Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Rod Dixon
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WEST COAST TEAMS THRIVE IN NFL PLAYOFFS, SPORTS B1 JUSTICE: After 40 years, execution set for killer of guard, couple A3 TOO HOT TO HANDLE: Health care law leaves volunteer reghting in limbo A4 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 6, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 6 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A4 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B2 VOICES A9 WORLD A4 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 67 / 24 Windy and not as warm. 50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County ofcials and water experts continue to warn that the communi ty must n d an alternative to diminishing groundwa ter supplies in the next ve years to avoid a direct im pact on lake levels and the quality of life in the region. The South Lake Regional Water Initiative consist ing of the South Lake Chamber of Commerce, the county and the municipalities of Clermont, Grov eland, Minneo la, Mascotte and Montverde targets regional solutions in the critical areas of reclaimed water distribution, mini mum ows and levels of the regions lakes and rivers, and alternative water supplies and con servation. County ofcials are considering taking another step to protect ground water by becoming a Groundwater Guard ian Community. Those communities work to educate people and pro tect local groundwater re sources, said James Burks, chairman of the Groundwa ter Foundation Board of Di rectors. There are more than 100 Groundwater Guardian Communities throughout the United States, with only one in the state of Florida, in Hernando County. The Groundwater Guard ian Community presents a good opportunity to focus on the education for the pro tection of our water resourc es, said Commissioner Sean Parks. It works with educat ing our kids about water is sues and the aquifer. Commissioner Jimmy Conner said more aware ness is needed on the issue. People only have concerns about water when you have growth. We need to make it a high priority. The inititiative is inclusive TAVARES Officials want to make Lake a Groundwater Guardian Community SEE LAKE | A2 DONNA CASSATA Associated Press WASHINGTON Congress returns to work today with election-year poli tics certain to shape an already limited agenda. Republicans in tend to focus on ev ery facet of President Barack Obamas health care law. They see a political boost in its prob lem-plagued rollout as the GOP looks to maintain its House majority and seize control of the Demo cratic-led Senate. First up in the House, according to Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., is legis lation addressing the security of personal data, part of his par tys effort to protect the American people from the harmful ef fects of Obamacare. Republicans also promise closer scruti ny of the administra tions tally of enroll ment numbers in the program. Democrats will press to raise the fed eral minimum wage from $7.25 an hour and extend unem ployment benets, trying to cast the par ty as more concerned with the less fortunate and intent on dealing with income inequali ty. The issues resonate with liberals, the core Democratic voters crucial in low-turnout midterm elections. Rep. Steny Hoy er of Maryland, the No. 2 Democrat in the House, said an exten sion of federal bene ts for an estimated 1.3 million Americans who saw their pay ments stopped on Dec. 28 is more than an economic issue. Its about real peo ple, people with fam ilies struggling to put food on the table, to Election-year politics shapes Congressional agendas ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Dec. 19, 2013, le photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., left, accompanied by Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. SEE POLITICS | A2 Instead of punishing families who can least afford it, Republicans should make it their New Years resolution to do the right thing and restore this vital economic security for their constituents right now. President Barack Obama on jobless benets THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A s temperatures dipped over the weekend, Melin da Rabin didnt complain as she portrayed Queen Anne Boleyn at The Villages Renais sance Faire. She was wearing an ornate 16th century period gown made of 40 pounds of up holstery fabric. Its very warm, she said of the layers of clothing and un dergarments. Its ne when the weather is cold; actually its love ly. Playing the queen allowed Rabin to live a childhood fantasy of being able to dress up in fan cy attire. As a child, ever since I can re member, I used to want to wear dress like this, she said. This is my element here. I love playing Queen Anne Boleyn and this is one of my favorite shows that we do. The children seem to really enjoy it and the children make it all worthwhile. They come up to you and the little girls eyes get big and wide when they see the big dresses. Originally from Pennsylvania, the Fort Lauderdale performer travels with her husband, who amuses Renaissance festival goers with his Loose Cannons sword-ghting show. The Rabins welcomed their rst child, Shane, born 2 months ago, and the baby ac companies mom and dad on their trips up and down the east coast as Renaissance perform ers. The family joins musicians, jesters, professional jousters and others on the renaissance circuit in entertaining crowds. The weekend event on a eld around The Villages Polo Club marked the rst Renaissance faire for the 2014 season. THE VILLAGES Returning to the Renaissance Performers transform community to early 1500s England PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Melinda Rabin, left, portraying Queen Anne Boleyn at The Villages Renaissance Faire, shows her infant son, Shane, to Shannon Hogrefe on Sunday. Julian Crespo, left, and Gene Smith, participate in archery shooting during The Villages Renaissance Faire. SEE FAIRE | A2 Its a lot of fun, but it takes a lot of perseverance to do this for a living. Of course, theres the stress of traveling, especially with a new baby. Melinda Rabin Queen Anne Boleyn

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 6, 2014: This year you often are very sensitive to others, and you express empa thy with ease. You also fre quently can be found play ing the role of cheerleader, encouraging those around you to go for their dreams. If you are single, you are likely to meet someone very signicant to your lifes his tory. You will know when you meet this person. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy each others company, and you seem to have a psychic connection. You know what the other is thinking. ARIES often grinds on your nerves. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might have a rm er grasp on what is happen ing than the person who in forms you of what is going on. This person likes to feel important. Say little. Play it low-key, and you will gather more information. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Zero in on what you want during the morning. Dont hesitate. You might need to consider how youd like to proceed with a differ ent matter in the afternoon. Consider your options care fully and discuss them with someone you often brain storm with. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your directness is more desirable than you think. Stay in touch with your goals as discussions en sue. You can identify with others. As a result, you could lose your ability to stay centered. Do not allow this to happen. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to hear the other side of an argu ment. Though you still might not agree with what is being said, you could see a way of incorporating two ideas that seem in opposition but ac tually have the same basis. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A close associate might have a lot to share. Encourage this person to express his or her intuitive sense more often. You will be able to understand an issue in a new way because of what is shared with you. Proceed accordingly. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Rethink a personal de cision, especially if some one close to you offers a new insight. Do nothing to damage the situation, and if possible, give yourself some breathing room. Put this decision on hold for now. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Understand what you are doing and why. Your need to handle a matter regarding real estate or your personal life is legitimate. Once you clear up this issue, you will nd the right direction for you to head in. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your creativity seems to be focused on a key issue. By the afternoon, your imag inative streak could fall at or not be as helpful. Your initial idea will prove to be the right one to pursue. Oth ers will be more enthusias tic than you had expected. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Touch base with a family member who has a very different perspective from you about a domestic matter. Recognize what is happening with a loved one, as he or she might want you to be more involved with an important project. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You will admire what a close friend thinks about a controversial is sue. This persons neutral ity touches you deeply. You might wonder what is need ed to make a certain situa tion easier to handle. Dis cuss the situation with this person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could see a situa tion in a much more relat able and viable way than you had in the past. Recog nize the change in your per spective, and explain it in a conversation with one of the parties involved. This will help ease communica tion between you. T PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) When handling your nances, it would be wise to make a decision regarding your limits. What is import ant to you? The holidays could have wreaked havoc on your budget. Take this opportunity to recalibrate your spending. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 5-0-8 Afternoon .......................................... 8-1-2 PLAY 4 ............................................. 8-4-9-1 Afternoon ....................................... 5-4-5-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY SATURDAY FANTASY 5 ............................. 1-8-17-20-21 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $8.50 4 of 5 wins $96 5 of 5 wins $277,401.33 LOTTO ........................... 14-15-23-34-36-37 3 of 6 wins $5.50 4 of 5 wins $85.50 5 of 5 wins $7,441.5 Rollover POWERBALL .................. 19-20-37-41-5814 With Powerball Without Powerball Powerball alone wins $4 ........................... 3 of 5 wins $7 1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4 ................. 4 of 5 wins $100 2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7 ...... 5 of 5 wins $1,000,000 3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100 ............................ Rollover 4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor 352-365-8208 ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com OTHERS PAM FENNIMORE editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. of a good cross section of the community, Burks said. It brings everyone to the table. Until you get the masses involved, you are not going to have ef fective results. Jay Beaumont, board member of the Ground water Foundation, said since establishing a Guardian Community in Orange County, N.Y., it has been effective at ed ucating people about the protection of water re sources. You do result-oriented activities, he said. Here in Orange County, we put on the Childrens Ground water Festival. We have had water conservation education in the schools. We will do stream walks, where Boy Scouts will go in and clean debris from the streams. It is a whole bunch of tools that local people develop to help protect the water. In Nebraska, there is a lot of nitrates that get into the groundwater, he said. Out in the far west, there is a lot less water falling as far as rainfall. And in Oregon and Wash ington, there is plenty of water, but it is about making sure pollution does not get into the wa ter. Burks said water sus tainability continues to be on the top concerns in the county. We are currently uti lizing about 94 percent of our total resource from the aquifer, he said, cit ing the hydrological studies from the Central Florida Water Initiative. If we grow to a point of utilizing another 6 per cent, then we would be at a point of depletion. LAKE FROM PAGE A1 make ends meet, includ ing ... 200,000 military veterans who are among these folks who are los ing their benets, he told reporters Friday. Senate Majority Lead er Harry Reid, D-Nev., has scheduled a vote Monday night on legis lation by Sens. Jack Reed, D-R.I., and Dean Hell er, R-Nev., to extend job less benets for three months. However, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he is unsure Democrats can cobble together 60 votes needed to overcome a procedural hurdle. If we dont get the 60, we will come back at this issue, he promised. President Barack Obama already has scheduled a White House event on Tuesday with some whose benets ex pired at the end of De cember. Instead of punish ing families who can least afford it, Repub licans should make it their New Years resolu tion to do the right thing and restore this vital eco nomic security for their constituents right now, Obama said Saturday in his weekly radio and In ternet address. Republicans hint ed they might go along with extending benets if they win spending cuts from Reid elsewhere to pay for them. If the senator comes up with any kind of a rea sonable idea to offset the $26 billion, I think that he might nd some peo ple that are willing to talk to him, said Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz. Schumer, one of his partys leaders, said Democrats would pre fer to pass the proposal as is without a way to pay for it, as has been the case for previous exten sions. But he told report ers Sunday he would lis ten to GOP suggestions. During a separate in terview, Reid predict ed widespread inaction would be the norm un less the Republicans in Congress decide they should do something for the American people, Im sorry to say. Such rancor ruled in the rst session of the 113th Congress with few bills passed and sent to the president. The com bination of divided gov ernment and the up coming elections stand as an obstacle to major legislation in the second session, counting down to November when all 435 House seats and 35 Senate seats will be on the ballot. POLITICS FROM PAGE A1 We do abo ut ve or six festivals a year and that is how we make our living, said Rabin, who alter nates from playing queen to another role as a village woman known as Mad Maggie, which she plays at the Florida Renais sance Festival. Many of the couples shows are in Connecticut, Virginia, and Florida. Its a lot of fun, but it takes a lot of persever ance to do this for a liv ing, she said. Of course theres the stress of travel ing, especially with a new baby. The Rabins joined fel low Renaissance peers in transforming The Villages to the village of Hopewell England, back in the day of early 1500s. The fes tival featured a profes sional jousting compa ny, a living chess board, performances by Johnny Phoenix, Loose Cannons, Irish and Celtic music by the Empty Hats, a come dy show by the Da Vinci Brothers, and others en tertaining Villagers and visitors. We love it here and this is just a wonderful, won derful show, Rabin said. The people here are so nice and the people who run the show are very nice, very accommodat ing. This is the friendliest audience of any show that I have ever done, add ed Chris Jones, who por trayed King Henry VIII. We hope that the show is successful in bring ing money to the charity event, The Villages Char ter School. Anthony DeNicola, who co-chaired the festival with his wife, called the event a success, where about 6,000 people at tended the two-day event. Its been awesome, DeNicola said. We had a much better turnout this year than we did last year. We are hop ing that once everything is done, we will have a $10,000 to $20,000 prot for the kids. FAIRE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ivette Figuero, left, and Ryan Geogieff, center, participate in the live chess match, one of the attractions Sunday during the second annual Villages Renaissance Faire, a weekend fundraiser for The Villages Charter School.

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news. Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT CLERMONT Child hospitalized after falling into pool A child was taken to the hos pital Saturday after falling into a Clermont pool. The Lake County Sheriffs Ofce is investigating the incident. Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, said they received a call at 4:55 p.m. Saturday from 17527 W. Apshawa Road regarding the fall. The child still had a pulse when taken to South Lake Hospital by paramedics and later transferred to Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children in Orlando for further treatment. Vachon said early this evening that detectives were still conducting the investigation and no other infor mation was available at the time. MOUNT DORA Doctor killed in crash praised by colleagues Area physician ofces have noth ing but praise for a 41-year-old Mount Dora doctor killed last week when he collided with a tractor trail er that reportedly pulled out into a stretch of busy trafc. Dr. Boris Todorovic, who spe cialized in internal medicine, was employed by Lakeview Internal Medicine and joined Central Florida Health Alliance as a staff internist at Leesburg Regional Medical Center in October of 2003. He joined The Villages Regional Hospital staff in May of 2004. A service will be held Saturday at Allen J. Harden Funeral Home in Mount Dora. LADY LAKE Man found dead Saturday under farm tractor A man was found dead under a farm tractor Saturday morning. James Vachon, spokesman for the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, said deputies responded to the incident at 2931 Sunnyside Road about 11:50 a.m. Saturday. The man was pro nounced dead on the scene. No other details were avail able Sunday and sheriffs ofcials couldnt verify the name of the man. LAKE COUNTY Repairs set for bridge over the St. Johns River The Florida Department of Transportation and contractor Quinn Construction Inc. are be ginning repairs to the Whitehair Bridge over the St. Johns River near DeLand. Trafc on State Road 44 over the bridge will be affected as two lanes will be reduced to one and motor ists should be aware of new trafc patterns and automated signals al lowing for single-lane travel over the bridge. Work is scheduled for 160 days starting today and is estimated to complete early next summer. Go to www.croads.com for information. State & Region NEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 CURT ANDERSON AP Legal Affairs Writer MIAMI A man convicted of ab ducting and killing a Miami couple and later stabbing a prison guard to death is set to be executed af ter nearly four decades on Floridas death row. Askari Abdullah Muhammad, previously known as Thomas Knight, is scheduled to die by lethal injection Tuesday at Florida State Prison in Starke barring a last-min ute, successful appeal. Gov. Rick Scott signed the death warrant after the Florida Supreme Court in December rejected Mu hammads challenge to chemicals used in the states execution proce dure. Muhammad, 62, was rst con demned to die for the 1974 killings of Sydney and Lillian Gans. Then known as Knight, he had worked for Gans at a paper bag company before abducting him in the busi ness parking lot with a rie. He or dered Gans to drive home to pick up his wife and then go to a bank to withdraw $50,000. Inside the bank, Gans asked a manager to alert authorities. Both the FBI and local po lice were able to follow the car for a while, includ ing use of aircraft, but lost track of it for a short time in a rural part of southern Miami-Dade County. Tri al testimony showed thats when Muhammad shot the couple in the back of the head and tried to hide by burying himself, the rie and the money in mud and weeds. Muhammad was found a short time later and arrested. While awaiting trial, he and 10 other in mates escaped from the local jail, leading to a nationwide manhunt including a Top 10 fugitives listing by the FBI. Although he was not charged, authorities say Muhammad was involved, after his escape, in the fatal October 1974 shooting of li quor store clerk William Culpepper during an armed robbery in Cord ele, Ga. Another clerk was shot and wounded, according to local au thorities. Execution set for killer of guard ALFONSO CHARDY The Miami Herald MIAMI When undocumented im migrants are detained by federal author ities, they have usually just arrived at an airport, the beach or on the street. Others are picked up at a house or apartment af ter agents check their papers and discov er that they have overstayed their visas, crossed the border illegally or been previ ously deported. But how Homeland Security Investiga tions (HSI) agents found Honduran Les vin David Giron-Rodriguez on Dec. 10 in Miami Beach makes this case intriguing. Federal immigration ofcials learned that Giron was illegally in the country only after a Customs and Border Protec tion (CBP) ofcer seized a package and found the Hondurans passport inside. Gi ron was nowhere near the site where the passport was seized. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforce ment said it could not comment on the case, but the agency said it works closely with CBP on certain cases. U.S. Immigration and Customs En forcement (ICE), Homeland Security In vestigations (HSI) works very closely with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to interdict contraband and other prohib ited items from entering our commerce at ports of entry, to include airports, sea ports, land-borders and international mail facilities, to protect the homeland, said a statement from Robert Hutchinson, HSI Miami deputy special agent in charge. All inbound and outbound shipments are subject to customs inspection to en sure adherence to numerous laws, rules, regulations and treaties. HSI regularly conducts investigations to further disrupt smuggling ventures and dismantle crimi nal organizations using international mail services. Girons attorney declined to comment. But Wilfredo Allen, a prominent Miami immigration attorney, said the circum stances in the Giron case are unusual. It is not very common at all, said Al len. Nevertheless, Allen recalled represent ing a client in a somewhat similar case al most 10 years ago involving the passport of an Ecuadorean woman who was not le gally in the country. Allen said that in her case, her passport was found by immigration ofcials in a facility that handles packages for private sipping services, such as FedEx and DHL. And in 2010, three Guatemalans illegally in the country were arrested by immigra tion ofcials at a FedEx facility in Riviera Beach in Palm Beach County, where they were hoping to pick up a package with passports sent by the Guatemalan consul ate in Miami. In all the cases, the discoveries of the passports appear to have been the results of random checks of packages, which seems to have been the case with Girons passport. Passport leads feds to undocumented immigrant JON SIMON / FEATURE PHOTO SERVICE FOR IBM In this photo taken by Feature Photo Service for IBM, Director of Computational Biology Ajay Royyuru points to a drawing of the chemical formula for DNA at IBM Research headquarters in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. Dec. 17, 2013. In ve years, cloud-based cognitive computers will routinely help doctors use DNA data to provide effective, tailored oncology treatments. BETH REESE CRAVEY The Florida Times-Union JACKSONVILLE Two years ago Patrick McLaugh lin of Jacksonville was in the Mayo Clinic for minor nasal surgery. But routine preparatory tests turned up something po tentially far worse. A lesion on his pancreas led to a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, which kills 85 percent of people who get that news within six months. It is one of the worst can cers one can have, said Mc Laughlin, now 66. Usually the diagnosis is late. The later it is, the more likelihood you are going to perish. There are not a lot of people (survivors) run ning around. After surgery, chemother apy and radiation treatment, he is one of the ones still run ning around. So he decided to support other people who get the same devastating diagno sis by helping found a Jack sonville-based nonprot, the Florida Pancreas Cancer Co alition Inc., to raise funds for Florida-based pancreatic can cer research. I did a lot of soul-search ing, he said. I can speak for people who cant speak for themselves. After his diagnosis at Mayo, McLaughlin underwent a ma jor, 10-hour operation called the Whipple procedure that calls for the removal of parts of the pancreas, stomach, small intestine and common bile duct, as well as the gall bladder and some nearby lymph nodes. He was in the hospital six days, followed by about six months of chemotherapy and radiation. He still has some gastrointestinal side effects and is participating in clinical trials at Duke Cancer Institute in North Carolina. How many more years he has is anyones guess. Its a tricky disease, he said. No one really knows. I just go on. So McLaughlin, an admin istrative law judge for the So cial Security Administration with retirement on the hori zon, just keeps living. He was on the golf course two weeks after surgery and now plays 18 holes of golf without a cart as often as he can. He and wife, Julie, traveled all the way to Michi gan for Christmas to visit their son. I feel good, he said. Ive done about as well as can be expected. Survivor of pancreatic cancer supporting underfunded research From a scientific perspective, its (pancreas) a very difficult organ to study. We cant image it easily due to its location. Biochemically, it makes all of our digestive enzymes, making it tough to study proteins and DNA from patient samples. Its simply more challenging that most other cancers. Howard Crawford An associate professor of cancer biology who is on Mayo Clinics research faculty

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com ALANNA DURKIN Associated Press FREEPORT, Maine Fire chiefs and lawmakers are working to protect the sys tem of volunteer reghting that has served rural Amer ica for more than a century but is threatened by an am biguity in President Barack Obamas health care law. Small and rural re de partments from California to Maine, which has one of the countrys highest per centages of volunteer and on-call reghters, rely on volunteers to avoid the bud get-strapping cost of paying them to be on duty in be tween ghting res. The volunteers are consid ered employees for tax pur poses, a classication that grew out of an ongoing effort to attract reghters by of fering them such incentives as stipends, retirement ben ets and free gym member ships. That leaves open the ques tion of whether the volun teer reghters fall under the health care laws require ment that employers with 50 or more employees working at least 30 hours a week must provide health insurance for them. Fire departments say they cant afford to pay such a cost. Most of these are oper ating on a shoestring bud get holding pancake din ners to raise money to put enough gas in the truck so they can respond to the next re, the next medical call, said Dave Finger, director of government relations for the National Volunteer Fire Council. Faced with the cost of in surance, or being ned if they fail to provide it, de partments would likely be forced to reduce the number of hours reghters can vol unteer or eliminate the ben et programs, ofcials said. That has both re chiefs and lawmakers raising con cerns. Darrel Fournier, re chief in Freeport, a town of about 8,000 people near the coast in southern Maine thats home to L.L. Bean, said his department is bracing for what could be signicant costs under the health care law. He expects hell have to provide coverage for the ve reghters he employs part time. That would cost the city and ultimately tax payers about $75,000, or a penalty of $150,000. Additionally, in a busy winter with lots of res, emergency calls and acci dents, he said his roughly 50 volunteers could work more than 30 hours a week, meet ing the threshold under the law that would require him to provide health insurance for them as well. To avoid the penalty, Free port could cut back on the number of hours part-time and volunteer reghters have to work. But that would mean nding more volun teers to make up the differ ence, something the depart ment and others across the country already struggle to do, Fournier said. When he started in Freeport in 1972, there was a waiting list of 25 people. After three months actively recruiting in the community, Fournier said hes lucky that hell soon be interviewing nine potential volunteer reghters. Its pretty amazing how this law is touching different operations, he said in an in terview in Freeports brick rehouse, where yellow re trucks and ambulances were lined up awaiting the next call. Im not sure everyone thought that through. Health law leaves volunteer firefighting in limbo ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Dec. 20, 2013 photo, Fire Chief Darrel Fournier speaks to a reporter in Freeport, Maine. Fire chiefs and lawmakers are working to protect the system of volunteer reghting that has served rural America for more than a century but is threatened by an ambiguity in President Barack Obamas health care law. Associated Press CHICAGO Snow-cov ered r oads, high winds and ice were creating dangerous driving con ditions Sunday from the Dakotas to Missouri to Delaware ahead of a po lar vortex thatll bring be low-zero and possibly record-breaking tem peratures not seen in years to much of the nation, The counterclock wise-rotating pool of cold, dense air will affect more than half of the continen tal U.S. throughout Sun day and into Monday and Tuesday, with wind chill warnings stretching from Montana to Alabama. With it comes a startling forecast: 25 below zero in Fargo, N.D., minus 31 in International Falls, Minn., and 15 below in Indianap olis and Chicago. Its just a dangerous cold, National Weath er Service meteorolo gist Butch Dye in Missou ri said. Several states in the Midwest were getting wal loped with up to a foot of new snow, and residents shoveled out and stocked up on groceries before bit terly cold temperatures set in overnight. Five to 7 inches fell over night in the Chicago area, while 8 to 10 inches was expected to fall in central Illinois, Indiana and Mich igan later Sunday, Nation al Weather Service mete orologist Ed Fenelon said. Forecasts also called for several inches in western Tennessee and 1 to 3 inch es in Kentucky. In Chicago, tempera tures were expected to fall throughout Sunday to about 11 degrees by 5 p.m., and from there it will be a freefall for the rest of the night, with tem peratures bottoming out around minus 15, like ly setting a daily record, Fenelon said. Earlier Sun day, the National Weath er Service reported tem peratures in the 20-below range in northern Minne sota and Grand Forks, N.D. It hasnt been this cold for almost two decades in many parts of the coun try. Because of that, med ical experts are remind ing people that frostbite and hypoth ermia can set in quickly at 15 to 30 be low zero, and say its key to dress in layers, hats and gloves. In St. Louis, grocery stores sold out of the es sentials before Sundays weather onslaught. The problem is the bread is sold out. Were out of milk. We sold out of chips, chicken wings, some meats, Issa Arar of Salama Supermark et said. Michigan residents had also jammed stores to stock up on supplies. Below-zero temps push into Midwest, Northeast ASSOCIATED PRESS Michael Jordan statue is covered by snow outside of United Center in Chicago on Saturday. OBITUARIES Linda S. Rash Linda S. Rash, 62, of Wildwood passed away Thursday, Janu ary 2, 2014 Mrs. Rash was born July 2, 1951 in Martin, KY. She moved to Wildwood in 1974 from IN and was a member of the Wild wood Church of Christ. She loved caring for her family and her cat. Survivors include her loving husband of 13 years, Herbert; chil dren, Eugene Harvey Slone, Jr. of NY, Tracy Mauldin of Lake Panaso ffkee and Matthew Slone of Wildwood; stepchil dren, Her bert John Rash of LI,NY, Michael Dean Rash of NJ, Joan Ann Rash of PA and Nora Beth Rash of PA; brothers, James Earl Caudill of OH, Bill Cau dill of FL, Arnold Cau dill of IN, Donald Cau dill of IN, Paul Caudill of PA and Fred Caudill, Jr. of FL; 11 grandchil dren and 6 great-grand children. She was pre ceded in death by her 1st husband, Eugene Harvey Slone; parents, Fred and Vada (Fields) Caudill, siblings, Eu gene, Lois and Bren da. Visitation for Lin da Rash will be held 6:00pm 8:00pm, Tues day, January 7, 2014 in the funeral home. The funeral service will be 10:00am, Wednesday in the Banks/Page-Theus Chapel. Interment will be in Florida Nation al Cemetery, Bushnell. On-line condolences may be shared by vis iting www.bankspag etheus.com. Arrange ments are entrusted to Banks/ Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. DEATH NOTICES Bernice H ogue Bernice Hogue, 83, of Leesburg, died Sat urday, January 4, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. Betty Ryan Betty Ryan, 93, of Leesburg, d ied Satur day, January 4, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. IN MEMORY RASH

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD ROD DIXON ........................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR BILL KOCH ....................... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURY HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 OTHER VOICES A friend recently got stuck when he tried to explain to his son, who was struggling to nd a job, how our econo my got to be the way it is. He asked my help since I am a wellknown crank on the matter. I offered him three short anec dotes: Last summer I was in a Home Depot standing in front of a veri table mountain of new air condi tioners. They were all from Chi na, which was no surprise. But to be annoying I asked a pass ing clerk where they were made. He was a young man, hired more for the spring in his step than his knowledge of international sourcing. We both looked at the boxes, piled in a pyramid, eight levels high. The boxes didnt say anything about China. But they did say Made in PRC. Are these from China? I asked. He paused a moment. No, theyre from Puerto Rico. Or consider this example from last month: A textile factory in It aly caught re and seven work ers were killed. They were all imported Chinese nationals working for Chinese companies operating in Italy so they could put a Made in Italy label on their cloth. A third example: The city of New York decreed a few years ago that each bedroom in the city must have a carbon mon oxide detector. There are rough ly 11 million bedrooms in New York City, so the law created a huge market. Further, the de vices have a life of ve years, af ter which they must be replaced, so the continuing market was also guaranteed. A manufactur ing enterprise could hardly nd a surer customer base. But was there a rush of com panies here in the United States gearing up to manufacture 11 million devices for this guaran teed sale? No. Almost all the de tectors were made in China or Taiwan. Over the last 20 years, coun tries around the world have ditched their communist gov ernments, or at least turned their backs on strict commu nist economic principles. At the same time, India and other Asian nations have rapidly moved into global trade. This has meant bil lions more workers around the world competing with American workers to make stuff and offer services. At the same time, ship ping has become more efcient and economical, and interna tional communication has be come cheap, instantaneous and simple. And since the interna tional workers are willing to ac cept extremely low wages, they have the advantage. Around the world, subsistence farmers have transformed themselves into subsistence factory workers. And during this entire peri od, what did the U.S. govern ment do to meet this challenge? Nothing. Our clueless, bellow ing national leaders from both parties took no action to meet the effect of this new competi tion. Many American companies embraced the changes, hap py to make prots off underpaid Asian workers while allowing huge swaths of American indus try to die. Two observations are of ten made to justify this disrup tive period. The rst is that the situation is an inevitable out growth of globalization and nat ural economic laws. In this sce nario, nothing that the foreign manufacturers have done to U.S. workers differs from what American manufacturing did to the older economies in Europe. Lower costs and cheaper goods will always gain market share. Sometimes that share will be 100 percent. A second explanation holds that what we are seeing is the necessary cost of the death of communism. Under this logic, communism was held in place by violence and oppression, and sooner or later it would have to be maintained by wars. Coun tries that depend on each other economically are less likely to go to war, not wanting to ght with their customers or suppliers. Thus the resulting pain of unem ployment is preferable to whole sale conict. But are those two observations valid? To assess them, we have to understand our history. War, it is said, is Gods way of teach ing Americans geography. Per haps unemployment is how we learn economics. Are Americans, whose jobs have been shipped overseas, the walking wounded in the war against Marxist total itarianism? Thats a stretch, but perhaps it will make lawmak ers feel better when they vote to cut off unemployment bene ts. If youre keeping score, they can shout, capitalism has defeat ed communism. We won. Oh, by the way, dont bother to show up for work Monday. Its hard to explain all this to younger Americans, who are gen erally a hopeful and cheerful lot. It means hinting that a great deal, maybe all, of what they have been taught so far in school is wrong, or at best useless. It means of fering a full explanation of hu man nature, including its awful and miserable characteristics, its meanness and its fearful avarice. That information is no fun to deliver. The worst human traits should be broken to the young in small pieces, so the facts can be digested and compared with what they already know. My friend invited me over to talk to his son, suggesting I could explain the new economic reali ties more clearly than he could. No, thanks, I said. Hes your kid. You do it. Jeff Danziger is a political cartoon ist and author of Rising Like the Tuc son, a novel about the Vietnam War. He wrote this for the Los Angeles Times. The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. S upreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomay or made a reasonable decision when, on New Years Eve, she temporarily blocked implementation of the Affordable Care Acts contraception coverage man date in a case brought by a religious order of nuns that operates homes for the poor and elderly in Catonsville, Md., and else where. Birth-control pills are often used for med ical reasons that have nothing to do with preventing pregnancy. Religious employers like churches are ex empt from the contraceptive coverage re quirement, and they always have been. For-prot companies whose owners object on religious grounds to contraception are not exempt, though that issue is headed for the Supreme Court via a pair of unrelated lawsuits. Last month, U.S. District Judge William J. Martinez agreed with the nuns that they were a religious organization under the act even though they are not a church. Whether the Little Sisters or any similar institution likes it or not, their employees are free to use birth control and doubtless do. Right now, they do so by using one form of the compensation they are provided as employees their salaries. Yet no one would argue that this fact makes the nuns complicit in the use of con traceptives, or that they should be allowed to prohibit their workers from shopping in stores where birth control is sold. Finding the balance between protecting the beliefs of organizations like the Little Sisters and those of its employees is tricky, and the nuns contention that they faced an impossible choice between committing what they see as a sin or paying hefty nes should not be taken lightly. For that reason, Justice Sotomayors grant of a reprieve at least until the government can respond on Friday makes sense. But it doesnt mean the nuns will or should ulti mately prevail. One of the consequences of living in a pluralistic democracy rather than a theoc racy is that faith groups must accept that they will be touched in some way by beliefs, practices and ways of living of which they disapprove. Thats not some new invention of the Affordable Care Act. Provided by McClatchy-Tribune News Service A VOICE Obamacare mandate doesnt violate nuns rights What has happened to all the jobs? Jeff Danziger Los Angeles Times

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014

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JOE KAY AP Sports Writer CINCINNATI Philip Rivers gloved hands found the right touch in the Janu ary cold. The Bengals? Still cant do anything right when its playoff time. San Diego took advan tage of Andy Daltons three turnovers in the sec ond half on Sunday, pull ing away to a 27-10 victory that extended the Bengals stretch of playoff misery to 23 years and counting. With Rivers making ac curate throws in the chill ing rain, the Char gers (10-7) won their fth in a row, beat ing the last team that had knocked them off. Theyll play next Sunday in Denver, which has the AFCs top seed. It was a shocking nish for the Bengals (11-6), who won the AFC North, went unbeaten at home and had their top-ranked defense for the playoffs. With ev erything in their favor, they fell apart, getting out scored 20-0 in the sec ond half. We asked a lot of our defense today and they came up with three big turnovers, said Rivers, who was 12 of 16 for 128 SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NBA: Heat topple Raptors / B4 Chargers rally for 37-10 victory; Bengals still inept in playoffs San Diego Chargers running back Danny Woodhead (39) runs against Cincinnati Bengals linebacker Rey Maualuga (58) in the second half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game on Sunday in Cincinnati. DAVID KOHL / AP SEE NFL | B2 RALPH D. RUSSO AP College Football Writer NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. Team Destiny vs. Team Domination. Before the Bowl Championship Series is replaced next year by a playoff, No. 1 Florida State and No. 2 Auburn will meet in its last title game Monday night at the Rose Bowl. The Seminoles (130) ripped through their schedule on the way to Pasadena, win ning each game by at least 14 points behind Heisman Trophy win ner Jameis Winston. I still think our best game is out there, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said Sun day. Im looking for ward to playing it on Monday night, and our kids are looking for ward to the challenge. The turnaround Ti gers (12-1) are the most unlikely group ever to reach the BCS champion ship game. Au burn went from 3-9 last year to Southeastern Conference champi ons in their rst sea son under coach Gus Malzahn. It was a wild ride. The Prayer at Jor dan-Hare beat Georgia. The Kick-Six beat Alabama. Desti ny? Fate? Luck? The Tigers dont see it that way. Hey, I know were a team of hard work, I know that, said tail back Tre Mason, a Heisman nalist who has run for 1,621 yards and 22 touchdowns for the No. 1 rushing of fense in the country. These guys put a lot of hard work in with me every day, blood, sweat and tears all year long. Auburn is the rst team to reach the BCS championship game after having a losing season the previous season, and would be come the rst national champion to start the season unranked since BYU in 1984. After 16 years of the BCS, the routine is fa miliar the day before the big game. The coaches hold their nal early morn ing news confer ences, and then take a DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston mugs for the cameras at BCS media day on Saturday in Newport Beach, Calif. DOMINATION & DESTINY FSU, Auburn face off tonight for BCS championship CHRIS CARLSON / AP Auburns Dominic Walker poses with The Coaches Trophy during media day. GENARO C. ARMAS AP Sports Writer GREEN BAY, Wis. Home or away. Late summer or during one of the coldest nights of the year. Doesnt matter where or when the San Francisco 49ers keep guring out how to beat the Green Bay Packers. Phil Dawson kicked a 33-yard eld goal as time expired, and Col in Kaepernick threw for 227 yards and ran for another 98 to lead the 49ers past the Packers 23-20 on Sun day night in a frigid NFC wild-card game. In a back-and-forth fourth quarter, the 49ers (13-4) threw the nal punch. Kaeper nick escaped a blitz on third-and-8 and scrambled for an 11yard gain to the 27 with 1:13 left. Just trying to gure out a way to get that rst down, Kaeper nick said. Had a play called, we didnt get the look that we want ed. It worked out for us. Dawson nailed the winning kick ve plays later but only after nearly being blocked by edge rush er Davon House. He was whistled for off sides on the play, but SEE BCS | B2 JEFFREY PHELPS / AP San Francisco 49ers running back Frank Gore dives into the end zone for a touchdown as Green Bay Packers free safety M.D. Jennings tackles him on Sunday in Green Bay, Wis. Niners outlast Packers 23-20 at frigid Lambeau SEE 49ERS | B2 49ers 23, Packers 20 San Francisco 6 7 0 10 23 Green Bay 0 10 0 10 20 First Quarter SFFG Dawson 22, 9:00. SFFG Dawson 25, 2:17. Second Quarter GBNelson 5 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 5:50. SFGore 10 run (Dawson kick), 2:48. GBFG Crosby 34, :00. Fourth Quarter GBKuhn 1 run (Crosby kick), 12:06. SFV.Davis 28 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 10:31. GBFG Crosby 24, 5:06. SFFG Dawson 33, :00. A,525. SF GB First downs 22 18 Total Net Yards 381 281 Rushes-yards 30-167 31-124 Passing 214 157 Punt Returns 2-20 0-0 Kickoff Returns 3-78 5-105 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-17 Comp-Att-Int 16-30-1 17-26-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-13 4-20 Punts 3-36.7 5-39.4 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 2-10 3-20 Time of Possession 29:06 30:54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 7-98, Gore 20-66, Hunter 2-4, Patton 1-(minus 1). Green Bay, Lacy 21-81, Starks 5-29, Rodgers 2-11, Kuhn 2-2, Cobb 1-1. PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 16-30-1227. Green Bay, Rodgers 17-26-0-177. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Crabtree 8-125, Bol din 3-38, V.Davis 2-37, Gore 1-11, Dixon 1-10, Celek 1-6. Green Bay, Nelson 7-62, Cobb 2-51, J.Jones 2-20, Kuhn 2-16, Lacy 2-7, Starks 1-13, Quarless 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 BASKETBALL National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 16 16 .500 Boston 13 20 .394 3 Brooklyn 12 21 .364 4 Philadelphia 12 21 .364 4 New York 10 22 .313 6 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 26 8 .765 Atlanta 18 16 .529 8 Washington 14 17 .452 10 Charlotte 15 20 .429 11 Orlando 10 23 .303 15 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 27 6 .818 Chicago 14 18 .438 12 Detroit 14 20 .412 13 Cleveland 11 23 .324 16 Milwaukee 7 26 .212 20 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 26 8 .765 Houston 22 13 .629 4 Dallas 19 14 .576 6 New Orleans 15 17 .469 10 Memphis 15 18 .455 10 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 26 7 .788 Portland 26 8 .765 Minnesota 16 17 .485 10 Denver 15 17 .469 10 Utah 11 25 .306 16 Pacic W L Pct GB Golden State 23 13 .639 L.A. Clippers 23 13 .639 Phoenix 20 12 .625 1 L.A. Lakers 14 19 .424 7 Sacramento 10 22 .313 11 Saturdays Games Miami 110, Orlando 94 Indiana 99, New Orleans 82 Brooklyn 89, Cleveland 82 Chicago 91, Atlanta 84 Oklahoma City 115, Minnesota 111 San Antonio 116, L.A. Clippers 92 Phoenix 116, Milwaukee 100 Philadelphia 101, Portland 99 Charlotte 113, Sacramento 103 Sundays Games Memphis 112, Detroit 84 Golden State 112, Washington 96 Indiana 82, Cleveland 78 Miami 102, Toronto 97 Boston at Oklahoma City, late New York at Dallas, late Denver at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Minnesota at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m. Golden State at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Boston at Denver, 9 p.m. Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m. COLLEGE FOOTBALL BCS National Championship Bowl Winners Jan. 7, 2013 Alabama 42, Notre Dame 14 Jan. 9, 2012 Alabama 21, LSU 0 Jan. 10, 2011 Auburn 22, Oregon 19 Jan. 7, 2010 Alabama 37, Texas 21 Jan. 8, 2009 Florida 24, Oklahoma 14 Jan. 7, 2008 LSU 38, Ohio State 24 Jan. 8, 2007 Florida 41, Ohio State 14 BCS Championship Games Jan. 4, 2006 Rose Bowl Texas 41, Southern Cal-x 38 Jan. 1, 2005 Orange Bowl Southern Cal-x 55, Oklahoma 19 Jan. 4, 2004 Sugar Bowl LSU 21, Oklahoma 14 Jan. 3, 2003 Fiesta Bowl Ohio St. 31, Miami 24, 2OT Jan. 3, 2002 Rose Bowl Miami 37, Nebraska 14 Jan. 3, 2001 Orange Bowl Oklahoma 13, Flor ida State 2 Jan. 4, 2000 Sugar Bowl Florida St. 46, Vir ginia Tech 29 Jan. 4, 1999 Fiesta Bowl Tennessee 23, Flor ida State 16 x-participation vacated Florida St. Bowl History Record: 26-14-2 Jan. 1, 2013 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, Northern Illinois 10 Dec. 29, 2011 Champ Sports BowlFlorida St. 18, Notre Dame 14 Dec. 31, 2010 Chick-l-A BowlFlorida St. 26, South Carolina 17 Jan. 1, 2010 Gator BowlFlorida St. 33, West Vir ginia 21 Dec. 27, 2008 Champs Sports BowlFlorida St. 42, Wisconsin 13 Dec. 31, 2007 Music City BowlKentucky 35, Flor ida St. 28 Dec. 27, 2006 Emerald BowlFlorida St. 44, UCLA 27 Jan. 4, 2006 Orange BowlPenn St. 26, Florida St. 23, 3OT Jan. 1, 2005 Gator BowlFlorida St. 30, West Vir ginia 18 Jan. 1, 2004 Orange BowlMiami 16, Florida St. 14 Jan. 1, 2003 Sugar BowlGeorgia 26, Florida St. 13 Jan. 1, 2002 Gator BowlFlorida St. 30, Virginia Tech 17 Jan. 3, 2001 Orange BowlOklahoma 13, Flor ida St. 2 Jan. 4, 2000 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 46, Virginia Tech 29 Jan. 1, 1999 Fiesta BowlTennessee 23, Flor ida St. 16 Jan. 1, 1998 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 31, Ohio St. 14 Jan. 2, 1997 Sugar BowlFlorida 52, Florida St. 20 Jan. 1, 1996 Orange BowlFlorida St. 31, Notre Dame 26 Jan. 2, 1995 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 23, Florida 17 Jan. 1, 1994 Orange BowlFlorida St. 18, Ne braska 16 Jan. 1, 1993 Orange BowlFlorida St. 27, Ne braska 14 Jan. 1, 1992 Cotton BowlFlorida St. 10, Texas A&M 2 Dec. 28, 1990 Blockbuster BowlFlorida St. 24, Penn St. 17 Jan. 1, 1990 Fiesta BowlFlorida St. 41, Ne braska 17 Jan. 2, 1989 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 13, Auburn 7 Jan. 1, 1988 Fiesta BowlFlorida St. 31, Ne braska 28 Dec. 31, 1986 All American BowlFlorida St. 27, Indiana 13 Dec. 30, 1985 Gator BowlFlorida St. 34, Okla homa St. 23 Dec. 22, 1984 Citrus BowlFlorida St. 17, Geor gia 17, tie Dec. 30, 1983 Peach BowlFlorida St. 28, North Carolina 3 Dec. 30, 1982 Gator BowlFlorida St. 31, West Virginia 12 Jan. 1, 1981 Orange BowlOklahoma 18, Flor ida St. 17 Jan. 1, 1980 Orange BowlOklahoma 24, Flor ida St. 7 Dec. 23, 1977 Tangerine BowlFlorida St. 40, Texas Tech 17 Dec. 27, 1971 Fiesta BowlArizona St. 45, Flor ida St. 38 Dec. 20, 1968 Peach BowlLSU 31, Florida St. 27 Dec. 30, 1967 Gator BowlFlorida St. 17, Penn St. 17, tie Dec. 24, 1966 Sun BowlWyoming 28, Florida St. 20 Jan. 2, 1965 Gator BowlFlorida St. 36, Okla homa 19 Dec. 13, 1958 Bluegrass BowlOklahoma St. 15, Florida St. 6 Jan. 1, 1955 Sun BowlTexas Western 47, Flor ida St. 20 Jan. 2, 1950 Cigar BowlFlorida St. 19, Wofford 6 Auburn Bowl History Record: 22-13-2 Dec. 31, 2011 Chick-l-A BowlAuburn 43, Vir ginia 24 Jan. 10, 2011 BCS ChampionshipAuburn 22, Oregon 19 Jan. 1, 2010 Outback BowlAuburn 38, Northwest ern 35, OT Dec. 31, 2007 Chick-l-A BowlAuburn 23, Clem son 20, OT Jan. 1, 2007 Cotton BowlAuburn 17, Nebraska 14 Jan. 2, 2006 Capital One BowlWisconsin 24, Auburn 10 Jan. 3, 2005 Sugar BowlAuburn 16, Virginia Tech 13 Dec. 31, 2003 Music City BowlAuburn 28, Wis consin 14 Jan. 1, 2003 Capital One BowlAuburn 13, Penn State 9 Dec. 31, 2001 Peach BowlNorth Carolina 16, Auburn 10 Jan. 1, 2001 Citrus BowlMichigan 31, Auburn 28 Jan. 2, 1998 Peach BowlAuburn 21, Clemson 17 Dec. 31, 1996 Independence BowlAuburn 33, Army 29 Jan. 1, 1996 Outback BowlPenn State 43, Au burn 14 Dec. 29, 1990 Peach BowlAuburn 27, Indiana 23 Jan. 1, 1990 Hall of Fame BowlAuburn 31, Ohio State 24 Jan. 2, 1989 Sugar BowlFlorida State 13, Au burn 7 Jan. 1, 1988 Sugar BowlSyracuse 16, Auburn 16, tie Jan. 1, 1987 Citrus BowlAuburn 16, Southern Cal 7 Jan. 1, 1986 Cotton BowlTexas A&M 36, Au burn 16 Dec. 27, 1985 Liberty BowlAuburn 21, Arkan sas 15 Jan. 2, 1984 Sugar BowlAuburn 9, Michigan 7 Dec. 18, 1982 Tangerine BowlAuburn 33, Boston College 26 Dec. 30, 1974 Gator BowlAuburn 27, Texas 3 Dec. 29, 1973 Sun BowlMissouri 34, Auburn 17 Jan. 1, 1972 Gator BowlAuburn 24, Colorado 3 Jan. 1, 1972 Sugar BowlOklahoma 40, Auburn 22 Jan. 1, 1971 Gator BowlAuburn 35, Mississippi 28 Dec. 31, 1969 Bluebonnet BowlHouston 36, Auburn 7 Dec. 28, 1968 Sun BowlAuburn 34, Arizona 10 Dec. 18, 1965 Liberty BowlMississippi 13, Au burn 7 Jan. 1, 1964 Orange BowlNebraska 13, Auburn 7 Dec. 31, 1955 Gator BowlVanderbilt 25, Au burn 13 Dec. 31, 1954 Gator BowlAuburn 33, Baylor 13 Jan. 1, 1954 Gator BowlTexas Tech 35, Auburn 13 Jan. 1, 1938 Orange BowlAuburn 6, Michigan State 0 Jan. 1, 1937 Bacardi BowlAuburn 7, Villanova 7, tie National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 42 28 12 2 58 124 89 Tampa Bay 41 25 12 4 54 116 95 Montreal 43 24 14 5 53 112 102 Detroit 43 19 14 10 48 114 121 Toronto 43 21 17 5 47 119 127 Ottawa 44 19 18 7 45 126 141 Florida 42 16 20 6 38 101 134 Buffalo 42 12 26 4 28 74 118 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 44 31 12 1 63 142 103 Philadelphia 42 21 17 4 46 111 116 Washington 42 20 16 6 46 128 128 N.Y. Rangers 43 21 20 2 44 105 115 Carolina 42 17 16 9 43 103 123 New Jersey 43 17 18 8 42 101 110 Columbus 42 18 20 4 40 113 123 N.Y. Islanders 43 14 22 7 35 112 143 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 44 29 7 8 66 165 121 St. Louis 41 29 7 5 63 150 95 Colorado 41 26 11 4 56 120 104 Minnesota 44 22 17 5 49 106 113 Dallas 41 20 14 7 47 120 124 Winnipeg 45 19 21 5 43 123 135 Nashville 42 18 18 6 42 101 127 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 43 30 8 5 65 142 108 San Jose 42 26 10 6 58 139 109 Los Angeles 43 26 13 4 56 113 89 Vancouver 43 23 13 7 53 114 104 Phoenix 41 20 12 9 49 123 127 Calgary 41 14 21 6 34 96 128 Edmonton 44 13 26 5 31 112 153 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Florida 5, Nashville 4, SO Boston 4, Winnipeg 1 Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Buffalo 2, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Rangers 7, Toronto 1 Ottawa 4, Montreal 3, OT Carolina 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 St. Louis 6, Columbus 2 Detroit 5, Dallas 1 Minnesota 5, Washington 3 Philadelphia 5, Phoenix 3 Los Angeles 3, Vancouver 1 Sundays Games Pittsburgh 6, Winnipeg 5 Nashville at Carolina, late San Jose at Chicago, late Tampa Bay at Edmonton, late Vancouver at Anaheim, late Todays Games Dallas at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Columbus at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Florida at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games Carolina at Buffalo, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m. Tampa Bay at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m. St. Louis at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Boston at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. NFL Playoff Glance All Times EST Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20 Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 11 New Orleans at Seattle, 4:35 p.m. (FOX) Indianpolis at New England, 8:15 p.m. (CBS) Sunday, Jan. 12 San Francisco at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX) San Diego at Denver, 4:40 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS) NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (FOX) St. Louis at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Boston at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. TENNIS Brisbane International Results Sunday At Queensland Tennis Centre Brisbane, Australia Purse: Men, $511,825 (WT250); Women, $1 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3. Doubles Men Championship Mariusz Fyrstenberg, Poland, and Daniel Nestor (2), Canada, def. Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah (4), Colombia, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 10-7. ATP World Tour Aircel Chennai Open Results Sunday At SDAT Tennis Stadium Chennai, India Purse: $459,140 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Stanislas Wawrinka (1), Switzerland, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin (7), France, 7-5, 6-2. Doubles Championship Johan Brunstrom, Sweden, and Frederik Nielsen (4), Denmark, def. Marin Draganja and Mate Pavic, Cro atia, 6-2, 4-6, 10-7. WTA Hobart International Results Sunday At The Domain Tennis Centre Hobart, Australia Purse: $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles First Round Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, leads Mona Barthel (6), Germany, 3-2, Suspended. Doubles First Round Irina Buryachok, Ukraine, and Oksana Kalashnikova (3), Georgia, def. Natalie Grandin, South Africa, and Alison Riske, United States, 4-6, 6-4, 10-4. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, and Mariana Duque-Marino, Colombia, def. Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, and Sandra Klemenschits, Austria, 7-6 (6), 6-4. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, and Janette Husarova (4), Slovakia, def. Soa Shapatava, Georgia, and Anas tasiya Vasylyeva, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-1. Aleksandrina Naydenova, Bulgaria, and Teliana Pereira, Brazil, def. Chan Chin-wei, Taiwan, and Xu Yi-Fan, China, 6-7 (8), 6-2, 10-8. Apia International Results Sunday At Olympic Park Tennis Centre Sydney, Australia Purse: Men, $511,825 (WT250); Women, $710,000 (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Women First Round Madison Keys, United States, def. Simona Halep (7), Romania, 6-1, 6-4. Sara Errani (3), Italy, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 6-4, 6-2. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-4, 7-5. Doubles Women First Round Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears, United States, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova and Ekaterina Ma karova, Russia, 6-2, 7-5. Sundays Sports Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Assigned G Elliot Williams to Delaware (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League NFL Fined Seattle RB Marshawn Lynch $50,000 for violating the leagues media policy. HOCKEY National Hockey League DALLAS STARS Reassigned F Chris Mueller to Texas (AHL). American Hockey League SPRINGFIELD FALCONS Returned G Mike Clem ente to Evansville (ECHL). Reassigned D Thomas Larkin to Evansville. COLLEGE CHOWAN Named Chris Whalley mens soccer coach. TEXAS Named Charlie Strong football coach. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN/ESPN2/ESPN CLASSIC/ESPNEWS BCS National Championship, Florida St. vs. Auburn, at Pasadena, Calif. GOLF 4 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, nal round, at Kapalua, Hawaii yards with a touch down and no inter ceptions. We didnt turn it over, which is always big in the play offs. The Bengals now have the sixth-lon gest streak of playoff futility in NFL history, stretching all the way back to the 1990 sea son. Theyve lost their playoff opener three straight years, match ing a league record as well, according to STATS LLC. Coach Marvin Lewis fell to 0-5 in the play offs during his 11 sea sons as head coach, but is expected to stick around and get another chance to try again. A lot of it fell on Dal ton, who has a trilogy of bad playoff games. He fumbled and threw two interceptions in the second half that set up San Diegos win. Dalton nished 29 of 51 for 334 yards with a below-average passer rating of 67. Combined with the Saints victory over the Eagles on Satur day night, the two No. 6 playoff seeds won for the rst time since 2010, when the Pack ers won the Super Bowl. And the Chargers are thinking: Why not us? We talked all week about this being the fth round, Rivers said, referring to their ve-game winning streak. So the sixth round will be in Den ver next week. This one was a rever sal from the last time they met. The Bengals forced three turnovers for a 17-10 win in San Diego on Dec. 1, which became the Chargers turning point. The Bengals got the rematch at home, where they had scored 49, 41, 41, 42 and 34 points in their last ve regular season games. They were blanked in the second half on Sunday, when Dal ton went 17 of 34 for 170 yards with two in terceptions, a fumble and three sacks. In rst-round play off losses each of the past three seasons, Dalton has thrown one touchdown pass and six interceptions. Rivers complet ed a team-record and NFL-best 69.5 percent of his passes this sea son for 4,478 yards. He was only 5 of 6 in the rst half for 48 yards with San Diego fre quently backed inside its 20-yard line to start drives. He completed all of his six passes during a 10-play, 80-yard touchdown drive in the third quarter that put the Chargers ahead to stay, with his 4-yard pass to Ladar ius Green giving San Diego a 14-10 lead. Dalton then made the mistakes that turned the game, al lowing the Chargers to pull ahead. NFL FROM PAGE B1 Chargers 27, Bengals 10 San Diego 7 0 10 10 27 Cincinnati 0 10 0 0 10 First Quarter SDWoodhead 5 run (Novak kick), :48. Second Quarter CinGresham 4 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 5:59. CinFG Nugent 46, :00. Third Quarter SDGreen 4 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 6:46. SDFG Novak 25, 2:00. Fourth Quarter SDFG Novak 23, 14:16. SDR.Brown 58 run (Novak kick), 2:17. A,277. SD Cin First downs 16 27 Total Net Yards 318 439 Rushes-yards 40-196 25-113 Passing 122 326 Punt Returns 0-0 3-6 Kickoff Returns 1-23 6-151 Interceptions Ret. 2-33 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 12-16-0 29-51-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-6 3-8 Punts 6-43.2 3-39.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-2 Penalties-Yards 5-28 4-38 Time of Possession 29:28 30:32 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Diego, R.Brown 8-77, Wood head 15-54, Mathews 13-52, Royal 1-9, Rivers 2-4, McClain 1-0. Cincinnati, Bernard 12-45, Green-Ellis 8-42, Dalton 5-26. PASSINGSan Diego, Rivers 12-16-0-128. Cin cinnati, Dalton 29-51-2-334. RECEIVINGSan Diego, Green 3-34, Allen 2-21, Woodhead 2-14, Mathews 2-12, Royal 1-33, R.Brown 1-9, Gates 1-5. Cincinnati, M.Jones 8-130, Bernard 7-73, Gresham 7-64, Green few minutes to shake hands with each other, exchange pleasantries and pose for pictures with the crystal foot ball trophy that goes to the winner. On Sunday it was Fisher, the fast-talking West Virginian and Nick Saban disciple, and Malzahn, who has gone from high school coach in Arkansas to the national champi onship game in eight years, running the drill. Malzahn, who was the Tigers offensive coordinator when they won the 2010 nation al title, said Sunday he told his players before the season one of their goals was to make the biggest turnaround in college football. Done. Auburn has already matched the 2000 Ha waii team for most im proved record in FBS history. Well, Auburn is a great program and used to winning cham pionships, so I knew that we were going to get it turned around, he said. I didnt know how quick. There was a lot of questions when we rst got there. We did a lot of Dr. Philing early, and our guys came together and they believed. Malzahns up-tem po, spread offense is a combination of decep tion and power that seemingly gets better every game. Against Missouri in the SEC championship game, Auburn ran for 545 yards. Well, you have to have eye discipline, Fisher said. Any time you have moving parts, any time you bring something in front of you, just like when youre driving, if some body ashes a hand in front of you while youre driving down the road it makes you blink, it makes your eyes dis tracted and you get off of what youre looking at and then at the same time they become very physical with how they play, and you get your self out of position, they knock you out of the way, and theres a four, ve, eight, 10 or they break a run right up the middle. Fisher has put togeth er the most talented two-deep depth in the country, a collection of ve-star recruits and NFL prospects remi niscent of coach Bob by Bowdens best Flor ida State teams. The Seminoles won two na tional titles under Fish ers Hall of Fame pre decessor and played in the rst three BCS title games. BCS FROM PAGE B1 TOM UHLMAN / AP San Diego Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers celebrates with fans after San Diego defeated the Cincinnati Bengals, 27-10, on Sunday in Cincinnati. the 49ers declined the penalty with the win in hand. The defending NFC champions came away with a huge win in con ditions that resembled a meat locker. It was 5 degrees at kickoff, and the winds made it feel like minus-10. San Francisco plays at Carolina next Sunday in the divisional round. They got us the rst time, linebacker Na Varro Bowman said, referring to Carolinas 10-9 win on Nov. 10. Whats on our minds is to get them now. Its the playoffs. Win or go home. Mason Crosbys 24yard eld goal tied it at 20 for the Packers (8-81) with 5:06 left before the 49ers nal drive. Until then, Pack ers quarterback Aar on Rodgers did his best to turn into Captain Comeback again. Af ter a slow rst quar ter, Rodgers nished 17 of 26 for 177 yards and touchdown. Kaepernick connect ed with a spinning Ver non Davis down the seam for a 28-yard touchdown pass with 10:39 left. The score quickly answered John Kuhns 1-yard touch down run that briey gave the Packers a fourpoint lead. That TD was set up after Rodgers, in the clutches of a 49ers de fender, somehow man aged to escape a sack on fourth-and-2 and found Randall Cobb for a 26-yard gain to the Niners 4. Eddie Lacy ran for 81 yards on 21 car ries for the Packers, while Frank Gore had 66 yards and a touch down on 20 carries for the 49ers. Michael Crabtree had eight catches for 125 yards for San Francisco. But it was Kaeper nick who was the dif ference-maker once again in San Francis cos fourth straight win over Green Bay. He n ished 16 of 30 with the touchdown and an in terception. 49ERS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS When coach Chuck Pagano arrived home after Saturdays play off victory, he tried to settle down. Instead, he settled in for the reality that the Colts ar ent nished yet. Youre able to go home and sit on the couch, turn the TV on and nd out that it did happen. It is real. It wasnt surreal, Pagano said Sunday, less than 24 hours after his team pulled off the second-greatest comeback in playoff history. Those guys, our players, they lay it on the line week in and week out. They truly left nothing, nothing, out there. The shocking turnaround, from a 38-10 second-half decit to 45-44 victory over the Chiefs, left Indianapo lis spent both physically and mentally, linebacker Jerrell Freeman said. And it has Indianapo lis (12-5) waiting to see if it plays at Denver or New En gland next weekend in the divisional round. Those are the results of this monumental victory. But a rare non-game day Sunday also gave the Colts a brief chance to reect on what had been accomplished. They won their rst postseason game without Peyton Manning since Janu ary 1996. They won their rst postseason game without Manning or Jim Harbaugh behind center since John Unitas was the starter in 1971. They became the rst NFL team in playoff history to win despite giving up 40 points and losing four turn overs. And they did it all with Andrew Luck leading the way on a less than stellar day. How? By following Paga nos long-standing mantra of playing hard until the nal whistle and never losing faith in their aptly-named quarterback. Hey, he does it all. As long as we continue to get the ball to him, we know some kind of way hes going to put points on the board, that of fense is going to get rolling, Freeman said, referring to Luck. (Offensive coordinator) Pep (Hamilton) has a lot of different schemes. Im sure yall see it, they can do it in the passing game and the run game. Its great to have a quarterback like that. Its not just Luck, though. These Colts thrive on de bunking conventional wis dom. When they started the re building process after the 2011 season with a rst-time general manager, a rst-time head coach, a rookie quar terback and no Manning, they were considered one of the worst teams in football. They wound up winning 11 games and making the playoffs even with Pagano missing 12 games to battle leukemia. This summer, when some said Indy would regress in terms of wins against a tougher schedule, the Colts still wound up winning 11 and captured their rst AFC South title without Manning. And on Saturday, after trailing by 28 with 28 min utes remaining and every body else giving up on them, the Colts still believed. NFL sacks champ Robert Mathis walked to the bench and slammed his helmet, then stewed stoically on the bench waiting for his next chance as Luck took the eld one more time. Saturday marked the 11th time he led the Colts to a winning score in the fourth quarter or overtime over the past two seasons more than any other quarterback in the NFL. And after Saturday, even the outsiders are beginning to wonder if theres anything Luck cant do. Pagano and his players al ready know the answer. I dont know what level it is, but he sure went to anoth er one (Saturday), Pagano said. Hes a guy that is able to put things behind him in a hurry. Ive seen a lot of guys on either side of the ball have some poor plays here and there whether its a quarter back and you throw three in terceptions, you come right out of the half and youre gunned up and ready to go play good football and boom, you start the second half the way we started the second half. The guy is just strong-minded that way. Colts have little time to savor stunning comeback MICHAEL CONROY / AP Indianapolis Colts center Samson Satele celebrates after an NFL wild-card playoff football game on Saturday in Indianapolis. Indianapolis defeated Kansas City 45-44. TERESA M. WALKER AP Sports Writer NASHVILLE, Tenn. Ruston Webster is in charge of his rst coaching search in the NFL and only the Ti tans second since moving to Tennessee, and the general man ager says his goal is nding the man who is the right t for the fran chise. Hes also not limiting what he wants in the Titans next coach. The biggest thing to me that you cant do is rule out guys, Web ster said. I want an of fensive guy or a defen sive guy, previous head coaching experience. It causes you to miss out on possibly some good candidates. Webster wants to start interviewing candidates as soon as possible to re place Mike Munchak, who was red Saturday after three years as head coach and 31 seasons with the franchise overall. The general manager says some of the candi dates he wants to inter view still are coaching in the playoffs. With the Titans ring Munchak six days after the regu lar season ended, they missed the window to interview candidates whose teams had a bye this week. The last time the Ti tans went looking for a new coach was late January 2011 after Jeff Fisher was red with all other openings in the NFL already lled. Munchak was hired Feb. 7, 2011. This time, the Titans became the seventh team in the league to re a coach, but only the Texans and Buc caneers have hired re placements. We denitely have a head start on that, said Webster, who assisted then-general manager Mike Reinfeldt in 2011. Webster said he plans to meet with assistant coaches starting Mon day. Munchaks ring happened so quickly after nearly a week of meetings that Webster said he hadnt complet ed the process yet with Titans president and chief executive ofcer Tommy Smith. This franchise hired its last two coaches by promoting from with in. Munchak had been offensive line coach when the Titans picked him in 2011, replac ing Fisher, who took over for Jack Pardee af ter 10 games in 1994 for the then-Houston Oil ers. Pardee was hired in 1990 away from the University of Houston. Webster said hes watched people such as Rich McKay and oth ers hire coaches when he was with the Buc caneers and Seahawks. Webster said hes not sure how many coach es were hired during his time in Tampa Bay, but it was a lot. Titans GM looking for the right fit in next coach AP FILE PHOTO Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Munchak yells to his players on Sept. 22 before an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers, in Nashville, Tenn. DAVE SKRETTA AP Sports Writer KANSAS CITY, Mo. In many ways, it was a dream, go ing from 2-14 and the rst overall pick in the NFL draft to 11-5 and a spot in the playoffs. Yet it ended in just about the most night marish way possible, a second-half collapse and another round of postseason heartache. No wonder the Kan sas City Chiefs had such a hard time summariz ing their season in the minutes and hours af ter a gut-wrenching 4544 loss at Indianapolis on Saturday. You know, I cer tainly think you use this as drive, Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith said Sunday be tween wrap-up meet ings. I think its good to be playing in these types of games. I think these types of games are contagious. You go back to playing in just regular-season games, you want that itch. You have that urge to try to get to these types of games. I certainly think that foundation has been laid for next year. The Chiefs have lost a record eight straight postseason games, their last victory com ing after the 1993 sea son. Most of the cur rent members of the team were in grade school, some of them still in diapers, the last time Kansas City tasted any success in games that truly matter. It appeared for most of three quarters Sat urday that things would be different. Kansas City had raced to a 31-10 halftime lead, and then took advantage of an inter ception early in the third quarter to tack on a touchdown that several Chiefs would say later should have sealed the game. The problem was that they started play ing as if the game was in hand, while Andrew Luck and the play off-tested Colts started to play as though they had nothing to lose. The result was a fu rious second-half ral ly, one made possi ble by unconscionable breakdowns by a de fense that was spectac ular during a 9-0 start. Luck torched a second ary that wilted when it faced premier quarter backs such as Peyton Manning and Philip Rivers, and his 64-yard touchdown pass to T.Y. Hilton with 4:21 left nished off the sec ond-biggest comeback in NFL playoff history. Dream season for Chiefs ends in nightmare fashion MICHAEL CONROY / AP Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith (11) runs the ball against the Indianapolis Colts on Saturday during the second half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game in Indianapolis. The Chiefs have lost a record eight straight postseason games, their last victory coming after the 1993 season. Most of the current members of the team were in grade school, some of them still in diapers, the last time Kansas City tasted any success in games that truly matter.

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NBA GOLF DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer KAPALUA, Hawaii The most pressure in volving the Ryder Cup this year is simply get ting on the team. It has never been more difcult for Europe or the United States. I do not want to be missing out on that one, Graeme McDow ell said last month at the end of a most suc cessful season. The former U.S. Open champion and Ryder Cup hero from Wales in 2010 won three times last year, including the World Match Play Championship in Bul garia. He nished the year at No. 14 in the world, behind ve Eu ropeans Henrik Sten son, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy, Sergio Garcia and Ian Poulter. But there are no guar antees in golf, especial ly in this era of great depth. McDowell goes into the year outside the top nine in the stand ings (four from Eu ropean Tour money, ve from world rank ing points, both earned since September). Both captains, Tom Watson and Paul Mc Ginley, have three wildcard selections. Both teams have young players who were nev er part of the Ryder Cup conversation un til now, whether thats Jordan Spieth of Texas or Victor Dubuisson of France. Theres going to be two or three guys who miss, McDowell said. Good players. Quality players. I assume Mc Ginleys wild cards are going to be very hot ly contested. No doubt its going to be a tough team to get on. Its like that for Amer ica, too. All anyone has to do is look at the Presidents Cup last October not because of who played for the American team, but who didnt. Jim Furyk was left off the team when U.S. captain Fred Couples picked Spieth, and it was hard to fault him for that. Dustin Johnson, whom many regard as the best American talent under 30, didnt make the team and wasnt picked. Former Masters champion Bubba Wat son stayed home. Rick ie Fowler hasnt played on a U.S. team since he was a captains pick for the Ryder Cup in Wales. It certainly is getting harder now that, and I think the American players are hungry for it, so theyre playing and theyre working, Zach Johnson said. They are grinding and they want to make that team. Its harder to make those teams. Last fall, Johnson couldnt help but look at the rosters and say, He deserved to be on the team, or How do you not take that guy? The obvious one was Jim, he said. How was he not on the team? Furyk had not missed a Ryder Cup or Presi dents Cup team since 1997. Then again, Fu ryk was 43 and every year gets a new class of young players who made it even hard er. Harris English won twice last year. Think he doesnt have the Ry der Cup on his mind, especially after having played in a Walker Cup? Tiger Woods, when he was going through a season of mediocre golf and troubling in juries in 2011, was re garded in some circles as a questionable cap tains pick for the 2011 Presidents Cup at Roy al Melbourne. Woods didnt even qualify for the FedEx Cup playoffs. Before heading down to Australia, his last top 10 was in April. Tak ing him would mean leaving PGA champion Keegan Bradley off the team. All the opinions and analysis overlooked one important thing. Hes Tiger Woods. And that made him an obvi ous choice. How many guys are locks like that now? Phil Mickelson, who turns 44 this year and is as unpredictable now as when he was a rook ie, probably still ts into that category. And thats about it. Consider who might be expected to play at Gleneagles the last week of Septem ber. Woods, Mickel son, Steve Stricker, Matt Kuchar, Zach and Dustin Johnson, Jason Dufner, Hunter Mahan, Keegan Bradley, Spieth, Webb Simpson, Brandt Snedeker, Bubba Wat son, Furyk. Were already up to 14. The Ryder Cup takes only 12. And thats overlook ing which new star might emerge this year. English? Billy Horschel? Gary Woodland? Ryan Moore? Europe was at its strongest in the mid dle of the 2000s decade. Again, the strength was measured more by who didnt make the team. That prompted Col in Montgomerie to say in Ireland in 2006 that Europe had reached a stage where it could eld two quality teams. It used to be the Eu ropeans barely had enough for one. Rose and Poulter didnt make the team. Darren Clarke was left off the 2008 team, even though he had won twice that year. Garcia didnt play in 2010. The Ryder Cup al ready is closer than ever. Sure, the Euro peans seem to have a lock on that gold chal ice. They won in 2010 when it came down to the nal match, even though the Americans won all but one session in that rain-lled week. Europes win in Medi nah required a stun ning comeback on the nal day. It effective ly was decided on a 45foot birdie putt by Jus tin Rose. The competition is greater than ever for three days of com petition, and especial ly for the next eight months trying to make the team. Ryder Cup quandary: How to secure spot on team MARCO GARCIA / AP Dustin Johnson follows his drive off the ninth tee during the second round of the Tournament of Champions golf tournament in Kapalua, Hawaii. TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI LeBron James scored 30 points, Michael Beasley came off the bench to add 17 and the Miami Heat held on down the stretch to beat the Toronto Raptors 10297 Sunday night. Dwyane Wade scored 14 points and Chris Bosh grabbed 11 re bounds for the Heat, who successfully over came a decit entering the fourth quarter for the seventh time in 13 tries. Miami was down by ve entering the fourth, then opened the nal period with a 7-0 run and never trailed again. DeMar DeRozan scored 26 points on 11 for 19 shooting for Toronto, which was bidding for its rst six-game win ning streak since April 2007. Amir Johnson and Jonas Valanciunas each scored 17 for the Raptors, who got 14 from Kyle Lowry. GRIZZLIES 112, PISTONS 84 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Jon Leuer matched a career high with 23 points, Zach Randolph had 16 points and 16 re bounds, and the Memphis Grizzlies dominated the second half to beat the Detroit Pistons 112-84 on Sunday afternoon. Memphis had six players in double g ures, including 15 from former Piston Tayshaun Prince. Greg Monroe led Detroit with 19 points, while Andre Drummond added 15 points and 14 rebounds. The Pistons lost their fourth straight and fth in a row at home. They are now 4-10 after a 10-10 start to the season. WARRIORS 112, WIZARDS 96 WASHINGTON Klay Thompson scored 26 points, Stephen Curry and Andrew Bogut connected on a trick play worthy of the NBAs slam dunk con test, and the Golden State Warriors have their longest in-season winning streak since 1975 after Sunday nights 112-96 win over the Washington Wizards. The Warriors won their ninth in a row by turning the third quarter into a laugh er, opening the period with a 30-5 run. Curry and Thompson topped John Wall and Bradley Beal in the bat tle of the two high est-scoring backcourts in the NBA. Curry scored 14 points on 5-for-17 shooting. Heat end Raptors win streak 102-97 AP FILE PHOTO Toronto Raptors Amir Johnson (15) tries to keep Miami Heats Dwyane Wade (3) from the ball during the rst half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, in Miami.

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 AGENDA NORTH LAKE COUNTY HOSPITAL DISTRICT MEETING ON JANUARY 23, 2014 LAKE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ROOM 5:30 p.m.1.Call to Order 2.Administration of Oath to Elizabeth Kallop 3.Roll Call 4.Presentation and approval of minutes of the budget meetings held on September 19, 2013 and September 26, 2013 5.Financial report audit presentation 6.Presentation of the annual report of the Board of Trustees. 7.Transaction of any business that may properly be brought before the board. a.Reaffirmation of Resolution 98-1. 8.Election of officers of the Board of Trustees. 9.Old Business 10.New Business: a.Presentation of quarterly audits b.Scheduling of budget and special meetings 10.Any other matter necessary to achieve the aforementioned goals. 11.Adjournment PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT PATRICIA SYKES-AMOS at 352-383-6300 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEARING. If a person decides to appeal any decision or recommendation made by council with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need record of the proceedings, and that for such purposes he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. This agenda is provided to the North Lake County Hospital District only as a guide, and in no way limits their consideration to the items contained hereon. The North Lake County Hospital District has the sole right to determine those items they will discuss, consider or act upon. Changes or amendments to this Agenda may occur at any time prior to, or during the scheduled meeting. It is recommended that if you have an interest in the meeting, you make every attempt to attend the meeting. This Agenda is provided only as a courtesy, and such provision in no way infers or conveys that the Agenda appearing here is or will be the Agenda considered at the meeting. SOCCER STEVE DOUGLAS Associated Press MANCHESTER, En gland West Hams gamble of playing a team full of young sters and reserve play ers backred spectacu larly when the Premier League struggler was thrashed 5-0 by Not tingham Forest in a third-round shock in the FA Cup on Sunday. However, Chelsea had no problem seeing off second-tier oppo sition, defeating Der by 2-0 thanks to sec ond-half goals by John Obi Mikel and Oscar, and Sunderland beat third-tier Carlisle 3-1. Later Sunday, third-ti er Oldham looks to beat Liverpool for the sec ond straight year in the worlds oldest club knockout competition and Manchester Unit ed hosts fellow Premier League side Swansea. With his squad hit by injury and the rst leg of a League Cup seminal against Man chester City to come on Wednesday, West Ham manager Sam Al lardyce elded an un recognizable starting XI that was humbled at The City Ground. Djamel Abdouns goal gave Forest a 1-0 lead at halftime before Jamie Paterson scored a hat trick and Andy Reid completed the hu miliation with the fth in injury time. West Hams line up further highlights the FA Cups increas ing lack of appeal in the eyes of many top clubs but Allardyce made no apologies, even though the humiliating result will pile the pressure on him after his teams poor start to the sea son. West Ham is next to last in the Premier League after 20 games. We had a huge amount of problems in terms of the available members of the squad so Ive got to keep them intact, thats a major priority, Allardyce said. Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho also rested many of his top players, and his weakened team relied on a much-im proved second-half dis play to ultimately see off Derby with some ease at Pride Park. Mikel headed home Willians devilish free kick in the 66th minute for only his fourth goal for Chelsea in 300 appear ances, before Brazil play maker Oscar struck a erce shot in at the near post ve minutes later. Chelsea will host Stoke in the fourth round while Sunder land will play either Kidderminster or Pe terborough thanks to goals from Adam John son and El Hadji Ba and an own goal by Sean OHanlon. West Ham humbled by Forest in FA Cup JOHN WALTON / AP Nottingham Forests Andy Reid celebrates scoring against West Ham United on Sunday during the English FA Cup third round soccer match at the City Ground, Nottingham, England. WINTER SPORTS PHILIP ELLIOTT Associated Press WASHINGTON Russias slide from dem ocratic reforms and its relationships with international peers threaten to undercut the spirit of the Olym pic Games it hosts next month, failed presiden tial nominee Mitt Rom ney said Sunday. Romney, who led 2002s Winter Games in Salt Lake City, said he also worried about se curity preparations but predicted Russia has done everything it can to prevent violence and to protect athletes at the Sochi games. I dont think any ma jor global event that brings people from all over the world togeth er like that can possi bly escape the threat of violence, said Rom ney, whom Republi cans picked to chal lenge President Barack Obamas re-election bid in 2012. Twin suicide bomb ings in the Russian city of Volgograd left 34 vic tims dead last week, just 400 miles from where the Sochi Games will be. No group has claimed responsibility for the bombings, but they highlight just how vulnerable the games could be to militant at tacks. Separatists seek ing to carve out an Is lamic state in the North Caucasus have mount ed attacks across Rus sia for nearly two de cades, following wars between separatist Chechen rebels and Russian forces. Russia has a spe cial problem given the threats that have been leveled, Romney said. Theres no question about it. Its very, very frightening to have any kind of Olympic event on your national soil, he added. Romneys criticism of Russia is hardly new. During his presiden tial campaign, Romney called Russia our No. 1 geopolitical foe. Romney: Putins Russia undercuts spirit of Olympics ALEXEI NIKOLSKY / PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, touches the glove of former ice hockey star Pavel Bure, center, after a friendly hockey match between the Stars of the NHL 1 and the Stars of the NHL 2 teams on Saturday at The Bolshoy Ice Dome in Sochi, southern Russia. ANDREW DAMPF AP Sports Writer BORMIO, Italy American teenager Mikeala Shiffrin fought through snow and rain to lead the opening run of a World Cup slalom Sunday, showing off her ability to deal with all types of conditions a month before the Sochi Olympics. Aiming for her second win of the season, Shiffrin clocked 57.72 seconds down the Stelvio course. Maria Pietilae-Holmner of Sweden led Shiffrin at both checkpoints but couldnt match the American in the nal gates and crossed second, a slim 0.03 seconds behind. Wendy Holdener of Switzer land stood third, 0.49 back, and overall World Cup leader Maria Hoe-Riesch was tied for fth with defending overall champi on Tina Maze. Shiffrin leads 1st run of Bormio slalom DAVID ROWLAND / AP Venus Williams of the U.S. plays a shot against Serbias Ana Ivanovic on Saturday in the singles nal at the ASB Classic womens tennis tournament at ASB Tennis Arena, in Auckland, New Zealand. TENNIS DENNIS PASSA AP Sports Writer BRISBANE, Austra lia With the Austra lian Open just over a week away, Venus Wil liams and Sloane Ste phens withdrew from warm-up tourna ments on Sunday and another American, John Isner, could soon join them. Williams, who lost the nal of the Auck land WTA tournament on Saturday, pulled out of the Hobart In ternational, informing ofcials on Sunday. I dont believe she has an injury, tour nament director Mark Handley said. Shes played a lot of tough, close matches over in Auckland and in the lead-up to a rst Grand Slam (of the season) shes not tak ing any chances. Williams was plan ning to use the Hobart event as nal prepa rations for the Austra lian Open which be gins Jan. 13. She lost in the third round at Mel bourne Park last year. The seven-time Grand Slam champi ons ranking has fallen to 47th as she has bat tled injuries over the past two years. Stephens injured her left wrist at the Hopman Cup team event on Friday in Perth, and withdrew from her scheduled appearance at the Sydney International. I was having some pain in my wrist and the doctor recom mended I not play this week, the 12thranked Stephens said. Former No. 1 Caro line Wozniacki with drew from the com pleted Brisbane International af ter hurting her right shoulder in practice. Venus, Stephens pull out of Aussie Open warm-ups

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 College Football Bowl Glance All Times EST Saturday, Dec. 21 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Colorado State 48, Washington State 45 Las Vegas Bowl Southern Cal 45, Fresno State 20 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho San Diego State 49, Buffalo 24 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 24, Tulane 21 Monday, Dec. 23 Beef O Bradys Bowl At St. Petersburg East Carolina 37, Ohio 20 Tuesday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu Oregon State 38, Boise State 23 Thursday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Pittsburgh 30, Bowling Green 27 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego Utah State 21, Northern Illinois 14 Friday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Annapolis, Md. Marshall 31, Maryland 20 Texas Bowl At Houston Syracuse 21, Minnesota 17 Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco Washington 31, BYU 16 Saturday, Dec. 28 Pinstripe Bowl At New York Notre Dame 29, Rutgers 16 Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina 39, Cincinnati 17 Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando Louisville 36, Miami 9 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Kansas State 31, Michigan 14 Monday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Navy 24, Middle Tennessee 6 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Mississippi 25, Georgia Tech 17 Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Oregon 30, Texas 7 Holiday Bowl At San Diego Texas Tech 37, Arizona State 23 Tuesday, Dec. 31 AdvoCare V100 Bowl At Shreveport, La. Arizona 42, Boston College 19 Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas UCLA 42, Virginia Tech 12 Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Mississippi State 44, Rice 7 Chick-l-A Bowl At Atlanta Texas A&M 52, Duke 48 Wednesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas North Texas 36, UNLV 14 Gator Bowl At Jacksonville Nebraska 24, Georgia 19 Capital One Bowl At Orlando South Carolina 34, Wisconsin 24 Outback Bowl At Tampa LSU 21, Iowa 14 Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Michigan State 24, Stanford 20 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. UCF 52, Baylor 42 Thursday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Oklahoma 45, Alabama 31 Friday, Jan. 3 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Missouri 41, Oklahoma State 31 Orange Bowl At Miami Clemson 40, Ohio State 35 Saturday, Jan. 4 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Vanderbilt 41, Houston 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (102), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 6 BCS National Championship At Pasadena, Calif. Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 18 East-West Shrine Classic At St. Petersburg East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) NFLPA Collegiate Bowl At Los Angeles American vs. National, 6 p.m. (ESPN2) Saturday, Jan. 25 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. South vs. North, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Strong excited to take over Texas JOHN RAOUX / AP Louisville head coach Charlie Strong calls out to players on the eld during the second half of the Russell Athletic Bowl against Miami on Dec. 28 in Orlando. RUSTY MILLER AP Sports Writer COLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State junior linebacker Ryan Shazier has decided to give up his senior sea son to make himself available for the NFL draft. In a statement released by Ohio State, the rst-team All-Ameri can said he just felt the timing was right. Playing in the NFL is something that I have been dreaming about since my days in pee-wee foot ball, said Shazier, a 29-game start er for the Buckeyes. I just feel that now is the perfect time for me. A 6-foot-2, 230-pounder from Fort Lauderdale, he led the Buck eyes in tackles each of the last two seasons. His 143 tackles this sea son rank sixth nationally and in a tie for 13th on the Ohio State sin gle-season charts. His 22.5 tackles for a loss this year rank third nationally. The Buckeyes won 24 games in a row the last two seasons before losing to Michigan State in the Big Ten championship game and to Clemson in the Orange Bowl on Friday night. I feel like my three years at Ohio State were about great rela tionships with coaches, my team mates and Buckeye Nation, Shaz ier said. Playing here was an amazing experience. It is really hard to explain the brotherhood I have with my teammates. They took care of me and were always there for me. Shazier was named a rst-team Associated Press All-American, allBig Ten (coaches and media), a Butkus Award nalist and Bednar ik and Lott award seminalist. USA Today, ESPN.com and Sports Illus trated also named him a rst-team All-American after a campaign in which he tied a Big Ten record with three conference defensive player of the week honors. Ohio States Ryan Shazier (2) walks off the eld following a 34-24 loss to Michigan State in the Big Ten Conference championship game. Shazier announced on Saturday that he has given up his senior season and plans to make himself available for the NFL draft. AP FILE PHOTO Ohio St. linebacker trades final season for NFL draft Malzahns wife does the coaching JOHN ZENOR AP Sports Writer NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. Gus Malzahns wife gave him some im portant advice before Auburns last national championship season. Kristi Malzahn told her husband he need ed to make sure quar terback Cam Newton knew he cared even if he was tough on him. The night before the opener, Malzahn let Newton know I was a real person and that I care about him. That helped our relationship moving forward. Then the offensive coordinator, Malzahn admits hes all about football sometimes. Malzahn has the sec ond-ranked Tigers in Monday nights BCS championship game against No. 1 Florida State. Newton won the Heisman Trophy and Auburn the national title during that 2010 season. The Malzahns are a pretty good team, too. The coach says Kris ti plays a big part in his career and I wouldnt be here without her. EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. Bobby Bowden has a big decision to make Monday. Stay in his hotel and watch Florida States quest for a third nation al title in peace. Or drive out to the Rose Bowl, where hell probably miss the whole thing. A lot of people will be coming up to me, Can you sign this? Can you take a picture with my girlfriend? things like that, Bowden said. And I have trouble say ing No. Such is life for the 84-year-old patriarch of Florida State foot ball, who now watch es from the outside but remains the most recognizable Seminole there is. Thats the payoff for 34 years of coaching, for taking a program on the verge of extinc tion and turning it into a national powerhouse and for doing it all with a dadgum smile. Bowdens number is still listed in the phone book. He still lives in the cream-colored brick house in Talla hassee, a drive across town from campus. But when he passes through that campus, which has prospered on every level because of the time he spent there, it never crosses his mind that he helped build all that. Same thing goes when he looks at the Seminoles, who, four years after Bowden was eased into retirement, nd themselves one win away from another championship. Im not built that way, Bowden said in an interview with The Associated Press. I love what theyre do ing. I want them to suc ceed, get back on top. Im happy about it. But as far as looking back and saying, Look at what I did, I have no desire to do that. No big surprise, given his humble roots and an aw-shucks demean or that once elicited the almost-believable ad mission that he was re ally enjoying easy-lis tening radio through the headphones he wore on the sideline. One of his other fa mous musings that he feared hanging it up because after you re tire, theres only one big event left, hasnt turned out quite like that. Unlike Bear Bry ant or his father, both of whom passed away shortly after they stopped working, Bowden is still going strong. Active as ever, he travels on a pri vate plane and gives up to ve inspiration al speeches a week at spots across the coun try. He is in high demand. He doesnt miss coaching all that much. I know that might surprise some people, he said. He wishes he could have left Florida State on his terms, not the schools. It was an awkward exit one Bowden wanted to make a year later than he did, and one that came after a string of seasons that didnt live up to the expectations he built. From 2001-09, his teams went 74-42 not good enough for a program that played for the title in ve of the previous eight seasons. I wanted to go out dadgum big-time, Bowden said. We kind of built our own mon ster there. And then we werent winning enough ballgames to get the job done. Im not bitter about any of it. It was fun. Bobby Bowden content watching FSU succeed AP FILE PHOTO Former FSU coach Bobby Bowden poses with the Paul Bear Bryant College Coach of the Year Award on Jan. 11, 2011 in Houston. I love what (FSU) is doing. I want them to succeed, get back on top. Im happy about it. But as far as looking back and saying, Look at what I did, I have no desire to do that. Former FSU coach Bobby Bowden JIM VERTUNO AP Sports Writer AUSTIN, Texas Charlie Strong left a Louisville program that needed to punch its way into the na tional spotlight for the Texas Longhorns, who live smack in the mid dle with their enor mous wealth, swagger, political intrigue and championship expec tations. And thats just the off-the-eld stuff. On the eld, he in herits a team mired in mediocrity with a 3021 record over the last four years, but still tal ented enough to come within 30 minutes of winning a share of the 2013 Big 12 title. Strong will be in troduced as the Texas football coach Mon day. In a statement re leased by the school Sunday, Strong said he was excited to be taking over one of the premier programs in the country. Texas is one of those places that is al ways on your radar and a program anyone would dream of being a part of because you have a chance to com pete on a national lev el every year, Strong said. Its special be cause it has such great history, pride, tradi tion and passion for football. In the 53-year-old Strong the rst black head coach of a mens program at Texas new athletic director Steve Patterson landed a coach whose teams went 23-3 the last two years, including a BCS bowl win over Florida and a blowout of Mi ami to end the 2013 season in the Russell Athletic Bowl. Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher, who has the No. 1 Seminoles in Monday nights national title game, praised the hire. Fisher was previously consid ered a possible target for Texas and would have faced Strong in the ACC when Lou isville moves to that league next season. I think hes done a tremendous job at Louisville, turning those guys around, Fisher said Sunday. I think Charlies an ex cellent coach. Strong succeeded at a school that had to ght its way onto the national radar even in the good years. At Tex as, the bad years draw just as much atten tion as the good ones, and college football will be watching to see how well he can unite a powerhouse pro gram with a discon tented fan base aching to return to the nation al elite.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 OUCH: A little respect for skin pullers, hair pullers / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES New Year-New You classes set for Wednesday EzNutrition101 will begin the New Year-New You health and weight loss course on Wednesday. With two classes to choose from, participants will have weekly weighins, nutritional information, sup port groups, recipes and prizes to weight loss winners. Participants will also receive a complimentary body analysis be fore starting the course, and a de tailed meal plan on how to improve their health To pre-register, or for information, call Lisa Johnson at 352-516-9855. LAKE COUNTY AARP smart driver classes scheduled during January The AARP Driver Safety Program Smart Driver classes help partici pants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits in a 6-hour, two-day curriculum. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligi ble for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, which includes workbooks and a comple tion certicate. Payment must be made by check to AARP. Classes will be offered on: Today and Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St. Register by calling 352-326-3540. Today and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. Register at 352-735-7180. Jan. 13 and 15 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Lady Lake Library, 225 W. Guava St. Register at 352-753-2957, ext. 114. Jan. 21 and 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Harden-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St. Eustis. Register at 352-394-0250. Jan. 21 and 22 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Umatilla Library, 412 Hateld Dr. Register at 352-669-3284. TAVARES Hospital schedules seminar on skin-cancer surgery A seminar on Reconstructive Surgery for Skin Cancer patients will be offered from 1 to 2 p.m., Thursday with Richard Bosshardt, MD as the guest, in the Mattison Conference Center, Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way. To register or for information, call 352-253-3635. Learn about MAKOplasty ro bot-assisted knee surgery for those with knee pain, from 9 to 10 a.m., Jan. 17, with Jon Radnothy, DO.at Florida Hospital, 8875 N.E. 138th Lane, Lady Lake Center for Health. Call 352-253-3635 to register or for information. MARK KENNEDY AP Drama Writer NEW YORK Valisia LeKae has a New Years resolution that has noth ing to do with weight loss, money or watching less TV. I will be cancer-free in 2014, shes vowed. The budding Broad way star who played Di ana Ross in the hit show Motown the Musical was diagnosed with ovari an cancer in late 2013. She went through surgery and this week endured the rst of six planned rounds of chemotherapy. The 34-year-old who was raised in Memphis, Tenn., and attended the University of Tennessee had to pull out of the mu sical and refocus her life on beating the disease, something shes done with grace and wit. I lost my ovary. I dont need to lose my sense of humor, she says. I have learned to really surren der. Cancer was not some thing that I was expecting in my life. About 220,000 new cas es of ovarian cancer are diagnosed each year around the world, and it causes 140,000 deaths. In the United States, the Na tional Cancer Institute es timates 22,000 new cas es and 15,000 deaths each year. LeKae was stunned by the diagnosis after un dergoing surgery to re move what was believed to be a benign cyst from one of her ovaries in No vember. Ovarian cancer is more common among white, post-menopausal women, and LeKae says she has no family history of the disease. Cancer does not dis criminate, regardless of if its in your family or not, she says. Cancer doesnt care if youre starring on Broadway or in a mov ie. Or that youre Angeli na Jolie. Shes taken her battle public in the hope that her diagnosis can help others. LeKae urges wom en to see their doctor reg ularly. She wants them to point out things that feel abnormal and to seek out second opinions. Even if I can change one persons mind about either going in for their checkups male and fe male that is a huge thing, she says. Its very important for people of all ages to be proactive. Youre never too young to have a physical. Its better to ght than have fear. Cancer came just as Le Kae, who had been an un derstudy or swing in four other Broadway shows, was making her debut as a leading lady and had earned a Tony Award AP FILE PHOTO From left, Sydney Morton as Forence Ballard, Valisia LeKae as Diana Ross and Ariana DeBose as Mary Wilson of The Supremes in Motown: The Musical, performing at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre in New York. The budding Broadway star, LeKae, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in late 2013, went through surgery and this week endured her rst of six planned chemotherapy rounds. Rejecting ovarian cancer After diagnosis, Broadway star ghts back and gives back CARLA K. JOHNSON AP Medical Writer CHICAGO An inves tigation into an outbreak of a superbug bacterial in fection shows Illinois hos pitals are learning to take preventive steps quick ly in cooperation with health authorities, the states top doctor said. The 2013 outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae or CRE affected dozens of patients, with some cas es apparently linked to a tainted endoscope used at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge. Illinois Department of Public Health Direc tor Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck said public health experts worked with the hospital to nd the source of the outbreak of CRE. Carbap enems are a class of anti biotics considered among the last lines of defense against hard-to-treat bugs. It is this type of coor dinated effort that is vi tal to stopping CRE in fections from spreading, Hasbrouck said in a state ment. The hospital changed its sterilization proce dures after the investiga tion to establish practices exceeding the manufac turers recommendations. The investigation was written up in the cur rent Morbidity and Mor tality Weekly Report pub lished by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The design of the specialty endoscopes might pose a particu lar challenge for cleaning Hospital upgrades scope cleaning after outbreak SEE BUGS | C3 SEE CANCER | C2

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Balanced on two prosthetic legs and holding a sponge be tween arms amputat ed just below her el bows, the sixth-grader was scrubbing the din ner plates with a deter mined vigor. I wanted to help clean up, Ashanti said. Norals natural reex was to fawn over the effort, to celebrate the moment as a milestone in an impossibly long journey for their family. Instead, she reminded herself that 11-year-old girls handle these types of chores every day and that her daughter should be no different. Well, then, Norals said, please carry on. Norals walked out of the kitchen, convinced they had reached a turning point. Once ruled by Ashantis lim itations, Norals could now see the many possibilities and they werent so different from the ones she envi sioned for her daughter before she brought her to the hospital May 23, 2011. Ashanti entered the hospital that day with a fever and severe pain in her right leg. A botched sepsis diagnosis and two months later, she left with four amputat ed limbs and an uncer tain future. At the time, it seemed she would no lon ger roller-skate, chal lenge the boys in her class to running races, hold her baby broth er or do myriad other things that 8-year-olds enjoy. Through no fault of her own, she faced a lifetime of never being able to fully dress her self, of needing help with basic hygiene, of learning to walk again, of seemingly insur mountable obstacles at every turn. So when Ashanti ini tially withdrew into herself, refusing to try her new prostheses or engage with people outside her immediate family, her mother un derstood the girls an ger. Norals just refused to give in to it. To the contrary, she decided to simply be thankful her daugh ter her athletic, sassy, big-hearted daughter was alive. And though she had no idea how to do it, she vowed to build a meaningful life for a third-grader who woke up one day to nd herself without most of her arms and legs. Less than three years later, Ashanti swims, uses a computer and likes to snap pictures of her younger broth er on her phone. She attends a public ele mentary school, walks on prosthetic legs and is required to make her bed each morning. Her family recently settled a medical malpractice lawsuit with the Uni versity of Chicago Med ical Center for $32 mil lion, which will ensure Ashanti can nally live in a handicap-acces sible house, afford the latest prosthetic tech nology and have a per sonal caregiver for the rest of her life. I knew she would feed off whatever emo tions I felt, so the rst thing I did was try to be positive about ev erything and tell her that there was nothing she couldnt do if she put her mind to it. It seemed to work, so Ive just stayed that way, Norals said. Maybe someday when the kids are grown and in col lege, Ill break down. ... But until then, Im just going to push all those feelings aside and make sure Ashanti lives a full and happy life. Ashanti doesnt dwell much on the hospi tal stay or the amputa tions, opting instead to focus on more press ing sixth-grade issues such as Justin Biebers rumored girlfriends and her disdain for her school uniform. She knows how logistical ly difcult her fam ilys life has become since the surgeries, but she seemed genuine ly surprised to hear her mother describe the emotional toll. But I never saw you crying in the hospital, the young girl said. Her mother looked at her and smiled. In that case, Norals said, I did my job. Norals thought she had a rm grasp on lifes blessings as she returned from a Mon day morning workout on May 23, 2011. She had a job as an assis tant manager at a phar macy, was working on a teaching degree and had two happy, healthy children. Her oldest child, Ashanti, hadnt been feeling well for two days, but Erica wasnt overly concerned. Ashanti had banged her knee at school a few days earlier, but she hadnt broken the skin in the accident. There wasnt even a vis ible bruise. But when Norals re turned to the fami lys three-bedroom apartment in Chica gos Washington Park neighborhood that Monday, Ashanti had a fever and couldnt bear any weight on her right leg. She complained about being in severe pain, something she never did. Norals took Ashan ti to the University of Chicago Medical Cen ter where, court re cords show, a triage nurse noted the little girl had a temperature of 100 degrees. Over the next 24 hours, Ashan tis fever would climb as high as 104, the leg pain would worsen and her lab work would show an elevated white blood cell count. Despite her worsen ing condition and an other test showing the presence of bandemia an excess of imma ture white blood cells that can indicate sep sis medical records show doctors did not order any antibiotics for the rst 24 hours. They treated her with mor phine, ibuprofen and Tylenol, and scheduled an MRI for her right leg, her mother said. As the hours passed, Norals frustration mounted. She contem plated leaving the hos pital with Ashanti about 1 a.m., records show, but decided to stay. I felt like they werent doing enough, like they were missing something. It just didnt feel right, but I didnt know what was wrong with her, she said. I trusted the doctors to do their jobs. I should have trusted my own instincts. It wasnt until 2:30 p.m. May 24 more than 24 hours af ter arriving at the hos pital that Ashanti received antibiotics, the familys attorneys said. But, by that time, it was far too late. nomination. Shes be come a vegan who con centrates on her white blood count and endures a long list of doctor visits. I think God has giv en me a different role to play at this time, she says with a laugh. This has sort of be come the new mov ie that Im in. God be ing the producer and my doctors being the directors. And I am the star of the show. A classic hardcharging, highly orga nized type-A, LeKae has had to switch gears. Im nding strength in allowing others to help me. Im so not used to it. I do not like bother ing people, she says. But I know there will be days where I wont be able to get up and make myself a meal and Im going to have to learn to ask for help. Im nding great peace in that, knowing that I dont have to carry this burden alone. Dr. David Fishman, LeKaes gynecological oncologist who is di rector of the Nation al Ovarian Cancer Ear ly Detection Program at The Mount Sinai Med ical Center, has been impressed by her desire to share her experience. Thats what a hero does help other peo ple. She has the courage to want to make a dif ference and I know that she will, he said. Im very optimistic shes go ing to do very well. While there is no ef fective screening yet for ovarian cancer, Fish man advises all wom en to learn their fami lys history with cancer and make it known to their health care pro vider. Any pelvic pain over a week needs to be discussed with a phy sician and Fishman hopes those talks in clude ovary health. After LeKae was di agnosed with cancer, she returned to the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre to tell the Motown cast. No email blast or press release for her: She wanted to be there, stand up and tell her castmates herself. In many ways, she want ed to comfort them. When someone is diagnosed with cancer, its not just your ght. Its everybody around you. They start to go through these things in their heads they hear cancer, they think about death, they think about all these differ ent things and it affects them emotionally. LeKae is condent shell soon rejoin them onstage, and when she does come back, she thinks shell be better. I think this journey for me will make me a better actress. It will make me a more com passionate person and I will know how to play roles differently. Ill be even more grounded. And you know what? I also will be a little bit more fearless, she says. Once youve faced cancer, everything else? Not so bad. CANCER FROM PAGE C1 Sepsis claimed girls limbs but not her spirit MCT FILE PHOTO Ashanti Norals, foreground, plays basketball with LaKenya Corbin during their adaptive physical education class at Chicago State University recently in Chicago.

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 and disinfection, the report said. The bacteria can cause infections of the bladder or lungs, caus ing coughing, fever or chills, and can be fatal, although there were no deaths in the most re cent outbreak. Dr. Tom Frieden, the head of the CDC, has called this class of bugs nightmare bacteria because they can spread their resistance to oth er bacteria and because of their high mortality rates. They kill up to half of people who get seri ous infections. Dr. Leo Kelly, vice president of medical management for Ad vocate Lutheran Gen eral Hospital, noted the help from the CDC and the Illinois health agency in an email. He said the investigation found no deciencies with the hospitals ster ilization process. However, as a pre caution, we have moved to gas sterilization for these particular scopes, which exceeds the man ufacturers recommend ed cleaning and disin fectant guidelines to ensure no other patients are at risk, Leo said. BUGS FROM PAGE C1 MELISSA DRIBBEN The Philadelphia Inquirer PHILADELPHIA Do you pick your skin until your arms are pit ted with scabs? Bite your nails down to bloody nubs? Tear the calluses off your heels until walking is painful? This year, you won a small, bittersweet victory. When stressed or bored, it is natural to engage in some sort of self-soothing behavior such as twisting a lock of hair or biting a rag ged cuticle. Any type of repet itive motor move ment can calm peo ple down, said Woods, a national expert on body focused repetitive behaviors. A 2006 study of 1,300 college students at the University of Delaware found nearly 15 per cent pulled their hair occasionally and more than 30 percent picked their skin, with wom en far more likely than men to report the be havior. At least 4 percent of the population take these habits to an ex treme, said Woods, who noted the num ber could be high er because many are too embarrassed and ashamed to seek help. Its a disorder. You keep quiet, said Abby Shaine, 23, an aesthe tician from Somer dale, N.J. Until recent ly, Shaine, who started picking at her face when she was 16, had never met anyone who shared the problem. Incrementally, with help from social me dia, support networks, and glancing referenc es in the public sphere, Shaine and others are feeling less alone and less odd. Unlike those who cut themselves, people who pick and pull are not intentionally trying to punish or inict pain on themselves, Woods said. Until these activities begin to hurt, they feel good. There is a primal sat isfaction in evening out the rough edge of a nail or peeling off dead skin. This behav ior, Woods said, is sim ilar to hair-pulling, or trichotillomania, an other disorder in the DSM, the psychiatrists manual. You get tactile plea sure from the feeling of tugging on your hair, having the hair in your ngers, he said. For some people, its unconscious. They may be watching television or reading a book and not realize their hands have been busily pluck ing until they see a pile of hair on the oor. Others, Woods said, are fully aware and give themselves permission to indulge, even if they are conicted about the outcome. A little respect for skin pickers, hair pullers

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 MIKE STOBBE AP Medical Writer ATLANTA Fif ty years ago, ashtrays seemed to be on every table and desk. Athletes and even Fred Flint stone endorsed ciga rettes in TV commer cials. Smoke hung in the air in restaurants, ofc es and airplane cabins. More than 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked, and there was a good chance your doctor was among them. The turning point came on Jan. 11, 1964. It was on that Satur day morning that U.S. Surgeon General Lu ther Terry released an emphatic and author itative report that said smoking causes illness and death and the government should do something about it. In the decades that fol lowed, warning labels were put on cigarette packs, cigarette com mercials were banned, taxes were raised and new restrictions were placed on where people could light up. It was the begin ning, said Kenneth Warner, a University of Michigan public health professor who is a lead ing authority on smok ing and health. It was not the end. While the U.S. smoking rate has fallen by more than half to 18 percent, that still translates to more than 43 million smokers. Smoking is still far and away the lead ing preventable cause of death in the U.S. Some experts predict large numbers of Americans will puff away for de cades to come. Nevertheless, the Terry report has been called one of the most important documents in U.S. public health history, and on its 50th anniversary, ofcials are not only rolling out new anti-smoking campaigns but reect ing on what the nation did right that day. The reports bot tom-line message was hardly revolutionary. Since 1950, head-turn ing studies that found higher rates of lung cancer in heavy smok ers had been appear ing in medical journals. A widely read article in Readers Digest in 1952, Cancer by the Carton, contributed to the larg est drop in cigarette consumption since the Depression. In 1954, the American Can cer Society announced that smokers had a higher cancer risk. But the tobacco in dustry fought back. Manufacturers came out with cigarettes with lters that they claimed would trap toxins be fore they settled into smokers lungs. And in 1954, they placed a full-page ad in hun dreds of newspapers in which they argued that research linking their products and cancer was inconclusive. It was a brilliant counter-offensive that left physicians and the public unsure how dangerous smoking re ally was. Cigarette sales rebounded. In 1957 and 1959, Surgeon General Le roy Burney issued statements that heavy smoking causes lung cancer. But they had little impact. Amid pressure from health advocates, Pres ident John F. Kenne dys surgeon general, Dr. Luther Terry, an nounced in 1962 that he was convening an expert panel to exam ine all the evidence and issue a comprehen sive, debate-settling report. To ensure the panel was unimpeach able, he let the tobacco industry veto any pro posed members it re garded as biased. Surveys indicated a third to a half of all phy sicians smoked tobac co products at the time, and the committee re ected the culture: Half its 10 members were smokers, who puffed away during committee meetings. Terry himself was a cigarette smoker. Dr. Eugene Guthrie, an assistant surgeon gener al, helped persuade Ter ry to kick the habit a few months before the press conference releasing the report. I told him, You got ta quit that. I think you can get away with a pipe if you dont do it open ly. He said, You gotta be kidding! I said, No, Im not. It just wouldnt do. If you smoke any ciga rettes, you better do it in a closet, Guthrie recalled in a recent interview. The press conference was held on a Saturday partly out of concern about its effect on the stock market. About 200 reporters attended. The committee said cigarette smoking clearly did cause lung cancer and was respon sible for the nations es calating male cancer death rate. It also said there was no valid ev idence lters were re ducing the danger. The committee also said more vaguely that the government should address the problem. This was front-page news, and every Amer ican knew it, said Rob in Koval, president of Legacy, an anti-smok ing organization. Cigarette consump tion dropped a whop ping 15 percent over the next three months but then began to re bound. Health ofcials realized it would take more than one report. In 1965, Congress re quired cigarette packs to carry warning la bels. Two years later, the Federal Commu nications Commission ordered TV and radio stations to provide free air time for anti-smok ing public service an nouncements. Ciga rette commercials were banned in 1971. Still, progress was slow. Warner recalled teaching at the Uni versity of Michigan in 1972, when nearly half the faculty members at the school of public health were smokers. He was one of them. I felt like a hypocrite and an idiot, he said. But smoking was still the norm, and it was difcult to quit, he said. Tobacco companies also came under in creasing legal attack. In the biggest case of them all, more than 40 states brought lawsuits de manding compensation for the costs of treating smoking-related illness es. Big Tobacco settled in 1998 by agreeing to pay about $200 billion and curtail marketing of cigarettes to youths. In 1998, while the set tlement was being com pleted, tobacco execu tives appeared before Congress and public ly acknowledged for the rst time that their products can cause lung cancer and be addictive. Experts agree the Terry report clear ly triggered decades of changes that whittled the smoking rate down. But it was based on data that was already out there. Why, then, did it make such a dif ference? For one thing, the drumbeat about the dangers of smoking was getting louder in 1964, experts said. But the way the commit tee was assembled was at least as important, said Dr. Tim McAfee, director of the Ofce on Smoking and Health at the Centers for Dis ease Control and Pre vention. AP FILE PHOTO This Oct. 13, 1997 le photo shows a cigarette vending machine in a bar in Montpelier, Vt. On Jan. 11, 1964, U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry released an emphatic and authoritative report that said smoking causes illness and death and the government should do something about it. Historic smoking report marks 50th anniversary On Jan. 11, 1964, surgeon general released report that said smoking causes illness and death Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. RACHEL COHEN Associated Press Melanie Oudin has played in the quarter nals of a U.S. Open un der the lights of tennis largest arena. On a quiet Monday in late November, though, this professional ath lete had something in common with the weekend warrior who makes a New Years res olution to get t. Oudin hadnt seriously lifted weights in two months, and all of a sudden she was pushing through an intense session. She wound up in the hospital. The 22-year-old Amer ican was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis, the re sult of muscles break ing down and releasing proteins into the blood stream, which in severe cases can cause kidney failure. Its the same con dition that sent 13 Iowa football players to the hospital in January 2011. Athletes, both elite and recreational, are susceptible, but doc tors arent exactly sure why some grueling workouts lead to the disorder while similar ones dont. Other athletes need to trust your body and realize if you feel some thing that youve nev er felt before and its something new and worse, there might be something wrong, Ou din said. Dehydration is a risk factor for rhabdomy olysis, and doctors think that contributed to Oudins problems. It didnt appear to be an issue for the Iowa play ers, but they had some thing else in common with Oudin and oth ers with the diagnosis: an intense workout im mediately after a long break. The Hawkeyes took three weeks off after their bowl game, then returned with a ses sion that included 100 back squats at half of the maximum weight each player could man age for one lift. The set had been done in 2004 and 2007 but with one major difference the players werent coming off a rest period. An investigative com mittee report commis sioned by the school called the workout a test of physical stamina, mental toughness and who wanted to be on the team. Shaun Prat er, then an Iowa defen sive back, described the mentality that elevates athletes to lofty achieve ments but can also land them in the hospital. He was going to be a senior, a player who had considered turning pro but stayed to try to win a championship. As miserable as he felt during those squats, he kept thinking: I cant throw up in front of these guys Ive got to be strong. There were plenty of times when I want ed to say, Im not doing this, he recently told the AP. But I couldnt. Im a senior. I wanted to lead. He was in so much pain the next couple of days, he couldnt bend down to take off his shoes. After four play ers told trainers about symptoms that includ ed dark urine and mus cle swelling, medical staff sent a text mes sage to the entire team to see who else might be experiencing similar problems. Prater was one who responded. He went to the hospital that night expecting to go through a few tests then head home. He was there a week. When his results came back with dangerous ly high levels of a pro tein called creatine ki nase in his blood, Prater recalled, The lady was freaking out. She was in tears. ... She was like, Yeah, one more work out and you couldve fallen into a coma. He played for Iowa in the fall then was drafted in the fth round in 2012 by the Cincinnati Ben gals. Prater started three games for the Minneso ta Vikings this season. The investigative committee cleared trainers and coaches of any wrongdoing and made several general recommendations to prevent a recurrence, including scrapping the workout with the back squats. School ofcials said they had adopted those recom mendations but de clined to discuss what specic protocols have been changed. Researchers at the university published a report on the cas es in the September issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Med icine. Among the nd ings: Players who were affected were signi cantly more likely than their teammates to re port muscle failure and that they didnt believe they could complete the workout. In other words, their bodies were telling them something was wrong. Dr. Corey Slovis, the chairman of Vander bilts department of emergency medicine, put it this way: Do ing anything to true ex haustion is not smart. Im not against no pain, no gain, he said. But minor or moder ate pain it shouldnt be severe pain. He believes athletes at all levels have be come wiser in recent years about the impor tance of staying hydrat ed and taking breaks. The dangers of rhab domyolysis have been raised recently in con nection to CrossFit workouts, but Slovis said cross-training that includes multiple types of exercises is generally less of a risk factor than regimens that require repeating a particular motion over and over. Oudin now knows to listen to her body. A day after the weightlift ing session, she couldnt straighten her arms. At one point, another play er said, Whoa, Mela nie, youre so jacked af ter one day of lifting. But her biceps werent bulging they were swelling. Oudin is expected to make a full recovery, though its uncertain whether shell be able to play in the Austra lian Open, which starts Pros to amateurs at risk from extreme workouts AP FILE PHOTO Melanie Oudin says she is not sure whether she will be back playing tennis by next months Australian Open after dealing with a muscle-damaging condition that she says caused her arms to weaken and swell like balloons. Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 315-8305 We invite you to come Rest. ., Relax. ., and Rejuvenate!Ion Detox Foot Bath Just $12.50Call today to schedule your appointment and receive a FREE Paraffin Hand Bath HEALTH BENEFITS: Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DEAR ABBY: Im a 28-year-old woman with a fantastic job, a wonderful boyfriend and many friends whom I love dearly. Im the only one without a child. Maybe I dont understand be cause Im not a parent myself, but all my friends can talk about is children. Whereas before, we were interested in each oth ers lives, I feel like my concerns and accomplishments are being brushed off. An example: I was excited to meet up with a pal to talk about my promotion, but the hour-long dinner was spent mostly teaching her child how to walk between the tables of the restaurant. I enjoy hearing about my friends and their families, but I feel they are no longer inter ested in me. Am I expecting too much because were at differ ent points in our lives, or am I a bad friend? Im growing resent ful, and I dont like it. Any words of wisdom? STILL RELEVANT IN MASSACHUSETTS DEAR STILL RELEVANT: You and your friends ARE at different stages of life. When you were in your teens, you and your friends would talk about dating. Then, as you grew older, the conversa tions revolved around college, jobs and marriage. As people experience the later stages of life, they talk about other things that are going on in their lives children, grandkids, aging parents and, nally, their own health concerns. Youll maintain and enjoy these friendships longer if you understand that. In the mean time, try to set some adult time only with your friends. DEAR ABBY: I have been di vorced for 14 years and have dated some, but not a lot. I re cently signed up for an on line dating service, and here is my dilemma: I have a felony conviction from 25-plus years ago. It did not involve violence, drugs, sex, stealing, etc. It was for a white-collar crime. I re ceived four years of probation, which I served without a hitch. My question is not if I should tell someone about my convic tion, but WHEN. If I say any thing at our rst meeting, Im pretty sure it will also be the last meeting. At the same time, I dont want it to appear that I was hiding it from them. I might add, this is the only time I have ever been in trouble with the law. Id appreciate your advice on how to deal with this. ONLINE DATING IN TEXAS DEAR DATING: The time to tell someone about your conviction is when the relationship stops being casual. At that point, you should disclose that there is a chapter from your past that you think the person should know about and its one that will never be repeated. DEAR ABBY: After 25 years, I have nally admitted to myself that Im married to a workahol ic, alcoholic womanizer. I have devoted my entire adult life, my time, effort and energy to my family. Now I feel used, abused and disrespected. Im grateful to be a member of Al-Anon. It has helped me to understand that I cannot change anyone but me. I have raised three great, suc cessful grown kids. I have yet to make a decision for myself. I married for life. Must I continue to suffer in silence? Or do I hope that there is love, kindness and respect out there to be had? STALLING IN IOWA DEAR STALLING: Let me remind you what youve already learned in Al-Anon: You cannot change anyone but yourself. The same is true of your circumstances. You are entitled to receive the same love and respect that you offer to others. I cannot guar antee that youll nd love. Be cause your workaholic, alcohol ic, womanizing husband hasnt changed in a quarter of a centu ry, its obvious he has no inten tion of doing so. You dont need to nd anoth er man in order to be happier than you are now. Being alone could give you peace, content ment and happiness. The ques tion you need to answer hon estly for yourself is whether you would be happier without your husbands negative inuence in your life. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Single woman is losing touch with friends who have kids

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 r r f fntbtbbtt n f ff frf n f f fr tb ntbtbbtt f bf t bbnn tb f t t b t t b f f f f f f f f f b f f n b t b f n b f t t t b t t b b n b b b r r f f nn ntb f fnn bftb tbt bbbb tbb n n bbtbtt btbtb r r f fntbbbbtt f n ff rffffff ffff f f n f f fr rtbn tbbbbtt f ff frfffff ffff ff f ff ffnf fr ffffff n f f bnfrfn bbtb f f f b f f n f f f f f f f f f b f f n n b f b b t t t b t n b b n trtbn ffnf nn bbfftb b b bt bbt bbb nnnt btbtb fntbbbt ff ffn fffff tbbt n rn n f f fr t tbtntb bbt n ff f fnff ffftbbt r rffrf fff ffnn ff b fbbnn t b f f f t f t f f t f n n t t t b b b b b n b t b n rnn tnfb t tb tb b n fftb nbbtt tb r r f fntbtbbttt ff n nn n f fr tbbbnn bnfn ff f f fn nbttttbtbbbbbbbb n tbtbbttt n b n tbn fn f f f f f r f f f f n f f b f f f b b r f t t t b f f f r f f f f f f r n tbtb nbbt btbtb fnf ff ttfb bb b btb nbbt btbtb r r f tbtbbbb rf n fn nnn f t f n f fr tb ntbtbbbb nn f fbn frf fbbnn tb ftft fft ftftf fffb n f f f f f f f f f b f f n f f f f n b f b b t t t b t n b b n tb f r f fnbb fr n nn fn f f fr tbn bb fr n n bbnn bnfn tt tb t b f f f f f n r n n n t b b b t b b b t n b t t t b b b b b t b b b b n fnf nr nn ffbbb b nbbttb tb rftt tbbb bbbr fn bn frft ttb bbb bbr fn nbbtbt btbtb

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 r f n t b b b b b b r b b f b n r b b b r f r n b r r n r n n b b t b b b r f b n b n r b n r r r r t r f b n b r f b b n r b n r n f r f b f n r b n r r b n b b t n n b n b f n b r f n r b b r r r r r t t n f f b b r f n b b b b f f bbbnrbnbfn nrrfnbbn rnrnbntbnnb rfffnrnbfb b f b n r t b f b r f n r b r r r b t brrrrnnr fnbfrrbb nrnnbnrnrbn b b f b n r n r f r r r rf t t t rfnrbbb bbbbr rfnbbfbtbbb rfnrbbbbrr rbbrnbnfbn rbnnr t t rfnrbbb rbbbbbbb rfnbbfbb rfnnfnrbn rbbnbbb rfnrbfb bnr b n r b r n b t b n n t b b b n r b r r b r n r b r f n n b b b b b r b b b b b f r f n b b b b b r n b r f b f n b b t b b b n n b n n f b n b r b b n r f b b b f b f n b f n b n b n r n n r b b b b b b r n n b b r f b n b n r r n n r r b r b r b n f n b n b b r n b n b r b b f r r b b b n b b n n r f b b b n b r b n b r n b t b r b r b r b b f r n r t r b r tb tt tt n b b b t b r f n f b b n b t b t r r r n f n r b t b b n t r r b n b b n t r r b b t r r n f t t b t r r t b b b n b n t r r r b r b b t b f f b b f r b f n b b n r f b r t t b b b b rf r r n b r t r r r f r f b t b t f b r f t t t t b b b b b b r b n r f b r b b b n r r b r f r b n n r b r r f t b r b b b b n t b b b b t r b n n b r b n b b t t rnnfrfbb bbrrfbbb bbrbbrrn fbrfrb r r b r f n r f n n b b f n t b b r n b b r n b t b b tf b t n b t r r r n b r f r b b n b r r n n b r b n b b b r n n f n b n n b n b b r r b r f r r n b n r n r r b n b r n n b n n r r b n b b r b n r f n b b r n r f n b n b n n b b n b n b b b r n n f n b n n b r b r b n b b n n r f n f n f b n b b n n b n n b r r b b b f b r f n b n n f n b b n r r b n r b n f b n b n b r b tr t r tt rb bbbbnb brr t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t tb tt r t ffnnrnbnnbnbrnnb rbrbrnbbbb nnnbrrfbb bnnb b b r b r b n b r n f b n b f b r n n b r bnrb bbnnnnrrr nbbnbbb b f r n n b n r f t b r n r r b t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t rbrrrbbb bnnbnbbrnnb nbrnnb rbnrnbfrf rnrnbbnb nbbnnbrbbnrb bfbbnbb rrnfnnrbbnbbnnrnb rrbrbnfbnrb brnrrbnrnbn rf bfbbrnfbnrrb rrbfnfbnbnbbnbn bbnnnbnbnbb rrnfnrrnfb brfbfnbfb nnrfnbrnbbn nnbbfb brrbbnrb brrnbnrfnbbnnr nnbrbbnnbbn bbbrrnbrbbr ffrbbbnrbfbnn bnbrrnbrbbb brrffbnbnbnr bbbfrnbb b brbfb rrnrnnbbnbfbr nrbnrf rnnnbnbnnbnrrnnb nbnnbbr nrnbbbn r f brnbr rbrfbrbnbnnrbnbb bbrnn rfnrrr ffnnrfbnr rnbrnnfnb bbbnbnnrbnr bbn r t ttf

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 rfntbf bffffn f rf fff f f f f fff ffr fbrff fffnbbf ff ffff fff ffffb fff fnfrbf fbtbff frfbfnf ff rf ntbf bbffffr ftff f fffffbf tfff nffb f ffbff fbrff frfftf bfffffbbfb rfffff bff bfff ff brffftf fbff ftfbff tbfbfff f fftffffr tff bfnt fbbrff f ff brff bffbbr brfff f ffn rfff f ffffff ff bbfffrf fbff fffnrf fbrff fff brbfff f ffff f ftffff fbrrfbff fff r fffbr ff n n n nffff f trff fbftrffftbf btbff f f bff nbffff t bbfbrftfbbr fbtbff bbfff fbfbbrff fbf fffff ffff bfff ffff ff f f f t b f f b t b f f ff bfff ff f ff b f f f f f b f b f f f b f f f f f f f f r f b ff f fbbr nrbbfff fbffnt rff fbffbr bffff n btfb bbffbrff f nffnf brff bbffb fff bfb nbfff f f ffnrtr bbrfbrfff f bfbf bbfffrftf brfff f nfff f fffnf brfbff nf bbrfffff rffnf fff f fbbrfbr ff bfffbrf btbff brfbfnr ff f f f f br fff fttbbfbf fbftbf fr nbfff fbffnf fbfnf fbfbff fbbrfbr ff f f f f f f f b f f f ff rfffff nffr fbfnff tfrfff f f rfr fbftbf f f f f n f f f b fbffrf ff fffbfff ffftfbffb f f f rfbffffb rfbfrffffr bbrffbfbfbff rf f f f rnbffrf bfrfbbrffrff frfbbrffbfbfb ffrf f fbrffbft fff r f ft fr r t f f f f b f f f r f r b f b f t f b f r f r b b r f bfbbrffbbfft frftfbff tfrfbffftfbfb fffbt bfbfr f f b f f f b f f t f f f f r b f f f f r b b f f b f r f f n f b f f b b f b b r b f b f r f f f f f f b f f t f f f b f r f b f f f f f b f f b f r f f f b f r f n f b f f ft f f b f f b f f f b f f b f b f fr f f f f b f fb f f f f f r f f b ft b f f b f f b f t f f n r r f r b f f f b fffbfffff ffbbfbbf fbbfb rfbfffftfb fbfbf rfbffff rffbrfr f r f f b r b b f b f b f f f b f f f f f t f f b r r f b f b b f b b f b f b f r f r f b f f f f f t f f b f f b f b f f f t fb f f r b b r f b f t f r f r r f r r f f t f b b f f f f f f f f r f b f r f b r f f r f f f f f f f f f r f f f b f f b f b b f b fb f b b f f n n b b n t f f f f f f f b f b f b r f b b f f f f f b f f f t r f r f b f f f t t f f f f f n f f f r f f b f f f f f f b f b f f f f f f r f f f f f b f f f fb f f f f f f fffbrfff ffrfffbr ffffff fffffb ftffbfff f f r b b f f f f f ff n ftfrffft tfbfrftffb fftfffff frfbrffbfb bfbffrnbfbbf trfbfffft f f r b f b f f f b f f b f f t f f f f f fffbfr bbrfbf ffrfrf rfbrffb f b f b f r ff f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f b f f f f f f t f f f brfftfr rfbff rffr bfbftfr bbfbfbftrfr ffffrr brffbbf trfrfbff frfbrff t f f f brfbfnbrfb tfrffffbfrnb bbftfbfrftff brffbftf frffbft ffftf rfbfb f f b f t r b b f f b f

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt rf trrfbtfr rbfrbbt frbfbtt rf ntbf r r n n bff r f b t r f b b r b t f r r b t f r r t t f t f r b t t r t r r r t b b b r r t b f r b r b t r f r b t b t t rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt rf bf n f t n f b b f r t r f f b t t r r r r f rf bf b f r f r b f b r r f r r r b t t r r f f t n r t t r f f n b f r n frrfnbf trrfttbftnfrr bfbrbtt tbf bf frrbfb rnbtr b t t f r b f r r f b t t rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt r r t f b t r b r f t t b t r b r f r t ff ff b f t t b b n b t r f r n b f b r f b f f f f n b t b t t b t r r f t f f b r f b r n b t f f r r t t t r r f r b f f r b f f b f b t r n b f r b t b r b b b t t b brr r frbtt r r r r b t t r f b r r r f b t t b t f b b t r frf frfbtt t t f r t f r r b t b f b t ff rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t tnf rffnbfb ftbbr ttttbtf tr fbtrffr brfrbtt ff bttbttb bbtr fbtt r f b r f t r f b t r bfbbfbtt bfbbn rrrfrrttbt t t r n r rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t r f b t r f b b r b t f r r b t f r r t t f t f r b t t r t r r r t b b b r r t b f r b r b t r f r b t b t t trf bf bff bf t bn nrttt tbbtt ttr frr fbbbfr bt fbb rr rtb rfbt r tbftr btt t r r t f btrfbf fnfrrfr bbfr rrrtfr tbbtt t f t b f b b ftbfrtt tbtt f brf rrnffb rf brbf fbbtt r f ff rb r r r b fbbrf btt r ff b r b b b t t bffrr btt bttbtb tffb rbbf r bbtrft rbtt b f r b f n rbnbtb rtf b t t r rtbfrrr btt b brfrbtt rtnfrt tbb tbtt btt frtbfr r f b t b t nfbrbrf btt trfb btt btfbftrr r rtfr r b t t r f tfr

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 rfnr tbrn t t r f r n tr rfrnnn rf nnn fnn nnr fnn r fnrn tt rfn r rfrn rrf t tt ttrrr rtf btfnrnnn n t n r f r n n ntrrfb tf tbrrfnr nnnn rfnr n ntrrfb tf n n b f n b n f n b f b n f n n b f t f f n r r t n n nn rrb r rtbr fnrn nr tr r fnrnn n n f fr n t trrfnrnn ntf b f t trfnrn n trfr nn n nn frf t r t t t t t r r r t r t r r b r f n f n r n n n r n f n r f r f r f r n n n n r t r f n t r t r nnt f b f t r r t b t t r b r n n n n tnnb rr f t t t t t r f n f n t t t r f n r n n nntf f



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WEST COAST TEAMS THRIVE IN NFL PLAYOFFS, SPORTS B1JUSTICE: After 40 years, execution set for killer of guard, couple, A3 TOO HOT TO HANDLE: Health care law leaves volunteer reghting in limbo, A4 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, January 6, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 6 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C9 LEGALS D1 LIVING HEALTHY C1 NATION A4 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B2 VOICES A9 WORLD A4 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.67 / 24Windy and not as warm.50 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County ofcials and water experts continue to warn that the communi ty must n d an alternative to diminishing groundwa ter supplies in the next ve years to avoid a direct im pact on lake levels and the quality of life in the region. The South Lake Regional Water Initiative consist ing of the South Lake Chamber of Commerce, the county and the municipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola, Mascotte and Montverde targets regional solutions in the critical areas of reclaimed water distribution, minimum ows and levels of the regions lakes and rivers, and alternative water supplies and conservation. County ofcials are considering taking another step to protect ground water by becoming a Groundwater Guardian Community. Those communities work to educate people and pro tect local groundwater re sources, said James Burks, chairman of the Groundwater Foundation Board of Di rectors. There are more than 100 Groundwater Guardian Communities throughout the United States, with only one in the state of Florida, in Hernando County. The Groundwater Guardian Community presents a good opportunity to focus on the education for the pro tection of our water resourc es, said Commissioner Sean Parks. It works with educat ing our kids about water is sues and the aquifer. Commissioner Jimmy Conner said more aware ness is needed on the issue. People only have concerns about water when you have growth. We need to make it a high priority. The inititiative is inclusive TAVARESOfficials want to make Lake a Groundwater Guardian Community SEE LAKE | A2 DONNA CASSATAAssociated PressWASHINGTON Congress returns to work today with election-year politics certain to shape an already limited agenda. Republicans intend to focus on ev ery facet of President Barack Obamas health care law. They see a political boost in its prob lem-plagued rollout as the GOP looks to maintain its House majority and seize control of the Demo cratic-led Senate. First up in the House, according to Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., is legis lation addressing the security of personal data, part of his par tys effort to protect the American people from the harmful ef fects of Obamacare. Republicans also promise closer scrutiny of the administra tions tally of enroll ment numbers in the program. Democrats will press to raise the fed eral minimum wage from $7.25 an hour and extend unemployment benets, trying to cast the par ty as more concerned with the less fortunate and intent on dealing with income inequality. The issues resonate with liberals, the core Democratic voters crucial in low-turnout midterm elections. Rep. Steny Hoy er of Maryland, the No. 2 Democrat in the House, said an exten sion of federal bene ts for an estimated 1.3 million Americans who saw their pay ments stopped on Dec. 28 is more than an economic issue. Its about real peo ple, people with fam ilies struggling to put food on the table, to Election-year politics shapes Congressional agendas ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Dec. 19, 2013, le photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., left, accompanied by Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. SEE POLITICS | A2Instead of punishing families who can least afford it, Republicans should make it their New Years resolution to do the right thing and restore this vital economic security for their constituents right now. President Barack Obama on jobless benets THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comAs temperatures dipped over the weekend, Melin da Rabin didnt complain as she portrayed Queen Anne Boleyn at The Villages Renais sance Faire. She was wearing an ornate 16th century period gown made of 40 pounds of up holstery fabric. Its very warm, she said of the layers of clothing and undergarments. Its ne when the weather is cold; actually its lovely. Playing the queen allowed Rabin to live a childhood fantasy of being able to dress up in fan cy attire. As a child, ever since I can remember, I used to want to wear dress like this, she said. This is my element here. I love playing Queen Anne Boleyn and this is one of my favorite shows that we do. The children seem to really enjoy it and the children make it all worthwhile. They come up to you and the little girls eyes get big and wide when they see the big dresses. Originally from Pennsylvania, the Fort Lauderdale performer travels with her husband, who amuses Renaissance festival goers with his Loose Cannons sword-ghting show. The Rabins welcomed their rst child, Shane, born 2 months ago, and the baby accompanies mom and dad on their trips up and down the east coast as Renaissance performers. The family joins musicians, jesters, professional jousters and others on the renaissance circuit in entertaining crowds. The weekend event on a eld around The Villages Polo Club marked the rst Renaissance faire for the 2014 season.THE VILLAGESReturning to the RenaissancePerformers transform community to early 1500s England PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Melinda Rabin, left, portraying Queen Anne Boleyn at The Villages Renaissance Faire, shows her infant son, Shane, to Shannon Hogrefe on Sunday. Julian Crespo, left, and Gene Smith, participate in archery shooting during The Villages Renaissance Faire. SEE FAIRE | A2 Its a lot of fun, but it takes a lot of perseverance to do this for a living. Of course, theres the stress of traveling, especially with a new baby.Melinda RabinQueen Anne Boleyn

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 6, 2014: This year you often are very sensitive to others, and you express empathy with ease. You also frequently can be found playing the role of cheerleader, encouraging those around you to go for their dreams. If you are single, you are likely to meet someone very signicant to your lifes history. You will know when you meet this person. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy each others company, and you seem to have a psychic connection. You know what the other is thinking. ARIES often grinds on your nerves. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might have a rmer grasp on what is happening than the person who informs you of what is going on. This person likes to feel important. Say little. Play it low-key, and you will gather more information. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Zero in on what you want during the morning. Dont hesitate. You might need to consider how youd like to proceed with a different matter in the afternoon. Consider your options carefully and discuss them with someone you often brainstorm with. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your directness is more desirable than you think. Stay in touch with your goals as discussions ensue. You can identify with others. As a result, you could lose your ability to stay centered. Do not allow this to happen. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You might want to hear the other side of an argument. Though you still might not agree with what is being said, you could see a way of incorporating two ideas that seem in opposition but actually have the same basis. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A close associate might have a lot to share. Encourage this person to express his or her intuitive sense more often. You will be able to understand an issue in a new way because of what is shared with you. Proceed accordingly. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Rethink a personal decision, especially if someone close to you offers a new insight. Do nothing to damage the situation, and if possible, give yourself some breathing room. Put this decision on hold for now. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Understand what you are doing and why. Your need to handle a matter regarding real estate or your personal life is legitimate. Once you clear up this issue, you will nd the right direction for you to head in. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your creativity seems to be focused on a key issue. By the afternoon, your imaginative streak could fall at or not be as helpful. Your initial idea will prove to be the right one to pursue. Oth ers will be more enthusiastic than you had expected. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Touch base with a family member who has a very different perspective from you about a domestic matter. Recognize what is happening with a loved one, as he or she might want you to be more involved with an important project. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You will admire what a close friend thinks about a controversial issue. This persons neutrality touches you deeply. You might wonder what is needed to make a certain situation easier to handle. Discuss the situation with this person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could see a situation in a much more relatable and viable way than you had in the past. Recognize the change in your perspective, and explain it in a conversation with one of the parties involved. This will help ease communication between you. T PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) When handling your nances, it would be wise to make a decision regarding your limits. What is important to you? The holidays could have wreaked havoc on your budget. Take this opportunity to recalibrate your spending. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 5-0-8 Afternoon . .......................................... 8-1-2 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 8-4-9-1 Afternoon . ....................................... 5-4-5-1FLORIDALOTTERY SATURDAYFANTASY 5 . ............................. 1-8-17-20-21 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $8.50 4 of 5 wins $96 5 of 5 wins $277,401.33LOTTO . ........................... 14-15-23-34-36-373 of 6 wins $5.50 4 of 5 wins $85.50 5 of 5 wins $7,441.5 Rollover POWERBALL .................. 19-20-37-41-5814With Powerball Without Powerball Powerball alone wins $4 . ........................... 3 of 5 wins $7 1 of 5 w/Powerball wins $4 . ................. 4 of 5 wins $100 2 of 5 w/Powerball wins $7 . ...... 5 of 5 wins $1,000,000 3 of 5 w/Powerball wins $100 . ............................ Rollover 4 of 5 w/Powerball wins $10,000 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Satur day and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 SUBSCRIPTION RATES STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comBILL KOCH, assistant managing editor352-365-8208 . ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comOTHERS PAM FENNIMORE, editorial assistant 352-365-8256 ............. pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. of a good cross section of the community, Burks said. It brings everyone to the table. Until you get the masses involved, you are not going to have effective results. Jay Beaumont, board member of the Ground water Foundation, said since establishing a Guardian Community in Orange County, N.Y., it has been effective at ed ucating people about the protection of water re sources. You do result-oriented activities, he said. Here in Orange County, we put on the Childrens Groundwater Festival. We have had water conservation education in the schools. We will do stream walks, where Boy Scouts will go in and clean debris from the streams. It is a whole bunch of tools that local people develop to help protect the water. In Nebraska, there is a lot of nitrates that get into the groundwater, he said. Out in the far west, there is a lot less water falling as far as rainfall. And in Oregon and Washington, there is plenty of water, but it is about making sure pollution does not get into the water. Burks said water sus tainability continues to be on the top concerns in the county. We are currently uti lizing about 94 percent of our total resource from the aquifer, he said, cit ing the hydrological studies from the Central Florida Water Initiative. If we grow to a point of utilizing another 6 per cent, then we would be at a point of depletion. LAKE FROM PAGE A1 make ends meet, including ... 200,000 military veterans who are among these folks who are losing their benets, he told reporters Friday. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has scheduled a vote Monday night on legis lation by Sens. Jack Reed, D-R.I., and Dean Heller, R-Nev., to extend jobless benets for three months. However, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he is unsure Democrats can cobble together 60 votes needed to overcome a procedural hurdle. If we dont get the 60, we will come back at this issue, he promised. President Barack Obama already has scheduled a White House event on Tuesday with some whose benets ex pired at the end of De cember. Instead of punish ing families who can least afford it, Republicans should make it their New Years resolu tion to do the right thing and restore this vital eco nomic security for their constituents right now, Obama said Saturday in his weekly radio and In ternet address. Republicans hinted they might go along with extending benets if they win spending cuts from Reid elsewhere to pay for them. If the senator comes up with any kind of a rea sonable idea to offset the $26 billion, I think that he might nd some people that are willing to talk to him, said Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz. Schumer, one of his partys leaders, said Democrats would pre fer to pass the proposal as is without a way to pay for it, as has been the case for previous extensions. But he told reporters Sunday he would lis ten to GOP suggestions. During a separate in terview, Reid predict ed widespread inaction would be the norm unless the Republicans in Congress decide they should do something for the American people, Im sorry to say. Such rancor ruled in the rst session of the 113th Congress with few bills passed and sent to the president. The combination of divided government and the up coming elections stand as an obstacle to major legislation in the second session, counting down to November when all 435 House seats and 35 Senate seats will be on the ballot. POLITICS FROM PAGE A1 We do about ve or six festivals a year and that is how we make our living, said Rabin, who alter nates from playing queen to another role as a village woman known as Mad Maggie, which she plays at the Florida Renaissance Festival. Many of the couples shows are in Connecticut, Virginia, and Florida. Its a lot of fun, but it takes a lot of persever ance to do this for a living, she said. Of course theres the stress of traveling, especially with a new baby. The Rabins joined fellow Renaissance peers in transforming The Villages to the village of Hopewell England, back in the day of early 1500s. The festival featured a professional jousting company, a living chess board, performances by Johnny Phoenix, Loose Cannons, Irish and Celtic music by the Empty Hats, a comedy show by the Da Vinci Brothers, and others entertaining Villagers and visitors. We love it here and this is just a wonderful, wonderful show, Rabin said. The people here are so nice and the people who run the show are very nice, very accommodating. This is the friendliest audience of any show that I have ever done, added Chris Jones, who por trayed King Henry VIII. We hope that the show is successful in bringing money to the charity event, The Villages Char ter School. Anthony DeNicola, who co-chaired the festival with his wife, called the event a success, where about 6,000 people attended the two-day event. Its been awesome, DeNicola said. We had a much better turnout this year than we did last year. We are hoping that once everything is done, we will have a $10,000 to $20,000 prot for the kids. FAIRE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ivette Figuero, left, and Ryan Geogieff, center, participate in the live chess match, one of the attractions Sunday during the second annual Villages Renaissance Faire, a weekend fundraiser for The Villages Charter School.

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT CLERMONT Child hospitalized after falling into poolA child was taken to the hospital Saturday after falling into a Clermont pool. The Lake County Sheriffs Ofce is investigating the incident. Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, said they received a call at 4:55 p.m. Saturday from 17527 W. Apshawa Road regarding the fall. The child still had a pulse when taken to South Lake Hospital by paramedics and later transferred to Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children in Orlando for further treatment. Vachon said early this evening that detectives were still conducting the investigation and no other infor mation was available at the time.MOUNT DORA Doctor killed in crash praised by colleaguesArea physician ofces have nothing but praise for a 41-year-old Mount Dora doctor killed last week when he collided with a tractor trailer that reportedly pulled out into a stretch of busy trafc. Dr. Boris Todorovic, who specialized in internal medicine, was employed by Lakeview Internal Medicine and joined Central Florida Health Alliance as a staff internist at Leesburg Regional Medical Center in October of 2003. He joined The Villages Regional Hospital staff in May of 2004. A service will be held Saturday at Allen J. Harden Funeral Home in Mount Dora.LADY LAKE Man found dead Saturday under farm tractorA man was found dead under a farm tractor Saturday morning. James Vachon, spokesman for the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, said deputies responded to the incident at 2931 Sunnyside Road about 11:50 a.m. Saturday. The man was pronounced dead on the scene. No other details were available Sunday and sheriffs ofcials couldnt verify the name of the man.LAKE COUNTY Repairs set for bridge over the St. Johns RiverThe Florida Department of Transportation and contractor Quinn Construction Inc. are beginning repairs to the Whitehair Bridge over the St. Johns River near DeLand. Trafc on State Road 44 over the bridge will be affected as two lanes will be reduced to one and motor ists should be aware of new trafc patterns and automated signals allowing for single-lane travel over the bridge. Work is scheduled for 160 days starting today and is estimated to complete early next summer. Go to www.croads.com for information. State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 CURT ANDERSONAP Legal Affairs WriterMIAMI A man convicted of abducting and killing a Miami couple and later stabbing a prison guard to death is set to be executed af ter nearly four decades on Floridas death row. Askari Abdullah Muhammad, previously known as Thomas Knight, is scheduled to die by lethal injection Tuesday at Florida State Prison in Starke barring a last-min ute, successful appeal. Gov. Rick Scott signed the death warrant after the Florida Supreme Court in December rejected Muhammads challenge to chemicals used in the states execution procedure. Muhammad, 62, was rst con demned to die for the 1974 killings of Sydney and Lillian Gans. Then known as Knight, he had worked for Gans at a paper bag company before abducting him in the busi ness parking lot with a rie. He or dered Gans to drive home to pick up his wife and then go to a bank to withdraw $50,000. Inside the bank, Gans asked a manager to alert authorities. Both the FBI and local po lice were able to follow the car for a while, includ ing use of aircraft, but lost track of it for a short time in a rural part of southern Miami-Dade County. Trial testimony showed thats when Muhammad shot the couple in the back of the head and tried to hide by burying himself, the rie and the money in mud and weeds. Muhammad was found a short time later and arrested. While awaiting trial, he and 10 other in mates escaped from the local jail, leading to a nationwide manhunt including a Top 10 fugitives listing by the FBI. Although he was not charged, authorities say Muhammad was involved, after his escape, in the fatal October 1974 shooting of li quor store clerk William Culpepper during an armed robbery in Cord ele, Ga. Another clerk was shot and wounded, according to local au thorities.Execution set for killer of guard ALFONSO CHARDYThe Miami HeraldMIAMI When undocumented immigrants are detained by federal author ities, they have usually just arrived at an airport, the beach or on the street. Others are picked up at a house or apartment af ter agents check their papers and discov er that they have overstayed their visas, crossed the border illegally or been previ ously deported. But how Homeland Security Investiga tions (HSI) agents found Honduran Les vin David Giron-Rodriguez on Dec. 10 in Miami Beach makes this case intriguing. Federal immigration ofcials learned that Giron was illegally in the country only after a Customs and Border Protec tion (CBP) ofcer seized a package and found the Hondurans passport inside. Gi ron was nowhere near the site where the passport was seized. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforce ment said it could not comment on the case, but the agency said it works closely with CBP on certain cases. U.S. Immigration and Customs En forcement (ICE), Homeland Security In vestigations (HSI) works very closely with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to interdict contraband and other prohib ited items from entering our commerce at ports of entry, to include airports, sea ports, land-borders and international mail facilities, to protect the homeland, said a statement from Robert Hutchinson, HSI Miami deputy special agent in charge. All inbound and outbound shipments are subject to customs inspection to en sure adherence to numerous laws, rules, regulations and treaties. HSI regularly conducts investigations to further disrupt smuggling ventures and dismantle criminal organizations using international mail services. Girons attorney declined to comment. But Wilfredo Allen, a prominent Miami immigration attorney, said the circumstances in the Giron case are unusual. It is not very common at all, said Al len. Nevertheless, Allen recalled representing a client in a somewhat similar case al most 10 years ago involving the passport of an Ecuadorean woman who was not le gally in the country. Allen said that in her case, her passport was found by immigration ofcials in a facility that handles packages for private sipping services, such as FedEx and DHL. And in 2010, three Guatemalans illegally in the country were arrested by immigra tion ofcials at a FedEx facility in Riviera Beach in Palm Beach County, where they were hoping to pick up a package with passports sent by the Guatemalan consul ate in Miami. In all the cases, the discoveries of the passports appear to have been the results of random checks of packages, which seems to have been the case with Girons passport.Passport leads feds to undocumented immigrant JON SIMON / FEATURE PHOTO SERVICE FOR IBM In this photo taken by Feature Photo Service for IBM, Director of Computational Biology Ajay Royyuru points to a drawing of the chemical formula for DNA at IBM Research headquarters in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. Dec. 17, 2013. In ve years, cloud-based cognitive computers will routinely help doctors use DNA data to provide effective, tailored oncology treatments. BETH REESE CRAVEYThe Florida Times-UnionJACKSONVILLE Two years ago Patrick McLaugh lin of Jacksonville was in the Mayo Clinic for minor nasal surgery. But routine preparatory tests turned up something po tentially far worse. A lesion on his pancreas led to a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, which kills 85 percent of people who get that news within six months. It is one of the worst can cers one can have, said Mc Laughlin, now 66. Usually the diagnosis is late. The later it is, the more likelihood you are going to perish. There are not a lot of people (survivors) running around. After surgery, chemother apy and radiation treatment, he is one of the ones still running around. So he decided to support other people who get the same devastating diagno sis by helping found a Jack sonville-based nonprot, the Florida Pancreas Cancer Co alition Inc., to raise funds for Florida-based pancreatic can cer research. I did a lot of soul-searching, he said. I can speak for people who cant speak for themselves. After his diagnosis at Mayo, McLaughlin underwent a ma jor, 10-hour operation called the Whipple procedure that calls for the removal of parts of the pancreas, stomach, small intestine and common bile duct, as well as the gallbladder and some nearby lymph nodes. He was in the hospital six days, followed by about six months of chemotherapy and radiation. He still has some gastrointestinal side effects and is participating in clinical trials at Duke Cancer Institute in North Carolina. How many more years he has is anyones guess. Its a tricky disease, he said. No one really knows. I just go on. So McLaughlin, an admin istrative law judge for the Social Security Administration with retirement on the hori zon, just keeps living. He was on the golf course two weeks after surgery and now plays 18 holes of golf without a cart as often as he can. He and wife, Julie, traveled all the way to Michi gan for Christmas to visit their son. I feel good, he said. Ive done about as well as can be expected.Survivor of pancreatic cancer supporting underfunded researchFrom a scientific perspective, its (pancreas) a very difficult organ to study. We cant image it easily due to its location. Biochemically, it makes all of our digestive enzymes, making it tough to study proteins and DNA from patient samples. Its simply more challenging that most other cancers.Howard CrawfordAn associate professor of cancer biology who is on Mayo Clinics research faculty

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 Ready and Willing Tell a firefighter today that their willingness to act in the face of danger is appreciated.Hamlin Hilbish Funeral Directors326 East Orange Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-357-4193 www.hamlinhilbish.com ALANNA DURKINAssociated PressFREEPORT, Maine Fire chiefs and lawmakers are working to protect the sys tem of volunteer reghting that has served rural Amer ica for more than a century but is threatened by an ambiguity in President Barack Obamas health care law. Small and rural re departments from California to Maine, which has one of the countrys highest per centages of volunteer and on-call reghters, rely on volunteers to avoid the bud get-strapping cost of paying them to be on duty in be tween ghting res. The volunteers are consid ered employees for tax pur poses, a classication that grew out of an ongoing effort to attract reghters by offering them such incentives as stipends, retirement ben ets and free gym member ships. That leaves open the ques tion of whether the volun teer reghters fall under the health care laws require ment that employers with 50 or more employees working at least 30 hours a week must provide health insurance for them. Fire departments say they cant afford to pay such a cost. Most of these are oper ating on a shoestring budget holding pancake din ners to raise money to put enough gas in the truck so they can respond to the next re, the next medical call, said Dave Finger, director of government relations for the National Volunteer Fire Council. Faced with the cost of in surance, or being ned if they fail to provide it, de partments would likely be forced to reduce the number of hours reghters can vol unteer or eliminate the ben et programs, ofcials said. That has both re chiefs and lawmakers raising concerns. Darrel Fournier, re chief in Freeport, a town of about 8,000 people near the coast in southern Maine thats home to L.L. Bean, said his department is bracing for what could be signicant costs under the health care law. He expects hell have to provide coverage for the ve reghters he employs part time. That would cost the city and ultimately tax payers about $75,000, or a penalty of $150,000. Additionally, in a busy winter with lots of res, emergency calls and acci dents, he said his roughly 50 volunteers could work more than 30 hours a week, meet ing the threshold under the law that would require him to provide health insurance for them as well. To avoid the penalty, Free port could cut back on the number of hours part-time and volunteer reghters have to work. But that would mean nding more volun teers to make up the differ ence, something the depart ment and others across the country already struggle to do, Fournier said. When he started in Freeport in 1972, there was a waiting list of 25 people. After three months actively recruiting in the community, Fournier said hes lucky that hell soon be interviewing nine potential volunteer reghters. Its pretty amazing how this law is touching different operations, he said in an in terview in Freeports brick rehouse, where yellow re trucks and ambulances were lined up awaiting the next call. Im not sure everyone thought that through.Health law leaves volunteer firefighting in limbo ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Dec. 20, 2013 photo, Fire Chief Darrel Fournier speaks to a reporter in Freeport, Maine. Fire chiefs and lawmakers are working to protect the system of volunteer reghting that has served rural America for more than a century but is threatened by an ambiguity in President Barack Obamas health care law. Associated PressCHICAGO Snow-covered r oads, high winds and ice were creating dangerous driving conditions Sunday from the Dakotas to Missouri to Delaware ahead of a po lar vortex thatll bring be low-zero and possibly record-breaking tem peratures not seen in years to much of the nation, The counterclockwise-rotating pool of cold, dense air will affect more than half of the continen tal U.S. throughout Sunday and into Monday and Tuesday, with wind chill warnings stretching from Montana to Alabama. With it comes a startling forecast: 25 below zero in Fargo, N.D., minus 31 in International Falls, Minn., and 15 below in Indianap olis and Chicago. Its just a dangerous cold, National Weather Service meteorologist Butch Dye in Missouri said. Several states in the Midwest were getting wal loped with up to a foot of new snow, and residents shoveled out and stocked up on groceries before bit terly cold temperatures set in overnight. Five to 7 inches fell over night in the Chicago area, while 8 to 10 inches was expected to fall in central Illinois, Indiana and Michigan later Sunday, Nation al Weather Service mete orologist Ed Fenelon said. Forecasts also called for several inches in western Tennessee and 1 to 3 inch es in Kentucky. In Chicago, temperatures were expected to fall throughout Sunday to about 11 degrees by 5 / p.m., and from there it will be a freefall for the rest of the night, with temperatures bottoming out around minus 15, like ly setting a daily record, Fenelon said. Earlier Sun day, the National Weather Service reported tem peratures in the 20-below range in northern Minne sota and Grand Forks, N.D. It hasnt been this cold for almost two decades in many parts of the coun try. Because of that, medical experts are remind ing people that frostbite and hypothermia can set in quickly at 15 to 30 be low zero, and say its key to dress in layers, hats and gloves. In St. Louis, grocery stores sold out of the essentials before Sundays weather onslaught. The problem is the bread is sold out. Were out of milk. We sold out of chips, chicken wings, some meats, Issa Arar of Salama Supermarket said. Michigan residents had also jammed stores to stock up on supplies.Below-zero temps push into Midwest, Northeast ASSOCIATED PRESS Michael Jordan statue is covered by snow outside of United Center in Chicago on Saturday. OBITUARIESLinda S. RashLinda S. Rash, 62, of Wildwood passed away Thursday, January 2, 2014 Mrs. Rash was born July 2, 1951 in Martin, KY. She moved to Wildwood in 1974 from IN and was a member of the Wild wood Church of Christ. She loved caring for her family and her cat. Survivors include her loving husband of 13 years, Herbert; chil dren, Eugene Harvey Slone, Jr. of NY, Tracy Mauldin of Lake Panasoffkee and Matthew Slone of Wildwood; stepchildren, Her bert John Rash of LI,NY, Michael Dean Rash of NJ, Joan Ann Rash of PA and Nora Beth Rash of PA; brothers, James Earl Caudill of OH, Bill Cau dill of FL, Arnold Cau dill of IN, Donald Cau dill of IN, Paul Caudill of PA and Fred Caudill, Jr. of FL; 11 grandchil dren and 6 great-grandchildren. She was pre ceded in death by her 1st husband, Eugene Harvey Slone; parents, Fred and Vada (Fields) Caudill, siblings, Eu gene, Lois and Bren da. Visitation for Linda Rash will be held 6:00pm 8:00pm, Tues day, January 7, 2014 in the funeral home. The funeral service will be 10:00am, Wednesday in the Banks/Page-Theus Chapel. Interment will be in Florida Nation al Cemetery, Bushnell. On-line condolences may be shared by vis iting www.bankspagetheus.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.DEATH NOTICESBernice HogueBernice Hogue, 83, of Leesburg, died Sat urday, January 4, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Betty RyanBetty Ryan, 93, of Leesburg, died Satur day, January 4, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.IN MEMORY RASH

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ........................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORBILL KOCH . ....................... ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 OTHERVOICESA friend recently got stuck when he tried to explain to his son, who was struggling to nd a job, how our econo my got to be the way it is. He asked my help since I am a wellknown crank on the matter. I offered him three short anec dotes: Last summer I was in a Home Depot standing in front of a veritable mountain of new air conditioners. They were all from China, which was no surprise. But to be annoying I asked a passing clerk where they were made. He was a young man, hired more for the spring in his step than his knowledge of international sourcing. We both looked at the boxes, piled in a pyramid, eight levels high. The boxes didnt say anything about China. But they did say Made in PRC. Are these from China? I asked. He paused a moment. No, theyre from Puerto Rico. Or consider this example from last month: A textile factory in Italy caught re and seven workers were killed. They were all imported Chinese nationals working for Chinese companies operating in Italy so they could put a Made in Italy label on their cloth. A third example: The city of New York decreed a few years ago that each bedroom in the city must have a carbon monoxide detector. There are roughly 11 million bedrooms in New York City, so the law created a huge market. Further, the devices have a life of ve years, after which they must be replaced, so the continuing market was also guaranteed. A manufactur ing enterprise could hardly nd a surer customer base. But was there a rush of companies here in the United States gearing up to manufacture 11 million devices for this guaranteed sale? No. Almost all the detectors were made in China or Taiwan. Over the last 20 years, countries around the world have ditched their communist governments, or at least turned their backs on strict communist economic principles. At the same time, India and other Asian nations have rapidly moved into global trade. This has meant billions more workers around the world competing with American workers to make stuff and offer services. At the same time, shipping has become more efcient and economical, and international communication has become cheap, instantaneous and simple. And since the international workers are willing to accept extremely low wages, they have the advantage. Around the world, subsistence farmers have transformed themselves into subsistence factory workers. And during this entire period, what did the U.S. government do to meet this challenge? Nothing. Our clueless, bellowing national leaders from both parties took no action to meet the effect of this new competition. Many American companies embraced the changes, happy to make prots off underpaid Asian workers while allowing huge swaths of American industry to die. Two observations are often made to justify this disruptive period. The rst is that the situation is an inevitable outgrowth of globalization and natural economic laws. In this scenario, nothing that the foreign manufacturers have done to U.S. workers differs from what American manufacturing did to the older economies in Europe. Lower costs and cheaper goods will always gain market share. Sometimes that share will be 100 percent. A second explanation holds that what we are seeing is the necessary cost of the death of communism. Under this logic, communism was held in place by violence and oppression, and sooner or later it would have to be maintained by wars. Countries that depend on each other economically are less likely to go to war, not wanting to ght with their customers or suppliers. Thus the resulting pain of unemployment is preferable to wholesale conict. But are those two observations valid? To assess them, we have to understand our history. War, it is said, is Gods way of teaching Americans geography. Per haps unemployment is how we learn economics. Are Americans, whose jobs have been shipped overseas, the walking wounded in the war against Marxist totalitarianism? Thats a stretch, but perhaps it will make lawmakers feel better when they vote to cut off unemployment benets. If youre keeping score, they can shout, capitalism has defeated communism. We won. Oh, by the way, dont bother to show up for work Monday. Its hard to explain all this to younger Americans, who are generally a hopeful and cheerful lot. It means hinting that a great deal, maybe all, of what they have been taught so far in school is wrong, or at best useless. It means offering a full explanation of human nature, including its awful and miserable characteristics, its meanness and its fearful avarice. That information is no fun to deliver. The worst human traits should be broken to the young in small pieces, so the facts can be digested and compared with what they already know. My friend invited me over to talk to his son, suggesting I could explain the new economic realities more clearly than he could. No, thanks, I said. Hes your kid. You do it.Jeff Danziger is a political cartoonist and author of Rising Like the Tucson, a novel about the Vietnam War. He wrote this for the Los Angeles Times. The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomay or made a reasonable decision when, on New Years Eve, she temporarily blocked implementation of the Affordable Care Acts contraception coverage man date in a case brought by a religious order of nuns that operates homes for the poor and elderly in Catonsville, Md., and else where. Birth-control pills are often used for medical reasons that have nothing to do with preventing pregnancy. Religious employers like churches are exempt from the contraceptive coverage requirement, and they always have been. For-prot companies whose owners object on religious grounds to contraception are not exempt, though that issue is headed for the Supreme Court via a pair of unrelated lawsuits. Last month, U.S. District Judge William J. Martinez agreed with the nuns that they were a religious organization under the act even though they are not a church. Whether the Little Sisters or any similar institution likes it or not, their employees are free to use birth control and doubtless do. Right now, they do so by using one form of the compensation they are provided as employees their salaries. Yet no one would argue that this fact makes the nuns complicit in the use of contraceptives, or that they should be allowed to prohibit their workers from shopping in stores where birth control is sold. Finding the balance between protecting the beliefs of organizations like the Little Sisters and those of its employees is tricky, and the nuns contention that they faced an impossible choice between committing what they see as a sin or paying hefty nes should not be taken lightly. For that reason, Justice Sotomayors grant of a reprieve at least until the government can respond on Friday makes sense. But it doesnt mean the nuns will or should ultimately prevail. One of the consequences of living in a pluralistic democracy rather than a theocracy is that faith groups must accept that they will be touched in some way by beliefs, practices and ways of living of which they disapprove. Thats not some new invention of the Affordable Care Act.Provided by McClatchy-Tribune News ServiceAVOICEObamacare mandate doesnt violate nuns rights What has happened to all the jobs? Jeff DanzigerLos Angeles Times

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A10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014

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JOE KAYAP Sports WriterCINCINNATI Philip Rivers gloved hands found the right touch in the Janu ary cold. The Bengals? Still cant do anything right when its playoff time. San Diego took advan tage of Andy Daltons three turnovers in the sec ond half on Sunday, pull ing away to a 27-10 victory that extended the Bengals stretch of playoff misery to 23 years and counting. With Rivers making ac curate throws in the chill ing rain, the Char gers (10-7) won their fth in a row, beating the last team that had knocked them off. Theyll play next Sunday in Denver, which has the AFCs top seed. It was a shocking nish for the Bengals (11-6), who won the AFC North, went unbeaten at home and had their top-ranked defense for the playoffs. With everything in their favor, they fell apart, getting out scored 20-0 in the sec ond half. We asked a lot of our defense today and they came up with three big turnovers, said Rivers, who was 12 of 16 for 128 SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNBA: Heat topple Raptors / B4 Chargers rally for 37-10 victory; Bengals still inept in playoffs San Diego Chargers running back Danny Woodhead (39) runs against Cincinnati Bengals linebacker Rey Maualuga (58) in the second half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game on Sunday in Cincinnati. DAVID KOHL / AP SEE NFL | B2 RALPH D. RUSSOAP College Football WriterNEWPORT BEACH, Calif. Team Destiny vs. Team Domination. Before the Bowl Championship Series is replaced next year by a playoff, No. 1 Florida State and No. 2 Auburn will meet in its last title game Monday night at the Rose Bowl. The Seminoles (130) ripped through their schedule on the way to Pasadena, winning each game by at least 14 points behind Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston. I still think our best game is out there, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said Sun day. Im looking for ward to playing it on Monday night, and our kids are looking for ward to the challenge. The turnaround Tigers (12-1) are the most unlikely group ever to reach the BCS championship game. Auburn went from 3-9 last year to Southeastern Conference champions in their rst sea son under coach Gus Malzahn. It was a wild ride. The Prayer at Jor dan-Hare beat Georgia. The Kick-Six beat Alabama. Destiny? Fate? Luck? The Tigers dont see it that way. Hey, I know were a team of hard work, I know that, said tail back Tre Mason, a Heisman nalist who has run for 1,621 yards and 22 touchdowns for the No. 1 rushing of fense in the country. These guys put a lot of hard work in with me every day, blood, sweat and tears all year long. Auburn is the rst team to reach the BCS championship game after having a losing season the previous season, and would become the rst national champion to start the season unranked since BYU in 1984. After 16 years of the BCS, the routine is fa miliar the day before the big game. The coaches hold their nal early morning news confer ences, and then take a DAVID J. PHILLIP / APFlorida State quarterback Jameis Winston mugs for the cameras at BCS media day on Saturday in Newport Beach, Calif. DOMINATION & DESTINYFSU, Auburn face off tonight for BCS championshipCHRIS CARLSON / APAuburns Dominic Walker poses with The Coaches Trophy during media day. GENARO C. ARMASAP Sports WriterGREEN BAY, Wis. Home or away. Late summer or during one of the coldest nights of the year. Doesnt matter where or when the San Francisco 49ers keep guring out how to beat the Green Bay Packers. Phil Dawson kicked a 33-yard eld goal as time expired, and Col in Kaepernick threw for 227 yards and ran for another 98 to lead the 49ers past the Packers 23-20 on Sunday night in a frigid NFC wild-card game. In a back-and-forth fourth quarter, the 49ers (13-4) threw the nal punch. Kaeper nick escaped a blitz on third-and-8 and scrambled for an 11yard gain to the 27 with 1:13 left. Just trying to gure out a way to get that rst down, Kaeper nick said. Had a play called, we didnt get the look that we wanted. It worked out for us. Dawson nailed the winning kick ve plays later but only after nearly being blocked by edge rush er Davon House. He was whistled for offsides on the play, but SEE BCS | B2JEFFREY PHELPS / APSan Francisco 49ers running back Frank Gore dives into the end zone for a touchdown as Green Bay Packers free safety M.D. Jennings tackles him on Sunday in Green Bay, Wis. Niners outlast Packers 23-20 at frigid LambeauSEE 49ERS | B2 49ers 23, Packers 20 San Francisco 6 7 0 10 23 Green Bay 0 10 0 10 20 First Quarter SFFG Dawson 22, 9:00. SFFG Dawson 25, 2:17. Second Quarter GBNelson 5 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 5:50. SFGore 10 run (Dawson kick), 2:48. GBFG Crosby 34, :00. Fourth Quarter GBKuhn 1 run (Crosby kick), 12:06. SFV.Davis 28 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson kick), 10:31. GBFG Crosby 24, 5:06. SFFG Dawson 33, :00. A,525. SF GB First downs 22 18 Total Net Yards 381 281 Rushes-yards 30-167 31-124 Passing 214 157 Punt Returns 2-20 0-0 Kickoff Returns 3-78 5-105 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-17 Comp-Att-Int 16-30-1 17-26-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-13 4-20 Punts 3-36.7 5-39.4 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 2-10 3-20 Time of Possession 29:06 30:54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 7-98, Gore 20-66, Hunter 2-4, Patton 1-(minus 1). Green Bay, Lacy 21-81, Starks 5-29, Rodgers 2-11, Kuhn 2-2, Cobb 1-1. PASSINGSan Francisco, Kaepernick 16-30-1227. Green Bay, Rodgers 17-26-0-177. RECEIVINGSan Francisco, Crabtree 8-125, Boldin 3-38, V.Davis 2-37, Gore 1-11, Dixon 1-10, Celek 1-6. Green Bay, Nelson 7-62, Cobb 2-51, J.Jones 2-20, Kuhn 2-16, Lacy 2-7, Starks 1-13, Quarless 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 BASKETBALL National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 16 16 .500 Boston 13 20 .394 3 Brooklyn 12 21 .364 4 Philadelphia 12 21 .364 4 New York 10 22 .313 6 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 26 8 .765 Atlanta 18 16 .529 8 Washington 14 17 .452 10 Charlotte 15 20 .429 11 Orlando 10 23 .303 15 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 27 6 .818 Chicago 14 18 .438 12 Detroit 14 20 .412 13 Cleveland 11 23 .324 16 Milwaukee 7 26 .212 20 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 26 8 .765 Houston 22 13 .629 4 Dallas 19 14 .576 6 New Orleans 15 17 .469 10 Memphis 15 18 .455 10 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 26 7 .788 Portland 26 8 .765 Minnesota 16 17 .485 10 Denver 15 17 .469 10 Utah 11 25 .306 16 Pacic W L Pct GB Golden State 23 13 .639 L.A. Clippers 23 13 .639 Phoenix 20 12 .625 1 L.A. Lakers 14 19 .424 7 Sacramento 10 22 .313 11 Saturdays Games Miami 110, Orlando 94 Indiana 99, New Orleans 82 Brooklyn 89, Cleveland 82 Chicago 91, Atlanta 84 Oklahoma City 115, Minnesota 111 San Antonio 116, L.A. Clippers 92 Phoenix 116, Milwaukee 100 Philadelphia 101, Portland 99 Charlotte 113, Sacramento 103 Sundays Games Memphis 112, Detroit 84 Golden State 112, Washington 96 Indiana 82, Cleveland 78 Miami 102, Toronto 97 Boston at Oklahoma City, late New York at Dallas, late Denver at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Minnesota at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m. Golden State at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Boston at Denver, 9 p.m. Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.COLLEGE FOOTBALL BCS National Championship Bowl WinnersJan. 7, 2013 Alabama 42, Notre Dame 14 Jan. 9, 2012 Alabama 21, LSU 0 Jan. 10, 2011 Auburn 22, Oregon 19 Jan. 7, 2010 Alabama 37, Texas 21 Jan. 8, 2009 Florida 24, Oklahoma 14 Jan. 7, 2008 LSU 38, Ohio State 24 Jan. 8, 2007 Florida 41, Ohio State 14 BCS Championship Games Jan. 4, 2006 Rose Bowl Texas 41, Southern Cal-x 38 Jan. 1, 2005 Orange Bowl Southern Cal-x 55, Oklahoma 19 Jan. 4, 2004 Sugar Bowl LSU 21, Oklahoma 14 Jan. 3, 2003 Fiesta Bowl Ohio St. 31, Miami 24, 2OT Jan. 3, 2002 Rose Bowl Miami 37, Nebraska 14 Jan. 3, 2001 Orange Bowl Oklahoma 13, Flor ida State 2 Jan. 4, 2000 Sugar Bowl Florida St. 46, Vir ginia Tech 29 Jan. 4, 1999 Fiesta Bowl Tennessee 23, Flor ida State 16 x-participation vacatedFlorida St. Bowl HistoryRecord: 26-14-2 Jan. 1, 2013 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, Northern Illinois 10 Dec. 29, 2011 Champ Sports BowlFlorida St. 18, Notre Dame 14 Dec. 31, 2010 Chick-l-A BowlFlorida St. 26, South Carolina 17 Jan. 1, 2010 Gator BowlFlorida St. 33, West Vir ginia 21 Dec. 27, 2008 Champs Sports BowlFlorida St. 42, Wisconsin 13 Dec. 31, 2007 Music City BowlKentucky 35, Florida St. 28 Dec. 27, 2006 Emerald BowlFlorida St. 44, UCLA 27 Jan. 4, 2006 Orange BowlPenn St. 26, Florida St. 23, 3OT Jan. 1, 2005 Gator BowlFlorida St. 30, West Vir ginia 18 Jan. 1, 2004 Orange BowlMiami 16, Florida St. 14 Jan. 1, 2003 Sugar BowlGeorgia 26, Florida St. 13 Jan. 1, 2002 Gator BowlFlorida St. 30, Virginia Tech 17 Jan. 3, 2001 Orange BowlOklahoma 13, Florida St. 2 Jan. 4, 2000 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 46, Virginia Tech 29 Jan. 1, 1999 Fiesta BowlTennessee 23, Florida St. 16 Jan. 1, 1998 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 31, Ohio St. 14 Jan. 2, 1997 Sugar BowlFlorida 52, Florida St. 20 Jan. 1, 1996 Orange BowlFlorida St. 31, Notre Dame 26 Jan. 2, 1995 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 23, Florida 17 Jan. 1, 1994 Orange BowlFlorida St. 18, Ne braska 16 Jan. 1, 1993 Orange BowlFlorida St. 27, Ne braska 14 Jan. 1, 1992 Cotton BowlFlorida St. 10, Texas A&M 2 Dec. 28, 1990 Blockbuster BowlFlorida St. 24, Penn St. 17 Jan. 1, 1990 Fiesta BowlFlorida St. 41, Ne braska 17 Jan. 2, 1989 Sugar BowlFlorida St. 13, Auburn 7 Jan. 1, 1988 Fiesta BowlFlorida St. 31, Ne braska 28 Dec. 31, 1986 All American BowlFlorida St. 27, Indiana 13 Dec. 30, 1985 Gator BowlFlorida St. 34, Okla homa St. 23 Dec. 22, 1984 Citrus BowlFlorida St. 17, Geor gia 17, tie Dec. 30, 1983 Peach BowlFlorida St. 28, North Carolina 3 Dec. 30, 1982 Gator BowlFlorida St. 31, West Virginia 12 Jan. 1, 1981 Orange BowlOklahoma 18, Flor ida St. 17 Jan. 1, 1980 Orange BowlOklahoma 24, Florida St. 7 Dec. 23, 1977 Tangerine BowlFlorida St. 40, Texas Tech 17 Dec. 27, 1971 Fiesta BowlArizona St. 45, Flor ida St. 38 Dec. 20, 1968 Peach BowlLSU 31, Florida St. 27 Dec. 30, 1967 Gator BowlFlorida St. 17, Penn St. 17, tie Dec. 24, 1966 Sun BowlWyoming 28, Florida St. 20 Jan. 2, 1965 Gator BowlFlorida St. 36, Okla homa 19 Dec. 13, 1958 Bluegrass BowlOklahoma St. 15, Florida St. 6 Jan. 1, 1955 Sun BowlTexas Western 47, Florida St. 20 Jan. 2, 1950 Cigar BowlFlorida St. 19, Wofford 6Auburn Bowl HistoryRecord: 22-13-2 Dec. 31, 2011 Chick-l-A BowlAuburn 43, Virginia 24 Jan. 10, 2011 BCS ChampionshipAuburn 22, Oregon 19 Jan. 1, 2010 Outback BowlAuburn 38, Northwest ern 35, OT Dec. 31, 2007 Chick-l-A BowlAuburn 23, Clemson 20, OT Jan. 1, 2007 Cotton BowlAuburn 17, Nebraska 14 Jan. 2, 2006 Capital One BowlWisconsin 24, Auburn 10 Jan. 3, 2005 Sugar BowlAuburn 16, Virginia Tech 13 Dec. 31, 2003 Music City BowlAuburn 28, Wisconsin 14 Jan. 1, 2003 Capital One BowlAuburn 13, Penn State 9 Dec. 31, 2001 Peach BowlNorth Carolina 16, Auburn 10 Jan. 1, 2001 Citrus BowlMichigan 31, Auburn 28 Jan. 2, 1998 Peach BowlAuburn 21, Clemson 17 Dec. 31, 1996 Independence BowlAuburn 33, Army 29 Jan. 1, 1996 Outback BowlPenn State 43, Au burn 14 Dec. 29, 1990 Peach BowlAuburn 27, Indiana 23 Jan. 1, 1990 Hall of Fame BowlAuburn 31, Ohio State 24 Jan. 2, 1989 Sugar BowlFlorida State 13, Au burn 7 Jan. 1, 1988 Sugar BowlSyracuse 16, Auburn 16, tie Jan. 1, 1987 Citrus BowlAuburn 16, Southern Cal 7 Jan. 1, 1986 Cotton BowlTexas A&M 36, Auburn 16 Dec. 27, 1985 Liberty BowlAuburn 21, Arkan sas 15 Jan. 2, 1984 Sugar BowlAuburn 9, Michigan 7 Dec. 18, 1982 Tangerine BowlAuburn 33, Boston College 26 Dec. 30, 1974 Gator BowlAuburn 27, Texas 3 Dec. 29, 1973 Sun BowlMissouri 34, Auburn 17 Jan. 1, 1972 Gator BowlAuburn 24, Colorado 3 Jan. 1, 1972 Sugar BowlOklahoma 40, Auburn 22 Jan. 1, 1971 Gator BowlAuburn 35, Mississippi 28 Dec. 31, 1969 Bluebonnet BowlHouston 36, Auburn 7 Dec. 28, 1968 Sun BowlAuburn 34, Arizona 10 Dec. 18, 1965 Liberty BowlMississippi 13, Auburn 7 Jan. 1, 1964 Orange BowlNebraska 13, Auburn 7 Dec. 31, 1955 Gator BowlVanderbilt 25, Au burn 13 Dec. 31, 1954 Gator BowlAuburn 33, Baylor 13 Jan. 1, 1954 Gator BowlTexas Tech 35, Auburn 13 Jan. 1, 1938 Orange BowlAuburn 6, Michigan State 0 Jan. 1, 1937 Bacardi BowlAuburn 7, Villanova 7, tie National Hockey League All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 42 28 12 2 58 124 89 Tampa Bay 41 25 12 4 54 116 95 Montreal 43 24 14 5 53 112 102 Detroit 43 19 14 10 48 114 121 Toronto 43 21 17 5 47 119 127 Ottawa 44 19 18 7 45 126 141 Florida 42 16 20 6 38 101 134 Buffalo 42 12 26 4 28 74 118 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 44 31 12 1 63 142 103 Philadelphia 42 21 17 4 46 111 116 Washington 42 20 16 6 46 128 128 N.Y. Rangers 43 21 20 2 44 105 115 Carolina 42 17 16 9 43 103 123 New Jersey 43 17 18 8 42 101 110 Columbus 42 18 20 4 40 113 123 N.Y. Islanders 43 14 22 7 35 112 143 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 44 29 7 8 66 165 121 St. Louis 41 29 7 5 63 150 95 Colorado 41 26 11 4 56 120 104 Minnesota 44 22 17 5 49 106 113 Dallas 41 20 14 7 47 120 124 Winnipeg 45 19 21 5 43 123 135 Nashville 42 18 18 6 42 101 127 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 43 30 8 5 65 142 108 San Jose 42 26 10 6 58 139 109 Los Angeles 43 26 13 4 56 113 89 Vancouver 43 23 13 7 53 114 104 Phoenix 41 20 12 9 49 123 127 Calgary 41 14 21 6 34 96 128 Edmonton 44 13 26 5 31 112 153 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Florida 5, Nashville 4, SO Boston 4, Winnipeg 1 Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Buffalo 2, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Rangers 7, Toronto 1 Ottawa 4, Montreal 3, OT Carolina 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 St. Louis 6, Columbus 2 Detroit 5, Dallas 1 Minnesota 5, Washington 3 Philadelphia 5, Phoenix 3 Los Angeles 3, Vancouver 1 Sundays Games Pittsburgh 6, Winnipeg 5 Nashville at Carolina, late San Jose at Chicago, late Tampa Bay at Edmonton, late Vancouver at Anaheim, late Todays Games Dallas at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Columbus at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Florida at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m. Tuesdays Games Carolina at Buffalo, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m. Tampa Bay at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m. St. Louis at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Boston at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. NFL Playoff Glance All Times EST Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20 Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 11 New Orleans at Seattle, 4:35 p.m. (FOX) Indianpolis at New England, 8:15 p.m. (CBS) Sunday, Jan. 12 San Francisco at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX) San Diego at Denver, 4:40 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS) NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (FOX) St. Louis at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Boston at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.TENNIS Brisbane International Results Sunday At Queensland Tennis Centre Brisbane, Australia Purse: Men, $511,825 (WT250); Women, $1 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3. Doubles Men Championship Mariusz Fyrstenberg, Poland, and Daniel Nestor (2), Canada, def. Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah (4), Colombia, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 10-7. ATP World Tour Aircel Chennai Open ResultsSunday At SDAT Tennis Stadium Chennai, India Purse: $459,140 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Stanislas Wawrinka (1), Switzerland, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin (7), France, 7-5, 6-2. Doubles Championship Johan Brunstrom, Sweden, and Frederik Nielsen (4), Denmark, def. Marin Draganja and Mate Pavic, Croatia, 6-2, 4-6, 10-7. WTA Hobart International Results Sunday At The Domain Tennis Centre Hobart, Australia Purse: $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles First Round Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, leads Mona Barthel (6), Germany, 3-2, Suspended. Doubles First Round Irina Buryachok, Ukraine, and Oksana Kalashnikova (3), Georgia, def. Natalie Grandin, South Africa, and Alison Riske, United States, 4-6, 6-4, 10-4. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, and Mariana Duque-Marino, Colombia, def. Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, and Sandra Klemenschits, Austria, 7-6 (6), 6-4. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, and Janette Husarova (4), Slovakia, def. Soa Shapatava, Georgia, and Anas tasiya Vasylyeva, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-1. Aleksandrina Naydenova, Bulgaria, and Teliana Pereira, Brazil, def. Chan Chin-wei, Taiwan, and Xu Yi-Fan, China, 6-7 (8), 6-2, 10-8. Apia International Results Sunday At Olympic Park Tennis Centre Sydney, Australia Purse: Men, $511,825 (WT250); Women, $710,000 (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Women First Round Madison Keys, United States, def. Simona Halep (7), Romania, 6-1, 6-4. Sara Errani (3), Italy, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 6-4, 6-2. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-4, 7-5. Doubles Women First Round Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears, United States, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova and Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-2, 7-5. Sundays Sports Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Assigned G Elliot Williams to Delaware (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League NFL Fined Seattle RB Marshawn Lynch $50,000 for violating the leagues media policy. HOCKEY National Hockey League DALLAS STARS Reassigned F Chris Mueller to Texas (AHL). American Hockey League SPRINGFIELD FALCONS Returned G Mike Clemente to Evansville (ECHL). Reassigned D Thomas Larkin to Evansville. COLLEGE CHOWAN Named Chris Whalley mens soccer coach. TEXAS Named Charlie Strong football coach.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN/ESPN2/ESPN CLASSIC/ESPNEWS BCS National Championship, Florida St. vs. Auburn, at Pasadena, Calif. GOLF 4 p.m. TGC PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, nal round, at Kapalua, Hawaii yards with a touch down and no inter ceptions. We didnt turn it over, which is always big in the play offs. The Bengals now have the sixth-longest streak of playoff futility in NFL history, stretching all the way back to the 1990 sea son. Theyve lost their playoff opener three straight years, match ing a league record as well, according to STATS LLC. Coach Marvin Lewis fell to 0-5 in the play offs during his 11 seasons as head coach, but is expected to stick around and get another chance to try again. A lot of it fell on Dal ton, who has a trilogy of bad playoff games. He fumbled and threw two interceptions in the second half that set up San Diegos win. Dalton nished 29 of 51 for 334 yards with a below-average passer rating of 67. Combined with the Saints victory over the Eagles on Satur day night, the two No. 6 playoff seeds won for the rst time since 2010, when the Pack ers won the Super Bowl. And the Chargers are thinking: Why not us? We talked all week about this being the fth round, Rivers said, referring to their ve-game winning streak. So the sixth round will be in Den ver next week. This one was a rever sal from the last time they met. The Bengals forced three turnovers for a 17-10 win in San Diego on Dec. 1, which became the Chargers turning point. The Bengals got the rematch at home, where they had scored 49, 41, 41, 42 and 34 points in their last ve regular season games. They were blanked in the second half on Sunday, when Dal ton went 17 of 34 for 170 yards with two in terceptions, a fumble and three sacks. In rst-round play off losses each of the past three seasons, Dalton has thrown one touchdown pass and six interceptions. Rivers completed a team-record and NFL-best 69.5 percent of his passes this sea son for 4,478 yards. He was only 5 of 6 in the rst half for 48 yards with San Diego frequently backed inside its 20-yard line to start drives. He completed all of his six passes during a 10-play, 80-yard touchdown drive in the third quarter that put the Chargers ahead to stay, with his 4-yard pass to Ladar ius Green giving San Diego a 14-10 lead. Dalton then made the mistakes that turned the game, al lowing the Chargers to pull ahead. NFL FROM PAGE B1 Chargers 27, Bengals 10 San Diego 7 0 10 10 27 Cincinnati 0 10 0 0 10 First Quarter SDWoodhead 5 run (Novak kick), :48. Second Quarter CinGresham 4 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 5:59. CinFG Nugent 46, :00. Third Quarter SDGreen 4 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 6:46. SDFG Novak 25, 2:00. Fourth Quarter SDFG Novak 23, 14:16. SDR.Brown 58 run (Novak kick), 2:17. A,277. SD Cin First downs 16 27 Total Net Yards 318 439 Rushes-yards 40-196 25-113 Passing 122 326 Punt Returns 0-0 3-6 Kickoff Returns 1-23 6-151 Interceptions Ret. 2-33 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 12-16-0 29-51-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-6 3-8 Punts 6-43.2 3-39.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-2 Penalties-Yards 5-28 4-38 Time of Possession 29:28 30:32 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Diego, R.Brown 8-77, Woodhead 15-54, Mathews 13-52, Royal 1-9, Rivers 2-4, McClain 1-0. Cincinnati, Bernard 12-45, Green-Ellis 8-42, Dalton 5-26. PASSINGSan Diego, Rivers 12-16-0-128. Cincinnati, Dalton 29-51-2-334. RECEIVINGSan Diego, Green 3-34, Allen 2-21, Woodhead 2-14, Mathews 2-12, Royal 1-33, R.Brown 1-9, Gates 1-5. Cincinnati, M.Jones 8-130, Bernard 7-73, Gresham 7-64, Green few minutes to shake hands with each other, exchange pleasantries and pose for pictures with the crystal foot ball trophy that goes to the winner. On Sunday it was Fisher, the fast-talking West Virginian and Nick Saban disciple, and Malzahn, who has gone from high school coach in Arkansas to the national championship game in eight years, running the drill. Malzahn, who was the Tigers offensive coordinator when they won the 2010 nation al title, said Sunday he told his players before the season one of their goals was to make the biggest turnaround in college football. Done. Auburn has already matched the 2000 Ha waii team for most improved record in FBS history. Well, Auburn is a great program and used to winning cham pionships, so I knew that we were going to get it turned around, he said. I didnt know how quick. There was a lot of questions when we rst got there. We did a lot of Dr. Philing early, and our guys came together and they believed. Malzahns up-tempo, spread offense is a combination of decep tion and power that seemingly gets better every game. Against Missouri in the SEC championship game, Auburn ran for 545 yards. Well, you have to have eye discipline, Fisher said. Any time you have moving parts, any time you bring something in front of you, just like when youre driving, if some body ashes a hand in front of you while youre driving down the road it makes you blink, it makes your eyes dis tracted and you get off of what youre looking at and then at the same time they become very physical with how they play, and you get your self out of position, they knock you out of the way, and theres a four, ve, eight, 10 or they break a run right up the middle. Fisher has put togeth er the most talented two-deep depth in the country, a collection of ve-star recruits and NFL prospects remi niscent of coach Bobby Bowdens best Flor ida State teams. The Seminoles won two na tional titles under Fishers Hall of Fame predecessor and played in the rst three BCS title games. BCS FROM PAGE B1 TOM UHLMAN / APSan Diego Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers celebrates with fans after San Diego defeated the Cincinnati Bengals, 27-10, on Sunday in Cincinnati. the 49ers declined the penalty with the win in hand. The defending NFC champions came away with a huge win in conditions that resembled a meat locker. It was 5 degrees at kickoff, and the winds made it feel like minus-10. San Francisco plays at Carolina next Sunday in the divisional round. They got us the rst time, linebacker NaVarro Bowman said, referring to Carolinas 10-9 win on Nov. 10. Whats on our minds is to get them now. Its the playoffs. Win or go home. Mason Crosbys 24yard eld goal tied it at 20 for the Packers (8-81) with 5:06 left before the 49ers nal drive. Until then, Packers quarterback Aar on Rodgers did his best to turn into Captain Comeback again. Af ter a slow rst quar ter, Rodgers nished 17 of 26 for 177 yards and touchdown. Kaepernick connected with a spinning Ver non Davis down the seam for a 28-yard touchdown pass with 10:39 left. The score quickly answered John Kuhns 1-yard touch down run that briey gave the Packers a fourpoint lead. That TD was set up after Rodgers, in the clutches of a 49ers defender, somehow managed to escape a sack on fourth-and-2 and found Randall Cobb for a 26-yard gain to the Niners 4. Eddie Lacy ran for 81 yards on 21 car ries for the Packers, while Frank Gore had 66 yards and a touch down on 20 carries for the 49ers. Michael Crabtree had eight catches for 125 yards for San Francisco. But it was Kaeper nick who was the difference-maker once again in San Franciscos fourth straight win over Green Bay. He n ished 16 of 30 with the touchdown and an interception. 49ERS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MICHAEL MAROTAP Sports WriterINDIANAPOLIS When coach Chuck Pagano arrived home after Saturdays play off victory, he tried to settle down. Instead, he settled in for the reality that the Colts ar ent nished yet. Youre able to go home and sit on the couch, turn the TV on and nd out that it did happen. It is real. It wasnt surreal, Pagano said Sunday, less than 24 hours after his team pulled off the second-greatest comeback in playoff history. Those guys, our players, they lay it on the line week in and week out. They truly left nothing, nothing, out there. The shocking turnaround, from a 38-10 second-half decit to 45-44 victory over the Chiefs, left Indianapo lis spent both physically and mentally, linebacker Jerrell Freeman said. And it has Indianapo lis (12-5) waiting to see if it plays at Denver or New En gland next weekend in the divisional round. Those are the results of this monumental victory. But a rare non-game day Sunday also gave the Colts a brief chance to reect on what had been accomplished. They won their rst postseason game without Peyton Manning since Janu ary 1996. They won their rst postseason game without Manning or Jim Harbaugh behind center since John Unitas was the starter in 1971. They became the rst NFL team in playoff history to win despite giving up 40 points and losing four turn overs. And they did it all with Andrew Luck leading the way on a less than stellar day. How? By following Paganos long-standing mantra of playing hard until the nal whistle and never losing faith in their aptly-named quarterback. Hey, he does it all. As long as we continue to get the ball to him, we know some kind of way hes going to put points on the board, that offense is going to get rolling, Freeman said, referring to Luck. (Offensive coordinator) Pep (Hamilton) has a lot of different schemes. Im sure yall see it, they can do it in the passing game and the run game. Its great to have a quarterback like that. Its not just Luck, though. These Colts thrive on de bunking conventional wisdom. When they started the re building process after the 2011 season with a rst-time general manager, a rst-time head coach, a rookie quar terback and no Manning, they were considered one of the worst teams in football. They wound up winning 11 games and making the playoffs even with Pagano missing 12 games to battle leukemia. This summer, when some said Indy would regress in terms of wins against a tougher schedule, the Colts still wound up winning 11 and captured their rst AFC South title without Manning. And on Saturday, after trailing by 28 with 28 min utes remaining and every body else giving up on them, the Colts still believed. NFL sacks champ Robert Mathis walked to the bench and slammed his helmet, then stewed stoically on the bench waiting for his next chance as Luck took the eld one more time. Saturday marked the 11th time he led the Colts to a winning score in the fourth quarter or overtime over the past two seasons more than any other quarterback in the NFL. And after Saturday, even the outsiders are beginning to wonder if theres anything Luck cant do. Pagano and his players already know the answer. I dont know what level it is, but he sure went to anoth er one (Saturday), Pagano said. Hes a guy that is able to put things behind him in a hurry. Ive seen a lot of guys on either side of the ball have some poor plays here and there whether its a quarter back and you throw three in terceptions, you come right out of the half and youre gunned up and ready to go play good football and boom, you start the second half the way we started the second half. The guy is just strong-minded that way. Colts have little time to savor stunning comeback MICHAEL CONROY / APIndianapolis Colts center Samson Satele celebrates after an NFL wild-card playoff football game on Saturday in Indianapolis. Indianapolis defeated Kansas City 45-44. TERESA M. WALKERAP Sports WriterNASHVILLE, Tenn. Ruston Webster is in charge of his rst coaching search in the NFL and only the Ti tans second since moving to Tennessee, and the general manager says his goal is nding the man who is the right t for the fran chise. Hes also not limiting what he wants in the Titans next coach. The biggest thing to me that you cant do is rule out guys, Webster said. I want an of fensive guy or a defen sive guy, previous head coaching experience. It causes you to miss out on possibly some good candidates. Webster wants to start interviewing candidates as soon as possible to replace Mike Munchak, who was red Saturday after three years as head coach and 31 seasons with the franchise overall. The general manager says some of the candidates he wants to inter view still are coaching in the playoffs. With the Titans ring Munchak six days after the regular season ended, they missed the window to interview candidates whose teams had a bye this week. The last time the Titans went looking for a new coach was late January 2011 after Jeff Fisher was red with all other openings in the NFL already lled. Munchak was hired Feb. 7, 2011. This time, the Titans became the seventh team in the league to re a coach, but only the Texans and Buc caneers have hired replacements. We denitely have a head start on that, said Webster, who assisted then-general manager Mike Reinfeldt in 2011. Webster said he plans to meet with assistant coaches starting Mon day. Munchaks ring happened so quickly after nearly a week of meetings that Webster said he hadnt completed the process yet with Titans president and chief executive ofcer Tommy Smith. This franchise hired its last two coaches by promoting from with in. Munchak had been offensive line coach when the Titans picked him in 2011, replac ing Fisher, who took over for Jack Pardee after 10 games in 1994 for the then-Houston Oil ers. Pardee was hired in 1990 away from the University of Houston. Webster said hes watched people such as Rich McKay and oth ers hire coaches when he was with the Buccaneers and Seahawks. Webster said hes not sure how many coach es were hired during his time in Tampa Bay, but it was a lot.Titans GM looking for the right fit in next coachAP FILE PHOTOTennessee Titans head coach Mike Munchak yells to his players on Sept. 22 before an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers, in Nashville, Tenn. DAVE SKRETTAAP Sports WriterKANSAS CITY, Mo. In many ways, it was a dream, going from 2-14 and the rst overall pick in the NFL draft to 11-5 and a spot in the playoffs. Yet it ended in just about the most nightmarish way possible, a second-half collapse and another round of postseason heartache. No wonder the Kansas City Chiefs had such a hard time summariz ing their season in the minutes and hours af ter a gut-wrenching 4544 loss at Indianapolis on Saturday. You know, I cer tainly think you use this as drive, Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith said Sunday be tween wrap-up meetings. I think its good to be playing in these types of games. I think these types of games are contagious. You go back to playing in just regular-season games, you want that itch. You have that urge to try to get to these types of games. I certainly think that foundation has been laid for next year. The Chiefs have lost a record eight straight postseason games, their last victory coming after the 1993 sea son. Most of the cur rent members of the team were in grade school, some of them still in diapers, the last time Kansas City tasted any success in games that truly matter. It appeared for most of three quarters Sat urday that things would be different. Kansas City had raced to a 31-10 halftime lead, and then took advantage of an inter ception early in the third quarter to tack on a touchdown that several Chiefs would say later should have sealed the game. The problem was that they started play ing as if the game was in hand, while Andrew Luck and the play off-tested Colts started to play as though they had nothing to lose. The result was a fu rious second-half rally, one made possible by unconscionable breakdowns by a defense that was spectac ular during a 9-0 start. Luck torched a secondary that wilted when it faced premier quarter backs such as Peyton Manning and Philip Rivers, and his 64-yard touchdown pass to T.Y. Hilton with 4:21 left nished off the sec ond-biggest comeback in NFL playoff history.Dream season for Chiefs ends in nightmare fashionMICHAEL CONROY / APKansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith (11) runs the ball against the Indianapolis Colts on Saturday during the second half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game in Indianapolis. The Chiefs have lost a record eight straight postseason games, their last victory coming after the 1993 season. Most of the current members of the team were in grade school, some of them still in diapers, the last time Kansas City tasted any success in games that truly matter.

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NBA GOLF DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterKAPALUA, Hawaii The most pressure involving the Ryder Cup this year is simply getting on the team. It has never been more difcult for Europe or the United States. I do not want to be missing out on that one, Graeme McDow ell said last month at the end of a most suc cessful season. The former U.S. Open champion and Ryder Cup hero from Wales in 2010 won three times last year, including the World Match Play Championship in Bul garia. He nished the year at No. 14 in the world, behind ve Europeans Henrik Sten son, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy, Sergio Garcia and Ian Poulter. But there are no guar antees in golf, especial ly in this era of great depth. McDowell goes into the year outside the top nine in the standings (four from Eu ropean Tour money, ve from world rank ing points, both earned since September). Both captains, Tom Watson and Paul Mc Ginley, have three wildcard selections. Both teams have young players who were never part of the Ryder Cup conversation until now, whether thats Jordan Spieth of Texas or Victor Dubuisson of France. Theres going to be two or three guys who miss, McDowell said. Good players. Quality players. I assume McGinleys wild cards are going to be very hot ly contested. No doubt its going to be a tough team to get on. Its like that for Amer ica, too. All anyone has to do is look at the Presidents Cup last October not because of who played for the American team, but who didnt. Jim Furyk was left off the team when U.S. captain Fred Couples picked Spieth, and it was hard to fault him for that. Dustin Johnson, whom many regard as the best American talent under 30, didnt make the team and wasnt picked. Former Masters champion Bubba Watson stayed home. Rick ie Fowler hasnt played on a U.S. team since he was a captains pick for the Ryder Cup in Wales. It certainly is getting harder now that, and I think the American players are hungry for it, so theyre playing and theyre working, Zach Johnson said. They are grinding and they want to make that team. Its harder to make those teams. Last fall, Johnson couldnt help but look at the rosters and say, He deserved to be on the team, or How do you not take that guy? The obvious one was Jim, he said. How was he not on the team? Furyk had not missed a Ryder Cup or Presidents Cup team since 1997. Then again, Fu ryk was 43 and every year gets a new class of young players who made it even harder. Harris English won twice last year. Think he doesnt have the Ry der Cup on his mind, especially after having played in a Walker Cup? Tiger Woods, when he was going through a season of mediocre golf and troubling in juries in 2011, was regarded in some circles as a questionable cap tains pick for the 2011 Presidents Cup at Roy al Melbourne. Woods didnt even qualify for the FedEx Cup playoffs. Before heading down to Australia, his last top 10 was in April. Tak ing him would mean leaving PGA champion Keegan Bradley off the team. All the opinions and analysis overlooked one important thing. Hes Tiger Woods. And that made him an obvious choice. How many guys are locks like that now? Phil Mickelson, who turns 44 this year and is as unpredictable now as when he was a rookie, probably still ts into that category. And thats about it. Consider who might be expected to play at Gleneagles the last week of Septem ber. Woods, Mickelson, Steve Stricker, Matt Kuchar, Zach and Dustin Johnson, Jason Dufner, Hunter Mahan, Keegan Bradley, Spieth, Webb Simpson, Brandt Snedeker, Bubba Watson, Furyk. Were already up to 14. The Ryder Cup takes only 12. And thats overlooking which new star might emerge this year. English? Billy Horschel? Gary Woodland? Ryan Moore? Europe was at its strongest in the mid dle of the 2000s decade. Again, the strength was measured more by who didnt make the team. That prompted Colin Montgomerie to say in Ireland in 2006 that Europe had reached a stage where it could eld two quality teams. It used to be the Eu ropeans barely had enough for one. Rose and Poulter didnt make the team. Darren Clarke was left off the 2008 team, even though he had won twice that year. Garcia didnt play in 2010. The Ryder Cup already is closer than ever. Sure, the Euro peans seem to have a lock on that gold chalice. They won in 2010 when it came down to the nal match, even though the Americans won all but one session in that rain-lled week. Europes win in Medi nah required a stunning comeback on the nal day. It effectively was decided on a 45foot birdie putt by Justin Rose. The competition is greater than ever for three days of com petition, and especial ly for the next eight months trying to make the team.Ryder Cup quandary: How to secure spot on team MARCO GARCIA / APDustin Johnson follows his drive off the ninth tee during the second round of the Tournament of Champions golf tournament in Kapalua, Hawaii. TIM REYNOLDSAP Basketball WriterMIAMI LeBron James scored 30 points, Michael Beasley came off the bench to add 17 and the Miami Heat held on down the stretch to beat the Toronto Raptors 10297 Sunday night. Dwyane Wade scored 14 points and Chris Bosh grabbed 11 rebounds for the Heat, who successfully over came a decit entering the fourth quarter for the seventh time in 13 tries. Miami was down by ve entering the fourth, then opened the nal period with a 7-0 run and never trailed again. DeMar DeRozan scored 26 points on 11 for 19 shooting for Toronto, which was bidding for its rst six-game winning streak since April 2007. Amir Johnson and Jonas Valanciunas each scored 17 for the Raptors, who got 14 from Kyle Lowry.GRIZZLIES 112, PISTONS 84 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Jon Leuer matched a career high with 23 points, Zach Randolph had 16 points and 16 rebounds, and the Memphis Grizzlies dominated the second half to beat the Detroit Pistons 112-84 on Sunday afternoon. Memphis had six players in double gures, including 15 from former Piston Tayshaun Prince. Greg Monroe led Detroit with 19 points, while Andre Drummond added 15 points and 14 rebounds. The Pistons lost their fourth straight and fth in a row at home. They are now 4-10 after a 10-10 start to the season. WARRIORS 112, WIZARDS 96WASHINGTON Klay Thompson scored 26 points, Stephen Curry and Andrew Bogut connected on a trick play worthy of the NBAs slam dunk contest, and the Golden State Warriors have their longest in-season winning streak since 1975 after Sunday nights 112-96 win over the Washington Wizards. The Warriors won their ninth in a row by turning the third quarter into a laugher, opening the period with a 30-5 run. Curry and Thompson topped John Wall and Bradley Beal in the battle of the two highest-scoring backcourts in the NBA. Curry scored 14 points on 5-for-17 shooting.Heat end Raptors win streak 102-97AP FILE PHOTOToronto Raptors Amir Johnson (15) tries to keep Miami Heats Dwyane Wade (3) from the ball during the rst half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, in Miami.

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5 AGENDA NORTH LAKE COUNTY HOSPITAL DISTRICT MEETING ON JANUARY 23, 2014 LAKE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ROOM 5:30 p.m.1.Call to Order 2.Administration of Oath to Elizabeth Kallop 3.Roll Call 4.Presentation and approval of minutes of the budget meetings held on September 19, 2013 and September 26, 2013 5.Financial report audit presentation 6.Presentation of the annual report of the Board of Trustees. 7.Transaction of any business that may properly be brought before the board. a.Reaffirmation of Resolution 98-1. 8.Election of officers of the Board of Trustees. 9.Old Business 10.New Business: a.Presentation of quarterly audits b.Scheduling of budget and special meetings 10.Any other matter necessary to achieve the aforementioned goals. 11.Adjournment PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY OF THESE PROCEEDINGS SHOULD CONTACT PATRICIA SYKES-AMOS at 352-383-6300 AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE SCHEDULED HEARING. If a person decides to appeal any decision or recommendation made by council with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need record of the proceedings, and that for such purposes he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. This agenda is provided to the North Lake County Hospital District only as a guide, and in no way limits their consideration to the items contained hereon. The North Lake County Hospital District has the sole right to determine those items they will discuss, consider or act upon. Changes or amendments to this Agenda may occur at any time prior to, or during the scheduled meeting. It is recommended that if you have an interest in the meeting, you make every attempt to attend the meeting. This Agenda is provided only as a courtesy, and such provision in no way infers or conveys that the Agenda appearing here is or will be the Agenda considered at the meeting. SOCCER STEVE DOUGLASAssociated PressMANCHESTER, England West Hams gamble of playing a team full of young sters and reserve play ers backred spectacu larly when the Premier League struggler was thrashed 5-0 by Nottingham Forest in a third-round shock in the FA Cup on Sunday. However, Chelsea had no problem seeing off second-tier oppo sition, defeating Der by 2-0 thanks to sec ond-half goals by John Obi Mikel and Oscar, and Sunderland beat third-tier Carlisle 3-1. Later Sunday, third-tier Oldham looks to beat Liverpool for the sec ond straight year in the worlds oldest club knockout competition and Manchester Unit ed hosts fellow Premier League side Swansea. With his squad hit by injury and the rst leg of a League Cup seminal against Man chester City to come on Wednesday, West Ham manager Sam Al lardyce elded an un recognizable starting XI that was humbled at The City Ground. Djamel Abdouns goal gave Forest a 1-0 lead at halftime before Jamie Paterson scored a hat trick and Andy Reid completed the humiliation with the fth in injury time. West Hams lineup further highlights the FA Cups increas ing lack of appeal in the eyes of many top clubs but Allardyce made no apologies, even though the humiliating result will pile the pressure on him after his teams poor start to the season. West Ham is next to last in the Premier League after 20 games. We had a huge amount of problems in terms of the available members of the squad so Ive got to keep them intact, thats a major priority, Allardyce said. Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho also rested many of his top players, and his weakened team relied on a much-im proved second-half display to ultimately see off Derby with some ease at Pride Park. Mikel headed home Willians devilish free kick in the 66th minute for only his fourth goal for Chelsea in 300 appear ances, before Brazil play maker Oscar struck a erce shot in at the near post ve minutes later. Chelsea will host Stoke in the fourth round while Sunder land will play either Kidderminster or Pe terborough thanks to goals from Adam Johnson and El Hadji Ba and an own goal by Sean OHanlon.West Ham humbled by Forest in FA CupJOHN WALTON / APNottingham Forests Andy Reid celebrates scoring against West Ham United on Sunday during the English FA Cup third round soccer match at the City Ground, Nottingham, England. WINTER SPORTS PHILIP ELLIOTTAssociated PressWASHINGTON Russias slide from dem ocratic reforms and its relationships with international peers threaten to undercut the spirit of the Olym pic Games it hosts next month, failed presidential nominee Mitt Romney said Sunday. Romney, who led 2002s Winter Games in Salt Lake City, said he also worried about se curity preparations but predicted Russia has done everything it can to prevent violence and to protect athletes at the Sochi games. I dont think any ma jor global event that brings people from all over the world togeth er like that can possibly escape the threat of violence, said Rom ney, whom Republi cans picked to challenge President Barack Obamas re-election bid in 2012. Twin suicide bombings in the Russian city of Volgograd left 34 victims dead last week, just 400 miles from where the Sochi Games will be. No group has claimed responsibility for the bombings, but they highlight just how vulnerable the games could be to militant at tacks. Separatists seeking to carve out an Is lamic state in the North Caucasus have mount ed attacks across Russia for nearly two de cades, following wars between separatist Chechen rebels and Russian forces. Russia has a spe cial problem given the threats that have been leveled, Romney said. Theres no question about it. Its very, very frightening to have any kind of Olympic event on your national soil, he added. Romneys criticism of Russia is hardly new. During his presiden tial campaign, Romney called Russia our No. 1 geopolitical foe. Romney: Putins Russia undercuts spirit of OlympicsALEXEI NIKOLSKY / PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICERussian President Vladimir Putin, left, touches the glove of former ice hockey star Pavel Bure, center, after a friendly hockey match between the Stars of the NHL 1 and the Stars of the NHL 2 teams on Saturday at The Bolshoy Ice Dome in Sochi, southern Russia. ANDREW DAMPFAP Sports WriterBORMIO, Italy American teenager Mikeala Shiffrin fought through snow and rain to lead the opening run of a World Cup slalom Sunday, showing off her ability to deal with all types of conditions a month before the Sochi Olympics. Aiming for her second win of the season, Shiffrin clocked 57.72 seconds down the Stelvio course. Maria Pietilae-Holmner of Sweden led Shiffrin at both checkpoints but couldnt match the American in the nal gates and crossed second, a slim 0.03 seconds behind. Wendy Holdener of Switzer land stood third, 0.49 back, and overall World Cup leader Maria Hoe-Riesch was tied for fth with defending overall champi on Tina Maze.Shiffrin leads 1st run of Bormio slalomDAVID ROWLAND / APVenus Williams of the U.S. plays a shot against Serbias Ana Ivanovic on Saturday in the singles nal at the ASB Classic womens tennis tournament at ASB Tennis Arena, in Auckland, New Zealand. TENNIS DENNIS PASSA AP Sports WriterBRISBANE, Australia With the Austra lian Open just over a week away, Venus Wil liams and Sloane Stephens withdrew from warm-up tournaments on Sunday and another American, John Isner, could soon join them. Williams, who lost the nal of the Auckland WTA tournament on Saturday, pulled out of the Hobart International, informing ofcials on Sunday. I dont believe she has an injury, tour nament director Mark Handley said. Shes played a lot of tough, close matches over in Auckland and in the lead-up to a rst Grand Slam (of the season) shes not tak ing any chances. Williams was planning to use the Hobart event as nal prepa rations for the Australian Open which begins Jan. 13. She lost in the third round at Mel bourne Park last year. The seven-time Grand Slam champions ranking has fallen to 47th as she has bat tled injuries over the past two years. Stephens injured her left wrist at the Hopman Cup team event on Friday in Perth, and withdrew from her scheduled appearance at the Sydney International. I was having some pain in my wrist and the doctor recommended I not play this week, the 12thranked Stephens said. Former No. 1 Caro line Wozniacki withdrew from the com pleted Brisbane International after hurting her right shoulder in practice.Venus, Stephens pull out of Aussie Open warm-ups

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 College Football Bowl GlanceAll Times EST Saturday, Dec. 21 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Colorado State 48, Washington State 45 Las Vegas Bowl Southern Cal 45, Fresno State 20 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho San Diego State 49, Buffalo 24 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 24, Tulane 21 Monday, Dec. 23 Beef O Bradys Bowl At St. Petersburg East Carolina 37, Ohio 20 Tuesday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu Oregon State 38, Boise State 23 Thursday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Pittsburgh 30, Bowling Green 27 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego Utah State 21, Northern Illinois 14 Friday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Annapolis, Md. Marshall 31, Maryland 20 Texas Bowl At Houston Syracuse 21, Minnesota 17 Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco Washington 31, BYU 16 Saturday, Dec. 28 Pinstripe Bowl At New York Notre Dame 29, Rutgers 16 Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina 39, Cincinnati 17 Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando Louisville 36, Miami 9 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Kansas State 31, Michigan 14 Monday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Navy 24, Middle Tennessee 6 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Mississippi 25, Georgia Tech 17 Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Oregon 30, Texas 7 Holiday Bowl At San Diego Texas Tech 37, Arizona State 23 Tuesday, Dec. 31 AdvoCare V100 Bowl At Shreveport, La. Arizona 42, Boston College 19 Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas UCLA 42, Virginia Tech 12 Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Mississippi State 44, Rice 7 Chick-l-A Bowl At Atlanta Texas A&M 52, Duke 48 Wednesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas North Texas 36, UNLV 14 Gator Bowl At Jacksonville Nebraska 24, Georgia 19 Capital One Bowl At Orlando South Carolina 34, Wisconsin 24 Outback Bowl At Tampa LSU 21, Iowa 14 Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Michigan State 24, Stanford 20 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. UCF 52, Baylor 42 Thursday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Oklahoma 45, Alabama 31 Friday, Jan. 3 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Missouri 41, Oklahoma State 31 Orange Bowl At Miami Clemson 40, Ohio State 35 Saturday, Jan. 4 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Vanderbilt 41, Houston 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (102), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 6 BCS National Championship At Pasadena, Calif. Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 18 East-West Shrine Classic At St. Petersburg East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) NFLPA Collegiate Bowl At Los Angeles American vs. National, 6 p.m. (ESPN2) Saturday, Jan. 25 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. South vs. North, 4 p.m. (NFLN)Strong excited to take over Texas JOHN RAOUX / AP Louisville head coach Charlie Strong calls out to players on the eld during the second half of the Russell Athletic Bowl against Miami on Dec. 28 in Orlando. RUSTY MILLERAP Sports WriterCOLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State junior linebacker Ryan Shazier has decided to give up his senior sea son to make himself available for the NFL draft. In a statement released by Ohio State, the rst-team All-Ameri can said he just felt the timing was right. Playing in the NFL is something that I have been dreaming about since my days in pee-wee football, said Shazier, a 29-game start er for the Buckeyes. I just feel that now is the perfect time for me. A 6-foot-2, 230-pounder from Fort Lauderdale, he led the Buckeyes in tackles each of the last two seasons. His 143 tackles this season rank sixth nationally and in a tie for 13th on the Ohio State single-season charts. His 22.5 tackles for a loss this year rank third nationally. The Buckeyes won 24 games in a row the last two seasons before losing to Michigan State in the Big Ten championship game and to Clemson in the Orange Bowl on Friday night. I feel like my three years at Ohio State were about great rela tionships with coaches, my teammates and Buckeye Nation, Shazier said. Playing here was an amazing experience. It is really hard to explain the brotherhood I have with my teammates. They took care of me and were always there for me. Shazier was named a rst-team Associated Press All-American, allBig Ten (coaches and media), a Butkus Award nalist and Bednar ik and Lott award seminalist. USA Today, ESPN.com and Sports Illus trated also named him a rst-team All-American after a campaign in which he tied a Big Ten record with three conference defensive player of the week honors.Ohio States Ryan Shazier (2) walks off the eld following a 34-24 loss to Michigan State in the Big Ten Conference championship game. Shazier announced on Saturday that he has given up his senior season and plans to make himself available for the NFL draft.AP FILE PHOTO Ohio St. linebacker trades final season for NFL draft Malzahns wife does the coaching JOHN ZENOR AP Sports WriterNEWPORT BEACH, Calif. Gus Malzahns wife gave him some im portant advice before Auburns last national championship season. Kristi Malzahn told her husband he needed to make sure quar terback Cam Newton knew he cared even if he was tough on him. The night before the opener, Malzahn let Newton know I was a real person and that I care about him. That helped our relationship moving forward. Then the offensive coordinator, Malzahn admits hes all about football sometimes. Malzahn has the second-ranked Tigers in Monday nights BCS championship game against No. 1 Florida State. Newton won the Heisman Trophy and Auburn the national title during that 2010 season. The Malzahns are a pretty good team, too. The coach says Kris ti plays a big part in his career and I wouldnt be here without her. EDDIE PELLSAP National WriterNEWPORT BEACH, Calif. Bobby Bowden has a big decision to make Monday. Stay in his hotel and watch Florida States quest for a third national title in peace. Or drive out to the Rose Bowl, where hell probably miss the whole thing. A lot of people will be coming up to me, Can you sign this? Can you take a picture with my girlfriend? things like that, Bowden said. And I have trouble say ing No. Such is life for the 84-year-old patriarch of Florida State foot ball, who now watches from the outside but remains the most recognizable Seminole there is. Thats the payoff for 34 years of coaching, for taking a program on the verge of extinc tion and turning it into a national powerhouse and for doing it all with a dadgum smile. Bowdens number is still listed in the phone book. He still lives in the cream-colored brick house in Talla hassee, a drive across town from campus. But when he passes through that campus, which has prospered on every level because of the time he spent there, it never crosses his mind that he helped build all that. Same thing goes when he looks at the Seminoles, who, four years after Bowden was eased into retirement, nd themselves one win away from another championship. Im not built that way, Bowden said in an interview with The Associated Press. I love what theyre do ing. I want them to suc ceed, get back on top. Im happy about it. But as far as looking back and saying, Look at what I did, I have no desire to do that. No big surprise, given his humble roots and an aw-shucks demean or that once elicited the almost-believable admission that he was re ally enjoying easy-listening radio through the headphones he wore on the sideline. One of his other fa mous musings that he feared hanging it up because after you re tire, theres only one big event left, hasnt turned out quite like that. Unlike Bear Bry ant or his father, both of whom passed away shortly after they stopped working, Bowden is still going strong. Active as ever, he travels on a pri vate plane and gives up to ve inspiration al speeches a week at spots across the coun try. He is in high demand. He doesnt miss coaching all that much. I know that might surprise some people, he said. He wishes he could have left Florida State on his terms, not the schools. It was an awkward exit one Bowden wanted to make a year later than he did, and one that came after a string of seasons that didnt live up to the expectations he built. From 2001-09, his teams went 74-42 not good enough for a program that played for the title in ve of the previous eight seasons. I wanted to go out dadgum big-time, Bowden said. We kind of built our own mon ster there. And then we werent winning enough ballgames to get the job done. Im not bitter about any of it. It was fun.Bobby Bowden content watching FSU succeedAP FILE PHOTOFormer FSU coach Bobby Bowden poses with the Paul Bear Bryant College Coach of the Year Award on Jan. 11, 2011 in Houston. I love what (FSU) is doing. I want them to succeed, get back on top. Im happy about it. But as far as looking back and saying, Look at what I did, I have no desire to do that.Former FSU coach Bobby Bowden JIM VERTUNOAP Sports WriterAUSTIN, Texas Charlie Strong left a Louisville program that needed to punch its way into the national spotlight for the Texas Longhorns, who live smack in the middle with their enor mous wealth, swagger, political intrigue and championship expectations. And thats just the off-the-eld stuff. On the eld, he in herits a team mired in mediocrity with a 3021 record over the last four years, but still tal ented enough to come within 30 minutes of winning a share of the 2013 Big 12 title. Strong will be introduced as the Texas football coach Monday. In a statement re leased by the school Sunday, Strong said he was excited to be taking over one of the premier programs in the country. Texas is one of those places that is al ways on your radar and a program anyone would dream of being a part of because you have a chance to com pete on a national level every year, Strong said. Its special be cause it has such great history, pride, tradition and passion for football. In the 53-year-old Strong the rst black head coach of a mens program at Texas new athletic director Steve Patterson landed a coach whose teams went 23-3 the last two years, including a BCS bowl win over Florida and a blowout of Mi ami to end the 2013 season in the Russell Athletic Bowl. Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher, who has the No. 1 Seminoles in Monday nights national title game, praised the hire. Fisher was previously considered a possible target for Texas and would have faced Strong in the ACC when Lou isville moves to that league next season. I think hes done a tremendous job at Louisville, turning those guys around, Fisher said Sunday. I think Charlies an excellent coach. Strong succeeded at a school that had to ght its way onto the national radar even in the good years. At Tex as, the bad years draw just as much attention as the good ones, and college football will be watching to see how well he can unite a powerhouse program with a discontented fan base aching to return to the nation al elite.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014OUCH: A little respect for skin pullers, hair pullers / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES New Year-New You classes set for WednesdayEzNutrition101 will begin the New Year-New You health and weight loss course on Wednesday. With two classes to choose from, participants will have weekly weighins, nutritional information, support groups, recipes and prizes to weight loss winners. Participants will also receive a complimentary body analysis before starting the course, and a detailed meal plan on how to improve their health To pre-register, or for information, call Lisa Johnson at 352-516-9855. LAKE COUNTY AARP smart driver classes scheduled during JanuaryThe AARP Driver Safety Program Smart Driver classes help participants rene their skills and develop safer and smarter driving habits in a 6-hour, two-day curriculum. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or older may be eligible for insurance discounts. Cost is $15 for AARP members and $20 for non-members, which includes workbooks and a completion certicate. Payment must be made by check to AARP. Classes will be offered on: Today and Wednesday from 1 to 4 / p.m. at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St. Register by calling 352-326-3540. Today and Wednesday from 9 / a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St. Register at 352-735-7180. Jan. 13 and 15 from 1 to 4 / p.m. at the Lady Lake Library, 225 W. Guava St. Register at 352-753-2957, ext. 114. Jan. 21 and 23 from 1 to 4 / p.m. at the Harden-Pauli Funeral Home, 1617 S. Bay St. Eustis. Register at 352-394-0250. Jan. 21 and 22 from 9 / a.m. to noon at the Umatilla Library, 412 Hateld Dr. Register at 352-669-3284.TAVARES Hospital schedules seminar on skin-cancer surgeryA seminar on Reconstructive Surgery for Skin Cancer patients will be offered from 1 to 2 / p.m., Thursday with Richard Bosshardt, MD as the guest, in the Mattison Conference Center, Florida Hospital Waterman, 1000 Waterman Way. To register or for information, call 352-253-3635. Learn about MAKOplasty robot-assisted knee surgery for those with knee pain, from 9 to 10 / a.m., Jan. 17, with Jon Radnothy, DO.at Florida Hospital, 8875 N.E. 138th Lane, Lady Lake Center for Health. Call 352-253-3635 to register or for information. MARK KENNEDYAP Drama WriterNEW YORK Valisia LeKae has a New Years resolution that has noth ing to do with weight loss, money or watching less TV. I will be cancer-free in 2014, shes vowed. The budding Broad way star who played Di ana Ross in the hit show Motown the Musical was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in late 2013. She went through surgery and this week endured the rst of six planned rounds of chemotherapy. The 34-year-old who was raised in Memphis, Tenn., and attended the University of Tennessee had to pull out of the mu sical and refocus her life on beating the disease, something shes done with grace and wit. I lost my ovary. I dont need to lose my sense of humor, she says. I have learned to really surren der. Cancer was not some thing that I was expecting in my life. About 220,000 new cas es of ovarian cancer are diagnosed each year around the world, and it causes 140,000 deaths. In the United States, the Na tional Cancer Institute es timates 22,000 new cas es and 15,000 deaths each year. LeKae was stunned by the diagnosis after un dergoing surgery to re move what was believed to be a benign cyst from one of her ovaries in No vember. Ovarian cancer is more common among white, post-menopausal women, and LeKae says she has no family history of the disease. Cancer does not dis criminate, regardless of if its in your family or not, she says. Cancer doesnt care if youre starring on Broadway or in a mov ie. Or that youre Angeli na Jolie. Shes taken her battle public in the hope that her diagnosis can help others. LeKae urges wom en to see their doctor regularly. She wants them to point out things that feel abnormal and to seek out second opinions. Even if I can change one persons mind about either going in for their checkups male and female that is a huge thing, she says. Its very important for people of all ages to be proactive. Youre never too young to have a physical. Its better to ght than have fear. Cancer came just as LeKae, who had been an un derstudy or swing in four other Broadway shows, was making her debut as a leading lady and had earned a Tony Award AP FILE PHOTOFrom left, Sydney Morton as Forence Ballard, Valisia LeKae as Diana Ross and Ariana DeBose as Mary Wilson of The Supremes in Motown: The Musical, performing at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre in New York. The budding Broadway star, LeKae, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in late 2013, went through surgery and this week endured her rst of six planned chemotherapy rounds. Rejecting ovarian cancerAfter diagnosis, Broadway star ghts back and gives back CARLA K. JOHNSONAP Medical WriterCHICAGO An investigation into an outbreak of a superbug bacterial infection shows Illinois hospitals are learning to take preventive steps quickly in cooperation with health authorities, the states top doctor said. The 2013 outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae or CRE affected dozens of patients, with some cases apparently linked to a tainted endoscope used at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge. Illinois Department of Public Health Direc tor Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck said public health experts worked with the hospital to nd the source of the outbreak of CRE. Carbap enems are a class of anti biotics considered among the last lines of defense against hard-to-treat bugs. It is this type of coor dinated effort that is vi tal to stopping CRE in fections from spreading, Hasbrouck said in a state ment. The hospital changed its sterilization proce dures after the investiga tion to establish practices exceeding the manufacturers recommendations. The investigation was written up in the cur rent Morbidity and Mor tality Weekly Report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The design of the specialty endoscopes might pose a particular challenge for cleaning Hospital upgrades scope cleaning after outbreakSEE BUGS | C3SEE CANCER | C2

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NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com STACY ST. CLAIRChicago TribuneCHICAGO Erica Norals walked into the kitchen of her South Side Chicago apartment on an ear ly autumn evening and nearly wept at the sight. There, without prompting or cajoling, stood her 11-yearold daughter, Ashan ti, washing dishes at the sink. Balanced on two prosthetic legs and holding a sponge between arms amputated just below her el bows, the sixth-grader was scrubbing the din ner plates with a deter mined vigor. I wanted to help clean up, Ashanti said. Norals natural reex was to fawn over the effort, to celebrate the moment as a milestone in an impossibly long journey for their family. Instead, she reminded herself that 11-year-old girls handle these types of chores every day and that her daughter should be no different. Well, then, Norals said, please carry on. Norals walked out of the kitchen, convinced they had reached a turning point. Once ruled by Ashantis lim itations, Norals could now see the many possibilities and they werent so different from the ones she envisioned for her daughter before she brought her to the hospital May 23, 2011. Ashanti entered the hospital that day with a fever and severe pain in her right leg. A botched sepsis diagnosis and two months later, she left with four amputated limbs and an uncer tain future. At the time, it seemed she would no lon ger roller-skate, challenge the boys in her class to running races, hold her baby broth er or do myriad other things that 8-year-olds enjoy. Through no fault of her own, she faced a lifetime of never being able to fully dress her self, of needing help with basic hygiene, of learning to walk again, of seemingly insur mountable obstacles at every turn. So when Ashanti initially withdrew into herself, refusing to try her new prostheses or engage with people outside her immediate family, her mother understood the girls an ger. Norals just refused to give in to it. To the contrary, she decided to simply be thankful her daugh ter her athletic, sassy, big-hearted daughter was alive. And though she had no idea how to do it, she vowed to build a meaningful life for a third-grader who woke up one day to nd herself without most of her arms and legs. Less than three years later, Ashanti swims, uses a computer and likes to snap pictures of her younger brother on her phone. She attends a public ele mentary school, walks on prosthetic legs and is required to make her bed each morning. Her family recently settled a medical malpractice lawsuit with the Uni versity of Chicago Medical Center for $32 mil lion, which will ensure Ashanti can nally live in a handicap-accessible house, afford the latest prosthetic tech nology and have a per sonal caregiver for the rest of her life. I knew she would feed off whatever emo tions I felt, so the rst thing I did was try to be positive about ev erything and tell her that there was nothing she couldnt do if she put her mind to it. It seemed to work, so Ive just stayed that way, Norals said. Maybe someday when the kids are grown and in col lege, Ill break down. ... But until then, Im just going to push all those feelings aside and make sure Ashanti lives a full and happy life. Ashanti doesnt dwell much on the hospital stay or the amputa tions, opting instead to focus on more press ing sixth-grade issues such as Justin Biebers rumored girlfriends and her disdain for her school uniform. She knows how logistically difcult her fam ilys life has become since the surgeries, but she seemed genuine ly surprised to hear her mother describe the emotional toll. But I never saw you crying in the hospital, the young girl said. Her mother looked at her and smiled. In that case, Norals said, I did my job. Norals thought she had a rm grasp on lifes blessings as she returned from a Mon day morning workout on May 23, 2011. She had a job as an assis tant manager at a phar macy, was working on a teaching degree and had two happy, healthy children. Her oldest child, Ashanti, hadnt been feeling well for two days, but Erica wasnt overly concerned. Ashanti had banged her knee at school a few days earlier, but she hadnt broken the skin in the accident. There wasnt even a vis ible bruise. But when Norals returned to the familys three-bedroom apartment in Chica gos Washington Park neighborhood that Monday, Ashanti had a fever and couldnt bear any weight on her right leg. She complained about being in severe pain, something she never did. Norals took Ashanti to the University of Chicago Medical Cen ter where, court re cords show, a triage nurse noted the little girl had a temperature of 100 degrees. Over the next 24 hours, Ashan tis fever would climb as high as 104, the leg pain would worsen and her lab work would show an elevated white blood cell count. Despite her worsening condition and an other test showing the presence of bandemia an excess of imma ture white blood cells that can indicate sep sis medical records show doctors did not order any antibiotics for the rst 24 hours. They treated her with mor phine, ibuprofen and Tylenol, and scheduled an MRI for her right leg, her mother said. As the hours passed, Norals frustration mounted. She contem plated leaving the hos pital with Ashanti about 1 / a.m., records show, but decided to stay. I felt like they werent doing enough, like they were missing something. It just didnt feel right, but I didnt know what was wrong with her, she said. I trusted the doctors to do their jobs. I should have trusted my own instincts. It wasnt until 2:30 / p.m. May 24 more than 24 hours after arriving at the hos pital that Ashanti received antibiotics, the familys attorneys said. But, by that time, it was far too late. nomination. Shes become a vegan who concentrates on her white blood count and endures a long list of doctor visits. I think God has given me a different role to play at this time, she says with a laugh. This has sort of become the new movie that Im in. God be ing the producer and my doctors being the directors. And I am the star of the show. A classic hardcharging, highly organized type-A, LeKae has had to switch gears. Im nding strength in allowing others to help me. Im so not used to it. I do not like bother ing people, she says. But I know there will be days where I wont be able to get up and make myself a meal and Im going to have to learn to ask for help. Im nding great peace in that, knowing that I dont have to carry this burden alone. Dr. David Fishman, LeKaes gynecological oncologist who is director of the Nation al Ovarian Cancer Ear ly Detection Program at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, has been impressed by her desire to share her experience. Thats what a hero does help other peo ple. She has the courage to want to make a difference and I know that she will, he said. Im very optimistic shes go ing to do very well. While there is no effective screening yet for ovarian cancer, Fishman advises all wom en to learn their familys history with cancer and make it known to their health care pro vider. Any pelvic pain over a week needs to be discussed with a phy sician and Fishman hopes those talks include ovary health. After LeKae was diagnosed with cancer, she returned to the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre to tell the Motown cast. No email blast or press release for her: She wanted to be there, stand up and tell her castmates herself. In many ways, she wanted to comfort them. When someone is diagnosed with cancer, its not just your ght. Its everybody around you. They start to go through these things in their heads they hear cancer, they think about death, they think about all these differ ent things and it affects them emotionally. LeKae is condent shell soon rejoin them onstage, and when she does come back, she thinks shell be better. I think this journey for me will make me a better actress. It will make me a more com passionate person and I will know how to play roles differently. Ill be even more grounded. And you know what? I also will be a little bit more fearless, she says. Once youve faced cancer, everything else? Not so bad. CANCER FROM PAGE C1 Sepsis claimed girls limbs but not her spiritMCT FILE PHOTOAshanti Norals, foreground, plays basketball with LaKenya Corbin during their adaptive physical education class at Chicago State University recently in Chicago.

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 and disinfection, the report said. The bacteria can cause infections of the bladder or lungs, caus ing coughing, fever or chills, and can be fatal, although there were no deaths in the most re cent outbreak. Dr. Tom Frieden, the head of the CDC, has called this class of bugs nightmare bacteria because they can spread their resistance to other bacteria and because of their high mortality rates. They kill up to half of people who get seri ous infections. Dr. Leo Kelly, vice president of medical management for Ad vocate Lutheran General Hospital, noted the help from the CDC and the Illinois health agency in an email. He said the investigation found no deciencies with the hospitals ster ilization process. However, as a precaution, we have moved to gas sterilization for these particular scopes, which exceeds the manufacturers recommend ed cleaning and disinfectant guidelines to ensure no other patients are at risk, Leo said. BUGS FROM PAGE C1 MELISSA DRIBBENThe Philadelphia InquirerPHILADELPHIA Do you pick your skin until your arms are pit ted with scabs? Bite your nails down to bloody nubs? Tear the calluses off your heels until walking is painful? This year, you won a small, bittersweet victory. When stressed or bored, it is natural to engage in some sort of self-soothing behavior such as twisting a lock of hair or biting a ragged cuticle. Any type of repet itive motor movement can calm peo ple down, said Woods, a national expert on body focused repetitive behaviors. A 2006 study of 1,300 college students at the University of Delaware found nearly 15 per cent pulled their hair occasionally and more than 30 percent picked their skin, with women far more likely than men to report the be havior. At least 4 percent of the population take these habits to an ex treme, said Woods, who noted the num ber could be high er because many are too embarrassed and ashamed to seek help. Its a disorder. You keep quiet, said Abby Shaine, 23, an aesthe tician from Somer dale, N.J. Until recently, Shaine, who started picking at her face when she was 16, had never met anyone who shared the problem. Incrementally, with help from social media, support networks, and glancing references in the public sphere, Shaine and others are feeling less alone and less odd. Unlike those who cut themselves, people who pick and pull are not intentionally trying to punish or inict pain on themselves, Woods said. Until these activities begin to hurt, they feel good. There is a primal sat isfaction in evening out the rough edge of a nail or peeling off dead skin. This behavior, Woods said, is similar to hair-pulling, or trichotillomania, another disorder in the DSM, the psychiatrists manual. You get tactile pleasure from the feeling of tugging on your hair, having the hair in your ngers, he said. For some people, its unconscious. They may be watching television or reading a book and not realize their hands have been busily plucking until they see a pile of hair on the oor. Others, Woods said, are fully aware and give themselves permission to indulge, even if they are conicted about the outcome.A little respect for skin pickers, hair pullers

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 MIKE STOBBEAP Medical WriterATLANTA Fifty years ago, ashtrays seemed to be on every table and desk. Athletes and even Fred Flintstone endorsed cigarettes in TV commer cials. Smoke hung in the air in restaurants, ofces and airplane cabins. More than 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked, and there was a good chance your doctor was among them. The turning point came on Jan. 11, 1964. It was on that Satur day morning that U.S. Surgeon General Lu ther Terry released an emphatic and author itative report that said smoking causes illness and death and the government should do something about it. In the decades that followed, warning labels were put on cigarette packs, cigarette commercials were banned, taxes were raised and new restrictions were placed on where people could light up. It was the begin ning, said Kenneth Warner, a University of Michigan public health professor who is a leading authority on smoking and health. It was not the end. While the U.S. smoking rate has fallen by more than half to 18 percent, that still translates to more than 43 million smokers. Smoking is still far and away the lead ing preventable cause of death in the U.S. Some experts predict large numbers of Americans will puff away for de cades to come. Nevertheless, the Terry report has been called one of the most important documents in U.S. public health history, and on its 50th anniversary, ofcials are not only rolling out new anti-smoking campaigns but reecting on what the nation did right that day. The reports bottom-line message was hardly revolutionary. Since 1950, head-turn ing studies that found higher rates of lung cancer in heavy smok ers had been appear ing in medical journals. A widely read article in Readers Digest in 1952, Cancer by the Carton, contributed to the largest drop in cigarette consumption since the Depression. In 1954, the American Cancer Society announced that smokers had a higher cancer risk. But the tobacco industry fought back. Manufacturers came out with cigarettes with lters that they claimed would trap toxins before they settled into smokers lungs. And in 1954, they placed a full-page ad in hundreds of newspapers in which they argued that research linking their products and cancer was inconclusive. It was a brilliant counter-offensive that left physicians and the public unsure how dangerous smoking re ally was. Cigarette sales rebounded. In 1957 and 1959, Surgeon General Le roy Burney issued statements that heavy smoking causes lung cancer. But they had little impact. Amid pressure from health advocates, President John F. Kennedys surgeon general, Dr. Luther Terry, an nounced in 1962 that he was convening an expert panel to examine all the evidence and issue a comprehensive, debate-settling report. To ensure the panel was unimpeach able, he let the tobacco industry veto any pro posed members it regarded as biased. Surveys indicated a third to a half of all phy sicians smoked tobacco products at the time, and the committee re ected the culture: Half its 10 members were smokers, who puffed away during committee meetings. Terry himself was a cigarette smoker. Dr. Eugene Guthrie, an assistant surgeon gener al, helped persuade Ter ry to kick the habit a few months before the press conference releasing the report. I told him, You gotta quit that. I think you can get away with a pipe if you dont do it openly. He said, You gotta be kidding! I said, No, Im not. It just wouldnt do. If you smoke any ciga rettes, you better do it in a closet, Guthrie recalled in a recent interview. The press conference was held on a Saturday partly out of concern about its effect on the stock market. About 200 reporters attended. The committee said cigarette smoking clearly did cause lung cancer and was responsible for the nations es calating male cancer death rate. It also said there was no valid ev idence lters were re ducing the danger. The committee also said more vaguely that the government should address the problem. This was front-page news, and every Amer ican knew it, said Robin Koval, president of Legacy, an anti-smok ing organization. Cigarette consumption dropped a whopping 15 percent over the next three months but then began to re bound. Health ofcials realized it would take more than one report. In 1965, Congress required cigarette packs to carry warning la bels. Two years later, the Federal Communications Commission ordered TV and radio stations to provide free air time for anti-smoking public service announcements. Cigarette commercials were banned in 1971. Still, progress was slow. Warner recalled teaching at the University of Michigan in 1972, when nearly half the faculty members at the school of public health were smokers. He was one of them. I felt like a hypocrite and an idiot, he said. But smoking was still the norm, and it was difcult to quit, he said. Tobacco companies also came under in creasing legal attack. In the biggest case of them all, more than 40 states brought lawsuits demanding compensation for the costs of treating smoking-related illnesses. Big Tobacco settled in 1998 by agreeing to pay about $200 billion and curtail marketing of cigarettes to youths. In 1998, while the settlement was being com pleted, tobacco execu tives appeared before Congress and public ly acknowledged for the rst time that their products can cause lung cancer and be addictive. Experts agree the Terry report clear ly triggered decades of changes that whittled the smoking rate down. But it was based on data that was already out there. Why, then, did it make such a difference? For one thing, the drumbeat about the dangers of smoking was getting louder in 1964, experts said. But the way the commit tee was assembled was at least as important, said Dr. Tim McAfee, director of the Ofce on Smoking and Health at the Centers for Dis ease Control and Prevention. AP FILE PHOTO This Oct. 13, 1997 le photo shows a cigarette vending machine in a bar in Montpelier, Vt. On Jan. 11, 1964, U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry released an emphatic and authoritative report that said smoking causes illness and death and the government should do something about it. Historic smoking report marks 50th anniversary On Jan. 11, 1964, surgeon general released report that said smoking causes illness and death Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. RACHEL COHENAssociated PressMelanie Oudin has played in the quarter nals of a U.S. Open un der the lights of tennis largest arena. On a quiet Monday in late November, though, this professional ath lete had something in common with the weekend warrior who makes a New Years res olution to get t. Oudin hadnt seriously lifted weights in two months, and all of a sudden she was pushing through an intense session. She wound up in the hospital. The 22-year-old Amer ican was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis, the re sult of muscles breaking down and releasing proteins into the bloodstream, which in severe cases can cause kidney failure. Its the same con dition that sent 13 Iowa football players to the hospital in January 2011. Athletes, both elite and recreational, are susceptible, but doctors arent exactly sure why some grueling workouts lead to the disorder while similar ones dont. Other athletes need to trust your body and realize if you feel some thing that youve never felt before and its something new and worse, there might be something wrong, Oudin said. Dehydration is a risk factor for rhabdomy olysis, and doctors think that contributed to Oudins problems. It didnt appear to be an issue for the Iowa play ers, but they had some thing else in common with Oudin and others with the diagnosis: an intense workout immediately after a long break. The Hawkeyes took three weeks off after their bowl game, then returned with a session that included 100 back squats at half of the maximum weight each player could manage for one lift. The set had been done in 2004 and 2007 but with one major difference the players werent coming off a rest period. An investigative committee report commis sioned by the school called the workout a test of physical stamina, mental toughness and who wanted to be on the team. Shaun Prater, then an Iowa defen sive back, described the mentality that elevates athletes to lofty achievements but can also land them in the hospital. He was going to be a senior, a player who had considered turning pro but stayed to try to win a championship. As miserable as he felt during those squats, he kept thinking: I cant throw up in front of these guys Ive got to be strong. There were plenty of times when I want ed to say, Im not doing this, he recently told the AP. But I couldnt. Im a senior. I wanted to lead. He was in so much pain the next couple of days, he couldnt bend down to take off his shoes. After four play ers told trainers about symptoms that includ ed dark urine and mus cle swelling, medical staff sent a text message to the entire team to see who else might be experiencing similar problems. Prater was one who responded. He went to the hospital that night expecting to go through a few tests then head home. He was there a week. When his results came back with dangerous ly high levels of a protein called creatine kinase in his blood, Prater recalled, The lady was freaking out. She was in tears. ... She was like, Yeah, one more workout and you couldve fallen into a coma. He played for Iowa in the fall then was drafted in the fth round in 2012 by the Cincinnati Bengals. Prater started three games for the Minneso ta Vikings this season. The investigative committee cleared trainers and coaches of any wrongdoing and made several general recommendations to prevent a recurrence, including scrapping the workout with the back squats. School ofcials said they had adopted those recommendations but de clined to discuss what specic protocols have been changed. Researchers at the university published a report on the cas es in the September issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Med icine. Among the nd ings: Players who were affected were signicantly more likely than their teammates to re port muscle failure and that they didnt believe they could complete the workout. In other words, their bodies were telling them something was wrong. Dr. Corey Slovis, the chairman of Vander bilts department of emergency medicine, put it this way: Do ing anything to true ex haustion is not smart. Im not against no pain, no gain, he said. But minor or moder ate pain it shouldnt be severe pain. He believes athletes at all levels have be come wiser in recent years about the impor tance of staying hydrated and taking breaks. The dangers of rhab domyolysis have been raised recently in connection to CrossFit workouts, but Slovis said cross-training that includes multiple types of exercises is generally less of a risk factor than regimens that require repeating a particular motion over and over. Oudin now knows to listen to her body. A day after the weightlift ing session, she couldnt straighten her arms. At one point, another play er said, Whoa, Mela nie, youre so jacked af ter one day of lifting. But her biceps werent bulging they were swelling. Oudin is expected to make a full recovery, though its uncertain whether shell be able to play in the Austra lian Open, which starts Pros to amateurs at risk from extreme workoutsAP FILE PHOTOMelanie Oudin says she is not sure whether she will be back playing tennis by next months Australian Open after dealing with a muscle-damaging condition that she says caused her arms to weaken and swell like balloons. Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 315-8305 We invite you to come Rest. ., Relax. ., and Rejuvenate!Ion Detox Foot Bath Just $12.50Call today to schedule your appointment and receive a FREE Paraffin Hand Bath HEALTH BENEFITS: Now Accepting Up-Scale FurnitureLocated in back of Main Street Antiques(352) 460-4806 facebook.com/mainstreetantiquesleesburgWhy Consign?Easy Hassle-free Safe Convenient DEAR ABBY: Im a 28-year-old woman with a fantastic job, a wonderful boyfriend and many friends whom I love dearly. Im the only one without a child. Maybe I dont understand because Im not a parent myself, but all my friends can talk about is children. Whereas before, we were interested in each others lives, I feel like my concerns and accomplishments are being brushed off. An example: I was excited to meet up with a pal to talk about my promotion, but the hour-long dinner was spent mostly teaching her child how to walk between the tables of the restaurant. I enjoy hearing about my friends and their families, but I feel they are no longer inter ested in me. Am I expecting too much because were at differ ent points in our lives, or am I a bad friend? Im growing resentful, and I dont like it. Any words of wisdom? STILL RELEVANT IN MASSACHUSETTS DEAR STILL RELEVANT: You and your friends ARE at different stages of life. When you were in your teens, you and your friends would talk about dating. Then, as you grew older, the conversations revolved around college, jobs and marriage. As people experience the later stages of life, they talk about other things that are going on in their lives children, grandkids, aging parents and, nally, their own health concerns. Youll maintain and enjoy these friendships longer if you understand that. In the meantime, try to set some adult time only with your friends. DEAR ABBY: I have been divorced for 14 years and have dated some, but not a lot. I recently signed up for an online dating service, and here is my dilemma: I have a felony conviction from 25-plus years ago. It did not involve violence, drugs, sex, stealing, etc. It was for a white-collar crime. I received four years of probation, which I served without a hitch. My question is not if I should tell someone about my conviction, but WHEN. If I say any thing at our rst meeting, Im pretty sure it will also be the last meeting. At the same time, I dont want it to appear that I was hiding it from them. I might add, this is the only time I have ever been in trouble with the law. Id appreciate your advice on how to deal with this. ONLINE DATING IN TEXAS DEAR DATING: The time to tell someone about your conviction is when the relationship stops being casual. At that point, you should disclose that there is a chapter from your past that you think the person should know about and its one that will never be repeated. DEAR ABBY: After 25 years, I have nally admitted to myself that Im married to a workaholic, alcoholic womanizer. I have devoted my entire adult life, my time, effort and energy to my family. Now I feel used, abused and disrespected. Im grateful to be a member of Al-Anon. It has helped me to understand that I cannot change anyone but me. I have raised three great, successful grown kids. I have yet to make a decision for myself. I married for life. Must I continue to suffer in silence? Or do I hope that there is love, kindness and respect out there to be had? STALLING IN IOWA DEAR STALLING: Let me remind you what youve already learned in Al-Anon: You cannot change anyone but yourself. The same is true of your circumstances. You are entitled to receive the same love and respect that you offer to others. I cannot guar antee that youll nd love. Because your workaholic, alcoholic, womanizing husband hasnt changed in a quarter of a century, its obvious he has no intention of doing so. You dont need to nd another man in order to be happier than you are now. Being alone could give you peace, contentment and happiness. The question you need to answer honestly for yourself is whether you would be happier without your husbands negative inuence in your life.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Single woman is losing touch with friends who have kids

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C10 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 rfnt rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrff rrrrff nrrrrff ttbrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrff rf rf ntrf brbtfrfrf nrtbrf rfnrtbntb nn rrfnf nfb nrrrb nfrnf rnbfn nnfb b frrfb n brtrtbtrrbbbtb bbrtrbbrrr tbbtbbtrbtbtbtrrfnt rfntbfbr tf fntt rfntb r rnt bnntbbntfntbt tntfntbt bntbffntbt nbntrnbtfntbt btbbntbt trtnbb btnf b fntb tbtbb bbnbbftbbn btbbbb tbnnfbbrtbt rtbfbbtb btfrf fffr t b ntbnrtb tbtbbbbnbb fbbrbr brnbrrbb tfrt btfr bbtbbtb btrfrf f r rb ntbnrtb tnbtb bbbnbbtb bbnt tbbtttbf tbnfttt ttfttnb bbtbntb rfrff f ff f nbb fn t tttbntnt tfftb btbt bbnbtbbtrf ntbftbff fbnbbt fbnnnnb bttbbtntnr tbtbb ff ff rttrffnnb tbttrtbbtt bnfb ff f f f nr f f f ff f b r t b n t f tbtrntbntf bfbbtr btrff tbnnnbn tbn bnnb nbtt bntrtbtbt nbbbbnf tbnnttrnb ttrnbbttbb bntbnbr trt tnt b ttnnb trf

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 r r f fntbtbbtt n f ff frf n f f fr tb ntbtbbtt f bf t bbnn tb f t t b t t b f f f f f f f f f b f f n b t b f n b f t t t b t t b b n b b b r r f f nn ntb f fnn bftb tbt bbbb tbb n n bbtbtt btbtb r r f fntbbbbtt f n ff rffffff ffff f f n f f fr rtbn tbbbbtt f ff frfffff ffff ff f ff ffnf fr ffffff n f f bnfrfn bbtb f f f b f f n f f f f f f f f f b f f n n b f b b t t t b t n b b n trtbn ffnf nn bbfftb b b bt bbt bbb nnnt btbtb fntbbbt ff ffn fffff tbbt n rn n f f fr t tbtntb bbt n ff f fnff ffftbbt r rffrf fff ffnn ff b fbbnn t b f f f t f t f f t f n n t t t b b b b b n b t b n rnn tnfb t tb tb b n fftb nbbtt tb r r f fntbtbbttt ff n nn n f fr tbbbnn bnfn ff f f fn nbttttbtbbbbbbbb n tbtbbttt n b n tbn fn f f f f f r f f f f n f f b f f f b b r f t t t b f f f r f f f f f f r n tbtb nbbt btbtb fnf ff ttfb bb b btb nbbt btbtb r r f tbtbbbb rf n fn nnn f t f n f fr tb ntbtbbbb nn f fbn frf fbbnn tb ftft fft ftftf fffb n f f f f f f f f f b f f n f f f f n b f b b t t t b t n b b n tb f r f fnbb fr n nn fn f f fr tbn bb fr n n bbnn bnfn tt tb t b f f f f f n r n n n t b b b t b b b t n b t t t b b b b b t b b b b n fnf nr nn ffbbb b nbbttb tb rftt tbbb bbbr fn bn frft ttb bbb bbr fn nbbtbt btbtb

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3 r f n t b b b b b b r b b f b n r b b b r f r n b r r n r n n b b t b b b r f b n b n r b n r r r r t r f b n b r f b b n r b n r n f r f b f n r b n r r b n b b t n n b n b f n b r f n r b b r r r r r t t n f f b b r f n b b b b f f bbbnrbnbfn nrrfnbbn rnrnbntbnnb rfffnrnbfb b f b n r t b f b r f n r b r r r b t brrrrnnr fnbfrrbb nrnnbnrnrbn b b f b n r n r f r r r rf t t t rfnrbbb bbbbr rfnbbfbtbbb rfnrbbbbrr rbbrnbnfbn rbnnr t t rfnrbbb rbbbbbbb rfnbbfbb rfnnfnrbn rbbnbbb rfnrbfb bnr b n r b r n b t b n n t b b b n r b r r b r n r b r f n n b b b b b r b b b b b f r f n b b b b b r n b r f b f n b b t b b b n n b n n f b n b r b b n r f b b b f b f n b f n b n b n r n n r b b b b b b r n n b b r f b n b n r r n n r r b r b r b n f n b n b b r n b n b r b b f r r b b b n b b n n r f b b b n b r b n b r n b t b r b r b r b b f r n r t r b r tb tt tt n b b b t b r f n f b b n b t b t r r r n f n r b t b b n t r r b n b b n t r r b b t r r n f t t b t r r t b b b n b n t r r r b r b b t b f f b b f r b f n b b n r f b r t t b b b b rf r r n b r t r r r f r f b t b t f b r f t t t t b b b b b b r b n r f b r b b b n r r b r f r b n n r b r r f t b r b b b b n t b b b b t r b n n b r b n b b t t rnnfrfbb bbrrfbbb bbrbbrrn fbrfrb r r b r f n r f n n b b f n t b b r n b b r n b t b b tf b t n b t r r r n b r f r b b n b r r n n b r b n b b b r n n f n b n n b n b b r r b r f r r n b n r n r r b n b r n n b n n r r b n b b r b n r f n b b r n r f n b n b n n b b n b n b b b r n n f n b n n b r b r b n b b n n r f n f n f b n b b n n b n n b r r b b b f b r f n b n n f n b b n r r b n r b n f b n b n b r b tr tr tt rb bbbbnb brr t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t tb tt r t ffnnrnbnnbnbrnnb rbrbrnbbbb nnnbrrfbb bnnb b b r b r b n b r n f b n b f b r n n b r bnrb bbnnnnrrr nbbnbbb b f r n n b n r f t b r n r r b t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t rbrrrbbb bnnbnbbrnnb nbrnnb rbnrnbfrf rnrnbbnb nbbnnbrbbnrb bfbbnbb rrnfnnrbbnbbnnrnb rrbrbnfbnrb brnrrbnrnbn rf bfbbrnfbnrrb rrbfnfbnbnbbnbn bbnnnbnbnbb rrnfnrrnfb brfbfnbfb nnrfnbrnbbn nnbbfb brrbbnrb brrnbnrfnbbnnr nnbrbbnnbbn bbbrrnbrbbr ffrbbbnrbfbnn bnbrrnbrbbb brrffbnbnbnr bbbfrnbb b brbfb rrnrnnbbnbfbr nrbnrf rnnnbnbnnbnrrnnb nbnnbbr nrnbbbn r f brnbr rbrfbrbnbnnrbnbb bbrnn rfnrrr ffnnrfbnr rnbrnnfnb bbbnbnnrbnr bbn r t ttf

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 rfntbf bffffn f rf fff f f f f fff ffr fbrff fffnbbf ff ffff fff ffffb fff fnfrbf fbtbff frfbfnf ff rf ntbf bbffffr ftff f fffffbf tfff nffb f ffbff fbrff frfftf bfffffbbfb rfffff bff bfff ff brffftf fbff ftfbff tbfbfff f fftffffr tff bfnt fbbrff f ff brff bffbbr brfff f ffn rfff f ffffff ff bbfffrf fbff fffnrf fbrff fff brbfff f ffff f ftffff fbrrfbff fff r fffbr ff n n n nffff f trff fbftrffftbf btbff f f bff nbffff t bbfbrftfbbr fbtbff bbfff fbfbbrff fbf fffff ffff bfff ffff ff f f ft b f fb t b f f ff bfff ff f ff b f f f f f b f b f f f b f f f f f f f f r f b ff f fbbr nrbbfff fbffnt rff fbffbr bffff n btfb bbffbrff f nffnf brff bbffb fff bfb nbfff f f ffnrtr bbrfbrfff f bfbf bbfffrftf brfff f nfff f fffnf brfbff nf bbrfffff rffnf fff f fbbrfbr ff bfffbrf btbff brfbfnr ff f f f f br fff fttbbfbf fbftbf fr nbfff fbffnf fbfnf fbfbff fbbrfbr ff f f f f f f f b f f f ff rfffff nffr fbfnff tfrfff f f rfr fbftbf f f ff n f f f b fbffrf ff fffbfff ffftfbffb f f f rfbffffb rfbfrffffr bbrffbfbfbff rf f f f rnbffrf bfrfbbrffrff frfbbrffbfbfb ffrf f fbrffbft fff r f ft fr r t f f f f b f f f r f r b f b f t f b f r f r b b r f bfbbrffbbfft frftfbff tfrfbffftfbfb fffbt bfbfr f f b f f f b f f t f f f f r b f f f fr b b f fb fr f f n f b f f b b f b b r b f b f r f f f f f f b f ft f f f b f r f b f f f f f b f fb f r f f f b f r f n f b f f ft f f b f f b f f f b f f b f b f fr f f f f b f fb f f f f f r f f b ft b f f b f f b f t f f n r r f r b f f f b fffbfffff ffbbfbbf fbbfb rfbfffftfb fbfbf rfbffff rffbrfr f r f f b r b b f b f b f f f b f f f f f t f f b r r f b f b b f b b fb fb f r f r f b f f f f ft f fb f f b f b f f f t fb f f r b b r f b f t f r f r r f r r f f t f b b f f f f f f f f r f b f r f b r f f r f f f f f f f f f r f f f b f f b f b b f b fb fb b f f n n b b n t f f f f f f f b f b f b r f b b f f f f f b f f f t r f r f b f f f t t f f f f fn f f f r f f b f f f f f f b f b f f f f f f r f f f f f b f f f fb f f f f f f fffbrfff ffrfffbr ffffff fffffb ftffbfff f f r b b f f f f f ff n ftfrffft tfbfrftffb fftfffff frfbrffbfb bfbffrnbfbbf trfbfffft f f r b f b f f f b f f b f f t f f f f f fffbfr bbrfbf ffrfrf rfbrffb f b f b fr ff f f f f r f f f f f f f f f f b f f f f f f t f f f brfftfr rfbff rffr bfbftfr bbfbfbftrfr ffffrr brffbbf trfrfbff frfbrff t f f f brfbfnbrfb tfrffffbfrnb bbftfbfrftff brffbftf frffbft ffftf rfbfb f f b f t r b b f f b f

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Monday, January 6, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt rf trrfbtfr rbfrbbt frbfbtt rf ntbf r r n n bff r f b t r f b b r b t f r r b t f r r t t f t f r b t t r t r r r t b b b r r t b f r b r b t r f r b t b t t rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt rf bf n f t n f b b f r t r f f b t t r r r r f rf bf b f r f r b f b r r f r r r b t t r r f f t n r t t r f f n b f r n frrfnbf trrfttbftnfrr bfbrbtt tbf bf frrbfb rnbtr b t t f r b f r r f b t t rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt r r t f b t r b r f t t b t r b r f r t ff ff b f t t b b n b t r f r n b f b r f b f f f f n b t b t t b t r r f t f f b r f b r n b t f f r r t t t r r f r b f f r b f f b f b t r n b f r b t b r b b b t t b brr r frbtt r r r r b t t r f b r r r f b t t b t f b b t r frf frfbtt t t f r t f r r b t b f b t ff rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t tnf rffnbfb ftbbr ttttbtf tr fbtrffr brfrbtt ff bttbttb bbtr fbtt r f b r f t r f b t r bfbbfbtt bfbbn rrrfrrttbt t t r n r rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt b t t r f b t r f b b r b t f r r b t f r r t t f t f r b t t r t r r r t b b b r r t b f r b r b t r f r b t b t t trf bf bff bf t bn nrttt tbbtt ttr frr fbbbfr bt fbb rr rtb rfbt r tbftr btt t r r t f btrfbf fnfrrfr bbfr rrrtfr tbbtt t f t b f b b ftbfrtt tbtt f brf rrnffb rf brbf fbbtt r f ff rb r r r b fbbrf btt r ff b r b b b t t bffrr btt bttbtb tffb rbbf r bbtrft rbtt b f r b f n rbnbtb rtf b t t r rtbfrrr btt b brfrbtt rtnfrt tbb tbtt btt frtbfr r f b t b t nfbrbrf btt trfb btt btfbftrr r rtfr r b t t r f tfr

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, January 6, 2014 rfnr tbrn t t r f r n tr rfrnnn rf nnn fnn nnr fnn r fnrn tt rfn r rfrn rrf t tt ttrrr rtf btfnrnnn n t n r f r n n ntrrfb tf tbrrfnr nnnn rfnr n ntrrfb tf n n b f n b n f n b f b n f n n b f t f f n r r t n n nn rrb r rtbr fnrn nr tr r fnrnn n n f fr n t trrfnrnn ntf b f t trfnrn n trfr nn n nn frf t r t t t t t r r r t r t r r b r f n f n r n n n r n f n r f r f r f r n n n n r t r f n t r t r nnt f b f t r r t b t t r b r n n n n tnnb rr f t t t t t r f n f n t t t r f n r n n nntf f