Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Newspaper
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English
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial,com N umero us efforts are under way to revitalize the city of Mount Dora and trans form its image in the next ve to six years. Those efforts in clude the completion of a 25-mile state toll road running through Mount Dora, providing easy access to Orlando. The Wekiva Parkway project is coordinat ed in conjunction with the construction of the Wekiva Trail, a 15-mile multi-use trail con necting Lake, Seminole and Orange counties. City ofcials in col laboration with the county have already begun planning for a Mount Dora region al commercial district, which would be locat ed at Round Lake Road and State Road 46. The Wekiva Trail will bring visitors from Seminole and Orange County to downtown, where they will hope fully spend money, and it will enhance the val ue of residential ar eas near the vicinity of the trail, Lake Coun ty Commissioner Leslie Campione said. Community lead ers and trail advocates have focused on get ting the trail built in conjunction with the parkway, she said. Otherwise, it would be out of reach nan cially for Lake Coun ty to take on a project of this magnitude, ac cording to Campione. Vol. 137, No. 329 | 4 sections MISSED YOUR PAPER? Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or 877-702-0600 (Sumter County) NEWS TIP? Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D4 DEAR ABBY D7 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER HIGH 72 LOW 62 See A8 BUCS DEFEAT LIONS 24-21 FOR THIRD STRAIGHT WIN, SPORTS B1 LOCAL: Homeless drop-in shelter to offer meals, showers, help to needy A3 STUDY: Nuts may lower cancer, heart death risk C3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, November 25, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com 50 BRADLEY KLAPPER, JULIE PACE and MATTHEW LEE Associated Press WASHINGTON With their destination and mission among Americas closest guarded se crets, the small group of ofcials hand-picked by President Barack Obama boarded a mili tary plane in March. The travel plans of the U.S. diplomats and foreign policy advisers were not on any pub lic itineraries. No reception greeted them as they landed. But awaiting the Americans in the remote and ancient Gulf sultanate of Oman was the rea son for all the secrecy: a delegation of Iranians ready to meet them. It was at this rst high-level gathering at a secure location in the Omani capital of Mus cat, famous for its souk lled with frankin cense and myrrh, that the Obama admin istration began laying the groundwork for this weekends historic nuclear pact between world powers and Iran, Associated Press has learned. Secret talks set stage for nuke deal DONNA CASSATA Associated Press WASHINGTON For 51 years of war and peace, Republi cans and Democrats rallied around a bill to pay the troops, buy ships and aircraft and set military policy. Last week, the Sen ate couldnt even agree on votes. Under pres sure from President Barack Obama, Sen ate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., was determined to avoid a vote on add ing a new batch of tough penalties against Iran to the National Defense Au thorization Act as ne gotiators held nuclear talks in Switzerland. A deal announced Sunday temporarily freezes Irans nuclear pr ogram. Defense bill caught in Congress political divide Trails, toll road seen as key to areas fortunes BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cyclists riding the Seminole Wekiva trail take a tunnel under International Parkway on Saturday. The Wekiva Parkway project will extend the trail and will connect it to areas in Lake, Seminole and Orange counties. Building paths to prosperity MOUNT DORA Wekiva Trail Wekiva Parkway Business park site MOUNT DORA APOPKA 441 441 437 429 437 46A 46 STAFF GRAPHIC / WHITNEY WILLARD 414ORANGE COUNTY LAKE COUNTY SLUG: wekivatrail.pdf SIZE: 3.5x2.5 LOCATION: News Composing>> Nov. 25 folder NOTE: Do not shrink or enlarge map size. Fonts will not appear correct. Wekiva Trail Wekiva Parkway Business park site MOUNT DORA APOPKA 441 441 437 429 437 46A 46STAFF GRAPHIC / WHITNEY WILLARD 414ORANGE COUNTY LAKE COUNTY N N STAFF GRAPHIC / WHITNEY WILLARD RICK RUNION / THE LEDGER Cattle run at the Lightsey Cattle Company ranch in Lake Wales. Florida is the third largest beef-producing state east of the Mississippi River and is ranked 10th in the nation. Staff Report The Flori da cattle in dustry is poised to grow to help offset a nation wide shortage of cows due to drought and as land for other uses becomes less in demand, according to Jim Handley, executive vice president of the Florida Cattlemens Association. So, what does that mean for Lake and Sumter counties? According to gures from the United States Department of Agricul ture, Lake is tied for 20th place among Floridas 67 counties in terms of Flor ida cattle and calve pro duction as of last January. In fact, there ar e more cat tle in Lake 23,000 head than there are people living in Leesbu rg, U.S. Census gures show. Sumter has even more cattle and calves, 35,000, ranking it 15th in the state among l ivestock-produc ing counties. Recent droughts in the West and Midwest have led to a 61-year low in cat tle population, and econ omists predict record prots here over the next three to ve years, said Handley, who spoke at a Farm-City Week luncheon last week in Gainesville. LEESBURG Things looking up for cattle industry SEE GREEN | A2 SEE CATTLE | A4 SEE DEAL | A4 SEE BILL | A4

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Mon day, Nov. 25, 2013: This year you focus on a long-term goal. Your friends also will play a signicant role in your year. Recognize that you might be unduly serious at times. If you are single, you are strikingly visible to the person who might be your next sweet ie. This person eventually will let you know how he or she feels. If you are attached, the two of you will enjoy being out and about as a couple, espe cially if youre involved in a mu tual commitment or cause. VIR GO fusses over details to such an extent that he or she loses sight of the big picture. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll act as if it is your desti ny to dive head rst into a proj ect in an attempt to move it for ward. Try not to get frustrated at others lack of vision or cre ativity. Experiment with a differ ent route, or communicate dif ferently. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your imagination and drive is limitless, or so it seems. You might try to entice others to think like you. Forget it. Your uniqueness makes you special and also more in demand. A partner will want to have a seri ous talk with you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You cant seem to get ener gized about anything at the mo ment. If you can take the day off and relax, that might be best. Dont take that attitude into work or even into a friendly lunch with a pal. Evaluate what is at the root of your malaise. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Be clear and direct. If confu sion ensues, youll know that you have done your best! Also make it a point to conrm meeting times and places. Tread lightly with a child or new friend. This person denitely seems to be in an off mood. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could give some troublesome issues power if you focus too much on them. Be as clear as possible. Bone up on your lis tening skills, and repeat any thing that seems off. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) A sudden surge greets you in the morning with your rst cup of joe. You might feel as if others are speaking pig latin, as they dont seem to understand what youre saying. You might want to stop and decipher what could be an important message. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) No one needs to tell you that its Monday you know by the way you feel. Stay out of the problems around you; instead, focus on accomplishing one task after another. It might be necessary to have a long-over due conversation about your nances. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You come off as very seri ous to those around you. Ap proach each moment as new and maintain a methodical ap proach. If a situation seems lu dicrous, know that it probably is. Maintaining your distance will work well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your ability to get through a hassle elevates your value to a higher-up. Once more, this per son might dump a problem on you. Confusion could surround a personal issue as well. Do what you must, but remember to take care of yourself, too. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Keep reaching out for a new solution. It is out there for you to nd; you just havent hit upon it yet. Detach and refuse to feel pushed. Back away from a pressure-cooker atmosphere, and much more will reveal it self. A meeting demands your presence. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) A loved one might mean well, but you will have a difcult time believing that when you see what is going on behind the scenes. Take a step back and chill out. Imagine what it would be like to walk in the oth er partys shoes. You will under stand. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your intentions are good, but your actions just might cre ate more of a fog around an al ready unclear situation. Make a point to detach, and youll gain a new perspective. The end re sult will be better if you do. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAY CASH 3 ............................................... 4-4-7 Afternoon .......................................... 9-1-2 PLAY 4 ............................................. 4-3-8-2 Afternoon ....................................... 1-6-6-1 FLORIDA LOTTERY SATURDAY FANTASY 5 ............................. 5-9-14-26-33 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $18.50 4 of 5 wins $555 Rolldown THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 787-0600 in Lake County or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon day through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. .............. 787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATES SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 91.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Year Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 STAFF INFORMATION ROD DIXON publisher 352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com BILL KOCH, assistant managing editor 352-365-8208 ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONS To have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCom munity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfenni more@dailycommercial.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Even so, county of cials said the big gest challenge is nd ing funding sources for the Wekiva Trail project. At the same time, city of cials said they want to bring Orange County res idents to east Lake Coun ty for work opportuni ties, but said they must overcome the notion that the area is just a big bed room community. Thirty years ago, the Florida Department of Transportation, the Or lando-Orange Coun ty Expressway Authori ty and Floridas Turnpike Enterprise determined the beltway needed to be completed, said Mary Brooks, public involve ment coordinator for Wekiva Parkway. The $1.7 billion proj ect funded in partner ship with the FDOT, the expressway authority and the enterprise would complete the beltway around metropolitan Or lando, according to in formation from the proj ect. Once the project is completed hopefully by 2019, it is going to make it much easier to get to the parkway and to travel between Seminole, Lake and Orange counties, Brooks said. The toll road will be gin at State Road 429/ Daniel Webster Western Beltway at the new Con nector Road, just north of U.S. Highway 441 in Apoka, according to de tails of the project. From there, it will head north to a systems interchange just south of the Or GREEN FROM PAGE A1 ange County-Lake Coun ty line. The parkway will in clude an interchange at State Road 46 near Round Lake Road in Mount Dora. It will then head east and north along the SR 46 corridor in both Lake and Seminole Coun ty before turning south to connect with State Road 417. As a result of the proj ect, there will be more than 3,400 acres of land set aside for conserva tion. Part of the work will involve the reconstruc tion of the U.S. Highway 441/SR 46 interchange in Mount Dora, and the re location of County Road 46A. Transportation of cials said the Parkway would reduce trafc con gestion on U.S. 441 and SR 46. Brooks said it also would reduce vehicle crashes on SR 46. Wekiva Parkway will alleviate the trafc on lo cal and state roads and make it much easier and quicker to get to a desti nation, she said, empha sizing it will provide con nectivity to SR 417 and the I-4 corridors. It is also expected to create 36,000 jobs, Brooks said. Project details also specify there will be a non-tolled option for lo cal trips from the Coun ty Road 46A realignment in Lake County to Orange Boulevard in Seminole County. Providing hikers, na ture enthusiasts and cy clists a connection be tween Lake, Seminole and Orange counties, the 15-mile trail will provide a gateway to the shops, restaurants and cultural destinations of the city of Mount Dora, according to project specications. Beginning at Tremain Street, the trail will con nect with the Seminole Wekiva Trail near the Wekiva River, accord ing to the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organizations Project Development and Envi ronmental Study. There are also plans to evaluate a north/south connection through the Neighborhood Lakes property to the West Or ange Trail near Kelly Park. Mike Woods, trans portation planner with the Lake-Sumter MPO, said a nal report on the study phase of the project would be completed at the end of the month. We would like the whole thing built within ve years, he said. The challenge is fund ing right of way and con struction costs, Woods ex plained. A large portion of the trail will sit on rights-ofway owned by CSX and the Central Florida Rail road. There is an agreement in place with Mount Dora and Lake County with the Central Florida Railroad to purchase the lease from them, and once they pur chase the lease, to negoti ate with CSX to purchase the land, Woods said. In 2011, the Balmoral Group conducted an eco nomic impact study on the proposed trail, citing numerous positive eco nomic development out comes. Once the trail is con structed, the group pre dicted it would bring in between $3 million and 12.7 million in benets for businesses and workers along the downtown trail segment while also creat ing more than 75 jobs. Also, along the down town trail segment, there will be an increase of at least $4.8 million in prop erty values, the study stat ed. The group also found that about 57,140 people are expected to use the trail at least one time each year. The downtown trail, with its connectivity to ex isting trails and addition of increased bicyclist traf c, will represent a signif icant enhancement to the existing Lake County Trail System, the study found. Campione said the economic activity associ ated with trails of this na ture is a proven phenom enon in other places that have similar characteris tics as Mount Dora, such as Winter Garden. Indeed, Balmoral Group highlighted Winter Gar den as a blighted area before its trail was con structed. Now, the area is nearly 100 percent storefront oc cupied, the study stated. Even though the trail has received community support, Campione said the challenge is nding funding sources for the projected expected to cost more than $11 million. We simply cannot jus tify spending money on building a trail when we have roads and sidewalks that need to be main tained competing for the same dollars, she said. That is why it is so criti cal that we look for fund ing opportunities that are outside the box. Those opportunities include partnering with agencies, the state, non prot organizations and the private sector, Campi one said. Mount Dora May or-elect Cathy Hoechst said bicycling has in creased in popularity in the city, highlighting the importance of the trail. You are seeing more and more people looking at the focus for health and wellness, she said. Currently, there are cow pastures at Round Lake Road and SR 46. City ofcials want to change that, bringing in industrial, manufactur ing, research and devel opment, institutional and educational facilities and retail to the area, after the Wekiva Parkway is built. Some 900 acres is eyed for an economic zone. The concept is that we will create an environ ment where people will locate businesses that have higher paying jobs, said Mark Reggentin, planning and develop ment director for Mount Dora. We dont want it to be a regional mall. We are shooting for higher, com mercial, industrial and of ce uses. Currently an ideal place for families to live, Campi one said an employment hub similar to Lake Mary, Maitland and Healthrow, is needed where coun ty residents can nd high wage jobs similar to those available in the metro-Or lando region. Reggentin said an econ omist has been hired to study the industries that would t in that area. One of the biggest challenges is we have been treated as a bed room community to the Orlando metro area, he said. We are just the place where people come in and sleep at night. We want people coming in from Orange County to jobs in east Lake Coun ty. We have a lot to offer in terms of quality of life in Mount Dora. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A motorcyclist was killed at the scene of a multiple-vehicle crash on State Road 44 and County Road 231 in Sumter Coun ty, Florida Highway Patrol ofcials said. According to police reports released Sunday, Benjamin Gerard Brown, 34, of Summereld, died around 6:30 p.m. Fri day after being struck by a motorist while both were driving westbound in the out side lane. FHP said Frank Biondi, 92, of Lake Panasoffkee, failed to slow down or stop for the motorcyclist and struck the 2003 Yamaha motorcycle. Police said Brown was subsequent ly struck by two more vehicles driven by Clayton Simmons, 69 of Lake Mary, and Jon McDonough, 50 of Wildwood, both driving westbound on State Road 44, while a fth vehicle, driven by Aldo na Michalina Ferraro, 56, of Hernando, collided with the overturned motorcycle. SUMTER COUNTY Motorcyclist dies in crash with cars

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity events and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and military news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT EUSTIS Christmas in Eustis begins TuesdayThe Christmas in Eustis annual fundraiser for the Eustis Historical Museum begins on Tuesday at the Eustis Community Center, 601 North Shore Dr. Hours are: Weekdays and Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. and closed on Thanksgiving. For information, call 352-483-0046.TAVARES Lake libraries to close on ThanksgivingLake County Library System li-braries will close Thursday through Saturday, and reopen Dec. 2, with regularly scheduled hours. Closings include: Astor County Library; Cagan Crossings Community Library, Clermont; Cooper Memorial Library, Clermont; East Lake County Library, Sorrento; Fruitland Park Library; Helen Lehmann Memorial Library, Montverde; Lady Lake Public Library; Marianne Beck Memorial Library, Howey-in-the-Hills; Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, Groveland; Minneola Schoolhouse Library; Paisley County Library; City of Tavares Public Library, Tavares; Umatilla Public Library; W. T. Bland Public Library, Mount Dora. County branch libraries and the Fruitland Park Library will close on Wednesday at 5 p.m., and the W.T. Bland Public Library will close at 6 p.m. The Leesburg Public Library will close on Wednesday at 6 p.m. and remain closed Thursday and Friday but will re-open on Saturday with normal operating hours. Go to www.mylakelibrary.org for information.LEESBURG Waste Management curtails service for holidayCustomers serviced by Waste Management and live in unin-corporated Lake County, The Villages, Lady Lake, Fruitland Park, Eustis and Mount Dora that have twice-weekly vegetation and recy-cling services, and commercial con-tainer service, will have no collec-tion on Thanksgiving Day. Services will resume for these cus-tomers for garbage pickup on Dec. 2; for recycling and vegetation on Dec. 5. The city of Eustis garbage, recy-cling and vegetation will be picked up on Friday. Wildwood will follow that same schedule. For information, call 352-787-4416.OCALA Live Christmas tree permits offeredLive Christmas trees will be avail-able to harvest in the Ocala National Forest today through Dec. 24. For information, call the Lake George Ranger District ofce at 352625-2520 or the Seminole Ranger District Ofce at 352-669-3153.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comHomeless people in Lake County may soon have a safe place to drop in for a hot shower, to wash their clothes or con-nect with services, thanks to efforts of two organiza-tions striving to help the homeless. LifeStream Behavior-al Center and the Lake Community Foundation are spearheading plans to renovate LifeStreams former outpatient clin-ic at 115 Citrus Ave., Eus-tis, into a homeless dropin center. B.E. Thompson, direc-tor of development for LifeStream, serves as pres-ident of Florida Coalition for the Homeless, and as a result Gov. Rick Scott is expected to appoint him to the Florida Council on Homelessness, since the Florida Coalition for the Homeless has an au-tomatic position on that board by legislative man-date. Thompson believes the drop-in center could be-come a model facility for other communities. We denitely want to set it up using evi-dence-based practices, so that it will be a model that hopefully other con-tinuums of care through-out the state will want to replicate and possibly throughout the nation, he said. Homelessness is de-nitely a priority for us be-cause so many of our clients are affected by homelessness. Thompson said he has seen a growing need for homeless services in the Eustis area, and the new center will be a place where the homeless can clean up with showers and laundry machines, while their belongings are safe-ly stowed in lockers. People using the center will be made aware of the many resources available, and will be able to con-nect with family and ser-vice agencies through lim-ited phone and Internet access and to meet with service organizations rep-resentatives. In order to make the drop-in center everything that we want, we are go-ing to have to increase the number of showers, bath-rooms and laundry hookups, Thompson said. We are going to be working aggressively after the rst of the year to try to raise the cash and in-kind do-nations to get the program operational. LifeStream will also be looking for grants to help the project. Mike Sleaford, chairman of Lake Community Foun-dations board of directors, said the partnership was the result of the efforts by the foundations Home-less Giving Circle to nd an organization that had the vision and resources to use funds donated by the Giving Circle to make a major difference in the lives of the homeless. The Homeless Giving Circle began after LCF di-rector Ann Huffstetler was trying to help a homeless, barefoot young woman with basic necessities and information. Ann was frustrated be-cause she could not help this young woman get what Ann considered to be basic needs, said Virginia Barker, executive director of the foundation. And they were simple things. The woman was barefoot and she needed shoes. She was hungry, she needed a shower, and she needed a place to stay. Ann needed someone to tell her how to help this woman meet those needs. The homeless cen-ter will be open daily and directed by an adviso-ry committee, including two representatives from LifeStream, one from the Lake Community Foun-dation, the foundations Giving Circle, a Eustis city commissioner, and one service provide appointed by the Mid Florida Home-less Commission. Those interested in speaking engagements about the project may call Virginia Barker at 3577259 or B.E. Thompson at 315-7509.EUSTISHomeless drop-in center to open THERESA CAMPBELL/DAILY COMMERCIALThis house at 315 Citrus Ave., Eustis, will serve as a drop-in center for homeless people to be able to shower and receive services. Ocala Star-BannerOCALA The president of a north Florida Tea Par-ty group has been killed in a two-vehicle car crash in Marion County. The Florida Highway Patrol told the Ocala Star-Banner that 70-yearold Stephen Hunter of Sparr died in the Friday night crash. Hunter head-ed the Ocala Tea Party or Tea Party Solutions for the last several years. Friends say Hunter was a Vietnam veteran who later worked at defense contractor Lockheed Martin. Troopers say Hunter was attempting to make a left turn on U.S. 441 and apparently did not see an oncoming pickup truck, which struck Hunters car on the drivers side. Hunter was pronounced dead at the scene. The two occupants of the truck were uninjured. Neither Kirkland nor Hodges were injured. They were wearing their seat belts, troopers said.Car crash kills Tea P arty leader Giving thanks Groveland Cares hosted a Thanksgiving dinner Saturday at the historic Womens Club building at Lake David Park in Groveland.PHO T OS BY LIND A CHARL T ON Eric Sorkin, left, and Les Putnam carve turkey. Dina Sweatt served rolls to diners Saturday at the Womens Club building at Lake David Park in Groveland. Dinner organizer Rose Radzik shows volunteers how its done. James Baumann serves rolls to early diners at Saturdays early Thanksgiving dinner.

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A4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 In Memory of Lear L. ShortNovember 25, 1946 November 5, 2011 Love, Howard Short & Family r frrrnr rtbfr rr rnbbr rnb nrr bb Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com 12 noonThey picked their price, uploaded a photo and paid for their ad. Its just that simple!No matter what time of the day it is, you can place your classified merchandise ad online, pay for it and just wait for the phone to ring! Fast, convenient and on your schedule! Time to sell that dress!Time to sell that washer! Time to sell that lawn mower! 7 24www.dailycommercial.com*Employment advertisements are excluded. Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep. Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Staff reportIf wellness and lifestyle changes are going to be on your list of New Years resolutions, note that Lees-burg Regional Medical Centers Well-ness Center will be offering dis-counted $60 memberships from Dec. 16 through Jan. 31. The personalized attention and expertise of our staff, combined with our high-quality exercise equipment and classes, will help you reach your goals, said Brett Jones, exercise spe-cialist at the center. The 10,000-square-foot facility is off Highway 441 and offers a team of certied exercise specialists, per-sonal trainers and licensed massage therapists. This offer expires at the end of March 2014. Memberships cannot be placed on hold during this time and refunds will not be given for non-use of the facility. For information, call at 352-3235639.LEESBURGWellness center offers discount memberships OBITUARIESFrances Marvin McCulloughFrances Marvin Mc-Cullough, 75, of Lees-burg, Florida, died Thursday, Novem-ber 21, 2013. She was born February 8, 1938 in Salt Springs, Florida and has been a Flori-da resident her whole life. She was of the Bap-tist faith, a homemaker whom enjoyed dancing and partying and was a member of the Ea-gle Auxiliary. She is sur-vived by her son, James Richard (Diana) Mc-Cullough of Leesburg; daughter, Frances An-nettte( Michael) Teate of Lady Lake; grand-children, Samantha, Matt, Jamie and Chris ; great grandchildren, Hayleigh, Taylor, Bri-anna and Trey. She was preceded in death by her husband, James P. Jimmy McCullough; sons, Greg, Ken, Mi-chael and Billy and daughter, Julie. Friends may call on Wednes-day, November 26, 2013 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at Beyers Funeral Home, Leesburg. Services will be held at Beyers Fu-neral Home Chapel on Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 11:00 am with Dr. Alan Holden ofciating. Burial will follow at E lectra Cem-etery in Oklawaha. On-line condolences may be left at www.beyers-funeralhome.com. Ar-rangements entrust-ed to Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.DEATH N OTI C ESBeverly Sue CunninghamBeverly Sue Cun-ningham, 83, of Tava-res, died Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. Harden/P auli Funeral Home, Eustis.IN MEMORY Were enjoying the benets of a tight sup-ply. Our export de-mand is skyrocketing, and our domestic de-mand is quite strong, he said. Its getting to the point that its cru-cial to see herd re-building. The states broodcow population dropped to 910,000 from a high of 965,000 as ranch land was de-veloped, but has sta-bilized in recent years with the land boom over and some citrus land converted to pas-ture as a result of cit-rus disease, he said. Demand for local and grass-fed beef is leading to expanded operations for nished cattle, a small but growing sector of the Florida cattle industry, Handley said. That in-cludes plans to expand Adena Springs Ranch in Marion County, as well as cattle farms in Suwannee and Sumter counties. A lot of people may not realize this, but Lake has a very ac-tive and thriving cat-tle industry, said Me-gan Brew, livestock and natural resources agent for the Univer-sity of Florida/Insti-tute of Food and Agri-cultural Science Lake County Extension Of-ce in Tavares. Florida is primar-ily a cow-calf state, meaning that calves are born and raised in Florida then shipped out west for nishing and processing be-cause it is more cost effective to bring the cattle to the grain than to bring the grain to the cattle, she said Thursday. There is also a small but growing grass fed beef movement here where cattle are raised and nished on pas-ture, Brew said. Not only does the cattle industry provide a wholesome and deli-cious meat it is also re-sponsible for preserv-ing a lot of the green space that makes our community so spe-cial, she said. According to Brew, Lake is home to an ac-tive Cattlemens As-sociation and Junior Cattlemens Associa-tion. In 2013, the Lake County Junior Cattle-men won a national beef marketing com-petition. Florida is the third largest beef-produc-ing state east of the Mississippi River and is ranked 10th in the nation. Beef cattle is a $670 million indus-try here with 1.6 mil-lion cattle, including 115,000 dairy cows and 910,000 brood cows. The top 10 cat-tle-producing coun-ties are Okeechobee, Highlands, Osceola, Polk, Hardee, De Soto, Hendry, Glades, Su-wannee and Jackson.Anthony Clark of Hali-fax Media contributed ma-terial to this report. CATTLE FROM PAGE A1 Even Americas clos-est allies were kept in the dark. Obama rst shared the existence of the secret diploma-cy with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Ne-tanyahu in September, and only then offered a limited recounting of how long the dis-cussions between Iran and the United States had been taking place. The Obama ad-ministration then in-formed the other ve nations negotiating alongside the U.S. Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia. And since then much of their public diplo-macy with Iran has fo-cused on incorporat-ing and formalizing the progress made in the private U.S.-Irani-an talks. The AP has learned that at least ve se-cret meetings have oc-curred between top Obama administra-tion and Iranian of-cials since March. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns and Jake Sullivan, Vice President Joe Bidens top foreign policy ad-viser, led each U.S. del-egation. At the most recent face-to-face talks, they were joined by chief U.S. nucle-ar negotiator Wendy Sherman. It was at the nal get-together that the two sides ultimate-ly agreed on the con-tours of the pact signed before dawn Sunday by the socalled P5+1 group of nations and Iran, three senior admin-istration ofcials told the AP. All ofcials spoke on condition of anonymity because they werent autho-rized to be quoted by name talking about the sensitive diploma-cy. The AP was tipped to the rst U.S.-Irani-an meeting in March shortly after it oc-curred, but the White House and State De-partment disputed el-ements of the account and the AP could not conrm the meeting. The AP learned of fur-ther indications of se-cret diplomacy in the fall and pressed the White House and oth-er ofcials further. DEALFROM PAGE A1Reid wasnt keen on replaying a ght over the health care law, opening up conten-tious issues such as government spying or allowing probably the last bill out of Con-gress this year to be-come a magnet for other matters. Everyone has to understand this is not going to be an open amendment process, Reid told his col-leagues as he sought to limit amendments and wrap up the $625 billion defense mea-sure after some three days of debate. He contends GOP delay-ing tactics have forced his hand. A power grab, com-plained frustrat-ed Republicans who demanded they be al-lowed to offer amend-ments and get votes on them the norm for decades on a bill that represents half the nations discre-tionary budget. The GOP repeated-ly carps about Reids heavy-handed con-trol, manifested by the rules change on libusters. Republicans say the defense bill could have been done months ago but was put off until the last minute to spare Obama a few nation-al security black eyes. Republicans are entitled to some amendments, plead-ed Sen. Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Ser-vices Committee. He offered a whittled list of 25 GOP amend-ments from the list of 350 put forth by mem-bers of both parties. It was a no go, the latest traditionally bi-partisan bill to fall o n the hard times of a fractious Congress. BILLFROM PAGE A1

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 JOVANA GECAssociated PressBELGRADE, Serbia Gazproms South Stream pipeline, which will bypass Ukraine to transport Russian nat-ural gas to Europe, is vital for Serbia because it will provide jobs and boost the Balkan coun-trys regional position, the prime minister said Sunday, insisting that traditionally close ties with Russia will not af-fect his nations bid to join the European Union. In an interview with the Associated Press at the formal start of the pipeline construction work in Serbia on Sun-day, Ivica Dacic said that Russia, which has supported Serbia polit-ically in a dispute with the West over Kosovo, does not object to the countrys effort at EU membership. He also suggested that West-ern powers have in fact pushed Serbia closer to Russia. Those (in the West) who criticize Serbia for its closeness to Russia and for our partnership with Russia, should ask themselves why they havent offered such re-lations to Serbia? Dac-ic said. I keep telling the West: Serbia needs a strategic partner in the West too ... But, they are not interested at all. Dacic also dismissed allegations by Serbias pro-Western opposi-tion parties that the 2008 energy deal, un-der which Serbia sold 51 percent of its oil and gas monopoly to Gaz-prom as part of the South Stream agree-ment, paved the way for Russian econom-ic and political domi-nance of the country. He said that critics are afraid of Russias pres-ence in this part of the world. The trans-European pipeline is expected to start operating in De-cember 2015. It is ex-pected to ship up to 2 trillion cubic feet of gas annually to Bulgaria, Serbia, Hungary, Slo-venia, Austria and Ita-ly in one leg and Croa-tia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey in a second. The pipelines route bypasses transit na-tion Ukraine. Pricing disputes between Rus-sian and Ukraine have caused major disrup-tions in recent years, cutting gas for millions of customers. Serbias state televi-sion on Sunday aired live the pipeline inau-guration ceremony, at-tended by top ofcials and Gazprom chief Alexey Miller. Presi-dent Tomislav Nikolic formally gave the goahead in a video broad-cast from the capital, Belgrade. Dacic said the stretch of pipeline in Serbia will cost about $2.7 bil-lion. It will be nanced by Gazprom, while Ser-bia will pay back its share later through pipeline transit taxes, he added. About 20,000 people will work on construction and other jobs around the pipe-line, including building gas storage and gas en-ergy plants, Dacic said. This is vital for Ser-bias energy safety ... Serbia will become an energy hub, Dac-ic insisted. We will be part of a pan-European project; this is not just a Russian project. Dacic said that Ser-bia is willing for one of the pipeline branch-es go to Kosovo, its for-mer province, which declared indepen-dence in 2008. Serbia has refused to recog-nize the split, but it has moved to normalize re-lations to move closer to EU membership Belgrade and Pristina signed an EU-brokered agreement in April.Serbia leader calls Gazprom pipeline vital ASSOCIA TED PRESSA worker welds the rst section of the Gazprom South Stream natural gas pipeline in the town of Sajkas, 50 miles north of Belgrade, Serbia, Sunday. Construction of the Serbian leg of the South Stream gas pipeline ofcially began on Sunday, Nov. 24, and, when nished, the pipeline is expected to ship up to 2 trillion cubic feet of gas annually to Bulgaria, Serbia, Hungary, Slovenia, Austria and Italy in one leg and Croatia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey in a second. IRINA TITOVAAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG, Russia The U.S. cap-tain of the Greenpeace ship seized by the Rus-sian coast guard de-scribed on Sunday the stress and fear he and the other 29 people on board felt when they were thrown into Rus-sian jails, with no idea when they would get out. Most of them were released on bail last week after spending two months behind bars, and all were ex-pected to be free soon. The hardest thing was the uncertainty, the anxiety, the damn fear, Peter Willcox, a veteran Greenpeace activist who was the ships captain told As-sociated Press Everybody lost weight during the rst three weeks, and not because of food, but because of stress. They were initially charged with piracy for protesting at a Russian oil platform in Arctic waters and if convicted were looking at up to 15 years in prison. That changes my life, that changes any-bodys life, said Will-cox, who is 60. I wont see my mother and fa-ther again, they are not going to live another 10 or 15 years. My chil-dren will be grown up with children of their own. Investigators have since said they no lon-ger consider the pro-test to have been pira-cy, but all 30 still face charges of hooligan-ism, which could send them to prison for up to seven years. Greenpeace lawyers are optimistic that the foreigners will be able to leave Russia pend-ing trial, but there has been no indication of how soon this could happen. Four of those arrested are Russian citizen, while the rest come from 17 other countries.Greenpeace captain describes fear felt in jail ALBERTO ARCEAssociated PressTEGUCIGALPA, Hon-duras Hondurans were choosing a new president Sunday in a country reeling from vi-olence, poverty and the legacy of a 2009 coup, and if polls are accu-rate, the vote could fail to produce a clear win-ner. The election pits Xi-omara Castro, whose husband Manuel Ze-laya was overthrown in a military-backed coup, against Juan Orlando Hernandez, the candi-date of the ruling con-servative National Party. No problems were reported after polling places opened at 8 a.m.. Polls show the two candidates in a statis-tical tie, raising fears of a disputed result that could produce more in-stability and protests in a failing state with 8.5 million people and the worlds highest homi-cide rate. Many have called on both candidates to wait for ofcial results before declaring victory.Hondurans head to polls with violence as their top worry Swayed by violence, cor-ruption, 2009 coup, Hondu-rans choose new president in close race

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON ...................................PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF .........................MANAGING EDITORBILL KOCH ...............ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN .......................NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD ............EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 OTHERVOICESI have lined up my Christmas presents this year for our President, Barack Obama, and for his Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius. I will send them both a copy of the last book written by one of greatest economists of the last century, and winner of the Nobel Prize in economics in 1974, F.A. Hayek. The book is called The Fatal Conceit: The Errors of Socialism. Although the language and discussion of the book is not all that simple, the basic point is, I think, pretty straightforward. Hayek summed it all up in his acceptance speech for his Nobel Prize. He noted the critical importance that we know what we dont know. Thinking you know what you dont and cant know, the illusion that men can plan, organize, and control things far beyond their understanding, is the fatal conceit of socialism. And, Hayek concludes, that knowing what you dont know, ought to teach the student of society a lesson of humility which should guard him against becoming an accomplice in mens fatal striving to control society a striving which makes him not only a tyrant over his fellow, but which may well make him the destroyer of a civilization which no brain has designed but which has grown from the free efforts of millions of individuals. Take a walk through the mall or the supermarket. Look at the almost infinite varieties of products in stores and on shelves designed and engineered to meet the unique tastes and desires of millions of different individuals. You dont need a Nobel Prize or a Ph.D to appreciate that no supreme bureaucrat with all the power in the world could ever conceive that vast array of products and decide they should be produced. This is the product and beauty of freedom. Free people deciding what they want and living how they want. And free people deciding to take risk, go into business, and become entrepreneurs and produce and deliver these many varied products. This approach freedom has produced bounty as never has been produced anywhere under any other arrangement. But the fatal conceit is a powerful force. It is a powerful force because there will always be haughty, arrogant people for whom humility is a challenge and who are convinced that the world would be better off if they designed it rather than letting free private individuals run their own lives. This is totally what the debacle we now confront with the Affordable Care Act ObamaCare is about. Anyone who follows these things and knows just a little bit of history knew from the day President Obama signed this law in 2010 that what is happening today was inevitable. Neither President Obama nor HHS Secretary Sebelius have ever done anything in their lives except work in one way or another in politics. Neither has ever run a small business, let alone a big one. Neither has a day of experience of being an entrepreneur, of taking personal risk and taking a loan to make a product to serve customers and to meet a payroll. But both have been supremely confident that they could take over and redesign one sixth of a 16 trillion dollar economy. Nothing is more unique to each individual than his or her personal health profile and needs. Yet a couple supreme bureaucrats in Washington have used their power to decide what kind of health care hundreds of millions of unique American individual citizens need and how to deliver it. Can it be any wonder that it is all collapsing? The only wonders are that there are still those who maintain that this socialist monstrosity can still work and that so many Americans have been willing to give up their precious personal freedom and turn their lives over to arrogant, pretentious, and deeply confused bureaucrats and politicians in Washington.Star Parker is an author and president of CURE, Center for Urban Renewal and Education. She can be reached at www.urbancure.org. The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom-mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Surely Las Vegas sports books and London bookies will be offering odds on when and on which airline the first fight breaks out if the Federal Communications Commission goes ahead with a proposal to allow virtually unrestricted cellphone use aboard commercial airliners. As The Wall Street Journal pointed out, the proposal pits the technically possible against the socially tolerable and we know who usually comes out the loser in that particular debate. Indeed, the FCC tipped its hand when the agency said it would use the public comment period to review our outdated and restrictive rules. The FCC proposed lifting the 1991era ban in 1994 but backed off because of opposition from the flight attendants and a number of technical questions. The technical questions have since been resolved but the flight attendants still oppose in-flight cellphone use and so do a slight majority of the flying public. A Federal Aviation Administration survey showed 51 percent opposed to 47 percent in favor. Other nations airlines are equipped with cellphone technology but require their passengers to turn off their phones when they enter U.S. airspace. But cellphones have become ubiquitous in the U.S. and it is probably only a matter of months before their use is allowed aboard our airliners. The decision about their use is likely to be left to the individual airlines but like charging for checked baggage, as soon as one does it the others will follow. Airline passengers have become a cynical lot. One frequent flier wondered what would happen if a passenger locked himself in one of the handful of bathrooms to carry on a sustained private conversation. And others have suggested that the airlines will charge extra for the privilege of using a cellphone in flight and charge extra for a seat that is out of earshot of a passenger carrying on an obnoxiously loud conversation. In todays air travel, one way or another you pay.Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.AVOICEA new outlet for the loudmouth in the next seat The fatal conceit of Obamacare Star ParkerSCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE N EITHER P RESIDENT O BAMA NOR HHS SECRETARY K ATHLEEN SEBELIUS HAVE EVER DONE ANYTHING IN THEIR LIVES E X CEPT W ORK IN ONE W AY OR ANOTHER IN POLITICS

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8208 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com NFL: Jaguars hold off Texans / B4 Cops handling of Winston case under fire GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Its han dling of sexual assault alle gations against Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston is just the latest controversy to hit the Tallahassee Police Department. A handful of grand ju ries recently have issued scathing reports about how some ofcers have conduct ed themselves in the line of duty. In the most egregious case, a fumbled drug investi gation resulted in the death of an informant. Now, the department is coming under scrutiny for its handling of a sexual assault case in which a Heisman Trophy candidate stands as the accused. The family of the student who says she was raped claims the depart ment tried to squelch the case: It took 11 months for Tallahassee police to hand over information to prose cutors. Patricia Carroll, the attor ney representing the alleged victim in the Winston case, said last week she had no faith whatsoever in the Po lice Department. On the same day the de partment handed over the Winston case to prosecu tors, a Leon County grand jury issued a stinging report criticizing the department for how it handled a drunk en driving arrest. The arrest which left the female driv er with a broken bone in her face created such an up roar this fall that it prompt ed Chief Dennis Jones to abruptly retire. The video from the Au gust arrest of Christina West showed ofcers slamming her into a police car before throwing her to the ground. West can be heard scream ing in the video. Wests attor ney said the police treated her like an animal and has already placed the city on notice that West plans to sue them. The grand jury blamed the department which has placed the two ofcers in volved in the arrest on ad ministrative leave for allowing the situation to es SEE FSU | B2 Auburn moves up to set up top-5 Iron Bowl clash BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES STANDINGS 1 Alabama .998 points 2 Florida St. .953 3 Ohio St. .918 4 Auburn .823 5 Missouri .831 6 Clemson .826 7 Oklahoma St. .774 8 Stanford .677 9 Baylor .646 10 S. Carolina .623 19 UCF .329 AP rankings, See Page B2 AP FILE PHOTO Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn talks with his players in the rst half of an NCAA college football game against Arkansas State on Sept. 7. JOHN RAOUX / AP Orlando Magics Victor Oladipo (5) gets between Phoenix Suns Miles Plumlee, left, and Gerald Green (14) for a shot during ton Sunday in Orlando. PHOTOS BY PAUL SANCYA / AP Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson (81) loses control of the ball after a hit by Tampa Bay Buccaneers outside linebacker Adam Hayward (57) during the fourth quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday at Ford Field in Detroit. LARRY LAGE AP Sports Writer DETROIT Tampa Bay is turning around its season, relying on a cool and calm rookie quarter back and an opportunis tic defense. Mike Glennon played almost mistake-free foot ball and Matthew Staf fords fourth interception went in and out of Calvin Johnsons hands inside the Buccaneers 5 in the nal minute, allowing Tampa Bay to hold on for a 24-21 win over the De troit Lions on Sunday. Bucs rookie Johnthan Banks made the critical pick toward the end of the game. Tampa Bay (3-8) has won three straight af ter losing its rst eight, joining the 1978 St. Lou is Cardinals as the only NFL team to do that. Wow thats his tory, Bucs rookie tight end Tim Wright said af ter making a season-high eight receptions for 75 yards. Tampa Bay took ad vantage of Detroits ve turnovers, including Kris Durhams fumble in the fourth period, in a game with six lead chang es and no more than a four-point lead for either team. One of the more gutsy performances Ive seen, Bucs coach Greg Schiano said. The Lions (6-5) have lost two straight for the rst time this season. They missed out on a chance to break a rstplace tie in the NFC North with Chicago. As disappointing as this was, it doesnt eliminate us from any thing, Detroit coach Jim Schwartz said. It just raises the urgency level for the next ve games. Detroit hosts the Green Bay Packers, who trail the Lions and Bears by a halfgame in the division, in its annual Thanksgiving Day game. We cant let this stay in our system too long, said Nate Burleson, who had seven receptions for 77 yards and a score HITTING THEIR STRIDE Bucs beat Lions 24-21 for 3rd straight victory Tampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback Leonard Johnson (29) jumps into the end zone after a 48-yard interception for a touchdown. Dargics 23 helps Suns down Magic FRED GOODALL AP Sports Writer ORLANDO Goran Dragic scored 23 points and Gerald Green added 20 to lead the Phoenix Suns to a 10496 victory over the Orlando Magic on Sunday night. Two days after stopping a fourgame losing streak at Charlotte, the Suns took the lead early in the rst quarter and never relinquished it. Orlando trimmed what had been a 14-point decit to three late in the fourth quarter. However, Channing Frye made a difcult jumper and Dragic scored the game s next seven points to put it away. Dragic made 10 of 17 shots and also had 13 assists. Frye nished with 14 points and seven rebounds. Nikola Vucevic led Orlando with 20 points. Andrew Nicholson had 19 off the bench and Aaron Afalo added 12 for the Magic, who have lost four straight games, seven of eight overall. RALPH RUSSO Associated Press The Iron Bowl is always important. For this Iron Bowl, the stakes are higher than ever before, and so are the rankings of Alabama and Auburn. Auburn moved up to No. 4 in The Associated Press college football poll Sunday, taking advantage of loss es by Baylor and Oregon to set up the second top-ve matchup in Iron Bowl history. On Saturday at Auburn, itll be No. 1 Alabama against the Tigers. The winner takes the SEC West and gets a trip to the Southeastern Conference champion ship game. The rst and only time the Crimson Tide and Ti gers played with both teams ranked in the top ve was 1971. No. 3 Alabama and coach Bear Bryant beat SEE BOWL | B2 SEE BUCS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 Sundays College Basketball Scores EAST Bryant 60, New Hampshire 55 Penn St. 93, Longwood 67 Penn St.-Altoona 75, Mount St. Vincent 71 Slippery Rock 113, Ohio-Eastern 72 Yeshiva 75, CCNY 65 SOUTH Georgia Tech 78, NC A&T 71 IPFW 76, Kennesaw St. 66 South Alabama 79, Houston Baptist 59 South Carolina 84, FIU 72 Southern Miss. 99, William Carey 54 MIDWEST Lakeland 104, Macalester 82 Lewis 78, N. Michigan 68 Minot St. 65, Valley City St. 44 Missouri St. 81, Hampton 67 N. Illinois 111, St. Josephs (Ind.) 61 Notre Dame 93, Army 60 Purdue 81, Siena 73 Toledo 94, FAU 74 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 99, Cent. Arkansas 56 SMU 87, Ark.-Pine Bluff 61 FAR WEST Boston U. 72, LIU Brooklyn 57 Loyola of Chicago 73, SIU-Edwardsville 72 TOURNAMENT Charleston Classic Third Place Nebraska 73, Georgia 65 Fifth Place New Mexico 79, Davidson 58 Hall of Fame Tip-off-Naismith Championship North Carolina 93, Louisville 84 Third Place Richmond 68, Faireld 47 Maui Invitational-Conway Championship Louisiana-Lafayette 73, Coastal Carolina 69 Third Place St. Francis (NY) 68, Oakland 62 NACC/SLIAC Challenge Second Round Edgewood 65, Westminster (Mo.) 59 Milwaukee Engineering 85, Fontbonne 73 Puerto Rico Tipoff Fifth Place Georgetown 84, VCU 80 Seventh Place Kansas St. 52, Long Beach St. 38 Winona State (Minn.) Tournament Second Round Concordia (St.P.) 79, Ferris St. 57 Northwood (Mich.) 59, Winona St. 58 TOURNAMENT Charleston Classic Third Place Nebraska 73, Georgia 65 Fifth Place New Mexico 79, Davidson 58 Hall of Fame Tip-off-Naismith Championship North Carolina 93, Louisville 84 Third Place Richmond 68, Faireld 47 Maui Invitational-Conway Championship Louisiana-Lafayette 73, Coastal Carolina 69 Third Place St. Francis (NY) 68, Oakland 62 NACC/SLIAC Challenge Second Round Edgewood 65, Westminster (Mo.) 59 Milwaukee Engineering 85, Fontbonne 73 Puerto Rico Tipoff Fifth Place Georgetown 84, VCU 80 Seventh Place Kansas St. 52, Long Beach St. 38 Winona State (Minn.) Tournament Second Round Concordia (St.P.) 79, Ferris St. 57 Northwood (Mich.) 59, Winona St. 58 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 6 7 .462 Philadelphia 6 9 .400 1 Boston 5 10 .333 2 New York 3 9 .250 2 Brooklyn 3 10 .231 3 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 10 3 .769 Atlanta 8 6 .571 2 Charlotte 7 7 .500 3 Washington 5 8 .385 5 Orlando 4 9 .308 6 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 12 1 .923 Chicago 6 6 .500 5 Detroit 5 8 .385 7 Cleveland 4 10 .286 8 Milwaukee 2 10 .167 9 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 12 1 .923 Dallas 9 5 .643 3 Houston 9 5 .643 3 Memphis 7 6 .538 5 New Orleans 6 6 .500 5 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 12 2 .857 Oklahoma City 8 3 .727 2 Minnesota 8 7 .533 4 Denver 6 6 .500 5 Utah 1 13 .071 11 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 10 5 .667 Golden State 8 6 .571 1 Phoenix 7 6 .538 2 L.A. Lakers 6 7 .462 3 Sacramento 4 8 .333 4 Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers 103, Sacramento 102 Indiana 106, Philadelphia 98 Washington 98, New York 89 Miami 101, Orlando 99 Boston 94, Atlanta 87 Houston 112, Minnesota 101 Charlotte 96, Milwaukee 72 San Antonio 126, Cleveland 96 Denver 102, Dallas 100 Portland 113, Golden State 101 Sundays Games Detroit 109, Brooklyn 97 L.A. Clippers 121, Chicago 82 Phoenix 104, Orlando 96 Utah at Oklahoma City, late Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m. Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Chicago at Utah, 9 p.m. New York at Portland, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 p.m. Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m. The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 23, total points based on 25 points for a rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (56) 11-0 1,496 1 2. Florida St. (4) 11-0 1,444 2 3. Ohio St. 11-0 1,375 4 4. Auburn 10-1 1,294 6 5. Missouri 10-1 1,202 8 6. Clemson 10-1 1,196 7 7. Oklahoma St. 10-1 1,177 11 8. Stanford 9-2 1,002 10 9. Baylor 9-1 976 3 10. South Carolina 9-2 960 12 11. Michigan St. 10-1 929 13 12. Oregon 9-2 731 5 13. Arizona St. 9-2 690 19 14. Wisconsin 9-2 684 16 15. LSU 8-3 642 18 16. Fresno St. 10-0 619 15 17. UCF 9-1 588 17 18. N. Illinois 11-0 470 20 19. Texas A&M 8-3 429 9 20. Oklahoma 9-2 386 22 21. Louisville 10-1 383 21 22. UCLA 8-3 300 14 23. Southern Cal 9-3 262 23 24. Duke 9-2 135 25 25. Notre Dame 8-3 68 NR Others receiving votes: Georgia 15, Cincinnati 10, Texas 10, Mississippi 7, Arizona 6, Nebraska 6, Minnesota 5, East Carolina 1, N. Dakota St. 1, Vanderbilt 1. GOLF South African Open Leading Scores Sunday At Glendower Golf Club Johannesburg Purse: $1.49 million Yardage: 6,899; Par: 72 Final Morten Orum Madsen, Denmark 67-66-69-67 269 Jbe Kruger, South Africa 65-70-71-65 271 Hennie Otto, South Africa 72-66-65-68 271 Marco Crespi, Italy 65-67-70-70 272 Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 67-65-69-71 272 Alejandro Canizares, Spain 69-67-69-68 273 Trevor Fisher Jr., South Africa 70-67-73-64 274 Johan Carlsson, Sweden 69-70-68-67 274 Warren Abery, South Africa 68-71-68-68 275 Garth Mulroy, South Africa 70-67-70-69 276 Christiaan Basson, South Africa 66-68-71-71 276 Jean Hugo, South Africa 71-67-70-69 277 Martin du Toit, South Africa 70-70-68-69 277 Peter Karmis, South Africa 69-72-67-69 277 Andy Sullivan, England 71-68-68-70 277 Jaco van Zyl, South Africa 71-70-66-70 277 National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 23 15 6 2 32 64 43 Toronto 23 14 8 1 29 66 54 Tampa Bay 23 14 8 1 29 67 61 Detroit 25 11 7 7 29 63 70 Montreal 24 13 9 2 28 64 51 Ottawa 24 9 11 4 22 68 77 Florida 24 6 13 5 17 53 80 Buffalo 25 5 19 1 11 44 79 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 24 15 9 0 30 69 54 Washington 24 12 10 2 26 72 68 N.Y. Rangers 23 12 11 0 24 48 54 New Jersey 23 9 9 5 23 49 55 Carolina 24 9 10 5 23 49 67 Philadelphia 22 10 10 2 22 49 53 Columbus 23 8 12 3 19 56 71 N.Y. Islanders 24 8 13 3 19 68 82 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 24 16 4 4 36 87 70 St. Louis 22 16 3 3 35 79 50 Colorado 22 17 5 0 34 69 45 Minnesota 24 15 5 4 34 64 55 Dallas 22 11 9 2 24 61 65 Nashville 23 11 10 2 24 52 67 Winnipeg 25 10 11 4 24 66 75 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 26 17 6 3 37 80 65 San Jose 23 15 3 5 35 79 52 Los Angeles 24 15 6 3 33 64 51 Phoenix 23 14 5 4 32 78 74 Vancouver 25 12 9 4 28 65 65 Calgary 23 8 11 4 20 64 84 Edmonton 24 7 15 2 16 64 84 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Minnesota 3, Winnipeg 2, SO Toronto 2, Washington 1, SO Boston 3, Carolina 2, OT Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2 Ottawa 4, Detroit 2 Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Islanders 2 N.Y. Rangers 2, Nashville 0 Anaheim 4, Phoenix 2 St. Louis 6, Dallas 1 Chicago 2, Vancouver 1 Colorado 1, Los Angeles 0, OT San Jose 2, New Jersey 1 Sundays Games Detroit 3, Buffalo 1 Carolina 4, Ottawa 1 Todays Games Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m. Columbus at Toronto, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m. Chicago at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m. Sundays Sports Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Sacramento F Travis Outlaw $15,000 for making excessive and unnecessary contact with Los Angeles Clippers G J.J. Redick during a Nov. 23 game. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS Assigned C Dewayne Dedmon and G Nemanja Nedovic to Santa Cruz. LEADING OFF | NBA GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES Derrick Rose will have surgery on his right knee Monday, and the Chi cago Bulls dont yet know how long theyll be without their star guard this time. Rose headed home to Chi cago while the Bulls went back to work Sunday, facing the Los Angeles Clippers in their rst game since Rose tore cartilage in his knee in Portland on Fri day night. Chicago coach Tim Thibo deau said the Bulls wont know how long the 2011 NBA MVP will be sidelined until Rose and team physician Brian Cole de cide how to x Roses knee. Were hoping for the best, Thibodeau said. We, of course, feel very badly for Derrick. Hes in good spirits, about as well as can be expected under the cir cumstances, and hes already thinking about his rehab. Typ ical Derrick. Hes concerned about his team, his teammates. Rose has a medial meniscus tear, which is typically less se rious than a lateral tear. Some athletes miss only a few weeks after surgery on meniscus tears, while others miss several months. The Bulls understandably wont speculate on a return date until they learn more about the inju ry, which often cant be fully eval uated until surgery is performed but if Rose needs to have his meniscus reattached, he could be out until spring or longer. Rose missed all of last sea son after tearing a ligament in his left knee in Chicagos 2012 playoff opener against Philadel phia. Rose already had missed 26 games during that lockout-short ened regular season while bat tling a variety of injuries. I think we have an under standing of what we need to do, Thibodeau said. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED 2 in Sports DAY OVER HEARD (Derrick) is already thinking about his rehab. Typical Derrick. Hes concerned about his team, his teammates. TIM THIBODEAU Chicago Bulls head coach MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 Maui Invitational, rst round, Arkansas vs. California, at Lahaina, Hawaii 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 Maui Invitational, rst round, Minnesota vs. Syracuse, at Lahaina, Hawaii 7 p.m. ESPN NEWS Oklahoma St. at South Florida FS1 Abilene Christian at Xavier 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 Legends Classic, rst round, Pitsburgh vs. Texas Tech, at Brooklyn, N.Y. 9 p.m. FS1 Marquette at Arizona St. 9:30 p.m. ESPN2 Legends Classic, rst round, Stanford vs. Houston, at Brooklyn, N.Y. Midnight ESPN2 Maui Invitational, rst round, Dayton vs. Gonzaga, at Lahaina, Hawaii NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 8:25 p.m. ESPN San Francisco at Washington NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 8 p.m. NBCSN Minnesota at St. Louis SOCCER 2:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Aston Villa at West Bromwich further nd that the ser geants failed to inter vene in the arrest and also deescalate the sit uation by not following their own policies and procedures. They also failed to demonstrate the respect for citizens that this community demands from its law enforcement ofcers. Interim police Chief Tom Coe contends that a handful of incidents should not be used to tarnish the entire de partment. When you consider we handle over 300,000 incidents a year and we have very few issues out of those 300,000, thats a good department, said Coe, a veteran ofcer who had been the Tal lahassee police chief in s. But State Attorney Willie Meggs who is still deciding whether to bring charges against Winston said its clear that its an agency with some problems. But its also clear that Chief Coe is trying to deal with those prob lems, and its also ex tremely clear that are many, many good po lice ofcers who work there and want it to be a top notch agency, Meggs said. The report issued Nov. 12 on the West case was the third grand jury report released in the last ve years to slam the department. The most damning report came in the wake of the May 2008 death of Rachel Hoffman. Hoffman, a Florida State University grad uate who was recruit ed by police as an infor mant after being caught with drugs, was shot ve times after police lost track of her during a drug deal. Hoffman, of Safety Harbor, was sent alone by police with $13,000 in marked bills to buy Ecstasy, cocaine and a gun, according to re cords. Instead, the men killed her and stole her car, a credit card and the marked money. FSU FROM PAGE B1 Bulls once again preparing for life without Derrick Rose No. 5 Auburn 31-7 and went on to play No. 1 Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. The Cornhuskers won that game 38-6. In this case, Ala bama has a straight shot to the BCS nation al championship game. Beat Auburn and win the SEC title game, and its on to the Rose Bowl to try to win an unprec edented third straight national title. For Auburn (10-1), its a little more complicat ed. Even with an SEC title, the Tigers might not be able to pass No. 3 Ohio State or No. 2 Florida State. The latest BCS standings were set for release later Sunday. There has already been speculation about the possibility of a one-loss SEC champion either Auburn or No. 5 Missou ri getting into the BCS title game over an unde feated Ohio State. That seems like a stretch and the mere suggestion is enough to send Buckeyes fans into a rage but rst things rst. Alabama, which tuned up for Auburn with a 49-0 light work out against Chatta nooga, has opened as a 10-point favorite against the Tigers, who took the week off. I really dont care what their record is, Tide quarterback AJ McCarron told report ers Saturday about Au burn. Theyre still the next team in our way. While Auburns na tional title hopes were bolstered by the fail ings of Baylor (49-17 loss at No. 7 Oklahoma State) and Oregon (4216 loss at Arizona), Mc Carron seemed to get a boost in the Heisman Trophy race thanks to Saturdays results. BOWL FROM PAGE B1 in his rst game since breaking his left arm in a one-car crash two months ago. The Bucs have re fused to let losses and off-the-eld distrac tions from the rst half of the season lin ger. They dealt with the benching and release of quarterback Josh Freeman and a MRSA infections outbreak. Tampa Bay had been relying on a running game lately, but couldnt against a defense that is stingy on the ground. Bobby Rainey was held to 35 yards on 15 carries after he had 163 yards rushing and scored three times last week against Atlanta. Glennon, a thirdround pick from North Carolina State, also didnt have go-to re ceiver Vincent Jackson open very often. But he didnt force the ball to Jackson or anyone else. He was 14 of 21 for 247 yards and threw two touchdowns to Ti quan Underwood, whose second score was an 85-yard recep tion early in the fourth quarter. Glennon had a season-high 138.4 quarterback rating. Hes very calm in the huddle, no matter what the situation is in the game, Wright said. Stafford was 26 of 46 for 297 yards with three TDs. He connect ed with Burleson, Bran don Pettigrew and Jo seph Fauria for scores that couldnt overcome his interceptions. I cant make bad deci sions, and I had a couple of those and a couple bad breaks, Stafford said. The last interception was not Staffords fault because Johnson had the ball briey before Kelcie McCray jarred it loose and Banks caught it out of the air. He got a good hit on me, Johnson acknowl edged. Stafford also was picked off when Pet tigrew ducked when a pass came his way and Leonard Johnson re turned it 48 yards for a go-ahead score. BUCS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div New England 7 3 0 .700 254 199 5-0-0 2-3-0 4-2-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 N.Y. Jets 5 6 0 .455 186 287 4-1-0 1-5-0 2-6-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Miami 5 6 0 .455 229 245 3-3-0 2-3-0 4-3-0 1-3-0 0-2-0 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-6-0 1-1-0 2-2-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 263 260 3-2-0 4-2-0 5-2-0 2-2-0 3-0-0 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 250 245 2-4-0 3-2-0 4-4-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 142 324 0-5-0 2-4-0 2-5-0 0-4-0 2-1-0 Houston 2 9 0 .182 199 289 1-5-0 1-4-0 2-5-0 0-4-0 1-2-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206 5-0-0 2-4-0 5-3-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 Pittsburgh 5 6 0 .455 243 256 3-2-0 2-4-0 4-4-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 Baltimore 5 6 0 .455 227 215 4-1-0 1-5-0 5-4-0 0-2-0 2-2-0 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 203 265 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-5-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 255 6-0-0 3-1-0 5-1-0 4-0-0 3-0-0 Kansas City 9 2 0 .818 270 179 5-1-0 4-1-0 6-2-0 3-0-0 1-2-0 San Diego 5 6 0 .455 269 260 2-2-0 3-4-0 3-5-0 2-1-0 1-2Oakland 4 7 0 .364 213 269 3-3-0 1-4-0 4-4-0 0-3-0 1-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Dallas 6 5 0 .545 298 279 4-1-0 2-4-0 6-2-0 0-3-0 4-0-0 Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260 1-4-0 5-1-0 5-2-0 1-3-0 3-2-0 N.Y. Giants 4 7 0 .364 213 280 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-5-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 311 2-2-0 1-5-0 1-6-0 2-1-0 0-3-0 South W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div New Orleans 9 2 0 .818 305 196 6-0-0 3-2-0 7-0-0 2-2-0 3-0-0 Carolina 8 3 0 .727 258 151 4-1-0 4-2-0 6-2-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Tampa Bay 3 8 0 .273 211 258 2-4-0 1-4-0 2-6-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Atlanta 2 9 0 .182 227 309 2-4-0 0-5-0 2-6-0 0-3-0 1-4-0 North W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Detroit 6 5 0 .545 286 277 3-2-0 3-3-0 5-3-0 1-2-0 3-1-0 Chicago 6 5 0 .545 303 309 4-2-0 2-3-0 3-5-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Green Bay 5 5 1 .500 284 265 3-2-1 2-3-0 3-4-1 2-1-0 2-1-1 Minnesota 2 8 1 .227 266 346 2-3-0 0-5-1 1-7-1 1-1-0 0-3-1 West W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179 5-0-0 5-1-0 7-0-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 Arizona 7 4 0 .636 254 223 5-1-0 2-3-0 4-4-0 3-0-0 0-3-0 San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 178 3-2-0 3-2-0 3-3-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 266 255 3-3-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 3-1-0 1-2-0 This Week Thursdays Game New Orleans 17, Atlanta 13 Sundays Games Minnesota 26, Green Bay 26, OT Jacksonville 13, Houston 6 San Diego 41, Kansas City 38 St. Louis 42, Chicago 21 Pittsburgh 27, Cleveland 11 Tampa Bay 24, Detroit 21 Baltimore 19, N.Y. Jets 3 Carolina 20, Miami 16 Tennessee 23, Oakland 19 Arizona 40, Indianapolis 11 Dallas 24, N.Y. Giants 21 Denver at New England, 8:30 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Todays Game San Francisco at Washington, 8:40 p.m. Next Week Thursdays Games Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 8:30 p.m. Dec. 1 New England at Houston, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Dec. 2 New Orleans at Seattle, 8:40 p.m. Pros talk climate change Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse is prais ing the NBA, NFL, Ma jor League Baseball and other profession al sports organizations for taking steps to ad dress climate change. The Rhode Island Democrat met with representatives from all the major sports orga nizations Thursday to discuss what teams are doing to limit their car bon emissions and en courage renewable en ergy. Saints 17, Falcons 13 New Orleans 7 7 3 0 Atlanta 7 6 0 0 First Quarter AtlJackson 1 run (Bryant kick), 8:48. NOWatson 1 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 1:17. Second Quarter AtlFG Bryant 39, 12:20. NOGraham 44 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 10:12. AtlFG Bryant 24, 2:41. Third Quarter NOFG Hartley 41, 4:37. A,422. NO Atl First downs 19 22 Total Net Yards 374 355 Rushes-yards 25-103 22-91 Passing 271 264 Punt Returns 1-0 1-10 Kickoff Returns 1-20 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 23-33-0 30-39-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 5-28 Punts 4-49.5 3-45.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-66 3-25 Time of Possession 26:14 33:46 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNew Orleans, Thomas 10-73, Ingram 9-32, K.Robinson 1-4, Collins 1-0, Brees 4-(minus 6). Atlanta, Jackson 16-63, Smith 1-11, Ryan 2-10, Rodgers 3-7. PASSINGNew Orleans, Brees 23-33-0-278. Atlanta, Ryan 30-39-0-292. RECEIVINGNew Orleans, Graham 5-100, Thomas 5-57, Colston 4-40, Moore 2-22, Stills 2-22, Hill 2-16, Meachem 1-18, Cadet 1-2, Watson 1-1. At lanta, Douglas 9-79, D.Johnson 6-67, Gonzalez 4-43, Jackson 3-16, Rodgers 2-31, White 2-24, Snelling 2-19, Dr.Davis 1-7, Toilolo 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALSAtlanta, Bryant 52 (WL). Jaguars 13, Texans 6 Jacksonville 7 3 0 3 13 Houston 0 3 3 0 6 First Quarter JaxJones-Drew 1 run (Scobee kick), 10:57. Second Quarter JaxFG Scobee 30, 7:57. HouFG Bullock 49, :29. Third Quarter HouFG Bullock 20, 8:26. Fourth Quarter JaxFG Scobee 53, 6:44. A,659. Jax Hou First downs 16 11 Total Net Yards 333 218 Rushes-yards 28-118 21-77 Passing 215 141 Punt Returns 3-14 3-19 Kickoff Returns 1-27 3-60 Interceptions Ret. 1-8 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 23-33-0 18-34-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-24 2-28 Punts 6-43.2 7-44.9 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-63 2-22 Time of Possession 33:41 26:19 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGJacksonville, Jones-Drew 14-84, Todman 11-31, Henne 3-3. Houston, D.Johnson 13-74, Kee num 1-2, Tate 7-1. PASSINGJacksonville, Henne 23-32-0-239, Robin son 0-1-0-0. Houston, Keenum 18-34-1-169. RECEIVINGJacksonville, Shorts III 8-71, Jones-Drew 6-60, Sanders 4-61, Lewis 1-18, Forsett 1-9, Harbor 1-8, Taylor 1-7, Todman 1-5. Houston, Graham 5-32, Tate 5-26, A.Johnson 2-36, D.Johnson 2-13, Grifn 1-37, Martin 1-12, Hopkins 1-8, Posey 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALSJacksonville, Scobee 49 (BK). Rams 42, Bears 21 Chicago 7 7 0 7 21 St. Louis 21 3 3 15 42 First Quarter StLAustin 65 run (Zuerlein kick), 13:30. StLStacy 1 run (Zuerlein kick), 12:36. ChiM.Bennett 7 pass from McCown (Gould kick), 6:14. StLCook 6 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick), 1:27. Second Quarter ChiMarshall 3 pass from McCown (Gould kick), 5:19. StLFG Zuerlein 29, 1:11. Third Quarter StLFG Zuerlein 40, 3:59. Fourth Quarter ChiBush 1 run (Gould kick), 7:15. StLCunningham 9 run (Pead pass from Clem ens), 3:05. StLR.Quinn 31 fumble return (Zuerlein kick), 2:05. A,024. Chi StL First downs 30 20 Total Net Yards 424 406 Rushes-yards 26-80 29-258 Passing 344 148 Punt Returns 1-0 1-1 Kickoff Returns 4-90 1-24 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 36-47-1 10-22-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 2-19 Punts 3-40.3 2-48.5 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 10-84 6-39 Time of Possession 36:09 23:51 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGChicago, Forte 16-77, McCown 2-4, Jeffery 1-4, Bush 7-(minus 5). St. Louis, Cunning ham 13-109, Stacy 12-87, Austin 1-65, Clemens 3-(minus 3). PASSINGChicago, McCown 36-47-1-352. St. Louis, Clemens 10-22-0-167. RECEIVINGChicago, Marshall 10-117, E.Bennett 8-58, Forte 7-40, M.Bennett 4-62, Jeffery 4-42, Fiammetta 2-23, Bush 1-10. St. Louis, Cook 4-80, Austin 2-39, Quick 2-19, Bailey 1-19, Stacy 1-10. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Panthers 20, Dolphins 16 Carolina 3 3 7 7 20 Miami 7 9 0 0 16 First Quarter CarFG Gano 52, 6:58. MiaWallace 53 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), 5:39. Second Quarter MiaFG Sturgis 32, 12:34. MiaFG Sturgis 47, 2:13. MiaFG Sturgis 23, 1:01. CarFG Gano 46, :00. Third Quarter CarNewton 5 run (Gano kick), 8:08. Fourth Quarter CarOlsen 1 pass from Newton (Gano kick), :43. A,156. Car Mia First downs 20 13 Total Net Yards 295 332 Rushes-yards 29-136 17-52 Passing 159 280 Punt Returns 1-41 7-71 Kickoff Returns 1-17 3-59 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-24 Comp-Att-Int 19-38-1 28-42-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 3-30 Punts 7-56.7 6-48.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-56 6-55 Time of Possession 30:12 29:48 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGCarolina, Newton 8-51, D.Williams 10-31, Stewart 7-31, Tolbert 4-23. Miami, Tannehill 4-36, Miller 10-8, Dan.Thomas 3-8. PASSINGCarolina, Newton 19-38-1-174. Miami, Tannehill 28-42-1-310. RECEIVINGCarolina, Smith 5-69, Olsen 5-34, Ginn Jr. 3-11, LaFell 2-36, D.Williams 2-16, Tolbert 1-5, Stewart 1-3. Miami, Wallace 5-127, Hartline 5-78, Miller 4-39, Clay 4-27, Matthews 3-2, Mar.Moore 2-20, Dan.Thomas 2-2, Sims 1-6, Egnew 1-5, Thig pen 1-4. Chargers 41, Chiefs 38 San Diego 3 7 14 17 41 Kansas City 7 7 14 10 38 First Quarter SDFG Novak 30, 6:11. KCAvery 32 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 1:37. Second Quarter KCCharles 7 run (Succop kick), 3:03. SDWoodhead 11 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :16. Third Quarter SDMathews 1 run (Novak kick), 12:17. KCCharles 1 run (Succop kick), 9:00. SDWoodhead 3 run (Novak kick), 5:27. KCFasano 4 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 2:12. Fourth Quarter SDFG Novak 30, 12:31. KCFG Succop 25, 9:32. SDGreen 60 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 7:50. KCBowe 5 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 1:22. SDAjirotutu 26 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :24. A,259. SD KC First downs 24 26 Total Net Yards 491 395 Rushes-yards 27-104 18-114 Passing 387 281 Punt Returns 1-5 4-34 Kickoff Returns 5-137 8-199 Interceptions Ret. 1-17 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 27-39-0 26-38-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 3-13 Punts 5-40.0 4-44.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 9-97 7-62 Time of Possession 30:57 29:03 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Diego, Mathews 14-55, Wood head 6-25, R.Brown 6-23, Rivers 1-1. Kansas City, Charles 14-115, Davis 1-3, McCluster 1-(minus 1), A.Smith 2-(minus 3). PASSINGSan Diego, Rivers 27-39-0-392. Kansas City, A.Smith 26-38-1-294. RECEIVINGSan Diego, Allen 9-124, Royal 4-87, Woodhead 4-45, Green 3-80, Gates 3-21, Mathews 2-10, Ajirotutu 1-26, R.Brown 1-(minus 1). Kan sas City, McCluster 7-59, Bowe 5-51, Avery 4-91, Charles 4-42, Fasano 4-21, Jenkins 1-22, Vikings 26, Packers 26 Minnesota 3 10 7 3 3 26 Green Bay 7 0 0 16 3 26 First Quarter GBTolzien 6 run (Crosby kick), 4:59. MinFG Walsh 36, 1:37. Second Quarter MinFG Walsh 47, 4:24. MinPeterson 1 run (Walsh kick), :50. Third Quarter MinEllison 12 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick), 8:22. Fourth Quarter MinFG Walsh 29, 14:22. GBLacy 3 run (pass failed), 11:42. GBBoykin 6 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 3:30. GBFG Crosby 27, :46. Overtime GBFG Crosby 20, 10:25. MinFG Walsh 35, 3:49. A,871. Min GB First downs 28 30 Total Net Yards 447 494 Rushes-yards 43-232 34-196 Passing 215 298 Punt Returns 2-0 3-8 Kickoff Returns 5-143 3-63 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-30-0 28-53-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 6-18 2-18 Time of Possession 40:33 34:27 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMinnesota, Peterson 32-146, Gerhart 8-91, Ponder 3-(minus 5). Green Bay, Lacy 25-110, Starks 3-37, Tolzien 2-25, Flynn 4-24. PASSINGMinnesota, Ponder 21-30-0-233. Green Bay, Flynn 21-36-0-218, Tolzien 7-17-0-98. RECEIVINGMinnesota, Patterson 8-54, Carlson 3-36, Simpson 2-54, Jennings 2-29, Ellison 2-26, Ford 1-20, Felton 1-7, Gerhart 1-5, Peterson 1-2. Green Bay, J.Jones 7-80, Lacy 6-48, Boykin 5-60, Nelson 4-58, Kuhn 2-29, Quarless 2-22, Bostick 1-24, Starks 1-(minus 5). Ravens 19, Jets 3 N.Y. Jets 3 0 0 0 3 Baltimore 3 6 10 0 19 First Quarter NYJFG Folk 27, 6:52. BalFG Tucker 30, 1:59. Second Quarter BalFG Tucker 26, 10:15. BalFG Tucker 33, 1:56. Third Quarter BalFG Tucker 53, 10:01. BalJ.Jones 66 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), :05. A,148. NYJ Bal First downs 12 15 Total Net Yards 220 312 Rushes-yards 28-102 31-67 Passing 118 245 Punt Returns 2-26 5-108 Kickoff Returns 5-102 2-38 Interceptions Ret. 1-20 2-0 Comp-Att-Int 10-24-2 17-27-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-22 4-28 Time of Possession 25:55 34:05 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGN.Y. Jets, Powell 11-41, Ivory 9-35, Cribbs 5-20, Smith 3-6. Baltimore, Rice 16-30, Pierce 1130, Taylor 4-7. PASSINGN.Y. Jets, Smith 9-22-2-127, Cribbs 1-2-013. Baltimore, Flacco 17-26-1-273, Taylor 0-1-0-0. RECEIVINGN.Y. Jets, Powell 3-24, Salas 2-48, Winslow 2-34, Smith 1-13, Holmes 1-12, Cumber land 1-9. Baltimore, J.Jones 4-103, Dickson 3-55, Clark 3-24, T.Smith 2-74, Stokley 1-7, Leach 1-6, Taylor 1-6, M.Brown 1-1, Rice 1-(minus 3). Steelers 27, Browns 11 Pittsburgh 3 10 7 7 27 Cleveland 3 0 0 8 11 First Quarter PitFG Suisham 47, 10:03. CleFG Cundiff 49, 7:21. Second Quarter PitA.Brown 41 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 2:33. PitFG Suisham 32, :07. Third Quarter PitSanders 4 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 7:43. Fourth Quarter PitGay 21 interception return (Suisham kick), 4:27. CleGordon 1 pass from Weeden (Bess pass from Weeden), 3:13. A,513. Pit Cle First downs 19 19 Total Net Yards 302 367 Rushes-yards 34-85 16-55 Passing 217 312 Punt Returns 2-19 1-6 Kickoff Returns 2-47 5-91 Interceptions Ret. 1-21 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-34-0 27-52-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 5-21 Time of Possession 33:39 26:21 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGPittsburgh, Bell 23-80, F.Jones 2-9, Dwyer 6-7, Roethlisberger 2-(minus 3), A.Brown 1-(minus 8). Cleveland, Ogbonnaya 4-26, Whittaker 6-16, Mc Gahee 4-12, Weeden 1-2, Campbell 1-(minus 1). PASSINGPittsburgh, Roethlisberger 22-34-0-217. Cleveland, Weeden 13-30-1-209, Campbell 1422-0-124. RECEIVINGPittsburgh, A.Brown 6-92, Sanders 6-52, Miller 5-41, Bell 2-18, W.Johnson 1-9, F.Jones 1-4, Dwyer 1-1. Cleveland, Gordon 14-237, Bess 5-27, Cameron 3-32, Little 2-17, Ogbonnaya 2-15 Buccaneers 24, Lions 21 Tampa Bay 3 14 0 7 24 Detroit 0 14 7 0 21 First Quarter TBFG Lindell 38, 3:23. Second Quarter DetBurleson 5 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 11:50. TBUnderwood 7 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 8:42. DetFauria 10 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 4:33. TBJohnson 48 interception return (Lindell kick), :50. Third Quarter DetPettigrew 18 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 9:36. Fourth Quarter TBUnderwood 85 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 14:05. A,098. TB Det First downs 10 25 Total Net Yards 229 390 Rushes-yards 24-22 24-104 Passing 207 286 Punt Returns 2-19 2-42 Kickoff Returns 2-83 2-49 Interceptions Ret. 4-86 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-21-0 26-46-4 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-40 2-11 Punts 5-43.6 4-37.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 9-67 5-39 Time of Possession 26:38 33:22 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGTampa Bay, Rainey 18-35, Leonard 1-3, Dawson 1-1, Glennon 4-(minus 17). Detroit, Bush 15-83, Bell 6-15, Stafford 2-6, Burleson 1-0. PASSINGTampa Bay, Glennon 14-21-0-247. Detroit, Stafford 26-46-4-297. RECEIVINGTampa Bay, Wright 8-75, Underwood 3-108, Jackson 2-61, Leonard 1-3. Detroit, Johnson 7-115, Burleson 7-77, Bush 4-17, Durham 3-46, Pettigrew 3-32, Fauria 1-10, Bell 1-0. Cardinals 40, Colts 11 Indianapolis 3 0 0 8 11 Arizona 7 20 7 6 40 First Quarter AriFitzgerald 4 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 10:02. IndFG Vinatieri 27, 1:15. Second Quarter AriFitzgerald 26 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 13:29. AriFG Feely 48, 8:15. AriDansby 22 interception return (Feely kick), 7:58. AriFG Feely 50, :00. Third Quarter AriMendenhall 5 run (Feely kick), 5:57. Fourth Quarter IndFleener 17 pass from Luck (Heyward-Bey pass from Luck), 10:26. AriFG Feely 21, 7:20. AriFG Feely 25, 2:17. A,882. Ind Ari First downs 15 27 Total Net Yards 239 410 Rushes-yards 15-80 30-120 Passing 159 290 Punt Returns 0-0 3-23 Kickoff Returns 4-115 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-22 Comp-Att-Int 20-39-1 26-38-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-4 3-24 Punts 5-44.6 2-36.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-89 9-84 Time of Possession 23:11 36:49 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGIndianapolis, Herron 4-33, Luck 2-31, Richardson 7-15, D.Brown 2-1. Arizona, Mendenhall 13-54, Ellington 10-50, Taylor 5-10, Fitzgerald 1-4, Peterson 1-2. PASSINGIndianapolis, Luck 20-39-1-163. Arizona, Palmer 26-37-0-314, Fitzgerald 0-1-0-0. RECEIVINGIndianapolis, Hilton 5-38, Fleener 4-55, Brazill 3-35, Heyward-Bey 3-22, Richardson 2-11, Cunningham 1-4, Satele 1-0, D.Brown 1-(minus 2). Arizona, Floyd 7-104, Fitzgerald 5-52, Housler 4-51, Roberts 3-43, Ellington 2-21, Mendenhall 1-24, Brown 1-16, Smith 1-6, Taylor 1-1, Peterson 1-(minus 4). MISSED FIELD GOALSArizona, Feely 28 (BK). Cowboys 24, Giants 21 Dallas 7 7 7 3 24 N.Y. Giants 0 6 7 8 21 First Quarter DalHeath 50 fumble return (Bailey kick), 4:17. Second Quarter NYGFG J.Brown 21, 12:40. DalWitten 20 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 9:37. NYGFG J.Brown 23, 5:18. Third Quarter DalWitten 2 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 6:54. NYGMyers 27 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick), 4:33. Fourth Quarter NYGMurphy Jr. 4 pass from Manning (A.Brown run), 4:45. DalFG Bailey 35, :00. A,499. Dal NYG First downs 24 22 Total Net Yards 327 356 Rushes-yards 20-107 30-202 Passing 220 154 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-(-4) Comp-Att-Int 23-38-1 16-30-0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 11-85 11-81 Time of Possession 29:21 30:39 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGDallas, Murray 14-86, Dunbar 3-20, Romo 3-1. N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 21-127, Jacobs 9-75. PASSINGDallas, Romo 23-38-1-250. N.Y. Giants, Manning 16-30-0-174. RECEIVINGDallas, Bryant 9-102, Witten 4-37, Mur ray 3-40, Dunbar 2-26, Beasley 2-13, Austin 1-17, Williams 1-10, Escobar 1-5. N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 4-11, Randle 3-64, Myers 3-39, Cruz 2-27. KRISTIE RIEKEN AP Sports Writer HOUSTON In a match up of the AFCs worst teams, the Houston Texans couldnt stop their skid Sunday. Maurice Jones-Drew ran for a season-high 84 yards and a touchdown and the Jacksonville Jaguars extend ed the Texans losing streak to a franchise-record nine games with a 13-6 victory. The two-time AFC South champions havent won since Sept. 15. Jones-Drews touchdown on Jacksonvilles rst drive put the Jaguars (2-9) on top, and they never trailed against an inept and ineffec tive Texans offense. Josh Scobee kicked eld goals of 30 and 53 yards to help the Jaguars win for the second time in three games. Case Keenum had the worst performance in his ve starts, throwing for just 169 yards with an intercep tion. Houston (2-9) was driving late when rookie Ryan Davis grabbed a one-handed in terception off a deection by Keshawn Martin to seal the win. The Jaguars pushed their lead to 13-6 with Scobees 53-yard eld goal with about seven minutes remaining. Houston got lucky on its next drive when Keenum threw a ball right into the hands of Jacksonville rook ie Johnathan Cyprien, but he couldnt hold on to it. It didnt matter much though as the Texans ended up punting a few plays later anyway. Jacksonville entered the game averaging an NFLworst 61.7 yards rushing a game, but nished with 118. Jones-Drew found some room in an otherwise tough season and added 60 yards on six receptions. Chad Henne was 23 of 32 for 239 yards and Ce cil Shorts led the team with eight catches for 71 yards. Houston coach Gary Kubiak coached from the booth for the second straight week on the advice of his doctors after returning to work last week after recover ing from a mini-stroke. Jaguars send Texans to 9th straight loss DAVID J PHILLIP / AP Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Ryan Davis (59) celebrates his interception against the Houston Texans during the fourth quarter of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013, in Houston. The Jaguars won 13-6.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 DAVE SKRETTA AP Sports Writer KANSAS CITY, Mo. Phil ip Rivers came through when the San Diego Char gers needed him the most. The once-embattled quar terback threw for 392 yards and three touchdowns, the nal one a 26-yarder to Seyi Ajirotutu with 24 seconds re maining, to give the Char gers a 41-38 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs on Sun day and end a three-game losing streak. The Chiefs had taken the lead when Alex Smith hit Dwayne Bowe for a goahead score with 1:22 left. But the Chargers (5-6) still had two timeouts, and they used both to quickly move downeld. Ajirotutus TD in tight coverage was just his third catch of the season. It also represented the eighth and nal lead change in the game. Smith threw for 292 yards and three touchdowns for the Chiefs, who dropped their second straight after a 9-0 start. They also lost top pass rushers Tamba Hali and Justin Houston to inju ries and now have to turn their attention to the Denver Broncos next week. Jamaal Charles added 115 yards rushing and two touchdowns. Donnie Avery had four catches for 91 yards and a score as Kansas City produced its best point total of the season. It still wasnt quite enough. Danny Woodhead had touchdowns rushing and re ceiving as he picked up the slack for Chargers running back Ryan Mathews, who left with a hamstring inju ry. Ladarius Green had a 60-yard touchdown recep tion in the fourth quarter, while Keenan Allen had nine catches for 124 yards. San Diego nished with 491 yards of offense against a Chiefs defense that had al lowed more than 17 points just once: last weeks 27-17 defeat in Denver. Hali rolled his right ankle and was taken to the locker room on a cart and did not return. The Chiefs lost their other pass rusher later in the rst half, when Houston was banged into during a scrum and left holding his right el bow. The game turned into a back-and-forth nail-biter in the second half. San Diego pulled ahead 17-14 when a 54-yard pass to Eddie Royal set up a 1-yard TD run by Mathews. But the Chargers helped the Chiefs take the lead right back with three pass interference pen alties that gave them the ball at the San Diego 1. Charles second touchdown made it 21-17. The Chargers embattled defensive backeld got one back on the Chiefs next se ries. Shareece Wright, who had one of those pass in terference penalties, batted a pass to Marcus Gilchrist, who had one of the oth ers. The interception set up Woodheads 3-yard touch down run. Kansas City retook the lead at 28-24 on Smiths short touchdown pass to Anthony Fasano, but after the teams traded chip-shot eld goals early in the fourth quarter, the Chargers took it right back. Rivers hit Green on a quick slant route, and the tight end ran 60 yards for his rst ca reer touchdown. It gave the Chargers a 34-31 lead with 7:50 left in the game. The Chiefs answered the call, only for the Chargers to trump them in the end. Rivers leads Chargers to 41-38 win over Chiefs CHARLIE RIEDEL / AP San Diego Chargers wide receiver Seyi Ajirotutu (16) catches a pass in the end zone for the game winning touchdown under pressure from Kansas City Chiefs cornerback Sean Smith (27) during the second half of an NFL football game on Sunday in Kansas City, Mo. The Chargers won the game 41-38. GENARO C. ARMAS AP Sports Writer GREEN BAY, Wis. Backup quarterback Matt Flynn threw for 218 yards to help the Packers storm back from a 16-point de cit for a 26-26 tie as the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay could only muster eld goals in overtime Sunday. Mason Crosby hit from 20 yards at 10:28 of the extra period and Blair Walsh connected from 35 with 3:54 left. Greg Jennings, play ing his rst game at Lambeau Field as a member of the Vi kings (3-8-1), dropped a third-down pass with 2:11 left. The Packers (55-1) also stumbled on their next possession. RAMS 42, BEARS 21 ST. LOUIS Tavon Austins 65yard touchdown run his fourth straight this season from beyond mid eld jump-started a 21-point rst quar ter and the St. Louis Rams defense made some big plays, too, in a 42-21 victory over the Chicago Bears on Sunday. The Rams (5-6) fol lowed up a 30-point rout at Indianapolis after their bye in front of their largest crowd of the season, about half of them clad Bears orange. Late scores by rookie backup running back Benny Cunningham and defensive end Robert Quinn helped nish off the Bears (6-5), who remained tied for the NFC North lead. STEELERS 27, BROWNS 11 CLEVELAND Ben Roethlisberger threw two touch down passes and beat Cleveland again as the Pittsburgh Steelers moved back into the playoff picture with a 27-11 win over the Browns on Sunday. Roethlisberger con nected on a 41-yard TD pass to Antonio Brown in the rst half, and hit Emmanuel Sanders on a 4-yarder in the third quarter for the Steelers (5-6), who have turned their sea son around following a 0-4 start. RAVENS 19, JETS 3 BALTIMORE Joe Flacco threw a 66yard touchdown pass to Jacoby Jones, Justin Tucker kicked four eld goals and the Baltimore Ravens shut down the sputtering offense of the New York Jets in a 19-3 vic tory Sunday. The defending Super Bowl champi on Ravens (5-6) had lost four of ve be fore bouncing back to beat New York (5-6) and keep their playoff hopes alive. Jones had four catches for 103 yards. CARDINALS 40, COLTS 11 GLENDALE, Ariz. Carson Palmer threw two touchdown pass es to Larry Fitzgerald, Karlos Dansby re turned an intercep tion 22 yards for a score and the Arizona Cardinals won their fourth in a row with a 40-11 victory over the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday. Cardinals coach Bruce Arians beat the team that pro pelled him to coach ing prominence last season, when he took over as Colts in terim coach while Chuck Pagano fought leukemia. TITANS 23, RAIDERS 19 OAKLAND, Calif. Ryan Fitzpatrick threw a 10-yard touchdown pass to Kendall Wright with 10 seconds re maining to cap a mis take-free performance that put the Tennessee Titans back in play off contention with a 23-19 victory over the Oakland Raiders on Sunday. Fitzpatrick also threw a 54-yard TD pass to Justin Hunter and Rob Bironas added three eld goals to give Tennessee (5-6) its second win in seven games. But de spite the recent slump, the Titans nd them selves in a six-way tie for the sixth and nal playoff spot in the AFC with ve weeks left in the regular season. COWBOYS 24, GIANTS 21 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. Tony Romo threw two touchdowns and led a drive that set up Dan Bailey 35yard eld goal on the nal play as the Dallas Cowboys defeated the Giants 24-21 Sunday. Dallas ended the Giants four-game winning streak and most of their playoff hopes. The victory moved the Cowboys (6-5) into a rst-place tie with idle Philadelphia in the NFC East. Packers come from behind to force 26-26 tie with Vikings MORRY GASH / AP Minnesota Vikings Adrian Peterson runs during the second half of an NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers on in Green Bay, Wis. LYNNE SLADKY / AP Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton (1) avoids a tackle by Miami Dolphins defensive end Dion Jordan (95) to score a touchdown during the second half of an NFL football game on Sunday in Miami Gardens. STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI GARDENS Cam Newton angrily slapped his hands to gether and stared into the end-zone stands, watching Miami Dol phins fans celebrate the interception he had just thrown. His mistake helped put the Carolina Pan thers in a deep hole Sunday, but Newton knew how to get out. He led a late come back for the second time in a week, con verting a fourth-and-10 situation at his 20 with a completion to keep alive the Panthers nal possession, and their touchdown with 43 seconds left beat Mi ami 20-16. The Panthers (8-3) overcame a 16-3 rsthalf decit to extend their winning streak to seven games, their lon gest since 2003. We didnt play our best early on, Newton said. We couldnt get it going. But we just nd ways to win. Newton hit Greg Ol sen with a 1-yard pass for the winning score to cap a 12-play drive. Carolina also rallied past the New England Patriots with a late drive last Monday. The Dolphins (5-6) fell to 2-2 since tack le Jonathan Martin left the team and the teams bullying scandal began to mushroom. Weve got to make plays at the end when it counts, receiver Mike Wallace said. Weve got to have a killer in stinct. I dont think we have it that well right now. Weve got to do a better job of putting teams away. The Panthers trailed 16-13 when their win ning drive began at their own 20 with 4:13 left. With only one timeout remaining, they went for it on fourth down, and Newton threaded a pass between two de fenders to Steve Smith for a 19-yard gain. A backbreaker for Mi ami? Im not sure theres any other word to de scribe that, defensive lineman Jared Odrick said. Thats when the tide shifted in our favor, Newton said. Panthers win 7th straight, 20-16 over hapless Dolphins

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 The Helpful PlaceWe Sell & ServiceEquipment* APOPKA Apopka Ace Hardware & Lumber 530 South Park Avenue (407) 889-4111 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 LEESBURG South Leesburg Ace Hardware 27649 U.S. Highway 27 (352) 787-5446 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 EUSTIS Bronson Ace Hardware 26 East Orange Avenue (352) 357-2366 M-Sat 7-6:30, Sun 9-5 MOUNT DORA Mount Dora Ace Hardware 18691 U.S. Highway 441 (352) 383-2101 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 SORRENTO Sorrento Ace Hardware 24329 St. Rd. 46 (352) 383-2061 M-Sat 7-7:00, Sun 9-5 TAVARES Tavares Ace Hardware 509-South Highway 19 (352) 343-3361 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 UMATILLA Umatilla Ace Hardware 811 North Central Avenue (352) 669-3411 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5Come See Our Great Selection of Benjamin Moore Paint *At select stores only. COLLEGE FOOTBALL No. 8 MISSOURI 24, No. 24 MISSISSIPPI 10 Missouri 7 10 7 0 24 Mississippi 0 3 7 0 10 First Quarter MoJosey 4 run (Baggett kick), 12:15. Second Quarter MoFG Baggett 33, 7:31. MissFG Ritter 30, 4:06. MoMurphy 3 run (Baggett kick), 1:37. Third Quarter MissMathers 45 run (Ritter kick), 13:27. MoJosey 10 run (Baggett kick), 6:56. A,168. Mo Miss First downs 25 21 Rushes-yards 51-260 29-126 Passing 225 252 Comp-Att-Int 15-26-1 27-43-1 Return Yards 17 9 Punts-Avg. 3-38.3 4-42.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-43 5-35 Time of Possession 33:03 26:57 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMissouri, Josey 15-95, Murphy 16-67, J.Franklin 8-42, Hansbrough 8-32, Brantley 1-26, Mauk 1-2, Team 2-(minus 4). Mississippi, Mathers 7-66, Walton 11-42, Brunetti 4-9, Wallace 3-6, J.Scott 3-5, Dodson 1-(minus 2). PASSINGMissouri, J.Franklin 12-19-1-142, Mauk 3-7-0-83. Mississippi, Wallace 26-42-1-244, Brunetti 1-1-0-8. RECEIVINGMissouri, Lucas 3-59, Waters 3-6, Sasser 2-72, Washington 2-47, Green-Beckham 2-14, Clark 1-13, J.Hunt 1-11, Josey 1-3. Mississippi, Moncrief 6-115, Walton 5-42, Treadwell 5-23, Logan 4-35, Sanders 4-17, Mathers 2-14, J.Scott 1-6. No. 11 OKLAHOMA ST. 49, No. 3 BAYLOR 17 Baylor 0 3 0 14 17 Oklahoma St. 7 7 21 14 49 First Quarter OkStStaley 2 run (Grogan kick), 3:07. Second Quarter OkStC.Moore 12 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick), 4:28. BayFG A.Jones 29, :13. Third Quarter OkStT.Moore 56 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick), 13:23. OkStStaley 1 run (Grogan kick), 10:10. OkStChelf 4 run (Grogan kick), :13. Fourth Quarter BayGoodley 24 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 14:04. OkStPatmon 78 fumble return (Grogan kick), 9:58. OkStSeales 33 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick), 3:01. BayNorwood 32 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 1:59. A,218. Bay OkSt First downs 26 21 Rushes-yards 36-94 46-154 Passing 359 440 Comp-Att-Int 28-48-0 21-27-0 Return Yards 0 (-6) Punts-Avg. 6-47.7 6-38.0 Fumbles-Lost 4-3 1-0 Penalties-Yards 3-10 7-65 Time of Possession 24:37 35:23 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGBaylor, Petty 11-46, Chan 7-33, Lin wood 14-29, Goodley 3-6, Team 1-(minus 20). Oklahoma St., J.Smith 12-71, Roland 11-36, Childs 4-35, Staley 7-25, Sheperd 1-13, Team 3-(minus 6), Chelf 8-(minus 20). PASSINGBaylor, Petty 28-48-0-359. Oklahoma St., Chelf 19-25-0-370, C.Moore 1-1-0-22, Stewart 1-1-0-48. RECEIVINGBaylor, Goodley 10-118, Norwood 6-83, Coleman 5-54, C.Fuller 3-90, Lee 2-10, Rhodes 1-4, Linwood 1-0. Oklahoma St., T.Moore 5-126, Stewart 5-45, C.Moore 4-67, Seales 3-74, Ateman 1-51, Chelf 1-48, Sheperd 1-25, Glidden 1-4. No. 19 ARIZONA ST. 38, No. 14 UCLA 33 Arizona St. 14 21 3 0 38 UCLA 10 3 14 6 33 First Quarter ASUT.Kelly 3 run (Gonzalez kick), 12:26. UCLALucien 42 pass from Hundley (Fairbairn kick), 12:10. UCLAFG Fairbairn 48, 3:30. ASUFoster 3 run (Gonzalez kick), :32. Second Quarter ASUBradford 18 interception return (Gonzalez kick), 14:56. ASUEubank 1 run (Gonzalez kick), 2:36. UCLAFG Fairbairn 23, :47. ASUStrong 19 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), :05. Third Quarter UCLAJack 3 run (Fairbairn kick), 11:38. UCLAPerkins 1 run (Fairbairn kick), 7:57. ASUFG Gonzalez 28, 1:07. Fourth Quarter UCLAEvans 27 pass from Hundley (pass failed), 11:25. A,131. ASU UCLA First downs 24 21 Rushes-yards 50-223 41-151 Passing 225 253 Comp-Att-Int 20-27-0 18-26-1 Return Yards 19 49 Punts-Avg. 5-34.8 2-39.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-20 6-45 Time of Possession 31:52 28:08 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArizona St., T.Kelly 22-99, Grice 18-95, R.Smith 2-40, Foster 4-8, D.Lewis 1-3, Eubank 1-1, Team 2-(mi nus 23). UCLA, Jack 16-86, Perkins 8-60, Hundley 17-5. PASSINGArizona St., T.Kelly 20-27-0-225. UCLA, Hundley 18-26-1-253. RECEIVINGArizona St., Grice 7-72, Strong 6-91, Coyle 2-15, Foster 2-1, Ca.Smith 1-20, D.Nelson 1-18, D.Lewis 1-8. UCLA, Evans 6-80, Payton 4-46, Bell 3-22, Mazzone 2-25, Lucien 1-42, Perkins 1-20, Vanderdoes 1-18. No. 23 SOUTHERN CAL 47, COLORADO 29 Southern Cal 9 14 14 10 47 Colorado 0 0 7 22 29 First Quarter USCAllen 12 run (Heidari kick), 5:34. USCSafety, 1:04. Second Quarter USCAllen 1 run (Heidari kick), 5:23. USCAgholor 20 pass from Kessler (Heidari kick), :42. Third Quarter ColBell 31 fumble return (Oliver kick), 14:46. USCTelfer 10 pass from Kessler (Heidari kick), 11:29. USCAllen 23 run (Heidari kick), 7:19. Fourth Quarter ColSpruce 38 pass from Liufau (Oliver kick), 14:34. USCFG Heidari 39, 10:14. ColAdkins 3 run (Oliver kick), 8:01. ColRichardson 5 pass from Liufau (Goodson pass from Liufau), 3:19. USCVainuku 52 run (Heidari kick), 2:19. A,005. USC Col First downs 20 18 Rushes-yards 41-243 31-124 Passing 206 188 Comp-Att-Int 20-30-0 17-33-1 Return Yards 33 1 Punts-Avg. 6-30.2 7-35.3 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-25 3-35 Time of Possession 33:24 26:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSouthern Cal, Allen 21-145, Vainuku 5-70, Isaac 8-26, Akiba 3-9, Madden 1-6, Wittek 2-(minus 5), Kessler 1-(minus 8). Colorado, Adkins 14-63, Powell 8-41, T.Jones 5-24, Goodson 1-2, Liufau 3-(minus 6). PASSINGSouthern Cal, Kessler 19-28-0-184, Wit tek 1-2-0-22. Colorado, Liufau 17-33-1-188. RECEIVINGSouthern Cal, Grimble 6-46, Rogers 3-56, Agholor 3-38, Allen 3-24, Vainuku 2-11, Isaac 1-17, Telfer 1-10, Pinner 1-4. Colorado, Richardson 8-88, Spruce 4-52, Goodson 2-31, Ad kins 2-10, Ross 1-7. LATE SATURDAY TOP 25 BOX SCORES BOYS BASKETBALL TAVARES 70, LEESBURG 59 Anthony Coleman scored 22 points, Osirus Munn had 19 and Demitrius Ramirez nished with 13 for Tavares. FIRST ACADEMY OF LEESBURG 54, CENTRAL FLORIDA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 49 Luke Lea led FAL with 25 points to keep his team perfect on the season at 3-0. CFCA fell to 0-3 with the loss. In girls action, CFCA (3-3) defeated FAL 3525 with Liza Thom as nine points leading First Academy. MOUNT DORA BIBLE 80, MASTERS ACADEMY 53 Zach Ward led the way with 29 points and 4 steals to lead Mount Dora Bible. Zach Brock had 14 points and 10 as sists while Demarius Smith nished with 15 points and eight re bounds. Mount Dora Bible (2-0) will face Mount Dora High School at 7 p.m. Tuesday. BOYS SOCCER LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH SCHOOL 5, UMATILLA 2 Jamon Elliott and Chris Chong each scored twice for the Hawks in the victory over Umatilla. PREP ROUNDUP RUSTY MILLER AP Sports Writer COLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State defensive lineman Noah Spence is from Harrisburg, Pa. He wasnt steeped in the enmity that grips fans of the Buckeyes and Wolverines about this time every year. But now in his sec ond season in the heart of Ohio, he has a good grasp of it now. Its a huge rival ry even if youre a guy from out of state like me, he said. Then he added, Its everything. Ohio State and Mich igan clash for the 110th time on Saturday, at Michigan Stadium. Its already been a long, grueling season. But, as it should be, the best and biggest game has been saved for last. Ohio State (11-0, 7-0), which moved up to No. 3 in all major rank ings on Sunday, won its school-record 23rd straight game and also earned a spot in the Big Ten championship game with a 42-14 win over Indiana in snowglobe conditions at Ohio Stadium on Sat urday. Almost immediately, the Buckeyes thoughts turned to the opponent that like Lord Volde mort in the Harry Pot ter books no one in Ohio refers to by name. Instead, they follow the lead of late coach/cur mudgeon Woody Hayes and call it That School (or Team) Up North. From a distance, it might look like a trap game: The Buckeyes have little to play for beyond holding on to what theyve already got an unbeaten sea son and conference and national title aspi rations. On top of that, the Wolverines (7-4, 3-4) have lost four of their last six games and have had major problems running the ball and scoring points. But in a rivalry the size of The Game, its almost impossible for one team to look past another even though the Buckeyes have an other major showdown a week later when they face No. 11 Michigan in the Big Ten title game on Dec. 7 in Indianap olis. Theres no chance of us overlooking a team from here on out, Buckeyes defensive tackle Michael Bennett said. Youve got That Team Up North, the Big Ten championship and whatever comes after that. Every week from here on out is a bowl week. Urban Meyer won his rst Michigan-Ohio State game as a head coach a year ago, 2621, by shutting out the Wolverines in the sec ond half and edging past them on two eld goals by Drew Basil. Moments after his team beat Indiana, Meyer said there was not time to waste to get ready for Michigan (although, of course, he did not speak that word). I have great re spect for this rivalry it almost makes me in awe, he said. The re spect we have comes with incredible respon sibility that sometimes can be overwhelm ing (when it comes) to what we have to do next week. So we take it very seriously. Were working on the game as we speak. Were all go ing to go home, see our families and then were coming back (Sunday) to get ready to go. Michigan, ranked as high as 11th in the na tion during a 5-0 start to the season, has had its hopes dashed. The latest punch to the gut was blowing a 14-point, second-half lead at Iowa on Saturday in a 24-21 defeat. Afterward, coach Brady Hoke like Meyer an Ohio native was asked what ob jectives remained for his team. We play for our se niors. Thats been the rst thing we always play for, he said. And weve got a pretty big ri valry game next week. JAY LAPRETE / AP Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller, left, tries to get away from Indiana defensive tackle Ralphael Green on Saturday during the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State won 42-14. For Buckeyes, Michigan game is everything Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial.

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 GOLF ISPS Handa World Cup of Golf Scores Sunday At Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Composite Course) Melbourne, Australia Purse: $7 million (Individual); $1 million (Team) Yardage: 7,024; Par: 71 Final Team 1. Australia 143-138-134-136 551 2. United States 137-137-142-145 561 3. Japan 143-138-141-141 563 3. Denmark 137-140-147-139 563 5. Canada 141-144-141-144 570 6. South Africa 147-141-145-139 572 7. Germany 144-145-139-145 573 7. France 145-140-145-143 573 9. Thailand 143-142-143-147 575 10. Scotland 141-143-146-146 576 11. Ireland 147-143-138-149 577 11. Sweden 148-143-147-139 577 13. Finland 142-147-144-145 578 13. England 144-143-143-148 578 15. South Korea 141-148-144-147 580 16. Netherlands 150-147-139-145 581 17. Spain 148-144-141-149 582 17. Portugal 140-142-146-154 582 17. Argentina 149-146-146-141 582 20. New Zealand 154-144-141-144 583 20. Italy 151-141-142-149 583 20. Brazil 144-143-141-155 583 23. Philippines 144-143-147-153 587 24. Chile 149-144-145-150 588 24. China 152-145-148-143 588 26. India 154-147-149-143 593 Individual Jason Day, Australia 68-70-66-70 274 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 66-68-71-71 276 Adam Scott, Australia 75-68-68-66 277 Matt Kuchar, United States 71-68-68-71 278 Ryo Ishikawa, Japan 71-71-70-69 281 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand 71-70-70-70 281 Hideto Tanihara, Japan 72-67-71-72 282 David Hearn, Canada 70-71-71-71 283 Stuart Manley, Wales 67-72-72-72 283 Kevin Streelman, United States 66-69-74-74 283 Francesco Molinari, Italy 75-67-66-75 283 Brendon de Jonge, Zimbabwe 74-72-70-68 284 Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 73-71-70-70 284 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 71-72-69-72 284 Roope Kakko, Finland 72-72-70-71 285 Gregory Bourdy, France 72-69-72-72 285 K.J. Choi, South Korea 67-74-71-73 285 Ricardo Santos, Portugal 69-69-73-74 285 Graeme McDowell, Ireland 72-71-67-75 285 George Coetzee, South Africa 74-71-73-68 286 Branden Grace, South Africa 73-70-72-71 286 Martin Laird, Scotland 67-72-74-73 286 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-69-71-73 286 Oscar Fraustro, Mexico 74-67-71-74 286 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 71-72-76-68 287 Vijay Singh, Fiji 73-69-75-70 287 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 70-76-70-71 287 Anirban Lahiri, India 72-70-73-72 287 Brad Fritsch, Canada 71-73-70-73 287 Jonas Blixt, Sweden 76-72-74-66 288 Victor Dubuisson, France 73-71-73-71 288 Fabian Gomez, Argentina 72-75-72-70 289 Chris Wood, England 75-70-72-72 289 Mark Tullo, Chile 74-72-71-72 289 Peter Hanson, Sweden 72-71-73-73 289 Marcel Siem, Germany 71-74-69-75 289 Danny Willett, England 69-73-71-76 289 Wu Ashun, China 77-69-75-69 290 Mike Hendry, New Zealand 75-73-71-71 290 Robert-Jan Derksen, Netherlands 74-75-70-71 290 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 74-71-72-73 290 Tim Sluiter, Netherlands 76-72-69-74 291 Adilson da Silva, Brazil 72-71-71-77 291 Shane Lowry, Ireland 75-72-71-74 292 Alexandre Rocha, Brazil 72-72-70-78 292 Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 77-71-74-71 293 Tim Wilkinson, New Zealand 79-71-70-73 293 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 70-75-74-74 293 Angelo Que, Philippines 74-72-70-77 293 CME Group Titleholders Scores Sunday At Ritz Carlton Golf Resort (Tiburon Golf Club) Naples Purse:, $2 million Yardage: 6,540; Par: 72 Final Shanshan Feng, $700,000 66-74-67-66 273 Gerina Piller, $139,713 71-67-67-69 274 Pornanong Phatlum, $101,352 70-68-67-70 275 Sandra Gal, $78,404 64-69-74-69 276 Inbee Park, $63,106 68-72-69-68 277 Cristie Kerr, $44,238 69-69-71-69 278 Sun Young Yoo, $44,238 68-68-73-69 278 Stacy Lewis, $44,238 71-73-63-71 278 Jennifer Johnson, $32,509 71-69-70-69 279 So Yeon Ryu, $32,509 70-71-69-69 279 Ilhee Lee, $26,848 69-77-69-65 280 Amy Yang, $26,848 73-68-69-70 280 Michelle Wie, $26,848 72-70-66-72 280 Angela Stanford, $22,871 74-69-69-70 282 Azahara Munoz, $22,871 72-68-69-73 282 Brittany Lang, $19,123 68-76-70-69 283 Morgan Pressel, $19,123 71-68-74-70 283 Meena Lee, $19,123 69-72-70-72 283 Hee Young Park, $19,123 69-70-72-72 283 Lexi Thompson, $19,123 66-74-67-76 283 Catriona Matthew, $16,063 70-73-75-66 284 Lydia Ko, $16,063 71-71-72-70 284 Anna Nordqvist, $16,063 66-73-75-70 284 Sandra Changkija, $16,063 67-74-70-73 284 Jane Park, $13,807 68-77-69-71 285 Chella Choi, $13,807 71-70-71-73 285 Ayako Uehara, $13,807 69-72-71-73 285 Karrie Webb, $13,807 70-73-69-73 285 Mo Martin, $11,780 69-72-74-72 287 Suzann Pettersen, $11,780 72-72-71-72 287 Mika Miyazato, $11,780 70-73-68-76 287 Natalie Gulbis, $11,780 70-70-65-82 287 Karine Icher, $9,806 69-74-75-70 288 Moriya Jutanugarn, $9,806 70-72-74-72 288 I.K. Kim, $9,806 72-74-70-72 288 Jenny Shin, $9,806 73-72-71-72 288 Na Yeon Choi, $9,806 71-74-70-73 288 Caroline Hedwall, $8,644 74-74-72-69 289 Beatriz Recari, $7,802 72-77-73-68 290 Candie Kung, $7,802 71-74-75-70 290 Lizette Salas, $7,802 71-72-75-72 290 Cindy LaCrosse, $7,802 69-76-69-76 290 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $6,635 72-73-76-70 291 Alison Walshe, $6,635 74-73-73-71 291 Pernilla Lindberg, $6,635 72-75-71-73 291 Rebecca Lee-Bentham, $6,635 65-76-75-75 291 Katherine Hull-Kirk, $5,928 73-78-70-71 292 Jessica Korda, $5,928 74-72-69-77 292 Irene Cho, $5,469 73-74-74-72 293 Carlota Ciganda, $5,469 72-75-72-74 293 Hee Kyung Seo, $5,125 74-73-76-71 294 Brittany Lincicome, $5,125 68-79-73-74 294 Mi Jung Hur, $4,742 73-74-75-73 295 Chie Arimura, $4,742 73-77-71-74 295 Stacy Prammanasudh, $4,742 71-74-75-75 295 Juli Inkster, $4,360 69-74-77-76 296 Hee-Won Han, $4,360 75-73-71-77 296 Paula Creamer, $4,130 74-76-74-73 297 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $3,978 68-81-71-78 298 Austin Ernst, $3,825 73-82-74-70 299 Caroline Masson, $3,710 77-76-73-74 300 Hanna Kang, $3,710 74-78-72-76 300 Eun-Hee Ji, $3,595 75-75-74-78 302 Brooke Pancake, $3,480 72-81-77-74 304 Jeong Jang, $3,480 77-73-75-79 304 Paola Moreno, $3,366 74-78-77-76 305 Jacqui Concolino, $3,251 81-73-77-75 306 Associated Press UNCASVILLE, Conn. Marcus Paige scored 32 points and No. 24 North Carolina broke open a tight game in the sec ond half to upset No. 3 Louisville 93-84 to win the Hall of Fame Tipoff Tournament. Brice Johnson added 13 points and Kennedy Meeks had 13 points, 12 re bounds and seven as sists for the Tar Heels (4-1), who lost just a week ago at home to Belmont. Russ Smith led all scorers with 36 points for Louisville, which came into the game on a school-record 21game winning streak. Chris Jones added 20 points It was a three-point game with just over 13 minutes left when Louisvilles Montrezl Harrell picked up his fourth foul. North Carolina scored the next eight points. Harrell fouled out with 7 minutes left with just ve points and eight rebounds. TOLDEO 94, FLORIDA ATLANTIC 74 DETROIT Justin Drummond scored 23 points and Rian Pearson had 17 as Toledo remained un defeated with a 94-74 win over Florida Atlantic on Sunday in a 2K Sports Classic matchup. Down 15-14 in the rst half, Toledo (6-0) went on a 24-8 run and never trailed the remainder of the game. Florida Atlantic (1-6) twice cut the decit to 8 in the sec ond half but Toledo pulled away. The Rockets are off to their best start since the 1998-99 sea son, when they began 10-0. Toledo shot 51.8 percent from the eld and made 34 of 36 free throws. Drummond was a perfect 9-of-9 from the free throw line. Pablo Bertone led Florida Atlantic with 29 points. It was the Owls sixth consecu tive loss. BRYANT 60, NEW HAMPSHIRE 55 DURHAM, N.H. Dyami Starks scored 19 points as Bryant beats New Hampshire 60-55 on Sunday in a game that included a 40-minute power fail ure delay. Starks, the nations sixth leading scorer going in to the game, had a cooler hand (shooting 5 of 14) but managed to lead all scorers. COLLEGE BASKETBALL Paige leads No. 24 UNC past No. 3 Louisville MICHAEL DWYER / AP North Carolinas Marcus Paige (5) reacts after scoring during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Louisville on Sunday in the Basketball Hall of Fame Tip-Off tournament championship at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn. COREY PERRINE / AP Shanshan Feng waves to the crowd as she carries her trophy after winning the CME Group Titleholders golf tournament on Sunday at Tiburon Golf Club in Naples. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer NAPLES Shanshan Feng of China seized control early and was awless in the nal round of the LPGA Tour season, closing with a 6-under 66 to win the LPGA Titleholders and claim the richest prize in womens golf Sunday. Feng opened with four birdies in six holes to go from two shots down to the outright lead, and she never gave it up the rest of the way at Tiburon Golf Club. Gerina Piller stayed within one shot and had a 10-foot birdie at tempt on the nal hole that would have forced a playoff. It narrowly missed, and Piller had to settle for a 69 and her best nish on the LPGA Tour. Pornanong Phatlum of Thailand had a 70 and nished alone in third. Before I started, I never thought I was going to win, Feng said. I knew I was only two behind. But I thought all the peo ple in the last group were really strong competitors. No one was stronger than Feng, who played the nal 31 holes with out a bogey. Natalie Gulbis, tied for the 54-hole lead with Pornanong and Piller, wasnt up to the task. Going for her rst win in six years, Gulbis didnt make a birdie until the 14th hole, and by then she couldnt stop a spec tacular slide. Gulbis closed with an 82. WORLD CUP MELBOURNE, Australia Jason Day made a 7-foot par-sav ing putt on the 16th hole, Thomas Bjorn bogeyed and the Australian won his rst tournament in near ly three years at the World Cup at Royal Melbourne on Sunday. Days 70 left him with a 10-under 274, two strokes ahead of Bjorn, who also bo geyed the 18th, with a 71. Days last tourna ment victory came at the Byron Nelson Championship on the PGA Tour in 2010, al though hes had four top-ve nishes in majors since 2011. Adam Scott nished third after a 66, three strokes behind. Scott, trying to win his third tournament in a row, shot 75 on the opening day, including a nine on the 12th hole, and spent the rest of the tournament trying to catch up. Day won $1.2 million and Australia also cap tured the team portion of the World Cup. Day and Scott, who each holed approach shots for eagles Sunday, also shared the $600,000 rst-place team prize. American Matt Kuchar shot 71 to n ish fourth in individual stroke-play, three be hind Day. Ryo Ishikawa (69) of Japan and Thailands Kiradech Aphibarnrat, who shot 70, nished tied for fth, seven be hind the winner. Shanshan Fengs 66 good enough to win Titleholders

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B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013

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KATHRYN MOSCHELLA Tampa Bay Times Daryl Whitaker can take comfort in knowing that her grandmother, Shir ley Shear, is nearby as close as her backyard. The 88-year-old, twice-widowed Shear lives behind Whitakers home in Tampa, in a for mer family guest house / game room. Shear, who owned a home in Lakeland for 50 years, fell and developed a blood clot almost two years ago. She couldnt af ford full-time home care and she couldnt keep her beloved dog, Sugar, in an assisted-living facility. So Whitakers husband, Joe, and their four children gladly gave up their lit tle getaway by the pool in order to make Shear safe and secure. Its fun here as long as I have my dog, she says. Its private, but its nice to know that the family is nearby if I need them. The Whitakers solu tion reects a burgeon ing home-building trend. Popular in Europe, the socalled granny pods are just one way families are bringing multiple gener ations under one house hold. Companies such as Len nar and M/I Homes have noticed the trend and are building homes that can accommodate seniors, adult children fresh out of college and extended family members. When Joe Whitak er asked his close friend Henry Moseley Jr. to re model the guest house for Shear, Moseley cus tomized the cottage and realized what a wonder ful solution the unit was for seniors who wanted to have their own private space yet still be close to their family. He and his son, Henry III, began researching the concept so popular over seas. They decided the solution was a perfect t in Southwest and Central Florida, two of the largest senior areas in the United States. Together, they launched Home Care Suites, a cus tom-backyard-cottage business designed as an alternative to assisted liv ing. At a time of high unem ployment and home fore closures, the number of U.S. households in which multiple generations of the same family double up under the same roof has spiked signicantly. One in ve seniors is part of this trend. If the rising cost of home health care, assisted living and nursing-home care is any indication, the gran ny pod might be a more affordable option that provides privacy, security and peace of mind for all parties. According to a nation al study by Genworth, a provider of long-termcare insurance, the aver age monthly fee for an as sisted-living facility was $3,300 in 2012. Home Care Suites three models can all be cus tomized to suit a seniors needs and the familys budget. They range from 256 to 588 square feet. The price varies based on site conditions, ranging from $42,000 to $83,000. Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 NUTS: Lowering cancer, heart death risks / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman awarded A grade Florida Hospital Waterman has been honored with an A grade in the Fall 2013 update to the Hospital Safety Score which rates how well hospitals protect patients from accidents, errors, injuries and infections. The Hospital Safety Score is com piled under the guidance of the na tions leading experts on patient safety and is administered by The Leapfrog Group, an independent in dustry watchdog. The rst and only hospital safety rating to be analyzed in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pa tient Safety. The Score is designed to give the public information they can use to protect themselves and their families. TAVARES Department of Health closed for Thanksgiving All Florida Department of Health Lake County ofces will be closed Thursday and Friday for Thankgiving. All ofces will reopen Dec. 2 with regularly scheduled hours. As in all medical emergencies, res idents needing immediate assis tance should dial 911. LAKE COUNTY AARP driver safety class schedule set for December The AARP Driver Safety Program helps participants rene their driv ing skills and develop safe driv ing habits. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or old er may be eligible for insurance dis counts. Cost for the classes is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members, which includes workbooks. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. The two-day course will be offered at the following locations: Dec. 2 and 4, from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., Leesburg. To register, call 352-326-3540. Dec. 2 and 4, from 9 a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora. To reg ister, call 352-735-7180. These classes are open to all. TAVARES Christmas Craft Days at EZ-Nutrition 101 This fun event for parents and kids involves making crafts and a smooth ie for $5 per adult and $3 per child. The schedule is from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Dec. 7 and Dec. 14. RSVP is required by calling EZ-Nu trition at 352-516-9855. KATHRYN MOSCHELLA / TAMPA BAY TIMES Daryl Whitaker, grandmother Shirley Shear, Shears beloved dog Sugar and Henry Moseley Jr. enjoy a pleasant afternoon outside Shears cottage, converted into a granny pod. Granny pods keep seniors, other generations together SEE GRANNY | C2 ALLIE SHAH Minneapolis Star Tribune You got a u shot. Youve kept your hands away from your mouth, eyes and nose, and youve kept yourself away from sick co-workers. So how come you still came down with the u? The plain truth: It isnt easy to pro tect against this tenacious, change able virus. The more we learn about in uenza, in many ways the less we know, said Michael Osterholm, di rector of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesotas School of Public Health. Uncertainty about how viruses are passed and which strains will be active from year to year makes pre vention a challenge. To complicate things, some habits that contribute to better overall health may do lit tle to protect against the u, which is caused by a virus that infects the nose, throat and lungs. More severe than a cold, it can lead to hospital ization or, in rare cases, death. Most experts believe that u vi ruses spread mainly by moist drop lets made when people sick with the u cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby. Less often, a person could catch the u by touching a surface or an object that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, eyes or nose. But unlike cold viruses, u viruses are fragile and dont sur vive for very long outside the body, Osterholm said. Thats why some common practices that can help Fighting the flu: An uphill battle SEE FLU | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 PATRICK CONDON Associated Press ST. PAUL, Minn. Standing at the front of a small classroom on the fourth oor of St. Pauls library, Maureen OConnell attempted to help the ve people at the MNsure Crash Course understand how federal care re form affects their lives. So does anybody know what actuarial value means? OCon nell asked with a smile. No one was sure. Most of the questions were more basic: Ana Reit er, a part-time speech pathologist, wanted to make sure she could transfer from her cur rent COBRA coverage to MNsure (the answer is yes). OConnell is the co-founder and proj ect manager for Ac cess MN, a major ben eciary of $3.91 million from a federal govern ment grant to private groups that pledged to recruit Minnesotans to sign up for coverage through MNsure, the states insurance ex change. These naviga tor groups have a vi tal role in the success of the health-care law, charged with reaching out to isolated and un derprivileged commu nities. The federal over haul sees a permanent role for groups like Ac cess MN, which got a $327,000 grant from MNsure. Of the 29 organiza tions to share in those MNsure grants, only two got more than Ac cess MN, which was formed only shortly be fore the grant applica tion deadline. MNsures grant decisions gener ated some controver sy, as some Democratic lawmakers complained that groups represent ing black and Somali Minnesotans were un derrepresented. April Todd-Malmlov, MN sures executive direc tor, said the groups cho sen proved they had the experience and partner ship to make inroads with hard-to-reach communities statewide. Access MN willingly shared its budget pro posal and other docu ments with Associat ed Press. OConnell is a former assistant com missioner of the state Department of Human Services. She is forgo ing a salary for at least the rst year of Access MNs operations, while retaining other work as a consultant. Most of the $327,000 grant is going to pay other Ac cess MN employees. This just looked like a really good op portunity to help peo ple, said OConnell, who cited her own ex perience with a 2007 breast cancer diagnosis as helping her under stand the importance of insurance coverage for people facing crises. In political work and policy work, youre al ways dealing with the compromises. This is about taking the law and making it work for people. John Freeman, who co-founded Access with OConnell and is serving as its lead navigator, will earn a $75,000 salary for plan ning outreach and en rollment events, train ing staff at partner organizations, man aging other navigators and working as a navi gator himself. Freeman, the former supervising attorney at the Minnesota Legal Services Coalition, said his work connecting lawyers with indigent clients was good train ing for the new role. I never want to be in a position where we have to charge peo ple for something so critical as understand ing their care options, Freeman said. The homes can be nanced for less tha n $800 a month. Home Care Suites provides free property analysis for the homeowner to determine zoning reg ulations and require ments. We build these units with structurally insu lated panels that are extremely energy-ef cient. Theyre like an ig loo, Moseley said. .... Its just like building a new house. It all has to meet zoning and build ing code. From start to nish, its probably about 120 days. These suites dont raise your property tax es and they can be a federal tax deduction if a doctor deems that your home needs spe cial medical accommo dations, to the extent that the value doesnt exceed the fair mar ket value of the exist ing structure, Moseley added. Depending on the in dividuals level of care, each Home Care Suite can be tted with a customized emergen cy-response system that monitors every thing from daily vital signs to voice prompts, reminders for medica tion and an automatic call to a family member whos away from home. The Moseleys note that a Home Care Suite can be used as ad ditional living space such as an ofce, guest house, exercise room or man cave. Like Home Care Suite owners, Lennar and M/I echo the versatili ty of their multigener ational approach but their offerings dont in volve a separate living facility. Lennar has built ap proximately 30 Next Gen homes around Tampa Bay commu nities that feature a home within a home oor plan that folds into the main house as a separate but adjacent dwelling. GRANNY FROM PAGE C1 LAKE COUNTY UNITED MOTORCYCLIST ASSOCIATION, INC.Lake Countys Largest Motorcycling Tradition Proudly Contributing More Than $185,000 To Date!To Benefit: The Salvation Army & Lake/Sumter Foster Parent AssociationDOUGHNUTS/COFFEE ~ At Start and VENDORS ~ At EndDATE:TIME:PLACE:Wal-Mart ENDING:COST: Chapter/Club challenge: Trophy given to the top 3 groups with the most participants. SPONSORS WANTEDCall Any Number Below for more infowww.CombinedLakeCountyToyRun.comCentral FL Cruisers Bones 321-689-9138 ABATE of FL, Inc. Lake Cnty Chapter Griz 352-742-7754 American Legion Riders #35 Jan 352-408-0750 Lake County HOG Wayne 352-396-3593 Ride Escorted by Law Enforcement Leaves at 11am sharpWE NEED SPONSORS! SATURDAY DECEMBER 7, 2013 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION 905 E. Alfred Street Tavares, FL 32778 352.343.3006 AirWay has over 80 Years of Combined Experience in the Home Health Industry. Our Lift & Recline Chairs make great gifts that are custom made to your specifications.Please contact us to see if you qualify under Medicare Guidelines. LEE BOWMAN Scripps Howard News Service More than 15 mil lion of the babies born around the world each year come too soon, with tre mendous cost in lives lost and disabled and medical expense. Yet newly-pub lished research shows many early infants, even in developed nations like the U.S., could benet from wider use of some simple caregiving methods. In the United States, 450,000 babies were born early, nearly one out of nine births numbers in line with countries like the Congo and Bangla desh and the most of any industrialized country. Dr. Joy Lawn, a neo natologist and ep idemiologist at the London School of Hy giene and Tropical Medicine and leader of the research team, said most newborn deaths could be pre vented without inten sive care. Some inexpensive methods that have shown very good im provement are not being used in many countries with a high pre-term burden. Whether babies are born in the U.S. or Ethiopia, they should all get the same good care, Lawn said in a phone interview. For instance, two injections of a steroid used to treat asth ma, given to moth ers in preterm labor, can speed along de velopment of a ba bys lungs and reduce the risk of breathing distress when theyre born. The treatment costs about $1. Premature births could be helped by simple steps JIM MONE / AP Maureen OConnell addresses people in attendance at the MNsure Crash Course on Nov. 13 at the St. Paul Library to help them understand how federal health care reform affects their lives. MNsure navigators to spread word on health care in state

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 It Almost That Time!Individuals or GroupsPlease Call 365-0079 ext: 25 Ask for Barbara KettlebellVolunteers Needed prevent against other viruses may not be ef fective against the u. There have been several studies done looking at hand wash ing and hand sani tizing with inuen za, he said. The data are quite unclear, with more data suggesting that hand washing may play a very, very limited role with inuenza. Osterholm still rec ommends frequent hand washing, howev er. We can prevent a lot of other infec tious agents including food-borne pathogens and other respirato ry agents with hand washing, he said. So Im very high on hand washing. I just think the attributable pre vention factor for u has been oversold. According to Oster holm, other healthy habits also have not proven to effectively guard against the u. Other health ofcials disagree. Eating a healthy diet, sleeping well and get ting enough exercise can help to prevent in fectious diseases in cluding the u by supporting a healthy immune system, said Dr. Greg Poland, direc tor of the Mayo Clinics vaccine research group. Poland and Oster holm agree that the u vaccine is the best weapon available, though it has its limita tions. Several recent stud ies suggest that u shots may not save the lives of as many adults age 65 and older as pre viously thought. The whole idea that the u vaccine protects 90 percent of the time is just not true, Oster holm said. It varies by age, by underlying risk group, and it varies by year. While there are stud ies that clearly show that the live vaccine works well in children, there is no evidence that its as effective in adults, he said. But there have been some improvements in the vaccines. This year, certain vaccines will guard against four strains of u instead of the usual three. For healthy peo ple ages 2 to 49, there also are nasal sprays that protect against all four u strains. (The nasal sprays, which contain live viruses, are not suitable for those younger than 2 and older than 49 because their immune systems tend to be weaker.) There also are spe cialized shots, includ ing one that penetrates just below the skin for those who dont like needles; a higher-dose shot for people age 65 and older; and one thats grown without eggs for those with egg allergies. Flu activity typically peaks in mid-January, and it generally takes two weeks for the vac cine to be effective. FLU FROM PAGE C1 MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer DALLAS Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of can cer or heart disease in fact, were less likely to die of any cause during a 30-year Har vard study. Nuts have long been called heart-healthy, and the study is the largest ever done on whether eating them affects mortality. Researchers tracked 119,000 men and wom en and found that those who ate nuts roughly every day were 20 per cent less likely to die during the study peri od than those who nev er ate nuts. Eating nuts less often also appeared to lower the death risk, in direct proportion to consumption. The risk of dying of heart disease dropped 29 percent and the risk of dying of cancer fell 11 percent among those who had nuts seven or more times a week compared with people who never ate them. The benets were seen from peanuts as well as from pistachios, almonds, walnuts and other tree nuts. The re searchers did not look at how the nuts were prepared oiled or salted, raw or roasted. A bonus: Nut eaters stayed slimmer. Theres a general perception that if you eat more nuts youre going to get fat. Our re sults show the oppo site, said Dr. Ying Bao of Harvard-afliated Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston. She led the study, published in Thurs days New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institutes of Health and the In ternational Tree Nut Council Nutrition Re search & Education Foundation sponsored the study, but the nut group had no role in designing it or report ing the results. Researchers dont know why nuts may boost health. It could be that their unsatu rated fatty acids, min erals and other nutri ents lower cholesterol and inammation and reduce other prob lems, as earlier studies seemed to show. Observational stud ies like this one cant prove cause and effect, only suggest a connec tion. Research on diets is especially tough, be cause it can be difcult to single out the effects of any one food. People who eat more nuts may eat them on salads, for example, and some of the bene t may come from the leafy greens, said Dr. Robert Eckel, a Univer sity of Colorado car diologist and former president of the Amer ican Heart Association. Dr. Ralph Sacco, a University of Miami neurologist who also is a former heart associa tion president, agreed. Sometimes when you eat nuts you eat less of something else like potato chips, so the benet may come from avoiding an unhealthy food, Sacco said. The Harvard group has long been known for solid science on di ets. Its ndings build on a major study ear lier this year a rig orous experiment that found a Mediterra nean-style diet supple mented with nuts cuts the chance of heart-re lated problems, espe cially strokes, in older people at high risk of them. Many previous stud ies tie nut consump tion to lower risks of heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer and other maladies. In 2003, the Food and Drug Administration said a stful of nuts a day as part of a lowfat diet may reduce the risk of heart disease. The heart association recommends four serv ings of unsalted, un oiled nuts a week and warns against eating too many, since they are dense in calories. The new research combines two stud ies that started in the 1980s on 76,464 female nurses and 42,498 male health professionals. LM OTERO / AP Shelled pecans are displayed at the Navarro Pecan Company in Corsicana, Texas. Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of cancer or heart disease, in fact, were less likely to die of any cause during a 30-year Harvard study. New study ties nuts to lower cancer, heart death risk MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer The nations rst new guidelines in a decade for prevent ing heart attacks and strokes call for twice as many Americans one-third of all adults to consider tak ing cholesterol-lower ing statin drugs. {div} The guidelines, issued Tuesday by the Ameri can Heart Association and American Col lege of Cardiology, are a big change. They of fer doctors a new for mula for estimating a patients risk that in cludes many factors besides a high choles terol level, the main focus now. The for mula includes age, gender, race and fac tors such as whether someone smokes. The guidelines for the rst time take aim at strokes, not just heart attacks. Partly because of that, they set a lower threshold for using medicines to reduce risk. The denition of high cholesterol isnt changing, but the treatment goal is. In stead of aiming for a specic number, us ing whatever drugs get a patient there, the advice stresses statins such as Lipitor and Zocor and identies four groups of people they help the most. The emphasis is to try to treat more ap propriately, said Dr. Neil Stone, the North western University doctor who headed the cholesterol guide line panel. Were go ing to give statins to those who are the most likely to bene t. Doctors say the new approach will lim it how many people with low heart risks are put on statins sim ply because of a cho lesterol number. Yet under the new ad vice, one-third of U.S. adults 44 percent of men and 22 percent of women would meet the threshold to consider taking a sta tin. Under the current guidelines, statins are recommended for only about 15 percent of adults. Some doctors not involved in writing the guidance worry that it will be tough to understand. It will be contro versial, theres no question about it. For as long as I remem ber, weve told physi cians and patients we should treat their cho lesterol to certain goal levels, said the Cleve land Clinics Dr. Ste ven Nissen. US doctors urge wider use of statins

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 Hearing WorksChange your life. Call us today at (888) 403-27798602 S.W. Hwy 200, Suite E Ocala, FL 3448110601 US Hwy 441, Suite E-1 Leesburg, FL 347882721 S. Woodland Blvd Deland, FL 327201216 Mt. Homer Rd. Eustis, FL 32726 10935 SE 177 Pl, Suite 203 Summerfield, FL 34491Better Hearing... Better Living!!!www.hearingworksflorida.com Thank you for reading the Daily Commercial. MIKE STOBBE Associated Press ATLANTA The number of U.S. children with attention decit hyperactivity disorder continues to rise but may be leveling off a bit, a new survey shows. More than 1 in 10 children has been diagnosed with it, accord ing to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which surveyed more than 95,000 par ents in 2011. ADHD diagnoses have been rising since at least 1997, ac cording to CDC data. Experts think thats because more doc tors are looking for ADHD, and more parents know about it. The condition makes it hard for kids to pay attention and control impulsive behaviors. Its often treated with drugs, behav ioral therapy, or both. The latest survey found about 11 percent of children ages 4 through 17 had been diagnosed with ADHD. That translates to nearly 6 million children. Half of children are diagnosed by age 6, the study found. A 2007 survey put ADHD diag noses at 9.5 percent of kids. The CDC survey asked par ents if a health care provider told them their child had ADHD. Its not known how thorough the assessment was to reach that conclusion. ADHD diagnoses were in creasing at a rate of about 6 per cent a year in the mid-2000s, but slowed to 4 percent a year from 2007 to 2011. That may reect that doctors are closer to diag nosing most of the kids with the condition, said the CDCs Su sanna Visser, the studys lead author. US survey: More than 1 in 10 kids has ADHD

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 DEAR ABBY: I have been dating my boyfriend, Jose, for a year. Before that, we were friends for ve years. Ever since Ive known him, he and his half-sister, Blan ca, have danced together at par ties. Were all in our mid-20s. They dance salsa, merengue and other styles of music togeth er. I used to think it was cute, but now that Jose and I are a cou ple, I nd it annoying and a little creepy. He says Blanca loves to dance and cant always nd good partners. She gets mad when he danc es with me instead of her during her favorite songs. I told Jose he can dance only with me at the parties or only with her. Not both. I dont want to share him, and honestly, people joke that its incestuous. How can I make him under stand how much this both ers me? What can I say to his half-sister when she gives me the evil eye? My relationship with her is friendly, but it was bet ter before I started dating her half-brother. TAKES ONLY TWO TO TANGO DEAR TAKES ONLY TWO: If you want to hang onto Jose, simmer down and be less heavy-handed. Dictating who he can dance with only makes you appear to be jealous, insecure and controlling. Because he and Blanca have danced together for so long, its understandable that she ex pects to dance with him. My ad vice is to be gracious and hold onto your temper, because if you dont, your relationship with Blanca will no longer be friendly, and it could cost you your boy friend. DEAR ABBY: My mother-in-law is a good person, but she nev er wants to be around us or our children. She lives only 30 min utes away, has only one child (my husband) and has been wid owed for more than ve years. She has never called our house, didnt visit when the kids were born and usually mails gift cards at birthdays and Christmas. My own mother died a few months ago. Our kids are almost 13 and 10, so theyre not babies anymore. I try to reach out to her, but she is cold and not re sponsive. What else can I do? NO GRANDMA IN AUSTIN, TEXAS DEAR NO GRANDMA: What does your husband think about this? Has his mother always been this way? Could the problem be that she dislikes you or is disappoint ed in her son? There is no way to force a con nection on someone who is un willing, and Im not sure you would even want to. It appears your mother-in-law isnt ma ternal and prefers her indepen dence. Im sorry that your feel ings are hurt, but if you crave closeness with an older woman, you will have to look elsewhere to nd it. DEAR ABBY: My family is hav ing a Thanksgiving conundrum. My uncle and his wife have of fered to host the holiday. My un cle hesitated about having it be cause he recently lost his job. My grandmother decided that each couple should chip in $50 to pay for the dinner. (The total amount will be $300.) We will all make and bring dishes with us as well. Their children are not being asked to pay anything. My grandmother thinks this is a good idea because it would cost us more than $50 to go out to dinner for Thanksgiving, but some of us think its odd that were being charged to attend our familys dinner. No one else in the family is able or willing to host, so the only other option would be going to a restaurant. Any thoughts? TURKEY TROUBLES IN PHILADELPHIA DEAR TURKEY TROUBLES: Just this pay up! And while youre of fering thanks at the dinner ta ble, be grateful that the person in need of nancial help this holi day season isnt you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Comics & Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear Abby JEANNE PHILLIPS Jealous girlfriend must watch her step on the dance floor

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizon tal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D1 r fntb b b bb b b r bbb tbb f nnnt b r n b b bfb t ffr tb tnf nfbb fb bn bfb fb bbr b bffb r frf f tb r r bb fbb br rrrnr r btbb tbt n bbb fb bf b bf br fbbf tt bt bbbb br f b t bb bfbbr tb b bbbr fbr bbb fff bbb fb bbf ffr bbb bbffb bb n fb b bb t bt fb rf ntnrbftnf fntbfnfnf nfnr bbbbb bb bbb bbb bb b bb ff fnfntnrbft n ntf nfnfnn frnfnf nfff nfnrfnnf rfrnnftf fnfnrfn nt rnrrnfb rfnrnfnnfrnf rrfnt nfrfnfnf nfnr nrfntnr bftfntbn ffntb tn nfnnfn ntn fff b b nftn nnnn fn f r nfn ffnn nnnnffntbf nfnnf n n n brrfntnf fnnrrfnf nnnnnn nnrn fnnfn nnrf rfnt rfnnrrn fnfft nnf nfnfnf nnfffn f ff fnnnnf nnffn nfn fnfb b bb bnf nnfrfnrf nfn bb b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b n f r f n n n n n n f f n r f r r f n n f n n n n n r f n t n n f n n n f n f n f n f f n f b f n n t f n f r n n n f n n f f r n n n f f n f t n r f nf nnf b bb nffb nnnf n ntf b tn fn t ff ffn nnnfnn b brfnf b bff b r f n f f r f n n f r f n r f n f n n r f bbnnf n b rf n f r f n n n n n n f f n r f r r f n n f n n n n r f n t n n f n n n f n f n f n f n f n n f f r n n f n n r r f n f n f f b bbb nfrnfftb nff n ntf b bbbbb t b b b b rfn bfnfnf f nnf nfnfnf nnffb bbbb b bb nrf fnfnf ftnfnf nrfft fnffnf fnfnfr fnfnf fn fnf bnn nfnbfb nfn n nnfrfnr fnfffnf n b b b b b b b b

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 r f r r f r n t b b n rfrr rnrr fr frtr rrf rf tff rtf frr trrf rfr nrrf rr rrr rrrf rrr rrrr rrfrr rfrrr frr rrrf rfrrf frnr rtr r rrfr r r f r r r r r r f t r f r f r f f t f r f t r r f r f r f t f f r f r f r r r f r f r f t r f r r f ntt b t r r f t r f r f r r r r f nt r f r r b t t f r n r f t f r r nt b t t r r r t r f r r r r f r f r f r f r r t r r r n b rr rr r r r f f n f r f r r r r n r r r r r f r r r r f r f r r r r f r r f r r r r r r r r n n n r r r f r r r r r f r r f r r t f r f t b t t t b b t t b t b t t t b b t b b b n b b n rr r fr f fr nrr r r r

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rf ntbbtt tfb rbtt rf rtrbb rrbfnb fbbttb tt tfb rfnrbb fft b rb frfnb rr frbrfrbb rfn tbf t t f r r b b t t nrtfb bb nrbn fbb bbtt b fnbrfttnrb tt rtbbfr ttbb n b t t r r n r b r r t t r r t t r bfr nrbrrbf r f nbrfrr fttftfrtrtft btr tffrtrrftr rfrftb t f r f b r b r r n r r r r f r r t f f r t f r r b b f f b t t r n r r r f r r b f t t f r f n r b r t r f t b t r r r f r r t b t t r r r f r f r t b t f t r f t r f t b f b r r n f t f r f t r f t b t r r r r r f t f n b f r r r t f t r f f r f r r b rtrfbrr rnrtrbrtrfr tfrrtrnrb b f t f f n f r b r t f t t f r b t r b b t b f b b b r r f n n b b r b r r r f f f r b t f r r f r f t t r r b r f n b t f r b r r n nf n ffnrrfrt rfrbtttrrtrf rrrbrtt rrrbrrb rfttfnrb t b f r r f f r b t t f n f t f n r b r f r f n t r r t b t b r b r r f r f t t r f f b r r r b n f b t t f r t r f r r r b t t r r f f t f b t r f t t r f f t ffntfrrf ffttrbtrrrfrr fffnftfnrfr tfrrbrttr fnffrnrb nrrfrb t t f b frfttrftrb rbtb t f r r f r r t f b f r f t f b t t b fttrrftrfr frrfnrftfrrr rtrfnrrnrtrb frrrtr rtftrffnr nbr rrffr trrtbbf trfbttrnfr rfrttbrrff rtfrnr fnrfrb t r r f t t t f f f t t r r f t r r r n b rbrfnf ffrrfnrftb trnrftfrrr ttfbf rrrbfnr rfrrtbnrfnrb t r r t t bfttfrfnrb rrtrffnr bnrb t f r f t t f b r r n rbftrnr frfrfrfttnr ffrrb r r ftfrrftfff rbfrrbrb nrfttrb r r f t t t r b b r r r n r r b f t r f t f t t f n b n r r b r f r r f n f t t b r f t r r r t t n r b r r f r t r f t f r r t t f n r f n f t t r rtnfr rnfrrrtrbrb rfrffrtr f frtrfb rrrfrrrfn r rffrbfftr ftrbrrrb rftbtr rrfrrrttb r r f r f t t r b r r t r f r r t b b r r f rrrfnr nfb rtrtfb rrb f t n f n b r r r f r r t f n r t t r r t f r r f b r f t r f t r r f r r n b r r r r f t r b r t f f r f r t r r r r f r t r r r f r r r b r r t f r r t r r t r r r f r r b f n t f r r f t f n t f r r t f f f t r r f t r f f r f f f n t r r t f r n f b r r r t t f f r r t t r r r f f t r r f t r t t f r r f f r f f n b r r t r f t r f t r r n f t t r f t r f t b r

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 rfn tbn n nrntnbb f bbntb rntn bb rbbb fnntnbb rfr rfffrfn trn ntbn bbn fntn r bbbntnb rrr rntfnb r tnb rfn fntnbb fnb fntff bb bt ffb ffr ffntn f tnbb n n t n b rff rnfntnb rntbff fffn rfrfffr rfrrf frfff ffrn rfrrf rnnftn rfffnfrf rrfff fffrrfnf rfrnf r r n n r t n f t n b r ntnb fr rntnb f r r f n t n b r rntbnb rf ntffn rf rrntn rfrnr rnnt rfrr rnntbb nrrn rtnb t f rn t bnffr ntn fr ntn rrf ntn rrrn rfntnb rnff rntnbb f ntffn frbrfn fffnt fbn rntnb n rntnb rf ntbf rrf fntnb ntffn bb bntn r rfntn fffn tffnb r fntnb f r r f r r t n t n n rb t fn tn fn tfrt tn b bnrfrn tn n rfbrbf ntbf n r rrntnb rfn t rfnrn t nb tn rrfr rntnb bbf brrntn rbbr rntffn rf nnrntbbbb ffnrtn frf ntb fn rntnb ff ffntn nn rrntb r ntbnb nbrn tffnbb rn tb frrn frnt fnff fnt tn r n n n f n r n n f f f r r f r n r r r r r n brff fnffffr rfff rr rfrfffrf rff n r r f r r r r f n r r r r f n f f f r f r f f b n r r n b b fnt ff rrnr ntnn r ntb fnbn nfntbnb rrb tb ff r nrntn rntn b fnrtbn b fn tbrrn ffr f fnrfffn tn r rrnntnb ff ntnbn r f nfntb rrrfn tffnfnb ntb rn fn tnb t ffrfr fntn rrntnffn b rrr t rnrfnr tn frr nftftn b bfffrnrf nt rfn ffntn ff frnt rntnb rfb ntf frfn tbb n rtbn bb t rfffffnt b rfff rfffnt rffff ftn rfft bb frr rrnrffnff ntbb r n f n n t n nrffnnf nrntbn r ntnbb n t rff fntn rfn tffnbb rbnn fffnt frn tn rfnfffn tn ff rff nfntnbb rrr fntb r r f r t f f r f r r f b rrr fnt rrrrn tff nfffn tnb ff rfrtb rf fntn fr rnt rnf fffntb rrrfrff rntnb rrnfffntn rff nrfntb tffnb ffrn tb fnff fnt fffnfff ffnt ffntn bb frn tn rn fntnb frfn brnt fnt bb rnfffntn frf ntnb nt n fffntnbb n ftnb nrrnt ff bb br frnt ffnt fr fnntnb nfn rffntffnb r r b n t b fb rfntn r r r f t r f f f f f n n f ffntn n f f f n t n rrfntffnb fnt b f ntbb n fffntnb r rfntbnbb bfnrn tnb ffrf ntn rfnfnt bb rrntn frnn tnb frff nntnbb r tnb f r r n n b b fffn tbb r rfnntb rrffn ntnb rn tbnn frf nnt

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D7 rf ntb rfnr rn rf fnff t ffb rffff frn nn r nrrnrbbbf bf b rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt fr ffrrtb r r r t f b t r b r f t t b t r b r f r t t b f b b t t r f f ntbr ttfrtr rr f b f b r f r b t t t f f b r f b r n b t f f r r t t t r r f r b f f b r r b r b b f b b f r f r t t r f b r f t r r b t t nr tbtt r r r r b t t r f b frrbbtrtt tt f tbr rrtrbr r r r t f b t r b r f t t b t r b r f r t t t f r t f r r b t b f b t rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt f tbr bfbr brbffr tbr r f b r f t r f b t r bbf tfrtr tbbtt r r f f b t f b f r b t t rrr rtbf btbrtrf bfbnbtt ftbbfbrft rbrbtbttbt rfbtt rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt rr tbf tbr n bfrfrbf btt bbrt tt fbb fbb tf btrttrf rfttbrr rbtt tr btrrr btt bt bttfbbrr btt btfb btt bt b r fbb rtbff r bt tbftr btt ff rrr bffrrr f r r n f r r b btbttt bfrr rt b fbbrnf r tb btt trrf btt t f t b f b b fbtb fbt tbbfb rtfrrr bb tr ftbf fb rr bbbt t rft rrftrr rfr f b t f t f r f r btt tt tbftbftr btt t nt t rrr rfbbt brrnff rt bbbb tr ftrrr btt brrfb bfbb fbbrf btt t r fr rfftb rffbrfbffrb rtrrftbfr ffb ttbft tr rnf btt rbbf r btb rfbf rr btt fr tt bbftnf rffbbtt b btt ttrfrr frfr bttrf tfrtnfrr rrnfttrf rfbtfbrrt rrr ttttr rrrrtb r bnbfr rffbr ttrffbfb f bfbrbr ttttrrt rrbtt ffrrt fbbtt ft n

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D8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 rfntb nbrtrn rb r nn b bbrrntn rn fnrrnbrntrn trrnrn trnbrtrnt tnrtrntfrn ffrnbrtrn trtnrn bb fr ntbb n b bt b rnb rnb b nnbt nb rrf b bb nnbrrbb rtnrb ntf btrrb rn b bnb bnr t rrnnbnr tnb nrnb rntrnbrrnnb nbb rfb rb b r r r r f f t r n t n b frbnb ntnb brrf f b tt rn nbb rbb f f f f f r n n b t b r n b tbb brbn frnn bnrn brnnrrnb b bb nt b t b t f r r r r t t r n t t t r r n t r t r n f t n t r n r b f b n n n r t r n r n n r r n r b r b r f b b nrb rbbbrbnt trb rrb n t t r r b b tf b frrn btnnb b b f b rn nbbbb rbtbb rn bb btf t tf bb frft nrrn rnt trnb brtfr b t b b n b t b b bb f f f b n b b n r n n r r r n r b r n n r n r b n n b frn tn nnrn rrrn bnrnrb rb rnfb bb b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn bbf f bbbrf f b b bb b bbbb b b b b bnf n t n f r n b n n f r r n b b r r b b bf f t b r r b n b b r r b r t b n b r r b b b t n r n bf f bbff f b t r f r n t r r n r rbbb brb rnf nbrb b b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn r r n b n t r n n r r f r n r b r r r b b b t b b n b t b rf ff r f trnrrrb rnrnn frnftrn rrnntrrr nrnntnb b nnrnn rnb n b t r r r n b b b r t t b r r b r n r r r frt f rb brnbt nnb b r n b n b r b b b nrbrnb nrnfb rb nf b rtrbnt r n b b r n b nrnr tb bff



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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial,comNumero us efforts are under way to revitalize the city of Mount Dora and trans form its image in the next ve to six years. Those efforts include the completion of a 25-mile state toll road running through Mount Dora, providing easy access to Orlando. The Wekiva Parkway project is coordinated in conjunction with the construction of the Wekiva Trail, a 15-mile multi-use trail connecting Lake, Seminole and Orange counties. City ofcials in collaboration with the county have already begun planning for a Mount Dora regional commercial district, which would be located at Round Lake Road and State Road 46. The Wekiva Trail will bring visitors from Seminole and Orange County to downtown, where they will hopefully spend money, and it will enhance the value of residential ar eas near the vicinity of the trail, Lake County Commissioner Leslie Campione said. Community leaders and trail advocates have focused on getting the trail built in conjunction with the parkway, she said. Otherwise, it would be out of reach nancially for Lake County to take on a project of this magnitude, according to Campione. Vol. 137, No. 329 | 4 sections MISSED YOUR PAPER?Call 787-0600 (Lake County), or 877-702-0600 (Sumter County)NEWS TIP?Call Scott Callahan at 365-8203 INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C6 CROSSWORDS D4 DEAR ABBY D7 en OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A7 WORLD A6 TODAYS WEATHER HIGH 72en LOW62 See A8 BUCS DEFEAT LIONS 24-21 FOR THIRD STRAIGHT WIN, SPORTS B1LOCAL: Homeless drop-in shelter to offer meals, showers, help to needy, A3 STUDY: Nuts may lower cancer, heart death risk, C3 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, November 25, 2013 www.dailycommercial.com 50 BRADLEY KLAPPER, JULIE PACE and MATTHEW LEEAssociated PressWASHINGTON With their destination and mission among Americas closest guarded secrets, the small group of ofcials hand-picked by President Barack Obama boarded a mili tary plane in March. The travel plans of the U.S. diplomats and foreign policy advisers were not on any public itineraries. No reception greeted them as they landed. But awaiting the Americans in the remote and ancient Gulf sultanate of Oman was the rea son for all the secrecy: a delegation of Iranians ready to meet them. It was at this rst high-level gathering at a secure location in the Omani capital of Mus cat, famous for its souk lled with frankin cense and myrrh, that the Obama admin istration began laying the groundwork for this weekends historic nuclear pact between world powers and Iran, Associated Press has learned.Secret talks set stage for nuke deal DONNA CASSATAAssociated PressWASHINGTON For 51 years of war and peace, Republicans and Democrats rallied around a bill to pay the troops, buy ships and aircraft and set military policy. Last week, the Sen ate couldnt even agree on votes. Under pressure from President Barack Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., was determined to avoid a vote on adding a new batch of tough penalties against Iran to the National Defense Au thorization Act as ne gotiators held nuclear talks in Switzerland. A deal announced Sunday temporarily freezes Irans nuclear pr ogram.Defense bill caught in Congress political divideTrails, toll road seen as key to areas fortunes BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cyclists riding the Seminole Wekiva trail take a tunnel under International Parkway on Saturday. The Wekiva Parkway project will extend the trail and will connect it to areas in Lake, Seminole and Orange counties. Building paths to prosperityMOUNT DORA Wekiva Trail Wekiva Parkway Business park site MOUNT DORA APOPKA 441 441 437 429 437 46A 46 STAFF GRAPHIC / WHITNEY WILLARD 414ORANGE COUNTY LAKE COUNTY SLUG: wekivatrail.pdf SIZE: 3.5x2.5 LOCATION: News Composing>> Nov. 25 folder NOTE: Do not shrink or enlarge map size. Fonts will not appear correct. Wekiva Trail Wekiva Parkway Business park site MOUNT DORA APOPKA 441 441 437 429 437 46A 46STAFF GRAPHIC / WHITNEY WILLARD 414ORANGE COUNTY LAKE COUNTY N N STAFF GRAPHIC / WHITNEY WILLARD RICK RUNION / THE LEDGER Cattle run at the Lightsey Cattle Company ranch in Lake Wales. Florida is the third largest beef-producing state east of the Mississippi River and is ranked 10th in the nation. Staff ReportThe Florida cattle industry is poised to grow to help offset a nation wide shortage of cows due to drought and as land for other uses becomes less in demand, according to Jim Handley, executive vice president of the Florida Cattlemens Association. So, what does that mean for Lake and Sumter counties? According to gures from the United States Department of Agriculture, Lake is tied for 20th place among Floridas 67 counties in terms of Flor ida cattle and calve pro duction as of last January. In fact, there ar e more cat tle in Lake 23,000 head than there are people living in Leesbu rg, U.S. Census gures show. Sumter has even more cattle and calves, 35,000, ranking it 15th in the state among livestock-producing counties. Recent droughts in the West and Midwest have led to a 61-year low in cattle population, and economists predict record prots here over the next three to ve years, said Handley, who spoke at a Farm-City Week luncheon last week in Gainesville.LEESBURGThings looking up for cattle industry SEE GREEN | A2SEE CATTLE | A4SEE DEAL | A4SEE BILL | A4

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 BRIDGE HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Nov. 25, 2013: This year you focus on a long-term goal. Your friends also will play a signicant role in your year. Recognize that you might be unduly serious at times. If you are single, you are strikingly visible to the person who might be your next sweetie. This person eventually will let you know how he or she feels. If you are attached, the two of you will enjoy being out and about as a couple, especially if youre involved in a mu tual commitment or cause. VIRGO fusses over details to such an extent that he or she loses sight of the big picture. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll act as if it is your desti ny to dive head rst into a proj ect in an attempt to move it forward. Try not to get frustrated at others lack of vision or cre ativity. Experiment with a differ ent route, or communicate differently. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your imagination and drive is limitless, or so it seems. You might try to entice others to think like you. Forget it. Your uniqueness makes you special and also more in demand. A partner will want to have a seri ous talk with you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You cant seem to get energized about anything at the moment. If you can take the day off and relax, that might be best. Dont take that attitude into work or even into a friendly lunch with a pal. Evaluate what is at the root of your malaise. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Be clear and direct. If confusion ensues, youll know that you have done your best! Also make it a point to conrm meeting times and places. Tread lightly with a child or new friend. This person denitely seems to be in an off mood. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could give some troublesome issues power if you focus too much on them. Be as clear as possible. Bone up on your lis tening skills, and repeat any thing that seems off. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) A sudden surge greets you in the morning with your rst cup of joe. You might feel as if others are speaking pig latin, as they dont seem to understand what youre saying. You might want to stop and decipher what could be an important message. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) No one needs to tell you that its Monday you know by the way you feel. Stay out of the problems around you; instead, focus on accomplishing one task after another. It might be necessary to have a long-overdue conversation about your nances. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You come off as very serious to those around you. Approach each moment as new and maintain a methodical approach. If a situation seems lu dicrous, know that it probably is. Maintaining your distance will work well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your ability to get through a hassle elevates your value to a higher-up. Once more, this per son might dump a problem on you. Confusion could surround a personal issue as well. Do what you must, but remember to take care of yourself, too. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Keep reaching out for a new solution. It is out there for you to nd; you just havent hit upon it yet. Detach and refuse to feel pushed. Back away from a pressure-cooker atmosphere, and much more will reveal itself. A meeting demands your presence. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) A loved one might mean well, but you will have a difcult time believing that when you see what is going on behind the scenes. Take a step back and chill out. Imagine what it would be like to walk in the other partys shoes. You will understand. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your intentions are good, but your actions just might cre ate more of a fog around an al ready unclear situation. Make a point to detach, and youll gain a new perspective. The end result will be better if you do. HOROSCOPES HOW TO REACH US SUNDAYCASH 3 . ............................................... 4-4-7 Afternoon . .......................................... 9-1-2 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 4-3-8-2 Afternoon . ....................................... 1-6-6-1FLORIDALOTTERY SATURDAYFANTASY 5 . ............................. 5-9-14-26-33 2 of 5 wins free ticket 3 of 5 wins $18.50 4 of 5 wins $555 Rolldown THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $91.59 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 787-0600 in Lake County or (877) 702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mon day through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation De part-ment 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . .............. 787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION RATESSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. SUBSCRIPTION REFUND POLICY: Subscription refunds will be calculated at the current basic subscription price, excluding the cur rent month. All refund requests must be made in writing and signed. Send to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. (In lieu of a refund, we will transfer any remaining time on a subscription to another party or make it available to students through our Newspapers in Education program.) RECYCLING: The Daily Commercial supports environmental protection through recycling. Plastic bags may be recycled at grocery stores. Newspapers may be recycled at the Commercials Leesburg ofce, 212 E. Main St., during business hours. This newspaper is printed on recycled newsprint. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 26.82 1.88 28.70 47.22 3.31 50.53 85.60 5.99 9 1.59 7 days a week Mail Subscription 3 months 6 months One Y ear Daily/Sunday 45.19 84.88 163.16 Sunday only 28.67 50.72 92.61 STAFF INFORMATIONROD DIXON, publisher352-365-8213 .................................. rod.dixon@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comBILL KOCH, assistant managing editor352-365-8208 . ................................... bill.koch@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comSPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be e-mailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU/ CELEBRATIONSTo have your club or organizations events printed in the YourCommunity calendar listings, just email the information to pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Even so, county ofcials said the biggest challenge is nding funding sources for the Wekiva Trail project. At the same time, city ofcials said they want to bring Orange County res idents to east Lake County for work opportunities, but said they must overcome the notion that the area is just a big bedroom community. Thirty years ago, the Florida Department of Transportation, the Or lando-Orange County Expressway Authority and Floridas Turnpike Enterprise determined the beltway needed to be completed, said Mary Brooks, public involvement coordinator for Wekiva Parkway. The $1.7 billion project funded in partner ship with the FDOT, the expressway authority and the enterprise would complete the beltway around metropolitan Or lando, according to information from the project. Once the project is completed hopefully by 2019, it is going to make it much easier to get to the parkway and to travel between Seminole, Lake and Orange counties, Brooks said. The toll road will begin at State Road 429/ Daniel Webster Western Beltway at the new Connector Road, just north of U.S. Highway 441 in Apoka, according to details of the project. From there, it will head north to a systems interchange just south of the Or GREENFROM PAGE A1 ange County-Lake County line. The parkway will include an interchange at State Road 46 near Round Lake Road in Mount Dora. It will then head east and north along the SR 46 corridor in both Lake and Seminole County before turning south to connect with State Road 417. As a result of the project, there will be more than 3,400 acres of land set aside for conservation. Part of the work will involve the reconstruction of the U.S. Highway 441/SR 46 interchange in Mount Dora, and the relocation of County Road 46A. Transportation ofcials said the Parkway would reduce trafc congestion on U.S. 441 and SR 46. Brooks said it also would reduce vehicle crashes on SR 46. Wekiva Parkway will alleviate the trafc on local and state roads and make it much easier and quicker to get to a destination, she said, emphasizing it will provide connectivity to SR 417 and the I-4 corridors. It is also expected to create 36,000 jobs, Brooks said. Project details also specify there will be a non-tolled option for local trips from the County Road 46A realignment in Lake County to Orange Boulevard in Seminole County. Providing hikers, nature enthusiasts and cy clists a connection between Lake, Seminole and Orange counties, the 15-mile trail will provide a gateway to the shops, restaurants and cultural destinations of the city of Mount Dora, according to project specications. Beginning at Tremain Street, the trail will connect with the Seminole Wekiva Trail near the Wekiva River, according to the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organizations Project Development and Environmental Study. There are also plans to evaluate a north/south connection through the Neighborhood Lakes property to the West Or ange Trail near Kelly Park. Mike Woods, transportation planner with the Lake-Sumter MPO, said a nal report on the study phase of the project would be completed at the end of the month. We would like the whole thing built within ve years, he said. The challenge is funding right of way and construction costs, Woods explained. A large portion of the trail will sit on rights-ofway owned by CSX and the Central Florida Railroad. There is an agreement in place with Mount Dora and Lake County with the Central Florida Railroad to purchase the lease from them, and once they pur chase the lease, to negotiate with CSX to purchase the land, Woods said. In 2011, the Balmoral Group conducted an economic impact study on the proposed trail, citing numerous positive economic development outcomes. Once the trail is constructed, the group predicted it would bring in between $3 million and 12.7 million in benets for businesses and workers along the downtown trail segment while also creating more than 75 jobs. Also, along the downtown trail segment, there will be an increase of at least $4.8 million in property values, the study stated. The group also found that about 57,140 people are expected to use the trail at least one time each year. The downtown trail, with its connectivity to existing trails and addition of increased bicyclist trafc, will represent a significant enhancement to the existing Lake County Trail System, the study found. Campione said the economic activity associated with trails of this nature is a proven phenomenon in other places that have similar characteristics as Mount Dora, such as Winter Garden. Indeed, Balmoral Group highlighted Winter Gar den as a blighted area before its trail was constructed. Now, the area is nearly 100 percent storefront occupied, the study stated. Even though the trail has received community support, Campione said the challenge is nding funding sources for the projected expected to cost more than $11 million. We simply cannot justify spending money on building a trail when we have roads and sidewalks that need to be maintained competing for the same dollars, she said. That is why it is so critical that we look for funding opportunities that are outside the box. Those opportunities include partnering with agencies, the state, nonprot organizations and the private sector, Campione said. Mount Dora May or-elect Cathy Hoechst said bicycling has increased in popularity in the city, highlighting the importance of the trail. You are seeing more and more people looking at the focus for health and wellness, she said. Currently, there are cow pastures at Round Lake Road and SR 46. City ofcials want to change that, bringing in industrial, manufactur ing, research and development, institutional and educational facilities and retail to the area, after the Wekiva Parkway is built. Some 900 acres is eyed for an economic zone. The concept is that we will create an environment where people will locate businesses that have higher paying jobs, said Mark Reggentin, planning and development director for Mount Dora. We dont want it to be a regional mall. We are shooting for higher, commercial, industrial and ofce uses. Currently an ideal place for families to live, Campione said an employment hub similar to Lake Mary, Maitland and Healthrow, is needed where county residents can nd high wage jobs similar to those available in the metro-Or lando region. Reggentin said an economist has been hired to study the industries that would t in that area. One of the biggest challenges is we have been treated as a bedroom community to the Orlando metro area, he said. We are just the place where people come in and sleep at night. We want people coming in from Orange County to jobs in east Lake County. We have a lot to offer in terms of quality of life in Mount Dora. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA motorcyclist was killed at the scene of a multiple-vehicle crash on State Road 44 and County Road 231 in Sumter Coun ty, Florida Highway Patrol ofcials said. According to police reports released Sunday, Benjamin Gerard Brown, 34, of Summereld, died around 6:30 / p .m. Fri day after being struck by a motorist while both were driving westbound in the out side lane. FHP said Frank Biondi, 92, of Lake Panasoffkee, failed to slow down or stop for the motorcyclist and struck the 2003 Yamaha motorcycle. Police said Brown was subsequent ly struck by two more vehicles driven by Clayton Simmons, 69 of Lake Mary, and Jon McDonough, 50 of Wildwood, both driving westbound on State Road 44, while a fth vehicle, driven by Aldo na Michalina Ferraro, 56, of Hernando, collided with the overturned motorcycle.SUMTER COUNTYMotorcyclist dies in crash with cars

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAIL Y COMMERCIAL A3 Area Briefs www.dailycommercial.com ... and well share it with our readers. Some of our best story ideas and photos come from our readers. So dont hesitate to share your youth activities, awards, accomplishments, festivals, charity e vents and other things that make our communities special. And dont overlook those family milestones birthdays, engagements, marriages, business promotions and militar y news.Just email your photos and news to ... pamfennimore@dailycommercial.com IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING, RECORD IT EUSTIS Christmas in Eustis begins TuesdayThe Christmas in Eustis annual fundraiser for the Eustis Historical Museum begins on Tuesday at the Eustis Community Center, 601 North Shore Dr. Hours are: Weekdays and Saturday, from 9 / a.m. to 5 / p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 / p.m. and closed on Thanksgiving. For information, call 352-483-0046.TAVARES Lake libraries to close on ThanksgivingLake County Library System libraries will close Thursday through S aturday, and reopen Dec. 2, with regularly scheduled hours. Closings include: Astor County Library; Cagan Crossings Community Library, Clermont; Cooper Memorial Library, Clermont; East Lake County Library, Sorrento; Fruitland Park Library; Helen Lehmann Memorial Library, Montverde; Lady Lake Public Library; Marianne Beck Memorial Library, Howey-in-the-Hills; Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, Groveland; Minneola Schoolhouse Library; Paisley County Library; City of Tavares Public Library, Tavares; Umatilla Public Library; W. T. Bland Public Library, Mount Dora. County branch libraries and the Fruitland Park Library will close on Wednesday at 5 / p.m., and the W.T. Bland Public Library will close at 6 / p.m. The Leesburg Public Library will close on Wednesday at 6 / p.m. and remain closed Thursday and Friday but will re-open on Saturday with normal operating hours. Go to www.mylakelibrary.org for information.LEESBURG Waste Management curtails service for holidayCustomers serviced by Waste Management and live in unincorporated Lake County, The V illages, Lady Lake, Fruitland Park, Eustis and Mount Dora that have twice-weekly vegetation and recy cling services, and commercial container service, will have no collection on Thanksgiving Day. S ervices will resume for these customers for garbage pickup on Dec. 2; for r ecycling and vegetation on Dec. 5. The city of Eustis garbage, recy cling and vegetation will be picked up on F riday. Wildwood will follow that same schedule. For information, call 352-787-4416.OCALA Live Christmas tree permits offeredLive Christmas trees will be available to harvest in the Ocala National F orest today through Dec. 24. For information, call the Lake George Ranger District ofce at 352625-2520 or the Seminole Ranger District Ofce at 352-669-3153.State&RegionNEWS EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comHomeless people in Lake County may soon have a safe place to drop in for a hot shower, to wash their clothes or con nect with services, thanks to efforts of two organiza tions striving to help the homeless LifeStream Behavior al Center and the Lake C ommunity Foundation are spearheading plans to renovate LifeStreams former outpatient clin ic at 115 Citrus Ave., Eus tis, into a homeless dropin center B.E. Thompson, direc tor of development for LifeS tream, serves as pres ident of Florida Coalition for the H omeless, and as a result Gov. Rick Scott is expected to appoint him to the Florida Council on Homelessness, since the Florida Coalition for the Homeless has an au tomatic position on that boar d by legislative man date. Thompson believ es the drop-in center could be come a model facility for other communities We denitely want to set it up using evi dence-based practices, so that it will be a model that hopefully other con tinuums of care through out the state will want to r eplicate and possibly throughout the nation, he said. Homelessness is de nitely a priority for us because so many of our clients ar e affected by homelessness. Thompson said he has seen a growing need for homeless services in the Eustis area, and the new center will be a place where the homeless can clean up with showers and laundry machines, while their belongings are safe ly stowed in lockers. P eople using the center will be made aware of the many resources available, and will be able to con nect with family and ser vice agencies through lim ited phone and Internet access and to meet with service organizations rep resentatives. In order to make the drop-in center everything that we want, we are go ing to have to increase the number of sho wers, bath rooms and laundry hookups , Thompson said. We are going to be working aggressively after the rst of the year to try to raise the cash and in-kind do nations to get the program oper ational. LifeStream will also be looking for grants to help the project. Mike Sleaford, chairman of Lake Community Foun dations board of directors, said the par tnership was the result of the efforts by the foundations Home less Giving Circle to nd an or ganization that had the vision and resources to use funds donated by the Giving Circle to make a major difference in the lives of the homeless. The Homeless Giving Circle began after LCF di rector Ann Huffstetler was tr ying to help a homeless, barefoot young woman with basic necessities and information. Ann was frustrated be cause she could not help this y oung woman get what Ann considered to be basic needs, said Virginia Barker, executive director of the foundation. And they were simple things. The woman was barefoot and she needed shoes. She was hungry, she needed a shower, and she needed a place to stay. Ann needed someone to tell her how to help this woman meet those needs. The homeless cen ter will be open daily and dir ected by an adviso ry committee, including two r epresentatives from LifeStream, one from the Lake Community Foun dation, the foundations G iving Circle, a Eustis city commissioner, and one service provide appointed by the Mid Florida Home less Commission. Those inter ested in speaking engagements about the project may call Virginia Barker at 3577259 or B.E. Thompson at 315-7509.EUSTISHomeless drop-in center to open THERESA CAMPBELL/DAILY COMMER cC IALThis house at 315 Citrus Ave., Eustis, will serve as a drop-in center for homeless people to be able to shower and receive services. Ocala SS tarBB annerOCALA The president of a north Florida Tea Par ty group has been killed in a two-v ehicle car crash in Marion County. The Florida Highway Patrol told the Ocala Star-Banner that 70-yearold Stephen Hunter of Sparr died in the Friday night crash. Hunter head ed the Ocala Tea Party or T ea Party Solutions for the last several years. Friends say Hunter was a Vietnam veteran who later worked at defense contractor Lockheed Martin. Troopers say Hunter was attempting to make a left turn on U.S. 441 and apparently did not see an oncoming pickup truck, which struck Hunters car on the drivers side. Hunter was pronounced dead at the scene. The two occupants of the truck were uninjured. Neither Kirkland nor Hodges were injured. They were wearing their seat belts, troopers said.Car crash kills Tea PP a rty leader Giving thanks Groveland Cares hosted a Thanksgiving dinner Saturday at the historic Womens Club building at Lake David Park in Groveland. PP HO tT OS BY L L IN d D A CHARL tT ON Eric Sorkin, left, and Les Putnam carve turkey. Dina Sweatt served rolls to diners Saturday at the Womens Club building at Lake David Park in Groveland. Dinner organizer Rose Radzik shows volunteers how its done. James Baumann serves rolls to early diners at Saturdays early Thanksgiving dinner.

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A4 DAIL Y COMMERCIAL Monday November 25, 2013 In Memory of Lear L. ShortNovember 25, 1946 November 5, 2011 Love, Howard Short & Family r frrrnr rtbfr rr rnbbr rnb nrr bb Army ~ Navy~ Air Force ~ Marines ~ Coast GuardActive Duty/Veterans Thank you for serving our country.Banks/Page Theus Funeral Home410 North Webster St., Wildwood, FL 34785 352-748-1000 www.bankspagetheus.com 12 noonThey picked their price, uploaded a photo and paid for their ad. Its just that simple!No matter what time of the day it is, you can place your classified merchandise ad online, pay for it and just wait for the phone to ring! Fast, convenient and on your schedule! Time to sell that dress!Time to sell that washer! Time to sell that lawn mower! 7 24www.dailycommercial.com*Employment advertisements are excluded. Please call 352-314-FAST to speak with a customer service rep. Lake: 352-314-3278 or Sumter: 352-748-1955 Staff reportIf wellness and lifestyle changes are going to be on your list of New Years resolutions, note that Lees burg Regional Medical Centers Wellness Center will be offering discounted $60 memberships from D ec. 16 through Jan. 31. The personalized attention and expertise of our staff, combined with our high-quality exercise equipment and classes, will help you reach your goals, said Brett Jones, exercise spe cialist at the center. The 10,000-squar e-foot facility is off Highway 441 and offers a team of certied exercise specialists, per sonal trainers and licensed massage ther apists. This offer expires at the end of March 2014. Memberships cannot be placed on hold during this time and refunds will not be given for non-use of the facility. For information, call at 352-3235639.LEESBURGWellness center offers discount memberships OBITUARIESFrances Marvin McCulloughFrances Marvin Mc Cullough, 75, of Leesburg, Florida, died Thursday Novem ber 21, 2013. She was bor n February 8, 1938 in Salt Springs, Florida and has been a Flori da resident her whole life She was of the Bap tist faith, a homemaker whom enjo yed dancing and partying and was a member of the Ea gle Auxiliary. She is sur vived by her son, James Richar d (Diana) Mc Cullough of Leesburg; daughter Frances An nettte( Michael) Teate of Lady Lake; gr and children, Samantha, M att, Jamie and Chris ; great grandchildren, Hayleigh, Taylor, Bri anna and Trey. She was pr eceded in death by her husband, James P. Jimmy McCullough; sons, Greg, Ken, Mi chael and Billy and daughter Julie. Friends may call on Wednes day, November 26, 2013 fr om 6:00 to 8:00 pm at Beyers Funeral Home, Leesburg. Services will be held at Beyers Fu neral Home Chapel on W ednesday, November 27, 2013 at 11:00 am with Dr. Alan Holden ofciating. Burial will follow at Electra Cem etery in Oklawaha. Online condolences may be left at www .beyers funeralhome.com. Ar rangements entrusted to Beyers Funeral H ome and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.DEATH N oO TI cC E S BB everly SS ue CunninghamBeverly Sue Cun ningham, 83, of Tava res, died Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. H arden/P auli Funeral Home, Eustis.IN ME mM ORY Were enjoying the benets of a tight sup ply. Our export demand is skyrocketing, and our domestic de mand is quite strong, he said. Its getting to the point that its cru cial to see herd rebuilding. The state s broodcow population dropped to 910,000 from a high of 965,000 as ranch land was de veloped, but has sta bilized in recent years with the land boom over and some citrus land converted to pas ture as a result of cit rus disease, he said. D emand for local and grass-fed beef is leading to expanded operations for nished cattle, a small but growing sector of the Florida cattle industry, Handley said. That in cludes plans to expand A dena Springs Ranch in Marion County, as well as cattle farms in Suwannee and Sumter counties. A lot of people may not realize this, but Lake has a very ac tive and thriving cattle industry, said Me gan Brew, livestock and natur al resources agent for the Univer sity of Florida/Institute of Food and Agri cultural Science Lake County Extension Ofce in Tavares. Florida is primar ily a cow-calf state, meaning that calv es are born and raised in Florida then shipped out west for nishing and processing be cause it is more cost effectiv e to bring the cattle to the grain than to bring the grain to the cattle, she said Thursday. There is also a small but growing grass fed beef movement here where cattle are raised and nished on pas ture, Brew said. Not only does the cattle industry provide a wholesome and deli cious meat it is also responsible for preserving a lot of the green space that makes our community so spe cial, she said. A ccording to Brew, Lake is home to an ac tive Cattlemens Association and Junior C attlemens Associa tion. In 2013, the Lake C ounty Junior Cattle men won a national beef mar keting com petition. F lorida is the third largest beef-produc ing state east of the M ississippi River and is ranked 10th in the nation. Beef cattle is a $670 million indus try here with 1.6 million cattle, including 115,000 dair y cows and 910,000 brood cows. The top 10 cat tle-producing counties are Okeechobee, H ighlands, Osceola, Polk, Hardee, De Soto, Hendry, Glades, Su wannee and Jackson.Anthony Clark of Halifax Media contributed material to this report. C ATTATT L EE FROM PAGE A A 1 Even Americas closest allies were kept in the dark. Obama rst shared the existence of the secret diploma cy with Israeli Prime M inister Benjamin Ne tanyahu in September, and only then offered a limited recounting of how long the dis cussions between Iran and the United States had been taking place. The Obama ad ministration then in formed the other ve nations negotiating alongside the U.S. Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia. And since then much of their public diplo macy with Iran has fo cused on incorporating and formalizing the progress made in the private U.S.-Irani an talks. The AP has lear ned that at least ve se cret meetings have occurred between top Obama administr a tion and Iranian of cials since March. D eputy Secretary of State William Burns and Jake Sullivan, Vice President Joe Bidens top foreign policy ad viser, led each U.S. del egation. At the most r ecent face-to-face talks, they were joined by chief U.S. nucle ar negotiator Wendy S herman. It was at the nal get-together that the two sides ultimate ly agreed on the contours of the pact signed befor e dawn Sunday by the socalled P5+1 group of nations and Iran, three senior admin istration ofcials told the AP All ofcials spoke on condition of anonymity because they werent autho rized to be quoted by name talking about the sensitive diploma cy. The AP was tipped to the rst U.S.-Irani an meeting in March shor tly after it oc curred, but the White H ouse and State De partment disputed elements of the account and the AP could not conrm the meeting. The AP learned of fur ther indications of secret diplomacy in the fall and pr essed the White House and oth er ofcials further. dD EA lLfF ROM PAGE AA 1Reid wasnt keen on replaying a ght over the health care law, opening up conten tious issues such as go vernment spying or allowing probably the last bill out of Con gress this year to become a magnet for other matters Everyone has to understand this is not going to be an open amendment process, Reid told his col leagues as he sought to limit amendments and wrap up the $625 billion defense mea sure after some three days of debate He contends GOP delay ing tactics have forced his hand. A po wer grab, com plained frustrated Republicans who demanded they be al lowed to offer amend ments and get votes on them the nor m for decades on a bill that represents half the nations discre tionary budget. The GOP r epeated ly carps about Reids heavy -handed con trol, manifested by the r ules change on libusters. Republicans say the defense bill could have been done months ago but was put off until the last minute to spare Obama a few nation al security black eyes. Republicans are entitled to some amendments, plead ed Sen. Jim Inhofe of O klahoma, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Ser vices Committee. He offer ed a whittled list of 25 GOP amend ments from the list of 350 put forth by mem bers of both parties. I t was a no go, the latest traditionally bi partisan bill to fall o n the har d times of a fractious Congress. BI llLLfF ROM PAGE AA 1

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAIL Y COMMERCIAL Monday November 25, 2013 JOVANA GECAssociated PressBELGRADE, Serbia Gazproms South Stream pipeline, which will bypass Ukraine to transport Russian nat ural gas to Europe, is vital for Serbia because it will provide jobs and boost the Balkan coun trys regional position, the pr ime minister said Sunday, insisting that traditionally close ties with Russia will not af fect his nations bid to join the European Union. In an interview with the Associated Press at the formal start of the pipeline construction work in Serbia on Sun day, Ivica Dacic said that R ussia, which has supported Serbia polit ically in a dispute with the West over Kosovo, does not object to the countrys effort at EU membership. He also suggested that West ern powers have in fact pushed S erbia closer to Russia. Those (in the West) who criticize Serbia for its closeness to Russia and for our partnership with Russia, should ask themselves why they havent offered such re lations to Serbia? Dacic said. I keep telling the West: Serbia needs a strategic partner in the West too ... But, they are not interested at all. Dacic also dismissed allegations by Serbias pro-Western opposi tion parties that the 2008 ener gy deal, un der which Serbia sold 51 per cent of its oil and gas monopoly to Gaz prom as part of the S outh Stream agree ment, paved the way for R ussian econom ic and political domi nance of the country. H e said that critics are afraid of Russias pres ence in this part of the world. The trans-European pipeline is expected to start operating in De cember 2015. It is ex pected to ship up to 2 tr illion cubic feet of gas annually to Bulgaria, Serbia, Hungary, Slo venia, Austria and Ita ly in one leg and Croa tia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey in a second. The pipelines route bypasses transit na tion Ukraine. Pricing disputes betw een Rus sian and Ukraine have caused major disr up tions in recent years, cutting gas for millions of customers. Serbias state televi sion on Sunday aired liv e the pipeline inau guration ceremony, attended by top ofcials and G azprom chief Alexey Miller. Presi dent Tomislav Nikolic for mally gave the goahead in a video broad cast from the capital, B elgrade. Dacic said the stretch of pipeline in Serbia will cost about $2.7 bil lion. It will be nanced b y Gazprom, while Ser bia will pay back its shar e later through pipeline transit taxes, he added. About 20,000 people will work on construction and other jobs around the pipe line, including building gas stor age and gas en ergy plants, Dacic said. This is vital for Ser bias energy safety ... S erbia will become an energy hub, Dac ic insisted. We will be par t of a pan-European project; this is not just a Russian project. Dacic said that Ser bia is willing for one of the pipeline br anch es go to Kosovo, its for mer province, which declar ed indepen dence in 2008. Serbia has r efused to recog nize the split, but it has mo ved to normalize re lations to move closer to EU membership Belgrade and Pristina signed an EU-brokered agreement in April.Serbia leader calls Gazprom pipeline vital ASSOCI aA TED PRESSA worker welds the rst section of the Gazprom South Stream natural gas pipeline in the town of Sajkas, 50 miles north of Belgrade, Serbia, Sunday. Construction of the Serbian leg of the South Stream gas pipeline ofcially began on Sunday, Nov. 24, and, when nished, the pipeline is expected to ship up to 2 trillion cubic feet of gas annually to Bulgaria, Serbia, Hungary, Slovenia, Austria and Italy in one leg and Croatia, Macedonia, Greece and Turkey in a second. IRINA TITOVAAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG, Russia The U.S. cap tain of the Greenpeace ship seiz ed by the Rus sian coast guard described on Sunday the str ess and fear he and the other 29 people on board felt when they were thrown into Rus sian jails, with no idea when they would get out. Most of them were released on bail last week after spending two months behind bars, and all were ex pected to be free soon. The hardest thing was the uncertainty, the anxiety, the damn fear, Peter Willcox, a veteran Greenpeace activist who was the ships captain told As sociated Press Everybody lost weight during the rst three weeks, and not because of food, but because of stress. They were initially charged with piracy for protesting at a Russian oil platform in Arctic waters and if convicted were looking at up to 15 years in prison. That changes my life, that changes any bodys life, said Willcox, who is 60. I wont see my mother and fa ther again, they are not going to liv e another 10 or 15 years. My chil dren will be grown up with childr en of their own. Investigators have since said they no lon ger consider the protest to have been piracy, but all 30 still face char ges of hooliganism, which could send them to pr ison for up to seven years. Greenpeace lawyers are optimistic that the foreigners will be able to leave Russia pend ing trial, but there has been no indication of how soon this could happen. Four of those arrested are Russian citizen, while the rest come from 17 other countries.Greenpeace captain describes fear felt in jail ALBERTO ARCEAssociated PressTEGUCIGALPA, Honduras Hondurans w ere choosing a new president Sunday in a country reeling from vi olence, poverty and the legacy of a 2009 coup and if polls are accu rate, the vote could fail to pr oduce a clear win ner. The election pits Xi omara Castro, whose husband M anuel Ze laya was overthrown in a militar y-backed coup, against Juan Orlando Hernandez, the candi date of the ruling conservative National Party. N o problems were reported after polling places opened at 8 / a.m.. P olls show the two candidates in a statis tical tie, raising fears of a disputed r esult that could produce more in stability and protests in a failing state with 8.5 million people and the worlds highest homi cide rate. M any have called on both candidates to wait for ofcial results before declaring victory.Hondurans head to polls with violence as their top worry Swayed by violence, cor ruption, 2009 coup, Hondu rans choose new president in close race

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAIL Y COMMERCIAL A7 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDROD DIXON . ...................................PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .........................MANAGING EDITORBILL KOCH . ...............ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . .......................NEWS EDITORGENE PACKWOOD . ............EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. DOONESBURYHAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 OTHERVOICESI have lined up my Christmas presents this year for our President, Barack Obama, and for his Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius. I will send them both a copy of the last book written by one of greatest economists of the last century, and winner of the Nobel Prize in economics in 1974, F.A. Hayek. The book is called The Fatal Conceit: The Errors of Socialism. Although the language and discussion of the book is not all that simple, the basic point is, I think, pretty straightforward. Hayek summed it all up in his acceptance speech for his Nobel Prize. He noted the critical importance that we know what we dont know. Thinking you know what you dont and cant know, the illusion that men can plan, organize, and control things far beyond their understanding, is the fatal conceit of socialism. And, Hayek concludes, that knowing what you dont know, ought to teach the student of society a lesson of humility which should guard him against becoming an accomplice in mens fatal striving to control society a striving which makes him not only a tyrant over his fellow, but which may well make him the destroyer of a civilization which no brain has designed but which has grown from the free efforts of millions of individuals. Take a walk through the mall or the supermarket. Look at the almost infinite varieties of products in stores and on shelves designed and engineered to meet the unique tastes and desires of millions of different individuals. You dont need a Nobel Prize or a Ph.D to appreciate that no supreme bureaucrat with all the power in the world could ever conceive that vast array of products and decide they should be produced. This is the product and beauty of freedom. Free people deciding what they want and living how they want. And free people deciding to take risk, go into business, and become entrepreneurs and produce and deliver these many varied products. This approach freedom has produced bounty as never has been produced anywhere under any other arrangement. But the fatal conceit is a powerful force. It is a powerful force because there will always be haughty, arrogant people for whom humility is a challenge and who are convinced that the world would be better off if they designed it rather than letting free private individuals run their own lives. This is totally what the debacle we now confront with the Affordable Care Act ObamaCare is about. Anyone who follows these things and knows just a little bit of history knew from the day President Obama signed this law in 2010 that what is happening today was inevitable. Neither President Obama nor HHS Secretary Sebelius have ever done anything in their lives except work in one way or another in politics. Neither has ever run a small business, let alone a big one. Neither has a day of experience of being an entrepreneur, of taking personal risk and taking a loan to make a product to serve customers and to meet a payroll. But both have been supremely confident that they could take over and redesign one sixth of a 16 trillion dollar economy. Nothing is more unique to each individual than his or her personal health profile and needs. Yet a couple supreme bureaucrats in Washington have used their power to decide what kind of health care hundreds of millions of unique American individual citizens need and how to deliver it. Can it be any wonder that it is all collapsing? The only wonders are that there are still those who maintain that this socialist monstrosity can still work and that so many Americans have been willing to give up their precious personal freedom and turn their lives over to arrogant, pretentious, and deeply confused bureaucrats and politicians in Washington.Star Parker is an author and president of CURE, Center for Urban Renewal and Education. She can be reached at www.urbancure.org. The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diversity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. Surely Las Vegas sports books and London bookies will be offering odds on when and on which airline the first fight breaks out if the Federal Communications Commission goes ahead with a proposal to allow virtually unrestricted cellphone use aboard commercial airliners. As The Wall Street Journal pointed out, the proposal pits the technically possible against the socially tolerable and we know who usually comes out the loser in that particular debate. Indeed, the FCC tipped its hand when the agency said it would use the public comment period to review our outdated and restrictive rules. The FCC proposed lifting the 1991era ban in 1994 but backed off because of opposition from the flight attendants and a number of technical questions. The technical questions have since been resolved but the flight attendants still oppose in-flight cellphone use and so do a slight majority of the flying public. A Federal Aviation Administration survey showed 51 percent opposed to 47 percent in favor. Other nations airlines are equipped with cellphone technology but require their passengers to turn off their phones when they enter U.S. airspace. But cellphones have become ubiquitous in the U.S. and it is probably only a matter of months before their use is allowed aboard our airliners. The decision about their use is likely to be left to the individual airlines but like charging for checked baggage, as soon as one does it the others will follow. Airline passengers have become a cynical lot. One frequent flier wondered what would happen if a passenger locked himself in one of the handful of bathrooms to carry on a sustained private conversation. And others have suggested that the airlines will charge extra for the privilege of using a cellphone in flight and charge extra for a seat that is out of earshot of a passenger carrying on an obnoxiously loud conversation. In todays air travel, one way or another you pay.Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service.AVOICEA new outlet for the loudmouth in the next seat The fatal conceit of Obamacare Star ParkerSCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE N eitherEITHER P residentRESIDENT O bamaB AMA norN OR HHS S ecretary ECRETARY K athleenA THLEEN S ebelius EBELIUS have HAVE everE VER done DONE anythin ANYTHIN G inIN their THEIR lives LIVES e E X ceptC EPT W orkO RK in IN one ONE W ayA Y or OR anotherA NOTHER in IN politics POLITICS

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 rfntb CALL TODAY 877-265-2510 www.gingerbreadinsurance.comHome Auto Collector Car Commercial 1640 East Hwy 50 Suite B Clermont, FL 34711352-404-8990 rrfn trfb frContact UsAccounting rf831 E. Myers (Hwy. 50)Groveland Donna We i nhe im er, the owner of Out of the Blue H alf Moon Retrea t, h a s been servi ng L a ke County s i nce 1990 a s a M a rtia l Arts Instructor, Nutr i t i on a l, Sp i r i tu a l a nd Hol i st i c Counselor and Massa ge Ther a p i st DE-stress, rela x a nd rejuvenate wi th a ny one or com b i n a t i ons of our s i gna ture holi sti c a nd spa trea t m ents. We offer you; N a t i ve Hot Stone Thera py, Celluli te Reduct i on a nd Body Sh a p i ng wi th Pure Li ght Sl im LED Technology, Cla y Body Wra ps, Swedi sh, Deep T i ssue, Sh ia tsu, Reflexology, Detox Ly m pha t i c Dr ai n a ge, Aroma Thera py, a nd severa l di fferent types of Energy Ther a p i es I specia l i ze i n i ntegra t i on of hol i st i c thera pys for c a ncer p a t i ents Integr a t i on i s not a ltern a t i ve. Integr a t i on i s co m b i n i ng Hol i st i c trea t m ents w i th st a nda rd m ed i c a l trea t m ents th a t com ple m ent ea ch other Som e of our i ntegra ted trea tments are; Vi sual i za ti on, Nutr i ti on, M assa ge, Stress Reduct i on, Detoxi fi c a ti on and Counseli ng. Out of the Blue i s loca ted i n Groveland 2 mi les south of Lake D a v i d P a rk a nd Hwy 50, 10 mi les from Hwy 50 & 27 i n Cler m ont, a nd one hour fro m The V i lla ges The retre a t i s pr i va tely loc a ted on 50 be aut i ful acres and i s also a vai l able for your workshops, meeti ngs or pr i va te get together, ple ase c all for detai ls. Co m e to m y Yo Ch i Do cla ss. I developed thi s cl a ss by co m b i n i ng my 24 ye ars of hol i st i c and martia l arts trai n i ng just for you Yo Ch i Do i s a fun mi x of core exerc i ses, yog a, stretch i ng, Chi Gong and T ae Kwon Do. Thi s one hour class w i ll be held out doors All you need i s a Yog a ma t and $7 per cl ass. All a ges are welcome. No exper i ence i s necess ary C all 352-394-7388 www .outoftheblueh alf moonretrea t.co m Donna Weinheimer, LMTMassageDetox ProgramsBody ShapingHalfMoonRetreat@Gmail.com352-394-7388OutOfTheBlueHalfMoonRetreat.comMM12675 MA27125 rfntbft n407-877-6677Mattress Market of Florida rfnftbfnrfnntbttfffbttttt

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8208Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013www.dailycommercial.comNFL: Jaguars hold off Texans / B4 Cops handling of Winston case under fire GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE Its han dling of sexual assault alle gations against Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston is just the latest controversy to hit the Tallahassee Police Department. A handful of grand juries recently have issued scathing reports about how some ofcers have conducted themselves in the line of duty. In the most egregious case, a fumbled drug investi gation resulted in the death of an informant. Now, the department is coming under scrutiny for its handling of a sexual assault case in which a Heisman Trophy candidate stands as the accused. The family of the student who says she was raped claims the department tried to squelch the case: It took 11 months for Tallahassee police to hand over information to prosecutors. Patricia Carroll, the attor ney representing the alleged victim in the Winston case, said last week she had no faith whatsoever in the Po lice Department. On the same day the department handed over the Winston case to prosecu tors, a Leon County grand jury issued a stinging report criticizing the department for how it handled a drunk en driving arrest. The arrest which left the female driv er with a broken bone in her face created such an up roar this fall that it prompted Chief Dennis Jones to abruptly retire. The video from the August arrest of Christina West showed ofcers slamming her into a police car before throwing her to the ground. West can be heard screaming in the video. Wests attor ney said the police treated her like an animal and has already placed the city on notice that West plans to sue them. The grand jury blamed the department which has placed the two ofcers in volved in the arrest on administrative leave for allowing the situation to es -SEE FSU | B2 Auburn moves up to set up top-5 Iron Bowl clash BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES STANDINGS 1 Alabama .998 points 2 Florida St. .953 3 Ohio St. .918 4 Auburn .823 5 Missouri .831 6 Clemson .826 7 Oklahoma St. .774 8 Stanford .677 9 Baylor .646 10 S. Carolina .623 19 UCF .329 AP rankings, See Page B2 AP FILE PHOTO Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn talks with his players in the rst half of an NCAA college football game against Arkansas State on Sept. 7. JOHN RAOUX / AP Orlando Magics Victor Oladipo (5) gets between Phoenix Suns Miles Plumlee, left, and Gerald Green (14) for a shot during ton Sunday in Orlando. PHOTOS BY PAUL SANCYA / AP Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson (81) loses control of the ball after a hit by Tampa Bay Buccaneers outside linebacker Adam Hayward (57) during the fourth quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday at Ford Field in Detroit. LARRY LAGEAP Sports WriterDETROIT Tampa Bay is turning around its season, relying on a cool and calm rookie quarter back and an opportunis tic defense. Mike Glennon played almost mistake-free football and Matthew Staffords fourth interception went in and out of Calvin Johnsons hands inside the Buccaneers 5 in the nal minute, allowing Tampa Bay to hold on for a 24-21 win over the De troit Lions on Sunday. Bucs rookie Johnthan Banks made the critical pick toward the end of the game. Tampa Bay (3-8) has won three straight after losing its rst eight, joining the 1978 St. Lou is Cardinals as the only NFL team to do that. Wow thats his tory, Bucs rookie tight end Tim Wright said after making a season-high eight receptions for 75 yards. Tampa Bay took advantage of Detroits ve turnovers, including Kris Durhams fumble in the fourth period, in a game with six lead chang es and no more than a four-point lead for either team. One of the more gutsy performances Ive seen, Bucs coach Greg Schiano said. The Lions (6-5) have lost two straight for the rst time this season. They missed out on a chance to break a rstplace tie in the NFC North with Chicago. As disappointing as this was, it doesnt eliminate us from any thing, Detroit coach Jim Schwartz said. It just raises the urgency level for the next ve games. Detroit hosts the Green Bay Packers, who trail the Lions and Bears by a halfgame in the division, in its annual Thanksgiving Day game. We cant let this stay in our system too long, said Nate Burleson, who had seven receptions for 77 yards and a score HITTING THEIR STRIDE Bucs beat Lions 24-21 for 3rd straight victoryTampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback Leonard Johnson (29) jumps into the end zone after a 48-yard interception for a touchdown.Dargics 23 helps Suns down Magic FRED GOODALLAP Sports WriterORLANDO Goran Dragic scored 23 points and Gerald Green added 20 to lead the Phoenix Suns to a 10496 victory over the Orlando Magic on Sunday night. Two days after stopping a fourgame losing streak at Charlotte, the Suns took the lead early in the rst quarter and never relinquished it. Orlando trimmed what had been a 14-point decit to three late in the fourth quarter. However, Channing Frye made a difcult jumper and Dragic scored the game s next seven points to put it away. Dragic made 10 of 17 shots and also had 13 assists. Frye nished with 14 points and seven rebounds. Nikola Vucevic led Orlando with 20 points. Andrew Nicholson had 19 off the bench and Aaron Afalo added 12 for the Magic, who have lost four straight games, seven of eight overall. RALPH RUSSOAssociated PressThe Iron Bowl is always important. For this Iron Bowl, the stakes are higher than ever before, and so are the rankings of Alabama and Auburn. Auburn moved up to No. 4 in The Associated Press college football poll Sunday, taking advantage of loss es by Baylor and Oregon to set up the second top-ve matchup in Iron Bowl history. On Saturday at Auburn, itll be No. 1 Alabama against the Tigers. The winner takes the SEC West and gets a trip to the Southeastern Conference championship game. The rst and only time the Crimson Tide and Ti gers played with both teams ranked in the top ve was 1971. No. 3 Alabama and coach Bear Bryant beat SEE BOWL | B2SEE BUCS | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 Sundays College Basketball ScoresEAST Bryant 60, New Hampshire 55 Penn St. 93, Longwood 67 Penn St.-Altoona 75, Mount St. Vincent 71 Slippery Rock 113, Ohio-Eastern 72 Yeshiva 75, CCNY 65 SOUTH Georgia Tech 78, NC A&T 71 IPFW 76, Kennesaw St. 66 South Alabama 79, Houston Baptist 59 South Carolina 84, FIU 72 Southern Miss. 99, William Carey 54 MIDWEST Lakeland 104, Macalester 82 Lewis 78, N. Michigan 68 Minot St. 65, Valley City St. 44 Missouri St. 81, Hampton 67 N. Illinois 111, St. Josephs (Ind.) 61 Notre Dame 93, Army 60 Purdue 81, Siena 73 Toledo 94, FAU 74 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 99, Cent. Arkansas 56 SMU 87, Ark.-Pine Bluff 61 FAR WEST Boston U. 72, LIU Brooklyn 57 Loyola of Chicago 73, SIU-Edwardsville 72 TOURNAMENT Charleston Classic Third Place Nebraska 73, Georgia 65 Fifth Place New Mexico 79, Davidson 58 Hall of Fame Tip-off-Naismith Championship North Carolina 93, Louisville 84 Third Place Richmond 68, Faireld 47 Maui Invitational-Conway Championship Louisiana-Lafayette 73, Coastal Carolina 69 Third Place St. Francis (NY) 68, Oakland 62 NACC/SLIAC Challenge Second Round Edgewood 65, Westminster (Mo.) 59 Milwaukee Engineering 85, Fontbonne 73 Puerto Rico Tipoff Fifth Place Georgetown 84, VCU 80 Seventh Place Kansas St. 52, Long Beach St. 38 Winona State (Minn.) Tournament Second Round Concordia (St.P.) 79, Ferris St. 57 Northwood (Mich.) 59, Winona St. 58 TOURNAMENT Charleston Classic Third Place Nebraska 73, Georgia 65 Fifth Place New Mexico 79, Davidson 58 Hall of Fame Tip-off-Naismith Championship North Carolina 93, Louisville 84 Third Place Richmond 68, Faireld 47 Maui Invitational-Conway Championship Louisiana-Lafayette 73, Coastal Carolina 69 Third Place St. Francis (NY) 68, Oakland 62 NACC/SLIAC Challenge Second Round Edgewood 65, Westminster (Mo.) 59 Milwaukee Engineering 85, Fontbonne 73 Puerto Rico Tipoff Fifth Place Georgetown 84, VCU 80 Seventh Place Kansas St. 52, Long Beach St. 38 Winona State (Minn.) Tournament Second Round Concordia (St.P.) 79, Ferris St. 57 Northwood (Mich.) 59, Winona St. 58 National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 6 7 .462 Philadelphia 6 9 .400 1 Boston 5 10 .333 2 New York 3 9 .250 2 Brooklyn 3 10 .231 3 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 10 3 .769 Atlanta 8 6 .571 2 Charlotte 7 7 .500 3 Washington 5 8 .385 5 Orlando 4 9 .308 6 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 12 1 .923 Chicago 6 6 .500 5 Detroit 5 8 .385 7 Cleveland 4 10 .286 8 Milwaukee 2 10 .167 9 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 12 1 .923 Dallas 9 5 .643 3 Houston 9 5 .643 3 Memphis 7 6 .538 5 New Orleans 6 6 .500 5 Northwest W L Pct GB Portland 12 2 .857 Oklahoma City 8 3 .727 2 Minnesota 8 7 .533 4 Denver 6 6 .500 5 Utah 1 13 .071 11 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 10 5 .667 Golden State 8 6 .571 1 Phoenix 7 6 .538 2 L.A. Lakers 6 7 .462 3 Sacramento 4 8 .333 4 Saturdays Games L.A. Clippers 103, Sacramento 102 Indiana 106, Philadelphia 98 Washington 98, New York 89 Miami 101, Orlando 99 Boston 94, Atlanta 87 Houston 112, Minnesota 101 Charlotte 96, Milwaukee 72 San Antonio 126, Cleveland 96 Denver 102, Dallas 100 Portland 113, Golden State 101 Sundays Games Detroit 109, Brooklyn 97 L.A. Clippers 121, Chicago 82 Phoenix 104, Orlando 96 Utah at Oklahoma City, late Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m. Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Chicago at Utah, 9 p.m. New York at Portland, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 p.m. Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m. The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 23, total points based on 25 points for a rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (56) 11-0 1,496 1 2. Florida St. (4) 11-0 1,444 2 3. Ohio St. 11-0 1,375 4 4. Auburn 10-1 1,294 6 5. Missouri 10-1 1,202 8 6. Clemson 10-1 1,196 7 7. Oklahoma St. 10-1 1,177 11 8. Stanford 9-2 1,002 10 9. Baylor 9-1 976 3 10. South Carolina 9-2 960 12 11. Michigan St. 10-1 929 13 12. Oregon 9-2 731 5 13. Arizona St. 9-2 690 19 14. Wisconsin 9-2 684 16 15. LSU 8-3 642 18 16. Fresno St. 10-0 619 15 17. UCF 9-1 588 17 18. N. Illinois 11-0 470 20 19. Texas A&M 8-3 429 9 20. Oklahoma 9-2 386 22 21. Louisville 10-1 383 21 22. UCLA 8-3 300 14 23. Southern Cal 9-3 262 23 24. Duke 9-2 135 25 25. Notre Dame 8-3 68 NR Others receiving votes: Georgia 15, Cincinnati 10, Texas 10, Mississippi 7, Arizona 6, Nebraska 6, Minnesota 5, East Carolina 1, N. Dakota St. 1, Vanderbilt 1.GOLF South African Open Leading Scores Sunday At Glendower Golf Club Johannesburg Purse: $1.49 million Yardage: 6,899; Par: 72 Final Morten Orum Madsen, Denmark 67-66-69-67 269 Jbe Kruger, South Africa 65-70-71-65 271 Hennie Otto, South Africa 72-66-65-68 271 Marco Crespi, Italy 65-67-70-70 272 Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 67-65-69-71 272 Alejandro Canizares, Spain 69-67-69-68 273 Trevor Fisher Jr., South Africa 70-67-73-64 274 Johan Carlsson, Sweden 69-70-68-67 274 Warren Abery, South Africa 68-71-68-68 275 Garth Mulroy, South Africa 70-67-70-69 276 Christiaan Basson, South Africa 66-68-71-71 276 Jean Hugo, South Africa 71-67-70-69 277 Martin du Toit, South Africa 70-70-68-69 277 Peter Karmis, South Africa 69-72-67-69 277 Andy Sullivan, England 71-68-68-70 277 Jaco van Zyl, South Africa 71-70-66-70 277 National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 23 15 6 2 32 64 43 Toronto 23 14 8 1 29 66 54 Tampa Bay 23 14 8 1 29 67 61 Detroit 25 11 7 7 29 63 70 Montreal 24 13 9 2 28 64 51 Ottawa 24 9 11 4 22 68 77 Florida 24 6 13 5 17 53 80 Buffalo 25 5 19 1 11 44 79 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 24 15 9 0 30 69 54 Washington 24 12 10 2 26 72 68 N.Y. Rangers 23 12 11 0 24 48 54 New Jersey 23 9 9 5 23 49 55 Carolina 24 9 10 5 23 49 67 Philadelphia 22 10 10 2 22 49 53 Columbus 23 8 12 3 19 56 71 N.Y. Islanders 24 8 13 3 19 68 82 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 24 16 4 4 36 87 70 St. Louis 22 16 3 3 35 79 50 Colorado 22 17 5 0 34 69 45 Minnesota 24 15 5 4 34 64 55 Dallas 22 11 9 2 24 61 65 Nashville 23 11 10 2 24 52 67 Winnipeg 25 10 11 4 24 66 75 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 26 17 6 3 37 80 65 San Jose 23 15 3 5 35 79 52 Los Angeles 24 15 6 3 33 64 51 Phoenix 23 14 5 4 32 78 74 Vancouver 25 12 9 4 28 65 65 Calgary 23 8 11 4 20 64 84 Edmonton 24 7 15 2 16 64 84 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Saturdays Games Minnesota 3, Winnipeg 2, SO Toronto 2, Washington 1, SO Boston 3, Carolina 2, OT Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2 Ottawa 4, Detroit 2 Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Islanders 2 N.Y. Rangers 2, Nashville 0 Anaheim 4, Phoenix 2 St. Louis 6, Dallas 1 Chicago 2, Vancouver 1 Colorado 1, Los Angeles 0, OT San Jose 2, New Jersey 1 Sundays Games Detroit 3, Buffalo 1 Carolina 4, Ottawa 1 Todays Games Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m. Columbus at Toronto, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m. Chicago at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Tuesdays Games Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m.Sundays Sports TransactionsBASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Sacramento F Travis Outlaw $15,000 for making excessive and unnecessary contact with Los Angeles Clippers G J.J. Redick during a Nov. 23 game. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS Assigned C Dewayne Dedmon and G Nemanja Nedovic to Santa Cruz. LEADING OFF | NBA GREG BEACHAMAP Sports WriterLOS ANGELES Derrick Rose will have surgery on his right knee Monday, and the Chicago Bulls dont yet know how long theyll be without their star guard this time. Rose headed home to Chi cago while the Bulls went back to work Sunday, facing the Los Angeles Clippers in their rst game since Rose tore cartilage in his knee in Portland on Fri day night. Chicago coach Tim Thibo deau said the Bulls wont know how long the 2011 NBA MVP will be sidelined until Rose and team physician Brian Cole de cide how to x Roses knee. Were hoping for the best, Thibodeau said. We, of course, feel very badly for Derrick. Hes in good spirits, about as well as can be expected under the cir cumstances, and hes already thinking about his rehab. Typical Derrick. Hes concerned about his team, his teammates. Rose has a medial meniscus tear, which is typically less se rious than a lateral tear. Some athletes miss only a few weeks after surgery on meniscus tears, while others miss several months. The Bulls understandably wont speculate on a return date until they learn more about the inju ry, which often cant be fully eval uated until surgery is performed but if Rose needs to have his meniscus reattached, he could be out until spring or longer. Rose missed all of last sea son after tearing a ligament in his left knee in Chicagos 2012 playoff opener against Philadelphia. Rose already had missed 26 games during that lockout-shortened regular season while battling a variety of injuries. I think we have an under standing of what we need to do, Thibodeau said. TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED 2in SportsDAY OVER HEARD(Derrick) is already thinking about his rehab. Typical Derrick. Hes concerned about his team, his teammates. TIM THIBODEAU, Chicago Bulls head coach MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m.ESPN2 Maui Invitational, rst round, Arkansas vs. California, at Lahaina, Hawaii5:30 p.m.ESPN2 Maui Invitational, rst round, Minnesota vs. Syracuse, at Lahaina, Hawaii7 p.m.ESPN NEWS Oklahoma St. at South Florida FS1 Abilene Christian at Xavier7:30 p.m.ESPN2 Legends Classic, rst round, Pitsburgh vs. Texas Tech, at Brooklyn, N.Y. 9 p.m. FS1 Marquette at Arizona St. 9:30 p.m.ESPN2 Legends Classic, rst round, Stanford vs. Houston, at Brooklyn, N.Y.MidnightESPN2 Maui Invitational, rst round, Dayton vs. Gonzaga, at Lahaina, HawaiiNATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE 8:25 p.m.ESPN San Francisco at WashingtonNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 8 p.m.NBCSN Minnesota at St. LouisSOCCER 2:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Aston Villa at West Bromwich further nd that the ser geants failed to inter vene in the arrest and also deescalate the sit uation by not following their own policies and procedures. They also failed to demonstrate the respect for citizens that this community demands from its law enforcement ofcers. Interim police Chief Tom Coe contends that a handful of incidents should not be used to tarnish the entire de partment. When you consider we handle over 300,000 incidents a year and we have very few issues out of those 300,000, thats a good department, said Coe, a veteran ofcer who had been the Tallahassee police chief in s. But State Attorney Willie Meggs who is still deciding whether to bring charges against Winston said its clear that its an agency with some problems. But its also clear that Chief Coe is trying to deal with those prob lems, and its also ex tremely clear that are many, many good police ofcers who work there and want it to be a top notch agency, Meggs said. The report issued Nov. 12 on the West case was the third grand jury report released in the last ve years to slam the department. The most damning report came in the wake of the May 2008 death of Rachel Hoffman. Hoffman, a Florida State University grad uate who was recruited by police as an infor mant after being caught with drugs, was shot ve times after police lost track of her during a drug deal. Hoffman, of Safety Harbor, was sent alone by police with $13,000 in marked bills to buy Ecstasy, cocaine and a gun, according to re cords. Instead, the men killed her and stole her car, a credit card and the marked money. FSU FROM PAGE B1 Bulls once again preparing for life without Derrick RoseNo. 5 Auburn 31-7 and went on to play No. 1 Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. The Cornhuskers won that game 38-6. In this case, Alabama has a straight shot to the BCS nation al championship game. Beat Auburn and win the SEC title game, and its on to the Rose Bowl to try to win an unprecedented third straight national title. For Auburn (10-1), its a little more complicat ed. Even with an SEC title, the Tigers might not be able to pass No. 3 Ohio State or No. 2 Florida State. The latest BCS standings were set for release later Sunday. There has already been speculation about the possibility of a one-loss SEC champion either Auburn or No. 5 Missou ri getting into the BCS title game over an unde feated Ohio State. That seems like a stretch and the mere suggestion is enough to send Buckeyes fans into a rage but rst things rst. Alabama, which tuned up for Auburn with a 49-0 light work out against Chattanooga, has opened as a 10-point favorite against the Tigers, who took the week off. I really dont care what their record is, Tide quarterback AJ McCarron told reporters Saturday about Au burn. Theyre still the next team in our way. While Auburns na tional title hopes were bolstered by the failings of Baylor (49-17 loss at No. 7 Oklahoma State) and Oregon (4216 loss at Arizona), Mc Carron seemed to get a boost in the Heisman Trophy race thanks to Saturdays results. BOWL FROM PAGE B1 in his rst game since breaking his left arm in a one-car crash two months ago. The Bucs have re fused to let losses and off-the-eld distractions from the rst half of the season linger. They dealt with the benching and release of quarterback Josh Freeman and a MRSA infections outbreak. Tampa Bay had been relying on a running game lately, but couldnt against a defense that is stingy on the ground. Bobby Rainey was held to 35 yards on 15 carries after he had 163 yards rushing and scored three times last week against Atlanta. Glennon, a thirdround pick from North Carolina State, also didnt have go-to re ceiver Vincent Jackson open very often. But he didnt force the ball to Jackson or anyone else. He was 14 of 21 for 247 yards and threw two touchdowns to Ti quan Underwood, whose second score was an 85-yard recep tion early in the fourth quarter. Glennon had a season-high 138.4 quarterback rating. Hes very calm in the huddle, no matter what the situation is in the game, Wright said. Stafford was 26 of 46 for 297 yards with three TDs. He connected with Burleson, Brandon Pettigrew and Jo seph Fauria for scores that couldnt overcome his interceptions. I cant make bad deci sions, and I had a couple of those and a couple bad breaks, Stafford said. The last interception was not Staffords fault because Johnson had the ball briey before Kelcie McCray jarred it loose and Banks caught it out of the air. He got a good hit on me, Johnson acknowl edged. Stafford also was picked off when Pettigrew ducked when a pass came his way and Leonard Johnson returned it 48 yards for a go-ahead score. BUCS FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div New England 7 3 0 .700 254 199 5-0-0 2-3-0 4-2-0 3-1-0 3-1-0 N.Y. Jets 5 6 0 .455 186 287 4-1-0 1-5-0 2-6-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Miami 5 6 0 .455 229 245 3-3-0 2-3-0 4-3-0 1-3-0 0-2-0 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-6-0 1-1-0 2-2-0 South W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 263 260 3-2-0 4-2-0 5-2-0 2-2-0 3-0-0 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 250 245 2-4-0 3-2-0 4-4-0 1-2-0 0-3-0 Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 142 324 0-5-0 2-4-0 2-5-0 0-4-0 2-1-0 Houston 2 9 0 .182 199 289 1-5-0 1-4-0 2-5-0 0-4-0 1-2-0 North W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206 5-0-0 2-4-0 5-3-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 Pittsburgh 5 6 0 .455 243 256 3-2-0 2-4-0 4-4-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 Baltimore 5 6 0 .455 227 215 4-1-0 1-5-0 5-4-0 0-2-0 2-2-0 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 203 265 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-5-0 1-2-0 2-3-0 West W L T Pct PF P A Home A way AFC NFC Div Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 255 6-0-0 3-1-0 5-1-0 4-0-0 3-0-0 Kansas City 9 2 0 .818 270 179 5-1-0 4-1-0 6-2-0 3-0-0 1-2-0 San Diego 5 6 0 .455 269 260 2-2-0 3-4-0 3-5-0 2-1-0 1-2Oakland 4 7 0 .364 213 269 3-3-0 1-4-0 4-4-0 0-3-0 1-2-0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Dallas 6 5 0 .545 298 279 4-1-0 2-4-0 6-2-0 0-3-0 4-0-0 Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260 1-4-0 5-1-0 5-2-0 1-3-0 3-2-0 N.Y. Giants 4 7 0 .364 213 280 3-3-0 1-4-0 3-5-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 311 2-2-0 1-5-0 1-6-0 2-1-0 0-3-0 South W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div New Orleans 9 2 0 .818 305 196 6-0-0 3-2-0 7-0-0 2-2-0 3-0-0 Carolina 8 3 0 .727 258 151 4-1-0 4-2-0 6-2-0 2-1-0 2-0-0 Tampa Bay 3 8 0 .273 211 258 2-4-0 1-4-0 2-6-0 1-2-0 1-3-0 Atlanta 2 9 0 .182 227 309 2-4-0 0-5-0 2-6-0 0-3-0 1-4-0 North W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Detroit 6 5 0 .545 286 277 3-2-0 3-3-0 5-3-0 1-2-0 3-1-0 Chicago 6 5 0 .545 303 309 4-2-0 2-3-0 3-5-0 3-0-0 2-2-0 Green Bay 5 5 1 .500 284 265 3-2-1 2-3-0 3-4-1 2-1-0 2-1-1 Minnesota 2 8 1 .227 266 346 2-3-0 0-5-1 1-7-1 1-1-0 0-3-1 West W L T Pct PF P A Home A way NFC AFC Div Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179 5-0-0 5-1-0 7-0-0 3-1-0 3-0-0 Arizona 7 4 0 .636 254 223 5-1-0 2-3-0 4-4-0 3-0-0 0-3-0 San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 178 3-2-0 3-2-0 3-3-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 266 255 3-3-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 3-1-0 1-2-0 This Week Thursdays Game New Orleans 17, Atlanta 13 Sundays Games Minnesota 26, Green Bay 26, OT Jacksonville 13, Houston 6 San Diego 41, Kansas City 38 St. Louis 42, Chicago 21 Pittsburgh 27, Cleveland 11 Tampa Bay 24, Detroit 21 Baltimore 19, N.Y. Jets 3 Carolina 20, Miami 16 Tennessee 23, Oakland 19 Arizona 40, Indianapolis 11 Dallas 24, N.Y. Giants 21 Denver at New England, 8:30 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Todays Game San Francisco at Washington, 8:40 p.m. Next Week Thursdays Games Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 8:30 p.m. Dec. 1 New England at Houston, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Dec. 2 New Orleans at Seattle, 8:40 p.m. Pros talk climate change Associated PressPROVIDENCE, R.I. U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse is prais ing the NBA, NFL, Major League Baseball and other profession al sports organizations for taking steps to ad dress climate change. The Rhode Island Democrat met with representatives from all the major sports organizations Thursday to discuss what teams are doing to limit their car bon emissions and encourage renewable energy. Saints 17, Falcons 13 New Orleans 7 7 3 0 Atlanta 7 6 0 0 First Quarter AtlJackson 1 run (Bryant kick), 8:48. NOWatson 1 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 1:17. Second Quarter AtlFG Bryant 39, 12:20. NOGraham 44 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 10:12. AtlFG Bryant 24, 2:41. Third Quarter NOFG Hartley 41, 4:37. A,422. NO Atl First downs 19 22 Total Net Yards 374 355 Rushes-yards 25-103 22-91 Passing 271 264 Punt Returns 1-0 1-10 Kickoff Returns 1-20 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 23-33-0 30-39-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 5-28 Punts 4-49.5 3-45.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-66 3-25 Time of Possession 26:14 33:46 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGNew Orleans, Thomas 10-73, Ingram 9-32, K.Robinson 1-4, Collins 1-0, Brees 4-(minus 6). Atlanta, Jackson 16-63, Smith 1-11, Ryan 2-10, Rodgers 3-7. PASSINGNew Orleans, Brees 23-33-0-278. Atlanta, Ryan 30-39-0-292. RECEIVINGNew Orleans, Graham 5-100, Thomas 5-57, Colston 4-40, Moore 2-22, Stills 2-22, Hill 2-16, Meachem 1-18, Cadet 1-2, Watson 1-1. Atlanta, Douglas 9-79, D.Johnson 6-67, Gonzalez 4-43, Jackson 3-16, Rodgers 2-31, White 2-24, Snelling 2-19, Dr.Davis 1-7, Toilolo 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALSAtlanta, Bryant 52 (WL). Jaguars 13, Texans 6 Jacksonville 7 3 0 3 13 Houston 0 3 3 0 6 First Quarter JaxJones-Drew 1 run (Scobee kick), 10:57. Second Quarter JaxFG Scobee 30, 7:57. HouFG Bullock 49, :29. Third Quarter HouFG Bullock 20, 8:26. Fourth Quarter JaxFG Scobee 53, 6:44. A,659. Jax Hou First downs 16 11 Total Net Yards 333 218 Rushes-yards 28-118 21-77 Passing 215 141 Punt Returns 3-14 3-19 Kickoff Returns 1-27 3-60 Interceptions Ret. 1-8 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 23-33-0 18-34-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-24 2-28 Punts 6-43.2 7-44.9 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-63 2-22 Time of Possession 33:41 26:19 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGJacksonville, Jones-Drew 14-84, Todman 11-31, Henne 3-3. Houston, D.Johnson 13-74, Kee num 1-2, Tate 7-1. PASSINGJacksonville, Henne 23-32-0-239, Robinson 0-1-0-0. Houston, Keenum 18-34-1-169. RECEIVINGJacksonville, Shorts III 8-71, Jones-Drew 6-60, Sanders 4-61, Lewis 1-18, Forsett 1-9, Harbor 1-8, Taylor 1-7, Todman 1-5. Houston, Graham 5-32, Tate 5-26, A.Johnson 2-36, D.Johnson 2-13, Grifn 1-37, Martin 1-12, Hopkins 1-8, Posey 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALSJacksonville, Scobee 49 (BK). Rams 42, Bears 21 Chicago 7 7 0 7 21 St. Louis 21 3 3 15 42 First Quarter StLAustin 65 run (Zuerlein kick), 13:30. StLStacy 1 run (Zuerlein kick), 12:36. ChiM.Bennett 7 pass from McCown (Gould kick), 6:14. StLCook 6 pass from Clemens (Zuerlein kick), 1:27. Second Quarter ChiMarshall 3 pass from McCown (Gould kick), 5:19. StLFG Zuerlein 29, 1:11. Third Quarter StLFG Zuerlein 40, 3:59. Fourth Quarter ChiBush 1 run (Gould kick), 7:15. StLCunningham 9 run (Pead pass from Clemens), 3:05. StLR.Quinn 31 fumble return (Zuerlein kick), 2:05. A,024. Chi StL First downs 30 20 Total Net Yards 424 406 Rushes-yards 26-80 29-258 Passing 344 148 Punt Returns 1-0 1-1 Kickoff Returns 4-90 1-24 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 36-47-1 10-22-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 2-19 Punts 3-40.3 2-48.5 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 10-84 6-39 Time of Possession 36:09 23:51 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGChicago, Forte 16-77, McCown 2-4, Jeffery 1-4, Bush 7-(minus 5). St. Louis, Cunning ham 13-109, Stacy 12-87, Austin 1-65, Clemens 3-(minus 3). PASSINGChicago, McCown 36-47-1-352. St. Louis, Clemens 10-22-0-167. RECEIVINGChicago, Marshall 10-117, E.Bennett 8-58, Forte 7-40, M.Bennett 4-62, Jeffery 4-42, Fiammetta 2-23, Bush 1-10. St. Louis, Cook 4-80, Austin 2-39, Quick 2-19, Bailey 1-19, Stacy 1-10. MISSED FIELD GOALSNone. Panthers 20, Dolphins 16 Carolina 3 3 7 7 20 Miami 7 9 0 0 16 First Quarter CarFG Gano 52, 6:58. MiaWallace 53 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick), 5:39. Second Quarter MiaFG Sturgis 32, 12:34. MiaFG Sturgis 47, 2:13. MiaFG Sturgis 23, 1:01. CarFG Gano 46, :00. Third Quarter CarNewton 5 run (Gano kick), 8:08. Fourth Quarter CarOlsen 1 pass from Newton (Gano kick), :43. A,156. Car Mia First downs 20 13 Total Net Yards 295 332 Rushes-yards 29-136 17-52 Passing 159 280 Punt Returns 1-41 7-71 Kickoff Returns 1-17 3-59 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-24 Comp-Att-Int 19-38-1 28-42-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 3-30 Punts 7-56.7 6-48.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-56 6-55 Time of Possession 30:12 29:48 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGCarolina, Newton 8-51, D.Williams 10-31, Stewart 7-31, Tolbert 4-23. Miami, Tannehill 4-36, Miller 10-8, Dan.Thomas 3-8. PASSINGCarolina, Newton 19-38-1-174. Miami, Tannehill 28-42-1-310. RECEIVINGCarolina, Smith 5-69, Olsen 5-34, Ginn Jr. 3-11, LaFell 2-36, D.Williams 2-16, Tolbert 1-5, Stewart 1-3. Miami, Wallace 5-127, Hartline 5-78, Miller 4-39, Clay 4-27, Matthews 3-2, Mar.Moore 2-20, Dan.Thomas 2-2, Sims 1-6, Egnew 1-5, Thigpen 1-4. Chargers 41, Chiefs 38 San Diego 3 7 14 17 41 Kansas City 7 7 14 10 38 First Quarter SDFG Novak 30, 6:11. KCAvery 32 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 1:37. Second Quarter KCCharles 7 run (Succop kick), 3:03. SDWoodhead 11 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :16. Third Quarter SDMathews 1 run (Novak kick), 12:17. KCCharles 1 run (Succop kick), 9:00. SDWoodhead 3 run (Novak kick), 5:27. KCFasano 4 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 2:12. Fourth Quarter SDFG Novak 30, 12:31. KCFG Succop 25, 9:32. SDGreen 60 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 7:50. KCBowe 5 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 1:22. SDAjirotutu 26 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), :24. A,259. SD KC First downs 24 26 Total Net Yards 491 395 Rushes-yards 27-104 18-114 Passing 387 281 Punt Returns 1-5 4-34 Kickoff Returns 5-137 8-199 Interceptions Ret. 1-17 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 27-39-0 26-38-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 3-13 Punts 5-40.0 4-44.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 9-97 7-62 Time of Possession 30:57 29:03 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSan Diego, Mathews 14-55, Woodhead 6-25, R.Brown 6-23, Rivers 1-1. Kansas City, Charles 14-115, Davis 1-3, McCluster 1-(minus 1), A.Smith 2-(minus 3). PASSINGSan Diego, Rivers 27-39-0-392. Kansas City, A.Smith 26-38-1-294. RECEIVINGSan Diego, Allen 9-124, Royal 4-87, Woodhead 4-45, Green 3-80, Gates 3-21, Mathews 2-10, Ajirotutu 1-26, R.Brown 1-(minus 1). Kan sas City, McCluster 7-59, Bowe 5-51, Avery 4-91, Charles 4-42, Fasano 4-21, Jenkins 1-22, Vikings 26, Packers 26 Minnesota 3 10 7 3 3 26 Green Bay 7 0 0 16 3 26 First Quarter GBTolzien 6 run (Crosby kick), 4:59. MinFG Walsh 36, 1:37. Second Quarter MinFG Walsh 47, 4:24. MinPeterson 1 run (Walsh kick), :50. Third Quarter MinEllison 12 pass from Ponder (Walsh kick), 8:22. Fourth Quarter MinFG Walsh 29, 14:22. GBLacy 3 run (pass failed), 11:42. GBBoykin 6 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 3:30. GBFG Crosby 27, :46. Overtime GBFG Crosby 20, 10:25. MinFG Walsh 35, 3:49. A,871. Min GB First downs 28 30 Total Net Yards 447 494 Rushes-yards 43-232 34-196 Passing 215 298 Punt Returns 2-0 3-8 Kickoff Returns 5-143 3-63 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-30-0 28-53-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 6-18 2-18 Time of Possession 40:33 34:27 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMinnesota, Peterson 32-146, Gerhart 8-91, Ponder 3-(minus 5). Green Bay, Lacy 25-110, Starks 3-37, Tolzien 2-25, Flynn 4-24. PASSINGMinnesota, Ponder 21-30-0-233. Green Bay, Flynn 21-36-0-218, Tolzien 7-17-0-98. RECEIVINGMinnesota, Patterson 8-54, Carlson 3-36, Simpson 2-54, Jennings 2-29, Ellison 2-26, Ford 1-20, Felton 1-7, Gerhart 1-5, Peterson 1-2. Green Bay, J.Jones 7-80, Lacy 6-48, Boykin 5-60, Nelson 4-58, Kuhn 2-29, Quarless 2-22, Bostick 1-24, Starks 1-(minus 5). Ravens 19, Jets 3 N.Y. Jets 3 0 0 0 3 Baltimore 3 6 10 0 19 First Quarter NYJFG Folk 27, 6:52. BalFG Tucker 30, 1:59. Second Quarter BalFG Tucker 26, 10:15. BalFG Tucker 33, 1:56. Third Quarter BalFG Tucker 53, 10:01. BalJ.Jones 66 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), :05. A,148. NYJ Bal First downs 12 15 Total Net Yards 220 312 Rushes-yards 28-102 31-67 Passing 118 245 Punt Returns 2-26 5-108 Kickoff Returns 5-102 2-38 Interceptions Ret. 1-20 2-0 Comp-Att-Int 10-24-2 17-27-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-22 4-28 Time of Possession 25:55 34:05 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGN.Y. Jets, Powell 11-41, Ivory 9-35, Cribbs 5-20, Smith 3-6. Baltimore, Rice 16-30, Pierce 1130, Taylor 4-7. PASSINGN.Y. Jets, Smith 9-22-2-127, Cribbs 1-2-013. Baltimore, Flacco 17-26-1-273, Taylor 0-1-0-0. RECEIVINGN.Y. Jets, Powell 3-24, Salas 2-48, Winslow 2-34, Smith 1-13, Holmes 1-12, Cumberland 1-9. Baltimore, J.Jones 4-103, Dickson 3-55, Clark 3-24, T.Smith 2-74, Stokley 1-7, Leach 1-6, Taylor 1-6, M.Brown 1-1, Rice 1-(minus 3). Steelers 27, Browns 11 Pittsburgh 3 10 7 7 27 Cleveland 3 0 0 8 11 First Quarter PitFG Suisham 47, 10:03. CleFG Cundiff 49, 7:21. Second Quarter PitA.Brown 41 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 2:33. PitFG Suisham 32, :07. Third Quarter PitSanders 4 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 7:43. Fourth Quarter PitGay 21 interception return (Suisham kick), 4:27. CleGordon 1 pass from Weeden (Bess pass from Weeden), 3:13. A,513. Pit Cle First downs 19 19 Total Net Yards 302 367 Rushes-yards 34-85 16-55 Passing 217 312 Punt Returns 2-19 1-6 Kickoff Returns 2-47 5-91 Interceptions Ret. 1-21 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-34-0 27-52-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 5-21 Time of Possession 33:39 26:21 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGPittsburgh, Bell 23-80, F.Jones 2-9, Dwyer 6-7, Roethlisberger 2-(minus 3), A.Brown 1-(minus 8). Cleveland, Ogbonnaya 4-26, Whittaker 6-16, Mc Gahee 4-12, Weeden 1-2, Campbell 1-(minus 1). PASSINGPittsburgh, Roethlisberger 22-34-0-217. Cleveland, Weeden 13-30-1-209, Campbell 1422-0-124. RECEIVINGPittsburgh, A.Brown 6-92, Sanders 6-52, Miller 5-41, Bell 2-18, W.Johnson 1-9, F.Jones 1-4, Dwyer 1-1. Cleveland, Gordon 14-237, Bess 5-27, Cameron 3-32, Little 2-17, Ogbonnaya 2-15 Buccaneers 24, Lions 21 Tampa Bay 3 14 0 7 24 Detroit 0 14 7 0 21 First Quarter TBFG Lindell 38, 3:23. Second Quarter DetBurleson 5 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 11:50. TBUnderwood 7 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 8:42. DetFauria 10 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 4:33. TBJohnson 48 interception return (Lindell kick), :50. Third Quarter DetPettigrew 18 pass from Stafford (Akers kick), 9:36. Fourth Quarter TBUnderwood 85 pass from Glennon (Lindell kick), 14:05. A,098. TB Det First downs 10 25 Total Net Yards 229 390 Rushes-yards 24-22 24-104 Passing 207 286 Punt Returns 2-19 2-42 Kickoff Returns 2-83 2-49 Interceptions Ret. 4-86 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-21-0 26-46-4 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-40 2-11 Punts 5-43.6 4-37.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 9-67 5-39 Time of Possession 26:38 33:22 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGTampa Bay, Rainey 18-35, Leonard 1-3, Dawson 1-1, Glennon 4-(minus 17). Detroit, Bush 15-83, Bell 6-15, Stafford 2-6, Burleson 1-0. PASSINGTampa Bay, Glennon 14-21-0-247. Detroit, Stafford 26-46-4-297. RECEIVINGTampa Bay, Wright 8-75, Underwood 3-108, Jackson 2-61, Leonard 1-3. Detroit, Johnson 7-115, Burleson 7-77, Bush 4-17, Durham 3-46, Pettigrew 3-32, Fauria 1-10, Bell 1-0.Cardinals 40, Colts 11 Indianapolis 3 0 0 8 11 Arizona 7 20 7 6 40 First Quarter AriFitzgerald 4 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 10:02. IndFG Vinatieri 27, 1:15. Second Quarter AriFitzgerald 26 pass from Palmer (Feely kick), 13:29. AriFG Feely 48, 8:15. AriDansby 22 interception return (Feely kick), 7:58. AriFG Feely 50, :00. Third Quarter AriMendenhall 5 run (Feely kick), 5:57. Fourth Quarter IndFleener 17 pass from Luck (Heyward-Bey pass from Luck), 10:26. AriFG Feely 21, 7:20. AriFG Feely 25, 2:17. A,882. Ind Ari First downs 15 27 Total Net Yards 239 410 Rushes-yards 15-80 30-120 Passing 159 290 Punt Returns 0-0 3-23 Kickoff Returns 4-115 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-22 Comp-Att-Int 20-39-1 26-38-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-4 3-24 Punts 5-44.6 2-36.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-89 9-84 Time of Possession 23:11 36:49 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGIndianapolis, Herron 4-33, Luck 2-31, Richardson 7-15, D.Brown 2-1. Arizona, Mendenhall 13-54, Ellington 10-50, Taylor 5-10, Fitzgerald 1-4, Peterson 1-2. PASSINGIndianapolis, Luck 20-39-1-163. Arizona, Palmer 26-37-0-314, Fitzgerald 0-1-0-0. RECEIVINGIndianapolis, Hilton 5-38, Fleener 4-55, Brazill 3-35, Heyward-Bey 3-22, Richardson 2-11, Cunningham 1-4, Satele 1-0, D.Brown 1-(minus 2). Arizona, Floyd 7-104, Fitzgerald 5-52, Housler 4-51, Roberts 3-43, Ellington 2-21, Mendenhall 1-24, Brown 1-16, Smith 1-6, Taylor 1-1, Peterson 1-(minus 4). MISSED FIELD GOALSArizona, Feely 28 (BK). Cowboys 24, Giants 21 Dallas 7 7 7 3 24 N.Y. Giants 0 6 7 8 21 First Quarter DalHeath 50 fumble return (Bailey kick), 4:17. Second Quarter NYGFG J.Brown 21, 12:40. DalWitten 20 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 9:37. NYGFG J.Brown 23, 5:18. Third Quarter DalWitten 2 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 6:54. NYGMyers 27 pass from Manning (J.Brown kick), 4:33. Fourth Quarter NYGMurphy Jr. 4 pass from Manning (A.Brown run), 4:45. DalFG Bailey 35, :00. A,499. Dal NYG First downs 24 22 Total Net Yards 327 356 Rushes-yards 20-107 30-202 Passing 220 154 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-(-4) Comp-Att-Int 23-38-1 16-30-0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 11-85 11-81 Time of Possession 29:21 30:39 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGDallas, Murray 14-86, Dunbar 3-20, Romo 3-1. N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 21-127, Jacobs 9-75. PASSINGDallas, Romo 23-38-1-250. N.Y. Giants, Manning 16-30-0-174. RECEIVINGDallas, Bryant 9-102, Witten 4-37, Murray 3-40, Dunbar 2-26, Beasley 2-13, Austin 1-17, Williams 1-10, Escobar 1-5. N.Y. Giants, A.Brown 4-11, Randle 3-64, Myers 3-39, Cruz 2-27. KRISTIE RIEKENAP Sports WriterHOUSTON In a match up of the AFCs worst teams, the Houston Texans couldnt stop their skid Sunday. Maurice Jones-Drew ran for a season-high 84 yards and a touchdown and the Jacksonville Jaguars extended the Texans losing streak to a franchise-record nine games with a 13-6 victory. The two-time AFC South champions havent won since Sept. 15. Jones-Drews touchdown on Jacksonvilles rst drive put the Jaguars (2-9) on top, and they never trailed against an inept and ineffec tive Texans offense. Josh Scobee kicked eld goals of 30 and 53 yards to help the Jaguars win for the second time in three games. Case Keenum had the worst performance in his ve starts, throwing for just 169 yards with an interception. Houston (2-9) was driving late when rookie Ryan Davis grabbed a one-handed in terception off a deection by Keshawn Martin to seal the win. The Jaguars pushed their lead to 13-6 with Scobees 53-yard eld goal with about seven minutes remaining. Houston got lucky on its next drive when Keenum threw a ball right into the hands of Jacksonville rook ie Johnathan Cyprien, but he couldnt hold on to it. It didnt matter much though as the Texans ended up punting a few plays later anyway. Jacksonville entered the game averaging an NFLworst 61.7 yards rushing a game, but nished with 118. Jones-Drew found some room in an otherwise tough season and added 60 yards on six receptions. Chad Henne was 23 of 32 for 239 yards and Cecil Shorts led the team with eight catches for 71 yards. Houston coach Gary Kubiak coached from the booth for the second straight week on the advice of his doctors after returning to work last week after recover ing from a mini-stroke.Jaguars send Texans to 9th straight loss DAVID J PHILLIP / AP Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Ryan Davis (59) celebrates his interception against the Houston Texans during the fourth quarter of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013, in Houston. The Jaguars won 13-6.

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 DAVE SKRETTAAP Sports WriterKANSAS CITY, Mo. Phil ip Rivers came through when the San Diego Char gers needed him the most. The once-embattled quar terback threw for 392 yards and three touchdowns, the nal one a 26-yarder to Seyi Ajirotutu with 24 seconds re maining, to give the Char gers a 41-38 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday and end a three-game losing streak. The Chiefs had taken the lead when Alex Smith hit Dwayne Bowe for a goahead score with 1:22 left. But the Chargers (5-6) still had two timeouts, and they used both to quickly move downeld. Ajirotutus TD in tight coverage was just his third catch of the season. It also represented the eighth and nal lead change in the game. Smith threw for 292 yards and three touchdowns for the Chiefs, who dropped their second straight after a 9-0 start. They also lost top pass rushers Tamba Hali and Justin Houston to injuries and now have to turn their attention to the Denver Broncos next week. Jamaal Charles added 115 yards rushing and two touchdowns. Donnie Avery had four catches for 91 yards and a score as Kansas City produced its best point total of the season. It still wasnt quite enough. Danny Woodhead had touchdowns rushing and re ceiving as he picked up the slack for Chargers running back Ryan Mathews, who left with a hamstring inju ry. Ladarius Green had a 60-yard touchdown recep tion in the fourth quarter, while Keenan Allen had nine catches for 124 yards. San Diego nished with 491 yards of offense against a Chiefs defense that had allowed more than 17 points just once: last weeks 27-17 defeat in Denver. Hali rolled his right ankle and was taken to the locker room on a cart and did not return. The Chiefs lost their other pass rusher later in the rst half, when Houston was banged into during a scrum and left holding his right el bow. The game turned into a back-and-forth nail-biter in the second half. San Diego pulled ahead 17-14 when a 54-yard pass to Eddie Royal set up a 1-yard TD run by Mathews. But the Chargers helped the Chiefs take the lead right back with three pass interference pen alties that gave them the ball at the San Diego 1. Charles second touchdown made it 21-17. The Chargers embattled defensive backeld got one back on the Chiefs next se ries. Shareece Wright, who had one of those pass in terference penalties, batted a pass to Marcus Gilchrist, who had one of the oth ers. The interception set up Woodheads 3-yard touch down run. Kansas City retook the lead at 28-24 on Smiths short touchdown pass to Anthony Fasano, but after the teams traded chip-shot eld goals early in the fourth quarter, the Chargers took it right back. Rivers hit Green on a quick slant route, and the tight end ran 60 yards for his rst ca reer touchdown. It gave the Chargers a 34-31 lead with 7:50 left in the game. The Chiefs answered the call, only for the Chargers to trump them in the end.Rivers leads Chargers to 41-38 win over Chiefs CHARLIE RIEDEL / APSan Diego Chargers wide receiver Seyi Ajirotutu (16) catches a pass in the end zone for the game winning touchdown under pressure from Kansas City Chiefs cornerback Sean Smith (27) during the second half of an NFL football game on Sunday in Kansas City, Mo. The Chargers won the game 41-38. GENARO C. ARMASAP Sports WriterGREEN BAY, Wis. Backup quarterback Matt Flynn threw for 218 yards to help the Packers storm back from a 16-point de cit for a 26-26 tie as the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay could only muster eld goals in overtime Sunday. Mason Crosby hit from 20 yards at 10:28 of the extra period and Blair Walsh connected from 35 with 3:54 left. Greg Jennings, play ing his rst game at Lambeau Field as a member of the Vikings (3-8-1), dropped a third-down pass with 2:11 left. The Packers (55-1) also stumbled on their next possession. RAMS 42, BEARS 21ST. LOUIS Tavon Austins 65yard touchdown run his fourth straight this season from beyond mideld jump-started a 21-point rst quar ter and the St. Louis Rams defense made some big plays, too, in a 42-21 victory over the Chicago Bears on Sunday. The Rams (5-6) followed up a 30-point rout at Indianapolis after their bye in front of their largest crowd of the season, about half of them clad Bears orange. Late scores by rookie backup running back Benny Cunningham and defensive end Robert Quinn helped nish off the Bears (6-5), who remained tied for the NFC North lead.STEELERS 27, BROWNS 11CLEVELAND Ben Roethlisberger threw two touchdown passes and beat Cleveland again as the Pittsburgh Steelers moved back into the playoff picture with a 27-11 win over the Browns on Sunday. Roethlisberger connected on a 41-yard TD pass to Antonio Brown in the rst half, and hit Emmanuel Sanders on a 4-yarder in the third quarter for the Steelers (5-6), who have turned their season around following a 0-4 start. RAVENS 19, JETS 3BALTIMORE Joe Flacco threw a 66yard touchdown pass to Jacoby Jones, Justin Tucker kicked four eld goals and the Baltimore Ravens shut down the sputtering offense of the New York Jets in a 19-3 victory Sunday. The defending Super Bowl champion Ravens (5-6) had lost four of ve before bouncing back to beat New York (5-6) and keep their playoff hopes alive. Jones had four catches for 103 yards.CARDINALS 40, COLTS 11GLENDALE, Ariz. Carson Palmer threw two touchdown passes to Larry Fitzgerald, Karlos Dansby returned an interception 22 yards for a score and the Arizona Cardinals won their fourth in a row with a 40-11 victory over the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday. Cardinals coach Bruce Arians beat the team that propelled him to coaching prominence last season, when he took over as Colts interim coach while Chuck Pagano fought leukemia.TITANS 23, RAIDERS 19OAKLAND, Calif. Ryan Fitzpatrick threw a 10-yard touchdown pass to Kendall Wright with 10 seconds remaining to cap a mistake-free performance that put the Tennessee Titans back in play off contention with a 23-19 victory over the Oakland Raiders on Sunday. Fitzpatrick also threw a 54-yard TD pass to Justin Hunter and Rob Bironas added three eld goals to give Tennessee (5-6) its second win in seven games. But despite the recent slump, the Titans nd themselves in a six-way tie for the sixth and nal playoff spot in the AFC with ve weeks left in the regular season.COWBOYS 24, GIANTS 21EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. Tony Romo threw two touchdowns and led a drive that set up Dan Bailey 35yard eld goal on the nal play as the Dallas Cowboys defeated the Giants 24-21 Sunday. Dallas ended the Giants four-game winning streak and most of their playoff hopes. The victory moved the Cowboys (6-5) into a rst-place tie with idle Philadelphia in the NFC East. Packers come from behind to force 26-26 tie with Vikings MORRY GASH / APMinnesota Vikings Adrian Peterson runs during the second half of an NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers on in Green Bay, Wis. LYNNE SLADKY / AP Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton (1) avoids a tackle by Miami Dolphins defensive end Dion Jordan (95) to score a touchdown during the second half of an NFL football game on Sunday in Miami Gardens. STEVEN WINEAP Sports WriterMIAMI GARDENS Cam Newton angrily slapped his hands to gether and stared into the end-zone stands, watching Miami Dolphins fans celebrate the interception he had just thrown. His mistake helped put the Carolina Panthers in a deep hole Sunday, but Newton knew how to get out. He led a late comeback for the second time in a week, converting a fourth-and-10 situation at his 20 with a completion to keep alive the Panthers nal possession, and their touchdown with 43 seconds left beat Mi ami 20-16. The Panthers (8-3) overcame a 16-3 rsthalf decit to extend their winning streak to seven games, their lon gest since 2003. We didnt play our best early on, Newton said. We couldnt get it going. But we just nd ways to win. Newton hit Greg Olsen with a 1-yard pass for the winning score to cap a 12-play drive. Carolina also rallied past the New England Patriots with a late drive last Monday. The Dolphins (5-6) fell to 2-2 since tackle Jonathan Martin left the team and the teams bullying scandal began to mushroom. Weve got to make plays at the end when it counts, receiver Mike Wallace said. Weve got to have a killer in stinct. I dont think we have it that well right now. Weve got to do a better job of putting teams away. The Panthers trailed 16-13 when their win ning drive began at their own 20 with 4:13 left. With only one timeout remaining, they went for it on fourth down, and Newton threaded a pass between two de fenders to Steve Smith for a 19-yard gain. A backbreaker for Mi ami? Im not sure theres any other word to de scribe that, defensive lineman Jared Odrick said. Thats when the tide shifted in our favor, Newton said.Panthers win 7th straight, 20-16 over hapless Dolphins

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B5

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B6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 The Helpful PlaceWe Sell & ServiceEquipment* APOPKA Apopka Ace Hardware & Lumber 530 South Park Avenue (407) 889-4111 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 LEESBURG South Leesburg Ace Hardware 27649 U.S. Highway 27 (352) 787-5446 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 EUSTIS Bronson Ace Hardware 26 East Orange Avenue (352) 357-2366 M-Sat 7-6:30, Sun 9-5 MOUNT DORA Mount Dora Ace Hardware 18691 U.S. Highway 441 (352) 383-2101 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 SORRENTO Sorrento Ace Hardware 24329 St. Rd. 46 (352) 383-2061 M-Sat 7-7:00, Sun 9-5 TAVARES Tavares Ace Hardware 509-South Highway 19 (352) 343-3361 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5 UMATILLA Umatilla Ace Hardware 811 North Central Avenue (352) 669-3411 M-Sat 7:30-7, Sun 9-5Come See Our Great Selection of Benjamin Moore Paint *At select stores only. COLLEGE FOOTBALL No. 8 MISSOURI 24, No. 24 MISSISSIPPI 10 Missouri 7 10 7 0 24 Mississippi 0 3 7 0 10 First Quarter MoJosey 4 run (Baggett kick), 12:15. Second Quarter MoFG Baggett 33, 7:31. MissFG Ritter 30, 4:06. MoMurphy 3 run (Baggett kick), 1:37. Third Quarter MissMathers 45 run (Ritter kick), 13:27. MoJosey 10 run (Baggett kick), 6:56. A,168. Mo Miss First downs 25 21 Rushes-yards 51-260 29-126 Passing 225 252 Comp-Att-Int 15-26-1 27-43-1 Return Yards 17 9 Punts-Avg. 3-38.3 4-42.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-43 5-35 Time of Possession 33:03 26:57 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMissouri, Josey 15-95, Murphy 16-67, J.Franklin 8-42, Hansbrough 8-32, Brantley 1-26, Mauk 1-2, Team 2-(minus 4). Mississippi, Mathers 7-66, Walton 11-42, Brunetti 4-9, Wallace 3-6, J.Scott 3-5, Dodson 1-(minus 2). PASSINGMissouri, J.Franklin 12-19-1-142, Mauk 3-7-0-83. Mississippi, Wallace 26-42-1-244, Brunetti 1-1-0-8. RECEIVINGMissouri, Lucas 3-59, Waters 3-6, Sasser 2-72, Washington 2-47, Green-Beckham 2-14, Clark 1-13, J.Hunt 1-11, Josey 1-3. Mississippi, Moncrief 6-115, Walton 5-42, Treadwell 5-23, Logan 4-35, Sanders 4-17, Mathers 2-14, J.Scott 1-6. No. 11 OKLAHOMA ST. 49, No. 3 BAYLOR 17 Baylor 0 3 0 14 17 Oklahoma St. 7 7 21 14 49 First Quarter OkStStaley 2 run (Grogan kick), 3:07. Second Quarter OkStC.Moore 12 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick), 4:28. BayFG A.Jones 29, :13. Third Quarter OkStT.Moore 56 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick), 13:23. OkStStaley 1 run (Grogan kick), 10:10. OkStChelf 4 run (Grogan kick), :13. Fourth Quarter BayGoodley 24 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 14:04. OkStPatmon 78 fumble return (Grogan kick), 9:58. OkStSeales 33 pass from Chelf (Grogan kick), 3:01. BayNorwood 32 pass from Petty (A.Jones kick), 1:59. A,218. Ba y OkSt First downs 26 21 Rushes-yards 36-94 46-154 Passing 359 440 Comp-Att-Int 28-48-0 21-27-0 Return Yards 0 (-6) Punts-Avg. 6-47.7 6-38.0 Fumbles-Lost 4-3 1-0 Penalties-Yards 3-10 7-65 Time of Possession 24:37 35:23 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGBaylor, Petty 11-46, Chan 7-33, Linwood 14-29, Goodley 3-6, Team 1-(minus 20). Oklahoma St., J.Smith 12-71, Roland 11-36, Childs 4-35, Staley 7-25, Sheperd 1-13, Team 3-(minus 6), Chelf 8-(minus 20). PASSINGBaylor, Petty 28-48-0-359. Oklahoma St., Chelf 19-25-0-370, C.Moore 1-1-0-22, Stewart 1-1-0-48. RECEIVINGBaylor, Goodley 10-118, Norwood 6-83, Coleman 5-54, C.Fuller 3-90, Lee 2-10, Rhodes 1-4, Linwood 1-0. Oklahoma St., T.Moore 5-126, Stewart 5-45, C.Moore 4-67, Seales 3-74, Ateman 1-51, Chelf 1-48, Sheperd 1-25, Glidden 1-4. No. 19 ARIZONA ST. 38, No. 14 UCLA 33 Arizona St. 14 21 3 0 38 UCLA 10 3 14 6 33 First Quarter ASUT.Kelly 3 run (Gonzalez kick), 12:26. UCLALucien 42 pass from Hundley (Fairbairn kick), 12:10. UCLAFG Fairbairn 48, 3:30. ASUFoster 3 run (Gonzalez kick), :32. Second Quarter ASUBradford 18 interception return (Gonzalez kick), 14:56. ASUEubank 1 run (Gonzalez kick), 2:36. UCLAFG Fairbairn 23, :47. ASUStrong 19 pass from T.Kelly (Gonzalez kick), :05. Third Quarter UCLAJack 3 run (Fairbairn kick), 11:38. UCLAPerkins 1 run (Fairbairn kick), 7:57. ASUFG Gonzalez 28, 1:07. Fourth Quarter UCLAEvans 27 pass from Hundley (pass failed), 11:25. A,131. ASU UCLA First downs 24 21 Rushes-yards 50-223 41-151 Passing 225 253 Comp-Att-Int 20-27-0 18-26-1 Return Yards 19 49 Punts-Avg. 5-34.8 2-39.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-20 6-45 Time of Possession 31:52 28:08 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArizona St., T.Kelly 22-99, Grice 18-95, R.Smith 2-40, Foster 4-8, D.Lewis 1-3, Eubank 1-1, Team 2-(mi nus 23). UCLA, Jack 16-86, Perkins 8-60, Hundley 17-5. PASSINGArizona St., T.Kelly 20-27-0-225. UCLA, Hundley 18-26-1-253. RECEIVINGArizona St., Grice 7-72, Strong 6-91, Coyle 2-15, Foster 2-1, Ca.Smith 1-20, D.Nelson 1-18, D.Lewis 1-8. UCLA, Evans 6-80, Payton 4-46, Bell 3-22, Mazzone 2-25, Lucien 1-42, Perkins 1-20, Vanderdoes 1-18. No. 23 SOUTHERN CAL 47, COLORADO 29 Southern Cal 9 14 14 10 47 Colorado 0 0 7 22 29 First Quarter USCAllen 12 run (Heidari kick), 5:34. USCSafety, 1:04. Second Quarter USCAllen 1 run (Heidari kick), 5:23. USCAgholor 20 pass from Kessler (Heidari kick), :42. Third Quarter ColBell 31 fumble return (Oliver kick), 14:46. USCTelfer 10 pass from Kessler (Heidari kick), 11:29. USCAllen 23 run (Heidari kick), 7:19. Fourth Quarter ColSpruce 38 pass from Liufau (Oliver kick), 14:34. USCFG Heidari 39, 10:14. ColAdkins 3 run (Oliver kick), 8:01. ColRichardson 5 pass from Liufau (Goodson pass from Liufau), 3:19. USCVainuku 52 run (Heidari kick), 2:19. A,005. USC Col First downs 20 18 Rushes-yards 41-243 31-124 Passing 206 188 Comp-Att-Int 20-30-0 17-33-1 Return Yards 33 1 Punts-Avg. 6-30.2 7-35.3 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-25 3-35 Time of Possession 33:24 26:36 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGSouthern Cal, Allen 21-145, Vainuku 5-70, Isaac 8-26, Akiba 3-9, Madden 1-6, Wittek 2-(minus 5), Kessler 1-(minus 8). Colorado, Adkins 14-63, Powell 8-41, T.Jones 5-24, Goodson 1-2, Liufau 3-(minus 6). PASSINGSouthern Cal, Kessler 19-28-0-184, Wit tek 1-2-0-22. Colorado, Liufau 17-33-1-188. RECEIVINGSouthern Cal, Grimble 6-46, Rogers 3-56, Agholor 3-38, Allen 3-24, Vainuku 2-11, Isaac 1-17, Telfer 1-10, Pinner 1-4. Colorado, Richardson 8-88, Spruce 4-52, Goodson 2-31, Ad kins 2-10, Ross 1-7.LATE SATURDAY TOP 25 BOX SCORESBOYS BASKETBALLTAVARES 70, LEESBURG 59Anthony Coleman scored 22 points, Osirus Munn had 19 and Demitrius Ramirez nished with 13 for Tavares.FIRST ACADEMY OF LEESBURG 54, CENTRAL FLORIDA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 49Luke Lea led FAL with 25 points to keep his team perfect on the season at 3-0. CFCA fell to 0-3 with the loss. In girls action, CFCA (3-3) defeated FAL 3525 with Liza Thom as nine points leading First Academy.MOUNT DORA BIBLE 80, MASTERS ACADEMY 53Zach Ward led the way with 29 points and 4 steals to lead Mount Dora Bible. Zach Brock had 14 points and 10 assists while Demarius Smith nished with 15 points and eight re bounds. Mount Dora Bible (2-0) will face Mount Dora High School at 7 p.m. Tuesday.BOYS SOCCERLAKE MINNEOLA HIGH SCHOOL 5, UMATILLA 2Jamon Elliott and Chris Chong each scored twice for the Hawks in the victory over Umatilla.PREP ROUNDUP RUSTY MILLERAP Sports WriterCOLUMBUS, Ohio Ohio State defensive lineman Noah Spence is from Harrisburg, Pa. He wasnt steeped in the enmity that grips fans of the Buckeyes and Wolverines about this time every year. But now in his sec ond season in the heart of Ohio, he has a good grasp of it now. Its a huge rival ry even if youre a guy from out of state like me, he said. Then he added, Its everything. Ohio State and Michigan clash for the 110th time on Saturday, at Michigan Stadium. Its already been a long, grueling season. But, as it should be, the best and biggest game has been saved for last. Ohio State (11-0, 7-0), which moved up to No. 3 in all major rank ings on Sunday, won its school-record 23rd straight game and also earned a spot in the Big Ten championship game with a 42-14 win over Indiana in snowglobe conditions at Ohio Stadium on Sat urday. Almost immediately, the Buckeyes thoughts turned to the opponent that like Lord Voldemort in the Harry Potter books no one in Ohio refers to by name. Instead, they follow the lead of late coach/cur mudgeon Woody Hayes and call it That School (or Team) Up North. From a distance, it might look like a trap game: The Buckeyes have little to play for beyond holding on to what theyve already got an unbeaten sea son and conference and national title aspi rations. On top of that, the Wolverines (7-4, 3-4) have lost four of their last six games and have had major problems running the ball and scoring points. But in a rivalry the size of The Game, its almost impossible for one team to look past another even though the Buckeyes have an other major showdown a week later when they face No. 11 Michigan in the Big Ten title game on Dec. 7 in Indianap olis. Theres no chance of us overlooking a team from here on out, Buckeyes defensive tackle Michael Bennett said. Youve got That Team Up North, the Big Ten championship and whatever comes after that. Every week from here on out is a bowl week. Urban Meyer won his rst Michigan-Ohio State game as a head coach a year ago, 2621, by shutting out the Wolverines in the sec ond half and edging past them on two eld goals by Drew Basil. Moments after his team beat Indiana, Meyer said there was not time to waste to get ready for Michigan (although, of course, he did not speak that word). I have great respect for this rivalry it almost makes me in awe, he said. The re spect we have comes with incredible responsibility that sometimes can be overwhelming (when it comes) to what we have to do next week. So we take it very seriously. Were working on the game as we speak. Were all go ing to go home, see our families and then were coming back (Sunday) to get ready to go. Michigan, ranked as high as 11th in the na tion during a 5-0 start to the season, has had its hopes dashed. The latest punch to the gut was blowing a 14-point, second-half lead at Iowa on Saturday in a 24-21 defeat. Afterward, coach Brady Hoke like Meyer an Ohio native was asked what objectives remained for his team. We play for our se niors. Thats been the rst thing we always play for, he said. And weve got a pretty big ri valry game next week. JAY LAPRETE / AP Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller, left, tries to get away from Indiana defensive tackle Ralphael Green on Saturday during the third quarter of an NCAA college football game in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State won 42-14. For Buckeyes, Michigan game is everything Thank you for reading The Daily Commercial.

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL B7 GOLF ISPS Handa World Cup of Golf Scores Sunday At Royal Melbourne Golf Club (Composite Course) Melbourne, Australia Purse: $7 million (Individual); $1 million (Team) Yardage: 7,024; Par: 71 Final Team 1. Australia 143-138-134-136 551 2. United States 137-137-142-145 561 3. Japan 143-138-141-141 563 3. Denmark 137-140-147-139 563 5. Canada 141-144-141-144 570 6. South Africa 147-141-145-139 572 7. Germany 144-145-139-145 573 7. France 145-140-145-143 573 9. Thailand 143-142-143-147 575 10. Scotland 141-143-146-146 576 11. Ireland 147-143-138-149 577 11. Sweden 148-143-147-139 577 13. Finland 142-147-144-145 578 13. England 144-143-143-148 578 15. South Korea 141-148-144-147 580 16. Netherlands 150-147-139-145 581 17. Spain 148-144-141-149 582 17. Portugal 140-142-146-154 582 17. Argentina 149-146-146-141 582 20. New Zealand 154-144-141-144 583 20. Italy 151-141-142-149 583 20. Brazil 144-143-141-155 583 23. Philippines 144-143-147-153 587 24. Chile 149-144-145-150 588 24. China 152-145-148-143 588 26. India 154-147-149-143 593 Individual Jason Day, Australia 68-70-66-70 274 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 66-68-71-71 276 Adam Scott, Australia 75-68-68-66 277 Matt Kuchar, United States 71-68-68-71 278 Ryo Ishikawa, Japan 71-71-70-69 281 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand 71-70-70-70 281 Hideto Tanihara, Japan 72-67-71-72 282 David Hearn, Canada 70-71-71-71 283 Stuart Manley, Wales 67-72-72-72 283 Kevin Streelman, United States 66-69-74-74 283 Francesco Molinari, Italy 75-67-66-75 283 Brendon de Jonge, Zimbabwe 74-72-70-68 284 Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 73-71-70-70 284 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 71-72-69-72 284 Roope Kakko, Finland 72-72-70-71 285 Gregory Bourdy, France 72-69-72-72 285 K.J. Choi, South Korea 67-74-71-73 285 Ricardo Santos, Portugal 69-69-73-74 285 Graeme McDowell, Ireland 72-71-67-75 285 George Coetzee, South Africa 74-71-73-68 286 Branden Grace, South Africa 73-70-72-71 286 Martin Laird, Scotland 67-72-74-73 286 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 73-69-71-73 286 Oscar Fraustro, Mexico 74-67-71-74 286 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 71-72-76-68 287 Vijay Singh, Fiji 73-69-75-70 287 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 70-76-70-71 287 Anirban Lahiri, India 72-70-73-72 287 Brad Fritsch, Canada 71-73-70-73 287 Jonas Blixt, Sweden 76-72-74-66 288 Victor Dubuisson, France 73-71-73-71 288 Fabian Gomez, Argentina 72-75-72-70 289 Chris Wood, England 75-70-72-72 289 Mark Tullo, Chile 74-72-71-72 289 Peter Hanson, Sweden 72-71-73-73 289 Marcel Siem, Germany 71-74-69-75 289 Danny Willett, England 69-73-71-76 289 Wu Ashun, China 77-69-75-69 290 Mike Hendry, New Zealand 75-73-71-71 290 Robert-Jan Derksen, Netherlands 74-75-70-71 290 Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 74-71-72-73 290 Tim Sluiter, Netherlands 76-72-69-74 291 Adilson da Silva, Brazil 72-71-71-77 291 Shane Lowry, Ireland 75-72-71-74 292 Alexandre Rocha, Brazil 72-72-70-78 292 Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 77-71-74-71 293 Tim Wilkinson, New Zealand 79-71-70-73 293 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 70-75-74-74 293 Angelo Que, Philippines 74-72-70-77 293 CME Group Titleholders Scores Sunday At Ritz Carlton Golf Resort (Tiburon Golf Club) Naples Purse:, $2 million Yardage: 6,540; Par: 72 Final Shanshan Feng, $700,000 66-74-67-66 273 Gerina Piller, $139,713 71-67-67-69 274 Pornanong Phatlum, $101,352 70-68-67-70 275 Sandra Gal, $78,404 64-69-74-69 276 Inbee Park, $63,106 68-72-69-68 277 Cristie Kerr, $44,238 69-69-71-69 278 Sun Young Yoo, $44,238 68-68-73-69 278 Stacy Lewis, $44,238 71-73-63-71 278 Jennifer Johnson, $32,509 71-69-70-69 279 So Yeon Ryu, $32,509 70-71-69-69 279 Ilhee Lee, $26,848 69-77-69-65 280 Amy Yang, $26,848 73-68-69-70 280 Michelle Wie, $26,848 72-70-66-72 280 Angela Stanford, $22,871 74-69-69-70 282 Azahara Munoz, $22,871 72-68-69-73 282 Brittany Lang, $19,123 68-76-70-69 283 Morgan Pressel, $19,123 71-68-74-70 283 Meena Lee, $19,123 69-72-70-72 283 Hee Young Park, $19,123 69-70-72-72 283 Lexi Thompson, $19,123 66-74-67-76 283 Catriona Matthew, $16,063 70-73-75-66 284 Lydia Ko, $16,063 71-71-72-70 284 Anna Nordqvist, $16,063 66-73-75-70 284 Sandra Changkija, $16,063 67-74-70-73 284 Jane Park, $13,807 68-77-69-71 285 Chella Choi, $13,807 71-70-71-73 285 Ayako Uehara, $13,807 69-72-71-73 285 Karrie Webb, $13,807 70-73-69-73 285 Mo Martin, $11,780 69-72-74-72 287 Suzann Pettersen, $11,780 72-72-71-72 287 Mika Miyazato, $11,780 70-73-68-76 287 Natalie Gulbis, $11,780 70-70-65-82 287 Karine Icher, $9,806 69-74-75-70 288 Moriya Jutanugarn, $9,806 70-72-74-72 288 I.K. Kim, $9,806 72-74-70-72 288 Jenny Shin, $9,806 73-72-71-72 288 Na Yeon Choi, $9,806 71-74-70-73 288 Caroline Hedwall, $8,644 74-74-72-69 289 Beatriz Recari, $7,802 72-77-73-68 290 Candie Kung, $7,802 71-74-75-70 290 Lizette Salas, $7,802 71-72-75-72 290 Cindy LaCrosse, $7,802 69-76-69-76 290 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $6,635 72-73-76-70 291 Alison Walshe, $6,635 74-73-73-71 291 Pernilla Lindberg, $6,635 72-75-71-73 291 Rebecca Lee-Bentham, $6,635 65-76-75-75 291 Katherine Hull-Kirk, $5,928 73-78-70-71 292 Jessica Korda, $5,928 74-72-69-77 292 Irene Cho, $5,469 73-74-74-72 293 Carlota Ciganda, $5,469 72-75-72-74 293 Hee Kyung Seo, $5,125 74-73-76-71 294 Brittany Lincicome, $5,125 68-79-73-74 294 Mi Jung Hur, $4,742 73-74-75-73 295 Chie Arimura, $4,742 73-77-71-74 295 Stacy Prammanasudh, $4,742 71-74-75-75 295 Juli Inkster, $4,360 69-74-77-76 296 Hee-Won Han, $4,360 75-73-71-77 296 Paula Creamer, $4,130 74-76-74-73 297 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $3,978 68-81-71-78 298 Austin Ernst, $3,825 73-82-74-70 299 Caroline Masson, $3,710 77-76-73-74 300 Hanna Kang, $3,710 74-78-72-76 300 Eun-Hee Ji, $3,595 75-75-74-78 302 Brooke Pancake, $3,480 72-81-77-74 304 Jeong Jang, $3,480 77-73-75-79 304 Paola Moreno, $3,366 74-78-77-76 305 Jacqui Concolino, $3,251 81-73-77-75 306 Associated PressUNCASVILLE, Conn. Marcus Paige scored 32 points and No. 24 North Carolina broke open a tight game in the second half to upset No. 3 Louisville 93-84 to win the Hall of Fame Tipoff Tournament. Brice Johnson added 13 points and Kennedy Meeks had 13 points, 12 rebounds and seven assists for the Tar Heels (4-1), who lost just a week ago at home to Belmont. Russ Smith led all scorers with 36 points for Louisville, which came into the game on a school-record 21game winning streak. Chris Jones added 20 points It was a three-point game with just over 13 minutes left when Louisvilles Montrezl Harrell picked up his fourth foul. North Carolina scored the next eight points. Harrell fouled out with 7 minutes left with just ve points and eight rebounds.TOLDEO 94, FLORIDA ATLANTIC 74DETROIT Justin Drummond scored 23 points and Rian Pearson had 17 as Toledo remained undefeated with a 94-74 win over Florida Atlantic on Sunday in a 2K Sports Classic matchup. Down 15-14 in the rst half, Toledo (6-0) went on a 24-8 run and never trailed the remainder of the game. Florida Atlantic (1-6) twice cut the decit to 8 in the second half but Toledo pulled away. The Rockets are off to their best start since the 1998-99 season, when they began 10-0. Toledo shot 51.8 percent from the eld and made 34 of 36 free throws. Drummond was a perfect 9-of-9 from the free throw line. Pablo Bertone led Florida Atlantic with 29 points. It was the Owls sixth consecutive loss.BRYANT 60, NEW HAMPSHIRE 55 DURHAM, N.H. Dyami Starks scored 19 points as Bryant beats New Hampshire 60-55 on Sunday in a game that included a 40-minute power failure delay. Starks, the nations sixth leading scorer going in to the game, had a cooler hand (shooting 5 of 14) but managed to lead all scorers. COLLEGE BASKETBALLPaige leads No. 24 UNC past No. 3 Louisville MICHAEL DWYER / APNorth Carolinas Marcus Paige (5) reacts after scoring during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Louisville on Sunday in the Basketball Hall of Fame Tip-Off tournament championship at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn. COREY PERRINE / AP Shanshan Feng waves to the crowd as she carries her trophy after winning the CME Group Titleholders golf tournament on Sunday at Tiburon Golf Club in Naples. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterNAPLES Shanshan Feng of China seized control early and was awless in the nal round of the LPGA Tour season, closing with a 6-under 66 to win the LPGA Titleholders and claim the richest prize in womens golf Sunday.Feng opened with four birdies in six holes to go from two shots down to the outright lead, and she never gave it up the rest of the way at Tiburon Golf Club. Gerina Piller stayed within one shot and had a 10-foot birdie attempt on the nal hole that would have forced a playoff. It narrowly missed, and Piller had to settle for a 69 and her best nish on the LPGA Tour. Pornanong Phatlum of Thailand had a 70 and nished alone in third. Before I started, I never thought I was going to win, Feng said. I knew I was only two behind. But I thought all the people in the last group were really strong competitors. No one was stronger than Feng, who played the nal 31 holes without a bogey. Natalie Gulbis, tied for the 54-hole lead with Pornanong and Piller, wasnt up to the task. Going for her rst win in six years, Gulbis didnt make a birdie until the 14th hole, and by then she couldnt stop a spectacular slide. Gulbis closed with an 82. WORLD CUPMELBOURNE, Australia Jason Day made a 7-foot par-saving putt on the 16th hole, Thomas Bjorn bogeyed and the Australian won his rst tournament in near ly three years at the World Cup at Royal Melbourne on Sunday. Days 70 left him with a 10-under 274, two strokes ahead of Bjorn, who also bogeyed the 18th, with a 71. Days last tournament victory came at the Byron Nelson Championship on the PGA Tour in 2010, although hes had four top-ve nishes in majors since 2011. Adam Scott nished third after a 66, three strokes behind. Scott, trying to win his third tournament in a row, shot 75 on the opening day, including a nine on the 12th hole, and spent the rest of the tournament trying to catch up. Day won $1.2 million and Australia also captured the team portion of the World Cup. Day and Scott, who each holed approach shots for eagles Sunday, also shared the $600,000 rst-place team prize. American Matt Kuchar shot 71 to nish fourth in individual stroke-play, three behind Day. Ryo Ishikawa (69) of Japan and Thailands Kiradech Aphibarnrat, who shot 70, nished tied for fth, seven behind the winner.Shanshan Fengs 66 good enough to win Titleholders

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B8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013

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KATHRYN MOSCHELLATampa Bay TimesDaryl Whitaker can take comfort in knowing that her grandmother, Shir ley Shear, is nearby as close as her backyard. The 88-year-old, twice-widowed Shear lives behind Whitakers home in Tampa, in a for mer family guest house / game room. Shear, who owned a home in Lakeland for 50 years, fell and developed a blood clot almost two years ago. She couldnt afford full-time home care and she couldnt keep her beloved dog, Sugar, in an assisted-living facility. So Whitakers husband, Joe, and their four children gladly gave up their lit tle getaway by the pool in order to make Shear safe and secure. Its fun here as long as I have my dog, she says. Its private, but its nice to know that the family is nearby if I need them. The Whitakers solution reects a burgeon ing home-building trend. Popular in Europe, the socalled granny pods are just one way families are bringing multiple gener ations under one household. Companies such as Lennar and M/I Homes have noticed the trend and are building homes that can accommodate seniors, adult children fresh out of college and extended family members. When Joe Whitaker asked his close friend Henry Moseley Jr. to remodel the guest house for Shear, Moseley customized the cottage and realized what a wonder ful solution the unit was for seniors who wanted to have their own private space yet still be close to their family. He and his son, Henry III, began researching the concept so popular over seas. They decided the solution was a perfect t in Southwest and Central Florida, two of the largest senior areas in the United States. Together, they launched Home Care Suites, a cus tom-backyard-cottage business designed as an alternative to assisted living. At a time of high unem ployment and home fore closures, the number of U.S. households in which multiple generations of the same family double up under the same roof has spiked signicantly. One in ve seniors is part of this trend. If the rising cost of home health care, assisted living and nursing-home care is any indication, the granny pod might be a more affordable option that provides privacy, security and peace of mind for all parties. According to a nation al study by Genworth, a provider of long-termcare insurance, the aver age monthly fee for an as sisted-living facility was $3,300 in 2012. Home Care Suites three models can all be customized to suit a seniors needs and the familys budget. They range from 256 to 588 square feet. The price varies based on site conditions, ranging from $42,000 to $83,000. LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8208 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013NUTS: Lowering cancer, heart death risks / C3 Health check www.dailycommercial.com TAVARES Florida Hospital Waterman awarded A grade Florida Hospital Waterman has been honored with an A grade in the Fall 2013 update to the Hospital Safety Score which rates how well hospitals protect patients from accidents, errors, injuries and infections. The Hospital Safety Score is compiled under the guidance of the nations leading experts on patient safety and is administered by The Leapfrog Group, an independent in dustry watchdog. The rst and only hospital safety rating to be analyzed in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pa tient Safety. The Score is designed to give the public information they can use to protect themselves and their families.TAVARES Department of Health closed for ThanksgivingAll Florida Department of Health Lake County ofces will be closed Thursday and Friday for Thankgiving. All ofces will reopen Dec. 2 with regularly scheduled hours. As in all medical emergencies, residents needing immediate assistance should dial 911.LAKE COUNTY AARP driver safety class schedule set for DecemberThe AARP Driver Safety Program helps participants rene their driv ing skills and develop safe driv ing habits. Upon completion of the course, Florida drivers age 50 or old er may be eligible for insurance dis counts. Cost for the classes is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members, which includes workbooks. Payment must be made by check to AARP. No cash or credit cards accepted. The two-day course will be offered at the following locations: Dec. 2 and 4, from 1 to 4 / p .m., at the Leesburg Senior Center, 1211 Penn St., Leesburg. To register, call 352-326-3540. Dec. 2 and 4, from 9 / a.m. to noon at the W.T. Bland Public Library, 1995 N. Donnelly St., Mount Dora. To reg ister, call 352-735-7180. These classes are open to all. TAVARES Christmas Craft Days at EZ-Nutrition 101This fun event for parents and kids involves making crafts and a smooth ie for $5 per adult and $3 per child. The schedule is from 10 / a.m. to noon, Saturday, Dec. 7 and Dec. 14. RSVP is required by calling EZ-Nutrition at 352-516-9855. KATHRYN MOSCHELLA / TAMPA BAY TIMES Daryl Whitaker, grandmother Shirley Shear, Shears beloved dog Sugar and Henry Moseley Jr. enjoy a pleasant afternoon outside Shears cottage, converted into a granny pod. Granny pods keep seniors, other generations togetherSEE GRANNY | C2 ALLIE SHAH Minneapolis Star TribuneYou got a u shot. Youve kept your hands away from your mouth, eyes and nose, and youve kept yourself away from sick co-workers. So how come you still came down with the u? The plain truth: It isnt easy to pro tect against this tenacious, changeable virus. The more we learn about in uenza, in many ways the less we know, said Michael Osterholm, di rector of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesotas School of Public Health. Uncertainty about how viruses are passed and which strains will be active from year to year makes pre vention a challenge. To complicate things, some habits that contribute to better overall health may do lit tle to protect against the u, which is caused by a virus that infects the nose, throat and lungs. More severe than a cold, it can lead to hospital ization or, in rare cases, death. Most experts believe that u vi ruses spread mainly by moist drop lets made when people sick with the u cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby. Less often, a person could catch the u by touching a surface or an object that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, eyes or nose. But unlike cold viruses, u viruses are fragile and dont sur vive for very long outside the body, Osterholm said. Thats why some common practices that can help Fighting the flu: An uphill battleSEE FLU | C3

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 PATRICK CONDONAssociated PressST. PAUL, Minn. Standing at the front of a small classroom on the fourth oor of St. Pauls library, Maureen OConnell attempted to help the ve people at the MNsure Crash Course understand how federal care re form affects their lives. So does anybody know what actuarial value means? OCon nell asked with a smile. No one was sure. Most of the questions were more basic: Ana Reit er, a part-time speech pathologist, wanted to make sure she could transfer from her cur rent COBRA coverage to MNsure (the answer is yes). OConnell is the co-founder and project manager for Ac cess MN, a major beneciary of $3.91 million from a federal government grant to private groups that pledged to recruit Minnesotans to sign up for coverage through MNsure, the states insurance exchange. These naviga tor groups have a vital role in the success of the health-care law, charged with reaching out to isolated and un derprivileged communities. The federal over haul sees a permanent role for groups like Ac cess MN, which got a $327,000 grant from MNsure. Of the 29 organizations to share in those MNsure grants, only two got more than Ac cess MN, which was formed only shortly before the grant application deadline. MNsures grant decisions gener ated some controver sy, as some Democratic lawmakers complained that groups representing black and Somali Minnesotans were underrepresented. April Todd-Malmlov, MNsures executive direc tor, said the groups cho sen proved they had the experience and partner ship to make inroads with hard-to-reach communities statewide. Access MN willingly shared its budget proposal and other documents with Associat ed Press. OConnell is a former assistant commissioner of the state Department of Human Services. She is forgo ing a salary for at least the rst year of Access MNs operations, while retaining other work as a consultant. Most of the $327,000 grant is going to pay other Ac cess MN employees. This just looked like a really good op portunity to help peo ple, said OConnell, who cited her own ex perience with a 2007 breast cancer diagnosis as helping her under stand the importance of insurance coverage for people facing crises. In political work and policy work, youre always dealing with the compromises. This is about taking the law and making it work for people. John Freeman, who co-founded Access with OConnell and is serving as its lead navigator, will earn a $75,000 salary for planning outreach and enrollment events, train ing staff at partner organizations, managing other navigators and working as a navigator himself. Freeman, the former supervising attorney at the Minnesota Legal Services Coalition, said his work connecting lawyers with indigent clients was good training for the new role. I never want to be in a position where we have to charge peo ple for something so critical as understand ing their care options, Freeman said. The homes can be nanced for less tha n $800 a month. Home Care Suites provides free property analysis for the homeowner to determine zoning regulations and require ments. We build these units with structurally insulated panels that are extremely energy-efcient. Theyre like an igloo, Moseley said. .... Its just like building a new house. It all has to meet zoning and building code. From start to nish, its probably about 120 days. These suites dont raise your property tax es and they can be a federal tax deduction if a doctor deems that your home needs special medical accommo dations, to the extent that the value doesnt exceed the fair mar ket value of the existing structure, Moseley added. Depending on the individuals level of care, each Home Care Suite can be tted with a customized emergency-response system that monitors every thing from daily vital signs to voice prompts, reminders for medica tion and an automatic call to a family member whos away from home. The Moseleys note that a Home Care Suite can be used as ad ditional living space such as an ofce, guest house, exercise room or man cave. Like Home Care Suite owners, Lennar and M/I echo the versatili ty of their multigener ational approach, but their offerings dont involve a separate living facility. Lennar has built approximately 30 Next Gen homes around Tampa Bay communities that feature a home within a home oor plan that folds into the main house as a separate but adjacent dwelling. GRANNY FROM PAGE C1 LAKE COUNTY UNITED MOTORCYCLIST ASSOCIATION, INC.Lake Countys Largest Motorcycling Tradition Proudly Contributing More Than $185,000 To Date!To Benefit: The Salvation Army & Lake/Sumter Foster Parent AssociationDOUGHNUTS/COFFEE ~ At Start and VENDORS ~ At EndDATE:TIME:PLACE:Wal-Mart ENDING:COST: Chapter/Club challenge: Trophy given to the top 3 groups with the most participants. SPONSORS WANTEDCall Any Number Below for more infowww.CombinedLakeCountyToyRun.comCentral FL Cruisers Bones 321-689-9138 ABATE of FL, Inc. Lake Cnty Chapter Griz 352-742-7754 American Legion Riders #35 Jan 352-408-0750 Lake County HOG Wayne 352-396-3593 Ride Escorted by Law Enforcement Leaves at 11am sharpWE NEED SPONSORS! SATURDAY DECEMBER 7, 2013 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Aching Feet?Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748 352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted NEW OFFICELOCATION 905 E. Alfred Street Tavares, FL 32778 352.343.3006 AirWay has over 80 Years of Combined Experience in the Home Health Industry. Our Lift & Recline Chairs make great gifts that are custom made to your specifications.Please contact us to see if you qualify under Medicare Guidelines. LEE BOWMANScripps Howard News ServiceMore than 15 million of the babies born around the world each year come too soon, with tre mendous cost in lives lost and disabled and medical expense. Yet newly-published research shows many early infants, even in developed nations like the U.S., could benet from wider use of some simple caregiving methods. In the United States, 450,000 babies were born early, nearly one out of nine births numbers in line with countries like the Congo and Bangla desh and the most of any industrialized country. Dr. Joy Lawn, a neo natologist and ep idemiologist at the London School of Hy giene and Tropical Medicine and leader of the research team, said most newborn deaths could be prevented without intensive care. Some inexpensive methods that have shown very good improvement are not being used in many countries with a high pre-term burden. Whether babies are born in the U.S. or Ethiopia, they should all get the same good care, Lawn said in a phone interview. For instance, two injections of a steroid used to treat asthma, given to moth ers in preterm labor, can speed along de velopment of a babys lungs and reduce the risk of breathing distress when theyre born. The treatment costs about $1.Premature births could be helped by simple stepsJIM MONE / APMaureen OConnell addresses people in attendance at the MNsure Crash Course on Nov. 13 at the St. Paul Library to help them understand how federal health care reform affects their lives. MNsure navigators to spread word on health care in state

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3 It Almost That Time!Individuals or GroupsPlease Call 365-0079 ext: 25 Ask for Barbara KettlebellVolunteers Needed prevent against other viruses may not be ef fective against the u. There have been several studies done looking at hand wash ing and hand sanitizing with inuenza, he said. The data are quite unclear, with more data suggesting that hand washing may play a very, very limited role with inuenza. Osterholm still rec ommends frequent hand washing, howev er. We can prevent a lot of other infectious agents including food-borne pathogens and other respirato ry agents with hand washing, he said. So Im very high on hand washing. I just think the attributable prevention factor for u has been oversold. According to Oster holm, other healthy habits also have not proven to effectively guard against the u. Other health ofcials disagree. Eating a healthy diet, sleeping well and get ting enough exercise can help to prevent in fectious diseases in cluding the u by supporting a healthy immune system, said Dr. Greg Poland, direc tor of the Mayo Clinics vaccine research group. Poland and Oster holm agree that the u vaccine is the best weapon available, though it has its limita tions. Several recent studies suggest that u shots may not save the lives of as many adults age 65 and older as pre viously thought. The whole idea that the u vaccine protects 90 percent of the time is just not true, Oster holm said. It varies by age, by underlying risk group, and it varies by year. While there are studies that clearly show that the live vaccine works well in children, there is no evidence that its as effective in adults, he said. But there have been some improvements in the vaccines. This year, certain vaccines will guard against four strains of u instead of the usual three. For healthy peo ple ages 2 to 49, there also are nasal sprays that protect against all four u strains. (The nasal sprays, which contain live viruses, are not suitable for those younger than 2 and older than 49 because their immune systems tend to be weaker.) There also are specialized shots, including one that penetrates just below the skin for those who dont like needles; a higher-dose shot for people age 65 and older; and one thats grown without eggs for those with egg allergies. Flu activity typically peaks in mid-January, and it generally takes two weeks for the vaccine to be effective. FLU FROM PAGE C1 MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterDALLAS Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of can cer or heart disease in fact, were less likely to die of any cause during a 30-year Har vard study. Nuts have long been called heart-healthy, and the study is the largest ever done on whether eating them affects mortality. Researchers tracked 119,000 men and women and found that those who ate nuts roughly every day were 20 per cent less likely to die during the study peri od than those who nev er ate nuts. Eating nuts less often also appeared to lower the death risk, in direct proportion to consumption. The risk of dying of heart disease dropped 29 percent and the risk of dying of cancer fell 11 percent among those who had nuts seven or more times a week compared with people who never ate them. The benets were seen from peanuts as well as from pistachios, almonds, walnuts and other tree nuts. The researchers did not look at how the nuts were prepared oiled or salted, raw or roasted. A bonus: Nut eaters stayed slimmer. Theres a general perception that if you eat more nuts youre going to get fat. Our results show the opposite, said Dr. Ying Bao of Harvard-afliated Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston. She led the study, published in Thursdays New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institutes of Health and the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Re search & Education Foundation sponsored the study, but the nut group had no role in designing it or reporting the results. Researchers dont know why nuts may boost health. It could be that their unsatu rated fatty acids, min erals and other nutrients lower cholesterol and inammation and reduce other prob lems, as earlier studies seemed to show. Observational studies like this one cant prove cause and effect, only suggest a connec tion. Research on diets is especially tough, be cause it can be difcult to single out the effects of any one food. People who eat more nuts may eat them on salads, for example, and some of the bene t may come from the leafy greens, said Dr. Robert Eckel, a Univer sity of Colorado car diologist and former president of the Amer ican Heart Association. Dr. Ralph Sacco, a University of Miami neurologist who also is a former heart association president, agreed. Sometimes when you eat nuts you eat less of something else like potato chips, so the benet may come from avoiding an unhealthy food, Sacco said. The Harvard group has long been known for solid science on di ets. Its ndings build on a major study ear lier this year a rig orous experiment that found a Mediterranean-style diet supple mented with nuts cuts the chance of heart-re lated problems, espe cially strokes, in older people at high risk of them. Many previous studies tie nut consump tion to lower risks of heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer and other maladies. In 2003, the Food and Drug Administration said a stful of nuts a day as part of a lowfat diet may reduce the risk of heart disease. The heart association recommends four servings of unsalted, unoiled nuts a week and warns against eating too many, since they are dense in calories. The new research combines two studies that started in the 1980s on 76,464 female nurses and 42,498 male health professionals. LM OTERO / APShelled pecans are displayed at the Navarro Pecan Company in Corsicana, Texas. Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of cancer or heart disease, in fact, were less likely to die of any cause during a 30-year Harvard study. New study ties nuts to lower cancer, heart death risk MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterThe nations rst new guidelines in a decade for prevent ing heart attacks and strokes call for twice as many Americans one-third of all adults to consider taking cholesterol-lower ing statin drugs. {div} The guidelines, issued Tuesday by the American Heart Association and American Col lege of Cardiology, are a big change. They of fer doctors a new for mula for estimating a patients risk that in cludes many factors besides a high cholesterol level, the main focus now. The for mula includes age, gender, race and factors such as whether someone smokes. The guidelines for the rst time take aim at strokes, not just heart attacks. Partly because of that, they set a lower threshold for using medicines to reduce risk. The denition of high cholesterol isnt changing, but the treatment goal is. In stead of aiming for a specic number, us ing whatever drugs get a patient there, the advice stresses statins such as Lipitor and Zocor and identies four groups of people they help the most. The emphasis is to try to treat more appropriately, said Dr. Neil Stone, the North western University doctor who headed the cholesterol guide line panel. Were going to give statins to those who are the most likely to bene t. Doctors say the new approach will limit how many people with low heart risks are put on statins sim ply because of a cho lesterol number. Yet under the new advice, one-third of U.S. adults 44 percent of men and 22 percent of women would meet the threshold to consider taking a sta tin. Under the current guidelines, statins are recommended for only about 15 percent of adults. Some doctors not involved in writing the guidance worry that it will be tough to understand. It will be controversial, theres no question about it. For as long as I remem ber, weve told physicians and patients we should treat their cho lesterol to certain goal levels, said the Cleve land Clinics Dr. Ste ven Nissen.US doctors urge wider use of statins

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 Hearing WorksChange your life. Call us today at (888) 403-27798602 S.W. Hwy 200, Suite E Ocala, FL 3448110601 US Hwy 441, Suite E-1 Leesburg, FL 347882721 S. Woodland Blvd Deland, FL 327201216 Mt. Homer Rd. Eustis, FL 32726 10935 SE 177 Pl, Suite 203 Summerfield, FL 34491Better Hearing... Better Living!!!www.hearingworksflorida.com Thank you for reading the Daily Commercial. MIKE STOBBEAssociated PressATLANTA The number of U.S. children with attention decit hyperactivity disorder continues to rise but may be leveling off a bit, a new survey shows. More than 1 in 10 children has been diagnosed with it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which surveyed more than 95,000 par ents in 2011. ADHD diagnoses have been rising since at least 1997, according to CDC data. Experts think thats because more doc tors are looking for ADHD, and more parents know about it. The condition makes it hard for kids to pay attention and control impulsive behaviors. Its often treated with drugs, behavioral therapy, or both. The latest survey found about 11 percent of children ages 4 through 17 had been diagnosed with ADHD. That translates to nearly 6 million children. Half of children are diagnosed by age 6, the study found. A 2007 survey put ADHD diag noses at 9.5 percent of kids. The CDC survey asked par ents if a health care provider told them their child had ADHD. Its not known how thorough the assessment was to reach that conclusion. ADHD diagnoses were in creasing at a rate of about 6 per cent a year in the mid-2000s, but slowed to 4 percent a year from 2007 to 2011. That may reect that doctors are closer to diagnosing most of the kids with the condition, said the CDCs Susanna Visser, the studys lead author.US survey: More than 1 in 10 kids has ADHD

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 DEAR ABBY: I have been dating my boyfriend, Jose, for a year. Before that, we were friends for ve years. Ever since Ive known him, he and his half-sister, Blanca, have danced together at par ties. Were all in our mid-20s. They dance salsa, merengue and other styles of music together. I used to think it was cute, but now that Jose and I are a couple, I nd it annoying and a little creepy. He says Blanca loves to dance and cant always nd good partners. She gets mad when he dances with me instead of her during her favorite songs. I told Jose he can dance only with me at the parties or only with her. Not both. I dont want to share him, and honestly, people joke that its incestuous. How can I make him under stand how much this bothers me? What can I say to his half-sister when she gives me the evil eye? My relationship with her is friendly, but it was better before I started dating her half-brother. TAKES ONLY TWO TO TANGO DEAR TAKES ONLY TWO: If you want to hang onto Jose, simmer down and be less heavy-handed. Dictating who he can dance with only makes you appear to be jealous, insecure and controlling. Because he and Blanca have danced together for so long, its understandable that she expects to dance with him. My advice is to be gracious and hold onto your temper, because if you dont, your relationship with Blanca will no longer be friendly, and it could cost you your boy friend. DEAR ABBY: My mother-in-law is a good person, but she never wants to be around us or our children. She lives only 30 minutes away, has only one child (my husband) and has been widowed for more than ve years. She has never called our house, didnt visit when the kids were born and usually mails gift cards at birthdays and Christmas. My own mother died a few months ago. Our kids are almost 13 and 10, so theyre not babies anymore. I try to reach out to her, but she is cold and not responsive. What else can I do? NO GRANDMA IN AUSTIN, TEXAS DEAR NO GRANDMA: What does your husband think about this? Has his mother always been this way? Could the problem be that she dislikes you or is disappointed in her son? There is no way to force a connection on someone who is unwilling, and Im not sure you would even want to. It appears your mother-in-law isnt maternal and prefers her independence. Im sorry that your feelings are hurt, but if you crave closeness with an older woman, you will have to look elsewhere to nd it. DEAR ABBY: My family is having a Thanksgiving conundrum. My uncle and his wife have offered to host the holiday. My uncle hesitated about having it because he recently lost his job. My grandmother decided that each couple should chip in $50 to pay for the dinner. (The total amount will be $300.) We will all make and bring dishes with us as well. Their children are not being asked to pay anything. My grandmother thinks this is a good idea because it would cost us more than $50 to go out to dinner for Thanksgiving, but some of us think its odd that were being charged to attend our familys dinner. No one else in the family is able or willing to host, so the only other option would be going to a restaurant. Any thoughts? TURKEY TROUBLES IN PHILADELPHIA DEAR TURKEY TROUBLES: Just this pay up! And while youre offering thanks at the dinner table, be grateful that the person in need of nancial help this holiday season isnt you.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Comics&Diversions LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM MUTTS ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE HEATHCLIFF PEANUTS www.dailycommercial.com Dear AbbyJEANNE PHILLIPS Jealous girlfriend must watch her step on the dance floor

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 SNUFFY SMITH HAGAR THE HORRIBLE BEETLE BAILEY BABY BLUES BLONDIE PHANTOM PICKLES SHOE DILBERT DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and ninesquare sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013

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D2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D3

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D4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 r f r r f r n t b b n rfrr rnrr fr frtr rrf rf tff rtf frr trrf rfr nrrf rr rrr rrrf rrr rrrr rrfrr rfrrr frr rrrf rfrrf frnr rtr r rrfr r r f r r r r r r f t r f r f r f f t f r f t r r f r f r f t f f r f r f r r r f r f r f t r f r r f nttb t r r f t r f r f r r r r f nt r f r r b t t f r n r f t f r r nt b t t r r r t r f r r r r f r f r f r f r r t r r r n b rr rr r r r f f nf r f r r r r n r r r r r f r r r r f r f r r r r f r r f r r r r r r r r n n n r r r f r r r r r f r r f r r t f r f t b t t t b b t t b t b t t t b b t b b b n b b n rr r fr f fr nrr r r r

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D5 rf ntbbtt tfb rbtt rf rtrbb rrbfnb fbbttb tt tfb rfnrbb fft b rb frfnb rr frbrfrbb rfn tbf t t f r r b b t t nrtfb bb nrbn fbb bbtt b fnbrfttnrb tt rtbbfr ttbb n b t t r r n r b r r t t r r t t r bfr nrbrrbf r f nbrfrr fttftfrtrtft btr tffrtrrftr rfrftb t f r f b r b r r n r r r r f r r t f f r t f r r b b f f b t t r n r r r f r r b f t t f r f n r b r t r f t b t r r r f r r t b t t r r r f r f r t b t f t r f t r f t b f b r r n f t f r f t r f t b t r r r r r f t f n b f r r r t f t r f f r f r r b rtrfbrr rnrtrbrtrfr tfrrtrnrb b f t f f n f r b r t f t t f r b t r b b t b f b b b r r f n n b b r b r r r f f f r b t f r r f r f t t r r b r f n b t f r b r r n nf n ffnrrfrt rfrbtttrrtrf rrrbrtt rrrbrrb rfttfnrb t b f r r f f r b t t f n f t f n r b r f r f n t r r t b t b r b r r f r f t t r f f b r r r b n f b t t f r t r f r r r b t t r r f f t f b t r f t t r f f t ffntfrrf ffttrbtrrrfrr fffnftfnrfr tfrrbrttr fnffrnrb nrrfrb t t f b frfttrftrb rbtb t f r r f r r t f b f r f t f b t t b fttrrftrfr frrfnrftfrrr rtrfnrrnrtrb frrrtr rtftrffnr nbr rrffr trrtbbf trfbttrnfr rfrttbrrff rtfrnr fnrfrb t r r f t t t f f f t t r r f t r r r n b rbrfnf ffrrfnrftb trnrftfrrr ttfbf rrrbfnr rfrrtbnrfnrb t r r t t bfttfrfnrb rrtrffnr bnrb t f r f t t f b r r n rbftrnr frfrfrfttnr ffrrb r r ftfrrftfff rbfrrbrb nrfttrb r r f t t t r b b r r r n r r b f t r f t f t t f n b n r r b r f r r f n f t t b r f t r r r t t n r b r r f r t r f t f r r t t f n r f n f t t r rtnfr rnfrrrtrbrb rfrffrtr f frtrfb rrrfrrrfn r rffrbfftr ftrbrrrb rftbtr rrfrrrttb r r f r f t t r b r r t r f r r t b b r r f rrrfnr nfb rtrtfb rrb f t n f n b r r r f r r t f n r t t r r t f r r f b r f t r f t r r f r r n b r r r r f t r b r t f f r f r t r r r r f r t r r r f r r r b r r t f r r t r r t r r r f r r b f n t f r r f t f n t f r r t f f f t r r f t r f f r f f f n t r r t f r n f b r r r t t f f r r t t r r r f f t r r f t r t t f r r f f r f f n b r r t r f t r f t r r n f t t r f t r f t b r

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D6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 rfn tbn n nrntnbb f bbntb rntn bb rbbb fnntnbb rfr rfffrfn trn ntbn bbn fntn r bbbntnb rrr rntfnb r tnb rfn fntnbb fnb fntff bb bt ffb ffr ffntn f tnbb n n t n b rff rnfntnb rntbff fffn rfrfffr rfrrf frfff ffrn rfrrf rnnftn rfffnfrf rrfff fffrrfnf rfrnf r r n n r t n f t n b r ntnb fr rntnb f r r f n t n b r rntbnb rf ntffn rf rrntn rfrnr rnnt rfrr rnntbb nrrn rtnb t f rn t bnffr ntn fr ntn rrf ntn rrrn rfntnb rnff rntnbb f ntffn frbrfn fffnt fbn rntnb n rntnb rf ntbf rrf fntnb ntffn bb bntn r rfntn fffn tffnb r fntnb f r r f r r t n t n n rb t fn tn fn tfrt tn b bnrfrn tn n rfbrbf ntbf n r rrntnb rfn t rfnrn t nb tn rrfr rntnb bbf brrntn rbbr rntffn rf nnrntbbbb ffnrtn frf ntb fn rntnb ff ffntn nn rrntb r ntbnb nbrn tffnbb rn tb frrn frnt fnff fnt tn r n n n f n r n n f f f r r f r n r r r r r n brff fnffffr rfff rr rfrfffrf rff n r r f r r r r f n r r r r f n f f f r f r f f b n r r n b b fnt ff rrnr ntnn r ntb fnbn nfntbnb rrb tb ff r nrntn rntn b fnrtbn b fn tbrrn ffr f fnrfffn tn r rrnntnb ff ntnbn r f nfntb rrrfn tffnfnb ntb rn fn tnb t ffrfr fntn rrntnffn b rrr t rnrfnr tn frr nftftn b bfffrnrf nt rfn ffntn ff frnt rntnb rfb ntf frfn tbb n rtbn bb t rfffffnt b rfff rfffnt rffff ftn rfft bb frr rrnrffnff ntbb r n f n n t n nrffnnf nrntbn r ntnbb n t rff fntn rfn tffnbb rbnn fffnt frn tn rfnfffn tn ff rff nfntnbb rrr fntb r r f r t f f r f r r f b rrr fnt rrrrn tff nfffn tnb ff rfrtb rf fntn fr rnt rnf fffntb rrrfrff rntnb rrnfffntn rff nrfntb tffnb ffrn tb fnff fnt fffnfff ffnt ffntn bb frn tn rn fntnb frfn brnt fnt bb rnfffntn frf ntnb nt n fffntnbb n ftnb nrrnt ff bb br frnt ffnt fr fnntnb nfn rffntffnb r r b n t b fb rfntn r r r f t r f f f f f n n f ffntn n f f f n t n rrfntffnb fnt b f ntbb n fffntnb r rfntbnbb bfnrn tnb ffrf ntn rfnfnt bb rrntn frnn tnb frff nntnbb r tnb f r r n n b b fffn tbb r rfnntb rrffn ntnb rn tbnn frf nnt

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Monday, November 25, 2013 DAILY COMMERCIAL D7 rf ntb rfnr rn rf fnff t ffb rffff frn nn r nrrnrbbbf bf b rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt fr ffrrtb r r r t f b t r b r f t t b t r b r f r t t b f b b t t r f f ntbr ttfrtr rr f b f b r f r b t t t f f b r f b r n b t f f r r t t t r r f r b f f b r r b r b b f b b f r f r t t r f b r f t r r b t t nr tbtt r r r r b t t r f b frrbbtrtt tt f tbr rrtrbr r r r t f b t r b r f t t b t r b r f r t t t f r t f r r b t b f b t rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt f tbr bfbr brbffr tbr r f b r f t r f b t r bbf tfrtr tbbtt r r f f b t f b f r b t t rrr rtbf btbrtrf bfbnbtt ftbbfbrft rbrbtbttbt rfbtt rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt rr tbf tbr n bfrfrbf btt bbrt tt fbb fbb tf btrttrf rfttbrr rbtt tr btrrr btt bt bttfbbrr btt btfb btt bt b r fbb rtbff r bt tbftr btt ff rrr bffrrr f r r n f r r b btbttt bfrr rt b fbbrnf r tb btt trrf btt t f t b f b b fbtb fbt tbbfb rtfrrr bb tr ftbf fb rr bbbt t rft rrftrr rfr f b t f t f r f r btt tt tbftbftr btt t nt t rrr rfbbt brrnff rt bbbb tr ftrrr btt brrfb bfbb fbbrf btt t r fr rfftb rffbrfbffrb rtrrftbfr ffb ttbft tr rnf btt rbbf r btb rfbf rr btt fr tt bbftnf rffbbtt b btt ttrfrr frfr bttrf tfrtnfrr rrnfttrf rfbtfbrrt rrr ttttr rrrrtb r bnbfr rffbr ttrffbfb f bfbrbr ttttrrt rrbtt ffrrt fbbtt ft n

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D8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, November 25, 2013 rfntb nbrtrn rb r nn b bbrrntn rn fnrrnbrntrn trrnrn trnbrtrnt tnrtrntfrn ffrnbrtrn trtnrn bb fr ntbb n b bt b rnb rnb b nnbt nb rrf b bb nnbrrbb rtnrb ntf btrrb rn b bnb bnr t rrnnbnr tnb nrnb rntrnbrrnnb nbb rfb rb b r r r r f f t r n t n b frbnb ntnb brrf f btt rn nbb rbb f f f f f r n n b t b r n b tbb brbn frnn bnrn brnnrrnb b bb nt b t b t f r r r r t t r n t t t r r n t r t r n f t n t r n r b f b n n n r t r n r n n r r n r b r b r f b b nrb rbbbrbnt trb rrb n t t r r b b tf b frrn btnnb b b f b rn nbbbb rbtbb rn bb btf t tf bb frft nrrn rnt trnb brtfr b t b b n b t b b bb f f f b n b b n r n n r r r n r b r n n r n r b n n b frn tn nnrn rrrn bnrnrb rb rnfb bb b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn bbf f bbbrf f b b bb b bbbb b b b b bnf n t n f r n b n n f r r n b b r r b b bf f t b r r b n b b r r b r t b n b r r b b b t n r n bf f bbff f b t r f r n t r r n r rbbb brb rnf nbrb b b n r t t n r n n r f tn n r b n n r n nn r r n b n t r n n r r f r n r b r r r b b b t b b n b t b rf ff r f trnrrrb rnrnn frnftrn rrnntrrr nrnntnb b nnrnn rnb n b t r r r n b b b r t t b r r b r n r r r frt f rb brnbt nnb b r n b n b r b b b nrbrnb nrnfb rb nf b rtrbnt r n b b r n b nrnr tb bff