Cheung and Aaron Cheung, siblings and founders of cleaning service Homejoy pose for a photo.SEE YOUNG | E6SEE SMALL | E2SEE GADGETS | E3SEE MACYS | E4SEE BISTRO | E2

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E2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 rfn ttbt f bftJANUARY 13, 2014 11:00 AM 2:00 PMLEESBURG COMMUNITY CENTER 109 E. DIXIE AVE. VENETIAN GARDENSLooking for a Cruise Bargain? Whats new for 2014? Find your next vacation!Join us for our 25th Annual Travel Showcase featuring representatives from these Cruise Lines, Tour Companies, and Area AttractionsGlobus Tours A-Rosa Cruises Carnival Cruises Norwegian Cruises Celebrity Cruises Azamara Cruises Hurst Transportation Pacific Delight Tours Princess Cruises Viking River Cruises Disney Cruises Florida Tour Connection Travel Insured International Oceania Cruises Victory Casino Cruises Monograms Independent Travel Yankee Holidays Cunard Cruises Holland American Cruises MSC Italian Cruises Royal Caribbean Cruises Avalon River Cruises Cosmos Tours Disney Resorts Amtrak VactionsLANDSEAIR TRAVELYour Vacation Specialist Since 1964 PRESENTED BY: Landseair Travel Celebrating 50 Years 1964 2014 secret santasTAKE NOTE FREE SMALL NUGGET TRAYrfnt bt bbb Need Tax Help?Call352-787-1040Open Year Round. should not short change the process of coming up with an effective and appropriate moniker. There are billions of business names al ready in existence, Coats said, so owners should start by listing hundreds of options. This is a quantity game, more than any thing else in the begin ning, Coats said. Coats will generate names by mashing up words, try ing different variations, prexes and sufxes. Owners should con sider their intended au dience, Coats said, and what they will tolerate. Knowing the toler ance of how descrip tive it needs to be, and how much leeway you have in the presentation of that will help to determine the vastness of the long list that you are creating, he said. A younger audience may be more willing to accept irreverent names, Coats said. But with some products or services, such as hotels, descriptive titles or es tablished brands might be more effective. Marketing budget is also a consideration, as obscure or made-up names might require a campaign to give it meaning, Coats said. Small-business owners can narrow their list by asking themselves which names are the most memorable and tell the story of their brand. If you sing them out, do they roll off of your tongue, or do they clang around in your mouth? Coats said. Owners should search the Internet for similar names and negative connotations, and explore registered names on the U.S. Pat ent and Trademark Ofce website. Once small-business owners identify a viable name, they should consider ling an ap plication for a trademark with the U.S. Pat ent and Trademark Ofce, said Justin Ni fong, a patent and in tellectual property at torney and managing partner with NK Patent Law in Durham, N.C. A trademark includes names or symbols used to distinguish the source of goods and services. Typically, a trademark is the name of a business, but logos and slogans also qual ify. For example, Nike registered its swoosh, and Chick-l-A registered Eat mor chikin. Federal registration isnt mandatory and requires a current or future intention for inter state commerce, but has several advantages over common law trademark registration or registra tion with the state, Ni fong said. Benets of federal registration include an owners claim to a mark in a national database, which could deter other businesses from using it, and a legal presumption of own ership in all U.S. states and territories. Common law trademark rights can be at tached to an in-use business name, but the protection is limited to geographic areas in which the company is operating, Nifong said. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Ofce will allow companies to register similar marks if their services are clear ly different, Nifong said. Delta, for example, is a brand associated with both an airline and bath and kitchen faucets. But the federal application process seeks to prevent similar products or services from having brands with similar names that could confuse the consumer. Early on, Lytton did some Internet research on the name Chubbys. He found restaurants with the name El Chub bys and The Original Chubbys in Colorado. Lytton told himself that no one would con fuse those with Chub bys Tacos in North Car olina. Now, Lytton is planning to open anoth er restaurant in Cary, N.C., while establishing consistent systems for franchising. Last year, Lytton reached out to Nifong to see whether he could move forward under Chubbys. He couldnt, howev er, because El Chubbys had claimed the federal trademark registration. In this case, Nifong said, Chubbys is the dominant word and consideration. Words such as original and tacos are descriptive and generally have less weight in the trademark consideration process. If Lytton wants to move forward with any out-of-state expansion, he has to change his name and his brand. We are probably OK as long as we stay in North Carolina, but if we start expanding, the (Colorado restaurant) with the rights to Chubbys would prob ably come smack us around, Lytton said. SMALLFROM PAGE E1 And opening a coffee shop has also been a dream. We purchased it on May 1 and opened on June 1, said Willis. We did 75 percent of the renovation. Literally, we began working the night we bought it and, for the next 30 days, weve been here ever since. Mount Dora Coffee House & Bistro is open from 7 / a.m. until 10 / p.m. every day but Sunday, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with their coffee house drinks and sweets. We really enjoy what we do here, said Willis. We have a sense of community and share it with everyone not just our cuisine and drinks, but we share in the community. Entertainment is a big part of their success. We have live music most nights, Willis said. The best way to put it, on any given night you can nd live entertainment at the Bistro, either open mike, poetry, or acoustical musicians. We keep a strong emphasis on entertainment. Of course the community also loves the edible items on the menu. Barretts Carrot Cake ies out of here, said Willis. The carrot cake is named after his fatherin-law, Barrett Hand, and it comes from a tried-and-true family recipe. In fact, the carrot cake is baked by Priscilla Hand, his mother-in-law, and her sister, Maggie Hayes. David also lends a hand in the kitchen, along with Olivia, doing whatever is necessary. But our morning crew is really good and we usually dont have to come in before noon, he said. His favorite item on the menu is Pappa Williss Southern Breakfast Bowl, which is home-style grits, Ver mont cheddar cheese, scrambled eggs and crumbled hickory smoked bacon. Its a warm comforting breakfast meal, Willis said. When I was growing up, we had a 10-bedroom inn for single mothers, foster kids, you name it. So from a very ear ly age I was cooking. And I never knew how many people were in each room, at least 15 a night for dinner. And I was trying to please everyones tastes. Their coffee beans are ordered fresh every week from Grovelands Golden Hills Coffee Roasters. Other breakfast hits include pancakes with berries, hashbrown-crusted quiche Lorraine and an old favorite, cinnamon French toast. Lunch includes homemade soup, sandwiches, paninis and salads. And there is a dinner menu as well. We have a number of sandwiches we rotate and some set items, Willis said. We consider ourselves foodies. And we like to share with friends and family. One of the things he cant share is whats happening with this seasons show. American Idol has been popular and topping viewer ship consistently since its inception in 2002. Ill be working and they come by and ask about the previous season and to get clues about this season, Willis said. Im limited about what I can share, what Im legally allo wed to say. The new season begins airing Jan. 1516. Willis auditioned in Detroit because he wasnt able to get to Atlanta and his audition will air the following week. The only thing I can say is tune in Jan. 15 and 16, he said. I say that with a smile. There are plenty of smiles to go around, before or after you sample the menu. Mount Dora Coffee House & Bistro is at 342 Dora Drawdy Way and is open from 7 / a.m. to 10 / p.m., Mon day through Saturday. For information, call 352-385-1781 or visit them on Facebook. BISTRO FROM PAGE E1 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALABOVE: The interior of the Mount Dora Coffee House and Bistro is shown. RIGHT: A cup of coffee sits on a table at the shop.

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E3 Call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.Attend a FREE LUNCH N LEARN spine seminar:Wednesday January 15, at 11:00 amComfort Suites CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT728-1668stanleysteemer.comServing All of Lake & Sumter Counties thats engaged both startups and big companies including Samsung, Sony, LG and others. At the Interna tional Consumer Electronics Show this week, companies are showing off hundreds of new watches, wrist bands and eyeglasses with built-in video screens or cameras. The industry is encouraged by the attention Googles Glass is get ting. The device is worn like a pair of glasses and projects a small vid eo screen into the wearers eld of vision. Companies are also encour aged by the success albeit on a small scale of the Pebble and Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatches. Intel Corp., the worlds largest maker of computer processors, is on the wearable computing band wagon, too. Its CEO, Brian Krzan ich, demonstrated a onesie that can measure a babys temperature, pulse and breathing rate. It sends a wire less signal to a parents smart cof fee cup, which shows a smiley face in lights if the baby is sleeping well and a worried face if the child is too hot or close to waking up. The outt can also send a signal to a smart bot tle warmer, so it can be ready with warm formula when the baby wakes. We want to make everything smart, Krzanich said, showing off the brains of the onesie a comput er the size of a stamp. The smart onesie is one example of the many gadgets at the show that are designed to demonstrate what technology can do. Whats less clear is whether they tackle real problems, and improve life so much that peo ple will care to buy them. The wearables industry is haunt ed by an earlier false start: Bluetooth headsets, which were commonplace a few years ago, fell out of favor. The shift away from phone calls and to wards texting was one factor, but many say it simply became uncool to walk around in public with a listen ing device protruding from ones ear. Its easier to convince consumers to wear gadgets on their wrists, and thats where most of the industrys energy is focused. The wrist is one of the few plac es where its socially acceptable and technologically feasible to wear a gadget, says David Rosales, the chief technology ofcer of Meta Watch Ltd., a spin-off of watchmaker Fos sil. Rosales has been making smartwatches for years, but only now does he believe they can break into the mainstream. Its not so much a mat ter of technology smartwatches worked ne in 2006, as one of social acceptance, he says. Smartwatches are still a small mar ket: the Consumer Electronics Association estimates that just under a million of them will be sold in the U.S. this year, up from 600,000 in 2013. I dont think consumers get the idea of smartwatches, says Russ Crupnick, senior vice president of industry analysis at research rm NPD Group. In a survey, the group found that the feature U.S. consum ers most desire in a smartwatch is the ability to make and receive calls something the watches gener ally dont do. He thinks the image a smartwatch projects of the owner is a more important driver. I think this is about jewelry ... I think at least in the near term, its about what having one of these things says about me and my per sonal brand, Crupnick says. Its hu man nature to brand ourselves. Fitness bands are also an effective way to brand oneself, and theyve seen a big surge in interest recently. The CEA says that last year, 13 per cent of U.S. consumers said they in tend to buy a wearable tness prod uct in the next 12 months, up from 3 percent the year before. But the staying power of these products is questionable much of their mo tion tracking can be done by smart phones, which already contain the motion sensors that let the tness bands act as advanced pedome ters. At CES, some bands are being revealed that do more than phones can; Epsons Pulsense, for instance, measures a wearers heart rate by shining a light through the skin. Glucovation, a startup from Carls bad, Calif., is among the companies that want to take wearables one step further: into the skin. Its developing a patch with a tiny needle that measures the wearers blood glucose level and relays it wirelessly to a smart phone. That could be useful not just for diabetics, but for anyone trying to control their eating habits. The patch, which is at least two years away from being sold, would be worn discretely under clothing. Goo gle Glass is the opposite: its blatant and in your face, literally. Many peo ple balk at the image of the man-ma chine integration it conveys, and since it contains a forward-facing camera, the gadget has given rise to privacy concerns. In theory, Glass wearers could be recording or taking pictures of anything they see, unbe knownst to others. GADGETS FROM PAGE E1 AP PHOTO The Panasonic HX-A100 wearable wicamera sits on display at the International Consumer Electronics Show. JIM PUZZANGHERALos Angeles TimesWASHINGTON The new regulator for Fannie Mae and Fred die Mac said Wednesday he was delaying planned fee increas es by the seized mort gage nance giants because he wanted to assess the impact on the housing market. Melvin L. Watt, who was sworn in as director of the Feder al Housing Finance Agency on Monday, quickly showed there would be a change in the direction of government oversight of Fannie and Freddie. He said he intended to conduct a thor ough evaluation of an increase in fees the rms charge lenders to guarantee mort gages. Those increases, which would make mortgages more expensive, were set to take effect in March and April. The FHFA, under former acting director Edward J. DeMarco, announced in Decem ber that it had direct ed Fannie and Fred die to increase their base guarantee fee, or g-fee, by 0.1 percent age points and make changes to other fees. The agency estimated that the fees for a 30-year xedrate mortgage would increase by 0.14 per centage points as part of an effort to reduce Fannies and Freddies over-sized presence in the housing market. The new fees bet ter reect the risk of guaranteeing mortgages and would allow private rms to better compete to guarantee mortgages, DeMarco said. Fannie and Freddie guarantee or pur chase more than six in 10 new mortgages. The fees usually are passed on by lenders to borrowers, inc reasing the cost of mort gages. New regulator delays Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac mortgage fee increases

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E4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAVID FERRELLThe Orange County RegisterChristmas gifts of yesteryear meet an inglorious end at Absolute Green Electronics Recycling in Lake Forest, Calif. Computers are dismantled, the parts sorted into cardboard bins. One holds noth ing but hard drives, another AC adapters. Bins stretch in rows across a mammoth warehouse a bin for graphic cards, a bin for cooling fans, also cellphones, VHS camcorders, digital cameras, cables, network switches. Stacked-up printers form a miniature mountain. Old-fashioned picture tubes sit face-down on pallets. Flat-screen monitors cluster along a wall like tombstones. There are differ ent grades of boards, said owner and Presi dent Victor Kianipay, stepping past hulk ing, dust-covered pro jection TVs to poke into apple boxes lled with circuit boards. Some are etched mainly in copper; others are heavily embedded with silicon chips. Every thing gets separated, Kianipay said. There are so many layers and layers of product. This is electronic waste, or e-waste a revenue stream for Ki anipay, who moved 25,000 pounds of discarded items in last Jan uarys post-Christmas frenzy. E-waste also, despite the work of Kian ipay and other entrepreneurial recyclers, is an environmental problem of global pro portion. The ever-rising tide of electronic junk now totals near ly 50 million tons a year worldwide, according to the Solving the E-Waste Problem Initiative, a co alition of governments, scientists and industry groups based in Bonn, Germany. Within ve years, the annual gure may reach 65 million tons enough to ll trucks parked bumper to bumper encircling three-quarters of the Earth, the coalition estimates. The waste is a particular concern in part because much of it contains lead, mer cury and other hazardous substances, which are released when the waste is melted down to recover gold, silver and copper. The widespread practice, by some recy clers and waste dealers, of exporting electronic waste to developing countries has created bustling scrap economies in poor parts of China and Africa while exposing large numbers of people to toxins and carcinogens. You see all these thousands literally thousands of wom en and young kids whose job is to cook circuit boards, said Jim Puckett, founder and executive direc tor of the Seattle-based Basel Action Network. The group is named af ter the Swiss city where international agreements were drafted in the late 1980s and early 1990s to stop the digi tal dumping. Although 35 nations have adopted the tenets of the Basel Con vention, Puckett said, the United States by far the largest producer of e-waste has not. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in a report posted on its website, said most dis carded consumer elec tronics end up in our landlls a wholly separate environmental problem. No one is sure how much e-waste ends up being exported from the U.S., the EPA says, but the United States govern ment is concerned that these exports are being mismanaged abroad, causing serious public health and environmental hazards. Puckett, who has spent years investigating the issue, estimates that about 50 to 80 percent of what is handed over to recy clers is exported. Spurred by environmental activists, Con gress and state gov ernments are trying to ensure that e-waste gets properly recycled here. The federal Responsible Electronics Recycling Act, introduced in July and co-sponsored by Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., would prohibit the export of toxics-con taining electronic junk to nations that cannot process them safely. The bill has gained bipartisan support and now sits in the House Committee on Ener gy and Commerce, said Austin Vevurka, Thompsons press aide. It addresses a grow ing environmental and health problem and it helps create good-pay ing recycling jobs in the U.S., Vevurka said. Its a win-win. In addition, President Barack Obama estab lished the Interagency Task Force on Elec tronics Stewardship in 2010 to encourage development of greener electronic devices and to boost domestic recy cling. California became a national pioneer by enacting the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003, which created a system of incentives to prevent the disposal of most video-display de vices and certain other types of electronic equipment in landlls. The law applies to lap tops and televisions that use liquid-crystal display or plasma screens and especially targets outmoded TVs and computer monitors that have cathode-ray tubes. The old TVs are par ticularly bad because they contain both lead and mercury, said Mark Oldeld, a spokesman for the states Depart ment of Resources Recycling and Recovery. Since 2005, when the state began keep ing track of e-waste re cycling statistics, more than 1.5 billion pounds of video-display equipment has been collect ed directly because of the law, Oldeld said. rrfntbn nntnb nft bfnfnb frn $19900$16900tb rfSCHEDULED DEPARTURES EVERY SUNDAY. tb rfIP CASINO RESORT4 DAYS/3 NIGHTSwww.goclassictours.comBILOXI BOUND4 DAYS 3 NIGHTSBEAU RIVAGErffntb fnBest Western Historic rrfnTHE BIG EASYNEW ORLEANS5 DAYS, 4 NIGHTS7 MEALS/$15 FREE PLAYnttb ttft tt tt t ttbtt$49595$599 Singlebnnfbbfbrrn t tt Shoppes of Lake Village (Next to Lake Square Mall)www.leadingdental.comLEESBURG 365-6442Sleep through your Dental Appointment The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of an within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for treatment.License# DN14389MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED Proudly celebrating20 YEARSin Leesburg. Enhance your life with Mini Dental Implants in 1 hrIV SEDATION: FREECONSULTATIONNew Patients$85 Value*x-rays not includedFinancing Available Dr. Vaziri & Staff and towels from the district level to the regional and national level. Ma cys says that such goods change less often than clothing and accessories and are less subject to local tastes. The moves come after a solid hol iday shopping season for the chain. Revenue at stores opened at least a year, a key indicator of a retailers health, rose 4.3 percent in November and December. The company is optimistic about this year. It expects earnings per share of $4.40 to $4.50 in 2014, best ing analysts prediction of $4.36 per share, according to FactSet. Our company has signicantly increased sales and protability over the past four years, and we have cre ated a culture of growth at Macys Inc., said Terry J. Lundgren, Macys chairman, president and CEO in a statement. As the success of these strategies has unfolded, we have identied some specic areas where we can improve our efciency with out compromising our effectiveness in serving the evolving needs of our customers. Shares rose 5.5 percent to $54.70 in after-hours trading after closing down 34 cents to $51.84. MACYS FROM PAGE E1 Obsolete gadgetry can pile up, contributing to pollution MINDY SCHAUER / ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER Old computer keyboards ll a box and EXPC employee Diego Cuellar walks through the business warehouse in Santa Ana, Calif. In California e-waste is recycled with funds paid by consumers as a fee when they purchase electronics.

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Sunday, January 12, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL E5 Dr. Heydari, DDSSUNY Buffalo School of Dental Medicine rfntb Golf Cart Accessable NOW OPEN IN THE VILLAGES NEW PATIENT EXAM & X-RAYPlease call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. Applies to cash paying patients only. Insurance will be billed for exam and x-rays.FULL SET OF DENTURESOffer only applies to Premium Comfort Dentures. Please call for details and appointment. Can not be combined with other discount offers. www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Sunday, Jan. 12, the 12th day of 2014. There are 353 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Jan. 12, 1959, Berry Gordy Jr. founded Motown Records (originally Tamla Records) in Detroit. On this date: In 1519, Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I died. In 1773, the rst public museum in America was organized in Charleston, S.C. In 1828, the United States and Mexico signed a Treaty of Limits dening the boundary between the two countries to be the same as the one established by an 1819 treaty between the U.S. and Spain. In 1912, textile workers at the Everett Mill in Lawrence, Mass., most of them immigrant women, walked off the job to protest wage cuts. In 1915, the House of Representatives rejected, 204-174, a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. In 1932, Hattie W. Caraway became the rst woman elected to the U.S. Senate after initially being appointed to serve out the remainder of the term of her late husband, Thaddeus. In 1948, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Sipuel v. Board of Regents of University of Oklahoma, ruled that state law schools could not discriminate against applicants on the basis of race. In 1964, leftist rebels in Zanzibar began their successful revolt against the government. In 1969, the New York Jets of the American Football League upset the Baltimore Colts of the National Football League 16-7 in Super Bowl III, played at the Orange Bowl in Miami. In 1971, the groundbreaking situation comedy All in the Family premiered on CBS television. In 1986, the shuttle Columbia blasted off with a crew that included the rst Hispanic-American in space, Dr. Franklin R. Chang-Diaz. In 2010, Haiti was struck by a magnitude-7 earthquake, killing as many as 300,000 residents and leaving over 1.5 million people homeless.DEAR ABBY: We rented a car while we were on vacation. Most of the newer cars have all kinds of high-tech equipment and devices different kinds for different models of vehicles. The problem is the instruction booklets that describe how the equipment oper ates are never provided with the cars. Its dangerous to try and gure out how the equipment oper ates by trial and error while starting to drive an unfamiliar vehicle. Why dont the rental agencies provide the instruction manuals, or at least a pamphlet summarizing the procedures? Surely not many people would steal them, since theyre just using the cars for a short time. Also, it would be helpful if the rental agencies would include an inexpensive ice scraper with every car in appropriate areas of the country, so customers could clean their windshields and avoid the hazard of obstructed vision. CAR RENTER IN CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. DEAR CAR RENTER: What youre describing is also true with loaner cars that are offered when a vehicle is being serviced. I am pretty sure the reason those items are not provided is fear that they would be stolen. However, I agree that knowing how to oper ate the radio, heating, air-conditioning and street map functions on the newer cars can be confusing which is why you should ask to have the pertinent pages of the manual photocopied so you can refer to them as needed. (The technologically inclined can Google the make of car and ask How to turn on the radio, etc. because the information is available online.) DEAR ABBY: My best friend died from the u in November. She was only 63 and had been my friend for 23 years. She died because she was stubborn and insisted to all her friends myself included that she was ne and didnt need to see a doctor or go to the emergency room. We had all threatened to come and drag her to the doctor or the ER or call 911, but because she insisted she was getting better, we took her word for it. Now were kicking ourselves for not getting her the help she obviously needed. Abby, please tell your readers that when a friend or family member is sick enough to cause this kind of concern, to ignore the person and get her (or him) to a doc tor! I will miss my friend every day for the rest of my life because I can no longer call to say good morning. Her name was Abby, too, and she was the best friend Ive ever had. DEVASTATED IN TARZANA, CALIF. DEAR DEVASTATED: Im sorry for the loss of your friend. But none of you should blame your selves for what happened to her. She made an unwise choice. It is not unusual for people who experience serious symptoms to go into a state of denial (Lets wait, It will pass, etc.). But unless your friend was experiencing extreme respiratory distress or an unusually high fever, she might have recovered from that virus without intervention. P.S. I cant help but wonder if your friend got her u vaccination last fall when they started being offered. While its not 100 per cent effective for everyone, it is effective in many people. I get one every year, and its worth discussing with your doctor.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014: This year you open up to a lot of new ideas and hobbies. Though others might not understand your excitement, youll feel as if your mind is expanding. A new job or career path becomes a possibility. If you are single, you might not be settled enough to pursue an important relationship. If you are attached, the two of you will develop a new pastime that you both enjoy. It could be taking a massage class together or pursuing a new hobby. GEMINI can be very supercial ARIES (March 21-April 19) You tend to express yourself in a highly charged manner. You could draw quite a response from a partner who has been nothing less than grumpy as of late. Expressing your feelings will just retrigger the situation. Say less if you can. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Check out a recent purchase with greater care, as the quality of the item could make a big difference in how you enjoy it. A partner might seem stiff or remote. Know that recent events have propelled his or her thinking in a new direction. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You cant help but keep smiling and enjoying yourself. Even if someone is being difcult, it makes little difference to you, as you accept this person for all of his or her different moods. A loved one will be full of surprises. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Continue the low-key theme of the past few days. You have pushed yourself very hard to accomplish certain tasks. Indulge in some you time, which could involve a friend or loved one. Try not to make plans. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Accept an invitation involving friends and a fun event. Your lively spirit is always considered an asset at parties. Still, you could be thinking through an important decision. You need some time to think before heading out. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might want to stop a conversation before it becomes too public. You have every reason to want to pursue this matter. Note that someone is liable to spill the beans. You might want to be more discerning as to whom you share news with. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Hopefully you have managed to get away from your routine. The relaxation of being in a different setting might have opened your mind to a new realm of possibilities. When you get settled back into your routine, you will see the difference. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might need to be more direct with a partner than you have been in a while. You could be uncomfortable changing the way you treat this person, but be open and allow the free exchange of ideas and opinions. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your popularity is high, and you have a plethora of options in various segments of your life. At this moment in time, you dont need to make any life decisions. Wait until the beginning of February to set goals for yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You might not have the most exciting day, but you will enjoy getting some extra R and R. A dear friend will want to discuss a nancial matter, but he or she might not be sure how to approach this topic with you. Keep an open mind. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You cant seem to be serious, unless it is a discussion about a new love. Your grace combined with your innate mischievousness attracts many people, especially friends who rarely see you like this. One of them could be magnetized by this side of you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You might feel as if you should stay at home in order to accomplish a particular goal. How reasonable you are could play into the outcome. Someone who cares about you a lot and understands where you are coming from will have your back. HOROSCOPES Bigars StarsJACQUELINE BIGAR High-tech rental cars should come with instruction manuals TODAY IN HISTORY

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E6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunday, January 12, 2014 qualities dont bode well for us. We want to see people who are collaborative, he says. Three entrepreneurs who successfully raised money for their com panies underscore the importance of hard work, of course and making friends and playing nice.HOMEJOYFOUNDERS: Adora Cheung, 30, and her brother Aaron Cheung, 25 STARTED IN: Mountain View, Calif., July 2012 THE BUSINESS: Now based in San Francis co, Homejoys website connects more than 100,000 house clean ers with customers in about 30 cities in the U.S. and Canada MONEY RAISED: $40 million BIG BACKER: Max Levchin, co-founder of PayPal Coming out of the University of Rochester, which had no en trepreneurial community that she was aware of, Adora Cheung want ed to learn how start ups work. She joined a Bay Area company, Slide, which was started by PayPal co-founder Max Levchin. IMPRESS THEM: Slide didnt have many em ployees when Cheung came on board. I got to work closely with Max, and he came to know a lot of how I work. He and I work on a very similar sleep schedule, she says. They would nd themselves talking shop at 4 / a.m. FOLLOWING FRIENDS: After Cheung left Slide, she and her brother spent three-and-a-half years trying to come up with a business. They participated in the Y Combinator acceler ator program, which helps startups launch. Friends who had been through the program recommended it. KEEP IN TOUCH: The Cheungs were in debt and needed money for Homejoy. Levchin was the rst investor. It was very helpful that Max knows me and I think he trusts me. He saw numbers that were going up and to the right. He gave us a bit of money, Cheung says. After that, other investors wanted in.SWEETGREENFOUNDERS: Former Georgetown University schoolmates Nicolas Jammet, 28; Jonathan Neman, 29; and Nathaniel Ru, 28 STARTED IN: Washington, D.C., August 2007 THE BUSINESS: Twen ty-two shops and 600 employees selling salads, wraps, soups and juices, in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Maryland and Virginia MONEY RAISED: $40 million BIG BACKER: Steve Case, co-founder of AOL The trio launched Sweetgreen the summer after their senior year of college. Over the years, they raised $17 million from about 100 people before land ing their rst invest ment from a nancial institution in December: $22 million from AOL co-founder Steve Cases Revolution fund. OLD FRIENDS: When the three had noth ing but a business plan and a possible location, they raised their rst chunk of money $375,000 from 25 friends, friends of fam liy, former bosses and classmates.BLUE APRONFOUNDERS: Matt Salzberg, 30; Ilia Papas, 32; and Matthew Wadiak, 35. STARTED IN: New York, August 2012 THE BUSINESS: Delivers about 300,000 boxes of ingredients and reci pes for home cooks ev ery month. Blue Apron has 130 employees. MONEY RAISED: $8 million BIG BACKERS: Jason Finger, co-founder of restaurant delivery website Seamless, then known as SeamlessWeb and Bob Goodman, partner at venture capital rm Bessemer Venture Partners. Matt Salzberg knew in college that he want ed to run his own business. So he deliberate ly went to work rst for a venture capital rm, Bessemer Venture Partners. He met key advisers there. PERSONAL CONNECTION: Salzberg had conver sations with Jason Finger, then an entrepre neur-in-residence at Bessemer, that went beyond the invest ment opportunities they worked on togeth er in the ofce. Fin ger was the rst person who said he would in vest in Salzbergs venture. With Fingers en couragement, Salzberg left Bessemer before he came up with Blue Apron. A former boss of his from Bessemer, Bob Goodman, was also one of the rst investors in Blue Apron. KNOW YOUR WEAKNESSES: Salzberg had worked in nance, and needed people with technology and food expertise. He brought on Papas, who had e-commerce expe rience, and Wadiak, a chef. IN PERSON: Its re ally important when youre raising capital to have people who be lieve in you, Salzberg says. And its easier to sway them with your passion face-to-face. Its hard to convey that through PowerPoint or on the phone. Often its through body lan guage. YOUNG FROM PAGE E1 AP PHOTO This photo provided by Blue Apron shows Blue Apron founder Matt Salzberg and Bob Goodman of Bessemer, a former boss of Salzbergs in New York.